(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "History of the city of Toledo and Lucas County, Ohio .."

-^1 l^^l 



1 1^1 




^NtllBRARYOc 



^lllBRARYQc^ 
u3 -1 1 C^ ^ 




^ c^ 



^dOdlWDJO'^ '^OJnVDJO'^ 



^OfCAllfO%. 



^OFCALIFOff^ 




%Aava9n-# ^CAavaani"^ 



>- ^ 

<: 




. _ o 



AWEUNiVERS/A 




<rj133NVS01^ 



^lOSANCElf, 

O 



z=. <: 



^lOSANCfl£ 
o 



e 5 



fen 



■n 



^iUBRARYa- 
fCAllFOft)^ 



^lUBRARYQc 




^OFCAllfOff^ 




Aavaan-i^ 



^OAavaani^ 



AWEUNIVERJ/a 




<ril30NVS01^ 



,^WEl)NIVER5'/A 




o 



o 




"^AaiAiNnaftv 



o , 




%a3MNn-3ftv^ 



^tUBRARYQ^ 




^OAavaani'^ ^<?Aa 



V)V^ 



.^WEUNIVERJ//! 




o 
•<I3133NVS01^ 



^lOSANCElfj-^ 
o ^^^ ■ 




%a]AIN(l-3WV 



^tllBRARYO/;^ 




^<!/0JnV3J0'^ 



^>^tLIBRARYQ^ 




oo 

^ojnvjjo"^ 



.\WEUNIVER% 




<rii]ONvsoi^ 



^lOS 



^/sa3/ 



i>^v 



^1 

"^t^Aavaani^ 



,^WEUNIVERVA 



^lOSANCElfj^, 

o " 




^/iaaAiNn-3Wi 



^OFCALIFORi^ 



^0FCAIIF0% 




^OAavaaiH^ 



•5 /— '» »■ £? 

^oAavaan-^- 



\irtEUNIVER%. 




•<rji3DNVS01^ 



^Aa3. 






^HlBRARYOc. ^^tUBRARYQc 







AWEUNIVERS/a 



^lOSANCElfj)> 




■5;. "^ ^^ 



^aiAINOWV* 



^tllBRARYOc. .s^tili 



^<!/0. 




%OJI1VJJO-^ 



Y//. ^lOSANCElfjv. 




^A;OFCA1IFO/?;|^ ^OFCAIIFOR)^ 



^ 





AWEUNlVERi'//, 




^lOSANCElfx> 



:mm^ -^nwrnw^ "^AadAiNdJ^w^ >&Aavaani'^ 




^OFCA11FO% 

4.A.J 




^0F( 



^ 



i^ 



iu- 



iUJIIW-JO" 



5? 



WEUNIVERJ/^ ^^lOSANCElfJ> 




%a3AINIl-3WV^ 



^l^lllBRARYftc 



^^IIIBRARYQ^ 




'^(JOJnVDJO'^ 



2 V "'Z U =0 



,^WEl)NIVER% ^lOS 




<rii3DNVS0i^'^ %ai 



> 



s 







^^WEUNIVERi//, 



^lOSANCElfj> 

o , 




^OFCAllFOft^ 

C5 



jAcOFCAllFORil^ 




, \WE UNIVERV/, ^vlO>■ 




s^tllBRARYdV ^lllBRARYQc 




IVJ-JO^i^ 



^iOdlWJJO^ 



^\^[UNIVER5'/A 




<rjl2DNVS01^ 



^lOSANCElfx> 




,-< 

%a3AiNn]v\v^ 



-^C^tllBRARYQc. 



^IIIBRARYO/: 




<: 




^aOJnVDJO'»^ ^OdllVJ-JO't^ ^TJlJDNVSOl^ 



UIFO% 



^OFCAIIFO% 

S- 




,^WEUMVER% 



^lOSANCfl£ry> 



■;ian-^\'^ 




^OfCAllFOR^ 



^OFCAllFOS'^ 




AV\EUNIVER% 




^OAyyjian^^^ <rji]ONVsoi^ ^/sa3AiNn-3ViV^ "^OAavaan-i^ '^CAavaani'^'^ ^-tjiiqnvsoi^'^ 



^\^EUNIVERVA 



' ■/ o 

''xjirjNVSoi^ 



^lOSANCElfjy. 




■^/^a3AINn-3WV^ 



^tUBRARY^/- 




^^ ^^tllBRARYQc^ 




^<!/0JllV3J0'^ ^OdlTVD'JO'^ 



^^WE•UNlVE^/^ 




■<ril3DNVS01^ 



^lOSANCElfj> 
o , 




"^AaJAIND-HWV^ 



^tllBRARYOc 




^ojuvdjo"^ 



^WEUNIVERJ/A 




o 
J" 



^lOSANCEtfj> 




%a3AINIl-3WV' 



,-V.OFCAllFO% ^0FCA1IF0% 



>&Aavaani^ >&Aavaaiii'^ 




\WEUNIVERJ/A 



i? ■$ 




<CJ130NVS01'^ 



^lOSANCElfj> 
o 




"^/.jasAiNn-jftV^ 



^OFCALIFO% 




'^■^omuw^ 



RARYQc 



fei 



'ouJllV3J0'»^ 



^lllBRARYO/r 




^WJIIVJ-JO^ 



,^ME•I)NIVER5•/A 




^^i]3DNVS01^ 



^lOSANCElfj> 

00 




%a3AiNn3ftV^ 



^tllBRARYQ^ 



^^lllBRARYQr 




^<!/0dllV3jO'^ 



CD 



^WEUNIVERJ/A 




^TillONVSOl^ 



^jOfCAllFOP^ 



^OFCAllFOff^ 




>&Aavaaii3i'»^ 



^(JAavaaiH^ 



.AMEUNIVERS/a 

i 




^lOSANCElfj> 




^/iasAiNndftV^ 



^0FCAIIF0% 



j\;OFCAllF0/?^ 




^CAavaaiii'^ 



^OAavaaiH'^ 



^\^El)NIVERi•/A 




^TiiJONVSOl^ 



^^WEUNIVER%. ^lOSANCElfj-^ ^tUBRARYO/;^ ^tUBRARYQ^ 




o 
<rjl3DNVS01^ 



%a3AINfl-3WV' 




^tfOdnvDJo"^ 



^OJITVDJO^^ 



AWEUNlVERi'/A 



^lOSANCEl£r^ 




^XJlJONVSOl^ 



"^/JadAINfl^Wv 



^;^ILIBRARYG^ 




^OJIIVJJO'^ 



^^\^E•UNIVERi'/^ 
is 




o 
SI 

^J5130WS01^ 



^lOSANCELfj> 
o 




%a3AIN(13W^^ 



^OFCAilFOR^ 




^^Aavaaiiiv^ 



^OF CAllFOff/)^ 




^CAavaan-1^ 



^^WEUN1VER%. 



^lOSANCElfj-^ 




^/ia3AIN(l3V^^ 



^OFCA1IFO% 




>&Aavaaii-^^ 



^t-LIBRARYQc 



^^^l•LIBRARYa<• 




'♦aojiivjjo'i^ %odiivjjo't^ 



AWEUNIVERV/, 




^ o 



^lOSANCElfx* 




■^Aa3AIN(l-3ft^^ 



jC^tllBRARYQ^ ^tllBRARYQ^ 




'%0JI1V3JO>' '%0JnVJJO^ 



.^WEUNIVERJ/A 







A;OFCAllF0ft|^ 







^OFCAIIFO% 

Or 

^ -TTT- K?^ 




,^ME•UNIVER% 



^lOSANCElfj^, 
o 




^OFCAllFORi^ ^0FCAIIF0% 

0= l\ / >^ \ o 9= ft / .-» A o 




.^VlEUNIVER% 
< 

oc ■ 



'^. 



-I 




^<^;^..^ 



HISTORY 



OK THE 



City of Toledo 



AND 



LUCAS COUNTY, 



OHIO. 



ILLUSTRATED, 



CLARK WAGOONER. Editor. 



NEW YORK AND TOLEDO : 

MUNSELL & COMPANY, PUBLISHERS. 
1888. 



COPYRIGHT, 1888, 

BY 

MuNSELL & Co., New York. 



Blade Printing & Paper Co., 
Engravers, Printers and Bookbinders^ 

TOLEDO, OHIO. 




X-JAH.IS XVtlJH.tlK 



r.vffi 



/Cr / ILUOJ, 



'■.V g i.JU).i 






\^^ 



TO THE 

LOYAL MEN AND LOYAL WOMEN 

BY WHOSE PROMPT, JUDICIOUS AND PERSISTENT ACTION, AT HOME AND 

IN THE FIELD, RECORD SO HONORABLE WAS MADE FOR 

LUCAS COUNTY DURING THE WAR OF 

THE REBELLION, 

f §ig W>otumi is IRespecffufEp BeDicafcJ) 

BY 

ToLKDO, August 1, 1888. THE EDITOR. 



457^30 



PREFACE 



IT was with no small degree of embarrassment that the writer undertook the work of 
historian. While not without exjierienc-e in another field of literature, he was too well 
aware of the special requisites for the new department, to feel assured of success. But the 
work was congenial and has been pursued with unflagging interest, and with results yet to be 
determined. 

So far as the writer had definite plan at the outset, it was, primaril3-, to furnish facts, 
rather than narrative or discussion. Hence, the history here presented is little more than a 
record of what has been done and said by individuals resident in Toledo and Lucas County. 
In fact, such must substantially constitute real human history. With this understanding, the 
writer has sought, in connection with the record of each event, to show by whom such was 
brought about. Hence, the unusual proportion of names of individuals given in this work. In- 
dispensable with sucli plan is an index by which may readily be found the names of the vast 
number of actors in tiie progress of events recorded. Such has been provided, with great care 
and labor; and containing, as it does, not less than 12,000 references, it will greatly aid in tracing 
personal record throughout the period covered by the history. 

A leading purpose with the writer has been to supply such record as promised most of 
practical value for future use. Of this class may be specially cited: 1. The chapters giving the 
County's part in the War of the Eebellion, which is believed to be more full in record, both in 
Home Work and Field Work, than will be found in any like volume. 2. The political record 
of the County, embracing the vote for the several candidates at every general election for 50 
years. 3. Full list of Toledo officers from the organization of the City in 1837. 4. The names 
of most County and Township officers. 5. Lists of officers, teachers and graduates of Toledo 
Public Schools ; of members of Toledo Board of Trade and Produce Exchange, of Secret Socie- 
ties, Pioneer Associations, Churches; and other organizations of permanent interest. 

The work of the historian in the present case, was made specially embarrassing and 
arduous by tiie fact, that he was virtually a pioneer in the field, and as such was compelled to 
seek chiefly in original sources material requisite for his purpose. In this, however, he was favored, 
(1) by comparatively long and intimate personal knowledge of the locality concerned; and (2) 
by access to files of local newspapers, dating even anterior to the establishment of Lucas County. 
These included complete files of the Toledo Blade from May, 1837, to 1850, generously donated 
to the Toledo Public Library by Abel W. Fairbanks, now of Cleveland, who was a Publisher of 
that paper during the period named. Beside those of the Blade, the files of other Toledo papers — 
the Commercial, the Register and the Times— and of the Maumee City Express, have been found 
highly useful. In this connection, it may properly be remarked, that there is no other source 
as prolific of desirable material for local history, as is the local Press; hence, the special impor- 
tance of carelul preservation of such record, a consideration quite too generally overlooked. 

It is a privilege here to state, that the protracted labor attending the preparation of this 
volume, was materially lessened by timely assistance. In such connection, the writer is indebted 



PREFACE. 



to the Toledo Public Libriu-y, for use of newspaper files aud books; to the State Library and 
the County Auditor, for newspaper files ; to the County Recorder ami County Clerk, for access 
to records; to Ex-President R. B. Hayes, for use of rare newspaper files and books; to Mr. John 
M. Osborn, for use of valuable books; to Fire Lands Pioneer Association, for use of files and 
map ; to Clerks of different Townships, for use of records; to the Adjutant General of Ohio, for 
use of records; to Mr. Calvin Crane, for access to records of Brie and Kalamazoo Railroad Com- 
l)any; and to Mr. J. P. Avorill, for use of illustrations of Fort Meigs and vicinity. Thanks 
are also due for valuable contributions, both of pen and pencil, by Hon. Richard Mott, specially 
mentioned elsewhere; to Hon. John R. Osborn, for use of personal diary; to Judge John H. 
Doyle, for chapter Bench and Bar; to William 0. Chapman, M. D., and William T. Rowsey, 
M. D., for chapter Medical Profession; to Hon. Guido Marx, for chapter German Element; 
and to Judge C. C. Baldwin, of Cleveland, for chapters Pre-Historic Period and Aborigines of 
Maumee Valley. 

To claim exemption fi-om errors in such work, would be unwarranted; for such, in the 
nature of the case, are inevitable. While the writer has been measurably free from the experience 
common to historians who rel^' largely for material on the memory of individuals, he has, 
nevertheless, been subject to errors in record, errors in transcribing and errors in printing, the 
whole constituting liability of no small extent. This applies especially' in connection with 
names of persons. And yet, it is believed that extreme care has largely avoided such errors. 

Of the prominent feature of this work which consists of portraits and accompanying 
biographies, it is proper to state, that while such accessory is found to be indispensable to the 
publication of local history, exceptional care has been taken in the present case, that they be 
justly representative of the class or interest with which the parties, respectively, are or were 
connected. Publishers and jJatrons alike may properly be congratulated on the success which 
attends this important department; while all concerned will appreciate so valuable a feature of 
the work. 

In behalf of the Publishers, no less than as the judgment of the Editor, it is a pleasure 

here to make special recognition, not only of the evident artistic taste and skill which mark 

alike the typography and binding of this volume, but also the pains-taking care and patient 

attention given to the same bji^ managers aud workmen -of the Blade Printing and Paper 

Company's establishment. 

CLARK WAGGONER. 
Toledo, August 1, 1888. 



CONTENTS. 



, — Page — , 

I. Outline History of the State of Ohio ..... 3-15 

Chapter I. Pre-Historic Period — Settlement — Territorial Government — Indian Troubles 
— The State Government — Internal Improvements — Public School System — Ohio 
and Michigan Boundary — Salt Manufacture — Railways— Constitution of 1851 . .3 

Chapter II. Benevolent and Reformatory Institutions — Geological Survey — The Ohio 
Press — Ohio in the War of the Rebellion — Governors — Glass and Iron Manufac- 
tures—Climate — Population — The " Buckeye " State — Historical Brevities . . 11 

II. Locality .......... 17-33 

Chapter I. Topography — Geological Structure— Surface Geology— Soils— Economic 

Geology— Water Supply— Analysis of Toledo Clay — " Green Scum " of the Maumee 19 

Chapter II. Pre-Historic Period ....... 23 

Chapter III. The Aborigines of the Maumee Valley ..... 25 

Chapter IV. Game — The Ague — Put-in Bay Islands — The Word " Maumee" . 28 

III. Military .......... 35-279 

Chapter I. Indian Troubles following the Revolutionary War — Indian Statesmanship 
— Failure of Negotiations — Gen. Wayne's Military Movements — Treaty of Green- 
ville—Restoration of Peace — Death of Wayne— Captain William Wells . 37 
Chapter II. The War of ISTJ with England — Hull's Surrender — River Raisin Massacre 
—Siege of Fort Meigs — Defense of Fort Stephenson —Battle of Lake Erie— Battle of 
the Thames— The End in the Northwest— Early Forts— Re Unions of Veterans of 
1812— Indian Character and Indian Wrongs — Indian Relics ... 52 
Chapter III. The Canadian " Patriot " War . . . . . .74 

Chapter IV. The Mexican War ....... 81 

Chapter V. Local Military Organizations ...... 82 

Chapter VI. The War of the Rebellion— Home Work .... 84 

Chapter VII. The War of the Rebellion— Field Work . . . . .126 

Appendix to Chapter VII ......... 274 

Chapter VIII. The Roll of Honor — Cemeteries ...... 220 

Chapter IX. Organizations of Union Soldiers — Armies of the Tennessee and of the 
Cumberland — Union Ex-Prisoners of War — Grand Army of the Republic — Loyal 
Legion— Woman's Relief Corps ....... 223 

Chapter X. Persons and Incidents — Young Heroes .... 254 

Chapter XI. Honoring the Soldiers — Memorial Day — Toledo Memorial Hall . 261 
Chapter XII. In Rebel Hands ....... 264 

Chapter XIII. Johnson's Island ....... 271 

IV. Governmental ......... 281-394 

Chapter I. Public Lands ........ 283 

Chapter II. Civil Government Established ...... 285 

Chapter III. The Disputed Boundary and the " Toledo War " ... 289 

Chapter IV. County Affairs ......'. 313 

Chapter V. Political Parties and Elections ...... 330 

Chapter VI. Toledo's Siart and Progress— Port Lawrence of 1817 and 1832 — Vistula 
— Toledo— Local Jealousies— Additions to Toledo — Transfers of Real Estate— Officers 
of Toledo City Government, 1837-1SS7 ...... 370 

V. Communication and Trade ....... 395-510 

Chapter I. Railways— The Pioneer Railway of the West — Toledo!s Eastern Railway 
Lines— The Erie Gauge War— The Ohio Railroad Project— The Wabash, The Colum- 



Vlll. 



CONTENTS. 



-Page — , 



397 



bus Hocking Valley and Toledo, The Flint and Pere Marquette. The Toledo and 
Woodville The Ohio Central, The Wheeling and Lake Erie, The Toledo, Canada 
Southern and Detroit, The Toledo, Ann Arbor and Northern Michigan, The Toledo, 
Saginaw and Muskegon, The Toledo, St. Louis and Kansas City, and the Swan Creek 
Railroad-Railway Miscellany -Toledo Street R^iilways-Olden and New Time Com- 
munication in Ohio '■■■'"'" "xoc 
Chai'Ter II. Western Reserve and Maumee Road .... 426 

Chai'tek in. Plank Roads 428 

Chapter IV. The Telegraph 432 

Chapter V. The Telephone 437 

Chapter VI. The Maumee M.arine ...•••• 438 

Chapter VII. Marine Incidents .....••■ 442 

Chapter VIII. Toledo's Canals-The Miami and Erie an.l the Wabash and Erie 444 

(JiiAPTER LX. Eariy Canal and Lake Traffic ...... 450 

Chapter X. Lake Marine ........ 452 

Chapter XI. Harbor Improvements . . . ■ • ■ • 460 

Chapter XII. Commercial Facilities ...... 464 

Chapter XIII. Toledo Warehouses— Old and New ..... 466 

. Chapter XIV. Early Trade of the West 468 

Chapter XV. Commerce and Traders ....... 470 

Chapter XVI. Trade Organizations ...... 474 

Chapter XVII. Toledo Business and Professions ..... 480 

Chapter XVIII. Banks and Banking ...... 488 

Chapter XIX. Real Estate Sales and Improvements . . . .505 

VI. Judicial . . ■ ■ • • • • • 511-538 

Chapter I. Bench and Bar (by Judge .lohn H. Doyle) - . . . 513 

VII. Hygienic ......... 539-576 

Chapter I. The Medical Profession (by Wm. C. Chapman, M. D., and Wm. T. Rowsey, , 

]VI. D.)— Drugs and Medicines— Dentistry . , . . . 541 I 

Chapter II. Hospitals— Asylums— Cemeteries ..... 560 

Chapter III. Drainage— Water Supply— Parks ..... 565 

Chapter IV. Cholera— Drouth— Mesmerism— Epizooty ... - 573 

VIII. Kelioious and Benevolent ....... 577-608 

Chapter I. Early Mission Work on the Maumee River — Labors of Revs. D. Bacon, 
Joseph Badger and Isaac Van Tassell, ....... 579 

Chapter II. Permanent Religious Work — The Methodist, the Congregational, the Pro- 
testant Episcopal, the Catholic, the Presbyterian, the Baptist, the Lutheran, the 
Unitarian, the LTnited Brethren, the Christian, the German Reformed and the Jew- 
ish Church— The Free Chapel— Toledo Bethel— Toledo Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation—Lucas County Bible Society— United States Christian Commission — Allen 
Street Mission — Adams Street Mission — Sabbath School Union — Home Mission — 
Lakeside Camp-Ground ......... 584 

IX. Literary . . . . . . . ... . 609-654 

Chapter I. Public Schools, with lists of Officers, Teachers and Graduates of Toledo 
Schools — Alumni Association— Church and Private Schools— School Books— School 
Statistics— Color in the Toledo Schools— Evening Schools— Toledo Manual Training 
School— Educational Association — Toledo Lyceum— Toledo Young Men's Associa- 
tion — Toledo Library Association— Toledo Public Library . . . (ill 

Chapter II. The Public Press— Press Miscellany— Press of Ohio in 1819, 1835, 1S77, 
and 1887— Printing Machinery— Amateur Printing and Publishing— Book and Job 
Printing — Press Associations •-...... 637 

X. Annals .......... 655-706 

Chapter 1. Events and Persons ........ (i.'>7 

Chapter II. Personal Mention of Pioneers and other Prominent Citizens . . 675 

Chapter III. Maumee Valley Pioneer Association, with List of Members— Pioneer 
Poetry— Maumee Valley Moninnental Association, with List of Members . . 699 



CONTENTS. 



IX. 



XI. Soil Products ..... 

Chapter I. Fruit Culture and Horticultural Societies 
CitAPTER II. Agricultural Societies 



. — Page — , 

707-716 

709 
714 



XII. Social 717-754 

Chapter I. The Temperance Cause in Lucas County— Toledo and Lucas County 
Women's Christian Temperance Unions— Toledo Young Women's Christian Tem- 
perance Union — The Retreat Mission— Suppression of Vice — Sunday Law and Order 
League . . . . . . . . . . . 719 

Chapter II. Secret Societies — Masonic, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Knights of 
the Golden Rule, Order of Chosen Friends, American Legion of Honor, Royal Ar- 
canum, Sons of Malta ......... 725 

Social Organizations— Toledo Woman Suffrage Association, New Century Literary Club, 
Boatingand Fishing Association, Ladies' National Covenant, Toledo Humane Society, 
Toledo Woman's Exchange, Places of Entertainment. Miscellaneous, Census Statis- 
tics, Ohio Centennial ......... 731 

Chapter III. Record of Nationality — The Gerraan Element (by Hon. Guido Marx) . 741 

XIII. Trade and Manufactures ....... 755-804 

Chapter I. Traders and Merchants ....... 757 

Chapter II. Manufactures — Labor Associations— Statistics— Strikes . . 779 

Chapter III. Fuel . . . . . . . . . .799 

XIV. Architecture ........ 805-822 

Chapter I. Public and Business Buildings— Fire Department — Hotels — Architects 807 



Appendix 



825-838 



Toledo Post, G. A. R.— Ohio National Guard— Woman's Relief Corjjs — Flags and Ban- 
ners—Expresses — St. Stephen's Evangelical Lutheran Church — St. John's Orphan 
Asylum— Retreat Mission— Home for the Aged— Protestant Orphans' Home— Street 
Improvements —Bridges— Ferries — Toledo Police. 

Townships op Lucas County ....... 841-934 

1. Adams, ........... 841 

2. Monclova, .......... 847 

3. Oregon, ........... 851 

4. Providence, .......... 858 

5. Richfield, ........... 864 

6. Spencer, ........... 869 

7. Springfield 874 

8. Swanton, . . . . . . . • . . . .879 

9. Sylvania, ........... 887 

10. Washington, .......... 896 

11. Waterville, ........... 908 

12. Waynesfield, .......... 921 

13. Manhattan, ........... 933 



PORTRAITS AND BIOGRAPHIES. 



Allen, John C. . 
Baokus, Abner L. 
Bacon, Randall G. 
Baker, William, 
Baldwin, Marquis, 
Bartle}^ Rudolph A 
Batenian, Elwood, 
Baumgardner, Leander S 
Bell, Robert H. . 
Berdan, Peter F. 
Bergen, Symnies H. 
Bigelow, Henry W. 
Bishop, Amasa, 
Blanchard, Samuel. 
Boice, Reed V. . 
Bond, Oliver S. 
Bostwick, O. A. . 
Bowen, Charles R. . 
Brigham, James M. 
Bronson, Calvin, 
Brown, Sylvester J. 
Brown, Theodore J. 
Brown, Theophilus P. 
Carrington, Miles D. 
Chapman, William C 
Crabb, Gershom, 
Crane, Charles A. 
Cass, Joseph G. 
Cook, Daniel F. . 
Cook, Josiah D. 
Coy, Charles, 
Davis, George W. 
Dawson, Alexander, 
Doyle, John H. 
Eaton, Frederick, 
Enright. Michael J. . 
Fairchild, Alonzo, 
Farley, James, . '. 
Fassett, Elias, 
Fontaine, Eugene, . 
Fuller, John W. 
Gendron, Peter, 
Granger, Volentine W 
Griffith, Wilson W. 
Hagenberg, Garrett W 
Hall, Israel, 
Hart, Timothy P. 
Haynes. George R. . 
Herrick, Calvin, 
Hiett, John W. 
Hill, Charles W. 
Hone, James W. 



Page. 




. 930 


Howard, Dresden W. H 


479u 


Howell, Daniel Y. 


. 767 


Hunt, John E. 


532 


Janney, Robert S. 


. 675 


Jones, William W. . 


762 


Kaley. David, 


. 7efffi 


Kellogg, Harvey, 


768 


Kelsey, Aaron L. 


. 762a 


Ketcham. John B. . 


75S 


Ketcham, Valentine H. 


. 550 


King, Charles A. 


783 


Laskey, George, . 


. 676 


Lee, John C. 


678 


Lemmon, Reuben C. . 


. 503 


Locke, David R. 


503 


Luce, Charles L. . 


. 767 


Lungren, Samuel S. 


845 


Mack, George, 


. 918 


Marx, Guido, . 


780 


May, John W. 


. 698 


Merrell, Thomas S. . 


771 


Messer. James C. 


. 421 


Monroe. James B. . 


479 


Morehouse, Lorenzo L. 


. 551 


Mott, Richard, 


907 


Myers, James. 


. 686 


Navarre, Peter, 


842 


Newcomb. Alexander H 


. 929 


Nichols, Francis L. . 


571 


O'Brien, Patrick, 


. 857 


Palmer, Andrew, 


502 


Parker, Torance D. 


. 811 


Pratt, Charles, . 


. ■ 528 


Pomeroy, George E. . 


. 763 


Potter, Emery D. 


789 


Prentice, Frederick, . 


. 873 


Puck, John H. . 


868 


Raab, Lucas, 


. 687 


Reed, Calvin H. 


793 


Reed, Isaac N. 


. 161 


Reynolds, Jeremiah, 


792 


Reynolds, Sheldon C. 


. 772 


Richards. Ransom E. 


502 


Roff, William, . 


. 773 


Romeis, Jacob, 


712 


Rood, Emmor A. 


. 830 


Rowsey, William T. 


531 


Scheets, George, . 


. 688 


Scott, J. Austin, 


509 


Scott, Jessup W. 


. 529 


Sherwood, Isaac R. 


510 


Skinner, Samuel W. . 



Page. 
690 

7776 

704 

784 

549 

844 

842 

773 

762« 

500 

479 

092 

534 

531 

654 

764 

557 

821 

753 

760 

777 

853 

420 

918 

497 

694 

658 

395 

535 

597 

695 

7626 

533 

830 

528 

712 

776 

873 

552 

559 

843 

472ci 

727 

766 

394 

7626 

558 

765 

711 

650 

199 

551 



Siiifail, Isaac D. 
8iuith, David, 
Smith, Dcnison B. . 
Smith. Kleazer N. 
Smith, Robert W. . 
Stei'lo, Peniiison, 
Stevens, Oliver, 
Strayer, .John, 
Thayer, I-yman T. . 
Trowhriiigf, Demetrius N. 
Waggoner, Clark, 
Waite, Morrison R. 



CONTENTS. 

Page. Page. 

790 Walbridge, Horace S 472e 

605 Weible, John, S50 

4725 'Williams, A. Davenport, 931 

008 Williams, Joseph R 6.53 

786 Wilcox, Henry, 607 

813 Wilcox, Minot 1 776 

696 Witker, Frederick E 785 

848 Worts, George 782 

821 Wright, James 856 

606 Young, Charles L 774 

651 Young, Samuel M 499 

525 



Map of Maumee River and Bay . 

Plat of original Port Lawrence 
Map of Northwestern Ohio in 1817, 



MAPS. 



Page. 
. 320 

372 

. 286 



Maps showing Indian Tribes, 
Map of LucaiS County, 



Page. 
25,26 

ii. 



VIKW'S. 



Page. 



Toledo, ISOO, 1846, 1888, between pages 370 and 371 
First Court House of Lucas County, . . 303 



Fort Meigs and Vicinity, 



Page. 
. 56 



Pioneer and Improved Toledo Warehouses, 

1817—1887 466 

Memorial Hall 261 

OfHce of Erie and Kalamazoo Railroad, . 676 

Pioneer Passenger Railway Train of America, . 398 

Pioneer Railway Passenger Car of the West, 404 

The Whig Log Cabin, 1840 352 

The Whig Coon, 1844 341 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Page. 



The "Gerrymander," 

The Steamboat Walk-in-the-Water, 

Toledo Central and Manual Training School 

Building, 

Toledo Water Works in 1873, 

Trinity Church, 

United States Government Building, Toledo, 
1888 



Page. 
3.39 
453 

630 
566 
591 

812 



PART I. 

STATE OF OHIO. 



OUTLINE HISTORY 



STATE OF OHIO 



CHAPTER I. 



PEE-HISTOEIC PERIOD. SETTLEMENT. TEEEITOKIAL GOVEENMENT. INDIAN TEOUBLES. — THE 

STATE GOVEENMENT. INTEENAL IMPEOVEMENTS. PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM. — OHIO AND 

MICHIGAN BOUNDARY. — -SALT MANUFAGTUBE. — EAILWAYS. — THE CONSTITUTION OF 1851. 



IN common with the rest of the American 
Continent, the primitive condition of the 
territory now embraced within the State of 
Ohio and of its inhabitants, is without reliable 
record. That this region was occupied by an 
active and intelligent race for hundreds of 
years before the advent of the white man, is 
made evident by proofs which leave no room 
for doubt. These are of various kinds, but 
consist mainly of stone and earthworks still 
remaining in different portions of the State. 
The predecessors of the European settlers have 
come to be known as the " Mound Builders," 
from the fact that the chief remains of their 
occupancy consist of the works so numerous, 
especially throughout the Valley of the Ohio, 
the number already found being not less than 
10,000. The purposes of these works seem to 
have been various, and chieflj' those of fortifica- 
tion, religious temples and bui-ial places. The 
chief record by which the age of these remains 
can be ascertained, consists of the trees here 
and there found growing ujion them. From 
these it is calculated that at least six hundred 
years have elapsed since the structures were 
abandoned by their builders. How much 
longer, of course, is problematical onlj'. These 
people seem to have lived in a condition more 
or less compact, and wei-e not migratory in 
their habits. From proofs left, they must have 
carried on more or less of traffic with peoples 
in other and distant portions of the continent. 
They left nothing to indicate that they used 



beasts of burden or vehicles of any sort, their 
work having all been done by themselves, in- 
cluding the carrying of the heavy materials 
used in their mounds and fortifications. Their 
religion seems to have been the worship of 
nature, in different manifestations. Whence 
they came, can only be conjectured, their most 
probable source being Asia, entering the con- 
tinent from the North, moving Southward, 
and being followed, if not driven, by succeed- 
ing hordes from the same general source. 
What was their final stopping place, is a mat- 
ter no less uncertain than their origin ; but 
they may have moved Southward into Mexico 
and there disappeared. The suj^posed succes- 
sors to the " Mound-Builders" — the Indians — 
are the earliest occupants of this region known 
to history ; and like their predecessors, these, 
too, were in time called to surrender their 
ground, and are now fast being crowded out of 
their hunting-grounds by advancing civiliza- 
tion and human greed. They will leave very 
little to mark their occupancy of the country 
or to indicate that they ever lived. 

In considering the date of the first settle- 
ment of a country, we must at the outset de- 
termine what constitutes a "settlement." If 
adventures for discovery, trade, missionary 
labor, or other temporai-j' purpose, be such, it 
is j)robable that the earliest settlers of Ohio 
were parties sent out in 1680, by Count de 
Frontenac, then the French Governor of Can- 
ada, for the purpose of erecting posts or stores 



OUTLINE HISTORY OF THE STATE OF OHIO. 



for occupancy and trade. One of these parties 
at that time built a small stockade just below 
where South Toledo (Maumec City) now stands, 
being substantially the location of Fort Miami, 
erected by the British in 1794. This was an 
important point for trade for several years, and 
was finally abandoned for the more desirable 
location at the head of the Maumee Eiver, 
where Fort Wayne now stands. Other enter- 
])rises of various kinds are connected with the 
early history of Ohio, but they can in no 
proper sense be considered " settlements. ' 

The first definite movement looking to the 
settlement of the territory now within the 
State of Ohio, was made in the organization of 
the " Ohio Company," in 1748, composed chiefly 
of Virginians, who asked the British Govern- 
ment for a grant of land. Their request was 
complied with and 500,000 acres of land given 
them, to be located on the South side of the 
Ohio Eiver, and on which a colony of 100 
families was to be located. This action excited 
the jealousy of France, which government, by 
right of discovery, claimed all the territory 
on the Mississippi and its tributaries. Active 
steps were at once taken to prevent the execu- 
tion of the British scheme. The Governor of 
Canada notified the Governor of ISTew York, 
that any attempt to carry out such project 
would be followed by seizure ; steps at the 
same time being taken to excite the Indians 
against the proposed settlers. The result was 
what came to be known as the " French and 
Indian War," which, with more or less activity, 
was continued until the treaty of 1763, by 
which France surrendered her claim to the 
territory in the Northwest. 

Thus relieved of sanguinary contests and 
uncertainty, the few weak settlements then 
made took on new life, while immigrants 
from Virginia and Maryland slowly came to 
open the country to civilization. Not entirely 
to yield their ground, the French sought to 
tamper with the Indians bj' efforts to excite 
their passions toward the British authorities 
and the settlements, in which they were so far 
successful as to cause serious trouble. The 
work of satisfying the several tribes making 
claims to the country in question, actively be- 
gun in 17G8, was so far accomplished by 1769, 
that settlers began to appear in increasing 
numbers on the South side of the Ohio. The 
author of '-Annals of the West," says: 



" Among the foremost speculators in Western 
lands at that time, was George Washington." 
He, with others, in 1769, asked of the King a 
ffrant of 2,500.000 acres in the West. In or- 
der to locate such lands, he crossed the moun- 
tains in 1770. 

The first definite step toward the permanent 
settlement of the territory West and North of 
the Ohio, was taken in 1778, when the Vir- 
ginia House of Burgesses passed an act declar- 
ing that "all citizens of Virginia who were 
already settled there or should be thereafter 
settled on the West side of the Ohio, should be 
included in the District of Kentuckj-, which 
should be called Illinois County." This fol- 
lowed the singularly successful military ex- 
pedition of Gen. George Rogers Clark, in 
which he conquered the country of the North- 
west in the name of Virginia. Five years 
later came the treaty of peace between the 
United States and Great Britain, when Gen. 
Clark's success was made the chief basis of 
the claim of the United States to the terri- 
tory which the British Government was loth 
to surrender. And yet. Gen. Clark was per- 
mitted to spend the closing years of his life in 
absolute want of the ordinary comforts essen- 
tial to a man of intelligence and refinement. 

Following the treaty of 1783, came the 
division of the Western country into three 
Territories — that of the Mississippi, that South 
of the Ohio, and that Northwest of the Ohio. 
Five distinct claims to different portions of the 
latter were set up by the States of Connecticut, 
New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and 
Virginia. Beside these, several incorporated 
Companies presented claims to portions, while 
the Indians claimed the whole as their prop- 
erty. One by one, the State claims were re- 
linquished, in part in consideration of lands 
set oflf to them, of which Virginia's portion 
was in Southeastern and Connecticut's in 
Northeastern Ohio (the Western Eeserve). 
In 1784, by treaty at Fort Stanwix (now Eome, 
New York), the Six Nations ceded what claim 
they had made to that territory. In 1785, at 
Fort Mcintosh (now Beaver, Penn.), the Wy- 
andots, the Delawares, the Chippewas, and 
the Tawas, surrendered their claims, save and 
except the large tract l}'ing between the Cuya- 
hoga and the Maumee Eiver, and extending 
South nearly to the center of the present 
State of Ohio. The following Indian tribes 



THE STATE GOVERNMENT. 



held reservations of lands in Ohio in 1828 : 
Wyandots (842 in number), 163,000 acres; 
Shawnees (800), 117,000 acres ; Senecas (557), 
55,505 acres; Delavvares (80), 5,760 acres; 
Ottawas (377), 50,581 acres. Totals— 2,350 
Indians, and 391,846 acres, or 1,800 acres each. 
All these have been relinquished, the last (by 
Wyandots) in 1843. 

Jesuit Missionaries appeared in the region 
between the Lake and the Ohio early in the 
17th century. In 1749 English traders were 
at Sandusky. The Moravian Missionaries be- 
gan operations in Eastern Ohio as early as 1762, 
and were driven away after great slaughter of 
their converts. The first important settle- 
ment in the State, was that made at Marietta, 
in 1788, while others about that time occurred 
along tlie Ohio between the Muskingum and 
the Hockiiocking Rivers. These may have 
preceded that at Marietta by one year. Con- 
necticut claimed the territory between the 
parallels 41° and 42° 2', and between the Penn- 
sylvania line and a line 120 miles West (going 
to the present West line of Huron County), 
which was then known as " New Connecticut," 
and since as the " Western Eoserve." In 1792 
that State granted to such of its citizens as 
suffered from loss of property by fire during 
the Eevolutionarj' War, 500,000 acres from the 
West end of this Reserve, which tract is now 
known as the " Fire Lands," and lies almost 
wholly within the Counties of Huron and Erie. 

By proclamation in 1788, Governor St. Clair 
declared Washington County organized, with 
limits extending Westward to the Scioto and 
Northwai'd to the mouth of the Cuyahoga, 
with its County-seat at Marietta. Some 10 
years later the Counties of Adams, Hamilton, 
Ross, Wayne, Jefferson and Trumbull were 
established, the latter including the Fire Lands, 
with its seat of justice at Warren. The cap- 
ital of the Territory was then at Chillicothe. 

The closing years of the 18th century were 
marked by serious Indian disturbances, espe- 
cially in the Western portion of the Territory. 
These fortunately closed with the signal vic- 
tory of Gen. Anthony Wayne at the battle of 
Fallen Timbers, which occurred in August, 
1794, within the present limits of Lucas 
County, and which was followed by the im- 
portant treaty at Greenville, Ohio, in 1795, 
whereby terms of peace were agreed upon, al- 
though the Maumee Valley was lelt in posses- 



sion of the Indians. Subsequent treaties were 
made— at Fort Industry (now Toledo) in 1805, 
at Detroit in 1807, at Brownstown, Mich., in 
1808, and at the Foot of the Maumee Rapids 
in 1817. By these, various reservations of 
land were made to the Indians, which since 
have been extinguished, the last case being 
that of the Wyandots at LTpper Sandusky in 
1842, which tribe left for their reservation in 
Kansas in 1843, then numbering about 700 
souls. 

Under the enabling act passed by Congress, 
a Convention to form a Constitution for the 
State of Ohio, was held at Chillicothe in 1802. 
The County of Wayne, embracing most of the 
present State of Michigan, was not included in 
the territory of the proposed State. This ac- 
tion caused serious dissatisfaction on the part 
of the people at Detroit and Monroe, who 
constituted the chief residents of that region. 
That County was attached to the Territory of 
Indiana, where it remained until 1805, when it 
was established as the Territory of Michigan. 
The Ohio Convention met November Ist, and 
closed its labors on the 20th same month. The 
Constitution then formed was not submitted to 
the vote of the people for approval, but went 
into effect without such action. The object of 
such step is believed to have been to avoid the 
risk of rejection on a popular vote. 

The State ot Ohio was admitted into the 
Union in February, 1803, and the first General 
Assembly convened in March following.* By 
the Constitution the Executive was made to 
consist of a Governor. The General Assembly 
was constituted of two bodies, the Senate and 
the House of Representatives. Only white 
males of 21 years of age were admitted to 
vote, but no property- qualification was re- 
quired. All State officers, Judges and Military 
oflScers were made elective by the Legislature, 
the pay of all to be fixed by that body. The 
judicial power was vested in a Supreme Court, 
Courts of Common Pleas, Justices of the 
Peace, and such other Courts as the Legisla- 
ture might see fit to provide. Justices of the 
Peace were chosen bj' the people of the re- 
spective Townships. The State organization 

* The exact date when Ohio became a member of 
tlie Union, is with some persons, j'et in dispute ; but 
the time here named is what has been generally ac- 
cepted as the correct one. The question is one not 
admitting of discussion here. 



OUTLINE HISTORY OF THE STATE OF OHIO. 



was followed by an increasing immigration 
and corresponding development, chiefly in the 
sections bordering on the Ohio Eiver and the 
Lake. 

War being declared against Great Britain in 
June, 1812, Ohio soon came to be the scene of 
important military events. The early sur- 
render of his command to the British, by Gen. 
Hull, whereby Northern Ohio was at once left 
without protection from British and Indian 
attack, was the cause of most serious appre- 
hension on the part of the scattered settlers. 
But the brilliant success of Gen. Harrison at 
Fort Meigs in May, 1813, and of Maj. Croghan 
at Fort Stephenson, August 2d, followed as it 
was by Com. Perry's victory over the British 
fleet on 10th September, greatly relieved this 
state of things and secured immunity from 
attack for that region to the close of the War 
in 1815. 

In 1814 the State accepted an offer of a tract 
of land on the East side of the Scioto Elver, 
opposite Franklinton, for use as its seat of 
government, and in 1816 the buildings thereon 
were so far completed as to be ready for oc- 
cujiancy, when the Capital was removed. 

The subject of a Canal to connect Lake Erie 
with the Ohio, was first broiight to the atten- 
tion of the Legislature by the Governor in 
1819, when he submitted to that body a letter 
from Gov. DeWitt Clinton of New Tork on 
that subject. Nothing was done on the sub- 
ject until 1820, when three Commissioners 
were appointed, with authority to emjjloy a 
civil engineer to make survey of a line for the 
proposed Canal. As the prosecution of the 
work was made to depend ujjon a grant of 
land by Congress along the line of the same, 
action was delayed until 1822, when steps 
were taken for the survey of four different 
routes, to-wit: From Sandusky Bay; fi-om 
the mouth of the Maumee Eiver ; from the 
mouth of the Cuyahoga or of Black Eiver, by 
the Muskingum ; and from the mouth of Grand 
Eiver, by the Mahoning — all to the Ohio. 
James Geddes, a civil engineer of New Tork, 
was employed for such survey. Eeport was 
made at the next session of the Legislature, 
showing each of these routes to be practicable. 
The Commissioners made final report in 1824, 
recommending the line of what is known as 
the Ohio Canal, from Cleveland to Portsmouth, 
with side-cut connection with Columbus. Se- 



rious in-otest was made to this decision by the 
friends of the other lines, and especially of 
the Sandusky route. For some time bitter dis- 
cussion through the press and protest by pub- 
lic meetings were kept up, including sugges- 
tions more or less distinct and definite of bad 
faith on the part of the majority of the Board 
of Commissioners. But this action failed 
to defeat the adopted plan. In February, 
1824, the Commission directed two additional 
lines to be surveyed, to-wit: One extending 
from the mouth of the Scioto to Coshocton, 
and thence by three different routes to the 
Lake ; and one from Cincinnati to the foot of 
the Eapids of the Maumee. The estimated 
cost of the latter (now known as the Miami 
and Erie Canal) was 82,502,494; and that of 
the Cleveland and Portsmouth line, from 
§2,626,571 to §2,934,024. Operations were 
soon commenced on the Ohio Canal, the Coshoc- 
ton route from Cleveland being selected, which 
was completed in 1833, at a cost of §4,695,202. 
In 1843 a Canal from Eoscoe to Walhonding, 
25 miles in length, was completed at a cost of 
§607,360. At the same time the Hocking 
Canal, between Carroll and Nelsonville, 42 
miles, was finished, at a cost of $947,670. The 
Muskingum Eiver Slack- water Improvement 
(Zanesville to Marietta), was completed about 
the same time and cost §1,628,028. The Miami 
and Erie (Toledo and Cincinnati), was opened 
throughout its line in 1845, its length, branches 
and feeders included, being 323 miles. The 
following Canals constructed by this State have 
been abandoned, as no longer of sufficient 
service to warrant keeping in repair, to-wit : 
The Sandy and Beaver, connecting Bolivar 
and Smith's Ferry ; length, 84 miles, costing 
§2,000,000. The Pennsylvania and Ohio, from 
Akron to the Pennsylvania line ; length, 87 
miles; cost §1,000,000. The Athens Branch 
(in part), ft-om Nelsonville to Athens; length, 
14 miles. The Lebanon Branch, from Middle- 
town to Lebanon; 20 miles; costing §217,552. 
The cost of these works, as given, by no means 
indicates the total outlay of the State on them. 
The excessive rates of interest and discount on 
bonds sold, made necessary- by a low state of 
public credit and a condition of general finan- 
cial prostration during most of the time of 
their construction, would largely augment the 
figures given ; while the heavy expenditures 
for repairs and other unforeseen outlays, ma- 



THE SCHOOL SYSTEM. 



terially add to the ultimate cost. And yet, 
there can be no doubt as to the wisdom of their 
construction. The advantages gained through 
them by the State, were both timely and im- 
portant, in bringing to the producing classes 
the means for access to market which other- 
wise would have been impossible ; in promot- 
ing intercourse and general trade, whereby all 
interests were advanced; and iu these ways 
inviting to the State population, capital and 
enterprise, so indispensable to its development. 
To these should be added the consideration, 
that through the enterprise and energy requi- 
site for such improvements under circumstances 
so unfavorable, the State was made for many 
years the most attractive field for the best 
classes of emigrants from the Eastern States 
and the Old World, which fact accounts for her 
wonderful growth for many years. Canals 
are often unfavorably comjjared with Kail- 
ways, as facilities for trade and travel. As 
well might youth and early manhood be com- 
pared in results with matured age. The Btiil- 
way system of Ohio is indebted for its present 
extraordinaiy extent and vigor, more to the 
foundation supplied by the Canal system, than 
to any other one cause.* 

* The Canal system of Ohio embraces the following 
Works, to- wit : 



Miles. 



334 
261 
9] 
•56 
25 



Name of Improvement 



Ohio Canal.- 

tMiami and Erie Canal 

Muskingum Improvement. 

Hocking Canal 

Walhonding Canal -. 



Total cost of Ohio Canals. 



Cod. 



$4,695,203 69 

6,808,800 20 

1,582,459 04 

940,ai9 76 

600,727 01 



$14,627,»i9 79 



t The Miami and Erie Canal comprises the Miami 
Canal (including the Warren County Canal, costing 
$861,473.52), the Miami Extension (costing $3,112,- 
953.63), and the Wabash and Erie (costing $2,834,- 
373.14). 

The accounts of these Works, up to Jan. 1, 1S59, 
as regards their net revenue and expenditure for 
repairs, etc., stood as follows: 



Canals. 



Ohio Canal 

Miami and Erie 

Muskingum Improve- 
ment 

Hocking Canal 

Walhonding 



Net Receipts. 



87,600,169 95 
4,500,067 76 

493,759 02 
160,181 73 
- 20,230 30 



Totals $12,824,408 76 $71,521 15 

Net balance applicable to payment oJ interest. 



Excess of 
Expenditures 
aver Receipts. 



$15,298 25 

46,522 M 

9,700 86 



Balance 

applicable to 

Interest. 



$4,476,646 43 
1,663,595 47 



$6,140,241 90 
6,068,720 75 



The School system of Ohio, now so ample 
and successful, dates its real commencement in 
1825, and received its start in connection with 
the adoption of the Canal system entered upon 
at that time. This relation is due to the fact, 
that the friends of the two interests made 
" common cause " to some extent sixty years 
ago, when the first State tax for School pur- 
poses (one-half mill on the dollar), was levied. 
In 1838 the School laws were revised and a 
State School fund of ^200,000 was established 
for distribution among the Counties. The 
adoption by the State in 1850 of the local act 
known as the " Akron School Law," was a very 
important advance. Under it the Schools 
were classified so far as might be practicable, 
and education made free to all children and 
youth, save where the parents or guardians of 
white pupils made objection to the attendance 
of colored children. In 1873 the School acts 
were consolidated in a general law, which pro- 
vides for more systematic and effective man- 
agement, while more liberal provision is made 
for educational facilities. Among the powers 
given local Boards of Education are these : 
They may levy an annual tax not exceeding 
seven mills on the dollar; may require any 
language to be taught; and are required to 
have German taught upon demand of seventy- 
five freeholders of the District, representing at 
least forty pupils ; all branches must be taught 
in English ; Boards may establish separate 
Schools for colored children, when the number 

Total original cost of Construction $14,627,549 79 

Total cost of Repairs - 6,782,526 15 

Aggregate cost inclusive of Repairs $21,410,075 94 

Interest on cost at 6 per cent, (to '59).. $14,042,447 6S 

Revenue from Canals applicable to 

interest $6,068,720 75 

Received from sale of Canal lands -.. 1,753,783 51 

7,822,504 26 

Difference of Interest paid and Revenue received.. $6,219,943 42 
From 1826 to 1836, the Counties having Canals 
paid in Canal tax, $481,953.78; while the Counties 
having no Canals, paid $474,840.59. In both .State 
and Canal taxes, from 1837 to 1845, the former class 
paid $2,962,610.65, and the latter class, $2,979,747.95. 
And in State taxes for all purposes, from 1846 to 
1858, the former paid $13,631,416.99, and the latter, 
$13,097,711.75. The.se figures show that the $27,630,- 
019.36 sunk by the State in cost and interest up to 
November 15, 1858, was about equally divided be- 
tween the Counties having and those not having 
Canals. Results since that date, as the burthen of 
the continued loss, are not at hand, but are probably 
not essentially different from the foregoing. 



8 



OCTLJAK imrOIiV OF TUE iSTATE OF OHIO. 



of such exceeds twenty, and provide suitable 
evening Schools for white pupils not able to 
attend the day Schools. The following sta- 
tistics for the year 1885, indicate the progress 
made in educational fiicilities in Ohio, to-wil: 

Number of vouth of school age in the State in Sep- 

tember.'m'. l'«»'^'» 

Number of youth of school age iu the State in Sep- 
tember. 18M 1.082,295 

Number of school districts in the State -. 2,099 

Number of sub-districts in township districts 11,798 

Number of school-houses in townshi]) districts — ll,lo5 

Number of school-houses erected within the year.- 455 

Cost of school-houses within the year $1,194,821 

Estimated value of school-houses, including grounds, $27,9(59,757 
Number of teachers necessary to supply schools-.- 18,181 
Number of different teachers actually employed-- 24,628 
Average number of weeks the schools were in ses- 
sion in township districts - --. 29 

.\venige number of weeks the schools were in ses- 

' sion in separate districts -_- 34 

Number of pupils enrolled in the schools 774,660 

Average number of pupils iu daily attendance — 517,.569 

Numberof school officers -.- .51,762 

Total receipts, including balance on hand Septem- 
ber 1. 1884 - $18,628,709.32 

Total expenditures - 10,093,938.17 

There are now in Ohio 54 Colleges and other 
institutions of learning established under au- 
thority of the State. Of these 32 are Colleges 
mostly denominational ; 12 are Schools of Med- 
icine ; 7 of Theology ; and 2 of Law. 

What is known as the " Toledo War," arose 
from a disagreement between the State of Ohio 
and tbe United States, in regard to the bound- 
aiy line between that State and the Territory 
of Michigan. Under the act of Congress of 
1802, authorizing the organization of the State 
of Ohio, the Northern boundary fixed for tbe 
same, was " an East and West line drawn 
through the Southern extremity of Lake 
Michigan running East, after intersecting the 
due North line from the mouth of the Miami 
(Maumee), until it should intersect Lake Erie 
on the Territorial line; and thence, with the 
same, through Lake Erie to the Pennsylvania 
line." In 1805 the Territory of Michigan was 
established by Congress, and its Southern 
boundary declared to be " a line drawn East 
from the Southerly bend of Lake Michigan 
until it should intersect Lake Erie, and East of 
a line drawn from the Southerly bend through 
the middle of Lake Erie to its Northern ex- 
tremity." The two lines did not tigree, a 
material strip of land lying between them, 
which was made the more important by the 
fact, that it included the mouth of the Maumee 
Eiver and the site of the present City of To- 
ledo. The question did not assume its full 
significance until 1835, when the State of Ohio 



found it necessary to fix upon a Northern outlet 
for the Miami and Erie Canal, then in the course 
of construction. It being necessary to reach 
the waters of Lake Erie within the disputed 
territory, the question of boundary became 
ui'gent. The Territory of Michigan, from the 
first, had exercised jurisdiction over this strip, 
without dispute. In 1835 action was taken by 
the Ohio authorities looking to the assertion 
of its claim to such territory, when the Mich- 
igan Territorial Legislature passed an act 
making it a penal oflfense for any person to 
assume to exercise official authority there, un- 
der color of any other authority than the laws 
of that Territory. This action was followed 
by the erection of the County of Lucas by the 
Ohio Legislature, to include the disputed strij). 
Following this, came militaiy demonstrations 
on both sides, which were more or less threat- 
ening. A few arrests were made and much 
liitterness provoked ; but the matter was soon 
put in shape for adjustment, by referring the 
disjJute to Congress. The result was, the con- 
firmation of the Ohio claim and the admission 
of Michigan into the LTnion with an extension 
of its Northern boundarj' to include the upper 
peninsula and the country lying along 'the 
shore of Lake Superior and the rich mining 
region of that section.* 

The first salt manufactured in Ohio, was 
made on tiie Scioto River, as early as 1794, 
and was transported by pack-mules across the 
AUeghanj- Mountains, and sold at 86 to $10 
per bushel. The product of the Scioto salt- 
works in 1808 amounted to 20,000 bushels, and 
then .sold at $3 per bushel. Stronger brines 
appearing elsewhere, the manufacture at that 
point in time ceased. The salt-producing sec- 
tions in this State are divided as follows : 
District No. 1 — Hocking Valley (Athens 
County). No. 2 — Muskingum Valley (Morgan 
and Muskingum Counties). No. 3 — Tuscara- 
was Valley (Columbiana, Guernsey and Tus- 
carawas Counties). No. 4 — Ohio River Val- 
ley (Meigs County, Ohio, and Mason County, 
W. Va.) Three-fourths of the entire product 
of salt in these districts, is made in District 
No. 4, where 7,917,230 Inishels were manufac- 
tured in 1881. The depths of the 115 wells 
average 950 feet, with a strength of brine of 
36 5 jier cent. 

* The subject of the " Toledo War" is treated more 
fully in a subsequent chapter of this work. 



CONSTITUTION OF 1851. 



9 



The first Eailroad charter granted in Ohio, 
was that of the Mad Eiver and Lake Erie 
Road, to connect Sandusky and Dayton (since 
the Cincinnati, Sandusky and C'levehmd Road), 
enacted June 2, 1832. Other charters soon 
followed, the most of which were never used. 
The first Railroad operated within the State, 
was the Erie and Kalamazoo, from Toledo to 
Adrian, Mich., (33 miles), and now constituting 
a part of the Lake Shore and Michigan South- 
ern Road. Its charter was granted by the 
Territorial Legislature of Michigan in 1832, 
when the entire route of the Road was under 
Michigan jurisdiction. It was opened for traffic 
during the fall of 1836, and operated by horse- 
power, the first locomotive being used the next 
summer. The Sanduskj- and Dayton Road 
was finished to Bellevue (16 miles), in 1839. 
In 1841 the Railway mileage in Ohio was 41 
miles ; 572 in 1851 ; 3,024 in 1861 ; and 3,457 
in 1871. In 1881, there were 5,353 miles of 
main track, 356 miles of branches, 194 miles 
of double track, and 1,185 miles of sidings, etc., 
making a total of 7,088 miles, of which 266 
miles were in Hamilton. 258 in Cuyahoga, 208 
in Lucas and 189 in Franklin County. The total 
taxable valuation of these Roads was then $82,- 
713,780, on which Sl,223,711 in taxes was paid. 

The first Territorial Delegate from the 
Northwest in Congress, was Gen. Wm. H. Har- 
rison, elected in 1799. In 1800 he resigned 
upon being appointed Governor of the Terri- 
tory of Indiana, and William McMillan, also 
of Hamilton County, was chosen as his suc- 
cessor. Paul Fearing of Washington County 
was elected in 1801, who served until the State 
Government went into operation, when Thomas 
Worthington of Ross, and John Smith of Ham- 
ilton, as Senators, and Jeremiah Morrow of 
Warren, as Representative, represented the 
State in Congress, the latter continuing as 
such until 1813, when the State was divided 
into Congressional Districts. The number of 
these at this time (1886) is 21. 

Amendments to the State Constitution were 
added from time to time, but no general revi- 
sion thereof was made until the Constitution 
of 1851 was adopted. The changes made in 
the form and mode of government were not 
numerous, nor very important. A Lieutenant 
Governor was provided and made elective by 
the people, to preside over the Senate and 
act as Governor in case of vacancy, and Pi-o- 



bate Courts for the several Counties. The 
limited power of the Governor was continued. 
Among the more important of the provisions 
of this Constitution, was that forbidding the 
granting of licenses for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors, which was a departure from the pre- 
ceding policy of the State in that regard. A 
third Constitutional Convention assembled in 
1873, adjourning in 1874, by which a new or- 
ganic law was framed, after a session of 188 
days, but it fixiled to meet the popular ap- 
proval at a succeeding election. The work 
of this body was singularly unsatisfactory to 
the people, and not less so for the expense of 
which it was the source. The entire cost of 
the Convention of 1802 did not reach 15,000 ; 
whereas, the official report of the proceed- 
ings and debates alone in 1874 amounted to 
$13,695.78, the aggregate expense being but 
little less than $200,000. Special amendments 
to the Constitution have been submitted to the 
popular vote by the Legislature from time to 
time, .some of which were adopted and others 
rejected. Notablj- among these was the one 
approved in 1883, providing for a system of 
Circuit State Courts, intermediate between the 
Common Pleas and the Supreme Court, and de- 
signed to facilitate the administration of justice 
by relieving the latter judicatory of its im- 
practicable charge. At the same time, were 
submitted two antagonistic provisions relating 
to the liquor traffic, one for a license system, 
under direction of the Legislature, and the 
other for utter prohibition of the manufacture 
or sale of liquors in the State. The result was 
defeat of both propositions. In this connec- 
tion may be mentioned two separate attempts 
by the Legislature so to subject the liquor 
traffic to taxation and regulation, as should 
evade the prohibitoi-y section of the existing 
Constitution. One of these was known as the 
"Pond" and the other as the "Scott" law. 
Both were pronounced unconstitutional by 
the Supreme Court, although the latter act 
was approved by that Court when first sub- 
mitted. At the session of 1885-86, a third act, 
looking to the taxation of the liquor traflic, 
was passed by the Legislature. It is known 
as the "Dow" law, and in its general scoj^e 
and aim, is much like the two acts already 
named. ■ Its constitutionality was challenged, 
but the Sujjreme Court, by a decision rendered 
in December, 1886, affirmed its validity. 



10 



OUTLINE HISTORY OF THE STATE OF OHIO. 



The rif^ht to vote in Ohio is now secured to 
all male citizens, without regard to race, color 
or previous condition of servitude, provided 
they be 21 years of age, and have a residence 
of one year within the State, 30 days in the 
Coiintj-, and 20 days in the Township, Village 
or Ward next preceding the election. The 
State or general elections are held on the 
first Tuesdaj- after the first Monday in JSTo- 
vemher annually, when State, District and 
County officers, members of Congress and of 
the Legislature and Presidential electors are 
chosen. Elections for Township and Munici- 
pal officers are held on the first Monday of 
April annually. 

The General Assembly consists of a Senate 
ofSfi members and a House of Eepresentatives 
of 105 members, both chosen for two 3'ears. 
The sessions are biennial, although they are 
made practically annual by an adjournment to 
the succeeding January, at the close of each 
regular session. The Executive officers of the 
State consist of a Governor, with a salary of 
$4,000 ; a Lieutenant Governor, salary, $800 ; 
a Secretary of State, salary, $2,000; an Au- 
ditor, salary, $3,000; a Treasurer, salary, 
$3,000 ; a Comptroller of the Treasury, salary, 
§2,000; an Attorney General, salary, $1,500, 
and fees; and a Commissioner of Schools, 
salary, $2,000. Of these all are elected for 
two years, except the Auditor, whose term is 
four years, and the Comptroller and Commis- 
sioner of Schools, elected for three years. 
The Board of Public Works, three in number, 
are chosen for three years each. The Com- 
missioner of Eailroads and Telegraphs, the 
Superintendent of Insurance, the Supervisor 
of Public Printing, the Gas Commissioner and 
the State and Law Librarians are appointed 
by the Governor, by and with the advice and 
consent of the Senate. The State Board of 
Agriculture, consisting of ten members, is 
chosen by a Convention of Presidents of the 



County Agricultural Societies, five being se- 
lected each j-ear. The Supreme Court of the 
State consists of five members, one elective 
each year, and the one serving on his fifth year 
acting as Chief Justice. Their salary is $3,000. 
There are nine Common Pleas Di-stricts, each 
having three sub-divisions, in which are pro- 
vided one or more Judges, according to the 
demands of the ease. The Circuit Court pro- 
vided for in 1883 consists of 21 Judges, with 
salaries of $4,000 each, chosen for seven Cir- 
cuits, who hold two terms of Court each year. 
There are special Superior Courts in Cincin- 
nati, Cleveland, Dayton and Xenia. Justices 
of the Peace, elected for each Township, have 
exclusive jurisdiction in civil actions in which 
not more than 8100 is involved, and concur- 
rent jurisdiction with the Common Pleas in 
cases of $100 to $300. By act of Congress the 
State is divided into two Districts for United 
States Courts, which are held, the one for 
Southern Ohio at Cincinnati, and the other, 
for Northern Ohio, at Cleveland and Toledo. 
Besides, Federal Circuit Courts ai-e held in 
each of these Districts. 

Under the laws of Ohio, a married woman 
may hold, free from claim by her husband or 
his creditors, all property belonging to her at 
the time of their marriage or afterward ac- 
quired bj' her by gift, bequest or inheritance, 
or by purchase with her own separate means, 
and may, by will or otherwise, dispose of such 
property. Like control over her earnings is 
possessed by her. Divorces may be granted 
for three j-ears' desertion, for adultery, impo- 
tence, extreme cruelty, fraudulent contract of 
marriage, gross neglect of duty, habitual 
drunkenness for three years, or imprisonment 
under criminal sentence. The legal rate of 
interest is six per cent., and not to exceed 
eight per cent, may be agreed upon in writing, 
while six per cent, maj- be recovered where 
more than eight has been contracted. 



CHAPTER II. 



BENEVOLENT AND EEFOEMATOEY INSTITUTIONS. GEOLOGICAL SUEVEY. THE OHIO PEESS. OHIO 

IN THE WAR OF THE EEBELLION. — GOVEENORS. GLASS AND IRON MANUFACTURES. CLI- 
MATE. POPULATION OF STATE AND CITIES. — THE " BUCKEYE STATE." — HISTORICAL BREVITIES. 



LIBEEAL provision for the care of the un- 
fortunate classes has been made by Ohio. 
As early as 1829, and far in advance of many 
older States, an Asj'lum for the Deaf and 
Dumb was established. This was followed by 
an Asylum for the Blind, in 1837, one for the 
Insane in 1839, one for Idiots in 1857, a Keform 
School for Boys in 1857, an Industrial Home 
for Girls in 18(39 ; to which have been added 
five asylums for the insane — the Northern, at 
Cleveland; the Southern, at Dayton; the 
Southeastern, at Athens; the Longview,-at 
Cincinnati; and the Northwestern, at Toledo, 
the latter to succeed the Lucas (lounty Asylum. 
The Longview Asylum, while belonging to 
Hamilton County, is largely occupied by State 
patients. Both white and colored insane are 
treated there. The Eefbrm School for Boys is 
situated on a tract of 1,170 aci-es, si.x miles 
South of Lancaster. The inmates are boys sent 
there for crime or misdemeanor, and besides 
receiving literary instruction, the}^ are em- 
ployed in farm and other industrial work. The 
average detention of them is about two and 
one-half years. The Industrial Home is at 
White Sulphur Springs, Delaware County, on 
a tract of 189 acres of land. The inmates are 
girls sent by authority of Probate Courts for 
reasons of viciousness and incorrigibility, or 
for want of proper parental care. At the ses- 
sion of the Legislature for 1885-86, provision 
was made for an Intermediate Penitentiary, 
for the incarceration of con victs for first offense, 
and for crimes of lesser turpitude, the prison 
being located at Mansfield. 

The first geological survey of the State was 
made in 1837-8, under direction of Prof W. W. 
Mather. A second and more full survey was 
begun in 18G9,and completed in 1874, by Prof. 
J. S. Newberry, assisted by E. B. Andrews, 
Edward Orton and John H. Klippart. 

As shown by the census of 1880, there were 
then in Ohio 774 newspapers, of which 683 
were printed in the English language, 89 in 
the German, one in the French and one in the 
Bohemian language. There were 57 religious 



papers, published for 17 different denomina- 
tions. Of the whole, 56 were issued daily, 584 
weekly, and the balance at various periods, 90 
being monthly. Their aggregate circulation 
per issue in 1879, was 3,093,931 copies, of which 
216,336 were by dailies, and 2,877,595 by week- 
lies and others. 

Few States responded as promptly or as 
freel}' to the call of the Government for troops 
in defense of the Union, as did Ohio. Her vol- 
unteers were among the first at the front, and 
throughout the struggle their numbers v^rere 
kept well filled, while their service was credit- 
able alike to them and to the State they repre- 
sented. The whole number of troops furnished 
by this State for the Union Army was 317,133, 
or, reduced to the three-years' standard, 239,976, 
making an aggregate of 719,928 years' service. 
Besides these, were large numbers of local 
troops, doing temporary service within the State 
and on the border. It so happened that Ohio 
was made even more conspicuous in the War 
for the Union by the relations which many of 
its most distinguished leaders bore to the State, 
among whom may be named Generals Grant, 
McPherson, Sherman, Sheridan, Eosecrans, 
Garfield, and others of more or less renown. 

The Governors of Ohio and years of service 
have been as follows : Arthur St. Clair, 1788- 
1802 ; Charles W. Byrd, 1802-1803 ; Edward 
Tiffin, 1803-1807 ; Thomas Kirker, 1807-1808 ; 
Samuel Huntington, 1808-1810; Eeturn J. 
Meigs, 1810-1814; Othniel Looker, 1814; 
Thomas Worthington, 1814-1818 ; Ethan Allen 
Brown, 1818-1822; Allen Trimble, 1822 ; Jere- 
miah Morrow, 1822-1826 ; Allen Trimble, 1826- 
1830; Duncan McArthur, 1830-1832; Eobert 
Lucas, 1832-1836 ; Joseph Vance, 1836-1838 ; 
Wilson Shannon, 1838-1840 ; Thomas Corwin, 
1840-1842; Wilson Shannon, 1842-1844 ; Thos. 
W. Bartley, 1844 ; Mordecai Bartley, 1844-1846 ; 
William Bebb, 1846-1848 ; Seabury Ford, 1848- 
1850 ; Eeuben Wood, 1850-1854 ; William Me- 
dill, 1854-1856 ; Salmon P. Chase, 1856-1860 ; 
William Dennison, 1860-1862; David Tod, 
1862-1864; John Brouffh, 1864-1865; Charles 



12 



OUTLINE HISTORY OF THE STATE OF OHIO. 



Anderson, 1865-186(J; Jacob D. Cox, 18B6-1868; 
Rutherford B. Hayes, 1868-1872 ; Edward F. 
Noyes, 1872-1874; William Allen, 1874-1876; 
Eutheriord B. Hayes, 1876-1877; Thomas L. 
Young, 1877-1878; Richard M. Bishop, 1878- 
1880 ;"charles Foster, 1880-1884 ; George Hoad- 
ley, 1884-1886; and J. B. Foraker, 1886 . 

The earliest record of glass-making in Ohio, 
is of date of 1817, when ten glass-houses were 
in operation in the State. None were reported 
by the census of 1840 ; but six were found in 
1850, four in 1860, and nine in 1870. The 
number in 1880 was 20, with a capital of 
81,194,850, employing 1,688 hands, with a total 
product of S],.'i49,:!2(l. 

The first venture in the iron industry in 
Oliio was that of Daniel Heaton, in 1804. His 
furnace stood in Poland Townshij), now Mahon- 
ing County, where the present furnace of the 
Struthers Furnace Company stands. The next 
furnace in the State was that Robert Mont- 
gomery and John Struthers built in 1806. Of 
these establishments Mr. Struthers said : 
" These furnaces were of about equal capacit}-, 
and would yield two and a half or three tons 
per day. The metal was principally run into 
moulds for kettles, bake-ovens, flat-irons, 
stoves, andirons and other such articles as the 
needs of a new settlement required, and any 
surplus into pigs, and sent to the Pittsburgh 
market." The Struthers furnace closed in 
1S07, and the Montgomery in 1812, by the 
drafting of its men into the arm3\ The next 
venture of this sort was at Niles, Trumbull 
County, in 18119, by James Heaton, where was 
produced the first hammered bars in Ohio. 
Subsequently, at various dates, furnaces ap- 
peared — in 1816 at Middlebury and at Tall- 
madge, now Summit County ; in Madison, now 
Lake County (the '■ Arcole " furnace), in 1825 ; 
and in Ashtabula, Cuyahoga, Huron (now in 
Erie), and in Lorain Counties. These Lake 
siiore establishments sprung from the deposits 
of bog-ore found in swales and swamps near, 
and generally to the North of a ridge of land 
which was probably once the shore of Lake 
Erie, and extended, with some interruptions, 
from the New York State line to the Huron 
River, the Westernmost furnace having been in 
Vermillion Township, now Brie County. One 
after another, these establishments were sus- 
pended, in consequence of the increasing cost 
of charcoal, their only fuel, and the cheaper 



product of regions possessing bituminous coal 
and larger deposits of iron. The first use of 
the new fuel in the State, was at Lowell, Ma 
honing County, by Wilkeson, Wilkes & Co., in 
a blast furnace which was blown in on the 8th 
of August, 1846 This use of uncoked coal was 
followed by like use at various charcoal fur- 
naces in the Mahoning valley and elsewhere. 
The discovery of the coal fields of Ohio and of 
the iron ores of Lake Superior, joined to stim- 
ulate the iron product in this State to a high 
degree, the latter article being found highly 
valuable for mixture with Ohio ores. The first 
rolling mill in Cleveland (in 1855) was a plate- 
mill, worked a direct ore process, but was not 
a success. Rails were first re-rolled at Cleveland 
in 1856. In the census of 1870 and 1880, Ohio 
stands second in rank as an iron-producing 
State. The latter return shows that there were 
then in the State 134 iron and steel manufacto- 
ries, with a capital of $25,144,294; emploj'ing 
20,900 hands, at an annual cost of 88,265,070 
in wages, with $34,918,360 worth of products. 
Pennsylvania had 366 establishments, with 
58,000 hands, and $145,576,268 in products. 

Tlie climate of Ohio is subject to material 
changes, the extremes in temperature being 
from 16° below zero to 100" above, showing a 
range of 116°. The annual mean at Cleveland 
for ten years was 49.77° — that of January 
being 27.36'-', and that of July, 72.57°, showing 
the annual range to be 45.21°. At 'Cincinnati, 
the average for sixteen j'ears was found to be 
54.67°; the mean for January 31.20°, and for 
July 78.61°. The annual precipitation ranges 
from 33.24 inches at Kelley's Island, to 44.87 at 
Cincinnati. Observations for ten years at Cleve- 
land, bj'CI. A. Hyde, showed tlie annual maxi- 
mum fall to be 48.91 inches in 1866, and the 
minimum to be 30.76 in 1863. 

The population of the State and its rank in 
the Union as to population, as shown b}- the 
Federal census, have been as follows : 



YE.1R. 


White. 


Colored. 


Total. 


Rank. 


1800 


45,028 

228,861 

.37fi..".72 

928,329 

1,502,122 

1,955,050 

2,302,,S08 

2,601,946 

3,117,920 


337 

1,899 

4,723 

9,574 

17,345 

25,279 

36,673 

63,213 

79.900 


45,365 

2.30,760 

581,295 

937,903 

1,519,467 

1,980,329 

2,339,511 

2,665,260 

3,198,062 




1810 


13 


1S20 


1830 


4 
3 


1840 , 

1850 


1860 




1870.. 


3 


1880 


3 







POPULATION OF STATE AND CITIES. 



13 



There are in Ohio 88 Counties, having pop- 
nhilion in 1880 and 1870, as follows: 



State. 



Adams 

Allen 

Ashland 

Ashtabula... 

Athens 

Aujilaize — 

Belmont 

Brown 

Butler.. 

Carroll 

Champaign . 

Clarke 

Clermont 

Clinton 

Columbiana. 
Coshocton... 

Crawford 

Cuyahoga ... 

Darke 

Defiance 

Delaware 

Erie 

Kairiield 

Fayette 

Franklin. •..- 

Fulton 

Gallia 

Geauga 

Greene 

Guernsey 

Hamilton ... 

Hancock 

Hardin 

Harrison ... 

Henry 

Highland ... 

Hocking 

Holmes 

Huron 

Jackson 

.lefferson 

Knox 

I^ake 

Lawrence ... 

Licking 

Logan ..: 

Lorain 

Lucas 

Madison 

Mahoning... 

Marion 

Medina 

Meigs. 



fiercer 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Morrow 

Muskingum. 

Noble 

Ottawa 

Paulding 

Perry 

Pickaway 

Pike....'. 

Portage 

Preble , 

Putnam 



1880. 



Total. White. Col'd 



3,198,062 



•24,005 
31,314 
28,883 
37,139 
28,411 
25,444 
49,638 
32,911 
42,579 
lt;,416 
27..S17 
41,948 
36,713 
24,7.56 
48,602 
26,642 
30,583 

196,943 
40,496 
22,515 
27,381 
32,640 
34,284 
20,364 
86,797 
21,053 
28,124 
14,251 
31,849 
27,197 

313,374 
27,784 
27,023 
20,4.56 
20,.585 
30,281 
21,126 
20,776 
31,609 
23,688 
33,018 
27,431 
16,.326 

3a,ui;8 

40,4.50 
26,267 
35,.526 
67,377 
20,129 
42,871 
20,565 
21,4.53 
32,325 
21,808 
36,1.58 
26,496 
78,,5.50 
20,074 
19,072 
49,774 
21,138 
19,762 
13,485 
28,218 
27,415 
17,927 
27,500 
24,533 
23,713 



3,117,920 79,900 



23,662 
.30,800 
23,843 
36,875 
27,236 
25,375 
48,007 
30,595 
41,435 
16,355 
26,145 
38,366 
34,895 
23,293 
47,918 
26,682 
30,475 

194,735 
39,917 
22,371 
26,770 
32,170 
33,881 
18,919 
82,846 
20,998 
25,178 
14,240 
26.774 
26,611 

.302,793 
27,632 
26,381 
19,809 
20,552 
28,515 
20,921 
20,774 
31,.357 
22,774 
31,835 
27,128 
16,174 
37,319 
40,077 
25,210 
.34,361 
66,281 
19,046 
42,419 
20,868 
21,417 
30,527 
21,502 
34,984 
26,416 
77,234 
19,881 
18,928 
48,446 
21,044 
19,726 
12,838 
28,127 
26,140 
16,700 
27,356 
24,051 
23,619 



343 

510 

40 

263 

1,170 

69 

1,631 

2,316 

1.140 

61 

1,661 

3,5,S0 

1.817 

1,468 

684 

59 

108 

2,175 

579 

144 

610 

468 

403 

1,444 

3,936 

55 

2,945 

11 

4,553 

586 

10,633 

152 

840 

647 

33 

1,763 

205 

251 

912 

1,183 

302 

152 

1,746 

370 

1.057 

1,169 

1,093 

1,083 

449 

197 

36 

1,798 

306 

1,172 

80 

1,310 

193 

143 

1,329 

94 

33 

647 

91 

1,2.52 

1,227 

144 

482 

94 



1870. 



Total. White. Col'd 



2,665,260 



20,7.50 
23,623 
21,933 
32,517 
23.768 
20,041 
39,714 
30,802 
39,912 
14,491 
24,188 
32,070 
34,268 
21,914 
:W,299 
23,600 
25,.556 
132,010 
32,278 
15,719 
25,175 
28,188 
31,138 
17,170 
63,019 
17,789 
25,.545 
14,190 
28,078 
23,838 
260,-370 
23,847 
18,714 
18,682 
14,028 
29,1.33 
17,925 
18,177 
28,532 
21,759 
29,188 
26,333 
15,935 
31,380 
36,7.56 
23,028 
30,308 
46,722 
15,633 
31,001 
10,184 
20,092 
31,456 
17.2.54 
32,740 
25,779 
64,006 
20,363 
18,583 
44,886 
19,949 
13,364 
8,544 
18,4.53 
24,875 
15,447 
24,,584 
21,809 
17,081 



!,601,946 



20,377 
23,410 
21,907 
32,365 
22.'.)95 
19,979 
38,406 
28,735 
38,921 
14,433 
23,078 
30,014 
32,638 
20,769 
37,814 
23,567 
25,454 
130,564 
31,717 
15,608 
24,618 
27,845 
30,824 
16,095 
60,251 
17,766 
22,743 
14,169 
24,199 
23,493 
2.52,934 
23,730 
18,440 
18,197 
14,017 
27,449 
17,783 
18.173 
28,332 
20,970 
28,183 
26,144 
15,835 
30,120 
35,513 
22,066 
29.196 
45,944 
14,928 
30,744 
16,087 
20,042 
29,841 
16,810 
31,691 
26,676 
68.197 
20,127 
18,440 
43,719 
19,864 
13,272 
8.069 
18,366 
23,7115 
14,304 
24,479 
21,390 
17,008 



63,213 



373 
213 
26 
151 
773 
61 

1,307 

2,067 
988 
.58 

1,110 

2,056 

1,629 

1,145 
485 
33 
101 

1,445 
.561 
111 
5.57 
342 
314 

1,074 

2,768 
23 

2.802 
21 

3,815 
345 

7,4.32 

117 

274 

485 

11 

1,684 

142 

4 

200 

789 

1,005 
186 
100 

1,241 
243 
962 

1,106 
776 
705 
257 
97 
50 

1,624 
444 

1,049 
103 
809 
236 
143 

1,166 

85 

92 

475 

80 

1,080 

1,142 

105 

419 

73 



Richland... 

Ross 

Sandusky .. 

Scioto - 

Seneca 

Shelby 

Stark 

Summit 

Trumbull .. 
Tuscarawas 

Union 

Van Wert .. 

Vinton 

Warren 

Washington., 

Wayne 

Williams.. 

Wood 

Wyandot.. 



1880. 



Total. White. Col'd 



36,306 
40,307 
32,057 
33,511 
36,947 
24,137 
64,031 
43,788 
44,880 
40,198 
22,375 
23,028 
17.223 
28,392 
43,244 
40,076 
23,821 
34,022 
22,395 



36,119 
37,020 
31,863 
32,352 
36,806 
23,602 
63,738 
43,397 
44,635 
40,052 
21,971 
22,539 
17,011 
27,109 
42,000 
39,892 
23,787 
33,868 
22,222 



186 

3,286 

194 

1,1.59 

141 

535 

292 

384 

245 

146 

404 

476 

212 

1,283 

1,243 

183 

34 

132 

171 



1870. 



Total. White. Col'd 



32,516 
37,097 
25,503 
29,302 
30,827 
20,748 
52,508 
34,674 
38,659 
38,840 
18,730 
15,823 
15,027 
26,689 
40,609 
35,116 
20,991 
24, .596 
18,553 



32,372 
33,862 
25,360 
28,289 
30,668 
20,142 
52,190 
34,373 
38,425 
33,724 
18,387 
15,619 
14,819 
25,511 
39,551 
35,061 
20,949 
24,553 
18,462 



144 

3,230 
143 
1,013 
159 
600 
318 
299 
233 
116 
343 
204 
208 
1,178 
1,058 
55 
42 
43 
82 



POPULATION OP CITIES IN OHIO, 
Having 4,000 inhabitants and over in 1880 and 1870 : 



Name of 
Place. 



Akron 

Alliance 

Ashtabula... 

Bellaire 

Canton 

Chillicothe . . 
Cincinnati .. 
Circleville... 
Cleveland ... 
Columbus... 

Dayton 

Defiance 

Delaware 

EastLiverpool 

Flyria .-. 

Findlay 

Fremont 

Gallon 

Gallipolis 

Hamilton 

Ironton 

Lancaster 

Lima 

Mansfield 

Marietta.' 

Massillon 

Middletown.. 
Mt. Vernon .. 

Newark 

Norwalk 

Piqua 

Pomeroy 

Portsmouth .. 

Salem 

Sandusky 

Springfield . . . 
Steubenville . 

Tiffin 

Toledo 

Urbana 

Van Wert 

Warren 

Wooster 

Xenia 

Youngstown . 
Zanesville 



1880. 



Total. Native. Foreign 



16,512 

4,636 

4,445 

8,025 

12,258 

10,938 

2.55,139 

6,046 

160,146 

56,647 

38,678 

5,907 

6,894 

5,568 

4,777 

4,633 

8,446 

5,635 

4,400 

12,122 

8,857 

6,803 

7,567 

9,859 

5,444 

6,836 

4,538 

5,249 

9,600 

5,704 

6,031 

5,.560 

11,321 

4,041 

15,838 

20,730 

12,093 

7,876 

50,137 

6,252 

4,079 

4,428 

5,840 

7,026 

16,435 

18,113 



12,901 

4,159 

3,652 

6,873 

10,315 

9,295 

183,480 

5,543 

100,737 

42,576 

31,432 

4,751 

6,006 

4,612 

3,667 

4,255 

7,077 

4,765 

4,144 

9,587 

7,647 

6,087 

6,614 

8,371 

4,788 

5,381 

3,821 

4,735 

8,424 

4,842 

5,159 

4,467 

9,695 

3,731 

1,128 

17,646 

10,150 

6,650 

35,778 

5,579 

3,871 

3,732 

5,233 

6,436 

10,678 

15,996 



3,611 

477 

793 

1,152 

1,943 

1,643 

71,659 

503 

59,409 

9,071 

7,240 

1,156 

888 

956 

1,110 

383 

1,369 

870 

2.56 

2,536 

1,210 

716 

953 

1,488 

656 

1,455 

717 

514 

1,176 

862 

872 

1,102 

1,6'26 

301 

4,555 

3,084 

1,943 

1,224 

14,349 

673 

208 

696 

607 

590 

4,757 

2,111 



1870. 



Total, 



10,006 
4,063 
1,999 
4,033 
8,660 
8,920 
216,239 
5,407 

92,829 

31,247 

30,473 
2,750 
5,641 
2,105 
3,038 
3,315 
5,485 
3,523 
3,711 

11,081 
5,686 
4,725 
4,500 
8,029 
5,218 
5,185 
3,046 
4,876 
6,698 
4,498 
5,967 
5,824 

10,592 
3,700 

13,000 

12,652 
8,107 
5,648 

31,584 
4,276 
2,625 
3,457 
5,419 
6,377 
8,075 

10,011 



Native. Foreign 



7,402 


2,604 


3,496 


668 


1,638 


361 


3,165 


668 


7,037 


1,623 


7,111 


1,809 


136,627 


79,012 


4,845 


862 


54,014 


38,815 


23,603 


7,611 


23,060 


7,423 


2,072 


678 


4,739 


902 


1,613 


402 


2,339 


669 


2,898 


417 


4,383 


1,072 


2,814 


709 


3,456 


255 


8,019 


3,062 


4,604 


1,082 


4,005 


720 


3,832 


668 


6,507 


1,522 


4,353 


865 


3,952 


1,233 


2,476 


570 


4,327 


546 


5,413 


1,285 


3,666 


832 


4,840 


1,127 


4,173 


1,651 


8,530 


2,062 


3,420 


280 


8.396 


4,604 


10,483 


2,169 


6,460 


1,647 


4,490 


1,168 


20,486 


11,099 


3,6,32 


644 


2,487 


138 


2,896 


861 


4,730 


689 


5,686 


691 


5,258 j 


2,817 


8,448 


1,663 



14 



OUTLINE HISTORY OF THE STATE OF OHIO. 



On tho occasion of the 45th anniversary 
of the settlement of Cincinnati, December 26, 
1833, a " Buckeye dinner " was given. Dr. 
Daniel Drake, one of the oldest and most intel- 
ligent physicians of the West, gave an ingen- 
ious and luunorous description of the Buckeye 
tree. He said it belonged to a family, of which 
but few existed. It was of the genus ^scidus, 
belonged to the class He-ptandria, signifying 
" seven men," and there were seven species of 
the genus, of which the Ohio species was the last 
discovered. Neither Europe nor Africa has a 
native species of ^senilis, and Asia but one, 
the ^sciilus-Bippocastanvm, or horse chestnut. 
Nearly 300 years previous, a minister from a 
Court in Western Europe, found this tree 
growing in Moscow, whither it had been 
brought from Siberia, and, struck by its 
beauty, naturalized it in his own country, 
where it flourished and spread rapidlj-, reach- 
ing England, where it became a favorite. Dr. 
Drake said the qualities of our native " Ohio- 
ensis," the " horse chestnvit," made it the fit 
representative of the hardy pioneers of the 
"Buckeye State." It is eminently prolific, 
hardy, beautiful in leaf and blossom, a native, 
and grew nowhere else until transplanted, as 
it had been to considerable extent. Its slow- 
ness in combustion made it specially valuable 
to the pioneers for " back-logs " in their ample 
cabin fire-places, where it survived the burning 
of several supplies of " fore-sticks " and accom- 
panying fuel. The medicinal qualities of the 
Buckeye are such, that if skillfully used, it is 
useful in fever and agae, but unskillfully em- 
ployed, it is a violent emetic. As the earliest 
tree in foliage each spring, it was a fitting em- 
blem of the advance-guard of the present 
millions in the " Buckeye State." 

A few of the more prominent facts in the 
history of Ohio may be stated as follows : 

The first permanent settlement within the 
bounds of the State was made at Marietta early 
in the year 1788, and the second settlement 
at what was known as Columbia, near to the 
present site of Cincinnati, was made in the 
latter part of the same year. 

The establishment of a Territorial Govern- 
ment was made by Congress in 1787, and was 
organized in July, 1788. 

The first and only Territorial Governor was 
General Arthur St. Clair. 

The first County established in Ohio was 



Washington, by proclamation of Governor St. 
Clair, July 26, 1788. The three next Counties 
organized were Hamilton, Wayne and Adams, 
that of Wayne embracing all that portion of 
Michigan south of Mackinaw. 

The first Court held within the State of 
Ohio met at Marietta, September 2, 1788. 

The battle most disastrous to the peace and 
welfare of the white settlers was that of Gov- 
ernor St. Clair by the Indians, November 4, 
1791, within the limits of Darke County. 

The most important victory gained over the 
Indians was that of General Anthony Wayne, 
at Fallen Timbers, on the Maumee Kiver, and 
now within the County of Lucas, August, 1794. 

The first Territorial Legislature met at Cin- 
cinnati, Sejjtember 16, 1799. 

The State of Connecticut, May 30, 1801, 
ceded to the United States her claim to the 
territory since known as the Connecticut 
Western Eeserve, extending from the Pennsyl- 
vania line to the Western boundary' of Huron 
County, and embracing, substantially, the 
Counties of Ashtabula, Trumbull, Lake, Sum- 
mit, Geauga, Cuyahoga, Lorain, Medina, Hu- 
ron and Erie. 

The first State Constitution was formed No- 
vember, 1802, at Chillicothe, which had be- 
come the Capital of the Territory. 

The first State election took place in Jan- 
uary, 1803, the new State Government being 
in operation in March, following. 

What was known as the " Burr Conspiracy," 
compassing the separation of the Southwestern 
States and their union with Mexico, to be 
seized by military and naval foi'ce, was fully 
organized and entered upon in the year 1806, 
and ended in the arrest of Burr and several 
associates in January, 1807. 

The most important events in connection 
with the war of 1812-15, and occurring within 
the limits of Ohio, consisted of the successful 
defense of Fort Meigs, in May, and of Fort Ste- 
phenson, in August, 1813, and the victory of 
Perry over the British fleet, in SejJtember, 
same year. 

The permanent location of the State Capital 
at Columbus was made in 1816. 

The formal "breaking of ground" in the 
commencement of the great system of State 
Canals, took place at Newark, a point on the 
Ohio Canal (Cleveland to Portsmouth), July 
4, 1825. Present and taking part- in the cere- 



HISTORICAL BREVITIES. 



15 



monies, were Governor Jeremiah Morrow of 
Ohio, and Governor DeWitt Clinton, of New 
York. 

The first definite steps toward a system of 
Public Schools, were taken in 1825. 

The first Railway opened within the State 
•was the Erie & Kalamazoo Road, in the fall of 
1836. It extended from Toledo to Adrian, 
Mich., a distance of 33 miles. 

Ohio has furnished four Presidents of the 
United States — William H. Harrison, Ulysses 
S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes and James A. 
Garfield, the first and the last named of whom 
died in oifice, the former after a service of one 
month, and the latter six months after his in- 
auguration. One Vice-President, Hendricks, 
of Indiana, was a native of Ohio. Two Chief 
Justices of the Supreme Court of the United 
States were apjiointed from Ohio — Salmon P. 
Chase and Morrison R. Waite ; as were three 
Associate Justices of the same— John McLean, 
Noah H. Swayneand Stanley Matthews. Four 
Secretaries of the Treasury of the United States 
— Thomas Ewing, Thomas Corwin, S. P. Chase 
and John Sherman — were citizens of Ohio 
while holding such ofiice. Of such were three 
Secretaries of the Interior — Thomas Ewing, 



Jacob D. Cox and Columbus Delano ; throe 
Secretaries of War — John McLean, Benjamin 
Stanton and Alphonso Taft; two Attorneys 
General — Henry Stanbery and Alfonso Taft, 
and three Postmasters General — Return J. 
Meigs, John McLean and William Dennison. 

Of those prominent in the military service 
of the United States during the War of the 
Rebellion (1861-65), the following were from 
Ohio : U. S. Grant, James B. McPherson, 
William T. Sherman, Phillip H. Sheridan, 
George B. McClellan, Irwin McDowell, Quincy 
A. Gilmore, Wager Swayne, James B. Steed- 
man and the McCook Brothers. 

Among others from Ohio renowned for suc- 
cess in their respective spheres of activity, ai'e 
Thomas A. Edison, the first Electrician of the 
age ; Dr. Hall, the great Arctic Explorer ; 
Professor O. M. Mitchell, the Astronomer, who 
died in the military service of his country. 
Of eminent Divines, may here be named Dr. 
Lyman Beecher, of the Congregational Church; 
Bishops Philander Chase and Charles P. McU- 
vaine, of the Protestant Episcopal Church ; 
Bishop Edward Thompson, of the Methodist 
Ejjiscopal Church, and President Finney, of 
Oberlin College. 



t 



PART I I. 

LOCALITY. 



CIIArTER I. 



TOPOGEAP IIY.* GEOLOGICAL STRUCTURE. 



• SURFACE GEOLOGY. — SOILS. — ECONOMIC GEOLOGY. 



JtAUMEE. 



THE surface of Lucas County is nearly flat, further exposed in the road West of the \'il- 

From the shore of Lake Erie there is an lage, so as to afford tiie following section : 

almost imperceptible ascent to the Western Alternations of hard gray, aud soft drab limestone.s, botl/^"- 

boundary, which has an elevation of from 90 thin-bedded « 

to 130 feet. The Lake coast is low, and ^''^'^^ive buff limestone, in part breeciated, witt> many 

' .small, lenticular cavities, and some chert nodules.- 30 

guarded by a sand beach. The Maumee Eiver, Gray, shaiy limestone— exposed r, 

wliich forms a part of the Southern boundary, Total 70 

and divides the County into two unequal tri- mL ^ -^ /^ • ^ ,• ^i 

, „„ „ . . „ . , The Corniferoxis Group is seen to overlie the 

angles, descends 60 feet in a series of rapids, -itt j. i- • c< ^ ■ ^ t-.- 1 . 1 

^ ,! ,. T^ • , ,1 Waterlime in iSylvania, at r isher s quarr}-, and 

over limestone strata, from Providence to Mau- • ^i , , /..1 ir ^i i- c- 

.in tbe bed of the JMaumee, the line of junction 

inee Citv, the head 01 slack water and of navi- . „ i ■ t. ■ ,. i i nr / i 

''' , 1 , n 1- • crossing iSylvania, Springheld, Monciova, and 

gation. The same beds of limestone proiect ,,r , -n " • o \i. 1 j- i- K^^ c 

^ , , , , • . . i I Watervilie, in a Southerly direction. All of 

above the level drift, at a few points further .^ , ,.„,.. 

, , . „ its members are exposed in Sylvania, in a 

North, but have no notable influence on the , ., ,i . i- , ■^ -wj ^ r ,\ 

' rockj' ridge, that lies two miles vVest of the 

topography. -tr-,, mi 

' " ' -^ ^ ^^ n,, , * illage. They are : 

The rocks of the County are : Huron Shale, feet. 

H.,, /-, n -f n ii7„* ''■ Dark, bluish grav, sectile limestone, with crowded 

amilton Group, Corniferous Gri-oup, Water- fossils 5 

lime Group, Onondaga Salt Group and Guelph 5. Thick-bedded, open, buff limestone, with white chert. 25 

fT-nim CXiio'qrnl ■*' Drab limestone : beds to 10 inches • ijO 

1 ^^ * ^ '* -J. Alternations of hard, arenaceous limestone, with fine- 

Guelph Gl'OVp. — There are no rock exposures grained, gray limestone 52 

in the Eastern Townships, but enough outcrbijs -• '«''^>^'™' ^""^'^^ ^"^"^ sandstone (giass-sand) 20 

' " '1. Soft, massive, cream and buff limestone, with fossils 

have been observed in the neighboring parts at top 12 

of Ottawa County to render ithighlj' probable Total ~m 

that the Guelph beds underlie a considerable hm i- n 4i • 1 en i, 1 • 4. 

' The full thickness of the upper bed is not 

portion of the Town of Oregon. , . , -.^j. ., , ik <■ * it 

^ '=■ shown. At vVhitehouse, 15 feet are seen, but 

The Waterlime and Onondaqn Salt Groups ,, .... , j a.-c? 1 

^ ^ the upper limit is nowhere exposed. At Sj'l- 

have not been separated in this County, and . n ji i j j- -ji ^ ^i -n^ ^ 

^ ■" vania, all the beds dip rapidly to the West, 

there IS some doubt as to the occurrence of the 1 ^i • t 1 4 1 • ^i 

and their outcrops can be noted m the space 

latter. At Genoa, in Ottawa County, charac- n -i c: n i 41 i- i- • • u 1 

' ■' ' of a mile. Southward, tlie dip diminishes, and 

teristic Waterlime fossils are found but a few -1 1 n /• 4 1 11 4-1 

the belt of outcrop becomes broader, until, 

feet above the Guelph limestone. , .,, ,, f, , ■ t) -j •» 

^ where it leaves tlio County, 111 rrovidence, it 

The Waterlime is exposed at various points. • ^ 1 4.1 c -i at o 1 

-■ i IS not less than nve miles across. JSIos. 2 and 

From the West line of Watervilie, to slack- ., . 4 c- 1 > at k 1 ,' 4. 

' 3 outcrop at insh s quarry, JNos. 5 and (1 at 

water at Maumee City, it forms the bed of the -1171 -4 1 j at •> * " -i <■ 4i t? 4. 

, •" Whitebouse, and iSo. o two miles further hast. 

Maumee, presenting a series of variable sectile, r 4.1, i 1 <• ^u ivr 4.1 1 a /at 

... ^ In the bed of the Maumee the glass sand (JNo. 

argillaceous limestones, with numerous local „% • <• 1 i^^ 4. j? iu t? 4. r e 

„ , 2) IS seen a few rods East of the East line of 

flexures, but no decided general dip. The n' • 1 1,1 • * 4 

' ° Tir Providence, and the successive strata appear 

same beds are exposed on the plain near Mau- . , 1 ^ 41 t) • 1 j 

\ ^ in order as we ascend to the rrovidcnce dam, 

mee City, in the bed of Swan Creek at Mon- , . , , 41 i, a? i- 4. /at r\ 

, .,r-., , r,. . , ■ n.-r , which rcsts on the bufr limestone (JNo. 5). 

clova Village, and at Fish s quarry, in North- t, -i ■ 1 n .1 u 1 1, * „ 

-.. , ^ '- *" tossils occur in nearly all the beds, but are 

ern Monciova. In Sylvania, Ten-mile Creek . ,, , , 4. • .1 1 • 1 ^ ^ +1 „ 

•' ' especially abundant in the highest and the 

cuts the \\ aterlime for some distance, and it IS , 4. ^ n ^ 1 a „ .■ 

[ lowest. I^ew were collected, as good speci- 

»See Geological Survey of Ohio. Report of J. 8. mens are rare, but of those that were preserved 

Newberry, Chief Geologist, 1S70. Mr. F. B. Meek, the PahTontologist of the 

[19] 



20 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Survey, distinguished 34 species of inverte- 
brates. The fishes, that so abound in the 
eijuivalent beds at Sandusky and other points 
East of the great anticlinal axis, arc but mea- 
gerly re]iresented. A few teeth of onyc.hodus 
have been found in limestones 1 and 5, and 
the gray limestone (No. C) yielded at Sylvania 
a single cranial bone not referable to any de- 
scribed genus. 

The Hamilton Group is not exposed, but is 
believed to bo represented by a bed of soft 
gray shale, outcrojjping in a narrow band 
along the edge of the Huron shale. At Delta, 
Fulton County, where it was traversed in 
boring for oil, it has a depth of 20 feet. 

The Huron Shale, a hard bituminous black 
shale, is entirely concealed under the drift, but 
has been struck by the auger at many points 
in Richfield. It must underlie the whole of 
that Town, together with Spencer and Swan- 
ton, and the Northwest portion of Providence. 
Its dip is to the West. 

Glacial Stria; are found in Lucas County, 
wherever the Erie clay is freshly renaoved 
from the rock surface. Even the friable sand- 
stone of the Corniferous, which crumbles away 
at the first frost, has preserved them. Their 
bearings were noted at seven different locali- 
ties, and range from S. 80° W. to S. W., the 
general direction being S. 55° W. The effect 
produced, when the ice encountered some flint 
nodules in the waterlime at Monclova Village, 
is very interesting. Each hard nodule pro- 
jects boldly from the ice-planed surface, and 
retains a long train or ridge of the limestone 
on one side. The semi-plastic ice did not at 
once fill the groove curved in it by the un- 
yielding flint, and so failed to remove the 
limestone immediately behind it. These trains 
all point in one direction (S. G0° W.), and 
prove that the motion of the ice was toward, 
and not from, that direction. By the kindness 
of Messrs. Coder and Wilson, of Monclova, a 
slab of this worn limestone has been placed in 
the State collection. The superficial deposits 
consist of two members : the Erie clay and the 
Lacustrine clay and sand. The former was 
deposited immediately after the retreat of the 
glacier, and is formed of glacial detritus, trans- 
ported in part by icebergs. The latter are due 
to the sorting and redeposition of the former, 
by Lake action. At Toledo, the Erie clay is 
blue, and the Lacustrine yellow, but the dis- 



tinction is not general. Bowlders afford a 
bettor mark, for they are rarely absent, in this 
vieinitj', from the Erie clay, and never present 
in the Lacustrine. A majority of the Eric clay 
bowlders attest their glacial origin by exhib- 
iting one or more ground faces. A large and 
beautiful specimen of Trenton limestone, in the 
possession of Dr. J. B. Trembley, of Toledo, is 
plainly a fragment torn from the bed of the 
glacier, and not subsequently worn, but de- 
posited with its fractured edges still angular. 
The leveling action of the Lacustrine forces 
has proceeded further in Lucas than in the 
more Westerly Counties, as it was longer sub- 
merged. The original surface of the Erie clay 
doubtless conformed, in great measure, to that 
of the subjacent rock, but has been remodeled 
without regard to it. While there is no drift 
on the limestone ridge, at Sylvania, its depth is 
over 145 feet at Metamora, eight miles West, 
and nearly 100 feet at Toledo, 10 miles East. 
The sand tract of the County records a shore 
action similar to that now transpiring at the 
head of Lake Michigan. The sand accumu- 
lated by the currents, was thrown up by the 
waves in beaches, and by the wind in dunes. 
It is so fine (and hence light and mobile) that 
it owes its present form chiefly to the wind, 
and no persistent beach ridges remain. In its 
vertical range, it extends from 60 feet above 
the present Lake to 110 feet, and will not im- 
probably be found, when its connections shall 
have been traced, to represent more than one 
stage of water, if, indeed, it was not accumu- 
lated during a gradual subsidence. The belt 
crosses the country in a Northeast and South- 
west direction, covering Swanton, with a con- 
siderable portion of Providence, Spencer, Mon- 
clova, Springfield and Sylvania, and small 
areas in Waterville and Washington. An ex- 
tension Southeastward from Sylvania covers 
nearly the entire Town of Adams. 

It is reported by Dr. J. B. Trembley that a 
tooth of mastodon was obtained from a marsh 
in the Town of Sjjringfield. I was unable to 
ascertain the precise locality and other ])artic- 
ulars, but, as all the marshes of that Town lie 
in depressions, that originated with the dunes, 
the tooth cannot be more ancient than they ; 
and the mastodon is shown to have survived at 
least, to the epoch of the lowest rai.sed beach 
of Lake Erie. 

The Towns of Oregon and Manhattan, and 



ECONOMIC GEOLOar. 



21 



the Eastern part of Washington, are jjart of 
the tract of country to which the name of the 
" Black Swamp " has been applied. The soil 
is a fine clay, black with decayed vegetation, 
and varied by streaks having an admixture of 
sand. Lying nearly level (the average descent 
Lakeward is four feet per mile), it has retained 
water on its surface many montiis in each 
j'ear, and, by its aid, converted into mold the 
leaves and trunks that have fallen u]ion it. 
Most valuable assistance in this work has been 
rendered by the fresh-water lobsters that 
abound throughout the district. When the 
land dries they dig little wells that they may 
retain the supply of water essential to their 
existence. As the season advances, they bur- 
row deeper and deeper, always bringing the 
excavated clay to the surface, where it is 
mingled with the mold. In this way the mold 
has become incorporated with the clay to a 
considerable depth, constituting a soil of great 
endurance. The soil of Eichfield and North- 
western Sylvania is somewhat similar in char- 
acter, but has a fine gravel, evenly mingled 
with the clay. 

Along the margins of the sand district are 
belts of shallow sand, with clay subsoil, and 
supporting, like the clay soils, a heavy forest 
growth. 

The district of deep sand is covered by " oak 
openings." It comprises many treeless, sandy 
swamjis, some of which are of considerable ex- 
tent. There can be no doubt that thorough 
drainage will convert them from inhospitable, 
miasmatic wastes into superior farming lands. 

Building Stone. — The Upper Buff limestone 
(No. 5, in the table of Corniferous rocks) is 
the most important building stone in the 
CountJ^ It is readily quarried in largo blocks, 
and very easily wrought while wet. While it 
is an impure limestone, it contains no sand, 
and it owes its open texture, not to loose ag- 
gregation, but to the loss of some component 
by dissolution. It has been extensively used, 
with the best results, for abutments and like 
heavy work, and it is now proposed to saw it 
into slabs for lintels, sills, etc. The principal 
quarries are at Whitohouse and Providence, 
while it is also worked in S3lvania, on the 
farms of Mr. Lee, Mr. Shay, and Mr. Kenj-on 
Cooper. 

The Arenaceous limestone (No. 3) is likewise 
a valuable buildino; stone. It is most exten- 



sively worked by Mr. George Loob, at a point 
two miles Bast of Whitehouse, and by Mr. Wm. 
Fish, in Northern Monclova. Near the former 
quarry, Mr. A. Shear, near the latter, Mr. W. S. 
Holt, and in Sylvania, Mr. J. Eampus, have 
openings in the same bed. 

The stoneless Lacustrine clay is well adapted 
and extensively used for the manufacture of 
bricks. On the border of the .sand district it 
contains a measure of incorporated sand, in 
virtue of which it is the more readily worked. 
Bricks burned from it have a pale red color, 
which is commonly heightened by an admix- 
ture of the convenient ferruginous sand. 

Lime is manufactured for local consumption 
from beds of the Waterlime group, at Maumee 
City, at the Villages of Waterville and Mon- 
clova, and at Fish's quarry ; from the Drab 
limestone of the Corniferous (No. 4), at Syl- 
vania (by Mr. Cooper), and at Providence; 
and from the Gray limestone (No. G), at White- 
house. All of these form efficient and durable 
cements, but differ in color and facility of use. 
Those from the Cornifei'ous beds slake and set 
more quickly than the others, and evolve in 
slaking a great amount of heat. A series of 
experimental tests of these and other limes, 
available for the Toledo market, was under- 
taken, but no satisfactory result was reached, 
and they will be continued in the coming season. 

It is hoped that in the Waterlime group will 
be found beds suitable for hydraulic cement. 
Several samjdes that were selected for exami- 
nation have been shown, by Dr. Wormley's 
analyses, to resemble the best cement rocks 
very closely in chemical composition ; but the 
more practical and decisive tests are yet to be 
applied. 

The friable sandstone (No. 2) affords a nearly 
pure white sand, adapted to the manufacture 
of glass. In 1863 it was opened in Sylvania, 
on the farm now owned by Mr. John Eampus, 
by Messrs. Card and Hubbard, and a consider- 
able quantity quarried, ground and shipped to 
Pittsburgh, Pa., where it was used in making 
flint glass. Seven or eight hundred tons had 
been shipped, when the business terminated, 
in consequence of the death of the managing 
partner, Mr. Card. The price received for the 
sand, delivered in Pittsburgh, was 116 to $17 
per ton.* 

* The development of the Water Supply, Building 
Stone and Glass Sand is noted elsewhere. 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Water Supply.— TUc tii-st discovery of the 
Artesian water, now obtained in so many parts 
oftlic Jhiuniee Valley, was made in Bryan, in 
1842. The water does not differ materially in 
character from that ordinarily- received from 
the Drift, and owes its Artesian head to some 
peculiarities of tlie distribution of the sand 
beds of the Erie clay, by which they are ena- 
bled to carry the water which ])ermeates them 
from higher to lower levels, while thej^ are pre- 
vented from discharging it through springs bj' 
a continuous covering of impervious clay. The 
flowing wells of Williams County are part of a 
series that occur in a narrow belt of country, 
lying just West of the upper beach. The evenly 
spread Lacustrine clays form, in this case, the 
impervious cover, and the reservoir, by which 
the flow is rendered perennial, is aflbrded by 
the broad, and often deep, sand beds, from 
which the supply is directly obtained. More 
remotely it is doubtless derived from the oxi- 
dized upper portion of the unmodified drift, 
lying East of, and higher than the beaches. 
This is generally permeable, and receiving the 
water from rains, yields it slowly to the sandy 
beds wherever they are connected. 

The wells of Lucas County are of two classes, 
the shallow and the deep. The shallow pierce 
onl}- the Lacustrine deposits, and receive either 
the water that accumulates in the deep sands 
of the oak openings, or that which percolates 
through what sandy beds are interstratitied 
with the Lacustrine day; the deep penetrate 
nearly or quite to the rock. I am not aware 
that any wells draw water from the body of 
the Erie clay. Though it contains frequent 
permeable beds, they are not so connected as 
to permit a free circulation. 

At the base of the Erie clay, and resting on 
the rock i?i situ, there are commonly — not al- 
ways — a few feet, or a few inches, of gravel 
and sand, fVom which water rises freely, sup- 
plying the Artesian and other deep wells. 
Whether the water is confined to this horizon, 
or circulates also through the underlyino- rock, 
is a question of little importance If we say 
that it passes under the clay, along the lime- 
stone ridge, in the West part of the County, 
and follows the rock surface until it finds 
escape upwards, we shall have proposed a 
theory by no means demonstrable, but quite 



adequate to account for the Artesian head in 
Toledo and Oregon. The Artesian water of 
IJichfield rises higher than this supposed source 
and must receive its supply from some point 
further West. The water in the Toledo wells 
formerlj' stood 14 feet above the Lake level ; 
but with increasing use, has gradually fallen 
to seven feet, and the only wells now flowing 
discharge below that height. 

In Julj', 1859, an analj'sis of Blue Cla}' un- 
derlying Toledo was made. It was taken from 
a cut then made in Adams Street, West of 
Michigan Street. Fifteen jjarts of the Clay 
yielded the following result : 

Pa rts 

Protoxide o£ Iron (FeO) 1.25 

Silica (Si05) _._ 2.7'.i 

Carbonate of Calcium (CaO, C0>) O.U 

Water (HO) 1.&? 

,\lumiiia (.\10) 7.90 

Trace of Sulphur and loss _ 1.21 

15.00 

Four parts of Alumina 3 ielded 1.25 parts of 
metallic Aluminum. This analj-sis at the time 
attracted some attention, and more espcciall}' 
by the showing made of Alumina. But it has 
never been considered best to pursue the 
matter further. 

In August, 1859, Mr. Aug. A. Fahnestock, 
Horticulturist, of Toledo, made careful exami- 
nation of the green matter, which previoush-, 
more than at that time, had appeared on the 
surface of the River at that season of the j'ear, 
the result of which was thus stated by that 
gentleman ; 

First, that it is the pollen or fecundating of an 
aquatic plant, the Zi:ani:c Aijuatic:c, or Indian Rice. 
Ttiis plant is always found in low, swampy lands and 
along the borders of Rivers and streams. It attains 
an altitude of from three to nine feet, and begins 
shedding its pollen about the 1st of August and con- 
tinues until late in September. The pollen when 
thrown from the glumes, is of an oval shape, and in 
color light yellow. When submerged it loses its color, 
and commences to vegetate ; and if it does not happen 
to be thrown into shallow water, soon decomposes. 
From the immense quantities of this pollen, many 
would think it impossible to be of vegetable origin ; 
but we have only to examine that borne by the 
Thistle, Poppy and many other common plants, to 
find a parallel. What effect this decaying vegetation 
may have on the health of the City, I am unable to 
.say. It is a question for Chemists and Physicians. 

Since the date above named, the pollen has 
almost wholl}- disappeared from the surface of 
the River. 



CIIArTEU II. 



THE PKE-IllSTOEIC I'EKIuD. 



THE bogiiiiiinijj of the history of the mouth 
and valley of the Mauiiioe River, i.s in- 
volved ill unusual obscurit}'. Tiio first settle- 
ments of the Dutch, and afterward of the 
English, were up tiio Hudson, and slowly 
towards the interior of the State of New York. 
Between these settlements and Ohio was the 
Iroquois Confederacy (Five Nations), the most 
]iowerful of Indian Tribes. They were not in 
the main unfriendly to these settlements ; but 
there was in the earliest times little tempta- 
tion to penetrate beyond, and in later days 
the Iroquois claimed to control Ohio as their 
hunting-ground. 

In 16(19, about a quarter of a century before 
Lake Erie was known, Champlain, at the re- 
quest of the Ottawas, met in battle the Iroquois. 
This was the first introduction of the latter to 
civilization. The lines of the allies opened, 
and the Indians were struck, as seemed to 
them, by " lightning from the gods," with the 
usual "thunder." But the confederated Iro- 
quois in the end conquered the other Indian 
nations, and this brilliant exjiloit of Champlain, 
for nearly a century and a half, prevented the 
settlement of the Ohio. The Iroquois were not 
friendl}', though not alw;iys at war. 

The French way to the AVest, for trade and 
settlement, was North of Lake Erie. In 1(171, 
Lake Superior was quite well represented on 
the maps. As late as 17-14, the French official 
Geographer, in the map furnished for that 
learned work, Charlevoix's " New France," has 
along the South shore of Lake Erie the legend, 
" Toute cette cote n'est presque point comme " 
(All this shore is nearly unknown). The other 
more Southern English Colonics were separated 
from the West by the Alleglianies— often on 
the maps not inaptly called " The Endless 
Mouutains." Gradually from the East and the 
West, adventurei'S, traders and settlements ap- 
proached what is now Ohio; and when Wash- 
ington was a young man, the French and 
English first met in tlie West. The eounti'y of 
the Ohio was the border-land on which they 
met. It had for many years lain between 
(hem. It conti imed thereafter to be the border- 



land, all through the Revolution, and even in 
the war between the United States and (ri'eat 
Britain, known as the War of 1812. Even in 
that war we can tell pretty well what was done 
by the people of New York and of Penn.syl- 
vania, and the sons of Kentucky are reasonably 
prominent in written history. The West in 
British hands was well reported ; but we know 
little of the part of Ohio in that war, except as 
we gaiher its history from the narratives of 
citizens of other States. As was the case of 
the English and Scottish border, and as is the 
case of border-lands generally, the history of 
Ohio is rich in romance and di-amatic interest, 
but precise information is wanting. 

The earliest known man in Europe was the 
Glacial Man — living when most of Europe was 
covered with glaciers, and following up closely 
the retreating ice. A large share of the United 
States was similai-ly covered. The Southern 
limit is easily traced and with close accuracy. 
Even the very farms which that limit crossed, 
can be and have been pointed out. This 
Southern line — the terminal Moraine, as it is 
called — formed a continuous line from the At- 
lantic Ocean to at least the Mississippi River. 
The line entered Ohio on the center line of 
Columbiana Count}*, not far from a lino with 
the centei- of the State, and pursued a zigzag 
course to the Southwest, crossing the present 
valley of the Ohio in Brown County, some dis- 
tance East of Cincinnati ; re-crossing into In- 
diana l)elow Cincinnati, and zigzagging to the 
Mississipjii. The accumulations of the ice are 
found 500 to (iOO feet on each side of the Ohio 
River, at Cincinnati. At that point was a great 
glacial dam. The Ohio must have been a Lake, 
with its water several hundred feet higher than 
at present, with irregular shores — up the pres- 
ent Valleys of the Rivers flowing into the Ohio. 
Alnindant evidences are found in the l^p|)er 
Ohio A'alley of the existence of this Lake. 
Toledo, of course, was far behind the front of 
the belt of ice. 

In New Jersey — in the sd-iated beds ofgravol 
which were deposited by the large streams 
runnino; from the ice — are found thousands of 



[23] 



24 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



relics of tho (Jiaeiiil Man, siibstiuitiallj' identi- 
cal with those of Kui-ope. As these are found 
ill undisturbed strata 20 feet and more from 
tho surface, they must have been deposited at 
the time the gravel was. In short, man lived 
in New Jersey while tiie ice covered the North- 
ern part of the State, lie may havo lived along 
and South of the ice-belt, in the West; and 
may as well have fished in the Ohio Lake and 
in the streams leading to it, as in tho Sea and 
the River which dejiosited the Trenton gravel. 

There have been found in the West a few 
I'elics similar to those of Glacial Man, and sup- 
posed to have been his. The line has only re- 
cently been traced in the W^est, so that more 
precise information is wanting. The Glacial 
Man is not long known to have been American 
as well, but surely living on this Continent 
may have been tho earliest inhabitant of Ohio; 
and, following the retreating ice, have been the 
first denizen of the Maumee Valley. 

The earliest man, however, who left perma- 
nent imprint upon the fiice of the country, was 
the mysterious Mound Builder — so-called, be- 
cause we have no other name for him. No- 
where are his works more numerous or more 
extensive than in Ohio. The Southern Vallej's 
of the State were his thickly populated home. 
These works are far less in number in the 
Northern part of the State, and still less in the 
lower Maumee Valley. That may well then have 
been to him, for some reason, a "borderland." 

The earliest dweller in Ohio may not un- 
lijicly — if he passed over the site of Toledo at 



all — have passed over a Lake. Before the 
Glacial period, Lake Erie was a Eiver. The 
glacial streams from the South emptied their 
waters some 200 feet lower than at present. 
As that is about tho depth of Lake Erie, thei-c 
could then have been no such Lake. The 
Niagara Eiver (to call it by that name% did 
not then flow over the present Falls, but had a 
channel to the North, and at a level not tiir 
from that below the Falls. That channel has 
been partly identified, but the ice which dammed 
the Ohio, dammed the Niagara, as well, and 
high enough so that in the retreat. Lake Erie 
■was higber than at jJresent. The well known 
ridges were Lake beaches, and the Lake has 
not yet, by far, found its ancient k'vel. 

The country of the Maumee difters widely 
from the Moraine in its manner of deposit, and 
may well have been the bottoms of a Lake, 
higher than the present, causing a level deposi- 
tion of matter not so deposited where the ice 
alone had covered the land. Possibly, in the 
earlier daj's of the Mound Builder, it may have 
been covered with water, Niagara River having 
a higher bed than now. Sonic Mounds are found 
not far from Toledo, and on land no higher. 
But the days of the Mound Builder in Ohio were 
ended, and they had disappeared from the State. 
Peace gave way to war, and agriculture to a 
more savage life. There is no reason to sup- 
jjose that the jjcoiile who drove away the Mound 
Builders were any other than those found suc- 
ceeding them and in a desultory way dwelling 
on their lands. 



CHAPTER III. 



THE ABORIGINES OF THE MAUMEE VALLEY. 



WHEN the French made their tir.st ap- 
proach u]) the St. Lawi'cnce, the In- 
iliaiis in or horderinn; on Ohio might have been 
divided into two great lingual divisions— those 
speaking the Algonkin language and those of 
Huron-Iroquois tongues. The Iroquois proper 
were South of the St. Lawrence and in Central 
New Yoi'k. Tiio Hurons, to whom they were 
allied, were to the Northwest of them ; the Neu- 
tral Nation to the West and around the East 
entl of Ijake Erie ; and the Eries or '■ Cats " (so- 



Nations (otten thereafter called the Six Nations). 
The Cherokees wei'o also, it is said, of original 
Iroquois stock. They lived South of tiie Oiiio 
Eiver. It is likely the Huron-Iroquois stock 
and the Algonkin, or both, met and drove oil' 
the Mound Builders. 

The most Southern of the Tribes of these 
stocks West of the Alleghanies were the Chero- 
kees, of the Iroquois; and the Shawnees, of the 
Algonkin stock. Both languages had become 
much corrupted, and thej' may well have rep- 




called) were South of the Lake and upon the resented the advance-guard of these great 

u])per Ohio.* These tribes lay in a compact grations. The languages of the Delawares 

body, surrounded on every side by Algonkins. Miamis — the one East of the Shawnees, and 

In some collision or catastrophe the Tuscacoras other We.st— were more alike than either 

(also of Iroquois tongue) had become separated the Shawnee. 

and were far to the South, to return long after The jiositions of the Indian Tribes in 

they were first known to unite with the Five about Ohio shortly alter the year IGOO, is pn 

' I bly not very inacciiratt'ly reiiresented Ijy 

" The Eries are here spoken of as allied by Ian- vT . 

guage to the Iroquois, as would appear from the early ' ^ ' 

French Relation, although it is not forgotten, that I" ^'"'^ ""H' the Ottawas, Miamis, Illinois 

lately it has been claimed that they were Algonkin. Shawnees were Algonkin. 



inl- 
and 

the 
like 

and 
)ba- 
the 

and 



[25] 



26 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



'I'lu' cai-lii'st in;i|i w liirli uiiilc'|-tii()l< to n'])i'0- 
seiit till' jMisitioiis anil iiaiuos of the Tribes at 
tho Wi'sl ciul of Lako Erii\ was tliat of Nicholas 
Siiiisoii. \\w l!'>yal Fromli Geographer, in liis 
little (|iiarto atlas of America. The map is it- 
self witlioiit (late, but is supposed to have been 
iiKnic alioiit 1(557. Afac simile of that part of 
il whieli covei's and surrounds the lower Mau- 
luee Valley, may be of interest. It is as follows : 



which only appears flowing from Chautauqua 
Lake. Southeast of that branch of the Ohio, 
are the Attionandarons (a Natidn speaking 
a little different language), which may mean 
either the Neuter.s or the Andastes (probaVily the 
latter). South of the West end of Lake Erie are 
the Ontarraronons (meaning "Lake People," 
as Ontario means " beautiful Lake"). The names 
on this map are in the main Huron, and the 




The positions of tlie Tribes and the siniilai'ity terinination, '' ronon," means " Nation," 
of names with those of the earliest Jes\iit liela- tei'minatioiis ■■ nek " and ■■ gonk " are Al 
tions, show that tliegi'ogra])hical date of much of tor the same. 



as tlie 
ironkin 



the map is 1640, about oO years before the Ohio 
or Mississippi was discovered. The Western 
Tribe of the Iroquois are the Sonontonaus 
(Seneeas), and East of the Genesee. The Hurons 
and Petuns occupy the Northern part of the 
I'eniusula North of Lake Erie. The Eriechro- 



The Jesuit Relation of 1648. written among 
the Hurons, says Lake Erie was foi'merly in- 
habited along its South coast by the Gat Nation. 
Avho had been obliged to di-aw well inland to 
avoid their enemies fi-oni the West. The On- 
tarraronons were likely the Algonkins. who had 



nons, or du Chat, are between the Eastern half ]mshed back the Eries (Cat NationV and very 
of Lake Eric and the Ohio, the upper part of likely the •• .Mianu due Lac." who gave name to 



THE ABORIGINES OF THE MAUMEE VALLEY. 



27 



tlio Maiimoe EiviT, at first and loiit;; c'alli'(l upmi 
the maps the ■' Miami due Lae." The Jjuke re- 
ferred ti) iiiaj' have been Sandusky Bay, at- 
tempted tdhe represented nn the niu]i, Imt very 
mueh out of position. 

On tliis map there ajij)ears to he a sUglit at- 
tempt to represent the Maunice. The Sqiien- 
quioronons, at tlie extreme West end of Lake 
Erie, may have been the Nepissing branch of 
the Ottawas, called Squekaneronons.* The 
first supposition is most probably correct, but 
the Indians were so apt to make a descrijjtive 
name, to sound to the whites like a tribal name, 
as to add greatlj- to the labor of studj-. In the 
very map before us, the Skraeronons, living 
East of Sault St. Marie, are simply peojile 
oftheSkiacor Sault. The Assistaeronons, or 
Nation du Ferr, represented as in Western Mich- 
igan, or South of Lake Michigan, were the well- 
known ^rasciiutins. 

The Jesuit TJehition of lG(i2 lias an enumera- 
tion of the bands of Indians in the Michigan 
Peninsula, all Algonkins, all friends of thcHu- 
rons, and all trading with the French, save 
some of the Five Nations and some Puauts far- 
thest to the West. The Outaanek are no doubt 
our olil friends in Northwest Ohio, tlic Ontar- 
raronons. The Outaonsinagouk arc substan- 
tially identical in luxme with the S(picnqui'i'ouon. 
The others are Ivichkagoneiak, Nigouanuich- 
iriiuk and Ouacliaskesouek. The first were 
jn-obably the Nepissings ; the next t(.) the last 
were no doubt the Nick Konek of the Relation 
of 1(348. likely the Couacronons of the map and 
no doubt Ottawas.f The geography of this 
map was not to be long unchanged. In 1655, 
before it was published in Paris, the Eries had 
received their final overthrow at the hands of 
the Iroquois — so complete, indeed, that what 
became of the survivors is not known. The 
Iroquois had before this (in 1640), overconu' 
and driven away from their homes, North of 
Lake Erie, the Hurons and the Ottawas, their 
allies. The Ancient Nation de Pctun (Owen- 
dat), kinsmen of the Hurons, were involved in 
the common ruin, and the Hurons and Pet- 
uus were afterwai'ds known as Wyandots, and 
lived in Northwestern Ohio until 1832. Al- 
though their stock and language were the Hu- 
ron, the Iroquois and the Ottawas were Algon- 
kin ; the common alliances, defeats and i-uin 

*Said l)y Sagard, in 11)24, to be tlieir proper name ; 
or the name may refer to tlie Lake " Skekonau." 
t Early Indian Migration in Ohio. Page 90. 



made them close comjianions, and the intimacy 
continued to the last. 

But this migration was not direct. The 
Petuns, with some Hurons, removed to Wis- 
consin. They were driven back to Lake Supe- 
rior T)y the Dacotahs, and about 1680 removed 
to the neighborhood of Detroit. In 1706 their 
war ]iarties reached the CUierokees, C'hoctaws 
ami Shawnees by way of Sandusky, the Scioto 
and the Ohio. In 1732 they claimed all Ohio 
as their hunting-ground, and warned the Shaw- 
nees to ])lant their Villages South of the Ohio. 
They gradually centered at Sandusky and the 
West end of Lake Erie, before the Revolution. 
The Ottawas, after the overthrow, fled to the 
mouth of Green Bay and beyond the Missis- 
sippi.- Driven back, as were the AVvandots, 
they were, after 1672, their inse])arable com- 
panions. In 1709 they were at war with the 
Miamis. In 1 747 the Wyandots, already estab- 
lished at Sanduskj-, persuaded a portion of 
them to settle on Lake Eric, on the lower Mau- 
mee, promising trade with the English.* 

The Indians of the neighborhood of the Mau- 
mee were not alone in claiming dominion in 
Ohio. The same Iroipiois who had driven them 
from the North of Lake Erie, and wlio had 
destj'oycd the Eries, claimed its tei-ritory as 
their best hunting-ground. They occui)icd a 
considerable part of Ohio at will, and the por- 
tion of Northern Ohio East of Sandusky, seems 
to have continued, even after the Revolution, 
a partly neutral ground, permanently occupied 
by no tribe, and no doubt the seat of many 
small contests. In 1685 they warred with the 
Illinois and Miamis, and the war was partly 
carried on across Ohio. The English persuaded 
the Iroquois to j^eace with the Western tribes, 
wishing under the friendshiji of that Nation to 
advance their own trade. The English claimed 
the country of the Ohio as against the French, 
under a deed gotten from the Iroquois in 1684, 
which, however, conveyed the land to be de- 
fended by the English to and for the use of the 
Indians. To use legal language, the Indians 
were " eertui qui trusts," and were to have the 
subsequent useof llie lands. t After 1696. from 
time to time. Iroquois, chiefiy Senccas. settled 
in Northeastern Ohio. In 1817 and 1818 the 
United States granteil the Seneca Eeservation, 
(now in Seneca County), on which these Indians 
lived until 1831. 

* 10 Xew England Colonial Documents, p. 162. 
t Wars of Iroquois, p. 27. 



CHAPTER IV. 



GAME. — THE AGUK IN POETRY AND ELSEWHERE. PUT-IN-BAY ISLANDS. THE WOKD " MAUMEE.' 



MAUCn ].-), lS(iO, Judo;c E. D. : 
livorod an aiKli-css before tlu 



Potter de- 
10 Maumoo 

\'all<'3- Shooting Association, Toledo, which 
was devoted niainlj- to the subject of " Game 
in the Maumee Valley." It was a very inter- 
esting and valuable paper. 

By way of introduction, Judge Potter said, that 
when he ranie liere, in 1835, the entire region, North 
of a line drawn from the liead of Lake Erie to the 
Pacific Ocean, was one unbroken hunting ground, 
tlie settlements in the intervening .States interfering 
very slightly with the game. This region then con- 
tained a greater variety and greater abundance of 
valuable game than ever did any other section of the 
globe in the same latitude, foremost of which were 
the BufTalo, the Grizzly Bear, the Caribou, the Elk 
and the Stag. In this Valley were the Red Deer, 
Bears, Wolves, Panthers, Lynx, Wild Cats, Foxes 
and Turkeys, with an almost infinite variety of small 
game. In 183.5 Deer were probably more plentiful 
here than elsewhere on the continent, and engaged 
almost exclu.sively the attention of the sportsman. 
The Red Deer (the only kind here) gets its growth at 
five years — the Stag and the Hind, popularly known 
as Buck and Doe. The terms Buck and Doe are ap- 
plied to the Fallow Deer, a different kind, with large 
flattened horns like a hand, and are smaller than 
ours. The Doe, at one year old, brings forth in May 
or June one Fawn ; at two years and after, two Fawns, 
going seven months with young. The Deerrelies for 
safety upon his .sense of smell, and no gunner must 
expect to get within gunshot of him, except from 
the leeward. Thus located, the hunter will soon, 
though in open sight, find him coming within 
a few yards of him, utterly unconscious of dan- 
ger. Judge Potter stated that he had kdled Deer 
in every Ward of the present City of Toledo. An Oak 
ridge near the High School building was a favorite 
resort for them ; there were many in Stickney's 
Woods, in the First Ward ; also on the " Nose," where 
the Oliver House now stands, iu the Fifth Ward. 
Where the residence of V. H. Ketcham stands, in the 
Seventh Ward, was a runway for them. He never 
heard that there were Elk in this Valley ; but in the 
region of Cleveland, at an early day, they were nu- 
merous. 

Next to the Deer, the Turkey was important as 
game. They grew to be very large, often weighing 
when drawn, 30 pounds. In habit they much resem- 
bled the domestic bird, laying from 13 to 15 eggs, and 
generally hatching a full brood. To get within range 
of the Turkey, the sportsman must keep out of its 
sight. An expert hunter, by shooting into the flock 



or sending in his dog to scatter them, may, with his 
" call," get them witliin range and shoot the flock. 
This " call " consists of a quill or a wing-bone of the 
Turkey, and the expert may so imitate the bird's 
voice as to entice them to his very presence, if he be 
perfectly hidden from sight. Ihey were often caught 
in great numbers by Ijuilding a tight-covered pen of 
rails or poles; digging a trench leading under one 
side of it, and then scattering corn iu the trench, 
which they pick up, and following the bait thus 
jdaced soon find themselves imprisoned, and not 
having sense enough to look down, but onlj- up, are 
made secure. 

The Wolf is a cowardly rascal. Like some men, 
he wants to know who his backers are, before he goes 
into a fight. At an early daj', a bounty was paid for 
Wolf scalps, ranging from $8.00 to $25.00. He knew 
two trappers, one of whom was then living, w'ho 
would get from 10 to 15 scalps apiece during the sea- 
son, all being males, for they never killed females, 
for that would injure tlieir next year's harvest of 
scalps. They were sometimes caught in steel-traps, 
and sometimes in dead-falls; an<l in the former case, 
when secured, are meek as Lambs, and handled 
with impunity. The trapper is thus enabled to re- 
lease the female and kill the male. The Judge once 
sought information as to the mode of catching the 
Wolf, from an old experienced trapper, a Pennsyl- 
vania Dutchman, who said to him: " Well, Chutch, 
I vas dinking dis ting all ofer, und ich kon only deli 
you dat der Volfs are ketch, brincipally, py main 
art." Seeing his lesson thus suddenly at an end, the 
Judge said, " Mr. K., I thank you a thousand times ;" 
when the old trapper replied, " Never minte, Chutch, 
one dime is a blenty." 

The Bears were very numerous, particularly in 
Wood, Henry, Defiance, Williams, Paulding and Van 
Wert Counties. Their practice of hil)ernating in 
hollow trees throughout the winter, made them little 
more than skin and bones when they came forth in 
the Spring. 

The Red, Black, Silver Grey and Cross Fox, were 
found in this region. They all wereof one family, and 
intermix with each other — the last named by a "cross" 
between the Red and the Black. The furs of the 
Silver Grey and the Black were most highly valued, 
a single skin having been sold as high as iJTo.OO. The 
Woods Grey, a very common species, was readily 
caught by treeing, but his fur was comparatively 
coarse and brittle. A Black Fox was often scented in 
this neighl)orhood, where he was readily found for a 
number of years, and led the hounds in a straight 
line for the Cottonwood Swamp, some 15 miles dis- 
tant ; but in a couple of days would be sure to return. 



[28] 



GAME. 



2!) 



He lost liis life by crossing a road near to where John 
Kaufman, then and 3'et of Toledo, was watching a 
Deer runway, on the IManhattan Road below Tre- 
niaiusville, when Kaufman wounded him with a 
charge of buck-shot, and he never again appeared. 
His remains were soon afterwards found near the 
place where he was shot. Since then very few 
Cross Foxes have been seen in this region, though 
previoush' much the larger proportion were of that 
description. 

Barlgers never were numerous in this section, 
though Judge Potter had occasionally seen them on 
the sand ridges in Washington Township, near the 
Haughton settlement. Being gregarious, they bur- 
rowed in sand- knolls and dry places. They were a 
dirty gray on the back and black on the belly. 
Badger hunting was characterized as " more a bar- 
barous than a civilized recreation." The hunter 
creeps stealthily to the burrow at night, and inserts 
a bag in the hole, with a puckering string at the open 
end made fast to a stake in the ground. The dogs 
are then turned loose, the field scoured, and the 
Badgers fly to their home only to be bagged. They 
are taken one at a time and removed from the bag 
and despatched by dogs trained for such conflicts, the 
Badger often making a heroic fight, terribly wound- 
ing the dogs. 

Panthers were frequently killed on the East side 
of the River, but were not numerous. Once or twice 
Lynx were found, and Wild Cat in great abundance. 
The latter offered good sport for the hunter. The 
Judge had killed as many as three in a day in the 
swale near East Toledo (the Sixth Ward). 

Small game was abundant — Prairie Chicken, Par- 
tridge, Quail, AVoodcock and Snipe. He had seen on 
Summit street near Oak, over .500 Prairie Chickens at 
one time; and tliousan<ls together on the open lands 
within six miles of Toledo. Hundreds of dozens of 
Quail had been sold in the streets of Toledo for a 
shilling (I2I2 cents) per dozen alive, and at 18% cents 
a dozen when dressed, having been caught with traps 
in the neighborhood. Ducks and Geese were plenty 
in the River above the Town, though very few persons 
hunted them or any of the smaller birds. Frenchmen 
from the Bay brought in Ducks and Geese and sold 
them for 30 cents per ilozen. 

The first shot-gun Judge Potter ever saw here be- 
longed to Naaman Goodsell; the next brought here 
were by Dr. H. A. Ackley and Charles M. Dorr. For 
a long time he that used a shot-gun was not regarded 
as much of a hunter. The rifle was the popular 
weapon. But as the Deer and the Turkey became 
scarce, attention was called to the smaller game, for 
which the shot-gun was better adapted, until the 
rifle has pretty much disappeared from among sports- 
men. 

Of the Hunter of pioneer times, Judge Pot- 
ter said : 

He is a pretty jolly, independent sort of an in- 
dividual. His ajjpetite never fails him ; his digestion 
is always good. He sleeps well, whether under the 



open sky or in a wigwam. He has his laws — unwrit- 
ten, but well understood — and more strictly oljserved 
than your City ordinances, with a Police Chief and his 
pos.se to enforce them. The Hunter could hang uj) 
his game in the woods, and it would hang until it 
rotted down ; and nobody — not even a hungry Ottawa 
Indian — would touch it. Attracted to the forest by 
a love for the chase and a passion for adventure, the 
Hunter becomes the pioneer of civilization. The 
forests disappear before him. Sunlight is let into the 
dark corners; the Savage and the wild beast recede 
before him. The waving Corn, the School-House, 
the Seminary and the Church spire, that ri.se up in 
his path, are the monuments of his courage, his per- 
severance and his sacrifices. It is no wonder that 
the Indian Heaven is "the happy hunting-ground," 
for I look back upon my hunting days in the Jlau- 
mee Valley as I may probably be allowed to do in 
the time to come. 

Throughout the earlier years of AVe.stern 
settlement, the forests and waters were so 
abundantly sujjplied with game that the 
thought of its protection from undue destruc- 
tion was not entertained. Hunters roamed and 
killed, as their need or their pleasure might 
suggest. The result was, that the more valua- 
ble species of wild game were graduall}- re- 
duced in quantity, and so rapidly that ere long 
the matter of their preservation from early 
extinction commanded attention both from 
citizens and from the State Legislature. In duo 
time laws were passed for tbe protection of 
game and fish, which, duly enforced, gave 
promise of valuable results. But these were 
so largely at variance with all previous usage, 
that no little repugnance, and even defiance, 
were shown by those who looked upon game 
as upon the air they breathed, as the natural 
right of a]l who might seek it. This was 
specially true in the cases of the owners of the 
lands and waters where game and fish were 
found. To say that an owner should not, at 
his will, trap or shoot the animals or birds 
grown upon his lands, was an innovation quite 
revolting to his views of right. Hence, the 
policy of legal protection to game and fish, was 
strongly opposed in nearly all localities where 
it was applicable, and it was found necessarj' 
in that, as in manj' other cases of poj^ular dis- 
favor to law, to give the enactment the or- 
ganized support of its friends. And here, 
again, was met a source of weakness, in the 
fact that such support came largely from non- 
residents, and, worse still, from residents of 
Cities and Towns, to whom, with more effect 
than justice, could bo attributed the motive of 



30 



mSTOHY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



the En.f^lish land-owners, in Jenyino- to the 
common people their natural right to game, in 
order that others might monopolize it. But the 
laws referred to, while not meeting whollj' the 
end sought, were valuable in materially check- 
ing the rapid destruction of game. 

The most prominent organization in this 
region, if not in the State, for the support of 
the game laws, was the Mauniee Valley Shoot- 
ing Association. It was organized October 
28, 1867. Its avowed principal objects were 
to secure the enactment and enforcement of 
pi'oper laws for the protection and preserva- 
tion of fi.sh and game in this section, and to 
promote acquaintance and .social intercourse 
among resident sportsmen. From December, 
ISCT, until July, 1869, the Association occupied 
rooms in the Chamber of Commerce (corner of 
Madi.son and Summit streets). Thence it went 
to more commodious quarters in the Drum- 
mond Block (corner of Madison and St. Clair 
streets). For nine years the organization 
maintained a vigorous activity and accom- 
]ilished much in inspiring respect for the game 
laws of the State; enforcing their general ob- 
.servance, and creating a pulilic sentiment in 
fivvor of the objects which led to its organiza- 
tion. It also made an extensive and valuable 
ornithological collection, embracing specimens 
of nearly or quite all the upland game-birds 
and water-fowls known to this localit}*. That 
collection was destroyed by fire at the burning 
of the Hall Block, in December, 1880, incurring 
a loss not only great, but from the nature of 
the case, irreparable. 

The principal officers of the Mauniec Valley 
Shooting Association from October, 1867, to 
1876, were as follows: To January, 1868 — 
President, Eobert Cummings; Secretary, Zeb- 
ulon C. Pheatt; Treasurer, Dr. C. H. Harroun. 
For 1868— D. C. Baldwin, President; Z. C. 
Pheatt, Secretary; C. H. Harroun, Treasui-er. 
1869-70— Chas. O. Brigham, President; Z. C. 
Pheatt, Secretary; E. E. Skinner, Treasurer. 
1871— W. B. Wiltbank, President; Theo. 
Klemm, Secretary; William Schansenbacli, 
Treasurer. 1872-76— Z. 0. Pheatt, President; 
Theo. Klemm, Secretary; William Schansen- 
bach. Treasurer. 

Under date of July 17, 1815, Alex. C. 
Lanier, who had been a soldier in General 
Harrison's army at Fort Meigs, furnished 
the Ohio Republican (Cincinnati), a letter in 



regard to the fish supply in the Maumee Eiver, 
and suggested " a plan for siipplying the State 
of Ohio with salted fish." His plan was sub- 
stantially this : To establish a companj' at 
Cleveland, with a capital of 840,000 ; build 
vessels suitable for Lake service of 70 tons, 
which should be employed in transporting salt 
from the port nearest to Onondaga, N. Y., to 
the different fisheries on the Maumee, as far up 
as the Eapids of the St. Mary's. He would have 
four seines of 100 fathoms each in length, to be 
employed from the breaking up of the ice to 
close of the season. The fish, when cured, to 
be taken by the vessels to the different Lake 
ports, and thence distributed. The fish season 
over, he would employ the fishermen inbuilding 
traps up the Maumee, Auglaize, St. Mary's and 
St. Jose])h Elvers, whence the fish thus caught 
would be taken in keels and pirogues up the 
St. Mary's and Auglaize, wagoned acro.ss to 
Loramie's, and conveyed down the Miami Eiver 
to supply the Western portion of the State. 

Mr. Lanier stated that he had known of 27 
bari'els of fish being taken by one traji in a 
single night above Fort Winchester, on the 
Auglaize. He said : " Nature has destined the 
waters of this Lake to supply this country 
with fish," and asked: "Will the people of 
Ohio be so neglectful of their own interests, as 
to let this valuable branch of business be 
neglected (or fall into the hands of the British), 
and still continue to import the few fish we 
now nse from the Eastern States?" A writer, 
under date of Chillicothe, Ohio, June 9, 1813, 
says, "the quantity offish taken at Fort Meigs 
was most surjirising. Some days there were 
not less than 1,000 to 1,500 of an excellent kind 
taken with the hook, within 300 j-ards of the 
Fort." The writer said : " No one can visit 
this spot and not be charmed by its appearance 
and the advantages of its situation." 

A severe storm of wind occurred about the 
1st of November, 1873, causing severe injury 
to the fishing interests, chiefij' about Sandusky. 
Following the storm the catch of fish was ex- 
traordinary. One firm brought to Toledo 44,000 
]iound8, chiefly white fish, taken from their 
nets at a single haul. In .some cases the fish- 
ermen were unable to remove the fish as fast as 
they got into the nets. 

In March, 1858, Eobert C. Navarre, then 
fishing at Cedar Point, Maumee Bay, after 3 
o'clock V. jf. made three hauls with an SO-roil 



THE AGUE IN POETRY AND ELSEWHERE. 



31 



seine, taking at the first haul, 50 baskets, at 
the second, 42 baskets, and at the third, 22 
baskets, making 114 baskets of extra size. 
The weight of fish was 250 pounds to the 
basket, thus making the total weight 28,500 
pounds, or over 14 tons. The fish were 
mostly pickerel. It was said to be thegreatest 
success ever had in the Bay. The value of the 
fish, read J' for the market, was $950. 

So abundant were fish in the Maumee River 
in earlj' daj's, that great quantities were caught 
by spearing with pitchforks and by means of 
baskets and bed blankets. It is repoi-ted that 
Major Stickney constructed a rude sort of a 
diving-bell, into which he put one of his sons 
(possibly Two), and plunged it overboard in 
the River, the boy catching the fish as they 
swam by, and passing them up to his father,' 
who sat quietly smoking his pipe in a canoe 
overhead. But this story lacks somewhat in 
the verification of absolute history. 

While the Maumee \alley has always been 
reserved in its claims to eminence in the way 
of poetry, there has been for over 50 years in- 
timately associated with the locality at least one 
production. It was first definitely I'ecognized as 
genuine, and as the work of " a genius of the 
Cat- Fish tribe," by the Maumee City Express, 
June 24, 1837, although then already familiar 
to the country. It is as follows : 

On Maumee, on Maumee, * 

Potatoes they grow small ; 
They roast them in the fire, 

And eat them — tops and all. 

There's Bass and Mullet, too ; 

They run from Spring till Fall ; 
They take them by the tail. 

And down them — scales and all. 

There's 'Possum, Coon and Fox, 

So poor they scarce can crawl ; 
They catcli them in a trap, 

And eat them — fur and all. 

There's Crows upon the bank. 

So lean they never sijuall ; 
They shoot them through the eye. 

And take them — down and all. 

The soil is rich and black ; 

The Corn it grows quite tall ; 
They take it from the field, 

And eat it — cobs and all. 

On New Year's holiday 

The chaps they have a ball ; 
'Tis whiskey in a gourd ; 

They drink it — gourd and all. 



The Girls are plump and fair ; 

The Babes know how to bawl ; 
The Boys they always court 

The Girl, Mam, Dad and all. 

On Maumee, on Maumee, 

'Tis Ague in the Fall ; 
The fit will sliake them so, 

It rocks the house and all. 

There's a funeral every day, 

Without a hearse or pall ; 
They luck them in the ground. 

With breeches, coat and all. 

This certainlj' shows something of' poetical 
license." Old settlers, sensitive about such 
matters, may think it has more lie than sense. 
And even these have seen the time when they 
could have better endured the " poetry-," had 
there been in it less of " truth." The present 
generation of dwellers on "the Maumee," in 
view of the exceptionally good health of the 
region, feel no sensitiveness over the old-time 
reports in that respect, whether set forth in 
prose or in rhyme. They can even endure the 
"old, old story" of the traveler, who, tbllow- 
ing directions to take " the main traveled 
road," soon brought up in a grave-yard. 

In this connection, may be pertinent an ar- 
ticle from the Express of November 24, 1838, 
in which the then not rare subject, " The 
Ague, ' is philosophically treated. It was 
written by the Editor, Mr. Henry Reed, Jr., 
now of California, after the issue of two or 
three editions of his papier on what were called 
" half-sheets," or sheets half the regular size. 
In one of these issues he stated that every body 
about the office was sick — "both seniors and 
juniors — every person, except the Devil !" The 
editor .said : " As there is a striking affinity be- 
tween poverty and pickled salmon, so there no 
doubt exists a near relationship between the 
fever and ague and profane asseveration ; and 
if the Recording Angel has not on hand a 
fountain of tears more plentiful than the wash- 
pots of Edom, he has doubtless but a sorry 
time of it in the exijenditure of elbow grease 
and blotting paper, to keep his accounts with 
this country posted up between the 1st of Au- 
gust and the last of September. Be that as it 
may, let a man try it, and if his pious matter 
does not become hard granite, his crystalline 
humors get out of all good humor, and the 
milk of his human kindness turn to rank 
' Bonny-Clabber ' in his bosom, he may con- 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



gratiilato liimsolf on possessing more of the 
si)iril of the niurtyrs, than any man wc wot of 
between the great Lakes and the Pacific Ocean. 
Wo know wo shall disoblige a young friend of 
ours, by stealing Ins doggerel; but as it ex- 
presses what almost everybody feels ou such 
occasions, we shall run the risk. The language 
lias a savor of technologj", but we hope no one 
will from thence infer the author : 

" I know it's not right to swear and curse, 
For it puts no money in tlic jiursc ; 
Besi<U's, it onlj- makes one worse, 
To curse and to swear. 

" But when a-body's shivering and shaking, 
Os ikntes chattering, os humani aching, 
The spinal pillar twisting and breaking, 
■\Vho can forbear?" 

The group of Islands lying at the Western 
end of Lake Erie, and known as Put-in-Bay 
Islands, although having been partially occu- 
pied by a few squatters for many years, never 
attracted much attention from persons seeking 
permanent settlement until after the year 1854. 
At that time Mr. J. DeRivera, a Spaniard, and 
a merchant in New York, having become 
acquainted with that vicinity and favorably 
impressed by its natural attractions, purchased 
five entire Islands — South Bass (Put-in-Bay), 
Middle Bass, Ballast, Sugar and Gibraltar — 
the whole containing 2,50U acres of land. The 
circumstances of his purchase, as stated by 
himself in 1886, were as follows: 

I was a poor lad, born in Spain in 1813. At the 
age of 13 I came to America, and in time was engaged 
as tlie representative of a New York house which 
took me much abroad. I did well, and in time went 
into business for myself. Fortune was with me, and 
I accumulated wealth in the foreign commission 
trade. Withal, 1 had a taste for agricultural pursuits 
on a large scale. In 1854 I made a tour of the South- 
ern States with the view of opening up a jjlantation 
manned with Spaniards. I found a suitable location, 
but was told a plantation cultivated by whites (in the 
days of slavery) would never do, and so desisted. I 
came North and heard of the beauty of the Islands 
of Lake Erie, and resolved to visit them. A San- 
dusky boat was engaged for the trip, and three un- 
successful attempts were made to reach the Islands. 
I then went to the harbor near where now is Lake- 
side. A lone fisherman and his boat were chartered 
and the voyage was made in the night. This was 32 
years ago. The old Mansion house was the only 
structure on the Island, and to this I made my way. 
Next morning I was up with the sun, and walked 
aliout the Island and down on the beach. It was a 
case of love at first sight, and in forty-eight hours 



after I first set foot on Put-in-Bay, I owned the five 
Islands at a cost of $44,000. From that time on I have 
circulated much between New York and my Island 
home, generally summering here. I first turned 
Put-in-Bay into a sheep ranch, at one time having a 
herd of about 2,000. Gradually I disposed of these 
and converted the Island into a fruit farm. As other 
people turned their attention this way, I disposed of 
my interests until I have only 300 acres left. Jay 
Cooke paid me §3,000 for Gibraltar, where his castle 
now stands. Fifteen years ago I retired from busi- 
ness, a millionaire. The estate consisted of slate 
works in Vermont, a West India sugar plantation, a 
large property in Kentucky and other interests. 
Four yeai's ago I came to Put-in-Bay to live perma- 
nently, where my family visit me in the summer. It 
is here I expect to pass quietly the rest of my life, 
and it was here the news came of my financial ruin. 

The financial embarrassment referred to by 
Mr. Eivera, was caused by obligations assumed 
in aid of a son, a Sugar Merchant in New York, 
who failed in 1886, for a large sum of money. 
The development and improvement of these 
Islands, without doubt, were materially pro- 
moted by Mr. Rivera's purchase, followed, as 
that soon was, by successful tests of the soil 
and climate for grape production, as well as 
for health and pleasure. 

In a letter published in the Toledo Blade of 
July 17, 1846, Maj. B. F. Stickney, by request 
of Elisha Whittlesey, made the following ex- 
planation of the origin of the name " Maumee," 
as given to the stream now bearing it : 

" At an unknown, but very remote period, the 
Wyandot Indians were acknowledged to have the 
most power and wisdom of any of the Eastern part 
of the Continent — occupying all the country North 
of the Niagara River and Lakes Ontario and Erie — 
having an absolute Monarchical Government, with its 
seat where Montreal now is. The title of the Jlon- 
arch, in their language, was Sans-taw-rit-sa. He ex- 
ercised p general superintending control East of tlie 
Mississippi, and probably farther West. The Wyan- 
dots acknowledged no superior, on the Continent, 
except the Mexicans ; and communication was kept 
up between Sans-taw-rit-sa and Montezuma. The 
traditions of all tribes of the Eastern part of the Con- 
tinent show that they all came from the West. The 
tribe we now call Miamis, came sulisequent to the 
Wyandots. The King of the Wyandots, for some 
cause, sent a deputation from Montreal as far West 
as where Fort Wayne now is. There, for the first 
time, they saw some persons of this tribe, and they 
were very old or ancient people, Mi-a-mi. The name 
they use for themselves is Tweet-twee. The French 
took the name from the Wyandots and gave it their 
authority. In English the sound would be Mee-a- 
mee — the Frencli sounding ( as wo do ce. ; and o as 
we do in father. We took the orthograi>liy from the 



THE WORD "MAUMEE." 



33 



French, and they called this River Mi-a-mi, because 
they found people here whom they called Miamis. 
They found some of the same on the two Rivers dis- 
charging into the Ohio, and called by the same name. 
To distinguish between them, they said ' The Miami of 
Lake Erie,' and the ' Big ' and the ' Little Miami of the 
Ohio.' During the extensive military operations on 
this River in the War of 1812, much use was made of 
the name by persons who did not understand French, 
and took the French sound of Mi-a-rai to be Maumee; 
and when the City of Maumee was named, this cor- 
ruption was confirmed. 

" The Miamis showed me a treaty on parchment, 
which they negotiated with William Penn at Phila- 
delphia. They said this was their first treaty with 
white people. It had a blue ribbon attached to the 
seal. In addition, there was a pressed dried heart 
attached to the ribbon. The end of the ribbon ap- 
peared to have been inserted into the heart in its un- 
dried state, and then dried and pressed. They told 
me this was the heart of the Indian who was the first 
signer, and who held it in his possession until his 
death." 

An unsuccessful attempt was once made to 
change the names " Maumee Eiver " and " Mau- 
mee Valley," to " Grand Rapids Eiver " and 
"Grand Eapids Yalley." For this purpose, a 
number of persons met iu Toledo November 7, 
1855, and after setting forth by preamble that 



" the early associations of the Eiver, aided bj' 
a poet's wit, had given tliese an unjust and un- 
favorable reputation,'" it was " resolved, that 
the Maumee River and the Maumee Bay be 
hereafter known as the Grand Eapids Eiver 
and the Grand Rapids Bay," antl the local press 
of " Grand Eapids Valley " was retjuested to 
publish such action. The Chairman of this 
meeting was S. J. Kuder, and the Secretary 
W. M. Scott. No further mention is found of 
efforts in that direction, the public sentiment 
not approving the proposed change. The only 
step taken of that sort was the substitution of 
Grand Rapids for the name of Gilead, on the 
Eiver in "Wood County. Not long after the 
above named meeting, the nlatter of sub- 
stituting the name "Miami" for "Maumee," 
was discussed with much favor, but nothing 
was accomplished. Still later, the people of 
Maumee City— for a reason substantially the 
same as given in the case of the Eiver, Valley 
and Bay — had the name of their Town changed 
to South Toledo, a change which never com- 
mended itself to the general approval of the 
people of that place, or to the judgment of the 
public. 



I 



PART III 



MILITARY. 



II 



CHAPTER I. 



INDIAN TROUBLES FOLLOWING THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR. — INDIAN STATESMANSHIP. FAILURE 

OF NEGOTIATIONS. — GENERAL WAYNe's MILITARY MOVEMENTS. TREATY OF GREENVILLE. 

RESTORATION OF PEACE. DEATH OF WAYNE. CAPTAIN WILLIAM WELLS. 



THE continued unsettled condition of the 
entire Nortliwestern country, largely 
agiiravated by the failures of the campaigns of 
Ilarmar and St. Clair, and other coincident 
hostile movements against the Indians, imposed 
upon the (lovernment imperative necessity for 
jjrompt and more vigorous measui*es in behalf 
of enforced peace. Recognizing such emer- 
gency, President Washington, in April, 1792, 
nominated General Aiithony Wayne for Major- 
Gcneral of the Ai-mj-, with special reference to 
ojierating against the Indians of the North- 
west. Such a])pointment was accepted by 
General Wayne, u]>on the expressed condition 
that he should not, as in the cases of Generals 
Harmai' and St. Clair, bo re(|uircd to advance 
into the wilderness before his army was 
])ro]icrly constituted and drilled ; and with the 
I'lirlher condition, that adequate provision of 
material be supplied before a movement. He 
was specially led to such requirements by the 
knowledge that two of his Revolutionary com- 
])alriots had sutfered failure, and one of them 
((Jeneral St. Clair) serious defeat, from un- 
timely advance upon the enemy. The fol- 
lowing spring (of IT'.Kt), preliminar3' to an ad- 
vance by General Wayne, a Board of Commis- 
sioners (Benjamin Lincoln, Beverly Randolph 
and Timothy Pickering) was appointed by the 
President, with authority to negotiate a treaty 
of peace and boundaries with the several tribes 
of Indians in the Northwest. Much confidence 
was felt in the success of this measure, on 
which would depend the necessity of a military 
can)])aign for the enforcement of peace. In 
April, 1793, the Commissioners received their 
instructions, which included the securing of a 
confirmation of the treaty of Fort Harmar 
(17S'J), and more particularly that part of the 
same which fixed the boundaries and ceded to 
tlu^ Government the lands lying East, South 
and West of a line drawn up the Cuyahoga 
River, from its mouth to the ])ortage of the 
Tuscarawas branch of the Muskingum ; thence 
down that branch to the forks ; thence West to 



the portage of the Big Miami, called the Lor- 
amies; thence along that portage to the 
Miami (sometimes called Ome or Maumee), 
and down the same to its mouth ; thence along 
the Southern shore of Lake Erie to the be- 
ginning at the mouth of the Cuyahoga. In 
consideration of such concessions, the Commis- 
sioners were instructed to offer the Indians the 
guarantee by the United States of the right of 
soil to all remaining lands in that quarter, and 
the relinquishment of places granted in the 
former treaty for trading posts ; and also the 
abandonment of any military posts existing 
within the boundaries named in the treaty. 
To this, they were to offer payment of $50,000 
in hand, and a permanent annuity of $10,000. 
The Commissioners proceeded to Niagara, 
where they were received by Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor Simcoe, of Canada, whose hospitalities 
they accepted. May 30th they advised Colonel 
McKee, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, of 
their mission and their purpose to hold a treaty 
at Sandusky, requesting him to inform the' 
Indians that they would meet them the latter 
part of June following. General Chapin, Su- 
perintendent of the Six Nations, was invited 
to attend the treaty, with compensation. June 
7th they addressed Governor Simcoe, sug- 
gesting the delicacy and importance of their 
mission, soliciting his co-operation in removing 
the prejudices then existing with the Indians 
toward the United States, and suggesting the 
appointment of British ofliccrs, to accompany 
them to Sandusky. To all this the Governor 
acceded. They were detained for some days 
by adverse winds. Meantime Colonel Butler, a 
British Superintendent of Indian Affairs, and 
Captain Brandt arrived, with some 50 Indians, 
a delegation from the Nations assembled at the 
Rapids of the Maumee, to confer with the 
United States Commissioners in the presence 
of Governor Simcoe, in regard to the proposed 
meeting of the Indians at the Rapids with the 
Commissioners, for holding a treaty. The 
matter was freely discussed, pro and con., but 



[o7] 



38 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



witlioul roufhinj; an agreement for a joint 
. iiiui'liiig. The Iiidian.s made it a condition 
j)reeo(k'nl to iindertakin.tr: a treaty, that the 
Ohio River should be the boundary between 
their hinds aud those of the Whites. This 
liroposition was signed by Chiefs of the 
Wyandots, Dehiwares, iShawnecs, Miamis, 
Mingocs, Pottawatomies, Ottawas, Conuoys, 
Clii|>iiewas and Alunsees. 

JJeplj-ing to sucii 2:)roposition, the Commis- 
sioners said : 

We do know very well, that at the treat}' of Fort 
.Stanwix, 25 yi'ars ago, the Kivcr Ohio was agreed on 
as tlie boundary line ; and we also know, tliat seven 
yeare after that boundary was fixed, a quarrel broke 
out between your father, the King of Great Britain, 
and the ])eoi)le of the Colonies, which are now the 
United States. The quarrel was ended by the treaty 
of i)eaoe made with the King about 10 years ago, by 
wliifh the great Lakes and the waters which unite 
them, was declared by him to be the boundaries of 
the United States. 

The Commissioners then refer in detail to 
the several ti'eaties with tribes held subsequent 
to the close of the Revolution, and in support 
of tlie claim to a division of the lands North of 
the Ohio, cite the White settlements already 
made within such territory, which could not 
be abandoned. The Indians were inflexible in 
their condition of boundary', when the Com- 
jni.ssioners declared the negotiations ended, 
saying : " We sincerely regret that peace is not 
the result; but knowing the upright and liberal 
views of the United States, which, so far as 
you gave us opportunity, we have explained to 
you, we trust that impartial judges will not 
attribute the continuance of the war to them." 
This was done at Captain Elliott's, at the 
mouth of the Detroit Eiver, August 16, 1793. 

In this connection may properh- be given a 
specimen of the acumen and true statesman- 
ship which marked the discussion of the rude 
denizens of the forest. For such purpose is 
reproduced a portion of the final answer of the 
Indian Council at the Rapids of the Maumeeto 
the communication of the Commissioners in 
which they declared the negotiations closed. 
Referring to the offer of money consideration 
by the Commissioners, the Council said : 

Money to us is of no value, and to must of us 
unknown. And, as no consideration whatever can 
induce us to sell tlie lands on which we get sustenance 
for our women and children, we hope we may be 
allowed to point out a mode by whicli your settlers 



may be very easily removed, ami peace thereliy ob- 
tained. We know [as the Commissioners bad stated] 
that these settlers are poor, or they would never 
liave ventured to live in a country which has been 
in continual trouble ever since they crossed the Ohio. 
Divide, therefore, tliis large sum of money which you 
have offered us among these people. Give to each, 
also, a portion of what you say you would give to us 
annually, over and above this very large sum of 
money ; and, as we are persuaded, they would most 
readily accept it in lieu of the land you sold them. 
If }'ou add, also, the great sum of money you must 
expend in raising and paying armies, with a view to 
force us to yield to you our country, you will cer- 
tainly have more than sufKcient for the purpose of 
repaying these settlers for all their labor and their 
improvements. You have talked to us about con- 
cessions. It appears strange that you should expect 
any from us, who have only been defending our 
i-ights against your invasions. We want peace. Re- 
store to us our country, and we shall be enemies no 
longer. You make one concession to us by offering 
us your money ; and another, by having agreed to do 
us justice, after having long and injuriously withheld 
it — we mean, in the acknowledgment you now 
make, that the King of England never did, and never 
had a right to give you our country, by the treaty of 
peace. And you want to make this act of justice a 
part of your concessions; and you seem to expect 
that because you have at last acknowledged our inde- 
Ijendence, we should for such favor surrender to you 
our country. You liave talked, also, a great deal 
about pre-emption, and your exclu.sive right to pur- 
chase Indian lands, as ceded to you by the King at 
the treaty of peace. We never made any agreement 
with this King, nor with any other nation, that we 
would give to either the exclusive right of purchasing 
our lands ; and we declare to you that we consider 
ourselves free to make any bargain or cession of lands 
whenever or to whomsoever we please. If the White 
people, as you say, made a treaty that none of them 
but the King should purchase of us, and that he had 
given that right to the United States, it is an affair 
that concerns you and him, and not us. We have 
never parted with such power. * « * » We jg. 
sire you to consider that our only demand is the 
peaceable possession of a small part of our once great 
country. Look back and review the lands from 
whence we have been driven to this spot. We can 
retreat no further, because the country behind hardly 
atibrds food for its inhabitants; and we have, there- 
fore, to leave our bones in this small place to which 
we are now confined. We shall be persuaded that 
you mean to do us justice when you agree that the 
Ohio shall remain the boundary line between us. 
If you will not consent thereto, our meeting would 
be altogether unnecessary. This is the great point 
which we hoped woulil have been explained before 
you left your homes, as our message, last Fall, was 
principally directed to obtain that information. 

Done at the foot of the Maumee Kapids, the loth 
dav of August, IT'Jo. 



FAILURE OF NEGOTIATIONS. 



:!9 



Tlii.s cloi'i.sivo message was signed by all 
ti'ibes represented in Couneil at that place, 
viz.: The Wyandots, Delawares, Shawnees, 
Mianiis, Mingoes, Pottawatomies, Ottawas, 
Connoys, Cliijijiewas and Munsees. 

Thus closed the ettbrts of the Government to 
negotiate for an adjustment of existing troubles, 
without the arbitrament of arms. Considering 
the matter at this distant period, free from the 
conditions involved, it is difficult to see how the 
ease of the Indians could have been more 
clearlj' or more fbrcil)ly put. It has been truly 
said of the matter, that " among the rude states- 
men of the Wilderness, there was exhil)ited 
here as pure ])atriotism and as lofty devotion 
to the good of their race us ever won applause 
among civilized men. The White men, ever 
since they came into the country, had been en- 
croaching upon tlieii' hinds. They hud long 
before occupied all the regions bej'ond the 
mountains. They had crushed the Confed- 
eracy which the far-sighted Poutiac had formed 
to f)rotect his race 30 years before. They hud 
taken possession of the common hunting 
grounds of all the tribes, on the faith of 
treaties they did not acknowledge. They 
were now laying out settlements and building 
Forts in the very heart of the country to which 
all the tribes had been driven, and which was 
now all they could call their own. And now 
they asked that it should be guaranteed to 
them that the boundary which they had so 
long asked for should be drawn, and a final 
end made of the continual aggressions of the 
Whites; or. if not, they solemnly determined 
to stake their all, against fearful odds, in de- 
fense of their homes, their country, and the 
inheritance of their children. Nothing could 
be more j)atriotic than the position they occu- 
pied, and nothing could be moi'e noble than 
the declarations of this great Council."* 

While, however, the world must ever accept 
and admire the lofty patriotism and heroic de- 
votion thus shown by these untrained states- 
men of the forest, and question the course of 
aggression to which they were made subject, 
the fact remains of the im])ractical)ility of the 
policy of defiance to which their logic led tln'm. 
It was not — unfortunately for them — un issue 
for decision by rea.sou or by discussion ; but a 
case of peace or war, in which superioi-ity in 

*" Annals of the West," J. D. Albach, lS.i6, pp. 
631-G32. 



arms, not in fact und urgument, was to determine 
the result. But there was with the Indians a 
most imjjortant — jierhaps a controlling — consid- 
eration, outside that of the justice of their cause, 
to wit: The assurance of British, and even the 
hope of Sjianish, intervention, should the case 
come to arms. The proof of this was found in 
admissions by the Indians, and speeches and 
messages of British and Spanisli emissaries 
active in encouraging the Indians to resistance 
of American demands. 

Accepting the situation as thus plainly fixed 
by the Indian Council, the United States Com- 
missioners, the following day (August 17th), 
left the mouth of the Detroit Kiver and reached 
Fort Erie on the 23d, whence they advised 
General Wayne of the outcome of their attempt 
at treaty. That officer at once directed his 
eftbrts toward raising, organizing and equijiping 
such force as would be necessary to the gigantic 
charge thus devolved upon him, meantime 
keej)ing himself advised, as fur as might be, of 
the plans und movements of the Indiuns. He 
was supplied with proof clearly showing the 
strong assurance of these, that in the crisis at 
hand they would have the active and decisive 
support of the British. Two Pottawatomies, 
taken jirisoners in June, 1794, replied to ques- 
tions as follows : 

When did your Nation receive the invitation from 
the British to join them and to go to war with the 
Americans? 

On the first of tlie last moon. The niessajre was sent 
by three Chiefs — a Delaware, a Shawnee and a Miami. 

What was the message brought by those Indian 
Chiefs, and what number of British troops were at 
Roche de Ba-uf * (foot of Rapids of the Maumee), 
May l.st? 

That the British sent them to invite the Potta- 
watomies to go to war against the United States ; 
that they (the British) were then at Roche de Banif, 
on their way to war against the Americans; tliat the 
numl)er of British troops then there was about -100, 
with two pieces of artillery, exclusive of the Detroit 
Militia ; and had made a fortification around Colonel 
McKee's houses and stores at that place, in which 
they had deposited all their ammunition, arms, cloth- 
ing and provision, with which they promised to sup- 
ply all hostile Indians in abundance, provided they 
would join and go with them to war. 

What tribes of Indians, and what their numbers, 
at Roche de Bieuf, on the 1st of May? [17'.I4.] 

The Chijipewus, Wyandots, Shawnees, Tawas, 
Delawares and Miamis. 

* A point on the North side of the Maumee River, 
and a. short distance above Waterville, Lucas County. 



40 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



The prisoners further stated that Governor 
Simt-oc the previous "Winter sent the Potta- 
wiitomios a mossatje urging united war against 
the Americans, saying he would cotnmand the 
whole force; and again in May, 1794, from 
Roclie (Ic Banif, sent another message, promis- 
ing fullest support in the ju-oposed hostilities. 
" All the speeches that we got from him," said 
they, " were as red as blood ; all the wampum 
and feathers were painted red; the war pipes 
and hatchets were red; and even the tobacco 
was red." They stated the Governor promised 
to join the Indians with 1,500 of his warriors; 
but the tribe wanted peace, except a few fool- 
ish young men. Like testimony was obtained 
from members of other tribes — all concurring 
in clearlj* cslablishing the unscrupulous ac- 
tivity of the Briti.sh authorities in fomenting 
trouble and encouraging hostilities on the part 
of the Indians, but for which promise of suj}- 
port the whole difficulty would probably have 
been adjusted on a peaceful basis. 

If more conclusive proof be wantingas to the 
part taken by the British Government in fo- 
menting antagonism between the Indians and 
the United States, it is supplied in the fact, 
that in April, 1794, Governor Simcoe was sent 
to the Eapids of the Maumee, within the ac- 
knowledged territories of the United States, 
and atatime of special irritation between tbeln- 
diansand our Government, to erect there a Fort. 
This action could have no other possible object, 
than bj' such mea,ns to encourage the savages 
with assurance of active support from the Brit- 
ish Government. About the same time, and as 
if in co-operation with the British intervention, 
a messenger from the Mississippi Province of 
Spain appeared in the Xorthwest, for the pur- 
pose of giving the Indians assurance of the sym- 
pathy and support of the Spanish Government. 
The character of his mission is shown in the 
opening sentences of his address to the Indians : 

"Children!" said he, "you see nic on my feet, 
grasping the tomaliawk to strike them. We will 
strike together. I do not desire you to go before me 
m the front ; but to follow me. I present you with 
a war-pipe, which has been sent in all our names to 
the Musquakics, and all those Nations who live to- 
ward the setting Sun, to get upon their feet and take 
hold of our tomahawk ; and as soon thev smoked it, 
they sent it back with a promise to get immediately 
on then- feet, and join us and strike this enemy You 
hear wliat these distant Nations have said to us, so that 
wc have nothing further to do, but to put our designs 
into numediate execution, and to forward this pij.e 



to the three warlike Nations who have so long been 
struggling for their country, and who now sit at the 
Glaize. Tell them to smoke this pipe, and forward 
it to all the Lake Nations and their Northern Breth- 
ren. Then nothing will be wanting to complete our 
general union from the rising to the setting of the 
Sun, and all Nations will be ready to add strength to 
the blow we are going to strike." 

The reasons and object oijerating both with 
Great Britain and Spain, in such alliance 
with the Indians, were understood at the 
time. The former power in March, 1793, 
had joined Russia in stejis for cutting off the 
trade of France, then in a revolutionary state, 
with a view to the subjection of that country. 
To that end, the British Government, in June, 
1794, issiied an order for interdicting trade with 
all ports of France or ports occupied by French 
troops. To this the United States interposed 
its jsrotest, and the matter soon assumed the 
character of serious irritation. This source of 
trOi;ble, added to the lingering sensibility over 
the result of the recent revolution and the in- 
terests of Indian trade, was sufficient with the 
British Government to induce it to the aggres- 
sive action taken with the Indians. Spain's 
motive for the steps taken bj' her, arose in 
jealousy provoked by the advance of American 
colonies toward her domain in the Mi.s.sissippi 
Valley. She had long been tampering with 
the Indians in the South, and now turned her 
attention to those of the Korth, in the hope of 
crippling the advancing settlements in the 
Northwest. 

While measures were in progress with refer- 
ence to a peaceful adjustment of difficulties 
with the Indians, General Wayne was active 
in the raising, equipping and drilling his forces 
for aggressive steps, should such be found nec- 
essary. On the 30th of April, 1793, he moved 
down the Ohio, from Legionville, and encamped 
near Fort Washington, at a point called " Hob- 
son's Choice,"* from the liict that the high 
water prevented the selection of any other 
place in the vicinity. Here he was engaged in 
drilling his troops, etc , while negotiations for 
peace were in progress at the North. Such 

" This term is understood to have had its origin 
in the practice of the pioneer livery-keeper of Cam- 
bridge, England, whose name was Hobson, and 
whose rule was, that customers mu.st, in succession, 
take the horse nearest the stable door, to the end that 
no favoritism should be shown or advantage had by 
one customer over others. Hence, " Hobsou's 
Choice " is no choice. 



GENERAL WAYNE'S MILITARY MOVEMENTS. 



41 



menacing prejiarations were offensive to the 
Indians, and had no doubt the effect of embar- 
rass! ni;; peaceful measures. 

Tiie Uniteil States Commissioners left the 
mouth of Detroit Eiver August 17, 1793, and 
arrived at Fort Erie on the 23d, whence they 
despatched a messenger with notice to General 
Wayne of the failure of the negotiation. That 
ofHccrat once commenced o]ierationslookingto 
an earl}^ advance toward the Maumee Eiver. 
October 23d, he was six miles from Fort Jeffer- 
son ; and soon thereafter, in view of the ap- 
])roach of the AVinter season, he established 
Winter-quarters at Fort Greenville (built by 
him), near the site of the present Town of 
Greenville, Darke County. While lying there 
he sent out a detachment to the field of St. 
Clair's defeat, where 600 skulls were gathered 
up and buried. One of the party stated that 
before lying down in their tents at night, they 
had to scrape the bones together, to make room 
for their beds. Here was built Fort Eecovery. 

During the early months of 179-t, General 
Wayne was engaged in preparation for a care- 
ful, but sure, advance, ilcantime, by means 
of Captain Gibson and his force of sjiies, he was 
ke])t advised of the plans of the Indians. 

July 26th, Colonel Scott, with 1,600 mounted 
Kentucliians, joined Wayne at Greenville, and 
on the 28th, his force moved forward. He 
reached the junction of the Au Glaize and 
Maumee Elvers, at Grand Glaize, and built 
Fort Defiance at that point. The Indians, 
learning of his approach, had hastily abandoned 
their Towns. Wayne was disappointed in not 
reaching Grand Glaize, the headquarters of the 
Savages, without discovery ; but they learned 
of ills advance through a runaway member of 
the Quartermaster's Corps, who afterwards was 
taken at Pittsburgh. To accomplish such sur- 
prise, Wayne had cut two roads — one to the 
Eapids of the Maumee, at Eoche de BccuF, and 
another to the junction of the St. Mar3''s and 
St. Jo.seph, while he pressed forward between 
the two, which strategy was defeated by the 
deserter referred to. 

While at Fort Defiance, Gen. Waj'ne became 
fully advised of tiie movements and plans of 
the Indians, and of the collusion with them of 
the British authorities. In order, however, 
that hostilities even then might be averted, he 
ti-ansmitted by Christopher Miller a message 
to the Indians, appealing to them, in the name 



of humanity and peace, for an amicable adjust- 
ment of matters, closing his address in the fol- 
lowing language : 

Brothers! Be no longer deceived or led astray 
1)3' the false promises and language of the bad men at 
the foot of the Rapids. They have neither power nor 
inclination to protect you. No longer .shut your eyes 
to your true interests and happiness ; nor your ears 
to this overture of peace. But, in pity to your inno- 
cent women and children, come and prevent tlie 
further effusion of your blood. Let them experience 
the kindness and friendship of the United States of 
America, and the invaUiable blessings of peace and 
tran(iuillity. 

This was dated at Grand Glaize, August 13, 
1794. 

Advancing down the Maumee, Gen. Wayne 
met Miller on the 16th, with the message of 
the Indians, to the ett'ect, that if he would wait 
ten days at Grand Glaize, they would decide 
for peace or for war. Fully understanding the 
subtle design of such a projjosition. Gen. Wayne 
continued his advance, reaching Eoche de Bceuf, 
41 miles below Grand Glaize, on the 18th. 
Here he commenced some light works, which 
he named Fort Deposit, taking its name fiom 
the fact that its chiefpurpo.se was that of de- 
posit for heavy baggage during the battle then 
imminent. On the 20th, about 8 a. m., Wayne 
moved down the North bank of the Eiver. The 
Indians were encamped on Swan Creek, in rear 
of the British Fort (Miami), and behind thick 
brushwood. The Legion was on the right, its 
right covered by the Eiver. A Brigade of 
mounted volunteers on tiie left, under Brig.- 
Gen. Todd, and another in the rear, com- 
manded by General Barbie. A select Battalion 
of mounted men, under Major Price, moved in 
front of the Legion, whose duty it was to give 
notice foi- anj- needed action. About five miles 
down. Price's force was so severely assailed by 
the enemj', ambushed in woods and grass, as 
to compel retreat. In two lines, the Legion 
prom])tly formed, extending some miles on tlie 
left, and some distance in Iront. Tiie presence 
on the ground of a large quantity of fallen 
timber, the result of a severe tornado a j-ear or 
two previous, constituted a barrier insurmount- 
able to the Cavaliy, while aftbrding e.xceilent 
defense for the enemy, who were formed in 
three lines, within supporting distance, and 
extending for nearly two miles, at right angles 
with the Eiver. The purpose of the enemy to 
turn AVaj'ne's left was at once discovered. The 



42 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Cieiicral ordered Ins sccoiul line to iulvance to 
llio supjiorl of the lii-wl, the wluiU^ iiuninteil 
I'oree lieiiiif in motion. lie directed .Major- 
(.ieneral Seott, \>y a eireuitoiis movcnient to 
gain and (urn liie ri^'lit flank of tlie Indians, 
the front line at tiic same time advancing and 
charging with trailed arms, to drive the enemy 
from their covert at the j)oint of the bayonet, 
a close and well directed fire to be dealt at 
their backs, followed by a brisk charge, in order 
that no time be allowed them for re-loading. 
The Legionary Cavaliy, under Cajitain Camp- 
bell, were sent to tni'n the left flank of the en- 
emy, next the IJiver, for which operation the 
field was favorable. All these movements were 
made vyith jiromptness. Such was the impet- 
uosity of the charge by the first line of Infan- 
try, that the Indians, Canada Militia, and De- 
troit Volunteers were driven from all coverts 
so suddenly, that it was impossible for other 
portions of the command to gain their jiroper 
positions in season to participate as contem- 
plated by the plan of the movement. The re- 
sult was, that by a force one-half tbeir own, 
the Indians were driven two miles through 
thick woods, within the space of one hour. 
Their number was estimated at 2,000 ; while 
of Wayne's force, not more than 900 were suf- 
ficient to drive the savages and their allies 
precipitately in all directions, leaving the vic- 
tors in complete possession of the field. The 
battle closed in full view of the British Fort, 
and even under the muzzles of its guns. A large 
portion of the Indians found themselves so 
completely cut ott' from retreat, that they took 
to the Eiver, across open ground, in passing 
which many were cut down by the Cavalry, 
Avho followed them into the stream. 

Captain Campbell, of the Dragoons, was 
killed, and Captain Solomon Van Rcnnssalaer, 
of the same Corjjs, was shot through the body, 
devolving the command ni that force on Lieu- 
tenant Covington, who had cut down two In- 
dians during the fight. The General's orders 
made strong commendation of all oflicers and 
men engaged, specially recognizing Brigadier- 
General Wilkinson and Colonel Hamtramck. 
His Aides (I)e Butts, Lewis and Wm. H. Har- 
rison) and Adjutant General (Major Mills) were 
also mentioned tlir s]iecial service. Besides 
these, like acknowledgment was made as to 
Captains Lewis and Brock of the Light Infan- 
try; of Captains Slough and Prior and Lieu- 



tenant Caiu])liell Sniilli of the Legionary 
Infantry; Captain Van Eennssalaer of the 
Dragoons, and of Captain Eawlins, Lieutenant 
McKinney and Ensign Duncan of the Mounted 
Volunteers — all wounded in the engagement. 
Among the dead, wei-e Captain Campbell of the 
Dragoons, and Lieutenant Fowler cif the Infan- 
ti-y <if the Legion, k'illed in the first charge. 
The number of Americans killed, including 
those d3-ing of their wounds, was 39 ; and 
number wounded, 100. The loss of the enemy 
was estimated at twice that of General Wayne's 
command. The woods, for considerable dis- 
tance, were strew'ed with dead Indians and the 
bodies of White auxiliaries, armed with British 
muskets and bayonets.=i= 

General Wayne remained three days and 
three nights in front of the scene of battle, 
during which time his forces destroyed all 
houses and cornfields of the Indians for miles 
above and below the Fort, and some within 
Ijistol shot of the British fortification. This 
woi'k of destruction included not only the 
])roperty of the Savages, but the houses and 
stores of Colonel McKee, the British Agent, 
who was mainly responsible for the hostile 
course of the Indians. The destruction of 
McKee's property was the more significant, 
since the fact was well known to General 
Wayne that it belonged really to the British 
Government, and was sent there to su.stain the 
Indians in their warfare on the United States. 

* Andrew Race, a solclier of Wayne's Armj', is 
creilibly reported as giving tlie following statement 
in regard to the Imttle of Fallen Timbers: That the 
Indians were camped back some three miles from the 
Maumee River on tlie " Openings," the position 
liaxingbeen selected by them with reference both to 
springs of water there existing and to tlie advantages 
of an oyien space, whereby they were secured against 
sudden attack, with dense forests about them, to 
which they could readily retreat if attacked. While 
thus situateil, the Indians were visited by a man 
claiming to have l)eeu sent by the commander of the 
British Fort at Miami, to notify them of Wayne's de- 
fenseless condition at Presque Isle, and of the ease 
with which he might be overcome and captured by 
vigorous attack. Accepting such statement as cor- 
rect, the Indians at once moved forwai'd for attack of 
the supposed defenseless force, who <iuietly awaited 
their approach within ready niuskc^t shot, when a 
murderous fire was opened on the Indians, who soon 
Ijecame demoralized and sought escape, mainly 
through the River, with Wayne's Cavalry in hot 
pursuit. What extent of credence is tu he accorded 
to this statement, cannot now be known. 



GENERA L WA YNE 'S MILITA R Y MO VEMENTfi. 



43 



While tanying in the vicinity, General Wayne, 
in company with several officers, including 
General Wilkinson ami Lieutenant Harrison, 
made critical examination of the British Fort, 
tor such |iurpose approaching very near to the 
same. lie found it to be a comiiletc military 
work, mounting live guns on the Eiver front. 
The rear had two bastions, with eight pieces of 
artillery. The whole was surrounded by a 
deej) ditch with horizontal pickets projecting 
from the parapet over the ditch. The rise 
from the bottom of the ditch to the top of the 
parapet, perpendicular, was about 20 feet. All 
was surrounded by an abatis, and defended bj^ 
a numerous garrison. General Wayne was so 
deeply impressed by what he there saw, that 
it was understood to be his strong desire to 
storm the Fort. The special examination made 
in the face of the British commander was de- 
signed as well to provoke that officer to hostile 
action as for information as to the fortification. 
He did not succeed in the former of these pur- 
poses, but ho did command the attention of 
the officer in command, as shown in the cor- 
respondence which followed the inspection. 
Tills was ojjened August 21.st, by Major Wm. 
Campbell, commanding the British fortifica- 
tion, in the following letter to General Wayne : 

Miami Rivek, August 21st, 1794. 

All army of the United States of America, said to 
111' under your command, having taken post on the 
tiauks of the Miami (Maumee) for upwards of the last 
I't hours, almost within tlie reach of the guns of this 
fort, l)eiug a post belonging to His Majesty the King 
of Great Britain, occupied by His Majesty's troops, 
and wliich I have the honor to command, it becomes 
my duty to inform myself, as speedily as possible, in 
what light I am to view your making such near ap- 
proaches to this garrison. I have no hesitation, on 
my part, to say tliat I know of no war existing be- 
tween Great Britain and America. 

To this, on the same day, General Wayne 
replied as follows : 

I have received your letter of this date, requiring 
from me the motives which liave moved the army 
under my command to the position they at present 
occupy, far witliin the acknowledged jurisdiction of 
the United States of America. Without questioning 
the authority or the propriety, sir, of your inter- 
rogatory, I think I may, without breacli of decorum, 
observe to you, that were you entitled to an answer, 
the most full and satisfactory one was announced to 
you from tlie muzzles of my small arms, j'esterday 
morning, in the action against the horde of savages 
in the vicinity of your post, wliich terminated 
glorious!}" to the American anus ; but, had it contin- 



ued until the Indians, etc., were driven under the 
influence of the post and guns you mention, they 
would not have much imjieded the jirogress of the 
victorious army under mj' command, as no such post 
was established at the commencement of the present 
war between tlie Indians and the United States. 

Major Campbell replied in the tbllowiiig note 
on the 22d: 

Although your letter of yesterday's date fully 
authorizes me to any act of hostility against the army 
of the United States in this neighborhood, under 
your command, 3-et, still anxious to prevent that 
dreadful decision which, perhaps, is not intended to 
be appealed to by either of our countries, 1 have 
forborne, for these two days ]iast, to resent tliose in- 
sults you have offered to the British flag flying at this 
fort, by apjn-oaching it within pistol shot of my 
works, not only singly, but in numbers with arms in 
their hands. Neither is it my wish to wage war with 
individua's ; but should you, after this, continue to 
approach inj' post in the threatening manner you are 
this moment doing, my indispensable duty to my 
King and country, and the honor of my profession, 
will oblige me to have recourse to those measures, 
which thousands of either nation may hereafter have 
cause to regret, and which I solemnly appeal to God, 
I have used my utmost endeavor to arrest. 

The same day General Wayne responded in 
the following note: 

In your letter of the 21st j'ou declare: "I have 
no hesitation on my part, to say that I know of no 
war existing l)etween Great Britain and America." 
I, on my part, declare the same, and the only cause I 
have to entertain a contrary idea at present is the 
hostile act you are now in commission of, i. e., by re- 
cently taking post far within the well-known and 
acknowledged limits of the United States, and erect- 
ing a fortification in the heart of the settlements of 
the Indian tribes now at war with the United States. 
This, sir, appears to be an act of the liighest aggres- 
sion, and destructive to the peace and interest of the 
Union. Hence it becomes my duty to desire, and I 
do hereby desire and demand, in the name of the 
President of the United States, that you immediately 
desist from any furtlier act of hostility or aggression, 
by forbearing to fortify, and by withdrawing the 
troops, artillery, and stoi-es, under your orders and 
direction, forthwith, and removing to the nearest post 
occupied by His Britannic Majesty's troops at the 
peace of 178.3, and which you will be permitted to do 
unmolested by the troops under my command. 

Which corresiJondence closed with the fol- 
lowing letter of Major Campbell; 

I have this moment to acknowledge the receipt 
of your letter of this date; in answer to which I liave 
only to say that, being placed liere in the command 
of a British post, and acting in a military cai)acity 
only, I cannot enter into any discussion either on the 
right or impropriety of my occupying my present 



44 



HmTonr of toledo and lvcas county. 



position. These nre matters that 1 conceive will be 
best loft to the ambassadors of our difterent nations. 
Ilavinjr .«aid tlii.s much, permit me to inform you that 
I cerliiinly will not abandon this post at the sum- 
mons of any i>ower whatever until I receive orders 
for that puriKi.se from those I have the honor to serve 
under, or tlie fortune of war sliould oblige me. I 
must still adhere, sir, to the purport of my letter this 
morning, to desire that your army, or individuals be- 
longing to it, will not ap])roach within reach of ray 
cannon, without expecting the consequences at- 
tending it. Although I have said, in the former 
l>art of my letter, that my situation here is totally 
military, yet, let me add, sir, that I am much de- 
ceived if His Majesty t!ie King of Great Britain had 
not a post on this Itiver at and prior to the period 
you mention. 

"Tlie only notice tiikeu of this letter," says 
Wayne, ■• was the immediate' setting tire to and 
destroying everj-thing within view of the Fort, 
and even under the muzzles of the guns. Had 
Major Campbell carried his threats into execu- 
tion, it is more than iirol)al)le that lie would 
have ex])ericneed a storm." 

It has been confidently stated, with much 
appearance of correctness, that Little Turtle, 
or Mosh-e-noh-qua, the famous Miami Chief, 
who had already successfully fought St. Clair 
and Ilarmar, was opposed to meeting General 
Wayne at the Mauniee Eapids. It was re- 
ported that at a council held the night previous 
to that engagement, lie addressed his associates. 
counseling prudence, sajing: 

We have beaten the enemy twice, under different 
commanders. We cannot expect the same good for- 
tune always to attend us. The Americans are now 
led liy a Chief who never sleeps. The night and the 
day are alike to him. And during all tiie time he 
has been marching upon our villages, notwithstand- 
ing the watchfulness of our young men, we have 
never been able to surprise him. Think well of it. 
There is something whispei-ing me it would be pru- 
dent to listen to his offers of peace. 

The fact is well attested of a general belief 
among the Indians of the Northwest, tiiat 
General Wayne was supernaturally endowed, 
and thus invulnerable. This view no doubt 
operated lai-gely toward the condition of dis- 
couragement and apprehension on their part 
wiiich followed their great disaster at Fallen 
Timbers in August, 1794. 

The immediate object sought in this expedi- 
tion to the Maumee Eiver having been attained 
in tiie brilliant and complete victory of " Fallen 
Timbers," General Wayne by easy inarches 
made his way to the Grand Glaize, arrivino- 



there August 27th. On his way he laid waste 
whatever could be found of the villages and 
cro]JS of the Indians, extending his search for 
the same to a distance of 50 miles North and 
South of the Eiver. Fort Defiance was im- 
proved and strengthened for subsequent use. 
Thence Wayne proceeded to the Miami Vil- 
lages, which General Harrison had laid waste 
in 1790, at which point General Wayne con- 
structed a strong tbrtification. which was 
named Fort Wayne, being now the site of the 
City of that name. October 14th the Mounted 
Volunteers inarched thence to Fort Washing- 
ton (Cincinnati). Leaving a sufficient force at 
Fort Wayne, the General, with a remnant of 
his former command, proceeded to Greenville, 
where he ai-rived November 2d, after a fii- 
tiguing tour of 97 days, during which ho 
marched upwards of 300 miles, through the 
heart of the enemy's country, being compelled 
to cut his way throughout a dense wilderness, 
meantime erecting three fortifications— Fort 
Adams, at the St. Maiy's ; Fort Defiance, at 
Au Glaize, and Fort Wayne at the Miami 
Villages. 

The effect of long fatigue and exposure upon 
General Wajnie's troops was very severe. The 
sick list was large, rendering many unfit for 
duty. Besides these causes, the army was re- 
duced materiallj* by expiration of terms of ser- 
vice. Such state of things gave not a little 
apjirehension of unfortunate results, should the 
enemy by any concerted movement renew their 
hostility. To pirevent this, every effort was 
made to keep them ignorant of the true state 
of things with him. 

Meantime, General Wayne was kept advised 
of the active eftbrts of the British authorities 
to cheer up the Indians, and, with promises of 
more adequate support, sought to encourage 
them to renewed war. Thus, on the 30th of 
September (40 daj's after the battle on the 
Maumee), Governor Simcoe, Colonel McKeo 
and Captain Brandt, arrived at the foot of the 
Eapids, with 100 Mohawk and Massasagoe In- 
dians, having sent for Chiefs of other hostile 
tribes to meet them with reference to a treaty 
to be holden at the mouth of Detroit Eiver. It 
was further learned that the above ])nrties, 
with Bluejacket, Buck-on-ge-iielas, Little Tur- 
tle, Captain Johnny, and Chiefs of the Dela- 
wares, Miamis, Shawnees, Ottavvas and Potta- 
watomies, had started for the same jjlaee, 



TREATY OF GREENVILLE. 



-15 



October 1st ; and that the Indians were being 
supplied with provisions from the British stores 
at Swan Creek. Otlier information, indicating 
strong probabilities of the success of British 
collusion, was received by General Wayne and 
forwarded to the War Department at Wash- 
ington, with a strong appeal for recruits for 
his enfeebled array. His anxiety was increased 
by the killing of Colonel Eobert Elliott, the 
acting Contractor, by the Indians, while pass- 
ing between Cincinnati and the out-])osts, Oc- 
tober 6, 1794. 

With all these untoward facts and indica- 
tions. General Wayne was in receipt of com- 
munications from Chiefs of different tribes 
friendly to peace, with some of a hostile nature. 
As the Fall and Winter passed, the friendly 
.sentiment communicated to him increased in 
strength, making the situation somewhat more 
ho])eful. It was evident, that the Indians were 
not agreed as to their policy. A majority were 
disposed to war, provided British pledges of 
help could be relied on. It was a source of se- 
rious doubt on that point, that the Port built 
at the foot of the Eapids ostensibly for their 
protection, was kept closed against them on 
the occasion of their extremest distress, in the 
defeat of August 20th — neither Chiefs nor War- 
riors having been admitted to its protection 
from Wayne's fierce assault. Wayne saw that 
with a divided sentiment among the Indians, 
there was hope for an early adjustment of the 
trouble. The result was, a steadily growing 
tendency toward permanent peace among the 
several tribes; and by June, 1795, several 
Chiefs, without apparent concert of action, 
began to assemble at Greenville, with the view 
of a treaty of peace. The first to arrive were 
Delawares, Ottawas, Pottawatoinies and Eel 
Eiver Indians. After they had received and 
smoked the calumet of j)eace. General Wayne 
addressed them as fallows : 

I take you all b>' the hand, as brothers, assem- 
bled for the good work of peace. I thank the Great 
Spirit for this glorious Sun, who appears to rejoice at 
our meeting ; and also for permitting so many of us 
to assemble here this day, being the first of the Moon, 
for the purpiose of holding a treaty. The Great Spirit 
has favored us with a clear sky, and a refreshing 
breeze, for the happy occasion. 1 have cleared this 
ground of all brush and rubbish, and have opened 
roads to the East, the West, the North and the South, 
that all your Nations may come in safety, and with 
ease, to meet me. The ground on which this Council- 



house stands, is unstained with blood, and is pure as 
the heart of General Washington, the great Chief of 
America, and of his great Council— as pure as my 
heart, which now wishes for nothing, so much as 
peace and brotherly love. I have this day kindled 
the Council-lire of the United States ; and I now de- 
liver to each tribe present, a string of white wam- 
pum, to serve as a recor(i of the friendship, this day 
commenced between us. [Wampum delivered.] 

The heavens are bright— the roads are open— we 
will rest in peace and love, and wait the arrival of 
our brothers. In the interim we will have a little 
refreshment, to wash dust from our throats— we 
will, on this happy occasion, be merry, but without 
passing the bounds of tempei-ance and sobriety. We 
will now cover up the Council-fire and keep it alive 
till the remainder of the different tribes assemble, and 
form a full meeting and representation. 

To this greeting Te-ta-bosh-ke, King of the 
Delawares, replied in the expression of a 
friendly sentiment, when the fire was raked up 
and the Council adjourned. 

The next day, June 17th, 40 Pottawatomies, 
with their Chief, New Corn, arrived and were 
received. On the 21st, Buck-on-ge-he-las, 
with a party of Delawares, and Asi-me-the, 
witb more Pottawatomies, came in. On the 
23d arrived Le Gris, the Little Turtle, and 70 
Mianiis. 

On the 25th, the Chiefs present assembled, 
and were addressed by General Wayne, in a 
few words of friendlj' feeling. On the 26th, 
34 Chippewas and Pottawatomies arrived. 

June 30tli, the Chiefs, on their own motion, 
assembled, when several of them addressed the 
General in warm terms of friendship. The 
same occurred on the 3d of July. On the 4th, 
A-gosh-a-way and 23 Ottawas arrived from 
Detroit. 

On the 15th of July, the Council met, with 
present Chiefs of the Wyandots, Delawares, 
Ottawas, Pottawatomies, Chippewas, Miamis, 
and Wabash tribes, and was formally opened, 
by uncovering the fire and administering the 
oath to interpreters. General Wayne addressed 
the Council, setting forth the condition of af- 
fairs and the importance of permanent amica- 
ble relations. The Council was continued fi-om 
day to day, being addressed by most of the 
principal Chiefs present, upon the several parts 
of the treaty which General Wayne presented 
for their consideration. On July 30th, the 
same was unanimously approved by every 
tribe represented, to wit : The Chippewas, Ot- 
tawas, Pottawatomies, Wjandots, Delawares, 



40 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Shawnccs, Miamis, AVcas and Kickapoos. On 
the 8d of August, the treaty having been 
transcribed, was again read in Council and 
duly signed by General Wayne on the part of 
the United States, and the Chiefs for their re- 
spective tribes. The Council met at different 
times thereafter, and finally adjourned on the 
KHh. The attendance of the several tribes was 
as follows: "Wyandots, 180; Delawares, 381; 
Shawnees, 143; Ottawas, 45; Chippewas, 46 ; 
Pottawatomies, 240 ; Miamis and Eel Elvers, 
73; Weas and Tiankcshaws, 12; Kickapoos 
and Kaskaskias, 1(». Total attendance, 1,130. 

The basis of this treaty was the one made at 
Fort Harmar in 1789. Its main provisions as 
follows: 1. Hostilities were immediately to 
cease and all prisoners discharged. 2. The 
boundaries between the lands of the United 
States and those of the Indians, were to begin 
at the mouth of the Cuyahoga Eiver; run 
thence up the same to the portage between 
that and the Tuscarawas branch of the Mus- 
kingum ; thence down the latter to the crossing- 
above Fort Laurens ; thence Westerly to a 
fork of that branch of the Great Miami run ning 
into the Ohio, at or near which fork stood 
Loramie's store, and where commences the 
portage between the Miami of the Oliio and 
St. Mary's Eiver, a branch of the Maumee 
running into Lake Erie; thence a Westerly 
course to Fort Eecovery, on a branch of the 
AVabash ; thence Southerly in a direct line to 
the Ohio at the mouth of the Kentucky. 3. As 
compensation to the United States for goods 
formerly delivered and those to be delivered, 
and indemnification for injuries and expenses 
of War, the Indians ceded all lands lying 
Eastwardly and Southerly of the boundarj- 
line here described. 4. The following Ees- 
ervations of lands within the territory of the 
Indians, were made to the United States : One 
at Loramie's Store, six miles square ; one at 
Girty's Town, on the St. Mary's Eiver, two 
miles square ; one at head of navigable water 
of the Au Glaize, six miles square; one at 
Fort Defiance, six miles square ; one at Fort 
AVayne, six miles square; one about eight 
miles West from Fort Wayne, on the Wabash 
Eiver, two miles square; one at old Wea 
Towns, on the Wabash, six miles square ; one 
at the foot of the Eapids of the Maumee, 12 
miles square; one at the mouth of the Mau- 
mee, six miles square; one upon Sandusky 



Lake, where a Fort formerly stood, six miles 
square ; and one at the lower Eapids of the 
Sandusky Eiver (now Fremont), two miles 
square. Provision was also made for the re- 
linquishment of all claim by the Indians to 
post at Detroit and certain lands in that sec- 
tion ; to the post at Mackinaw, and lands in 
that vicinit}' ; to lands at the mouth of the 
Chicago Eiver, and other points in Illinois. 
Free access was granted by the Indians for all 
necessary communication with all reserved 
lands within the Indian territory-. The United 
States agreed to pay to the Indians annually 
in goods, at market cost, the sum of $9,500, to 
be divided among the several tribes, with the 
provision that any tribe might change its an- 
nuity from goods to domestic animals, farming 
implements, etc., at their choice. The Indians 
were to possess their lands in quiet, for the 
purpose of hunting, planting and dwelling 
thereon, so long as they pleased, without mo- 
lestation by the United States ; but when they 
should desire to sell the same, they should be 
sold onlj- to the United States. Meantime, 
the Indians were to be protected from all in- 
vasion by Whites. Intruders were to be pun- 
ished and removed by either party to the 
treaty. The Indians could hunt on lands 
ceded by them. All injuries were to be re- 
ferred to law for adjustment, and not privately 
avenged ; and all known hostile designs against 
either to be made known to the part}^ con- 
cerned. 

Such, in substance, is the most important 
Indian treaty that had then or has since been 
negotiated in the West. Dated August 3, 1795, 
it was presented to the Senate December 9th, 
and ratified December 23d following. It is 
difficult to estimate all that was involved in the 
question of peace or continued war with the 
several tribes who then menaced the settle- 
ment of the great Northwest, and the lives of 
the scattered settlers already there. The honor 
won by General Wayne in the short space of 
one year — from August 20, 1794, to August 3, 
1795 — b}- means of one battle and one treaty, 
in bringing permanent j^eace to that region, in 
spite of British perfidy, is enough to commend 
his name to lasting and grateful remembrance 
of mankind. No other citizen has been per- 
mitted to do as much for this section. It is a 
source of just pride with the citizens of Lucas 
County and of the Maumee Valley, that the 



RESTORATION OF PEACE— BEATII OF WAYNE. 



47 



first and controlling success of General Wayne 
in this great result was won at Turkey Foot 
Rock. 

Permanent peace having thus been secured 
and the Indians placed beyond the reach of 
collusion and temptation, the British Govern- 
ment in 170G surrendered its posts within the 
limits of the United States, including Fort 
Miami, at the foot of the Uapids of the 
Maumee, the Town of Detroit, and the mili- 
tary works there and at Mackinaw, pursuant 
to the treaty negotiated in 1793 by Chief 
Justice Jay. 

As soon as he had received those Posts, in 
the name of the Government, and made ar- 
rangements for their care. General Wayne pro- 
ceeded to Erie, on his way to AVashingtou. 
On his passage down the Lake, he was seized 
with a violent attack of gout in the stomach, 
which terminated in his death before reaching 
the port of destination. He was buried at 
Erie.* Upon disinterment of the body by his 
son, many years thereafter, for removal to his 
place of nativity, it showed no signs of decay, 
a result supposed to have been due to antiseptic 
qualities of the soil, which would, in time, 

* In his " Notes on the Northwestern Territory," 
Judge Burnet states that one of General "Wayne's 
motives in going from Detroit to Philadelphia at 
this time, was to meet certain cliarges made against 
him by General Wilkinson. What these were, is not 
specifically stated. General Wayne characterized 
them as unfounded and malicious. Suffice it here to 
state, that no attempt ever was made to sustain 
them ; and tfiey were entirely disi'egardcd at the 
War Department. General Wilkinson was one f)f 
the most aecomplislie<l officers and men of his da)-. 
He served with special creilit in the Kevolutionary 
War, where he imbibed a strong personal antagonism 
to tieneral Wayne. In tlie Spring of 1792, while a 
Colonel, in command of Fort Washington, Wilkinson 
was made a Brigadier-General. Although General 
Wayne was made Commander-in-Chief previous to 
that time, and assigned to the campaign against the 
Indians, he did not reacli Fort Washington until Sej)- 
tendjer, 179.'!. During the interim, as Judge Burnet 
states, Wilkinson improved his opportunity for cre- 
ating prejudice and bitterness among the officers 
against Wayne, for wliich purpose he was, in his 
easy and graceful deportment and suavity of man- 
ners, well adapted. In this work he w&a probaljly 
heliied by the known bluntness, sometimes reaching 
rudeness, of Wayne's manner, by which he often 
gave unintentional offense. Wilkinson was thus en- 
abled to arrange on his side a large portion of those 
about him, whereby General Wayne nas not a little 
embarrassed on taking command. But many were 



have given it the solid, permanent state of the 
mummy. 

General Wayne was born in Chester Count}-, 
Pennsylvania, in Januarj-, 1745, and was in 
the 52d year of his life, and bad just reached 
his mental and physical prime, when suddenly 
cut off. lie was the son of a farmer, who was 
a prominent man, having served in the Pro- 
vincial Legislature and taken part in exjiedi- 
tions against the Indians. Anthony's record 
has long been familiar with readers of Ameri- 
can history-, and need not be detailed here. It 
has been justly stated of him, that " there was 
scarcely an important battle or hazardous en- 
terprise, from the beginning to the end of the 
Revolutionary struggle, in which he was not 
more or less distinguished" — prominent among 
which stands his desperate and successful at- 
tack on Stony Point, which gave him the name 
of "Mad Anthony," and procured for him a 
gold medal, at the hands of Congress. The 
first civil organization established after the 
Greenville treaty, was the Count}' formed of 
the Michigan Peninsula (in 1796), and named 
Wayne, in honor of its deliverer from Indian 
and British rule, with Detroit for its seat of 

attached to tliat officer, while others properly kept 
aloof from the dispute. After the victorious battle 
of Fallon Timbers, Wilkinson undertook to belittle 
Wayne's honors, by representing that the result was 
due, not to military skill, but to want of concert in 
action on the part of the Indians — that the attack by 
them was premature, and before half of their forces 
bad arrived — that Blue Jacket, the Shawnee in com- 
mand, had rejected Little Turtle's plan of attack, 
who afterwards became Wilkinson's confidential 
friend, and was among the most talented Chiefs in 
the AVest. It was thus claimed among Wilkinson's 
adherents that if Little Turtle's advice had been acted 
upon in a simultaneous attack by the entire Indian 
force, they could not have been flanked, and the re- 
sult with them would have been a victory instead of 
a defeat. The number of Indians reported as killed 
in the engagement was over .50, besides some taken 
away hy comrades. This statement was met with 
ridicule, and Major Smith facetiously reported a dia- 
logue as taking jjlace on the banks of the River Styx, 
between Old Charon and the ghost of one of AVayne's 
soldiers, who boasted of the great slaughter of Indians 
in that battle ; when the old fen-yman, shaking his 
head, protested, solemnly, that he had, upon count, 
ferried over the ghosts of just 1(3 Indians from that 
field, and not one more. All this, however, can 
never detract from the brilliant record of " Mad An- 
thony," whether as made in the AVar of the Revolu- 
tion proper, or in the magnificent campaign by which 
alone that AVar was brought to its actual close. 



48 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



justice, which was then a garrison Town, com- 
pactly built on streets not averaging more than 
one roil in width, and completely enclosed 
with strong jjicK-ets. It was the most ancient 
Town on the Upper Lakes, having been settled 
by the French as early as 1683, and was the 
Capital of Upper Canada until it fell into the 
hands of the United States.* 

» In this connection, the following statement from 
Burnet's " Notes," us to the original 'Wliite settlers on 
the Detroit l^iver, will be of interest, and the more 
so, as it applies with much jjropriety to those on the 
River Riiisin, and in tlie " Bay Settlement," South of 
that stream : 

" When the American troops took possession of 
the Northern posts, the inhabitants of Detroit and 
its contiguous settlements, from Lake St. Clair to the 
Rivei- Raisin, on both sides of the Straits, -vvere, almost 
exclusively, Canadian French, who were the owners 
and cultivators of the soil. The land had been laid 
out, originally, into farms of very narrow fronts— in 
most instances not more than tifty rods— and running 
back from one to two miles, for quantity. The own- 
ers and occupiers were extremely ignorant, and were 
under the influence of a strong religious superstition. 
They had been treading in the footsteps of their 
fathers, time out of mind, like mere imitative beings, 
without seeming to know that any improvement had 
been made in agriculture since Noah planted his 
vineyard. They raised the same crops without vari- 
ation, and in the same succession, they had been ac- 
customed to see from boyhood. When a field became 
exhausted it was suffered to rest till it became par- 
tially recruited, by its own scanty, spontaneous pro- 
ducts, and by the rains and dews of heaven. Their 
houses, barns, and other improvements, were fronting 
on the Strait, separated from it by a narrow road, 
which ran along the edge of the water. Each farm had 
an orchard contiguous to the house, containing a vari- 
ety of fine fruit. When the litter about the barn and 
stable increased so much as to become inconvenient, 
they piled it on sleds, drew it down to the Strait, 
which was just at hand, and threw it into the water. 
Under that practice, the soil, though naturally good, 
produced very light crops, and the jirice of every ag- 
ricultural product was extravagantly high. That con- 
tinued to be the case till emigrants from the United 
States purchased and settled among them, and intro- 
duced a better system of agriculture. 

"The native French were Catholics, and conscien- 
tiously exact in the performance of their religious 
duties. Their tithes were regularly brought and de- 
posited in the storehouse of the Priest, with apparent 
cheerfulness. 

" Previous to the establishment of American 
Courts at Detroit, all matters of controversy among 
the inhabitants ha<l been setted in a summary way 
by the Commandant, to whose decision the inhabi- 
tants had been accustomed to submit. They had been 
habituated, all their lives, to this summary, expedi- 
tious mode of settling their disputes ; and were, con- 



The real design of the protracted and persis- 
tent efforts of the British authorities in their 
unwarranted intrigue with the Indians, mani- 
festly, was to combine their several tribes in a 
Confederacy sufficiently strong to comjJel the 
United States to accept the Ohio River as a 
boundary line. This was sought, not in the 

sequently, very much dissatisfied with the slow, te- 
dious progress of an American Court ; against which 
they complained very loudly. 

" Among the advantages of which the people of 
Detroit then boasted, was the excellence of their do- 
mestic servants. No visitor from the States could 
spend any time at a public or private house in that 
City, without being satisfied that they did possess 
that advantage in a greater degree than the inhabi- 
tants of any other part of the United States. 

" The Canadian French w ere naturally olistinate 
and headstrong ; and were illiterate and untaught in 
the principles of equality, professed and practiced in 
Republics. They had grown up from infancy under 
the impression that nature had estalilished ditl'erent 
orders in society — that power and i-ank were insep- 
arable from wealth ; and that inferiority and submis- 
sion were ordained for the poor. That imi^ression 
was carried out into practice, and accounts, in a great 
measure, for the excellence of their hirelings and do- 
mestics ; but their best servants were the Pawnee In- 
dians and their descendants, who are held an<l dis- 
posed of as slaves, under the French and British Gov- 
ernments — a species of slavery which existed to a 
considerable extent in Upper Canada. It was intro- 
duced at the early settlement of the country, and was 
founded on the assumed right of selling captives 
taken in war as slaves. The Pawnees were numer- 
ous and powerful ; but were considered as degraded 
by all the other tribes ; on which account, prisoners 
taken from them by any other Nation were con- 
demned to slaver}', and were held as slaves by the 
captors or sold as such to others. Many of them were 
purchased by the Canadians, and employed as 
drudges in the fur trade, and frequently as house 
servants. The Indian code justified the putting of 
prisoners to death, which had been their common 
punishment, till it was commuted for the milder one 
of being sold into slavery for life. That relation ex- 
isted when the countr}' was delivered up to the 
United States, though the practice of purchasing In- 
dian captives as slaves by the white people, had 
ceased before the siu'render ; and consequently the 
priucijial part, if not all the Indians then in slavery, 
were the descendants of enslaved captives. Innne- 
diately after the laws of the United States were intro- 
duced, and their Courts of judicature estaldished, the 
validity of that relation was (xuestioned, and the value 
of that species of property very much diminished ; 
not only by the uncertainty of its tenure, but by the 
effect which the discussion of the subject produced 
on the minds of the slaves. Very soon after the right 
became a subject of inquiry, public oiiinion decided 
against it, and the relation ceased to exist." 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM WELLS. 



49 



interest of the Indians, but with expectation, 
that such line once fixed, the great Northwest, 
now constituting several of the largest and 
most prosperous States of the Union, would 
become a jtrotectorate of Great Britain. The 
stake, to an unscrupulous povver, was very 
tempting. Besides this, was added a desire, if 
possible, to humble the young Government, 
whose entire territory consisted of domain 
wrested by force from British possession. To 
these considerations were added special sources 
of irritation, including the action of the Vir- 
ginia Legislature in maintaining laws against 
the fiaymentof claims held by British creditors 
against citizens of that vState. At the vei'y time 
of the battle of Fallen Timbers, there was a 
general apprehension that these matters migbt 
culminate in renewed war. But it so happened, 
that at that verj^ time John Jay, Envoy Ex- 
traordinary of the United States, was actively 
engaged in negotiating for the adjustment of 
all matters of difference between the two Gov- 
ernments ; and with such etfect, that, three 
months after Wayne's signal victory over the 
British allies, what is known as the "Jay 
Treaty " was concluded with Lord Greenville. 
Just how much that battle had to do with 
such result, is a matter of opinion only. Suffice 
it here to know, that by that treaty the yet 
straggling shreds of the Kevolutiouary War 
were gathered up and finally disposed of, and 
peace secured to tlie great Xorthwest. 

The association of the name of Captain 
William Wells with manj' of the prominent 
events in the early history of the Maumee 
Valley, will Justify brief mention of his life. 
Of him Jesse L. Williams, in a historical sketch 
of the First Presbyterian Church of Fort 
Wayne, says : 

Of Captain AVin. Wells's birthplace and parent- 
age, we have no record. Pie was captured at the age 
of 12 years, when he was an inmate of the family of 
Hon. Nathaniel Pope, in Kentucky, by the Miami 
tribe, and going through the formal adoption, lived to 
manhood among them. His Indian name was Black 
Snake. He became quite an influential man among 
tliem, and married a sister of the celeVjrated Chief, 
Little Turtle. He fought by the side of his Chief in 
the contests with Generals Harmar and St. Clair. 
Afterward, in times of calm retiection, with dim 
memories still of his childhood home, of brothers and 
■ playmates, he seems to have been harassed with the 
T thought that among the slain, by his own hand, may 
have been his kindred. The approach of Wayne's 
army, in 1794, stirred anew ronflioting emotions, 



based upon indistinct recollections of early ties, of 
country and kindred on the one hand, and existing 
attachments of wife and children on the other. He 
resolved to make his history known. With true 
Indian cliaracteristics, the secret purpose of leaving 
his adopted nation was, according to reliable tradi- 
tion, made known in this manner: Taking with him 
the AVar Chief, Little Turtle, to a favorite .spot on the 
banks of the Maumee, Wells said : " I leave now your 
nation for my own people. We have long been 
friends. We are friends yet, until the sun reaches a 
certain height [which he indicated]. From that time 
we are enemies. Then, if you wish to kill me, j-ou 
may. If I want to kill you, I may." At the appointed 
hour, crossing the river. Captain Wells disappeared 
in the forest, taking an easterly direction to strike the 
trail of Wayne's army. Obtaining an interview with 
General Wayne, he became ever afterward the faith- 
ful friend of the Americans. 

He was made Captain of the spies connected 
with Wayne's army. His adventures in that capacitj- 
are sufficiently detailed by IMr. McBride. After the 
treaty of Greenville, and the establishment of peace, 
he was joined b}' his wife and family, and settled at 
the "Old Orchard" a short distance from the con- 
fluence of the St. Mary's and St. Joseph, on the banks 
of a small stream there, afterward called " Spy Run," 
and which still bears that name. The Government 
subsequently granted him a jire-emption of some 320 
acres of land, including his improvement, the Old 
Orchard, etc. Wells afterward also became, by ap- 
pointment of the Government, Indian Agent here 
(Fort Wayne), in which capacity he served several 
years. 

By his first wife, Cajitain Wells had four 
children — three daughters and one son. The 
former became Mrs. Judge Wolcott of Maumee 
City (South Toledo), and Mrs. Turner and 
Mrs. Hackley, of Fort Wayne. Mr. Williams, 
referring to the latter two ladies, says : 

Of the first members of this Church, two were 
half Indian, who had before (in 1820) joined the 
Baptist Church, under the labors of Rev. Mr. McCoy, 
a Missionary to the Indians at this jjost (Fort Wayne). 
They were educated in Kentucky, and are yet kindly 
remembered by some in the Church and community 
as ladies of refinement and intelligent piety. 

The son, Wayne Wells, died while yet a 
young man, while crossing Lake Erie, in 1823. 
For his second wife, Captain Wells married a 
second sister of the Indian Chief, Little Turtle, 
having with her a daughter, Jane, who married 
Matthew Griggs, a pioneer of Fort Wayne, and 
settled at Peru, Indiana. For a time Captain 
Wells had command of a small force of spies 
in Wayne's service. Among them were liobert 
McClellan, made famous through Irving's 
" Astoria," and Henrj- Miller. The former was 



.50 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



ail athlete without an equal in afrility and en- 
durniu'i'. Hi- had leaped over a covered wagon, 
ri'((iiiriiiij a rise of eight and one-half feet. 
Miller, with his brother Christopher, while 
j-oiuig li:i(l \ivvu made captives by Indians and 
adopted by an Indian family. When 24 years 
of ago, Henry made his escape to the Whites, 
but was uiiahle to induce his brother to go with 
him. In June, 1794, while his headquarters 
were at Fort Greenville, General Wayne dis- 
patched Wells, Miller and two others (Hick- 
man and Thorp) to bring into camp an Indian, 
as ])risoner, with the hope through him of 
obtaining information as to the intentions of 
the enemy. For such purpose Miller entered 
the Indian countr3', crossing the St. Mary's and 
thence to the Au Glaize ; following up that 
stream they discovered a smoke. Dismount- 
ing they made examination and soon found 
three Indians camped on high ground. Soon 
Wells approached unobserved quite to the 
party, whom they found roasting their venison 
by a fire. By arrangement Wells and Miller 
each were to select a victim — one taking the 
Indian at the left, and the other the one at the 
right, with McClellan to run and capture the 
third. The two shots were effective, and Mc- 
Clellan sprang after the remaining Indian, 
who made all possible speed down the 
Elver; but finding himself likely to be over- 
taken, he sprang from the bank into the 
stream, 20 feet down, sinking into the 
soft mud at the bottom, which held him firmly 
in its grasp. McClellan made a like spring, 
landing near the Indian, whom after a severe 
struggle, he was soon enabled to subject to his 
control. With the assistance of W^ells and 
Miller, the captive was taken from the water. 
He was sulky, refusing to speak. When washed 
of the mire, he was found to be a white man. 
Taking their course for Greenville, the prisoner 
for a time continued silent and sullen. It 
finally occurred to Miller that the captive 
might be his own brother, and to test that 
point, he rode up and called him by his Indian 
name. This startled him, and he inquired 
how his name came to be known. The mys- 
tery was soon explained. The prisoner was 
Christopher Miller. The case was a remarka- 
ble one, and his extraordinary escape from the 
fate of his two associates, by being between 
them, made a strong impression on his mind. 
Finally, after agreeing not to rejoin the In- 



dians, but to remain with the Whites, he was 
released, and soon joined Wayne's force and 
did good service during the balance of the 
War. One more incident in Captain Wells's 
service may be given hero. On one of his ex- 
peditions through the Indian country, and 
when on the bank of the St. Mary's, he discov- 
ei'ed an Indian familj' coming up the Eiver in a 
canoe. Dismounting, he concealed his men, 
and then went to the bank, and called the In- 
dians to come over. Suspecting no danger, 
they crossed to where he was. As the 
canoe touched the shore, Miller heard the 
clicks of his men's rifles, preparatory to 
shooting the Indians. What was his surprise, 
to find the jJarty to consist of his Indian father 
and mother, by adoption, and their children ! 
Saying to his men that the family before them 
" having fed him when he was hungry, clothed 
him when he was naked, and nursed him when 
sick ; and in every respect been as kind and 
affectionate to him as they were to their own 
children," they must not suffer in any way at 
his hands. Accepting such ground for lenitj', 
the party ajiproached the canoe, and shook 
hands with its alarmed inmates in the most 
friendlj' manner. While Wayne was at Fort 
Defiance, in August, 1794, Wells was sent to 
bring in another prisoner, with a view to in- 
formation from the enemy. F'or such purpose 
he followed cautiously down the Maumee, until 
he came opposite the subsequent site of Fort 
Meigs, and about two miles above Fort Miami 
(then called Fort Campbell, after its British 
commander). At this point was an Indian 
Village, into which Wells and party rode, as if 
from the Fort. In the dress of the Indian, 
they were received and treated as friendly. 
Passing through the Village, the party met an 
Indian man and woman, whom they made pris- 
oners, and with them set off for Defiance, On 
their way, they fell in with an Indian encamp- 
ment, which they approached, hoping for in- 
formation. The Indians were communicative, 
giving all they had heard about Wayne's move- 
ments and the probabilities of a battle. At 
length an Indian some distance from them, in 
an undertone and anotlier tongue, said he sus- 
pected the visitors were spies. Wells heard 
this, and at once gave the signal, when the 
party fired their rifles at the Indians about 
them, and immediately put spurs to their 
horses. The Indians promptly fired on them, 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM WELLS. 



51 



one ball wounding MeClellan in the shoulder, 
and another breaking Wells's arm. Taking 
their prisoners, the party resumed their march 
to Fort Defiance, where the captives were duly 
examined, and the wounded cared for The 
battle of Fallen Timbers soon thereafter closed 
hostilities with the Indians, and Captain Wells 
and his inti-epid command found no further 
service of the kind in which they had so dis- 
tinguished themselves. 

In the War of 1812-15, Captain Wells was in 
command of Fort Wayne. It is stated, that 
ujJon hearingof Hull's order for the evacuation 
of Fort Dearborn, he made a rapid march to 
reinforce Captain Ileald ; to the end, that that 
position might be held as a protection to Fort 
Wayne and the Maumee Valley. But he was 
too late by a few hours. On the 15th of Au- 
gust, the little force at the Fort, accompanied 
by Captain Wells and his Miamis, left the Fort 
and moved along the shore to Sand Hills, 
where they were attacked by 'M) Pottawato- 
inies. At the beginning of the conflict. Wells 



was with the wife of Captain Heald (a niece of 
his). Turning to her, he said : " We have not 
the slightest chance for life. We must part to 
meet no more in this world. God bless you," 
and dashed into the fight. After the most des- 
perate contest, he was wounded, taken prisoner 
and reserved for torture. To save himself 
from such fate, he sought to provoke his cap- 
tors with insulting epithets, calling them Per- 
so-tum (the name for a Squaiv), the most op- 
probrious term in the Indian tongue, when 
ap])lied to males. The result was his in.stant 
death with a tomahawk, and the tearing of his 
heart from his body, and the eating of a por- 
tion of it while yet warm by the assassin. 

These details of Captain Wells's record, be- 
sides the interest given them by his identifica- 
tion with the Maumee Vallej', are valuable, as 
giving in brief space something of Indian life 
and Indian connection with the early history 
of this region. To all this, is added the rela- 
tion borne by that intrepid hero to one of the 
prominent families of Lucas County. 



CHAPTEE 11. 

TIIK WAR OF 1812 WITH ENGLAND. HULl's SUERENDER. THE RIVER RAISIN MASSACRE. 

SIEGE OF FORT MEIGS. — DEFENSE OF FORT STEPHENSON. —THE BATTLE OF LAKE ERIE. — 
THE BATTLE OF THE THAMES. — THE END IN THE NORTHWEST. 



O .section of the countiy was made the 
XM scene or was called to suffer more severely 
the unfortunate incidents and consequences of 
the War of 1812-15 between the United States 
and Great Britain, than was the Maumee Val- 
ley. This fact, no doubt, was largely due to 
the geographical proximity of this region to 
the British possessions in Canada; but was 
even more a result of long-existing and bitter 
feeling engendered by conflicting interests of 
trade, and the presence of Indian tribes cun- 
ningly employed by the British authorities in 
resisting the advance of civilization and law 
under the Government of the United States. 
The profit of traffic with these savages, so long 
contended lor, had lost little of its temptation 
to the shameful policy of British traders, backed 
by British power. Considerations of military 
strategy also operated to the same end. The 
possession of the Lakes, and especially of Lake 
Brie and the countrj' about it, was an end too 
important to be overlooked. Hence, the first 
object of the British Government, upon the dec- 
laration of War, would be to seize these positions 
of advantage; and in doing so, the ways and 
means were matters of subordinate consider- 
ation. Lacking the Military and Naval forces 
requisite for that purpose, they would not 
hesitate to supplement such limited means, by 
employing the services of the Indian tribes and 
bands within the reach of their unscrupulous 
machinations. All this was too well understood 
by the United States Government, and by the 
settlers specially concerned, to be overlooked. 
For several months previous to the declar- 
ation of War by Congress, the matter of 
preparation for that event, was seriously dis- 
cussed and strongly urged. Such provision 
would have included the means requisite for 
seizing full command of the Lakes, the conquest 
of Upper Canada (now Ontario), and securing 
the favor— at least, the neutrality— of the 
Indian tribes most likely to become allies of 
the British. Such steps were repeatedly rec- 



ommended by Governor Hull of Michigan 
Territorj', in March, and again in April, 1812; 
and by Gen. Armstrong, in January, 1812. 
These recommendations included both Naval 
and Military means. The War Department, 
however, in its jjrovisions, limited itself to 
2,000 soldiers, and refused to increase its force 
to 3,000 men, when urged so to do by General 
Hull. 

No definite movement was made toward the 
highly important strategic ends named, until 
June 1st, 1812. At this date. General Hull, 
at the head of a force which he well knew to be 
inadequate for the objects sought, left Dayton, 
for the Maumee Elver, as his first stopping 
place. The force was known as the "North- 
western Army." From Cincinnati marched a 
Regiment under Col. James Findlay. Two 
other Regiments of Ohio Volunteers, under 
Cols. Duncan McArthur and Levv'is Cass, joined 
the command at Urbana. The march occupied 
the entire month, and was attended bj- a degree 
of toil and jjrivation rarelj* experienced bj^ 
military commands. He had roads to out and 
bridges to make through an unbroken forest 
of unsurpassed denseness, and block-houses to 
build at different i^oints. A communication to 
General Hull from the War Departnient of date 
of Maj- 18th, which reached him on the 2-tth, 
gave no indication that war was likely to be 
declared, or that there was special urgent}- for 
haste in the movement of his forces. And 
this, while Senator Thomas Worth ington was 
writing from Washington warnings of the ap- 
])roaching declaration of hostility by Congress ; 
which caution, at the time, is said to have 
been communicated to General Hull by Colonel 
Duncan McArthur. So thoroughly was the 
latter officer impressed with such information, 
that he refused to trust his baggage in the 
vessel employed for sending stores and sick 
soldiers from the Maumee to Detroit. General 
Hull treated all reports of impending War, as 
unworthy of credence, assuming, with some 



[■'-'] 



rin.i.'s sri:nE\i>Ei: 



53 



justice, that were sucli event immediately 
probable, the War Department would not liave 
failed to advise him of the fact in time for 
proper action on his part. 

On the day General Hull left Dayton for his 
march North, President Madison sent to the 
Senate his message recommending a declara- 
tion of War with Great Britain. Two days 
later, Senator Calhoun, from the proper Com- 
mittee, made a report approving such step ; 
and on the 19th the important declaration was 
made by Congress in secret session. It was on 
the day previous to this final action, and 17 
da3-s after the President recommended the 
same, that the Secretai-y of War forwarded to 
General Hull the letter received bj- that officer 
on the 24th, in which no reference was made 
to even a probability of early hostilities. It 
seems that dispatches were forwarded for Gen- 
eral Hull on the HHh of June, b}' ordinary 
course of mail, to Cleveland, reaching there on 
the 2!1th. By direction, the Cleveland Post- 
master disjiatched a me.ssenger with this letter 
to General Hull, who received it July 2d, 
making tlie time of its passage 13 days. The 
British commander at Maiden received infor- 
mation on the Ist of July, of the declaration 
of War. It thus reached him one day ahead 
of General Hull's intelligence, coming m'a Fort 
Erie and the Nortliern shore of Lake Erie, by 
express, the distance being 100 miles greater 
til an was traveled by that officer's advices. It 
was stated, that so certain was the British 
commander at Fort Maiden that the Americans 
were first informed of the declaration of War, 
that he delayed his movement for the capture 
of Detroit. While General EuU was thus left 
to the delaj' of uncertain transmission of intel- 
ligence on which the success of his important 
campaign rested, letters franked by the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury and containing notice of 
what had taken place, were sent to the British 
post at St. Joseph, near the Northwestern shore 
of Lake Huron, and to Maiden, reaching the 
latter place June 28th, or four days before the 
War Department's notice was received by 
General Hull. 

The American forces made their way, unop- 
posed, to Detroit, crossed the River to Sand- 
wich, July 12th, preparatory to movements for 
the capture of Maiden and the conquest of 
Upper Canada. General Hull's lack of fitness 
for his position was here manifested" in the 



irresolution and hesitation in his action, due 
chiefly to a sense of the weakness of his forces. 
To such source of embarrassment was added 
the impatience of his command for an advance. 
For the space of 26 days — from July 12th to 
August 7th — he remained practically idle, 
awaiting intelligence of a contemjjlated move- 
ment on the Niagara frontier, which did not 
take place, the result of such non-action at that 
point being the rapid transfer of British troops 
from the Niagara to the Detroit Eiver. The 
cause of such failure, was found in the failure 
of General Dearborn to make a diversion at 
Niagara and Kingston, in Hull's favor, the 
former having, instead, made an armistice with 
the British commander, thereby j)ermitting 
the diversion of a portion of the latter's forces 
for the support of Colonel Proctor at Maiden. 
The result was, that on the 16th of August, 
without a serious attempt to accomplish the 
great jjurpose and end of his commission, Gen- 
eral Hull disgracefully surrendered Detroit, 
the chief strategic point on the boundary of 
the two countries, together with 1,400 brave 
and true men, long eager for battle, to a force 
consisting of .300 British troops, 400 Canadian 
Militia (disguised in red coats, the uniform of 
British soldiers), and less than 100 Indians ; or 
about one-half the number of his own com- 
mand. Whatever the prevailing cause of his 
fatal inaction, there can be no possible justifi- 
cation or excuse therefor. It matters little, 
whether he was jjossessed by absolute cowardice 
— by fears that his own troops would be unfair 
with him— by apprehension for the personal 
safety of his daughter and grandchildren as 
captives of the Indians — or by a weakness the 
result of habits of intemperance — whether 
either or all of these led to his fatal imbecility 
in action, his grave offense against his country 
remained the same. That he was not duly 
forearmed for his campaign, in either proper 
force or timely information of the exigency of 
the crisis, could properly have been pleaded in 
justification of failure in any earnest movement 
he might have made toward the execution of 
his charge. But no possible excuse could be 
found for his failure to undertake anything in 
that direction. He could have been in no sense 
responsible for results; but he was in the 
highest degree responsible for proper eftbrt 
toward desirable results. Other commanders, 
throughout the history of wars, have, like him, 



-.4 



IIISTORY OF TOLEDO AA'D LUCAS COUNTY. 



suffered from lack of adequate support ; and 
many of the most brilliant records of com- 
manders have been made in the face of such 
want. In illustration of this fact, it is necessary 
only to cite the memorable defense of Fort 
Stephenson, by Major Croghan and his little 
band, against the very forces to whom General 
Hull had surrendered his superior command * 
J.ake Erie was at that time wholly com- 
manded by the British fleet, and no route open 
for supplies to the United States forces in this 
region, save that through the Black Swamp 
and other forests of Northwestern and Central 
Ohio ; to which were added the serious peril 
and annoyance arising from the presence in 
these forests of hostile Indians, requiring a 
strong military guard for every train of wagons 
and pack-horses. A few days after its date, 
the following note was received by Governor 
Meigs, at Chillicothe, to wit: 

Detroit, July 12, 1812. 
Dear ,9ir;— The Army arrived here on the 5th. I 
have now only time to state to you, that we are very 
deficient in provisions, and I have autliorized Mr. 
Piatt to furnish a supply for two months. 

The communication must be preserved by your 
Militia, or this Army will perish for want of provis- 
ions. We have the fullest confidence that j'ou will 
do all in your power to prevent so distressing a cal- 
amity to this patriotic Army. 
I am very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

W. Hull. 
His Excellency, R. J. Meigs, 

Governor of Ohio. 

This letter was furnished by SamuelWilliams, 
who, at the time of its date, was connected with 

*The following were the terms of General Hull's 
surrender : 

" Camp at Detuoit, IGth August, 1812. 
" CajntvJatwn for the surrender of Fort Detroit, entered 
into between Major General Brock, commanding His 
Britannic Majestifs Forces, on the one pari, and 
Brigadier General Hull, commanding the North- 
western Army of the United Stales, on the other part. 
" 1st. Fort Detroit, with all the troops, regulars as 
well as militia, will be immediately surrendered to 
the British forces, under the command of Major 
General Brock, and will be considered prisoners of 
war, with the exception of such of the militia of the 
Michigan Territory who have not joined the army. 

" 2d. All public stores, arms, and all public docu- 
ments, including everything else of a puljlic nature, 
will be immediately given up. 

"3d. Private persons and property of every de- 
scription will be resjiected. 



Governor Meigs, and afterwards found the orig- 
inal copy of the same among his papers and 
carefully preserved it, first making it public 
in a narrative of Military Campaigns of 1812 
and 1813, published in the Ladies' Repository, 
a publication of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, in 1854. 

The object General Hull had in writing this 
letter, is not entirely clear. The attendant 
facts furnish very slight proof of the good 
faith of its author. The probable end sought 
in sending it, was to lay foundation for the 
plea subsequently put forth, that the criminal 
surrender of his command to the British was 
made necessary by a lack of supplies. 

A Court Martial was appointed for the trial 
of General Hull. It met in January, 1814, and 
reached a decision March 23, in pronouncing 
the accused guilty of the second and third 
charges (cowardice and neglect of duty), but 
acquitting him of treason. By a vote of two- 
thirds of the Court, he was sentenced " to be 
shot to death," but recommended to the mercy 
of the President, by whom he was pardoned 
and his name stricken from the Army roll. 
Martin Van Buren, subsequently President of 
the United States, was Judge Advocate in the 
trial. One of the specifications of the first 
charge of treason, was as follows: 

That he traitorously contrived to convey intelli- 
gence of the declaration of War, of the expedition 
under his command, and of the number, state and 
condition of his Army ; by hiring an unarmed 
vessel at the Kapids of the ]\Iianii of Lake Erie, and 
putting on board a trunk containing a copy of the 
declaration of War, his correspondence with the .Sec- 
retary of War, etc., with the intent that they should 
fall into the hands of the enemy. 

" 4th. His Excellency, Brigadier General Hull, 
having expressed a desire that a detachment from 
the State of Ohio, on its way to join his army, as well 
as one sent from Fort Detroit, under the command of 
Colonel McArthur, .shall be included in the above 
capitulation — it is accordingly agreed to. It is, how- 
ever, to be understood that such part of the Ohio 
militia as have not joined the army, will t>e permitteil 
to return to their homes on condition that they will 
not serve during the war. Their arms, however, 
will be delivered up, if belonging to the public. 

".5th. The Governor will march out at the hour 
of twelve o'clock this day, and the Britisli forces will 
take immediate jjossession of the fort. 

"Approved: 

"William Hull, Brig. Gen. 

" Commanding the N. W. Army. 
" Isaac Brock, Major General." 



THE RIVER RAISIN MASSACRE. 



55 



The first definite movement toward the 
re-conquest of Michigan from British con- 
trol secured through Hull's surrender, con- 
sisted of the advance of General Harrison's 
Army from the South. On the 10th of January, 
1813, General Winchester, with his command, 
reached the Foot of the Eajjids; Harrison, 
with the right wing, being yet at Upper San- 
dusky; and Tapper, with the center, at Fort 
McArthur. On the 13th, and again on the 
16th, Winchester received messages from the 
inhabitants of Frenchtown, on the River 
Raisin, setting forth the danger to which that 
place was exposed from the hostility of British 
and Indians. This intelligence acted strongly 
upon the sjmpathies of General Winchester 
and his command, and on the 17th Colonel 
Lewis was dispatched with 550 men to the 
River Raisin ; followed by Colonel Allen, with 
110 more. Proceeding along the borders of 
Maumee Bay and the Lake, then frozen, Lewis 
reached the point of destination on the 18th, 
when he at once attacked the enemy, posted 
in the Village, and gained possession of the 
.same. He then sent for much needed rein- 
forcements and prepared, as well as he could, 
to strengthen his position. The situation was 
very critical, since he was but 18 miles from 
the whole Britisli force, then lying at Maiden, 
under Proctor. Winchester, learning of the 
situation, stai'ted with 250 men on the 19th, 
the.se being all lie dared to withdraw from the 
Rapids, and reached Frenchtown on the even- 
ing of the 20th. Instead of taking ordinary 
precaution against surprise, he suffered his 
forces to remain on open grounds, notwith- 
standing he was warned of the danger of 
momentary attack by reinforcements from 
Maiden. Sure enough, on the night of Jan- 
uarj- 2l8t, the entire British force, unobserved, 
arrived and placed a battery within 300 feet of 
Winchester's camp. Early in the morning, 
and l)efore the American troops were under 
arms, the British opened vigorous fire into 
their camp, soon followed by thu dread yell 
and whoop of the Indian allies. Partial pro- 
tection l)y garden pickets had been secured to 
Ijewis's force; but nothing interposed to shield 
the imprudent Winchester's men, who received 
the main attention of the combined enemy, 
and who soon gave way, and fled precipitately, 
and were mown down at fearful rate. Both 
Winchester and Lewis were captured. The lat- 



ter's forces were maintaining their ground un- 
til they received from Winchester what they 
understood to be an order for surrender, upon 
which they acted, although that oflicer declared 
that his message was intended as suggestion 
or advice, and not an order. He was induced 
to send it by Proctor, the British commander, 
by representing to him that by such step alone 
could he save his men from an Indian mas- 
sacre, at the same time pledging, in case of sur- 
render, protection to iirisoners. Such promise 
was never regarded, as the inhuman barbarities 
that followed, abundantly showed. Of 800 
men there under Winchester, full one-third 
were killed in battle and the massacre which 
followed, and less than 40 escaped, the rest 
being taken prisoners. 

Something of the real character of that 
murderous scene, will be seen from the follow- 
ing account thereof, given by Dr. Gustavus M. 
Bower, Surgeon's Mate of the Fifth Kentucky 
Regiment, an ej'e-witness. It is as follows : 

Yours of the 5th instant, requesting me to give 
you a statement respecting the late disaster at French- 
town, was duly received. Rest assured, sir, that it is 
with sensations the most unpleasant that I under- 
take to recount the infamous and barbarous conduct 
of the Britisli and Indians after the battle of the 22d 
January. The blood runs cold in m}' veins when I 
think of it. 

On the morning of the 23d, shortly after light, 
six or eight Indians came to the house of Jean Bap- 
tiste Jereaume, where I was, in company with Major 
Graves, Captains Hart and Hickman, Doctor Todd, 
and fifteen or twenty volunteers, belonging to differ- 
ent corps. They did not molest any person or tiling 
on their first approach, Init kept sauntering about 
until there was a large number collected (say one or 
two hundred), at which time they commenced plun- 
dering the houses of the inhabitants, and the massacre 
of the wounded prisoners. I was one amongst the 
first that was taken prisoner, and was taken to a 
horse about iwenty paces from the house, after being 
divested of part of my clothing, and commanded by 
signs there to remain for further orders. Shortly 
after being there, I saw them knock down Captain 
Hickman at the door, together with several otliers 
with whom I was not acquainted. Supposing a gen- 
eral massacre had commenced, I made an eflbrt to 
get to a house about one hundred yards distant, 
whicli contained a number of wounded, but on my 
reaching the house, to my great mortification, found 
it surrounded by Indians, which precluded the pos- 
sibility of my giving notice to the unfortunate vic- 
tims of savage barbarity. An Indian chief of the 
Tawa tribe of the name of McCarty, gave me posses- 
sion of his horse and blanket, telling me by signs to 
lead the horse to the house which I had just before 



ii/srnny of Toledo and lvcas county. 



left. The Indian that first took me, by this time 
came up, and manifested a liostile disposition towards 
me, !))■ raising liis tomahawk as if to give me the 
fatal blow, whifli was prevented by my very good 
friend McCarty. On my reaching the house which I 
had first started fi-om, I saw the Indians take ofl' 
several prisoners, which I afterwards saw in the 
road, in a most mangled condition, and entirely 
stripped of their clothing. 

Jdessre. Bradford, Searls, Turner and Blythe, 
were collected round a carryall, w'hich contained 
articles taken by the Indians from the citizens. We 
had all been placed there, by our respective captors, 
except Blythe, who came where we w'ere entreating 
an Indian to convey him to Maiden, promising to 
give him forty or fifty dollars, and whilst in the act 
of pleading for mercy, an Indian more savage than 
the other, stepped up behind, tomahawked, stripped 
and scalped him. The next that attracted my at- 
tention, was the bouses on fire that contained several 
wounded, whom I knew were not able to get out. 
After the houses were nearly consumed, we received 
marching orders, and after arriving at Sandy Creek, 
the Indians called a halt and commenced cooking ; 
after preparing and eating a little sweetened gruel, 
JSIessrs. Bradford, Searls, Turner and myself, re- 
ceived some, and were eating, when an Indian came 
up and proposed exchanging his moccasins for Mr. 
Searls's shoes, which he readily complied with. They 
then exchanged hats, after which the Indian inquired 
how many men Harrison had with him, and, at the 
same time, calling Searls a AVashington or Jladison, 
then raised his tomahawk and struck him on the 
shoulder, which cut into the cavity of the body. 
Searls then caught hold of the tomahawk and ap- 
peared to resist, and upon my telling him his fate 
was inevitable, he closed his eyes and received the 
savage blow which terminated his existence. I was 
near enough to him to receive the brains and blood, 
after the fatal blow, on my blanket. A short time 
after the death of Searls, I saw three others share a 
similar fate. We then set out for Brownstown, 
which place we reached about 12 or 1 o'clock at 
night. After being exposed to several hours' inces- 
sant rain in reaching that place, we were put into 
the Council-house, the floor of which was partly 
covered with water, at which place we remained 
until next morning, when we again received march- 
ing orders for their ^^llage on the river Rouge, which 
place we made that day, where I was kept six days, 
then taken to Detroit and sold. For a more de- 
tailed account of the proceedings, I take the liberty 
of referring you to a publication which appeared in 
the public prints, signed by Ensign J. L. Baker, and 
to the publication of Judge Woodward, both of 
which I have particularly examined, and find them 
to be literally correct, so far as came under my 
notice. 

There can be no reasonable ground for 
doubt, as to where lay the real responsibility 
for this atrocious scene, to wit: With the 



British commander. The actual perpetrators 
might plead the barbarous dispositions and 
practice of their race, in partial extenuation 
of their savagery ; General Proctor, in sliame- 
fully consenting thereto, had no such mitiga- 
tion. The bloody work was done by his own 
command, without even protest. The only 
pretext put forth in his behalf, was, that he 
believed to be true a report set afloat by 
American prisoners, for the purpose of intim- 
idating their captors and staying their lives, 
that General Harrison, with a large force, was 
at Otter Creek. This report — known to the 
Indians as incorrect — was sufficient to fi-ighten 
the British to flight to Maiden. 

Harrison, on the night of the 16th, started 
from Upper Sandusky for Lower Sandusky 
(Fremont), and on the 18th dispatched a Bat- 
talion to Winchester ; and learning the situa- 
tion, he hastened to the Maumee Rapids, ar- 
riving there on the morning of the 20th, and 
waited there until the evening of the 21st, for 
a Kegiment, which fell behind in crossing the 
Black Swamp. On the 22d this Regiment was 
dispatched to Frencbtown, other troops follow- 
ing. The movement was in vain, since the 
fatal engagement occurred on that day, and 
Harrison met a few survivors before reaching 
the ground. It was not deemed best to pro- 
ceed, and the forces returned to the Rapids ; 
whence, as a matter of precaution against be- 
ing cut off from convoys of stores and artillery 
yet in the Black Swamp, Harrison proceeded 
to " Carrying" (Portage) River, to await rein- 
forcements daily expected, but which, in con- 
sequence of I'ains, did not arrive until the 
30th. Now reinforced by two Regiments, 
Gen. Harrison, on the Ist February, advanced 
toward the Rapids, where he set about the 
construction of a fortification, which, in honor 
of the Governor of Ohio, he named Fort 
Meigs, where his entire force was concen- 
trated. At the same time fortifications were 
constructed at Ujjper Sandusky. 



The situation in the Northwest, at this 
time, was far from satisfactory — the chief 
military results there, since the opening of 
the War, having been the capture of Mack- 
inaw, the surrender of Hull, the massacre 
at Chicago, and the massacre on the River 
Raisin. Harrison found an entire change in 
his plans necessary, as a result of Winchester's 



FORT MKIGS AND VICINITV. 

MAUMEE RIVER. 







A— Gun Batteries. B— Mortar Battery. C— Blockliouses. D— Luokoliis, E— Old Magazine. F— New Magazine. H— Gateways in the 
Grand Traverse. K— Outer Gateways. M— Graves of Offleers. N— Officers' Quarters. P— Store Houses. R— Forges and Repair Shops. S— 
Burial Ground of Pittsburg Blues. T— Garrison Burial Ground. The Guns were placed in position at the different Batteries as occasion 
requiretl. 









BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF FORT MEIGS, FROM THE NORTH. 




Across the River from the Fort, where the main British Batteries were planted. 







■:A 






,3::^-^^^§5t»=* 



ji" 



4 



Across the Fort nn<l 4o\vii tin- WilK-y, i'imih tin W'csi Angle. 




/ _.; ■ -■ ..Ml 






Down the RiivJRe toward Perrysburg, from the North Angle, looking East. 
Dudley Burial Ground on the right, marked by a dead Walnut tree. 











Down the small Ravine off the East 
Angle of the Fort. 






y'Vrf.v "**" ' 

Up the N'alley from the Fort. Battle- 
field of Fallen Timbers in 
the distance.' 



f^IEGE OF FORT MEKIS. 



57 



sad fiiiliire. For this purpose, he returned to 
Oliio, liut soon hastened back to Fort Meigs, 
tliat ho might more closely watch tho progress 
of matters. 

It had now become the accepted policj' of 
the Government, to employ regular troojis 
only and secure the command of the Lakes, 
which was expected to be accomplished by the 
1st of June, 1813. General Harrison con- 
siilered the exclusive use of regulars im- 
practicable, for lack of sufficient force of such. 
Hence, militia continued to be a dependence 
for troops. 

It was expected that the Britieh, on the 
opening of Spring, would proceed for the con- 
quest of Fort Meigs, and Harrison directed 
his efforts accordingly. The investment of 
that post began Ajjril 28th, and by May Ist 
the British had their batteries in position. 
Such was the structure of the Fort, that five 
days of cannonading proved ineffective. On 
the 5th General Clay of Iventuckj-, with 1,200 
additional troops, on flat boats, came down the 
Manmee. Of these, 800 were detached under 
Col. Dudley, to attack the batteries on the left 
bank of tlie River, while the balance of Clay's 
troo])s landed on the South shore and forced 
their way into the Fort. Dudley cajitured the 
batteries, but neglecting to spike the guns and 
hasten to the Fort, he wasted time until Proc- 
tor cut him off from retreat, and killed and 
captured all but 150 of his command. Col. 
Miller succeeded in capturing and rendering 
useless the British batteries on the South side 
of the River. This day's operations consti- 
tuted a sad record for the Americans, although 
the British saw little encouragement for the 
future. The Indians found it " hard to fight 
people who lived like ground-hogs." Mean- 
time additional trooi)s for Harrison were ap- 
proaching from the South. Such was the 
situation, that Proctor determined to retreat, 
and on the 9th left for Maiden. 

A private soldier of the Petersburg (Va.) 
Volunteers, writing from Zanesville, O., March 
28, 1813, to a friend at Petersburg, gave an ac- 
count of the experience of his Company and 
other troops of Harrison's Army, in a passage 
from Up]icr Sanduskj' to Fort Meigs, not long 
before that date. Major Orr was in command. 
The writer says : " We had with us 20 pieces 
of Artillery, and a quantity of military stores 
of every description. We at this time knew 



nothing of the unfortunate events on the 
Raisin. On tiio second day of our march, a 
courier arrived from General Harrison, order- 
ing the Artillery to advance with all po.s.sible 
speed. This was rendered totall}' impossible 
by the snow which took place, it being a com- 
plete swamp nearly all the way. On the even- 
ing of the same day, news arrived that GeTieral 
Harrison had retreated to Portage River, 18 
miles in rear of the camp at the Rapids. As 
many men as could be spared, determined to 
proceed immediately to reinforce Lim. It is 
unnecessary to state, that we were among the 
first who wished to advance. At two o'clock 
the next morning our tents were struck, and 
in half an hour we were on the road. I will 
candidl}^ confess that on that day I regretted 
being a soldier. On that day we marched 30 
miles, under an incessant rain ; and I am afraid 
you will doubt my veracitj*, when I tell j'ou, 
that in eight miles of the best road, it took us 
over the knees, and often to the middle. The 
Black Swamp (four miles from Portage River, 
and four miles in extent) would have been 
considered impassable by all but men deter- 
mined to surmount every difficulty to accom- 
plish the object of their march. In this Swamp 
you lose sight of terra firma altogether. The 
water was about six inches deep on the ice, 
which was very rotten, often breaking through 
to the depth of four or five feet. Tlie same 
night we encamped on very wet ground, but 
the driest that could be found, the rain still 
continuing. It was with difficulty we could 
raise fires. We had no tents; our clothes were 
wet; no axes; nothing to cook in, and very 
little to eat. A brigade of pack-horses being 
near us, we procured from them some flour ; 
killed a hog (there being a plenty of them 
along the road). Our bread was baked in the 
ashes, and the pork wo broiled on the coals. 
A sweeter meal I never partook of. When we 
went to sleep, it was on two logs laid close to 
each other, to keep our bodies from the damji 
ground. Good God ! what a pliant being is 
man in adversity ! The loftiest spirit that ever 
inhabited the human breast, would have been 
tamed amid the difficulties that surrounded us. 
The next morning we arrived at Portage River 
(the headquarters of the North .vestern Army)." 
The writer says of the view obtained from Fort 
Meigs: "Along this river is the handsomest 
country I ever saw. There had been several 



k 



58 



nrsroRV of toledo and lucas county. 



fine phiiitations in the vicinity, but all is now 
a scene of desolation. After Hull's surrender, 
the whole country was laid waste by the In- 
dians. Every half-mile had been a house. The 
only indications of habitations that now re- 
main, are the ruins that cover the grounds 
where tiiey once stood." lie wrote of a march 
after British troops to within five miles of 
Kiver Raisin, and return, a disianco of 60 miles, 
made in 21 hours, with but two hours of sleep. 



About this time, Proctor's forces again 
gathered about Fort Meigs, remaining there 
for a week, their object seeming to be the 
diversion of Harrison's attention from Erie, 
and giving employment to the immense bands 
of Indians gathered at Maiden, rather than any 
active work against the Fort. Proctor then 
moved toward Sandusky. Harrison's principal 
stores were at that point, while he was at Fort 
Seneca, on the Sandusky River, and about 10 
miles South of Lower Sandusky. Major George 
Croghan was at Fort Ste])henson, Lower San- 
dusky (Fremont). This post was regarded as 
indefensible from heavy cannon, such as Proc- 
tor was expected to bring, and Harrison after 
a council of war, concluded it best, as a matter 
of prudence, to abandon it, and July 3Lst dis- 
patched an order to Croghan, accordingly; but 
before tliis could be done, the enemy appeared 
ascending the Sandusky River in open boats, 
and soon invested the Fort, while bands of In- 
dians ranged through the woods, ready to in- 
tercept Croghan's men, sliould thev leave the 
Fort. 

The garri.son of Fort Stephenson consisted 
of 150 men onlj', with a commander just past 
his 21st year; while the investing force, in- 
cluding Tecumseh's Indians, was said to be 
3,300 strong. Croghan had a single piece of 
cannon, to the six of the enemy (the latter, 
fortunately, not being heavy). Proctor de- 
manded a surrender, repeating the old story 
of the danger that resistance might provoke 
his Indian allies to acts of savage barbarity. 
To all this, the intrepid Croghan replied, that 
when Proctor got posse.ssion of the Fort there 
would be found therein no men to massacre. 
Whereupon, fire was opened on the Northwest 
angle of the Fort. Apprehending Proctor's 
design to be to effect a breach and enter there, 
Croghan strengthened that point with bags of 
flour and sand ; while under cover of night, he 



•so located his six-jiounder as to rake the angle, 
loading his piece with slugs, when he awaited 
the enemy's approach. Throughout the night 
of August 1st, and until the evening of the 2d, 
the fire continued on the angle of the Fort. At 
last, assuming that the requisite breach had 
been effected, and under cover of smoke and 
gathering darkness. Proctor directed a column 
of 350 men to advance. When within 20 paces 
of the walls, they were seen by Croghan, who 
at once ordered a fire of musketry upon them, 
but with little effect, the advance of the enemy 
not being stayed. The ditch being filled with 
Proctor's troops, the gun was suddenly un- 
masked and fired, the first discharge killing 27 
men. This seemed to be decisive. The col- 
umn in the ditch recoiled and withdrew. The 
Fort was saved without the lo.ss of a single 
man. The next morning the British and allies 
concluded not to continue their movement to- 
ward Harrison at Fort Seneca, but, leaving 
guns, stores and clothing, and some wounded, 
withdrew, abandoning the field. A British 
account of this affair, placed Proctor's force at 
400 regular and 300 Indians, with two six-pound 
guns. Their loss was 90 killed at the Fort, 
about 100 men being lost in all. 

Few military events of the West have com- 
manded more attention, than has this brilliant 
defense of Fort Stephenson. This fact is due, 
first, to the real merits of the case ; and second, 
to the connection subsequenti}- given it with 
General Harrison's candidac\' for President, in 
1830 and 1840. On both the.se occasions, de- 
termined and persistent effort was made by 
that gentleman's political opf)Ouents, to preju- 
dice voters against him, by charging to cow- 
ardice his order to Croghan for the evacuation 
of Fort Stephenson. Suffice it here to state, 
that neither Jlajor Croghan nor any other 
officer of Harrison's Army for one moment 
countenanced such view; but one and all full}' 
approved the course taken by their commander. 
In fact, Croghan would have promptly with- 
drawn his force, when directed, had not the 
presence of the enemy rendered capture cer- 
tain. By fortuitous circumstances then un- 
known to iiiiii, lie was enabled to make a defense 
for which he had not reason to hope. 



The brilliant victory at Lower Sandusky 
substantially closed the military movements 
in Northwestern Ohio, and attention was 



THE BATTLE OF LAKE ERTE. 



59 



next directed toward Brie and Perry's prep- 
arations for Naval operations. It so liap- 
pened, tliat that commander, on the very day 
of Croghan's victory (August 2d), had com- 
pleted the equipment of his tieet at Erie, but, 
owing to a lack of water, he did not cross the 
bar in tlie harbor until the 4th, when he set 
sail in search of the enemj-. Not finding them, 
lie returned on the 8tli to Erie, to take in rein- 
forcements. August 12th, he again left, and 
anchored in Sandusky Bay on the 15th, whence 
he soon departed iu quest of the enem3\ Cruis- 
ing off Maiden, but not finding the object of 
his search, he retired to Put-iu Bay. His fleet 
consisted of the Brig Lawrence (the flag ship), 
of 20 guns; the Niagara, of 20 ; the Caledonia, 
of 3; the Schooner Ariel, of 4; the SlooiJ 
Trippe, and Schooners Tigress and Porcupine, 
of 1 gun each — nine vessels with 54 guns and 
two swivels. The British had six vessels, but 
the)' were superior in size, with a greater num- 
ber of guns. 

On the morning of the memorable 10th of 
September, Commodore Perry discovered the 
enemy bearing down upon him, when he at 
once made preparation for the conflict, which 
was accepted on both sides as probably deci- 
sive of supremacy on the Lake, and as certain 
to have most important bearing on the general 
contest. The rejiort made by Perry con- 
stitutes the most compact and interesting 
account of the engagement to be had. It is as 
follows : 

United States Schooner Ariel, ) 
Put-in Bay, 13th Sept., 181:!. (" 

At sunrise on the morning of the 10th, the en- 
emy's vessels were discovered from Put-in Bay, where 
I lay at anchor with the Squadron under my com- 
mand. 

We got under way, the wind light S. W., and 
stood for them. At 10:00 A. M. tlic wind hauled to 
S. E., and Ijrought us to windward; formed the line 
and brought up. At !■> uunutes before Vi, the enemy 
commenced firing. At live minutes before 12, the 
action commenced ou our part. Finding their fire 
very destructive, owing to their long guns, and it 
being most directed to the Lawrence, 1 made sail and 
directed the other vessels to follow, for the jiurpose 
of closing with the enemy. Every Ijrace and ))0w 
being .shot away, she became unmanageable, notwith- 
standing the great exertions of the sailing master. In 
this situation she sustained the action upwards of two 
hours, within canister-shot distance, until every gun 
was rendered useless, and a greater part of the crew 
either killed or wounded. Finding she could no 
longer annoy the enemy, I left her in charge of Lieu- 



tenant Yarnall, who, as I was convinced, from the 
liravery already displayed by him, would do what 
would comport with the honor of the flag. 

At lialf-past two, the wind springing up, Captain 
Elliott was enabled to bring his vessel, the Niagara, 
gallanth- into close action. I immediately went on 
board her, when he anticipated mj' wish by volun- 
teering to bring the Schooner, which had been 
kept astern by the lightness of the wind, into close 
action. 

It was with unspeakable jiain, that I saw, soon 
after I got on board the Niagara, the flag of the ]>aw- 
rence come down, although I was perfectly sensible 
that slie had been defended to the last, and that to 
have continued to make a show of resistance, would 
have been a wanton sacrifice of the remaining of her 
brave crew. But the enemy was not able to take 
possession of her, and circumstances soon permitted 
her flag to be hoisted. 

At 4.5 minutes past two, the signal was made for 
close action. The Niagara being very little injured, 
I dcteruuned to pass through the enemy's line, bore 
up and passed ahead of their tw'o Ships and a Brig, 
giving a raking fire to them from the starboard guns, 
and to a small Schooner and Sloop, from the larboard 
side, at half-pistol shot distance. The smaller ves- 
sels at this time having got within grape and canister 
distance, under the direction of Captain Elliott, antl 
keeping up a well-directed fire, the two Ships, a Brig 
and a Schocmer surrendered, a Schooner and Slooj) 
making vain attempt to escape. 

Those officers and men, who were immediately 
under my observation, evinced the greatest gallantry, 
and I have no doubt that all others conducted them- 
selves as became Ameriean Officers and Seamen. 

In the days of this battle, war history was 
largely recorded in ballads. This was specially 
true of events appealing to the popular senti- 
ment. A fair sample of such recoi'd is fur- 
nished in the following production, in connec- 
tion with the Naval engagement of September 
10th, which at the time and for many years 
thereaftci- was familiar to old and young: 

JAMES BIRD. 

Sons of Plefisure, listen to me ; 

And ye daughters too give ear. 
You a sad and mournful story 

As was ever told shall hear. 
Hull, you know, our troops snrreinlered, 

And defenseless left the West; 
Then our fleet was quick assembled, 

The invader to resist. 

'Mimg the troops that marched to Erie, 

Were the Kingstown volunteers : 
Captain Thomas then commanded. 

To protect our West frontiers. 
Tender were the scenes of parting: 

Mothers wrung their hands and cried ; 
Maidens wept their loves in secret: 

Fathers strove their tears to hide. 



60 



lllSTonV OF TOI.KDO AND LVi'AS COUNTY. 



But there's one among the number, 

Tall and Kracefnl ■" his mien; 
Firm his steji, his look umliumted ; 

Ne'er a nobler youth was seen, 
One sweet kiss he snatehed from Mary, 

Craved his mother's prayers once more, 
Pressed his father's hand and left them 

For Lake Krie's distivul shore. 

Mary tried to say "Farewell, .lames," 

Waved her iiand but nothing spoke; 
"Farewell, Bird, may Heaven protect you," 

From the rest at parting broke. 
Soon he came where noble Perry 

Had assembled all his tleet : 
There the gallant Bird enlisted, 

Hoping soon the foe to meet. 

Where is Rird "' The battle rages. 

Is he in the strife, or no? 
Now the cannons roar tremendous. 

Dare he boldly meet the foe? 
\'es, behold him— see !— with Perry, 

In the self-same ship they fight — 
Though his mess mates fall around him. 

Nothing can his soul aft'right. 

But behold a ball has struck him. 

See the crimson current flow ; 
"Leave the deck," exclaimed brave Perry; 

"No," cried Bird. "I will not go. 
Here on deck I'll take my statiou, 

Ne'er will Bird his colors fly, 
I'll stand by you, gallant Captain, 

Till we conquer, or we die." 

And he fought, though faint and bleeding. 

Till our stars and stripes arose. 
Victory having crowned our efforts, 

All triumphant o'er our foes. 
But did Bird receive a pension? 

Was he to his home restored? 
No, nor ever to his bosom 

Clasped the maid his heart adored. 

But there came most dismal tidings 

From Lake Erie's distant shore; 
Better, far, poor Bird had perished 

'Midst the battle's awful roar. 
" Dearest Parents," read the letter, 

"This will bring sad news to you. 
Do not mourn, my best beloved. 

Though this brings my last adieu. 

" Brothers, sisters, read this letter, 

'Tis the last you'll have from me ; 
I must suffer for deserting 

From the brig Niagara." 
Though he fought so brave at Erie, 

Freely bled, and nobly dared— 
Let his courage plead for mercy, 

Let his noble life be spared. 

Sad and gloomy was the morning. 

Bird was ordered out to die ; 
Where's the breast so dead to pity 

But for him must heave a sigh? 
See him march, and hear his fetters, 

Harsh they clank upon the ear; 
Yet his step is lirm and manly. 

For his breast ne'er harbored fear. 

See! he kneels upon his coffin- 
Sure his death can do no good. 

Save him !-IIark, O God ! they've shot him ! 
Now his bosom streams with blood. 

Farewell, Bird ! farewell, forever ; 
Friends and home he'll see no more; 

For bis mangled corpse lies buried 
On Lake Erie's distant shore. 



Jame.s Bird -was born in Lucerne County, 
Penn., and was a young man when tlie war 
commenced. He early enlisted in the Arm}', 
joining a Company raised by Henry Bucking- 
ham, whose son Henr}- was a pioneer Merchant 
at Norwalk, Ohio, and whose grandson Henry 
now (1887) resides at Lawrence, Kansas. 
At the Battle of Lake Erie, Captain Thomas 
was his commander. Bird was employed by 
Captain Buckingham in his mill at Kingston, 
and " Mary," spoken of in the song, was a 
member of the Captain's family. The two 
were recognized as lovers, and parted as such. 
The " Annals of Lucerne County," written by 
Stewart Pearce, has this mention of Bird's case : 

He was from Pittston, and was descended from 
a most respectable family. He was a man of great 
bodily strength and activity, and was full of patriotic 
devotion to the cause of his country, but unfortu- 
nately his proud spirit boldly rejected many of the 
restraints imiiosed by the stern rules of military dis- 
cipline. He fought like a tiger and when wounded 
refused to be carried below. News of the intended 
attack of the enemy on New Orleans had reached the 
fleet on Lake Erie, and Bird, ambitious to be in the 
midst of the smoke and fire of battle, one night, when 
in command of the guard, marched away with sev- 
eral of his men to join General Jackson. He was 
pursued and arrested at Pittsburg, from which place 
he was about to embark with a companj' of volunteers 
for the Crescent City. Being arraigned before and 
tried by a Court Martial, he was sentenced, in accor- 
dance with the rules of war, to be shot. Had Com- 
modore Perry received intelligence of the proceedings 
in time, Bird's life would have been spared. 

Bird's remains probably now rest with those 
of his comrades on Gibraltar Island, Put-in Bay, 
and said to be under a large willow tree front- 
ing the Bay, enclosed by a chain fence. The 
ballad, according to the best information at 
hand, was written by Charles Miner, who pub- 
lished the Gleaner, at Wilkesbarre, Penn., from 
1801 to 1818, and afterwards was a member of 
Congress from that State. 

Harrison's Army had been j^atiently, j^et 
anxiously waiting the outcome of Naval 
operations; meantime receiving reinforce- 
ments and organizing, with reference to 
following up Perry's signal success, by an ad- 
vance upon Canada. September 27th, Harri- 
son set sail, and .soon reached Maiden, from 
which Proctor had retreated to Sandwich, on 
his way, as rajiidly as possible, for a safe point 
in the interior, via the Thames River. Harri- 
son reached Sandwich on the 29th, and on the 



THE BATTLE OF THE THAMES. 



same day McArthixr took possession of Detroit 
and Micliigan. October 2d, the Americans 
began their pursuit of the retreating British 
force, which was overtaken on the 5th. Find- 
ing an engagement unavoidable, Proctor was 
led to post his Army, its left wing resting on 
the Thames, while the right was defended by 
a marsh. Without here going into details of 
the engagement, it will suffice to state, that 
Harrison's troops consisted of about 120 Jiegu- 
lars of the 27th Hegiment ; five Brigades of 
Kentuck}' Militia Infantrj-, averaging less than 
500 men, under Governor Isaac Shelby, of 
that State ; and Colonel Richard M. Johnson's 
Regiment of Mounted Infantry; making in all 
about 3,0(10 men. The force of the British is 
not definitely stated, but it was supposed to be 
something less than that of Harrison's, consti- 
tuted of British and Indians. The battle was 
of short duration. The enemy being seriously 
demoralized, they fought chiefly on the defen- 
sive, and retreated as fast as the way therefor 
opened. The most notable incident of the en- 
gagement, was the killing of the renowned 
Indian leader, Tecumseh, at the hands, as since 
pretty well determined, of Colonel Johnson of 
Kentucky, subsequently (1837-41) Vice Pres- 
ident of the United States. This fact was for 
a time in dispute; iiut it finally became the 
generally accepted belief, that the credit of 
Tecumseh's death is due to Colonel Johnson.* 

* Johnson was severely wounded during the en- 
gagement, and was borne from the field b}' Captain 
James Knaggs, of Monroe, and Menard Labadie. In 
18.5:5, wJien the act of killing Tecumseh was j-et in 
dis])ute, Captain Knaggs, in an aftidavit, made the 
fiillowing statement : 

" I was attached to a Company of mounted men, 
called Rangers, at the battle of the Thames, in 1813. 
During the battle, we charged into the swamp, where 
several of our horses mired dow'n, and an order was 
given to retire to the hard ground in our rear, which 
we did. The Indians in front, helieving that we 
wen' retreating, immediatel}- advanced upon us, 
with Tecum.seh at their head. I distinctly heard his 
voire, with which I was perfectly familiar. He 
yelled like a tiger, and urged on his braves to the 
attack. We were tlien but a few yards ajiart. We 
halted on tlie hard gnjund, and continued our fire. 
After a few minutes of very severe fighting, I discov- 
ered Colonel Johnson lying near, on the ground, 
with one leg confined by the body of his white 
mare, which had been killed, and had fallen upon 
him. My friend Menard Labadie was with me. We 
went up to the Colonel, with whom we were previ- 
ously aci|uainted, and fnund him badly wounded. 



In this connection the testimony of as intel- 
ligent and well-informed witness to the true 
character of Tecutnseh, as was General Leslie 
Combs, of Kentucky, will not be out of place. 
In a letter to the editor of the Historical Record, 
under date of Lexington, Ky., October, 1H71, 
that gentleman wrote as follows : 

You ask me for a description of the celebrated 
Indian warrior, Tecumseh, from my personal observa- 
tion. I answer that I never saw the great chief but 
once, and then under rather exciting circumstances, 
but I have a vivid recollection of him from his api>ear- 
ance, and by intercourse with his personal friends I 
am possessed of accurate knowledge of his character. 

1 was, as you know, one of the prisoners taken at 
what is known as Dudley's defeat on the banks of 
the Maumee River, opposite Fort Meigs, early in 
May, 1813. Tecumseh had fallen upon our rear, and 
we were compelled to surrender. We were marched 
down to the old Fort Miami or Maumee, in squads, 
where a terrible scene awaited us. The Indians, 
fully armed with guns, war clubs and tomahawks — 
to say nothing of .scalping knives, had formed them- 
selves into two lines in front of the gateway between 
which all of us were bound to pass. Many w^ere 
killed or wounded in running the gauntlet. Shortly 
after the prisoners had entered, the Indians rushed 
over the walls and again surrounded us, and raised 
the war-whoop, at the same time making unmistak- 
able demonstrations of violence. We all expected to 
be massacred, and the small British guard around us 
were utterly unable to aflord protection. They called 

lying on his side, with one of his pistols in his 
hand. I saw Tecumseh at the same time, lying on 
his face, dead, and about fifteen or twenty feet from 
the Colonel. He was stretched at full length, and 
was shot through the body, I think near the heart. 
The ball went out through his hack. He held his 
toniaha\vk in his right hand (it had a brass pipe on 
the head of it), his arm was extended as if striking, 
and the edge of the tomahawk was stuck in the 
ground. Tecumseh was dressed in red speckled leg- 
gings, and a fringed hunting shirt; he lay stretched 
directly towards Colonel Johnson. When we went 
up to the Colonel we offered to help him. He rej^lied 
with great animation, ' Knaggs, let me lie here, and 
push on and take Proctor.' However, we liberated 
him from Ins dead horse, took Ins blanket from his 
saddle, placed him in it, and bore him oft' the field. 
I had known Tecumseh from my boyhood ; we were 
boys together. There was no other Indian killed 
immediately around where Colonel Johnson or Te- 
cum.seh lay, although there were many near the 
Creek, a few rods back of where Tecumseh fell. 

" I had no doubt then, and have none now, that 
Tecumseh fell by the hand of C(jlonel Johnson." 

Captain Knaggs w'as a gentleman much esteemed 
at Monroe, and was an active and valuable friend of 
the American cause throughout the AVar. 



62 



msTonr of Toledo and lucas county. 



loudly for General Proctor and Colonel Elliott to 
come to our relief. At this critical moment Tecum- 
seh came rushing in, deeply excited, and denounced 
the murderers of jiri.foners (is cotmrrh. Thus our lives 
were spared and wo were sent down to the fleet at 
the mouth of Swan Creek (now Toledo), and from 
that place across the en<l of the Lake to Huron and 
paroled. 

1 sliall never forget the noble countenance, gallant 
bearing and sonorous voice of that remarkable man, 
while addressiuf; his warriors in our behalf. He was 
then between forty and forty-five years of age. His 
frame was vigorous and robust, but he was not fat, 
weighing about one hundred and seventy pounds. 
Five feet 10 inches was his height; he had a high 
projecting forehead, and broad, open countenance ; 
and there was something noble and commamling in 
all his actions. He was brave, humane and gener- 
ous, and never allowed a prisoner to be massacred if 
he could prevent it. At Fort Miami he saved the 
lives of all of us who had survived running the 
gaimtlet. He afterwards released seven Shawanese 
belonging to my command, and sent them home on 
parole. Tecumseh was a Shawanese. His name 
signified in their language. Shooting Star. At the 
time when I saw him he held, the commission of a 
Brigadier General in the British Army. I am satis- 
fied that he deserved all that was said of him by 
General Cass and Governor Harrison, previous to 
his death. 

The battle of tlie Tliamos substantially 
closed hostilities in the West. Their successive 
failures at Fort Meigs, at Fort Stephenson, on 
the Lake and at the Thames, satisfied the 
British that fnrther attempts in this section 
would be useless, and none such were made. 
This scries of important victories by the Amer- 
ican forces, accomplished all that skill and 
heroism could do toward retrieving the loss of 
position and honor in Hull's surrender and 
Winchester's sad defeat. 

The purpose here has been simply to note 
the more important events of the War occur- 
ring in this section, and tliose having a local 
interest. 

The following is a succinct statement of 
events following the victory of Commodore 
Perry : 

September 10th.— The victory. " We have 
met the enemy, and they are ours ! " Septem- 
ber 11th.— The American and British officers 
killed in the action of the Kith, were buried at 
Put-in Bay, but the bodies of those holding no 
official rank in the fleet, were "in the deep 
bosom of Ocean buried." This discrimination 
is not a grateful reminiscence. September 
17th.— Governor Shelby of Kentucky, at the 



head of 4,000 mounted volunteers arrived at 
the month of Portage Eiver (Port Clinton), 
flushed with exultation at the events of the 
week before, and destined to invade Canada. 
" What shall bo done with the horses?" was 
the first question. A fence was thrown from 
Sanduslcy Baj^ to the nearest jjoint on the 
Portage River, and thus enclosed in a luxuriant 
pasture of 10,000 acres, the 5,000 horses were 
left to range under guard of 500 Kentucky 
volunteers. September 20th. — General McAr- 
thur's Brigade reached the mouth of the Port- 
age, after a toilsome march from Fort Meigs — 
the grass often so high and dense, that one 
man was compelled to mount upon the shoul- 
ders of another, to determine their line of 
march. September 21st. — The Army of Can- 
ada embarked under command of General Wra. 
H. Harri.son. Put-in Bay was their first stage, 
which was 16 miles from Portage River. Com- 
modore Peri-y's vessels were engaged in trans- 
])orting baggage. Great enthusiasm among the 
troops. Sc]itcmber 22d. — The whole Army 
gained the Island, and were encamped on the 
margin of the semi-circular Bay (South Bass). 
The St. Ijawrence and the six prize-ships were 
at anchor within Put-in Bay, and were visited 
by jiarties from the shore. September 23d. — 
Unfavorable wind.s — the Army at rest at Put- 
in Bay. September 24th. — A deserter shot. 
He had deserted three times, and been twice 
piardoned. Two platoons fired on him at a 
distance of five paces. The poor fellow fell, 
riddled like a sieve. September 2oth. — Reached 
East Sister, an Island of only three acres, with 
hardly room for the men to sit down. Sep- 
tember 26th. — Violent storm — fears of inunda- 
tion. Canadian shore reconnoitered by General 
Harrison and Commodore Perry. September 
27th. — Sixteen ships of war and 100 boats, 
landed in Canada, three miles below Maiden. 
September 28th. — Marched to Aux Canads. 
September 29th. — Marched to Sandwich. Sep- 
tember 30th. — Joined by Colonel E. M. John- 
son's regiment, which had marched fi-oni Fort 
Meigs to Detroit, and thence to the junction 
with the main body. October 6th. — Battle of 
the Thames — British Army routed — Tecumseh 
killed— the War in the Northwest virtually 
ended. 

Following is a statement of the locations and 
characters of the several Military Stations of 
the United States in JMorth western Ohio, 



EARLY FORTS. 



63 



I 



erected previouK to and during the War of 
1812-15 ; together with their condition in 1819, 
as given by Col. James Kilbourne's Gazetteer, 
of that date : 

Fort Amanda — some 20 miles Northeast from 
Fort St. Mary's — on route from Loi-amie's to 
Fort Defiance. 

Fort Brown — on Auglaize River, about 20 
miles South of Defiance. 

Fort Defiance — an important Military Forti- 
fication, situated on the point of land formed 
by the junction of Auglaize with Maumee 
River. During the late War the name was 
partially changed to that of Winchester; but 
it seems now very ]n'operly resuming its oi'ig- 
inal a)i2Jcllation. 

Fort Ferres — a Station so called, at Upper 
Sandusky, 40 miles South or up the River from 
Fort Stephenson. 

Fort Finley — a small Post, on the Military 
Road from Urbana to Fort Meigs. 

Fort Greenville — a Military Post, erected 
during the early settlement of the territory 
now the State of Ohio. Here was con- 
cluded the celebrated Indian Treaty in the 
j'ear 17!)"), commonly' called the Trcatj' of 
Greenville, by which the present East and 
West l)oundary line between the Ohio people 
and the Indians was established. A Village 
has since gradually grown up in its vicinity, 
called by its name, which is the seat of justice 
for Darke County. 

Fort Jennings — a minor Post, on the Auglaize 
Road, 18 miles Southerly from Fort Amanda, 
and 22 miles from Fort Brown. 

Fort Laramie — a Post so called from a trad- 
ing station formerly made by a man of that 
name, on one of the bead waters of the great 
Miami River, now in Shelby County. 

Fort Mc Arthur — a small Post, 24 miles North- 
erly from Urbuna on the Road thence to Fort 
Meigs. 

Fort Manary — a Block-house, situated near 
the Indian boundary line, North of Urbana, on 
the Military route to Fort Meigs. 

Fort Meigs— n noted Military Fortification, 
erecteil in the Winter of 1812-13, on the South- 
eastern bank of tlie Maumee River, at the 
lower Rapids of that River, a few miles from 
its mouth. Distance, Southerh' from Detroit, 
70 miles and Northwesterly 3G miles from Fort 
Stephenson. It is of an oblong figure, and when 
first completed enclosed an area of 11 acres. 



The wall consisted of palisades 14 feet high, 
sunk four feet into the ground, with embank- 
ments of earth on each side, taken from a 
broad ditch, and a deep exterior moat. At 
suitable distances are regular bastions, mounted 
with artillery. This Post is remarkable for a 
siege which it sustained from the British and 
Indians, in April, 1813, and until the 5th of May, 
following, when the garrison, together with a 
reinforcement from Kentucky, made a gallant 
.sortie, driving their enemy in every direction, 
and compelling them to raise the siege. Since 
the siege, it has been considerably reduced 
from its former dimensions, and is now (181G) 
going to decay. 

Fort Necessity — on route from Urbana to 
Fort Meigs, now in Hardin Count}'. 

Fort Portage — a Block-house, sometimes de- 
nominated a Fort, on Portage or Carrying 
River, on the route from Fort Finley to Foi't 
Meigs; 18 miles from the latter, and 2!) from 
the former. 

Fort Seneca — a Military Post, occupied dur- 
ing the late War, on the West side of Sandusky 
River, 10 miles South of Fort Stephenson. 

Fort Stephenson — an important Military Post, 
on the Western bank of Sandusky River, 18 
miles from its mouth and 67 North from the 
Indian boundary [now the North line of Union 
County]. It stands on a tract of land ceded by 
the Indians at the Greenville Treaty to the 
United States. It is rendered famous by the 
bravery with which it was successfully de- 
fended, b}' an inconsiderable number of Ameri- 
can troops, against a furious assault made upon 
it by the British, with vastly sujjerior numbers, 
in July [August], 1813. This j^lace, together 
with the settlements in its vicinity, is fre- 
quently, and perhaps, most generallj', called 
Lower Sandusky, it being situated adjacent to 
the lower Rapids of Sandusky River. 

Fort St. Mary's — a Military Station near 
the source of St. Mary's River, on the route 
from Greenville to Fort Defiance, 12 miles 
from Loramie's Station and 12 from Fort 
Amanda. 

Fort Industry. — A question having been 
raised as to the name of the fortification erected 
by the United States Government at the mouth 
of Swan Creek about the beginning of the pres- 
ent century — whether it was Fort Industry or 
Fort Lawrence — the writer made inquiry of 
the War Department as to the fact, when 



CA 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Aiijiitaiit Genonil L. C. Druniin ix'iilied as 
tbllow.s : 

A stocka<le Fort was erected about the year 1800, 
near the mouth of Swan Creek, on the Mauinee River, 
and, as near as can Ije iletermined, upon wliat is now 
Summit .Street, in the City of Toledo, to which was 
given the name of Fort Industry. It was at tliis Fort 
that a treaty was held with the Indians, July 4th, 
:805, by which the Indian title to the Fire Lands, 
[Huron and Erie Counties] was extinguished, and at 
which were present Mr. Charles Jouett, United 
States Commissioner, and Chiefs of Ottawa, Chip- 
pewa, Pottawatomie, Shawnee, Muncieand Delaware 
Imliau tribes. 

This oliice has no record of a Fort Laurence within 
the limits of the State of Ohio. Fort iaHrcH^— named 
in honor of the President of the Continental Congress 
—was built by Gen. Mcintosh, in 1778, on the West 
bank of the Tuscarawas River, now in Tuscarawas 
County, and near the Town of Bolivar. This Fort is 
by some writers spelled Lawrence, but improperly so. 



In June, 1870, it having been ascertained by 
the citizens of Perrysburg and Maumee City, 
that a party of Veterans of the War of 1812, 
serving in the Army in this section, propcsed to 
make a visit to the scenes of their service 57 
j-ears before that time, preparations were at 
once begun for a reception worthy of the pro- 
posed visitors. Meetings of citizens of both 
Towns were held, and steps taken which re- 
sulted in very suitable provision for an occasion 
so interesting to the people of all this region. 

June 23d, a committee of citizens of the two 
places, with Hon. M. E. Waite, at Columbus 
Grove, met the party, who came in a special 
car furnished by the Dayton & Michigan Rail- 
road, which reached Perrysburg at 5 P. m. The 
f()i]o\ving is a list of the Veterans, to wit : 

Colonel Charles S. Todd, Aide to General Harrison 
in the War of 1812, a Minister to Russia from 
1841 to 184t). Lived at Owensboro, Ky., and was 
79 years old. 

Major Jere Duncan, Bourbon Co., Ky., aged 78. 

General E. Pendleton, Clark Co., Ky., aged 81. 

Colonel William Hamilton, Nicholas Co., Ky., aged 78. 

A. B. Crawford, Clark Co., Ky., aged 80. 

Peter Bonta, Bourbon Co., Ky., aged 78. 

W. T. Foster, Grant Co., Ky., aged 73. 

Francis McLoer, Fayette Co., Ky., aged 8L 

Seward Beall, Clark Co., Ky., aged 74. 

Nelson Bush, Clark Co., Ky., aged 80. 

William C. Berry, Clark Co., Ky., aged 80. 

Thomas Jones, Bourbon Co., Ky., aged 81. 

Elisha Sturgeon, Grant Co., Ky., aged 84. 

Henry Gailher, Cincinnati, 0., aged 80. 

Sanford Branham, S(»tt Ca>., Ky., aged 78. 



Thomas Lindsey, Fayette Co., Ky., aged 81. 
William C. Keas, Mt. Sterling, Ky., aged 75. 
Dr. Alva Curtis, Cincinnati, 0., aged 73. 
Joseph Quinn, Grant Co., Ky., aged 74. 
R. P. Menifee, Kenton Co., Ky., aged 81. 
George Williams, Grant Co., Ky., aged 80. 
John Jolley, Campbell Co., Ky., aged 82. 
T. A. Grimes, Bourbon Co., Ky., aged 73. 
William B. Davis, McArthur, 0., aged 79. 
H. W. Davis, McConnellsville, O., aged 77. 
William Shafler, Middletown, O., aged 87. 
Samuel Bownell, Middletown, 0., aged 74. 
Joseph Baruett, Middletown, 0., aged 70. 
David McChessney, Middletown, O., aged 77. 
John Stine, Pendleton Co., Ky.. aged 74. 
Samuel Dewese, Wood Co., 0., aged 78. 
David Lamb, Toledo, 0., aged 83. 
Michael Morgan, Wood Co., 0., aged 89. 
Peter Navarre, Toledo, C, aged S.i. 
John Moore, Wood Co., 0., aged 75. 
J. L. Jolly, Napoleon, 0., aged 80. 
David Deal, Fremont, 0., aged 86. 
John Ross, Wood Co., 0., aged 77. 
David Johnson, Wood Co, 0., aged 83. 
Samuel Kuder, Wood Co., 0.,aged 81. 
John Noel, Wood Co., O., aged 79. 
Horace Thacher, Toledo, O., aged 09. 

The Kentucky Veterans had for some years 
held annual re-unions, and at their meeting, at 
Paris, in that State, June 22d, with 80 present, 
it was decided that as many as could undertake 
the trip, join in the visit to the Maumee, when 
it was found that about one-half of those 
present joined the movement. 

On the morning of the 24th, Mayor William 
Kraus, the City Council, a delegation from the 
Police force and many citizens of Toledo, went 
to Perrj'sburg by the Steamer Cora Locke, to 
participate in the exercises. At that place a 
procession was formed, which marched to Fort 
Meigs, where the Veterans and citizens spent 
some time in passing around the premises, the 
former seeking points specially reminding them 
of the events of 1813. The assemblage was 
called to order by Mayor J. W. Tylor of Perrys- 
burg. Rev. George A. Adams of that place 
offered prayer; and the Veterans and citizens 
were entertained by Mayor Tyler. The spokes- 
man of tlio old soldiers in response was Colonel 
Todd. He said, that though not present at the 
time of the siege by tlie British and Indians, 
lie yet helped to build the Fort, and was with 
General Harrison before thesiege and through- 
out the war after that event. Previous to that, 
he bore dispatches from Harrison to General 
Winchester. He was Acting (Quartermaster. 



\\ 



REUNIONS OF VETERANS OF !H12. 



65 



He had no wagons for transpoi-tation through 
the Black Swamp, but carried provisions and 
other supplies on horseback. In the winter 
the}- might have used sleds, but had no har- 
ness, except what he constructed of green hides, 
which answered while it remained dry. At 
times the horses would give out, when the men 
took their places and drew the loads, some- 
times for 30 miles. Colonel Todd referred to 
the battle of the Thames, and stated that after 
the capture of Genei-al Proctor's forces, they 
found the General was missing; when he (Col. 
T.) and Major Wood, with a Company of men, 
started in pursuit. The men giving out, these 
two officers pushed on and finally overtook 
Proctor's carriage, but found its occupant had 
escaped on the back of one of the horses. In 
the carriage they found all of Proctor's papers, 
including the speech of Tecumseh, the great 
Indian leader, in which he severely rebuked 
his British associate commanders for allowing 
the Indians to murder helpless prisoners, say- 
ing among other things: " I conquer to save ; 
but you to murder." Again, he said, " Father, 
listen ! In the Eevolutionary War, we tried to 
assist you ; but our Great Father was thrown 
on his back. In the last War we could not 
think of defending men who lived like ground- 
hogs." Colonel Todd regarded the War of 
1812, as but the continuation of the War of the 
Eevolution— the British made peace; but their 
Indian allies did not. The defeat of Dudley 
was due to inconsiderate valor. General Har- 
rison had said, the misfortune of Kentuckians 
was, that "they were too brave." Colonel 
Todd in strong terms thanked the people of 
the Maumee Valley for the grand reception 
given the Veterans, concluding with the words : 
"We thank you, and thank you, and thank 
you I " At the conclusion of bis remarks, he 
exhibited the flag which was carried at Fort 
Meigs, and which bore the rents made in it by 
British balls. From the Fort, the Veterans 
crossed the River to Maumee City, where prep- 
arations had been made for them. A dinner 
was served at the American House, after which 
the visitors and citizens assembled in a gi-ove, 
where Mr. George W. Reynolds presided ; 
prayer was offered by Rev. Mr. Swan ; and an 
address delivered by Rev. Mr. Richardson, re- 
sponded to by Colonel Todd. Remarks were 
made by Dr. Gaither of Cincinnati, Lieutenant- 
Governor J. C. Lee and M. R. Waite, the latter 



stating that Mrs. Harriet O. Hall, daughter of 
Major William Oliver, one of Harrison's trusted 
subordinates, had deputed him to invite her 
father's comrades to accept her hosjiitality at 
the Oliver House, Toledo, which they did, Mrs. 
Hall receiving them in the hotel parlors, and 
invited them to a dinner prepared for them. 
Mr. Menifee was at Winchester's defeat on the 
River Raisin ; was made prisoner and as such 
lay in the water at night, and through a change 
of weather, his clothes were fastened by ice thus 
formed. He had been crippled ever since by 
a wound then received at River Raisin. Peter 
Navarre, of Toledo, one of Harrison's best 
scouts, was at the Oliver House, as was also 
Captain David Wilkison, who, though not a 
soldier or a sailor, in 1815 assisted in removing 
the cannon and other stores from Fort Meigs 
to Detroit. 

June 15, 1871, 19 survivors of the River 
Raisin Massacre of 1812, met at Monroe, Mich., 
where a banquet was provided for them, at 
which Mayor Redfield presided, and General 
Custer and others made addresses. The names 
and ages of the Veterans present were as fol- 
lows : Joseph B. JSTadeau, 77 years; Peter 
Navarre, 82 ; Robert F. Navarre, 80 ; Joseph 
Guyer, 88 ; George Younglover, 77 ; Bronson 
French, 82; Francis Lazane, 82; David Van 
Pelt, 89 ; William Walters, 88 ; Joseph Foulke, 
80; Fred. Bouroff, 100 years, 7 months; Jean 
DeChovin, 77 ; John Clappen, 76 ; Charles 
Hixon, 76 ; Henry Mason, 79 ; Hall DeLand, 
75 ; Thomas Whelpley, 73 ; Louis Jacobs, 96 ; 
John Beseau, 80. Peter and Robert F. Navarre 
continued to reside in this section until their 
deaths. Frank Bouroff, the centenarian, was 
born in Pennsylvania, 1770. The united ages 
of the group were 1,158 years, the average being 
nearly 90. 

July 4th, 1872, was celebrated at Monroe, 
Mich., the chief incident of the occasion being 
the presence of 117 Veterans of Harrison's 
Army, serving at Fort Meigs and elsewhere 
in this section, during the war of 1812. A 
large gathering of people were present. General 
George Spaulding was Marshal of the day. 
Among the prominent officials and civilians 
present, were Governor Baldwin ; Judges 
Christiancy, Campbell, Cooley, and Patchin, 
of Michigan ; General Leslie Combs of Ken- 
tucky, General G. A. Custer, and General S. 
L. Williams, then nearly 91 years old, himself 



m 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



a \eicran. Mayor Keiltiold presulod, and Hon. 
Warner Wing delivered an address. General 
Custer called the roll of Veterans present (each 
of whom an.swered to his name), as follows : 
John B. McLean, aged 77; George Younglover, 
79; Brown French, 83; Joseph Foulke,S3; John 
Clapper,77 ; Charles Avon, 77 ; Thomas Whelp- 
ley, 97 ; Louis Jacobs, 9G ; Henry Gaither, 
82; Alvah Curtis, 7G ; John Mulholland, 75 ; 
Francis Santour, 76; Simon Van Aiken, 82; 
'James Vanderwalker, 82 ; William Hamilton, 
80 ; Edward Warring, 79 ; Peter Bants, 81 ; 
Alex. Crawford, 81; James Peawick, 78 ; Joseph 
C. Barrett, 78 ; Aaron Eddelman, 81 ; Eoger 
C^uinsberry, 79: Michael Goodright, 78; Thos. 
Bolivar, 76 ; J. W. Kolfuss, 77 ; James Y. Love, 
74; Eobert S. Goatney, 72; J. C. Eeid, 75; 
John Jameson, 79; James Carrey, 75; Eobert 
Carrick, 77; Thomas Lindsley, 83; James 
Clusin, 85; Edward Pendleton, 84; James E. 
Armstrong, 85 ; Solomon McVay, 76 ; J. C. 
Parker, 77; A. B. Crawford, 82; Leonard Beall, 
75; J. K. Goodwin, 80; Joseph Vance, 84; 
Isaac C. Eossenet, 79 ; James Kirke, 84 ; Oliver 
Talbot, 79 ; Moore Johnson, 77 ; William Shaf- 
fer, 89 ; Thomas Mount, 68 ; Larken Webster, 
80; John Gebhart, 78; Jesse Holly, 82 ; V. B. 
Davis, 80; B. B. Hudnut, 78; Lewis Ball, 70; 
Elisha Williams, 80; W. E. Locke, 79; B. J. 
Puller, 81 ; J. E. Eogers, 80 ; J. C. Craddock, 
84; Samuel L. Williams, 91; Judge S. Blan- 
cbard, 77; E. W. Benson, 75; Daniel Helwig, 
82 ; S. J. Armstrong, 84 ; Thomas B. Davis, 
83 ; W. D. Hixson, 91 ; W, Dayor, 82 ; Andrew 
Burns, 72; Francis McLock, 78 ; John Martin, 
76i; John B. Lafrige, 77; Joseph Gunn, 85; 
Frederick Bouroff, lOH; Samuel Dowese, 80; 
Louis Souans, 88; JSTap. Navarre, 81; Peter 
Navarre, 86 ; Alex. Navarre, 82 ; Daniel Van 
Pelt, 91 ; Joseph Besnett, 79 ; John Clappen, 
76; Henry Mason, 80; James Harvey, 80; 
John Eaot, 78; A. C. Couseign, 82; Joseph 
Verkies, 82 ; L. Y. Grant, 77 ; A. A. Pasko, 78 ; 
Joseph Ewalt, 87; John B. Eessau, 81 '; N. 
Moyer, 77; W. Walters, 78; Shubal Lewis, 70; 
Hall DeLand, 76 ; Eobert McNeill, 77 ; Lewis 
Beach, 79; Benon L. Bortine, 79; C. H. Mc- 
Nain, 84; Joseph Hall, 85; Isaac G. Futzna, 
74; Mathew Gibson, 83; Lewis Jacobs, 97 ,' 
John Boot, 78; W. Waters, 79; Dr. Curtis, 78^ 
Henr> Davis, 82; C.Hall, 71; Simeon Gan- 
arke, 82; Jona Sheam, 76; Charles McNain, 
85; Andrew Burns, 78; Perry Nedmore 82- 



George Shapine, 84; H. M. Davis, 79; W. B. 
Davis, 81. The oldest in the list was Frederick 
Boroff,whose age was 101 years and six months, 
having been born six years before the declara- 
tion of independence, 1776. Edward Willets 
read the declaration of independence. Judge 
H. V. Campbell delivered an oration ; a dinner 
was served to the Veterans and pioneers pres- 
ent ; following which came toasts and responses. 
Complete amnesty was then informally de- 
clared for all "Toledo Eebels of 1835 against 
the sovereignty of the Territory of Michigan." 
Several citizens of Toledo were present. 



As successors in possession of the soil, it is 
desirable that the white race have a correct 
understanding of the nature and true character 
of the Eed Man whom they have dispossessed. 
The i^revailing sentiment now is that of depre- 
ciation and contempt for those who not many 
yeai'S ago held this entire region in undisputed 
control and use. Wherever the facts of the 
case are known, however, this estimate of the 
aborigines does not prevail. The main ground 
for it, is found in the greatly changed habits 
and character of these people, whicli followed 
and ai'e attributable to their association with 
the Whites. It is the testimony of nearly all 
intelligent persons familiar with their condi- 
tion on the advent of the obtruding race, that 
they bore very little of the spirit and traits 
which followed such advent. It is a most sug- 
gestive fact in this connection, that among the 
first steps taken in their work by the Moravian 
Missionaries at Gnadenhutten, Shoenbrun and 
Salem, in Eastern Ohio, was to petition tl>e 
Territorial Legislature to prohibit the intro- 
duction of intoxicating liquors among the peo- 
j)le whom thej' had come to civilize and chris- 
tianize. For a time, this plan was successful ; 
but as the Whites increased in numbers, and 
the Indians in resources, the law became inop- 
erative, and the result, as in all other cases of 
unrestrained traffic of that sort, was intemper- 
ance, idleness and debaucherj' ; the outcome — 
directly traceable to that one cause — being the 
loss of influence by the Missionaries over the 
natives and the abandonment of the settlements 
and of ettbrts for their improvement. The work 
of demoralization thus begun h\ the heart- 
less cupidity of the alleged "superior race," 
continued, with increasing results, as long as 
Indians were permitted to remain on the soil 



I 



INDIAN CHARACTER, AND INDIAN WRONGS. 



07 



of their fathers. When the degraded remnants 
of a truly " noble race " — the handiwork of 
professed Christian civilization — finally left the 
scenes of their ancestors, the contrast of their 
condition with that of their fathers on the 
advent of the Whites, could hardly have been 
more marked. Nothing could be more unjust, 
than to judge of the Indians, as a race, by the 
degraded samples produced by contact with 
Europeans. Much better might the latter, as a 
class, be judged by the specimens seen hover- 
ing about and produced by tlie dens of pollu- 
tion and crime which infest most of the larger 
Cities of the United States. These wretched 
creatures, like the debauched Red Men, are the 
work of alcoholic ruin, but with the greater 
crime of better knowledge of the practice which 
degraded them. Those only who knew the 
Indians in their "best estate" — untaught and 
unpolished, as they were — and who also knew 
the sad remnants of the race, in the state to 
which association with the Whites bad brought 
them, can appreciate the contrast of the two 
conditions. It is the testimony of all having 
knowledge in the case, that the Indians at first 
met the Whites as friends, and continued to 
treat them as such until encroachments and 
the evident design of hostility aroused their 
suspicion and resentment, which feeling, as to 
those in the Northwest, was materially pro- 
moted by British traders and the policy of 
British authorities.* 

In his " Notes on the Northwestern Terri- 
tory," published in 1847, Judge Jacob Burnet, 
one of the most prominent and intelligent of 
the early settlers of this region, who was active 
and influential in its affairs for many years, 
having been a leading member of tiie Terri- 
torial Legislature and subsequently a Senator 

*()n this point Monett's History of the Mississippi 
Valley has the following: "At length it was per- 
ceived that these continued aggressions were 
prompted and instigated by British traders and agents 
at Detroit and on the Maumee. The fur trade in the 
Northwestern Territory was almost wholly controlled 
by British traders, who were interested in checking 
the advance of American population across the Ohio, 
which would sound the knell of approaching dissolu- 
tion of their monopoly. A state of active hostilities 
renewed by the savages might yet defer for many 
years the advance of the white settlements north of 
the Ohio, and thus prolong the monopoly of the free 
trade. Such were the views and conclusions of the 
British traders and agents at Detroit and other points 
south of Lake Erie." 



in Congress — makes the following reference to 
the Indians of the Maumee Valley : " In jour- 
neying more recently through the State, the 
writer has occasionally passed over the ground 
on which, many years before, he had seen In- 
dian Towns filled with that devoted race, con- 
tented and happy ; but he could not perceive 
the slightest ti-ace of those Villages, or of the 
people who had occupied them. All settle- 
ments through which he passed on the Maumee 
and the Auglaize, from Fort Wayne to Defi- 
ance, and from thence to the foot of the Eapids, 
had been bi-oken up and deserted. The battle- 
ground of General Wayne, which he had often 
seen in the rude state in which it was when the 
action of 1794 was fought, was so changed in 
its appeai-ance, that he could not recognize it, 
and not an indication remained of the populous 
Indian Villages he had formerly seen, extend- 
ing many miles on either side of the River. 
Flourishing Towns and fields, cultivated by 
white men, covered the ground, which 30 years 
before, was the property and the home of the 
natives of the forest. The contrast was strik- 
ing, and excited a train of unpleasant recol- 
lections. It was a natural inquiry: 'Where 
are the multitudes of red people, who were 
formerly seen here, amusing themselves at the 
Eajjids, taking the swift muskelunge with their 
bows and arrows?' They were then inde- 
pendent and undisturbed owners of the countiy 
which had descended to them through a long 
line of heroic ancestors, and which they ex- 
pected their children would continue to possess 
when they should be gone. ***** 
The final catastrophe of that noble race, was 
witnessed by the peojile of Cincinnati a few 
years since, when the remnant of the Wyan- 
dots — the last of the braves of the Ohio 
tribes — ' reliqxdas Danaum atque itnmitis Ach- 
illei'— arrived at the landing, and ascended 
the steamships that were to convey them from 
the places of their nativity into hopeless ban- 
ishment. To the eye of the humane observer, 
they seemed to linger, and to turn to the North, 
as if to bid a last farewell to the tombs in which 
they had deposited the remains of their de- 
ceased children, and in which the bones of their 
fathers had been accumulating and mouldering 
for untold ages." 

Two chief subterfuges are employed to justify 
the gross abuse to which that unfortunate race 
is subjected, (1) that they are by nature the 



6S 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



enemy of civilization ; and (2) that they are 
incapable of such degree of improvement, in 
morals or habits, as would warrant eflfort to 
that end. Both those assumptions are disproved 
by well established facts, which show that both 
races are susceptible to the same influences 
for good or for evil, and that under like con- 
ditions, each may be made better or made 
worse. This is shown in the fact, that iu every 
known case iu which Whites have been 
taken in chihlhood and subjected to the care 
and habits of the Indians, tliey have in after 
life manifested all the peculiarities of the native 
Indian; while Indian children, separated from 
their own race and trained among civilized 
people, have shown the moral sense, taste, and 
habits of their captors. It is safe to say, that 
the American Indians, when first brought in 
contact with the Whites, were more hopeful 
subjects for civilization and Christianity, than 
were the natives of Britain, when efforts for 
their improvement were first put forth by 
Saxon invaders. The truth is, that they have 
never been treated as if designed for anything 
better than plunder and extermination. It is 
a fact, most potent here, that throughout the 
years in which the Government made no claim 
either of ownership or occupancy of the soil in 
this region, there was little trouble with them 
— no Indian wars, whose bloody record mainly 
now give character to that race — but all was 
friendly and peaceful. It was only as, step by 
step, the advance of White aggression excited 
suspicion and aroused resistance, that enmity 
toward the aggressor was manifested. No peo- 
ple capable of substantial improvement or fitted 
for usefulness, would have done less for beating 
back their avowed enemy, than did they. Not to 
have resisted such aggression, would have 
shown them without the manhood essential to 
the respect of the world. As already remarked, 
it is only those who have seen that race, both 
in their original state and after years of contact 
with the Whites, who can intelligently judge 
them. In the " Conspiracy of Pontiac," Park- 
man most justly says of the treatment to which 
the Indians were subjected by traders, whom 
he characterizes as " ruffians of the coarsest 
stamp": " They cheated, plundered, and cursed 
the Indians and outraged their families, ofi'er- 
ing, when compared with the French, who were 
under better regulation, a most unfavorable 
example of their nation." The chief agency 



employ-ed in giving effect to such brutal policy, 
consisted of intoxicating liquors, often in their 
worse possible forms. The Indians of the 
Maumee Valley and Michigan were subjected 
to greater wrong in this respect, in consequence 
of the bitter competition for their trade exist- 
ing for many years between the French and 
British traders, each class receiving from its 
home Government whatever sujjj^ort prom- 
ised to aid in their shameless struggle for In- 
dian traffic. The inevitable result was the 
rapid and extreme demoralization of a once 
comparatively moral people. Some idea of the 
extent of this degradation, may^ be had from the 
statement of a white man, adopted into an In- 
dian tribe when young. Of a particular de- 
bauch, he said : " A trader came to the Town 
with French brandy. We purchased a keg of 
it and held a council about who was to get 
drunk and who was to keep sober. I was in- 
vited to get drunk, but I refused the proposal. 
Then they told me I must be one of those who 
were to take care of the drunken people. I 
did not like this, but of the two evils I chose 
that which I thought was the least, and fell in 
with those who were to conceal the arms and 
keep every dangerous weapon we could out of 
their way; and endeavor, if possible, to keep 
the drinking club from killing each other, 
which was a very hard task. Several times 
we hazarded our own lives, and got ourselves 
hurt, in preventing them from slaying each 
other." 

This state of things would continue as long 
as the Indians had a merchantable skin to traf- 
fic for liquor, when it stopped, and the de- 
graded Sons of the Forest, for very lack of 
means for further debauch, were compelled 
slowl}- and wretchedly to recover from the sad 
condition to which merciless tradei's had 
brought them. For such treatment of an un- 
happy^ race, there was no relief. Enactment 
of laws and promulgation of orders, however 
restrictive in terms, were ineffective with the 
remorseless and lawless trader, whose crimes 
were generally committed beyond the reach of 
executive power, even when, in exceptional 
cases, there was a will to employ such power 
in defense of the plundered and debauched In- 
dians. It is entirely safe to say, that no Na- 
tion in history — considering all the conditions 
of the case — has a record of more inexcusable 
wrong toward defenseless subjects of its power, 



INDIAN CHARACTER AND INDIAN WRONGS. 



69 



than have those who have for 260 years per- 
mitted the rapacity of their own people to pur- 
i<ue, with every form of demoralization and 
wrong, the defenseless Indians of the Western 
Hemisphere. This is strong language, but it 
is believed to be just. It would be a privilege, 
could it be truthfully said that such long-con- 
tinued and inexcusable wrong is a thing of the 
past only. While in a great degree modified 
in extent, it continues to blemish the otherwise 
fair fame of the American people. 

The Black Hawk War (between the United 
States and the Sac and Fox Indians of Bock 
Kiver), was largely due to the sale of whiskey 
by licensed traders to those Indians, in viola- 
tion of law. Black Hawk, with other Chiefs, 
remonstrated against such traffic with their 
tribes, and appealed to the Government to en- 
force its prohibition. This they did, because 
of the debasing effects of that traffic upon the 
morals of those people, and the danger of pro- 
vocation of aggression upon the Whites bj* the 
Indians while in a state of intoxication. A 
memorial directed to Governor Eeynolds, in 
1S31, bj' the white settlers on Eock Eiver, upon 
which paper, that officer declared the State of 
Illinois to be hostilely invaded by the Sac and 
Fox Indians, and ordered out the Militia to re- 
pel them, was based largely on the fact that 
the Indians had destroyed a barrel of whiskey 
which the owner was retailing to them in de- 
fiance of the laws of Congress. Such disregard 
of regulations intended to protect the morals 
of the Indians and preserve peace, was habitu- 
ally winked at by the authorities, and thus 
was influential in provoking war.* In a letter 
of date of July 25th, 1832, addressed to Gen- 
eral Joseph M. Steel, Indian Agent at Prairie du 
Chien, Henry II. Schoolcraft protested against 
the practice of traders licensed by General 
Steel, who sold liquors to the Indians in viola- 
tion of la^^^ Mr. Schoolcraft said : " I am 
fully persuaded that ardent spirits are not nec- 
essary to the successful prosecution of trade ; 
that they are deeply pernicious to the Indians; 
and that both their use and abuse is derogatory 
to the character of a wise and sober Govern- 
ment. Their exclusion, in every shape and 
every quantity, is an object of primary impor- 
tance." An agent of a Temperance Society, in 
a journal of a tour to the Upper Mississippi, 



about 1847, pictured the sad results of the liquor 
traffic among the Winnebago Indians, neigh- 
bors of the Sacs and Foxes. Twenty years 
previous to such visit, at which time the settle- 
ment by the Whites had begun, those Indians 
raised more of corn, beans and other vegetables 
than were required for their consumption. In 
1847, they had become wholly dependent on 
the Whites for even the scanty subsistence by 
which they were dragging out the remnant of 
a miserable existence. "And what was the 
cause of so great a change in a few years in 
the habits and circumstances of a whole people ? 
The answer is plain to every one at all ac- 
quainted with Indian history. It is the avarice 
and perfidy of the Whites ; and Whiskey, 
Whiskey has been the all-potent age7it by 
which it has been effected. By selling and 
giving them whiskey till they become drunk, 
they were soon filched of the little annuities 
received from the Government, and then, for 
the rest of the year, treated like so many 
dogs." * 

A writer, familiar with the subject, says : 
" Humanity shudders at the recital of the ne- 
farious acts practiced by white traders upon 
the Indians. Yet, not half of them are known 
or dreamed of by the American people. Some- 
times the traders were found taking, by force, 
from an Indian, the produce of a year's hunt, 
without making any return, sometimes pilfer- 
ing a portion while buying the remainder; and 
still oftener wresting from the poor wretches, 
while in a state of intoxication, a valuable 
property for an inadequate remuneration." 
The case is given, in which an Indian woman, 
in the course of a single day, sold 120 Beaver 
skins, with a large quanty of Buffalo robes, 
&c.,for rum. " Of a large load of peltries— the 
produce of so many days of toil, so many long 
and difficult journeys— one blanket and three 
kegs of rum only remained, beside the poor 
and almost worn-out clothes on their bodies." 
Eev. Timothy Flint, in his " Indian Wars of 
the West," says: "We affirm an undoubting 
belief, from no unfrequent nor inconsiderable 
means of observation, that aggression has 
commenced in the account current of mutual 
crime, as a hundred to one on the part of the 
Indians." 

At the head of Second street. Defiance, and 



*" The Black Hawk War," by Benjamin Drake, 1848. *St. 'Lo\As,Bullelin, 1847. 



70 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



on the bank of the Auglaize Eiver, lie buried 
the remains of many soldiers of the American 
Army of 1812-15. Among these are those of 
the Indian Chief, Logan* He was not the 
Mingo Chief, celebrated in earlier history 
and made memorable by Jefferson, but a 
namesake of Benjamin Logan, from whom 
Logan County derived its name. In the Au- 
tumn of 178G, General Clarke raised a force 
that captured Kaskaskia, on the Mississippi, 
and Vincennes, on the Wabash. General Lo- 
gan was then detached fi'om General Clarke's 
force on the Falls of the Ohio, to march against 
the Indian towns at the head of the Mad 
River and the Great Miami. The first en- 
counter he had with the Indians, was in Clarke 
County, on the Mad River. General Lytle, 
then a boy of 16, was one of the party in the 
contest that captured Moluntha, the great 
Chief of the Shawanese, and Spemica Laub, 
tlie subject of this notice. The latter was of 
the age of Lytle. General Logan took the 
Indian boy to Kentuckj- and adopted him in 
his family and kept him for several years, 
when he returned to his tribe. Then he be- 
came known by the name of Logan, and rose 
to the rank of Civil Chief, on account of his 
intellectual and moral qualities. His personal 
appearance was commanding, he being six 
feet high and weighing 2(t0 pounds. He con- 
tinued the unwavering friend of the Whites. 
In the War of 1812 he was with General Har- 
rison, who directed Logan with a small party 
to reconnoiter in the direction of the head of 
the Rapids of the Maumee. The party con- 
sisted of Logan, Bright-Horn and Captain 
Johnny. When near this point, they were 
met by a superior force of the enemy, and 
compelled to retreat. They made their escape 
to the left wing of the Army under General 
Winchester, then in a picket fort on the bank 
of the Auglaize, near the east end of First 
street. Defiance, to whom they related their 
adventure. Logan's party, while here, was 
accused of infidelity to our cause by an officer 
of the Kentiicky troops. Indignant at such 
charge, Logan called on Major Oliver, saying 
he would leave the Fort in the morning, and 
either leave his body bleaching in the woods, 
or return with such trophies from the enemy 
as would relieve his character from the sus- 



picion that had been east ujion it. On the 22d 
of November, 1812, in company with Bright- 
Horn and Captain Johnny, he set out on his 
perilous adventure. At noon, having stopped 
to rest, they were surprised by the approach 
of seven of the enemy, among whom was 
young Elliott, a half-breed, and the celebrated 
Pottawatomie Chief, Winnemac. Resistance 
against such odds was u.seless, and they re- 
sorted to strategy. Logan extended his hand 
to Winnemac, with whom he was acquainted, 
and told him that he and his two companions 
were tired of American service, and were leav- 
ing Winchester's Army to join the British. 
This did not satisfy Winnemac, who was well 
versed in Indian strategy. Logan and his 
party were disarmed and marched down the 
river under guard. The British troops at this 
time were at the head of the Rapids, which 
was to be their destination. Logan and party 
were so much at ease in their new jwsition, 
that Winnemac became so satisfied that his 
story was ti'ue, that their arms were restored 
before evening. Logan then resolved to at- 
tack the enemy on the first favorable opportu- 
nity, and so informed Bright-Horn and Captain 
Johnny. Their guns were loaded, and they 
put some bullets in their mouths to facilitate 
re-loading. Logan, fearing detection while 
doing this, remarked to an Indian by his side : 
" Mo chaw heap tobacco." In the evening 
they arrived at the mouth of Turkeyfoot 
Creek (now in Henry County), with the in- 
tention of camping for the night. Winnemac's 
party strolled off to gather black haws, a wild 
berry. Logan now gave the signal for attack, 
when the three fired, killing two and wounding 
one, who required a second shot, leaving the 
parties four to throe. They treed, and for a 
while Logan's party were safe. One of the 
enemy reached a position that uncovered 
Logan, when he was shot through the body. 
Meanwhile, two more of the enemy were 
mortally wounded, when the remaining two 
of Winnemac's party fell back. Taking ad- 
vantage of this state of things. Captain Johnny 
mounted Logan, now suffering from a mortal 
wound, and Bright-Horn, also wounded, on 
the enemy's horses, and started them for De- 
fiance. Captain Johnny, having scalped Win- 
nemac, followed on foot. The wounded men 
arrived at Defiance about midnight, and Cap- 
tain Johnny the nest morning. This desperate 



INDIAN CHARACTER AND INDIAN WRONGS. 



71 



conflict resulted in the death of Logan, who, 
with such fearful odds, deliberately dared to 
vindicate himself against a false charge by one 
high in Winchester's Army. The case caused 
a deep feeling of sympathy and admiration for 
the dying Chief, and none more deeply regret- 
ted his sad fixte, than did the officer who made 
the charge. Logan lived two or three days 
after reaching Defiance. He suifered great 
pain, and wliile writhing in agony, related to 
his friend. Major Wm. Oliver, the particulars 
of the fight, saying that he prized his honor 
higher than his life, and died satisfied. In 
the course of this interview he was noticed to 
smile, and being questioned as to the cause, 
he replied, that when he recalled to mind the 
manner in which Captain Johnny took off the 
scalp of Winnemae, while at the same time 
watching the enemy, he could not refrain 
from laughing. He was buried bj' the officers 
with the honors of war. 

General John B. Hunt's estimate of the 
character of the great Indian Chief Tecumseh, 
whose name is so intimately allied with the 
history of this region, will be of interest here. 
He says of that noted warrior : " Tecumseh was 
not a large man, but strong and well made. 
He usually dressed very plainly, in buclcskin 
Indian costume, for a long time wearing three 
feathers — one given him by Mrs. Proctor and 
the others by wives of other British officers. 
Tho.KC were plain ostrich plumes — rod, white 
and black, respectively. They were tied to 
his queue, hanging down his back. He was 
generally armed with iiis tomahawlc, scaljjing- 
knife and pipe in his belt, with his rifle on his 
arm. He very much resembled Otusso, an 
Ottawa War Chief, wiio died at tiie mouth of 
the JIaumee River before those Indians were 
removed to the West." 

What is known as the "Brownstown Treaty," 
was made at Brownstown, within the Territory 
of Michigan, and was concluded November 
25, 1808. Governor William Hull of Michi- 
gan Territorj', represented the Government on 
the one side, while the Chippewa, Ottawa, 
Pottawatomie, Wyandot and Shawnee Indians 
were represented b}' sachems, chiefs and war- 
riors of their respective tribes. The chief 
object of this treaty, on the part of the United 
States, was to secure the right to locate and 
construct a public road through lands of the 
Indians, which was obtained. The road was 



subsequently constructed by the State of Ohio, 
and is known as the Western Reserve and 
Maumee Eoad. The route of the same was 
fixed by the treaty as follows : For a " i-oad of 
120 feet in width, from the foot of the Rapids 
of the River Miami of Lake Erie, to the Western 
line of the Connecticut Reserve;" and "all 
lands within one mile of the road, on each side> 
for the purpose of establishing settlements 
along the same." By the same treaty was 
granted " a tract of land, for a road only, of 120 
feet in width, to run Southwardly from what 
is called Lower Sandusky (Fremont) to boun- 
dary line established by the ti'eaty of Green- 
ville." This road never was constructed, 
although for many years the people at Lower 
Sandusk}^ urged upon the State the execution 
of the project contemplated in the treaty of 
Brownstown. 

Most of the remnant of the Ottawas which 
remained in this section after the departure of 
the body of the tribe for their location West 
of the Mississippi in 1833, took their departure 
August 31, 1837, for the same region. They 
left on the steamboat "Commodore Perry" for 
Cleveland, to go thence by Canal to Portsmouth, 
and thence by the Ohio and the Mississippi. 
They were under the care of Colonel John 
Mcllvaine of Columbus, Superintendent, with 
Captain W. E. Cruger of Rochester, N. Y., as 
Assistant and Disbui-sing Agent. Messrs. John 
Mack, D. H. Forsyth and C. Roby of Maumee 
City, were attached to the expedition — the 
former as Commissar)', and the others as in- 
terpreters. Several in the tribe yet remained 
in this section, not being willing to join their 
fellows in the removal. They numbered about 
150, the Chief Otteka being with them. The 
causes leading to such separation of this frag- 
ment, are indicated by notice published in 
Maumee, August 19, 1837, by Superintendent 
Mcllvaine. He therein, by appeals to alleged 
creditors of members of the tribe not to ob- 
struct their departure, intimated that efforts 
would be made to do that. He said : " They 
have now no country or home here. May the 
Removing Agent not ask, in the name of hu- 
manity, — in the name of justice — in the sacred 
name of mercy — that if any are secretly 
working to discourage the emigration of these 
unfortunate creatures, they will pause and 
consider the impropriety of their course?" 
He also made this significant appeal: "In 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



conclusion, it is requested, that IJiose who 
iiavo been in the habit of selling liquors to 
these Indians, do so no more; as it will be 
impossible to remove the dissipated, if it be 
continued, anil they must, to their ruin and to 
the aunoj-ance of good citizens, remain." The 
remnant still remaining continued here about 
two years, and their dejjarture was thus stated 
by the Ohio (Perrysburg) Whig of July 30, 
1839: "The i-emaining few of the once pow- 
erful tribe of Indians (the Ottawas), who have 
been lingei-ing about this section for the past 
few years, dragging out a miserable and pre- 
carious existence, took their departure for the 
country "West of the Mississippi Julj' 25th, on 
board the Steamer Commodore Perry, under 
the superintendence of Judge Forsyth of Mau- 
mee City, the Indian Agent. Their course 
was directed to Cleveland, and thence by 
Canal to the Ohio Eiver. They were about 
100 in number, including both sexes. They 
hated to go; and we learn that it was with 
mnch persuasion, that Judge Forsyth pre- 
vailed upon them for their removal." 

A treaty between the United States and 
Wyandot, Ottawa, Chijjpewa and Munsee, 
Delaware, Shawnee and Pottawatomie tribes 
of Indians was held at Fort Industry (now 
within Toledo), July 4, 1805. By this treaty, 
the Indians relinquished their title to all lands 
in Ohio as far West as the "Western boundary 
of the Connecticut "Western Eeserve (the 
"Western line of Huron County). Included in 
this grant, were what have been known as the 
" Fire Lands," embracing all of present Huron 
County, and nearly the whole of Brie County. 
They were so named, because they had been 
set apart by the State of Conuecticut from its 
"Western Eeserve, as consideration for damages 
sustained by citizens of that State by the de- 
struction of property by fire at the hands of 
the British during the Eevolutionary "War. 
The quantity of such lauds was 500,000 acres. 
November 7, 1807, at Detroit, Governor 
"William Hull made treaty with the Ottawa, 
Chippewa, "V\^'andot and Pottawatomie 
Indians, whereby lands described as follows 
were ceded to the United States : Beginning 
at the mouth of the Miami Eiver of the Lake's 
(the Maumee), and running up the middle 
thereof to the mouth of the Great Au Glaize 
Eiver; thence running North until it intersects 
a parallel of latitude, to be drawn from the 



outlet of Lake Huron, which forms the Eiver 
St. Clair; thence Northeast in a direct line to 
"White Eock, in Lake Huron ; thence due East 
to the boundary line between the United States 
and Canada in said Lake ; thence Southerh- on 
said line through Eiver and Lake St. Clair and 
Detroit Eiver into Lake Erie to a point due 
Bast of the Maumee Eiver; and thence West, 
to the place of beginning. The ludiansreserved 
one tract of land six miles square on the 
Maumee Eiver, above Eoche de Boeuf, " to in- 
clude the Tillage where Tondanie" (the Dog), 
then lived, being a short distance above the 
present site of the Town of Waterville. Also, 
was reserved to them a tract three miles square 
on the same Eiver, and above the 12 miles 
square ceded to the United States by the treaty 
of Greenville. The Eeserve referred to in- 
cluded what is known as Presque Isle, about 
half way between Waterville and Maumee 
City. Another Eeserve, Jour miles square, on 
tiie Maumee Bay, including the Village where 
Meshkemau and Waugau then lived. 

In 1873, a variety of Indian trinkets were 
plowed up, as the Ten-Mile Creek road was 
being worked, then in Manhattan Township. 
Among them was a large silver cross, found in 
the breast of an Indian's skeleton, he probably 
being a man of note with his tribe, and that 
article placed there as a special mark of respect. 
The cross is thirteen and one-half inches long 
and eight and five-eighths wide; its weight, 
eight ounces, pure silver. It bore on a smooth, 
polished sui'face, light representations of 
boughs of trees. With this was found a silver 
chain, five feet long, beai'ing six charms. 
There was a double cross — one upright and 
two transverse pieces, the latter two and one- 
half inches in length ; also marked with light, 
small circles. Another relic was a silver 
wheel or circle, with small, egg-shaped figures, 
which might have been used as a pin and for 
ornament. There were six small and one larger 
silver pendants — the former probablj- designed 
for the ears and the latter for the nose. Also, 
four silver brooches ; a silver head-band, one 
inch wide and two feet long ; and a silver 
bracelet, about two and one-half inches broad. 
There were beside these, a stone pipe ; a scalp- 
ing-knife, of pure steel ; and a stone image of 
a bird. The knife was found sticking down 
beside an Indian's skull. The image of a bird 
was found in a copper vessel or bucket about 



INDIAN RELICS. 



73 



eight inches high and four across. It is of 
thick, heavy copper, witli cover (of copper) 
fitting closely. On the bottom of this vessel 
is the inscription, "J. C. D., 1737," indicating 
it to be 150 years old. In it were found small 
images similar to the one above named, and 
representing fishes, birds and Indians, the latter 
sometimes on horseback, and some with bows 
and arrows drawn for shooting. These, how- 
ever, ujjon exposure to the atmosphere, soon 
crumbled to fine dnst, leaving but tlieone. The 
skull, apparently of an Indian Princess, was 
found witli hair in good state of preservation, 
coiled on the top, which soon crumbled to dust. 
The presence of the articles of oi-nament in the 
graves of Indians, is explained bj' the impres- 
sion which formerlj- so fully obtained with that 
race, that death is but a transfer from one 
scene of material existence to another, but 
which has been more or less modified by asso- 
ciation with the Whites and the teaching of 
Christian Missionaries. The first thing with 
them, was to secure a safe journey to the 
" happy hunting-ground," to which they 



believed they were to go. With this is the 
ambition to bear to the new scene of activity 
ornaments and marks of their distinction in 
this life. Another common thought with thein 
was, that their position in the next existence 
would depend largely on the number of enemies 
which they had here slain in battle, while 
such could be commanded as servants to hel]> 
them on their journey to the new grounds. At 
another time in the ncigiiborhood of the same 
locality, were plowed uj) two solid silver 
crosses. They were about six inches in length, 
and covered with exquisite designs in engrav- 
ing. One of them was marked, " E. C. Mon- 
treal," indicating it to have been a heraldic 
device, connected with the Jesuit Missionary 
work. With the crosses, were found a large 
number of human bones, several cooking 
utensils and a pair of silver ear-rings. It so 
happened that the finder of one of the crosses, 
was one of two Chippewa Indians, who had 
just begun work on the road then being re- 
paired. Their excitement at such discovery 
was intense. 



CHAPTER HI. 



niE CANADIAN " PATKIOT WAR. 



WHAT was known as the " Patriot" insur- 
rection in Canada, beginning in 1837, and 
continuing through 1838, was the cause of 
much excitement and disturbance along this 
side of the border of that Province. The al- 
leged object of the movement on the other side, 
■was the overthrow of British rule and the es- 
tablishment of an independent Eepiiblican 
Government, to be known as the " Eepublic of 
Upper Canada," with the design, when such 
should be successful, of extending the move- 
ment to Lower Canada. The enterprise, while 
supported by a few Canadians, more or le.ss 
sincere in their professions of love for Free 
Government, depended chiefly for men and 
means, upon co-opieration from this side. At 
no lime had the scheme enough of home sup- 
port to last 30 days, and most that it did have 
was due to exaggerated ideas of what was to 
be done in the United States. 

The work of prejmration occupied most of 
the year of 1837, when there was considerable 
agitation, attended bj^ some collisions in Can- 
ada. Meantime, the work of the "sympathi- 
zers " progressed on this side. The grossest 
exaggeration was employed for eilect on both 
sides of the line. Thus, in the United States 
rejiorts were rile of wondei'ful ''popular uji- 
risings' all over Canada ; while in tliat Prov- 
ince, equally false accounts of symiiathy 
and assured support from this side were em- 
ployed to bolstei' the movement. "Whereas, in 
fact, there was in neither country any support 
to justify a moment's continuance of the mad 
scheme. 

By December, 1837, such forces as the leaders 
had been able to raise, were gathered along the 
line, with the purpose of a "combined move- 
ment" of .some sort. The recruits Irom this 
side consisted mainly of the idle and thriftless, 
which clas.-ics had been swollen in numbers by 
the .serious financial collapse and business sus- 
pension of that year. An idea of the sort of 
material that made up the body of the "Patriot" 
recruits, may be had, when it is stated, that 
the distribution of "rations" to a squad of 



these at Norwalk, while on their way from 
Akron to " the front," consisted of one man 
iiassing along the rank with a basket of crack- 
ers, followed by another with a pail from which 
was delivered to each "soldier" a small cup of 
whiskey. Poultry and young pigs were in 
constant pei-il on the line of march, while deal- 
ers in clothing, boots, shoes, etc., often had all 
they could do to maintain and enforce their 
idea.s of right to property so much coveted bj- 
the "Patriots" passing through, who could 
not understand why those who stayed at home, 
should not contribute more liberally to the aid 
of those who went to the " battlefields of Free- 
dom." 

The two ends of Lake Erie were the scenes 
of the main movements of the " Patriots." In 
December they took possession of Navy Island 
(belonging to Canada), in Niagara Elver, and 
from there issued a jiroclamation gravely an- 
nouncing that the " Provisional Government 
of the Pcpublic of Upper Canada" was estab- 
tablished — that a reward of £500 was offered 
for the apprehension of Sir Francis Bond Head, 
then Governor of Canada — that 300 acres of 
Her ^fajestj-'s lands would be (reel\- bestowed 
by the Provisional Government upon every 
volunteer who should join the revolutionary 
forces — adding that " ten millions of those 
lands, fair and fertile, would speedily be at 
their disposal, with the other vast resources of 
a country more extensive and rich in natural 
treasui'es than the United Kingdom or old 
France." 

For purposes of communication with the 
American shore, the "Patriots" emploj'cd a 
small steamboat, the " Caroline," of which 
Captain " Gil." Applebj- (a well-known Lake 
navigatoi") had command. This craft proved 
very useful, and this so far aggravated the 
British autliorities, that on the night of the 
29th of December, a British force sent for the 
purpose, burned the Steamer, while lying at 
Schlosser, on this side of the river. This action 
was a god-send never more needed by the fail- 
ing fortunes of the new-born •' Republic," in 



[74] 



THE CANADIAN "PATRIOT" WAR. 



75 



inflaming the American people, and arousing 
our Government in protest against such unwar- 
ranted violation of our territorial rights. The 
question at one time threatened the peace of 
the two countries. 

The Eastern campaign of the " Patriots " 
collapsed with the loss of the Caroline, and 
operations were transferred to the West. In 
Februaiy, 1838, the Volunteers from this side 
made a movement from Sandusk}-, crossing on 
the ice to Point au Pellee Island, where they 
landed on the 25th of that month, and took 
possession. The Island was the property of a 
Mr. McCormic, and had been deserted. It was 
well stocked with provisions, cattle, hogs and 
poultry — which, as reported, proved a very 
acceptable prize with the " Patriots." An ox- 
mill and a supply of corn also were found. On 
the od of ^March, the scene was changed by the 
arrival of Hi-itish troops, wdien was fought the 
" Battle of Point au Pellee." The engagement 
took place on the ice. Col. Edwin D. Bradley, 
now (1887) of Stryker, AVilliams County, Ohio, 
was in command of the " Patriot" forces ; and 
since the Point au Pellee locality is now 
attracting new attention from Ohio people 
through its piscatorial advantages, the more in- 
terest will bo felt in Colonel Bradlej's report 
of that engagement,* which action at the time 

'OFFICIAL REPORT OF COLONEL BRADLEY. 

To Brigadier- General McLeod, Commanding Western 
Division of Patriot Service of the Rtpnblic of Upper 
Canada : 

Dear Sir: — I hasten to answer to you for the in- 
formation of the Comman(ler-in-(;liicf, that an action 
was fought on the morning of the 3d instant, at Point 
au Pellee Island, Upper Canada, between the Patriot 
force under my command and a detacliment of aljout 
400 Brittsh Regulars. 

At day-break the enemy was discovered in great 
force a few miles from our encamiiment, which was 
at the head of the Island. Their main force, about 
700 strong, was marched down quietly in front ; their 
left, about 200 strong. Hanking off in the direction of 
the light-house at North Point ; and their right, con- 
sisting entirely of British liegulars, in sleighs and on 
horse-back, were pushing on with great sj^eed ak)ng 
the West side of the Island to gain our rear, for the 
purpose of cutting off our retreat, should the main 
force succeed in driving us from our position. 

After closely examining the force and disposition of 
the enemy, 1 did not think it prudent to await the 
attack of the main body. The men w^ere therefore in- 
stantly mustered and tiled off toward the Southern end 
of the Island, a distance of .seven miles, to meet and 
fight the regular force, which had already gained our 



excited intense interest throughout the border. 
Colonel Bradley subsequently commanded with 
credit a Company of Infantry in the Mexican 
War of 1846-47, and afterwards the .38th Ohio 
Volunteers in the Union Army, as long as his 
health permitted. 

Coincident witli the advance of Colonel 
Bradley's forces across the Lake from San- 
dusky, was a similar movement bj^ another 
"Patriot" command from the Michigan side, 
to Fighting Island, in the Detroit Eiver, some 
eight miles below Detroit, where an engage- 
ment took place February 2.5, 1838. 

The Detroit Free Press, of February 26th, 
had the following report of the affair : 

Yesterdaj' the war commenced in or near Canada. 
On Sunday p. ji. the Patriot forces, which had been 
lurking in small and detached squads at various 
points between Toledo and Gibraltar, collected on the 
American sliore, opposite Fighting Island, belonging 
to the British, their number amounting to Ix'tween 
200 and liOO, without arms, except five or six muskets 
and a small field piece mounted on two rails. In this 
condition, after receiving and cheering a patriotic 
speech from General McLeod, who commanded them, 
they crossed (on the ice) and took possession of the 
Island. They did not, we understand, intend to cross 
until their arms, which were undoubtedly delayed, 
had lieen received ; but they were forced immediatel}- 
to abandon the American territory, in order to evade 
the civil authorities, which, aided by the United 

rear. This was effected as speedily as circumstances 
would admit. When we arrived in view of this 
force, which consisted of about 850 heavy Infantry 
and 75 well-mounted Cavalry, drawn up in ordinary 
battle array on the ice, one and one-half miles from 
the shore, in the direction of Middle Island — as we 
had no time for delay, in consequence of the enemy's 
main force, which was fast approaching— I gave 
instant orders to form in line of battle, which were 
cheerfully obeyed by officers and men. When all 
was in rt'adiness, the line moved forward with a firm 
and unrtinching resolution worthy of tried veterans 
and advanced within half musket-shot of the enemy, 
when they oijened a tremendous fire on our whole 
line, checking its progress and compelling us to com- 
mence the action at a greater distance than we first 
intended. Nevertheless (some of our troops having 
fired without orders), to prevent confusion, it was 
thought proper that the action should become gen- 
eral. For half an hour we sustained the shock of 
three times our number of British Regular troops, 
twice throwing them into confusion, breaking their 
ranks, and strewing the battle-ground with their 
dead and wounded. At this time the men remained 
firm, the ranks unbroken, and all determined to con- 
tinue the contest. The near approach, however, of 
the main force in our rear, induced some to leave the 



76 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



States troops, were in close pursuit of them. In the 
course of the night, about 50 stands of arms \yere 
conveyed to them on the Island. About daylight 
yesterday morning, the British troops opened a fire 
on them with grape-shot from tlie Canadian shore. 
After receiving two or three shots and returning as 
many, the Islanders retreated in confusion to the 
American shore, with three wounded— one severely, 
and two slightly. At the shore they were met by the 
United States troops, who arrested and disarmed 
them as fast as they landed. The British troops took 
possession of the Island as soon as it was evacuated. 
We have seen and conversed with one of the men 
who was on Fighting Island, and who informs us 
that they were assured by their officers, that 500 men 
had crossed into Canada below Maiden from San- 
dusky. This is the prevalent belief here, as heavy 
cannonading was heard during the forenoon of yes- 
terday, in that direction. Our informant says he 
knows of no other force in this quarter which has 
been preparing to enter Canada, except that with 
which he was connected on Fighting Island, and that 
which is supposed to have gone over from Sandusky. 
General Vreeland, of the "Patriot" forces, has been 
arrested by the United States authorities. 

Toledo contributed her quota to the "Patriot" 
force ou this occasion, which was commanded 

by Captains William Dodd and Crane, who 

were strongly endorsed for their bravery and 
skill, by General McLeod, the "Patriot" com- 
mander, in a letter published in the Blade at 
the time. 

The letter was as follows : 

To the Citizens of the City of Toledo : 

I beg to recommend to your favorable notice, the 
gallant and intrepid conduct of Captain William 
Dodd of this City, and his Company, who so gallantly 
and intrepidly sustained me in the unequal contest 

ranks, in spite of their officers. Still, the battle was 
continued by a few of the men until the greater part 
of the troops had retired to the Island, where all 
assembled to deliberate upon the best mode of escape. 
It was concluded to cross over from the East to the 
West side of the Island, and under its cover retreat, 
which was safely effected, although the enemy's Cav- 
alry hung continually on our flank and rear. 

I was ably seconded in all my efforts during the 
engagement by Colonel Ward, Major Lawton and 
Adjutant Olney, who fought with a bravery un- 
equaled in modern warfare. It is with pain and 
regret, that I announce the fall of Major Hoadley and 
Captain Van Rennssalear. The former displayed a 
coolness during the whole engagement worthy of a 
better fate. His memory should be engraven on the 
hearts of his countrymen. Other officers condticted 
themselves with unexampled bravery. None were 
willing to give up the contest, till compelled by the 
superior force of the enemy. 



of the morning of the 25th instant. I have seen much 
service in Europe and America, but never witnessed 
officers of a commission who conducted themselves 
so coolly, determinedly, and deliberately, as did Cap- 
tains Dodd and Crane for three and one-half hours, 
with 40 men against 500 British troops w-ell armed. 
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, 
Donald McLeod, 
Brig-Gen. Patriot Army, Upper Canada. 

With the Fighting Island fiasco, the "Patriot" 
folly collapsed in a failure which would have 
been ludicrous, but for the many deluded vic- 
tims of its vain hopes, and the peril in which 
it placed the peace of two Nations. The in- 
s|)iration of the movement was two fold — a 
zeal for liberty without knowledge of the means 
necessary to obtain it, and the spirit of plunder 
always so ready as an incentive in such cases. 

The Caroline affair at Schlosser at once 
aroused the intensest excitement along the 
border, and for a time operated somewhat to 
ffalvanize the sinkinsr " Patriot " cause. Its 
national bearing, as was to have been expected, 
was serious fi-om the question of hostile inva- 
sion which grew out of it. Public meetings 
were at once called at different points along 
the Lakes, for the expression of the popular 
feelings as to the matter. Such a meeting con- 
vened at Maumee City, January 17, 1838, being 
held at the American House, the signers to the 
call being Henry Eeed, Jr., J. J. Bingham, 
David Howe, W. C. White, Geo. Richardson, 
D. R. Ranney, Jonah Woodruff, D. B. Taylor, 
A. Clarke, James Wolcott, John Sargent, Ed. 
A. Pierson, Geo. T. Cose, Alanson Powers, 
John Furey, L. B. Dean, J. F. Smi.th, T. W. 

Our loss is one Major, one Captain and eight pri- 
vates killed ; one Captain and 15 privates wounded, 
and three taken prisoners. The enemy's loss, from 
the best information received, is Major McCormick 
and other officers (names unknown), and from 50 to 
60 rank and file killed, and 75 wounded. I will further 
state, that we numbered just 150 on the morning of 
the engagement, offlcere included. 
I have the honor to be. Sir, 
Yours, 
E. D. Bradley, Colonel, 
In command Patriot Forces Point au Pellee Island, 

Upper Canada. 
ISIarch 5th, IS3S. 

P. S. — I have just received information from a 
Frenchman, who was the owner and driver of the 
teams that carried the enemy from Maiden to Point 
au Pellee. He states that 58 of the enemy were killed 
and 75 wounded. E. D. B. 



THE CANADIAN "PATRIOT" WAR. 



77 



Crowell, Geo. S. Hazard, James F. Shephard, 
Wheeler French, E. P. Parkman, J. Dwight, 
F. E. Kirtland, Guv C. Noble, Chas. "Woodruff, 
D. S. Gregory, A. J. Hackley, John Moriaii, 
Wm. CoiJeland, G. B. Warner, Wm. E. Dunham 
and vStephen T. Hosmer. James Wilkinson was 
Chairman, and Henry Reed, Jr., Secretary of 
the meeting thus called. J. J. Bingham, H. L. 
Hosmer and J. Dwight were appointed the 
committee on resolutions, whose report was in 
strong sympathy with the " Patriot " cause. 

The people of Toledo were not united in 
sentiment, as to either the general question of 
the " Patriot " movement or the character of 
the Schlosser affair. A meeting of about 150 
citizens was held January 20th, at the Mansion 
House, of which Dr. Jacob Clark was the 
Chairman, and Chas. W. Hill the Secretary. 
D. O. Morton, C. E. Brintnall, E. B. Dodd, 
Sam. Allen, and E. S. Dodd, constituted the 
committee on resolutions, and reported a series 
of such bitterly denouncing tiie destruction of 
the Caroline, as "an outrage upon a body of 
unoffending and unarmed citizens of the United 
States," and "an open violation of the laws of 
Nations," etc., such proceeding being further 
characterized as "an unprovoked invasion of 
our soil and wanton massacre of our citizens." 
With these declarations as to the actions and 
purpose of the " Patriots," was another by the 
same meeting, that its members would " use all 
their power to prevent the unlawful organiza- 
tion of armed forces within our territory, and 
to avoid any measures calculated to involve our 
country in trouble or difficulty" — at the same 
time pledging " sympathy with the people of 
Canada in their grievances," and whatever aid 
"a neutral people could consistently " render 
them. The meeting was addressed by Mr. 
McDermott, late of London District, Upper 
Canada, and by several citizens of Toledo. 

The Toledo Blade did not sympathize with 
the " Patriot" movement, as conducted on the 
South side of the Lakes. On the contrary, it 
severely criticised all attempts here to raise 
troops or otherwise aid warlike operations in 
its support. 

Under date of January 17, 18:^8, the Blade 
discussed, at some length, the merits of the 
case, as relating to the duties of American 
citizens. It said : " Troops had been publicly 
enlisted at Buffalo — armed and equipped by 
her citizens, and in broad day, in daring defi- 



ance of law and open derision of the civil 
authorities, had marched out of the City and 
taken hostile possession of a British Island. 
Here they proceeded to fortify themselves, and 
under American leaders, receiving daily rein- 
forcements of American troops, supplied by 
bountiful donations of provisions, arms and 
munitions of War from American citizens; and 
emboldened and urged on by the perverted 
sympathies of a giddy multitude, and the pre- 
vailing tone of a servile and dependent Press, 
they were meditating a descent upon the shore 
of Canada, to shed the blood other unoffending 
inhabitants. Nor was this all ; for this high- 
handed aggression could only have been con- 
summated at the almost certain risk of involv- 
ing the whole country in a war — a war, too, 
with a friendly Power, to whose generous 
mediation, but a short time ago, our own 
Nation had probably been indebted for an 
escape from the horrors of a sanguinary conflict 
with France." 

Eeferriiig to alleged disaffection among 
the people of Canada, the Blade said ; "More- 
over, where was tiie force embodied in Upper 
Canada, to encourage these volunteers and 
beckon them on ? Where were the gathered 
troops of the Provincial 'Patriots,' ready to 
welcome these partisans to the brotherhood of 
arms? They were not to be found. There 
was no sign or trace of internal revolt; much 
less of a matured and extended insurrection, to 
afford a shadow of excuse for the meditated 
invasion. The majority of that people, as we 
learn, are in favor of reform, but not of revolu- 
tion. The mass of the peojjle dread nothing 
so much as the threatened invasion from us. 
Their shores are lined— not with open arms to 
receive us, but unbought bayonets to repel the 
unnatural encroachment, and defend their 
altars and hearths. And yet, our American 
volunteers, in the desecrated name of Freedom, 
are bent upon hostile violation of their terri- 
tory ; and we are required to applaud their 
disinterested heroism — to find a model for their 
leaders in the venerated LaFayette, and to 
libel the honest and sturdy yeomanry of our own 
Eevolution, who bled for their own firesides, 
by degrading them to a com^aarison with these 
bold crusaders against a foreign soil. * * 
We are with the cause of free principles and 
Republican institutions. We believe in the 
right of the majority to determine their own 



78 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



form of government; luul il the majority of 
the inhabitants of the two Provinces are not 
satisfied with their connection with Great 
Britain, and are bent, at whatever hazard, to 
renounce their allei-iance and establish an in- 
dependent Government, we bid them ' God 
speed.' Our sympathies are with them. We 
do not, liowever, believe in that romantic 
Quixotism, which would compel thera to the 
horrors of revolution against their will. * * 
Now, we put it to the candid sense of every 
reflecting and considerate member of this com- 
munity, who believes in the obligations of good 
citizenshij) and obedience to laws, what was 
our duty ill such a crisis? Was it, to court the 
giddy breath of popular favor, by fanning a 
flame which threatened to subvert all delibera- 
tion and self-control, and to lead to utter an- 
archy? Or was it, to be silent, and through 
fear of giving off'ense to a generous, but over- 
heated ardor, stifle our convictions of the wrong 
committed upon our social obligations, and the 
shame and dishonor which impended over the 
National character? Our course was plain. 
Impelled alike by the strength of our feelings, 
an ardent love for our country's honor, and an 
imperative sense of duty, we raised a voice of 
resolute condemnation against the high-handed 
enrollment of American Volunteers to invade 
the coast of Canada. And what was the con- 
sequence? A great ferment was raised in 
Town, among some well-meaning, but impas- 
sioned champions of revolution, who seemed to 
think we had been guilty of some mon.strous 
treason to the cause of Ee])ublicau institutions, 
because we could not approve of the dishonor- 
able divorce of Liberty and Law. We took our 
position under the laws of the United States, 
and condemned, as no attempt at intimidation 
or proscription shall prevent us from still con- 
demning, earnestly and indignantly, the illegal 
enrollment of American Volunteers." The arti- 
cle closed with the quotation of a sentiment 
uttered by Henry Clay in the Senate in regai-d 
to the demonstrations at Buffalo, to wit : 
" There is no spectacle more unworthy a free 
people, than that presented by our country at 
present; where, while the Nation is ut peace, 
the People are at war." The Blade at that 
time, is understood to have been under the ed- 
itorial management of George B. Way. The 
free quotation from his article is made here, as 
much in consideration of the able and dignified 



assertion of the true character and office of the 
Press, as of the just and conservative course 
adopted for the paper upon an exciting and 
highly delicate public question ; whereby was 
furnished a precedent, as well as reasons, which 
can never be less valuable than the}' were under 
the particular circumstances which called them 
forth. 

The end of the so-called "Patriot" move- 
ment, as might have been expected, was utter 
and complete failure — both in its practical re- 
sults, and in its claims to consideration on the 
score of merit. The more it was examined as 
to the grounds upon which it was undertaken, 
the more causeless and unwarranted it ap- 
peared. At the outset, and for a time there- 
after, the natural sympathy of the people of the 
border States of the Union with any subjects 
of monarchical power, led them to accept the 
stories of " British tyranny and wrong," and 
to wish the victims of such oppression success 
in their supposed atterajjt at freedom. This 
sentiment, more or less general, at first mate- 
rially stimulated the "Patriot" cause, and aided 
in securing for it both financial support and 
securitj- for active operations. It was greatly 
strengthened by the sjnnpathy of the Press, 
which very generally encouraged the move- 
ment. It was only necessary for a few active 
and persistent men in almost any City or Town 
along the Lakes, to make the proper appeal, to 
secure more or less of popular sujjport. It was 
soon found, however, that the response was 
more liberal in volunteers for the " Patriot " 
Army, than in funds for its support. The 
financial condition of the country was specially 
favorable for active recruiting of men. The 
panic and attendant general prostration of trade 
commencing early in 1837, had deprived large 
numbers of persons of employment, while 
throwing manj^ others out of business, many 
of whom were thus well prepared to accept the 
plausible jiromises of the " Patriot " leaders 
that the property of the hated British, should 
soon be placed at their disposal. This consid- 
eration operated powerfully toward raising so- 
called "troops." But the essential supplies of 
the Commissary Department were lamentably 
wanting, whereby the movement was seriously 
crippled. The result was, that recruits drawn 
to the enter])rise bj' hope of plunder or other 
gain, often without arms, clothing and food, 
were but a charge upon an illy-supplied ex- 



THE CANADIAN "PATRIOT" WAR. 



79 



chequer. As a rule, they were anything but a 
hopeful material out of which to make soldieris. 
As in the case of some of the officers of the 
force, many of the rank and file no doubt were 
sincere in their desire to sustain what they 
supposed to be a good cause ; but the body of 
them knew nor cared for much beyond the 
hope for plunder and a love of venture — the 
more desperate the better.* 

The most important event connected with 
this mad movement, was the burning of the 
Caroline at Sclilosser. Buffer that, the " Pa- 
triot "War" would not have attained even to 
its actual significance, and would have much 
sooner been lost to popular view. The arrest 
and trial of General McLeod, by the authori- 
ties of the L'nited States, for the pai't taken by 
him in that event, led to coinplications and 
discussion with the British Government, which 
for a long time excited more or less alarm and 
apprehension of serious ti'ouble. The ijrudence 
of the two Governments, however, prevailed in 
an amicable adjustment of the delicate ques- 
tions involved. Such result was no doubt 
largely promoted by the action of the United 
States in protesting against participation by its 
citizens in the " Patriot " movement, and in 
the steps taken toward the maintenance of 
order and peaceful relations with the Canadian 
Government by citizens of the border States. 
In securing such end. President Van Buren 
sent Major-General Winfield Scott to the fron- 
tier for purposes of inspection and the repres- 
sion of participation by American citizens in 
the acts of hostility to British authority. On 
such mission, General Scott spent some time 
along the border, with evidentbeneficial results. 

Prominent in the " Patriot" movement dur- 
ing the Winter of 1838-9, was a Pole, Sholtew- 
sky von Schoultz, who had fled from Poland, 
to escape the vengeance of the Eussian Gov- 
ernment, for his jiarticipation in the insurrec- 
tion against that power. lie was considered a 
man of exceptional intelligence and energy, 
with an earnest, burning zeal for any cause 
that promised relief of a people suffering o\)- 

* A biographical sketch of General Bierce, who 
died at Akron in 1876, aged 75 years, says: "The 
whole movement (against Canada by Americans), 
was an unadvised one, and plainly a violation of in- 
ternational law, that, in his more mature life, he did 
not take much pride in." The same view is believed 
to have been general among the more intelligent 
American participants in that movement. 



pression such as had been forced upon his na- 
tive land. Volunteering for the " Patriot " 
service, he was appointed Colonel, with author- 
ity to organize a Eegiment to be constituted 
chiefly of Poles. In prompt response to such 
appointment. Colonel von Schoultz transmitted 
to Major-General Lucius V. Bierce, of Akron, 
Ohio, a detailed plan for the operations of the 
"Patriot" Army, in its advance into Canada. 
The document has historical interest, as better 
showing the real character of that movement, 
and the sort of men who led it, than could 
otherwise be done. It was as follows: 

Salina, N. Y., Sept. 28, 1838. 
To Major-General Bierce, Commander-in-Chief : 

Dear Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the 
receipt of your letter dated the 17th of September, 
which this moment was handed to me, in relation to 
the organization of my forces and their movements. 
It is with feelings of gratification and pride I accept 
the honorable part you have entrusted to me, and I 
hasten with the utmost dispatch to fulfill my prom- 
ises. 

As the nature of the troops I organize requires offi- 
cers of a jiarticular description, I confidently trust 
you will have the goodness to permit me to appoint 
my officers and staff and report them to you for com- 
missions. 

The headquarters of my countrymen being at Phil- 
adelphia, I hasten to them through night and day, 
and will immediately report to you from that place. 
Your orders regarding the movement of my eonqia- 
nies will Ijc i)unctually obeyed. I hope you will rely 
with confidence upon my discretion in ail that regards 
the secrecy and security of our noble enterprise. 

Permit me, General, to lay before you a plan of at- 
tack for the ojjening of the campaign, and be assured 
at the same time that the reason why I do it does not 
originate in a supercilious pride, but that I consider 
it an imperious duty on my part, thereby to show 
myself worthy the command wherewith I have been 
entrusted, and add the experience which during 
twelve years' active service, I may have acquired in 
the art of war and military combinations to the talents 
with which you have surrounded yourself ; and fur- 
ther, that if the service of the detached regiment is a 
difficidt and bloody one, I will regard it as a particu- 
lar favor to have my regiment ordered to execute it. 
The plan is the following : 

Twenty-four hours before j'ou open hostilities with 
the main army from Dotroit or its neighborhood, a 
regiment will be detached and sent around by water 
to Waterloo. There it lands and proceeds imme- 
diately to Fort Erie, which is stormed and carried ; a 
small garrison and the wounded are left there. The 
regiment will proceed the same night, without repose, 
toward Queenston (twenty-four miles), where it arrives 
the following day ; attacks, storms, and carries the 
fortifications and the town. Leaves a garrison and 



80 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



proceeds to Fort George; storms and carries It; leaves 
a garrison, wheels to the left and occupies Port Dal- 
housie ; organizes that Town for defense by throwing 
up two strong redouts, and abides there the move- 
ments of your main army, which will have jiroceeded 
in the following manner: 

Twenty-four hours after the departure of the de- 
tachment, the army is put in motion, storms and car- 
ries Fort Maiden ; leaves a garrison and proceeds in 
ordinary marches on the London road leading toward 
Toronto. Arrived at Ancaster, an express is dis- 
patched to the commander of the detachment at Dal- 
liousie (who will send scouts and reconnoitering par- 
ties so far), informing him of the very hour you intend 
to malie the attack on Toronto. The commander of 
the detachment will in the meantime have arranged 
means for crossing the lake, and shall at the fixed 
hour, land his forces at Toronto, thereby operating on 
the flank of the enemy, and force him to divide his 
troops. I have no doubt the place will thus be carried. 
The benefits resulting from this plan are the follow- 
ing: Fort Erie, situated opposite and near Buflalo, 
enables the patriots there to send their supplies of 
arms, etc., to a fortified place, and voluntaires can 
there be taken uji, drilled and forwarded ; the same 
it is with other fortified places. In the meantime, 
the enemy at Toronto dares not venture to advance 
against the main army, because he would be taken in 
the rear by the detachment. Consequently, you can 
advance undisturbed with your whole force, incor- 
porating all the Patriot forces on your way onward. 



Your troops will be enlivened and confident of suc- 
cess by the information of the victories of the detach- 
ment, thus raising a moral impulse among the soldiers. 
The Patriots will more readily hasten round your 
standard, knowing that you have places where, in a 
movement, the)' can be in security and near the fron- 
tiers ; finally, in case of any reverse, the arm)- can 
rally round the fortresses, which thus constitute a 
sure basis of operation and contain excellent depots. 
Free communications East and West with the United 
States are also opened. 

It is with great anxiety I await your answer, which 
I beg you to send on to Philadelphia, Penna. 

I have the honor to be, General, very respectfully, 
your obedient servant, 

Sholtewsky von Schoultz, Colonel. 

During the following Winter, von Schoultz 
and his command made the famous attack on 
Prescott, Upper Canada, in which he at first 
succeeded so far as to entrench himself at 
Windmill Point, but was overcome, captured, 
and executed by hanging. Manj^ other pris- 
oners were taken by the British authorities, 
some of whom were discharged, and others 
banished to the penal Colonies of Great Britain. 
Most of the latter died there, while a very few 
were permitted, after long years of confine- 
ment, to return. 



CHAPTER IV. 



THE MEXICAN WAR. 



ONE Comf)any was raised in Lucas County 
for service in the War with Mexico. Of 
that, Daniel Chase, then of Manhattan, was the 
Captain. It left Toledo for the field May IS, 
1847. The Toledo Guards, Captain Willey, 
turned out on the occasion to escort the Com- 
pany to the Steamboat; and the citizens, 
through Judge Mj'ron H. Tilden, jiresented 
Captain Chase with a sword. 

Little can be learned of the service oi' this 
Company ; but what is known, is creditable to 
men and oflScers. It was Company B, 15th 
United States Infantry. 

In a letter dated at Chapultepec, near the 
City of Mexico, December 19, 1847, Captain 
Chase furnished the following list of deaths in 
his command, to wit: 

Chester G. Andrews and John Sleath, killed 
in battle near City of Mexico, August 20, 1847. 

Joseph F. Clark, died of wounds received in 
same battle. 

Jonas G. Anglerayer, died of wounds received 
at .storming of Chapultepec. 

John Ball, died in hospital, at New Orleans, 
August 20, 1847. 

Solomon Blenbaugh, died in hospital at City 
of Mexico, October 6, 1847. 



Chauncy Crego, died at San Borgia, Septem- 
ber 3, 1847. 

ilobert Graves, killed at City of Mexico, 
September 14, 1847. 

Isaac H. Huyck, died in hospital, at Chapul- 
tepec, November 19, 1847. 

Joseph Hickory, died in hospital, at Vera 
Cruz, June 22, 1847. 

Sam. Jennings, died near Jalapa, June 26,1847. 

Thomas L. Kolloch, died in hospital, at Cha- 
pultepec, December 15, 1847. 

Thos. Marks, died near Santa Fe, June 19,1847. 

Jacob Eeid, died in Perote, July, 1847. 

David Eobinson, died in Chapultepec, 
November 19, 1847. 

Noble Robinson, died in hospital, at Perote, 
July 3, 1847. 

George W. Hough, died in same, July 15,1847. 

James "W. Skoen, died in hospital, at Mexico, 
Sejitember 27, 1847. 

Died in hospital, atPuebla — Calvin Waggins, 
Charles Carroll, Edward Bennett, Joseph Cum- 
mings, Wm. Davis, Samuel Garrison, Wm. Gee, 

Hann, George Holder, Eobert Kinkley, 

Wm. Reigert, Ephraim Smith, Aaron Strevor, 
Leander P. Stoddard, Charles Tupel, Charles 
Smith. 



[81] 



I 



CHAPTER V. 



LOCAL MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS. 



FACTS and dates as to early Military organ- 
izations, are ditiicult to be obtained. No 
record beyond what is supplied by the public 
press can be found. But it is learned, that this 
department of well-regulated government was 
by no means overlooked. 

The first Military Company in Toledo, was 
the Lucas Guards, which had its birth in 1835, 
amid, as probably it was born of, the stirring 
scenes and excited feelings of the Toledo War. 
Captain Granville Jones was in command. 
How long the Guards maintained their organ- 
ization, is not definitely known; probablj", not 
long after the boundary question ceased to 
suggest such means for defen.se from " Wolver- 
ine" aggression. 

In 1838 a second Military Company was in 
existence, viz.: The Toledo Guards; but noth- 
ing can be learned of its organization at that 
time. In 1840, Charles W. Hill was its Captain ; 
Coleman I. Keeler, Jr,, and Henry Allen, as 
Filers; and Mavor Brigham, as Drummer. 
Charles B. Phillips was the Secretary of the 
Company, who gave notice for a drill to take 
place March 5, 1840. The Company was con- 
nected with the First Eegiment, First Brigade, 
of the Eighteenth Division of the Ohio Militia. 
While probably not a partisan organization, 
the Guards became prominent in connection 
with the political campaign of 1840, and espe- 
cially in its attendance at the great Whig 
gathering at Fort Meigs, in June of that year. 

The Toledo Guards gave their " First Annual 
Military Ball " at the American Hotel, on Jan- 
uary 8, 1841, " at 5 o'clock p. m." Managers : 
General E. S. Dodd, General J. W. Brown, 
Colonel B. P. Peckham, Colonel S. B. Campbell, 
Major Ed. Bissell, Major H. S. Wood, Captain 
C. W. Hill, Captain A. A. Eabineau, Captain 
P. Palmer, Captain W. A. Chamberlin, Captain 
J. A. Titus, Lieutenant C. I. Keeler, Jr., Sur- 
geon C. McLean, Sergeant H. G. Cozzens, 
Lieutenant E. A. Brown, Corporal Levi Snell, 
Sergeant C. M. Dorr, Private H. W. Goettell, 
Corporal C. B. Phillips, Private D. B. Smith, 
Private Dan Segur, Private Pliny Hoagland. 



March 5, 1841, the Guards elected the fol- 
lowing officers: Captain, C. W. Hill; First 
Lieutenant, Horatio G. Cozzens ; Second 
Lieutenant, Charles Bellows; Orderly Sergeant, 
Daniel Schraffenberger ; Second Sergeant, 
Thomas D. Thomas. 

Under the head, " Military Election," the 
Blade of May 22, 1839, says : " On Thursday 
last, John R. Osborn, Esq., of this City, was 
elected Colonel of the Regiment of Ohio Militia 
in this County." Colonel Osborn not accepting 
the command of the First Regiment, Fir.st 
Brigade, Eighteenth Division, Ohio Militia, he 
was succeeded by Colonel B. P. Peckham, with 
L. S. Lownsbury as Adjutant. 

The following officers of Toledo Guards were 
chosen hy that Companj', in April, 1841 : Cap- 
tain, Chas. W. Hill; First Lieutenant, Horatio 
G. Cozzens ; Second Lieutenant, Chas. Bellows; 
Orderly Sergeant, Daniel Schraffenberger ; 
Second Sergeant, Thomas D. Thomas. 

Edson Allen, Paymaster of the First Regi- 
ment, First Brigade, Eighteenth Division, Ohio 
Militia, December 26, 1842, reported that the 
amount of fines collected for non-performance 
of Militarj' dutj- during the ^-ear 1842, was 
S.3G.50. 

Captain C. W. Hill, of Toledo Guards, was 
elected Brigadier-General, in June, 1842. 

A new Military Company, taking the name 
of the old Toledo Guards, was organized in 
August, 18.55, with the following officers: 
Captain, Chas. B. Phillijjs ; First Lieutenant, 
John E. Bond ; Second Lieutenant, H. D. 
Kiugsburj' ; Third Lieutenant, Kin. S. Dygert; 
Fourth Lieutenant, Wm. S. Sizer; First Ser- 
geant, Chas. Ballard ; Second Sergeant, Geo. W. 
Merrill ; Third Sergeant, Fred. H. Brown ; 
Fourth Sergeant, Alonzo Kingsbury; First 
Corporal, C. M. McCarty ; Second Corporal, 
Chas. E. Bliven ; Ensign, John Gavin. 

At a convention of the several Military Com- 
panies, held in Toledo. June 6, 1857, Mr. G. 
Dunn was made Chairman, and C. E. Bliven, 
Secretary. The object was the selection of 
some suitable person as Major-General of the 



[82] 



LOCAL MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS. 



815 



Division. The names of Generals Hill, Phillips, 
and Gilson, Colonel Steedman, Major Dunn, 
and Lieutenants Bond and Finlay, were an- 
nounced; all of whom, except that of Colonel 
Steedman, were withdrawn, when that gentle- 
man was unanimously chosen, and he accepted 
the position. 

A Military Election was held at Toledo, 
September 29, 1857, when Charles B. Phillips, 
of Toledo, was elected Brigadier-General, Ohio 
Militia, by 50 votes, to 46 for Garret Dunn. 

An election of officers for the Toledo Guards, 
was held December 5, 1857; the following were 
elected: Captain, Chas. B. Phillips; First 
Lieutenant, H. D. Kingsbury ; Second Lieu- 
tenant, Geo. W. Merrill ; Third Lieutenant, 
Albert Moore; Ensign, Chas. E. Bliven. 

The non-commissioned officers of Toledo 
Guards, elected February 1, 1859, were as fol- 
lows : First Sergeant, Wm. P. Pugb ; Second 
Sergeant, Eoger Alcott; Third Sergeant, J. W. 



Smith ; Fourth Sergeant, J. W. Holmes ; First 
Corporal, J. B. Howard; Second Corporal, J. 
B. Foley; Third Corporal, M. O. Merrill; Fourth 
Corporal, C. P. Dixon. The Captain was Geo. 
W. Merrill. 

In February, 1859, Colonel J. M. Ashley 
having resigned his po.sition on the Staff of 
Governor Chase, was commissioned as Commis- 
sary-General of the Volunteer Militia of Ohio, 
with rank as Brigadier- General. Major John 
Stevens, of Milan, Erie County (now of Toledo), 
was at the same time commissioned as En- 
gineer-in-(Jhief of Volunteer Militia of Ohio, 
with rank of Colonel. 

Manj^ other local organizations of similar 
kinds have existed, from time to time, whose 
records are not now accessible to the writer. 
Suffice it to say, that Lucas Countj' has not 
been lacking in the spirit which suggests and 
maintains the military arm of defense from 
outside foes and disturbances. 



I 



CHAPTEE VI. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION HOME WORK. 



plies and recruits, which could be secured only 
through the prevalence of a sound, popular 
sentiment, whence such supj)ort must come. 
As every Union Soldier can testify, the Army 
was no less sensitive to reports of disloyal 
manifestations in the rear, than to those of 
hostile action in the front. When Putnam 
entered the den in search of the bear, he was 
quite as anxious to feel the assuring hold on 
the outer end of the rope attached to his ankle, 
as he was to find the animal before him. It 
was only by such patriotic and trustful co- 
operation of a loyal people, that the glorious 
success of Union arms was attained. 

The long-threatened blow of rebellion was 
struck in the commencement of cannonading 
upon Fort Sumpter by the Confederate guns 
at Fort Moultrie, on the morning of April 
12, 18(51. The news of such action was jDub- 
lished in the Toledo Blade of Saturday, April 
13th, with the following editorial comment: 

" The blow is struck ! The time when the friends 
of Constitutional Government and Civil Liberty 
must take their position for or against the Gov- 
ernment, has arrived ! The enemies of the Union 
and of Freedom have at last reached the point where 
they feel warranted in opening hostilities upon the 
Government they are bound by every consideration 
of loyalty and patriotism to support. * * All that 
forbearance and moderation on the part of the 
friends of order could do, has been done to avert this 
shocking calamity. * ® The history of the world 
furnishes no parallel to either the madness of the 
ofTenders, or the forbearance of the Government. In 
any other country on the Globe it would have been 
impossible for deliberate, protracted and extended 
armament against the Government to be carried for- 
ward openly and undisguisedly for months, as was 
the case in this instance. 

"The practical question now for every citizen, is 
]yhat is duty? .What responsibilities devolve upon 
you, in this emergency ? "\\'e make no partisan ap- 
peal. We speak not to Republicans or to Democrats 
— native or foreign born— but to American citizens, of 
all classes and divisions. * * There can be but 
one answer from an American heart, and that will be 
a prompt and pati-iotic pledge of support to the 



TlIF publication of this volume affords the 
first opportunity for presenting the rec- 
ord of Lucas County, in connection with the 
gi-eat struggle between Treason and Loyalty — 
Slavery and Freedom — Nationality and An- 
archy — which bathed the United States in 
blood for the four years beginning April 12, 
1861. Hence, it has been deemed fitting that 
such opportunity be improved, so far as may 
be found practicable. To that end, much of time 
and patient labor have been employed in gath- 
ering and embodying material, which it is 
hoped, may be found acceptable at this time, 
and serviceable in years to come. As may be 
supposed, the work has been one of selection, 
largely, since, with the facilities at hand, there 
has been no trouble on the score of quantity. 
Volumes might be filled with available material. 
In the use of the material selected, it has 
been deemed best to divide it under two heads 
—"Home Work" and "Field Work "—the 
former showing, to some extent, what was done 
by loyal men and women at Home, for the sup- 
port of the Government, in the various modes 
open to them; and the latter briefly showing 
by whom and how Lucas County was repre- 
sented 171 the Field. In the preparation of the 
Home department of this historj-, it was 
thought to be only simple justice, that those 
contributing to the suj^port of the operations 
at the front of the war, and to the mainte- 
nance of a loyal sentiment at home, should be 
recognized, so far as that should be found 
practicable. This view is based upon the 
assumption, that the two departments of action 
were equally essential to success — that the 
Soldiers were as dependent upon the efifective 
co-operation of the friends of the Union at 
home, as were the latter upon the action of the 
former in the field. The two classes were in- 
dispensable to success, and equally entitled to 
recognition of their faithfiil sujjport of the 
Government. This fact was even more fully 
appreciated by those at the front, than by those 

at home, since they were constantly impressed °"''''"''^.* ^'^''^' *^« Government, or the chosen rep- 

wit.h . «.... ,.f ... indisoen.nhrl 7 7 i-e^entatives of the Nation, shall devise for the vindi- 

indispensable need of sup- cation of its authority and the preservation of our 



with a sense of tht 



[>S-t] 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



85 



liberties. The man who takes this position, will be 
of the Party of Patriots — no matter what his past des- 
ignation or association; and he who refuses to do so, 
should be known as a Tory and a Traitor to his 
Country and his duty. * * '* 

"We are rejoiced to believe that the masses of all 
parties are true to their duty, and are guided by the 
impulses of loyalty and patriotism. In our own 
section we look for a unity of sentiment and action, 
which will nerve the hearts and sustain the hands of 
those in charge of the Government, and leave no 
doubt as to the position of Northwestern Ohio in this 
crisis. And here let us suggest that immediate steps 
be taken by our citizens, without distinction of party, 
to give expression to public sentiment on this great 
cjuestion. We believe such a movement would do 
much toward concentrating popular feeling, and en- 
couraging our State and National authorities in the 
measures demanded by the exigencies of the times." 

In the i.ssiie of that jiaper of Monday, the 
15th, appeared the following call for a public 
meeting : * 

PATRIOTS ATTEND! RALLY TO-NIGHT! 

The time has come when all who love their coun- 
try are called upon to stand by the Flag. Treason 
has raised its head within the pale of our glorious 
country. Traitorous bands have struck down the 
National Flag, and the Government calls on all true 
patriots to assist in vindicating its authority. In 
order that an expression of feeling may be made on 
this important subject, a meeting is hereby called for 
consultation. Let party ties and party feeling be for- 
gotten in this hour of our country's peril, and let the 
people assemble to-night at the Union depot. Tole- 
do, April 1.5, 1S61. 

■Signed by James Deveau, Alonzo Godard, E. R. 
Skinner, Robert H. Bell, II. S. Commager, Valentine 
Braun, S. B. Moe, Wra. H. Whitaker, Wm. Kraus, 
Salter Cleveland, Benj. F. Mallett, Joel W. Kelsey, 
Wm. Baker, T. C. Stewart, F. J. King, Geo. A. Car- 
penter, Ebenezer Walbridge, Matthew Brown, Samuel 
S. Read, Henry D. Walbridge, Almon Hopkins, John 
B. Carson, Daniel Segur, M. D. Carrington, Theo. B. 
Casey, James R. Strong, A. J. Hand, Pat. Murray, 
Lyman Wheeler, John T. Maher, Matthias Boos, 
Louis Wachenheimer, F. J. Cole, S. A. Raymond, 

*0f this call, the BJade said : "The call in this 
paper for a public meeting at the Depot this evening, 
to one familiar with the names it bears, will testify 
to the universality of the Union feeUng here. Men 
prominent in every walk of life, and more or less 
active in each of the political parties, have cheerfully 
and promptly pledged tliemselves to stand by the 
right. All semblance of partyism has disapjjeared, and 
everybody is ready to express confidence in, and 
sympathy with the Administration. Already do we 
hear of volunteers seeking opportunity for enlistment, 
and should a call be made, we doubt not large num- 
bers could readily be obtained." 



Peter Lenk, Uriah Gregory, E. Bivens,Wm. C. Cheney, 

D. C. Dewey, P. H. O. Willibrand, C. B. Eells, Wm. C. 
Earl, James B. Steedman, Andrew Young, H. T. 
Smith, N. T. Nash, H. D. Kingsbury, Alex. Hender- 
son, Gustavus Goldsmith, Jos. Thomas, C. D. Wood- 
ruff, Christ. Woebler, Leman Kraus, Jacob Kraus, 
H. P. Piatt, Jos. K. Secor, David Ketcham, Leander 
Biirdick, Chas. A. Moore, Lewis C. Hunt, Geo. F. 
Denison, H. Stebbins, H. W. Bigelow, Aug. Thomas, 
John Sinclair, H. S. Walbridge, Horace Thacher, 
Geo. Spencer, Jacob Landman, Chas. O'Hara, J. H. 
Kohn, Clark Waggoner, Geo. True, E. M. Brown, 
Wm. H. Atwill, Patrick H. Galloway, Chas. T. Wales, 
M. H. Porter, H. C. Nicholas, E. T. JNIortimer, Henry 
Bennett, M. R. Waite, Jas. A. Boyd, Paul Edwards, 
J. Brown, J. H. Huyck, G. R. Peckman, W. A. Titus, 
R. W. Titus, Jas. H. Maples, John Brownlee, F. H. 
King, John P. Freeman, Dennis Coghlin, Louis H. 
Pike, Edward C. Smith, T. H. Hoag, Geo. Wilder, 
Matthew Shoemaker, H. Espy, A. V. Stebbins, John 

E. Hunt, Thos. Card, John E. Hunt, jr., Chas. I. Scott, 

F. J. Klauser, Jos. H. Joyce, H. D. I'ugh, John Cum- 
mings, Geo. W. Hart, I. N. Hathaway, R. V. Boice, 
Robert Cummings, Chas. B. Roff, Wm. Rofl', Robert W. 
Smith, Gilbert Rogers, jr., Wm. T. Hall, Jos. Coghlin, 
Thos. Dunlap, J. D. Crennan, M. C. Byrne, Chas. 
Kent, Hez. L. Hosmer, James C. Hall, W. W. Jones, 
Fred. A. Jones, John G. Fulton, C. H. Swain, A. G. 
Dooley, Wm. H. Harris, E. A. Thomas, John Kauff- 
man, R. C. Daniels, G. P. Crosby, Tlios. Howlett, Jas. 
Love, Lyman Parcher, Samuel Wagner, N. W. Eddy, 
A. H. Hathaway, Jos. E. Marx, G. D. Clafiin, D. E. 
Gardner, C. M. Yeager, Frank J. Scott, T. Tuey, John 
Frank Wallace, Jos. Fitzpatrick, Alex. Reed, Chas. 
Pratt, W. G. Powers, J. B. Trembley, John M. Blod- 
gett, David Anderson, John W. Fuller, Paul Jones, 
E. D. Nye, and hundreds of others. 

lu pursuance of this call, an immense assem- 
blage of citizens gathered at the Union Depot, 
where Judge James Myers was chosen Presi- 
dent; William C. Earl, Andrew Young and 
Henry S. Commager vvere made Vice Presi- 
dents; and N. T. Nash, Secretary. As a Com- 
mittee on Eesolutions, General Steedman, 
General C. W. Hill, H. S. Commager, Daniel 
Segur and J. W. Brown. Speeches were made 
by General Steedman, M. R. Waite, M. T. 
Brown, H. L. Hosmer, S. A. Raymond, D. S. 
Price, H. S. Commager and E. P. Bassett. 
The Committee on Eesolutions reported the 
following, which was unanimously adojJted : — 

Where.\s, The Flag of our Country has been fired 
upon and struck down by rebels and traitors, who 
avow their purpose to march upon and capture the 
Capital and overturn the Government, therefore. 

Resolved, That, as citizens, we pledge ourselves to 
ignore all past party distinctions, and give our united 
aid and suijport to our Government ; to protect the 



86 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Capital; maintain the Government; punish tlie in- 
sult oftered our Flag; and restore peace and tran- 
quility to the Country. 

Resolved, That, in our opinion, the Legislature of 
Ohio ought to make an appropriation of $5,000,000, 
and provide for raising a force of 50,000 troops, to aid 
in sustaining the Naticmal Government. 

rhilharmonic Hall— Summit Street— wa.s at 
once engaged for " Patriotic Headquarters." 

The Blade of the 17th of April, said : " Many 
of our citizens are awaiting instruction.s from 
General Carrington, Adjutant-General of Ohio, 
as to the mode of raising troops. Persons re- 
quiring information, ma}' call on General C. 

B. Phillips, General J. B. Steedman or George 
P. Este." The same paper of the 18th, said : 
'■ The work of enlistment is progressing here 
actively, and the enthusiasm is more general 
and deeper than at any former time." The 
recruited men were already drilling at Phil- 
harmonic Hall (the armor}'). 

The following call ajipeared April 18, to wit: 

YOUNG AMERICA TO THE RESCUE ! 

In all crises in the World's history, certain respon- 
sibility has attached to Young JVIen. To ascertain the 
state of feeling existing among America's Youth in 
this City, in this hour of sadness, we propose a meet- 
ing to be held at Stickney Hall (248 and 250 Summit 
Street), this evening at 7:00 o'clock. Let all who 
glory in the title of " Young America," turn out. 

Signed by John L. Johnston, Hartwell Osborn, 
Theodore Sawyer, Eli M. Ashley, Orin S. Anderson, 
Henry S. Waite, R. B. Pratt, Charles Scott, James A. 
Eaton, Samuel R. Adams, George E. Welles, George 

C. Pepper, Charles J. Swift, T. H. Ellison, William 
Crowell, William H, H. Smith, E. P. Hopkins, George 
F. Hazlott, A. M. BLike, B. F. Card, Charles C. Starr, 
Fred. W. Haines, L. Goldsmith, William Bodley, 
William Markscheflel, John H. Doyle, Henry J. 
Chase, J. W. White, Carlos Colton, J. Kent Hamilton, 
John Henry, H. W. Dodd, James W. Clark, Foster 
W. Wilder, Charles R. Messenger, George E. Farley, 

C. F. INIeyer, William P. Garret, J. C. Frisbee, Robert 

D. Whittlesey, Theodore J. Brown, Orin G. 01m- 
stead, Ralph H. Waggoner, Edwin Avery, John E. 
Eldridge, H. J. Crane, William Corlett, William Bur- 
wick, A. Steele, Richard Bodley, William H. Perigo, 
Thomas Rowsey. 

In pursuance of this call, a large and enthu- 
siastic meeting was held, of which J. L. John- 
ston was Chairman, and Theodore Sawyer, 
Secretary. Remarks were made by Messrs. 
Johnston, Sawyer, Blake, and others, and res- 
olutions adopted strongly endorsing the Gov- 
ernment. 

The first Company of Volunteers for the 



Union Army from Lucas County, was sworn 
in on the 17th. Sheriif Henry D. Kingsbury, 
George P. Este, E. P. Bassett and John A. 
Chase, each was raising a Company. It was 
expected that these would be filled in Toledo, 
and a Regiment within the Military District 
in a week from that time. 

At the regular meeting of the Toledo Board 
of Trade, April 20th, it was " resolved, that the 
United States flag be i-aised over our building," 
and Charles A. King and Samuel S. Read were 
instructed to see that it was done. It was 
done. 

April 19th, Robt. H. Bell, .Joel W. Kelsey and 
Augustus Thomas, committee, gave notice that 
they had obtained from the citizens, contribu- 
tions sufficient to defraj' the immediate neces- 
sary contingent expenses of the Companies 
organizing at Toledo. It was then expected 
by Governor Dennison, that three Companies 
from Toledo would be in Cleveland April 24th. 

The Blade of April 20th, had at the head of 
its editorial columns, in large letters, the fol- 
lowing : 

God bless our Native Land : 
Firm may she ever stand. 

Through storm and night ! 
When the wild tempests rave, 
Ruler of Wind and Wave, 
Do Thou our Country Save, 

By Thy great might! 

For her our prayers shall rise 
To God above the skies : 

On Hi.M we wait. 
Lord, hear our Nation's cry ; 
Be Thou forever nigh : 
May Freedom never die : 

God save the State ! 

April 'I'M, three Companies enrolled at 
Toledo, were organized as follows : 

Company A (Ander.son Guards). — Henry D. Kings- 
bury, Captain ; S. B. Moe, First Lieutenant ; Francis 
N. Marion, Ensign ; Sergeants — N. J. Doolittle, 
James H. Boggis, J. W. White, Robert Just ; Corpor- 
als— Geo. W. Reynolds, Jr., B. F. Card, M. S. B. 
Truax, H. C. Roemer ; Drummer — S. H. Anderson ; 
Fifer— A. L. Callard. Privates— S. R. Adams, R. H. 
Bliven, H. W. Blodgett, H. P. Blake, Jacob Brand, 
I. G. Butterfield, Jacob Beach, Peter Bellman, Ed- 
ward Becker, David Brett, VVm. Church, John E. 
Cobb, Henry S. Commager, Frank Y. Conjinager, 
Luther H. Cook, W'm. Dustin, Samuel H. Decker, 

P. W. Disbrow, Isaac D'Isay, Marshal Davis, 

Evans, Archibald J. Eyster, Jas. F. ElUott, Ed. J. 
Fitield, Geo. Duncan Forsyth, Allen W. Frary, Geo. 
W. Freatenborough, Geo. Farley, Geo. Griswold, 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



S7 



John Gates, Frank H. Gill, Geo. W. Gore, August 
Graft, Geo. \V. Hanies, John H. Hicks, John C. Han- 
son, Edward Hartman, Geo. F. Hazlett, Samuel W. 

Johnston, June, Patrick Kelley, Calvin S. 

Kimball, Fred. Kerbell. Ed. P. Lacy, Patrick Mitch- 
ell, Jas. Menhcnnick, Daniel Mills, Samuel Mills, 
Benj. F. McCord, Peter McC'urdell, C. D. Meyer, Jas. 
McFadden, Walter McCarron, Samuel E. Norton, 
Henry G. Neubert, John Niehouse, Daniel H. Nye, 
Horace Odell, Geo. H. Planner, Daniel S. Price, Ed- 
ward Paine, Geo. W. Rodebaugh, Isaac D. Eiker, 
Fred. Rougement, Alpheus R. Rogers, W. F. Stopford, 
Thos. iScott, Wm. A. Snyder, Edward Stephan, C'has. 
H. Thompson, Philo B. Town, John C. Wuerfel, 
Edward Williams, Andrew J. Wales, Geo. J. Willis- 
ton, Albert V. Wilder, Wm. H. Wood, Horace H. 
Warren, Alonzo H. Wood, and Geo. N. Young. 

Company B. — Louis von Blessingh, Captain ; John 
A. Chase, First Lieutenant; Wm. Schulz, Ensign; 
Sergeants — Louis Koeppel, Henry Sengmier, PhiHp 
Breids, L. T. Smidt ; Corporals — Solomon Haughton, 
Casper Peters, Arthur Kraft, Frank Fleck ; Drum- 
mer — G. Milverstedt; Fifer — Henry Hermance. Pri- 
vates — John Raymer, John Brillman.Willard Kishael, 
Henry Archer, Jas. Ostrander, Edson Pratt, Fine 
Green, C. G. Tilebitsz, Thos. Hinds, Gilbert Ostrander, 
I. A. Ingersoll, Michael -Bess, Aaron Applegate, 
Aaron Lawrence, John Coon, Henry Belknapp, John 
Wedman, Fred. Waiman, Henry Bredt, Reed Harri- 
son, Wm. Dustin, Emil Rompant, Anton Weil, Con- 
rad Weil, Louis Sebastian, Michael Keish, John 
Hosh, Ferd. Walz, Christian Luishardt, Carl Has, 
Fritz Hobe, N. L. Grow, Ludwig Koehler, Geo. Die- 
fenseller, Jerold Kuebler, Louis Roeger, James L. 
Bullard, Matthew Cnlligan, James McBrido, Cornelius 
O'Callagren, Matthew Tooney, Aaron La<lsoir, Chas. 
Maculen, Franklin Harwood, August Hickenburg, 
Wm. Bingel, Christ. Sohr, Malvern McMillan, Haman 
Johnson, Jarol Alery, Wm. Cjradolph, Phil. Roll, 
Geo. Hehner, Jacob Kramer, John Linden, Wm. 
Neiss, Anton Holzmann, Alex. Witesgreter, Ali 
Zimmer, Chris. Dittman, Benedict Emch, John 
Doerig, John Schickler, Robert Hartman, Jacob 
Smith, Lewis Richley, Henry Killen, Jolm H. Lieppel, 
John Ryant, Thos. Brown, John J. Clarke, Lewis 
Noler, Harrison C. Williams, Christ. Corson, Davis 
Kirk, Henry Cook, Nelson Bordo, Jas. Alicky, Jas. 
Rubar, Samuel McDonald, H.R.Carson, Benj. F. 
Duston, H. W. Case, Michael Kenney, Nasson Edson, 
John William Cooper, John Cartwright, Sampson 
Hellrick, Norris Heller, A. Freeman, Solomon Martz, 
John Van Orman, Anton Himmelsbach. 

CoMc..\NY K.— Ctco. W. Kirk, Captain; John F. 
Wallace, Fii-st Lieutenant; Samuel Sherman, Second 
Lieutenant; Sergeant.s— Wm. Griflen, F. T. Warner, 
Edward Dodd, Wm. Martin; Corporals— A. Shau- 
melofl'el, E. C. Tillotson, Julius Hanpel, L. Heben- 
thall; Drummer, Wm. Bentel; Fifer, J. McD. Miller. 
Privates — Jared W. Arnold, Lewis Angell, George 
Allen, Chas. Backus, Andrew Barten, Jos. Blumberger, 
Samuel Bayless, Wm. J. Barkley, Albert Burroughs, 



Horace Benedict, Chas. E. Browne, Chas. B. Betters, 
Jas. Brown, Thos. Byrne, Christ. Baum, Chas. Beech- 
er, Jas. Belts, Franklin Brumhoffer, Morris Culver, 
Chas. Cline, Sylvester Chesebrough, Geo. Crouse, 
Clement Cochrane, Robert Carney, Anthony Debry, 
Thos. Delvin, Henry Denick, Henry Drago, IMathias 
Daum, Fred. Ersam, Chas. French, Wm. Fonstihl, 
Fred. Fobes, Haskell Farrer, Wm. Ferguson, An- 
drew Fisher, Thos. Graham, Oscar Gibson, Cyrus 
Greeley, Henry Gounier, Seneca Green, Simon Hol- 
landwort, Henry Hansen, Joseph Hustider, Abram 
Height, Geo. Holloway, John Hedsick, John Ham- 
ilton, Michael lieister, Jasper Hayden, Jas. Hyne, 
Chas. Huster, Fred. Huddlemier, Geo. W. Harding, 
Geo. Kommor, Wm. Kelley, Conrad Kale, Washing- 
ton King, John Kline, Oliver Lafontaine, Fred Lewis, 
Alex. Marker, John W. Miller, John McCarty, Geo. 
Myers, Jas. Pulver, Simon Pemberton, Francis Perry, 
Lewis Pipenger, DeAVitt C. Rogers, Franklin Rhoad, 
Eli Roberdo, Michael Russell, Jos. Sudborough, Wm. 
Souls, Benj. F. Sherman, Gustavus Seminier, Jacob 
Steel, IMichael Schamboserger, John Sour, Conrad 
Silling, Samuel Seaman, Geo. Smith, Israel Timmer, 
Walter A. Titus, AUis Thomas, Jos. A. Nasner, My- 
ron Weaver, Truman Wheeler, Josiah Walker, Thos. 
Wakely, Jas. Wadman, Jas. Wickham, Ruel Wet- 
more, Patrick Welch, John Wagner, John Welles, 
and Simon Waldman. 

The Blade of April 22d, had a letter from 
"A. E.," a colored citizen, expressing his own 
desire and that of his race generally, to be per- 
mitted to contribute toVard the defense of the 
CTOvernment. After citing a law of Congress, 
prohibiting the employment of a colored man 
in any military capacity whatever, he said : 
" I for one, have offered my services to a few 
of the oflScers of the Companies being formed 
here, as I wisli to make myself useful as cook, 
waiter or in any other way, so I may have a 
hand in putting down the enemies of the Gov- 
ernment." The patriotic citizen making that 
noble offer, little thought at the time, tliat the 
Slave-holding power, in whose behalf his race 
were excluded from military service, would 
persist in its madness, until the Government, 
for sheer self-preservation, should be compelled 
to repeal its prohibitorj' law and appeal to his 
race to take their place as equals of the 
oflScers whose menial service was the most he 
expected to be permitted to do for the Govern- 
ment who had thus degraded him and his I'ace. 
It is just cause for regret, that the name of this 
patriotic colored citizen cannot be given here. 

April 24, 1861, Colonel J. B. Steedman, com- 
manding, issued his order for the "Northwes- 
tern Ohio Eegiment " to proceed the next 



s« 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



morning for rendezvous at Cleveland, D. H. 
Nye being detailed as Quartermaster. At 7 
A. M , the Companies were to form on Magnolia 
and Superior streets, as follows: 1. Toledo 
Guards, Captain Kingsbury', 97 men. 2. Toledo 
Company, Captain Este, 124 men. 3. Bryan 
Company, Captain Fisher, 115 men. 4. Defi- 
ance Company, Captain Sprague, 103 men. 
5. Stryker Company, Captain E. D. Bradley, 
123 men. 6. Napoleon Company^, Captain 
Crawford, 125 men. 7. Antwerp Company, 
Captain Snook, 97 men. 8. Wauseon Company, 
Captain Barber, IIU men. 9. Waterville Com- 
pany, Captain Dodd, 102 men. 10. Toledo 
Company, Captain Kirk, 114 men. Total, 1,116 
men. General Chas. W. Hill acted as Adjutant 
pro tem., assisted by General C. B. Phillips 
and Lieutenant J. W. Fuller. The foregoing 
order was carried out. The Blade said of the 
occasion : " Never has our City experienced 
siich a day as the present. At early dawn, the 
people fi'om the country began to arrive in 
immense crowds, and the firing of cannon 
aroused our own citizens from their slumbers, 
and by 9 o'clock there must have been 10,000 
peojjle on the streets. At the Eailroad depot 
the scene was truly grand. The crowd filled 
the entire space devoted to passenger trains ; 
but after energetic effort by the police, a pas- 
was made and the troojis, in sections, 



marched to the cars. The Eegiment numbered 
1,058 men, all told, composed mainly of young 
men. At 8 a. m. religious services had been 
conducted on the parade ground by Eev. H. B, 
Walbridge, of Trinity Episcopal Church. Much 
disappointment was felt by the Waynesfield 
Guards, Lieutenant E. B. Mitchell, commanding, 
that the offer of that Company had not been ac- 
cepted by the President." At Cleveland, Eegi- 
mental officers were chosen, as follows : Colonel, 
J. B. Steedman ; Lieutenant-Colonel, Geo. P. 
Este ; Major, Paul Edwards. Geo. W. Kirk 
succeeded Captain Edwards, in command of 
his Company, as did Lieutenant von Blessiugh 
Captain Este. Upon organization at Camp 
Taylor, Cleveland, the Northwestern Eegiment 
became the " Fourteenth Ohio." It left Camp 
for Marietta, via Columbus, May 22d, where 
they arrived on the 24th.* 

The German Eifles (Yeager's), Toledo; the 
Waynesfield Guards, Maumee; and one Com- 

■■•The history of this Regiment is given more fully 
elsewhere. 



imny each from Delta, Fulton County, Bryan 
and Defiance, were not accepted, for the reason 
that the Eegiment was full. 

April 29th, a neat flag, made by Scholars in 
the Toledo Public Schools, was raised on the 
flag-staff of the High School building, in the 
presence of 1,000 Scholars. On motion of 
Judge Potter, Judge James Myers was made 
Chairman, when prayer was offered by Eev. 
Wm. W. Williams. After singing, addresses 
were made by Moses T. Brown, Superintendent 
Public Schools, and Messrs. W. A. C. Converse, 
Fred. B. Dodge, E. W. Dickerson, and B. W. E. 
Koch, Teachers. An original ode* — "Live 

* Mr. Hasty's production was as follows : 

LIVE, LIBERTY! 
To arms ! to arms V For yonder come the foe ! 
To arms ! to arms ! the battle-trumpets blow. 
The tramp of Rebel hosts is heard 

On every Southern plain : 
Old Massachusetts draws her sword 
For Lexington, again. 
Then rise, ye sons of noble sires ; 
Defend your altars and your fires, 
And lay the traitors low. 

CViorKS— Live, Freedom, live ! 
Liberty forever ! 
Union shall with Freedom live. 
Despotism, never— 
No, no, KG ! 

The die is cast. See Sumpter's battered wall. 
To arms ! to arms ! Must our dear country fall ? 
Shall bloody brigands pitch their tents 

Beside Mt. Vernon's grave? 
Shall Rjittlesnakes and Pelicans 
Above our Cities wave? 
Shall Liberty herself be slain ? 
Must we put on a Southern chain ? 
It never shall be so. 

Chorus— hive. Freedom, live, etc. 

True blood Howed where Anderson's brave men 
Were starved and wasted in their fortress pen. 
Around, ten thousand yelling fiends, 

Their murderous cannon ply ; 
Within, Columbia's noblest sons, 
Half-smothered, bleed and die. 
But every purple drop that fell, 
Shall fertilize its dusty cell, 

And to an Army grow. 

Chonts — Live, Freedom, live, etc. 

Through every State, from Oregon to Maine, 
The shriek of Liberty resounds again ; 
And every party, creed and clan. 

Dissolving into one, 
Tlirow paiit dissensions to the winds, 
And to the rescue run : 
For we wiU raise that Flag again 
Crush out the Rebels— break their chain. 
Or fall before the foe. 

CTiorus— Live, Freedom, live, etc. 
Sylv.\;jia, Ohio, April '25, 1861. 

The impressive reading of the above by Mr. Brown 
made some parts of it truly electrical with the vast 
audience. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



89 



Liberty " — written by Emerson E. Hasty, a 
graduate of the Toledo High School, was i-ead 
by Mr. M. T. Brown, when the exercises closed 
with singing " The Star Spangled Banner." 

May 6th, J. W. Kelsey and J. T. Maher, Sub- 
Committee, gave notice, that they could be 
found every Satiirdaj-, from 9 till 12 m., at the 
Hanks building, Cherry street, with supplies 
for Soldiers' families. 

The first Company of Militia of Eeserve or 
Home Guards, Toledo, was organized by the 
election of officers, as follows : Captain, Chas. 
W. Hill; First Lieutenant, John W. Fuller; 
Second Lieutenant, John C. Gavin ; Sergeants — 
Richard Waite, Victor Keen, A. G. Dooley, 
W. A. Collins, Geo. True; Corporals— John B. 
Lounsbury, A. W. Gleason, Alex. Reed, E. W. 
E. Koch, D. E. Austin, Eobert I). Whittlesey, 
Carlos Colton, M. W. Day; with 80 privates. 
It took the name of Toledo Citizens' Corps. 

April 27th, a Company arrived at Toledo 
from Perrysburg, of which Asher Cook was 
the Captain, Arnold McMahon, First Lieuten- 
ant, and L. B. Blinn, Second Lieutenant. The 
Worth Guards, of Gilead, Wood Count}', 109 
strong. Captain O. C. Carr, First Lieutenant 
J. J. Vorhes, and Second Lieutenant J. E. Mc- 
Gowan, arrived same day. Over $1,000 was 
raised in two hours at Gilead, for the benefit of 
the Guards and their families. 

The Toledo Zouave Cadets, with 65 members, 
organized May 27, 1861, as follows : 

Captain, Hamilton C. Colton ; First Lieutenant, 
Chas. N. Stevens ; Second Lieutenant, Jno. A. Waite ; 
Third Lieutenant, Chas. B. Scott; Sergeants — Wm. 
E. Parmelee, Jr., W. Hunt Walbridge, J. Scott, Chas. 
L. Brooks, C. W. Breed ; Corporals — Chas. J. Swift, 
Ralph Osborn, F. B. Sboeroaker, A. W. Hunker. 
Privates— E. D. Potter, Jr., Orlin S. Hayes, John J. 
HuuktT, K. D. Barker, W. E. Lawton, Geo. C. Pepper, 
A. E. Scott, B. J. Wheeler, Wm. H. Boos, B. AVood- 
worth, E. M. Hamilton, S. L. Frazer, Wm. P. Gard- 
ner, John M. McKee, Allen H. Forsyth, 0. T. Wil- 
liams, Theo. J. Curtis, Thos. Southard, Wm. Murphy, 
G. Baker, Geo. Lilliland, C. Fisk, W. Calvert, J. 
Thomas, W. J. Chase, Wni. Kief, W. Dodd, Wm. W. 
Backus, C. Thomas, H. Clark, H. Burr, J. Murjihy, 
Geo. Haskell, F. T. Lane, Levi Lownsbury, John W. 
Fitch, Chas. Scott, F. Wilder, Wm. Crowell, Henry 
S. Waite, J. Hail, Chas. Bond, E. Willey, Fred Ham- 
lin, Jos. Beeley, Geo. Hazlett, H.Gavin, A. Brow- n, 
W. Vorace, J. Allen, Burton Taylor, J. E. Eldridge. 

The following officers composed the staff of 
Brig.-General Charles W. Hill, First Brigade, 
First Division of Ohio troops, in three-months' 



service, under act of May 8, 1861 : Lieuten- 
aot-Colonel John W. Fuller, Assistant Adju- 
tant General ; Major Charles C. Walcutt, Bri- 
gade Inspector ; Major John B. Frothingham, 
Aide to Commander-in-Chief, detailed as 
Brigade Engineer ; Major William A. Collins, 
Judge Advocate ; Captains Reuben E. Cham- 
pion and A. W. Hull. Aides-de-Camp. 

The Third Wisconsin Regiment passed 
through Toledo July 13, 1861. It was com- 
manded by Colonel C. S. Hamilton. The men 
were supplied with refreshments by the ladies 
of the City, for which Governor Eandall, of 
that State, telegraphed his thanks. On the 
15th, the Fourth Wisconsin Eegiment, Colonel 
H. E. Paine, reached Toledo, and were met at 
the depot by 30 ladies, who, with baskets of 
wholesome food, passed along the line and 
dealt out the same to the hungry troops. John 
D. Campbell, Superintendent of the Michigan 
Southern Eailroad, supplied coffee from the 
Island House for the Soldiers. The Fifth Wis- 
consin, Colonel Amasa Cobb, passed Toledo 
July 25th, when, as in the cases of the Tliird 
and Fourth Eegiments, the men were provided 
by Toledo ladies with an ample supply of food. 

The following rates were paid for rations bj' 
the State in July, 1861 ; At Cleveland, $13.70 
per 100; at Wooster and Warren, $13.85; at 
Toledo, §13.90. Army daily rations were then 
as follows : 20 oz. fresh and salt beef, or 12 oz. 
pork ; 18 oz. soft bread or flour, or 12 oz. hard 
bread ; 2h oz. beans, or 1 3-5 oz. rice ; 1 5-6 oz. 
sugar; 1 oz. ground coffee; J gill of vinegar; 
\ oz. candles; | oz. soap; \ oz. salt. 

A meeting of citizens of Toledo was held 
Sept. 1, 1861, to devise ways and means for the 
relief of families of soldiers, of which Clark 
Waggoner was Chairman, and Warren Eussell 
Secretary. The chair appointed Wm. Kraus, 
C. A. King and C. B. Phillips a couimittee" to 
wait upon the City Council and ascertain wliat 
that body could do in the premises, and also 
appointed M. E. Waite, F. A. Jones and Charles 
Pratt a committee to confer on the same sub- 
ject with the County authorities. 

In October, 1861, Military Districts were es- 
tablished in Ohio corresponding to the Con- 
gressional Districts, with a Military Committee 
for each, whose duty it was to look after the 
work of recruiting and otherwise co-operate 
with the Governor. Such Committee for the 
5th District was as follows: Francis Holleu- 



90 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



beck. Wood Co.; A. Sanky Latty, Defiance ; 
Richard -Mott, Lucas; S. W. Norris, Williams; 
Dr. K. K. Scott, Henry; John H. Palmer, 
Hancock; Joseph Cable, Paulding. 

Special arrangements were made for caring 
for the savings of Ohio Soldiers when paid off 
in tlie field, which worked well. Capt. Jona- 
than Brown, Co. K, 25th Eegimcnt, in Octo- 
ber, 18tJl, brought ?15,000 from that command, 
of which S1,8(IU came to Toledo. At the same 
time a Cincinnati Regiment sent $14,000. 

The Military Committee for the 9th District, 
Oct. 11, ISUl, ajipointed the following County 
Committees : 

Ottawa— W. L. Cole, E. P. Reynolds, R. Devereaux, 
J. Lattimore, John Ryder. Sandusky — La Q. Rawson, 
James Justice, C. 0. Tillotson, C. Doncyson, Isaac 
Knapji. Hardin — Henry G. Harris, Edward Stellings, 
Thos. Roufih, Benjamin R. Bronson, Wm. Shrader. 
Wyandot— H. S. Hunt, John Berry, Jona. Maffott, 
Michael Moran, Alex. Brinkerlioff. Crmrford — Josiah 
S. Plants, S. R. Harris, C. Elliott, Ro))ert Lee, H. C. 
Carhart. Seneca — Leander Stem, John J. Steiner, 
J. M. Zahm, G. M. Ogden, Chas. Foster. Lucas — 
R. C. Lemmon, Moses T. Brown, W. W. Howe, John 
T. Maher, and Guido Marx, of Toledo ; Foster R. 
Warren, of Sylvania ; Jas. M. Brigham, of Waterville ; 
Dr. W. A. Scott, of Pwanton; and Geo. W. Reynolds, 
of Maumee. 

October 2G, 1861, the Toledo Bar gave Col- 
onel J. A. Mulligan, the hero of Springfield, 
Mo., a public reception at White's Hall, and a 
supjier at the Oliver House. 

The Toledo Zouave Cadets elected the fol- 
lowing officers, October 7, 1861, to wit: 

Captain. Hamilton Colton ; Fir.st Lieutenant, Wm. 
E. Parmelee, Jr.; Seeonrl Lieutenant, Chas. B. Scott; 
Third Lieutenant, Henry S. Waite ; Sergeants — Chas. 
N. Stevens, Theo. J. Curtis, Wm. W. Bolles, Wm. H. 
Perigo, Fred. B. Shoemaker. Corporals— Charles 
Scott, Walter J. Chase, Chas. J. Swift, Wm. Keif, 
Geo. W. Haskell, Wm. Murphy, Wm. W. Backus, 
Andrew H. Hunker. 

The Military Committee for the District met 
at Toledo, July 23, 1862, with the following 
members present : 

Lucas Omntij—'F. R. Warren, W. A. Scott, John T. 
Maher, W. W. Howe, J. M. Brigham, A. L. Backus, 
Geo. W. Reynolds, H. C. Lemmon. Sandusky County- 
La. Q. Rawson, C. 0. Tillotson, Jas. Justice. Wood 
County— Geo. Laskey, J. E. McGowan, B. W. Johnson, 
John Norris, H. H. Dodge. Williams Co^mly— James 
Beery, J. S. Cannan, 1. R. Sherwood, B. H. Fisher, 
S. E. Blakeslee. Fvlton County — Jos. H. Miller, D. 
W. H. Howard, N. Merrill, 0. B. Verity, O. Waters. 



Henry County — J. H. Tyler, Lorenzo Higby. Defiance 
Couniy—Fm\siy Strong, J. P. Buflington. Ottawa 
County — W. L. Cole. Paulding County — S. R. Brown. 

Among the proceedings of the Committee 
was the recommendation of officers for the 
100th Ohio Eegiment, as follows ; Colonel, Wm. 
E. Haynes, of Fremont, then (Captain in 8th 
Ohio; Lieutenant-Colonel, P. S. Slevin, of 
Perrysburg ; Major, E. L. Hayes, of Wauseon, 
then Captain 44th Illinois; Surgeon, Dr. W. A. 
Scott, Lucas County ; Assistant Surgeon, Dr, 
O. C. Pier, Napoleon ; Quartermaster, David 
R, Austin, Toledo; Chaplain, Eev. Mr. Grittin, 
Port Clinton. 

The Lucas County Committee, August 9, 
1861, recommended J. W. Smith for appoint- 
ment as Captain ; Horace H, Warren and 
Patrick H. Dowling as First Lieutenants, and 
John H. Haverlj' as Second Lieutenant in the 
100th Eegiment. The last named, then a 
resident of Toledo, has since attained special 
prominence as manager and proprietor of lead- 
ing Theatrical and Opera enterprises in differ- 
ent Cities. He was not appointed as Lieutenant. 

The Governor appointed John C. Groom, of 
Columbus, Colonel of the 100th Eegiment, 
which left Toledo, September 8th. The fol- 
lowing were the non-commissioned staff: Ser- 
geant-Major, Norman Waite ; Quartermaster- 
Sergeant, JohnW. Polk; Commissarj'-Sergeant, 
Henry W. Titus ; Principal Musician, Jacob 
Marts ; Hospital Steward, Jos. Orno. 

During the rebellion, the Blade office was at 
No. 150 Summit Street. On the top of the 
building was a flag-staff, on which, as occasion 
suggested, the stars and stripes apjieared. In 
times of special interest, and particularly when 
important war news was expected, that signal 
was looked for with deepest solicitude, since 
its appearance came to be accepted as indica- 
ting the receipt of " good news " (though not 
always the most reliable news, since misleading 
or partial reports sometimes came). On Mon- 
day, February 17, 1862, under the heading, 
"Our Flag is There," the Blade said: "Through- 
out the day, Saturday, and until 10 this A. M., 
the Blade's flag-staff was watched by eager 
and longing eyes for the stars and stripes, the 
unfurling of which, it was ardently hoped, 
would signal a triumph at Fort Donelson. 
Few persons iu the neighborhood of the office 
stepped into the street without giving an anx- 
ious glance toward that center of general inter- 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



91 



est, aud many a one often stepped to the near- 
est window, in hope to see the glorious old 
banner unfurled. About the hour named, 
longing eyes and anxious hearts were made 
glad by the appearance of the much sought 
banner; and then the tide set in strongly for 
the Blade office, to obtain ' the particulars.' 
Such a joyous crowd as soon gathered there, 
has not been seen in Toledo since the morning 
of the 22d of July last, when the first install- 
ment of the Bull Run news was received. (May 
the second installment of Donelson be different 
from that of Bull Run.) Joy now beams from 
every eye, and many a ' Thank the Lord ! ' has 
found utterance from grateful hearts. Imme- 
diately following the Blade's flag, the stars and 
stripes were flung to the breeze from the Cus- 
tom House, the Board of Trade Rooms, the 
High School building, and other ])laces in the 
City." 

The 18th Michigan Regiment passed through 
Toledo, September 4, 1862, for Kentuckj-. It 
contained 1,010 men, raised principally in 
Lenawee and Hillsdale Counties. The follow- 
ing were the field officers: Colonel, Charles 
C. Doolittle; Lieutenant-Colonel, Geo. Spald- 
ing; Major, John W. Horner; Adjutant, 
A. J. Finch ; Quartermaster, Jas. W. Pratt.; 
Surgeon, Simeon P. Root; Asst. Surgeon, 
A. "Woodward. Edwin W. Hulburd of Hud- 
son, and subsequeiutly of Toledo, where he died, 
was Captain of Company A in this Regiment. 
At the depot, Henry Waldron of Hillsdale, 
presented the command a fine flag. Colonel 
Doolittle, subsequentlj' promoted, is now (1887) 
and for 14 years has been. Cashier of the Mer- 
chants National Bank of Toledo. 

The following Surgeons, to superintend draft- 
ing, were appointed in August, 1862: Leman 
Galpin, Milan ; Wm. Ramse}-, Fulton Co. ; 
Wm. Crawford, Henry; W. W. Jones, Toledo ; 
Jas. W. Wilson, Fremont; R. McD. Gibson, 
Seneca Co.; G. W. Finch, Williams; H. A. 
Hamilton, Perrysburg. 

July 15, 1862, the Military Con^mittee rec- 
ommended officers of two Companies to be 
raised in Lucas County, as follows: First — 
P. Hoffman, Captain ; D. F. Waltz, First Lieu- 
tenant; J. E. Greiner, Second Lieutenant. 
Second— W. W. Hunt, Captain ; E. E. Stew- 
art, First Lieutenant; A. J. Wales, Second 
Lieutenant. August 13th, the same Commit, 
tee agreed upon the following appointments : 



For Captain — Martin O'Neil ; First Lieuten- 
ant — J. J. Sullivan ; Second Lieutenants — 
Thos. Ward, Louis Reiser, Paris H. Pray, Geo. 
W. Arnold, Martin Stryker, J G. Manor, W. 
J. Halloway, H. N. Cole, J. Kent Hamilton, 
Louis H. Pike, Henry T. Bissoll, Fred. A. 
Jones, Thos. Cherry, Reuben Hall, Jacob Gel- 
zer, John W. Kerr. Dr. W. W. Jones was 
recommended as Examining Surgeon of re- 
cruits; R. C. Lemmon as Military Commis- 
sioner; and W. A. Collins as Provost Marshal 
for the County. 

Upon receipt of news of the battle of Pitts- 
burg Landing, and of need of additional surgi- 
cal service, several Toledo practitioners ten- 
dered their services to Governor Tod. who 
accepted the same, when Dr. Chas. Cochran, 
Oscar White, S. S. Thorn, L. A. Brewer, and 
J. G. Nolan left for Columbus, whence two 
(Drs. Cochran and Thorn), proceeded to Pitts- 
burg Landing. 

The Assessors of the several Townships in 
Lucas County, made returns in August, 1862, 
showing the following results : Number men 
in three-year service, 1,466; number in three- 
month service, 84; number discharged, 54; 
" Skedaddlers," 13; deserters, 6; number then 
liable to draft, 4,266 ; total enrollment, 5,889. 
The Assessor for the Second Ward, Maumce 
City, found in it 62 persons liable to Military 
duty, of whom 31— just one-half — were already 
in the Union Army. 

A public meeting was held in Toledo, July 
14, 1862, for the promotion of enlistments in 
the Army, and especially to fill two Conijianies 
then assigned to Lucas County. M. R. Waite 
was made Chairman, and Josiah Riley, Secre- 
tary. R. C. Lemmon explained the object of 
the meeting, when Richard Molt, Wm. Baker, 
Wm. Kraus, M. R. Waite, and A. L. Backus, 
were appointed a Committee to raise funds for 
the object named. Alex. Reed was appointed 
to arrange for speakers for meetings to be held 
for the same purpose. The meeting was ad- 
dressed by M. R. Waite, R. C. Lemmon, A. L. 
Backus, Wm. Kraus. Dr. W. W. Jones, S. A. 
Raymond, Chas. Pratt, Octavius Waters of 
Fulton County, A.M. Pratt of Williams County, 
and N. Reeve of Detroit. 

A very large "War Meeting" was held in 
Clinton Park, Toledo, August 1, 1862. Most 
of the stores and shops in the City were closed. 
The officers were: President, M.R. Waite; 



92 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Marshal, General Jos. W. Brown; Assistant 
Marshals, Captain Geo. \V. Merrill and dap- 
tain E. S. Piatt; Committee in Charge, E. B. 
Bronson, R. C. Lemmon,W.W. Howe, John P. 
Freeman, J. W. Walterhouse. Addresses were 
delivered by F. T. Backus and H. B. Payne 
(now United States Senator), of Cleveland. 
Fully 4,000 persons were present. 

The young ladies of Toledo, in June, 1862, 
forwarded to Battery H, First Ohio Artillery, 
two flags — one for the Battery, and one for 
Division C of the same. The staff of one of 
them was of black walnut and was taken from 
a Georgia Regiment by the 14th Ohio, while 
in the three-months service. 

September 10, 1862, Governor Tod called for 
volunteer Minute Men for the protection of the 
Southern border of the State, when an ample 
force at once was furnished, who proceeded to 
Cincinnati, whence many of tliem were ordered 
into Keutuck}', serving the purpose sougiit in 
holding in check Eebel advances. So prompt 
was the response to this call, that only three 
days later (Sept. 13), the Governor telegraphed 
" No more troops are requii-ed at Cincinnati." 
Under call of the Militarj- Committee, a meet- 
ing was held at Toledo, September 10, which 
was called to oi-der by C. D. Woodruff, and 
presided over by Mayor Manor, with Henry 
Merrill as Secretary. As a result, two Com- 
panies of 50 men each were raised on the spot, 
and officers elected as follows: Co. A — Cap- 
tain Worts; First Lieutenant, John Garner; 
Second Lieutenant, Ed. AverJ^ Co. B — Captain, 
E. B. Hall ; Lieutenant, R. C. Lemmon. The 
Toledo forces returned September 19th, when 
appeared a card of thanks of Co. A, First Reg- 
iment Ohio Rifles, Captain E. B. Hall, L. H. 
Pike, F. A. Jones and Frank J. Scott, Commit- 
tee, for attentions shown them b}- the ladies of 
Covington and Dayton. These troops, from 
their peculiar, and especially their brief service, 
were known as "Squirrel Hunters." 

In May, 186H, Adjutant-General C. W. Hill 
was in Toledo, and then presented to such vol- 
unteers as were present, the Governor's dis- 
charge. The diploma was neatly engraved. 
On the upper right-hand corner was a likeness 
of the Governor; on the opposite corner one 
of Major McDowell ; on the right lower corner 
a Squirrel Hunter, gun in hand, and knapsack 
on his back; opposite, on the left, a broken 
tree, in which sat a squirrel, inspecting the in- 



terior of a nut; in the center, the seal of the 
United States; underneath, that of Ohio, and 
in the center of all, the Governor's certificate.* 
The total number of " Squirrel Hunters " in 
the State was 11,534. 

In August, 1862, the following Army Sur- 
geons were appointed : Geo. Cornell, Milan ; 
T. M. Cooke, Monroeville; Geo. A. Collamore, 
Toledo; J. T. Woods, Hancock County; Dr. 
L. A. Brewer, Toledo. Assistant Surgeons — 
Walter Caswell, Castalia; F. C. Connelly, 
Vermillion; J W. Miner, Edgerton ; W. H. 
Thacher, Defiance: JohnW. Goodson, Bellevue. 



The darkest period of the Union cause, in 
the progress of the War, was that commenc- 
ing in the Summer of 1862 and extending 
to July, 1863. The serious disappointments of 
the campaign of 1862, had operated both to 
moderate the zeal of many lo3al men at the 
North, and to strengthen and embolden those 
in sympathy with the Rebels. The effects of 
this state of things were clearly shown in the 
Fall elections of that year, when the opponents 
of the War policy of the Government made 
unexpected gains in most of the Northern 
States, and greatly strengthened their force in 
Congress. This was specially true of Ohio, 
where the Union majority of 55,203 on Gov- 
ernor in 1861, was changed to a minority of 
4,870 in 1862. So geuei-al was this indication 
of a reverse in popular sentiment at the North, 
that the soldiers in the field came to be solici- 
tous as to its extent, and sought to ascertain 
what was likely to be their reliance for support 
in recruits and other means. With such view, 
the Ohio Soldiers in the Western Army, from 
"the Battlefield of Stone River," February 1, 
1863, issued an address to the loyal people of 
Ohio, setting forth the aim and hope which in- 
spired the men at the front, and the corre- 
sponding responsibility and duties of the men 
at home. No appeal made during the war 

* The Squirrel Hunter's Discharge — Cincinnati 
wa.s menaced by the enemies of our Union ; David 
Tod, Governor of Ohio, called on the Minute Men of 
the State, and the "Squirrel Hunters" came by 

thousands to the rescue. You, , was one of 

them, and this is your honorable discharge. 

Charles W. Hill, Adjutant-General of Ohio. 
Malcom McDowell, Major and A. D. C. 

Approved, David Tod, Governor. 

September, 1862. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



93 



could have excelled this in patriotic sentiment ; 
ill recital of sufferings endured ; in statement 
of assistance needed; and in jiresentation of 
claim for prompt and adequate aid — phj'sical, 
in men and means; and moral, in the manifes- 
tation of a sound loyalty and assurance of the 
sympathjf of those at home. The character 
and spirit of the paper may be understood 
from the following extracts therefrom, to wit : 

People of Ohio ! But one alternative is left you. 
You must pronounce this a just Rebellion. You 
must say that it was right and justifiable to destroy 
tliis RepubHc ; that a Republic is a weak, helpless 
Government, powerless to sustain itself, and to be 
destroyed whenever conspirators enough can be 
rallied for the purpose. Or, you must show to the 
World the power of self-preservation in the great ex- 
ample of Confederated Republics — that it has a quiet, 
dormant force, which, aroused, has gigantic strength 
and energy ; that it not only can protect its citizens 
in all of their rights and privileges, but can sustain 
itself, as well against foreign attack as internal treason. 

We [the Army] are fighting for the Republic. To 
it, we have given our hearts, our arms and our lives. 
We intend to stand between you and the desolating 
hosts of the Rebels, whose most cherished hope and 
desire have been and are, to take possession of and 
ravage your own beautiful Ohio. Once, already, we 
have stood as a living wall between you and this fate, 
and we may have to do it again. 

Men of Ohio ! You know not what this Western 
Army has sufl'ered. You know not now, the hard- 
ships and sufl'erings of your Soldiers in their chill 
tents — their shelterless bivouacs — their long, weary 
marches, and their battle-thinned ranks. If there be 
• honesty and purity in human motives, they must be 
found among your long-enduring Soldiers. 

Hear us ! And for your country's sake, if not for 
ours, stop your wild, .shameless political strifes; unite 
for the common cause ; and never think or speak of 
Peace and Compromise, until the now empty terms 
mean Tlie Republic as it was — peaceably, if that may 
be; forcibly, at all events. 

The Army of the West is in terrible earnest — 
earnest, to conquer and destroy armed Rebels — 
earnest, to meet face to face— earnest, in its hearty 
detestation of cowardly Traitors at home — earnest, in 
will and power to overcome all Mho desire the Na- 
tion's ruin. Ohio's one hundred thousand Soldiers 
in the field. Citizens at home — potent in either capac- 
ity — ask their fathers, brethren and friends, by their 
firesides and in their peaceful homes, to hear and 
heed this appeal ; and to put an end to covert Trea- 
son at home, more dangerous now to our National 
existence, than the presence of the armed hosts of 
misguided Rebels in the field. 

The authorship of this jjaper was attributed 

to Colonel J. M. McConnell, 17th Ohiolnfimtry. 

The address reached Ohio about the 20th of 



February, and was received with an enthusi- 
asm equal to any that could have been exi^ected. 
Public meetings were held in all parts of the 
State, from which went responses earnest and 
cheering to the Soldiers. 

A preliminary meeting was held at Toledo, 
February 27tli, which was called to order by 
Eichard Mott, who nominated for President 
Denison B. Smith. Darwin E. Gardner was 
chosen Secretary. Morrison E. Waite, D. B. 
Smith and D. E. Gardner, were appointed a 
Committee to prepare a suitable response from 
the jieople to the Apjjeal of the Soldiers for cir- 
culation and signature by the people. Ad. 
dresses were made by S B. Scott, A. G. Clark, 
Andrew^Stephan, and Wm. Kraus, in approval 
of such action. On motion of Alex. Eeed : H. 
S. Walbridge, Wm. Kraus, F. J. King, T. H. 
Hoag, Denison Steele and E. H. Bell, were ap- 
pointed as Committee of Arrangements for a 
Mass Meeting to be held at Toledo at such 
time as they might deem proper. The meet- 
ing adjourned till the 2d of March. 

At the time named, a large gathering of 
citizens of Lucas and other Counties of North- 
western Ohio, was held at White's Hall, Toledo. 
The Appeal of Ohio Soldiers in the field was 
read by Eev. E. B. Eafifensperger, Pastor of 
First Presbyterian Church, Toledo. The Com- 
mittee charged with the preparation of an ad- 
dress (understood to have been written by 
M. E. Waite) in response to the Appeal of Ohio 
Soldiers, was read and approved. The Com- 
mittee appointed February 27th, had made 
arrangements for a Union Mass Meeting, at 
Toledo, March 18th, and made report of their 
action. 

At the appointed time, notwithstanding the 
very unpropitious state of the weather, the 
atte-ndance was very large, being estimated as 
high as 8,000, and from all portions of North- 
western Ohio. The procession formed soon 
after 10 a. m., and after marching on different 
Streets, returned to the Union Eailway Depot, 
and was dismissed for dinner. The gathering 
in the afternoon was declared to be the largest 
overseen in Toledo. The officers of the occa- 
sion, as previously selected, were as follows : 

President — Morrison E. Waite. 

Vice Presidents— iwcas Comity : D. B. Smith, Chas. 
Kent, Lyman Wheeler, Dennis Coghliu, Mavor 
Brigham, Geo. A. Carpenter, Warren Colburn, T. H. 
Hoag, Chas. A. King, Jacob Landman, J. Bash, Ed. 



94 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Connelly, S. L. Collins, Haskell D. Warren, Chas. A. 
Crane, Geo. W. Reynolds, Dr. John Smith, Capt. 
Tliomas Watts, James C. Wales, James Taylor, Wm. 
Cole, Elijali 1)0(1(1, Patrick (iuigloy, Patrick Carey, 
Pliny Lathrop. Pulnam Cwmlij : Geo. Skinner, H. J. 
Boelmicr, C. M. Godfrey. Fttllm County : Xahum 
Merrill, M. D. Ilibbard, A. C. Hough, Octavius 
Waters. Defiance Cminlti : Jonas Colby, Edwin 
Phelps, Judge Ensign, Samuel Koher. Henri/ Cmmly : 

A. J. Haley, Chas. H. Horning, Cyrus Howard. 
TViHi-iHW Comity: A. M. Pratt, P. W. Norris, H. A. 
Ensign, James Bell, Peter Planson. Wood County: 
Gilbert Beach, Col. J. S. Norton, Dr. E. D. Peck, 
Geor'e Laskey. Pnnldlntj County: H. N. Curtis, 

B. B. Woodcock. 

Secuetaries— Clark Waggoner, James A. Boyd, 
Cyrus H. Coy, and Wm. C. Earl. 

Marshal— Gen. John E. Flunt. 

Assistant Marshals -John D. Campbell, Geo. H. 
Burroughs, Albert L. White, Robert H. Bell, Col. 
Chas. B. Phillips, Matthew Shoemaker, Lieut.-Col. 
Paul Edwards, H. J. Hayes. 

Committee of Reception — Mayor J. J. Manor, D. E. 
(iardner, Paul Jones, James C. Hall, Geo. W. Davis, 
Augustus Thomas, Wm. Baker, J. R. Osboru, Moses 
T. Brown, V. H. Ketcham, W. W. Grithth, P. H. 
Birckhead. 

After music by the band of St. Francis de 
Sales Temperance Society, the President called 
the assemblage to order, and was about to pro- 
ceed with the regular programme of the occa- 
sion, when his attention was called to a black- 
ened, torn flag, borne toward the stand, and 
followed by an infirm gentleman, evidently 
advanced in age, who proved to be Rev. Geo. 
Taylor, Chaplain of 8th Michigan Infantry, on 
his waj' home, by request of his Regiment, 
with their tattered banner. On reaching the 
stand and being introduced, he held up the 
tattered flag and said : 

I am a poor, sick, and emaciated Chaplain of the 
Army. I have been trying to serve mj' country as a 
Soldier, and I thank God, that I have been there. I 
present to you the flag of the Sth Michigan Infantry. 
It has been to Port Royal, and wherever men have 
gone to fight. This is the banner which led the glo- 
rious Sth Michigan through all the battles they have 
been in. See the motto : " One Country— One Des- 
tiny." I want you to understand, that this is the 
spirit of the Michigan Soldiers. I could not go 
through here without saying that the Army— at least 
that portion of it which comes from Michigan— won- 
ders at the dissensions at home. You talk to them 
about Generals— one man in favor of McClellan, 
another for Joe Hooker, and another for somebody 
else ; but, they are all in favor of going to the front. 
Oh, how glad I am to see a Union feeling waking up. 
Spur yourselves to the contest, and let the motto of 



our glorious flag— "One Country -One Destiny"— 
be yours! The victory shall be achieved, and our 
glorious country be the greatest that God ever made. 

The effect of this episode was electrical, and it 
was received with cheers, and a vote of thanks. 
It could not have been more timely or more 
happy in its effect with the vast concourse who 
witnessed it. 

Wm. Baker, on behalf of the Committee, 
read telegrams and letters received from Col- 
onel Moses R. Brailey, Major I. R. Sherwood, 
and Henry T. Bissell, Committee of 111th Ohio 
Infantry, then at Bowling Green, Ky.; from 
Colonel J. C. Groom, 100th Ohio; Colonel E. 
H. Phelps, 68th Ohio ; Colonel Geo. P. Este, 
commanding PovSt at Lavergne, Tenn.; J. Rey- 
nolds, President, and James F. Pray, Secretary 
14th Ohio, endorsed bj" General Robert Mitch- 
ell; General Egbert B. Brown; James Myers, 
Representative, Columbus; D. S. Dickinson, 
Albany, N. Y.; Governor David Tod, Ex-Gov- 
ernor Wm. Dennison, Samuel Galloway, Col- 
umbus; and Wm. S. Groesbeck, Cincinnati. 

President Waite made report of a recent 
visit by him to several Ohio Regiments in the 
South, including the 14th, 38th and 21st. He 
then introduced Colonel Isaac R. Hawkins, 
from Tennessee, who addressed the meeting at 
some length and with special effect. Geo. C. 
Bates, of Chicago, followed, but deferred his 
speech until the evening. He told how he had 
himself been a Soldier, with spurs and shoulder 
straps in a great War; how, at the time of the 
"Toledo War" — when Ohio stole Michigan's 
land— he won his promotion; how he camped 
out in Major Stickney's orchard, captured One 
Stickney and Two Stickney ; how Indiana 
Stickney and Maryland Stickney visited the 
W^olverine camp, beseeching, with tears, for the 
release of their One, Two brothers;* He said 
he was a Toledo man, and knew more of its 
earlj^ history than did the great body of its 
present inhabitants, having come here when 
the first tide of emigration rolled Westward ; 
and sat down on the banks of the Maumee, when 
Toledo was a hamlet of not more than half a 
dozen families. 

While the main meeting was in progress, 
another was held at the North end of the 
Island House, which was addressed by Moses T. 

®A peculiarity in Major Stickney's family,consisted 
the naming of his sons, One and Two, and his daugh- 
ters after States of the Union. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



95 



Brown, Superintendent Toledo Public Schools, 
and by James M. Ashley, then a Representative 
in Congress. 

The evening meeting was an enthusiastic one, 
and was addressed by Mr. Bates, Col. Hawkins, 
and Mr. Ashley. Mr. Waite read resolutions 
adojited by the 14th Ohio, and Mr. Baker the 
address of Col. John W. Fuller's Regiment, 
(27th Ohio). Wm. C. Earl presented resolu- 
tions, such as had been adopted bj" a mammoth 
meeting of citizens of New York, at Cooper 
Institute, which were adopted, when the meet- 
ing adjourned. 

The prepared response of citizens to the 
appeal of Ohio Soldiers was afterward sent to 
them, bearing the names of about 2,500 citizens 
of Northwestern Ohio, largely made up of those 
prominent in active life, and embracing men 
of both political parties. That paper, locall}' 
so prominent and influential in that crisis in 
the Nation's life, assumed historic value. It is 
reproduced here, with the names of citizens of 
Lucas County, whose signatures thereto at- 
test their unswerving loyalty to their coun- 
try's cause in the darkest hour of its existence, 
and their earnest sympathy with those of their 
neighbors who had j)iiti'iotically undertaken 
the privations, toils and dangers of the camp 
and the field. It has seemed proper that side 
by side, should here appear, so fully as may be, 
the names of those who "went to the front" 
from Lucas County, and of those who as loyally 
stood faithfully on guard in the no less impor- 
tant sphere of civil cooperation and support at 
home. Without such joint devotion, nothing 
cttective could have been accomplished by 
either branch of the great Union host. That 
such was the belief of the Soldiers in the field, 
is clearly shown b}' their impassioned appeal 
for the " home support " which they recognized 
as indispensable to their success. That such 
appeal was not made in vain, is shown by the 
response liere rejiroduced : 

Soldiers of Ohio, enrolled in the Army of the United States : 
We thank you, for the long-continued and patient 
endurance of the toils, privations and dangers of a 
Soldier's life. We thank you for your deeds of noble 
daring on the field of battle, by which you have 
covered yourselves and your State with glory. And 
last, but not least, we thank you — from our hearts, 
we thank you — for the words of wise and patriotic 
counsel you send back to us from the battle fields of 
" the front," in this, the hour of our greatest peril ! 
From the Headquarters of the Commander of the 



Army of the Cumberland, Ohio's sons whom she is 
proud to know she gave to the Army of the Union — 
from the bloody field of Stone River — from every 
place wliere an Ohio Soldier can pen a message to 
" the loved ones at home," there come appeals which 
we will not — we cannot — disregard. 

Yes, Soldiers, as you well have said: "This is a 
War for the Republic ; and he who is not for it, is 
against it." This is no time to divide upon measures. 
You know no law, but obedience to the will of your 
Commander. Your Commander-in-Chief is your 
President. His heart is full of love for his country, 
and he acts only as his judgment tells him the 
necessities of his country demand. What he com- 
mands, you carry into execution ; and so long as it is 
his duty to decide what sliall be done, we will not, 
when that decision is made, weaken the blow which 
you are to give, by discussing at home, for party or 
political purposes, the merits of that decision. We 
know no Government, but that which has our time- 
honored Constitution for its foundation ; and while 
this great danger is upon us, that Government, in its 
efforts to restore the integrity of the Union, shall 
have our cordial and united support. When the 
danger shall be over, let those in power give account 
of their stewardship, and receive the reward or pun- 
ishment which their conduct shall deserve. 

You went into the field to fight for the Union, the 
whole Union, and nothing but the Union ! When 
you left, your homes on this errand of patriotism, we 
spoke to you from our hearts, the words of hope and 
encouragement, and we registered in Heaven an oath, 
never, by any fault of ours, should dishonor come 
upon you ! Nobly have you performed the part which 
you then took upon yourselves ! When the history 
of your campaign shall be written, it will cast into 
the shade that of all other Wars the world has seen. 
True, the work is not done ; but the time has not yet 
come, when you are to be told that the Union you 
went forth to maintain " cannot be restored by the 
armed hand." Some may tell you so, who see no 
way to their own elevation, but upon your disgrace ; 
but such men know not the great heart of the People, 
or of the brave Soldiers in the Army of the Union 
from our noble State, because it is held only by those 
who dare not risk their lives to defend the countr\-'s 
honor. 

Soldiers ! the work before you is a noble one. It is 
nothing less than to make that "good old Flag," 
which was born in the battlefields of the Revolution 
and baptized in the blood of our Fathers, again 
respected on every foot of soil which has been honored 
by its protecting care. That, Soldiers, is the work of 
our age. And with you in front, standing shoulder 
to shoulder, with the brave men who come from our 
sister States, to vie with you for the Hei-o's crown, 
to strike — and with union at home and hearts in 
earnest as yours are in earnest to uphold and support 
you when the blow is given — there is no power on 
Earth that can, and none in Heaven that will, prevent 
our triumph. 

In this great crisis we have each a part to perform. 



90 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



You have yourselves assigned them. You say you 
are " fighting for the Republic," and to it you have 
given " your hearts, your arms and your lives." We 
know you have. Your gallant bearing on many a 
well-fought field, tells what you have assumed to do. 
Of us, you ask that we shall " stay, support and up- 
hold your hands." Soldiers, we will do it ! And know- 
ing "in union there is strength," and in disunion 
there is weakness, we will make the support of the 
Governuient our rallying-point ; and as the traitors 
have forced upon us the alternative of conquering or 
being conquered, we accept the issue ; and in con- 
ducting this war, we pledge ourselves to you, to each 
other, to our Country, and to God, that we will devote 
our lives and our substance to the support of the 
Government, and maintain the Union of these States, 
" now and forever— one and inseparable." 

This paper bore the signatures of the follow- 
ing citizens of Lucas County : 



Morrison R. Waite. 
Darwin E. Gardner. 
Deni.son B. Smith. 
Richard Mott. 
William Kraus. 
James M. Ashley. 
Charles Kent. 
John E. Hunt. 
Joseph W. Brown. 
Peter Lenk. 
Matthew Brown. 
Ebenezer Walbridge. 
Frank J. Scott. 
Truman H. Hoag. 
W. S. Towle. 
Dan. A. AVaterman. 
Wm. T. French. 
G. F. Richardson. 
Carlos Colton, Jr. 
John Stevens. 
H. J. Hayes. 
George AV. Dart. 
"Wm. H. Bellman. 
Gustave Wittstein. 
George Woodburv. 

E. B. Hyde. 
I. H. Wright. 
W. W. Griffith. 
Harry Chase. 
Thomas Daniels. 
Henry S. Waite. 
C. S. Sevin. 
Wm. J. Finlay. 
J. H. Locke, Jr. 
Charles Scott. 

W. W. Sherwood. 
Wm. B. Welles. 
George Bunde. 

F. Bunde. 

John G. Sullivan. 



W. C. Phillips. 
Daniel J. Mattocks, Jr. 
A. W. Barlow. 
D. V. Edsil. 
H. J. Williams. 
Joseph H. Williams. 
Charles A. King. 
H. S. Walbridge. 
Frank J. King. 
Thomas C. Stewart. 
John J. Manor. 
Clark Waggoner. 
Denison Steele. 
Fred. A. Jones. 
Calvin Bronson. 
Mavor Brigham. 
Alex. Reed. 
William O. Brown. 
Henry W. Claflin. 
R. E. Morey. 
George Torber. 
John T. Maher. 
Samuel A. Raymond. 
Charles T. Wales. 
Levi Snell. 
P. Martel. 
Joseph Tolman. 
James Tolman. 
Robert W. Smith. 
Alfred Braun. 
R. V. Bowes. 
Emery D. Potter, Sr. 
W. H." Clark. 
Geo. H. Richardson. 
Theo. B. Casey. 
Adam Burgert. 
C. W. White. 
Luther Whitney. 
John B. Lownsbury. 
Hudson B. Hall. 



H. Blankmej'er. 
Frank C. Courte. 
James Mallon. 
John Pfisterer. 
C. H. Schmelzfennig. 
Henry M. Samsen. 
Plympton Buck. 
John A. Conway. 
Mark Knight. 
Henry Gross. 
James Cunningham. 
James Cunningham, 2d. 
John Mulhenny. 
Charles Gradolph. 
Dan. A. Collins. 
J. M. Hall. 
Thomas Carlisle. 
W. S. Dustin. 
James Snow. 
James Draper. 
Minot I. Wilcox. 
J. H. Park. 
Benjamin Brower. 
J. P. Flynn. 
Peter Graver. 
Robert Cummings. 
John Cummings. 
P. M. Ainsley. 
J. D. McKenley. 
Wm. H. Dyer. 

A. C. Tubbs. 

H. Birkenkemp. 
Conrad Rupple. 
M. E. Fahnestock. 
G. E. Coulson. 

B. Allen. 
Fred. Schaal. 
John Enderlin. 

S. Van Xoorden, Jr. 
H. C. Hall. 
Henry Miller. 
John W. May. 
S. B. Hathaway. 
George F. Dunning. 
S. A. Wheeler. 
Hugh Ga'v'in. 
Frank T. Lane. 
Fred. Hand. 
Edward Yardley. 
Albert G. Dooley. 
Chas. S. Tarbox. 
Geo. R. Haynes. 
Maurice A. Scott. 
T. X. Finney. 
J. Austin Scott. 
John Kohn. 
John Best. 
H. G. Weber. 
J. T. Bickel. 
Chas. 0. Brigham. 
W. Sceazan. 
JL D. Carrington. 



H. A. Boyd. 
Ralph W. Baker. 
Samuel B. Scott. 
B. H. Hitchcock. 
Madison Miller. 
Benjamin Mallett. 
T. B. Richardson. 
Geo. W. Hart. 
George Baker. 
R. O. Morse. 
Samuel M. Young, 
W. A. DeForest. 
Charles Ballard. 
E. G. Crane. 
Joseph Cooke. 
S. G. Lane. 
William Keyl. 
Edward Danforth. 
H. J. Totten. 
D. Morris. 
Wm. C. Huffman. 
J. A. Corbusier. 
Horace H. Butler. 
M. B. Butler. 
Timothy Sheldon. 
William Rotf. 
Charles B. Roff. 
Jerry Peck. 

0. A. Bostwick. 
C. F. W. Ahrendt. 
Herman Neufaldt. 
George Worts. 
Alva C. Johnson. 
Israel Roberts. 
W. C. Tisdel. 

J. M. Hauser. 
James Birchall. 
Theo. Stahl. 
A. A. Fahnestock. 

1. R. Nelson. 
John Bell. 
William A. Beach. 
William Cutway. 
Frank P. Isherwood. 
Henry J. Chase. 
Joseph Miller. 
Theo. Lewis. 

F. Bigelow. 
John Sallis. 
M. Hoffman. 
Peter Phillips. 
Allen Kirk. 
C. T. Hubbard. 

C. S. Grossman. 
James Maloney. 
John Autibus. 
John Sinclair. 

D. W. Kellogg. 
Chas. B. Benedict. 
Charles O'Hara. 
David Miller. 
Leonard AVilcox. 



TEE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



Geo. Gassaway. 
Henry D. Walbridge. 
James H. Maples. 
Robert W. Titus. 
Henry T. Haskell. 
Carlos Colton. 
Abram W. Colton. 
William Harlow. 
Jacob Bash. 
D. G. Saltonstall. 

D. N. Bash. 
James D. Smith. 
Milo Bashare. 

E. A. Smith. 
George Knight. 
James R. Strong. 
E. H. Van Hoesen. 
Wm. H. Clark. 
Samuel S. Read. 
W. Y. Swager. 
John B. Carson. 
Frank Braisted. 

L. A. Willard. 

A. B. Brownlee. 
Alonzo Godard. 
Wm. H. Whitaker. 
Geo. R. Tourtellotte. 
Frank T. Card. 
Curtis Ripley. 
Piatt Card. 

Paul Jones. 
Samuel Smiley. 
E. T. Mortimer. 
Horatio S. Young. 
Charles H. Jones. 

B. M. Rigby. 
John H. Moulton. 
Thos. Thorneloe. 
E. B. Bronson. 
John Copland. 

J. W. Walterhouse. 
O. C. Smith. 
E. D. Peck. 
Moreau Allen. 
Chas. B. Phillips. 
Joel M. Gloyd. 
Alex. H. Ewing. 
Henry Hall. 
Alex. H. Newcomb. 
Chas. H. Fisk. 
J. M. Lycan. 
Y. L. Hopkins. 
R. C. Thompson. 
A. F. Bissell. 
Calvin K. Bennett. 
John Pratt. 
G. R. Bennett. 
Hiram Alfred. 
G. W. Wainer. 
J. Outcalt. 
0. Sexton, Jr. 
Perry Crabbs. 



Andrew J. Hand. 
A. Rutherford. 
J. D. Cook. 
Wm. H. Osbon. 
Thomas Hamilton. 
Fred. Raitz. 
Allen Brown. 
John I'atton. 
Thomas O'Neil. 
D. Innes. 
M. O'Reily. 
Vincent Hamilton. 
W. S. Newman. 
John Fitch. 
John J. Adam. 
David Smith, 
Charles F. Peck. 
Perry B. Truax. 
Fred. 0. Opitz. 
Charles West. 
Peter Faskin. 
A. Sazenly. 
Denis Weyburne. 

F. W. Higby. 
Austin H. Bruen. 
T. Radclitf. 
Thos. B. Aldrich. 
A. Border. 
James Berthholf. 
Paul Kunkle. 

J. D. Pomeroy. 
Chas. N. Yeager. 
W. S. Jackson. 
Toby Greer. 
John Boop. 
Thos. Bloomfield. 
J. B. Webber. 
J. Fitts. 

Valentine Wall. 
W. H. Huler. 

G. Wasser, Sr. 
Boliver Meeker. 
Boena Meeker. 
Florello Meeker. 
L. J. Seek. 

Chas. Brinkerhoff. 
Charles H. Reed. 
Henry G. Bupr. 
J. H. Kennedy. 
R. West. 
Wm. H. Harris. 
John Gregg. 
Charles A. Chase. 
Ed. Fifield. 
J. A. JNIinnio. 
James Ballard. 
J. W. Doane. 
J. S. Bloomfield. 
W. H. Nichols. 
Samuel Southard. 
M. J. Cooney. 
A. Nicke. 



James J. Doolittle. 
W. H. Moore. 
Lewis Mathias. 
Henry Devlin. 
David Walker. 
Samuel S. Thorn. 
Alonzo Rogei's. 
Davis Lewis. 
Geo. D. Whitmore. 
H. L. Sargent. 
John Dibbeling. 
Theo. J. Brown. 

A. T. Fite. 
Albert G. Clark. 

B. W. Rouse. 
Frank I. Smith. 

C. V. Jenison. 
Thomas Dunlap. 
James Ceesick, 
John Murphy, Sr. 
Thos. Morrow. 
Geo. P. Pricketts. 
P. I. Latham. 
Henry Merrill. 
W. S. Isherwood. 
John Bullarston. 
M. H. Gill. 

F. S. Chandler. 
H. J. Eake. 
L. Fisk. 

J. E. Lockwood. 
John Mills. 
Reuben H. Slioles. 
Samuel Andrews. 
J. A. Laird. 
Noble L. Stacy. 
Junius A. Flagg. 
C. H. Harroun. 
W. W. Whitney. 
Geo. W. Merrifl. 
J. E. Cole. 
John P. Lewis. 
E. Bivins. 
George Reichart. 
O. Mather. 
Alonzo Cornell. 
A. R. Martin. 
Thos. Jackson. 
A. G. Warren. 
Horatio E. Bangs. 
C. P. Leland. 
Wint. Dunn. 
J. R. Blanchard. 
Wm. Chollett. 
A. O. Marsh. 
Wm. Van Orden. 
Chas. B. Weaver. 
John M. McKee. 
P. H. Redding. 
W. Wiesman. 
Orlin Phelps. 
J. Haynes. 



Stillman Eastman. 
John Cunningham. 
John Kelley. 
George Fordham. 
Daniel Moore. 
C. Kenny. 
J. S. Lawrence. 
J. Lang. 
F. D. Ettin. 
John McCaul. 

B. Webster. 
J. W. Daniel. 
Charles Davison. 

C. Crawford. 
T. Rooney. 
W. C. Geitter. 
P. Mitchell. 
Robert Nicholas. 
Erastus Kenyon. 

A. L. Mills. ' 
J. J. Downs. 

B. B. Firchmond. 
Robert Dunnigan. 
John Galloway. 

C. M. Fisher. 
N. Mortimer. 
A. Morton. 
L. Hevnsling. 
Moses T. Brown. 
Thomas Brown. 
H. R. Haskell. 

J. R. Pinkertou. 
John D. Crennan. 
S. S. Ketly. 
Thos. Armstrong. 
S. H. Bergen. 
F. AV. Himes. 
J. H. Hampton. 
Chas. H. Soper. 
Charles B. Hall. 
J. W. Toullerton. 
Geo. McMonagle. 
Andrew Shurtz. 
Chas. S. Beach. 
Henry T. Cook. 
John B. Murphy. 
Gid. K. Pheatt." 
W. Hunt Walbridge. 
William Clark. 

D. J. Coulson. 
Chris. Marman. 
J. T. Southard. 
J. V. Straight. 
N. T. Ha.skell. 
S. Earl. 

W. J. Freatenborough. 

E. Thomas. 
John H. Moon. 
Thos. C. Mayhew. 
P. C. Whitehead. 
Geo. R. Rogers. 
Wm. Hoffman. 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



N. M. Lilleland. 

E. B. Raffensperger. 

D. S. Anderson. 
John J. Branigan. 
Daniel Keller. 
Dan. Y. Howell. 
N. H. Roberts. 
Hiukley Hurd. 

5. C. Sampson. 
Henrj' Spahn. 
Charles Cochran. 
W. U. Barry. 
W. T. Allen. 
John J. Hunker. 
George Brown. 
Ed. MeLeary, Jr. 
John Hunker. 
M. Sausle. 

W. Scott. 
M. Scranton. 
James S. Fifield. 
John Cassiday. 
O. Kingsbury. 
Lewis Deutch. 
N. Brainard. 
Samuel Brooks. 
Wm. S. B. Hubbell. 
M. C. O'Connor. 
G. Frost. 

Pat. Cunningham. 
Charles Pratt. 

E. Putnam. 
Elijah Clark. 
N. M. Landis. 
Robert Ackland. 
Henry Reed, Sen. 
E. Gardner. 

A. A. Gardener. 
Ralph Tarbox. 
E. J. Woodruff. 
Israel Hall. 
Samuel B. Campbell. 
John B. Fella. 
Chas. H. Eddy. 
Tyler Bush. 

E. P. Shelley. 
J. Lyons. 
D. C. Holley. 
Richard Doolittle. 
Geo. C. Pepper. 

6. J. Jones. 

W. D. Ramsdell. 
Wm. H. Carl. 
Joseph Gittsky. 
Henry E. Hill. 

B. H. Bayliss. 
R. Gittsky. 
Peter Scott. 
Wm. Olrich. 
John L. Tanke. 
Theo. Tanke. 
G. Goldsmith. 



Calvin Chibb. 
Tllrich Fey. 
H. P. Whitney. 
Luke Draper. 
Sidney Bissell. 
Geo. Weidman. 
E. J. Fifield. 
Richard Greenwood. 
James Cole. 
J. A. Speyer. 
Joseph Lieber. 
Joseph Corey. 
Wm. M. Coon. 
A. F. Rutherford. 
Wm. Hoak. 
James Marry. 
H. C. Nicholas. 
James L. Smith. 
John H. Doyle. 
Richard Waite. 
Alf. H. Clark. 
James A. Anderson. 

5. P. Halsey. 
E. H. Alley. 
Jonathan Wynn. 
C. M. Sanford. 
William Miller. 
Geo. M. Lilleland. 
John Shull. 

G. G. Randall. 
Franz Zarang. 
John A. Fisher. 
A. V. Stebbins. 

C. Dittmary. 
H. Hazenzahl. 
Lehman Kraus. 
John Dorter. 
Andrew Nesbit. 
Lewis Page. 
John A. Moore. 

6. E. Demise. 
L. Vincent. 
Coleman Keeler. 
Wm. A. Snyder. 
P. H. Foster. 
Fred. P. Waite. 

D. B. Huff. 
Guido Marx. 
Josiah Johnson. 
John Shecks. 
H. Roesbert. 
Chas. Eggert. 
Jlichael Fitzgerald. 
Robert Bloomfield. 
Francis Fitzgerald. 
Hiram Brown. 

I. N. Poe. 
P. Koster. 
Benj. Gittsky. 
H. D. Perry. 
S. Goldsmith. 
John Plessner. 



Patrick McKay. 
Berne Whitehead. 
W. A. Titus. 
John Keller. 
Mathias Seyler. 
Wm. W. Williams. 

C. B. Eells. 
Chris. Woehler. 
W. Dittmore. 
Wm. Jones. 
Hollis Hammond. 
Wm. Brewster. 
G. H. Reippel. 
Peter Blank. 
John Gramer. 

G. F. Meyer. 

H. Van Karsen. 

A. C. Moore. 

John C. Renthinger. 

Wm. Burwick. 

A. J. Machen. 

Tho.s. Carey. 

Theo. Kirchmaier. 

Joseph Mark. 

J. S. Bowers. 

J. S. Mille. 

J. B. Farnham. 

Wm. C. Cheney. 

Charles W. Hall. 

Charles Cleaves. 

G. L. Krite. 

Fred. Schigeizer. 

John Uagain. 

Gotleib Hole. 

J. Geo. Hege. 

E. O. Ross. 

A. Obergarten. 

Fred. Witker. 

R. Shehan. 

John J. Leith. 

Geo. Stebbins. 

D. S. Mead. 
A. B. Page. 
R. H. Rogers. 
Lewis Dormer. 
Thomas Cherry. 
J. Pargo. 

A. H. Smith. 
Geo. W. Jsavaugh. 
David Fisher. 
J. F. Curtis. 

E. Hunt. 
John Chollett. 
P. Smith. 
Ralph Jenison. 
C. Thompson. 

F. E. Osgood. 
Geo. Brown. 
Robert Bentham. 

G. Singer. 
Ira E. Lee. 
Chas. Caughling. 



Jacob Beach. 
Augustus Sechsler. 
Geo. Myers, jr. 
Thos. Southard. 
J. B. Fisk. 
Wm. C. Fisk. 
Thomas Corlett. 
Ferd. Johnson. 
W^ra. Pelkey. 
Geo. Milmine. 
Thos. B. Smith. 
E. C. Bodman. 
Berry Fitts. 
Peter Hubber. 
L. M. Skidmore. 
M. W. Smith. 
"Wm. F. Brome. 
Henry C. Gilmore. 
John Woehler. 
J. F. Wilkol. 
S. D. Curtis. 
W. G. Cook. 
H. M. Curtis. 
M. Heyman. 
Jacob Wansel. 
Mike Rabit. 
Oscar Wetmore. 
John Hilt. 
John Morris. 
Chas. Beuana. 
H. Kohn. 
O. E. M. Howard. 
Ed. H. Fitch. 
H. Burt Taylor. 

A. H. Hunker. 
J. L. Merritt. 

E. W. Dickerson. 

B. T. Blue. 

Otto Reidemeister. 
Robert Dederich. 
H. A. Ensign. 
Peter Eiserman. 
E. L. Cummer. 
Alfred Leonardson. 
P. Klahr. 
Chas. Meissner. 
Henry Levi. 
Austin B. Waite. 
Warren S. Waite. 
Sam. Warren. 
Geo. Furney. 
Rudolph Brand. 
Geo. Tanner. 
Simon Jack. 
Jolin H. Gherkins. 
E. W. E. Koch. 
Gustavus Goldsmith. 
Bernard Tummers. 
John Gorgen. 
Andrew Horning. 
Chris. ITnhekan. 
Frank Sekwesl. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



99 



G. A. Chase. 
John Kerume. 
Albert Johnson. 
August Phillips. 
August Rail. 
George Albert. 
Mark Edgar. 
J. H. Tappan. 
W. A. C. Converse. 
W. C. Palmer. 
F. M. Smiley. 

D. Daggett. 

A. H. Garfield. 
Theo. Klemm. 

E. Parry. 
Wm. Walcott. 
C. Alexander. 
H. W. Gifford. 
Calvin Barker. 
C. C. Warren. 
C. A. Lemar. 

A. W. Thompson. 
Charles Wasson. 
M. C. Worts. 
S. R. Brown. 
James J. French. 
Wm. Unthank. 
H. Boyce. 
Charles H. Reed. 
Oscar H. Cole. 
Orson B. Kingsbury. 
Watson Bopel. 
James Lewis. 
Aug. Brown. 
C. J. Culver. 
Chas. Brown. 
H. Rinal. 
Hiram Hurlburt. 
Wm. Taylor. 
Levi Ruggles. 
T. Moon. 
Lewis Dusseau. 
Henry Hiukley. 
S. W. Allen. 
Richard Meim. 
Alf. Enders. 

E. Beckwith. 

A. E. Tynker. 
Sylvester Brown. 
J. O. How. 

B. A. Peterson. 
Anthony Bordeau. 
Joseph Doroy. 

C. Gatee. 

P. C. Conant. 

F. P. Beckwith. 
Gabriel Crane. 
B. Folsom. 

Ed. Chajjin. 
Calvin Cone. 
H. D. Laylor. 
James Gilmore. 



Henry Plessner. 
M. Quigley. 
Wm. Massey. 
Eleazer Baldwin. 
Amos V. Barker. 
B. E. Warren. 
M. H. Allen. 
R. G. H. Huntington. 
John Hoyt. 
Frank Sladden. 
J. Y. Warren. 
Benj. Ruther. 
Daviil Howe. 
Thomas Wood. 
Bernard Lancto. 
P. B. Porter. 
Daniel Wolf. 
Predom Martin. 
Lewis Volade. 
John Ryan. 
W. H. Ford. 
Charles B. Young. 
A. Benedict. 
Joseph Garner. 
R. H. Barr. 

D. A. Brown. 
Joseph McPhillips. 
Anthony Lavine. 
F. D. Gleason. 
Wm. H. Hamilton. 
Chas. P. Curtis. 

S. T. Howe. 
John Thorpe. 
Mars Nearing. 
Wm. H. Smith. 
Wm. G. Powers. 
John Tollman. 
Geo. A. Carpenter. 
J. P. Constable. 
H. L. Hollo way. 
Wm. C. Earl. 
Wm. F. Church. 
John L. Peck. 
David E. Merrill. 
Loomis Brigham. 

E. A. Durbiu. 
William Baker. 
Geo. D. Claflin. 
Thomas Howells. 
J. W. Howells. 
James W. Clark. 
Henry L^hlman. 
R. C. Lemmon. 
S. A. Ford. 
Louis A. Pike. 
Geo. W. Gove. 
Orin S. Anderson. 
D. S. Fifield. 

J. S. Fifield, Jr. 
Wm. Murphy. 
Dan. H. Miner. 
Thomas Van Stone. 



J. N. Stevens. 

Charles H. Stevens. 

Wm. H. Raymond. 

James Love. 

John Wortz. 

Thomas J. Bodley. 

R. Plessner. 

John Auth. 

Charles E. Bliven. 

Wm. P. Gardner. 

J. Kent Hamilton. 

John R. Osborn. 

Silas Benly. 

Charles Dodge. 

Warren Colburn. 

Geo. R. Watson. 

Geo. W. Davis. 

Calvin Bullock. 

M. R. Fassett. 

R. Redington. 

Chas. C. Miller. 
C. H. Spear. 
A. W. Fischer. 
C. C. Hine. 
James Coldham. 
M. K. Kunkle. 

Wm. T. Hall. 
John Kauffman. 
Samuel McMeeken. 
C. J. Morgan. 
Wm. K. Holdridge. 
N. W. Eddy. 
James Booth. 
Edwin Jackson. 
John McAllyn. 
Daniel Nitschke. 
A. B. Penfield. 
H. J. Conovan. 
Geo. Spencer. 
Wm. Holmes. 
James W. Atkin. 
Geo. W. Hoglin. 
Joseph Meirr. 
E. S. Hanks. 
Asa Boice. 
L. B. Van Hoosen. 
S. J. Locke. 
S. P. Browning. 
H. Wilhelm. 
W. F. Essing. 
Ed. P. McMahon. 
John L. Johnston. 
M. W. Hubbell. 
Sewal Whittlesey. 
John Harbauer. 
Geo. Pezzy. 
Melchoir Webber. 
Thomas Bolles. 
Jonathan Lundy. 
Willein Kneal. 
M. K. Draper. 
Spencer L. Eraser. 



Chas. Hotchter. 

James A. Eaton. 

Wm. Leahenny. 

Wm. Schroeder. 

J. W. CannefF. 

L. A. Hall. 

Thomas Tuey. 

John C. Klotz. 

Geo. Shipman. 

Henry V. Poulton. 

Samuel Jackman. 

John H. Wood. 

Quiuby Tappan. 

Chas. Haynes. 

M. McKissick. 

John Shay. 

J. H. Minnitou. 

W. G. Brim.son. 

L. B. Symons. 

P. B. Pratt. 

M. Stabler. 

Wm. Gorman. 
Thos. Sarber. 
D. E. Peck. 

John Harris. 

Thomas Jackman. 

D. F. Morgan. 
James Higgins. 
James Kenyon. 

Henry C. Frentz. 

A. Black. 
Samuel Tanner. 

P. F. Schneider. 

Henry Demmou. 
Caleb Blanchard. 
Joel W. Crane. 
Thomas Carr. 
Geo. MeLssner. 
J. A. Thompson. 
Wm. McKinley. 
Thomas McGuire. 
James Cowlett. 
Greenfield Dooley. 
Wilson Haynes. 
Frank Otto. 
A. Spru.ss. 
Isaac N. Hathaway. 
John Slop. 
Wm. B. Thorn. 
P. Hamblin. 
W. C. Raymer. 
L. R. Jerome. 
C. A. Rowsey. 
L. H. Johnson. 
James Sullivan. 
M. Hay. 

J. W. Fahnestock. 
James Hebbett. 
N. C. Pepper. 
H. E. Flynn. 
J. J. Leith. 
James Dority. 



100 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Jacob Jayalz, 
Wm. Durrell. 
T. Crampton. 
Jaini'S J. Wall. 
AV. F. KobL-rts. 
I'. H. Blake. 
John C. Tluesfel. 
F. Diebel. 
Geo. A. Willi pel. 
M. W. Hazenzahl. 
Ed. Avery, Jr. 
Hermann Wittsteiii. 
Fred. W. Griswold. 
Jere. T. Dewey. 
H. Hohly. 
M. B. Doyle. 
Valentine Braun. 
Erne.st Greiner. 
L. P. Smith. 
Cyrus H. Coy. 
Josiah Riley. 
Joseph Feust. 
E. A. Durbin. 
Ignace Wernert. 
Fred. Etaris. 

C. D. Woodrutf. 
R. Stowe. 

B. Kern. 
Alonzo Smith. 
John Van Gunten. 
J. M. Kale. 

Frank W. Anderson. 
Edmund Knapp. 
J. S. Kunkle. 
J. B. Trembley. 
J. P. Smith. 
Charles Matteel. 
A. Bust. 
John Miller, Jr. 
Wm. T. Huntington. 
J. Seyler. 
Declan Allen. 

D. D. Learie. 
M. B. Plummer. 
Lyman Wheeler. 
Dan. A. Brown. 
Asa Backus. 

S. B. Brown. 
John T. Newton. 
Uriah Gregory. 
A. D. Pelton. 

C. Hitchcock. 
Ernst Kibbe. 
George D. Claflin. 
Fred. Severn. 
Charles P. Boardman. 
John T. Page. 
Stillman Brown. 
Henry Brown. 

R. F. Russell. 
John Wheeler. 
Timothy Tredwell. 



Daniel Barrmatzel. 
Peter Yost. 
Julius Schenck. 
Geo. Tilbury. 
Ira Z. Settle. 
Thomas Henry. 
Charles M. Woodbury. 
John Golttell. 
Joseph Merrill. 
H. W. Goettell, Jr. 
Horace Hertzler. 
Calvin Barker. 
W. M. Steele. 
Jacob Landman. 
Henry Philipps. 
A. Schansenbach. 
Mavor Brigham. 
Wm. B. Messinger. 
John Burns. 
Chauncy H. Buck. 
John Henry. 
Chas. A. Crane. 
Wm. MarkschefFell. 
M. H. Austin. 
Theo. Wegener. 
John A. Auth. 
A. Bunert. 
Wm. Rawle. 
James F. Snow. 
Fred. Eaton. 
Martin Northup. 

C. C. Wilson. 
Matt. Seyler. 

M. C. T. Pleahorn. 
John Metliias. 
Ed. C. Smith. 
Charles E. Poe. 

D. D. Vannocker. 
John Devlin. 

E. A. Thomas. 
Andrew Stephan. 
John Ray. 

Alfred Chesebrough. 
J. G. Burbank. 
Denison Steele. 
C. C. Cato. 
J. E. Carpenter. 
W. C. Lyons. 
Fred. Schiller. 
H. W. Comstock. 
Charles R. Penfield. 
W. H. Lewis. 
L. A. Fontaine. 
Leander Burdick. 
James M. Comstock. 
Dexter Knights. 
A. H. Hathaway. 
H. G. Brown. 
J. A. Brown. 
J. W. Gildersleeve. 
Ij. Gushing. 
L. Hancock. 



C. H. Flint. 
S. D. Chamberlin. 
Alphonso Stratton. 
T. R. Gibson. 
Michael Kaeihele. 
J. Smith. 

Lewis C. Thatcher. 
Silas Topliff. 
Henry L. Phelps. 
Wm. Ryan. 
Daniel Lamb. 
Hiram Eggleston. 
George E. Buck. 
A. 0. Smith. 
Charles Raymer. 
Seymour W. Johnson. 
George H. Ryan. 
E. Bloomfleld. 
Asa W. ]\Iaddocks. 
A. H. Davidson. 
James S. Whitney. 
Alfred W. Gleason. 
Julius Chesebrough. 
Thomas Black well. 
Edward Bissell. 
Wm. A. Collins. 
Edw-ard P. Bassett. 
Edson Allen. 
R. A. Brown. 
Ralph H. Waggoner. 
R. Garner. 
Ira B. Blondin. 
James Raymer. 
Wm. W. Consaul. 
M. T. Huntley. 
R. I. Skidmore, 
E. J. Woodrufl. 
James Secor. 
A. Ketcham. 
Wm. E. Parmelee, Sr. 
Charles Breshaver. 
Jacob Whitmore. 
George Zerk. 
Henry Schwartz. 
John .\dam. 
Joseph Wei.shahn. 
Sylvester Kronsberger. 
Henry Jones. 
Martin Buck. 
Charles Werther. 
Fred. Volkstaedt. 
John Clopes. 
Charles Koester. 
Leo Schneider. 
Henry Strehle. 
Valentine Horning. 
Martin Yaeger. 
Wm. Lutterbeck. 
John Fick. 
John Wolf. 
Jacob Gherring. 
Charles Tene. 



F. D. Gurley. 
Jacob Roemer. 
Samuel Blanchard. 
Edward Hannin. 
Wm. Laughlin. 
Wm. Cunningham. 
W. Chamberlin. 
J. B. Russell. 
J. Danzie. 
Waters Whitmore. 
Isaac Rideout. 
Oliver Stevens. 
Charles Coy. 
Daniel R. Stebbins. 
John V. Van Orden. 
Patrick McCalliget. 
Thomas Card. 
James C. Messer. 
Luther Whitmore. 
Lewis Consaul. 
Elias H. Fassett. 
Thomas K. Crane. 
Jacob Stevens. 
J. C. Ketcham. 
Joseph Berr}'. 
Robert C. Drunia. 
L. H. Roberts. 
D. W. Stancliflf. 
C. E. Roberts. 
J. B. Hoag. 
John C. Bonnell. 
Gid.W. Weed. 
Peter C. Moross. 
Joseph K. Secor. 
John F. Wallace. 
Wm. Church, 
John H. Whitaker. 
Aaron L. Kelsey. 
Wm. H. Boos. 
Charles Hennessey. 
R. W. Brown. 
H. Case. 

Charles R. Messinger. 
Robert A. Wason. 
A. B. Cautield. 
S. T. Moore. 
Wm. W. Bolles. 
S. P. Meng. 
Charles B. Scott. 
Wm. Wheeler. 
John B. Ketcham. 
W. H. Fish. 
Henry Williams. 
Warren S. Waite. 
Foster Ellis. 
A. Ware. 
Byron Roberts. 
Charles Ranno. 
J. Annis. 
Charles Riebel. 
F. B. Case. 
W. D. Burgess. 



THE \YAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



101 



Mathies Niemeyer. 

Jacob Ogg. 

Calvin Bronson. 

N. Montgomery Howard. 

Louis Riebel. 

W. B. Hill. 

C. B. Jones. 

H. Kurd. 

W. H. Hamlyn. 

Wm. Sexton. 

James Crofts. 

Phillip Webber. 

O. S. Brown. 

Stephen Raymer. 

W. S. Backman. 

C. Hancock. 

George H. Hiser. 

Alex. King. 

John Mason. 

C. A. Gamby. 

A. Smith. 

W. E. Tattler. 

George M. Crandall 

Valentine Bargy. 

Wm. Wilkison. 

Wm. Schirman. 

Charles E. Winans. 

W. R. Peck. 

C A. Lewis. 

C. R. Faulkner. 

J. Rhodes. 

Lloyd Davis. 

H. J. Keep. 

V. Hubbell. 

Theophihis P. Brown. 

F. A. Ensign. 

Joseph Rancho. 

T. G. Uamby. 



Wm. Mack. 
John Mack. 
H. S. Bronson. 
R. J. Tubbs. 
Victor Keen. 
Thomas J. Webb. 
Amos M. DeBolt. 
Thomas Reed. 
C. H. Langdon. 
P. Stevens. 
K. R. Wiuslow. 
N. Hoyt. 

C. E. Parrish. 
John Gillrom. 

D. Lester. 

Henry Williamson. 
Fred. Jacobs. 
John Nauman. 
Wendell Hazenzahl. 
Joseph Furst. 
Henry Munday. 
John Kloraer. 
W. W. Englehardt. 
Paul Oberle. 
Mendel Shultz. 
Joseph Pell. 
Chris. Rudolph. 
F. F. Geigle. 
A. A. Belknap. 
John P. Boice. 
S. S. Hooper. 
I. K. Seaman. 
W. A. Warren. 
L. Cooper. 
Milton Blaford. 
T. Cooper. 
M. Foley. 
Joseph Kay. 



MAUMEE CITY. 



Geo. W. Reynolds. 
Horatio Conant. 
Amos Reynolds. 
James Woolley. 
P. N. Boyd. 
John C. Allen. 
II. Norton. 
Chauncey Merrill. 
Wm. Burge. 
John W. Hiett. 
G. Norton. 
W. P. Homer. 
David Perrin. 
H. Burritt. 
C. Kichards. 
Curtis Perry. 
Mark Richardson. 
E. Mitchell. 
James Howey. 
Homer Dalson. 
John S. Gregory. 
M. L. Crossett. 



W. W. Wolcott. 
H. C. Norton. 
Jacob Brahior. 
Wm. B. Dicks. 
C. M. Norton. 
A. C. Potter. 
E. Jervis. 
W. R. Hull. 
J. C. Kilbourne. 
Almeron McKinney. 
Richard Reed. 
J. F. Allen. 
A. T. Adams. 
Fred. Wolcutt. 
Daniel Phillips. 
M. Navarre. 
John A. Kreps. 
Charles Reed. 
M. Phillips. 
Geo. Mallett. 
James S. Darling. 
Alex. C. Forsyth. 



Geo. W. Dobson. 
Edward Pratt. 
Geo. H. Blaker. 
A. C. Winslow. 
H. Wolfinger. 

C. A. Scott. 
M. R. Langell. 
P. C. Holt. 
Jacob Spangler. 
Geo. W. Harvey. 
Robert A. Forsyth. 
Geo. W. Reynolds, Jr. 
Smith Gilbert. 
Henry Geiger. 
Caleb Goff. 
William Winters. 

J. C. Wardwell. 
John Smith. 
Richard Small. 
Isaac Hull. 
Andrew Fox. 
Eli Carman. 
Andrew Gessner. 
Peter Ditzler. 

D. Leonard. 
Rinal Robbins. 
Jacob Neff. 
Franklin Hamilton. 
O. S. DeWolf. 
John Williams. 
Wm. Robertson. 
John Farley. 
William Burritt. 
David Rodd. 

H. S. Clark. 
W. S. Holt. 

E. H. Hunter. 
E. C. Moore. 
Wm. P. Griswold. 
P. McGovern. 
Richard Estell. 
Thos. Dale. 
Peter Bollner. 
Simeon Myers. 
James M. Wolcott. 
L. Smith. 

Jacob Zacbadus. 



J. W. Gillman. 
Wheeler French. 
Robert A. Forsyth, Jr. 
A. D. Williams. 
J. Rojioss. 
Jacob Stoilyer. 
Wm. Limbrick. 
M. A. Patchin. 
S. Case. 
J. M. Lee. 
John E. Cobb. 
Nicholas Angel. 
William Bates. 
Roliert Potter. 
J. H. Kuder. 
A. H. Plant. 
Francis Quiggle. 
John Van Horn. 
M. Scran ton. 
Charles McCabe. 
R. N. Reynolds. 
A. W. Gilbert. 
Curtis Hall. 
Frank T. Lane. 
Thos. Tonergon. 
Jos. S. Hull, 
Thos. H. Phillips. 
Isaac Stewig. 
E. C. Hurdley. 
John A. Moore. 
Geo. Church. 
Alex. Munch. 
Alex. H. Gere. 
John Morris. 
Geo. Steiter. 
Peter Hopner. 
John Dodds. 
Jacob Kreese. 
H. W. Horton. 
Nicholas Geiger. 
John Gersbirr. 
John Kail. 
Wm. Phillips. 
G. G. Burkhart. 
Samuel Stewig. 
John Midsot. 



WATEKVILLE. 



James M. Brigham. 

Lorenzo L. Morehouse. 

Wm. H. Morehouse. 

Grin Smith. 

Wm. Van Fleet. 

William Smith. 

Elijah Dodd. 

H. Starkweather. 

J. B. Van Rennssalaer. 

Paris L. Pray. 

Thos. Pray. 

M. W. Pray. 

Jacob Len. 



G. W. Mallory. 
Horace Honey. 
James Craven. 
James Pollock. 
Aaron Highland. 
S. H. Thomas. 
L. Eastwood. 
Jesse Huft'. 
L. W. Haskins. 
O. A. Ballou. 
C. B. Judson. 
John Pray. 
Whitcomb Haskins. 



102 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



J. A. Hutchinson. 
G. H. Ultz. 

E. W. Lenderson. 

F. Briggs. 
Aaron Col>loigl). 
Elias Sliell. 
JaiiK's B. Marston. 
Frederick Heater. 
William D. Mills. 
Eliiis Reed. 
David H. Carroll. 
H. B. Gray. 
Ranatus DcMuth. 
Thomas T. Gray. 
E. S. Burchard. 

J. B. Cooper. 
J. E. Hall. 
James M. Stiles. 
Andrew Elliott. 
S. P. Rathbun. 
J. H. Scofield. 
James Cooper. 
Benj. E. Barney. 
A. Wolf. 

John P. Farnsworth. 
R. Hall. 



H. H. Wakeman. 
William Moorehouse. 
S. C. Brainard. 
A. P. Brainard. 
John Doren. 
Elisha Whitcomb. 
Emanuel Heller. 
Jacob Bos. 
P. Boyer. 
John Uutt. 
John Restor. 
Jacob Sander. 
E. R. Dyer. 
Mile Smith. 
R. W. Gillett. 
Caleb Ellis. 
James Cole. 
Hugh Cole. 
Marvin Wade. 
E. M. Dyer. 
Charles H. Reed. 
J. E. Kilborue. 
M. S. Stebbins. 
John Williams. 
G. A. Harne. 
O. F. Hall 



SYLVANIA. 



John U. Pease. 
Haskell D. Warren. 
Foster R. Warren. 
H. Hawley. 
Henry Harwood. 
John M. Wells. 
Lewis Cacher. 
Samuel H. Decker. * 
S. M. Judson. 
Owen Hendrickson. 
PelegT. Clark. 
David Harroun. 
D. W. Frary. 
Joseph Zeigeu. 
S. K. Wilcox. 
A. A. Wilcox. 
Geo. P. Dolph. 
W. H. Warren. 

A. O. Holloway. 
Fred. Hartman. 
Crawford Smith. 

B. R. Butler. 
B. Smith. 
Amos Redding. 
Nelson E. Shattock. 
N. Leonardson. 
Wm. J. Phelps. 

S. T. Chase. 
R. H. Alexander. 
Wm. A. Adams. 
Wm. Clamflitts. 
James Mann. 
John H. Van Pelt. 



Lewis Sears. 
Wm. B. Warren. 
Henry Hassan. 
Wm. H. Huling. 
Garret Vroman. 
Andrew Printuji. 
Isaac Washburn. 
W. A. Crandall. 
John Polley. 
Geo. Van Pelt. 
Amos Hopper. 
David P. Baker. 
Hiram Hollister. 
William Evison. 
Lewis P. Smith. 
W. H. Taylor. 
Wm. VandeViurg. 
Robert Shoeppel. 
P. V. Moon. 
Timothy Bressner. 
Thomas Probert. 
John L. Hendrickson. 
Samuel Young. 
H. Parker. 
William Crane. 
Daniel Tuthili. 
Wm. R. Faxon. 
Wm. Tuttlepen. 
Isaac M. Hatch. 
Alden A. Roberts. 
R. Gridley. 
George Hattersley. 
John Bertholf. 



E. H. Eaton. 
S. Perschall. 

E. N. Acres. 

B. B. Comstock. 
James H. Keller. 
Isaac Farnham. 
Thos. Brimercombe. 
Joseph Smith. 
Alonzo Hines. 
Geo. Hendrickson. 
John Phelps. 
John Gridley. 

A. Comstock. 
S. B. McGlenn. 
A. Cherry. 
S. Collins. 

C. H. Hagerman. 
George Gerwick. 
Harmon Murphy. 
Jas. P. Ostrande. 
John Kenvole. 
Nicholas D. Young. 
P. V. Moon. 
John M. Tubb. 
Orris F. Tubb. 
John Bellman. 

D. Kruse. 
Henry Vaughn. 
Thomas Greenavey. 
C. M. Griffith. 
Perry D. Seager. 
John P. Cornell. 
Reuben Treadway. 
Isaac Duncan. 

F. Bertholf. 

C. H. Gilchrist. 

D. Roberts. 
Samuel H. Nasou. 
John Buskirk. 

D. S. Dalley. 
A. Bowland. 
C. N. Lewis. 
Henry H. Roberts. 

E. Green. 
P. Sealing. 

C. H. Kennedy. 



Isaac Bertholf. 
David Brown. 
J. J. Ritchie. 
J. H. Parker. 
Abram Jesup. 
D. W. Frary. 
Robert Deshong. 
Oscar Collins. 
Henry Hubbard. 
S. H. Matthews. 
Henry Frat. 

B. Bellows, Jr. 
Edward Maloney. 
Jacob Van Alstine. 
O. Holloway. 

W. B. Butts. 
Wm. Patton. 
N. Vickery. 
S. M. Judson. 
Isaac Taft. 
Geo. W. Talbott. 
W. Lenderson. 

D. P. Gilson. 

A. D. Blanchard. 
A. Wintemart. 

A. C. Granger. 
Benj. Joy. 
Ira Harriden. 
John Showier. 
N. Dennis. 
Joseph Warren. 
James Haskell. 
Geo. W. Clark. 
James H. Colden. 
Wm. W. Wilson. 
J. J. H. Ingall. 

S. W. Bradley. 
Edward Lester. 

E. Comstock. 
Alonzo Crandall. 
J. V. Moore. 

W. A. Crandall. 

C. Dolph. 

B. H. Whitney. 
J. M. Thompson. 



MANHATT.VN. 



"Had no hands— both lost in battle. Said "Amen," to the paper. 



Thomas Wynn. 
Peter Mouieny. 
James L. Cha.se. 
S. F. Bailey. 
John L. Brown. 
T. Tompkins. 
D. E. Ford. 
Warren Salisbury. 
Amos Brown. 
A. H. Brown. 
Jacob Carson. 
Montgomery Carson. 
Robert Carson. 
S. M. Denman. 



Stephen Arguetts. 
Charles A. Straight. 
John Perry. 
Andrew Custash. 
Ferdinand Rinaldi. 
Francis Entew. 
Henry Elackmeyer. 
Martin Blackmeyer. 
John W. Bitter. 
John T. Kuber. 
Henry Shields. 
Henry Hurzstadt. 
Jokam Haas. 
John Brickman. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



103 



Edwin Case. 
T. W. Taylor. 
Wm. Hulest. 
John Koch. 
Peter Koch. 
John Koth. 
Peter McTague. 
David Springsted. 
John Crucher. 
A. Jerome. 
McKees Murphy. 
Gilbert Delye. 
Oliver Delye. 
Aiign.stus Crucher. 
William Ward. 

C. B. Holloway. 
Perry Wood. 
Hiram Wiltse. 
Harrison Hubbell. 
S. G. Ca.ss. 
James Wood. 
John Wood. 

M. S. Hubbell. 
Jonathan Barlow. 
Kev. John Butler. 
Elisha L. Wood. 
Nathaniel Hooker. 
Wm. S. Jay. 
John C. Delgart. 
Jacob Eagley. 
Absalom Arn. 
A. C. Dermott. 
Edward Lees. 
Franklin Y. Hall. 
J. Ain. 

.Samuel Dermott. 
Daniel Bailey. 

D. D. Hodges. 
Philo Hall. 
Frederich Hoeht. . 
James McDermott. 
Samuel Rodd. 
Harry Gunn. 
John Harrington. 
Calvin Pincnutt. 
Oscar Stow. 

J. Elliott. 
A. Brown. 
George Wilber. 
J. W. Jerome. 
F. Hamilton. 
RoVjertTheo. Vhees. 
Smith Edington. 
John McNess. 
Nathan B. McNutt. 
Wm. J. McNutt. 
S. D. Hilcox. 
James Jay. 
James Carlis. 
Josiah Birchfield. 
C. Clark. 



John Lalendorf. 
Fred. Mathers. 
E. S. Wynn. 
Charles Applegate. 
James McMurphy. 
Wm. McMurphy. 
Moses Mcilurphy. 
William Kervis. 
J. Dupont. 
John B. Dupont. 
Samuel Wynn. 
Joseph Chinavarre. 
Hubert Delye. 
Augustus Dusha. 



Isaac N. Reed. 
Joseph Rolph. 



Charles Clark. 
Samuel Cable. 



PROVIDENCE. 



SPRINGFIELD. 



Michael Sheehy. 
Bryan Sheehy. 
Thomas Sullivan. 
John Walker. 
George W. Emerson. 
J. W. Rhineberger. 
George Fought. 
Robert Irwin. 
John Eiklor. 
Wm. Fletcher. 
I.evi Z. Leroun. 
A. Ramsey. 
Joseph Walker. 
Josiah Cressy. 
John Ironside. 
William Elliott. 
Theodore Burt. 
Nathan N. Clark. 
Thomas Dunner. 
Jacol) Smith. 
David Smith. 
Samuel R. Jay. 
Robert Clark. 
Levi Manley. 
William Manley. 
Harrison Hubbell. 
Abram Van Wert. 
Elisha L. Wood. 
Patrick Delaney. 
Tarlyaze M. B. Rupal. 
James Trumble. 
R. A. Haynes. 
Ezra Holt. 
Barnet Mills. 
Thomas Watts. 
J. W. Cr&ssy. 
S. P. Lees. 
Charles Carroll. 
Osgood D. Cressy. 
Josiah Albon. 
John Elliott. 
Elis DeMott. 
Ausborn Awyles. 
Jacob Foulk. 
Henry Cable. 
H. J. Reed. 



R. C. Quiggle. 
Marvin Wade. 
F. Crosby. 
V. R. Crosby. 
James Roach. 
James Roach, Jr. 
John Brown. 
John Plase. 
Henry Killon. 
John Talbert. 
Ed. Koenig. 
Wm. Hutchinson. 
V. C. Whitcomb. 
Jacob Baumgartner. 
F. W. Whitcomb. 
R. D. Gillett. 
Lewis Crosby. 
R. F. Roach. 
B. G. H. Ryder. 
Jacob Hertzfeld. 
Alvin Roach. 
David Crosby. 
William Crosby. 
John D. Halsey. 
Henry Strayer. 
Jacob Ness. 
John Villman. 
George Perry. 
John Needel. 
Daniel Walter. 
Absalom Arbogart. 
John J. Boillatt, 
William Miller. 
W. R. Wilson. 
Charles Ryan. 
J. W. Heller. 
Seth Winsiow. 
H. R. Winsiow. 



James Hutchinson. 
Julius Richter. 
J. George Atkinson. 
Wm. Atkinson. 
David McCulloch. 
E. Hellon. 
D. S. Crosby. 
Alonzo Crosby. 
John Bartholl. 
Albert Mayer. 
C. B. Demuth. 
Fred Cipher. 
Peter Diem. 
James Ford. 
O. Crosby. 
C. B. Mead. 
C. Bucklin. 
A. Mead. 
G. W. Lamb. 
W. D. Lamb. 
J. Leunde. 
A. Miller. 
Levi Roach. 
William Gill. 
Samuel Miller. 
W. S. King. 
John Sheets. 
H. W. Keeler. 
Isaac Boillatt. 
Leonard Kury. 
Jacob Box. 
Michael Ness. 
John R. Hight. 
A. J. Roach. 
A. B. Mead. 
Tamall Rocherstraw. 
Isaac Boilet. 
Robert Wilson. 



WASHINGTON. 



Sanford L. Collins. 
John W. Collins. 
J. P. Collins. 
Peter C. Lewis. 
John Hazleton. 
Amasa Bishop. 
Wm. Richards. 
Lyman Haughton. 
W. R. Richards. 
Wm. Laskey. 
Wm. Powlesland. 
J. W. Colhns, Jr. 
Charles Henrick. 
William Leybourn. 
John Soulier. 
Toussaint Leroy. 
Benj. Mallett. 
M. Mallett. 



H. P. Whitney. 
S. P. Whitney. 
Joseph Gaper. 
0. Kasler. 
H. G. Downer. 
George Baker. 
John Gibbon. 

E. E. Andrews. 
Samuel G. Lewis. 
Joel Nye. 
ITptfm McLain. 
John Byrne. 

M. R. Johnson. 
Anson Trowbridge. 
Charles Hasty. 

F. J. Cole. 
Geo. Stetter. 
Thos. Secor. 



104 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



David Walker. 
Geo. Walker. 
&UU. Groesenliacher. 
G. S. Martin. 
William Coiintpr. 
H. Glenn. 
Wm. P. Warren. 
S. 8. Ketehauj. 
Henry Major. 
Cliarles E. Burton. 
George Careen. 
George Wliitwill. 
Franeis Conrsin. 
G. E. Bush. 

B. Holmes. 
A. Bersh. 
Peter Lane. 
0. Bush. 
G. W. Mallett. 

A. Ware. 
James Wright. 

William Taylor. 
J. C. Vaughn. 
Thomas Tunison. 
Peter Miller. 
D. C. Tunison. 
Emanuel Butts. 
Levi Munson. 
Shubal Munson. 
Caleb Crissey. 
Phillip Dennis. 
John Murbach, Sr. 
Alex. Crissey. 
Charles N. Curtiss. 
H. Murbach. 

C. Young. 
John Miller. 
John Wairs. 
M. Rohrbossy. 
Sebastian Durker. 
Simon S. Pemberton, 
AVm. H. Morry. 
John Breick. 
John Clum, Jr. 
Andrew Miller. 
John Clum, Sr. 
Peter Lumbriser. 
Abner D. Debolt. 
Samuel Devine. 
John Barnes. 
Peter Raab. 
John Farner. 

B. T. Geer. 
Sebastian Brown. 
Abram Kalcy. 
W. D. Herrick. 
Erastus Brown. 
Adam Weizel. 
David Mills. 



Elisha Whipple. 
Sol. A. Stebbins. 
W. R. Richards. 
John W. Welch. 
Augustus Hartman. 
Edwin Richards. 
Ransom E. Richards. 
Henry C. Richards. 
Ira Haughton. 
Albert Haughton. 
Orson Haughton. 
C. W. Ferguson. 

A. C. Harris. 
Richard Collins. 
Francis Granger. 

B. 0. Gordanier. 

C. L. Phillips. 
John Grinage. 
Solon Haughton. 
Paul Kunkle. 

SPENCER. 

Abram Johnson. 
Ezra C. Tunison. 
James Patten. 
Henry AVilliams. 
Adam Brown. 
Alonzo Fairchild. 
Prosser Coon. 
Willard Barnes. 
Frederick Peters. 
Wilham ColHtt. 
Charles Nichol. 
John Nichol. 
James S. White. 
Jefferson Fairchild. 
Elisha Bard. 
Isaac Dennis. 
Joseph Cunningham. 
David Dennis. 
Joseph Dennis. 
George Dill. 
John All. 
William Brown. 
A. B. Johnson. 
Fayette H. Coon. 
Francis S. All. 
Solon Morei. 
Harrison Earns. 
Emanuel Shrock. 
Ezra C. Tunison. 
Abram Seyler. 

S WANTON. 

Arthur Mills. 
Oscar F. Mills. 
George Gird ham. 
Wilber Brace. 
Thomas Ru.ssell. 
A. B. Waltz. 
Wm. McXamara. 



James Pegden. 
James Egnew. 
J. G. Holbrook. 
Jonathan Gilbert. 
Jacob Brown. 
John H. Adams. 
W. S. Mills. 
Abraham Deck. 
Silas Zeigen. 
Henry Kiser. 
William AUman. 
J. C. Mills. 
James Plerzig. 
Oscar Brown. 
Charles Brockway. 
George Curtis. 



Hiram Haughton. 
J. G. Kellogg. 
W. Woodard. 
C. Dugan. 
J. Warner. 
Daniel Kaley. 
M. Carney. 
James Patten. 
J. J. Dugan. 
Robert A. Haynes. 
P. Vandenhoff. 
Isaac B. Ellis. 
Anthou)' Herrick. 
Cyrus Davis. 
Michael Phalen. 
John Halpin. 

Pliny Lathrop. 
C. C. Lathrop. 
Henry Metcalf. 
Asaph Ely. 
George F. Ford. 
Levi Ford. 
Wallace R. Ford. 
Otis Ford. 
Eugene F. Ford. 
Charles Ford. 
Lucius L. Ford. 
E. Buck. 
M. P. Sanderson. 
Menzo Grover. 
James J. Lathrop. 
L. C. Lathrop. 
Lorenzo Lathrop. 
Wm. W. Wilson. 
Henry C. Ely. 
James Wood. 
M. Bennett. 
Alanson Bennett. 
William Swift. 
Jame.s Farley. 
David Mangel. 
Stephen Green. 



Adam Brown. 
Robert W. Taylor. 
John Atkinson. 
J. W. Deck. 
Thomas Tunison. 
Charles Lampman. 
James C. Wales. 
Daniel Allman. 
John Shepler. 
Joseph Shepler. 
Jacob Herzig. 
George N. Gardner. 
John G. Wales. 
Charles Brown. 
John C. Sherwood. 
WoodrufT A. Curtis. 



Harvey Kellogg. 

B. F. Cunningham. 

C. F. Bates. 
L. Merickel. 
John McMillen. 

G. W. Cunningham. 
Frederick Newbitt. 
John Patten. 
Josiah Clark. 
G. S. Monelly. 
Jacob Hunt. 
Patsy Fotie. 
John Jeall. 
Frederick Hoffman. 
Gilbert Jacobs. 

RICHFIELD. 

Henry Chule, Jr. 
M. F. Collins. 
Daniel Brint. 
Peter Waterman. 
James Talva. 
William Gray. 
George Polly. 
Jonas Woltinger. 
George Wickham. 
A. Bordeaux. 
W. M. Whitney. 
P. C. Turner. 
R. Sawyer. 
L. W. Hendrickson. 
David Hendrickson. 
A. Buck, Sr. 
G. VV. Hughes. 
T. Vetter. 
Thomas Gorman. 
G. B. White. 
Martin Perky. 
Wm. L. Bennett. 
Charles D. Sprague. 
Ellas Welch. 

D. H. Farley. 
D. D. Hawes. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



105 



In this connection, the following admirable 
production, from the pen of Professor W. A. C. 
Converse, then Principal of the Toledo High 
School, is deemed jaertinent and fitting for 
preservation ; 

THE SOLDIERS' APPEAL. 

[Suggested at the Union Meeting, Toledo, March 2, 1SG3.] 

Hear ye the voice tbat speaks afar. 
From every blood-stained field of War — 
In strife— above the bugle blast; 
In dying tones, when strife is past. 

Hear ye, the words our Brothers speak, 
Who stand for us within the fight— 

" O, for the helpless and the weak. 
Ye Patriot Men, Unite— Unite ! " 

Brave Men from the Atlantic's strand 
Meet Braves from the far " Golden Land ;" 
The Heroes from the Mountain side 
Greet Heroes from the Prairies wide. 

Behold them, partisans no more. 
Contending side by side for right. 

Oh, hear their million tongues implore — 
" For love of God. Unite— Unite ! " 

From Ellsworth's grave, from Baker's blood — 
From fields W'here fallen thousauds stood — 
Thousands, who fondly hoped to be 
Shrined in a Nation's memory— 

From twice ten thousand graves, there comes 
The earnest voice we hear to-night - 

And twice ten thousand mourning homes 
Echo the words, " Unite- Unite ! " 

Nay, from graves the older Heroes fill- 
From Yorktovvn, Trenton, Bunker Hill— 
From Vernon's Tomb, from Marshfield's sage — 
From Ashland and the Hermitage— 

The gray-haired men from every tomb. 
Potent where our shattered armies fight : 

List to the countless tones that come— 
" For Country, Home, and God, Unite ! " 

Great God in Heaven ! before Thee now, 
We register our holy vow: 
Our Party names— we spurn them all, 
And swear, whatever may befall, 

While Traitors raise a Hag on high. 
We'll aid our Brothers in the fight; 

" For Union, we will live and die — 
So help us God. w'E will Unite ! " 



The purpose of this movement in response to 
the appeal of the Ohio Soldiers, was met in a 
high degree. Probably no popular movement 
in this section during the war, was more timely 
or more potent in arousing the spirit of loy- 
alty, which for some time had seemed latent, 
and thus without projjer influence in maintain- 
ing an active co oi)eration at home, while tend- 
ing to depress and discourage the Soldiers in 
the field. The efi"ect of the appeal of the Ohio 
Soldiers was by no means limited to their own 
State, but it was accepted by loyal citizens 
throughout the country, as no less addressed to 
them, and with them it had corresponding in- 
fluence in awakening a desired spirit of loyalty 
and activity. The result was a general stimu- 
lus to the Union cause through the North, 



whereby was made more free needed recruits 
for depleted Regiments, while the hearts and 
nerves ot the Soldiers at the front were greatly 
strengthened by such timely assurance of home 
support. As a consequence largely of this 
state of things, the camjjaign of 1863 early de- 
veloj)ed features of renewed energy, and was 
marked with corresponding efiiciencj' and suc- 
cess. Grant's Army was permitted to celebrate 
the 4th of July in Vicksburg. The brilliant 
success at Gettysburg, and the capture of 
Port Hudson, with other signal victories, 
united to mark the change in the situation 
which loyal citizens had so greatlj' desired; 
the people of Ohio having special satisfaction 
in the defeat and capture of John Morgan, on 
his mad raid witliin this State. The reverse 
in feeling which tliesc successes produced, is 
indicated by two editorial articles in the Toledo 
Blade, the one of June 30th, when the culmi- 
nation of long-delayed military operations in 
different directions had wrought the popular 
feeling to the highest pitch of anxiety and &])- 
23rehension of defeat; and tiie other— just one 
week later — when Gettysburg and Vicksburg 
had electrified the North with their brilliant 
victories for loyal arms. 

From the Toledo Blade of June 30, 1863: 
DON'T CROAK! 

If we could utter but two words, at an hour like 
this, we think they would be, " Don't Ckoak ! " 
Croaking does nobody good— especially the croaker. 
It sours his mind and feelings toward everybody, and 
the Government in particular, while it more or less dis- 
courages and disheartens all who listen to him. It 
there be a man in the community, whom we feel like 
going round a block to avoid, it is one of these "birds 
of ill-omen "—these dog-in-the-manger characters— 
who, seeing no good they can do, consider themselves 
as specially commissioned to carp and find fault with 
every one who tries to do good without consulting 
them. We submit, if this be the part of patriots at 
a time like the present? The Government needs the 
best help the peoiile can render, to extricate the Na- 
tion from its present difficulties. Does croaking fur- 
nish such help ? We are not to stop here to wrangle 
about men or past mistakes, but to enquire where we 
can strike the most efi'ective blow for our bleeding 
country. If errors in leaders would justify the Civil- 
ian in withholding aid from the Government, then 
would such also warrant the .Soldier in aljandoning 
his post; for the obligation of the man in the field to 
stand by the Government, in defeat and in reverses, 
is no stronger than is that of the man at home. What 
would excuse the one, would excuse the other. The 
Soldier is daily called to make sacrifices and hazard 
his life to correct the errors of leaders. Why should 
not others do the same '? 



106 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



From Toledo Blade, July 7, 1863 : 

VICTORY ! 

Thank God, for the occasion for again writing tliat 
word! We never doubted tliat sncli grateful priv- 
ilege would be granted us. Our faith in the darkest 
hours of recent dark days, never failed us. Still, the 
portentous, gloomy present, wa.s painful and oppres- 
sive. And what a relief, to have it changed ! How 
the heart rebounds, when the weiglit of disappoint- 
ment and reverses is removed, and faith gives place 
to reality I How grateful to every true patriot, is the 
thought, that all the immense preparations and stu- 
pendous plans of the enemy for ravaging the peace- 
ful, prosperous North, and seizing the National Cap- 
ital, have been not onh- frustrated and safety restored 
where imminent danger threatened ; but the in- 
vading hosts terribly punished, if not totally annihi- 
lated. The lesson we desire to draw from this expe- 
rience, is, that we should cultivate a more rational, 
and consequently, a more abiding faith in the ulti- 
mate success of our cause. We should, so far as 
possible, avoid extravagant expectations of success, 
and thereby be the better prepared for reverses 
which we have reason to expect. The authorities 
and the gallant men in the Army and the Kavy, have 
enough to do to meet and thwart the consummate 
skill and desperate efforts of the enemy, without the 
" fire in the rear " with which tinreasoning croakers 
harass them. If the latter cannot afford to do, can't 
they aflbrd to wait f 

In July, 1862, a series of public meetings 
were held in Lucas County, tinder the auspices 
of the Militar}' Committee, for the purpose, 
chiefly of promoting enlistments in the Union 
Army. These were held in every Township, 
and were addressed by different citizens, in- 
cluding E. C. Lemmon, Wm. Kraus, E. P. 
Bassett, M. E. Waite, D. E. Gardner, F. Henig, 
Sr., Thomas Duulap, S. A. Eaymond, W. C. 
Earl, L. H. Pike, Nathan Eeeve, J. E. Osborn, 
J. V: Hall, J. M. Eitehie, Wm. M. White, D. 

E. Austin, B. T. Geer, Wm. Baker, Eev. E. B. 
Morrison, Eev. Ambrose HoUington, E. C. 
Marksheffel, Geo. E. Haynes, Andrew Young, 

F. A. Jones, Wheeler French, John J. Manor, 
and A. G. Clark. The result of these meetings 
was materially to awaken a popular sense of 
the needs of the Government and of the obli- 
gation of loj'al citizens promptly and effectu- 
ally to meet such want. 

March 20, 1863, in pursuance of a call signed 
by several iiundred citizens of Toledo, a large 
meeting was held at White's Hall, when a 
Loyal National League was organized. The 
nature and purpose of the organization was set 
forth in the call, as follows : 



We pledge ourselves to an unconditional loyalty 
to the Government of the United States— to an un- 
wavering support to its efibrts to suppress the Rebel- 
lion—and to spare no endeavor to maintain, unim- 
paired, the National Vnity, both in principle and in 
territorial boundary. The primary object of this 
League, is, and shall be, to bind together all Loyal 
Men — of all trades and professions — in a common 
Union— to maintain the power, the glory and the in- 
tegrity of the Nation. 

The meeting was called to order by Wm. 
Baker, on whose motion Mayor Manor was 
made Chairman, W. C. Earl being appointed 
Secretary. Wm. Baker, Geo. W. Davis, Wm. 
Kraus, Chas. Pratt and Chas. Dodge, were ap- 
pointed a Committee to prepare a constitution 
for the League; and A. G. Clark, D. E. Gard- 
ner, J. A. Scott, J. M. Eitehie and Jacob 
Landman, a Committee to recommend officers 
for the same. Mr. Baker read a letter to the 
Union demonstration of March 18th, from 
General J. B. Steedman, when three cheers 
were given for its author. The Committee 
presented the following list of temporary offi- 
cers for the League, which was adopted, to wit : 
President, Denison B. Smith ; Vice Presidents, 
Augustus Thomas, Wm. Baker, J.J. Manor; 
Secretaries, C. H. Coy, Ernst Greiner; Cor.- 
Secretary, Wm. C. Earl; Treasurer, Denison 
Steele. John E. Osboru and Captain C. W. 
Moulton, upon call, addressed the meeting, 
when it adjourned to meet March 30th, at 
which time the constitution was adopted, and 
the League was addressed bj- E. D. Nj^e, Esq., 
then recently from the South. April 6th, the 
League again met, when permanent officers 
were chosen, as follows: President, Denison 
B. Smith ; Vice Presidents, 1st Ward, Wm. 
Baker; 2d Ward, Matthew Brown; 3d Ward, 
Peter Lenk ; 4th Ward, Wm. C. Huffman; 
5th Ward, James C. Hall ; 6th Ward, Alonzo 
Eogers; Eec. Secretaries, C. H. Coy, Ernst 
Greiner; Cor. Secretary, Darwin E. Gardner; 
Treasurer, Wm. Kraus. A letter was read from 
Judge James Myers, Eepresentative, at Co- 
lumbus, approving of the movement. 

Pursuant to the call of a number of German 
citizens, a large and enthusiastic meeting of 
that nationality was held at Philharmonic 
Hall, Toledo, March 28, 1863, of which Dr. 
Valentine Braun was President, and Ernst 
Greiner Secretary. Guido Marx read an ad- 
dress and resolutions from Companj' H, 14th 
Ohio Infantrj', when the following committee 
was appointed to draft an address in response 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



107 



to the same, to wit: Dr. Hohly, Dr. Plessner, 
Geo. Weaver, Ignace Wernert and Guide 
Marx. Jacob Landman, A. Bunert and Guido 
Marx were ajipointed a committee to make ar- 
rangements for the organization of a German 
Loyal Leagiie. The meeting was addressed by 
Wm. Ivrau.s, J. M. Ashley, Dr. Plessner, An- 
drew Stephan and G. Marx. The meeting was 
regarded as a success. 

In 1863, for the purpose of provision for 
whatever demand might be made for men 



in support of the Government, the State was 
thoroughly enrolled and largely organized as 
the Ohio National Guard, nine Districts having 
been created for such purpose, the Ninth con- 
sisting of the Counties of Lucas, Fulton, Wood, 
Williams, Defiance, Henry, Paulding, Putnam, 
Van AVert, Allen, Hancock, Seneca, Huron, 
Erie, Sandusky and Ottawa. In July, elec- 
tions of Compan}' officers were held in the sev- 
eral Counties, and Eegiments organized. The 
following officers were chosen in Lucas County : 



FIRST REGIMENT. 



COMPANY 


MCATION 


CAPTAIN 


FIRST LIEUTENANT 


SECOND LIEUTENANT 


A . . .. 


1st Ward, Toledo 


E. B. Bronson 


E. P. Eaton 

John Tollman _ 

Harlow J. Boice 


Geo. Kapp - — 


B 








C 


.. K 


John Nauman 

S. W. Freeman 


Artius Weil 


D 


.< (( 




E 


•'d Ward " 


Fred. Ingold 

John H. Fork 

Dan. J. Mattocks, Jr 

Joseph B. Fisk 

John Ascheubrenner 

John Kessler 




F 


(( >i 




Chas. H. Harroun 


G 


>. .. 




Ernest Kibbe - 


H 


.1 .. 


Chas. \V. Hall 


Henrv Bruksieker 


I 


,1 .. 


Wolfgang Fox _ . 


John Schumaker 


K 


« I. 


Jacob Gelzer 


John Boyer - 









SECOND REGIMENT. 



COMPANY 


LOCATION 


CAPTAIN 


FIRST LIEUTENANT 


SECOND LIEUTENANT 


A .. 


3d Ward, Toledo 

„ 1, 




Geo. A. Bishop 

Wm. 0. Brown. 

Julius Parcher.- 

G. Goldsmith 


Chas. P. Boardman 






B. H. Hitchcock 


C 


Stephen W. Dyer 

Chas. C. Starr 


Jus. W. Clarke 


D 






F . 




John G. Barbank 


Leander Burdick 

M. Dooley 


Jas. Dority 


G 


4th Ward, " 


Timothy B. Mellay 


Thos. Gregory 


H 











Wm. H. Dyer 

Ed Slalone 




Chas. Woodbury 


K. 


James Mattlmore 


Patrick Waters 











THIRD REGIMENT. 



A . 

B. 
C. 
D . 
E. 
F. 
G. 
H. 
I.. 
K. 



5th Ward, Toledo. 



6th " 

Manhattan .. 
Washington . 



Sylvauia . 

.4 

Adams... 



CAPTAIN 



Alfred W. Gleason. 

[No return] 

James Coyle 

James Ford 

Edward Chase. 

[No return] 

Ed. Upton 

Wm. D. Moore 

[No return] 

Hiram Haughton... 



FIRST LIEUTENANT 



J. Paul Jones. 



Ferd. Johnson 

Richard Garner., 
Samuel Jacobs — 



N. A. Cone.... 
H. H. Warren - 



Alonzo Lane. 



SECOND LIEUTENANT 



E. Yardley. 



Henry Thoensing. 

John Downey 

E. S. Wynn 



Upton McLain 

Nathaniel Cooper. 



J. Reynolds. 







FOURTH REGIMENT. 




C0.MPANY 


LOCATION CAPTAIN 


FIHST LIEUTENANT 


SECOND LIEUTENANT 


A 


Richfield 

Spencer.. _ 


W Tunison - 


Wm. Gowman 


G. F. Ford - 


B 






c 




J. W. Cressey 

John Miller ... . 


Edward Carroll 


D 




W R Hull 


Frank Witzler 


E 




Wm. Robertson 


Louis Kaiser 

Philip Ruchel 

Oscar F. Mills 

P. H. Pray 

A. Walp - 


Geo. H. Blaker — 




Monclova 

SwantOD 




H. C. Norton 


G 


Wm A Scott 


Thos. Russell 


H 




R. W. Gillette 


I 




J Farriugton 


M. W. Pray 


K 




R. C. Quieele 


D. G. Crosby 


Levi Stutts 











Captains E. B. Bronson. N. M. Howard, James Ford and C. B. HoUoway, were detailed to act as Colonels until the election of 
field officers. 



los 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Subsequently, Luther Whitney was elected 
Colonel, Geo. W. Merrill, Lieutenant-Colonel, 
and E. Kibbe, .Major, of the 1st Eegiment; 
Captain N. M. Howard, Colonel, C. C. Starr, 
Lieutenant-Colonel, and W. H. Dyer, Major, 
of the 2d Regiment; James Ford, Colonel, 
Stephen S. Kingsley, Lieutenant-Colonel, and 
W. n. Huling, Major, of the 3d Regiment; and 
J. Farrington, Colonel, C. B. Holloway, Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel, and W. A. Scott, JIajor, of the 
4th Regiment. 

Camps for di-ill were established in the sev- 
eral Districts, that for the Ninth having been 
located at Toledo, the ground selected being 
out Cherry street, about two miles from Sum- 
mit street, and the time September 18th-2.3d, 
inclusive. In camp were about 10,000 men, 
divided into three Brigades, commanded as 
follows: 1st Brigade, Colonel D. F. DeWolf; 
2d Brigade, Colonel Stearns ; 3d Brigade, Col- 
onel Kelsea, the latter including eight Compa- 
nies of Ist Regiment, Lucas County, Colonel 
C. B. Phillips. The stalf officers of General 
Hill, as instructor of the Camp, were as fol- 
lows: Colonel C. B. Phillips, Chief; Colonel 
N. M. Howard and Captain Richard Waite, 
Aides-de-Camp ; Colonel Luther Whitnej', In- 
spector; Lieutenant M. H. Austin, Assistant- 
Inspector; Lieutenant-Colonel C. C. Starr and 
Lieutenant Fielding S. Cable, Acting Assistant 
Adjutant-Generals; S. S. Thorn, M. D., and 
Chas. Cochran, M. D., Surgeons. Other details 
were made, as follows : Lieutenant Chas. N. 
Stevens and Frank McGinniss, Clerks to Gen- 
eral Commanding ; Lieutenant JamesW. Clark, 
Clerk to Acting Assistant Adjutant-General ; 
Lieutenant Pomeroy, Postmaster; Lieutenant 
Jetfrey "Wheeler and Wm. Clark, Orderlies to 
General Commanding; J. Burgoon, Orderly to 
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General; Sergeant 
S. "W. Hart, Orderly to Inspector. On the 23d, 
the Camp was visited by Governor Tod, who 
there reviewed the ti'oops and addressed them 
at some length, expressing his high gratifica- 
tion at both the numbers present and the pro- 
gress made in their drill. He said it was 
possible, that before the season was ended, they 
might be called upon to cross the State to meet 
a Southern foe. If General Eosecrans should 
be compelled to fall back, the Soldiers then in 
camp would be needed, and he assured them 
he would give them an opportunity to " show 
their steel." This announcement was received 



with prolonged cheering, the men swinging 
their hats. He said that in March previous, 
Ohio was found to be 30,000 men ahead of her 
proper quota. The Governor closed with a 
call for three cheers for General Hill, in recog- 
nition of his success as Commandant of the 
Camp, and of his prominent service in the in- 
ception and organization of the State Militia. 
From 10,000 to 12,000 persons were reported 
as present on the occasion. The Camp broke 
uj) on the 24th of September, and at 1 p. m. 
the troops marched to the Union Railway de- 
pot, passing through the City. The streets were 
verj- generally adorned with stars and stripes 
and other marks of respect for the soldiers. 
At the corner of Summit and Monroe streets, 
they were halted, when in an appropriate fare- 
well order, General Hill took leave of them. 

As a train on the Dayton k Michigan Rail- 
road, bearing Volunteer Infantry on their way 
for drill at (Jamp Lucas, Toledo, was passing 
around the curve in that Road, in East Toledo, 
in September, 1863, a "pony " engine collided 
with the train, killing John Scott and William 
Philo, of Wood County, and injuring many 
others more or less seriously. A fund for the 
benefit of the families of the deceased, was 
raised by contributions of the soldiers at the 
Camp, which amounted to about $725. 

In August, 1862, Major Lewis Butler, com- 
manding 67tli Ohio, wrote a letter in which he 
said: "I will send our old flag to the citizens 
of Toledo at the first opportunity. It is so 
completely riddled, that it is no longer service- 
able to us. Let it be preserved as a token of 
their generositj-, and let all who look upon it, 
breathe a silentprayer for those brave defenders 
of their country, who fell fighting for its pro- 
tection " October 1, 1863, this flag was for- 
mally delivered to the Toledo City Council, by 
Maj^or Dorr, with a letter ft-ora Colonel A. C. 
Voris, making fitting mention of the scenes 
through which the banner had passed, without 
a stain or reproach on those who gallantly bore 
it. Appropriate resolutions were adojited by 
the Council, accepting the flag and recognizing 
the heroism of the Regiment. 

March 31. 1864, the Toledo Board of Trade 
appointed the following named persons as a 
committee to visit Cleveland, to meet the com- 
mittee on Naval Affairs of Congress, and to 
submit for its consideration the advantages of 
Toledo as a location for a Navy Yard, to wit: 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



109 



Harry Chase, T. C. Stewart, J. W. Scott, Rich- 
ard Mott, M. E. Waite, Wm. Baker and S. M. 
Young. At this time Cono-ress was seriously 
considering the policy of more adequate means 
of protection for the Lakes from attack by 
Eebel forces, Canadian sympathizers and dis- 
loyal combinations within the Northern States. 
The rebellion collapsed before definite meas- 
ures were adopted to that end. 

In view of apprehended i-aids b^- Confeder- 
ates operating from Canada, attention was 
called to the policy of temporary defense at 
different points on Lake Erie. In accordance 
with such purpose. Colonel T. J. Cram, of 
United States Corps of Engineers, made report 
to the War Department in January, 1864, of a 
plan for the mouth of the Maiimee River and 
harbor of Toledo. Among other provisions, 
he suggested for the outer harbor, 20, 30 and 
100-pound Parrott guns, and 8 and 10-inch 
Columbiads en barbette, for Turtle Island ; a 
co-operative Battery at North Cape Ridge, and 
a Battery on Cedar Point. For the inner har- 
bor, he recommended three Batteries, two one 
side, and one on the other, of the River, be- 
tween its mouth and the Middle Ground in the 
City. November 10, 18(34, Major-General Joe 
Hooker visited Toledo, and by invitation, 
briefly addressed the Board of Trade. The 
object of his visit was to examine the harbor 
and Bay, with reference to any defenses that 
might be feasible. He expressed the opinion 
that a Battery located on the bluff at the West 
point of Presque Isle, and another on a point op- 
posite on the main land, would afford ample pro- 
tection. This oijinion was based on examination 
then made. No steps ever were taken toward 
carrying out either of the above suggestions. 

LTnder an arrangement between the War 
Department and the Governors of Ohio, In- 
diana, Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa, these 
States were to furnish 85,000 men for 100 days' 
service. Pursuant to this arrangement, Gov- 
ernor Brough by proclamation called out 
30,000 of the Ohio National Guard, for May 
2, 1864. He said : " Our armies in the field are 
marshaling for a decisive blow, and our Citizen- 
soldiery will share the glory of the crowning 
victories of the campaign, by relieving our 
veteran Regiments from post and garrison 
duty, to allow them to engage in the more 
arduous duties of the field." So prompt was 
the response to this call for 30,000 troops, that 



within one week 38,000 were ready, and nine 
days later, 35,000 were in and on the wa}' to 
the field. In a letter of June 1, 1864, the Secre- 
tar}- of War wrote Governor Brough as follows: 
" This prompt and energetic action of yourself 
and staff and the loj-al jieoplo of Ohio, exhibits 
an unmatched effort of devoted patriotism and 
stern determination to spare no sacrifice to 
maintain the National Government and over- 
throw the rebellion." The credit for such re- 
sults was largely due to Adjutant-General 
Charles W. Hill, through whose foresight and 
energy, in a great measure, the National Guard 
were put in shape to make such prompt re- 
sponse possible. Pursuant to this call. Colonel 
C. B. Phillips, 1st Regiment Ohio National 
Guard, ordered his command to report May 
2d, in Toledo, wbicli was done, and the Regi- 
ment, as the 130th Ohio Volunteer Infantrj', 
left for Johnson's Island, Erie County, May 
12th. The force then included four Companies 
from Fulton County, and numbered over 1,000 
men. It was officered as follows; Colonel, 
Charles B. Phillips; Lieutenant-Colonel, John 
Faskiu; Major, E. B. Hall; Surgeon, S. S. 
Thorn; Assistant-Surgeon, Calvin Hathawaj' ; 
Adjutant, Will. B. Dicks; Quartermaster, Mi- 
not I. Wilcox; Chaplain, James W. Alder- 
man. Company A — Sylvester Brown, Captain; 
Wesley Chamberlin, First Lieutenant ; James 
C. Messer, Second Lieutenant; 80 men. Com- 
pany B — Dan. A. Collins, Captain ; Wm. C. 
Cheney, First Lieutenant ; Fred. Ingold, Sec- 
ond Lieutenant; 75 men. Company C — Rich- 
ard Waite, Caf)tain ; John J. Barker, Second 
Lieutenant; 81 men. Company D — L. Jay 
Carrell, Captain ; L. D. Msison, First Lieuten- 
ant; Erwin M. Fenner, Second Lieutenant ; 
79 men. Company E — Geo. W. Reynolds, Jr., 
Captain; Louis Kaiser, First Lieutenant ; 80 
men. Company F — Louis Koejjpel, Captain ; 
John C. Wuerful, First Lieutenant ; Louis 
Rieger, Second Lieutenant ; 78 men. Company 
G — Warren D. Moore, Captain ; L. W. Hen- 
drickson. First Lieutenant; Jos. Warren, Sec- 
ond Lieutenant; 75 men. Company H — S. L. 
Spencer, First Lieutenant; J. B, Faslibaugh, 
Second Lieutenant ; 82 men. Company I — 
Samuel Leybourn, Captain ; Henry Brown, 
First Lieutenant; Geo. Curson, Second Lieu- 
tenant; 72 men. Company K — Wm, O. Webb, 
Captain; Geo. P. Bristol, First Lieutenant; 
Henry Lange, Second Lieutenant; 80 men. 



110 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



The non-commissioned officers of Company C, 
were as follows : Orderly, Fred. B. Shoemaker; 
Sergeants, Geo. Durringer, John Nagley, 
Henry G. Totton and Horatio S. Young ; Cor- 
porals, Fred. P. Waite, Ealph H. Waggoner, 
F. W. Moellenburg, Conrad Weil, Edward Sex- 
ton, Fred. A. Stevens, Elijah P. Crane, Chas. 
H. Coffin. For a time the Regiment did guard 
duty at that place, and while there the rebel 
prisoners attempted an escape by tunneling, 
but were discovered and defeated. June 4th, 
the Regiment left the Island for Bermuda Hun- 
dred, in the James River, via Washington, 
where it remained three days, calling on Pres- 
ident Lincoln, who spoke to them as follows : 
"Soldiers: I understand you have just come 
from Ohio — come to help us in this, the Na- 
tion's day of trial, and also of its hope. I thank 
you for 3'our promptness in responding to the 
call for troops. Your services were never more 
needed than now. I know not where yon are 
going. You may stay here and take the place 
of others who will be sent to the front, or you 
may go there yourselves. Wherever you go, I 
know you will do your best. Again, I thank 
you. Good bye." The Regiment was placed 
in the 2d Brigade, 3d Division, 10th Army 
Corps, Brig.-General 0. S. Terry, commanding. 
It was ordered to Point of Rocks, on the Appo- 
mattox, and soon i-eturned to the left of the 
intrenchments at Bermuda Hundred, where it 
was occupied in drilling, digging rifle-pits, and 
picketing the lines until June 21st, when it 
moved to Deep Bottom, again doing picketing 
and digging. June 22d, the Regiment partic- 
ipated in a skirmish with Rebel pickets, losing 
one man wounded. August 11th, it proceeded 
to Fort Powhatan, where it remained until 
mustered out, its term of service having ex- 
pired. September 7th, it took the transport 
Keyport, on the James River, the boat en- 
countering a severe storm, and barely escap- 
ing wreck. On the 12th, it reached Toledo, 
where it was enthusiastically ,though informally 
received. The ladies of the National Covenant, 
under direction of Mrs. S. R. L. Williams and 
Mrs. Palmer, had made arrangements with Mr. 
R. P. Ainger, of the Island House, for a supper 
for such of the men as might desire it. Com- 
pany A, Captain Brown, had already proceeded 
to East Toledo, where a supper awaited them. 
Rev. Seth G. Clark, Chaplain of the 10th 
Ohio Cavalry, addressed a meeting in Toledo, 



October 30, 1864. He had then recently been 
released from a rebel prison, having been cap- 
tured near Lovejoy's Station, South of Atlanta, 
while with Kilpatrick on his raid. 

In May, 1804, Governor Brough issued an 
urgent appeal to the people of Ohio for sup- 
plies of fruits and clothing for the wounded 
Union Soldiers on the Potomac. In response 
to that call, a meeting of citizens of Toledo was 
hold May 20th, of which Chas. M. Dorr was 
Chairman and W. C. Earl the Secretary. Rev. 
E. F. Piatt offered praj-er. Two committees, 
each consisting of two citizens of the different 
Wards of the City, were appointed ; the one to 
secure money contributions, and the other to 
collect supplies. The Money Committee was 
constituted as follows : First Ward— David 
Smith, E. B. Hyde: Second Ward— T. C. Stew- 
art, Alex. Reed; Third Ward— A. L. Kelsey, 
D. H. Miner; Fourth Ward— W. H. Dyer, 
Robert Cunimings ; Fifth Ward — J. N. Drum- 
mond, J. T. Newton ; Sixth Ward — Alonzo 
Rogers, M. T. Huntley. The Committee on 
Supplies, were : First Ward — C. A. King, J. 
R. Osborn ; Second Ward — John Sinclair, M. 
D. Carrington; Third Ward— D. B. Smith, H. 
S. Walbridge; Fourth Ward— A. W. Barlow, 
Wm. Kraus; Fifth Ward— James C. Hall, 
Matthew Shoemaker ; Sixth Ward — A. Rogers, 
Richard Garner. An Executive Committee, 
consisting of R. H. Bell, Thomas Hamilton, 
and J. Austin Scott, w^as appointed. The meet- 
ing was addressed by Rev. Mr. Thomas, M. R. 
Waite, H. T. Niles and D. E. Gardner. The 
result of this movement was the provision of 
liberal supplies of both money and articles 
needful for the wounded soldiers. 

The cause of the Union was called to a spe- 
cial crisis during the Summer of 1864, to meet 
which. President Lincoln, much against his 
choice, was constrained to call for additional re- 
inforcements of men for the National Army. At 
the time no State had a better account with 
the War Department, than had Ohio; while no 
portion of the State was on better footing in 
that connection, than was the Northwest. 
These facts however, in no way lessened the 
patriotic response to such call, to be made in 
this section. Immediate steps were taken for 
supplying the requisite re-enfoi'cements. A 
meeting of the County Military Committee of 
this Congressional District was held in Toledo, 
August 26tb, when it was resolved to issue an 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



Ill 



address to the people, urging prompt action in 
filling up the quota called for. M. K. Waite 
was invited to prepare such address, which he 
did. The character of the paper may be 
judged from the following extract: 

This is no time to stop and enquire whether all 
has been done that could have been done with the 
men and means already furnished. It is enough for 
all true patriots to know, that the one great object of 
the contest has not been accomplished. The integrity 
of the Union has not been restored. All the old United 
States do not recognize the Constitution under which 
we have so long lived and prospered. Our flag does 
not float resi^ected over the old Union. When that 
great end is attained, it will be time enough to en- 
quire whether more remains to be done. The Gov- 
ernment says it must have the men, and without 
them, we know our cause may fail. Shall we give 
them ? Only a few days remain in which to do the 
work, but enough for the purpose, if each man in the 
District does his duty. Heretofore the Soldiers from 
our District have been Volunteers. Let them be such 
hereafter. 

By proclamation of July 18, 1864, the Presi- 
dent called for 500,000 additional troops, for one, 
two and three years. For these the Government 
oifered bounties for Volunteers, of $100, $200 
and $300. To this, Toledo added $100 for Vol- 
unteers. Counting tlie quota under that call, 
the account of Lucas County stood as follows : 



SUB-DISTRICTS 


Quota 
July.'()4 


DEFI- 
CIENCY 


SUEPL' S 


DUE 

Aug. 1st 


Toledo 
1st Ward 


96 
117 
111 

127 
96 
28 
31 
39 
22 

m 
ao 

13 
21 
13 

8 
39 
37 

S 
18 


6 

39 
17 

7 

1 

5 
3 

7 


6 

30 

9 

3 
3 
7 
2 
10 


102 


2d " 


111 


3d " 


81 


4th " 


166 


5th " 


113 


6th " 


35 


Oregon Town.ship 


32 
30 


Manhattan 

Sylvania 


27 
38 


Richfield 

Spencer 

Adams 

Monclova 

Springfield 

Wavnesfield 


27 
10 
21 
G 
6 
29 


Waterville 


37 


Swantou 

Providence 




2 


6 
18 











In December. 1864, the following local Com- 
mittees were appointed for the purpose of cor- 
recting errors in the Enrollment lists, to wit; 

ToL-EBO— First Ward— 8. W. Freeman, L. H. Pike, 
Geo. Platfoot. Second Ward— A. G. Clark, Charles 
Pratt, .John Kessler. Third WardS. H. Hitchcock, 
D. H. Miner, M. I. Wilcox, John H. Gherkins. Fourth 
Ward— .John Paul Jones, C. H. Eddy, Matthias Kess- 
ler. Fifth 11 ard— Mathew Shoemaker, Fred. Witker, 



Henry Brand. SiMh Ward~F. B. Porter, Augustus 
Brown. Washington To%v7iship—Sianue\ Blanchard, 
Joseph Chambers, Joel W. Kelsey. Sylvania— Valeg 
T. Clark, W. D. Moore, Isaac Thorp, J. Warren, R. 
C. Thompson. Richfield— C. C. Lathrop, H. C. Ely, 
Isaac Washburn. ^da»(ji— Harvey Kellogg, J. G. 
Cass, J. Reynolds, Henry Miller. Springfield— Perry 
Wood, C. B. Holloway, Hiram Wiltsey. Waterville— 
James M. Brigham, Yarnell Rakestraw, J. G. Isham. 

iVonclova—J. McDonald, F. J. Evans, Metzger. 

Sj^encer—Wm. Taylor, Jacob Surbeck. Providence — 
A. B. Mead, John Wilson, Frank Manor. Swanlon— 
Dr. W. A. Scott, James C. Wales, W. D. Herriek, B. 
T. Geer. il/an/i,aMa?i— Jonathan Wynn, Peter J. 
Shaw, Henry Martin. Oj-cgora— Sylvester Brown, 
James Rideout, Henry Phelps, Anthony Reihing, 
J. Tippen. Waynesfield and Maumee City— Geo. W. 
Reynolds, R. B. Mitchell, Jo.seph Hull, Jo.seph Lan- 
genderfer. 

The following exhibits the number of men 
due from the several Sub-Districts in Lucas 
County, March 1, 1865: 



First Ward, Toledo, 


. 


Svlvania, . . . 


9 


Second Ward, " 


. 


Richfield, . . . 


. C 


Third Ward, 


. 


Spencer, . . . 


. 


Fourth Ward, " 


.10 


Waynesfield, 


. 1 


Fifth W^ard, 


.12 


Waterville, . . 


. 1 


Sixth Ward, 


. .5 


Providence, . . 


. 3 


Oregon Township, 


. 


Washington, . . 


. 


Manhattan, . . . 


. 8 


Swanton, . . . 


. 


Monclova, . . . 


. 


Springfield, . . 


. 



March 13, 1865, the total deficiencies of Lu- 
cas County anounted to only 24, to wit : F"ourth 
Ward, Toledo, 9; Fifth Ward, 8; Manhattan, 
3; Richfield, 3; Providence, 1. 

This was the last showing publislied, and 
the account coukl not have been materially 
changed after that date. At that time the de- 
ficiencies in the other Counties of the Tenth 
Military Districts, were as follows : Wood, 29 ; 
Fulton, 42, of which 35 were in German Town- 
ship; Henry, 29; Putnam, 43, of which 22 
were in Blanchard Townshij) ; Williams, 101 ; 
Defiance, 50 ; Paulding, 57. Total for the 
District, 375, which may justly be regarded as 
a very creditable showing for Northwestern 
Ohio. Few if any sections of the country 
more promptly or more fully responded to the 
calls of the Government for Soldiers in its 
defense, than did this. 

Two modes for promoting the raising of re- 
cruits for the Union Army, were adopted dur- 
ing the Eebellion. One was by providing 
individual substitutes, and the other by the 
co-operative efforts of loyal citizens. The lat- 
ter class were not limited to those liable to 



112 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



military duty, but embraced also many who 
were exempt from such liability. Organiza- 
tions for such purpose were formed in the sev- 
eral Wards of Toledo, in December, 1864, 
whose chief immediate object was to raise 
funds for use as bounty to Volunteers. In this 
way, enlistments were greatly aided, with the 
result, that witii the other bounties paid, the 
City quota was kept exceptionally well com- 
plete. The reported operations of the several 
Ward Clubs, were as follows: 

First Ward.— The Club for this Ward was organ- 
ized December 28, 1864. Fred. A. Jones was the 
President, C. T. Wales the Secretary, and J. R. Osborn 
the Treasurer. The Executive Committee consisted 
of L. H. Pike, F. A. Jones, C. T. Wales, Wm. Baker 
and M. W. Day ; and the Finance Committee of T. 
J. Brown, H. Sam.son, Geo. Platfoot, Dennis Sullivan, 
Wm. Essing, John Tolman, M. Rail, R. Dunnigan, 
A. Rutherford, F. Licher, Joseph Wernert, and Geo. 
R. Rogers. The work of soliciting contributions of 
$2.5 and over not proving satisfactory, a meeting of 
subscribers to the fund was held in January, when a 
" Mutual Protection Society " was formed, under 
which the funds raised and to be raised were made 
available solely for the benefit of the members of the 
Club. Its Executive Committee consisted of Wm. 
Baker, F. A. Jones, C. T. Wales, L. H. Pike and Geo. 
Platfoot ; and its Finance and Advisory C'ommittee 
of M. R. Waite, C. A. King and Col. J. S. Norton. 
The final report of the Treasurer, made May 27, 186.5, 
showed the total receipts to have been $10,611.50— 
$7,811.50 from subscribers, and $2,800 from City 
bonds. The expenditures were — for 28 recruits, to 
fill quota, $9,680; and |273.20 for expenses; total, 
$9,95:5,20 ; leaving a balance of $658.30. This balance 
was given to the wounded Soldiers and the families 
of Soldiers of the Ward. 

Second Ward.— The Club of this Ward was formed 
December 28, 1864, with Clias. Pratt as President, and 
A. G. Clark as Secretary, and Nehemiah 'Waterman 
as Treasurer. The bounty fixed upon was $28 per 
man. This was under the call of December 9th, for 
.300,000 men. The Finance Committee consisted of 
Richard Waite(Chairman),John Sinclair, T. B. Casey, 
L. F. Hubbard, J. T. Southard, E. C. Smith, Henry 
Spielbush, Henry Williams, John Aschenbrenner, 
John Byer, Henry Pfefferly, Rev. Father Botf (St. 
Francis de Sales Church), John O'Farrell and John 
Gildea. The Recruiting Committee consisted of 
John J. Barker, A. J. Sprague, Ernest Kibbe, W. C. 
Cheney, Fred. B. Dodge, H. T. Cook, Geo. Tanner, 
W. W. Whitney, Fred. Eaton, S. B. Roshong, Fred. 
M. Burton, P. C. Moross, Chas. J. Burton, Robert A. 
Wason, James H. Maples, T. B. Casey, A. W. Colton, 
Ralph H. Waggoner. The final report of this Club 
was published February 10, 1805, showing the receipts 
from citizens liable to draft to have been $8,703 ; from 
those not so liable, $831 ; from City bonds issued as 



bounty, $3,000 ; and from other source, $15 ; making 
a total of $12,549. Of this sum, $10,620 was paid for 
30 recruits to fill the Ward's quota on last 300,000 
call ; $25 for former recruits ; $26 for expenses ; and 
$60 as discount on bonds; making $10,731, and leav- 
ing a balance on hand of $1,818. 

Third Ward. — For this Ward a Club was organized 
January 5, 1865, for the mutual protection of its 
members. Its officers were : President, H. S. Wal- 
bridge ; Vice President, Dr. J. G. Nolan ; Secretary, 
Don. A. Pease; Treasurer, James R. Strong. The 
Executive Committee consisted of M. I. Wilcox, R. 
H. Bell, Dr. J. G. Nolan, Edward Knapp and T. 
Wegener ; and its Finance Committee of D. H. Miner, 
Calvin Barker and Milo Bashare. The final meeting 
of the Club w^as held February 11, 1865. At that 
time its funds amounted to about $7,500, in contribu- 
tions, and $3,000 in City Bonds. Before final adjourn- 
ment, the Club, in strong terms tendered its thanks 
to D. H. Miner, for his services on the Finance Com- 
mittee. After all was closed up, this Club had a bal- 
ance of $1,500, the disposal of which is stated else- 
where. 

FouBTH Ward. — The Club in this Ward was organ- 
ized in November, 1864, with John Paul Jones as 
President, and C. M. Woodbury as Secretary. A re- 
port, published January 5, 1865, showed receipts to 
the amount of $3,485, of which $2,485 consisted of 
subscriptions, and $1,000 of City bonds. Included in 
expenditures was $3,000 for 10 recruits. Owing to 
backwardness of subscriptions, a Mutual Protection 
Club was organized jNIarch 9, ]<S65. March 10th, the 
Club had published the names of 175 persons en- 
rolled and liable to draft, who had not contributed 
funds for the provision of recruits to save the Ward 
from draft. The final report of the Club, made April 
13, 1865, showed its receipts to have been $13,126.80, 
including $10,068 from members, and$:5,000 in bonds. 
The expenditures embraced $12,572 for 30 recruits. 
There was on hand a balance of $137.44, which was 
turned over to the Ladies' Soldiers' Aid Society. 
Wm. Markscheffel was Treasurer of the Club. 

Fifth Ward.— "The Fifth Ward Recruiting Club" 
was organized February 1, 1865, with Wm. Hall as 
President; O.W. Dawson as Secretary ; J. T. Newton 
as Treasurer, and Fred. Witker as Assistant-Treas- 
urer. The emergency of an impending draft, stimu- 
lated action. Of $8,000 needed, $4,000 was raised on 
the spot. February 4th, was published the names of 
enrolled men who had not contributed in aid of the 
Clul). June 2d,' was published the final report of the 
Club, showing receipts to the amount of $14,521.00, 
of w'hieh $10,781 was from subscriptions, and $3,300 
in City bonds. Among expenditures, were $13,895, 
and $283 discount on City bonds. Of the contribu- 
tions, $3,055 was from citizens of the Ward not liable 
to draft. 

Sixth Ward. — Two reports from this Ward were 
published. The first in February, 1865, showed re- 
ceipts to the amount of $2,283, including $1,725 in 
subscriptions, and $558 as City bounty. Of this, 



TBE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



113 



$2,100 was paid for six recruits. The second report, 
in March, 1865, showed, receipts, $2,492.33, and ex- 
penditures, $2,712.-50, inchiding $2,655 for 14 recruits; 
leaving a deficiency of $220.17. The Treasurers of 
the Club were R. I. Skidmore and James Raymer. 

In 1862, Provost Marshals were appointed 
at different points in Ohio, Charles Kent, of 
Toledo, being among those selected, who served 
until the close of the War. 

On occasions of ditferent drafts for Army re- 
cruits during the Rebellion, more or less of res- 
idents of the County, filed with Provost Mar- 
shal Kent, claims for exemption from Military 
Service, on the grounds of over-age, phy,sical 
disability, subjection to foreign powers. Rail- 
road employment and Government Civil Ser- 
vice. 

To October 1, 18fi2, Lucas County had fur- 
nislied 2,562 recruits for tiie Union Arm}' ; all 
of them having been Volunteers — a large por- 
tion having received bounties from public and 
private sources. 

When the 14th Ohio Regiment passed through 
Norwalk on its way to the field, a private Sol- 
dier stepped from the car to the platform at 
the depot, when a young Miss, quite lame, ap- 
proached and presented him with a bouquet of 
fresh flowers, to which was attached the name, 
" Nellie Mason." Deeply affected by this un- 
expected mark of respect from one so entirely 
a stranger to him, he accejjted it gratefull}-, 
and, as he returned to the car, he said : " You 
shall hear from me." He passed on to the 
camp and the field, and months elapsed before 
anything was heard from him. Finally he 
sickened, and after wearisome days he became 
satisfied that he never should return to liis 
friends. But he did not forget his promise to 
Nellie, and when the end seemed near, his 
mind returned more and more strongly to the 
scene at the Norwalk depot, longing more and 
more that his pallid brow might feel the gentle 
hand that bore to him the sweet bouquet. And 
then, how could he redeem his pledge? When 
life was nearly extinct, and the honorable dis- 
charge so many gallant Soldiers receive was 
nearlj- his, he settled his accounts, and finding 
about §60 of his wages lett, he placed it in the 
hands of a fellow-soldier, with his dying in- 
junction to bear to Norwalk and personally 
deliver it to Nellie. Inquiry was recently 
made as to the donor of the bouquet, when it 
was found that she was the daui<liter of Alex- 



ander Mason, formally of Norwalk and Tiffin, 
and now of Lima; that her present name is 
Mrs: Nellie McConachie; and that she never 
received the Soldier's gift, nor otherwise heard 
from him. 

November 14, 1864, Governor Brough issued 
an earnest appeal to the Military Committees 
of the several Counties of the State, in behalf 
of the needy families of Soldiers in the Army. 
In response to such call, the committees of 
Lucas met and resolved to take immediate 
action in the case. They appointed a special 
committee, consisting of General J. E. Ilunt, 
D. E. Gardner, C. A. King, L. L. Morehouse, 
Wm. Taylor, and H. D. Warren, to prepare 
and issue an appeal to the people of the County 
in behalf of such object. This duty was per- 
formed. November 26th was set apart as a 
day of festival, for the distribution of such 
contributions of money, food, clothing and fuel, 
as should be made. Local Committees, in the 
several wards and townships, were appointed 
to solicit donations. These were as follows : 

Toledo— J^irs( IFard, Wm. Baker, C. A. King, Colo- 
nel J. S. Norton, A. Stephan ; Second Ward, T. B. 
Casey, E. Kibbe, Rev. E. B. Raifensperger ; Third 
Ward, H. S. Walbridge, D. B. Smith, Paul Jones; 
Fourth Ward, Wm. Kraus, L. M. Skidmore, W. \V. 
Griffith ; Fifth Ward, M. Shoemaker and J. J. Baird ; 
Si.rlh Ward, James Raymer and I). A. Bi-own. 

Manmce — R. B. Mitchell, Joseph Hull and Wm. 
Limbrick. 

Waterville — J. M. Brigham, C. C. Brainard, John 
Batt, Alex. Walp and Y. Rakestraw. 

Providence— John Wilson, A. B. Mead and Mr. 
Crosby. 

Su'cmton— W. A. Scott, W. D. Herrick and J. C. 
Wales. 

Moncloru — J. McDonald, John Weible and Louis 
Metzger. 

Spencer — Wm. Taylor, Wm. Shaffer and — Cole, Jr. 

Richfield — Pliny Lathrop, Isaac Washburn and Ben- 
jamin Farley. 

Sylvania — Peleg T. C'lark, Wm. H. Huling and E. 
Gordinier. 

Springfield — Hiram Wiltse, Perry Wood and Dennis 
Sage. 

Washington — S. L. Collins, J. W. Kelsey and N. 
Ashley Whitney. 

Adams — Harvey Kellogg, Hiram Haughton and P. 
Larkins. 

Manhattan — P. J. Latsbaw, Jonathan Wynn and 
J. L. Chase. 

Oregon — C. A. Crane, James IMesser and Lutlier 
Whitmore. 

On the 3d of June, 1865, at the Toledo Board 
of Trade rooms, and in the j)resence of a large 



114 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



number of members and other citizens, a gold 
watch was presented to Colonel P. B. Slevin, 
on behalf of the officers and men of the l«Oth 
Ohio Infantry, that gentleman liaving been 
comjiellod by a severe wound, to relinquish the 
command of the Regiment. 



No part of the grand and multiform work 
of the sujipression of the Eebellion and the 
preservation of the Union, will stand out in 
history more noble and heroic, than will 
that borne by the loyal Christian Women of 
the United States, in the moral and physical 
care of the Soldiers of the Union. It is with- 
out the approach of a parallel in human expe- 
rience in the magnitude and munificence of its 
provision. It is due as simple justice to the 
memory of Florence Nightingale, and the true 
Women of England who co-operated in her 
heroic and unprecedented work during the 
Crimean War, to say here, that their noble ex- 
ample operated largely in suggesting the more 
ample and extended service of their worthy 
American Sisters. This is not the place to at- 
tempt a history of that branch of the country's 
patriotic Army ; but it is proper briefly to 
recognize something of what was done in that 
direction by a few of the loyal Women of Lucas 
County, which may be taken as but a sam]de 
of like devotion throughout the loyal States. 

On the 9th of October, 1861, a few of the 
Women of Toledo met and organized The 
Toledo Soldiers' Aid Society, under circum- 
stances not the most assuring of success. It 
vs-as a movement so entirely new in this coun- 
try, that the mass of the people had to be edu- 
cated to a just understanding of its importance 
and of its methods. But the Toledo pioneers 
had faith in both the merits of their plan and 
the final approval and co-operation of their 
neighbors. For means for operations, reliance 
was at first had on the membership fee of any 
sum over 25 cents; but this soon proved to be in- 
adequate, when (November 5th) a festival was 
given, and on the 6th, a dinner. In the Win- 
ter a " Continental Tea Party " met with good 
results. In April following, 8321.50 was col- 
lected, which, with other receipts, aggregated 
for the first year, $1,852.91. Before that year 
closed, the~plan of the Society was made to 
embrace the care of Soldiers' families at home, 
as well as of the Soldiers in the field. Amono- 

o 

the items of expenditure for the first year, were 



these : For hospital stores, $1,142.74 ; for arti- 
cles for hospitals, $105. .37 ; money to Soldiers' 
families, §112.98; money to invalid Soldiers, 
834.50; hotel bills of invalid Soldiers, S89.22. 
Hospital supiJlies wei-e sent to the following 
Camps : Oliver, Toledo ; Worcester, Norwalk, 
Ohio; and Calvert, Ky.; to hospitals at Nash- 
ville, Louisville, Lebanon, and Pittsburg 
Landing; to the Cincinnati Sanitary Commit- 
tee, and the Ohio Relief Association, Washing- 
ton, D. C; and to the following Regiments: 
The 14th, 25th, 27th, 38th, 49th, 67th, 84th, 
100th, and 111th Ohio Infantry, and to the 1st 
and 2d Tennessee Regiments. In addition to 
the $1,852.91 stated, the County, through this 
Society, disbursed to Soldiers' families the sum 
of $1,266. 

The first year's trial was hopeful and en- 
couraging in its results, and the second year 
proved even more so. The popular a])precia- 
tion of the work was increased, with corre- 
sponding readiness to aid, the total receipts 
being $3,652.84, of which $815.07 was from do- 
nations, including $500 from " a gentleman 
unknown," and $423.93 as proceeds of a Fourth 
of July dinner, prepared by the members of 
the iSociety, with assistance. This year closed 
with $1,163.27 in the treasury. During this 
year supj)lies were forwarded to the 55th, 27th, 
111th, 67th, and 14lh Ohio, and the Anderson 
Guards ; to the Ohio Association at Washing- 
ton ; to Union Refugees at Cairo (caro of 
Chaplain John Eaton), fOr destitute "Contra- 
bands;" to Union Refugees at Springfield, 
Mo.; to General Hos2)ital, Lexington, Kj-.; and 
to Cumberland (Md.) Hospital. Special men- 
tion is made of the fact, that Mr. John Gavin 
(with Bell, Holcomb & Co.) had, during the 
year, mailed and marked every box and barrel 
of stores sent away by the Society, refusing 
compensation for such service. 

At the suggestion of the Toledo Soldiers' Aid 
Society, the citizens of Toledo furnished the 
14th Ohio Regiment with a sujierb stand of 
colors, manufactured to order at Chicago, and 
costing $130. The same was presented in 
March, 1862. 

The Seeretary's report for the third year 
(1863-64), said : 

As memVjers of the ToUmIo Soldiers' Aid Society, 
we may congratulate each other on the marked suc- 
cess which has attended our efforts during the year. 
The average attendance at the general meetings has 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



115 



been greater than ever before ; the donations have 
been larger and more spontaneous ; and the work ac- 
complished far beyond our expectations. Our Aux- 
iliary Societies have been untiring in their eflbrts, 
and very liberal in their contributions, and have 
rendered most efficient aid, in the making of hospital 
garments. * * Barrels of Blackberry Syrup have 
been made by our Auxiliaries, they, in most cases, 
supplying the juice of the roots and berries, and we 
furnishing the sugar, spices and brandy. 

Most of this year's contributions went to the 
Cincinnati Branch of the U. S. Sanitary Com- 
mission, but all special calls for aid were met. 
In November, 162 families of Soldiers were 
pi'ovided with Thanksgiving dinners, the cost 
of which was about S900. The rooms of the 
Society were kept open on Wednesdays and 
Saturdays throughout the year, with ladies in 
attendance to wait upon calls and receive do- 
nations. The receipts of the j'car amounted to 
$2,(596,81, and the disbursements, 81,537.07, 
leaving a balance of $1,159.74. Shipments were 
made to the 55th, 67th, 100th, 111th, and 130th 
Ohio Kegiments ; to hospitals at Louisville, 
Nashville, Chattanooga, and Camp Nelson; 
to the Cincinnati Branch of the U. S. Sanitary 
Commission; to Ohio Military Agents at Wash- 
ington and Louisville; and to Quartermaster- 
General of Ohio. 

On Thanksgiving Day, 1863, the Toledo 
Soldiers' Aid Society furnished such of the 175 
families of Union Soldiers in the City as 
were accessible, with a dinner. The donation 
consisted of 8 lbs. fresh meat (as preferred), 2 
lbs. butter, 2 lbs. ground coffee, 4 lbs. sugar, 1 
head of cabbage, 1 peck of jjotatoes, and 10 lbs. 
of flour. 

January 8, 1864, a levee was held at the Oli- 
ver House, J. D. Bourne, Manager, for the 
benefit of the Toledo Soldiers' Aid Society, the 
net receipts of which amounted to $600. The 
thanks of the Society wore tendered to differ- 
ent parties contributing to the success of the 
occasion, including James C. Hall, proprietor 
of the Oliver House, and Misses Mary Hamil- 
ton, Lottie Steele, Anna Colton and Lottie 
Haskell, who acted as ticket-sellers. 

With the fourth year of the Society's labors 
but half completed, the War, and with it, 
largely, the demand for sxich labors, had ceased; 
but its operations were maintained until the 
close of that year (1865). The Secretary's re- 
port very justly congratulated the members of 



the organization on the work accomplished. 
It said : 

In all the demands made upon our time, our labor 
and our money— in all the inconveniences and an- 
noyances, which, of course, are inseparable from 
efforts of this kind— we have had one great source of 
joy and satisfaction. We have never doubted the 
utility of this and kindred organizations. We know 
that our work was not in vain. We were strong in 
the consciousness that our "Boys" did enjoy the 
comforts we provided. We look back upon the days 
and weeks in which we have been associated here, as 
the golden period of our lives. The almost unbroken 
companionship of four years is now closed. Let us 
never forget those whose necessities have occupied 
so large a share of our time and thoughts. Let not 
the sight or the name of a Union Soldier ever fail to 
command our highest respect— our deepest gratitude. 
They all deserve a thousand times more than we gave 
them ; for they have secured for us the freedom of 
our bondsmen, the safety of our homes and country, 
and the respect of the civilized world. 

In her final report, the Corresponding Sec- 
retary (Mrs. E. P. Osborn) said : 

Much of our success as a Society, is due to the un- 
tiring energy and singular self-devotion of our first 
President (Mrs. Samuel A. Raymond). Quick to de- 
vise and prompt to execute, she gave all her time 
and ability to the duties of her office. Her strength 
failed, and with health seriously impaired, she was 
compelled to see others complete the work she had 
so judiciously and faithfully begun. Her mantle fell 
upon worthy shoulders, and those who have since 
assumed the duties of the principal offices, have 
served faithfully and ably. 

While eulogy is not a special work of the 
compiler of this volume, it cannot be improper 
here to say, that the above recognition of the 
services of Mrs. Eaymond was just. Many 
names might properlj' be added to hers in the 
same connection; but those of two should not 
here be omitted. First, that of Mrs. E. Perigo, 
whose long, diversified and self-sacrificing 
works of labor and personal kindness, are in 
the memories and hearts of very many Soldiers 
and Soldiers' families. She has passed from 
the scenes of earthly needs and earthly cares, 
and it cannot be indelicate to say, that to no 
resident of Toledo were the Soldiers more in- 
debted for the good offices of this Society, than 
to her. Second, it dow becomes eminently 
fitting in behalf of the memory of the faithful, 
untiring and efficient Secretary who penned 
the foregoing testimony to the Society's first 
President's faithfulness, and who also has 



116 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



passed from earthly labors, to bear witness in 
this connection to her fidelity and great use- 
fulness. The name of Mrs. O.sborn will long- 
be recognized by Soldiers and families of Sol- 
diers, as that of a true and sympathizing friend. 
Many other true women — some dead and some 
yet living — though less prominent, were no less 
devoted to the cause of the Eepublic and to 
the support and comfort of the Republic's 
defenders. 

The total of cash receipts of the Society for 
the four years, was $10,079.90, with disburse- 
ments amounting to §9,653.55 ; leaving a bal- 
ance on hand of 1376.35. Among the donations 
to Soldiers' families, and to sick and disabled 
Soldiers, was §1,923.62 in cash, and orders for 
provisions, $224. Included in the hospital 
stores prepared by the Society, were 239 bed- 
ticks, 295 pillow-ticks, 677 pillow-cases, 625 
sheets, 2,448 shirts, 1,092 pairs drawers, 1,219 
pairs socks, 16,210 yards (9 miles) of bandage, 
145 rolls cotton and linen, 629 cans fruit, 25 
barrels dried apples, 2^ barrels blackbei-ry 
syrup. 

OFFICEHS OF THE SOCIETY. 

Presidents.— Mrs. S. A. Raymond, one year ; Mrs. 
J. T. Newton, one year; and Mrs. J. M. Gloyd, two 
years. 

Vice Presidents. — Mrs. E. Perigo, four years; Mrs. 
J. N. Stevens, one year; Mrs. J. M. Gloyd, one year; 
Mrs. E. S. Phelps, one year ; Mrs. Calvin Bronson, 
one year. 

Secret.\ries. — Corresponding — Mrs. E. P. Osborn, 
tbi'ee years ; Miss Mary D. Chase, Secretary one year 
and Assistant one year. Recording— Mrs. Alex. Reed 
and Mrs. M. R. Waite, first year; Mrs. Alonzo God- 
ard, two years ; Mrs. E. B. Atherton, one year. 

Treasurers. —Mrs. Chas. E. Winans, and Miss E. 
R. Bissell, first year; Miss E. R. Bissell and :Mrs. M. 
R. Waite, second year ; Mrs. Waite, third and fourth 
years. 

Directors. — Mesdames M. D. Carrington, Wm. 
Kraus, Chas. Cochran, Fred. Eaton, Geo. R. Haynes, 
S. H. Bergen, J. T. Newton, Calvin Barker, John J. 
Barker, Dr. Bigelow, T. C. Mayhew, Ebenezer Wal- 
bridge, C. A. Crane (East Toledo), H. A. Ensign (East 
Toledo), L. L. Morehouse (Waterville), John Sinclair, 
A. D. Pelton, Dennison Steele, E. P. Bassett, Wm. 
Baker, D. E. Merrill, M. Rathbun (Maumee), G. W. 
Reynolds (Maumee), Limbrick (Maumee), Perrin 
(Perrysburg), Westcott (Perrysburg), C. 0. Brigbam, 
Edson, Mary Walbridge, N. M. Landis, G. W. Davis, 
Wm. Taylor (Java); and Misses Cannie Mott, Dicks 
(Maumee), Tracy (Tremainsville), Emily J. Ray- 
mond, Belle Hammell, and Kate Shoemaker. 

On Committees.— Mrs. Nehemiah Waterman, Mrs. 
W. W. Williams, and Messrs. John Gavin, Geo. Has- 
kell, J. H. Moulton, and D. II. Miner. 



The following names of ladies contributing 
articles for the Soldiers' Aid Society of Toledo, 
in November, 1861, will show who then were 
among the friends of the Soldiers in tliat City : 

Mesdames Joseph K. Secor, Chas. E. Winans, J. 
J. Hunker, Lyman Casey, Fred. Eaton, Denison 
Steele, D. E. Gardner, J. G. Fulton, J. E. Hunt, 
Edson Allen, J. R. Osborn, F. J. King, J. McKenster, 
Mary Walbridge, H. S. Walbridge, Wm. Rofl', W. W. 
Hunt, J. M. Gloyd, E..S. Hanks, E.D.Nye, John 
Kaufl'man, E. B. Rafl'ensperger, W. W. Sherwood, 
Geo. R. Crane, David Smith, T. C. Stewart, D. E. 
Merrill, Calvin Bronson, G. Bush, Alfred Wilkin, 
D. C. Baldwin, E. M. Smith, Luther Whitney, Geo. 
F. Dunning, B. F. Mallett, A. Godard, P. B. Truax, 
A. D. Pelton, Clark Waggoner, Mavor Brigham, S. 
H. Bergen, B. W. Rouse, A. H. Newcomb, Wm. 
Kingsbury, Henry Bennett, John Sinclair, F. J. 
Scott, H. D. Kingsbury, F. L. Nichols, J. N. Stevens, 
Harry Chase, Wm. Mack, Wm. Bolles, Chas. Kent, 
M. R. Waite, R. P. Ainger, Ira E. Lee, A. L. White, 
S. A. Raymond, T. B. Casey, C. B. Phillips, E. B. 
Hj'de, Geo. Stebbins, D. B. Scott, C. S. Crossman, 
J. W. Walterhouse, A. W. Maddocks, Peleg T. Clark, 
C. H. Parsons, H. B. Hall, C. D. Woodruff, Thos. 
Daniels, Henry INIcHenry. 

Misses Elizabeth R. Bissell, Sarah Brown, Jessie 
Jones, Alice Carrington, Julia Fitch, Tinie Bidette, 
Mattie Hofi'man, IMaggie Tredwell, Lena Morton, 
Mary Blackwell, Ann Sisson, Cannie Mott, Sophie 
Hill, Lottie Haskell, Carrie R. Waggoner, Hattie 
Mather, Eliza Spencer, Mary Kingsbury, ]\Iartha Bid- 
die, Nellie Collamore, Julia Steele, Lottie Steele, 
Mary Hayes, Lucy Hamiltim, Abbie Sexton, Maria 



The work of the Toledo Society after the 
first year, was materially promoted by the 
generous co-operation in labor and contribu- 
tions from the several Auxiliaries, to wit: 
Those of Maumee City, Waterville, Sylvania, 
Whitehouse, Swanton, Bryan, Monclova, Genoa, 
Washington Township (Districts Nos. 6 and 
8), Springfield and Adams, Juvenile Aid, Young 
America Aid, and Excelsior Aid. 

The untiring zeal of the ladies was also ma- 
terially stimulated by the constant return to 
them of thanks for their unremitting devotion. 
These came in letters from both officers and 
men — in camp, in field, and especially in hos- 
pital. Among the articles forwarded to the 
Louisville Hospital in June, 1864, were a lot of 
"Comfort Bags," containing different articles 
useful to the invalids. These were contributed 
by young misses of Toledo, and one of them 
contained the name of the maker, with the re- 
ijuest that the invalid into wiiose iiands it 



I 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



117 



might fall, should address to her a letter. In 
due time, such response came, from which the 
foliovving is taken, to wit: 

Louisville, Ky., June 30, 1864. 
To Miss Mnria Raymond, Soldiers' Friend, Toledo, 0.: 

Through the kindness of Captain Horn, the worthy 
Military Agent of the noble State of Ohio, your pack- 
age, containing many needful articles, fell into my 
hands, and in accordance witli your request, I now 
write to acknowledge its receipt. You can scarcely 
imagine how much it pleases us Soldiers, to see that 
we are remembered by our ever-thoughtful lady- 
friends at home ; and when you contrast their be- 
havior with that of the sece.sh ladies (?) in this and 
in every other Southern Town, can you wonder in 
whose favor we are prepossessed ? If you could only 
sit in the office of your Agent here for half a day, and 
see the anxious crowds to whom he deals out your 
Sanitary stores, you and your co-laborers would be 
pleased with the results of your work. The sick and 
wounded are being sent here in large numbers from 
the Army of the i umberland, and as a general thing, 
each one needs some little thing for his comfort; and 
if the giver could only see the smile that lights up 
his wan countenance, as he receives his share, all 
trouble would be repaid. 

Hoping this will find you laboring in the good 
cau.se, I remain, in unshaken confidence in the integ- 
rity of the old flag. 

Your Unknown Soldier Friend, 

H. S. Private, Co. G, 21st Wisconsin. 

On the 28th of October, 1864, " Sergeant 
E. H. W." forwarded from Toledo to the Sol- 
diers' Aid Society, Zanesville, Ohio, an empty 
" Comfort Bag," with a letter, stating how 
much good the contents of the bag had done 
to the sick comrades to whom he had given 
them, while serving about Petersburg and 
Eichmond, the preceding Summer. The let- 
ter was published in the Zanesville Courier, 
with a reply forwarded to the Toledo corre- 
spondent, by Mrs. D. C. Smith, Secretary of 
the Zanesville Society, in which she said : 

Wlien our men are bravely defending our homes 
and rights, I feel that we, too, have a work to do ; 
aud I believe the women of America are doing much 
to alleviate sufi'ering humanity, so that it may be 
said of very many, " She hath done what she could." 
Our own Society has done well — so well, that the 
Secretary of the Christian Commission at Cincinnati 
writes me that we have done and are doing, more 
than any other Society in the State ; and yet, nearly 
all the work devolves on about six ladies. 

In January, 1865, the ladies of the First 
Congregational Church, Toledo, organized a 
Christian Commission, Auxiliary to the United 
States Commission, for the Army and Navy, 



and elected oflScers as follows: President, 
Mrs. Mary Walbridgo ; Vice President, Mrs. 
J Austin Scott ; Secretary, Mrs. J. S. Lyman ; 
Treasurer, Miss Carrie Eaton. The amount 
raised by memberships was $150, of which 
^140 was turned over to the Branch of the 
United States Commission for Northwestern 
Ohio. 

In December, 1861, the ladies of Waterville 
organized a Soldiers' Aid Society, of which 
Mrs. W. C. Daniels was the President, and 
Sarah E. Morehouse the Secretary. Among 
the contributors to the Society, were Messrs. 
L. L. Morehouse, H. H. Wakeman, George 
Eeed, John Batt, J. H. Stadden, John A. Flagg, 
C. N. Brewster, J. F. Taber, John Webb, 
Abner Brainard, A. Eakestraw, C. E. Schnei- 
der, E. W. Gillett, Jacob Christman, Geo. Beis, 
Oscar Ballou, Geo. Latham, Thos. Pray, J. E. 
Hall, James Marston, Paris H. Pray, S. C. 
Brainard, Wm. H. Dyer, Wm. Morehouse, 
Phillip Boyer, B. W. Lenderson, Henry Bern- 
thistle, J. Winters, A. Cobleigh, E. Stark- 
weather, J. M. Brigham, Harry Hauford, and 
E. Burchard ; and Mrs. Mary Sly, Mrs. John 
Hain, Mrs. Di-. Pray, Mrs. E. Hutchinson, Mrs. 
Hilton, Miss Maria Haine, Miss Catharine 
Haine, Miss Alice Morehouse, and Miss Malina 
Whitcomb. 

The loyal men and women of Washington 
Township organized a Soldiers' Aid Society, 
October 11, 1861, of which the following named 
were members : 

]\Iary P. Whitney, Horace P. Whitney, Wm. Rich- 
ards, Mrs. W. R. Richards, Noah A. Cone, Milton 
Whitney, Edwin Richards, Carrie Whitney, Henry 
Richards, Sarah Goodrich, Lucy Whitney, F. V. Bush, 
Libbie Bush, Maria Bush, Mary Richards, Dr. B. H. 
Bush, Mrs. Dr. Bush,CorneliaStebbins, W. T. French, 
B. B. Roberts, Mary Bishop, Edwin Bishop, Charles 
Green, H. F. Sturtevant, George Jones, Frank Lane, 
J. W. Clark, H. C. Nicholas, Mr. Copeland, J. D. 
Pomeroy, A. H. Clark. 

The officers of the Societj; were : 

President, Mrs. Mary P. Whitney ; Vice President, 
W. T. French; Secretary, F. C. Bush; Treasurer, 
Amelia Bishop. 

Committees.— Purchasing— H. P. Whitney, and 
Mrs. W. Richards. Cutting— Mary Bisho]) and Lucy 
Whitney. 

The first anniversary of this Society was 
held in October, 1862. The annual report 
showed the following articles to have been 
sent to Ohio Eegiments in the field: 



118 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Bed ticks, 21 ; pillow ticks, 21 ; pillow cases, 28 ; 
sheets, 8 ; quilts, 3 ; filled pillows, (i ; shirts, 87 ; arm 
pads, 20; socks, 5 pairs ; uiittens, 25 pairs ; towels, 
10 ; napkins, 4 ; handkerchiefs, 2 ; bandages, :!,024 
yards; lint, 92 boxes; old linen, 12 rolls; old cotton, 
2 rolls ; dried apples, 58 pounds ; fruit, 14 cans ; con- 
centrateil chicken, 42 quarts ; grated horse radish, 10 
buttles; wine, 10 bottles; dried cherries, 8 packages; 
cloves, 1 package; farina, 1 package; soap, 1 pack- 
age ; ginger snaps, half a bushel ; toast, 1 bari'el ; 
volumes, 14; papers and magazines, 27 packages ; 
stationery, 1 package. 

Ill this connection the following list of arti- 
cles contributed for Company K, 25th Ohio 
Infantrj', chiefly by ladies of Washington 
Township, with assistance from Adams Town- 
sliip, in October, 1861, will be appropriate, as 
showing how such supplies were gathered for 
the Soldiers of the Union by their friends at 
home : 

Solon Haughton, 1 Soldiers' blanket, overcoat and 

shoes. 
Miss Adelia Haughton, cash, 15.00. 
Miss Ruth Haughton, cash, $5.00. 
Lyman Haughton, 3 undershirts, 3 blankets, 1 pair 

drawers, 1 pair boots, pants, coat and 2 vests. 
W. Haughton, cash, §3.00. 
S. Haughton, cash, $5.00. 
Miss 0. Haughton, cash, $1.00 and 1 blanket. 
O. Haughton, 1 flannel shirt and $2.00. 
Electa and Frank Haughton, 15c each. 
Hiram Haughton, $10.00. 
M. Chittenger, cash; $.5.00. 

C. Waterbury, cash, $5.00. 

D. Covert, cash, $1.00. 

Mrs. Thomas Secor, 1 pair socks, 1 woolen blanket 

and 50c. 
Mrs. Acres, 2 pair socks. 
Mrs. J. White, 1 pair socks and 50c. 
Mrs. Comstock, 1 woolen blanket. 
Mrs. Foreman, 1 pair woolen blankets. 
Miss W. Parker, $3.00. 
Sirs. L. Parker, 1 pair shoes. 
Mrs. H. Miner, 1 quilt, 1 pair socks. 
Mrs. S. Miner, 1 pair woolen blankets, 1 pair wool 

socks, and 1 neck comfort. 
Mrs. Hoag, 1 pair socks, 1 wool quilt. 
F. Linencole, cash, 2.ic. 
Mrs. Holcombe, 1 pair socks and 50c. 
Jlr. Kellogg, 50c. 
Joseph Kellogg, 8c. 
Mr. Covert, cash, $1.00. 
J. Hooker, cash, $1.00. 

E. N. Smith, cash, $3.00. 
Al. Morgan, cash, $2.00. 
Mrs. Lane, 2 pair socks. 
Mr. Schramer, cash, $2.00. 

Wm. Richards, 3 blankets, 1 pair boots, and cash 
$8.00. 



Mrs. Bush, 1 quilt, 2 pair socks. 

H. Brown, $2.00. 

Samuel Blanchard, $1.00. 

Mrs. Evans, 1 shirt, 1 pair drawers, 1 pair boots, 3 
pair shoes, 1 blanket. 

J. Aiken, cash, $1.00. 

C. Covell, cash, $1.00. 

H. Leybourne, cash, $1.00. 

J. Potter, 1 blanket, 1 pair socks, 2 shirts. 

J. G. Cass, 1 quilt, 1 rubber coat, 2 pair socks, 1 pair 
drawers, 1 shirt, 1 quire paper, 1 package envel- 
opes, 1 neck comfort. 

C. Crabbs, cash, $2.00. 

E. Thomas, cash, 50c. 

J. Glan, 1 blanket and cash, $1.00. 

H. Glan, 1 blanket and cash, $3.00. 

J. Hoag, $1.00. 

Mr. Searls, $1.00. 

Cone Brothers, 2 j^air drawers, 4 pair socks, 2 shirts, 
1 quilt, 1 undershirt and 2 yards of oilcloth. 

Ira Haughton, 1 coat, 1 pair jiants, 2 pair drawers, 1 

quilt, 1 pair boots, 1 pair mittens, 2 pair socks. 

Mrs. J. S. Whitnev, 2 wool quilts, 2 pair socks, and 
$1.30. 

Mrs. Trowbridge, $1.00. 

Mrs. Knights, 1 quilt and 25c. 

Mr. Green, 1 blanket. 

Mrs. Porter Whitney, 2 oil capes, 2 quilts, 1 pair 

socks and $1.00. 
Mrs. N. A. Whitney, 1 quilt, 1 pair socks. 
S. S. Ketcham, 1 pair socks, 2 shirts, 1 pair pants, 

and 50c. 
J. Lester, $1.00. 
A. Johnson, $2.00. 
M. Whitney, $1.00. 
Mrs. Green, 1 blanket. 

5. Green, $1.00. 
E. Cone, |1.00. 
Miss Miller, $1.00. 
Mrs. West, $2.00. 

R. E. Richards, $1.00. 

Mrs. Bishop, 1 pair socks. 

Mr. L. Bissell, 1 blanket. 

J. Micham, $2.00. 

Mrs. S. Ten Eyck, 1 pair socks. 

Mrs. C. Ten Eyck, 1 quilt. 

Mrs. B. F. Joy, .$3.00. 

Mrs. Hasty, 1 blanket. 

Mrs. Wilson, 1 quilt. 

Mrs. Barga, 1 quilt. 

Mrs. D. Mills, 1 quilt. 

Mrs. H. Miller, 1 quilt. 

Mr. Etting, $2.00. 

H. Stebbins. G5c. 

W. R. Richards, 1 pair drawers, 2 pair socks. 

J. Reynolds, 1 undershirt. 

6. Goettell, 1 pair socks. 

H. A. S. and A. M., 2 pair socks. 

Mrs. C. F. Johnson, 11 pair socks; by contributions 
solicited, 18 pair socks, 2 pair drawers, 2 wool 
undershirts, 2 pair mittens, 1 scarf, pins, needles, 
thread, etc. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



119 



Mrs. Merrill, 1 bundle, to son. 

Mrs. Mulliken, 1 pair socks. 

Mr. Sisson, 5 pair socks. 

Mrs. Damn, 1 bundle, to son. 

Mrs. Mulbollaud, 1 shirt, 2 pair socks, 1 neck comfort. 

H. B. W. and W. E., 75c. 

N. C. Kellogg, 1 pair boots, 1 shirt, 1 pair drawers, 2 

pair socks, 3 pair gloves, paper, envelopes, and 

$1.00. 
D. A. Merrill, 1 box and $1.00. 
Mrs. Sprooleken, 1 shirt, 2 pair drawers. 
Jlrs. BakeT, 1 shirt, 1 pair drawers, 2 pair socks, 1 

pair gloves. 
F. Whitney, 2 pair socks. 
F. Lang, 1 pair drawers, 4 pair socks, 1 blanket, and 

$1.00. 
L. Beoghold, 1 blanket, 3 pair socks, 1 pair drawers, 

and $1.00. 
Mrs. Lang, 1 shirt. 

Mrs. Graham, 2 blankets, 2 pair socks. 
Mrs. Wilkinson (collected), 1.5 pair socks, 3 shirts, 9 

pair drawers, 4 (|uilts, 1 oil-cloth, 6 packages, 1 

overcoat. 
Mr. Grant, 1 oil-cloth, 1 iiuilt, 3 pair socks, 1 pair 

drawers, 1 shirt. 
Mrs. R. A. Scott, 1 shawl, 2 pair drawers, 2 shirts, 2 

pair socks, 1 pair mittens, 1 pair overshoes, 1 

pound tobacco. 
C. Woehler, 2 shirts and 2.5c. 
Mrs. Love, 25c. 
Mrs. J. Brown, 1 pair pants, 1 shirt, 2 pair socks, 1 

pair boots. 
Irwin Brown, 50c. 

The express charges on these articles to Grafton, 
Virginia, amounted to $26.66, which sum was con- 
tributed by difl'erent persons. 

lu 1864, the President of the Washington 
Township Soldiers' Aid Societj', received let- 
ters from Army Hospitals in the South, ac- 
knowledging receiirt of supplies sent by that 
organization. Extracts from these will indi- 
cate something of the character of the work 
the loyal women of the North were then doing 
for the " Boys in Blue." A letter from Mary 
Jewett, of Division Eight, Nashville General 
Hospital, under date of March 27th, said: 

Would that you might know how acceptable were 
the pickles and apple sauce. 1 have just sat down 
from a tour through the wards, and tlie men all think 
there never were such pickles made before. The 
dried apples are furnished in part, at least, by the 
Commissary, but the other articles are luxuries in- 
deed. Oh! you cannot know how it goes to ni}- 
heart to have a patient ask for a thing I cannot give 
him, or how my heart gives a bound when he calls 
for something our little stores afford. 

April 22d, the same writer said : 

Yesterday came your nice, little tightly-packed 
box, in splendid condition. Miss Chase was unable 



to be up, so I went with an Orderly into the lower 
hall where we unpack goods, and it was not long 
before there was a circle around me of " our Boys." 
Contrary to our usual custom, I gave out some of 
them as I unpacked them. They were all most accept- 
able. Taking an armful of the horse-radish, 1 distrib- 
uted the bottles around on the convalescents' tables, 
so the Boys had a good relish for their dinner. The 
papers I immediately distributed among the men. 
The socks are much nicer than those we get at the 
Commission, and are worth a dozen pairs of " Gov- 
ernment." The currant wine (a little of it), I put 
with ice, and a poor low patient, whose father was 
watching anxiously by him, was cheered and 
strengthened by it. The barberry preserves put a 
" good taste " into the mouth of more than one pa- 
tient. 

The ladies at the North are doing more than they 
think or dream of. Many a patient from this hospital 
has been saved to friends and country by the thou- 
sand-and-one little articles prepared by Northern Aid 
Societies. 

The stores from your Society have come through 
more directly than from other places. In the name 
of our many Soldiers let me thank you and your So- 
ciety for the acceptable shipments already received. 

A meeting of ladies of Washington Town- 
ship was held at the Prairie School House, 
October 3, 18G3, for the purpose of adopting 
measures for procuring a flag for Company G, 
1st Eegiment, O. V. M., raised in that Town- 
ship. Mrs. A. C. Harris was President, and 
Mrs. H. C. Perry the Secretary. The chair 
appointed the following committee to circulate 
subscription papers for the purpose named : 
Mrs. Geo. Mallett, Mrs. Giles Mallett, Miss 
Miranda Granger, Miss Sarah Dixon, Miss 
Anna Poseland, Miss Cobb, Miss Sarah L. 
Bailey, Miss Ann Aldrich, Miss Carrie Ley- 
bourn, Miss Clara Bush, Mrs. Thos. Secor, 
Miss Haughton, Miss Lucy Whitney, and Mrs. 
N. Haughton. A committee, consisting of 
Miss Haughton, Mrs. N. Haughton, and Miss 
Cousins, were appointed to make arrangements 
for the flag. Miss Ruth Haughton was the 
Treasurer. 

The Ladies' Freedmen's Aid Society of 
Toledo was organized March 27, 1865, with the 
following officers: President, Mrs. W. W. 
Griffith ; Vice Presidents, Mrs. John Sinclair, 
Trinity Church ; Mrs. Matthew Brown, First 
Congregational Church ; Mrs. Geo. Tanner, 
German M. E. Church ; Mrs. Fred. Valentine, 
Ames Chapel; Mrs. R. R. Foulkes, St. Paul's 
M. E. Church. Treasurer, Mrs. Plympton 
Buck, St. Paul's M. E. Church. Secretary, 



120 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Mrs. Alonzo Godard, First Congregational 
Church. This Society was auxiliarj'^ to the 
Western Freednien's Aid Commission. At one 
time it forwarded goods and money of the 
value of $1,610.15, for the use of the Freed- 
men of the South. There was at that time also 
in Toledo, the Colored Ladies' Freednien's Aid 
Society, which made contributions to the same 
object, as also did the Colored School, then 
separate fi-om the Schools provided for white 
children, but which ceased to exist whea 
colored children were admitted to all Schools 
in 1871. 



From the beginning of the War until the 
Summer of 1862, the Government had been en- 
abled, with the effective co-operation of loyal 
citizens, to fill its Army by volunteering. At 
the latter date, however, the demands for re- 
cruits became too great to be met in that wa}', 
and the coercive agency of the draft was found 
necessary, chiefly as stimulation to volunteer- 
ing and the provision of substitutes by these 
liable to draft. On the 1st 'of July, the Presi- 
dent had called for 300,000 three-years' troops, 
which call was in progress of execution, when, 
early in August, he issued a requisition for 
300,000 one-year men. The effect of this last 
call, was greatly to alarm such persons subject 
to draft as had expected to escape through vol- 
unteering by others; and they were moved to 
devise ways and means for relief from such 
unpleasant situation. Along the Northern 
border, Canada at once became a locality of in- 
terest to this class; and soon a manifest tide 
of emigration Northward set in, which in- 
creased with the increasing danger of a draft. 
The Government, by the order of the Secretary 
of War, sought to check this movement, and 
to some extent succeeded in such object ; but 
it could not be wholly repressed. The " Ske- 
daddlers," as they soon came to be called, in 
greater or less numbers found their way "over 
the border," under the flag of Britain. The 
local authorities of Cities on and near to the 
Canada line, did what they could to co-operate 
with the Government ; but it was not practica- 
ble to accomplish very much in that direction. 
On the 9th of August, 1862, the Toledo City 
Marshal arrested at the Union Depot, 13 pas- 
sengers arriving by the Dayton & Michigan 
Eailroad, and took them to the Police Station. 
They were en route for Canada. At the Police 



Court, each gave an account of himself and the 
object of his journeyings ; but none confessed 
to " skedaddling." No evidence being pre- 
sented that they were deserters from the Mil- 
itary Service, they were discharged. 

This sudden emigration to Canada, was 
largely made up of Irish residents, some of 
whom were naturalized citizens, and many 
were not. For the purpose of relieving their 
nationality of such shame, a number of promi- 
nent Irish citizens of Toledo, August 11, 1863, 
had jjublished the following card, to wit : 

To Die Public: 

The undersigned, citizens of Toledo of Irish birth, 
having heard that, in anticipation of a draft to fill the 
Armies of the Union, large numbers of persons are 
leaving or attempting to leave the country for Can- 
ada, take this method of expressing our utter con- 
demnation and detestation of such conduct, so cow- 
ardly and treacherous. 

Beneath the glorious flag of the Republic, citizens 
of Irish birth have enjoyed protection and immunity 
for life, property, and religious opinions and worship 
— freedom, which, in the oppressed land of their na- 
tivity, they could not expect to enjoy; and we rec- 
ognize in its fullest extent, the duty of defending the 
honor of that flag, wherever or by wliomsoever as- 
sailed. We hope that no Irishman has attempted or 
will attempt to evade the call of his adopted country, 
when his arm is needed to defend her. 

The undersigned would advise and request the 
Irish citizens of Toledo to put their shoulders to the 
wheel, and help the great and glorious old flag — the 
Stars and Stripes — out of her present trouble, by rais- 
ing one or more Volunteer Companies to till the call 
made by the President. That flag has at all times 
stretched the hand of Liberty to the oppressed of all 
Nations. Irishmen ! come to her aid ! .She has 
called for your help, to put down the Traitors who 
are ready to sell our liberties back to the hated of all 
flags— the British flag. Let there be no more saying, 
" This is an Abolition War." The President has 
stood, and is bound to stand by the Constitution, and 
like good citizens, let the Irish .stand by the Consti- 
tution and the President in his noble efl'ort to put 
down the Rebellion. 

Dennis Coghlin. Declan Allen. 

James McGallaghan. John D. Crennan. 

Thomas Tuey. P. H. Blake. 

Thomas O'Neil. M. Howard. 

John Mulhenny. Wm. J. Finlay. 

James Callagiian. Patrick Gavin. 

Thomas Tiernan. Charles Sinclair. 

John Gildea. Fred. J. Cole. 

Dennis Hart. Patrick Clear. 

Barney O'Farrell. Thomas Morris. 

Will. Larkins. Jlorrough O'Brien. 

Patrick Flynn. Thomas Henry. 

Edward Connelly. Charles O'Hara. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION —HOME WORK. 



121 



F. O'Farrell. 
Thomas Gregory. 
Patrick Conlisk. 
Patrick Malonc. 
John Byrne. 
Patrick Galloway. 



John McKinney. 
John T. Mahcr. 
John H. Moore. 
Edward Malone. 
Michael K. Doyle. 
Barney Malion. 
Toledo, August 11, 1803. 

The " Skedaddler " was recognized in verse 
by a poet of the time, as follows : 

LAY FOR SKEDADDLERS. 
A.1R—A11 tlie Blue Bonnels Over the Border. 

Run, run, Yankee and foreigner- 
Run, run, my lads, never mind going in order. 
Run, run, conscripts and colored men- 
All Skedaddlers en route for the border- 
Many a Copperhead, 
Not liking steel or lead ; 
Many a " Unionist," famous for bluster. 
Mount and make ready, men ; 
Here comes the draft again ; 
Fly for security over the Border. 
Run. run, etc. 

Come from your homes where you are sure to be drafted— 

Trust to your heels to escape from the foe ; 
Come to the laud where you will ouly be laughed at ; 
Come where you still can continue to blow. 

Trumpets are braying 

Conscripts are praying ; 
Gird up ^ur loins and run in good order ; 

Canada '11 many a day 

Tell of the fuuny way 
JIany a Skedaddler went over the Border. 



Here is an original contribution from the 
Toledo Blade of December 24, 18()4, written 
at a point in the Eebellion when the final suc- 
cess of the cause of the Union was well assured : 

VICTORY ! 

We sing to Thee, O God ! this night, 
A song of praise, that in Thy might 
Thou strikes! down the foes of right 

And Freedom's cause ; 
That from the chaos of the hour 
Thou bringest forth a beauteous flower— 
An Olive— from the peaceful bower 

Of higher laws; — 

That from the blood-staiued battlefield, 
Where centre hopes we'll never yield. 
So long as Thy right hand shall wield 

Thy Sword of Truth- 
Assurance comes that Freedom's stars 
Shall still bedeck the crown she wears ; 
While ' neath her lustre lurk no scars 

To mar her youth. 

Let mourner, who for hero weeps. 
Who loves the spot where valor sleeps. 
Or tender watch ' round loved ones keeps, 

Come join our song ; 
God save the Union ! Save the land, 
Blighted not by treason's band, 
Firm in Thee, a Sister band, 

Forever Strong. Quiz. ■* 

The true poet could hardly have more fitting 
subjects or more inspiring incidents to awaken 

* Judge J. H. Doyle, of Toledo. 



his muse, than were furnished by the events 
of the struggle for the Nation's life; and most 
frequently and fittingly were these improved. 
Among the pi'oducts of the occasion, was the 
following, which made the rounds of the press 
without due credit to its author : 

SOMEBODY'S DARLING. 

luto a Ward of the white-washed halls. 

Where the dead and dying lay. 
Wounded l>y Ijayonet, shells and balls. 

Somebody's Darling was borne one day. 
Somebody's Darling, so young and so brave, 

Weariug yet iu his pale sweet face, 
Soon to be hid by the dust of the grave, 

The lingering light of his boyhood's grace. 

Matted and damp are the curls of gold, 

Kissing the snow of the fair young brow ; 

Pale are the lips of delicate mold- 
Somebody's Darling is dying now. 

Back from his beautiful blue-veined brow. 
Brush all the wandering waves of gold ; 

Cross his hands on his bosom now— 
Somebody's Darling is still and cold. 

Kiss him once, for Somebody's sake; 

Murmur a prayer both soft and low ; 
One bright curl from its fair mates take— 

They were Somebody's pride, you know. 
Somebody's han<l hath rested there — 

Was it a Mother's, soft and white'? 
And have the lips of a Sister fair. 

Been baptized in the waves of light'? 

God knows best ! He was Somebody's love : 

Somebody's heart enshrined him there; 
Somebody's wafted his name above 

Night and morn, on wings of prayer. 
Somebody wept, when he marched away, 

Looking so handsome, brave and grand. 
Somebody's kiss on his forehead lay. 

Somebody clung to his parting hand. 

Somebody's waiting and watching for him— 

Y' earning to press him again to her heart ; 
But there he lies with his blue eyes dim, 

With his smiling child-like lips apart. 
Tenderly bury the fair young dead, 

Pausing to drop on his grave a tear; 
Carve in the wooden slab at his head — 

" Sonic6odi/'s Darling slumbers here.** 

Nor should the " Contrabands" of the South, 
who in 1864 had risen to the dignity of 
" Freedmen," be passed without recognition of 
the jubilant litei-ature with which they gave 
expression to the joy which President Lincoln's 
Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 18(j3, 
brought to them. Here is a sample of such, 
which was sung by that class in Mississippi: 

OLD SHADY. 

Oh ! ya, ya ! Darkies, laugh with me ; 
For de White Folks say old Shady's free ! 
Don't you see dat de jubilee 

Is comin', ccmin' ! Hail mighty day I 

CHORUS. 

Den away, den away ; for I can't stay any longer; 
Hurra, Hurra I for I am going home. [Bepeat.] 



I 



122 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Miissa got seared, and so did his lady ! 
Dis chile brolce tor ole Uncle Ahy ; 
Open de gates out ! here's old Shudy 

Comin', comin' ! Hail, mighty day ! 

CliOKUS— Jfep«a<. 

Good-bye, Massa JoflT! good-bye. Missus Steveus! 
' Sense dis Nigger for taking his Icabins'. 
' Spec, prettj- soon, yon'll see Vncle Abram's 
Comin', comin' ! Hail, mighty day ! 

CiioKUS— J?epca(. 

Good-bye, hard work, and nebber any pay— 
I'm gdin' up Norf. where the White Folks stay ; 
White wheat-bread and a dollar a day ! 

Comin', comin' ! Hail, mighty day ! 

Chorus— iJcpeo*. 

I've got a wife, and she's got a baby, 

W'ay up Norf in Lower Canady — 

Won't dey shout when dey see ole Shady 

Comin', comin'? Hail, mighty day ! 
Chori's— ii:e;>(;a(. 

No less appropriate here, will be the follow- 
ing ditty, sung by Uncle Sam's Colored Infan- 
trj-, on their joyous march into and through 
Petersburg and Eichmond, early on the morn- 
ing (April 19, 1865) following the surrender 
of Lee at Appomatox : 

Say, Darkies, hab you seen de Massa, 

Wid de muiTstash on his face, 
Go 'long the road some time dis morniu', 

Like he'sgoin' to leab de place? 

He seen de smoke way up de ribber 

Where de Linkum gunljoats lay : 

He took his hat and leab berry sudden. 

And I 'spose he's gone away. 

De Massa run, ha ! ha ! 

De Darkey stay, ho ! ho ! 
It must be now de Kingdom Comin', 
An' de yar ob Jubilo. 

He's six foot one way and four foot todder, 

An' he weighs six hundred poun'. 
His coat's so big he couldn't pay de tailor, 

An' it won't reach half way roun'. 
He drills so much dey calls him Cap'n, 

An' he gits so mighty tan'd. 
I spec he'll try to fool dem Yankees 
For to tiuk he's " Contraband." 
De Massa run. ha ! ha ! 

De Darkey stay, ho ! ho ! 
It must be now de Kingdom Comin', 
An' de yar ob Jubilo. 

The song, "John Brown's Body," first be- 
came known soon after the opening of the 
Kebellion. This came about chiefly through 
the singing of the medley by Union Soldiers. 
It received a special send-oif from the Webster 
Begiment, made up chiefly of the more culti- 
vated young men of Boston, who surprised the 
conservative jjeople of that City by singing it 
through their streets in August, 1861. As then 
produced, it was as follows : 

John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the grave; 
John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the grave : 
John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the grave; 
His soul goes marching on ! 



CAOTOS— Glory Hally Hallelujah ! Glory Hally Hallelujah ! 
Glory Hally Hallelujah ! 
His soul 's marching on ! 

The substratum of the balance, omitting the 
repetition and refrain, was: 

He 's gone to be a soldier in the army of the Lord — 
John Brown's knapsack is strapped upon his back— 
His pet lambs they will meet him on the way— 
They will hang Jefl'. Davis to a sour apple tree ! 
Now, three rousing cheers for the Union I 
As we are marching on ! 

Cho.— Glory Hally Hallelujah ! Glory Hally Hallelujah ! 
Glory Hally Hallelujah ! 
Hip, Hip, Hip, nip, Hurrah! 



While it might be invidious and unjust to 
claim that any one State of the Union did 
more, in proportion to its means, than did any 
other State, for the defense of the Union in the 
hour of its sorest trial, it is deemed entirely 
safe to assert, that in such resfiect Ohio stands 
abreast the foremost of her Sisters, She did 
her duty, and that is all the best possibly could 
do. From the first signal of rebellion rung out 
at Charleston Hai'bor, the Buckeye State was 
alive with both indignation towards the trea- 
son and activity and earnestness fer its sujj- 
presaion. And the sentiment of loyalty and 
promptness in action which marked her course 
at the outset, were not the mere ebullition of 
the moment; but were shown throughout the 
four years of persistent rebellion. While 
prompt in response to calls for men and means 
for the support of the Militaiy operations of 
the Government, she was no less conspicuous 
in the maintenance of the no less essential aid 
of a sound public sentiment. No State did 
more to cheer the hearts of the Soldiers of the 
Union, by the assurance of an earnest sj-mj^a- 
thy and devoted co-operation, than did Ohio. 
It was claimed — with what justice cannot here 
be asserted — that the Foui'teenth Ohio Volun- 
teers, was the first Eegiment accejJted by the 
Government; while her force of Volunteers 
recruited for the three-months service, was 
fully one-fourth in number ot the entire call 
of the President. 

The report of the Provo.st- Marshal General, 
prepared after the clo.se of the War, showed, 
that from April, 1861, the date of the Presi- 
dent's first call, until December, 1864, when 
the last call (for oO(i,0()0 men) was made, Ohio 
had furnished 311,4H3 men. These were en- 
listed for different periods of service — fi'om 100 
days to five years — but reduced to a three- 
years standard, they represented 237,076 men. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



123 



Under the call of May, 1864, the State furnished 
84,116men, although her quota was only 67,365. 
Under the call of July 2, 1862, she furnished 
58,325 men, when her quota called for but 
36,858. The number of Colored men enlisted 
in the State was 5,002, and of Sailors, 1,016. 

Of the 317,433 Ohio Soldiers, 78,219 suffered 
some casualty or left the field before the expi- 
ration of their terms of service, as follows : 
Killed, 11,237; died of disease, 13,554; honor- 
ably discharged, 16,031 ; deserted, 12,609 (less 
than four per cent.); dishonorably discharged, 
105 (less than one-third of one per cent.); dis- 
charged for disability, 21,880. Officers resigned, 
4,804; officers dismissed, 157; officers cashiered, 
16. 

The citizens of Ohio paid ?4,908,087.53 com- 
mutation to escape liability to draft and to 
avoid service when drafted. In addition to her 
share of $300,000,000, which it cost the General 
Government to obtain 2,500,000 of Soldiers, 
Ohio, in her State capacity, and through 
county and other organizations, paid $23,500,- 
000. The total vote of Ohio in 1860, was 
442,441. Comparing this with the number of 
troops furnished, it will be seen that the equiv- 
alent of about 75 per cent, of her voting Jiop- 
ulation wore in the field in defense of the Union. 
Including those from Ohio who enlisted in other 
States, it would probably be found that the 
number would nearly, if not quite, reach the 
entire voting population. 



During the War of the Eebellion,the readers 
of home papers were largely indebted to intel- 
ligent and observing Soldiers for rejjorts of 
movements in the field, so far as these could 
properly be given. The Toledo Blade was 
highly favored in that respect. Among those 
who, to greater or less extent, sent such corre- 
spondence, were the following named persons : 

Chaplain John Eaton, jr., 27th Ohio, as "J. E. Jr." 

Charles E. Bliven, as " Pen Lever." 

Chaplain E. B. RafFensperger, 14th Ohio, as " E. 
B. R." 

Samuel S. Read, Secretary of General J. B. Steed- 
man, as "Erie." 

Wui. A. Ewing, Battery H, 1st Ohio Light Artil- 
lery, as "Wanderer." 

Captain Reed V. Boice, 67th Ohio, as " R. V. B." 

Henry T. Bissell, Adjutant 111th Ohio Infantry, as 
" H. T. B." 

Ralph H. Waggoner, l.'jOth Ohio, as " Dolphus." 

Lieutenant Geo. M. Ballard, 67th Ohio, as "G.M.B." 



Captain John C. Cochran, ()7th Ohio, as "J. C. C." 

Chaplain Geo. A. Adams, Uth Ohio Cavalry, iis 
"G. A. A." 

Colonel J. AV. Paramore, 3d Ohio Cavalry. 

Major Lewis Butler, 67th Ohio. 

Captain James A. Chase, 14th Ohio. 

Dr. Robert Johnson, Assistant Surgeon lOOtli Oliio. 

Rev. J. Crabbe, Chaplain t)7th Ohio. ' 

Jonathan Wood, 14th Ohio. 

Colonel H. N. Howland, od Ohio Cavalry. 

Henry G. Burr. 

Martin B. Ewing, Battery Shields. 

Wm. H. Perigo, Battery H. 

Captain J. Kent Hamilton, 113th Ohio. 

Captain Henry G. Neubert, 14th Ohio. 

Rev. L. M. Albright, from Chattanooga. 

Dr. Charles Cochran, Volunteer Surgeon, at Pitts- 
burg Lauding, April, 1862. 

Captain Hartwell (Jsborn, o5th Ohio. 



The surrender of Lee's Eebel forces at Ap- 
pomattox, took place April 9, 1865. The next 
day a meeting of citizens of Toledo was held 
at the Board of Trade Rooms, to consult in re- 
gard to the manner of complying with the 
request of Governor Brough, for proper com- 
memoration of the close of the Rebellion. 
Harrj' Chase was the Chairman, and Chas. T. 
Wales of the Blade, and Stephen J. Meaney of 
the Commercial, were the Secretaries of the 
meeting. Measures were taken for such object, 
but ere the time arrived for the proposed ex- 
ercises, the assassin's hand laid President Lin- 
coln in death, whereby the day of rejoicing 
and thanksgiving was suddenly changed to 
one of sorrow and sadness. Accordingly, the 
day appointed for celebrating the great Na- 
tional victory in the defeat of armed Rebellion, 
was devoted to an extent of mourning never 
before known in Toledo. The Blade's report 
of the occasion was substantially as follows: 

The request of the authorities that the people of 
this City should observe a portion of the day in ap- 
propriate religious exercises, was complied with, but 
the time mentioned did not suffice for such an ex- 
pression of the public feeling as the majority deemed 
appropriate, and, instead of a suspension of business 
for four hours during the middle of the day, from 
morning until night the stores on Summit street were 
closed, and employers and employes engaged in the 
exercises on the street and at the different houses of 
worship, and afterward refrained from all worldly 
pursuits for the remainder of the day. 

From early morn until evening the City presented 
a most gloomy appearance. Kearly every building 
on Summit .street was draped in black — Hags in the 
City and of the shipping in the harbor floated at half- 



124 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



mast, and many of them were draped in mourning, 
while on all the back streets, the dwellings showed 
that the inmates partook of the general sorrow, and 
in whatever direetion the eye turned there was evi- 
dence of universal grief. 

At the hour specified the ujeiiibers of the First 
rtegiuient National Guards assembled at the corner 
of Summit and Cherry streets, and each company as- 
sumed its appropriate place in regimental line. While 
this was being done, citizens were arriving at the 
place designated for organizing the procession, and 
when the military arrangements were completed, 
there wore several thousand on the ground awaiting 
assignment to places in the procession. Among these 
were several Fire t'ompaniesand other CivicSocieties, 
some of them wearing tlie regalia of the Order tii 
which they belonged, and all wearing crape on the 
left arm. 

Under the direction of Colonel John R. Bond, ]\Iar- 
shal of the Day, and his assistants, Colonels D. F. 
DeWolf and N. M. Howard, the procession was soon 
completed, and the word being given, the march 
commenced in the following order: 

Union Silver Band. 

Field Oflieers 1st Regiment O. N. G. 

First Regiment Ohio National Guards. 

Provost Marshal and Assistants. 

Mayor and Conncil. 

The Toledo Board of Trade. 

Fire Department. 

Wapaukonica Lodge No. o7. I. O. O. F. 

German Saengerbnnd. 

Cierman Shooting Society. 

Ancient Order of Druids. 

Father Matthew Temperance Society. 

Disbanded Fire Companies. 

Citizens. 

The procession marched up Summit Street to Perry, 
thence to St. Clair, down St. Clair to Monroe, :Monroe 
to Summit, and thence to Madison street, in front of 
the Post Office, where it was massed for the purpose 
of hearing addresses. The streets through which the 
procession ]iassed were densely crowded with men, 
women and children, all of whom seemed to partake 



of the solemnity of the occasion, for there was an en- 
tire absence of that frivolity and noise which usually 
attend large gatherings of the people. The bells were 
tolled between the hours of 9 and 11 a. m., and their 
melanchoh' tones, mingled with those of the Union 
Silver Band, added to the solemnity of the occasion. 
The various organizations, which constituted the 
larger part of the procession, made a fine ajipearance. 
The members of the First Regiment t)hio National 
Guard, by their martial bearing, showed that their 
military experience of last summer had not been for- 
gotten, and, both as regards numbers and display, 
their turnout yesterday was exceedingly creditable. 
The different Civic Societies were out in full nundiers. 
Having arrived in front of the Post Office, Mayor 
Dorr called the meeting to order, and Hon. J. M. 
Ashley, Rev. Father Edward Hannin, Capt. Charles 
Kent and Louis H.Pike, Esq., addressed the audience. 
The speaking concluded, the immense concourse 
united in singing " Old Hundred," the benediction 
was pronounced by Rev. E. B. Raffensperger, and the 
members of the different congregations repaired to 
their respective places of worship. 

At the Churches the deepest solemnity prevailed. 
In each, the altar, jnilpit and walls were drajied in 
black, the effect of which, combined with the mourn- 
ful state of the public mind, rendered the occasion 
the most impressive ever w itnessed in this City. The 
discourses in the Churches were listened to with 
marked attention. The subject chosen by each Cler- 
gyman had reference to the loss which the Nation 
had suilered in the death of iMr. Lincoln, and the 
necessity of entrusting to Him who rules among the 
nations of the earth for the accomplishment of His 
ow'n wise purposes, the guidance of our affairs, and 
looking to Him for the preservation of the Republic 
and the fulfillment of our long cherished hopes of a 
permanent peace. 

In connection with the foregoing report, the 
Blade of Ain-W liOtb liad the following appro- 
priate tablet : 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— HOME WORK. 



125 



Zo tbe 
of 

"Hbrabam Xincoliv 



I 
I 



PKESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 

Who died a Martyr to his Countrj', 

Falling under the hands of a Traitor Assassin, 

Oil the night of the 14th day of April, 1865, 

The Fourth Anniversary of the beginning of the great 

WAR OF REBELLION, 

Through which he had led the Nation to a Glorious Triumph, 

Just comjjleted. when the Dastardly Revenge of 

Vanquished Treason was wrought in his monstrous murder. 



Tiie Great Republic loved him 

As its Father, 

And reverenced him as the Preserver of its National Life. 

The oppressed People of all Lands looked up to him 

As the Anointed of Liberty, and liailed in him the consecrated 

Leader of her Cause. 

He struck the chains of Slavery from Four Millions 

Of a despised Race, and with a Noble Faith in Humanity, 

Raised them to the admitted dignity of Manhood. 

ills Wisdom, his Prudence, his Calm Temper, his Steadfast Patience, 

His lofty Courage and his loftier Faith, 

He Saved the Republic from Dissolution ; 

By his Simple Integrity he illustrated the neglected Princijjles 

Of "its Constitution, and Restored them to their just Ascendancy; 

all tlie Results of his Administration of its Government, 

He Inaugurated a New Era 

In the History of Mankind. 

The Wisdom of his Statesmanship was excelled 

Only hj its Virtuousness. 

Exercising a Power which surpassed that of Kings, 

He bore himself ahvaj-s as 

The Servant of the People, 

And never as its Master. 

Too sincere in the Sim))licity of his Nature to be affected by an elevation 

The Proudest among Human Dignities, 

He stands in the ranks of the Illustrious of all Time as 

The Purest Exemplar of Democracy. 

While Goodness is beloved. 

And Great Deeds are Remembered, 

The World will never cease to Revere 

The Name and Memory 

o P 



By 



By 



Hbrabam Xincoliu 



" If God wills that this mighty Scourge uf War continue until all the wealth piled by the Bond- 
man's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood 
drawn by the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years 
ago, so still it must be said, that tlie Judgments of ' the Lord are true and righteous altogether.' " 



March 4th, 1865. 



ABRAHAM LI^X'OLN. 



CHAPTER VII. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION FIELD WORK. 



THE compiler of this Volume is not insensi- 
ble to the extreme delicacy of the duty de- 
volved upon him in the preparation of the sec- 
ond branch of Lucas County's record in defense 
of the Union. Full justice could be done the 
County, only by doing full justice to every cit- 
izen thereof who took an active part as a Sol- 
dier of the Union ; and that would be imprac- 
ticable. Record the most complete possible 
would not supply the data requisite for such a 
work; for the reason that human testimony 
could not reveal the qualities of such service 
which, after all, most truly bear witness to the 
Soldier's real merits— those of the heart. The 
best to be done is to present the actio7i of those 
who " went to the front," in such just light as 
may be practicable, leaving the reader to judge 
therefi'om as to the motives which, in each 
case, controlled such action. The greater 
prominence of particular individuals, is by 
no means conclusive proof of either superior 
service or superior mei'its. The obscure pri- 
vate, with nothing but the " enlisting papers " 
to bear witness even of his presence in the 
Army, often is entitled to higher honors than 
he whose promotion was sounded through 
the ranks and proclaimed bj' the public press ; 
but proof of this fact, is denied the world, and 
ma}" never have been known beyond the mod- 
est, unpretending consciousness of the obscure 
hero. It was the Private Soldiers — not their 
commanders — who suppressed the Rebellion ; 
and this fact cannot be too fully recognized. 
It was not the giving, so much as the execu- 
tion of orders, that controlled results. It is 
to the brave men who made the charges — not 
those who directed them — that the country 
is indebted chiefly for the manj' signal ad- 
vantages, and the final triumph, over treason's 
cohorts. Hence the writer's great regret that 
so little can be done toward the record so 
eminently due to the untitled heroes of the 
Union Army. It is a source of satisfaction, 
however, that to so large extent it has been 
found practicable now to present the names 



of Lucas County's " Enlisted Men " in that 
patriotic force ; the only regret being, that 
the list cannot be made more complete. With 
the imperfect sources of information, it is not 
possible to secure the names of all ; while in 
some cases those shown may not be correctly 
given. 

The special reference here made to the ser- 
vice of the Private Soldier, cannot properly 
be taken as in any sense depreciation of the 
qualities and record of those placed in com- 
mand, whether from this County or elsewhere. 
Officers and enlisted men are alike indis- 
jjensable to efficient work ; and both classes 
in their respective spheres are entitled to 
credit according to the fidelity of their ac- 
tion. Lucas County may justly point with 
pride to her representatives in both. With 
exceptions very rare, they loyally and effi- 
ciently met duty, as the same was made 
known, and thus contributed to the good rec- 
ord made. 

It will be the purpose briefly to present the 
organization and service of such Regiments 
and Companies as were raised in or largely 
contributed to from this County. In doing 
this, the most ready and reliable source found 
for information, is the work of Whitelaw Reid 
(" Ohio in the War "), which, though published 
soon after the close of war, is yet recognized 
as the mo.st full and correct presentation yet 
made of the State's share in the vindication of 
American Nationality. The rosters given of 
the several Regiments and Companies, are sup- 
plied mainly from the records in the State 
Adjutant-General's office, which are as com- 
plete as the returns of muster-out rolls made 
practicable. Omissions no doubt occur, as do 
errors in names, which are unavoidable from 
the imperfect data furnished by returning offi- 
cers, and the repeated copying of papers. 
Notwithstanding these fticts, it is believed the 
record here given will be found serviceable in 
showing something of what Lucas County did 
for the " Union and Liberty." 



[126] 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



127 



POUETEENTH EBGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEEE INFANTEY. 



part is not yet published 



Tlie official list of battles in which this Eegiment bore an honorable 
in orders of the War Department, but the following has been prepared after careful research: 
IN three-months' service. ~~ ' ' ^ 



Philippi, W. Va. 
Laurel Hill, W. Va. 
Carrick's Ford, W. Va. 



June 2, 1861. 
June 7, 1801. 
June 12, 1801. 



IN THREE-YEARS SERVICE. 



Wild Cat, Ky. . 
Mill Springs, Ky. 
Shiloii, Tenn. . 
Corinth, Miss. (Siege of) 



October 21, 1801. 
January 19-20, 1802. 
April 0-7, 1802. 
April 30, 1802. 



First in order of time, and first in jh'o- 
portion of Lucas County recruits, stands the 
Fourteenth Eegiment, which was raised almost 
wholly in the Toledo Congressional District, 
and veiy largelj' in Toledo and vicinity. In 
less than three da.y8 from the President's call 
for 75,000 men, this Eegiment was read}' for the 
field, being, as believed, the first Eeginient 
accepted bj* the Government. On the 25th 
April, 1861, and only 12 days from the attack 
on Fort Sumpter, this command left Toledo 
for Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, for comple- 
tion of organization and thorough drill. Until 
May 18tli it was a State Eegiment, and on 
that day was transferred to the General Gov- 
ernment. May 22d, it left Camp Taylor for 
Columbus, where it was provided with arms, 
and at once left for the field, reaching Zanes- 
ville and Marietta on the 23d. At the latter 
place, it went into Camp Putnam, and re- 
mained there until the 27th, when it embarked 
for Parkersburg, Virginia, where it first set 
foot on Eebel soil, and without opposition. A 
Company was double-quicked along the line of 
the Baltimore and Ohio Eailroad, the bridges 
of which bad been fired by retreating Eebels, 
upon the appearance of Union troops. On the 
29th the Eegiment advanced into Virginia, 
reaching Clarksburg on the 29th, having re- 
paired the Eailroad to that point, when trains 
were put in operation for bringing in supplies. 

June 2d the Eegiment took rail for the Town 
of Webster, whence it marched to Philippi, 13 
miles, on a dark, dismal, rainy night. Ar- 
riving at 5 A. M., a force of 2,000 Eebel Cav- 
alry in camp were surprised by the cannonading 
of the unexpected Union troops. Owing to a 
mistake which deprived the movement of a 
co-operating force from an opjjosite direction, 



Hoover's Gap, Tenn. 
Chick AM AUG A, Ga. 
Mission Ridge, Tenn. 
Ringgold, Ga. 
Dalton, Ga. 
Resaca, Ga. . 
Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. 
Utoy Creek, Ga. . 
Jonesboro, Ga. . 
Goldsboro, N. C. . 



June 27, 1803. 
September 19-20, 1803. 
November 2.5, 1803. 
November 27, 1803. 
May 9, 1804. 
May 13-16, 1804. 
June 9-30, 1864. 
August 5-7, 1804. 
September 1, 1864. 
March 21, 1865. 



it was not as successful as had been hoped for. 
But the superior Eebel force were most 
thoroughly frightened, and at once, in great 
disorder, took to the bushes and hills for es- 
cape, leaving their clothing behind. A few 
prisoners and several wagon loads of war 
material were taken by the invading force. 

On the 3d of June, the Fourteenth, in con- 
nection with the Sixteenth and Seventeenth 
Ohio, the Sixth and Seventh Indiana, and the 
First Virginia Intiintrj', went into camp near 
the Town of Philippi ; whence expeditions were 
sent in diiferent directions against guerrilla 
bands. On these marches, the men suffered 
severely from excessive exhaustion and lack 
of essential supplies — made the more severe 
by their entire lack of preparation for such 
service. The.se expeditions seemed to amount 
to little, having been induced by unwar- 
ranted alarm and false reports in regard to 
Eebel movements. 

The Eebels under General Garnett, began to 
show themselves at Laurel Hill, on the 7th 
June, when works were thrown up at Bealing- 
ton to repel their attacks, which soon followed, 
but were promptly repulsed. On the 12th the 
Eebels suddenly retreated, when the Union force 
moved out, the Fourteenth Ohio in the lead, 
and took possession of a Eebel fort, and rap- 
idlj^ advanced in jjursuit. So severely were 
the Eebels pushed, that they left baggage and 
supplies of every kind on the waj^. At Car- 
rick's Ford they were overtaken, and com- 
pelled to make a stand. The advance guard 
of the Fourteenth first reached them, when a 
shower of balls from the bluff above and oppo- 
site the stream, met the advance. The Four- 
teenth promptly responded in an effective 
volley, and in 20 minutes, and just as the first 



128 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Eegiraent of the main column of the Union 
force came up for action, the enemy gave way 
in confusion, throwing away whatever could 
impede their retreat. Among the fruits of 
this occasion, were 30 baggage wagons, well- 
laden, three stands of colors and 250 prisoners 
taken from the Kebels. The next day the 
Eegiment started for Philippi, where it ar- 
rived on the 15th July, on the way fording 
six streams, swollen by heavy rains. 

As a sample of the experience to which the 
Fourteenth was then subjected, it may be 
stated, that on Friday noon, June 14th, the 
Kegiment was ordered from Philippi toBuck- 
hannon, 20 miles distant, over one of the worst 
roads in the State, At Buckhannon they 
cooked breakfast, and rested for two hours 
only, when they were ordered back to Phil- 
ippi, and left at 11 a. m. Saturday, getting 
into camp at that place at 2 A. M. Sunday. 
Saturday was an intensely hot day, and so 
prostrated were the men, tliat the moment 
thev were within camp they dropped on the 
ground and were soon all asleep. During 
their return trip thej' had no food, save a 
single cracker apiece. And all this, because 
a fleeing young Kebel had written from Bev- 
erly to his girl in Grafton, that Gen Wise 
was in Beverly at the head of 9,000 Virginia 
troops. The girl showed the letter to Col. Der- 
raont, of an Indiana Regiment, who thereupon 
gave the order for the march referred to. 

At Laurel Hill the Fourteenth remained in 
camp until July 22d, when its term of en- 
listment having expired, it returned to Ohio. 
On the way, it was the object of much atten- 
tion, including many expressions of kindness. 
At Toledo, where the Eegiment arrived on the 
25th, a meeting of citizens had made arrange- 
ments for a fitting reception ; but such was 
the throng in attendance and the excitement 
of the occasion, that the programme provided 
could be but partially carried out. The Eegi- 
ment was received with every manifestation 
of pride and joy. Not the people of Toledo 
only, but many persons from other localities 
represented in that command were present. 

The loss of the Eegiment in service con- 
sisted of the following: In battle, two — Frank 
Gero and Samuel Mills. Accidentally killed, 
two— Captain Andrew Crawford and Lieuten- 
ant J. D. Belknap. The circum.stances of 
Captain Crawford's death were very painful. 



While as oflScer of the day, making the guard 
rounds one dark night, passing through a dense 
thicket he came suddenly upon a soldier on 
duty as picket guard, who, greatly frightened 
bv such sudden appearance, at once fired at 
the Captain, killing him instantly. The de- 
ceased was from Napoleon, Henry County, 
where he practiced law, and was much es- 
teemed. 

Immediately upon the return of the Eegi- 
ment, measures were taken for the enlistment 
for three years of such of its members as saw 
fit to " veteranize," and on the 25th Septem- 
ber it again left for the field, via Cincinnati. 
The day before its departure, a picnic was 
held at Camp Oliver, out Cherr^y Street, when 
5,000 to 6,000 people were on the ground, the 
Soldiers' tables being abundantly supplied by 
the ladies of Toledo. Crossing the Ohio to Cov- 
ington, Ky., it took cars for Lexington and 
Frankfort. On the way the train was as- 
saulted with stones, which broke windows and 
injured a few of the men. Two of the offend- 
ers were arrested, one of which in passing 
along the streets of Frankfort as prisoner, 
drew a large knife across his throat, which 
did not pi-ove fatal. The incident shows 
something of the spirit of disloyalty then in 
the South. From Frankfort the Eegiment 
moved by cars to Nicholasville, where three 
weeks were spent in drill. The next stop- 
ping place was Camp Dick Eobiuson, which 
was reached October 2d. At this point, it is 
said a Eegiment of loyal East Tennesseeans 
arrived, but to do so, the men were compelled 
to crawl on all-fours through the Eebel lines. 
With these were Andrew Johnson, United 
States Senator, and Horace Maynard, Con- 
gressman, from Tennessee, on their way to 
Washington. The former of these spent some 
time as a guest of the Fourteenth. 

While the Eegiment was at Camp Dick 
Eobinson, word came that a Union force at 
or near Wild Cat, a desolate locality some 
00 miles to the Southward, were surrounded 
by Eebels. With Barnet's First Ohio Artil- 
lery, the Fourteenth started for that point, on 
forced march, through mud and rain, ar- 
riving at 9 A. M. October 21st. Approaching 
thej^ heard the sound of artillery and mus- 
ketry, when amid great excitement they 
rushed to the point of attack. It was found 
that five Companies of the Thirtj- Third In- 



TEE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



129 



diana, on a wild knoll, were almost surrounded 
by Eebels. Under covei* of a brisk fire by 
Barnet's Battery two Companies of the Four- 
teenth, with shovels and picks, crawled 
through the bushes over a ravine, to the knob 
which they soon fortified so effectual!}', that 
the enemy abandoned the siege, and retreated 
toward London, Ky., leaving about 30 of liill- 
ed and wounded. The Union forces pursued 
the Eebels, who were commanded by General 
ZoUicotfer, a prominent politician of Kentucky, 
to a point near London, where the Union 
ti'oops went into camp for two weeks, when 
they proceeded to Lebanon, via Crab Orchard 
and Lebanon, and there went into winter 
quarters. 

December 31st the Camp at Lebanon was 
broken up and the march resumed, taking the 
route toward Somerset or Mill SjDrings. Zol- 
licoffer's force was met at Logan's Cross-Eoads 
and defeated, in which action but one Company 
(C, Captain J. W. Brown of Toledo) partici- 
pated. The Union troops pursued the Eebels, 
and drove them into their fortifications at Mill 
Springs. The night of January 19th was 
spent in cannonading the enemy's works, pre- 
paratory to the assault whicli followed early 
the next morning, whereby the Eebels were 
overwhelmed, with the loss of one Eegiment 
captured, 20 pieces of Artillery, and their en- 
tire camp equipage. The main body of tlie 
enemy escaped across the Cumberland Eiver, 
burning their Steamer as they left. The Four- 
teenth led the assault on the Eebel works, and 
was the first to enter ; as it also led in the 
pursuit of the flying enemy. This movement 
was among the most important, as it was 
among the most brilliant of the War to that 
period ; and as such it did much toward bring- 
ing the Fourteenth Ohio into honorable recog- 
nition. 

The Union forces remained at Mill Springs 
till February 11th ; when, with five days' 
rations, the line of march was resumed for 
Louisville, where they arrived on the 26th. 
Thence, with 20,000 other troops, it left by 
steamer for Nashville, which was reached 
March 4th. Here they remained until the 
20th, the meantime being employed in build- 
ing fortifications, and perfecting the drill of 
the men. At the date named, with General 
Buell as Commander, they left for the relief 
of Grant at Pittsburg Landing, where they 



arrived April 7th. A portion of the com- 
mand participated in the desperate fight 
which turned the tide against the enemy; but 
the Fourteenth was not there in time to take 
part in the battle, much to the disappoint- 
ment of officers and men. 

The Eegiment started on the niglit of the 
12th April on an expedition to Chickasaw 
Landing, near which five bridges were de- 
stroyed, amid severe skirmishes, whereby 
the enemy failed of expected re-enforcements. 
Thence the Eegiment returned by steamer to 
Pittsburg Landing. On board was General 
W. T. Sherman, who publicly thanked the 
men for the service they had rendered. Ee- 
joining its Brigade, the Fourteenth consti- 
tuted a jjortion of the large command under 
General Buell, on its march to Corinth. The 
only death in the Eegiment during the siege, 
was that of Frank Callern, Fifer, of heart 
disease. 

June 23, 1862, the Fourteenth, with other 
troops, was sent to luka, Mississippi, whence 
it marched to Tuscumbia, Alabama. After 
the performance of different kinds of service 
in that vicinity, it took the line of march 
toward Nashville, Tennessee. On the way, 
and near Waynesburg, Tennessee, General 
Eobert L. McCook was murdered by guer- 
rillas. September 7th Nashville was reached. 
On the 14th marching orders for Bowling 
Green, Kentucky, were received, the ob- 
ject being the pursuit of Bragg's Eebel com- 
mand, then moving on Louisville, which point 
was reached on the 26th. On this march the 
Fourteenth was under command of Major 
Paul Edwards, Colonel Steedman having been 
assigned to General E. L. McCook's late com- 
mand, and Lieutenant Colonel Este being 
absent on furlough. This march, owing to 
exti'eme heat and dry and dusty roads, was 
vei'y severe on the men. 

October 1, 1862, General Buell's Arm}- 
left Louisville, in pursuit of Bragg, the Four- 
teenth being in the advance. Bardstown was 
reached on the 3d. On the 0th the Brigade 
was detailed as headquarters and ammunition 
train-guard, and they were permitted to take 
part in the battle of Perryville on that day. 
Continuing the pursuit of Bragg, Buell 
marched through Danville and Crab Or- 
chard, where the movement was abandoned, 
and the forces turned their faces toward 



no 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Nashville. At Gallatin the Brigade, em- 
bracing the Fourteenth, went into winter 
quarters November 15th. While there the 
Regiment was repeatedly detailed for scout- 
ing duty against guerrilla (John Morgan's) 
Cavalry, with which several skirmishes were 
had, involving the loss of some men. Morgan 
was badly whipped at EoUing Fork, whereby 
a raid on Louisville was believed to have been 
prevented. January 13, 1863, the Regi- 
ment left Gallatin and arrived at Louisville 
the 15th. On the 17th the Regiment marched 
for Murfreesboro, as guard to an ammunition 
train, and returned to Lavergne, where the 
Brigade was engaged in fortifying against 
the enemy. 

June 3, 1863, the Fourteenth and Brigade 
left Lavergne for Triune, Tennessee, as a 
portion of General Eosecrans' advance on 
Tullahoma and Chattanooga. Twenty days 
were consumed at Triune in rigid drill, while 
awaiting the arrival of necessary supplies. 
Hoover's Gap Avas reached on the night of June 
26th, where the Brigade participated in a brisk 
engagement, losing 30 men in killed and 
wounded. On the 28th the vicinity of Tul- 
lahoma was reached. That night Captain 
Neubert's picket detail of the Fourteenth 
drove in the enemj^'s line of pickets, whereby 
he was enabled to get so near the Town as to 
discover that the enemy were evacuating the 
place, which information led to the advance 
of the Union force early the next morning. 
Elk River was crossed with great difficulty, 
that stream being quite deep, with a swift 
current, causing the drowning of several men. 
The command reached Sequatchie Valley, 
near Sweden Cove, August 18th. On the 
31st the Army crossed the Tennessee River 
by means of rafts, pontoons not being at hand. 
On the 19th the enemy were discovered in 
force on Chickamauga Creek, when the 
Fourteenth, under Lieutenant Colonel Kings- 
bury, was immediately deployed in line of 
battle, and were in hot and close contest with 
the enemy from 9 a. m. until 4 P. m., when, 
being relieved it replenished its ammunition 
and again entered the fight, which was con- 
tinued until sundown. All this with the men 
badly exhausted by the arduous march they 
had just made, but they were ready and 
cheerful in duty, despite such untoward con- 
dition. The following morning at 9 o'clock, 



the Regiment had a desperate encounter with 
a portion of Longstreet's Rebel Division. In 
consequence of a gap in General Thomas's 
line, the whole Union force was compelled to 
fall back to avoid severe defeat. It stopped at 
Rossville. 

September 21, 1863, the Fourteenth with 
its Brigade and Division, was all day in line 
of battle, but were again forced to fall back 
near to Chattanooga, the enemy closely fol- 
lowinir. The Regiment went into battle with 
499 men, of which it lost 233 killed, wounded 
and missing — 14 enlisted men being captured 
by the enemy. Of 14 officers in the engage- 
ment eight were severely wounded, including 
Captains Albert Moore, Company A ; H. W. 
Bigelow, Company I ; Dan Pomeroy, Com- 
pany D; W. B. Pugh, Company H ; J. J. 
Clarke, Company C ; and Lieutenant James 
E. McBride, Company F. Colonel Croxton, of 
Tenth Kentucky, commanding the Brigade, 
was severely wounded. 

During the ensuing beleaguerment at Chat- 
tanooga, a detail of 100 men of the Fourteenth, 
under Captain Neubert, was sent to Steven- 
son, Alabama, to procure rations, cro.ssing the 
rugged mountains for such pui'pose. The 
force set out on a march of 11 days with but 
one day's rations. The service was very se- 
vere, and after subsisting on j^arched corn, 
leaving more than half their wagons and 20 
dead mules on the road, the detail reached 
Stevenson. Ten of the 60 wagons with which 
they started out, were loaded with " hard- 
tack," and the return journey commenced. 
November 9th, and at the end of 25 days' 
absence, the detail reached Chattanooga, 
where its precious supplies were gladly wel- 
comed by their famished comrades. 

The Fourteenth bore a gallant part in the 
memorable assault on Mission Ridge, charging 
a Rebel Batterj' of three guns, under personal 
direction of General Hardee, losing 16 killed, 
91 wounded, and three missing. 

The Union forces started November 26, 
1863, in pursuit of the Rebel Army toward 
Ringgold, where the enemy made a stand. 
General Hooker's forces, being in advance, 
made a charge on the Rebels, but were re- 
pulsed. The Fourteenth Corps then came up 
and forming in line of battle, chai'ged the 
Rebel position ; but the enemy had fled toward 
Buzzard's Roost. The Fourteenth Ohio on 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



131 



I 



the 29th November, returned to Chattanooga, 
where it was reviewed by General Grant 
December 1, 1863. 

The Three- Years' enlistment of the Four- 
teenth having expired, all but 30 eligible men 
of the Eegiment re-enlisted for a second like 
term on the 17th December, 1803. Christmas- 
day was spent most actively in mustering in 
the men, and by hard work the rolls were 
completed that night. The Eegiment left for 
Bridgeport on the 31st December, where it 
took cars for Nashville, arriving there Janu- 
ary 2, 1864. This trip was made during the 
extraordinarily sudden and extreme change in 
the temperature on the night of the Slst De- 
cember, which, though most severe at the 
North, was not there near as distressing as at 
the South, and especially with the soldiers un- 
provided with requisite clothing. On the trip 
to Nashville the feet of several colored ser- 
vants belonging to the Eegiment were so badly 
frozen as to require amputation. 

From Nashville the Fourteenth, by cars, 
went to Louisville, and thence by boat to Cin- 
cinnati, arriving there January 4th. From 
that city it came to Toledo, arriving there 
January 5th. It was met at the Eailway depot 
by a large concourse of citizens, and wel- 
comed home in a speech by M. E. Waite, Esq., 
when they marched down Summit street to 
Adams, whence they returned to the Island 
House for dinner. The field officers at that 
time were: George P. Este, Colonel; H. D. 
King.sbury, Lieutenant-Colonel ; J. W. Wil- 
son, Major; Joseph B. Newton, Adjutant; 
Dr. George E. Sloat, Surgeon ; Dr. Charles A. 
Ames, Assistant Surgeon ; John W. Beecher, 
Quartermaster; Quartermaster's Sergeant, A. 
J. Morse; Commissary Sergeant, David Bow- 
ker; Musicians, Nathaniel G. Pierce and 
Henry Weitzel. The Eegiment left 110 
wounded and 38 sick in hospital at Chat- 
tanooga, Nashville, Louisville and Cin- 
cinnati. Sixty-six members did not re-enlist ; 
out of these 24 were rejected, largely from 
disabilities arising from wounds. Every 
wounded man having an opportunity, re- 
enlisted. 

The ofiScers and privates of the Fourteenth 
Ohio in December, 1864, contributed the sum of 
$210 for the benefit of the family of Private 
Peter W. Disbrow, Co. C, of that Eegiment, 
who was killed in the trenches near Atlanta, 



August 7th. Captain H. G. Neubert for- 
warded the amount to the widow. 

At the expiration of its 30-days' furlough, 
the Fourteenth left Toledo (February 6, 
1864) for Cleveland, and there went into 
camp, remaining about a week, when it started 
for Cincinnati and the field, reaching Nash- 
ville February 23d, and Chattanooga the 29th. 
March 5th the Eegiment moved to Einggold, 
where it had severe duty — the construction of 
corduroy roads, pickets, outposts, etc., between 
that place and Chattanooga. May 9th, with 
its Brigade, it moved on Dalton, driving the 
enemy's videttes to the vicinity of Tunnel 
Hill, where the enemy in force was encoun- 
tered. Here began the protracted and ex- 
hausting march of the Union forces for At- 
lanta, in which the Fourteenth bore its full 
share of fatigue and privation, as well as of 
frequent and severe skirmishing. It lost heav- 
ily in both oificers and men. At Atlanta the 
Eegiment lest 20 men in killed and wounded. 

August 26, 1864, commenced a flanking 
movement in the direction of Jonesboro, 
which reached the Atlanta and Western Eail- 
road, five miles from that point, on the 31st, 
where 200 prisoners were captured. The next 
day the Third Division of the Fourteenth 
Army Corps, in which was brigaded the Four- 
teenth, continued the advance, destroying the 
railroad track as it progressed. At 4.30 p. m. the 
Third Division (General Baird in command) 
confronted the enemy's works about Jones- 
boro. Third Brigade, in command of Colonel 
Este, of the Fourteenth Ohio, was drawn up 
iu immediate rear of a regular Brigade of 
General Carlin's Division, which had just made 
an unsuccessful charge on the Eebel works in 
the edge of the woods on the opposite side of 
a large cornfield. Colonel Este's Brigade (em- 
bracing the Fourteenth and Thirty-Eighth 
Ohio, Tenth Kentucky and Seventy-Fourth In- 
diana) was read J- for action, when its com- 
mander gave the order, " Battalions forward ! 
Guide center I " General Baii-d at the same time 
waving his hand for the " forward." Amid 
an intense shower of rebel balls the lines 
moved forward. Soon a batterj' of grape and 
cannister opened, but the Brigade did not 
he.sitate. The edge of the timber was gained, 
when, amid cheers and yells, the charge was 
made, the enemy's works gained, and a hand- 
to-hand conflict ensued. The Eebel force (of 



132 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



General Pat (Ucburne's Division) contested the 
ground inch by inch, and surrendered only 
after many had been killed in the desperate 
tight. The Fourteenth took as many prisoners 
as its own force numbered, together with a 
battery of four guns, several stands of colors 
and two lines of trenches full of men. This 
substantial success was not won except at 
heavy cost. The Third Brigade lo.st one-third 
of its number. In the ranks of the Four- 
teenth Ohio were 100 brave men whose terra 
of enlistment had expired, but who willingly 
volunteered for the desperate struggle in which 
some of them gave up their lives for their 
country. Stronger or nobler proof of patriot- 
ism or heroism could not be furnished. The 
names of men capable of such patriotic devo- 
tion should not be forgotten. 

The Third Brigade did not join in the pur- 
suit of the enemy from Jonesboro. The Four- 
teenth Ohio followed in pursuit of Hood's 
troops, on their advance into Tennessee, as far 
as Rome, Ga., when, the chase being aban- 
doned, the Brigade returned to Kingston, Ga., 
on the 6th November. Joining Gen. Sher- 
man's forces at Atlanta, the Regiment partici- 
pated in the " March to the Sea," and through 
the Carolinas to Goldsboro and Raleigh. 

At Raleigh was promulgated to the Union 
forces the glorious news of the surrender of 
Lee and the Rebel Army near Eichmond, as- 
suring the collapse of the Rebellion. Soon 
came like tidings of General Johnston. Noth- 
ing more being left of field service, the Four- 
teenth and its heroic associates started for 
Washington, where it joined the Grand Armies 
of the Union in the review before the Presi- 
dent and his Cabinet. 

June 15, 1865, the Fourteenth Ohio left 
Washington by rail for Parkersburg, Va., ar- 
riving there the 18th. Thence by boats it 
proceeded to Louisville, Ky., where it was in 
camp until July 11th, when, having been mus- 
tered out, it left for home, reaching Cleveland, 
Ohio, July 14, 1865. 

At Cleveland the Eegiment was received 
with special manifestations of enthusia.sm. 
Arriving at the Park, a welcoming address 
was delivered in behalf of the citizens by Eev. 
Dr. Goodrich, of the First Presbyterian 



Church, in the course of which the eloquent 
sjjeaker said : 

We bless the day which has brought you home. 
The country now needs just such citizens as you 
have been soldiers. We know your .services, how in 
the very dawn of the conflict you won an honorable 
name, and in the first campaign in West Virginia 
struck blows which forever after kept back from our 
own borders the invading hosts. 

We remember Carrick's Ford, where the day was 
won by a single charge of the Fourteenth Ohio, and 
we know the long course of toil and conflict and vic- 
tory in which you have borne your part with the 
bravest, and whose record is on your banners. And 
we remember that it was because you thus stood in 
the brunt of battle that we have dwelt in undis- 
turbed security, and possess all these liberties un- 
touched. We have lain down in peace and slept be- 
cause you were resting only on your arms, or pacing 
the weary round of the sentinel. We have gathered 
in these sanctuaries on the Sabbath and enjoyed the 
consolations of a Christian worship, because you, 
knowing no day of rest, have marched or fought or 
waited the assault, a« the God of Hosts appointed 
to you. All these peaceful industries have been ours ; 
these schools, these courts of law, unbroken in their 
course of usefulness, because you stood a serried 
rampart between us and anarchy. 

This has been your glorious work, and for it all we 
give )'ou this day our public tribute of gratitude. In 
old Rome, when peril came to the Commonwealth, 
the resort was always to a Dictator. One man, the 
strongest and ablest, was found, and to him it was 
given solemnly in charge that the Republic should 
receive no detriment. But we are not saved by one 
man. Our hope in the great emergency did not, 
would not, turn to any single soul, however great. 
It was to you we looked to save the Nation. To you, 
the volunteers of our Army, who .stood forth, the 
laud over, to defend the country, to all of you we gave 
the Republic in keeping. And your work is done — 
a greater work than you or we yet know. Genera- 
tions must pass before the true history of this war can 
l)e written, or the worth of your labor reckoned up. 

In the name of your fellow-citizens, I thank you 
and bid you welcome. As a llinister of Religion, I 
thank you for your defense of Christian justice, and 
your maintenance of Christian institutions. God be 
with you evermore. God bless you all. 

The Regiment was paid off at Cleveland and 
disbanded, a largo portion of its members 
i-eaching Toledo July 2l8t. Although no for- 
mal demonstration was made on the occasion, 
the veterans were received amid warm ex- 
pressions of admiration and thanksgiving by 
their families and citizens generally. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



133 



ROSTER THREE MONTHS' SERVICE. 



FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 



James B. Steedman, 
George P. Este, 
Paul Edwards, 
Edwin D. Bradley, . 
Henry D. Kingsbury, 
Marshall Davis, 
James McDemiller, 
Israel A. Coons, 
Waldo C. Daniels, 



Colonel. 

. Lieut.-Colonel. 

Major. 

Adjutant. 

(Quartermaster. 

t^uartermaster Sergeant. 

Principal Musician. 

Surgeon. 

Surgeon's Mate. 



COMPANY A. 

S. Backus Moe, Captain ; Wilbur F. Stopford, Lieut.; 
Frank N. Marion, Ensign ; Newton J. Doolittle, 1st 
Sergeant; Jas. H. Boggis, 2d Sergeant; Josiah W. 
White, 3d Sergeant ; Robt. F. Just, -itli Sergeant ; Ed- 
mond Paine, 1st Corporal ; Henry Roenier, 2d Corpo- 
ral ; Alpheus R. Rogers, 3d Corporal ; Benj. F. Card, 
4th Corporal ; Samuel H. Anderson, Drummer; Ar- 
thur L. Callard, Fiter. 

COMPANY B. 

Louis Von Blessingh, Captain; Jolin A. ('base, 1st 
Lieutenant; Wm. Schultz, 2d Lieutenant; Louis 
Koeppei, 1st Sergeant; Henr)' Seignier, 2d Sergeant; 
Phillip Breidt, 3d Sergeant; Ithamer Smith, 4th Ser- 
geant; Solon Haughton, 1st Corporal ; Caspar Peters, 
2d Corporal ; Anton Kraft, 3d Corporal ; Frank M. 
Fleck, 4th Corporal ; Gottfried Milverstedt, Drum- 
mer : Henry J. Hermance, Fifer. 

COMPANY c. 

Benjamin H. Fisher, Captain; Edwin . I. Evans, 1st 
Lieutenant; Edgar M. Deucher, 2d Lieutenant; 
Charles Greenwood, 1st Sergeant ; James H. Queen, 
2d Sergeant ; Henry Reichelderfer, 3d Sergeant ; Jas. 
H. Long, 4th Sergeant ; Samuel Hausey, 1st Corporal; 
Benjamin F. Conrad, 2d Corporal ; Charles Mallory, 
3d Corporal ; Henry Marshall, 4th Corporal; John 
W. Bowlin, Fifer. 

COMPANY D. 

Sidney I. Sprague, Captain; William Irving, 1st 
Lieutenant ; Charles Kahlo, 2d Lieutenant ; Ransom 
P. Osborn, 1st Sergeant ; WMlliam N. Rogers, 2d 
Sergeant; David A. Gleason, 3d Sergeant; Elijah 
Karnes, 4th Sergeant; Demetrous L. Bell, 1st Corpo- 
ral; Amiel Peachin, 2d Corporal; Jeremiah Hall, 3d 
Corporal; Lewis Cohlman, 4th Corporal; Christian 
M. Graham, Drummer; John W. Wilson, Fifer. 

COMPANY E. 

Amon C. Bradley, Captain ; David S. Talerdy, 1st 
Lieutenant; Orrin G. Dough ton, 2d Lieutenant; 



Henry Rust, 1st Sergeant; Sanders M. Huyck, 2d 
Sergeant ; Oscar Mott, 3d Sergeant ; Samuel Donald- 
son, 4th Sergeant ; John Rogers. 1st Corporal ; An- 
drew W. Grice, 2d Corporal ; Aquilla Coonrad, 3d 
Corporal ; James L. Ashcrof, 4th Corporal; Israel E. 
Kintigh, Drummer; Daniel Uidenour, Fifer. 

COMPANY F. 

Enoch Mann, Captain ; Samuel Poraeroy, Lieu- 
tenant ; Lay W. Richardson, 1st Sergeant; Samuel 
Homan, 2d Sergeant ; David H. Perrin, 3d Sergeant ; 
Washington W. Bowen, 4th Sergeant; Benjamin S. 
Pender, 1st Corporal ; Thaddeus Lemmert, 2d Corpo- 
ral ; Remus Howard, 3d Corporal ; William Brownell, 
4th Corporal; George D. Steedman, Drummer; 
William S. Pdtts, Fifer. 

COMPANY C. 

John S. Snook, Captain; Alfred M. Russel, 1st 
Lieutenant; John Crosson, 2d Lieutenant; Patrick 
H. Mooney, 1st Sergeant; Dennison S. Hughs, 2d 
Sergeant ; Elijah Luvart, 3d Sergeant ; William C. 
Haukins, 4th Sergeant; Samuel G. Robinson, 1st 
Corporal ; Joseph S. S. Champion, 2d Corporal ; 
Henry B. Ferguson, 3d Corporal ; David Ankney, 4th 
Corporal ; William Cuddy, Drummer. 

COMPANY H. 

Ephras L. Barber, Captain ; Thomas I\I. Ward, 1st 
Lieut.; Reason A. Franks, 2d Lieut.; Hiram Mc- 
Clutchie, 1st Sergeant ; Jacob Bartlett, 2d Sergeant ; 
Erastus W. Briggs, 3d Sergeant; Enmiet Losure, 4th 
Sergeant ; Worling R. Leggett, 1st Corporal ; Albert 
R. Stranahan, 2d Corporal ; Emanuel B. Cantlebury, 
3d Corporal ; Samuel Hartley, 4th Corporal ; Ithamer 
Culbertson, Drummer; John B. ]\Iikesell, Fifer. 

COMPANY I. 

Caleb Dodd, Captain ; Dennis C. Lehan, 1st Lieut.; 
James Marston, 2d Lieut.; Reuben Hall, 1st Sergeant; 
Paris H. Pray, 2<1 Sergeant ; James H. Cooper, 3d 
Sergeant ; Sedgwick Rathljurn, 4th Sergeant ; Alfred 
R. Hill, 1st Corporal ; Joseph Hain, 2d Corporal ; 
John Reston, 3d Corporal ; James Carroll, 4th Cor- 
poral ; Charles N. Brewster, Drum ^lajor ; Joseph 
Hutchinson, Filer. 

COMPANY K. 

George W. Kirk, Captain ; John F. Wallace, 1st 
Lieut.; Samuel Sherman, 2d Lieut.; William Griffin, 
1st Sergeant ; Franklin Warner, 2d Sergeant ; Edward 
S. Dodd, 3d Sergeant ; George W. Harding, 1st Cor- 
poral; Augustus Shaminfell, 2d Corporal; Ebenezer 
Tillottson, 3d Corporal ; Julius Hipel, 4th Corporal ; 
Andrew Marshall, Drummer ; Walter P.. Kirk, Fifer. 



Key to Abbreviations.— jldj/.— Adjutant. A. Q. if.— Acting Quartermaster. .4s.— Assigned. A. Swr^.— Assistant Surgeon. 
Briff. —Brigadier. Co.— Company, or County. CT/.— Certificate. Col. — Colonel. Corp. or Cp!.— Corporal. Capt. — Captain. Chap.— 
Chaplain. Cap —Captured. Cfti'cit.- Battle of Chickamaugn. />.— Died. Disc —Discharged. />jsa.— Disabled, or Disability. Exp. 
term — Expiration of term of service. Frajik. — Battle of Franklin. Hos. — Hospital. Jones. — Battle of Jonesboro. A' — Killed. L^ or 
Lieut. — Lieutenant. M. 0.— Mustered out. M. 0. Cu. — Mustered out with company. if«s.— Musician. A'as/i. — Battle of Nashville. 
Pro.- Promoted. Pi'te.— Private. Q. Jf.— Quartermaster. E. Q. if.— Regimental Quartermaster. E. to JJ.— Reduced to ranks. 
Surg. — Surgeon. Sgt. or Serg(.— Sergeant. IV. or Traw.— Transferred. Fc(.— Veteran. 



134 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



ROSTER THREE YEARS' SERVICE. 



Names, 



Kdiik. 



James B. Steedman Colonel. I 43 

lieorfie P. Este ! " 31 

Paul Kihvanls Lt. t'ol. 38 

Henry l>. Kingsbury " 42 



Albert Moore 

John W. Wilson. 



Waldo ('. Daniels 

George E. Sloat 

E. King Na.'ih 

Charlfs D. .Vnies 

Charles .M. Eaton 

Thomas J. Cronise . 

Edwin B. Raffensperger. 

Horatio L. Sargent 

Seth B. Moe 

Joseph B. Newton 



Andrew J. Morse . 
John E. Teal 



Major. 

Surgeon. 

Asst. Surg. 

Chaplain. 
Adjutant. 



Daniel H. Nye. 
John Dixon __ . 
Ezra B. Kirk ._ 



William T. Bennett _ 



Marshall Davis 

Charles B. Mitchell . 
Jesse Thrapp 



Livingston E. Beaidsley. 

Horace M. Parmelee 

Saunders M. Huyck 

George W. Westerman._ 

Smith Cadwalader 

William A. Tanner 

James Bloom 

Chauncey M. Reynolds. 

David K. Bowker 

Isaac J. Bogart 

William P. Elwell 



R. Q. M. 



Sergt. Maj. 



Q. M. S. 



Elijah W. Greene 

James B. Smith 

Warren S. Johnson 

Stephen H. Anderson. 

Henry Wetzell 

Andrew Jackson 



Com. Ser. 



Nathaniel G. Pierce... 

Christian Milverstedt . 

James D. McMiller 

Isaac Lamb 



Hos. St'd. 



Prin. Mus. 



Leader. 
Musician. 



33 

27 

20 
37 
34 



30 

18 

34 
40 
31 

20 

25 
22 

24 

21 

27 
35 
30 

21 

19 

50 

18 

22 

33 

22 

35 
39 



Bate o_f 

Entering the 

Service. 



Remarks. 



Aug. 16, 1861 
Aug. 16, 1861 
Aug. 16, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 

Aug. 16, 1861 
Aug. 21, 1861 

Aug. 16, 1861 
Sept. 9, 18(;i 
April 10,1863 
Dec. 30, 1862 
Aug. 21, 1862 
Julv 30, 1864 
Sept. 17, 1861 
Mav 28, 18(i4 
Aug. 21,1861 
Aug. 21, 1861 



Aug. 28, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Aug. 21, 1861 
Aug. 25, 1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 

Aug. 21, 1861 

Aug. 21, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1S()1 
Sept. 5, 1861 

Aug. 18, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 
Nov. 1, 1861 
Aug. 28, 1861 

Sept. 4, 1861 

Aug. 26, 1861 

Aug. 21, 1861 

Sept. 6, 1861 

Sept. 4, 1861 

Aug. 25, 1861 

Aug. 25, 1861 

Aug. 25, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 
Mar. 1, 1862 
Aug. 26, 1861 

Aug. 26, 1861 

Sept. 1, 1861 
Sept. 12, 1861 
Sept. 12, 1861 



Promoted to Brig. -General July 16, 1862. 



Pro. from Lt.-Col. July, 1862 



o. Julv, 1865. 



Pro. from Major July 17, '62 ; res. Nov. '62. 

Pro. from Capt. co. A to Maj. Julv, '62; Lt.-Col. Dec. 

'62; m. o. Nov. '64. 
Pro. from Capt. Co. A to Lt.-Col. Nov. '64; m. o. July, '65. 
Pro. from Capt. Co. E Jan. '63 ; died Oct. '64, "from 

wds. Jonesboro. 
Resigned Nov. 7, 1862. 

Pro. from Asst.-Surg. Nov. '62 ; m. o. Nov. '63. 
Pro. from Asst.-Surg. Nov. '64 ; m. o. Regt. July, '65. 
Pro. to Surgeon 60th 0. V. I. May 1, 1864. 
Resigned March 4, 1863. 
Mustered out with regiment Julv 11, 1865. 
Resigned Feb. 24, 1863. 
Mustered out with regiment July 11, 1865. 
Pro. to Capt. and A. A. G. of Vol. Aug. '62. 
Pro. to Sgt.-Maj. from Corp. Co. A, Feb. '62; pro. to 2d 

Lt. as. to Co. B, Nov. '62 ; 1st Lt. as. to Co. H, Feb. 

'63; ap. Adjt. Aug. '63; pro. to Capt. as. to Co. A, 

Nov. '64. 
Pro. Q. M. Sergt. from private Co. F, Dec. '63; to 1st 

Lt. Nov. '64, Co. I ; Adjt. Jan. '65 ; as. Co. G, May, '65. 
Pro. Sgt.-Maj. from 1st Sgt. Co. I, Feb. '(i3; pro. 1st Lt. 

Apr.'65, as. Co. G; Adjt. May,'(i5; ni.o. Regt. July, '65. 
Assigned to Co. K April 1, 1862. 
Pro. from 2d Lt. Co. K, Apr. '62 ; res. Dec. '62. 
As. from Co. C, Dec. '62 ; pro. Capt. and Asst. Q. M. 

Feb. 1864. 
Ap. Act. R. Q. M. from 2d Lt. Co. E, June, '64 ; pro. 

1st Lt. Co. B, Nov. '64 ; Regt. (.}. M. May, '65 ; trans. 

from Co. B ; m. o. Regt. Julv, '65. 
Pro. 2d I.ieut. Sept. '61 ; as. Co. E. 
Pro. from Sergt. Co. I, Jan. '63; 2d Lt. ('o. E, Mav, '64. 
Pro. from 1st Sergt. Co. I, July, '64; 1st Lieut. Co. 1, 

Jan. '64 ; vet. 
Pro. from Sergt. Co. A, May, '65 ; m. o. Regt. 

'65 ; vet. 

Red. ranks, and trans, to Co. A, Nov. '61. 
Red. to ranks, trans, to Co. I, March, '62. 
Pro. from private Co. F, ]\Iar. '62 ; dis. Feb. '63, Surg. 

ctf. disab. 
Pro. from Sergt. Co. D, Dec. '63 ; dis. Jan. '65, 

ctf. disab.; vet. 
Pro. from Sergt. Co. G, Feb. '65; m. o. Regt. Julv, 

'65; vet. 
Pro. from private Co. A, Sept. '61 ; dis. Apr. '62, Surg. 

ctf. disab. 
Pro. from private Co. A, May, '62 : 

ctf. disab. 
Pro. from private Co. D, Dec. '63 ; 

'64; vet. 
Pro. from private Co. K, Dec. '64 ; 

Apr. '65 ; vet. 
Pro. from 1st Sergt. Co. K, Apr. '65 ; m. o. Regt. July, 

'65 ; vet. 
Discharged June, '62, on Surg. ctf. disab. 
Pro. Sergt. Co. A, July,'62; died June 23,'63, Nashville. 
Pro. from private Co. E, Dec. '63 ; m. o. Regt. July, 

'65 ; vet. 
Assigned to Co. H, Oct. 1, 1862. 
Pro. from private Co. H, June, '63 ; dis. JIar. '65. 
Pro. from mus. Co. G, May, '65 ; m. o. Regt. Julv, 

'65; vet. 
Pro. from n\us. Co. G, Mav, '65 ; m. o. Regt. July, 

'65; vet. 
M. o. Sept. '62, Bowling Green, Ky.; ord. W. Dept. 
M. o. Sept. '62, Bowling Green, Ky.; ord. W. Dept. 
M. o. Sept. '62, Bowling Green, Ky.; ord. W. Dept. 



July, 



Surg. 



, dis. June, '63, Surg. 
1st Lt. Co. B, Nov. 
red. ranks Co. K, 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION- FIELD WORK. 



135 



Names. 



Alexander Miller 

Nicholas Bink 

John Altraper 

Josejih Williams 

John W. Hannon 

Adolph Rapp 

Bernard Stum 

Leonard Long 

Samuel Sidlinger 

Jolm Allen 

Daniel Keefer 

Charles Myers 

John Sidlinger 

George W. Harving... 
Godfrey Milverstedt _. 
Francis A. Rockwood . 





u 


iJan.it, 


^ 


Musician. 


30 


" 


27 


(( 


29 


(( 


19 


u 


36 


(( 


19 


" 


18 


*' 


18 


" 


18 


a 


31 


(1 


38 


(( 


30 


" 


39 


(( 


33 


(( 


35 


(( 


37 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 



12, 1861 
12,1861 
12, 1861 
12, 1801 
5, 1861 
12, 1861 
12,1861 
12,1861 
12, 1801 



Remarks. 



12, 1861 iM. 



12,1861 
12, 1S61 ] M. 
12, 1801 1 M. 
12, 1861 'M. 
12, 1861 ' M. 
12,1861 M. 



o. Sept. 
o. Sept. 
o. Sept. 
o. Sept. 
o. Sept. 
o. Sept. 
o. Sept. 
o. Sept. 
o. Sept, 
o. Apr. 
o. Apr. 
o. Sept. 
o. Sept. 
o. Sept. 
o. Sept. 
o. Apr. 



'62, 
'62, 
'62, 
'65, 
'()2, 
'62, 
'62, 
'62, 
'62, 
'62, 
'02, 
'02, 
'02, 
'ti2, 
'62, 
'62, 



Bowling Green, Ky. 
Bowling Green, Ky, 
Bowling Green, K)', 
Bowling Green, Ky. 
Bowling Green, Ky, 
Bowling Green, Ky. 
Bowling Green, Ky. 
Bowling Green, Ky. 
Bowling Green, Ky. 
Lebanon, Ky,; Surg, 
Lebanon, Ky.; Surg, 
Bowling Green, Ky. 
Bowling Green, Ky 
Bowling Green, Ky. 
Bowling Green, Ky. 
Lebanon, Ky.; Surg. 



; ord. W. Dept. 
; ord. Vt'. Dejit. 
; ord. W. Dept. 
; ord. W. Dept. 
; ord. W. Dept. 
; ord. W. Dept. 
; ord. W. Dept. 
; ord. W. Dept. 
; ord. W. Dept. 

ctf. disab. 

etf. disab. 
; ord. W. Dei)t. 
; ord. W. Dept. 
; ord. W. Dept. 
; ord. W. Dept. 

ctf. disab. 



COMPANY A. 



Henry D. Kingsbury. 

Albert Moore 

Joseph B. Newton .__ 



Marshal Davis 

Alonzo H. Wood 



Rank. 



Captain. 



1st Lieut. 



William B. Pugh 

Frank Fleck 

Nathaniel 0. Cobb 

Harrison Wood 

Gains B. Hanford 

Francis O. Wyman 

Thomas Scott 

Orlando C. Geer 

George R. Pennell 

Samuel Emery 

James Moore 

James B. Smith 

John Gillman 

Thomas W. Gilbert 

Arthur I). Tarbox 

James N. Ferine 

Livingston E. Beardsley 

Thomas Glenn 

John H, Pugh 

Ignatius Warner 

George Bennette 

Albert Osborn 

William Hughes 

Joseph E. Warner 

William Rutherford 

.lulius C. Bennette 

George Dodds 

John Owen 

Avery, John G 

Anderson, William 

Alcorn, William H 

Bond, William 

Brown, George W 

Bogle, Francis 

Barr, Robert W 

Barlow, Jonathan 

Beecher, John W 

Brichfield, Eli 

Bloom, James 

Burnes, AVilliam 



2d Lieut. 



1 st Sergt. 



Sergeant. 



Cbrporal. 



Private. 



42 
33 
23 

25 

20 

25 

32 

26 

30 

22 

22 

20 

21 

21 

35 

21 

39 

31 

21 

25 

30 

21 

19 

21 

19 

24 

23 

23 

19 

28 

40 

29 

20 

19 

27 

19 

18 

18 

18 

18 

41 

33 

24 

50 



Bate of 

Entering tfie 

Service. 



Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 18,1861 

Aug. 21, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 

Aug. 17,1801 
Aug. 20,1 8lil 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 17,1861 
Sept. 3,1861 
Aug. 19, 1861 
Aug. 21,1861 
Aug. 19, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 28, 1861 
Aug. 21, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1801 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Sept. 4, 1801 
Aug. 19, 1861 
Aug. 22, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 17,1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 25, 1864 
Jan. 25,1864 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 21,1861 
Sept. 8, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 22, 1861 
Jan. 19, 1864 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Feb. 10, 1804 
Feb. 6, 1864 
Sept. 8, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 21,1861 
Aug. 21, 1861 
Aug. 21,1801 
Aug. 21, 1801 
Aug. 21,1861 



Ermarki.. 



Pro. to Major, July, 1802. 

Pro. 1st Lieut. Aug. '02 ; Lieut.-Col. Nov. 18, 1864. 

Pro. Sergt.-Maj. from Corp. Feb. '62 ; to Adjt. Nov. 

'04 ; m. o. Co. July, '65 ; vet. 
From Co. E, March, "'62 ; pro. Capt. Co. E, Nov. '04. 
1st Sergt. from Corp.; to 1st Lieut. Apr. '65 ; m. o. Co.; 

vet. 
Pro. to Captain Co. I, Nov. 1.S62. 
Pro. from Sergt. Co. H, Aug. 1S()2; res. Sept. 1S64. 
Pro. 2d Lieut. Co. I, Oct. '02. 
Ap. from Sergt.; pro. 1st Lt. Co. H.; veteran. 
Ap. Corp.; Sgt. June, '(14; IstSgt. Dec. '(54; m.o.Co.; vet. 
Ap. from Corp. Sept. '64; m. o. Co.; veteran. 
Ap. from Corp. Dec. '04 ; m. o. Co.; vet. 
Ap. from Corp. May, '05 ; m. o. Co.; vet. 
Ap. from Corp. June, '05 ; m. o. Co.; vet. 
Disc. Aug. '62 ; Surg. ctf. disability. 
Ap. from Corp.; disc. Dec. '62, on Surg. ctf. di.'fab. 
Pro. Hospital Steward, July, '62. 
Ap. from Corp.; killed at Chiekamauga, Sept. 19, '63. 
Mus. as private; ap. Sgt.; wd. C'hickamauga; d. Oct.'63. 
Mus. as private ; ap. Sgt.; k. at Jonesboro, Sept. 64. 
Died Sept. 2, 1864, wounds received at Jonesboro. 
Mus. private ; ap. Sgt.; pro. Sgt.-Maj. May, '65 ; vet. 
Ap. Corp. Nov. '62 ; m. b. Co. July, '65 ; veteran. 
Ap. Corp. Sept. '04 ; m. o. Co. July, '05 ; veteran. 
Ap. Corp. Sept. 1804 ; m. o. Co. July, '05; veteran. 
Ap. Corp. Sept. 1865 ; m. o. Co. July, '65 ; veteran. 
Ap. Corp. Oct. 1864 ; m. o. Co. July, 1865. 
Ap. Corp. Dec. 1864; m. o. Co. July, 1865; veteran. 
Ap. Corp. May, 1865 ; m. o. Co. July, 1865 ; veteran. 
Ap. Corp. June, 1805 ; m. o. Co. July, 1865 ; veteran. 
Disc. March, 1862, Surgeon's certificate, disability. 
Ap. Corp.; discharged Sept. 20, 1864. 
Killed at Chiekamauga, September, 1863. 
Mustered out with Company. 
Killed at Chiekamauga, September 19, 1863. 
Reduced from C'orporal ; disc. Sept. 1864, at .-Vtlanta. 
Mustered out with Company. 
^Mustered out with Company. 

Disc. Aug. 1862, Cincinnati, Surg. ctf. disability. 
Discharged at Nashville, Surgeon's certificate disab. 
Promoted 2d Lieutenant, Jan. 1803, C'ompany C. 
Cap. Chiekamauga, Sept.'03; d. Andersonville, Sep. '64. 
Promoted Com. Sergeant, Sept. 7, 1861. 
Wd. at Chiekamauga ; disc. Jan. '65, Surg. ctf. disab. 



136 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Names. 



Bank. 



Barnes, William 

Harm-s, Frederick C— 

I'.oner, Fraiuis \V 

r.urclilielil, Aaron H_. 

Barr, Amos 

Hames, AVilliain 

Cook, Luther II 

t'lark, John 

Clark, Henry H 

Collins, Oavid 

Canklin, Isaac 

Cobb, .lolm K 

Carman. Eli 

Carter, ,Iohn 

Cottin, Admiral B 

Cornelius, John 

Coalwell, William 

Dryer, George H 

D'8hana\vay, Lafayette F 

D'Shanaway, John 

Donavin, Richard 

Davis, Abram 

Davis, Andrew J 

Eldridge, John E 

Frusher, James 

Frisbee, John C 

Felt, James S 

Glenn, Andrew 

Glemon, Martin 

Ciilbert, Uriah 

Gates, John 

Hathaway, William W.- 
Hull, Ira 

Humes, Cornelius 

Uarbauer, Jacob 

Hapins, Charles W 

Hines, Thomas 

How, Adam 

Heuch, Charles H 

Hepl), John 

Harper, Benjamin 

James, Ephraim 

Jones, Francis L 

Jolly, Jared 

June, Reuben A 

Jones, Charles H 

Knai)p, Wilson B 

Kingsbury, Orison V 

Kleinsory, William 

Kennedy, William 

Lanagan, Thomas 

Leach, David 

Lafleur, Antone 

Lathrop, Elislia D 

Lewis, William M 

Lane, Thomas 

Landburg, Andrew i 

Lendberger, George W.- 

Laird, F. A 

Long, John E 

JloVetta, Thomas 

McMillin, Henry P 

Moore, Peter 

^IcHenry, Charles 

Moran, Patrick 

ilurk, Anthony 

;\Iallette, John 

Merrill, Levin M 

Miller, Ludwig 

Xye, Henry T 

Kills, Henry 

Parmelee, Horace M 



Private. 



22 
19 
25 
19 

21 
19 
26 
28 
28 
27 
26 
29 
33 
23 
23 
18 
18 
18 
IS 
18 
45 
29 
19 
20 
21 
20 
18 
25 
18 
18 
19 
40 
45 
25 
23 
18 
21 
16 
19 
22 
35 
26 
18 
20 
36 
18 
42 
21 
18 
30 
19 
19 
23 
19 
23 
26 
22 
40 
21 
23 
29 
25 
41 
18 
33 
25 
18 
19 
3(i 
21 
18 
9.7 



Dale of 

Entcrinp the 
Service. 



Feb. 1,1864 
Aug. 21, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 17. 1801 
Feb. 1, 1864 
Sept. 25, 1861 
Sept. 14,1863 
Feb. 13, 1864 
F'eb. IS, 1S64 
Aug. 17,1861 
Aug. 17,1801 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 21,1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Jan. 11, 1864 
Jan. 12, 1864 
Jan. 21, 1864 
Jan. 18, 1864 
Mar. 5, 1864 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Jan. 25, 1864 
Aug. 17,1861 
Aug. 26, 1861 
Sept. 4, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Sept. 30,1864 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
June 12, 1864 
Sept. 27, 1864 
Sept. 24, 1864 
Sept. 27, 1864 
Aug. 21, 1861 
Sept. 29, 1864 
Aug. 19, 1861 
Sept. 26, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Aug. 21,1861 
Jan. 19, 1864 
Sept. 4, 1861 
Oct. 12, 1861 
Sept. 24, 1864 
Sept. 26, 1864 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 19, 1861 
Aug. 21, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1801 
Sept. 27, 1864 
Sept. 27, 1864 
Sept. 27, 1864 
Sept.27, 1,S64 
Nov. 18, 1864 
Sept. 27, 1864 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 22, 1861 
Jan. 11, 1864 
Jan. 30, 1864 
Jan. 8, 1864 
Sept. 29, 1864 
Aug. 22, 1861 
Sept. 26, 1864 
July 27, 1861 
Aug. 22, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 



Hemarks. 



Discharged Dec. 29, 1864, at Columbus, Ohio. 
Wounded Chickamauga; in hospital ; discharged. 
Missing at Chickamauga. No further record. 
Died May 16, 1862, near St. Louis, Missouri. 
Died Nov. 28, 1861, at Lexington, Kentucky. 
Discharged Sept. 1864, Surgeon's certificate disability. 
Mustered out with Company ; veteran. 
Discharged June 17, 1865, at Camp Chase, Ohio. 
Mustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Captured at Raleigh, S. C. April, 1865 ; m. o. Co. 
Reduced from Corporal ; discharged April, 1862. 
Discharged Oct. 1862, Nashville, Surgeon's ctf. disab. 
Discharged Oct. 1862, Nashville, Surgeon's ctf. disab. 
Discharged Sept. 13, 1864, at Atlanta, Georgia. 
Red. from Cpl.; wd. Atlanta, June,'63; dise.Apr.'65; vet. 
Discharged Sept. 13, 1864, at Atlanta, Ga. 
Discharged June, 1865, Cleveland, O., Surg. ctf. disab. 
Mustered out with Company. 
Mustered out with Company. 
Clustered out with Company. 
^Mustered out with Company. 

Trans. 1st Vet. Vol. Engineers, Sept. 1864 ; veteran. 
jTrans. 1st Vet. Vol. Engineers, Sept. 1864; veteran. 
JDischarged Feb. 20, 1863, Surg, certificate disab. 
jMustered out with Company. 
Mustered out with Company. 
[Mustered out with Company. 

Captured at Chickamauga ; disc. April 7, 1865; veteran. 
'Wounded at Resaca, May, 1864; veteran. 
Wd. at Chickamauga and Jonesboro ; d. Sept. 64 ; vet. 
Mustered out with C'ompany ; veteran. 
Discharged July 4, 1865, at Columbus, Ohio. 
Red. from Cpl.; dis. Dec. '62, Surg. ctf. disa. 
Disc. May, '63, Lavergne, Tenn., Surg, certificate. 
' Captured Chickamauga ; no further record. 
Mustered oat with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustei-ed out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
KilletTbattle Chickamauga, Sept. 19, 1863. 
Disc. June, 1865, order of War Department. 
Wd. Chickamauga ; no further record. 
Disc. June, 1865, order of War Department. 
Wd. Mission Ridge, Nov. '63; disc. Sept. '64, Surg. ctf. 
Mustered out with company ; veteran. 
Mustered out with company. 
Disc. March, '62, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Disc. June, '62, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Absent sick; m. o. July '65. 
Discharged June 13, 1865, at Louisville, Ky. 
Died Dec. 26, 1862, at Lebanon, Ky. 
Died Dec. 1, 1861, at Lexington, Ky. 
Died Nov. 25, ISfil, at Lexington, Ky. 
Mustered out with coiupan}- ; veteran. 
Mustered out June, 1865, order War Department. 
Mustered out June, 1865, order War Department. 
Mustered out June, 1865, order War Department. 
Mustered out June, 1865, order War Department. 
Mustered out June, 1865, order War Department. 
Mustered out June, 1865, order War Department. 
Disc. March, 1862, at Louisville, Ky., Surg. ctf. 
Disc. May, 1863, Lavergne, Tenn., Surg. ctf. 
Disc. Oct. 1862, Columbus, O., Surg. ctf. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Died May 21, '64, from wds. at Resaca. 
Discharged Juue, I860, order War Department. 
Disc. April, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn., Surg. ctf. 
Wounded at Chickamauga; m. o. Co. 
Red. fromQ. M.Sgt. Nov.'61; disc. Aug.'62,Columbus,0. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



137 



Na7n€£. 



Sank. 



Perry, Ezra 

Phillips, Aaron 

Pellon, Eli 

Pelky, John 

Pelky, Lewis 

Pfanner, Jacob 

Robinette, Narcissus 

Reynolds, Chauncey M_- 

Railton, George W 

Sbutts, Albert A 

Stone, Homer B 

Sifer, Abraham F 

Seager, Francis M 

Stricklin, Nathan 

Spangler, John E 

iStautzenberger, William . 

Sondeet, Joseph 

Steffus, Mathias 

8egur, William O 

Sinting, John 

Seeron, Henry 

.Siedke, Augustus 

Southwiek, Charles 

Thomas, Jerome B 

Wilder, Albert V 

Wood, Jonathan 

Waldron, Henry L 

Wood, Samuel T 

Walbridge, Charles H 

WiUiaius, Cyrus M 

VVilhams, Joseph K 

Wilkinson, Edwin R 

Warner, Zophar 

Warner, Levi S 

Warren, Alfred N 

AVeller, John A 

Wilkinson, Albert S 

Wood, Francis V 

Zeigen, John 



Private. 



29 
29 
25 
;i2 
19 
18 
45 
18 
19 
3() 
39 
24 
19 
23 
21 
20 
18 
18 
IS 
19 
18 
31 
23 
18 
23 
()2 
20 
20 

30 
IS 
21 
19 
19 
18 
IS 
18 
18 
18 
21 



Dale of 

Entering ilie 

Service. 



Sept. 6, 
Aug. 17, 
Aug. 17, 
Jan. 12, 
Jan. 12, 
Feb. 13, 
Aug. 21, 
Sept. 6, 
Feb. 12, 
Aug. 17, 
Aug. 17, 
Aug. 17, 
Feb. 22, 
Aug. 28, 
Jan. 25, 
Feb. 11, 
Jan. 22, 
Aug. 21, 
Jan. 12, 
Sept. 26, 
Sept. 26, 
Mch. 10, 
Nov. 22, 
Aug. 19, 
Oct. 12, 
Sept. 5, 
Aug. 17, 
Aug. 19, 

Aug. 17, 
Aug. 17, 
Aug. 19, 
Aug. 21, 
Oct. 18, 
Oct. 18, 
Jan. 25, 
Feb. 25, 
Aug. 19, 
Jan. 14, 
Aug. 18, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1861 
1861 
1S62 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1S62 
1861 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1861 
1864 
1S64 
1864 
1862 
1863 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 

1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1864 
1864 
1861 
1864 
1861 



Hemarks. 



Disc. March 1863, Louisville, Ky., Surg, certificate. 
M. o. Sept. '64, Atlanta, exp. term service. 

Mustered out June, 1865, at Louisville, Ky. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Disc. May, 1862, Shiloh, Tenn., Surgeon's certificate. 

Pro. Com. Sergeant May 2, 1862. 

Discharged May IS, 1865, at Columbus, O. 

Di.sc. June, 1862, Columbus, Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharged Sept. 13, 1864, at Atlanta, Ga. 

Died July 29, 1862, at Pulaski, Tenn. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company ; veteran. 

Mustered out witli company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company ; veteran. 

Died Sept. 24, 1864, wounds at Jone.sboro. 

Disc. May 29, 1865, order War Department. 

Disc. June 3, 1865, order War Department. 

Disc. Feb. 26, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Trans, to 1st Vet. Vol. Engineers Sept. 1864. 

Red. from Cpl.; det. Q. M. Sept. '64; m. o. Co.; vet. 

Disc. May. 1863, Manchester, Tenn., Surg, certificate. 

Trans, from co. I, Nov. '62; disc. Jan. '64; Surg. ctf. 

Cap. Chick.; died Oct. 16, '64, Andersonville. 

Cap. Chick.; esc. March 2, '64; wd. Jonesboro; m. o. 

Sept. '65 ; veteran. 
Mustered out Atlanta, Sept. 1 3, '64. 
Died Oct. 6, '63, of wds. at Chickamauga. 
Died Dec. 12, 1863, at Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Mustered out witli company ; veteran. 
Mustered out with company ; veteran. 
Mustered out with company ; veteran. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Died Jan. 5, 1864, at Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Disc. June, 1865, order War Department. 
Cap. Chick.; died Danville Prison, Jan. 12, '64. 



COMPANY B. 



iVam^s. 



George W. Kirk 

Henry G. Neubert 

Edward S. Dodd 

David K. Bowker 

James B. Rutledge 

William T. Bennett 

Henry A. Valentine 

Joseph B. Newton 

Isaac L. Van Meter 

Ebenezer C. Tillotson 

Walter B. Kirk 

Albert Burroughs 

Horace Culver 

James N. Cooley 

John Cahoo 

John Klein 

Joseph Perry 

Josiah T. Walker 

Augustus C. May 

Peter Emery 



Rayik. 



Captain. 

(C 

1st Lieut. 



2d Lieut. 

li 

1st Sergt. 
(( 

Sergeant. 
(( 

(( 

(( 

It 

Corporal. 



Date of 

Entering 

the Service. 



43 

20 
20 
22 
35 
20 
21 
23 
22 
31 
19 
24 
26 
20 
20 
23 
28 
26 
19 
18 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



15, 1861 
14, 1861 
28, 1861 

4, 1861 
12, 1861 
21, 1861 

1, 1861 
18, 1861 
2.5,1861 
15, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1S61 
18, 1861 
IS, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1S61 
18, 1861 



Remarks. 



M. o. Sept. '64, Atlanta, exp. term service. 

As. from Co. K, Jan. '65; m. o. Co.; vet. 

Assigned to Company F, February 18, 1863. 

Pro. from Com. Sgt. Nov. '64, Capt. Co. C, Apr. 1S65. 

Pro. from 2d Lt. Nov. '61; res. Sept. '63. 

Pro. from 2d Lt. Nov. '64; ap. R. Q. U. May, 1S65. 

Pro. from 1st Sgt. Co. H, Nov. 1864; m. o. Co. 

Pro. from Sgt.-Maj. Nov. '62, to 1st Lt. Co. H, Feb. '63. 

Pro. from 1st Sgt. Co. K, Feb. '63; m. o. Co.; veteran. 

Transferred to Company K, June Ki, 1862. 

Pro. to 2d Lieutenant Co. H, November, 1862. 

Pro. to 1st Lieutenant Company C, January, 1865. 

Appointed from ."Sergeant, June, ISiio; m. o. Company. 

Appointeil from Corjioral, Dec. 1863; m. o. Co.; vet. 

Apijointed from Cdrporal, May, 1864; ra. o. Co.; vet. 

Appointed from tJorjioral, January, 1865; m. o. Co.; vet. 

Ap. from Cpl. Jlay, 1864; on det. duty; m. o. Co.; vet. 

Died December, 1863, wounds Mission Kidge. 

Ap. Cpl. Dec. 1863; pris. war 3 m.; m. o. Co.; vet. 

Ap. Cpl. Dec. 1863; m. o. Co.; veteran. 



138 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Namei. 



Michael Gates 

Tboinas Kay 

Henry McGrau 

Martin Culver 

Freilerick McKllight — 

Lewis Srlianipaign 

Heed Wetuuire 

Daniel Craig 

Charles E. Davis 

Albert H. Huntley 

Franeis M. Perry 

Cliristopher Jacobs 

WarlieM, Henry C 

Ainl, Andrew 

Acker, William H 

Bryan, George W 

Bryan, Dennis 

Bivans, George F 

Burk, Jesse 

Born, Jacob 

Beeler, Rudolph 

Baker, Emanuel 

Bowles, Thomas 

Conger, Horace 

Carrol, John 

Cotter, John 

Cochran, Clement 

Clark, Willis E 

Callard, Arthur L 

Cluckey, John 

Coulton, Joseph 

Cowles, Gay lord 

Culver, Newton 

Coulton, William 

Conner, Cornelius 

Cooper, Reuben 

Chrisley, George W 

Craudall, Caleb 

Drewior, Noah L 

Davis, C'harles 

Dudley, Joseph 

Dellinghausey, Edward 

Durall, John 

Dailev, John 

Da^-is■, William H 

Emerling, William A_ _ 

Eaton, Nathaniel 

Easlin, Mathias 

Estell, Chauncey 

Flanagan, Arthur 

Fritz, John. 

Gillis, William H 

Gleason, Matthew W . 

Gates, Adam 

Harrison, John W 

Harrison, John 

Helmy, Cornelius 

Harris, Amos 

Harris, Edward 

Jordan, Patrick 

Kastack, Frank 

Kelley, Gustain 

Lyons, Martin ._ 

LaFontaine, Oliver 

Lee, David 

Lue, Conrad 

Laughlin, William J 

Miller, Frederick 

Miller, Levi 

]\IcPhillips, James 

Murphy, James 

McMahon, James 



Rank. 



Corporal. 



Date of 

ETitering the 
Sermcc. 



Wagoner. 

Private. 



20 
29 
21 
21 
18 
23 
49 
33 
19 
27 
23 
20 
18 
32 
19 
29 
18 
IS 
22 
18 
34 
22 
20 
18 
43 
39 
19 
24 
24 
36 
34 
37 
27 
21 
23 
2() 
18 
20 
21 
25 
25 
19 
IS 
18 
35 

44 
24 
18 
18 
29 
23 
19 
18 
18 
44 
20 
19 
21 
28 
19 
18 
21 
22 
33 
42 
IS 
32 
27 
23 
20 
35 



Aug. 

May 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 
I Aug. 
ISept. 
1 Aug. 
I Aug. 

Sei)t. 

Feb. 
I Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861] 
1861 1 
18611 
lS64i 
1861, 
18611 
1864; 
1861 

1864: 

1864 
1864 
1864 
1861 
1861 
186^ 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861. 
1861! 
1861 
1861 1 
lS6l' 
1864 
1864' 
1864' 
1861! 
1861 
1861 
1864, 
1864 
1861 
1861 
1861, 
1801 
1864 
1864 
1861 
18641 
1861 
1861 ! 
1864 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1864 

isr.4 

1864 
1861 
1864 
1861, 
1861 
1861' 
1864 
lS(i4 
1,S61 
1861 
1861 
1861' 
1861, 



Appointed Corporal, Mar. 1, 1864; m. o. Co.; veteran. 
Appointed Corporal, November, 1864; m. o. Co.; vet. 
Appointed Corporal, November, l.s64; m. o. Co.; vet. 
Appointed Corporal, November, 1804; m. o. Co.; vet. 
Appointed Corporal, November, 1864; m. o. Co.; vet. 
Appointed Corporal, November, 1864; m. o. Co.; vet. 
Ap. Cpl. Sept. 1861; d. hospital, Nashville, Mar. 1863. 
Ap. Cpl.; disc. Apr. 1863, Surgeon's certificate. 
Ap. Cpl.; died Aug. 1864, wds. Kingston, May, '64; vet. 
Died October, 1864, Nashville; veteran. 
Died Oct. 6, 1864, wounds at Jonesboro; veteran. 
Died September 6, 1864, wounds at Jonesboro; veteran. 
Mustered out witli Company; veteran. 
Discharged February, 18(i3, Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged June 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 
Mustered out with Company; veteran. 
Mustered out with Company. 
Mustered out w'ith Company. 

Red. from Corporal; disc. July, 1863, on Surgeon's ctf. 
Discharged June 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 
Discharged June 3, 186o,'_at Washington, D. C. 
Discharged June 3, 1865, at AVashington, D. C. 
Discharged May 20, 1865, at Newbern, N. C. 
Clustered out with Company. 
Mustered out with Company; veteran. 
Mustered out with Company. 
Reduced from Corporal; disc. Sept. 1864, Atlanta. 
Reduced from Corporal; disc. Sept. 1864, Atlanta. 
Died April 20, 1862, at Shiloh, Tennessee. 
Died December 6, 1861, at Lexington, Kentucky. 
Discharged September 18, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged April 27, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged August 18, 1863, Surgeon's ctf. disability. 
Discharged Dec. 4, 1863, Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged June, 186.5, Surgeon's certificate; veteran. 
Discliarged June 29, 1865, order AN'ar Department. 
Discharged June 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 
Discharged June 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 
Wounded at Mission Ridge, Nov. 1863; m. o. Co.; vet. 
Died Nov. 7, 1861, in hospital, at London, Kentucky. 
Died Jlarch 26, 1862, at Lexington, Kentucky. 
Discharged June 3, 1865, at W^ashington, D. C. 
Discharged June 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 
Transferred Reserve Corps, ^larch, I860; veteran. 
Killed August 8, 1864, near Atlanta; \-eteran. 
Discharged September 12, 1864, at Atlanta, Ga. 
Discharged July 20, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged April 13, 18(i4, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Mustered out with Company. 
Discharged September 22, 1864. 
Discharged June 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 
Discharged January 20, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Mustered out with Company. 

Died February 20, 1864, at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Discharged April 18, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Transferred to N'eteran Reserve Corps, Sept. 1, 1863. 

Mustered out with Company. 

Mustered out with Company. 

Discharged June 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Discharged Sept. 22, 1864, at Atlanta, Surgeon's ctf. 

Died June 29, 1864, in hospital at New Albany, Ind. 

Discharged Sept. 12, 1864, at Atlanta, Gia. 

Dis. Aug. 4, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 

Dis. Aug. 4, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 

Dis. June 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Died March, 1865, near Catawl>a River, S. C. 

Discharged Sept. 22, 1864, exp. term of service. 

Discharged Sept. 22, 1864, exp. term of service. 

Discharged Sept. 22, 1864, exp. term of ser^•ice. 

Discharged Sept. 22, 1864, exp. term of service. 

Discharged Sept. 12, 1864, exp. term of service. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



139 



Names. 



Moon, Thomas 

McKay, Joseph 

Miller, Sylvester 

Mark, John 

Marsh, Lewis 

Miller, Charles 

Monger, Frank 

Miller, Martin 

Miller, Jacob 

Mullinix, Solomon 

Milikee, Patrick 

Moon, John W 

Munchler, Alonzo 

Merrill, Charles M 

Mack, Jacob H 

Noonan, Timothy 

Paddock, Miner 

Porter, William H 

Phelan, John 

Price, C'liarles 

Papman, Charles R 

Phelps, Charles A 

Quintine, Arthur 

Reagan, Peter 

Robedeaux, Robert R. 

Reed, Franklin 

Rogers, Alpheus R 

Rowan, William 

Roberts, George W 

Regan, James 

Schaler, Charles 

Sunkers, Jacob 

Smith, Leander W 

Sheppard, William 

Tillott, George D 

Topliff, Charles A 

Tuttle, (Jrlando 

Thom, AVebster 

Trafler, Nicholas 

Thornton, Charles W__ 

Tugo, Nelson 

Winn, Francis 

Wilson, Lewis E 

Williams, Geo. W 

Wilson, Robert 

Wetmore, Nicholas H. 

Walcott, Albert 

Webei-, Charles W 

Wagoner, John 

Wyatt, Albert 



Bank. 



Private. 



18 
37 
25 
20 
66 
21 
28 
40 
24 
20 
26 
32 
28 
18 
18 
19 
34 
19 
31 
29 
19 
23 
29 
18 
22 
24 
22 
21 
24 
18 
36 
26 
18 
23 
18 
20 
21 
23 
22 
20 
19 
22 
IS 
45 
34 
26 
19 
IS 
19 
18 



Date of 

Entering tlie 

Service. 



Feb. 
Jan. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept, 

Aug. 

Jan. 

Sept, 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 



Jieinarks. 



18, 1S64 

2, 1864 
22, 1861 
21,1861 

7, 1861 
20,1861 
23, 1861 
26, 1864 
24, 1864 
26, 1864 
30,1861 
28,1861 
28, 1861 
12, 1864 
28, 1864 
23, 1861 
26, 1861 

6, 1861 
2.3, 1861 
14,1861 
24, 1861 
27, 1862 

3, 1864 
, 1, 1861 
, 18, 1861 
19, 1.S61 
15, 1861 
, 1, 1861 
25, 1861 
21, 1864 
. 1, 1861 
, 8, 1861 
,21,1861 
, 22, 1861 
,1.5, 1S61 
, 28, 1S61 
, 28, 1861 

1, 1861 
24,1861 
21,1861 
18, 1861 
21, 1861 
23, 1861 
20, 18(il 
27, 1861 
15,1861 
21, 1861 
20, 1864 
14, 1864 
24, 1864 



Killed June 3, 1864, at Atlanta, Ga. 
Transferred to U. S. Navv April 27, 1864. 
Killed in battle of Mission Ridge, Nov. 25, 1863. 
Died Feb. 23, 1863, at Nashville, Tenn. 
Discharged April 15, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged Nov. 29, 1863, on Surgeon's certifiate. 
Discharged Dec. 15, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged June 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 
Discharged June 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 
Discharged June 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Died May 12, 1865, at Newbern, N. C. 
Discharged Sept. 22, 1864, at Atlanta, Ga. 
Discharged Sept. 12, 1864, at Atlanta, Ga. 
Killed in battle of Mission Ridge, Tenn., Nov. 25, 1863. 

Discharged June 16, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Transferred to 4th U. S. Battery Dec. 4, 1862. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Discharged June 10, 1865, by order War Department. 
Discharged Sept. 12, 1864, at Atlanta, Ga. 
Discharged Sept. 12, 1864, at Atlanta, Ga. 
Discharged Sept. 13, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged Oct. 7, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with comjiany July 11, 1865; veteran. 
Dicharged Feb. 19, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged April 23, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Transferred to 4th U. S. Battery Dec. 4, 1862. 

Discharged Sept. 12, 1864, expiration of term of service. 
Red. from CorpL; dis. Sept. 1864, exp. term of service. 
Discharged Sept. 22, 1864. expiration of term of service. 
Wounded at ilissiou Ridge; disc. Sept. 18()4. Surg. ctf. 
Discharged Sept. 12, 18(i4, by order War Department. 
Red. from Corpl.; disc. June, 1862, on Surg, certificate. 
Discharged July 16, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Killed in battle of Mission Ridge, Tenn., Nov. 25, 1863. 
Died March 2, 1862, at Louisville, Ky. 
Discharged Aug. 4, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged Dec. 20. 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Transferred to 4th U. S. Battery Dec. 4, 1862. 
Discharged June 21, 1865, by order War Department. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 



COMPANY C. 



Navietf. 


Hank. 


^ 
■^ 


Date nf 

Entering the 

Service. 


Remarks. 


Jacob W. Brown 

.Toll n J. Clark 

David K. Bowker 

Ezra B. Kirk 

William B. Steedman___ 

Henry G. Neubert 

Albert Burroughs 

John M. Hamilton 

John W. Beecher 

Henry W. Bigelow 

Henry F. Morgan 


Captain. 

1st Lieut. 

(( 
2d Lieut. 

Ist Sergt. 


37 
29 
22 
21 
28 
20 
24 
26 
33 
23 
20 


Aug. 15, 1861 
Aug. 28, 1861 
Sept. 4, 1861 
Aug. 15,1861 
Sept. 4, 1861 
Aug. 14, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 15,1861 
Aug. 21, 1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 
Sept. 2, 1861 


Resigned Oct. 29, 1862. 

Pro. from 1st Lieut. Co. F, Nov., 1862; m. o. Mar., 1865. 

Pro. from 1st Lieut. Co. B, April, 1865; m. o. with Co. 

Appointed Regimental (J. M. Dec. 19, 1862. 

Pro. from 2d Lt. Co. D, Dec, 1862; as. to E, June, 1863. 

Pro. 2d Lt. Aug. 1862; 1st Lt. Jan. 1863; Capt. K, Nov.'64. 

Pro. from 1st Sergt. Co. B, Jan. 1865; m. o. with Co. 

Resigned Sept. 15, 1862. 

Pro. from private, Co. A, Jan. 1863; res. Aug. 1864. 

Promoted to 2d Lieut. Co. T, March 13, 1862. 

Mus. as private; ap. 1st Sergt.; killed at Jone.sboro; vet. 



140 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Names. 



Charles E. Wilcox 

Micluiel M. Goulden 

Geoigc (.'. Clmnli 

Williuin n. KandiUl 

tiilbi'i-t Applftrate 

William Lariiiiug 

ratrick O'Ueily 

William Krall 

John KcUey 

Andrew J. IMorse 

Francis Brunhoofer 

George R. Morris 

John O'Conner 

Andrew J. Martin 

James W. Stout 

David Finkinbrinder 

Abram^Ieer 

Valentine Weil 

Emanuel Summerlott -_. 

Henry Ralph 

Leeman 8traus 

Hiram Palmer 

Lyman S. Hall 

IMicliael Lutz 

Andrew Weigle 

Alfred Isabel 

Eli Shauteen 

Robert H. Church 

Anderson, Thomas 

Anderson, James 

Albinson, John 

Blumberg, Joseph 

Brennaman, Harrison. 

Benner, William 

Benner, Eli 

Britly, John 

Barnes, George R 

Brennan, James 

Butler, Edward 

Barton, James P 

Barrette, Michael 

Butler, William H 

Burwell, James 

But'er, Anthony J 

Consine, Moses 

Cargette, Jacob 

Cuddy, William 

Carney, John 

Conger, Daniel 

Cook, John 

Clark, Smith 

Cole, George W 

Carney, Samuel 

Campbell, Whitney I 
DeShetler, Hubbell.,.. 

Doran, John 

Dobbon, John P 

Doyle, Michael 

Dibble, Horace M 

Disbrow, Peter W 

Derling, Alfred J 

Eskin, John 

Enfleld, Jacob . 
Enfield, Philip. ^.I^H"; 

Fritch, Joseph 

Finney, William H .__ 

Fry, John J 

Fox, Lawson 

Foley, Thomas 

Gallagher, Alonson J . 
Gossman, Earnest C ._ 
Gorsuch, Jonathan 



Rank. 



1st Sergt. 
Sergeant. 



Corporal. 



Wagoner. 
Private. 



20 

29 

19 

20 

IS 

19 

IS 

18 

19 

29 

25 

23 

18 

19 

18 

44 

22 

37 

24 

20 

32 

32 

19 

IS 

20 

23 

35 

23 

40 

28 

31 

23 

21 

26 

18 

38 

IS 

23 

19 

IS 

29 

18 

19 

24 

IS 

19 

20 

IS 

39 

19 

30 

IS 

21 

21 

28 

19 

2G 

42 

18 

37 

37 

28 

23 

20 

22 

IS 

34 

24 

24 

IS 

45 

19 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Aug. 17, 1861 

Sept. IS, 1861 

Aug. 17,1861 

Aug. 17, 1S61 

Sept. 3, 1861 

Sept. 2, 1861 

Sept. 10,1861 

Sept. 2,1861 

Sept. 2,1861 

Aug. 15,1861 

Aug. 15, 1861 

Aug. 24, 1861 

Aug. 26, 1861 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Aug. 24, 1861 

Feb. 15, 1864 

Feb. 22, 1862 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Aug. 15, 1861 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Aug. 24, 1861 

Aug. 17, 1S61 

Aug. 24, 1861 

Sept. 21, 1861 

;Vug. 19,1861 

Aug. 24, 1861 

Sept. 2, 1861 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Sept. 2, 1861 

Jan. 5, 1864 

Aug. 21, 1861 

Aug. 15, 1861 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Nov. 1, 1S62 

Feb. 12, 1864 

Sept. 27, 1864 

Sept. 26, 1864 

Sept. 26, 1864 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Aug. 21, 1861 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Aug. 17, 186! 

Sept. 2, 1861 

Sept. 12, 1864 

Sept. 2, 1861 

Sept. 12, 1864 

Sept. 28, 1864 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Sei)t. 2, 1861 

Sept. 17, 1861 

Nov. 4, 1862 

Jan. 14, 1864 

Sept. 27, 1864 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Sept. 2, 1861 

Aug. 19, 1861 

Aug. 17, 1861 

Sept. 27, 1864 

Sept. 10, 1861 

Sept. 10, 1861 

Sept. 26,1864 

Sept. 28, 1864 

Aug. 10, 1861 

Aug. 27, 1861 

Nov. 10, 1862 

Sept. 2,1861 

Jan. 29, 1864 

Sept. 29, 1864 



Remarks. 



Mus. as private; ap. 1st. Sergt. Sept. '64; m. o. Co.; vet. 

Ap. from Corp.; on duty Hd. Qtrs.; m. o. with Co.; vet. 

Ap. from Corp.; cap. at Chick.; died Andr'ville, Aug.'64. 

Mus. as private; ap. Sergt. Dec. '63; m. o. with Co.; vet. 

Ap. from Corpl. Sept. 1S()4; m. o. with Co.; veteran. 

Ap. from Corpl. Sept. 1864; ni. o. with Co.; veteran. 

Ap. from Corpl. June, 1865; m. o. with Co. July, '65; vet. 

Mus. as private; discharged June, 1865; veteran. 

Ap. from Corpl. June, 1865; discharged June, 1865; vet. 

Promoted to Q- M. Sergt. Feb. 1863. 

Killed at Chickamauga, Sept. 19, 1863. 

Absent Sept. 19, 1863, for wds. Chick.; m. o. Sept. 1864. 

Ap. Corp. Aug. '63; m. o. Sept. '64, exp. term. 

Wounded at Chickamauga ; m. o. Sept. '64, exp. term. 

Ap. Corp. Nov. 64; m. o. with Co.; veteran. 

Ap. Corp. Nov. 1864; m. o. with Company. 

Ap. Corp. Nov. 1864 ; m. o. with Company ; veteran. 

Ap. Corp. Nov. 1864 ; m. o. with Company ; veteran. 

Ap. Corp. Nov. 1864; m. o. with Company ; veteran. 

Ap. Corp. Jan. 1865 ; m. o. with Company ; veteran. 

Ap. Corp. June, 1865 ; m. o. with Company ; veteran. 

Transferred to U. S. Navy. 

Killed at Chickamauga. 

Caji. at Chickamauga; died Andersonville, July, '64. 

Died Jan. 8, 1S62, at Lebanon, Ky. 

Discharged May, 1S64, at Detroit, Surg, certificate. 

Discharged July, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Red. from Corp.; disc. Sept. 1864, expiration term. 

Died Oct. 4, 1862, at Bacon Creek, Ky. 

Killecl in battle at Atlanta, Aug. 17, 1864. 

Red. from Corp.; miss. Chickamauga; no other record. 

Red. from Sergt.; m. o. Sept. 1864, expiration term. 

M. o. on expiration term of service, Sept. 1S64. 

Diecl Sei)t. 1S64, hospital near Atlanta. 

Iiistharged June 7, 1865. 

Discharged June 3, 1865 ; substitute. 

Discharged June, 1865 ; substitute. 

Discharged June, 1865 ; substitute. 

Transferred to 4th U. S. Batterv Feb. 1863. 

Killed at Chickamauga, Sept. 20, 1863. 

Killed at Mission Ridge, Nov. 25, 1863. 

Died Sept. 9, 1862, at Nashville, Teiin. 

Died Nov. 1863, wounds at Chickamauga. 

Wd. Chickamauga; m. o. Sept. '64, expiration term. 

Wd. Chickamauga; m. o. Sept. '64, expiration term. 

Mustered out with Company; veteran. 

Discharged July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Discharged June 3, 1865 ; substitute. 

Discharged June 3, 1865; substitute. 

Di.sc. Feb. 16, 1S63, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Died Feb. 6, 1862, Camp Beach Grove, Ky. 

Disc. March, 1864, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Died March 1, 1862, at Nashville, Tenu. 

Mustered out with Company. 

Mustered out with Company. 

Di.scharged June 3, 1865; substitute. 

Disc. Dec. 24, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Cap. Chickamauga; paroled ; disc. Sept. '64, exp. term. 

Killed in action .\ug. '64, near Atlanta. 

Reduced from Corporal. 

Discharged June 3, 1865 ; substitute. 

Died Nov. 15, 1861, at Gallatin, Tenn. 

Missing at Chickamauga. No further record. 

Discharged June 3, 1865; substitute. 

Discharged June 3, 1865 ; substitute. 

Died Nov. 30, 1862, at Nashville, Tenn. 

Died Nov. 23, 1861, at Lebanon, Ky. 

Mi.ssing at Chickamauga. No further record. 

Mustered out Sept. 12, 1864, on expiration term. 

Mustered out Feb. 1865, on expiration term; substitute. 

Discharged June 3, 1865 ; substitute. 



I 
I 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



141 



Names. 



Graham, Lowery 

GilliUind, Wilson S 

Granger, Joseph A 

Herhert, Henry 

Housey, James - 

Houck, Cyrus 

Haynes, Anderson 

Horton. (icorge W 

Jenkins, John 

Jordan, Patrick 

Johnson, Alva C 

Kingsley, iNIichael 

Koka, Beunette H 

Kane, James 

Lapsley, William 

Letiler, David 

Leere, John 

Monimee, Paul 

McKay, James 

Martin, John M 

McDonald, Socrates 

Miller, John 

Owens, Michael J 

O'Neill, Siuion P 

Prince, Charles J 

Pershing, AVilliam G 

Palmer, James F 

Phillips, Thomas L 

Plout, Joseph 

Ponsee, Lambert 

Pratt, Abram 

Plout, Edward 

Philli|)s, Thomas H 

Powell, Benjamin W 

Phillips, William P 

Plout, Peter 

Potter, Hannibal A 

Plout, Anthony 

Rodebach, George W ... 

Robideaux, Eli 

Russell, Jlichael 

Shanteau, Anthony 

Starberd, Bennette 

Steiner, Christian 

Sullivan, Jeremiah 

Stevens, John 

Short, Frank 

Shanteau, Francis 

Shanteau, Thomas 

Sulier, David 

Summerlott, John 

Stout, Joseph 

Smith, John 

Sheehan, Richard 

Upell, Charles 

Vanan, Joseph 

Wiggins, Joseph A 

Wilson, James 

Wolfe, Hezekiah 

Winters, Joseph W 

Wilson, Henry J 

Winsell, Frank 

Wolfe, George W 

Weideman, David 



Private 



IS 
21 
2o 
IS 
IS 
22 
43 
21 
24 
85 
23 
IS 
45 
18 
32 
18 
\'.) 
1") 
21 
18 
35 
35 
18 
22 
26 
24 
29 
18 
22 
IS 
23 
18 
44 
IS 
31 
20 
41 
21 
34 
21 
20 
27 
39 
23 
25 
18 
24 
21 
28 
18 
22 
28 
19 
19 
22 
34 
45 
24 
25 
20 
24 
18 
45 
34 



Date of 

Enteritig the 

Sermce. 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

A ug. 

Apri' 

Jan. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

!\Ich. 

Sept. 

Mch. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept, 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Sept, 

Sept, 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Jan. 



29, 1S64 
27, 1864 
17, 1861 
2, 1861 
26, 181)4 
2, 1861 
2, 1861 
2, 1S61 
1.5, 18G1 
2, 1861 
4, 1861 
2, 1861 
19,1864 
2, 1861 
28, 1,SI)4 
29,1864 

I7,i8(;i 

17, 1S61 
20, 1861 
24,1864 
15, 1861 
27, 1864 
10,1861 
30, 1861 
2, 1 8(il 
10,lS(il 
17, lS(il 
130,1862 
2, 1864 
14, 1864 
15, 1861 
7, 1864 
10, 1861 

22. 1861 
10,1861 

21. 1862 
14,1861 
21,1862 
14, 1S(>1 
17, 1861 
17, 1861 
2, 1861 
10, 1861 
17,1861 
24, lS(il 
10, 1861 
2, 1861 
2, 1861 
2, 1861 
12, 1864 
22, 1861 
10, 1861 

2, 1861 
17,1861 
17,1861 
20, 1861 
17. 1861 

10,1861 
18, 1861 
21, 1861 

2, 1861 
4, 1864 
24, 1861 
7, 1863 



Remarks. 



Discharged June 3, 1865; substitute. 

Di.scharged June 3, 1865; substitute. 

Discharged 1,S()2, Camp Dennison, on Surg, certificate. 

Mustered out with Company ; veteran. 

Disc. June, 1865, order War Dept.; substitute. 

Di.sc. Oct. 1862, Detroit, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Disc. Slarch, 1863, Columbus, Surgeon's certificate. 

Killed at Chickamauga, Ga. Sept. 20, 1863. 

Trans, from Co. B, Mar. '64; m. o. Sept. '64 ; e.xp. term. 

Discharged Dec. 19, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharged Nov. 19, 1862, at Cincinnati, Surg. ctf. 

Wounded Chickamauga; m. o. Sept. '64, exp. term. 

Discliarged June 3, 1865, order War Dept.; drafted. 

Mustered out with Company ; veteran. 

Disc. June 3, 1865, order War Dept.; substitute. 

Disc. June, l.S()5, onler War Dept.; substitute. 

Di.scharged Dec. 14, 1863, order War Department. 

Clustered out with Company ; veteran. 

Mustered out with Company; veteran. 

Disc. June 3, 1865, order War Dept.; substitute. 

Discharged April 7, 1862, order War Dept. 

Died May 19. '05, MeClellan Ho.sp. Philadelphia ; sub. 

Mustered out with Company ; veteran. 

Mustered out Sept. 12, '64, expiration term. 
ilusterc<l out Sept. 12, '64, expiration term. 
Mustered out Sept. 12, 1864 ; expiration of term. 
Mustered out with company ; veteran. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Died Jan. 27, 1865, near Stone River, Tenn. 
Disc. .May 17, 1865, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged April 1, 1S62, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged April 1, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged Oct. 31, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Died Feb. 29, 1864, at Toledo, O. 



Discharged April 13, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Killed Chickamauga, Sept. 20, 1863. 

In hospital May, '63, Danville ; mustered out Sept. '64. 

Mustered out Sept. 12, 1864, expiration of term. 

Mustered out Sept. 12, ISlU, expiration of term. 

Mustered out Sept. 12, 1864. 

Wounded Chickamauga ; m. o. Sept. '64, exp. term. 

^Mustered out Sept. 12, 1864, on expiration of term. 

Mustered out with company ; veteran. 

Died April 8, 1862, at Toledo, O. 

Died Jan. 22, 1862, at Nashville, Tenn. 

Killed Aug. 15, 1864, near Atlanta, Ga. 

Wounded at Chickamauga ; died Sept. '63. 

Discharged Nov. 1863, at Gallatin, Tenn. ; Surg. ctf. 
Discharged May 17, 1864, Surgeon's certificate. 
Woundeil Chickamauga; m. o. Sept. '64, exp. term. 
Captured Chickamauga ; no further record. 
Discharged Sept. 12, 1864, Surgeon's certificate. 
Mustered out with company ; veteran. 

Died April 8, 1862, in hospital, at Louisville, Ky. 
Mustered out Sept. 12, 1.864, order War Dept. 
^Mustered out July, 1865, order War Dept. 
Discharged April 1, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged Jan. 1, 1864, on Surgeon's certificate. 



142 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



'COMPANY E. 



Rank 



John W. AVilson.- 
Pavid A. GleasoiK 
Marshal Davis 



William B. Steedman — - 

William T. Bennett .... 

C'liailes 15. Mitchell 

Davi<l F. Fortney 

Bidderwell. Henry 

Cosgrove, Samuel 

Churchman. William ___ 

Christie, Frederick 

Dush, Elzy 

Gleason, Ei-astus 

Hall, Adam 

Hall, Jacob C 

Hudson, James P 

Haver, James 

Hall, Solomon 

Haynes, Wallace D 

Keezer, Samuel A 

Long, John, 

IMillhouse, Davison 

Myers, Adam 

Morris, Peter 

Morse, John H 

Pecliur, Armiel 

Rollins, Zachariah 

Roth, John P 

Rath, Michael 

Reploge, Aaron B 

Rogers, Alexander 

Stoner, James A 

Scarlett, Edward 

Thrailkill, Richard H „ 
Woodcox, George W 



Captain. 



1st Lieut. 

2d Lieut. 

Corporal. 
Private. 



Date of 

Entering the 

i^iince. 



Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 



28, 1861 
21, 1801 
21, UStil 



Sept. 4, 18(il 



Aug. 
Sept. 
Mch, 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Aug. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Feb. 



21, 1861 
5, 1861 

6, 1864 
18, 1864 
10, l.S6o 

23, l.S(;4 
10, 18(i4 
25, 1864 
10, 18li4 

8, 1804 

8, 1S04 
15, 1864 

24. 1864 
10, 1.S64 

4, 1864 
21, hSiil 

9, 1.S6:! 

17, 18(i4 
11,1864 
28, 18l.;3 

18, 1864 

7, 1864 

8, 1864 
15, 18(i4 
15, 1864 

8, 1884 

8,1804 

28, 1864 

6, 1864 

25, 1864 

15, 1864 



hcTnarks. 



Promoted to Major January 20, 1863. 

Pro. from 1st Lieutenant, Jan. 20, 1863; dis. Jan. 1865. 

Pro. to 2d Lieut. Sept. 1861; 1st Lieut. Co. A, Mar. 1862; 

Cajit. Co. E, Nov. '64; det. General's stall', June, '65; 

Brvt. :Maj. May, '65; m. o. with Company. 
As. to Co. C, June, '63; Gen.'s staff, Julv, '61; m. o. Co.; 

vet. 
Pro. from 1st Sgt. Nov. '62; ap. A. R. il M. June, "64. 
Pro. from Sgt. :Maj. May, '64; d. Sept. 28, '64, wds. Jones. 
Appointed t'orporal January 1, 1865; m. o. Company. 
Mustered out with Company. 
Mustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Discharged June 13, 1805, Dennison hospital. 
Mustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Mastered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Sick at Jeftersonville, Ind., Jlay, 1865; m. o. Company. 
Mustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Discharged May 23, 1865, at Chattanooga, Tennessee. 
Discharged March (!, 1865, at Cleveland, Ohio. 
Killed at Chickamauga, September 111, 1863. 
Clustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with Co. July 11, liSOo, War Dept. 
Mustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with Company, July 11, 1805. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Sept. 27, 1864. 
Died ^lay 27, 1864, at Chattanooga, Tennessee. 
INIustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Clustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Clustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with Company, July 11, 1865. 
Wounded Jonesboro; hospital, Phila.; m. o. July, 1S65. 
Discharged June 23, 1865, at Camp Dennison. 



*Only members in this Company enlisting at Toledo, are given here. 



COMPANY F. 



Names. 



John A.Chase 

James E. McBride 

John I. Clark 

Edwards. Dodd 

William W. Moats 

Josiah Johnson 

Charles G. Tibbits 

Sampson A. Hildreth ___ 
Hezekiah Leonardson_. . 

Edward Carrol 

Eli Jacobs 

Allen C. Collins 

Henry Sagmeyer 

Davis Kirk 

John Van Orman 

Miner T. Cole 



Captain. 



1st Lieut. 



2d Lieut. 
1st Sergt. 

Sergeant. 



Date of 

Entering tiic 

Service. 



31 !Aug.28, 1861 

19 ! Aug. 28, 1861 



29 Aug. 
29 Aug. 
22 !Aug. 
32 Aug. 
20 Aug. 
34 ,Aug. 

24 lAug. 

25 jAug. 
20 Aug. 
18 iAug. 
39 I Aug. 
20 Aug. 
24 lAug. 
22 lAug. 



28, US61 
28, 1861 
21, 1S61 
21, 1861 
28, 1861 
28, ]8(il 
28, 1861 
28, 1801 
28, 1801 
28, 1801 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 



Rejnarks. 



Mustered out September 13, 1864, on expiration term. 
Pro. to 2d Lieut, from 2d Sgt. Nov. '64; 1st Lt. Nov. '64, 

Capt. Jan. 1865.: mustered out with company; vet. 
Promoted to Captain Company C, November 1, 1861. 
As. from Co. B, Feb. 1863; m.o. Sept. 1864, exp. term. 
Pro. from 1st Sgt. co. E, Jan. 1865; m. o. CO.; veteran. 
Resigned October 7, 1862. 

Ap. from Cpl. Dec. 17, 1864; m. o. company; veteran. 
Pro. to 1st Lieutenant, Nov. 1864; assigned to co. K. 
.\p. from Corporal. August, 1864; m. o. with co.; vet. 
Ap. from Corporal, August, 1864; m. o. with co ; vet. 
Ap. from Corporal Dec. 1864; m. o. with co.; veteran. 
Ap. from Corporal, April, 18li5; m. o. company; veteran. 
Ap. from private, Oct. '64; died May, 1862, at Toledo. 
Mustered out with company, July il, 1865; veteran. 
Ap. from Cpl.; killed Aug. '64, in action, near Atlanta. 
Discharged May, '65, to Colored U. S. Troops; veteran. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



143 



Narn^s. 



Rank. 



Henry Archer 

William Farley ^_ 

Charles Van Orraan 

David Slaughterback 

Charles 1. Dennis 

John W. Cooper 

Henry Burilo 

Sidne}' Wilder 

Henry C. Richmond 

JohnF. McBride 

Augustus L. Smith 

Cornelius O'Callahan . _ 

James E. FuUerton 

James Barrington 

Atwell, Joseph A 

Applegate, Aaron 

Atwell, Martin J 

Bennett, Thomas J 

Bunting, Matthew 

Bunting. Alonzo 

Bordeaux, Alva 

Bordeaux, Eli 

Bevelheimer, Benjamin I 

Buck, Dorman 

Brint, John 

Brint, William 

Beeker, William S 

Bennette, Perry 

Bucklin, Hamilton 

Bunting, Eli 

Bowker, David K 

Conson, Christopher 

Capaul, Casper 

Christian, John J 

Cheeney, Uriel 

Cooper, Marquis 

Cressey, Alexander 

Cooper, Robert 

Crots, Daniel 

Cone, William 

Clifford, Henry 

Carrol, James 

Case, John I 

Case, Harlow W 

Demsche, Joseph 

Dings, Morgan 

Edgar, William 

Fox, Charles A 

Fox, Albert 

Farley, Daniel H 

Frayer, Henry H 

Garnch, Jasper 

Gordinier, John I 

Gray, Josiah 

Gee, Dominick 

Hopkins, John 

Hendrickson, Oscar 

Hardv, Joseph K 

Hinds, Alfred W 

Hinds, Orange 

Hinds, Egbert 

Hulse, Lester 

Hardy, James 

HoUoway, Charles O 

Harty, Charles F 

IngersoU, Alva J 

Jacobs, Samuel 

Johnson, John 

Kanaval, John H 

Kilburn, Samuel 

Knapp, Adelbert 

Kltchell, William B 



Sergeant. 
Corporal. 



Musician. 
Private. 



24 

21 
19 
20 
28 
24 
19 
18 
28 
26 
IS 
24 
19 
16 
39 
38 
19 
21 
17 
20 
16 
18 
21 
33 
25 
22 
20 
21 
29 
36 
24 
30 
22 
si 
18 
20 
26 
18 
21 
21 
28 
33 
21 
25 
28 
24 
IS 
19 
19 
22 
20 
19 
44 
21 
43 
20 
19 

50 
21 
31 

18 
19 
IS 
18 
20 
24 
27 
25 
38 
18 
21 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service, 



Remarks. 



Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Jan 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Dec. 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Jan. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 



28, 1861 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 
2S, 1S61 
25, 1862 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 

25. 1861 
28,1801 
28,1861 
28, 1861 
28,1861 

24. 1862 
28, 1861 
28, 1S61 
13, 1864 
28, 1864 

16, 1S63 
5, 1S63 

25, 18()3 

13,1864 

28, 1861 

28, 1861 

28, 1861 

28, 1861 

5, 1863 

7, 1863 

28, 1861 

2, 1861 

28, 1861 

28, 1861 

28, 1861 

28, 1861 

17, 1863 

12, 1862 
1.3, 1S64 

9, 1S64 
28, 1861 

13, 1S64 
28, 1861 

28, 1861 
28,1861 
27,1864 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 

18, 1863 
13, 18(i4 
28, 1S61 
24, 1864 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 

29, 1863 
18, 1864 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 
28,1861 
28, 1 8(il 1 
28,18611 
28, 1861 ' 

9, 18621 

16. 1863 
23. 1863 
28, 1861 

2, 1864 
5, 1864 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 
28, 1861 



Discharged June 8, 1863, Surgeon's certificate. 

Appointed Corporal, August, 1864; m. o. co.; veteran. 

Ap corporal Aug. '64; m. o. Co.; veteran. 

Ap. corporal Aug. '64; m. o. Co.; veteran. 

Ap. corporal Aug. '64; m. o. Co.; veteran. 

.4p. corporal Aug. '64; m. o. Co.; veteran. 

Ap. corporal Sept. '64; m. o. Co.; veteran. 

Ap. corporal Dec. '64; m. o. Co.; veteran. 

Ap. corporal April, '65; m. o. Co.; veteran. 

Discharged June 13, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 

Ap. corporal Sept. 1862; m. o. Sept. 13, '64; exp. term. 

Killed at L'hickamauga, Sept. 19, 1863. 

Died July 30, '64, Nashville, wds. Kene.saw Mountain. 

Killed at Jonesboro, September 1, 1864. 

Ab.sent sick; m. o. July, 1865. 

Killed at Pittsburg Landing, April 7, 1865. 

Discharged March 30, 1865, Surgeon's certificate. 

Mustered out with company .fuly 11, 1865. 

Mu.stered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with couiiiany .lul'v 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Muistered out with com])any July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out Sept. 13, \»M, on expiration term. 

Captured at Chickamauga; m. o. Jan. 6, 1865. 

Died Oct. '64, from wounds at Jonesboro. 

Mustered out Sept. 13, 1864, on expiration of term. 

Died Dec. 8, '63, wounds at Mission Ridge, Nov. 25,'63. 

Killed in battle at Jonesboro, Sept. 1, 1864. 

Died Dec. 5, 1861, at Lexington, Ky. 

Discharged Feb. 13, 1863, oh Surgeon's certificate. 

Promoted to Com. Sergeant Dec. 17, 1863. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out wdth company July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

^Mustered out with comjjany July, 1865; veteran. 

Killed at battle of Jonesboro, Sept. 1, 1864. 

Killed at battle of Jonesboro, Ga. Sept. 1, 1864. 

Died July 28, 1862, at Tuscumbia, Ala. 

Died April 5, 1862, at Nashville, tenn. 

Discharged Feb. 16, 1865, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Captured at Chickamauga; m. o. Sept. 1864. 

Died from wounds at Chickamauga. 

^Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Wounded at Chickamauga; absent .sick; m. o. July, '65. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out Sept. 13, 1864^ on expiration term. 

Mustered out Sept. 13, 1864, on expiration term. 

Discharged June 17, 1863, at Detroit, INIich. 

Mustered out with company Jul)- 11, 1865. 

Discharged Dec. 30, 1864, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Captured at Chickamauga; mustered out Sept. 1864. 
Captured at Chickamauga; mustered out Sept. 1864. 
Transferred to Co. D March 24, 1864; veteran. 
Discharged April 29, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged June 20, 18()2, Surgeon's certificate. 
Killed near Kenesaw Jlountain June 17, 1864. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Cap. at Chickamauga; m. o. Sept. 1864, exp. term. 
Mustered out with com})any Jul}' 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Discharged June 18, 18(i3, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Transferred to Co. I) March 14, 1864; veteran. 
Killed in battle of Chickamauga, Sept. 19, 1863. 
Killed in battle of Chickamauga, Ga. Sept. 19, 1863. 



144 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Names. 



Kane, Alexander 

Kimball, .lolin C 

Kaiiaval, TlKinias 

Kaiuival, ( 'liarle.s S 

Kiik, William H 

Kiuibull, I'hillip A 

Latlirop, Wilson (' 

Lcn-k, Simon .1 

Messeicau, Wallace D. 

McMillin, Tlieron 

Miiiison, Kliakim 

McBride, W. II. W._-. 

Munson, Leroy 

Martin, Gilbert F 

Maxtield, .John 

Jlorrow, George 

INIangel, Alexander 

:McBride, Wallace W_- 

Mangle, Joseph 

Slorse, Andrew J 

Jlersereau, Henry P-- 
Kieholson, ArehibokL 
Navarre, Alexander J_ 

Newell, Adelbert 

Out, John 

Ostrander, James N .. 

Ostrander, Lewis 

Pelkey, Louis 

Pelkey, Edward 

Pierce, Charles 

Pierce, Chai-les 

Parker, Hiram 

Kunnolls, Alonzo 

King, Lewis 

Kay, Henry 

Kulapaugh, Aaron 

Surbeck, Jacob 

Smith, Ithamer T 

Seyniour, Geo. D 

Smith, Joseph 

Smith, Jesse . 

Stiickford, Samuel 

Smith, Milo_. 

Smith, Porter 

Schumacher, John M 

Stine, Peter 

Squires, Edward H. 

Shanks, Lewis H 

Thorp, David M 

Tunison. John P 

Tripp, Byron 

Tunison, William 

Thorp, Henry 

Woodmanse, David W._ 

Westerman, Josiah 

Westerman, George W_. 

Wood, John K ._ 

Woodmanse, John W 

AVakely, Thomas 

Washliurn, Aaron 

Ward, Francis C 

Wilder, James S 

Williams, John P 



Kaiik. 



Private. 



10 
24 

18 
18 
10 
31 
21 
18 
10 
IS 

:u 

20 

20 

31 

22 

18 

23 

30 

18 

20 

2G 

IS 

IS 

18 

28 

17 

18 

20 

21 

26 

21 

10 

18 

19 

24 

19 

27 

20 

IS 

44 

20 

23 

30 

19 

19 

22 

19 

2.5 

22 

20 

18 

20 

24 

30 

35 

18 

22 

18 

3t> 

IS 

35 



Dale of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Kcmarks. 



Aug. 28, 1861 Died Dec. 16, 1861, at Lexington, Ky. 

Jan. 3, 1864 Died April 22, 1864, at Ringgold, Ga. 

Dec. 28, lS(i3 Died April 10, 1864, at Kinggold, Ga. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Died Nov. 21, 1861, at Mt. Vernon, Ky. 

Dec. 18, 1862 Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Jan. 27, 1864 Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Aug. 28,1861 Killed in battle of Utoy Creek, Ga. Aug. 5, 1864. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Discharged June 1, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Wounded at (!hickamauga; absent sick; m. o. July, '65. 

Aug. 28,18()1 Transferred to Co. D ISIarch 15, 1864. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Killed in battle of Chickamauga Sept. 19, 1863. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Died Dec. 8, 1861, at Crab Orchard, Tenn. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Discharged June 30, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Clustered out with company; veteran. 

Jan. 15, 1S64 Mustered out with company. 

Jan. 7, 1864 Absent, sick; mu.stered out July 11, 1865. 

Feb. 11, 1864 Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Mar. 25, 1864 Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Aug. 28, 1S61 Died Dec. 9, 1862, at Nashville, Tenn. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Appointed Q. M. Sergeant Dec. 13, 18(i3. 

Aug. 11, 1862 Discharged May 16, 1S65, by order of AN'ar Department. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Cap. at Chickamauga; died Dec. 1863, Danville prison. 

Aug. 28, 1S61 Died June 27, 1862, at Camp Dennison, O. 

Jan. 19, 1864 Absent from wounds; mustered out July 11, 1865. 

Oct. 2, 1S61 Died Sept. 7, 1862, at Na.shville, Tenn. 

Aug. 28,1861 Transferred to Co. D, March 15, 1S64. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Captured at Chickamauga; mustered out May, 1865. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Discharged April 20, 1863, by order War Department. 
Aug. 28, lS(il Died Aug. 1S64, from wds. at Kenesaw Mt.; veteran. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Discharged April 29, 1863, by order War Department. 
Dec. 11, 1862 Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Aug. 28, 186] Discharged Ajiril, 1864, for pro. in U. S. Colored Troops. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Died Feb. 6, 1862, at Lebanon, Ky. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Mustered out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Oct. 5, 1863 Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Aug. 28,1861 Mustered out Sept. 13, 1864, on exp. term of service. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Wounded at Chickamauga; mustered out Oct. 1864. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Absent sick; mustered out July 11, lS(i5. 

Aug. 28, 1S()1 Mustered out Sept. 13, 1864, on exp. term of service. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Mustered out Sept. 13, 1864, on exp. term of service. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Mustered out Sept. 13, 1864, on exp. term of service. 

Nov. 8, 1862 Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 

Aug. 28,1861 Transferred to Co. D, March 15, 1864; veteran. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Died April 16, 1862, at Riga, Mich. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Absent sick; mustered out July, 1865; veteran. 

Jan. 13, 1864 In Rebel prison 3 mos. from Sept. 1864; m. o. with Co. 

Feb. 4,1864 Mustered out w'ith company July 11, 1865. 

Jan. 13, 1864 Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Aug. 28, 1S61 Mustered out Sept. 13, 1864", on exp. term of service. 

Aug. 28, 1S61 Mustered out Sept. 13, 1864, on exp. term of service. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Red. from Corpl. Oct. 1863; m. o. Sept. 1864; exp. term. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Discharged Aug. 12, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Oct. 14, 1862 Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Mustered out Sept. 13, 1864", on exp. of term of service. 

Aug. 28, 1861 :\Iustered out Sept. 13, 1S64, on exp. of term of service. 

Aug. 28, 1S(;1 Appointed Q. ^l. Sergt. ]\Iarch 15, 1862. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Died INIarch 10, lS<i2, at Nashville, Tenn. 

Aug. 28,1861 Died June IS, 1862, near Corinth, Miss. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Discharged April 24, ]8(i2, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Aug. 28, 1861 Mustered out with company July 1 1, lS(i5; veteran, 

Oct. 14, 1S62 Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Feb. 4, 1864 Clustered out with company July 11,1865. 

Jan. 16, 1S64 Discharged May 16, 1865, on Surgeon's certificate. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



145 



COMPANY H. 



Wilbur F. Stopford 

Henrv W. Bigolow 

Robert F. .lust 

Joseph B. Newton 

Harrison Wood 

George E. Murrav 

Walter B. Kirk.l 

Henrv A. Valentine 

Albert. H. Mohr 

Harrison Hathaway 

Ambrose C Croxton 

George H. Rice 

John Brown 

John Beely __ 

John C Hanson J 

Wolfgang Fnchs 

Frank Fleck 

John Sullton 

William H. Miller 

Philip C. Carrothers 

William Kemp 

George Metcalf 

William Bergin 

John H. Goodman 

John G. Strawman 

Jonathan Philo 

Hamond Virtel 

John Harmover 

John Koon 

Levi W. LownsV)erry 

William Paddock 

Joshua R. Lathrop 

James McCaft'ery 

Stephen H. Anderson 

William Dietrich 

Albrccht, John C 

Bassette, Michael 

Barber, Hiram F 

Brandt, Frank 

Blodgette, John M 

Barkley, Joseph 

Bentz, Hammond 

Bartholomew, Frank 

Carr, Theodore 

Cotterell, Daniel 

Carson, Farlington 

Cain, Henry D 

Carpenter, Lyman A 

Denicker, Henry 

Dahoff, Conrad 

Ellis, Isaac B 

Fleischman, John 

Farley, George E 

Freatenborough, James. 

Forbes, Frederick 

Fence, John 

Frederick, George 

Frey, Christian 

Forbes, Harry 

Fifiekl, Edward J 

Frisby, William 

Fuchs, Lawrence 

Gunther, Francis 

Grant, Adam 

Guitzell, Andrew 

Geyer, Carl 

Henry, George 













Rank. 


->! 


Captain. 


22 


u 


27 


1st Lieut. 


24 


" 


23 


*' 


30 


2d Lieut. 


2.T 


(1 


19 


1st Sergt. 


21 




33 


Sergeant. 


20 




2(i 


(( 


25 


a 


21 


i( 


18 


'* 


25 


** 


33 


ti 


32 


Corporal. 


29 


u 


21 


" 


27 


" 


18 


a 


18 


a 


25 


•' 


22 


" 


23 


'* 


29 


" 


35 


" 


33 


<f 


21 


'* 


19 


" 


18 


" 


19 


" 


43 


Musician. 


19 


Wagoner. 


•>■> 


Private. 


31 






20 






IS 






21 






26 






31 






37 






20 






19 






29 






24 






20 






20 






31 






31 






39 






27 






19 






26 






16 






38 






38 






24 






21 






24 






3() 






39 






38 












.J.5 






28 






19 






43 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Sept. 

Aug 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sejit. 

Sept. 

Sept 

Sept. 

Feb. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Sept, 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept, 

■ept. 

Sept, 

Aug. 

Sept 

Dec. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 



1, 1861 

15, 1861 

1,1861 

18, 1861 

17, 1861 

1, 1861 

18, 1861 

1, 1861 

20, 1861 

5, 1861 

5, 1861 

5,1861 

5,1861 

5, 1861 

27, 1861 

17, 1861 

20, 1S61 

17, 1861 

5, 1864 

5, 1861 

5, 1861 

5, 1861 

5, 1861 

5, 1861 

5, 1861 

5, 1861 

1, 1861 

20, 1861 

1, 1861 

1, 18<>1 

1, 1861 

5, 1861 

1, 1861 

5, 1861 

5, 1861 

26, 1864 

8, 1864 

23, 1863 

15, 1864 

1, 1861 

26, 1864 

5, 1861 

5, 1861 

5, 1861 

20, 1861 

5, 1861 

5, 1861 

5, 1861 

20, 1861 

25, 1864 

31, 1863 

5, 1861 

1, 1861 

20, 1861 

20, 1861 

17, 1861 

17, 1861 

28, 1862 

5, 1861 

1, 1861 

5, 1861 

17,1861 

20, 1861 

5, 1861 

20, 1861 

26, 1864 

5, 18()1 



Remarks. 



Det. as A. A. G. 3d Brg., 3d D., 14th Corps; k. at Jones. 
Pro. from 1st Lt. co. I, Nov. 1864; m. o. with Company. 
Resigne<l February 5, 1863. 

Pro. from 2d Lt. co. B, Feb. '63; ap. Adjutant, Aug.'63. 
Pro. from IstSgt. co. A, Nov. '64; m. o. with Company. 
Resigned November 26, 1862. 

Pro. from 1st Sgt. co. B, Nov. '62; killed at Jonesboro. 
Pro. to 1st Lieutenant, Nov. '()4, Company B; veteran. 
Ap. Sgt. Jan. 1864; 1st Sgt. June, 1865; m. o. CO.; vet. 
Ap. from Cpl. Dec. 1863; wd. Jonesboro; m. o. co.; vet. 
Mustered out September 12, 1864, on exp. of term. 
Ap. Cpl. Dec. '63; Sgt. Aug. '64; m. o. with co.; vet. 
Ap. Cpl. Dec. '63; Sgt. Sept. '64; m. o. with co.; vet. 
Ap. Cpl. Dec. '63; Sgt. June, 1865; m. o. with co.; vet. 
Died September 17, 1862, at Tyree Springs, Tennessee. 
Discharged January 30, 1863, Surgeon's certificate. 
Promoted to 2d Lieutenant, August, 181)2, co. A. 
Appointed Corporal Dec. 15, 1863; m. o. with co.; vet. 
Appointed Corporal Dec. 15, 1863; m. o. with co.; vet. 
Ap. Corporal November 1, 1864; m. o. with co.; vet. 
Ap. Corporal November 1, 1864; m. o. with co.; vet. 
Ap. Corporal, November 1, 1864; m. o. with co.; vet. 
Ap. Corporal, November 1, 1864; m. o. with co.; vet. 
Ap. Corporal, May 1, 1865; m. o. with compan}'; vet. 
Ap. Corporal. June 1, 1865; m. o. with company; vet. 
Mustered out on expiration term, September, 1864. 
Captured at Chickamauga; mustereti out March, 1865. 
Died Oct. 1863, woimds at Chickamauga. 
Mustered out with company, June 11, 1865; veteran. 
On detail duty; mustered out with company; veteran. 
Mu.stered out with company, June 11, 1865; veteran. 
Ap. Cpl. Sept. '64, disc. Dec. '64; wds. in action; vet. 
Discharged July 21, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 
Trans, from Field and Staff Oct. 1862; m. o, co.; vet. 
Ap. Wagoner Nov. 1864; mustered out with co.; vet. 
Mustered out, June, 1865, substitute. 
Mustered out with company, July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, July 11, 1865. 
Detailed in hospital, Sept. 1863; dis. Sept. 1864. 
Mustered out, June, 1865; substitute. 
Discharged August 31, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 
Mustered out with company; veteran. 
Mustered out with company; veteran. 
Mustered out September 12, 1864, on expiration term. 
Mustered out September 12, 1864, on expiration term. 
Captured at Chickamauga; discharged January, 18()5. 
Discharged February 18, 1864, Surgeon's certificate. 
Mustered out with company, July 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out June 3, 1 865; substitute. 
Died June 17, 1864, at Chattanooga, Tennessee. 
Mustered out with company; veteran. 
Mustered out September 12, 1.864, on expiration term. 
Died January 1, 1862, at Louisville, Kentucky. 
Died July 18, 1862, at Tuscumbia, Alabama. 



Discharged May 22, 1864, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged Sejitember 17, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged February 16, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, September 1,'63. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, September 1,'()3. 
Wd. battle of Utoy Creek; inhosp.; m. o. Sept. 1864. 

Died June 30, 1864, at Chattanooga, Tennessee. 
Mustered out June 3, 1865; substitute. 
Mustered out with company; veteran. 



146 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Nataet. 



Holmes, John Q 

Halbert, Otto..- 

Hiuiinelspaugh, Anthony 
Hartis, William 

Hazolie, Leonard 

Jamison, Renwick J 

Johnson, Warren S 

Kloindenst, John 

Knntz, Henry 

Kemp, Maurice M 

Leiberman, William 

Lassner, Jesse 

Langendorf, Sebastiers_. 

Motz, Joseph 

McDunel, Henry 

Mann, Frederick 

Meister, Jacob 

Jlclntie, James 

Mepbis, Charles 

McFadden, James 

Moletoe, Nicholas 

Maier, John 

McCarty, John 

Nagley, John 

Nicholson, John 

Poe, Conard 

Pelee, Jolin 

Prummer, John 

Pechard, William 

Patterson, Eugene M__ 

Rhodie, Frederick 

Roswinkel, Christopher 

Ringle, George 

Rupp, William 

Rhodie, Harmond 

Schaffer, John 

Seis, Jacob 

Spencer, Samuel 

Schenaway, Lewis 

Schamberger, Michael _ 
Schevalier, Abraham A. 

Sheil, William 

Smith, John 

Stevenson, James D 

Short, Frank 

Samse, William 

Teiterman, Charles 

Vaska, Joseph 

Volkstaedt, Frederick __ 

Winnie, Gotleib 

Weitzel, Henry 

Warder, John 

Weitzel, John 

Waggoner, John 

Wickham, James 

Wheaton, Joseph 



Rank. 



Private. 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Remarks. 



Sept. 5,1861 
Oct. 23,1862 
Mch. 5,1862 
Sept.24, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1S61 
Jan. 23, 186-1 
Sept. 5, 1801 
Sept.27, 1864 
Sept.27, 1864 
Jan. 23, lK(i4 
Aug. 17, 1.S61 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5,1861 
Sept. 26, 1864 
Sept. 5,1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Sept. 5,1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Feb. 3, 1864 
Jan. 22, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Jan. 30, 1864 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Sept. 1, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Sept. 1, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Sept. 9, 1863 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 1, 1861 
Jan. 5, 1863 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 17,1861 
Feb. 14, 1865 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Mch. 1, 1862 
Jan. 22, 1864 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 
Sept. 5,1861 
Sept. 1, 1861 



Mustered out September 12, 1864, on expiration term. 
Cap. at Chick.; d. Andersonville Prison, July, 1864. 
Discharged March 27, 1865, on expiration of term. 
Mustered out June 3, 1865; substitute. 
Wd. in action, June, '64; dis. June,'()5, Surg, eft.; vet. 
Mustered out with company, July 11, 1865. 
Promoted to Hospital Steward, June 23, 1863. 
Mustered out June 3, 1865; substitute. 
Mustered out June 3, 1865; substitute. 
Mustered out with company, July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Wounded Aug. 7, '64; in ho.sp.; m. o. Sept. 12, 1864. 

Mustered out June 3, 1865; substitute. 

Trans, to Veteran Engineer Corps, September 10, '64. 

Discharged July 5, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharged July 17, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharged September 16, 1862, on Surgeon's eft. 

Trans, to Veteran Reserve Corps, April 30, 1864. 

Cap. Aug. 29, '64; escaped Nov. '64; m. o. co.; veteran. 

Mustered out with company, July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with company, July 11, 1865. 

Discharged July 5, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharged July 17, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Wd. Chickamauga; in hospital; m. o. September, 1864. 

Mustered out September 12, 1864, on expiration term. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Mustered out September 12, 1864, expiration term. 

Discharged September 20, 1864, Surgeon's certificate. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Killed at battle of Utoy Creek, August 5, 1864. 

Mustered out September 12, 1864, expiration term. 
Wd. Chickamauga; in hospital; m. o. September, 1864. 
Mustered out September 12, 1864, expiration term. 
Mustered out September 22, 1864, expiration term. 
Mustered out with company; veteran. 
Mustered out with company, July 11, 1865. 

Discharged June 9, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 
Trans, to Veteran Reserve Corps, April 30, 1864. 
Trans, to Co. C, 4th U. S. Cavalry, December 1, 1862. 
Cap. Chickamauga; died Andersonville, May 17, 1864. 
Discharged May 23, 1803, Surgeon's certificate. 
Mustered out, August, 1865, Springfield, 111.; veteran. 
Mustered out with company, July 11, 1865. 
Trans, to Veteran Reserve Corps, November 1, 1863. 
Promoted to Principal Musician, June 30, 1863. 
Mustered out with company, July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, July 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustei-ed out September 22, 1864, expiration term. 
Cap. Chickamauga; died Andersonville, Nov. 16, 1864. 
Discharged March 16, 1863. 



COMPANY I. 



Names. 



John W. McCabe 
William B. Pugh.. 

Josiah Farmington 
Henry W. Bigelow 







Rank. 




Captain. 


59 


(( 


25 


Ist Lieut. 


34 


ii 


23 



Bate of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Sept. 5,1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 

Sept. 5,1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 



jRemorts. 



Resigned May 2, 1862. 

Pro. from 2d Lt. co. A, Nov. '62; to A. A. G. 3d Brg. 3d 

Div. 14th Corps; mustered out with company. 
Resigned May 2, 1862. 
Pro. to 2d Lt. from 1st Sgt. co. C, Mar. '62; 1st Lt. co. 

H, November, 1864. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



147 



Names. 



Andrew J. Morse 

Jesse Trapp 

Alexander Walp 

Nathaniel 0. Cobb 

John E. Teal 

Oscar N. Gunn 

James F. Pray 

Thomas Litchfield 

Charles B. Mitchell 

Edward Sly 

George Smith 

Thomas Johnson 

David Soper 

John H. Bateman 

John Welch 

Alfred O. Gunn 

Peter Breidling 

Matthew Scott 

Owen T. Williams 

William Gaunt 

Fredrick Jaberg 

Hiram Davis 

John Cable 

Daniel Heffelbower 

Travis Adams 

Jonathan Miller 

Wiley Hamilton 

William O. Butler 

John Foster 

Herman Hanson 

Benjamin F. Kerr 

James E. Wildy 

William H. Haynes 

Thomas Wolfinger 

Levi McMulleu 

Abbott, James H 

Bateman, Peter 

Berry, Edward 

Birch, Charles 

Bott, William 

Brown, John W 

Bulger, Lorenzo 

Buzzard, Jacob 

Burton, George 

Bloom, Charles A 

Brown, Benedict 

Barges, William 

Benjamin, Nathan AV 

Bronson, John P 

Berger, Jacob 

Bowser, Josiah 

Cronise, Thomas J 

Cressey, Mason 

Cressey, Josiah 

Clark, Leroy E :'. 

Coder, Noah W 

Cable, George 

Clarkson, Charles 

Criplive, JohnW 

Davis, Samuel 

Denning, William 

Day, Newton 

Dark, AVilliam H 

Dell, McDonald 

Dobson, Daniel 

Dorsey, Hamilton 



Rank. 



1st Lieut. 



2d Lieut. 



1st Sergt. 



Sergeant. 



Corporal 



Private. 



36 

24 

41 
26 

18 
24 
19 
19 

22 
25 

19 
19 
18 
21 
19 
24 
21 
24 
20 
18 

21 
18 
20 
18 
18 
20 
18 
18 
48 
20 
19 
25 
19 
21 
33 
21 
19 

33 

22 
18 
21 
18 
18 
18 
25 
21 
41 
29 
18 
19 
18 
32 
23 
20 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
23 
18 
22 
26 
24 
30 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Aug. 16, 1861 
Sept. 5,1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 
Aug. 17, 1861 

Sept. 5, lS6l 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Nov. 19, 1863 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5, 1861 

Sept. 5,1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Feb. 1, 1864 
Jan. IS, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Jan. 11, 1864 
Jan. 25, 1864 
Sept. 28, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Feb. 12, 1864 
Sept. 28, 1864 
Sept. 17, 1863 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5,1861 
Sept. 5,1861 
Feb. 26, 1862 
Feb. 11, 1864 
Jan. 13, 1864 
Jan. 28, 1864 
Sept. 27, 1864 
Sept. 26, 1864 
Sept. 26, 1864 
Feb. 9,1864 
Sept. 24,1864 
Sept. 27,1864 
Sept. 27,1864 



Scmarks. 



Pro. from Q. M. Sgt. Nov. '64; ap. Adjutant, Jan. '65. 
Ap. 1st Sgt.; pro. Sgt. Maj., July, '64; 1st Lt. Jan. '65; 

mustered out with company; veteran. 
Resigned Nov. 15, 1861. 
Pro. from 1st Sergt. A, Oct. '62; died Oct. '64; wounded 

at Jonesboro. 
Appointed Sergt. Major Feb. 10, 1863. 
Promoted to 2d Lieut. Co. D, Dec. 1862. 
Ap. from Sgt. July, 1864: killed at Jonesboro, Sept. '64. 
Ap. Corj)!. Jan. 186.'!; Sergt. Sept. 1864; 1st Sergt. April, 

1865; mustered out with company; veteran. 
Wounded at Jonesboro; died at Atlanta, Oct. 1864. 
Ap. from Corpl. June, 1863; captured at Chickamauga; 

in Richmond prison; m. o. Sept. 1864, exp. term. 
Ap. Jan. 1863; wd. at Chick.; m. o. Sept.'64, exp. term. 
Ap. Corpl. Feb. '64; Sergt. Sept. '64; m. o. with Co.; vet. 
Ap. Corpl. May, '64; Sergt. Nov. '64; m. o. with Co.; vet. 
Ap. Corpl. May,'64; Segt. April, '65; m. o. with Co.; vet. 
Ap. Corpl. May, '64; Sergt. April, '65; m. o. with Co.; vet. 
Died Nov. 25, 1861, at Lexington, Ky. 
Ap. Corpl. Sept. 1864; mustered out with Co.; veteran. 
Ap. Corpl. Jan. '63; cap. at Chick.; m. o. Co. exp. term. 
Ap. Corpl. Nov. 1862; m. o. Sept. 1864, exp. of term. 
Ap. Corpl. Jan. 1863; captured at Chickamauga; died 

in Andersonville, July, 1864. 
Ap. Corporal Sept. 1864; m. o. with Co.; veteran. 
Ap. Corporal Nov. 1, 1864; m. o. with Co.; veteran. 
Ap. Corporal Nov. 1, 1864; m. o. with Co.; veteran. 
Ap. Corporal Nov. 1, 1864; m. o. with Co.; veteran. 
Ap. Corporal Nov. 20, 1864; m. o. with Co.; veteran. 
Ap. Corpl. Nov. '64; wd. head Jonesboro; m. o. Co.; vet. 
Ap. Corporal May, 1865; m. o. with Co.; veteran. 
Discharged April 30, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Di.scharged April 30, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged Oct. 22, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged Aug. 22, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged April 5, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged May 4, .1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Transferred to U. S. Engineer Corps, Aug. 15, 1864. 
Ap. Corporal Sept. 1, 1864; died Dec. 18, 1864. 
Mustered out with company; veteran. 
Captured at Chickamauga; escaped through tunnel at 

Libby, April, 1864; m. o. exp. of term, Sept. 1864. 
Captured at Chick.; in Andei'sonville; m. o. Jan. 1865. 
Captured at Chick.; in Andersonville; m. o. Jan. 1865. 
Mu.stered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 18()5. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Absent sick; mustered out June 29, 1865. 
Died March 22, 1862, at Nashville, Tenn. 
Discharged March 3, 1864, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged Oct. 28, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged June 21, 1865, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Mustered out June 3, 1865; substitute. 
Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Mustered out Sept. 12, 1864, on exp. of term of service. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga, Ga. Sept. 19, 1863. 
Discharged Sept. 5, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Wd. at Jonesboro; left arm amputated; dis. March, '65. 
Discharged Sept. 5, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out June 3, 1865, order War Dept.; sub. 
Mustered out June 3, 1865, order War Dept. sub. 
Trans, to 5th U. S. Col. Infantry, May, '65; substitute. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Absent, sick; mustered out" July, 1865; substitute. 
Absent, sick; mustered out July, 1S65; substitute. 
Absent, sick; mustered out July, 1865; substitute. 



148 



BISTORT OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Namet. 



Evans, Thomas 

Ebbert, David 

Estell, Emil 

Frost, William B 

French, Frank H 

Farmer, Joseph 

Foley, Joseph 

Foster, Richard W 

Foster, Christopher — 

Greene, John 

Goodwin, Oliver R 

Geesl)aeli, Benedict — 

Crockett, Samuel 

Gunn, Leonard H 

Geyser, William 

Graham, William 

Hepp, Jacob 

Howser, John 

Hanford, Charles 

Haines, Henry 

Huftill, Abraham 

Huyck, Saunders M 

Hart, Henry C 

Hefflehower, Simon, __ 
Henderson, Edward ,_ 

Huftill, Benjamin 

Holt, Williams 

Jenkins, Smith 

Jay, George E 

Jenkins, John 

Kerr, Thomas 

Knapp, Albert 

Limbrick, John 

McClelland, John 

Myers, I-eonard 

Moody, Edward 

Marker, William 

Marker, Thomas 

Monahan, Joseph 

McDermott, Cornelius 

McLaughlin, John 

Miller, William 

Nelson, David 

Newton, Charles W 

Newton, John G 

Orcutt, Curtis J 

Parkey, Gabriel B 

Potter, Edgar F 

Quiggle, Ozro F 

Reed, Anson A 

Ray, Julius 

Ragan, James 

Reed, Edwin F 

Roush, George W 

Ruckle, Henry C 

Ruckle, David 

Richter, Julius 

Reader, Levi 

Smith, Ossian W 

Seibring, William 

Strayer, John 

Snyder, George ._ 

Swift;, George 

Slater, Daniel 

Sly, Robert 

Spade, Isaac 

Sly, Edward R 

Stewig, William 

Strayer, Daniel 

Switzer, George 

Trumbull, William _ 
Trumbull, Rufus H ._. 



Rank. 



Private, 



40 

18 
20 
19 
27 
29 
24 
19 
19 
18 
28 
42 
35 
21 
20 
26 
18 
23 
18 
21 
19 
35 
29 
18 
18 
27 
21 
29 
18 
24 
18 
21 
18 
25 
25 
20 
20 
18 
18 
35 
29 
31 
18 
18 
19 
18 
19 
33 
18 
21 
21 
26 
18 
18 
19 
20 
31 
18 
21 
24 
18 
23 
26 
42 
18 
23 
18 
19 
20 
18 
19 
18 



Dote of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Sei>t. 5,1861 
Feb. 11, 1864 
Feb. n, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 27, 1864 
Sept. 27, 1864 
Jan. 20, 1864 
Feb. 11, 1864 
Sept. 25,1863 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1801 
Sept. 27, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Nov. 25, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Nov. 1, 1861 
Jan. 29, 1864 
Feb. 3,1864 
Jan. 28, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Feb. 3, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Oct. 9, 1862 
Oct. 24, 1862 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Jan. IS, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Feb. 11,1864 
Nov. 20, 1862 
Mar. 4, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Jan. 16, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept.. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Feb. 3,1864 
Jan. 11, 1864 
Jan. 12, 1864 
Nov. 16, 1863 
Jan. 12, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Feb. 12, 1864 
Sept. 17,1863 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Feb. 26, 1864 
Sept. 5,1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. .5,1861 
Dec. 15, 1863 
Jan. 29, 1864 
Jan. 22, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Feb. 20, 1864 
Oct. 24, 1862 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Feb. 11,1864 



Remarks. 



Mustered out Sept 12, 1864, exp. term of service. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Discharged Nov. 30, 1S61, on Surgeon's certiticate. 
Trans, to Veteran Reserve Corps April 30, 1S64. 
Mustered out June 3, 1865; substitute. 
Mustered out June 3, 1865; substitute. 
Mu.stered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Mastered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Died Jan. 30, 1865, at Nashville, Tenn. 
Trans, to l.st U. S. Engineer Corps Aug. 1862. 
Wd. at Chickamauga; m. o. Nov. '64, Columbus. 
Mu.stered out June 3, 1865; suh.stitute. 
Died Nov. 19, 1861, at Lexington, Ky. 
Mu.stered out with company; veteran. 
Mustered out with company; substitute. 
Captured at Chickamauga; mustered out Jan. 1865. 
Died July 4, 1862, at Nashville, Tenn. 
Died Oct. 6, 1863, from wounds at Chickamauga. 
Discharged July 15, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharged March 18, 1864; veteran. 

Mustered out w'ith company July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Missing Sept. 20, 1863. No further record. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Trans, to 1st U. S. Engineer Corps Aug. 15, 1864. 

Trans, to 3.5th O. V. L Jan. '65; m. o. Co.; veteran. 

Trans, to Veteran Reserve Corps April 9, 1864. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Discharged Dec. 31, 1861, Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharged May 22, 1863, Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharged Nov. 22, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 

Died Nov. 17, 1S6], at Lexington, Ky. 

Killed on picket line, front of Atlanta, Aug. 8, 1S64. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Killed in battle at Chickamauga Sept. 19, 1863. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Disc. June, 1865, Surgeon's certificate; veteran. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Killed Nov. 22, 1864, near Milledgeville, Ga. 

Cap. at Chickamauga; m. o. Jan. 1865, at Columbus. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Wounded in face at Jonesboro Sept. 1, '64; m. o. Co. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Died of wounds at Kenesaw Mountain, June, 1864. 

Died Sept. 30, 1.S64, from wounds at Jonesboro. 

Killed in battle at Jonesboro Sept. 1, 1864. 

Killed June 16, 1864, at Kenesaw Mountain. 

Died Oct. 9, 1866, wounds received at Chickamauga. 

Died April 11, 1864, near Atlanta, Ga. 

Discharged Dec. 12, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged May 2, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged June 9, 1865, order \\'ar Department. 
Mustered out May 29, 1865; substitute. 
Mustered out witli company July 11, 1865. 
Wd. at Jonesboro; in hosp.; ui. o. July, '65; veteran. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 
Wounded at Chickamauga; m. o. company July 11, '65. 
Mustered out Sept. 12, 1864, on expiration term. 
Wounded at Chickamauga; m. o. company July 11, '65. 



J 



THE WAR OP THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



149 



iVa?«cs, 



Van Fleet, Henry C__ 
Wagner, Benjamin F_ 

West, Isaac B 

Wolflnger, William __ 

Wood, William H 

Winchell, Eli 

Wood, Jonathan 

Wood, .James 

Webber, Otto 

Wetmore, Peter 

Weigel, Charles 

Wyman, Frederick __ 

Yager, George 

Zook, Joseph ___ 









Date of 


Rank. 




Entering the 
Service. 


Private. 


19 


Sept. 5, 1861 






19 


Sept. 5, 1861 






0'> 


Sept. 5, 1861 






19 


Sept. 5, 1861 






20 


Sept. 5, 1861 






22 


Sept. 5,1851 






62 


Sept. 5, 1861 






IS 


Sept. 5, 1861 






20 


Feb. 2, 1864 






13 


Sept. 5, 1861 






21 


Fe3. 9, 1864 






21 


Feb. 4, 1864 






20 


Sept. 5, 1861 






22 


Sept. 5, 1861 



Remarks. 



Cap. at Chickamanga; now in Monclova. 
Mustered out Sept. 12, 1864, on expiration term. 
Mustered out Sept. 12, 1864, on expiration term, 
Wd. at Chickam.auga; in hospital; m. o. Sept. 1864. 
Discharged Sept. 5, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged March 12, 1864, Surgeon's certificate. 
Transferred to Co. A, Nov. 1, 1862. 
Mustered out with company; veteran. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865; substitute. 
Mustered out witli company July 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865; substitute. 
Mustered out with company July 11, 1865; substitute. 
Died Nov. 13, 1863, from wounds at Chickamauga. 



KOLL OF HONOR, FOUETEENTH REGIMENT, OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



Name. 



AUtop, Benjamin 

Anderson, William 

Applegate. Aaron 

Anderson James 

Armstrong, Thomas 

Ballinger, David 

Bogart, William J 

Bowers, Stephen 

Bowers Francis M 

Bushing, George 

Barton, John P 

Barrett, Michael 

Baldwin, Harlow M 

Brichfield, Eli 

Burchfield, Aaron H 

Boyer, Lemuel R 

Burvvell, James 

Bowen, Robert 

Beeker, William S 

Byers, George A 

Belford, William 

Bruker, George 

Barr, Amos 

Bueklin, Hamilton 

Borden, Edward 

Ballinger, George 

Brown, Henry A 

Beard, Daniel 

Butler. William H 

Bowers, Solomons... _. 

Brint, John 

Barrington, James 

Brumhoofer. Francis 

Bennett, Perry 

Benuor. William 

Black, Walter W 

Bartell. Harvey B 

Bowers, William H 

Brendle, Joseph E 

Brown, Benedict 

Beal. Robert 

Bates, Henry 

Bixley, Charles W 

Cobb, Nathaniel O 

Conard, John Q. A 

Cressey, Mason 

Church, George C 



Co. 



Private. 



Sergeant. 
Private. 



Corporal 
Private. 



Corporal. 
Private. 

u 

Sergeant. 

Private. 

(( 

Corporal. 



Private. 

Corporal. 

Private. 



2d Lieut. 
Private. 

Sergeant. 



Died. 



May 23, 
Sept. 19, 
April 14 
Aug. 17, 
Oct. 4, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Julv 5, 
Oct". 7, 
July 28, 
Sept. 20, 
Nov. 25, 
Dec. 4, 
Sept. 27, 
Mav 16, 
Sept. 23, 
Nov. 1, 
Jan. 2, 
Dec. 3, 
Dec. 8, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Nov. 28, 
Dec. 5, 
Feb. 27, 
Feb. 9, 
Sept. 19, 
Dec. 16, 
Sept. 9, 
Sept. 19, 
Oct. 12, 
Sept. 1, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 1, 
Sept. 25, 
Nov. 29, 



Buried. 



1862 Corinth, Miss... 

1863 Chattanooga, Tenn 
,1862Shiloh, Tenn 

1864 Marietta, Ga 

1862 Louisville, Ky 

1863 Chattanooga, Tenn 
1863 Chattanooga, Tenn 
1863 Nashville, Tenn 

1863 Chattanooga, Tenn 

1864 Columbus, O 

1863 Chattanooga, Tenn 

1863 Chattanooga, Tenn 

1861 Lebanon, Ky 

1864 Andersonville, Ga. 

1862 Jeff. Barrracks,Mo. 

1863 Chattanooga, 'Tenn 

1863 Chattanooga, Tenn 

1864 Chattanooga, Tenn 
1863 Chattanooga, Tenn 
1863 Chattanooga, Tenn 

1863 Marietta, Ga 

1863'Marietta, Ga 

1861 Lexington, Ky 

1861|Lexington, Ky 

1862iLehanon, Ky 

1864, Toledo, O 

1863 Chattanooga, Tenn 
1863 Nashville, Tenn _. 

1862 Nashville, Tenn _. 
1863' Chattanooga, Tenn 
1864 1 Nashville, Tenn _. 

1864jMarietta, (ia 

1863:;\Iarietta, Ga 



Remarks. 



1864 
1864 
1863 



Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga._ 



Sept. 10, 1864 Marietta, Ga 

July 20, 1864 Marietta, Ga 

Sept. 1, 1864 Marietta, Ga 

Mar. 22, 1862;Nashville, Tenn _. 
Jan. 25, 1865|New Albany, Ind. 
Aug. 28, 1864'Nashville, Tenn .. 

May 9, 1862 Cincinnati, O 

Oct. 3, 1864 Marietta, Ga 

July 14, 1864 Andersonville, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 1863 Chattanooga, Tenn 
Aug. 18, 1864 Andersonville, Ga. 



At Hamburg, Miss. — disease. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Wounds in battle April 7, 1862. 
Killed in battle near Atlanta. 
Disease. Cave Hill Cemetery. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Died of chronic diarrhtea. 
Of wounds at battle Chickamauga. 
Disea.se. In Green Lawn Cemetery. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Killed at battle Missionary Ridge. 
Died of congestion of lungs. 
Cap. Chickamauga; died in prison. 
Died — disease. 

Of wounds at Cliickamauga,Sept.'63. 
Wounds at Chickamauga, Sept. '63. 
Died — disease. 

Wds. at Missionary Ridge, Nov. '63. 
Wounds at Chickamauga, Sept. '63. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Died — disease. City Cemetery. 
Died— disease. City Cemetery. 
Died in hospital, typhoid fever. 
Died at Antwerp, "o. — disease. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Died of chronic diarrhoea. 
Died— disease. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Of wounds at battle of Joncsboro. 
Killed at liattle of Jonesboro. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 
Died in hosp. near Atlanta — disease. 
Wd. and cap. at Chickamauga; died 

in Rebel prison, Atlanta. 
Of wounds battle Atlanta, July, '64. 
Killed at battle Peachtree Creek. 
Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 
Died — disease. 
Disease. In City Cemetery. 
Died — disease. 

Disease. Spring Grove Cemetery. 
Wd. battle of Jonesboro, Sept. '64. 
Cap. at C hickamauga; died in prison. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Cap. at Chickamauga; died in prison. 



150 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Name. 



Co 



Carroll, James 

Cook, Harrison 

Cole, George W 

Cluckey, John 

Campbell, Whitney I - 

Clark. Henry C 

Clifford, Henry 

Cone, William 

CoUard, Arthur L 

Case, John I 

Click, Joseph 

Cook, George 

Clements, Andrew B.. 

Cain, John 

Conn. James 

Davis, Thomas 

Dings, Morgan 

Dudley, Joseph 

Davis, Charles 

Ditzler, John 

Davidson, Isaac 

Davit, Charles E 

Davis, William H 

Disbrow, Peter W 

Davis, Andrew J 

Doring, Reuben F 

Enfield, Jacob 

Edsul, William 

Ellis, Isaac B 

Fry, John J 

Fox, Lawson 

Fox, Isaiah 

Featheringale, John B-_ 

Fuller, Reuben M 

Fleming, Edwin D 

Forest, Joseph A 

FuUerton, James E 

Frentenburg, James 

Forbes, Frederick 

Gaunt, William 

Gutherie, Sanford 

Guitzell, Andrew 

Glancy, Da\ad M 

Gunn, Alfred O 

Gunn, Leonard 

Gordon, Jonathan C 

Gordon Reynold 

Green, John 

Gillman, John 

Grubb, Abraham _ 

Gilbert, Thomas W 

Gilbert, Uriah 

Graham, William I_. 

Hepp, John 

Halbert, Otto 

Hudson, Milton ._ 

Hall, Lyman S 

Harrison, John W.__II 

Hanford, Charles I 

Howser, John '_ 

Haver, John "~" 

Heatlev, William' 

Holtzell, Jacob 

Hoover, Wilham 

Hanson, Christian 

Horton, George W 

Hanson, John C 

Huntley, Albert H.I_~ 

Hazelitt, John F 

Hendrix, Philomen ' 

Hulse, Lester 

Harris, Weedon H._II"I 

Harmover, John I 

Jones, Wheehng A __!' 



Rank. 



F 


Private. 


K 


(( 


C 


(( 


B 


it 


C 


11 


D 


(( 


F 


(< 


F 


u 


B 


(< 


F 


(( 


D 


(( 


K 


(( 


D 


Corporal. 


E 


Private. 


K 


(( 


D 


(( 


F 


(( 


B 


(( 


B 


(( 


K 


(( 


K 


(( 


B 


Corporal. 


B 


Private. 


C 


(( 


A 


ti 


G 


Corporal. 


C 


Private. 


D 


" 


H 


(( 


C 


(( 


C 


(( 


D 


ft 


K 


K 


K 


(< 


K 


Corporal. 


E 


Private. 


F 


Corporal. 


H 


Private. 


H 


" 


I 


Corporal. 


K 


Private. 


H 


" 


K 


Sergeant. 


i 


(( 


I 


Private. 


G 


Sergeant. 


G 


Private. 


I 


" 


A 


Sergeant. 


E 


Private. 


A 


Sergeant. 


A 


Private. 


E 


Sergeant. 


A 


Private. 


H 


(( 


K 


(( 





Corporal. 


B 


Private. 


I 


" 


I 


" 


E 


(i 


E 


(( 


E 


(( 


G 


(( 


G 


(t 


C 


11 


H 


Sergeant. 


B 


Corporal. 


G 


Private. 


D 


(1 


F 


(( 


E 


Corporal. 


H 


u 


E 


Private. 



DM. 



Buried. 



July 28, 1862 
Mar. 28, 1864 
Feb. 6,1862 
Dec. 6, 1861 
Mar. 1, 1862 
Sept. 1, 1864 
Sept. 1, 1864 
Sept. 1, 1864 
April 20,1862 
April 5, 1862 
Oct. 24, 1862 
Feb. 2, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Sept. 20, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Aug. 7, 181)2 
Sept. 19,186:; 
Mar. 26, 1862 
Nov. 7, 1861 
June 19, 1863 
Sept. 1,1864 
Aug. 8, 1864 
Aug. 8, 1864 
Aug. 10, 1864 
Sept. 20, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Nov. 15, 1861 
Oct. IS, 1863 
June 17, 1864 
Nov. 30, 1862 
Nov. 23, 1861 
Sept. 8,1862 
Sept. 19, 1863: 
Julv 1, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1863 
June 6, 1862 
July 30, 1864 
Jan. 1, 1862 
July 18, 1862 
July 12, 1864' 
Feb. 22, 1862 
June 30, 1864 
Dec. 24, 1861 
Nov. 25, 1861 
Nov. 19, 1861 
May 10, 1862 
Aug. 3, 1864 
Jan. 30, 1865 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Sept. 2, 1862 
Oct. 22, 1863 
Sept. 6, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Julv 2, 1864 
Dec. 2, 1861 
Sept. 20, 1863: 
Feb. 20, 1864| 
Oct. 6, 1863 
July 4, 18621 
April 4, 1864i 
Sept. 1, 1864' 
Dec. 4, 18631 
Mch. 9, 1864! 
July 16, 1862: 
Sept. 20, 186:i 
Sept. 17, 1862; 
Oct. 23,1864: 
Sept. 2, 1864 
Sept. 4, 1864 
June 17, 1864 
Sept. 1, 1864 
Oct. 19, ISii.'. 
April 4, 1862 



Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 

Louisville, Ky 

Lexington, Ky 

Nashville, Tenn _. 

Mai-ietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Mound City, I1L_- 
Nashville, Tenn __ 
Nashville, Tenn __ 
Nashville, lenn __ 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 

Louisville, Ky 

Loudon, Ky 

Nashville, Tenn ._ 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Nashville, Tenn.. 

Lebanon, Ky 

Nashville, Tenn _ 
Chattanooga, Tenn 

Corinth, Miss 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Nashville, Tenn._ 
Nashville, Tenn._ 

Louisville, Ky 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Andersonville, Ga. 
Nash'^'ille, Tenn__ 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Lexington, Ky_ 
Lexington, Ky_ 

Lexington, Ky 

Nashville, Tenn. - 
Nashville, Tenn... 
Nashville, Tenn .. 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Nashville, Tenn... 
Nashville, Tenn... 

Marietta, Ga 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Andersonville, Ga. 

Cincinnati, O 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Cincinnati, O 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Nashville, Tenn.. 
Chattanooga, Tenn 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Nashville, Tenn 

Louisville, Ky 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Nashville, Tenn__ 
Nashville, Tenn._ 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta. Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Chattanooga, Tenn; 
Cincinnati. O i 



Remarks. 



Died at Tuscumbia, Ala. — disease. 

Died Ringgold; wds. in bat.Nov.'63. 

D. at Camp Beach. Cave Hill Cem. 

Died — disease. City Cemetery. 

Died— disea.se. 

Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 

Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 

Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 

Died at Shiloh, Tenn. — disease. 

Died— disease. 

Died — disease. 

Died of chronic diarrhoea. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Kille<l at battle of Chickamauga. 

Killed near Huntsville, Ala. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Disea.se. In Cave Hill Cemetery. 

Died in hospital — disease. 

Disc. June 5, '63, Surg, certificate. 

Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 

Wds. battle Kingston, May 18, '64. 

Killed in action near Atlanta. 

Killed in action near Atlanta. 

Tr. to V.V.Eng. K. at Chickamauga. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Died of fever at Gallatin, Tenn. 

Wds. at Chickamauga, Sept. 19, '63. 

Died — disease. 

Died — disease. 

Died — tlisease. 

Died at Tuscumbia, Ala.— disease. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Died — disease. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Died — disease. 

Wds. Kenesaw Mt., June, 1864. 

Died — disease. Cave Hill Cem. 

Died at Tuscumbia, Ala. — disease. 

Cap. Chickamauga — died in prison. 

Died at Spring Hill, cong. lungs. 

Died — disease. 

Typhoid fever. In City Cemetery. 

Died — disease. Interred City Cem. 

Died — disease. Interred City Cem. 

Died — disease. 

Died wounds in action July, 1864. 

Died — disease. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

jli pri j~j "1 f^ j^ o f^ r* 

Wds. Chickamauga, Sept. 20, 1863. 
Wds. at Jonesboro, Sept. 1, 1864. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Cap. Chickamauga. Died in prison. 
Dis. Int. Spring Grove Cemetery. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Disease. Spring Grove Cemetery. 
Wds. at Chickamauga, Sept. 1863. 
Died — disease. 

Died at Ringgold, Ga. — disease. 
Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 
Wds. at Chickamauga, Sept., 1863. 
Wounds in action, Dec. 25, 1863. 
Disease. In Cave Hill Cemetery. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Died at TyreeSprings,Tenn., disease. 
Died — disease. 

Wounds at Jonesboro, Sept. 1, 1864. 
Wounds at Jonesboro, Sept. 1, 1864. 
Killed in action at Kenesaw Mt. 
Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 
Wds. at Chickamauga, Sept. 19, '63, 
Disease. In Spring Grove Cem. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



151 



Name. 



James, Malachi 

Jackson, John 

Johnson, James 

Jacob, Christophei' 

Keezer, Alden G 

Keezer, Samuel A 

Keezer, Edwin 

Killin, Hamilton 

Keneval, Charles S 

Kimball, John C 

Kaine, Alexander 

Kelley, Gustin 

Kirk," Walter B 

Keizer, Samuel L 

Kramer, Lewis 

Knapp, Adelbert 

Kitchell, William 

Lane, Dennis 

Louis, Benjamin 

Lonagan, Thomas 

Laughlin, Wm. J 

Lutz, Michael 

Lasure, Robert C 

Lamphere, Alonzo 

Luce, David 

Lafieur, Antone 

Leach, David 

Lafontaine. Oliver 

Lightner, Samuel H 

Long, Ephraim 

Le filer, David 

Lathrop, Wilson C 

Limboch, Charles 

Mitchell, William B 

Meek, Andrew J 

Morrison, Matthew 

Morris, Rufus 

Merrill, Levin M 

Miller, William H 

Miller, John 

Miller, John W 

Miller, Sylvester 

Murphy, George 

Mack, Jacob H 

Mangle, Joseph 

McCombs, William 

McMullen, Levi 

March, Daniel 

Marker, AVilliam 

Morgan, Henry F 

Morris, AVilliam b' 

Munson, Eliakim 

McBride, W. H. W 

McCombs, Noah A 

Moon, Thomas 

Mark, John 

Meek, George W 

Moody, Edward 

Navarre, Alexander 

Nelson, David 

Nicholson, Archibald --. 

Owen, John 

Osborn, Henry N 

Oglevee, Lewis 

Ott, George 

O'Callahan, Cornelius .._ 

O'Callahan, Bernard 

Oglevee, Oliver 

Oat, John 

Osborn, Joseph M 

Porter. John B 

Packer, James 

Porter, William H 

Pratt, Abraham 



Co. Sank. 



Private. 



Corporal. 
Private. 



Died. 



Buried. 



June 22, 1862 Cincinnati, 0.. 



2d Lieut. 

Private. 
Corporal. 

Private. 



Corporal. 
Sergeant. 
Private. 



2d Lieut. 
Private. 



Corporal. 
Corporal. 
Private. 

1st Sergt. 
Private. 



Corporal. 

it 

Private. 

(( 

Corporal. 

(( 

(( 
Private. 

Corporal. 
Private. 



Dec. 23, 1861 
Feb. 12, 1862 
Sept. .3, 1864 
Sept. 24, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1863 
April 9, 1865 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Nov. 21, 1861 
Apr. 22, 1864 
Dec. 16, 1861 
June 29, 1864 
Sept. 1, 1864 
Nov. 3, 1862 
Sept. 23, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Aug. IS, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Dec. 26, 1862 
Mch. 2, 1865 
July 18, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Nov. 23, 1861 
June 7, 1865 
Nov. 25, 1861 
Dec. 1, 1861 
Nov. 13, 1862 
Jan. 24, 1864 
Dec. 12, 1862 
Aug. 13, 18(i4 
Aug. 5, 1864 
Sept. 1, 1864 
Sept. 28, 1864 
Apr. 24, 1862 
Sept. 17, 1862 
June 18, 181)4 
May 21, 1864 
Mch. 13,1864 
May 19, 1865 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Nov. 25, 1863 
June 13, 1864 
May 12, 1865 
Dec. 9, 1862 
Aug. 13, 1864 
Dec. 18, 1864 
Sept. 1, 1864 
Aug. 8, 1864 
Sept. 1, 1864 
Oct. 16, 1863 
Sept.l9, 1863 
Dec. 8, 1861 
Jan. 22, 1863 
June 3, 1864 
Feb. 23, 1863 
Feb. 15, 1862 
Nov. 17, 1861 
June 27, 1862 
Sept. 19, 18G3 
Dec. 24, 1863 
Sept.l9, 1863 
Sept. 1, 1864 
Sept.l9, 18( " 
July 9, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Sept. 25, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Sept. 7, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Sept. 25, 1863 
Feb. 9, 1862 
Nov. 25, 1863 
Jan. 27,1863 



Lebanon, Ky 

Lebanon, Ky 

Marietta, Ga 

Nashville, Tenn__ 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 

Lexington, Ky 

New Albany, Ind_ 

Marietta, Ga 

Lebanon, Ky 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
( Uiattanooga, Tenn 

Louisville, Ky 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Lebanon, Ky 

Marietta, Ga 

Andersonville, Ga. 
Chattanooga, Tenn 

Lexington, Ky 

Philadelphia, Pa.. 

Lexington, Ky 

Lexington, Ky 

Nashville, Tenn.. 
Nashville, Tenn.. 
Nashville, Tenn__ 

Marietta, Ga 

^Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Cincinnati, O 

Jefl'erson Bks., Mo. 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
C'hattanooga, Tenn 
Philadelphia, Pa__ 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
New Albany, Ind. 
Newberne, N. C.__ 
Nashville, Tenn__ 
Nashville, Tenn._ 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Nashville, Tenn.-_ 

Marietta, Ga 

Nashville, Tenn.__ 

Toledo,© 

Lexington, Ky 

Cincinnati, 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Danville, Va 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Marietta, Ga, 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Corinth, Miss 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 

Marietta, Ga 

Nashville, Tenn 

Marietta, Ga 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Lebanon, Ky 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Stone River, Tenn. 



Semarks. 



Disease. In Spring Grove Cem. 

Chronic diarrhoea, Bardstown, Ky. 

Died —disease. 

Wounds at Jonesboro, Sept. 1864. 

Died — disease. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Died — disease. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Died at Mt. Vernon, Ky — disease. 

Died at Ringgold, CTa. — disea.se. 

Disease. Interred in City Cemetery. 

Disease. Interred in City Cemetery. 

Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 

Died — disease. 

Wds. Chickamauga, Sept. 19, 1863. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Disease. Interred in Cave Hill Cem. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Died — disease. 

Died nr. Catawba Riv., S.C, disease. 

In prison. Cap. at Chickamauga. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Disease. Interred in City Cem. 

Died in McClellan Hosp. — disease. 

Disease. Interred in City Cem. 

Disease. Interred in City Cem. 

Discharged on Surg. ctf. Aug. 4,1862. 

Died — disease. 

Died — disease. 

Died near Atlanta, Ga. — disease. 

Killed at battle of Utoy Creek, Ga. 

Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 

Wds. at Jonesboro, Sept. 1, 1864. 

Disease. In Spring Grove Cem. 

Hospital, Corinth, Miss. — disease. 

Died — disease. 

Wounds at Resaca, May 14, 1864. 

Died at Ringgold, Ga. — disease. 

McClellan Hospital — disease. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Killed at battle of Mission Ridge. 

Diarrhcea. City Cemetery. 

Died — disease. 

Died — disease. 

Died — disease. 

Died near Atlanta — disease. 

Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 

Killed near Atlanta. 

Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 

Died in hospital — disease. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Died Crab Orchard, Ky. — disease. 

Died — disease. 

Killed in action near Atlanta. 

Died — disease. 

D. at home, Williams co. — disease. 

Disease. Interred in City Cemetery. 

Disease. Spring Grove Cemetery. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Cap. at Chickamauga. D. in prison. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Died — disease. 

Killed at Ijattle of Chickamauga. 

Wds. at Chickamauga, Sept. 19, '63. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Died — disease. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 

Wds. Chickamauga, Sept. 19, 1863. 

Died of congestive chills. 

Killed at battle of Mission Ridge. 

Died — disease. 



152 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Name. 



Pond, Benjamin F 

Palmer, Daniel 

Pippus, William 

Porter, Alva 

Platter, William 

IVlkey, Edward 

Perrine, James N 

Perry, Francis M 

Prav, James F 

Ploiit, Peter 

Parrish, Benjamin 

Platter, Cliristopher 

Purcell, Francis M 

Preston, Esseltine 

Quiggle, Ozro F 

Ramsey, David 

Rannafls, Alonzo 

Ruckle, DaWd 

Russell, Granville 

Reider, Levi 

Richter, Julius 

Roop, William 

Robideaux, Eli 

Randall, Henrv V 

Roth, John P_". 

Shanteau, Thomas 

Strayer, John 

Scott, William 

Seams, William 

Speigle, Frederick 

Shindler, Anthony 

Speaker, Jacob. ." 

Steen, Hugh S 

Shanteau, Peter 

Sampson, William I 

Stopford, Wilbur F 

Summerlott, John 

Sifer, Abraham F 

Smith, Christopher. 

Smith, George W 

Smith, James B 

Smith, James W 

Smith, William 

Smith, Vincent 

Smith, Barney 

Smith, Hiram 

Smith, Porter 

Smith, William E 

Smith, Ossian W 

Sagmeyer, Henry 

Seabring, William 

Salmon, Byron. 

Segur, William 

Sulier, David 

Shanteau, Francis 

Tennaut, Edwin T 

Tillotson, Ebenezer C __ . 

Tarbox, Arthur D 

Tate, John 

Tate, Perry H '_ 

Virtner, Perry 

Van Fleet, Henry C 

Van Orman, John 

Waush, Nicholas 

Weigle, Andrew 

Walker, Josiah T 

Waldron, Henry L 

Ward, William 

Wickham, James 

Williams, Cyrus 

Wilhams, Joseph K 

Wilkinson, Albert S ._~ 
Wry, George 



Co. 



G 
K 
K 
E 
E 
F 
A 
B 
I 
C 
K 
G 
G 
E 

I 
K 

F 
I 
D 
I 
I 
H 
C 
E 
E 
C 
I 
K 
H 
D 
E 
E 
E 
D 
G 

C 
A 
G 
G 
F&S 
D 
G 
E 
G 
E 
F 
G 
I 
F 
I 
K 
A 
C 
C 
G 
K 
A 
K 
K 
K 
I 
F 
E 
C 
B 
A 
K 
H 
A 
A 
A 
K 



Sank. 



Private. 



Corporal. 

(( 

Private. 
Sergeant. 
Corporal. 
1st Sergt. 

Private. 



Captain. 
Private. 



Hos. St'd. 
Private. 

Corporal. 
Private. 



Sergeant. 

Private. 
Sergeant. 

Private. 



2d Lieut. 
Private. 



Corporal. 
Private. 
Sergeant. 
Private. 

Sergeant. 
Private. 



Died. 



Oct. 

Mch. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Feb. 

May 

Mch. 

Apr. 

Feb. 



22, 1863 

18, 1S()2 

19, lS(i4 

24, isi;:; 

22, l.S(i2 

18, lS(i4 

2, 1804 

6, ist;4 

1, lS(i4 

29, LSI 14 

5, 185.3 

18. 1864 

16, 1862 

15, 1865 



Buried. 



Nov. 22, 
Mav 19. 
Feb. 6, 
June 27, 
Feb. 24, 
Sept.l9, 
Sept.30, 
Aug. 5, 
Sept.20, 
Oct. 26, 
May 27, 
Jan. 22, 
Apr. 11, 
Sept.l9, 
May 17, 
Aug. 11, 
Oct. 27, 
Sept. 25, 
Feb. 2, 
Sept. 27, 
June 7, 
Sept. 1, 
Sept. 23, 
July 29, 
Sept. 19, 
Oct. 24, 
June 23, 
Mch. 14, 
June 22, 
Dec. 25, 
Sept. 19, 
Apr. 2, 
Apr. 16, 
Jan. 24, 
June 16, 
May 22, 
Oct. 9, 
Oct. 25, 
Sept. 24, 
Aug. 15, 
Apr. 8, 
Oct. 15, 
Sept. 24, 
Sept. 1, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 1, 
Sept. 19. 
Oct. 7, 
Aug. 6, 
July 12, 
Jan. 8, 
Dec. 29, 
Oct. 16, 
Sept. 19, 
Nov. 16, 
Oct. 6, 
Dec. 12, 
Jan. 5, 
Nov. 8, 



1864 
1864 
1862 
1864 
1862 
1863 
1S(;4 
1.S64 
1863 
1863 
1864 
1862 
1864 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1863 
1862 
186; 
1864 
18(i4 
l.sii:; 
isi;2 
1S6.J 
1.S6L' 

1863 

1862 

1862 

1861 

1863 

1864 

1862 

lSli4 

1.S64 

1862 

1863 

1863 

1864 

1864 

1862 

1863 

18()4 

1864 

1863 

1864 

1863 

1864 

1864 

1864 

186 

1863 

1864 

1863 

1864 

1863 

1863 

1864 

1864 



Marietta, Ga 

Danville, Ky 

Louisville, Ky 

Xasliville, Tenn __ 

Corinth, Miss 

Marietta, Ga . 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

.Marietta, Ga 

Toledo, O 

Newberne, N. C ._ 

Nashville, Tenn 

Nashville, Tenn __ 
Toledo, 

Marietta, Ga 

Columbus, O 

Lebanon, Ky 

Marietta, Ga 

Lebanon, Ky 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Nashville, Tenn __ 

Marietta Ga 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Andersonville, Ga 
Andersonville, Ga 

Cleveland, O 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Louisville, Ky 

Nashville, Tenn __ 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Cluittanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Nashville, Tenn __ 
Nashville, Tenn _. 
Nashville, Tenn __ 

Corinth, Miss 

Lebanon, Ky 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 

Toledo, 0„: 

Nashville, Tenn .. 

Marietta, Ga 

Toledo, O 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 

Marietta, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Toledo O . 

Marietta, Ga 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Marietta, Ga 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Marietta, Ga 

Chattanooga, Tenn 
Andersonville, Ga. 
Marietta, Ga.__ ._. 
Chattanooga. Tenn 

Lebanon, Ky 

Cliattanooga, Tenn 
Andersonville, Ga. 
Chattanooga. Tenn 
Andersonville. Ga. 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Chattanooga, Tenn 



Remarks. 



Wds. Chickamauga, Sept. 19, 1863. 
Disease. Interred in City Cemetery. 
Chronic diarrhwa. Cave Hill Cem. 
Wds. bat. Chickamauga. Sept.19,'63. 
Died in hospital of fever. 
Wds. Kenesaw Mt. June 27, 1864. 
Wds. bat. Jonesboro, Sept. 1. 1864. 
Wds. bat. Atlanta. July 22, 1864. 
Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 
Died of small-pox. 
Died —disease. 
Died — disease. 
Died — disea.se. 

Pris. war. D. at home. Defiance co. 
0.,dis. contracted in rebel prison. 
K. skirmish, near Milledgeville, Ga. 
Disease. Green Lawn Cemetery. 
Died — disease. 

Killed in assault on Kenesaw Mt. 
Died — disease. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Wds. bat. Jonesboro, Sept. 1, 1864. 
Killed at battle of Utoy Creek, Ga. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Wds. at Chickamauga, Sept. 19, '63. 
Died of chronic diarrhoea. 
Died — disease. 
Died near Atlanta— disease. 
Killed at battle of C'hickamauga. 
D. rebel prison. Cap. Chickamauga. 
D. rebel prison. Cap. Chickamauga. 
Died — disease. 

Wds. at Chickamauga, Sept. 19, '63. 
Disease. Cave Hill Cemetery. 
Wds. at Cliickamauga, Sept. 19,' 63. 
Hosp. near Atlanta, Ga. — disease. 
Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 
Wds. at Chickamauga, Sept. 1863. 
Drowned, Tenn. river, near Pulaski. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Died — disease. 
Died — disease. 
Died — disease. 
Died — disease. 
Died — disease. 

Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Died at Ringgold, Ga. — disease. 
Died at Riga, Mich, — disease. 
Died — di,sea.se. 

Wounds in battle near Atlanta. 
Died — disease. 

Wds. at Chickamauga, Sept. 19, '63. 
Wds. at Cliickamauga, Sept. 19, '63. 
Wds. bat. Jonesboro, Sept. 1, 1864. 
Killed in action near Atlanta. 
Died of small-pox. 
Wds. at Chickamauga, Sept. 19, '63. 
In hosp. Lookout Mt. — disease. 
Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Killed at battle of Jonesboro. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Died in prison; cap. Chickamauga. 
Killed at battle of Utoy Creek. 
Wounds at Kenesaw Mt. June, '64. 
Died — disease. 

Wds. bat. Mission Ridge, Nov. '63. 
Died in prison; cap. Chickamauga. 
Killed at battle of Chickamauga. 
Died in prison; cap. Chickamauga. 
Wounds at battle of Chickamauga. 
Died — disease. 
Died — disease. 
Died — disease. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION —FIELD WORK. 



153 




Following is an official list of casualties in 
the Fourteenth Regiment during the Georgia 
campaign — May 1st to September 1st, inclu- 
sive, 1864. The cases were of wounded, except 
as otherwise stated : 

May 15. — Levin Merrill, A (died) ; Martin Glen- 
non, A ; John Dailey. 

June 2.— Francis T. Wood, A ; Joseph Hill, D. 

June 3. — Thomas Moon (killed.) 

June 4. — Orlando Stout, D. 

June 14. — Corp. Geo. Pennell, A ; A. Newell, F ; 
Corp. Jas. Fullerton, Jacob Lumbeck, Alex. Mangel, 
Levi Stout and Lewis King, F; Christ. Lichly, G ; and 
Dennis Lane, K. 

June 15. — 0. W. Smith, David Eunkle; Rufus 
Trumbull, I. 

June 17. — Lester Hulce, F. 

June 21. — Sergt. Johnson Miller, E. 

June 22. — Leonard Hazelie, H. 

June 24. — Jas. Vaska, H ; Nicholas Waush, H ; 
Barney McGee, D. 

July 7. — Col. Geo. P. Este ; Corp. John Lottora, H. 

July 9. — John Gates, A ; Daniel Savage, Reynold 
Gordon, Edward Durfee, G. 

July 21.— William S. Bowers. K (killed) ; Geo. 
Hunger, G ; Sergt. W. E. Clarke, B. 

July .^O.— A. D. Coffin, A. 

Aug. 4. — Lewis Champaign, B. 

Aug. 5. — Sergt. John Van Orman (killed) ; Henry 
Cliflbrd (killed) ; Corp. Wilson C. Lathrop (died) ; 
John Brint, Edward Pelkey, Alva Bordeaux, Harow 
W. Case, Robert Cooper, Corp. H. Leonardson and 
Aaron C. Washburn, F ; M'm. Rupp, H (killed) ; 
John P. Bronson, 1. 

Aug. 6. — William Marker, I (in head, died) ; 
Albert Wilcox and Preston Esseltine, E ; Chas. 0. 
Holloway, F; and Geo. Gordon, G, captured. 

Aug. 7. — Wm. P. Sponsler, Adam Myers and J. P. 
Hudson, E ; Jas. Anderson and Sergt. Jas. F. Pray, 
I ; S. Langerdorf, H ; Wm. Van Newkirk, K. 



Augusts.— Wm. H. Davis, B (killed); Francis Gun- 
ther, H. 

August 10.— Peter W. Disbrow, C (killed). 

August 11. — Anthony Shindlcr, E. 

August 12. — Lieut. H. W. Bigelow, I. 

August 13.— David B. Sullier, C (killed). 

August IS. — Corp. W. Lanning, I. 

September 1st. Killed— Capt. W. F. Stopford, H; 
2d Lieut., N. 0. Cobb, A; Lieut. Walter B. Kirk, B; 
Sergt. Arthur D. Tarbox, A; Sergt. Henry F. Mor- 
gan, C; Henry C. Clarke and David March, D; Corp. 
Jos. E. Brendle and Corp. Weden H. Harris, E; Wm. 
H. Cone, Perry Bennett and Jas. Barrington, F; 1st 
Sergts. Jas. F. Pray and Levi Redder, 1; Corp. Henry 
M. Osborn and Isaac Davidson, K; Sergt. Maj. Jesse 
Trapp. Wounded — Major J. W. Wilson, Sergt. Jas. M. 
Perrin (died), Sergt. Alonzo H. Wood, Musician G. 
W. Brown, Wm. Coalwell, Uriah Gilbert (died), John 
Gates, Patrick Moran, Wm. T. Segur, James E. War- 
ner, Alfred W. Warren, Samuel Wood, Edwin R. 
Wilkinson, and Corp. Thos. Scott, A; Corp. John 
Kline, Corp. Christopher Jacobs (died), Corp. F. M. 
Berry (died), Corps. Michael Gates and John W. 
Brown, B; Capt. John J. Clarke, Corp. Williamson 
Lanning, Wm. Kroll, Sergt. Wm. Hanna, Jas. Wilder, 
Corp. Harvey Bortell (died), Corp. John Heckler, P. 
Hendricks, Jacob Hohr, Wm. Weaver and John Kel- 
ler, D; Capt. David A. Gleason, Chas. B. Mitchell, 
Sergt. Wm. W. Moats, Sergt. R. C. Livingston, Wm. 
Heatly, Elijah Dush, Abram Gilts, Oliver J. Craft, 
Richard H. Thrailkill, Wm. Luce and D. Millbouse, 
E. A. L. Smith and Charles Dennis, F. John Drake, 
Harrison Wheeler, John F. Hazlett, F. M. Snook, 
Enoch A. Pierson, G. Sergt. Henry A. Valentine, 
Harrison Hathaway, and Geo. Rice, Corps. John 
Beely, William Miller and Geo. Metcalf, Rennick 
Jennison, John Myer, Joshua Lathrop, and Michael 
Bassett, H. Leroy E. Clarke, Jonathan Miller, Jas. 
Ragan, Edwin C. Reed, .Julius Richter, Wm. Stewig, 
Geo. Cable and Wm. Bapp, 1. Capt. Noah W. Ogan, 
Sergt. Isaac Bogart, Sergt. Oscar Smith, Corp. Jacob 
Koli, and John Y. VanMeter, K. 



154 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



TWENTY-FIFTH EEGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEBE INFANTEY. 
THREE-YEAES' SERVICE. 
Tlio following is a list of battles in which this Eegiment bore an honorable part, as rocog- 
oizod by the War Department : 



Cheat Mountain. 
Chancellorsvillk. 
Rafting Creek. 
Monterey. 



Alleghany Summits. 
Gregory's Landing. 
Statesburg. 
Cross Keys. 



Gettysburg. 
Dingle's Mills. 
Honey Hill. 
Freeman's Fokd. 



Devereaux Neck. 
Swift Creek. 
McDowell. 
Greenbrier. 



Second Bull Run. 



This Eegiment was made up of recruits from 
different parts of the State, and was organized 
June '28, 1861, at Camp Chase. Company K 
was from Lucas County — the Anderson Guards, 
organized at Toledo, under the laws of Ohio. 
It left Toledo June 25th, when it was escorted 
to the Eailroad by the Zouave Cadets and Fire 
Engine Company No. 1. At that place a large 
concourse of citizens had assembled to bid the 
Companj' a hearty farewell. When mustered 
in, its officers consisted of Captain, Jonathan 
Brown; First Lieutenant, Nathaniel Hough- 
ton ; and Second Lieutenant, Harlan Millikan. 

On tlie 29th July, the Regiment proceeded 
to Western Virginia; serving attirst along tlie 
Baltimore and Oliio Railroad, in operations 
against " Bushwhackers." August 21st it re- 
ported to General Reynolds at Beverly, and 
soon proceeded to the summit of Cheat Moun- 
tain, where it suffered severely during the en- 
suing Fall and Winter. The men were con- 
stantly on duty without overcoats, and many 
without shoes or blankets; and the successive 
falls of sleet and snow caused much distress, 
liittle of interest occurred, until September 
12th, wlien a wagon-train on its waj- to the 
Valley for rations, was surprised and captured. 
Steps were taken for the pursuit of the Rebels, 
who were driven to their main support, when 
it was found that the Rebel force was under 
command of General Robert E. Lee. Prepara- 
tions were made for strenuous defense, and 
for eight days skirmishing was continuous, 
when troops from below broke through the 
Eebel lines with supplies of provisions, and 
Lee gave up the movement on the Union 
camp. November 25th the Regiment marched 
into the Valley and entered Winter quarters at 
Huttonsville. Here the duty was light, giving 
the men opportunity to recover from their ex- 
posure. December Uth a detachment of 460 



men, under Colonel Jones, participated in a 
movement against the enemy at Camp Bald- 
win, where an engagement took place in which, 
at first, the Rebels were driven in ; but being 
re-enforced, they made a stand, when a light 
of three hours ensued, in which the enemy 
three times were driven inside their cabins ; 
but from absolute exhaustion Colonel Jones's 
troops were compelled to retire. In the en- 
gagement the Eegiment lost nine killed and 
35 wounded. On the return it marched 60 
miles in 26 hours. On the 31st it moved on a 
raid to Huntersville, marching 106 miles in 
five days, penetrating far into the enemy's 
countiy and destroying large quantities of 
Rebel stores. At the time this was regarded 
as one of the greatest feats of the War. At 
Huttonsville Co. D had been detached as a 
Battery of Artillery, armed with Wiard's steel 
guns, and subsequently known as Twelfth 
Ohio Battery. 

February 27, 1862, the Regiment marched 
to Beverly, where its "smooth-bores" were 
exchanged for Vincennes rifles, which, being 
too heavy, were subsequentl}- exchanged for 
Springfield rifles. April Ist the Regiment 
moved on the Seneca scout, crossing Cheat and 
Alleghany Mountains, passing through Circle- 
ville and reaching Monterey, after a march of 
125 miles. On the 12th the Rebel General 
Johnston made an attack on Monterey, but 
after a sharp engagement, was repulsed ; and 
on the arrival of General Milroy, with the re- 
mainder of the Division, he fell back to 
McDowell, and afterwards retreated to Staun- 
ton. Here the Union troops remained quiet 
until May 7th, when it was confronted by a 
large force under Johnston and Jai'kson. A 
general engagement was delayed until the Sth, 
when General Schenck with his Brigade ar- 
rived, and the battle of Bull-Pasture Mountain 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



155 



occurred. In that the Twenty-Fifth Ohio 
opened bj' a charge in which the enemy was 
driven from hi8 position. Each side being re- 
enforced, the engagement assumed a serious 
character, and continued until after night-fall, 
when it was deemed best to fall back to Frank- 
lin, the Twenty-Fifth being the last Eegiment 
to retire, the}^ covering the retreat, after losing 
nine killed and 56 wounded. 

May 26, 1862, the Eegiment accompanied 
Fremont from Franklin to Strasburg and up 
the Shenandoah Valley in pursuit of Jackson, 
participating in the battle of Cross- Keys with 
a loss of eight killed, 54 wounded and two 
missing. In July, with Sigel's Corps it passed 
into Eastern Virginia, and took part in General 
Pope's campaign along the Rappahannock, and 
from the Rapidan to the plains of Manassas, 
where, August 29th and 30th, it was in the 
second battle of Bull Run, losing 10 killed, 
78 wounded and 22 missing. On the evening 
of the 30th it fell back to Centerville, and on 
the 30th of September moved to Upton Hill, 
having marched since August 8th, 220 miles, 
been under fire 14 successive days on the Raj)- 
pahanaock and taken part in the second bat- 
tle of Bull Run. Until the Spring of 1863, 
the Regiment was engaged in marches and 
counter-marches and in building winter-quar- 
ters, until it settled down near Brooke's Station, 
where Battalion drill occupied much attention. 

April 25, 1863, the Eegiment started on 
the Chancellorsville campaign, with 443 men, 
and took 444 into camp at Chancellorsville — 
one man having joined the force and none be 
ing lost. The Regiment was in Second Brigade, 
First Division, Eleventh Army Corps. With it 
was the Fifty-Fifth Ohio, Colonel J. C. Lee. 
Colonel Richardson of the Twenty-Fifth and 
Colonel Lee on the 2d May, with a sense of 
impending danger, sent tried scouts into the 
wilderness, for information as to the enemy. 
They soon returned with the intelligence that 
they were massing on the right and rear of the 
Union force, and that there were no pickets 
between the two Armies. With this informa- 
tion, the (lolonels hastened to Division head- 
quarters ; but the General commanding gave 
it no credence, remarking that the scouts were 
" probably scared," and sent the Colonels back 
to their commands. It was but an hour from 
this time, that Stonewall Jackson came down 
upon the unprepared Division, finding large 



numbers of its troops with guns in stack and 
others eating their supjier. Not a picket-shot 
or other signal had told of the approaching 
enemy. The First Brigade gave way in con- 
fusion, the men not stopping to unbuckle their 
knapsacks, but cutting the straps. The Twenty- 
Fifth deployed, changed front and moved some 
100 yards, exposed to a merciless fire, men 
from other Regiments, meantime, bi'eaking 
through their lines. The Fifty-Fifth and Sev- 
enty-Fifth Ohio joined the Twenty-Fifth, and 
the three Regiments held their position until 
the broken fragments of the First Brigade 
passed to their rear and the enemy had encir- 
cled them on three sides, when they, too, fell 
back. The Corps was reorganized the next 
morning, and remained in the trenches until 
the 5th, when, with the Army, it recrossed the 
River, and went into the old camp at Brooke's 
Station. 

June 27, 1863, the Regiment started on the 
Gettj-sburg camj)aign, with General Ames in 
command of the Brigade, and (ieneral Barlow 
in command of the Division. It passed over 
the Bull Run battlefield, crossed the Potomac at 
Edwards's Ferry, marched through Maryland, 
arriving at Emmetsburg on the 29th. In the 
sanguinary conflict which followed at Gettys- 
burg, the Eegiment bore an active and efl^ec- 
tive part, sharing fulh- in the danger and losses 
of the fight. At Cemetery Hill, July 1st, it 
numbered 45 men, commanded by a Second 
Lieutenant; on the 2d and 3d, it still occupied 
the advanced lines, suflTering severely from 
Eebel sharp-shooters, and on the 4th it was 
honored with the advance into Gettysburg. It 
went into action with 220 men, and lost 20 
killed, 113 wounded and 50 missing. The ma- 
jority of its otficers had been killed or wounded, 
and the Eegiment was commanded by a Lieut- 
enant who had been wounded the first day of 
the battle. 

July 5th, the Eegiment moved in pursuit of 
the Eebels, going as far as Hagerstown, where 
the Division supported Kilpatrick's Cavalry in 
driving the Eebel Cavalry and Infantry through 
the town to their main supports. The force 
moved on to the Department of the South, 
taking up quarters at Folly Island, when the 
Eegiment numbered 72 men, under command 
of a Lieutenant. Subsequently it took part 
in the siege of Fort Wagner, and then went 
into camp at Folly Island for rest. 



156 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



January 1, 1864, the Kegiment re-enlisted, 
and on the 15th started for Ohio on veteran 
furlough, which began February 3d, at Camp 
Taylor, Cleveland, Ohio. Co. K, or what re- 
mained of that command, reached Toledo on 
the 4th, whore it was met at the Railroad 
Depot by a goodly number of citizens with the 
Union Silver Band, and escorted down Sum- 
mit street to Chen-y, whence they counter- 
marched to the McKenster House, S. Groff, 
proprietor, where they were welcomed in a 
speech by M. R. Waite, who thanked them for 
their brave and noble conduct. They then 
entered the McKenster House, and partook of 
a dinner prepared for them. At the close of 
the meal, toasts were drank and speeches made 
by Charles Kent, Lieutenant John Kehn, Or- 
derly William P. Scott, M. E. Waite, Mayor 
Dorr, and others. Of the 97 men who left 
Toledo in 1861, only 16 returned to Cleveland ; 
and but 14 came to Toledo— an extent of deci- 
mation shown by very few, if any, commands 
in the service. On calling the roll after the 
sanguinary fight at Gettysburg, only four men 
responded to their names. 

On the 5th March the Regiment rendezvoused 
at Camp Chase, when many recruits had been 
added to it. On the 16th, the Regimental 
flags, which had passed through 20 battles, and 
under which 18 color-bearers had been killed 
or wounded, were presented to Governor 
Brough for the State archives, and the Regi- 
ment received a beautiful stand of new colors. 
Leaving Columbus the same day, it proceeded 
to Camp Grant, Virginia, remaining there un- 
til April 23d, it proceeded to Hilton Head, 
South Carolina, arriving the 26th. In this 
vicinity it did service until September, mean- 
time suffering severely from the malaria of the 
swamps, most of the men being prostrated by 
sickness. On the 25th of that month, Cos. A, 
G and K were ordered to Fort Pulaski, 
Georgia, returning October 23d to Hilton 
Head. November 2d nearly 300 recruits were 
added to the Regiment. November 28th, in 
the Coast Division, it left on an expedition to 
the Cliarleston and Savannah Railroad, re- 
maining in that region until December 4th 
when the Regiment proceeded by water up 
the Coosa River, capturing a Rebel Batterj', 
and thence up Broad River to Devereaux 
Neck, in which vicinity the Regiment did 
good service, meeting the enemy at difterent 



points, one day losing 54 men killed and 
wounded. 

February 26, 1865, the Regiment marched 
into Charleston, quartering at the South Caro- 
lina Depot. February 28th it moved by rail 
to Goose Creek, 20 miles, and thence marched 
to Santa River, and returned to Charleston 
March 10th. April 3d, by steamer it went to 
Georgetown, South Carolina, and joined the 
force under General E. B. Porter, in an expe- 
dition against the Central and Eastern South 
Carolina Railroad, in which engagements were 
fought at Dingle's Mills, Statsburg, Rafting 
Creek, Boykin's Mills, Swift Creek and Red 
Hill. April 20th, 16 locomotives and 245 cars 
loaded with ammunition and clothing were to- 
tally destroyed. The next day a Staff-officer of 
General Beauregard, with a flag of truce, 
brought information that Lee had surrendered 
to Grant, that Sherman and Johnston agreed 
to a cessation of hostilities, and that the War 
had probably closed. Great was the joy caused 
by such tidings, and the next 100 miles to the 
Coast was marched in three days, the last two 
days on rations of two ears of corn. Reaching 
Georgetown April 25th, the Regiment pro- 
ceeded to Charleston, and went into its old 
camp at Mount Pleasant. In consequence of 
the sad condition of affairs at Columbia, the 
State Capital, caused by the liberation of the 
slaves and the terrible destruction of property 
by fire, it was found necessar}' to send there a 
military force to preserve order. For that 
purpose, the Twenty-Fifth Ohio was detailed, 
under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Haugh- 
ton. It arrived May 25th, and encamped on 
the grounds of the South Carolina College. Of 
the condition of affairs there, a reliable corres- 
pondent, under date of June 2l8t, said: 

The once beautiful Capital of South Carolina did 
not escape the avenging hand of Sherman. Her 
beautiful blocks of elegant man.sions and public 
buildings are in ashes. Probably no City of any size 
in the United States could compare with Columbia 
in beauty or in the wealth and refinement of its in- 
habitants. There was its Capitol, and here were 
congregated the elite and chivalry of the State. All 
that nature, art and wealth could do to embelhsh and 
adorn its streets and gardens and to make it attractive 
had been done. The streets are wide and the walks 
lined with every variety of foliage most attractive to 
the eye. !• lowers in infinite number and variety are 
to be seen on every side ; while the parks, gardens 
and door-yards are most tastefully arranged. The 
inhabitants, from the highest to the lowest, are to- 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



157 



day in the most abject state of poverty. They have 
neither provisions nor the wherewith to obtain them. 
People who occupy elegant mansions, and who, a 
few weeks since, were worth their thousands, are 
now penniless and without the means of buying the 
actual necessaries of life. Money, there is none, 
with the exception of a little put in circulation by 
the officers and soldiers of the garrison. 

In talking with the citizens I find them generally 
ready and willing to submit to the necessities of the 
case, but without any abandonment of the principles 
of State rights for which they have been contending. 
The negroes have all learned that they are free, and, 
as is usually the case at first, most of them stopped 
work, both on the plantations and in the City, and 
congregated in large numbers at Columbia. As there 
are in South Carolina more than double the number 
of negroes than of white people, it was found necessary 
to have a military force distributed through the 
country to preserve order. Lieutenant-Colonel 
Haughton, commanding the Twenty-Fifth Ohio Vol- 
unteers, was accordingly sent to Columbia for this 
purpose. Upon arriving near the Town he found the 
roads and .streets of the City blocked up with negroes. 
The next morning he sent out and arrested all the 
able-bodied male negroes, and set them to work 
clearing the rubbish from the burnt district. They 
worked all day faithfully, expecting when night 
came to get something to eat; but such was not the 
Colonel's plan. He allowed them to go hungry, and 
in the morning not a negro could be found. All of 
them returned to their homes, glad to work again. 

An order was then issued requiring owners of 
slaves to call them up and tell them that they were 
free, advising them to continue their work, with the 
understanding that they should share the crop when 
harveste<l, but notifying all those who wished to 
leave that they were at liberty to do so. Many took 
advantage of the offer and left, and have since been 
roaming about the country, living on what they 



could steal, for the supply of labor Is greater than 
the demand, and their only method of obtaining a 
living this year is by living with their former mas- 
ters, who are compelled to keep them if they wish 
to remain. 

As a whole, the state of society at the South is in a 
deplorable condition. The men have neither the 
means nor ambition to take hold and try to extricate 
themselves from their embarrassments. In the loss 
of their negroes they think they have lost all worth 
living for, and prognosticate all manner of trouble 
and danger in the future. The crops are in many 
instances suffering from want of care, and unless 
they wake up to a sense of their duties the coming 
winter will bring famine and suffering. 

In September, a Sub-district, comprising five 
Counties, was constituted, of which Lieutenant- 
Colonel Haughton was made commander, and 
which was garrisoned by bis Regiment. Dur- 
ing the Fall and Winter the service was arduous 
in the extreme, made so by the bands of out- 
laws which infested the country. Several of 
the Soldiers were wounded, and one was assas- 
sinated. The outlaws roamed about, killing 
the negroes and committing other depredations. 
April 30, 18(36, the Regiment moved to Summer- 
ville and garrisoned the surrounding country. 

On the 7th June the Regiment left Charles- 
ton by steamer for New York, whence it pro- 
ceeded to Columbus, Ohio, arriving there on 
the 12th. On the 16th, in front of the State 
Capitol, it held its last j^arade, when its colors 
were presented to Governor Cox, and on the 
18th June, 1866, after over five years of faith- 
ful and effective service, it was mustered out 
and discharged. 



ROSTER OF COMPANY K, TWENTY-FIFTH REGIMENT. 

Mustered in June 24, 1861, at Columbus, 0., by John C. Robinson, Captain 5th Infantry, U. S. A. Mustered 
out June 18, 1866, at Columbus, O., by John H. Doyle, Captain 18th Infantry, U. S. A. 



Nam^, 



Jonathan Brown 

John H. Milliman 

Charles W. Ferguson 

Nathaniel Haughton 

Alexander Sinclair 

William P. Scott 

Charles H. King 

William L. Fonts 

Harlow Muliken 

Thomas J. Janney 

Lewis E. Wilson.' 





s. 


Rank. 


-^ 


Captain. 


34 

27 


(( 


36 


1st Lieut. 


26 


" 


28 


u 


23 


t( 


19 


(1 


20 


2d Lieut. 


44 


{( 


19 




18 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



June 4, 1861 
June 18, 1861 
Mch.16, 1864 



June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

Jan. 

June 



4,1861 
10,1861 
24, 1861 

5, 1861 
26, 1861 

4. 1861 

8. 1862 
10, 1861 



Rein arks. 



Resigned March 20, 1863. 

From 1st Lt. co. G, Mar. '64; m. o. July, '64, exp. term. 

From 1st Lt. co. B, Aug. '64; wd. bat. Honey Hill, S. C. 

Nov. 30, 1864; mustered out with co. July 18, 18()6. 
Promoted to Captain company A, July 30, 1862. 
From 2d Lt. co. C, Julv, '62; k. Chancellorsville,May,'63. 
Wd. May, '63, Chan'ville; ap. 1st Lt. co. A, May, '64; vet. 
From 2d Lt. co. G, Mar. '64; dis. Mar. '65, Surg. eft. 
From 2d Lt. co. F, Feb. 1865; mustered out with co. 
Resigned Oct. 19, 1861. 

Promoted to 1st Lieutenant co. I, September 19, 1862. 
From 1st Sgt. co. C, Sept. '62; to 1st Lt. July, '63; but 

never mustered; k. July, 1863, at Gettysburg. 



158 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Names. 



Peter Triquart 

Edward H. Severance . 

James R. Smith 

Clark Kellev- 

Morrison Lewis 

Sumner B. Belt 

Henry J. Willing 

Lewis F. Shannon 

August Knaack 

Lemuel Viers 

George S. Frazier 

Solon Haughton 

George H. Palmer 

John H. Kehn 

Thomas Masters 

John Baker 

Philip Hasenzahl 

Cemrens I. Kohr 

Charles A. Smith 



Rank. 



. 2d Lieut. 
Ist Sergt. 
Sergeant. 



William Bellville 

.James W. Hall 

^larcus L. Decker 

Thomas Dunn 

Joseph S. Grim 

Joseph Moore 

Edwin V. Buckner 

Reuben Drippard 

Solomon McMillan 

Nathan Falk 



Eugene O. Ross 

Derillo Nelson 

John Klinck 

William P. Ketchum . 

Robert C. Sisson 

James M. Cranker 

William H.Rich 

Aufdergarden, Henry. 

Angel, George 

Angel, xibraham W 

Barger, Joseph 

Boeham, Gustave 

Bernard, Henry 

Bridge, James E 

Burns, Lawrence. 

Burdo, E. D 

Bier, John 

Briggle, Joseph 

Bowers, John 

Buckley, John 

Baker, Charles O 

Byers, Andrew 

Benway, James 

Bolesmayer, John H .. 

Bender, Martin 

Boegehold, Lewis C _ 

Birch, Thaddeus 3 

Butler, Thomas 

Burdo, James H 

Brown, George 

Bauman, Christian. 
Cameron, Neil 



Copeland, George S.._ 

Cooper, Wesley H 

Carrol, William 

Conger, Charles H 

Cass, Charles M 

Church, John A 

Carpenter, Calvin A 

Crawford, Reginald... 



Corporal. 



Musician. 
Private. 



Date of 

Entering the 

Seri'ice. 



June 24,1861 

June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
April 5, 1862 
Feb. 17, 1862 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
Nov. 14, 1861 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
June 18,1861 
June 24,1861 
Dec. 21, 1863 
Feb. 23, 1864 
June 24,1861 

Mch. 7,1864 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
Feb. 18, 1864 
Feb. 26, 1864 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
Feb. 2.5, 1864 
Feb. 25, 1864 

Feb. 19, 1864 
June 24, 1861 
Julv 10, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
Feb. 29, 1864 
Feb. 29, 1864 
June 24, 1861 
Feb. 29, 1864 
Feb. 29, 1864 
Aug. 27, 1864 
Feb. 23, 1864 
Sept. 26, 1863 
Dec. 19, 1863 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
Feb. 19, 1864 
Feb. 22, 1864 
Feb. 23, 1864 
Sept. 6, 1864 
Feb. 27, 1864 
June 24, 1861 
Sept. 16, 1864 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
Feb. 20, 1864 
Oct. 1.5,1864 
Feb. 29, 1864 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
Julv 10, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
July 10, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
June24, 1S61 



Remarks. 



Wd. Bull Run, Aug. '62; 1st Sgt. Apr. '64; 2d Lt. Oct. 

'64; wd. bat. Honey Hill, Nov. '64; res. July,'65; vet. 
Pro. to 2d Lieutenant, co. H, May 16, 1862. 
Pro. to Ist Sgt. Nov. 5, 1864; m. o. with co.; vet. 
Ap. August 1, 1864; mustered out with co.; veteran. 
Ap. Sgt. Nov. 5, 1864; mustered out with co.; veteran. 
Wd. May, '63, Chan'ville; Sgt. Apr. 'i\(y, m. o. co.; vet. 
Ap. April, 1866; mustered out with company; veteran. 
Killed August 30, 1862, battle of Bull Run, Virginia. 
Killed November, 1864, battle Honey Hill, S. C; vet. 
D. Maj', '63, hosp. Brooks Station, Va. wds. Chan'ville. 
Wd. December, 1864; Gregory's Landing, S.C.; veteran. 
Ap. November, 16, 1862; dis. Aug. 1863, Surg. eft. disab. 
Wd. July, '63, Gettysburg; dis. January, '64, Surg. eft. 
Ap. Sept. '62; pro. 2d Lieut, co. I, November, '63; vet. 
Trans, from co. C, Apr. '64; m. o. Apr. '64, exp. term. 
Appointed April 1, 1864; veteran. 

Transferred to company C, 7.5th 0. V. I. Jan. 16, 1864. 
Ap. April, 1866; mustered out with co. June 16, 1866. 
Wd. June, '62, bat. Cross Keys, and Nov. '64, Honey 

Hill; ap. Corporal, April, 1866; m. o. with co.; vet. 
Ap. Corporal, April 1, 1866; mu.stered out with co. 
Ap. Corporal, April 1, 1864; mustered out with CO.; vet. 
Killed Dec. 31, 1861, battle of Baldwin Camp, Virginia. 
Killed July 1, 1863, battle of Gettysburg, Pa. 
Died in gen. hosp. at Hilton Head, wds. at Honey Hill. 
Wounded Dec. 7, 1864, battle Devereaux Neck, S. C. 
Dis. Jan. 1863, StafibrdC. H., Virginia, Surgeon's eft. 
Wd. July, 1863, Gettysburg; dis. April, 1864, Surg. eft. 
Dis. March 29, 1866, Columbus, 0., order War Dept. 
Wd. Dec. 6, 1864, bat. Greg. Landing; ap. Cpl. Feb. 1, 

1865; discharged April, 1866. 
Ap. Cpl. Feb. 1864; dis. May, 1865, order War Dept. 
Ap. Dec. 1, '65; dis. .\pril, '66, order War Dept.; vet. 
Wd. May, '63. Chan'ville; tr. Vet. R. Corps, Nov. 1863. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, October, 1865. 
Mustered out witli company, June 18, 1866. 
Mustered out with company, June 18, 1866. 
Trans, to co. C, 75th O. V. I.; m. o. July, '64, exp. term. 



Discharged July 15, 1865, order War Department. 

Transferred from 107th O. V. I., July 13, 1865. 
Transferred from 107th O. V. I., July 13, 186.5. 

D. May, '63, hosp. Brooks Sta. Va., wds. Chan'ville. 
Wd. Dec. 1864, Greg. Landing; mustered out with co. 
Mustered out with company, June 18, 1866. 
Transferred from 107th O. V. I., July, 1865; m. o. co. 
Killed November 30, 1864, battle Honey Hill, S. C. 

Dis. at Columbus, 0., Surgeon's certificate disability. 
Discharged July 15, 1865, by order of War Department. 
Transferred to 75th 0. V. 1., January 1, 1864. 
Mustered out July 16, 1864, expiration of term. 
Wd. Chan'ville, May, '63; m. o. July, '64, exp. term. 
Mustered out July 15, 1864, expiration of term. . 

Mustered out October, 1865, expiration of term. 

Wd. Chan'ville, Mav, '63; tr. Vet. R. Corps, Nov. '63. 
Wd. Chan'ville, May, '03; tr. Vet. R. Corps, Nov. '63. 
Killed May 8, 1862, in battle of McDowell, Virginia. 

Wd. June, '63, Cross Keys; m. o. July, '64, exp. term. 
Dis. June, '62, Mt. Jackson, Va., Surgeon's certificate. 
Wd. July 1, '63, Gettysburg; m. o. July, '64, exp. term. 
Dis. August, 1862, for wds. at Cross Keys, June, 1862. 
Mustered out July 16, 1864, expiration of term. 
Mustered out July 16, 1864, expiration of term. 
Wd. June, '62, Cross Keys; m. o. July, '64, exp. term. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



159 



Navies. 



Chalett, Charles __. 

Carvin, Irvin F 

Cook, Walter G _.. 
Conrad, Frederick . 
Chaney, Thomas__. 

Delancy, Levi 

Dryer, Fredoline... 
Dietgold, Robert... 



Rank. 



Dean, Maynard H_. 

Driscol, John H 

Daum, Conrad 

Delvin, Thomas 

Drago, Henry 

Darval, Albert 

Debolt, Charles A _ 

Evans, Thomas 

Emery, Lewis 

Evans, Christian E. 



Flynn, John H 

Forbes, John W 

Fenton, Wm. H 

I'urenback, Charles.. 

Furney, George 

Garung, John 

Garvin, John 

Gray, Orlando 

Girover, Daniel D 

Griffith, Chauncey 

Graff, James D 

Hays, Barton S 

Hutchins, Andrew J. 



Holloway, William S._. 

Hadnet, William 

Hollister, Lewis 

Hotchkiss, Arthur 

Harrington, John 

Harmon, Nathan 

Harmon, Conrad 

Hinds, Sherman B 

Hartman, Gustave 

Hutchins, Shubal 

Hartley, Albert 

Houston, Joseph 

Harkins, Andrew J 

Hiett, John 

Herbert, Michael 

Hawkins, George W 

Hifner, George 

Hj-ke, Gfeorge A 

Houghton, Austin 

Jones, James 

Jeremy, Anthon}- 

Knechenmeister, Fred. 

Kemps, George, F 

Kameron, Enos 

Laughlin, John 

Lineham, Thomas 

Lynn, David H 

Lang, Frederick M 

Lewis, Sheppard 

Linden, John P 

Lobdell, Lucius 

Lewis, Morrison 

Metzger, James 

Morau, James 

Mortal, John 

McLaughlin, James 

Miller, Andrew 

Monz, John G 



Private. 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



18 
24 
2S 
24 
27 
44 
43 
20 

21 
23 

18 
18 
27 
42 
19 
30 
21 
18 

21 
23 
41 

26 
24 
18 
18 
25 
26 
22 
23 
27 
27 



June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
Sept. 28, 1864 
Feb. 28, 1864 
Oct. 15, 1862 
Moh. 7, 1862 
Oct. 1, 1864 
Oct. 20,1862 

June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
une24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
Dec. 26, 1S63 
Feb. 23, 1864 
June 24, 1861 
Nov. 12, 1864 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 

June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
Feb. 13, 1864 
Feb. 23, 1864 
Feb. 23, 1864 
June 24,1861 
July 16, 1861 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 



Remarks. 



26 

19 

18 

30 

23 

37 

19 

19 

41 

31 

37 

23 

31 

42 

19 

18 

18 

23 

19 

21 

39 

28 

22 

23 

18 

18 

18 

35 

25 

25 

28 

io' 

22 
24 
20 
23 
31 



June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
Sept. 19,1,S64 
Sept. 13,1864 
Sept. 12,1864 
Oct. 7, lS(i2 
Oct. 7, 1862 
Feb. 20, 1864 
Dec. 27, 1863 
Oct. 7, 1862 
Nov. 1,1864 
June 24,1861 
Feb. 28, 1864 
Feb. 20, 1864 
June 24,1861 
Sept. 12,1864 
Feb. 26, 1864 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
Sept. 12, 1864 
Nov. 10, 1863 
June 24, 1861 
Feb. 29, 1864 
Feb. 29, 1864 
Mch. 25, 1862 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
Feb. 17, 1864 
Sept. 2, 1864 
April 5, 1862 
June 24,1861 
June 24,186i 
June 24,1861 
Oct. 7, 1862 
Sept. 14, 1864 
Oct. 8, 1864 



Wd. Gettysburg; m. o. July, 1864, expiration of term. 
Mustered out July, 1864, expiration of term. 
Discharged October 5, 1865, order War Department. 
Wd. Honey Hill, Nov. '64; dis. May, 1865, Surg. eft. 
Mustered out October 15, 18()5, expiration of term. 
Mustered out December 7, 1862, exp. term— 9 months. 
Discharged July 15, 1865, order War Dept.— 1 year 
Trans, from 107th O. V. I., July 13, 1865; m. o. Oct. 

20, 1865, expiration of term. 
Transferred to Vet. Reserve Corps, November 30, 1863. 
Killed December 31, 1861, battle Baldwins Camp, Va 
D. July 1, 1862, Winchester, Va., wds. Cross Kevs. 
Died December 31, 1861, at Huttonville, W. Va. " 

Wd. May 8, 1862, battle McDowell, Virginia; veteran. 
Mustered out November 12, 1865, exp. of term— 1 vear 
Died March 13, 18l>2, at Beverlv, W. Va. 
Wounded May, '62, at battle of "McDowell; and July,'63, 

Gettysburg; m. o. July, 1864, expiration of term. 
Discharged Nov. 1862 at Cheat Mountain, Surg. ctf. 
Discharged Nov. 1862, at Alexandria, Va., Surg. ctf. 
Discharged at Baltimore, Md., Nov. 1862, Surg ctf 
Killed Sept. 12, 1861, battle of Cheat Mountain. 
I'ied in Port Hospital, at Columbia, S. C. 



Discharged June, 1862, Columbus, O., Surg. ctf. 
Mustered out July 16, 1864, expiration of term. 
Discharged Nov. 1861, at Cheat Mouhtain, Surg. ctf. 
Wd. at battle of Camp Alleghany, W. Va. Dec. '61; and 
at Chancellorsville, Mar, '63; dis. May, '64, Surg. ctf. 
Mustered out July 16, 1864, expiration of term. 
Mustered out July 16, 1864, expiration of term. 
Discharged July 15, 1865, order War Dept.— 1 year. 
Discharged July 15, 1865, order War Dept.— 1 year. 
Discharged July 15, 1865, order War Dept.— 1 year. 
Mu.stered out July 7, 1863, expiration of term— 9 mos. 
Mustered out July 7, 1863, expiration of term— 9 mos. 
Wd. Apr. 1865, battle Red Hill, S. C; dis. June. 1865. 
Discharged Dec. 1865, on Surgeon's ctf. of disability. 
Wd. Chancellorsville; m. o. July, '63, exp. term— 9 mos. 
Mustered out Nov. 1, 1865, exp. of term— 1 year. 
Mustered out July, 1864, expiration of term. 
Mustered out w-ith couipanv, June 18, 1866. 
Killed Dec. 6, 1864, battle of Gregory's Landing. 
Killed Mav 2, 1863, battle of Chancellorsville, Va. 
Died Dec. 21, 1864, at Beaufort, S. C— 1 vear. 
Died Dec. 9, 1865, Lexington Dist. Ho.spital, S. C. 
Died Sept. '62, Washington, wds. at Bull Run Aug. '62. 
Promoted to Com. Sergt. March 16, 1864; veteran. 
Wounded June 8, 1864, battle of Cross Keys, Va. 
Mustered out July, 1864, expiration of term. 
Discharged July 15, 1865, order AVar Dept.— 1 year. 
Mustered out with company, June 18, 1866. 
Wd. Chancellorsville, Mav,'63; m. o. July, '64, exp. term 
Died Nov. 3, 1865, Port Hospital, Columbia, S. C. 

Discharged Dec. 1863, Huttonsville, W. Va., Surg. ctf. 
Wd. Dec. '61, bat. Camp Alleghanv; dis. Aug.'62, disab. 
Wd. Nov.'64, bat. Honey Hill, S. C.; dis. Mav, '65, disab. 
Discharged Julv 15, 1865, order War Dept.— 1 year. 
Wounded May 3, 1863, battle Chancellorsville." 
Discharged Nov. 27, 1861, Cheat Mountain, ctf. disab. 
Wd. Bull Run, Aug. 1862; dis. Jan. 1863, ctf. disab. 
Mustered out July 16, 1864, expiration of term. 
Mustered out July 7, 1863, expiration of term— 9 mos. 
Discharged July 15, 1865, order War Dept.— 1 year. 
Mustered out Oct. 8, 1865, expiration of term— 1 year. 



160 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



tiamet. 



Muntz, Gottleib 

Mi-Kinney. Jacob M... 
Jlontgomerv, Kdward.. 
Millliollan, "Charles T . 

Matthews, Peter 

Marx, Emil I 

Meyer, Henry 

Mairosi, David 

MeKinney, Isaac 

Minor, Amos W 

McMonagle, John 

Mitchell, Christian 

Markley, Henry S 

Millet, Joseph 

Miller, Lewis 

Moore, Philander 

Newton, George H 

Niehus, Rudolph L 

Nave, Fred 

Oeckel, Charles 

O'Neil Thomas 

Petrie, Robert A_.. 

Pelleto, Louis 

Peck, Edward 

Page, Harlan 

Page, George W 

Pettis, John 

Panches, Perry 

Pancost, James 

Patten, John 

Rose, Thomas 

lianney, Jonathan 

Romine, James 

Richards, Frederick 

Richards, Allen 

Rantz, Fredoline 

Ripkee, Charles 

Schmidt, Fred 

Scbropp, Joseph 

Shure, George 

Santer, Senius 

Stephens, Henry 

Sherman, Richard M 

Seagrist, John 

Stoecker, John 

Smith, Charles W 

Shireley, Stephen M 

Smith, John 

Stillwell, John 

Smith, Joseph B 

Schneider, Austen 

Schorr, John 

Sey, John 

Stone, Lyman B 

Shaflfer, Nelson H 

Tebean, Adolphus 

Tannal, John W 

Town, William I 

Tiederman, Charles 

Thompson, John A _ . _ 

Taylor, Zachariah 

Tiederman, Christopher 

Targer, Francis M 

Vickory, William 

Viers, David S 

Viers, John B 

Weeler, Michael 

Wagner, William 



Rank. 



Private. 



Date of 

Entering the 
Service. 



Oct. 2. 1862 
Sept. 28,1862 
Nov. .30, 18(14 
June 24, 1861 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
Feb. 23, 1864 
Sept. 8, 1863 
Feb. 19, 1864 
July 10, 1861 
Feb. 25, 1864 
Dec. 23 1863 
Feb. 1.5, 1864 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
Mch. 14,1862 
Feb. 29, 1864 
Jan. 2, 1864 
Feb. 26. 1864 
June 24,1861 
June 24,1861 
Sept. 12,1864 
Feb. 29, 1864 
July 18, 1861 
July 10, 1861 

June 24,1861 
Sept. 12, 1864 
Sept. 16,1864 
Sept. 22, 1864 
July 10, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
Oct. 7, 1862 
Sept. 12, 1864 
Feb. 15, 1864 
Feb. 18, 1864 
Dec. 19, 1863 
Jan. 4, 1864 
Dec. 22, 1863 
Jan. 1, 1864 
Feb. 26, 1864 
Jan. 7, 1864 
Feb. 17. 1864 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
June 24. 1861 
Sept. 6, 1864 

Sept. 12, 1864 

Sept. 14, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Feb. 29, 1864 
Nov. 1, 186i 
Nov. 1, 186i 
Oct. 11. 1862 
July 10, 1861 

June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
Oct. 7, 1862 
June 24, 1861 
Jan. 15, 1864 
Oct. 7, 1862 
Feb. 12, 1864 
Dec. 23, 1863 
Feb. 4, 1864 
July 10, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
June 24, 1861 
Dec. 19, 1863 
Oct. 4, 1864 



Remarks. 



Mustered out Oct. 2, 1865, expiration of term. 
Mustered out Oct. 2, 1865, expiration of term. 
Mustere<l out Nov. 30, 1865, expiration of term — 1 year. 
Wd. July, 1863, Gettysburg; ra. o. July, '64, exp. term. 
Mustered out July, 1864, expiration of term. 
Discharged, Mav, 1863, Brook's Sta., certificate disab. 
Dis. Aug. 11, 1865, Hilton Head, S. C, ctf. disability. 
Mustered out with company, June 18, 1866. 
Mustered out with company, June 18, 1866. 
Killed Aug. .30, 1862, in battle of Bull Run, Va. 

Transferred from Co. C, 7.5th O. Y. I., June 12, 1864. 



Transferred to 3d O. V. Cavalry. 

Mustered out with company, June 18, 1866. 
Killed Feb. 8, 1865, inaction at Combahee Ferry, S. C. 
Drowned June 27, 1864, at Jenkins' Island, S. C. 
Wd. July,'63, Getty.sburg; to Vet. Rev. Corps, Nov.'63. 
Wd. at McDowell, Ya.; m. o. out with Co.; veteran. 
Killed Feb. 8, '65, action Combahee Ferry, S. C. — lyear. 
Wd. Dec. '64, Gregory's Landing; disc. June, 1866. 
Killed Aug. 30, 1862, in battle of Bull Run, Ya. 
D. Feb. 27, '62, Svlvania, 0. Wds. at battle Baldwin's 
Camp, Dec. 13. 1861. 

Discharged J uly 15, 1865, order War Dept. — 1 year. 
Discharged July 15, 1865, order War Dept. — 1 year. 
Discharged July 15, 1865, order War Dept. — 1 year. 
Discharged Feb. 12, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Wd. Aug. 1862. bat. Bull Run; dis. Dec. 5, '62, disab. 
Mustered out July 7, 1863, expiration term — 9 months. 
Discharged July 15, 1865, order War Dept. — 1 year. 
Wd. Honey Hill; disc. June, 1865, certificate disab. 
Discharged Aug. 11, 1865, Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged June 18, 1866, order War Dept. 

Mustered out company June 18, 1866. 
Mustered out company June 18, 1866. 
Killed Nov. 30, 1864, battle Honey Hill, S. C. 
Died Sept. 24, 1864, at Da^^d's Island, N. Y. 



Disc. Nov. 27, 1861, Cheat Mountain, certificate disab. 
Disc. Nov. 27, 1861, Cheat Mountain, certificate disab. 
Wd. April, '65, bat. Red Hill; dis. May, 1865, ctf. disab. 

1 year. 
Wd. Apr. '65, Red Hill, S. C; dis. Aug. '65. ctf. disab. 

1 year. 
Discharged July 15, 1865, order War Dept. — 1 year. 
Discharged July 15, 1865, order War Dept. — 1 year. 
Discharged Aug. '65, Hilton Head, certificate disab. 
Mustered out Nov. 1865, expiration of term. 
Mustered out Nov. 1865, expiration of term. 
Mustered out Oct. 1865, expiration of term. 
Wd. May, '63, bat. Chancellorsville; m. o. July, 1864, 

expiration of term. 
Mustered out July 16, 1864, expiration of term. 
Di.sc. May 31, 1862, Beverly, W. Ya. certificate disab. 
Mustered out July 7, 1863, expiration term — 9 months. 
Transferred to 18th V. S. Infantry. 
Died Aug. 13, 1864, at Hilton Head. S. C. 
Died July 26, 1863, at Baltimore, Md. — 9 months. 
Died May 10, 1866, at Charleston, S. C. 
Mustered out with company June 18, 1866. 
Mustered out with company June 18, 1866. 
Wounded Mav 8, 1862, battle McDowell, Ya. 
Disc. Jan. 27, 1862, Huttonsville, AV. Ya. ctf. disab. 
Disc. Jan. 1862, Alexandria, Va. certificate disab. 
Disc. Feb. 21, 1866, on certificate disability. 
Mustered out Oct. 4 1865, expiration of term — 1 year. 




Q3^£j^PiiduA^ 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION-FIELD WORK. 



1(U 



Names. 



Wike, Jacob 

Whaley, Abuer 

Warts, John J 

Weiizen, George 

Whitniore, Nicholas __ 
Yarnall, Jonathan H._ 
Beverly Henderson 



Rank. 



Private . 



Cook. 



Date of 
Entering the 

Service. 



JRemarks. 



Oct. 11,1864 Mustered out Oct. 11, 180.5, e.\-piration term— 1 year. 
tsept. 1'7, 1804 Mustered out Oct. 5, l.S(i5, ex])iration teriu— 1 year. 
June 24,1861 Mustered out July 16, 1864, on expiration of term. 
June 24.1861 



Feb. 18,1864 
Oct. 7,1862 
Oct. 31,1863 



Mustered out July 8, 1863, on expiration term-fl mos. 
Colored under-cook; m. o. company June 18, 1805. 



TWENTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT, OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 



While this could not strictly be called a Lucas 
County Regiment, the j-epresentatioTi of the 
County therein was such as to demand brief 
mention here. It was organized at Camp 
Chase, in August, 1861, and was composed of 
volunteers from all parts of the State — officers 
and enlisted men being almost total strangers 
to each other. August 20, 1861, it left camp, 
950 strong, taking the cars for St. Louis, Mis- 
souri. The Lucas County representatives in 
the command consisted of John W. Fuller, 
Colonel ; Rev. John Eaton, Jr., Chaplain ; 
Theodore Sawyer and James H. Boggis, First 
Lieutenants. The latter for a long time served 
as Adjutant, and was promoted to be Captain 
March 19, 1864 Lieutenant Sawj-er served 
with special credit, was promoted to be Cap- 
tain March 5, 1863, and was killed at Dallas, 
Georgia, Ma}^ 27, 1864. He was a graduate of 
the Toledo High School, a young man of much 
promise, and a third of such graduates who 
within a few weeks surrendered their lives to 
their country. The Regiment lost 20 men in 
that battle. Some 15 enlisted men of the 
Tweutj'-Seventh were from Lucas County. 
Chaplain Eaton had been Superintendent of 
the Toledo Public Schools, and subsequently 
entered the ministry. He served as Chaplain 
until 1863, when General Grant appointed him 
" Superintendent of Contrabands," he serving 
in that capacity to the close of the War. 
Afterwards he was Commissioner of Public 
Schools of Tennessee. In 1870 he was ap- 
pointed United States Commissioner of Edu- 
cation, continuing as such until he was elected 
President of Marietta College, Ohio, in 1886, 
which position he now holds. 

An incident in connection with this Regi- 
ment is worthy of record here. It consisted of 
11 



the capture of the Battle Flag of the Ninth 
Texas Regiment, by Orrin B. Gould, of Com- 
pany G. The circumstances were as follows : 

The Rebels, in four close columns, were pressing with gal- 
lantry, amounting to recklessness, upon the Ohio Brigade, with 
the evident intention of breaking our line, when a terrible and 
incessant fire drove them back in utmost confusion. The Ninth 
bore down on the left center of the Twenty-Seventh Ohio, with 
their flag at the head of their column, and advanced to within 
six or eight yards of its line, when Gould shot down the Color 
Bearer and rushed forward for the Rebel Flag. .\ Rebel officer 
shouted to his men to save their colors, and, at the same 
moment, put a buUet into the breast of Gould. But the young 
hero was not to be thus intimidated. With the flag-staff in his 
baud and the bullet in his breast, be ret\irned to his Regiment, 
waving the former deliantly in the face of the enemy. After 
the battle, while visiting the hospitals, Colonel Fuller found 
young Gould stretched ou a cot, evidently in great paiu. Upon 
seeing him. his face was instantly radiant with smiles, and, 
pointing to his wound, he said : " Colonel, I don't care for this. 
I got the flag." 

The flag was sent by Colonel Fuller to Gov- 
ernor Tod, and is now among "the War relics 
at the State Capitol. Gould's heroism was 
recognized in an appointment as Lieutenant. 



JOHN W. FULLER, Merchant and Brevet 
Major General United States Volunteers, was 
born July, 1827, in Cambridge, England, and 
came to the United States with his father's 
fixmily in 1833. His father was a Baptist Clergy- 
man and a graduate of Bristol College, England. 
He personally superintended the education of 
his son, and to him the latter is largely in- 
debted for whatever measure of success has 
been attained in his subsequent life. He passed 
his years of boyhood and earlier manhood at 
Utica, New York, where he came to be known 
as one of the leading merchants of the Citj-. 
His establishment being destroyed by fire in 
1858, he closed his business there and removed 
to Toledo. Here he engaged in Book Trade, in- 
cluding both the sale and publication of Books, 



162 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



the establishment becoming one of the fore- 
most in that branch of business. He was tlni« 
engaged, wlion, in April, 18(il, the War of the 
llebeHion began. Being thoroughly in sym- 
pathy with the cause of the Union, and having 
to some extent cultivated a taste for the military 
profession, lie was not long in identifying hini- 
self actively with the side of loyalty. His first 
service in the Fnion Army was in West Vir- 
ginia, where for a sliort time he was a member 
of the Staff of Brigadier General Charles W. 
Hill, of Ohio. 

Under appointment of Governor Tod, he 
took command of the Twenty-Seventh Ohio 
"Volunteer Infantry. That command served 
under Pope in Missouri, and joined General 
Hunter at Springfield, Missouri, about the 
Ist of November. In February, 18C2, itformed 
part of the force under General Pope which 
drove the Rebel troo})s out of New Madrid, and 
in April following cros.sed the Mis.sissippi and 
captured Island Number Ten, taking several 
thousand prisoners. It continued with General 
Pope until after the evacuation of Corinth by 
General Beauregard. In July, 18G2. Colonel 
Fuller was placed in command of the " Ohio 
Brigade, " which soon came to be classed with 
the most famous in the Western Arm}-. This 
Brigade was constituted of the Twenty Sev- 
enth ; the Forty-Third, Colonel Wager Sway ne; 
the Thirty-Ninth, Colonel B. F. Noyes; and 
the Sixty-Third Ohio, Colonel John W. 
Sprague. At luka, this Brigade came to the 
fight oidy to see its clo.se; but at the succeed- 
ing engagement at Corinth, it took so conspic- 
uous and efifective a part, that Colonel Fuller 
was specially commended by both General 
Stanlj' and General Eosecrans, and for such 
service was promoted to the rank of Brigadier 
General. In December, 18ti2, his command 
fought the Eebel force under Forrest at Par- 
ker's Cross-Roads, Tennessee, driving him 
across the Tennessee River and capturing seven 
pieces of artillery and 360 prisoners. In 
March, 1864, General Fuller crossed the Ten- 
nessee by night, and at daylight captured 
Decatur, Alabama, which soon was strongly 
fortified. In the Atlanta campaign his Brigade 
was conspicuous at Resaca, at Dallas and at 
Kenesaw Mountain. Early in July, 1864, 
General Fuller was assigned to the command 
of the Fourth Division, Sixteenth Army Corps, 



his command taking an important part in the 
l)attle at Atlanta, July 22d. In recognition of 
8]jecial service by him on thatoccasion, ho was 
made Major General by Brevet. lie marched 
with Sherman " to the Sea," and then from 
Savannah to Raleigh, North Carolina, where 
Johnston surrendered his command and the 
hostilities of the war ended. It is entirely 
safe to state, that the recognition and promo- 
tion of no Soldier from Ohio were more wholly 
due to merit of service in the field, than were 
those extended to General Fuller ; while few 
commanded equal honors. His record is 
brilliant throughout, and it stands without 
occasion for excuse or apology, and wholly on 
its own merits. Upon honorable discharge 
from military service, he returned to his home 
at Toledo, at once resuming mercantile life, 
becoming the senior partner of the firm of 
Fuller, Childs & Companj', one of the largest 
wholesale Boot and Shoe houses in tlie North 
west, which relation he held until his retirement 
from business, in 1888. He was appointed by 
President Grant Collector of Customs for the 
Miami (Toledo) District, in 1874, and re-ap- 
pointed by President Hayes in 1878, serving for 
two terms of four years each. Politically, 
General Fuller is a Republican. In 1853, he 
was married with Miss Anna B. Rathbun, of 
Utica, New York. Their children consist ot 
three sons - Edward C, of Columbus ; and Rath- 
bun and Frederick C, of Toledo ; and three 
daughters — Mrs. Florence, wife of Thomas 
A.Taylor; and Misses Jennie and Irene, of 
Toledo. 



The Ohio Brigade held a Reunion at Colum- 
bus, October 3 and 4, 1878. Addresses were 
made by General John Beatty, General J. W. 
Fuller, Chaplain Eaton and General Wager 
Swaj'ue. A dinner was partaken of, and toasts 
presented with responses by General M. 
Churchill, Captain W. H. H. Mintun, Chaplain 
R. L. Chittenden and Captain R. K. Shaw. 
The latter had for his topic the " Union Soldier's 
Oath," and closed liis response with an original 
poetical production, " The Union Soldier's 
Oath." 

A permanent organization was effected, with 
the following officers : President, J. W. Fuller, 
Toledo; Vice-Presidents, Major James Mor- 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



163 



gan, Twenty-Seventh Ohio, Cincinnati; Cap- 
tain W. H. H. Mintun, Thirty-Ninth Ohio, 
Athens; General Wager Swayne, Forty-Third 
Ohio, Toledo; Colonel Charles E. Browne, 



Sixty-Third Ohio, Cincinnati. Secretary, J. 
W. Thompson, Forty-Third Oiiio, Chicago, 
Illinois. Treasurer, A. J. White, Thirty-Ninth 
Ohio, Cincinnati. 



THIETY-SEVENTH EEGIMENT, OIIIO VOLUNTEER INFANTEY. 



This Eegiment, coraj^osed substantially of 
Germans, was raised chiefly at Toledo, Cleve- 
land and Chillicothe, being the third German 
Eegiment from Ohio. Its organization was 
commenced under the second call of Presi- 
dent Lincoln for 300,000 men, August, 1861. 
So prompt was the movement that the Eegi- 
ment was mustered into the service October 
2d, fully prepared for the field. For Colonel, 
Edward Siber, a skilled and competent officer 
of the German Army, who had served in 
Prussia and Brazil, was ap^Jointed, with Louis 
von Blessingh, of Toledo, as Lieutenant- 
Colonel, and Charles Aubele, of Cleveland, as 
Major. The line officers were chosen from 
those who had been in the three-months' 
service. 

The Eegiment moved from Camp Dennison 
to a point on the Kanawha Eiver, West Vir- 
ginia, reporting to General Eosecrans. It was 
soon sent, with other forces, up the Kanawha, 
to the Oil Works at Cannelton, for the pur- 
pose of driving Floyd's Eebel force out of the 
valle}-, which object was accomplished, the 
enemy being driven to within seven miles of 
Ealeigh C. H. Eeturning, the Eegiment went 
into winter quarters at Clifton, where, besides 
drilling, it was employed in more or less oc- 
casional service in the protection of important 
points in that section. In January, 1862, it 
was sent to Logan C. H., East of Guayandotte 
Eiver, when, after a hard march of 80 miles, 
and much brisk skirmishing, the place was 
captured, and all war material destroyed, when 
the Eegiment returned to Clifton, with loss of 
one officer and one man killed. 

In March, 1862, the Thirty-Seventh Ohio 
was attached to the Third Provisional Brig- 
gade of the Kanawha Division, which was 
sent on a raid to the southern part of West 
Virginia, for the destruction of the Virginia 
and East Tennessee Eailroad, near Wythe- 
ville. This exj)edition was not successful. 
The Eegiment lost one officer and 13 men 
killed, 2 officers and 46 men wounded, and 14 



men missing. The force proceeded to Plat- 
Top Mountain, where it remained until August 
1st, when it marched to Ealeigh to garrison 
the place and do scouting service for a circuit 
of 25 miles. The latter part of August it 
moved in detachments to Fayetteville, Vir- 
ginia, and, with the Thirty-Fourth Ohio, it 
garrisoned that place. In September the 
whole force engaged with General Loring's 
Eebel command, and after fighting from 12 m. 
until dark, the approach of Eebel re-enforce- 
ments made a retreat necessary to Cotton 
Hill, on the Gauley Eoad, where the enemy 
were fought successfully for an hour. The 
Union troops continued their retreat, arriving 
at Charleston September 13th, where thej' 
stopped for the jDrotection of a valuable train 
of 700 wagons, with supplies for all troops in 
the Kanawha Valley. September 15th the 
Ohio Eiver, opposite Eijjley, Ohio, was 
reached, where they crossed, but almost im- 
mediately recrossed, and went into camp at 
Mt. Pleasant. In the unfortunate retreat the 
Eegiment lost 2 men killed, 3 wounded, and 
62 missing, while all the Company wagons, 
camp equipage and officers' baggage were loat 
near Fayetteville by u rear attack of the 
enemy. 

October 15, 1862, the Eegiment, under 
Lieutenant-Colonel von Blessingh, advanced 
up the Kanawha Vallej', reaching Gauley 
Bridge November 20th, whence, December 
30th, it marched to Camp Piatt and embarked 
by steamers for Cincinnati. Colonel Siber 
joined his command at the latter point, and 
the Soldiers exchanged their arms for Enfield 
rifles. From Cincinnati the Eegiment pro- 
ceeded down the river, landing first at Napo- 
leon, Arkansas, January 16, 1863, where it was 
attached to the Third Brigade, Second Divis- 
ion, of the Fifteenth Army Corps. On the 
21st this force moved to Milliken's Bend, 
nearly ojjjDosite Vicksburg, where it was em- 
ployed on the canal for isolating that Town 
from the Mississijqii, but a freshet soon drove 



164 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



them to higher ground at Young's Point, 
whence various expeditions were sent out in 
different directions. 

April 29, 186S, the Eegiment, under Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel von Blessingh, with eightother 
Regiments, took steamers for Haines's BluflF, up 
the Yazoo River, for the purpose of a feint, to 
cover General Grant's plans below Vicksburg, 
but soon returned to Young's Point, where it 
was on guard and fatigue duty until May 
13th, when it went down to Grand Gulf. From 
this point it marched with other troops, under 
Grant, to the rear of Vicksburg, and was 
assigned as a portion of the front line of the 
force investing that place. In the severe but 
unsuccessful assaults on the Rebel works, on 
May 19th and 22d, and the following siege, the 
Reffiment lost 19 killed and 75 wounded, the 
latter including Lieutenant-Colonel von Bless- 
ingh, whereby the command of the Regiment 
was devolved upon Major Charles Hipp, until 
June 18th, when Colonel Siber resumed com- 
mand. 

After the surrender of Vicksburg the Thirty- 
Seventh participated in the expedition against 
Jackson, Mississippi, where it did provost 
guard duty. July 23d it marched to Camp 
Sherman, near Big Black River, remaining 
there until September 26, 1863, when it 
marched to Vicksburg and took steamer for 
Memphis ; thence marched to Corinth, to 
Cherokee Station, Alabama, where it remained 
in bivouac until October 26th. With its 
Division the Regiment marched to drive off 
Forrest's Rebel Cavahy from their interfer- 
ence with the Union forces operating for the 
relief of Chattanooga, which point was reached 
November 21st. On the morning of the 25th 
the Regiment took pai-t in an assault on the 
enemy's fortified position, losing 5 men killed 
and 36 wounded. The enemy retreated the 
following night, and were followed as far as 
Ringgold. November 29th the Regiment 
started on a three weeks' expedition to East 
Tennessee, to drive out Longstreet's Rebel 
force, which movement involved intense suf- 
fering by the troops, in consequence of the 
severity of the cold, and a want of clothing 
and of rations ; many Soldiers were shoeless ; 
yet they endured such trials not only without 
a murmur, but throughout showed unusually 
exuberant spirits. Returning to Bridgeport, 
Alabama, the Regiment remained there until 



December 26th, and then went into camp at 
Larkinsville, Alabama. Early in February, 
1864, the Thirty-Seventh formed part of an 
expedition toward Lebanon, Alabama, march- 
ing with the Fifteenth Army Corps on a 
reconnoissance near to Dalton, and returning 
to Larkinsville March 2d. 

March 8, 1864, three-fourths of the men of 
the Regiment re-enlisted for another three 
years' term, and were placed in the Second 
Brigade, Second Division, Fifteenth Corps. 
The usual thirtj^ days' leave was spent by the 
men in a visit to their homes in Ohio, when 
they rendezvoused at Camp Taylor, near 
Cleveland. Leaving that place, they were 
again at the front April 28th. On their pas- 
sage, 30 men were wounded and one killed 
by a railroad accident near Munfordsville, 
Kentucky. Reaching Chattanooga, the Regi- 
ment joined its Division May 10th, in Sugar 
Creek Valley, Georgia. On the 13th it lost 3 
men killed (2 being officers) and 10 wounded. 
Thence it marched to Kingston, Georgia, 
reaching there 19th. It was then under com- 
mand of Major Hipp, the Lieutenant Colonel 
boinsrin Ohio, on sick leave. In the march on 
Atlanta the Regiment lost four men wounded 
at Dallas and New Hope Church. On the re- 
treat of the enemj'the Thirty- Seventh pursued 
toward Acworth, and participated in the memo- 
rable but disastrous assaults made against the 
Rebel stronghold on Kenesaw Mountain, which 
the enemy were compelled to abandon. June 
11th to July 2d the Regiment lost 4 men killed 
and 19 wounded. 

The next movement of the Regiment, with 
its Division, was to the extreme right of the 
Army, supporting the Twenty-Third Army 
Corps in the engagements near the Chattahoo- 
chie River and Nicojack Creek. July 12th it 
moved, passing through Marietta, Rosswell 
Factories, and across the Chattahoochie River, 
and destroyed the Atlanta & Augusta Rail- 
road for a considerable distance ; whence it 
marched through Decatur, and encamped, Julj^ 
20, 1864, near Atlanta. On the 22d the Regi- 
ment was on the right of the Division, in 
breastworks abandoned by the enemy ; but by 
re-enforcements of the Rebels the Union lines 
were broken, and the Thirty-Seventh com- 
pelled to evacuate, losing 4 men killed, 10 
wounded and 38 taken prisoners. By most 
desperate effort the Union troops, with the 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



165 



help of the Sixteenth Army Corps, re-took the 
position and held it. July 27th the Fifteenth 
Corps moved to the right of the besieging 
Army, thus threatening the enemy's commu- 
nications with the South, to prevent which 
they made an effort to drive the Union ibrces 
from their position, when the battle of Ezra 
Chapel was fought, in which the Rebels were 
severely punished. In this engagement the 
Thirty-Seventh held the extreme right, deploy- 
ing as skirmishers, and frustrated the enemy's 
attempt to turn the Union right. In this move- 
ment Major Hipp lost his left arm, devolving 
the command upon Captain Morritz. The Regi- 
ment lost one man killed and five wounded. 

From July 28th to August 2Gth was con- 
sumed in the advance of the Union lines 
toward the fortifications in front of the rail- 
road between Atlanta and East Point, in 
which the Regiment lost five men killed and 
eight wounded. The 30th August found it in 
line of battle moving on Jone.sboro, in advance 
of the Brigade. In the bloody repulse of the 
enemy's charges and other movements it lost 
in two days two killed and seven wounded. 
The night of September 1, lS(i4, found the 
Ihiion forces in possession of Jonesboro and 
Atlanta, and in a pursuit of the Rebel Army, 
which ended at Lovejoy's Station. The Regi- 
ment returned to East Point September 7th, 
and rested in camp until October 4th, when it 
left in pursuit of Hood's forces. Forced 
marches were made over Northern Georgia 
and Alabama, and returned to Ruffin's Sta- 
tion, near the Chattahoochie, where it remained 
until November 13th. At this point Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel von Blessingh resumed com- 
mand of the Regiment, relieving Captain G. 
Boehm, who had taken the place of Captain 
Morritz, absent on leave. 



November 13, 1864, the Thirty-Seventh Ohio 
entered Atlanta to draw the outfit necessary 
to the "March to the Sea," which began on 
the 15th. Throughout that long journey the 
Regiment did active and full duty in the vari- 
ous kinds of service from time to time assigned 
to it. At Clinton, in company with the Fif- 
teenth Michigan, it did valuable service in 
preventing Rebel Cavalry from crossing the 
road leading to Marion, with the view of cap- 
turing a Division train. Arrived at Savannah, 
the Regiment occupied itself in drilling, per- 
fecting its equipment and fortifying. January 
19, 1865, it marched to Fort Thunderbolt, on 
the Savannah River, and there embarked for 
Beaufort, South Carolina, arriving there on the 
22d, where it went into camp, but soon re- 
turned to Beaufort, and on the 30th started 
for the march through South Carolina, and 
the Southern part of North Carolina, biv- 
ouacking near Columbia. Again moving, Feb- 
ruary 18th, it was engaged in destroying the 
track of the Columbia & Charleston Rail- 
road. By March 7th Cheraw was reached, and 
the Great Pedee crossed, and subsequently the 
Regiment was ordered to escort General 0. O. 
Howard's headquarters and pontoon train of 
the Army of the Tennessee (right wing), 
which it brought safely into Fayetteville, North 
Carolina, March 11th. On the 24th it reached 
Goldsboro, where it was in camp until the cap- 
itulation of Lee and Johnson, when, with the 
rest of the Union troops, it proceeded to Wash- 
ington, and thence by rail to Louisville, where 
it lay until the latter part of June, when, with 
the Second Division, Fifteenth Corps, it went 
to Little Rock, Arkansas, arriving July 4th. 
Here, August 12th, it was mustered out, and 
proceeded to Cleveland, Ohio, and was dis- 
charged, the men returning to their homes. 



KOSTER OF COMPANY B. 









Date of 




Names. 


Jiank. 




Entering the 
Service. 


Jiemarks. 


Louis Von Blessingh ._ . 


Captain. 


34 


Aug. 18, 1861 


Promoted Lieutenant-Colonel, October 12, 1861. 


Carl Morritz .. .- .. 


^11 


34 


Sept. (1,1861 


From 1st Lieut, co. H, Feb. 1862; dis. December, 1864. 


CarlMaeulen 


(t 


35 


Aug. 18, 1S61 


Pro. from 1st Lieut. Jan. 1865; mustered out Aug. 1865. 


Henry Goeker 


1st Lieut. 


35 


Aug. 18, 1861 


Pro. from 2d Lieut. Jan. 18(i5; mustered out Aug. 1865. 


Gustav Baither 


" 


23 


Sept. 3, 1861 


Wd. June, 1864, Kenesaw; ra. o. Jan. 1865, exp. term. 


Aucfust Lossberg 


(( 


32 


Aug. 15, 1861 


From l;gt. Maj. co. D, January, 1865; m.o. co.; vet. 


Frederick Ingokl 


2d Lieut. 


31 


Aug. 18, 1861 


Pro. to 1st Lieut. Oct. '61; not mustered; res. Apr. '62. 


Louis Keppel -_ . 




25 

27 


Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 


Pro. 1st Lieut. May, 1862; not mustered; dis. May, '63. 


Jacob F. Mery 


From 1st Sgt. May, 1862; 1st Lieut, co. K, Nov. 1862. 



l(jG 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Names. 



Dii'trick Schmidt 

Julius Kuepel 

Simon Hollandworitz .. . 

Louis Sebastian 

Martin Sclilachter 

August Avork 

llt'rinan Jolinson 

Pi'tcr Bock 

August Stuenberg 

Frederick Hobe 

Carl Huster 

Nicliolas Niesser 

Carl Boek 

Alex. Muench 

Joseph Baumgartner 

Carl Seutter 

Casper Schmidt 

August Diebel 

Carl F. Welshofer 

Geo. Bodenmiller 

Johann Miner 

Aunmerman, John 

Aboud, Joseph 

Aschemor, Geo. F 

Baunian, John 

Bothe, Heinrich 

Bauer, William 

Butter, Emil 

Bader, Gottfried W 

Bauer, Christian 

Brellman, John 

Bremer, Frederick 

Bauer, John 

Blawkenbach, John 

Clael, Edward 

Cezaplenski, Andreas__. 

Eberle, Peter 

Ehrsam, Frederick 

Ernsthausen, Gerhart___ 

Fries, George 

Frehse, Louis 

Fricke, John 

Gaensle, Wilhelm _1 

Haas, Carl 

Hoflein, Fritz 

Haas, Johann 

Henneger, Herman 

Heed, George 

Jost, Joseph 

Kaes, Leonhard 

Knechenmeister, Fred'k 

Kramer, Mathias 

Krahl, Frederick 

Kurtz, Carl 

Klaus, Carl 

Klapper, Philip 

Klevenz, Frederick 

Kopp, Jacob 

Kirschmer, Frederick., _ 

Kruezer, Lewis 

Kuhn, Heinrich 

Kraus, George 

Mueller, John E HI 

Martin, Henrj' 

Nagel, Carl. !"_' 

Nagel, Wilhelm 

Nels, Frederick 

Nopper, Fritz _ 

ott, Phihp ;; 

Peters, John 



Jtank. 


^ 

■s 


2d Lieut. 


28 


H 


82 


Sergeant. 


22 


tt 


26 


n 


33 


tt 


28 


a 


23 


a 


28 


Corporal. 


27 
20 


ii 


31 


u 


27 


(( 


3(i 


(( 


21 


(1 


20 


u 


19 


" 


19 


it 


28 


Musician. 


18 


'* 


18 


(( 


44 


Private. 


44 


it 


31 


'* 


18 


(( 


19 


[( 


23 


tt 


33 


(( 


3fi 


It 


23 


n 


14 


" 


24 


(( 


30 


i( 


25 


it 


20 


It 


30 


" 


2fi 


(( 


26 


'( 


26 


(( 


33 


it 


33 


a 


23 


" 


21 


(1 


28 


" 


21 


" 


38 


i( 


18 


(( 


31 


(t 


42 


" 


30 


ti 


21 


ii 


21 


u 


21 


(( 


30 


" 


21 


(( 


27 


(( 


2.5 


(( 


25 


it 


28 


(( 


24 


u 


30 


11 


27 


" 


26 


(( 


33 


" 


32 


1( 


IS 


" 


26 


It 


45 


" 


22 


(( 


24 


(( 


44 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Aug. 26, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 

Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 26, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



26, 1861 
20,1861 
18,1861 
18,1861 
18,1861 
4, 1862 
18,1861 
18,1861 
18,1861 
20,1861 
30,1862 



Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 20,1861 
Aug. 20,1861 
Aug. 20,1861 
Aug. 19,1862 
Aug. 2(i,1861 
Aug. 26,1861 
Aug. 12,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18.1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18.1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 26,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Sept.30, 1862 
Nov. 3, 1862 
Oct. 23, 1862 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 26,1861 
Aug. 26,1861 
Aug. 26,1861 
Aug. 26,1861 
Oct. 28,1862 
Aug. 25,1861 
Sept. 8,1862 
Sept. 8,1862 
Aug. 18,1861 
Aug. 26,1861 
Aug. 26,1861 
Aug. 18,1861 



Remarks. 



From Corporal, Dec. 1862; 1st Lieutenant, April, 1864. 

Ap. Jan. 1864; wd. Mar. 1865, Bentonville, N. C; mus- 
tered out August, 1865; veteran. 
Pro. Sergeant Major, March, 18(i3. 

Ap. Feb. '64; wd. Jonesboro, Aug. '64; dis.!\Iay,'65,disab. 
Ap. Sergeant, February, 1864; ni. o. company; veteran. 
Mustered out September, 1864, Surgeon's certificate. 
Mustered out September, 1864, on expiration of term. 



Mustered out September, 1864, on expiration of term. 
Killed June 7, 1863, in action near Vicksburg. 

Pro. Hospital Steward, February, 1863; veteran. 
Mustered out September, 1864, on expiration of term. 
Ap. Jan. 1864, duty as engineer hd.-qtrs. 15th A. C; 

mustered o>it July, 1865; veteran. 
Cap. at Atlanta, July, 1864; mu.stered out June, 1865. 
Ap. Jan. 1865; mustered out with co. Aug. 1865, vet. 
Mustered out September 12, 1864, expiration of term. 
Trans, to Vet. Reserve Corps; dis. May, 1864, disab. 
Discharged December 31, 1862, certificate of disability. 
Died August 20, 1863, at Camp Sherman, Mississippi. 

Absent sick; mustered out order of War Department. 
Mustered out with company, August, 1865; veteran. 
Cap. at Atlanta, July, 1864; mustered out June, 1865. 
Killed at Mission Ridge, November 25, 1863. 
Died from injurj' in R. R. accident. May, 1S64. 
Appointed Sergeant company A, March, 1863. 
Dis. Sept. 1863, at.St. Louis, Mo., Surgeon's certificate. 
Wd. Aug. '64, Atlanta; m. o. Sept., '64, expiration term. 
Discharged Oct. 1862, Gallipolis, O., Surg, certificate. 
Missing near Montgomery, W. Va.; no further record. 
Died October, 1863, in genera! hospital, Memphis. 
Wounded near Atlanta, July, 1864; m. o. May, 1865. 
Mustered out Sept. 1864, Ft. Corcoran, Va. exp. term. 
AVd. action, Vicksburg, May, 1863; m. o. co.; veteran. 
Died in hospital at Clifton, W. Va. December, 1864. 
Dis. Jan. 1863, Louisville, Kentucky, Surgeon's ctf. 
Wd. May, 1863, action at Vicksburg; m. o. co.; veteran. 
Wd. May, 1864, R. R. accident; mustered out co.; vet. 
Died December 22, 1863, in hospital at Memphis. 
Mustered out September, 1864, expiration of term. 
Cap. July, 1864, in battle; ui. o. June, 1865; veteran. 
Died in hospital at Larkinsville, Ala. March 7, 1864. 
Mustered out September 12, 1864, expiration of term. 
Mustered out September 12, 1864, expiration of term. 
Di.scharged Oct. 9, 1864, Gallipolis, 0. Surgeon's ctf. 
Discharyed December 31, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 
Mustered out August, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company, August, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered uut with company, August, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company, August, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company, August, 1865; veteran. 
Died May 27, 1863; at Young's Point, Louisiana. 
Dis. April, 1864, Dennison hospital, O. Surgeon's ctf. 
Mustered out September, 1864, expiration of term. 
Mustered out September, 1864, expiration of term. 
Mustered out September, 1864, expiration of term. 
Discharged October, 1862, Gallipolis, O. Surgeon's ctf. 
Mvistered out September 12, 1864, expiration of term. 
Mustered out September 12, 1864, expiration of term. 
Died June, 1863, of wounds received near Vicksburg. 
Killed May, 1863, in action near Vicksburg. 
Mustered out May 28, 1865, by order War Department. 
Mustered out Mav 28, 1865, by order War Department. 
Dis. July, 1.SI12, Flat Top Tannery, Va. Surgeon's ctf. 
Mustered out September 12, 1864, expiration of term. 
Wd. at Atlanta, July, 1864; m. o. Sept. 1864, exp. term. 
Discharged October, 1862, Gallipolis, O. Surgeon's ctf. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



167 



Names. 



Pump, Frederick 

Pepper, Heinrich 

Penscher, Joseph _. 

Rentsch, Henry 

Sautter, Michael 

Schroeder, Carl 

Schumacher, Frederick. 

Schultz, Carl 

Schumacher, Wilhelm 

Sander, Heinrich 

Sanzenbacher, John 

Seter, Christian 

Schmidt, George 

Schlatter, George 

Stohrer, Melchoir 

Senf, Werner. 

Schuartz, Frederick 

Suwold, Johann 

Suwold, Jacob 

Tlese, Herman 

Teefelmever, August 

Tilse, Wilhelm 

Weber, Valentine 

Winsler, Mathias 



Rank, 



Private. 



Date of 

Entering ttie 

Service. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Nov. 



2S, 18(51 
18,1861 
15,1802 



Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



18,1861 

8,1862 

8,1862 

4,1862 

4,1862 

18,1861 

18,1861 

18,1861 

18,1861 

26,1861 

18,1861 

26,1861 

18,1861 

26,18(11 

26,1861 

26,1861 

26,1861 

8,18(52 

18,1861 

18,1861 



Remarks. 



Mustered out with company, August 7, 1S65; veteran. 

K. July, 1864, battle Ezra Chapel, Atlanta; veteran. 

Mustered out with company, August, 186.5. 

Pro. Quartermaster Sergeant, February, 1864; veteran. 

Mustered out with company, August, 186.5; veteran. 

Wd. June, 1864, Kenesaw Mt.; dis. Feb. 18(55, disab. 

Mustered out June, 1865, order of War Department. 

Mustered out June, 18(55, order of War Department. 

Transferred to Signal Corps, September, 18()3. 

Killed May, 186:5, near Vicksburg. 

Dis. July, 1862, at Flat Top Tannery, Surgeon's ctf. 



Died in hospital at Raleigh, W. Va. August, 1862. 
Discharged October, 1862, Gallipolis, O. Surgeon's ctf. 
Mu.stered out September, 1864, on expiration of term. 
Clustered out September, 1864, on expiration of term. 
Transferred to Signal Corps, September, 186:5. 
l)i.schai'ged January, 18(5:5, Louisville, Surgeon's ctf. 
Killed May 111, 186:3, in action near Vicksburg. 
Mustered out September, 1864, on expiration of term. 
Mustered out May, 1865, by order of War Department. 
Mustered out August 16, 1865, on expiration of term. 
Mustered out September 12, 1864, expiration of term. 



COMPANY G. 



Names. 



Frederick Schoening 

Louis E. Lambert 

William Schultz 

Geo. W. Tenime 

Theodore Nieberg 

Jacob Littu 

John Hamm 

Gustav A. Wintza 

Carl Maeulen 

Gustav Baither 

John Mollenkopf 

Lewis Allien . 

Carl Darn 

Herman Waldman 

Alexander Schoenig 

Ernst Forgler 

Carl Breidert 

Carl Schmidt 

August Roedieker 

Gottleib Grau 

Henry Kruessman 

Joseph Boselgia 

George Scherer 

Nicholas Hotz 

John Tamboch 

Jacob Baumhauer 

Robert Dietrich 

John S. Kountz 

Michael Adams 

George S. Veidenger 

Artz, Franz 

Albers, Heinrich 

Acheman, Lewis 

Aberle, Joseph 

Auman, John 

Boessinger, Heinrich 





^ 


Rank. 


^ 


Captain. 


:56 

20 


1st Lieut. 


:5i 


(( 


32 


" 


20 


" 


31 


2d Lieut. 


38 


" 


23 


(1 


35 


IstSergt. 


2:5 


" 


2o 


Sergeant. 


25 


II 


35 


(I 


25 


" 


24 


" 


'>9 


" 


29 


It 


3:! 


Corporal 
II 


23 
31 


" 


28 


" 


1!) 


II 


30 


II 


25 


" 


23 


.Musician. 


18 


" 


17 


It 


16 


II 


18 


Wagoner. 
Private. 


20 




:5(i 


" 


20 


" 


23 


u 


22 


" 


20 



Date of 

Entering ttie 

Service. 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Aui.'. 
Sejjt. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



1, 1861 
2(5,1861 
9, 1861 
5, 1861 

.30, 1861 
(5, 1861 
12,1861 
22,1861 
18, 1861 
3, 1861 
12, 1861 
:i, 1861 
12,18(il 

11, 1861 

2, 1861 
21, 1861 

3, 1861 

12, 1861 
9, 1861 
3, 1801 

21, 18(52 
17,1861 
24,1861 
25,1861 



Sept. 4,1861 
Oct. 13, 1862 
Sept. 30,1861 

Mch. 31,1864 
Sept. 20,1861 
.Sept. 24,1861 
Oct. 8, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Sept. 13,1861 
Sept. 24,1861 
Sept. 3, 1861 



Remarks. 



Died May '(54, wounds Resaca, May 13, 1864. 
1st Lieut. F, April, '64; Adjt. July, '64. Capt., Jan. ,'(55. 
Appointed A<ljutant, June 1, 18(>2. 
From 2d Lieut. K, May, '62; R. Q.M. December 29, '62. 
Tranferred from Adjutant, July, '(54; res. Sept. 20, '64. 
From 2d Lieut. E, June, 18(54; to Capt. E, April, 1865. 
To 1st Lieutenant Co. C, February 8, 1862. 
From 1st Sgt. C, Feb., 1862; to 1st Lt. (', Dec, '(52. 
From l,st Sgt. B, May, 1863; to 1st Lt. H, April, 18(51. 
Promoted 2d Lieutenant Co. B, November, 18(i2. 
From Sergt. Sept. 20, '64; mustered out Co.; veteran. 
From Corpl.; disc. Sept. 1864, Cleveland, O.; Surg. ctf. 
Trans. Vet. R. C. Jime, '(i4; m. o. Sept., '64, exp. term. 
Discharged, March, 1863, Gallipolis, Surg, certificate. 
From Corporal; mustered out Sept., 18(54, exp. term. 
From Corporal July, 18(54; mustered out May, 1865. 
Trans. V. R.C., March, 1864; m. o. Sept. 1864; exp. term. 
From Corporal, Jan., 1865; m. o. Co. Aug., '65; veteran. 

Discharged Jan. 1, '63, Louisville, Ky., Surg, certificate. 

From Corpl. Nov., 1863, to Com'y Sgt.. January, 18(53. 
Wd. May, '(53, Vicksliurg; K. Mch, '65, bat. Bentonville. 
Corporal, October, 1861; m. o. Sept., 18(i4, exp. term. 
Corporal, Feb., 1863; m.o. Sept., 18(54, expiration term. 
Wd. July, '64, Atlanta; ap. Cpl, July, '(55; m. o. co.; vet. 
Killed, May, 1863, in action near Vicksburg. 

Wd. Mission Ridge, November 25, 1863 (right leg amp.); 

discharged April, 1864. 
Cap. July, '(54, bat. Atlanta; ex. Sept. '64; m. o. co. 
Drowned Ohio R., steamer N. C. Lewis, January, 1863. 

Wd. Vicksburg, May, 63; trans.Vet. R. Corps, Jan., '65. 
Trans. Vet. R. Corps April, '64; mustered out Sept., '(54. 
Trans. Vet. R. Corps April, '64; mu.stered out Sept., '64. 
M. o. September, 18(54, at East Point, Ga.; exp. term. 
Mustered out Co. August, 1865, veteran. 



IHS 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Names. 



Balof, Jacob 

Beiscke, John 

Brooks, Frederick 

Bender, Peter 

Brndder, Henry 

Dcwrie, George 

Eichen, Joseph 

Eiiisch, Frederick 

Emsch, John 

Friederich, Edward 

Felder, Jacob 

Fanbach, John 

Guentert, Heinrich 

Grobe, John H 

Gartis, Joseph 

Hittler, George 

Hess, Erhard 

Eager, Philip 

Haberbusch, Havier 

Heinberger, Carl 

Hartman, Armand 

Kraeger, Martin 

Kampeler, Henry 

Knuer, Christian 

Loesch, Jacob 

Loesch, Phihp 

Linneman, Henry 

Langenderfer, Joseph.. 

Loesch, John W 

Langer, Christian 

Meyer, Henry 

Muening, John 

Mittmann, August 

Miller, George 

Metzger, George 

Myer, Conrad 

Mueller, Jacob 

Mayer, Frederick 

Nelio, Lewis ._. 

Oetgel, Valentine 

Philipar, Frederick 

Puck, Henry 

Kufly, John 

Reger, Elois 

Riegar, Leonhard 

Schmidt, William 

Saflfel, Frederick 

Schwartz, Louis 

Steiamger, George 

Sauppe, Ernst 

Schmidt, Jacob 

Sebach, Julius 

Scheninghamer, Fred'k 

Schneider, Mathias 

Schneider, John 

Saamorzaum, Jacob 

Schumacher, Leon 

Schneider, Peter 

Schneider, Carl 

Thome, Peter 

Twaerenbold. Joseph".. 

Volget, George 

Weiss, John L 

Weber, George I 

Walter Christian ...1 

Witzler, Michael I 

Weber, Marcus 

Weber, Valentine I 

Young, John '_ 

Zeigler, Frederick 

Zeutgraf, George 

Zimmerman, Samuel 



Ra7ik. 



Private. 



Date 0/ 

Entering the 

Service. 



Mar. 

Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



29,1864 
6, 1862 
16,1862 
,1862 
1864 
,1862 
,186: 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
',186: 
,186 
,1864 
,186 
i,186: 
;,186 
',186 
',186 
,186: 
:,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,1862 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,1862 
,186 
,186: 
,186 
186 
,186: 
i,186 
•,186 
,186: 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186: 
;,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 
,186 



Semarks. 



Mustered out May, 1865, order War Department. 
Mustered out May, 1865, order War Department. 
Mustered out May, 1865, order War Department. 
Mustered out May, 1864, to date September, 1864. 
Mustered out June, I860, order War Department. 
Discharged, January, 1863, Louisville, Surg, certificate. 
Discharged, January, 1863, Louisville, Surg, certificate. 
Discharged, Jan. 14, '63, Louisville, Ky., Surg, certf. 
Died June 27, '63, hosp., Jefi'erson Barracks, St. Louis. 
Mustered out Co. August 1865; veteran. 
Wd. July, 1864, bat. Vicksburg; mustered out Co.; vet. 
Wd. battle Atlanta; no further record. 
Cap. battle Atlanta; exchanged; m. o. June, 1865; vet. 
Mustered out March, '65, Cleveland, O., Surg, certif. 
Mustered out Sept., 1864, Ea.st Point, Ga., exp. term. 
Mustered out Co. August, 1865; veteran. 

Mustered out September, 1864, expiration term. 
Mustered out May, 1865, order War Department. 
Died July, 1863, hosp. Benton Barracks, wds. in action. 
Discharged February 26, 1865, on Surg, certificate. 
Cap. Aug., '64. action Atlanta; d. May, '65, Columbus, O. 
Died hospital July, 1863, near Vicksburg. 
Mustered outSept.'64, East Point, Ga., expiration term. 
Mustered out Co. August, 1865; veteran. 
Died March, 1862, at Clifton, West Virginia. 
Died Aug., 18(;4, of wounds Julv, 1864, near Atlanta. 
Promoted to 2d Lieut. Co. F, February 28, 1862. 
Died February, 1863, hospital Young's Point, La. 
Mustered out Sept., 1864, East Point; expiration term. 
Wd. May, 1863, Vicksburg, disc. July, '64, Surg, certif. 
Discharged July, 1864, Cleveland, G., Surg, certificate. 
Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps December, 1863. 
Trans, to Vet. Res. C.;m. o. September, 1864; exp. term. 

On muster-in roll; no further record. 
Died Nov. 26, 1863, wounds Nov., 1863, Mission Ridge. 
Discharged March, 1863, Louisville, Ky., Surg, certif. 
Mustered out Sept., '64, East Point, Ga., exp. term. 
Died July, 1862, Flat Top Tannery, Virginia. 
Mustered out Sept., 1864, East Point, Ga., exp. term. 
Wd. August, 1864, Jonesboro; mustered out May, 1865. 

Mustered out May 28, 1865, order War Department. 
Mustered out Sept. 1864, East Point, Ga., exp. term. 
Mustered out Company August 7, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out Company August 7, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out Company August 7, 1865; veteran. 
Drowned July, 1863, in Ohio River, near Gallipolis. 
Died July 26, 1864, wounds July 23, 1864, Atlanta. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 
Transferred to Signal Corps, August, I860. 
Discharged Jan., 63, near Louisville, Ky., Surg, certif. 
Captured in action; died Feb., '64, in Richmond Prison. 
Mustered out September 21, 1864, expiration term. 
Died November 29, 1861, at Cannelton, West Virginia. 
Discharged Jan. 20, 1863, Louisville, Ky., Surg, certif. 
Discharged Jan. 6, '63, Louisville, Ky., Surg, certificate. 
On muster-in roll; no further record. 
Missed July, '64, bat. Atlanta; m. o. Jan., '65; exp. term. 
Mustered out Sept. 1864, East Point, Ga., exp. term. 
Discharged ]\Iay 8, 1863, Louisville, Surg, certificate. 
Discharged Sept. 22, '64, Columbus. O., Surg, certificate. 
Mustered out September 24, 1864; exp. term. 
Mustered out September 28, 1864, exp. term. 
Cap. July, '(i4, Atlanta; d. Jan. '65, Rebel Prison, Florence 
Discharged January, 1863, Louisville, Surg, certificate. 
Mustered out Co. August, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out September 28, 1865, exp. term. 
Died September, '64, wds. August, '64, Jonesboro; vet. 
Discharged July, 1862. Clifton, W. Va., Surg, certificate. 
Discharged January, 1863, Louisville, Surg, certificate. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



169 



COMPANY K. 



Naiiu^. 



F. M. Stumpf 

Theodore Voges 

William Kenig 

Herman Rosenbaum 

Andrew Huber 

Jacob F. Mery 

Joseph Siet'ert 

George W. Temme 

Sebaldns Hossler 

William Weiss 



John Fischer 

George Weber 

Peter Grossman 

Philip Pflster 

Adolph Wolff 

Jaroslaus Wandtte 

Anton Naas 

George Weber 

Rudolph Haney 

Ferdinand Jeite 

Jacob Stahl 

William Birkenhauer __ 

George Dillman 

Ludwig Theobold 

Charles Boegehold 

Christian Stuormor 

Allglier, John 

Anneshausley, Henry __ 
Baumann, Freiderick _. 

Bartholomy, Daniel 

Benden, Henry 

Bruenesholf, Joseph 

Brick, Henry 

Bonner, Nicholas 

Beck, William 

Blanke, Louis 

Buchrer, Conrad 

Curie, Charles 

Clauss, William 

Ditto, Martin 

Eisele, Charles 

Eichhorn, George 

Frey, Victor 

Frey, Joseph 

Frohbatlo, Henry 

Goetsinger, Michael 

Greb, Hubertus 

Gerster, Henry 

Gilbert, Jacob 

Huebbler, Joseph 

Hersig, Jacob 

Hartman, Henry 

Hanselman, Wendelin_ 

Halamer, George 

Harbaum, Henry 

Hotlmeyer, Henry 

Hulscher, Charles 

Jhsen, Theodore 

Kitner, Jacob 

Keller, John 

Kutzley, Barnhard 

Keip, Friederick . 

Klatzel, Nicolaus 

Kossandy, George 

Keller, Freiderick 

Keiser, Christian 

Keller, John 



Hank. 



Captain. 

(1 
1st Lieut. 

(( 
2d Lieut. 

(( 

1st iSergt. 
(( 

II 

Sergeant. 

(( 

u 

II 
a 

Corporal. 



Musician. 
Wagoner. 
Private. 



38 
34 
34 
26 
29 
27 
24 
32 
21 
25 

22 

18 
21 
31 
28 
43 
18 
26 
21 
27 
38 
22 
19 
19 
15 
22 
27 
26 
25 
25 
36 
36 
46 
18 
20 
22 
24 
28 
22 
18 
31 
21 
18 
45 
40 
25 
34 
22 
21 
25 
23 
36 
18 
26 
37 
20 
35 
32 
34 
25 
21 
25 
49 
37 
21 
45 
41 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Feb. 15, 1862 
Aug. 12, 1861 
Oct. 22, 1861 
Sept. 5, 1861 
Oct. 2, 1861 
Aug. 18, 1861 
Aug. 10, 1861 
Nov. 15, 1S61 
Sept. 12, 1861 
Nov. 7, 1861 

Oct. 5, 1861 
Sept. 4,1862 
Nov. 7, 1861 
Oct. 15, 1861 
Nov. 20, 1861 
Nov. 9,1861 
Oct. 4, 1861 
Sept. 25,1861 
Nov. 3, 1861 
Oct. 3, 1861 
Oct. 10, 1861 
Sept. 1, 1862 
Sept. 4,1862 
Oct. 3, 1861 
Nov. 11,1861 
Oct. 3, 18fil 
Aug. 25, 1862 
Mch. 7, 1862 
Jan. 8, 1864 
Sept. 10, 1861 
Aug. 1, 1864 
Jan. 3, 1862 
Sept. 25,1861 
Oct. 3, 1861 
Sept. 15, 1862 
Sept. 1, 1862 
Dec. 21, 1863 
Sept. 4, 1862 
Aug. 31, 1862 
Sept. 4, 1862 
Dec. 20, 1863 
Nov. 7, 1861 
Nov. 10, 1861 
Nov. 10, 1861 
Oct. 5, 1861 
Dec. 21, 1863 
Oct. 3, 1861 
Mch. 7, 1862 
Aug. 6, 1862 
Oct. 10, 1861 
Dec. 28, 1863 
May 13, 1864 
Sept.25, 1861 
Aug. 29, 1862 
Nov. 20, 1861 
Nov. 8, 1861 
Sept. 30, 1861 
Nov. 16, 1861 
May 13, 1864 
Sept. 4, 1862 
Sept. 4, 1862 
Sept.l2, 1862 
Dec. 22, 1863 
Jan. 4, 1862 
Oct. 31, 1861 
Oct. 3, 1861 
Feb. 11, 1862 



lieinarks. 



From 1st Lt. Sept. 1862; to Co. D, September, 1862. 

From 1st Lt. Co. H, Dec. '62; disc. Nov. '63, Surg. ctf. 

Pro. Capt. April, 1864; m. o. with company. 

Resigned November 9, 1862. 

From 2d Lieut. Co. B, Nov. '62; to Capt. Co. D, Apr. '62. 

From 1st Lieut. Co. I, Jan. 18()5; m. o. company; vet. 

Pro. to 1st Lieut. Co. G, May 28, 1862. 

From 1st Sergt. Co. F, Apr. '62; 1st Lt. Co. E, Nov.'62. 

From 1st Sergt. Dec. 20, '(i2; com. 1st Lt., not mustered; 

killed at Resaca, May 10, 1864. 
Mustered out October, 1S64, expiration term. 
Ap. 1st Sergt. Oct. '64; m. o. May, '65, or. War. Dept. 
Ap. 1st Sergt. June, '(i5; m. o. company; veteran. 
In hospital; mustered out June, 1865; veteran. 
Ap. Sergt. Mar, 1862; disc. Aug. '63, Surg, certificate. 
Ap. Sergt. June, 1863; killed at Vicksburg, June, 1863. 
A p. Sergt. June, 1863; killed Aug. 6, '64, near Atlanta. 
From Corp.; m. o. Sept. 1864, expiration term. 
Ap. Sergt. Jan. 1865; m. o. company Aug. '65; veteran. 
Ap. March, 1864; killed June, 1864, Kenesaw Mt.; vet. 
Ap. Nov. 1862; died Aug. 1863, in Regt. hospital. 
Mustered out May 30, 18()5, order War Dept. 
Mustered out May 30, 1865, order War Dept. 
Ap. Corp. Feb. 1864; m. o. company Aug. 65; veteran. 
Veteran. 
Veteran. 

Mustered out May, 1865, order War Department. 
Captured July, 1S64, battle Atlanta; no further record. 
Mustered out with company August 7, 1865. 
Returned to company from Prin. Musician; veteran. 

On muster-in roll; no further record. 

Mustered out Sept. 2(), 1864, expiration term. 

Mustered out Oct. 19, 1864, expiration term. 

Mustered out May 30, 1865, order War Dept. 

Mustered out May 30, 1865, order War Dept. 

VVd. Aug. 1864, in action at East Point; m. o. June, '65. 

Died Aug. 6, 1864, wounds at battle Atlanta, July, '64. 

Mustered out May 30, 1865, order War Dept. 

Trans, to Veteran Reserve Corps, April 4, 1864. 

Died Sept. 1, '65, of wounds at Jonesboro, Aug. 31, '64. 

Mustered out January 26, 1865, expiration term. 

Died Nov. 21, 1863, on march near Chattanooga. 

Discharged Feb. 3, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharged Gctober 15, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Mustered out with company August 7, 1865. 

Wd. May, '62, bat. Princeton; dis. Feb. '63, Surg. ctf. 

Mustered out April 19, 1865, expiration term. 

Mustered out May 30, 1865, order War Dept. 

Mustered out with company Aug. 7, 1865; veteran. 

Mustered out with com[iany August 7, 1865. 

Absent sick; m. o. Aug. 1865, order War Dept. 

From Co. H, Nov. '61; d. Sept. '63,Camp Sherman, Miss. 

Wd. May, 1862, bat. Princton; disc. Aug. 1862. 

Mustered out Nov. 26, 1864, expiration term. 

Mustered out Sept. 3(1, 1864, expiration term. 

Discharged April 14, 1864, Surgeon's certificate. 

Mustered;! out with company August 7, 1.S65. 

Died July 11, 1863, at Memphis, Tenn. 

Died June 11, 1863, wds. near Vicksburg, May 19, 1863. 

Died at Toledo, June 3, 1863. 

D. Aug. '64, Jetl'ville, Ind, of wds. Resaca, May, 1864. 

Discharged Sept. 1, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged July, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged Jan. 30, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 



170 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



yames. 



Kraigor, Fricderick 

Kiebs, Frank 

Lindhardt, Christian... 

Loch. Alois 

Lauber, Joachim 

Lothes, John 

Matler, Joseph 

Shiver, John 

Mfisler. Martin 

Jloritz, Joseph 

Jlook, John 

Mueller, Christian 

Mueller, Max 

Nohl, A.John 

Nohl, Jacob 

Philliis, Friederick 

Pfeipfer, Nicolaus 

Racharter, Christian 

Riedy, Jacob 

Ritter, Adam 

Ruhl, Elias _. 

Rottenberg, Henry 

Riichrath, Adam 

Rottax. Philip 

Schatlner, Sebastian 

Schueeberger, George__ 

Sines, John 

Schroeder, Andreas 

Stilbler, August 

Schilling, Andreas 

Sass, John 

Stelzer, Christian 

Sodaier, Aaron 

Schickler, Adam 

Steinerman, Jacob 

Tundt. Frank 

Theobold, Jacob 

Truijr, Michael 

Thomas. John 

Udick, Jacob 

Voegeli, Oswold 

Yoelker, Nicolaus 

Vongunter, Christian ._ 

Walscher, George 

Welke, Ludwig 

Wenger, .Joseph 

Wengler. Jacob 

Wenninger, Lorenz 

Wenninger, George 

Weber, John 

Zimmer, Michael 



Rank. 



Private. 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Mch 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Sept, 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Aug. 

Sept, 

Feb. 

Sept, 

Sept, 

Sept, 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Mch 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Sept, 

Sept 

Sept, 

Sept, 

Sept, 

Feb. 

Sept, 

Dec. 

Sept. 

Sept, 

Sept, 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Nov. 



.2.5,1862 
3, 1801 
7, 1861 

7, 1S61 
25, 1861 
,25, 1861 
22, 186:'. 
18, 1863 

1,1864 

16, 1861 

16,1861 

. 4, 18(i2 

16, 1861 

30, 1861 

8,1862 

. 4, 1862 

28. 1862 
. 1,1862 
. 4,1862 
.23, 1861 

8, 1861 

9, 1861 
3, 1861 

10, 1861 

15, 1863 

21,1864 

,.11,1862 

15, 1S61 
9, 1861 
9, 1861 
9, 1861 

25, 1862 
9, 1861 

25, 1862 

18. 1863 
18, 1863 

. 4,1862 
, 4, 1862 
. 4,1862 
. 2, 1861 
. 2, 1861 

12, 1862 
. 1,1862 

20, 1863 
, 7, 1861 
, 6,1862 
. 4, 1862 

14 1861 
, 9,1862 
,27,1862 
, 14, 1861 



Ranarks. 



Mustered out May 25, 1865, expiration term. 
Transferred to JMarine Brigade, June 27, 1863. 
Killed May 16, 18(i2, at battle of Princeton, W. Va. 
Killed May 19, 1863, in action near Vicksburg. 
Killed Mav 16, 1862, in battle at Princeton, W. Va. 
Died Mayi '62, Raleigh, Va. of wds. atPrinceton,W.Va. 
Mustered out with company August 7, 1865. 
Mustered out with company August 7, 1865. 

Discharged Jan. 16, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged Jan. 14, 1863, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Mastered out May 20, 1865, order War Dept. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Nov. 15, 1863. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865, order War Dept. 
Mustered out May 30, 1865, order War. Dept. 
Appointed Acting Assistant Surgeon, June 29, 1863. 
Died Aug. 13, '64, near Atlanta, wds. there, Aug. 12,'64. 

Trans, from Co. I ; disc. July, 186.3, Surg, certificate. 
Discharged July 22, 1863, Surgeon's certificate. 
Missing bat. Princeton; disc. Dec. 1863, Surg. ctf. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps Nov. 7, 1863. 
Mustered out Oct. 13, 1864, expiration term. 
Mustered out with company August 7, 1865. 
Mustered out with company August 7, 1865. 
Died June 2, 1864, at Bryan, Ohio. 



Discharged August 24, 1863, Surgeon's certificate. 

Wd. May 19, '63, Vicksburg; dis. Aug. '63, Surg. ctf. 

Mustered out June 25, 1865, Surgeon's certificate. 

Mustered out May 30, 1865, order War Dept. 

Wd. at Jonesboro, Aug. 1.S64; mustered outMay 18,'65. 

Mu.stered out with company August 7, 1865. 

Died -luneO, 18(i3, Young's Point, La. 

Discharged Jan. 6, 1S63, on Surgeon's certifiaate. 

Clustered out Ma\- 30, 1865, order War Dept. 

Trans, from Co. H, Sept. 1862; disc, order VVar Dept. 

Mustered out with company Aug. 7, 1 865; veteran. 

Mustered out May 30, 1865, order War Dept. 
Mustered out with comi)any August 7, 18(i5. 
From Co. K, April, 18(12; killed at Princeton, Mav, '62. 
Died at Milliken's Bend, La. April 29, 1863. 

Wd. and cap. at Princeton; dis. Dec. 1862, S\irg. ctf. 
Mustered out May 30, 1865, order War Dept. 
Mustered out May 30, 1865, order War Dept. 
Missing bat. Atlanta; m. o. company Aug. 7, '65; vet. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION — FIELD WORK. 



171 



POETY-SEVBNTH REGIMENT, OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 

THREE-YEARS' SERVICE. 
This Regiment took active and iionorable part in the folh)wing liatlics ; 



Jackson, Mississippi. 

ViCK.SBURG, MiSSI.SSIPPI. 

Lewisburg, Virginia. 
Chakleston, Virginia. 

TuscuMBiA, Alabama. 
Mission Eidge, Georgia. 



The Regiment was organized at Cani]i Den- 
nison August 13, 1861. The circumstances 
attending the work of recruiting and organ- 
izing were unusually embarrassing, and caus- 
ing much delay and discouragement with the 
men. Two months were spent in getting the 
several Companies tilled and readj' for Regi- 
mentiil muster. It was said that 13 Nation- 
alities were represented in the command, 
Americans and Germans constituting much 
the larger portions. But one Company (I) 
was from Toledo. Of that the Captain was 
llanaiiiah D. Pugh, the First Lieutenant 
Horace A. Egbert, from August 28, 1861, 
until drowned in West Virginia, October 9, 
1861, when Alonzo Kingsbury succeeded him ; 
and the Second Lieutenant Herbert Stejer. 
The Colonel was Frederick Poschner, jr., a 
Hungarian Patriot who took part in revolu- 
tionary operations in Hungary in 1848, hav- 
ing previously been an officer in the Prussian 
Army. The Lieutenant- Colonel was Lyman 
S. Elliott, of Michigan ; and the Major, Augus- 
tus C. Parry, of Cincinnati. 

The Regiment's first rendezvous was at 
Camp Clay, in the Eastern suburbs of Cin- 
cinnati, June 10, 1861. August 27th, its organi- 
zation having been perfected, it was ordered 
to Clarksburg, West Virginia, to report to 
General Roseerans. August 29th it was fully 
equipped for the iield. At Weston, the Regi- 
ment was divided. Companies A, B, C, D, H 
and K, under the Colonel and Major, joining 
the main Army ; leaving E, F, G and I, under 
Lieutenant-Colonel Elliott,to guard the Village. 
Colonel Poschner, at BuUtown, was brigaded 
with the Ninth and Twenty-Eighth Ohio, 
under Colonel Robert L. McCook, whose com- 
mand was familiarly known as the " Bully 
Dutch Brigade." At Sutton Company B was 
left as re-enforcement to the garrison, the re- 



Knoxville, Tennessee. 
Resaca, Georgia. 
Dallas, Georgia. 
Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia. 
Atlanta, Georgia. 
Jonesboro, Tennessee. 



mainder of Colonel Posclmi'r's men nujving for- 
ward and taking part in (ho battle of Carnilex 
Ferry. September 2-tth the Brigade crossed 
Gauley River and advanced on Big Sewell 
Mountain, where the Regiment sulfered al- 
most beyond description, the result of exces- 
sive rains whereby supplies were denied them 
for a long time The men were in for a lively 
time. They were on quarter rations and 
without clothing to make them comfortable ; 
and were finally forced to retire to Gauley 
Bridge, Colonel McCook's Brigade being as- 
signed to camp about six miles to the East. 
While there the Forty-Seventh with the Ninth 
Ohio cro.ssed the New River to Fayette C. H. 
and destroyed valuable Rebel property. For 
four days the Regiment sulfered from incessant 
cannonading from FI03 d's Rebel force across 
the River, but Captain Mack's ten-pounder 
Parrotts finally silenced the enemy's guns, and 
he retreated, when the Forty-Seventh went 
into winter quarters at Gaulej' Mountain. 

A letter from Captain Pugh, Co. I, of date of Jan- 
uary 25th, 18G2, gave an account of a visit he had 
made eight miles from Camp Gauley Mountain, to 
see an " old Virginian," 91 years of age. He liad 
lived in the place 73 years — was an old hunter and 
Indian-fighter, who had personally known Daniel 
Boone and other noted pioneers. He was a strong 
Union raan, and denounced the Secessionists roundly. 
At his advanced age, he was able to read the finest 
print without glasses. 

On the 19th September, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Elliott, with three Companies of the Regiment, 
had marched to Cross Lanes, to relieve the 
Thirteenth Ohio and Schneider's Battery, and 
succeeded in ridding the country of guerrilla 
bands. His force performed active and severe 
work, by night and by day, and did much to 
8uj)portand protect loj'al citizens. 

The Regiment was re-united at Gauley 
Mountain December 5, 1861, and began a 



172 



HfSTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



line of fortifications covering Gauley Eidge 
and the Kanawha Valley, which it occupied 
until April, 1862, with the exception of one 
week, when it took part in an expedition to 
Little Sewell Mountain to drive the Eebels 
from their quarters, whose works were de- 
stroje<l anil prisoners taken. Maj' 10th the 
three Companies formed part of a force under 
Lieutenant-Colonel Elliott which moved on 
Lewisburg, and was entirely successful, the 
enemj' being routed with loss of camp equi- 
page, horses, and many prisoners. The Third 
Provisional Brigade, Colonel George Crook, 
Thirty-Sixth Oiiio, commanding, was organ- 
ized, the Forty-Seventh constituting part of 
the Ibrce. June 22d the Brigade compelled 
the Eebel General Lovering to retreat to Salt 
Pond Mountain and captured valuable prop- 
erty from him, the march of 90 miles being 
performed in three days, under intense heat, 
causing cases of sun-stroke. In July, the Eeg- 
iment under Major Parry, performed valuable 
service on expeditions, including the suppres- 
sion of guerrilla bands. 

On December 30, 1862, the Eegiment took 
steamers for Louisville, Kentucky, and Mem- 
phis, at which latter point it joined the expedi- 
tion against Vicksburg, in the Third Brigade, 
Second Division, Thirteentli Corps. Work on 
the canal was commenced late in January, 1863. 
The Eegiment was in the advance to the rear 
of Vicksburg, reaching Walnut Hills May 18th. 
On the 19th Colonel Parry (meantime promo- 
ted fi'om Lieutenant-Colonel), led an impetu- 
ous charge on Cemeterj- Hill, which was par- 
tially successful, but with severe loss. A like 
charge was made by them on the 22d. The 
Eegiment was in front line on Cemetery Hill 
until the surrender of the City. The nextdaj- 
after the surrender, tiie Fort}-Seventh was 
dispatched toward Jackson, Mississippi, after 
Johnston's forces, and took part in the capture 
of Jackson, when Colonel Parry was made 
Provost-Marshal, and his Eegiment destroyed 
the Eebel fortifications and the Eailroad about 
the City. September 27, 1863, the Corps 
proceeded to Memphis, where it was ordered 
to marcli to Germantown. Thence the Forty- 
Seventh went to Corinth ; and thence to luka, 
and to Tuscumbia, Alabama. On the 21st Oc- 
tober the Eegiment arrived opposite Chatta- 
nooga, and at once constructed rifle-pits for its 
use on the South side of the Tennessee Eiver. 



At noon of the 24th, Lieutenant-Colonel Wal- 
lace in command of the skirmish line, the whole 
army advanced and opened the battle of Mis- 
sion Eidge, in which the Forty-Seventh bore a 
prominent and effective part; and on the fol- 
lowing day, it joined in the pursuit of the re- 
treating enemy. Subsequently it was actively 
engaged in different movements, and early in 
November it was sent to the relief of Burnside; 
but it returned to Chattanooga in a march of 
great severity, the men being without shoes, 
with scanty clothing and almost without ra- 
tions, their bloody foot-prints on the frozen 
ground marking their line of march. The Eeg- 
iment was at Bellefonte early in January, 1864, 
and on the 30th performed a diversion against 
Eome, Georgia. At Lebanon, Alabama, a skir- 
mish occurred, February 3d. It then proceed- 
ed to Larkin's Landing, at which place three- 
fourths of the men re-enlisted, thus making the 
Fort3--Seveuth a Veteran Eegiment. A denial 
of the customary furlough caused some dissat- 
isfaction on thepart of the men; but the difficul- 
ty was arranged, and the Veterans left for Ohio 
March 18th, reaching Cincinnati on the 22d. 
April 28th the Eegiment again left Camp Den- 
nison,and Maj' 3d at Stevenson, Alabama, took 
its place in the Atlanta campaign, in which it 
bore a part honorable to both officers and men. 
At Kenesaw Colonel Parry was severely 
wounded, the command devolving on Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Wallace, who led it until taken 
prisoner in the action near Atlanta, when Ma- 
jor Taylor took command, holding the same 
until Colonel Parry's recovery, September 30th. 

November 15th, the Forty-Seventh, as part 
of Sherman's Army, commenced the " March 
to the Sea." This accomplished, the Eegiment 
was prominent in the Northerly advance. 
At Port McAllister, December 13th, it was in 
the advance, and was prominent throughout the 
engagement, and its colors were believed to have 
been the first planted on the Eebel fortress. 
The Seventeenth Ohio disputed for this honor. 

The Eebellion finally collapsed, the Forty- 
Seventh was permitted to join in the march 
through the Confederate Capital to Washing- 
ton City, and participate in the grand review 
there. It entered the field with 830 men, who, 
at the close of the Atlanta campaign were re- 
duced to 120 ; but were recruited to 520. Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Wallace was paroled at the 
close of operations and died soon alter, from 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



173 



effects of starvation while a prisoner of war. 
Colonels Parry and Taylor wei-e both brevet- 
ted Brigadier General. From Washington the 
Regiment proceeded to Cincinnati, and thence 
to Little Eock, Arkansas, where it served in 
the "Army of Occupation " until August 11th, 



when it was mustered out and again left for 
Camp Denuison, Ohio, where it arrived August 
22d and was paid off and discharged, after a 
service of four years, two months and nine 
days, having campaigned through every South- 
ern State, save Texas, Florida and Missouri. 



ROSTER OF COMPANY I. 



Names. 



Hananiah D. Pugh 

Horace A. Egbert 

Alonzo Kingsbury 

William C.Wright 

Wm. C. Kimbal 

Leverett H. Clendeniu. 

Hubert Steyer 

John W. Wilbur 

Manley Turner 

Almon Tiney 

Joseph Picott 

Edward M. Kelley 

James Blane 

Washington King 

Wm. S. Beckham 

Mansel McCormick 

Ebenezer Colwell 

Edmond A. Sprague 

Jacob Huddelmeyer 

Peter Foster 

John Shuler 

Peter Reno 

Charles Blane 

Joseph Sudborough 

Matthew M. Davis 

Oliver Duvall 

Martin McKnigbt 

Uriah Cheney (Chaney) 

John Kiff 

Henry Carpenter 

John E. Morris 

Samuel D. Butterfield... 

Atkins, John 

Alguire, Levi 

Blane, Robert 

Butterfleld, Samuel D._. 

Baumer, Augustus 

Butts, William B 

Brockway, Matthew 

Bevoir, Isadore 

Butler, Michael 

Cox, Noah W 

Chapman, Henry 

Cloiier, Augustus 

Crooksbanks, Win 

Carles (Cowles), Chas- _. 

Chamberlain, Levi 

Calkins, Orin B 

Carpenter, Henry 

Culver, George 

Clark, Thomas 

Clendenin, Leverett H_. 

Crockett, Samuel 

Elliott, Daniel 

Fredon, Henry 

Folsom, Eldredge 



Rank. 



Captain. 
1st Lieut. 



2d Lieut. 
Sergeant. 



Corporal. 



Private. 



June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Aug. 28, 1861 
Aug. 28, 1861 
Nov. 27, 1861 
Jan. 9, 1862 
June 15, 1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 
Aug. 28, 1861 
June 15, 1862 



Re-marks. 



15,1861 
15, 1861 
13,1861 
1.5, 1861 
15, 1861 
10, 1861 
15, 1861 
15, 1861 
15, 1861 



June 15, 1861 
June 25, 1861 

Mch. 9, 1864 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 1.5, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Nov. 1, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Oct. 19, 1864 
June 15, 1861 
Mar. 9, 1864 
June 15, 1861 
Dec. 26, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Oct. 18, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Nov. 25, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
IJune 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Nov. 1, 1861 



Mustered out September 28, 1864, expiration of term. 

Drowned Oct. 9, 1861, Carnifex Ferry, Va. 

Appointed Regimental Q. M. October 31, 1862. 

Pro. 1st Lieut. Nov. 18(>2; dis. January 19, 1864. 

Pro. 2d Lieut. B, Jan. 1863; trans. Co. D, Sept. 14, 1863. 

Pro. 1st Lieut. Jan. 1865; m. u. with Co. Aug. 186.5. 

Discharged August 26, 1862. 

Pro. 2d Lieut. Nov. 29, 1862; resigned Nov. 1864. 

Appointed Corpl. Mar. 1862; Sergt. Oct. 1862; IstSergt. 

Mar. 1864; mustered out with company; veteran. 
Mustered out with company, August 15, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company, August 15, 1865; veteran. 
Died July 15, 1863, from wounds. 
Captured July 22, 1864, b.attle of Atlanta; veteran. 
Veteran. 

Discharged June, 1862. on Surgeon's certificate. 
Mustered out August 20, 1864, expiration of term. 
Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, October 30, 1864. 
Mustered out with company, August 11, 1885; veteran. 
Mustered out with company, August 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company, August 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company, August 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company, August 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company, August 11, 1865; veteran. 
Killed July 22, 1864, at Atlanta. 
Died July, 1863, at Louisyille, Ky. 

Appointed Corporal January 1, 1862. 

Mustered out Nov. 10, 1864, expiration of term. 



Mustered out with company, August, 1865. 



Captured July, 1864. battle of Atlanta; veteran. 
Discharged Feb. 20, 1863, Gallipolis, 0.,Sur. certificate. 
Injured by falling tree, June 22, 1H63, at Vicksburg. 
Dis. June, 1865; wounded July 22, 1864, Atlanta; vet. 
Mustered out August 20, 1864, expiration of term. 
Absent sick since June, 1864, at Columbus. 
Mustered out with company, August, 1865. 
Died in hosp. Mav, 1863, at Young's Point, La. 
Died July 22, 1862, in Fayette Co., Va. 



Discharged from hospital at Gallipolis, O. 
Discharged Oct. 19, 1862, Gallipolis, O. Surg, certificate. 
Mustered out August 20, 1864, expiration of term. 
Mustered out August 20, 1864, expiration of term. 

Killed May 19, 1863, in assault at Vicksburg. 



Killed May 19, 1863, in assault at Vicksburg. 



174 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Names. 



Gonicer (Goinearl.Henry 
Gilson, Deary (DeiTy)_. 

Gillson, Norman 

Geary, Miles 

Ilall,' John 

Henwood, John AV 

Ilinkle, .Ararfin 

Hall, Samuel 

Hicks, David H 

Havens, George 

Hazlewood, John 

ITiuUllemeyer, Frederick 

Jacobs, Julius 

Kirk, George 

Ladoe (Ladue), Ezra 

Lillis, William 

Morris, John J 

Mason, Wm. J 

JIcGrath, Thomas 

Mangle, Jacob 

Moore, Thomas 

Morrow, Joseph 

McDowell. Wm H 

Morreau, Joseph 

Oberfell (Oberfield),John 

Osborn, Blanchard 

Patton, Andrew 

Patterson, Sylvester 

Partland, James 

Perry, Robert B 

Partlin, James 

Parker, Mark 

Palmer, Levi 

Kobertson, John 

Rice, Wm. P 

Shriner, Paul 

Stedman, Clark 

Stedman, Horace 

Sturdivant, Cautious . _. 

Stone, Elijah J 

Satterly, Horace 

Squires, Edgar A 

Treadway. Martin V 

Varin, John 

Woods, Edward 

Wood, Garret V 

White, Jacob 

Washner, Jerry 

Wmchell, Benjamin 

Wiley, Lorenzo 



Rmk. 



Private. 



Bate of 

Entering 

the. Service. 



June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Nov. 1,1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 
June 15, 1861 



Ranarks. 



Mustered out witli company, August, 1865; veteran. 
Died at Weston, Va. 

Mustered out August 20, 1864, expiration of term. 
Mustered out with Company, August 11, 1865; veteran. 

Killed Sept. 13, 1862, In action at Charleston, Va. 
Died September, 1802. 

Discharged October 16, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 
Mustered out August 20, 1864, expiration of term. 
Captured July, 1864, battle Atlanta; m. o. exp. of term. 
Killed May 22, 1863, siege of Vick.sburg. 
Mustered out August 20, 1864, expiration of term. 
Cap. July, 1864, bat. Atlanta; m. o. with Co.; veteran. 
Discharged Oct. 1862, G^llipolis, Surgeon's certificate. 

Mustered out with company, August 11, 1865; veteran. 
Mustered out with company, Augu.st 11, 1865; veteran. 
Died November 4, 1863, at Memphis. Tenn. 
Discharged October 11, 1862. 

Mustered out August 20, 1864, expiration of term. 
Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, Septendjer 1, 1803. 



Mustered out August 20, 1864, expiration of term. 
Mustered out August 20, 1864, expiration of term. 
Died December 26, 1862, Charleston, Va. 
Died July 8, 1863, in hospital at Vicksburg. 
Discharged October 7, 1862. on Surgeon's certificate. 
Mustered out August 20, 1804, expiration of term. 



Died of wounds at assault of Vicksb\irg, May, 1803. 

Promoted Q. M. Sergt. May 1, 1864. 

Mustered out with company August 11, 1865; veteran. 

Died September 4, 1861, in West Virginia. 

Died September 20, 1803, Camp Sherman, Miss. 

Died March 14, 1862, at Gauley Mountain, Va. 

Died September 1, 1863. 

Discharged August, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, September 1, 1862. 

Died Mav 19, '64, of wounds at Resaca, May, 1864. 

Killed at battle of Atlanta, July 22, 1864. 

Mustered out August 20, 1864, expiration of term. 

Discliarged Oct. 15, 1803, at Vicksburg, on promotion. 

Died July 7, 1865, at Sylvania, O. 

Discharged April, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharged October 4, 1862, Gallipolis, Surgeon's etf. 

Discharged at Gallipolis, on Surgeon's certificate. 



SIXTY-SEVENTH EEGIMENT, OHIO VOLUNTEBE INFANTEY. 



This Eegiment was constituted of the frac- 
tional Eegiments — the Forty-Fifth and Sixty- 
Seventh, and loft Camp Chase January 19, 
1862, for We.st Virginia, where it passed under 
command of General F. W. Lander. The 
month of February was chiefly spent at Paw 
Paw Tunnel, the only movement outside being 
a march to Bloomery Gap. March 5th it 
moved to Winchester, joining the Division of 
General Shields, where it had frequent skir- 
mishes on the picket-line with Ashby'.s Cavalry. 



THREE YEARS' SERVICE. 

March 22d, the Eegiment joined Banks' 
command at Winchester, and was soon en- 
gaged with the Eebels, driving them until into 
the night and as far South as Kearnstown. 
The men lay on their arms all night, and the 
next morning were the first to engage the eu- 
emy. The Infantry fighting liaving fairly 
opened, the Eegiment was ordered to re-enforce 
General Tyler's Brigade, to do which it was 
necessary to pass an open field, exposed to the 
enemy's tire lor three-fourths of a mile, which 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



175 



was done in double-quick, the command com- 
ing into action in fine order. In that action 
the Regiment lost 15 killed and 32 wounded. 
From that time until the last of June following, 
it rendered severe service in the marches to 
and fro in the Shenandoah Valley, over the 
mountains and back, from the Potomac to Har- 
risonburg, from Front Royal to Fredricks- 
burg, Fredericksburg to Manassas, Manassas to 
Port Republic, and thence to Alexandria. 

June 29th, the Regiment took passage bj' 
water for the James, to re-enforce McClcllan. 
On the night of the 30th, when near the mouth 
of Chesapeake Bay, the troops were subject to 
great peril and distress, in consequence of the 
parting of the Steamer and Barge, from a 
severe storm. Men, horses, arms and other 
ecjuipage were swept overboard, and it was 
nearly an hour before the two crafts could be 
re-attached. The Regiment at Harrison's 
Landing camjiaigned with the Potomac Army 
until the evacuation of the Peninsula, when, 
with only 300 men for duty out of 850, it went 
to Suffolk, Yirginia. While there it was per- 
mitted the first opportunity for rest and drill. 
Late in December following it was transferred 
to North Carolina and to Hilton Head, reaching 
the latter February 1, 18G3. It shared liber- 
ally in the Charleston expedition, landing at 
Cole's Island April 2d. From that time until 
November, it heroically met all the hardships, 
l^rivations and dangers of the extraordinary 
siege, and was specially prominent in the san- 
guinary attack on Fort Wagner, sustaining 
heavy loss at different times. 

Its term of service having exj)ired, the Regi- 
ment re-enlisted with creditable unanimity, 
and returned to Ohio, reaching Toledo, Feb- 
ruary 20, 18G4, where it was welcomed with 
great enthusiasm by the peof)le, whose spokes- 
man, M. R. Waite (now Chief Justice), ad- 
dressed them in appropriate terms, and was 
responded to by Colonel Voris It so hap- 
pened that the First Regiment, O. V. M., had 
arranged for the commemoration of Washing- 
ton's Birthday, at that time, whicii fact added 
much to the interest of the occasion. De- 
positing their guns at Hanks' Hall, the 
Regiment marched to the Oliver House for 
dinner. 

The Regiment's furlough having expired, it 
left Toledo for the field March 24, 1864, reach- 
ing Bermuda Hundred, Yirfrinia, under Gen- 



eral B. F. Butler. May ()th. On theflth it was 
detached as guard for tlic right flank of the 
Tenth Corps, which had gone to destroy the 
Railroad between Chester and Pcter.sburg. 
During the night the Rebels were re-enforced, 
and the next morning made a general attack ; 
but the Regiment maintained its position to 
the last, presenting an unbroken front to four 
successive charges. The day was made mem- 
orable with the Regiment by the glorious, 
though sad, ordeal to which it was there sub- 
jected. Its killed and wounded numbered 65, 
officers and men. On the 20th of May, a por- 
tion of the Union lines having fallen into the 
hands of the Rebels, the Sixty-Seventh, with 
other Regiments, was designated to recapture 
it, which they did by a charge which cost the 
Regiment 60 officers and men killed antl 
wounded. The Rebel General W. H. S. Walker 
was wounded and captured, his sword being 
taken as a trophj-. August 16th, four Com])a- 
nies of the Regiment charged the Rebel rifle- 
jjits at Deep River, and at the first volley 
lost one-third of its men ; but the position 
was gained before the enemy could re-load. 
On the 7th, 13th, 27th and 28th of October, the 
Regiment was again engaged with the Rebels, 
losing over 100 of its force. During the Spring 
and Summer of 1864, it many times confronted 
the enemy, always within range of their guns; 
and it is stated by officers qualified to judge, 
that during the year it was under fire 200 
times. Danger seemed to attend its every 
movement. For weeks at a time, the men 
wore their accouterments. Of over 6(MI mus- 
kets taken out in the Spring, fully 360 were 
laid aside during the year on account of 
casualties. 

In the spring of 1865, the Regiment partici- 
pated in the assault on the Rebel works below 
Petersburg; on April 2d was foremost in the 
charge at Fort Gregg; and at Ajjpomattox C, 
H, was "in at the death," bearing its battle- 
flag proudly in the last fight with Lee's once 
proud Army of Northern Virginia. May 5th, 
the Regiment garrisoned the District of South 
Anna, Virginia, till December, 1865. Mean- 
time the Sixty-Second Ohio was consolidated 
with it, the latter retaining its organization. 
The Sixty-Seventh was mustered out December 
12th, lacking onl}' six dajs of a Regimental ex- 
istence of four j'ears, and with but two of its 
original officers left. It had ijiven Colonels to 



176 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



four Eegiraents (111th, 120th, 182d and 184th 
Ohio); and furnished one Brevet Major-Gen- 
eral and two Brevet Brigadier-Generals. 

Among the brave men of this Kegiment 
killed in the battles of May 9 and 10, 1864, 
near Petersburg, was First Lieutenant George 
M. Ballard, Company I. He was a son of 
James Ballard, Toledo, and a young man of 
superior endowments. His last words to a 
fi-iend on leaving Toledo, after having re-en- 
listed, were: "If you hear nothing else from 
me, I hope you will hear that I did my duty." 
The next intelligence of him received by that 
friend, was, that he had been shot down in 
battle, in the place where a superior oflScer had 
placed him, and while taking aim at Eebels 
within five rods of him. Indeed, he " did his 
duty." His remains were brought to Toledo, 
where they were buried June 3d, fi'om the resi- 
dence of the family, 29 ISTorth street. 

In February, 1865, private David Conlisk, 
Company £, Sixth-Seventh Ohio, was home at 
Toledo on a furlough of 20 days. On his fur- 
lough was this endorsement by Major-General 
Gibbons, commanding First Division, ap- 
proved by Major-General Ord, commanding the 
Corps : " Furlough granted for 20 days, for 
being the best-appearing Soldier in the First 
Division, Twenty-Fourth Army Corps, on in- 
spection, February 2,1865." The significance 
of such endorsement will be appreciated when 
it is understood how it was gained. Examina- 
tion was made in each Eegiment for the man 
best skilled in handling the musket and whose 
arms and accouterments were in best condi- 
tion ; such Soldier was sent to Brigade head- 
quarters, where he met like competitors ft'om 
the other Regiments; after which the best was 
sent to Division headquarters, where he was 
compared with representatives from the other 
Brigades, the whole being examined and drilled 
about two hours in the most thorough manner. 
Through all this rigid scrutin}- and relentless 
test, did David Conlisk come out triumphant, to 
win the distinction of being " the best-appear- 
ing Soldier in the First Division, Twenty- 
Fourth Army Corps." Until this furlough he 
had never been absent a day from his Com- 
pany (over three years); had been in all the 
battles of the Eegiment ; and had never re- 
ceived an injury in the service. 

In this connection, it may be stated, that 
about the same time, examination was made to 



ascertain which Regiment in each Brigade of 
the same Division was in the best condition 
and madethebest appearance, when itappeared 
that the Sixty-Seventh won such honor in its 
Brigade. A similar examination for the Di- 
vision, had the same result. Whereupon, that 
command was entitled to relief from picket 
duty and outside details for two weeks; but in 
the spirit of the true Soldier, the men volun- 
tarily offered to perform their regular labor, 
and thus relieve the other Regiments of ad- 
ditional service, very severe at that season of 
the year. 

The losses sustained by the Sixty-Seventh 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as officially reported 
bj' Colonel A. C. Voris, at the close of the War, 
were as follows : 

At Winchester, Virginia, March 23, 18(52, lost 47. 

At Morris Island, South Carolina, July 10, 1863 ; 
Fort Wagner, South Carolina, July 18, 1863; and 
siege of Morris Island, South Carolina, July, August 
and September, 1863, lost 133. 

At Chester Station, Virginia, May 10, 1864, lost 76. 

At Weir Bottom Church, Virginia, May 20, 1864, 
lost 70. 

At Bermuda Hundred, Virginia, May, June, July 
and August, 1864, lost 22. 

At Deep Run, Virginia, August 14 and 16, 1864, 
lost 44. 

At Petersburg, Virginia, August and September, 
1S64, lost 1.5. 

At Newmarket Heights, Virginia, September 29, 
1864, lost 2. 

At Darbytown, Virginia, October 13, 1864, lost 62. 

At Charleston Road, Virginia, October 27 and 28, 
1864, lost 28. 

At Petersburg, Fort Gregg, Virginia, April 2, 1865, 
lost 66. 

At Appomattox C. H., Virginia, April 9, 1865, lost 8. 

These aggregate 577. Colonel Voris stated 
that losses sustained on other occasions would 
swell the aggregate to over 600. 

March 23, 1867, the survivors of the Sixty- 
Seventh commemorated the anniversary of the 
first battle of Winchester, March 23, 1862, at 
the American House, Toledo. In that severe 
engagement — one of the fiercest of the War — 
the Sixty-Seventh bore a conspicuous part and 
suffered severely. The Eebels lost 800 killed 
and wounded, and 500 captured. Battery H, 
First Ohio Artillery, was also prominent in the 
tight. The enemy were under command of 
General T. J. Jackson, who on that occasion 
received the name of " Stonewall," from having 
fought in part from behind a stone-wall. On 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



177 



this occasion toasts were responded to by Gen- C.Lewis; Surgeon S. P. Forbes; R. 0, Lemmon, 

eral John R. Bond (Major of the Sixty-Seventh Esq.; Sergeant Wm. Corlett (Battery H.) '; 

at the battle); M. R. Waite; Adjutant R.J. Captain J. J. Weaver, and Color-Sergeant Mc- 

Hathaway ; Adjutant John Faskin; Captain C. Donald. 



STAFF OF SIXTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT. 



Names. 



Otto Burstenbinder 

Alvin C. Voris 

Alvin C. Voris 

John R. Bond 

Henry S. Commager 

Lewis Cas.s Hunt 

Plenry R. We.st 

John R. Bond 

Henry S. Commager 

Edwin S. Piatt 

Lewis Butler . 

Thomas J. Piatt 

Samuel F. Forbes 

James Westfall 

James Westfall 

C. Costan 

Joseph H. Van Deman. 

A. S. Combs 

John Crabbs 



Rank. 



Colonel. 

Lieut. Colonel. 
(( 

Major. 

K 
tl 

Surgeon. 

(t 

Asst. Surgeon. 
({ 

(( 
Chaplain. 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Oct. 17,1861 
Oct. 17, 1861 
Oct. 2, 1861 
July 29, 1862 
Aug. 28, 1862 
Mar. 18, 1865 



Oct. 1, 1861 
July 29, 1862 
Aug. 28, 1862 
Jan. 13, 1863 



Oct. 10, 1861 
Oct. 7, 1863 
Jan. 9, 1862 
Apr. 24, 1862 
May 9, 1863 
Nov. 3, 1861 
Jan. 15, 1862 



Remarks. 



Dismissed July 29, 1862. 

Mustered out with Regiment. 

Promoted to Colonel. 

Mustered out August 28, 1862. 

Mustered out for promotion February 7, 1863. 

Mustered out September 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with Regiment. 

Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel. 

Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel. 

Resigned January 13, 1863. 

Discharged for promotion October 10, 1864. 

Mustered out with Regiment. 

Resigned October 13, 1863. 

Mustered out with Regiment. 

Promoted to Surgeon. 

Resigned March 6, 1863. 

Commission returned. 

Mustered out May 16, 1865. 

Resigned July 7, 1864. 



ROSTER OF COMPANY A. 



Navies. 



Theodore J. Curtis 

Henry S. Commager _ 

Lewis C. Hunt 

George (J. Tappan 

Cluarles F. Handy 

Charles L. Stevens 

Harvey Aldrich 

Andrew J. Bowman _ 

Geo. W. Baker 

Alva Howe 

James S. Baxter 

John L. Yeamans 

Wm. R. Lucas 

Homer Sawver 

Wm. H. Sindle 

John T. Bailey 

James Brocken. 

Geo. AV. E. Conklin . 

Robert Fairchilds 

Joseph Hughes 

Horace Man.sfleld 

Wm. Price 

Samuel Peck 

Vinson Smith"' 

Theodore Sebring 

Royal C. Stevens, 

Wm. Waffle 

John Alexander 

Albert Borne 

Arthur Borton 



Rank. 



Captain. 

(( 

(( 

1st Lieut. 

(( 

(( 
(( 

2d Lieut. 

u 

(C 

1st Sergt. 

(( 
it 

Sergeant. 



Corporal. 







44 


Oct. 8, 1861 


20 
23 


Nov. 19,1861 
Oct. 28, 1861 


21 


Nov. 5,1861 


'32" 


Oct7277is6i 



Date Qj 

Entering tlie 

Service. 



Remarks. 



Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

'Vug. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Aug. 



4, 1861 

28, 1861 

5, 1861 

19, 1861 

4, 1861 

17, 1861 

19, 1861 

19, 1861 

16,1862 

1, 1864 

30, 1861 

3,1862 

1, 1861 

7, 1861 

7, 1862 

5, 1861 

5, 1861 

28, 1861 

7, 1862 



Transferred from co. G, Sept. 1, 1865; Brevet Major. 
Promoted Lieutenant Colonel. 
Discharged Sept. 1,18()5, by reason of consolidation. 
From CO. F, Sept. 1, 1865; mustered out with company. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate of disability. 
Wounded July, 1863, Ft. Wagner; transferred to co. H. 
Wd. July, 1863, near Ft. Wagner; m. o. exp. of term. 
Transferred to company E. 

Ap. 2d Lieutenant March 27, 1865; m. o. with company. 
Discharged on Surgeon's certificate of disability. 
Supposed killed at Ft. Wagner, July IS. 1863. ' 
Discharged November 10, 1862, Surgeon's certificate. 
Discharged July, 1864, Bermuila Humlred, Virginia. 
Mustered out Sept. 1, 1865, as supernumerary; veteran. 
From CO. F, Sept. '65; mustered out with co.; veteran. 
Died July, 1863, Charleston, S. C. wds. at Ft. Wagner. 
Died August 9, 1862, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
From CO. F, September 1, 1865; m. o. with co"; veteran. 
Died August 29, 1863, at Newbern, North Carolina. 
Mu.stered out June 21, 1865, at Richmond, Virginia. 
Died Augu.st, 1864, in rebel prison. 
Mustered out with company, December 7, 1865; vet. 
Trans. V. Res. Cps. Sept. '63; m. o. Sept. '65, exp. term. 
Mustered out with company, December 7, 1865; vet. 
Mustered out with company, December 7, 1865; vet. 
Mustered out May 24, 1865, at Fort Monroe. 

Mustered out with company, December 7, 1865; vet. 
Discharged Augu.st 4, 1863, at Hilton Head, S. C. 
Mustered out June 21, 1865, at Richmond, Va.; vet. 



178 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Names. 



Rank. 



Ainaziah Olark 

Peter ('ranker 

Michael Fouble 

Joseph Kullorton 

Frederick Foster 

ThoiiKis (iirdham 

Geo. Mauley 

Kaiulolpli I'letsig 

Henry A. Hampson-„ 

OrrinN. Howe 

Robert S. Keith 

John Metzger 

Isaac Miller 

Napoleon Nearing 

Edward Roth 

James 8. Smith 

Samuel .Shifi'ter 

James Wilcox 

Wm. Van Fleet 

Albert R. Button 

Van Buren A. Knapp. 

Nelson R. Masters 

John Morris 

Benjamin F. Stowe 

Wm. Newitt 

All, Francis 

Alexander, Charles 

Ballard, Franklin 

Barnes, George 

Bailey, Henry 

Barden, Frederick 

Bayes, Sanford P 

Beach, Thomas 

Beach, John 

Bennett, Harrison 

Bird, Asher E 

Bowdle, John W 

Brady, Peter 

Brace, Franklin 

Brown, Isaac 

Brown, Daniel 

Burr, Charles 

Buckley, Royal 

Buckley, Freeman E_.. 

Burton, Joseph W 

Carter, James 

Carter, Andrew 

Galley, Charles E 

Cheney, David 

Clark, Leander 

Cobb, F>nest 

Connely, John E 

Grout, Charles W 

Grout, Elijah. 

Grout, George W 

Crosby, Lyman 

Drayton, John 

Drayton, George 

Doran, Isaac 

Edwards, Edson 

Emmerson, Hiram 

Emmerson, Emmett _. 

Ewers, Gladney 

Fairchild, Charles 

Farr, Kimball 

Fetterman, Peter 

Frayer, Royal 

Gay, Hiram 

Gilford, George 

Green, Samuel 

Hetsig, John 

Hetsig, Frederick 



Corporal. 



Musician. 



Wagoner. 
Private. 



23 

25 

18 

18 

18 

21 

19 

41 

21 

21 

20 

25 

44 

19 

18 

18 

18 

25 

19 

31 

31 

30 

28 

20 

42 

33 

22 

19 

21 

21 

44 

21 

22 

29 

30 

18 

25 

18 

20 

19 

22 

IS 

18 

20 

40 

33 

IS 

19 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Nov. 12, 1863 
Sept. 16, 1862 



Remarks. 



44 
26 
18 
18 
19 
25 
29 
40 
18 
29 
18 
19 
22 
32 
26 
18 
26 

"is" 



Oct. 17, 1861 

Aug. 25, 1862 

Oct. 17,1861 

Nov. 25, 1861 

Dec. 9, 1861 

Nov. 8, 1861 

Nov. 4,1861 

Oct. 23, 1861 

Nov. 5, 1861 

Jan. 10, 1864 

Nov. 4, 1861 

Nov. 9,1861 

Nov. 4,1861 

Oct. 9, 18t;i 

Nov. 4, 1861 

Nov. 8,1861 

Feb. 24, 1862 

Nov. 9, 1861 

Aug. 8,1862 

Oct. 27, 1861 

Oct. 28,1861 

Nov. 4, 1861 

Nov. 9, 1861 

Nov. 25, 1861 

Oct. 11, 18{il 

Oct. 1,1862 

Sept. 26, 1862 

Oct. 9, 18(;2 

Aug. 10, 1862 

Oct. 17. 1S61 

Oct. 28,1861 

Oct. 7, 1862 

Aug. 15, 1862 

Aug. 15, 1862 

Oct. 2,1862 

Oct. 17, 1S61 

Nov. 4, 1861 

Nov. 8,1861 

Oct. 2, 1862 

Dec. 10, 1861 

Nov. 5, 1861 

Dec. 9, 1863 

Nov. 7, 1861 

Nov. 4, 1861 

Nov. 9, 1861 

Oct. 22, 18()1 

Nov. 9, 1861 

Dec. 2, 1861 

Oct. 10, 1S62 

Nov. 9, 1S61 

Nov. 8, 1861 

Nov. 9, 1861 

Nov. 5, 1861 

Oct. 27, 1861 

Nov. 4. 18(il 

Oct. 22, 18(S1 

Aug. 17, 1862 

Nov. G, 1861 

Nov; 25, 1861 

Aug. 15, 1S62 

Nov. 8, 1S61 

Aug. 15, 1862 

Nov. 22, 1S61 

Oct. 21,1861 

Aug 1, 1862 

Dec. 11, 1861 

Nov. 1, 1861 

Sept. 9, 1862 

Dec. 9, 1861 



M. o. Sept. 1, 1865, Richmond, Va., supernumerary. 
Mustered out by order of- War Department. 
Mustered out with company, December 1, 1865; vet. 

Wounded July 18, 1863, at Fort Wagner. 
M. o. January, 1865, at Columbus, O. exp. term. 
Mustered out with company, December 7, 1865; vet. 
Mustered out with company, December 7, 1865; vet. 
M. o. January, 1865, at Columbus, O. exp. term. 
Died in hospital at New York. 

Discharged October 20, 1861 , Surgeon's ctf. disability. 
D. March 28, 18()2, wds. battle Winchester, March 23d. 
Mustered out with company, December 7, 1865. 
Mustered out with company, December 7, 1865; vet. 
Wd. July, 1803. Ft. Wagner; m. o. Sept. 1865; veteran. 
Dis. July 30, 1862, Surgeon's certificate of disability. 
Wd. July, 1863, at Ft. Wagner; m. o. Sept. 18(i5; vet. 
M. o. September, 1865, as supernumerary; veteran. 

Mustered out June 21, 18(i5, at Richmond, Virginia. 
Mustered out with company, December 7, 1865; vet. 
Mustered out June, 1865, at Richmond, Virginia. 
Discharged July 30, 1862, Surgeon's ctf. disability. 

Veteran. 

Discharged April, 1862, Surgeon's certificate disability. 
Transferred to company F, December 31, 1861. 
Transferred to company F, December .'SI, 1861. 
Died February 17, 1865, at Point of Rocks, Virginia. 
Missing July, 1863, at assault on Ft. Wagner. 
Mustered out with companv, December 7, 1865. 
Wd. July 18, 1863, at Ft. Wagner; m. o. June, 1865. 
Killed July 4, 1862, at Harrison's Landing, Virginia. 
Discharged February 29, 1SI13, Surgeon's ctf. disability. 
Died November 9, 1S62, in hospital at New York. 
M. o. June, 1865, at Richmond, Va. order War Dei)t. 
M. o. June, 1865, at Riclimond, Va. order War Dept. 
Wd. July 18, '63, Ft. Wagner; m. o. Nov. '65, exp. term. 
Died September 17, 1863, at Morris Island, S. G. 
Died November 4, 1862, in hospital at New York. 
Discharged October, 1862, Surgeon's ctf. disability. 
D. Oct. 28,'64, Flying hosp. Va. wds. in skirnii.sh Oct. 27. 

Dis. June, '65, Washington, D. C. Surg, ctf.; veteran. 
From CO. F, Sept. '65, as Wm. Barton; m. o. with co. 
Died February 25, 1862, at Cumberland, Maryland. 

Discharged December 9, 1862, Surgeon's ctf. disaliilitv. 
Died May, 1864, at Ft. M(jnroe, wounds May 20, 1S64. 

Discharged December 8, 1S62, Surgeon's ctf. disability. 
Discharged December 18, 1S64, at Richmond, Virginia, 
Discharged December 8, 1862, Surgeon's ctf. disability. 
Trans, to company F, Dec. 1861, as Elihu T. Crout. 

Transferred to companv I, December 31, ISdl. 

Discharged July 30, 1862. 

M. o. December 5, 1864, Columbus, O. exp. of term. 

Wd. July 18, '63, Ft. Wagner; m. o. Nov. '65, exp. term. 
Trans, company F, December, ISiil; dis. April, 1862. 



Discharged October 28, 1862. 

Mustere<l out June, 1865, at Richmond. Virginia. 

Discharged January 9, 1865, Surgeon's ctf. disabilit}'. 

Discharged July 12, 1862, Surgeon's ctf. <lisability. 

M. o. June, 1865, Richmond, order War Department. 

Wounded July 18, 1863, assault on Ft. Wagner. 

Wounded July 18, 1863, assault on Ft. Wagner. 

M. o. November 1, 1865, Richmond, expiration term. 

Transferred to company F, December 31, 1861. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



179 



Natnes, 



Hetsig, Rudolph 

Hemp, Jacob 

Hill, Wesley 

Jay, Moses 

Jones, Newton. 

Keith, Munson 

Miller, Isaac 

Miller, Marcus 

Modey, John 

Middough, Henry , 

Moon, Joseph 

Morgan, Patrick 

Patterson, Fli 

Palmer, Martin 

PuUen, William 

Randall, Charles 

Robinson, Welcome C . 

Sible, George 

Shaw, Marion C 

Shadle, Hosea 

Shetier, Wm. T 

Smith, John A 

Snell, llezekiah 

Stevens, John S 

Stockale, John 

Terry, Stephen — 

Taylor, Henry 

Taylor, Edward S 

Welch, I^ewis 

Wafle, Henry 

Weigle, Adam 

Welch, Ira 

Whitten, Wallace 

Welsh, James 

Welsh, Warren 

Win.slow, Lawrence 

Warne, George M 

Warne, William R 

Welch, Commodore P . 

Welch, Harrv 

Wilcox, Wilfiam S 

Zelmar, John J 



Hank. 



Private. 





Date of 


■^ 


Entering the 


Senice. 


IS 


Dec. 9, 1861 


34 


Nov. ."), 1861 


24 


Sept.24,18i;2 


4.i 


Nov. 1, 1861 


20 


Nov. 1,1861 


18 


Oct. 27, 1861 


18 


Oct. 28, 1861 


27 


Nov. 2.3, 1861 


27 


Oct. 1, 1862 


44 


Nov. 9, 1861 


20 


Dec. 9, 1861 


■2!) 


Oct. 24, 1861 





April 2, 18(i2 


20 


Aug. 19, 1861' 


18 


Nov. .5, 1861 


19 


Nov. 21, 1861 


4,'5 


Nov. 9,1861 


30 


Oct. 22,1861 


21 


Nov. -21, 1861 


25 


Nov. 4. 1861 


21 


Oct. 9, 1861 


21 


Nov. 8,1861 


2.3 


Oct. 30, ]8(il 


19 


Aug. 7,1862 


22 


Aug. 19, 1862 


44 


Nov. 9, 1861 


.■',0 


Nov. 25, 1861 


23 


Oct. 28, 1861 


19 


Nov. 4, 18(il 




Nov. 1,1 861 


40 


Nov. 5, 1.861 


21 


Nov. 4, 1861 


18 


N<jv. 25, ]S(il 


23 


Nov. 4, 1861 


21 


Nov. 5, 1861 


21 


Nov. 28, 1861 


18 


Nov. 1, 1861 


22 


Nov. 5, 1861 


18 


Nov. 9, 1861 


-ir> 


Nov. 25, 1861 


3.") 


1861 


18 


Aug. 1(), 1862 



Remarks. 



Transferred to company F, December 31, 1861. 

Discharged Augu.st 8, 18(iL'. 

Died March 4, 1863, at Fort Monroe. 

Wd. July, '63, Ft. Wagner; m. o. Jan. '65, exp. term. 

Mustered out with company, December 7, 1865; vet. 
Mustered out May, 1865, order of War De|)artment. 
Transferred to company F, December 31, 1861. 
Transferred to company F, December 31, 1861. 
Died .January 5, 1862, at Toledo. 

M. o. June, 1865, at Richmond; order War Dept. 
Di,scharged February 14, 1863, Surgeon's ctf. disabilitv. 
Mustered out with company, December 9, 1865; vet. " 

Discharged by order of War 1 )epartment. 

Discharged July 30, 1862. 

Mustered out .\iarch, 18()5, Cohnnbus, O. exp. term. 

Missing July 18, 1863, at a.ssault on Ft. Wagner. 

Transferred to company F. 

Mustered out June 21, i,S65, Richmond, ord. War Dept. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865, Richmond, ord. War Dept. 

Discharged August 9, 1862. 

Mustered in as Horace G. Taylor; dis. August 9, 1862. 

Mustered out with company; veteran. 

Dis. Sept. 9, 18()2, at New York, Surgeon's ctf. disab. 

No further record. 

Discharged November 3, 1862. 

Discharged January 30, 18()3, Surgeon's ctf. disaViility. 

Mustered out January 17, 1865, on expiration of tenii. 

Mustered out Januarv 17, l.si)5, on I'xpiration of term. 

D. Mar. 26, '62, wds. "Mar. 23, '62, battle of Winchester. 

Died September 26, 1861', at Crany Island. 

Died March 2, 1862, at Cumberland, Maryland. 

V>\vi\ ..'anuary 5, 1865, at Fort INIonroe, Virginia. 



.VI. o. June 21, 1865, at Richmond, order War Dept. 



COMPANY B.« 



Navies. 


Sank. 


^ 

^ 


Dale of 

Entering the 

Service. 


Remarks. 


Erastus A. Morton 

Levi Linniger 

John Dahn .. _. . 


Sergeant. 
Corporal. 

u 

Private. 

(( 

11 

u 
u 

(( 


18 
19 
20 
32 
24 
18 
24 
20 
18 
45 
37 
21 
27 
18 
28 
2.3 
40 
28 
24 


Nov. 4. 1861 
Nov. 14, 1861 
Oct. 10, 1861 
Dec. 14, 1861 
Mar. 3, 1864 
Dec. 18,1863 
Dec. 13, 1861 
Feb. 26, 1864 
Feb. 26, 1864 
Dec. 2,1861 
Sept. 2 1,1864 
Jan. 19, 1864 
Feb. 26, 1864 
July .30. 1862 
Feb. 22,1864 
.Jan. 20, 1864 
Mar. 9, 1864 
Mar. 2, 1865 
Aus. 18. 1862 


Mustered out with company December 12, 1865. 

Mustered out with comjjany December 12, 1865. 

Mustered out witli company Decendjer 12. 18(i5. 

Mustered out witli company December 12, 18()5. 

Mustered out with company Decendier 12, 1865. 

Mustered out with company December 12, 1865. 

Mustered out with company December 12. 1865. 

Mustered out with company December 12, 1865. 

Transferred. 

Mustered out with company December 12, 1865. 

Transferred. 

Mustered out with company December 12, 186.5. 

Mustered out with company December 12, 186.5. 

Transferred. 

Clustered out with company December 12, 1865. 

Mustered out with company December 12, 1865. 

Jhustered out with company December 12. 1865. 

Mustered out with company December 12, 1865. 

Transferred. 


John Cowdes 

Peter Burns 

Wallace Whitten 

Joseph Ankany 


Wm. Lininger 


Daniel Holland 

Peter Miller 

William Aukermann 

Isaac E. Blowelt 

David Clookev 


Thomas Conway 

Martin Everett 

Augustus Freese 

Jacob Heppinger 

Hilive Kavant 

John Kelly, 




" ' 1 



*The rolls of this Company and of others followiug, as here given, are talseu' from the Muster-out rolls on record at the Stale 
Adjutant General's Office. 



180 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Names. 



C. M. Lalley 

Cliarles Looke 

Josepli Liindry 

Jeremiah McCarthy.. 

James McC'arthy 

Anthony Navarre 

William" Kaker 

John King 

David Sprlngsted 

Stephen Tiemann 

Warren Tyler 

Jacob A. Tritt 

David Welsh 

Washington Norton.. 

David Gorsuch 

Wm McKay 

Ira Johnson 

Montgomery Messer _ 

Warren Cone 

Robert Norris 

John Bunce 

William Watson 

Samuel Forsht 

Henry J. Morrow 

Moses Trailor 

Patrick Grant 

Joseph Colton 

Hiram Craig 

Joseph Ring 

Wm. H. Cogan 

P>ancis Etan 

George Chrispower .. 

John Leech 

Oliver J. Nelson 

Frank Godi 

Henry Jacobs 

Collins Cottrell 

Alex. Shanalley 

Alex. McKay 

John Cornyea 

Jeremiah Houston 

Hiram Scurloch 

Lewis Lalerday 

Peter Lawrence 

John Minicks 

Daniel Pannyea 

James Mahetfy 

James Tobias 

Hiram Billings 

Samuel Dunn 

Alex. Siddon 

Joseph Jacobs 

Elijah Whitmore 

Henry J. Crane 

Samuel G. Beebe 

Amos Short 

Dennis Roberts 

Nathan Edson 

Orin McKissick 

Frank Van Orden 

Wm. Hamilton 

Alonzo E. Tinker 

Albert W. Oles 

Andrew Hartzinger. 

Dominick Gee 

Edward A. Mercer.. 

Marshall Hewitt 

Benj. Newsbaumer . 

George Williams 

Alex. Hamilton 

Robert Newton 

Lewis Consaul 



Rank. 



Private. 



Sergeant. 
Private. 
Corporal. 
Private. 



Corporal. 
Sergeant. 
Private. 



1st Sergt. 
Private. 



Corporal. 
Sergeant. 
Corporal. 



Private. 



1st Lieut. 
2d Lieut. 
Captain. 
Private. 



Corporal 
Private. 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Remarks. 



, ISIil 
. 181)4 



Aug.l6,18B2 
Dec. 26,1.8(i:! 
Mar. 17, lS(i4 
Mar. 12, lS(i4 
Mar. 25 
Feb. 21. 
Sept. 10, 1862 
Feb. 26, 1S64 
Mar. 2, 1864 
Mar. 23, 18(i4 
Jan. 14, 1864 
Feb. 6, 1804 
Aug. 2,1862 
Mar.31, 1862 
Nov. 1, 1864 
Dec. 3, 1861 
Oct. 21, 1861 
Oct. 16, 1861 
Oct. 16, 1861 
Oct. 29, 1861 
Nov. 4, 1861 
Oct. 9, 1861 
Nov. 4, 1861 
Oct. 9, 18(51 
Oct. 10, 1862 
Sept.l8, isr.L' 
Jan. 31, 1864 
Oct. 1, 1861 
Feb. 29, 1864 
Mar. 17, 1864 
Mar. 17, 1864 
Aug. 4,1862 
Oct. 25, 18(il 
Nov. 1, 1804 
Oct. 24,1861 
May 30, 1861 
Mar. 24, 18()4 
Dec. 9, 1861 
Jan. 1, 1864 
Nov. 21, 1861 
Nov. 1,1864 



26 



21 



Transferred. 
Mustered out with 
Clustered out with 
Mustered out with 
Transferred. 
Mustered out with 
Sent to hospital. 
Mustered out with 

Captured. 

Mustered out with 

Mustered out with 

(.!aptured. 

Died. 

Died. 

Died. 

Died. 

Died. 

Died. . 

Killed in action. 

Killed in action. 

Died. 

Killed in action. 

Wounded ; died. 

Died. 

Wciunded ; died. 

Dieil of disease. 

Wounded ; died. 

Killed in action. 

Wounded ; died. 

Died. 

Killed in action. 

Died. 

Died. 

Killed in action. 



company December 12, 1865. 
company December 12, 1865. 
company December 12, 1865. 

company December 12, 1865. 

company December 12, 1865. 



company December 12. 1865. 
company December 12, 1865. 



Feb. 6, 1864 
Dec. 11, 1861 



Oct. 11, 1861 



21 
27 
25 
25 

28 
18 
28 
27 
28 
22 
29 

li' 

'43" 
26 
19 
21 



Oct. 

Nov, 

Oct. 

Nov 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Mar. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Oct. 



3, 1861 
29, 1861 
25, 1861 

25. 1861 
18, 1861 

14, 1862 

23. 1862 
10, 1861 

3, 1861 
7, 1861 

21, 1861 
20,1861 
16, 1861 

5, 1861 
24, 1861 
14, 1861 
17, 1861 

8, 1861 

22, 1861 
3, 1861 

15, 1861 
20, 1861 
10,1861 
13, 1861 

2, 1861 



Discharged. 

Resigned. 

Mustered out with comjtany. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



181 



Names. 



John Yallian 

Squire Spencer 

George Stonebook 

James Roberts 

Edward Pagen 

James R. Barker 

Hosoa Baxter 

John Yamans 

John M. Edson 

Lewis IMatt 

Charles Tyler 

Samuel JIcDonald 

Charles Clayton 

James Eton 

John F. Eton 

Lewis Hemspeck 

AVm. R. Lamb 

Frank O. Callahan 

Joseph Shanteau 

Lewis Shanbion 

Christopher DeLucia 

Jeremiah Barnes 

Alfred Hewton 

Clovis Bosky 

David Willey 

Austin Dane 

Octavius Teny 

Isaac G. Rideout 

Henry Fink 

Francis M. McLaughlin , 

Luther Johnson 

Anthony Lavine 

Patrick McKaliger 

Ransom Webster 

Isaac O. Black 

Edmond Curtis 

Wm. H. Crouse 



Hank. 



Private. 

Sergeant, 
Private. 



Sergeant, 
(( 

Corporal, 
Private. 



Corporal. 
Private. 



1st Sergt. 
Corporal. 
Private. 



22 
32 
42 
20 
2:! 
38 
45 
24 
21 
42 
2.") 
32 
25 
29 
33 
19 



Bate of 

Entering the 

iServLce. 



Oct. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Mar. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 



16, 1861 
13, 1861 
16,1862 
18, 186! 
18, 1861 

16, 1861 
7, 1861 

17, 1864 

5, 1861 
13, 1861 
22. 1861 

18, 1861 

28, 1861 

17, 1861 

18, 1861 
2, 1861 

29. 1861 

6, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
11, 1861 



Sept 
Mar. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Oct. 



. 15,1862 

, 26, 1864 

23, 1864 

16, 1864 

1, 1864 

22, 1861 

1, 1861 

8, 1862 

, 21, 1861 

17, 1861 

8, 1861 

22, 1861 

5, 1861 

13, 1861 

11,1861 



Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Transferred to 

Transferred to 

Transferred to 

Transferred to 

Transferred to 

Transferred to 

Transferred to 



Remarks, 



Company H. 
Company H. 
Company H. 
Company H. 
Company H. 
Company H. 
Company H. 



COMPANY D. 

Names on Muster-in Roll, not found on Muster-out Roll. 



Names, 



Louis M. Miller 

James Yeman 

John A. Rowsey 

Herman Hansen 

Wm. Sennitt 

Josiah Slirock 

Peter Gallaher 

Joseph H. Luce 

Edward Curtis 

Dennis Lovett 

Orlin Randall 

Blower, Philip 

Barber, Arnold 

Bower, Jesse 

Burns, John 

Bell, George 

Behan, Edward 

Corkins, Patrick 

Clark, Lucius S 

Call, Uriah 

Coolahan, Michael 

Codigan, William 





^ 


Sank. 


■^ 


2d Lieut. 


25 


1st Sergt.. 


28 


Sergeant. 


21 




2U 


Corporal. 


25 


u 


20 


u 


25 


(( 


42 


M\isician. 


45 


" 


18 


Wagoner. 


42 


Private. 


27 




44 


i( 


24 


" 


42 


(( 


45 


" 


25 


" 


18 


(1 


18 


<; 


45 


u 


32 


(( 


20 



Dat^ of 

Entering the 

Sermee. 



Nov. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Oct. 



28, 1861 
14, 1861 

2, 1.S61 
9, 1861 

16, 1861 
22, 1861 

3, 1861 

4, 1861 

13, 1861 
21,1861 
23, 1861 
24,1861 

14, 1861 
14, 1861 
25,1861 
12, 1861 
14, 1861 

9, 1861 
22, 1861 
22, 1861 
10, 1861 
18, 1861 



Remarks. 



182 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Names. 


Rank. 


36 

24 

23 

19 

28 

43 

35 

40 

21 

42 

36 

20 

39 

21 

31 

21 

21 

19 

21 

30 

21 . 

21 

"is" 

26 
19 
37 
37 
18 
44 
35 
18 
30 
50 
18 
29 
24 
24 
38 
18 
19 
22 
18 
43 
40 
44 
30 
28 
18 


Date of 

Entering 

the Service. 


Remarks. 


Prowlv. James 


Private. 

(( 

(t 
(( 
(t 

*t 
(t 

c, 

n 
(1 

(1 
(( 

(t 
t( 

(( 

(( 

(1 


Nov. 2, 1861 
Nov. 26, 1861 
Dec. 14, 1861 
Dec. 23, 1861 
Dec. 19, 1861 
Nov. 22, 1861 
Nov. 2, 1861 
Nov. 11, 1861 
Nov. 22, 1861 
Dec. 22, 1861 
Dec. 5,1861 
Oct. 16, 1861 
Nov. 25, 1861 
Nov. 27, 1861 
Nov. 15, 1861 
Oct. 10, 1861 
Dec. 5, 1861 
Oct. 4, 1861 
Oct. 9, 1861 
Nov. 27, 1861 
Oct. 9, 1861 
Oct. 16, 1861 
Oct. 11, 1861 
Oct. 18, 1861 
Oct. 25, 1861 
Nov. 15, 1861 
Nov. 18, 1861 
Oct. 25, 1861 
Dec. 17, 1861 
Nov. 6, 1861 
Nov. 7, 1861 
Oct. 22, 1861 
Oct. 8, 1861 
Dec. 23, 1861 
Dec. 27, 1861 
Jan. 7, 1862 
Oct. 7, 1861 
Dec. 10,1861 
Nov. 11,1861 
Oct. 9, 1861 
Oct. 5, 1861 
Dec. 20, 1861 
Nov. 25, 1861 
Oct. 24,1861 
Oct. 23, 1861 
Oct. 13,1861 
Oct. 14, 1861 
Nov. 20, 1861 
Dec. 19,1861 




Carpenter, \Vm. D 

Criswell, Percival 




Doolittle, Jonathan 




]>rummond, Napoleon.. 
Fern, A .. - 




(ielrought, John 

Cioeldner, Henry 

Lot en Helms 




Hart, James-- 




Herranne, Jerry 

Hale, H. V. B 




Huglies, John _ _ 




Jackson, Henry 

Johnson, George 

Jordan, Wm. E 

King, Thomas 




Knew, Frederick 

Learv, James. 




Lehary, Thomas 

IMintong, A. B _ . 


Discharged. 


McManus, Thomas 

McGrath, Michael 

Marker, John 

Mvers, ."^imeoii _ 


Discharged. 


Neaiy, Edward- 

Nichols. Wilson 

INIard, John 0. 


' 


O'Sullivan, Daniel 

Oates, Timothy _ 




O'SuUivan, F.J 

O'Berst, Michael __ 

Priest, Clark . . ._ . 




liuinn, Thomas 




Kus.sell, George 

Kyan, William _. 




Smith, James. 




Shinaver, Joseph 

Shoemaker, Wm 

Stickney, Myron 

Stickell, Frank 




Towers, Peter _ 




Valtine, David_ . . 




Wilbur, George W 

AV'ilson, John 




Welch, James 




Young, John. 









COMPANY E. 



Names. 


Rank. 




Date of 

Entering the 

Sen^ice. 


Remarks. 


Joseph Whidden 

Charles Broshorder 

James Mulaskey 

Alfred D. Turk 

Thomas Demoss 

Eseck M. Dver 


1st Sergt. 
Sergeant. 

(( 
Corporal. 

>( 

Private. 

it 


27 
20 
17 
19 
34 
21 
20 
18 
19 
18 
30 


Oct. 18, 1861 
Jan. 13, 1862 
Dec. IS, 1861 
Oct. 7,1861 
Oct. 10,1861 
Feb. 25, 1864 
Oct. 8, 1861 
Feb. 27, 1864 
Jan. 4, 1864 
Mch.29, 1864 
Feb. 13, 1864 


Mustered out with company December 12, 1865. 
Mustered out with company December 12, 1865, 
Mustered out with company December 12, 1865. 
Mustered out with company December 12, 1865. 
Mustered out ■n'ith company December 12, 1865. 
Transferred from Company K. 
Transferred from Company K. 
Transferred frem Company K. 
Transferred from Company K. 
Transferred from Company K. 
Transferred from Company K. 


Henry Dawns ___ . 

Sila.s R. Stebbins 

Hugh M. Lamb 


Charles Brockway 

Cephas D. Barnes 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION -FIELD WORK. 



183 



William H. Caniv 

Michael Call '. 

Michael Dennis 

James Freeman 

Charles A. Geer 

Frederick Hiplev- 

Sherman A.Jones 

Charles MeCarty 

Daniel Scjuires 

Anton Sn viler 

Feter St. Faul 

O. W. Trowbridge 

Alex. Webber 

George M. Wyman 

Benj. F. Yelman 

Amos C. Cooper 

Ira H. Green 

William Green 

Jaeolj Hanson 

Adam Sniten 

John G. Young 

Frederick Houss 

William McCabe 

Charles HilHs 

Faul Single 

William H. Benjamin 

Francis Caswell 

John Cruse 

William K. Mullen 

C;hristian Powers 

James Reed 

William Ryan 

John Viregar 

George Willis 

Casper Peters 

John Burgan 

James Swerby 

M. F. Poorman 

Hugh Longus 

William FI. Barry 

Leonard Burkheart 

Jacob Bentz 

David Carlick 

John Dobelstine 

John Donovan 

Charles Fry 

James W. Fifer 

Robert M. Ferguson 

Thomas Fox 

Samuel R. Green 

Anson Gehil 

Calvin Gleason 

John Govan 

George Gebring 

Dennis Hart 

John Hancock 

Christoplier Holland 

Frederick Iklor 

John Kramer 

Charles McCaren 

David Moran 

James Philips 

John Rebbe 

George Rimmelspeck _.. 

Conrad Shelling 

Alex. Campbell 

Albert Woodberry 

R. Webber 

Milton H. Whitney 

Arton Williams 

Jerome B. Waldron 

William Green 



Rank. 



Private. 



Corporal. 

(( 

Musician. 

(( 

Private. 



Sergeant. 
Corporal. 



Private. 



Musician. 
Private. 



Wagoner. 
Private. 



Date of 

Entering tlie 
Service. 



Dec. 24,lSfi3 
Feb. 3, 18(1-1 
Mch.21, 1864 
Jan. 5, 181)4 
Dec. .30, 18(11 
Dec. 10, lS(il 
Feb. 8, 18(14 
Mch. 7, 18(14 
F'eb. 1, 1864 
Feb. -27, 1864 
Mch. •_>, 186.3 
Mch. 18, 1864 
Mch.l8, 1864 
Feb. 8,1864 
Feb. 8, 1864 
Feb. 20, 1864 
Oct. 2(1, 1861 
Deo. 30, 1861 
,Tan. 1, 1862 
Dec. 9, 1.S61 
Nov. 20, 1.S61 
Mch. 23, 1864 
Get. 24, 1861 
Jan. 18, 18()4 
Dec. 30, 1863 
Oct. 7, 1861 
Dec. 0, 18(il 
Dee. 24, 18(i] 
Jan. 22, 1864 
Oct. 14, 1861 
Oct. 18, 1861 
Dec. 10, 1861 
Dec. 24, 1861 
Dec. 2, 1861 
Jan. 10. 1862 
Nov.26, 1861 
Aug.2S, 1862 
Feb. 26, 1864 
Mch. 11, 1864 
Oct. 7, 1861 
Jan. 12, lS(i2 
Oct. 28, 1862 
Sept. 9, 1862 
Nov. IS, 1861 
(Jet. 7, 1801 
Oct. 10, 1861 
Oct. 11, 1861 
Sept. 9, 1S62 
Oct. 19, 1861 
Dec. 10, 1861 
Nov. 21, 1861 
Oct. 10, 1862 
Oct. 13, 1861 
Aug.30. 1862 
Oct. 7, 1861 
Sept. 17, 1862 
Sept. 1. 1862 
Jan. 2, 1862 
Jan. 10, 1862 
Nov. 18, 1261 
Oct. 8, 1861 
Oct. 24, 18G1 
Jan. 4, 1862 
Oct. 14, 1861 
Dec. 31, 1.S61 
Nov. 16, 1861 
Nov. 26, 1861 
Dec. 3, 18(il 
Dee. 3, 1861 
Aug. 28, 1862 
Feb. 22, 18(34 
Dec. 30, 1861 



Jieutarks. 



Transferred from Company K. 

Mustered out with company December 12, 

In hospital December 12, 1865. 

In hospital December 12, 18(1.'). 

In hospital December 12, 18(1.'). 

Mustered out with company December 12, 

Mustered out with comijany December 12, 

Mustered out with company December 12, 

Mustered out with company December 12, 

Mustered out with company December 12, 

Mustered out with company December 12, 

Mustered out with company December 12, 1865. 

Mustered out with company December 12, 1865. 

In hospital. 

Died. 

Died. 

Died. 

Died. 

Died. 

Died. 



18(>5. 



1865. 
18(15. 
1885. 
1865. 
1865. 
1855. 



Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Detached. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Di.scharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Transferred. 



184 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



COMPANY F. 



E. O. Mason 

Pewitt C. Dewey 

John C. Cochrane 

(!('o. (i. Tajipiin 

Joshua B. Larimer 

Marquis K. Woodforcl... 

Joseph Wolcott 

Theodore J. Curtis 

'I'liouias J. Brown 

Wni. H. Sindle 

David Becker . 

Geo. W. E. Conklin 

Peter Colton 

Joel Fiekel 

John M. Gray- 

Wm. J. Keif 

Emil Rampano 

George Ansell 

Noval B. Carter 

D. Conklin 

Wm. Driskell 

Richard Hinkle 

Stephen Jordan 

John M. Johnson 

Wesley Johnson 

Robert G. Marshall 

Harrison Patterson 

Thomas E. Rains 

Josephus Spohn 

Friend Young 

John Alexander 

Rudolph Hetsig 

Napoleon Nearing 

Francis M. White 

Van Buren A. Knapp__. 

Henry B. Lamphier 

Adams, James 

Alexander, Charles 

Barnes, Edward 

Barrett, Wm 

Barbour, Levi 

Barr, John H 

Burden, Frederick 

BJngle, William 

Blain, Wellington 

Blain, Samuel 

Blain, Myron D 

Blower, Philip 

Beckham, Wm. S 

Bonerson, John W 

Bohla, Martin 

Butler, Aaron 

Boyd, Hugh R 

Booky, Joseph 

Bowdle, John W 

Beckham, John 

Carpenter, Wayne 

Clough, Ephraim 

Colton, Frank 

Cornwell, Alonzo 

Cox, Michael 

Cox, William 

Grout, Ehhu Y 

Duncan, Isaac 

Duncan, Wm. H. H 

Duncan, Samuel 

Dundon, John R 

Driskell, Alfred 



Rank. 



Captain. 

ii 

t( 

1st Lieut. 

t( 

2d Lieut. 
(1 

1st Sergt. 
(( 

Sergt. 



Corporal. 



Musician, 
Private. 



Bate of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Oct. 4, 18(11 
Oct. 4, 1861 
Oct. 15, 1861 
Nov. 19, 1861 
Oct. 5, 1861 
Oct. 9, 1861 

De"c.~"l7i86T 
Oct. 5, 1861 
Nov. 19, 1861 
Oct. 29, lS(il 
Nov. 19, 1861 
Oct. 9, 1861 
Oct. 5, 1S61 
Oct. 27, 1861 
Dec. 1, 1861 
Oct. 8, 1861 
Oct. 8, 1861 
Oct. 10, 1861 
Oct. 9, 1861 
Feb. 29, 1864 
Dec. 6, 1864 
Oct. 27, 1861 
Oct. 10, 1861 
Oct. 8, 1861 
Oct. 14, 1861 
Oct. 9, 1861 
Oct. 8, 1861 
Oct. 8, 1861 
Oct. 9, 1861 
Nov. 5, 1861 
Dec. 9, 1861 
Nov. 4, 1861 
Nov. 23, 1861 
Nov. 19, 1861 
Dec. 14, 1861 
Sept. 8, 1864 
Nov. 25, 1861 
Oct. 30, 1S61 
Oct. 7, 1861 
Oct. 25, 1861 
Nov. 2, 1861 
Oct. 9, 1S()2 
Oct. 10,1861 
Oct. 10, 1861 
Nov. 19, 1861 
Oct. 20, 1861 
Oct. 14, 1861 
Feb. 24, 1864 
Sept.26, 1864 
Sept.23, 1864 
Oct. 10, 1861 
Oct. 29, 1861 
Mar. 2, lS(i4 
Oct. 29, 1864 
Nov. 1, 1864 
Mar. 6, 1864 
Feb. 12, 1864 
Nov. 17. 1861 
Oct. 27,1861 
Nov. 4, 1861 



Nov. 8, 1861 
Feb. 24, 1864 
Oct. 10, 1861 
Oct. 18, 1861 
Nov. 1, 1864 
Nov. 19, 1861 



Remarks. 



Promoted to Captain and A. A. G., October 5, 1862. 

Promoted from 1st Lieut. Oct., '62; resigned June, '63. 

Died in Sandusky county, Ohio. 

Ap. Corpl. Sgt. 1st Sgt.; promoted 1st Lieut. March, '65. 

Mustered out November 13, 18()4, expiration term. 

Resigned August 7, 1862. 

Ap. Cpl., Sgt, Q. M. Sgt., 2d Lieut., Aug. '65; m. o. co. 

Promoted 2d Lt. Aug., '62; to 1st Lt. Dec, '62; tr. to G. 

Mustered out August 23, 18(i5. 

Ap. Cpl., Sgt., IstSgt. Mar.'65; wd. July,'63, Ft. Wagner. 



Transferred to Co. A, September, 1865; veteran. 
Wounded July 18, 1863, Ft. Wagner; m. o. Sept., 
Mustered out. 



1865. 



Ap. Aug., 1865; mustered out Sept., 1S65, Richmond, ^'a. 
Mustered out April, '65, Columbus,0., expiration term. 



Killed Aug. 16, 1864, bat. Deep Bottom Run, Virginia. 

Mustered out September 1, lS(i5, Richmond, Virginia. 

Killed August, 1864, battle Deep Bottom Run. 

Transferred to Company A, December 31, 1861; vet. 
Transferred to Company A, December 31, 1861; vet. 
Transferred to Company A, December 31, 1861; vet. 
Transferred to Company A, September, 1865; veteran. 
Det. to headquarters at South Anna, Virginia; veteran. 

Mustered out May 29, 1865, Camp Lee, Virginia. 
Transferred to Company A, December 31, 1861. 



Transferred to Compan}' A, September 1, 1865. 
Transferred to Company A, September 1, 1865. 



Transferred to Company A, September-!, 1865. 
Mustered out June 21, 1865, Richmond, Virginia. 
Mustered out June 21, 1865, Richmond, Virginia. 



Transferred to Company A, September 1, 1865. 
Transferred to Company A, September 1, 1865. 
Transferred to Company A, September 1, 1865. 
Transferred to Company A, September 1, 1865. 
Mustered out June, 1865, Columbus, O., exp. term. 



Died Nov. 10, 1864, wds. near Richmond, Oct. 27, 1864. 
Transferred to Co. I, December, '61, as Elilni T. Crout. 
Trans, to Company A, Sept. '65, while on det. duty. 

Wounded July 18, 1863, assault on Ft. Wagner. 
Transferred to Company A, September 1, 1865. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION — FIELD WORK. 



185 



Names. 



Emmerson, Hiram 

E3'erly, Jacob 

Fisher, Andrew 

Fisher, Joliii 

Fitzpatrick, James 

Ford, James 

Fox, Joel 

Gardinier, Arthur 

Gressford, Jeremiah 

Hassan, Amos 

Hallett, Daniel 

Hallett, DeMott 

Hammond, James 

Hewitt, George 

Hedsig, Frederick 

Hoffman, Emanuel 

Hodgson, Thos. H 

Jolinson, Alonzo 

Jotum, John 

Justice, Thos. J 

Justice, Wesley N— 

Jump, Eli 

Kelsey, Alexander 

Kengeigle, WiUiam 

Kester, Martin 

Knight, William 

Kimball, Harrison 

Lane, Elzy 

I,athrop, Walter 

Leonard, John 

Luce, James H 

Martin, Thomas 

Micldaugh, Henry 

McCuliough, William __ 

McCall, John 

McGrady, Thomas 

McKeon, Laurence 

Musselman, John E 

Malonv, Patrick 

O'Brien. Bartley 

Parient, Washington W_ 

Parient, William 

Parient, Nathaniel 

Patterson, John 

Porter, Samuel... 

Robinson, Joseph 

Sampson, Chester 

Shields, Francis 

Smalley, William 

Smith, John 

Shouler, Matthew 

Snell, Hezekiah.. 

Sprague, Philo C 

Sutton, John 

Tappan, George E 

Thornton, Geo. W 

Thornton, William 

Thornton, Charles 

Thomas, John.. .. 

Watson, AVilliam 

Welch, Harry 

White, Francis 

Welch, Benjamin F 

Wilcox, Leander J 

Wood, Samuel S 

Wilson, John 



Rank. 



vate. 



20 
IS 
19 
25 
32 
18 
18 
17 
20 
45 
21 
25 
2(i 
24 
18 
27 
31 
19 
35 

23 
17 
20 
20 
38 
27 
22 
18 
18 
19 
38 
25 
44 
26 
23 
41 
16 
19 
36 
17 
39 
IS 
22 
19 
22 
21 
19 
25 
22 
39 
20 
26 

OO 

18 
20 
19 
18 
44 
30 
43 
45 



Dale of 

Fnterintj the 

Service. 



Nov. 

Dec. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Mar. 

Jan. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

(.)ct. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Mar. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 



6, 1801 

8, 1863 
24, 1S64 

13. 1862 
11, 1861 

7, 1864 

6, 1862 
19, 1861 
15, 1861 

1,1864 
18, 1861 
29, 181)4 

18, 18(il 
26, 1861 

9, 1861 
16,1861 
19, 1861 

7, 1864 
26, 1861 

12. 1863 
19, 1861 
26. 1861 

10, 1861 
23, 1861 

8, 1861 
24, 1861 

4, 1861 

1, 1861 
19, 1861 
25,1861 
19, 1861 
25, 1861 

9, 1861 

2, 1861 

27. 1861 
24, 1861 

15. 1862 
24, 1861 

11, 1,S61 
10, 1861 
10, 1861 
18, 1861 

19, 1861 
IS, 1861 
18, 1861 
23, 1861 

1, 1861 
21, 1861 
15, 1861 
13, 1861 
22, 1861 
31, 1861 
25, 1861 
24, 1861 
19, 1861 

3, 1861 
19, 1861 
19, 1861 

8, 1861 
7, 1861 

25, 1861 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Oct. 



16, 1861 
12, 1861 

4. 1861 

5, 1861 



Semarks. 



From Company A, December, 1861. 

Transferred to Company A, September, 1865. 
Mustered out June 21, 1865, at Richmond, Virginia. 

Wounded May, 18(i4, in action near Chester, Virginia. 
M. o. February, 1865, Coluuubus, O. expiration of ti'riii. 
Wounded May, 1864. in action near Chester, Virginia. 

Transferred to Company A, Suptendjer 1, 18()5. 
Wounded July, 1863, as.sault on Fort Wagner. 
Wounded May, ]8()4, near Chester, Virginia. 
Mustered out December, 1865; veteran. 

From Co. A, Dec. 1861; wd. July, 1863, at Ft. Wagner. 



Cap. Oct. 1864; mu.stered out June, 1865, Camp Chase. 
Mustered out May, 18(i5, at Columbus, Ohio. 

M. o. Columbus, O., February, 1865, expiration term. 



Transferred to Company D. 

Transferred to Company A, December, 1861. 
Mustered out with company, December 7, 1865. 



Mu.stered out June 21, 1865, at Richmond, Virginia. 



Mustered out January, 1865, at Columbus, Ohio. 

M. o. January 17, 1865, Columbus, Ohio, exp. of term. 

Transferred to Company A, September, 1865; veteran. 

Transferred to Company A, September, 1865. 



Wounded July, 1863, assault on Fort Wagner. 
Transferred to Company A, Sept. 1865, while absent. 
K. Aug. 16, 1864, battle of Deep Bottom Run, Virginia. 



ISO 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



ElCIITY-FOimTII BEGIMENT, OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTEY. 



^ray 2(1, 1862, Governor Tod called for 500 
additional men for three months, for three 
years, or for guard duty. The first Company 
to respond was the Toledo Light Guards, 
Captain Kichard Waite, of Ohio Militia of the 
Reserve, which reported June 3d. A second 
Company, recruited in Toledo by Uriah Greg- 
oi-y (then proprietor of the Ohio Bu.siness 
College) and Edmond Paine, left Toledo June 
oth,for Camp Chase, where the Eighty-Fourth 
Ohio Regiment \va,i organized June 7th, in 
which the first named was Company A, and 
the other Company K. The Regiment left for 
Cumberland, Maryland, on the 11th of that 
month. From that point detachments were 
sent in different directions for preventing 
the passage of arms and supplies into the 
Rebel lines, cajituring Rebel mails, and put- 
ting an end to guerrilla operations. Septem- 
ber llith, it was ordered to New Creek, 
where an attack by the Rebel forces under 
Jackson and Imboden was anticipated, but did 
not occur. Its term of service having expired, 
the Regiment returned to Ohio, and after 
being reviewed and highly complimented bj' 
Governor Tod at Camp Delaware, was mus- 
tered out. 

Second Lieutenant Colton died at Cumber- 
land, Maryland, of typhoid fever, August 10th, 
1862, aged 18 years. He was a young man of 
rare promise, no less in the high personal 
character to which while yet in bis youth he 
had attained, than in the rare talents preco- 
ciously developed. He was a son of Carlos 
Colton of Toledo, tlien Secretary of the 
Toledo Board of Trade. The .sou's interest in 
military affairs was early shown, in which he 
had attained unusual proficiency before 
the Rebellion broke out. He had been 
for some time the Captain of the Toledo High 
School Cadets when he volunteered in the 
Eighty-Fourth Regiment. An expression by 
the Regiment on the occasion of his death, 
contained this specific testimony to his charac- 
ter and habits, to wit : " He was, in his mor- 
als, worthy the imitation of the most virtuous. 
He never was known to utter an oath or drink 
a drop of liquor." 

ROSTER, THREE MONTHS' SERVICE.. 
[Nearly all the men entered the service May 27th, 
1862, and with the exceptions named, all were mus- 



tered out with the Company about October 1st, fol- 
lowing.] 



Names. 



Wni. Lawrence 

John .J. Wiseman 

John C. Groom* 

Benjamin B. Leonard 

James W. Thompson 

Abraham R. Howbert 



Colonel 

Lieut. Colonel - 

Major 

Surgeon 

Asst. Surgeon. 
Chaplain 



COMPANY A. 



Name. 



Richard Waite 

John B. Lounsbury 

Hamilton C. Coltout 

George F. .Straeper 

Frank Biaisted | 

Victor Keen 

George H. Pfanner 

Carlos Colton 

Charles N. Stevens 

Dante W. Thomas 

John L. Johnston 

Ezra L. Ross 

Joseph II. PrentLss 

Samuel F. Hersey 

Pliny H. Sanderson 

Foster V. Wilder 

John H. Mack 

John H. Hicks 

George W. Brown 

Chas. R. LaCroix 

Brooks, Charles L 

Blodgett, Henry W 

Bishop. Austin 

Bennett, Alanson 

Bodley, Prichard P 

Barnard, Edgar A 

Bellman, Frederick. 

Bashare, Henry 

Burge, Edwin Ct 

Brownlee, James 

Boehm,L. Edward 

Chase, George A 

Card, Frank S 

Curtis, Charles P 

Clark, Alfred H 

Cone, \Vm. H 

Curson, George 

Carsner, Michael 

Clark, Wm. H 

Cherry, Charles W 

Church, Charles M 

Durbin. Edward A 

FUigg. Frank E 

Fisk, Charles H 

Eraser, Spencer L 

Ferdig, Jeremiah 

Ford, Eugene F 

Eraser, William 

Ford, George F 

Gill, Frank H 

Gillett, Douglass C 

Grover, David 

Green, Simeon F 



Rank. 



Captain 

1st Lieutenant. 
2d Lieutenant. 
1st Sergeant 

Sergeant 



Corporal. 



Musician. 
Private. 



Age. 



Age. 



30 
24 
18 
27 
35 
27 
19 
25 
ISI 
1!) 
21 
27 
l!l 
21 
IS 
22 
20 
21 
10 



IS 
20 
li) 
IS 
20 
20 
IS 
21 
'^2 
19 
19 
21 
21 
22 
19 
20 
21 



18 
24 
19 
IS 
18 
34 
21 
24 
24 
18 
18 
21 
20 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



187 



NartKS. 



Holt, "William 

Himes, Frederick W__. 
Hamblin, Frederick S-. 

Hurst, Horace N 

Haynes, James 

Johnson, William 

Kennon, Thomas AV ._. 

Lawrence, Aaron 

Leutz, George 

Laukin, Richard 

Marvin, George L . 

Murphy, John D 

Nagely, .John 

Osborn, Ralph 

Pratt, Phineas B 

Pfanner, Jacob P 

Potter, Emery D., Jr._. 
Richardson, George F__ 

Raymond, Henry 

Rayraon<l, J. Morton 

Richards, Henry C 

Reitter, Thomas C 

Sanderson, James W 

Stearns, Mordant 

Stockman, Richard 

Sturtevant, Harry F 

Swift, Charles J 

Stephan, Kdward J 

Landman, William 

Steig Jacob 

Stribler, Martin 

Tourtellotte, Eugene C. 

Taylor, H. Burton 

Taylor, John 

Thomas, Charles D 

Voris, William J 

Vischer, Edward 

Walbri.k'e, W. Hunt___ 

Wright, James H 

Waite, Henry S 

Wheeler, R. Jettrey__, 

Winsl<jw, George 

Williams, Henry W 



Hank. 



.J.w. 



Names. 



'■■-Appointed Colonel 100th Ohio V. I. 

tDied August 10, 1868. 

JAppointed Regimental Quartermaster July 15, 1802. 

COMPANY K. 



2S 
22 
17 
18 
20 
21 
18 
10 
24 
15 
17 
22 

is 

17 

23 

17 

IS 

19 

19 

17 

19 

20 

IS 

20 

19 

20 

20 

20 

32 

24 

21 

18 

18 

20 

IS 

19 

IS 

18 

IS 

21 

18 

21 

20 



Names. 


Sank. 


Age. 


Uriah Gregory _ 


Captain. 

1st Lieutenant. 
2d Lieutenant. 

1st Sergeant. 

3d Sergeant. 

4th Sergeant. 

5th Sergeant. 
Corporal. 


38 


Edmund Paine 

Wm. H. H. Miller -._ _ 

Robert Potter _ _ 


20 
21 
29 


George .1. Wiliiston 


25 


G. W. Freatonborough 

Charles W. Wilsey 

David Straiten 


23 
20 
23 


Philip Ruckel _ _ .. 


25 


John L. North-. 


24 







Robert Burge 

John M. Chapman 

Adams, Martin 

Allen, James F 

Adams, John H 

Bradley, Enoch A 

Bli.ss, Robert 

Bloomfield. Thomas 

Brownell, Lafayette 

Barnes, Benjaniin F 

Buckingham, Charles E_ 

Clark, Leroy E 

Chamben, Joseph 

Emmick, Vincent J 

Everett, Brayton O 

DoLson, Homer D ^ 

Dubree, Homer 

Doran, William 

Daily, Thomas 

Godfrey, Era.stus C 

Goucher, Alvin 

Gleason, Mario A 

Glea.son, Charles M 

Hill, .Joseph B 

Hawks, Ira R 

Hill, Daniel 

Horton, William 

Henderson, Oliver 

Meick, Anthony 

Heely, O.scar J 

Palmer, Richard J 

Bentley, James 

Boree, Horace M 

Campbell, Benjamin F_.. 

Heller, George.. 

Henning, James L 

Hubbard, Langdon C 

Kirk, WillianrM 

Ivirk, Emerick 

Millison. William 

Place, James 

Rodd, Charles 

Ray, Julius 

Roberts, Samuel 

Sawyer, George 

Smith, Thomas M 

Sclappi, Henry 

Shugar, .John 

Taylor, James 

Waggoner, Joseph M 

Waite, Harrison 

Wentz, Ephraim 

Wolcott, James M 

Wise, Thomas 

Wheaton, Jon. D 

Walters, George 

Zimmerman, .John 

Bradley, James H* 

Jones, Enoch Ft 

Austin. Willist 

"Wangle, Alexander? 



Hunk. 



Aije. 



Musician. 

Wagoner. 

Private. 



18 
34 

IS 
17 
2S 
20 
21 
45 
l.s 
.■J4 
17 
IS 
18 

17 
19 
28 
32 
25 
18 
22 
22 
24 
■>>> 

25 
19 
21 
17 
21 i 
20 
17 
25 
19 
23 
IS 
19 
19 
25 
23 
20 



17 
20 
19 
19 
18 
21 
17 
24 
30 
17 
19 
22 
32 
33 
19 
28 
'*2 
20 
17 
21 



"Discharged July 2B, 1862. 
fDischarged August 18, ISIJS. 
tDied September 15, 1862. 
gLeft in hospital, sick. 



188 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



ONE HUNDEEDTH EEGIMENT, OHIO VOLUNTEER INPANTEY. 



The followins? is a list of tlie more imiiortant 
Ecgiincnl took ;iii iionorublc |)tirt : 

Kkoxville, Tknn. . . Winter of 1864. 

Rocky Face, .... May 5, 9, 1804. 

Dai.ton. Ga. . . . May 9, 1864. 

Rksaca, Ga May 13-16, 1864. 

Cahteissvili.i:, Ga. . . May 20, 1864. 

Dalla.s, Ga MayL'r)-June4, 1864. 

Kenksaw Mountain, . . June 9-30, 1864. 

Chattaiioochik liivKK, Ga. . July 6-10, 1864. 

Atlanta, (iA. . . . July 28-.Sept. 2, 1864. 

Utoy CitEEK, Ga. . . . Aug. 5-6, 1864. 



battles and military movomuiits iu wliicli this 



JONESBORO, Ga. 

Love.joy'.s Station, Ga. . 
Etowah Orekk, Ga. . 
Columbia, Tenn. 
Spuing Hii,i,, Tenn. 
Franklin, Tenn. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Pursuit op Hood's Army, 
Town Creek, 
Wilmington, N. C. . 



Aug. 31-Sept. 1, 1864. 
Sept. 2, 1864. 
Sept. 15, 1864. 
Nov. 24, 1864. 
Nov. 29, 1864. 
Nov. 30, 1864. 
Dec. 15-16, 1804. 
Dec. 1S04. 
Feb. 20, 18(i5. 
Feb. 22, 1865. 



The Regiment was organized at Toledo in 
Jul}- and August, and "was mustered into the 
service September 1, 1SG2. On the 8th it moved 
to Cincinnati, for the defense of that City, then 
.seriously threatened by raids. The Eebel Armj- 
under General Bragg was then tiireatening 
Cincinnati, and the Eegiraent was placed in 
trenches at the left of Fort Mitchell, on the 
Lexington Pike, Kentucky. As Bragg did not 
attempt an assault on Covington Heights, as 
apprehended, little came of the movement, 
although, with fresh troops, the ease was by no 
means a trifling one. The Eebel force soon re- 
treated to Tennessee, via Lexington and the 
Cumberland Passes. Colonel Groom having 
resigned, Lieutenant-Colonel Slevin was pro- 
moted, his rank dating May 25, 1863. He con- 
tinued in command until "ounded for life, 
August G, 18fi4, in a charge on the enemy's 
works in front of Atlanta, Ga. The command 
then devolved on Captain Frank Eundell, who 
retained the same until the release of Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Hayes from Eebel prison. May 
12, 1865, he re.signed, when Captain Rundell, 
meantime promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, was 
placed iu command, retaining the same until 
mustei- out, July 1, 1865. 

The Regiment having been assigned to the 
Second Brigade, Third Division, Army of Ken- 
tucky, moved in pursuit of the retreating 
Rebels to Lexington, Ky., where it went into 
camp on the Fair Grounds. Remaining in Ken 
tucky during the "Winter and Spring, doing 
garrison duty, and pursuing Rebel Cavalry 
raiders until August, 1863, it then entered upon 
a more active campaign, as part of First Bri- 
gade, Third Division, Twenty.Third Corps of 



the Army of the Ohio. It then marched with 
Burnside's force across the Cumberland Moun- 
tains, and assisted in the capture of Knoxville, 
Tenn., the Rebels evacuating upon the approach 
of the Union troops. At Knoxville a part of 
the Regiment was detailed for provost duty, 
while the balance (some 300 men), under Major 
Hayes, were sent to Limestone Station, East 
Tennessee, about 100 miles distant, to intercept 
the Rebels and prevent the destruction of 
the Railroad bridge at that point. The detach- 
ment reached the bridge at midnight, when 
the Major lett 25 men under Lieutenant Hine, 
Company H, at the bridge, and proceeded to 
Jonesville, 10 miles distant, where a Rebel Bri- 
gade was encamped under General '' Mudwall " 
Jackson. At daj-break Major Hayes moved 
upon the Eebel pickets, and drove them to 
their camp. He then placed his command 
aboard the cars, and fell back to Limestone 
Station. Here he disembarked, and deployed 
on picket line. The little command had scarcely 
deployed on the skirmish line when the Eebels 
made attack. Major Hayes held his men in 
line from 12 m. to 5 P. M., when by repeated as- 
saults, his command was driven into small 
block-houses at the bridge. Of this the enemy's 
artillery soon had range, when the Union force 
(265 in number) was compelled to surrender. 
Of these, 85 died in Eebel prisons from starva- 
tion and exposure. This capture was a sad 
blow to the young and promising Eegiment. 
It was fortunate in the liberal recruits received 
by it during the following winter, p)reparing it 
for participation with Sherman in the Georgia 
camfiaign. 

Soon alter Burnside entered Knoxville, Gen. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



189 



Carter, of the United States Arm^-, was ap- 
pointed Provost Marshal of East Tennessee, 
with headquarters at that point. He issued 
safeguards for all who asked for them for 
several miles about, making it difficult to pro- 
vide stocks of supplies for the troops and 
horses. Hence, when the Rebel General Long- 
street placed the City under siege, resources 
for food were limited to the Holston. The men 
were limited to one-third rations, and these of 
the poorest quality. The result was severe 
.suffering. Large number.s of the cattle designed 
for the troojjs became useless, some dying from 
starvation. 

General Eeilley's Brigade, of which the One 
Hundredth was a part, was designated as the 
Reserve, to be ready for any movement which 
the situation might indicate. Hence, the men 
were denied the use of tents or other protection 
from the weather, often from cold and rain 
very severe, causing much suffering therefrom, 
as well as from hunger, during the three weeks' 
siege. At length, General Sherman brought 
deliverance by driving off Longstreet and rais- 
ing the siege. The Rebel force retreated toward 
Bull's Gap and Richmond, followed by General 
Burnside's main force; a small detachment, in- 
cluding the One Hundredth Ohio, being left to 
guard Knoxville, Colonel Slevin being in com- 
mand. It was deemed fortunate that the Rebels 
wei'e not advised of the inadequate force then 
left in charge of that important point. 

Earl}' in the Sjiring of 1864, General Cox's 
Division, including the One Hundredth Ohio, 
marclied to East Tennessee, whei-e it remained 
until May, when, after destroying the Railroad 
and bridges in its rear, it rejoined the Twenty- 
Third Corp.s at Knoxville, then under command 
of General Schofield, taking tlie line of march 
for General Sherman and the Atlanta cam- 
paign, in which the Regiment bore an active 
and honorable part, as shown by the foregoing 
list of battles. It lo.st heavily, especially at 
Rocky Face Ridge, Daiton, Resaca, Cartersville, 
Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain, and Chattahoocliie 
River. On 6th of August General Reilley's 
Brigade was ordered to charge on the enemy's 
works in front of Atlanta, and to carry them at 
all hazards. In that desperate action the Bri- 
gade lost, in killed and wounded, 600 men, in- 
cluding 103 out of 300 of the One Hundredth. 
Col. Slevin was among the severely wounded. 

From Atlanta the Regiment joined in the 



pursuit of Hood and afterwards participated in 
the battles of Franklin and Nashville. With 
the Twenty-Third Corps, it moved to Wil- 
mington, North Carolina, and was there ac- 
tively engaged. Thence it moved with Sher- 
man's Army to Raleigh. It then moved to 
Greensboro, whence it proceeded to Cleveland, 
Ohio, where it was mustered out July 1, 1865, 
having served two years and 10 months 
During its term of service, the Regiment lost 
65 men killed in battle ; 142 wounded ; 27 died 
of wounds; 108 died of disease ; 325 wei-e cap- 
tured by the enemy ; and 85 died in Rebel 
prisons. It participated in the battles of Le- 
noir Station, Knoxville, Rocky Face Ridge, 
Resaca, Dallas, Etowah Creek, Columbus, 
Franklin, Nasiiville, Town Creek, Wilmington 
and Goldsboro, besides numerous skirmishes. 

At Cleveland, on its return, the Regiment 
was provided with a bountiful supply of re- 
freshments, and at the Park was addressed on 
behalf of the citizen.s by A. T. Slade, Esq., who, 
in the course of his remarks, said : 

Think of it. The Confederate soldier goes to his 
home, after years of fruitless resi.stance to his Govern- 
ment, to find that home desolate — his friends killed 
or scattered — with no pay, no pension, no land, no 
thanks — to go down, for all time, as a traitor to this 
great and good Government. You, on the other 
hand, after years of fighting, find your homes joy- 
ous — with pay, with pensions, with the gratitude of 
your loyal countrymen ; and, above all, and over all, 
with an undivided country — with names that poetry 
and eloquence shall vie to honor. 

April 2, 1864, was published at Toledo a let- 
ter from Lieutenant Norman Waite, 100th 
Ohio, asking the people of Toledo to furnish 
that command with a new stand of colors, for 
reasons which he stated as follows : 

Sept. 8, 1863, .300 of the Regiment met 1,200 of 
the enemy and fought them from 9 to 11;30.\. m., and 
repulsed them, and then fell back six nules, and from 
1:30 till 5 P. M., fought 2,100 Rebels with four cannon, 
our boys having no artillery — holding them until 
their last cartridge was fired, and then retiring into 
log stockades, which the enemy soon knocked down 
over their heads, and only surrendered when over- 
powered by seven to one. We have lost one flag and 
have one-half of the other, filled w'ith bullet-holes, 
the balance having been .shot away by a shell from 
the enemy's guns. Will not the citizens of Lucas 
County see that this Regiment — true to its country — 
true to its State, and an honor to this District — is 
furnished with a new stand of colors ? 



190 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Within three days of such imblicatioii the 
re<iiiisite sum of money wa8 on its way to 
Lieutenant "Waite, where it was duly received. 

In a letter, dated at Libby Prison, Novem- 
ber 8, 18(;3, Captain W. W. Hunt furnished a 
list of members of his Company (E) then held 
at Belle Isle, as follows : Sergt. N. Stutgard. 
Corp. .Tamos D. Kniglit. Privates— Harry 
Stark, Ira Beverly, Milo Metcalf, Truman M. 
Tyler, Daniel Navarre, Miles A. Aldrich, Henry 
Berncr, John Cuthbert, Samuel Berry, Levi 
Leuardson, Charles LaFountain, Lewis M. 
Poierier, Wm. James, George W. Seymour, 
James Brimson, Alonzo Sabin, Conrad Folmer, 
Harry Albert, D. P. Streeter, Daniel Clark, and 
Wm. Day. 

On the 28tb of March, 1865, the battle-flag 
of the One Hundredth Ohio was delivered to 
the Toledo Board of Trade, by Captain J. B. 
Blinn, accompanied by the following letter: 

Headquarters IOOth 0. V. I., 

1st Brig., 3d Div., 230 A. C. 
Wilmington, N. C, March 4, 1865. 
Sir— In behalf of the officers and men of this Reg- 
iment, I bave the honor to present to you this tattered 
banner, with the request that it may be preserved 
by the Toledo Board of Trade, in memory of the 
brave men who have gallantly carried and defended 
it in the battles of If toy Creek and Atlanta, Columbia, 
Franklin and Nashville, and of Town Creek ; also in 
sacred remembrance of Color-C!orporal Byron C. Bald- 
win, who yielded up his life in its defense at Frank- 
lin, Tennessee, saturating its folds with his precious 
blood. Its term of service has been short — less tlian 
a year— but it is covered with honorable scars, worthy 
of a veteran. Presented to us by the citizens of To- 
ledo, we know of no better hands in wliich to deposit 
it, than yours. 

Your obedient servant, 

E. L. HAYES, Brevet Brig.-Gen. 
To the President of Toledo Board cif Trade. 

The Board of Trade, through Harry Chase, 
President, and Carlos Colton, Secretary, made 
fitting reply to the foregoing letter, accepting 
the flag, thanking the Regiment for it, and 
promising carefully to preserve it. This was 
the flag provided at the suggestion of Lieuten- 
ant Waite in April, 1864. In July, 1865, Col. 
Slevin delivered the flag to the Board of Trade. 
It bore the record: "Limestone," "Siege of 
Knoxville," "Eocky Face," "Resaca," " Dallas," 
"Utoy Creek," "Atlanta," "Columbia," "Frank 
lin," "Nashville," "Town Creek," "Wilming- 
ton." M. E. Waite, Esq., on behalf of the 
Board of Trade, responded to the address of 



Colonel Slevin, thanking the Eegiment for the 
flag, and pledging the Board that the same 
should be carefully preserved. 

The following casualties occurring at the 
battle of Franklin in the One Hundredth Eeg- 
iment, were reported at the time : 

Killed.— Capt. W. W. Hunt, Co. E; Lieut. M. A. 
Brown, Co. E; A. D. Hines, Co. K; Corps. Henry 
Shaffer, Co. B, and Byron C. Baldwin, Co. A; Miirtin 
Miller, Co. D; Andrew E. Bradley, Co. H; William 
Stone, Co. I. 

Wounded. — Lieut. Henry Obee, Co. I); Ordeily 
Sergts. H. C. Connard, Co. 1, and W. Fergu.son, Co. 
K; Sergts. Emanuel Gruger, Co. A, and A. W. Allen, 
Co. K; Corps. N. C. Navarre, Co. E, and James Jones, 
Co. A; Z. Zeller. Co. A; Wm. Myrice Co. B; A. .1. 
Duncomb, Co. C; C. Badger, John Obee, John Wes- 
sels, Fred. Nilds and M. G. Worden, Co. D; C. La- 
Fountain and Martin V. Bates, Co. E; John Kerr and 
Mack Boon, Co. G; Campbell Boyd and W. H. Ligs- 
by, Co. H; Jas. Donot and Levi JMorris, Co. I; Samuel 
Whitehead and Wm. Mowrey, Co. K. 

Missing. — Sergt. John F. Bookwalter, Corp. A. W. 
King, Jos. Young, B. D. Donahue, Allen Borden, H. 
AV. Walker, I). H. Hosach, Henry Dunlay, Angust 
Tnlbert, Lyman R. Critchfield, J. A.Fleming, George 
Hill, Wm. llilbert, Wm. Wheeler and AVillis Lane, 
Co. I); H. Alfred and E. B. Stockwell, Co. E; Pat. 
Farley, Geo. Whitenuui and Wm. AVhiteman, Co. G; 
M. Crew, John Gross, Theo. Hess, W. H. Patten J. 
H. Ross, John Starr, M. V. B. Phillips and B. M. 
Black, Co. H; Benj. B. Beal, Co. I; John Fleagh, 
Co. K. 

In a letter dated Nashville, Tennessee, De- 
cember 9, 1864, Adjutant Norman Waite, llKiih 
Ohio Infantry, gave this incident of the battle 
of Franklin : 

Colonel E. L. Hayes ordered the Color-Bearer 
(Byron C. Baldwin, Co. A) to advance and place his 
colors in the works, which be did, and the works 
were ours again. It was nearly dark, and they had 
charged at six dift'erent times, and we fought nearly 
the whole time until 10 p. m. Capt. W. W. Hunt, Act- 
ing Major, fought nobly. About 7 o'clock we missed 
him, and found him dead near the front works. 
Lieut. Milton A. Brown was on the .skirmish line 
and w'as wounded as it was falling back, but gained 
our works, and while cheering on our men was 
shot dead. Color-Sergeant Baldwin had the flag pre- 
sented to. us by the citizens of Toledo. The upper 
part of the stall' was broken oti' by a bullet, and the 
lower half gone. While thus carrying the colors he 
was shot, when he deliberately wrapped the flag 
around him and died — his life-blood saturating the 
folds of the flag. In less than 4S hours the Regiment 
fought in two hard battles, and marched over 40 
miles, besides building a line of works. AVe went into 
the fight with 250 men and lost 62 in killed, wound- 
ed and missing. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



191 



STAFF OF ONE HUNDREDTH REGIMENT. 



Names. 


Rank. 


Date 0/ Rank. 


Remarks. 


- 


.John C. Groom 


Colonel. 


Aug. 28, 1862 


Resigned May 13, 1863. 




Patrick S. Slevin 


" 


May 13, 1863 


Honorably discharged November 


30, 1864. 


Edwin L. Hayes 




Jan. 2, 1865 


Resigned May 12, 1865. 




Patrick S. Slevin 


Lieut. Colonel. 


Aug. S, 1S()2 


Promoted to Colonel. 




Edwin L. Haves 


C( 


May 13, 1863 


Promoted to Colonel. 




Franklin Kundell 


'* 


Jan. 2, 1865 


Mustered out with Regiment. 




Edwin L. Haves 


Major. 


Aug. 26, 1862 


Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 




John A. Shannon 


*' 


May 13, 1863 


Mustered out Mav 11, ls(i4. 




Henry D. Taylor 


(1 


July 13, 1864 


Resigned, Captain, December 12, 


1S()4. 


Franklin Kundell 




Jan. 2, 1865 


'romoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 




Geo. A. CoUaniore 


Surgeon. 


Aug. 9, 1S62 


Mustered out with Regiment. 




Henry McHenry 


" 


Aug. 15, 1S62 


Declined. 




Wm. H. Thacker 


(( 


Aug. lit, 1862 


Discharged October 1, 1863. 




Robert Johnson 




Sept. 8, 1862 


Mustered out with R(>giment. 




Leonard B. Griffing 


Chaplain. 


Sept. 13,1862 


Discharged October i), 1864. 





ROSTER OF COMPANY E. 



Names. 



Dennis C. Lehan 

Francis M. Shoemaker., 

Noe Nelson 

John P. Denny 

Israel K.Kramer 

Orson G. Ballou 

Alford R. Hill 

Wm. H. Pen>berton 

Wm. Perrin 

John Winters 

Albert Dean 

Maberry Van Fleet- 

Morris Harford 

John E. Farner 

Wni. E. Dibble 

William Lose 

Martin Hut'tile 

John Eastwood 

Bates, Thomas 

Blystone, William 

Brown, .John 

Black, William 

Bulger, Henry 

Burds, Noah 

Crepps, David 

Coon, Almon P 

Curtis, Levally R 

Disher, Christian 

Duck, John 

Davis, Philander 

Dart, David 

Eckert, Isaiah 

Gallmer, Jacob 

Gistwite, Samuel 

Hall, Archillus B 

Holt, AVm___ ._ 

Holt. John P 

Hoat, Cyrus 

•lay, William H 

Lafiore, Oliver 

Lapoint, Joseph 

Mitchell, Francis 

Monroe, Spencer 

McNutt, Stephen L. .__ 
Miller, McConnell 



Rank. 



Captain. 

>( 

1st Lieut. 
(( 

2d Lieut. 

1st Sergt. 

Sergeant. 
i( 

e( 

Corporal. 



Musician. 
Private. 



26 
23 
31 
23 
2!) 
27 
28 
25 
32 
33 



20 
21 
20 
18 
33 
21 
30 
28 
18 
19 



19 
33 
21 
19 
18 
19 
39 
19 
20 
28 
18 
31 
18 
25 
19 
28 
27 
18 
32 
25 
25 



Date nf 

Entering tlte 

Service. 



.July 27,1802 
July 25. 1862 
July 29, 1,S62 
Am;. 7,1862 
Aug. 9,1862 
July 24, 1862 
Aug. 4,1862 
July 25, 1862 
Aug. 7, 1862 
Aug. .S,1,S62 
Aug. 6. 1862 
Julv 25, 1862 
July 28, 1862 
July2.S, 1862 
July 28, 1862 
Aug. 7,1862 
Aug. 6,1862 
July 22, 1862 
Aug. 6, 1862 
6,1862 
2. 1862 
8,1862 
8,1862 
7,1862 
July 27, 1862 
July 28, 1862 
Aug. 8,1862 
Aug. 8,1862 
Aug. 7,1862 
Aug. 5,1 S62 
Aiag. 12,1862 
Aug. 7,1862 
July 25, 1862 
Aug. 7,1.S62 
Aug. 2,1.S(;2 
July31,l.s62 
July 25, 1862 
Aug. ,S,1862 



Remarks. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



2,1 S62 
7,1862 
5,1862 
2,1862 
6,1862 
6,1862 



July 28, 1862 



Resigned April 27, 1863. 
Mustered out with company. 
Resigned. 

Mustered out with company. 
Resigned. 

Captured. Died in captivity. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mu.stered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Discharged July 8, ],8(;5. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with comiiany. 
Mustered out «ith conipany. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Sent to hospital. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with compan}'. 
Left in hospital. 
Mustered out with company, 
JNIustered out with company. 
Wounded. Discharged. 
Clustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mu.stered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mu.stered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Mustered out with company. 
Discharged June 23, 1865. 
Absent, .sick. 

Mustered out with company. 
Discharged May 24, 1865. 



102 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 







w* 


Date of 




NdTiies. 


JJa»iit. 


'S 


Entering the 


lirmavks. 








Service. 




Navarre, Tsadore. 


Private. 


23 


Aug. 12,1862 


Mustered out with company. 


Navarre, DaviiL- 


a 


25 


Aug. 12,1862 


Mustereil out with company. 


I'inkcrton, (ieorge 


" 


18 


July 27, 1862 


Mustered out with company. 


IVlkiv, William — 


It 


21 


Aug. 8,1862 


Mustered out with company. 


Patten, Cieorge M 


ti 


22 


Julv 31,1862 


Mustered out with company. 


Rpillv. Jaiue.s W 


" 


23 


Aug. 8,1862 


Mustered out with company. 


Stewart. Jacob S_ 


" 


IS 


July 27,1862 


Mustered out with company. 


Swangston, Isaac 

Shinkev, Andrew 


(t 


18 


Aug. 2,1862 


Mustered out with company. 


" 


IS 


Aug. 8,1862 


Wounded. 


Shoultz, Benjamin 


*' 


33 


Aug. 9,1862 


Mustered out with company. 


Switzer, Jacob __ - - - 


(( 


30 


Aug. 7,1862 


Discharged. 


Snntt lillfuS 


(1 


18 
20 
40 


Aug. 8.1862 
July 29,1862 
Aug. 1,1862 


Mustered out w^ith companv. 


Trnnn Elias -- 


Mustered out with company. 


Wbiteman, Harrison 


Mustered out with company. 


Whitmore, Fred K 


(. 


37 


Aug. 1,1862 


Mustered out with company. 


Weible, George S 


C( 


18 


Aug. 8,1862 


Mustered out with company. 


AVard, Charles.. _- - 


(( 


25 


July 25,1862 


Mustered out with companv. 


Trorabla, Basail 


Sergeant. 


37 


Aug. 7,1862 


Discharged. 


All Francis 


Private. 


28 
22 


Julv 28,1862 
July 20 1862 


Discharged. 


Batt, Levi 


Discharged. 


Laflore, Dominic 


i( 


22 


Aug. 5,1862 


Discharged. 


Loncrgan, Martin 


(( 


is 


Aug. 6,1862 


Discharged. 


McNutt, William J 


*' 


18 


Dec. 5,1863 


Discharged. 


Phillips, Lyman 


(( 


32 


Aug. 8,1862 


Discharged. 


Morris. George W 


(( 


24 


Julv 28,1862 


Transferred. 






44 
22 


Aug. 9,1862 
Feb. 28, 1864 


Transferred. 


Sangston, George 


Transferred. 


T?.fliifttiis Heller 


Sergeant. 

Corporal. 

it 


■'() 


Aug. 8, 1862 


Wounded. Died. 


T prov J. Smith 


•'3 


July 25, 1862 


Killed. 


James C. House 


29 


Aug. 8,1862 


Killed. 


Jackson P. Sager 


(( 


32 


Aug. S, 1862 


Killed. 


Andrew M. Trapp 


(( 


22 


Aug. 1,1862 


Killed. 


Cyius Salsbury 


'' 


30 


Aug. 8,1862 


Killed. 


Richard Herbert 


Musician. 


44 


Julv 23, 1862 


Died. 


Abbott, Lucius 


Private. 


IS 


Aug. 2,1862 


Died. 


Abbott James 


*< 


•^3 


July 24, 1862 


Died. 


Bemis, William C 


(( 


19 


Aug. 2,1862 


Died. 


Boucher, Jacob 


(( 


23 


Sept. 1,1862 


Died. 


Cramer, John 


(( 


30 


Aug. 7,1862 


Died. 


Charter, Nelson 


(( 


36 


Aug. 7,1862 


Died. 


Clutter; Andrew J 


(( 


26 


Aug. 8,1862 


Killed in action. 


Cumniings, Ira S 


(( 


18 


July 23, 1862 


Died. 


Dicken, Isaac. 


,1 


21 

90 


July 31, 1862 
Aug. 8,1862 
Aug. 8,1862 


Killed in action. 


Hahn Valentine 


Died in captivity. 
Killed in action. 


Lucas, Ranatus 


(( 


18 


Mills, Robert 


11 


26 


Aug. 22, 1862 


Died in hospital. 


Phillips, Ed ward 


It 


23 


Aug. 7,1862 


Killed in action. 


Ruckel, John 


*' 


19 


Aug. 7,1862 


Killed in action. 


Rathbun, Benjamin 


11 


20 


July 24, 1862 


Killed in action. 


Snider, Israel 


(( 


19 


Sept. 1,1862 
Aug. 6,1862 


Died in hospital. 


Sandviet, Anthony 


<( 


37 


Died in hospital. 


Stebbins, Cuvler 


(( 


18 


July 28, 1862 


Died in hospital. 


Spade, Samuel 


(( 


■^1 


Aug. 9,1862 


Died in captivity. 

Died in hospital from wounds. 


Wilcox, George E 


>e 


18 


Aug. 22,1862 


Waggoner, George E 


(( 


IS 


Julv 27, 1862 


Died in hospital from wounds. 


Higgins, Dennis 


ii 


36 


Aug. 6,1862 




Pavne, John B. 


'* 


18 


Julv 20, 1862 




Saw ver, Ira B _ _ _ _ 


(t 


23 


Aug. 8,1862 









COMPANY F. 



Names. 


Rant. 


& 
■^ 


Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 


Remarks. 


Norman Waite 

John W. Jaquett 

Alonzo Streeter 

Wm. N. Stutgard 


1st Lieut. 

1st Sergt. 
Sergeant. 


27 
38 
33 
34 


Aug.lO, 1862 
July 17, 1862 
Aug. 8, 1862 
July 26, 1862 


Promoted to Adjutant December 1, 1864. 
Promoted 1st Lieutenant December 1, 1864. 
Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 
Wounded; mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



193 



Navies, 



James D. Knight 

Alonzo L. Freeman 

Delevan R. Streeter 

Thomas Bladon 

George Finch 

Daniel Luke . 

Geo. E. McBride 

Chas. W. Allen 

Martin V. Bates 

Francis Bunting 

George Bladon 

Ira Beverly 

John A. Boston 

Samuel Berry 

William Carpenter 

Peter Coleman 

Conrad Falmer 

John Harris 

Frank Hollister 

Chas. H.Johnson 

William James 

Thomas Lyons 

Wm. Langendorf 

Levi Leonardson 

Daniel Navarre 

Isadore Navarre 

Philip Newcoman 

Owen O'Neal 

Chas. H. Peter 

Lewis N. Porerier 

John Raymond 

Jacob Rahan 

Peter Suzor 

Wm. Shay 

Henry Sterk 

Israel Timmer 

Pierre Vasen 

James B. Menhennick__ 

Henry Alberts 

Henry Alford 

James Brennan 

Daniel Clark 

Willis Lane 

Silas McCarty 

Israel K. Kramer 

George W. Gove 

Thos. Armstrong 

Robert C. Navarre 

Henry Belknap 

John Cuthhert 

John Dilmore 

Robert S. Drake 

Walter Dustin 

George Griffin 

James Laughlin 

Charles LaFontain 

Patrick O'Neal 

William Reinhart 

John Riser 

William Shaffner 

Ch.as. H. Sprague 

Leander J. Wilcox 

Abram J. Ferguson 

Orlin S. Hayes 

James S. Ritch 

John Armstrong 

James Doyle 

George Foly 

James Smiley 

Edmund S. Smith 

Geo. H. Seymour 

Jeremiah Wildy 



Rank. 



Sergeant. 



Corporal. 

(( 

Mu.sician. 

Wagoner. 

Private. 



Corporal. 
Private. 



Sergeant. 
Corporal. 



Private. 



Musician. 

Sergeant. 

Corporal. 

Private. 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Aug. 4, 
JulvL's, 
Aug. S, 
Julvlii), 
July 20, 
Aug. 9, 
Aug. 8, 
Aug. 5, 
July 18, 
Aug.27, 
July 29, 
Aug.ll, 
July 23, 
Aug.lo, 
Aug.ll, 
Aug. 1, 
Aug.22, 
Aug. 7, 
Aug.22, 
Aug. 1, 
Aug.22, 
Aug. 13, 
Aug. 16, 
Aug. 9, 
July 28, 
Aug.l4, 
Dec. 2, 
Aug. 15, 
Aug.21, 
Aug. 6, 
Aug. b, 
Aug. 0, 
Aug. 8, 
July 18, 
Aug. 13, 
July 26, 
Aug. 10, 
Aug. 7, 
Aug. 13, 
Oct. 22, 
Aug.22, 
Aug. 8, 
Aug. 8, 
Aug. 13, 
Aug. 7, 
Aug.13, 
July 23. 
July 26, 
Aua.22, 
Aug.14, 
Aug. G, 
July 30, 
July 16, 
Aug. 7, 
Aug. 8, 
July 2.5, 
Aug.lo, 
Julv29, 
Aug.13, 
Aug. 10, 
July 18, 
July 28, 
July 21, 
July 19, 
Aug. 1, 
Aug. b, 
July 21, 
Aug.16, 
Aug. 8, 
Aug. 8, 
Aug.22, 
Aug. 4, 



1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1865 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1863 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 



Remarks. 



Captured; mustered out with company July 1, 1SC5. 

Wounded. 

Captured; mustered out with company July 1, 186.5. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1S65. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 18(i5. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Discharged J\Iay 30, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

.Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company .luly 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, J 865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 186.5. 

Mustered out with company July I, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with compan}- July 1, 1S65. 

Transferred to Yet. Res. Corps .lanuary 15, 1865. 

Mustered out with companv July 1, 186.5. 

Transferred to 183d O. V. L, June 1.5, 1865. 

Discharged June 3, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 1865. 

Mustered out with company .luly 1. 1865. 

Mustered out with company July 1, 

Mustered out with company July 1, 

Discharged; captured. 

Discharged; captured. 

Captured. 

Discharged; captured. 

Captured. 

Missing. 

Captured. 

Promoted to 2d Lieutenant October 28, 18G3. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged; wounded. 

Discharged. 

Discharged; captured. 

Discharged. 

Appointed in Regular Army. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Captured; wounded; mustered out. 

Mustered out ; accidentally wounded. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged; wounded. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Promoted to Sergeant-Major. 

Promoted to Commissary Sergeant. 

Transferred to Invalid Corps. 

Transferred to Navy. 

Transferred to Navy. 

Transferred to Navy. 

Transferred to Navy. 

Transferred to Navy. 

Transferred; discharged. 



1865. 

1865. 



194 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Names. 



Wm. A. Brown 

Charles Wilkinson 

Miles A. Aldrieh 

John Bales 

Henry Benoar 

William Davis 

Abel Ethvards 

Wni. Day 

John Knight 

Arthur McGlue 

Milo R. Metcalf - 

Charles Rolling 

William SidelL 

Alonzo Sabing 

Christian Swakeman 

Eli Salsbury 

Eleazer B. Stoekwell 

Alonzo Turner 

Truman M. Tyler 

John VV. Williams 

Joseph Youngs 





?^ 


Rank. 


— 

26 


1st Sergt. 


Corporal. 


18 


Private. 


18 


n 


'so" 


il 


20 


n 


'42' 


tl 


21 


It 


43 


tl 


24 


tl 


19 


11 


30 


" 


21 


I 


34 


il 


34 


il 


32 


(1 


26 


11 


21 


•* 


38 


(C 


19 



Date of 

Entering the 

Service. 



July 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Dec 

Aug. 

July 

Dec. 

July 

July 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

July 

July 

Aug. 

Aug. 

July 

Aug 

July 

Aug. 



24, 1862 
8, 1862 
5, 1862 

21, 1863 
8, 1862 

30, 1S62 
30, 1863 
20, 1862 
23, 1862 
8, 1862 
2, 1862 

7, 1862 

13, 1862 
27, 1862 
26, 1862 

8, 1862 

14, 1862 
2.5, 1862 

22, 1862 
19, 1862 

5, 1862 



Remarks. 



Killefl in action. 

Died. 

Died; captured. 

Died; wounded. 

Died; captured. 

Died. 

Died; wounded. 

Died; captured. 

Died. 

Died. 

Died; captured. 

Died. 

Killed in action. 

Died; captured. 

Killed in action. 

Died. 

Lost on steamer Sultana. 

Died. 

Died; captured. 

Died. 

Killed in action. 



ONE HUNDKBD AND ELEVENTH EEGIMENT, OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTEY. 

The following is a list of the more important battles in whicli this Eegiment bore an honora- 
ble part : 

Frankfort, Ky Oct. .S, 1862. Nicoj.ick, Ga 

Huff's Ferry, Tbnn., . . Nov. 14, 1862. Decatur, Ga., Dee. 27-28, 1864. 

Loudon Creek, Tenn., . . Nov. 15, 1862. Peachtree Creek, Ga., . . July 20, 1864. 

Campbell's Station, Tenn., . Nov. 17, 1862. Atlanta, Ga., July, 1864. 

Rocky Face Ridge, Ga., . . May 9, 1864. Lovbioy's Station, Ga., . . Sept. 2-6, 1864. 

Resaca, Ga., May 13-14, 1864. Franklin, Tenn., .... Nov. 30, 1864. 

Kenesaw, Ga., June 27, 1864. Nashville, Tenn., .... Dec. 15-16, 1864. 

Dallas, Ga., May 2.5-June 4, 1864. 



The Eegiment was raised in the Counties of 
Lucas, Wood, Sandusky, Fulton, Williams and 
Defiance; was organized in August, and mus- 
tered into service September 5 and 6, 1862. 
On the 11th it took the field at Covington, 
Kentucky, and remained there until the 18th, 
when, with four other Eegiments and a Bat- 
tery, it made a reconnoissance to Crittenden, 
Kentucky, where it drove out the Eebel Cav- 
alry under Kirby Smith, and returned to 
Covington. Eemaining there until the 25th, it 
then took transports for Louisville, where it 
was assigned to Buell's Army, in the Third 
Brigade, Twelfth Division, under General 
Duniont. October 3d, the Eegiment moved to 
Shelbyville, and on the 8th occupied the 
advance in the movement on Frankfort, where 
a skirmish took place. The 11th of October it 
moved on Lawreneeburg and cam]>ed at Crab 



Orchard, there joining Buell's Army. After 
Bragg's escape through Ckimberland Gap, the 
Eegiment, by rapid marches, proceeded to 
Bowling Green, Kentucky. May 29, 1863, it 
was ordered to Glasgow, Kentucky, at which 
place it was assigned to the Second Brigade, 
Second Division, Twenty-Third Army Corps, 
in which it remained until mustered out of 
service. From Glasgow the command moved 
on Scottsville and Tomkinsville. 

It was about this time that John Morgan be- 
gan his famous raid on Indiana and Ohio. In 
pursuit of him the One Hundred and Eleventh 
took part, marching July 4, 1863, from Tom- 
kinsville to Glasgow, 32 miles, in one day, 
carrying guns, equipments, and 40 rounds of 
ammunition. July 6th, it marched to Munfords- 
ville, and on the 9th took cars for Ijouisville. 
Morgan had then crossed the Ohio, and the 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



195 



Eegiment was ordered to New Albany, Indi- 
ana, whence it marched to Jeffersonville, thei-e 
taking transportsi for Cincinnati. At an iahmd 
10 miles above Louisville a portion of the 
Regiment was landed and a detachment of 
Morgan's force was captured, the larger por- 
tion of them by Company H, Captain J. W. 
Smith, after a chase of a mile. Arriving at 
Cincinnati on the 13th, it proceeded to Ports- 
mouth, which was reached on the 18th. 
After Morgan was captured the Regiment re- 
turned to Kentuck}', stopping first at Lebanon, 
whence it marched to New Market, where tlie 
Corps rendezvoused, before marching to East 
Tennessee, which was commenced August 19th; 
Jamestown, 85 miles from Knoxville, being 
reached on the 26th. From that jDoint the 
command, by rapid march, proceeded through 
Turman's Gap, reaching Montgomery, August 
30th. It forded Big Emery River September 
2d, and arrived at Loudon, Tennes.see, on the 
4th. Here it remained until November 14th, 
and took part in the movement North of New 
Market for checking the Rebel advance from 
Virginia, and also in several forced marches, 
scouts and skirmishes along the Tennessee and 
Holston Rivers. 

The advance of Longstreet's Rebel force 
ap))eared in front of Loudon October 22d, 
when considerable skirmishing took place. 
November 14th the Union force marched to 
Ijenoir, whence the Second Brigade was 
ordered to Huff's Ferrj', three hiiles below 
Loudon, to prevent Longstreet from crossing 
the River, but owing to the bad condition of 
the roads, the ferry was not reached until dusk. 
A Brigade of Rebels was encountered on a 
bluff half a mile from the river, on wliich a 
successful charge was made, in wliich the Regi- 
ment lost a few wounded. The Brigade stood 
to arms all night in a pelting rain, without 
shelter or food ; and at daylight, with the 
Division fell back, the One Hundred and 
Eleventh covering the retreat. A brisk skir- 
mish took place at Loudon Creek, between the 
Regiment and the Sixth South Carolina Sharp- 
shooters, composing Longstreet's advance. 
The stand was made to permit Henshaw's 
Illinois Battery to get its caissons up a hill al)ove 
the Creek. In that ensatfement the Regiment 
lost four killed and 12 wounded. The com- 
mand then marched unmolested to Lenoir. On 
the night of the 15th of November all camp 



and garrison equipage and transportation were 
destroyed, and at 3:00 a. m. of tiie Kith, the 
force moved for Knoxville. At <layliglit 
Lieutenant Norris and 52 men of Company B 
were captured while on picket. Of these 52 
strong, able men, no less than 36, or over two- 
thirds, died of starvation and exposure in the 
Rebel prison-pen at Andersonville. General 
Burnside had fixed upon Campbell Station as 
the point for meeting Longstreet's force. In 
that engagement the One Hundred and 
Eleventh occupied the front line, directly in 
front of the Rebel Batteries, where, for six 
hours, it was exposed to the shells of a con- 
centrated fire. Its loss was but eight, as the 
enemy used percussion shells, which fell 
chiefly in rear of the first line. The command 
marched into Knoxville, six miles, being three 
nights without sleep, food or rest, and taking 
part in three separate engagements. It took 
part in the siege of Knoxville, occupj-ing the 
Fort on College Hill, losing six men killed and 
wounded. After Longstreet's retreat, it was in 
skirmishes at Blain's Cross Roads, Danville 
and Strawberi'y Plains, and occupied an out- 
post six miles from the city, when General 
Schofleld the second time fell back on Knoxville. 
January 21, 1804, it protected the crossing of 
the Second Division at Strawbcrrj' Plains, 
losing one man killed. February 'Jth, General 
Schofleld arrived at Knoxville and assumed 
command of the Department. On the 24th the' 
Second Division marched to vStrawberry Plains; 
and on the 27th crossed the Holston River, and 
marching some distance, returned as far back 
as Mossy Creek. March 14th, the Regiment 
moved to Morristown, Tennessee, and the next 
day was on the picket line and had a brisk 
skirmish with Rebel Cavalry. Moving back to 
Mossy Creek, it remained there until April 26th, 
when it started for Charleston, on the Hiawas- 
see River, 100 miles distant, arriving there on 
the 30tH, and at Red Clay, Georgia, May 0th. 
Here the Army of the Ohio became part 
of Sherman's left wing to participate in 
the Atlanta campaign. Marching to Tunnel 
Hill May 7th, the next day it skirmished 
into a jjosition in front of Buzzard's Roost. 
May 9th the Regiment was assigned the 
front line of skirmishers in the advance on 
Rocky Face Mountain, and lost nine men 
killed and wounded in an advance of three- 
fourths of a mile. May 12th the Regiment 



19(1 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



mai-chod through Snake Creek Cap, arriving 
in front of Resaca on the evening of the 13th. 
The next day its Brigade made an unsuccessfid 
charge on tlie Rebel works in whicli, with but 
seven Companies engaged, it lost seven killed 
and :K) wounded. The Regiment took part as 
the supporting column in the second day's 
fight at Resaca. After an unsuccessful assault 
on the Union lines at midnight, the enemy 
evacuated. May Kith the Regiment partici- 
pated in a pursuit, and captured six prisoners 
in a skirmish on the 20th. May 27th it made 
a charge at double quick, on a Rebel Brigade, 
breaking its lines and losing 15 men killed and 
wounded. 

The Regiment pai-ticipated in the entire 
movement against Atlanta, and was actively 
engaged in the siege of Kenesaw, the battles at 
Pine Mountain, Lost Mountain, Dallas, on the 
Chattahooehie near Nicojack Creek, Decatur, 
and Peachtree Creek, and in the siege of 
Atlanta, and the skirmishes at Rough-and- 
Ready, Lovejoy's Station and Utoy Creek, in 
which service it lost 212 in killed and woun- 
ded, out of 380 men. September 8th it went 
into camp at Decatur, Georgia, remaining there 
until the morning of October 4th, when the 
movement against Hood's forces commenced. 
During its stay at Decatur the Regiment lost a 
few men in an encounter with Rebel Cavalry. 
It marched rapidly to Allatoona Pass and to 
within 18 miles of Chattanooga, when the 
Corps was ordered in pursuit of Hood's Army 
in Alabama. On the way the Regiment, at 
Cedar Bluffs, on the Coosa River, in a skirmish 
with Rebel Cavalry, lost one officer and three 
men captured on picket. Thence it marched to 
Rome, Georgia, where a brisk skirmish took 
place; and continuing its march, it reached 
Resaca November 1, 18G4. Here it took cars 
for Johnsonville, on the Tennessee, 85 miles from 
Nashville, to protect that place fi'om a Rebel 
raid; remained there until the 20th, and then 
by rail went to Columbia, Tennessee, to aid in 
checking Hood's advance. At that place it 
participated in skirmishes, and was detailed to 
remain in the rear to guard the fords of Duck 
River, while Thomas's Army fell back on 
Franklin. It guarded a wagon train to Frank- 
lin, and was twice attacked, each time repuls- 
ing the ememy. It reached Franklin on the 
morning of November 30th, and was assigned 
to the front line of works, on the left flank of 



the Second Division, Twenty-Third Corps. In 
the fight of that day, out of 180 men engaged, 
it lost 22 killed on tiie field and 40 wounded, 
manj- being killed by rebel bayonets. So 
close was the contest, that the Regiment's flag 
was snatched from the bands of the Color Ser- 
geant, but the Rebel who took it was killed 
on the spot. The troops on the immediate left 
falling back during the chartce, the One Hun- 
dred and Eleventh suffered from an hour's 
enfilading fire of the Rebels. So severely had 
the Regiment suffered in the loss of officers, 
that it was found necessary to detail such from 
other Regiments for the command of the Com- 
panies. 

December 1, 1864, the Regiment marched 
back to Nashville, and was assigned position 
in the line of defenses on the left, and was 
severely engaged during the two days' fight- 
ing at that point. On the second day in a 
charge, it captured three Rebel battle-flag.s and 
a large number of prisoners, with a loss of 
seven killed and 15 wounded. The Regiment 
participated in the pursuit of Hood, when it 
marched to Clifton, Tennessee, where, Januarj' 
17, 18G5, it took transports to make the cam- 
paign of North Carolina, passing Cincinnati 
the 23d, and reaching Washington City on the 
31st. By Ocean steamer it was taken from 
Alexandria for Fort Fisher, where it joined 
General Terry's. force and took part in the cap- 
ture of Fort Anderson, February 19, 18G5, and 
in the skirmishes of Moseby Hall and Golds- 
boro. In fact, the work of capturing Fort 
Anderson, so far as land forces were concerned, 
was mainly performed by the Brigade, Colonel 
O. H. Moore commanding, of which the One 
Hundred and Eleventh was a part. After the 
surrender of General Johnston, the Regiment 
moved to Salisbury', North Carolina, at which 
j)lace it remained on garrison duty until sent 
home, reaching Cleveland, Ohio, July 5, 1865, 
and was there mustered out on the 12th. 

The One Hundred and Eleventh re-enlisted 
as veterans in February, 1864, while in East 
Tennessee, but owing to the special demand for 
troops the veteran furlough could not be 
granted the men. Again (October, 1864), after 
the Atlanta campaign, more than two-thirds of 
the Regiment re-enlisted as veterans, when in 
consideration of Hood's campaign in the rear, 
the furlough was again suspended. 

The Regiment entered the field with 1,050 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



197 



men and received 85 reeruite. Of these, 234 
were discharged for disability, disease and 
wounds; 200 died of disease contracted in the 
service; 252 were killed in battle or died of 
wounds; and 401 were mustered out — makinsr 
an aggregate of 687 casualties of the kinds 
named. 

Casualties of the One Hundred and Eleventh 
Eegiment at the battle of Franklin, as reported 
at the time : 

Company A — Daniel Plantz and J. B. Guttow, 
wounded; J. Jackson, supposedkilled. 

Company C — Capt. P. H. Dowling, Lieut. Isaac E. 
Kintigh, Philip Bush, Sergt. John E. Woodworth, 
Adam Miller, Geo. W. Ward and James L. Penny, 
wounded. Oscar B. Daniels, Almon B. Daniels, 



Andrew Kannaur, and David K. Mounts, supposed 
killed. 

Company D — Julius Greeley, Eli Bonder and Wm. 
Adams, supposed killed. Sergt. Alex. Rowland, 
Corp. G. W. Innman, J. B. Snively, F. Lawler, and 
T. Strickland, wounded. 

Company E — Captain T. South worth, and J. W. 
Grubb, wounded. 

Company F — Sergt. Samuel Snyder, Corporals 
Charles A. Locost and Daniel Bear, Emanuel Bycrs, 
W. H. Lauder, Lafayette C. Olds and Warren Shaw, 
wounded. Corp. B. Hemenway and John Latvr, killed. 

Company J^Vetus Ha^is, killed ; Henry Linker and 
Sergt. A. Daguer, wounded. Henry Speck, missing. 
Company K — Lieut.C. Baker, Joseph Gingery, Sergt. 
Samuel McCutcheon, Henry Bordue, Wm. H. Carlin, 
Francis M. Davenport, Thos. Irwin and David Gress- 
inger, wounded. Sergt. Major Geo. H. Curtis, killed. 



STAFF OF ONE HUNDRED AND ELEVENTH REGIMENT. 



John R. Bond 

Isaac R. Sherwood.. 

B. W. Johnson 

Moses R. Brailey 

I. R. Sherwood 

Thomas C. Norris 

Moses R. Brailey 

I. R. Sherwood 

Thomas C. Norris ._. 

Benj. F. Southworth 

Henry J. McCord 

Lvraan A. Brewer ._. 

E". G. Clark 'A.sst:Sur^ 

C. M. Chalfant 

D. H. Silver 

John W. Mock 

Ambrose Hollington . 
T. H. Hines 



Rank. 



Colonel. 



Lt. Col. 



Major. 



Surgeon. 



Chaplain. 



Date of Hank. 



Aug.28, 
Sept. 8, 
Aug.l7, 



1862 
18(54 
18(52 



Remarks. 



Jan. 1, 

Sept. 8, 
Aug.28, 
Feb. 1, 
Jan. 1, 
Sept. 8, 
May 31, 
Aug.l9, 
Aug.27, 
Aug.27, 



1864 
18(54 
18()2 
18(53 
18(54 
18(54 
18(55 

1861: 

1861 
186; 



July 1.3, 
Sept.16, 
May 31, 



1864. 
1862 
1865 



Honorably discharged (!)ctober 18, 1864. 

Transferred to 183d 0. V. I. 

Resigned February 1, 1863. 

Honorably discharged December 29, 1863. 

Promoted to Colonel. 

Mustered out with Regiment as Major. 

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Mustered out as Captain, May 15, 18(55. 

; Mustered out with Regiment as Captain. 

Detached as Brigade Surgeon. 

Declined. 

Discharged June 30, 1864. 

Died June 27, 1864. 

Mustei-ed out with Regiment. 

Honorably discharged September 24, 1864. 

Mustered out with Regiment. 



ROSTER OF COMPANY H. 







s 


Dale of 






Names. 


Rank. 


30 


Entering tlie 
Service. 


Remarks. 




John W. Smith... . . 


Captain. 


Aug.l2, 18(52 


Mustered out with comnanv. 




Patrick H. Dowling 


1st Lieut. 


26 


Aug.l2, 18(52' Promoted to Captain. 




Jeremiah Bowlin 


" 


30 


Aug. 1, lS(i3 Promoted to Captain. 




Oristen HoUowav 


2d Lieut. 


46 


Aug.14, ]S()2 Resigned. 




Henrv T. Bissell 


" 


28 


Dec. 14, 1862 Appointed Adjutant; died Louisville, Ky., Sept. 10, '63. 


James R. Thompson 


(( 


44 


Mav 15, 18(53 Transferred. 




Patrick F. Dalton 




23 


Apr. 8, 1865iMu8tered out with company. 




Samuel W. Bare 


1st Sergt. 


25 


Aug.l4, 1862!Mustered out with company. 




Alfred Kelley 


tSergeant. 


32 


Aug.l2, ]8(i2!Mustered out with company. 




Smith L. Latshaw 


(( 


19 


Aug.ll, 1862lMustered out with company. 




Wm. C. Fletcher 


'* 


44 


Aug.15, 1802] Mustered out with company. 




Revillo H. Stevens 


(( 


29 


Aug.14, 1862 Mustered out with company. 




Roselle Cowdry 


Corporal. 


22 


Aug.i::, 1862; Detached. 




Elias Pelton 


a 


18 
22 


Aug.l8, 18(i2;Mustered out with company. 
Aug. 1(5, 1862 Mustered out with company. 




Harrison Wynn 




James W. Cooke 


a 


24 


Aug.14, 1862 Mustered out with company. 




James Russell 


u 


19 


Aug.ll, 1862 Mustered out with company. 




Charles H. Wilson 


>( 


21 


Aug.l2, 1862|Mustered out with company. 





108 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Names. 



SaTiiuel L. Kimball 

Gfoi-fjo Dolby 

Joronio B. Stevens 

Jumes Lucas 

Abraiiis, Charles 

Bailey, !?. W 

Cutcher, Peter 

("oimelly, Patrick 

Clohesy, Michael 

C'ullen, James 

Davis, Wilson 

Ernst, Henry 

English, Thomas 

Eckert, John 

Furney, Peter 

Green, Ulysses 

Groce, Richard 

Hegeman, Walker 

Hall, Thomas J 

Humbarger, Samuel 

Harwood, Jonas L 

Hallet, James 

Hartman, Ed-n'ard H 

Jacobs, Michael 

King, Daniel 

Lang, Edward 

La Bounty, Faries 

Lang, William 

Mclntyre, Arthur 

Morin, Henry 

Moss, John 

Potter, Thomas 

Robinson, Ezra 

Ross, John 

Rump, Charles 

Sage, (jrson 

Sheppard, James 

Thompson, James 

Textor, William 

Tebeau, Adolph 

M'oods, Simon 

AVittich, Charles 

Ware, George 

Yates, Leonard 

Shipley, Thos. E 

Brown, Amos 

CoTOstock, Charles E 

Castillo, George 

Cromwell, Joseph 

Cochran, Henry L 

Farris, AA'illiam 

Hayes, Patrick 

Kerr, John W 

Marker, Lewis L 

Manor, Eli 

Newman, Edward 

Palmer, John H 

Squires, Edward A 

Skinner, Almon.__, 

Thompson, Chas. H 

Van Norman, J. H 

Bragdon, L. H 

Brennard, Louis 

Curtis, Geo. H 

Chandler, Geo. F 

Enright, Michael J 

Hill, Thomas 

Justice, Jeremiah 

Solo, Isaiah 

McCabe, Robert 

King, Alvestin 

Redding. H. E 





si. 


Itank. 


■^ 


Corporal. 


18 


" 


20 


Musician. 


27 


Wagoner. 


44 


Private. 


45 


" 


18 


«' 


24 


" 


27 


(( 


45 


>( 


37 


(( 


20 


ii 


19 


" 


21 


" 


44 


(1 


18 


" 


40 


n 


37 


(( 


4.5 


(( 


2,5 


(( 


18 


" 


33 


" 


18 


(, 


23 


it 


21 


ti 


18 


il 


20 


(1 


24 


(( 


18 


il 


33 


" 


19 


(. 


19 


(( 


18 


11 


18 


(( 


19 


" 


21 


(( 


19 


il 


25 


11 


36 , 


11 


18 


11 


19 


11 


2« 


11 


19 


(( 


21 


(( 


22 


Musician. 


20 


Private. 


40 


11 


18 


11 


28 


" 


20 


11 


18 


(( 


36 


" 


28 


(( 


■?.?. 


11 


21 


" 


18 


(( 


26 


(1 


35 


" 


18 


u 


26 


11 


20 


" 


22 


Sergeant. 


33 


Private. 


18 


" 


IS 


(1 


22 


" 


19 


(( 


27 


" 


40 


It 


27 


Sergeant. 


21 


" 


32 


Corporal. 


23 



Dale of 

Entering the 

Service. 



Hemarks. 



Aug.15, 
Aug. 12, 
Aug.l3, 
Aug.13, 
Aug.16, 
Aug.22, 
Aug.l4, 
Aug.15, 
Aug.13, 
Aug.23, 
Aug.22, 
Aug. 12, 
Aug. 14, 
Aug.13, 
Aug.13, 
Aug. 15, 
Aug.22, 
Aug.13, 
Aug.22, 
Aug.22, 
Aug.15, 
Aug.22, 
Aug.l2, 
Aug.l4, 
Aug.ll, 
Aug. 18, 
Aug.15, 
Sept. 5, 
Aug.22, 
Aug. 14, 
Aug.15, 
Aug. 14, 
Aug. 12, 
Aug.l4, 
Aug.15, 
Aug.lS, 
Aug.13, 
July 29, 
Aug. 6, 
Aug.l2, 
Aug.22, 
Aug. 12, 
Aug.lS, 
Aug.lS, 
Aug.13, 
Aug.l4, 
Aug. 1.5, 
Aug.15, 
Aug.l9, 
Aug.13, 
Aug.22, 
Aug.22, 
Aug.lS, 
Aug.n, 
-lug.ll, 
Aug.l2, 
Aug.13, 
Aug.lS, 
Aug. 8, 
Aug. 9, 
Aug.22, 
Aug.lo. 
Aug.22; 
Aug.20, 
Aug.lS, 
Aug.13, 
Aug.lS, 
Aug.lS, 
Aug.l4, 
Aug.22, 
Aug. 14, 
Aug.lS, 



1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1S62 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
]8(i2 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 



Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Twenty-Third Corps train. 

Mustered out with company. 

Clustered out with company. 

Clustered out with company. 

Clustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

In general hospital; mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

AVith supply train; mustered out with company. 

On furlough: mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Captured November, 1864; not heard from. 

^Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Miistered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Mustered out with company. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Wounded at Huff's Ferry, Tenn.; discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Discharged. 

Wounded at Atlanta, July, 1864; discharged. 

Wounded at Atlanta, July, 18()4; discharged. 

AVounded at Atlanta, July, 1864; discharged. 

Wounded at Atlanta, July, 1.864; discharged. 

AVounded at Atlanta, July, 1864; discharged. 

AVounded at Atlanta, July, 1864; discharged. 

AVounded at Atlanta, July, 1864; discharged. 

Transferred. 

Transferred. 

Killed at Franklin, November, 1864. 

Transferred. 

Transferred. 

Transferred. 

Transferred. 

Transferred. 

Died. 

Died; first death in companv. 

Died. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



199 









Date uf 






Names. 


-Rant, 


V 


Entering the 
ServUe. 




Bemarks. 


BoUinsin, Christian 


Private. 


37 


Aug. 1.5, 1862 


Died. 




Cooper, Horace A 


(( 


'lb 


Aug.1.5, 1862 


Killed at Stone River, 


Nov. '62. 


Cripliver, James 


it 


18 


Aug. 15 1.S62 


Died. 




Chappel, Stanton 


i( 


27 


Aug.1.5, 1862 


Died. 




Dufiy, John 


" 


4.5 


Aug. 15, 1862 


Died. 




Green, Zina 


(( 


28 


Aug.1.5, 1862 


Died. 




Fitzgeralil, Patrick 


it 


,S0 


Aug.22, 1862 


Died. 




Searles, Francis R 


'• 


18 


Aug.U, 1862 


Died. 




■Skinner, Isaac 


u 


28 


Aug. 8, 1862 


Died. 




Young, Adam 


u 


44 


Aug.l:-!, 1862 


Died. 




Welch, .fames 


(f 


29 


Aug.lo, 1862 


Died. 




Bailey, Samuel W 


" 


18 


Aug.22, 1862 






Comhs, Joseph 


" 


2.5 


Aug.22, 1862 






Fendon. Joseph 


ii 


18 


Aug. 13, 1862 






Smith, Jonathan 


(( 


23 


Aue.15, 1862 







ISAAC R. SHERWOOD was born in Stan- 
ford, Dutchess County, New York, August 1.3, 
18.35. His ancestors were among the very 
earlie.st of the early settlers of New England , 
Thomas Sherwood, with his wife Alice and four 
children, having set sail from Ipswich, Eng- 
land, in 16o4, but 14 years after the landing at 
Plj-mouth Rock. They belonged to that branch 
of the English family which entered England 
with William the Clonqueror, from Normand3-, 
1066. Records of Thomas Sherwood are first 
found at Westerville, later at Fairfield, Con- 
necticut, where he died, in 1655, as shown by 
his will, jDrobated that year. In their several 
lines, his descendants were prominent, as shown 
by the records of the "Standing Order," and 
the official lists of the Colonial Training Bands. 
They were a stalwart race, of powerful phy- 
sique, and great powers of endurance and lon- 
gevit}-; of firm, inflexible will and staid and 
sober habits. Isaac R. is a descendant, in the 
seventh generation, of Thomas Sherwood, as 
follows: Captain Matthew Sherwood, born 1043 
(Marj- Fitch); Captain Samuel Sherwood, born 
1680 (Eebecca Burr); Captain John Sherwood, 
born 1705 (Mary Walker); Captain Samuel 
Sherwood, born 1730 (Ruth Sherwood); Isaac 
Sherwood, a private in the Revolution (Drusilla 
Morehouse); and Aaron Sherwood (Maria Y'"ou- 
mans). In the maternal line he is descended 
from early Colonial families, except, that his 
mother (daughter of Peter Y'oumans and Anna 
Camjjbell) was of a Scotch family, which came 
to America near the close of the last century. 
Captain John Sherwood was a leader in the 
"Separatist" movement that followed the 
preaching of Eev. George Whitefield, and be- 



came the first Pastor of the old Stratfield 
Church, first gathered at his dwelling-house, 
October, 1751. While preaching he continued 
in command of the Training Band, and made 
himself fiiinous, on a Training Day, for defeat- 
ing a greased and nalced Indian, in a wrestling 
match, for which duty he had been formally 
chosen by his fellow-townsmen. Isaac Sher- 
wood, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, 
took up land in Dutchess County, New York, 
under the New Hampshire grants, prior to the 
Hevolution, and defended his rights with the 
" Green Mountain Bo3-s " under Ethan Allen. 
He served thi-ough the Eevolutioii with the 
Cavalry, and was of the body-guard of General 
Gates at the battle of Stillwater, 1777. He was 
a local magistrate and a member of the New 
York Legislature. Aai-on Sherwood, the father 
of Isaac R., was enrolled with the troops of 
War of 1812-15, and marched to the Hudson 
Eiver, but being unable for service, his brother 
took his place in the ranks. He was an inven- 
tor and 7iiade many improvements in mill and 
farm machinery. The father dying when Isaac 
E. was nine years old, his uncle, Daniel Sher- 
wood, became his guardian. He was a man of 
sterling character, a leading Democrat, and a 
member of the New York Legislature when 
Silas Wright was Governor. He exerted a 
marked influence upon his nephew, and dis- 
suaded him from entering West Point Military 
Academy. In 1852, Isaac E. entered the 
Hudson Eiver Institute, Claverack, New York, 
and in 1854 went to Antioch College, Ohio, 
which had a National repute under Horace 
Mann. After two years at Antioch, having 
read law with Judge Hogeboom, at Hudson, 



199a 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



New York, he entered the Ohio Law College, at Po- 
land, Ohio (later removed to Cleveland). Through- 
out his College days, he was a frequent contributor 
to the press. In 18.57, he located at Bryan, Ohio, and 
Iiublished the Williams County Gazelle, an intensely 
radical newspaper, which he put in full mourning 
when John Brown was hung at Harper's Ferry. 
April 16, 181)1, the day following President Lincoln's 
call for Volunteers, he left the office of Probate Judge 
and his newspaper business in the bands of others to 
enlist as a private in the Fourteenth Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, Colonel James B. Steedman commanding. 
He was with the advance guard over the West Vir- 
ginia mountains and was in the first battles of the 
war, at Laurel Mountain, Cheat River and Carrick's 
Ford. He was critically ill the summer after his re- 
turn, having served four months. He resigned the 
office of Probate Judge to .serve in the One Hundred 
and Eleventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was mus- 
tered in at Toledo with his Regiment, and made 
Adjutant September 8, 1862. Upon recommendation 
of all the officers of his Regiment he was promoted to 
Major, February 14, 1863. He commanded the Regi- 
ment throughout its entire field service, beginning 
with the John Morgan campaign in Kentucky, 1863, 
to the muster-out, embracing 31 engagements. In 
the East Tennessee campaign (Winter of 186.3-64), he 
shared all the hardships with his men. Without 
tents, short of clothing and rations, and exposed to 
pitiless storms of sleet and snow, they gave a new 
emphasis to their patriotism by oflering their services 
far another three years in the Veteran Enlistment, 
then progressing. During the 17 days' siege of Knox- 
ville and in the battles jireceding and following, the 
One Hundred and Eleventh, under his command, bore 
a gallant part. They covered the retreat of Burnside's 
Army from the Holstein River to .Strawberry Plains, 
and were three days and nights without sleep or ra- 
tions, harassed by Longstreet's Cavalry, as they fell 
back on Knoxville, fighting their way, step by step. 
At Campbell's Station, where the One Hundred and 
Eleventh, lying prostrate, supported Henshaw's Bat- 
tery, in that furious storm of shot and shell, Major 
Sherwood lost the hearing of his right ear from the 
concussion of a shell. For gallant conduct in this 
campaign he was complimented in the official reports 
of Colonel Chapin, Second Brigade, and General 
"White, Second Di\'ision, Twenty-Third Corps, and 
personally by General Burnside, at Campbell's Sta- 
tion, in the presence of the assembled forces. At 
Knoxville he was ordered by General Burnside to 
hold the One Hundred and Eleventh in readiness to 
strengthen any portion of the line attacked, and for 
seven days and nights they lay on their arms in the 
Streets, their rations reduced to bran bread, and little 
of that. In Longstreet's charge on Fort Saunders 
they went to the relief on the double-quick. Major 
Sherwood was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel Feb- 
ruary 2, 1864, and to Colonel, September 8, 1864. In 
the Atlanta campaign (1864), in which the Regiment 
was 90 days under fire. Colonel Sherwood was never 
absent from his Regiment, which bore a conspicuous 



part in those fierce battles. At Lost Mountain he 
commanded a Division of Skirmishers. He jiarticu- 
larly distinguished himself by riding at the head of 
the Regiment in the charge down the steep slopes at 
Resaca, where the Second Brigade lost 679 men out 
of the 1,300 who went into the first action. The prin- 
cipal engagements of this campaign were those of 
Rocky Face, Resaca (two days). New Hope Church, 
Dallas, Peach Tree Creek, Lost Mountain, Pine Moun- 
tain, Kenesaw, Nickajaek Creek, Chattahoochie, De- 
catur, Burnt Hickory, Atlanta (July 22 and 27), Utoy 
Creek, and Lovejoy Station. In the Hood campaign, 
1864, fought by General George H. Thomas, after 
General Sherman had set out on his March to the 
Sea, Colonel Sherwood, while in command of the One 
Hundred and Eleventh Ohio and Twenty-Foui-th 
Missouri, covered the retreat of Thomas' Army from 
the battlefield of Columbia (where his command par- 
ticipated) to Franklin, Tennessee. In the battle of 
Franklin. November .30th, his position was on the 
right of the i)ike, near the Carter house, on the left 
flank. His men fired 200 loundsof ammunition, and 
many of their guns were made totally worthless from 
long-continued firing. The lines on the left of the 
Regiment broke and their trenches were occupied by 
Hood's advance, but the command soon recovered, 
and when their ammunition was gone, tney fought 
with muskets clubbed and bayonets. Their colors, rid- 
dled to shreds, in many battles, were captured and re- 
captured, and are now in the State Capitol at Columbus. 
General Orders No. 7, of the Regular Army officer in 
command of the Second Brigade. Colonel O. H. Moore, 
issued at Nashville, Tennessee, December 2, 1864, 
contained the following: "The heroic spirit which 
inspired the command was forcibly illustrated b}' the 
One Hundred and Eleventh Ohio Infantry on the left 
flank of the Brigade. When the enemy carried the 
works on their left, they stood firm and crossed bay- 
onets with them, holding their ground." During the 
closing hours of the engagement Colonel Sherwood 
was in command of the Brigade. In recognition of 
his services the Ohio civilians in Tennessee presented 
him with an elegant sword, in a silver scabbard, aj)- 
propriately inscribed. The officers of his Brigade 
and Di\nsion forwarded a recommendation to the 
Secretary of War, asking his promotion, in pursuance 
of which President Lincoln made him a Brevet Brig- 
adier-General, for long and faithful service, and con- 
spicuous gallantry at the battle of Franklin. Colonel 
Sherwood commanded the Regiment in the two days' 
fighting at Nashville, and followed Hood's retreating 
army to the Tennessee River, near luka, Mississippi. 
From there they were transferred to Washington, and 
by Sea to North Carolina, participating at Fort An- 
derson, Town Creek, Goldsboro, and in the final sur- 
render, near Raleigh. In July. 1865, General "Sher- 
wood was ordered by Secretary Stanton to report to 
Major-Geueral Saxton, for duty in Florida, with the 
rank and pay of Brigadier-General, but he preferred 
to retire to private life, and was mustered out with 
his Regiment at Cleveland, July 15, 1865. In a fare- 
well address, a copy of which was presented to each 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



200 



Veteran of the command, he extolled their virtues in 
War, and urged them to be equally true to the issues 
of peace. Taking up his residence in Toledo, he was 
for some time a conductor of the Toledo Commercial ; 
and disposing of his interest in that paper, he was for 
a time on the editorial staff of the Cleveland Leader. 
In the Fall of 1S6G he resumed the i)ublication of the 
Bryan Pre»s, and in 1S08 was elected Secretary of 
State, and was re-elected in 1870, serving for four 
years. He organized the Bureau of Statistics and is- 
sued four annual reports, widely commented upon 
for their accurate exhibits. In 1872 he was elected 
to Congress from the Sixth Congressional District, 
and served on the Committee on Eailroads and 
Canals. From 1875 to 1886. he published the Toledo 
Journal. In 1S79 he was elected Probate Judge of 
Lucas County, and was re-elected in 1882. serving .six 
years. He is a member of the fraternity of Masons 
and Odd Fellows, and of For.syth Post, No. 15, De- 
partment of Ohio Grand Army of the Republic. He 
was one of the first members of the Society of the 



Army of the Ohio and of the Army of the Cumber- 
land, and contributed a War poem to the first Re- 
union of the former at Cincinnati, 1866. General 
Sherwood was married September 1, ISoi), with Miss 
Katharine Margaret Brownlee, daughter of Judge 
James Brownlee, of Poland, Mahoning County, Ohio, 
who early became associated with him in journalistic 
work. She contributed to leading periodicals, and 
has published a volume of patriotic selections, enti- 
tled "Camp Fire and Memorial Poems." Her verses 
appear in several standard volumes, including the 
" Union of American Poetry and Art," and 'Through 
the Year with the Poets." In 1883 she served as 
National President of the Woman's Relief Corps, 
Auxiliary to the Grand Army of the Republic, and 
for some years has edited the Woman's Department 
of the National Tribune, Washington. D. C. General 
Sherwood has two children — James Brownlee and 
Lenore Kate Sherwood. James H. Slierwood, of the 
Northwestern RepxMican.'W nuseon, Ohio, is a brother. 
Their mother still lives, aged 86. 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT 

INFANTRY. 

This Regimeut was organized as three years' 
troops, as other like comiiiauds iu the United 
States service. It was constituted December 
25, 1863, of four Companies before knovpn as 
"The Hoflfmau Battalion," raised in 1862, to 
which were added six new Companies, mus- 
tered in at Camp Taylor, Cleveland, January 
8 and 15, 1864. The Battalion had been mainh- 
on guard dtity at Johnson's Island since its 
muster-in. In the Fall of 1863, as the result of 
repeated alarms touching apprehended attempts 
for the release of the Rebel prisoners at that 
point, the force on guard was materially 
strengthened, in Artillery and Cavahy as well 
as Infantry. January 13, 1864, the First 
Brigade, Third Division, Sixth Corjjs, including 
five Regiments, arrived at Sanduskj', of which 
four Regiments, with General Shaler, were 
stationed on the Island, the other Regiment, 
with General H. D. Terrj', commanding the 
whole, stopping at Sandusky. April 14, 1864, 
General Shaler, with three Regiments, left to 
rejoin the Sixth Corps in the field ; other 
portions of the force leaving for Camj) Dennison. 
Soon after, the six new Companies of the One 
Hundred and Twentj-Eighth were removed to 
the Island, the Regiment then being for the 
first time united as one command, under Colonel 
Charles W. Hill, who, in May, 1864, succeeded 
General Terry in command of the Island. 
Troops of various commands were frequently 
arriving and departing. 



OHIO VOLUNTEER 



The One Hundred and Twenty Eighth from 
the first was kept under strict drill and disci- 
pline. The condition of the Island, and its 
docks, roads and barracks, demanded heavy 
work for the provision of means for defense, 
for proper quarters, sanitary needs, etc., which 
gave abundant employment for the troops sta- 
tioned there. The strength of the Regiment 
was seriously reduced from May until late in 
the Fall by detachments sent off and kept 
awaj- for long periods on special duty, thus 
devolving guard duty on comparatively a small 
force. 

As the result of constant alarms in regard to 
raids for the release of the prisoners and of the 
uprising of these, the construction of three 
Forts was undertaken by the Government in 
the Fall of 1864. One of these was on Cedar 
Point, mouth Sandusky Bay, o])posite the 
Island; and two on the Island. It was ex- 
pected this work would be performed bj^ hired 
laborers, but these were scarce and Colonel 
Hill found it necessary to employ his men for 
the work, the larger portion of which was 
done by them, at most inclement seasons, 
without extra pay, and at a time when other 
details made heavy drafts upon them. The 
result was the accomplishment of service highly 
creditable to the command. 

The often scattered condition of the One 
Hundred and Twenty-Eighth Regiment was a 
serious obstacle to due discipline and drill ; 



200a 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LVCAS COUNTY. 



yet these were maintained in liigh degree 
throughout. Many of its officers and men had 
served in the War, some having been discharged 
for disability ; yet for the particular service of 
the Island, they were well qualified. 

It was expected that upon the completion of 
the defenses at Sandusky Bay, the Eegiment 
would be relieved by other troops, and permitted 
to go to the field, which was earnestly desired 
by both oflicers and men ; but the collapse of 
the Rebellion prevented this. The honors of 
the command, however, were none the less, 
that it was not allowed the privilege so much 
desired, while faithfully meeting the important 
duties devolved upon it. In the Spring of 
1865, the number of prisoners was reduced to 
150, and on the 10th July, the Eegiment left 
the Island for Camp Chase, where it was mus 
tered oiit on the 17th. 

PARTIAL ROSTER THREE-YEARS' SERVICE. 

Tbis list is intended to include only the Regiuiental and 
such of tlie Company oiiicers and enlisted men as were from 
Lucas County. Ihe list, evidently, is not complete, but is the 
best that can be prepared from" the rolls in the Adjutant- 
General's Office, Columbus. 



Name. 



Charles W.Hill 

Wui. S. Pierson 

Edward H. Scovill 

Thomas H. Linnell 

Edward A. Scovill 

Thomas H. Linnell 

Junius R. Sanford 

Timothy Woodbridge _. 

Wm. Tripp 

Porter Yates 

John J. Manor 

Orlin S. Hayes 

Charles C. Starr 

Orlin S. Haves 

Charles C. Starr 

Geo. W. Hollenbeck 

Charles N. Stevens. 

Geo. W. Hollenbeck. __ 
Charles X. Stevens 



Rank. Age. Dale of Bank. 



Colonel. 
Lt.-Col. 



Major. 

a 

Surgeon. 

Asst.Surg. 

Captain. 

(( 

1st Lieut. 

t( 

a 

2d Lieut. 



Dec. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Mar. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Mar. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Nov. 

June 

June 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Sept. 

Mar. 

Jan. 

Nov. 



2.5,1863 
2o,lS63 

6,1863 
25,1865 
25,1863 
29,1864 
25,1865 
16,1862 

4,1864 

5,1864 
25,1863 
26,1865 
27,1865 
22,1863 
22,1 S()3 

8,1864 
29,1865 

5,1863 
23,1863 



COMPANY A. 



Nanif. 



Baker, John 

Chamberlain, O. N 

Clinton. William 

Coder, John 

Edwards, Hezekiah 

Richardson, Benj. F._. 
Williams. Geo. W _ _ 

Boyd, J.Wesley 

Burnam, Joel..' 

Clark, George 

Cavil, Henry 

Culver. Thomas 

Crossett, L. Miles 

Collier, Isaac 



Mank. 


Age. 
19 


Private. 


" 


35 


" 


24 


'* 


38 


(( 


32 


'' 


23 


Corporal. 


29 


Private. 


18 


(( 


21 


t( 


23 


" 


29 


a 


18 


" 


39 


(1 


29 



Date 0/ Hank. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



26,1864 
29,1865 
30,1864 
24,1864 
24,1864 
29,1864 
22,1864 
23,1864 
22,1864 
23,1864 
16,1864 
23,1864 
23, LSI 14 
23 1864 



^^ame. 



Dill, Lafayette 

Davis, Charles W._ 

Davi.'i, William 

Disher, Jacob 

Davis, Thomas 

Eddv, James 

Forsyth, Alex. C._ 
Gowman, George 

Howes, Samuel 

Haskill. Chauncy.. 

Hogle, Frank 

Heater, William 

Motley, Smith 

Morris, James 

Norcross, William. 
Wailer, Benjamin- 
Pike, Samuel C 

Reno, Moses 

Reno, Adam 

Reno, John 

Rufsnyder, F. B 

Stimson, Walter C. 
Smith, George A 



Private. 



19 
37 
20 
21 
18 
23 
18 
36 
35 
29 
18 
'^2 
34 
19 
27 
39 
33 
31 
23 
38 
35 
32 



Date 0/ Rank. 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

rVug. 

Aug. 
A ug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



22,1864 
22,1,864 
22,1864 
20,1864 
23,1864 
23,1804 
22,1864 
15.1864 
23.1864 
23,1864 
22,1864 
22,1864 
23,1864 
22.1864 
22,1864 
23,1863 
22,1863 
23,1863 
23,1863 
23.1863 
22,1863 
15,1863 
16,1863 



COMPANY B. 



Name. 


Bank. 


Age. 


Date of Sank. 


Allen, S. F 


Private. 


34 


Aug. 25,1863 


Buzzell, Nathaniel 




36 


Aug. 29,1863 


Lacv, Geo. W . _ . 




IS 


Aug. 24,1863 


Richeson, Daniel H 




34 


Aug. 24,1863 


Scott, Charles. .. . 




36 


Aug. 24,1863 
Aug. 29,1863 


Whiteman, Reason 




22 


Wright, John W 




26 


Aug. 29,1863 


Brimacoinb, John 




25 


Aug. 22,1863 


Dech, Daniel. . 




18 
31 


Aug. 23,1863 


Ireland, Hezekiah 


Aug. 22,1863 


Lester, Alonzo 




35 


Aug. 22,1863 


Mvres, Emerv. . 




33 

38 


Aug. 23,1863 


Wilnor, Leroy.. . . 


Aug. 20,1863 


Mercerson, Chas. W _. 




18 


Aug. 22,1863 


Miller, Francis 




29 


Aug. 23,1863 


Alurdock, John. 




''2 


Aug. 23,1863 


Piukerton, Horace 




If) 


Aug. 22,1863 


Roberts, ( hauncy H ._ 


" 


29 


Aug. 22,1863 


Robinson, George 




27 


Aug. 22,1863 


Robinson, Daniel _ . 




43 


Aug. 23,1863 


Reed, Charles 




18 


Aug. 23,1863 


Shepler, Pius L 




29 


Aug. 23,1863 


Sloan, Horatio C 




28 


Aug. 15,1863 


Whiton, Josiah B 




38 


Aug. 19,1864 


Wall, J. V 




22 


Aug. 14,1864 



COMPANY C. 



Name. 



Alex. M. Samuel 

Ballever, Aaron 

Mahlon, Paul R 

Alexander, Chas. H 

Hinsdale, E. R 

Miller, Conrad 

Maloy, Wm. A 

Peters, Wm 

Williams, George W... 

Hamilton, P. H 

Norcross, Jos. 0. (died). 



Jia7ik. 


Age. 


Sergeant. 


19 


Private. 


24 




21 




45 




31 




27 




28 




30 




20 




21 




19 



May 
Mav 
May 
June 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Julv 
May 
Aug. 



1862 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1862 
1862 
1864 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



201 



COMPANY D. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Age. 

34 
23 
36 
29 


DaieoS Sank. 


Gaskill, William 

Knight, Wra. K 

Kenyon, \Vm 

Myers, Otto 


Private. 


Aug. 23,1864 
Aug. 22,1864 
Aug. 23,1864 
Aug. 17,1864 



COMPANY G. 



Name. 



Nor. N. Allen 

L. P. DuBois 

Albert A. Legg 

George A.Wood 

Milton J. Justice 

AVillard Houghton .__ 

Joseph Stelzell 

Jon. H. Adams 

James F. Eaton 

AVm. C. Britton 

Jeremiah Loucke 

Timothy Felt 

Adams, Joseph 

Allen, John 

Auspaugh, Henry . 

Brailey, John 

Brailev, Elijah 

Bliss, Robert A 

Bamberger, John 

Brown, John A 

Campbell. Svlvanus 

Caster, Eli E" 

Delarber, John 

Davis, John W 

Donovan, John 

DiUman, Augustus C_. 

Fleig, Anton 

Friend, Henry 

Gignac, Napoleon 

Gillett, Joseph 

Griffin, Benj. F 

Graves, Conrad 

Greenman, Samuel 

Gitner, Marshall 

Gordon, Daniel 

Hall, John 

Harroun, Henry 

Harrigan, Daniel 

Heath, Francis M 

luscho, Edwin 

Jones, Iloyal C 

Kellv, Francis M 

Kelly, Eli..„ 

Kendall, George 

King, Elias O 

Kirk, Joshua 

Krist, Michael 



Bank. 


Age. 


Date of Rank. 


Sergeant. 


18 


Dec. 


9,1863 


" 


26 


Dec. 


19,1863 




22 


Dec. 


16,1863 




27 


Dec. 


8,1863 


Corporal. 


34 


Dec. 


19,1863 


(( 


22 


Dec. 


17,1863 


*' 


38 


Dec. 


24,1863 


'* 


19 


Dec. 


5,1863 




25 


Dec. 


16,1863 


(( 


24 


Dec. 


8,1863 


" 


25 


Dec. 


14,1863 


Musician. 


29 


Dec. 


9.1863 


Private. 


30 


Dec. 


4,1863 


u 


24 


Dec. 


16 1863 


(1 


'>2 


Aug 


24,1864 


il 


33 


Dec. 


4,1863 


ii 


21 


Dec. 


14,1863 


*' 


22 


Dec. 


11,1863 


(C 


32 


Deo. 


15,1863 


11 


99 


Dec. 


14,1863 


il 


18 


Dec. 


9,1863 


il 


21 


Dec. 


9.1863 


(( 


27 


Dec. 


14,1863 


" 


25 


Dec. 


4,1863 


a 


22 


Dec. 


12,1863 


" 


19 


Dec. 


8,1863 


(( 


22 


Dec. 


1.5,1863 


11 


23 


Dec. 


21,1863 


11 


19 


Dec. 


14,1863 


a 


29 


Dec. 


15,1863 


" 


24 


Dec. 


14,1863 


(( 


28 


Dec. 


16,1863 


11 


28 


Dec. 


16,1863 


il 


25 


Dec. 


9,1863 


*' 


36 


Dec. 


4,1863 


il 


27 


Dec. 


19,1863 


11 


22 


Dec. 


17,1863 


t( 


24 


Dec. 


12,1863 


n 


•>o 


Dec. 


14,1863 


" 


26 


Dec. 


16,1863 


" 


33 


Dec. 


8,1863 


It 


18 


Dec. 


26,1863 


*' 


24 


Dec. 


16,1863 


" 


36 


Dec. 


15,1863 


il 


20 


Dec. 


7,1863 


11 


28 


Dec. 


18,1868 


il 


35 


Dec. 


16,1863 



Name. 


Sank. 


Age. 


Date of Sank. 


Mills, Wm. S 


Private. 


23 


Dec. 11,1863 


Miley, Thomas 


ft 


21 


Dec. 17,1863 


Mar.sh, Henry _i 


(( 


23 


Dec. 17,1863 


Mannon, Jacob G 


" 


19 


Dec. 8 1863 


Mclntyre, Porter W 


(( 


20 


Dec. 12,1863 


Patton, James D 


it 


24 


Dec. 14,18(i3 


Peabody, James B 


" 


19 


Dec. 14,1863 


Peabodv, Jolin S. M 


(( 


22 


Dec. 11,1863 


Phillips, John 


u 


23 


Dec. 11,1863 


Paulson, William N 


(t 


27 


Dec. 7,1863 


Paulson, James 


(( 


19 


Dec. 17,1863 


Peron, John. . __ 


u 
li 


36 
19 


Dec. 19 1863 


Renlapaugh, John. 


Dec. 12,1863 


Rejiass, (icrard A 


(( 


18 


Dec. 9,1863 


Rodd, Charles 


(( 


19 


Dec. 14,1863 


Shanley, George 


(1 


28 


Dee. 10,1863 


Shank, Henry _ ... _ 


'* 


•}'> 


Dec. 11,1863 


Showman, John H 


(( 


23 


Dec. 21,186;! 


ShuU, Isaiah.. .... . 


11 


23 

21 


Dec. 18,1863 


Smith, Edwin 


Dec. 2:), 1863 


Spaulding, William 


'* 


24 


Dec. 9,1863 


Stough, Henry. 


(( 


09 


Aug. 2:',, 1864 


Thompson, Samuel 


(i 


36 


Aug. 31,1864 


Wales, William R 


** 


18 


Dec. 18,1863 


Wales, Ralph W 


1( 


20 


Dec. 26,1 SI i3 


Watson, William 


'* 


22 


Dec. 17,1863 


Weston, John H 


•' 


,34 


Dec. 14,1863 


Wickwire, Alfred S 


(( 


34 


Dec. 18,1863 


Morton, Helon C 


Corporal. 


26 


Dec. 19,1863 


Young, Charles 


Musician. 


18 


Dec. 4,1863 


Brown, Oscar A 


Private. 


24 


Dec. 11,1S(;:! 


Cunningham, Geo. W__ 


'(( 


28 


Dec. 14,1.S(;3 


Coe, Henry B.. ... . 


u 


28 
43 


Dec. 19,186;', 


Rathburn, Francis 


Dec. 4.186:; 


Spaulding, John 


(( 


34 


Dec. 9,186;; 


Boyd, Weslev J 


(1 


18 


Aug. 2;;,is64 


Collier, Isaac 


(( 


29 


Aug. 2;;,is64 


Heiner, Jacob F 


IstSergt. 


24 


Dec. 8.1S63 


Bale, William (died). .. 


Private. 


38 


Dec. 8,186;; 


Smith, John (died) 


t( 


19 


Dec. 14,1863 


Bates, Charles F 


a 


38 


Dec. 2,1863 


Beckwith, Francis 


(( 


IS 


Dec. 17.1863 


Roberts, Frank 


(t 


28 


Dec. 24,1863 



COMPANY I. 



Name. 



Higher, Hugh 

Overmire, Washington. 

Stickney, Malcom 

Van Houten. Peter 

Crosby, Thomas W 

Bird, William 

Fields, Hiram 

Mayer, Albert 

Woolever, William 

Thomas, David 



Sank. 



Private. 



Corporal. 
Private. 



ilge. 



Datr of Sank. 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



26,1863 
28,1863 
28,1863 
2;?,lS(i;! 
22,1S(>3 
22,1863 
22,1863 
22,1863 
22,1863 



Aug. 2:5,1864 



ONE HUNDEED AND THIETIETH EEGIMENT, OHIO VOLUNTEEE INFANTEY. 



Since the preceding history of thi.s Eegiment the service May 2d, and was mustered out 

was printed (jwiges 109, 110), its roster so far September 22, 1864. 

aa Lucas County is concerned, has been ob- Note.— Casualties are noted as follows: *Died; 

taiued as here given. The command entered t discharged ; t rejected ; J captured. 



202 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



ROSTER— ONE HUNDRED DAYS' SERVICE. 



Names. 



Charles B. Phillips.. 

John Faskin 

Elijah B. Hall 

.SaiMUul S. Thorne 

James W. Alderman 

Minot I. Wilcox 

Calvin Hathawav 

Will B. Dix ". 

Will H. Burritt 

William Barge 

James B. Carpenter. . 

John B. Fella 

George T. Watson 

Volney Moore 



Bank. 



Colonel 

Lieut. Colonel-. 

Major 

Surgeon 

Chaplain 

Quarter Master. 
Asst. Surgeon_. 

Adjutant 

Sergt. Major 

Sen. Musician.. 
Jun. •' 
Hosp. Steward. 
Com. Sergeant.. 
Q. M. Sergeant. 



COMPANY A. 



Name. 



Sylvester Brown 

Wesley Chamberlain 

James C. Messer 

John Mack 

Wm. Sexton 

Thomas Rideout 

Warren Whitmore 

Henry Munday 

Predorn Martin 

James H. Crane 

James L. Johnson 

James B. Ten Eyck 

Amos W. Crane 

Tou.ssaint Navarre 

John Campbell 

Myron H. Parmelee 

Lewis E. Bassett 

Arquett, Stephen 

Ackerman, I. Christopher 

Amies, Nelson P 

Brown, Augustus 

Bartlett, Gilbert 

Brown, Loren A .. 

Bean, William H 

Bean, We.sley 

Burt, Edward 

Brown, John L 

Britton, Bradford 

Buckley, Azel 

Blanch, Phihp 

Branisch, John 

Cunningham, Wm* 

Chamberlain, Robert V__., 

Consaul, Lewis 

Danzey, John .__ 

Debolt, Amos M 

Delge, Oliver 

French, James E 

Gaetz, .lacob F 

Gardner, Nathan 

Gilson, George W 

Hoyt, Noah 

Hoereing, John 

Hunt, Luther 

Hart, Martin L 

Jones, Lucerne 

Kohner, Henry 

Mosher, Eugene 

Moore, Trayton 



Rank. 



Ca >tain. 


43 


1st -jeut. 


41 


2d Lieut. 


28 


1st Sergeant. 


22 


Sergeant. 


30 


" 


39 


(f 


20 




28 


Corporal. 


27 


(( 


30 




24 


C( 


25 


<f 


25 


(i 


30 


a 


27 


Musician. 


14 


(1 


14 


Private. 


41 


(( 


33 


4( 


22 


(( 


33 


t( 


18 


(( 


31 


tl 


28 


(( 


18 


(( 


29 


(( 


44 


(( 


21 


(( 


21 


(( 


30 


(( 


26 


cc 


30 


(i 


21 


(( 


22 


n 


35 


(( 


23 


i( 


27 


t( 


33 


(( 


30 


(( 


43 


tl 


18 


it 


35 




35 


(( 


31 


a 


18 


n 


25 


n 


27 


a 


21 


ii 


31 



Age. 



44 
43 



32 
29 
35 
25 
24 



Age. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Age. 


Momenee, Peter 

Mosher, De Witt. 


Private. 


36 

18 


Moon, James A 

Myers, Charles. 


40 
20 


Navarre, Samuel 

OhiLStead, Theodore 

Porter, Peter B._ .. . 


29 
19 
40 


Phelps, Henry L. _ 


28 


Reed, Thomas. _ . . _ 


32 


Rideout, James 

Roberts, Cutler H 

Raymond, Wm. H 


43 
30 
21 


Russell, Joseph M. . ._ 


22 


Skidmore, Russell I 

Suzor, Fred 

Sauter, Gephardt 

Sohuie, Henrj' . 


37 
26 
39 
29 


Scott, Michael . 


18 


Smith, Leonard . _ 


42 


Sherwood, EnosD.* 

Shipman, Henry.. 


18 
20 


Thorp, John... . 


42 


Tavlor. Lewis 


32 


Topliff, Theodore 


20 


Vinal, Joshua 

Wynn, John L 

Ward, William . . 


18 
32 
33 


Waterbury, Chas. H 

Wynn, Samuel 

Warren, John J 

Wales, Andrew J. 


19 
37 
18 
21 


Warren, Silas H 

Walter, Ernst t 


37 
35 


Young, Samuel 


36 


Yaslin, Jacob . 


30 







COMPANY B. 



Nam^s. 


Rank. 


Age. 


Dan. A. Collins 


Captain. 

1st Lieutenant. 

2d Lieutenant. 

1st Sergeant. 

Sergeant. 
i( 

(( 

(( 

Corporal. 

(( 
(( 
(t 

(( 

a 

Musician. 

Private. 

It 

(( 
(( 

a 
(( 
t( 

(f 


26 


William C. Cheney 

Frederick Ingold.." 

Don A. Pease 

E. M. Hamilton.. 


44 
35 
36 

21 


Edwin Jacoby. 


29 


Charles V. Lincoln 


37 


William M. Uiithank 

Con. Burke 

George R. Rickets 
Fred. S. Hamlin*.. 


38 
38 
32 
21 


Sylvester F. Ensign ... 
John H. Wood. 


37 
22 


Philip Ringleman 


18 


Jacob Eng chart 

Charles S. Brooks 

Robert G. Branson 


28 
20 
15 


Wm. M. Woodruff 

Allen, Moreaut 


15 
47 


Allen, John C 


18 


Avery, George S.._ 


18 


Barnes, Henrv G .. 


24 


Bartlett, Matthew 


24 


Belknap, Henry 


24 


Buck, Thomas W 


23 


Babington, Mitchell 

Bowker, James J 


18 
18 


Butler, Samuel 


21 


Bell, John M 


23 


Beck, Samuel. _ . 


37 







I 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION ~ FIELD WORK. 



203 



Name. 



Hank. 



Cooper, John 

Croswell, Charles 

Dooley, James W 

Diebel, Charles 

Diebel, Frederick 

Dages, William 

Diefeuthaler, George 

Fuller, Orson A* 

Frazer, James 

Fiske, Charles H 

Gray, Andrew 

Gilbert, George C 

Goettell, Christopher .. 

Ginder, Isaac 

Gwinner, Gustav A 

Hunker, Andrew J 

Hoyt, Charles 

Heritage, James 

Hatz, Sebastian 

Harbauer, John 

Kraft, Anton 

Kruse, Albert 

Krousberger, Louis 

Ketcham, Nicholas T 

Kirschner, John 

Kasdorf, Christian 

Lewis, Adelbert 

Meisner, James 

Mullen, Patrick 

Metzger, John C 

Mertz, Charles F 

Obist, Christian* 

Oberly, Paul 

Parcher, William H 

Parcher, Zachary 

Pratt, Martin L 

Koth, George 

Ruppel, Conrad 

Ruchert, George 

Southard, Wesley C _„ 

Sallis, John 

Samson, Louis 

Stephan, Edward 

Tinker, Alonzo E 

Tourtellotte, Arthur D_ 

Trimble, Nelson 

Weed, AVilliamS 

Wernert, Anton 

Young, Henry 

Bailey, Sanford L. 

Harris, William C 



Private. 



COMPANY C. 



Age. 



Name. 



19 
20 
36 
34 
36 
27 
33 
25 
20 
32 
18 
20 
18 
32 
47 
20 
20 
38 
31 
32 
25 
27 
44 
44 
40 
20 
20 
19 
19 
IS 
18 
31 
20 
18 
18 
43 
33 
45 
22 
42 
25 
22 
30 
18 
32 
18 
24 
19 
35 
30 



Names. 


Jiank. 


Age. 


Richard Waite 


Captain. 

Ist Lieutenant. 

2d Lieutenant. 

1st Sergeant. 

Sergeant. 

(( 
Corporal. 


33 


William B. Messinger 

John J. Barker 

Fred. B. Shoemaker 

George Durringer , . 


29 
32 
20 
25 


John Nagley 

Henry G. Totten 


20 

40 


Horatio S. Young 


21 


Charles H. CoflBn 

Elijah G. Crane _ 


23 
33 


Fred'k W. Madenburg 

Edwin Sexton 


32 
19 


Fred'k A. Stevens . -_ 


18 


Ralph H. Waggoner 

Fred'k P. Waite 


21 

20 







Rank. 



Age. 



Conrad Weil. 

Frank T. Dewey 

R. Stanley Thurston 

Abbott. George F 

Ansbangh, John 

Babington, Henry 

Bayne, William H 

Beardsley, Douglas S 

Bertrand, Richard K 

Breed, George S 

Burwick, Fritz 

Cranker. Jacob 

Curran, Allen 

DeBolt, Franklin J 

Dustin, CharU'S 

Edmonds, Joseph A 

Fitch, John W 

Freeman, Benjamin F 

Freeman. George W 

Fresch. Frank 

Gray, Edward 

GrLswold, Fred'k W 

Harwood, Franklin 

Haskel, Fred'k 

Hopkins, Livingston S 

Jones, Lewis B 

Kaurmeyer, John 

Kerchmain, Theodore 

King, George E 

Lane, Samuel G 

Langenderfer, Joseph 

Maurer, Andrew 

Merickel, Lewis 

Merrill, Morris O 

Miller, John, Jr 

Miller, John W 

Mills, John 

Nichols, Francis L 

Norton, Edwin 

Raines, Howard 

Reinboldt, Henry 

Root, Miles C 

Sanderson, Myron P 

Sheys, Pleury B 

Steele, George A 

Thurston, Carl 

Van Nest, William H ' 

Viess, Ezrom L 

Watson, Samuel 

AVestmyer, Richard J 

Witker, Fred'k 

Williams, Elislia C 

Williams, Mark H .. 

Winfield, Thomas E 

Withee, Newell 



Corporal. 
Musician. 

a 

Private. 



COMPANY E. 



23 

14 

13 

20 

22 

18 

23 

22 

25 

18 

2!) 

44 

31 

35 

21 

18 

20 

27 

18 

22 

32 

21 

20 

18 

21 

27 

22 

23 

21 

32 

39 

26 

20 

23 

29 

19 

40 

45 

21 

18 

18 

30 

21 

26 

18 

19 

22 

18 

22 

23 

19 

22 

21 

20 

21 



Nairn. 


Sank. 


Age. 


George W. Reynolds, jr 


Captain. 

1st Lieutenant. 

1st Sergeant. 

Sergeant. 
(1 

n 

Corporal. 


27 
35 


George H. Blaker 

James M. Wolcott 


28 
23 


Charles Everett 

Halsey C. Garritt . 


23 
20 


David Perrin 


27 


Oscar S. DeWolf ._. 


30 


Ant. Gignac. _ 


25 


Homer Dabin 


36 


Charles Cherry 


28 



204 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Namts. 



Ed. Mallett 

John Winsler 

Frank Hamilton 

George Lucas 

Sumner Spaulding 

James F. Clark 

Brenemane, John 

Bremer, John 

Briggs, Walter 

Burrett, Wm. H 

Burge. William 

Brown, Thomas 

Burge, Robert 

Broadbeck, Martin 

Easier, Jacob 

Coehne. Frederick 

Connelly, Marcus 

Cook, Milton 

Creps, David 

Cooper, James B 

Calkins, Robert K 

Cass, James B ..- 

Chapman, Robert C 

De Mott, Samuel 

Dyer, Edward R 

Driftmyer, Frederick 

Erenbeck, Benj 

Edmonds, James 

Frost, William B 

Flowers, Peter 

Fox, Jacob 

Forsythe, William 

Frank, John 

Geer, Amos 

Gilbert, Elias 

Hahn, Bennett 

Howe. Edward 

Hackinsmith, John G 

Johnson, Harlow L 

Klerter, Frederick 

Keyes, Edward E 

Lucas, James F 

Lloyd. Edward S 

Limbrick, John 

Mivch, George 

Minnis, John 

Martin (or Marlton), John,. 

McKinney, Allen 

Myers, Wm. H 

Miley, Wm. C 

Miley, Henry AV 

Moses, Kimball A 

Moses, Frank A 

Nechl'en, Andrew 

Neveau, David 

Nuhfer, Jacob 

Neff, Jacob 

Neider, Philip 

Phillips, Merrett 

Perry, William 

Rekoss, Joel..: 

Richardson, Frank 

Reynolds, Russell N 

Rodgers, Holmes 

Ratz, Frederick. 

Sheffer, AVilliam R 

Sterrigg, Daniel 

Schwager, John 

Tibbitts, William 

Throny, John A 

Williams, Everett B 

Walters, Jeremiah 



Rank. 



Corporal. 


23 




21 


(( 


42 


u 


26 


Musician. 


33 


** 


18 


Private. 


33 


'• 


35 


" 


42 


" 


24 


*' 


26 


** 


30 


** 


21 


a 


35 


'* 


22 


(( 


27 


•' 


25 


" 


40 


'* 


19 


(( 


20 


*' 


23 


t( 


29 


" 


23 


" 


18 


it 


39 


i( 


22 


*' 


19 


'* 


20 


'* 


21 


a 


32 


'' 


37 


'' 


44 


*' 


32 


'* 


18 


'' 


18 


*■ 


29 


*' 


30 


• ( 


34 


it 


26 




36 


it 


32 


" 


18 




18 


(( 


21 


(( 


24 




19 




28 




18 


a 


35 




20 


11 


27 


(( 


21 


n 


23 


'* 


21 




26 


It 


20 


it 


35 


" 


18 




30 




26 




38 




21 


n 


30 


** 


28 


(( 


18 




25 


ii 


28 




44 


" 


44 




18 


'* 


18 


(( 


22 



Age. 



COMPANY F. 



Nmnes. 



Louis Koeppel 

JohnC. Wuerfel 

Louis Rieger 

Otto Albert 

Wm. Gradolph 

George Hehner 

Charles Meissner 

Fritz Hennig 

Jacob Kraemer 

AVhi. Hempfling 

Conrad Pflster 

F. A. Gaetschenberger_. 

Thos. F. Palm 

William Entemann 

John M. Hauser 

George Stetter 

Christ. Martes* 

Louis Wacher 

Benz, Paul 

Buhler, Adrian 

Brown, Carl 

Beck, Fritz 

Bulan, Martin 

Beck, Jacob 

Damarier, William 

Dnrian, William 

Durian, E 

Emmick, Vincent J 

Englehardt, Henry 

Feldmann, Conrad 

Fella, JohnB 

George. Emil 

Gaetsenberger, Fritz 

Hoehler, Charles 

Hassenzahl, Wendell- _. 

Herrmann, John 

Haepl'el, Andreas 

Hacker, Henry 

Haussermann. Christ... 

Jacobs, Grist 

Josenhans, Fritz 

Kasdorf, Grist 

Koch, Max 

Kneciit, Charles 

Kruse, William 

Kiefer, John- 

Kern, Henry 

Kureth, Gottl 

Keller, George 

Lang, Michael 

Miller, Conrad 

Miller, John 

Mahr, William... 

Naegeli, John 

Naegeli, Matthias 

Naumann, John 

Ruhfeldt, Henry 

Rutishauser, John E 

Rieger, Franz 

Schmidt, I'ritz 

Schreidtiy, George 

Schaumloeffel, Henry. 

Smith, Louis jJ 

Schwartz, Fritz 

Strauss, John 

Sommer, Charles. 

Sloctier, John 

Schneider, Jacob 

Schmidt, Charles 



Ea7ik. 



Captain. 
1st Lieutenant. 


28 
23 


2d Lieutenant. 


24 


1st Sergeant. 
Sergeant. 


31 

24 
37 


a 


33 


(( 


42 


Corporal. 


35 
32 


(( 


32 


a 


35 


a 


36 


a 


26 


" 


31 


(( 


26 


Musician. 


26 


It 


29 


Private. 


33 


*' 


19 


" 


20 


(( 


20 


a 


19 


It 


20 


(( 


30 


a 


18 


(( 


43 


(( 


19 


n 


31 


n 


45 


ft 


30 


a 


19 


(( 


29 


" 


29 


(( 


27 


({ 


23 


({ 


44 


a 


33 


a 


29 


a 


27 


a 


42 


t< 


32 


(( 


22 


(( 


20 


a 


19 


(( 


23 


({ 


30 


(( 


26 


a 


28 


ii 


41 


t' 


40 


" 


35 


a- 


38 


*' 


50 


a 


42 


C( 


37 


it 


29 


'* 


28 


(( 


31 


11 


28 


li 


,26 


it 


20 


t( 


43 


(( 


34 


tt 


31 


ii 


24 


it 


23 


it 


23 


t( 


21 



.ige. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



205 



Names. 



Schlenker, Christ. „ 

Hfhwarz, Sel) 

Strauss, David 

Unbehauser, Clirist 

Von Cotta, Paul 

AVeibler, Christ 

Wcnsky, August _. 

Weiss, Charles 

Windischgratz, E. . 

Zimmer, Conrad 

Zwicljer, Jacoli 



Private. 



COMPANY G. 



Names. 



AVarren D. Moore 

Lyman H. Hendrickson.. 

Joseph Warren 

Isaac Thorp . 

Horace Tredway 

Joseph Printup 

Luther C. Lathrop 

James W. Sanderson 

Nicholas Young 

Lindsy Fletcher* 

William Phelps 

Wesley O. Cooper 

Henry H. Babcock 

James S. White 

Don A. Hendrickson 

Henry Chulep 

Abraham Johnson 

Francis .Sandaband 

Aerte, Philip 

Braunschweiger, Jacob ._ 

Beach, Malcom 

Beach, Marshall 

Blanchard, Albert D 

Comstock, Ambrose 

Covel, Oliver F 

Cherry, Martin 

Clark, Edmond 

Collins, Martin H___i 

Coucher, Louis* 

Champion, John 



Rank. 



Captain. 
1st Lieutenant. 
2d Lieutenant. 

Sergeant. 



Corporal. 



Musician. 
Private. 



Agi. 



Names. 



:;o 

44 
18 
23 
29 
34 
33 
4.') 
38 
3.5 
19 



Age. 



34 

31 

28 
26 
22 
30 
3.5 
19 
30 
21 
37 
26 
39 
34 
20 
22 
28 
15 
17 
39 
27 
24 
20 
33 
23 
28 
27 
23 
38 
18 



Dean, Leander H 

D.dpli, DeWitt C 

Decker, Clie.sli'r II 

Decker, Jacob, jr . 

Ed.son, Charles 

Ford, Wallace li 

Farley, Daniel H 

Ford, Lucius L. 

Ford, Eugene F 

Faxon, Herbert C 

tjrecn, Charles H 

Green, Henry 

Gardanier, Henry 

Gerhart, Armiel 

Grover, Menzo 

Gidley, John 

Gardanier, Abraham. . 

Green, Simeon, 

Gordon, James 

Geigle, Jacob 

Hassan, Araos 

Hollister, Hiram . 

Hug, Joseph 

Hauser, Chri.stopher 

Jordan, Frederick 

Kimball, Jared 

Kennedy, Theodore D_ 

Kapp, George 

Lester, Jackson 

Lewis, Eli 

Lathroi), James J 

Moore. Peter V 

McBride, John F 

Moore, Cscar B 

Miller, Joseph 

Miller, Henry 

Nalter, Jo.seph 

■Parker, John H 

Phelps, John 

Shay, Lewis 

Sawyer, Jud.son 

Sheller, Frederick 

Shule, Frederick 

Van Pelt, George 

Wilson, John ._ 

Wilcox, Albert 

Welch, George W 

Whitney, Milton A 

Witcer, Henry 

Young, Charles 



Sank. 



Private. 



Age. 



31 

26 
19 
27 
39 
20 
22 
27 
23 
IS 
19 
33 
33 
21 
21 
20 
18 
21 
26 
31 
20 
37 
46 
18 
36 
32 
18 
42 
32 
30 
27 
32 
28 
25 
18 
18 
38 
41 
30 
31 
18 
35 
28 
32 
22 
18 
21 
26 
19 
.33 



ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FOURTH REGIMENT, OHIO VOLUNTEER 

INFANTRY. 



This was one of the Regiment.s raised under 
the last call of President Lincoln for one year's 
service. It was organized at Camp Chase, 
Februarj- 21, 1865, whence it at once proceeded 
to Nashville, Tennessee, where it was engaged 
in garrison duty for a time, and then went to 
Chattanooga and to Bridgeport, March 21st, at 
which place it guarded a Railroad bridge across 
the Tennessee, as well as the Railroad track 
between Chattanooga and Bridgeport, a dis- 
tance of 30 miles. In such service it had fre- 
quent encounters with Rebel guerrillas and 
Cavalrj', capturing some of the enemy and 



losing a few men. .Tul3- 25th the Regiment 
moved to Edgefield for garrison duty, in which 
it was employed until mustered out of the ser- 
vice, September 20, 1865, wlien it returned to 
Camp Chase, and was paid and discliarged Sep 
tember 27th. The Regiment was composed 
largely of excellent men, most of wiioni had 
served two or three years. Its commander, 
Colonel Henry S. Commager, had won distinc- 
tion as Captain, Major and Lieutenant-Colonel 
in the Sixtj-Seventli Ohio, Ezra S, Dodd, now 
State Senator, was ^Major of the Regiment, and 
Judge David H, Commager a Second Lieutenant, 



206 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



ONE HUNDEED AND EIGHTY-NINTH REGIMENT, OHIO VOLUNTEER 

INFANTRY. 



Tliis Regiment was organized at Camp Chase, 
Alarch 5, 18(55. Four of its Companies were 
from the Toledo Congressional District ; one 
from Cincinnati ; one from Dayton ; one from 
Georgetown ; and one from Tuscarawas County. 

The field officers of the Regiment were as 
follows: Colonel, Henry D. Kingsbury, of To- 
ledo ; Lieutenant-Colonel, J. McDermott Roe, 
of Toledo; Major, Norman Waite, of Toledo; 
Surgeon, Sidney C. Gordon; Assistant Sur- 
geons, L. S. B. Otwell and Curtis Otwell. 

The Regiment left Camp Chase March 7th, for 
Huntsville, Alabama, arriving there on the 17tli. 
Seven Companies were stationed at points on 
the Memphis & Charleston Railroad, between 
Stevenson and Decatur, and engaged in build- 



ing stockades and guarding bridges. June 20th 
the Regiment was concentrated at Huntsville, 
performing post duty there until September 
25th, when it was ordered to Nashville, and 
there mustered out. Thence it proceeded to 
Camp Chase, and was there paid and discharged 
October 7, 1S(J5. 

As in the case of most of the Regiments 
raised during the last few months of the Rebel- 
lion, the One Hundred and Eighty-Ninth was 
not permitted to see much of the active service 
common to commands earlier in the field ; but 
it was out long enough for ofiicers and men to 
raauifest both their desire and their fitness for 
whatever of toil or danger might be involved 
in the defense of the Union. 



BATTERY H, FIRST REGIMENT OHIO LIGHT ARTILLERY. 



In the fall of 1861, largely through the efforts 
and influence of Harvey Kellogg, George W. 
Norton and others, the young men of Adams 
and adjoining Townships undertook the organ- 
ization of a Company for service in the Union 
Army. For such purpose, Mr. Norton visited 
Columbus, where he was authorized to raise an 
Artillery Company. This work was so well 
performed, that on the 18th September nearly 
a Company went into Camp Dennison, near 
Cincinnati, where they were re-enforced by a 
squad from Marietta, thus completing a Bat- 
tery, which came to be Battery H, First Regi- 
ment Light Artillery, Colonel James Barnett. 
Recruits entering the command later, were 
mostly from Toledo and vicinity, so that it 
eventually came to be substantially a Lucas 
County Battery. 

Leaving Camp Dennison January 20, 1862, 
armed with six bronze smooth-bore guns, it 
proceeded by River to Parkersburg, West Vir- 
ginia, and thence b}' Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 
waj', to Patterson's Creek. In a few days it 
joined General F. W. Lander's Division at Paw 
Paw Tunnel, Shenandoah Valley. The Battery 
opened, on the Union side, the first battle of 
Winchester, March 22, 1862. General James 
Shields, who succeeded to the command of the 
Division upon the death of General Lander, 
was wounded while on his horse, near the 
Battery's guns. Before leaving the field, he 



ordered Captain Huntington to begin firing. 
It was the Battery's first fight, and the men had 
good reason to be proud of it, that being the first 
time " Stonewall " Jackson had been whipped. 
The Battery now marched up and down the 
Valley, with Banks's Corps, taking part in 
skirmishes at Edinburg, Reed's Hill, New 
Market and Mt. Jackson. 

In May, Shields's Division crossed the Blue 
Ridge at New Market, moving rapidly to join 
McDowell at Falmouth. Without rest or a 
chance to "brush up,'' the Division Mas re- 
viewed by President Lincoln, who said he 
wanted to •' see the Boys who had whipped 
' Stonewall ' Jackson." The Division was hast- 
ened back to the Valley, being at Front Roj'al 
June let. Marching Soiith on the east side of 
the Shenandoah River, it was near the battle 
ground at Cross Ke3-s June 8, 1862, but could 
not join Fremont, owing to high water in the 
River. June 9th it was in the ugly little battle 
of Port Republic, where the Third and Fourth 
Brigades of Shields's Division (all Western 
troops), of about 2.400 Infantry, with 18 pieces 
of Artillery, undertook the task of stopping 
Jackson's Corps of about 20,000. The Division 
made so gallant a stand, that Jackson had to 
use about one-half his force to dislodge it ; and 
with such overwhelming numbers against them, 
General Imboden (with Jackson in the battle) 
in j)rint has admitted that at one time during 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK:. 



207 



the day, Jackson was reallywliipped,but made 
another eflbrt, wiuriing the day and the field. 
Battery H was complimented by General 
Shields for its efficient service on the field at 
Port Eepublic, in spite of the fact that it lost 
three of its guns. 

The Batterj' now went to Alexandria to re- 
fit — getting recruits, horses, and new three-inch 
rifled Eodman guns. It took part at the close 
of Second Bull Kun,at Chantilly, September 1, 
1862. For about a montli, it helped in the dis- 
agreeable service of defending Washington. 

In October, 18(!2,the Battery joined the Armj- 
of the Potomac at Harper's Perry, and with that 
command marched to Fredericksburg; getting 
into a lively skirmish at Manassas Gap, about 
November Ist. Taking part in the battle of 
FredericksT>urg under Burnside, December 
10th, nth, 12th, 15th, it there used nearly ],0()O 
shells. 

In January, 1863, the Battery was with ad- 
vance in Burnside's "mud-march" up the 
Rapid Ann River, being one of the few Bat- 
teries to reach the River bank, and be placed in 
position to cover the crossing. In the Chan- 
cellorsville campaign it was part of the force 
sent below Fredericksburg to cover the crossing 
of the Sixth Corps; and then with the Third 
Corps making a forced night march to Chan- 
cellorsville Saturday afternoon. May 2d, when 
Jackson flanked and crushed the right of the 
Army. The Battery, with Tenth and Eleventh 
New York Batteries, was near Hazle Grove, 
without support ; but bravely stood by its guns 
in tlie terribly desperate situation, checkingthe 
extreme right of Jackson's advance, and hold- 
ing open a road for the return of Sickles's Third 
Corps. For such timely service, the three 
Batteries were warmly, and witii much feeling, 
thanked by General Sickles on the spot, before 
the smoke of battle had cleared. With day- 
light Sunday morning, the Infantry went to the 
rear, with the two New York Batteries, leaving 
Battery H to hold the advance or exposed posi- 
tion at Hazle Grove, while the lines were being 
re-formed near the Chancellorsville House. It 
was a hot and lively place, but the Battery did 
not leave until ordered, and after losing three 
guns. When near the Chancellorsville House, 
General Hooker rode up to the Battery, saying ; 
" You have done splendidly. I saw you fight, 
and (lid not expect you could get out. You 
have done your share." 



The Division (Whipples' of the Third Corps), 
to which the Battery belonged, being badly 
cut up at Chancellorsville, was now broken 
u]), and H was placed in the Reserve Artillery. 
Staying there but a few daj^s, it was sent uj) 
the River on picket at Banks's Ford, with 
Ayres's Brigade, Fifth Corps. General Ayres 
had just been promoted from command of a 
Regular Battery, and he had the frankness 
to compliment the Ohio boys on their disci- 
pline, drill, etc., as he did not expect as much 
in a Volunteer Battery. Good autiiiirity and 
high praise. 

With Sikes's Division, Fifth Corps, as rear 
guard to the Army, was made the memoi-abie 
and fatiguing march to Manassas Junction via 
Catlett's, across Bull Run battlefield, joining 
the Reserve Artillery at Fairfax C. IT.. June 
17, 1863. It marched with the Reserve to 
Gettysburg, taking part in that battle, July 2d 
and 3d, in position on Cemetery Ridge, near 
where now stands the monument in the National 
Cemetery. It went into action under lire, 
taking the place of a crippled Battery, and 
staying until the fighting was over. Left Get- 
tysburg with the Reserve Artillery July 5tli, 
crossed the Potomac at Berlin July 18th, 
strolled along with the Army in Virginia heat 
and dust until August Sth, when it was sent to 
Rappahannock Station, to the Fii'st Corps; 
going into position on the picket line for more 
than a month, when it advanced with tiie Army_ 
to the Rapid Ann River, and was put on picket^ 
at Robinson's Ford, near to Cedar Mountain, 
for over two weeks, under continual fire, where 
it learned the full meaning of being ''in re- 
serve." In October, 1863, the Battery moved 
with the Army back to Centerville, and as the 
advance to Brandy Station. 

On Ohio election-day (October 13th), the 
Battery was on the march ; but the bovs organ- 
ized an Election Board, and voted for John 
Brough to be Governor of Ohio. It was unani- 
mous. The ''polls were opened " at ditterent 
hours, as the exigencies of the march allowed, 
the ballot-box being carried on the pommel of 
an oflicer's saddle. The result was, that the 
balloting took place in three difterent Counties 
of Vii-ginia. 

In the advance about November 4, 1863, 
the Battery was on duty at Kelley's Ford with 
the Third Corps. As a portion of the Reserve 
Artillery, it took part in the severe Mine Run 



208 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



campaign. It spent the "Winter at Brandy Sta- 
tion, where it was refitted with a liberal supplj^ 
of recruits. During this time, Captains Hunt- 
ington and Norton left the Battery. 

May 4, 18li4, the Battery, in excellent trim, 
entered the Wilderness campaign under Grant. 
Captain Dorsej- took command May IGth. The 
Reserve Artillery was then broken up, and 
Battery H became part of the Sixth Corps, and 
was with it at Spottsylvania, Phillips' Store 
and Jericho Mills. It was part of the troops 
making the rapid night march of 30 miles to 
get to the Pamunky Paver and Hanover Town. 
Reaching Cold Harbor, June 1st, in time to be 
the first Battery of the Sixth Corps in position, 
it opened tiie fight for them, and had very hard 
and exposed work for 12 days, when the Army 
moved across the James River, June 15th, near 
Wind Mill Point. With Getty's Second Divi 
sion, Sixth Corps, the Battery made a forced 
march for a night and day in the heat and sand 
for Petersburg. Immediately on reaching 
there, it was put in position on the front line, 
and for three days and nights had a hot time, 
fighting and digging, until all were fairly ex- 
hausted. It took part in the siege-work at 
Petersburg for some 10 months ; was in Fort 
Sedgwick (otherwise known as " Fort Hell "), 
at the timeand just to the left of where the mine 
was exploded July 30th. It spent some two 
months in that " Summer Resort," being close 
to the Rebel lines, and so hot a place naturally, 
that all agreed that it was rightly named. 
During the siege-work the Battery occupied 
Redoubts 13, 14 and 23 ; also. Forts Wilcox, 
Hayes, Keene and Connelly, taking an active 
part in the breaking of the lines near Fort 
Tracy, April 2d; and then was among the sur- 
plus Batteries sent back t(.) City Point, while the 
Army made the race for Appomattox, the sur-- 
render of Lee's Army, and - the end. 

In May, the Battery marched for Washington, 
passing through Richmond, Bowling Green, 
Fredericksburg, &c. Discipline was then slack, 
and the boys were gay and happy, as they 
'• went marching home." June 3, 18(i5, they 
turned in guns and horses at Washington. 
June 4th, they took cars for Cleveland, Ohio, 
where they were given a dinner ; and thence 
to Camp Taylor, where they were mustered out 
and paid off June 14, 1865. 

The fortunate escape of the Battery, with a 
comparatively small list of dead and wounded, 



considering the exposed positions it was so often 
in, is a matter of surprise and gratitude. Some 
half dozen of the horses taken out in 1861, were 
turned in at the close of the War — " unnamed 
heroes" and veterans. 

About 90 members of Battery H reached 
Toledo at 12:45 P. m. June 15th, with Captain 
Stephen W. Dorsey, and Lieutenants James 
Harris, William E. Perigo and William E. 
Parmelee, Jr. They were met at the Railroad 
Depot by the Union Silver Band and a large 
number of citizens, by whom they were escorted 
to the Dining Hall of the Island House, where 
a dinner had been prepared for them. The 
i-oom was ornamented with flags, banners, ever- 
greens and flowers, including the old flag of the 
Battery, bearingthe inscriptions, " W^inehester," 
" Chancellorsville," " Port Republic," " Frede- 
ricksburg " and " Gettj'sburg." Mayor C. M. 
Dorr, in behalf of the people of Toledo, wel- 
comed the heroes home, and thanked them for 
their long and gallant service. Rev, William 
W. Williams, Pastor of the First Congregational 
Church, by request, invoked upon the occasion 
the Divine blessing, when the meal was par- 
taken of with a zest. After dinner, the Soldiers 
wei'e escorted b}- the Band for a distance up 
Summit street, when they returned to the Island 
House, and soon departed for their respective 
homes. At the time, the remarkable exemp- 
tion of the Battery from sickness, throughout 
its service, was referred to, the same being 
accounted for by the almost uniformly excellent 
habits of its members, among whom there was 
very little of excess of any kind. Probablj- no 
other command was marked by greater care in 
that respect, the effect of which was so plainly 
noticed in the robust, vigorous condition of the 
men at the close of their long service. 

The members of the Battery were given a 
reception and dinner June 21st, by the citizens 
of Adams Township and vicinit}-. There w-ere 
present 1,200 to 1,500 persons. At 11 o'clock 
A M. the assembly was called to order, and 
Captain Norton asked to preside. Returning 
thanks for such compliment, he called upon a 
choir present to sing, when Elder Seeley ottered 
prayer. James W. Clark, of Toledo, delivered 
an appropriate address, welcoming the soldiers 
to their homes and friends, and briefly recog- 
nizing the distinguished services of the Battery, 
Rev. Mr. Page, of Maumee City, addressed the 
assemblage on the duty of citizens, FoUow'ing 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



209 



these exercises were a general interchange of 
social greetings between the Soldiers and citi- 
zens, and the disposal of the bountiful provision 
of food made for the occasion. 

The following named members of Battery H 
were killed, as stated : 

Private Jacob Jeager, Winche.';ter, March 22, 1802. 

Sergeant Edward Allen, Port Kopublic, June 'J, 1802. 

Private John ]McGill, Port Republic, June 9, 1802. 

Private Phillip Oshnaugh, Port Republic, June 9, 
1802. 

Private Lycurgus Bishop, died of wounds received 
at Chancellorsville. 

Private John Jones, died of wounds received at 
Chancellorsville. 

Private John Edmunds, died of wounds received at 
Gettyshurg. 

Private Henry Schram, Gettysburg July 2, 1803. 

Private Jacob Kirsh, Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. 



Corporal W. D. Perrin, Cold Harbor, June 1, 1864. 

Private Luther Search, Pctcrslniig, Jan. 18, ISO.'). 

Private Charles M. Cor.scr, died of wounds received 
at Petersburg. 

Private Noah S. Lockwood, died of wounds re- 
ceived at Petersburg. 

Following are statistics of the Battery: 

Names on the roll 202 

Killed and wounded in action 28 

Died in hospital and camp 1,^ 

Discharged at expiration of term of enlistment— 30 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificates 40 

Re-enHsted as veterans 40 

Detailed for secret .service at A rmy headquarters 3 

Detailed for .service in the Signal Corps 2 

Transferred to Veteran Reserves 9 

Promotions from the ranks to serve in Battery.. 7 

Promotions to other organizations 9 

Discharged at Cleveland, June 14, 1805 128 



ROSTER OF BATTERY H. 









Date of 






Names. 


Rank. 


"^ 


Entering the 
Service. 


Xemarks. 




James F. Huntington .. 


Captain. 


Nov. 7, 1801 


Resigned October 26, 1863. 




George W. JNorton 


'* 




Oct. 26, 1863 


Resigned March 21, 1864. 




Stephen W. Dorsey 


*' 





Apr. 13, 1864 


Mustered out with Batterv. 




George W. Norton 


1st Lieut. 




Nov. 7, 1861 


Promoted to Captain. 




George Davenport 


" 





Nov. 7, 1861 


Resigned January 7, 1863. 




Charles G. Mason 


u 




Mar. 12, 1862 


Resigned April 2(i, 1802. 




Albert G. Merrill 


(( 




Mar. 3, 1804 


Resigned October 12,1804. 




James Harris 


(( 


''I 


Feb. 8, 1865 


Mustered out with Batterv. 




William H. Perigo 


(( 


21 


Feb. 8, 1865 


Mustered out with Batterv. 




Thomas M. Bartlett 


2d Lieut. 




Nov. 7, 1861 


Promoted. 




Martin B. Ewing 


{( 




Nov. 7, 1861 


Promoted. 




Albert G. Merrill 


(( 




Sept.lo, 1862 


Declined promotion. 




Wm. E. Parmelee, jr 


** 


IS 


Aug.1.5, 1862 


Mustered out with Battery. 




Frank R. Reckard 


(< 




Jan. 7, 1803 


Promoted. 




William A. Ewing 


'* 




April 1. 1802 


Promoted. 




Albert Reagler. 


t( 




May 9, 1804 


Mustered out with Batterv. 




Lewis B. Maxwell 


i( 




May 2, 1805 


Mustered out with Battery. 




Silas H. Judson 


" 




Mav 2, 1865 


Mustered out with Battery. 




William H. Perigo. 


4C 




Junel4, 1804 


Promoted. 




Philenzo Norton 


Q. M. Sgt. 


21 


Sept.28, 1801 


Discharged on expiration of term. 




James H. Cooper 


** 


31 


Aug. 0, 1862 


Mustered out with Batterv. 




Edward Allen 


Sergeant. 


23 


Oct. 22, 1861 


Killed at the battle of Port Republic, June 9, I.S(;2. 




John H. Merrell 


ii 


20 


Sept.28, 1861 


Discharged on expiration of term. 




Luke Carr ._ 


(( 


33 


Sept.28, 1801 


Discharijed on Surgeon's certificate, June :',, I.S05. 




^Michael Best.. . 


<( 


23 

21 


Sept.28, 1861 
Sept.28, 180] 


Mustered out with Battery. 
Mustered out with Batterv. 




John E. Wilcox 




Phil. Simmons 


(i 


24 


Sept.28, 1861 


Mustered out with Battery. 




William D. Mann 


Corporal. 


20 


Sept.28, 1801 


Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, June 9, 1802. 




George I. Cooper 


(i 


26 


Sept.28, 1801 


Discharged on expiration of term. 




John W. Horton 


t( 


25 


Feb. 27, 1864 


Discharged to accept promotion March 3, 1865. 




Alonzo J. Thompson 


.1 


22 


Nov. 5, 1801 


Discharged to accept promotion, .\ugust 7, 1863. 




William II. H.Smith... 


(( 


21 


Oct. 24, 1801 


Discharged to accept promotion Deccml)er 4, I.S02. 




Samuel W. Cass. . 


" 


22 


Sept.28, 1801 


Transferred to Signal Corps. 




W. D. Perrin _ 


(( 


20 


Nov. 4, 1861 


Killed at Cold Harbor, June 1, isi;4. 




John W. Aikens 


(( 


27 


Sept.28, 1801 


Mu.stered out with Battery. 




Jasper Playden 


(( 


20 


Sept.2S, 1801 


Mustered out with Batterv. 




George Konimer. 


(( 


21 


Oct. 24,1861 


Mustered out w ith Battery. 




Cecil A. Hall 




18 
18 


Aug. .5,1802 
Aug. 11, 1862 


Mustered out with Battery. 
Mastered out with Battery. 




John T. Lucas..-.! 




Lemuel H. Hooker 


(t 


30 


Aug. 20, 1802 


Mustered out with Battery. 




Geo. F. Spencer 


(( 


21 


Aug. 5,1802 


Mustered out with Battery. 





t4 



210 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



Namei. 



John L. Wiltse 

Orin C. Dority 

J. Lansing Prav 

Herbert H. Walker.. 

Michael G. Tyler 

Ames, Newton 

Aikens, Alonzo S 

Aikens, Geo. W 

Bemis, Charles S. 

Brown, Wni. J 

Bayliss, Samuel 

firmer, Joseph H 

Briner, Wm. H 

Baker, Frank 

Burt, Theo 

Corlett, Wm 

Cooper, Amos 

Corser, Charles M 

Cass, Wm. H 

Cor.sou, Robert 

Canfield, Henry C.__ 
Connor, George M._- 

Cotherall, .Silas J 

Cass, Henry A 

Cook, .lames I) 

Clark, Wm. R 

Cassady, Geo. A 

Demolt, John 

Dodd, Henry W 

Davis, Charles F 

Davis, Sylvester 

Doyle, Michael F 

Eaton, Wm. F 

Eddy, N. Bennett 

Edmonds, John N 

Fletcher, Stillman 

Fitzgerald, M 

Foreman, Jacob 

Ferris, Albert 

Fisher, Louis 

Frish, Mathias 

Furgerson, Geo. R 

Grover, Eugene W 

Goodrich, Stephen 

Himmelspech, C 

Holloway, Geo. W 

Hooker, Geo 

Hetrick, Thomas C - _ 

Hill, James B 

Hopkins, Edwin P 

Hunker, John J 

Hutchinson, Wm. C_ 

Kidder, AVm. H 

Isham, Henry 

Isham, John. 

Jay, Samuel 

Jacobs, Lewis 

Jerome, Samuel C 

Jacobs, Edward D 

Jacobs, Spencer 

Jacobs, Gilbert 

Lewis, Fred 

Lewis, David 

Lewis, Adelbert 

Lutz, Nicholas 

Lewis, Casper F 

Lewis, Wm 

Lee, Martin 

Lockwood, Noah S 

Jerome, S. B 

Marston, Edward P 
McCord, B. F 



Sank. 



Corporal. 

It 

Bugler. 

Artificer. 
Private. 



21 
19 
25 
21 
25 
26 
21 
24 
20 
18 
33 
42 
19 
18 
33 
22 
18 
25 
20 
25 
28 
23 
22 
.30 
23 
19 
17 
21 
21 
21 
16 
18 
15 
IS 
23 
18 
20 
26 
37 
27 
17 
24 

21 
21 
18 
17 
IS 
24 
19 
19 
22 
20 
21 
24 
IS 
23 
24 
23 
32 
45 
25 
28 
18 
25 
IS 
20 
IS 
33 
27 
38 
20 



Date of 

Entering the 
Service. 



Aug. 6,1862 
Aug. 5,1862 
Sept. 28, 1861 
Aug. 6,1862 
Sept. 28,1861 
Sept. 28,1861 
Sept. 28,1861 
Sept. 28,1861 
Sept. 28,1861 
Nov. 5, 1861 
July 22, 1862 
Sept. 28,1861 
July 24, 1862 
Feb. 29,1864 
Jan. 24, 1864 
Sept. 28,1861 
Sept. 28,1861 
Sept. 28,1861 
Aug. 1,1862 
Dec. 17, 1861 
Feb. 28,1864 
Sept. 28,1861 
Sept. 28,1861 
Aug. 11,1862 
Feb. 3,1864 
Feb. 29,1864 
Nov. 11,1864 
Sept. 28,1861 
Oct. 26, 1861 
Aug. 9,1862 
Aug. 11,1862 
Feb. 29,1864 
Feb. 8,1864 
Feb. 16,1864 
Sept. 28,18(!1 
Aug. 6,1862 
Oct. 26,1864 
Oct. 19, 1864 
Aug. 11,1862 
Nov. 16,1864 
Nov. 17,1864 
Sept. 28,1861 
Sept. 28,1861 
Aug. 6,1862 
Sept. 28,1861 
July 26.1862 
Aug. 5,1862 
Feb. 8,1864 
Nov. 16,1864 
Oct. 26, 1861 
Oct. 21,1861 
Sept. 28, 1861 
Feb. 29, 1864 
Aug. 1,1862 
Aug. 5, 1865 
Feb. 13,1864 
Sept. 28, 1864 
Sept. 28, 1864 
Sept. 28, 1864 
Oct. 1.5,1861 
Oct. 15, 1861 
Oct. 29,1861 
Dec. 31, 1863 
Aug. 25, 1864 
Aug. 25, 1864 
Feb. 24, 1S64 
Feb. 27, 18(i4 
Feb. 29, 1864 
Aug. 11,1862 
Sept. 28, 1861 
Sept. 28, 1861 
Oct. 28, 1861 



Remarks. 



Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Transferred to Signal Corps. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Died June 5, 1.S63. 

Died Februarj', 1864. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Discharged at expiration of term. 

Discharged at expiration of term. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, December 26, 1862. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out \\\X\\ Battery. 

Blustered out with l?attery. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, July 1, 1863. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, March 22, 1863. 

Died of wounds. 

Died of wounds, August 2, 1864. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate, January 1, 1863. 

Discharged to accept promotion. 

jNIustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

IMustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out \\'ith Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Discharged at expiration of term. 

Discharged at expiration of term. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Died of wounds received "at Gettysburg. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Died at Annapolis, August, 1863. 

Died at Annapolis, August, 1863. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered tmt with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered nut with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Discharged at expiration of term. 

Mustered out v\ith Battery. 

Mustered out \\itli Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Discharged at expiration of term. 

Transferred to Navy. 

Died. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered ^mi with Battery. 

Discharged at expiration of term. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharged at expiration of term. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

IMustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Mustered out with Battery. 

Died of wounds. 

Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharge<l on Surgeon's certificate. 

Discharged at expiration of term. 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



211 







K 


Dale of 






Names, 


Rank. 


■? 


Entering tlie 
Service. 


Remarks. 




Murphy, Wm. H 


Private. 


20 


Oct. 28, 1861 


Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. 




Metzger, Wm. J 


" 


Ul 


Dec. 19, 1861 


Discliarged at expiration of term. 






i( 


18 


Aug. 6, 1862 
July 31,1862 


Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. 
Musten^d out with Battery. 




Morris, CUirenoe 


u 


18 




Maguire, John T 


(( 


30 


Nov. 3, 1864 


Mustered out with Battery. 




Millbrandt, Andrew 




28 


July 29, 1862 


Discharged on Surgeon's certificate. 




McMahon, Edward 


it 


80 


Nov. 7, 1864 


Mustered out with I?atterv. 




Majors, Roval 


K 


19 


Aug. 22, 18(i4 


Clustered out with Battery. 




Morgan, Avery 


'' 


21 


Sept. 28, 1861 


Mustered out with Batterv. 




INIoro^an Albert 


" 


"0 


Sept. 28, 1861 
Jan. 2, 1864 


Transferred to \'etcrau Keserve Corps, 
ilustered out with Battery. 




Norton, Charles ]\I 


" 


18 




Pierce, Wm. G 


(( 


21 


Feb. 12, 1862 


Discharged on account of wound. 




Radcliff, Will 


il 


21 


Feb. 24, 1864 


Mustered out with Battery. 




Search, Luther 




18 
19 


Jan. 29, 1864 
Feb. 16, 1864 


Killed. 
Died. 




Sibley, Mark E_ 




Scott, Albert E 


U 


19 


Aug. .■), 1862 


Mustered out witli Battery. 




Starrin, James H 


(( 


IS 


Aug. .5, 1862 


Mustereil out with Battery. 




Snyder, Geo. R 


'' 


2.5 


Feb. 8. 1864 


Mustered out with Battery. 




Scouteii, Albert 


ii 


20 


Feb. 8, 1864 


Mustered out with Battery. 




Stronj»", Fred 


(t 


:i6 
18 


Feb. 23, 1864 
Dec. 17, 1863 


Mustered out with Battery. 
Mustered out with Batterv. 




Starrin, Alpheus 




Smith, Thomas 


(( 


24 


Dec. 18,1863 


Mustereil out with Battery. 




Stevens, Henry K 


(( 


29 


Nov. 23, 1864 


Mustered out with Battery. 




Schenck, Charles 


(i 


23 


Nov. 16, 1864 


Mustered out with Battery. 




Starr, John . _ _ 


a 


21 
28 
19 


Nov. 16, 1864 
Feb. .5, 1864 
Sept. 29, 1864 


Mustereil out with Battery. 
Mu.stered out with Battery. 
Mustered out with Battery. 




Taylor, Amos C . _ 




Tourtellotte, E. E 




Wilson, Oliver C 


" 


20 


July 31,1862 


Mustered out with Battery. 




Waldroff, John. 




25 
22 


Aug. 6, 1862 
Aug. 6, 1862 


Mustei-ed out with Battery. 
Mustered out with Battery. 




Warren, Oscar 




Woodward, Henry F 


il 


16 


Aug. 6, 1862 


Mustered out with Battery. 




Vanness, Jacob M 


11 


38 


Aug. 7, 1862 


Mustered out with Battery. 




Visher, Edward E 


it 


20 


Feb. 22, 1864 


Mustered out with Battery. 




Brice, Harlow J 


li 




Oct. __, 1861 






Waldman, Jacob 


" 


23 


Nov. 1, 1861 






Wall, James 


(( 


21 


Oct. 21,1861 











TWENTY-FIEST OHIO INDEPENDENT BATTERY. 



The Twenty-First Battery was mustered into the 
United States service April 29, 1863. May 8th fol- 
lowing, Captain Patterson, with four guns, was sent 
to West Virginia, where he took an active and ardu- 
ous part in military operations in that section, when 
he returned to Camp Dennison. May 20th, the Bat- 
tery left Cincinnati, per Gunboat Exchange, as guard 
to Clement L. Vallandigham of Ohio, who, under sen- 
tence of a Court Martial, approved by President Lin- 
coln, had been banished to the Rebel States. It 
proceeded as far as Louisville in such service, when 
it was brought back to Camp Dennison. Here the 
Battery remained until John Morgan crossed the 
Ohio into Indiana, when it was taken to Madison, in 
that State, where four of its guns were placed on 
board steamers, to serve as patrol of the Ohio Kiver. 
In this way the pursuit of Morgan was materially 
aided, the boats keeping close along with the pur- 
suing Cavalry throughout. 

Septeml)er 22, 1863, the Battery started for Camp 
Nelson, Kentucky. Thence, October 1st, it proceeded 
to Gnienville, Tennessee, and was kept actively at 
work through the roughest portions of that State until 



January 16, 1864. At Walker's Ford, December 2, 
1863, it took prominent part in the fight, doing valua- 
ble service on the ranks of the Rebels. From that 
time until the close of the War, the Battery was on 
duty in Tennessee and Alabama, chiefly in guarding 
important fords and Railroad lines. July 21, 186.'), 
it returned to Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, Ohio, 
where it was paid off and mustered out of service. 

ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE. 



Name and Rank. 


Date 


of Sank 


Remarks. 


Captain — 








James W. Patterson.. 


Nov. 


13,1862 


Res. Mav 9. 1864. 


James N. Walley 


May 


2.5, 1864 


M. O.July 21, '6.5. 


1st Lieutenant — 








James N. Walley 


Jan. 


7, 1863 


Pro. to Cajitain. 


Harrison L. Holloway 


Nov. 


19,1862 


Res. Dec. 2:'., 181)3 


Wm. H. H. Smith __.. 


Feb. 


18, 18(>4 


M.o. Julv22,'(i5. 


John M. Raymond 


Mav 


2.5, 1864 


Died Nov. 18,'()3. 


2d Lieutenant— 








Wm. H. II. Smith.... 


Nov 


9, 1862 


Pro. to 1st Lieut. 


John M. Ravniond 


Jan. 


7, 1863 


I'ro. to 1st Lieut. 


Wm. D. Mann 


Feb. 


18, 1864 


M.o. July 21, '(i5 



212 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



THIED EEGIMENT, OHIO VOLUNTEER CAVALEY. 



This Eegiment was organized in September, 
18(11, at Camp Worcester, Monrocville, Huron 
County, and January 14, 18()2, moved to Camp 
Dennison. In February it proceeded to Jef- 
fersonville, Indiana, and tbence to Nashville, 
Tennessee, arriving there March 18th, and 
leaving on the 29th for Pittsburg Landing. On 
the march (April 4th) General Buell detached 
the P'irst Battalion, sending it to Lawrence- 
burg, Tennessee, against Biffle's Eebel Cavalry, 
which was met and driven from the town. The 
Battalion rejoined the Eegiment at Savannah, 
whence that force moved in advance of Buell's 
Army, reaching Pittsburg Landing April 25th, 
going into camp four miles from the Eiver. 
May 4th the First Battalion went an recon- 
noissance, marching as far as Monterey, and 
was ordered to cross Chamber's Creek, where 
the enemy was met and driven back to its 
main force. The Eegiment then moved within 
10 miles of Corinth, where a brisk enagement 
took place between the First Battalion and a 
Rebel force, resulting in the retirement of the 
Battalion. May 27th the Eegiment discovered 
the enemy in force on the railroad west of 
Corinth, engaged and routed them. 

June 1, 1862, the First Battalion was de- 
tached to join General T. J. Wood's Division, 
leaving the balance of the Eegiment at Cor- 
inth. The Eegiment was re-united June 19th, 
at Tuscumbia, lying there in camp until the 
30th, when it went to Mooresville, via Court- 
land and Decatur. It lay thei'e until Julj- 9th, 
when the Second and Third Battalions were 
ordered to Woodville, 30 miles east of Hunts- 
ville. July 13tb the First Battalion marched 
to Huntsville, going into camp there on the 
14th. On the 15th the Battalion went to 
Shelbyville, to defend that Town from appre- 
hended attack; and on the 18tli returned to 
Winchester. July 29th, Major Foster, with the 
Battalion and two companies of Infantry, went 
to Salem, and there captured from the enemy 
89 head of cattle. 

Leaving Winchester August 14th, the Divi- 
sion and Eegiment moved to McMinnville, via 
Manchester. On the 29th the Fir.st Battalion 
was ordered to cross the Cumbei-land Mountains 
to Dunlap, to ascertain the" enemy's jjosition. 
On the way Eebel messengers were captured, 
bearing dispatches from Bragg to Wheeler, 



then north of McMinnville. The force then 
returned to its Division. September 3d the 
Division marched to Nashville, arriving there 
the 6th, and the 7th marched to Gallatin. 
Leaving that point on the 9th on a forced 
march for Bowling Green, Kcntuckj-, to get 
there ahead of Bragg's forces, it arrived there 
on the 10th, after marching 34 miles f>er day. 
The 16th it marched for Munfordsville, en- 
camjjing at Cave City the 20th. On the 21st 
the First Battalion had a sharp engagement at 
Munfordsville with a Eebel force three times 
its number, and in three charges drove them 
into their works, losing two killed and 12 
wounded, while the enemy lost 38 killed and 
60 wounded. Among the Eebel killed was 
Lieutenant-Colonel Brown. September 22d,the 
Division marched for Louisville, arriving on 
the 25th. October 1st the pursuit of Bragg's 
Army was resumed, and near Beardstown the 
First Battalion of the Third Cavalry, re-enforced 
by two Companies of Second and Third Ken- 
tucky Cavalrj', attacked the enemy 1,200 
strong, but without success, losing .six killed, 
20 wounded and 17 captured. Major Foster 
being among the disabled. 

The Second and Third Battalions, under 
Colonel Zahm, during a portion of the Summer 
of 1862, were stationed at Woodville, Alabama, 
guarding a railroad. Eepeated attacks by 
Eebel guerrillas made this duty one of great 
activity and fatigue. An expedition under 
Major Paramore, to Guntersviile, on the Ten- 
nessee, resulted in driving the Eebel guerrillas 
from that section, with a loss to the command 
of six men killed and several wounded, the 
enemy suffering more severely'. For about 
four months this portion of the Eegiment was 
daih^ engaged in scouting and skirmishing 
with the enemj'. 

The Second and Third Battalions were now 
attached to the Second Brigade of Cavalry, 
under Colonel Lewis Zahm, and went into 
camp at Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This Brig- 
ade formed the rear guard of Buell's Army, 
and guarded its transportation in the pursuit 
of Bragg to Louisville. Colonel Zahm was 
highly- complimented by General Buell for his 
tact in bringing his trains safely through. At 
Shelbyville the Brigade engaged the advance 
of Cavalry of Colonel Smith's Eebel Arm^-, 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION ~ FIELD WORK. 



213 



drove them from the Town, capturing many 
prisoners. During the battle of Perryville the 
Third Cavalry was engaged with the enemy at 
the fording of the Kentucky Eiver near Paris; 
and after that battle it went into camp near 
Danville. October 19th a detachment of the 
Regiment under Major Ciiarles Seidel, with a 
portion of Fourth Oliio Cavalry, in all num- 
bering 250, was sent, under special orders from 
General McCook, to escort special couriers to 
Lexington and Covington, a forced march of 
40 miles. The force encamped near the old 
plantation of Henry Clay at Ashland. At 
daylight, October 20th, the camp was com- 
pletely surrounded by John Morgan's force, 
and made desperate resistance, but wore com- 
])olled to yield to superior numbers. After 
being stripped of their valuables and dis- 
mounted, they were immediately' paroled, sent 
into the Union lines and thence to Camp 
Chase, Ohio. Private Thomas Crofts, in a let- 
ter to his parents, stated that in the tight he 
was not more than 50 feet from the Eebel 
ranks. Nearly everv horse in the Company 
was killed or disabled. Edwin B. Carr, of 
East Toledo, and Charles H. Colerain^ of To- 
ledo, and F. M. Kent, of Bryan, were killed in 
battle. The forces engaged were 250 Union 
Cavalrj', and Morgan's 3,400 men and eight 
mountain howitzers. The number of men 
paroled was 198, beside officers. After the 
surrender Private Weis, of the Third Cavalry, 
asked to be shown General Morgan, when one 
among the Rebels wa.s ])ointed out as the man. 
Whereupon Weis at once drew up his carbine, 
and, before he could be disarmed, took aim and 
shot down the supposed guerrilla leader, who 
proved to be Charlton Morgan, a cousin of 
John. Weis was immediately killed by the 
infuriate Rebels. 

The remaining portion of the two Battalions 
moved from Danville to Bowling Green, and 
were stationed on the Railroad, with head- 
quarters at Fountain-Head Station. Morgan's 
force then occupied Gallatin. Colcyiel Zalim 
ordered out a detachment on a reeonnoissance 
toward Gallatin, to learn tlie enemy's strength 
and position, when Rebel pickets were cap- 
tured and the required information obtained. 
Tlie next morning Morgan's camp was at- 
tacked and his camp equipage and a large 
number of prisoners captured, Morgan hastily 
retreating across the Cumberland to Lebanon, 



Tennessee. Here after a separation of seven 
months, the throe Battalions of the Third 
Cavalry met under novel circumstances. Col- 
onel Zahm, not aware that the First Battalion 
was in the vicinitj-, on approaching (iallatin 
from the North, was attacked by a Cavalry 
force which turned out to be his own First 
Battalion, which mistake was probably the 
cause of Morgan's escape and the failure of 
the expedition, the firing between the two 
forces giving him notice of the presence of 
Union troops. 

From Gallatin the Regiment moved to Harts- 
ville, Tennessee, there going into cam]). A 
detachment, under Captain E. M. Colver, went 
up the Cumberland River to Carthago to in- 
tercept a large drove of mules and Rebel stores ; 
and after a chase of 26 miles — fording the River 
four times — the}- captured the train and drove 
otf 146 mules, killing three and capturing 17 
of the Rebel escort, including two quartermas- 
ters and a paymaster. In December this ])or- 
tion of the Regiment moved to near Nashville 
and were incorporated into the Second Brig- 
ade of Cavalry, First Cavalry Corps, Army of 
the Cumberland, under General D. S. Stanley. 
The First Battalion of the Third now rejoined 
the Regiment. December 26th the Regiment 
moved up with its Brigade and took position on 
the extreme right of Rosecrans's Army, near 
Franklin. On the 27th an attack was made on 
Franklin, resulting in completely routing the 
Rebel force remaining at that place. On the 
28th the Brigade engaged the enemy on Wil- 
kerson Turni^ike beyond Triune, and drove 
them with severe loss, the Brigade losing a few 
prisoners. At 2 A. m., December 31st, the First 
Battalion, being on picket dutj-, apprised 
Colonel Zahm of the advance of Bragg's Rebel 
forces. At four o'clock the skirmish-line was 
driven in and the Brigade attacked hy Wheel- 
er's Rebel Cavalry. After two hours' fighting, 
the enemy, through superiority of numbers, 
forced the main portion of the Brigade from the 
field, that command suff'ering severely in both 
officers and men. The enemy had captured 
McCook's Coi-ps ammunition-train, wlien the 
Second and Third Battalions, Third Oiiio, after 
withstanding the shock of battle, remained at 
their posts, made a gallant dash and recaptured 
the train, killing a number of Rebels and 
horses, and taking 140 prisoners. On that daj- 
the Regiment lost 13 men killed and a large 



214 



HISTORY OF TOLEDO AND LUCAS COUNTY. 



luimbor wounded. Jauuai-y 1, 1863, the Third 
Cavalry bore an active part in escorting a train 
of 4,000 wagons fi-om Franklin for Nashville, 
in doing which fierce contests occurred with 
Wheeler's Rebel Cavalry. 

After the battle of Stone River, the Third 
Cavahy was sent in pursuit of the enemy, and 
near Middleton, Tennessee, attacked his rear- 
guard and captured one of his trains. While 
in camp at Murfreesboro, a detachment of the 
Third Battalion, while on a scout, under Lieu- 
tenant F. Bernard, was surrounded by Rebels, 
when they cut their way out, with slight loss, 
and taking with them a number of jirisoners. 
About that time the Regiment was in affairs at 
Milton, Liberty, Readyville, Franklin, Snow 
Hill, Smithville, Auburn, Manchester and Mc- 
Minnville, suffering in men killed and wounded 
and loss of horses. 

The Regiment bore an active part in the ad- 
vance of Rosecrans's Array from Murfreesboro, 
in July, 1863. During the battle of Chicka- 
mauga, it was at Lafayette, where it was at- 
tacked and forced back to Charleston, Tennes- 
see. After the battle, the Third Cavalry moved 
as the advance of General Crook's forces in 
pursuit of Wheeler's Cavalry, with which a 
handsome and successful fight took place at 
Farmington, the enemy being completely 
routed, with loss of large numbers in killed and 
captured. The Third Cavalry lost two men 
killed and 23 captured. In November, 1863, 
a portion of the Regiment, under Colonel Seidel, 
scouted through the mountains of East Ten- 
nessee. Another detachment, under Captain 
Richard D. Wood, was engaged about Dalton, 
Georgia, when Ca^Jtain Wood was killed. About 
this time an incident occurred which illustrates 
both the character of the guerrilla warfare 
which the Union troops were called to meet and 
the spirit and manner in which it was met. 
The circumstances of the incident were given 
at the time, as follows : 

Lieutenant-Colonel Howland was then Post Com- 
mander at Decherd, Tennessee. A band of about 50 
guerrillas suddenly pounced on a Union man's store 
at Winchester, three miles West, completely empty- 
ing it of.iits contents, which afforded a handsome 
prize to them. As soon as word of the robbery was 
received at Decherd, a detail from the Third Cavalry 
was sent after the plunderers ; but in consequence of 
deceptive information given of the route taken by 
them, they escaped. Not long afterwards, a force, 
increased to 150, appeared in the neighborhood, when 



Lieutenant-Colonel Howland sent Company A, Cap- 
tain Terry, and Company F. Captain George Williams, 
of Fremont, in pursuit of them. Coming in sight of 
them, the scamps, using spurs instead of weapons, 
incontinently fled. The race was a hard one, during 
which Captain Williams was thrown by his horse and 
disabled, but Captain Terry and 15 men soon over- 
took GO of them, including Colonel Holman, the Rebel 
officer in command. The enemy made a stand to re- 
ceive their pursuers ; on perceiving which Captain 
Terry called on his men to prepare for a sabre-charge, 
which was no sooner said than done, when the Rebel 
force of four times their number wheeled and ran, 
again pursued by the little band. It happened that 
Colonel Holman's more immediate pursuer w'as Ser- 
geant Paul Deal, of Fremont, and of Captain Wil- 
liams's Company. The race between these was long 
and earnest. The speed of their horses was very 
nearly equal, and although Deal got so near he could 
touch Holman, he could not get near enough to hit 
him a fair blow. While thus near, and both horses 
at their highest speed, the Rebel Colonel drew his 
revolver and turning around in his saddle tired three 
times at Deal, the latter each time parrying the 
weapon with his sabre so as to divert the shot and 
save himself from injury. Finally, Holman and several 
others of the band were captured and returned to 
Decherd. The Rebel leader was warm in his admi- 
ration of Sergeant Deal, pronouncing him the bravest 
and coolest man he had met, and insistingthat his ( Hol- 
man's) revolver should be presented to Deal and he 
be promoted. These suggestions were so just, that 
they were strictly carried out, and Sergeant Deal re- 
turned to Ohio with Holman's revolver, and on ar- 
riving at Columbus received a Lieutenant's commis- 
sion for his gallantry. 

In January, 1864, while at Pulaski, Tennessee, 
the Third Cavalry re-enlisted. Of the original 
1,300, only 400 effective men were then left. 
On the 4th of February, it left Nashville for 
Ohio, reaching Camp Worcester, Monroeville, 
after an absence of two years. Of the Company 
which left Toledo, only 30 returned, many of 
them being on detached service when these left 
Nashville. Owing to a misunderstanding as to 
the time of their arrival at Toledo, the contem- 
plated reception of the Veterans did not take 
place ; but impromptu steps were taken by 
the Mayor ; a dinner was provided at the 
McKenster House ; a procession of citizens 
escoi'ted the heroes to the hotel, where the 
dinner was partaken of. 

March 2, 1864, its furlough having expired, 
the Third Cavalry re-assembled at Monroeville, 
with nearly 1,000 recruits secured for it, and 
making its total force over 1,500 men. Pro- 
ceeding again to the field, it was re-equipped 



THE WAR OF THE REBELLION— FIELD WORK. 



215 



and went into eamj:) at Columbia, Tennessee, 
with charge of the line of road from Nashville 
to Iluntsville. About the 1st May, a.s part of 
Long's Second Brigade of Cavahy, at Decatur, 
and also at Courtland, -Alabama, the Kegiinent 
was engaged with the Rebel General Eoddcy's 
command, which was routed, with the loss of a 
Lieutenant-Colonel, a Major and upwards of 30 
men killed and wounded. At Moulton, Ala- 
bama, the Regiment was attacked by the same 
force in camp before daylight ; and although 
partly surprised it rallied, drove the enemy 
from the field with slaughter, and jJursued it, 
capturing 25 or 30 prisoners. At Rome, it was 
given position on the left flank of Sherman's 
Army, and participated in the engagements at 
Etowah, Kenesaw Mountain, Noonday Creek, 
and the crossing of the Chattahoochie River. 
Being sent to Roswell, Georgia, to destroy Rebel 
stores and factories, it there captured 400 fac- 
tory-girls, who were sent through the linos by 
General Sherman. At McAfee Bridge (or 
Shakerock), July 9th, four Companies of the 
Regiment, under command of CajJtain E. M. 
Colver, engaged a superior force of Texan 
Cavalry, killing a Lieutenant and seven men and 
capturing prisoners and horses. Subsequentlj' 
the Regiment took part in the battles of Peach- 
tree Creek and Decatur, and in raids to Cov- 
ington and Stone Mountain. In the Kilpatrick 
raid, the Third Cavalry was with the Brigade 
in the advance to the rear of Atlanta, and 
destroyed a portion of the Railroad from Atlanta 
to West Point, losing thereby 48 men. It also 
took part in the Stoneman raid, under General 
Kenner Garrard. In each of these raids it 
suffered severely. In the flanking movement 
on Jonesboro, the Regiment was in Garrard's 
Division of Cavalry. After the occupation of 
Atlanta, it went into camp near Decatur, 
Georgia, and when Hood's dash was made, 



the Regiment was sent in ])ui-suit as far as 
Gadson. 

In the first battle of Franklin, the Regiment 
was on the left of Thomas's forces, and was 
engaged with the Rebel Cavalry. A portion 
of the Regiment was engagetl in the battle 
before Nashville. After Hootl's retreat, it fol- 
lowed him across the Tennessee into Alabama. 
It was then engaged in the Wilson raid through 
Alabama and Georgia ; and in the battles of 
Selraa and Montgomery, Alabama ; and of 
Macon and Griftin, Georgia. In the capture of 
Selma, Captain Archibald J. Eyster, now of 
Toledo, was in command of the advance-guard. 
Tiie Rebel defense consisted of 6,000 troops in- 
side fortifications. General Forrest being in 
command. The assault was made by 1,G00 
Union Cavalry under Colonel Long, command- 
ing the Division. Lieutenant-Colonel II. N. 
Howland, of Third Ohio, commanded the Second 
Brigade. He subsequently was made Colonel 
and Brigadier-General by brevet. The Regiment 
also took part in the chase after Jeff. Davis, in 
Wilson's command, in which pursuit a detach- 
ment went through to the Gulf At Selma it lost 
heavily in killed and wounded. Lieutenant D. 
C. Lewis and other officers were taken prison- 
ers. Lieutenant Lewis, afterwards paroled, 
was killed bj'tlie explosion of the boiler of the 
Steamer Sultana, near Mem])his. At Macon, 
Georgia, while on duty, Captain J. S. Clock was 
murdered by one of the Fourth United States 
Cavalry. 

Under orders from General Geo. H. Thomas, 
the Third Cavalry turned over its horses and 
arms at Macon, and was then ordered to report 
at Nashville for muster out. Proceeding home 
via Louisville, the Regiment reached Camp 
Chase, where it was paid off and discharged 
August 14, 1865, after an active and efficient 
service of four years, lacking 20 days. 



ROSTER, THREE YEARS' SERVICE. 

[Note— This list is intended to