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Full text of "History of the class of nineteen hundred and sixteen Yale College"

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HISTOEY OF THE CLASS OF 

^^I^TETEEX HFXDEED AXD SIXTEEjS^ 

YALE COLLEGE 



_ 



HISTORYoftheCLASS 

of 

MNETEEN HUNDRED 

AND SIXTEEN 
YALE COLLEGE 



VOLVMEr 0N£^ 




EDITED BY 

ROBERT S.OLIVER 
CLASS SECRETARY 

Printed for the Ol^^^ 

under the direction of the 

^eile XJnivefsit^ Pr*es« 

Ne^'p^Haven Connecticut 

1316 Allen County Public Library 
900 Webster Street 
PC Box 2270 
Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270 

gKV 



ACICXOWLEDGMEXTS 

To the ^'alc riii\(rsitv Press for its ]>ci-s(>ii;il interest in this 
book ; 

To ]Miss IJislid]) ;ni(l the C'hiss Secretaries Bureau: 

To The Tuttle, ^Morehouse aud Taylor r'oin])any ; 

To Professor William Beche aud the Ilistoriaus, whose 
articles form a hiruc part of this volume, as well as to Ilunt- 
iuutou Lymau and Lawrence Williams and others (d the Class 
Avho have materiallv aidetl; and 

To the ('lass Treasurer, Krnest liussell. 



PREFACE 

''Yale is a place for work." But there were lapses, too, as 
we remember it, and the lapses are pleasant memories not to 
be forgotten. The object of this l)ook is to photograph a few 
of them for your enjoyment. Little attention has been given 
to organized extra-curriculum activities, not for the purpose 
of minimizing their importance, but because these other inci- 
dents have greater power to keep alive pleasant memories. 

When the members of the Class have become scattered, it is 
hoped that these pages may help them to look liack upon Yale 
and wish to become again undergraduates to be excluded from 
the Graduates Club along with "Ladies and dogs." 

One last word — do not be modest in supplying your secre- 
tarv with facts about yourself. 



To 

James W. D. Ingersoll, 

Guide aij^d Friend, 

This Volume is Affectionately Dedicated 

BY THE Class. 



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TABLE OF COXTEXTS 



Pap.t I 



ilf&UIlitlll -L f ill 

Sophomore Year 


•J 

15 


Junior Year . 




Senior Year . 


57 


Fifty Years Ago and Xow 




Part 


II 


Graduates 


1 


Xon-Gradnates 


. 253 


Ex-Members . 


. 293 


01)ituaries 


. 307 


Miscellany : 




Xineteen-Sixteen and the Wa 


r . . . . 315 


The Yale Artillery 


. 322 


Statistics . 


. 331 


Senior Committees 


. 345 


Eoll of the Class . 


. 340 



HISTOEY OF THE CLASS 




• FRESH.A[AX YEAR 

"Youth is the Heyday of Romanee.'" My task here is to 
set down the history of Youth, the Infancy, of the Ch\ss of 
lUKi. If the episodes of that time, as written here, seem a 
bit unbelievable, lay it to the romance of youth. 

Ours was the ''g-reatest" class that had ever entered Yale, 
for it numbered 412. Old Alumni Hall had been torn down 
against the day of our coming and Wright Hall erected in its 
stead. The half of the class fortunate enough to gain admit- 
tance to the palatial quarters of Wright accepted their lot 
without a murmur and the rest were contented with dwelling 
in "262 York" or within the recesses of Pierson, where one 
soon learned to don a miner's cap and light on entering the 
lower hall. 

We found mutual friends in the Roseys, Cornelius and Klig, 
and enemies in the army of solicitors which assaulted our doors 
and tricked us into "signing up" for a hundred-and-one dif- 
ferent things. It was not until the night of September 26, 
however, that we realized that we were an entity — the Class 
of 1916. 

The marshals of the rush called "Xineteen-sixteen this way" 
and, in time, some of the more daring of our classmates took 
up the cry. The parade formed in front of Osborn and, with 
the Second Regiment Band at its head, marched down College 
Street to Elm and l>ack to the Campus, where the wrestling 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



niatchcs were held. Our own Dick Gnrlcy was aoclainiod 
the champion of 1910 rights in the lightweight bout and was 
pitted against George Ewung of 1915. Ewing obtained a fall. 
Bull Roberts won from G. Gardner of 1915 and Bayne Denegre 
threw Wes Oler in an exciting match in the hcav^"^vcig•ht 
division. 

The rush itself was the first ever held on the Campus, faculty 
decree having brought that time-honored institution over from 
York Street. The Class of 19 10 defended a goal formed by 
two elms at the end of Connecticut, while the Sophomores 
presented a formidable array before Durfee. The Sophomores 
pursued a ''watchful waiting" policy while the Freshmen 
went at top speed down the Campus, shouldering the push-ball 
before them. The tussle which ensued w^as a memorable one, 
especially for the men who got under the ball in the scramble. 
The 1910 defense was adamant and, as a result of the dead- 
lock w'hich ensued, 1915 set in motion a flank movement which 
placed the push-ball in a prominent position on Dwaght Hall 
steps, when the marshals called the rush a draw. 

The cheering in Wright Court, after we had been assembled 
by the Senior ''Y" men who acted as marshals, started a bit 
haltingly, but by degrees assumed volume and the words came 
with certainty. At last we felt that w^e knew the Yale cheer, 
and the crowd — the first formal gathering of 1910 — broke up. 
The Pierson contingent and Wright Hall men who ventured 
off the campus had numerous exciting encounters with 
''townies" armed with lead pipes and clubs, with the result 
that many caps w'ere lost; and Bunny Burgess is reputed to 
have sustained a broken nose when he attempted to recapture 
his hat as it was disappearing down an alley. 

It was a memoral)le night. Xineteeu hundred and sixteen 
had been initiated into the ways of Yale. That night four 
hundred and tw^elve members of our class went over again the 
events of the rush ; the flaming torches w^hich lighted the center 
of the closely packed ring around the wrestlers, the jostling, 
pushing, panting crowd about the push-ball, the white "Y's" 
on the blue sweaters of the marshals and the cheering in the 
court after the celebration — impressions as vivid now as then. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 




Before Names were Made 



To the Freshman who had come to Xew Haven with the idea 
that his studies would be all that was required of him, Sep- 
tember 27tli was a rude awakening. On that evening was 
held the formal reception for 1910 in Dwight Hall. President 
Hadley offered the metaphorical handshake and opportunities 
for extra-curriculum activity were pointed out by an imposing 
array of leaders and captains. 

The reception itself, if the truth l)e known, was a trying 
affair. Upperclassmen stood in the reception line and did their 
best to make the guests feel at ease. The task was a difficult 
one, for little cliques of awkwardly self-conscious Freshmen 
gathered in spite of the best efforts of the hosts. Propinquity, 
even intimacy was forced upon us, however, for the room soon 
began to fill. When President Hadley finished speaking the 
room was closely packed. By the time opportunities in track 
had been discussed, the temperature of the room had reached 
eighty and the close of the invitation to become members of 
the Lit board saw a sturdy Freshman carried out in a faint. 
A wild scramble for refreshments, which consisted of frank- 
furters and ginger ale served in the basement, gave the reception 
the finishing touch. 

The following night we went over to a part of Xew Haven 
we were beo-innino' to know as ''Sheft'-town" to witness the 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




In re Barney, Deceased 



Shelf Freslniian rush. Wo fullv expected to see them Imrii the 
Temple Street bridge and suffer the penalty of heing ])laeed on 
probation, as their predecessors had been, but, as leaders for 
such an enterprise were lacking, we returned disa])pointed. 

Shortly following this, we had our first introduction to Xew 
Haven society at a tea given by President and ]\lrs. Hadley. 
Half of 191() went one day and half the next so that there 
were few of us who missed being present at least once. One 
nienil)er of the class attended on both occasions and was mor- 
tified to find President Iladley's iiuuiorv of his first visit so 
perfect that a second introduction was unnecessary. 

Our football team was by now in the ]n-ocess of evolution, 
and October saw the development of numy men who later 
were to distinguish themselves on the 'varsity. Pi(^ ^^ Jiy? 
Aleck Wilson, Otis Guernsey, Herman von Holt, ]>ull Roberts 
and Eddie Hubbard were among the football stars who appeared 
on the hori/on. Otis developcil an uucauuy sense of direc- 
tion in his toe, with the result that he tied the game with 
Princeton 1910 in the final minute of ])lay l>y a lO-yard drop 
kick. Our team was undefeated until the tiual game iu wliich 
the Harvard Freshmen ])eat us by a scor(^ of IS to 17. 

On October r)tli, the crew men rejiorted for work. Allan 
McLane's gift of expression won him a phice as cox. of the 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



1010 ''oiii'lit" and Sctli Low foiiiid a sc^at in the waist of the 
boat. Seth is reputed to have assumed sueh a erinisou tint 
as the shell passed a lii'onp of eirls on the wharf at the ''Ferrv''' 
that he was taken for a well-tanned Harvard man, rowin*;' in 
a sweater. Johnny Fitzpatriek was another to ""make" tlit 
Freshman eight. The fonr-oared erew was entirely nncon- 
taminated l)y Shelf intlnenee. In the bow was Sam (iaillard, 
wrestler and sing-le-senller. At Xo. ;> was Phil Schwartz, 
whose high-erowned hat was later destined to bob in and out 
in a Connectient orchard, where he led the life of the tradi- 
tional country squire. At Xo. '1 was Charlie Dickey, the hockey 
player, while at stroke was Heiny Hume, whose crimson thatch 
made a port light quite unnecessary. The 101(5 representation 
on the squad was completed l)y Warren liansom, who became 
the pride of the "Ferry'' by virtue of his ability to consume 
Beechnut gum. 

October saw our class split in twain over the wcndd's series. 
One half, led by Roly Vaughn, averred the lied Sox would 
wipe the earth with the Giants, while Art Lane and his fol- 
lowers insisted that the hub of the baseball world was Xew 
A'ork. A goodly nuijority of the class journeyed to the playo- 
grapli at the Casino to watch the progress of the games and 




Errand Credit 



8 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



inako Ix'ts. Excluiiiiic in Xcw Y(jrk on Boston jumped sky- 
ward after Snodorass muffed Engel's easy tly in the tenth 
inning- of tlic dccidiui:' game of the series. In the Inter-class 
track meet at the Field on October 17th, 1910 took the palm 
with 4!t points, the Juniors lieing second with 381/. points. 

Our first glimpse of the Whiffcupoofs came on XoV('Uil)er 9th 
at the Brown game. Two days later we went to the gym and 
practiced songs and cheers for the Princeton game. The fol- 
lowing Saturday saw an exodns to Princeton, when Pumpelly 
in the final minute of ]»lay made himself famous In- a ol-yard 
drop kick, tying the score at (5 to 0. 

On Xovember 23d, President Hadley and a score or more 
of capped and gowned graduates outflanked the matutinal 
h^inns of Dwight and the automobile klaxons from Elm Street 
and made their voices sufficiently audible to dedicate formally 
Wright Hall. At the close of the first term exams caught 
some of us amidships, and with our number somewhat reduced 
by a broadside from the Dean's Office, we proceeded full speed 
ahead to our homes on December 19th. 

The Christmas festivities over, February saw Gerty Hoffman 
and Gaby Deslys come and go in rapid succession, the appear- 
ance of the latter being notable for the fact that there was no 
riot. Xewspapers of the morning of February IGtli had head- 
lines, "Four Faint as Dean Brown Prays,'' an allusion to the 
happenings in Woolsey during the morning chapel of the 
previous day. Bed Rumelin soon after came into his own 
and discovered a silver mine located in the telephone in the 





,1 

1 



The 
Green Room — 
Wrtgiit Hall 



FRESHMAN YEAR 




"Friday's" Lesson 



corner entrv of Wrii2,ht. lie 
immediately developed the 
''property" hy throwing the 
telephone down two liiiiiits 
of stairs, a method which 
proved eminently snccessful 
for Red strnck a pay streak 
of nickels, dimes and qnar- 
ters. Eddie Ocumpaugh 
had already qualified for 
the honor he was to win 
later as Yale's best dressed 
man. 

The approach of Washing- 
ton's birthday was the signal 
for the death knell of a Yale 
tradition known as Washing- 
ton's Birthday rush. At noon 

of February 20th, the class of 1915 met and decided to stay 
away from the rush. iSTevertheless it was our class that per- 
formed the obsequies over this ancient custom for at 6.15 
o'clock that evening 1916 met in solemn conclave in Osborn, 
and, urged by some of Aleck Wilson's oratory, took the same 
action. 

March brought us an insight into the Dr. Jekyll and Mr. 
Hyde existence of our contemporaries in Sheif through Gundel- 
finger's "Ice Lens." About this time jSTaomi eloped from the 
Old Eli with a Sheff Freshman and thus rid Yale of a tradi- 
tional fraud. This "heroine-worship" was not confined to 
Sheff, however, for Edna attracted huge crowds at the Studio, 
where our class unfailingly maintained a watchful represen- 
tation from 11 to 11. 

With the first snowfall, the chaste profile of Wright began 
to assume a dilapidated appearance, as sofa cushions replaced 
window panes. Bills for repairs followed from the Bursar's 
Office with alarming frequency. 

Pierson gained an unsavory reputation with the Xew Haven 
police. The balconies on the fifth floor were particularly 



10 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



advaiita^oons ])ositions from Avliicli to di-oj) water haiis on 
passers-by. Tlie cliiiiax cainc when the j)oli('(' inspector, on 
his way home from a (lance in his dress clothes, met a huge 
water hau' lu^ad-on as he passed Piersoii. Police made for the 
intei-ior of the l)nihling" as rapidly as possible, but by the time 
they reaclicd tlic tilth tloor tlie occnitants were "fast asleep." 
Wild J.)ill Kckman and Herman von Holt were the leading 
spirits in the Pierson uprisings. They "reaped the whirl- 
wind" in the spring when the Dean's OtHce placed the entire 
fifth floor on probation for attempting a return to the barbaric 
])ractice of "bottle night." 

All the electric lights in Wright Hall went out on the night 
of ^larch 14tli. Heads were stuck out of windows and burning 
papers were thrown out into the court and piled into a bonfire. 
Someone appeared with a bass-drum and we had a procession 
through Sheff-town and down Chapel Street. 

Spring vacation of Freshman year was a welcome relief 
from the exactions of scholastic endeavor. To those westerners 
who returned home, it was particularly pleasant, for the Dayton 
flood prevented their return on time and a special (lis])cnsation 
from the Dean's Office excused the cuts. On our return we 
found all the movies in town running Sundav benefits for the 




-tliis raw, rlicuinatic day' 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



11 



Followers 

OF Puck 




flood sufferers and we eontrihiited onr dimes and quarters witli 
enthusiasm. 

Professor W. H. Taft was fittingly weleomed on April 1st 
bv a hngli procession which accompanied the former-president 
to Woolsev Hall, where he delivered a brief speech. Don Fitts 
upheld the honor of 1916 by out-generalling" the Xew York 
photographers. He crawled out on the coping of The Dining 
Hall and obtained a remarkable photograph of the new Kent 
Professor of Law making his maiden speech as a member of 
the Yale faculty. 

Romance entered our midst in A])ril. On the thirteenth the 
Convict Slave ship tied up at the city wharf and a dozen-odd 
stevedores, fittingly disguised as convicts and laden with the 
perennial ball and chain, marched through the streets, guarded 
by a man with a rifle. The imagination of 1910 was so stirred 
by the sight that half the class, urged on by magazine offers 
of "fabulous fortunes for fine film features," began writing 
movie plays. Otts Wood and George Dovenmuehle came the 
nearest of anyone to making money, George having seventy- 
nine manuscripts, containing thirty times as many scenarios, 
rejected. 

The annual Spring Pegatta on Xew Haven harbor was fol- 
lowed quickly by Omega Laml)da Chi and Tap Day. On 
May 13th we were brought closely in touch with the latter 
ceremony when we were called to a class meeting of 1916 and 



12 



in ST our of the class 



askod to stay away from the sacred oak. Wo acroed. Tlio 
day itself was a revelation to most of iis, wliu witnessed it tor 
the tii'st time. Xeeks wei'e craned fiMui the windows of \\'i'ii:lit 
and slionldei's iiave way beneath the weijiht of those al>ove. A 
larii'e eontiniz'ciit fi'oiii Slietf held ])hiees of vantiii:c on Wriiiht 
Hall steps. 

Onr hasehall team lost to the Harvard Freshmen liy a score 
of 7 to 4. riif()rtnnat(dy rain ])revented the Princeton ^ame. 
iuily \;niiilnu ('hat Taylor, Dud ^Indge, Ive(l Rnmelin, Tloy 
Wilcox. Pie Way, T.ari-y Walsh and Gus W(dls were awarded 
nnmei'als. In track we were victorious over both Ilarvanl and 
I*rinceton, a fact which Harry Crocker's tooth-comb liaiul 
blared to the heavens above Wrii>ht Hall court. 

The crew was at the "P^erry," the cham})ionship baseball 
games were near at hand and the Keirs carried advertisements 
of the best routes home, when the fence orations were i>iven. 
(lil Porter and Archie McLeish effected the transfer of that 
ancient collection of initials. The flow of wit and vei-biau'c, 
excellent in themselves, gave a stimulus to introspection on the 
part of members of 15)10 which had not been afforded since the 
night of our rush. We had run the first lap of our college race. 
Some had dro])ped by the wayside, others had achieved the 
heights and yet every man, no matter what his deeds or mis- 
deeds, had had a part in the history of Freslnnan year. 

Harrij AHJiiir Torsoii 




SOPIIOMOEE YEAK 



SOPHOMORE YEAK 




There have l»eeii histories of 
iniisic, of art, of nations and of 
races, of revolutions and of 
movements. Sneh tales as these 
we have known hnt too well 
in classroom and lecture hall. 
They are old. old stories to our 
tutored ears and havino- gained 
our knowledge of them we have lost our interest. There is 
one history, however, which cannot l)e classified except with 
itself. It has to do neither with the throbbing of stringed 
instruments in the night air nor the tap of chisel on marble. 
It cannot deal with the whole of one nation or race for it is 
concerned with fractions of many nations and many races. Xo 
wild upheaval is recorded in its pages, it tells of no movement 
set on foot to make tremble the walls of tradition. The History 
of the Sophomore year of 19 10 is something new and strange, 
something unheard of. It is the history of a flow. With the 
spirits of youth — at least we hope it was youth — the class flowed 
undisturbed from baccalaureate to commencement. 

The day was Wednesday, the twenty-fourth of September. 
In clusters of fives and sixes, birddike, they clung to the bars 
of their newly acquired fence, and spoke knowingly of many 
things, for once they had been grubs, but now they had cast off 
their embryonic husks and emerged great gorgeous butterflies. 
It was thus that the sons of 1916 returned at the beginning of 
Sophomore year. The initial appearance w^as unpropitious. 
The gods of chance turned their faces from us and we struggled 
helpless against foreordained defeat. Of course it was mere 
hard luck that we obtained only one decision of the three bouts 
in wrestling, but in the rush we were unmitigatedly roasted. 
We charged unopposed from Durfee to Connecticut and should 
have been awarded the laurels of victory on the spot. The 
marshals, however, were biased and made us charge again. The 
Freshmen breathed an atmosphere of deceit from the Seniors 



16 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 







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id 



The Author 



wlio admoiiislicfl them and quite 
unfairly stood in our way, even 
treatinii' us rouiilily, Ag'ainst 
this ('(iiiil)!)!;!!!!)!! of deceit and 
jx-rvcrsion we could do nothing. 
The decision went to the class of 

r.nT. 

Still, the misfortunes of our 
first day were soon forgotten in 
the rush of duties. Having 
l)een worsted by the Freshmen 
in brutal physical combat, we 
contrived a diabolical revenge 
and sent Carrington, Coleman, 
Guernsey, Hadley, Tener, Tighe, Tittman and A. Wilson to 
extend our welcome to them in Dwight Plall, after which 
diplomatic stroke w^e considered them suthcientl}^ cowed and 
proceeded forthwith to forget their existence. 

The days passed merrily and in their due course. Hampton, 
while the warm weather lasted, became deeply addicted to noc- 
turnal rambles wherein he communed, we trust, with nature. 
Caldwell developed a consuming interest in culture and could 
be seem almost any day staggering out of the library with an 
armful of choice and ancient books on damnonology or the art 
of after-dinner speaking in the twelfth century. Apart from 
this there was little that was distinctive in the class. But few 
of us had become such individuals that we could brazenly 
remain seated during the prayers in chapel, though, to be sure, 
there were developing evident leanings towards such a state of 
aifairs. Some joined strange organizations, thereby gathering 
charms for their watch chains, and swearing eternal brother- 
hood against the vagaries of the world. Others, divesting 
themselves of all digTiity, acquired a true scientific craving, 
and went in pursuit of the earthworm, blithely imitating the 
pitter patter of rain drops and crawling on all fours about 
the precincts of the campus. Almost any bright day brought 
forth half a hundred crouching figures that tapped persist- 
ently with the middle finger of the right hand, all for the keen 




"IN THIS 
COLLEGE 
LIFE—" 







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18 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




Pedes Virumque Cano 



pleasure of watching the disappoint- 
ment depicted on the countenance of 
the earthworm when he crawled forth 
to tiiid not rain<lroj)s, hut a blinding 
sun. The lirst incident which dis- 
turbed our rustic quiet was the elec- 
tion of the Sophomore German com- 
mittee. We met for the last time as 
a class in Osborn, and after what 
seemed like hours of fruitless ballot- 
ting, expressed our choice. We chose 
with perspicacity, we chose wnth an 
eve to the delighting of the feminity 
which was to grace our German, and 
in the hands of Elmore Bostwick as 
chairman, Don Shepard as floor manager, with Wes Oler, Gil 
Porter and Alec Wilson composing the rest of the Committee, 
we placed the honor of the class as an organization of fussers. 

Throughout the first month of 
the term the crew had been toil- 
ing nnthanked and unnoticed 
about the oily sewers of Xew 
Haven harbor. Seth Low was 
rowing bow and Johnny Fitz- 
patrick iSTo. 6, Every morning 
saw them depart w^ith empty 
stomachs to sport with the cruel 
weaves of the sound at that par- 
ticularly witching hour of the 
day when everyone who is think- 
ing of going to bed has gone, 
and those who are getting up 
have not yet done so. The idea 
seems to be that the early l)ird 
can catch the worm. In this 
case, however, the proverb was 

faulty, for when they rowed at g q s.— Pkofessor Leipeb 

Princeton towards the end of Supervising 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 



19 



October the worm refused to be cani»,'lit, and in spite of many 
g-ame sprints Princeton won. A week later the first Adee with 
Bunker, Mnnson, Hume, Gaillard and Pratt, and a few incon- 
sequential upperclassmen defeated the iirst Dunhams who had 
only three members of the class — Dickey, Ransom and Putnam. 

About this time certain unmentionable Junior organizations 
began to prove a fertile source of conversation about the class. 
After two weeks of calling, forced conversation and free cigar- 
ettes, a large crowd gathered on the corner of the campus nearest 
Battell. Strange happenings took place behind the walls of the 
Sophomore dormitories, while maniacs upon the stroke of seven 
shrieked unintelligible ejaculations at ears that had become 
chilled with fear. A little later on Calcium Light ISTight, 
ninety-nine men of the Class of 1916, whose names have now 
become obscured in the forward march of time, were enrolled 
into live separate, rollicking brotherhoods. 

Beneath this tinsel of recreation, however, as an undertone 
to the shrill cry of the aesthete on discovering a latent feature 
of beauty in Greek mythology and the hoarse croak of the 
philosopher solving the riddle of his own little world, and try- 
ing to apply his solution to the world at large, the football 
team, doggedly, though not brilliantly, was struggling onward. 
Finally, after its full share of ups and downs the team lined 
up against Princeton, and much to the dismay of the newspaper 
prophets, proceeded to outplay their opponents from start to 
finish, on two occasions just missing breaking a tie of 3-3 by a 
matter of inches. Otis Guernsey scored one goal. Alec Wilson 
was the star of the hour, his work at quarterback ''was the 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 



21 




Midyear's — Everybody Home 



most brilliant exhibition of football of the afternoon." A week 
later the team went down to defeat at the hands of Ham-ard 
in spite of a game struggle. In the final squad our class was 
represented bv Guernsey, Wilson and Hubl)ard, who won their 
letters, and Miller, Maleom, Way, Roberts, Cowles and von 
Holt. 

The month of Xovember saw the Dramatic Association whip- 
ping its actors into shape for the Christmas trip, and Kin Tener, 
our manager, to be, calmly deciding momentous questions with 
a simple '\ves" or "no.'' The presentation during the vaca- 
tion was as usual a great success. In the cast 1916 was 
represented by Rowland Wilson, whose acting was *'a very 
subtle and convincing study." 

Meanwhile, the rest of the world was becoming famous or 
infamous as chance directed. Mudge, Elkin and Grant 
developed remarkable histrionic abilities, and out of the full- 
ness of their brains concocted a shadowgraph performance 
which sent shivers of shame into the breasts of their classmates 
and drove Dame Grundy, shrieking in hysteria forever from 
the campus. The conception was hideous, the execution of 
the piece fiendishly realistic. 

Don Malcom and Bob Coleman, better known perhaps as 



22 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




S. R. O. 



Rob, were likewise seeking the limelight of fame. They had 
been down town one evening and were returning arm in arm 
and glowing internally with benefaction for mankind, towards 
the campus. It is unknown to this day whether it was Don or 
Rob that first brought forth the idea. At any rate, they both 
deserve credit for the brilliance of their imaginations. Of 
Chapel Street they constructed a green, grassy level field, of 
the passersby they made great Harvard football warriors, each 
with a ball which he was seeking to put across the bulldog's 
goal line in the distance where Riker's marked the intersection 
of Church Street. Don was a halfback and Rob an end. Rob 
was the first to spring to fame. In a swooping dive that set 
the imaginary stands screaming with delight, he tackled and 
brought to earth an elderly Italian. Don followed with a 
robust German. After that nationalities became indistinguish- 
able, and it was onlv when the fallen figures numlx'red fortv 



Tapping 

FOR Worms 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 



23 



I'm buyixg 'em 




or more that Don remarked to Eol) on the lateness of the honr, 
and they hastened into the sacred grounds of the campns where 
none of the nnelite durst follow, just ninety feet ahead of the 
leader of a hungry mob. 

So the time rolled itself onward to the semi-annual examina- 
tions, a feature new in the Yalensian calendar. After much 
desperate ruffling of hair and muttering of curses we emerged 
from one slough of despond. The faculty in a moment of gen- 
erosity had decreed three days of freedom for the celebration of 
the Promenade, and happy in the anticipation of the results of 
this unwonted softness of heart we were enfolded deliciously 
into the lap of silkiness and the whirl of feminine festivities. 

On Washington's Birthday we continued in the path blazed 
the year before by 191."), and refused to meet the Freshmen 
in the usual vulgar rush in which we w^ere armed with canes. 
Instead, as twilight was merging into dark and the long shadows 
from Vanderbilt disappeared on the background of soft wet 
snow of the campus, we crept forth from our habitations to 
demolish the forces of the Freshmen. With aching fingers 
we moulded balls of ice and hurled them at the windows of 
Wright. In a moment all was chaos. For an hour war raged, 
favor first leaning to one side, then to the other, but at the 
last we emerged triumphant over the forces of 1917. 



24 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




"Bull" 
trying to eat 
'Oats" 



During the course of the winter, Hockey was given its place 
amongst the most important of the minor sports by the buikling 
of an artiticial ice rink, hut the team was handicapped for the 
season by the lateness of its completion. In spite, therefore, of 
the fact that Yale enjoyed the services of Aldrich, Sproul, 
AVashburn, Dickey and Burgess it was defeated by both Har- 
vard and Princeton. The swimming team, on the other hand, 
enjoyed one of the most successful seasons in the history of 
the League. Yale, with the aid of von Holt, Howe, Fitzpatrick 
and Symington, won the championship. 

In the field of letters our class shone as a star to men. In 
the fall Horchow and Smith were added to the Xeirs board. 
Towards the middle of the year, Iladley and Murphy argued 
l>rillinutly with the best of the debaters. Lewis Bredin and 
Clem Ripley made the Becord board in the very beginning of 
the fall term, Downey and Buck were taken on in the spring. 
Doc Walker, Curt Mnnson and Dave Hamilton astounded the 
world and broke all records in their phenomenal struggle for 
places on the board of the Yale Literary Magazine. The run 
was neck and neck, while the remainder of an unusually large 
field followed not far behind. 

About this time George Haven had a birthday! Xow we 
are well aware that birthdays are not such rare events in human 
aft'airs that any one may be mentioned as an exceptional 
occurrence. Xow and then we all have them. It is the natural 
lot of mankind to have anniversaries, and every one in his 
lifetime may be led to expect at least one twenty-first birthday. 




OMEGA 
LAMBDA 

CHI 





26 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Hence the reader of this ac- 
(•(iiiiit may be at some loss to 
justify the mention of a natal 
(lay simply because it is the 
twenty-first, and has nothing 
whatsoever to do with George 
W'ashiniiron, Lincoln, or even 
-Icauue D'Arc. At the begin- 
ning of this tale, however, we 
likened the history of Sopho- 
more year to a ihtw and it is 
necessary at least to try and 
justify that simile. Hence 
we say George Haven had a 
liirthday. 

Thus the days came, passed 
and were forgotten. The 
Xew York commuters re- 
turned regularly on the milk 
train. The Xew Haven 
dancers wore out their i)umps upon the floors of the Lawn Club. 
The rest of us attended the highest class moving picture shows 
and the most elite vaudeville. Elm Street crossing was black 
with slush and mud. Occasionally a ray of sunlight slanted 
down on the pea-green domes of Phelps. Otherwise all was 
murky. Tn the midst of this desolation we turned from our 
duties with heroic self abneiiation and elected Dan Elkin to 




Innocence 



4? JBI^B^H|^^^^ii^^ 


r^y^^^d^L ^te * ^ Mi^H 


E^ 4^^^^^fl 






The 

National 

Sport 



'The eagles — 





THEY FLY HIGH" 



28 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



compete for managership of the crew, Harry Crocker for base- 
ball and Iliintie Lvmaii for track, and after this period of 
iitfnl awakeninii' relapsed once more into the usual late winter 
dormancv. 

^^'ith the end of the Promenade came the beginning of work 
for the crews. Yale's coaching system had been revised and 
wirh the incentive this otfcrcd an exceptionally large number 
of candidates made their a})pearance. The tirst event to break 
the rontine of training was the Spring Kegatta. The class crew, 
composed of Ilnme, Sanderson, Mnnson, Stanffer, Dickey, 
Shepard, Howe, Xewton and Pratt, went do^\^l to defeat before 
the far heavier Junior boat, thongh they managed after a close 
struggle to nose ont the Senior crew. Then in quick succession 
came the Henley regatta at Philadelphia with Johnny Fitz- 
patrick rowing six, and a week later the triangular regatta at 
Ithaca against Cornell and Princeton, where 1010 was repre- 
sented by Seth Low and Allan McLane. This marked the end 
of the preliminary training and the beginning of the serious 
work for the Harvard race in June. 

Towards the middle of May, as a class, we clung to the 
grilled fence of Berkeley Oval and watched a strange spectacle, 
the most extraordinary perhaps that was ever seen there. Our 




To TUK Morning Disappointment 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



29 




Where Nobody 

CAN Talk 

Back 



friends the Juniors who should have led us by their noble pre- 
cept into the ways of righteousness and conservatism, had 
become imbued with the idea of reform, and sought to mitigate 
the horrors of Tap Day by holding the celebration on the 
Oval, away from the eyes of the curious world of the campus. 
They succeeded in having themselves tapped in the place of 
their choosing, and incidentally in receiving a glaring light 
of publicity, the like of which had never before been known. 

Meantime, Lyman, Tittman, Guernsey and E. R. Wilson 
had been circulating secretively about the class, and thanks 
to their efforts, in the very end of May the campus blossomed 
into rejuvenated hilarity, and we met to celebrate the gaieties 
of Omega Lambda Chi. Though the thought of examinations 
was heavy upon us, for some at least the day was not a fruitless 
occasion. 

The baseball team meanwhile was oivina: its best for the Uni- 




Harold meets 
a Friend 



30 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




The Class Jesteb 



versitv. Duriiio- Easter vacation it broke even on the games 
played with the aid of Dud Mndge, Pie Wav and Roily Vaughn. 
From then on it proceeded with varying success. Things looked 
bright for a triumphant termination of the season. Harvard 
had been vancpiished conclusively, Yale and Princeton had one 
more game to play. Then in the very last heart-breaking 
moment, Princeton won with one lone hit. 

The track team had been working with its usual spirit. The 
spring meet promised much for the success of the later events 
nor did the fulfillment in any way disappoint the promise. 
In the big meets Yale was supreme. Princeton was defeated 
by a score of 87 2-5 to 16 '4-5 with the aid of Ricketts, Cowles, 
Oler, Hampton, Johnstone and Buck. In the Harvard meet 
Ricketts, Oler, Johnstone and Hampton scored, helping to win 
by a margin of GGl/o to 3Tl/o. The three last men won their 
letter. 

The last official activity of the Class was the gathering on 
the campns in the early days of June to deliver over our 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



31 



A 

Siesta 




fence into the hands of the oncoming class. Curt Mnnson with 
some difficulty stood upon a table and told the precocious 
infants of the Class of 1917 just exactly what we of 191o 
thought of them. Then the ceremony being concluded we 
adjourned to our rooms and to the completion of the final 
examinations. 

This year, howeyer, was to mark our entry into the real 
actiyity of college life with a fitting climax to so auspicious an 
occasion. From the time of the Cornell disaster the crew had 
been working amidst an atmosphere of questioning from the 
college at large. There did not seem much more possibility 
of defeating Haryard than there had been in the six preceding 
years. It was, therefore, with the added thrill of unexpected- 




■Framin' " A 
"Pa-a-arty' 



32 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



ness that wc saw or ratlior were told of the victory of Yale bv 
a matter of inches. All honor to ns that wo contributed Seth 
Low an<l Allan .M(d>an( \<> rlic most famous crew in tlie history 
of Yale rowinii'. 

Thus we tlowed through our trials and enier<>('(l wiser if not 
better mortals. 

Alexander McKee Mtinson 




What's the Dope? 



JUNIOR YEAR 




JUXIOR YEAE 

It was on the thirtieth of September that we gathered 
together from far and near ; into the Oval we flocked from 
the cactus forests of Texas and ukalele groves of Hawaii, from 
the skyless canyons of j^ew York and the remote places of Xew 
Haven. For the first time in our history we found ourselves 
an architectural unit, set apart ; and there was only Tute 
to watch over us. We felt ever so nmch more than a year 
older and wiser when we realized that we were mere spectators 
in the fistivities of the first night ; hut the other rites of the 
starting of the year were the same : there were a few days of 
handshaking and "have-a-good-time-ing" — (a never failing 
source of material for the Becord) — a season of untangling 
chairs from the tables and sorting pictures from rugs ; a time of 
bafiling the best efforts of the Dean's office and the architects 
of Osborn by rediscovering our courses for the year. Then 
we were off as if the Summer vacation had been only a Sunday 
jaunt. But there were a few changes: a few hitherto unseen 
phenomena appeared among us such as the General's smile and 
salute ; and some old faces were missing. Connie Woehler, 
for instance, had left Yale to fight for Vaterland. 

Whatever may have been the custom back in the days when 
Freshmen paled at the prospect of examinations, ice surely did 
not take our ease in Junior year. In fact, even before the vari- 
ous preliminary rites above-mentioned took place, some of our 
number were hard at work. Among the football braves, W^ilson, 




"Have a Good 

SUMMEB?" 



Ringside 
Seats 





The Oval 
Express 



JUNIOR YEAR 



37 



von Holt, Guernsey, Taylor, Way, Roberts, Miller and Wash- 
burn were conspicuous warriors, while Carrington, in his 
capacity of Assistant !^Ianager, kept them properly clothed and 
fed. The old wooden stands were senang their last term, and 
in them we cheered and stamped and sang and shivered and 
watched, while the team piled up seven victories out of eight 
games. Then we followed to Princeton, whence we returned 
to our Elms rejoicing, wearing in our hats tufts of Tiger fur 
which the first three of the warriors above-mentioned had helped 
to capture. Meanwhile the Bowl was nearing completion. It 
was opened for the first time on the occasion of the Harvard 
game, though fate decreed that the real christening be post- 
poned until our Senior year. Alec Wilson's work was one of 
the few bright spots of the game. In fact, his performance 
throughout the year marked him as the unanimous choice for 
the next captain, and also j)ut him on Walter Camp's third 
All- American eleven. 

Football was, par excellence, the ruling passion of the Fall 
term. But we were represented by skilled and talented per- 
formers in every act of the college vaudeville. Anyone who 
watched the Fall regatta must have noticed, interspersed in the 
three 'varsity boats, such expert oar-wielders as Seth Low, Bob 
Munson, Dickey, Sanderson, Ransom and Hume, not to mention 
the incomparable oyster-stake dodgers, IMcLane and Pratt. 
Scant-clad Juniors could be seen of an afternoon clambering 
up the precipitous sides of West Rock in emulation of Pheidip- 
pides. (Classical scholars and partakers of T. ^: B. are expected 



BUNYA BUXYA 




38 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

to understand the reference without aid of encyclopedia.) 
Piatt, Gulliver and Young- were rewarded by finding places on 
the University team in the Intoreolleiiiate run. "Whatever 
tribulations the various glee club trials furnished to others they 
had no terrors for Bostwick, Chappell, Black and Jessup. We 
are not told what happened on the trip during the intervals 
between the concerts (which opened the eyes and ears of the 
citizens of Buffalo and points West) — but rumors have been 
various. Vacations are not, however, within our province. On 
the Mandolin Club, Clarke, Sid :\Iiller, F. D. Downey and 
Tom Hapgood survived the final cut. In the subsequent elec- 
tions Bostwick and ^liller were chosen leaders and Chappell 
and Downey recorders of their respective arms of the service, 
while it was decreed that Anderson should, in the future, look 
up trains and secure lucre. Meanwhile, still others were fol- 
lowing the lure of the footlights. To Larry Tighe it was all 
one whether he inspired Xews heelers with awe or audiences 
with admiration. Dave Hamilton broke so many hearts among 
the student body that the Dean registered a solemn and secret 
oath that he would give him but one more chance to charm. 
''Whisky" Wilson was scarcely less captivating; while Harry 
Crocker proved that our versatile class can turn out actors as 
well as actresses. It is whispered abroad that a certain sea- 
man was kidnapped from the navy and draughted into the 
army, where he did noble service as a guardsman, armed with 
a pike ; a low, but not a menial task. Our iutlueuce was mean- 
while felt in the forensic world. In the Syracuse debate the 
Yale victory was largely due to the heart-felt ai-guments and 
passionate appeals with which Gardiner Murphy denounced 
national prohibition. Early in the Fall term we found time 
to visit the haunts of our boyhood; many were the stairs we 
climbed and reclimbed in the Sophomore dormitories in search 
of edifying conversations and Yale types ; many the memories 
we revived and many were the appeals to Rosey and Xed Howe, 
the Castor and Pollux of all good dopesters. The curriculum 
itself was not devoid of excitement, intellectual and otherwise. 
The dry-cut system devised in economics, a beautiful applica- 
tion of that verv doctrine of economic etHeienev; the bi-weeklv 



'DrcK ! " 









"Ix Cash 
most justly 
Paid' 



'What 

GOES OX?"' 




40 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



promise of a lantern-slide 
lecture and a tour of Pea- 
lx)dy; the frantic Friday 
search for specific appeal and 
range of gesture dovm. titanic 
glooms of chasmed thought; 
all helped to make the days 
slip by until rumblings from 
the dean's office about double 
cuts made us wonder what 
was going to happen — and 
then the Christmas vacation 
burst upon us. 

AVe returned to find mid- 
years uncomfortably close. 
The floor of the post-office 
was strewn with postal cards 
guaranteeing us safe passage 
through any hostile course 
in the catalogue. The mim- 
eographed Digest stalked 
abroad from its Whitlockian 
den, seeking by whom it 
might he devoured. Then 
the examinations themselves were given to us in doses of one 
or two a day. But their sting, if they left any, was soon for- 
gotten in the gaiety of the Prom. Bostwick and his valiant 
henchmen. Porter, Carrington, Hampton, Wilson, Crocker, 
Shepard and Tener. assisted by a few Sheff additions, com- 
prised the committee. The class exhibited remarkable taste in 
femininity, with the result that such a dazzling assembly con- 
gregated in Xew Haven from all points of our fair country 
that the like, we fear, will never be seen again I Avaunt. pale 
care ; away, text-books and " literal translations ; to the dark- 
ness of bureau drawers ye soft collars I This was a time — all 
too brief — a time of music, of song, of drama. Xow did the 
stars and the university catalogue stop in their courses to ''let 
the dance go on." But the best of things end, — which seems 




Pick the Wixneb 



JUNIOR YEAR 



41 



to be the only logical reason for the ending of the Prom festivi- 
ties — and soon the world slipped back into its grooving. After 
bunva-bunyas come wadi-wadis, and the class once more took 
up its weapons with a will. Xever was known such a wave of 
prosperity : industry thrived : intellect blossomed. In the 
Gvmnasium a keen sighted observer might, almost any day. 
catch a glimpse of Murray Chism twinkling in aerial evolu- 
tions somewhere over the tumbling mat, in an act which won 
him first place in that coveted event in the intercollegiates, 
and did much toward giving his team the championship. He 
was reelected captain for the next year. In the tank, von Holt 
was practicing on the enemies of Yale the tactics which he had 
learned from his many encounters with deep-sea sharks in 
Honolulu bay. The exact number of drownings to his credit 
is not reported ; but he was chosen for the all-collegiate water- 
polo team, and elected captain of the Tale team for 1915- 
1916. On the ice. Btirgess and Dickey were our representatives 
with the University stick-artists and worshippers of Puck : the 
former was elected captain for the next season : Otis was 
chosen manager. Meanwhile Howe's hardies were hammering 
otit a place for themselves near the top of the class hockey 
teams. The literary life of the college was now l^eginning to 
find leaders among us. Eoss Proctor, elected chairman of the 
yews, began to cast a worried look abroad for editorial subjects ; 
after a hot race and violent struggle — a spectacle much enjoyed 




Folkways 

AXD Mores 



42 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 





^^rSJ^^ 


^^^^}p 


E '^W3L" ' 


Ml 




.^^^1 




[ 


^ 

*. 




^ 


<^- 


^^^w 





1 » y ( ' u r t .Minis o n — Doc 
^^' a 1 k ( ' r ' s Lit score was 
I'atilicil l>y tlie class and he 
entered upon the duties of 
chairman, with Dave Ilamil- 
tdii cldsc lichiiid. I)iAvney 
was prochiinied Dean of the 
Droolers by the Kecording 
Owl ; and Ilalstead fell heir 
to the topmost seat at the 
('onn('ill)oard of the Courant 
(illustrated). Graves was 
chosen trade-ad editor. In 
this whirl of academic affairs 
the troubles of the nation 
were not forgotten. The 
country was undecided as to 
the advisability of an in- 
crease of the army and navy ; 
Morris Hadley and Gardner 
Murphy strove to lift her out of the mire of dou])t, but 
as they espoused different sides of the question and as each 
won his case, the country was not greatly aided; though it 



Recruiting 



^^^^^^^HR^ r^l^B^Bni^^^^^BI 






kl^^^L^ "^.^V' X^J^^HI^^^^^I 




^BBII^^B^^'' '^^^B 



A JSi'Y. (Too bad — the ropo broke.) 




MOBILIZATIOK 



Off to the 

Fbont 





The Last 
Stand 



44 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




(Jex. Booth 



was ill this debate that Yale 
won the championship from 
llai'vard and Princeton. Tlie 
J)('bating association subse- 
(luently elected Morris Had- 
h'v president : an action 
which was ])r(iinptly and 
cldscly cdjijcd by our (Udega- 
tioii of Phi IJcta Kappa. 

The spring vacation was 
decidedly not all that the 
name implies, tor it was 
nshered in ly one of the 
heaviest snow-storms of the 
year. If anyone thirsts for 
a graphic description of the 
snow-bonnd race which was 
rowed during this vacation 
on the Schuylkill, he is re- 



spectfully referred to Frank (just 
boat-house Frank; if he has a last 
name nobody has even heard it). 
Frank, will start much after this 
manner : "^ow say, let me tell you. 

Snow^? By " and so on, until 

he has both Yale crews safely over 
the line, each two lengths ahead of 
its Pennsylvania rival. And if he 
mentions names, you will find out 
that Setli Low rowed in the Univer- 
sity crew and Bob Munson in the 
Junior, and that to Allan McLane 
and Charlie Pratt belongs the credit 
of safely piloting their respective 
shells between bothersome icebergs 
and around occasional glaciers. 
But at last grass took the place of 




Troop A 



JUNIOR YEAR 45 



ice on the oval ; the sun-dial was no longer a frozen mockery ; 
the gay earthworm answered the rap-rap of the facetious 
Junior ; Ixoly Vaughn crept out of the baseball cage, and 
went on to the field, in spite of the fact that he saw his shadow; 
the spring term, and spring itself, had come ! AVith it came 
the three-ringed circus of major sports. Xo sooner would we 
be intent upon watching Wes Oler making ready to clear six 
feet or so, than Pie's marvelous winding-up would rivet our 
attention to the diamond; and, on one occasion we were just 
comfortal>ly settled at a baseball game when we had to be up 
and oif by jitney and trolley car to Lake Whitney to witness 
the Spring regatta. It was on that day that our class crew 
won handily from the sophomores ; but the officials objected 
to the Tirpitzian policy put into effect by Howard Putnam, 
and the race was rowed again, with a less satisfactory result. 
It was then, too, that Sam Gaillard displayed an ability to 
row with one eye over each shoulder, which captured for him 
the Single Scull title, and, later on, enabled him to defeat 
the Harvard disciple of this sport on the Charles. On that 
day, too, did Seth Low (unhoped-for sight) appear in a full 
beard ! But this triumph was somewhat dimmed, alas, owing 
to the fact that he was bearded '"gregarious, in a herd" with 
some seventeen other 'Varsity seamen. The account that the 
crew a;ave of itself later on is too famous to need comment. 



^M^Bf^^~ 


^flj^^M 


1 "IfA^ 





The Lucky Seventh 




The 

Barouche 
Club 



SPRING 

REGATTA 







>>v., i 


. 


1 


' J^C' H^^^l 




1 




1 


i 


M 




■e 


9^lBC2«m 


B 


Mil 




IJ-.iHia 




HHtV^^^Bi 


■b^ 




~^ .'i",'*":^ 






-'■ *'4 J 


N 




m 




•Oh. well I 
remember the 
davs of '49" 



JUNIOR YEAR 



47 



Mabks fall 

AGAIN 




At Princeton, Cornell and Princeton acknowledged our naval 
supremacy, — and anyone who saw Allan McLane at the finish 
of the race on the Thames cannot be in any doubt as to the 
outcome of the battle with Harvard. Seth Low and Allan 
McLane, Bob Munson and Charlie Pratt were at their old posts 
in the "varsity and second boats respectively. After the race 
Low was unanimously added to our company of Captains, while 
Dan Elkin removed the "Asst."' from his former title and 
became manager. 

In baseball the elevation of Pie's leg as he delivered curly 
ones over the inside corner was a miracle that cost us many a 
ride or walk to Yale field during that spring. It was something 
we had to see. It was too, a sight for which opposing batters 
paid heavily — especially those of Old Xassau. Another attrac- 
tion at the field was the spectacle of Harry Crocker, in 
assistant-managerial shirt-sleeves, chasing the foul-tips that 
cleared the stands and bumped into the unknown beyond. Roily 
Vaughn came back into form for the championship series ; and 
it was such incidents as his three-bagger in the "lucky seventh" 
of the Harvard game that made that series worth while. 

To return to the other ring of the circus, where we left Wes 
Oler about to start the high jump at six feet: this height was 
enough to give him the event at Princeton ; whereupon, still 
not content, he glanced at the broad-jump pit, said he thought 
that he had recollections of having seen something of that kind 
before, and straightway took a leap at right angles to his 
usual direction which added another five points to Yale's score. 



48 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




Class Team — 1915 



Arkie Hampton scored in the same event; while Johnnv John- 
stone in the pole vault and Ricketts in the hundred contributed 
likewise to the downfall of Princeton. In the Harvard meet 
our delegation substantially repeated its performance. Perhaps 
the most notable feature of the season was Wes Oler's high 
jump in the intercollegiates, in which he broke the intercol- 
legiate record by clearing six feet, four and one-half inches. 
He was chosen to lead the team for the next year. 

Every good circus has its side shows, and this one offers no 
exception. Imported direct from Scotland, behold our heroes 
of the links — Sid Farnsworth, Dick Pierce and Ham Gard- 
ner ; and the greatest of these is Ham Gardner. Watch him 
as he waves his stick twice or thrice majestically around his 
head, and Presto, gentlemen, he has won the University title 
and makes off for fresh woods and golf-links new. But hark! 
What signifies that flutter of wings and crying of birds in dis- 
tress ? Yonder are our militarists, slaughtering clay pigeons 
for the honor of the gun team ; and if a bird escapes the fusil- 
lade of iSTeil Taylor it is sure to fall before one or the other 
barrels of Sterl Halstead's well-aimed piece. In a uiore peaceful 
frame of mind, many of our number were occupied at the tennis 
courts, and Tom Hapgood made a place on the University team 
in the Intercollegiates. ''Bull" Roberts and his company of 



JUNIOR YEAR 



49 




Wash's 

Debut 



Lacrosse players introduced a sport that had passed awav from 
Yale sometime back in the dim ages. 

While athletics flourished art, too, blossomed. The Drama 
made its appearance among us, and we heard Thaos bellow 
blank verse to picturesque (if not Kelleresque) primitive head- 
hunters, where once Alec Wilson had shouted cryptic signals 
to more modern warriors. Xear the end of the term — so near, 
in fact, that many of us had already declared summer vacation — 
the Campus was the scene of "Harold" ; Dave Hamilton so 
transcended the expectations of even the Dean that the far 
above-mentioned oath of the latter took effect in the form of a 
much discussed edict which is, perhaps, treated under Senior 
year. Hamilton was elected to succeed Tuttle as president of 



'LW'f 




50 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

Dramat ; the long cloak of honest Steve Davenport fell 
upon the shoulders of Kin Tener and reached almost to his 
knees; while Baldv Allen was chosen to go before the com- 
pany of maskers with trumpet and poster. This term saw 
Johnny Johnstone safely installed as President of Dwight Hall ; 
and the class exhibited its remarkalily keen powers of dis- 
crimination in choosing Harry Ci'ocker winner of the Gordon 
B rown Memor i al . 

Having thus settled the weightier affairs of college life 
let us take umbrellas, rain coats, and chainmail, and ven- 
ture into the Oval. The reports that Tute kept a collapsi- 
ble ark under his bed, ready for any sudden emergency, are 
founded on reason, but seem to lack adequate substantia- 
tion in. fact. Such foresight would have been commendable ; 
for on one occasion the water hurled out of windows from 
every receptacle from paper bags to uprooted bath-tubs would 
have terrified Noah himself. The deluge attracted the atten- 
tion of a crowd of interested citizens, until a neatly directed 
Moran's box drove into their dampened heads the fact that 
spectators spectated at their own risk. Bill Kallman's fire- 
escape was always adorned with an assortment of crockery, 
and it was a dry day that the sight-seeing American Express 
Wagon rattled under his window undamaged by a cloudburst. 
Red Burnett so mistrusted us that he would not ride around 
the Oval without first donning oil-skins — a precaution which 
on at least one occasion proved to be exceedingly well-taken. 
The lawn-sprinkler proved to be a valuable asset to our domain. 
Its uses were various ; perhaps its most unique application was 
as concealed artillery. The details of the scheme were worked 
out with great ingenuity — from the sprinkler hidden in the 
hedge under the fence, to the final release of the distant kink 
and the discomfiture of the unsuspecting victim, whose attitude 
was not unlike that of a man who sits unawares on a beehive. 
Some sports were transplanted from our former abodes on the 
campus ; bicycle races, for instance, flourished among us again. 
The bicycle record around the Oval was never committed to 
the archives, and seems to have passed from the memory of 
man. The only available tradition puts it at three broken spokes 



JUNIOR YEAR 51 



and a pair of bent handle bars, attributed to Closson. As 
for power machines, the scars still worn by Xorm Finch and 
Jess James proclaim these two the champion tandem-smashers- 
into-Baker-electrics — a title which most of us will gi*ant without 
protest. 

Those who date the first military activity at Yale with our 
Senior year are mistaken by several months. Why our king- 
dom was invaded is still a question for future historians; but 
invaded it was and with all the accessories of modern warfare, 
including trenches. We mobilized. The military experts of 
the class found a drum, two swords, guns, a horse pistol, Harry 
Crocker and a pick-axe. Eaw material thronged to the standard 
of Arkie Hampton, recruiting officer, and the army stormed 
the trench. Private Booth fell on the parapet ; Field Marshal 
Eckman was left impaled in the entanglement; but the trench 
was won. It w^as real war; three six-inch guns — (from the 
arsenal of the city department of street drains) — three six-inch 
guns were captured ; and not the least realistic touch was the 
special photographic staff of the Courant, Don Fitts and Walt 
Freeman, follow^ing close upon the heels of the victors. Rumors 
have been rampant concerning training in another branch of 
the service. Bob Munson organized a naval force for the 
express purpose of teaching Wash Porter the finer points 
of sailing. It w^as Wash's debut, and was duly celebrated 
with such effect that it took this child of Xeptune more time 
than it should have to get back his "land legs" even after 
the voyage was over. Another incident in the nautical branch 
of the service was the feat of Commodore Gil Porter, who 
managed to steer Frank's pet shell exactly between two chan- 
nels, thereby giving his crew practice in leaving a sinking ship 
in due order and cold water. The spectacle was thoroughly 
enjoyed by the female element of the native population. 

There must be clouds even on the brightest day; a history 
must record the vices as well as the virtues of those within its 
scope. It is with deepest regret that w^e heard of, and with 
deeper regret (if possible) that we chronicle the case of Pro- 
fessor Johnson vs. Smith — for nothing less reprehensible than 
house-breakino' and theft of furniture. In vain did the defend- 



52 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

aut ring' his private bell to summon aid from Woodbridge Hall. 
But let us drown our sorrows by plunging headlong into Omega 
Lambda Chi — "an alehoholiday," to quote the Xews, ''when 
evervbody was the fool, and all were on the laughing side." 
A Keystone comedy, the Johnson-Willard fight, Fred Stone, 
and a Tug of war, were the events around which clustered deeds 
of daring and hilarity which marked May eleventh with red 
ink. An occasion of even greater mirth was the class party — 
our first, — at the Taft a week later. The ''Spring Chicken" 
cackled in anticipation ; even the black-edged announcement of a 
per capita direct tax did not keep us from turning out to the Taft 
to the last man. Even ''Art" was there — (last name unknown. 
He was labelled simply, "Call me Art)" — "Art" whose winning 
smile quite captivated the imported Mexican charmer, Madame 
Hunyadi-Janos. Talent from all over the world — Hawaii, 
famous Milwaukee, and lands unknown, gave us such a brilliant 
entertainment that even the most nervous forgot Rosey's lists. 
Who could mourn that he had not gone out for football instead 
of chess, while the inimitable Pie Way was drawing on his 
fund of shadowy stories i But after the party Rosey's signs 
were again hanging to every door; and small groups gathered 
and buzzed and melted away, only to gather once more. Then 
Tap day came and went and left everything much as it had 
been long before, except that we went without our hats. And 
this was an outward and visible sign that Junior year was well 
behind us — that we were about to enter, very soon, into the 
last stage of our college course. We were eager to become 
seniors — even though the road lay through final examina- 
tions — ; and yet, it was perhaps with some feeling of regret 
that we cast a look backward. For those were crowded 
days, those spring days of Junior year. They were filled 
with all the pleasures that go to make spring terms the best ; 
but we had found new and broader interests than those we had 
enjoyed in either of the two preceding years; we knew each 
other better ; we knew Yale better. 

The whole year w^as, perhaps, to many of us, the brightest 
of any of the four. To all of us it must have been a full 
year, a year worth living and worth remembering. Each of 



JUNIOR YEAR 



53 



us lived it in his own particular way; each of us must have 
his own peculiar memories of it — memories so fine-woven that a 
pen can only tatter them in any vain attempt to set them 
down. In view of this, to write anything like a true history 
of Junior year is hopelessly impossible : there are as many his- 
tories as there are men in the class. This account can pretend 
to be only a delving here and there into the things that inter- 
ested most of us. In one sense, it belongs to the class — is 
everybody's; in a far truer sense it belongs to nobody, is no 
man's. It is, at best, a sort of orphan history, taken from the 
asylum of black-bound volumes of the News. It has served its 
purpose if an occasional reader, glancing over its pages, is 
thereby tempted to spend an idle moment or two reconstructing 
in his mind another history,- — his own — of Junior year. 

Louis Cappel Zahner 




^2:^^-1 



SEXIOK YEAE 




SEXIOK YEAR 

The summer before our last and brightest was itself unusual, 
thanks to the people of the Pacific coast. Perhaps half the 
class accepted the tempting invitation to improve their minds 
on a transcontinental journey, and to look over the wonders of 
the world assembled at its close. They returned with many 
new friends and experiences. Some of them actually visited 
the expositions, though the majority seems to have surveyed 
them from a height like Xapoleon at Moscow. In the stories 
of the returning pilgrims we have heard, — the less fortunate 
of us, — about everything but these affairs, which we had child- 
ishly supposed were the cause of the pilgrimage. We were 
wrong; they were only the excuse. As to what they were the 
excuse for. it is impossible to go into very gTeat detail. We 
have heard of a snake dance joined in by the President around 
the lobby of a leading San Francisco hotel: Chat-Taylor dis- 
covered a new way of catching lagooms at Del Monte; W. E. 
Proctor's daring and successful impersonation of Phelps Put- 
nam forms a small chapter of a long story. The transcon- 
tinental railways were as full of your classmates as the Friday 
Milk ; their exploits could be published only, if at all, in twenty 
or more volumes. 

But while this history was being made, five of the boys were 
on the other side of the world, in France, dressed up in khaki 



58 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



and spiral puttees, in the service of the Ambulance Corps. The 
]\Iunson brothers, Knight Cowles, Walter Hellier and Victor 
Bush Caldwell were the gallant young chauffeurs. Curtis 
developed a fondness for the French peasantry and has a pic- 
ture to prove it. The rumor spread that Walter had been 
blown up, Ford and all, by a German shell, but though a little 
late in getting back, he appeared undamaged and unchanged, 
except for his upper lip. In this connection Stew-art Bullivant's 
luxuriant display, so aptly compared to the rear view of a 
sprinkling cart, deserves mention. In such cases it is usually 
hard to recognize the mustache ; this time, however, it was 
Stew that was hard to find. 

The rest of us returned more or less apologetically from 
prosaic summers to settle dowm to the hardship of twelve hours 
a week and Chapel. Senior year was on. A deep bellow, dis- 
tinguishable from among the sweet piping of the other choristers 
made it certain that Bill Kallman was back and in good form, 
while later in the day an inspired tenor, in that well known 
Bacchic strain of "drunk last night . . .," heard so often on 
the road home from Mory's, left no question about Bos Bost- 
wick's being among us, though he turned out on investigation 
to be in the School of ]\[usic. The Dean sent cards to the 




:30 




'Sitting on the Old Yale Fence — Oh, Pshaw"' 

— Princeton Song 




Same song — second verse 



60 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




chosen, to the effect that he was still 
doing business between the nsiial 
hours ; in a day it was as though 
we had never been to France or 
Frisco or Fordjce. 

The early football games were dis- 
mal on the whole, but a certain 
amount of comic relief was furnished 
l)_v our cheerleaders, McLane, Proc- 
tor, Elkin and Low, especially Seth, 
whose introduction of Russian Ballet 
figures into the final ''Yale" met with 
great success. Pavlowa herself might 
have been jealous. His wrist motion, 
too, showed the previous education 
of those members under Guy ]S^ick- 
alls. Bos as song leader could not 
Another Group keep up the pace like his predecessor 

Henney Keep, and was finally forced 
to give up all l)ut the arm motion. He found it hard, later, to 
lead a cheer with a ten-inch pipe in mouth. Then when the 
Spring-field boys began turning hand springs and back flips 
our humiliation M^as complete. It was suggested that Red 
Elkin be taught to do these tricks, for our sake and that of 
his figure, but he could not be persuaded. 

J^ew footl)all songs came from Chappell, !N'orm Finch, Lewy 
Miller and Don Fitts ; Eli's day fitted the Saturday of the 
Princeton game as if it had been written for the occasion. 
At the Brown Game the Whiffenpoofs enacted another solemn 
allegory, in which F. M. Hampton rose far above his usual 
level. Morgan Spiegle made an impatient corpse, coming to 
life twice before any of the others. 

During the fall the University had been invaded by a secret 
society of enormous extent and power, known as the Ancient 
and Honorable Order of the Little Yellow dogs. Dan Collier 
Elkin is believed to be the original Little Yellow Dog for the 
Xew England States, sent as Prime Canus Extraordinary from 
Kennel 116 of Lancaster, Kentucky. It was supposed by 




"Sheets" 




The Whiffenpoofs are dead — Loxg live the Whiffenpoofs 



62 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




The 

rumhouxds 

Johnstone. Q. B. 



enterprising agents of the Xew Haven dailies that this organi- 
zation was a Yale and not a national affair, and that it had 
for its purpose the idea of arousing football spirit during the 
sad reverses of the season. Although it is absolutely impossible 
to reveal the true nature of the society's aims, still it is safe 
to deny any truth for this report. The latest census shows a 
total of some eight thousand fifty-two dogs. 

Xearly as surprising as this in its extent, was the enlistment 
in the Yale Battery. Although the Battery is not strictly a 
1910 affair, it deserves mention on account of the vital part 
that some of our classmates took in its foundation and early 
history. Morris Hadley, whose militarism would shock our 
Bryanites and intellectual preparationists, might be held per- 
sonallv responsible for the whole movement. Keg Field, Cal 
Littlefield, Stew BuUivant. Mel Carv, Marcus Morton, Dus 



'•I'm coming in" 




SEXIOE YEAR 



63 




Sanderson and Allan McLane 
are prominent for one reason 
or another. One valuable 
part of being a member that 
has l)een realized by Curt 
Munson and others, but not 
ret given as one of the rea- 
sons for the batterv. is the 
convenience of the uniform 
for masquerade affairs. The 
Lawn Club looked several 
times like the ball room of 
an army post. 

When the Princeton game 
came along, after the dismal 
weeks of the preliminary 

season, there were plenty of us who refused to stake even our 
hopes on the outcome : but Otis Guernsey's long range attack 
on the Princeton goal. — from the fifty-four yard line. — altered 
matters in an instant. Xobody would have been afraid to be 
confident after the first quarter. Then when Pi scooped up 
the neglected pigskin, and frolicked lightly across the line with 
it like a playful lamb, there was no doubt alwut its l>eing 
another hard luck story for Princeton. 

Harvard may well be passed over quickly, noting only that 
Bull Poberts and Chat-Taylor got their T"s. It was on the 
night of the game that Bostwick. Haven. Anderson and Smith 
became honoraiw members of the Pen and Pencil Club. Shortly 
after the season the Riunhounds sprang into being, and played 
several hard-fought and well-lost games. Captain Littlefield 
directed the attack. Johnny Jcihustone won distinction at 
quarterback. However, he is responsible for one of the 
defeats. — in part, — on account of a ptmt which was received 
by the Freshmen on the Eumhound two-yard line. It had 
plenty of height, however, and the ends had no trotilde in get- 
ting under it as soon as they saw it at all. Cap Higliee and Fat 
Levy were the mainstays of the line, while Sam GaiHard played 
a dashins eame at end. After Ira Washburn got into the spirit 



64 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




Commencement, 1916 



of the game all signals but his were discarded. Although the 
Rumhounds had an unsuccessful season, each hound enjoyed 
himself, and it is hoped that there will be future generations, 
even if class football never gets officially organized. 

It was about this time that the class lost forever its beloved 
member Charles Morgan Spiegle, getting in return Charley 
Aldrich, who is not, as far as anyone can yet discover, any 
particular improvement on his predecessor. The exchange was 
made with due ceremony. The attic of the Pratt University 
club was brightly lit ; on the table reposed a keg of beer ; Grant 
in golf trousers, silk stockings and a cutaway announced, while 
G. E. Porter and D. O. Stewart with Al between them formed 
the receiving line. "The Duke is dead, long live the Duke" ; 
Aldrich was received as though he had been with us always ; 
a good time was had by all. 

After this unusual episode, Larry Lloyd, Chuck Fagan and 
Ira Washburn surprised us by becoming the owners of a spirited 
piece of horseflesh, in return for the sum of ten dollars. This 
price will no longer seem high when it is remembered that a 
wagon was thrown in with the noble animal. They bought 
him out of pity on finding him stuck in a snow drift, down- 
hearted and disgusted with life, and not enjoying the good 



SENIOR YEAR 



65 



opinion of liis master, who seemed anxious to get rid of him. 
Thej expect to use Burgess, — for that is his name, — as a means 
of conveyance to and from the baseball games. Larry, however, 
says that he does not think he will be able to use Burgess in this 
way on account of being on mark probation. By tying barrel 
staves onto the wheels of Burgess's barouche the equipage was 
adapted to the unusually hard winter. There were other pets 
in the class during the year ; John McLennan had two love 
birds, Sid Miller a canary, while Paul Phoenix and Dan Wil- 
lard are said to have kept gold iish in an effort at homely cheer 
in the college room. Bull Roberts tried enlivening things with 
a kettle drum, which had to be stolen before relief was obtained 
for the rest of the entry. 

Just as life at Yale was beginning to drag Otis Guernsey 
announced a special excursion to N^ew York, with himself as 
local manager. I^o one who went will forget the party, — how 
Harry Crocker got Caruso a chair, — how Aldrich and Grant 
led the singing at supper, — and especially how it felt to find 
a sleeper on the milk where an international slum had been 
expected. It was without any doubt an historic occasion. 

Then, almost before we had taken stock of the swift gliding- 
associated with the college year, it was Christmas vacation. 
The Dramat set out with an Ideal Husband, in which Nineteen 
Sixteen was represented by three butlers, a dowager and one 
gentleman, in the persons of Messrs. Lyman, Elkin, Wilson, 
Enright (replaced by Longstreth), and Hamilton, respectively. 




^ 





"The seasons come, the seasons go; 
The earth is green or white with snow." 




SENIOR YEAR 67 



Bostwick and Henry Anderson took the Musical Chiles on a 
southwesterly trip, while Bunny Burgess and his hockey team 
went to Pittsburgh. It was there that an enthusiastic spectator, 
leaning over the boards, did away with his tooth leaving the 
cavity so noticeable on his return. The Yale audience was 
criticized for its attitude at the Princeton games, but it never 
did anything like that. 

The lull before examinations seems to have been uneventful ; 
at this time those who have not gone to the ant, go to the 
tutor, and learn other ways to be wise. When the smoke of 
battle cleared it was found that George Haven had repulsed 
every counter attack of the authorities, and was our fourth 
living graduate. This was duly celebrated with a party at 
Mory's, — positively the last, — and followed the next week by 
two more. George then began work in ^ew York. 

At the Prom the class was well represented, both with and 
without, in spite of the fact that Seth Low, Allan McLane, Bob 
Munson, Cepe Smith and Louis Bredin went to the Adiron- 
dacks on a health trip. Titty went with them, and gave lessons 
in snow shoeing. A great many things happened during Prom 
time, but it would be unfair in many ways to mention most 
of them. The goal that Ira Washburn shot in the Dartmouth 
Hockey game, in the third extra period, with all the girls watch- 
ing, however, can be mentioned, and will be remembered up at 
Tuttles, and other storehouses of Yale lore well into the next 
century. He made it from a few feet in front of the Yale 
goal, through the whole Dartmouth team. At the Prom itself, 
Dod Cassard is said to have been prominent though the reasons 
are withheld. When Montey Woolley arrived from Syracuse 
with a sprained ankle, he was met at the station by members 
of the Dramat in stovepipe hats, black whiskers and steel 
spectacles, who removed him to College Street Hall in a wagon, 
much to the amusement of Xew Haven and the Prom girls at 
the Taft, who were charmed with the playfulness of the under- 
graduate, and his picturesque ways, and undoubtedly were 
jealous for not having been met in the usual way themselves. 
Whether this ceremony was part of the advertising campaign 
in which the Dramat and the Musical clubs fought hard and with 



68 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



strategy for the dollars of Prom victims will never be known ; 
anyhow the Dramat won in the struggle, either on this account, 
or because its billboards were a few feet larger. The cut- 
throat competition between these two organizations is one of 
the unpleasant facts of the year, — like the Harvard Game and 
the Eligibility Question, — and the Dramat parts, — which have 
done enough damage wnthout being introduced here. 

The students of Metaphysical Poetry enjoyed a metaphysical 
banquet on the evening of the final Princeton hockey game, 
and their enthusiasm has done a great deal for a word which 
until lately has been under a cloud. It is not yet known in 
the class at large what metaphysics are, but suspicion has been 
allayed and curiosity aroused. The game afterward was per- 
haps more primitive in its appeal, perhaps too primitive, l)ut 
it met with general approval. Aldrich, who has been out for 
the team since he decided to come to Yale from St. Paul's, got 
in at last. If the official had knowm about Morg's history, 
he might not have put him off for two minutes out of the three. 
The game was a good sequel to the one in the bowl. 

The Yale Country Club, with its fine squash courts, billiard 
tables and bowling alleys, was welcomed heartily by the class. 
One of the events of the year was a twenty-four hour bowling 
match, in which Ham Gardner and Bill Wyer competed suc- 
cessfully. Other members have spent very nearly that length 
of time on the alleys, but will not admit it. 

It had now come to the time for an established custom to 
be observed. Gil Porter was seen telegraphing and telephoning 
to points of interest along the Atlantic Coast, while Aldrich 
and Burgess acquired a stealthy look which we remembered 
having seen before. Arrangements were finally completed, and 
the team started at nine-thirty Friday morning, this time for 
Baltimore instead of Atlantic City. They all agree that taking 
this year and last, this made a total eclipse. 

Baseball practice started in the same spirit as usual in spite 
of the difficulties; even Pie Way went in February. Captain 
Oler was confident alx>ut the Track Team, which had better 
winter conditions in the new track cage than any previous team, 
but it looked as though they would never get out doors on 



SENIOR YEAR 



69 



account of the snow which was three feet or so deep and fell 
regularly two days out of three. Setli Low, Allan ]\rcLane, 
Guy Xiekalls and Red Elkin started the Crew season with the 
Crew Banquet, at which the doctrine of "fun and victory both" 
was preached and practiced, and justly recommended to the 
other sports. 

These were some of the events of Senior year ; how the class 
as a whole liked their last year is impossible to say. Each 
man likes to express sentiment in his own way, and it is even 
possible that there were those among us who felt little. But 
the majority had moments in which they wondered how they 
were going to do without the pleasures of athletics, friendship 
and curiosity which are the meaning of Yale. 

John Henry Vincent 



FIFTY YEAKS AGO AN^D -NOW 




FIFTY YEAKS AGO AXD XOW 

I have been asked to set down some of mv recollections of 
college life during my undergraduate years, 1869 to '73. 

The interval is not quite half a century but the contrast 
between then and now is great as will be realized when I 
mention that then football was unknown, the winner of the 
DeForest Prize was a greater man in college estimation than 
the Captain of the Crew (Manager there was none) and a 
student was by law forbidden to be out of town over night 
without special permission from his division officer. This 
article of the Laws of Yale College was brought to my mind 
recently when I chanced to visit the railway station on a Friday 
afternoon at the height of the weekly ebullition whereby so 
much of the froth of the undergraduate world is drawn off, 
or levitates, to Xew York. I reckoned that as many students, 
courteously so called, went down for this week end as formerly 
in a year, and I recalled that I myself visited N^ew York in 
term time but once during my four undergraduate years. 

The body of laws referred to was a fairly liberal code, still 
retaining some theological flavor and overburdened with minute 
regulation of student-conduct, the residuum from the first 
formal code drawn up by President Clap in 1745. The 
original draft of these laws of 1715 is in the Archives of 
the University. It is a manuscript of perhaps twenty pages 
of rough paper, in a fair round hand and bound in a cover 



74 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




Yale 



formed of two sheets of a 
school boy's copy book. It is 
written in English but the 
edition published for the use 
of the students is in Latin. 
It enumerates and punishes 
sjx'citieally every conceivable 
form of misconduct — begin- 
ning- with denial of the in- 
spiration of the Bible or any 
part thereof and an attempt 
on the life of the President 
or a Tutor, punishable by ex- 
pulsion, down through sword 
play or practice with cudgels 
and many minor misde- 
meanors, as possession of 
gambling implements (in- 
cluding a backgammon board), failure to remove the hat within 
the prescribed distance from a college officer, until we reach 
absence from prayers punished by a fine of one penny. The 
ban upon backgammon remained in force for a hundred years. 
President Clap's laws ordained that the Beadle should 
wait upon the President each morning soon after six of 
the clock for orders for the ringing of the bell. In the 
seventies it rang without presidential supervision to indicate 
each successive item of our daily routine. We rose, prayed, 
ate our meals and attended our recitations at 8, 11.30 and 5 
by its clamorous command, and four times on Sunday it sum- 
moned us — to prayers, that is, morning and afternoon chapel 
and evening meeting, as also on Wednesday evening, the 
evening service not being obligatory. The student who was 
responsible for its punctual performance fifty-one times per 
week and received for his services tuition and a room under 
the bell, earned his pay. To the best of my recollection the 
bell ringer failed in his duty but once in four years. 

The elective system forced the bell out of business and put 
the clock in its place — a striking improvement, — which has 



FIFTY YEARS AGO AND NOW 



75 



not resulted in ''great irregularity on the part of the students 
in respect to their meals" as an influential memher of the 
faculty gravely predicted. So unsafe is it to prophesy. 

This machine-like regularity of student life, symbolized by 
the ringing of the bell, and its unity of purpose form the most 
marked features of contrast to life on the campus to-day. The 
flood of extra-curriculum activities had not overwhelmed us. 
The classes which for many years had not varied much from 
one hundred in number lived all together in the old brick row, 
and lived there all the time as already intimated. They there- 
fore knew each other well and liked or disliked each other 
heartily. Most important influence of all, the whole class 
studied the same subjects through almost the entire course. The 
writer sat by the same man in class, who as it chanced had the 
same name and surname, three times a day for nearly four years. 
This unity in the classroom led to a competition in scholarship 
which is now impossible and was then a great incentive to 
study. Between the leading scholars of a class it often became 
intense and it was watched by the rank and file in its daily 
progress as men now watch athletic games from the bleachers. 
By reflex influence it affected 
the scholarship of the class 
generally. It was not the 
highest kind of a motive for 
study, but it served a useful 
purpose and did much to 
vivify the somewhat barren 
and lifeless course of study 
to which we were confined. 

The curriculum had be- 
come too varied to admit of 
the old custom of assigning 
to a class a tutor who should 
continue with it for four 
years and teach everything 
in course, but in many 
branches instruction was not 
given by specialists. 




Harvard 



76 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




Pbinceton 



111 the class before my own, 
circumstances made it con- 
venient to assioji the teaching 
of Political Economy to the 
senior professor of Latin, He 
frankly avowed to the class 
his lack of special knowledge 
of the subject and conducted 
the recitations for the most 
part by asking questions 
from the text book, with re- 
sults like the following: 
"Jones" (reading from the 
book on the Effect of the 
Malthusian Theory) "is 
there then no remedy?" 
Jones rises and responds 
with fervor, also in the words 
of the book, "Thank God ! There is !" and sits down. 

In the following year Professor Sumner returned from study 
in Europe to take the chair of Political Economy, then first 
established, and we had the benefit of the early enthusiasm of 
the greatest of Yale's teachers. His influence over us was 
enormous. He did not convince men but he made them think. 
I have seen men gather outside at the close of a lecture on 
protection and shake their fists in each others' faces. Dean 
Wright and Professor Beers also began their teaching with 
our class to our great pleasure and profit. 

In 1745 a student was examined for admission to college 
on a considerable amount of Latin and a little Arithmetic. 
Fifty years ago the number of required subjects and their 
quantity were nearly as great as now, but the examination 
was oral and not unduly stringent. A candidate entered 
Alumni Hall informally and sat at an octagonal table, some 
of which are still in use, and waited for an examiner to come 
his way. If he happened to be kept busy he might finish in 
half a dav. 



FIFTY YEARS AGO AND NOW 77 

The only entrance examinations that I remember anything 
about are those in Latin Composition and the Analiasis. In 
the former Professor Thacher put a copy of Arnold's Latin 
Prose Composition before me opened at a certain page and told 
me to look over the exercises on that page without turning 
over the pages. He then turned to another candidate and when 
he returned I said the prescribed sentences. In the Analiasis 
I was examined by Professor Hadley. After a rather halting 
translation he asked me several grammatical questions, the last 
of which I was unable to answer. After waiting a reasonable 
time he moved away. Just then an idea occurred to me and I 
shouted the answer after him in a stentorian tone. He looked 
back and smiled, and I have always believed that I thereby 
escaped a condition. 

Professor Hadley was a man of wide erudition and profound 
scholarship. His mind was brilliant, clear cut and lucid. He 
was an admirable teacher and his untimely death in 1871 was 
an irreparable loss. In his funeral address President Porter 
said that the Faculty would have had no hesitation in entrust- 
ing to him at any time the teaching of any subject in the 
curriculum. 

In spite of the informality of entrance examinations condi- 
tions were freely bestowed and they were an immediate and 
heavy burden, for it was a rule that a student might not be 
admitted to recitations until he had made up his conditions. 
Special examinations were held weekly for removing conditions 
and it was the middle of the fall term before the last of the 
stragglers appeared in the class room. Thus those who most 
needed to get a good start in college work were seriously and 
often fatally handicapped. 

Admission to college was not complete until the ceremony 
of matriculation had been performed. When this took place or 
of what it consisted I do not remember. The sole reminder 
of it at present is the ''Matriculation Sermon'' delivered by 
the President on the first Sunday of the college year. These 
rambling reminiscences and loosely stated comparisons between 
the past and the present might be continued indefinitely if space 



78 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



permitted. Any one who cares to make such comparisons in 
extensu can do so by reading ''Four Years at Yale" bj Lyman 
H. Bagg of '69, published in '71. 

Let me rather pass per caJtum from the alpha to the omega 
of college life and say a word about Commencement. Then 
as now it was a dignified and enjoyable function. The pro- 
cession wended its way to Center Church through crowds much 
admiring, as now, though it was not given to them to see the 
pomp of caps and gowns or to thrill before the majesty of the 
mace. At the church the ceremonies up to the conferring of 
degrees w^ere conducted by the graduating class and were long 
drawn out, beginning with the Latin Salutatory. During the 
intermediate series of orations, philosophical and otherwise, 
dispute, colloquies and the like, the assembled company wan- 
dered in and out at will, seeking relief from the hot air of the 
pew^s and the platform under the shade of the superb elms that 
W'Cre the just pride of the city. The scene around the church 
resembled a lawn party and is stamped on the memory of many 
an old graduate, marred by no monument of ugliness like the 
Hotel Taft. When the valedictorian got up the crowds poured 
back and filled the house to suffocation, and then gladly 
adjourned to dinner and speeches at Alumni Hall. 

The Commencement function as at present conducted is 
considered by good judges to be unsurpassed in dignity and 
impress! veness by any ceremony in the country. Its perfection 
of form and detail is due in great part to the administrative 
genius of the lamented Professor John C. Schwab, University 
Librarian. It serves the great purpose of impressing on the 
minds of the graduating class as they enter into the fellowship of 
the Alumni of the University a sense of the dignity and power 
of that fellowship, and sends them out of their play time into 
life with a realization of the value of their inheritance as sons 
of Yale. 

The tradition of the Alumni, faint and elusive to the under- 
graduate, becomes definite when he receives his diploma, and 
as years pass has a culminative effect that is very powerful. 
To the undergraduate it is apt to be crystallized about some 



FIFTY YEARS AGO AND NOW 79 

notable class. At present this is no doubt the class of '78 in 
which President Taft is the leading figure of a brilliant group 
typifying the best in Yale. In the seventies it was the class 
of '37, the only class that ever gave to the country a Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court, a Secretary of State and a 
President. Chief Justice Morrison R. Waite possessed all the 
substantial qualities that belong to the foremost judicial posi- 
tion in the world. Secretary William M. Evarts had the most 
acute legal mind of any lawyer of an epoch of great lawyers. 
Samuel J. Tilden is the only man ever elected to the presi- 
dency who has surrendered his title to the office from patriotic 
motives. 

Mr. Tilden was a bachelor but the children and grand- 
children of Evarts and Waite are Alumni of Yale. Mr. 
Evarts only of the three came frequently to ISTew Haven and 
he for many years rarely missed a Commencement, where his 
after-dinner speech was looked forward to as the crowning- 
event, for he was a master of epigram and repartee and esteemed 
the foremost wit as well as lawyer of his time. Among innu- 
merable of his remembered sayings there may be cited his 
remark, concerning the tradition of Washington having once 
thrown a silver dollar across the Potomac, that "a dollar went 
much further then than now'' ; and his reply when an attempt 
was made to catch him napping at a dinner of the Harvard 
Medical School by calling on him without previous notice to 
speak of the coats of the stomach — that he was not prepared 
''since it had been his habit when attending a Harvard dinner 
to leave the coats of his stomach at home." 

Mr. Tilden left college before graduation. He was a man 
of gTcat wealth and there is the best authority for the state- 
ment that he made Yale his residuary legatee. But during 
the campaign in which he was the Democratic candidate for the 
Presidency, ex-President Woolsey, who took no active part in 
polities, published a letter in which he spoke of Mr. Tilden 
as having ''sought the Presidency with uncommon anxiety." 
The criticism offended Mr. Tilden and he changed his will, 
giving the residuary estate, amounting to several millions, to 



80 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



the City of Xew York for l)iuldiiig the pul)lie library which 

stands on Fifth Avenue at Forty-second Street. The sentence 

above quoted may be reckoned as the most expensive ever 

spoken by a Yale man, since each word was worth about a 

million dollars. 

William Beehe, '73 




"Spirit of Youth, alive, unchanging' 



80 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



the City of Xew York for building the public library which 

stands on Fifth Avenue at Forty-second Street. The sentence 

above quoted nuiy be rcckoiicd as the most expensive ever 

spoken by a Yale man, since each word was worth about a 

million dollars. 

William Beehe, '73 




"Spirit of Youth, alive, unchanging" 



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GRADUATES 



GRADUATES 



WALTER KARL EDWARD 
ABEL, "Walt," was born in 
Meriden, Conn., Angnst 10, 1892. 

His father, Albert Abel, was 
born in Sampolil, Germany, in 
1852, came early in life to Meri- 
den, where he is still living, and 
is connected with the Charles 
Parker Company. Abel's mother 
was Pauline Patzlaflf, of Klein 
Konarczin, Germany. There 
were thirteen sons and daughters 
in the family, of Avlioni six sons 
and five daughters are living. 

Walt prepared at a private 
school, Concordia Gymnasium, at 
Bronxville, N. Y. He received 
college honors, first division, in 
Freshman year, first division 

honors in Junior year, and honorable mention, Lucius F. Robinson 
Latin Prize. He is a member of the Deutscher Verein, and its 
president during Senior year. He lived at home in Meriden dur- 
ing Freshman and Sophomore years; and roomed alone, at 416 
Berkeley, in Junior and Senior years. 

Abel expects to enter the ministry, and his permanent address 
is 130 Oak Street, Meriden, Conn. 




EDWITvT EDGERTOTvT AIKEN, JR., "Ned/' was born in 
Tientsin, China, January 17, 1894. Eleven years were spent in 
China, and before entering Yale he had lived in Middlebury, 
Conn., and Auburndale, Mass. 

His father, Edwin Edgerton Aiken, is a missionary to China, 
serving under the American Bible Society. He was born in N'ew- 
ington. Conn., March 1, 1859, and was graduated at Yale with 
the degree of B.A. in 1881, and B.D. in 1884. Mrs. Aiken, who 
was Maude Lockwood before marriage, died in Tientsin, China, 
in September, 1899. There are two sons and two daughters in the 
family. Yale relatives include, besides his father, William P. 
Aiken, '53 ; Martin Welles, '82 ; William P. Aiken, '89 ; Lemuel 
Aiken Welles, '93; George L. Aiken (brother), 1917, and 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




CotlAMM 



C OUJUM,^ 



for his work in the iiiiuistrv, 



Leonard A. Beadle (cousin), 
1919. 

Xed prepared at the Newton 
(Mass.) High School, and in col- 
lege received honors of the third 
grade in Freshman year, and a 
dissertation Junior appointment. 
He is a member of the Yale Bat- 
tery and Beta Theta Pi. He 
roomed with H. W. Hume at 
613 Wright Freshman year; with 
Hume and E. D. Houlihan in 
Sophomore and Junior years at 
181 Lawrance and 355 White, 
and Senior year with R. A. 
Dudley, D. N. Beach, Jr., and F. 
W. Lorimer at 101 Welch. 

Aiken will enter Union Theo- 
logical Seminary in preparation 
His permanent mail address is 



144 Hancock Street, Auburndale, Mass. 




{%6/^ 9a.-'^^>4'Si^^ 



CHARLES MORGAN ALD- 

RICH, "Morg," "Spieg," was 
born in Passaic, N. J., January 
3, 1893, but has lived in Colorado 
Springs, Colo., for the past fif- 
teen years. 

His father, Charles Spiegle, 
who is a designer in the employ 
of the American Lithograph 
Company of New York, was bom 
in that city, and has always lived 
there. His mother's maiden name 
was Annie E. Morgan. There 
are three children, one son and 
two daughters. 

Morg prepared at St. Paul's 
School, Concord, N. H. He was 
a member of the Freshman Glee 
Club and the choir, and belongs 



GRADUATES 



3 



to the Birthday Club, the Whiffenpoofs, Psi Upsilon, the Elihu 
Club, and is on the Class Supper Committee. The entire four 
years he has roomed -with C. B. and A. M. Munson, at 553 Piersou 
in Freshman, 238 Durfee in Sophomore, 489 Haughton in Junior, 
and 30 Yanderbilt in Senior years. 

Aldrich is not yet certain of his future occupation. His address 
is 1206 Wood Avenue, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



WALDO MORGAX ALLEX, "Baldy," ''Wally," was born 
in Orange, N. J., February 17, 1893, where he lived for sixteen 
years, removing thence to Bloom- 
field, 'N. J., for two years, to 
Orange again for two years, and 
finally to Roland Park, Balti- 
more, Md., where he has lived for 
three years. 

His father, Elisha Hubert Al- 
len, was born in Hanover, Conn., 
March 20, 1857, and has spent 
most of his life in Orange, ]^. J. 
He is now business manager of 
the Oilman Country School at 
Roland Park, Baltimore. He 
married Jane Elizabeth Durand, 
of Lake Forest, 111. They have 
had four children, of whom three 
are now living. Yale relatives 
include Jeremiah L)ay, 1795, 
president of Yale College, 1817- 
1846 ; Henry C. Allen, 1893 ; 

Hubert C. Downs, 1896 S. ; Arthur F. Yaggy, 1901, and C. 
Durand Allen, 1913. 

Baldy prepared at the Lake Forest Academy and The Hill 
School, Pottstown, Pa. He has belonged to the Apollo Glee Club, 
the University Glee Club, the University Quartet, the Double 
Quartet, and the College Choir, and won his numerals on the 
Freshman Relay Team. He sang in the chorus of "Quentin Dur- 
ward," was press manager of the Dramatic Association, treasurer 
of the College Christian Association, treasurer of the Senior 
Promenade Committee, and is a member of the Yale Batterv, 




^M ^. CUL^. 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



'I'lic Hill School ('lul), Kcouoiiiics ( 'lub, Zi'ta i'isi, and llic l^liliu 
( 'lul). Ill Fi-t'slmiaii year he roomed at 668 Wright, witli E. W. 
Hubbard and F. I). Dowiu'v; with Hubbard, Downey, K. J. 
Tener and S. L. Bullivant at 171 and ^~2 Lawrance in Sopho- 
iiiorc year; with Bullivant, -lunior and Senior years, at 343 White 
and 12<S Welch, respectively. 

Allen exjiects to enter the wholesale grocery business, and his 
permanent address will be care Durand <fe Kasper Company, 701 
West Lake Street, Chicago, 111. 



HENRY HILL ANDERSON, ''The Dane," "Heinie," "Andy," 
was born on December 19, 1893, in New York City, where he has 

since lived, although he has spent 
a ])art of each year in Ridgefield, 
Conn., and Great Neck, Long 
Island. 

Henry Burrall Anderson, his 
father, was horn January 2, 1863, 
in New York (Hty, which is still 
his home, and where he is of the 
law firm of Anderson & Ander- 
son. He was graduated from 
Yale in 1885, and from the Har- 
vard Law School in 1886. Mrs. 
Anderson's name was Marie 
Larocque, a resident also of New 
York City. They have two sons. 
Aside from his father, Anderson 
numbers among his Yale rela- 
tives William B. Anderson, '86, 
an uncle; Chandler P. Anderson, 
'87, also an uncle, and a cousin, 
Grenville Tremain Anderson, in the Class of 1919. 

Andy prepared at the Adirondack-Florida School, and in col- 
lege received second division honors in Freshman year, an oration 
Junior appointment, was manager of the Banjo and Mandolin 
Club, a member of the Glee Club, the University Club, Yale Bat- 
tery, Psi Upsilon, Wolf's Head, B. P., Ptombers, and the Corin- 
thian Yacht Club. Freshman year he roomed with Richard 
Lanpher, at 636 Wright. In Sophomore, Junior and Senior years 




VAj>»««.^. \4.0^ Ook^ ^^«x&« 



GRADUATES 



lie roomed with Arthur Bliss Lane, at 216 Fariiain, 447 Fayer- 
weather, and 98 Welch, respectively. 

Anderson will enter the Haiward Law School, to prepare him- 
self for work as a law^yer. His address is 375 Park Avenue, 
New York Citv. 



AAROI^ FREDERICK APSEL, "Happy," was born in :N"ew 
Haven, Conn., August 12, 1894, and has always lived there. 

His father, Moritz Apsel, was 
born in Krakau, Austria, Xovem- 
ber 27, 1863, came to New Haven 
and located, and has passed the 
greater part of his life in that 
city as a merchant. Mrs. Ap- 
sel, whose name was Dorothy 
Schneider, resided in jSTew^ A'ork 
City before her marriage. Of 
their three children one son and 
one daughter are now living. 

Happy prepared at the New 
Haven High School. He received 
a dissertation Junior appoint- 
ment and is a member of two 
New Haven societies, the Adel- 
phi and the Harmonic. He has 
lived at his home, 537 Whitney 
Avenue, New Haven, Conn., 
during his four years at college. 

Apsel expects to enter the law, and his address is 537 Whitney 
Avenue, Ncav Haven, Conn. 




^.- 7^ CdLy^L€^ 






SIGMUND JOHN ARCHENHOLD, "Arch," "Sig," was 
born in Waco, Texas, February 17, 1894, and spent the first fifteen 
years of his life there ; the three following years in Wiesbaden, 
Germany. 

Sigmund Archenhold, his father, was born in Westphalia, Ger- 
many, November 1, 1849, came to America, and settled in Waco, 
Texas, where he has land interests, and is a director in the First 
National Bank. Mrs. Archenhold was Lisette Meyerhoff, also of 
Westphalia, Germany, and there were four sons and two daugh- 
ters in the family, of whom five are living. 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



School. 



Arch prepared for college at 
the Waco High School, and at 
the Real Gymnasium, Wies- 
baden, Germany. During his 
course at Yale lie received third 
division honors in Junior year, 
and an oration .Junior appoint- 
ment, lie is a member of 
the Southern Club. During 
Freshman year he roomed alone 
at 203 York Street ; with C. W. 
Willey and E. E. Schwien, at 185 
Farnam, in Sophomore year; 
with C. W. Willey at 473 Haugh- 
ton, in Junior year ; and with C. 
W. Willey and A. M. Brown, at 
1 Yanderbilt, during Senior year. 

Archenhold expects to study 
law at the Columbia Law 
His permanent address is Waco, Texas. 




i/.^- ^LU.i.^^^^<^^ 




-y^Cuup /2. i2>^t^ 



HANS ALBERT ASCHER 

was born in Germany, November 
14, 1895, and at the age of ten, 
came to Springfield, Mass., where 
he has since lived. 

His father, Morris Ascher, was 
born in Germany, March 17, 
1850, and his life has been spent 
in Germany and Springfield, 
Mass., where he is now a real 
estate broker. Mrs. Ascher was, 
before marriage, Amalie Bod- 
laender, of Germany. There Avere 
seven children in the family, of 
whom six are living. 

Ascher prepared at the public 
schools and high school in 
Springfield, Mass. He received 
a first colloquy in Junior year, 



GRADUATES 



was a member of the Freshman Debating Club, and chairman of 
the executive committee, and also president of the Political Econ- 
omy Club, in the organization of which he aided. He roomed at 
454 Fayerweather, with R. D. Houlihan, in Freshman year; at 
241 Durfee, with C. A. Veasey, Jr., Sophomore year; at 461 
Fayerweather, with W. J. Wiese, Junior year, and at 42 
Vanderbilt, with W. J. Wiese and P. M. Thompson, Senior year. 
Ascher expects to engage in mercantile business, and his ad- 
dress is 326 Central Street, Springfield, Mass. 



KIRBY ATTERBURY, "Cub," was born in Chicago, III, 
September 1, 1894, and has always lived there. 

His father, George Stone Atterbury, who was born in Paterson, 
N. J., is now in the railroad business in Chicago, where he is 
general agent for the Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Railway. His 
mother, who was Lizzie Reynolds, was also a native of Paterson, 
N. J., and the family consists of two sons and two daughters. 

Cub prepared at the University 
High School, Chicago, and at 
Phillips-Andover. He received a 
second colloquy in Junior year, 
and is a member of Alpha Delta 
Phi. 

During Freshman year he 
roomed at 262 York Street with 
C. H. Roberts, Jr., and H. S. 
Buck; with R. E. Lee, C. H. 
Roberts, W. B. Ryan and H. S. 
Buck, at 142 Lawrance, in 
Sophomore year; with R. E. Lee 
and H. S. Buck at 346 Fayer- 
weather, in Junior year, and 
with the same men, at 647 
"Wright, during Senior year. 

Atterbury intends to study law 
at the Chicago Law School, and 
his address is 5642 Kenwood 
Avenue, Chicago, 111. 




LESLIE EDWARDS BABCOCK, "Les," "Bab," "Bab- 
bie," was born in N'ew Haven, Conn., on September 21, 1891, 



8 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



and with the exception of eight 
years in Old Saybrook, has lived 
there always. 

His father, Robert Anderson 
Babcock, was born in Xew 
Haven, Conn., Jannary 27, 1861, 
and his life has been largely spent 
tliere. He is manager of the 
Automatic Machine Company. 
Mrs. Babcock was Emma Joseph- 
ine Edwards before her mar- 
riage, and her home was in 
Bridgchampton, N. Y. The fam- 
ily now consists of two sons and 
one daughter. One son died. 

Les i)repared at the Morgan 
School, in Clinton, Conn., and 
speut one j'ear at Brown Univer- 
sity before entering Yale. He 
received the Hale Scholarship Senior year; Avas a member of the 
Class Baseball Team, secretary of the Political Economy Club, 
associate member of the Dramatic Club, and belongs to Zeta Psi. 
Babcock roomed at home during the four years of his college life. 
He expects to study at the Yale School of Law, and his address 
is 116 Muuson Street, jVew Haven, Conn. 




\j_,iJi^_:t_ (^ch^yJ^i-^cA^ ] ■J cxX-c-OT^*^. 



MALCOLM JOHXS BABER, "Babe," was boru ou the fifth 
day of June, 1894, at Pottsville, Pa. 

His father, William Davis Baber, was born at Port Carbon, 
Pa., March 23, 1851, and has lived the greater part of his life 
in Pottsville, Pa., where he was engaged in the lumber business, 
but is now retired. His mother, before her marriage, was Eliza- 
beth Miles Johns, and her home was in St. Clair, Pa. One son 
and one daughter are living. William Atkins, Jr., a relative, was 
a member of the Class of 1906 S. 

Babe prepared at the Pottsville High School, and at Hotchkiss. 
He received third division honors in Freshman year, was given an 
oration appointment in Junior year, and has belonged to various 
musical organizations, including Freshman and Apollo Banjo and 
Mandolin Club. He is captain of the Duelling Sword Team, one 
of the executive committee of the Cerele Frangais, and took part in 



GRADUATES 



its plays of 1913-1914. He is 
also a member of the Hotchkiss 
Club. He roomed with A. R. 
Felty, at 620 Wright, in Fresh- 
man year; with W. J. Freeman, 
Jr., at 424 Fayerweather and 165 
Lawrance, in Sophomore year ; 
with F. E. Toole, at 408 Berke- 
ley and 455 Fayerweather, in 
Junior year, and with G. Mur- 
phy and D. Aubry Quarles, at 43 
Vanderbilt, during his Senior 
year. 

Baber expects to enter the Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy, Boston, Mass., to further fit 
himself for the engineering pro- 
fession. His permanent address 
is Pottsville, Pa. 




Kji<Xv 



V&fvvv^_ 



©olU. 



ARCHER WAYLAND 
BACHMAN, ''Arch," "Bach," 
was born in Orange, ]^. J., July 
25, 1894, and has always lived 
there. 

His father, Absalom Pierre 
Bachman, was born in Easton, 
Pa., March 31, 1861, and lived 
there for twenty years, removing 
thence to Orange, N. J., where 
he has since lived. He was grad- 
uated at Lafayette with the de- 
gree of B.A. in 1881, and is 
engaged in the practice of law. 
Mrs. Bachman was Bessie Mat- 
thews Ennis, of Orange, X. J. ; 
there are three sons and one 
daughter in the family. Stanley 
M. Bachman, e.r-'13, is a brother. 




CUaAjl^ (yd ^_/j(S.-eXL.v 



10 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Arcli j)reparcd at the Orange High School. He received a 
second colloquy in Junior year, took part in the dramatics in 1913, 
and is a member of the Deutscher Verein. 

He roomed with Charles Parker Eddy, at 554 Pierson, in Fresh- 
man year; with Henry Kingsley Blake during Sophomore, Junior 
and Senior years, at 169 Lawrance, 332 "White and 71 Connecticut, 
respectively. 

Bachman expects to enter the mercantile business, and liis ad- 
dress is 39 Park Street, Orange, N. J. 



HAROLD CHAPMAN BAI- 
LEY, "Bill," was born December 
24, 1893, in West Avon, Conn. 

Rev. Gurdon Eranklin Bailey, 
his father, graduated from Yale 
College in 1891, from the Yale 
School of Religion in 1903, and 
is, at present, minister to the 
Congregational Church at Col- 
linsville, Connecticut. Mrs. Bai- 
ley was Mary Swan Chapman. 
Ebenezer Rosseter, 1718, and 
John Cotton Rosseter, 1756, are 
Yale relatives. 

Bailey prepared at the Mor- 
gan School, and at the Collinsville 
High School. He received a dis- 
sertation appointment. Among 
other matters, he has been 
especially interested in various aspects of mediaevalism principally 
as expressed in Gothic architecture, and in mediaeval literature. 

He roomed alone during Freshman year in 705 Taylor Hall; 
Sophomore year with H. S. Corlett in 150 Lawrance; Junior year 
with E. L. Sheldon and H. S. Corlett in 422 Berkeley; Senior 
year with J. S. G. Bolton and L. E. Porter in 78 Connecticut. 

Bailey expects to teach English. His permanent address is Sun- 
set Terrace, Collinsville, Conn. 




y^^C^ (X^^t^-^ 4?-<:^ 



DANFORD NEWTON BARNEY, JR., "Dan," "Sunshine," 
was born in Farmington, Conn., July 21, 1892, and has lived at 



GRADUATES 



11 



various times in Farmington ; York, Maine ; Waterto-mi, Conn. ; 
Phoenix, Ariz., and Tyrone, ]^. Mex. 

His father is Danford ]^ewton Barney, who was born in Berlin, 
Conn., January 10, 1859, and was graduated from Yale with the 
Class of '81. He has lived in Farmington and in Hartford, where 
he is now treasurer of the Hartford Electric Light Company. His 
mother Avas Laura Dunham, of Hartford, Conn., and there are five 
children living. Yale relatives include, besides a brother in the 
Class of 1918, a grandfather, uncle, great uncle, and several cousins. 

Dan prepared for college in 
the public school in Farmington, 
with a tutor, and had four years 
at the Taft School, Watertown, 
Conn. He was a member of the 
Apollo and L^niversity Glee Clubs, 
and was the founder of the Taft 
Debating Club. He was captain 
of the L'niversity Bowling Team 
in 1912-13. He roomed alone 
Freshman year, at 661 Wright ; 
alone Sophomore year at 357 
White; alone Junior year at 496 
Haughton, and Senior year with 
Foster Williams, at 71 College St. 

Barney expects to devote him- 
self to art. His address is Farm- 
ington, Conn. '^~~BNarrv^<3F^j3oJ-\-r^,*l_ 




EDWARD SEBRI^'G BASSETT, "Sebe," "Bass," was born 
in Tarrytown, N". Y., December 1, 1893, and lived there for twelve 
years. 

His father, Edwin Barton Bassett, was born in Athol. Mass., 
January 11, 1864, but has spent the most of his life in Tarrytown, 
IST. Y., and ISTew York City, where he is a broker, with the firm 
of Orris Brothers. Mrs. Bassett's name was Marie Gertrude 
Sebring, and she was a resident of Charleston, S. C. Five chil- 
dren are living. 

Sebe prepared at Lawrence Academy, Groton, Mass., the 
Charleston School, Charleston, S. C, and the Choate School, Wal- 



12 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




liiigford, Coiiii. He rowed on 
one of the club crews in Sopho- 
more year, received a second col- 
loquy in Junior year, and was 
])re8ident of tlie Choate Club. 
He is a member of the Yale Bat- 
tery. He roomed with Charles 
F. Neave at 662 Wright, in 
Freshman year; with Donald C. 
Fitts, 84 Farnani, in Sophomore 
year; with J. Kennedy Wood 
and D. P. Robinson, at 444 Fay- 
erweather, in Junior year, and 
with Wood and J. H. Burnett in 
Senior year, at 45 Vanderbilt. 

Bassett will go into the manu- 
facturing business. His address 
is Apartment 83, 507 West 113th 
Street, New York City. 




i^cxx/vJl'VX^aeJU^V 



DAVID NELSON BEACH, 
JR., "Dave," "Shorty," was 
born in Cambridge, Mass., June 
17, 1894, and has since lived 
in Minneaj^olis, Minn., Denver, 
Colo., Bennington, Vt., and Ban- 
gor, Me. 

His father, David Nelson 
Beach, Avas born November 30, 
1848, in South Orange, N. J., 
and was graduated from Yale 
with the degree of B.A. in 1872, 
and B.D. in 1876. He also re- 
ceived the degree of D.D. from 
Western Reserve College in 1896. 
He is a minister, and at the 
present time is president of the 
Bangor Theological Seminary, 
Bangor, Maine. Mrs. Beach's 



GRADUATES 



13 



maiden name was Lillian Tappan, and her home was in Gloucester, 
Mass. Four children are living. Yale relatives besides his 
father are John Wickliffe Beach, '64; Harlan P. Beach, '78; 
several cousins; a brother, Joseph W. Beach, 1911; Paul M. 
Atkins and Earle K. Cummings, 1911; Robert S. Cornish, 1916. 

Dave prepared at the Bangor High School, and at Andover. 
He received honors, first division, and a philosophical oration 
appointment in Junior year, is a member of Beta Theta Pi, Phi 
Beta Kappa, and of the Andover Club. He has been out for 
track, Avas a member of the Freshman debating team and of the 
University Debating Association. He is a member of the executive 
committee of the Christian Association. 

He roomed with Frank W. Lorimer, at 535 Pierson, in Fresh- 
man year; with Lorimer and Raymond A. Dudley, in Sophomore 
year, at 434 Fayerweather; with Lorimer and Dudley at 466 
Fayerweather, in Junior year; and Avitli Lorimer, Dudley, and 
Edwin E. Aiken, at 101-104 Welch, during his Senior year. 

Beach expects to enter the Bangor Theological Seminary, and 
to become a minister. His permanent address is 319 Union Street, 
Bangor, Maine. 



ROBERT BEALE, '^Bob," 
was born in Wallace, Idaho, Oc- 
tober 27, 1893. 

His father, Charles Wesley 
Beale, was born in Lima, X. Y., 
November 11, 1861, spending his 
youth there and later removing 
to Wallace, Idaho, where he is 
an attorney at law. His mother 
was Harriet Leona Hubbell, and 
she lived in Altona, 111., before 
her marriage. There are two 
children in the family. 

Bob prepared at the Wallace 
High School, Wallace, Idaho, 
the Cutler Academy, Colorado 
Springs, Colo., and at Phillips- 
Exeter Academy. He was a 
member of the Debating Assooia- 




fteWV-^toAt,. 



14 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



tioii, 1914-1915, and received a second dispute appointment in 
Junior year. He belongs to Delta Kappa Epsilon, and to the 
Exeter Club. 

During Freshman year he roomed with Ormrod Titus, at 432 
Fayerweather ; Sophomore and Junior years with Titus at 139 
Welch and 472 Kaughton respectively, and during his Senior year 
with Nelson M. Way, at ')1 Yanderbilt. 

Beale intends entering the Harrard Law School, and iiis address 
is 107 Cedar Street, Wallace. Idaho. 




MORRIS BURKE BELK- 
XAP, "Bunny," '^lorrie," was 
born in Louisville, Ky., January 
30, 1893. 

His father, Morris Burke 
Belknap, was born in Louisville, 
Ky., June 7, 1856, and lived 
there until his death, April 13, 
1910. He was graduated from 
Yale in the Class of '77 S., and 
was engaged in the hardware 
business, under the name of 
Belknap Hardware & Manufac- 
turing Company. Mrs. Belk- 
nap's maiden name was Lily 
Buckner, and her home before 
marriage was in Hart County, 
Kentucky. She died December 
29, 1893. The family consisted of 
two sons and two daughters, of whom three are now living. Aside 
from his father, his Yale relatives include Walter K. Belknap, 
'08 S. ; William B. Belknap, '08 ; William R. Belknap, '69 S. ; 
William B. Allen, '89 S. ; Charles A. Allen, '55 ; Lafon Allen, '93 ; 
Arthur D. Allen, '01, and Charles W. Allen, '81. 

Bunny prepared at Paterson-Davenport School, Louisville, Ky., 
and the Morristown School, Morristown, IST. J. He received 
honors of the third division in Junior year, and a first dis- 
pute appointment. He is a member of Zeta Psi, and of the 
Southern Club. He roomed with Lawrence G. Williams, at 656 
Wright, in Freshman year; Avith T. A. Buckner, Jr., at 148 Law- 



iCXiA>*\t '0(A\\-u«iO. 



GRADUATES 



15 



ranee, in Sophomore year; Junior and Senior years with Wil- 
liam A. Brown, Jr., at 459 Tayerweather and 63 Vanderbilt. 

Belknap expects to devote himself to art. His permanent 
address is The Midlands, R. B. 1, Station A, Louisville, Ky. 



LLOYD BISSELL, "Biss," 
Avas born in Buffalo, oST. Y., 
August 12, 1891. 

His father, Arthur Douglas 
Bissell, was born in jN^ew Lon- 
don, X. Y., January 10, 1844, 
and was graduated from A^ale in 
the Class of 1867. He has lived 
the greater part of his life in 
Buffalo, where he is a banker, 
president of the Peoples Bank 
of Buffalo. Yale relatives in- 
clude, aside from his father, 
an uncle, Wilson S. Bissell, 
1869 ; and three brothers, How- 
ard Bissell, 1900, Eaymond Bis- 
sell, 1902, and Arthur D. Bissell, 
Jr., 1906. 

Biss prepared at the Lafayette 
High School, Buffalo, X. Y., at 
the Salisbury School, Salisbury, Conn., and the Nichols School, 
Buffalo, X. Y. He received a dissertation Junior appointment, 
and is a member of O. C. C. and the Yale Battery. He roomed 
during Freshman year with S. L. Hoff, at 496 Haughton; Sopho- 
more year with Xorman Penney, at 129 Welch ; Junior and Senior 
years Avith Lawrence G. Williams, at 372 White and 19 Vanderbilt. 

Bissell expects to enter business in Buffalo, and his permanent 
address is 950 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, X. Y. 




HEXRY KIXGSLEY BLAKE, "King," was born in Engle- 
wood, X. J., December 10, 1894. 

His father, Henry William Blake, was born in Xew Haven, 
Conn., December 7, 1865, was graduated from the Sheffield Scien- 
tific School in the Class of 1886, and has lived mostly in Engle- 



16 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



wood, ^'. .1., niid ill Xcw York 
City, where he is editor-in-chief 
of the Electric Railway Journal. 
Mrs. Blake Avas Ida Jewett, and 
her home, before marriage, was 
iu Brooklyn, X. Y., and Staten 
Island, X. Y. There are two 
children livin<r. Yale relatives 
incliulc -lames J^uce Kingsley, 
1799; Eli Whitney Blake, 1816; 
Henry T. Blake, 1848; Edward 
F. Blake, 1858; James K. Blake, 
1891. 

King prepared at the Taft 
School, Watertown, Conn. He 
received honors of the first divi- 
sion, and a philosophical oration 
appointment in Junior year. He 
belongs to the University Debat- 
ing Association, to Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, the Cosmopolitan 
Club, the Taft School Club and the Yale Battery. He roomed 
with Coolidge Billings in Freshman year, at Pierson Hall; in 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior years with Archer W. Baclnnan, 
at 169 Lawrance, 332 White and 71 Connecticut. 

Blake expects to enter the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
Xew York City, and ultimately to practice medicine. His address 
is Lydecker Street, Englewood, X. J. 




M<ytru^ /uA<(y^.i£y. /i^aJijL^ 



JOSEPH AUGUSTUS BLAKE, JR., was born in Xew York 
City, October 29, 1891. 

His father, Joseph Augustus Blake, Avas gradiuited at Yale in 
1885, receiving a degree at Shelf the following year, and an 
M.D. from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia, in 
1889. In 1909 Yale conferred upon him an honorary M.A. in 
recognition of his distinguished work as a surgeon. His mother 
was Catharine Ketchum of Saugatuck, Conn. There are two sons 
in the family. One grandfather was graduated from Sheff in 
1852, while the other received an honorary Ph.B. degree in 1865 
at Yale. 



GRADUATES 



17 



Joe prepared at the Taft 
School and in college was a mem- 
ber of the Taft School Club, the 
Yale Battery, and the University 
Gun Club. He roomed at 242 
York Street during 1911-12; 
our Freshman year at 7 Library 
Street; Sophomore year at 248 
Durfee; Junior year at 357 
White and this year at 62 Yan- 
derbilt, the last three years with 
Clement Ripley. 

Blake's home address is 138 
East Thirty-seventh Street, Xew 
York Citv. 




GEORGE REDDINGTOX BLODGETT, "George," "Blodg," 



was born in Schenectady, X. Y. 
New York City, w^here he has 
since lived, when he was two 
years old. 

His father, George Reddington 
Blodgett, was born in Bangor, 
Maine, September 17, 1862, and 
was graduated from Yale in the 
Class of 1884. He spent most of 
his life in Boston, Mass., and 
Xew York, and was a patent law- 
yer, of the firm of Bentley & 
Blodgett, and later senior coun- 
sel for the General Electric Com- 
pany. He died in Schenec- 
tady, X. Y., December 4, 1897. 
Mrs. Blodgett was Katharine 
Buchanan Burr, and she lives in 
Xew York City. There are two 
children living. 

George prepared at the Col- 



May 2, 1895, and removed to 




t^ n nUxL^b^ 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



legiatc iSc'liool in Xcw ^'ork ( "ity. He rcccivt'd a first (lis])Uto 
appointment in .Junior year, was a iiumuIxt of the Yale City (Jov- 
ernuient Club, and has parti('i]»atod in Class hockey, lie roomed, 
in Freshman year, with Frederick L. Ganiage, at 616 Wright; 
with Arthur F. Morrill during Sophomore, Junior and Senior 
years, at 218 Farnam, 3S0 White, and 131 AVelch. resiiectively. 

Blodgett Avill enter the Harvard Law School, and his address 
is Christodora House, 147 Avenue B, Xew York City. 



WILLIAM KOBERT BLUM, 

"Bob," was born in Xew York 
City, November 17, 1894. 

His father, Joseph A. Blum, 
who is a silk merchant, was 
born in Xew Y'ork City, Xovem- 
ber 2, 1859, and has lived there 
and in France. Mrs. Blum, who 
Avas also born in Xew Y'ork 
City, w^as Flora Rothschild be- 
fore marriage. There are two 
sons in the family. Among the 
Y'ale relatives are a brother, 
Alexander Blum, 1912; George 
A. Seligmann, a cousin, 1908 ; 
and Herbert X. Arnstein, also a 
cousin, 1905. 

Bob prepared at the Columbia 
Grammar School, Xew Y'ork, 
and at Andover. He was a member of the Andover Club, the 
1916 Class Hockey Team, Lacrosse Team, and the Yale Battery. 
He roomed alone during Freshman and Sophomore years, at 609 
Wright, and 138 Welch; during Junior 3'ear he roomed with 
Adam L. Gimbel, at 439 FayerAveather ; and during Senior year 
alone, at 48 Vanderbilt. 

Blum intends to enter the mercantile business, and his address 
is 19 East Twenty-fourth Street, XeAv Y'ork City. 




2<J ^^.y-uS 0^0.-.^ 



ALLEX HITCHCOCK BOARDMAX, born in Meriden, 
Conn., July 15, 1894, removed Avhen a child to Waterbury, Conn., 
where he still lives. 



GRADUATES 



19 




His father, Francis Barbour 
Boardmaii, Avas born in Lynn- 
field, Mass., December 12, 1864, 
but has lived mostly in Meriden, 
Conn., and Waterbury, Conn., 
where he is the secretary and 
treasurer of the City Lumber cV 
Coal Company. His mother, 
who was Mary Parker Hitch- 
cock, before her marriage lived 
in Brimfield, Mass. Allen is the 
only child. A Yale relative is 
William B. Boardman, 1893, and 
1898 L. 

Allen prepared at the Crosby 
High School in Waterbury. He 
was awarded first division honors 
in Freshman year, and the Ben- 
jamin F. Barge Mathematical 

Prize in both Freshman and Sophomore years. In Junior year 
he received first division honors, and a philosophical oration 
appointment. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, 
Alpha Delta Phi, the City Government Club, and was on the 
Freshman Track and Cross Country squads. He roomed with 
Harold S. Gulliver in Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years, at 
663 Wright, 170 Lawrance, and 460 Fayerweather ; during Senior 
year he roomed with Gulliver and Xornian H. Piatt, at 23 Van- 
derbilt. 

Boardman is undecided as to his future career; his address is 
78 Chestnut Avenue, Waterbury, Conn. 



(2M^ M /3i^^i^^^ 



01^*1^ 



GOHDOX BODEXWEIX was born in Xew London, Conn., 
May 10, 1893, and that city is still his home. 

His father, Theodore Bodenwein, was born in Diisseldorf, Ger- 
many, in 1863, has spent the most of his life in Xew London, and 
is there engaged in business as a publisher, owner of the Xew 
London Bay. Mrs. Bodenwein (Sarah Jane Muir) was born in 
Xew London. There are two children living. 

Gordon prepared at the Mackenzie School, Dobbs Ferry-on- 
Hudson, X. Y., and while in college has served on the Lit Board, 



20 



lIJSrORY OF THE CLASS 




and belonged to the Elizabethan 
Club, and Pundits. In Fresh- 
man year he roomed with Ells- 
worth Bunker, at 570 Pierson; 
with (Jilbert McC. Troxell, in 
Sophomore year, at 235 Durfee ; 
Junior year alone at 491 Haugli- 
tou, and Avith Troxell, at 96 
Welch, during Senior year. 

Bodenwein is undecided as to 
the future, and his address is 
Mohican Hotel, New London, 
Conn. 



^^^Tid^^ii^ X^''2t!!^*<:*<^Z*— c^ 



JOSEPH SHELDON GERRY BOLTON, "Judge," "Jerry," 
"Joe," was born in New Haven, Conn., October 6, 1893. 

His father is James Robert 
Bolton, Avho was born in Halifax, 
Nova Scotia, September 5, 1852. 
He has lived largely in New 
Haven, where he is a newspaper 
publisher. His mother was Fran- 
ces Sheldon ; there are four 
children in the family. Yale 
relatives are Joseph Sheldon 
(grandfather), '51, '53 L. ; a 
brother, Clarence H. Bolton, 
1913, 1915 L.; and an uncle, 
Edward M. Tillinghast, '88. 

Judge prepared under private 
tutors at home, and in college 
was awarded the Galpin Latin 
Entrance Prize; first division 
honors in Freshman year ; Berke- 
ley Latin Prize 1913-14; second 
Winthrop Prize; part of second 




Q^>W-^ ^. ^ (J^^^X^n^. 






GRADUATES 



21 



Ten Eyck Prize ; second Lucius F. Robinson Latin Prize ; first 
division honors Junior year, also a philosophical oration appoint- 
ment in Junior year; passed the Rhodes Scholarship examina- 
tion, and held the Calliopean Scholarship. He is a member of 
Alpha Chi Rho, and Phi Beta Kappa. During Freshman year 
he roomed at home; Sophomore and Junior years with Herbert 
C. Jackson, at 220 Farnam, and 381 White ; during Senior year 
he roomed Avith Harold C. Bailey and Lyman E. Porter, at 78 
Connecticut. 

Bolton intends to enter the Yale Graduate School, and to devote 
himself to educational work. His address is 61 Division Street, 
New Haven, Conn. 



LUCIUS COMSTOCK BOLTWOOD was born in Grand 
Rapids, Mich., May 3, 1894, and still lives there. 

His father, Lucius Boltwood, was born in Amherst, Mass., and 
was graduated from Yale with the degree of B.A. in 1883, and 
LL.B. in 1886. He has lived in Grand Rapids since 1887 where 
he practices law with his two brothers, under the firm name of 
Boltwood (fc Boltwood. His mother, Etta Monique Comstock, 
daughter of Hon. Charles C. 
Comstock, Congressman from 
Michigan, graduated at St. Mar- 
garet's School, Waterbury, Conn., 
in 1887, and has always lived in 
Grand Rapids. Lucius has one 
brother, Chester, who is prepar- 
ing for Yale at Phillips Acad- 
emy, Andover, Mass. Yale 
relatives include Edward Bolt- 
wood, '60; Thomas Kast Bolt- 
wood, '64; George S. Boltwood, 
'82 and '85 L. ; Charles W. Bolt- 
wood, '90 and '92 L. ; Edward 
Boltwood, '92, and Bertram B. 
Boltwood, '92 S. 

Lucius prepared at the Grand 
Rapids Central High School. 
He received a first dispute ap- 
pointment in Junior year. He 




i^^^^^-e^a^^c^^ C . Z^-zi^^^S'-zrzT^ 



22 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



roomed alone during Freshman year, at G64 Wriglit ; with Charles 
Daly King during Sophomore and .Junior years, at 14!t Lawranee 
and 247 White. 

Boltwood eompleted his four-year course in tliree years and 
entered the University of Michigan Law I)ei)artment at Ann 
xVrbor, in October, 1915. His permanent address is 60") Michigan 
Trust Company Building, Grand Eapids, Mich. 




EGBERT CYRUS BOOTH, 

"Bob," "Cy," was born in 
Plattsburg, N. Y., July 21, 1894. 
His father, John Henry Booth, 
was born in Vergennes, Vt., 
December 20, 1863, was grad- 
uated at Yale in the Class of 
'85, and from the Columbia Law 
School in the Class of '87. The 
most of his life has been spent in 
Plattsburg, Avhere he practices 
law. Mrs. Booth was Marie 
Theresa Parkhurst, of Platts- 
burg. The family consists of 
two sons and one daughter. Y^ale 
relatives include, aside from his 
father, a brother, John P. Booth, 
1914, and Charles M. Edwards, 
1894 S. 
Bob prepared at the Plattsburg High School. Since entering 
college he has belonged to the Freshman Glee C*lub, the Fresh- 
man Track Squad, the Soccer Team, received a Senior Record 
Charm, and received third division honors and an oration ap- 
pointment in Junior year. He is an associate member of the 
Dramatic Association and a member of Zeta Psi. In Freshman 
year he roomed with Lawrence Healy, at 642 Wright ; with Nor- 
man Piatt in Sophomore and Junior years, at 199 Farnam and 
465 Fayerweather ; during Senior year with Lewis Miller, 2d, at 
29 Vanderbilt. 

Booth expects to enter the Albany Law School, and his address 
is Plattsburg, N. Y. 



(rknj''\l<yZX-t>^i^ . 



GRADUATES 



23 



WILLIAM McECHRON 
BOWDEX, "Bill," was born in 
Glens Ealls, N. Y., September 8, 
1893, and has since lived there. 

His father, Hugh Andrew 
Bowden, was born in Troy, N. 
Y., in 1855, spent most of his life 
in Xew York, where he was in 
the lumber business, and died in 
1895. His mother was Margaret 
McEchron before her marriage, 
and her home in Glens Falls, 
]Sr. Y. There is one daughter and 
one son in the family. 

Bill prepared at Lawrenceville 
and at Andover. He received a 
first dispute in Junior year, is a 
member of Alpha Delta Phi, and 
of the Andover Club. He 

roomed Avith T. C. Sherman, at 631 Wright, in Freshman year; 
with John D. Shove during Sophomore and Junior years, at 256 
Durf ee and 346 White ; during Senior year he roomed with Shove 
and L. P. Graves, at 671 Wright. 

Bowden will enter the Laurentide Paper Company of Canada; 
and his address is Grand Mere, Que., Canada. 







SHELDOIST JACKSON BRADY, "Shel," was born in Sitka, 
Alaska, September 22, 1892, and lived there for the first fourteen 
years of his life, later spending some time in Brookline, Mass., and 
in Xew York City. 

His father, John Green Brady, was born in Xew York City, 
and Avas graduated from Yale in 1874, and Union Theological 
Seminary in 1876. Most of his life has been spent in Sitka, 
Alaska. He was governor of Alaska from 1897 to 1906, but is 
now interested in mining, and is president of the Yonona Associ- 
ates, Incorporated. Mrs. Brady was Jane Elizabeth Patton, her 
home before marriage being Cochranton, Pa. Yale i-elatives are 
his father, and a brother, Hugh P. Brady, Yale 1914. 

Shel prepared at the Brookline High School, and at Phillips- 
Andover. He received a second colloquy in Junior year. He was 



24 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




yCj/UxAA^"-^ V \d->v,o-<\/\^ 



assistant manager of the Wres- 
tling Association of 1914-1915, 
and manager in 1915-1916. went 
out for Freshman football, and 
belongs to Zeta Psi, and the An- 
dover Club. He has roomed with 
George Bentley Meyer the entire 
four years, at 623 Wright, 262 
Durfee, 344 White, and 87 Ton- 
neeticut, respectively. 

Brady plans to enter the 
Columbia School of Chemical 
Engineering, New York City, 
and to devote himself to science 
and engineering. His address is 
Sitka, Alaska. 



EARL RUSSELL BRAGG, "Russ," ''Caleb," "General," was 
born in Moosup, Conn., November 29, 1890, and lived there the 

first ten years of his life, after- 
ward in Stafford Springs, Conn., 
and in Central Village, Conn. 

His father, Charles Bragg, 
was born in Ware, Mass., April 
6, 1858, but has spent the most 
of his life in Moosup. He is a 
manufacturer, and is treasurer of 
the Central Worsted Company. 
His mother's maiden name was 
Estelle Eliza Whitehead. Earl is 
the only child. 

Russ prepared at the Norwich 
Free Academy, and at the Con- 
necticut Literary Institution, at 
Suffield, Conn. He was awarded 
the Plainfield Scholarship for 
1913-14 and also for 1914-15, and 
received a second colloquy in 
Junior year. He belongs to the 




(j>^(%A^^iy^ilLt(xjA<:^^^^ 



GRADUATES 



25 



Norwich Club, serving as president in 1915-16, and Beta Tlieta 
Pi. Freslunan year he roomed alone at 344 Elm Street ; in 
Sophomore year with John A. Gee at 108 Welch; Junior year 
Avith E. B. Smith, at 468 Fayerweather, and Senior year witli 
F. W. Gilbert and M. M. McChesney, at 15 Vanderbilt. 

Bragg intends to enter upon mercantile or manufacturing work ; 
his address is Central Village, Conn. 




LEWIS LEOlSrARD BREDIN 

was born in Piqua, Ohio, I^o- 
vember 23, 1894, but has lived in 
Detroit, Mich. 

His father, Charles Henry 
Bredin, was born in Butler, Pa., 
in 1865, but has lived in Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., and Detroit, Mich., 
where he is president and general 
manager of the Chamberlin 
Metal Weather Strip Company. 
His mother was Grace Leonard, 
and she lived in Piqua before 
marriage. One son and one 
daughter comprise the family. 
Yale relatives are Forrest Leon- 
ard Daniels, 1907, and Thomas 
Leonard Daniels, 1914. 

Lew prepared at the Detroit 
University School and the Detroit Central High School. He was 
on the Record Board, played on the University Golf Team for 
four years, winning his numerals and managing the team in 
Junior year, received a second dispute in Junior year, and belongs 
to Psi Upsilon, Elizabethan Club, Yale Battery, and Wolf's Head. 
He roomed with David O. Hamilton in Freshman, Sophomore 
and Junior years, at 453 Fayerweather, 436 Fayerweather and 
483 Haughton; Senior year Avith Hamilton and LaAvrence G. 
ISToyes, at 68 Vanderbilt. 

Bredin is undecided as to AA^hether he will enter Harvard or 
Michigan Law School, and whether he Avill devote himself to the 
law, or go into the manufacturing business. His address is 81 
Eliot Street, Detroit, Mich. 



Lc^t./X'^ c . 



26 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



HAROLD HIXOX BRIT- 
TIXGHAM, "Brit," was born 
in Madison, Wis., March 21, 
1894. 

His father, Thomas Evans 
Brittinghani, was born in Han- 
nibal, Mo., March 18, 1860, but 
has lived for the past twenty-one 
years in Madison, where he is 
chiefly interested in the lumber 
business. Mrs. Brittingham was 
Mary Clark before marriage and 
she lived in Waterloo, Wis. 
Three children are now living. 

Brit prepared at the Madison 
High School, and at the Hotch- 
kiss School; he was awarded 
second division honors in Fresh- 
man year; first division honors, 
and a high oration in Junior year. He is a member of Beta 
Theta Pi, Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, and of the Hotchkiss Club. 
He has roomed the entire four years with P. AV. Higbee, at 66" 
Wright, 265 Durfee, 341 White, and 112 Welch, respectively. 

Brittingham expects to spend the next four years in the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin and Harvard, and ultimately to practice 
medicine. His address is care T. E. Brittingham, Madison, Wis. 




CHARLES SIDXEY BRODY, "Steve," was born in Xew 
York City, May 24, 1894, and has lived there and in Bridgeport, 
Conn., all his life. 

His father, Samuel Brody, was born in Hungary, March 3, 
1860, but has spent his life in Xew York and Bridgeport, where 
he is engaged in the grocery business. Mrs. Brody was Jeannette 
Breuer, of Xew York City, who died in Xew York, February 22, 
1905. Two children are living. 

Steve prepared at the Bridgeport High School. He was 
awarded a third Lucius F. Robinson Latin Prize in Sophomore 



GRADUATES 



27 



year, and a dissertation aj^point- 
nient in Jnnior year. He lived 
tlironghout the four years at his 
lionie in Bridgeport, Conn. 

Brody expects to enter either 
Yale or Harvard Law School, 
ultimately to practice law. His 
address is 143 Parrott Avenue, 
Bridgeport, Conn. 




^^.. J^^ 




A R T H U E M c K E A ^ 
BE OWN, "Brownie," "Art," 
or "Arth," was born in ISTew 
Castle, Pa., December 16, 1892, 
and has lived there all his life. 

His father, William McKean 
Brown, born in Greenville, Pa., 
September 21, 1850, spent most 
of his life in ISTew Castle, Pa., 
where he was interested in the 
development of real estate. He 
died in ISTew York City January 
31, 1915. Mrs. Brown's name 
before marriage Avas Margaret C. 
Foltz, and her home in Xew 
Castle. Two children comprise 
the family. 

Browuie prepared at the Ashe- 
ville School for Boys, Asheville, 




l0kCC%.^ fi^jCTMn-^ 



28 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



X. C. lie was awarded a second dispute in Junior year. Ho 
roomed alone in Freshman and Sophomore years, at 138 Welch 
and 232 Farnam ; during Junior and Senior years with S. J. 
Archenhold and Charles W. Willey, at 473 Haughton, and 1 
Yanderbilt. 

Brown is undecided between Yale Law School and Columbia 
Law School, in preparation for becoming a lawyer. His address 
is 304 East Street, Xew Castle, Pa. 



HERRICK CROSBY BROWN, "Bro^^^lie," "Bruno," "Cros," 
was born in Melrose, Mass., February 21, 1893, but has lived in 
Boston, Mass., Chicago, 111., Palo Alto, Calif., and Honolulu, 
Hawaii. 

His father, Edward Herrick Brown, was born in Andover, 
Mass., May 14, 1864, spent his boyhood in New Haven, and has 
since lived in Boston, Mass., Chicago, 111., Palo Alto, Calif., and 

Honolulu, Hawaii, being a spe- 
cial agent for various publishing 
houses. His mother Avas Elsie 
Louise Gilbert, and her home 
in Andover, Mass. Their fam- 
ily now consists of five sons. 
Yale relatives include Rev. 
James Pierpont, one of the 
founders of Yale University, 
great grandfather, seven genera- 
tions back; Rev. Claudius Her- 
rick, 1798; Rev. Henry Herrick, 
1822; Dr. Thaddeus Brown, 
1826, being great-great- and 
great-grandfathers ; Rev. Thad- 
deus H. BroAvni, 1860, his grand- 
father ; Edward Claudius Her- 
rick, 1838 Hon., treasurer of 
Yale College, 1852-1862, and 
librarian, 1843-1858, a great- 
great-uncle; Rev. Edward P. Herrick, B.D. 1871, a great-uncle, 
and a cousin, William W. Herrick, 1902 and M.D. 1905. 




/>' " 1/T.-tXl-X ^ • -A^^^rX^^-V-*^ 



GRADUATES 



29 



Brownie prepared at the McKiiiley High School, Honolulu, 
Hawaii, and at Oahu College, Honolulu, and since entering col- 
lege has held the Hawaiian Alumni Scholarship for the four years. 
He is a member of Beta Theta Pi, the Cosmo2:)olitan Club, the 
Yale Battery, the Hawaiian-Yale Club, of which he has been the 
treasurer during Junior and Senior years. He roomed alone in 
Freshman year at 575 Pierson ; Avith S. A. Thompson, at 197 
Parnam, in Sophomore year; with Thompson and P. H. Nichols, 
at 379 White, in Junior year, and during Senior year with 
Thompson, at 88 Connecticut. 

Brown intends to enter the Yale Graduate School, and to devote 
himself to the study of geology. His address is Honolulu, Hawaii. 



WILLIAM ADAMS BROWN", JR., "Bill," was born in New 
York City, November 14, 189-4, and has always lived in and 
about there. 

His father, William Adams Brown, was born in New York City, 
December 29, 1865, and was graduated from Yale Avith the degree 
of B.A. in 1886, received an M.A. in 1888. Ph.D. in 1901, and 
D.D. in 1907, and was also given 
the degree of D.D. by Union 
Theological Seminary in 1890. 
He has lived in New York, and 
is a clergyman, now profes- 
sor of systematic theology in 
Union Theological Seminary. 
His mother resided in St. Paul, 
Minn., before marriage, and her 
name was Helen Oilman Noyes. 
There are three sons and one 
daughter in the family. Yale 
relatives, aside from the father, 
are John C. Brown, 2d, '15 ; R. 
Saltus, Jr., '18 ; Lawrence G. 
Noyes, '16; C. T. Ludington, 
'19; Thatcher M. Brown, '97; 
James C. Brown, '94; R. D. 
Noyes, '05 ; Winthrop G. Noyes, 
'91; Arthur C. Ludington, '02; 




Up^^'t^.le^.^ /2-Ua..r>^^ 



30 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Charles II. Ludiiigtoii, \s7; William IT. Ludiiigton, '87; Moreau 
Delano, '9;"); Eugene Delano, '08; William A. Delano, '0,'), and 
others. 

Bill proi)ared at The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa. He was 
awarded third division honors in Freshman year, and second divi- 
sion honors and an oration in Junior year. He received a Xeivs 
Charm, is vice president of the Spanish Club, and a member of 
The Hill School Club, and Psi Upsilon. Freshman year he 
roomed with K. J. Tener, at 383 Berkeley; with Ellwood 
Thomas, at 242 Durfee, in Sophomore year; with Morris B. 
Belknap in Junior and Senior years, at 459 Fayerweather, and 
63 Vanderbilt, until he left on a year's leave of absence to travel 
in China. 

Brown expects to go into business at the close of his college 
course, and his address is care Brown Brothers & Company, 59 
Wall Street, New York City. 



HOWARD SWAZEY BUCK was born in Chicago, III, October 

23, 1894. 

His father, Carl Darling Buck, was born in Bucksport, !Maine, 

October 2, 1866, and was graduated at Yale with the degree 

of B.A. in 1886, Ph.D. in 
1889, and given the degree of 
Litt.D. by the University of 
Athens in 1912. He has lived 
mostly in Chicago, where he is a 
professor in the University of 
Chicago, and the head of 
the Department of Comparative 
Philology. Mrs. Buck, who was 
Clarinda Darling Swazey before 
marriage, lived in Bucksport, 
Maine. The family contains two 
sons and one daughter. Besides 
his father, his grandfather, Ed- 
ward Buck, is a Yale graduate, 
in the Class of 1852. 




^^nt>-uj-«.-<_-x^ CZL-^-^ cyf^ 



Howard prepared at the Uni- 
versity High School, Chicago, 111., 
and at Andover. He received 
second division honors in Fresh- 



GRADUATES 



31 



man year, third division honors and a dissertation in Junior 
year. He won his numerals on the Freshman Track Team, has 
been on the University Track Squad, was an editor of the Record 
and the Lit. He is Class Poet, a member of Alpha Delta Phi, 
the Elizabethan Club, the Andover Club, and Pundits. During 
Freshman year he roomed at 262 York Street, with C. H. 
Eoberts and Kirby Atterbury; Avith Roberts, Atterbury, R. E, 
Lee and W. Ryan in Sophomore year, at 142 Lawrance ; with 
Atterbury and Lee during Junior and Senior years, at 346 
Fayerweather and 674 Wright. 

Buck expects to continue his studies at Yale, or Chicago Uni- 
versity. His address is 5733 University Avenue, Chicago, 111. 



STUART LODGE BULLIVANT, ''Stu," "Bull," ''Svengali," 
was born in West Newton, Mass., March 23, 1892, and has always 
lived there and in Marion, Mass. 

His father is William Maurice Bullivant, who was born and 
has spent most of his life in Boston, Mass., where he is president 
of the Northwestern Leather Company. His mother was Libbie 
Priseilla Lodge, who died January 21, 1911. There are three 
sons and two daughters in the family. 

Stu prepared at the Newton 
High School and the Allen 
School, Newton, Mass. ; at the 
Ridgefield School, Ridgefield, 
Conn., and at Phillips-Andover. 
He received a first prize in the 
single sculls race in October, 
1914, and rowed on the Second 
Class Crew. He is a member of 
the Yale Battery, the Andover 
Club and Zeta Psi. Freshman 
year he roomed with Dan C, El- 
kin at 583 Pierson; Sophomore, 
Junior and Senior years with 
Waldo M. Allen, at 172 Law- 
rance, 343 White, and 128 Welch. 

Bullivant is undecided as to 
his future occupation. His ad- 
dress is Marion, Mass. 




UyU^i^^iAT^a^ /hu./^^y'y^^^ 



32 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



ELLSWORTH BUNKER, 

"Bunk," ''Elly," was born in 
Yonkers, :N'. Y., May 11, 1894. 

His father, George Raymond 
Bunker, was born in Brooklyn, 
N". Y., in 1845, but has lived for 
the most part in Yonkers, X. Y. 
He is in the business of manu- 
facturing and refining sugar, 
and is general manager of the 
National Sugar Refining Com- 
pany. Mrs. Bunker's nuiiden 
name was Jean Polhemus Cobb, 
and her home was Tarrytown, IST. 
Y. The family consists of three 
sons and one daughter. Yale rel- 
atives include a half brother, 
Raymond U. Bunker, '04 S. ; 
Arthur H. Bunker, '17 S., a 
brother; and a cousin, George H. Bunker, '08 S. 

Bunk prepared at the Mackenzie School. He received second 
division honors in Freshman year, second division honors in 
Junior year, and a high oration appointment in Junior year. 
He was on the second Freshman Crew, and Junior Class Crew, 
and is a member of Zeta Psi, and Single Sculls and Foam. In 
Freshman year he roomed with Gordon Bodenwein, at 570 Pier- 
son; and the following three years with Von Holt, Ransom and 
Geary, at 136 Welch, 337 White, and 136 Welch, respectively. 

Bunker intends to go into the manufacturing business. His 
address is 421 North Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. 




FREDERICK VAUGHN BURGESS, "Bunny," was born in 
Burlington, Vt., September 11, 1892. 

His father, Frederick Elmer Burgess, Avas born in Bennington, 
Vt., in December, 1860, and has spent most of his life in Burling- 
ton, where he is engaged in banking, and in business, being 
president of the Howard National Bank, and of the Horatio 
Hickok Lumber Company. Mrs. Burgess was Agnes Huling, of 



GRADUATES 



33 



Bennington. One son and one 
dangliter constitute the family. 

Bunny j)repared at public 
schools and at St. Paul's School, 
Concord, J^. H. He won nu- 
merals on the Freshman Foot- 
ball Team. He belonged also 
to the Class Baseball Team, the 
University Hockey Team, which 
he captained in Senior year, 
and to the Freshman Glee Club. 
He is also a member of the 
"Turtles," Delta Kappa Epsilon, 
the "Scarabs," the Sword and 
Gun Club, the Uniyersity Club, 
Scroll and Key, and Vermont 
Club, of which he is president. 
He is rice president of St. 
Paul's School Club. His Fresh- 
man year roommate w^as Charles D. Dickey, Jr., at 654 Wright. 
Sophomore year he roomed with Dickey, W. Chatfield-Taylor, 
Philip D. Armour, Walter Hellier and H. J. Crocker, Jr., at 
481 Fayerweather ; Junior year and Senior year with Dickey, 
Taylor, Hellier, Crocker and E. Howe, at 431 Fayerweather and 
119 Welch. 

Burgess is undecided as to Avhether he will enter the Law 
School, or go in for manufacturing or banking. His address is 
Burlington, Yt. 




Vf^/ctct^^ /l?»i-^>*^I? 



y^ 



EGBERT LAWSON" BURKES was born in Welsh, Ala., Feb- 
ruary 21, 1886, and has lived there nearly all his life. 

His father, James Hilliard Burkes, was born in La Grange, Ga., 
but has spent the past forty years in Welsh, Ala., where he has 
farming interests, and is also in business. Before marriage 
Mrs. Burkes was Georgia Ann Hammond, and lived in La Grange, 
Ga. There are eight children in the family. 



34 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




Robert prepared at the La 
Fayette (Ala.) High School, and 
entered Yale in Senior year, hav- 
ing received the degree of B.A. 
from the University of Alabama 
in 1910. He has roomed alone 
at 25 Kent. 

Burkes expects to enter Colum- 
bia, and to devote himself to 
educational work. His address 
is Welsh, Chambers County, Ala. 



(^U-tc^^^ 



a-«-i--^-<rM_ 



^^Q^'i.^^Jic-^ 



JOSEPH HAMILTON BURNETT, "Reddy," "Red," "Eat," 
"St. Peter of Berkeley Hall," was born October 2-i, 1892, in 
East Boston, Mass. 

His father, Thomas L. Burnett, was born in Boston, Mass., 
March 12, 1860, has always lived there, and is a contractor with 
the New England Telephone cV Telegraph Company. His mother 
was Margaret Elizabeth Damery of Boston. Five children are 
living. 

Red prepared at the Boston Latin School, and spent one year 
at the University of Maine, where he was a member of Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon and the football team. After coming to Yale he 
played on the 1916 Class Football Team, served as assistant coach 
to the 1919 Freshman Football Team, and was a candidate for 
the Freshman and University Crews. He received a second 
dispute appointment in Junior year. He roomed with Charles 
MacNeill at 1087 Chapel Street in Freshman year; with Ira 



GRADUATES 



35 



Washburn, at 266 Durfee, Soplio- 
more year; alone in Junior 
rear at 385 Berkeley, and with 
J. Kenneth Wood and E. Sebring 
Bassett, at 45 Yanderbilt, in 
Senior year. 

Burnett expects to practice 
medicine, and will enter the Har- 
vard Medical School. His ad- 
dress is 1193 Bennington Street, 
East Boston, Mass. 




/f-^dM^^ 



GEORGE DANIEL BUT- 
LER, ''But," was born in Sey- 
mour, Conn., November 14, 1893. 

His father, Albert Charles 
Butler, was born in Michigan, 
June 14, 1864, and has lived 
there, and in Connecticut, all his 
life. He is connected with the 
Seymour Manufacturing Com- 
pany, in Seymour. His mother, 
who is a native of Ireland, was 
Mary Richey Quigg before mar- 
riage ; their two sons and two 
daughters are living. Two 
uncles are Yale men, Edwin B. 
Robinson, B.D. 1899, and War- 
ren F. Cressy, LL.B. 1905. 

But prepared at the Seymour 
High School, and later at the 




^^^%r^<) 6^^..6:t^ 



36 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Mount Hennou Boys' School. In his Freshman year at col- 
lege he received second division honors; in Junior year he 
received first division honors, and a philosophical oration ap- 
pointment. He was for two years secretary of the Mount Her- 
mon Club, belongs to Phi Beta Kappa, and was a member of 
the Cross Country Squad. Freshman year he roomed with Har- 
lan Perrins at 531 Pierson; the rest of his course he roomed 
with A. A. Collinge and E. A. Lundgren, at 196 Farnam, 467 
Fayerweather, and 93 Connecticut. 

Butler is uncertain as to his future studies and career. His 
address is 13 Pearl Street, Seymour, Conn. 



JOHN MEIGS BUTLER, 
"Johnny," "Jake," was born in 
Evanston, 111., December 6, 1892. 
Morton Butler, his father, was 
born in New York City, Feb- 
ruary 2, 1858, but his life has 
been spent in Chicago, 111., where 
he is president of the Morton 
Butler Timber Company. Mrs. 
Butler's home before marriage 
was Buffalo, N. Y., and her 
name, Julia Pettibone. Three 
sons and one daughter comprise 
the family. Gerald M. Butler, 
1909, is a brother; Herman B. 
Butler, 1876 S., an uncle, and 
Francis P. Butler, 1909, and 
Dwight R. Meigs, 1907, are 
cousins. 
Johnny prepared at the University School of Chicago, and at 
Hotchkiss. He Avas on the Freshman Glee Club; the Class Base- 
ball Team; was awarded a first colloquy in Junior year, and 
belongs to Psi Upsilon and the Hotchkiss Club. He roomed with 
John H. Vincent and Lyman Porter in Freshman year, at 659 
Wright. The other three years with P. H. Lindenberg, E. E. 
Converse, R. F. Potter, R. S. Young, and G. W. Carrington, at 
128 Welch, 448 Fayerweather, and 4 Vanderbilt. 

Butler expects to go into the manufacturing business, and his 
permanent address is 1555 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, 111. 




Q^it^ ^. ^&t^^t€e^. 



GRADUATES 




PAGET KIERSTED CADY, 
"Padge," "P. K," "P.," "Padg- 
ter," "Piiget," was born in Chi- 
cago, III, July 31, 1895. 

His father, Jeremiah Kiersted 
Cady, "was born in Indianapolis, 
Ind., June 30, 1856, Avas grad- 
uated from Cornell, with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Architecture, 
in the Class of 1876, and prac- 
tices this profession in Chicago, 
111., where he has spent the most 
of his life. He married Paget 
Daniels, of Madison, Wis., who 
died in Chicago in the spring of 
1914. One son and one daugh- 
ter are in the family. 

Padge prepared at the Chicago 
Latin School. He was awarded 
second division honors in Fresh- 
man year; the Hurlbut Scholarship 1913-1914; a Berkeley pre- 
mium in Latin composition, second grade, 1913-1914; third divi- 
sion honors and a high oration in Junior year; played on the 
Class Tennis Team ; is a member of the Yale Battery, Beta Theta 
Pi, and Phi jSTu. Freshman year he roomed at 567 Pierson, with 
Franklin H. Perkins ; the remaining three years with Perkins and 
Langdon L. Ricketts, at 204 Farnam, 406 Berkeley, and 16 Van- 
derbilt. 

Cady intends to be a manufacturer, and his permanent address 
is 1217 Astor Street, Chicago, 111. 



ifc/S^t^ 



VICTOR BUSH CALDWELL, JR., ''Buck," Vic," was born 
in Omaha, N'ebr., August 14, 1892. 

His father, Victor Bush Caldwell, was born in Omaha, Feb- 
ruary 14, 1865, and had always lived there, up to the time of his 
death, December 26, 1915. He was president of the United States 
National Bank of Omaha. Mrs. Caldwell's maiden name was Nel- 
lie Reese Hugus, and her home also was Omaha. Four children 
are in the family. Aside from his father, Yale relatives arc a 
brother, J. H. Caldwell, 1912, and Morris H. Beall, 1893 S. 



38 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




^ /? CilA^t 



=?r 



Buck prepared at the Law- 
renceville School. He was on the 
Freshman Track Team, where he 
won numerals, and the Univer- 
sity Football Squad. He belongs 
to Psi Upsilon, the Elihu Chib, 
Lawrenceville Club, "Plugs," and 
the Birthday Club. He roomed 
at 626 Wright in Freshman year, 
with K. A. Rumelin; with D. B. 
Grant and C. P. Goodhue in 
Sophomore year, at 236 Durfee ; 
with Grant in Junior and Senior 
years, at 494 Haughton, and 9 
Vanderbilt. 

Caldwell expects to go into the 
banking business. His address is 
630 South Twentieth Street, 
Omaha, Nebr. 




zyj^xjttU f ■ C^tZC^^-'-h^...^'^ 



GERALD JAMES CALLA- 
HAN", "Jerry," "Cal," was born 
in Holyoke, Mass., January 10, 
LS96. 

His father, Christopher Theo- 
dore Callahan, born in Boston, 
Mass., February 16, 1868, has 
spent his life in Holyoke, where 
he is a justice of the Superior 
Court of Massachusetts. His 
mother was Ella Teahan, also of 
Holyoke, where she died May 6, 
1913. Four children survive her. 

Jerry prepared at the Holyoke 
High School. He went out for 
golf, basketball and debating 
while in college. Freshman year 
he roomed alone at 526 Pierson ; 
Sophomore year with A. K. 



GRADUATES 



39 



Riimsey, at 152 Lawrance; Junior and Senior years with JST. E. 
Derecktor, at 348 White, and 95 Welch. 

Callahan plans to enter the Harvard Law School, and his per- 
manent address is 39 Fairfield Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. 



WILLIAM PATRICK CAMPBELL, ''Bill," "Pat," was horn 
in Clifton, Ohio, December 19, 1893, and has lived in Port Deposit, 
Md., Cornwallville, N. Y., Caldwell, N. J., and Essex Fells, N. J. 

James Rickarby Campbell, his father, was born in New Orleans, 
La., October 3, 1859, but has spent the larger portion of his time 
in Essex Fells, J^. J., where he is head master of the Kingsley 
School. He received an honorary degree of M.A. from Coe Col- 
lege. Mrs. Campbell, whose name Avas Helen Armitage Strong, 
was born in Galena, 111., but lived in Waukesha, Wis., before her 
marriage. Eight of their ten children are now living. Yale rela- 
tives include a brother, Charles S. Campbell, 1909, and Addison 
S. Pratt, 1896, a cousin. 

Bill prepared at the Kingsley School, Essex Fells, N. J., and 
entered with 1915. He was aAvarded the Woolsey and Lispenard 
Stewart Witherbee scholarships; a Berkeley premium; second 
division honors Junior year, also a philosophical oration appoint- 
ment. He w^as on the 1915 
Freshman Track Team and won 
numerals, taking first place in 
pole vaulting in the Fall Track 
Meet, 1911. He belongs to Zeta 
Psi, Phi Beta Kappa, and the 
Cosmopolitan Club. He served 
on DAvight Hall and Hope Mis- 
sion executive committees. He 
roomed alone in Freshman year, 
at 591 Pierson; with C. E. 
Martz and Austin C. Smith, at 
180 Lawrance, in Sophomore 
year; with M. Chism, H. W. 
Johnstone, R. Lucas, A. B. Gur- 
ley and R. S. Cornish, in Junior 
year, at 433 Fayerweather ; "with 
Chism, Johnstone, Lucas and 
Gurley, in Senior year, at 80-91 
Connecticut. 




40 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Camplu'll plans to enter either Princeton or Hartford Theolog- 
ical Seminary, to study for the ministry, and expects to devote 
his life to missionary work. His address is Kingsley School, Essex 
Fells, X. J. 



SETH WILSON" CAXDEE, 

"Doc," Avas born in Phoenix, 
X. Y., October 16, 1890. 

Charles Eli Candee, his father, 
Avas born April 3, 1849, and has 
always lived in Phoenix; he is a 
farmer. Mrs. Candee, who was 
Elizabeth Bolie, was born in 
Phoenix. There are three sons 
and two daughters. 

Doc prepared at the Phoenix 
High School, and attended 
Doane College, Crete, Xebr., for 
one year. He was a member of 
the Apollo Glee Club, has par- 
ticipated in track and basket- 
ball, and belongs to Beta Theta 
Pi and the Yale Battery. Dur- 
ing Freshman year he roomed 

Avith Herbert L. L. Macdonald at 594 Pierson ; the remainder of 

his course he roomed with Harry V. Champion and Russell J. 

Meyer, at 189 Farnam, 358 White, and 107 Welch. 

Candee expects to go into business; his address is Phoenix, 

X. Y. 




VO . C-cx^cUsu 



GEORGE WILLIAMS CARRIXGTOX, ''Sam," ''Carrie," 
was born in Charleston, S. C, June 1, 1890. 

His father. Waring Parker Carrington, w^as born June 4, 1849, 
and has always lived in Charleston, where he is a banker, vice 
president of the Carolina Savings Bank. His mother is also a 
native of Charleston ; her name was Mattie Williams. The fam- 
ily numbers four, two sons and two daughters. Yale relatives 
include Patrick Calhoun, Jr., 1915 S.; George W. Calhoun, ex- 
1918; Andrew Calhoun, 1918; John C. Simonds, 1887, all cousins. 

George prepared at Hotchkiss. He was assistant manager of 
the University Football Team in 1914, and manager in 1915, and 



GRADUATES 



41 



has a '' Y" ; he was on the Fresh- 
man Glee Club, the Junior 
Promenade Committee, is a 
Class Deacon, a member of the 
Triennial Committee, Psi Up- 
silon, the Southern Club, the 
Hotehkiss Club, the Corinthian 
Yacht Club, and Scroll and Key. 
Freshman and Sophomore years 
he roomed with E. E. Converse 
and R. F. Potter, at 657 Wright 
and 126 Welch ; Junior and 
Senior years with Converse, at 
449 Fayerweather, and 5 Van- 
derbilt. 

Carrington is undecided as to 
his future career; his permanent 
address is 2 Meeting Street, 
Charleston, S. C. 




^^;^1c.^A.^1>4c^-1^«-A-^--a/^ 



MELBERT BRII^CKER- 
HOFF CARY, JR., ''Mel," was 
born in New York City, Novem- 
ber 28, 1892. 

Melbert Brinckerhoff Cary, 
his father, w^as born July 23, 
1852, in Racine, Wis. He grad- 
uated from Princeton in 1872. 
He practiced law in the West, 
and in New York City and Con- 
necticut, received Democratic 
nomination for Governor of Con- 
necticut in 1902 and is president 
of the Flower Hospital, New 
York City. Mrs. Cary's maiden 
name was Julia Metcalf, and 
her home Milwaukee. One son 
and two daughters are living. 

Mel prepared at Groton, re- 
ceived third division honors in Freshman year, and a dissertation 
in Junior year. He belongs to the Groton Club, is Battalion 




J^^U.4^^z^ /3. 



'^^ 



42 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



(^uartcriiiastcr and Coiimiissary, and Secretary of the University 
Debating Association. He roomed alone at 678 Wright in Fresh- 
man vear; with Kichard deZeng Pierce, at 191 Farnam, in Sopho- 
more year; alone in Junior year at 389 Berkeley; with C. M. 
Kielland and R. W. Wilson, at 40 Vanderbilt, in Senior year. 

Cary expects to go into a manufacturing or export business. 
His address is 59 West Forty-sixth Street, New York City, or the 
Yale Club, New York City. 



DANIEL WATERS CAS- 
Sx\RD was born in Chicago, 111., 
March 11, 1894, and has lived in 
Chicago, in Germany (one year), 
and in Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Morris Cassard, his father, 
was born in Baltimore, Md., in 
1864, but has spent most of his 
life in Chicago, 111. Mr. Cas- 
sard has retired from business. 
His mother was Anna Waters, of 
Grand Rapids, Mich., and there 
are three sons in the family, of 
whom one, Morris Cassard, Jr., 
w^as graduated from Yale in 
1915. 

Daniel prepared at the West- 
minster School. He was on the 
Freshman Glee Club, received a 
second dispute api)ointment in Junior year, and is a member of 
Psi Upsilon, Sigma Delta Psi, and the University Club. He has 
roomed the entire four years with Charles Pratt and Palmer 
Black, at 644 Wright, 263 Durfee, 334 White, and 25 Vanderbilt. 
Cassard intends to take up art; his address is College and Ful- 
ton Streets, Grand Rapids, Mich. 




JjoAxmDU). QlAJuiju/ 



HARRY VIRGIL CHAMPION was born in Lyme, Conn., 
September 16, 1894, and has lived in Lyme, and in Norwich, Conn. 

Roger Burnham Champion, his father, was born at Black Hall, 
Conn., in 1864, spent most of his life in Lyme as a merchant, and 
died in Old Lyme in June, 1903. Mrs. Champion was Annie 



GRADUATES 



43 



Maria Daniels before marriage, 
and lived in l^iantic. There are 
two children in the family. 

Harry prepared at the Black 
Hall private school, and received 
first division honors and a second 
dispute appointment in Junior 
year in college. He has partici- 
pated in track athletics and base- 
ball. Lucius Augustus McAdani 
was his roommate during Fresh- 
man year, at 537 Pierson ; the 
remaining three years he roomed 
with Seth W. Candee and Rus- 
sell Meyer, at 189 Farnam, 358 
White, and 107 Welch. 

Champion intends to go into 
business; his address is 86 Cliff 
Street, Norwich, Conn. 




C^^^MiM Oyin^ t/ ^/Ct-^Tw^-t^r^ 



ALFRED HEBARD CHAP- 
PELL, "Fritz," ''Al," "Chap," 
was born in ]^ew London, Conn., 
August 9, 1892. 

His father, Alfred Hebard 
Chappell, who was treasurer of 
the F. H. k A. H. Chappell Com- 
pany, coal dealers, died in 1912 
in New London, Conn., where he 
had always lived. His mother, 
also of New London, was Adeline 
Shepard before her marriage. 
Yale relatives are George S. 
Chappell, '99, a brother ; Harold 
Chappell, '01, and Donald Chap- 
pell, '00, cousins. 

Al prepared at the Bulkeley 
High School, New London, and 
at the Pomfret and Hotchkiss 
Schools. He sang on the Freshman and University Glee Clubs, 




oeA-^i^.t^^^ 



1 1 



44 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



and is a member of the University Club, Psi Upsilon and Wolf's 
Head. During the entire course he has roomed with A. M. Rich- 
ards, in 608 Wright, 165 Lawrance, 424 Fayerweather and 103 
Welch. 

Chappell will probably enter Harvard Law School in prepara- 
tion for his professional work. His permanent address is 128 
Huntington Street, New London, Conn. 




WAYNE CHATFIELD-TAY- 
LOR, "Chat," was born in Chi- 
cago, 111., December 19, 1893, 
and has lived there, and in Lake 
Forest, 111., all his life. 

His father is Hobart Chatfield 
Chatfield-Taylor, who was born 
in Chicago, 111., March 24, 1865, 
was graduated from Cornell with 
the degree of B.S. in 1886, and 
was given the degree of Litt.D. 
by Lake Forest in 1913. He has 
lived in Chicago, and is an 
author, having Avritten a number 
of books, and contributed to 
various magazines. Mrs. Chat- 
field-Taylor was born in Lake 
Forest, 111. ; her name was Rose 
Farwell. Albert D. Farwell, '09 ; 
Henry E. Tuttle, '14; Henry N. Tuttle, '81; Arthur F. Tuttle, 
'15; John V. Farwell, '79; Frank C. Farwell, '82; Arthur L. 
Farwell, '84; C. Farwell Winston, '15; John V. Farwell, 3d, '18, 
and R. I. Farwell, '19, are among the Yale relatives. 

Chat prepared at St. Mark's School, Southborough, Mass. He 
played right field on the Freshman Baseball Team, and was on 
the 1914 Golf Team, and University Football Team, 1915. He 
has numerals and a "Y." He received a first colloquy in Junior 
year, and belongs to Delta Kappa Epsilon, the "Plugs," the 
"Scarabs," the University Club, Mohicans, the Grill Room Griz- 
zlies, Scroll and Key, the Corinthian Yacht Club, St. Mark's Club, 
is a Cup Man and on the Senior Promenade Committee. He 
roomed with H. J. Crocker, Jr., during the entire four years, at 



t^a^^ ^LAXlijuUL-lTGLybrr. 



GRADUATES 



45 



673 "Wriglit, 430 Fayerweather during Sophomore and Junior 
years, and at 120 Welch during Senior year. 

Chatfield-Taylor expects to enter business ; his address is Lake 
Forest, 111. 



MURRAY SIMMONS CHISH, "Chiz," was born in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., May 3, 1895. 

His father, Andrew Pearson Chism, was born in Ardara, 
County Donegal, Ireland, September 5, 1857, but has spent his 
life in Philadelphia, where he is engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness, M'ith the Yoeum & Powers Company. Mrs. Chism, whose 
name was Mary Isabel Simmons, lived in Philadelphia before her 
marriage. There are three children, one son and two daughters, 
in the family. 

Chiz prepared at the Friends' Central School, in Philadelphia. 
He won third division honors in Freshman year, third division 
honors in Sophomore year and an oration appointment in Junior 
year; he belonged to the University Gymnastic Team in 1913-14, 
was captain in 1914-15, and 1915-16, and held the Intercollegiate 
Tumbling Championship for two years ; he has numerals. He is 
a member of the Dwight Hall 
Executive Committee and belongs 
to Zeta Psi and the Elihu Club. 
He roomed in Freshman year 
with Henry W. Johnstone, at 
679 Wright; with Johnstone, at 
214 Farnam, in Sophomore 
year ; with Johnstone, R. S. 
bornish, W. P. Campbell, A. B. 
Gurley and R. H. Lucas, in 
Jvmior year, at 433-34 Fayer- 
weather, and with Johnstone, 
Campbell, Gurley and Lucas, at 
80-91 Connecticut, Senior year. 

Chism will be the Academic 
Secretary at Dwight Hall, 1916- 
1917. His address is 1250 South 
Fifteenth Street, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 




^'^M^i^i^ ^ <^2^.2-^^ 



46 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



RALPH WESTON CHISOLM, "Chis," was born in Minne- 
apolis, Minn., July 19, 1892. 

Kobort Gregg Cbisolin, bis fatber, Avas born in Charleston, S. C, 
May 3, 1860, but removed to Minneapolis, Avliere be is engaged 
in the wholesale lumber business, being secretary and treasurer of 
the Nichols-Chisolm Lumber Company. Before her marriage 
Mrs. Chisolm was Clara Smith, of Minneapolis. Kalph is the 
only child. Yale relatives include Edward T, Horn, M.A. 1908. 
Chis prepared with a tutor at home, at the East High School, 
and at The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa. He was a member of 

the Apollo and University 
Banjo-Mandolin clubs, and was 
assistant coach for the Mandolin 
(Mub during Freshman year. 
He belongs to the Ptombers, the 
Corinthian Yacht Club, O. C. C, 
The Hill School Club and to 
Zeta Psi. He roomed with L. 
G. Noyes, at 634 Wright, during 
Freshman year; with Noyes and 
R. J. Jewett, at 250 Uurfee and 
373 White, in Sophomore and 
Junior years, and with Jewett, 
at 127 Welch, during Senior 
year. 

Chisolm proposes to go into 
business, manufacturing or mcr- 

■f,^j2UCaiS&r^iu<,&^ ^''"'■^ His address is 1787 Col- 
yiujc^M^^^ ^^^ Avenue South, Minneapolis, 

Minn. 




GEORGE WILLIAM CLARK, JR., was born in Jackson- 
ville, Fla., February 25, 1894. 

His father, George William Clark, was born in Owego, N. Y., 
January 22, 1865, and went to Jacksonville, where he is in the 
real estate business, president of the George W. Clark Company. 
Mrs. Clark, whose name was Gertrude Anna Scott before mar- 
riage, also lived in Jacksonville, and George is their only child. 

George prepared at the Duval High School, and at the Univer- 



GRADUATES 



47 



sity School in 'New Haven. He 
received a second colloquy in 
Junior year, was a member of 
the Southern Club, assisted in 
organizing the Florida Club, of 
which he is secretary and treas- 
urer, and belongs to Delta 
Kappa Epsilon. The entire 
four years he has roomed 
with Clement C. Einehart, 
at 501 Haughton, 257 Dur- 
fee, 471 Haughton, and 53 
Vanderbilt. 

Clark is going into mercantile 
business; his address is Clark 
Building, Jacksonville, Fla. 




PHILIP JEROME CLARK 

was born February 15, 1895, in 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Jesse Redman Clark, his 
father, was born in Cincinnati, 
and has always lived there, being 
engaged in the life insurance bus- 
iness as president of the Union 
Central Life Insurance Com- 
pany. He is a graduate of Ohio 
Wesleyan. His mother was Car- 
oline Marqua, of Cincinnati. 
There are three sons and two 
daughters in the family. Jesse 
Redman Clark, Jr., '06 S., is a 
brother. 

Jerry prepared at Phillips-An- 

dover, and has belonged to the - „ -^ // ^ 

Apollo Banjo-Mandolin Club and '' 

to the LTniversity Banjo-Mandolin Club. He received a second 

colloquy in Junior year, and belongs to the Yale Battery, Alpha 




"^iW^^ 



48 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Delta Phi, the Trinity Club, Andover Club, and the Ohio Club. 
He roomed alone in Freshman year, at 533 Pierson; with F. J. 
Manning, at ^^55 Durfee, in Sophomore year; with George Doven- 
muehle during Junior and Senior years, at 437 Fayerweather, 
and 668 Wright. 

Clark expects to go into business, and his address is 618 Forest 
Avenue, Avondale, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



HEN'RY WHITXEY CLOSSOX, 2d, was born in Orange, 
N. J., February 11, 1894, Avhere he has since lived. 

Henry Burke Closson, his father, Avas born in Xewport, K. I., 
August 12, 1858, and was graduated from Dartmouth in 1879. 
He was the son of an army officer, and spent most of his youth 
in travel, finally going into the law, which he still practices, under 
the firm name of Parsons, Closson & Mcllvaine, of New York 
City. Mrs. Closson, who lived in New Haven, Conn., before her 
marriage, was Ellen Brinley Bacon. One son and one daughter 
are living. 

Henry prepared at the Carteret Academy, Orange, X. J. 

He has played in the Sym- 
phony Orchestra for four years, 
and in the New Haven String 
Orchestra for two years ; re- 
ceived third division honors 
in Freshman year ; third divi- 
sion honors and an oration 
in Junior year. He roomed 
with Gilroy Mulqueen, at 618 
Wright, in Freshman year ; 
alone in Sophomore and Junior 
years, at 109 Welch and 400 
Berkeley; during Senior year 
with Charles Daly King, at 129 
Welch. 

Closson expects to devote his 
life to music, and will continue 
his work in the Yale School of 
Music. His address is 99 Cleve- 
land Street, Orange, N, J. 




y.M^.^ 



GRADUATES 



49 



FEANCIS GEAHAM COATES, "Texas," "Possum," was 
born in Baltimore, Md., October 31, 1893, but has lived most of 
liis life in Abilene, Texas. 

His father, George William Pennock Coates, was born in 
Coatesville, Pa., May 10, 1857, and was graduated from 
the University of Georgia with the degree of Bachelor 
of Agriculture in 1877. He has lived most of his life 
in Maryland and Texas, where he was engaged in ranching, 
but is now retired. Mrs. Coates lived in Louisville, Ky., and 
in "Waco, Texas, before marriage; her name was Edwin 
Graham. There are two sons in the family. 

Texas prepared at the Cooper 
School, Abilene, Texas, tutored 
by Dr. Oscar H. Cooper, Yale 
'72. He received third division 
honors in Freshman year, and a 
dissertation in Junior year. He 
was in the Dunham Boat Club in 
1913, belongs to Delta Kappa 
Epsilon and the Southern Club. 
The first three years he roomed 
with E. J. White, at 109 Welch, 
202 Farnam, and 370 White; in 
Senior year he roomed with 
White and E. E. Fish, at 7 Yan- 
derbilt. 

Coates intends to practice law, 
and plans to enter the Law 
School at the University of 
Texas. His address is Abilene, 
Texas. 




■^^rcO^o 



EOBEET HEXEY COLEMAX, "Bob," was born in Louis- 
ville, Ky., February 15, 1894. 

His father, John Coleman, Avho was born in Louisville in 1851, 
died in Easthampton, jST. Y., in 1910. His mother was Susan 
JN'orton of Eussellville, Ky., before her marriage. 

Bob prepared at Phillips-Andover. He received a first col- 
loquy Junior appointment; played on the 1916 Class Baseball 



50 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




l^SU^A.- 



Team, was an editor of the Xeics, 
and a member of the Andover 
Club, the Cosmopolitan Club, 
UniA-ersity Club, and Delta 
Kappa Epsilon. While at Yale 
he roomed with D. C. Malcom at 
331 White, 261 Durfee and 336 
White. 

Coleman completed his work 
for the B.A. degree at Yale in 
three years and this year is 
studying at the Harvard Law 
School. He is living at 48 Brat- 
tle Street, Cambridge, Mass., but 
his permanent address is East- 
hampton, N. Y. 



'^K.-^ 



0^^ 



AMBKOSE AUSTIN" COLLINGE, "Shorty," "Doc," 
"Amby," was born in Passaic, N. J., April 19, 1885, and has 

lived in Passaic, Mt. Hermon, 
Mass., and l^yack, N. Y. 

His father, Robert Austin Col- 
linge, was born in Manchester, 
England, January 81, 1854, and 
spent his early life in England. 
He came from England to Pas- 
saic, Avhere he has since lived. 
He is an engraver by trade, but 
is at present a workman in the 
employ of the Pipkin &: Hols- 
worth Company. Mrs. CoUinge 
was Martha Kennedy, of Lodi, 
N". J., before marriage, and there 
are three children, one son and 
two daughters. 

Shorty prepared at the Mt. 
Hermon School, at Mt. Hermon, 
Mass., where he spent four years. 
He received a first colloquy in 




^^^..^^ 



GRADUATES 



51 



Junior year, and belongs to the Mount Hermon Club. During 
Freshman year he roomed alone, at 399 Orange Street ; the other 
three years with G. D. Butler and E. A. Lundgren, at 196 Farnam, 
467 Fayerweather, and 93 Connecticut. 

Collinge expects to take up educational work. His address is 
58 Henry Street, Passaic, ]^. J. 



ELISHA EDMANDS CONVERSE, ''Dooley," was born in 
Maiden, Mass., July 6, 1894, but has lived in Marion, Mass., for 
the past seventeen years. 

Harry Elisha Converse, his father, was born in Maiden, Mass., 
May 7, 1863 ; he has lived in Boston the most of his life, where 
he is connected Avith the United States Rubber Company, being 
president of the Boston Rubber Shoe Company. Mrs. Converse 
was Mary Caroline Parker, of Maiden, Mass., before she married. 
There are three sons and two daughters. H. Eugene Sawyer, Jr., 
1913, and Parker Converse, 1919, are relatives. 

Dooley prepared at the Hotchkiss School. He was a member of 
the Freshman Glee Club, Psi Upsilon, the University Club, 
Corinthian Yacht C^lub, the Eliliu Club, and president of the 
Hotchkiss Club. During Fresh- 
man year he roomed with R. F. 
Potter and G. W. Carrington, at 
657 Wright; Sophomore year 
with Potter, Carrington, P. 
H. Lindenberg, R. S. Young and 
J. M. Butler, at 127 and 129 
Welch; with the same five in 
Junior and Senior years, at 448- 
49-50 Fayerweather and 4, 5, 
and 6 Vanderbilt. 

Converse expects to enter busi- 
ness ; his address is 101 Milk 
Street, Boston, Mass. 




2^^<i 



ryt4M^ A/> 




HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



HAROLD STEPHEN" COR- 

LETT, "Doc," "Corley," was 
horn in Clarkson, N. Y., October 
24, 1891. 

His father, Edward Philip 
Coriett, was born in Buffalo, 
X. Y., December 19, 1853, and 
later removed to Clarkson, X. Y., 
where he is a farmer. Mrs. Cor- 
iett, a native of Clarkson, Avas 
Mary Louise Stickle before mar- 
riage. Their two sons and one 
daughter are living. 

Doc prepared at the Holley 
(N. Y.) High School. He 
roomed alone, at 523 Pierson, 
during Freshman year; with 
Harold Chapman Bailey in 
Sophomore year, at 150 Law- 

rance; with Bailey and Edward Louis Sheldon, at 422 Berkeley, 

in Junior year, and with Sheldon, at 82 Connecticut, during 

Senior year, 

Coriett expects to engage in educational work. His permanent 

address after next fall will be R. F. D., Waterloo, N. Y. ; until 

then, Clarkson, X. Y. 



/>rayi~^<<X ^ C<r-uc«^7Jr 



ROBERT SAXFORD CORXISH, "Bob," was born in Chi- 
cago, 111., May 9, 1894, but has lived in Montclair, X. J., for 
the past eighteen years. 

His father, Robert Harrison Cornish, was born in Gillette, X. J., 
September 13, 1857, and was graduated from Yale in 1883. He 
has lived the most of his life in Montclair, and is a teacher, 
being head of the department of physics in the Wadleigh High 
School, Xew York City. His mother was Ida Galpin Skilton, of 
Xorthampton, Mass., before marriage, and there are three chil- 
dren, one son and two daughters, living. Besides his father, two 
uncles, Charles S. Skilton, 1889, and William A. Cornish, 1887, 
are Yale men. 

Bob prepared at the Montclair High School. He received first 
division honors in Freshman year, was second tenor on the Apollo 
Glee Club, and in the College Choir, has rowed on the class 



GRADUATES 



53 



crews, and in Junior year was 
awarded second division honors, 
and a philosophical oration ap- 
pointment. He belongs to Beta 
Theta Pi, Phi Beta Kappa, and 
the Elihu Club. He roomed 
alone in Freshman year, at 577 
Pierson; with Isaac Heyward 
Peck, at 203 Farnam, in Sopho- 
more year; with Murray Chism 
and Henry Johnstone, at 434 
Payerweather, in Junior year, 
and with Walter Leonard and 
Robert Oliver, at 116 Welch, dur- 
ing Senior year. 

Cornish expects to take up 
manufacturing. His address is 
211 Walnut Street, Montclair, 
N. J. 




^^i^^.^cT^ 



KKTGHT CHE]^EY COWLES, ":N^it," "King," "Casey," 
"Count," was born in Chicago, HI., December 27, 1892. 

His father, Alfred Cowles, was bom in Chicago, February 5, 
1865, and was graduated from Yale in the Class of 1886. He 
has always lived in Chicago, where he is engaged in the practice 
of law. Mrs. Cowles was Elizabeth Cheney of South Manches- 
ter, Conn., before her marriage. She died in Colorado Springs, 
Colo., April 7, 1898. Four sons survive her. Aside from his 
father, Yale relatives are: Alexander Lambert, '84; Philip B. 
Stewart, '86; William H. Cowles, '87, and '89 L. ; Hugh A. 
Bayne, '92; Knight D. Cheney, Jr., '92; Howell E. Cheney, 
'92 ; John P. Cheney, '90 S. ; Horace B. Cheney, '90 S. ; Ward 
Cheney, '96; Eichard O. Cheney, '97 S.; Clifford D. Cheney, 
'98; Austin Cheney, '98 S. ; Frank D. Cheney, '00; Philip 
Cheney, '01; Thomas L. Cheney, '01; Eussell Cheney, '04; 
George W. Cheney, '10; Alfred Cowles, 3d, '13; Thomas H. 
Cowles, '18 ; John C. Cowles, '19 ; John W. Stewart, '19 ; Shreve 
C. Badger, '19. 

Knight prepared at the Taft School, and was tutored in 
1910-11 by J. M. Howard, '09, in France and Germany. He has 



54 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




\<Li^ C Co^rCs - 



been a member of the College 
Choir for four years, of the 
Freshman Glee Club, the Uni- 
A'ersity Glee Club, Freshman 
Football Team, Freshman Track 
Team, and the 1914 University 
Track Team. He is a member 
of Psi Upsilon, the Elihu Club, 
B. P., Jumblies, Whiffenpoofs, 
and the Taft School Club. He 
roomed with Farwell Knapp dur- 
ing the entire four years, at 674 
Wright, 160 La wr a nee, 427 
Fayerweather, and 54 Vanderbilt. 
Cowles expects to enter 
the Pennsylvania Architecture 
School. His address is 1130 
Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, 111. 




EDWAED MAE SHALL 
CEAIG, JE., was born in Cuth- 
bert, Ga., July 23, 1895, and 
has lived in Cartersville, Ga., 
Bessemer, Ala., Birmingham, 
Ala., Dothan, Ala., and Pratt- 
ville, Ala. 

His father, Edward Marshall 
Craig, was born in Craigsville, 
Va., May 26, 1867, and has lived 
in Virginia, Georgia and Ala- 
bama. He spent three years at 
the Hampden-Sydney College, 
Va. ; one year at "Washington 
and Lee University; three years 
at Union Theological Seminary, 
Va., and is a minister, pastor of 
the Presbyterian Church, Pratt- 
ville, Ala. Mrs. Craig was, be- 



GRADUATES 



55 



fore liei" marriage, Lelia Lymvood Glenn, of Rustburg, Va., and 
three sons and one daughter comprise the family. 

Craig prepared at the Dothan (Ala.) High School; the Autauga 
County (Ala.) High School; the Riverside Military Academy, 
Gainesville, Ga., and "was graduated from Washington and Lee 
University in 1914, with the degree of B.A. During his one year 
at Yale he has roomed with Ralph L. Roll, at 92 Connecticut. 

Craig is undecided as to his future career, although inclined to 
the ministry. His permanent address is Prattville, Ala. 



HENRY JOSEPH CROCKER, JR., ''Harry," was born in 
San Francisco, Calif., July 2, 1893. 

His father, Henry Joseph Crocker, spent most of his life in 
California, where he died, in San Francisco, in 1912. He was a 
capitalist. Mrs. Crocker, whose name was Mary Ives, was also 
a native of California. Two sons and four daughters comprise 
the family, five of whom are now living. William H. Crocker, 
'82 S., Templeton Crocker, '08, and William W. Crocker, '15, are 
Yale relatives. 

Harry prepared at the University School, San Francisco, and 
at the Taft School, Watertown, Conn. He went out for track 
in Freshman year; was assist- 
ant manager of the Baseball 
Association, 1911-15, manager. 



1915-16; has 



'Y 



also 



a football numeral man ; was a 
member of the Dramatic Associa- 
tion, and has taken part in two 
plays; was awarded the Gordon 
Brown Prize, and in Junior year 
received a first colloquy; was 
floor manager of Junior Prome- 
nade Committee, elected to Class 
Day Committee, Supper Com- 
mittee, Triennial Committee, and 
Student Council; belongs to 
Delta Kappa Epsilon, Mohicans, 
Scarabs, Grill Room Grizzlies, 
Scroll and Key, University Club, 
and the Taft School Club. He 
roomed with Edgar Lockwood 




--/^eyityt^^ C^'T^o-eAje^Sl 



56 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



and Wa^ne Chatfickl-Taylor in Freshman year, at 643 and 673 
Wright; during Sophomore year with Taylor, E. Howe, C. 
Dickey, F. V. Burgess and W. Hellier, at 430 Fayerweather ; 
during Junior and Senior years with the same men at 430 Fayer- 
weather and 120 Welch. 

Crocker expects to enter business. His address is 2301 Laguna 
Street, San Francisco, Calif. 



EGBERT GRAEME CROCKER, "Shorty," was born in San 
Diego, Calif., on June 12, 1894, and lived there until 1902, when 
his family removed to Washington, D. C, 

His father, Henry Graham Crocker, was born in Milwaukee, 
Wis., on August 10, 1868, and entered Yale with the Class of '91, 
but transferred to the School of Law, where he received the degree 
of LL.B. in 1891, and that of M.L. in 1892. He has lived largely 

in Washington, where he is 
connected with The Carnegie 
Endowment for International 
Peace. His mother, who died in 
1902, was Florence Gates, of 
Worcester, Mass. 

Shorty prepared for Yale at 
the Western High School in 
Washington, and at St. Luke's 
School in Wayne, Pa. He 
roomed alone during Freshman 
year at 624 Wright; and during 
the other three years with Wil- 
liam Hamilton Gardner at 162 
Lawrance, 353 White, and 75 
Connecticut. 

Crocker's address is in care of 
his father, 2 Jackson Place, 
Washington, D. C. 




iCV^t"/" >'<*t«t^ Ci^>^U 



THOMAS IRVIXG CROWELL, JR., "Tom," was born in 
Newton Center, Mass., May 5, 1894, but has lived the past sixteen 
years in Montclair, N. J. 

His father, Thomas Irving Crowell, was born in Gloucester, 
Mass., March 24, 1866, but has spent most of his life in Boston, 



GRADUATES 



Mass. He is in the publishing business in New York City under 
the firm name of the Thomas Y. Crowell Company. His mother 
was M. Helen Leland before her marriage, and her home was 
Boston. There are three sons and one daughter in the family. 

Tom prepared at the Montclair High School. He has been 
business manager of the Yale 
Record, has sung in the College 
Choir, and on the Apollo and 
Freshman Glee clubs; received 
a dissertation appointment in 
Junior year, is in the Yale Bat- 
tery, and is a member of Zeta 
Psi. During Freshman year he 
roomed with Russell H. Lucas, 
at 638 Wright; and with Lucas 
at 226 Farnam in Sophomore 
year; with Fairfax D. Downey, 
at 375 White, in Junior year, 
and with Downey and E. F. Rus- 
sell, at 8 Vanderbilt, in Senior 
year. 

Crowell expects to go into the 
advertising business. His ad- 
dress is 512 Park Street, Upper 
Montclair, IST. J. 




RAYMON^D BEXJAMIN^ CULVER, "Riley," was born in 
Alagansee Township, Mich., July 11, 1887, removed to Reading, 
Mich., when two years old, and has lived in McMinnville, Ore., 
for the past twelve years. 

His father, Frank Dwight Culver, was born October 24, 1859, 
in Branch County, Michigan, but now lives in Oregon, Avliere 
he was engaged in the furniture and undertaking business. He 
is now retired. His mother's maiden name was Sarah Maria 
Walter, and her home was in Branch County, Mich. There were 
six sons in the family, of whom four survive. 

Ray prepared at the Reading (Mich.) High School, the Oregon 
Agricultural College, and the preparatory department of McMinn- 
ville College, Ore. He graduated from McMinnville College with 
the degree of B.Mus. in 1910, and with the degree of B.A. in 1914. 



58 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




While in that college he was 
juanager of the Dramatic Club, 
soloist for the Glee Club, won 
his "M" in Track, took part in 
several oratorical contests, and 
was president of the Student 
Body. He was on the Yale Uni- 
versity Glee Club, 1915-16, and 
belongs to Beta Theta Pi. He 
has lived at the home of Pro- 
fessor Henry B. Wright, 20 
Livingston Street, during his one 
year at Yale. 

Culver plans to enter the Yale 
School of Religion, and subse- 
quently the ministry. His ad- 
dress is 711 South B Street, Mc- 
Minnville, Ore. 



GEORGE RIPLEY CUT- 
LER, ''Rip," was born in Ban- 
gor, Maine, March 25, 1895, and 
lias lived in Andover, Mass., 
in Watertown, Conn., and in 
Waban, Mass. 

His father, Charles Herrick 
Cutler, was born in Farmington, 
Maine, December 18, 1859, and 
was graduated from Bowdoin 
with the degree of B.A. in 1881, 
from Andover Theological Semi- 
nary in 1886, and received the 
degree of D.D. from Bowdoin 
in 1905. He spent almost 
twenty-five years of his life in 
Bangor, Maine, but is now pas- 
tor of the Union Church in 
Waban, Mass. Mrs. Cutler was 
Sarah Franklin Ripley before her marriage, and her home was in 
Andover, Mass. The family includes one son and two daughters. 




Q .Atrr^y' I <-~^fiJ.t^ 






GRADUATES 



59 



Alfred L. Kipley, '78; Frank R. Sliipman, '85, and Philip F. 
Ripley, '97, are Yale relatives. 

Rip prepared at the Taft School. He was awarded first division 
honors in Freshman year ; in Junior year he received first division 
honors, and a philosophical oration appointment. He belongs to 
Phi Beta Kappa, the Elizabethan Club, and the Taft Club. 
Freshman and Sophomore years he roomed with W. Bishop, at 669 
Wright, and 268 Durfee ; with D. L. McCoy, at 502 Haughton 
and 17 Vanderbilt, in Junior and Senior years. 

Cutler expects to enter the Yale School of Music. His perma- 
nent address is Waban, Mass. 



ARTHUR BURR DARLING, "Art," was born in Wichita, 
Kans., December 28, 1892. 

His father, Howard Wetmore Darling, was born in Columbus, 
Ohio, February 28, 1856. He has lived in La Porte, Ind., Michi- 
gan City, Ind., and is now engaged in the lumber business in 
Wichita, Kans., as manager of the Louisiana Red Cypress Lumber 
Company. Mrs. Darling was Marietta Emmeline Upson of Michi- 
gan City, Ind., before her mar- 
riage. Their three sons are all 
living. James Wetmore, 1714, 
Israhiah Wetmore, 1748, and 
Charles Henry Wetmore, 1804, 
were Yale relatives, while How- 
ard Upson Darling and Lyman 
Strong Darling, both of 1910, 
are brothers. 

Art prepared at the Fair- 
mount Academy, Wichita, and at 
Andover. He sang on the 
Apollo Glee Club and Quartette, 
in Freshman year, and received 
first division honors. He also 
belonged to the College Choir, 
was awarded second division 
honors and a philosophical ora- 
tion in Junior year, and belongs 
to Zeta Psi, Phi Beta Kappa, 
Skull and Bones, and the Birth- 




60 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



day Club. He is president of the Andover Club, and a member 
of the executive committee of the University Christian Associa- 
tion. During Freshman year he roomed with Foster M. Hamp- 
ton, at 675 Wright; with Hanii)ton and Dan C. Elkin, at 237 
Durfee, 490 Haughton, and 55 Vanderbilt, the remaining three 
years. 

Darling will enter the Yale Graduate School next year and 
expects to become a teacher. His address is 3755 East Douglas 
Avenue, Wichita, Kans. 



SIDNEY WETMORE DAVIDSON, "Sid," was born in 
Augusta, Ga., December 30, 1894, and has lived there, and in 
Warren, Pa. 

His father, William Treat Davidson, was born in Rome, Ga., 
September 26, 1848, but spent most of his life in Augusta, where 
he practiced law, being a member of the firm of J. S. & W. T. 
Davidson. He died May 1, 1900. The maiden name of his 
mother, who is now Mrs. Richard Hiles, was Carolin Amelia 
Wetmore, and her home was in Warren, Pa. There are three sons 

in the family. Yale relatives in- 
ehide Robert Treat, 1718, great- 
great-great-great -g r a n d f a t h e r ; 
Douglas T. Davidson, 1909, and 
W. Treat Davidson, ex-'lO S., 
brothers. 

Sid prepared at the Lawrence- 
ville School, Lawrenceville, N. J. 
He has been interested in crew 
work for four years ; Avas on the 
Freshman Glee Club, and has 
been in the Choir for two years ; 
on Commons Committees in 
Frcslunan and Senior years; and 
Avas in the chorus of "Harold" in 
the spring of 1915. In Junior 
year he received a second col- 
loquy appointment. He belongs 
to Zeta Psi and the Lawrenceville 
Club. He has roomed with Neil 






GRADUATES 



61 



Randall Taylor the entire four years, at 600 Pierson, 215 Farnam, 
464 Fa_verweatlier, and 137 Welch. 

Davidson expects to study law, and will probably enter the 
Yale School of Law. His permanent address is Warren, Pa. 



XATHAX EDWARD DERECKTOR, "Red," was born in 
Meriden, Conn., January 26, 1894. 

His father, Esedor Derecktor, was born in Russia, in 1864, but 
has spent most of his life in Meriden, Conn., where he is a real 
estate broker. His mother, who lived in Meriden before mar- 
riage, was Esther Mag. There are two sons and one daughter in 
the family. I. Henry Mag, p.r-'04 L. ; Samuel Derecktor, '19, and 
I, Arthur Mag, '17, are Yale 
relatives. 

Red prepared at the Meriden 
High School. He received a 
first dispute in Junior year, and 
has engaged in wrestling and 
basketball, winning first place in 
a University novice wrestling 
meet. He roomed with J. S. 
Youle, at 527 Pierson, in Fresh- 
man year; with Henry Denkert, 
at 149 Lawrance, in Sophomore 
year; with G. J. Callahan, at 
348 White and 95 Welch, in 
Junior and Senior years. 

Derecktor expects to enter the 
Yale School of Law. His ad- 
dress is 39 Crown Street, Meri- 
den, Conn. 




t//^^^<t:/Ca-^ ^ cZ/ -e-A-t.^^^y^P^ 



MARIS EMERSON DeWOLF, "Wolfie," was born in Mara- 
thon, Iowa, July 27, 1892, and has lived in Laurens, Iowa, and 
in Spencer, Iowa, all h.is life. 

Merton Eugene DeWolf, his father, was born in Cambria, 
Mich., July 23, 1868, and has lived at Hillsdale, Mich., and in 
northwestern Iowa. He is engaged in the grain and coal busi- 
ness, as president of the DeWolf & Wells Company of Spencer, 
Iowa. Mrs. DeWolf was Elizabeth Prentiss, of Hillsdale, 



62 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




y^f^t^^^ ^^€ P^i^ 



Mich., before her marriage. 
There are four children in the 
family. 

Maris prepared at the Spencer 
High School, Spencer, Iowa, 
where he took a five-year course, 
and spent two years at Carleton 
College, Northfield, Minn., in 
the Class of 1914. He entered 
Yale in Junior year. He roomed 
with Robert Pflieger, at 103 
Welch, in Junior year; and with 
Edward M. Gallagher, at 105 
Welch and 94 Yanderbilt. in 
Senior 3'ear. 

DeWolf expects to enter busi- 
ness. His address is Spencer, 
Iowa. 



CHARLES DENSTOIsT 
DICKEY, JR., was born in 
New York City, December 3, 
1893. 

His father, Charles Denston 
Dickey, was born in Mobile, 
Ala., May 8, 1860, and was grad- 
uated from Harvard, with the 
degree of B.A., in the Class of 
1882. He has spent most of his 
life in New York, where he is a 
banker, a partner in the firm of 
Brown Brothers & Company. 
His mother was Louise Lawrence 
Whitney, of New Haven, Conn. 
There are three sons in the fam- 
ily. Stephen Whitney, '08 S., 
and '11 L., is a Yale relative. 

Charley prepared at St. Paul's 
School, Concord, N. H. He was awarded second division honors, 
and first grade Berkeley Premium in Latin, in Freshman year; 




^^^^^^ ^^.->^^ 



GRADUATES 



63 



rowed on the Freshman Four-oared Crew, and was on the Board 
of Governors of the University Club; he received a dissertation 
Junior appointment; was secretary and treasurer of the Univer- 
sity Club, 1914-15; secretary of the Corinthian Yacht Club, and 
a member of the Freshman and University Hockey teams. He 
is also a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon, Scroll and Key, the 
Sword and Gun Club, and is a Cup Man. He roomed for the 
four years Avith F. V. Burgess, at 654 Wright, in Freshman year ; 
431 Fayerweather, in Sophomore and Junior years, and 119 
Welch, in Senior year. 

Dickey expects to go into business. His address is 37 East 
Fifty-first Street, New York City. 



FEED HARRISON DIDDLE 

was born in Philippi, West Ya., 
October 20, 1891. 

His father, George Diddle, 
was born in Staunton, Ya., but 
has spent most of his life in 
Philippi, where he is a contrac- 
tor. His mother, who lived in 
Philippi, was Flora Lee Mason 
before her marriage ; Fred is the 
only child. 

Fred prepared at the Broad- 
dus Institute, in Philippi, West 
Ya., and was in the Class of 1915, 
West Yirginia University, and 
also in the Class of 1915, Uni- 
versity of Michigan. He en- 
tered Yale in Sophomore year, 
and received a first dispute " • '■'■'' 

appointment in Junior year. He belongs to Alpha Sigma Phi, 
Yale Battery, Acacia, and the Southern Club. He roomed alone 
throughout the course, at 285 York Street during Sophomore 
year; at 403 Berkeley, Junior year; at 16 York Square during 
Senior year. 

Diddle expects to go into banking. His permanent address is 
Philippi, West Ya. 




;22^^:^^^- 



64 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



CHARLES CROPPER DILLEY, "Pop," was born in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. January 18, 1894. After spending eight years 

there lie moved to Lebanon, 
Ohio, and later to Wyoming, 
Ohio. 

His father, Boyd Edwin Dil- 
ley, was born in Sarabsville, 
Ohio, February 7, 1854, but has 
spent most of his life in Cincin- 
nati, Avhere he is clerk of the 
United States Court. Mrs. Dil- 
ley's maiden name Avas Ella 
Louise Clayton, and her home, 
before marriage, was in Coving- 
ton, Ivy. Charles is the only 
child. 

Charles prepared at the Wy- 
oming (Ohio) High School. He 
received an oration appointment 
in Junior year. He belongs to 
Beta Theta Pi, Yale Battery, 
and the Ohio Club, and has 
engaged in track athletics, crew and lacrosse. He roomed alone 
in Freshman and Sophomore years, at 561 Pierson and 198 Far- 
nam; with P. R. Mather, at 498 Haughton, in Junior year, and 
with J. M. McHatton, at 115 Welch, in Senior year. 

Dilley is undecided as to his future career. His address is 
735 Stout Avenue, Wyoming, Ohio. 




^i^tAA, €. ^liUjuy . 



ADAMS DODSOIs\ "Ad," Avas born in Bethlehem, Pa., Feb- 
ruary 18, 1893. 

His father, James Stout Dodson, was born in Wheeling, W. 
Va., about 1860, and died in Bethlehem May 30, 1904. He was a 
graduate of Lehigh, and was in the coal business in Bethlehem, 
Pa. His mother Avas Martha Amelia Snyder, of Bethlehem, 
Pa. Adams is the only child. John T. Snyder, '15 S., is a Yale 
relatiA-e. 

Ad prepared at The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa., entered the 
Sheffield Scientific School in the Class of 1915, but transferred 



GRADUATES 



65 



to Academic after oue year. lie 
was awarded a second dispute 
appointment in Junior year. 
His athletic activities have 
been crew and wrestling. He 
roomed with A, B. Johnston, Jr., 
at 126 High Street, in Freshman 
year; alone, at 384 Berkeley, in 
Sophomore year; with T. A. 
Buckner, Jr., at 350 White, in 
Junior year, and alone in Senior 
year, at 117 Welch. 

Dodson expects to enter the 
Hai'vard Law School. His per- 
manent address is 136 Church 
Street, Bethlehem, Pa. 




K^yfti^t-^^ZO' yO^^^Zl&^i/, 



GEORGE HENRY DOVEX- 
MUEHLE, ''Dovey," "Dunk," 
Avas born in Chicago, 111., Jan- 
uary 29, 1895. 

Henry C. Dovenmuehle, his 
father, was bom in Chicago 
August 19, 1864, and has spent 
his life there, being engaged in 
the wholesale shoe business, un- 
der the firm name of H. 
E. C. Dovenmuehle & Son. His 
mother, Louise K. Hoffman, 
who was also from Chicago, died 
in 1911. There are two children, 
one son and one daughter. 

Dovey prepared at the Uni- 
versity School, Chicago, and at a 
private school. He was awarded 
a second dispute in Junior year, 
and belongs to Alpha Delta Phi ; 
and was on the Class Baseball Team 




^^^(^Q~\Af. /(>Uva.t,c^vt-c^.4.-<^X/A.. 



has participated in basketball 
He roomed with J. L. Moss, 



66 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Jr., ill Frcsliiiuiii and Soplioiiiore years, at 621 Wright and 
229 Faniaiu; witli P. .F. Clark, in Junior and Senior years, at 
434 Fayerweather and 66S Wright. 

Doveninuehle expects to go into business. His address is 616 
Arlington Place, Chicago, 111. 



FAIRFAX DAVIS DOWNEY, 'Tairy," "Fax," was born in 
Salt Lake City, Utah, November 28, 1893, and has lived in 
Manila, P. I.; Denver, Colo.; Cuba; San Francisco. Calif.; 
Washington, D. C, and in New York City. 

His father, George Faber Downey, a colonel in the United 
States Army, was born in Prescott, Ariz., in 1866, and has been 
stationed in various ]3arts of the country and in foreign posses- 
sions. Mrs. Downey's name before marriage was Mattie Louise 
Davis, and her home was Piedmont, W. Va. There are two sons 
in the family. T. B. Davis, '97 S., J. E. Davis, '00, and G. F. 
Downey, Jr., '18, a brother, are Yale relatives. 

Fairy prepared at The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa. He was an 
editor of the Yale Record, chairman of the 1916 Board; a member 
of the University Banjo and Mandolin clubs (recorder in 

1915-16), and was coach of 
the Freshman Mandolin Club, 
1914-15. He was a member of 
the University Fencing Team, 
1914-16; received a second collo- 
quy appointment in Junior year ; 
and is an associate member of 
the Yale Dramatic Association. 
He belongs to the Yale Battery, 
to the Eli Society Orchestra, 
and to Zeta Psi. He roomed 
with W. M. Allen and E. W. 
Hubbard, in Freshman year, at 
668 Wright; with Hubbard and 
K. J. Tener, at 173 Lawrance, in 
Sophomore year ; with T. T. 
Crowell, Jr., in Junior year, at 
375 W^hite; and in Senior year 
wnth Crowell and E. F. Russell, 
at 8 Vanderbilt. 




-^a^-v^Ci^rxvSrvS^^'^^s^^^^^ 



GRADUATES 



67 



Downey is undecided whether to go into the coal business, or 
take up journalism. His address is care Col. G. F. Downey, War 
Department, Washington, D. C. 



EAYMOND AUGLTH DUDLEY, ''Dud," ''Ray," was born in 
Guilford, Conn., February 18, 1890. 

His father, Horace Francis Dudley, was born in Guilford, 
March 9, 1846, and has always lived there, being engaged in farm- 
ing. His mother, before she married, was a resident of Middle- 
field, Conn. ; her name was Mary Eliza Augur. Four sons com- 
prise the family, two daughters being deceased. 

Dud prepared at the Guilford High School and at the Morgan 
School, Clinton, Conn. He debated on the Freshman Team 
against Harvard and is manager of the University Debating 
Association; received third divi- 
sion honors in Junior year, and 
an oration appointment ; be- 
longs to Beta Theta Pi. He has 
been active in Christian Associa- 
tion work. During Freshman 
year he roomed alone, at 590 
Pierson ; in Sophomore year 
with D. ^. Beach, Jr., and F. 
W. Lorimer, at 434 Fayei-- 
weather; with Beach and Lori- 
mer, at 466 Fayerweather, in 
Junior year ; and with Beach, 
Lorimer, and E. E. Aiken, Jr., 
at 101-104 Welch, in Senior year. 

Dudley expects to enter the 
Yale School of Religion, in prep- 
aration for the ministry. His 
permanent address is Guilford, 
Conn. 




(^*:prH^ d. ^.4t^. 



ORTEN EVERETT DULING was born in Charleston, W. 
Ya.. July 17, 1889, and has lived in Spencer, W. Va., and in Mor- 
gantown, W. Va. 

His father, Charles Franklin Duling, was born in Charleston, 
W. Va., in 1840, and spent most of his life there as a merchant. 



68 



II I STORY OF THE CLASS 




He died December 24, 1905, in 
Spencer. Mrs. Duling was 
Sarah Annie McCnllougli. Of 
tlii'ir fifteen children, thirteen 
arc now living. 

Orten prepared at the West 
A'ii-ginia University Preparatory 
School, Morgantown, W. Va., 
and Avas graduated from the 
West Virginia University, with 
the degree of B.A., in 1915, en- 
tering Yale as a Senior. He has 
I'oomcd alone in Kent Hall dur- 
ing this year. 

Duling will enter the Colum- 
bia School of Journalism, in 
preparation for his future work. 
His address is 337 Park Street, 
Morgantown, W. Va. 




JLiiiv^ 




0~*A.^ 



NICHOLSON JOSEPH 
EASTMAN, "Nick," was born 
January 20, 1895, in Crawfords- 
ville, Ind., but has spent most of 
his life in Indianapolis, Ind. 

His father, Thomas Barker 
Eastman, was born in Browns- 
burg, Ind., April 8, 1869, and 
was graduated from Wabash Col- 
lege with the degree of B.A. in 
1890. He has spent most of his 
life in Indianapolis, where he 
is a surgeon, connected with 
the Eastman Sanatorium. His 
mother was Ota Beale Nichol- 
son, of Crawfordsville, Ind. She 
died September 27, 1910. Nich- 
olson is the only child. 

Nick prepared at the Short- 



GRADUATES 



69 



ridge High School, Indianapolis, and at Andover. He is a mem- 
ber of Alpha Delta Phi. He roomed with Welch at 452 Fayer- 
weather, 164 Lawrance, 446 Fayerweather, and 28 Yanderbilt. 

Eastman expects to practice medicine, and will enter the Har- 
vard Medical School. His address is 4150 Washington Bonlevard, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



WILLAED HOLMES ECK- 
MAN, "Bill," "Pete," was born 
in Wilmington, Del., Angust 21, 
1894. 

His father, Aument Eckman, 
was born in Drnmore Township, 
Lancaster County, Pa., Septem- 
ber 7, 1854, and has spent most 
of his life in Wilmington, Del., 
where he is engaged in business 
as a contractor and builder. His 
mother, who was Margaret Anne 
O'Xeal, was born in Philadelphia, 
Pa. There are three sons and 
three daughters in the family. 

Bill prepared at the Friends 
School, Wilmington, Del. He 
was on the Freshman Basketball 
Team, and the University Bas- 
ketball and Track Squads. He received a second dispute appoint- 
ment in Junior year, and is a member of the Southern Club. His 
roommate in Freshman year was Lowell Innes, at 589 Pier- 
son; during Sophomore year he roomed with Innes and Wil- 
liam A. James, at 178 Lawrance; Junior year Avith Frederick 
J. Manning, at 505 Haughton, and Senior year with Innes, at 
83 Connecticut. 

Eckman intends to go into business. His address is Hillcrest, 
Wilmington, Del. 




^aMoJuL n. ZcJUys^OAAy 



CHARLES PARKER EDDY was born in Haddam, Conn., 
October 27, 1891, lived there for fourteen years, and has since 
lived in Hartford, Conn. 

His father, Willard Eddy, was born in Turner, Maine, August 
29, 1845, was graduated from Yale in the Class of 1870, and from 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



tlic Albany Law School in 1871. 
His home is in Haddani, Conn., 
and he is an attorney at law with 
offices in Hartford. Mrs. Eddy's 
name hefore marriajje was Marie 
Minna llertel. She was born 
in Zwickau, Saxony, Germany, 
afterwards living in Hartford. 
Two sons and a daughter are in 
the family; a son is deceased. 
Yale relatives are a grandfather, 
Henry A. Eddy, B.A. 1832, M.D. 
1851; and an uncle, Henry T. 
Eddy, B.A. 1867, Ph.B. 1868. 

Charley prepared at the Hart- 
ford High School. He received 
third division honors in Fresh- 
man year; Connecticut Scholar- 
ship for Hartford in Freshman 
year, and the Thomas Hamlin 
Curtis Scholarship for Junior and Senior years. He received 
a dissertation appointment in Junior year, was president of the 
Yale Dining Club, and belongs to Alpha Delta Phi. He roomed 
Avith A. W. Bachman, at 554 Pierson, in Freshman year; with 
E. R. Fish, Sophomore and Junior years, at 211 Farnam, 458 
Fayerweather, and with F. E. Toole, at 74 Connecticut, Senior 
year. 

Eddy proposes to become a journalist. His address is 92 
Atwood Street, Hartford, Conn. 




V — ^<!^t-'^2-'7'^^--c:^2:^<- 



DANIEL COLLIER ELKIN, "Red," was born in Louis- 
ville, Ky., March 26, 1893, but lives in Lancaster, Ky. 

His father, Robert Elkin, was born in Lancaster, Ivy., Sep- 
tember 12, 1866, and has always lived there, being engaged in 
farming. His mother was Roberta Collier before marriage, and 
her home was in Louisville, Ky. Daniel is the only child. 

Red prepared at Andover. He was awarded a first dispute in 
Junior year. He has been assistant manager, and manager of 
the Crew, has a "Y," and belongs to Delta Kappa Epsilon, 
Sword and Gun Club, Birthday Club, Plugs, Whiffenpoofs, 



GRADUATES 



71 



Mohicans, Scroll and Key, Yale 
Southern Club, the Andover 
Club, is a member of the Su})- 
per Committee, and the Yale 
University Athletic Association. 
He was a Cheer Leader, and tools- 
part in the Dramatic Associa- 
tion's production at Christmas, 
1915. Freshman year he roomed 
with Stuart Bullivant, at 583 
Pierson ; the remaining three 
years with Hampton and Dar- 
ling, at 237 Durfee, 490 Haugh- 
ton, and 55 Yanderbilt. 

Elkin expects to study medi- 
cine, but is undecided as to what 
school he will enter. His address 
is Lancaster, Ky. 




//^Uoii f . ^ifc^ ^ 



CLAIE MORTIMER ELS- 
TON was born September 2, 
1894, in Collinsville, Conn. 

His father, Albert A. Elston, 
was born in Unionville, N". Y., 
April 21, 1869. He has spent 
most of his life in Port Jervis, 
X. Y., and Collinsville, Conn., 
Avhere he is employed as an in- 
spector in the Collins Company. 
Mrs. Elston's maiden name was 
Jane Augusta B. Warren, and 
her home was Collinsville. 
Their family consists of one son 
and one daughter. Charles M. 
Warren, 1898, M.A. 1903, and 
B.D. 1912, is a Yale relative. 

Clair jjrepared at the Collins- 
ville High School. He was 

awarded a second dispute in Junior year. He held the scholar- 
ship at large from Connecticut in Freshman year. During the 




C 7h ^\^Ui::^ 



72 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



first three years lie roomed alone at 641 Wright, 217 Farnani, and 
404 Berkeley ; in Senior year with T. K. Emhof , at 409 Berkeley. 
Elston intends to study chemistry, and to devote himself to 
scientific pursuits. His address is Collinsville, Conn. 



EDWARD WALDO EMER- 
SON, ''Baldy," was born in 
Titusville, Pa., December 12, 
1893. 

Charles Francis Emerson, his 
father, was born in Wisconsin in 
1866, and was a member of the 
Class of '86 S. He passed most 
of his life in Titusville, Avhere he 
was in the oil business, and died 
there September 5, 1904. Mrs. 
Emerson, who Avas Bessie Ben- 
son, was also a resident of Titus- 
ville. There are five children in 
the family. John L. Emerson, 
ex-'93, Edward O. Emerson, '98, 
(O V\^ ^4ji ^S^XV\SJ\)^cyv. and John Emerson, 1919, are 

Yale relatives. 

Baldy prepared at The Hill 
School, Pottstown, Pa. He was awarded a second dispute appoint- 
ment in Junior year. He was on the Freshman Banner Com- 
mittee, Freshman Glee Club, belongs to Alpha Delta Phi, Yale 
Battery, The Hill School Club, and has participated in track ath- 
letics and golf. He has roomed with William H. Gurney during 
his four years, at 653 Wright, 151 Lawrance, 345 White, and 
59 Vanderbilt. 

Emerson plans to devote himself to journalism and letters. His 
address Avill be 189 N'orth Perry Street, Titusville, Pa. 




CHARLES ALOYSIUS PAGAN", JR., "Chuck," Avas born 
in Pittsburgh, Pa., December 9, 1892. 

His father, Charles A. Fagan, was born and has always lived 



GRADUATES 



73 



in Pittsburgh, where he prac- 
tices law, under the firm name of 
Fagan «fc McElroy. Before her 
marriage Mrs. Fagan was Mary 
Kane, and her home in Pitts- 
burgh. There are five children 
living. 

Chuck prepared at the Shady 
Side Academy, Pittsburgh, Har- 
strom School and later with a 
private tutor. He has belonged 
to the Freshman Glee Club, the 
Apollo Glee Club, Alpha Delta 
Phi, R. K. K., and the Harstrom 
School Club. He roomed alone 
in Freshman year, at 262 York 
Street ; \n.th James M. Sym- 
ington, at 235 Welch, in Sopho- 
more year; with Symington and 
Prentice Goodhue, at 456 Fayerweather, in Junior year, and with 
Laurence M. Lloyd and Ira H. Washburn, at 64 Yanderbilt, in 
Senior year. 

Fagan expects to practice law, and will enter the Pittsburgh 
Law School. His address is 736 North Highland Avenue, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 




^^^"h/iiAM^ 61 . -ha^a^^^^ 



SIDIvTEY WILBUR FARTvTSWORTH, "Farny," "Necker," 
"Pupa," ''Sid," was born in Memphis, Tenn., January 17, 1895. 

Charles Francis Farnsworth, his father, was born in Nashville, 
Tenn., July 23, 1858, but has lived in Memphis the greater part 
of his life. His mother, whose maiden name was Katherine Wal- 
ton Church, was also a resident of Memphis. Mr. Farnsworth was 
in the cotton business, but is now^ retired. There are three children 
living. 

Sid prepared at the Memphis University School, and at the 
Princeton (jST. J.) Preparatory School. He played on the Uni- 
versity Golf Team against Pennsylvania, Harvard, and several 
country clubs, and has been out for track. He belongs to Delta 
Kappa Epsilon, the Birthday Club, Yale Battery, was treas- 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




urer of the Southern Club in 
1914-15, and vice president in 
1915-16. Tliroufilioiit the course 
he has roomed with Alexander 
D. Wilson ; in Freshman year at 
502 Ilaughton ; Sophomore year 
at 234 Diirfee; Junior year at 
367 White, and Senior year at 
47 Vanderbilt. 

Farnsworth expects to go into 
the cotton business. His address 
is 1720 Central Avenue, Mem- 
phis, Tenn. 



J<^l7U^7/^ ^^)^;c<Uiyi!n^ 




Lcr^ju^^ peM/tw\QAjw 



LOUIS FEINMAEK, 'Terc," 
''Finey," was born in New Haven, 
Conn., August 13, 1896. 

His father, Morris Feinmark, 
was born in March, 1859, in 
Warsaw, Poland, but has lived 
in New Haven for many years. 
He is an inspector in the Public 
Works Department of the City. 
His mother, whose maiden name 
was Esther Lefcovitz, was born 
in Lodz, Poland. There were four 
sons and four daughters in the 
family; only five are now living. 

Perc prepared at the New 
Haven High School and is a 
member of the Menorah Society. 
He has roomed at home through- 
out the course. 



GRADUATES 



75 



Feinmark lias already taken some work in the Yale School of 
Law, where he expects to continue next year. His permanent 
address is 188 Woleott Street, New Haven, Conn. 



AUGUSTUS KOI FELTY, ''Bus," ''Buster," was born in Abi- 
lene, Kans., August 27, 1895, but has lived in Hartford, Conn., for 
eighteen years. 

His father, John Wellington Felty, was born in Campbelltown, 
Pa., March 4, 1860, but has made his home in Hartford, where he 
is a physician. He was graduated from the Jefferson Medical 
College, with the degree of M.D. in 1884, and received the degree 
of F.A.C.S. in 1914. Mrs. Felty, who was Elizabeth Shallen- 
berger, of Hamburg, Pa., died in Hartford, in 1903. One son 
and one daughter survive her. 

Bus prepared at the Hartford High School. He received first 
division honors in Freshman year; the Chamberlain Greek En- 
trance Prize ; first division honors and a philosophical oration 
in Junior year. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa 
and Sigma Xi. Malcolm J. Baber was his roommate in 
Freshman year, at 620 Wright ; 
Sophomore and Junior years, 
he roomed with Edward N. 
Little, at 208 Farnam and 
382 White; Senior year, with 
Little, R. C. Tefft, Jr., and 
H. E. Woodward, at 81-90 Con- 
necticut. 

Felty expects to practice medi- 
cine, and will enter the Johns 
Hopkins Medical School. His 
address is 734 Prospect Avenue, 
Hartford, Conn. 




76 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




REGINALD FIELD, "Reg," 
"was boni September 23, 1S93, in 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Frank Harvey Field, his 
father, was born August 14, 
1863, in Chicago, 111. He was 
graduated from the Columbia 
Law School with the degree of 
LL.B. in 1888, and lives in New 
York City, where he practices 
law, Mrs. Field was Mary Lutz 
Sniffen before her marriage, and 
her residence was Brooklyn. 
There were seven children in the 
family; four are now living. 
Reg prepared at the Boys' 
^O ' n C?' l\ High School of Brooklyn, and at 

/ulP UJuJtM^ W) Phillips-Exeter Academy, Exe- 

' ter, X. H. He entered Harvard 

with the Class of 1915, but transferred to Yale. He received third 
division honors in Junior year, and is a member of the Yale Bat- 
tery and the Exeter Club. In Freshman year he roomed at 9 
Library Street with Roland Virgil Vaughn; with E, S. Robinson 
and A. T. Campbell, in Sophomore year, at 271 Durfee; with 
Calvin Goodrich Littlefield, in Junior and Senior years, at 407 
Berkeley, and 672 Wright. 

Field expects to enter Columbia Law School. His address is 
274 Sterling Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



NORMAN RIDLEY FINCH, "Norm," was born in Plain- 
field, N. J., July 5, 1894. 

Edward Lucius Finch, M.D., his father, Avas born in New 
Haven, Conn., May 31, 1845, and was graduated from General 
Russell's Military Academy, New Haven, and from the Hahne- 
mann Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa. He has lived in New 
Haven, and in Plainfield, N. J. Annie Ridley (Crane) Finch, 
his mother, lived in New York City. There were five sons and 
two daughters in the family ; six are now living. Justice Edward 
Ridley Finch, Yale '95, is his brother. 



GRADUATES 



77 



I'^orm prepared at Leal's 
School, Plainfield, X. J. He 
was the composer of the foot- 
hall song, "Eli's Day," used in 
Senior year. He is a niemher of 
Zeta Psi. Rohert S. Wentworth 
Avas his roommate in Freshman 
and Sophomore years, at 521 
Pierson and 192 Farnam ; Junior 
year he roomed at 390 Berkeley, 
with William A. James, and at 
32-33 Yanderhilt in Senior year, 
with D. C. Fitts, James, and 
D. P. Robinson. 

Finch expects to he associated 
with a chemical concern in Xew 
York. His address is "Gray- 
stone," Plainfield, IST. J. 




Vj6\UActM.^R 



MAURICE LOUIS FIRUSKI, 

"Mus," was born June 26, 1894, 
in Xew York City. 

Louis L. Firuski, his father, 
born in St. Louis, Mo., has lived 
most of the time in Xew 
York City, where he has a stor- 
age warehouse. Sara (Hirscli) 
Firuski is his mother, and her 
home was Brooklyn. There are 
three children, one son and two 
daughters. 

Mus prepared at the Polytech- 
nic Preparatory School, Brook- 
lyn. He was on the Freshman 
Basketball Squad; was dramatic 
editor of the Coiirant, and won a 
Be cord Charm. He received third 
division honors in Junior vear, 




T. 



omu^ TAhJO^ 



78 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



also ail oratiiiii aiipointniciit, won the Pundit prize essay aiul is 
a niciulx'r i»t' the Pundits. He roomed alone in Freshman year, at 
7 Library Street; with John Hoyt the remaining three years, at 
247 Durfee, 356 White, and 61 Vanderbilt. 

Firuski is undecided about his future work. His address is 
137 Riverside Drive, New York City. 



EUGENE ROYSTER FISH, "Ix^vs," was born in Laredo, 
Texas, September 30, 1894, and lived there four years; the past 
seventeen he has lived in Palestine, Texas. 

Charles William Fish is his father, and Margaret (Royall) 
Fish, of Palestine, his mother, Eugene is the only child. 

Ix^Ds prepared at the Palestine High School, and at the Macken- 
zie School. He went out for track Freshman year, and played on 
the Class Tennis Team, in Junior year; received the Heaton 
Testimonial and first division honors, in Freshman year ; took part 
in the Sophomore Public Speaking Contest; was second tenor in 
the Apollo Glee Club, and in the College Choir; was awarded a 
philosophical oration appointment, in Junior year; and is treas- 
urer of the Southern Club, a 
member of Delta Kappa Epsilon, 
and of Phi Beta Kappa. James 
White Knapp was his roommate 
in Freshman year, at 552 Pier- 
son ; Sophomore and Junior 
years he roomed with Charles 
Parker Eddy, at 211 Farnam, 
and 458 Fayerweather ; Senior 
year with Francis Graham 
Coates and Richard Joseph 
White, at 7 Vanderbilt. 

Fish expects to enter the bank- 
ing business. His address is 
Palestine, Texas. 




(Lj&*<^,^^>M>y(/: ■T^i-^tX/' 



GRADUATES 



79 



DONALD CUMMINGS 

FITTS, "Don," "Dek," was 
born April 6, 1891, in North- 
ampton, Mass. 

Charles Nathan Fitts, his 
father, was born in Leverett. 
Mass., but has lived in North- 
ampton for the last thirty 
years, where he is in the fur- 
niture business. Mrs. Fitts' 
maiden name Avas Lillian DePuy 
Cummings, and her home Free- 
port, 111. The family consisted 
of three sons and one daughter, 
of whom three sons are now 
living. C. Norman Fitts, Yale 
1919, a brother, is his only Yale 
relative. 

Don prepared at the North- 
ampton High School, and also tutored. He was photogra]:)hic 
editor of the Courant. He received third division honors in 
Freshman year ; is the managing editor of the Eli Book ; wrote 
the words to the Yale Football Song "Eli's Day"; received a 
dissertation appointment in Junior year, and belongs to Zeta Psi. 
Arthur Bliss Lane was his roommate in Freshman year, at 605 
Wright ; Sebring Bassett in Sophomore year, at 184 Farnam ; 
Lewis Miller, at 482 Haughton, in Junior year, and in Senior 
year Norman Eidley Finch, William Augustus James, and Donald 
Pelton Robinson, at 32-33 Vanderbilt. 

Fitts will probably take up interior decorating after graduation. 
His permanent address is 12 Bedford Terrace, Northampton, Mass. 




ALFRED WILLOUGHBY FOWLER, "Hen," "Al," "Halb- 
Schnitt," was born in Fremont, Nebr., July 28, 1893. 

Willard Horton Fowler, his father, born in Columbus, Nebr., 
November 23, 1863, is noAV in business in Fremont, Nebr., where 
he is a partner in the hardware firm of Holloway & Fowler. His 
mother. Clara (Willoughby) Fowler, was a resident of Chicago, 



80 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



111. One son and one daughter make up their family. Joseph 
H. Ensign, Yale 1889, is a relative. 

Al prepared at the Fremont 
(Nebr.) High School, and entered 
the University of Chicago in the 
Class of 1915, remaining there 
one year. Since entering Yale, 
he has held the Learned Scholar- 
ship during Sophomore, Junior 
and Senior years; received sec- 
ond division honors in Freshman 
year; was a member of the 
Freshman Cross Country Team, 
and won numerals on the Gym- 
nastic Team. He has also been 
on the Wrestling Squad. He re- 
ceived first division honors and 
a high oration in Junior year; 
belongs to the Spanish Club, 
Chess Club, and Phi Beta 
Kappa. In Freshman year he 
roomed with Edward Brainerd 
Smith, at 614 Wright; with Smith and Frank Hammond Sweet, 
at 183 Lawrance, in Sophomore year; Junior and Senior years 
with Sweet, at 451 Fayerweather, and 58 Vanderbilt. 

Fowler may go into business directly, or possibly take a course 
at the Northwestern School of Business. His address is Fre- 
mont, ]^ebr. 




yKT.'ud. iCJUcz^ay-J.-L,) Fcvi.'CcT. 



WALTER JACKSON FREEMAN, JR., was born November 
14, 1895, in Philadelphia, Pa. 

His father, Walter Jackson Freeman, who Avas born December 
22, 1860, is a physician in Philadelphia, Pa. He Avas graduated 
from the University of Pennsylvania in 1885 Avitli tlio degree of 
M.D. His mother, whose maiden name Avas Corinne Keen, has 
ahvays liA'ed in Philadelphia. 

Walt prepared at the Protestant Episcopal Academy in Phila- 
delphia and in 1915 attended the University of Pennsylvania 
Summer School. He receiA^ed a first colloquy Junior appoint- 



GRADUATES 



81 



ment, played on the University 
Orchestra, and is an editor of 
the C our ant. He roomed with 
J. H. Grubb, Jr., at 601 Wright, 
in Freshman year; with M. J. 
Baber, at 424 Fayerweather and 
166 Lawrance, in Sophomore 
year, and with G. W. Goodwin 
the rest of the course, at 484 
Haughton and 70 Connecticut. 

Freeman expects to do gradu- 
ate work in engineering at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. His permanent address 
is 1832 Spruce Street, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 




lArOLiiin t foijL/wvi/w 1^ 



JULIUS WEIS FEIEXD 
was born in ISTew Orleans, La., 
August 20, 1894. 

His father, Joseph Emanuel 
Friend, was born August 4, I860, 
in Milwaukee, Wis., and was 
graduated from Yale in 1882. 
He is a cotton merchant, a mem- 
ber of the firm of J. Weis & 
Company. There are two sons 
and two daughters in the fam- 
ily. Leon Godchaux, '09, and 
Paul L. Godchaux, '17, are 
cousins. 

Jule prepared at Phillips-Exe- 
ter Academy. He went out for 
the Fencing Team in Freshman 
year, and has written for the 
Coiirant. He roomed alone all 




Ju£i^ l^r^/^^(jUc4. 



82 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



four years at 2G2 York Street, 420 Berkeley, 500 Haughton and 
100 Welch. 

Friend expects to enter the mercantile business. His permanent 
address is 1807 Palmer Avenue, New Orleans, La. 




SAMUEL GOURDIN GAIL- 
LARD, JR., ''Sam," ''Dine," was 
born in Philadelphia, Pa., March 
22, 1894, and has lived in 
Charleston, S. C, New Cumber- 
land, W. Va., and Chestnut Hill, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

His father, Samuel Gourdin 
Gaillard, was born in Eutaw- 
ville, S. C, July 17, 1853, and 
was graduated from Union Col- 
lege with the degree of C.E. in 
1881. He has lived in Roanoke, 
Va., Philadelphia and in New 
Cumberland, W. Va., and is a 
manufacturer, being president 
and general manager of the 
Mack Manufacturing Company. 
His mother was Esther Lynch 
McCrady, of Charleston, S. C. 
There are two sons, one of whom, Edward McC. Gaillard, is 
now in the Freshman Class. Edw^ard McCrady, A'^ale 1820, is 
a great-grandfather. 

Sam prepared with a private tutor, and spent six years at 
Chestnut Hill Academy, St. Martins, Pa. He has won numerals 
and prizes in rowing and wrestling. He rowed on the Freshman 
Four-oar Crew; won two cups in the University Sculling cham- 
pionships, and others in the fall and spring regattas, and a Uni- 
versity Wrestling Medal ; he belonged to the Yale Orchestra for 
two years; received a first colloquy appointment in Junior year; 
belongs to Zeta Psi, Skull and Bones, and the Little Yellow 
Dogs ; is president of the Chestnut Hill Club, and a member of 
the Yale Battery. Freshman year he roomed with William 
Mikell, al 584 Pierson; the remaining three years with Mikell, 



GRADUATES 



83 



and Edwards F. Leiper, Jr., at 230 Farnam, 377 White, and 
60 Vanderbilt. 

Gaillard expects to become a civil engineer. His address is 23 
East Gravers Lane, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 



EDWARD MANN GAL- 
LAGHER, "Eddie," was born 
in O'lSTeill, Nebr., November 16, 
1892. 

His father, Edward F. Gal- 
lagher, and his mother, Mary 
Mann, were both born in Dar- 
lington, Wis. Mr. Gallagher is 
president of the First National 
Bank of O'Neill. There are two 
sons in the family. 

Eddie prepared at the O'Neill 
High School, and was graduated 
from the University of Nebraska 
with the degree of B.A. in 1913, 
entering Yale in Senior year. 
He is a member of Beta Theta 
Pi. He roomed with Maris E. 
DeWolf, at 49 Vanderbilt. 

Gallagher expects to become a banker. His permanent address 
is O'Neill, Nebr. 




XaU^ur^x^^ ?T^ 'f^^:LX-^^^,^J/tV'„ 



WILLIAM HAMILTON GARDNER, ''Ham," was born in 
Buffalo, N. Y., January 26, 1893, and has lived for ten years in 
Snyder, N. Y. 

His father, William Allan Gardner, was born March 18, 1868, 
in Buffalo, N. Y., where he is now in the banking business with 
the firm of J. C. Dann & Company. His mother, Edith (Sidway) 
Gardner, Avas also a resident of Buffalo. One son and one daugh- 
ter are living. Henry B. Spaulding, Yale '05, and Albert T. 
Spaulding, Yale '08, are relatives. 

Ham prepared at St. Luke's School, Wayne, Pa. He played 



84 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




^:<yr:i^H^.n^^^^^ 



on the University Golf Team for 
four years, during which he was 
twice captain. He won the Uni- 
versity Championship in the 
spring of 1915, and was runner- 
up in September, 1915; he was 
president of the Intercollegiate 
Golf Association, 1914-15. He 
belongs to Alpha Delta Phi. 
During Freshman year he roomed 
with Gilbert McCoy Troxell, at 
622 Wright; the remaining 
three years with Robert Graeme 
Crocker, at 162 Lawrance, 353 
White, and 75 Connecticut. 

Gardner will become a broker, 
and his address is Snyder, X. Y, 



JOHX DAY GAEYIX, 

"Johnner," was born in Old 
Concord, Pa., December 9, 1893, 
and has lived in Chicago, 111., 
Taylorsville, 111., and Wilkins- 
burg, Pa. 

His father, James Ellsworth 
Garvin, was born in Jackson 
Centre, Pa., September 10, 1862, 
and was graduated from Waynes- 
burg College with the degree of 
B.A. in 1886, and M.A. in 1889, 
was given the degree of B.D. by 
Cumberland University in 1889, 
and that of D.D. by Wayuesburg, 
in 1906. He has lived most of 
his life in the southwestern 
jiart of Pennsylvania, where he 
is a Presbyterian clergyman. 

His mother is Caroline Lulu (Parkinson) Gaiwin. There are 

two sons in the family. 




GRADUATES 



85 



Jolinner prepared at the Pittsburgh (Pa.) High School, and 
was graduated from the University of Pittsburgh, with the degree 
of B.A., in 1915, entering Yale in Senior year. While at Pitts- 
burgh he belonged to the Freshman Football and Baseball Teams, 
and also to the Glee Club, and was a member of Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. He has roomed with F. B. Weakley during this year, 
at 111 Welch. 

Garvin Avill enter the University of Pittsburgh Law School; 
his address is 1705 Montier Street, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 



DOXALD DUXLEVY GEAEY, "Don," was born in Xew 
York City, January 8, 1894. 

He is the only child of Henry Elmer Geary, who was born 
August 16, 1861, and Florence (Herdman) Geary, both of Albany, 
X. Y. Mr. Geary is in the manufacturing business in iSTew York 
City, the secretary of the Troy Laundry Machinery Company. 

Don prepared at the Stevens School, Hoboken, X. J. In Junior 
year he received a first colloquy appointment, has been out for 
crew, and is a member of the 
Yale Battery, Zeta Psi, and 
Single Sculls and Foam. He 
roomed alone in Freshman year, 
at 573 Pierson; with Eansom, 
Bunker and von Holt, in Sopho- 
more, Junior and Senior years, 
at 137 Welch, 337 White, and 
136 Welch. 

Geary expects to practice law, 
and will enter the Harvard Law 
School. His permanent address 
is 221 Park Avenue, Orange, 
X.J. 




/(3trM^c^ ^: -^c5ow. 



86 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



JOHN ARCHER GEE was 
born in Fall River, Mass., Octo- 
ber 25, 1894. 

His father, Frederic Archer 
Gee, was born in Providence, 
went later to Wrentham, Mass., 
and is now engaged in the real 
estate business in Fall River. 
Mrs. Gee, whose maiden name 
was Margaret Hawkins, lived in 
Fall River before her marriage. 
There are two sons and one 
daughter in the family. 

John prepared at St. George's 
School and at Phillips-Exeter. 
He was on the Class Tennis 
Team and went out for foot- 
ball and crew. He belongs to 
the Exeter Club, and to the 
St. George's School Club. During Freshman year he roomed with 
Malcolm E. Langdon, at 266 York Street ; with Earl Russell 
Bragg, at 108 Welch, in Sophomore year; in Junior year wuth 
P. M. Thompson, at 333 White ; and with Edwin Stein, in Senior 
year, at 66 Vanderbilt. 

Gee is undecided about his future career, although he inclines 
toward the law, and may go to the Harvard Law School. His 
address is 661 High Street, Fall River, Mass. 




^^S^U^~>^V>JVSiY.oij._ '^^^Sl.S-. 



JOHN RICHMOND GIBB, "Johnnie," was born in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., February 10, 1891. 

His father, John Richmond Gibb, was a merchant in Brooklyn, 
and in Islip, L. 1.; he died in Magnolia, Mass., in 190S. Mrs. 
Gibb, who was Emily Josephine Mathews before her marriage, 
was also a resident of Brooklyn. There were four children, two 
sons and two daughters, in the family, three of whom are now 
living. Arthur S. Goodwin, Yale ^'.r-'OO, and Harold W. Carhart, 
Yale '12, are relatives. 

Johnnie prepared at the Pomfret (Conn.) School, and at the 
Harstrom School. He entered Yale with the Class of 1915, was 
on the University Banjo and Mandolin Club; belongs to the 
University Club, the Turtles, the Skunk Club, Alpha Delta 



GRADUATES 



87 



Plii, aud the Pomfret Club. 
He is affiliated with the Class 
of 1915. During Freshman year 
he roomed with Bud Truesdale, 
Philip Swift, Valentine Bartlett, 
and Will Brooks, at 239 Durfee ; 
with Truesdale, Swift, Barnes 
Newberry, Bartlett and Brooks, 
in Sophomore year, at White ; 
with Carroll Alker, at 65 Yan- 
derbilt, in Junior year ; and 
alone, at 52 Vanderbilt, in Senior 
year. 

Gibb intends to enter business ; 
his address is Glen Cove, Long 
Island, lv\ Y. 




FKAISTK WELLINGTON 
GILBERT, ''Gil," "Gilly," 
"Duke," was born in Salem, 
Ore., May 19, 1892, and has 
lived in Moscow, Idaho, and in 
Portland, Ore. 

His father, Frank Newton 
Gilbert, was born in Kalamazoo, 
Mich., November 12, 1848. He 
has spent his life in Oregon, 
where he is a merchant, and vice 
president of the Commerce Safe 
Deposit & Mortgage Company, 
of Portland. Mrs. Gilbert was 
Annie Charlotte Hovenden, of 
Hubbard, Ore. Their three sons 
are living, Alfred C. Gilbert, 
M.D. Yale 1909, being one. 

Gil prepared at the Allen Pre- 
paratory School, Portland, and at Andover. He was on the 
Wrestling Team, the Hand-ball Team, and the Track Squad, 




V r-^ei-^vO^ XjO , 



e^-XX^x^ 



88 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



and is a member of the Andover Club. His roommate iu Fresh- 
man and Sophomore years was Arthur D. Piatt, at 629 Wright, 
and 278 Lawrance; during Junior year he roomed with Mark 
McChesney and Herbert Macdonald, at 462 Fayerweather, and 
in Senior year with McChesney and Kussell Bragg, at 15 
Vanderbilt. 

Gilbert expects to go into the manufacturing business. His 
permanent address is 14 Everit Street, New Haven, Conn. 



THOMAS LEVERETT GIISTGOLD, "Hingy," "Ginglymus," 
was bom in New Haven, Conn., November 23, 1894. 

His father. Max Gingold, was born in Kobrin, Russia, Decem- 
ber 1, 1858, and came to New 
Haven, where he has since been 
engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness. His mother was Sara Re- 
becca Chapnik, of Gorodetz, 
Russia. Of their nine children 
but three survive. 

Tom prepared at the New 
Haven High School. Junior year 
lie Avas aAvarded a first colloquy 
appointment; he is a member 
of the Menorah Society. He has 
roomed at his home in New 
Haven during his entire course. 
Gingold intends to practice 
medicine, and will enter the 
Yale School of Medicine. His 
permanent address is 109 Sher- 
man Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 




•<7M''>vUU3 o( y6^i/^ 



GEORGE WAITE GOODWIN was born in Albany, N. Y., 
July 31, 1895. 

His father, Scott DuMont Goodwin, was born December 10, 
1845, in Albany, was graduated from Yale in 1869 and from the 
Albany Law School in 1870. He practiced law continuously in 



GRADUATES 



89 



Albany i;ntil liis retirement 
several years ago. Mrs. Good- 
win, who was Sarah Coffin Waite 
before marriage, died January 1, 
1914. 

George prepared at Andover, 
and belongs to the Andover Club. 
He received third division honors 
in Freshman year, and a disserta- 
tion appointment in Junior year. 
He was on the University Or- 
chestra, 1914-15. He has roomed 
at 648 Wright, 166 Lawrance, 
484 Haughton, and 70 Con- 
necticut. 

Goodwin expects to go into 
the law, and will enter the Har- 
vard Law School. His address 
is 333 State Street, Albany, 
^. Y. 




^ 



Mjrs^cdA 



w/. 



WEIGHT DILLINGHAM 
GOSS, JE., "Dill," "Gossy," 
was born June 8, 1894, in New 
York City, where he now lives. 

Wright Dillingham Goss, his 
father, was born in Edinbui'gh, 
Ohio, October 25, 1856, but has 
spent most of his life in ISTew 
York City. He is president and 
a director of the Empire Brick 
& Supply Company. Mrs. Goss 
was Minnie Eleanor Morehouse 
of Brooklyn before her marriage. 
There are seven children in the 
family, Wright being the only 
son. 

Dill prepared at the Horace 
Mann School in New York City. 
He was on the Freshman Swim- 




1jJ/u,aA^ ^. A/r:U^{JA, 



90 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



iiiiug Team, received a first colloquy apj)uiiitiiicut in Junior 
year, and belongs to Zeta Psi. Freshman and Sophomore years 
he roomed with T. M. Hequembourg, at 632 Wright, and 222 
Farnam ; Junior year his roommates were E. F. Russell, and 
M. Morton, Jr., at 378 White; Senior year he roomed with 
Morton and H. W. Herring, at 140 Welch. 

Goss expects to go into business; his address is 548 West 
One Hundred and Fourteenth Street, New York City. 



DAXIEL BROOKS GRANT, "Boone," was born November 
1, 1893, at Memphis, Tenn. He lived in Antwerp, Belgium, for 
four years. 

His father, James Daniel Grant, was born in Atlanta, Ga., 
November 3, 1865, and attended the University of Georgia. He 
is connected with the Columbia Mortgage & Trust Company, of 
Memphis, Tenn. His mother, who was Pearl Neely before her 
marriage, lived in Memphis, Tenn. ; there are two sons in the 
family. 

Boone prepared at the Memphis University School, and at 

Lawrenceville. He is a member 
of Delta Kappa Epsilon, Wolf's 
Head, the Lawrenceville Club, 
the Birthday Club, Plugs, 
Little Yellow Dogs, the Univer- 
sity Club, and the Southern Club. 
He roomed with Goodhue in 
Freshman year, at 534 Pierson ; 
with Goodhue and Caldwell in 
Sophomore year, at 236 Durfee; 
with Caldwell in Junior and 
Senior years, at 494 Haughton 
and 9 Vanderbilt. 

Grant expects to become an 
architect, and will enter Colum- 
bia or the Ecole des Beaux Arts, 
Paris, France. His address is 
652 Adams Avenue, Memphis, 
Tenn. 




p^ayuuJ m-^L jlpi^L^ 



GRADUATES 



91 



LUTHER POMEROY 
GRAVES, JR., 'Tete," ''Lute," 
was born in Buffalo, N. Y., Octo- 
ber 1, 1893. 

Luther Pomeroy Graves, his 
father, who was born at Niagara 
Falls, K Y., January 29, 1862, 
is now in the lumber business in 
Buffalo, under the firm name of 
Graves, Manbert, George & Com- 
pany, and Graves, Bigwood & 
Company. Mrs. Graves, whose 
name was Nellie White before 
marriage, was a resident of Buf- 
falo. There are four sons and 
three daughters in the family. 
Stanley H. Graves, '08 S., and 
Nelson M. Graves, '16 S., are 
relatives. 

Lute prepared at the Nichols School in Buffalo. He was 
business manager of the Courant and won a Record Charm, was 
awarded a second dispute in Junior year, and belongs to the Yale 
Battery, O. C. C. and Zeta Psi. He roomed with Marshall H. 
"Williams in Freshman year, at 599 Pierson; with J. Sterling 
Halstead, Sophomore and Junior years, at 179 Lawrance and 
371 White; with John D. Shove and William McE. Bowden, at 
671 Wright, in Senior year. 

Graves intends to go into the manufacturing business. His 
address is 1297 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 




^C^€^^i^ (P &7<P^-i^^i^ sQ>^ 



JOSEPH HILL GRUBB, JR., ''Joe," was born in Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., January 1, 1895, and has lived in Atlanta, Ga., and 
in Philadelphia, Pa., for the past fifteen years. 

His father, Joseph Hill Grubb, was born in Wilmington, Del., 
and is engaged in the wholesale hardware business in Philadel- 
phia. Mrs. Grubb, who lived in Louisville, Ky., was Genevieve 
de Selding Dumesnil. There are two children, one son and one 
daughter. 

Joe prepared at the Episcopal Academy, a private school, in 



92 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




j2^?A^ ^S-Ml. 



Philadelphia. He contributed to 
the Courant, received a first col- 
loquy appointment in Junior 
year, and has been active in 
tennis and Avrestling. He is a 
member of Sigma Delta Psi. 
During Freshman year he roomed 
with Walter Freeman, at 601 
"Wright; with E. Longstreth, at 
205 Farnam, in Sophomore year; 
in Junior year with Longstreth 
and P. M. Guenther, at 331 
White, and with Guenther, at 
132 Welch, in Senior year. 

Grubb expects to enter the 
Pennsylvania Law School and to 
practice law. His address is 107 
East Montgomery Avenue, Ard- 
more. Pa. 




/^/u-£</t l^irT^a^ ^!ei*»t^i^0i^^ 



PHILIP MORGAN GUEN"- 
THER, "Phil," was born in 
Cleveland, Ohio, October 23, 
1893. 

William George Guenther, his 
father, was born in Indianapolis, 
Ind., and practices law in Cleve- 
land, Ohio, under the firm name 
of Calhoun & Guenther. His 
mother, Alice (Morgan) Guen- 
ther, lived in Cleveland before 
her marriage. One son and 
daughter are in the family. Wil- 
liam H. Marlatt, Yale 1892 L., 
is a relative. 

Phil prepared at the Shaw 
High School, East Cleveland. 
He received second division hon- 
ors in Freshman year; he also 



GRADUATES 



93 



received tliird division honors in Junior year, and a high oration 
appointment. He belongs to the Ohio Chib. He roomed alone 
in Freshman year, at 262 York Street; Avith P. M. Thompson, 
at 242 Durfee, in Sophomore year; at 331 White, with J. H. 
Grubh, Jr., and E. Longstreth, in Junior year, and with Grubb, 
at 132 Welch, in Senior year. 

Guenther will enter the Western Reserve Law School. His 
address is 12424 Cedar Road, Cleveland Heights, Ohio. 



OTIS LOVE GUERJs^SEY, ''Ots," "Guerns," was born in 
Des Moines, Iowa, and has lived there for nineteen years, in New 
York City, and in Greenwich, Conn, 

His father, I^athaniel Taylor Guernsey, was born in Davenport, 
Iowa, December 29, 1859, and was graduated from Yale in 1881. 
He has spent the most of his life in Des Moines, which was Mrs, 
Guernsey's home. Her name 
was Martha Godman Love, Mr, 
Guernsey is now located in New 
York City, where he is general 
counsel for the American Tele- 
phone <fe Telegraph Company. 
Two of their three sons are 
living. 

Ots prepared at the Taft 
School, Watertown, Conn., and 
belongs to the Taft School Club, 
He was Captain of the Freshman 
Football Team, played on the Col- 
lege Baseball Team in 1915, and 
on the University Football Team 
for three years. He has numerals 
and a ''Y" and is a member of 
Delta Kappa Epsilon, Scroll and 
Key, the Little Yellow Dogs, the 
University Club, and chairman 
of the Senior Promenade Com- 
mittee. He roomed with H. H. Tittman, Jr., and H. Sproul, at 
649 Wright, in Freshman year; and with Tittman, Sproul, Haven 
and Proctor Sophomore year, at 155 Lawrance, with Tittman, in 




J., \J \ySU\MAJiAAy 



94 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Junior year, at 368 White, and with Tittniau and W. K. Proctor, 
at 12 Vanderbilt, in Senior year. 

Guernsey is undecided as to his future occupation. His address 
is West View Farm, Greenwich, Conn. 



HAROLD STRONG GULLIVER was born in New Haven, 
Conn., July 30, 1893, but has lived in Stockbridge, Mass., and in 
Waterbury, Conn., for the last twenty years. 

Henry Strong Gulliver, his father, Avas born in Norwich, Conn., 
October 31, 1853, and was graduated from Yale with the degree 
of B.A. in 1875, the honorary degree of M.A. in 1893, and was 
given the degree of LL.B. by Columbia in 1879. He is a teacher, 
and now conducts a private school in Waterbury, Conn. Harriet 
(Evans) Gulliver, his mother, Avas born in New York City, and 
was graduated from Vassar with the degree of B.A. in 1883. 
There were seven sons in the family, of whom four are now 
living. Yale relatives include Colonel Schubael Conant, 1732; 
Major General Jabez Huntington, 1741; Reverend Nathan Strong, 
1742; Joseph Strong, 1772; Henry Strong, 1806; Daniel F. 
Gulliver, 1848; Arthur H. Gulliver, 1877, and two brothers, 

Carl C. Gulliver and Robert H. 
Gulliver, of the Class of 1913. 

Harold prepared at the Crosby 
High School, Waterbury, Conn., 
and at Phillips Academy, at An- 
dover. He was on the Fresh- 
man Debating Club, Freshman 
Track Team, the Freshman Cross 
Country Team, and a member 
of the University Cross Country 
Team. He has numerals and 
received first division honors and 
a philosophical oration ap])oint- 
nicnt in Junior year; is a mem- 
ber of the Yale Battery, and 
an associate member of the Yale 
Dramatic Association, having 
taken part in ''The Recruiting 
Officer" and ''Quentin Durward." 
He roomed with Allen H. Board- 




r4T>J^-<>-tA/ SAnxrv>-* CAAXt*W-t^. 



GRADUATES 



95 



man during Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years, at 663 
Wright, 170 Lawrance, and 460 Fayerweather ; with Boardman 
and I^orraan H. Piatt, at 23 Vanderbilt, in Senior year. 

Gulliver expects to become a teacher, and plans to be at Robert 
College, Constantinople, for the next three years. His permanent 
address is 51 Walnut Street, Waterbury, Conn. 



ALVIN BARTLETT GURLEY, "Dick," was born in Wash- 
ington, D. C, October 25, 1891, and lived there for fourteen 
years. 

William Brooks Gurley, his father, was born August 8, 1843, 
in Indianapolis, Ind., but lived in Washington, D. C, where he 
was a broker. He died at Germantown, Pa., February 10, 1915. 
Elizabeth Howard (Shields) Gurley, his mother, was a resident 
of Washington. There were five sons and two daughters in the 
family, of whom five sons and one daughter survive. Melville 
B. Gurley, Yale 1906, and W. Shields Gurley, ex-1904:, are 
brothers ; other relatives are Walter Hart, 1878 S., George van 
Santvoord, 1912, R. Philip Hart, 1913 S., and John G. van 
Santvoord, 1916 S. 

Dick prepared at the Phillips 
Academy at Andover, and be- 
longs to the Andover Club. He 
held the Thacher Scholarship, 
and also one offered to candi- 
dates for the ministry; received 
a second colloquy appointment 
in Junior year; belonged to 
the Freshman Glee Club, is 
student president of the Yale 
Hope Mission, and vice president 
of Dwight Hall. He belongs to 
Zeta Psi. Freshman year he 
roomed with Norman H. Piatt, 
at 262 York Street; Sophomore 
year with Edward J. Howe, at 
225 Farnam; with W. P. Camp- 
bell, R. H. Lucas, H. W. John- 
stone, M. S. Chism and R. S. 
Cornish, in Junior year, at 433 




/^a.-M-j. 



96 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Fayerweather, and with Campbell, Lucas, Johnstone and Chism, 
at 80-91 Connecticut in Senior year. 

Gurley expects to enter the ministry, and will probably continue 
his studies at the Yale School of Keligion. His address is 257 
Harvey Street, Germantowai, Pa. 



WILLIAM HENRY GUR- 
NEY, "Bill," "Bus," was born 
in Buffalo, K Y., August 19, 
1893. 

His father, Charles Locke Gur- 
ney, was born in Buif alo, May 24, 
1865, and is in the real estate and 
insurance business there, under 
the firm name of Gurney & Over- 
turf ; he is also vice president of 
the Buffalo Savings Bank. His 
mother, Evelyn (Ramsdell) Gur- 
ney, lived in Buffalo before her 
marriage. There are four sons 
in the family; Albert R. Gurney, 
Yale 1918, and Charles L. Gur- 
ney, Jr., 1919, are brothers. 

Bill prepared at the Nichols 
School, and at The Hill School, 
Pottstown, Pa., and belongs to The Hill School Club. He was on 
the Freshman and University Baseball squads, received a second 
colloquy appointment in Junior year ; is a member of Alpha Delta 
Phi, O. C. C, the Elihu Club and on the Senior Promenade 
Committee. He roomed the entire four years wnth E. Waldo 
Emerson, at 652 Wright, 151 Lawrance, 345 White, and 59 
Vandei'bilt. 

Gurney expects to go into the real estate business; his address 
is 312 Summer Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 




lAJ iMu^y*^ p J^^""'^^ 



MORRIS HADLEY, "The Haddle," was born in New Haven, 
Conn., March 21, 1894. 

His father, Arthur Twining Hadley, president of Yale Uni- 
versity, was born April 23, 1856, in New Haven, Avas graduated 
from Yale in the Class of 1876, received the degree of LL.D. from 



GRADUATES 



97 




V\\cyvufc lA^^kdSii^Y 



Harvard in 1899, and Ph.D. from 
Berlin in 1910. He has always 
lived in New Haven. Mrs. Had- 
ley was Helen Harrison Morris 
of Xew Haven. Yale relatives, 
besides his father, include James 
Hadley (grandfather), '42; Lu- 
zon B. Morris (grandfather), 
'54; Charles G. Morris, '95, and 
Ray Morris, '01 (uncles), and 
Hamilton Hadley, '18, a brother. 

Morris prepared at Groton. 
He has had a philosophical ora- 
tion stand throughout his course. 
The prizes which he has received 
are a first Lucius F. Robinson 
Latin Prize, a first and second 
Barge Mathematical Prize, Class 
of 1868 (English essay) Prize, 

a first Thacher Debating Prize in Sophomore year, divided with 
E. A. Burtt, 1915, the John Hubbard Curtis Prize, the second 
TenEyck Prize and the DeForest Prize for public speaking. He 
is a member of the University Debating Association and is 
president of Delta Sigma Rho. He was a member of the Fresh- 
man teams which debated against Syracuse and Princeton, and of 
the University Team vs. Princeton in 1914 and Harvard in 1915. 
He rowed on the Class Crew, was interested in the introduction 
of artillery work at Yale, is a lieutenant in Battery D, secre- 
tary of the Student Council, Class Orator ; a member of the 
Groton Club, Psi Upsilon, Elizabethan Club, Chi Delta Theta, 
Phi Beta Kappa, Pundits, Jumblies, Little Yellow Dogs, and 
Skull and Bones. 

During his entire course he has roomed mth Bennett Sander- 
son and Louis C. Zahner, at 677 Wright, 231 Farnani, 470 Fayer- 
weather, and 141 Welch. 

Hadley expects to enter the Harvard Law School. His address 
is 93 Whitney Avenue, !Xew Haven, Conn. 



JOHN EDWARD HALLEN, ''Jack," ''Hal," "Halley," was 
born in Bridgeport, Conn., January 16, 1894. 



98 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



His father, Thomas Hallen, 
was born in Nashua, N. H., 
December 29, 1860, and has lived 
there and in Bridgeport, where 
he is now head of the employ- 
ment office of Warner Brothers. 
Mrs. Hallen was Mary Louise 
Wetstine of Bridgeport. Five 
sons are living, of Avhoni one, 
Francis A. Hallen, is in the Class 
of 1918 S. Edward F. Hallen, 
LL.B. 1901, is also a relative. 

Jack prepared at the Bridge- 
port High School, and received 
third division honors in Fresh- 
man year. He received an ora- 
JiTA^Tu /^fiura/^ yf^ru^A/K^ tion appointment in Junior year, 

and belongs to the Way land De- 
bating Club of the School of Law. 

He lived at home in Bridgeport for the first three years, and 

roomed at 123 Welch, with John D. Hiiuslein and H. S. Weaver, 

during Senior year. 

Hallen expects to go into the law, and will enter the Yale School 

of Law. His address is 168 Sherwood Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. 




JACOB STERLI^^G HALSTEAD, ''Sterl," "Jake," was 
born in Mamaroncck, !N. Y., August 16, 1894. 

Jacob Halstead, his father, was born in Harrison, N. Y., April 
9, 1860, but lived in Mamaroneek, and in New York City, where 
he practiced law. He was a graduate of Columbia University in 
1883, witli the degree of LL.B., and died at Mamaroneek, October 
5, 1915. His mother, Clara Sage (Kenworthy) Halstead, lived 
in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., before her marriage. There were two 
children in the family. Sterling being the only one living. Howai'd 
Kenworthy, Yale '08, and R. Albert Kenworthy, Jr., ex-'09 S., 
are cousins. 

Sterl prepared at the Pawling (N. Y.) School, and is a member 
of the Pawling School Club (president, 1915-16). He is busi- 
ness manager of the Lit and chairman of the Courant; was a 
member of Freshman Debating Association, was secretary and 



GRADUATES 



00 



treasurer of the University Gun 
Club; received third division 
honors and a dissertation in Jun- 
ior year, and belongs to O. C. C. 
and Zeta Psi. He roomed with 
C. Powers Smith in Freshman 
year, at 415 Berkeley; with 
L. P. Graves in Sophomore and 
Junior years, at 179 Lawrance 
and 371 White; during Senior 
year Avith L. P. Graves, at 671 
Wright until October 30; then 
at 150 East Kock Road. 

Halstead will enter either Har- 
vard or Columbia Law School. 




J. _j!t^ZL^-tMiAjL^^ 



DAVID OSBORNE HAM- 
ILTON, "Dave," was born in 
Detroit, Mich., June 19, 1893. 

His father, William Pegram 
Hamilton, was born in Louis- 
ville, Ivy., in 1863, and was grad- 
uated from the University of 
Glasgow, Scotland, in 1883. He 
has lived in Glasgow and Detroit, 
Avhere he is vice president of the 
National Bank of Commerce, and 
president of the Clinton Woolen 
Manufacturing Company. Mary 
McLellan (Farrand) Hamilton, 
his mother, was born in Detroit. 
There are one son and two daugh- 
ters in the family. 

Dave prepared for college with 
a private tutor. He is an editor 




/%J^ 6>^^^^^ /^-.^..i/TK 



100 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



of the Yale Literary Magazine, president of the Dramatic Asso- 
ciation, is on the Ivy Committee, and the Board of Governors 
of the Elizabethan Club. In Junior year he received third 
division honors, and a dissertation appointment. He belongs to 
Psi Upsilon, the Pundits, and Scroll and Key. He roomed 
with Le\ids L. Bredin in Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior 
years, at 643 Wright, 436 Fayerweather, and 483 Haughton; 
with Bredin and Laurence G. Noyes, at 68 Vanderbilt, in Senior 
year. 

Hamilton expects to enter the Academy of Design in Xew 
York City. His permanent address is Beverly Place, Grosse 
Pointe, Detroit, Mich. 



FOSTER MARTIN HAMP- 
TON, "Arky," was born in For- 
dyce, Ark., May 2, 1893. 

His father, George Minor 
Hampton, is in the stave and 
lumber business in Fordyce, pres- 
ident of the Hampton Stave 
Company. Mrs. Hampton was 
Mary Anna Hall before mar- 
riage, and her home in Monti- 
cello, Ark. There are six chil- 
dren living. Samuel W. Weeks, 
Yale '18, is a relative. 

Arky prepared at the Clary 
Training School in Fordyce, and 
at Phillips-Andover, and belongs 
to the Andover Club. He was 
on the Freshman Track Team, 
and the University Track Team, 
winning numerals and a "Y" in the broad-jump. He belongs 
to the Dramatic Association, the Birthday Club, Southern Club, 
Psi Upsilon, and Scroll and Key, and served on the Junior 
Promenade Committee, and the Class Day Committee. Fresh- 
man year he roomed with A. B. Darling, at 675 Wright; the 




^^^yi^M-auyt/L.fz^6(jfyy^ 



GRADUATES 



101 



remaining three years with Darling and D. C. Elkin, at 237 
Durfee, 490 Haughton, and 55 Vanderbilt. 

Hampton expects to go into the manufacturing business. His 
address is Fordyce^ Ark. 



THOMAS EMERSOT^ HAP- 
GOOD was born in Hartford, 
Conn., June 26, 1893. 

His father, Edward Thomas 
Hapgood, who was an architect, 
was born in Ossining, N. Y., and 
lived in Hartford. He died in 
September, 1915. His mother, 
who also lived in Hartford, was 
Mary Elizabeth Smith. One 
son and one daughter are in the 
family. 

Tom prepared at the Hart- 
ford High School. He was a 
member of the Freshman Man- 
dolin Club, the Apollo Mandolin 
and Banjo Club, and the Uni- 
versity Mandolin and Banjo 
Club ; was on the Freshman, and 

University Tennis teams ; is manager of the Squash Team and in 
Junior year received a first colloquy appointment. He is on the 
Senior Promenade Committee, and belongs to Alpha Delta Phi. 
He has roomed the entire four years with P. L. Hose, at 602 
A¥right, 201 Farnam, 480 Haughton, and 675 Wright. 

Hapgood intends going into the manufacturing business ; his 
address is 30 Walbridge Eoad, Hartford, Conn. 




^-^c 



^JH-r^^y<~'^..-CrXj-tA^ 



ALEXAT^DER WOLCOTT HARBISON, "Doc," "Harby," 
v/as born March 21, 1894, in Hartford, Conn., which is his home 
at the present time. 

Hugh Harbison, his father, was born in Armagh, Ireland, in 
1833, and died March 10, 1903, in Hartford, Conn., where he 
had spent most of his life. He was identified with large business 



102 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



interests in Hartford, and for many years was secretary and 
treasurer of the Colt's Firearms Company. Mrs. Harbison, who 
was Annie Marshall Phelps, lived in Windsor, Conn., before 
marriage. There are two sons and one daughter in the family. 

Yale relatives are : Dr. Alex- 
ander Wolcott, great-great-grand- 
father, of the Class of 1731; 
Oliver Wolcott, great-great-great- 
great-uncle, 1747; Hugh Har- 
bison, a brother, 1914; John 
Pooler Harbison, a cousin, 
1918. 

Doc prepared at the Hartford 
High School and at Phillips- 
Andover and is a member of the 
Andover Club. He was on the 
Track Squad in 1913 and 1914, 
and on the scrub football team in 
1914. He belongs to Psi Upsilon. 
Freshman year his roommates 
were Carrol Johnson and Ed- 
mund Ocumpaugh, 3d, at 627 
Wriglit ; Sophomore year he 
roomed Avith Ocumpaugh at 
154 Lawrance; with Herbert Camp Sneath at 485 Haughton 
in Junior year; and with Ocumpaugh and Sneath in 69 Vander- 
bilt in Senior year. 

Harbison expects to enter the Harvard Law School, but is 
undecided as to his future career. His address is 194 Washington 
Street, Hartford, Conn. 




^:^£e<uuii^t!!^!^t£^c/^^u^^^(^^^^ 



PHILIP WADLEIGH HAREIS, "Phil," was born in Sakm, 
Mass., February 6, 1894. 

His father, Howard Putnam Harris, and his mother, Carrie 
Ashby (Trumbull) Harris, were both born in Salem. Mr. Harris, 
now retired, was engaged in the creamery business, as president 
of the Diamond Creamery Company. Mrs. Harris died March 6, 
1894. There were three sons and three daughters in the family, 
of whom there are four living. 



GRADUATES 



103 



Phil prepared at the Salem 
High School, and received a 
Junior oration appointment. He 
was engaged for a time in cross 
country Avork and belongs to 
Beta Theta Pi and the Yale 
Battery. He roomed alone at 
580 Pierson, in Freshman year; 
with W. L. Kallman and P. R. 
Mather, in Sophomore year, at 
175 Lawrance; and with Kall- 
man in Junior and Senior years, 
at 399 Berkeley, and 85 Con- 
necticut. 

Harris proposes to go into 
business; his address is 128 
Bridge Street, Salem, Mass. 







LJs3. r'«:e«->-L>-LAlA-^ 



JOHN DAWSOI^ HAUS- 
LEIX, "Texas," was born in 
I*^ew Haven, Conn., April 18, 
1893, and has lived in Galves- 
ton, Denton, and Austin, Texas. 

His father, Ferdinand Albert 
Hauslein, was born in Genoa, 
111., May 7, 1866, and was grad- 
uated from Yale ^vit]l the degree 
of B.A. in 1892, and M.A. in 
1895. Most of his life was spent 
in Texas, where he was a pro- 
fessor in the ISTorth Texas jSTormal 
College. He died in Denton, 
July 12, 1912. Mrs. Hauslein 
was Clara Elizabeth Dawson be- 
fore her marriage, and her home 
was Northampton, Mass. 

John, who is the Class Boy of 





vlT JfeLo~.M-£ei^<y^ 



104 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Yale 1S92, prepared at the Denton High School, and at the North 
Texas Normal College, and was graduated from the University 
of Texas with the degree of B.A. in 1915. While there he took 
part in athletics, belonged to the University Chess Club, and took 
part in the play, "Lumpaci Vagabundus." He entered Yale in 
Senior year and belongs to the Southern Club. He roomed with 
H. S. Weaver and J. E. Hallen at 123 Welch. 

Hauslein is undecided as to his future occupation. His address 
is Denton, Texas. 



GEOKGE GRISWOLD 
HAVEN, JR., "G," was born 
in New York City, March 21, 
1893, and has lived there, and in 
Ridgefield, Conn. 

His father, George Griswold 
Haven, was born in New Y'ork 
City, June 14, 1866, and Avas 
graduated from Y^'ale, with the 
degree of B.A., in 1887. He lias 
always lived in New York, where 
he is a banker and broker, a 
partner in the firm of Strong, 
Sturgis & Company. His mother 
was Elizabeth Shaw Ingersoll, 
whose home was in New Haven, 
Conn. One son and two daugh- 
ters are in the family. Yale 
relatives include Charles R. 
40 (grandfather), and Francis G. Ingersoll, '74 




v^l-Oi^^i'-'^^--. 



?/ 



Ingersoll, 
(uncle). 

G prepared at the Syms School, New York City, and at the 
Pomfret School, Pomfret, Conn., and belongs to the Pomfret 
Club. He was manager of the Apollo Musical clubs; manager 
of the University Musical clubs until he resigned; received 
a first colloquy in Junior year; belonged to B. P., Scarabs, 
Psi Upsilon, and the University Club. During Freshman year 
he roomed with W. R. Proctor, Jr., at 676 Wright; with Proctor, 



GRADUATES 



105 



Otis Guernsey, H. Tittman, and J. H. Sproul, at 155-156 Law- 
rance, in Sophomore year; with Proctor during Junior and 
Senior years, at 369 White and 10 Vanderhilt. He completed 
his course in February, 1916. 

Haven intends to go into manufacturing business. His perma- 
nent address is 6 East Fifty-third Street, New York City. 

EGBERT LEONARD 
HECKERT was born in 
Pittsburgh, Pa., December 27, 
1890. 

His father, William Henry 
Heckert, who was born in But- 
ler, Pa., and is now in Pitts- 
burgh, is interested in the mer- 
cantile development of oils, and 
in the hardware business. His 
mother's maiden name was Ame- 
lia Steiner, and her home was in 
Allegheny County, Pa. There 
are six sons in the family. 

Robert prepared at the Grove 
City Preparatory School, Grove 
City, Pa., and was graduated 
from Grove City College, with 
the degree of B.A., in 1911. He 
entered Yale this year. He roomed with M. M. Pharr, at 126 
Welch. 

Heckert intends to study law, and he will probably enter the 
Yale School of Law. His address is Bakerstown, Allegheny 
County, Pa. 




(?\.|4eAx^ 



LAURENCE STURDIVANT HEELY, "Larry," was bom 
in Brooklyn, N. Y., May 14, 1894, but now lives in Plainfield, 
K J. 

Augustus Yanderoef Heely, his father, was born in New York 
City, and attended Union College. He is in business in New 
York City, as a banker, being secretary and vice president of 
the Farmer's Loan & Trust Company. Mrs. Heely, who was 
Jessie Ross, lived in Brooklyn before her marriage. Three sons 



106 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




^. 



/.// 



^ 



were in tlio family; two are now- 
living, Allan V. Heely, Yale 
1919, being one. 

Larry prepared at the Phillips 
Academy at Andover. He be- 
longs to the Andover Club, and 
to Alpha Delta Phi. R. C. Booth 
was his roommate in Freshman 
year, at 642 Wright; he roomed 
alone at 122 Welch in Sophomore 
year; Avith J. L. Moss, Jr., in 
Junior and Senior years, at 340 
White, and 113 Welch. 

Heely expects to go into the 
banking business. His address 
is 321 West Eighth Street, Plain- 
field, IS^. J. 




WALTER HAR:\rOX HEL- 
LIER, "Hell," was born in 
Brookline, Mass., August 5, 1893, 
but has lived in Boston the most 
of his life. 

His father, Charles Edward 
Hellier, was born in Bangor, 
Maine, July 8, 1864, and was 
graduated from Yale in 1886, 
and from Boston University Law 
School with the degree of LL.B. 
in 1889. He has lived in Bangor 
and in Boston, where he is a 
lawyer. Mrs. Hellier, who was 
Mary Lavinia Harmon, lived in 
iSTew^ Haven, Conn. There are 
three sons and one daughter. 
Charles E. Hellier, Yale '86, 
and William C. Harmon, Jr., 
1915 S., are relatives. 

Hell prepared at St. Mark's School, Southborough, Mass., and 



k/dL 7^ /^^ 



GRADUATES 



107 



belongs to the St. Mark's School Club. He Avas luanagtr of 
the Freshman Hockey Team, and received a first dispute appoint- 
ment in Junior year; belongs to Delta Kappa Epsilon, University 
Club, Elihu Club, Yale Corinthian Yacht Club, Yale Battery, 
and the Cosmopolitan Club. Freshman and Sophomore years he 
roomed with P. D. Armour, at 672 Wright and 429 Fayerweather ; 
Junior and Senior years with E. J. Howe, at 429 Fayerweather 
and 121 Welch. 

Hellier will enter the Harvard Law School ; his address is 
105 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 



THEODORE MARSH HEQUEMBOURG, "Dory," "Heck," 
was born in Dunkirk, K". Y., May 17, 1894, and has lived there, 
and in Schenectady, IST. Y., and New York City. 

Harry Clarence Hequembourg, his father, was born in St. Louis, 
Mo., in 1860, and is engaged in business as a promoter and organ- 
izer in Dunkirk, IST. Y. Minnie G. (Treadway) Hequembourg, 
his mother, was a resident of Oswego, N". Y. There are five sons 
and one daughter in the family. Charles Louis Hequembourg, 
Yale 1835, is a relative. 

Dory prepared at the Stuy^-e- ■ 

sant High School, at the Horace 
Mann School, and at Andover, 
and belonged to the Andover 
Club. He sang on the College 
Choir, received an oration ap- 
pointment in Junior year and 
was out for track. Freshman 
year he roomed with Wright 
Goss, Jr., at 623 Wright ; Sopho- 
more year mth Goss at 222 Far- 
nam ; Junior year alone at 378 
Berkeley. 

Hequembourg completed his 
work for a degree in three years 
and is now studying in Columbia 
Law School. He is living at 873 
St. Nicholas Avenue, New York 
City, but his permanent address 
is Dunkirk, N. Y. 




108 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



HAMPDEN WALTON HER- 
RING, "Walt," was born July 

27, 1894, in Montclair, N. J. 

Hampden Herring, his father, 
was born near Frederick's Hall, 
Louisa County, Ya., November 
14, 1852. During his early life 
he lived in Virginia, then moved 
to New York, where he was en- 
gaged in business, until his death, 
which occurred in Staunton, Va., 
September 22, 1908. Mrs. Her- 
ring, whose maiden name was 
Florence Gibbs, spent her early 
life in North Carolina, but later 
lived in Brooklyn ; three of her 
four children are living. 

Walt prepared at the Montclair 
public schools, and went out for 
cross country in Freshman year. He was a member of the City 
Government Club in Sophomore and Junior years ; received a 
first dispute in Junior year; belongs to Psi Upsilon, and the 
Yale Battery. He roomed alone, at 416 Berkeley, in Freshman 
year; with Conrad W. Woehler and F. W. Hooper, at 437 Fayer- 
weather, in Sophomore year ; with Robert G. Walker and Hooper, 
at 486 Haughton, in Junior year ; and with Wright D. Goss, Jr., 
and Marcus Morton, Jr., at 140 Welch, in Senior year. 

Herring expects to go into business, either manufacturing, 
mercantile, or transportation. His address is 156 Valley Road, 
Montclair, N. J. 




PAUL JOHN HERRMANN, "Doc," was born in Memel, 
Germany, June 6, 1893, came to America wdien three years of 
age, and has since lived in New York City. 

Edward Albert Herrmann, his father, was born in Insterburg, 
Germany, but has lived the most of his life in New York, where 
he is rector of the Catholic Apostolic Church. Mrs. Herrmann 
died in New York, November 24, 1905. Ten children, six sons 
and four daughters, survive her. 

Doc prepared at the Townsend Harris Hall Academy, New 
York City, and was a member of the Class of 1915 in the College 



GRADUATES 



109 



of the City of New York. Since 
entering Yale in Sophomore year 
he has been out for crew; re- 
ceived a first colloquy appoint- 
ment in Junior year; is a mem- 
ber of the Deutscher Verein, and 
the Yale Battery. William 
Clewly, Theodore Evans, and 
Frank Delaney were his room- 
mates in Sophomore year, at 128 
High Street ; George Jarvis 
Taft, at 199 York Street, in 
Junior year; Herman R. Schoe- 
ler, at 138 Welch, in Senior year. 
Herrmann is undecided whether 
he will go into educational work, 
or into business. His address is 
1224 Union Avenue, New York 
City. 




PAUL WILBUE HIGBEE, 

"Cap," "Hig," was born in 
Proctor, Vt, June 7, 1892. 

His father is Wilbur E. Hig- 
bee, who was born in Monkton, 
Vt., March 30, 1862, and lives in 
Proctor, Vt., where he is super- 
intendent and secretary of the 
Vermont Marble Company. El- 
len Cecilia (Creer) Higbee, his 
mother, died in Proctor, March 
7, 1908. There are two children. 

Cap prepared at the Proctor 
High School, at the Hotchkiss 
School, Lakeville, Conn., and be- 
longs to the Hotchkiss Club. He 
received a second colloquy ap- 
pointment in Junior year, be- 
longs to Beta Theta Pi, and is 




(jia/ti/y^ 



110 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



vice president of the Venuunt Club. He has roomed the entire 
four years with Harold H. Brittingham, at 667 Wright, 265 
Durfee, 341 White, and 112 Welch. 

Higbee intends to engage in manufacturing; his address is 
Proctor, Vt. 




fka:^klin walker 

HOOPER, ^'Hoop,'' was born 
in Larchmont, 'N. Y., September 
6, 1894, and lives in 'New York 
City. 

His father, Benjamin Franklin 
Hooper, was born in Xew York 
City, June 30, 1857, and died 
there April 20, 1902. He was a 
graduate of the College of the 
City of Xew York, and was in 
the plumbing supply business. 
Mrs. Hooper was also from Xew 
York. Her name was Edith May 
Walker before her marriage. 
Four children are living. Wil- 
bur F. Davis, Yale 1910, is a 
cousin. 

Hoop prepared at the Irving 
School, I^ew York City. He has been out for basketball, lacrosse 
and soccer, and is a member of the Yale Battery. He roomed 
alone in Freshman year, at 639 Wright; with Conrad Woehler 
and Walton Herring in Sophomore year, at 437 Fayerweather ; 
with Robert G. Walker and Herring, at 486 Haughton, in Junior 
year, and alone, at 56 Vanderbilt, in Senior year. 

Hooper is going into the mercantile business; his address is 
130 West Seventy-fourth Street, New York City. 



(/^/^£^^/^^ 



REUBEX HORCHOW, ''Rube," "Horch," was born in Ports- 
mouth, Ohio, August 9, 1895. 

His father, Samuel Horchow, and his mother, Laura (Brillant) 
Horchow, were both born in Brody, Austria, Mr. Horchow on 
February 13, 1867. They came to Portsmouth, Ohio, Avhere Mr. 
Horchow is president of the Samuel Horchow Coni])any. There 
are thi-ee sons. 



GRADUATES 



111 



Rube prepared at the Ports- 
mouth (Ohio) High School, and 
belongs to the Ohio Club. He 
received first division honors in 
Freshman year; was an editor of 
the News; received first division 
honors and a philosophical ora- 
tion appointment in Junior year, 
and is a member of Phi Beta 
Kappa, the Yale Battery, Inter- 
national Polity Club, and is treas- 
urer of the Menorah Society. 
He roomed alone, at 560 Pierson, 
in Preshman year ; with S. D. 
Weissman, at 665 Taylor, in 
Sophomore year ; with Walter 
Lasar in Junior and Senior 
years, at 478 Haughton, and 31 
Vanderbilt. 

HorchoAV will enter the Yale School of Law 
Portsmouth, Ohio. 




QiuX^W fnyucAo^xJ— 



his address is 



RAYMOXD D'ARSEY HOU- 
LIHA^^, ''Ray," was born in 
Hazardville, Conn., June 14, 
1895, and has lived there and 
in Springfield, Mass. 

Patrick Prancis Houlihan, his 
father, was born in Hazardville, 
December 21, 1863. His mother, 
Katherine Elizabeth (D'Arsey) 
Houlihan, w^as also from Hazard- 
ville. Mr. Houlihan is in the 
grocery and meat business, under 
the firm name of Houlihan & 
Leary. Two sons and two daugh- 
ters are in the family, and the 
younger son, Leo J. Houlihan, is 
in the Class of 1918 S. Paul E. 
Leary, a cousin, is in Y^ale 1918. 

Ray prepared at the Central 




/L'e^^^'-?T^-<f'7^ eC /^ /T'P^Z'i^^^^ ri-iSt^f^, 



112 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



High School, Springfield, Mass. Freshman year he was secretary 
of the Debating Union. He received a dissertation appointment 
in Junior year and has been out for cross country and crew. His 
roommate in Freshman year was Hans Ascher, at 454 Fayer- 
weather; Sophomore and Junior years he roomed with Henry 
Hume and E. E. Aiken, Jr., at 181 Lawraiice and 355 White; 
Senior year Avith Hume, at 97 Welch. 

Houlihan plans to enter the Yale School of Law. His 
address is 476 Belmont Avenue, Springfield, Mass. 




EDWAKD JEN^KINS 

HOWE, 2d, "Xed," "Edo," 
was born in Dorchester, Mass., 
September 28, 1892. 

His father, William Francis 
Howe, was born in Dorchester, 
Mass., in 1861, and is in the shoe 
business in Boston, Mass. Mrs. 
Howe w^as Alice Belle Tuesley be- 
fore her marriage. Her home 
was in Boston. Two sons are 
in the family, William Francis 
Howe, Jr., 1913 S., being the 
elder. 

Ned prepared at the Brook- 
line High, Stone School, and at 
Phillips-Andover, and is a mem- 
ber of the Andover Club. He 
was on the Swimming Team, the 
Class Crew, Class Hockey Team, and University Football and 
Crew squads, and has his numerals. He belongs to Delta Kappa 
Epsilon, the Elihu Club, and is a member of the Yale Battery. 
Freshman year he roomed alone, at 262 York Street; Sophomore 
year with Alvin Bartlett Gurley, at 225 Farnam ; Junior and Senior 
years with Walter Hellier, at 429 Fayerweather, and 121 Welch. 

Howe expects to go into business. His address is 401 Quincy 
Street, Dorchester, Mass. 



CjeUArUA-dt. ^'ItiMMAyn I4r^^ X 



^ 



JOHN" DORRANCE HOYT, "Jack," was born in Spokane, 
Wash., March 23, 1894, and has lived in Spokane, San Francisco, 
Paris, and Kingston, Pa. 



GRADUATES 



113 



His father, Henry Martyn 
Hoyt, was born in Kingston, Pa., 
November 8, 1861, was gradu- 
ated from Yale in the Class of 
1883, and is a lawyer, of the 
firm of Hoyt, Gibbons & French, 
of Reno, ISTev. His mother was 
Laura Pease Cutter before her 
marriage, and her residence Day- 
ton, Ohio. John is the only 
child. 

Jack prepared at the Taft 
School, Watertown, Conn., and 
belongs to the Taft School Club. 
He has contributed to the Cour- 
ant and Yale Literary Magazine, 
and was in the competition for 
press agent of the Dramatic Asso- 
ciation; was awarded a first dis- 
pute appointment in Junior year, and is a member of the Yale 
Battery. He roomed with James Symington, in Freshman year, 
at 586 Pierson; the remaining three years with Maurice L. 
Firuski, at 247 Durfee, 356 White, and 61 Vanderbilt. 

Hoyt expects to practice law, and will enter the University of 
California Law School. His address is 226 Maple Avenue, 
Kingston, Pa. 




\tr^ PhMr 







EDWAPD WAITE HUBBAED, ''Ed," was born in Auburn, 
K Y., June 29, 1893. 

His father, William Henry Hubbard, was born in Clarks 
County, Ky., April 16, 1851; was graduated from Amherst with 
the degree of B.A. in 1871, from Princeton Theological Seminary 
in 1874, and was given the degree of D.D. by Berea College 
(Ky.) in 1905. He was a clergyman, living in Auburn, N". Y., 
before his death in ISTew York City, January 31, 1913. Mrs. 
Hubbard, who was Elizabeth xVllen Skinner before she married, 
lived in Holyoke, Mass. Three sons are in the family, William 
H. Hubbard, 1909 S., and xVllen S. Hubbard, 1911, being brothers. 
Other relatives are Joseph A, Skinner, '83 S., an uncle, and 
William Skinner, 2d, '18 S., a cousin. 



114 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




LdL. 



.flk v^ 



Ed prepared at The Hill 
School, Pottstown, Pa., and be- 
longs to The Ilill School Club. 
He was on the Freshman Foot- 
ball Team, and on the University 
Football Team in 1913, and has 
a "Y" and numerals. He be- 
longs to Psi Upsilon, O. C. C, 
and Wolf's Head. Freshman year 
he roomed Avith Waldo M. Allen 
and Fairfax D. Downey, at 668 
Wright ; Avith DoAvney and Kinley 
J. Tener, in Sophomore year, at 
171 Lawi'ance; Junior and Senior 
years with Tener, at 426 Fayer- 
weather and 20 Vanderbilt. 

Hubbard expects to go into 
business. His address is 98 Xorth 
Street, Auburn, JST. Y. 




NORMAN SQUIRES HUB- 
BARD, "Norm," "Hubb," was 
born in Foochow, China, Septem- 
ber 8, 1892, and lived there for 
eight years, subsequently in Con- 
necticut, and Ohio. 

His father, George Henry 
Hubbard, was born in Wood- 
mont. Conn., January 11, 1S55, 
was graduated from Yale with 
the degree of B.A. in 1881, and 
B.D. in 1884. He is a clergy- 
man, a missionary in Foochow, 
where he has spent most of his 
life. Mrs. Hubbard's maiden 
name was Ellen Louise Peet, and 
lier home West Haven, Conn. 
Three sons and four daughters 
are in the familv. Besides his 



GRADUATES 



115 



father, Yale relatives include Theodore V. Hubhard, 1918; 
George C. Hubbard, 1913; William B. Hubbard, B.D. 1881; 
Lvman P. Feet, 1885, B.D. 1888 ; Edward Feet, 1886, and John 
Hubbard, 1744. 

Xorm prei:)ared at the Oberlin (Ohio) High School, and Oberlin 
College 1911 to 1913, entering Yale in Sophomore year. He was 
given a first dispute appointment in Junior year. He roomed at 
112 Huntington Street, alone, in Sophomore year; with T. Y. 
Hubbard, at 420 Berkeley, in Junior year, and with A. C. Smith 
at 76 Connecticut, in Senior year. 

Hubbard expects to take graduate ^vork, but does not know where 
he will continue his studies. His address is 11 Wagner Place, 
West Haven, Conn. 



HE^EY WOODS HUME, "Heinie," was born November 15, 
1895, in Ahmednagar, Hidia, and lived there for nine years; later 
in Brookfield Center, Conn., in Springfield, Mass., and in Xew 
Haven, Conn. 

His father, Robert xVllen Hume, was born in Bombay, India, 
March 15, 1847, and was graduated from Yale with the degree 
of B.A. in 1868, and received the honorary degree of D.D. in 1895. 
He has spent his life in India, as 
a minister and missionary, serv- 
ing under the American Board 
of Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions. His mother, Katie 
(Fairbank) Hume, has also lived 
in India almost all her life. Of 
Dr. Hume's eight children, seven 
are living. Three brothers are 
Yale graduates, Robert E. Hume, 
'98, '00 M.A., '01 Ph.D. ; Wilson 
M. Hume, '09 ; Walter F. Hume, 
'12 S. Edward S. Hume, '70, is 
an uncle; Edward H. Hume, 
'97, Robert H. Miller, '97, John 
C. Hume, e.r-'05, and Robert W. 
Hume, ?.r-'07, are cousins. 

Heinie prepared at the Curtiss 
School, Brookfield Center, and 
at the Springfield High School. 




^^^ <i;,~^4.^ 



116 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



He was on the Freshman Four-oar Crew, the Sophomore and 
Junior crews, and the Second University Crew in 1915; has 
numerals; received a second colloquy in Junior year; and belongs 
to Zeta Psi. He roomed with E. E. Aiken, Jr., at 613 Wright, 
in Freshman year; with Aiken and R. D. Houlihan, in Sopho- 
more and Junior years, at 181 Lawrance and 355 White; Avitli 
Houlihan, at 97 Welch, in Senior year. 

Hume expects to enter some kind of business. His address is 
54 Alden Street, Springfield, Mass. 



WALTER ROGER HU^^T, 

''Wal," "Rog," "Huntie," "Cal," 
was born in Bowling Green, Ky., 
December 11, 1892. 

His father, Price Hunt, was 
born in Bowling Green, August 
23, 1863. Lou Ella (Smith) 
Hunt, his mother, was also born 
in Bowling Green, Ky. They 
have always lived in Kentucky, 
where Mr. Hunt is engaged in 
farming. Of their four sons and 
four daughters, seven are living. 
Rog prepared at the Ogden 
Preparatory School, and was 
graduated from Ogden College, 
with the degree of B.A., in the 
Class of 1912, entering Yale in 
Sophomore year. He received a 
second colloquy appointment in Junior year, is a member of the 
City Government Club, the Southern Club, and the Yale Battery. 
He roomed alone in Sophomore and Junior years, at 166 Park 
Street, and 664 Taylor ; with James W. Knapp in Senior year, at 
36 Vanderbilt. 

Hunt plans to enter either the transportation or mercantile 
business. His address is Bowling Green, Ky. 




.///a/&*- /C*-^^'*-x:^*^<'t'*<^^ 



CHARLES HYDE, "Chas," "Charlie," was born in Plainfield, 
K J., October 28, 1893, and has lived there, and in Paris, France, 
and Territet, Switzerland. 



GRADUATES 



117 



His father, Dorsej William 
Hyde, was born in Titusville, Pa., 
in 1852. He is a musician (now 
retired), having studied in Leip- 
zig, and Berlin. For many years 
he has resided in Plainfield, N. J. 
Katherine Montieth Clarke was 
Mrs. Hyde's name before mar- 
riage, and her home in 'New 
Hampshire, and in N'ew York 
City. There are three sons and 
three daughters in the family. 
Louis K. Hyde, '87; Charles L. 
Hyde, '86 ; Francis deLacey 
Hyde, '91, and H. Godfrey Hyde, 
'19, are Yale relatives. 

Chas prepared at Leal's School, 
Plainfield, I^. J., at the Ecole 
Technique, Brussels, Belgium, at 
the Lycee Lakanal, Sceaux, France, and at Andover, Mass. He 
belongs to the xVndover Club, and was on the Apollo and Freshman 
Glee clubs, and the Freshman Cross Country Team; received a 
second colloquy appointment in Junior year, and is a member of 
Zeta Psi. W. H. Jones was his roommate in Freshman year, at 
655 Wright; Jones and B. K. Welch, in Sophomore year, at 168 
Lawrance ; Junior and Senior years he roomed with Jones, at 
455 Fayerweather, and 3 Vanderbilt. 

Hyde intends to go into business. His present address is 
Hydewood Hall, Plainfield, N". J. 




(5LucA^ JL^ 



HERBEET COOPER JACKSON, "Herb," ''Chic," was born 
in Cleveland, Ohio, March 27, 1894. 

Charles Edmund Jackson, his father, was born in Lowestoft, 
England, and is in the manufacturing business in Cleveland, where 
he is president of C. E. Jackson & Company. Mary Mulvina 
(Cooper) Jackson, his mother, has always lived in Cleveland. 
Herbert is the only child. 

Herb prepared at the East High School, Cleveland, and held 
Cleveland Scholarships in 1913-14 and 1914-15. In Sophomore 



118 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




'H^J^*'5lr<lV.a«^^rvs, 



year ho went out for track, and 
ran on the Class Relay Team in 
the fall meet; received third 
division honors in Junior year ; 
has contributed to the Record; 
belongs to the Cosmopolitan 
Club, the Ohio Club, and Beta 
Theta Pi. lie roomed alone, at 
420 Berkeley, in Freshman year; 
Sophomore and Junior years with 
Joseph S. G. Bolton, at 220 Far- 
nam and 381 White; with Philip 
K. Mather and Orlando C. Scar- 
borough, at 133 Welch, in Senior 
year. 

Jackson intends to go into bus- 
iness ; his address is 1344 East 
Eighty-fourth Street, Cleveland, 
Ohio.' 




"yyra.. 



WILLIAM AUGUSTUS 
JAMES, "Jess," ''Bill," was 
born in Sandy, Utah, January 
28, 1893, and has lived in Lead- 
ville, Colo.; Denver, Colo.; Sa- 
lida, Colo.; Mexico, and in San 
Antonio, Texas. 

His father, Samuel James, was 
born in Cambridge, Mass., and 
was graduated from the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology 
with the degree of B.S. in 1876. 
He is a metallurgist, connected 
Avith the Coeur d'Alene Company, 
and has lived in the West. Susie 
(L^pton) James, his mother, was 
born in Baltimore, Md. Two of 
the three sons in the family are 
now living. 



GRADUATES 



119 



Jess prepared at the Garden Academy, San Antonio, Texas. 
He was circulation manager of the Courant, business manager of 
The Eli Bool:, manager of the Princeton-Yale Football Program 
in 1915, and belongs to Zeta Psi. He roomed alone in Freshman 
year, at 592 Pierson ; with W. H. Eckman and Lowell Innes in 
Sophomore year, at 178 Lawrance; with Norman R. Finch, at 
390 Berkeley, in Junior year, and with Finch, D. C. Fitts, and 
D. P. Robinson, at 32-33 Yanderbilt, in Senior year. 

James intends to enter the mercantile business ; his address is 
iSTorthport, Wash., or 404 East Evergreen Street, San Antonio, 
Texas. 



JAMES MAY JESSUP, ''Jim," "Sphinx," "Jess," was born 
in Scranton, Pa., December 23, 1893. 

His father, William Henry Jessup, was born in Montrose, Pa., 
July 25, 1859, and was graduated from Yale in 1884. He has 
lived in Montrose and in Scranton, where he practices law. His 
mother, whose name was Lucy Ada Stotesbury, lived in Phila- 
delphia, Pa. The family consists of two sons and one daughter. 
Yale relatives include, besides his father, William Jessup, 1815; 
William H. Jessup, 1849; Dr. Henry H. Jessup, 1851; S. B. 
Mulford, 1842; Samuel Hunt- 
ting, 1767 ; Dr. Samuel Jessup, 
1860; Douglas J. Torrey, 1907; 
William H. Jessup, 1915, and 
Albert C. Leisenring, Jr., 1917. 

Jim jDrepared at the Black 
Hall School, Lyme, Conn. He 
was a member of the Freshman 
and Apollo Glee clubs, the Uni- 
versity Glee Club, and the Col- 
lege Choir; belongs to the Yale 
Artillery, Battery C ; the Yale 
Flower Agency, of which he is 
treasurer; is on the Dramat eligi- 
bility list; received a first col- 
loquy appointment in Junior 
year, and belongs to Psi Upsilon. 
Freshman year he roomed with 
C. A. Carlisle, H. A. Torson and 
A. B. Jones, at 604 Wright ; with 




^o^vAj.^^ X\K . ^\rtJVa^-»^ 



120 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



E. M. Bostwiek in Sophomore year, at 200 Farnain ; with Bost- 
wiek and C. P. Smith in Junior and Senior years, at 423 Fayer- 
weather, and 99 Welch. 

Jessup plans to go into the manufacturing business, and his 
address is 815 Madison Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 



ROBERT JAMES JEWETT 
was born in Buffalo, X. Y., June 
22, 1893. 

His father, Frederick Arthur 
-Jewett, was born in Buffalo, 
Xovember 10, 1859, and was 
there engaged in business as a 
manufacturer of refrigerators. 
He died April 3, 1906. His 
mother, who was Anna Louise 
James, lived in Lockport, X. Y. 
One daughter and one son are in 
the family. 

Robert prepared at the Fes- 
senden School, the Nichols 
School, and at The Hill School, 
Pottstown, Pa. He belongs to 
O. C. C. and Alpha Delta Phi. 
Freshman year he roomed with 
H. C. Sneath and D. L. McCoy, at 670 Wright; Sophomore and 
Junior years with R. W, Chisolm and L. G. Noyes, at 250 Durfee, 
and 373 White; Senior year with Chisolm, at 127 Welch. 

Jewett expects to go into business. His address is 313 Summer 
Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 




'1 



.Qsiweju 



CHARLES ADAMS JOHN'SOX, "Johnnie," "Charlie," was 
bom in Yonkers, N", Y., October 4, 1895, and has always lived 
there. 

John Quincy Adams Johnson, his father, was born in Wash- 
ington, D. C, February 12, 1858, and was graduated from Yale 
in the Class of 1878, and from Columbia Law School in 1880. 
He has lived most of the time in Yonkers, and is a lawyer. His 
mother was Caroline Curtiss, also of Yonkers, before her marriage. 



GRADUATES 



121 



Of their seven daughtei's and four 
sons, eight are living, three of 
whom are William C. Johnson, 
e.r-'07, John Q. A. Johnson, Jr., 
'08, and Alexander B. Johnson, 
'11 ; other relatives are Selden 
S. Sanford, ex-'Od S., and Curtis 
A. Sanford, '02. 

Charlie prepared at the Yon- 
kers High School. He was on 
the second Soccer Team, and the 
Class Baseball Team. He re- 
ceived a dissertation appointment 
in Junior year and is a member 
of the Yale Battery. He has 
roomed with W. K. Vance, Jr., 
for the entire four years, at 555 
Pierson, 244 Durfee, 474 Haugh- 
ton, and 124 Welch. 

Johnson plans to devote himself to science; his address is 
87 High Street, Yonkers, N. Y. 




QJaolaJjud Q , V'"^<-<-'-et-T-v^ 



HENRY WEBB JOHNSTONE, "Johnnie," was born in 
Mexico City, Mexico, October 13, 1892, but has spent most of his 
life in Philadelphia, Pa. 

His father, Andrew Johnstone, was born in Greenville, S. C, 
February 22, 1865. He has lived in South Carolina, Mexico, 
and in Philadelphia, where he is a mechanical engineer, being 
superintendent and chief engineer of the Witherspoon Building. 
Mrs. Johnstone's name was Minnie Webb before marriage, and 
her home in Philadelphia. There were two sons and seven 
daughters in the family, of whom six are now living. 

Johnnie prepared at the William Penn Charter School, Phila- 
delphia, was vice president Sophomore and Junior years, of the 
Penn Charter School Club, and president in Senior year. He 
held the Philadelphia Alumni Scholarship, the Anthony D. Stanley 
Scholarship, and the Witherbee Scholarship. He was on the 
Freshman Track Team, and the University Track Team for 
three years, where he won a "Y" in the pole vault; was on the 



122 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Fresiiinan Eootball Squad; and 
managed the Yale Student Flower 
Agency in Senior year. He was 
awarded third division honors 
and a first dispute in Junior year, 
was secretary and president of 
the City Government Club ; presi- 
dent of the Christian Association, 
and cliairman of the Dwiglit Hall 
executive committee; class dea- 
con, and business manager and 
editor of the Freshman "Bible." 
He is a member of Zeta Psi, 
Argus, the Student Council, the 
Triennial Committee, and Skull 
and Bones. He roomed wdth 
Murray S. Chisni in Freshman 
and Sophomore years, at 679 
Wright, and 214 Farnam; with 
Chism, Robert S. Cornish, Rus- 
sell H. Lucas, Alvin B. Gurley and William P. Campbell, at 
433-434 Fayerweather, in Junior year ; and with Chism, Campbell, 
Lucas and Gurley, at 80-91 Connecticut, in Senior year. 

Johnstone is undecided as to his future; he may become a 
teacher, or go into business. His address is 5353 Magnolia 
Avenue, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 




ARTHUR RUSSEL JONES, 2d, "Art," was born in Chi- 
cago, 111., March 13, 1894, and with the exception of two years 
spent in Fort Worth, Texas, has always lived there. 

He is the only child of Arthur R. and Edith (Forrester) Jones, 
both of Vinton, Iowa, where Mr. Jones was born January S, 
1865. Mr. Jones is a financial agent, and president of the Con- 
tinental Credit Trust; he has lived in St. Paul, Minn., Fort 
Worth, Texas, and Chicago, 111. 

Art prepared at the Lake Forest Academy, Chicago, and had 



GRADUATES 



123 



one year of private tutoring. He 
■went out for track and received 
a first colloquy appointment in 
-Junior year. Freshman year he 
roomed with Harry A. Torson 
and J. M. Jessvip, at 600 Pierson 
and 604 Wright ; the remaining 
three years with Torson and 
R. H. Polhamus, at 161 LaAv- 
rance, 457 Fayerweather, and 
21 Vanderbilt. 

Jones expects to go into the 
banking business ; his address is 
5212 University Avenue, Chicago, 
111. 




WILLIAM HENRY JONES, 
"Bill," was born in Waterbury, 
Conn., November 4, 1892. 

His father is William Samuel 
Jones, born in Meriden, Conn., in 
1861, and now treasurer of Jones, 
Morgan & Company, Inc., of 
Waterbury. His mother, whose 
home was in Hartford, Conn., 
was Elizabeth Roberts McGowan. 
Four sons and one daughter are 
in the family. Edward F. 
Sweeney, Yale 1907, 1910 L., 
John M. Sweeney, 1910, and 
Edward J. Kilduff, 1912, are 
relatives. 

Bill prepared at the Crosby 
High School, Waterbury, and at 
Andover; he is a member of the 




Uu -jjOcMX/-rO .)S~. \o-y\Ay^ 



124 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Andover Club. He received a second colloquy appointment in 
Junior year, and is a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. Fresliraan 
year be roomed witb C. Hyde, at 655 Wrigbt; tbe remaining 
tbree years mtb Hj^de and Brian Welcb, at 168 Lawrance, 452 
Fayerweather, and 3 Vanderbilt. 

Jones expects to go into business ; bis address is 9 Cliff Street, 
Waterbury, Conn. 

TROY KAICHEN was born 
February 15, 1894, in Cincinnati, 
Obio. 

His fatber, Arnold Herman 
Kaicben, was born in Detroit, 
Micb., May 4, 1865, and is in 
business as a mercbant, in Cin- 
cinnati. He is secretary and 
treasurer of tbe Meyer, Wise &: 
Kaicben Company. Mrs. Kai- 
cben was Beatrice Troy of Cin- 
cinnati before sbe married. Tbere 
are two sons in tbe family. 

Troy prepared at tbe Univer- 
sity Scbool, Cincinnati, Obio, and 
at tbe Worcester Academy, Wor- 
cester, Mass., and is a member of 
tbe Worcester Academy Club, and 
of tbe Obio Club. In Junior 
year be received a first colloquy appointment. He is a member 
of tbe Yale Battery. Fresbman year be roomed alone at 558 
Pierson ; tbe remaining tbree years witb Ricbard Rotbsebild, at 
260 I)urfee, 442 Fayerweatber, and 57 Vanderbilt. 

Kaicben expects to enter business. His address is 686 Gbolson 
Avenue, Avondale, Cincinnati, Obio. 




\j A<n^ /xo^ciwv^. 



leoy 



WILLIAM LOOMIS KALLMAN, "Bill," was born October 
1, 1894, in Jersey City, N. J. 

He is tbe only son of William S. and Anna (Webansen) Kail- 
man, botb of Jersey City. Mr. Kallman is assistant freigbt traffic 
manager for tbe I^ew York Central Railroad at 'New York City. 
He was born February 21, 1866. Tbere are two cbildren, one 
daugbter, and one son. 



GRADUATES 



125 



Bill prepared at the Jersey City 
High School, with a tutor, and 
at the Asheville School, Ashe- 
ville, 'N. C. He was on the Apollo 
Glee Club, and in the College 
Choir, and rowed on the first 
Ereshnian Crew in the fall of 
1912; was awarded third divi- 
sion honors in Freshman year, 
and third division honors and an 
oration in Junior year; belongs 
to the Yale Battery and Alpha 
Delta Phi. He roomed in Fresh- 
man year with Philip P. Mather, 
at 671 Wright; with Mather and 
Philip W. Harris, in Sophomore 
year, at 175 Lawrance; Junior 
and Senior years with Harris, at 
399 Berkeley, and 85 Connecticut. 

Kallman expects to enter the Harvard Law School ; his address 
is 242 Garfield Avenue, Jersey City, jST. J. 




DANIEL JOSEPH KEAI^E, 

"Dan," was born in ISTew Haven, 
Conn., February 3, 1895, and has 
lived there and in Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

His father, M. »Toseph Keane, 
was born in Sandy Hook, Conn., 
January 18, 1865, and has lived 
in Bridgeport and ISTcav Haven, 
where he is a pharmacist. His 
mother was Margaret B. Daly 
before her marriage. There are 
four sons and two daughters in 
the family. James Louis Keane, 
1916 S., is a brother. 

Dan prepared at the Hillhouse 
High School, Xew Haven. He 
has held four scholarships since 
entering college, and was a 




e<^ 'O^IUZyC (lo-ZJiAlJl^ '^^^>COonJty . 



126 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



member of the "Waylaiid Debating t'lub, its secretary in 1915-16, 
and on the University Debating Team, 1916. He received a second 
dispute ai)pointnu'iit in Junior year. He roomed at lionie the 
entire four years. 

Keane is undecided as to his future work, but will probably go into 
the law. His address is 189 Columbus Avenue, Xew Haven, ronn. 

CASPER MARVIN KIEL- 
LAXD, ''Cap," was born in 
Buffalo, N. Y., May 6, 1S93. 

His father, Soren Munch Bull 
Kielland, Avas born at Villa 
"Bei'gene," Stavanger, ^N^orway, 
in 1854, and received the degree 
of C.E. from the University of 
Gottenburg, Sweden; was 
knighted by the King of Xor- 
way in 1910 as a Knight of St. 
Olaf. He has done much ex- 
ploring and hunting in Africa. 
He has lived most of his life in 
the United States, where he is a 
mine owner, a consulting engi- 
YAoAovn l^dflil^cwJl iieer, is interested in several rail- 
roads, and is a Xorwegian 
Consul. Mrs. Kielland before 
her marriage was Anna May Harris and lived at Kendall Farms, 
Kendall, X. Y., and in Saybrook, Conn. 

Cap prepared with a private tutor, and at the Detroit Uni- 
versity School; was a member of the Class of 1916 at Lehigh 
University, but left at the end of his second year. While at 
Lehigh he Avas on the 1916 Class Baseball Team, and won 
numerals; belonged to Psi Upsilon, the Scimeter Club; Sopho- 
more Cotillion, and Sword and Crescent. Since entering Yale 
he has been awarded a prize and diploma from the Rice Leaders 
of the World Association for Business Ideas. He played on the 
University Lacrosse Team; and is a member of Psi L^psilon. He 
roomed at 428 Fayerweather in Junior year, and with Melbert 
Brinckerhoff Cary, Jr., at 40 Vanderbilt, in Senior year. 

Kielland is going into banking and promoting. His permanent 
address is Yale Club, New York City. 




G 



axMPfiA 



GRADUATES 



127 



CHARLES DALY KING was 
born in New York City, Febru- 
ary 17, 1895, but has lived in 
East Orange, N. J., most of his 
life. 

His father, Robert Courtney 
King, was born in Jersey City, 
N. J., April 5, 1861, and is in 
the dry goods business in New 
York City. Mrs. King^ whose 
name was Ella Daly, also lived 
in New York before her mar- 
riage. Charles is the only child. 
Charles Howard Daly, '94 S., is 
a relative. 

Daly prepared at the Newark 
(N. J.) Academy. He has been 
out for baseball and tennis, was 
on the Class Tennis Team in the 
spring of 1914 and 1915; re- 
ceived third division honors in Freshman year, and third division 
honors and an oration in Junior year, and is an acting corporal 
of the Yale Battery. Freshman year he roomed alone, at 544 
Pierson ; Sophomore and Junior years with Lucius Comstock 
Boltwood, at 149 Lawrance and 347 White ; Senior year with 
Henry Whitney Closson, at 129 Welch. 

King plans to go into business ; his address is 59 Prospect 
Street, East Orange, N. J. 




Oimk^'^/tL: 



FARWELL KNAPP, ''Far," "Verp," was born in Bridge- 
port, Conn., November 28, 1893, and has lived there, in Farm- 
ington. Conn., and in Hartford, Conn. 

His father, Howard Hoyt Knapp, was born in South Norwalk, 
Conn., April 18, 1861, and was graduated from Yale with the 
degree of B.A. in 1882, and LL.B. in 1884. He lived in Bridge- 
port, where he practiced law, but is now retired. His mother, 
Emily Hale (Perkins) Knapp, was a resident of Hartford. Of 
their two sons one is living. Among the many Yale relatives are 
Rev. Thomas Clap, president of Yale College, 1740-1766 ; Nathan 
Hale, 1773; Simeon Baldwin, 1781; Enoch Perkins, 1781; Elias 



128 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




Perkins, 1786; Henry Baldwin, 
1797; Lyman Beecher, 1797; 
Thomas C. Perkins, 1818; George 
W. Perkins, 1824; Simeon E. 
Baldwin, 1861 ; Arthur Perkins, 
1887, '89 L.; James H. Knapp, 
1896; Henry A. Perkins, 1896; 
Edward C. Perkins, 1898. 

Far prepared at the Taft 
School, Waterto^\ai, Conn., and 
took a post-graduate year at the 
Hartford High School. He held 
the George Benedict Sherman 
Scholarship, 1913-14; the John 
Bennetto Scholarship, 1914-15; 
received first division honors in 
Freshman year; was on the 
Freshman Football and Fresh- 
man Track teams, and has nu- 
merals; was on the University 1914 Track Squad, and won the 
third Lucius F. Robinson Latin Prize in 1914. In Junior year 
he received second division honors, and a philosophical oration 
appointment. He is president of the Taft School Club, belongs 
to Psi Upsilon ; Phi Beta Kappa ; City Government Club ; 
Elizabethan Club; Jumblies; Ptombers, and Skull and Bones. 
He is head coach of Freshman Track Team, and on the Student 
Council, and Class Day Committee. He has roomed with Knight 
C. Cowles throughout the four years, at 674 Wright, 160 Law- 
rance, 427 Fayerweather, and 54 Vanderbilt. 

Knapp intends to enter the Harvard Law School, and his 
permanent address is 9 South Marshall Street, Hartford, Coiin. 



^JloO^ K>^«^- 



JAMES WHITE KNAPP, "Jim," was born in Blooming- 
dale, J^. J., July 13, 1892, but has lived in Paterson, N. J., all 
his life. 

His father, Angelo H. Knapp, was born in Johnson, Orange 
County, N. Y., October 10, 1860, and was a coal dealer in Pater- 
son, N. J., where he died October 11, 1906. Mrs. Knapp, whose 
name was Clara Thurston White, lived in Bloomingdale, N. J., 



GRADUATES 



129 



and died there in August, 1892. 
James is the only child. 

Jim prepared at the Paterson 
High School, at the Centenary 
Collegiate Institute, and at the 
Mackenzie School. He roomed 
with Eugene R. Fish, in Fresh- 
man year, at 552 Pierson ; with 
William Henry Overby, Jr., in 
Sophomore year, at 233 Durfee; 
with Alphonso F. Raynes, at 479 
Haughton, in Junior year, and 
with Walter Roger Hunt, at 36 
Vanderbilt, in Senior year. 

Knapp will go into mercantile 
business ; his address is 604 East 
Eighteenth Street, Paterson, 
K J. 




Ciz^H^Uy^.^fdca^ 



GEORGE LEO^^ KRAMER 

was born in Hartford, Conn., 
February 12, 1895, and has lived 
there, and in N^ew Haven. 

His father, Philip Kramer, 
and his mother, Sarah Kramer, 
were born in Russia. There are 
two sons and one daughter in 
the family, Samuel Kramer, 1912, 
being a brother. 

George prepared at the Hart- 
ford High School. He received 
second division honors in Fresh- 
man year and a First Berkeley 
Latin Premium, 1913-14. In 
Junior year he received a high 
oration appointment and is a 
member of Phi Beta Kappa. 
During the first three years of 




130 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



liis courst' lio lived at home ; in Senior year he roomed with 
Arthur B. Weiss, at 18 Vanderbilt. 

Kramer will enter the Columbia Law School; his address is 
care S. Kramer, 74 Broadway, New York City. 



ARTHUR BLISS LANE, "Art," was born in Hay Ridge, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., June 16, 1894, and has lived most of the time 
in New York City. 

His father, James Warren Lane, was born in Orange, X. J., 
July 31, 1864, and was graduated from the College of the City 
of New York with the degree of B.A. in 1887. He is a mer- 
chant and manufacturer, doing business in New York City under 
the firm names of the E. W. Bliss Company and J. H. Lane & 
Company. His mother, who was Eva Metcalf Bliss, was born in 
Bay Ridge, N. Y. There are four sons in the family. Mortimer 
B. Lane, Yale '13, is a brother. 

Art prepared at the Browning School, and at the Ecole de Tile 
de France. He was on the Freshman and Apollo Glee clubs ; in 
the University Orchestra ; has belonged to the Class Baseball 

and Hockey teams; was awarded 
tliird division honors and a sec- 
ond dispute in Junior year, and 
is a member of the Cercle Fran- 
^ais. Little Yellow Dogs, the 
University Club, the Corinthian 
Yacht Club, the Ptombers, Zeta 
Psi, and the Elihu Club. He 
roomed at 605 Wright in Fresh- 
man year, with D. C. Fitts ; the 
remaining three years with 
H. H. Anderson, at 216 Far- 
nam, 447 Fayerweather, and 98 
Welch. 

Lane intends to go into the 
foreign service, and is unde- 
cided as to where he will con- 
tinue liis studies. His address 
is Saint James, Long Island, 
N. Y. 




AjiAia §Am dOuLi 



GRADUATES 



131 



EICHARD LANPHER, 

"Dick," was born in St. Paul, 
Minn., December 4, 1893. 

His father, Obed Pardon Lan- 
pher, was born in Waukegan, 111., 
October 13, 1848, and Avas en- 
gaged in the wholesale fur busi- 
ness, under the firm name of 
Lanpher, Skinner (t Company. 
He has spent most of his life in 
St. Paul. His mother Avas Emma 
Maria Balliet before she mar- 
ried, and she lived in Bal- 
lietsville, Pa. There Avere three 
sons and tAvo daughters in the 
family, of whom three are now 
liA'ing. William F. Forepaugh, 
'96 S., and Joseph L. Forepaugh, 
'96 S., are relatiA^es. 

Dick jDrepared at the Adirondack-Florida School, and at the 
St. Paul Academy; he \A^as aAvarded third division honors in 
Freshman year, and a high oration in Junior year, was on the 
board of the Yale Record, and belongs to Delta Kappa Epsilon. 
Freshman year he roomed Avith Henry H. Anderson, at 636 
Wright; the remaining three years Avith Thomas C. Sherman, 
at 257 Durfee, 374 White, and 50 Vanderbilt. 

Lanpher intends to enter business ; his address is 482 Portland 
Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 




"niU-ohJ ^a/^/jiLh^ 



WALTER LASAR, "Dubarry," ''Dubie," was born in New 
York City, February 24, 1895. 

His father. Max Lasar, Avas born in Bordeaux, France, in 1860, 
and after coming to America Avas engaged in business as an im- 
porter of precious stones. He died in France in 1905. Mrs. 
Lasar, whose home was in Ncav York City, was Mamie Dreicer 
before her marriage. Walter is the only child. Louis S. DaA^idson, 
1913 S., is a cousin. 



132 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




>^0MjOu /^OAJLAy. 



Dubarry i)r('j)an'd at the 
Columbia Grammar School in 
Xcw York City. lie was on the 
('ligil)ility list of the Dramatic 
Association and became an asso- 
ciate member in Junior year. He 
received a second dispute appoint- 
ment. He roomed at 581 Pier- 
son, in Freshman year; with 
Louis S. Davidson, at 86 "Wall 
Street, in Sophomore year; with 
Ifeuben Horcliow in Junior and 
Senior years, at 478 Haughton, 
and 31 Vanderbilt. 

Lasar is undecided about his 
future occupation ; his permanent 
address is 4 East Seventy-eighth 
Street, Xew York City. 




{£J^^r^^ 



EGBERT EDWARD LEE, 

"Bob," was born in Xew Britain, 
Conn., February 1, 1893. 

His father, Patrick Joseph Lee, 
was born in Clare, Ireland, in 
1840, and was engaged in busi- 
ness as a merchant in !New Brit- 
ain, Avhere he died in 1899. His 
mother, Bridget Cloughessy, was 
from l^ew Britain, and died there 
in 1912. Four sons and one 
daughter sur\4ve her. John A. 
Lee, '95, was a brother. 

Bob prepared at the Xew Brit- 
ain High School. He is a mem- 
ber of Alpha Delta Phi, the Red 
Coffin Club, Trinity Club, and 
Barouche Club. Freshman year 
he roomed alone at 262 York 



GRADUATES 



133 



Street; Sophomore year with H. S. Buck, K. Atterbury, W. 
Ryan and C. H. Roberts, at 142 Lawrance; Junior and Senior 
years Avith Buck and Atterbury, at 436 Fayerweather and 674 
Wright. 

Lee expects to practice law. His address is 30 Summer Street, 
I^ew Britain, Conn. 



EDWARD H0KYNT0:N' 
LEETE, ''Ed," "Eddie," "Elite," 
was born in New York City, 
April 16, 1894, but lives in Pots- 
dam, i^. Y. 

His father, Charles Henry 
Leete, Avas born in Potsdam, 
X. Y., March 17, 1857, gradu- 
ated from Yale in the Class of 
1879, and received the degree 
of Ph.D. from Leipzig, Germany, 
in 1890. He has lived in New- 
York, and in Potsdam, and is a 
teacher and manufacturer, be- 
ing proprietor of the Potsdam 
Foundry & Machine Shop, and 
also the principal of the Leete 
School. Isadore Amelia (Kel- 
ton) Leete, his mother, lived in 
Burlington, Yt. There were two sons in the family ; one is living. 

Ed prepared at the Potsdam State Normal School. He received 
first division honors in Freshman year and first prize in College 
Premiums in declamation; was on the eligibility list of the Dra- 
matic Association in Freshman year, and became an associate 
member in Sophomore year. In Junior year he was awarded first 
division honors and a philosophical oration ; also a second Ten 
Eyck Prize. He is a member of the Dwight Hall Executive 
Committee and Phi Beta Kappa. His roommate in Freshman 
year was W. C. Leonard, at 610 Wright; in Sophomore and 
Junior years, R. W. Wilson, at 187 Famam and 342 White; 
Senior year N. B. Mead, Jr., at 94 Welch. 

Leete will enter the Columbia Law School. His address is 17 
East Sixtieth Street, New York, or 54 Elm Street, Potsdam, N. Y. 




134 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




EDWARDS FAYSSOUX 
LEIPER, JR., "Faysy," "Eddy," 
was born in Philadelphia, Pa., 
December 5, 1893, and has lived 
there and in Annapolis, Md., 
Washington, D. C, and Cali- 
fornia. 

His father, Edwards Fayssoux 
Leiper, born in Chester, Pa., in 
1859, was graduated from the 
United States Naval Academy in 
1880. He spent twenty-five years 
on sea duty in the United States 
Navy, is a retired commander, 
and now superintendent of the 
Episcopal Hospital in Philadel- 
phia, Pa. Mrs. Leiper was for- 
merly Mary Jane Ashhurst of 
Philadelphia. There are three 
sons and two daughters in the family. Howard Richards, Jr., 
1900 S., is an uncle. 

Faysy prepared at St. Luke's School, Wayne, Pa. He was on 
the Class Baseball Team in Sophomore and Junior years, and 
belongs to the Yale Battery. He roomed alone in Freshman year, 
at 577 Pierson; with S. G. Gaillard, Jr., and William Mikell 
the remaining three years, at 230 Farnam, 377 White, and 60 
Vanderbilt. 

Leiper expects to go into the law, and will enter the L'niversity 
of Pennsylvania Law School. His permanent address is Episcopal 
Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa, 



<^cti*ja^edyo -fr ^ZtLj^Uji.^ J^ 



WALTER CHURCHILL LEONARD, ''Walt," was born in 
Coudersport, Pa., December 25, 1893, and has lived in Washington, 
D. C, Pittsburgh, Pa., Harrisburg, Pa., and Scranton, Pa. 

His father, Fred Churchill Leonard, was born in Harrison, Pa., 
February 16, 1856, and graduated from Yale with the degree of 
B.A. in 1883. He is a banker and oil producer, being president 
of the First National Bank of Coudersport, and of the Octo Oil 



GRADUATES 



135 



Company. Mrs. Leonard was 
Estella Cook before her mar- 
riage, and lived in Mansfield, 
Pa. One son and three daugh- 
ters are in the family. 

Walt prepared at the Couders- 
port High School, and at the 
Harrisburg (Pa.)Academy. He 
belonged to the Freshman Glee 
Club; won second prize in the 
Sophomore public speaking con- 
test ; was on the College Choir, 
and an associate member of the 
Dramatic Association, taking 
part in ''Quentin Durward," 
1914, and 'The Eecruiting Offi- 
cer." He received a first colloquy 
appointment in Junior year, and 
belongs to the Yale Battery and 

Beta Theta Pi. Freshman year he roomed with Edward H. 
Leete, at 610 Wright; Sophomore and Junior years with M. H. 
Williams and R. S. Oliver, at 206 Farnam and 376 White; 
with R. S. Oliver and R. S. Cornish, in Senior year at 116 
Welch. 

Leonard plans to go into business ; his address is Couders- 
port. Pa. . 




\>^ oSXm^ e. 



WILLIAM MAYNARD LEVY, JR., "Fat," was born in 
Plattsburg, N". Y., August 7, 1895. 

His father, William M. Levy, was born in Plattsburg, July 14, 
1859, and is now in business there, with the firm of Levy Brothers. 
Frances (Wertheim) Levy, his mother, was born in Middleburgh, 
I^. Y. ; one son and two daughters are in the family. 

Fat prepared at Phillips Academy, Andover, and belongs to 
the Andover Club. He was a member of the Lacrosse Team and 



136 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




was out for swiiuuiiiig and water 
polo. lie roomed with A. L. 
Wells in Freshman year, at 
414 Berkeley; Sophomore year 
with A. L. VVells, A. B. Graham, 
L. Lloyd and J. L. Hopkins, at 
272 Durfee; with Wells and 
Graham in Junior and Senior 
years, at 354 White and 65 
Vanderbilt. 

Levy expects to enter business; 
his address is 92 Court Street, 
Plattsburg, X. Y. 



VOJUI. 



lTWj-^ysaj>-A^ (^"JLTU. OU 



CHARLES THOMAS 
LEWIS, JR., ''Tom," was 
born in Toledo, Ohio, July 7, 
1892. 

His father, Charles Thomas 
Lewis, was graduated at Mari- 
etta College in 1872, and is a 
counsellor at laAV, in the firm of 
Doyle k Lewis. His mother is 
Dora (Glidden) Lewis. There 
are four sons and one daughter 
in the family. 

Tom pre])ared at Lawrence- 
ville, and is a member of the 
LaAvrenceville Club. He was a 
member of the Freshman Musical 
Clubs, and the Apollo Mandolin 
and Banjo Club in 1914-15; be- 
longs to the Ohio Club, R. K. Iv., 
and Alpha Delta Phi. During Freshman year he roomed with 
Dean C. Paul and B. H. Lytton, at 251 Crown Street; with 




y^^. ^ t^<^<>^ 



^- 



GRADUATES 



137 



Paul in Sophomore and Junior years, at 269 Durfee and 438 
Fayerweather ; in Senior year with Paul and John W. Smith, 
at 37 Vanderbilt. 

Lewis expects to go into the transportation business ; his address 
is 2209 Robinwood Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. 



PHILIP HEN^RY LINDEN- 
BERG, "Chick," was born on 
September 20, 1892, in Columbus, 
Ohio. 

His father, Philip Lindenberg, 
was born in Genthin, Germany, 
in 1842, and has lived in Colum- 
bus, Ohio, where he is in the 
manufacturing business, general 
manager of the M. C. Lilley & 
Company. Mrs. Lindenberg, who 
was from Columbus, was Clara 
Kaumacher. There were three 
sons and five daughters, of whom 
six are living. Otto H. Linden- 
berg, '99 S., and George W. Lin- 
denberg, '02, are brothers ; and 
Carl R. Lindenberg, '95 S., Frank 
H. Lindenberg, '99 S., Paul Lin- 
denberg, '03, and Robert Lindenberg, e.r-'05 S., are cousins. 

Chick prepared at the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and 
is a member of the Hotchkiss Club, the Ohio Club, and Psi 
Upsilon. He played class baseball. He roomed with R. S. Young 
and R. C. Wilcox in Freshman year, at 633 Wright ; with Young, 
J. M. Butler, E. E. Converse, R. F. Potter and G. W. Carrington, 
in Sophomore year, at 128 Welch; with the same men in Junior 
and Senior years, at 448 FayerAveather and 6 Vanderbilt. 

Lindenberg expects to go into the manufacturing business; his 
address is 1306 East Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio. 




C/JU^ Jr iUoL cCk.*.i,.Ayr^ 



EDWARD NORTON LITTLE, "Ed," "Eddie," was born in 
Washington, D. C, November 26, 1893, and has lived in La Grange, 
111., and Peoria, 111. 



138 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




c/<5Ura^N\- ratfe- 



His father, the Reverend Ar- 
thur Mitchell Little, was horn in 
Fort Wayne, Ind., April 10, 
1865; was graduated from Yale 
in 1889, and given the degree of 
B.D. in 1891; received the de- 
gree of Ph.D., from Leipzig, in 
1892, and D.D. from Knox Col- 
lege (111.) in 1912. He is a 
minister, i)astor of the Second 
Presbyterian Church, Peoria, 111. 
His mother, who lived in Wash- 
ington, D. C, was Marion Perci- 
val Keene (Spear) ; there are 
two sons and one daughter in the 
family. 

Ed prepared at the Peoria 
High School. He was awarded 



third division honors in Fresh- 
man year and an oration appointment in Junior year. He Avas 
on the University Fencing Team. He roomed alone in Freshman 
year, at 651 Wright ; Sophomore and Junior years he roomed 
with A. R. Felty, at 208 Farnam and 382 White; Senior year 
with Folty, Henry E. Woodard and Richard C. Tefft, at 81-90 
Connecticut. 

Little expects to take up engineering as a profession ; his address 
is 308 North Perry Avenue, Peoria, 111. 



CALVIN GOODRICH LITTLEFIELD, '^Cal," "Litt," was 
born in Chicago, 111., August 8, 1893, and lived there seven years, 
in Colorado twelve years, then in Asheville, N. C, and noAv lives 
in Chicago. 

His father is Andrew Sylvester Littlefield, who was born in 
Baltimore, Md. Mrs. Littlefield, who was Blanche Worthington, 
was also born in Baltimore; she died in Asheville, December 11, 
1914. Mr. Littlefield has lived in Baltimore and Chicago, and is 
now connected with the North American Street Railway Con- 
struction Company, and is the western representative of the Lorain 
Steel Company. Four sons comprise the family, one of whom is 
Arthur S. Littlefield, 1912 S. 

Cal ])i-epared at tlic Cutler Academy, Colorado Springs, 



GRADUATES 



139 



Colo., and at the Phillips Acad- 
emy, Andover, and is a member 
of the Andover Club. He was 
awarded third division honors in 
Freshman year, and second divi- 
sion honors and an oration in 
Junior year. He belongs to the 
Yale Battery and Alpha Delta 
Phi. Freshman year he roomed 
alone, at 550 Pierson ; Sopho- 
more year Avith A. L. Gimbel, 
at 251 Durfee; Junior and 
Senior years with E. Field, at 
407 Berkeley, and 672 Wright. 

Littlefield will probably go into 
the transportation business. His 
address is 1320 Monadnoek Build- 
ing, Chicago, 111. 




GjuA^ a ^cmc-^iciU 



CHAELES LITTWIT^, 

^'Charlie," 'Tit," "Doc," was 
born in Tomsk, Siberia, October 
2, 1893. 

His father, Israel Joseph Litt- 
win, was born in Mohliev, Eussia, 
in 1854, and was graduated from 
the Kowna (Eussia) Talmudic 
Seminary in 1870. He is a rabbi, 
director of "G of I," Hebrew 
School, Brooklyn, I^. Y. He has 
lived for many years in America. 
Mrs. Littwnn was born in Kowna, 
Eussia ; her name Avas Maria 
Propp. Of their six sons and five 
daughters, ten are living. 

Lit prepared at the Boys' 
High School, Brooklyn. He had 
a first colloquy appointment in 




140 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Junior year, and belongs to the Cosmopolitan Club, the Inter- 
national Poliiv Club, and the Menorah Society. In his Junior 
and Senior year? he was also a member of the Class of 1918, 
Yale School of Medicine. He roomed alone, at 363 White, in 
Freshman year; with Dan Thorn in Sophomore and Junior years, 
at -US and 421 Berkeley; in Senior year alone, at 1174 Taylor. 

Lit twin is im decided as to whether he will enter Columbia 
Medical School, or go into some educational work. His address is 
602 Sutter Avenue, Brooklvn. X. Y. 



lAUREXCE MAGEE 
LLOYD. "Larry,** was bom in 
Philadelphia, Pa., March 13. 
1S93. and has lived in Philadel- 
l>]iia. Los Angeles, Calif., and 
Xew York City. 

He is the only child of John 
Sharpe Lloyd and Mary Ger- 
trude (Magee) Lloyd, of Phila- 
delphia. Mr. Lloyd, who was 
bom in 1S62, was in business as 
a manufacturer in Philadelphia, 
where he died February 6, 1900. 
Larry prepared at the De- 
Lancey School, Riverview Mili- 
tary Academy, and the Prince- 
ton Preparatory School. He was 
on the 1916 Class Baseball Team, 
and belongs to Alpha Delta Phi, 
and R. K. K. Freshman year he roomed with AUan B. Graham, 
at 307 Berkeley; Sophomore year with John L. Hopkins. A. B. 
Graham, A. L. Wells and W. Levy, at 272 Durfee; Junior year 
with Ira H. TTashbum, at 435 Fayerweather, and Senior year 
with Washburn and Charles A. Fagan, Jr., at 64 Vanderbilt. 

Lloyd proposes to go into the manufacturing biisiness ; his 
address is care WiUiam M. Campbell, Hartsdale, X. Y. 




U.^M. Lltrx^ 



EDWARD LOXGSTRETH. 2d. '^Xed.' 
"Cupid,*' "Cupe." was bom at Lansdowne, Pa. 
has lived there and in Philadelphia, Pa. 



'•Eddie.*' '-Ed.'* 
Julv 2. 1S94, and 



GRALrATE< 



141 



His father. Charles Longstreth, 
was bom in Philadelphia, and 
attended Swarthmore College, but 
did not graduate. He is located 
in Philadelphia, where, as presi- 
dent of the United States Metal- 
lic Packing Company, he is en- 
gaged in manufacturing railroad 
supplies. Mrs. Longstreth. whose 
maiden name was M. Gertrude 
Hever. died in Philadelphia in 
March. 1915. One son and one 
daughter stLrrive her. 

Ed prepared at the Protestant 
Episcopal Academy in Philadel- 
phia, and was tutored by the 
Roxbtiry Tutoring SchooL He 
was on the C our ant board and _- 

also on the Gymnastic Team. 

where he won numerals. He belonged to the T^ramatic Assc»- 
ciation. and took part in the "Recruiting Omcer." 1913. "Quentin 
Ihirward." 1914. and "An Ideal Husband." 1916: sang in 
the College Choir: was a member of the Fencing Associa- 
tion, and the Tale Banery. He was awarded a first colloquy 
in Junior year. Freshman year he roomed alone, at 547 Pierson: 
Sophomore year with Gmbb. at 205 Famam: .Junior year with 
Grubb and Guenther. at 331 TThite. and Senior year alone at 
130 TVelch. 

Longstreth expect* to enter the University of Pennsylvania La~ 
School. His address is 1631 Loctist Street. Philadelphia. Pa. 




FEAXK WILLIAM LORIMEE. "Lorry." "BiU." was bjm 
in Bradley. Maine. July 1. IS 94. and has lived in Woonsocket, 
E. I.. Bangor. Maine, and Lynn, Mass. 

His father. Addison Benjamin Lorimer. was b-:>m in Beebe 
Plain. Quebec. Canada. April 4. 1S65. and was graduated from 
Colby College with the degree of B.A. in ISSS. and from Xewton 
Theological Institution with the degree of BJD. in 1S91. He is 
pastor of the First Baptist Church in Lynn. Mass. His mother. 



142 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



whose name was Florence Olive 
Livermore, lived in Bradley, 
Maine. Frank is the only child. 
Lorry prepared at the Bangor 
(Maine) High School. He took 
part in the Freshman debate, be- 
longed to the University Debat- 
ing Association, and received first 
division honors in Junior year. 
He is a member of the Yale Bat- 
tery. Freshman year he roomed 
with David IST. Beach, Jr., at 535 
Pierson; Sophomore and Junior 
years with Beach and Kaymond 
A. Dudley, at 434 and 466 Fayer- 
weather; with Beach, Dudley 
and Edwin E. Aiken, at 101 and 
104 Welch, in Senior year. 

Lorimer expects to enter Xew- 

ton Theological Institution in preparation for the ministry. His 

address is 7 Park Street, Lynn, Mass. 





f.^ / 



ru^ 



SETH LOW, 2d, "The Dea- 
con," was born in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., June 6, 1893, and has 
lived there and in New York 
City. 

His father. Abbot Augustus 
LoAV, was born in Brooklyn in 
1844, and died there in 1912, 
He Avas in the manufacturing 
business. Mrs. Low, whose home 
was in New York, Avas Marian 
Ward. Of her four sons and one 
daughter, four are living. G. C. 
W. Low, '06, and A. A. Low, '11, 
are brothers. 

The Deacon pi-e])ared at Groton 
School, Groton, Mass., and belongs 
to the Groton Club. He rowed on 
the 1916 Freshman Crew; rowed 



GRADUATES 



143 



for three years on tlie University Crew and was captain in 1016; 
has his "Y" and nnmerals. He was also on the Freshman Glee 
Club ; received second division honors in Freshman year, and 
a Berkeley Premium in Latin composition ; received an oration 
appointment in Junior year ; belonged to the Dramatic Associa- 
tion, and took part in ''St. Bartholomew's Eve" in 1914; is a 
member of Psi Upsilon, the Senior Promenade Committee, the 
Lawn Club Dance Committee ; is a cheer leader, and belongs to 
the Mohicans and Skunks, the Yale Battery, and Wolf's Head. 
He has roomed Avith Huntington Lyman the entire four years, 
at 606 Wright, in Freshman j^ear; 425 Fayerweather in Sopho- 
more and Junior years, and in 102 Welch, in Senior year. 

Low expects to go into the manufacturing business. His address 
is 30 East Fifty-fifth Street, New York City. 



RUSSELL HEALEY LUCAS, "Russ," was born in New York 
City, December 16, 1893, and has lived in East Orange, Montclair, 
N. J., and in New York City. 

His father, George Eldridge Lucas, was born in New Bedford, 
Mass., December 28, 1860, and was a sugar broker. He died 
August 12, 1904. His mother 
was Grace Walton Healey of 
Brooklyn before her marriage. 
There are two sons and one 
daughter in the family. 

Russ prepared at the Mont- 
clair High School, at Phillips- 
Andover, and belongs to the An- 
dover Club. He was manager of 
the Yale Calendar; on the Ban- 
ner and Put Pourri board, and 
on the Picture and Gown Com- 
mittee ; recording secretary of 
the Christian Association, and a 
member of Zeta Psi. Freshman 
year he roomed with T. I. Cro- 
well, Jr., at 638 Wright ; Sopho- 
more year with Crowell, at 226 
Farnani ; Junior year with W. P. 
Campbell, M. S.' Chism, R. S. 




iujUlAdl^- MX<^^. 



144 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Cornish, A. B. Gurley and H. W. Johnstone, at 433-434 Fayer- 
weather; Senior year with Campbell, Chism, Gurley and John- 
stone, at 80-91 Connecticut. 

Lucas intends to go into the manufacturing business. His 
address is 620 West One Hundred and Twenty-second Street, 
Xow York Citv. 



ERLAXD ANTHONY 
LUXDGREN, "Tony," was 
born in Higganum, Conn., Octo- 
ber 22, 1892. 

His father, Lars Alfred Lund- 
gren, was bom in Sweden, Feb- 
ruary 13, 1861, and lives in Hig- 
ganum, where he is a farmer. 
His mother, Alberttina Elizabeth 
(Anderson) Lundgren, Avas born 
in Espeng, Westergotland, Swe- 
den. There are five sons and 
three daughters in the family. 

Tony prepared at the Middle- 
town (Conn.) High School. He 
belongs to the Yale Battery. 
Freshman year he roomed with 
Sheridan A. Thompson, at 591 
Pierson; the remaining three 

years with G. D. Butler and A. A. Collinge, at 196 Farnam, 467 

Fayerweather, and 93 Connecticut. 

Lundgren expects to become a teacher ; his address is Higganum, 

Conn. 




C_AJCX>._^^A.J^ IX 



^-a-^./O^.AjIl.'vS,.^^- 



HUNTINGTON LYMAN, "Hunty," was born in Seabright, 
N. J., August 6, 1894, but has lived in New York City. 

His father, Hart Lyman, born in Plymouth, Conn., December 8, 
1851, has spent his life in New York, where he was editor-in-chief 
of the New York Tribune, until he retired. He was graduated 
from Yale in the Class of 1873. Mrs. Lyman, whose name was 
Marion Torrey, lived in New York City, and died March 5, 1912, 
at Atlantic City, N. J. One son and two daughters survive her. 
Yale relatives include Ephraini Lyman, 1832; James "W. McLane, 



GRADUATES 



145 



1861; Henry Richards, 1912; 
Frederick C. Lyman, 1913 S. ; 
George Richards, 1872 ; Archi- 
bald M. Richards, 1916; Dickin- 
son W. Richards, Jr., 1917, and 
Guy H. Richards, 1919. 

Hunty prepared at Groton 
School, and belongs to the Gro- 
ton Club. He received second 
division honors in Freshman 
year; was on the Freshman and 
Apollo Glee clubs; was on the 
Governing Board of the Univer- 
sity Club for four years ; Omega 
Lambda Chi Committee for four 
years ; secretary of the Dramatic 
Association; took part in the 
Christmas play, 1915; was man- 
ager of the Freshman Track 

Team; received a dissertation appointment in Junior year, and 
belongs to Psi L'psilon, the B. P.'s, the Whiffenpoofs, Picture and 
Gown Committee, Senior Class Book Committee, the Yale Battery, 
the Ptombers, and Wolf's Head. He has roomed the entire four 
years with Seth Low, 2d, at 607 Wright, Freshman year; 425 
Fayerweather, in Sophomore and Junior years, and at 102 Welch 
in Senior year. 

Lyman expects to enter the mercantile business; his address is 
65 West Fifty-fourth Street, Xew York City. 




\/T^ ■•' • ^ ^ ' J /^PT-«- */ ' y^ 



MARK MATTESOX McCHESA^EY, "Mac," was bom in 
Aspen, Colo., N'ovember 13, 1894, and has lived in Seattle, Wash., 
for the past sixteen years. 

His father, Charles Thomas McChesney, was born August 5, 
1860, in Syracuse, X. Y., but has also lived in Colorado, Utah, 
and Seattle. He is a journalist, and is head of the proof depart- 
ment of the Seattle Times. His mother, Cora (Folsom) McChes- 
ney, lived in Aspen, Colo., before her marriage; there are two 
sons in the family. 

Mac prepared at the Lincoln High School, Seattle. He held 
the Seattle Alumni scholarship; was awarded third division 
honors in Freshman year; was a member of the University 



146 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




^l^O^Xyi^yk ^ ^<^<tAm>y 



Debating Association ; received 
a dissertation appointment in 
Junior year; was on the Coiirant 
lioai'd; and belongs to Beta 
Theta Pi, and the Seattle Club. 
Tie roomed alone in Freshman 
year, at 598 Pierson; in Sopho- 
more year Avith Herbert L. L. 
Macdonald, at 219 Farnam; with 
Macdonald and Frank Welling- 
ton Gilbert, in Junior year, at 
462 Fayerweathcr, and with F. 
Russell Bragg and Gilbert in 
Senior year, at 15 Vanderbilt. 

McChesney is undecided as to 
his future work. It may be busi- 
ness, or possibly journalism. His 
address is Madison Park, Seattle, 
Wash. 



HUGH McCONTsTELL, 

"Mac," was born in Chester, Pa., 
February 13, 1893, but has lived 
in Northampton, Mass. 

His father, Thomas McConnell, 
was bom in ISTeilston, Scotland, 
and is engaged in manufacturing 
cotton goods in this country, with 
the Hampton Company, East- 
hampton, Mass. His mother, 
Mary (Kerr) McConnell, was 
born in Glasgow, Scotland ; three 
sons and one daughter are in the 
family. 

Mac prepared at Lawrenceville, 
and at Ridgefield, Conn., and is 
a member of the Lawrenceville 
Club ; he belongs also to the Uni- 
versity Club and Alpha Delta 

Phi. Freshman year he roomed with J. B. Fitzpatrick and J. G. 

Goodlett, at 424 Fayerweathcr; with Fitzpatrick, Goodlett, and 




i^^mdaud^ 



GRADUATES 



147 



A. McLane, in Sophomore year, at 252-253 Durfee; with McLane 
and Goodlett in Junior year, at 441 Fayerweather, and with 
McLane, Goodlett, and J. H. McLennan, in Senior year^ at 
46-49 Vanderbilt. 

McConnell expects to go into the manufacturing business. His 
address is Crescent Street, Northampton, Mass. 



JOH^^ MORIER McHAT- 
TOX, ''Johnnie," was born in 
Butte, Mont., September 22, 
1891. 

His father, John Joseph Mc- 
Hatton, Avas born in Mt. Sterling, 
111., February 3, 1860, and was 
graduated from the State LTni- 
versity of Iowa in the Class of 
1883, with the degree of LL.B. 
He has lived in Stillwater, Minn., 
and in Butte, Mont., where he is 
engaged in the practice of law. 
Rosa (Morier) McHatton, his 
mother, was a resident of Butte. 
Of their two sons, John is the 
only one living. 

Johnnie prepared at Phillips- 
Andover, and belongs to the An- 
dover Club. He received a first colloquy appointment in Junior 
year, and is a member of Beta Theta Pi. Freshman and Sopho- 
more years he roomed with Harold iN'ute, at 617 Wright and 195 
Farnam; in Junior year with T^ute and Richard Pierce, at 495 
Haughton; in Senior year wntli C. C. Dilley, at 115 Welch. 

McHatton intends to go into the law, and may enter the Uni- 
versity of Michigan Law School. His address is 315 West 
Broadway, Butte, Mont. 





, <^. "^^/^ 



ALLAN" McLANE, JR., "Mac," was born in Baltimore, Md., 
October 26, 1894. 

His father, Allan McLane, was born in Baltimore, December 8, 
1864, and was graduated from Johns Hopkins with the degree of 
B.A. in 1886, and from the University of Maryland in 1888 with 



148 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




tlio degree of LL.B. lie is a judge 
in the third district circuit court 
of Baltimore County, Md. Mrs. 
McLane "was also a resident of 
Baltimore; her name was Au- 
gusta James. Two sons and two 
daughters are in the family. 
Yale relatives include William 
H. L. Lee, 1869; Henry A. 
James, 1874, 78 L.; Walter B. 
James, 1879 ; Norman James, 
1S90; Charles E. McLane, 
1893 S.; R. C. James, 1894; 
Henry James, 1903; W. E. S. 
James, 1917, and Oliver B. 
James, 1918. 

Mac prepared at The Country 
School, Baltimore, and at St. 
Paul's, Concord, and belongs to 
the St. Paul's School Club. On the Freshman Glee Club, and 
coxswain of the Freshman Crew, and of the University Crew 
for three years. He has numerals and a ''Y" ; received a second 
dispute appointment in Junior year; belongs to Alpha Delta Phi; 
to the Sword and Gun Club; Little Yellow Dogs; University 
Club ; the Big Four ; the Southern Club, and Wolf's Head, and is 
chief of the Skunk Club. Freshman year he roomed with E. E. 
Wilson, at 628 Wright; Sophomore year with J. G. Goodlett, 
H. McConnell, and J. B. Fitzpatrick, at 253 Durfee; with Good- 
lett and McConnell in Junior year, at 441 Fayerweather ; with 
Goodlett, McConnell and J. H. McLennan first half of Senior 
year, at 49 Vanderbilt, and with P. L. Rose and T. E. Hapgood 
at 675 Wright the remainder of the year. 

McLane intends to enter the manufacturing business. His 
address is ''Gillean," Garrison, Md. 



Mit^^J^. 



JOHN HiVRBISON McLENNAN was 1)orn In Louisville, Ivy., 
March 13, 1892. 

His father, Alexander McLennan, was born in Montreal, Can- 
ada, October 30, 1865, and died July 1, 1892, at Pincher Creek, 
Canada. Mrs. McLennan was Margaret Rosanna Harbison ; two 
daughters and one son are in the family. 



GRADUATES 



149 



John prepared for Yale at 
the Paterson-Davenport School, 
Louisville, Ky., and at Phillips- 
Andover. He entered Yale with 
1915, and has also been a mem- 
ber of McGill 1916. He is a 
member of Alpha Delta Phi, and 
the Trinity and Southern clubs. 
Freshman year he roomed alone 
at 348 York Street ; Sophomore 
year with R. E. Cox, at 237 Dur- 
fee; Junior year alone, at 499 
Haughton, and Senior year with 
J. G. Goodlett, A. McLane, and 
H. McConnell, at 46-49 Vander- 
bilt. 

McLennan expects to become 
an architect; his address is 1500 
Third Avenue, Louisville, Ky. 




'LfertcM. fh A4A.S.^^etx-ot_.<<u,<^^ 



ARTHUR CLEMEXT MAC- 
NEAL, ''Mac," was born in 
iSTew Orleans, La., May 17, 
1891. 

His father, James MacJSTeal, 
who was born in Petersburg, Va., 
April 19, 1832, spent most of his 
life in Mobile, Ala., and in liew 
Orleans, where he died January 
1, 1906. Mrs. Macl^eal was Pel- 
limina Maria Williams before 
her marriage, and she lived in 
Canterbury, Conn. There are 
four sons and one daughter in 
the family. 

Mac prepared at Straight Uni- 
versity, jSTew Orleans, La., and at 
Talladega College, Ala., from 
which he was graduated with the 




^ CJ^e^'^^ji^zn^^t.tXicji^jt^ 



150 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



degree of B.A. in 1913. After entering Yale in Junior year, he 
received third division honors, and held two scholarships. He 
roomed with L. P. O'llara, at 59 Dixwell Avenue, in Junior year, 
and with G. L. liegeman, at 207 Park Street, in Senior year. 

MacNeal expects to become a teacher; his address is 1438 
Entorpo Street, New Orleans, La. 



DONALD CANMOKE MAL- 

COM was born in Roselle, N. J., 
February 9, 1893, and has lived 
in Newport, R. I., Lausanne, 
Switzerland, and Montclair, N. J. 
His father, Howard Malcom, 
Avas born May 15, 1859, in New- 
port, R. I., and died December 
25, 1910. His mother's name 
Avas Mary Anne Bruce Haynes. 
Before her marriage she lived 
in Berwick-on-Tweed, England. 
There are three sons in the 
family. 

Don prepared at the Newark 
A-cademy, Newark, N. J., and at 
Andover. He played on the 
Freshman Football Team and is 
a member of Delta Kappa Ep- 
silon and the Elihu Club. Freshman year he roomed with Robert 
H. Coleman, at 331 White; Sophomore year with Coleman, at 
238 Durfee ; Junior year with Coleman and Otis, at 336 White ; 
Senior year with Joseph Otis, at 27 Vanderbilt. 

Malcom expects to enter the banking business and may be 
addressed in care of Lee, Higginson & Company, 43 Exchange 
Place, New York City. 




tvS^^fevxo-Q.-^ CL , KjjlqSUss,^^^ 



FREDERICK JOHNSON MANNING, "Fred," Avas bom in 
East Braintree, Mass., July 2, 1894, and has lived in Nahant, 
Mass., Boston, and New York City. 



GRADUATES 



151 




He is the only child of Fred 
Newcomb Manning, and Amy 
Caroline (Johnson) Manning. 
Mr. Manning was born in North 
Andover, Mass., and is now in 
business in Boston, with Marden, 
Orth & Hastings, oil importers. 
Mrs. Manning lived at iSTahant, 
Mass., before her marriage. H. 
Parker Fellows, Yale 1870, and 
James I. Brainard, ex-1902 S., 
are relatives. 

Fred prepared at the Thayer 
Academy, Braintree, Mass., and 
at Phillips Academy, Andover; 
he is a member of the Andover 
Club. He has contributed to the 
Lit, was on the Apollo and Uni- 
versity Banjo and Mandolin 

clubs, and Avas aAvarded second division honors, and a high oration 
in Junior year, and also the Class of 1868 Prize. He belongs to 
Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Chi Delta Theta, the 
Elizabethan Club, and the Pundits. He roomed alone in Fresh- 
man year, at 587 Pierson; with P. J. Clark in Sophomore year, 
at 255 Durfee; with W. H. Eckman in Junior year, at 505 
Haughton, and with H. P. Putnam, in Senior year, at 77 
Connecticut. 

Manning expects to become a teacher, and will enter the Yale 
Graduate School next year. His address is 47 French Avenue, 
Braintree, Mass. 



JTVdLA.'^ cJU X<rWvu«rvi w\ <XA..iAAj>.*Aai 



THOMAS JOSEPH O'NEILL MANNING, ''Derby," was 
born in Derby, Conn., March 23, 1895. 

His father, Thomas Francis Manning, was born in Athlone, 
County Westmeath, Ireland, April 22, 1862, and was in business 
in Derby, Conn., where he died December 18, 1898. Mrs. Manning 



152 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




was Lena O'Xcill before mar- 
riage. Of rlicii- four cliildi-cii 
two are living. 

Tom prepared at the Derby 
High School. He roomed at 
home, in Derby, during his entire 
course. 

Manning expects to become a 
teacher; his address is 274 Olivia 
Street, Derby, Conn. 



/jUnAy1.CiA- JL ///[yOyP-PT-PT^ 




^^^ f.9?/c.^j^ 



ANTHONY FRANCIS 
MASS A, JR., was born in 
New Haven, Conn., March 20, 
1894. 

His father, Anthony F. Massa, 
was born in Naples, Italy, and is 
employed as a mason, in New 
Haven, Conn., where he has 
spent most of his life. His 
mother, also born in Italy, was 
Louise Cangano before her mar- 
riage; she died in New Haven, 
Conn., October 20, 1909. Of 
her seven children four are now 
living. 

Anthony prepared at St. John's 
Parochial School, New Haven, 
and at the New Haven High 
School. He received a first col- 



GRADUATES 



153 



loquy appointment in Junior year. He has roomed at home 
during his entire course. 

Massa, who is now taking the second year work in the Yale 
School of Medicine in connection with his College course, expects to 
practice medicine. His address is 100 Wooster Street, New Haven, 
Conn. 



PHILIP KICHAED MATHER, "Phil," was born in Cleve- 
land, Ohio, May 19, 1894. 

His father, Samuel Mather, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, July 
13, 1851, and is in the iron-mining and pig-iron business there, 
in the firm of Pickands, Mather & Company. Mrs. Mather, whose 
maiden name was Flora Amelia 
Stone, was a resident of Cleve- 
land, and died there January 19, 
1909. Three sons and one daugh- 
ter survive her. Amasa S. Ma- 
ther, Yale 1907, and S. Living- 
ston Mather, 1905, are brothers. 
J. S. Raymond, 1917, Samuel E. 
Raymond, 1913, Henry A. Ray- 
mond, 1905, and Adelbert S. Hay, 
1898, are cousins. 

Phil prepared at the Univer- 
sity School, Cleveland, Ohio, and 
is a member of the executive com- 
mittee of the Ohio Club. In 
Freshman year he was awarded 
first division honors ; in Junior 
year third division honors and 
a philosophical oration. He be- 
longs to Phi Beta Kappa, and to 

Beta Theta Pi. Freshman year he roomed at 671 Wright, with 
W. L. Ivallman; Sophomore year with Kallman and P. W. Harris, 
at 175 Lawrance; Junior year with C. C. Dilley, at 498 Haughton, 
and Senior year with H. C. Jackson and O. C. Scarborough, at 
133 Welch. 

Mather expects to go into the mercantile business. His address 
is 2605 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 




H>J^ /f. %uxiju^ 



154 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



XELSON BUSH MEAD, JR., 
"Xel," "Nels," was born in 
Greenwich, Conn., January 14, 
1893, and has always lived 

there. 

His father, Nelson Bush Mead, 
born March 25, 1860, and his 
mother, Anna R. Mead, both lived 
in Greenwich, where Mr. Mead 
is in the real estate business. 
Four sons and two daughters are 
in their family. S. Harold Mills, 
'05 S., and G. Gordon Mead, '12, 
are relatives. 

INTel prepared at the Greenwich 
Academy, and at The Gunnery. 
He went out for track ; received 
a second colloquy appointment 
in Junior year, and belongs to 
the Yale Battery. He roomed alone in Freshman year, at 528 
Pierson ; with E. G. Scovill in Sophomore and Junior years, at 
184 Farnam, and 463 Fayerweather ; in Senior year with E. H. 
Leete, at 94 Welch. 

Mead intends to make art his life work. His address is 97 
Maher Avenue, Greenwich, Conn. 




"y^l/i.Oia^L 






GEORGE ALBERT MEILER was born in Chicago, III, 
November 25, 1894. 

His father, Albert Joseph Meiler, was born in Ottawa, III, June 
7, 1873, and lives in Pasadena, Calif. He is employed as a 
Pullman conductor, on the Santa Fe Railroad. Mrs. Meiler was 
Sophia Kallas before her marriage, and lived in Chicago. George 
is the only child. 

George prepared at the Murray F. Tuley High School, Chicago, 
and has held the Chicago Alumni Scholarship for three years, 
the Ryerson Scholarship for one year, and the Robert Callender 
Scholarship for two years. He was awarded first division honors 
in Freshman year, was on the University Handball Team for 
three years, and its captain in 1915-16. In Junior year he 



GRADUATES 



155 



received first division honors, 
and a pliilosoi)liical oration, and 
also received the Scott Prize in 
German. He belongs to Phi Beta 
Kappa. Fi'eshman and Sopho- 
more years he roomed with Har- 
old H. Wright, at 664a Wright 
and 435 Fayerweather ; Junior 
year alone, at 419 Berkeley, and 
Senior year at 417 Berkeley, for 
the first term Avitli August Leis- 
ner, the second term alone. 

Meiler expects to go into busi- 
ness; his address is 2345 Cortez 
Street, Chicago, 111. 







GEORGE BE^TLEY 
MEYER was born in iSTew 
York City, January 6, 1895. 

He is the only child of Julian 
Harriman Meyer, of jSTew York, 
and Clara Dempsey (Bentley) 
Meyer, whose home before her 
marriage was in Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Mr. Meyer is a merchant in iSTew 
York City. 

George prepared at the Horace 
Mann School, and at Phillips- 
Andover ; he is a member of the 
Andover Club. He belonged to 
the Freshman Musical clubs, the 
Corinthian Yacht Club, and re- 
ceived a second colloquy appoint- 
ment in Junior year. He has 
roomed with Sheldon Jackson 




(jf^7f£. xw./w "ffy^^ 



156 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Brady for the entire course, at 623 Wright, 262 Durfee, 344 
White, and 87 Connecticut. 

Meyer expects to practice law. His address is 307 West One 
Hundred and Seventh Street, New York City. 



RUSSELL JAY MEYER, ''Russ," "Ichthy," was born in 
Ada, Ohio, October 29, 1892, and has lived there, in Springfield, 
Ohio, and in Urbana, Ohio. 

His father, William Henry 
Meyer, was born in Findlay, 
Ohio, February 4, 1862, and died 
at Ada, Ohio, October 4, 1897. 
Before his death he was local 
agent for the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road, a director of the First Na- 
tional Bank, and also of the Ada 
Coal & Lumber Company. Mrs. 
Meyer was Harriett Coyt Graf- 
ton, of Ada; she died January 
21, 1904. Five sons and one 
daughter survive her. William 
W. Meyer, M.A. 1912, and 
1915 L., is a brother. 

Russ prepared at the Urbana 
and Ada (Ohio) High schools, 
and at the Ohio Northern Uni- 
versity in the Class of 1914, 
where he belonged to Theta Nu 
Epsilon. He was a member of the Freshman Glee Club; was 
awarded a second colloquy appointment in Junior year; is a ser- 
geant in Battery A of the Yale Artillery, and belongs to the Ohio 
Chil). The first half of Freshman year he roomed with W. W. 
Meyer, at 120 York Street ; the last half alone at 597 Pierson ; the 
remainder of the course he has roomed with Harry V. Champion 
and Seth W. Candee, at 189 Farnam, 358 White, and 107 Welch. 

Meyer intends to enter business ; his address is 607 North Main 
Street, Ada, Ohio. 




/CLi^^.M^^ 



WILLIAM MIKELL, "Bill," "Mike," was born in Lincoln- 
ton, N. C, December 20, 1894, and has lived there and in 
Philadelphia. 



GRADUATES 



157 



His father, William E. Mikell, 
was born in Sumter, S. C, Janu- 
ary 29, 1865, graduated from the 
University of South Carolina 
about 1888, and was given the 
degree of LL.M. by the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania in 1915. 
He is located in Philadelphia, 
where he is dean of the Law De- 
partment in the University of 
Pennsylvania. Mrs. Mikell lived 
in Lincolnton before her mar- 
riage ; her name was Martha 
Turner McBee. There are two 
sons and one daughter. 

Bill prepared at the William 
Penn Charter School, and is sec- 
retary and treasurer of the Penn 
Charter Club. He received sec- 
ond division honors in Freshman year; held the Stanley Scholar- 
ship ; and received a second Ten Eyck Prize for public speaking, 
in Junior year. In Junior year he also received first division 
honors, and a high oration appointment. He belongs to Zeta Psi, 
and Phi Beta Kappa. In Freshman year he roomed with S. G. 
Gaillard, at 584 Pierson ; the remaining three years with Gaillard 
and E. F. Leiper, at 230 Farnam, 377 White, and 60 Vanderbilt. 

Mikell plans to enter the University of Pennsylvania Law 
School. His address is 229 East Johnson Street, Germantown, Pa. 




^CU^u^^^^^^^^^ 



EDWAED TYLOR MILLER, ''Ted," "Ed," "Eddie," was 
born in Woodside, Md., February 1, 1895, and has lived in Wash- 
ington, D. C, and in Easton, Md. 

His father, Guion Miller, was born in Sandy Spring, Md., 
April 29, 1864, was graduated from Swarthmore in 1883, and 
received the degree of M.A. in 1888, the degree of LL.B. from 
Columbian (now George Washington University) in 1885, and 
LL.M. in 1886. He practices law in Washington, D. C, in the 
firm of Miller & Tylor. Mrs. Miller's maiden name was Annie E. 
Tylor, and she lived in Denton, Md. There were four sons and 
three daughters in the family, of whom three sons are living. 



158 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Francis Miller, 1852 (grand- 
father), George B. Miller, ex- 
1882 (uncle), and Samuel M. 
Janney, Jr., ^a--1914 (cousin), 
are Yale relatives, 

Ted prepared at the Friends' 
School, Washington, D. C. He 
won a "Y" on the University- 
Football Team, and played water 
polo, lacrosse, and class basket- 
ball. He received second divi- 
sion honors in Freshman year, 
second division honors in Junior 
year, and also a philosophical 
oration appointment. He be- 
longs to Phi Beta Kappa, Psi 
LTpsilon, and "H. O. C." He 
roomed the Avhole four years 
with James Whitman Osgood, at 

538 Pierson, 393-394 Berkeley, 487 Haughton and 77 Connecticut. 
Miller intends to practice law, and will probably enter George 

Washington University, Washington, D. C. His address is "The 

Pines," Easton, Talbot County, Md. 




^yd^^^j^^ T. TjiJA^ 



LEWIS MILLER was born in Canton, Ohio, May 29, 1894, 
lived there five years, then in Ponce, Porto Rico, five years, and 
now lives in ISTew York City. 

His father, Robert Anderson Miller, was born in Akron, Ohio, 
April 11, 1861, and attended Ohio Wesleyan University. He was 
postmaster at Ponce, Porto Rico, for twelve years, and died in 
Chautauqua, X. Y., in 1911. Mrs. Miller lived in Canton, Ohio, 
before her marriage; her name was Louise Mary Igoe. There 
are two sons and one daughter in the family. Theodore W. Miller 
and John Y. Miller (uncles) were graduated in the Class of 1897, 
and Robert A. Miller, a brother, in 1911. 

Lewis prepared at St. Paul's School, Concord, X. H., and 
belongs to the St. Paul's School Club. He wrote the words of 
"Bring on the Tiger," and was on the Freshman Glee Club; 



GRADUATES 



159 



received a second colloquy ap- 
pointment in Junior year ; is a 
member of the Cosmopolitan 
Club, and belongs to the Yale 
Battery. In Freshman year he 
roomed with Donald P. Robinson, 
at 653 Wright; with Robinson 
and Lawrence G. Williams in 
Sophomore year, at 173 Law- 
rance ; Junior year with Donald 
C. Fitts, at 482 Haughton, and 
in Senior year with Robert C. 
Booth, at 29 Vanderbilt. 

Miller expects to devote him- 
self to journalism and letters. 
His address is corner Witherbee 
Avenue and Winwood Road, Pel- 
ham Manor, ]^. Y. 




a^£.^ ?nii£A^ 



SIDNEY TROWBRIDGE 
MILLER, JR., "Sid," was born 
in Detroit, Mich., April 20, 1894. 

His father, Sidney T. Miller, 
was born in Detroit, January 4, 
1863, was graduated from Trinity 
College in the Class of 1885, and 
attended the Harvard Law School 
two years. He has always lived 
in Detroit, where he is senior 
partner in the law firm of Miller, 
Smith, Canfield, Paddock k 
Perry. Before her marriage 
Mrs. Miller was Lucy Trumbull 
Robinson, and her home in Hart- 
ford, Conn. One son and one 
daughter make up the family. 
Among his Yale relatives are 
Henry C. Robinson, '53 ; Lucius 




<kjL^^ T'XJjC'l^^J, 



160 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



F. Robinson, '85; Henry S. Robinson, '89; John T. Robinson, 
'93; Adrian V. S. Lambert, '93; Lucius F. Robinson, Jr., '19, 
and Barclay Robinson, '19. 

Sid i)rei)ared at the Detroit University School, and at the Hotch- 
kiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and belongs to the Hotchkiss Club. 
He was a member of the Mandolin and Banjo clubs for three 
years, and its leader in Senior year ; received a second colloquy 
appointment in Junior year; belongs to Alpha Delta Phi, the 
Big Four, the Red Coffin Club, the Trinity Club, the Barouche 
Club, and the Yale Battery. In Freshman year he roomed with 
Waters and Manierre at 646 Wright; Sophomore year with 
Manierre at 249 Durfee ; Junior year with H. O. Wood and Perry, 
at 481 Haughton, and with the same men in Senior year, at 
35 Yanderbilt. 

Miller expects to enter the Harvard Law School. His address 
is 524 Jefferson Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 



'Guy,' 



was born in Hongkong, 



KAI FOOK MOK, "Kai," 

China, February 2, 1894. 

His father, Mok Lai Chi, was born in Hongkong, January 10, 

1868. He is a graduate of Queen's College, Class of 1889, and 

is principal of the Morrison Eng- 
lish School of Hongkong. Mrs. 
Mok was Alice Lena Chow of 
iSTew Orleans, La. Of their eight 
sons and two daughters, nine sur- 
vive. Ivai Yan Mok, '15 S., is a 
brother. 

Kai prepared at Queen's Col- 
lege, Hongkong, China. He was 
awarded third division honors in 
Freshman year, and the second 
Barge Mathematical Prize; he 
received a high oration appoint- 
ment in Junior year; is a mem- 
ber of the Chinese Students' Club, 
of the Cosmopolitan Club, and 
Ps;i F])silon. Freshman year 
he roomed with Iv. Y. IMok, at 
333 York Street; So])homore 
year witli (\ H. Wang, at 333 




k^JP^.llUk^ 



GRADUATES 



161 



York Street ; Junior year with Mok, at 68 Tninibnll Street, and 
Senior year with Wang, at 84 Connectieut. 

Mok is undecided as to his future course, whether he will go 
in for Government service, for education, or for scientific pursuits. 
He will enter Columbia University. His permanent address is 
care the Y. M. C. A., Peking, China, but until 1919 mail will 
reach him if sent care Columbia University, New York City. 



AETHUE FLETCHEE 
MOEEILL was born in Port- 
land, Maine, January 25, 1895, 
but has lived in New Haven. 

His father, Arthur Boothby 
Morrill, was born in Portland, 
Ajaril 16, 1852, and was gradu- 
ated from Yale in 1873. He 
lives in New Haven, where he is 
principal of the State Normal 
School. Mrs. Morrill, who lived 
in Portland before her marriage, 
w^as Clementine Fletcher. Arthur 
is the only child. 

Art prepared at the New Ha- 
ven High School. In Junior 
year he received a first colloquy 
appointment. He lived at home 
during Freshman year; the re- 
maining three years he roomed with George E. Blodgett, at 218 
Farnam, 380 White, and 131 Welch. 

Morrill expects to go into the mercantile business ; his address 
is State Normal School, New Haven, Conn. 




QaM^^^ ^ rru-v^tjuz 



LAWEENCE SHACKELFOED MOEEIS, "Shack," "Larry," 
was born in Waterto'Rm, N. Y., December 25, 1894, and has lived 
in Albany, N. Y., for the last sixteen years. 

His father, Irving James Morris, is in the service of the state, 
being secretary of the New York State Department of Highways, 
with headquarters in Albany. Mrs. Morris was Lucille Phelps 
Shackelford. Lawrence is the only child. 

Shack prepared at the Albany Academy, Albany, N. Y. He 



162 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




LduntAAjtJL ^UAtJiMicAu) UJUvuyi^ 



was awarded second division hon- 
ors in Freshman year, a Berkeley 
Premium in Latin Composition, 
the C. Wyllys Betts Prize, the 
John Hubbard Curtis Prize, first 
division honors and an oration in 
Junior year; was president of tlie 
Berkeley Association ; an associ- 
ate member of the Dramatic 
Association, and belongs to the 
Yale Battery. He roomed dur- 
ing the entire course Avith Wil- 
liam Wyer and Howard H. Wiles, 
at 637 Wright, 167 Lawrance, 
414 Berkeley, and 106 Welch. 

Morris expects to devote him- 
self to journalism and letters ; 
his address is 901 Lancaster 
Street, Albany, N. Y. 




>^. 



CUlCCL^ 



'?7?atyirr? 



/ 



MARCUS MORTON, JR., 

"Marc," was born in West !N"ew- 
ton, Mass., August 13, 1893, and 
has lived there and in J^ewton- 
ville. 

His father, Marcus Morton, was 
born in Andover, Mass., April 27, 
1862, and was graduated from 
Yale in the Class of 1883. He 
is a Justice of the Superior Court 
of Massachusetts. His mother 
was Maria Eldredge Welch 
of West Newton, Mass., before 
her marriage. There is one son 
and one daughter in the family. 

Marc ])repared at Groton 
School, and is a member of the 
Groton Club. He Avas awarded 
first division honors in his Fresh- 



GRADUATES 



163 



man year, and tlie Lucius F. Robinson Latin Prize (second) 
in Sophomore year. In Junior year he received second divi- 
sion honors, and a philosophical oration appointment. He 
belongs to the Corinthian Yacht Club, to Zeta Psi, and Phi Beta 
Kappa, and is a second lieutenant in the Yale Battery. He has 
been out for crew and cross country. He roomed alone, at 559 
Pierson, in Freshman year; with E. F. Russell, at 227 Farnam, 
in Sophomore year; mth Russell and W. D. Goss, Jr., at 378 
White, in Junior year, and with Goss and H. W. Herring, at 
140 Welch, in Senior year. 

Morton will enter the Harvard Law School. His permanent 
address is ISTewtonville, Mass. 



JESSE LATHROP MOSS, 
JR., "Mose," was born in Lake 
Forest, 111., October 29, 1894, 
and has always lived there. 

His father, Jesse Lathrop Moss, 
was born in Westerly, R. I., ISTo- 
vember 12, 1848, and was gradu- 
ated from Yale in the Class of 
1869. He has spent most of 
his life in Chicago, where he is 
financial agent and secretary of 
the Newberry Library. Mrs. 
Moss, whose name was Harriet 
A. Calhoun, liA'ed in Morristown, 
X. J. ; there are two children 
living. 

Mose prepared at the Uni- 
versity School, Chicago, and at 
the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, 
Conn. ; he is a member of the Hotchkiss Club, and in Junior year 
received a dissertation appointment. He belongs to Beta Theta Pi 
and the Yale Battery. Freshman and Sophomore years he 
roomed with George Dovenmuehle, at 621 Wright and 229 Far- 
nam; Junior and Senior years wath L. S. Heely, at 340 White, 
and 113 Welch. 

Moss expects to go into business ; his address is Lake Forest, 111. 




^ 



^ 



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164 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




EDWARD DURAND MUL- 
LIGAN was born in Rochester, 
X. Y., September 7, 1894. 

His father, Edward Wright 
Mulligan, was born in Ontario, 
Canada, in 1858, and was gradu- 
ated from Rush Medical College 
with the degree of M.D. in 1883, 
and Bellevue Medical College 
with the degree of M.D. in 1884. 
He practices medicine and sur- 
gery in Rochester, X. Y. Mrs. 
Mulligan was Mary Stuart Du- 
rand of Rochester, N. Y. Tliere 
are two children living. John E. 
Durand, 76; Henry S. Durand, 
'81 ; John S. Durand, '81 ; Henry 
S. Durand, 1913 S., and Samuel E. 
Durand, 1919, are Yale relatives, 
Edward prepared at The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa., and 
belongs to The Hill School Club. He played second violin in 
the University Orchestra ; in Junior year was awarded third divi- 
sion honors and a first dispute appointment ; was out for lacrosse, 
and belongs to the Yale Battery. He roomed alone in Freshman 
year, at 556 Pierson ; the remaining three years with S. K. Viele, 
at 246 Durfee, 352 White, and 108 Welch. 

Mulligan expects to enter the Cornell Agricultural College, and 
to go in for scientific farming. His address is 788 East Avenue, 
Rochester, JST. Y. 



fe^^^^^'^STTViA 



L^<X^ 



ALEXANDER McKEE MUNSON, ''Bob," was born in 
Detroit, Mich., January 8, 1894. 

His father, Robert Hallani Munson, was born in Bradford, 
N. Y., January 27, 1857, and was graduated from Yale in 1879. 
He was engaged in the lumbering and financial business, but has 
now retired. Mrs. Munson, who lived in Pittsburgh, Pa., before 
her marriage, was Olivia McKee. Two sons and one daughter are 
living. Edgar and George S. Munson, 1904, Curtis Munson, 1916 
(brother), and C. LaRue Munson, '75 L., are Yale relatives. 



GRADUATES 



165 



Bob prepared at the Anglo- 
Saxon School, Paris, France, and 
at St. Paul's School, Concord, 
X. H., and belongs to the St. 
Paul's School Club. He was on 
the Freshman Hockey Team, 
captain of the Sophomore Crew, 
and on the second University 
Crew, 1915, and has his numerals. 
He was awarded the George De- 
Forest Lord Scholarship ; has 
contributed to the Yale Literary 
Magazine; belongs to the Birth- 
day Club, the Elizabethan Club, 
of which he is secretary, the 
Jumblies, Psi Upsilon, Senior 
Class Book Committee, Wolf's 
Head, and the Yale Battery. For 
the entire four years he roomed 

with his brother, Curtis B. Munson, and C. Morgan Aldrich, at 
553 Pierson, 338 Durfee, 489 Haughton, and 30 Vanderbilt. 

Munson expects to go into business; his address is 46 "West 
Fifty-second Street, j^ew York City. 




Q m^u in 



(MJAirii 



CURTIS BURTON" MUNSOX, "Curt," was born in Wash- 
ington, D. C, February 9, 1892, and has lived in Bay Mills, Mich. ; 
Xew York City; Paris, France; Concord, jST. H. ; Boston, Mass.; 
Madrid, Spain; Montreal, Quebec; Detroit, Mich., and Duluth, 
Minn. 

His father, Robert Hallam Munson, was born in Bradford, X. Y., 
January 27, 1857, and graduated from Yale in 1879. He was 
engaged in business as a lumberman and financier, formerly of 
the Hall k Munson Company, but is now out of active busi- 
ness. Olivia (McKee) Munson, his mother, formerly resided 
in Pittsburgh. Alexander McKee Munson, 1916, is his brother. 
Other Yale relatives include C. LaRue Munson, '75 L. ; George S. 
Munson, '04, '07 L., and Edgar Munson, '04, '07 L. 



166 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



With his brother, Curt attended the Anglo-Saxon School, at 
Antcnil, Paris, France, and St. Paul's School, Concord, and he 
also is a member of the St. Paul's School Club. He was on the Lit 
Board; took part in Dramatics in Freshman and Senior years; 
belongs to the University Club; Corinthian Yacht Club; Psi 

Upsilon ; Elizabethan Club; 
Pundits; Grillroom Grizzlies; 
Birthday Club, and Scroll and 
Key. He is Class Historian, 
and was a Fence Orator. He 
has roomed Avitli his brother, 
A. M. Munson, and C. Morgan 
Aldrich during the entire course, 
at 553 Pierson, 338 Durfee, 489 
Hanghton, and 30 Yanderbilt. 

Munson expects to devote him- 
self to journalism and letters. 
His address is care Hayden, 
Stone & Company, 25 Broad 
Street, Wew York City. 




(j/n&a ^-iiftXiiL^ 'li4jjuAA^(^\^ 



GARDJ^TER MURPHY, ''Murph," "Gard," ''Speed," was born 
in Chillicothe, Ohio, July 8, 1895, and has lived in Montgomery, 
Ala., New York City, and Concord, Mass. 

His father, Edgar Gardner Murphy, was born in Fort Smith, 
Ark., August 31, 1869, and also lived in San Antonio, Texas, in 
Montgomery, Ala., and in New York City. He graduated from 
the University of the South in 1888, and was given the honorary 
degree of M.A. by Yale in 1904, and D.C.L. by the University of 
the South in 1911. He died in New York City June 23, 1913. 
Mr. Murphy was for twelve years a clergyman, and then left the 
ministry to go into educational and social service work in the 
South, spending several years in Montgomery, Ala., and other 



GRADUATES 



167 




cities. He was Secretary of the 
Southern Educational Board and 
author of "Problems of the Pres- 
ent South" and other books. 
Mrs. Murphy, who lived in Con- 
cord, Mass., before her marriage, 
was Maud King. There are two 
sons in the family, DuBose Mur- 
phy, Yale 1915, being a brother. 

Mui-ph prepared at the New 
Haven High School, and at The 
Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, 
Conn. He held the Woolsey 
Scholarship, and a Waterman 
Scholarship. He tied for the 
Chamberlain Entrance Prize in 
Greek; received a first grade 
Berkeley Premium in Latin, 
the Winthrop Prize, and second 

Thacher Prize. He received first division honors in Freshman 
year, and was on the Freshman Glee Club; is president of the 
UniA^ersity Debating Association, vice president of Delta Sigma 
Rho, and belongs to Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi. In Junior 
year he was awarded first division honors, and a philosophical 
oration appointment. Freshman year he roomed alone, at 545 
Pierson; Sophomore and Junior years with Harlan B. Perrins 
and Donald A. Quarles, at 188 Farnam and 339 White; Senior 
year with Quarles and Malcolm J. Baber, at 73 Vanderbilt. 

Murphy expects to continue his studies at the Harvard Graduate 
School, and to go into educational work. His address is 88 Main 
Street, Concord, Mass. 



GctyicC-y-iuA^ /?7Z*-<^yci-<^^ 



JOSEPH THOMAS NEWMAX was born in Xew Haven, 
Conn., May 5, 1895. 

His father, Thomas F. Newman, was born in Norwich, Conn., 
November 29, 1860, and is a resident of New Haven, where he 
is employed by Peck Brothers & Company. Mrs. Newman, who 
is also from New Haven, was Ellen Monahan before marriage; 
there are four sons in the family. Walter E. Hope, ex- 12 Art, 



168 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




U/irii^riA^-'. 



*J- fijUimuuyt^ 



Jeromiah J. Coliane, '98 M., and 
Mary G. Sullivan, Avho received 
a certificate from the Music 
School in 1909, are relatives. 

Joseph prepared at the Xew 
Haven High School, and received 
a second colloquy appointment 
in Junior year at college. He 
roomed at home the entire four 
years. 

J^ewman expects to become a 
physician, and will continue his 
course in the Yale School of 
Medicine. His address is 50 
Lawrence Street, New Haven, 
Conn. 




?CAt£Av^_^ ^!XM fiu^Ji^Zi^ 



HARLAN FAY NEWTON, 

^'Harlie," "Fay," "Fig," was 
born in Winchester, Mass., Feb- 
ruary 8, 1895, and has lived there 
and in Reading, Mass. 

His father. Reverend Darius 
Augustus Newton, was born in 
Westboro, Mass., October 1, 1855, 
and was graduated from Am- 
herst, with the degree of B.A., in 
1879. He has been located in 
Lexington, Stoneham, Winchester, 
and Reading, Mass., and is a 
clergyman, in the Congregational 
Church. His mother, Marion 
Chandler Stone, was also from 
Westboro. Of their five children 
four are living. 

Harlie prepared at the Win- 



GRADUATES 



169 



Chester High School, and at Phillips-Andover, and is a member 
of the Andover Club. He was a member of the Freshman Glee 
Club, was on the second Freshman Crew, the first Sophomore 
Crew, and on the Junior and third University Crews. In Junior 
year he was given a first colloquy appointment. He roomed at 
648 Wright, with George W. Goodwin, in Freshman year; with 
Charles F. i^eave and Goodwin, at 166 Lawrance, in Sophomore 
year; the two remaining years with Xeave, at 497 Haughton and 
139 Welch. 

Xewton is undecided between the ministry and medicine, and 
Avill enter either the Harvard Medical School, or Union Theo- 
logical Seminary. His address is 56 Linden Street, Reading, 
Mass. 



JOH^ SCHADE NORTON, "Jack," was born in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., July 7, 1893, and has also lived in Mt. Vernon, and in 
Springfield, Mass. 

■His father, Edward Hiram iSTorton, was born in Richmond, 
Mass., June 17, 1862, and was graduated from Yale in 1887. He 
has spent the greater part of his life in Springfield, Mass., Avhere 
he is a publisher, being manager 
of the subscription department of 
the G. & C. Merriam Company, 
publishers of Webster's Diction- 
ary. Mrs. Norton, who lived in 
Brooklyn before she married, was 
Martha Schade; she died April 
21, 1897. There are four sons 
in the family. 

Jack prepared for college at 
the Springfield High School, and 
the Berkshire Hills School. He 
was formerly a member of the 
Class of 1915. He was manager 
of the University Tennis Team, a 
member of the minor Athletic 
Association; Solomons; and 
Zeta Psi. Freshman and Sopho- 
more years he roomed with 
Chandler Bennitt, at 600 Pierson 




j^^rU-u^ /C 



170 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



and 181 Lawrance; with Bennitt and Ralph Gordon in Junior 
year, at 342 White, and with Bennitt at 569 Pierson in Senior 
year. 

Norton expects to go into business; his address is 11 Maplewood 
Terrace, Springfield, Mass. 




LAURENCE GILMAN 
NOYES, ''Larry," was born in 
St. Paul, Minn., May 26, 1893. 

His father, Charles Phelps 
Noyes, was born in Lyme, Conn., 
April 24, 1842, and is in business 
in St. Paul, Minn., under the firm 
name of Noyes Brothers & Cut- 
ler, Inc., wholesale druggists and 
importers. Emily Hoffman (Gil- 
man) Noyes, his mother, was a 
resident of New York City, and 
of her three sons and three daugh- 
ters, four are living. Among his 
Yale i-elatives are W. A. Brown, 
1886; C. H. Ludington, 1887; 
W. H. Ludington, 1887 ; W. S. G. 
Noyes, 1891; C. N. Loveland, 
1894; T.M. Brown, 1897; A. C. 
Ludington, 1902; D. R. Noyes, 1905; C. R. Noyes, 1905; R. H. 
Noyes, 1908; J. C. Brown, 2d, 1915; W. A. Brown, Jr., 1916; 
R. S. Saltus, Jr., 1918, and C. T. Ludington, 1919. 

Larry prepared at the Adirondack-Florida School, and at The 
Hill School, Pottstown, Pa. He was a member of the Apollo Glee 
Club, was on the Dramatic eligibility list, and belongs to the 
Squash Team, the Yale Battery, Zeta Psi, and the Elizabethan 
Club. Freshman year he roomed with Ralph Weston Chisolm, at 
634 Wright ; Sophomore and Junior years with Chisolm and 
Robert James Jewett, at 250 Durfee and 373 White; Senior year 
with David Hamilton and Lewis Leonard Bredin, at 68 Vanderbilt. 
Noyes is planning to become an architect, and will enter the 
Columbia Architectural School, in New York City. His address 
is 89 Virginia Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 



<^< 



OUUXJLVUU^ 



Q/Mmx^ 



ta. 



GRADUATES 



171 



HAEOLD HOEN NUTE was 

born in St. Louis, Mo., June 2, 
1894, and has lived there and in 
New York City. 

His father, John Wesley N"ute, 
was born in Burlington, Maine, 
December 6, 1860, and was grad- 
uated from Lafayette as a civil 
engineer in 1882. He died in 
Portland, Maine, October 5, 1908. 
Mrs. Nute was Annie Belle Lau- 
bach of Easton, Pa. There are 
three sons, George H. Nute, 
1914 S., William L. Xute, 1914, 
and Harold. 

Harold prepared at Phillips 
Academy, Andover, and belongs 
to the Andover Club. He was 
given third division honors in 

Junior year; has been out for crew; belongs to Beta Tlieta Pi, 
and the Yale Battery. During Freshman year he roomed with 
John M. McHatton, at 617 Wright; with McHatton in Sophomore 
year, at 195 Farnam; with McHatton and Richard D. Pierce, at 
475 Haughton in Junior year, and alone in Senior year, at 22 
Vanderbilt. 

Nute is undecided about the future; his address is 375 Park 
Avenue, New York City. 




/^^^y^"^^ 



WESLEY MARIOi^ OLER, JR., '^Wes," "Doc," was born 
in Baltimore, Md., December 15, 1891, and has lived there and 
in Larchmont, N. Y. 

Wesley Marion Oler, his father, was born in Baltimore, April 
3, 1856, and is now a resident of Larchmont, IS". Y. He is 
president of the Knickei'bocker Ice Company. His mother was a 
resident of Old Point Comfort, Va., before her marriage; her 
name was Elizabeth Kimberly. There are three children. Clarke 
Oler Kimberly, Yale 1917, is a relative. 

Wes prepared at St. Paul's School, Garden City, L. L, X. Y., 
at the DeWitt Clinton High School, and at the Pawling School, 



172 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Pawling, N. Y., and belongs to 
the Pawling School Club. He 

was captain of the Freshman 
Track Team ; was on the Uni- 
versity Track Team for three 
years, and captain during Senior 
year. He has nuuierals and a 
"Y" ; was on the Sophomore 
German Committee; belongs to 
Zeta Psi, Ptombers, Little Yel- 
low Dogs, and is president of 
Sigma Delta Psi, He received 
a first colloquy appointment in 
Junior year ; is on the Class Day 
Committee, the Triennial Com- 
mittee, and belongs to the Yale 
Battery and Skull and Bones. He 
roomed with John Graves Put- 
nam in Freshman year, at 647 

Wright; with Putnam at 159 Lawrance in Sophomore year; 

with Putnam and Clarke Oler Kimberly, at 447 Haughton, in 

Junior year, and with the same men at 13 Vanderbilt in Senior 

year. 

Oler expects to go into the manufacturing business ; his address 

is Larchmont, N. Y. 




A 




ROBERT STONE OLIVER, "Bob," was born in Spokane, 
Wash., October 13, 1894, but has lived most of his life in and 
near l^ew Haven, Conn. 

His father, Thomas Beattie Oliver, was born in Rochester, 
N. Y., October 25, 1861, and has lived there, in Spokane, Wash., 
and in New Haven, where he is now engaged in the manufactur- 
ing business, as treasurer of the A. B. Hendryx Company. Mrs. 
Oliver, who was also from Rochester, was Clarissa Louise Stone. 
One son and one daughter comprise the family. 

Bob prepared at the New Haven High School. He was on the 
Freshman Glee Club, and the Lacrosse Team in 1915. He received 



GRADUATES 



173 



a first dispute appointment in 
Junior year, is on the Student 
Council, Class Secretary, and be- 
longs to Beta Tlieta Pi, and the 
Elihu Club. Freshman year he 
roomed with Walter Toole, at 
611 Wright; in Sophomore and 
Junior years with Walter Leon- 
ard and Marshall Williams, at 
206 Fayerweather and 376 White ; 
in Senior year with Leonard and 
Robert Cornish, at 116 Welch. 

Oliver expects to go into the 
manufacturing business; his ad- 
dress is 166 East Rock Road, 
ISTew Haven, Conn. 




C^f^i^J^^u^ 



JAMES WHITMAI^ OS- 
GOOD, "Jim," "Ozzy," "Oz," 
"Jimmie," was born in Washing- 
ton, D. C, January 17, 1895. 

His father, Whitman Osgood, 
was born in Washington, D. C, 
]^ovember 12, 1865, and was 
graduated from Columbian (now 
George Washington) University 
with the degree of LL.B., in the 
Class of 1892, He has lived in 
Chicago, 111., and in Washington, 
where he is president of the 
Washington Printing Company. 
Marie Laurance (Foppiano) Os- 
good, his mother, lived in Mem- 
phis, Tenn., before her marriage ; 
one son and one daughter are in 
the family. 





^r nAyCoiZA^ 




174 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Jim i)repart'd at the Friends' School, Washington, D. C. He 
was a member of the Apollo and University Banjo and Mandolin 
Clubs, and in the College Choir. He played on the Lacrosse 
Team, was manager in Senior year; was on the Class Basketball 
Team and received second division honors in Junior year, and 
an oration appointment. He belongs to the Southern Club, 
"H. O. C." and Alpha Delta Phi. He has roomed with Edward 
T. Miller the entire four years, at 538 Pierson, 393 Berkeley, 
487 Haughton, and 77 Connecticut. 

Osgood will go into the law, and expects to enter George "Wash- 
ington University, Washington, D. C. His address is Adams 
Mill Koad and Lanier Place, X. W., Washington, D. C. 



JOSEPH EDWARD OTIS, JR., "Joe," was born November 
19, 1892, in Chicago, 111. 

His father, Joseph Edward Otis, was born in Chicago, March 5, 
1868, and belongs to the Class of 1890 S. He has always lived in 
Chicago, where he is engaged in banking, in the Central Trust 
Company of Illinois. His mother, also of Chicago, was Emily 
Palmer Webster. The family consists of three sons and two 

daughters. Yale relatives include 
a brother, G. W. Otis, 1919; two 
uncles, George H. Webster, ex- 
1887, and Stuart Webster, 1892, 
and Herman A. Webster, 1900 S. 
Joe prepared at St. Paul's 
School, Concord, N. H., and at 
the Harstrom School, Xorwalk, 
Conn. He is president of the 
Harstrom Club, and a member of 
the St. Paul's School Club; was 
secretary of the Minor Athletic 
Association, manager of the 
Hockey Team ; and belongs to 
the University Club, Delta Kappa 
Epsilon, and the Elihu Club. 
Freshman year he roomed with 
A. C. Newell and P. Schwartz, 
at 645 Wright; Sophomore year 
with Schwartz, at 242 Durfee; 




^a^^TZ^ ^^^^ 






GRADUATES 



175 



Junior year with D. C. Malcoiu and K. H. Coleman, at 336 White, 
and Senior year with D. C. Malconi, at 27 Vanderbilt. 

Otis plans to go into manufacturing; his address is 1441 jSTorth 
State Street, Chicago, 111. 



DEAN CASTLEMAIvT PAUL 
was born in Washington, D. C, 
June 9, 1894, and his home has 
always been in Washington. 

His father, Joseph Paul, who 
has lived for most of his life in 
Washington, D. C, is noAv re- 
tired. His mother was Elva 
Dean of Duluth, Minn., before 
her marriage. Yale relatives in- 
clude Edward C. Dean, '00 S., 
and Frank H. Snell, '82. 

Dean prepared at Lawrence- 
ville, and belongs to the Law- 
renceville Club. He was on Class 
Basketball and Baseball teams, 
and in Junior year received a 
dissertation appointment. He be- 
longs to Alpha Delta Phi, and the 
Red Coffin Club. The first three years he roomed with C. T. 
Lewis, at 251 Crown Street, 269 Durfee, and 438 Fayerweather; 
with Lewis and John Smith in Senior year, at 37 Vanderbilt. 

Paul intends to go into business ; his address is Oak Lawn, 
Washington, D. C. 




^ 



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C /2c^^. 



ISAAC HEYWARD PECK, "Peckie," was born in Roslyn, 
L. I., June 10, 1893, and has lived there and in Flushing, N. Y. 

His father. Reverend Isaac Peck, was born in Flushing, Janu- 
ary 15, 1858, and was graduated from Yale in the Class of 1879. 
He was a clergyman of the Episcopal Church, and died in Brook- 
lyn, Conn., June 20, 1911. Mrs. Peck, w^ho was Mary Constantia 
(Smith) Heyward, was a resident of Kinderhook, N. Y. Hey ward 



176 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




^-<3>|--;v-v^t>^^<,rL0^e^»^ 



is the only child. Besides his 
father, Yale relatives include a 
great-great-grandfather, Judge 
Isaac Mills, 1786, and a great- 
grandfather, Dr. Timothy Phelps 
Beers, 1808. 

Peckie prepared at the Hoosac 
School. He belongs to Beta Theta 
Pi. Freshman year he roomed 
alone, at 578 Pierson ; Sopho- 
more year with P. S. Cornish, at 
203 Farnam; alone in Junior 
year, at 384 Berkeley, and with 
M. H. Williams in Senior year, 
at 73 Connecticut. 

Peck expects to go into busi- 
ness; his address is 25 Lawrence 
Avenue, Flushing, N. Y. 



feanklunt head per- 

KIK'S, "Perk," 'Trank," was 
born in Chicago, 111., September 
4, 1894. 

His father, Herbert Farring- 
ton Perkins, was born October 18, 
1864, in Constantinople, Turkey, 
while his father was a professor 
at Robert College, and was gradu- 
ated from Yale in the Class of 
1887. He is located in Chicago, 
where he is division manager of 
the International Harvester Com- 
])any. He is president of the 
Yale Club of Chicago. Mrs. 
Perkins lived in Chicago before 
her marriage; her name was 
Margaret Dana Head. Franklin 
has three sisters. 
Perk prepared at the Chicago Latin School, and at Hotchkiss, 
and is a member of the clubs associated with these schools. He 




GRADUATES 



177 



was awarded second division honors in Fresliman year, and be- 
longed to the Freshman Mandolin Club. In Junior year he 
received third division honors, a high oration appointment, 
and was on the Lacrosse Team. He is a member of the Yale 
Battery and of Beta Theta Pi. Freshman year he roomed with 
P. K. Cady, at 567 Pierson ; the remaining three years with L. L. 
Ricketts and P. K. Cady, at 204 Farnam, 406 Berkeley, and 
16 Vanderbilt. 

Perkins intends to go into the manufacturing business; his 
address is 6106 Kenmore Avenue, Chicago, 111. 



HARLAX BASSETT PERRINS, "Harly," was born in 
Ansonia, Conn., April 14, 1894, and has lived there and in 
Seymour, Conn. 

His father, Thomas Asbury Perrins, was born in Philadelphia, 
Pa., March 3, 1857, and has spent most of his life in Con- 
necticut, where he is engaged in business as a mechanical engineer, 
being superintendent of the Rimmon Eyelet Company. His 
mother, Emily Andrews Bassett, was from Seymour. Of her three 
children, Harlan is the only one living. 

Harly prepared at the Sey- 
mour High School. He received 
third division honors in Fresh- 
man year; first division honors 
and a high oration in Junior year. 
He is a member of Phi Beta 
Kappa, Sigma Xi and Xu Sigma 
Xu. Freshman year he roomed 
with G. D. Butler, at 531 Pier- 
son ; Sophomore and Junior 
years with Donald A. Quarles 
and Gardner Murphy, at 188 
Farnam, and 339 White; Senior 
year he roomed with J. R. Scott 
at 98 Park Street. 

Perrins expects to continue his 
work in the Yale School of Medi- 
cine, and ultimately to practice 
medicine. His address is 197 
Pearl Street, Seymour, Conn. 




/s/c^^'^J^ ^. 



178 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




HOYT OGDET^ PERKY, 

''Hop," was born in Soutliport, 
Conn., July 19, 1893. 

His father, John Hoyt Perry, 
was born in Southport, Conn., 
July 26, 1848, and was gradu- 
ated from Yale with the degree 
of B.A. in the Class of 1870, and 
from Columbia with the degree 
of LL.B. in 1872. He is a 
lawyer, now retired. Mrs. Perry 
was Frances Virginia Bulkley of 
Southport. Four sons and one 
daughter make up the family. 
Among Yale relatives are Oliver 
H. Perry, 1834; George Bulk- 
ley, 1855 ; William Bulkley, 1861 ; 
James E. Bulkley, 1863; Henry 
H. Perry, 1869 S. ; Winthrop H. 
Perry, 1876; George B. Perry, 1898; J. Walter Perry, e.r-1901 S., 
and Richard A. Perry, e:c-1905. 

Hop prepared at the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and 
belongs to the Hotchkiss Club. He is a member of the Corin- 
thian Yacht Club, Alpha Delta Phi, and Sigma Delta Psi. 
Freshman and Sophomore years he roomed with H. Ogden Wood, 
Jr., at 666 Wright and 223 Farnani ; Junior and Senior years 
with Wood and Sidney T. Miller, Jr., at 481 Haughton and 35 
Vanderbilt. 

Perry expects to enter the Harvard Law School; his address 
is Southport, Conn. 



n> 



\\cjvyf O . U 




MARION MILTON" PHARR was born in Saltillo, Texas, 
November 18, 1893, and has lived there and in Ridgeway, Texas, 
and Fort Worth. 

His father, Samuel Milton Pharr, has lived the greater part 
of his life in Texas, where he is a farmer and stockman. Mrs. 
Pharr was also a Texan, and of her seven sons and four daughters, 
nine are now living. Her name was Margaret Jane Stevenson. 



GRADUATES 



179 



Clyde Pliarr, B.A. 1906, Ph.D. 
1910, is a half brother. 

Marion prepared at the East 
Texas N'ormal College, Com- 
merce, Texas, and was graduated 
■with the degree of B.A. in 1914, 
entering Yale in Senior year. 
He roomed "vvith R. L. Heckert, 
at 126 Welch. 

Pliarr is undecided as to the 
future ; he may go into the trans- 
portation business, or may be- 
come a teacher. His address is 
Ridgeway, Texas. 




Vi .>H. (f^LoAyi^ 



ROBERT EMMET PHELAI^. 

was born in ISTew Haven, Conn., 
December 31, 1893. 

His father, Richard F. Phelan, 
Avas born in N'ew York City, De- 
cember 1, 1860, and is connected 
with the signal department of the 
Xew York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad Company. His 
mother, whose maiden name was 
Ellen Agnes McDermott, lived in 
Derby before her marriage. Of 
their four sons and two daugh- 
ters, four are now living. 

Phelan prepared at the N'ew 
Haven High School and has 
roomed at home throughout his 
course. He is taking the first 
year work at the School of 

Medicine and expects to complete the course there. His perma- 
nent address is 128 Plymouth Street, New Haven, Conn. 




//V^XY. QA^Xy'T^tnjM/ 



180 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



PAUL STETSON" PHEXIX 

was boru in Portland, Maine, 
.Taiiuary 8, 189-1, and lias lived 
there, in Boston, Mass., Brook- 
line, Mass., Hampton, Va., and 
Montreal, Quebec. 

His father, Charles Edward 
Phenix, was born in Portland, 
Maine, April 11, 1869, and is in 
the hotel business, being manager 
of the Windsor Hotel, Montreal, 
Quebec, Canada. His mother, 
Angeline Gerrish Stetson, was a 
resident of Portland. There are 
two children, a son and a 
daughter. 

■ tutor, at the Choate School, and 

at Phillips-Exeter. He is a mem- 
ber of the Exeter Club, of Phi Beta Kappa, and Alpha Delta Phi. 
Freshman year he roomed at 451 Fayerweather, with Daniel 
Willard, Jr. ; the remaining three years with Willard, at 258 
Durfee, 443 Fayerweather, and 24 Vanderbilt. 

Phenix is undecided about his future career, but may devote 
himself to scientific farming. His address is 1 Thomas Street, 
Portland, Maine. 




EICHAED DE ZEXG PIERCE, ''Dick," was born in Hyde 
Park, 111., April 20, 1892, and has lived in Chicago, 111., and 
Xewton, Mass. 

His father, Richard Henry Pierce, was born in Woonsocket, 
R. I., November 20, 1860, and was graduated from Yale in 1882, 
and from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1885. He 
is a consulting engineer, now retired, and has lived in Chicago, 
and in Boston, Mass. His mother, Carrie de Zeng Morrow, lived 
in Green Bay, Wis., and died April 7, 1906. Richard is the only 
child. 

Dick prepared at the Berkshire School, Sheffield, Mass. He won 
the first MacLaughlin Prize in English in Freshman year. He was 



GRADUATES 



181 



on the University Golf Teniu, its 
manager, and lias numerals. He 
was also on the Freshman Track 
Squad. He belongs to the Acacia 
Fraternity, and to the University 
Club. Freshman year he roomed 
with Clarence Archibald Veasey, 
Jr., at 630 Wright; Sophomore 
year with Melbert B. Cary, Jr., 
at 191 Fayerweather ; Junior 
year with John M. McHatton 
and Harold Horn ISTute, at 475 
Haughton, and Senior year alone, 
at 26 Vanderbilt. 

Pierce expects to go into the 
bond and banking business; his 
address is 462 Walinit Street, 
Newtonville, Mass. 




ARTHUR DURHAM PLATT, 

"Bull," "Art," was born in Port- 
land, Ore., August 22, 1895. 

His father, Harrison Gray 
Piatt, was born in Milford, 
Conn., August 24, 1866, and was 
graduated from Yale in the Class 
of 1888. He practices law in 
Portland, Ore., with the firm of 
Piatt & Piatt. Mrs. Piatt's 
maiden name was N^ellie Dur- 
ham, and her home in Portland. 
Four of their five children are 
living. Besides his father, an 
uncle, Robert T. Piatt, '89, '92 L., 
is a Yale graduate. 

Bull prepared at the Allen 
Preparatory School, Portland, 
and at Phillips-Andover, and 




/\yt.^^.^u^b.mat 



182 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



belongs to the Aiidover Club. He received a first colloquy 
appointment in Junior year. Freshman and Sophomore years 
he roomed with Frank W. Gilbert, at 629 Wright, and 180 Law- 
rance; Junior and Senior years with Wells R. Ritch at 453 
Fayerweather, and 126 Welch. 

Piatt plans to enter the Harvard Law School; his address is 
211 East Fifty-fifth Street, Portland, Ore. 




NORMAN" HUNTINGTON 
PLATT, "Norm," was born in 
Morristown, N. J., January 25, 
1894. 

His father, Charles Davis 
Piatt, was born in Elizabeth, 
N. J., in 1856, and was gradu- 
ated from Williams in 1877. He 
is a teacher, and principal of the 
Dover (N. J.) High School. 
Mrs. Piatt, whose name was 
Mary Jane West, was a resident 
of Williamstown, Mass. Of their 
seven children, five are now liv- 
ing. W. Wallis Piatt, '02, is a 
Yale relative. 

Norm prepared at the Dover 
High School, and at Phillips- 
Andover, and is a member of the 
Andover Club. He received second division honors in Freshman 
year, and won numerals in track; he was on the University 
Cross Country Team three years, and the University Track 
Team one year. In Junior year he received first division honors, 
and was awarded a high oration appointment. Freshman year 
he roomed with Alvin B. Gurley, at 262 York Street; Sopho- 
more and Junior years with Robert C. Booth, at 199 Farnam, and 
465 Fayerweather; Senior year with Allen H. Boardman and 
Harold S. Gulliver, at 23 Vanderbilt. 

Piatt is undecided as to his future career. His address is 
Dover, N. J. 



yunmoAiJ^ ^A^ 



GRADUATES 



183 



RUSSELL HARRISON POL- 
HAMUS, ''Riiss," was born in 
Fort Wayne, Ind., September 15, 
1894, and has lived there and at 
Long Beach, Calif. 

His father, Albert Z. Polhamus, 
was born in Fort Wayne, Ind., 
August 21, 1861, and lives there, 
engaged in the manufacturing 
business. Mrs. Polhamus was a 
resident of Grand Rapids, Mich. ; 
her name was Matilda Russell. 
Two sons and one daughter are 
in the family. 

Russ prepared at the Tome 
School, Port Deposit, Md., and 
belongs to the Tome School Club. 
He was on the Freshman Glee 
Club, and received third division 

honors and a second colloquy appointment in Junior year. He 
belongs to Alpha Delta Phi, and was on the Eli Book Committee. 
He roomed alone in Freshman year, at 525 Pierson ; with Arthur 
R. Jones and Harry A. Torson the remaining three years, at 
161 Lawrance, 457 Fayerweather, and 21 Vanderbilt. 

Polhamus expects to go into business; his address is R. F. D. 11, 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 




(J^^.(J.,-U-K.w^ 



GILBERT EDWIX PORTER, 3d, "Gil," ''Gilly," "Port," 
was born in Chicago, 111., July 19, 1892. 

His father, Gilbert Edwin Porter, was born in Eau-Claire, Wis., 
in 1865, and attended Wisconsin University, and Northwestern 
Law School. He is an attorney at law in Chicago, 111., with 
the firm of Isham, Lincoln & Beale. His mother, Edith (Lor- 
imer) Porter, lived in Boston, Mass., before her marriage, and 
died at Elmhurst, 111., October 8, 1915. Of her three sons, two 
are living, Burford Lorimer Porter, Yale 1919, being one. George 
H. Lorimer, ex-1888, is a Yale relative. 

Gil prepared at the Chicago Latin School, and at Phillips- 
Andover, and belongs to the Andover Club, the Chicago Latin 



184 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



School Club, and the Harstroni 
School Club. He was manager 
of the Freshman Glee Club; 
Freshman Fence Orator; on the 
Apollo Glee Club; a member of 
the Sophomore German Com- 
mittee, the Junior Promenade 
Committee, and the Class Sup- 
]ier Committee; and is a cup 
man. He belongs to the Birth- 
day Club, Sword and Gun Club, 
"Wliiffenpoofs, Delta Kappa Ep- 
silon, and Skull and Bones. 
Freshman year he roomed with 
M. K. Wilson, D. C. Shepard, 
D. H. Mudge and L. G. Tighe, 
at 266 York Street; Sophomore 
year with the same men at 239 
Durfee; with Shepard, Mudge 
and Tighe in Junior year, at 398 Berkeley, and with Shepard, 
Mudge, Tighe and D. O. Stewart, at 39 Vanderbilt in Senior year. 
Porter plans to go into the transportation business. His address 
is Elmhurst, 111. 




^UUdC Cr.^tfdiy 



unz 



LYMA^ EDWARDS PORTER, "Lyme," was born in Xew 
Haven, Conn., J^ovember 7, 1893, and with the exception of tAvo 
years in Beloit, Wis., has always lived there. 

His father, Frank Chamberlain Porter, was born in Beloit, 
Wis., January 5, 1859, and was graduated from Beloit with the 
degree of B.A. in 1880, and M.A. in 1883. He received the degree 
of B.D. at Yale in 1886, and Ph.D. in 1889, and the degree of 
D.D. at Beloit in 1897. He is Winkley Professor of Biblical 
Theology in Yale University. Mrs. Porter was Delia Wood 
Lyman, and her home was in jSTew Haven. There are tAvo 
sons, Lyman, and Quincy Porter, 1919. Other relatives include 
Charles S. Lyman, '37 (grandfather), and Chester W. Lyman, 
'82 (uncle). 

Lyme prepared at the ISTew Haven High School, and at the 
Taft School, Watertown, Conn., and belongs to the Taft School 



GRADUATES 



185 



Club. He took part in ''Quentin 
Durward," and in Junior year 
received a second colloquy ap- 
pointment. Freshman year lie 
roomed with J. M. Butler and 
J. V. Vincent, at 659 Wright; 
Sophomore and Junior years 
with Washington Porter, Jr., at 
127 Welch and 476 Haughton; 
with H. C. Bailey and J. S. G. 
Bolton in Senior year, at 78 
Connecticut. 

Porter will probably go into 
educational work; his address is 
266 Bradley Street, :N'ew Haven, 
Conn. 




C^LtAra.'\.^<^ f »-t^te.-v. 



WASHINGTON" PORTER, 

JR., ''Wash," ''Washie," was 
born in Chicago, 111., December 
28, 1893. 

His father, Washington Por- 
ter, was bom in Garden Prairie, 
111., October 26, 1843, and has 
spent his life in Chicago, where 
he manages his own real estate, 
and is president of the Majestic 
Building Company. Frances Pau- 
line (Lee) Porter, his mother, 
lived in Cincinnati, Ohio, before 
her marriage. There are two 
sons and one daughter in the 
family; Roy McWilliams, '97, 
is an uncle. 

Wash prepared at the Har- 
vard School, Chicago, and the 




^//£ii<ay^Li-''^^^<^r 




186 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



University High School. He received third division honors in 
Freshman year, and a dissertation appointment in Junior year. 
He roomed alone in Freshman year at 603 Wright ; with Lyman 
Edwards Porter in Sophomore and Junior years, at 127 Welch 
and 476 Haughton. 

Porter graduated with the Class of 1915. He was recently 
elected vice president of the Majestic Building Company. His 
address is 4013 Lake Park Avenue, Chicago, 111. 




ROWLAND FARWELL 
POTTER, "Roily," was born 
in Saginaw, Mich., September 13, 
1893, and has lived in Detroit, 
Mich., and Brookline, Mass. 

Henry Camp Potter, Jr., his 
father, spent most of his life in 
Michigan, where he was engaged 
in banking, being vice president 
of the People's State Bank. He 
died in Detroit, Mich., in 1908. 
Bertha (Hamilton) Potter, his 
mother, was a resident of Sagi- 
naw, Mich. Three sons are liv- 
ing. Yale relatives include John 
H. Potter, 1911 S., and Stephen 
Potter, 1919. 

Rowland prepared at Hotch- 
kiss, and belongs to the Hotchkiss 
Club. He belonged to the Freshman Glee Club; played Class 
Baseball; and is a member of Psi TJpsilon, and the Elihu Club. 
Freshman year he roomed with E. E. Converse and G. W. Car- 
rington, at 657 Wright; the remaining three years with R. S. 
Young, at 126 Welch, 448 Fayerweather, and 6 Vanderbilt. 

Potter expects to go into manufacturing; his address is 233 
Clinton Road, Brookline, Mass. 



6f^^w^^ T^C/ktu, 



CHARLES PRATT was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., October 
13, 1892. 

His father, Frederick Bailey Pratt, was born in Brooklyn, 



GRADUATES 



187 




February 22, 1865, and was grad- 
uated from Amherst with the 
degree of B.A. in 1887. He is 
secretary and treasurer of the 
Board of Trustees of Pratt Insti- 
tute, in Brooklyn, N. Y. Mrs. 
Pratt lived in Portland, Ore., be- 
fore she married, and her name 
Avas Caroline Ames Ladd. There 
are three children, one son and 
two daughters. 

Charlie prepared at the Poly- 
technic Preparatory School in 
Brooklyn, at the Thacher School, 
Xordhoff, Calif., and the West- 
minster School, Simsbury. He 
belongs to the Polytechnic Pre- 
paratory Club, the Yale Thacher 
Club, and the Corinthian Yacht 

Club. He was on the Freshman Mandolin Club ; was coxswain of 
the Sophomore Class Crew in 1914, and the second University 
Crew in 1915, and has numerals. He was one of the Board of 
Governors of the University Club, 1915, and its president in 1916; 
and belongs also to the Sword and Gun Club, the Mohicans, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon, and Scroll and Key. He roomed for four 
years with D. W. Cassard and G. P. Black, at 644 Wright, 263 
Durfee, 334 White, and 25 Yanderbilt. 

Pratt is undecided as to his future occupation, but probably 
will go into the manufacturing business. His address is 229 
Clinton Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



^^^— SU^V^_^5^ 



ARTHUR M. PROCTOR, ^^Doc," "Art," "Proc," was born 
in Wakefield, Mass., August 30, 1893. 

His father, Edward Everett Proctor, was born in Portland, 
Maine, in 1852, and is a real estate broker. His mother, Grace 
Lawrence (Otis) Proctor, lived in Waterville, Maine. There are 
two sons and one daughter in the family. Edward O. Proctor, 
1909, is a brother. 



188 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




^^54^^. 



Doc prepared at the "Wakefield 
High School, and at Aiidover. 
He ])layed on the Freshman 
^laiidoliu Club and belongs to the 
Andover Club and Delta Kappa 
Epsilon. He roomed with R. K. 
Sutherland in Freshman, Sopho- 
more and Junior years, at 660 
Wright, 193 Farnam, and 445 
Fayerweather ; with Sutherland 
and T. W. Enright, at 67 Van- 
derbilt, in Senior year. 

Proctor expects to go into busi- 
ness, either mercantile or trans- 
portation. His address is Wake- 
field, Mass. 



WILLIAM ROSS PROCTOR, JR., "Proc," Avas born in 
Pittsburgh, Pa., June 10, 1893, and has lived there and in 

Lakewood, IST. J., and N'ew York 
City. 

His father, William Ross Proc- 
tor, was born in ISTew York City, 
April 5, 1863, and was graduated 
from Columbia with the degree 
of E.M. in 1884. He has lived 
for the greater part of his life in 
]^ew York City. He Avas for- 
merly an architect, but is now a 
stock broker, special partner in 
the firm of Abbot, Johnson &: 
Company. , Mrs. Proctor lived 
in Pittsburgh before her mar- 
riage ; her name was Elizabeth 
Singer. 

Ross prepared at the Pomfret 
School, Pomfret, Conn., and be- 
longs to the Pomfret School Club. 
He was chairman of the Xews; 




^^c^oa» "^Jioftjojn 



GRADUATES 



189 



received a second dispute appointment in Junior year, and belongs 
to Psi Upsilon, the Elizabethan Club, the University Club, the 
Cosmopolitan Club, Grill Eoom Grizzlies, and Scarabs. He is 
chairman of the Student Council; a Cheer Leader; Class Agent 
Universitj Alumni Fund; on the Class Day Committee, and the 
Triennial Committee and belongs to Scroll and Key. He roomed 
with G. G. Haven, Jr., in Freshman year, at 676 Wright; Sopho- 
more year with H. Sproul, G. G. Haven, Jr., O. L. Guernsey and 
H, H. Tittman, at 156 Lawrance; the remaining two years with 
Haven, Guernsey and Tittman, at 369 White and 10 and 12 
Vanderbilt. 

Proctor is going into business; his address is Shohola, Pike 
County, Pa. 



HOWARD PHELPS PUTJ^AM, "Put," was born in Allston, 
Mass., July 9, 1894, and has lived there and in Orange, N. J., 
Lexington, Mass., and Harvard, Mass. 

His father, Henry Howell Putnam, has lived most of the time 
in Boston, where he is an editor, and secretary of the ISTational 
Association of Local Fire Insurance Agents. His mother, Cordelia 
Howard, lived in Allston, Mass., before marriage. There are three 
children in the family. 

Put prepared at Phillips-Ex- 
eter, and belongs to the Exeter 
Club. He was coxswain of the 
Class Crew in Junior year, and 
received a second dispute appoint- 
ment ; belongs to the Elizabethan 
Club, Delta Kappa Epsilon, 
Pundits, Chi Delta Theta, and 
Skull and Bones. Freshman year 
he roomed with IST. M. Way, at 
9 Library Street; Sophomore 
and Junior years with Way and 
D. O. Stewart, at 140 Welch and 
504 Haughton ; Senior year with 
F. J. Manning, at 79 Connecticut. 

Putnam may go in for journal- 
ism, or for scientific farming. 
His address is Old Mill Farm, 
Harvard, Mass. 




V^.^Vv^ ^v;3^D^ 



190 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



JOHN" GRAVES PUTN'AM, 
"Jack," "Put," lives in Buffalo, 
N^. Y., where he was born Decem- 
ber 24, 1892. 

His father, James Wright Put- 
nam, was born in Fredonia, 
X. Y., in 1860. Graduating with 
the degree of M.D. from the Uni- 
versity of Buffalo, Class of 1882, 
he became a professor in his uni- 
versity, and a nerve specialist. 
Jack's mother before marriage 
was Caroline Moore Graves of 
Buffalo. The rest of the family 
consists of Put's two brothers. 
Pelatives at Yale are James O. 
Putnam, 1839; Frank C. Put- 
nam, 1893 ; George P. Putnam, 
1896 S. ; James O. Putnam, 1903 ; 
and Edward H. Putnam, 1904 S. 

Put prepared at St. Luke's School, Wayne, Pa., and at the 
Nichols School, Buffalo, X. Y. He won his numerals on the 
Freshman Relay Team ; took part in the spring play of the 
Dramatic Association ; is president of the St. Luke's School 
Club and a member of the Ptombers and Zeta Psi. In his 
Freshman and Sophomore years he roomed at 647 Wright and 
159 Lawrance, respectively, with Wesley Marion Oler, Jr. In 
Junior and Senior years he roomed at 477 Haughton and 13 Yan- 
derbilt with Oler and Clarke Oler Kimberly. 

Putnam expects to go into business. His address is 525 Dela- 
ware Ave., Buffalo, X. Y. 




DONALD AUBRY QUARLES was born in Van Buren, Ark., 
July 30, 1894. 

His father. Dr. Robert Warren Quarles, was born in College 
Hill, Miss., July 13, 1854, and has lived thirty years in Mississippi, 
and thirty years in Arkansas, where he practiced dentistry. Mrs. 
Quarles, whose name was Minnie Hynes, was born in Canada, 
but has lived in NeAv York, Ohio, and Arkansas. Of her five 
children two sons and two daughters are living. 



GRADUATES 



191 



Donald prepared at the Van 
Biiren High School, and at the 
University of Missouri. He was 
awarded first division honors in 
Freshman year, and has held the 
Benjamin F. Barge Mathemati- 
cal Prize ; the Waterman Schol- 
arship ; Stanley Mathematical 
and the Dettra Mathematical 
prizes. He received first division 
honors and a philosophical ora- 
tion in Junior year; belongs to 
Phi Beta Kappa ; Sigma Xi ; 
the Student Council, and the 
Triennial Committee. Freshman 
year he roomed with Joseph R. 
Brown, at 543 Pierson ; Sopho- 
more and Junior years with Har- 
lan B. Perrins and Gardner 

Murphy, at 188 Farnam and 339 White; Senior year mth 
Murphy and Malcolm J. Baber, at 43 Vanderbilt. 

Quarles expects to enter the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, and prepare himself for engineering. His address is 
Yan Buren, Ark. 




jQfrxA^oJik (^^--^^A^^jU^JlKjSis^ 



WARREX AAROX RANSOM, "Warring," "Rans," was born 
in New York City, April 2, 1894, and has lived in Knoxville, 
Tenn., Buffalo, N. Y., and in Englewood, N. J. 

His father, Warren Aaron Ransom, was born in 'New York City, 
October 22, 1855, "was graduated from Yale in 1878, and died in 
Englewood, N. J., May 19, 1903. He was vice president of the 
St. Lawrence Power Company, and in the paper manufacturing 
business. His mother, who was Harriott Wood McNulty before 
her marriage, was from New York City. There were three sons 
and two daughters in the family; three are now living. Frank 
McN. Ransom, 1913, is a brother. 

Warren prepared at the Taft School, Watertown, Conn., and 
belongs to the Taft School Club. He was on the Apollo Glee 
Club and the College Choir. He was a Freshman Crew substitute. 



192 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




6<Ji 



Oif^TKJUjt^ 



e.^t 



CiA^^v^y^'** . 



on the second Class Crew in 1914, 
and the Class Crew in 1915, and 
has numerals. He was also on 
the Freshman Swimming Team, 
and the Class Baseball Team, 
1914, and belongs to the Yale 
Battery. He is a member of 
Zeta Psi, Single Sculls and Foam, 
and the University Club. Fresh- 
man year he roomed with Clem- 
ent Ripley, at 585 Pierson; the 
remaining three years with Ells- 
Avorth Bunker, Hermann Y. von 
Holt, and Donald D. Geary, at 
136-37 Welch, at 337-38 White, 
and 134-36 Welch. 

Ransom plans to go into busi- 
ness ; his address is 58 West Fifty- 
eighth Street, New York City. 




CUuJ^^Ji 4tf /^-^tX-o-*-^. 



ARCHIBALD McMARTIN" 
RICHARDS, "Arch," was born 
in Orange, N. J., December 16, 
1892, and has lived there and in 
iSTew York City most of his life. 

George Richards, his father, 
was born in Boston, Mass., March 
23, 1849, was graduated from 
Yale with the degree of B.A. in 
1872, and received an honorary 
M.A. degree in 1893. He was 
also given the degree of LL.B. 
by Columbia in 1876. He is a 
lawyer, of the firm of Richards 
k Affeld, in New York City. His 
mother, whose name was Harriet 
M. McLaren, lived in New York 
City. There were six children 
in the family, five now living. 



GRADUATES 



193 



Besides his father, Yale relatives include Guy H. Richards, '19, 
a brother, and George Richards, '40 (grandfather) ; William R. 
Richards, '75; Dickinson W. Richards, '80 (uncles); George H. 
Richards, '03; Henry B. Richards, '12; Dickinson W. Richards, 
Jr., 1917 (cousins). 

Arch prepared at the Carteret x\cademy, and at the Hotchkiss 
School, and is a member of the Hotchkiss Club. He was manager 
of the University Tennis Association 1915-16, and was awarded a 
second dispute appointment in Junior year. He is vice presi- 
dent of the Minor Athletic Association, and belongs to Psi Upsilon 
and Wolf's Head. He has roomed for the four years with Alfred 
H. Chappell, at 608 Wright, 165 Lawrance and 424 Fayerweather 
(in Sophomore year), 424 Fayerweather, and 103 Welch. 

Richards expects to go into the banking business; his address 
is 399 Park Avenue, i^ew York City. 



LAI^GDON LAWS RICKETTS, "Rick," ''Gin," was born 
in Cincinnati, Ohio, September 24, 1893. 

His father, Benjamin Merrill Ricketts, was born in Proctors- 
ville, Ohio, in 1859, and is a surgeon, located in Cincinnati. Mrs. 
Ricketts, who was from Cincin- 
nati, was Elizabeth Laws; there 
are two sons in the family. Stuart 
B. Sutphin, '03, and Langdon 
Laws, '02, are relatives. 

Rick prepared at the Asheville 
School, ^. C. He was on the 
University Track Team, and has 
numerals. He belongs to the 
Yale Battery, the Ohio Club and 
Alpha Delta Phi. Freshman 
year he roomed alone at 563 
Pierson; the remaining three 
years with Franklin Perkins and 
Paget Cady, at 204 Farnam, 
406 Berkeley, and 16 Vanderbilt. 

Ricketts will enter the manu- 
facturing or mercantile business. 
His address is 2927 Reading 
Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 





<^- (2Jcc::(^ 



194 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



CLEMEN"T CASTXER 
RI^EHART, "Clem," was 
born in Fredericktown, Ohio, Au- 
gust 23, 1895, but has always 
lived in Jacksonville, Fla. 

His father, Clement Darling 
Rinehart, was born February 20, 
1864, in Fredericktown, Ohio. 
His mother was Maude Alice 
Castner, also of Frederickto^\^l. 
Mr. Rinehart was graduated from 
the Yale School of Law in 1888, 
and practices law in Jacksonville, 
Fla., with the firm of Axtell & 
Rinehart. Of three children 
Clement is the only one living. 

Clem prepared at the Duval 
High School, Jacksonville, and 
the University School, Xew 
Haven. He is president of the Yale Florida Club, and president 
of the Southern Club. He has been out for crew, and in Junior 
year was given second division honors, and an oration appoint- 
ment. He belongs to Delta Kappa Epsilon. His roommate for 
the four years has been George W. Clark, Jr., at 501 Haughton, 
259 Durfee, 471 Haughton, and 53 Vanderbilt. 

Rinehart expects to enter Harvard Law School; his permanent 
address is 1406 Hubbard Street, Jacksonville, Fla. 




C^f^i-'Z^'Ci^^/fis^lG^yi.^T^^ 



CLEMENT RIPLEY, "Rip," was born in Tacoma, Wash., 
August 26, 1892. 

His father, Thomas Emerson Ripley, was born in Rutland, Vt., 
September 19, 1865, and was graduated from Yale with the degree 
of B.A. in 1888. He is engaged in business in Tacoma, as vice 
president of the Wheeler & Osgood Company, manufacturers of 
doors, blinds, etc. Charlotte Howard (Clement) Ripley, his 
mother, lived in Rutland, Vt., before her marriage ; there are two 
children in the family. Besides his father, Yale relatives are 
Robert Clement, 1910, and John P. Clement, 1915. 

Rip prepared at the Taft School, and belongs to the Taft 



GRADUATES 



195 



School Club. He was on the 
Record Board; received a second 
dispute appointment in Junior 
year, and belongs to the Yale 
Battery and the Pundits. Fresh- 
man year he roomed with War- 
ren A. Hansom, at 585 Pierson; 
the remaining three years with 
Joseph A. Blake, at 245 Durfee, 
357 White, and 62 Vanderbilt. 

Ripley plans to enter the Yale 
School of Law, but may go in 
for journalism and letters. His 
address is Interlaken, South 
Tacoma, Wash. 




SJU/wuaC^ \i\x^jbu\ • 



WELLS ROSSITER PITCH 
was born in Port Jefferson, Long 
Island, N". Y., December 24, 1890. 

His father, Thomas Jefferson 
Pitch, was born in Port Jefferson, 
K Y., May 19, 1846, and was 
graduated from Yale in 1869, and 
from the Albany Law School 
with the degree of LL.B. in 1871. 
His life has been spent in Port 
Jefferson and iN^ew York, where 
he practices law. Alice Phillips 
(Pandall) Pitch, his mother, was 
also from Port Jefferson ; of their 
two sons and three daughters, 
three are now living. Aside from 
his father, Thomas Gr. Pitch, 
1854, is a relative. 

Wells prepared at the Port 




IVmu. iL^<4:jux^ <R^ixck. 



196 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Jefferson High Scliool and at Andover, and is a member of the 
Andover Club. He went out for tennis and soccer and was on 
the Soccer Team. Freshman year he roomed alone at 576 Pier- 
son; Sophomore year with John D. Cooper, at 453 Fayerweather ; 
Junior and Senior years with A. D. Piatt, at 453 Fayerweather 
and 125 Welch. 

Ritch expects to enter Columbia Law School; his address is 
Port Jefferson, Long Island, N. Y. 



CHAELES HOLMES ROBERTS, JR., ''Bull," was born in 
Brooklyn, N, Y., January 31, 1894, and has lived there and in 
Flushing, Long Island, N. Y, 

His father, Charles Holmes Roberts, was born in Kansas City, 
Mo., February 16, 1863, and was graduated from the N"ew York 
University with the degree of B.A. in 1886, and from Columbia 
Law School with the degree of LL.B. in 1888. He is engaged 
in business in and about New York, as president of the firm of 
Roberts, Nash & Company, builders. Mrs. Roberts lived in 

Brooklyn, N". Y., before her 
marriage; her name was Anne 
Caroline Ropes. There are three 
children in the family. 

Bull prepared at Andover. He 
was on the Freshman and Uni- 
versity Football teams, captained 
the Lacrosse Team and has played 
basketball. He was assistant man- 
ager of the Basketball Association 
ill 1914-15, and has a "Y" and 
numerals. He was on the Fresh- 
man Glee Club, and belongs to 
the Yale Battery, Delta Kappa 
Epsilon, the Little Yellow Dogs, 
and Skull and Bones. His room- 
mates in Freshman year were 
Kirby Atterbury and Howard 
Buck, at 262 York Street ; Soph- 
omore year, Atterbury, Buck, 




C^£^<aJ^. 



GRADUATES 



197 



R. E. Lee and W. B. Ryan, Jr., at 142 Lawrance; Junior and 
Senior years he roomed with W. B. Ryan, Jr., at 335 White, and 
11 Yanderbilt. 

Roberts pLans to go into the law, and will enter Columbia Law 
School. His address is 10 Franklin Place, Flushing, Long Island, 
K Y. 



DON'ALD PELTON ROB- 
INSON", ''Don," "Robbie," was 
born in Meriden, Conn., August 
26, 1894. 

His father, William James 
Robinson, was born in Xewburgh, 
N. Y., June 2, 1854, but has 
spent most of his life in Meriden, 
where he is treasurer of the 
Bradley & Hubbard Manufac- 
turing Company. Mrs. Robin- 
son, who lived in Portland, 
Conn., before her marriage, was 
Edith M. Wheeler. One son and 
one daughter are in the family. 
Alfred P. Wheeler, '92 S., is an 
uncle. 

Don prepared at the Meriden 
High School. He was on the 

eligibility list of the Dramatic Association, received third divi- 
sion honors and a second dispute appointment in Junior year, 
and belongs to Zeta Psi. Freshman year he roomed with 
Lewis Miller, 2d, at 653 Wright ; Sophomore year with Miller 
and Lawrence G. Williams, at 173 Lawrance; Junior year with 
J. K. Wood and E. S. Bassett, at 444 Fayerweather, and Senior 
year with D. C. Fitts, N. R. Finch and W. A. James, at 32-33 
Yanderbilt. 

Robinson intends to go into manufacturing; his address is 
8 Lincoln Street, Meriden, Conn. 




V^Ur^o^d^^. ^Vljft5js-0w> 



<NVV_ 



ELLIOTT STIRLING ROBINSON, "Robbie," "Bob," "Dyna- 
mite," was born in New Haven, Conn., August 22, 1894. 



198 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



His father, Paul Skiff Robin- 
son, Avas born in New Haven, 
Conn., February 8, 1868, and was 
graduated in the Class of 1889 S., 
and from the School of Medicine 
in 1S91. He is a physician, prac- 
ticing in Xew Haven. Mrs. 
Robinson, whose maiden name 
was Jennie Louise Stirling, lived 
in Bridgeport, Conn., before she 
married. Of her four sons three 
are now living. Aside from his 
father, his Yale relatives include 
William C. Robinson, '81 Hon- 
orary (grandfather) ; Frank A. 
Robinson, 72 L. ; Philip N. Rob- 
inson, '86 L., and George W. 
Robinson, '88 L. (uncles). 

Robbie prepared at the 'Kew 
Haven High School, and at Phillips-Exeter. He received a 
philosophical oration appointment in Junior year, and belongs 
to the Exeter Club, and !N^u Sigma Nu. Freshman year he 
roomed at 9 Library Street, with Thomas Randolph and Arthur 
T. Campbell; Sophomore year with Reginald Field and Camp- 
bell, at 271 Durfee; Junior year with Gilroy Mulqueen, at 
488 Haughton, and Senior year at his home, 450 Edgewood 
Avenue. 

Robinson has already entered the Yale School of Medicine; 
his address is 450 Edgewood Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 




(^llfS^l^siu.^ 



rn 



RALPH LEON ROLL was born in Lebanon, Ohio, August 26, 
1895. 

His father, William Zimmer Roll, was born in Butlerville, Ohio, 
and is a lawyer and mayor of Lebanon. Frances Guttery (Bird) 
Roll, his mother, lived in Pleasant Plain, Ohio. Her five sons 
and one daughter are living. 

Ralph prepared at the Lebanon schools, and was graduated from 
the Lebanon (Ohio) University in 1913, with the degree of B.A. 
From 1913 to 1915 he was principal of the Germantown (Ohio) 



GRADUATES 



199 



schools, and entered Yale in 
Senior year. He roomed with 
Edward M. Craig, Jr., at 92 
Connecticut. 

Roll intends to go into busi- 
ness ; his address is 10 Jackson 
Street, Lebanon, Ohio. 




e/Q^ 



PHILIP LIVII^GSTON ROSE, 'Thil," "Doc," was born in 
Xew York City, July 27, 1894, but has lived in Hartford, Conn,, 
for nineteen years. 

His father, John Henry Rose, 
was born in Branchport, N. Y., 
August 24, 1866, and Avas gradu- 
ated from Hobart College with 
the degree of M.D. in 1889, and 
from Xew York University in 
1892. He has lived in ^ew York 
and Hartford, where he is a 
physician and surgeon. Susan 
Tarleton (Goldthwaite) Rose, his 
mother, lived in Mobile, Ala. 
Philip is the only child. R. Sel- 
don Rose, 1909, is a cousin. 

Phil prepared at the Hartford 
High School, Pomfret School, 
Bellefonte Academy, and the 
Harstrom School; he is a mem- 
ber of the Harstrom School Club. 
He was on the Preshman Glee 




llCiikp ^nA^^c^Jjo^ (Uoc^ 



200 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Club, the Ai)ollo Glee Club, the University Mandolin Club, and 
has taken part in Dramatics. He belongs to Alpha Delta Phi, 
and the Ptombers. He has roomed with Thomas E. Ilapgood 
the entire four years, at 602 Wright, 201 Farnam, 480 Haughton 
and 675 Wright. 

Rose is undecided as to his future career; his address is 43 
Concord Street, Hartford, Conn. 




JOSEPH FRANK ROSEN- 
BERG, "Joe," "Rosy," was born 
in Chicago, III, August 18, 1893. 

His father, Bernhard Rosen- 
berg, was born in Chicago, July 
5, 1861, and is in the real estate 
business, and on the board of 
directors of the Michael Reese 
Hospital, in that city. His 
mother, Avho was Estelle Frank 
before her marriage, lived in 
New York City; there are three 
children in the family. Abraham 
K. Selz, 1903 S., and Robert H. 
Mayer, 1913, are relatives. 

Joe prepared at the Harvard 

j[ovMc^.(5?<«.C/vifru^. ^^^°°^' Chicago. He received a 
\J *' M* second colloquy appointment in 

Junior year, is a member of the 
Yale Battery and has been out for baseball and tennis. He roomed 
alone during his college course, at 539 Pierson in Freshman year, 
144 Lawrance in Sophomore j^ear, and 44 Vanderbilt in Junior 
and Senior years. 

Rosenberg intends to go into the manufacturing business; his 
address is Congress Hotel, Chicago, 111. 

RICHARD CHARLES ROTHSCHILD, "Dick," "Roth," was 
born in Chicago, 111., March 24, 1895, and has since lived in 
Toledo, Ohio, and in New York City. 

His father, Charles Ernest Rothschild, was born in Leaven- 
worth, Kans., October 24, 1863, and, until his death in New 
York, November 24, 1914, was engaged in business as a mer- 
chant. His mother, who lived in New Haven, Conn., before her 



GRADUATES 



201 



marriage, was Justine Sonnen- 
berg; there are two sons in the 
family, Dick and Herbert C 
Rothschild, '16 S. Other rela- 
tives are Louis M. Sonnenberg, 
'97 and '99 L., and Charles H. 
Studin, '97 and '99 L. 

Dick prepared at the Toledo 
(Ohio) Central High School, and 
at the DeWitt Clinton High 
School, New York City. He re- 
ceived third division honors in 
Junior year, and a first dispute 
appointment. He roomed alone 
in Freshman year, at 562 Pier- 
son ; the remaining three years 
with Troy Kaichen, at 260 Dur- 
fee, 442 Fayerweather, and 57 
Vanderbilt. 

Rothschild is uncertain as to his future work. His address is 
562 West One Hundred and Thirteenth Street, New York City. 




[//'^(JxM^ { 



LOUIS RUBIN was born in 
New Haven, Conn., May 25, 
1891. 

His father, Jacob H. Rubin, 
was born in Russia, February 22, 
1866, but has lived the greater 
part of his life in New Haven, 
where he is a wholesale leather 
dealer, president of the J. H. 
Rubin Company. His mother, 
who was Anna K. Opolinsky, died 
December 27, 1909. Five chil- 
dren are in the family. Nathan 
Rubin, 1918, is a brother. 

Louis prepared at the New 
Haven High School, and at the 
High School of Commerce, New 
York. He received a first col- 
loquy appointment in Junior 




202 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



year. He has roomed at 102 Avon Street, for the entire four 
years. 

Rubin expects to enter his father's business. His permanent 
address is 375 State Street, !N^ew Haven, Conn. 

ERNEST FREDERICK 
RUSSELL, "Ernie," ''Doctor," 
Avas born in iN'ew York City, De- 
cember 29, 1893, and has lived in 
Willard, N. Y., Brooklyn, Pough- 
keepsie, and White Plains, Is". Y. 
His father, William Logie Rus- 
sell, was born in Chatham, ISTew 
Brunswick, Canada, attended the 
New Brunswick University, and 
was given the degree of M.D. by 
the Medical College of New York 
University in 1885. He is medical 
superintendent of Bloomingdale 
Hospital, a part of The Society 
of the New York Hospital. Mrs. 
Russell lived in Plainfield, N. J.; 
her name was Addie Lewis. Three 
of their four sons are living. 
Ernie prepared at the Riverview Academy, Poughkeepsie, and 
at the Westchester Academy, White Plains, N. Y. He was on 
the Fi"eshman and Apollo Mandolin and Banjo Clubs, and also 
the University Mandolin and Banjo Club, and is a member of 
Alpha Delta Phi. He is Class treasurer. Freshman year he 
roomed alone, at 7 Library Street; Sophomore year with Marcus 
Morton, at 227 Farnam; Junior year with Morton and Wright 
D. Goss, Jr., at 378 White, and Senior year with Fairfax D. 
Downey and Thomas I. Crowell, Jr., at 8 Vanderbilt. 

Russell intends to enter the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
Columbia. His address is Box 175, White Plains, N. Y. 




^iu*^c^^7^' /G>uC^.£^ 



WILLIAM BELFORD RYAN, JR., "Bill," was born in 
Laredo, Texas, January 6, 1893, and has lived in New York City; 
St. Louis, Mo. ; San Antonio, Texas ; Laredo, Texas ; Mexico 
City, and Greensburg, Pa. 



GRADUATES 



203 



His father, William Belford 
Ryan, was born in St. Albans, 
Yt., in 1868, but has spent the 
greater part of his life in Mexico, 
where he is vice president and 
general manager of the Tehuan- 
tepec National Railway. Mary 
Maud (Latta) Ryan, his mother, 
lived in Greensburg, Pa. ; there 
are six sons and three daughters 
in the family. John Latta Ryan, 
ex- 14: L., is a brother and John 
Latta, 1859 L., a grandfather. 

Bill prepared at the Woodberry 
Forest School, Ya. He was on 
the Freshman Glee Club, and be- 
longs to Delta Kappa Epsilon, 
and the L^niversity Club. He 
roomed alone in Freshman year, 
at 534 Pierson; with R. E. Lee, Kirby Atterbury, Howard 
Buck and C. H. Roberts in Sophomore year, at 143 Lawrance; 
with C. H. Roberts in Junior and Senior years, at 335 White 
and 11 Yanderbilt. 

Ryan expects to go into the transportation business; his 
address is Greensburg, Pa. 




uni3. 



iCvjLOAA., If. 



BEI^^ETT SAIs^DERSOX, "Dus," was born in Littleton, 
Mass., October 31, 1893, and has lived there and in Arlington, 
Mass., and in Ayer, Mass. 

His father, George Augustus Sanderson, was born in Littleton, 
Mass., July 1, 1863, and was graduated from Yale in the Class of 
1885. He is a Justice of the Superior Court of Massachusetts. 
His mother, Annie Sarah Bennett, lived in Ayer, Mass., before 
marriage. Of their five children four are living. 

Dus prepared at Groton School, and belongs to the Groton 
Club. He received first division honors in Freshman year. In 
Junior year he received third division honors, and a high oration 
appointment. He was captain of the Junior and Senior Class 
Crews. He has numerals, is a lieutenant in Battery D. and 



204 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




(/C'e/t/L-v._£^?' \j^X,\A_c:/a^A^0-(Th^ 



belongs to Zeta Psi, Ptombers, 
and Wolf's Head. He has roomed 
for the four years with M. Had- 
ley and L. C. Zahner, at 677 
"Wright, 231 Farnam, 470 Fayer- 
weather, and 141 Welch. 

Sanderson Avill enter the Har- 
vard Law School; his address is 
.Vyer, Mass. 



ORLANDO CALHOUN SCAEBOROUGH, JR., ^'Scarby," 



was born in Bishopville, S. 




Cij2£u^(2-JmHJ<H/>u^QA 



Q., October 29, 1893, and has 
lived there and in Summerton, 
S. C. 

His father, Orlando Calhoun 
Scarborough, was born in Darling- 
ton County, S. C, March 5, 1849, 
and has always lived in South 
Carolina, where he is a cotton 
planter. His mother was Mary 
Ella Ambrose of Bishopville. Of 
three sons and six daughters 
eight are living. Julian H, Scar- 
borough, 1914, is a brother. 

Scarby prepared at the Sum- 
merton High School, and at Fur- 
man University, Greenville, S. C, 
from which he was graduated 
with the degree of B.A. in 1914. 
He entered Yale in Junior year 
and belongs to Beta Theta Pi. 
He roomed with C. M. Kielland 



GRADUATES 



205 



in Junior year, at 428 Fayerweather ; with IT. C. Jackson and 
P. R. Matlier in Senior year, at 133 Welch. 

Scarborough intends to enter the Law School of South Carolina 
University; his address is Summerton, S. C. 



EDWARD LOUIS SHEL- 
DOX, "Eddie," was born in 
Fort Ann, N". Y., December 23, 
1893. 

His father, Albert Uriah Shel- 
don, was born in Fort Ann, IST. Y., 
May 28, 1857, and lived there 
and in Tonaw-anda, N. Y., and 
in Kansas. He was in the bank- 
ing business, and died at Fort 
Ann, July 27, 1906. His mother, 
whose name was Frederica Eliza- 
beth Wurster before marriage, 
lived in Illinois and Kansas. Her 
two sons and three daughters are 
living. 

Eddie prepared at the Fort 
Ann (X. Y.) High School, and 
at Hopkins Grammar School, 

Xew Haven, Conn. He received second division honors in Fresh- 
man year, was aw^arded part of the third Lucius F. Robinson 
Latin Prize in Sophomore year, received first division honors and 
a high oration in Junior year, and belongs to Phi Beta Kappa. 
Freshman year he roomed alone at 566 Pierson; Sophomore year 
with Alphonso F. Raynes, at 158 Lawrance; Junior year with 
Harold C. Bailey and Harold S. Corlett, at 422 Berkeley, and 
Senior year with Corlett at 82 Connecticut. 

Sheldon expects to enter the Princeton Graduate School, and 
become a teacher. His address is Fort Ann, X. Y. 




CcluJOAci i^TuM^ S "rutX^jjrr'i 



DONALD CARRIXGTOX SHEPARD, "Don," "Stevie," 
was born in Buffalo, X. Y., October 8, 1891, and has lived there 
and in Bristol, Conn. 

His father, William Tuttle Shepard, was born in Bristol, Conn., 
January 1, 1865, and was graduated from Yale in the Class of 



206 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




1884 S. He lias spent his life 
ill Bristol, Conn., and Buffalo, 
X. Y., -where he is in the iron 
and coke business, as a member 
of the firm of Rogers, Bro^vn & 
Company. Julia Isabel (Car- 
rington) Shepard, his mother, 
lived in New Haven, Conn., be- 
fore she married. Her three 
sons and one daughter are living. 
Dr. Herbert DeW. Carrington, 
'84 S., is a relative. 

Don prepared at the Choate 
School, at Phillips-Exeter, and 
at the Harstrom School, and be- 
longs to the Exeter Club. He 
was on the Freshman Glee Club, 
on the Sophomore Class Crew, 
and was floor-manager of the 
Sophomore German. In Junior year he was awarded third 
division honors, and a second dispute appointment; he was on 
the Junior Promenade Committee, belongs to the Birthday Club, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon, and Skull and Bones. Freshman year he 
roomed with Gilbert Porter, LaAvrence Tighe, Dudley Mudge and 
Morris Wilson, at 266 York Street; Sophomore year with the 
same men at 239 Durfee; Junior year with Porter, Tighe and 
Mudge at 391 Berkeley; Senior year with Porter, Tighe, Mudge 
and Donald Stewart, at 39-41 Vanderbilt. 

Shepard expects to go into the manufacturing business ; his 
address is 230 North Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



ibvfHuSdl CS-ij^ 



THOMAS COOLIDGE SHERMAN, "Tee," was born in 
Glens Falls, N. Y., September 29, 1894. 

His father, A. W. Sherman, and his mother, Gertrude (Coolidge) 
Sherman, were both born in Glens Falls. Mr. Sherman has spent 
most of his life there, where he is in the banking business, with 
the First National Bank. Three of their four children are 
living. 

Tee prepared at Andover, and is a member of the Andover 



GRADUATES 



207 



Club. He received a first col- 
loquy appointment in Junior 
year, and belongs to Zeta Psi 
and O. C. C. Freshman year he 
roomed with W. M. Bowden, at 
631 Wright; the remaining three 
years with Richard Lampher, at 
257 Durfee, 374 White, and 50 
Vanderbilt. 

Sherman expects to go into 
mercantile business ; his address 
is 105 Ridge Street, Glens Falls, 
X. Y. 




JOHX DAVIS SHOVE, 

''Johnnie," "Push," was born 
in Syracuse, IST. Y., May 10, 
1894. 

His father, Benjamin Jay 
Shove, was born in Greene, N". Y., 
July 3, 1859, and was graduated 
from Syracuse University with 
the degree of B.A. in 1880, and 
M.A. in 1883. He is located in 
Syracuse, where he is Judge of 
the Municipal Court. Mrs. Shove 
lived in Cleveland, Ohio, before 
her marriage ; her name was Rose 
Margaret Davis. There are two 
sons and one daughter in the 
family. The elder son is Ben- 
jamin E. Shove, Yale 1914. Ed- 
ward L. Davis, 1896, is also a 
relative. 





^. iCLa^. 



208 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Johnnie prepared at the Syracuse High School. He was on 
the Freshman Mandolin Club; the Freshman Tennis Team, of 
■which he was captain; the second University Tennis Team and 
the Squash Team. He was awarded a first dispute appointment 
in Junior year, and belongs to Zeta Psi. Freshman year he 
roomed with Thomas Aylette Buckner, Jr., at 635 Wright; Sopho- 
more and Junior years with William McEchron Bowden, at 256 
Durfee and 356 White; Senior year with Bowden and Luther 
Pomeroy Graves, at 671 Wright. 

Shove is undecided about his future occupation; his permanent 
address is 365 Green Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 



ALAIST CORNWALL SMITH was born in New Haven, Conn., 
February 14, 1893, and has always lived there and in West Haven. 
His father, Edwin Alan Smith, was born in Allentown, Pa., 
Avigust 14, 1857, and was graduated from the Yale School of 
Law Avith the degree of LL.B. in the Class of 1881, and given the 
degree of M.L. in 1882. His mother, Elizabeth (Cornwall) Smith, 

was a resident of New Haven. 
Two sons constitute the family. 
Woodruff R. Smith, 1918 S., be- 
ing the younger. 

Alan prepared at the West 
Haven High School, and received 
a first dispute appointment in 
Junior year. He is a member 
of the Yale Battery, He roomed 
at home Freshman and Sopho- 
more years, and alone in Junior 
year at 401 Berkeley; in Senior 
year he roomed with N. S. Hub- 
bard at 76 Connecticut. 

Smith intends to become an 
architect, and wall enter the Yale 
School of Fine Arts to take up 
the architectural course. His ad- 
dress is 445 Washington Avenue, 
West Haven, Conn. 




GRADUATES 



209 




CHAKD POWEES SMITH, 

"Cepe," was born in Watertown, 
K Y., November 1, 1894. 

His father, Edward ISTorth 
Smith, was born in Watertown, 
1^. Y., November 30, 1867, and 
was graduated from Hamilton 
with the degree of B.A. in 1890, 
and from the Buffalo Law School 
with the degree of LL.B. in 1892. 
He is a lawyer, senior member of 
the firm of Smith & Phelps, 
Watertown, JST. Y. Mrs. Smith, 
whose name was Alice Lamon 
Powers, also lived in Watertown, 
and died there in 1906. There 
were two sons ; PoAvers is the 
only child living. 

Cepe prepared at the Water- 
towm High School, and at the Pawling School, and belongs to 
the Pawling School Club. He was managing editor of the Yale 
News; was a member of the Freshman Glee Club, and the Uni- 
A^ersity Musical Clubs ; belonged to the Class Baseball Team, 
Class Basketball Team and the University Basketball Squad. He 
received a first colloquy appointment in Junior year, and belongs 
to the Ptombers, Zeta Psi, and Wolf's Head. Freshman year he 
roomed with J. Sterling Halstead, at 416 Berkeley; Sophomore 
year with George K. Houpt, at 221 Farnam; Junior year with 
J. M. Jessup and E. M. Bostwick, at 423 Fayerweather, and 
Senior year with the same men at 99 Welch. 

Smith expects to enter the Harvard Law School; his address 
is 162 Clinton Street, Watertown, N. Y. 



(j'^^-ik^&^ii y^^^^^^u^^ 



JOHN WILLIAM SMITH was born in Youngstown, Ohio, 
June 30, 1894. 

His father is William Alvin Smith. Mrs. Smith's name before 
marriage was Clara Harmon. 

John prepared at the Bayen School, and in Junior year received 



210 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 





Uliju^ 



a first dispute appointment. He 
belongs to Alpha Delta Plii, the 
Yale Battery, and the Ohio Club. 
He roomed alone at 548 Pierson 
in Freshman year; with G. L. 
Walsh and J. W. Stewart in 
Sophomore year, at 270 Durfee; 
alone in Junior year at 397 
Berkeley, and with C. T. Lewis, 
Jr., and D. C. Paul in Senior 
year, at 37 Yanderbilt. 

Smith intends to go into busi- 
ness, and his address is 246 
Broadway, Youngstown, Ohio. 




f/^hff bom> Jiusi^ 



HERBERT CAMP SNEATH, 
"Herb," ''Chub," was born March 
31, 1895, in Middletown, Conn., 
but has spent most of his life in 
New Haven. 

His father, Elias Hershey 
Sneath, was born in Mountville, 
Pa., August 7, 1857, and gradu- 
ated from Lebanon Valley College 
in 1881. He received the degrees 
of B.D. and Ph.D. at Yale in 1884 
and 1890 and is professor of the 
philosophy of religion and of 
religious education in the Yale 
School of Religion. Mrs. Sneath's 
maiden name was Anna Sheldon 
Camp, and her home Middle- 
town. There are two sons and a 
daughter in the family, George 



GRADUATES 



211 



M. Sneath, '07 ; Kenneth M. Bissell, '07, and Clifford H. Bissell, 
'08, are relatives. 

Herb prepared at the Hopkins Grammar School and at The 
Hill School. He is a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. He 
roomed with Robert J. Jewett and D. Littlefield McCoy at 
670 Wright in Freshman year; with Roy C. Wilcox at 153 Law- 
rance in Sophomore year; with Alexander W. Harbison at 485 
Haiighton in Junior year, and with Harbison and Edmund 
Ocumpaugh, 3d, at 69 Vanderbilt in Senior year. 

Sneath will enter Harvard Law School, but expects his future 
work to be in transportation. His permanent address is 285 
Whitney Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 



EDWIN" STEIN, ''Ed," was born in New York City, March 
5, 1895. 

His father, Leo Stein, was born in Chicago, 111., May 4, 1866, 
and was graduated from Yale in the Class of 1888. He is in 
business in New York City, with the firm of Stein, Hirsh & 
Company, manufacturers and importers of starch. There are 
three sons and one daughter in the family. Aside from his 
father, Sidney Stein, Yale 1884, is a relative. 

Ed prepared at the Ethical 
Culture School, New York City. 
He belonged to the Freshman 
Basketball, Class Baseball, and 
Class Basketball Teams and re- 
ceived a first colloquy appoint- 
ment in Junior year; belongs to 
the Midnight Club and the Yale 
Battery. Freshman and Sopho- 
more years he roomed with J. R. 
A. Lannom, at 116 High Street 
and 252 Durfee; Junior year 
alone, at 388 Berkeley; Senior 
year with J. A. Gee, at 66 Van- 
derbilt. 

Stein expects to enter the mer- 
cantile business; his address is 
37 West Ninetieth Street, New 
York City. 




^-cWa^w^ .^^UaJvx 



212 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




DOXALD OGDEX STEW- 
ART, "Don," "Shep," "Stewie," 
was born in Columbus, Ohio, No- 
vember 30, 1894. 

His father, Gilbert Holland 
Stewart, was born in Boston, 
Mass., March 15, 1847, and was 
graduated from Harvard in 1868. 
He lived and practiced law in 
Columbus, Ohio, where he died 
November 28, 1912. His mother 
lived in Worthington, Ohio, be- 
fore her marriage, and her name 
was Clara Landon Ogden. Of 
her five children, one son and 
one daughter are living. 

Don prepared at Phillips-Ex- 
eter, and belongs to the Exeter 
and Ohio clubs. He was assign- 
ment editor of the Yale News and was on the Freshman Football 
Squad, the Freshman Crew Squad, and the University Crew 
Squad. He received a second dispute in Junior year ; is on 
the executive committee of the Berkeley Association, and the Class 
Supper Committee; belongs to Delta Kappa Epsilon, the Eliza- 
bethan Club, and Skull and Bones. Freshman year he roomed 
with Charles Rumford Walker, at 9 Library Street; Sophomore 
and Junior years with H. Phelps Putnam and Nelson M. Way, 
at 141 Welch and 504 Haughton; Senior year with Donald Car- 
rington Shepard, Gilbert E. Porter, Laurence G. Tighe and Dudley 
H. Mudge, at 41 Vanderbilt. 

Stewart expects to go into the telephone business, for which he 
has prepared himself by summer work. His address is 924 
Madison Avenue, Columbus, Ohio. 



T)fru.aijJL 0«|«1jlm '^3'«Juio«r! 



JAMES WRIGHT STEWART, "Jim," was born in Pierre, 
S. Dak., July 29, 1893. 

His father, Robert Wright Stewart, was bom in Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa, March 14, 1865, and graduated from the Yale School of 
Law in 1888. He is general counsel for the Standard Oil Com- 



GRADUATES 



pany of Indiana, Avith offices in 
Chicago. His mother was Gloria 
Josephine Giffen of Marion, 
Iowa. There are four sons. 

Jim prepared at the Univer- 
sity High School, Chicago. He 
roomed Avith Robert M. Scholle 
at 207 York Street in Freshman 
year; the three other years with 
Laiiriston "Walsh at 270 Durfee, 
383 Berkeley and 86 Connecticut. 
Stewart expects to go into bank- 
ing. He may be addressed in 
care- of E. W. SteAvart, 72 West 
Adams Street, Chicago, 111. 




CARL HUMPHREY 
STRONG, "Strongie," "Shorty," 
was born in West Suffield, Conn., 
June 27, 1893, and has liA^ed in 
Harwinton, and in Prospect, 
Conn. 

His father, Charles Bentley 
Strong, w^as born in South Deer- 
field, Mass., in 1850, and gradu- 
ated from Amherst in 1873, and 
from Hartford Theological Semi- 
nary Avith the degree of B.D. in 
1876. He is a minister and liA'ed 
in South Deerfield for twenty- 
five years, afterAvards in West 
Suffield and noAv in the parish 
of Prospect, Conn. Mrs. Strong 
was Mary Ella Beech of Go- 
shen, Conn., before her marriage. 
Carl is the only child. Edward 




214 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



M. Bentley, 1880, and Richard H. Phillips, 1912, are Yale 
relatives. 

Strongie prepared at the Torriiigton High School, and the 
Mount Hermon School, and is a member of the Mount Hermon 
Club. He roomed at home in Freshman year; at 280 Elm 
Street the remaining three years, alone. 

Strong expects to go into business, and will enter the Yale 
Graduate School. His address is care Rev. C. B. Strong, R. F. D. 
2, Waterbury, Conn. 

WALTER STUART was born 
near Mt. Clare, W. Va., January 
25, 1879, and has lived in Ohio, 
Kentucky, Texas, Virginia .and 
Indiana. 

His father, Charles Stuart, was 
born near Mt. Clare, W. Ya., 
in 1835 and was a fanner in West 
Virginia most of his life. He 
died in Baltimore in 1896. His 
mother, whose maiden name was 
Letitia RadcliflF, lived near Mt. 
Clare. Of their three sons and 
three daughters, five are living. 

Walter prepared with a pri- 
vate tutor at the National ISTor- 

*"!/ A^L^ _ /^/ / ^^^^1 University, and at West 

yr^UctlA^ (ixtZCaAyT^ Virginia University and the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, where he 

graduated with the degree of B.A. He entered Yale in Senior 

year. He roomed at 45 Lake Place. 

Stuart plans to take up educational work. His address is 

Mt. Clare, W. Va. 

RICHARD KERENS SUTHERLAND, "Dick," "Suthy," was 
born in Hancock, Md., November 27, 1893, and has lived in 
various places in Maryland and West Virginia. 

His father, Howard Sutherland, was born in Kirkwood, Mo., in 
1865, and was given the degree of B.A. by Westminster College 
(Mo.) in 1889. He is in the real estate business and has lived 
in St. Louis, Mo., Washington, D. C, and Elkins, W. Va. He 




GRADUATES 



215 



was a member of Congress. Effie 
(Harris) Sutherland, his mother, 
lived in Fulton, Mo. Of her ten 
children six are living. 

Dick prepared at the Davis- 
Elkins College, and at Andover. 
He belonged to the Freshman 
Mandolin Club and is a member 
of the Yale Battery and Alpha 
Delta Phi. He roomed "with 
A. M. Proctor the first three 
years of his course, at 660 Wright, 
193 Farnam, and 445 Fayer- 
weather; Senior year he roomed 
with Proctor and T. W. Eu- 
wright, at 67 Vanderbilt. 

Sutherland is undecided as to 
his future occupation; his ad- 
dress is Elkins, W. Va. 




iQj^^rU^Q-tUAJl 



FEAN"K HAMMOXD 
SWEET, JK., "Fran," was 
born in Grand Rapids, Mich., 
June 29, 1892. 

His father, Frank H. Sweet, 
was born in Grand Rapids, in 
1854, and attended Cornell, and 
Leipzig University, Germany. He 
has lived in Grand Rapids, where 
he is secretary of the Edward 
Lowe Timber Lands. Mabel 
(Lowe) Sweet, his mother, lived 
in Ashton-under-Lyne, England, 
and Grand Rapids before she 
married. She died in 1908. One 
son and one daughter survive her. 
Albert V. Hall, '13 S. ; Marcus B. 
Hall, '05, and Sidney E. Sweet, 
'05, are relatives. 

Fran prepared at the Westminster School, entered Yale with 
the Class of 1915 and then entered the Class of 1916 at the 




#ux^ € "^u^^- 



216 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Columbia School of Journalism, where he belonged to Delta Kappa 
Epsilon. lie was on the Freshman Glee and Mandolin Clubs and 
the 1915 Class Hockey Team. He received a second colloquy 
appointment in Junior year. Freshman year he roomed alone at 
596 Pierson; Sophomore year with A. W. Fowler and E. B. Smith, 
at 173 Lawrance; at 451 Fayerweather, in Junior year, with A. W. 
Fowler, and with Fowler in Senior year, at 58 Vanderbilt. 

Sweet expects to go into manufacturing; his address is 1015 
Michigan Trust Building, Grand Eapids, Mich. 



JAMES MANSFIELD SYMINGTON, "Jim," ''Sym," was 
born in New York City, December 2, 1894. 

His father, Albert Edmond Symington, was born in New York 
City, October 24, 1862, and was graduated from Yale in 1883, 
and from Columbia with the degree of LL.B. in 1887. He has 
lived in New York, where he practices law under the firm name 
of Symington, Symington & Symington. His mother lived in 
Cleveland, Ohio, before her marriage ; her name was Edith Louise 
Harris. Of her five children, three are living. William H. 
Symington, Yale 1912, is a brother. 

Jim prepared at the Taft School, and belongs to the Taft 

School Club. He was on the 
Freshman Glee Club; the Fresh- 
man Swimming Team; the Class 
Hockey Team ; and the Uni- 
versity Hockey Squad. He be- 
longs to Alpha Delta Phi, and 
the Red Coffin Club. Freshman 
year he roomed with John D. 
Hoyt, at 586 Pierson; Sopho- 
more year with Charles A. Fagan, 
at 143 Welch; Junior year with 
Fagan and C. P. Goodhue, at 
456 Fayerweather, and Senior 
year with John B. Fitzpatrick, 
at 667 Wright. 

Symington expects to go into 
the mercantile business. His ad- 
dress is 114 East Sixty-fourth 
Street, New York City. 




GRADUATES 



217 



I^EIL EANDALL TAYLOR, 

"Steak," was born in Portland, 
Maine, ISTovemLer 5, 1893. 

His father, William J^eil Tay- 
lor, who was born in Portland, 
Maine, February 19, 1859, has 
lived in Kansas and Portland, 
where he is engaged in the coal 
business, being city manager of 
the Eandall & McAllister Com- 
pany. Mrs. Taylor lived in Port- 
land before her marriage; her 
name was Maude Havens Ran- 
dall. JSTeil is the only child 
living. 

Steak prepared at the Port- 
land High School. He received 
first division honors in Freshman 
year ; was a member of the Fresh- 
man Banner Committee ; on the Freshman Glee Club ; on the 
Yale Gun Team, captain in 1915, and also manager, and has his 
numerals. In Junior year he was awarded third division honors, 
and a philosophical oration appointment ; and belongs to Phi 
Beta Kappa and Zeta Psi. He roomed throughout the course 
with S. W. Davidson, at 600 Pierson, 215 Farnam, 464 Fayer- 
weather and 137 Welch. 

Taylor expects to enter the Yale School of Law, and then 
to go into the mercantile business. His address is 64 Eastern 
Promenade, Portland, Maine. 




JCuJLQ. ^cy^ 



RICHARD CARLISLE TEFFT, JR., "Dick," was born in 
Hudson Falls, N. Y., August 9, 1893. 

His father, Richard Carlisle Tefft, was born in Plattsburg, 
N". Y., I^ovember 8, 1860, and was graduated from the Yale 
School of Law in 1883. He now lives in Hudson Falls, X. Y., 
where he is president of the Sandy Hill Iron k Brass Works. 
Mary Louise (Luther) Tefft, his mother, lived in Hudson Falls; 
there are two children in the family. 

Dick prepared at the Hudson Falls High School. Freshman 
year he was in the University Orchestra and received third 



218 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




division honors; in Junior year 
he won first division honors and 
an oration appointment. He was 
elected to Sigma Xi. He roomed 
with Henry E. Woodard in 
Freshman, Sophomore and Junior 
years, at 422 Berkeley, 209 Far- 
nam, and 469 Fayerweather ; 
Senior year with Woodard, A. R. 
Felty, and E. N. Little, at 81-90 
Connecticut. 

Tefft expects to enter the Johns 
Hopkins Medical School. His 
])ermanent address is 11 Mechanic 
Street, Hudson Falls, N. Y. 



6luu r 



KINLEY JOHN TENER, "Kin," was born in Allegheny, Pa., 
October 6, 1893, and has lived in Pittsburgh and Sewiekley, Pa. 

His father, George Evans 
Tener, was born in County Ty- 
rone, Ireland, November 4, 1856. 
He is in the copper business and 
resides in Sewiekley, Pa. His 
mother, who lived in Pittsburgh 
before her marriage, was Annie 
Frances Fallbush. There are two 
sons and two daughters in the 
family. A. C. Tener, 1912, is a 
brother. 

Kin prepared at the Sewiekley 
Public School, Miss Munson's 
Academy and The Hill School. 
He received second division hon- 
ors in Freshman year and a high 
oration appointment in Junior 
*-^^ *^ year. He was on the Crew 

/CcuJijyy' ^^^^<X/> Squad in Freshman and part of 
• - Sophomore year; is a Jumbly, 




GRADUATES 



219 



a member of the International Polity Club and The Hill School 
Club. He was on the University Choir; superintendent of the 
Bethany Sunday School; manager of the Dramatic Association; 
treasurer of the Junior Prom Committee, and is on the Class Day 
Committee. He belongs to Psi Upsilon and Skull and Bones. 

Freshman year he roomed with W. A. Brown, Jr., at 383 
Berkeley; Sophomore year with F. D. Downey and E. W. Hub- 
bard at 171 Lawrance; Junior and Senior years with E. W. 
Hubbard at 426 Fayerweather, and 20 Vanderbilt. 

Tener is undecided as to his future career. Sewickley, Pa., is 
his address. 



ELLWOOD DAVIS THOMAS, ''Tom," was born in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., January 6, 1896, and has lived there always with 
the exception of one year spent in Munich, Germany. 

His father, John D. Thomas, was born in Philadelphia, in 
July, I860, and is an architect, associated with John T. Windrim 
of Philadelphia. His mother, whose name was Julia Kingston 
Shipley, was also from Philadelphia. There are two sons, one 
being Shipley Thomas, Yale 1915. Other relatives are Morris S. 
Shipley, 1877 ; Caleb W. Shipley, 
1882; Murray Shipley, 1885 S., 
and Rev. Murray Shipley How- 
land, 1897. 

Tom prepared at the Chestnut 
Hill Academy, and belongs to the 
Chestnut Hill Club. In Junior 
year he received a second colloquy 
appointment and went out for 
crew. Freshman year he roomed 
alone at 656 Wright ; Sophomore 
year with W. A. Brown, Jr., at 
182 Lawrance; Junior and Senior 
years alone at 410 Berkeley and 
110 Welch. 

Thomas intends to enter Har- 
vard Law School; his address 
is 174 Maplewood Avenue, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 




y^^^iifyT-^-liK^:^ 



220 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




PERCY MUN"^ THOMP- 
SOX, ''Tommy," was born in 
Southington, Conn., January 29, 
1892, and has lived there, in 
Litchfield, Conn., and 'New York 
City. 

iris father, Charles Tuttle 
Thompson, Avas born in Xew 
Haven, Conn., and most of his 
life has been spent in Connect- 
icut. His mother who was also 
from New Haven, Conn., was 
Martha Candee Munn. There 
are three children in the family. 
Tommy prepared at the Boys' 
High School, Brooklyn, X. Y. 
//yh^ ^--y-y . He was on the Class Baseball 

' ^.«^*«/'«'a^«t . Team, Sophomore year, and on 

the University Squad in Junior 
year. He received a second colloquy appointment in Junior 
year. He roomed alone in Freshman year, at 262 York Street; 
with Philip Morgan Guenther in Sophomore year, at 242 Durf ee ; 
with John Archer Gee in Junior year, at 333 "White; and with 
Hans Albert Ascher and Walter John Wiese, at 42 Vanderbilt, 
in Senior year. 

Thompson is planning to take up banking; his address is 82 
Herriman Avenue, Jamaica, N. Y. 



SHERIDAX ALFRED THOMPSON", "Sherry," "Tommy," 
was born in the town of Conquest, Cayuga County, N". Y., 
April 28, 1893. 

His father, Emery Charles Thompson, was born in Camillus, 
]Sr. Y., October 8, 1850, and has lived most of the time in Con- 
quest, where he is a farmer and a mechanic. His mother, 
Harriet Emma (Wood) Thompson, was also born in Conquest, 
N. Y. There are two sons in the family. 

Sherry prepared at the Savannah High School, Savannah, 
Wayne County, N. Y. He received first division honors in 
Freshman year, and was on the Freshman Glee Club, and the 



GRADUATES 



221 



College Choir. In Junior year 
he received the Larned Scholar- 
ship, second division honors, and 
a philosophical oration. He is 
a nieniher of Phi Beta Kappa. 
Freshman year he roomed with 
E. A. Lnndgren at 591 Pierson ; 
Sophomore year with H. C. 
Brown, at 197 Farnam; Junior 
year with P. J^ichols and BroAvn, 
at 379 White, and Senior year 
with BroAvn, at 88 Connecticut. 
Thompson will enter the Yale 
Graduate School, and devote him- 
self to scientific pursuits. Plis 
address is K. D. 39, Port Byron, 
K Y. 




^.J^i^u^T,^^^^^^ d. 7^icn-^yLi-^>-^ 



LAUKEI^CE GOTZIAN 
TIGHE, ''Larry," was born 
in St. Paul, Minn., March 19, 
1894. 

His father, Ambrose Tiglie, was 
born in Brooklyn, JST. Y., May 8, 
1859, and was graduated from 
Yale in the Class of 1879. He 
has lived in St. Paul, Minn., 
where he practices law. Mrs. 
Tighe, who lived in St. Paul be- 
before her marriage, was Harriet 
Florence Gotzian. There are two 
sons and two daughters in the 
family. Aside from his father, 
Yale relatives include Conrad G. 
Driscoll, 1908 S.; Arthur G. Dris- 
coll, 1909 ; Robert Driscoll, 1913, 
and Theodore G. Driscoll, 1915 S. 




q^ 



^y^U4/^6^u^tc^ 



^"^^ 



222 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Larry prepared at The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa., and is 
president of The Hill School Club. In Freshman year he received 
second division honors. He was on the Freshman and Class 
Hockey Teams; business manager of the Xews; is treasurer and 
director of the Associated College Newspaper Publishers ; belongs 
to the Dramatic Association, and took part in "Quentin Durward," 
"Behind the Beyond," and "The Ghost of Jerry Bundler" ; received 
second division honors and a philosophical oration appointment in 
Junior year; is on the Class Supper Committee; a member of 
the Birthday Club; vice president of Phi Beta Kappa, and belongs 
to Delta Kappa Epsilon, the University Club, and Skull and Bones. 
He roomed Freshman and Sophomore years with G. E. Porter, 
M. K. Wilson, D. H. Mudge and D. C. Shepard, at 266 York 
Street and 239 Durfee. Junior year with G. E. Porter, D. H. 
Mudge, and D. C. Shepard, at 391 Berkeley. Senior year with 
G. E. Porter, D. H. Mudge, and D. O. Stewart at 39 Vanderbilt. 

Tighe expects to enter either Columbia or Harvard Law School ; 
his address is 314 Dayton Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 



HAROLD HILGARD TITTMANN, JR., "Titty," "Tit," 
"Ripper," "Twink," was born January 8, 1893, in St. Louis, Mo. 

His father, Harold Hilgard 
Tittmann, was born in Belle- 
ville, HI., in 1856, and has lived 
in St. Louis most of his life, 
where he is president of the St. 
Louis Stave & Lumber Company. 
Mrs. Tittmann lived in St. Louis ; 
her name was Emma Roe Cope- 
lin. Of her five children but two 
are living. Breckenridge A. Day, 
1913, and Clive C. Day, 1917, are 
relatives. 

Titty prepared at the Smith 
Academy, and at the Taft School 
and belongs to the Taft School 
Club. He was on the Freshman 
Glee Club, and the College Choir ; 
was an editor of the News; was on 
the Omega Lambda Chi Commit- 
tee, and belongs to Psi L^psilon ; 




yjU^/^/^;^.^,j„ 



GRADUATES 



223 



the Scarabs; the University Ckib; and Wolf's Head. lie taught 
at the Bethany Mission Sunday School. Freshman year he roomed 
with O. L. Guernsey, at 649 Wright; the remaining three years 
with Guernsey, H. Sproul, G. Haven and W. R. Proctor, Jr., at 
156 Lawrance, 468 White and 12 Vanderbilt. 

Tittmann expects to go into the manufacturing business ; his 
address is 5024 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo. 



FRAXK EDWARD TOOLE was born in Branford, Conn., 
:N"ovember 13, 1891. 

His father, Thomas Joseph Toole, was born in Xew Haven, 
Conn., in 1867, and is engaged in business in New Haven and 
Branford. Mrs. Toole was Mary McKeon of Branford before 
her marriage. Of her nine chil- 
dren, seven are living. Yale 
relatives are John E. Toole, 1917, 
a brother, Walter O'B. Toole, 
1916, and J. Frank Toole, 1917 S. 

Frank prepared at the Bran- 
ford High School, and was a 
member of the Class of 1915. 
He was on the 1915 Freshman 
Football Team. He roomed at 
home in Freshman and Sopho- 
more years ; with Malcolm Johns 
Baber, at 455 Fayerweather, in 
Junior year, and with Charles 
Parker Eddy, at 74 Connecticut, 
in Senior year. 

Toole is enrolled in the Yale 
School of Medicine. His address 
is Branford, Conn. 




.^Z^Sl^J^rt^ 



WALTER O'BRIEN TOOLE, "Walt," 'Toolie," was born 
in Branford, Conn., February 12, 1894, and has lived there and 
in New Haven. 

His father, James Francis Toole, was born in New Haven, 
Conn., February 23, 1866, and is proprietor of the Hotel Duncan, 
and The Shoreham. His mother, Margaret Kent (O'Brien) Toole, 
lived in New Haven. Her two sons and one daughter are living, 
Yale relatives include Frank E. Toole, 1916; J. Frank Toole, 



224 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




C^^^r^^^^€:^^1l^'<2Ur^^^ 



1917 S.; John E. Toole, 1917, 
and James M. O'Brien, '98 M. 

Walt prepared at the New 
TTaven High School. He was 
(111 the Frcsliiiiaii Glee C'hib. 
Junior year he received a first 
dispute a])i)oiiitnient. lie was on 
the Water Polo Team in Senior 
year, and belongs to the Yale 
Battery and Beta Theta Pi. 
Freshman year he roomed wnth 
Robert Oliver, at 611 Wright ; the 
remaining three years at Hotel 
Duncan, Avith J. Frank Toole. 

Toole is undecided whether he 
will go in for manufacturing, or 
some mercantile business ; his 
address is Hotel Duncan, New 
Haven, Conn. 



HARRY ARTHUR TOR- 
SON", "Tawson," was born in 
Moorhead, Minn., October 28, 
1892. 

His father, Thomas Torson, 
was born in lola, Wis., in 1862, 
and studied two years at Ripon 
College. He is located in Fargo, 
N. Dak., where he conducts a 
business college. Mrs. Torson, 
whose name was Josephine Car- 
penter Ames before her marriage, 
lived in Waubeck, Wis. There 
are two sons and three daughters 
in the family. 

Torson prepared at the Moor- 
head High School, and Fargo 
College. He was on the Fresh- 
man Glee Club; the Freshman 
Football Squad, and the University Football Squad; is on the 
Class Book Committee; belongs to Psi Upsilon, the Ptombers, the 




^tUy^ O^Tl 



(T-Vo o-iTL 



GRADUATES 



225 



Yale Battery, and the Elihii Club. He roomed with Arthur R. 
Jones and James M. Jessup, in Freshman year, at 600 Pierson 
and 604 Wright ; the remaining three years with Jones and R, H. 
Polhamus, at 161 Lawrance, 457 FayerAveather, and 21 Vanderbilt. 
Torson will go into business. His address is Moorhead, Minn. 



STANLEY JOHN" TRACE- 
SKI, "Stan," "Tress," "Tri," 
"Tracey," was born in j^ew 
Britain, Conn., April 27, 1893. 

His father, John Traceski, was 
born in Frisztak, Austria, De- 
cember 12, 1861, but has lived 
the most of his life in ISTew Bri- 
tain, where he is a carpenter and 
wood-worker, in the employ of 
Landers, Frary & Clark. His 
mother, who also lived in Frisz- 
tak, Austria, was Gabrielle Gro- 
man. Of her seven sons and four 
daughters, nine are living. 

Stan prepared at the Wew Bri- 
tain High School. He won third 
division honors in Freshman 
year, received three scholarships, 
and took part in the Sophomore Public Speaking Contest. Junior 
year he received second division honors, and a high oration appoint- 
ment. Freshman year he roomed alone, at 239 York Street ; 
Sophomore year with Clarence T. Lowell, at 210 Farnam ; alone 
in Junior year, at 418 Berkeley, and with Harold H. Wright in 
Senior year, at 89 Connecticut. 

Traceski will enter the Yale School of Law. His address is 
80 Jubilee Street, ISTew Britain, Conn. 




52^^^#<,.^^2^^l^»-c,t.<*^ 



GILBERT McCOY TROXELL, "Trixie," was born in West 
Pittston, Pa., May 29, 1893. 

His father, Edgar Rudolph Troxell, was born in Fogelsville, 
Pa., April 3, 1850, and was a member of the Yale Class of 1872, 
later receiving the degree of M.D. from the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, in 1875. He has lived in Wilkesbarre and Pittston, 



226 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Pa., where he is engaged in ac- 
tive practice. Besides his father, 
Yale rehitives are Thomas Xu- 
gent Troxell, 1902; Edgar R. 
Troxell, Jr., 1904 S., and George 
S. Troxell, f.r-1908 S. 

Trixie prepared at St. Luke's 
School, Wayne, Pa. He was on 
the executive committee of the 
Berkeley Association, a member 
of Chi Delta Theta, was awarded 
a second dispute in Junior year, 
and received the Scott Prize in 
French. Freshman year he 
roomed with William Hamilton 
Gardner, 2d, at 622 Wright; 
Sophomore year with Gordon 
Bodenwein, at 235 Durf ee ; alone 
in Junior year at 394 Berkeley, 
and with Gordon Bodenwein, at 96 Welch, in Senior year. His 
permanent address is 232 Wyoming Avenue, West Pittston, Pa. 





JjJjLun^y y/y iJcuvCL^ Qy. 



WILLISON KERR VAXCE, 
JR., "Bill," "Ad," was horn 
in Monongahela, Pa., March 19, 
1895. 

His father, Willi son Kerr 
Vance, was born in Mononga- 
hela, Pa., May 30, 1871, and was 
gradnated from the University of 
Michigan with the degree of 
LL.B. in 1894. He practices 
law in Monongahela, in the firm 
of Vance k Gibson. His mother, 
Harriet (Sampson) Vance, lived 
in Xenia, Ohio, before her mar- 
riage. Of her three children, 
two are living. 

Bill prepared at the Mononga- 
hela High School, and at Kiski- 
minetas Springs School. He was 



GRADUATES 



227 



awarded a first colloquy appointment in Junior year. He roomed 
for the four year witli Charles A. Johnson, at 555-7 Pierson, 
244 Durfee, 474 Haughton, and 124 Welch. 

Vance expects to enter the Johns Hopkins Medical School ; his 
address is Monongahela, Pa. 



ROLAND VIRGIL VAUGHN", 

"Rollie," "Leaguer," was born in 
Haverhill, Mass., January 23, 
1891. 

His father, Harvey Scribner 
Vaughn, born in Haverhill, 
Mass., in 1865, is now in the 
upholstering business there. His 
mother, who also lived in Haver- 
hill, Avas Susie Caroline Bickum; 
of her three sons and two daugh- 
ters, four are living. 

Rollie prepared at the Haver- 
hill High School, and at Exeter, 
and belongs to the Exeter Club. 
He was captain of the Freshman 
Baseball Team ; played on the 
L^niversity Team, captain in 
1916. He received a first col- 
loquy appointment in Junior year; belongs to the Yale Battery, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon, and the Elihu Club. He roomed with 
Reginald Field in Freshman year, at 9 Library Street ; with 
Charles Walker the remaining three years, at 213 Farnam, 501 
Haughton, and 2 Vanderbilt. 

Vaughn expects to enter Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
and to go into the manufacturing business. His address is 27 
Commonwealth Avenue, Haverhill, Mass. 




^\o^ii-v^ Uu-Y-' (^«-<'^*-u^ 



SHELDON KNICKERBOCKER VIELE, "S. K.," was born 
in Buffalo, N. Y., November 18, 1892. 

His father, Sheldon Thompson Viele, "was born in Buffalo, Janu- 
aiy 4, 1847, and was graduated from Yale in the Class of 1868. 
He is a lawyer, in Buffalo, where Mrs. Viele also lived. Her 



228 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




OUcUxh.VuAi 



iiaine was Anna Porter Dorr. 
There are five children in the 
family. Dorr Viele, '02, is a 
brother and William Y. Warren, 
ex-'65 S., is a relative. 

S. K. prepared at the Lafayette 
Pligh School, Buffalo. lie was on 
the Record Board and received 
a first colloquy appointment in 
Junior year. Freshman year he 
roomed alone at 572 Pierson ; the 
remaining three years with Ed- 
ward D. Mulligan, at 246 Durfee, 
352 White, and 108 Welch. 

Viele is undecided as to his 
future work. His address is 
218 Highland Avenue, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 



JOHN HENKY VINCENT, "John," "Johnnie," was born 
in Clifton Springs, N. Y., May 5, 1895, and has lived in Buffalo. 

N. Y., Chicago, 111., and Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

His father, George Edgar Vin- 
cent, was born in Rockford, 111., 
March 21, 1864, and was gradu- 
ated from Yale with the degree 
of B.A. in 1885, and from the 
University of Chicago in 1896 
Avith the degree of Ph.D. He re- 
ceived the honorary degree of 
LL.D. from Yale in 1911. He 
is president of the University of 
Minnesota. His mother, Louise 
Mary (Palmer) Vincent, lived in 
Wilkesbarre, Pa., and was gradu- 
ated from Wellesley in the Class 
of 1886. There are three chil- 
dren in the family. 

John prepared at the Hotcli- 
kiss School, Lakeville, Conn. 




^Mi^ J'/^A^/yu. (/.x^^c^aaA 



GRADUATES 



229 



Freshman year he was awarded first division honors and was 
on the Freshman Track Team, winning nnmerals. In Junior year 
he received third division honors, and a philosophical oration 
appointment. He is on the Senior Class Book Committee, belongs 
to the Hotchkiss Club, the Elizabethan Club, Phi Beta Kappa, 
Psi Upsilon, and Scroll and Key. Freshman year he roomed 
with J. M. Butler and L. Porter, at 549 Pierson ; the remaining 
three years with E. R. Wilson, at 151 Lawrance, 432 Fayer- 
weather, and 34 Vanderbilt. 

Vincent expects to enter Harvard Law School ; his address is 
1005 Fifth Street, Minneapolis, Minn. 



HERMA^^N VALDEMAR vonHOLT, "Herm," ''Von," "Xui," 
Avas born in Honolulu, Hawaii, January 29, 1894, and has lived 
in California and in England. 

His father, Harry Martin vonHolt, was born in Honolulu, 
September 15, 1863, and has always lived there, where he is 
engaged in ranching, and is vice president and manager of the 
ranch department of the Oahu Railroad k Land Company. His 
mother, Avhose name was Ida Eliza Knvidsen, lived in Waiawa, 
Kekaha, Kauai, Hawaiian Islands. There are two sons and three 
daughters in the family. 

Herm prepared at the Valley 
School, the Punahou Preparatory 
School, the Oahu College Prepar- 
atory School, and at the Thacher 
School. He is president of the 
Hawaiian Club, and vice presi- 
dent of the Thacher Club. He 
was on the Water Polo Team for 
four years, captain during Senior 
year; played on the University 
Football Team ; has a "Y" and 
numerals and was on the second 
Class Crew in 1914. He was 
awarded third division honors in 
Freshman year, and a first dispute 
in Junior year. He is on the 
Senior Promenade Committee ; 
and belongs to the Cosmopolitan 
Club, Zeta Psi, the Ptombers, 




:H.V. 



lAzn^^ 



J4x>-C^ 



230 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



and Skull and Bones. He roomed alone in Freshman year, at 
588 Pierson ; the remaining three years with Ellsworth Bunker, 
D. D. Geary and W. A. Eansom, at 136-137 Welch; 337-338 
White; and 134-136 Welch. 

von Holt intends to go into the transportation business; his 
address is Honolulu, Hawaii. 



CHARLES RUMFORD WALKER, JR., "Doc," was born in 
Concord, N. H., July 31, 1893. 

His father, Charles R. Walker, was born in Concord, N. H., 
February 13, 1852, and was graduated from Yale with the degree 
of B.A. in 1874, and from Harvard Medical School with the 
degree of M.D. in 1878. He is a physician, practicing in Con- 
cord, N. H. Frances (Sheafe) Walker, his mother, lived in 
Boston, Mass., before her marriage ; there are two children living. 
Sheafe Walker, 1913, is a brother. Other relatives are Joseph 
B. Walker, 1844, M.A. 1891 (grandfather), and Nathaniel U. 
Walker, 1877 (uncle). 

Doc prepared at the Concord High School, and at Phillips- 
Exeter, and is on the executive committee of the Exeter Club. He 
received first division honors in Freshman year ; was on the 
Freshman and University Track Teams and has numerals. He 

received a philosophical oration 
appointment in Junior year and 
is chairman of the Yale Literary 
Magazine. He belongs to Psi 
Upsilon, Chi Delta Theta, the 
Elizabethan Club, Phi Beta 
Kap])a, Pundits; is a Townsend 
num (Senior speaking contest), 
and a member of Skull and 
Bones, and the Ivy Committee. 
He roomed with Donald O. Stew- 
art in Freshman year, at 9 
Library Street; the remaining 
three years with Roland Y. 
Vaughn, at 213 Farnam, 501 
Haughton, and 2 Yanderbilt. 

Walker is uncertain as to his 
future occupation. His ad- 
dress is 18 Park Street, Concord, 
N. H. 




^^^^^/z:^^/^. 



GRADUATES 



231 



LAURISTON WALSH, 
"Larry," was born in Corning, 
N". Y., October 6, 1894. 

He is the only cbikl of George 
B. Walsh, born in Bremerton, 
N. Y., 1865, who has lived chiefly 
in Corning, N. Y., engaged in 
railway employ. Mrs. Walsh 
Avas Ida Cowan Tui)])er of Corn- 
ing, before her marriage. 

Larry prepared at the Corning 
Academy, and at Exeter. He 
was on the Freshman Baseball 
Team ; on the University Base- 
ball Team and has numerals. He 
is in the College Choir, and be- 
longs to the Exeter Club, Alpha 
Delta Phi, and Theta jSTu Epsilon. 
He roomed alone in Freshman 

year, at 530 Pierson; with J. W. Stewart and J. W. Smith in 
Sophomore year, at 270 Durfee ; the remaining two years with 
Stewart, at 383 Berkeley, and 86 Connecticut. 

Walsh expects to enter Harvard Law School. His permanent 
address is 44 East First Street, Corning, N. Y. 




oixUA^JlUl/l 




CHEA^G-HSU HENRY WANG, "C. H.," was bom in Ningpo, 
China, September 30, 1893, and has lived in Shanghai and 
Peking, China. 

His father, Yiu Kw^ong Wang, was born in 1849 in ISTingpo, 
and was graduated from Trinity College, Ningpo. He Avas a 
Christian minister, being pastor of the Diocese of Ningpo. He 
died in 1911. His mother is Dz-Meo Sze, and her home before 
marriage was in Shanghai. There are eight children in the family. 
Cheng-ting T. Wang, Yale 1910, is a brother. 

C. H. prepared at the St. John's Preparatory School, Shanghai, 
China, and at Tsing Hua College, Peking. He also spent tw^o 
years at St. John's College, Shanghai, and entered Yale in 
Sophomore year. He held a Chinese Government Scholarship. 
He belongs to the Chinese Students' Club, was its treasurer in 
Junior year, and is now" its president. He Avas awarded the 
first TenEyck Prize for public speaking, and a ToAvnsend Pre- 



232 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




iniiiiu ill Senior year ; also an 
oration appointment in Jnnior 
year. He is president of the 
Cosniopolitau Club ; president of 
the Chinese Students' Christian 
Association of North America, 
and councilman of the Chinese 
Students' Alliance in the United 
States. He roomed with K. F. 
Mok in Sophomore year, at 333 
York Street; alone in Junior 
year, at 409 Berkeley, and with 
Mok at 84 Connecticut, in Senior 
year. 

Wang expects to go into busi- 
ness ; his permanent address after 
1918 will be 3 Quinsan Gardens, 
Shanghai, China. 




^i)UX- jX \j^ CUbSlv5l>V*>v/v^ 



IRA HEDGES WASH- 
BUR]^ was born in Haverstraw, 
N. Y., August 11, 1892, and that 
is still his home. 

His father, Mortimer Fowler 
Washburn, was born in Haver- 
straw. His mother, Margaret 
(Hedges) Washburn, lived in 
Haverstraw before her marriage. 

Ira prepared at St. Paul's 
School, Concord, iST. H., and is 
a member of the St. Paul's 
School Club. He was on the 
Freshman Football and Hockey 
Teams, and the University 
Hockey Team in 1916. He Avas 
awarded a second colloquy ap- 
pointment in Junior year. Be- 
longs to Alpha Delta Phi, 



GRADUATES 



233 



R. K. K., and the C'orintliiau Yacht Chih. Freshman year he 
roomed with Thomas Dolan, 3d, at 619 Wright ; Sophomore year 
with Joseph Burnett, at 266 Diirfee; Junior year with L. M. 
Lloyd, at 435 Fayerweather, and Senior year with Lloyd and 
C. A. Fagan at 64 Vanderbilt. 

Washburn is going into the manufacturing business, and his 
address is Haverstraw, ]^. Y. 



NELSOX MARION" WAY, 

"Pi," "Leaguer," Avas born in 
Pierre, S. Dak., June 14, 1890, 
and now lives in Manchester, 
K H. 

His father, Benjamin Thomas 
Way, who has lived most of his 
life in Vermont, is president of 
the Lyster Chemical Company. 
His mother, Nellie (Durkee) 
Way, lived in Malone, IST. Y., be- 
fore her marriage. She died in 
1890. There are two sons and 
four daughters in the family. 

Pi prepared at the Manchester 
High School, and at Exeter, and 
was in the Class of 1915 at ISTor- 
■^'ich University. He played on 
the Freshman and University 
Football and Baseball teams and 
has numerals and a "Y." He was business manager of the 
Banner-Pot Pourri and is a member of the Exeter Club, Delta 
Kappa Epsilon and Scroll and Key. Freshman, Sophomore and 
Junior years he roomed with Phelps Putnam and D. O. Stewart, 
at 9 Library Street, 140 Welch, and 504 Haughton ; Senior year 
with Robert Beale, at 51 Vanderbilt. 

Way expects to go into business. His address is 155 Myrtle 
Street, Manchester, ^N". H. 




FORREST BANKS WEAKLEY was born in Roby, Texas, 
December 8, 1895, and has lived there and in Abilene, Texas. 

His father, John Norton Weakley, was born near Munroe, Mo., 
in 1855, and lived in Roby, Texas, where he was a ranchman and 



234 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




%>>/>^ Jlcx..j^.^fUiJ0JU,4l£LM 



druggist. He died at Mineral 
Wells, Texas, in 1908. His 
mother, who lived in Tokeen, 
Texas, was Lula Jane Bright. 
Two sons and one daughter are 
in the family. 

Forrest prepared at the Roby 
(Texas) High School, at the 
Academy at Simmons College, 
Abilene, and was graduated from 
Simmons College, with the de- 
gree of B.A., in 1915, entering 
Yale in Senior year. He roomed 
at 111 Welch, with John D. 
Garvin. 

Weakley will enter the State 
University at Austin, Texas, to 
study law. His address is Abi- 
lene, Texas. 



HOBART STOWE WEAVER, 

"Weav," was born in Torrington, 
Conn., March 19, 1894, and has 
lived there, in Derby, Conn., and 
in Waterbury, Conn. 

His father, Franklin Everett 
Weaver, was born in N^ew Bed- 
ford, Mass., November 1, 1870, 
and has spent most of his life 
in Xew Bedford, New Haven, 
Conn., and Waterbury, where lie 
is assistant secretary and sales 
manager for the American Brass 
Company. His mother, who lived 
in New Haven before her mar- 
riage, was Sarah Read Stowe. 
There are three sons and one 
daughter in the family. Ed- 




i{ S. i^ 



QJU<./K^ 



GRADUATES 



235 



wiu S. Pickett, '99, '01 L., and Kalpli M. Read, '12 S., are Yale 
relatives. 

Weav prepared at tlie Crosby High School, "Waterbury, and 
was in the Class of 1915 at Yale. He received a first colloquy 
in Junior year; was in the cast of "Quentin Durward"; and 
also took part in debating, as a member of the Wayland Club. 
Freshman year he roomed alone at 577 Pierson ; Sophomore and 
Junior years with H. P. Hamblin, at 165 Lawrance and 348 
White; Senior year Avith J. E. Hallen and J. D. Hauslein, at 
123 Welch. 

Weaver expects to enter the Columbia Law School; his address 
is 88 Cooke Street, Waterburv, Conn. 



ARTHUR BISMARCK WEISS, ''Art," was born in Brook- 
lyn, X. Y., March 26, 1895, but has lived in Bridgeport, Conn. 

His father, Leopold Weiss, was born in Olmiitz, Austria, April 
2, 1858, but has lived in Bridgeport for many years, where he is 
a real estate broker. His mother, Kate Helen (Spitz) Weiss, lived 
in Vienna, Austria, before her marriage; she died May 25, 1904. 
Three sons and three daughters survive her. 

Art prepared at the Bridgeport High School. Freshman year 
he was awarded third division 
honors; in Junior year he re- 
ceived second division honors, and 
an oration appointment. He be- 
longs to the International Polity 
Club, the Biblical and Semitic 
Club and the Menorah Society. 
Freshman year he lived at home, 
in Bridgeport. Sophomore year, 
he roomed alone, at 419 Berkeley; 
Junior year with Benjamin Lev- 
inson, at 109 Welch, and Senior 
year with George Kramer, at 18 
Vanderbilt. 

Weiss expects to enter Dropsie 
College, Philadelphia, and to go 
into educational work. His ad- 
dress is 1438 Main Street, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 




2B6 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




bria:n' kennicott 

WELCH, "Bree," was born in 
Gowanda, K Y., March 14, 1893, 
and has lived in Pasadena, Calif., 
for the ]iast ten years. 

His father, Theodore Freyling- 
hnysen Welch, was born in Go- 
Avanda, 'N. Y., in 1847, and was 
graduated from Yale in 1869. He 
lived the most of his life in Go- 
wanda, practicing law in Buffalo, 
later continuing his practice in 
Los Angeles, Calif. He died in 
Pasadena, Calif., April 13, 1911. 
His mother, who also lived in 
Gowanda, was Jennie Torrance; 
there are three children in the 
family. Besides his father, Tor- 
rance C. Welch, 1913 (a brother), 
Jared S. Torrance, 1875 S. (uncle), and George S. Welch, 1890 
(cousin), are Yale relatives. 

Bree prepared at Throop Polytechnic Institute, Pasadena, at 
the Pasadena High School, and at Phillips-Andover. He belongs 
to the Andover Club and Alpha Delta Phi. Freshman year 
he led the Freshman Mandolin Club and Sophomore year he was 
on the Apollo Mandolin Club; in Junior year received a second 
colloquy appointment. He roomed the entire four years with 
Nicholson Joseph Eastman, at 452 Fayerweather, 164 Lawrance, 
446 Faj^erweather, and 28 Vanderbilt. Part of Sophomore year he 
also roomed with W. H. Jones and Charles Hyde at 168 Lawrance. 
Welch plans to go into business; his address is 1210 Wash- 
ington Building, Los Angeles, Calif. 



'i^'-^^t^ M vx>JC(X 



AUGUSTUS LEWIS WELLS, "Gus," was born in Parkers- 
burg, W. Va., July 2, 1890, and has lived in a number of places, 
including Milan, Ohio, fourteen years, and Waterbury, Conn. 

His father, Charles Walker Wells, was born in Parkersburg. 
W. Va., in 1852, and was in the oil refining business in West 
Virginia, and later a salesman. He died January 3, 1900. His 
mother, Frances Helene Dis Debar, was a resident of Parkersburg ; 
there are seven children in the family. Frederick J. Murphy, 
Yale 1910, is a brother-in-law. 



GRADUATES 



237 



Gus prepared at Andover, and 
is a member of the Andover Club. 
He played left-field on the Fresh- 
man Baseball Team, has numer- 
als and has played class baseball 
and soccer. He belongs to Delta 
Kappa Epsilou. Freshman year 
he roomed with W. M. Levy, Jr., 
at 414 Berkeley ; Avith Levy, A. B. 
Graham, L. M. Lloyd and John 
Hopkins, in Sophomore year, at 
272 Durfee ; with Levy and Gra- 
ham in Junior and Senior years, 
at 354 White and 65 Yanderbilt. 

Wells expects to go into the 
manufacturing business ; his ad- 
dress is 59 Pierpont Street, 
Waterbury, Conn. 




^ ;f. ^.c^ce^ 



RICHARD JOSEPH WHITE, "Sam," "Tex," "^ig," "Jose- 
phus," was born in Quanah, Texas, K^ovember 12, 1893, and 
lives in Brady, Texas. 

His father, Joseph Hudspeth 
White, was born in Independence, 
Mo., N'ovember 1, 1856, and has 
lived the most of his life in 
Brady, Texas^ where he is a cat- 
tleman and real estate dealer. His 
mother, Mary Amanda (Richard- 
son) White, lived in Clarksville, 
Tenn., before her marriage ; there 
are three sons and one daughter 
in the family. 

Joe prepared at the Terrill 
School, Dallas, Texas, and is sec- 
retary and treasurer of the Ter- 
rill School Club. He received 
second division honors in Fresh- 
man year, and a Berkeley pre- 
mium^ of the first grade in Latin 
composition. He was a candidate 




£Juj£m 



238 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



foz- the Freshman Debating Team ; belonged to the Apollo Glee 
Club for three years, and the University Glee Club one year, and 
was on the (.^ollege Choir; in Junior year received third division 
honors and a high oration appointment. He belongs to the 
Southern Club, the Yale Battery and Alpha Delta Phi. He 
i-oomed with F. G. Coates in Freshman, Sophomore and Junior 
years, at 109 Welch, 202 Farnam, and 370 White; with Coates 
and E. R. Fish in Senior year, at 7 Vanderbilt. 

White expects to study medicine, and will enter Johns Hopkins 
Medical School. His address is Brady, Texas. 



WALTER JOHN WIESE, "Walt," was born in Meriden, 
Conn., June 13, 1894. 

His father, John M. Wiese, was born in Germany, August 24. 

1865, and is in business in Meri- 
den, Conn. His mother, Anna 
Henrietta (Nissen) Wiese, lived 
in Middletown, Conn., before her 
marriage; there are two sons in 
the family. 

Walt prepared at the Meriden 
High School. He received a sec- 
ond dispute appointment in Jun- 
ior year. Sophomore year he 
roomed with Albert C. Merriam, 
at 163 Lawrance; Junior year 
with H. A. Ascher, at 461 Fayer- 
weather ; Senior year with Ascher 
and P. M. Thompson, at 42 
Vanderbilt. 

Wiese expects to enter the Har- 
vard Medical School ; his address 
is 102 Lincoln Street, Meriden, 
Conn. 




Iwifec -l ■ Iw-^ 



HOWARD HALLEY WILES was born in Albany, N. Y., 
May 15, 1894. 

His father, Charles Frederick Wiles, was born April 29, 1856, 
in Albany, where he has always lived. His mother, Fannie Hart 
(Halley) Wiles, also lived in Albany; there are two sons in the 
family. 



GRADUATES 



239 



Howard prepared at the Al- 
bany Academy. He was awarded 
the Berkeley Premium in Latin 
composition (second grade), and 
honorable mention in the Lucius 
F. Robinson Prize. In Junior 
year he received second division 
honors, a first dispute appoint- 
ment, and stood third in rank for 
the Lucius F. Robinson Prize. He 
has roomed for four years with 
Lawrence S. Morris and William 
Wyer, at 637 Wright, 16-t Law- 
rance, 414 Berkeley, and 106 
Welch. 

Wiles expects to go into busi- 
ness ; his permanent address is 
336 State Street, Albany, K Y. 




Qu^.^r.^C^'^.A^ 



DANIEL WILLARD, JR., "Dan," was born in Minneapolis, 
Minn., February 15, 1894, and has lived there, in Baltimore, Md., 
I^ew York City, and in Chicago, 
111. 

His father, Daniel Willard, 
was born in ISTorth Hartland, 
Yt., January 28, 1861, and was 
honored with the degree of LL.D. 
by the University of Maryland 
in 1914, and by Dartmouth in 
1915. He has lived in various 
places, being in the railroad busi- 
ness, and is now president of the 
Baltimore &: Ohio Railroad. Mrs. 
Willard lived in N'orth Troy, Yt., 
before her marriage ; her name 
was Bertha Leone Elkins. There 
are two sons in the family. 

Dan prepared at Phillips-Ex- 
eter ; he belongs to the Exeter 
Club, the Southern Club, the Yale 
Battery, the University Club, and 




/v^^^^^-^^^wi^^^^^^^4» 



240 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Alpha Delta Phi. His roommate for the four years has been 
Paul Stetson Phenix, at 451 Fayerweather, 258 Durfee, 443 Fayer- 
weather, and 24 Vanderbilt. 

Willard expects to enter the Harvard Law School, and to go 
into the transportation business. His address is Roland Park, Md. 

LAWREXCE GEORGE 
AVILLIAMS, 'Tarry," ''Harry," 
■was born in Buffalo, X. Y., May 
31, 1892. 

His father, Harry Dezell Wil- 
liams, was born in Hamilton, 
N. Y., October 28, 1862, and has 
spent most of his life in Buffalo, 
X. Y., where he practices law 
with the firm of Williams, 
Minard k Howell. His mother, 
who lived in Port Dover, Ontario, 
Canada, before her marriage, was 
Louise Caroline Skey. There are 
three sons in the family. 

Larry prepared at the Xichols 
School, Buffalo, and is treasurer 
of the Xichols School Club. He 
was secretary and circulation 
manager of the Yale Record; is on the Senior Class Book Com- 
mittee, and belongs to O. C. C. and Alpha Delta Phi. Freshman 
year he roomed with Morris Belknap, at 656 Wright; Sophomore 
year with Louis Miller and Donald Robinson, at 173 Lawrance; 
Junior and Senior years with Lloyd Bissell, at 372 White and 
19 Vanderbilt. 

Williams intends to enter the Harvard Law School ; his address 
is 60 Oakland Place, Buffalo, X. Y. 




ix..^,^^.^^^ 



MARSHALL HEXRA^ WILLIAMS, "Marsh," was born in 
Brooklyn, X. Y., September 24, 1894, and has lived in Bing- 
hamton, X. Y ., for the past seventeen years. 

His father, Frederick Harrison Williams, was born February 
25, 1868, and Avas graduated from A'ale in 1891. He has spent 
most of his life in Xew York City, but is now a teacher in the 
Binghamton High School. His mother, Alice Eliza (Corbett) 
Williams, lived in Brooklyn before her marriage, and died in 



GRADUATES 



241 



Corbettsville, N. Y., in Septem- 
ber, 1901. Two sons and one 
daughter survive her. Aside from 
his father, Cyprian S. Brainerd, 
Jr., Yale 1850, is a relative. 

Marsh prepared at the Bing- 
hamton Central High School. 
He sang on the Freshman Glee 
Club, went out for swimming 
and belongs to the Yale Bat- 
tery, Beta Theta Pi, and Phi 
'Nil. Freshman year he roomed 
with Luther P. Graves, Jr., at 
599 Pierson ; Sophomore and 
Junior years with Robert S. 
Oliver and Walter C. Leonard, 
at 206 Farnam and 376 White; 
Senior year with I. Heyward 
Peck, at 73 Connecticut. 

Williams intends to enter business. 
Street, Binghamton, JST. Y. 




His address is 18 Murray 



LORIN" WILLIAM WILLIS, 
"Bill," was born in Bridgeport, 
Conn., June 1, 1893, and still 
lives there. 

His father, Lewis Curtis Wil- 
lis, was born in Bristol, Conn., 
April 4, 1868, and has lived most 
of the time in Bridgeport, where 
he is in the employ of the Bridge- 
port Brass Company. His mother 
was Lulu Louise Broadmeadow of 
Bridgeport. There are two sons, 
Stanley L. Willis, Yale '17 S., 
being the other. 

Bill prepared at the Bridge- 
port High School, and was 
awarded a second colloquy ap- 
pointment in Junior year. He 
roomed with A. G. Newman, at 




^.cw^ Uf. U/.Jl^ 



242 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



925 Howard Avenue, in Freshman year; with C. F. Black, at 
344 Elm Street, in Sophomore year; with his brother, S. L. 
Willis, in Junior and Senior years, at 299 York Street, and 295 
York Street. 

Willis intends to enter the Yale School of Law; his address is 
2925 Main Street, Bridgeport, Conn. 




ALEXANDER DICKSOX 

WILSON", "Alex," ''Wiltsie," 
was born in Binghamton, X. Y., 
February 15, 1892. 

His father, Leslie McLean Wil- 
son, has spent the most of his life 
in Scranton, Pa., and Bingham- 
ton, X. Y., where he is a whole- 
sale grain dealer, president of the 
Empire Grain and Elevator Com- 
pany. His mother, Nellie (Orr) 
Wilson, lived in Wilkesbarre, Pa., 
before her marriage. Of her 
eleven children, eight are living. 
Stuart S. Wilson, Yale 1912, is a 
relative. 

CZJUi. ^. ijj tjUjriA :^^'''' prepared at Exeter, and 

' V Princeton Preparatory School, 

and belongs to the Exeter Club. 
He was on the Freshman Football Team, and the Fniversity 
Football Team for three years, captain in Senior year; has a 
"Y" and numerals; belonged to the L'niversity Track Team for 
two years, and the University Basketball Team. He was on the 
Sophomore German Committee, the Junior Promenade Com- 
mittee, and the University Dining Hall Committee, and a mem- 
ber of the University Athletic Association. He is a cup man; 
belongs to Plugs, Birthday Club, Delta Kappa Epsilon, and 
Scroll and Key. He roomed for the four years with Sidney 
W. Farnsworth, at 502 Haughton, 234 Durfee, 367 White, and 
47 Vanderbilt. 

Wilson expects to go into business; his address is 27 Xorth 
Street, Binghamton, X. Y. 



GRADUATES 



243 



EVERETT ROWLAND 
WILSON, ''Whiskey," was born 
in Pekin, 111., September 19, 
1892. 

His father, Everett Woodruff 
Wilson, was born in Peoria, No- 
vember 3, 1861, and has spent his 
life there, as a banker and a capi- 
talist. His mother, Anne (Wan- 
snider) Wilson, lived in Pekin; 
there are three sons in the family. 

Whiskey prepared at St. Paul's 
School, Concord, N. H., and be- 
longs to the St. Paul's School 
Club. He was an editor of the 
Xeus; was on the Apollo Glee 
Club, and vice president of the 
Dramatic Association. He took 
part in ''Fritzchen," ''Gringoire," 
"Paranoia," "Behind the Beyond," "The Stranger," "Harold," 
and "An Ideal Husband." He belongs to Psi Upsilon. Freshman 
year he roomed with Allan McLane, Jr., at 654 Wright ; the 
remaining three years with John H. Vincent, at 157 Lawrance, 
432 Fayerweather, and 34 Vanderbilt. 

Wilson expects to go into manufacturing; his address is 905 
South Fifth Street, Pekin, 111. 




ROBERT WILBAR WILSON, "Bob," "Wils," was born in 
Harrisburg, Pa., August 26, 1893. 

His father, Edwin Ellsworth Wilson, was born in Shepherds- 
town, Pa., and his mother, Emma Loretta Wilbar, in West 
Fairview, Pa. There are three sons and one daughter in the 
family. 

Bob prepared at the Harrisburg Academy, and belongs to the 
Harrisburg Academy Club. He is on the Dramat Eligibility List. 
He received a second colloquy appointment in Junior year, and 
belongs to the International Polity Club. He roomed with C. T. 



244 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




c^.a/OKM^ 



Lowell in Fresliinaii year, at 665 
Wright ; with E. H. Leete in 
Sophomore and Junior years, at 
187 Fayerweather and 342 White ; 
in Senior year with M. B. Gary 
and C. M. Kielland, at 40 Van- 
derbilt. 

Wilson is undecided as to the 
future ; he may go into engineer- 
ing, law, or some mercantile busi- 
ness. His address is Camp Hill, 
Pa. 



HOWARD OGDEN WOOD, JR., "Otts," was born in East- 
hampton, Long Island, N. Y., August 2, 1894, and has lived in 

Xew York City and in Brooklyn 
all his life. 

His father, Howard Ogden 
Wood, was born in Brooklyn, 
May 22, 1867, and was gradu- 
ated from Amherst in the Class 
of 1887. He has lived in Brook- 
lyn and New York, where he 
practices law, in the firm of 
Wood, Cooke k Seitz. His mother, 
Julia Curtis (Twichell) Wood, 
lived in Hartford, Conn. There 
are two children in the family. 
Yale relatives include Joseph 
H. Twichell, '59 (grandfather); 
David C. Twichell, '98; Burton 
P. Twichell, '01, and '05 L. ; 
Joseph H. Twichell, '06, and 
Cornelius D. Wood, '00 S. 

Otts prepared at the Hotchkiss 




^)<iT»~a. €k_.Cii ^ci'^ij, Oi o-vi^ \ 



GRADUATES 



245 



School, Lakeville, Conn., and belongs to the Hotehkiss Club. He 
received a second dispute appointment in Junior year; is a mem- 
ber of the Barouche Club and Alpha Delta Phi. Freshman and 
Sophomore years he roomed with Hoyt Perry, at 666 Wright and 
223 Farnani; Junior and Senior years with Perry and S. T. 
Miller, Jr., at 481 Haughton and 35 Vanderbilt. 

Wood expects to go into business; his address is 831 St. Mark's 
Avenue, Brooklyn, X. Y. 



JOHN KENNEDY WOOD, 

''Ken," "Jack," "Woodie," was 
born in Delhi, N. Y., August 14, 
1893, but has lived the past eigh- 
teen years in Scranton, Pa. 

His father, Henry Marvine 
Wood, was born in Stamford, 
N. Y., August 26, 1860, and has 
lived there, in Delhi, N. Y., and 
in Scranton, Pa., where he is a 
merchandise broker. His mother, 
who was Katherine Kennedy be- 
fore her marriage, lived in King- 
ston, N. Y. One son and two 
daughters are in the family. 

Ken prepared at the Scranton 
Central High School, and with a 
tutor. He went out for track. 
He roomed alone in Freshman 

year, at 571 Pierson ; with Schuyler Leslie Hoff, at 174 Law- 
rance, in Sophomore year ; wutli E. S. Bassett and Donald P. 
Robinson, at 444 FayerAveather, in Junior year ; and with. Bassett 
and Joseph H. Burnett in Senior year, at 45 Vanderbilt. 

Wood expects to go into business; his address is 115 Mulberry 
Street, Scranton, Pa. 




JfiCt^ /{. U/(^-!>r/ . 



HENRY ELI WOODARD, ''Woody," was born in Albany, 
N. Y., March 29, 1893. 

His father, Eli M. Woodard, was born in Salem, N. Y., Janu- 
ary 13, 1859, and has lived the most of his life in Albany, where 
he is engaged in business as a wholesale grocer. His mother lived 
in Glens Falls, N. Y., before her marriage; her name was Nettie 



246 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




4 



C UJ o-xr-tL^oy-x^ 



Viola Bush. Henry is the only 
child living. 

Woody prepared at the Albany 
High School. Junior year he re- 
ceived a first colloquy appoint- 
ment, was out for crew and be- 
longed to the Jonathan Edwards 
Club. He roomed with Richard 
C. Tefft, Jr., in Freshman, Soph- 
omore and Junior years, at 422 
Berkeley, 209 Farnam, and 469 
Fayerweather ; in Senior year he 
roomed with Tefft, Edward N. 
Little and Augustus R. Felty, at 
81-90 Connecticut. 

Woodard expects to enter Roch- 
ester Theological Seminary^ and 
to become a minister. His address 
is 146 Elm Street, Albany, N". Y. 




-Qs^V^^^-^ '^^^^^^^^'^'^^^^(^'^i^^ 



HAROLD HANIiTOISr 
WRIGHT, "Chick," was born 
in Watertown, Conn., October 8, 
1895. 

His father, Ernest Gilbert 
Wright, was born in Northfield, 
Conn., in 1875^ but has spent 
most of his life in Watertown, 
where he is in the employ of the 
Hemingway & Bartlett Silk Com- 
pany. His mother, whose name 
was Eva Hannon, also lived in 
Watertown. Harold is the only 
child. 

Chick prepared at the Water- 
town High School. He received 
third division honors in Fresh- 
man year; first division honors 
and an oration in Junior year. 



GRADUATES 



247 



and belongs to Alpha Chi Rho. He roomed with George Albert 
Meiler in Freshman and Sophomore years, at 655 Wright, and 
435 Fayerweather ; alone in Junior year at 417 Berkeley, and 
with Stanley John Traceski, at 89 Connecticut, in Senior year. 

Wright intends to enter the Yale Graduate School, and devote 
himself to teaching. His address is Watertown, Conn. 




WILLIAM WYER, "Bill," 
**Pork-chop," was born in Con- 
cordia, Kans., April 3, 1895, but 
now lives in Albany, X. Y. 

His father, James Ingersoll 
Wyer, was born in Red Wing, 
Minn., and was a member of the 
Class of 1899 at the University 
of Minnesota. He received the 
degree of B.L.S. in 1898, and 
M.L.S. in 1907. He is now lo- 
cated in Albany, 'N. Y., where he 
is State Librarian, New York 
State Education Department. 
May (Tyner) Wyer, his mother, 
lived in Concordia, Kans. ; there 
are two children living. 

Bill prepared at the Albany 
Academy. He won first division 

honors in Freshman year, the James J. Hogan Scholarship, the 
Andrew D. White History Prize, and second McLaughlin Prize. 
Sophomore year he received the Scott Hurtt Scholarship^ and the 
Donald Annis Prize; Junior year, first division honors, the Lis- 
penard Stewart Witherbee Scholarship and a philosophical oration 
appointment. He has been out for tennis ; M^as captain of the 
Bowling Team for two years ; is treasurer of Phi Beta Kappa, 
and belongs to Sigma Xi and Beta Theta Pi. Freshman year 
he roomed with L. S. Morris and H. H. Wiles, at 637 Wright; 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior years with the same men at 167 
Lawrance, 414 Berkeley, and 106 Welch. 

Wyer intends to enter the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
and go in for engineering. His address is 399 Western Avenue, 
Albany, N". Y. 



U/xX^C^uWt U/yUXA, 



248 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



REGINALD STANLEY 
YOUNG, "Cy," "Reg," was 
born in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., 
February 25, 1892. 

His father, Edmund Young, 
was born in Avon, N. Y., June 1, 
1845, and has always lived in 
Poughkeepsie, where he was in 
the real estate business, now re- 
tired. His mother, who also lived 
in Poughkeepsie^ was Jessie Gray 
Stanley. There are two sons in 
the family. D. Cady Eaton, 1860, 
and Mason Young, ex-'97, are 
relatives. 

Cy prepared at the Hotchkiss 
School, Lakeville, Conn., and is 
a member of the Hotchkiss Club. 
He was on the Freshman and 
University Cross Country teams, and the University Track Team; 
has a "Y" and numerals, and belongs to Psi Upsilon, and the 
Elihu Club. He roomed with P. H. Lindenberg and Roy C. 
Wilcox, in Freshman year, at 633 Wright; the remaining three 
years with Lindenberg, Carrington, Potter, Converse and J. Butler, 
at 128 Welch, 450 Fayerweather, and 6 Vanderbilt. 

Young has not yet decided what his future occupation will be. 
His permanent address is 94 South Hamilton Street, Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y. 




/?. J/CUJL CJctLOu 






LOUIS CAPPEL ZAHNER, "Zu," was born in Adams, 
Mass., September 20, 1893. 

His father, Rev. Louis Zahner, D.D., was born in Shanesville, 
Ohio, in 1849, graduated from Franklin and Marshall College 
and General Theological Seminary, and was given the honorary 
degree of S.T.D. by Hobart in 1887. He lived in Bloomsburg, Pa., 
Omaha, Nebr., and in Adams, Mass., and was a clergyman of the 
Episcopal Church. He died in Adams, Mass., December 31, 1913. 
His mother, Mary Allen (Leckler) Zahner, lived in New Castle, 
Del. There are two sons and two daughters in the family. 



GRADUATES 



249 



Charles Haffner, Jr., Yale 1919, 
is a first cousin. 

Zu prepared at Groton. Fresh- 
man year in college he was given 
first division honors and was 
on the Freshman Glee Club. 
He has rowed on the Class 
Crews. Junior year he received 
first division honors, and a philo- 
sophical oration appointment. He 
has held, in different years, the 
Garvan, Husted, and Waterman 
scholarships. He is on the Senior 
Class Book Committee, and the 
Ivy Committee. Belongs to Phi 
Beta Kappa, Zeta Psi, the Eliza- 
bethan Club, Yale Battery, and 
Single , Sculls and Foam. He 
roomed with Morris Hadley and 
Bennett Sanderson the entire four years, at 677 Wright, 231 
Farnam, 470 Fayerweather, and 141 Welch. 

Zahner expects to go into educational work ; his address is 
Adams, Mass. 




The following members of the Class of 1915 received their 
degrees with the Class of 1916: 



WALTER J. BUKXS, JR. 

PAUL DAILY 

WILLIAM RINEHART JUTTE 

JAMES RALPH SCOTT 

HAROLD CRAWFORD STEARXS 

FREDERICK FOSTER WILLIAMS 





NON-GRADUATES 



NON-GRADUATES 



25,3 



FRANK WILLIAM ADAMS 

Avas born in Charleston, S. C, 
December 7, 1892, and has also 
lived in Toledo, Ohio. 

His father, Frank W. Adams, 
"vvas a building contractor. He 
died in Charleston in 1907. His 
mother's maiden name was Re- 
becca Tucker. Of their four sons 
three are living. 

Frank prepared at the New 
Haven High School. In Fresh- 
man year he roomed at 366 Or- 
chard Street. The following year 
he transferred to Dartnioutli, 
where he is completing his course. 
His permanent address is 19-4 
Dixwell Avenue, New Haven, 
Conn. 




% c^ W^JUU.^^ (XA 



o—^ 



PHILIP DANFORTH AR- 
MOUR was born in Chicago, 111., 
March 17, 1893, and has lived 
there, and in New York City. 

His father, Philip D. Armour, 
Jr., Avas born in Milwaukee, Wis., 
in 1869, and was graduated from 
Yale in the Class of 1890 S. He 
lived in Chicago, where he was 
vice president of Armour Com- 
pany, packers. He died in Santa 
Barbara, Calif., in 1900. Mrs. 
Armour, whose name was May 
Lester, li^'ed in Chicago. There 
are two sons in the family, Lester 
Armour, Yale 1918, being one. 
J. Ogden Armour, '84 S., is a 
relative. 

Philip prepared at St. Mark's 




254 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



School. He was a member of Psi Upsilon. He roomed with 
W. H. Hellier, W. Chatfield-Taylor, and H. J. Crocker, Jr., in 
Freshman year, at 672 Wright; with Hellier, Chatfield-Taylor, 
C. B. Dickey and F. V. Burgess in So])honiore year, at 429 
Fayerweather. 

Armour left college at the close of Sophomore year to enter 
business ; his address is care Armour Company, Chicago, 111. 

COOLIDGE RICHAKDSOI^ BILLINGS was born in Mem- 
phis, Tenn. His father, O. M. Billings, is Avith the Stewart Dry 
Goods Company of Louisville, Ky. Coolidge prepared at the 
Horace Mann School, the Mountain School and the Taft School. 
He roomed during Freshman year with Henry K. Blake at 568 
Pierson, and at 9 College Street until he left College after the 
first term of Sophomore year. 

Billings' permanent address is 1464 St. James Street, Louis- 
ville, Ky. 

WARXER BISHOP, 414 Madison Avenue, New York City. 




^^^.S£4^<u, /3-d^ae^ 



GEORGE PALMER BLACK, 

"Pam," was born July 24, 1894, 
in Pittsburgh, Pa. 

His father, George Philip Black, 
was born in Pittsburgh. He has 
now retired from the steel busi- 
ness, in which he was engaged. 
His mother, Mary Jane Palmer, 
was born in Allegheny, Pa. There 
are three sons and a daughter in 
the family. 

Pam prepared at the Lakewood 
and Westminster schools. He re- 
ceived a second colloquy Junior 
appointment ; was a member of 
the Apollo and University Glee 
clubs and the College Choir. He 
belongs to Delta Kappa Epsilon. 
C. Pratt and D. W. Cassard have 



NON-GRADUATES 



255 



been his roommates throughout the course, at 644 Wright, 46 
Durfee, 334 White and 25 Vanderbilt. He left College during 
Senior year on account of ill health. 

Black will enter the manufacturing business ; his address is 
903 Park Avenue, New York City. 




ELMOKE McNeill BOST- 

WICK, "Bos," was born in 
Montclair, K J., April 8, 1892, 
lived there thirteen years, in 
Orange, N. J., subsequently, and 
now resides in St. Louis, Mo. 

His father, Arthur Elmore 
Bostwick, was born in Litchfield, 
Conn., in 1860, and was gradu- 
ated from Yale with the degree 
of B.A. in 1881, and Ph.D. in 
1883. He has spent the most of 
his life in and near New York 
City, but is now located in St. 
Louis, Avhere he is head of the 
St. Louis Public Libraries. His 
mother, Lucy (Sawyer) Bostwick, 
lived in New Haven, Conn., before 
her marriage; there are three 

children in the family. Besides his father, Rollin A. Sawyer, ea-'83, 
(uncle), and Andrew L. Bostwick, '08, a brother, are Yale relatives. 

Bos prepared at The Gunnery, and Washington University, 
St. Louis, Mo. He sang on the University Glee Club for the 
entire four years, and was leader in 1916 ; was a member of 
the University Quartet and editor of the Yale Song Bool:, 1916. 
He was chairman of the Sophomore German Committee, and 
Junior Promenade Committee ; a cheer leader ; a member of 
the Dramatic Association, the Whiffenpoofs, the Mohicans, Psi 
Upsilon, and Wolf's Head. He roomed in Freshman year with 
A. duPont Dimmick, at 612 Wright; Sophomore year with 
J. M. Jessup, at 200 Farnam; Junior and Senior years with 
Jessup and C. P. Smith, at 223 Fayerweather and 99 Welch. 

Bostwick left the Class in Senior year to enter the Yale School 
of Music and later left the University. He went to France as 



^■<^^^.^^^^^ 



256 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



an ambulance driver and thinks of going into the manufacturing 
business when he returns. His address is 68 Vandeventer Place, 
St. Louis, Mo. 



THOMAS AYLETTE BUCK- 
NER, JR., was born in Chicago, 
III, January 17, 1893, but has 
spent the most of his life in New 
York City. 

His father, Thomas Aylette 
Buekner, was born in Blooming- 
ton, 111., January 18, 1865, and 
has lived in Illinois, Missouri and 
Kansas. He is vice president of 
the 'New York Life Insurance 
Company. Mrs. Buckner, who 
was Myrtie Lewis before her 
marriage, lived in Ottumwa, 
Iowa. One son and one daughter 
comprise the family. 
r Q^2a3[fcL^S?yuSr5/vx«/v^ Buckner prepared at The Hill 

School, Pottstown, Pa. He 
roomed with John Shove, in 

Ereshman year, at 635 Wright ; with Morris Belknap, at 148 

Lawrance in Sophomore year, and with Adams Dodson, at 350 

White, in Junior year. 

He left college to go into business at the end of Junior year. 

His address is Riverdale-on-Hudson, New York City. 




ARTHUR THOMAS CAMPBELL, "Art," was born Sep- 
tember 11, 1891, in Middletown, Conn. 

His father, Arthur Joseph Campbell, attended the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons in Baltimore and practices his pro- 
fession in Middletown, Conn. His mother's maiden name was 
Nellie Mountain. There are two sons and a daughter in the 
family. 



NON-ORADUATES 



257 



Art prepared at the Middle- 
town ]Iigh School and Pliilli}).s- 
Exeter. He went out for base- 
ball. In Freshman year he 
roomed with E. S. Robinson at 
9 Library Street and in Sopho- 
more year with Robinson and 
Field at 241 Durfee. He is now 
attending the University of Mary- 
land Medical School. His per- 
manent address is 148 Washing- 
ton Street, Middletown, Conn. 




VAaXV>jJ^ oVtNw<N'a 



Vok/vvOlvV*AJ^ 



CHARLES ARTHUR CARLISLE, JR., "Chuck," was born 
in South Bend, Ind., February 14, 1894. 

His father, Charles Arthur Carlisle, was born in Chillicothe, 
Ohio, but has spent most of his life in South Bend, Ind., where 
he is president of the Milmore Corporation, manufacturers of 
chemicals. His mother, Anne (Studebaker) Carlisle, lived in 
South Bend. Of her seven children six are living. William R. 
Innis, '80, and Woodson Carlisle, 1919, are relatives. 

Chuck prepared at the Westminster School, the Black Hall 
School, and entered the Class of 1917 Purdue University after 
spending his Freshman year at Yale. He roomed with James 
M. Jessup at 604 Wright. 

Carlisle is now at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
and will go in for engineering. His address is 131 South Taylor 
Street, South Bend, Ind. 



DAVID BURTON COHEN, born December 21, 1893, in New 
Haven, Conn., is the son of Isidor Cohen. He prepared at the 
'Nev: Haven High School. He was with the Class during Fresh- 



258 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



man, Sophomore and Junior years and lived at his home, 71 
William Street. He is now a member of the first year class in 
the School of Medicine. 

Cohen's address is 71 William Street, ISTew Haven, Conn. 

JOHN DRAPER COOPER, "Coop," was born December 29, 
1893, and has lived in Pennsylvania all his life. 

His father, Edward Nelson Cooper, was born in Kingston, Pa., 
and has lived there and in Camp Hill, Pa., where he is engaged 
in the iron business, being the owner of E. N. Cooper & Company. 
His mother, who lived in Camp Hill before her marriage, was Alice 
Bowman, and her five sons and one daughter are living. Frank 
M, Cooper, 1889 S., is an uncle. 

Coop prepared at the Harrisburg Academy, and spent two years 
at Yale. He roomed with Danforth Barney in Freshman year, at 
661 Wright; and with Welles Ritch in Sophomore year, at 453 
Fayerweather. 

Cooper left at the end of Sophomore year to go into the manu- 
facturing business ; his address is Camp Hill, Pa. 




yT^^t^^ oJ<^ty/<^/- 



HENRY DENKERT, 

"Hank," "Dank," was born in 
Johnstown, N. Y., March 30, 
1894. 

His father, Mitchell Denkert, 
was born in Moscow, Russia, and 
has lived most of his life in 
Johnstown, where he is a manu- 
facturer of sporting goods under 
the name of M. Denkert & Com- 
pany. Mrs. Denkert lived in 
Berlin, Germany, before her 
marriage ; her name was Fanny 
Hirschberg. There are two sons 
in the family. Fred de Beer, 
ea;-1913, is a relative. 

Hank prepared at the Johns- 
town High School. Freshman 
year he roomed at 596 Pierson, 



NON-GRADUATES 



259 



alone, and with N". E. Derecktor in Soplioniore year, at 149 
Lawrance. 

Denkert left Yale at tlie close of Sophomore year, to go into the 
manufacturing business. His address is 198 Wells Street, Johns- 
town, N. Y. 



ALLEI\^ Du PONT DIMMICK 

was born in Scranton, Pa., March 
16, 1893, and has lived in Man- 
chester, England, San Francisco, 
Calif., Cincinnati, Ohio, Wash- 
ington, D. C, and Chicago, III. 

His father, Edward C. Dim- 
mick, has lived most of his life 
in Scranton, Pa., Avliere he is 
a lawyer. His mother, Joanna 
(duPont) Dimmick, lived in Wil- 
mington, Del., before her mar- 
riage. Of her five children, four 
are living. J. Benjamin Dim- 
mick, '81, and Milton L. Dim- 
mick, ex-'OQ S., are relatives. 

Allen prepared at Gresham's 
School, England, and at the Bel- 
mont School, California. He 

roomed in Freshman year with E. M. Bostwick, at 612 Wright, 
and with Tom Welles in Sophomore 3^ear, at 243 Durfee. 

Dimmick left Yale at the close of Sophomore year. His pres- 
ent address is care The Barber Asphalt Paving Company, 
Chicago, 111. 




U^,^ ^^L./'^^Q-^ 



-c^ 



THOMAS DOLAN, 3d, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., Janu- 
ary 27, 1894. 

His father, Thomas J. Dolan, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., 
April 1, 1865, and was graduated from Princeton in 1886. He is 
a financier, living in Philadelphia. Yzabel Whelan (Hoffman) 



260 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




uAc.^ AL^ 



Dolan, his mother, lived in Xew 
York before her marriage ; there 
are five children in the family. 

Thomas prepared at the De- 
Lancey School, Philadelphia, Pa., 
the Yeates School, Lancaster, Pa., 
and at St. Paul's School, Concord, 
INT. H. He roomed with Ira H. 
Washburn, at 619 Wright. 

Dolan left at the close of his 
Freshman year to go into min- 
ing. His address is 2107 Walnut 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 




THOMAS WILLIAM E^- 
WEIGHT, 'Tom," was born 
in Amesbury, Mass., December 
1, 1891. 

His father is John J. En- 
wright and his mother was Mary 
Elizabeth Cullinan before her 
marriage. 

Tom prepared at Andover. 
He was on the Freshman and 
Apollo Glee Clubs ; belonged to 
the Dramatic Association, Yale 
Battery, Alpha Delta Phi, the 
Andover Club, and served on the 
Yale Courant Board. Freshman 
year he roomed with A. !N^. 
Shaver, at 262 York Street; 
with J. Kerr in Sophomore year, 
at 240 Durfee; alone, at 454 



NON-GRADUATES 



261 



Fayerweather, in Junior year, and with A. M. Proctor and R. K. 
Sutherland, at 67 Vandcrbilt, until February of Senior year, when 
he left to enter business. 

Enwright's permanent address is Washington, D. C. 



FREDERICK LUTHER 
GAMAGE, JR., ''Fritz/' was 
born ill Garden City, L. I., Janu- 
ary 13, 1896, and has lived there 
and ill Pawling, 'N. Y. 

His father, Frederick Luther 
Gamage, born in Hopkiiiton, 
Mass., June 19, 1860, was gradu- 
ated from Brown University with 
the degree of B.A. in 1882. He 
has the degree of M.A., and re- 
ceived the degree of D.C.L. from 
Hobart College in 1898. He has 
spent most of his life teaching 
in New York State, and is at 
present head master of the Pawl- 
ing (X. Y.) School. His mother, 
Isabella (Horner) Gamage, lived 
in Delhi, N. Y., before her mar- 
riage ; there are two children in the family. 

Fritz prepared at the Pawling School. He roomed with George 
R. Blodgett at 616 Wright, in Freshman year, and with iST. J. 
Eastman, B. Welch and R. C. Myles, Jr., at 164 Lawrance, in 
Junior year. 

Gamage is in the Class of 1917, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, and will go in for engineering. His address is 
Pawlinff, X. Y. 




l^/S^ 



C4^u^^y, 



AXDREW RALPH GAMBORDELLA, "Gamby," "Andy," 
"Andrea del Sarto," was born in Xew Haven, Conn., October 
12, 1892. 

He is a son of Ralph S. and Angelina (Prata) Gambordella, 
both of Amalfi, Italy, where his father was born in 1864. 



262 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Mr. Gambordella is a soap manu- 
facturer in Xew Haven, Conn, 
There Avere nine sons and five 
daughters in the family; three 
are deceased. 

Gamby prepared at the Xew 
Haven High School, and at the 
Hopkins Grammar School. He 
l>elonged to the University Banjo 
and Mandolin Club, and went 
out for wrestling and basketball. 
He is treasurer of the Yale Ital- 
ian Club, and a member of the 
Cosmopolitan Club. Freshman 
year he roomed with Xicholas 
Rago and Emil Marzano, at 205 
Farnam; alone in Sophomore 
and Junior years, at 411 and 395 
Berkeley; Senior year he lived 

at home. He left college after the first term of Senior year. 
Gambordella is expecting to enter the Yale School of Medicine, 

and ultimately practice medicine. His address is 276 Wooster 

Street, Xew Haven^ Conn. 




^^^'tc/te^j^^a^.y^^J.eXZ.^ 



ALEXAXDER GIFFORD, "Gif," was born in Greenfield, 
Mass., October 27, 1895. 

His father, Ralph Waldo Gifford, was born in West Dedham, 
Mass., October 1.5, 1867, and received a B.A. from Harvard in 
1892, and LL.B. in 1901. An honorary M.A. was conferred by 
Yale in 1912 and an LL.D. by Fordham in the same year. He 
was professor of testamentary law at Yale, 1912-15, and since 
1914 has been professor of law at Columbia. His mother, Sarah 
Lowell (Parsons) Gifford, lived in Greenfield, Mass., before her 
marriage. There are three sons and a daughter in the family. 

Gif prepared at the Morris High School, Xew York City, and 
at the Roger Ascham School, White Plains, X. Y. During his 
two years at Yale he lived at home, 190 Edgehill Road and 432 
Temple Street. He is now attending Harvard College. His 
address is 27 Grays Hall, Cambridge, Mass. 

His permanent address is care of Professor Ralph Waldo 
Gifford, Columbia University, Xew York City. 



NON-GRADUATES 



263 



ADAM LOXG GIMBEL, 

"Ad," "Gim," was born in Mil- 
waukee, Wis., December 21, 1894, 
but has lived in Philadelphia, 
Pa., for the past twenty-one 
years. 

His father, Charles Ginibel, 
born in Danville, 111., in 1862, 
has lived the most of his life in 
Philadelphia, where he is a mem- 
ber of the firm of Gimbel Broth- 
ers. His mother, Ella (Long) 
Gimbel, lived in Wilkesbarre, 
Pa., before her marriage ; there 
are two children in the family. 
Frederic A. Gimbel, 1913; Ellis 
A. Gimbel, Jr., 1919, and Lee A. 
Gimbel, 1919, are Yale relatives. 

Ad prepared at Penn Charter 
School, and at Andover. He Avas a member of the Freshman 
Swimming Team. He roomed alone in Freshman 3'ear, at 541 
Pierson; Sophomore year with Calvin G. Littlefield, at 251 
Durfee ; Junior .year vAXh. W. R. Blum, at 439 Fayerweather. 

Gimbel left at the end of Junior year to go into business. His 
address is care Gimbel Brothers, Philadelphia, Pa. 




a^^[iiu;yjiJ 



CHARLES PREIsTTICE GOODHUE, 'Trent," "Goody," was 
born in j^ew York City, January 21, 1895. 

His father, Charles Edward Goodhue, was born in iSTew York 
in 1853, and has always lived there. He is retired from active 
business. His mother, who also lived in N'ew York, was Maria 
Amanda Fisher; there are two sons and two daughters in the 
family. Fisher Goodhue, Yale 1911, is a brother. Reginald McI. 
Cleveland, 1908, and Geoffrey Konta, 1908, are brothers-in-law. 

Prent prepared at the Lawrenceville School. He was on the 
Freshman Glee Club, the Class Baseball, Basketball and Tennis 
Teams, and the second University Tennis Team. He was on the 
eligibility list of the Dramatic Association, and belonged to the 



264 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




CJ^arwis VrtAMXiEc /Qi^Kui/L 



Red Coffin Club, Birthday Club, 
University Club, and Alpha 
Delta Phi. He roomed in Fresh- 
man year with D. B. Grant, at 
536 Pierson; with Grant and 
V. B. Caldwell in Sophomore 
year, at 236 Durf ee ; with C. A. 
Fagan, Jr., and J. M. Symington 
in Junior year, at 456 Fayer- 
weather. 

Goodhue left at the close of 
Junior year, and is now a 
member of the Class of 1917, 
Columbia. He expects to enter 
Columbia Law School later. His 
permanent address is 157 East 
Thirty-fourth Street, N'ew York 
City. 




JOHA^ GARTH GOODLETT, 

"Muggins," was born in Kansas 
City, Mo., June 19, 1893. 

He is the only child of Robert 
Mitchell Goodlett, who was born 
in Evansville, Ind., and is a 
retired broker in Kansas City. 
Mrs. Goodlett lived in Hannibal, 
Mo., before her marriage ; her 
name Avas Anne Housten Garth. 
Xickolas Minor Goodlett, Yale 
1886, and James C. Thornton, 
Yale 1908, are relatives. 

Muggins prepared at St. Luke's 
School, Wayne, Pa., and at Phil- 
lips Academy, Andover, and is a 
member of the Andover Club. 
He was on the Freshman Glee 
Club ; was a member of the 



NON-GBADUATES 



265 



Corinthian Yacht Club, and its president in 1914; belongs to Alpha 
Delta Phi, the Big Four, Little Yellow Dogs, the Skunk Club, 
and the Trinity Club. Hugh McConnell and John B. Fitzpatrick 
were his roommates in Freshman year, at 424 Fayerweather ; 
McConnell, Fitzpatrick and Allan McLane, Jr., in Sophomore 
year, at 253-254 Durfee ; McConnell and McLane at 441 Fayer- 
weather, in Junior year. In Senior year he roomed with McCon- 
nell, McLane, and John McLennan at 46-49 Vanderbilt until 
January when he left college on account of sickness in his family. 

Goodlett expects to go into the banking business, and his address 
is 9 East Forty-fifth Street, Kansas City, Mo. 



PATRICK PHILIP GRIFFIN, ''Griff," was born in Rut- 
land, Yt., December 11, 1891. 

His father, Michael Henry Griffin, was born in Montreal, 
Canada, and has spent the greater part of his life in Rutland, 
where he is superintendent of the printing department of the 
Tuttle Company. Mrs. Gritfen, whose name was Mary Elizabeth 
Lynch, lived in Rutland before her marriage. There were three 
sons and one daughter in the 
family; two sons are living. 

Griff prepared at a private 
school in Montreal, Que., Can- 
ada, and spent a year at St. 
Laurent's College, Quebec, Que., 
Canada. He was also a member of 
the Sophomore Class in the Uni- 
versity of Yermont, before enter- 
ing Yale in Sophomore year. 
He went out for hockey and 
baseball. He roomed alone at 
391 Temple Street in Sophomore 
year, and at 392 Berkeley in 
Junior year. He left at the close 
of Junior year, to enter the 
Georgetown Law School, in fur- 
ther preparation for practicing 
law. His permanent address is 
Rutland, Yt. 




fobwO. ^tX^ ^^Hl^ 



266 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



HARVEY FERDI:N'A1S^D 
HAMBUR, "Hobs," "Hambo," 
"Ferdy," was born in Chicago, 
111., iSTovember 24, 1894, and has 
lived there, in Paris, France, and 
in Boston, Mass. 

His father, Sol Hamburger, 
was born in Aschaffenburg, Ba- 
varia, in 1857, and was in the 
cigar business in Chicago, vice 
president of A. Santaella & Com- 
pany. He died in Chicago in 
1906. Mrs. Hamburger was Mil- 
lie Regensburg before her mar- 
riage; there are two children in 
the family, one deceased. 

Hobs prepared at La Villa, 
Lausanne, Switzerland, at the 
LTniversity High School, Chicago, 
and at Phillips-Exeter. He went out for track and swimming, 
and received a first oration appointment. He also belonged to 
the Cercle Francais, and assisted with the annual plays. He 
roomed alone at 262 York Street in Freshman year, and at 
426 Fayerweather in Sophomore year. He left at the close of 
Sophomore year, to go into the banking business. His permanent 
address is care W. Wolf &: Company, 549 Atlantic Avenue, 
Boston, Mass. 




■^^^"-^ 



LEWIS IRVIN'G HARRISON, born September 10, 1892, in 
Xew Haven, Conn., is the son of X. Irving Harrison. He pre- 
pared at the Xew Haven High, Hopkins Grammar and Mount 
Hermon schools. He was with the Class two years and roomed 
at home during Freshman year and at 619 Taylor Hall during 
Sophomore year. 

Harrison's permanent address is 37 Willard Street, Xew Haven, 
Conn. 



JOHX XICHOLAS GERRIX HEMMIXG was born in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., July 29, 1894, but has lived in Xew York nearly 
all his life. 

He is a son of Henry Glover Hemming, who was born in 



XOX-dRADUATES 



267 



Pliiladelpliia, Pa., September 17, 
1872, and is now located in New- 
York City, where he is a stock 
broker, connected with the firm 
of Elias Smith, Son k Com- 
pany. His mother, Louise Ger- 
rin, lived in !N^ew York before; 
her marriage. 

John prepared at the Prince- 
ton Preparatory School, Prince- 
ton, X. J., and at Pennsylvania 
Military College, Chester, Pa. 
He Avent out for swdmming, and 
was captain of the Freshman 
Swimming Team. He roomed at 
114 High Street, and left at the 
close of Freshman year. His ad- 
dress is 310 West Eighty-sixth 
Street, Xew York City. 




SCHUYLER LESLIE HOFF, 
"Blondy," ''Sky," was born in 
Buffalo, K Y., July 6, 1892. 

His father, Francis Leslie Hoff, 
was born in Savannah, N. Y., 
December 27, 1864, but has lived 
in Buffalo, where he is treasurer 
of the Colonial Bond & Security 
Company, real estate and invest- 
ments. His mother, Katherine 
Hoff, lived in Fulton and Buf- 
falo, X. Y., before her marriage. 
There are four children in the 
family, one deceased. 

Blondy prepared at the Lafay- 
ette High School, and the Xichols 
Preparatory School. He roomed 
in Freshman year at 491 Haugh- 
ton, with Lloyd Bissell, and with 




JcL^JI^ 



268 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



John K. Wood, at 174 Lawrance in Sophomore year. He left at 
the close of Sophomore year to go into the manufacturing business ; 
his address is 73 Richmond Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



GEORGE KNIGHT HOUPT 

was born in Buffalo, N. Y., Jan- 
uary 25, 1894. 

His father, Wilber Eugene 
Houpt, was born in Somerset, 
N. Y., March 11, 1856, and was 
graduated from Yale in 1883. 
He practices law in Buffalo, 
N". Y., and is also treasurer of 
the George Irish Paper Com- 
pany, Buffalo, N. Y. Mrs. Houpt 
was Grace Louise Knight, of 
Brazil, Ind. ; there are two chil- 
dren in the family. Edward H. 
Knight, 1898, is an uncle. 

George prepared at the La- 
/j_ \^- \ V . ^_- ^^f^ fayette High School, and at the 

^tM\. \ \ '^^^-^'Yn* Mchols School. He was on the 

* Freshman Glee Club, the Uni- 

versity Glee Club, College Choir and the Freshman Track Squad. 
He belongs to Zeta Psi and the Ptombers. He roomed alone in 
Freshman year at 606 Wright; with C. P. Smith in Sophomore 
year at 221 Farnam; alone in Junior and Senior years, at 
492 Haughton and 114 Welch. 




CHARLES PERCY HUNT was born in Richfield Springs, 
N. Y., February 7, 1887, and has lived there and in Utica, N. Y. 

His father, Frank C. Hunt, was born in Morrisville, N. Y., in 
1860, and was located in Richfield Springs, where he was a com- 
mission merchant. He died in Arizona. His mother, who lived 
in Richfield Springs, was Sarah E. Hunt, and she died in Utica, 
N. Y., in 1905. There are two sons and one daughter in the 
family. 

Charles prepared at the Richfield Springs High School, at 
Utica Free Academy, and with a private tutor. He left college 



N ON -GRADUATES 



269 



during Freshman year to go into business. He is now general 
manager of the Utiea Ice Company, and may be addressed at 
1211 Park Avenue, Utiea, :N' . Y. 



CARKOLL WIGHTMAAT 
JOHNSON, ''Johnny," was 
born August 15, 1893, in New- 
ark, X. J., but has lived in 
Orange, N. J., for twenty years. 

His father, Wilbur I. Johnson, 
was born in Newark, N. J., in 
1835, and is a vice president of 
the Prudential Life Insurance 
Company. He lives in East 
Orange. His mother Avas Vir- 
ginia Wightman, and her home 
was in Newark. Carroll has one 
brother. William F. Flagg, 1912. 
and Wallace W. Johnson, 1918 S., 
are relatives. 

Johnny prepared at the Mohe- 
gan Lake School, and at Andover. 
He roomed at 627 Wright, with 
Edmund Ocumpaugh and Wolcott Harbison. He left at the 
end of Freshman year, and married Miss Alice Flagg, of New 
Haven, Conn. They have a son, born November 21, 1915. 
Johnson is connected with the Prudential Life Insurance Com- 
pany, and may be addressed at 144 Harrison Street, East Orange, 
N. J. A temporary address is 20 Ivy Court, Orange, N. J. 




cUue ^yV^^''^^^ 



JAMES KERR, ''Jim," was born in Washington, D. C, Octo- 
ber 14, 1893, and has lived there, in New York City, and in 
Syracuse, N. Y. 

His father, James Kerr, was born in Mifflin, Pa., October 18, 
1854, and lived the greater part of his life in Pennsylvania 
and New York City. He was president of the Beech Creek Coal 
& Coke Company, and a United States Congressman from Penn- 
sylvania. He died in New York October 30, 1908. Mrs. Kerr, 
who was Julia Boardman Smith, lived in Clearfield, Pa. There 
are five sons. Albert B. Kerr, '97; Walter B. Kerr, '04 S., and 



270 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




^^u.^^U^_^ 



Chester M. Kerr, e.r-'lO S., are 
brothers. 

Jim j^repared at the Cutler 
School, and at Hotchkiss. He 
Avent out for soccer and Fresh- 
man baseball ; Avas on the Fresh- 
man Glee Club and is a member 
of Alpha Delta Phi. He roomed 
alone in Freshman year, at 266 
York Street ; in Sophomore year 
with T. W. Enwright, at 240 
Durfee. He left at the end of 
Sophomore year to go into the 
manufacturing business, and is 
now in the employ of the Iro- 
quois China Company, in Syra- 
cuse. His permanent mail ad- 
dress is care Iroquois China 
Company, Syracuse, N. Y. 



MALCOLM ELMORE LANGDOT^, 2545 Elden Avenue, 
Avondale, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



LIONEL LEON LAPOINTE, born June 21, 1891, in Hart- 
ford, Conn.^ is the son of Joseph N. Lapointe. He prepared at 
the Hudson (Mass.) High School and at the Hopkins Grammar 
School. He was with the Class during Freshman year and 
roomed at 266 York Street. 

His home address is 230 Niel Street, Hudson, Mass. At present 
he is attending the University of Pennsylvania. His address there 
is 1919 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



HAROLD RUSSELL LEEKE, ''Larry," was born in Ham- 
den, Conn., August 30, 1894, and lives in New Haven, Conn. 

His father, Albert Sanford Leeke, born in Hamden, Conn., 
May 19, 1866, is in the employ of the Winchester Repeating 



N 02^^ -GRADUATES 



271 



Arms Company. His mother 
lived in Xorth Haven before her 
marriage, and her name was 
Irene Elizabeth Howarth. Tliere 
are two sons in the family. 

Larry prepared at the Xew 
Haven High School. He Avas 
a member of Alpha Chi Rho. He 
roomed at his home in Freshman, 
Sophomore, and part of Junior 
years, when he left college to go 
into the manufacturing business. 
He is in the employ of the Win- 
chester Repeating Arms Com- 
pany, and may be addressed at 
Dixwell Avenue, New Haven, 
Conn. 




^jtxAxyCciO^^^^^i^i^U tsjJ^Ji 



CHEUNG TSUEN LEI was 
born in Kwantung, China, in 
1889, and lived in China for 
twenty-three years. His father, 
Nam Hai Lei^ was born in 
Kwantung, China, fifty-five years 
ago, and has always lived in that 
country. He is a merchant, a 
partner in the K^vantong Yun 
Company. His mother's name 
was Lin-Wu ; she died in 1910. 
There were two sons, one de- 
ceased. 

Cheung prepared at the Can- 
ton Christian College, and grad- 
uated from that institution. He 
roomed alone, at Kent Hall in 
Freshman year, and at 395 
Berkeley in Sophomore year. He 




272 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



left at the end of Sophomore year and is now at Wesleyan Col- 
lege. His permanent address is care trustees of Canton Christian 
College, 156 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 



EDGAK LOCKWOOD was 
born in New York City, Septem- 
ber 27, 1892, and has lived in 
Greenwich, Conn., Madison, "Wis., 
and Ithaca, N. Y. 

His father, Edgar Lockwood, 

Avas born in Stamford, Conn., in 

October, 1858, and was located 

in New York, where he was a 

member of the firm of Munroe 

& Company, bankers; he died 

December 3, 1906, in New York 

City. His mother's maiden 

name was Florence Spear; she 

died in Greenwich, Conn., May 

2, 1915. There were three sons 

•^ /^ in the family, one deceased. 

/cIqUa -A ^^t/^ l\/Tiri\__^^ Edgar prepared at the Taf t 

/ School, Watertown, Conn., and 

at the Brunswick School, Greenwich. He roomed with Henry J. 

Crocker, at 643 Wright, during Freshman year. 

After leaving Yale Lockwood was a special student in agri- 
culture at the University of Wisconsin, and took a winter course 
in agriculture at Cornell. He is now in the general purchasing 
department of the New Jersey Zinc Company, 55 Wall Street, 
New York City. His permanent address is The Maples, Green- 
wich, Conn. 




MATTHEW JAMES LOORAM, born December 6, 1892, in 
New York. City, is the son of Matthew M. Looram. He prepared 
at the Newman and Pawling schools. He was with the Class one 
year and roomed at 540 Pierson. A brother, Lucien A. Looram, 
was formerly a member of 1917. 

Looram's home address is Davenport Neck, New Rochelle, N. Y. 



N ON -GRADUATES 



273 



CLAREI^CE TIMOTHY 
LOWELL, "Crusty," was born 
in Minneapolis, Minn., March 19, 
1S91, and has lived there and in 
St. Paul. 

His father, Frederick William 
Augustus Lowell, was born in 
Jackson, Mich., September 21, 
1854, and attended Carleton Col- 
lege. He lived in Minnesota all 
his life, and was a manufacturer, 
part owner of the Union Mattress 
Company. He died in Echo, 
Minn., in 1900. Mrs. Lowell 
was Jennie Ann Winslow before 
her marriage; she lived in 
Brownsville, Minn. There are 
two sons in the family. 

Crusty prepared at Mechanic 
Arts High School, St. Paul, and was a member of the Class of 
1916 in the University of Wisconsin. He entered Yale on a 
Northwestern Yale Alumni Association Scholarship. He roomed 
in Freshman year with Robert Wilson, at 669 Wright ; Sopho- 
more year with Stanley John Traceski, at 210 Farnam. He left 
at the close of Sophomore year, and entered the University of 
Minnesota, Class of 1915. He expects to graduate with the degree 
of B.A. in 1916, and is a Junior in the Law College at the Uni- 
versity, expecting to receive the degree of B.L. in 1917. His 
jDermanent address is 1091 Grand Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 




LUCIUS AUGUSTUS McADAM, born July 23, 1892, in Xew 
York City, is the son of Lucius McAdam. He prepared at the 
Hyde Park High School, Chicago. He was with the Class during 
Freshman year and roomed with Harry V. Champion at 537 
Pierson. 

McAdam's home address is 5137 Lexington Avenue, Chicago, 111. 



DANIEL LITTLEFIELD McCOY, "Bessy," "Mac," was 
born in Pawtucket, E. I., April 8, 189-4. 

His father, J. C. McCoy, is a mine owner. Mrs. McCoy was 
Florence Littlefield before her marriage. 



274 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




^ 






Bessy prepared at The Hill 
School, Pottstown, Pa., and be- 
longs to The Hill School Club. 
He was a member of the Dra- 
matic Association, and took part 
in the 1913 play; he Avas also a 
member of the Fencing Associa- 
tion. Freshman year he roomed 
Avith H. C. Sneath and R. J. 
JeAvett, at 670 Wright; Sopho- 
more year alone, at 101 Welch ; 
Junior and Senior years AAath 
G. R. Cutler, at 502 Haughton 
and 17 Vanderbilt. He left at the 
end of first term of Senior year. 

McCoy expects to practice laAV, 
and AAall enter the 'New York 
LaAV School. His address is care 
Perth Amboy Trust Company, 
Perth Amboy, ]^. J. 




a.C.TtUU^n/t^c. Cy, 



GEORGE EDWARD RALPH 
McCOY Avas born in Bridgeport, 
Conn., December 22, 1889, and 
noAV liA^es in Philadelphia. 

His father, EdAA^ard Henry 
McCoy, Avas born in Brooklyn, 
jST. Y., and has spent his life in 
Connecticut, and in Philadelphia, 
Avhere he is uoaa^ located as man- 
ager of the Columbia Malleable 
Iron <fc Steel Company. Mrs. 
McCoy liA^ed in Bridgeport be- 
fore her marriage ; her name 
AA-as Rose Annie Memmott. One 
son and three daughters comprise 
the family. Dr. Ralph R. Ryan, 
Yale 1902, M.D. Columbia 1905, 
is a relatiA^e. 

George prepared at the James 



NON-GRADUATES 



275 



G. Blaine School, and at the Central High School, Philadelphia, 
and was a member of the Class of 1912 from September to 
December, 1908. He remained with our Class but one year, 
having roomed alone at 461 Edgewood Avenue. 

McCoy is in the manufacturing business, and may be addressed 
at 1817 iSTorth Thirty-first Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



CYRUS EDSOIvT MANIERRE, "Eddie," was born in Chicago, 
III, Xovember 19, 1892. 

His father, William Reid Manierre, was born in Chicago, in 
1845 and was graduated from Chicago University in 1897, and 
Union Law in 1880. He is a manufacturer and a custom house 
broker. Mrs. Manierre lived in JSTew York City before her 
marriage ; her name was Julia Orr Edson. There were seven 
children in the family; one is deceased. Yale relatives include 
George Manierre, '68, uncle ; Alfred E. Manierre, '02 ; Louis 
Manierre, '01, and Erancis E. 
Manierre, '07, cousins. 

Eddie prepared at the Milton 
Academy, Milton, Mass., and at 
Hackley School, Tarrytown, jST. Y. 
He went out for baseball and 
wrestling; was on the Apollo 
Banjo and Mandolin Clubs, and 
belongs to Alpha Delta Phi. 
Freshman year he roomed Avitli 
Harris E. Tindel until Christmas, 
then with Sidney T. Miller, at 
551 Pierson and 646 Wright ; 
Sophomore year with Miller, at 
249 Durfee. Manierre left at the 
end of Sophomore year to go into 
business, and may be addressed at 
1507 Dearborn Parkway, Chi- 
cago, 111. 




(f. 



i<sn^ 



^ 



^^^''.^JlAAf. 



ALBERT CHARLES MERRIAM, ''Al," was born in Meriden, 
Conn., December 24, 1891. 

His father, Charles Andrew Merriam, was born in Meriden, 
Conn., October 10, 1863, and spent his life there, connected with 



276 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




the Meriden Fire Department. 
He died in 1906. His mother, 
Mathilda Elizabeth Schuerer, was 
born in Wiirttemberg, Germany. 
There were two sons and two 
daughters in the family; one 
daughter is deceased. Rev. 
Charles L. Merriam, '79, and 
Julius S. Augur, '13, are Yale 
relatives. 

Al prepared at the Mt. Her- 
mon School, Mt. Hermon, Mass. 
He was a member of the Fresh- 
man Track Squad, and also took 
part in dramatics. He has a 
Yale Record Charm, and belonged 
to the Mt. Hermon Club. Fresh- 
man year he roomed alone at 333 
Crown Street; Sophomore year 
with Walter G. Weise, at 169 Lawrance. He left at the close of 
Sophomore year to enter the Class of 1916 at Wesleyan, where 
he is a member of Beta Theta Pi. He expects to enter the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City, and ulti- 
mately to practice medicine. He may be addressed at Woodmont, 
Conn. 



ajuuj€h<:yr) 



VOvoa/nrrx/- 



JOHN AUBRY MORGAN, born February 10, 1894, in Provi- 
dence, R. I., is the son of P. A. Morgan. He prepared at the 
Providence Hope Street School and was a member of the Class 
of 1915 Brown University. He was with the Class Freshman year 
and roomed at 271 Crown Street. 

Morgan's home address is 184 Howell Street, Providence, R. I. 



GILROY MULQUEEN, ''Gil," was born in New York City, 
September 1, 1895. 

His father, Michael Joseph Mulqueen, was born in New York 
City in 1855 and is a lawyer. Mrs. Mulqueen was Mary Gilroy 



NON-GRADUATES 277 



of 'New York. There Avere two sons and three daughters; four 
of the children are living. 

Gil prepared at the Cutler School, New York City. He took 
part in the spring play of the Dramatic Association in Freshman 
year. He roomed with H. Clossou at 618 Wright in Freshman 
year; Avith R. C. Myles, Jr., at 267 Durfee in Sophomore year, 
and with E. S. A. Robinson at 488 Haughton in Junior year. 

Mulqueen left college in Junior year and is noAv a member of 
the Class of 1916, Columbia. After graduating he will enter the 
Columbia Law School. His permanent address is 43 West Eighty- 
fifth Street, New York City. 



ROBERT CUNNII^GHAM MYLES, JR., "Bob," "Rob," 
"Bobby," was born in JSTew York City, July 30, 1893. 

His father, Robert Cunningham Myles, was born in New Orleans, 
La., about 1857, and was graduated from the University of the 
South with the degree of M.D. He has lived in Wew Orleans, 
London, England, and J^ew York, where he is a physician. His 
mother's maiden name was Edith Russell Piatt, and her home 
New York. There are two sons in the family. Beverly R. Myles, 
1918, is a brother. 

Bob pre^Dared at The Hill School. He went out for tennis ; 
received the Freshman doubles tennis prize, and was a member 
of the Dramatic Association, having taken the part of Betsy in 
"Fruits of Culture." He is now attending Columbia University. 
Freshman year he roomed alone at 615 Wright; Sophomore year 
with, l^icholas Eastman and George Goodwin, at 166 Lawrance. 
He left at the close of Sophomore year. His permanent address 
is 875 Park Avenue, jSTew York City. 



AUGUSTUS CARPENTER NEWELL, "Pete," "Gus," was 
born in Chicago, 111., September 6, 1893, and lives in Mentor, Ohio. 

His father, John Edmund Newell, was born in Amboy, 111., 
December 14, 1862, and was graduated from Yale in the Class of 



278 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



1883 S. He is in the coal business in Chicago and Cleveland, 
president of the Jefferson Coal Company. His mother's name 
was Annie Carnenter, and her home in Chicago, 111. There are 

two sons in the family. Ashbel 
B. Newell, 1890, and ISTewell 
^^t/jj^K/l/l^^^ Garfield, 1918, are relatives. 

^^^^^^^^^^^k Fete prepared at Westminster, 

^H^I^H^^^^^^ and at the Harstrom School. He 

m ^^^^^^^B roomed in Freshman year with 

f ^^m§. Philip Schwartz and Joseph E. 

t..^^. ^.m^ Wl Otis, Jr., at 645 Wright. 

Newell left at the close of 
Freshman year to go into the 
manufacturing business. His ad- 
dress is Mentor, Ohio. 




EOBERT AXFORD OSTHAUS entered the Class from Lafay- 
ette College. He roomed at 532 Pierson and left at the end of 
the first term. 

Osthaus' home address in 1912 was 330 Wheeler Avenue, 
Scranton, Pa. 



TIMOTHY JOSEPH O'SULLIVAN, JR., ''Bonnie," 
"Natural," was bom in New York City, February 6, 1895, and 
after living there five years, moved to Andover, Mass. 

His father, Timothy Joseph O'Sullivan, was born in Ireland 
in 1857, but has lived in New York most of his life, Avhere he 



NON-GRADUATES 



279 



is superintendent of ii private 
estate. Mrs. O'Sullivan was 
Elizabeth Bennett before mar- 
riage ; there are two sons and 
two daughters in the family. 

Bonnie prepared at Phillips- 
Andover. He roomed at 262 
York Street and left at the end 
of Freshman year. 

O'Sullivan intends to practice 
law, and will enter the Yale 
School of Law. His address is 
Box 555, Andover, Mass. 




WILLIAM HENRY OV- 
ERBY, JR., "Bill," ''Creps," 
w^as born June 27, 1894, in 
Henderson, Kr. 

His father, William Henry 
Overby, was born in Henderson, 
Ky., !N^ovember 8, 1850, and was 
a member of the Yale Class of 
1884. He has always lived in 
Henderson, where he is a lawyer, 
and cashier of People's Savings 
Bank. Mrs. Overby lived in 
Eranklin, Ky., before she mar- 
ried ; her name w^as Fannie Bell 
Moore. Of their six children 
William is the only one living. 

Bill prepared at Phillips- 
Exeter. He roomed alone at 
549 Pierson in Freshman year, 




^uEt^Cv^ l<L-^^.^ (^U<^ 



280 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



and at 333 Durfee with James White Knapp in Sophomore year. 
He left at the end of the second year, and may be addressed at 
840 Green Street, Henderson, Ky. 



XORMAN" PENNEY was born 
in Buffalo, N. Y., September 25, 
1892. 

His father, Thomas Penney, 
was born in London, England, 
May 6, 1859, and was graduated 
from Yale in the Class of 1887, 
and from the School of Law in 
1889. He practices law in Buf- 
falo, N. Y. Mrs. Penney's name 
was Celia Elizabeth Patterson; 
there are three sons and one 
daughter in the family. Charles 
Patterson Penney, 1917, and 
Thomas Penney, Jr., 1918, are 
brothers. 

Norman prepared at the 
Nichols School, Buffalo, and at 
the University School, Cleveland, 
Ohio. He was on the Banjo and Mandolin Club, and a member 
of Alpha Delta Phi. Freshman year he roomed with John Llow^e 
Hopkins, at 426 Berkeley; Sophomore year with Lloyd Bissell, 
at 196 Welch. 

Penney left at the close of Sophomore year, to enter the Rens- 
selaer Polytechnic Institute, where he is a member of the Class 
of 1918. His address is 54 Hodge Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 




ItUsVa-l-o^^ uL 



TOM RANDOLPH, JR., was born in Sherman, Texas, Janu- 
ary 1, 1893, and has lived in St. Louis, Mo., and Houston, Texas. 

His father, Tom Randolph, was bom in Rome, Tenn., and is 
chairman of the board of directors of the National Bank of 
Commerce, St. Louis, Mo. His mother was from Sherman, Texas ; 
her name was Fay Binkley. There are three children living, one 
deceased. Henry Potter, '03, is a brother-in-law. 



NON-GRADUATES 



281 



Tom prepared at the Hackley 
School, Tarrytown, Smith Acad- 
emy, St. Louis, and the Harstroni 
School, South i!^orwalk, Conn. 
He was also a special student 
at Washington University, St. 
Louis. Freshman year he roomed 
with Elliott Robinson, at 9 
Library Street. 

Randolph worked one year in 
the credit department of the Na- 
tional Bank of Commerce in St. 
Louis, and is now directing the 
credit work for the Kirby Lumber 
Company in Houston, Texas. He 
married Miss Daisy Ewing of 
Houston, Texas, j^ovember 3, 
1915. His address is 3200 Mt. 
Vernon Avenue, Houston, Texas. 




\^m^Ou 




EDJVIOND JAMES ROS- 
EiSTER, "Ed," was born in iNTew 
York City, November 23, 1893. 

His father, Sol Rosener, was 
bom in Elbing, Germany, in 
1852, and lived in Louisville, 
Ky., and Xew York City, where 
he was a tobacco merchant. He 
died May 12, 1914. His mother's 
name was Natalie Jacoby, and 
her home New York. There are 
two sons in the family. Alfred 
L. Rosener, 1918, is a brother. 

Ed prepared at Andover. He 
sang on the Freshman Glee Club 
and won his numerals on the 
Freshman Track Team. Fresh- 
man year he roomed at 262 York 
Street. 




C^^U^-t^trT^.xPC' y. /(L^hfi.c^^^e^\ 



282 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Rosener left College to go into the stock and bond brokerage 
business. His address is Hotel Ansonia, Broadway and Seventy- 
third Street, New York City. 



JOHN McLINN ROSS, "Mac/' was born in New Haven, 
Conn., April 16, 1895. 

His father, John William Ross, was born in New Haven, Conn,, 
December 25, 1870, and has always lived there. He is a clerk in 
the New Haven Post Office. His mother's name was Ernestine 
McLinn; there are two children, a daughter and a son. Ira M. 
Mason, 1910, is a relative. 

Mac prepared at the New Haven High School. He is a member 
of Alpha Phi Alpha. He lived at his home during Freshman year. 

Ross left to enter the University of Illinois, w^iere he is a 
member of the Class of 1917, specializing in French and Spanish. 
He intends to go into the government service. His permanent 
address is 445 Orchard Street, New Haven, Conn. 




REED ASHLEY RUMELIN 
was born in Portland, Ore., 
March 8, 1892, and is the son 
of Charles E. Rumelin, of Port- 
land. 

He prepared at the Lawrence- 
ville School and at Portland 
Academy. He sang on the 
Freshman Glee Club and was a 
member of the Freshman Base- 
ball Team and the Plugs. Fresh- 
man year he roomed with Victor 
B. Caldwell at 626 Wright. He 
left college during Sophomore 
year. 

Rumelin's address next year 
will be 152 Madison Avenue, 
New York. 



NON-GRADUATES 



283 



ALBERT KOXDRICK RUMSEY, Webster Groves, Mo. 



ROBERT MELVILLE SCHOLLE, 46 East Seventy-fourth 
Street, ]N"ew York City. 



PHILIP SCHWARTZ, "Phil," was born in Chicago, 111., 
April 28, 1893, and has lived in California, Georgia, and 
Connecticut. 

His father, Charles Schwartz, was born in Albany, !N^. Y., and 
spent most of his life in Chicago, where he was a member of 
the firm of Schwartz, Dupee & Company, grain and stock brokers. 
He died in 1893. His mother, who lived in Suffield, Conn., 
before her marriage, was Emma Wadsworth ; she died in Orange, 
]Sr. J., in 1901. There are two sons in the family. Charles W. 
Schwartz, 1914 S., is a brother. 

Phil prepared at Westminster, 
and the Harstrom School. He 
was on the Freshman Four-oared 
and Sophomore Class Crews and 
has numerals. He was a mem- 
ber of the Harstrom Club, the 
Westminster Club, the Grill 
Room Grizzlies, the Scarabs, 
the L'niversity Club, and Delta 
Kappa Epsilon. Freshman year 
he roomed with Joseph Otis, 
Jr., and Augustus C. I^ewell, at 
645 Wright; Sophomore year 
with Otis, at 264 Durfee. 

Schwartz left at the close of 
Sophomore year to follow agri- 
cultural pursuits. He may be 
addressed at Suffield, Conn. 




PU^JMr^^JJT 






284 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



EDWIN EUGENE 
SCHWIEN, "Ed," was born in 
St. Joseph, Mo., June 24, 1894. 
His father, Victor Schwien, 
was born in Napeiwille, 111., 
August 1, 1865, and is in busi- 
ness in St. Joseph, Mo., presi- 
dent of Nevin & Schwien Com- 
pany. His mother was Amelia 
Dietz, of Weston^ Mo. ; there are 
four sons in the family. 

Ed prepared at the St. Joseph 
High School. He went out for 
wrestling, and was on the 1913-14 
Wrestling Team. He left Col- 
lege after Sophomore year. He 
roomed with S. J. Archenhold 
and C. W. Willey, at 411 Berke- 
ley and 185 Farnam. 
Schwien has gone into the mercantile business ; his address is 
423 JSTorth Twenty-second Street, St. Joseph, Mo. 




(g, O^UA-v~b^ (l^-vx^ <J ^/UAX,^ 




^Sn^^yhyf^A^a^/iAj 



HENRY NATHAN SHAVER, 

''Shave," was born in Cohoes, 
N. Y., September 20, 1892. 

His father, Henry Lincoln 
Shaver, was born in Cohoes in 
1861, and is president of H. L. 
Shaver & Company, merchants. 
Mrs. Shaver's maiden name was 
Estella J. Scott; Henry is the 
only child. 

He prepared at Egbert's High 
School, Cohoes, and at Phillips- 
Andover. Freshman year he 
roomed with Thomas Enwright, 
at 116 York Street; Sopho- 
more year, alone, at 114 High 
Street. 

Shaver left College to enter 
Columbia Law School, where he 



NON-GRADUATES 



285 



is a member of tlie Class of 1917. He was married July 10, 
1915. His permanent address is 240 Mohawk Street, Cohoes, 
N. Y. 




EDWARD BRAINERD 
SMITH, "E. B.," was born in 
Middlebury, Vt., February 22, 
189-1, and has lived the greater 
part of his life abroad, having 
been in Italy seven years, Switz- 
erland three, and Germany two. 

His father, James Atwood 
Smith, was born in Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich., November 3, 1864. 
He has been in the United States 
Government service in various 
parts of the world, and is now 
Consul General at Calcutta, 
India. Mrs. Smith lived in 
Lansing, Mich., before her mar- 
riage; her name was Marguerite 
Adelaide Ransom. Edward is 
the only son living; a second son 

is deceased. Lewis A. Parsons, 1908 S., is a cousin, and Joseph 
M. Smith, 1854, a grandfather. 

E. B. prepared at St. Paul's School, Concord, iST. H., and at 
the Coit School, Munich, Germany. He went out for tennis, track 
and fencing, and Avas a member of the Cercle Frangais, taking 
part in the French play in 1913. He roomed with Alfred N. 
Fowler in Freshman year, at 614 Wright; with Fowler and 
Frank Sweet in Sophomore year, at 183 Lawrance ; Junior year 
with E. Russell Bragg, at 468 Fayerweather. He left at the close 
of Junior year, and is engaged in agriculture in Florida. His 
permanent address is Oakhurst, Pinellas County, Fla. 



6 . 



5- 



X Sr^r^ 



HARRY SPROUL, JR., was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., April 6, 
1892, and has lived there and in l^ew York City. 

His father, Henry Sproul, was born in Pittsburgh, and has been 
in the brokerage business in that city. His mother was Louise 
Biggs before her marriage; Harry is the only child. John C. 



286 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




Dilworth, 1905 S., and Joseph C. 
Dilworth, 1907 S., are relatives. 

He prepared at St. Paul's 
kScliool, Concord, J^. H., and at 
the Evans School, Mesa, Ariz. 
He went out for squash and 
hockey, and played on the Fresh- 
man Hockey Team. He was a 
member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. 
Freshman year he roomed alone 
at 625 Wright; Sophomore year 
with Ross Proctor, Otis Guernsey, 
Harold Tittman and George Ha- 
ven, at 155 Lawrance. 

Sproul left after Sophomore 
year, and went into the manu- 
facturing business. His perma- 
nent address is 22 West Fifty- 
seventh Street, ISTew York City. 




HARRIS EMORY TINDEL 

was born in Eastport, Maine, 
August 20, 1892. 

His father Adam Tindel, was 
born in Newcastle, England, and 
was graduated from Penney- 
liousie Law School. He has 
spent most of his life in America, 
principally Philadelphia, Pa., 
where he is president of the 
Tindel-Morris Company, steel 
manufacturers. His mother's 
maiden name was Sarah Wil- 
liams ; there are two children 
in the family. 

Harris prepared at Andover, 
Mass. He went out for tennis. 
He roomed with E. Manierre 
and P. Brereton, at 551 Pierson, 



NON-GRADUATES 



287 



ill Fresliinan 3'ear; Sophomore year witli D. Barney, at 357 
White. 

Tiiidel left College to go into the steel manufacturing business, 
in which he is still engaged. His address is care Tindel-Morris 
Company, Eddystone, Pa. 

CLAEEXCE ARCHIBALD VEASEY, JR., 1118 Xinth 
Avenue, Spokane, Wash. 

YAN'DERBILT BURTON WARD, born March 12, 1893, in 
Xew York City, is the son of J. H. Ward. He prepared at 
St. Paul's School (Concord) and at Heathcote School (Harrison, 
jST. Y.). He roomed at 574 Pierson and left the Class at the end 
of the first term in Freshman year. 

Ward's home address is Rye, X. Y. 



JOHI^ MACLEAN WATERS, "Dunkie," was born in 
Buffalo, X. Y., October 24, 1891. 

His father, Henry Doubleday Waters, w^as born in Oswego, 
N. Y., in 1856, and is in the grain business in Buffalo. Mrs. 
Waters was a resident of Buffalo ; 
her name was Jennie Phoebe 
Webster. There are two sons in 
the family. James Webster Wat- 
ers, 1911, Frank G. Webster, 
1903 S., and Harold E. Webster, 
1907 S., are relatives. 

Dunkie prepared at the Hotch- 
kiss School. He roomed with 
S. T. Miller, Jr., in Freshman 
year, at 646 Wright. 

Waters was obliged to leave 
college on account of his eyes. 
He traveled for the Larkin Com- 
pany and has been wnth F. W. 
Woolworth & Company for two 
years. He may be addressed at 
45 Richmond Avenue, Buffalo, 
X. Y. 




)fcri.^^^ >ruM_i.. uj,fc^ 






288 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




SIMON DAVID WEISS- 
MAN", born April 12, 1895, in 
New Haven, Conn., is the son 
of George "Weissman. He pre- 
pared at the jSTew Haven High 
School. He Avas with the Class 
Freshman and Sophomore years 
and roomed at home. 

Weissman's home address is 
20 Pearl Street, New Haven, 
Conn. His 1915-1916 address is 
564 Washington Street, Boston, 
Mass. 



THOMAS WELLES was born January 24, 1892, in Hartford, 
Conn. He prepared at the East Orange High School and the 
University School, New Haven, Conn. Freshman year he roomed 
at 105 Welch and Sophomore year with Allen duP. Dimmick at 
243 Durfee, until he left during the first term of Sophomore 
year. 

His mail address is care 172 Glenwood Avenue, East Orange, 
N. J. 



EOY CORNWELL WILCOX was born in Meriden, Conn., 
December 24, 1891. 

His father, George H. Wilcox, was born in Meriden, Conn., 
August 22, 1856, and was graduated from Yale in the Class of 
1875 S. He is president of the International Silver Company. 
Mrs. Wilcox also lived in Meriden before her marriage ; her 
name was Nettie Barker Curtis. There are three sons in the 
family. Harold C. Wilcox, 1912, and Horace Wilcox, 1916 S., 
are brothers. 



NON-GRADUATES 



289 



Roy prepared at the Hotclikiss 
School. He won his numerals 
on the Freshman Baseball Team; 
belonged to the University Banjo 
and Mandolin Club, and is a 
member of the Hotchkiss Club, 
the Ptonibers and Zeta Psi. 
Freshman year he roomed with 
R. S. Young and P. H. Linden- 
berg, at 633 Wright ; Sophomore 
year Avitli W. Harbison, E. Oc- 
iimpaugh, and H. Sneath, at 15-i 
LaAvrance. 

Wilcox left at the close of 
Sophomore year to go into the 
manufacturing business. He is 
now with the International Silver 
Company. His address is Meri- 
den. Conn. 




^^.^^^ 



MORRIS KARL WILSOX 

was born in Evanston, 111., March 
15, 1892. 

His father, Hugh Robert Wil- 
son, was located in Chicago, 
Avliere he was in the Avholesale 
men's furnishings business. He 
died in Atlantic City in 1900. 
Mrs. Wilson, whose name Avas 
Alice Jane Tousey, lived in In- 
dianapolis, Ind., before her mar- 
riage; she died in 1911. There 
are ^xe children living, tAvo de- 
ceased. Hugh R. Wilson, 1906, 
and Oliver T. Wilson, 1898, are 
brothers. 

Morris prepared at The Hill 
School. He roomed Avitli G. 
Porter, Sheppard, Tighe and 




290 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

Mudge, at York and Elm Streets, in Freshman year; Sopliomore 
year with the same men at 239 Durfee. 

Wilson left College to go into the mercantile business, and 
may be addressed care Wilson Brothers, 528 South Fifth Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. 



CONRAD WALTER WOEHLER. (See page 319.) 



JACOB SAMUEL YOULE, born October 31, 1892, in Hart- 
ford, Conn., is the son of Max Youle. He prepared at the Pitts- 
field High School and the Hartford Public High School. He was 
with the Class until Junior year and roomed Freshman year at 
527 Pierson with Nathan E. Derecktor; Sophomore year at 170 
St. John Street, and Junior year at 257 Columbus Avenue. 

Youle's 1915-1916 address is Beacon Falls, Conn. 



Note. — Earley Emmett Caple left college in April, 1916, and is now a 
non-graduate member. His biography appears on page 294. 



EX-MEMBERS 



EX-MEMBERS 



293 




SIDNEY ALVORD BEARD- 

SLEE, '^Sid/' "Beard/' was 
born in Hartford, Conn., De- 
cember 20, 1893. 

He is a son of Clark Smith 
Beardslee, who was born in Cov- 
entry, N. Y., February 1, 1850, 
graduated from Amherst with the 
degree of B.A. in the Class of 
1876, and was given the degree 
of D.D. by Berea and Amherst, 
and the degree of M.A. by Am- 
herst. He was a professor in the 
Hartford Theological Seminary; 
he died April 14, 1914. Mrs. 
Beardslee w^as Emma Gillette 
Alvord before her marriage ; her 
home was in Bolton, Conn. She 
died in Hartford, December 8, 

1913. There are six sons and two daughters in the family. 
Saul Alvord, 1800; Raymond A. Beardslee, 1905; Claude G. 
Beardslee, 1909; R. W. Alvord, 1915 S.; Ezra Hall Gillette, 
1841; George B. Alvord, 1895, and Samuel M. Alvord, 1896, 
are relatives. 

Sid prepared at the Hartford High School, and entered Yale 
wath the Class of 1916, holding the E. C. Jones Scholarship. He 
is a member of Book and Bond. He left during Freshman 
year on account of illness and returned the next year in the 
Class of 1917. He has roomed at 529 Pierson, 660 and 1180 
Taylor. 



<^0^^'i^ije..'O^^'*-J^<LJLsui..^ 



PIERCE HILL BRERETON, "Perce," was born in New 
Bedford, Mass., March 2, 1894. He has lived in Washington, 
D. C, Providence, R. I., and Santa Barbara, Calif. 

His father, Percy Hutchison Brereton, born in Paterson, 
N. J., is a lieutenant of the U. S. R. C. S. Mrs. Brereton was 
Mary A. H. Pierce of New^ Bedford, Mass. Pierce is the only 
child. 



294 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




Perce prepared at the Hope 
Street High School, Providence, 
R. I. Before he entered Yale 
he was a member of the Class 
of 1915, Brown University, where 
he belonged to Psi Upsilon. He 
left our Class at the end of 
Freshman year to enter the Shef- 
field Scientific School. He was 
a member of the Berzelius So- 
ciety (Colony), and K. B. L. He 
took the Select Course and gradu- 
ated in 1915. Freshman year he 
roomed at 546 Pierson. 

His permanent address is Ap- 
ponaug, R. I. 



^ 



-<s<Jic<:f 




■<sL>..^su^ 



FARLEY EMMFTT CAPLE, 

''Mutt," "Zip," was born August 
13, 1893, in Portsmouth, Va., and 
has lived in Virginia, in Boston, 
Mass., in Stratford, and New 
Haven, Conn. 

His father, Fmmett Liggins 
Caple, born on May 2, 1868, in 
Garysburg, N". C, has spent the 
greater part of his life in Ports- 
mouth, Va., and is a minister. 
Mrs. Caple, Avho was Pinkey 
Gorham Johnson, lived in Scot- 
land N^eck, N. C, before she mar- 
ried. There were two sons and 
two daughters in the family; 
two children are deceased. 

Zip prepared for college at the 
N'ew Haven High School, and 



EX-MEMBERS 



295 



held a Yale INTew Haven Scholarship. He took part in the Sopho- 
more Declamation Contest, and is at the present time superintend- 
ent of the Immanuel Baptist Sunday School, ISTew Haven. He 
roomed at his home during Freshman, Sophomore and Junior 
years, alone; during Senior year at 65 Edgewood Avenue, with 
Arthur Taylor. 



LAWKEXCE JOSEPH CASEY, 17 Tenner Street, Willi- 
mantic, Conn. 



JOHX BAINBRIDGE FITZPATRICK was born in St. Paul, 
Minn., April 2-2, 1893. 

His father, John Francis Fitzpatrick, was born in Waterbury, 
Conn., and was graduated from Yale in the Class of 1885 L. He 
practices law in St. Paul. Mrs. Fitzpatrick lived in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, before her marriage ; her name was Cora Bainbridge. 
There are three sons and one daughter in the family. Abner P. 
Hayes, '98 and '02 L., is a relative. 

John prepared at the St. Paul 
Academy, St. Paul, Minn. He 
was on the Freshman Crew^ on 
the University Crew in the fall 
of 1913, and the Second Crew in 
the spring, and has numerals. 
He is a member of the Double 
Beach Club, and Psi Upsilon. 
He was obliged to remain away 
from college during his Junior 
year because of sickness and is 
now enrolled with 1918. Fresh- 
man year he roomed with Hugh 
McConnell and J. G. Goodlett, at 
424 Fayerweather ; Sophomore 
year with the same men and Al- 
lan McLane, Jr., at 254 Durfee. 
During 1915-16 he roomed with 
James Mansfield Symington, at 
667 T\'right. 




296 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



ALLAN BEOW]^ GRAHAM, 

'^Xuts," "Dutch," "Shorty," was 
born in Pittsburgh, Pa., October 
18, 1892. 

His father, Samuel Creighton 
Graham, was born and lives in 
Pittsburgh, where he is president 
of the Lockport Paving Com- 
pany. His mother's name was 
Caroline Fisk Brown before her 
marriage. There are two sons in 
the family. 

Nuts prepared at the River- 
view Academy, and at the Prince- 
ton Preparatory School. He be- 
longs to R. K. K. Freshman year 
he roomed with L. M. Lloyd, at 
407 Berkeley; Sophomore year 
with Lloyd, J. L. Hopkins, W. M. 

Levy, Jr., and A. S. Wells, at 272 Durfee; Junior and Senior 

years with Levy and Wells, at 354 White and 65 Vanderbilt. He 

is now enrolled with 1917. 

Graham expects to go into business, and he may be addressed 

at 703 German National Bank Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 




^^^^<>^ /t/. .^^^^^a-^^^^ioc^t,^. 



EDWARD KNIGHT HILL, Peekskill, N. Y. 



LOWELL INNES, "Soc," was born in Biddeford, Maine, 
March 3, 1894. 

His father, Charles Herbert Innes, was born in Wickham, Que., 
Canada, and lives in Saco, Maine, where he is tax collector. His 
mother's maiden name was Georgie Leavitt Sawyer; Lowell is 
the only child. 

Soc prepared at the Thornton Academy, Saco, Maine. He was 



EX-MEMBERS 



297 



on the Freslinian Tennis Team 
and went ont for lacrosse. lie 
received an oration appointment 
in Junior year. He roomed with 
Willard H. Eckman in Freshman 
year, at 389 Pierson ; Sophomore 
year with Eckman and William 
A. James, at 178 Lawrance. 

Innes left during Junior year 
because of poor health, and re- 
turned Senior year enrolling Avith 
1917. This year he roomed at 
83 Connecticut with W. Eckman. 
He may be addressed at Saco, 
Maine. 




J^u^^M^KjZ. 



CLAKKE OLEK KIM- 
BERLY, ^'General," ''Colonel," 
"Rat," "Nigger," "Kim," was 
born in Hampton, Ya., February 
6, 1894. 

His father, Harry Harper 
Kimberly, was born in Balti- 
more, Md., and is cashier of the 
First iN'ational Bank, Hampton, 
Ya. His mother's maiden name 
was Juliette Clarke. There are 
three children in the family, two 
deceased. Wesley Marion Oler, 
Jr., 1916, is a relative. 

General prepared at the Hamp- 
ton High School, and at the Yir- 
ginia Military Institute, Lexing- 
ton, Ya. He entered Yale in 
Junior year, went out for the 




298 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



crew and wrestling; and is a member of Zeta Psi and tlie South- 
ern Club. He is enrolled with the Class of 1917. He roomed 
with Wesley M. Oler, Jr., and John Graves Putnam, at 477 
Haughton, in Junior year, and with the same men at 13 Vander- 
bilt, in Senior year. 

Kimberly expects to go into the manufacturing business ; his 
address is Hampton, Va. 




DUDLEY HERSEY MUDGE 
was born in Evanston, 111., N'o- 
vember 24, 1894, and now lives 
in St. Paul, Minn. 

His father, Daniel Archibald 
Mudge, was born in Leesburg, 
Va., and is in the real estate 
business in Chicago, being presi- 
dent of the -Hersey Land Com- 
pany. His mother, Eva Estelle 
Hersey before her marriage, lived 
in Stillwater, Minn. ; there are 
two sons and two daughters in 
the family. John Reid, Jr., 1899, 
and Archibald Reid, 1905, are 
relatives. 

Dudley prepared at the Hotch- 
kiss School, and went out for 
baseball, hockey and golf. He 
was on the Freshman and University Baseball Teams, and the 
Golf Team, and has numerals and a "Y." He is a member of 
the Sword and Gun Club, the Plugs, and Delta Kappa Epsilon. 
Freshman year he roomed with G. E. Porter, M. K. Wilson, 
L. G. Tighe and D. C. Shepard, at 266 York Street ; Sophomore 
year with the same men at 239 Durfee; Junior and Senior years 
with Porter, Tighe and Shepard, at 391 Berkeley and 39 Vander- 
bilt. He left College Junior year because of ill health and returned 
the next year, enrolled as a member of 1917. 

Mudge will go into the manufacturing business; his address is 
449 Portland Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 



f^muA^ 



EX-MEMBERS 



299 



CHARLES FERRIDAY 
NEAYE, "Chas/' was born in 
Winchester, Mass., July 12, 1894, 
and. lives in New York City. 

His father, Charles ISTeave, Avas 
born in Cincinnati, Ohio, De- 
cember 27, 1868, and was gradu- 
ated from Yale with the degree 
of B.A. in 188S; from Boston 
School of Technology Avith the 
degree of B.S. in 1890, and was 
given the degree of M.A. by Har- 
vard in 1892. He is a patent 
lawyer, member of the firm of 
Fish, Richardson, Herrick k 
Neave, New York City. Mrs. 
ISTeave was Elizabeth Ferriday, 
and her home in Pomfret, Conn. 
There are two sons in the family. 

Joseph R. Swan, 1902; Robert S. Piatt, 1911, and Rutherford H. 
Piatt, Jr., 1918^ are relatives. 

Chas prepared at the Westminster School, Simsbury, Conn. 
He went out for tennis, sw^imming, and crew; was an associate 
member of the Dramatic Association, and took part in ''Harold." 
He also belongs to the Cercle Francais, and to the University Club. 
He roomed with Sebring Bassett at 661 Wright in Freshman year ; 
with H. F. Xewton and G. W. Goodwin in Sophomore year, at 
166 Lawrance; Junior and Senior years with Newton, at 497 
Haughton and 139 Welch. 

Xeave is now enrolled as a member of 1917. His permanent 
address is 133 East Sixty-second Street, New York City. 




QL^^ii^^ 



EDMUND OCUMPxVUGH, 3d, was born in Rochester, N. Y., 
May 27, 1893. 

His father, Edmund Ocumpaugh, 2d, was born in Rochester 
and attended the University of Rochester from 1886 to 1888. He 
is a manufacturer. His mother's maiden name was Clara Solomon. 
There were two sons in the family; one is deceased. Herbert E. 
Ocumpaugh, '14, is a relative. 



300 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




Cd/^^yn-^y-yuof UC* 



ij 



Edmmid i^repared at tlie East 
High School, Rochester, and at 
Aiidover. He belonged to the 
Freshman, Apollo and University 
Glee clnbs, and was leader of the 
Apollo in 1915-16. He went out 
for tennis and hockey and is a 
member of Zeta Psi. 

Freshman year he roomed with 
Carroll Johnson and Wolcott 
Harbison at 627 Wright; Soph- 
omore year with Harbison at lo-t 
Lawrance ; Junior and Senior 
years with Harbison and Herbert 
C. Sneath at 485 Haughton and 
69 Yanderbilt. He is enrolled in 
the Class of 1917. 

Ocumpaugh's address is 121 
Brunswick St., Rochester, N. Y. 




.X^z^tt-^y, 



FREDERIC BAXTER PEN- 
XEY, 'Tritz," ^Ten," was born 
in New Haven, Conn., December 
6, 1891. 

His father, Frederic Hamlin 
Penney, was born in Waterbury, 
Conn., August 4, 1860, and is a 
traveling salesman in the employ 
of the L. C. Bates Company, 
Xew Haven. His mother, Clara 
E. Persons, lived in Colebrook, 
Conn., before her marriage. 
Fritz is the only child. Yale 
relatives include Robert Penney, 
'74 L. ; Ernest R. Starkweather, 
'13 S.; Henry Starkweather, 
'80S.; Rev. Frederick T. Per- 
sons, '93; Howard W. Pease, '95; 
R. Edward Penney, e.r-'OOL.; 



EX-MEMBERS 



301 



Heni-y W. Starkweatlior, '06 S., and George P. Starkweather, 
'91 S.' 

Fritz prepared at the Hopkins Grannnar School, the Blake 
School, and the Williston Seminary, and belongs to the Yale- 
Williston Club. lie Avas on the baseball and football squads. 

Penney, who is now with the Class of 1917, roomed at his home 
during his college course, and is undecided as to his future occupa- 
tion. His permanent address is 329 Alden Avenue, New Haven, 
Conn. 



EGBERT LUTHER RANDOL, Ardmore, Okla. 



ALPHOXSO ERAN'CIS RAYNES, "Alph," "Shorty," was 
born in Charlestown, Mass., January 10, 1892, but now lives in 
Portsmouth, N. H. 

His father, George Wadsworth Raynes, was born in Somerville, 
Mass., August 15, 1864, and was graduated from Yale in the Class 
of 1890 w^ith the degree of B.A. Mrs. Raynes, whose name was 
Marie K. Goodwin, lived in 
France before her marriage; 
there are two children in the 
family. 

Alph prepared at the Asheville 
School, Asheville, jST. C. He is 
a member of the University Fenc- 
ing Association. He roomed 
alone in Freshman year, at 564 
Pierson ; with Edward Sheldon 
in Sophomore year, at 157 Law- 
rance; in Junior year with 
James Knapp, at 479 Haughton, 
and in Senior year alone, at 122 
Welch. 

Raynes will graduate with the 
Class of 1917 and expects to en- 
ter the Harvard Medical School ; 
his address is Post Office Box 
1066, Portsmouth, X. H. 




CA^'^^icr^^^ ~F" 7^^i^<-*t^ 



302 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




EDWARD GEORGE SCO- 
VILL, "Sco," was born in 
Waterbury, Conn., February 28, 
1893. 

His father, George B. Scovill, 
was born in Watertowai, Conn., 
January 16, 1856, and is en- 
gaged in business in Waterbury, 
Conn., where he is manager of 
the Mold Foundry Company. 
Harriet W. (Higgins) Scovill, 
his mother, lived in Fredericks- 
burg, Ya., before her marriage. 
Edward has three sisters. Elton 
Scovill Wayland, 1915, is a 
relative. 

Sco pi'epared at the Waterbury 
High School. He went out for 
creAV. Scovill roomed alone at 
582 Pierson in Freshman year; with Keelson B. Mead, Jr., in 
Sophomore year at 186 Farnam; at 463 Fayerweather in Junior 
year, and alone at 419 Berkeley in Senior year. He is now a 
member of 1917. He will go into manufacturing after he 
graduates. His address is 16 Frederick Street, Waterbury, Conn. 



^.J'^.^2^^ 



ORMROD TITUS, ''Scandy," was born in Rochester, K Y., 
April 10, 1893. 

His father, Herbert Myron Titus, is an agriculturist, and has 
lived in and about Rochester. Mrs. Titus, whose name was Anna 
Weis, was from Macedonia, N. Y. 

Scandy prepared at the Churchville (IST. Y.) High School, 
and at Phillips-Exeter. He went out for track and belongs to 
Delta Kappa Epsilon. He roomed with Robert Beale during his 
College course, at 432 Fayerweather in Freshman year, 139 
Welch, Sophomore year, and 472 Haughton in Junior year. 



EX-MEMBERS 



303 



Titus is now enrolled in the 
Shetfiekl Scientific School, where 
he is studying engineering. 

His permanent address is Orni- 
rod Road, Churchville, N. Y. 




(^^yx-ccoT-^ro 



ROBERT SEA BURY 
WENT WORTH, ''Bob," 
"Went," "Wenty," was born 
in Plainfield, N. J., August 17, 
1893, and has since lived in 
Philadelphia, and Stratford, Pa. 

His father, Charles Seward 
Foote, was born in Port Henry, 
I^. Y., February 7, 1860, and 
was graduated from Yale with 
the Class of 1883. He studied 
during 1883-84 at the Albany 
Law School, and practices laAv 
in Xew York City. His mother, 
Mary Cecelia Wentworth, lived 
in Strafford, Pa. There are two 
sons in the family. Thomas 
Foote Wentworth, 1913 S., is a 
brother. 




304 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

Bob prepared at Leal's School for Boys, Plainfield, N. J. He 
went out for class baseball in Freshman and Sophomore years ; 
and after entering the Sheffield Scientific School in Sophomore 
year, became assistant manager of the Yale Sheffield Monthly. 
He belongs to York Hall. Wentworth roomed with J^orman 
Finch at 521 Pierson in Freshman year and at 192 Farnam in 
Sophomore year. 

He is now a member of the Class of 1917 S. His address is 
Strafford, Pa. 



OBITUARIES 



OBITUARIES 307 



JOHN CHRISTOPHER SCHWAB was a remarkable man. 
He possessed in liigli degree a large number of different qualities 
which are not often combined. He imited personal charm with 
administrative efficiency, critical scholarship with judgment of 
practical affairs, responsibility in the conduct of his own business 
with interest in public service of every kind, scrupulous adherence 
to principle with large tolerance of the feelings of others. 

During his college course he had already given proof of his 
worth. The Class of 1886, of which he was a member, contained 
an unusual number of strong men, and he was recognized as one 
of its leaders. He continued to show the same qualities of leader- 
ship in his graduate study and in his work of instruction. His 
book on The Confederate States of America has been pronounced 
by James Ford Rhodes a model of how economic history ought 
to be studied and written. But it was not until the time of the 
bicentennial celebration that the world recognized his extraordi- 
nary administrative power. Of the exercises on that occasion he 
was given general charge. He perfonned the complex duties 
incident to that trust in a way which commanded universal 
admiration. Seldom, if ever, has so difficult a position been filled 
in a way to satisfy every one so well. 

A more permanent field for the exercise of his administrative 
ability was found when he was called upon to succeed Addison 
Van !N"ame in the headship of the Yale University Library. The 
ten years during which Mr. Schwab held the office of Librarian 
constituted a period of marked development in library administra- 
tion, not only here but throughout the country; and in that develop- 
ment Mr. Schwab took a leading part. Mr. Putnam, Librarian 
of Congress, who probably had more to do with this work than 
any other man, spoke with admiration of the manner in which 
Mr. Schwab, coming into library administration without special 
training, had Avithin three years placed himself at the head of his 
profession. 

But Mr. Schwab's activities were never confined within any one 
line. Every enterprise for public betterment commanded his sup- 



308 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



port. New Haven mourns him hardly less than Yale. In its 
musical activities, in its charitable organizations, and in its efforts 
for better government, he was ready to take his share and more 
than his share. 

''His life was gentle ; and the elements 
So mixed in him that ISTature might stand forth 
And say to all the world. This was a man." 



JtVvu-^^iA^^ 



OBITUARIES 



309 




In the death of JOHN LLOWE HOPKINS which occurred on 
the twenty-eighth day of July, nineteen hundred and fifteen, Yale 
and the Class of 1916 sustained the loss of a beloved and loyal 
friend. The shock occasioned his friends by the report of his 
death has been equalled only by the consequent feeling of loss. In 
the two years during which he was with us, his strong character, 
magnetic personality, gentlemanly conduct, and fairness of mind, 
won for him a lasting and tender place in the hearts of all his 
friends, 

L. M. L. 



310 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




JOHI^ ROBERT ALEXAN'DER LANNOM was born N'ovem- 
ber 23, 1894, in Louisville, Ky., and died November 16, 1913, at 
Yale University. 

He was possessed of an exceptionally keen mind, wbicb, coupled 
with his ever cheerful nature, made him a friend of all who came 
in contact with him. His brilliant intellect made him an inspiring 
companion, and his inexhaustible fund of humor, an exceptionally 
congenial one. His tastes were catholic, and although he special- 
ized in no particular field of extra-curriculum activity, he was 
interested in all of them. 

His death came as a great shock to us all. It seemed incon- 
ceivable that one so brimful of life and cheerfulness, who meant 
so much to all who knew him, should so suddenly go out of our 
lives forever. 

E. S. 



OBITUARIES 



311 




On July 14th, 1914, at Delta, Colorado, occurred the death of 
BEAUMOXT HEXEY LYTTO^" as the result of an accidental 
pistol wound. It was with a real sense of profound sorrow that 
his friends learned of this affair which was made the more 
intense by its abruptness. 

The leading spirit in "Bemo's" life was his unselfishness ; and 
to be unselfish was not a habit he had acquired: it was in his 
very nature. He was indeed a thorough gentleman, reserved, 
generous, self-effacing and altogether a magnificent example of 
young manhood. The sorrow occasioned by his death is com- 
mensurate only with the admiration he commanded in life. 



C. T. L., Jr. 



312 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




In the midst of a stormy life, a life fraught wth hardships, yet 
full of promise, HERBERT LEO LAWRENCE MACDONALD 
was taken from us. So fearlessly did he meet all odds, so cheer- 
fully did he look upon life in the midst of disappointments, that 
few of us knew the battle he was waging. The vigor of his 
personality commanded the respect and won the admiration of 
all of us. His whole-hearted participation in athletics as well as 
his brilliant, energetic work in the curriculum, have left upon the 
minds of his classmates an impression that will not soon fade away. 
We who have felt the spell of his buoyant spirit, and have seen 
the working of his indomitable will, shall ever find in them a high 
and noble inspiration. 

M. M. M. 



MISCELLAXY 



XINETEEX-SIXTEEI^ AND THE WAR 
Ambulaxce Service ix Fkance 

In the summer of 1915 the dass was represented in the 
greatest war of all history, by five members, Caldwell, Cowles, 
Hellier, A. Munson, and C. Mnnson, volunteering for ambu- 
lance work in France. That we were not more numerously 
represented at so important an event is probably owing to the 
fact that an indefinable something restrains us from crossing 
the street to see Caesar if the roads be muddy. It is an old 
tradition at Yale that the bull dog is hard to arouse. But let 
that pass. Xineteen-thirty-two will probably see Yale decently 
interested in history in the making — if the war lasts that long. 

It is too much of a chestful to tell all about the war in one 
breath. To call upon our classmates' letters written in the field 
is a better mode of procedure, like throwing pictures upon a 
screen, and far out-reaches in graphicness, the philosophizing 
of an author. Besides, a man at a distance has a way of saying, 
''War is hell'' with a sweeping inclusive gesture. The only 
trouble with that is that war is only intense life after all, and 
like life sometimes is hell and sometimes is not. Anyhow, we 
feel more confidence in the words of a man who is actually in it. 

France, after sitting up all night in a train from Bordeaux 
to Paris : — "When morning finally dawned the country looked 
beautiful, — little French fields all neatly kept, except very 
occasionally here and there, — and all would have been just the 
same as ever, had it not been for the soldiers. At every bridge 
stood one or two silent men. All along the line were boxes or 
hovels, some with men in them and some empty and at other 
places the grass was pressed where one or two had bivouacked 
the night." 

A run for wounded to an artillery camp at the front : — ■ 
''Suddenly we turned out of the town and plunged into a 
lonely pine forest, I sitting on the running board of the 
Mercedes. Down the pine road we went, meeting occasionally 
soldiers and officers, comino- from and going to the trenches. 



316 



HI ST BY OF THE CLASS 








A. M. Muxsox, 

Amblxance 

Driver 



Finally we came to a crossroads in the forest where a wagon 
stood with a crowd of men about it. It was the Red Cross 
wagon from the trenches, with the wonnded man in it. Right 
there was the artillery camp. There were about twenty houses 
in all, little undergrowing hovels, covered with logs and sand. 
They had glass windows, real doors. Some had small gardens 
in front and fences around them, and others had flowerpots in 
the window frames. xVll the while the 'seventy-fives' were 
firing, for it was late in the afternoon when they usually opened 
up. They had walks laid out with rather artistic fences along 
the sides made out of some wood which bent easily and looked 
very much like that of which workbaskets are woven. Then 
one of the men showed me, with great pride, a cage made out 
of wire netting, with perches in it, in which they had about 
six birds. There were two or three little cats about. A little 
bewhiskered soldier in loose-fitting uniform and wobbly hat 
which had seen months of service picked one of them up and 
told me, without my asking, that its name was 'Sarah' and 
it was his." 

Then again : — "He went way out very near to the trenches 
in an auto and lost the road and stopped. Then he heard rifle 
bullets, singing and banging on the trees, and he thinks to 
himself, thinks he, ' 'Twere better should I put me behind yon 
large tree,' — which he did and proceeded to smoke tranquilly. 
A soldier came along and told him his car was in full sight of 
the Germans, and besides he was standing on the wrong side 
of the tree." 



XIXETEEX-SIXTEEN AXD THE WAR 317 

Another writes: — "I have gotten rather to like cigarettes — 
French ones. It is a sure sign that I am becoming degenerate." 

And from the same letter : — "I like night calls as everything 
is so picturesque : trench lights flaring up along the distant 
trenches, and a man on a stretcher transferred from a two- 
wheeled horse wagon, floored with straw, by the light of a 
lantern, to the automobile." 

The following is a gripping anecdote which developed uncon- 
sciously in the pages of a rather rambling letter : — "I walked 
along a sort of trench out on the back of a bank to the cellar 
of the church, and then up into it. Tt was pretty much nothing 
but busted bricks. Every time we heard a shell singing over- 
head, I believe we all wished we were 'ter hum.' The first 
one that went over me, I'll swear, I held my breath from when 
I first heard it singing till it l)nrst. Then after the first half 
dozen, we settled down, though we never lost interest or 
yawned .... Back of the church there was a barricade of 
cobble stones piled high across the street. The wounded men 
all looked pretty pale in the afternoon sun, but their artillery 
companions of the battery where they had been wounded 
crowded around them and said, 'Good-bye, my Comrade.' 
Then the wounded men, who were on stretchers slung under 
sort of steel push carts, smiled and said, 'Good-bye, my Com- 
rade.' Two of them died later at the operating hospital." 

From another letter: — "I really feel that we are doing a 
great deal of good here, and the soldiers we bring in certainly 
appreciate it. I tried to hold one man from bumping around 
so much on the rough road. He was practically dying, but 
he said, 'Xe vous derangez pas, ^Monsieur.' '' 

Then from a diary : 
"Sept. 15. Pont-a-Moun 

Big bombardment of the "Pont" yesterday afternoon; 
incendiary shells and shrapnel. Town set fire to in two places 
and only one person killed. An aeroplane bomb landed within 
thirty feet of Lovell but luckily didn't go off. It seems funny 
that we should go on living here as usual, eating and sleeping, 
and watch Taubes and Aviatiks flv about directlv over us. Often 



318 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




C. B. MUNSON 
AND COWLES IN 

THE Trenches 



the French and Boche machines are up over the town at the 
same time, but they seem to take good care not to get close to 
one another — as Jean Iluffer says, 'They understand aviation 
too welL' The sky is of course full of shrapnel and when the 
setting sun tints the cotton-like puffs of smoke pink and shines 
on the planes, it is a remarkable sight. 

This morning at five or earlier I had a call to Monteauville 
and Clos Bois, an 'officer.' That is really the best time of 
the day here, nice and cool — one must wear coat and gloves 
driving ; the valleys and hollows filled with mist and the forest- 
crested hills standing around. The French seem to realize the 
beauty of it, for they are all up — peasants about the villages 
and ouvriers (territorials) going up to the Bois le Pretre. The 
American Ambulance is the only thing that eats petit dejeuner 
as late as seven o'clock. 



Sept. 20. P-a-M. 

Talked with a telephonist to-day whose job it is to listen to 
the German telephones. They are grounded with a bayonet, 
as are the French also. But the French have a system or 
apparatus much like a wireless receiver, whereby they can hear 
through the ground the conversation on the German wires. I 
don't understand it, so can't explain it. Often the voices are 
not very clear, but at times they are quite so. By this method 
one knows when the Germans are going to attack and where, 
which section is promptly shelled by the 75's, which rather 
dampens the ardour of the attack." 



NINETEEN-SIXTEEN AND THE WAR 



319 



Soon after Christmas two more members, Bostwick and 
Hoiipt, sailed for France, but so far news from them has been 
scanty. Later, perhaps, there will be more. For a young 
graduate just setting out into the vicissitudes of the world the 
war is invaluable, if only for the philosophy of the French 
"poilu." Whenever anything goes hopelessly wrong, ''C'est 
la Guerre," he says, and leaves it at that. It saves so much 
time and definitely settles the question. A thing like that 
might be of use in after life. He who can say it never will 
lie of service to him, is indeed fortunate, — but that is neither 
here nor there, — Vive la France ! 

C. B. Munson and 1T\ Hellier 



COIsTKAD WOEHLER 

This sentiment of the ambulance volunteers is not endorsed 
by every member of the Class. One man, in particular, is 
actively engaged against la France. At the beginning of the 
war Conrad Woehler, better known as '^X^omiie," ''Count," was 
in his home in Dresden, Saxony. Finishing Sophomore year, 
he had sailed for Germany, expecting to spend the summer 
with his family, whom he had not seen in eight years, and to 

return in September. He had 
no sooner arrived in the country 
than w^ar was declared and he 
found himself inv^olved in it. 

Many letters have been re- 
ceived from him since he first 
volunteered for service and in 
all he has remembered his class- 
mates and his two years at Yale 
w^ith the fondest memories, in 
spite of the life he has gone 
through. The first word was 
received September 4, 1914, be- 
ing brought over by an Ameri- 
can. He starts off: "Perhaps 




320 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




Watching the 
Germans 



the last letter from me, as I must go to war, as have all 
my brothers here. I do it gladly, yet sadly." Fortunately 
this was not the last letter from Connie and he has survived 
nearly two years of actual service. He saw his first fighting 
in October, 1914, before Rheims, a letter dated February 2, 
1915, beginning: "I have been in the trenches at Rheims 
since October 21. I am a volunteer of the Second Company, 
13th Regiment of Saxon Jager. Please greet all my friends 
and professors most heartily. Assure them that I think of 
them very often." In another letter that same month he 
described more in detail the bombproofs and the daily life in 
the trenches. ''Since our battalion has been reenforced the 
individual soldier needs to serve on watch only 4-6 hours a 
day. He then works a coitple of hours on the earthworks, and 
the rest of the time one can read, sleep and eat (the main 
things). You get a 'bomb' appetite in spite of the bombs 
and shells. I can picture what you are doing now. 'Let's go 
to the movies — Hellno !' I would only too well like to say: 
'Here's hoping I may be able to again.' " Connie's New Haven 
education and good nature have not forsaken him. 

During the summer of 1915 it was thought he had been 
killed, as a letter was returned to this country unopened with 
the following written across : "Auf Felds der Ehre gefallen." 
This was contradicted when word came from him direct. He 
had been shifted to the Eastern front and had taken part in 
the Russian campaign against Warsaw, being later confined to 
the rest camp in Posen. In the fall he returned to the fighting 



NINETEEX-SIXTEEX AXD THE WAR 321 

in France. During' Senior year letters have l)een less frequent. 
He has been on several furloughs, either l)eeause wounded or 
sick, which he has evidently been prevented from stating. 
Because unable to take part in actual fighting, he spent part 
of the winter drilling recruits in the interior of Germany. 
Early in the spring he again joined his regiment. 

Enlisting as a private, Connie had risen to the rank of Vice- 
feldwebel, which corresponds to a second sergeant, l>y ^lay, 
1915. Soon after this he wrote for his college record, which 
he needed to show in order to advance as an officer in the 
German army. Connie is the only member of the class who 
has been in actual service in the war. He has done his duty 
as he saw it. The battalion with which he is connected has 
several times distinguished itself and been mentioned for 
special service and bravery. Yet he has always hoped to be 
able to return and finish his course at Yale. The contrast 
between the war there and life here can hardly be realized 
and he looks to the latter as the pleasantest part of the past 
and a hope for the future. Xo better greeting to the class 
can be found than Connie's words in a recent letter : "Please 
remember me to all the good fellows who have thought of me, 
assure them that I very often think of them and the dear 
Yale Campus." 

1T\ Herrina 



THE YALE AETILLERY 
I 

During the army camps held at Plattsburg this summer, the 
attention of men attending from Yale was naturally drawn to 
the lack of all military training at this University. 'Not only 
had the men attending the camps from the Western universi- 
ties had previous opportunities for military work, but such 
opportunities were to be found in the East as well. Thus 
Harvard had a battery made up almost entirely of her own 
men. Enquiries were made as to what form of training in col- 
leges was most favored by the army, and it was learned that 
by far our greatest need was in field artillery. Prior to this 
some of the students at the camp had suggested a Yale cavalry 
troop, but after talking it over with the officers at Plattsburg, 
particularly Major-General Leonard Wood, all agreed on artil- 
lery work as the form to be introduced at Yale. Consequently 
a movement was set on foot after the return to college and 
enough men for four batteries enlisted within a few days. 

At present the batteries have as large an enrollment as is 
possible under the existing state law, so that there are men 
on the waiting list who drill with the batteries, but who cannot 
be enlisted. It is expected that next year the Connecticut 
legislature will vote an increase in the militia strength of the 
State, so that the batteries can be recruited up to full strength. 
As it is, they average about 120 men each, and the total number 
of students enlisted, including those in the medical corps, is 
approximately 500. 

These batteries are part of the Connecticut National Guard, 
and are designated "A," '^B," ''C," and "D." Together 
with the existing batteries at Branford (battery "E") and 
Stamford (battery "F") they form the Tenth Regiment of 
Militia Eield Artillery. 

As in any militia service, enlistment is for three years, but 
men who leave college before the expiration of their service 



THE YALE ARTILLERY 323 

will be mustered out for non-residence, unless they continue 
to reside in the vicinity, when they will be required to complete 
their three years of service. An opportunity is offered for 
men to place their names upon a reserve list after finishing 
their service, and from these men the batteries will be recruited 
to war strength (171 men each) in the event of hostilities. 

Funds for an armory have been partially guaranteed by 
graduates interested in the work. 

The extreme importance of field artillery has been shown 

more clearly than ever by the present European war. Whether 

fighting against an enemy intrenched or unintrenched, shrapnel 

fire is necessary to prepare the way for an attack, and to cover 

the attack while it is under way. On the defensive it is equally 

important in stopping the enemy's advance. Yet our army at 

present is short of field guns, and lacks enough trained men 

fully to man even the guns it does possess. In case of war our 

first need would be more trained artillery. When we add to 

this the fact that artillery, more than infantry or cavalry, 

requires a high degree of intelligence among the personnel, we 

see that our colleges have here a gi-eat chance to be of service 

to the country. 

Morris Hadley 

II 

The army camps held at Plattsburg during the summer 
of 1915 aroused a storm of dissatisfaction with conditions at 
Yale in the breasts of the martial delegates from Xew Haven. 
They saw men from Western colleges easily surpass them on 
the imaginary field of battle because of previous training. This 
could have been endured had it not been discovered that at 
Harvard there was a regiment of infantry composed almost 
entirely of her own hirelings. This was the last straw — Yale 
must don the uniform. 

The first outward manifestation of Yale's military spirit 
was called forth l)y the Mexican trouble, which took the form 
of several sporadic but none the less zealous outbursts and 
culminated in a parade inspired by pistol shots of a few 
incendiaries on the Oval. Beating on impromptu cymbals and 



324 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

shouting vociferously, this procession had advanced to the resi- 
dences of Secretarv Stokes, and Professors Taft and Phelps, 
where they demanded speeches. The need of organization was 
evidenced by the fact that the exact nature of these gatherings 
was not clear even to the participants themselves, who one 
moment enthusiastically echoed General Sherman's famous 
remark and the next shouted with as much fervor, "We want 
war." This outburst was severely stigmatized by the Journal- 
Courier and subsequently by publications from "Maine to 
California" as jingoism. 

However, here was the fuel. All that was necessary was the 
spark. JSTineteen-sixteen possessed two efficient sparks in the 
persons of Morris Hadley and Stew Bullivant. The officers at 
Plattsburg, particularly Major-General Wood, all agreed that 
the artillery was that branch of the service which it would be 
most advisable to join. There were several reasons. The 
European War was proving conclusively the growing impor- 
tance of artillery ; the United States army hardly possessed 
enough men to man its guns and, lastly, this branch was in 
need of a higher degree of intelligence than the others. The 
"sparks" assured the officers that Yale was the place to look 
for this quality. 

Preparations began early in October with several articles in 
the News. It was planned to have one battery consisting of 
133 men and five officers. However, when 950 men had signed 
a]iplication blanks, this arrangement was seen to be inadequate. 
Hereupon the Government stepped into the breach and author- 
ized the enlistment of four batteries. 

The time for enlistment came and the floor of the Gym pre- 
sented an unusual sight. Seated at tables, stools and various 
machines of torture, the novitiates struggled with yards of 
enlistment blanks. The Inquisition of the physical examina- 
tion followed, but it soon became evident that Herculean 
qualities were not insisted upon. 

As a result, four batteries, averaging 120 men each, were 
enlisted as a part of the Connecticut i^ational Guard. Together 
with the medical corps, about 500 men were enrolled under 
the command of Robert M. Danford, a lieutenant of the regular 



326 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

army, and ranking as major commanding the Tenth Connect- 
icut Field Artillery. 

Drills were next in order, adding at least one hour and a 
half to the schedule of every man. The basic principles of 
"counting off" were explained and soon the Cage reechoed 
with "One, two, three, four," bellowed or piped in seven 
different octaves, i^^ed Howe helped things along by clearly 
demonstrating how not to right-about-face. Art Lane proved 
of invaluable service to the men in his section ; they soon dis- 
covered that, to keep in step they simply had to ]ye at variance 
with him. 

The demand for uniforms was met, and, a few weeks after 
measuring, a series of forced marches was made to the equip- 
ment station in Welch. During these maneuvers the columns 
were subjected to a severe fusillade of fire from the heights 
of surrounding dormitories, consisting of commands varying 
from "Halt" to "Don't fire till you see the whites of their 
eyes." Several darkly hinted that the French system of uni- 
forms of one size for short men and one for tall men was to 
be adopted. Their hopes were dashed to the ground by the 
appearance of the strangely costumed forms of Lloyd Bissell 
and Kin Tener, who loomed up as sacrifices to longitude. Bill 
Bowden resembled a needle removed to the nth power, and the 
officers sighed that they could not have an army composed of 
such difficult targets. However, in view of the numbers accou- 
tered it was agreed that the tailor had done fairly well and 
that it was a relief to the eyes to have the long lines of drab 
interspersed with a coat or pair of trousers of different hue. 
The manners of the officers were aped in order to acquire the 
true military carriage. When not at attention it was discovered 
that it was "en regie" to saunter with hands in the hip pockets 
and hat inclined at an angle of forty-five degrees. 

Soon after the demerit system was introduced; Sergeant 
Cropper took his post with notebook and pencil, and woe to 
him who shifted his hat or hitched his belt ! Battery "C" 
took a severe fall from grace on one occasion and some say it 
could scarcely be blamed. The circumstances were as follows : 
Stew Bullivant, while changing the command of a section. 



THE YALE ARTILLERY 327 

suffered a relapse, and. iniaiiiiiing- himself at a far different 

gathering, announced that "Corporal D would take the 

place of Brother S y." Sergeant Cropper had to sharpen 

his pencil twice. 

Yale's political system, more labyrinthine than the most 
ingenious minion of Tammany could ever devise, was presently 
given an opportunity to prove its worth at the election of 
officers. The returns showed that seven '10 men had received 
the necessary support from their constituents. Stew Bullivant, 
Reg Field, Morris Hadley, General Kimberley, Cal Littlefield, 
Charlie Xeave and Dus Sanderson were those chosen. Morris 
Hadley was appointed to the position of Acting Adjutant and 
Mel Cary was made Quartermaster and Commissary Sergeant. 

Wig-wagging was introduced and the batteries gave all the 
appearance of learning how to fly while they interpreted the 
movements of Sergeant Cropper as he balanced himself in a 
perilous position on a caisson. It is hoped that those who 
will have to translate the messages sent by Yale wigwaggers 
will be able to speak all languages. The batteries at the 
present writing have made considerable headway ; as many 
as two men in a line frequently have their arms in the same 
position. 

Choice of occupation was given between serving guns, driv- 
ing, or special detail service. Many chose to serve a gun instead 
of a horse but the sound of ''equitation" proved to be a great 
drawing-card. An announcement that an Aero Corps was to 
be organized was received with much enthusiasm, especially 
by those residing in the heights of fifth-floor regions, for whom 
great altitude had no terrors. 

The hospital service provided an outlet for those who claimed 
to be more humanely minded. About sixteen, mostly sons of 
'16, enrolled, and Hop Perry was given the operating imple- 
ments of leadership. The mysteries of carrying dead and 
wounded were explained, and thereafter those who would volun- 
teer as corpses were at a premium and the mercy of their 
roommates. Dull thuds liegan to echo from room to room as 
the bodies of "dead" men, possessed of an uncanny limpness, 
slipped from the embrace of their would-be rescuers. 



328 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Announcements to the effect that there would be an encamp- 
ment at Tobyhanna, Pa., after Commencement were made from 
time to time. In all probability '16 will be well represented, 
as there are many who regard the two dollars per day wage 
as a considerable increase over their expected earnings in such 
trades as stone-breaking or brick-laying. 

It seems inadvisable in closing this account to add that the 
Yale Artillery will always be found where the ammunition is 
thickest, as this trite remark is usually interpreted in a very 
unflattering manner. However, in the case of a Bridgeport 
riot it is not inapplicable and in this light it is hoped that the 
reader will regard it. 

. L. P. Graves, Jr. 




The Oval is his Beat 



STATISTICS 




A "Favorite Amusement" 



THE FABLE OF THE QUEER BIRD AXD THE 
SEis^IOR STATISTICS 



Chapter I 

Once upon a time there was a Queer Bird. Pie wasn't a 
Yale Type at all. He had been Sent to Xew Haven by a Fond 
Parent who had once met a Yale Man and had been impressed 
by his Sterling Seven Point Qualities. Guy (for such was the 
Q. B's. name) was a Nice Boy, and very Good to his mother, 
but he just Didn't Fit at College. He had the most Remark- 
able Ideas. He believed that he had come to College to Get an 
Education. This of course might have been Overcome in Time, 
but Guy had other Strange j^otions equally Ridiculous. He 
would do the Strangest Things, such as Going over to the 
Library, even when he didn't have an Essay to Write. And 
he used to Read Books which were not Required. Of course 
his Classmates soon Found this Out and Tried to Stop It. 
They showed him that if he wanted to Make Good, he would 
have to Work for Yale. They pointed to various "Big Men" 
who were Busy as the Deuce Running Something or Other. And 
they took Guy with them to various Rooms and Eating Joints 
in order that he might Broaden himself by finding out what 
the class was Thinking about. But although Guy Learned that 
Charlie Chaplin got Fifty Thousand Dollars a Week, and that 
Edna was Married, and that Francis X. Bushman was at the 
Globe, he didn't seem to Evince 
much Interest, and in fact re- 
fused to submit any more to the 
Broadening Influence of Con- 
temporary Conversation. He 
was Hopeless. He played on 
the Soccer Team because he 
felt that Athletics were a 
Means and not an End, which 
shows how Queer he really was. 
His favorite poem was not Double-crossing the Bar 




332 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

'^Crossing; the Bar," nor his favorite novel "Henrv Esmond." 
He was Peculiar enough not to think that there was Something 
Wrong with Yale because the Football Team had Lost. He 
got an Education but it wasn't a Hell of a Lot of Fun ; Guy 
was often as Low as a Snake. 

Chapter II 

But Guy was no Boob. After he graduated he went into 
Business and in Ten Years had amassed a Huge Fortune. He 
was one of the leaders in his City. His fellowmen had Some- 
how gotten over the Idea that he was Queer, and were Always 
Glad to See Him. He had even been Elected to the Elks. 

One day his Family Doctor came to him and whispered that 
his Better Half would soon present him with an Heir, and Guy 
was Pleased as Punch, for he had always wanted a Son. But 
then and there he determined that the Boy should Enjoj his 
College Life and not go through the Misery that he had Suffered. 
He took down his Class Book and Looked Up the Class Statis- 
tics, for he thought that by So Doing he could find out Much 
about How to Be Happy Although an Undergraduate. 

The First Thing he looked at was the ''Most Valuable Thing 
You Have Obtained from Your College Career." There were 
Many Different Answers. One answered ''Independence," 
another "Concentration." Many of them said that "Acquaint- 
ances" and "Friendships" were the most Valuable Things. 
Other answers were "How To Take Disappointments," 
"Breadth," "Intellect," "Appreciation of Literature," "Poise," 
"Discipline," "Self-Confidence," "An Ideal of Public Service," 
"Sense of Proportion," "Self-Knowledge," "Mental Labor," 
"Destruction of Most Cherished Beliefs," "Character," "A 
Knowledge of the Value of Work," "Insight," "A Respect 
for the Man with Knowledge," "A Loss of Religious Denomi- 
nation with a Consequent Gain in Faith," "A Basis for Under- 
standing Present Day Conditions." 

Guy next looked at the "Things Which You Most Regret 
About Your College Course," for he Knew That Here he should 
get some Valuable Hints about what his Son Should Kot Do. 
The Answers were Varied. Some said "Failure to Go Out for 



STATISTICS 333 



Things," "Lack of Friends," "That T Came T(30 Yonng," 
"■Limitations Imposed bv Finances." Other answers were, 
"LUeness,"' "Poor Courses," "Xot Having Studied," "Failure 
to Stand for a Principle," "Superficial Relations to ^fen," 
"Hypersensitivity," "Failure to Participate in Athletics," 
"Failure to Go to Library," "Failure to Room with Class," 
"Hours Failed," "Wasted Time," "That the Course is Only 
Four Years Long," "Failure to be an Honor ^Man," "Four 
Football Defeats by Harvard," "Compelled to Commute," 
"Spending Too Much Time with Xew Haven People," "En- 
forced Relations with Battell Chapel." One man regretted 
Kothing, while the Chief Regret of Another was "A Trip to 
Bridgeport." 

Guy, Being Very Well Off Financially, decided that He would 
Celebrate the Coming Birth of his Heir by Making a Gift to his 
Alma Mater. He therefore again turned to his Class Statistics, 
concerning "Yale's Greatest Xeed." Here he found Diverse 
Answers, among them being the following: "Endowment," 
"A Football System," "Instructors," "Personal Christianity," 
"Dormitories," "A Xew Museum," "A Xew Library," "A 
Sense of Unity by Means of More Dormitories," "An Awaken- 
ing from the Present Attitude of Self-Satisfaction," "A Fight- 
ing Spirit," "More Cooperation between the Faculty and the 
Students," "]\[ore Social Meetings of the Student Body," 
"More Respect for Radicalism," "More Tennis Courts," "A 
Branch of Public Life to Supply with Men," "Graduate 
Athletic Control," "The Welding of Academic and Sheif," 
"A Union." 

Glancing down the Page, Guy's Eye fell upon the "Sugges- 
tions for an Increased Interest in Scholarship." Some of These 
were the following: "Place Emphasis on Learning Rather 
than on Marks," "Exam Exemption," "Greater Mingling of 
Instructors and Pupils," "Better Instructors," "More Pro- 
fessors with Personality," "More Attention to Individualism," 
"Increasing Social Recognition for Scholarship," "Better 
Freshman and Sophomore Courses," "Lower Phi Beta Kappa 
Requirements," "Smaller Classes," "Better Freshman Faculty," 
"Less Mental Discipline in First Two Years,'' "^Monthly List 



334 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



of Marks," "'Fewer Two O'clock Classes," ''More Prizes and 
Scholarships," ''More Elizabethan Clubs," ''Removal of Sci- 
entific Attitude of Mind," "Some Reward for Those Just 
Missing Phi Beta Kappa," "Have Professors Mark the Papers." 
One cynic answered "Impossible in America." 

]^ow Guy wanted to be sure that his Offspring chose Yale 
instead of Some Other College, so he Glanced at the "Reasons 
for Coming to Yale" in order to Get the Dope. Most of the 
answers were "Relatives" or "Friends." Other answers were 
"Reputation as The ISTational American College," "Democracy," 
"Yale's Ideas Stood for a Vigorous Type of American Man- 
hood," "Proximity," "Spirit," "Athletic Reputation," "Ease 
of Self-Support," "Sanity of Atmosphere," "Environment," 
"Compulsory Chapel," "Having Seen the Disastrous Effect 
of Harvard on Several Close Friends," "Desire to Play on 
Yale Team," "Course of Study," "Tradition for Grit," "Fight- 
ing Qualities," "Sportsmanship," "President Hadley." 

"IsTow," said Guy, "I have All the Dope. My Boy will 
Surely Enjoy his College Life much more than I did. I shall 
Bring Him Up According to these Statistics." 

Just then the Family Doctor Beckoned Guy to Come and See 
the Latest Arrival. 



It was a Girl. 
There is no Moral. 



Chapter III 
Moral 



D. 0. Stewart 



The detailed votes and statistics of the Class follow: 

Done Most for Yale : — W. R. Proctor, 46 ; H. W. Johnstone, 
21; Morris Hadley, 20; A. D. Wilson, 20; R. S. Oliver, 16; 
K M. Way, 16; W. M. Oler, 14; O. L. Guernsey, 10; H. J. 
Crocker, 5. 

Most Popular: — H. J. Crocker, 185; Gilbert Porter, 36; 
Foster Hampton, 9 ; A. D. Wilson, 6 ; R. S. Oliver, 5. 

Most Original: — C. B. Munson, 93; H. J. Crocker, 61; 




The Four Captains 



336 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

Calvin LittlclielJ, ; J. G. Putnam, 5 ; Philip Pose, 5 ; 
G. Troxell, -4. 

Hardest Worl-er:—R. Lucas, 38 ; Charles Eddy, 29 ; Edward 
Leete, 21 ; Gardner Murphv, 13 ; Henry Johnstone, 8 ; Donald 
Qnarles, 8 ; Robert Coleman, 7 ; Sheriden Thompson, 7 ; 
Robert Oliver, 7 ; George Carrington, 6 ; Ernest Russell, 6 ; 
L. G. Tighe, 6 ; D. O. Stewart, 5 ; Morris Hadley, 5 ; Alex- 
ander Harbison, 4 ; Reuben Horchow, 4 ; W. M. Oler, 4, 

Most To Be Admired: — H. W. Johnstone, 30 ; PL J. Crocker, 
19 ; Farwell Knapp, 15 ; W. R. Proctor, 12 ; R. S. Oliver, 13 ; 
Morris Hadley, 11; K. J. Tener, 8; Ernest Russell, 7; A. D. 
Wilson, 6 ; Charles Eddy, 5 ; D. O. Stew^art, 5 ; W. M. Oler, 
4; Donald Quarles, 4; Setli Low, 4; O. L. Guernsey, 4; 
L. G. Tighe, 4. 

Most Thorough Gentleman: — AY. R. Proctor, 25; W. M. 
Allen, 15; R. S. Oliver, 14; G. W. Carrington, 11; Donald 
Malcom, 10; G. E. Porter, 10; Morris Hadley, 9; D. C. 
Shepard, 8 ; H. W. Johnstone, 7 ; Daniel Grant, 6 ; R, S. 
Young, 6 ; Murray Chism, 5 ; D. O. Stewart, 4 ; D. O. Hamil- 
ton, 4 ; F. W. Hampton, 4 ; Huntington Lyman, 4. 

Best Xatured:—G. E. Porter, 39; H. J. Crocker, 27; C. 
.Littlefield, 21; William Levy, 18; A. M. Proctor, 16; R. W. 
"Chisholm, 10; H. H. Tithnan, 8; D. C. Elkin, 5; C. 
Aldrich, 5 ; F. W. Hampton, 5 ; Clark Kimberly, 5 ; Landon 
Ricketts, 5 ; P. Cady, 4 ; A. Harbison, 4 ; X. M. Way, 4 ; 
R. V. Vaughn, 4. 

Best All-around Athlete:—^. M. Way, 173; W. M. Oler, 
56; O. L. Guernsey, 6; H. V. von Holt, 5; A. D. Wilson, 5. 

Most Scholarly: — Morris Hadley, 169; Gardner Murphy, 
13 ; C. R. Walker, 11 ; J. Bolton, 6 ; D. Quarles, 6 ; H. S. 
Buck, 4. 

Handsomest: — O. L. Guernsey, 53; J. Stewart, 29; K. J. 
Tener, 27 ; Seth Low, 9 ; Charles Dickey, 9 ; H. J. Crocker, 
6; A, M. Munson, 6; H. V. von Holt, 6; Lewis Bredin, 5; 
Knight Cowles, 4 ; W. Chatiield-Taylor, 4 ; Farwell Knapp, 
4 ; S. Miller, 4 ; Dudley Mudge, 4 ; ' D. C. Sheppard, 4. 

Most Brilliant:— Morris Hadley, 60; C. R. Walker, 43; 
C. B. Munson, 22 ; Donald Quarles, 15 ; Reuben Llorchow, 



THE 



SPRING ^ CHICKEN 



SEW HAVKN. CONN . MONDAY. MAY 17, \9]5 




338 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 




14; C. Littlefield, 14; L. G. Tiglie, 
s ; J. H. Vincent, 8 ; D. O. Hamil- 
ton, (> ; Farwell Knapp, T). 

Most Likely to Succeed: — L. G. 
Tiglie, 53 ; Morris Iladley, 22 ; Don- 
ald Qnarles, 17 ; D. O. Stewart, 12 ; 
Farwell Knapp, 11; I). C. Elkin, 7; 
Reuben Horchow, 7 ; II. J. Crocker, 
(i ; AV. A. James, 5 ; Casper Kiel- 
land, 5 ; George Haven, 4 ; W, R. 
Proctor, 4 ; R. C. Lee, 4. 

Best Dressed: — Edmund Ocum- 
paugh, 20; H. Sneath, 20 ; D. Mal- 
colm, 22; L. Bredin, 20; D. Cas- 
sard, 12; S. Miller, 8; W. Bowden, 7; J. Rosenberg, 7; 
L. iN^oyes, ; L. Lloyd, 6 ; E. Bunker, ; D. Grant, 6 ; 
X. Eastman, 5 ; W. Chatiield-Taylor, 5 ; K. Cowles, 4 ; C. 
Dickey, 4. 

Other interesting class facts are these : Two hundred and 
thirty-five seniors use tobacco, 129 of whom did so before enter- 
ing Yale. Xinety-seven smoke a pipe, 35 smoke cigars and 
103 smoke cigarettes. One hundred and forty men use alcoholic 
liquor of whom 54 have taken it up here. One hundred and 
thirty-four men wear glasses, 35 starting during their college 
course. Twenty-five seniors are engaged. Twenty-one seniors 
have "Y's" and 49 have won their numerals. 

There are 92 Episcopalians, 55 Presbyterians, 41 Congre- 
gationalists, 20 Catholics, 13 Baptists, 12 Jews, 9 Methodists, 
5 Lutherans, 2 Agnostics, 2 Methodist-Episcopal, 2 Dutch 
Reformed, 2 Buddhists, 1 Anglican, 1 Society of Friends, 1 
l^'nitarian, 1 Mormon, 1 Atheist. 

Honor Most To Be Desired : — First choice — Phi Beta Kappa 
key, 138; ''Y," 127; Xews charm, 21; Lit triangle, 16. 
Second choice — "Y," 129; Phi Beta Kappa key, 100; Xews 
charm, 31; Lit triangle, 23. 

Prohable Future Occupation: — Law, 70; Mercantile Busi- 
ness, 08; Manufacturing, 37; Education, 24; Banking, 11; 
Transportation, 10; Journalism, 10; Art, 10; ^Ministry, 9; 



STATISTICS 



339 





i 


™Pnr*' 





Eiig-ineeriiig, 8 ; Business, ; 
Science, 6 ; .VgTicnltui'e, 4 ; 
Architecture, 2 ; Keal Estate 
and Insurance, '2 ; Broker, 
1 ; Foreiiiii Service, 1 ; Tele- 
phone, 1 ; AVholesale Grocer, 
1; Publishing,!; ]\Iusic, 1; 
undecided, 19. 

ProhahJe P rofessional 
S c J I 1 : — II a r v a r d L a w 
School ; 29 ; Yale Law 
School, 13; (\^lunil)ia Law 
School, 12; Yale .Afedical 
School, 7 ; M. I. T., G ; Yale 
Graduate School, 5 ; Har- 
vard ]\Iedical School, 5 ; 
Columbia, -1 ; Penn. Law 
School, -1 ; Johns Hopkins, 
3 ; Yale School of Religion, 
3 ; College of Physicians and 

Surgeons, 3 ; Pittsburgh Law School, 2 ; ^lichigan Law School, 
2 ; George AVashington Law School, 2 ; Cornell Agricultural 
College, 2 ; Austin, 2. Twentv-six other professional schools 
each received one vote, while 12 men expect to attend graduate 
schools but are undecided where they will go. 

Freshman year was voted the hardest by 158 ; Sophomore 
year by 9 ; Junior year by 29 and Senior year by 39. 

Senior year was voted the pleasantest by 190 ; Junior year 
next with 57; Sophomore year, 18, and Freshman year, 16. 

The average nund)er of states that each has visited is 18. 
One hundred and twelve men have been abroad, the trips 
averaging two per man. Two men have been abroad ten times 
and one man nine times. Fifty-four men have been once only. 

The fathers of sixty-five of the 325 seniors were Yale gradu- 
ates, while the fathers of 110 were coUeo'e graduates. One 
hundred and ninety-three fathers did neither attend nor gradu- 
ate from college. Five of the fathers graduated from Amherst, 



"Friends, Uoma.ns — " 



340 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

three were Cornell men, while no other college or university, 
exclusive of Yale, could claim more than one. 

The favorite college next to Yale was Princeton, which 
received 122 votes. Harvard was second with 63 votes and 
Williams was third with 41. Cornell, Amherst, and Wesleyan 
received 10, 5 and 4 votes, respectively. 

The 324 men in the class have spent $l,087,.'')(i4 for their 
college education. 

One hundred and twenty seniors have earned their way 
through college either in part or altogether. Up to the present 
time they have earned $306,979. 

Statistics on expenses are as follows : 

Total Expense of Entire Class 

Freshman year $257,479 

Sophomore year 268,727 

Junior year 278,656 

Senior year 282,702 

Total $1,087,564 

Average Expenditure of Class 

Ereshman year $ 964 

Sophomore year 1,006 

Junior year 1,044 

Senior year 1,059 

Total $4,073 

Largest Individual Expenses 

Ereshman year $3,500 

Sophomore year 3,500 

Junior year 4,000 

Senior year 4,000 

Total $15,000 



STATISTICS 341 



Smallest Individual Expenses 

Freshman year $200 

Sophomore year 200 

Junior year 225 

Senior year 175 

Total $800 

One hundred men in the Senior class came from preparatory 
schools and 90 from high schools, 12 of these coming from 
Xew Haven High School. Phillips-Andover, 4G ; Hotchkiss, 
18; Hill, 11; Phillips-Exeter. 11; St. Paul's School, 13; 
Taft, 12; Groton, 7; Mt. Vernon, 3; Choate, 2. 

The average age is 22 years, 5 months, 11: days. Average 
height, 5 feet, 8 inches. Average weight, 149 pounds. The 
oldest man is 37 years; youngest man, 19 years; heaviest man 
weighs 210 pounds; lightest man weighs 115 pounds;, tallest 
man is 6 feet, 314 inches, and shortest man 5 feet, 2 inches. 

Of the fathers having degrees, there were 23 LL.B. ; 13 
D.D.; 13 M.A.; 8 LL.D. ;^ 8 M.D. ; 7 Ph.D.; B.D. ; 2 
C.E.; 2 LL.M.; 2 M.L. ; 1 B.L.S.; 1 M.L.S.; 1 D.C.L.; 
1 F.A.C.S. 

Most Popular Campus Character: — Eosey, 67 ; Bill Wiser, 
51 ; Peter Squirrel, 24 ; Cornelius, 10 ; Xathan Hale, 10 ; 
Harry Crocker, 9 ; Tittman, 7 ; Leo, C ; Dean Jones, 6 ; 
X. Rosenberg, 6 ; Hanc Statuam, 4. 

Character in Fiction: — Falstaff, 24; Jean Valjean, 17; 
Lorna Doone, 8 ; Sidney Carton, 8 ; Beckey Sharp, S ; 
D'Artagnan, 7 ; Penrod, 6 ; Sherlock Holmes, 5 ; Oliver 
Twist, 5 ; Hamlet, 5 ; Tom Sawyer, 4 ; Tom Jones, 4 ; Cyrano 
de Bergerae, 4. 

Character in Historij: — Al)raham Lincoln, 95; Xapoleon. 
40 ; Christ, 9 ; Washington, 7 ; Alexander VI, 6 ; Kaiser 
Wilhelm, 5 ; Caesar, 4 ; Alexander Hamilton, 4. 

Favorite XoreJ: — Lorna Doone, 31; Tale of Two Cities, 
13; Ivanhoe, 13; Treasure Island, 11; David Copperfield, S; 
Tom Jones, 8 ; Vanity Fair, 7 ; Three Musketeers, 7 ; Les 
Miserables, 7 ; Cloister and Hearth, 5 ; Oliver Twist, 5 ; 



342 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Pickwick Papers, 5 ; Alice in Wonderland, 4 ; The Crisis, 4 ; 
Henry Esmond, 4. 

Favorite Poem: — Crossing the Bar, 32; Gray's Elegy, 11; 
Eve of St. Agnes, 8 ; Ulysses, 8 ; The Raven, 7 ; Lady of 
Shalot, G ; If, 6 ; In Menioriam, 6 ; Rabbi Ben Ezra, 5 ; 
Ring and the Book, 4 ; Locksley Hall, 4. 

Favorite Prose ^yriter: — Dickens, 45; Stevenson, 28; Kip- 
ling, 23 ; Scott, 13; Thackeray, 12; Carlyle, 12 ; O.Henry, 
10 ; Charles Lamb, 8 ; Victor Hngo, 6 ; Dumas, 5 ; Professor 
Gooch, 5 ; Joseph Conrad, 4. 

Favorite Poet: — Tennyson, 88; Browning, 58; Shakespeare, 
30; Kipling, 15; Keats, 8; Robert Service, 7; E. A. Poe, 6; 
Longfellow, (5 ; Byron, 5 ; Horace, 4, 

Favorite Actor: — Forbes Robertson, 00 ; Robert Mantell, 19 ; 
William Gillette, 19 ; E. H. Sothern, 10 ; Cyril Maude, 15 ; 
Charley Chaplin, 14 ; George Arliss, 13 ; John Drew, 10 ; 
Fred Stone, 10 ; Harry Faulkner, ; David Warfield, 4. 

Favorite Actress: — Maude Adams, 70 ; Mary Pickford, 13; 
Elsie Ferguson, 11; Julia Marlowe, 10; Julia Sanderson, 10; 
Elsie Janis, 9; Billie Burke, 9; Anita Stewart, 9; Pauline 

Frederick, 8; Phyllis Ts^gil- 
son-Terry, 8 ; McCoy, ; 
Theda Bara, ; Martha Hed- 
man, 5 ; Adele Roland, 5 ; 
Marguerite Clarke, 4 ; Marie 
Doro, 4 ; Jane CoMd, 4. 

Most Valuable Sul>ject: — 
History, 29 ; Economics, 28 ; 
English, 28 ; Comparative 
Politics, 20 ; Anthropology, 
17; Law, 10; Biology, 15; 
Physics, 12 ; Tennyson and 
BroMaiing, 10 ; Philosophy, 
8 ; Age of Johnson, ; Con- 
tracts, ; Chemistry, ; 
Financial History, 4. 

Most Inspiring Instruc- 
'jiM" ^or;— Prof. W. L. Phelps, 




STATISTICS 343 



(U; Prof. Tinker, HC ; Prof. Farrand, 20; Prof. Lull, 15; 
Prof. Berilaii, l-j; Prof. Kreider, 12; Prof. Allen Johnson, 
11; Prof. Keller, 10; Dr. :Mason, 7; Prof. Ferris, G; Prof. 
Fairchild, 5. 

Hardest Suliject: — Plijsies, 55; Chemistry, 3G ; Financial 
History, ;]1 ; ^Mathematics, 27; Calcnlus, 15; Economics, 12; 
French, 12 ; History, 11 ; Organic Chemistry, 11 ; German, 8 ; 
Old English, 7 ; Philosophy, ; American History, 4 ; Biol- 
ogy, 4 ; Latin, 4 ; English A, 4. 

Easiest Subject: — Biology, 21; French, 21; Hygiene, 21; 
Latin, 14; Llistory, 12; German, 10; English, 10; Eco- 
nomics, S ; Greek, 7 ; Daily Themes, 7 ; Public Speaking, 7 ; 
Geology, 6; Logic, 0; Cliemistry, (! ; English Poets of the 
19th Century, 6 ; Organic Evolution, 5 ; Latin, 5 ; Anthro- 
pology, 5 ; Physiology, 5. 

Favorite Amusement: — Theatre, 52; Reading, 20; Danc- 
ing, 20; Bridge, 19; Movies, 18; Talking, 16; Music, 12; 
Golf, 10 ; Fussing, 9 ; Athletics, 6 ; Sleep, 5 ; Horse-back 
Riding, 4 ; Sailing, 4 ; Loafing, 4 ; Tennis, 4. 

Favorite Sport to Watch:— YootlmU, 217; Baseball, 30; 
Hockey, 7 ; Polo, 5. 

Favorite Sport to Play: — Tennis, 75; Football, 52; Base- 
ball, 41; Golf, 41; Hockey, 14; Basketball, 10; Rowing, 9; 
Horse-back Riding, 4 ; Polo, 4. 

Favorite Xew YorJv Xeirspaper: — Times, 106; Tribune, 60; 
Evening Post, 30 ; Sun, 24. 

Favorite Chapel Preacher: — President Fitch, 57; Rev. Mr. 
Speer, 46; Dean Brown, 31; Dean Lyman Abbott, 28; Presi- 
dent Hadley, 22; Dr. Coffin, 5; T. Sherwood Eddy, 4; 
Anson Phelps Stokes, 4 ; William Lyon Phelps, 4 ; Rev. John 
Mott, 4. 

Fathers' Occupations: — Lawyer, 45; manufacturer, 24; 
minister, 21; merchant, 21; banker, 17; real estate, 16; 
teacher, 13; business, 13; doctor, 11; journalist, 11; lumber, 
11; farmer, 10; railroad, 6; broker, 6; hardware, 5; 
judge, 5 ; architect, 4 ; contractor, 4 ; oil importer, 3 ; min- 
ing, 3 ; grocer, 3 ; inspector, 2 ; shoe business, 2 ; mechani- 
cal engineer, 2 ; capitalist, 2 ; iron mining, 2 ; librarian. 



344 



HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



2 ; grain dealer, 2 ; brass business, 2 ; hotel business, 2. 
The following- occupations claim one each : promoter, plumb- 
ing supplies, musician, metallurgist, financial agent, armj 
officer, engraver, ranchman, insurance, engineer, nerve special- 
ist, marketing. President of the University of Minnesota, 
mechanic, storage warehouse, wholesale furs, importer of 
precious stones, commander in United States l^avy, street 
railroad construction, sugar broker, liquor dealer, mason, 
Pullman conductor, local agent Pennsylvania Railroad, Dean 
of University of Pennsylvania Law School, postmaster, prin- 
cipal of normal school, state service, silk mill, railroad presi- 
dent, chemist, designer, dentist, cotton planter, carpenter, 
upholsterer. 

Fifty-six men have voted, 35 having voted the republican 
ticket, IS the democratic, 1 the socialist and 2 the progressive. 




SENIOR COMMITTEES 



CLASS DAY COMMITTEE 
Henry Joseph Crocker, Jr. Foster Martin Hampton 
Farwell Knapp Wesley Marion Oeer, Jr. 

William Eoss Proctor, Jr. Kinley John Tener 

TRIENNIAL COMMITTEE 

George Williams Carrington Wesley Marion Oler, Jr. 
Henry Joseph Crocker, Jr. William Ross Proctor, Jr. 
Henry Webb Johnstone Donald Aubrey Quarles 

SUPPER COMMITTEE 
Daniel Collier Elkin Gilbert Edwin Porter, 3d 

Charles Morgan Aldrich Donald Ogden Stewart 

Laurence Gotzian Tighe 

PICTURE AXD GOWN COMMITTEE 

Russell Healey Lucas Huntington Lyman 

IVY COMMITTEE 

David Osborne Hamilton Charles Rumford Walker, Jr. 

Louis Cappel Zahner 

SENIOR PROMENADE COMMITTEE 
Waldo Morgan Allen William Henry Gurxey 

Wayne Chatfield-Taylor Thomas Emerson Hapgood 

Otis Love Guernsey Hermann Yaldemar von Holt 

SENIOR DELEGATION TO THE STUDENT COUNCIL 
Henry Joseph Crocker, Jr. Farwell Knapp 
Morris Hadley Robert Stone Oliver 

Henry Webb Johnstone William Ross Proctor, Jr. 

Donald Aubrey Quarles 

CLASS BOOK COMMITTEE 
Huntington Lyman Harry Arthur Torson 

Alexander McKee Munson John Henry Vincent 
Robert Stone Oliver Lawrence George Williams 

Louis Cappel Zahner 



ROLL OF THE CLASS 



ROLL OF THE CXASS 

GRADUATES 

Abel, W. K. E.. 130 Oak St., Meriden, Conn. 
^.^-Aiken, E. E.. Jr.. 114 Hancock St., Auburndale, Mass. 

Aldrich, C. M., 1206 Wood Ave., Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Allen, W. M., Durand and Kasper Co., 701 West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

Anderson, H. H., 375 Park Ave., New York City. 

Apsel, A. F., 537 Whitney Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

Archenhold. S. J.. 508 North 16th St., Waco, Texas. 

Ascher, H. A., 326 Central St., Springfield. Mass. 

Atterbury, K., 5642 Kenwood Ave., Chicago. 111. 

Babcock, L. E., 116 Munson St., New Haven, Conn. 
^._^-^aber, M. J., Pottsville. Pa. 
,_-.— Bachman, A. W., 39 Park St., Orange, N. J. 

Bailey, H. C, Collinsville, Conn. 

Barney, D. N., Jr., Farmington, Conn. 

Bassett. E. S., 507 West 113th St., Apartment 83, New York City. 
, Beach, D. N., Jr.. 319 Union St., Bangor, Me. 

Beale, R., 107 Cedar St., Wallace, Idaho. 

Belknap, M. B., The Midlands, R. R. 1, Station A. Louisville. Ky. 

Bissell, L., 950 Delaware Ave.. Buff'alo. N. Y. 
^^ — Blake, H. K., Lydecker St., Englewood, N. J. 

Blake, J. A., 138 East 37th St., New York City. 

Blodgett. G. R., Christadora House, 147 Avenue B, New York City. 

Blum, W. R., 19 East 24th St., New York City. 
, Boardman, A. H., 78 Chestnut Ave., Waterbury, Conn. 

Bodenwein, G., Mohican Hotel, New London, Conn. 
^^' Bolton, J. S. G., 61 Division St., New Haven, Conn. 

Boltwood, L. C, 605 Michigan Trust Co. Bldg., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
^-Booth, R. C, Plattsburg, N. Y. 

Bowden, W. M., 31 Maple St., Glens Falls. N. Y. 

Brady, S. J., Sitka, Alaska. 

Bragg. E. R., Central Yillage, Conn. 

Bredin, L. L., 81 Eliot St., Detroit, ]\Iich. 

Brittingham, H. H., care of 1. E. Brittingham, Madison, Wis. 

Brody, C. S., 143 Parrott Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Brown, A. M., 304 East St.. New Castle, Pa. 

Brown, H. C, Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Bro\\Ti, W. A., Jr., care of Brown Bros. & Co., 59 Wall St., New York City. 

Buck, H. S., 5733 University Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Bullivant, S. L., Marion. Mass. 

Bunker, E., 421 North Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Burgess, F. V., Burlington. Vt. 

Burkes, R. L., Welsh. Ala. 

Burnett, J. H., 1193 Bennington St., East Boston, IMass. 



350 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

-Sutler, G. D., 13 Pearl St., Seymour, Conn. 

Butler, J. M., 1555 Eidge Ave., Evanston, 111. 
^— Cady, P. K., 1217 Astor St., Chicago, 111. 

Caldwell, V. B., Jr., 630 South 20th St., Omaha, Neb. 

Callahan, G. J., 39 Fairfield Ave., Holyoke, Mass. 

Campbell, W. P., Kingsley School, Essex Fells, N. J. 

Candee, S. W., Phoenix, N. Y. 

^ Carrington, G. W., 2 Meeting St., Charleston, S. C. 

Gary, M. B., Jr., 59 West 46th St., New York City. 

Cassard, D. W., College and Fulton Sts., Grand Eapids, Mich. 

Champion, H. V., 86 Cliff St., Norwich, Conn. 

Chappell, A. H., Jr., New London, Conn. 

Chatfield-Taylor, W., Lake Forest, 111. 

Chism, U. S., 1250 South 15th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Chisolm, R. W., 1787 Colfax Ave., South, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Clark, G. W., Jr., Clark Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Clark, P. J., 618 Forest Ave., Avondale, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Closson, H. W., 2d, 99 Cleveland St., Orange, N. J. 
,.^— -Coates, F. G., Abilene, Texas. 
——Coleman, R. H., East Hampton, N. Y. 
---Collinge, A. A., 58 Henry St., Passaic, N. J. 

Converse, E. E., 101 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 

Corlett. H. S., Clarkson. N. Y. 

Cornish, R. S., 211 Walnut St., Montclair, N. J. 

Cowles, K. C, 1130 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, 111. 

Craig, E. M., Jr., Prattville, Ala. 

Crocker, H. J., Jr., 2301 Laguna St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Crocker, R. G., 2 Jackson PL, Washington, D. C. 

Crowell, T. I., Jr., 512 Park St., Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Culver, R. B., 711 South B St.. McMinnville. Ore. 

Cutler, G. R., Waban, Mass. 

Darling, A. B., 3755 East Douglas Ave., Wichita, Kans. 

Davidson, S. W., Warren, Pa. 

Derecktor, N. E., 39 Crown St., Meriden, Conn. 

DeWolf, M. E., Spencer, Iowa. 

Dickey, C. D., Jr., 37 East 51st St., New York City. 

Diddle, F. H., Philippi, W. Va. 

Dilley, C. C, 735 Staut Ave., Wyoming. Ohio. 
^,.^odson, A.. 130 Church St., Bethlehem. Pa. 

Dovenmuehle, G. H., 616 Arlington PI., Chicago, 111. 

Downey, F. D., War Dept., Washington, D. C, care of Col. E. F. Downey. 

Dudley, R. A., Guilford, Conn. 

Duling, O. E., 337 Park St., Morgantown, W. Va. 

Eastman, N. J., 4150 Washington Blvd., Indianapolis, Ind. 
^^ckman, W. H., Hillcrest, Wilmington, Del. 
^^^Eddy, C. P., 92 Atwood St., Hartford, Conn. 

Elkin, D. C, Lancaster, Ky. 
^ Elston, C. M., Collinsville, Conn. 

Emerson. E. W., 189 North Perry St., Titusville, Pa. 

Fagan. C. A.. Jr.. 730 North Highland Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



ROLL OF THE CLASS 351 



Faniswortii. S. W.. 1.721) ('ciitnil Ave, Memphis, Teiiii. 

Feinmark. L., 188 Wolcott St., Now Haven, Conn. 

Felty. A. R.. 734 Prospect Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

Fii'l.i, I'v., 274 Sterling PI., Prooklyu, X. V. 
,- Finch. X. R.. Plainfield, N. .1. 

Firuski. M. L.. 137 Riverside Drive, New York City. 
,^ish, E. R., Palestine, Texas. 

Fitts. D. C, 12 Bedford Terrace, Xortlianijiton. ]\Iass. 

Fowler, A. W., Fremont. Xebr. 

Freeman. W. J.. Jr.. 1832 Spruce St.. Phila(h'l])iiia, Pa. 

Friend. J. W.. 1807 Palmer Ave., New Orleans, La. 

Gaillard. S. G., Jr., 23 E. Gravers Lane, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gallagher, E. :\I.. O'Xeill. X^ebr. 
. Gardner. W. H., Snydei-, X. Y. 

Garvin, J. D., 1705 Montier St., ^Yilkinsburg, Pa, 

Geary. D. D.. 221 Park Ave., Orange, X. J. 

Gee. J. A.. 0(J1 High St., Fall River, Mass. 

Gibb. J. R., Glen Cove, Long Island, X. Y. 

Gilbert. F. \Y., 14 Everit St., Xew Haven, Conn. 

Gingold. T. L.. 100 Sherman Ave., Xew Haven, Conn. 

Goodwin. G. \Y., 333 State St., Albany, N. Y. 

Goss. W. D., Jr., .548 \Yest 114th St.. New York City. 

Grant. D. B.. 052 Adams Ave., Memphis, Tenn. 
, Graves. L. P.. Jr., 1297 Delaware Ave., Buffalo. X'. Y. 
^.^^Grubb. J. H.. Jr.. 107 East Montgomery St., Ardmore, Pa. 
^^^uenther. P. M., 12424 Cedar Rd., Cleveland Heights, Ohio. 

Guernsey. 0. L.. ^Yest View Farm, Greenwich, Conn. 

Gulliver. H. S., 51 Walnut St., \Yaterbury, Conn. 

Gurley, A. B., 257 Harvey St., Germantown. Pa. 

Gurney, \Y. H., 312 Summer St.. Buffalo, X. Y. 
^^.^-^adley, ]\I., 93 Whitney Ave., X^ew Haven, Conn. 

Hallen, J. E., 168 Sherwood Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Halstead. .J. S., ^Nlamaroneck, X. Y. 

Hamilton, D. 0.. Beverly Place, Grosse Point, Detroit, Mich. 

Hampton, F. ^I., Fordyce, Ark. 

Hapgood. T. E., 30 Wall)ridge Rd., Hartford, Conn. 

Harbison. A. W., 194 Washington St.. Hartford, Conn. 

ffarris. P. W., 128 Bridge St., Salem, Mass. 

Hiiuslein. .J. D.. Denton, Texas. 

Haven, G. G.. Jr., 6 East 53d St., Xew York City. 

Heckert, R. L.. Bakerstown. Alles Co.. Pa. 

^^.^JHeely. L. S.. 321 West Sth St., Plainfield, X. J. 

. Hellier. W. H., 105 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Hequembourg, T. ^l.. Dunkirk, X. Y. 
^.-Herring, H. W.. 15G Valley Rd., Montclair. X^. J. 

Herrmann. P. J,. 1224 Union Ave., Xew York City. 

Higbee. P. W., Proctor, Vt. 

Hooper. F. W.. 130 West 74th St., X'ew York City. 

Horchow, R.. Portsmoutli, Ohio. 

Houlihan. R. D., 476 Belmont Ave., Springfield, Mass. 



352 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 



Howe, E. J,, 2d. 401 Quincy St., Dorcliestor, :Mass. 

Hoyt, J. D., 226 Maple Ave., Kingston, Pa. 

Hubbard. E. W., 98 North St., Auburn. X. Y. 
_,^-Hubbard. X. S., 11 Wagner PI., West Haven, Conn. 

Hume, H. W., 54 Alden St., Springfield, Mass. 

Hunt, W. R., Bowling Green, Ky. 
^^lyde, C, Hydewood Hall, Plainfiekl. X. J. 
.--Jackson, H. C, 1344 East 84th St., Cleveland, Ohio. 

James, W. A., Xorthport, Wash. 

Jessup, J. M., 815 Madison Ave., Scranton, Pa. 

Jewett, R. J., 313 Summer St., Buffalo, X". Y. 
^^^ohnson, C. A., 87 High St., Yonkers, X. Y. 

Johnstone, H. W., 5353 Magnolia Ave., Germantown, Pa. 

Jones, A. R., 2d, 5212 University Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Jones, W. H., 9 Cliff' St., Waterbury, Conn. 

Kaichen, T., G86 Gholson Ave., Avondale, Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Kallman, W. L., 127 North Columbus Ave., Mt. Vernon, X'. Y. 

Keane, D. J., 189 Columbus Ave., X'ew Haven, Conn. 

Kielland, C. M., 351 Humbolt Parking, Buffalo, X. Y. 

King, C. D., 59 Prospect St., East Orange, X. J. 
.,,--^vnapp, F., 9 South Marshall St., Hartford, Conn. 

Knapp, J. W., 604 East 18th St., Paterson, X'. J. 

Kramer, G. L., 74 Broadway, Xew York City. 

Lane, A. B., Saint James, Long Island, X. Y. 

Lanpher, R., 482 Portland Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 

Lasar, W., 4 East 78th St., Xew York City. 

Lee, R. E., 30 Summer St., New Britain, Conn. 

Leete, E. H., 17 East 60th St., Xew Y'ork City. 

L,eiper. E. F., Jr., Episcopal Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 
:.eonard, W. C, Coudersport, Pa. 

Levy, W. M., Jr., 92 Court St., Plattsburg, X". Y. 

Lewis, C. T., Jr., 2209 Robinson Ave., Toledo, Ohio. 

Lindenberg, P. H., 1306 East Broad St., Columbus, Ohio. 

Little, E. N., 308 North Perry Ave., Peoria, HI. 

Littletield, C, 1320 Monadnock Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

Littwin, C. G., 602 Sutter Ave., Brooklyn, X^. Y. 

Lloyd, L. M., Hartsdale, X^. Y., care Wm. M. Campbell, 
^.^ongstreth, E., 2d, 1631 Locust St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
:jorimer, F. W., 7 Park St., Lynn, Mass. 

-Low, S., 2d, 30 East 55th St., X^ew York City. 

Lucas, R. H., 620 West 122d St., X"ew York City. 

Lundgren, E. A., Higganum, Conn. 

Lyman, H., 65 West 24th St., X'ew York City. 

McChesney, M. M., Madison Park, Seattle, Wasli. 

McConnell, H., Crescent St., X^orthampton, Mass. 

McHatton, J. M., 315 West Broadway, Butte, ]\Iont. 
McLane, A., Jr., "Gillean," Garrison, Md. 

McLennan, J. H., 1800 Third Ave., Louisville, Ky. 

MacNeal, A. C, 1438 Enterpe St., X^ew Orleans, La. 

Malcom. D. C, care of Lee, Higginson & Co., 43 Exchange PI., X^ew York 
Citv. 



ROLL OF THE CLASS 353 



IMiiniiiiig. F. J., 47 Fri'iicli .\\i'.. IJraiiitrcc. .Mass. 

Manning. T. J.. 274 Olivia St.. Dciliv, ( nni. 

Massa. A. F., .Ir.. KK) Wdnstcr St.. New Jlavcii. ('(Uiii. 
_^Iatlier, P. 11.. 2()().") Kuclid Ave., Cleveland, Oliiu. 

Mead, X. P».. dr.. !»7 Maiier Ave., Greenwich. ( dun. 

Meiler, G. A.. 2:540 Gortez St., Chicago, 111. 

Meyer, G. B., 307 West l()7th St., New York City. 

Meyer, K. J., G07 North Main St., Ada. Ohio. 

Mikell, W., 229 East Johnson St., Germantown, Pa. 
^]\iiller. E. T.. "The Pines," Easton. Talbot Co., Md. 

Miller, L,, 2d, corner Witherbee Ave. and Winwood Pvd., Pelham !Manor, 
X. Y. 

:\riller. S. T., Jr„ 524 Jefferson Ave.. Detroit. INIich. 

Mok, K. F., care of Y. 'SI. C. A., Shanghai, China. 

Morrill, A. F., State Xornial School, Xew Haven. Conn. 

Morris. L. S., !)01 Lancaster St.. Albany. X. Y. 

Morton, IM., Jr.. Xewtonville, ^lass. 

Moss, J. L.. Jr.. Lake Forest, 111. 

Mulligan. E. D., 788 East Ave., Rochester, X. Y. 

Munson. A. :\I., 46 West 52d St.. X'ew York City. 

Munson, C. B.. care Hayden, Stone & Co., 25 Broad St., Xew York City. 

Murphy, G., 88 Main St., Concord. Mass. 

Newman, J. T., 50 Lawrence St., Xew Haven. Conn. 
„--^ewton, H. F., oG Linden St., Reading, Mass. 

Norton, J. S., 11 Maplewood Ter., Springfield, Mass. 

Noyes, L. G., 89 Yirginia Ave., St. Paul. Minn. 

Nute, H. H., 375 Park Ave.. Xew York City. 

Oler, W. M., Jr.. Larchmont, X'. Y. 

Oliver, R. S.. 166 East Rock Rd.. Xew Haven, Conn, 
^-Osgood, J. W., 730 13tli St.. X. W., Washington, D. C. 

Otis, J. E., Jr.. 1441 Xortli State St.. Chicago. 111. 

Paul, D. C, -Oak Lawn," Washington, D. C, 

Peck, I. H., 25 Lawrence Ave.. Flushing, X. Y. 
-Perkins, F. H., 6106 Kenmore Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Perrins, H. B., 197 Pearl St., Seymour, Conn. 

Perry, H. 0., Southport. Conn, 

Pharr, IM. 'M.. Ridgeway, Texas. 

Phelan, R, E,, 128 Plymouth St.. Xew Haven, Conn. 

Phenix, P. S., 1 Thomas St.. Portland. INlaine. 
:--— Pierce, R. deZ., 462 Walnut St.. Xewtonville, Mass, 

Piatt, A. D., 211 East 55th St., Portland, Ore. 

Piatt, X^. H., Dover. X. J. 

Polhamus, R. H.. R. F. D. 11. Fort Wayne. Ind. 
yPorter. G. E., 3d, Elmhurst, 111. 

Porter, L. E.. 266 Bradley St.. Xew Haven. Conn. 

Porter, W.. Jr., 4043 Lake Park Ave., Chicago. 111. 

Potter, R. F., 223 Clinton Rd., Brookline, Mass. 

Pratt, C, 229 Clinton Ave., Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Proctor, A, M., Wakefield. Mass. 

Proctor, W. R., Jr., Sholoha. Pike Co., Pa. 



354 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

Putnam. H. T., Old r^Iill Farm. Harvard. :Mass. 

Putnam, J. G., 525 Delaware Ave.. Butlalo. X. Y. 
^, Quarles, D. A., Van Buren, Ark. 

Ransom, W. A., 58 West 58th St.. New York City. 

Richards, A. M., 399 Park Ave., Xew York City, 
^^^ieketts, L. L., 2927 Reading Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Rinehart, C. C, 1406 Hubbard St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Ripley, C, Interlaken, South Taconia, Wasli. 

Ritch, W. R., Port Jefferson, Long Island, X. Y. 

Roberts, C. H., Jr., 10 Franklin PL. Flushing, Long Island, X. Y. 

Robinson, D. P., 8 Lincoln St., Meriden, Conn. 

Robinson. E. S., 450 Edgewood Ave., Xew Haven, Conn. 

Roll, R. L., 10 Jackson St., Lebanon. Ohio. 

Rose, P. L., 43 Concord St., Hartford, Conn. 

Rosenberg, J. F., Congress Hotel, Chicago, 111. 

Rothschild, R. C, 562 \Vest 113th St.. New York City. 

Rubin, L., 375 State St., Xew Haven, Conn. 

Russell, E. F., Box 175, White Plains. X. Y. 

Ryan, W. B., Jr., Greensburg. Pa. 

Sanderson, B., Ayer, Mass. 

Scarborough, O. C, Jr., Sunimerton. S. C. 

Sheldon, E. L., Fort Ann, X. Y. 
^^hepard, D. C, 230 Xorth St., Buffalo, X. Y. 

Sherman, T. C, 105 Ridge St., Glen Falls, N. Y. 

Shove, J. D., 365 Green St., Syracuse, X. Y. 

Smith, A. C, 445 Washington Ave., West Haven, Conn. 

Smith, C. P., 162 Clinton St.. Watertown, X. Y. 

Smith, J. W., 246 Broadway, Youngstown, Ohio. 

Sneath. H. C, 285 Whitney Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

Stein, E., 37 West 90th St., Xew York City, 
^^^tewart. D. 0., 924 Madison Ave.. Columbus, Ohio. 

Stewart, J. W., 72 West Adams St., Chicago, 111. 

Strong, C. H., care Rev. C. B. Strong, R. D. 2, Waterbury, Conn. 

Stuart. W., Mt. Clare, W. Va. 

Sutherland, R. K., Elkins, W. Va. 

Sweet, Frank H., Jr.. 1015 INlichigan Trust Bldg., Grand Rapids. Mich. 

Symington, J. :\1., 114 East 64th St.. X^ew York City. 

Taylor, X. R., 64 Eastern Promenade. Portland, Maine, 
^efft, R. C, Jr., 11 Mechanic St., Hudson Falls. X. Y. 

Tener, K. J., Sewickley, Pa. 
-Thomas, E. D., 174 Maplewood Ave.. Philadelphia. Pa. 

Thompson, P. ]\I., 82 Herrimau Ave.. Jamaica. X. Y. 
^^hompson, S. A., Port Byron, X. Y., R. D. Xo. 39. 
^Pighe, L. G., 314 Dayton Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 

Tittman, H. H., Jr., 5024 Westminster PI., St. Louis. Mo. 

Toole, F. E.. Branford, Conn. 
^ Toole, W. O'B., Hotel Duncan. Xew Haven. Conn. 

Tor son. H. A., Moorhead, Minn. 

Traceski, S. J., 80 Jubilee St., X^ew Britain. Conn. 

Troxell. G. M.. 230 Wvoming Ave.. West Pittston. Pa. 



ROLL OF THE CLASS 355 

Vance. N\'. K., .)r.. Mononiraliela. V:\. 

Vauglm. \\. \ ., ■!' ('oiiiiMninvcaltli Axe. 1 lavciliiU. ^lass. 

Viele, S. K.. 21S llinhlainl Ave. I'.ufValo. X. Y. 

Vincent. J. 11.. Kid.') ."itli St.. S. K.. :\linnpapolis. :\Iinn. 

Von Holt. 11. v.. Honolulu. Hawaii. 

J^Valker. C. R., Jr., IS Pariv St., Concord, Mass. 

Walsh, L., 44 East First St., Corning, X. Y. 

Wang-, C. H.. 120 Szechncn IM.. Sliangliai. China. 

Washburn, I. H., Haverstraw. X. Y. 

Way, X. :\1.. 1.5o ^[yrtle St., Manchester. X. 11. 

Weakley, F. T'., Aliilene, Texas. 

Weaver. H. S., 8S Cook St., Waterl)ury. Conn. 

Weiss, A. B.. 143S :\rain St., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Welch, B, K., 121(1 Washington Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Wells, A. L.. 5!) Pier])ont St.. Waterlnuy. Conn. 

White, R. J., Brady, Texas. 

Weise, W. J., 102 Lincoln St., ^Nleriden, Conn, 

Wiles, H. H., 330 State St., Albany, X. Y. 

Willard. D.. Jr., Roland Park. :Md. 
-^Villiams, L. G.. 60 Oakland PL, Buffalo. X. Y". 

Williams, M, H,. 18 Murray St., Binghamton, X. Y. 

Willis, L. W., 2925 Main St.. Bridgeport. Conn. 

Wilson, A, D,, 27 Xorth St.. Binghamton, X'. Y. 

Wilson, E. R., 905 South 5th St., Pekin, 111. 

Wilson, R. W., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Wood, H. 0„ Jr., 831 St. Marks Ave., Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Wood, J. K., 1115 Mulberry St., Scranton, Pa. 
-Woodard, H. E., 146 Elm St., Albany, X". Y. 

Wright. H. H., Waterto^^n, Conn. 
-Wyer, W., 399 Western Ave.. Albany, X. Y\ 

Y'oung. R. S., 94 South Hamilton St., Poughkeepsie, X. Y. 

Zahner, L. C, Adams, Mass. 

Xumber of Graduates. 324. 



XOX-GRADUATES 

Adams. F. W.. 104 Dixwell Ave., Charleston. S. C. 
Armour. P. D.. Armour & Co., Chicago. 111. 
Billings. C. R., 1404 St. James St., Louisville, Ky. 
Bishop. W., 414 ]\Iadison Ave.. Xew York City. 
Black. G. P., 903 Park Ave.. Xew York City. 
^,^-J3ostwick. E. M., 68 Vandeventer PL. St. Louis. ^lo. 
Buckner, T. A.. Jr.. Riverdale-on-Hudson. X. Y. 
Campbell. A. T.. 14S Washington St., Middletown. Conn. 
Carlisle. C. A., Jr.. 131 South Taylor St., South Bend, Ind. 
Cohen, D. B.. 71 William St., Xew Haven, Conn. 
Cooper, J. D., Camp Hill, Pa. 
Denkert, H.. Johnstown. X. Y. 
Dimmick, A. du P.. care of The Barber Asphalt Paving Co., Chicago. 111. 



356 HISTORY OF THE CLASS 

Dolan, T., 3d, 2107 Walnut St., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Enwright, T. W., Amesbury, Mass. 

Gamage, F. L., Jr., Pawling, X. Y. 

Ganibordella, A., 276 Wooster St., Xew Haven, Conn. 

Giflford, A., care of Ralph W. Gifford, Columbia University, Xew York City. 

Gimbel, A. L., care of Gimbel Brothers, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Goodhue, C. P., 157 East 34th St., Xew York City. 

Goodlett, J. G., 9 East 45th St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Griffin. P., Rutland, Vt. 

Hambur, H. F., care of \Y. Wolf & Sons, 549 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Harrison, L. I., 37 Willard St., Xew Haven, Conn. 

Hemming, J. X. G., 310 West 86th St., Xew York City. 

H(jff. S. L., 73 Richmond Ave., Buffalo, X. Y. 

Houpt. G. K., 559 Lafayette Ave., Buffalo, X. Y. 

Hunt, C. P., 1211 Park Ave., Utica, X. Y. 

•Johnson, C. W., 144 Harrison St., East Orange, X. J. 

Kerr, .James, care of The Iroquois China Co., Syracuse, X. Y'. 

Langdon, M. L., 2545 Elden Ave., Avondale, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Lapointe, L. L., 128 Montauk Ave., Xew London, Conn. 

Leeke, H. R., Dixwell Ave., Hamden, Conn. 

Lei, C. T., care of Trustees of Canton Christian College, 156 Fifth Ave., 

Xew Y'ork City. 
Lockwood, E., The Maples, Greenwich. Conn. 
Looran, ~Sl. J., Davenport Xeck, Xew Rochelle. X. Y. 
Lowell, C. T., 1091 Grand Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 
McAdani, L. A., 5137 Lexington Ave., Chicago, 111. 
McCoy, D. L., Perth Amboy Trust Co., Perth Aniboy, X. J. 
McCoy, G. E.. 1817 Xorth 31st St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Manierre, C. E., 1507 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 
Merriam, A. C, Woodmont, Conn. 
Morgan, J. A., 184 Howell St., Providence, R. I. 
:\Iulqueen, G., 43 West 85th St., Xew Y^ork City. 
Myles, R. C, Jr., 875 Park Ave., Xew York City. 
Xewell, A. C, Mentor, Ohio. 

Osthaus, R. A., 330 Wheeler Ave.. Scranton, Pa. 
O' Sullivan, T. J., Jr., Andover, Mass. 
Overby, W. H., Jr., Henderson, Ky. 
Penney, X., 54 Hodge Ave., Buffalo, X. Y. 
Randolph, T., Jr., 3200 Mt. Vernon Ave., Houston, Texas. 
Rosener, E. J., Hotel Ansonia, Broadway and 73d St., Xew York City. 
Ross, .J. M., 445 Orchard St., Xew Haven, Conn. 
Rumelin, R. A., 152 Madison Ave., Portland, Ore. 
Rumsey, A. K., Webster Groves, Mo. 
Scholle, R. M., 46 East 74th St., Xew York City. 
Schwartz, P., Suflield, Conn. 
Schwien, E. E., St. Joseph, ]\Io. 
Shaver, H. N., 240 Mohawk St., Cohoes, X. Y^ 
Smith, E. B., Oakhurst, Pinellas Co., Fla. 
Sproul, H., Jr., 22 West 57th St., Xew York City. 
Tindel, H. E., care of Tindel-Morris Co., Eddystone, Pa. 



ROLL OF THE CLASS 357 

-^^easey. C. A.. Jr.. Ills Ninth Ave. Spcikaiic W'nsli. 
Ward. V. J!.. Uyv. X. V. 

Waters. J. .M.. 4r) Itifliiiiond Ave. I'.iillal.). X. V. 
Weissinaii, S. ])., 0(54 Washington St.. Boston. Mass. 
Welles, T.. 172 Glenwood Ave., East Orange. X'. J. 
Wilcox. E. C, [Meriden, Conn. 

Wilson. M. K., care of Wilson Bros.. .528 South Kittii Avenue. Chicago, IlL 
Woehler. C. W., 19 Kreuzstrasse, Dresden. Gernumy. 
Yoiile, J. S., Beacon Falls, Conn. 

X'uuihi'r of X'on-Oraduates, 71. 



EX-MEMBERS. 

•Beardslee. S. A.. X'ewbury, X. IT. 
Brereton. P. H., Apjionaug, R. I. 

Caple. E. E.. 05 Edgewood Ave., Xew Haven. Conn. 
Casey. L. J., 17 Tenner St., Willimantic, Conn. 

Fitzpatrick, J. B., Merchants Xational Bank Bldg.. St. Paul. :\Iinn. 
Graham, A. B., 703 German X'ational Bank Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Hill. E. K.. Peekskill, X. Y. 
nnes. L.. Saco, ^Maine. 
Kimberly. C. O., Hampton, Va. 
Mudge, D. H., 449 Portland Ave., St. Paul. Minn. 
X'eave. C. F., 133 East 62d St., X'ew York C ity. 
Ocumpaugh, E., 3d, 121 Brunswick St.. Rochester, X. Y. 
Penney, F. B., 329 Alden Ave., Xew Haven, Conn. 
Randol, R. L., Ardmore, Okla. 

Raynes, A. F., P. 0. Box lOGti. Portsmouth. X. H. 
Scoville, E. G., IG Frederick Street, Waterbury. Conn. 
Titus. Ormrod. Ormrod Rd.. Churchville. X. Y'. 
Wentworth. R. S., Strafford, Pa. 

Xumber of Ex-!Members. IS.