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Full text of "History of Clay and Norman counties, Minnesota : their people, industries, and institutions : with biographical sketches of representative citizens and genealogical records of many of the old families"

HISTORY 

OF 

Clay and Norman Counties 

Minnesota 

THEIR PEOPLE, INDUSTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS 



JOHN TURNER 

AND 

C K. SEMLING 

Joint Editors 



With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and 
Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families 



VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRAl^ED 



1918 
B. F. BOWEN & COMPANY 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



CONTENTS. 



VOLUME I. 



CLAY COUNTY. 



CHAPTER I— RELATED STATE HISTORY 33 

A Review of the History of the State of Minnesota From the Days of 
the Louisiana Purchase to the Present Day — Establishment of Ft. Snell- 
ing — Indian Treaties — Establishment of Territorial Government — The Coun- 
cil at Traverse des Sioux and Other Treaties Whereby the Indians Relin- 
quished Their Claims to Lands Now Comprising the State of Minnesota — 
Unrest Among the Indians — Townsite Speculation — Coming of the Rail- 
roads — Sioux Uprising of 1862 — Period of Development Following the Civil 
War — Agricultural Interests and Matters of a General Statistical Character 
With Reference to the Resources of the State, Concluding With a 
Chronological Epitome of the Chief Incidents Relating to the Develop- 
ment of the State. 

CHAPTER II— CLAY COUNTY, MINNESOTA 59 

Boundaries, Area and Topography of the County, Together With a Word 
of Introduction Concerning the Beginning of White Settlement Here and 
the Gradual Development of the Resources of This Section of the Great 
Red River Valley— First White Settlers— Failure of Ambitious Project to 
Create a City, "Lafayette," at the Mouth of the Cheyenne, and the Coming 
of R. M. Probstfield, the First Permanent Settler in the County— Some 
"First" Events and Summary of Recent Statistical Survey. 

CHAPTER III— GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL FEATURES 63 

Warren Upham's Geological Survey of This Region Made the Basis of 
a Technical Description of the Land Formation Hereabout, Together With 
Topographical Data and a Learned Description of the Great Glacial Lake 
Agassiz, the Chapter Concluding With a Comprehensive and Illuminative 
Soil Survey of the Red River Valley, by E. C. Sprague, Whose Paper on 
Conditions in This Wonderful Valley of "the Nile of the North" Covers 
Crop and Soil Conditions Most Entertainingly. 



CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER IV— ORGANIZATION AND COUNTY GOVERNMENT 74 

Here Is Presented Briefly But Comprehensively a General Statement of 
Official Procedure in This County From the Day of the County's Erection 
in 1872 to the Present Day — Court House and Jail — Formation of Civil 
Townships — Commissioners' Proceedings — Election Districts Defined — 
Organization of School Districts — Building of Roads and Bridges — Finances, 
Assessed Valuation by Towns and Villages, Real Estate Increase, Bonded 
Indebtedness, Drainage and Other Details Relating to the Common Ac- 
tivities of the Commonwealth of Clay. 

CHAPTER V— COUNTY, STATE AND NATIONAL REPRESENTATION 92 

This Chapter Carries a Complete Roster of Those Elective Officers Who 
Have Served Clay County in an Official Public Capacity Since the Days 
of the Creation of the County, Including Lists of Congressmen, State 
Senators and Representatives, District Court Judges, County Auditors, 
Registers of Deeds, Sheriffs, County Attorneys, Probate Judges, Coroners, 
Surveyors, Clerks of Court, County Treasurers, County Commissioners, Su- 
perintendents of Public Instruction and County Commissioners, Together 
With a Roster of the Present County Officers, a Statement Regarding the 
Salaries Received by the Same, and a Digest of the Presidential Election 
Returns From This County Since 1884. 

CHAPTER VI— TOWNSHIP HISTORY ^ 100 

In This Chapter There Is Set Out Briefly the Details Regarding the 
Organization of the Thirty Townships in Clay County, Together With 
Many Interesting Facts Relating to the Conditions Existing in These 
Townships in the Early Days of Settlement — List of Original Landowners 
and Facts Regarding Towns and Villages — Review Presented in Alpha- 
betical Order of the Townships of Alliance, Barnesville, Cromwell, Eglon, 
Elkton, Elmwood, Felton, Flowing, Georgetown, Goose Prairie, Glyndon, 
Hagen, Hawley, Highland Grove, Holy Cross, Humboldt, Keene, Kragnes, 
Kurtz, Moland, Moorhead, Morken, Oakport, Parke. Riverton, Skree, Spring 
Prairie, Tansem, Ulen and Viding. 

CHAPTER VII— AGRICULTURAL INTERESTS OF CLAY COUNTY 154 

In the History of Any County Situated in an Almost Purely Agricultural 
Region, As Is This, the Chapter Relating to Farming and Farming Methods 
Ought to Be the Most Interesting One of the Series, and This Chapter Is 
No Exception; for Here Are Set Out in Interesting Fashion Such Details 
as Are Particularly Informative With Relation to the Agricultural Interests 
of Clay County — Farmers' Clubs and Young People's Farm Contests — Soil 
Tests — Farmers' Bureau and Agricultural Societies — Amazing Development 
of Potato Culture — "Father of the Potato Industry" — Dairying and the 
Creamery Industry — Silos — Stock Raising — Official Record of Farm Names — 
Urban Conveniences on the Farm — Crop Summary and General Farm Sta- 
tistics, the Chapter Closing With Fitting Reference to Many of the Individual 
Farmers of the County Whose Operations Have Met With Distinctive 
Success. 



CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER VIII— EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM OF CLAY COUNTY 175 

Former County Superintendent John Turner Has in This Chapter Given 
a Most Comprehensive and Entertaining Review of the Development of 
the Public Schools of Clay County, Beginning With the Days When Indian 
Youngsters Were in the Majority Among the Pupils of the Pioneer Schools 

— "The School of Nature" — First School in County— Early Rural Schools 

Roster of Superintendents of Public Instruction — Statistics Relating to the 

Growth of the Schools — Consolidated Schools — Comparative School Tax 

School Funds and Apportionment — School Officers and Teachers— State 
State School System — Hope Academy — Bishop Whipple School— Concordia 
College and the State Normal School at Moorhcad. 

CHAPTER IX— CHURCHES OF CLAY COUNTY 197 

Herein Is Found a Review of the Various Church Organizations of Clay 
County From the Earliest Years of Settlement, Including the Names of 
the Charter Members of Most of These Organizations and a List of the 
Pastors Who Have Served the Same, All the Leading Religious Denomi- 
nations Being Thus Represented, Including the Congregational, Presby- 
terian, German Evangelical, English Evangelical, Methodist Episcopal, Nor- 
wegian Lutheran, Swedish Lutheran, Scandinavian Lutheran, Catholic, Ger- 
man Lutheran, United Lutheran, Episcopal and Baptist. 

CHAPTER X— NEWSPAPERS OF CLAY COUNTY 212 

It Was Not Many Months After the Beginning of a Social Order Hereabout 
I'ntil the "Red River Star" Appeared to Shed Light on the Situation and 
Ever Since Then This Region Has Been Well and Ably Represented 
in the Domain of the_ Fourth Estate, the County Scat and the Various 
Villages of the County Having Newspapers That Intelligently and Com- 
petently Cover Their Respective Fields, and a List of Which, Together 
With Details Concerning the Founding of These Several Newspapers, Is 
Set Out in the Chapter Plere Indicated. 

CHAPTER XI— PHYSICIANS AND HOSPITALS IN CLAY COUNTY 217 

From the Time in 1871 When Dr. John Kurtz Appeared on This Then 
Frontier of Western Civilization to Act as Physician in the Construc- 
tion Camps of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company to the Present 
Day, Clay County Has Had Able Representation Among the Disciples of 
^sculapius and in This Chapter There Is Set Out a List of the Physicians 
Who Have Thus Served This Community, Together With Brief Biographies 
of Many of Them, as Well as a Roster of the Present Members of the 
Medical Profession in This County and a History of the Several Hospitals 
That Are Serving Their Beneficent Purpose in the Community. 

CHAPTER XII— BENCH AND BAR OF CLAY COUNTY 223 

Courts and Lawyers Have Ever Played an Important Part in the Work 
of Development Marking the Progress of Communities and the Part 
Thus Taken by These Agents of Society in the Development of This 
Community Has Been Both Honorable and Conspicuous— History of the 



CONTENTS. 

District Court, With Brief Biographies of the Judges Who Have Occupied 
Positions on the Bench Thereof — History of the Bar of Clay County. Carrying 
a Roster of tlic Attorneys Who Flave Been Connected Therewith, as Well 
as a Bit of Interesting Biographical Mention of Many of Them. 

CH.APTER XIII— BANKS OF CLAY COUNTY 230 

Nineteen Banks in Clay County Carry Deposits of Three Millions of 
Dollars — More Than Seventy Farmers in the County are Stockholders in 
Some One or More of the Banks of the County — Strong and Admirably 
Managed Financial Institutions Maintain a High Standard of Credit for the 
Community — List of the Banks Now Doing Business in the County, To- 
gether With Brief Histories of Their Respective Organizations, a List 
of Officers and Current Statements of Condition. 

CHAPTER XIV— RAILROAD AND RIVER TRANSPORTATION 242 

From the Days of the Lumbering Red River Carts That Served as Mediums 
of Transportation for the Important Traffic of the Hudson Bay Company 
to the Present Day of the Steel Vcstibulcd Transcontinental Railroad 
"Flyers" That Go Thundering Along the Ways Followed by the Old Trails 
Is Not a Long Time Measured in Years, But Vast Have Been the Changes 
Effected in Methods— Steamboating on the Red River Back in the 70s^ 
Great Land Grants for Purposes of Encouraging Railroad Construction — 
Northern Pacific Railroad — Great Northern System — Some Interesting Side- 
lights on Earlier Methods of Transportation. 

CHAPTER XV— MILITARY HISTORY OF CLAY COUNTY 246 

During the Days of the Civil War There Was No Such a Civic Entity as 
Clay County, Hence This County Had No Part in the Great Struggle 
Between the States; But in the Spanish-American War and in the American 
Participation in the Great War Following the Declaration of War Against 
Germany in the Spring of 1917. .Admirable Response Was Made to the Call 
to .'\rms — Something Relating to the Local Organization of the Grand 
.Army of the Republic. 

CHAPTER XVI— FRATERNAL ORDERS IN CLAY COUNTY 250 

Responding to That Noble Instinct Which Recognizes the Common Brother- 
hood of Man, the Early Settlers of Clay County Lost Little Time in 
Organizing Local Benevolent and Fraternal Organizations After Orderly 
Settlements Began to Be Formed Here and There Have Come to Be 
Organized in the County Numerous Lodges of Secret Societies Which 
Are Quietly and Effectively Doing the Work for Which They Were Organ- 
ized and a List of Which Is Set Out in the Chapter Here Indicated. 

CHAPTER XVII— CITY OF MOORHEAD, THE COUNTY SEAT 259 

"Key City of Minnesota," as It Was Styled in the Old Frontier Days, 
Was Founded in 1871 and When Clay County Was Formally Organized 
as a Civic Entity in the Following Year Was Made the County Seat, Which 
Position of Eminence It Ever Since Has Occupied, Moorhead Gradually 



CONTENTS. 

Developing Until It has Long Been Recognized as the Chief City of This 

Section of Minnesota — Interesting Events in the Early Days of the City 

Review, of Conditions in 1874 — Disastrous Fires— Industrial Development- 
Municipal History— Postoffice, Public Library and a Business Directory 
for 1917. 

CHAPTER XVIII— EARLY RECOLLECTIONS OF EASTERN CLAY 

COUNTY 279 

Reminiscences of Alvide Anderson Covering Recollections Dating Back to 
1880 Presented in a Fashion to Awaken Memories of Other Days in the 
Minds of Old Settlers and to Prove of Informative Interest to Those of 
the Present Generation to Whom This Whole Volume Ought to Be a 
Veritable Mine of Information Concerning Incidents of Other Days — Early 
Modes of Travel — Woman's Part in the Settlement — School Reminiscences 
— Grasshoppers — Mail and Marketing — Prairie Fires — Prices in Early Times 
and an Illuminating Comparison Between Conditions Then and Now. 

CHAPTER XIX— MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS 1 .288 

Here Will Be Found a Series of Brief Historical Narratives Covering 
Points That Could Not Conveniently Be Covered in Preceding Chapters. 
Such as Matters Relating to Postoffices in Clay County, Local Fire Insur- 
ance Companies. Population Statistics, Original Village Plats, Market Quo- 
tations, Early Weather Reports, Temperature and Precipitation, Telephone 
Service, How Holy Cross Township Got Its Name and. Finally, and Quite 
Fittingly, a Poem, "Clay County," by John Turner, and a Statement Con- 
cerning the Naming of That County. 



NORMAN COUNTY. 



CHAPTER I— GEOLOGICAL AND TOPOGRAPHICAL FEATURES 299 

Generally Level Trend of the Surface of Norman County, the Highest 
Point in the County Being "Frenchman's Bluff," in Flom Township— Nat- 
ural Drainage by Way of the Basin of the Wild Rice River— Artifi- 
cial Drainage Provided by Hundreds of Miles of Ditches— Artesian Wells 
— Timber — Grasses and Fruits. 

CHAPTER II— COUNTY ORGANIZATION ■"'- 

Statement Regarding the Legislative Act of February. 1881, by Which Nor- 
man County Was Set Off From Polk County, and of the Later Transfer 
of the Sixteen Congressional Townships Now Comprised Within Mahno- 
men County in 1906— First Official Proceedings of the County-Location 
of County Seat— Erection of Present Court House— County Finances. 



CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER III— COUNTY AND STATE OFFICIALS 3.12 

In This Chapter There Is Set Out a Complete Roster of All Who Have 
Served Norman County In an Official Capacity From the Days of Its Organ- 
ization to the Present, Including a List of State Senators and Representatives, 
County Auditors, Treasurers, Sheriffs, Registers of Deeds, Judges of Probate, 
County Attorneys, Surveyors, Coroners, Clerks of the District Court, School 
Superintendents, Court Commissioners, County Commissioners, and County 
Physicians, Together With a Review of Local Political Conditions and a 
Digest of the Presidential Vote Since 1884. 

CHAPTER IV— COUNTY GOVERNMENT 318 

Here is Presented a Review of Conditions That Confronted the Commission- 
ers Upon Taking Up the Work of Organization In the New County of Nor- 
man — Notes From the Minutes of the Board — First Plat Made for the County 
— Settlement With Polk County — Bonds Authorized — Farmers Alliance 
Organization Urged — Various Acts of the Commissioners and a Word Con- 
cerning Drainage. Roads and Bridges and County Finances, Closing With 
Some Statistical Figures and a Roster of the Present County Officers. 

CHAPTER V— RAILROADS AND TRANSPORTATION 331 

Coming of the Railroad Into Norman County During the Middle '70s 
Opened a New Era for This Region — Reference to Other Roads that Never 
Got Beyond the "Paper" Stage — Railroad Lands and the Prices at Which 
the Same Were Advertised for Sale in 1883 — Great Northern Railway Strike 
— Pioneer "Fast Mail." 

CHAPTER VI— AGRICULTURE AND KINDRED INDUSTRIES 336 

It Is But Proper to State That as an Agricultural County Norman Ranks 
Well with Any in the Commonwealth of Minnesota, a Conclusion Borne 
Out by a Perusal of the Statistical Information Carried in the Chapter 
Here Called to the Attention of the Reader — Wheat Acreage — Crop Aver- 
ages — Markets of Another Day — Diversified Farming — Potato Culture 
— Creameries — Orchard and Nursery Interest — Agricultural Societies — F'irst 
Hog In County — Registered Farm Names. 

CHAPTER VII— THE BENCH AND BAR 349 

Though Norman County Has Never Been Much Given to Litigation There 
Is Still a Field for the Lawyer Here and for the Orderly Processes of the 
Courts, and In This Chapter There Is Set Out a List of the .'\ttorneys Who 
Have Practiced Their Profession In This County From the Days of the Be- 
ginning of a County Organization, Together With a Roster of the Present 
Members of the Bar and a List of Those Who Have Served as Judges of 
Probate and as County Attorneys. 

CHAPTER VIII— THE MEDICAL PROFESSION 35.S 

From the Days of the "Roots and Yarbs" Doctors This County Has Been 
Well Represented In the Medical Profession and This Chapter Carries a 
List of All Who Have Practiced Here From the Beginning, With Brief 
Biographical References to Many of Them, Together With a Narrative 
Relating to a Tragedy of the Middle '80s Involving a Physician and a Drug- 
gist. 



CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER IX— CHURCHES OF NORMAN COUNTY 360 

Evidences of Respectful Worship Among the Members of a Community 
Afford One of the Most Significant Indices to the General Character of the 
People of that Community and in this Respect Norman County Measures up 
Highly, As the Reader Will Note By a Perusal of the Chapter Here In- 
dicated and Which Sets Out In Brief a History of the Numerous Church 
Organizations That Have Been Active and Potent Factors In the Develop- 
ment of the Social and Moral Life of the Community Since the Days of the 
Beginning of Settlement Here. 

CHAPTER X— BANKS OF NORMAN COUNTY 383 

The Twenty Banking Houses In Norman County Afford an Admirable Inde.x 
to the General Prosperity and Financial Standing of the Community — List 
of the Early Banks In the County — Present Banks Doing Business In the 
County and Brief Statements Relating to the Organization of Eacli. 

CHAPTER XI— FRATERNAL AND BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES 393 

Norman County Is Well Represented In the Matter of Fraternal Societies 
and In This Chapter the Reader Will Find a Brief Statement Relating to the 
Organization of Each of the -Several Organizations of That Character That 
Have Been Effected Here, This List Carrying References to the Local Or- 
ganizations of the Masons, the Order of the Eastern Star, the Knights of 
Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Independent Order of 
Foresters, the Sons of Norway, the Daughters of Norway, the Modern Wood- 
men of America, the Good Templars and the Brotherhood of American Yeo- 
men. 

CHAPTER XII— EDUCATIONAL INTERESTS OF NORMAN COUNTY.— 399 
In 1874 the Region Now Comprised Within the Bounds of Norman County 
Had But One School House, a Humble Structure of Logs; Today It Has One 
Hundred and Nine School Houses and Is Carrying On the Noble Work of 
Education With a Degree of Efficiency That Gives to All Districts Admirable 
School Facilities — First Public Schools — Formation of School Districts 
—Consolidated Schools— School Statistics— Graded Schools— Model School 
Building. > 

CHAPTER XIII— MILITARY HISTORY — — 406 

Though In the Nature of Things Norman County Had No Part In the -Activ- 
ities Incident to the Great Civil War, It Was Well Represented In the Span- 
ish-American War and In the Gigantic Struggle Which This Country Entered 
In 1917 It Rose Nobly to the Patriotic Task of Furnishing Its Quota for 
Participation In the World War— Enlistments From Norman County— List 
of Those Who Became a Part of the Nation's Selective Draft— Aids to the 
War— Home Guard— Red Cross Work— First Toll Exacted By the War ?rom 
This County— Company I, Third Regiment, Minnesota National Guard. 

CHAPTER XIV-THE PRESS OF THE COUNTY -"Z"' '*'" 

From the Days of the Establishment of the "Ada -Alert" Back m the Year 
1880, Norman County Has Been Ably Represented By Vigorous and Progres- 
sive Newspapers and the Reader Will Find In the Chapter Here Indicated an 



CONTENTS. 

Interesting Narrative Relating to the Gradual Development of the News- 
paper Interests of the County, With Brief Histories of the Several News- 
papers and Fitting References to Some of the Editors Who Have Exerted 
a Helpful Influence Upon the Community By Reason of Their Editorial Activ- 
ities. 

CHAPTER XV— THE CITY OF ADA 419 

As the Social and Political Center of the County, the City of Ada, County 
Seat of Norman County, Merits Particular Mention In a Work of This Char- 
acter and In This Chapter the Reader Will Find Set Out In Detail Something 
of the Municipal History of the City. Together With References to Its Public 
Utilities, Parks, Library, Postofficc, Industries, the Abolition of Its Saloons 
and a Review of Its Commercial Development, Together With a Comprehen- 
sive and Up-to-Date Commercial Directory, Carrying a List of Persons and 
Concerns Doing Business There In 1918. 

CHAPTER XVI— TOWNSHIPS OF NORMAN COUNTY 431 

This Chapter Is Devoted to a Brief Review of the Work of Organization of 
the Several Townships of Norman County, Together With Interesting De- 
tails Relating to the Early Settlement In Each and a Roster of First Set- 
tlers; the Townships Being Set Out in the Following .Mphabetical Order: 
Anthony. Bear Park, Flom, Fossum, Good Hope, Green Meadow,. Halstad, 
Hegne, Hendrum, Home Lake, Lake, Ida, Lee, Lockhart, Mary, McDon- 
aldsville. Pleasant View. Rockwell, Shely, Spring Creek, Strand, Sundahl, 
Waukon, Wild Rice and Winchester — Histories of the Several Towns and 
Villages of the County . 

CHAPTER XVII— REMINISCENCES OF EARLY PIONEERS 503 

Wherein the Reader Will Find Some of the Most Interesting Narratives in 
This History, First-Hand Stories Here Being Related Concerning Many In- 
cidents and Events of Pioneer Days That Ought to Prove of Intense In- 
terest to All Who Are In Any Way Concerned In the Matter of the Preserv- 
ation of the History and Traditions of This Community — Hudson Bay Stations 
— Early Settlers — Difficulties .Attending Pioneering — Grasshopper Days — Ind- 
ian "Scares" — Pioneer Preacher's Experiences — Ox-Team Travel. 

CHAPTER XVIII— MISCELLANEOUS SUBJECTS 515 

Herein Will Be Found a Number of Items of Interest Worthy of Preserva- 
tion In the Annals of Norman County, Including Reference to Some "First" 
and "Early" Events. City and Village Plats. Postoffices, Population Statis- 
tics. Weather Statistics, Big Flood Years, Destructive Storms, Prairie Fires, 
the Old Settlers Association, Pioneer Reminiscences and An Interesting Nar- 
rative Relating to Some of the Early Political Fights In the "Bloody Fifth." 



HISTORICAL INDEX 



CLAY COUNTY. 



A 

Aboriginal Earthworks 65 

Activities of Normal School 192 

Activity in Railroad Building 45 

Admission to Statehood 39 

Agricultural 154-174 

Agricultural Societies 156 

Alliance Township — 

Boundaries of 101 

First Settlers 100 

Location of 76 

Organization of 85, 100 

Population of 100 

Taxes Paid ^ 87 

Village of Baker 101 

Altitudes in Clay County 64 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons- 250 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. 256 

Anderson, Alvide 279 

Area of Clay County 59, 63 

Area of Minnesota 47 

Assessed Valuation 62, 88 

Averill, Village of 137, 290 

B 

Baker State Bank .* 231 

Baker, Village of 101, 290 

Banks of Clay County 230-241 

Baptist Church 211 

Barnesville, City of 103-107, 290 

Barnesville Hospital 222 

Barnesville Township — 

Boundaries of 102 

City of Barnesville 103-107 

Early Settlers 103 

Location of 77, 102 

Organization of 102 



Bar of Clay County 223-229 

Baxter, Judge L. L 224 

Bear Shot by Pioneer 134 

Bench and Bar of Clay County 223-229 

Bethel, Early Name of Hawley 127 

"Bill" Nye's Brother 229 

Bishop Whipple School, the 186 

Bonded Indebtedness of County 89 

Bonds of County OiTicials i 86 

Boundaries of Clay County 59 

Buffalo River Settlement 61 

Buflfalo River, the 145 

Butter, the Best in the World 160 

C 
Carvell, J. S., County's First Lawyer 225 

Cash Resources of County 88 

Catholic Churches 208 

Catholic Order of Foresters 254 

Catton 290 

Census of 1860 40 

Chippewa Indian Kills Settlers 109 

Chronological Data 50 

Churches of Clay County 197-211 

City of Barnesville 103-107, 290 

City of Moorhead 259-278 

Citizens Bank of Barnesville 236 

Civil Townships, Formation of.-76, 100 

Civil War Period 40, 246 

Civil War Retards Settlement 40 

Clay-Becker Joint Sanitarium 222 

•Clay County," a Poem 295 

Clay County Bankers Association. 241 

Clay County Farmers Bureau 156 

Clay County in 1874 59 

Clay County in War — 246-249 

Clay County Journalism 212-216 

Clay County Medical Society 221 

Clerks of District Court— 95 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Climatological Conditions 49, 293 

Coal Mine "Boom" That Failed 133 

Collins, Judge L. W 224 

Commissioners Court, Opening of — Tl 
Comstock, Hon. S. G.— 59, 60, 78, 80, 81, 
92, 93, 94, 118, 186, 190, 192, 225, 229, 
230, 260, 264, 265, 266, 268, 291. 

Comstock State Bank 231 

Comstock, Village of 131, 290 

Concordia College 187 

Congregational Churches 197 

Congressional Apportionment 92 

Congressmen 92 

Consolidated Schools 180 

Consolidation of Colleges 189 

Co-operative Creamery Associations 161 

Corn n, 154 

Coroners 94 

Council at Traverse des Sioux 35 

County Attorneys 94 

County Auditors 93 

County Commissioners 95 

County Fair Association 157 

County Finances 87 

County Government 74-91 

County Named for Henry Clay 296 

County Officers 92-99 

County Printing 216 

County's Cash Resources 88 

County Seat .'\spirations Dashed 123 

County Seat Town, the 259-278 

County Surveyors 95 

County Treasurers 95 

Court Commissioners 95 

Court House, History of-_74, 82, 84, 85 

Creameries 161 

Cromwell Township — 

Boundaries of 107 

Location of 76. 107 

Organization of 108 

Population of 108 

' Settlement Notes 108 

Crop Conditions 70, 154-174 

Crop Statistics 174 

Cross Saves Settlers 294 

D 

Dairying in Clay County 160 

Daughters of Rebeckah 252 



Decrease in Population Noted 109 

Degree of Honor 256 

Development of Minnesota 50 

Dilworth State Bank 232 

Dilworth, Village of 139, 291 

District Court Judges 93, 223 

Doctors of Clay County 217-222 

Dog Trains 261 

Douglas, Wallace B. 227 

Downer, Village of 111, 291 

Drainage 63, 69, 86, 89 

Driving Park Association 157 

E 

Early Commissioners' Records 11 

Early Recollections 279-287 

Editor Holds the Fort 212 

Educational 175-196 

Eglon Township — 

Boundaries of 108 

Early Settlers 109 

First Settlers Slain 109 

Location of 11 

Organization of 108 

Picturesque Lake Region 110 

Population of 109 

Waste Land Noted 109 

Election Districts Defined 78 

Elevation of State 49 

Elkton Township — 

Downer, Village of 111 

First Settlers 111 

Location of 76, 110 

Originally Named Madison 76, 111 

Organization of 83, 111 

Population of 111 

Taxes Paid 87 

Elmwood Township — 

Boundaries of 112 

Location of 76 

Organization of 83, 112 

Population of 112 

Sabin, Village of 113 

Settlement Notes 112 

Taxes Paid 87 

English Evangelical Church 202 

Episcopal Church 211 

Examples of Successful Farming 165 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



F 

Farmers as Bank Stockholders 230 

Farmers' Clubs 1^5 

Farming in Clay County 154-174 

Farm Names, a Record of 162 

Farms in Clay County, Number of- 59 
"Father of the Potato Industry" 159 

Felton Township — 

Boundaries of ^^^ 

Location of '" 

Organization of ^5, 114 

Settlement Notes ^^ 

Taxes Paid S'' 

Village of Felton ^^ 

Felton, Village of 114, 291 

Ferry Toll Rates in Early Days 80 

Finances of County ^7 

Financial Crash of 1873 

Finkle Station 1^^ 

Fire Insurance Companies (Local)— 288 

Fire Loss at Hawley 128 

Fire Losses' at Moorhead 267 

Fire Losses at Ulen 151 

First .Constitutional Convention 38 

First County Officers Appointed— 78, 93 

First Election Districts 78 

"First Events" in Clay County-61, 78 
First National Bank of BarnesviUe. 235 

First National Bank of Hawley 233 

First National Bank of Moorhead- 230 

First National Bank of Ulen 231 

First Newspaper in County 21- 

First School in County 176 

First State Bank of Felton 233 

First State Bank of Glyndon 234 

First State Bank of Moorhead 237 

First State Legislature 39 

First Steamboat to Ft. SneUing 33 

First Territorial Governor 35 

First White Settlers ^9 

„, 71 

Flax 

Floods of Other Days -^^^ 

Flowing Township H^ 

Flowing Wells at Felton 115 

Founding of Moorhead 259 

Fraternal Orders 250-258 

Frontier Life Exciting at Times— 262 



G 

Game Plentiful in Pioneer Days 153 

Geography of Minnesota 4/ 

Geological and Natural Features--63-73 
Georgetown Township — 

Boundaries of 116 

Georgetown, Village of 118 

Old Trading Post 117 

Organization of 116 

Population of --. 116 

Settlement Notes 116 

Georgetown, Village of 118, 291 

German Evangelical Church 202 

German Lutheran Churches 210 

Glacial Lake Agassiz 65 

Glyndon Township — 

Boundaries of 1-1 

First Settlers 122 

Glyndon Village 122 

Organization of 1-1 

Population of 1 — 

Glyndon Village 122, 291 

Good-Roads Movement in County— 90 
Goose Prairie Township- 
Boundaries of 120 

Early Settlement - 120 

Hitterdal, Village of 121 

Location of 76, 120 

Organization of 83, 120 

Taxes Paid ^' 

Gophers, Bounty on 86 

Graded Schools of County 180 

Grand Army of the Republic 248 

Grasses and Forage Crops 72, 154 

Grasshopper Visitations— 61, 152, 284 

Great Northern Railroad 44 

Growth of PubHc Schools 179 

H 

, • P4 

Hagen Township - 

Hawley Township— * 
Early Settlement YJt 

„f —76, 123 

Location of • 

Old English Colony — J^^ 

Organization of '9, 1^^ 

Population of 

Taxes Paid 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Village of Hawley 127 

Hawley. Village of 127, 291 

Highland Grove Township — 

Boundaries of 129 

Discontinued Postoffices 129 

Early Settlement 130 

Location of IT, 129 

Organization of 130 

Villages in Township 130 

Highways of the County 90 

History of Townships 100-153 

Hitterdal Security State Bank 238 

Hitterdal, Village of 121, 291 

Holes, Andrew— 59, 74, 76, 77, 95, 176. 

237, 259, 263, 265. 
Holy Cross Township — 

Location of IT. 131 

Organization of 131 

Origin of Name 294 

Settlement of 131 

Village of Comstock 131 

Hope Academy 186 

Hospitals at Moorhead 221 

Hotels of Moorhead 263 

Humboldt Township 132 

I 

Immigration. During the Fifties 37 

Improved Order of Red Men 255 

Incidents of the Old Days 262. 279 

Incorporation of Moorhead 269 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 251 

Indian Dance 280 

Indian Hunters Cause Trouble 37 

Indians Notified to Leave County 81 

Indian Treaties 33 

Indian Uprising of 1862 42. 76 

J 

Jail Destroyed by Fire 74 

Jail Poorly Guarded 82 

Johnsons. Predominance of 259 

Journalism in Clay County 212-216 

Judges of District Court 93. 223 

Judges of Probate 94 

Judiciary, the 223 

K 
Keene Township — 

Boundaries of 133 



Early Settlement 134 

Location of 76, 133 

Only Two Homesteaders 134 

Organization of 85, 133 

Population of 133 

Taxes Paid 87 

"Key City of Minnesota" 259 

Kragnes State Bank 238 

Kragnes Township — 

Boundaries of 134 

Early Settlement 134 

Location of 76, 134 

Originally "Woodland" 83 

Organization of . 83, 134 

Taxes Paid 87 

Village of Kragnes 135 

Kragnes, Village of 135 

Kurtz, Plat of 291 

Kurtz Township 135 

L 

Lafayette, a "Paper Town" 60 

Lakes of Clay County 63 

Likes of Minnesota 48 

Legal Profession, the 223-229 

Lightning Strikes Postoffice 137 

List of Registered Physicians 217 

Louisiana Purchase 33 

"Lund" Township 148 

M 

Machinery for Cultivating Potatoes. 158 

Manitoba Junction 291 

Market Quotations 292 

Masonic Lodges 250 

Massacre of 1862 ..42, 76 

Medical Profession, the 217-222 

Memorial Day Observance 249 

Meridian Line Officially Fixed 85 

Methodist Episcopal Churches 203 

Military History of County 246-249 

Mills, Judge Ira B 224 

Minnesota State History 33-58 

Mirage, Description of 64 

Miscellaneous Topics 288-296 

Modern Rural Schools 178 

Modern Woodmen of America 253 

Moland Township — 

Boundaries of 136 

First Settlers 137 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Location of 77, 136 

Organization of 136 

Population of 136 

Taxes Paid 87 

Village of Averill 137 

Moorhead Hospital 221 

Moorhead National Bank 237 

Moorhead, the County Seat- 
Business Directory 275 

Churches 1"' 

Conditions in 1874 265 

Created County Seat 74 

Disastrous Fires 267 

Distinctive Events 264 

For Whom Named 261 

Hotels 263 

Lawyers 223 

Location of 259 

Lodges 250 

Municipal History 269 

Original Plat 292 

Population of 259 

Postoffice 271 

Public Library 274 

Schools 175 

When Founded 259 

Moorhead Township — 

Boundaries of 13° 

City of Moorhead 138, 259 

Location of 76, 138 

Organization of 79, 138 

Population of 138 

Schools and Churches 139 

Settlement of 138 

Taxes Paid 87 

Village of Dilworth 139 

Morken Township — 

Boundaries of l'"^ 

Location of 76, 140 

Organization of 83, 140 

Population of 14^ 

Settlement of l-^O 

Taxes Paid 87 

Mound Builder Evidences 65 

Murder of a Policeman 264 

Muskoda, Village of 129, 291 

Mc 
McKelvey, Judge James M 224 



N 

National Loan and Improvement 

Company 240 

Newspapers of Clay County 212-216 

Nichols, W. D., Pioneer Editor 212 

"Nile of the North," the 68 

Normal School Activities 192 

Northern Pacific Railroad 243 

Norwegian Lutheran Churches 205 

Northwestern Hospital, the 221 

Northwestern Lutheran College As- 
sociation 187 

Nye, Judge Carroll A. 225, 228 

O 

Oakport 260 

Oakport Township — 

Boundaries of 141 

Location of 76, 141 

Oak Mound Consolidated School- 142 

Organization of 83, 141 

Population of 1^1 

Settlement of 1^1 

Taxes Paid 87 

Officers of Clay County 92-99 

Official Statistics Regarding County 

62, 289 

Ondeland, Old Postoffice of 151 

Order of the Eastern Star 251 

Organization of County 75 

Original Village Plats 290 

Origin of State's Name 47 

P 

Parke Township — 

Boundaries of 1"*- 

Early Settlers 142 

Location of ^^ ^ l'*2 

Organization of '4- 

Population of 1''2 

Rollag Postoffice 143 

Township Hall 144 

Parsons, Judge William L 225 

Patriarchs Militant 251 

Period of Rapid Development 44 

Physicians and Hospitals 217-222 

Pioneer Braves Indian Terror 76 

Pioneers Slain by Indians 109 

Population Statistics 46, 62, 289 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Postoffices in County 288 

Postoffices Robbed 128, 272 

Postoffice Struck by Lightning 137 

Potatoes 7i, 152, 154, 157-160 

Potato Growers' Association 159 

Prairie Fires 284 

Prehistoric Lake Bed 65 

Presbyterian Churches 201 

Present County Officers 98 

Presidential Vote 99 

Press of Clay County 212-216 

Prices in Early Times 287, 292 

Prisoners Burned in Jail 74 

Prisoners Enjoy Freedom 82 

Probate Judges 94 

Probstfield, R. M.— 59, 60, 61, 75. 76, 92, 
117, 119, 142, 260, 263. 

Public Library at Moorhead 274 

Public Schools of Clay County 176 

R 

Railroad and River Traffic 242-245 

Railroad Bonds Issued 39 

Railroad Land Grants 243 

Railway Shops at Dilworth 139 

Rainfall 293 

Ramsey, Gov. Alexander 35 

Real Estate Increase 89 

Recollections of Other Days 279-287 

Record of Local Farm Names 162 

Rcd-Rivcr Carts 261 

Red River Valley, the 68 

Red River Valley Treaty of 1863-.- 43 

Registered Physicians, List of 217 

Register of Deeds 94 

Related State History 33-58 

Religious Activities 197-211 

Reminiscences 279-287 

Report on School Conditions 184 

Rivers of Minnesota 48 

Riverton Township — 

Boundaries of 144 

Farmers Picnic Ground 146 

Locations of 76, 144 

Organization of 85, 144 

Population of 144 

Settlement of 144 

Stockwood Postoffice 145 



Taxes Paid 85 

River Traffic in Old Days 242 

Road and Bridge Expenditures 87 

Roads of Clay County 90 

Roeser, Judge John A 225 

Rollag Postoffice — 143 

Roster of Clay County Bar 229 

Rough Life on the Frontier 262 

Royal Arcanum, the 255 

Royal League, the 257 

Rural Conditions. Improvement in 181 

Rural Schools in Pioneer Days 177 

Rustad. Village of 136 

s 

Sabin State Bank . 239 

Sabin, Village of 113, 292 

Salaries of County Officials 98 

Sale of Old Court House 82 

Scandinavian Lutheran Churches 207 

School Buildings at Moorhead 176 

School Districts Early Defined 79 

School Disturbed by a Bear 178 

School Funds 182 

School Lands .182 

School Officers' Conferences 184 

Schools of Clay County 175-196 

School Superintendents— *— 95, 178, 184 

School Tax Rates — 181 

Schroeder, Henry, "Potato King" 159 

Searle, Judge D. B 224 

Secret Societies 250-258 

Settlers Flee From Indians 76 

Sheriffs 94 

Skree Township 146 

Small Fruits 73 

Soil Conditions 59, 64, 68 

Soldiers for the World War 246 

Spanish-.\mcrican War 46, 246 

Special Taxes for Schools 182 

Spirit Lake Massacre 38 

Sprague, E. C. 68 

Spring Prairie Township 147 

State .Aid for Schools 183 

State Bank of Georgetown 234 

State Bank of Hawley 232 

State Development by Years SO 

State History 33-58 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Statehood Granted Minnesota 39 

State Normal School at Moorhead-_ 190 

State Representatives 92 

State Roads in County 91 

State School System 185 

State Senators 92 

Statistics for 1913 62 

Statistics Relating to Crops 174 

Statistics Relating to Schools— 179, 184 

Stein, Adam 60, 260 

Steamboat Lines at Moorhead 263 

Stearns, Judge O. P 224 

Stockholders Lose in Bank Failure- 241 

Stockwood Postoffice 145 

Successful Agriculturists 165 

Surveyors 95 

Swedish Lutheran Churches 206 

T 

Tansem Township — 

Boundaries of 148 

Early Settlement 148 

Location of 76, 148 

Named for John O. Tansem 149 

Organization of 81, 148 

Taxes Paid 87 

Tax Collecting Season 86 

Tax Rate for School Purposes 181 

Taylor, Judge M. D 224 

Teachers Institutes 184 

Teachers Insurance Fund 179 

Telephone Companies 294 

Temperature and Precipitation 294 

Territorial Government 34 

Timber Conditions 64 

Topography of County 63 

Township History 100-153 

Townsite Speculation in the '50s — 38 

Transportation 242-245 

Traveling Library Established 86 

Treasurers of County 95 

Treaties With the Indians 33 

Turner, John 175, 295 

U 

Ulen State Bank 240 

Ulen Township — 

Boundaries of 149 



Early Settlement of 149 

Location of 76, 149 

Named for Ole Ulen 149 

Organization of 84, 149 

Taxes Paid 87 

Village of Ulen ISO 

Ulen, Village of 150, 292 

L^nited Lutheran Church 210 

Unrest Among the Indians 40 

Upham, Prof. Warren 63 

V 

Valley of the Red River 68 

Valuation of County 62, 88 

Viding Township 153 

Village of AveriU 137, 290 

Village of Baker 101, 290 

Village of Comstock 131, 290 

Village of Dilworth 139, 291 

Village of Downer 111, 291 

Village of Felton 114, 291 

Village of Georgetown 118, 291 

Village of Glyndon 122, 291 

Village of Hawley 127, 291 

Village of Hitterdal 121, 291 

Village of Kragnes 135 

Village of Rustad 136 

Village of Sabin 113, 292 

Village of Ulen 150, 292 

Village Plats. Original 290 

W 

Water Transportation 242 

Watts, Hamlet of 124 

Weather Reports 293 

Wells and Water Conditions 65 

Wheat 71, 154 

Wilson, Peter 76, 11, 95 

Winnipeg Junction 292 

Woman's Part in Pioneer Life 281 

World War, the 246 

Y 

Young Men's Christian Association. 211 

Young People's Farm Contests 155 

Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion 193 



NORMAN COUNTY. 



A 

Abolition of Saloons 425 

Ada Commercial Directory 428 

Ada Postoffice Robbed 422 

Ada, the city of — 

Abolition of Saloons 425 

Business Interests 426 

Charter Granted in 1878 419 

City Building 420 

City Officials 420 

Commercial Directory 428 

County Seat 304, 309 

Electric Light Plant 420 

Industries 423 

Library 422 

Location of 419 

Municipal History 419 

Parks 421 

Plat of, Filed 516 

Postoffice 422 

Railway Depot 423 

Reincorporation 420 

Schools 401 

Agriculture 336- 348 

Agricultural Societies 344 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 393 

Anthony "Settlement" 432 

Anthony Township 431 

Artesian Wells 300, 469. 475 

Assessed Valuation of County 329 

Auditors of County 312 

B 

Bank Destroyed by Fire 389 

Bank Robbery at Halstad 389 

Banks of Norman County 383- 392 

Bar of Norman County 349, 353 

Bear Park Township 433 

Before Railroad Days ;5J4 

Bench and Bar 349 

Betcher. Hamlet of 442 

"Bloody Fifth," the 524 

Bonds, First Authorization of 321 

Borup, Village of 500, 516 

Boy Killed by Falling Tree 444 

Brotherhood of American Yeomen. 398 
Buffalo "Wallows" 466. 471 



Burial of Soldiers 325 

Business Interests of Ada 426 

c 

Catholic Churches 382 

Cause Celebre of Early Days 458 

Children Burned to Death 453, 480 

City and Village Plats 516 

City Officials of Ada 420 

Civil War Period 406 

Clerks of Court 314 

Churches of Norman County 360- 382 

Commercial Interests of Ilcndrum.. 454 

Community Hall at Hendrum 452 

Company I, Third Regiment, Min- 
nesota National Guard 406 

Congregational Churches 381 

Consolidated Schools 402 

Creameries 341 

Crop Statistics 336 

Coroners 314 

Costly Blaze at Gary 486 

County Attorneys 313, 354 

County Commissioners 314 

County Finances 311, 328 

County Government 318 

County Officials 312, 334 

County Organization 302 

County Physicians 315 

County Seat, Location of 304, 419 

Court Commissioners 314 

Court House, Erection of 309 

D 

Daughters of Norway, the 396 

Destructive Fire at Ada 421 

Destructive Fire at Shelly 480 

Diphtheria, Scourge of 457 

District Schools 401 

Diversified Farming 340 

Doctors of Norman County 355 

Drainage 299, 326, 501 

E 

Early Official Proceedings 318 

Early Settlers 504 

Early Settlement Notes 454, 493, 503 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Educational 399- 405 

Enlistments for World War 408 

Evangelical Lutheran Church ; 378 

F 

Kaith, Hamlet of 439, 516 

Farmer Frozen to Death 494 

Farmers' Alliance 3^:^ 

Farm Losses Due to Hail 521 

Farm Names 345 

"Fast Mail" in 1864 335 

Fight for County Seat 305 

Finances of County 311, 328 

Fire Department at Ada 421 

Fire of 1900 at Ada 421 

First and Early Events 515 

First Bank in County 384 

First Church in County 360 

First Commissioners Court 318 

First Hog in Norman County 345 

First Lawyer in County 349 

First Newspaper in County 412 

First Officers of County 303 

First Plat of County 319 

First Physician in County 355 

First School House in County 399 

First Toll Exacted by World War.- 411 

Flaming. Village of 490 

Flom Township 435 

Flom, Village of 437 

Floods at Various Periods 519 

Flour-Mill Destroyed by Fire 439 

Flour-Milling Industry 423, 496, 497 

Flowing Wells in Norman County.- 469 

Fossum Township 437 

Fraternal Societies 393- 398 

"Frenchman's Bluff" 299 

Fruits and Nuts 301 

G 

Gary, Village of 485. 516 

Geological and Topographical 299 

German Lutheran Churches 376 

German M. E. Churches 378 

Good Hope Township 439 

Good Templars, Order of 398 

Goose River Trading Post 512 

Gophers, Bounty on 323 

Government of County 318 



Graded Schools 405 

Grand Army of the Republic 406 

Grasshopper Plague 456, 508 

Great Northern Railway Strike 334 

Grasses and Fruits 301 

Green Meadow Township 440 

H 

Hailstorm of 1886 463 

Halstad Township 442 

Halstad. Village of 445, 516 

Hegne Township 448 

Heiburg, Village of 497, 517 

Hendrum Township 449 

Hendrum, Village of 451, 453. 516 

Highest Point in County 299 

Highway Robbery Near Hendrum-- 458 

Hollanders in Spring Creek 482 

Home Lake Township 459 

I 

Incorporation of City of .^da 420 

Incorporation of Twin Valley 495 

Independent Order of Foresters 396 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 396 

Indian "Scares" 509 

Industries of Ada 423 

J 

Judges of Probate 313, 354 

Judicial Ditches 300 

Journalism in Xorman County.. -412-418 

K 
Knights of Pythias 395 

L 

Lake Ida Township 460 

Lakes of Norman County. — 299 

Lawyers of Norman County 349 

Legal Profession, the 349-354 

Lee Township ^^ 

List of Banks in County 3W 

Local Aids to War Work 410 

Lockhart Township -— Zrl 

Lockhart. Village of 468, 516 

Lumber-Milling Industry 4^4 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



M 

Market Quotations in Early Days—- 339 

Mary Township 469 

Masonic Organizations 393 

Medical Profession, the 355-359 

Meteorological Conditions 518 

Methodist Episcopal Churches 381 

Military History 406-411 

Miscellaneous Subjects 515-526 

Model School Building 405 

Modern Woodmen of America 397 

Mosquitoes Prove a Pest 456 

Municipal History of Ada 419 

Mc 
McDonaldsville Township 471 

N 

Negroes Didn't Stay Long 465 

Newspapers of Norman County--412-418 

Norman County in War 406-411 

Norwegian-Danish Lutheran Church 376 

Norwegian Lutheran Churches 360 

Norwegian M. E. Church 379 

Norwegian Newspaper 418 

o 

Official Bonds 327 

Oldest Resident of County 488 

Old Settlers Association 503, 511 

Orchards and Nurseries 342 

Order of the Eastern Star 394 

Organization of County 302 

Ox-Team Travel 513 

P 

"Paper" Railroads 331 

Park at Heiberg 498 

Parks of Ada 421 

Physicians of Norman County 355 

Pioneer Preacher's Experiences 511 

Pioneer Reminiscences 454, 493 

Pioneer Sketches 503-514, 523 

Pedley, Village of 463, 516 

Pleasant View Township 473 

Political Bellwethers Deserted 526 

Political Fight in Old Days 524 

Political Parties 316 



Polk County, Settlement With 320 

"Poor Farm" Movement 324 

Population Statistics 517 

Postoffice at Ada 422 

Postoffice Robberies 422, 496 

Postoffices in County 517 

Potato Culture 341 

Prairie Fires 498, 522 

Presbyterian Churches 380 

Presidential Vote 316 

Press of Norman County 412- 418 

Public Library at Ada 422 

Public Playground at Hendrum 452 

Public Utilities at Ada 420 

R 

Railroad Land Prices 333 

Railroads and Transportation 331 

Red Cross Work 408 

Registered Farm Names 345 

Registers of Deeds 313 

Religious Life of Community 360 

Rindahl, Village of 435 

Reminiscences of Pioneers— 503-514, 523 

Roads and Bridges 327 

Robbers Hold Up Bank 389 

Robbery on Cazenove Farm 465 

Rockwell Township 475 

Roster of War Draftees 408 

Russian Thistles 326 

S 

Saloons Abolished 425 

Scandinavian Lutheran Church 364 

Scheie Church, the 508 

Schools of Norman County 399-405 

School Statistics 404 

Secret Societies 393-398 

Seed Grain Furnished by County — 

324, 327 

Selective Draft of 1917 408 

Settlement Notes 454, 493, 503 

Seventh-Day Adventists 382 

Shely Township ■ 476 

Shelly, Village of 478, 516 

Sheriffs 313 

Sons of Norway, the 396 

Spanish-American War 407 

Spring Creek 300 

Spring Creek Township 480 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



State Representatives 312 

Statistics Relating to Crops 336 

Statistics Relating to Population 517 

Statistics Relating to Schools 404 

Strand, Postoffice of 483 

Strand Township 483 

Stuart-Xaruin Tragedy, the 355 

"St. Vincent Extension," the 510 

Sundahl Township 488 

Superintendents of Schools 314 

Surveyors 313 

Syre, Hamlet of 459, 516 

T 

Taxes in 1883 328 

Timber Growths 301 

Topographical 299 

Townships, Dates of Organization-- 304 
Townships of Xorman County--431-502 

Transportation 331 

Treasurers of County 312 

Tribute to Senator Nelson 526 

Twin Valley, Village of 495, 516 



U 

"Union" Church at Borup oW) 

Cnion of Norwegian Churches 360 

V 

Victim of Submarine Warfare 411 

Vote Buying Scathingly Rebuked-. 525 
Vote for President 316 

W 

War Draftees of Norman County-- 408 

War Work, Local Aids to 410 

Waterworks and Electric Light 420 

Waukon, Hamlet of 492 

Waukon Township 491 

Weather Conditions 518 

Weights and Measures, Standard 340 

Wheat Prices In Early Days 337 

White Earth Indian Reservation 302 

Wild Rice Drainage Basin 299 

Wild Rice Township 493 

Winchester Township 499 

World War, the 407 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. 



A 

Aabye, Andrew T. ^88 

Aagaard, Charles M. ^90 

Aamoth, Ingvald H. o^j* 

Aamoth, Peter H. ^^" 

Aanenson, Andrew ^^^ 

Aanenson, A. U. 

Aasen, Ole T. _^_^ 

Aasgaard, Martinus ^'- 

Adanis, Edwin ^^^ 

Akesson, Ake T. -;; 

Alberts, Edward ' 

Allen, Albert C. «0^ 

Allen. Charles C. °-" 

Allen, John W. 'Z 

Altenbernd, Frederick \\ . J 

Altenbernd, Loms ; 

Amlniel, Peter ^^° 

Amundson, Nels 

Anderson, Adolf 

Anderson, Albert - 

Anderson, Alfred ^^ 

Anderson. Andrew ^ 

. r- - 53o 

Anderson, Anun (j. 

Anderson, Bernt 

Anderson, Halvor 

Anderson, Henry V. ^^^ 

Anderson, Jens 

Anderson, Joseph W. G. - 

Anderson, Rev. Martin ^^ 

Anderson, Martin O. ^^^ 

Anderson, Olaf 

Anderson, S. P. g 

Anderson, Theodore H. 

Arends, John J. ^^g 

Arnestad, Alert "g^ 

Aschbach, Bernhart ^^^ 

Aske, Julius B. 



Askegaard, David 240 

Askegaard, Eugene l^ 

Awty. William J., M. D 52 

B 

Backman, Gust ^53 

Backman. John A. ^^^ 

Bagne, Nels B. 55- 

Bakke, Bennie °f 

Bakke, Ole E. "J 

Bakken, Lars A. '^y 

Ballard, Prof. C. A. ^ 

Barnes. George S. -^^^ 

Barry, John S. 

Barry, M. Coleman ^J- 

Bauer, Emil __-- ^ ~ 

Bauer, George C. 

Beck, William ' 

Beckman, Ole L. ^ 

Bekkerus, Askild T. "^^ 

Bekkerus, Halvor 

.■ T- J ■ r -- loo 

Benedict, Edwin L. ^^ 

Benson, Charles " 

Benson, Henry * 

Bentley. Helmer N ^^^ 

Bentley, Ole b. ^^ 

Bergh, Justus C. ^^^ 

Betcher, E. C ^^^ 

Bjerke, E. N. ^7 

Bjorge, Edward E. ^^^ 

Bjorkquist. Carl 

Bjorndahl, Adolph ^.^ 

Bjorndahl, Ole N. ^^ 

Bjornson, Lars g^j 

Bodkin. William J. ^^^ 

Bowen, J. J- ^ 268 

Braman, John H. — ^^^ 

Bratland. Andrew A. 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Braunschweig, Albert 756 

Bredemeier, Christian 639 

Bredeson, Melvin O. 797 

Breiland, Adna H. 459 

Brekke, Ole J. . 802 

Bremer, Bennie 469 

Brendenuihl, Charles W. 206 

Briggs, W. R. 208 

Brodine, C. B. 329 

Brown, Edmund L. 231 

Brunsberg, Peter 888 

Burns, James 905 

Burrill, Herbert F. 179 

BurriU, John 123 

Burrill, H. K. 131 

Burrill, Jacob 42 

Burrill, Dr. James S. 116 

Burud, John E. 210 

Bye, Andrew 252 

C 

Canning, Charles \V. 685 

Carlson, Albert 421 

Carlson, David E. 884 

Carlson, John E. 310 

Casselman, W. E. 504 

Cederberg, August 303 

Cederberg, Charles J. 281 

Chloupek, Matt 727 

Christiansen, Andrew 361 

Christianson. Otto A. 382 

Christianson, Sever 870 

Clayton, Herbert 514 

Colby, Charles E. 187 

Comstock, Solomon G. 272 

Connelly, James 133 

Connelly, John 167 

Cook, Walter, Jr. 88 

Corneliuson, John 483 

Crosby, Gunerius I. 413 

D 

Dahl, Henry 543 

Dahl, Nils O. 795 

Dahl, Ole A. 895 

Dahl, Otto 235 

Dahl, Otto L. 324 

Dahlcn, Martin O. 487 

Dalen. S. S. 404 

Daniels, K. M. 417 



Danielson, John 780 

Danielson, Walfred 909 

Darrow, Daniel C, M. D 33 

Davy, VV. H. 112 

Degerness, Andrew T. 853 

Denenny, R. H. 37 

Desing, John C. 675 

Dorseth, John A. 779 

Drageland, Jakob O. 480 

Dullard, Patrick 423 

Durling, August 573 

E 

Eckhoff, Henry 512 

Eckmann, C. J. 195 

Edwards, Prof. H. R. 128 

Eeg, Gustav O. 763 

Egge, Erick J. 621 

Egge, Ole O. 190 

Eggiman, Andrew 162 

Eklund, Gust 799 

Ellefson, H. O. 683 

Ellingson. Iver X. 836 

Ellingson, Ole I. 864 

Engen, Herbrand 900 

Enger, Xels J. 405 

Engum, Claus , 785 

Erickson, Herbran 574 

Erickson, John 692 

Erickson, Ole O. 197 

Erstad, Gustav A. 200 

Erstad, Jacob X. 642 

Euren, Emil 901 

Evans, Edward M. 520 

Evanson, Theodore 75 

Evenson, Clarence I. 183 

Evje, Conrad H. 429 

F 

Farsdale, O. G. 400 

Ferris, William H. 115 

Fetting, Robert H. 666 

Fisch, J. H. 846 

Fischer, August 292 

Fiskum, Peter O. 476 

Flakne, John O 742 

Flom, Elhng H. 762 

Flom, Eric H. 860 

Fobes, Arthur L. 135 

Follett, Leiand C. 151 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Ford, John 276 

Foss, Jens 374 

Fossay, Charles 247 

Foster, John C. 902 

Freeman, John H. 171 

Fridlund, Adolph J. 643 

Fridlund, J. 103 

Fuchs, George F. 158 

Fulton, David E. 226 

G 

Gaare, Joseph 380 

Gangler, John G. 828 

Garden, Evans N. 758 

Garden, Lewis 597 

Garden, Martin O. 868 

Garden, Ole L. 545 

Garrity, James A. 153 

Gartland, Albert 697 

Garven, Jacob 260 

Germolus, August 508 

Giere, Martin A. 271 

Gilbertson, Albert 424 

Gilbertson, Cornelius 424 

Gilbertson, Magnus O. 733 

Gilbertson, Thor 481 

Gilbery, William 250 

Glasgovi', James, Sr. 50 

Glawe, Albert C. 842 

Gol, Ole H. 333 

Grande, P. A. 840 

Gray, Frank 570 

Grettum, Henry 170 

Griewe, Herman 766 

Griffin, John 80 

Grina, Conrad I. 775 

Grina, Lars L 358 

Grina, Ole 1. 214 

Grinde, John E. 910 

Grommesh, John W. 216 

Grothe, Albert J. 419 

Grothe, John P. 410 

Grover, Otto J. 568 

Gruhl, Fred 432 

Grutle, Henning E. 904 

Gunderson, Bennie J. 448 

Gunderson, Gilbert 53 

Gunderson, Henry E. 814 

Gunderson, Oscar 305 

Gustavson, Adolph 899 



H 

Haagenson, Alfred A. 145 

Haaland, Andrew 418 

Haljerle, Fred 470 

Haberle, Henry W. 79 

Hadler, Jacob 464 

Hadler, Walter G. 817 

Hagen, Andrew J. 396 

Hagen, Tver O. 664 

Hagen, Rev. T. A. 600 

Halvorson, Hans 659 

Hammer, Nels 330 

Hammerud, Charles H. 463 

Hammerud, L 142 

Harare, Andrew 875 

Hansen. Julius A. 344 

Hanson, Aslak 708 

Hanson, Elmer G. 140 

Hanson, H. H. 95 

Hanson, Martin F. 603 

Hanson, Ole H. 873 

Hanson, Peter H. 1 809 

Hanson, Sten 314 

Hassel, Peter 876 

Haug, Filing 342 

Hauger, Anton J. 323 

Hauske, Erick 752 

Havelson, Torger 850 

Hcdahl. Knut E. .— — 767 

Hedin, John 744 

Heglie, Albert 654 

Heiberg, Jorgen F. 563 

Heiberg, Martin A. 592 

Heinen, A. P. 539 

Hellerud, Hans J. 560 

Hellerud, Oswald S. 583 

Hendrickson, Olaf H. 777 

Henrickson, Hans P. 528 

Henry, James E. 86 

Henry, Purkey 44 

Herman, Lambert, Jr. 914 

Hermanson, Henry O. 632 

Herringer, Eugene J. 280 

Higgins, Michael 453 

Hilde, Ole O. 426 

Hillestad, John O. 279 

Hilmo, Lewis 745 

Hitterdal, Bendt O. 220 

Hitterdal, Lars 92 

Hogcnson, Hogan 854 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Ilogstad, Ole H. 64 

Holbeck, Nils 63 

Holden, Alexander 485 

Holes, Andrew 614 

Holm, Andrew E. 39 

Holmes, Walter B., M. D. 880 

Hopeman, Albert M. 148 

Hoppe, August F. 340 

Iloseth, Severin A. 701 

llouglum, Andrew O. 300 

Hovden. Ole 818 

Hoven, Borre 640 

Hovland, Andrew A. 796 

Hovland, John 741 

Hurner, Jacob 889 

Huseby, Andrew 522 

I 

Idtse, Rhinehart P. 484 

Ingberg, G. T. 826 

Ingberg, John G. 565 

Ingberg, Peter O. 606 

Ishaug, William O. 898 

Iverson, O. N. 186 

J 
Jackson, John W. 501 

Jacobson, John 561 

Jelsing, Andrew L. 363 

Jenkins, E. S. 48 

Jensen, Carl O. 684 

Jensen, John 657 

Johnson, Albert H. 299 

Johnson, Albert H. 617 

Johnson, Andrew 90 

Johnson, Frank 885 

Johnson, George 537 

Johnson, Hans L. 295 

Johnson, John T. 205 

Johnson, Martin 656 

Johnson, Sylvester J. 99 

Johnson, Theodore 746 

Jones, D. C. 107 

Jones, Isaac 298 

Joop, Herman W. 317 

Juhl, Chris N. 774 

K 

Kail, Charles R. 430 

Kasin, Ole H. 907 



Kassenborg, Edward A. 288 

Kelting, Otto F. 57 

Kimm, Frank 886 

Kippels, Bruno 85 

Kittilson, Gilbert 479 

Kittelson, K. 821 

Kjelstad, Nils A. 350 

Kleppe, Nels M. 331 

Klokseth, Iver 375 

Knutson, Carl 844 

Knudtson, Louis 755 

Kost, Anton 59 

Krabbenhoft, Ernest F. 296 

Krabbenhoft, Henning O. 248 

Kroll, W. P. 87 

Kuehl, Benedix 144 

Kvidt, Gjert J. 771 

Kvidt, Martin J. 695 

Kyllander, Gustav 694 

L 

La Grange, Byron G. 12 

Lahey, John 360 

Lamb, Charles, Sr. 184 

Lamb, David A. 62 

Lamb, James 136 

Lamb, John 848 

Lamb, Patrick H. 861 

Lammers, Claus P. 261 

Landro, Jens N. 473 

Langeland, Ole M. 526 

Langseth, Carl M. 147 

Larson, Hans 624 

Larson, Jakob J. 768 

Larson, James 213 

Larson, Jens 173 

Larson, Lars B. 176 

Larson, Louis T. 416 

Larson, Ludwig B. 676 

Larson, Mads 440 

Larson, Ole 445 

Larson, Ole D. 371 

Larson, Peter 533 

Larson, Peter 587 

Larson, William P. 262 

Leach, Eugene E. 68 

Leding, John E. 578 

Lee, B. O. 739 

Lee, Gustav O. 384 

Lee, Hans O. 447 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Lee, Martin G. 613 

Lee, Mekkel O. 608 

Lee, Ole T 726 

Lee, R. M. 653 

Lee, S. M. 580 

Lee, S. N 722 

Lee, Sverre J. f^ 

Lee, W. C. 43^ 

Lee, William S. 230 

Lemke, Louis 222 

Lerud, Emil 856 

Lerud, Jacob 6^^ 

Leverson, Knudt A. 275 

Libok, John A. 646 

Lien, Johannes P. 649 

Lightbourn, David C. 588 

Lindahl, John 266 

Lindback, John J. 716 

Lofgren, Lewis 171 

Lorentz, John P 576 

Lovsnes, Oscar ^^ 

- , r r 874 

Luchan, (j. 1-. 

Luedke, August J. ^53 

Lunder, Julius T. ^44 

Lura, Severt S. _ 

Lussenden, John T. 730 

Luthi, John ^^'^ 

M 

^44 
Maas, August ^ 

Madson, C. O. " 

Malakowsky, John 610 

Malme, Johan M. 50U 

Marden, Charles S. 6o 

Marquart, Fidelis ^^ 

Marsden, Henry ^°^ 

Marston, Henry '|^^ 

Marth, John " 

Martinson, O. C. 

Martinson, Ole " 

Mayer, George J. V. 

Meighcn, J. J- ' 

Mclbostad, Lars ^ 

Melbye, George H. - 

Meldrum, Elbert A. -^^'^ 

Melvey, Nels N. °J'^ 

Menge, Emil A. 

Merkins, John A. •; 

Meyer, Dick 

Midgarden, Ole G. 



Mikkelson, Martin L. 452 

Milsten, Jacob E. 660 

Moe, Nels H. 753 

Moen, Nels O. 734 

Moll, Albert E. 596 

Moore, Peter B. 191 

Morken, Torgrim O. 233 

Mortenson, Otto J. 209 

Mueller, Frank S" 

Muhle, Torge G. 35 

Mumford, Hamilton M. 101 

Mc 

McCabe, Thomas 152 

McCartan, Arthur A. 228 

McColgin, Edgar B. 89 

McEvers, Smith W. 1^2 

McGough, John 1^8 

McGrath, John 1^0 

N 

Narverud, Ole S. 270 

Natwick, Thomas T. 630 

Nelson, Anton 663 

Nelson, August G. ^78 

Nelson, Hans J. °f 

Nelson, Magnus P- "^ 

Nelson, Nikolai "S- 

Nelson, Swan 32d 

Nelson, Theodore S. -°^ 

Nereson, Nere J. ^ 

Nesheim, W. M. =6 

Ness, Andrew O «60 

Ness, Lars O. 

Nickel, Wilhelm ^^- 

Nicklay, Christian ^^^ 

Nilson, Ole 

Norby, A. J 2g 

Norby, Hans L. ^^^ 

Norby, Joris C- 

Nordby, Rev. Halvor O »^^ 

Nokken, Ole P. ^.^ 

Norby, Ole L. ^^ 

Northrop, John H. 

Nybakken, Ole A. '=^ 

Nye, Judge Carrol A -^^^ 

Nygaard, Haldor 1. ^^^ 

Nygaard, John P. _gj 

Nystevold, Ole 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



236 

403 

702 

449 

431 

Olin,' Ole J. 557 

Oliver, Charles R. 105 

Oliver, Orris 1^;^ 

Olson, Alfred R. 

Olson, Anion 



Oberg. John 

Odegaard, Nels T 
Ofstedal, Ole I. -. 

Oien, B. M. 

Oien, Hans P. 



Olson. Oscar 



Olson, Martin 
Olson, Ole K. 
Olson, Olaf C. 
Olson, Olaus _- 



Olson, Peter P. --- 
Ondrush, Valentine 
Opgrand, Anton — 
Opgrand, Arnt 



668 
681 
838 



Olson, Carl K. 

Olson, Christian 728 



750 



Olson, Andrew 356 

Olson, Hakan 341 

Olson, Halvor 326 

883 

585 

492 

301 



678 

712 

108 

108 

Opsahl, Ludwig A. 347 

Oss, Alfred 159 

Oss. John '-- 

Otterson, "p. A. 605 

Overbo, Peder H. 879 



Pagel. William 862 

Pallas, Charles 822 

Paulson, Lars 761 

Pederson, Aanen 84/ 

Pederson, Gilbert 869 

Pederson, P. H. 78 

Perkins, John G. 362 

Perry, Albert W. 893 

Peterson, Gilbert 146 

Peterson, Oscar 670 

Peterson, Peter A. 320 

Peterson, Samson N. 395 

Pilot, Chester S. 612 

Pinske, Ernest 584 

Plummer. Omer J. 77 

Poehls, Ernest 113 

Poppe, August 513 



Possehl, H. C. 290 

Possehl, Herman 338 

Possehl, Louis ^71 

Powers, J. H. 903 



Qualley, Even N. 618 

Quam, Lewis K. 336 

Quam, Ole - 263 



Rabe, William H. 



680 



Ramsey, Jens R. 827 

Ramstad, P. N. 357 

Rasey, William H. 265 

Rask, Halvor O. 415 

Rasmusson, Halvor ' 243 

Rasmussen, Hans 478 

Redland, John T. 385 

Rehder, Christian -. 93 

Reirsgord, Ole E. 189 

Richards, Gill H. B. 242 

Richards, Harry 393 

Richard, Margaret E. G. 443 

Richards, Max 609 

601 

593 



Rindahl, Ole L. 
Rishof, Tron 



Roach, Thomas M. 832 

Robertson. Mads 662 

Roesch, Lambert 815 

RoUe. Leo J. 460 

Romkey, Charles B. 282 

Rost, Elias O. 202 

Rostvold, Andrew 824 

Rostvold, Lars H. «03 

Rude, Andrew K. 709 

Russell, William 139 

Rustad. Garfield H. 119 

Rustvold, John A. 748 



Salomonson, C. John 882 

Sanders, Peter 322 

Sauer, James A. 254 

Schecl, Fred 141 

Scheide, Iver 911 

Scheie, Anthony 857 

Scheie, John L. 372 

Schellak, Fred 150 

Schindler, Charles F. 273 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Schmidt, Jacob 713 

Schroeder, Edward C. 663 

Schroeder, Henry 160 

Schroeder, Henry C. 566 

Schulstad, Carl N. 690 

Scott, Robert L. 368 

Semling, C. K. (Vol. I) 527 

Semlinge, Iver 688 

Serum, A. O. 96 

Shaide, Francis E. 518 

Shea, P. J. 212 

Sheets, Peter, Jr. 625 

Sirjord, George K. 674 

Skalet, Ole 154 

Skaurud, Fred L. 547 

Skaurud, Henry O. 534 

Skavdalh, Karelins J. 843 

Skrei, Hilbert O. 307 

Skrei, Theodore H. 104 

Sliper, Thomas N. 328 

Smith, John I. 517 

Snartland, Saavi T, 316 

Solberg. George O. 705 

Sulcm, Rev. O. A. Th. 427 

Solum, Hans O. 651 

Solum, Bernhard J. 891 

Solum, Martin O. 451 

Solum, M. J. 156 

Solum, S. O. 245 

Solwold, Andrew O. 318 

Solwold, Olaf 399 

Spenningsby, John 253 

Spotts, W. L. 178 

Sprague, Elisha C. 800 

Sprung, William 264 

Stadum, Norman H. 786 

Stadum, Oscar 556 

Steen, John G. ',. 349 

Steen, Ole M. 343 

Stennes, Edward H. 422 

Stennes, Edward T. 390 

Stensgaard, Lars J. 698 

Stephenson, Erick 738 

Sticn, Peter I. 736 

Stiening, August 334 

Stoen, Ole N. 790 

Stordahl, Carl J. 496 

Strand, Anund K. 467 

Stromberg, Nels J. 749 

Stromstad, Martin 433 



Stiidlien, Edwin O. 219 

Sulerud, Hon. Christen L. 40 

Sulerud, John C. 224 

Sundet, Johan P. 720 

Sundet, Torger O. 519 

Svenson, Frank V. 195 

Swanson, Anthony G. ._.. 807 

Swenson, August 793 

Swenson Brothers 793 

Swenson, Lenus 793 

Swave. Erick O. 700 

T 
Tall, Carl 672 

Tang, Prof. Severt O. 283 

Tangen, Ole E. 138 

Tenney, Bernard F. 369 

Tatley, John K. 791 

Thomas, A. T. 229 

Thomas, Peter 531 

Thompson, Frank P. 166 

Thompson, Nels 352 

Thompson, William 256 

Thortvedt, Levi 376 

Thorstad, Ed. O. 466 

Thorson, Ole 706 

Thune, Halvor W. 896 

Tillotson, William R. 304 

Todd, Thomas L. 472 

Toftner, Johan 703 

Torske, John 769 

Torstenson, L. O. 348 

Tronnes, Edward A. 365 

Tufte, Frederick F. 549 

Tufte, Hans C. 527 

Turner, John (Vol. I) 297 

Tucker, William J. 788 

U 

Ueland, Andreas O. 238 

Ullrich, Hans J. 126 

Liven, Andrew 687 

Ulven, Bernt J. 688 

Liven, Hans J. 688 

LUven, Juel 687 

Ulven Family, The 686 

Undeland, Ole M. 631 

V 
Valen, Malker O. 523 

Van Vlissingen, Paul 441 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Verne, Victor E., M. D. 82 

Videen, William 820 

Vistaimet, P. S., M. D. 456 

Voje, Andrew J. 529 

W 

Wade, Edward U. 201 

Walker, Ludvig 157 

Wangen, Mons J. 289 

Wardeberg, Edward O. 71 

Webb, Robert B. . 834 

Wefald, Knud 66 

Weld, Frank A., M. A., LL. D. 60 

Welley, Andrew J. 852 

Welter, Leslie 715 

Wendlandt, Herman G. 73 

Wennevold, Ole 731 

Westberg, Peter 337 

Westlin, Oscar M. 620 

Weum, Mons T. 100 



Weuni, Randolph M 294 

Whaley, Archie 913 

Wiegen, Esten T. 835 

Wilkins, Reinhart W. 554 

Wilson, Alonzo, M. D. 312 

Winjum, Jens, Jr. 174 

Withcrow, James M. 84 

Wold, Hon. John L. 524 

Woldahl, Harold O. 345 

Wolfe, J. Pierce 223 

Woodward, Flavel A. 207 

Works, Wright 258 

Wouters, Peter 655 

Wright. Albert J. 232 

Y 

Young, John F. 339 

Z 

Zervas. Hubert 673 






ASU 











Oi^i 




\AAA.Or^A 





tJL. 




CJXAjC/^^J 



•'IFK 



Itildl;- i-.v.' 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



DANIEL C. DARROW, AI. D. 

Dr. Daniel C. Darrow, a member of the medical profession at Moor- 
head, county seat of Clay county, proprietor of the first hospital established 
in that city, and one of the l:>est-kno\vn physicians and surgeons in the Red 
river valley, is a native of the neighboring state of Wisconsin, but has been 
a resident of Minnesota and of Moorhead since the year of his graduation 
from medical college in 1884. He was born on a pioneer farm in the town- 
ship of Clayton, in Winnebago county, Wisconsin, January 4, 1850, son of 
Daniel C. and Isabella D. (Murray) Darrow, both natives of New York- 
state and members of old Colonial families, who became pioneers of Winne- 
bago county, Wisconsin, and there spent their last days. 

The elder Daniel C. Darrow came West with his family from New 
York in 1846 and pre-empted a tract of land between Neenah and Oshkosh. 
in Clayton township, Winnebago county, Wisconsin, where he established his 
home, one of the pioneers of that section, and where lie spent the remainder 
of his life, his death occurring there on June 3, 1862. His widow survived 
him many years, her death occurring in December, 1895. They were the 
parents of nine children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the fifth 
in order of birth, the others being as follow : Annabelle, who married James 
Chamberlain, who became a soldier of the Union during the Civil War, 
going to the front as a member of the Third Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer 
Infantry, and who died at Andersonville prison after having been held tliere 
for thirteen months; Seymour F., who also gave his life that the unity of 
his country might be [)reserved, his death having occurred, at the age of 
nineteen years, while he was serving as a soldier of the Union, a nieniber 
of the Twenty-first Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantn-; Mary H.. who 
died at the age of twenty-six: years; David M.. who lived to be sixty-four 
years of age: Delia, wife of John G. Hubbard, now of Chicago; Grace, 
who died at the age of forty-four years; Dr. Edward M. Darrow. a grad- 
(3a) 



^4 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

uate of Rush Medical College and a resident physician at i''argo since 1878, 
one of the real pioneer physicians of the Red river country, and Gregg 
E.. who died at the age of seven years. The mother of these children 
was a member ui the United Rresbyterian church and they were reared in 
accordance with the rigid tenets of that faith. The Darrows are an old 
.\merican family, two Iirothers of that name having come to this country 
from the north of Ireland in Colonial days, settling in Connecticut. .A son 
of one of these brothers served as a soldier of the, patriot army during the 
W'ar of Independence and it is from that Re\-olutionary sire that Doctor 
Darrow is descended. He was one of the company that put a cable across 
the river at Albany to stop the boats from coming up the ri\er. The Murrays 
also are an old Colonial family, the ancestors of Mrs. Darrow having come 
to this side from Scotland in the days preceding the Re\olulion. 

The junior Daniel C. Darrow was twelve years of age when his father 
died. He grew to manhood on the home farm in Winnebago county, receiving 
his schooling in the schools of Xeenah, and after his marriage in 1872. 
established his home there. l'"rom the days of his boyhood he had been 
attracted to the study of medicine and after a while iletermined to devote 
liis life to the medical profession. Presently entering Rush .Medical College 
at Chicago, he was graduated from that institution in 1884. Thus admirably 
qualified for the practice of his profession. Doctor Darrow came up into 
the Red river country, his brother. Dr. Edward M. Darrow, having located 
at Fargo six years previously, and opened an office at -Moorhead, across the 
river from the city in which his brother was practicing, and has ever since 
been engaged in practice at Aloorhead, now the oldest physician in continuous 
practice in Clay county. In T8f)3 Doctor Darrow erected the first hospital 
erected in Clay county and is still operating the same, just recently having 
built an addition to the hospital, this addition being for the purpose of pro- 
viding a home for the nurses. The doctor is a member of the Clay-Becker 
Medical .Society, the Minnesota State Medical Society and the American 
Medical Association, in the deliberations oi which organizations he takes a 
warm interest, and has ever kept abreast of the wonderful advances con- 
stantly being made in his profession. He also takes an active interest in 
civic affairs and for twelve years served as coroner of Clay county, rendering 
admirable public service in that connection. The doctor has done well in 
his practice and in addition to his property interests at Moorhead is the owner 
of a fine farm of two hundred acres in section 30 of Home Lake town- 
ship, in Norman county. Since 1S86 he has been a member of the local lodge 



CLAY AXD NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. -le 

of the liulepeiident Order of Odd Fellows at .Moorlicad and lakes a warm 
interest in the affairs of tlie same. 

On January 4, 1872, Dr. Daniel C. Harrow was iiniied in marriage l(, 
AHce J\I. Stone, who was horn at Fond (hi Lae, Wi.sconsin. daughter of 
Richard Stone and wife, and who was a schoohnate at Xeenali, and to tliis 
union two children have 1ieen horn, j'.crtha 1)., who married Charles Foring. 
an attorney at Crookston, and has two children, Helen and (k-nevieve. and 
F.dith, who married Joseph V. Godfrey, who died in kjii. leaving two 
children, Vernon D. and Annahelle. Doctor and Mrs. Danow arc attendants 
at the Congregational chiurh and ha\e ever taken an interested part in 
the general good works of the community, as well as in its social and cultural 
activities, and have heen helpful in many ways in promoting movements 
designed to adxance tlie common welfare hereabout. .Mrs. 1 )arrow's father, 
Richard Stone, was a iiati\e of F'ngland and for nine vears served as a 
memher (d" the Royal (iuard. with the rank of corporal. 



FORGF CLJNDKRSON MUHFE. 

1 he late 'Forge Cuniler-o?i .Muhle. who>e memory ever will he cherished 
in this section of the i\ed Ri\er country as one of the ver\- first settlers in 
Cla\ county and perhaps the first .settler in diat part of the county now com- 
prised withm the houmls of Aloland township, he lia\ing pre-empted a claim 
there in i<S70, was a nati\e oi the kingdom of Xorwa\ . hut had heen a resi- 
dent of Minnesota since he was nineteen years of age, he having accompanied 
his parents to this state in iRh(). ITc liecanie a substantial pioneer farmer in 
Moland township, owner of a line fai'ni. where his last da\s were spent, his 
death occmTing there on .September _' i . iSc^j, and where hi^ widow is .-till 
living. 

Torge ( iundersou .\luiile was born in .\orwa\' in iNat). son of (iunder 
and Ingeborg ( Chestersdatter ) Torge, also natives ol Xoiwvay, who came to 
the United States with theii" frunil\- in iSdh and proceeded directh' on out to 
.Minnesota, settling on a farm in Houston county. There Torge (i. Muhle 
remained until 1869, in which \eai- he made a pros])ecting trip np here info 
the then prairie wilds of the Red Ri\er country .and in 1870 pre-empted a 
((uartcr of a section of land in what later came to Ijc organized as Moland 
toAvnship, in (da\- countw thou.gh that was in the days before Clay county 



36 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

liad been organized as a civic unit. The next year Iiis parents joined him on 
that pre-emption claim and the family home was estabhshed there, one of 
the very first permanent settlements made in this section of the Red River 
valley. Upon the enactment of the homestead law in 1872, T. G. Muhle con- 
\ erted his pre-emption into a homestead, "proved up" on the same and grad- 
ually improved and developed the place until he had a well-established farm. 
In 1879 there joined the Torge family a young woman just out from Nor- 
way. Guro Olasdatter Rue. and on December 21. 1879, in the little neighbor- 
hood school house, there then being no church thereabout in which to cele- 
brate a marriage, Torge G. Muhle and Miss Rue were united in marriage. 
■ imid the felicitations and well wishes of many friend>. .\ftcr his marriao-e 
Mr. Muhle continued to make his home on his homestead ])lace and became 
a well-to-d(i farmer and a man of substantial weight and influence in his 
community, his deatii occurring there, as noted above, in the fall of 1897. 
He was the second in order of birth of the si.\ children born to his parents, 
the others having been Ole, Carrie, Chester, Ole (second), and one who died 
in infancy, all of whom are now deceased save Chester. 

Since the death of her husband Mrs. Muhle has continued to make her 
home on the old home place in Aloland town.ship and has done much to 
further improve the ])lace, having erected substantial new buildings, and has 
also increased her lanil holdings, being the owner now of three hun<lred and 
twenty acres of excellent land. She is a daughter of Ole and loraand 
( Johansdatter ) Chesterson, also natives of Norway, who came to this coun- 
try in 18S3. several years after the coming here of Mrs. Muhle, and for about 
twehe \ears thereafter made their home with the Muhles, but later settled 
on a tract of their own: later, however, returning to the Muhle home, where 
then- last days were spent. They were the parents of five children, of whom 
Mrs. Muhle was the fourth in order of l)irth, the others being Carrie (i), 
Carrie (2). Chester and IJv, all of whcjm are still living, Chester Chesterson 
now being a resident of the territory of .\laska. Mrs. :Muhle has a very 
pleasant home in Moland township and has e\er taken an earnest interest in 
the general affairs of the community of which .she has been a resident ever 
since her coming to this country back in the early flays of the settlement of 
this part of Minnesota. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Muhle ten children, eight of whom are living, were 
l)orn, named as follow : Gust Olaf, Olaus, Oscar (deceased), Oscar, Josephine 
Emelia, Edward Julius. Eva Olive, Gina Theres-a. John and Martin Tidman, 
the latter being deceased. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 37 

R. H. DENENNY. 

In writing tlie history of Norman county, Minnesota, and especially of 
Borup it is well to mention the life's work of R. H. Denennv, a promi- 
nent and successful hardware dealer of that place. He was horn in the 
state of New York in the year 1877, the son of C. C. and Catherine 
(Barry) Denenny, who were also born in the state of New York, where 
they received their education in the public schools and grew to maturity. 
They were later united in marriage and established their home in the state 
of their nativity and early life. There Mr. Denenny engaged in general 
farming after his marriage and there he and his wife and family lived until 
the year 1880, when they decided to leave their home in that state and 
establish a home in the state of Minnesota. On their arrival here they 
settled in Clay county, where they homesteaded one hundred and si.xty 
acres of land. The tract was undeveloped and unimproved at that time 
and the prospects for a future home were not bright to the people who 
had come from a thickly settled and well-developed section of the state of 
New York. A house was erected, in which the family lived for some years, 
and the task of developing and improving the farm was begun. By much 
hard work and close application to business, Mr. and Mrs. Denenny in time 
transformed the wild prairie and wood tract into a splendid farm, and 
where once grew the forest tree and the wild prairie grass, there grew the 
golden grain, and the pasture lands were dotted here and there with herds 
of fine cattle and splendid hogs. The task was not an easy one, and it re- 
quired the energy and determination of a vigorous people. It was here 
that Mrs. Denenny spent the remaining days of her life, devoted to the 
interests of her family and the community in which she lived. Her death 
occurred in the year 1914, after a life of usefulness and well doing. She 
was a woman in whom the people of her home community had the greatest 
confidence, and at her death she left to mourn her passing a large circle of 
friends, who felt the loss of her taking away. Since the death of his wife, 
Mr. Denenny has lived at his home in Felton, where he and his wife first 
came on their arrival in the .state many years ago. 

C. C. Denenny has always taken the keenest interest in the affairs of 
the district in which he has lived, and where he has exerted such an admu"- 
able influence. He has held many of the local offices and during his official 
life always ga\e the same careful care and attention to public matters that 
he has given to his own business; and has always been interested in those 
projects that had to do witli the growth and development of the township 



38 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

and the county in which lie hved. Before the teleplione became a part of 
the life of the people of this section, Mr. Denenny and his son, R. H. 
Denenny, installed a line between the farm and the village home for their 
own convenience. This enterprise led to the extension of the system and 
soon Mr. Speck connected with the line and it was not long till others had 
ioined the colony of pioneers in the telephone business. This line was in 
time extended to the town of Borup. after which the Borup Telephone 
Compan}' was organized and the line was extended to all jiarts of the terri- 
tory and other towns. This was in the year 1905. and on the organization 
of the company C. C. Denenny was made the first president of the com- 
pany and has since held the position. To him much of the success of the 
company depends, and it is to his credit that he and his son were the very 
first in their locality to enjoy the pleasure and convenience of this inven- 
tion. Mr. Denenny is a man of unusual ability and business tact and his 
leadership has resulted in much that has been of advantage to the com- 
munity in which he has lived so long. His advent into this territory was 
at a time when the settlements were few and far apart. In the great devel- 
opment of the district he has done well his part and has ever devoted his 
best efforts to that development. He and his wife were of Irish descent, 
though they were born in this country. His parents, as well as those of 
his wife, were born in Ireland and there they received their education and 
grew to maturity and later came to the United States, where they estab- 
lished homes. 

C. C. and Catherine (Barry) Denenny were the parents of the following 
children: F. C, R. H.. \\illiam. Grace. Jack, Stella. C. C. and Bernice, all 
of whom are living save the last named. Mr. and Mrs. Denenny were long 
active members of the Catholic church and were devoted to the cause 
of religious teaching in their home community, Mr. Denennv ever being 
a liberal subscriber to the support of the local church. 

R. H. Denenny received his education in the schools of Felton and 
Moorhead and was reared on the home farm, during his boyhood days 
assisting his father with the work on the farm. .After he had reached man- 
hood he and his brother, F. C. Denenny, for six vears farmed the home 
place, which had been extended to comprise four hundred and eight}' acres. 
In addition to this. Mr. Denenny had one hundred and sixty acres of his 
own and his brother had one hundred and sixty, which, together with the 
father's land, made a tract of seven hundred and sixty acres. This tract of 
splendid land was all in one body and was later developed and improved 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNKSOTA. 



39 



and put under a In't^li state of cultivatiun. In connection with tlieir general 
farming they were extensive hreeders and raisers of stock and were known 
oxtv the county as successful and suljstantial farmers and stockmen. After 
having spent six years in the work on the farm, R. H. Denenny located in 
the town of I'^elton. where he was for two years successfully engaged in 
the well-drilling hnsiness and operating a threshing-machine. He then 
moved to Bfirup, -where in 191 1 he purchased the hardware and implement 
business of Oscar .Mattison. which business he has since conducted w^ith 
success. He has a well-stocked store and his constantly increasing tratle is 
evidence of his ])iipularity and business tact. He is posses.sed of much 
business acumen and is held in the highest esteem by all. 

In 1904 R. H. Denenny was united in marriage to Lillian Paranto, 
of X'iding township. Clay county, the daughter of Midie Paranto and wife, 
who were among the earl\- pioneers of that section. To this union the fol- 
lowing children have been born : Gladys, Eunice, Raymond, Curtis and 
Francis. Mr. and Mrs. Denenny are devout members of the Catholic 
church, and are prominent in the social life of the town. Mr. Denenny 
has always taken an active interest in local afifairs and is one of the influen- 
tial men of the town as well as the county. Being possessed of excellent 
judgment, his advice and counsel are often sought in matters that ])ertain 
to the general welfare of the community. 



.\NDREW It. HOLM. 



Among the native-born Norwegians who have come to America and 
engaged in general farming with success, is Andrew E. Holm, who was 
born in the kingdom of Norway, on May 7, 1854, a son of Even and Emilia 
1 Christianson ) Tngebrightson, both of whom were also born in that same 
country, where they were of the farming class. 

Even Ingebrightson was educated in the schools of Norway and 
worked at fanning u]) to rSji, in which year he immigrated to the United 
.States, first locating in billmore county, this state. He continued to reside 
there for ten years and in r88i moved to Norman county and lived with 
his son, Andrew l',. Holm, until his death. He operated a .small farm, 
which he contin.ued to work during his active years. His wife died in Nor- 
way. Thev were the parents of live children, namely: Sirene, who died in 



40 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Norway; Matliia, who also dietl in that country; Bertha, who is living in 
Beltrami count}-, this state; Andrew E., the subject of this sketch, and 
Torger, of Hendrum township, Norman county. The parents were mem- 
bers of the Lutlieran church and their children were reared in the same 
faith. 

Andrew hi. Ilolni was educated in the schools of his native country 
and in 1871 came to Minnesota with his father and settled in Fillmore 
county, working on die farm. .About nine years later he moved to Norman 
county and in the summer of 1879 he homesteaded a quarter section of 
land in Hegne township, and here he has made iiis home ever since, engaged 
in general farming, and since the commencement of his agricultural opera- 
tions has met with a marked degree of success. He has effected a number 
of substantial improvements and erected some fine farm buildings and has 
set out a grove which adtls much to the general appearance of the holding. 
Mr. Holm is also the owner of one hundred and thirty-five acres in section 
7, Hegne township, which is given over to the production of general crops. 

Andrew E. Holm has been twice married. His first wife was Christina 
Anderson Holm, who was Ixjrn in Norway; she died some years after her 
marriage. There were no clu'ldren of that union. Mr. Holm later was 
married to Matilda JohnsDU, ;ilso a native of Norway. There arc two 
children of this marriage, .\nna and ivlwin. The Ilohn family are mem- 
bers of the Concordia Lutheran church and are earnest supporters of all 
its good works, Mr. Holm l)eing a generous contrilnitor to the upkeep of 
the ciiurch. Mr. Holm takes a good citizen's interest in public affairs and 
has served as road overseer for some vears. 



HON. CHRISTEN L. SULERUD. 

Hon. Christen L. Sulerud, mayor of Halstad, former representative 
in the Minnesota state Legislature from the sixty-first legislative district, 
a well-known hardware dealer in the flourishing village of Halstad and the 
proprietor of one of the best-improved and most thoroughly equipi>e(l dairy 
farms in Norman county, is a native of Norway-, but has been a resident of 
Minnesota and of Norman county since he was sixteen years of age. He 
was born on July 17, 1865, son and last-born of the eight children of 
Christen Anderson and Karen (Johnson) Sulerud, also natives of Norway, 
the former of whom was a blacksmith and farmer, and lioth of whom spent 




IKl.X. CIIlilSTKX L. SULERUD. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 



41 



all their lives in their native country, the other children of the family bcins' 
Carl, Maren, Johan, ]^Iartin, Caroline, Sophia and John. 

Reared on a farm in his native Norway. Christen L. Sulerud received 
his schooling there and at the age of sixteen years, in 1881, came to the 
United States and proceeded on out to Minnesota, his destination being 
Ada, Cdunty seat of Norman county, which county had just been organized 
in that year. Mr. Sulerud's residence in this county, therefore, has covered 
the full period of the county's existence as a separate civic entity and he 
has been a witness to and a participant in the development of the same 
since pioneer days. After his arrixal at Ada, Mr. Sulerud entered school 
there and attended for some time, perfecting himself in English, and for 
some years after his arri\al was engaged at various forms of employment, 
including several winters of service as a clerk in a store at Strand. He 
then engaged in the mercantile business, as a partnership, at Gary and was 
there about three years, at the end of which time he returned to Ada 
and clerked in a hardware store there for about three vears. He and Iris 
brother, John Sulerud, then bought a hardware store at Ada and operated 
the same for one \ear, or until 1894, when they moved to Ilalstad and opened 
a hardware store there, which Jjusiness they have been conducting very 
successfully ever since, long having been regarded as among the leading 
merchants and business men of that thriving little city. 

For years Mr. Sulerud has been much interested in the dairy business 
and is a practical dairyman of large experience, his dairy farm of about 
three hundred and .seventy-five acres directly adjoining the town of Halstad 
being looked upon as one of the best-equipped dairy farms in northern 
Minnesota. During his ser\ice in the Legislature Mr. Sulerud succeeded 
in securing tlie enactment of a bill furthering the interests of the dairymen 
of this state, which gained for him the warm gratitude of all those tiuis 
engaged. Mr. Sulerud's dairy barn, a very convenient structure, built in L 
shape, one hundred by sixty Ijy sixty feet, with cement floor, is a model 
of up-to-date convenience, equipped with steel mangers and stalls for his fine 
herd of Guernsey cattle, steel watering basins for the cows, a milking- 
machine, operated by a gasoline engine, electric lights, and other conveniences 
designed to Ijring the operations of the dairy plant as near to perfection 
as ixjssible. Mr. Sulerud raises little corn on his ])lacc, devoting the most 
of it to alfalfa and potatoes. 

Politically, Mr. Sulerud is an ardent Prohil)itiiHiist and in 1908 be 
was made the nominee of that part)- for representative in the Legislature 
from the sixtv-first Minnesota legislative district, carrying the election by 



42 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

a vote four times in excess of the Piohil)ition vote, an evidence of confidence 
on tlie part of tlie \-oters of the district very highly appreciated by ^Ir. Sulcrud 
and his friends. So satisfactory did his serx'ice in the House during' the 
session of 1909 prove that Mr. Sulerud was re-elected in 1910 and gave equally 
efficient sei-\'ice during the session of 191 1. Mr. Sulerud has ever given his 
close attention to local civic afi^airs and has served for years as president 
(if the Halstad school board and in other ways has done a good citizen's 
part in advancing the best interests of his home town, which he now is 
further serving as mayor. 

In 1893 Christen L. Sulcruil \\a> united in marriage to lunula lieise and 
to this union five children ha\o been born. Hazel. Gladys, Clark. George 
and Lester. The Suleruds have a \ery pleasant home at Halstad and take 
an interested part in the community's various .social activities. Mr. and Mrs. 
Sulerud are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and give their earnest 
attention to cliurch work and other good works in the community, ever 
helpful in promoting all worthy mosenients for the advancement of the 
common welfare. 



JACOB BURRILL. 



The first of the numerous and sterling old Burrill family in America 
was John Burrill, father of John Burrill, the second, who was born in 
J658 and died in 1731. He was the fadier of John Burrill, the third, who 
was born in \(h)4 and died in 1756. He was the father uf John Burrill, 
the fourth, who was Ixnn in 1719. He was the father of John Burrill. 
the fifth, who was born in 1752 and died in 1842. He was the father of 
Jacob Burrill, who was born in 1818 and died in 1S91. The latter was 
the father of H. R. Burrill, merchant of Hawley, Clay county, a .sketch of 
whom appears on another page of this work. Paul C. Burrill, of 1518 
Ninth street, Milwaukee, ^^'isconsin, has compiled a genealogical record of 
the family an.] from that is copied the following: 

There were at least two different families of Burrills in Massachusetts 
in Lolonial times, (^ne was a descendant from (jeorge Burrill, of Lynn, 
that state, who was a prosperous farmer and one of the wealthiest men 
of his town. One of his descendants was for many years speaker of the 
Massachusetts Assembly, another was chief justice of Rhode Island, and it 
is very probable that the city of Burrill, that state, was named for him. 
The other Burrill family is descended from John Burrill, of ^^'eymouth, 



CLAY AXD NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 43 

Massachusetts. John Burrill, founder of the Hne in i\merica, arrived at 
Weymouth, a tnwn a1)out twelve miles southeast of Boston in 1639. His 
wife was named Rebecca, and to them three children were liorn, John, in 
iC)38: Thomas, in 1659. and Ephraim, in 1664. The son, John, married 
Mercy Alden, in Taunton, Massachusetts, June 26, 1688. She was a grand- 
tlaughter of John Alden and Prisciila Mullins, who came over in the "Ma}- 
tlower," and who were celebrated as leading characters in Longfellow's 
"Courtship of Miles Standish." It will be remembered th:it the first white 
child born in Xew England was Elizabeth Alden. daughter of John and 
I'riscilla (Muilins) Alden. John Burrill. great-grandfather of the subject 
of this sketch, was born Se])tember 24, 17 19. He was a soldier in the 
h'rench and Indian War. and was known as Sergeant Burrill. 

[acob Burrill, of this review, was born at Dover, Maine, April 20, 
1X18. He grew up in Xew England and married Rachel Bennett, who 
was born in (juebec. Canada. Eebruary 18. 1824. ;md died June i, 1904. 
|()hn Burrill. of Weymouth. ^Massachusetts, the first of the family, married 
Xellie Craig. John Burrill, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was 
a soldier in the Revolutionary War. serving in a Massachusetts regiment. 
under General Gates. He took part in the battles of Bennington and Sara- 
t(jga. About the close of the war he moved to Maine, locating at Dover, 
and there he spent the rest of his life, dying at the advanced a,ge of ninety- 
tliree years. 

Jacob Burrill. of this sketch, was educated in the schools of Dover. 
Maine. He worked on the farm w lien a young man : he also learned the 
carpenter's trade. About 1852 he moved to Framingham. Massachusetts. 
There he hauled stone to build the first normal school building ever erected 
in llie United States. He also hauled the stone for the foundation for 
the house of Henry Wilson, later vice-president of the L'nited States, whose 
residence was at Xatick, Massachusetts. About 1854 he moved to Fitz- 
wiljiam, Xew Hampshire, where he followed the carpenter trade. In 1868 
he nuived to Keenc, that state, where he was emi)loyed in the carpenter 
department of the railroad shops f(jr a period of ele\en _\eai-s. In 1879 
he came to Minnesota and took up a homestead in Clav county, being one 
of the pioneers here. He circulated the petition lor the organization of 
the township which he nanie.l Keene. alter his old home town in New Ivig- 
land. He developed a good farm in that town.ship and tiiere spent the 
rest of his life. He was also one of the organizers of school district Xo. 
30. and he built the school house. He was a Democrat in politics. 

Eio-ht children were born to Jaco!^ Burrill and wile, namely: John. 



44 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

who is mentioned in a separate sketcli in this work; Adtlie, the wife of 
Henr}' C. Longley, of l^'itchlKus'. Massachusetts: ]\Iarv Augusta, who first 
married Charles Putney, and later Lewis Smith, and she is living in Idaho; 
H. F., who is mentioned in a separate sketch on anotlier page of this volume; 
Xellie, deceased, was the wife of Frank Spooner. also now deceased, and they 
matle their home in Fitchliurg, Afassachusetts; H. R.. a merchant at Hawley. 
Clav county, who is mentioned in a separate sketch in this work; Susie, the 
wife of Ben Tacohson; Cora, who married Charles Brooks and they live in 
ATinneapolis. Minnesota. 



PURKEY HEXRV 



Among the earliest settlers of Elkton township, in Cla)' county, were the 
Henry familv, who settled there in the latter seventies, helped organize the 
township and became active and influential in the work of bringing about 
proper social conditions in the pic)neer community. The head of this family, 
-\braiiam Henry, was a native of Pennsylvania and a man of the true pioneer 
breed, moving successively from Pennsylvania to Illinois and thence to Iowa 
and thence up here into the Red River valley, ever following the frontier, ;m(l 
here lie spent his last da\s, one of the most intluential pioneers of Elkton 
township, which he had helped to organize in the days of the beginning of 
the settlement of that regior.. His fatlier, John Henr\-. was a man of much 
the same type and when se\ent\-two years of age. in i<S54. headed an expe- 
dition, of which liis son Abraham was a member, to the Pacific coast, acting 
as scout for the party and walking almost the entire distance. John Henry 
liad served during the War of 1812 as a member of Commodore Perry's 
command on the Great Lakes. 

In Penn.sylvania, where he had grown to manhood. Abraham Henry 
married Rachel Jones, a daughter of Isaac and Esther (Xefif) Jones, the 
former of whom was a native of Holland, who moved from Pennsylvania 
into Illinois, driving through with a family of eleven, the essential domestic 
belongings being transported in a one-horse wagon, all but the frailest of the 
party walking. Later, about 1855. Isaac Jones and his wife moved to Jack- 
son county, Iowa, and there spent their last davs. It was in 1854 that 
Abraham Henry had moved from Kane county. Illinois, to Jackson countx. 
Iowa, and there lie remained until 1878. when, finding the settlement there 
Iiecoming too crowded for one of his pioneering instincts, he came up here 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 45 

into the Red River valle} and homesteaded the southwest (luarter of section 
2f) in Elkton township. Clay county and "tree-claimed" the northwest 
(|uarter of the same section and settled down to prepare a place for his 
family, who joined him here the next year, he meantime having erected a 
shack of a house for their reception, and on that place he and his wife spent 
their last days, among the leaders of that community. Abraham Henry 
liell)id to organize the township. He and his wife were earnest Presbyterians 
and the latter offered the opening prayer at the first public religious service 
held in that communit}', that service having been held in the railway section- 
bouse, which for a time was used as a place of worship until presently a 
-chool house was built, the latter serving as a place for worship until later 
the Presbyterians erected a church at Baker. Abraham Henry and wife were 
the parents of eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the 
last-born, the others being Clinton, Alfonzo, James E., Anna, Lsaac, Betsy 
,ind Isabel. 

i'urkey Henry was born in Jackson county, Iowa, in June, 1861, and 
was eighteen years of age when he came up into Minnesota with the family 
and settled in Clay county. Upon reaching his majority he homesteaded a 
i|uarter of a section in Skree township and after his marriage in 1884 estab- 
lished his home there, continuing to make that his place of residence until 
1899, when he moved back to the old home place and has since occupied that 
portion of it comprised in the northwest quarter of section 26 of Elkton 
township, the original tree-claim entered by his father back in the seventies. 
.Mr. Henry has an excellent farm and he ami his family are very comfortably 
situated there. He ba^ taken an interested part in general civic affairs and 
has served as a member of the local school board. He and his family are 
members of the Presbyterian church and take a projier jiart in the general 
good works of the communit\-. 

In 1884 Purkex- Henr\ was united in marriage to Ruth Jane Daniels. 
\\hn also was born in J.-ick^m county, Iowa, datighter of Kensey C. and 
Enialie (Rose) Daniels, who moved from that county into western Iowa and 
after five years of residence there came up into this part of Minnesota, in 
1880. and homesteaded a (|uarter of a .section in .section 6 of Humboldt town- 
^hii., Clav cr.untv. where Kensev C Daniels died about 1893. His widow 
^urvi\ed him for more than txventy years, her death occurring at her home 
in the village of Baker in nji4- They were the parents of six children, who 
-r.wv to matnritv. Ruth fane Daniels had received excellent schoohng ni 
Iowa and upon her arrival in Clav county was engaged at once as a school 
teacher, beginning in 1881 as the teacher of the first school opened between 



46 CLAY AND NdUMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

( ilvmlon and Barnesville. for llie tirst month of that term conducting her 
school in an old chrt-floor homestead shack that stood on land now a part of 
the farm of Charles J.amh. Sr.. a little east of the present village of Downer. 
To Mr. and ^^rs. Henry four children have been horn, Joseph. I'.emis. 
Lamont and IVarl. Thex have hesides an adopted daughter. Matilda. 



w 1 



JUDGl". r.XRROL .\. NVI-:. 

S];)ecific mentinn is niaile in this history of Clay count)' of many of the 
rth\- citizens wlm have figured in the growth antl development of the 
cdunfy and whose interests are identified with its varit)us phases of progress. 
I'^ach has contributed his share to the well-being of the ci>ninuniity, and to the 
achancement of its interests. Though all do not reach the heights to which 
lhe\ aspire, \et in some degree each can win a measure of success and 
bring adxantages to his fellowmen. It is not necessary to follow an_\- par- 
ticular line of endeavor or engage in an\- [)articular \H>cation, to be of service 
to one's home communitx. In all walks of life there remains much good to 
be accomplished and main opportunities for the exercise of talent and influ- 
ence that in some way lotuh the lixes of those with whom one may come in 
contact, making them the better ;uid the greater. Of the men of the county. 
who ha\e had an ele\ating elfect on the resident pt)i)ulati(jn, as well as on the 
entire district, it is well to mention one of the most prominent members of 
the ( la\- county bar. and one wh(j has risen to a high position in the legal 
fraternity in the county. Judge Carrol A. Nye. 

Judge Carrol A. .\\e was born in St. Croix county. Wisconsin, in 1861, 
and receixed his education in the common and normal schools of that stale. 
After having cijinpleted his education in the schools of the state, he entered 
the law office of his brother, h'nuik M. Nye, who was at that time located at 
Cle;ir Lake. Wisconsin, and is now a successful attorney of Minneapolis. 
.Minnesota. He later studied in the otfice of l\ol)ert M. LaFollette, the 
pre.sent senator from that .state, and who was at that time located at Madison. 
Me then entered die I'niversity of \\'isconsin in 1886, where he was given 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He received the greater part of his educa- 
tion ilu'ough his own efforts and. while in college, paid the larger p.art of 
his expenses with money earned i)y working on the farm and in teaching 
school. After completing his education and after having been admitted to 
the bar. he located in Afoorhead. Minnesota, where he has since resided. 



CLAY AND NOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 



47 



After having estaljli.slicd his residence and liaving engaged in the praclice 
of his profession in Cla}- county, Judge Nye met with much success, and 
always took the greatest interest in local affairs. His ability and force of 
character were soon recognized and he was appointed city attorney, which po- 
sition he held for five years. He was then elected mayor of the city and was 
the efficient executixe for four years, and was for eight years attorney for 
the county. His educational qualifications and high standing attracted to him 
the attention of the officials of the State Normal, and he scr\cd on the hoard 
of management of that institution for a term of six years. In all of diese 
positions he gave to the pe(iple the highest measure of ser\ice and won the 
approval of the entire community. In 1910 he was elected district judge, 
and in 1916, was re-elected without opposition. His services on the bench 
ha\-e been of the hi.ghest class, and his decisions have been regarded as just 
by the people and the bar. His life as an attorney and as a judge has placed 
him among the high-minded and conscientious men of the district. Few 
men in the district are held in higher regard and few have had more to do with 
the high standard of mcM-al excellence. 

In 1886 Carrol A. Nye was united in marriage to Mary A. Gordon. 
and to this union a son, James G., was born. He received his primary 
education in the local schools, and later was graduated from the Philip I'-xter 
College and the University of Wisconsin, and from the lalter institution he 
received the degree of Baciielor of Laws. He later entered (ju the practice 
of his profession and has met with the highest degree of success. Hi< 
patriotism and loyalty to his government have been demonstrated by the 
fact that he served with the troops on the border of Mexico during the 
years iqiCi and 1917. He is n(iw a commissioned officer :U I't. Snellmg. 
Minne.sota. In 1896 Mary ((Jordon) Nye passed away, and two years later 
Mr. Nye was marrie.l to Harriett Rumball, and to this union one son has 
been born, Carrol A., Jr. Harriett Nye was for a number of years an 
instructress in reading and expression in the Moorhead Normal, and is a 
woman of education and refinement. Her work in the normal school was of 
the highest class, and many of the proficient teachers of the state bear evi- 
dence to her abilitv as an instructress. Since assuming her i)osition in the 
home of judge Nve, she has won the esteem of a large circle of friends, 
who hold 'her"^ in the highest regard. She has long been identified with the 
social and religious life of the community. Mr. and Mrs. Nye's best efforts 
are ever exerted in the jiromotion of those enterprises that x\ ill tend to the 
future greatness of the district. 

nuring his student days in the university, Judge Nye .gave much atten- 



48 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

tion to military training, and has always been a strong advocate of pre- 
paredness and the training of young men for military duty, whereby they 
may be able to assist in the defense of their countr}-. In 1916 Judge Nye 
was at Plattsburg, New York, where he took part in camp life. On Januan- 
5, 1917, he was appointed captain in the (|uartermaster"s division of the 
reserve corps of the United States army, which position he now holds. Judge 
Nye has lived an acti\e and useful life and he has accomplished much that 
is worthy of note. 



E. S. JENKINS. 



E. S. Jenkins, a member of the board of commissioners of Norman 
county, former chairman of the board of supervisors of McDonaldsville town- 
ship, vice-president df the Farmers and Merchants State Bank of Ada and 
a well-to-do retired farmer now living at Ada, is a native of the great 
Empire state, but has been a resident of Minnesota since he was ten years 
of age and of Norman county since pioneer days, he having settled here 
on a quarter of a section of land he pre-empted in McDonaldsville township 
back in 1878, in the days before the county was organized as a separate 
civic unit. He was born in Warren county. New York, October 7, 1856, 
son of Chauncey and Sarah (Davis) Jenkins, both of whom were born in 
that same county, who later became pioneers of Stearns county, this state, 
and there spent their last days. 

Chauncey Jenkins was born on a farm in Warren county, New York, 
February 24, 1821, and was a farmer all his life. He married Sarah Davis, 
who was born on March 16. 1826, in the village of Hague, in that same 
county, and remained there until 1866, in which year he came with his 
family to Minnesota and settled in Stearns county, where he and his wife 
spent the remainder of their li\cs. Upon coming to this state he Iwught 
a farm three miles from Sauk Center, but presentl}- left the farm and moved 
to Sauk Center, where he died in 1868. His widow survived him for man\ 
years, her death occurring in 1906, she then being eighty years of age. They 
were the parents of six children, of whom the subject of this sketch was 
the fifth in order of birth, the others being as follow: John W., born on 
May 19, 1846: Julia S., Februan- 17. 1849; George W., August 17. 185 1 : 
Edith A., December 27, 1853, and Emma E., May 2"/, 1859. 

As noted above, E. S. Jenkins was about ten years of age when he 
came to this state with his parents in 1866 and his schooling was completed 




Mi;. AND JIKS. E. S. JENKINS. 



TH& NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENeX 

TILDKN FOUNDATIONS 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 49 

ill the schools of Stearns county. His youtii was spent on the farm and 
he later became engaged in a livery stable at Sauk Center, where he was 
employed until his marriage in the summer of 1878, when he and his wife 
straightway came up to this part of the state and establishefl their home in 
Norman county, where they ever since have resided, honorable and influential 
pioneers of this section. They drove up here into the Red river valley by 
ox-team, riding in a "prairie schooner," and bringing with them such house- 
hold goods as would be essential to the starting of their humble home in a 
new lantl. They were ten days in making the trip from Sauk Center. Upon 
arri\ing here JMr. Jenkins pre-empted a quarter of a section of land in what 
later came to be organized as McDonaldsville township and there established 
his home. The first small house he erected there presently was supplanted 
by a more substantial and commodious residence and the other improve- 
ments on the farm were in keeping with the same. He later added an adjoin- 
ing "forty" and is now the owner of two hundred acres of well-improved land 
in sections 12 and 13 of McDonaldsville township, besides another "forty" 
in section 16. During his long residence on the farm Mr. Jenkins gave 
considerable attention to the raising of Jersey cattle, in addition to his 
general farming, and did very well. He remained on the farm until 1908. 
when he retired from the active labors of the farm and moved to Ada, where 
he and his family are now living and where they are very comfortably 
situated. 

Mr. Jenkins has given considerable attention to the general business 
affairs of the community and is vice-president and a member of the board 
of directors of the Fanners and Merchants Bank of Ada. Since the organ- 
ization of the Norman County Agricultural Society in 1S95, he has been 
a member of the board of directors of that organization, was secretary of 
the same for five years and president for one term. He is an ardent Repub- 
lican and ever since he settled in Norman county has given his earnest atten- 
tion to civic affairs. For twenty-eight years he served as treasurer of his 
local school district ; for ten years was chairman of the lx)ard of supervisors 
of McDonaldsville township, 'and for ten years was treasurer of the same. 
In the fall of 1914 Mr. Jenkins was elected a member of the board of county 
commissioners from his district and is now serving in that important and 
responsible public capacity, the whole county thus getting the benefit of 
his wide experience in county affairs. 

It was on July 4, 1878, that E. S. Jenkins was united in marriage to 
Marv Revnolds. who was born in ^\'aushara county. W'isconsin, September 
(4a) 



50 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

9, 1861, a daughter of Solomon and Sarah ( i\rnistrong) Reynolds, Ijoth 
of whom were born in the neighborhood of Syracuse, New York, the former 
on March 4, 1834, and ihe latter, October 27, 1843. Solomon Reynolds 
was an honored veteran of the Civil War, having served with a Wisconsin 
regiment, and was with Sherman on that commander's memorable march 
to the sea. He died on February 12, 1873, and his widow sur\ived him 
for more than fifteen years, her death occurring on October 24, 1888. .Mr. 
and Mrs. Jenkins have three children. Ruby, who married George Coldwell 
and has one child, a son, Charles E. ; Effie, who married J. C. Chick and has 
eight children, Vivian, Ora, Floy, Elmore, .Xrnie. Lloyd, Orin and Kenneth; 
and Jessie, who married Edward E. Carmen and has one child, a daughter, 
Mildred. Mrs. Jenkins is a member of the Congregational church. For 
more than twenty-five years .she has been affiliated with the Daughters of 
Rebekah. tlie woman's auxiliary to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and is a past i)residing officer of that organization in .Minnesota. 



J.A.\[ES GLASGO\\'. SR. 



James Glasgow, Sr.. manager of the Monarcii Elevator Company's 
extensive plant at Barnesxille, former member of the common council of 
that city and former president of the school boanl, is a native of Scotland, 
but has l)een a resident of this countr\- since he was eighteen years of 
age, a resident of Minnesota ever since his arrival in this country, with 
the exception of a couple of years spent in the grain business in Oregon 
during the early nineties. He was born in .\yr.shire in October, 1855, 
son of .\iKlrew and .\nn ( f-iobertson) Glasgow, both of whom also were 
natives of Scotland, the former born in .Ayrshire and the latter in Dundee, 
who later became pioneers of the Red river country and whose last da\s 
Avere spent in Clay county. 

.'\ndrew Glasgow was a tailor and draper, who moved from his native 
-\yrshire to England about the year i860 and there was engaged in the 
tailoring Ijusiness until the year 1873, when he came with his family to 
the United States and proceeded directly on out to Minnesota and bought 
a tract of railroad land in the vicinity of Hawley, in Clay count)-, where 
he established his home and where he and his wife spent the remainder 
of their lives, honored and influential pioneers of that community, .\ndrew 
Glasgow had a fine farm of two hundred and forty acres, which he bought 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. CI 

ill its raw prairie state and which he improved and developed into one 
of the best farms in tliat part of the county. As one of tlie real pioneers 
of Clay county, he took an active part in pul)lic affairs durin.y; the earl\ 
(lays of the county's organization, served for two or three terms as a 
member of the board of county commissioners and for twent\-live years 
served as justice of the jieace in and fur his home townshij). lie and his 
wife also were active in the work of the church in earl\- da\s hereabout 
and were among the organizers of the congregation of the Congregational 
church at Hawley. They were the parents of two children, the suhjccl i>\ 
this sketch ha\ing a sister, Anna, widow of the late Thomas .\1. Krown, 
of Hawley. 

James Glasgow was but a child when his parents mo\ed from Scotland 
to England and in the latter country he received his schooling, completing 
the academic course. He was about eighteen years of age wlim he came 
with his parents to this country and settled on a pioneer farm in the Hawley 
neighborhood and he at once took an active part with his father in the lators 
of developing and improving that raw prairie farm, continuing there thus 
engaged until i8c)i, in which year he went to Oregon, where he became 
employed in the service of the old Northern I'acific Elevator Company antl 
where he remained a couple of years, at the end of which time, in 1893, 
he returned to Clay county and became engaged as manager of the old Min- 
nesota and Dakota elevator at Barnesville, which position he ever since 
has occupied: the elevator and the extensive plant connected therewith now 
being the property of the Monarch Elevator Company, and is thus one of 
the be.st-known grain men in this jjart of the state, having been continuously 
eneac-ed in the tirain business at Barnesville for nearly a quarter of a 
century. Mr. (ilasgow is the owner of a tract of several acres ot ground 
just inside the city limits, where he makes his home and where he and 
his family are very comfortalily and very pleasantly situated, Mr. (Ilasgow 
has for years gi\en his earnest attention to local civic affairs and for two 
terms served as president of the local .school board and for two terms as 
a member oi the city council from his ward. 1-raternally. he is affiliated 
with the local lodges of the Ancient Free and Accepted .Masons and of the 
Ancient Order of Cnited Workmen and in the affairs of l>oth n\ these organ- 
izations takes a warm interest. 

In 1880 James Glasgow was united in marriage to Josephine .\arveson, 
daughter of Xarve Xarvesoii and wile, iiioneers of b'.glon tounship. Clay 
county, and to this union eight children have been iK.rn, .\nna, .\ndrew. 
Agnes fames, b,sephinc, Marv, Gretchen and Ruth, all of whom are hvm.g. 



52 CLAV AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

Tlie Glasgow's are menihers of tlie Congregational clnirch and lune ever 
taken an interested part in church work, as well as in the general good 
\vorks and social activities of their home town, and have been helpful in 
]jronioting causes designed to advance the common welfare not only there, 
but throughout the county and this region at large. 



WILLIAM j. AW r\', .M. D. - 

Dr. William J. Awty, a practicing physician at iloorhead since the 
\ear 1892, was born on a farm in the province of Ontario, in the Dominion 
of Canada. January 24. 1863, .son of Foljambe and Hannah (Chapnian) 
Awty, the former a native of luigland and the latter of Ontario, whose 
last days were spent in Ontario. I^'oljambe .\wty was a substantial fanner 
and a man of influence in the communitx in which he lived. He and his 
wife were the parents of eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch 
was the fourth in order of birth, the others being Mary A., .Sarah !•".., 
Folj;unbe, Fannie M., Maud, Harriet G. and Kate M. 

Reared on the home farm in Ontario, William J. Awty received lii> 
early schooling in the schools of that ncighliorhood and remained at home 
until he was nineteen years nf age, when, in 1882, he went to Winnipeg, 
remaining there and at ]^t. Arthur for about five years, at the end of which 
lime, in 1887. he reiurned to his home in Ontario. The next year, in 
1888, he entered the medical department of Trinity University at Toronto 
and was graduated from the .same in i8gi. Upon receiving his diploma 
IDoctor Awty was appointed an interne in the City and County Hospital 
at St. Paul and after eighteen months of very practical and \alnable ser\icc 
there opened an office for the practice of his profession at INIoorhead, in 
October, 1892. and has e\er since been located there, one of the best-known 
physicians in the Red ri\er \allev. Doctor Awty is a member of the Cla}'- 
Becker Medical Society, the Minnesota State Medical Association and the 
American Medical Association and takes a warm interest in the deliberation.- 
of these organizations. 

In 1906, Dr. William J. .\wty was united in marriage U< Fthel ('•. 
L(ird, daughter of L. C. Lord and wife, and to this union two children 
have been born, William J- and Inez Lord. Doctor and Mrs. .\\vty are 
members of the Fpi'^copal church at Moorhead and take a proper interest 
ui the various beneficences of the same, as well as in the general good works 
and -ocial and cnltunil activities of the conimunitv in which tbev live. 



CLAY AND XORMAX COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. C' 

i,. GILBERT nrXDERSOX. 

Gilbert Gunderson, cashier o! tlie Security State Jiauk of iiittenlal ami 
one of the leaders in the business lite of that thriving village, treasurer 
of Goose Prairie townshij) and otherwise interested in the general affairs 
of his home community, was born in Clay county and lias lived here all 
his life. He was born on a pioneer farm in Highland (lro\e townshi]) on 
June iJ, 1883, son of Olaf and Maren { Ivilstad) (junderson, natives of 
Sweden and Norway, respectively, the former born on October 24, 1832, 
and the latter. February 21. 1846, who became pioneers of Clay county 
and here s])ent their last days. 

(llaf Gunderson came to the United States fi-oni his native Sweden 
in the days of his y<jung manhood and settled in the neighlx)rho()d of 
Decorah, Iowa, where he presentl}- married, later coming up into the Red 
ri\-er country in .Minnesota and settling in Clay count\. Cp()n his arri\ai 
here he bonicsteaded a quarter of a section of land in Highland (jrove town- 
ship and there established his home, he and his wife spending the remainder 
of their li\es there. She died on June 16, 1896, and he survived her nearly 
twenty years, his death occurring in .March. 1916. 'rhe\- were t!ie members 
of the Norwegian Lutheran clun'ch and were the parents of fixe sons anri 
one girl. 

Gilbert ( lunderson was reared on the homestea<l farm in Highl.and 
Grove township and sujjplemented the schooling recei\ed in the local schools 
by a course in the Archil)ald Business College at Minnca[)olis, beginning his 
attendance there in icpo, when se\enteen years of age. L^pon leaving college 
lie began working in the store of Ole 1'. Storberg at I law ley and later 
was employed in the general store of Rittiman & lude and for the Andrew 
Johnson Company at th;it same place, continuing thus engaged in the mer- 
cantile line until in .i()io. when be became employed in the State Bank of 
Hawlev. I''(jr four \cars Mr. (iunderson remained in the Ijank at Hawley 
and then, in April. 1914, was elected cashier of the Security State P.ank 
of Ilitterdal. a position he ever since has occupied, one of the l>est-known 
young bankers in that part of Clay county. In addition to his banking 
intere.sts Mr. Gunderson also takes an interested pari in the general civic 
aftairs of his borne communitv and is the present treasurer of Goose Prairie 
township. 

In the vear 1907 Gilbert Gunderson w;is united in marriage to .Mabel 
Mitchell, dausbter of the Rev. Charles Milchell. and to ibis union five chil- 



54 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 



ilren have been burn, Stanley, Dorothy, Harry, I'lorence and draee. Mrs. 
Gunderson is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Gunderson 
is a member of the local lodge of the Modern Woodmen of America and 
takes a warm interest in the affairs of the same. He is an active young 
business man and is regarded as one of the most energetic "boosters" in 
that part of the county. 



PROF. C. A. T!.\LLARD. 

Prof. C. A. Ballard, one of the most popular members of the faculty 
of the Minnesota State Normal School at Moorhead and head of the depart- 
ment of biology of that institution, is a native son of Minnesota and has lived 
in this state all his hfe, with the exception (>f a few years during his youth 
when he li\ed in Indiana. He was born at Zumbrota, in Goodhue county, 
this state, in icSdj, son of Joshua Ballard and wife, the former of whom was 
a farmer, wIim, a few years later, moved back to his old home in Hendricks 
count}', Indiana, with his f;!mily and remained there until about 1883, when 
he returned to Minnesota and again established his home at Zumbrota. 

C. .A^. Ballard was about sixteen years of age when his parents moved 
l)ack to this state and he complete<l his common-school education in the high 
school at Zumbrota, from which he was graduated in 1889. He then entered 
the University of Minnesota and after two years of attendance there Ijegan 
teaching school, but a year later returned to the university, from which he 
was graduated in 1894. with the degree of Bachelor of Science. While at- 
tending the university he won a scholarship in Ijotany and held the same 
during his last two years of attendance there. During several summers 
while going to school he was engaged in work on behalf of the state botanical 
departnient and was a member of the partv of botanists that established the 
Marine botanical station on Vancou\er Island in the summer of 1891. 

In the fall of 1894 Professor Ballard took up his real work as an edu- 
cator and has since ilevoted his time and his energies to the cause of educa- 
tion. It was in that }ear that he accepted a position in the high school at 
bergus Falls and in the December following his arrival there was made 
superintendent of the schools of that city to fill the vacancy created by the 
resignation of Prof. Frank A. Weld, superintendent of the Fergus Falls 
schools. Professor Ballard remained at Fergus Falls, superintendent of the 
schools there, until 1800. Nvhen he was appointed a member of the faculty 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 



55 



of the State Xomial School at Aloorhead, in charge of the department of 
biology, and has since occupied that position, with his residence at Moor- 
head. During his residence in Moorhead. Professor Ballard has taken an 
active interest in the general affairs of the city and for six years served as a 
member of the city council. He owns a well-improved farm south of the 
city and gives considerable attention to the operation of the same. 

In 1898. the year before he moved to Moorhead, Prof. C. A. Ballard 
was united in marriage to Ida Bell, of Fergtis Falls, and to this union four 
children have lieen born, James, Curtis, Margaret and Edward. Professor 
and Mrs. Ballard are members of the Congregational church and take an 
earnest interest in church work, as well as in the general works of the com- 
munity, and are recognized as among the leaders in the cultural activities of 
their home town. The IVofessor is a member of the Masonic order and 
takes an active interest in the affairs of the same. 



REV. MARTIN ANDERSON. 

The present pastor of the Trinity Lutheran church at Moorhead, Clay 
county, Rev. Martin Anderson, was born in Benton county, Iowa, May 
17, 1882, a son of Mons and Sarah (Tvedt) Anderson, both natives of. 
the kingdom of Norway. 

Mons Anderson came to .\merica in 1865 and located in LaSalle county, 
Illinois, where he remainetl for two years. He then moved to Benton 
county, Iowa, where he engaged in farming until 1905, in which year he 
retired from acti\e work and moved to Minneapolis, IMinnesota, where he 
died in 1915. He was the father of eight children, as follow: Bertha. 
deceased: Andrew, Celia, John, Anne, Peter, Christine and Martin. 

Rev. Martin .\nderson received his elementary education in the puljlic 
schools of Benton county, Iowa. He afterwards attended the St. Olal 
College, at Northfield. Minnesota, and graduated from that institution in 
1906. Having chosen the profession of the ministry he attended the L'nited 
Church Seminary, at St. Paul, Minnesota, where he completed a course 
of theological study and graduated from that seminary in roog and was 
ordained in the same year. His first pastoral charge was at Madison. South 
Dakota, where he remained for nearly five years. In 191 4 he came to 
Moorhead and accepted the pastorate of the Trinity Lutheran church in 



^6 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

this place, where he has since remained. In 191 5 he received the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Divinit}-. conferred hy Fargo College. 

Re\'. Dr. .\nderson has proven himself to be a man of ability, energy 
and influence by his work in this community. He was instrumental in the 
building of a fine new church, costing forty-two thousand dollars, whicli 
was completed in 191 5. The building is of modern construction and equipped 
with modern appointments. It is a credit to tlie congregation an<l one of 
the attractive buildings of the town. 

In 1909 Doctor Anderson was married to Cora Gunderson, daughter 
of lohn E. Gunderson, of Driscoll, North Dakota. Two children have been 
born to this union, Milo and Harriet. 



W. Al. XESHEIM. 



W. M. Nesheim, a well-known druggist at .Moorhead, was born in 
Decorah, Iowa, April 19, 1865, a son of Iver H. and Elizabeth Nesheim, 
the former of whom was born in Norway and came to .America in young 
manhood, locating in Iowa, where he followed the occupation of a painter. 
In 1880 he removed to Minneapolis, Minnesota, and lived there until his 
death. His children were : Josephine, Christine, W. M., Ida, Emma 
(deceased), Oscar (deceased), and Louis (decea.sed). Iver H. Nesheim was 
head of the paint department of the .\mon Scop & Coiupany, of Decorah, 
and was a man of rare artistic talent, his decorative work giving him more 
than local fame. 

The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools of Decorah, 
Iowa. At the age of fifteen he began work in a drug store in Decorah, 
where he continued for about one year. In 1881 he went to Minneapolis 
and was employed in drug stores in that city for fourteen years. Coming 
to Moorhead in 1895. he engaged in the drug i)usiness on his own account 
in that city and has continued in this business there ever since. 

In 1905 W. M. Nesheim and Eleanor Albertson. daughter of Orris 
Albertson, of Battle Lake. Minnesota, were united in marriage, and to this 
union three children have been born: Eleanor, Roseltha and William (de- 
ceased). Mr. Nesheim's fraternal affiliation is with the local lodge of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen at Moorhead. Mrs. Nesheim's father. 
Orris Albertson, for many years one of the foremost residents of Battle 
Lake, which town he helped to lay out. buying the first town lot sold there. 




W. M. XESHEIM. 



THE NEW YUhK 
PIIBI,IC LIBRARY 



^o,wR, LENex 
TILDEN FOUNDATfONh 



CLAY AXD NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 57 

was born in Jefferson connly, New York, a son of Josiali and Rhoda I Kig- 
gins) Albertson. natives of the state of New Jersey. When nineteen years 
of age, in 1869, Orris Albertson came to Minnesota to join his sister, Mrs. 
Benjamin Sherman, in Otter Tail county, and for some time thereafter was 
employed as a clerk in the city of Otter Tail. In the fall of 1873 he married 
Mrs. Roseltha (Gould), Corliss, a widow and the owner of a homestead farm 
in Everts township. Otter Tail county, and took a homestead in his own 
name adjoining that of his wife. In 1876 he established a store on that farm 
and later moved the same to the new townsite of Battle Lake and for many 
vears thereafter was engaged in the mercantile business there, six years of 
which time he served as postmaster. For eight years he served as clerk 
of the township and in 1904 was elected sheriff' of Otter Tail county, an 
office he held for four vears. 



OTTO F. KELTING. 



Otto F. Kelting, a well-known merchant at Downer and justice of the 
peace in and for Elkton township. Clay county, is a native of Germany, but 
has lived in this country since he was seven years of age and in Minnesota 
since he was twelve and is therefore thoroughly familiar with conditions 
up here in the Red river country. He was born on February 13, 1886, son 
of John and Anna (Grevey) Kelting, also natives of Germany, who came 
to this country in 1893 and after a residence of five years in Chicago came 
to Minnesota and located in Clay county, where they are still living, sub- 
stantial residents of Elkton township. 

John Kelting was born on April 9. 1861, son of Otto and .\nna ( Brown » 
Kelting, l)Oth also natives of Germany, farming people, the latter of whom 
is still living there at a ripe old age, and who were the parents of eight 
children, those besides John, the first-born, being Henry, Kathcrine, WW- 
liam. Otto (deceased), Augusta, August (deceased), and Ferdinand. Dur- 
ing 1912-13 the Widow Kelting made a visit to her children in this country. 
Tohn Kelting was trained as a stonemason in his native land and there 
became a proficient workman. From 1882 to 1885 he ser\ed in the anuy 
and in the latter year, shortly after his return to civil life, married .\nna 
Grevev, who also was born in Germany, daughter of Hans and Katherme 
(Lench) Grevey, the former of whom is still living there. After his mar- 
riage John Kelting continued to make his home in his native land untd 



1^8 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

1893, ill which year he came to the United States with his little family and 
located in Chicago, wliere he became engaged working at his trade as a 
stonemason and where lie made his home for five years, or until 1898, when 
he came to Minnesota with his family and settled at Sabin, in Clay county, 
wliere he continued working at his trade and was thus engaged there until 
his appointment some years later, upon the establishment of rural mail routes 
nut of Sabin, as a rural mail carrier out of that postoftice, the first carrier 
thus appointed there. A year later, in 1906, he bought a quarter of a 
section of land in Elkton townshi]) and has since made his home on that 
place, having improved the farm in admirable shape. John Kelting has 
given considerable attention to local civic affairs since liecoming a resident 
of Clay county and while at Sal)in and since moving to the farm has been 
a member of the school board, a period of about fifteen years. He also 
served for some time as justice of the jieace. He and his wife are members 
(if the German Lutheran church and their children were reared in that faith. 
Of the ten children born to them, seven are still li\ing, those besides Otto 
l*".. the subject of this sketch and the first-born, being as follow: Emma, 
wife of Marcus Ullrich; Freda, wife of David Lamb, Gusta, wdio is engaged 
with her brother. Otto, in business at Downer, and Bertha, Minnie and 
August, at home. 

As noted abo\e. Otto F. Kelting was but se\eii vears of age when he 
came to this country with his parents and his schooling was continued in 
the schools of Chicago until he came to Minnesota, where he completed 
his schooling in the Sabin schools. .\s a young man he became interested 
in railroading and for three years was employed as a brakeman on the 
Great Northern. He then became engaged in farming and was for se\en 
years thus engaged, the owner of a Cjuarter-section farm adjoining the 
village of Downer. He then sold his farm and on Januar_\- 25, 191 7, bought 
the store building and stock of goods of Kost Brothers at Downer and has 
since then iieen engaged in the general mercantile business in that village. 
Mr. Kelting has been attentive to local political affairs and is now serving 
as justice of the ]ieace in and f<ir his home township. He formerlv served 
as constable. 

On .'\pril 28, 1908. Otto V. Kelting was united in marriage to Eliza- 
beth Kluck, who was born in Skree township. Clay county, daughter of 
Vved Kluck, one of tlie homesteaders and pioneers of that townshi]). anfl a 
biographical sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume, and to 
this union si.x children ha\e been Ijorn, Lawrence, Pearl, Alfred, Florence, 
Evalvn and \\'illiam. 



CI.AY AND NOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. eg 

ANTON KOST. 

Anton Kost, one of the early settlers of thi> part of Minnesota and a 
snbstantial landowner, of Alary township, Norman connty. umw living re- 
tired in the \ illaaje of Downer, in Clay county, is of European birth, a native 
of the rei)ublic of Switzerland, but has been a resident of Minnesota since 
the days of his young manhood, having settled up here in tiie Red I^iver 
countr}, a homesteader in what later came to be organized as Marv town- 
shi)) in Norman count\-, at that time a ])art of Polk county, and became one 
of the organizers of that township and chairman of its first board of super- 
visors. He was born on December 24, 1850, son of Joseph and .Mary ( Ilell- 
miller) Kost, also natives of Switzerland, who spent all their lives in that 
country. Joseph Kost was a butcher. He died in the middle fifties and his 
widow survived him many years, her death occurring about the year 1880. 
The}- were the jiarents of seven children, of whom the subject of this sketch 
was the fourth in order of birth, the others being Joseph, Jack. Robert, Fitz- 
mons, Katie and Christina. 

Anton Kost was but a child when his father died. He grew to manhood 
in his nati\e country and there learned the carpenter trade, remaining there 
until some little time after reaching his majority, when, in 1873, he came 
to the United .States and proceeded directly on out here to the Red River 
country, marrving in that same year a Swiss lass who had come out here 
:md had located in Clav county in that same year. I'Vir a short time after his 
marriage Mr. K(jst worked as a butcher at Moorhead, working for John 
Erickson, and then he entered a homestead claim on a (|uarter of a section 
of land in what later came to be known as Mary township, miw in Norman 
count\-, liut then ;i ]);irt of I'olk county, and there established his home. One 
of his first ste]!-- in the way of developing and improving that virgin tract 
was the jilanting <>\ a grove, which in the years since then has grown to 
noble proportions, one of the finest groves in that part of the county. A\'hen 
it came time to organize that pioneer community as a township for civic pur- 
poses, Mr. Kost took an active part in the work of organization and was 
chairman of the first board of sujjervisors of the township, a position he held 
for four years. He was the second treasurer elected in his school district 
( district No. 20 ) and held that position for twenty-one years, a strong and 
able factor in the work of developing the school system of the community in 
an early da\ . As he prospered in his farming operations Mr. Kost added to 
his boidini/s until be became the owner of an excellent farm of two hundred 



6o CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MI N NKSOTA. 

and eighty acres, on which lie erected suljstantial huil(hngs, and gradually 
created there one of the liest farm plants in that section. He also paid con- 
siderable attention to the raising of live stock and did very well. On that 
farm Mr. Kost made his home until his retirement in 1912 and removal to 
the village of Downer, where he built a line house and where he and his wife 
are now making their home, comfortably siluated and enjoying in quiet re- 
tirement the rewards of their labors during the pioneer period of the de- 
\elopment of this region. 

In 1873, shortly after his arrixal in Clay county. .Mr. Kost was united 
in marriage to Nina Heflicker, also a native of the rciniblic of Switzerland, 
who had arrived here in that same year, and to this union four children have 
been born, Katie (deceased), .\nton, .\dolph and John. Mrs. Kost's parents. 
John and Katherina Heflicker. who also were born in Switzerland, spent all 
their li\es in their native land. iNIr. and Mrs. Kost are Catholics and aided 
in the organization of the first Catholic church in the community in which 
they settled in Norman county — .St. Mary's church, which now is a strong 
and nourishing parish. As pioneers of this region they are thoroughly famil- 
iar with the details of the development of tin,' counlr\- hereabout and both 
have man\- interesting tales to tell of the earh' da vs. 



FRANK AUGUSTINE WELD. .M. .\., LL. D. 

Dr. Frank Augustine Weld, president of the .Minnesota State Normal 
school at Moorhead. is a native son of the old Fine Tree State, but he 
has been a resident of Minnesota for the past thirty-five years or more. 
He is thus as nnich a Minnesotan in spirit, and in the ardor of his service- 
to this state as one "nati\e and to the manner born." Doctor Weld was 
born in the city of Skowhegan. Maine. December 10, 1858, son of George and 
Lucy .\nn (Robbins) \\'eld. Flis father was a cabinet-maker and farmer, 
who came to this state in 1899 and spent his last days in Moorhead. 

Upon completing the course in the Skowhegan high school and Bloom- 
field Academy in 1877, Frank A. Weld entered Colby College at \\'aterville. 
Maine, where he received his collegiate training, having made his wav 
through college b\- teaching country schools, the grammar school at Machias. 
ALaine, and by serving as principal of the high school at Cherryfield. in 
that same state. In 1882 he came to IMinnesota, where for a short time lie 
was engaged in newspaper work in Minneapolis and St. Paul, but not long 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 6l 

afterward accepted a call to take the superinteiidency of the schools at 
I'arniington. From Farmington he went to Zumbrota, in Goodhue county, 
a position which he occupied for fi\e years. While living at Zuinl)rota, 
he married, and in 1889 accepted a call to the sui)erintendency of the schools 
at I'"ergus h'alls, in which city he was thus engaged for more than iivc 
years, at the end of which time he accepted the ]iosition of Northwestern 
representative for the ])uljlishing house of D. C. Heath & Company, with 
offices at Minneapolis. .\ year later, however, he resumed school work, 
going to Stillwater as superintendent of the schools of that city, and there 
he remained until 1899. in which year he received the appointment as head 
of the State Normal school at Aloorhead, which office he has since held, 
making liis home at Moorhead. Doctor Wekl has devoted practically his 
entire life since reaching maturity to the cause of education, and there 
are few lietter know 11 educators in the Northwest than he. in 1899 he 
received his master degree, and in 1914 Fargo College conferred upon 
him the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws. He has written and delivered 
many lectures on travel, art and literature, and his services are in wide 
demand on the lecture |)latlorm. Doctor Weld has served as president 
of the Minnesota Educational A.ssociation ; he has been president of the 
Council of State Normal School Presidents, an organization covering all 
the states west of the ^lississippi : he is now a member of the state com- 
mission of education, and he has held other important positions of trust. 
The Moorhead Normal school was the fourth school of its kind provided 
for by the state Legislature, the act passing in 1885. The site of the 
school is a gift of the Hon S. G. Comstock. The buildings are modern 
and include a main Imilding; two dormitories for young women; an addi- 
tion to the main building, which contains a beautiful library, gymnasium and 
bath rooms: a model school building for the elementary school; and an 
auditorium, costing $100,000, providing space for the science departments 
and a beautiful auditorium. The school was opened on August 29, 1888, 
with a membership of forty-two, and since that time the growth of the 
school has been steady and continuous. The present annual enrollment 
in all departments is one thousand four hundred and fifty. 

--Vs noted above, it was while living in Zumbrota that Doctor Wekl 
was u,u-le<l in marriage to Hattie F. Flwell. To that union three children 
have been born. Moselle Edna, wife of Dr. O. J. Hogan, a well-known 
physician and surgeon of Moorhead; Lucy Ann. wife of Curtis Pomeroy, 
au'atlor.iev at Barnesville, and I- rank F., now a senior in the Moorhead 
Normal school Doctor and Mrs. Weld are members of (he Congregational 



62 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

church at :\Ioorhead. Fraternally. Doctor Weld is affiliated with the Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons and with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. He, also, is a memher of the Delta Kappa Epsilon college fraternity. 



DAVID A. LAMB. 



David -\. Lamh. chairman of the hoard of supervisors of Elkton town- 
ship, Clav county, and the proprietor nf a line farm in section 28 of that 
township, is a native of Scotland, hut has heen a resident of Miiniesota 
since he was live years of age, the Lamh family having come here in 187 J. 
first settling in Becker count\ and later moving over into Clay county, 
heconiing prominent and influential factors in the development of the pioneer 
interests of Elkton and Elmwood tcnvnships. In a memorial sketch relating 
to the late John Lamh, uncle of the suhject of this sketch, and a hiographical 
sketch relating to Charles Lamh, .Sr., father of suhject, presented else- 
where in this volume, there are set out in considerahle detail particulars 
of the coming of the Lamb family from Scotland, their settlement in the 
Red river country and the ])art tiiey t(X)k in the (levelo]>nient of this region, 
and the attention of the reader is respectively directed to those narratives 
for further details of a genealogical ,-md historical character in this con- 
nection. 

Daviil A. L.aml), eldest son of his father, Charles Lamh, Sr.. was Ijorii 
in Forfarshire, Scotland, June 9, 1867. and was hut five years of age when 
he came with his parents and grandparents to Minnesota, the family settling 
in Becker conntv and later moving o\er into Cla\' county, where he ever since 
has made his home. He received his schooling in the early schools of this 
latter county and grew u\i a practical farmer, thoroughl\- familiar with 
pioneer conditions hereahout. When he reached his majority, in 1888, he 
homesteaded a tract of one hundred and si.xtv acres in section j8 of Elkton 
township and entered upon the ask of impro\ing and developing the same, 
and after his marriage in 1893 established his home there and has ever 
since resided there, one of the best-known and most substantial farmers 
and stockmen of that neighborhood. As he prospered in his operations Mr. 
Lamb added to his land holdings and is now the owner of three hundred and 
forty acres of excellent land, three hundred and twenty acres of which is 
in the home place, one of the best-developed half-sections thereabout. Mr. 
Lamb has substantial buildings on his place and has a fiiie farm plant. In 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 63 

addition to his general farming, Mr. Lamb has given considerable attention 
to the raising of graded Shorthorn cattle and is doing very well. For 
years he has gi\'en close attention to the civic affairs of his comninnily 
and for more than ten years has been serving as a member of tiie l)oard 
of township supervisors, the present chairman of the board, and in that 
capacity has done much for the advancement of the general public interest. 

In 1893 Da\id A. Lamb was united in marriage to Elizabeth Mann. 
who also was born in Scotland and who died in 1901, lea\ing live children, 
Ernest, Jessie, Laura, David and Margaret, all of whom are living. Mrs. 
Lamb was a daughter of Alexander Mann and wife, who came to this counlr\-. 
but who returned to their nati\e land after about two years of residence 
here. Mr. Lamb is a member of the Presbyterian church and takes a proper 
interest in the various beneficences of the same. He is a member of the 
local lodge of the Modern Woodmen of .\merica and take^ an jictive interest 
in the afYairs of that organization. 



NILS HOLBECK. 



Nils Holbeck, proprietor of the New Columbia Hotel at Moorhead, 
former chief of police of that city, former deputy sheriff of Clay county 
and actively identified with the affairs of that county since old homestead 
days, he having been a homesteader in Morken townshi]). is a native of 
tlie kingdom of Denmark, fnit has been a resident of Minnesota since the 
days of his boyhood, having come to this state with his parents, who 
settled tMi a homestead farm in Otter Tail county, this state, where the.v 
.spent the remainder of their lives, honored pioneers of that county. . 

Nils Holbeck was liorn on December 16, 1855, and was about tifieen 
years of age when he came to Minnesota with his parents, b'or^some 
time after coming here he worked as a farm hand on a farm near Fergus 
Falls and then came on farther West and for a time was employed on a 
farm in the \ icinitv of Fargo. He then went over to Hi.smark and thence 
after a while down into the P.lack Hills, whence he presently returned to 
Minnesota and settled at Moorhead, where he has made his home most 
of the time since then. L'pon coming back to this state Mr, Holbeck en- 
tere<l a homestead claim to a tract of Land in Morken town.ship, Clay county, 
and while living there wa. made deputy sheriff of that county, movnig 
to Moorhead, where be later was made chief of police. Cpon the com- 



64 CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

pletion of his term of service in that office lie engaged in the coal Ijusines^ 
at Moorhead and later became proprietor of the old Columbia Hotel. When 
that building was destroyed by fire Mr. Holbeck went to Minneapolis, where 
for a time he was engaged in the retail Iic|uor business, but he presently 
returned to Moorhead and resumed the i)roprietorshi]) of the New Columbia 
Hotel and has since been conducting the house, one of the most popular 
hotels in this part of the country. In addition to the official [wsitions above 
mentioned as haxing been held by Mr. Holbeck. he also for some time 
served as state game warden for this district and in that capacity did 
much to help preserve the native game out of season. 



OLE H. HOGSTAD. 



Among die [)ersevering and energetic fanners of Oak Port township. 
Clav county, is Ole H. Hogstad. who was born in Norway, September 4. 
1861. He is a son of Helge and Ingeborg (Nelson) Hogstad, both natives 
of Norway, where they lived and died on a farm. Their family consisted of 
four children, namely: Ingeborg. Bertha (deceasedj, Jacob and Ole H. 

Ole H. Hogstad grew to manhood in Norway and there attended the 
public schools. In 1884 he emigrated to America, coming directly to Moor- 
head. Minnesota, and for some time he worked as a farm laborer in Clay 
count} and has resided here ever since. He worked on farms along the 
Buffalo river for nine years, then rented land in Oak Port township for 
seven years, operating one hundred and sixty acres just across the road from 
where he now lives : but in the meantime he had purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of unimproved land where he now resides. He moved on this 
land in 1899 and in due course of time had it under cultivation, erected a 
good group of buildings and set out a grove. He has one of the most de- 
sirable farms in the township, and has Ijeen very successful as a general 
farmer and stock raiser, now owning three himdred and twenty acres. He 
raises a great deal of grain, much of which is fed to live stock, preparing 
large numbers of cattle and hogs for the market annually. He plants a large 
acreage of potatoes every year, his land being admirably adapted to the 
growing of the white tubers. 

Mr. Hogstad helped organize the Northern Potato Growers' Sales 
Company, and was president of the same for two or three years. He did 
much toward making it a pronounced success. He also helped organize the 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 65 

Farmers' Elevator Company at Moorhead and was the first vice-president of 
the same. Politically, he is independent. He is township supervisor, which 
office he has held during the past sixteen years. 

Mr. Hogstad was married on November ii, 1910, to .Anna Grinis- 
tvedt. who was born in Norway, a daughter of Sven and Signie (Ness) 
Grimstvedt. also natives of Norway, where they established their permanent 
home, and both of whom are now deceased. Sven Grimstvedt was married 
twice and was the father of fifteen children. Mrs. Hogstad came to America 
in 1897. Three children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Hogstad. namelv : 
Helge, Segfred and Bertha. 



CHARLES S. MARDEN. 

Charles S. Marden, extensive owner of land, former member of the 
state Legislature and former county attorney for Clay county, is a native 
of the state of Vermont, but has been a resident of Minnesota since 1882. 
He was born in Randolph, Vermont, on October 2, 1864, a son of Riley H. 
and Emily M. (Clififo-rd) Marden, natives of the same state. 

Riley H. Marden was born in Albany, Vermont, on January 24, -1832, 
and was a member of the legal profession and a well-known member of 
the bar in his native place. At the age of fifty, in 1882, he moved to 
Fergus Falls, Minnesota, where he continued to practice as an attorney and 
also became the owner of a tract of land. His death took place on July 
22, 1900. Riley H. RLnrden served the cause of the Union during the 
Civil War and was a member of Fourth and Ninth Regiments, Vermont 
Volunteer Infantry, and later held a commission in the One Hundred and 
Twenty-seventh United States Colored Infantry. His war service covered 
the entire period of that conflict and he participated in several important 
engagements, receiving his honorable discharge at the close of the war. Mr. 
Marden's wife, Emily M. Clifford, was born in April, 1837, in the .same 
house in Randolph, Vermont, as was her son, Charles S., the subject of 
this sketch. She died in April, 187 1, eleven years before her husband 
came to this state. They were the parents of two children, namely, Mrs. 
Caroline E. Hooper, whose death occurred in Omaha, Nebraska, in March, 
1899, and Charles S. 

Charles S. Marden was reared in Bristol, Vermont, and attended the 

(5a) 



66 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

public schools and Bristol Academy. In 1882 he accompanied his father 
to Minnesota, where they settled in Fergus Falls and he commenced taking 
a law course with the view to practicing as an attorney. In 1891 he moved 
to Barnesville, Clay county, where he resided until igi i. and where he served 
as city attorney from 1891 to 1901. From 1901 to 1907 Mr. .Marden was 
county attorney for Clay county, and from 191 1 to 1915 he represented the 
Sixtieth district in the Minnesota state Senate. During all those years of 
public service he commanded the unstinted confidence of the electors and 
was generally recognized as one of the leading and public s[)irited men of 
Clay county. In April, 191 1, Mr. Marden rcmo\ed his practice to Moorhcad. 
In January, 191 1, he organized the Red i\i\er Farm F(ian Comp;uiy. and 
has been president of the company ever since. 

On January 2, 1886, Charles S. Marden was united in marriage to 
Elise E. Cayo, who was born on April 15. 1863, in Two Rivers, Wisconsin. 
Thev are the parents of two children. Irene Emily, who married L. V. 
Repke and is living at St. Paul, this state, and Edith Josephine, who became 
the wife of Fred M. Brophy and lives in Moorhead, this county. Mr. and 
Mrs. Marden take a proper part in the general social activities of the 
community in which the\' reside, helpful factors in the promotion of all 
causes having for their object the common good of the community. Mr. 
Marden is a member of the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution ; 
he is also a member of the Masonic order and is a Shriner and also holds 
membership in the Odd Fellows. Knights of Pythias and the h'lks, and in 
all these several organizations takes an active part. He served two years 
in Company C, Second Regiment, State Militia, at Winona, Minnesota. 



KNUD WEFALD 



Knud Wefald, well-known lumberman of Hawlev, Clav county, was 
born in Kragero, Norway, November 3, 1869. He is a son of Knut and 
Karen (Pederson) Wefald. The father was born June 10, 1843. i" Drange- 
dal Parish, Norway, June 10, 1843, and the mother was born in Songedal, 
Sondeled Parish. Norway. They grew to maturity, w-ere married and estab- 
lished their home in their native land. The father was a non-commissioned 
officer in the regular Norwegian army for about twentv-five years. He 
was a surveyor by profession, but spent the latter part of his life on a 
farm. His was the oldest family in Drangedal Valley, the old Wefald home- 



CI, AY AND iXORMAX fOl'NTIES. MINN KSdI'A, ()'' 

Stead being the oldest dwelling in the valley. They were all known as good 
citizens and were intluential in the affairs of their locality. Four chil- 
dren were bom to Knut and Karen W'efald, namely: Kniid, of this sketch: 
-Martin, who lives in Minneapolis. Minnesota: Peter, who is farming in 
Mountrail county, Xorth Dakota, and F.ninia, unmarried, wlio resides in 
Minneapolis. 

Knud W'efald grew to manhood in Norway, and there he rcccixed a 
public school education: lit- also attended high school. lie immigrated to 
America in 18(87, landing in -\ew \'ork City on May Jtjtli of that year. 
He came on West and located in l-'ossum townshi]), Xorman count\', .Min- 
nesota, where he worked on farms until i8r)r), in which \ear he came to 
Hawley, Clay countw and accepted a position with tlie Wilcox Lumber Com- 
|)anv, with which he remained until i()02, gi\ing eminent satisfaction and 
doing much during that period to increase the business and prestige ot 
the firm in the localit\' of llawle\. lie took his famil\- on a \ isit to Xorwax' 
in 1902, remaining in the old country one year. He had redeemed the old 
home i)lace, which he sold while there. In the fall of 1903 he returned 
to Hawley. Minnesota, and in the spring of 1904 he organize<l the Hawley 
T. umber Coni])an\- in partnership with Andrew Johnson and II. 1*". Mensing. 
and he has been manager and secretary of the same ever since. The \enture 
proved successful from the first and the business has gr.adually increased 
with advancing vears until it has now reached vast proportions, which 
result has been due \ ery Largely to the eft'orts and judicious management of 
Mr. Wefald. .\ large and well-stocked yard is maintained and a complete 
line of building material and paints is handled. It is one of the best known 
and most successful lumber coni])anies in Clay county. 

Mr. Wefald was married in 1899 to Sarah Skree. a d.aughter of .Mikel 
Skree and wife, natives of Telemarken, Norway. To Mr. and Mrs. W'efald 
nine children have been born, namely: Magnus, Harold, Egil, Karen, Martha, 
Olav, Nana. Else and Sarah. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wefald are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church, 
in which he served several years as secretary. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
Woodmen and the Sons of Norway. Politically, he is a ])rogressive Re- 
l)ul)lican. l'"rom 190^1 to i()|j he served as i)resi(lent of tlie village council 
of Hawley. to which otfice he was again elected in nn;. In 191-' he was 
elected representative and served two terms in the state Legi.slature. or 
during the sessions of 1913 and n^i.s. lie made a most commendable 
record, of which his constituents and friends were justly i)roud. Durnig 
the session of 191 3 be. with the assistance of Senator Charles .Marden. 



68 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

secured an appropriation of one hundred tliousand dollars witli which to 
erect a science huilding for the Moorhead State Normal school. He made 
his influence felt for the general good of Clay county and the state. He 
is a man who is well informed on current topics of the day and has kept 
well ahreast of the times. He is widel}- read and is a close ohserver. 
He is also public-spirited and scrupulously honest. He has done much 
for the upbuilding of Hawley, whose interests he has long had at heart and 
sought to promote in every legitimate way. and is eminently deserving of 
the o-ood will and high esteem in which he is held by all who know Iiim. 
irrespective of party alignment. 



EUGENE ELLSWORTH LEACH. 

Eugene I'^Usuorth Leach, member of the board of township supervisor- 
of Iilkton township. Clay county, and the proprietor of a tine farm of four 
hundred and eighty acres in the northern part of that township, is a native 
of Illinois, born at Franklin Grove, in Lee county, that state, on August 
27, 1S64, son of James and Lucy (Miller) Leach, who later moved to 
Dows, Wright county, Iowa, where the latter is still living. 

James Leach was born in New York state in 1839. He later moved to 
1-ranklin Grove, Illinois, and was there married in 1863. to Lucy Miller, 
who was born in Illinois on June 16. 1846. Two or three years after 
his marriage James Leach established his home on a farm in the immediate 
\icinity of Dows, low-a, and there si)ent the remainder of his life, his death 
occurring in 1889. His widow is still living there. They were the parents 
of four sons, the suliject of this sketch, the first-born, having three brothers, 
Claud, of Dows. Iowa: Mont, who is married and is living in Clay county, 
and Harry, of Dows, Iowa. 

Eugene E. Leach was but a child when his parents moved from Illinois 
to Iowa and settled in the neighborhood of Dows, where he received his 
schooling and grew to manhood, from the days of his boyhood a valued 
assistant in the labors of improving and developing the home place. In 
1891. in \\'right county. Iowa, Mr. Leach was united in marriage to Eva 
McCov, who was born at Galesburg. Illinois, in 1872, and in the spring 
of 1904 he bought the farm on which he is now living, in Clay county, 
and has ever since made his home there, he and his family being very 
comfortablv situated. Mr. Leach is the owner of four hundred and eighty 



CLAY AND XOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 69 

acres, a lialf section in section 2 of Elklon townshij). and a (|uaitcr o\ a 
section cornering on the same in section 10, and has improved and developed 
the same in fine shajje, now having one of tlie l^est farm ])l;ints in that i)art 
of the county. In addition to liis general farming he is .giving consideral)le 
attention to the raising of li\e stock, with particular reference to l^iland 
China hogs and Shorthorn cattle, and is doing well in his npcralions. Mr. 
Leach gi\-es his earnest attention to the general civic affairs of the com- 
munity and is now serving as a meml)er of the hoard of township supervisors. 
He is a progressive and puhlic-si)irited agriculturist and for the past \'ear 
has heen serving as president of the East Side Farm cluh. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leach have twelve children, Ray, Roy. .Arthur. Clyde. 
Lloyd. l*!arl, .Alva, Lewis, Virgil, Ruth, Lucy and A'clva 1)., all of whom 
are living, a verv interesting family. They never lia\c had a doctrir on 
account of sickness up to the date of this puhlicalion. The Leachc; have 
a pleasant home and take a proper interest in the community's general 
social activities. 



JOHN \Y. .ALLEN. 



[ohn W. .Mien, former well-known extensi\e landowner and now a 
dealer in real e.state, is a native-horn Hoosier. whose hirth occm-red near 
Brazil, in the state of Indiana, on October 7, 1870. He is the son of 
William Allen and wife, the former of whom was a farmer on a lar.ge scale 
for several years in Indiana., later going to the state of Iowa, where he 
continued his farming operations, meeting with considerable success, and 
in that .state he spent the remainder of his life. 

When lohn W. Allen was ten years old he ;iccomi);niied his parents 
from Indiana to Iowa and jn the public schools of the latter state he received 
a sound general education. He was reared on his father's farm and assisted 
in the work on the land for some years. He then commenced Kj operate 
a farm on his own account in Iowa, engaged in .general farming for several 
years, until the fall of 1900, in which year be came over to the state of 
Minnesota, coming to Barnesville. He has owned several farms in this 
vicinity, which he sold from time to time, always to advantage, and eacii 
of those farms varying from one hun.lred and sixty acres to two sections 
of land. Throughout the >ears he w.is engaged in the purchase and sale 
of his different land holdings, he was conducting on a large scale, a gram 
and slock farming business, a handsome competency accruing to him a^ 



/O CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

the result of his successful operation.^ in those lines. Durin<( the greater 
part of his residence in Clay county. Mr. Allen has been engaged in handling 
real estate and now chiefly follows that occujiation. at the same time being 
engaged in tlie sale of automobiles, and in all hi> various undertakings 
he has met with marked success, his knowledge of land \ alues being well 
established throughout Clay county and outside it. 

On October 3. 1803. John W. Allen was united in marriage to .Marv 
\'. Miller, a dau.ghter of Johnson Miller and wife. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen six children have been born as follow : Claude. Harlcv. Gladys. 
Donald, William and Delores. The .Allen family are earnest members of 
the Methodist church and are warmly interested in its good works and 
in all community good work-, ever hel])ing every worthv cause in the town- 
ship and county. 

Mr. Allen is a Democrat in politics, but has never been a seeker after 
public office, ])referring to devote his time to his real-estate interests. Ik- 
is a member of the Modern \\'oodmen of .\merica. and in the affairs of 
that fraternal order he takes a li\elv interest. 



EUGEXK ASKF-:C,.VARI). 

One of the enterprising yt>ung business men of Clay county is Eugene 
A>kegaard. cashier of the Comstock State Bank, and a man who is doing 
much toward the development of his home town in a general wav. He 
was born on the home farm in Pleasant township. Cass county. Xorth 
Dakota, just across the Red river of the Xorth. on l<"ebruary 1. 1884. He 
is a son of D.ivid and Miimie (Dunhom) Askegaard, a sketch of whom 
ajjpears on another page of this \olume. Suffice it to sa\- here that the 
father is one of the leading business men of Comstock and an old .-md 
influential citizen of Clay countv. 

Eugene .Vskegaard grew up on the home farm in Holy Cross township. 
Clay county, his father moving from Cass county. Xorth Dakota, to a farm. 
the present site of the village of Comstock, in 1886, when Eugene was 
two years old. Here the son assisted with the general work on the farm, 
and in the winter time he attended the public schools at Comstock, later 
the State Xormal school at Moorhea.l, from which he was graduated in 
1004. After leaving school he taught for three winters in the district 
schools of Clay county and during the summer months he worked in his 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 7 1 

father's store or on the liome farm. Upon the organization of the Gmi- 
stock State Bank in 1909 he hecame cashier, the (hilies of which responsible 
position he has since discharged in a manner that has reflected nnich credit 
upon himself and to the satisfaction of tlic stockholders and patrons of the 
Ijank. He has been a close observer and student of modern banking methods 
and is an alert, courteous and painstaking man, who believes in system as 
well as fair dealing. 

In January, 19 10, he was appointed assistant secretary of the Comstock 
and Holy Cross Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and in 1916 
he was elected director and secretary of the same. The pronounced and 
rapidly-growing success of this company has been due very largely to his 
influence, as he has done practically all the work in prcmioting and carrying 
on the work of the same since it was first started. 

Mr. Askegaard married Harriet Charlotte Rustad on June 4, 1914. 
She is a native of North Dakota and grew to womanhood in Rustad. Min- 
nesota. She received good educational advantages, graduating from the 
Moorhead State Normal. She is a daughter of Sanuiel and Valliorg Rustad. 
a native of Rustad, Minnesota. To Mr. and Mrs. Askegaard two children 
ha\e been born, Dorothy Margaret and Rachael Helen. 

Politically, Mr. Askegaard is a Republican and he lias been more or 
less active in public affairs for some years. He served as village clerk 
of Comstock for three \ears and is now serving his second year as treasurer 
of the village. He is at present clerk of the school board. He is a member 
of the Masonic order and the Norwegian Lutheran church. 



EDWARD O. WARDEBERG. 

One of the enterprising voung business men of Barnesville, Clay countx'. 
Minnesota, is Edward O. Wardeberg, who was born on a farm in Wilkin 
county, this state, the son of Ole E. and Agnetta (Jenson) Wardeberg, both 
of whom were natives of Norway. 

Ole E. Wardeberg came to America as a young man, and located in Wil- 
kin county, Minnesota, where he made his home up to the time of his death, 
September, 1909. He was the owner of a fine farm of four hundred and 
sixty acres located in Prairie View township, his farm lying along the county 
line lietween Cla}- and Wilkin counties. He and his wife were the parents 
of four children, Edward O., Anton, George and Bertha. The family are 



72 CLAY AXD XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

earnest members of the Norwegian Lutheran cliurcli. and are among tlie 
substantial citizens of their home community. 

Edward O. Wardeberg received his early education in the public schools 
of his native county, and later attended the Agricultural College at Fargo, 
North Dakota. During his summer vacations he assisted with the work on 
the home farm until 1914, in which year he came to Barnesville, and in part- 
nership with O. P. I.andsom, engaged in the general merchandise business, in 
which line he has met with a very commendable degree of success. Besides 
dealing in all kinds of general merchandise, they buy and ship many car- 
loads of potatoes. Mr. Wardeburg is well known, prominent and popula: 
in the social activities of the younger residents of Barnesville, and also t 
an active interest in the affairs of the Norwegian Lutheran church, of whicli 
he is a member. Mr. Wardeberg on July 9, 1917, married Clara Linn, of 
Maidenrock, Wisconsin. 



BYRON GRAHAM LA GRANGE. 

Byron Graham La Grange, proprietor of a tine farm of four hundred 
acres in Elkton township, Clay county, and one of the most progressive 
farmers of that .neighljorhood, is a native of the neighboring state of Wis- 
consin, but has been a resident of Minnesota since he was six years of age. 
He was born on a pioneer farm in Winnebago county, Wisconsin, in 1858, 
son of .\lonzo Graham and Anna .\1. (Hillman) La Grange, the former a 
native of the state of New ^'ork and the latter of German}-, she having come 
to this country with her widowed mother when she was but a child. In the 
fall of 1864 Alonzo G. La Grange came with his family from Wisconsin to 
Minnesota, driving through, and locating at Garden City, in Blue Earth 
county, arriving there on October 13 of that year. At Garden City he estab- 
lished a hotel and later a butcher shop and made his home there until 1868, 
when he moved to Worthington. ccnmty seat of Nobles county, opened a 
hotel there and continued in the hotel business in tiiat city until his retire- 
ment. He is still living at A\'orthington, now nearly ninety years of age. 
His wife died in 1912. He is a member of the I'resbyterian church, as wa' 
his wife, antl their children were reared in that faith. There are three c 
these children, the subject of this sketch, the lirst-born. having two sisters, 
Grace and Leonice. 

As noted above, Byron G. La Grange was but a child when he came 




P.yUOX ti. I.AOnAXGE AND FAMILY. 



Tnt Nh-'vV YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENeX 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. J? 

with his parents to Minnesota and his schoohng was completed in the schools 
of Worthington. As a young man he followed various branches of industry, 
none of these various jobs being "snaps," however, he declares: and later 
became a railroad contractor and then a butcher, and for eight years was 
(lei>uty sheriff of Xobles county. In the meantime he had bought a tract 
of land up here in the Red River country, in Elkton township. Clay county, 
and in ^larch, 1906, moved here with his family and established his home 
on that farm and proceeded to improve and develop the same. Since enter- 
ing upon the occupancy of his land .Mr. I.a Grange has erected a substantial 
set of Ijuildings and has otherwise improved the place until he now has a 
fine farm plant, one of the best-ordered places in the community. He has 
four hundred acres of excellent land and of late years has gone in quite 
extensively for potato raising, in addition to his extensive live-stock busi- 
ness, his specialty in the latter line being Durham cattle. 

On November 5, 1894, Byron G. La Grange was united in marriage to 
Augusta Berreau, who was born in Nobles county, this state, daughter of 
Otto Berreau and wife and to this union two children have l>een born, a 
son and a daughter, .\rthur (jraham and Eudora Louise. Air. and Mrs. La 
Grange are members of the Presbyterian church and take a proper part in 
church work, as well as in the general good works and social activities of 
the communilv in whicii the\' live. Mr. La Grange is a member of the local 
lodge of the Modern Woodmen of America and takes a warm interest in the 
affairs of that organization. 



HERMAN G. VVENDLANDT. 

Herman (i. Wendlandt, well-known merchant of Sabin, in Clay 
county, and for \ears postmaster of that village, also formerl\- and for 
years justice of the peace in and for Elmwood township, is a native son 
of Minnesota and has lived in this state all his life. He was born on a 
pioneer farm not far from St. Cloud, in Steams county. May 16, 1869, son 
of Fred and Ernestine (Schultz) Wendlandt, natives of Germany, who 
were married in Stearns county and there spent their last days. 

Fred Wendlandt was born in 1844 and was eleven years of age when 
his parents. Christian and Rebecca Wendlandt. left Germany in 1855 and 
came to the United States with their family, settling in Wisconsin, where 
they remained until 1863, in which year they came o\er into Minnesota 
and settled in Stearns county, where they spent the remainder of then" 



74 CLAV AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

lives. Christian Wendlandt had served as a soldier in the army of his 
native country and was in the army at the time Poland took up arms against 
Germany, but did not participate in any active engagements. Fred Wend- 
landt was under twenty years of age when he came to Minnesota with his 
parents from Wisconsin and in time he homesteaded a tract of land in 
Stearns county and after his marriage in thai county estalilished his home 
there. His wife, Ernestine Schultz, was horn in 1S45 and was eighteen 
years of age when she came to this country. She was a daughter of 
Gottfried Schultz and wife, tlie latter of whom was a Moede. Her mother 
died in her nati\e land her father later married \\'ilhelmina Ernst and 
in 1863 left Germany with his family, and after spending a year in Canada 
came to Minnesota and hecame a homesteader in Stearns county, where he 
spent the rest of his life, living there to the age of ninety-one years. His 
father was a soldier in the Napoleonic Wars and carried a hullet in liis 
knee to his gra\e. l'"red Wendlandt hecame a substantial farmer of Stearns 
county and a man of influence in his community. He died there on Sep- 
tember 12, 1916. and his widow surxivetl him a little less than a year, 
her death occurring on February 5, 1917. They were the parents of nine 
children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the first-born, the- others 
being Rebecca. Emelia. Augusta. Ji>hn, Eouisa. Mathilda. Lena and 
William. 

Reared on the home farm in the vicinity of St. Cloud, H. G. Wend- 
landt received his early schooling in the schools of St. Cloud and was 
later graduated from the State Normal school there, after which he was 
engaged in teaching school for three years, in the meantime becoming ac- 
<|uainted with commercial forms and the mercantile business, and remained 
there until 1899. when he came up into the Red River country and opened 
a general store at Sabin. in Clay county, where he ever since has been 
engaged in business, one of the best-known business men in that part of 
the count}-. In December of that same yeai- Mr. ^^'en(llandt was commis- 
sioned postmaster of .Sabin and has ever since occupied that position. From 
the beginning- of his residence in Clay county Mr. \\'endlandt has taken 
an earnest interest in local political affairs, served for some time as a 
member of county Republican central comi-nittee and for vears served as 
justice of the peace in and for his home township. 

In 1900, the year after he became established in business at Sabin, 
H. G. W^endlandt was united in marriage there to Minnie Schroeder, 
daughter of Frank Schroeder and wife, pioneers of the Sabin neigh1)or- 
liood. and to this iu-iion three children have been born. Fred. Erna and 



CLAY AND XOKMAX COUNTIES, M INNICSOTA. 



/D 



liuijert. The Weiullandts are members of tlie Lulheran cliurch and take 
a proper interest in chnrch work, as well as in the <,rcneral good works 
and social activities of their home commnnity. 



THEODORE EVANSON. 

In the case of 'J'lieoddre Evanscjn, a farmer of Ulen township. Clay 
county, the opportunity to succeed may not have sought the man, hut most 
certainly the man sought and took advantage of the opportunity and he has 
made good application of the gifts which nature has bestowed upon him. 

Mr. Evanson was born in Decorah, Iowa, May 4, 1866. He is a son of 
John and Catherine | Anderson) Evanson, both natives of Norway, where 
they spent their earlier years, but were not married until after they came to 
the United States. He came in 1850 and she preceded him by aljout one vear, 
coming with lier ninther and stepfather, Iver Ringstad. .Mr. Ring- 
stad bought government land in Winneshiek county, Iowa, on which 
he and his wife spent the rest of their lives. The parents of the 
subject of this sketch located near Decorah, Iowa, where they were married, 
in 1 85 1, being the first couple to marry in Winneshiek county, and were 
among the early pioneers there. They worked hard to get a start in the new 
country and eventually became very comfortably established. They owned 
one hundred and twent\- acres for which they paid only one dollar and twenty- 
five cents per acre. They subsequently bought and sold other farms in that 
county. Mr. Evanson made all the improvements on the homestead, erecting 
.good buildings, his first house being of logs. Later a large frame dwelling 
was erected, ^^■hen he married, Winneshiek county had not Ijeen organized 
and Ik- was cnm]ielled to go a long distance to the county seat of .Allamakee 
countv. in order to ])rocure the necessary license. Not knowing the customs 
in America very well be took his bride to the parson's residence and when 
asked for the license handed the preacher his first naturalization papers. So 
he had u> leave bis bride there and make a long jnurney to secure the proper 
license. 

John Evan.son took an active interest in the early affairs of Winneshiek 
count)-, which he helped organize, also assisted in organizing the township 
in which his land was located. He was thereafter incumbent of some town- 
ship office, most of the time, until his death, the township being Madi.son. He 
was assessor of the same for a period of twenty-five years, also served as 



76 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

treasurer for more than a quarter of a century; a part of the time he lieUl 
both offices simultaneously. He gave a lot for the first cemetery and also 
for the first E\angelical Lutheran church in his community, and it was liuilt 
on one corner of his farm. He and his wile s])ent the rest of their lives in 
that county, each reaching an advanced age. 

To John Evanson and wife ten childen were horn, named as follows: 
Enielia, deceased; Nora; Eliza, deceased; Evan, deceased; Maria, Theodore, 
Lena, Edva, Anna, deceased, and Emma. They .grew up on the home farm 
in Iowa and attended the district schools there. 

Theodore Evanson grew to manlmod on tiie home farm in W'inneshiek 
county, Iowa, and he received his education in the district schools there. He 
continued to work on his father's farm until he went to Ada. Minnesota, in 
1885, east of which town he rented a farm one summer: then returned home 
for a year. He later went to Xnrman county, Minnesota, and located in Green 
Meadow township, where he bought a tree claim of one hundred and sixty 
acres, which he rented out most of the time and worked in the vicinity of 
LHen, Clay county. He has made his home in Ulen township for a period 
of thirty years, or since 1887. During that time he has seen the township dc- 
\ eloped from a sparsely settled prairie to its present advanced position as a 
modern farming community. Upon coming here he bought a homestead 
right of one hundred and sixt\ acres, which he proved up on, but later sold 
out and in 1900 bought one hundred and twenty acres on which he has since 
resided. He made all the present excellent im|)ro\ements on this land and 
has been successful as a general farmer and stock raiser. He is also a stock- 
holder in the I'armers" Co-operative Creamery at Ulen. whose pronounced 
success has been due very largely to his efforts. He was formerly a director 
of this concern and in 1916 he became manager and vice-president, but later 
gave up the office of manager; he is still discliarging the duties of vice- 
president. 

Mr. Evanson was married in September. i8qi. to Gena Mobeck. who 
was born in Norway, from which country she came to America when young. 
She is a daughter of Lars Mobeck and wife. Three children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Evanson. all of whom live at home at this writing: thev 
were named as follows : Leonard. Eliza and Mildred. 

Mr. Evanson has long been active in public aff'airs. Politically, he is a 
Republican. He was first road boss; later served about seven years as town- 
ship assessor and is now clerk of the township, which position he has held 
for eighteen years, or ever since the village of LHen was separated from the 
township. He served as school clerk while living on his homestead farm 



CLAY AND NOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNKSOTA. 'J-J 

from 1892 to 1900, when he moved to his present farm. At that time he was 
made clerk in this school district, which office he has since held. He helongs 
to the Lutheran church. 



OMER J. PI.UMMER. 



Omer J. Plummer, a suhstantia! farmer and stockman of Humboldt 
township, owner of a half section of land in that township, is a native of the 
state of Illinois and has been a resident of Clay county for the past ten years. 
He was born in \\'hiteside county. Illinois, on January joth, 1852, a son of 
Kaleb and Rebecca (I'ittenger) riummer, the former a native of the state 
of Marvland and the latter, of the state of Ohio, and whose la.st days were 
spent in Iowa. 

Kaleb I'lummcr was born in Maryland in 1803 and was educated in the 
schools of that state. He follcnved the occupation of a farmer and thus con- 
tinued in his native state for some years, later moving to Iowa, where he 
resumed his farming oi)erations and spent the remainder of his life, his death 
taking place in 18^4. at the advanced age of eighty-nine years. He was a 
.good, practical farmer of the old school and trained his sons to lives of use- 
fulness. In 1830 Kaleb I'lumnicr was married to Rebecca Pittenger. who 
was born in Ohio in 18 14. The marriage was performed in Ohio and Mrs. 
Plummer died in Iowa in iSSS. having reached the age of seventy-four years. 
To Kaleb Plummer and wife the following children were born: John, Susan 
and Hiram (twins). Anna. Thomas, Joseph, Nicholas, Elizabeth, Mary, 
lulia, Wavne, Omer J.. I.ydia, Belle and Catherine. Of the sons of this 
faniih-. all are dead but Omer J., the subject of this sketch. Four of them 
\-olunteered for service on behalf of the Union during the Civil War. a family 
record to be justlv proud of, and three of the four boys died while in the 
service. 

Omer f. Plummer was educated in the public schools of Illinois and was 
reared on his father's farm. He accompanied his parents to Iowa and settled 
on the farm, where he continued to work, a valuable as,sistant in the develop- 
ment of the home place. He came to Clay county in 1907 and rented a farm 
in Eglon township, which place he worked for two years. 'Hie next year he 
rented a farm near Hawley and in 1910 he bought the farm which he now 
occupies, consisting of a half section of prime land, located in .section 10, 
Humboldt township, and on this tract he is engaged in general fanning and 
in the raising of a choice strain of Hereford cattle and is doing very well. 



78 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNKSOTA. 

When Mr. Plummer took over tlie holding a set of good liuildings had lieen 
ahead}- erected and his farm is now regarded as one of the best-kept and 
productive in the township. 

On November ist, 1S74. Onier J. I'lunmier was united in marriage to 
Ida Downs, who was born in Ogle county, lUinois. July 9th, 1857, the mar- 
riage taking place in Iowa. To this union eleven children were born as fol- 
low : Luc\', married and hves in .Missouri; Xicliolas. married, lives in \e- 
Ijraska: Mary, deceased: Calel), married, in Iowa; lielle, married, in Iowa; 
luldie. who is married and lives in Clay county: Cora, killed by a cyclone 
while the family livetl in Iowa: Ida, at home, Hazel, deceased, and Sylvester 
and Henrv, at home. Mr. Plummer takes a good citizen's interest in local 
affairs and in all movements intended for the benefit of the public. He is a 
director and vice-president of the Clay County I'"air Assix'iatiou, proving a 
v.ilua1)le factor in making the annual fairs a success, :md in other ways he 
tri\'es of his time and energy to the liest interests of the communitv. 



P. H. PEDRRSON. 



P. H. Pederson. one of Moorhead's leading business men. proprietor of 
a hardware store in that city and president of the Ivpiity Manufacturing 
Company, is a native of the Kingdom of Xorvva\, but has been a resident of 
Minnesota since he was seven years of age and of Moorhead since he was 
twenty. He was born in 1862 and was seven years of age when his parents, 
Peter E. and Mary (Chri.slock) Pederson, left their native Norway in 1869 
and with their children came to this country. 

Upon his arrival in this countr\- in 1869, Peter E. Pederson proceeded 
on out to Minnesota with his family and settled in Goodhue county, where he 
engaged in farming and where he made his home until 1882, in which year 
he came over into this part of the state with his family and settled in Norman 
countx. l)U\ing a tract of land near Twin \ alley, where he for a second time 
established his home in a pioneer section of this state and where he and his 
-wife spent their last days. They were the parents of five children, of whom 
the suljject of this sketch was the third in order of birth, the others being 
ICrick, Ral])!!. Caroline and Gertina. 

.\s noted abo\e, P. H. Pederson was but seven years of age when lie 
came to Mimiesota with his parents in 1869 and he grew to manhood on the 
home farm in Goodhue county, receiving- his schooling in the neighborhood 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 7g 

schools and at the same time gaining- some practical business experience 
which, when he came over to this part of the state in 1882 with his parents, 
he presently put into use. Mr. Pederson was twenty years of age when he 
came up into this section and he secured employment at Moorhead. where he 
ever since has made his home. Some time after locating- there he engaged in 
the wholesale liquor business in that city and later engaged in the lunil)er 
business over the river in North Dakota, though continuing to make his 
home in Moorhead. Gradually he accjuired other interests and it was not long 
until he came to be recognized as one of the most active business men in his 
home town. In 19 13 he became connected with the Moorhead Hardware 
Company, as a partner in that concern, a corporation, and presently became 
the sole owner of the same, now operating the business alone. Mr. Pederson 
also is president of the Equity [Manufacturing Company of Moorhead and is 
vice-president of the Bergerth Fish Company at Fargo. 

In 1893 P. H. Pederson was united in marriage to Emma Thorson, and 
to this union four children have lieen born, Irene, Esther, Clifford and Earl. 
The Pedersons are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take an 
active interest in church wcirk and the general good works of their home city. 



HENRY WITJJ.VM HABERLE. 

Flcnrv William Flaberle, one of the pioneers of Clay county and the 
owner of a half section of excellent land in Elkton township, where he and 
his familx- make their home, is a native of Germany, but has been a resident 
of this county since 1882. He was born on December 25, 1854, son of John 
and Fredericka ( Caesemann ) llal)erle, also natives of that country, farming 
people, who spent all their lives in their native land and who were the par- 
ents of five children. Fred, Fredericka, Katherina, Henry W. and Elizabeth, 
all of whom are still living. John Halierle and his wife were members of the 
LtUheran church .ind their children were reared in that faith. 

Reared on the home farm in his native land, Henry W. Haberle received 
his .schooling there and remained at home until 1882, when he came to the 
United States and after a year spent in New York state came to Minnesota, 
in 1883, and homesteaded a (juarter of a section of land in b:ikton township. 
Clay countv, and proceeded to improve and develop the same, .\fter his mar- 
riage in 1887 he established his home on that place and has ever since resided 
there. As he prospered he added to his land holdings until he now owns three 



8o CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

hundred and twenty acres, one of the best-improved farms in that part of the 
county. Mr. Haberle has long given his earnest attention to the general civic- 
affairs of his community and was for years road overseer in his district. 

Mr. Haberle lias been twice married. In 1887, about four years after 
settling in Clay county, he was united in marriage to Paulina Beck, also a 
native of Germany, who died leaving two sons, Henry John and William 
Fred. In 1895 Mr. Haberle married Christina Weber, who also was born in 
(rermany, daughter of Eberhart Weber and wife, and to this union foiu" 
chikiren have been Ixirn. Emma, Fred. Christina and Mary. The Haberles 
have a pleasant home un their well-kept farm in Elkton township and take a 
proper interest in tlie general afifairs of the community. 



JOHN GRIFFIN. 

The late Jolin (jriffin. one of the pioneers of Clay covmty, who died at 
liis home in Barnesville, that county, in the fall of 1913, was a native of 
County Kerry. Ireland, l)ut had Ijeen a resident oi this country since the 
early seventies, he iiaving come to the United States shortly after reaching 
his majority. He was Ix)rn in 1850 and grew to manhood in Ireland. Upon 
coming to this country he located in Massachusetts, but after awhile came 
West, proceeding on u[) into the Red River country, and after awhile home- 
ste;i(ietl a tract of land in .Alliance township. Clay county. In 1885 he re- 
turned East and at Holyoke, Massachusetts, in that same year, married 
.Margaret Griffin, wlio also was born in County Kerry, Ireland, and who 
liad come to this country in 1882. 

.\fter his marriage John Griffin returned to Clay county with his bride 
and established his home on the homestead farm in Alliance township, one 
of the most .substantial pioneers of that part of the county, a continuous 
resident of Clav cotmtv for more than forty years. Mr. Griffin wa> the 
owner of a fine farm of four liundred and eighty acres of land, which he 
had ini])ro\ed in a<imirable s!iape and brought to ;i higli state of cultivation, 
he long having been regarded as one of the most progressive farmers of his 
neighliorhood. He developed that land from its virgin state, built up an 
excellent farm plant and was very comfortably circumstanced at the time of 
his death, which occurred on October 29, 1913. 

To John and Margaret (Griffin) Griffin were born ten children, namely: 
John, deceased: Thomas, deceased: Catherine, deceased; Mamie, who is 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDEN fOU.N-D-\T10NS 





JOHN GRIFFIN. 




MRS. MARGARET GRIFFIN. 



TH - 
PUBl aY 



ASTOR, LENOX 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. Si 



married and livint; in Iowa; Josephine, wIkj is now living in I'argo; James, 
who is assisting widi the management of the home farm; Wilhani, de- 
ceased; Patrick, who is assisting with the management of the home fann, 
and Margaret and Ceceha, also at home. The Griffins have a very pleasant 
home and have ever taken an interested part in the general social activities 
of the ct)mmunity in which they live. Besides her e.xtensive farm holdings, 
Mrs. Grif^tin also is the owner of a honse and lot in Barnesville, and she and 
her family are cjuite well situated. They attend the Catholic church at 
Barnesville. 



JOHN S. BARRY. 



John S. Barry, clerk of Alliance township. Clay county, owner of a 
fine farm of five hundred and sixty acres in that township and president 
of the Baker Telephone Company, is a native of die great Empire state, but 
has heen a resident of Clay county since 1881 and a landowner there for 
the past twenty-five years and more. He was horn on a farm in St. Law- 
rence county. New York, on January 21, 1859, son of John and Margaret 
(Clemnions) Barry, both natixes of Ireland, who were married in St. Law- 
rence county, New York, and there spent their last days, the former dying 
in 1902, at the age of seventy years, and liis widow surviving until 1909, 
she being over ninety years of age at the time of her death. The Barrys 
are genealogically connected with the famous Commodore Barrv* of Revolu- 
tionary fame. They were the parents of eleven children, of whom the subject 
of this sketch was the eighth in order of birth, the others being as follo\v : 
Hannah, w'ho is now living in Wisconsin; Mary, deceased; Bridget, died in 
Felton; Thomas, who came to this part of Minnesota and spent his last 
days in the village of Felton ; Kate, deceased ; Julia, who lives at Massena, 
New York; Joseph, (if Louisville. New York; William P., of Felton; 
.Samuel, deceased, and Ilenrw who is now a practicing attorney at Dickinson, 
North Dakota. 

Reared on the home farm in St. Lawrence county. New York. John 
S. Barry received his schooling in the neighboring schools and early began 
teaching school. In i88r he came to this part of Minnesota and began 
to teach school at Georgetown and was for seven years thereafter engaged 
in teaching there and in other schools in the county, during the summers 
giving his attention to farming, and after his marriage, in 1891, l)ought 
(6a) 



82 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

a farm and established his Iiome. In 1900 he bon_y;ht the farm on wliich 
he is now Hving, in section 2 of Alhance township, and has since made his 
home there, he and his family being very comfortably situated. Mr. Barry 
has an excellent farm of fi\-e hundred and sixty acres and has the same 
improved in admirable shape, one of the best general farm plants in that 
part of the county. In addition to keeping up his farming interests, Mr. 
Barry has long given his earnest attention to the civic affairs and general 
business life of the community and for seventeen years served as a member 
of the school board and is now serving as town clerk. He is also president 
of the Baker Telephone Company and has done much to extend the telephone 
ser\ice throughout that part of Clay county. 

.\t Moorhead, Minnesota, June 25. 1891, John S. Barry was united 
in marriage to Cora Agnes Burns, who was born in Mason county, West 
Virginia, near Glenwood, June 25, 1867, and to that union have been born 
scAen children, namely: Irwin, who was married on June 2, 1917, and who is 
the owner of a quarter of a section of land in the neighborhood of his 
father's home : Edith, who is a teacher in the schools of Clay county ; Paul, 
deceased, and Malcolm, Russell, John and Philip, who are at home. The 
Barr\s are Catholics, members of the church at Barnesville, and take ;i 
Ijroper interest in parish affairs, as well as in the general social and cultural 
acti\ities of their home neighborhood, and are helpful in promoting all 
movements having to do with the advancement of the common welfare 
thereabout. Mr. Barry is a member of the local lodge of Woodmen and 
takes a warm interest in the affairs of the same. 



\ ICTOR E. VERNE, M. D. 

Dr. \ ictor E. \'erne, a practicing physician at ^Moorhead since the sum- 
mer of 1909. is a native son of Minnesota and has lived in this state all his 
life. He was born in the city of Minneapolis, March 2, 1883, son of Olof and 
Charlotte (Blom) \'erne, natives of the kingdom of Sweden, who are still 
living at Minneapolis, where Olof \"erne is engaged in the merchant tailoring 
Inisiness and where he has made hi< home since he came to this country in 
1871. He and his wife are members of the Congregational church. They 
have four children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the eldest, the others 
being Dr. Paul C. Verne, a well-known dentist at Moorhead ; Dr. .\rthm- 
\'erne, of Cando, North Dakota, and Charlotte. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNKSOTA. 8^ 

Reared in the city of Minneapolis, the place of his hirtli, Victor E. Verne 
was graduated from- the high school there and in 1902 entered Minnesota 
State University, later entering the State College of Medicine and Surgery, 
a department of the University, from which he was graduated in 1906, witli 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Upon receiving his diploma. Doctor \'erne 
was appointed an interne at the City and County Hospital at St. Paul and was 
thus engaged for a year, at the end n{ which time, in the sunmier of 1904. lie 
took a course of supplemental work under Doctor DeLee. In 1906 Doctor 
Verne opened an ofifice for the practice of his profession at Biwabik, in St. 
Louis cdunt}- and was located -there from June to December of that year, when 
he returned to St. Paul and was further engaged there in the City and Conntv 
Hospital for a few months, at the end of which time, in 1907, he opened an 
office at Parker's Prairie, in Otter Tail county. The next )-ear he marrietl 
and he continued in i)ractice at Parker's Prairie until in July, 1909, when 
he moved to Moorhead, where he opened an office for the practice of his pro- 
fession and where he since has lieen located. The Doctor is licensed to prac- 
tice in North Dakota as well as in this state and is doing very well in his 
practice. He is a member of the Clay-Becker Medical Society, the Minne- 
sota State Medical Association, the .\merican Medical .\ssociation, Associa- 
tion of Military Surgeons, United States Army, and Southern Minnesota 
Aledical Society, and takes a warm interest in the deliberations of these bodies. 
He is a Scottish Rite ]\Iason and Xoble of the Ancient Arabic Order of 
Nobles of the Mvstic Shrine. In 1908 Doctor \'erne married Charlotte 
Granell and has one child, Marion, bom on July 26, 191 1. 

Dr. Paul Conrad \^erne, younger lirother of Dr. V. E. Verne, was born 
in .Minneapolis in 1882 and after his graduation from the high school in that 
city entered the dental department of the State University, from which lie 
was graduated in 1909, with the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, b'ol- 
lowing his graduation he began the practice of his profession at Minneapolis 
and was thus engaged there for two years and six months, at the end of 
which time, in 1912, he joined his brother. Dr. V. E. Verne, at Moorhead 
and has ever since been engaged in practice there. Dr. P. C. Verne is a mem- 
ber of the National Dental Society and of the state organization of dental 
surgeons, as well as of the local society maintained at Fargo and MoorheatI 
and at Crookston, and the North Dakota Dental Society. He is a Scottish 
Rite Mason and a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine and a member of the Moorhead Commercial Club. Dr. P. C. Verne 
married Cora Agnes Christopherson and has two children, Paula and Jeanne, 
both daughters. Both of the Doctors \'erne have pleasant homes at Moor- 



84 CLAY AND XOKM.W COUNTIKS, MINNESOTA. 

head and take an acti\e interest in tlie t;eneral social and cultural activities 
of their home city. 

On Mav 2. U)i/. Dr. \'. E. \crnc applied for a commission in the 
.Medical Ofificers' Reserve Corps. United States .\rniv, and on July lo, 1917, 
he received his a])])ointnient hy President Wilson as first lieutenant in the 
medical service. 



JA.MI-:S .M. W ITIIl'.ROW. 

lames M. Withcrow. court commissioner for Clay county, former city 
attorney of Moorhead, a practicin.i; attorney in that city for the past twenty 
vears and one of the best-k-no\vn lawyers and public s])eakers in this part of 
the state and in the neighboring state of North Dakota, is a nati\e of the 
Emerald Isle, but has been a resident of this country since he was s-eventeen 
\ears of age. He was born in the north of Ireland on December 19, 1869. 
son of James W'itherow and wife, both of Scottish descent, and received his 
earlv schooling;- in his native land, remaining- there until he was tlfteen years 
oi age, when, in 1884. he came to the United States. 

Upon arriving in this country Mr. W'itherow [)roceeded on up uilo the 
i\ed River vallev. his ])oint of destination being Grandiu, Traill county. North 
Dakota. After two years in Ncjrth Dakota, he left and came into Minne- 
sota for the purpose of attending school, stoi)ping in Norman county, where 
he worked on farms during vacations. During the winter of 1887-88 he 
attended Carlton College and later entered the Minne.sota State Normal at 
Mocrhead. from wliich he was graduated in 1892. During the year follow- 
ing his graduation. Mr. W'itherow was engaged in teaching school at St. \'in- 
cent. up in Kittson county, and during tlie succeeding winter, 1893-94. was 
enga,ged in teaching at Caledonia, Traill county. North Dakota. Upon the 
completion of that term of school Mr. W'itherow returned to Moorhead and 
entered systematically upon the study of law, a subject to which he had for 
some time been gixing his thoughtful attention, having carried on his law 
studies and the stuch' of elocution;ir\ expression privately during the time he 
was engaged in teaching school, many hours having thus been put in prac- 
ticing expression. On June 21, i8g8, Mr. W'itherow was admitted to the bar 
and has since Ijeen engaged, in the practice of his profession at Moorhead, for 
years having been regarded as one of the leading lawyers in this part of the 
state, his recognition as a trial lawyer having come early in his practice. For 
ten years he served as attorney for the city of ]\Ioorhead and for the past 



CLAY AND NOUMAN CUL'NTrES, Ml N .\-KS( IT A, gc 



twenty years has been court commissioner for Clay county, which official 
position he now occupies. Mr. Witherow is an active and anient Repul)!ican 
and has done much campaigning^ for his party, particularl\- in Xortli Dakota, 
under engagement to the Republican natidual committee, lie also is widelv 
known as a lecturer and his lectures on travel, literature and kindred subiecls 
are in much flemand among farmers' clubs and school organizations. 

On Xovember j6, 1904, James .\1. Witherow was united in marriage to 
hjnnia Jane liund, daughter nf James I'xind and wife, the former of whom is 
a farmer lixing near 1 Funter, North Dakota, and to this union four children 
have been burn, (irace, ALargaret (deceased), James and b'rank. The W'itli- 
erows are lUL-mbers of the Episcopal church and take an earnest interest in 
cburch woik. Air. Witherow was reared in the Presbyterian church, his 
])eople for generations ha\ing been I'resbyterians, and one of his uncles was 
for some time moderator of the General Assembly of that church in Ireland. 
Fraternally, Air. Witherow is affiliated with the Alasons and takes a warm 
interest in the affairs of that order. 



BRUNO KIPPELS. 

l!run(i Ki]ipel>, proprietor of the Aloorhead laundry, owner of the public 
abattoir in Abjorhead. formerly and for years a well-known building con- 
tractor in that citv and in other ways identilied with the comnuuiity of which 
he has been .a part since pioneer days, is a native of Germany, but has been a 
resident of this country since he was twenty-four years of age. He was 
born in 1856. son of William and Katherina ( Isaacheimer) Kippels, also 
natives of German)-, the former of whom was a farmer and a manufacturer, 
who spent all their lives in their native land and who were the parents of 
eight children. 

In his native Germany, I'.runo Kippels learned the trade of a miller and 
that of a baker and remained there until the summer of 1880, when he came 
to this country, landing at the port of Baltimore, August i. A few weeks 
later he came on out to A/finnesota and located at Moorhead, presently home- 
steading a (piarter of a section of land in Spring Prairie township, Clay 
county, and the next spring entered up(jn the task of developing and improv- 
ing the same, giving that place his close attention for nine years, at the end 
of which time he disposed of his farming interests and at Aloorhead engaged 
in carpentering. Three vears later he began work as a building contractor 



86 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

on his own account and for ten or fifteen years was engaged at Moorhead 
as a contractor. In tlie meantime Mr. Kippels had engaged in the retail meat 
Inisiness at Moorhead. in partnership with Hubert Zervas, and that partner- 
ship continued for ahout eighteen years, or until it was dissolved in 191 1. It 
was about 1906 that .Mr. Kippels built the public abattoir in Aloorhead and 
he still owns the same. In October. 1914. he bought the Moorhead laundry 
and has since owned and operated the same with much success, the excellent 
cliaracter ni the work turned out at his laundry having recommended the 
])lacc widelv throughout this section. Mr. Kipi)cls has put on the markc 
three (|uite successful inventions, a children's merry-go-round, a clothes 
hanger and a ])!aitc'r. and has diuu' fpiite well in the several enterprises with 
which he is connected. 

.On October 4. 1904. I'.runo Kippels was united in marriage to Martha 
Kopi-h. and to diis union four children have been born, Joseph, John, Bruno 
and Mar\. The KijJiiels are members of the Catholic church ;uid take a 
iiriiuer interesi in parish affairs. 



I.AMES E. HEXRY. 



Elsewhere in this volume there is set out at considerable length some- 
thing of the genealogy and history of the Henry family, which settled in 
Clav county in the seventies and became among the most useful and influen- 
tial factors in the early settlement and organization of Elkton township, and 
it therefore will not be necessary to repeat those details in connection with 
the subject of this sketch. 

lames V.. Henrv was born in Kane county. Illinois. .April 11, 1852, son 
of .\lirahani and Rachel (Jones) Henry, who later moved with their family 
to Jackson countv, Iowa, and thence, in 1878, up into this section of Minne- 
sota and settled in Clay comity, as set out in another part of this volume. In 
the meantime, in 1875, James E. Henry had gone from Jackson county, Iowa, 
to Cass countv. in that same state, and in 1880 he left there and came up 
here to join the other members of the family in Clay county and upon his 
arrival here homesteaded a quarter of a section of land in Elkton township 
and there established his home, he having married the year previously. To 
that quarter section be added, by purchase, an adjoining "eighty" just across 
the road on the east, and now has a fine farm of two hundred and forty acres. 
Mr. Henry has an interest in the fanners' creamery and in the farmers' ele- 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. g- 

vator at Barnesville. For sixteen years he served as a member of the town- 
ship board and for the past twenty years has been treasurer of his local 
school board. 

In 1879, at Greenfield, Iowa, James E. Henry was united in marriage to 
Alary E. Daniels, who was born in Jackson county, Iowa, daughter of Ken- 
sey Daniels and wife, further reference to whom is made elsewhere in this 
\olume, and to this union one child has been born, a son, Marion Henry. Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry have an adopted daughter, Ida Ellen. 



W. P. KROLL. 



Among the many enterprising Germans who have made a success in 
their adopted country is W. P. Kroll, who is die owner of a fine farm in 
Elklon township, Clay county, and is also the affable proprietor of a fiourish- 
ing livery business in Barnesville. He was born near Stetien, Prussia, on 
September 3, i860, and is a son of Charles and Augusta (Riemer) Kroll, 
both of whom were also natives of Germany. 

Charles Kroll and family came to America in 1870, settling (irst in St. 
Cloud, Minnesota, from which i)lace they dove overland with an ox-team to 
Long Prairie, Todd county, Minnesota. They were among the early pioneers 
of that county, where they homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land. 
In those early days their market and base of supplies was either St. Cloud or 
Long Prairie, and supplies had to be hauled one hundred miles, the round 
trip requiring six days. In addition to farming, Charles Kroll freighted 
supi)lies to the early settlers of Todd county for four or five years, and his 
death occurred in Long Prairie in 1876. In 1884 the mother and family 
moved to Hawlev, Clay county, Minnesota, where the mother died in 191 5. 
Charles Kroll and wife were parents of six children, B. E., Charles, W. P., 
Ann:e, ^■'j.rlclph cr) .\."""-\ t'"? b'* *""r vi'v.f.d being deceased. The family 
were sll fcitiiiji rr.;; iini.: i t ;« vjC liiii j.iitheran church. 

W. P. Kroll rcccivcii hiS early edcKation in the public schools of Kbng 
Prairie, later attending the schools of Moorhead. .\fter leaving school he 
worked for a time with his brother in a flour-mill at Hawley, but in 1887 
he homesteaded land in Elkton township, and proceeded to develop and culti- 
vate his tract. He placed all the improvements on his farm, which now con- 
sists of two hundred acres, and lived there until 1910, when he moved to 



88 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Rarnesville, and in tliis little city he has been engaged in the livery business 
very success full\- for the past seven years. 

In 1887 Mr. Kroll was married to Isabel Wilson, the daughter of A. 
Henry Wilson, a resident of Elkton, Minnesota. He is a member of the 
Modern Woodmen lodge, and takes an active interest in the affairs of that 
(irganization. While living in Elkton township. Mr. Kroll very efficiently 
served his township as school clerk for eighteen years; was supervisor of 
Elktown township for a period of four years, and also served as road overseer 
for eight ^■ears, and alilv discharged his duties as a citizen of his community. 



WALTER COOK, JR. 

Walter Cook, Jr., a [jrosperous farmer and stockman, the owner of a 
lull section of land in Clay county, is another of those enterprising Cana- 
dians who have come across the l)or<ler tcj Minnesota. He was born in Can- 
ada on July 8, 1866, a son of Walter and Eleanor (Ching) Cook, both of 
whom were natives of Devonshire. England. 

The elder Walter Cook and his wife left luigland in 1857 and went to 
Toronto, Canada, where they resided up to the year i88j, in which year 
they crossed over to the United States and settled in this part of Minnesota. 
Walter Cook had learned the carpenter trade and participated in the "Fargo 
boom" of 1882. In the .same year he settled on a homestead and farmed 
during all the vears of his active life and met with marked success in his 
farming operations. He was among the early settlers in this part of the 
county and lived on the homestead farm, which he acfjuired in 1882, until 
1909, after his wife died, when lie came to live with his son, Walter, Jr., 
and has reached the line old age of ninety years, honored and respected bv 
tlie community in which he has lived for more than thirty-five vears. His 
wife, Eleanor (Ching) Cook, died at the advanced age of eighty-three years. 
.She was born on March 4, 1826, in Devonshire, England. To Walter Cook 
and wife the following children were born: \\'illiam .Alfred, living in Flint. 
Michigan; .\nna, who resides in Canada; Jennie, in Minneapolis, this state; 
Pollen, deceased; Carrie, Josephine, Mary Grace and \\'aUcr, all living in this 
country, and Joseph, who was drowned when a boy of nine years old. The 
Cook family were members of the Episcopal church. 

Walter Cook, Jr., came with his parents from Canada to Clay county 
in 1883 and settled on the homestead farm which his father entered the 



"•{E NEW YORK 
''BRARY 

ASTOR, LEN©X 

TILDEN FOUNDATiONS 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MIN NKSOTA. 8q 



;i' 



previous _\ear. He worked ou his father's farm for several \ears, and late 
decided to engage in farming on his own account. In 1889 he purchased a 
tract of land and coniinenced to cultivate crops, and as he prospered in his 
labors he added to his holdings from time to time until he liecanie the 
owner of one full section of land. He has set out eighty acres to the cultiva- 
tion of potatoes and has had good average crops from that source. He is 
extensively engaged in general farming and stock raising and is recognized 
as one of the most substantial farmers in Elmwood township. He has car- 
ried out many costly improvements, iiis outbuildings and dwelling house 
being in the front rank in the district in which he resides. In addition to his 
farming interests Mr. Cook finds time to give attention to pulilic afYairs and 
has been township assessor for three years, and is a warm advocate of all 
movements calculated to serve the public welfare. 

On February 11, i8(;i, \\'alter Cook, Jr., was united in marriage to 
Jane T.;imb. :i daughter of Charles T.amb and wife, and to their union the 
following children have been born: Cora, who married Merle Schenck, of 
Elmwood townshij), and the\ have two children. Vera and Milo; Elsie. 
Myrtle, Allen, l\dith, Charlie. Jennie. Robert, Etta, Clifford and George. 
The family are earnest members of the Presbyterian church at Baker ;ind 
are warmly interested in all its good works as well as in the general social 
activities of the community in which they live. 



EDGAR B. McCOLGIN. 



Edgar B. McColgin. postmaster of the village of Downer, in Clay county, 
and the proprietor of a well-improved farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
adjoining that village, is a native of the old Keystone state, but has been a 
resident of the Red River country and of Clay county since he was twenty- 
four years of age. He was born on a farm in .\rmstrong county, Pennsyl- 
vania! April 14. 1872, son of Thomas and Mary (Marshall) McColgin, both 
natives of that same state and the former of whom is still living there, being 
now past ninety years of age. Thomas McColgin served as a soldier of the 
Union during the Civil War, a member of a Pennsylvania regiment. He 
and his wife were the parents of nine children, Oscar, William, Luella, Anna. 
Elizabeth, (irant, Totton, Edgar and one who died in infancy. Thomas 
McColgin and wife were members of the Presbyterian church and their chil- 
dren were reared in that faith. 



go CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Reared on the home farm in his native Pennsylvania. Edgar B. McCol- 
gin received his schooHng in tlie schools of that neighborhood and for two 
terms taught school there. He continued to make his home there, helping in 
the cultivation of the iiome farm, until he was twenty-four years of age, 
when, in 1896, he came to Minnesota with a \iew to estalilishing himself as a 
farmer up here in the Red River country, and located in Clay county. Two 
years later he married and after his marriage established his home on a farm 
southeast of Havvley, where he remained until about 1905, when he moved 
to his present quarter-section farm in the vicinit)- of Downer, where he ever 
since has been activelx- engaged in general farming and stock raising and has 
done well. For years Mr. McColgin has given his clo.se attention .to local 
civic affairs, for some time served as a member of the board of township 
supervisors and is the present treasurer of l^lkton township. On January i, 
icjio, he was commissioned postmaster of Downer and has ever since occu- 
pied that position. In that same year he bought a store at Downer and has 
since continued to manage the same, at the same time giving his general 
direction to the management of his well-kept farm. Mr. McColgin is a mem- 
ber of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at the neigh- 
lioring village of Baker and takes a warm interest in the affairs of the same. 

On Decemlier 7, i8c)8, Edgar E. McColgin was united in marriage to 
Anna Mix, daughter of Charles Mi.x and wife, of Clay county, and to this 
union four children ha\ e been born, Thomas, Totten, Elohama and William. 
The McColgins have a very pleasant home and give proper attention to the 
ciimmunitv's gcner;d social affairs. 



ANDREW JOHNSOX. 



One of the enterprising and influential citizens of Hawley, Clay countv. 
who has forged to the front by his own eft'orts, often in the face of obstacles 
that would have discouraged men of less courage and mettle, is Andrew- 
Johnson, well-known general merchant. He was born in Norway, February 
12, 1857, and there he grew to manhood and attended school. He remained 
in his native land until 1876, when he immigrated to the United States, locat- 
ing in Trempealeau county, Wisconsin. 

In 1879, with William E. Bennett and James Craig, :Mr. Johnson came 
to Hawley, Clay county, and worked in this vicinity for two years at the 
carpenter's trade. In 1882 he and Pete Larson started in the luinber business 



CLAY AND NOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNKSOTA. QI 

under tlie firm name of Johnson & Larson also taking contract building at 
Hawlcv. This partnership continued with mntna! Iicnetit and ever-increasing 
success until tlic spring of 1887, at which time Mr. Johnson engaged in gen- 
era! merchandise, lumber and machinery business on his own account, in fact, 
he handled everything that could be bought and sold in this part of the state 
to advantage. He did a large business from the start and carried an exten- 
si\e stock of goods, his customers coming from all over the eastern part of 
Cla\- county. In the spring of 1904 he organized the Havvley Lumber Com- 
pany, in j)artnership with Knnd ^Vefald and H. L. Mensing. They estab- 
lished a large yard and i)nl in an extensive stock of all kinds of lumber and 
nthcr materials used by builders. Lender the wise foresight and counsel of 
.Mr. Johnson the venture has proven more successful even than was at first 
antici])ated, and it is now one of the leading lumber firms of the county. 

Afr. Johnson is a heavy stockholder in the First National Bank of Haw- 
lev and is a director in the same. He is also a dealer in potatoes at Hawley 
on a \ ast scale, buying and shipping many carloads annually. He sold his 
machinery business a few years ago, and he now devotes much of his atten- 
tion to the operation of his fine department store in Hawley, which would be 
a credit to towns much larger than Hawley. It is modern in all its appoint- 
ments ; a varied, extensive and carefully selected stock of goods is carried at 
all seasons and everything is managed under a superb system. The thou- 
sands of regular customers of this popular store always are assured of hon- 
est. i(romi)t and courteous treatment I)y both the management and the 
employees. 

Mr. John>on was married in iS8_' to Louise Anfinson, who was born in 
Houston county, Minnesota. She was educated in the public schools. Mr. 
and Mrs. Johnson are the parents of six children, two boys and four girls. 
a1I living at Hawley. 

I'oliticallv. Mr. Johnson is a Repuljlican. He served as president of 
ilawlev, also on the village council for some time. He has done much toward 
the general welfare of Hawley in fact, has been one of its principal boosters 
ever since he located here, believing in its future with implicit confidence. He 
always supports any mo\ement having for its object the good of his town and 
county. Fraternaliv. he lielongs to the Masonic Order, and he is a member 
;uid liberal supporter of the Lutheran church, which he helped to organize. 
He is deser\ing of a great deal of credit for what he has accomplished, 
unaided and bv sheer force of character, having started out in life with no 
capital, a stranger in a strange land. He is a m:m whose word is as good 
as the bond of most men, and he has the respect and good will of all who 
know him. 



92 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

LARS HITTERDAL. 

One of the well-reniemljeiecl citizens of Clay county iluring tiie genera- 
tion tliat is past, whose name is deserving of perpetuation on the pages of 
local history was the late Lars Hitterdal, for many years a successful farmer 
of Goose Prairie township. He was born in Norway in 1859, a son of Ole 
and Berat Hitterdal, both natives of Norwa\-, where they grew to matur- 
ity and married. They finally came to .\merica and located in Houston 
county, Minnesota, when their .son, Lars, was nine years old, and when he 
was about sixteen }ears old his parents moved to Clay county and took up a 
homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in section 34, Goose Prairie town- 
ship. The father had improved the place only slightly when he died, leaving 
It to his son, Lars. The mother, who spent her l;ist years with her dau"hter, 
.Mrs. I'aregan, in Hitterdal. died in 1914 at the advanced age of eighty-four 
\ears. 

To Ole Hitterdal and wife six children were born: Bens, who 
lives on a farm in Highland (hove township: Lars, of this sketch; Marie, 
deceased; Mrs. Marie Faregan, of the village of Hitterdal: Ole, living in 
Hitterdal, and Hanna. who lives in the state of Washington. 

Lars Hitterdal grew to manhood on the home farm and he was edu- 
cated in the district schools, .\fter inheriting the homestead he continued 
to develop it into a tine farm and as he prospered he bought adjoining land 
untd he owned one of the choice farms of the township, consisting of live 
hundred acres, which his widow now owns. He erected an attractive home 
and a good group of outbuildings. Lie carried on general farming and stock 
raising on an extensive scale, raising vast quantities of grain and large num- 
bers of live stock. He was regarded as one of the most progressive farmers 
of this locality. 

Mr. Hitterdal married Isabel Clenientsoii. who was born in Xorway on 
-March j^, 1864. She came to .\merica when ten years old with her mother 
and six other children, about the year 1875. Her father was a farmer 
and died in Norway. His widow came to America, as stated, in 1S75 and 
located with her children in Houston county, Minnesota, and there the chil- 
dren worked out. The mother took up a claim near Ulen, Clay county. She 
was a woman of courage and business ability and she provided well for her 
family, keeping her children together and giving them educational advan- 
tages. She lived to the advanced age of eighty-seven years, dying in 19 14. 

To Lars Hitterdal and wife seven children were born, namelv : Clara, 



CLAY AND NORMAN COL-NTIES, MINNESOTA. 93 

married and living in North Dakota; Mrs. Olga \'iner, married and living in 
Highland Grove township; [Minnie, Oden. Clifford, Leona and Harry, are all 
lixe at home. 

Mr. Hitterdal was a Repul)lican. He served as a meniher of the school 
lioard in his district; also as a member of the township hoard. He was a 
meml)er i)f the United Lntheran church, of which he was a trustee. He was a 
mail who believed in keeping abreast of the times. He raised full-blooded 
live stock and did much to encourage raising better stock in his township, 
especially cattle. He and liis l>rother. Bens, owned the first steam tractor 
engine in their localit) . 

The death of I.ars Hitterdal occurred on November 21, 1900, at the 
age of forty-one years. Mrs. Hitterdal later married for her second husband 
Carl Rroton, who owns a harness shop in Hawley, Clay county, also a store 
there. This last unimi has been without issue. 



CHRISTIAN REHDRR. 



Christian Rehder, owner of se\en hundred and twenty acre.s of fine 
land in Alliance township. Clay county, for many years chairman of the board 
of supervisors of that tovvTisJiip, president of the Farmers Elevator Com- 
])any of Comstock, vice-president of the State Bank of Comstock, a member 
of the board of directors of the Northwestern Hospital at M(K)rhead, formerly 
treasurer of his home township, formerly overseer of roads in his district 
and in other ways for vears actively identified with the civic and business 
interests of the community in which he has lived since pioneer days, is a 
native of Germany, but has been a resident of this country since he was 
twenty-one years of age and of Clay county since the year 1884, one of the 
most substantial citizens and homestead farmers in the soiuheni part of the 
county. He was born on .\u,gust 13, i860, son of John and Magdalina 
Rehder, l)oth also natives of Germany, the former of whom died many 
vears ago in his native land. The widow Rehder later married I'red K'uehl, 
father of Bendix Kuehl, a hiograpliiacl .sketch of whom is presented else- 
where in this volume, .\lioul 1889. some time after he had become well 
settled in Clav county. Christian Rehder .sent lor lii's molher and his .step- 
father and thev came from Germany and located at Sabin, where Mr. Kuehl 
spent his last days, his widow thereafter making her home with her son 
Christian, her last days being spent there. 



94 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

Reared in his nati\e land, Chri-stian Rehder received his schooling- there 
and remained there until he was twenty-one years of age. when, in 1881, 
he came to the United States and located at Davenport. Iowa, in which cit\ 
and in the vicinity whereof he remained for about eighteen months, the most 
of that time being engaged in farm labor. He then went to Des Moines 
and was there engaged, driving a delivery wagon and working in the coal 
mines, until his marriage in 1884. in which 3'ear he came up here into the 
Red River country, Sabin being his destination, ;md in June of that year 
homesteaded the southeast quarter of section 30 of Alliance township, in 
Clay county, established his home there and has e\er since resided there, he 
and his family being Acry comfortably situated. When Mr. Rehder settled 
on that quarter section it was raw prairie land and for si.\ years after set- 
tling there he farmed with oxen. He planted a line grove, which is now 
an attracti\e feature of the landscape thereabout, and gradually impro\ ed 
his place: replacing his original homestead building with buildings of a sub- 
stantial character, and has for years had one of the best-ordered farm plants 
in that part of the countr\-. .\s his affairs prospered Mr. Rehder added 
to his homestead holdings b\- |)nrchase of .additional land and now has a 
well-improved and profitably cultivated farm of seven hundred and twenty 
acres. Of late years he has given considerai)le attention to the raising of 
potatoes, which have proven to be such a desirable crop in this region, and 
has done much to encour;ige potato culture among his neighbors. Not only 
has he done well in his farming operations, but Mr. Rehder has for years 
given his intelligent attention to the general business affairs of his commun- 
ity. He helped to organize the Farmers Elevator Company at Comstock 
;ind is now president of the same. He also as.sisted in the organization of 
the State Bank of Comstock. ;i member of the board of directors from the 
beginning of that sound financial institution, and is now vice-i)resideut of 
the same. In all measures having to do with the community's general wel- 
fare he also has taken a warm personal interest and is a member of the board 
of directors of the Northwestern Hospital at Moorhead. In civic affairs Mr. 
Rehder also has taken an .active interest and for many years has been serving 
as a member of the Ixiarcl of township supervisors, for years past chair- 
man of the board. He also for years served as overseer of roads in his 
district, in that capacity doing much to encourage the better-roads move- 
ment hereabout, and also served for some time as treasurer of his home 
township. He also helped to organize the Comstock and Holy Cross i'"arm- 
ers»Mutual Fire Insurance Company, of which he is treasurer. 

In 1884, about three years after coming to this country. Christian K'ehder 



CLAY AND XOKMAN COrXTIES, MINNKSOTA. 



95 



was united in marriage to Christina Sclmoor, who also was born in Germany, 
and to this union eight children have been born, Franz. Adelia, Bertha, Sclnia! 
Paulina, Henning, Edward and Alax, all of whom are living. The Rehdcrs 
are members of the Lutheran church at Sabin, with the affairs of which the\- 
ha\e been closely identified for years, Mr. Rehder having helped to build 
the present house of worship and parsonage of that congregation, and take 
an earnest interest in cliurch work, as well as in the general good works 
and social activities of the communitv in which thcv live. 



H. H. HANSON. 



H. H. Hanson, a well-known and substantial retired farmer of Hendruni 
town.ship, now living retired in the village of Hendrum, former member of 
the township board and actively identified with the interests of that part 
of the county since pioneer days, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, 
but has been a resident of Minnesota since he was seven \cars of age and 
of Norman county since shortly after attaining his majority. He was liorn 
on July 17, 1858, and was seven years of age when his parents. Hans and 
Bertha (Gilbertson) Hanson, left their native Norway in 1865 and came 
to the United States, proceeding on out to Minnesota and settling in Houston 
county, whence, two years later, they moved over into Fillmore county and 
there established their home. Hans Hanson became a substantial farmer in 
Fillmore county and remained there until 1881, the year in which Norman 
county was organized, when he disposed of his interests in h'illmore count\- 
and with his family moved to Norman county. He Ivnight a tract of two 
hundred and twenty acres in section 21 of Hendrum township, established 
his home there and there he and his wife spent their last days, his death 
occurring in 1903. Hans Hanson and wife were members of the Norwegian 
Lutheran church and their children were reared in that faith. There are two 
children, the subject of this sketch, the first-born, having a sister, Annie, 
who married R. ?I. Thompson, 

Having been but a child when his parents came to this state, H. iJ. 
Hanson completed his schooling in Fillmore county and from the days of his 
boyhood was a valuable aid to his father in the labors of the farm. Upon 
moving to Norman county with his father he practically took charge of the 
operations of the new farm in Idendrum township and did well, at one lime, 
in as.sociation with his father, owning aboiU five hundred acres of land. 



96 CLAY AND NORMAX COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

He still owns two humlred ami eight}- acres and has the same well improved. 
In IQIO he rented his farm- and retired from active farming, moving to 
Hendrum, wliere lie and his wife are now lixing and where they are very 
comfortably sitnated. \Vhile living on tiie farm Mr. Hanson took an active 
part in local cixic affairs and for some time ser\ed as a nicmher of the town- 
ship board. 

On Novemljer JiS, 1888. H. H. Hanson was united in marriage to Jnlia 
H. Harvey, who was horn in l'"illmore county, this state, daugiitcr of H. 
and Martha (Solberg) Harvey, natives of Norway, the former born in 
November, 1837. and tlie latter, in 1838. H. Har\ey was but a toy when 
he came to America w ilh his parents, the family locating in Houston county, 
this state, later moving to Fillmore county, where lie married .md where he 
remained until 1882, when he moved to Norman count)- and engaged in the 
mercantile business at .\da, remaining thus engaged until his retirement in 
1914. Both he and his wife are now living at Ada. Mr. and Mrs. Hanson 
are attendants of the serxices of the Lutheran chuich ami contril)ut(jrs to 
the support of the saiue. 



A. O. SERl'M. 



A. O. Serum, one of the real pioneers of Norman county, a well-to-do 
farmer of Halstad township, clerk of that town.ship practically all the time 
since its organization, secretary of the Halstad Telephone Company e\er 
since the organization of that company, for more than a cjuarter of a century 
secretary of the Halstad Fire Insurance Compan_\-, a member of the school 
board ever since his local district was organized, and in other w ays prominently 
identified with the development of the community in which he has lived since 
pioneer times, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, but has been a resident 
of Minnesota since the days of his boyhood and of Norman county since 
i87_>, nine \ears before the county was organized as a .separate civic entit\^ 
Fie was born in the parish of Selboe, in the stift of Trondhjem, February 
28. 1849, a son of Ole and Annie J. (Norby) Serum, both natives of Norway. 
the latter of whom spent her last days in Minnesota, one of the pioneers of 
Norman county. 

Ole Serum was a farmer in his native Norway. There he married Annie 
J. Norby and to that union eleven children were born, of whom the subject 
of this sketch was the hfth in order of birth, the others living being Ingeborg, 
Maret, Karen, Mollie. Annie and Ole. In 1862 the elder Ole Serum was 



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CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 97 

drowned while taking part in a loj; drive on the river not far from his 
home, his body being carried over a waterfall when the log boom broke 
away from the drivers. Five years later, in 1867, the Widow Serum and 
four of her children came to the United States and proceeded on out to 
Minnesota, settling in l"'illmore county, where she had kinsfolk living. There 
she remained until 1872, when she accompanied her son, A. O. Serum, uj) 
into this part of the state and settled on the homestead he took in what 
later came to be organized as Halstad township, Norman county, and there 
she spent the remainder of her life, her death occurring in 1907. She was 
an earnest member of the Norwegian Lutheran church and her children 
were reared in that faith. 

A. O. Serum was eighteen years of age when he came to Minnesota 
with his mother from his native Norway and settled in Fillmore county. 
For a time after his arrival there he attended school, furbishing up his 
limited knowledge of the English language, and even after he moved to 
Norman county and became a homesteader he attended school a while, per- 
fecting himself in the tongue of his adopted country. In 1872 he left Fill- 
more county and came up into this part of the state, having l)ecome convinced 
in his own mind that here there were great opportunities awaiting the earnest 
young homesteader. He entered one hundred and sixty acres of land in 
sections i and 6 of what later came to be known as Halstad township and 
there he and his mother established their home. He drove through with 
a team of oxen, leading two cows and besides what essential household articles 
and a few farming implements could be loaded in the wagon, had practically 
nothing. Upon his arrival here he built on his homestead tract a house 
sixteen bv eighteen feet and that sufficed as a home until 1896, when he 
built his present commodious residence. The year of his arrival here was 
the year of the great grasshopper scourge in this part of the state and 
everything that he attempted to grow during the first season of his residence 
here was destroyed by the pests. At that time the nearest market was at 
Fergus Falls, to which he made a trip that fall, the journey requiring about 
two weeks. After the first discouraging year, when the grasshoppers almost 
ate him out of house and home, Mr. Serum's affairs began to prosper and 
it was not long until lie had his quarter section well improved and profitabl\- 
cultivated. After his marriage in 1877 he further improved his home and 
earl}- became regarded as one of the most forehanded and substantial pioneers 
of that section. .\s he ])rospered in his farming operations he gradually 
added to his land holdings until now he is the owner of a little more 
(7a) 



g CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

than a half section of land, which he has improved in excellent shape and 
has brought the same up to a high state of cultivation. 

It was in the fall of 1879 that Halstad township was organized. The 
following pioneers comprised the poll list of those present at the first meeting 
called to' consider the question : A. A. Scheie. L. B. Larson, A. B. Larson, 
Ole Halstad. W. Christopherson. T. Stennes, Ole E. Olson and Anthony 
Scheie. .\t a later meeting held on November 6, 1879. A. O. Serum was 
present and helped to organize the township, being elected first clerk of the 
same, the other officers elected being as follow : Supervisors, J. L. Scheie. 
L. B. Larson and Ole E. Olson, the first-named being chairman of the board ■ 
treasurer, Antliony Scheie: justices of the peace. E. L. Iverson and Ok 
Halstad and constables. John (i. Paulson and J. L. Houske. With the 
exception of a period of about five years Mr. Serum has continued to serve 
as clerk of the township ever since that date, a record of such service prob- 
ably not exceeded in this part oi the state. When his local school district 
was organized he was elected a member of the school board and has ever 
since served in that capacity, ha\ing done much to advance the interests of 
the schools thereabout. In addition to his earnest i)ublic service Mr. Serum 
has been an equally earnest promoter of the general interests of the com- 
munity and has done much to advance the common welfare in that part of 
the county. In 1904, when the Halstad Telephone Company was organized, 
he was elected secretary of the same and has ever since occupied that office, 
doing much to promote the extension of telephone service throughout this 
section, and for more than twenty-six years he has been secretary of the 
Halstad Fire Insurance Company, a mutual organization that has been of 
large benefit in the territory its policies cover. 

In 1877 A. O. Serum was united in marriage to Anna Rustvold. who 
was born in Nonvay in i860 and who had come to this country with her 
parents in the days of her girlhood, the family settling in this state, and 
to that union nine children were born, Mary .'\nn, Oliver, Anton, Joseph 
(deceased), Clara, Minnie, Anna Isabel, Clarence A. and Edwin (deceased). 
The mother of these children died in 1896. Mr. Serum is a member of the 
Norwegian Lutheran church and was one of the organizers of the local 
congregation, which was organized in 1875, about three years after he located 
here. Since the day of the organization of that congregation he has opened 
and closed the church services and has led the singing and has also been 
clerk of the congregation practically ,ill the time since it became an organized 
body. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNKSOTA. 99 

SYLVESTER JAMES JOHNSON. 

S_\lvcster James Jolinsoii, who nuns tlie fine farm in Elmwood town- 
shi]). Clay county, developed ])y his late father, Sever Johnson, was born at 
Dwatonna, in Steele county, this state, in 1881. He was but two years of 
age when his parents. Sever and Bertha (Johnson) Johnson, came up into 
this i)art of the state and settled on the farm on which he is still living and 
of whicli he has had practical charge since the lamented death 0i his father. 
\\lif> was killed in a railway-crossing accident at Moorhead in 1907. 

Sever Johnson was born in Wisconsin, son of Louis and Dora Johnson, 
who had come to this country from Norway and had settled in Wisconsin, 
later going to Montana, afterward settling in Steele county, Minnesota. Louis 
Tohnson was living in Montana at the time of the Indian uprising, and for 
the valuable service he rendered in giving warning to other settlers of the 
uprising, was awarded a medal by the state. Reared in Steele county, Sever 
lohnson was there married to IJertha J(jhnson, who was Ixirn in the kingdom 
of Xorwav and who had come to this country with her parents, the family 
lirst settling in Wisconsin and later coming to Minnesota. After his mar- 
riage he continued to make his home in the vicinity of Owatonna, where he 
was engaged in farming until iXX;;, in which year he came with his family 
u]) into the Red River country and located on the farm on which his son 
SvKester is now living, in Elmwood township. Clay county, and proceeded 
to develop and improve the same, becoming the owner there of a well- 
improved place, comprising one-half a .section of excellent land. The father 
was prospering in his affairs when he accidentally met his death at a railway 
crossing in Moorhead, as ncjted above. Ifis widow is now making her home 
in the village of Sabin. They were the parents of three children, Dora, Teda 
and Sylvester J., and had besides an adopted son, Alvin. 

Sxlvester J. Johnson was I)ut a child when his parents settled on the 
|)ioneer farm in lilmwood township and there he grew to luanhood, Ijecom- 
ing ;i i)ractical farmer. Upon completing the course in the district school in 
the neighliorhood of his home, he entered the high school at Moorhead. He 
tlien took a course in the State Normal School in that city and for ten years 
afterward was engaged in teaching school, his service in that cf)nnection being 
rendered in four districts, in one of \\hich he taught for seven years. Mean- 
while, he continued to he actively engaged in farming diu-ing the summers, 
and after his father's shocking death took charge of the home place and has 
since been managing the same, making a pronounced success of his opera- 



87S962 



lOO CI.AY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. .MINNESOTA. 

ti(in>. In addition to his general farming, Mr. Johnson gives considerable 
attention to the raising of potatoes and is doing well. He has an excellent 
farm plant and carries on his operations in accordance with approved and 
up-m-date methods. Tliough not particularly active in politics, he has held 
liK-.il otifices and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs. 
In 1907, Svlvester J. Johnson was united in marriage to Margarette 
Malchose, daughter of Hubert Malchose and wife, of Clay county, and to this 
union twi) children lia\e l)een l)orn, sous I)otIi. Xiles and Gordon. Mr, and 
Airs. Johnson have a \erv pleasant home and take a proper interest in the 
social affairs of the community. Mr. Johnson is a member of the Modern 
r.rotherhood, and in the affairs of that organization takes a warm interest. 



MONS T. WEUM. 



Mons T. W'eum. |)resident of the State Bank of Moorhead, president of 
the I'irst State Hank of .South Haven and a director in several other banking 
concerns in this part of the state, formerly engaged in the retail clothing 
business at Moorhead and still the ]K)ssessor of mercantile interests, is a 
native of the kingdom of Xorwa\-. but has been a resident of Minnesota 
since he w;is twehe years of age. He was lx)rn on March 20, 1857, a son 
of Tosten .\. and Ingeljorg W'eum. also natives of Xorwav, who spent all 
their li\es in their natix'e land. 

W hen he was twelve years of age, Mons T. Weum came to the United 
States with a 1)rother and a sister, the three proceeding on out to Minne- 
sota and locating in Goodliue county, where he began working on farms, later 
liecoming a clerk in a store at Owatonna and was engaged in the latter occu- 
l)ation for se\eral years, :it the end of which time he started a store of his 
own at Xorcross, in Grant county. Two years later, upon the establishment 
of the village of Georgetown, in Clay county, he moved to that new town 
and started there the first real store started in the place. His business there 
prospered and he still is a partner in that pioneer store, though a resident of 
Moorhead for the jxist fifteen years. It was about 1902 that Mr. Weum 
located at Moorhead. where he started a ck^hing store. He also for a time 
was connected with the jobbing trade at Minneapolis. In 1903, about a year 
after becoming a resident of Moorhead, Mr. Weum was made the president 
of the State Bank of Moorhead, a position he ever since has held and to 
the duties of which he gives his active attention. Mr. Weum has other 



CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNKSOTA. lOI 

banking interests throughout this part of the state, incKiding his position of 
president of the First State Bank of South Haven : a director of the Farmers 
and Merchants' Bank of Perley, and a director of the Farmers and ^^ercl^- 
ants' Bank of Steele, all three of which banks he helped to organize. Mr. 
Weum has long been recognized as one of the active and public-spirited busi- 
ness men of Moorhead and as an influential member of the Commercial Club 
of that city. He also gives his earnest attention to local civic affairs and is 
now serving as a member of the school board of his home city. 

Mr. Weum is a member of the Trinity Lutheran church and takes a 
proper interest in church work. Fraternally, he is affiliated with the local 
lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, in the affairs of which 
he takes a warm interest, and is a member of the ^Iinnea])olis .\thletic Club. 



; HAMILTOX MEECH MUMFORD. 

Hamilton Meech Muiuford, cashier of the Farmers" State Bank of Glyn- 
don and a substantial landowner in the vicinity of that thriving village, is a 
native of Connecticut, but has been a resident of Minnesota since he was five 
years of age and of Clay county since the summer of 1875, '^'^ parents having 
been among the early pioneers of the Glyndon neighborhood. He was born 
at Norwich, Connecticut, February 15, 1870, son of Robert B. and Helen M. 
(Phillips) :\lumfortl, both of whom also were born in Connecticut and who 
later became honored and influential pioneers of this section of Minnesota, the 
former spending his last days at Glyndon and the latter later moving to 
Seattle, where her last days were spent. 

Robert B. IMumford. who is well rememljered hereabout as one of the 
.most jjotent influences in the development of this region in pioneer days, was 
a veteran of the Civil War, having been one of the first to resporrd from his 
home town of Bozrah, Connecticut, upon the President's call for volunteers 
in April, 1861, and served with a Connecticut regiment until the close of the 
war. Some time after the completion of his mihtary service he married and 
after his marriage continued to make his home in Connecticut, a resident of 
Xorwich, until 1872, when he came with his family to Minnesota, coming by 
way of Duluth, and settled on a homestead fanu in the vicinity of Rochester, 
in Olmstead countv, where he remained until the summer of 1875, when he 
disposed of his interests there and moved with his family to Clay county, 
establishing his home on a homestead tract of a quarter of a section of land 



I02 Cl.AY AND NORMAX COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

at the edge of what later came to he the village of Glyndon, and tliere he spent 
the remainder <>{ his life, althmigh his later husiness activities kept him trav- 
eling far and wide over the then rapidlx developing country in this section 
of the Northwest. The }ear after his settlement at Glyndon, Robert B. 
Alunifiird imported a large herd of dairy cattle into Clay county, driving 
them through from Fergus Falls, and distributed the cattle among- the pioneer 
settlers throughout the neighborhood in which he had settled and from the 
])rn(lucts of that herd there was established here in that same year the first 
cheese factory in the county. He also shipped in many horses from Roches- 
ter and became an extensive dealer in horses as well as in cattle. .At the same 
time he became largely interested in real estate ventures, acting- for a .Minne- 
apolis firm of realty dealers, and in that capacity did a .a;reat deal of develop- 
ment work, handling- land ihrougbout the Red River valley and as far west as 
Bismarck, with particular reference to the creation of townsites along the line 
of the Northern Pacific railroad, acting as land agent for the railroad coni])any, 
being- thus the means of inducing the immigration to this section of many 
settlers. On one occasion he and his wife drove all the way from Glyndon 
to Bismarck in a buggy, inspecting the progress of the settlements he had been 
instrumental in projecting. Mr. JMum ford's special interest ever centered in 
and aliout (ilyndon, and he did niucli tn promote the development of that place 
during the early da\s of the settlement, continuing to make that his estab- 
lished home the rest of his life, his death occurring there in March, 1889. His 
willow sur\-i\cd him more than twent\--five years, her death occurring at 
Seattle, Washingt-jn, in May, IQ16. They were the parents of six children, 
of whom the subject of tliis sketch was the second in order of birth, the others 
being Arthur .\.. Hale H., Leonard J., Morris C. and Mary .Vnne, all of 
whom are living sax'c- the last-named, who died at the age of nine months. 

As noted above. Flaniilton M. Mumford was but five years of age when 
his jjarents settled at r,iyndon in 1875 and he has ever since made that place 
his established home, though six \ears of his life were spent in developing a 
couple of sections of land in Canad;i. Reared at Glyndon. he received his 
carl} schooling- in the schools of that village and supplemented the same by 
a course in the State Normal School at Moorbead. from which he was grad- 
uated in 1894. In the meantime he had taught several terms of school and 
after his graduation taught two more terms of school. He then became con- 
nected with an agricultural implement house and for ten vears thereafter was 
■"on the road" for that concern, meanwhile, however, continuing to make his 
home at Glyndon. lie having married in 190J. I'pon leaving the road Mr. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. IO3 

Mum ford bougiit a couple of sections of land in Canada and for six years was 
engaged in developing the same, his family spending two summers with him 
there. He still holds and operates his Canada land, as well as the quarter 
section homestead farm entered by his father at Glyndon in 1875 and on 
which he has founded a herd of Shorthorn cattle; he and his family being 
very comfortably situated in a home in the village, where he is active in the 
bank work. In January, 1917, Mr. Mumford and others organized the Farm- 
ers State Bank of Glyndon and Mr. Mumford was made cashier of the same, 
a position he now occupies and to the duties of which he is giving his most 
earnest and intelligent attention. 

On September 20, 1902, Hamilton M. Mumford was united in marriage 
to Anna Osborne, daughter of Luther Osborne and wife, further and fitting- 
mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume, and to this union four 
sons have been born, Leonard Phillips, Kenneth Osborne, Ralph Vernon and 
Luther. Mr. and Mrs. Mumford are members of the church at Glyndon 
and take a proper interest in church work, as well as in other neiglilx)rhood 
good works and in the general social activities of the community in which 
they live, helpful in pminoting all a.gencies designed to advance the cominmi 
welfare thereatout. 



T. FRIDLUND. 



J. h'ridlund was l)(irn in .Sweden in 1853, a son of C. M. Fridlund, and a 
brother of Adolpli Iridlund, whose personal sketch appears in another place 
in this work. 

J. F'ridlund rccei\ed his elementary education in tiie common schools of 
Sweden. He came to America in 1874 and located in Goodhue county, Min- 
nesota. From 1875 to 1878 he attended Augustana Colege, at Rock Island, 
Illinois: also attended the high school at Red Wing, Minnesota. In 1881 he 
located at Fargo, North Dakota, where he was engaged in the flour and feed 
business for about four years, and has been buying grain since that time. For 
the last six years he has been manager of the Farmers' Elevator Company at 
Hawley, Minnesota. 

Mr. Fridlund was married to Matilda Samuelson in 1880, and to this 
union three children have been born, namely: Minnie, who married C. A. 
Bye, a general merchant at Pine Wood, Minnesota : Ruth, who is attending 
the normal school at ]\Tankato, Minnesota; and Carl, who is attending Gus- 



I04 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

tavus College, at St. Peter. Minnesota. Mr. Fridlund is a student and well- 
read man and is giving his children the advantage of a good education. He 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and a member of the Masonic 
Lodge, in both of which he takes a deep interest. 



THEODORE H. SKKKI. 



Theodore H. Skrei, a substantial aiul progressive farmer, engaged in 
raising blooded Holstein cattle, former township treasurer and former clerk 
of the school board, is a native son of Minnesota, born on Buffalo River on 
December 15, 1870, tlie first white child born here, a son of Norwegian 
parents, who were married in their native land before coming to America. 
He is the son of Targe T. and (iunhild (Herve) Skrei, the former of whom 
was born in 1836 and the latter ten years later. 

Targe T. Skrei was educated in the schools of Norway and grew u[> 
to the work of the farm. He was married in that country to Gunhild 
Berve. who was born in 1846 in Xorway, and in 1866 they decided to try 
their fortunes in the new world, where so manv of their countrA-men had 
found a himie ar.d an ;unplc means (j1 li\ing. On arriving in this country 
they came on to Houston county, Minnesota, where they remained for four 
years. Targe T. Skrei then moved west, joining a party, the journey being 
made by o.x-team, and came to Clay county, where he homesteaded the 
southwest i|uarter of section 28. Moland township, and on that place he im- 
mediately l)egan farming operations and was thus engaged for the remainder 
of his active life, being regarded as a hard-working and skillful agricul- 
turist, popular with iiis friends and neighbors. He died in 1895 at the 
age of fift\-nine years and his wife survived until 1908, when her death 
occurred at the age of sixty-two. Targe T. Skrei and wife were the jiarents 
of the following children: Signa, who is living with Hilbcrt; Theodore H.. 
the suliject of this sketch, and Hilbert, who is married. Targe T. Skrei 
took a good citizen's part in public affairs, but never sought office. 

Theodore H. Skrei attended the public schools of Clay county and was 
reared on his father's farm, where he became a valuable assistant in the 
work of improving and develoiiing the holding. At the age of twenty-one 
he bought one hundred and sixty acres of land in section 29, Moland town- 
ship, which he improved and now has in an excellent state of cultivation. In 
1909 he l)ought out die old homestead and four years later, in 1913. he 



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N fOUNDATlONS 













1 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I05 

iii.iight an additional eighty acres in section 29, and is now the owner of 
four hundred acres of prime land, from which he is ohtaining most satis- 
factory results, the land being set out to wheat, barley, oats, corn, alfalfa 
and potatoes. He raises a fine strain of blooded Holstein cattle and has 
some spendid specimens of that breed on his place. In 1912 Mr. Skrei built 
a nine-room house, fitted with all modern requirements, including electric 
light, waterworks, hot-water heat, etc., and here he and his family are com- 
fortably situated. 

On September _>/, 1897, 'it Aloorhead, Theodore H. Skrei was united 
in marriage to Tilda Juve, who was lx)rn in Houston county, Minnesota, in 
1867, a daughter of Ole and Gunhild Juve, who came to Clay county in the 
early seventies. Mr. and Mrs. Skrei are the parents of four children, name- 
ly : .\nna, Obert, Milo and Targe. They are also providing a home for 
Robert and Nellie (Mson, children of Mrs. Skrei's sister, the latter and her 
husband being both deceased, the children having been living with Mr. ami 
Mrs. Skrei for the past five years. 

Mr. Skrei and family are members of the Concordia church, of which 
he has been trustee and in connection with which he has held other offices. 
He has been identified with public affairs for several years and served the 
people as township treasurer, in which responsible position he gave general 
satisfaction. He was clerk to the school board for six years, proving a 
satisfactory olficial. He is interested in the Farmers' Grain and I.umber 
Company of Glyndon. to the affairs of which he gives close attention. Mr. 
Skrei's life has been one of usefulness and hard work and proves again that 
being born in a log house with a sod roof is no barrier to progress. 



CH.^RLES R. OLIVER. 



Charles R. Oliver, former cashier of the First National Bank at Barnes- 
ville. Clay countv, and now president of that flourishing institution, an exten- 
sive landowner, his land holdings amounting to four thousand acres, was 
born in the state of Wisconsin, but has been a resident of this part of Minne- 
sota for the past twenty-six years. He was born in August, i860, in Grant 
county, Wisconsin, a son of Douglas and Sarah (Fitzgerald) Oliver, whose 
last days were spent in Kansas. 

Douglas Oliver was born in Tennessee in 18 19 and died in 1885, at the 
age of sixty-six vears. During his active life he was a well-known woolen 



I06 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

manufacturer, havin.g a large mill for that purpose, and he also farmed on 
an extensive scale, in Grant county, Wisconsin. Some years before his death 
he moved to Kansas and there spent his last days. His wife, Sarah Fitz- 
gerald, was born in Grant county, Wisconsin, in 1834 and died one year after 
her husband, her death occurring in 1886, in Kansas at the age of fifty-two. 
They were the parents of the following children: i-rank, living in Santa 
Cruz, California: Duighi, married and ii\ing in Lancaster, Wisconsin; 
Grant, married, lives in Dinuba, California; h'red, in Fresno, California: 
Charles R., the subject of this sketch. ;md Mrs. TTarriet Mullen, of Tempc, 
Arizona. 

Charles R. 01i\er was educated in the schools of (iraiu county, Wis- 
consin, and was reared on his father's farm, with the work of which he 
assisted during a few of his early years. His business inclinations led him 
to follow the profession of a banker and before coming to Clay county he 
was associated with the b'irst National Bank of Breckenridge. In 1891 he 
moved to Clay county and became assistant cashier in the First National Rank 
at Barnesville and has ser\ed through all the departments and official positions 
of the bank's service, for the past three years being president of the company. 
Much of the success of the institution is traceable to Mr. Oliver's sound and 
conservative methods of banking and he is generally regarded as one of the 
far-seeing bankers in this part of the state. In addition 10 his banking inter- 
ests, Mr. 01i\er is tlie owner of four thousand acres of land located in Clay 
and Wilkin counties, the greater part being in Wilkin. His farming is tarried 
on according to modern methods of agriculture and he is fully abreast in 
the ecjuipment of his farms, everything being maintained in first-class con- 
ditit^m, the improvements being fully e(jual to the best in the county. He 
also owns business i)roperty in the town of Barnesville and is generally 
accounted one of tlie most pros])erous and enterjirising citizens of the town- 
ship and count}-. 

In .\pril. 1898. Charles R. Oliver was united in marriage to Mary E. 
McGinn, who was born in Blooming Prairie. Minnesota, the marriage taking 
place in Barnesville. There are no children to this union. Mr. Oliver takes 
an active part in the general social conditions of the township and has long 
lieen holding membership in various fraternal organizations. He is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic lodge at Barnesville and Shrine at I'argo. the Knights of 
Pythias and IModern Woodmen of .\merica. and lias a warm interest in the 
successful working of these popular organizations. Mr. Oliver, however, 
devotes the greater part of his business life to his banking interests. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I07 

D. C. JONES. 

D. C. Jones, one of tlie best-known and most substantial ti.t;ures in 
financial circles of tbis part of tbe state, president of tbe b'armers and Alercli- 
ants State Bank of Ada, president of tbe Fir.st State Bank of Gary and 
president of the First State Bank at Lockbart, is a native of tbe nei.e^bborinf;- 
state of Wisconsin, born at Cambria, in Columbia count>-, that state, .Vu.^ust 
23, 1866, son of Morris and Margaret (Jones) Jones, natives of tbe princi- 
pality of Wales, whose last days were spent in tbe nciejiborini; stale of 
South Dakota. 

Morris Jones w.-is reared in his native Wales, where he received bis 
schooling, and about 1S40 came to the L'nited States with his father, Joini 
Jones, tbe family settling;- in Racine, A\'isconsin. There be ])resently became 
engaged as a contractor and builder and later moved to Cambridge, that same 
state, where be remained until 1S80, when be mo\ed with his family to 
Ib'ow n county. South Dak(jta. about nne hundred miles ahead of tbe railroad, 
and settled on a homestead farm there. He later entered a tree claim to 
an adjoining cjuarter section, proved up the same, and on that half-section 
farm spent the rest of bis life, brin.ging bis place u]) to an excellent state 
of dex'elopment. Morris Jones and bis wife were tbe [)arents of five children, 
of whom tbe subject of tbis sketch was the last born, the others being as 
follow: IMary, wife of Hugh Pugh ; Sarah, wife of Owen Evans; John, of 
Aberdeen, South Dakota, and Susie, wife of T. A. Jones. 

D. C. Jones was about i'onrteen years of age when his jjarents nio\ed 
from Wisconsin to Brown county. South Dakota, and be grew to manhood 
on the homestead farm in that county, completing bis schooling at Groton 
College at Groton, South Dakota, and at Carbon College at Nortbfield, this 
state. Upon leaving school be became engaged as a grain buyer for tbe St. 
Anthony & Dakota I'llexator Company and was thus engaged in his home 
state for eight vears. or until i8(;4. when be was transferred to Minnesota 
and given charge of that company's business at Ada. fn [900 Mr. Jones was 
made cashier of the First State Bank at Gary, in Norman county, and for 
eleven years was in charge of that bank's affairs, in 191 1 returning to Ada, 
where he enga.ged in the banking and real-estate business and where be since 
has made his home. Mr. Jones retained bis intei-est in die b'irsl State 
Bank of Gary and is now president of tbe same, as well as president of tbe 
First State Bank at Eockbart. a flourishing village in tlic northern part of 
the county. In 19x5 Mr. Jones and Eambert Koescb organized tbe h'armers 



lOS CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES^ MINNESOTA. 

and Merchants Bank at Ada and Mr. Jones is president of the same. Tn 
addition to his e.xtensive banking interests he also is the owner of some \al- 
nable land in Xonnan county and in South Dakota. .Mr. Jones is a Repub- 
lican and lias ever criven his earnest attention to local political aft'airs. Ib- 
is a member of the Bene\olent and Protective Order of Elks. When the 
village of Gary was organized he was elected treasurer of the same and 
served in that capacity until lie left there, lie also for some time served 
as president of the village council and was also for some time the president 
of the village school board. 

In Octol:)er, 1897, D. C. Jones was united in marriage to Clara ri'und. 
daughter of John Pfund and wife, and to this union three children have been 
l)orn, Beatrice, Law rence and Deverau.x, the latter of whom died in child- 
hood. Mr. and Mrs. Jones have a very peasant home at Ada and take a 
proper interest in the general social activities of the city, helpful in ])ro- 
moting all movements basing ti> do with the advancement of the general 
welfare hereabout. 



-\RXT .\xn .\XTOX OPGRAND. 

Arnt and .Knton Opgrand, general mercliants at Haistad, doing busi- 
ness there under the firm style of Opgrand Brothers, ha\"e been residents of 
Xonnan county since the days of their Ixnhood. ha\ing come here with their 
[jarents in pioneer days, and are active and energetic members of the busi- 
ness community in the flourishing village in which they are conducting their 
well-stocked mercantile establishment. They are the sons of M. A. Opgrand. 
one of the pioneers of X'orman county, who settled in Haistad townshi]) 
back in the early eighties and is still living there, one of the substantial and 
well-to-do farmers of that [jart of the countv. 

M. A. Opgrand was born in Xorway on April 8, 1847, ^"fl there spent 
his youth and young manhood, being about twenty years of age when he 
came to this country in 1867 and proceeded on out to Minnesota, locating 
in Houston county. There he married Joran Xelson, who was born in Xor- 
way on January 16. 1836, and who had come to Minnesota with her parents 
in die days of her girlhood, .\fter his marriage ?*Ir. Opgrand continued 
to make his home in Houston county until the early eighties, when he came 
up to this part of the state with bis family and settled on an eightv-acre 
farm which he bought in Shelly township. Xonnan county, on the line 
adjoining Haistad township. In 1893 he bought a quarter of a section in 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 Oy 

section 5 of Halstad townsliip, adjoining his eighty in Shelly, sold the eight}' 
and established his home in Halstad township. To the quarter section he 
bought at that time he later added an adjoining quarter and now owns a 
half section of well-imprii\ed land in Halstad townshij). where he still lives 
and where he and his family are very comfortably situated. He and hU 
wife are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and their children 
were reared in that faith. There are nine of these children, .Vrnt, Anton, 
.\nna, Pedra, Clara, Pauline, Ole, Carl and James, all of whom are living. 

Arnt Opgrand was born in Winneshiek county, Iowa, over the line 
from Houston county, this state, .\ugust 24, 1S74, and was eight or ten 
years of age when his parents moved from the latter county up into this part 
of the state and settled in Xorman county. He received his elementary 
schooling in the district schools of Halstad township and supplemented the 
same by a course in Concordia College at Moorhead, after which he resumed 
his place on the home farm and there remained until iqoo, when he began 
clerking in the hardware store of J. H. Xokken at Halstad and was thus 
engaged for two years, at the end of which time he transferred his services 
to the Halstad Mercantile Company and was engaged as a clerk for thai 
concern for three vxars. He then worked a year in the general store of 
Iver Lien at Halstad and then he and his brother, Anton, went over into 
North Dakota and each homesteaded a quarter of a section of land in .\dams 
countv, that state. A \ear later they returned to Minnesota and Arnt 
Opgrand resumed lii-, fcrnier pusitinn in the store of Per Lien at Halstad. 
where he worked a year, at the end of which time he returned to the store 
of the Halstad Mercantile Comjiany and was there engaged until in May. 
U)i2. when he and his brother, .\ntou, .started in the mercantile business 
on their own account at Halstad and have ever since been thus engaged, 
having a well-equipped and well-stocked general store, and have built u]i an 
extensive trade in the village and throughout the surrounding countr\-. In 
addition to his mercantile interest, .Arnt Opgrand is the owner of a jiotato 
warehouse, which he has operated for the past four years. He has served 
as a meml)er of the village council and has for years taken an earnest inter- 
est in local civic affairs. Fraternally, he is affiliated with the local lodge 
of the Modern Woodmen of America and is clerk of the same. 

Pi 1904 Arnt Opgrand was united in marriage to Emma Larson, a 
daughter of Ole Larson, .and to this union three children have been born, 
Judith. Evalyn and :\Iilburn. Mr. and AP's. Opgrand are members of the 
PInited Lutheran church and Lake a proper interest in church affairs. 

Anton Opgrand was born in Houston county, this state, .September 14. 



no CLAY AND NORMAX COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

1876, and was Init a l)oy wlien his parents settled in N'unnan county. L'pcm 
completing tlie course in the district schools of Halstad township he entered 
the normal school at Minneapolis and later took a course in a business 
college in that city. In the spring of 1907 he and his brother each home- 
steaded a quarter of a section of land in Adams count)'. Xorth Dakota, and 
a 3'ear later returned to this state. Anton Opgrand ihcn went to Minne- 
apolis, where for three \ears he was em])loyed in the wholesale mercantile 
establishment of W'yman & T'artridge. On May 15. 191 _', lie and his brother. 
Arnt, opened their mercantile establishment at Halstad. as above set nut. 
and have since been very successfully engaged in business together. In 
addition to his mercantile interests, Anton Opgrand is the owner of a farm 
of eighty acres in Cass county, this state. He is a member of the local 
society of the Sons of Xorwav and takes .a warm interest in the alfairs of 
the same. 

On January i. 11)13. Anton 0])grand was united in marriage to ( )lga 
Stordahl, a daughter of Carl Stordahl. .Mr. and .Mrs. Opgrand are member^ 
of the ATorwegian Lutheran church and take an active interest in the affairs 
of the same. The Opgrand brothers are energetic and enterprising busi- 
ness men and are doing well their part in the i)romotion of the best interests 
of the communitv in which the\- Ii\-e. 



E. C. BETCHER. 



E. C. Betcher, manager of the i)lanl of the I'armers Ele\ator Company 
at Ada, member of the cit\- council and a substantial landowner and retired 
farmer of Norman county, is a native of Germany, but has been a resilient 
of A'linnesota since the days of his childhood and of Norman county since 
the days of his )oung manhood, having settled here with, bis parents in pio- 
neer days. He was born on January 22. 1S58, and was but four years of age 
when his parents, John and l^rnestine (Tobranz) Betcher, also natives of 
that country and the former of whom was a weaver, left German\- many 
years ago and came to the United States in 1862 and settled in Goodhue 
count3% this state, not far from the city of Red Wing. 

Upon his arrival in Goodhue county John Betcher homesteaded an 
eighty-acre tract there and proceeded to develop the same, making his home 
there until 1880. when he disposed of his interests in that countv to 
advantage and came up into this part of the state, pre-empting a quarter 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I I t 

of a section of land in what later came to be organized as Green Meadow- 
township, Norman county, and there estahHshed his second and final home 
in the land of his adoption. Mr. Betcher developed a good farm in (ireen 
Meadow township and took an active part in the affairs of that township in 
pioneer days. There he spent his last days. He and his wife have hoth 
passed away. They were members of the German Lutheran church and their 
children were reared in that faith. There were seven of these children, of 
whom the subject of this sketch was the first-born, the others being" Ro1)ert. 
Lena, Arthur, Richard (deceased), Fred and Charles. 

As noted above, E. C. Betcher was but a child when he came to this 
state with his parents and he .grew to manhood on the home farm in Good- 
hue county, receiving his schooling in the schools of Ked Wing. Being the 
eldest son he was a valuable aid to his father in the labors of developing 
the homestead farm, even from the days of his boyhood, and when the 
family moved to Xorman countx' he aided his father in the initial develop- 
ment of the new farm here, being thus occupied until his marriage in i88(i. 
when he started farming on his own account in Pleasant View township, 
where he established his home and where he remained until i8gS, at the time 
of the or.ganization of the h'armers I'llevator Company, when he was elected 
mana.ger of the same and in order to .give his whole attention to the affairs 
of that company moved to Ada, the site of the elevator, where he since has 
made his home. Mr. Betcher continues to retain his farm lands, however, 
and is the owner of a fine farm of two hundred and forty acres in Pleasant 
View township, one of the best-improved farms in that part of the countv. 
Mr. Betcher has made a distinct success of the affairs of the Farmers Ele- 
vator Com])any and is widely recognized as one of the leading men in this 
section of the state. He has done much to advance the general interests of 
the countv seat and of the county at large and has long been regarded as 
one of Norman county's most substantial and influential citizens. For nine 
years he has been a member of the Ada city council and in that capacity has 
rendered excellent service in helping to "boost" the county seat into its pres- 
ent high place among the flourishing little cities of northern Minnesota. 

It was in 1886 that E. C. Betcher was united in marriage to Minnie 
Mackel, daughter of Ignatius Mackel and wife, and to this union five chil- 
dren ha\e been born, Alfred, Ida, Walter, Raymond and I'lrvin. Capt. 
Alfred Betcher, first-born of Mr. and Mrs. Betcher's sons, is ;i graduate of 
the United States Military Academy at West Point and is now a captain in 
the United States regular army. \\r. and Mrs. Betcher are members of the 
Congregational church at Ada and take a proper interest in church work and 



112 CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

in the general good works of the community, helpful in promoting all worthy 
causes. Mr. Betcher is a Republican and has ever gi\en a good citizen"* 
attention to local iiolitical affairs. Fraternally, he i> affiliated with the local 
lodge of the Modern Woodmen of America and takes a warm interest in the 
aft'airs of that orsani;?ation. 



W. H. D.WY. 



W. H. Davy, former mayor and one of the most substantial citizens 
of Moorhead, was born in Bath, Ontario, Canada, June 19. 1844, a son of 
William H. Davy and Sarah M. (Perry) Davy, both of whom were born 
in Ontario, Canada. William H. Davy was a shipbuilder in Bath, Ontario, 
and lived there practically all his life. He was the father of three children: 
Sarah Minerva, Mary I'erry and W. H. Mr. Da\y, Sr., was a member 
of the Episcopal church. 

\\'. H. Davy was educated in the public schools of Bath. Ontario. 
Canada, where he spent his early years. During the Civil \\'ar he came 
to Chicago, Illinois, and li\ed there until the close of the war and then 
returned to Canada. In 1869 he came ag.'iin to this country and located in 
Duluth, Minnesota, where he remained for about three years, .\bout 1872 
he came to Moorhead and spent one winter, and in the following year he 
came here to live and has since made this his home. For the first three 
or four years after coming here he was empkned as bookkeeper and ca.shier 
for the firm of Brunes & Finkle, and also was agent for the American 
Express Company. At that time express matter was carried by a stage line 
running from Breckinridge by way of Moorhead, to Minneapolis, also 
from Aloorhead to Vt. Gary. Following this employmerit Mr. Davy was for 
several years engaged in the grocery Inisiness. Later he started in the grain, 
flour, building-material and fuel business, in partnership with I*". Goodsell, 
under the firm name of W. H. Davy & Company. After about eight or 
nine years in that business Mr. Davy retired from active management and 
left the business in the hands of Mr. Goodsell, his partner. 

For the past thirty years Mr. Davy has been interested in farming and 
has large land investments. He now owns about three sections of land in 
Clay county and carries on farming on an extensive scale. His time for 
the past eleven or twelve years has been mostly occupied in superintending 
his farms. In 1914 he had a patch of potatoes within the citv limits, adjoin- 




W. H. DAVY. 



•: NEW YORK 



A STOP. 
TTLDEN F 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. II3 

ing- the Normal Scliool grounds, on which was produced over fifteen thous- 
and bushels of potatoes. 

For the last twenty-five years ^Ir. Davy has spent most of his winters 
in Florida or California and has thus been able to escape the rigor of Minne- 
sota winters. He is among the wealthiest farmers in the state, yet he is very 
unpretentious and li\es in ]\Ioorhead in a modest way. He is a member of 
the Episcopal church of Moorhead and has served for many years as warden 
in that church. He served several years as county commissioner of Clay 
county, and was chairman of that board for several years. He served two 
tenns as mayor of Moorhead. 

Mr. Daw is one of the living pioneers of Moorhead and is still one of 
the citizens of the town who is actively interested in public affairs. 



ERNEST POEHLS. 



Ernest Poehls, proprietor of a well-kept farm of two hundred and 
sixty acres just north of the \ illage of Sabin, in Elmwood township, Clay 
countv. former constable for that township and former supervisor of high- 
ways in his district, was born in Scott county, Iowa, November 23, 1876, 
son of Chris and Elizabeth ( Krabbenhoft) Poehls, who lx;came residents 
of Clay county in 1883 and are still living, prominent and influential resi- 
dents of Elmwood township. 

Both Chris Poehls and his wife are of European birth, natives of 
Schleswig-Holstein, who came to this country in 1866, settling with their 
respective families in Scott county, Iowa, where they were married in 1868 
and where they remained, engaged in farming, until the latter part of 1883, 
when they came to Minnesota and established their home in Clay county, 
arriving at their new home there on December 10 of that year. Chris Poehls 
had bought a farm in Elmwood township, during the prexious summer, and 
came well-equipped for successful farming. As he prospered in his opera- 
tions, he graduallv added to his land holdings until now he is the owner 
of eleven hundred and fifty-three acres of excellent land. Despite the fact 
that he is now past seventy-five years of age, he is still hale and hearty and 
continues to give his active attention to the general direction of his extensive 
farming interests. During eight years of his residence in Iowa, Mr. Poehls 
was supervisor of roads in liis home district, and, since taking up his resi- 
(8a) 



114 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

dence in ATinnesota, also has given considerable attention to general local 
affairs, one of his active business connections being with the local telephone 
company. He and his wife are acti\e members of tlie Lutheran church 
and their children were reared in that faith. There were twelve of these 
children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the sixth in order of birth: 
the others being: Eureka, Minnie, Henry, Emma, John, Laura (deceased), 
Hulda, Fred (deceased), Emil, Lena and .\nna. 

Ernest Poehls was but se\en years of age when he came to Minnesota 
from Iowa with his parents in 1883, and he completed his schooling in the 
Sabin schools. From the days of his boyhood, he was an active assistant 
to his father and brothers in the labors of developing and improving the 
li(5iue place in Elmwood township, and he remained at home, thus engaged, 
until his marriage, in the fall of 1904. He then engaged in farming on 
his own account, establishing his home on the farm on which he is still 
living, in that same township, just north of Sabin, and where he and his 
familv are \ery comfortably situated. Mr. Poehls is the owner of a well- 
developed farm of two hundred and sixty acres, and has an excellent farm 
]>lant. He has erected good Iniildings on his place and carries on his opera- 
tions in up-to-date fashion. Upon taking possession of that farm, he planted 
a good-sized grove which is now well developed, a very attractive feature 
of his farm. In addition to his general farming, Mr. Poehls has given 
considerable attention to the raising of Shorthorn cattle and is successful 
in this enterprise. He gives close attention to local civic affairs and has 
served his community in the capacity of constable and as "road boss." 

In the fall of 1904 Ernest Poehls was united in marriage to Mary 
Mickelsen, who was born in the \icinity of her present home, in Elmwood 
township, daughter of Jens and Sophia (Wright) Mickelsen, early settlers 
in that neighborhood, the former of whom spent his last days there. Jens 
Mickelsen was born in Denmark and came to this country in the days of 
his young manhood. He came on out into the Northwest and for some time 
was engaged as a freighter out of Fargo, hauling to points along the then 
frontier as far north as one hundred and twenty miles and more. He mar- 
ried, after coming to this country, and in 1879 homesteaded a quarter of a 
section of land in Elmwood township. Clay county, where he established 
his home and where he spent the remainder of his life, one of the sub 
stantial and influential pioneers of that neighborhood. His widow is now 
living at Sabin. The}- were the parents of seven children, of whom Mrs. 
Poehls was the first-born: the odiers being: \\'illiam, Andrew, Martin. 
Matilda and George. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. II5 

To Ernest and ilary (Alickelsen ) Poehls five children have been born; 
Argan, Calvin, Harold, Ethel and Vivian. Mr. and Mrs. Poehls are mem- 
bers of the Lutheran cliurclT and take a proper interest in church work, as 
well as in other local good works and the general social activities of the 
community, of which they have l)een residents since the days of their child- 
hood, and which they have seen develop from its pioneer state to its present 
high stage of development and cultivation. 



WILLIAM H. FERRIS. 



W'ilHam H. Ferris, the proprietor of a fine farm of five hundred and 
sixty acres in Elmwood township. Clay county, and the owner also of a 
tract of three quarters of a section of land down the river in Wilkin countv 
in the neighborhood of Kent, anil long recognized as one of the most sub- 
stantial fanners in the Sabin neighborhood, is a native of Ireland. He has 
made his home on this side of the water since he was twelve or thirteen 
years of age, and in Minnesota since 1880, having come down here froui 
Canada in that year, and has therefore been a witness to, aud a particijiant 
in, the development of this region since pioneer days. He was torn in 
County Down, Ireland, Septeml)er 22, 1862, son of William aud Eliza Jane 
(Beggs) Ferris, both born in that same county, and the former of whom died 
when his son was a mere child. His widow later, about 1S65, emigrated 
to Canada, where she married again, later coming to Minnesota and is now 
uiaking her home at Minneapolis. 

Having been left fatherless when little more than an infant, aud liis 
mother later leaving Ireland, William H. Ferris was reared by his grand- 
mother Beggs in County Down, and, in 1875, came with ber to this side 
of the water, locating in Canada. In July, 1880, William II. b'erris came 
down from Canada with his uncle. Henry Beggs, who homesteaded a (piartcr 
of a section of land in Elmwood township. Clay county, aud there estab- 
lished his home. William FI. Ferris gave his active assistance to the labors 
of impro\-ing and developing that farm and, upon the death of liis uncle 
in 1887, bought the place, and continued the work of improvement. In the 
meantime, his grandmother Beggs had come down here from Canada aud 
he. cared for her in her declining years, her death occurring at his home 
.some years later. Mr. Ferris prospered in his farming o])erations and grad- 
ually increased his land holdings until his home farm now comprises fwi: 



Il6 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

hundred and sixty acres of excellent land, well inijiroved and i)rofital)Iy cul- 
ti\ated. In addition to this farm, Mr. l-'erris is the owner of tin-ee-qiiarters 
of a section in the neighhorhood of Kent, down in Wilkin county, and is 
regarded as heint;- (|nite well circumstanced. lie is a niemher of the local 
school board and is interested in the Xorlhw estern Hospital at Moorhead. 
In No\enil)er. 1890. William H. |-"erris vv;is united in marriage to Nel- 
lie Xolan, daughter of \\'illiam Xolan and wife, of Wilkin county, and to 
this union five children have been horn. 'I'homas, Ma\, W illiam, Alfred and 
Cecelia. The Ferrises have a \ery pleasant home and ha\e e\er taken an 
interested pait in tlie general social affairs of the community. They are 
members of the Catliolic clinrch at Sahin. ?\linncsota. and take a proper 
interest in the jjarisli affairs. 



DK. JA.MES S. UrRKlLL. 

Dr. James S. liurrill a ])rogTessi\e \oung dentist of IJlen, Clay county, 
was born in Keene township, Clay county, July 27. 1892, a son of H. R. 
and Harriet (McDonald) lUirrill. the former of whom is now a well-known 
dealer in farming imi)Iements in ilaulev, this county. 11 K. IJurrill was 
liorn on September 19, JS58, in bitzw illiam, of the Granite state, a son 
of Jacob Burrill. who was born in 1S18 a.nd died in 1891. The father of 
James Burrill was educated, in the common schools of Keene, his native 
state of Xew Hampshire, and in iX^fi bf liegan working in a store at Dana. 
^Massachusetts. In the sj)ring of 1878, he came to Hawle\', Minnesota, and. 
soon after arri\ing in Clay county, took up a homestead in Keene townshi]) 
whicli he developed into a good farm. He and Lewis Smith were among 
the earliest pioneers in Keene township, breaking the first sod in this vicinit\- 
with ox-teams. He remained on the old homestead until 1897. when he sold 
the same and bought another farm in section 10, f)ne and one-half miles west 
of the village of Hawley, where be lived until 1907. In that year, he moved 
to Hawley and formed a partnership with Hans Rushfeldt in the machine 
business. In 1912. his son, Robert, bought out the interest of Mr. Rush- 
feldt. and formed a partnership with his fattier. The new firm is located in 
a large and niodernly-e(|uipped implement store, where they handle an exten- 
sive stock of all kinds of farming machinery. On April 19, 1885, H. R. 
P.urrill was married to Harriet ]\IcDonald. a daughter of fohn McDonald, 



CLAY AND NDRMAX COIXTIES, MINNESOTA 



117 



and to their union the following;- clnUh-cn have hcen liorn; Uobert H., wiio 
is in business with his father: Dan \V., who married i-'annie Skinner and 
\\h(j died Ijy accidental asphyxiation on April 28, kjK); Henr\'. Allen. i,ei)la. 
an adopted child, and James S., the subject of this review. 

James S. Burrill received his elementary education in the public schools 
of Hawley, ij^radnating from the high scIiodI of that place in i()io. He then 
entered the L'nixersity of Minnesota, where he spent one year, pursuing the 
agricultural course of study. In the _\ears, 191 1 and \()\2. he was engaged 
in teaching at Velva, Xorth Dakota, and in the fall of kjI-', he returned 
to the state university and took a course in dentistry, which he com[)leted. 
graduating in 191 3. He then engaged in the practice of his profession at 
Hawle)-, remaining there until the spring of 1916, when he came to I'len 
and opened an office as a dentist and has been here ever since. 

Dr. Burrill was marrieil in 11)14 to Edna Rapp. daughter of Louis Rapp, 
of Minneapolis. They have one child, Herman Robert James. 'Vhtv are 
members of the Congregational church. 

Dr. Burrill is a niemljer of the Masonic Lodge and of the Indeiiendent 
Order of Odd h'ellow s. lieing \-ery wide-awake and progressive in his 
profession. Dr. Bui-rill is a member of the Crookston District, the state and 
the National denial associations. He is also a member of the Psi Phi dental 
fraternity. 



JOHN A. BACKMAN. 

John .\. Backman, a farmer of Eglon township. Clay county, was born, 
April 2, 185-', in Sweden. He is a son of Andrus and Kajsa (Svvenson) An- 
derson, both natives of Sweden, where they grew up, married and established 
their home on a farm, and there the father died at the early age of thirty-three 
years, when his son John was only eight months old. The mother was mar- 
ried a .second tiiue. her last husband being Andrew Berg-, who initnigrated 
with her to .Vnierici in i<S8i. They located in Highland Grove township, 
Cla\- count V, on a farm in section 36. and there the death of Mr. Berg 
occurred in the summer of 1916, having survived his wife, the mother of the 
subject of this sketch, whose death occurred there in the autumn of 1914 at 
the advanced age of ninety-one years. She had only the one child, John A., 
bv her brst marriage, and four children by her second marriage, namely: 
Gust, who is farming in Highland Grove township; Mary, deceased; Hannah, 



wiir 
1 



\\ 



ll8 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

a widow, living in Detroit. Minnesota: and Sarah, the wife of the chief of 
police of Fargo, North Dakota. 

Tames A. Backman spent his boyhood in Sweden where he attended the 
common schools. He immigrated to America, when a young man, and first 
ked two months on the Northern Pacific railroad in Minnesota, then three 
nonths on the Stillwater railroad, which extended from W^hite Burr Lake to 
Stillwater, this state, .\fter spending the winter of 1870-71 in St. Paul, he 
went to St. Cloud, where he took the stage for Crowing, and from there 
alked for three tlays to a place eighteen miles east of the present village of 
I'criiam. where he worked until April, 1871. -\t that time he came to Becker 
count\, locating on a farm, hut later settled on land in sections 6 and i, Eglon 
township, Clav count), on his uncle's claim. Two of his uncles had come whh 
him to America and had at once taken up claims in Minnesota. In 1876, Mr. 
Backman homesteaded eighty acres in section 2. Kglon township. He later 
l)OUght fort\ acres more in section 11. l-".gl<>n township, and subsequently 
another fortv in section 3. Eglon township. He now owns a well-improved 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres. He has continued to reside on the 
same claim that he took up over forty years ago, and has made all improve- 
ments, including a good home and numerous outbuildings, and is making a 
success as a general farmer and stock raiser. 

On January 16. 1880. Mr. Burns was married to Mary Xelson, who was 
lioni in Sweden, January 24. 1861, and there she grew up and attended 
.school. She came to .\mcrica in 1873 ^^'''i ^^^^ parents. .After her father had 
worked in the mines of the iron district of Michigan for some time, he came 
to Eglon township. Clay county. Minnesota, and established the family home 
on a farm in section 8, where his death occurred in 1899. His widow is 
still living in this townshi]) at the unusual age of ninety-seven years. 

To John -\. Backman and wife, nine children were born, namely: Min- 
nie. Mho is married and lives in \'ale, Minnesota: Ida, who works in Fargo. 
North Dakota: Fretiof, who works in Lake Park, Minnesota; Matilda, who 
lives at home and is a school teacher; Olga, living at Dilworth, Minnesota, in 
the employ of the Northern Pacific railroad; Kail, who operates the home 
farm : Hulda. Henr}' and August, all of whom are living on the home place 
in Eglon township and assisting their parents with the general work on the 
farm. 

Politically. Mr. Backman is an Independent Democrat. He was a mem- 
ber of the tow'-nship hoard of Eglon township for ten or eleven years, and was 
clerk of the school hoard for a twelve-year period. He was one of the organ- 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. HQ 

izers of the Lake Parke Mutual Fire Insurance Company. He is a member, 
also formerly a trustee, of the Swedish Lutheran church, the plans for the 
church edifice of which he drafted, the same being- accepted by the congre- 
Q-ation. 



GARFIELD H. RUSTAD. 

Garfield H. Rustad, a well-known young attorney-at-law, with offices at 
Moorhead, city attorney there and former president of the Moorhead Com- 
mercial Club, was born in the neighboring state of North Dakota, but has 
lived in Moorhead since the days of his I)oyhood. He was born at Larimore, 
North Dakota, in 1887, son of August J. and Thea (Thorson) Rustad, who 
later became residents of Moorhead, where their last days were spent. 

August J. Rustad was born in the kingdom of Norway and lived there 
until he was grown, when he came to this county and located in Larimore, 
North Dakota, where he presently became engaged in the clothing business, 
t-emaining there for some years, at the end of which time he moved to Grand 
<"orks, in that same state, engaging there in the same line of business, after- 
vvard "coming over into Minnesota and locating at Moorhead, where he 
engaged in business and where he and his wife spent the remainder of their 
lives. His wife's parents, Ole Thorson and wife, also spent their last days 
in Moorhead, at which place they had settled shortly after the laying out of 
tlie town, having located there straightway upon their arrival in this country 
fmni Norway, of which country they were natives. Ole Thorson was 
engaged in the fiour-milling business at Moorhead and was one of the best- 
known and most active among the pioneer residents of that city. He died 
about fifteen years after locating there. August J. Rustad and wife were the 
])arents of three sons, of whom the subject of this sketch was the last-born, 
tlie others being Oscar and Fred. 

Garfield H. Rustad was but a child when his parents located at Moor- 
liead and he finished his course in the common schools there. Upon gradu- 
ating from the high school at that place in 1905 he entered the law depart- 
ment of the UniversitN of Minnesota and was graduated from that institu- 
tion in igo8, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. For two years after his 
adinission to the bar Mr. Rustad was engaged in the ofifice of the county 
attorney at Moorhead, N. I. Johnson being county attorney at that time, and 
since then has been maintaining an ofifice of his own and has acquired a fine 
practice. In 1911 Mr. Rustad was elected city attorney and has since been 



I20 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

serving in that capacity, giving his earnest attention to local civic affairs. He ' 
also has given his close personal attention to the general affairs of his home 
town and during the year 1916 served as president of the Moorhead Com- 
mercial Cluh. doing much in that time to promote the general interests of 
the city. 

On January 1. 1Q13, Garfield H. Kustad was united in marriage to Agnes 
E. Aladsen, of Fargo. JNIr. and Mrs. Rustad are members of the Episcopal 
church and take a warm interest in the general good works of their home 
town. Mr. Rustad is a ^klason and a member of the local lodges of the 
Knights of Pythias, of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of the 
Ancient Order of United \\'orkinen and of the Royal League, and in the 
affairs of all these organizations takes a warm interest. 



JOHN MARTI I. 

John Marth, well-known and well-to-do retired farmer and an honored 
veteran of the Civil War, throughout which he had seen much service, was 
liorn in Germany, but has been a resident of this country for sixty years, 
having come tn the United States in 1857. He was born on June 6, 1837, 
the only son of George and Sophia (Hohman) Marth. also born in the 
Fatherland and wiio spent all their lives in that country. 

George Marth was born in Germany in February, 1793. and was edu- 
cated in the schools of his nati\c land, where he followed the occupation of 
a farmer during all his active years. He died in the old country in 1876. 
having reached the advanced age of eight\-three years. He was twice mar- 
ried, his second wife being Sophia Hohman. who was born in Germany in 
1814, and who died at the earh- age of twent\-ninc vears, in 1843. They 
were the jjarents of two children. F,lizal)eth Keiser, who lives in Delano. 
Minnesota, and John, the subject of this sketch. 

John Marth was educated in the schools of (jerman\- and was reared on 
his father's farm, where he helped in the agricultural labors up to the age of 
nineteen, when he immigrated to .\merica. arriving in this country in 1857. 
He engaged in farming, at which he contiinied for a few years, and .some 
six months after the Civil War l)egan. he enlisted on October 4, 1861, and 
served to the end of the war. He enlisted at Ft. Snelling, Minnesota, and 
saw service in the battle of Shiloh and at the siege of Corinth, at the end of 
which engagement he followed General Price through Tennessee and Mem- 




MR. AND MRS. JOHN MARTH. 



CLAY AXD XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 121 

phis. He was also at tlie battle and siege of \'icksburg. He re-enlisted at 
the end of the first term and was with Sherman's army on the march to the 
sea. At the end uf the conflict between the states he was honorably dis- 
charged at Ft. SneJling on Jnne i, 1865. having served three years and nine 
months on beliaif of tlie Union cause. He was in ten battles and was never 
captured, nor did he receive any wound. 

Following his discharge from the army, Mr. Martii engaged in the mer- 
cantile business in Wright county, this state, and continued in same until 
1877, when he mo\-ed to Barnesville, Clay county, and Iniilt a store and 
stocked it with a full line of general merchandise, his venture in this line 
proving very successful. In ic)o8 he soid out tlie stock, but still retains the 
ownershi]) of the Iniilding. In 1877 li<^ had homesteaded a quarter section 
of land in section 18, Humboldt township, and continued to operate it for 
twenty-one years, selling out in 1899. About 1891 lie bought a quarter 
section in section 18, Barnesville township, which he still rclains. and is now 
the owner of six hundred and eighty acres in all. Mr. Marth carried out 
many Aaluable improxements on his holdings and during his active life on 
tlie land be was regarded as one of the most .substantial farmers in that part 
of the township. 

Tn June, 1867, John .\larth was united in marriage to Wilhelmina 
Kleinent, who was born in (iermany on b'ebruary 15. 1851, and who came to 
America four years later, in 1855. The marriage took i)lace in Wright 
count}', .Minnesota, and the following children w^ere born: Mrs. Mathilda 
Englis, deceased : Sophia, at home : Amanda, deceased ; John, who is now 
managing his father's farming interests; Rosa, a clerk at Frazee, Minnesota, 
antl Mrs. .\lvina Partridge, who lives at Dodge Center, this state. The 
senior John Marth. notwithstanding his extensive mercantile and land opera- 
tions, found time to devote to matters connected with the civic affairs of the 
township. He was president of the townshi]) Ijoard of the village of Barnes- 
ville for several \ears, and at a later time, when the i)lace was incorporated, 
he was alderman of the cit> of Barnesville, and in these representative jiosi- 
tions he gave general satisfaction to the public. He is a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic and in that organization continues to take a warm in- 
terest. Mr. Marth is now living retired at Barnesville. and has reached ten 
years beyond the allotted span of three-score and ten years, still vigorous in 
mind and body. 

The junior John Marth is nc^w carrying on the farming operations 
since his father's retirement. He had been living in Canada, where he was 
engaged in farming, and sold his land there in 1916 and returned to the old 



122 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

farm, which he is now managing very successfully. He carries on general 
farming and raises mule-foot hogs, and is doing \ery well. He was mar- 
ried to Ida Nelson on December 28. 1898, and the\- are parents of one child, 
a daughter, Winifred, now three years old. 

An interesting item in connection witli the Alartli fanuly on tiie female 
side is worth recortling. Rosalia Ziel)erth, grandmother of Wilhelniina 
Klement. who became the wife of John Alarth. Sr., was the third white 
woman to cross Crow river from Wright county, .Minnesota. 



]OHN OSS. 



John Oss, an in\entor now living in Hitterdal. Clay county, was born 
in Norderhow, Ringerike, X(jrway, September -'3, 1845, a son of Nels Paul- 
son and Kari Ellinger, both natives of Norway. The father was a farmer 
in Norway and spent his entire life in that country. He was the father of 
five children, namely: Paul. .Martin. Thomas, John, the subject of this 
review, and Nels. 

John Oss. who was a sergeant in the Norwegian army, received there 
his education, passing his examination in the higher studies with honors. 
In 1882, he came to America and located in .\tlanla township, Becker 
county, Minnesota, and engaged in farming. In 1886, he came to Keene 
township, Clay county, and took up a homestead consisting of one hundred 
and sixty acres, where he built a house and other Iniildings, making this 
home until about i8q0. In that year he returned to .Atlanta township, Becker 
county. Minnesota, and bought a farm of eighty acres, which he later sold. 
and then bought another tract of one hundred and sixty acres in the same 
township. He lived on this farm and engaged in general farming until 1914. 
when he sold out and removed to Hitterdal, Clay county, where he has since 
resided. 

For fourteen Aears, while living in Becker county. Mr. Oss was county 
surveyor, and, being of an in\entive turn of mind, worked out several 
improvements on surveyors' leveling rods and computing machines, at Ids 
spare time. He was for twenty years a member of the school board, and for 
two years assessor of Atlanta township. While living in Keene township, 
Clay county, he serxed as chairman of the school board of that township, 
also as constable for a time, and as justice of the peace. Mr. Oss was t)ne 
of the organizers of the Clay County Bank, of Hitterdal, of which he has 



CLAY AND NOUMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I23 

l)een a trustee since its org-anization. He is a member of the Synod Lutheran 
church, of whicli lie was for three years trustee before becoming treasurer, 
which office he now holds. 

Before coming to America, Mr. Oss was sergeant in the Norwegian 
armv which he entered in 1867. serving until 1872. After leaving the 
arm\-, he went to Christiania, Norway, where he was empoyed for eight 
years as superintendent of a manufacturing plant, where many kinds of 
machinerx', tools, stoves, and the hke were manufactured. Because his health 
was failing he was advised by his physician to gi\e up inside work and he 
quit the factory. He then decided to come to America, where there was 
larger opportunity fnr outdoor work. 

John Oss was united in marriage to Johanna Wenner, and to this union 
six children were horn, namel\- : Oscar, Ra)-, Jennie, who married Anton 
Melbye: Tlieoclore, Helga. the wife of Julius Schloesser : Alfred, the post- 
master at Hitterdal, a sketch of whose life appears elsewhere in this work. 
Mr. and Mrs. Oss. being members of the Synod Lutheran church, have 
reared their children according to the jjrecepts of this creed. 



JOHN BURRILL. 



One of the well-reniembered and highly esteemed citizens of Hawley, 
('la\ count\. during a past generation was the late John Burrill. He was 
born at \i)l)ott. Maine, tm August 2, 1842, a son of Jacob and Rachael (Ben- 
nett ) r.urrill. who are mentioned on other pages of this volume. 

hihn lUirrill spent a part of his boyhood in his native town, where he 
attended the public schools, but before he had reached man's estate, he 
reuKived with his parents to I'raminghani, Massachusetts, and later to Fitz- 
willi.im. New Hampshire, where he was employed in a woodenware factory. 
In the spring of 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Second New Hampshire 
\"olunteer Infantrv, l)eing the first man from his county to enlist in the three- 
year service. At the expiration of his first term of enlistment, he re-enlisted 
for the duration of the war. a jjcriod of one year. He took part 
in many of the leading battles of the Civil War, including Bull Run 
(first and sec<Mnl). Fredericksburg, Antietam, Gettysburg, siege of Rich- 
moud. and many others, being present at Lee's surrender at Appomattox. 
\'irginia. Soon, thereafter, he was detailed as a guard. He had previousl\' 
been an orderlv for Gen. Joe Hooker, and he had the honor of escorting Pres- 



124 



CLAY AND XOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNKSOTA. 



C) 



ident Lincoln from the Ijoat-landing at Fredericksburg to General Hooker's 
head(iuarters on one occasion, when the chief executive paid the commander 
f the .\rmy of the Potomac a visit. In all, Mr. Burrill took part in about 
thirty battles and skirmishes. He was a lirave and efficient soldier for the 
Union. Other battles in which he took part were those of Cold Harbor, siege 
of ^'orktown, Williamsburg, siege of I'etersburg and those of the Peninsular 
campaign. The dates of his enlistment were as follows: April 25, 1861 ; one 
uKuitli liter. May 31. 1861. when he enlisted for three years in Company A. 
-Second Xew Hampsliire \'olunteer Infantry, and on February i. 1865. when 
he enlisted a third time, in Company C, of his old re.giment. 

After the war J(jhn P.urrill went tn .St. John!)erry. \'ermont, and worked 
a \ear in ;i scale factory, then returned to bitzwilliam, Xew Hampshire, and 
l)oupht a saw mill. In 1870 be moved to Iowa, where he remained until 1872. 
then went to Minneapolis. Minnesota, and later moved to Brainard, this 
state. He came to Hawley in iH;;,. and helped build the present Northern 
Pacific depot. He located on a homestead in section 26, Cromwell town- 
siiip, Clav countv. at this time, and about 1878 he moved from his farm in 
1887. In 1880. he moved to Superior, this state, where he remained one 
year, and tlien returned to Hawley. li\ ing there until his death, which occurred 
on June 12, 1906. 

Mr. Burrill was married in i8()() to i.ewellyn I't^-istall, who died in 1873. 
leaving three children, (lertrude. who married .\rthur ShoUey and lives in 
Minneapolis; Mabel, the wife of I.. D. Libbey, a farmer of Honey Creek. 
Wisconsin, and Allen F., who served in the Spanish-American War as a 
memljer of Companv C. Thirteenth Minnesota N'olunteer Infantry, and also 
in the Philippine W ar. and who married Daisy I'ryor. after which he moved 
to luigene. Oregon, where he died. 

John Burrill married for his second wife Jane Colborn, and two children 
were born to them, namely: Paul C, who married Hilda Andrea and is a 
lieutenant in the Minnesota Xational (iuard, and Margaret, who makes her 
home in Minneapolis. 

John Burrill was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic Po.st at 
Hawley. of which he was commander at the time of his death. He belonged 
to the Masonic Lodge. In his early days here he served on the school board 
and for many years was justice of the peace at Hawley. He gave eminent 
satisfaction as a public servant, being conscientious, loyal and painstaking; 
prompt and obliging. He was a great student of history and was a well- 
informed man along general lines. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. IJ5 

DICK MEYER. 

Dick .Me\er, a well-kiuiwn and siil>stantial farmer of Humboldt town- 
shi|), owner of three hundred and twenty acres of land in sections 2 and 3, 
that township, at present township treasurer and in other ways connected with 
the public life of Humboldt township, is a native of Germany, born in that 
country in July, i860, but has been living in America since 1882. He is the 
son (if Herre and Marv ( Hein ) Meyer, natives of Germany and who lived 
and died in that country. 

iierre Mever was hurn in (jermany in 183 1 and was educated in the 
schools of that country. R\- occupation he was a farmer and continued thus 
engaged throughout Iiis active life, his death taking place in 1917, at the 
advanced age of cightv-six years. The intimation of his father's death 
reached his son, Dick, the subject <>f this sketch, through a newspaper notice. 
His wife, Mary Hein, was also Ijorn in the fatherland and spent all her life 
in lier native land, her death occurring in 1907, having reached seventy-three 
\ears of age. To Iierre Meyer and wife the following children were born: 
Hey, a farmer, living in Germany; Trenty, married and living in Germany; 
Dick, living in Humboldt township; Volke (i) deceased, and Volke (2), 
.also deceased. 

Dick Meyer recei\cd a sound education in the excellent schools of Ger- 
m.anv and was reared on liis father's place, where he assisted in the labors 
of developing the farm. At the age of twenty-two, in i88j, he immigrated 
to tlie United States, liis lir^t place of residence in this country being Madison 
countv, Illinois, where he worked on farms for some years. In 1901 Mr. 
Mewr moved to ("lay county and bought a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres of prime land in section J. lIuml)ol(lt townshi]). the farm on which he 
now lives. He is also the owner of another one hundred and sixty acres in 
section 3, in the same townshi]). He carries on general farming and since 
the commencement of his oiieratious he has been most successful, everything 
al)out his two tracts of laml l>eing in excellent condition. The dwelling 
house in which Mr. Meyer and his family reside was erected before he be- 
came the owner of the farm, but all the other buildings, including a new barn, 
were ])ut u]) by him. His place is well improved and he is generally regarded 
as one of the substantial and progressive farmers in the township, operating 
his place according to modern methods of agriculture. He plants about 
I'orly-live acres of jiotatoes, the yield to the acre being well up to the average 
for the district. 



126 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Tn 1 89 1 Dick Meyer was united in marriage to Cena Johnson, who was 
lioni in Christian county. Illinois, in 1869. the marriage taking place in Iowa. 
They are the parents of the following children : Herman, John. Mary, Cena 
and Kattie. Mr. and Mrs. Meyer take a proper interest in the affairs of the 
community in which they reside, helpful factors in the promotion of all 
causes ha\ing for their object the common good of neighborhood and town- 
ship. Mr. Merer gives a good citizen's attention to public affairs and is now 
serving as township treasurer, filling the office with a marked degree of abil- 
itv. He also was a director on the district school board for six years, his 
attention to educational matters during that period being unremitting. 



HAXS I. ULLF'tlCH. 



o 



Hans J. L'llricli, wcll-kndvvn grain buyer at the \illage of Downer, 
and clerk of the to\vns]iii> of Elkton, Clay county, was born in Germany, 
but has been a resident of this country since he was ten years of age, and 
f Minnesota since 1885. He was born on October 27, 1870, son of Hans 
and Wibv (Glohe) Ullrich, also natives of Germany, who came to the 
United States with their family in 1880 and settled in Boone county. Iowa. 
Five years later they came to Minnesota and settled on a farm in Martin 
county, and there Mrs. Ullrich spent her last days. Some time after his 
wife's death. Hans Ullrich, Sr., mo\ed to Elkton township. Clay county, 
where he was engaged in farming until his death. He took an active inter- 
est in local ci\ic aft'airs and was ser\ing as a member of the board of 
township supervisors at the time of his death. He and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church and tiieir children were reared in that faith. 
There were fi\e of these children, all of whom ;ire living, the suliject of 
this sketcli having three brothers. Henry. Julm and Marcus, and a sister. 
Anna. 

Having Iieen Init a boy when he came to ihis country with his parents 
in 1880, Hans J. L'llricli completed his schooling in the schools of Iowa 
and Martin county, Minnesota, where he began farming on his own account. 
He remained there until the fall of 1899. when he came up into the Red 
River country, where he has e\er since made his home, living in Downer 
and vicinity. For a time after coming here, he was engaged in farm labor 
and then for five years was engaged as a clerk in a store at Downer, work- 
ing first for John Seini and later for Mrs. Hawkins, the latter having sue- 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 12/ 

ceeded the former in the proprietorship of tlie store. Mr. Ullricli then was 
engaged by the Hennepin Grain Company as buyer at Downer and, after 
two years of connection with that concern, was employed Ijy the St. Anthony 
& Dakota Grain Company as buyer in the same place and has ever since 
been thus engaged, one of the best-known grain men in that part of the 
country. Mr. Ullrich is the owner of a fine farm of two hundred acres at 
Downer, a part of the townsite hax'ing been laid out on his place. In addi- 
tion to his activities as a grain Ixiyer, he gives his personal attention to the 
management of his farm. He also handles the local agency for the Fargo 
Implement Company. Ever since coming to this section, Mr. Ulrich has 
given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs, having served for two 
terms as justice of the peace in Rlkton townshi]) and for the past eight 
years as clerk of the same. 

In 191 2, Hans J. Ullricli was united in marriage to Lydia .\. Austin, 
who was born in Clay county, daughter of C. W. Austin and wife, and to 
this union two children ha\e been born, John Arthur and Myrtle Anna. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ullrich are members of the Lutheran church, the former being 
one of the organizers of the local congregation of that rluirch. in the affairs 
of which he and his wife take a warm interest. 



FREDEf^ICK W. ALTENBERND. 

Frederick W. Altenhernd, a well-known and substantial farmer of the 
southern part of Clay county and the proprietor of a fine place of four 
hundred and eight acres in Elmwood township, where he and his family are 
very comfortably situated, is a native of Kansas, Irarn on a pioneer farm 
in Douglas county, that state, on January 4, 1871. He is a son of William 
and Katie (Hill) Alten1)ernd, natives of Germany, the former of whom 
came to this country in r80o. he then being twenty-seven years of age, and 
the latter of whom came to .America with her parents \\hen she was eight 
years of age. Both are now deceased. 'I'hey were the parents of eiglit 
children. 

Reared on the home farm in the neighborhood of Lawrence, Kansas, 
Frederick \V. Altenhernd received his schooling in the public schools of 
that city and in the business college there. Not long after leaving, he came 
up here into the Red River country and bought a farm of two hundred and 
forty acres in Elmwood township. Clay county, and started in to improve 



Ij8 clay and NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

and develop the same, establishing his permanent home diere after his mar- 
riage in 1901. Mr. .\ltenbernd has done well in his farming oi)erations. 
and has increased his original holdings nntil now he is the owner of a fine 
place of four hundred and eighty acres. He is now regarded as one of the 
most securely established farmers in that section of the county, his place 
being well improved and profitably cultivated. In addition to his general 
farming, he has, of late )ears, gone somewhat extensively into potato rais- 
ing and has done well in that line, having discovered, along with many 
other thoughtful agriculturists hereabout, that potatoes constitute one of 
the most profitable crops raised in the Red River valley. 

In 1901, Frederick W. Altenbernd was united in marriage to Wilhelmiua 
Schroeder, who was born in Elmwood township, daughter of Henry 
Schroeder and wife, pioneers of Clay county, further and fitting mention 
of whom is made elsewhere in this volume, and to this union two children 
ha\-e been born, sons both, Carl and Clarence. ^Ir. and Mrs. Altenbernd 
are members of the German Lutheran church and give proper attention to 
the various beneficences of the same, as well as to the general good works 
and social affairs of the community in which they live, and are doing well 
their part in advancing the neighborhood's common welfare. 



I'ROF. II. R. i;d\\ards. 

Prof. H. R. Julwards. .superintendent of the Moorhead city schools, 
past president of the Minnesota .State .Vssociation of School Superintend- 
ents, an acti\e memijer of the National Education Association for more than 
twentv vears and for years one oi Minnesota's best-known and most influ- 
ential schoolmen, is a nati\e of the great ICmpire state, but has been a resi- 
dent of Minnesota, actively engaged in school work here, for nearly a quar- 
ter of a century. He was born in the village of Alfred, in Allegany county. 
New York, Decemljer i. 1870, son of Joseph and Harriet fW^lliams) 
Edwards, both natives of that same state, who spent all their lives there. 
Joseph Edwards was a substantial miller and landowner and a man of 
influence in his community, tie and his wife were members of the Baptist 
church and their children were reared in that faith. There were seven of 
these children, all of whom grew to maturity and of whom the subject of 
this sketch was the fifth in order of birth, the others being Horace G., .Allison 




TKOF. II. ];. KUWAKDS. 



-5- up, NEV_V 



AlM 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 29 

]., Elsvvorth J., William S., Lillian M. and Lewis D. Professor Edwards is 
of distinguished lineage both on the paternal side and on the maternal side, 
being a lineal descendant of Jonathan Edwards, the great America:i divine, 
theologian, metaphysician and early president of Princeton College, and of 
Roger Williams, Welsh clergyman and Puritan, who fled from England to 
escape persecution and settled in New England in the early days of the Pil- 
grim colony, where he hoped to enjoy the religious freedom he was denied 
at home. 

Reared at his home village of Alfred, H. R. Edwards spent his youth 
as an assistant in the labors of his father's mill and farm, meanwhile giving 
careful attention to his studies, and after his graduation from the Alfred 
high school entered the university at that place and was graduated from the 
same in 1894. Upon receiving his diploma Professor Edwards entered at 
once upon his long and useful career as an educator and has since taken post- 
graduate work in the University of Wisconsin and in the University of Min- 
nesota. He began his high-school work in Minnesota in the fall of 1895 
antl has ever since been actively engaged in school work in this state, before 
entering upon his present position of superintendent of city schools at Moor- 
lead in 1909 having had successive connection with the schools at Wheaton, 
.t Browns Valley, at Redwood Ealls, at Worthington and at Morris. It was 
in 1909 that he accepted the position of superintendent of schools at Moor- 
head and he has been retained in that useful and influential position ever 
since. During' the past fifteen years Professor Exiwards has occupied his 
summers as a teacher in the State Normal Schools at Mankato and at Moor- 
head and has long been one of the best-known schoolmen in Minnesota. For 
the past twenty-one vears he has Iteen a member of the National Education 
Association and has attended most of the meetings of superintendents. In 
1975 he was the president of the Minnesota State Association of School 
Superintendents. For vears he has taken an active interest in the delibera- 
tions of this association and in tlie general school work of the state, and was 
a memljcr of the state high-school committee that formulated the present 
high-school curriculum in use in this state. 

In' 1894. the year of his graduation from the university. Professor 
Edwards was united in marriage to Harriet M. Potter, of Albion, Wisconsin, 
and has two children, Carrol and Helen. Professor and Mrs. Edwards are 
members of the Baptist church and take an active interest in the various 
beneficences of the same, as well as in the general social and cultural activ- 
(9a) 



I^O CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

ities of the comnniniity in which they live. Professor Edwards is a member 
of the local lodges of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and of the 
Knights of Pythias and takes a warm interest in the affairs of the same and 
is an officer in llie Ro^al League. 



JOHN McGRATH. 



John McGrath, former member of the Legislature, former mayor of 
Barnesville, city treasurer for several years and in otiier ways identified 
with public affairs, is a native of the state of Wisconsin, born in Outaga- 
mie county, on Octol^er 20, 1857. He is a .son of Dennis and Ellen (Cashman) 
McGrath, both of whom were natives of Ireland, and who came to this 
country in 1847 — the year of the great immigration from that country — 
and soon located in Wisconsin. 

Shortly after his arrival in Wisconsin, Dennis McGrath settled in 
Outagamie countw and commenced ojjcrations as a farmer, success attending 
his efforts from the very l)eginning. He continued thus engaged until iS()7. 
when the family moxed to near Owatona. Steele county, Minnesota, where 
he bought a farm and operated the same for a short time only, death claim- 
ing him that same year. His wife survived him several years. Dennis 
and Ellen (Cashman) McGrath were the parents of eight children as fol- 
low: Alice, Mary Anna, Thomas. John, the subject of this sketch; Johanna. 
D. F., Michael and Edward. Dennis McGrath and his wife were earnest 
memljers of the Catholic church, always interested in its good works, and 
their children were reared in the same faith. 

John McGrath was ten years old when his parents left Wisconsin and 
came to Steele county, Minnesota, and he was educated in the public schools 
of that county. At the age of twenty-two, in 1879, he came to Barnesville. 
Clay county, and homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land in Barnes- 
\ille township. .\t the time he settled here there was no town where the 
present village is located, and the place at the time Mr. McGrath. settled 
there, consisted of two or three stores. He continued to reside on his home- 
stead for about two years, at the end of which time he came to Barnesville. 
where lie has since li\ed. His first residence was northwest of what is 
now the main portion of Barnesville. 

On settling in Barnesville John McGrath started in the butcher business 
and was engaged in that branch of work up to 1909, meeting with encourag- 



CLAY AXD NOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I^I 

ing- success during the long period he was in that trade. In addition therein. 
al)out 1885, he opened up an ini])lement and harness Ijusiness, in which lie 
was equally successful and which he cnntinued to operate until igOQ, when he 
disposed of the harness branch of his store. He still conducts the imple- 
ment department which he first opened in 1885, being thus one of the oldest 
merchants in tli;it branch of commercial enterprise in Clay countv, and 
from the operations of which he has reaped a handsome cnmpetency. 

On September i, 1885. John AIcGrath was united in marriage to Alice 
Brislaim. formerl\- a resident of Steele county, this state. Mr. and Mrs. 
McGrath are the parents of seven children, namely : F"rances, .Mice, Cecilia, 
Luc\\ Ruth, John and Harold Robert. The McGrath family are mem- 
bers of the Catholic church and are warm supporters of all the good works 
and societies attached to the church. They take an active interest in the 
affairs of the C( immunity and are earnest advocates of all movements 
designed to further the general welfare of the township and county. 

.Mr. McGrath is a supporter of the Republican party and was returned by 
the votes of that party to the Le.gislature, in which he served for one term, 
giving general satisfaction in that important office to the interests he repre- 
sented. He was elected ma\or of Trlarnesville and served the jniblic very 
acceptably for a period r)f six years, during which period many improvements 
of an important character were carried out. Mr. McGrath was elected to 
the office of treasurer and occupied that responsible ofifice for the long tern? 
of thirteen vears — a period during which he enjoyed the undiminished con- 
fidence of the public. i''or many years he was a member of the local council 
and is now serving as justice of the peace in and for the Barnesville town- 
ship. Mr. McGrath holds membership in the Knights of Columbus and in 
the affairs of that popular order takes a warm interest. 



H. R. BURRILL. 



H. R. Burriil, dealer in farming implements at Hawley, Clay county, 
was born on September 19, 1838, in Fitzwilliam, Xew Hampshire, a son 
of Jacob Burriil, who was born in 1818 and died in iSqi. He was edu- 
cated in the common schools of his native town, and at Keene, New Hamp- 
shire, until 1876. After that, he worked in a store at Hana. .Mas.saciiusetts. 
In the spring of 1878, he came to Hawley, Minnesota, arriving in Clay 
county on April 19th. Fie took up a homestead in Keene township, which 



132 Cl.AY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

lie developed into a good farm. He and Lewis Smith were among the 
earliest pioneers there, hreaking the first sod in Keen township, using oxen 
fur the pvn-pose. Hawley, twelve miles away, w^as their nearest base of sup- 
jilies. They continued farming until 1897 when they sold out. While living 
in that township, Air. llurrill was the first treasurer of school district Xo. 
30, which office he held many years until a new district was formed out of 
part of the old. In 1897, he bought a farm in section 10, Hawley town- 
ship, one and one-half miles west of the village of Hawley, and there 
he lived until 1907. in which year he moved to Hawley and formed a part- 
nership with Hans Rushfeldt in the machine business. In 1912. he formed 
a partnership with his son Robert, who bought out the interest of Mr. 
Rushfeldt, the new firm also taking over the Andrew Johnson machine 
business. They have a large and well-eciuipped store and handle an exten- 
sive stock of farming implements, making a specialty of the John Deere 
machinery, and they now carry on a large and constantly growing trade 
with the surrounding country. 

Mr. Burrill was married on April 19, 1885, to Harriet McDonald, a 
daughter of John McDonald, and to their union the follow-ing children have 
been bom: Robert H., who is in business with his father at Hawley; Dan 
\\'., who married b'annie Skinner, and who died by being accidentally suffo- 
cated by gas on April 28, 1916; James, who married Edna Rapp, and is 
a dentist at Ulen, Minnesota; Henry, Allen, and Leola, an adopted child. 

Politically, H. R. Burrill is a Democrat. He has served three terms 
as a member of the Hawley school board, and is, at this writing, a member 
of the \illage council. He belongs to the Congregational church. 

Robert H. P>urrill, son of H. R. Burrill and partner in business with 
his father at Hawley. was l;oni, January 24. 1888, at Hawley, where he 
was reared and received his education in the public schools, graduating 
from the high school. In 1907, he went to Minneapolis and found employ- 
ment with the Deere & Weber Implement Company, where he learned the 
\arious phases of the farming machinery business. He was alert, faithful 
and courteous and gave his employers eminent satisfaction. In the spring 
of 1910, he returned to Hawley and worked for his father-in-law, in the 
store of the Andrew Johnson Company until the spring of 1912, when he 
formed a partnershij) with his father, as related in a preceding paragraph 
in this sketch. He has remained here in the farming implement business 
which has steadily grown until it has now assumed vast proportions. 

Robert H. Burrill was married to Laura Johnson, a daughter of Andrew 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1^3 

Johnson and wife, well-known citizens of Hawley, where Air. Johnson lias 
long been a leading merchant. To Robert H. Burrill and wife three chil- 
dren have been born, namely: Robert H., Jr., Laton Herman, and Henry 
Willard. 



TAMES CONNELLY. 



James Connell)-. (Hie of the best known and most progressive young 
farmers in the central western part of Clay county and who, in association 
with his elder brother, William Connelly, is farming the old Patrick Con- 
nellv farm in Glyndon township, is a native son of this county and has lived 
here all his life. He was born on what is now known as the Wright farm, 
in the vicinity of Moorhead, in Moorhead township. May 2, 1884, son of 
Patrick and Bridget (Lundy) Connelly, natives of County Monaghan, Ire- 
land, who became pioneers of Clay county, settling here in 1880, and fur- 
ther and fitting mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume. Patrick 
Connelly was a substantial and influential pioneer citizen, and for years 
served as a member of the board of supervisors of Glyndon township, in 
which he established his home three or four years after coming here and 
where he spent his last days. His widow is still living on the home place. 
They were the parents of three sons, William and James Connelly having a 
brother, John Connelly, also a Glyndon township farmer, a biographical 
sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume. 

Reared on the home place in Glyndon township, to which his parents 
moved from Moorhead township when he was but an infant, James Con- 
nellv completed his schooling in the public schools at Moorhead and early 
became a practical farmer. At the age of fourteen he became fireman in a 
threshing crew and at seventeen years of age qualified as an engineer, in 
which position he acted for five years or more during the threshing seasons. 
Since the death of their father, he and his elder brother, William, have been 
operating the home place and have done well. They also own and operate 
a threshing outfit and have a wide ac(iuaintance throughout the field of then- 
operations. The Connelly farm consists of two hundred and forty acres 
of excellent land and the brothers have one of the best-equipped farm 
plants in that part of the county. William Connell}-. who is unmarried, was 
born in 1877, in Pennsylvania, and was but three years of age when his par- 
ents moved from that state to Minnesota, where he has ever since lived, 
making his home on the home place in Glyndon township, with the exception 



134 C],AY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

of the period spent in "proving- up" a liomestead tract of a lialf section of land 
in tlie vicinity oi ?^Iiles City, Montana. He is the eldest of the three Con- 
nell\' brothers and his judg;inent is highly \alued h}' them. 

On Deceni1)er g. 19 14, James Connelly was united in marriag^e to 
Amanda Hetn-ietta Kuehl, who was hurn in the neitjhboring township of 
Jilmwood, daugliter of I'red Kuehl and wife, pioneers of that section of 
Cla\ county, the latter of whom died suddenly on March 4, 191 7, at Sabin, 
Minnesota, at the age of fifty-nine )ears. He was of German ancestry, and 
was the father of ten children, si.x girls and four box s. Mr. and ]\frs. Janie^ 
Connellv are the ])arents of one child, a son. Raymond. Thev are members 
of the Catholic church and have e\er taken an active interest in ])arish 
affairs, liberal contributors to the work of the same and helpful in other 
ways in advancing the good works of the ncighhorliood. in which they have 
been residents since pioneer days. 



ORRIS OLIN'ER. 



Orris Oliver was. born in Grant county. Wisconsin. July 5, 1873. a son 
"f Douglas and Sarah ( Fitzgerald) Oliver, the former a native of Ten- 
nessee and the latter (jf Grant countv. Wisconsin. Douglas Oliver came to 
firani county. Wisconsin, when a }Oung man and there was interested in 
a woolen and flour mill, and also was engaged in the mercantile and farm- 
ing business. About 1879, he removed to Kansas, where he conducted a 
large farm, on wiiich he engaged in general extensive agriculture. He 
died at Junction City. Kansas. To Mr. and Mrs. Oliver were born the fol- 
lowing children: Charles R.. Dvvight. Grant, Hattie. Fred, and Orris, the 
subject of this review. Mrs. Oliver, who was a devoted member of the 
Methodist Episcojjal church, survived her husband a few years, her death 
occurring also at Junction City. 

Orris Oliver was educated in the public schools at Kansas, and later 
took a Inisiness course in a school at Fargo, North Dakota. In 1893, he 
entered the Barnesville bank :is a bookkeeper, and on December i, 1894, he 
entered the law office of Charles S. Marden, at Barnesville. to take charge 
of the real estate department in which that office was largely engaged. In 
1897, he went to the Klondyke, where he remained for two years, and 
after returning to Minnesota in 1899, 'le located at Minneapolis, where he 
was cni])loyed until T901 with a threshing machine companx'. Then he 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 135 

returned to Barnesville and again took charge of the real estate business 
in the office of Charles S. Marden. In 1910, on Mr. Marden's removal to 
Moorhead. the Red River Farm and Loan Company was organized in 
Barnesville to handle the real estate business of the community, and Mr. 
Oliver took charge of the enterprise and has continued in this business 
since. 

Air. Oliver was married to Minnie G. Cornish in 1902, and to this 
union three children have I)een born: Charles D., Frank C, and Lew D. 
Mr. Oliver's fraternal affiliations are with the Masonic, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Woodmen lodges. He has served on the city council two 
terms and is at present serving his second term as a meml>er of the school 
lioard. 



.ARTHUR L. FOBES. 



-Vrthur L. Fobes, one of the best-known and most progressive farmers of 
Ehnwood township, Clay county, and the proprietor there of a fine farm of 
three hundred and twenty acres, was born on a farm in the vicinity of 
Racine, in Racine county, Wisconsin, January 21, 1866, son of Orange and 
Cxnthia (Morse) Fobes, natives of the state of Ohio. His parents settled 
in Wisconsin about 1S65. Init later moved to Iowa, where the former spent 
his last days and where the latter is still living. 

Orange l'"nl)es was a farmer through life. He was of old Colonial and 
of Revolutionary descent and his wife was descended from "Mayflower" 
stock. He and his wife located in Racine county, Wisconsin, about 1865, 
and remained there until 1876, when they moved to Grundy county, Iowa, 
where the former died in 1881. His widow is now living' in Butler county, 
Iowa. They were the parents of six children, those besides the subject of 
this sketch, who is the second in order of birth, being Homer L. ; Stiles, 
who died in infancv: Clarence M. and Clara E., twins, and one other, who 
died in infancv. 

.\rthur L. Folies was aljout twelve years of age when his parents 
moved from Wisconsin to Iowa, and he completed his schooling in the latter 
state. He began farming on his own account in Butler county, Iowa, 
where lie was married in i8q2, and continued to reside until 1902, when he 
came u]) into Minnesota and bought the farm on which he is now living, 
a half section in Elmwood township, Clay county. He has since made this 
his ])lace of residence, he and his family being very comfortably situated 



136 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

there. In addition to his general farming interests, Mr. Fobes has given 
considerable attention to other interests and is president of the Home 
Farmers Mntual Hail Insurance Company of Minneapolis, which he helped 
to organize and of which he has been the president since the date of its 
organization. He also is active!}- interested in the local telephone com- 
pany. In civic affairs he likewise has taken a proper interest, and has been 
clerk of the school l)oard in his home district ever since it was organized. 

On Septeniljer 28. 1892, in Iowa. .A.rthur L. Fobes was united in 
marriage to Cora G. Bronson, daughter of G. M. and Margaret (Hendrick^ 
Bronson. natives of New York state, who became residents of Wisconsir 
and later of Iowa. G. M. Bronson was a veteran of the Civil War, who 
performed service in a Wisconsin regiment, a member of the Twelfth Wis- 
consin Batterv, and also was for some time connected with the United 
States secret service. Mr. and Mrs. Fobes have four children: Charles V., 
Orange G., Joseph and Josephine, all of whom are at home. Mr. Fobes 
is a member of the Baptist church and the children are connected with the 
Presbyterian church. Mr. Fobes is a member of the local lodges of the 
Modern Woodmen of America and of the Knights of the Maccabees, and 
in the affairs of these organizations takes a warm interest. He is now 
serA'ing as supervisor of bigliwav construction in his home district. 



I AMES LAMB. 



The late James Lamb, one of the pioneers of Clay county, who died 
at Fergus Falls, and whose widow is still living on the home place, the 
owner of three-quarters of a section of land besides a quarter section in 
North Dakota, was a native of Scotland, born in Forfarshire in 1847, ''"J" 
of John and Elizabeth Lamb, also natives of Scotland, the former of whom 
died in his native land and the latter of whom came to Minnesota with 
her younger son, John, in the seventies. The son pre-empted a claim in 
Elkton township. Clay county, and here she spent her last days on a quarter 
section near Dormer. In a memorial sketch relating to the late John Laml 
and in a biographical sketch relating to Charles Lamb, Sr., of Baker, brother: 
of the subject of this memorial sketch, presented elsewhere in this volume, 
there is set out at some length further details of the settlement of the Lamb 
family in Clay county and the attention of the reader is respectfully invited 




JAMES LAMP. AND FAMILY. 



THE NEW YORK 
PUB! '^ ' '^RARY 



ASTOR. LENOX 
TILDEN FO'Jf: O \TinNS 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. ] T,J 

to those narratives for further information of a genealogical and historical 
character relating to this well-known and influential family. 

Reared on the home farm in his native Forfarshire, James Lamb there 
grew to manhood and in that neighborhood was married in 1868 to Ann 
Anderson, who also was born in Scotland, a daughter of George and Agnes 
(Todd) Anderson, the former t)f whom was an extensive stock dealer and 
had many business interests. He was an ardent church member and he 
and his wife spent all their lives in Scotland. George y\nderson and wife 
were the parents of four children, of whom Mrs. Lamb was the last-born, 
the others being Mary, who is still living in Scotland, and Agnes and 
James, both now deceased. In 1882 James Lamb came to the United States 
with his family and proceeded on out to Minnesota, locating in Clay county, 
whither his mother and his brothers had preceded him some years before, 
settling on a homestead tract of one hundred and sixty acres in Elkton town- 
ship, where he and his family established their home. L'nhappily, not long 
after locating there, Mr. Lamb became incapacitated for the physical labor 
necessary to the development of a pioneer farm and the laborious ta.sk of 
developing and improving the place fell upon his wife, who with fine cour- 
age and indomitable spirit surmounted the difficulties in her way and pres- 
ently had an excellent farm plant there, a substantial set of buildings and a 
profitably-cultivated farm. Mrs. Lamb is undoubtedly one of the niDst 
remarkable pioneer \\omen in the state. She did not lia\e a dollar of lier 
own, or a wagon team, implement or seed with which to start her crops, 
when she took hold of this pre-empted claim. With true Scotch grit .she 
managed to keep her family together and paid off every dollar she borrowed. 
She succeeded in accumulating the land interests she now owns, all of the 
work being the outcome of her own energy. She has numerous friends who 
hold her in the highest esteem. .\s she prospered in her undertak- 
ings Mrs. Lamb bought three hundred and twenty acres more of land and 
now has three-quarters of a section of valuable land, continuing actively 
engaged in the mana.gement of her well-improved place. 

To James and Ann (Anderson) Lamb the following children were lioru, 
namely: George,- deceased; Mary, deceased; Andrew, now a resident of 
North Dakota; Agnes. decea.sed, Avife of Gu.stav Erstad; Albert, of Clay 
county; William, deceased; James, who is at home assisting his mother in 
the management of the home farm, and one who died in infancy. Besides 
rearing this family, Mrs. Lamb rearecl her grandson. Walter, son of lier 
deceased daughter.' Mary (Lamb) Morey, and the young man has adopted 



I ^8 CLAY AND XOR.MAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

the surname Lamb, being known as Walter Laml). Mrs. Lamb is an active 
member of the I'resbyterian church and has ever taken an interested part 
in tlie affairs of tlie church, as well as in the general good works of the com- 
niunitv of which she has been a resident since i)ioneer days. 



OLE E. TAXGEN. 



The career of Ole E. Tangen, a farmer of Kragnes township. Clay 
county, is a good example of what may be accomplished by a man of grit 
and perseverance, who comes to a strange land without capital. There have 
been many such in :\Iinnesota during the past half century, principally from 
Scandinavia, and we have always welcomed them, knowing that most of 
them would turn out to be good citizens. 

Mr. Tangen was born in Norway, January 19, 1851. He is a son of 
Evan O. and Inge Marie (Stensgord) Tangen, both natives of Norway, the 
father born on January i, 1829, and the mother, in 1825. They grew up 
in their native land, where they married and where they lived until they 
came to America and established the family home in Fillmore county, Min- 
nesota, where they s]5ent the rest of their li\es on a farm, the father dying 
at the age of fifty-four years. The mother reached the advanced age of 
eighty-five vears. To these parents the following children were born: 
Andrew, who died in New York City at the age of fifty-four years: Ole 
E., the subject of this sketch: Ivathryne, who died in South Dakota at the 
age of forty-five: Gust, who is engaged in farming in Montana: Christ, who 
lives at Livingston, this state: Christina, who married B. B. Hetland and 
died in Moorhead, Alinnesota. June 16, 191 7. 

Ole E. Tangen was ten years old when he came to America in 1861. 
He spent his boyhood on the farm of his father in iMllmore county, Minne- 
sota, where he attended the district schools: but his education was limited, 
for he had to go to work when only ten years old. He came to Clay county 
in 1878 and the following year bought one-half of section i6, Kragnes town- 
ship, and here he has since resided. During his residence of thirty-eight 
vears in this locality he has seen the country change from a wild prairie to 
a fine farming section. He made all the improvements on his land, erecting 
a splendid group of buildings, good fences, etc.. and has been very success- 
ful as a general farmer and stock raiser. He makes a specialty of raising 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 39 

Shortliorn cattle. He is a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator Company at 
Kragnes. 

Mr. Tangen was married in Houston county. Minnesota, on March 30, 
1878, to Gelina Studlien, wlin was born in that county June G, i860, and 
tiiere she grew to wonianhr)()<l on the farm and received a common school 
education. She is a daughter of Ole and FJertha (Lien) Studlien, both natives 
of Norway, where they grew up and married and from there immigrated to 
America in 1850. and established the family home in Houston county, this 
state, being pioneers there. The father owned a good fann there, which 
was sold a number of years ago. They moved to Clay county and here 
both passed away. 

Fourteen children ha\e I)een Ijorn to Mr. and Mrs. Tangen, namely: 
Mrs. Bertha Montgomery, who lives in St. Louis, Missouri; Edward, who 
died in 1900 at the age of nineteen years; Bernice. who is at home; Clara, 
who li\es in Missouri; Mrs. Genelia \\'liitsel. who lives in Montana; Selma. 
at home ; Oberlin, also at home ; Jennette. at home ; Martin Walter, who died 
at the age of eighteen months: and Winnifred, Walter. Esther. Rudolpli and 
Norman, all at home. 

Politically. Mr. Tangen is a Rei)ublican. He has held all the offices 
on the school board in district No. 24 and is now a director. He has also 
held all the offices on the township board and has been assessor, etc. He 
is a member of the Lutheran church and is chairman of the board of trus- 
tees of the same. 



WILLLVM RUSSELL. 



William Russell, formerly and for years the official reporter for the 
seventh Minnesota judicial district, with residence at Moorhead, and for 
tile i):ist seventeen years a practicing attorney in that city, is a native of the 
Dominion of Canada, but has been a resident of Minnesota since the njiddle 
eighties and is thus thoroughly familiar with the development of this part 
of the state for more than thirty years. He was born in Stratford, in the 
l)r(ivince of Ontarirj. and there received his schooling and grew to manhood. 

In 1883 Mr. Russell left his native Canada and came to Minnesota, 
locating at Moorhead. where, and at Fargo, he began the study of law. In 
ilie year 1886 he removed to St. Cloud. Minnesota, having been appointed to 
the |)osition of reporter for the seventh judicial district, comprising the 
counties of Stearns. Benton. Afille Lacs, Morrison, Todd, Douglas, Otter 



140 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Tail, W'abena, Becker and Cla)-, and held that position continuously until in 
January, 1900, wlien he engaged in the practice of law at Moorhead and has 
since been thus engaged. During his many years of experience as reporter 
for this judicial district, Mr. Russell gained an acquaintance throughout the 
district and a familiarity with legal procedure that has been invaluable to 
him since he entered upon the practice of the profession, to which he had 
lieen giving his studious altentiun since the days of his young manhdud, and 
there is perhaps no better known lawyer throughout this whole section of 
the state than he. !\Ir. Kussell has ever given a good citizen's attention to 
the general afifairs of his home town and is an active member of the Moor- 
head Commercial Club, in the affairs of which he takes a warm interest. Mr 
Russell is the owner of a half section of well-improved land in the neigh- 
borhood of Moorhead and gives considerable interested attention to the oper- 
ation of his farm. 

In iqoi, \\'il!iani Russell was united in marriage to Esther Davis, of 
Marshall, this state, and to this union one child has l>een born, a daughter, 
Mary. Mr. and Mrs. Russell are members of the Presbyterian church and 
take a proper interest in the general good works of their home town. 



EOIER G. H.-\NSOX. 



I'llmer G. Hanson was born in Badger, Iowa, .\ugu.st 17, 1890, a son of 
H. P. Hanson, Ixirn at Mineral Point, Wisconsin, and Rena Hanson, born 
at Rushford, Minnesota. The former is a retired merchant, of Badger, 
Iowa, and is now living at Driscoll. .Vorth Dakota, the owner of several 
farms which he operates by tenants. 

Elmer G. Hanson received his elementary education in the public 
schools of Iowa, and then attended St. Olaf College, at Northfield, Minne- 
sota, where he took a course of preparator\- studies, after which he entered 
the University of Wisconsin for a regular college course. He completed 
the course and graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. After leav- 
ing college, he took up the banking business and received his training in that 
line in Iowa. In October. 1916, he came to Hitterdal. and in November of 
that year he opened up the Clay County State Bank. He was made cashier 
of this bank and has held that position since. 

On January 4, 19 17, Mr. Hanson was married to Annette Davenport, 
daughter of N. S. Davenport, of Dennison, Minnesota. Mr. Hanson is a 
member of the United Lutheran church. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. I4I 

FRED SCHEEL. 

Among- tlie well-knuwn residents of long standing in and about the 
town of Sabin, Glay county. Fred Scheel. fuel merchant at that place, de- 
serves recognition. He was born in German) on February 22, 1858, a son 
of Wilhelhi and ]\Iargaret ( Kraino) Scheel, both of whom were also born 
in Germany and sjjent their entire lives in that country, the son. Fred, liein.g 
the only member of the Scheel family to settle in the United States. 

Wilhelm Scheel, father of the subject of this sketch, followed the occu- 
pation of a railroad man for several of the active years of his life. His 
diligence and attention to his duties brought him recognition and he was 
eventuall\ promoted to the important position of railroad inspector, his 
journeys in connection with this work taking him on long trips over the 
railroad system on which he was employed. Wilhelm Scheel was also in 
the military service of his country and saw active campaigning in 1866 
during the war between Germany and Austria. Mr. and Mrs. Scheel were 
the parents of five children. namel\- : Caroline. Fred, Wilhelm. Margaret 
and Henry. 

I'red Scheel was educated in the public schools of Germany, and some 
short time after the close of his school days he started life for himself as a 
sailor. He made several voyages to this country, the first being in 1874, 
and eventually decided to seek fortune as a landsman, settling permanently 
in the United States. 

In 1885 Fred Scheel made a tri[) to America and located in Chicago, 
where lie took up sailing on the Great Lakes, and continuefl thus engaged 
for some years. In i8<;4 he came to Clay county and worked for two year^ 
as a brick layer in Sabin and then started in the hardware business, buy- 
ing out a former hardwareman, Fred Hafifen. Mr. Scheel continued in that 
line of trade for several years during which time bis hardware business 
proved a financial success, and in 19 15 he turned the store over to his son. 
Fred M.. who has since been conducting it. giving the business the same 
care which made it successful under his father's management. Following, 
the transfer of the hardware business to his son, Mr. Scheel started in the 
fuel business and has been so engaged since 1915, making a success of his 
operations in that line as he had done previously in the hardware enterprise. 

In i8gj. l*>ed Scheel was united in marriage to Augusta Fraino, who 
was born in Germany, a daughter of Fred Fraino and wife, both of whcjui 
spent their lives in Germany, where the former was a fanner. To Mr. and 



142 CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

^Irs. Scheel three children have been bom, namely : Fred AL, Alargaret. 
and Helen. The Scheel family are earnest members of the Lutheran church 
and are active in all its good works and in all community good works. Mr. 
Scheel was for three years chairman of the Klmwood township board, and 
also served on the school board for some time. 



I. HAMMERUD. 



I. Hammerud. manager of the Farmers' Elevator at Comstock, Clav 
county, was Ixnn in Xorway, June u, 1874, a son of Halvor and Jennie 
(Hanson) Hammerud. bnth natives of Norway, where they grew up, were 
married and established their home. They continued to reside in their 
native land until 1880, when they immigrated with their family to America, 
locating near Lake I-'ark. in Becker county, Minnesota, where the father 
liecanie \ery well situated, owning a farm which he developed through his 
close application and persistency. He continued general farming and stock 
raising there until liis death, which occurred in 1912. He was a member 
of the Norwegian Lutheran church, as was also his wife. They were par- 
ents of eleven children, as follows: Ole, Hans, Christine, I., Mary, .\ndrew , 
Charles. Henry. George, .Albert and Rudolph. 

L Hammerud was six years old when his parents brought him to the 
L'nited States. He grew to manhood in Becker county, Minnesota, and 
assisted his father with the work on the home farm. During the winter 
months, he attended the district schools of Clay county, since the nearest 
school house was in Clay county. Later he attended Concordia College at 
Moorhead, this county. He continued farming until about 1902, when he 
came to Comstock. Clay county, and conducted a pool hall for about twelve 
}ears with success. In August, 1916, he became manager of the J-'armers' 
Elevator at Comstock, which position he still holds and has discharged his 
duties in an able and faithful manner to the satisfaction of the stockholders 
and all concerned. He handles a large amount of grain each year and has 
made this the best-known elevator in the southwestern part of the county, 
doing a thriving business with the farmers on every^ side. 

'Sir. Hammerud was married on June 12, 1908, to Jennie Monson, who 
was born in Comstock, Clay county, Minnesota, where she was educated in 
the public scliools. She is the daughter of Ludwig and Eliza (Knoph) 
?iIonson, both natives of Norway-, who immigrated to America and are still 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 143 

living. They are the parents of three children, as follows: Jennie, the wife 
of the subject of this review; and two sons, Henry and Reinard, both at 
home. They also have an adopted daughter, Dora, who is also living at 
home. To ]Mr. and Mrs. Hammerud three children have been born, namelv : 
Leonard. Chester and Ivin. 

Politically. Mr. Hammerud is a Republican. He was assessor of Holy 
Cross township four years^ and has performed his duties as a public servant 
in a highly acceptable manner. He is a member of the Norwe.gian Lutheran 
church, which he has served as treasurer. 



LOUIS ALTENBERND. 

Louis Altenbernd, a well-known landowner and the proprietor of sev- 
eral potato warehouses in and alx)ut Clay county, was born in the Blue 
Grass state on February i8, 1876, the son of William and Katie (Hill) 
Altenbernd, both of whom were natives of Germany. William Altenbernd 
immigrated to the United States in i860, when he was twenty-seven years 
old, and his wife, Katie Hill, came to this country with her [larents, when she 
was twelve. Thev were the parents of eight children. William Alten- 
bernd and his wife were memlx;rs of the Lutheran church and ever were 
active in its affairs. 

Louis Altenbernd was reared on his father's farm in Kansas, and he 
attended the public schools of the community in which he lived. Later he 
supplemented this training l)y a course in the business college of Lawrence. 
Kansas, from which institution he was graduated. After helping in the 
work on his father's farm fcjr se\eral years, he finally lie.gan agricultural 
pursuits on his own account. In 1903. he removed to Sabin, Clay county. 
Minnesota, and there began to farm on a modest scale, his efforts meeting 
with success. As he i)rospered in his farming operations, he added to his 
land holdings and is now the owner of sixteen hundred and sixty acres of 
choice farming land in and around the Sabin vicinity. 

In 1905. Mr. Altenbrend began to handle potatoes on a large scale and 
now has several warehouses where potatoes are stored. To meet the grow- 
ing demands for his potatoes, which crop is one of the most im|)ortant on iiis 
farms, he built the present large potato warehouse at Sabin in 1905, and 
also operates warehouses at such different points as Rustad, Baker, Downer. 
Watts and Hawley. His operations in potatoes are on a very extensive 



144 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

scale and he is generally recognized as one of the largest and most substan- 
tial potato growers in this part of the state. In addition to the potato trade, 
he also conducts general farming and has been very successful. 

In the summer of 1909. Louis Altenbernd was united in marriage to 
Alary Brandt, a native of the state of Ohio, and a daughter of Louis Brandt 
and wife, residents of that state. To Mr. and Airs. Altenbernd four chil- 
dren have been born, namely: Walter, Esther, Louise and Hilda, all of 
whom are at home witli their parents. The Altenbernd family are members 
of the Lutheran church and are active i)articipants in the good works of the 
same. They are warm advocates of all movements designed to advance the 
cdmmunitv interests. Air. .Altenbernd is an independent in politics, but 
has never been a seeker after public office, preferring to devote his time to 
his large potato warehouse interests. 



BENEDIX KUEHL. 



Benedi-x Kuehl, a substantial and prosperous farmer, owner of three 
hundred and twenty acres of prime land in Elmwood township. Clay county, 
is a native-born German, but has been a resident of this country for more 
than twenty-seven years. He was born in Germany in 1855 and is a son 
of Fred and .Anna Kuehl, also n;itives of the Fatherland, where .\nna Kuehl 
died in 1869. 

Following the death of his first wife, l-'red Kuehl was married a second 
time and in company with some of the members of his family he immigrated 
to the United States in 1890. On his arrival in this country' he came on 
out to the state of Alinnesota and settled in Clay county. He engaged in 
farming in Elmwood township, at Sabin. and continued thus engaged for 
the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1903. He was the father 
of the following children : Dora, Lizzie, Alargaret, Kattie, living in Germany : 
Fred, who is deceased, and Benedi.x, the subject of this sketch. 

Benedix Kuehl was educated in the common schools of Germany and 
\vorked for some time at farm later. At the age of thirty-five, in 1890. 
he accompanied his father to the United States and on reaching this country 
they came on out to Alinnesota and settled in Clay county. Benedix Kuehl 
worked for various farmers in and about this county for a period of about 
eight years. In 1898 he decided to purchase land and to commence the 
life of a farmer on his own account. He bought a tract of prime land and 



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Th., . . 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LEN©X 
TILDEN fOUNDATfONS 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I45 

immediately proceeded to place it in a state of cultivation. He ))rospered 
from the very beginning of his farming operations and added dther I.ind to 
his original purchase, and he is now the owner of three hundred and twenty 
acres of choice land. He is engaged in general farming and has now a well- 
developed tract, and is generally regarded as one of the most progressi\e 
and energetic farmers in Elmwood township; his farming operations being 
carried on according to modeiMi methods of agriculture. Mr. Kuehl made 
.all the present substantial improvements on his farm, and his buildings and 
<lwelling are among the best in the district. 

On July II, 1880, Benedix Kuehl was united in marriage to Henrietta 
Neve, while they were living in Germany. They are the parents of the 
following children ; Fred, who is married : Henning : Hans, married ; Ferdi- 
nand : John; Lena, Margaret, A'lary, Dora, the latter four being married, and 
Lincke. The Kuehl f;imilv are earnest members of the Lutheran church and 
take .'I ])roper interest in the affairs of the same, as well as in the general 
.social activities of the communitv in which thev live. 



ALFRED A. HAAGENSON. 

Alfred A. Haagenson was born at Sacred Heart. Renville county. Min- 
iKxjta. December 13, 1879, a son of Arne Haagenson, born in Saaler, Nor- 
wav, and Ida A. (Ericson) Haagenson, born in Dakota county, Minnesota. 
/\rne Haagenson, father of our sul)ject, came to America from Norway at 
the age of fifteen years and found employment, working on the Mississippi 
ri\er for three or four iiears as a river man. Then he went to Renville, 
Minnesota, in 1877, and was one of the jjioneer homesteaders in that county. 
He established a home on his homestead, improved the land and remained 
there the rest of his life. He was the father of eight children, namely: 
Alfred A., the subject of this review: Sina, John, Carl, Matilda. Bennie. 
Olivia and Robert. He was a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church. 

Alfred A. Haagenson was educated in the public schools of Sacred 
Heart and Renville, Minnesota, working on the farm when not in school. 
Later he attended a private school in Minneapolis. From 190 1 to 1905, he 
\\as employed in the state grain department at Duluth, and for three years 
following this employment he was manager of the Farmers' elevator at 
W^elcome. Minnesota. In 1908, he came to Barnesville, Minnesota, and 
( loa.) 



146 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

I)ecame manager of the Farmers' elexator at this place and has been in this 
Inisiness since. He also has a farm implement business here, and is inter- 
ested in other business enterprises. 

Mr. Haagenson was married, in 1904, to Sigrid 1*1 Bolinder, daughter 
of Andrew Bolinder, of Maine township, Otter Tail county, Minnesota, and 
to this union three children ha.\c been Iwrn : Alfred, Jr., Margaret, and 
Ida. Mr. Haagenson is an ;ictive member of the Norwegian Lutheran 
church. He served as alderman of Barnesville in 191 1 and 1912; as mayor 
in 1913 and 1914; clerk of the board of education since 1915, which position 
he holds at the present time. He is a member of both the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. 

The maternal grandfather of our subject was John Erickson. born in 
Sweden, as was his wife, Lou\isa. They came to .\merica in the spring of 
1849 and located in Minnesota. At that time the entire white population 
of Minnesota, not yet a territory, was estimated to be one thousand. They 
were among the first of the Swedish colony to come to Minnesota. John 
Erickson was among the men from Minnesota who enlisted in defense of 
his adopted country when it was threatened with disunion in 1861. He as 
a soldier in the Ci\il War, enlisted in Company ¥. First Regiment. Minne- 
sota \'(ilunteer Infantrv. and was killed in the battle of Gettysburg. 



GILBERT PETERSON. 



Gilbert Peterson was born in Norway, January 11, i860, a son of Peter 
and ^latikla (Peterson) Gubbrandson. both natives of Norway, the former 
being a carpenter by trade and spending his entire life in Norway. 

Gilbert Peterson was educated in the public schools of Norway. In 
1878. he came to .America with his uncle, Gilbert Hanson, and located in 
Polk count), Minnesota, where he remained until 1880, when he came to 
St. Croi.x county, Minnesota. In 1883, he removed to Ada, Norman county, 
Minnesota, and was there for eight years engaged in farming and carpenter 
work. In igii. he came to Hitterdal, Clay county, and has made this his 
home since that time. He is engaged in carpentering and contracting work. 
making a specialty of the latter, and has been doing most of this work in 
North Dakota. 

JNIr. Peterson was married in 1883 to Anna Anderson, and to this 
union four children have been born, namely : Bennie. Gunda Christina, 
Carl and Emma. Thev are members of the Svnod Lutheran church. 



CLAY AND NORM AN COl'NTIES, MIXNKSOTA. 1 47 

CARL MARTIN LANGSETH. 

Carl Martin Langseth, former member of the l^oard of township super- 
visors in Elkton township, Clay county, and the proprietor of a fine farm of 
four hundred and eighty acres in section 5 of that township, on the line of 
the Great Northern railroad, was born on a farm in Worth county, Iowa, 
May 13. 1879, son of Hans N. and Anna (Benson) Langseth, both natives 
of the kingdom of Norway, the former of whom is still living, now a resi- 
dent of Richland c"untv. North Dakota, where he owns and farms a half 
section of land. 

Hans N. Langseth was born in 1856 and remained in his native Norwa\- 
until he was sixteen or seventeen years of age, when, about 1872, he came 
to the United States and located in Iowa. Two or three years later, he 
returned to Norway after his sweetheart, Anna Benson, and after their 
retmn here, the\- were married and established their home in Worth county, 
Iowa, later moving to North Dakota, where the former is now living, as 
noted above. His wife died in 189 1, she then being forty-one years of age. 
They were the parents of six children, the subject of this sketch having four 
brothers, Oscar, Nels, William and Peter, and a sister, Emma, who is mar- 
ried and now lives at New Ulm, this county. .\11 the brothers are farming 
in Richland county, North Dakota. 

In 1901. at Moorhead, Carl M. Langseth was married to Marta Seter, 
who was born in the kingdom of Norway in 1877, and who came to this 
country in 1897. About two years after his marriage, Mr. Langseth Iwught 
the farm on which he is now living, in section 5 of Elkton township, and 
has since made his home there, he and his family being very comfortably 
situated. In addition to his general farming, Mr. Langseth gives consider- 
able attention to the raising of Shorthorn cattle and is doing well. He has 
a well-improved place of four hundred and eighty acres and has an excellent 
farm plant. During the season of 19 12 he had in sixty acres of potatoes. 
For eleven }ears Mr. Langseth ser\-ed his community as a member of the 
township l)oard of supervisors, his term of office having just recently 
expired, and for the past thirteen years has been serving as clerk of his local 
school district. He is a stockholder in the Glvndon Telephone Company 
and in other ways has displayed hi^ interest in the general affairs of his 

community. 

Mr. and Mrs. Langseth have ten children: Hans, Anna, Selma. Alice, 
:^Ielvin and :Marv (twins), Albert, Norman, Helen and Alma, all of whom 



148 CLAY AND NORMAX COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

are living-. The Langseths are menil)ers of the Xorwegiaii Lutheran church 
ami take a projjcr interest in the attairs of the same. They have a very 
jjleasant home and give their interested attention to the community's various 
social affairs. licl|)fu! in [iromoting all agencies having to do with the ad- 
vancement of the general welfare of that neighborhood. 



.\LBERT M. IIOPEMAN. 

.\lhert .M. Ilopeman, one of the well known and prominent residents 
ni .Moorhead. Cla\ conntv, was born at Preston, Minnesota, in 1878. He 
recei\ed his education in the common and high schools of that place, and 
after completing his education in the latter, he entered the University of 
Minnesota and was graduated from the department of civil engineering with 
the class of 1905. .\fter he had completed his work in the university he 
was with the Chicago Sr Great Western Railway Company for one and 
one-half vears. a fur which he ser\ ed for one year as civil engineer of the 
city of St. I'aul. lie then came to Moorhead. where he engaged in the gen- 
eral construction work until the year 1912, when he organized the Ilopeman 
Material Companv. -au^] was elected president and general manager of th ■ 
same. The conii)anv does an extensive work in the handling of building 
materia! and in construction work. Their territory has covered a large part 
oi the state of .\drth Dakota and the northwestern part of Minnesota. In 
addition to his large interests in the Hopenian Material Company. Mr. Hope- 
man, in 19 1 4. organized the ^loorhead Hardware Conrjiany, and was presi- 
dent of the organization until 1916, at which time he sold his interests in 
the concern. He was most active in the enterprises in which he was inter- 
ested and much of their success was due to his untiring effort to make them 
a success. 

It was in the spring of 1907 that .\li)ert M. Hopeman was united in 
marriage to T^illie Ul,g. one of the prominent young women of Moorhead. 
anil to tills union ha\e been horn two children, Albert and Lillian, both of 
whom are now attending the home schools. Mr. and Mrs. Hopeman are 
active members of the Congregational church, and have long been proni- 
inem in the social life of their home community. Mr. Hopeman has always 
taken a very keen interest in local affairs and is now the president of the 
C ommercial Club. He is a member of the Free and .Accepted Masons, hav- 
ing filled all the chairs of the local lodge, and of the Ancient Order of 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I49 

United Wurkinen, of which he is a past master. For the past five years, he 
has served as a member of the school board, where he has given most effi- 
cient scr\ice. As a member of tlie Progress Club, lie has done much active 
work and lias given his best servive to the home city. Few men in the com- 
munity have done more for the welfare of Moorhead antl the surrounding 
country than has Mr. Hopeman. whose best efforts have always been 
e.xerted for the district in which be has lived and where he is held in the 
iiighest regard. 



OFF P. XOKKEN. 



.NuKing the natixe-boni Xorwegians wlio ha\c come ti) the L'nitcd 
States and engaged in general farming and stock raising in Clay county. 
is Ole P. Nokken, the owner of a fine farm in Moorhead, Kurt township. 
He was born in Norway in liS^j and is the son of Peter P. and Anna 
(Ouamme) Xokken. the former of whom was horn in Sogn. Norway in 
1825 and the latter, in i82_|, in the same country. 

Peter P. Nokken, who is still living at the advanced age of ninetv- 
two years, was a farmer in his nati\e country. He was married in Xorw ax- 
to Anna Ouamme. and, in 1870. lie and liis wife and clu'ldreii ininiigrated 
to this country, where he resumed his farming operations and continued in 
such during the acti\e years of his life. Peter P. Nokken and wife were 
the parents of four children, as follow : I'eter, deceased: Ole, the subject 
of this sketch; iiertha. deceased, and S\en, who is married and li\ing in 
North Dakota. His long residence in Clay coiuit\- has endeared Peter 
Nokken to a wide circle of friends. He and bis wife were earnest mem- 
bers of the United Lutheran churcii, and were e\er interested in all its 
good works. 

Ole P. Xokken was educated in the schools of his native land and 
for some time afterwards assisted his father in farming operations. At 
the age of eighteen years he came witli his parents to tliis comitry, in 1870. 
On arrixing here, the familv came on out to Minnesota and, in 1871. ( )le 
P. Xokken came to Clay county, where he acquired a tract of kuid and 
commenced farming on his own account. .Vs be prospered in iiis labors 
on the farm, he added to his Land holdings and final!}' became the owner 
of three hundred and se\enty-three acres of the choicest land, having pur- 
chased the place on which he lives outright in i88j. He is engaged in 
general farming and is very successful, his land being profitably and sys- 



150 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 



tfiiiatically cultivatetl. ;\Ir. Xokken has made many valuable and costly 
improvements on his place to bring it up to the standard of modern require- 
ments, and he is now accounted one of the best farmers in this section of 
the county. 

In 1883. Ole 1'. Xokken was united in marriage to limlic liettland. 
who was born in i8()5, and following their marriage, they settled on the 
farm where they have ever since been living. Mr. and Mrs. Xokken are 
the parents of the following children: .Mabel, wiio is married; Kmma, also 
married; Anna, Henry, Gilford, Engel, Caroline and Bertha. The Xokken 
family are memljers of the United Lutheran church at Salem and are earnestly 
interested in all its good works, as well as in the general social activities 
of the community, ever supporting all movements having for tlicir purpose 
the advancement of the public welfare. 



FRED SCHEI,1..\K. 



Fred Schellak. owner of a half section of tine land in Elkton town- 
ship, Clay county, where he and his family are very comfortably situated, 
is of European birth, a native of western Germany, but has been a resi- 
dent of this country for the past twenty-five years or more. He was born 
on September 16, 1864, son of Gustav and Augusta (Parsharlus) Schel- 
lak, also natives of (lermany. the former of whom, a stonemason, died 
when his son Fred was but six weeks of age. Tlu- Widow Schellak was 
still living in Germany at the time communication was interrupted u])on 
the declaration of war between the United States and that country in 
the spring of 191 7. (Justav Schellak and wife were the parents of two 
sons, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Carl Schellak. who remained 
in his native land. 

Reared in his native land, h'red Schellak received his schooling there 
and grew up a practical farmer, remaining there engaged in farming until 
1892. when he came to the United States and located at St. Louis, where 
for three years thereafter he was employed working in a factory. He then 
decided to take up farming and went to Iowa, where he rented a farm in 
Buchanan county, that state, and was engaged in farming there for three 
years, at the end of which time he came up into Minnesota and bought 
a farm of eightv acres in Elkton township. Clay county. Three years later 
he sold that place and bought the farm on which he is now living, in that 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I5I 

same township, and lias since made that his phice of residence, having 
developed an excellent piece of property there. Mr. Schellak has three hun- 
dred and twenty acres of fine land, on which he has an attractive grove 
and substantial farm buildings, one of the best-ordered farm plants in that 
neighborhood. In addition to his general farming, he has gi\en considerable 
attention to the raising of live stock and has done well in his operations. 

On June 19, 1898, Fred Schellak was united in marriage to Bertha 
Wendtland, who also was born in Germany, and who came to this country 
with her sister, and to this union seven children have been born, Ella. 
Otto, Herbert (deceased), Eddie, Alma, Elsie and Clara. The Schellaks 
have a pleasant home on a rural mail route out of Glyndon and take an 
interested part in the general social activities of the community in which 
they live. 



LELAND C. FOLLETT. 



Leland C. Follett, cashier of the First State Bank of Sabin and treas- 
urer of Elmwood township. Clay county, was born at Mapleton, in the 
neighboring county of Cass, over the river in North Dakota, on January 
28, 1891, son of Charles C. and Sarah E. (Ohr) Follett, the former of 
whom was a native of the state of New "S'ork and the latter of Illinois, 
pioneers of the Red River countiy. 

It was about 1874 that Charles C. Follett came up into this part of 
the country and settled on a homestead farm in the immediate vicinity of 
Lisbon, in Ransom county. North Dakota. There he made his home until 
his removal to Mapleton, in the adjoining county of Cass, where he became 
engaged in the grain business. Later, however, he moved to Oriska, where 
he remained until about 1912. when he returned East and is now living, 
retired, at Williamstown, Pennsylvania. His wife died in 1904. Of the 
children born to this parentage, three are still living, the subject of this 
sketch having two brothers, C. O. Follett, of Fargo, vice-president of the 
Fargo Mercantile Company, and Dr. W. C. Follett. a practicing dentist 
at Devils Lake, North Dakota. 

Leland C. Follett received his schooling at Fargo and, upon the com- 
pletion of the course in the high school of that city, became employed 
as bookkeeper and teller in the Dakota Trust Company of Fargo. He 
remained thus engaged until his appointment on February i, 1914, as cashier 
of the First State Bank of Sabin, which position he still occupies, one of 



152 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

the best-known young bankers in Clay county. He established his home 
in Sabin in October, 1915, and he and his fainil}- are now \ery pleasant!}- 
situated tliere. Mr. Follett gives his earnest attention to local civic affairs 
and is now serving as treasurer of his home township. 

On December 25. 1914, Leland C. Follett was united in marriage to 
leannette Johnson, of Moorhead, and to this union one child has been 
born, a son Robert C. Mr. and Mrs. FoUelt are members of the Method- 
ist Episcopal church at Sabin and take a proper interest in church work, 
as well as in the general good works and social activities of their home 
communitv. Mr. Follett is a member of the Ancient Free and Acceptec 
Masons, in the affairs of which fraternitv he takes a warm interest. 



THOM.XS McCABE. 



Thoiuas McCabe, a member of the board of directors of the Sabin State 
Bank and the proprietor of a fine farm of seven hundred and twenty acres 
in Elmwood township. Clay county, is a native of County Cavan, Ireland. 
but has l)een a resident of this country since he was fourteen years of age 
and of Minnesota since he established his home here in the spring of 1884, 
shortly after his marriage. He was born on March 10, 1858, son of John 
and Kate (Murphy) McCabe, also natives of County Cavan, who spent all 
their lives in their nati\e land. 

At the age of fourteen years Thomas .McCabe left his native Ireland 
and came along to the United States. He proceeded on out to Wisconsin 
and located at Oshkosh, in the vicinity of which city he began working on 
farms and for several years afterward spent his winters attending school. In 
the spring of 1880 he came over here into the Keel River country on a pros- 
pecting tour and bought the homestead right to a tract of land, the place 
on which he is now living; but at that time did nothing toward the develop- 
ment of the same, presently returning to Oshkosh, and worked in the timber. 
fn the fall of 1883 he was married at Fargo. North Dakota, and shortly- 
after his marriage, he and his wife came to Clay county and entered ui)on 
the occupancy of the homestead tract he had Ixiught three or four years 
before, and have e\er since made that place their home. .Mr. McCabe pros- 
pered in his farming operations from the very start and has increased his 
holdings until he now owns seven hundred and twenty acres of excellent 
land surrounding his home and has long been regarded as one of the most 



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'^'■g^'a^^^.qfll ^Ml^ 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY' 



.•.«TOB LENOX. 



CLAY AXD NOUMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I :; ^ 

substantial citizens of that community. In addition to his general farmin.t;-. 
he gives proper attention to the general business affairs of the community 
and is a member of the board of directors of the Sabin State Bank of the 
neighboring- village of Sabin. 

On October i, 1883. Thomas AlcCabe was united in marriage to Carrie 
Moon, daughter of .M. O. Moon and wife, of Pierce county, Wisconsin, 
natives of Norway, bi)th of whom are now deceased, and to this union 
fire children have Ijeen born, Margaret, Frank H., Emma, Edward G. and 
Thomas M., all of whom are li\ing. The McCabes have a very pleasant 
home on their well-ke])t farm and have ever given proper attention to 
the community's social activities. Mr. McCabe is a member of the local 
lodge of the .\ncient i*>ee and Accepted Masons at Barnesville and takes 
a warm interest in Masonic affairs. 



JAMES A. GARRITY. 



James A. Garrity, a well-known and energetic young lawyer of Moor- 
head and local attorney there for the Xorthern Pacific Railroad Company, 
is a native of the neighboring state of Wisconsin, but has been a resi- 
dent of Moorhead since entering upon the practice of his profession upon 
completing his studies at law school in 1913. He was born at Hudson, 
Wisconsin, July 24, 1892, son of Thomas Garrity and wife, and grew to 
manhood at that place. He was graduated from tiie Hudson high school 
in 1910 and afterward entered the St. Paul College of Law at St. Paul, 
from which institution he was graduated in 191,3, with the degree of Bache- 
lor of Laws, and was atlmitted to practice law. 

In the December following bis graduation from law school, Mr. Gar- 
rity located at Moorhead for the practice of his profession and, until Sep- 
tember I, 191 5, was associated there in practice with Edgar E. Sharp. 
Upon the termination of that connection, Mr. Garrity formed a partner- 
ship for ])ractice with Grover McGrath, a connection which was shortl\- 
afterward terminated, since which time he has maintained offices alone. 
In addition to his general practice, Air. Garrity is the legal representative 
of the Xorthern Pacific Railroad Company at Moorhead. Since taking 
u]} his residence in Moorhead, he has given his thoughtful attention to 
the .general affairs of this part of the state, and, as a member of the Moor- 
head Commercial Club, is doing all he can to advance the material interests 



J54 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

of his home town, of whicli lie was elected city attorney on l*'el)i"uar\ 20, 
1917. 

Mr. Garrity is an earnest member of the Catholic church and is promi- 
nently affiliated with the local council of the Knights of Columbus and with 
the Catholic Order of Foresters. He also is a member of the local branch 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and in the affairs of these several 
organizations takes a warm interest. 

On May 31, 1917, Mr. Garrity was united in marriage to Marguerita 
luans, of Ottumwa, Iowa, the daughter of (ieorge W. and Regina Jivans. 
the former being one of Iowa's prosperous farmers in Wapello county, 
that state. Mrs. Garrity was the teacher of domestic science in the public 
schools of Moorhead before her marriage. 



OLE SKALET. 



Ole Skalet, one of the best-known and most substantial first settlers 
of Clay county, general manager of the Ulen Grain Company at Ulen, 
president of Citizens Auto Company of Ulen. vice-president of the State 
Bank of Ulen, former president of that village, former chairman of the 
board of supervisors of Keene township, former assessor of that township 
and the owner there of four hundred and forty acres of fine land, is a 
native son of Minnesota and has lived in this state all his life, a continuous 
resident of Clay county since he was twenty -one years of age, having come 
up here into the Red River country in 1883. He was born on a pioneer 
farm in Houston county on Octol>er 14, 1861. son of Knut and Helga 
(Olson) Skalet, natives of the kingdom of \orwav. who came to this coun- 
try in 1852 and proceeded on out to Minnesota, settling on a farm in 
Houston county, where they reared their family and spent the remainder 
of their lives, substantial and useful pioneers of that section. Knut Skalet 
antl wife were the parents of ten children, of whom the subject of this 
sketch was the fifth in order of birth, the others being; Gutrum, Helga, 
Mary, Anna, Knut, Gura, Berget, Andrew and Olaus. 

Reared on the pioneer home farm in Houston county, Ole Skalet re- 
ceived his early education in the local schools, and from the days of his 
boyhood was a valued assistant in the labors of developing and improving 
the home farm, becoming practical manager of the same when in his teens. 
He continued to he thus engaged until he was twenty-one years of age, 



CLAY AND NOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 55 

when, in 1883, he came up into the Red River country and began working 
in Clay county. He married in 1885, and shortly afterward bought a farm 
in section 2 of Keene township, where lie estabhslied his home, liis iirst 
place of residence there lieing a humijle shack, nine by eleven feet, enclosed 
in lap-siding, with Init one door and one window. This is a distinct ccni- 
trast to tlie present substantial farm house and excellent farm buildings 
that mark the Skalet farm. When Mr. Skalet took that tract, it was 
wholly unimproveil and he "broke" e\'erv furrow and planted e\er}' tree 
on the place. As he prospered in his farming, he gradually added U) his 
holdings until now he is the owner of two hundred and eighty acres sur- 
rounding the home place, and an additional tract of one hundred and sixty 
acres in section 4. The old original home shack on the home place is 
still standing, and Mr. Skalet is carefully preserving the same as an inter- 
esting relic of his experience as a pioneer farmer. 

In 1901, Ole Skalet retired from the farm, lea\-ing the same in re- 
sponsible hands, and moved to Ulen, where he became engaged as local 
manager of the Monarch Elevator Company and was thus engaged until 
1911, when he returned In the farm. The next year, however, he returned 
to Ulen and there bought the Great Western elevator and has ever since 
been operating the same, the elevator now being under the management 
of the Ulen Grain Company, of which Mr. Skalet is general manager, 
the company doing a general grain, coal and seed business. In addition 
to his interests in the grain and coal business, Mr. Skalet takes an active 
interest in the general business affairs of his home village, being president 
of the Citizens Auto Company of Ulen and vice-president of the State 
Bank of Ulen. He has ever taken an interested part in the civic affairs of 
the community and for six years served as i)resident of the village council. 
During his residence in Keene township, he served for about five years as 
chairman of the board of township supervisors, and at the time of his 
remo\al t(.) Ulen was serving as township assessor. He also served for several 
years as clerk of the local school board and in other ways has given of his 
time and energies to the public service. Mr. Skalet is a member of the 
Lutheran (Synod) church in Keene township. He helped build the church, 
being a member of the building committee when the church was erected, 
and for years served as a member of the board of trustees of the same. 

In 1885, Ole Skalet was united in marriage to Martine Martinson, 
daughter of Carl Martinson and wife, who died in 1909, leaving nine 
children: Xedia, Charlotte. Charles, Ella. Hermana. .Myrtle, Elvina, Olga 
and Carl. 



l^(, CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

M. J. SOLUM. 

.M. f. Solum, president ui the Security State I'.ank of Hitterdal, clerk 
of Goose Prairie township, and for the past i|uarler of century actively 
engaged in the general hardware and farm-iniplement husiness at Hitterdal. 
one of the veteran business men of Clay county, is a native of the kin.s^di.ni 
of Norway, but has been a resident of Minnesota and of Clay county since 
he was fifteen years of age. having come here in the year 1888. He was 
l)orn on June 14. 1873, one of tlie three children born to John and Mette 
(Solum) Johnson, also natives of Norway, who si)ent all their lives there. 

When fifteen years of age M. J. Solum came to the L'nited Staler 
in 1888, alone and jiroceeded on out to the Red River country in Min- 
nesota, which then was attracting large numbers of settlers, making hi-- 
honie with some kinsfolk in the township of Tausem. in Clay county. 
He arrived there, owing sixtv-hve dollars of money advanced on his steam- 
ship ticket, and began working at farm labor, his first wages being eight 
or ten dollars a month. Later he learned the carpenter trade, at which 
he began working for seventy-five cents a day. his wages being graduall> 
increased twenty-tive cents a "raise" until he was receiving one dollar and 
seventv-five cents a day. the highest wages he ever received for a (la\"s 
labor. During the winter of 1892-93, Mr. Solum took a course of instruc- 
tion in Hope Academy ;it .Moorhead; and in die fall of 1893, engaged in 
the hardware business at Hitterdal, erecting there a little store building, 
eighteen by twenty-four feet, and starting with a stock of goods \alued at 
about two hundred and fifty dollars. From that small lieginning Mr. Solum's 
present well-established and extensive business has had a continuous growth. 
iMom time to time, as the demands of his growing business required, he 
built additions on to his original store rocmi and it was not long until he 
was doing a large business in the general liardware and farm-implement 
line. On January 3. 1914. his store was destroyed by fire, and in that same 
year he erected his present substantial store building of brick and cement 
i)locks. the same being thirty-three by eighty feet, with a full basement, 
and at the same time added to his stock a full line of furniture. In addi- 
tion to his mercantile business at Hitterdal. .Mr. Suluni has ever given his 
close attention to the general business atYairs of the community. He was 
one of the organizers of the Security State Bank of Hitterdal, of which 
he has been president for the past ten years. It was also largely through 
his initiative that seven or eight years ago the present flourishing Solum 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 57 

Elexator Company was organized. He also has given close attention to 
local civic affairs and for the past eight or nine years has been clerk of 
the township of Goose Prairie. 

In the year 1896. abont three years after embarking in bnsiness at 
Hitterdal, M. J- Solum was united in marriage to Anna Anderson, and 
to this union three children ha\e been Ixjrn, Xorman, Mette and Raymond. 
Mr. and Mrs. Solum are members of the L'niled Lutheran church at Hitterdal 
and take an active interest in the affairs of the same. Mr. Solum being the 
liresent secretar\- of the local congregation. 



LUDVIG WALKER. 



Ludvig \\'alker, one ni the well-known and prosperous farmers of 
Kurtz township, owner of a full section of laud of prime quality, was born 
in the kingdom of Norway on Christmas Eve, 1848. He is the son of Kristen 
and Brita ( Marum ) Walker, natives of Solvorn, Norway. The original 
faniilx- name was Walaker, which has been changed to Walker in recent 
years. Kristen Walker wa^ born in 1809, and his wife. Brita (Marum) 
Walker, was born in 1809. Thex' were the parents of the following children : 
Anna, a widow, now living in Norway: Lars, deceased, and Ludvig. the 
subject of this sketch. 

Ludvig Walker was educated in the schools of Norway and worked 
for some time at farm labor. At the age of twenty-one he decided to .seek 
his fortune in tlie United States and came to this country in 1869. On 
his arrival, he went to the state of Wisconsin and worked on farms for 
about seven or eight years. In 1878, he came lo the state of Minnesota 
and settled in Clay county, where he has ever since been engaged in the 
active duties of farming aufl is recognized as one of the most progressive 
and substantial agriculturalists of Kurtz township. .\s he prospered in Ins 
labors, he added to his land holdings and is now the owner of six hundred 
and forty acres of ])rime l.-md. one hundred acres of which is set out to 
the cultivation of potatoes. .Mr. Walker carried out a series of systematic 
improvements on his farm, and his outbuildings and dwelling house are 
among the best in the district. 

In 1883 Ludvig Walker was united in marriage to Carrie Grove, who 
was born in Minnes(.la in November. 1862. They are the parents of the 
following children: Annie, deceased: Thomas, Carl and Minnie, all living 



158 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

at home with tlieir parents. The Walker family aue members of the Luth- 
eran church and take a proper interest in the affairs of the same, as well 
as in the general social activities of the community in which Mr. W .ilk-cr 
has resided for nearly forty years. Mr. Walker is an independent in ixjli- 
tics, and has served the public as township super\isor and as treasurer of the 
district school board. In addition to this, he has in other ways given of his 
time and ability to the furtherance of all nioxemcnts having for their object 
the general good of the community. 



GEORGE F. FITTIS. 



Among the native-born German settlers of Clay county, who are en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits, is George V. h\ichs, who was born in tiie 
Fatherland in 1863, but has l)een a resident of this country since he was 
seventeen years old. He is a son of Martin and Mary (Bick) I'uchs. also 
natives of Germany. 

Alartin Fuchs w.is born in German\' about the _\ear 184J and died 
there in iS/J at the early age of thirty. He was married to Mary Bick, 
who came to this country some three years after her son, George F., and 
spent her last days in this county, dying about 1913. after she had reached 
the advanced age of seventy-seven years. Martin Fuchs and wife were 
the [larents of two children. C harlie W .. deceased, and (ieorge 1'"., the subject 
of this sketch. 

George F. Fuchs was educated under the e.\celleiu school system pre- 
vailing in Germany and at the age of seventeen, in 1880, immigrated to 
the United States. He was but nine years old at the time of his father's 
death and the responsibility of doing for him.self was early cast upon him. 
On his arrival in this country, he started for Ottawa, Illinois, and remained 
in that place for three years. He then moved to Chicago, that state, and 
work in that city for about seven years, at the end of which period he 
went to the state of Kansas and engaged in farm work for some twelve 
years. About 1902, Mr. Fuchs made a further change, coming to the state 
of Minnesota and settling in Clay county, where he has ever since been 
engaged in farming and has been very successfid. Me purchased land in 
Glyndon township, and, as he succeeded in his farming operations, he added to 
his holdings, and is now the owner of three hundred and sixty acres of 
fine land, the equal of any in the township. He follows general farming 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 59 

and. at the present time, one of his important crops is potatoes, of whicla 
he has about sixty acres in cultivation. He is regarded as one of the 
progressive and substantial farmers, following modern methods in his work. 
In 1887, George F. Fuchs was united in marriage to Lena Gutyahr, 
who was born in 1862. They are the parents of five children, as follow : 
George M., who is married; Carl F., Archie, Jennie and Emily, who are 
at home with their parents. The Fuchs family are members of the Lutheran 
church and take a proper interest in the affairs of the same, as well as in 
the general social activities of the community in which they live. Air. Fuchs 
gives a good citizen's attention to public affairs, having been treasurer of 
the school board for ten years and is now ser\-ing as township trustee, in 
which office he is giving general satisfaction. 



ALFRED OSS. 



Alfred Oss was born in Keene township. Clay county, Minnesota, 
March 27, 1893, a son of John and Johanna (Wenner) Oss, l.)oth nati\es 
of Norway. 

John Oss came to America in 1882 and located in .\tlanta township, 
Becker county, Minnesota, where he engaged in farming. In 1886, he came 
to Keene township, Clav county, and took a homestead of one hundred and 
sixty acres of government land. He built him a home and improved tliis 
land and continued to live there until 1896, when he returned to Becker 
county, Minnesota, and bought a farm of eighty acres. Later he sold this 
farm and bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in section 33. 
Atlanta township, where he lived, actively engaged in farming until 1914. 
when he sold out and remo\ed to Hitterdal, Clay county. I'or fourteen years, 
while living in Becker county, he was county surveyor; he also ser\ed 
twenty years on the school board, and f(.ir two years as township assessor. 
A more extended sketch of John Oss appears in another jilace in this work. 

Alfred Oss was educated in the public schools of Atlanta townshij 
Clay county. He learned the barber trade, when a young man, and 1 
lowed that occupation for three years. In 191 5, he and his sister, Helga. 
started a general grocery store at Hitterdal, which the\- operated jointly 
until his sister married Julius Schloesser, and then he assumed entire control 
of the business. Mr. Oss was appointed postmaster in 1914 and now holds 
that position. On October 5. T915, he married Lillian Tingdahl, dan.ghter 
of Theodore Tingdahl. .Mr. Oss is a member of the Synod Lutheran cbnrcli. 



), 

.,1- 



l6o CLAY AND NORMAN COl'NTIKS. MINNI-SOTA. 

HENRY SCHROF.DKR. 

Henry Scliroeder, who began his activi- Ute in an humble way, now 
president of the First National BanU at Moorhead, also interested in other 
banking institutions, and owner of extensive land holdings in and about Clay 
county, is a native-born German, but has been living in this county siuce 
1871. He was born in Renesburg. Holstein. Germany, August 31. 1853. a 
son of Henry and W'ilhelmina (May) Schroedcr, both of whom were natives 
of that same country and there spent all their lives. 

The senior Henry Schroeder was engaged in the tannery business in 
his native land, and bad followed that occupation during all of his active 
life, the tannery still being carried on by his son. Adolph. The elder Henry 
Schroeder died in German>- before the sul)ject of this sketch came to America. 
Wilhelmina Schroeder, his wife, died the summer after her son, Henry, 
immigrated to this country. The tannery has been in the possession of the 
Schroeder family for upwards of one hundred years. To Henry Schroeder 
and wife three children \\ere born, namely: Adolph, who still operates the 
tannery in Germany; Emil, who came to America about 1867, now living 
in San Francisco, where be is engaged in the fur-dyeing and dressing busi- 
ne.ss; and Flenry, the subject of this review. The parents of these children 
were members of the German Lutheran church. 

Henry Schroeder attended the excellent .schools provided by the edu- 
cational system of Germany and received a very thorough education. Ik- 
came to the United States in 1871 and proceeded out to P.enson, Minnesota. 
which town was then the terminus of the Great Xorthern railroad. From 
this point he started out on an eighty-mile walk, going north to .Mexandria, 
the journey occupying a few days, to join an uncle. AMiile living at the lat- 
ter place he worked on farms during the summers, going for that purpose 
to different parts of southern Minnesota. When winter would set in he 
generallv returned to .Mexandria, and north of that town he spent most of 
the winter seasons bunting and trapping, still continuing to reside with his 
uncle, and during a portion of the time he lived in a very rude shack. 

In 1878 Henry Schroeder left Alexandria and came to Wadena, accom- 
panying the mail carrier on the journey. From Wadena be traveled on to 
Glyndon, Clav countv, via the Northern Pacific railroad, and then walked 
to where Sabin now is, most of the way being partly under water. He 
purchased a tree claim of one hundred and sixty acres in F.lmwood town- 
ship, Clav county. He then returned during tlie next winter, going on foot. 



. DaTIONSI 




MRS_ HENRY SCHROEDER 




HENRY SCHROEDER. 



THE NEW vf,HK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A STOP 
TILDCN ' 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. l6l 

to Alexandria and there bought a team of horses, whicli lie brought back 
to Elmwood township, the following January. In the preceding summer 
he had purchased oxen near Sabin and used them to break the land for till- 
age. He continued at the laborious task of breaking and clearing the land 
on his tree claim, and finally got it fit for the planting of crops. Later, he 
added forty acres to the tree-claim holding and still lives on that farm, 
where he was first housed in a small shack, which had been standing up to 
a recent date. 

Prosperity attended j\lr. .Schroeder's efforts from the very start. He 
became an extensive farmer and potato grower. He is now the owner of 
two thousand six hundred acres of prime land, one thousand acres of which 
is lying near Sabin and sixteen hundred acres near Glyndon, Clay county. 
He has effected numerous costly and substantial improvements on his various 
tracts of land, the entire amount so expended being seventy-five thousand 
dollars. He erected warehouses at Watts and Sabin. and bought potatoes 
for some years, storing them in these warehouses, but the latter he now 
operates for his own use. In addition to his vast land holdings Mr. Schroeder 
is connected with banking. He is now the president of the First National 
3ank of Moorhead, which institution has flourished under his wise guidance, 
u'n 1908 he helped to organize the First State Bank of Sabin, and is also 
the president of that thriving bank. He is also interested in the operations 
of other banks, principally as a stockholder, and is recognized throughout 
the entire county as one of the foremost bankers in this part of the state, 
as well as being one of the most substantial landowners in the county. 

In 1879 Henry Schroeder was united in marriage to Wilhelmina Krab- 
benhoft, who was born in Germany, a daughter of Wolf Krabbenhoft and 
wife, also natives of Germany. Her parents were farmers in their native 
land. They immigrated to the United States in 1874, coming on the same 
shi]) which had brought Mr. Schroeder three years earlier. On their arrival 
in this country they came on out to Minnesota and located near Sabin, 
Clay county, and bought land on which they carried on general farming for 
several vears, later dying in the vicinity where they had settled. They were 
members of the German Lutheran church. Their eldest son, W. C, who 
had come to America some couple of years before them, is still living near 
Sabin. Mr. and Mrs. Krabbenhoft. were the parents of the following chil- 
dren: W. C Chris. Eliza, Anna, Henry O.. Wilhelmina and Henry. 
To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder the following cliildren were born: 
E. C. Theo, Minnie. Emma, Ernest. Irene, Erhart and Henry. Mrs. 
(iia) 



l62 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Schroeder passed away on April 5. 1917, and \va^ l)uried in the (kninan 
Evangelical Lutheran cemetery at Sabin on April S. Tlie Schroeder famil\- 
are earnest members of the German Lutheran church and are active work- 
ers in all church affairs, wanuly interested in all that concerns the welfare 
of the community, where din-ing their long years of residence they have 
been universally esteemed and regarded as representing the highest type of 
citizens. In politics. Mi: Schroeder is a supporter of the Republican party, 
but has never been a seeker after public ofiice, preferring to devote his nnic 
and energies to his commercial, banking and land-holding interests. 



ANDRLW l-.GGIMAN. 



Among the native-born Swiss who have come to .\merica and engaged 
in general farming with considerable success in Elniwood township, Clay • 
count\-. is .Andrew Eggiman, who was born in the republic of Switzerland, 
.August 24. i86(;. He is the son of John and .\nna (Merkendahl) Eggi- 
man, also natives of the same country, the former of whom is now about 
seventy years old. but the son, .Andrew, has not heard from his father or 
mother for some twent\- years. John and Anna Eggiman are parents of 
three children, namely: Anna and Elsie, who are living in Switzerland. 
and .\ndrew. die subject of this .-sketch. The members of the Eggiman fam- 
ily in the old countrv are members of the Lutheran church. The parents 
came from ;i long line of ancestors, noted for upright lives in the part of 
their native country in which they lived. 

\ndrew Eo-giman attended the schools of his home district in Switzer- 
land, and when he reached the age of twenty-three in 1892, he immigrated 
to the United States. On arriving in this country, he went on out to Liv- 
ingston. Illinois, where he was eiuployed at farming work for two years. .\t 
the end of that period, he went to Calhoun county. Iowa, where he also en- 
gaged in the labors of the farm, living in that state for nine years. He then 
decided to acipiire land for himself and. with that purpose in view, came to 
Minnesota in 1900. and settled in Elmwood township, Clay county. Here 
he is the owner of two hundred and forty acres of choice, land, which has 
been placed in a high state of cultivation. He has placed important and valu- 
able improvements on his farm, on which his operations are very successful. 
When Air. Eggiman assumed possession of his farm, a house stood on the 
land, but this he has torn down and a new- and substantial dwelling erected 



CLAY AND NOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 163 

in its place: here lie and his family are comfortably and pleasantly situated. 
On February 9, 1895, .\ndre\v Eosriman was united in marriage in 
.\nna .\'yt1er, a daughter of Jacob Xyller and wife. Mr. and Mrs. Eggiman 
are the parents of the following children: WilHam, Martha, Walter, Her- 
man and Rudolph, all of whom are living at home with their parents. 
Andrew Eggiman and his family are members of the Presliyterian church, 
and he is a Renujjlican in ixilitics. 



H ALDOR P. NYGAARD. 

ll;ildcir I'. .Vygaard, fi)rmer president of the village of Halstad, former 
recorder and treasurer of the same, former justice of the peace, present sec- 
retary of the local school l.ioard, secretary of tlie local creamery company 
and head of the lirm of Xygaard & Hostad. retail dealers in meats at Hal- 
stad. is a nati\e of the kingdom of Norway, but has been a resident of Min- 
nesota and of Xoi-nian county since the days of his childhood. He was born 
in the cit\- of Troudlijem on May 30, 1871, son of 1'. J. and Jonette (Moen) 
Xvgaard, nati\es of that same country, who came to Minnesota in 1881 
with tluir family and settled in Hendrum township, Xorman county, remain- 
ing there on a farm until the station at Halstad was established, when, in 
1883, t!ie_\' moved to that [jlace, where Mrs. Xygaard siJent her last days and 
where Mr. XA.gaard is still living, an honored pioneer of Xorman county. 

1'. |. .Xygaard was a carpenter in his native land and he built for him- 
self one of the fust houses erected in Halstad, besides building many other 
houses there in ;iu early day. On April 9, tgio. he and his wife celebrated 
their golden wedding anniversary, about sixty guests being present, besides 
six of iheir ciiildreu, forty-three grarid-children and one great-grandchild. 
Mr. Xvgaard now has fifty -one grandchildren and fourteen great-grand- 
children. To iiim and his wife eight children were born, all of whom are 
living sa\e Ole. the last-born, who died in 1883, the others being Jacob, 
Ingeborg-, Hansine, Haldor and John P. 

ilaldor P. Xygaard was ten years of age when his parents came to 
Minnesota and he grew to manhood at Halstad, early learning the carpenter 
trade under the skillful direction of his father. Upon completing the course 
in the local public schools he took a cour.se at Concordia College at Moor-, 
head, and upcjn leaving school engaged in the carpenter trade and was thus 
engaged at Halstad for ten vears. Tn igoo he started a meat market at Hal- 



164 CLAY AND NOKMAX COr\'TIKS. MIN.VESOTA. 

stad in partnership with S. Ftjrseth and tliat connection continued for a 
couple of years, at the end of which time Forseth sold his interest in the 
business to A. Melting, who remained a partner of Mr. Nygaard until 1908. 
when he suld liis interest to A. M. Hostad and the business has since then 
Iseen continued uncler tlie firm name of X\gaard & ITostad. Mr. Xygaard 
lias ever taken an acti\e interest in local affairs and particularly in the affairs 
of the village schools, in the upbuilding of which no one has been more 
enthusiastically attentive than he. it benig generally admitted that the present 
splendid school in the village owes its present form largely to his long-con- 
tinued, energetic and unselfish service in thai behalf. Me has been a member 
of the local school board since 1897 and is now ihc efficient secret:iry of 
the hoard. In other ways Mr. Nygaard has devoted much time and labor 
to the public welfare and has long been accounted one of Halstad's most 
l)ui)lic-spirited citizens. He has served as a member of the village council, 
was for two terms president of the same and has also served as village 
recorder, as treasurer and as justice of the peace. He has ever been active 
in promoting local enter|>rises and is now the secretary of the local creamery 
company. 

In 1906 Haldor P. Nygaard was united in marriage to Hansine Grend- 
stad. and to this union seven children ha\ e been born. Pcrcival H., Elmer. 
Julia B.. Amanda Belinda, Oliver, Herman and Ethel N'ictoria. Mr. and 
Mrs. Nygaard are members of the United Lutheran church, in the affairs of 
\vhich they take a warm interest, as well as in the general social activities of 
their home town, and Mr. Nygaard fur some years has been a member of 
the board of trustees of the church. 



EDWIN ADAMS. 



Edwin Adams, one of the well-known and successful attorneys and 
prominent business men of Moorhead. Clay county, was born in Lanark 
county, Ontario, Canada, on July 19, 1852, a son of Daniel Adams and 
wife, both natives of the Dominion of Canada, where they received their 
education in the public schools, and lived their li\es. they having died in 
the land of their nati^•it^• some years ago. The paternal grandfather, Joshua 
•Adams, was a native of Vermont and was a captain in the British Army. 
during the time of the Revolutionan.- War. After that memorable cf)ntlict. he 
located in Canada, where he established his home and continued to live 



CLAY AND XOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 05 

until the time of his deatli. Daniel Adams, as a young man, engaged in 
the milling business and in time became the owner of a saw, flouring and a 
woolen mill, in the operation of which he met with success. He and h\< 
father, during the time of the Mcivenzie Rebellion in the year 1837. took 
an active part in assisting the government to quell .the disturbance. The 
family were ever prominent in local aiTairs, and were active in the social 
and religious life of the communit\- where they liveil. being held in high 
regard and esteem by all. 

Edwin .\dams received his education in the schools of Ontario and 
there he grew to manhood. He later studied law in the office of T. B. 
Pardee and others in Ontario, after which he came u> the United States 
and established himself at St. Paul, Minnesota, where he was with the 
Omaha Railroad C"oni])any for one and a half years. He came to .\l<„ior- 
head, Minnesota, in the year 1881, and, on July 13 of that year, entered 
the employ of H. G. Finkle in the mercantile and grain business, remaining 
until 1884. His desire had been to engage in the practice of the law, and 
in the last year mentioned :>.bove opened an office at Hawley, where he 
practiced with success until 1892, when he returned to Moorhead, becoming 
cashier of the First National Bank. Sometime later he opened a law office 
and has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession. In 
connection with his legal practice, he is engaged in the insurance and real- 
estate business, and is today regarded as one of the successfid and substantial 
men in his line of work in the state. His careful businesslike methods 
have won for him a large circle of friends and clients, who regard him 
as a man of the highest integrity. 

It was in the vear 189J that Edwin Adams was united in marriage 
to Georgia Axtel of Troy, Penn.sylvania, and to this union the following 
children have been born: E. Maurice, Helen M., John C. Grace E., .Man 
K., Henry A., and Laura C, all of whoiji are now living. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adams are active members of the F.piscopal church and 
have long been prominent in the social and the religious life of their home 
town. Their interests have ever been for the betterment and the growth 
of the district in which they have lived, and their best efforts have ever 
l>een exerteil in the promotion of those enteq^rises that would tend to the 
substantial growth and improvement of the city of Moorhead and the sur- 
rounding country. They have had much to do with the high sentiment of 
their city in its educational anfl moral development. 

Mr. Adams is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, the i<o\al 
Arcanum, the .\ncient Order of United Workmen and the Commercial 



l66 CLAY AM) XORMAN ('( H' XIU:S. MINNESOTA. 

Club. He ha.^ never been a seeker after oliice. yet he has taken the keenest 
interest in local affairs and has had much to do with the civic life ot 
the district. While living in Canada, he was a member of the C"anadian 
Volunteers and saw active service iii the I'enian Raid, and held a commis- 
sion as lieutenant. Mr. .Adams is a man of much force of character and 
is a leader in the \arious organizations of which he is a member. I le has 
lived a useful and active life anc! i-~ today known as one of the prnminent 
men of Moorhead. 



"R.\XK P. THOMPSON. 



]-"rank 1'. 'riionipson. proprietor of a well-kept farm in Elmwood town- 
ship. Cla\- county, and one of the pioneers of that neighborhood, is a native 
of the kingdom of Denmark, but has l)een a resident of this county since he 
was nineteen years of age and of Minnesota since 1880, the year in which he 
liomesteaded the tract on which he is now living and where he has made his 
home since his niarria.ge in the year following his location there. He was 
born in 185J, son of I'eter and Cecelia ( Johanson) Thompson, also natives 
of Denmark, industrious farming jieople. who spent all their lixc^ in their 
native land. 

Reared on the home farm in Denmark. Frank P. Thompson received 
his schooling in his native schools and he remained at home until he was 
nineteen years of age. when, in 1871. he came to the United States and 
located at Ivan Claire. Wisconsin, where for two years thereafter he was 
engaged working in tlie lumber mills and in the big timber adjacent to that 
place. He then went to Okoma. in that same state, and a short time after- 
ward went over into the big timber region of Michigan, where he worked 
for some lime in the luniljer woods. He then returned to Wisconsin and 
located at Oshkosh. where he became acfjuainted with Thomas McCabe and 
in 1880 the two of them came over into this part of Alinnesota and home- 
steaded neighlx)ring quarter sections in Elmwood township, Clay county. In 
the ne.xr year. 1881. Mr. Thompson married and established his home on his 
(|uarter section, but Mr. McCabe did not settle on his tract until after his 
marriage in 1883. The old neighbors are still living alongside each other 
and the fine neighborly relations established back in the days of their pio- 
neering together have remained altogether amicable and wholly undisturbed 
all these years : the fine friendship which sprang up between the two young 
men from a foreign shore, for Mr. AfcC.abe .also is of European birth, a 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 167 

native of the Emerald Isle, remaining as tinii as in the days when it was 
cemented by their mutual interest upon coming up here into the Red River 
country to look for homes. Mr. Thompson has improved his place in admir- 
able shape and has been quite successful in his operations, for years having 
been regarded as one of the most substantial farmers in that neighborhood. 
In 1881 Frank 1'. Thompson was united in marriage to Katie .\. Gal- 
ligan, of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and to this union five children have been 
born, Stephen, Thomas, Marie, Marjorie and Katheryn, all of whom are 
living. The Thompsons have a very pleasant home on their well-kept farm 
and from the days of the beginning of their residence there have ever given 
their thoughtful attention to the general improvement of the community 
in which they have lived since the days of the pioneers. 



JOHN CONNELLY. 

John Connelh , proprietor of a line farm of two hundred acres in 
Glyndon township, and one of the best-known young farmers in that part 
of Clay county, was born on a pioneer farm in that township on April 
lo, 1883, son of Patrick and Bridget (Lundy) Connelly, natives of Ireland, 
who became pioneers of this section of Minnesota and the latter of whom 
is still living on the old homestead farm in Glyndon township, where the 
family settled about the year 1880. 

It was in 1877 that Patrick Connelly and his wife came to the United 
States from their native Ireland and located in New York City. Not 
long afterward they moved to Pennsylvania. In the spring of 1879, Pat- * 
rick Connelly started West on a prospecting tour and his good fortune 
directed his way up here into the Red River country, his destination being 
Moorhead. Becoming deeply impressed with the possibilities of this region, 
Mr. Connellv returned East and in the fall of that same year brought his 
family here and located at Moorhead. Three years later, he settled on 
the farm in Glyndon township, where he established his permanent home 
and where be .spent the rest of his life, a well-to-do farmer, his death 
occurring there on May 12, 1912. Patrick Connelly from the very beginning 
of his residence there took an active part in local civic affairs and for 
fifteen years, or more, served his home township in the important capacity 
of a member of the board of supervisors, and in other ways contributed 
of his time and his energies to the public service. He and his wife were 



]68 CLAY AND NORMAN C0T;NTIES. MINNESOTA. 

members of the Catholic church and took an active part in local parish 
affairs. They were the parents of three sons, the subject of this .'sketch 
having two brothers, William and James Connelly, who are still living on 
the old home place with their widowed mother. 

John Connelly was reared on the home farm in Glyndon township 
and attended the common schools of that neighlmrhood. .Vs a youth, h- 
learned the carpenter trade and worked at the same until 1909, two years 
after his marriage, when he bought a quarter of a section of Jand in Glyn- 
don township, not far from his old home, and has ever since made that 
place his home. In 1914, he bought an adjoining tract of two hundred acres 
and is very successful in his farming operations, being regarded as one 
of tlie substantial farmers of that neighborhood. 

On February 2-], 1907, John Connelly was united in marriage to .Mannc 
Krabbenhoft, who was born in Elmwood townsliip. Clay county, daughter 
of W. C. Krabbenhoft and wife, pioneers of that township and further 
and fitting mention of whom is made elsewhere in this work To this 
union three children have been born. I^wrence. ]'"<lna and Helen. Mr. and 
Mrs. Connelly have a very pleasant home and have e\cr taken an interested 
part in the general social activities of the community in which they have 
lived all their lives. Mr. Connelly is a member of the Masonic lodge at 
jNIoorhead and of the ^lodern Woodmen of America at that place. In 
the affairs of both of these organizations he takes a warm interest. 



EDWIN C. BENEDICT. 

Edwin C. Benedict, clerk of Glyndon township. Clay county, and one 
of the best-known and most substantial farmers of that part of the county. 
is a native of Wisconsin, but has Ijeen a resident of Minnesota and of Cla}- 
county since he was seventeen years of age, his parents having settled here 
in 1887. He was born at Oshkosh. Wisconsin. January 19, 1870, son of 
Stephen D. and Sarah F. (Pride) Benedict, the former a native of Ohio 
and the latter of Maine, who were married in Wisconsin and later came to 
Alinnesota. becoming pioneers of Clay count\-. where the fomier died, tht 
latter going to California, where her last days were spent. 

Stephen D. Benedict, who was an honored veteran of the Civil War, 
was but a child when his parents moved from Ohio to Wisconsin, becoming 
pioneers of the Oshkosh neighborhood, where he was reared on a pioneer 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 69 

farm. Upon the outbreak of the Civil War he eiiHsted for service as a 
member of Company C, Fourteenth Regiment, Wisconsin VoUinteer In- 
fantry-, and with that command served for four years and three months, 
during whicli long period of service he never was wounded nor taken pris- 
oner. After the war Mr. Benedict continued for some time in service, on 
guard dut}-, and ujion the completion of his military service returned to his 
home in Wisconsin, where he presently married Sarah I'. Pride, who was 
Ijorn in the state of Maine and who was but a girl when her parents came 
over into the northwest and settled in the vicinity of Oshkosh. After his 
marriage Mr. Benedict continued to make his home in Wisconsin until 1887, 
in which year he moved with his family over into Minnesota and bought a 
homestead right to a (|uarter of a section of land in .\lliance township, Clav 
county, which he "proved up" and improved and to which he added by later 
purchase until he became the owner of six hundred and forty acres there, 
one of the best farms in that part of the county, and on that place he spent 
his last days. His widow later moved to California, where her last days 
were spent. Stephen D. Benedict took an active part in local civic affairs 
and fur some years served as assessor of Alliance township. He and his 
wife had three children, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Mabel, 
wife of Henry Legler, of Blackduck, up in Beltrami county, and a brother, 
Henry Benedict, of Oakland, California. 

As noted abo\'e, I^dwin C. Benedict was seventeen vears of age when 
he came into the Red River country with his parents in 1887, the family set- 
tling in Clay county, and he at once became an active factor in the labors of 
developing and improving the home place in Alliance township. After his 
.marriage ten years later he rented the home place and operated the same for 
four years, at the end of which time he bought the place on which he is now 
living, in Giyndon township, and has since made his home there. He has 
done well in his operations there and has increased his holdings until now 
he is the owner of nine hundred and twenty acres and has long been re- 
garded as one of the most substantial citizens of that part of the county. In 
addition to his general farming, Mr. Benedict gives considerable attention to 
the raising of live stock and makes a specialty of his fine Percheron horses. 
His place is improved in admirable sliajie and he has one of the best farm 
plants in Clay county. The year in which he moved to Giyndon township 
Mr. Benedict was elected township clerk and by successive re-elections has 
ever since been retained in that office, giving his most thoughtful and intelli- 
gent attention to local civic affairs. He likewise gives his interested atten- 
tion to the general business affairs of the community and is a stockholder in 



I JO CLAY AND NORMAN COUNXmS. MINNESOTA. 

the Equity packing plant at Fargo and in the creamery i)iant at .Moorhead. 
On November lo. 1S97, Edwin C. Benedict was united in marriage to 
Kallierine Wiedenian. daughter of Ewald W'iedenian ;ind wife, of Clay 
county, and to this union ten children have been born, Mabel, Ewald, Lila, 
l-'.sther. Alice. Ethel, I'Vances, lulwin. George and ('".dith, all of whom are 
living. The Benedicts have a very pleasant home on their fine farm ;uid 
have ever given their iinijicr attention to the general social activities and 
good works of the community in which they live, helpful in many ways in 
liromoting movements ilesigned to adxance the common good thereabout. 



HENin" GRETTUM. 

One of the most promising of the younger farmers of Cla)' comity is 
Henry Grettum, who lives on the farm on which he was born in L'len 
township. He has been wise in remaining on the homestead where he has 
found all the opportunities necessary for a successful career as a tiller of 
the soil. Too many of our farmer boys hasten away to some distant city 
to start their careers. The life of the average farmer is more satisfactory 
in many respects than that of his city brother. 

Mr. Grettum was born on May 11, nSgi, in L'len townshij), Clay 
county, a son of John and Bertha ( Klemmetson ) Grettum, both natives 
of Xorwav, where they spent their earlier years, but were still single when 
they immigrated to America. They were married in Houston county, Minne- 
sota, where he had settled in the seventies. John Grettum worked as a 
farm hand until 1882, when he came to Clay county and took up a home-, 
stead of one hundred and si.xty acres in Ulen town.ship, where he has since 
made his home. He dexeloped the raw land into a good farm, placing it 
under excellent improvements, including the erection of a substantial group 
of buildings. He has engaged in general farming and stock raising. His 
wife died in 191 5. She was a member of the Lutheran church to which 
he also belongs. He was treasurer of the .school board in his district 
for a number of years. To John Grettum and wife six children were born, 
namelv : Clara, Julius, Selma, Clarence, Henrv and Helen, all of whom 
are living at this writing. 

Henry Grettum received his education in the district schools. He has 
always lived on the home farm, which he has l)een managing successfully 
since 1916. He received excellent training tinder his father and is a student 



CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. \J\ 

of modern methods of agriculture. He feeds much of the grain the phice 
produces to h\e stocic, fattening large numbers of cattle and hogs for the 
market annually. He has remained unmarried He has been treasurer of 
the local school district for two years. I'oliticallv. be is a Republican. 



JOHN HENRY FREEA'IAN. 

John Henry Freeman, manager of the Moorhcad Nezvs, is a native of 
the state of Illinois, but has been a resident of Minnesota since he was a 
child, having been lint four years of age when his parents settled at Moor- 
head. He was born ;it Rdckfnrd,. Illinois. May 27. 1878, son of C. W. and 
Anna M. ( Blomf|uisl i breeman. who came to Minnesota in March, 1882, 
and settled in Mooriiead. where they since have made their home. 

Jn ]<)07 John 11. breeman became proprietor of the Moorhcad Iiulc- 
l^cndcnt and continued as the publisher of that paper until 191 1, in which 
year he disjiosed of his paper and was thereafter engaged in operating a job- 
printing plant in Fargo. North Dakota, until in April, 1916, when he was 
enga.ged as manager by the Moorhead News Company, of which he is one 
I'f the stiickholders. 



LEWIS LOFGREN. 



Lewis Lofgren, cashier of the First National Bank of Ulen and one 
of the most"acti\e real-estate dealers and promoters of immigration in 
Clav county, is a native of Sweden, but has been a resident of this country 
since he was four years of age. He was born on March u. 1864. son 
of Olaf and Margaret (Johnson) Lofgren. also natives of the kingdom 
of Sweden, who came to the L'nited States with their famil\- in 1868 and 
-ettled in Trempealeau cmint)'. Wisconsin. Two years later, in 187c. they 
came over into Minnesota and located on a homestead quarter section in 
I 'ope comity, between Tdenwood and Sauk Center, remaining there until 
their retirement from the farm and removal in 1908 to Duluth, where 
both are now living. To Olaf Lofgren and wife were l)orn seven children, 
of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth: the 
others being: Charles J.. August. Julius. Fred. Melvin and Clara L. 

.\s noted above, Lewis Lofgren was but four years of age when he 
came with his parents to this country and was but six when they moved 



1J2 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

from Wisconsin to Pope county, this state. He grew to manhood on the 
home farm in the latter county, a valued assistant to his father and elder 
brother in the labors of improving and tleveloping the home place. lie 
supplemented the schooling he received in the local schools by attendance 
at the high school at Sauk Center and at a business college at La Crosse. 
Wisconsin. In the meantime, his elder brother, Charles J. Lofgren, had be- 
come engaged in the drug business at Sauk C^enter and, uiX)n leaving the 
business college, Lewis Lofgren liecame engaged as prescription and general 
clerk in his brother's store, continuing thus engaged for three years. At 
the end of that period, in 1886, he transferred his services to the Bank of 
Park Kivcr at Park River. Xorth Dakota, and was there employed as lx)ok- 
keeper and assistant cashier until 1890, wlien he returned to Minnesota 
and became engaged as assistant cashier in the bank of his brother, Charles 
T. Lofgt;en. at Ada. n(n\ the First National Bank, and was thus engaged 
there until i8c;_'. In that year, he went to the coast and for two years 
thereafter was employed in a bank at Sumas City, Washington. In 1894 
Mr. Lofgren returned to the i)lace he had left in the bank at Ada and 
remained there until 1897, when he went to Chicago ami was for a year 
engaged in the maimfacturing business in that city. He then returned 
to the bank at .\da and was there again employed until in June, 1899, 
when he was elected cashier of the State Bank of L'len and moved to that 
village, where be has since resided. In December, 1903, the State IJank 
of Ulen was reorganized and was rechartered as the First National Bank 
of Ulen, Mr. Lofgren being retained as cashier of the same, a jwsition he 
still occupies, one of the best-known bankers in this part of the state. Since 
taking up his residence in Lien, Mr. Lofgren has been also actively engaged 
in the general real-estate business, with particular reference to farm lands, 
and in that capacity has done much to stimulate immigration to this part 
of the state, having encouraged many settlers to locate in this region. 

In the year 1897 Lewis- Lofgren was united in marriage to CharloUe 
C. Irwin, and to this imion five children have been born: Lowell I., ?^Iar- 
, garet L., Lawrence, Mildred and Charles. The Lofgrens have a very pleas- 
ant home at Ulen and take an interested part in the general social activities 
of the community. Mr. Lofgren is a member of the local lotlges of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, and in the affairs of these organizations takes a warm interest. He 
gives careful attention to the general business and civic activities of W\> 
home village and of the county at large, and has long been regarded as 
one of Clav countv's "live wires." 



CLAV AND XORMAN COUNTIES, MIXXESOTA. 1 73 

JEXS LARSON. 

Jens Larson, a suljstantial and progressive farmer, ihe owner of large 
tracts of land in Clay county, former treasurer of the township school board, 
and otherwise identified with public affairs, was born in the kingdom of 
Sweden, but has been living in the L'nited States for the past thirty years, 
ha\'ing immigrated from his native land in 1887. He is the son of Lars 
and Anna Fireson. also born in Sweden and who spent their last days in 
that country. 

Lars Fireson was educated in the schools of his native land, following 
which he engaged in farming and continued thus occupied during the years 
of his active life, his death occurring in 1902, when he had reached the 
age of seventy-seven years. His wife, Anna Fireson, died in 191 2 at the 
ad\anced age of eighty-five years. They were the parents of the following- 
children : Peter and John, living in this country ; Torkel, who lives in 
Sweden; Johanna, the wife of Ingle Christianson, and who lives in Sweden; 
-Marie, who married Xels Pearson and lives in Haver, Montana, and Jens, 
the subject of this sketch. 

Jens Larson was educated in the schools of his native land and was 
reared on his father's farm, where he was an able assistant in the work 
of the farm. In 1887, he left Sweden and came to this country, locating in 
Clay county, Minnesota, where he settled in section 16, Hawley township. 
There he bought two hundred acres of land, which he continued to operate 
for several years and which he still owns. His first venture in farming 
in the new country pro\ing successful, he continued to add to his land 
holdings and in T902 he Ijought a tract of two hundred and sixty-seven 
acres in section 8, Hawley township. Mr. Larson and his sons now own 
among them about one thousand acres of the choicest land to be found 
in the township. He is engaged in general farming and stock raising, having 
an excellent herd of Shorthorn cattle, and since the commencement of h{> 
operations he has been most successful, everything about his farms l>emg 
in good order and condition. He has entirely remodeled some of the 
outbuildings and erected new ones, including potato storage accommodation 
and additions to the dwelling house. He allots about seventy acres to 
the cultivation of potatoes and is generally regarded as one of the progres- 
sive and substantial farmers of the township. 

In November, 1889, Jens Larson was united in marriage to Anna 
iThvsell) Tolson. Mrs. Larson had been married before, the first husband 



174 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

being Andrew Tolson. who died in Clay county. .Minnesota, in 1888. Tliere 
were no children Ijorn to this union. Mrs. Larson was horn in Sweden in 
February, 1867, and came to .\nierica twenty years afterward, in 1887. She 
was the daughter of Andreas and Emma (Helstrom) Thysell, both i\ative~ 
of Sweden, where the father died in 1901. The mother, who survived the 
father, came to .\merica in igo6 to join her children, all of whom have 
come to this country except one. Albion, who still resides in Sweden: the 
others are: Anna, the wife of the subject oi' this review: August, wh" 
was drowned near I'ortland. Oregon; Tilda, the wife of John Larson, 
living near St. Cloud. Minnesota.: Xels, who resides in Hawley, and Carl. 
living in Hawlex' township, .\ndreas and lunula Tliysel! were de\out and 
conscientious iiieniliers of the Lutheran church, rearing their children in 
that faith. Jens and .\niia Larson are the parents of eleven cliildren all 
of whom are living: Lewis, Edward, who owns eighty acres anil rents a 
half section: Anna. Carl. Hilda. Selnia. Clarence. \'ictor. X'endal. Oscar 
and Ida. Mr. Larson takes a good citizen's interest in the local civic affair-- 
and in the general conditions of the cominunit\ in which he li\es. He 
served on the township board and as super\isor iov ten years, and was 
treasiuer of the schcjol board for two terms. In these representative posi- 
tions he rendered a good account of himself, serving tlic ]ienple with fidelitx' 
and abilit\-. 



li:XS WIXTU.M. IK. 



L the husbandman is fortunate enough to have the true vision of 
farming and starts out to make it a reality, he will certamly find this busi- 
ness a most profitable one. He will urge the l)ackward acres of his farm 
into actix it\ that will make them produce abundantly, keep a good grade of 
li\e stock and use the most modern implements. S\ich a man is lens W'inium. 
Jr., of Goose Prairie township. Clay county. 

Mr. Winjuni was born in Fillmore countv. Minnesota, belirnary 21. 
1871. a son of Jens. Sr., and Margaretta W'injum. both natives of Norway, 
where they .sjient their earlier years, finally coming to America and locating 
in I<"illmore county. Minnesota. The mother died in 1905 at the age of sixty 
years. The father was twenty years okl when he came to America, coming 
at once to Fillmore county, this state, where he worked out as a farm hand. 
He came up to Clay county in 1871 and homesteaded one hundred and sixty 
acres in section u. Highland Grove township, bein,g one of the pioneers of 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. T 



/.I 



the county, and there he followed general farming successfully for a period 
of a))out forty years. He added to his original holdings by buying eighty- 
six acres and, later, one hundred and sixty more. He became one of the 
leading farmers of his township and was influential there in the early histor\- 
of the locality. He finally sold out and moved to Norman cmmty, where he 
has since li\ed retired, after many years of hard work, at the age of seventy- 
four years. His family consists of nine children, namely : Ella and Louise, 
who are both dead; Andrew, who owns and operates a farm in Norman 
county, Minnesota: Claia, Anna, Mary and Sam, all four of whom are 
deceased, and Jens, Jr., t>\ this sketch, the youngest of the family. 

Jens Winjum, Jr., who was an infant when his parents brought him 
here from I'"illmore county, grew to manhood on the home farm where he 
assisted with the general wofk during crop seasons, and in the winter time 
he attended the district schools. When a young man, he began farming for 
himself, and in 1897 bought his present farm of two hundred acres, one 
hundred and sixty acres in section 21, Goose Prairie township and forty 
acres in section 5, Highland (Irove township. It was all wild land, and he 
worked hard ])utting it under its present hi.gh state of cultivation and devel- 
opment. He has erected a substantial rmd convenient set of buildings, set 
out a grove, and added other excellent improvements, and has oile of the 
choice farms in his locality. He raises wheat, oats and flax, principally, and 
also sends large numliers of cattle and hogs to the market every year. He 
is one of the leading farmers of bis vicinity. He is a stockholder and direc- 
tor in the State Bank at Hitterdal. 

Mr. Winjum was married June i, 1898, to Jennie Iverson, who was 
burn in Norway, December 8. 1880. She came to America with her parents 
when fourteen years old, the family locating near Hitterdal, Clay county, 
^Minnesota, where Mr. Iverson bought a farm. He carried on general 
farming there' until a few years ago, when he sold part of the farm and 
mo\-ed to the \illage of Hitterdal, where he and his wife are now living in 
retirement. To Mr. and Mrs. Winjum, six children have been born, all 
of whom are'living; they are: Clara, now (1917) eighteen years old, who 
is attending the State Normal school at Moorhead, and ex])ects to become 
a teacher: I'.lla, aged fourteen: George, who has reached the age of thir- 
teen; Arnt, who has passed his tenth birthday; Norman, who has attained 
the age of eight; and Murkle, who is now six years old. 

Politically, Mr. Winjum is an independent. He .served as assessor 
of Goose I'rairie township for six or seven years, but is not now incumbent 



176 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

of til is oFfice. He took the census for the government of Goose Prairie and 
Keene townships in 1910, and is at present a director on the school hoard in 
his district. He helongs to the Lutheran church, in which he is a trustee. 



LARS B. LARSON. 



Lars B. Larson, one of the real pioneers of Norman county and a well- 
known and substantial retired farmer of Halstad township, now living in 
the pleasant village of Halstad, has been a resident of this section of the 
state from the days of the beginning of permanent settlement up this way. 
having come here before the city of Moorhead had been laid out and some 
years before the city of Ada even had been projected in the mind of man. 
In those days the old Hudson Bay Company was still doing a. thriving busi- 
ness in furs throughout this section of the country and for some time after 
taking his homestead here Mr. Larson found profitable incidental employ- 
ment as a freighter in the service of that company. When settlers began 
coming in and there were enough of them in the vicinity of the location of 
Mr. Larson's place to effect a township organi;;ation he took an active part 
in the organization of Halstad township and afterward served for some 
time as a member of the board of township supervisors and for two years 
as chairman of the Iward, while in other ways he performed well his part 
in the general development of this section in pioneer days. 

Lars B. Larson was born in the kingdom of Norway on January 18, 
1846, son of Bjorn and Ingeborg (Johnson) Larson, natives of that same 
country, \\'ho came to the United States with their family in 1854 and located 
in LaSalle county. Illinois, whence, two years later, in 1856, they came to 
Minnesota and settled in Fillmore county, where they remained until along 
in the middle or later seventies, when they came up to this part of the state, 
whence their son, the suljject of this sketch, had preceded them some \ears 
before, and located in Halstad township, Norman county, where they si)ent 
their last days. Bjorn Larson was a substantial pioneer farmer. Though 
reared a Lutheran, he died in the faith of the Methodist church. He and 
his wife were the parents of nine _ children, of whoin the subject of this 
sketch was the first-born, the others being Andrew B., Martha B.. B. B., 
Lena, Daniel, Eli, William and Christen. 

Eight years of age when he came with his parents to this country, Lars 
B. Larson completed his schooling in the schools of Fillmore countv. this 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY' 



I JTMOX 



CLAY AND NORMAN COL'NTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 77 

State, and there grew to manhood on the farm on which his parents had 
settled, farming on his own account after he had attained his majority. In 
1 87 1 he married and in that same year he and his wife came up to this part 
of the state, thus being among the very first permanent settlers in this 
section. That was one year before Clay county was organized as a separate 
civic body and ten years before the organization of Norman county, Moor- 
head, the county seat of Clay county, not being founded until a year after 
lie came up here and Ada, seat of Norman county, not for some years after- 
ward. Upon coming up here Mr. Larson entered a quarter of a section of 
land, a portion of which was situated in section 13 of what later came to Ije 
organized as Halstad township and tlie remainder in section 18 of the adjoin- 
ing township, establishing his home on that portion in section 13. When 
the "odd" sections later were set off to the state to be held in trust for the 
promotion of railroad Iniildiiig, Mr. Larson was required to buy that portion 
lit his homestead l>ing in section [3. ^Slr. Larson and his wife drove through 
from Fillmore count\- with two ox-teams, two cows, two calves and two 
sheej), a wagonload of household goods and essential farming implements, 
one sack of flour and five dollars in cash. During the first year of his resi- 
dence here Mr. Larson was able to add to his small supply of cash by doing- 
some freighting lor the Hudson Bay Company, which at that time was 
still doing an extensive business in the Red River vallc}-. .\s he gradually- 
]irosiicrcd in his farming operations Mr. Larson added to his land holdings 
imtii be became the owner of four hundred and seventv-five acres of excel- 
lent land and was counted one of the substantial pioneer residents of that 
section. He continued to make his home on the farm until 1896, when he 
retired from the active labors of the farm and moved to Halstad, where he 
since has made liis home. In 1912 he bought a furniture store in that village, 
but after conducting the same for about three years again retired and is now 
taking things easy again. As noted above, Mr. Larson was one of the 
organizers of Halstad township and served for years as meml)er of the 
l:)oard of super\isors of the same, for two years serving as chairman of the 
lioard. He is a member of the Methodist church and has ever given his 
earnest attention to neighborhood good works and in other ways has been 
helpful in bringing his home tow^nship to its present high state of develop- 
ment. 

Lars B. Larson has been twice married. It was on January 18. 187 1. 
the year in which he movetl to this part of the .state, that he was united in 
marriage, in Fillnn>re county, to Anna K. Faae, who shared with him the 
(12a) 



178 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

trials and privations of a life on the frontier and who died in 1896, after 
a residence of more than twenty-five years in Halstad township. To that 
union seven children were born, Bernhardt, Emma, Isabel, Theodore, Clara. 
Emelia and Lawrence. On January 2, 1907, Mr. Larson married Betsie 
Bloom, who died on July 10. 1915. 



W. L. SPOTTS. 



W. L. Spotts, [jostmaster at Dilworlh and a well-known railway con- 
ductor in the ser\ice of the Northern Pacific, was bom in Sterling, Illinois, 
August 7, 1869, a son of Adam and Margaret (Lichtenwalter) Spotts, 
who were both natives of Ohio, the father having lieen born in Akron and 
the mother, in Massilon, that state. 

Adam Spotts was a farmer in Ohio. Later he removed to Sterling. 
Illinois, where he lived and followed the same occupation for several years. 
In 1880 he removed to Fargo, North Dakota, and entered one hundred 
and sixty acres of land near that place under the homestead law. Me 
improxed this lanil and maintained his home there until about 1886. when 
he removed to OI)eron, North Dakota, and made a pre-emption and tree- 
claim entry of three hundred and twenty acres. He farmed this for a 
number of years and then returned to Fargo where he continued to live 
until his death, which occurred in .\ugust. 1916. Adam Spotts was the 
father of six children: Flla, Laura, Emma, William L., Herbert F. and 
Jennie. He was an active member of the Congregational church and was 
for many years a deacon in the Plymouth church of that denomination in 
Fargo. 

William L. Spotts was educated in the public .scliools of Sterling, 
Illinois. In his young manhood he was employed as a salesman for the Luger 
Furniture Company, at Fargo, and continued with that firm for six years. 
He was then with the American Express Comi)any for two years, and 
then entered the employ of the Great Northern Railroad Compan\- as a 
brakeman. He continued with this company for several years, working his 
way up to the position of conductor. He was conductor on this road 
running out of Fargo, for about twelve years: then came to Dilworth, in 
1904, and took a position as conductor on the Northern Pacific railroad, 
a position which he still holds. In 1916 Mr. Spotts was appointed post- 
master of Dilworth but did not give up his railroad position. He still 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1/9 

runs as conductor on the Northern Pacific, while his wife, as assistant 
postmaster, attends to the postoffice. 

In 1892 W. L. Spotts and Minnie J. Phimmer were united in marriage. 
To this union two cliildren have Ijeen horn, William P., who is in the 
L'nited States navy, and Margaret. They are memhers of the Christian 
Science church at Fargo. The Order of Railway Conductors is Mr. Spotts's 
only lodge affiliation. 



HERBERT F. BURRILL. 

Herbert V. Burrill. well-known contractor and Iniilder, of Hawley. 
Clay county, was born in b>amingham, Massachusetts, January 24, 1853. 
He is a son of Jacob and Plachael (Bennett) Burrill and a brother of H. 
R. Burrill, sketches of whom will be found in another part of this volume. 

Herbert F. Burrill received his education m the public schools of Fitz- 
william. New Hampshire. .\s a boy he worked in a woodenware factor\- 
at Fitzwilliam, then worked in a tlouring-mill for two years at Winchendon, 
Worcester county, Massachusetts. He later secured employment in Keene. 
New Hampshire, in a sash-and-door factory, where he remained about four 
vears, at the end of which time he went to Dover, Maine, where he learned 
the trade of bricklayer. In 1878 he came to Minnesota, locating at Hawley, 
and proved up on a homestead in section 28, Keene township; living there 
about ten vears, working at the mason's trade at intervals the meanwhile. 
In 1895 he moved to Hawley, where he has since resided and followed a 
contracting and building business ever since. He has worked on every 
brick building in Hawley, with but one exceptif)n. He helped build the 
first brick roundiiouse for the Northern Pacific railroad at T-'argo, North 
Dakota, in 1879. He also helped build the second brick dwelling house 
in Moorhead. 

On March 19, 1884, Herbert 1*". Burrill was married to Jean AIcDonald. 
a daughter of John McDonald and wife. Her death occurred on Septem- 
ber 22, 1915. She was the mother of five children, namely: Addie. born 
on Tanuary 13, 1S85, who married Ray Williams, h'ebruary [4, 1912, and 
lives in Alberta, Canada: John, July 4. 1887, who is a bricklayer by trade: 
Herbert drover, June 15. 1892, who is in the newspaper business: Mary 
Augusta, October 13, 1895. a"'! Wallace Douglas. March 10, 1903. 

Politically, Mr. Burrill is a Democrat. He was chairman of the first 
lioard of supervisors of Keene township, and later was cliairman of the 



l8o CLAY AND XORMAX COf XTIKS. MINNESOTA. 

l)oard of supervisors of Hawiey township. He also served two terms as 
justice of the peace at Hawiey, and was special census agent for the United 
States in 191 5, covering ten counties. As a public servant he has discharged 

his duties in an aljlc. faithful and highl\ accciitahlc manner. 



BERXH.XRT .\SC1I P.. \CH. 

Bernhart .\schi)ach. one of Xornian county's best-known and most sub- 
stantial pioneer farmers, now living retired at Ada, secretary and treas- 
urer of the Ada Creamery Association and secretary of the Xorman County 
I'air Association and for years actively identified with the development of 
those useful enterprises, is a native of Germany, but has been a resident 
of Norman county since the days of his young manb(»od. Iiaving come <>ul 
to this part of .Minnesota early in the days of the .settlement of this section. 

Born on May 13. 1858, Bernhart .\schbach was reared in his nati\e 
Gernianv and ilu-ie received his schooling and learned the trade of shoe- 
maker. VVlien twenty-one years of age he married and two years later, 
in 1881, he and his wife came to this country and proceeded on out to 
Minnesota and settled in Xorman county, which has been their home ever 
since. That was the \ear in which Norman county was organized as a 
ci\ic unit and the country hereabout was very sparsely settled. Not long 
after his arrival in Ada Mr. .\.-;chbach bimghl a tract of eighty acres in 
AIcDonaldsville township and there established hi> home, improving and 
developing the ])lace and remaining there for eight years, at the end of 
which time he bought a half section of unimproved land in Winchester 
township. On this Litter place Mr. .\schl)ach made his home from 1889 
to 1913, in wliicii latter year he retired from the active labors of the farm 
and moved to .\da. where he and his wife are now living and where the}' 
are very comfortably situated. ^Ir. .\schbach improved his farm of three 
hundred and twenty acres in excellent shape, putting up fine buildings, 
and has there one of the best farm plants in the county. In addition to 
his general farming Mr. Aschbach gave much attention to dairying and 
when the Ada Creamery .Association \\as organized in 1903 was made 
secretary and treasurer of the same and has ever since occupied those posi- 
tions, doing much to help promote the dairy interests of this section of 
the state. He also for years has given his earnest attention to the affairs 
of the Norman Countv Fair Association and is now the secretary of that 



CI.AY AND XORMAX COINTIES, MINNKSOTA. l8l 

useful au(l inlluential urganization. During liis long residence in Winchester 
township Mr. Aschhach gave proper attention to the civic affairs of that 
township and served for some lime as township assessor. He also was 
clerk' of his Ujcal school district an^l did much to advance the work nf 
the school, while in other ways he also did what , he could U> a<lvance the 
common welfare. 

It was in 1879, two years hefore he came to America, that P.ernhart 
Aschhach was united in marriage to Matilda Glaesner. who also was horn 
in Germany, and to that uni(jn eight children have heen horn, Olga, Oscar. 
William, (Jtto, Clara, George, Hilda and Elma, all of whom are living. 
The Aschhachs are nienihers of the Lutheran church and have ever gixen 
their earnest attention [n church work. 



IL'LILS BAKER ASKE. 



One of the large landowners of (lay county is Julius Baker Aske, 
who resides in Moorhead. He was horn in Eillmoi'e county, Minnesota, 
Decemher 13, i^~^, a son of Lars and Martha ( Bersagel ) .\ske. The 
mother also was a native of that cijunty, hut the father was horn in Norwav, 
from which country he came to America when a young man, locating in 
Fillmore county, this state, where he married. Ahout 1882 he moved to 
Norman county, hringing' his family and household effects overland hy ox- 
team and wagon. He located on a homestead of one liundred and si.\t\' 
acres, four miles northwest of Ada, later selling out and huying another 
farm in the same \icinity and there he remainefl a number of years. He 
worked hard developing the raw land and hy ])erseverance Ijecame \erv 
comfortably establisherl, continuing farming during his active life. His 
wife died on the farm in Norman county, hut he died in California. Their 
family consisted of five children, Lewis, Louise, Julius, .\nna and Ella. 

Julius P). .\ske attended- the early-day schools in Norman county, being 
four yeJirs old when his |)arents located there. He assisted his father 
with the work of imjjroving and culti\ating the homestead. ,\s a young 
man he engaged in the ice and dra\age business at ,\da, then followed the 
saloon business two vears, after which he spent one \eru- in Twin Valley, 
in the same liusiness ; then came to Moorhead and continued in that line 
until 1906. since which year he has been interested in a saloon in .Min- 
neapolis. In 19 If) he started a pool hall and soft-drink business at his 



l82 CLAY AXD NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

old Stand next to the north bridge in Mnorhead. He owns six hundred 
acres of vahtable land in Clay county, and four hundred and twenty acres 
in Cass county, over the river in Xorth Dakota. Most of Mr. Aske's time 
during the crop seasons is taken up with the management of his land. He 
carries on general farming on a large scale. 

Mr. Aske was married in 1903 to Rosella Schill. a native of Mariim 
township. Norman county, and a daughter of Lambert Schill and wife. 
To this union three children have been born. Jerome. Egienia and W'endal. 
Politically, Mr. Aske is a Republican. Fraternally, he belongs to the Improved 
Order of Red Men and to the I'ratern.al Order of Eagles. 



OLE MARTFXSOX. 



(31e Martinson was Ijorn in Xorway. Januar\- 19. 1847, ^ son of Martin 
Anderson and Olava Jerswald, both natives of Xorway, where they lived 
their entire life, the father being a farmer. Their children were: Erick, 
Uergette, .Vnna, Xickolena, Karlen Marie, Ole and Olena. 

Ole Martinson was educated in the schools of Norway. He worked on 
his father's farm during the summer season, and in the winter engaged 
in the business of cod fishing which was a common and remunerative voca- 
tion of the people in that community. With a view of seeking a larger 
opportunity for a livelihood, he followed the foo^teps of many others of 
liis neighborhood and nationality and came to America in 1872. He landed 
in Xew York, May 2T,, of that year, and came directly to Minnesota, locat- 
ing first in St. Peter, Xicollet county, where he remained for three years. He 
then went to ^Minneapolis, where he found employment for about seven years 
in a planing mill. In 1882 he came to Moorhead, Minnesota, where he 
has made his home since that time. For more than twenty years Mr. 
Martinson was engaged in the mercantile business here, conducting a grocery 
and crockery store, but in 1904 he sold this store and retired from business. 

Mr. Martinson was one of the organizers of the First State Bank of 
IMoorhead, and ser\ed as vice-president of this institution for several years. 
He finally sold liis interest in the bank and retired from official connection 
\vith this institution. For about sixteen years he has been a stockholder 
in the Moorhead Xational Bank and is at present one of the directors of 
this bank. ]\Ir. Martinson is also interested in farming. He is the owner 
of a half section of land in Kurtz township. Clay county. Minnesota, a 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 183 

tract of land well-adapted for general fanninq- and stock raising, in whicli 
Air. Martinson is largely engaged. 

The maiden name of Mr. Martinson'.s wife is Christine Otto. Three 
children have been born to them: Mollie, who is at the head of the piano 
department in Concordia College: Eric and Oscar. Mr. Martinson and 
family are members of Trinity chnrch, Moorhead, Mr. Martinson being 
one of the organizers and charter members of this church, of which he was 
the first church treasurer. He has served several terms as school director 
in Moorhead. 

Eric Martinson, son of O. Martinson, was born in Moorhead, Minne- 
sota, October ii, 1888, and was educated in the public schools of that citv. 
He afterward attended the North Dakota Agricultural College, from which 
he graduated as a civil engineer in 19 12. For the first three years after 
graduating he was employed in engineering work in St. Paul, Minnesot;i. 
In 1915 he returned to Moorhead and was appointed district engineer of 
Clay county, which position he holds at present. He is a member of the 
Norwegian Lutheran church, and a member of the Commercial Club of 
Moorhead. 



CLARENCE I. EVENSON. 

Clarence I. Evensnn was born in Moorhead, January 17. 1890. a 
son of Even and Olena (Anderson) Evenson, both natives of Norway. 
The father came to America in the spring of 1882 and located first in 
Decorah, Iowa, where he remained for four years, at the end of which 
period he came to Moorhead, Minnesota, and has since made this his home. 
He is the father of three children: Alvina E., Clarence I., subject of this 
sketch, and Ethel. His church relationship is with the Norwegian Lutheran 
church, at Moorhead. 

C. I. Evenson was educated in the public schools of Moorhead, and 
found employment, as a liny, in working for a grocery firm in Moorhead, 
delivering groceries. Later he held the position of a clerk in the same store 
and was thus employed for eight years. On November 9, 1912, he started 
in the grocerv business for himself and has continued in this enterprise 
since. He handles an extensive general grocery line and has established a 
good trade in the town and surrounding country. 

Mr. Evenson is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church, in the 
afifairs of which he takes a deep and consistent interest. He is fraternally 



]84 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

atililiated witli the local lodges of the Modern Woodmen of America. Ini- 
jM-oved Order of Red Men. Degree of Honor, the Royal League and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is president of the Moorhead 
Retail Merchants Association and is a member of the board of directors 
of the State Retail Merchants .\ss(Kiation. Mr. Evenson is also keenly 
alive to the civic progress of his comnnmity and was elected a membei- m' 
the city council in January of 1917. 



CHAUl.l'.S L.\MB. SK. 

Charles Lamb. Sr., the hrst permanent settler in Llkton township. Clay 
county, one of the organizers of that township and for twenty-four years a 
member of the board of supervisors of the same and for ten years town- 
ship clerk, a substantial landowner and retired farmer, who is noW varying 
his residence between his tine farm home in l-llkton township and his town 
house in Baker, is a native of Scotland, but has been a resident of Minnesota 
since 187^. one of the early residents of the Red River country and one of 
the most influential pioneers of the section in which he settled back in the 
days of the beginning of the development of this region. He was liorn in 
b'orfarshire. Scotland, April 30. 1844, son of John and Llizabeth Lamb, also 
natives of Scotland, the former of whom died there many years ago and 
the latter of whom came to this country with her younger son, the late John 
Lamb, a meuKnial sketch of whom is ]>resented elsewhere in this volume, 
in 1873, '^'^'l li\ed in Becker count\. this state, until ai)out 1878, w'hen she 
homesteaded a quarter section in Rlkton township. Clay county, where sin- 
spent the remainder of her life, making her home with her son William and 
family. That quarter section is now owned by her grandson, Charles Lamb. 
son of the subject of this sketch, whom she reared and who is now making 
his home there. Of the chiklren born to the senior John Lamb and his wife, 
the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being 
David. .\nn. Magdaline. Charles, James. John, Alexander, Marv, lane and 
William. 

Reared on the h(jme farm in his native Forfarshire, Charles Lamb there 
grew to manhood and was married. In 1872 he came to the United States 
with his famil}' and proceeded on out to Minnesota, settling in Becker county, 
which not long before had been opened for settlement, and there made his 
home for five years, or until 1877. when he moved over into Clav countv 




CHARLES LAMB. SR. 



THP NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

astor. LENes. 



CLAY AND NOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 85 

and hume:^teade(I a quarter of a section of land in what later came to be 
organized as Elkton township, tiie first permanent settler in th.it township. 
At the same time he bought the tree-claim right to an adjoinin.g quarter sec- 
tion, the original claimant having become discouraged and willing to dis- 
pose of his claim, and later bought an adjoining tract of one hundred acres 
of railroad land, thus making him a i)!ace of four hundred and twenty acres, 
which he gradually improved and which he still owns, now one of the most 
valuable farms in the townshi]). As the premier pioneer of that section of 
the county. Air. Lauib look an active part in the organization of the town- 
shij) when increasing settlement jiresently necessitated the organization of 
the community for civil purposes, and was elected a member of the first board 
of township supervisors, a position he occupied for twent}-four years and 
in the performance of the duties of which he did much for the development 
of the substantial interests of Elkton township and of the community in 
general. For ten years he also served as clerk of the tcnvnship and likewise 
helped to organize his home school district, the first school district in the. 
townshi]). He also was a prominent factor in the organization of the first 
religious congregation in that community and was a charter memlier of the 
Presbyterian church, which at first conducted services in the school build- 
ing, but later erected a house of worshij:) at Baker, of which congregation Mr. 
Lamb is still an active member. During the days of the Good Templar 
crusade in this countrv Mr. I.amb helped organize a branch of the (lood 
Templars in his community and was active in the work of the same, the 
meetings being held in the school house, which was the general social 
center of the communit\- in those days. Mr. Lainb improved and developed 
his land in fine shape and in (hie time had an excellent farm plant there, con- 
timiing activelv engaged in farming and stock raising until his retirement, 
since which time he has divided his time between his town house in Baker 
and the farm. In addition to his extensive farining interests, Mr. Lamb is 
the owner of a tidy bit of real estate in Baker and is quite well circiunstanced. 
Mr. Lamb has been twice married. In Scotland he married Jessie 
Taylor, who also was born in i-'orfarshire and who died some years after 
the family settled in Clay county. To that union were born seven children, 
Mary, David .\., John, Jennie, t'harles, James fdecea.sed). and Jessie 
(deceased). Some time after the death of the mother of these children. 
Mr. Lamb married, in Clav countw F.lizabeth Stewart, also now deceased, 
who was born in Scotland and who came to Minnesota with iier parents, 
Charles and Elizabeth Stewart, natives of Scotland, in 1S77. the family 



1 86 CLAY AXD NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

.-ettling- on a homestead farm of one lumdred and sixty acres in section 8 
of Elkton township. Clay county. To this second union seven children were 
horn, Elizabeth. Fred. Mabel, Ronald and three who died younf,^ As one 
of the pioneers of Clay county Mr. Lamb has a remarkable fund of 
reminiscences relating- to the early days of the settlement of this region and 
his stories of pioneer days are interesting and informative. He has been a 
witness to and a participant in the development of Elkton township and of 
the Baker neighborhood since the days of the very beginning of a social 
order therealxjut and has done well his part in that development. 



O. N. IVERSOX. 



O. N. Iversoii, the present postmaster at Baker, where he is an enter- 
prising merchant, is well known in the southern part of Clay count}', although 
he is but a young man. He was born in Tansem township, this county, 
January 9. 1887, a son of S. O. and Anna (Herbranson) Iverson, the 
father a native of Dakota county, Minnesota, and the mother, of Wisconsin. 
About 1880, the father came to Clay county, Minnesota, and took up a 
homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Tansem township. He de- 
veloped the raw land into a good farm and there he has since resided. He 
put all the buildings and improvements on the place, and, prospering through 
hard work and good management, has added to his original holdings until 
he now owns three hundred and twenty acres of excellent land, and is one 
of the leading general farmers and stock raisers of his township. To S. O. 
Iverson and wife eight children have been lx)rn, as follow : O. X., of this 
sketch : Theodore. Emma. Cora. George. Xettie, Melvin and Alexander. 
S. O. Iverson and wife belong to the Xorwegian Lutheran church. He has 
Ijeen active in local public affairs for many years, serving on the board for 
Tansem township for al)out fifteen years, and as a member of the school 
board ten or twelve years. 

O. N. Iverson grew to manhood on the home farm, and he received 
his education in the rural schools of Tansem township. When seventeen 
Acars old. he began clerking for Thompson Felde & Company of Barnes- 
ville. this county, remaining in that capacity about four years, giving satis- 
faction in every respect, for he was alert, courteous and faithful. He then 
'spent two years in Adams county. Xorth Dakota, on a homestead of one 
hundred and sixty acres. He left there in the spring of 1910 and came 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 187 

to Baker, Clay county, Minnesota, where he worked for Possehl Brothers 
in tlieir store for two years, giving them excellent service, for he had 
fdnnerly mastered the various phases of the mercantile business. In 1912, 
lie launched out in business for himself, starting a general grocery store 
at Baker, where he has built up a large trade and carries an extensive stock 
of staple .-md fancy groceries. In 1917 he and his brother, Theodore, who is 
unmarried, bought the implement business of H. C. Possehl and N. C. 
Xoice and this the\- are operating with gratifying results, their trade with 
the surri3unding country for many miles being on the upward trend. 

On December 8, 19 14, O. X. Iverson was appointed postmaster at 
Baker and has since been discharging his duties in a manner acceptaljle t'> 
the people of this vicinity and to the postoffice department. 

Mr. Iverson was married in 1912 to Clara Butenhoff, a daughter of 
August Butenhoff and wife. Two children have been born to ^Ir. and 
Mrs. Iverson. namelx- : Francelia and Edward. Mr. and Mrs. Iverson be- 
long to the English Lutheran church at Barnesville. in the affairs of which 
thev have a devout and conscientious interest. 



CHARLES E. COLBY. 



Charles E. Colby, ecHtoi and publisher of the Banicsz'illc Headlight at 
Barnesville, and former president of the Clay County Editorial Associa- 
tili)ii, is a nati\e son of Minnesota and has spent all his life in this state, 
witli the exception of four \'ears spent in the postoffice service in South 
Dakota back in the eighties. He was born on a pioneer farm in Plain- 
view township, in Wabasha county, but was reared and educated at Glencoe, 
where he finished the high school course : later becoming a student in the 
Archibald Business Cnlle.ge at Minneapolis. His father, George H. Colby, 
a native of Xew York stale and a veteran of the Civil War, lived on his 
farm in McLeod countv until his retirement and removal to Hector, where 
his last days were spent. 

.\t the age of thirteen years, Charles E. Colby began his ai)prenticeship 
in "'the art preservative of all arts," and before he entered the business col- 
lege had become a proficient printer, thoroughly familiar with the details of 
that important trade, and was engaged working at that trade until 1884, 
when he went to Groton. South Dakota, where he spent the ensuing four 
\ti-Ar< as a clerk in the postoffice and as mailing clerk in the railway post- 



l88 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

office at that jjlace. In 1888 Mr. Colby returned to Glencoe und there bought 
the plant of the Enterprise and was editor and manager of that paper for 
two years, at the end of which time he scjld the Enterprise and moved to 
Duluth, where he established a jobiirinting- ])lam and was there engaged in 
the jolj-printing business until i8()_^. In the meantime Mr. Colby had mar- 
ried at Duluth and in 1893 he mo\ ed with his family to (Irand Rapids, thi- 
state, where he entered upon the position of foreman of the plant of the 
Magnet and where he remained until his removal to Barnesville, which has 
ever since been his place of residence. It was in January, 1897, that Mr. 
Colliy established the Rarnesville Record, the lirst number of which \\a.'~ 
dated January 2S. Mr. Colby started the Record as a stanch supporter of 
the principles of the Republican party and continued to publish the same 
until he sold the i)aper to the P.arnesville Record-Review Company in 1903, 
after which, for two years, he acted as local agent for the Money-Weight 
Scale Company, of Toronto. Mr. Colby then returned to the print shop and 
took uj) the duties of foreman of the plant of the Barncsz'ille Rccord-Rei'iezv. 
Two years later he was made manager of the Record-Reinciv and continued 
in that position nnlil 11)13. in which year he established his present news- 
paper, the Baniesz'ille lleadiight. .\t the same time he bought the plant 
of the Moorhead Independent and on July 18, 1913, merged that paper with 
the Headlight, which has ever since been published under that name, the pub- 
lishing linn being Colby Brothers. The BaruesviUe Headlight is well 
ei[uipped mechanically, not only for ne\\si)aper work but for general job 
printing, the efiuipment including a linotype machine and all the up-t<i-date 
appliances for the successful operation of a modern ()rinting ])lant. Mr. 
Colby is widely known in newspaper circles throughout this part of the 
state and for three years or more served as president of the Claj' County 
Editorial .As.sociation, in the affairs of which he takes a warm interest. 

It was while living at Duluth that Charles ]•.. CoUiy was united in 
marriage to Anna Termath, also natives of Minnesota, born in the village 
of LeSuenr, in LeSueur county, of German descent, though her parents 
both were of American birth. Mr. and Mrs. Colby have two sons, Dana 
T. and Everett C, the latter of whom is associated with his father in tlie 
publication of the Barnes^c'ille Headlight, an energetic and progressive voung 
newspaper man. Dana T. Colby also is engaged in newspaper work, which 
has been his life-long vocation, and is now coiinected with the Fargo (North 
Dakota) Daily Eornin. He received his early training in new.spaper work 
under the able direction of his father and then for some time was emploved 
on the force of the Courier-Neivs at Fargo, later going to the Fargo Eonini 



CLAY AND NOKMAK COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. " 189 

and thence to the Capital at Jamestown. North Dakota, later to tlie Bis- 

inark Tribune and then returning to the Forum, wliere lie holds an editorial 
chair. 



OLE E. REIRSGORD. 



Ole E. Reirsgord was horn, July 2T,, 1875, in Norway, a son of Evan 
Gury (Ellingson) Reirsgord. hoth natives of Norway, the former l)eing 
horn, Septemher 4, 1851, and the latter, January i, 1852. The father came 
to America in 1875 and located in Houston county, Minnesota, his wife and 
child coming the following \'ear. In 1877, Evan Reirsgord came to Clay 
county and legated a tree claim of one hundred and sixty acres in Ulen 
township, section 10, where he lived two years and then sold the impro\e- 
ments to Robert Syverson. He then removed to another location in Hagen 
township, six miles west, taking a homestead of one hundred and sixty 
acres. He lived on this for about sixteen years and then sold out and 
removed to Thief River h'alls, Minnesota, where he li\ed for four years. 
Disposing of this ])lace, he removed to Canada, where he still lives. His 
first wife died in ]888, and four years later he married Julia Halvorson, 
who died in 1898. He was the father of six children by his first wife: 
Ole 1'^., the subject of this review; .\nnie, Ella, Julius. Olof and Carrie; and 
of four children by his second wife: Edward, Gilbert. P>ert, and Hilman. 
He was a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church. 

O. E. Reir.sgord was educated in the puhhc schools of Hagen township, 
and in the city .schools of Moorhead which he attended about three winters. 
In the spring of 1893, he be.gan teaching school in Clay county, continuing 
in this profession every sjiring and fall until the spring of 1898. In the 
winter and spring of 1894, he attended Concordia College at Moorhead, 
where he completed a business course, graduating from that institution. In 
the spring of 1898, he iiought the plant of the Ulcn Union, took jiossession 
as sole proprietor, Mrw 17. of that year, and has been editor and publisher 
of the same since that date. 

Air. Reirsgord was postmaster of Lien from June, 1909, to June, igi.V 
lie is the present chairman of the Republican central committee of Clay 
county, and president of the public school lioard. He has served as presi- 
dent of the village council, villa.ge recorder and justice of the jieace. lb- 
held all these official positifms before he became postmaster. 

On June 3, i8()7, O. r:. Reirsgord and Clara Bjerke, a daughter d' 



igO CLAY AXD XORMAN COUXTIKS. MINNESOTA. 

Nels and Catherine Bjerke, were united in jnarria,<;c. They have seven 
children: Alice, Erwin, Cora, Lila, Reuben. .Milton and May. Tlicy are 
members of the Lutheran church. Mr. Reirsgord is at present superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school and takes a jironiinent part in all church 
activities. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd I'ellow^ and 
of the Modern \\"oodmen of America. 



OLE O. EGGE. 



Ole O. Egge. a well-to-do and prominent farmer and owner of a 
several tracts of land in HumI)oldt township. Clay county, director on the 
township school board and on the township board and otherwise active in 
public affairs, was bom in the kingdom of Xorway. .March i, iSf>i. i)ut 
has been living in this country since 1884, having settled in Clay county in 
.\pril of that year. He is the son of Ole Hanson and Carrie (Dahlen) Egge, 
also born in Norway and who lived and died in that country. 

Ole Hanson Egge was educated in the schools of Xorway where he 
was a farmer liy occupation and continued thus engaged for the remainder 
of his active life, his death occurring in his native land in 1878. Ole H. 
Egge was twice marrieil, his lirst__wife being Goro Dahlen, to whom he was 
married alxnit i8j8. and to that union the following children were born: 
Hans, who was born in i8.:;o and died in Xorway at the age of eighty-seven 
vears: Paul: .Anders and .\nn.i. By his second marriage, in 1846, to Carrie 
Dahlen he was the father of four children, namely: Ole O., the subject of 
this .sketch; Goro, Bertha Marie and Carrie. Mr.s. Carrie (Dahlen) Egge 
died in Xorway in 1890. Ole H. Egge was a member of the Norwegian 
T,utheran church. 

Ole O. Egge was educated in the schools of Xorway and was reared 
on his father's farm, where he assisted in the labors of the same. His father 
died when he was se\enteen years old. and for six years thereafter, or until 
1884 when he immigrated to this country, he continued to remain oti the 
old home farm and help the other members of the family. Upon his arrival 
in Clav county, Mr. Egge purchased eighty acres of land, part of his present 
farm, and, as he prospered in his farming operations, he made further pur- 
chases and now has a tract of five hundred and eighty acres of choice land' 
in section 12, Humboldt township, and has additional land in sections i 
and II, in the same township. He carries on general fanning according to 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 (J I 

modern methods of agriculture and is very successful. His place is well 
improved with new buildings and dwelling house, and he is accounted 
one of the substantial and progressive farmers of this section of the county. 
On November 7, 1894, at Pelican Rapids, Minnesota, Ole O. Egge 
was united in marriage to Anna Egge, who was born in Norway in 1861 
and came to America in 1884, ten years before the date of her marriage. 
To this union the following children have been born : Clara, Oscar, Olga 
(deceased), Gena and Henry. The Egge family are members of the 
Norwegian Lutheran church and are warmly interested in all its good 
works, and to the congregation of the church Mr. Egge has been secretary 
for the past twenty-three A'cars. He takes a good citizen's interest in the 
civic and general affairs of the township and has served as a member of 
district school board No. 45 for upwards of twenty-four years. He has 
rendered further pul)lic service through his connection with the township 
board, at the deliberations of which he has been a constant attendant for 
the long period of eighteen years. In many other directions he has given 
evidence of a warm interest in ,ill matters tending toward the common 
good of the community. 



PETER B. MOORE. 



Peter B. Moore was born in Becker county, Minnesota, November 10, 
1878, a son of Peter and Kari (Oppen) Moore, natives of Norway, who 
came to America in 1872 and located in Becker county, Minnesota, where 
they took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres of government 
land in Cuba township, of that county. Here they built a home, improved 
the land, and continued to live until Peter Moore's death in 1881. His 
wife is still living. There were seven children in this family: Christina,. 
Bertha, Andrew, Atlanta, who was born on the .\tlantic cjcean on their 
way to this country: Ellick, Hans and Peter B. 'I'lie father was an active 
member of the Norwegian Lutheran church. 

Peter B. Moore was educated in the public schools of Cuba township. 
Baker county, and worked on the farm in his early years. In the spring of 
1897, he came to Ulen. Clay county, and was employed as a clerk in the 
store of Robert Hanson for two years. He was afterward employed for 
three years as a clerk for L. V. Herreid, and then with the Ulen Mercantile- 
Company until 1910, in which year, Mr. Moore, in partnership with (iill 
Fevig, bought out this company and assumed full control of the busuiess 



192 CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIKS. MINXKSOTA. 

and liave continued thus e\er since. They are <;;eneral niercliaiidise dealers 
and have also a potato warehouse business in connection with their store. 

In 1902, Peter B. Moore and Helma Fe\ig were united in marriage, 
and three children ha\e been born to this union: Ruby. T'ern and Ray. 
Mr. Moore is a member of the United Lutheran church, and also a member 
of the Modern \\'oodmen of .\merica. 



SMITH WESLEY McEVERS. 

Smith Wesley AlcEvers. former member of the board of supervisors of 
I'^lmwood township, Cla\- county, former assessor of that township and the 
proprietor of a fme farm of si.\ hundred and thirtv-.sevcn acres in the 
vicinity of Baker, where lie has made his home since his marriage in 1883. 
is a native of the Dominion of Canada, but has been a resident of Minnesota 
since he was twenty-five years of age. He was horn on a farm in the prov- 
ince of Ontario in 1.S55. <on of Hiram and b'lizabeth (Grieves) McEvers, 
the former Of whom also was born in C)ntari(j and the latter in Sc(jtland. 
whose last days were spent on their well-kept farm in Ontario. Hiram 
McExers and wife were the parents of eleven children, Jane, John, Elizabeth. 
Mary Ann. Hiram, William. Stephen. Benjamin, Emily. James and Smith 
W'esley. all of whom are now deceased sa\e the three last named. 

Reared on the liome farm in Ontario, Smith W. McEvers received his 
schooling in the .schools of his Ikmuc neighborhood and rerrmined there until 
he was twenty-five years of age. when, in 1880, he came down into the States 
and located at St. Paul, where for three years he was employed in the estab- 
lishment of E. B. Stickney & Company. In iSHt, he married and, seeking 
a place to establish a permanent home, came up into the Red River country 
and bought die farm on which he is now living, in ICImwood township. Clay 
county, and has ever since made his home there, having created there one 
of the liest farm jilanis in that part of the county. ^Mr. McEvers has a well- 
improved place of six hundred and thirty-seven acres, on which he is en- 
gaged in general farming, potato raising and stock raising, making a spe- 
cialty of his fine Percheron horses, and has done'well in his operations. From 
the time of die l)eginning of liis residence there, Mr. McEvers has given a 
.good citizen's attention to local civic attairs and has served his township 
;is a member of the board of supervisors and as assessor. 

In 1883, the year in which he settled in Clav countv. Sniidi W'. McEvers 



v. 




THE NEW YORK 1 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA, 1 93 

was united in marriage to Bessie Larson, who was born in the kingdom of 
X(irw;iy and who had come to tlie United States in 1866, when but a small 
child, with her parents. Andrew and ^Marian Dorothy (Halverson) Larson, 
the family settling in Wisconsin, where Andrew Larson and his wife spent 
the remainder of their lives. They were the parents of five children, those 
besides Mrs. McRvers being Mar\-. Lars. Hans and Josephine. Of these 
children but two are now living. Mrs. McEvers and her brother Lars. Mr. 
and Mrs. McEvers have five children. Charles A., George W., Joseph S., 
Stephen and Daniel L., all of whom are living. The family are members of 
the Presbyterian church and take an interested part in church work and in 
the general good wdrks and social activities of the neighborhood, helpful in 
man\- ways in promoting movements having to do with the advancement of 
the common welfare. 



O. C. MARTINSON. 



O. C. Martinson was born in Moorhead, Minnesota, December 27, 1890, 
a son of O. Martinson, who was a native of Norway, born on January 19, 
1847. 

O. C. Martinson was educated in the public schools of Moorhead, and 
after the completion of his elementary studies, he attended Concordia col- 
lege, at Moorhead. and graduated from that institution in 1909. Later he 
engaged in business, and with .i view of fitting himself for the profession 
of optometrist, he attended an optical school, at Minneapolis, where he took 
a full course of instruction, passed the required examination and received 
a certificate as a registered optometrist in the state of Minnesota. 

In 191 1 O. C. Martinson, associated with j. Ouale. purchased 
the jewelry store of Sweningsen & Company, in Moorhead. and engaged in 
that business under the firm name of Quale & Martinson. In March, 1916, 
.Mr. .Martinson purchased his partner's interest and has since conducted 
the business alone. He carries a full line of jewelry and optical goods and 
has a good trade among the substantial people of the town and county. 

Mr. Martinson is a member of the Trinity church of Moorhead, and 
:i member of the church quartette. He is a baritone singer and is prom- 
inent in musical circles. Mr. Martinson is not married and makes his home 
with his parents. 
(13a) 



194 CLAV AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

JOHX LUTHI. 

John Lutiii. a well-known and substantial farmer, li\in^- in Haw ley 
township, the owner of a (luarter-section of prime land and actively engaged 
in farming- oiierations, is a native of the republic of Switzerland, but has 
been living in this country since he was seventeen years old, having immi- 
grated from his native land in 1886. He was born in June, 1869, a son of 
Christ L. and .\nna liarbara 1 l-'iman ) l.uthi. who came to the I'niled States 
in 1891. 

Christ L, Luthi was born in Switzerland in 1830, and in that countr\- 
he was educated and brought uj) to the life of a fanner. He was marrieil 
in his native land and immigrated to .\merica in 1891, his son. John, the 
subject of this sketch having preceded him some five years before. He 
continued to follow fanning after coming here, and is now living practicalb 
retired in the state of Iowa. His wife. .\nna iJarljara FZiman, was born 
in 1838, also a natixe of Switzerland, and came witli lier husband to this 
country in 1891 and is now living in Iowa. Christ Luthi and wife are 
the parents of the following children: Charlie, iMed, .\lbcrt, .\nna, Louisa. 
Lena and John. During their active lifetime the parents were inlluential 
residents of the district in which they lived and were helpful in promoting 
all good causes for the benefit of the communitv. 

John Luthi was educated under the excellent .school system that pre- 
vails in Switzerland, and, on coming to this country in 1886, he commenced 
to work on farms and came to Clay county in 1898, after his marriage in 
the previous year. He entered into occupation of his present farm in 1903 
and now is the o\\ ner of a (|uarter section of choice land in section 9, Haw- 
ley township. Here he is engaged in general farming and since the com- 
mencement of his agricultural operations he has been most successful, his 
place Ijeing well improved and his farming methods being modern in all 
particulars. He sets out a portion oi his holding, exclusivelv. to the culti- 
vation of potatoes. 

In 1897, John Luthi was united in marriage to Hermina Sinkler, a 
native of Germany, who was born in that country in Ajiril, 1877, and who 
has been living in this country since she was si.x years old. Mr. and .Mrs. 
Luthi are the parents of eleven children, as follow: Rosie. who is inarrieil: 
Minnie. Loui.sa, Lena, Elau. John, Freda. George, Clara. Margaret and 
A'label. Mr. Luthi takes a good citizen's interest in all community affairs, 
and for years has been giving attention to the cause of education, serving 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I (J5 

as treasurer of the t(nvnship sdiool Ijoarcl. His efforts are not confined 
to that form of puljlic usefuhiess. and in many other wavs he has given 
of his time and enert,^- to furtlier the welfare of the cuinniunitv. 



FRAXK \-. SVENSON. 



Frani< \'. Svenson. son of Sven Anderson and Ehia (Nelson) Svenson, 
and a native of Sweden, as were his father and mother, was horn. April 5. 
1882. His father still lives in Sweden and follows the occupation of a 
farmer, the ^uhject of this sketch hein.g- the only child in this family. 

i-'rank \'. Svenson was eflucated in the puhlic schools of Sweden and 
s])ent his early manhocjd in werkint;- with his father on the farm. In 11)04 
he came to America and located at Hitterdal. Clay county, Minnesota. He 
found emplo\nient in carpenter work and followed that trade until 1912. He 
then hecaniL- niana,t;er of the Wilcox Lumber Company at Hitterdal, and 
has been thus enc^a^ed since that time. He is not married. 



C. T. KCKMANN. 



C. J. Eckmann. he.id nt the C. J. Eckmann Euniher Company at Hen- 
drum, present treasurer of the \illa.ge of Hendrum and one of the best- 
known and most wideawake business men in Xorman county, is a native 
of the king-dom of Norway, but has been a resident nf Minnesota fin- 
more than a quarter of a century, having li\ed at Hendrum e\'er since he 
was twenty-five years of age. He was born in the city of Stavanger. on 
the southwest coast of Norway, October 14. 1866, son of Ca])t. Carsten 
and Malena (Johnson) Eckmann, both of whom were born in that same 
city, the former of whom is now living in the xillage of fTendrum and 
the latter of whom spent her last days there. 

Capt. Carsten Eckmann grew uj^ to the life of the sea and became the 
captain of a merchant vessel, which he sailed for \ears, or until he tired 
of the sea and. in 1891, came to the United States with his family, pro- 
ceeding on out t<i Minnesota and coming on up here into the Red River 
valley and locating in Norman county. He bought a farm of four hundred 
acres one-half mile east of the village of Hendrum and there made his 



]g6 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

home for ten years, or until 1901. when lie sold his farm and retired, 
moving to the village of Hendruni, where he still lives, one of the sub- 
stantial citizens of that village. His wife died there nn January 10, 1913. 
They were the parents of four children, of whom the sul)ject of this sketch 
was the last-horn, the others being Hans, who lives in England: Caia. who 
lives at Halstad, and Albert M.. of Hendruni. 

C. T- Kckniann grew uj) among seafaring folk in Ins native Stav- 
anger and upon completing his schooling took to the sea. remaining on 
liis father's ves.sel until he became a thoroughly (pialified navigator and 
at the age of twent\' ])assed the official examination and was commissioned 
a ship's officer. He Cdiilinued a seafaring life until i8(,ii, when he came 
to this countrv with his parents and located in Xorman county, shortly 
afterward being employed by the Imiierial Elexator Company as that com- 
pany's local grain buyer at Hendruni. In 1904 he was transferred by that 
company from the elevator U> the lumber yard it alM) controlled at Hen- 
drum and was thus engaged as manager of the lumjjer yard when, in 1907. 
the same was sold to the Stenerson Brothers Lumber Compan\-. Mr. Eck- 
niann remained in the employ of the latter conipaiix' until in i'"ebruary, 
i()i5. when he bought the lumber yard from Stenerson Brothers and has 
since conducted the lumber business, under the firm style of the C. J. Eck- 
mann Lumber Company. Mr. I'A-kmann has long been regarded as one of 
the leading lumber men of this \rdrt of the state and is doing very well in 
his operations. He gives close attention to the general business affairs of 
the village and is now the treasurer of the local Commercial Club. Ever 
since locating at Hendruni he has given a good citizen's attention to Ipcal 
ci\ic affairs, has served as recorder of the village and is now treasurer 
of the village, secretary and treasurer of the Hendruni fire department 
and director of school district Xo. i, giving to his various public duties 
his most intelligent attention. 

On October 10. iS()4. C. j. bx-kmann was unitetl in marriage to Julia 
C. Seines and to this union seven children have been born, Chester, Carsten. 
Lillie. Millard, Vivian, one who died in infancy, and Lillie, who died at 
the age of two years and nine months. Mr. and Mrs. Eckmann are meni- 
liers of the Cnited laitheran church and take a proper part in the various 
beneficences of the same, as well as in the general social activities of the 
coniniunitv in which they li\e. heljiful in promoting all worthy causes there- 
about. Mr. Ecknianu is a member of the local lodge of the Indei)endent 
Order of P'oresters and is financial secretary of the same. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I97 

OLE O. ERICKSON. 

One of the liest known and most successful farmers and stockmen 
of the northeastern part of Clay county is Ole O. Erickson, of Ulen town- 
ship. He was horn in Filhnore county, Alinnesota, Marcli 24, 1864. a son 
of Ole and Christie ( Christophersdatter) Erickson, hoth natives of Nor- 
way, from which country they came directly to \^'isconsin about 1830. 
After remaining there about two years, thev came on to Fillmore counlw 
^Minnesota, driving an ox-team to a co\'ered wagon, the trip requiring nearl}- 
a rnonth. The father took up a homestead of one hundred and si.xty 
acres in I''illmore ccjuntv. six miles west of Rushford. which land he improved 
into a good farm, erected such outbuildings as his needs re(|uired and a 
comfortable residence. There he and his wife spent the rest of their li\c-, 
the mother reaching an advanced age. dying in January, iqi/. They were 
among the earliest pioneers of that county, there being only five other 
families in that part of the county when the}' went there. Eight children 
w ere born to Ole and Christie Erickson, namely : Christopher and Erick-. 
both deceased; Turena, Ole O., of this sketcli; Helge, Mar)-, Bengt and 
Helen. 

Ole O. Erickson, of this re\"iew, grew to manhood on the home farm 
in Fillmore county, \\here he received a limited education in the early-da\- 
schools. He remained in his native community until 1890. when he came 
to Clay count}' and worked in the \icinity of Ulen two years. He then 
married and began farming for himself, buying forty acres in section 2-j. 
L'len township, which was all in timber and \\ithout Iniildings. The [lari 
of his land which he cleared he put under culti\atioii. He also erected 
.suitable buildings and continued to reside there until March, 191 1. when 
he moved to the fann he now occupies, just across the road from his origi- 
nal forty, which contains one hundred and sixty acres. He added an eight}- 
acre tract to his original forty many years ago, and all this he sold upon 
mox'ing to his present farm. He has a we!I-impro\'ed and prijducti\'e place, 
the improvements having been made b}' Helge Klemmetson, his brother- 
in-law, of whom he bought the farm. .Mr. Klemmetson took the land up 
as a homestead in 1879. Mr. Erickson has been very successful as a general 
farmer and stock raiser, breeds full-blooded Holstein cattle and is a deaU'r 
in all kinds of live stock, of which he is an excellent judge. 

.Mr. Erickson was married on May 28, 1892, to Karen Klemmet,-on, 
who was born in Xorwav, a daughter of Klemmet and Christie (Halvorsdat- 



HjH CLAY AND NORM AN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

ter) Lia. both natives of Norway, where tliey grew up and married and 
there the fatlier died a few montlis before his <hiughter Karen was Ijorn. 
The widow siibsequentl\- brought fwi; rhilchen to America, three weeks 
after her daughter's liirtb. coming' (hrectlv to Houston county. .Minnesota, 
and locating in Spring (iro\e townshiij. where lier son I lel.ge had preceded 
her l)v one \ear. About iHjg, Helge Klenimetson came to Clay county 
and ,1 \-ear later his mother i()ine<l him here, bringing the rest of her chil- 
dren. She homesteaded nne hundred and sixty acres of prairie laiul in 
section 14, L'len township, and nn this she erected Iniildings and resided 
for seven years. .\t the end of this time she sold out and built a small 
house on the farm of her son, Helge. and there li\ed for some time, but 
her death occurred in the home where the subject of tiiis sketch now resides. 
Her death occurred in i<;i5 at the unusual age of eighty-nine years. She 
was the nu)ther of the following children: Helge, Ingeborg, Bertha, 
deceased; Andrie. lulling. Andrew and Karen. The Klenimetson frunily 
heljied organize the lirst church at l^'len. 

To Mr. and .Mrs. b'rickson four children, all li\ing at this lime, were 
born, namely: Clara Olena. l"'dva Castelia, Clifford (Oliver, and .Mice 
llehena. Mr. I'lricksou is a member of the Lutheran church, j'olitically. 
he i> an inile]>endent. 



lOHX MrCOCGH. 



The late julin Mr(iciugh. first postmaster of the village of Downer, a 
pinneer home-^teader of that neighborhood, formerly chairman of the board 
<if supervisors of Elklcin township, for years a representative of the railroad 
ciimpany's interests at Downer and a substantial landowner in the vicinity 
i>\ that \'illagc and one of the bestd<nown men in Clay county, was a native 
tif the Dominion f)f Canada, but had been a resident of Clay county since 
about the \ear 1880. and had therefore been a witness to and a participant 
in the de\clopnient of that region since the days of the pioneers. He was 
born on June 11. 1840. and was reared and educated in his native Canada, 
where lie became a teaming contractor and where he married. 

Xot long .after his marriage John McGough came to the States and 
became engaged ni railroad wurk. being thus employed at various places 
until about 1880. when he liecame engaged on the construction work of the 
railrojid at Downer, where he ever afterward made his home, spending the 
re^t of his life there, his death occurring on May 30, 1917. Though actively 



Cl.AY AND XOKMAN COUNTIES, MIXXESOTA. J 99 

engaged in the work of the raih'oad after his arrival at Downer, serving the 
company variously as foreman of the section, superintendent of the gravel 
pit and foreman of the extra gang, Mr. McGough found opportunity mean- 
whilc to de\eliip an excellent piece of farming property adjoining the vil- 
lage, he having homesteaded the northwest quarter, of section 22, l^lktou 
township, shortly after entering upon his duties at the railroad station, estab- 
lishing his home there. When the postoffice was established at Downer 
Mr. McGough was a])])ninte(l postmaster and for several years occupied that 
jjosition, being succeeded by his daughter. Miss Alice McGough, who made 
iier home with him and who held the office until the postofifi'ce finally was 
located in the store building at Downer, the office previously having been 
located in the McGough residence. The McGoughs are Catholics and John 
McGough helped to organize the Catiiolic parish at Barnesville, his famih 
still being attached to that parish. He took an active part in the various 
civic affairs of the community in pioneer days and at one time and another 
held .ibdut all the t(n\nship ofhces, including that of chairman of the board 
of supervisors, .\fter he became pretty well established at Downer, Mr. 
McGough gave up his railroad work there and thereafter devoted himself 
to the development and improvement of his homestead farm, adding to the 
same until he became the owner of a fine place of two hundred and eighty 
acres. His wife died on I'cljruary 23, 1889, and lie survived her eighteen 
years, his death occm-ring, as noted above, on May 30, 191 7. She was born, 
l'.ridget Mahone\', in Ireland, Init was reared in Canada, having been but a 
child when she crossed the water witli lier widowed mother. Mr. and Mrs. 
Mc(iough had live ciiildren : Thomas, who is living at Downer; Anna, de- 
cea,sed, who was the wife of William Hogan : .Mice, who is still on the old 
home farm : James, deceased, and Edward J. 

I'.dward J. McGough was born on September 17, 1874, and was about 
six vears of age when his parents settled at Downer. He received his 
schooling in the local scliools and from the days of his boyhood was a valued 
assistant in the labors of improving and developing the home place, lie and 
his father working together to that end. About fifteen years ago Edward 
J. McGough established his home on his present fine farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres in the Downer neighborhood and has since lived there, de- 
veloping that place from the raw prairie. He has excellent Iniildings on his 
place and has a well-ordered farm plant. 

On .\ugust q. 1894, Edward J. McGough was united in marriage to 
Dela Burlev, who was born near Tama, Iowa, but who was reared in Elkton 



200 CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

township, daughter of Frank and Matilda (Croskey) Burley, and to this 
union seven children have been born: Mary, Agnes, Emma (deceased), 
Tames, Edward, Etta, Effie and Thomas. 



GU,ST.W .\. ERSTAD. 



Gustav A. Erslad, proprietor of "Elmwood 1-arni,"' a line place of four 
hundretl and eighty acres lying on the line between I'^lnnvood and Glyndon 
townships in Clay county, is a native son of Minnesota and has lived in this 
slate all his life. He was born on a pioneer farm in Mineola township, 
Goodhue count}. Jul\ 3, 1869, ^on of Andrew and Olene (Lebeck) Erstad. 
l)t)th natives of the kingdom of .Xorway, wht) were married in Goodhue 
county, this state, and there spent their last days, honoretl i)ioneers of that 
community. 

Andrew Erstad came to iJie United States in i'^53 and about two \ears 
later, in June. 1855, pre-empted a tract of l;uid in what later came to be 
organized a.> Mineola township, in Goodhue county, this state, the second 
settler in that township : Christian Peterson, the first entrant there, having 
made his location in the previous month of May. \ot long after filing on 
his claim Andrew Erstad married Olene Leljeck, who had not long before 
come to this country with her parents, the family settling in Goodhue county, 
and after his marriage established hib home on his pre-emption tract and 
jjroceeded to develop and imj)ro\ e the same, in time coming to be one of the 
most substantial farmers in that community and a considerable landowner. 
He was one of the organizers of his home township and for some time 
served as a member of the board of township sujjcrvisors and also for .some 
time was assessor of his townshij). He and his wife were the parents of 
eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the fifth in order of 
liirth, the others being Cornelius, John, Albert. Marv, Selma (deceased). 
.\ugaistus (deceased) and one other, who died in \outh. Andrew Erstad 
and wile were meml)ers of the Lutheran church and their children were 
reared in that faith. 

Reared on the home farm in Goodhue county, Gustav A. Erstad re- 
ceived his schooling in the schools of that county and early l)ecame a prac- 
tical farmer, remaining there until 1897. w^it-'" ''^^ L'-ime up into the Red 
River country and locateil on the place where he is now li\ing, in Elmwood 
townshii). and where he and his family are very comfortably and very pleas- 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 201 

antly situated. When IMr. Er.stad took possession of "Elmvvood Farm" the 
place was Ijut a tract of raw i)rairie lantl and he has made all the substan- 
tial improvements which make the place one of the best-appointed farm 
plants in that part of the county. He has three-quarters of a section there, 
one (|uarter being over the line in Glyndon township, and in addition to his 
general farming and potato raising has .given considerable attention to the 
raising of pure-Ijred Shorthorn cattle and has done well in his operations. 
He is a stockholder in the Glyndon Elevator Company and in other ways 
gives his earnest .attention to the general business affairs of the communitv 
in which he lives. 

In 1901. abcjut four vcars after taking up his residence in Clay countv, 
Gustav A. Erstad was united in marriage to Maggie Lamb, daughter of 
James Lamb and wife, pioneers of Clay county, and to this union five chil- 
dren have been born, .Mbert. Lawrence, Earl Wallace, Ede (deceased), and 
I'earl. Mr. and Mrs. Erstad are memliers of the Lutheran church and take 
a proper interest in churcli work, as well as in other neighborhood good 
works. 



EDWARD U. WADE. 



Edward U. \Vade, the present efficient and well-known police magis- 
trate of Moorhead. was born in Albany, New York, July 3. 1867, a son 
of Edward Wade, who was a prominent lawyer at Albany for forty-two 
years. He is a descendant of an old American family, one of the oldest, 
in fact, the first of the name to land on the shores of the western continent 
coming to Massachusetts in the year i^),V- James Wade, a direct ancestor 
of the subject of this sketcli, fought in the Revolutionary War, with a 
Massachusetts re.giment. 

Edward U. Wade grew to manhood in his native city, and he received 
his education in the Albany Boys Academy. Later he was a student in the 
Albany Law School, from which institution he was graduated with the class 
of 1888; however, he never practiced. He came West as a surveyor to 
Duluth. Minnesota, and after remaining there and at Superior, the adjoining 
city, until Jul\- f, 1891, he came to Fargo, North Dakota, and established 
his home. For some time he represented a mercantile company as collector 
in this section of the northwest, but after the great fire at Fargo he located 
in .Moorhead, where he engaged in the bicycle sales and repair business. 
About 1007. he was elected justice of the peace and has since discharged the 



-202 CLAY AND ,\<)K.MAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

duties of this office in an able, faithful and eminently satisfactorv manner. 
Smce 191 5 he has also been incumbent of the office of police magistrate and 
has looked after the affairs of both offices in a manner that has reflected 
much credit iqion himself and has given satisfaction to all concerned. His 
decisions show not only a profound knowledge of the basic principles of 
jurisprudence but also an unbiased fairness in dealing with all cases, his 
decisions never being reversed at the hands of higher tribunals. 

Mr. Wade was married on March 3. 1892, to Anna G. I'.orgen. of 
I'argo, Xorth Dakota, a daughter of T. L. P.orgen. To Mr. Wade and wife 
eight children have been born, as follow: l-'.dward, who is deceased; Dudley 
P.radstreet, deceased; Ivlward, Dudley P.radstreet, Richard, Ellen Anna, 
Alary and Anna Borgen. 

Politically, Mr. Wade is a Republican. He is a member of the state 
b. i.ucl of man.-igers of the .Sons of the .\merican Revolution to which he 
belongs, and ha^ been on the board four years. He belongs to Moorhead 
Lodge Xo. i_'6. .\ncient Free and .Accepted Masons, of which he has been 
secretary for ten years, and also past master. He has always taken an 
abiding interest in local affairs and is a pnblic-.spirited and highly esteemed 
resident of Clav conntv. 



ELIAS O. ROST 



It is not the weaklings that accomplish worthy ends in the face of 
obstacles and opposition, but those with nerve and initiative, whose motto 
IS. "He never fails who never gives up," and with this terse aphorism ever 
m \iew, they forge ahead until they reach a definite goal in life. Elias 
U. Rost, a farmer of L'len township. Clay county, is a man who has won 
despite adverse circumstances. 

Mr. Rost was born in Norway. December 5, 1845. He is a son of 
Ole X. and Ann (Syverson) Rost, both natives of Xorway, where they 
grew up, married and continued to reside until 1870, when they came tf. 
America to join their son Elias, who had precedefl them to Osceola, Clear 
county, l^ennsyhania. After spending a year there they all went to F.auder- 
dale county, Tennessee, remaining there until the fall of rSji. when they 
went to Chicago, in which cit>- the\- resided until 1879. when thev came 
to Alinnesota and located on the farm in Clay county, where the suljject of 
this sketch now resides, in I'leii township. Ole X. Rost, the father, took up 



CLAY AXD XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 20 ? 

a homestead in Hagen township, where he developed a good farm on which 
lie spent the rest of his life, dying at an advanced age. His widow spent 
her last }ears in the \illage of Ulen. reaching tlie remarkable age of nearlv 
ninety-nine. To these parents three children were born, namely : Xich, 
deceased: Elias, the subject of this sketch, and Ellen, wlio is the wife nf 
lulling Wang. 

Elias O. Rosl .grew to manhood in Xorway and there attended the 
common schools. He came to America in 1868. locating in Osceola, I'enn- 
syhania, where he spent three years, working on a farm the first summer: 
then worked in the coal mines during winters, but continued working un farms 
in the croj) seasons. He then came West with his parents, as related in the 
preceding paragraph, remaining with them until the fall (if 1879, when 
he came to Clay county a little aiiead of them and took up a homestead of 
one hundred and sixty acres in Ulen townshi]). i'his he (le\el(i|)ed int(^ 
a good farm, putting on all impro\ements, including an excellent group 
of buildings, and here he has since resided. He worked hard and managed 
well and, prospering with advancing years, he added to his original place 
until he now owns li\e hundred and twenty acres, constituting one of the 
most desirable farms in Lien townshiij: and he has been very successful, 
carrying on general farming and stock raising on an extensive scale. He 
raises large cpiantitics of grain and prejiares live stock for the markets in 
large numbers. 

Mr. Rost was married in rSjf'i to Anna 'riiompson, who was burn in 
Xorway. She is a daughter of Halger Thompson and wife and came to 
.\merica when youn.g. To Air. and Mrs. Rost six children have been liorn. 
namely: Olaf, .\dolph (deceased), Eliza, Matilda, Emil and .\lbert. who 
grew up on the home farm and were educated in the juililic schools. 

.\lr. Rost has seen .threat changes "come o\er the face of the land" 
since he took up his residence in Ulen township some thirty-ei.ght years ago. 
for lie was an earl\- pioneer there, the country being then but a wild, 
sparselv settled prairie. He has taken a good citizen's interest in this develop- 
ment, helped organize the school district where he lives and was the first 
clerk of the same. In fact, he helped organize Ulen township and was one 
of the first members of tlie board of the same and was clerk of the fir^t 
board. Later he served as chairman for many years. He is well known 
i>\ei- the northeastern part of the county and is higb.ly respected. He i- 
an active member of the Xorwegian Lutheran church at the village of L'leii. 
which church lie helped organize. This was the first church in Ulen. 



204 CLAY AND NORMAX CULNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

C. O. MADSON. 

C. O. Madson, postmaster of tlie \illage of llalstad, was Ijorn on a 
pioneer farm about two miles northeast of that village and has lived in that 
neighborhood all his life, with the exception of a year spent at Warren. 
He was born on January 4, 1889, son of Christ and Christine (Baggerudj 
Madson, tlie former a native of the kingdom of Denmark and the latter 
of the kingdom of Xorwa}', who are now living on their old home farm 
northeast of the village of llalstad, pioneers of Xornian county. 

Christ Madson was born in the town of Xystad, on the south coa:^t 
of the Island of Laaland, Denmark, and from the time he was fourteen 
years of age until he was twentj'-four he followed the sea as a sailor. 
About 1874 he came to the United States antl hjcated at IJeloit, Wisconsin, 
where he found employment as a blacksmith in the Thompson plow works. 
and w litre he remained for a time, when he came over into Minnesota 
and homesteaded a quarter of a section of land in what later came to be 
organized as Halstad township, Xorman county, two miles northeast of 
the present flourishing village of llalstad. and there he still li\es. one of 
the honored and inHuential pioneer citizens of X'omian county. Mr. Mad- 
son has ever taken an active part in local civic affairs and serveil for alwut 
fourteen \ears as chairman of the board of supervisors of Halstad town- 
ship and for four years, 1902-06, served as a member of the board of 
county commissioners from the second district. He and his wife are earnest 
members of the L.utheran church and their six sons were reared in that 
faith. Of these sons the subject of this sketch is the second in order of 
liirili, the others being Martin, Charles, Mandley. Odin and Walter. 

C. O. Madson was reared on the homestead farm in Halstad town- 
ship and following his graduation from the high school at Halstad learned 
the art of photography under the direction of C. V. Olson, of Halstad. 
He then went to Warren, up in Marshall county, where, he worked as a 
photographer for a >ear. at the end of which time, in 1909, the year of his 
marriage, he returned to Halstad and opened a photograph studio of his 
own and was thus very successfully engaged in business at that place until 
his appointment as postmaster of Halstad. Mr. Madson entered upon die 
duties of postmaster on January i, 1915, and has since given his full atten- 
tion to the affairs of that office, renting his studio. 

It was on June 7, 1909, that C. O. Madson was united in marriage 
to Julia Xelson, daughter of T. A. Xelson and wife, and to this union 



CLAY AND XORMAX COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 20^ 

three children liave been born, two daughters, Charlotte and Karren, and 
one son, W'oodrow Jennings. Mr. and .Mrs. Madson are members of the 
Lutheran cliurch and take a proper interest in the various beneficences of 
the same, as well as in the general social activities of their home village 
and are helpful in promoting all good works thereabout. Mr. Madson is 
a member of the local lodges of the Modern A\"oodmen of .\merica and of 
the Knights of Pythias and takes a warm interest in Ihe affairs of these 
organizations. 



TOHX T. JOHNSON. 



jfihn T. Jiihnson. nieniher of the board of county commissioners of 
Clay county and a pmininent real-estate dealer at Ulen. was born in Fill- 
more count}-. Minnesota, March 5, 1867, a son of John Johnson, born in 
Norway in 1825. and Ingebor (Ellefson) Johnson, also born in Norway. 
The elder John Johnson came to America in the spring of 1843 ^"d located 
in LaSalle county, Illinois, where he li\ed for several \ears engaged in 
farming. In 1856 he removed to Fillmore county, Minnesota, and took up 
a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres which he improved and on 
which he established his home. He continued to live there, engaged in gen- 
eral farming, until lii^ death, which occurred in 1905. His wife died in 
1^1 J. They were members of the Norwegian Lutheran church. The\' had 
quite a large family consisting of twelve children: Thomas E.. who died at 
the age of fiftv-four; Martha, E\\s.s. Robert, Inger, Elvina, John T., Isabel, 
Christine, Jose]jhine. Allicrt, who died at the age of nine years, and Edward. 

John T. Johnson recei\ed his elenientar\- education in the public 
schools of I'"illniore count\-, and in the high school at Rushford. After com- 
pletion of his prepur;itorv studies in this school he entered Augustana Col- 
lege, at Canton, South D.ikota, and was graduated from that institution in 
the spring of 1888. He then came to Clay county, and for three years fol- 
lowing was engaged in teaching at Ulen. He then spent six months attend- 
ing a business college in Minneapolis, and for two years following was en- 
gaged in office work in I'reston. Minnesota. In the fall of 1892 he returned 
to Clav countv and was engaged in teaching for five years, three of which 
were in the \illagc of Ulen. After he quit teaching he was engaged in the 
iiardware business in Ulen for about three years. He then started in the 
real-estate business and has continued in that business since. In 1906 he 
was elected countv commissioner of Clay county and has been elected as 



206 CLAY AXD XOK.MAX COUNTIES. MIXXliSOTA. 

his own successor on the lioard at e\cry election since tliat year, and is now 
lioUling that position. 

Mr. Johnson was married ni i8go to Tohina Thompson, daughter of 
her Thompson, of Ada. county seat of Xorman county, and to this union 
two children have heen horn, .Adeline and Franklin. Mr. Johnson's fra- 
ternal affiliation is with the Woodmen's lodge. 



CHARLES W. BRENDKMllll.. 

Few farmers in flay county take greater ])leasure in their work llian 
Charles \\'. Brendenmhl. of Kragnes township. He was horn at Rochester. 
Minnesota, in June. 1S71, a son of Charles .\. and Wilhelmina ( I'ink ) 
Brendenmhl. The father was horn in Germany, from which country he 
came to .\merica with his i)arents when ten years old. the family locating 
on a farm eighteen miles from the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It was 
the custom of the mother to carry eggs to that city, for which she received 
onlv six cents a dozen, making the trip on foot. Later the family moved 
to near Rochester, Minnesota, where they lived several years. One of 
the sons, August T.. was one of the first settlers on the present site ol 
Moorhead. Charles A. lirendemuhl owned land where the court house 
now stands. He hecame ow ner of sixteen hundred and forty acres in Kragnes 
township. Clay county. He ga\e each of his sons a large farm as they 
attained the age of twenty-five years. The father died in the spring of 
i(ji3. at the age of .seventy-nine years, on the old home place in Kra.gnes 
township, to which he removed in 1878. His wife died there in 1909 at 
the age of sixty-nine years. She was a native of Wisconsin. These parents 
were married in 1S65. Eleven children were born to them, as follow: 
Clara, who is married and lives in California; Will, who also is married: 
Fred, who is married and lives in North Dakota: Charles W., the subject 
of this review : Albert, who died when two years old: .\nna, who lives in 
[•"ergus Falls, Minnesota: August, who lives in Idaho: Henry, who ha> 
remained on the old home place: Mrs. Minnie Xorljy. who al.so lives on 
the homestead, and Lilly, who died at the age of thirty years. 

Ch.irles W. Brendemuhl grew up on the farm and attended the public 
schools. He has devoted his life successfully to general farming and slock 
raising, and is now the owner of a well-im]5ro\ed farm of three hundred 
and twenty acres of productive land in Kragnes township. He built a 



CLAY AND NOUMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 20/ 

new residence in 1899, which he remodeled in 19 15, making it modern 
in every appointment, installing a bath, hot and cold water, sewerage sys- 
tem, furnace, electric lights and the like, making it one of the most com- 
fortable homes in the count)-. All the outbuildings are well kept and every- 
thing about the place denotes that a gentleman of good taste and progres- 
sive ideas is at the helm. In connection with his general farming and 
stock raising, Mr. Brendemuhl makes a specialty of potato growing, thirtv 
acres being planted in tubers in 1917, and the crop for the pix-ceding \ear 
was sold for thirty-six hundred dollars. 

On October 26, 1899, Mr. Brendemuhl was married to llulda Poelils, 
who was born in Iowa in 1881. To their union sexen children have been 
born, Lena, Nellie, Lizzie, Emma, Howard, Roy and Ruth, all of whom 
live at home. 

Politically, the subject of this sketch is independent. He served as 
chairman of the township board for eight years and is at present a member 
of the school board. He is a stockholder and director in the Farmers 
Elevator Company at Kragnes, also in the telephone company that operates 
in Oak])ort and Kragnes township, known as the Oak and Kragnes Tele- 
phone Company. He has been treasurer of the school board in district No. 
24 during the past fifteen years, takes a general interest in local public affairs 
and is regarded as a good citizen in every respect. 



FLA\1':L .\. WOODWARD. 

I''la\el .\. Woodward, president nt the farmers State Bank, of Glyndon, 
Minnesota, and one of the enterprising and substantial business men of that 
progressive little city, is a native of Michigan, born in Barry county, on 
Septemlier 28, i860, a son of Oliver Z. Woodward and wife, natives of New 
York state. About 1872, (Jliver Z. Woodward came from Michigan to 
Wright countx. Minnesota, but alter residing there about a year he returned 
to Michigan, later going to Kansas, where his death occurred. 

E. A. Woodward is the only child of his parents who grew to maturity. 
.After his mother's death occurred when he was onlv an infant nine days 
old, he was given to a neighbor woman to rear, Ijut at the age of si.x years, 
he went to live with his father. When he was twelve years old, he and his 
father drove overland with a horse team from Michigan to Minnesota. 
l''rom that time Mr. W(;od\\ard has made his own wav in the world, and 



208 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

1)\- hard work, close application and diligence, he has won a very com- 
mendable success in the business world. In 1880 he came to Glyndon, Clay 
county, Minnesota, and has made his home here practically ever since. 
\Mien he first came to the county, he worked at various occupations, among 
which were farming and lumbering. He lived on a farm alxjut a half mile 
mirth of Glyndon until k;!^, in which year he went to California, hut the 
following year he returned to Glyndon, and, in partnership with Walter 
Shave, engaged in the machinery business, which they are still ver\- suc- 
cessfully carrying on. dealing in farm implements and other machinery. 
Mr. Woodward was one of the organizers of the i'"arniers State Bank, a 
progre.ssive financial concern of Glyndon. and is now serving as president 
of that institution. 

In June, 1897, Mr. Woodward was married to Bertha M. Webb, the 
daughter of R. 15. Webb, of Glyndon, and to this union one son has been 
born, Roy W. .Mr. Woodward and family are prominent in all the social 
activities of the community, having an active interest in the welfare and 
betterment of their village. Mr. Woodward has served several terms on 
the village council. 



W. R. BRIGGS. 



W. R. Briggs, a well-known lloriculiurist at Moorhead, was born in 
lUoomington. Illinois, .\ugust i. 1875, ^ son of W. R. and Mary (De Board) 
Briggs. The father was born in Ireland and the mother in Pennsylvania. 
The senior W. R. l!riggs came to America when a young man and located 
in Illinois, near lUooniiugton, where he engaged in the business of a gar- 
dener and continued in this business for manv years. His children were: 
Minnie, W. R., B. H., R. H., J. W., Frank and David. He was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church at Bloomington. 

The suliject of this sketch received his education in the coiumon schools 
of llliu-ois, where he spent his boyhood years. He worked widi his father 
as a gardener until the death of bis father. .\t the age of eighteen years he 
started out to make his own living and worked for farmers in the neighbor- 
hood for four or five years and then engaged in farming on his own account. 
He farmed in Illinois for about two years and then removed to Missouri and 
farmed in that state for two years. Then, with a cash capital of three 
thousand dollars, he packed up his household goods and removed to Texas, 
with the expectation of increasing his property possessions. After an expe- 



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HE NEW YORK 
BLIC LIBRARY 



CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 20g 

rience of about one \ear and a halt in the business of farming and gardening; 
in Texas he found that liis expectations were not reaHzed. He lost practi- 
cally all that he had brought with him, as well as the profit on his labor dur- 
ing the time of his sojourn in Texas. In igo6 he removed to Tower City, 
Xorth Dakota, arriving at that place with ei.ghty dollars in cash and very 
little in the wa_\' (if household goods. He engaged in farming in that state 
tor two years and b}' econonn- and industry greatly improved his condition 
in the way of worldly possessions. In 1908 he came to Moorhead, and 
bou.ght a tract of ground and engaged in gardening. In the fall of that 
year he built the first one of his greenhouses. He has added others as the 
!)usiness increased and now has five large greenhouses, with all modern ap- 
pointments and conveniences, his plant now carrying about thirty thousand 
square feet of glass. Mr. Briggs cultivates all varieties of vegetables, plants 
and llowers and finds a ready market for his product in Moorhead and Fargo. 
On February 19. 1902, W. R. Briggs was married to Eva Kate Miller 
and to this union four children have been born : Harold, Gertrude, Mildred 
and Francis. Mr. and Mrs. Briggs are members of the First Methodist 
Episcopal church at Moorhead. Mr. Briggs is a member of the school 
board and his fraternal affiliation is with the Independent Order of Odd 
l'"cllo\\>. Politicalh'. he is independent. 



OTTO J. MORTENSON. 

Otto J. ^lortenson. secretary of the Moorhead Realty Company at 
Moorhead and one of the best-known real-estate dealers in this part of the 
state, is a native of the Red River valle}' and has lived in this section most 
of his life. He was born on a pioneer farm, over the river in Cass county. 
North Dakota, July ri. 1880, son of Paul and Maren (Lee) Mortenson, 
natives of Norway, who came to this country in 1870, proceeding on up 
into the Red River \ alley and settling on a homestead farm in Cass county. 
North Dakota, where the latter spent her last days and where the former 
is still living, one of the well-established pioneer farmers of that communit\-. 
Paul Mortenson has held office in his home township and was one of the 
organizers of the church in his neighborhood. 

Reared on the homestead farm. Otto J. Mortenson received his ele- 
mentary schooling in the schools of that vicinity and then entered Concordia 
(14a) 



2IO CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

College at Moorhead, from which institution he was .<>;raduated in 1900, 
with the degree of Bachelor of Accounts. Upon leaving school Mr. .Mor- 
tenson became engaged in the office of a real-estate dealer at A'loorhead 
and after awhile engaged in the real-estate business on his own account in 
that city and was thus engaged there until IQ04, when he went to Sawyer, 
over in \\'ar(l county. Xorth Dakota, where he established the Sawyer 
State Bank and remained there, acting as cashier of that concern, nniil 
1908, when he went over into Montana, homesteaded a quarter of a sec- 
tion of Ian din that state and remained there, improving and developing 
his tract, until January i, 1911, when he returned to Moorhead, where he 
since has made his residence. L'pon returning to Moorhead Mr. Morten- 
son resumed his connection with the real-estate business and was engaged in 
the interest of various land firms until 1915, in which year he organized 
the Moorhead Realty Comjjany, of which he since has lieen the secretary, 
and has worked up an extensive business in that line, his operations in 
realty covering a wide territory hereabout. 

On June 23, 1904, Otto J. Mortenson was united in marriage to Leonora 
II. Dahl, daughter of T. II. Dahl and wile, of Moorhead, and to this union 
si.x children have been born. Kthel, Carroll, Kenneth (deceased), Philip. 
W'illjur and Robert. Mr. and Mrs. Mortenson are members of Trinity 
Lutheran church at Moorhead and take a proper interest in church works, 
as well as in the general good works of the community. Fraternall}-, .Mr. 
Mortenson is affiliated with the .Masonic order and takes a warm interest 
in the affairs of the same. 



JOHN E. BURUD. 

Success as a general farmer has come to John E. Burud because he 
worked hard and managed well and he is now enabled to spend his declin- 
ing years in retirement. He is one of the well-known citizens of Goose 
Prairie township, Clay county. He was born on November i, 1854, in 
Norway, a son of Ellef Jenson and Barbara ( I'.rickson) Burud, both 
natives of Norwav, where they grew up, married and established their home, 
l)nt came to .America in 1881, locating in Clay county, Minnesota. There 
they took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Hagen town- 
ship, which they developed into a good farm through their industr}-, and 
there continued to carry on general farming until .alxjut 1894 when they 



CLAY AXD XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 211 

sold uut and spent the rest of their li\es witli their son John E. on his 
farm in Goose Prairie township. The death of the father occurred in 1910 
at the ad\anced age of eighty-seven years, and that of the mother in 1907. 
She was t\\o years )"ounger than her husband. To these parents five chil- 
dren were born, namely: John E., of this sketch; Mary, who died in the 
spring of 1Q17: Edward, who owns and operates a farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres in section 4, Goose Prairie township; Mrs. Tilda McTeney, 
living in Chicago, and Olc. who lives in Ulen, ]\Iinnesota, and works on the 
Xorthern Pacific railroad. 

John v.. Burud grew to manhood in Norway and there attended the 
common schmils. lie immigrated to America when twenty-three years old 
in 1878, alone, and came on west to Clay county, where he worked out for 
two and one-half years, dien took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty 
acres in section 12, Goose Prairie town.ship. He worked hard developing 
this land, but prospering with advancing years, he later bought more land 
and now owns one of the choice farms of his township, consisting of four 
hundred and iortx acres. He has made all improvements on this land, 
erecting a comfortable bume and numerous substantial outbuildings, and 
setting out a large grove. Everything about the place denotes thrift and 
good management. He has been very successful, carrying on general farm- 
ing and stock raising on an extensive scale. He raised some pure-blooded 
stock. 

Mr. r.urud was married in Lake Park, Minnesota, in 1880, to Caroline 
Thompson, who was born in Rice county, this state, in 1859. Her parents 
were natixes of Norway, from which country they came to Minnesota in 
pioneer da}-s, locating first in Rice county. Later they moved to Becker 
countv, where they spent the rest of their lives, both being now deceased, the 
mother dying when her daughter Caroline was twelve years old. Not long 
thereafter, Mr. Thompson sold out and bought a farm in Becker, where he 
lived until his death in 1910. To Mr. and Mrs. Burud four children were 
torn, namelv : Theodore, who died when twenty-two years old ; Albert. 
Oscar and Joseph. 

Mr. Burud bought property in the village of Ulen, Goose Prairie 
town.shiii, in 191 5, and moved thereto, retiring from active farm work. He 
has since rented out his land to Ole Holt. Mr. Burud served as township 
supervisor for many years, also as a director of the school board in his dis- 
trict. He is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church, of which he was 
a trustee for a numlier of \-ears. 



212 CLAY AND NORilAX CdLXTIES. MINNESOTA. 

P. J. SHEA. 

P. J. Shea was hmn in Jlainpton county. Massachusetts. t)clol)cr 13. 
1866, a son (if Mich.iel ami ^Nfary (Sullivan) .Shea, both natives of Ireland. 
His father came to .Xnierica in 1856 and located in Hampton countv. Massa- 
chusetts, where he enijaged in his trade as a brick mason for alx)ut twenty 
years. In 187(1. he l)r(iu.<,dit his family t>> Minnesota, located in Glvndon. 
(lay county, and fnund employment with the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad 
('(>m])any. He entered a homestead of one hundred and sixtv acres, and 
entered a tree claim of antnher one hundred and sixty acres in I*"elton town- 
shii>. He continued his employment with the railroad company while his 
.son worked the farm. He is still living at Glvndon; his wife died several 
years ago. Their children are: Rose. P. J., the subject of this review; Mary 
and James. Michael Shea was the first postmaster of Felton. 

P. J. .Shea had a \er\ limited schooling when he was young and is 
liractically self-educated. As a boy. he assisted his father in the postofifice, 
and also was emploxed as a time-keeper for the railroad company. When 
yet m his youthful years, he was occupied in looking after his father's farm, 
while the father was working on the railroad. .Mr, Shea did some of the 
In-t breaking of the virgin soil in Clay county, using an ox team to draw the 
]ilow. He continued on the farm until be was twentv-one, and then st.arted 
to work for the r.iilroad. in the employment of which he continued for 
al)out four years. He first worked for the dreat Xorthern and afterward 
tor the Xorthern Pacific railroad. In 1893 'i^ embarked in the general 
mercantile business ;it Saliin, Minnesota, in partnership with his uncle, 
James Shea. He continued in business at this jilace for about five years 
and then came to Clynder and established the firm of P. J. Shea & Com- 
pany in the general merchandising business. He has conducted this busi- 
ness alone since that time. In 1889, he started a hotel at this place and 
conducted that in connection with his mercantile interests for about eight 
years Mr. Shea also has large farming interests to occupy his time and 
attention. He began making investments of his savings in land sc\-eral 
\ears ago and secured a considerable body of land when it was available for 
purchase at a k)W price. 

Mr. Shea was one of the organizers of the First State Bank of Glvndon. 
and has been vice-president of this bank since the time of its organization. 
lie has served twt. terms as president of the school board, and was president 
of the \illage council some years ago. He helped to organize the Glyndon 



CLAY AND NOKMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 2I3 

Telephuiie Company, of which he was the first president. In 1914 he 
Ijuilt a fine two-st(jry modern home with heautiful .orounds and modern 
eqnipnient. In addition to the othur l)usiness activities in which ^Ir. Shea 
has been interested he was one of the organizers of tlie Farmers' Grain and 
r^nmher Company of Glyndon. of whicli he is president and E. D. Grant, 
vice-president. In tiiese, and in all other lousiness enterprises, Mr. Shea is 
a ieadini;' -.])irit. He is tlie leading; l)nsiness man of Glyndon and is always 
readv to contribute his fuU sliare in the promotion of anv enterprise or move- 
ment that tends to the growth and welfare of the town .and commnnitx'. 

In iS8<), I'. J. Shea and Julia Timrue were united in marriage, and to 
this union live children have been born, namely: Florence M., Frances E., 
.\fjuinia, Adeline and lulward T. The Shea family are very delightfully 
situated in their new two-story, modern home at Glyndon, wdiich Mr. Shea 
built in 1914. 



TAMES LARSON. 



James Larson, cashier of the State Bank of Halstad, a member of the 
school board at Flalstad and the manager of a well-improved farm on 
the outskirts of that \illage. was born on a farm in Mouston county, ihis 
stale. May 10. 1873. son of I'cter and .Maria ( Christopherson) Lar.son 
((iagnum). natives of .Vorway, who came to Minnesota about 18C9 and 
settled in Houston county, where they remained until 1879. when they 
moved to Cass county. Xortb Dakota, where they spent the rest of their 
li\-es. with the exception of fi\e _\ears sjient in Ransom county, that state. 
Peter Larson and wife rearefl a family (;f twehe children. 

Reared on the paternal farm in Xorth Dakota, James Larson com- 
])leted his common-school course in the schools of R;insom county, X(.irili 
Dakota, and supplemented the same by a course in Concordia College at 
Moorhead. In this connection he gratefully acknowledges a debt of grati- 
tude to his uncle. K. F.. Bakke, of Onawa. Iowa, who supported him for 
eighteen months during his school days there. L'pon completing his school- 
ing in [ow.-i lames Larson resumed his labors on the home farm in Buffalo, 
Xorth Dakota, and there remained until he was twenty-five years of age. 
when, in 1898. he came over into Minnesota and located at Ilalstad. where 
he remained until his marriage in 1901, when he moved up into Polk county 
and there remained until igii, in which year he returned to Halstad and 
has ever since been en.gaged there as cashier of the State Bank of Halstad. 



214 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

In addition to his lianking interests. Mr. I.arson is the manager of a well- 
iniproved farm located just one-lialf mile cast of Halstad and gives con- 
siderable attention to the raising of early Ohio ])Otatoes and has done much 
to stimulate the cultivation of potatoes in that part of the county. Air. 
[.arson gives his earnest attention to local affairs and for the past five years 
has been serving as a member of the local school board. 

It was in h)oi that James Larson was united in marriage to Margaret 
Holmberg. daughter of Charles and Beret Ilolmberg. and lo this union 
seven children have been born. Harriet. Alton. Victor. i:;rdis. Helen. 
Erling and Aaron. .Mr. .md .Mrs. Larson are members of the Norwegian 
Lutheran rhiu-ch and Mr. I.arson has served as secretary of the local con- 
gregation of that church. 



OLE I. GRIXA. 



Ole I. (hina, local manager of the plant of the Stenerson Brothers 
l.nniber Company ;it Halstad, is a native son of Minnesota and has lived 
in this state the greater part of his life. He was born on a pioneer farm 
in Trondhjem township. Ottertail county, .\pril i<). 1874. son of Tver O. 
and Oline L. ( Ohe ) Crina. both natives of the kingdom of Xorway, the 
former of whom, a pioneer of this section of Minnesota, is now living at 
I'clican Rapids and the latter of whom died on P^bruary 22, 1914. 

Iver O. Grina was but three years of age when his parents, Ole H. 
and Martha (Moger) Grina. left their native Norway and came to the 
I'uited States, settling in Clayton county. Iowa, where they homesteaded 
a quarter of a section of land and where they remained for twenty years 
or more, or until their removal to Minnesota and settlement in Ottertail 
county, where their last days were spent. Reared on the homestead farm in 
Iowa. Iver O. Grina remained there until the days of his young manhood. 
when he started out to do for himself and came up into this section of Min- 
nesota, locating" on a homestead farm which he bought from a dissatisfied 
homesteader in Trondhjem township. Ottertail county, later buying one 
hundred and twenty acres of railroad land adjoining the same, and there 
he li\ed until his retirement from the farm, after the death of his wife, in 
it)i4 and removal to Pelican Rapids, where he is now living. Mrs. Grina 
was a daughter of Lars and Ingeborg ( W'aterud) Ohe. who were among 
the earliest settlers of Erhard Grove townshii). Ottertail county. To I\-er 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 215 

O. Grina and wife nine ciiildren were born, those besides tiie subject of 
this sketch, the first-born, being as follow: Lars I., who is engaged in 
the lumber business at Felton ; Melvin I., who is engaged in the hardware, 
implement and lumber inisiness at Erhard; Conrad I., who is engaged in 
the lumber and machine business at Borup ; Joseph, who died in infancy ; 
Joseph, second, who is farming his grandfather's farm, which was bought 
by I. O., in Ottertail county: Theodore, who is in business at Erhard: Inga, 
also living at Erhard, and Emma, who is living with her father at Pelican 
Rapids. Iver O. Grina is a member of the Lutheran church, as was his 
wife, and their children were reared in that faith. In 1913 Iver O. Grina 
helped to organize the Erhard State Bank at Erhard and is a member of 
the board of directors of the same. During his long residence on the 
farm he served his home township in various public capacities and did 
much for the development of the region in which he settled in pioneer days. 

Ole I. Grina was reared on the homestead farm on which he was born 
and received his schooling in the district sch(jol in that neighborhood. He 
remained on the farm until he was twenty-one years of age and in Xo\em- 
ber, 1895, started working for O. E. Juverud at Rothsay, and was thus 
engaged for something more than three years, at the end of which time 
he went over into North Dakota and took a homestead in Benson countw 
A year later, in April, 1901, he returned to this state and began working 
for the Stenerson Brothers Lumber Company at Borup. He was married 
in the summer of that year and remained at Borup for fixe years and one 
month, at the end of which time he returned to Xorth Dakota and engaged 
in the lumlter business for him.self, locating at Columbus, in Ward county. 
North Dakota, remaining there for nearly four years, from July, 1906, to 
March, 1910, in which latter month he went to Montana and was there 
engaged for four years in the lumber trade, connected with the Northern 
Montana Lumber Company. On April 4. 1914. he returned to Minnesota, 
resuming his former connection with the Stenerson Brothers Lumber Com- 
pany and has since been engaged as the local manager of that company's 
extensive plant at Halstad, one of the best-known lumber men in this part 
of the state. 

It was' on June 15, 1901, that Ole I. Grina was united in marriage to 
Anna C. Ringstad, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter. 
.'\lice Onida. Mr. and Mrs. Grina are members of the Lutheran church and 
take a proper part in church affairs. They have a very pleasant home at 
Halstad and take an interested part in the general social activities of that 



2l6 CLAY AXD NOKMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

village. .Mr. Grina i.s independent in his political views. l)ut takes an earnest 
interest in local civic affairs, ever willing to promote any movement lia\ ing 
as its object the advancement of the common welfare. 



JOHN \\-. GROMMliSlI. 

John W. Grommesh, a well-known retired landowner, living at Barnes- 
\ille. Clav count}, was Iiorn in Sand Creek township, Scott county, Minne- 
sota, on October 14, 1855. lie is the son of John and Clara (Wagner) 
Grommesh, both natives of Luxemburg, who left that country and came 
to .\nierica the year before their son. John \V., was born. 

On arriving in this country John (irommesh and his wife proceeded 
out to .Minnesota and settled in Scott county about 1854, being among the 
early settler> in that jiart of tiic state. John Grommesh pre-empted a tract 
of timber l.md in that county and proceeded to clear and prepare it for the 
planting of crops, .\fter c(3nsiderable labor he succeeded in getting the land 
into condition, .ind remained there engaged in general farming until 1861. 
In the latter year lie moved to Jackson township, Scott county, and resumed 
farming operations, meetin.g with success during the greater part of the 
time. In 1873 he moved to L;ike\ille township, Dakota county, and settled 
on a farm located twenty-four miles south of St. Paul, where he remained 
for five years. In 1880 John Grommesh made his final move and went to 
House township. Cass county, .\orth Dakota, and there Ixnight out a home- 
steader. On the land thus acrjuired he contiinied to farm for the remainder 
of his life, his death occurring in I'ebruary, looj. His wife had predeceased 
him l)y many years, her death having occurred in 1885, on the homestead 
.settled on by her husband in 1880. To John Gronnnesh and wife the follow- 
ing children were born : John W., the subject of this sketch, Celia, Michael, 
Clara, Hubert. Mary (deceasetl), and Lewis. They were earnest members 
of the Catholic church and their children were reared in the same faith. 

John W". Grommesh was educated in the public and parochial schools, 
after which he helped his father in the work of the farm for some time. He 
then started for himself as a farmer in Dakota county, Minnesota, and re- 
mained there engaged in general farming until the fall of 1880, at which 
time he went with his parents to Cass county. North Dakota, and there 
bought out a homesteader, as his father had done, and stayed on the home- 
stead for six months, at the end of which time he .sold out. He later farmed 



o 



u; 




7: 





7 



CLAY AXD NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 21/ 

some scliool land and put in two crops wliile in that territory, but the grass- 
hoppers came along and destroyed everything. 

In June, i88j. Mr. firommesh came to Clav cotuit\- and commenced 
to farm a tract of railroad land in Alliance township, six and one-half miles 
west of Barnesxille. and continued thus engaged for six years. In 1888 he 
moved to tiie town of Barnesxille, li\ing there for two years, and worked 
for the great Northern Railroad Company. By the winter of 1890 he had 
saved one thousand five hundred dollars by hard work and thrifty habits, and 
proceeded to iiurchase land for himself. He bought a farm of one hundred 
and si.xt}- acres in Wilkins county, six miles southwest of Barnesville, and 
engaged in general farming for alxjut six years. In i8g6 he returned to 
Barnesville: but in the meantime, in 1891, he had bought two hundred acres 
of the land he had previously been farming in .\lliance township, Clay 
county. He has Ii\ed in Barnesville since 1896 and has bought and operated 
several farms up to recently, when he retired from the more active duties 
of farm life. He now owns three hundred and ninety-four acres of prime 
land at the edge of Barnesville and twenty acres within the city limits, 
which latter jiarcel be operates personally. He is also the owner of one 
hundred and sixtv acres uf what was formerly railroad land in Barnesville 
townshi]), and one hundred and twenty acres which adjoins die latter, con- 
sisting of school land, and which is situated in Alliance township. In all 
iiis i)urchases and sales of land Mr. Grommesh has met with marked suc- 
cess, and he mainlv attributes his good fortune to hard work and to good 
crops, which latter have resulted in his case from close attention to all de- 
tails of cultivation. 

On September 23, 1878, John W. Crommesh was united in marria,ge to 
Julia Stork, who was born in New Alarket, Scott county, this state, a 
daughter of John and Katherine (Zeimat) Stork. Her parents were born 
in Luxemburg and came to .\merica in 1854 and located first at Lakeville, 
Scott countv. and later went to New Market, in the same county. The 
Storks were farming people and spent the remainder of their lives in Scott 
countv. Mr. and Mrs. Stork were the parents of nine children, as follow: 
Katherine (deceased), Richard, Nicholas, Henry, ]^Iinnie. Mary, Kate, 
Joseph (deceased) and Julia, wife of Mr. Grommesh. Tliese i)arents and 
their children were 'members of the Catholic church. 

^Ir. and Mrs. Grommesh are the parents of two children, namely, John 
and Hubert, who are engaged in f.irming at Barnesville, ant! are well-known 
citizens of that district. The Grommesh family are earnest members of the 
Catholic church and are warmlv interested in all its good works as well as in 



2l8 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIKS, MINNESOTA. 

all moveineiit? makings: for the welfare of the community. Air. Grommesh 
ami his two sons. John and Hul)ert, are members of the CathoHc Order of 
h'oresters and are ardent supporters of that fraternal organization and of all 
neighborhood good works. Mr. Cironimesh was for two years clerk of the 
Alliance lownshi]i school board. He also served as township chairman for 
three rears and as alderman in Barnesville for some years, and in all these 
public positi(jns he rendered excellent services to the citizens. 

John Grommesh, eldest son of the subject of this sketch, was married 
to Minnie Palman. of Barnesville, and they are the parents of two children, 
Cecilia and Kenneth. Hubert Grommesh, the younger son. married Chris- 
tina Lander, of I'rior Lake, Scott count \. this state, and they are the pa- 
rents of one child. T.ucv. 



ALERT ARNESTAD. 



Alert .\rnestad, tire warden of .\da, who operates a general automobile- 
repair and vulcanizing shop at that place, is a native of the kingdom of 
Norwa\', but has been a resident of Xorman county since 1881, the year 
in which that county was organized as a ci\ic entity. He was born on Sej)- 
tember 28, 1858, son of Hans Gulmonson Jacob and Eliza Leeberg. natives 
of that same country, farming people, who spent all their lives there. They 
were the parents of nine children. Thee, Carl, Olaf (deceased). Ludwig, 
Alert, Charlotta, Ole. Casper and Halvor (deceased). 

Reared on a farm in his native Norway, Alert .Arnestad early began 
learning the trade of wagon-maker and became a proficient craftsman in 
that line. In March of 1881 he married there and he and his bride straight- 
wav started for the United States. U])on their arrival here they came on 
out to this then frontier section of Minnesota and settled at Ada, where 
they ever since have made their home, thus being recognized as among 
the real "old settlers" of that city. Upon his arrival at Ada Mr. Arnestad 
secured employment at his trade in a local blacksmith shop and was thus 
engaged for about two years, at the end of which time he engaged in 
carpenter work and was thus occupied for five years or more, during which 
time he erected many of the houses built at .\da and surrounding coun- 
trv during that period. Mr. Arnestad then began farming near Ada, but 
after two years of that form of work gave up farming and began working 
in the establishment of Andrews & Hanson, hardware and lumber, at .Ada, 



CLAY AXD XORMAX COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 219 

and remained with that tirni lor eleven years, at the end of which time he 
transferred his services to Lofsness & Shordahl, hardware, and was with that 
concern for some \ears. He then started a liardware store and tin shoj) 
of iiis own and o])erated the same for three or four years, or until failing 
health cf)mpelled his temporary retirement. About a year ago Air. Arnestad 
started a vulcanizing and repair shop at Ada and is meeting with a good 
measure of success in his new enterprise. Mr. Arnestad has e\er given a 
good citizen's attention to local civic affairs and is now serving his fourth 
year as fire warden at Ada. 

It was on March 21, 1881. in Xorway, that Alert Arnestad was united 
ill marriage to Martha Hang, who also was born in that countrv, a daugh- 
ter of Ingebright anrl Olena (Ingebrightson) Hang, farming people, and 
to this union seven children ha\e been born, Eliza, Arnold, Helga, Bertha, 
Adel, Ruth and Esther, all of whom are li\ing. Mr. and Airs. Arnestad 
are members of the Hauges Lutheran church and ha\e ever taken mucii 
interest in church work. 



EDWIX O. STL'DLIEN. 



Edwin O. Studlien, a farmer of Kragnes township. Clay county, was 
born in Houston county, Minnesota, in March. 1865. He is a son of Ole 
(). and Bertha ( Lundelein ) Studlien, both natives of Xorway, where they 
grew up and married and made their home tuitil 1853. when the}' immi- 
grated to America, locating in Houston county, Minnesota, and liought a 
farm. There the father established a comfortable home and developed a 
fine farm. He was one of the earliest pioneers of that county and he and 
his family endured the hardships and privations incident to pioneer life. 
Ole O. Studlien continued to reside there until 1874, when he moved to 
Clay count}- and bought the farm in Kragnes township on which his son 
Edwin O. now resides. There he spent the rest of his life, engaged in gen- 
eral farming with his usual success, his death occurring there in 1908 at 
the advanced age of eighty-two years years. His widow also reached the age 
of eighty-two, dying in 1914 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Olena 
Kragnes. To these parents eight children were born, namely: Inger, who 
is married and lives in Houston county; Jane, deceased: Galena, the wife 
of O. E. Tangen : Mrs. Olena Kragnes, mentioned above: Edwin O., the 
subject oi this sketch: Mary Ann, who is married and li\es in Moorhead : 
Otis, who disappeared in St. Paul, Minnesota, in December, 1891, and it is 



220 CLAY AXD NljUMAN COUNTIES. MIX XHSOTA. 

believed that he is dead, and Roljiii. who Hves with Mrs. ( )lena Kratjncs, 
his sister. 

Edwin O. Studlien grew up on the home farm in lltnistoii county and 
there attended the district schools. He has dexotecl his life to .tjeueral 
farming and has lived on his present farm in section 2^, Kragnes tnwii- 
ship. since 1876. huyino- the place from his father in the year 1899. lie 
has kept it well improved, replacing- all the ultl huildings with new ones. 
He first bought a half section, later one huudrcd and lift}- acres in section 
j6, and later a quarter section in section 13. which he later sold. He now 
owns li\e hundred and forty acres, on which he carries on general farming 
and stock raising- on an extensive scale, ranking among the leading farmers 
of liis town.ship. 

;\Ir. Studlien was married in 1889 to Engeborg Rc)holt. who was born 
in 1863 in Xorway. where she grew up an<l attcmled school. She came 
to America in the fall of 1885. making the trip to .Minnesota alone, to join 
her two brothers who had come here from .\(jr\\a_\- several years previously 
and had settled in C\:iy county. Five children ha\-e been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Studlien. namely: Oiaf, ' Eugene, Elida. .\nna and iulwin, ail of 
whom are living. 

Mr. Studlien is now- a member of the board of township supervisors 
and is also clerk of school district Xo. 101. having iiekl this latter position 
since the district was organized in 1901. He has been a member of the Moil- 
ern Woodmen lodge for twenty years, or since 1897. His family are 
Lutherans. He is one of tlie well-known and intluential men in pubhc 
aftairs in Kragnes township. 



BENDT O. HITTERDAL. 

There is no better farmer in Goose Prairie township, Clay county, than 
Bendt O. Hitterdal, who was born in Norway, November 30, 1855. ^^ '* 
a son of Ole and Bertha ( Hertse) Hitterdal, both natives of Norway, where 
the)' grew up. married and made their home until 1869. In that year they 
immigrated to America and located in Winneshiek county, Iowa, where they 
spent two 3 ears, then came to Clay county, Minnesota, driving an ox-team to 
a prairie-schooner overland, in 1871, and thus were among the early 
pioneers of this county. The trip from Iowa took about one month. The 
father at once took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, lying 



CI.AY AXD XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 221 

less than a mile east of the present village of Hitterdal. in Goose Prairie 
township. He worked hard at developing the land into a farm, erected 
suitable buildings and there he and his wife spent the rest of their lives, 
his death occurring about 1874. The village of Hitterdal was named in 
honor of this old family, which was one of the first to settle in that locality. 
Six children were born to Ole Hitterdal and wife, namely: Mary, the oldest; 
Bendt O., of this sketch; Lars, Maria, Ole, Jr., and Hannah. 

The father of the ai)n\e named children was influential in the affairs 
of his township, and he helped organize the first church in the comnumitv, 
known as the Conference Lutheran church. 

Bendt O. Hitterdal spent his boyhood in Xorvvay, where lie .ittended 
school. He went to school only alxiut one month in ;\merica. He was 
fourteen years old when his parents brought him to Iowa, and he came 
with the family to C'l;iy county, ATinnesota, and helped develop the home 
farm at Hitterdal. When he became of legal age, in 1878, he took up a 
homestead of one Imiidred and si.xty acres where he has since made his 
home. He worked hard at adding all the improvements on his land, includ- 
ing a comfortable home and a convenient set of outbuildings. He has seen 
the county develop from ;i wild prairie to a fine farming region during his 
continuous residence here of forty-six years and has played well his part in 
tliJN i!e\elopmciU. being regarded as a public-spirited and useful citizen all 
the while. AMien he first located on the land he planted a large grove which 
is now tall and flourishing. He has prospered through good management 
and close application until he is one of the substantial men of his vicinity. 
He later took up three-fourths of a section, one-fourth of which was a treie 
claim, and this he has also well im])roved. He has been very successful as a 
general farmer and stock raiser. 

Mr. Hittedral was married about 1879 to yVnna Setter, who was born in 
Wisconsin, a daughter of Paul Larson Setter, who removed to Goose Prairie 
township, Clav county, Minnesota, about 1877. To Mr. and Mrs. Hitterdal, 
six children have been liorn, namely: Oliver, Albert. Joseph, deceased; 
Andree, Ldjul and Bernhard. 

Politically, Mr. liittcrdal is an independent. He helped organize Goose 
I'lairie townshij) and was the first chairman of the township board. He has 
since held various townshi]) offices. He helped organize the school district 
ill which he resides, when the district included the entire town.ship within 
its borders. He was a member of the first school board and he has been 
treasurer of his .school district most of the time since. He also helped or- 
ganize the L'luon Lutheran cliurch at Hitterdal. 



222 CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES. iMINNESOTA. 

LOUIS LEMKE. 

Louis Lenike. one iif the most suljstantial farmers of Clay county and 
proprietor of all of section 31 of Elkton townshi]), the seat of his pleasant 
home just north of the xilla^e of Baker, is a native of Germany, but has 
been a resident of this country since he was fourteen years of age. He 
was born on .September 5. 1858. son of Carl and Christina (Blomk) Lemke, 
lioth nati\es of that same countrw who came to the LTnited States in 1872 
with their family and setlled on a farm in die vicinity of Chicago, in Cook 
county, Illinois, where the father spent his last days. His widow died at 
the home of one of her sons in Charlton county, Minnesota. Carl Lemke 
and his wife were the parents of three sons, the subject of this sketch having 
two brothers. John Lemke. now a resident of Martin county, this state, and 
August Lemke. of Nebraska. 

.As noted al)ove. Loui'; Lemke was fourteen years of age when be came 
to this country with his parents in 1872 and for nineteen years thereafter 
he made his home in Cook county, Illinois, engaged in farming. In 1892 
he mo\ed from Illinois to Iowa and located on a farm in Franklin county, 
that state, where he remained for eighteen years and where he developed a 
fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres. In 1909, Mr. Lemke disposed of 
his interests in Iowa and came up into Minnesota, locating on the farm 
just north of Baker, where he is now living and where he and his family 
are very comfortably situated. Mr. Lemke owns the whole of section 31 
in Elkton township and has improved the place in fnie shape, having erected 
an entirely new set of farm buildings there since taking possession of the 
same, a ben-house being the only structure of the old set of buildings re- 
maining. In addition to his general grain farming. Mr. Lemke has for some 
time given considerable attention to the raising of potatoes and has done 
nnich to encourage the cultivation of that crop in that neighborhood. 

In 1 881 Louis Lemke was united in marriage to Sophia Pos.sehl, a 
sister of H. C. Possebl, a biographical sketch of whom is ])resented else- 
where in this volume, and to this union have been born fourteen children, 
all of whom are living, namely: Fred, who lives in Franklin county, Iowa: 
Amanda, who married Fred Fahrmann and is living in Elmwood town- 
ship; ^linnie, wife of Louis Lenthe, of Elkton township: Herman, who is 
at home: Eddie, also at home: Martha, wife of George Meyer, of Franklin 
county. Iowa: /\nna. wife of Carl Carr, of Elkton township, and Edna. 
Louie. Alvin. Arthur. Albert: Melinda and Lillie. who are at home. The 



CLAY AXD NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 22^ 

Lenikes are members of the German Evangelical Lutheran church at Sabin 
and take a proper interest in church work, as well as in the general good 
\\orks and social activities of the community in which they live, helpful in 
promoting all agencies having to do with the advancement of the common 
welfare thereabout. 



J. PIERCE WOLFE. 



One of the substantial and successful men of Mourhead, Clay countv, 
who is engaged in the insurance business, in which he has met with much 
success, is J. Pierce Wolfe, who was born at Osseo, Hennepin county, Min- 
nesota, on July II, 1872, a son of John Wolfe and wife, who are prominent 
farmers and well-known and highly respected people of Nicollet countv, Min- 
nesota. The parents were much interested in the education of their children, 
and after the son, J. Pierce, completed his education in the local schools at St. 
Peter, Minnesota, he entered the Gustavus Adolphus College at St. Peter, 
where he later completed the course of study, in 1892. 

Soon after having completed his work at St. Peter, Mr. Wolfe came to 
Moorhead, where he established himself in business and where he has since 
resided. When he first came to Moorhead, he kept books for Jacob Kiefer 
for some years, and in April. 1898. he entered the general insurance busi- 
ness, in which he has met with much success. He has devoted his best 
efforts to this business and is today the agent and adjuster of the Security 
and Reliance Insurance companies for the states of North and South Dakota, 
Montana and the western |)art of Minnesota. Further, he is associated with 
E. A. Davis of Minneapolis as general agents of the hail department of the 
Security Insurance Company of Connecticut for North and South Dakota. 
Montana and Minnesota. Withal, as an insurance man, he is today recog- 
nized as one of the best in the state. Moreover, he is one of the directors of 
the Equity Manufacturing Company of Moorhead, and is an advisory direc- 
tor of the U. S. I. Realtv Company, a million-dollar corporation of Minneap- 
olis. Even though Mr. Wolfe's business interests cover a wide extent of 
territorv, \et his methods and progressive spirit place him in a positi(jn to 
know every detail in the territory in which his interests are located. 

It was on May 12, 1904, that J. Pierce Wolfe was united in marriage to 
Alice Ambs of Moorhead, and to this union two children have been born, 
Sarah and John, both of whom are now attending the local schools and are 
at home with their parents. Mr. and Mrs. Wolfe are active members of the 



224 CI. AY A.XD XOR.MAN COI-NTIKS. MINXliSOTA. 

l-^piscopal clnirch and have long lieen prominent in the social and the relig- 
ious life of tlie coninuinity in which they live, and where they are held in the 
highest regard and esteem by all who know thcni. 'riicy have always taken 
the greatest interest in the educational and moral development of the district, 
and their inllncncc has ]iad a marked effect on the high standing of the 
communitw 

Mr. Wolfe i-^ a memlier ni the IVec and .\ccepte(l Masons and has at- 
tained the Shriner degree, and is also a member of the Elks Lodge, Ancient 
Order of United Workmen and the Knights of the Maccabees. Of the 
latter organization he is a member of the state executive board, a position 
he has held for twelve years. He has also taken a prominent part in the 
local alYairs anrl for the past eight years he has been a member of the state 
Democratic central committee, to which he has devoted much time, thus 
winning much praise for the efficient work that he has rendered. 



JOHN C. SLI.I'.KUD. 



John C Sulerud, president of the State Bank oi llalstad, former pres- 
iclent of the \illage of Halstad, for years actively engaged in the hardware 
business at Halstad and the owner of a fine farm of two hvmdred acres 
north of that village, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, but has been a 
roident of this cnuniry since he was twenty-one years of age, having made 
his home in Xorman county ever since he came over. He was born on 
Januarv 5, 1862. seventh in order of birth of the eight children born to his 
parents. Christen .\. and Karen (Johnson) Sulerud, also natives of Nor- 
way, the former of whom was a blacksmith and farmer and both of whom 
spent ;dl their lives in their native land. The others of these children are 
Carl. Maren. Johan, Martin, Caroline, Sophia and the Hon. Christen I.. 
Sulerud. former representative in the Legislature from the sixty-first Alinne- 
sota district, who is engaged with his brother, the subject of this sketch, in 
the hardware Inisiness at Halstad and a biographical sketch of whom is pre- 
sented elsewhere in this volume. 

Reared on a farm in his native land, John C. Sulerud received his 
schooling in the common schools there and at the age of fifteen went into the 
citv of Christiania. where he became engaged as a clerk in a store and where 
he remained until he was twenty-one years of age, when, in 1883. he came 
to the United States and proceeded on out to Minnesota, his destination 



p 
m 

id 



/ 




CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 225 

being Norman county. For the first year after his arrival here he was 
engaged in farm labor and then, in the fall of 1884, he secured employment 
as a clerk in a store at Ada and was thus engaged at that place for about 
nine years, or until 1894, when he and his brother, C. L. Sulerud, opened a 
hardware store at Halstad and have ever since been thus engaged at that 
place, long having been regarded as among the leading merchants and citi- 
zens of that thriving little city. Since 19 14 John C. Sulerud has been the 
president of the State Bank of Halstad and in addition to his banking and 
mercantile interests at Halstad is the owner of a fine farm of two hundred 
acres, two miles north of the village, to the operation of which he gives his 
interested attention. Mr. .Sulerud has given his earnest attention to local 
civic affairs and has served as a member of the village council and as presi- 
dent of the same. 

Mr. Sulerud has lieen twice married. His tirst wife, who was Anna 
.\aker, daughter of Hans .\aker, died in 1895 withont issue and on August 
i,. 1902. he married Christine Holmberg, to which union three children have 
been born: Allen C, l^uth and John Clintdn. Mr. and Mrs. Sulerud are 
Mienibers of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take an active interest in 
■hurch work, for the past twenty }ears Mr. Siderud having been treasurer 
• >\ the local congregation. 

Mrs. Sulerud is the daughter and only child of .\rnt and Bereth 
( lirotten ) Reiten. natives of Norway, who upon coming to this country set- 
tled in Houston countv, this state, later coming up into the Red River conn- 
try and settling in Xnrman county, where -\rnt Reiten died in 1876. His 
widow married Charles Hulml)erg two years later and by his death in 1879 
was again left a widow. .She is still living and is now making her home 
with her daughter, Mrs. Sulerud. By her second marriage she is the mother 
of one child, a daughter. Margaret, wife of James Larson, cashier of the 
State Bank of Halstad and a biographical sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this volume. Charles Holmberg was one of the pioneers of Nor- 
man c>iuntv. hax'ing settled in the neighborhood of what is now the Brant 
farm, near Halstad, in 1870. he and his party camping there in a tent until 
the\- could make arrangements for permanent places of habitation. At that 
time Indians still were numerous throughout this region and game was 
plentiful. In 1914 Mrs. .Sulerud visited the scene of that jiioneer camp and 
there unearthed some of the camp utensils that had been left by the party of 
settlers. 

(iSa) 



226 CLAY AND NOKMAX COUNTIES^ MINNESOTA. 

D.WID E. I'-ULTON. 

13a\i<I v.. I'liltuii. auditor of Xorniaii couiitv, casliic-r of the Fanners 
Bank of Ada and for years actively engaged in tlic real-estate business in 
that city, is a native son of Minnesota and has lived in this state all his 
life, a resident of Xorman county since he was eigliteen years of age. lie 
was horn in the city of Red Wing, this state, in 1861, a son of Sanmel .\l. 
and Elizaheth J. (Hutchinson) Fulton, hoih of whom were horn in llutlcr 
county, Pennsylvania, and who came to Minnesota in 1859, locating at 
Red Wing, where Samuel M. Fulton engaged in the d ravage business. 

In i87() Samuel M. F\ilton left Red W'ing and with his family came 
up into this part of the state and settled on a homestead tract in what later 
came to be (organized as Winchester township, Norman county, which farm 
he improved and there made his home for fifteen years or more, or uniil 
his retirement from the active labors of the farm, when he moved to .\d,i, 
where he and his wife spent their last days in the lujuie of their .son. ihc 
subject of this sketch. Samuel .M. l-'ulton and wife formerly were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church, but when the Congregationalists effecte<l 
an organization here they became affiliatefl with that denomination. Of 
their children five are now living, .\lzada, David K.. Mary, J. H. and Min- 
nie M. 

.\s noted al)(ne, l)a\id F. I'ulton was eighteen years of age when he 
came to this section with his ])arents fn:>m Red W ing in 1879 and he at 
once entered upon die task of aiding in the development of the homestead 
farm in Winchester township. In 1883, he by that time having arrived at 
legal age. he took a homestead claim of his own and for a short time fol- 
lowed farming on his own account, but presently gave that up and engaged 
in the buying of grain in the neighboring county of Polk, presently engag- 
ing in the real-estate business at Ada. in which he was engaged for about 
four or five years, at the end of which time he was made cashier of a 
bank at Beltrami, where he remained for four years. He then returned to 
.\da, resuming there his real-estate business, and in the fall of 1904 was 
elected auditor of Xorman county, a position of trust and responsibility 
he ever since has held, the voters of the county displaying their confidence 
in him by successive re-elections. Mr. Fulton helped to organize the Farm- 
ers Bank at Ada and is the cashier of that institution. 

In December, 1887. Da\id E. Fulton was united in marriage to I^Ila 
M. Phelps, of Dane county, Wisconsin, a daughter of Rolland Phelps and 



CLAY AND XORMAN COtNTIES, MINNESOTA. 22/ 

wife, and to this union two dauijliters lia\e been l)orn, Jean .\[aric and 
;\Iillicent. Mr. and Mrs. l-'ulton attend tlie Congregational cliurch and take 
a ])roper i)art in the \arious beneficences of the same, as well as in the 
general social acti\ities of their home city. Mr. Fulton is a member of tlic 
local lodges of the Independenl ( )r(ler of Odd Fellows, of the Knights nf 
Pythias and of the Modern Woodmen of .\merica, and in the atTairs of 
these or.c;anizations takes a warm interest. 



MAGNUS P. NFLSON. 



Magnus P. Xelson is of Swedish nativity and ancestry, which runs 
back through several generations. He was born in Sweden. February 20. 
1845, '^ ^o" "^f Nels Pearson, and .\nne Xelson. both born in Sweden. The 
father was a farmer in Sweden and spent his entire life in that country. 
He had five children: Xellie, Ole. Ma.gnus 1'.. Sii,M-e and Fllcn. He was a 
member of the Swedish Lutheran church. 

Magnus P. Xelson was educated in the public schools in Swetlen and 
worked with his father on the farm in his youthful days. Later he started 
farming on his own account. With a view of seeking larger opportunities 
for a livelihood, he came to America in 1866. Lie located first at Red Wing, 
Goodhue count\. Minnesota, where he found employment on a farm, con- 
tinuing at that iilace for six years. In 1871 he returned to his native land 
for a visit and after remaining there for a short time returned again to 
America, bringing his mother with him. He located again in Goodhue county. 
Minnesota, and resumed w(jrk on the farni. In 1880, he came to l"la\- county. 
Minnesota, and located on a tract of land that he had bought in 1878. '^lli^ 
land comprises a farm of one hundred and twent\- acres, lying on the river 
three miles south of Moorhead. In 1883 he bought eighty acres of land in sec- 
tion 30, on which he put up buildings and made other improvements. He 
made his home on this place and was engaged in general farming until the 
sjiring of 1014, at which time he removed to Moorhead, where he has since 
continued to live. .\t one time Mr. Nelson was the owner of four hun- 
dred and ei,ght\- acres of l;md. ;i part of which he ha-> sold. ;uid now owns 
three hundred and twenty acres of good farming land. Though living a 
somewhat retired life, Mr. Xelson continues to look after his farming inter- 
ests and continues to take an active interest in public affairs. .\s one of the 
pioneers of Clay county, he has always occupied a iimminent place in ct)unty 



228 CL.W AND XOKMAX COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

affairs and is lield in ln.t;h esteem in the cumniunity ut which he has been 
an honored citizen. 

Mr. Xelson was one of the organizers of the Swedish Lutheran church, 
in Moorheatl. in 1880. and has been for many years a deacon in the same 
and prominent in all the activities of the societ) . In civic positions he has 
ser\ ed as supervisor in the township of Moorhead ; also as chairman of the 
township l)oard. At the time of removal from the township to the town of 
Moorhead, he was treasurer of the former. He also served for some time 
as clerk of the school board of the township. 

In 1884. Mr. Nelson was married to Carrie Jenson and to this union 
five ciiildren were born, namely: Edith. Agnes, Manfred, .\lfred and 
l\rnest : the latter is living on the old home farm. 



ARTHUR A. McCAKT.W. 

.\rthur .\. McLarlan, president of the l>arnes\ille Record-Review 
rul)lishing Company, head of the real-estate firm of McCartan & W'halen at 
Barnesville and a member of the common council of that city, for years one 
of the most energetic and public-spirited citizens of Barnesville, was formerly 
an Iowa farmer, hut since l)ecoming a resident of Barnesville in lyoi has 
been engaged in tiie real-estate and newspaper business and has done well 
there. He was born in the city of Dubuque, Iowa. October 3, 1867, son 
of Bernard and Mary ( McXamara) McCartan, the former of whom was 
I)orn in Ireland and the latter in the city of Buffalo, Xew York, who were 
the i)arents of thirteen children, all of whom grew to maturity sa\e three. 
For some time after he came to this country, as a young man, Bernard 
McCartan followed the vocation of a miner, Init later became a farmer and 
his last days were spent in Iowa. 

Reared on a farm in Iowa, .\rthur A. McCartan received his school- 
ing in tlie schools of that state, and early became engaged in farming. 
which \ocation he followed in that state until 1901. in which year he came 
up here into the Red River coimtry and located at Barnesville, where he 
l)ecanie engaged in the real -estate business and where he has ever since con- 
tinued actively engaged in that line, head of the firm of McCartan & W'halen. 
About two years after he locatctl at Barnesville the Record-Review Publish- 
ing Company was organized at tliat place and that company has since been 
engagefl there in the publication of the Banics2nlle Record. Since the 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 22g 

organization of that company .Mr. McCartan lias taken an active interest 
in tlie same and most of tiie time has served tlie companv in the capacilv 
of president, which position he now occupies, thougli until lately giving little 
attention to the actual details of newspaper work, his real-estate operatiuns 
occupying the greater part of his time. In January, icji/, the manager 
of the Record died and Mr. .McCartan was compelled to assume the manage- 
ment of the paper until such time as he could find a successor for the late 
manager. Mr. McCartan takes an active interest in local political affairs 
and for the past four years and more has been serving as a member of tlic 
city council from his ward. 

In November, 1914, Arthur .V. McCartan was united in marriage t'l 
Gundrun Scow, daughter of Erick O. Scow, of Halstad, in the neighboring 
county of Norman, and to this union one child has been Ixjrn, a son, .\ithur 
.Vustin. ;\Ir. and Mrs. McCartan are members of the Catholic church ;ind 
take a proper interest in parish affairs. 



A. T. THOMAS. 



A. T. Thomas, a farmer of Kragnes township. Clay county, was born 
in Norway on June 24, 1848, and there he grew to manhood and attended 
the common schools. He is a son of Torge and Kenne Islik (Tommas) 
Tonimas, natives of Norway, where they grew up. married and established 
their home, spending their lives there, the father dying when about forty- 
six years old, his wife having preceded him to the grave by three years. The 
father was a laborer all his life. To these parents four children were born, 
namel}-: Osmon, who makes his home in Alaska: Sarah, who is married and 
lives in Minnesota: .\. T., the subject of this sketch, and Christie, who died 
at about the age of seven years. 

A. T. Thomas was nineteen years old when his father died. He re- 
mained in Norway until he was twenty-one, when he immigrated to Amer- 
ica, locating first in Houston county, Minnesota, and for some time worked 
out as a hired hand on a farm. He .saved his earnings and in 1878, after 
he had spent three years in Clay county, he purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres in section 15, Kragnes township, later buying one hundred and sixty 
acres in section 10, same township. He has made all the improvements on 
his land, including a substantial set of buildings. He has been quite suc- 
cessful as a general farmer and stock raiser and has one of the best farms 



27,0 CI. AY AM) XOK.MAX COL'XTIKS. MINNESOTA. 

ill Ill's locality, in which he has lived since the ]iioiieer days, when this sec- 
tion of tlie state was sparsely settled. 

On I line ,^o. iS()o, Mr. Thomas was married to .Anna K. Gletna, in 
l''argo, Xorth Dakota. She was horn in Norway on March ii. 1862. and 
there she sjient lier girlhood and attended school. Her parents. Knut K. 
and Maria 1 .. 1 lierystal ) Gletna. were natives of Norway. He died in 
.\orwav in about loi.V I ''e mother is si ill livins;- in Norway. Tliere were 
seven children in the (iletna family, six of whom are livin.t;. Two of these, 
Johanna and Marie, came to .\iiierica; the others are still living in Norway. 
.\lr>. Thomas came to .\merica in 1889, locating at Fargo. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas live children have been horn: Theodore. Regina. Louis. Clar- 
ence and .Arthur. 

Politicallv. .Mr. Thomas is a Uepuhlican. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Norwegian Lutheran church. 



WILLI A. M S. LEE. 

William S. Lee, cashier of the Citizens .State liank of Baniesviile and 
one of the best-known and most energetic bankers in Clay county, is a 
native son of Minnesota and has lived in this state all his life. He was 
iiorn at Little l-"alls. in Morrison county, on December 2. 1872, son of 
Samuel Lee. an early merchant at that place and who was one of the first 
to operate a ferrv across the Mississippi river there. During the seventies 
Samuel Lee mo\ed from Little Falls to Long Prairie and in the latter place 
started a store, which he continued to operate until bi< death .M>nie years 
later. 

Reared at Long Prairie, to which place his parents had moved when 
he was but a child, William S. Lee received his schooling there and early 
became thoroughly familiar with business forms and the mercantile busi- 
ness, through association with his father in the latter"s store. .After his 
father's death he continued to operate the store for about two years, at 
the end of which time he disposed of his business interests there and entered 
a store at .\kelev. Not long afterward he was employed to take charge 
of a department store t'or .\. L. Cole at .Akeley, going thence, after a while, 
to Eagle Bend, where for five years he was engaged as assistant cashier of 
the First National Bank of that place. In 1907 Mr. Lee went from Eagle 
Bend to Elizabeth, where he organized the Merchants State Bank and was 



CI.AY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 23I 

made cashier of the same: remaining there until 191 1, in which vear lie 
moved to Barnesville and tliere organized tlie Citizens State P'.anl< of Barnes- 
ville and since May 31, 191 1, has heen cashier of the same. Mr. Lee not 
only is an active 1)anker, but lie takes an interested part in the general 
business and civic affairs of liis Iiome town, a consistent "Ijooster" of the 
various enterprises of that thriving city. While living at Long Prairie he 
served for some time as village recorder, probably the \oungest otficial that 
village ever had. He also served as a member of the village council there 
and served in a like capacity during his residence at Eagle Bend. 

In 1905, while living at Eagle Bend, William S. Lee was united in 
marriage to Myrtle A. Euller, daughter of George E. Euller, of Moorhead. 
and to this union two sons have been born, Robert G. and Charles S. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lee are members of the Baptist church and take an interested 
part in church work, as well as in the general good works and social activi- 
ties of their home town, helpful in many ways in promoting agencies having 
to do with the advancement of the common welfare thereabout. Mr. Lee is 
a Mason and a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias and 
of the Independent Order of United Workmen, and in the affairs of these 
several organizations takes a warm interest. 



EDMUND L. BROWN. 



Edmund L. Brown, a well-known realty dealer at Barnesville, was 
born in Memphis, Tennessee, March 10, 1872, a son of Judge B. C. Brown, 
who was born in Pulaski, Tennessee, and Jeanette B. (Booker) Brown, 
who was born in .Memphis, Tennessee. Judge B. C. Brown was attorney 
for the Southwestern division of the Missouri Pacific Railroad and had an 
e.xtensive general law practice at the tiiue of his death, which occurred at 
Little Rock, in 1888. His children are: Benjamin C, wlio is an artist in. 
Pasadena. California: Annie, who married Isaac B. Gardener, superintendent 
of the state institute for the deaf and dumb, at I-ittle Rock, Arkansas; and 
Edmund L., the subject of this sketch. Mrs. Brown, mother of these chil- 
dren, died in 1872. 

After the death of his first wife. Judge Brown married Ida Jordan, who 
is now living in I'asadena, California. The children by the second wife 
are: Howell J., a designer living in Pasadena, who designed the floats for 



232 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

the tournament of roses in that city, and Sibley, who also lives in Pasadena, 
California. 

Edmund L. Brown was educated in the public schools of Little Rock, 
Arkansas. As a young man he served an apprenticeship in the office of the 
.4rkansas Gascffc, at Little Rock and was for some time reporter and city 
editor of that paper. In 1894 he moved to Indianapolis, Indiana, where he 
was married to Lucy Huxley, of Martinsville. Indiana. He removed to 
Martinsville, where he was engaji^ed for nine years in the manufacture of 
old hickory chairs and rockers. Then he went to Seymour, Indiana, where 
he had a factor}- in the same line of business for six years. Then he wen) 
to Janesville, Wisconsin, and established a factory for the making of fireless 
cookers, and continued in that business at that place for four years. In 
1913 he came to Minnesota and engaged in the real-estate business at 
Baniesville, and has been thus engaged in that city ever since. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brown have one daughter, Frances, who is now a student 
at Oberlin College, ()l)erlin, Ohio, taking a special course in that institution. 
Mr. Brown is a Scottish Rite .Mason, aftiliated with the consistory of the 
\'alley of Indianapolis, and is a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of 
X'obles of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with Murat Temple of that order at 
Indianapolis. 



.\LBERT T. WRIGHT. 



Albert J. Wright, undertaker and funeral tlirectnr at Moorhead, is a 
native of Norway as were all his ancestors. He was lx)rn in Norway 
on August 14, 1858. a son of .\ndrew and Oliaima (Sannes) Wright, who 
were born and spent the greater part of their lifetime in that country. In 
i860 the father of our subject came to America and located at LaCrosse, 
Wisconsin, where he remained until 1876. In that year he rcmo\ed to Fill- 
more county. Minnesota, where he is still living. He is a minister in the 
United Lutheran church. His children are Albert T-. -Anna W., Marie O., 
Laura J.. Edwin P.. William R.. Ella T., Samuel J. and Hilma Louise. 

.\lhert T. Wright came with his father to America in his chiidhocKJ 
vears. He received his education in the schools of LaCrosse, Wisconsin 
anil in the high school at Rushford, Minnesota, from which he was grad- 
uated. He taught school for two years and then was engaged in farming 
for about three years in Mower county. Minnesota. In 1881 he came to 
Moorhead and engaged in the undertaking business and has contiiuied in 



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ALBERT J. WRIGHT. 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



TILDE.N 



vVlONS 



CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 233 

this business ever since, liis beino; the oldest undertaking- establishment in 
Moorhead. 

-Mr. W'ritjht lias been twice married. His first wife was Julia A. 
Colberg. to whom he was married in 1878. To that union four children 
were born : Albert Lawrence, ^Valter Collins, Russell Sherman and Lillian 
C. The mother of these children died in 1893. Mr. \Vright"s second wife 
was Christine Soreng, and by this marriage five children have been born : 
Edgar Eugene, Alice Marie, Henry Morris, Clarence Bernard and Norman 
Eerdinand. The family are members of the United Lutheran church. Mr. 
Wright served for twenty-eight years as superintendent of the Sunday 
school in this church, and lias held uther official positions in the same. 

-Mr. Wright has held several official civic i)ositions. Eor three or four 
}ears he ser\ed as city recorder ; was chief of the fire department for eight 
years; in 1912 he was elected county commissioner of Clay county and was 
re-elected to that office in 19 16 and holds that office at present. Fraternally, 
he is affiliated with the Ancient Order of United \\^)rkmen, with the Knights 
of the Maccabees and with the Sons of Norwav. 



TORGRIM OLSON MORKEN. 

Among the successful self-made men of a past generation in Clay 
county, whose efforts and influence contributed to the general welfare of 
his locality, the late Torgrim Olson Morken, one of the sterling pioneers 
of Morken township, occujjied a conspicuous place, and his record is well 
worth setting forth in a volume of the province of the one in hand. 

Mr. Morken was born in Norway on October 14, 1846, and there he 
grew to manhood and attended school. He was a son of Ole Torgrim 
Morken and wife, natives of Norway, where they grew up. married and 
continued to reside until 1867, when they immigrated to America, locating 
in Houston count}', Minnesota, where they established their home on a 
farm, and there the death of the father occurred in September, 1888. The 
subject of this memorial sketch came to America with his parents at the 
age of nineteen years. He was the youngest of a family of five children. 
the others being as follow: Tona. who is married and lives in Houston 
countv; Nels, who is also married and lives in that same county: Salva. 
deceased, and Ole. deceased. 

Torgrim O. Morken de\oted his active life to general fanning ami 



234 CLAY AXD NOK.MAN COUNTIKS. MINNESOTA. 

Stock raisino- and met with s'latifyins- success. He worked out as a larni 
hand while Hving in Houston county, later worked in the Lake Superior 
copper mines for some time, and also worked several months tor the South 
Minnesota railroad. He came to Clay county in 1S73, being one of the 
pioneers in this section of the state. He took up the first homestead in 
.\lorken townshi]). ac<|uiring one hundred and sixty acres in section 30. 
He broke the wild prairie sod with oxen and continued farming with ox- 
teams for two vears. He finally had his land under an excellent state of 
cultivation and erected a substantial set of buildings on the same, and there 
he carried on general farming until his death, ranking among the best 
farmers of his townshii). After his death his widow bought one hundred 
and sixty acres in the same section as the original homesteail, and there 
she still resides. She is a woman of much business ability and has man- 
aged the farm well, raising a great deal of grain and large numbers of live 
stock annually. 

Mr. Morken was married in 1878 to Augusta Kassenborg, who was 
jjorn in Houston county, Minnesota, in i860, and there .she spent her girl- 
hood and received her education in the early-day rural schools. She is a 
daughter of Andrew and Tilda (Olson) Kassenborg. natives of Norway, 
the father born there on December i, 1836. They had come to this country 
with their res))ective jiarents in 1850, the families settling in Rock county, 
Wisconsin. There thev were married in 1858 and continued to reside there 
until 1S76. when they came to Minnesota, beginning life in Clay county 
ill t>pical pioneer fashion. They endured ten years of hardships and pri- 
vations, but perse\ered and eventually developed a good farm from the 
raw prairie and established a comfortable home. The death of Mr. Kas- 
senborg occurred in September, 191 3. He held numerous township oftices 
and was an influential man in his community. His widow is still living, 
at the adxanced age of eighty-three years. They had eight children. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Morken ten children were born, as follow: Andrew, 
who owns a farm in Marshall county, Minnesota, which he is operating; 
Gilbert, who works in a lumber camp at Rose Lake, Idaho; Salve, who 
owns a farm at Park Rapids. Minnesota, and is actively engaged in farming 
there: :\lartin. who is farming near the place of his brother Andrew; John, 
unmarried, who is a commercial traveler; Obert, who is helping operate 
the home farm in Morken township: Henry, who also lives at home and 
works on the farm: Tilda, who works out. and Trina and Sophia, who 
live at home and assist their mother keeping house. 

Mr. Morken was independent in politics. He was a member of the 



CLAV AND XOKMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 235 

Norwegian Lutlieran cliurcli, to whicli his family also belong. He had been 
in failing health for a numijer of years and, in 1883, made a visit to Nor- 
way, believing that the change would benefit him. He took an active interest 
in public affairs, and was the first townshi]) clerk of Morken township: 
was also treasurer of his township for a number of years and served as 
supervisor and clerk of the school board in his district. He was one of 
the public-spirited and useful men of his townshi]) and the entire locality- 
expressed sincere regret at his death, which occurred on October 7, 1908. 
he then being sixtv-two }'ears of age. He was a. man of good character- 
and was highly respected. 



OTTO DAHL. 



Otto Dahl. (if Miiiirhead, was burn in Alnnrcjc county. Wisconsin, I'^eb- 
ruary 22, 1871. a son of Anton ( )lean ( Opsahl ) Dahl. both natives of Norway. 
Anton Dahl came to America about 186S and first located in .Monroe county. 
Wisconsin. In 1871 he removed to Trem)iealeau countw \Visconsin. where 
he entered a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres. He improved this 
land and made hi^ home there until his death, which occurred about 1883. 
He was the fatliei- of six children: ( Ml<i, Matilda. Ingo, Mahin. .Xdoljih 
and Marie. 

(Jtto Dahl was educated in the public scliools of Trempealeau county, 
Wisconsin. His father died while he was still _\^oung and the charge of 
the farm came to him at the age of fifteen \-ears. lie continued to work 
on the farm until he was twenty-fi\'e years of a.ge. at which time his brother 
was old enough to take charge, ami he then went to Luther College, at 
Decorab, Iowa, to take a course of study in that institution. In 1897 he 
came with his uncle. Jens J. Opsahl. to Mimie.sota and they opened a store 
in the line of general merchandise at b'elton, in Clay county. They con- 
tinued the business as jiartners for two years, at the end of which time 
Otto Dahl (lis])osi.-(l of his interest to his uncle and. in connection with his 
brother-in-law. T. ( ). Alelby, opened uj) another general st(jre in Felton. 
They continued in this business, under the firm name of Dahl & Melby. 
until 1907. In the meantime the business liad grown to such an extent 
that a branch store had been established at Wilton, in Beltrami county, 
and in 1907 Mr. Dahl bought his ])artner"s interest in the Felton and Wil- 
ton stores, and took in his two brothers as partners in the branch store 
at W'illon. Mr. Dahl continued business at Felton tmtil December. 1914. 



236 (LAY AND NORMAN COUNTIKS. MINNESOTA. 

wlien he removed to Moorhead, wlicre he lias since hved. He still owns 
the business at Felton. 

In 1897 Mr. Dahl was married to Mae l)ewell. a daughter of lierlieri 
O. Dewell, of Le Roy, Minnesota. To this union four children have been 
horn: .\nton. who died at the age of ten years: Doris, \'irgil and Oliver 
Wendell. Mr. and Mrs. Dahl are members of the Congregational church 
at Moorhead. 

While li\ing at i'"elton Mr. Dahl served as a meml)er of the .school 
Intard and as a member of the village council, of which he was president 
for two years, and also held other offices of trust. lie was actively inter- 
ested in getting the first church built in Felton. Mr. Dahl has always been 
interested in music, and while living in Felton organized and was the director 
of the brass band at that place, the membership being composed of village 
and Cfjuntry boys. 



JOHN OBERG. 

.\o life is more satisfactory than that of the farmer, provided he has 
the right outlook and the proper attitude toward his work. One of the 
contented and successful agriculturists of Clay county is John Oberg of 
Kragnes township, who is also interested in the banking business and is one 
of the leading citizens of his locality, a splendid example of a self-made 
man. 

Mr. Oberg was born in Xorway in 1855. a son of luigebrigt au.d Maria 
Oberg, both natives of Xorway. where they grew up. married and establisheil 
their home, never coming to America. They devoted their active li\es 1 1 
farming. The death of the father occurred in 1905 at the advanced age 
of eighty-six. and the mother reached the luiusual age of ninety-tw-o. dying 
in 1909. To these parents the following children were born: Xels, .\ndrew, 
Ola, Mar\, Ole and John, three of whom are living in Xorway on farnis. 

John Oberg grew to manhood in Xorway, where he attended school 
there, and. as a boy. helpetl his father on the farm. He came to .'\mcrica 
in 1879, first locating in Houston county. Minnesota, but in a short time 
went to \\'isconsin where he spent three years working in a lumber camp. 
He came to Clay county in 1882 and, during his residence here, of thirty- 
i\ye years, has .seen the country transformed from a wild stretch of plains 
to one of the foremost farming communities in the state. He has played 
well his part in this transformation, being a useful citizen from the first. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 237 

He owned a store at Kragnes for about six years and in i8gi bought six 
hundred and eighty-five acres in sections 24 and 2() in Kragnes townshii). 
which he still owns. He replaced the old Iniildings with substantial new 
ones and made other improvements. In 1900 he bought one-fourth of 
section 13 and subse(|uentl_\- another one- fourth of the same section, on 
which holding he also erected new buildings. He is now ow-ner of one 
thousand and seven acres, and also owns the picturesque Riverside Addi- 
tion in the city of Moorheacl. He has carried on general farming and 
stock raising on an e-\tensi\e scale for man}- _\ears and is regarded as one 
of the foremost general agriculturists in Clay county. He keeps an excel- 
lent grade of live stock, preparing many cattle for the market annually, 
feeding to them a large portion of the immense amount of grain he raises, 
liis land is all under a high state of scientific cultivation. 

Mr. Oberg is deserving of a great deal of credit for what he ha'^ 
accomplished unaided, ha\ing started out with very little capital and no 
influential friends in a new land, where e\en the language was strange, 
but be has forged to the front amid discoura.ging environments and is today 
one of the representative citizens of western Minnesota. Besides farming, 
he is interested in a financial wa\- in various enterprises, being a business 
man of rare foresighl and acumen. He is a stockholder in the Norwegian- 
American Steamship Line, the ()lness Luml)er Company in Montana, of 
which he is president, the Houglam b^umiture Company of Moorbead, also 
the Pederson Mercantile Conijjany of that city, the Cream of Barley Com- 
pany of Minneapolis, and the Service Machine Company of Chicago. He 
is also financiallv interested in numerous banks. He was one of the organ- 
izers of the First State Bank of Moorhead and has been vice-president of 
the same almost all tlie time it was organized. He is a stockholder in the 
State Bank at South Haven, Minnesota; the Farmers and Merchants Bank 
at Steele, North Dakota: the State Bank at I'erley. Minnesota: the TM|uit\- 
Bank at Fargo, North Dakota: the Peoples Bank in St. Paul, and the 
Bankers Trust and Savings Company in Minneapolis. 

Air. Oberg was married in Fargo, North Dakota, in 1890, to Christina 
Nelsen, a native of Goodhue county, Minnesota. She received a good edu- 
cation and was a woman of man\ commendable traits of bead and heart. 
Her death occurred on the home farm, in Clay county, in 1903, at the 
earlv age of thirty-four years. Si.\ children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Oberg, all of whom are now living at home with the exception of the 
eldest, who is deceased; tbe\- are Ingemann. who died when seventeen years 
old; Goodman, Maria, Josephine, Nettie and Martin. 



238 CLAY AND XOKMAN COUXTIES, MIXXESOTA. 

Politically, .Mr. ()ber<f is an independent voter. lie has never been 
\ery active in public affairs, nor a seeker for politica.! leadership, however, 
he has always stood ready to support all movements luuing for their objeel 
the general upbuildino- of his locality, trying at all times to perform ihv 
duties of a good citizen. He was a memljer of the school lx:)ard in district 
Xo. 101 for many years, and he also served as treasurer and supervisor 
of the town board for many years. Other business interests with which Mr. 
(^berg has been and is connected are: the Farmers Elevator Company of 
Moorhead, which he helped to organize; the Moorhead Telephone Com- 
pany, of which he was treasurer, and the Comstock antl Ploly Cross Insur- 
ance Company, of which he was a director and also an agent. He is .1 
wide reader and has kept well informed along general lines and personally 
his reputation has ever been alKive all idle cavil. He is held in high esteem 
bv all who know him. 



ANDRE. \S O. lEL AND. 



.Andreas O. Ueland, lawyer and banker, of Halstad, recorder of ili.it 
village for a number of years, and one of the best-known citizens of Xorman 
county, is a native of the kingdom of Xorway, but has been living in Minne- 
.sota. a resident of Xorqian count}', since he was eighteen years of age. He 
was born on October i. 1871, son of C). M. and Bertha (Eeg) Ueland. 
lK)th natives of Xorway. farming people, who spent all their lives in th.it 
country. They were members of the Lutheran church and their children 
were reared in that faith. There were ten of these children, of whom 
the subject of this sketch was the fifth in order of l)irth. the others being 
Martha. .Anna, Ole G.. Enoch. Christine. -\rne. Olga, Christan and Tine. 

Reared on a farm, .\ndrcas O. I'eland completed his local schooling in 
the schools of his native amt and when eighteen years of age, in iSSc). 
came to the United States and proceeded on out to Minnesota, his point 
of destination being Xonnan county. He spent the first two years after 
his arrival here in Shelly tow nship. attending school there during the winters, 
advancing his study of English, and during the following winter attendeil 
Concordia College at Moorhead. He then entered Curtis Business Col- 
lege at Minneapolis and after a course there returned to Xorman county 
and, in 1893. ^^^* installed as bookkeeper in the State Bank of Halstad. 
The following winter he returned to Minneapolis and in the fall of 1894 
entered the law department of the University of Minnesota, from which 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 239 

he was graduated in the spring of 1896. Upon receiving his diploma Mr. 
Ueland remained employed in a law office at Minneapolis until the summer 
of 1897, when he returned to Xorman county and opened an office for 
the practice of his profession at Halstad, where he e\er since has made his 
home and where he has continued in practice, one of the best-known mem- 
bers of the bar in this section of the state. For years .Mr. Ueland served 
as recorder of the \illage of Halstad and since 1907 has been engaged as 
assistant cashier of the State ISank of Halstad. In his jiolitical affiliation 
he is a Democrat and gives his thoughtful attention to local civic affairs. 
In 1897 Andreas O. Ueland was united in marriage to Elsie Ueland. 
daughter of Nels N. Ueland and wife, of Shelly township. Xorman county. 
She died in 1899 without issue. Mr. Ueland is a member of the local 
society of the Sons of Norway and of the local lodge of the Knights 
of Pythias, in the affairs of both of which organizations he takes an acti\e 
interest. 



OSCAR LOVSNES. 



Oscar Lovsnes, a well-known hardware merchant of Halstad antl for- 
mer member of the village council there, is a nati\e son of Xorman count\' 
and has li\ed there all his life. He was born on a pioneer farm in Halstad 
township, August 28, 1878, son of Engel and Mollie (Serum) Lovsnes, 
natives of Norway, who came to the United States in 186C) and proceeded 
on out to Minnesota, locating in Fillmore county. There they remained 
until about 1872, when they came up into this part of the state and home- 
steaded a farm in what later came to lie organized as Halstad township. 
Xorman county, and there spent the rest of their lives, substantial antl 
influential pioneers. Engel Lovsnes and his wife were the i)arents of eight 
children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the fourth in order of 
birth, the others being: Camella, Syvert, Isabel, Ella, Clara, Marie and 
Emma, all of whom are living save Ella, who died when about fifteen years 
of age, and Clara, who died at the age of twelve years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lovsnes were earnest members of the Xorwegian Lutheran church, active 
workers in the same, and their children were reared in the faith of that 
denomination. 

Reared on the paternal farm in Halstad township, Oscar Lovsnes re- 
ceived his early training in the schools of that township .and at the village 
school at Halstad and supiilemented the same by a course in the Metro- 



240 CLAY AND XORMAX COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

politan Business College at Minneapolis. In 1902 he began his mercantile 
career as a clerk in the hardware store of the Solerud Brothers at Halstad. 
and four years later, in 1906, bought a hardware store at Ada, remaining 
in business there for four years. .At the end of that peritxl. in 1910, he 
returned to Halstad. bought an interest in the store of his former emi>Ioyers, 
Solerud Brothers, and has ever since been thus connected with that long- 
established and progressive firm. Mr. Lovsnes gi\es proper attention to 
local civic affairs and has served for one term as a member of the Halstad 
village council. He is affiliated with the local lodge of the Knights of 
Pythias and takes a warm interest in the affairs of that order. 

In 1905 Oscar Lovsnes was united in marriage to Minnie Beise, daugh- 
ter of .August Beise and wife, and to this union three children have been 
born, Russell, A\'allacc and Eleanor. Mr. and Mrs. Lovsnes have a very 
pleasant home at Halstad and take a proper part in the general socird 
activities of the village. 



D.WID ASKKG.\ARD. 



A well-known citizen of the southwestern part of Clay county is David 
.Askegaard, merchant, banker, lumber and elevator man of Comstock, where 
he owned a farm before the village was started. He was born in Norway, 
June 19, i<^53. and is a son of David and Johanna Askegaard, both 
natives of Norway, where they grew up and married and continued 
to reside until 1872, when they immigrated with their family to the 
L'nited Slates, locating in Cass county. North Dakota, where the father 
entered a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Pleasant town- 
ship, which he developed into a farm and there he and his wife spent 
the rest of their lives. Their family consisted of the following children : 
Corrinne. Ingeborg, Clara, Ole, David, John, Otto. Peter, Johannes and 
Mary. 

The junior David Askegaard grew to inanhood in Norway and there 
he attended the public schools. He was nineteen years old when he came 
with the rest of the family to America. As a young man he took up 
a homestead of eighty acres in Pleasant township, Cass county, North Da- 
kota, which he developed into a farm through hard \vork and perseverance, 
remaining there until 1886. when he removed to Holy Cross township. 
Clay county, Minnesota, and bought the land on which the \illage of Com- 
stock now stands. Here he improved another farm and established the 




>rr!. AM) Mi;s. kavih askhcjaakd. 



tsEV^' 



Y0R1^ 






CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 24I 

l';iniil\- home. In 1890 he iiio\ecl to Conistock and started a general store 
in partnership witli a .Mr. HaHand under the firm name of Halland & 
Askegaard. and he ha.s lieen successfully engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness ever since, enjoying a large and constantly growing trade. He carries 
an extensive general stock of goods. In 1909 he assisted in organizing 
the Comstock State Bank and was elected vice-president of the same. He 
is now president of the bank. The rapid growth of this sound and popular 
institution has been due very largely to his able management and local 
prestige. In 1891 Mr. .Vskegaard established the Askegaard elevator at 
Comstock and he also manages a lumber yard in Comstock. Both have been 
very successful and are growing industries. In fact, whatever Mr. Aske- 
gaard turns his attention to results in gratifying financial returns, for the 
is a man of rare foresight and soundness of judgment and is one of the 
strong financial men of Clay county, as well as one of the most influential 
men of affairs in this locality. From 1892 to 1913 he was vice-president 
of the First National Bank of Moorhead. In addition to the five and a 
halt sections of fine land Mr. Aske.gaard owns in his home township, he 
is the owner of three cpiarter sections in another township in Clay county, 
a section in Montana and a quarter section in North Dakota. 

In 1876 David Askegaard was united in marriage to Minnie Dunhoui. 
who was born in Xorwax', daughter of Fric Dunhom and wife, who spent 
all their lives in their native land. .Mrs. .V.skegaard and her three sisters 
came to the United States in 1870 and after a year spent in Fillmore county, 
ihis state, came up into this part of the state and was living in Otter Tail 
county at the time of her marriage. To that union were born ten children, 
of whom four are deceased, Milla. .\rthur, Delia and Henry, those living 
being Milla (second), Edwin, Eugene, .\rthur (second), Corrinne and Delia 
(second). In July, 1917, -Arthur .A.skegaard enlisted for service in the 
regimental hand of the Washington Coast .\rtillery and is now serving with 
that command. The mother of these children died in 1890 and Mr. Aske- 
gaard later married Christine Larson, who was born in Sweden, daughter 
of .\ndrew and Hannah (Nelson) Larson, who came to the United States 
with their faniilv in 1880 and located at Moorhead. Mr. Larson became the 
owner of a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in the vicinity of that 
city, but later moved to a farm near the home of his daughter, Mrs. Aske- 
gaard. and there died in 191. t. His widow now makes her home with Mrs. 
.\skegaar(l. .\ndrew Larson and his wife were the parents of two chil- 
dren. Mrs. Askeg-aard having a brother. To David and Christine (Larson) 
(i6a) 



242 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Askegaard six cliildren have been born, namely : Aileen (deceased), an 
infant (deceased), Tekia (deceased), Henry, Tekla (second) and Rolfe. 

Political!}', Mr. Askegaard is a Republican, and from 1892 to 1896 he 
served as county commissioner. He and iiis family are members of the 
Norwegian Lutheran church. He has always borne an unblemished reputa- 
tion as a man and citizen and is one of the highly esteemed men of Clay 
county, a plain, ])ractical, unassuming gentleman who takes an active interest 
in whatever pertains to the development of his town and county. 



(".ILL 1I()\\\RD BARKER RICHARDS. 

One of the enterprising young farmers of the western part of Cla\' 
county is Gill Howard Barker Richards, a member of a well-known and 
highly-respected family in the vicinity of Kragnes, where he was born on 
the old home farm, .\ugust 11, 1886. He is a .son of Roljert and Ellen 
(Giffin) Richards. The mother, who was torn in Belfast, Ireland, in 
August, 1844, came to America in early life, and her death occurred here 
in 191 3. Robert Richards was Iwrn in Cornwall, England, in December, 
1844, and there he grew to manhood and attended the common schools. 
He immigrated to America in 1864, first locating at Calumet, Michigan, 
where he worked in the copper mines for some time as foreman. He 
came to Clay county, Minnesota, in 18^2, locating on a farm in Kragnes 
township, and there engaged successfully in general farming and stock rais- 
ing until his death in February, 191 2. which, however, occurred in a hos- 
pital in Fargo, North Dakota. His family consisted of seven children, 
as follow: John, who died in 1903; Tom, unmarried, who was born in 
September. 1871, and has remained on the home place, consisting of one 
hundred and sixty acres, which he owns, also operating another farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres, which l>elongs to his sister, Margaret, farm- 
ing in all three hundred and twenty acres; Max, who was born in April, 
1873, and is married, living in Fargo, North Dakota; Alexandria, born 
in May, 1874, and living on a farm in section 17, Kragnes township; 
Margaret, who is operating a rooming house in Moorhead, and also owns 
a good farm in Kragnes township ; Will, who is married, having three 
children, and is farming on the homestead in section 17, Kragnes town- 
ship; Gill H. B.. of this sketch, the youngest of the family. 

Gill H. B. Richards grew to manhood on the home farm in Clay county. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 243 

where he worked hard wiien a 1)oy. He received his education in the 
(Hstrict schools of his native community. \Mren a young man he began 
for himself on a farm, belonging to his brother John, !)ut now owns an 
excellent farm of one hundred and sixty acres in section 17, Moland town- 
ship, on which he has made all improvements. He mo^'ed to this place 
in KJ14, where he is engaged in general farming and stock raising. He 
was married in 1906 to Carrie Rassmussen. who was born in 1888, at 
Blooming Prairie, Minnesota. To their union six children have been l)orn. 
namely : Clara Belle, Harold, Arnold, Robert, .\lfred and Violet. 

Robert Richards, father of the subject of this sketch, was a prominent 
man in his township for many years. He held a number of county offices, 
having served seven years as county commissioner, of which board he was 
chairman for some time. 



HALVOR RAS^IUSSOX. 

Halvor Rasmusson, former clerk of the district court of this district, 
former recorder of the cit)- of Aloorhead, one of the incorporators and 
first treasurer of Concordia College and for many years a well-known real- 
estate dealer and banker, now living retired in the city of Moorhead, is a 
native of the kingdom of Norway, but has been a resident of this country 
since he was twenty years of age and of Moorhead since 1878, having 
come up here into the Red River valley from Houston, this state, of which 
city he was the first mayor. Mr. Rasmusson is one of the numerous band 
of Telemarkens who found Minnesota so hospitable a place of abode in 
the sixties and seventies of the past century and has never regretted the 
decision which prompted him to locate in this state. He was born in the 
pari.sh of Kritseid, in the district of Telemarken, Norway, September _M). 
1841, a son of Rasmus and Anna ( Halv(jrson) Gunderson, who. with the 
other members of their family, followed their son, the subject of this sketch, 
to America in 1866 and settled in Houston county, this state. There Mrs. 
Gunderson, who was born on November 10, 1817, died on March 2, 1875. 
Rasmus Gunderson remained in Houston ccjunty, engaged in farming, for 
fifteen years, at the end of which time he sold his farm there and mo\cl 
to La Crosse, Wisconsin, where he spent the rest of his life, retired, hi- 
death occurring there on August 8, 1903. He was born on June C), 1819. 
Rasmus Gunderson and wife were the parents of six children, of whom 



-'44 CI. AY AXl) XOKMAX COINTIKS. MIXXIiSOTA. 

tlie subject of this sketch \v;i> the first honi. the dtliers l)eiiig as follow: 
Mrs. Signe l\ice. who died at her hmne in ('la\ county in IQ12; .\nna, wile 
of l)(x-tor Hoegh. of .Minneapolis: (iunder, who is married and is engaged 
in farming in Roseau county, tliis state: .Mrs. Christie llals. a widow, of 
.Minneapolis, and Hans, who is engaged in farming in .Montana. 

Ilahtir Kasnnisson grew to manhood on the paternal farm in Te!- 
emarken and in the spring of 1861 was niarrietl, he and his bride straight- 
way thereafter setting sail for the countrv of promise across the sea. 'I'hc}' 
landed at the jxirt of Quebec on June S. 1861, after a voyage of eight 
weeks, dming which twenty-four persons died on board the vessel on which 
they had taken passage. I'Vom Oueljcc Mr. Rasmusson and his bride pro- 
ceeded to Chicago and after a stay of some time in diat city went to 
Afadison, Wisconsin, where they remained until their not oxerly large stock 
of funds was exhausted, after which they walkeil sevent\' miles to the 
farm home of .Mr. Rasmussou's uncle, in the vicinity of Kilborn City, 
Wisconsin, where they found a cordial welcome. .Mr. Rasmusson found 
employment in a store at Kilborn City and there remained thus engaged 
until 1864. when he caiue to .Minnesota and was for a year thereafter en- 
gaged in farm labor in b'illmore coimty. He then secured a position in 
a store at Winona and remained there until 1866, in which year he mo\ed 
to Houston, where he became engaged as grain buyer for the liergendahl 
ele\ator, a position which he held for twelve years, or until his removal 
to .Moorhead in 1878. During the time of his residence in Houston Mr. 
Rasmusson took an active part in the conmiercial and ci\ic affairs of that 
place and was elected first mayor of the town upon its incorporation as a 
cit\ He also served as a member of the school board of that city and in 
other W'ays did his part toward promoting the best interests of the ])lace. 

Upon locating at .Moorhead in the spring of 1878 Mr. Rasmusson 
became enga.ged in the hotel business, but after a year's experience in that 
line abandoned that form of endeavor and became engaged in the real-estate 
business, in the office of Comstock & White. In 1883 he was elected rec- 
order of the city of Moorhead and was re-elected to that office in the sjiring 
of 1884, also clerk of the municipal court. In the fall of 1884 Mr. Ras- 
nuisson was elected clerk of the district court and by successive re-elections 
was retained in that important ofTice for a period of si.xteen years, during 
much of which time he also served as a member of the board of education 
and was clerk and treasurer of the board. Mr. Rasmusson has e\er given 
his earnest attention to the promotion of the educational interests of his 
adopted state and when the moxenu'ut which culminated in the establish- 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 245 

nient of Conconlia College at AI(jorhfa<l in i8gi was under way he became 
one of the incorporators of that institution and was elected first treasurer of 
the same. In the meantime Mr. Rasmusson had continued his activities in the 
real-estate line and for years was regarded as one of the best judges of 
realty in the Red Ri\er valle\'. carrying on cjuite extensive operations in 
that hue hoth at .Moorhead and at Winnipeg. In Kjoj; he became one of 
the incor])oralors of the Iwrst State iJank of Moorhead. Of late years, 
howe\er, he has been living practically retired from business cares, "taking 
things easy" in his declining years. 

Mr. Rasmusson has been twice married. ( )n .March J4, 1861. in his 
native Norway, just a few daws before he and his bride took their depar- 
ture for this country, he was united in marriage to Li\- Johnson, who also 
was born in Xorwaw June 24. \i^42. and whose parents died when she 
was an infant. To that uiu'on were horn six children, namely: John, who 
is engaged in the hardware business at Crookston, this state; .Anna, wife 
of (). ]). Dahl. of I'argo: Julia, who died at Moorhead in .\ugust, 1913; 
Rud(il]ih, who is lix'ing at Minneapolis: Dr. b'rederick Rasmusson, of 01i\er 
count)-, Xorth Dakota, and Xora, wife of Mar\in b'ullerton, of l*"argo. 
The iui>ther of these children died in 1909 and in ii)ii, during a visit 
b.'ick to his (lid iiomc in Xorwa\', .Mr. Rasmusson wa^ married in that 
countr\- to .Marie ( hristijuison. who was burn in Xorw.'iy on December 
iN, iS(Sj. .\lr. and .Mrs. Rasmusson ba\'e a \ery pleasant home at .Moor- 
head and Mr. Kasmussou is also the owner of some \;iluablc business 
houses on Front street. 



S. O. SOLl'M. 



S. O. .Solum, cashier of the hirst Xational liank of li.-irnesN ille. jiresi- 
deiu of the mercantile firm of Xorby. Solum & Company (incorporated), 
city treasurer of Barnesville and for years activel\- identified with the com- 
mercial and other interests of that city, one of the best-known bankers 
;nid merchants in this section, is a nati\e son of Minnesota and has li\ed 
in this state all his life, a resident of Cla_\' county since he was three years 
of age. and ma\' thus \erv properly be accoimted as one o( tlie leal "old 
settlers" of this jj.'irt of the Red River country. F fe was born on a pioneer 
farm in hillmore county on June 18, 1869, son of Ole H. and Karie 
( Stadum ) Soluiu. natives of the kingdom of X'^orway, who became ])ioneers 
of Clay countv in 1872 and here spent their last days. 



246 CI. AY AND NORMAN- COl'NTIKS. MINNESOTA. 

Ole H. Sdluni was horn and reared in Xorway, as was his wile. In 
1868, W'ith tlie two cliildren. Hans and .Andrew, born to them in their native 
land, they came to the United States and ]5roceeded on out to ^[inne.sOla, 
selthng in I'ilhnore county, where the\' remained for four years. At tlie 
end of that time, in iSjJ, they came up into tlie Kt.'i\ River vallex' with 
their family, drivinj^ thruuijh with a covered waj^on and a team of oxen, 
and located in Clay county, which had just been erected into a civic unit 
that year. Upon his arrival here. Ole H. Solum honiesteaded a ([uarter of 
a section of land in Tanscm townshii) and there established his home. .\t 
that time, Indians still were mimerous herealjout and there was not another 
settler between the Solum place and Glyndon. During the first summer of 
his residence here. Mr. Solum eked out his slender means of subsistence 
by working as a freighter to I't. .\bercrombie. Though he started with 
practically nothing save his homestead right, he was a good farmer and 
an excellent manager and presently i)egan to see his way clear to the de- 
velopment of a fine piece of farm propert}-. .\s he prospered in his affairs, 
he gradually added to his holdings until he became the owner of an excel- 
lent farm of three hundred and forty acres. He and his wife were earnest 
workers in the church and were among the organizers of the First North 
Kmanuel church. They were the parents of seven children, of whom the 
subject of this sketch was the third in order of birth, the others Ijeing : 
Hans, Andrew, Uars (who died at the age of eleven years), Martin, Chris- 
tine (who (lied at the age of fourteen), and Peter. 

.\s noted above, S. O. Solum was but three years of age when hi- 
parents settled in Clay county and he grew up on the homestead farm in 
Tansem townshij), thoroughly familiar with pioneer conditions thereabout. 
Upon completing the course in the local schools, he entered W'illmar Semin- 
arv and wa?- in attendance at that institution for the better part of two 
terms, after which, in 1890, then being twenty-one years of age, he began 
working in a lumber yard at Barnesville. In 189J he accepted the position 
as bookkeeper in the Barnesville State Bank, and not long after that bank 
was rechartered as the I'irst National Bank of Barnes in 1895 he was 
made assistant cashier of the s^ame and, in 1910, was elected ca.shier, which 
position he still occupies, one of the best-known bankers in this part of the 
state. In addition to his banking interests Mr. Solum has other business 
interests in Barnesville and is the president of the mercantile firm of Norby. 
Solum & Company (incorporated). For the past sixteen years and more, 
he has served as treasurer of the city of Barnesville and has in other 
ways given of his time and his energies to the public service. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2^/ 

In the year 1893 S. O. Solum was united in marriage to Christine 
Austin, daughter of John and Bertha Austin, of Crawford county, Wis- 
consin. Mr. and Mrs. Solum are members of the Norwegian Lutheran 
church and take a proper part in church work, as well as in the general 
social and cultural activities of their home community. 



CHARLES FOSSAY. 

There is no more persevering tiller of the soil in Kragnes township. Clay 
county, than Charles F"ossay, who was born in Norway in 1853. He is a 
son of Ole E. and Olia F. Fossay, both natives of Norway, where they 
grew up, married and made their home until immigrating to America in 
1866, locating in Mitchell county, Iowa, where the father bought one hun- 
dred and twenty acres of land, for which he paid five dollars an 
acre. The same land is now worth one hundred and seventy-five 
dollars an acre. Here they engaged in farming, developing raw land 
by hard work. The father's death occurred there in 1907 at the advanced 
age of eighty-eight years. The mother died some three years later at the 
age of eighty-four. To these parents the following children were born : 
Eberhart, who was killed by a bull in 1912 in North Dakota; iVnton. who 
died in Mitchell county, Iowa ; Charles, the subject of this sketch ; Bertha, 
who is married and lives in Mitchell county, Iowa; Emma, who is mar- 
ried and makes her home in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Minnie, who 
died near Davenport, North Dakota ; Oliva, who was married and who died 
in Foster county, North Dakota, in 1915; Oliver, who lives in McHenry 
cfjunty. North Dakota, and Mary, who died in Cass county, that state. 

Charles Fossay was thirteen years old when his parents brought him 
to America. He received a common-school education and grew to man- 
hood on the farm. Like all sons of pioneers he worked hard when a bo_\-, 
helping his father develop the home farm. In 1S77 he went to Fargo, 
Xorth Dakota, anrl there operated a dray line for twelve years with very 
gratifying results. He then, in 1889, came to Clay county and bought his 
present farm in Kragnes township. The farm originally consisted of four 
hundred acres, but Mr. Fossay later sold half of it and now owns the two 
hundred acres, which lie in sections 30 and 31. He made all the improve- 
ments on this land, including the erection of a modern and substantial set 



248 CLAY VXD XORMAN COUXTIICS. MINNESOTA. 

of buildings. He has been very successful as a general farmer ami sioclc 
raiser, and makes a specialty of raising Shorthorn cattle. 

On September 6. 1886. at Ivargo. Mr. Fossay was married to Anna 
Danielson. who was Ixmi in Sweden in i85<). She spent her girlhood in 
her native land and there attended school,, coining to America alone whin 
eighteen years old. locating at Fargo, North Dakota, where she remained 
until her marriage. Five children have been born to .Mr. and Mrs. I'ossav. 
namely: Charles, who is married and lives in the province of Manitoba, 
Canada: I'^dward, who makes his home with Ch.uJes in Canada, and Obcii, 
.Mice and Maliel. at home. 

Politically. Mr. Fos.say is an "Independent", lie served as treasurei 
of the .school board in his district for many years and was also a niemlu)- 
of the township board for many years. He is a member of the Congrega- 
tional church, in which he is a deacon, and is active in church affairs. 



HENNIXG u. KRABBENIIOI 1. 

Henning O. Krabbenlioft. one of Clay county's most successful farmers 
and substantial landowners, proprietor of a section and a half of fine land in 
the Sabin neighborhood of l^Imwood township, former assessor of that town- 
ship, former chairman of the board of supervisors of the same and in other 
ways actively identified with the affairs of that community since pioneer 
days, is a native of Germany, but has been a resident of Minnesota and of 
Clay county since he was eighteen years of age, having come here with his 
parents, who became the first permanent white settlers of what later became 
organized as Elmwood township. He was born in Schleswig-Holstein on 
May 27, 1856, son of W. F. and Katherine (Jess) Krabbenhoft, natives 
of that same province of Prussia, who came to the L'nited States with their 
family in 1874 and proceeded on out to Minnesota, settling on a homestead 
tract in what later came to be organized as Elmwood township, in Clav 
county, and there spent the remainder of their li\es, useful and influential 
pioneers of that community, their original homestead tract there now being 
the place of residence of the subject of this sketch. 

It was in 1872 that the Krabbenhoft tract in Elmwood was entered, 
W. C. Krabbenhoft, eldest son of W. F. Krabbenhoft having come here in 
that year and made his claim to the same, ])utting up a homestead shant\ 
and preparing the way for the coming of his parents and the other members 



a 

5? 



2 



■31 




CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 249 

of the family, who anivctl in 1874, and established their hmne there, the 
lirst permanent settlers in that section of the county. VV. F. Krabbenhoft 
bought the claim from his son and completed the development of the same, 
later increasing his land holdings to two hundred and thirty acres, which 
in 1882 he sold to his son Henning, who has continued to reside there since 
his coming in 1874, one of the real '"nld-timers" now living in Clay county. 
On that pioneer farm \V. F. Krabbenhoft and his wife spent their last days. 
They were members of the Lutheran church and took an active part in the 
organization of a con.gregation of their faith in the neighborhood of their 
home in tlic early days. The\- were the parents of twelve children, six of 
whom died in the old country, the other six coming with them to this country, 
these latter being as follow : Wolf C, now deceased, who was the first of 
the family to come to this country, as noted abo\e ; Christ, also now deceased : 
Henning O., the immediate subject of this biographical sketch; Katherine. 
wife of Chris I'eohls : Anna, wife of Chris Wright, and Wilhelmina, 
now deceased, who was the wife of Henry Schroeder. 

.\s noted above Henning O. Krabbenhoft was eigliteen \ears of age 
when he came to Minnesota with liis parents and the otiicr members of the 
family and settled in Clay county. He had received his schooling in iiis 
native land and upon coming here he at once took an active hand in the 
difficult labors of improving and developing the homestead place in Elm- 
wood township. He married in tiie fall of 1881 and the next year bouglit 
the home place from his fatlier, who was prepared to retire at that time, 
and there established his permanent home. Since taking possession of that 
place he has erected excellent buildings and for years has had one of the 
best-ecjuipped farm plants in Clay county. As he prospered in his farming 
operations, Mr. Krabbenhoft gradually added to liis land holdings until he 
became the owner of two and three-quarter sections of land, but has since 
sold a section and a f|uarter, retaining a section and a half, which he has 
brought under a hi.gh state of cultixation. About 1892 Mr. Krabbenhoft 
began to recognize the peculiar adaptability of the soil of the Red river 
^■alley to the raising of potatoes and in that year made his first really exten- 
sive plant of potatoes. Since then he has made much of potato crops and has 
on his place one of the largest ]:)rivate potato warehouses in this part of the 
state. He has also given considerable attention to the raising of pure- 
bred live stock and has done very well in his operations. From the be- 
ginning of his residence here Mr. Krabbenhoft has taken a .good citizen's 
interest in local political affairs and at one time and another ha,s held 
most of the offices within the gift of the ])eoplc of his home township. 



250 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

including that of chairman of the l)uard of township supervisors and assessor. 
Of late years, however, he has practically retired from politics. Among 
the other interests to wliich he gives his earnest attention is the North- 
western Hospital at Moorhead, in the affairs of which he has been deeply 
interested since the day of its establishment. 

On November 29, 1881, Henning O. Krabbenhoft was united in mar- 
riage to Margaret Kuel, also a native of Holstein, who came to this country 
in that same year. Some years later, in 1890, her parents, Fred and Mag- 
daliua (Naeve) Kuehl, also came to this country and their last days were 
sjK'nt in F.lniwood townshi]). Mr. and Mrs. Krabbenhoft have thirteen 
children, Katlierinc, August, Herbert, Anna, .Alfred, Tiicodore, Waller, John, 
Adoli)h, Christian, Siefried. Lizzie and Elsie, all of whom are living in this 
communiiy, save John, who is now a resident of .Ambrose, North Dakota. 
There are also four children deceased, Herman, Rudolph. Heinrich and Dora. 
The Krabbenhofts have a very pleasant home and have e\er taken a proper 
part in the general social activities of the community, helpful in many ways 
in advancing movements having to do with the betterment of conditions 
hereabout. As one of the real pioneers of Clav county, Mr. Krabbenhoft 
has a wonderful fund of information regarding the conditions in the early 
days of the settlement of this part of the state and some of his tales of 
pioneer days are interesting indeed. 



WILLIAM GILBERY 



William Gilbery. a well-known fanner of Kragnes township, Clay 
county, was Ixjrn in Devonshire, England, on May i. 1855. He is a son of 
U. Hugh and Dina (Newcombs) Gilberj-, both natives of England, where 
they grew up. married and established their home. In 1874 they immigrated 
to Canada, where they resided until 1879, when they moved to Wisconsin and 
spent the rest of their lives in Grant county, that state, each reaching an ad- 
vanced age, the father dying in 1910 at the age of eighty-two, and the mother, 
in 1914. at the age of eighty-three. Three children were born to these pa- 
rents, namely: U'illiam, the subject of this sketch; Richard, deceased: and 
Charles, who lives on a farm in Wisconsin, is married and owns his own 
place. 

William Gilberv grew to manhood in England and there attended the 
pul)lic schools. He immigrated to Canada in the spring of 1873 and lived 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 25 1 

there three years, at the end of wliich time, in 1876, he moved to Hancock, 
Houghton county. Michigan, wliere he hved three years with an uncle. In 
tlie fall of 1878 he came to Minnesota and worked at Crookston that winter. 
His uncle, with whom he lived in Michigan, came here in 1879 and bought 
two hundred and twenty acres in Oak Port township, Clay county, and this 
land was farmed by the subject of this sketch for three years. He continued 
to work on various farms in this county and finally bought land in Oak 
i'ort township for another uncle and farmed the place for seven years. In 
the spring of 1890 he ]nirchased his present farm in section 20 of Kragnes 
township, on which he has made all imjirovements, including an excellent 
group of buildings. He has three hundred and twenty acres of well-kept 
and productive land, which is well adapted to potato growing and he planted 
thirtv-five acres of the white tubers in 1917. He al.so raises a great deal of 
wlieat and has been (|uite successful as a general farmer and stock raiser. 

On September 9, 1879. Mr. Gilbery was married to Clara Milden, who 
was born in Houghton county, Michigan, Septemlier 23, 1859. She is a 
daughter of John and Mary ( Westley ) Milden. both natives of Devonshire. 
Rngland. where tliev grew up. ni;irricd and made their home until coming 
to America over sixty years ago, or about the year 1856. They located at 
Hancock, Michigan, being pioneers of that section of the Wolverine state. 
.Mr. .Milden was a carpenter by trade and he helped build the first house in 
the present town of Hancock. His death occurred in 1907. at the age of 
seventy-three years. He was twice married, his first wife, mother of the 
wife of the subject of this sketch, dying in 1882, at the age of fifty-one 
vears. He was the father of four children by his first wife and eight by his 
second wife. 

To William Gilbery and wife eight children have been born, namely: 
.\nna, who is married and lives on a farm in Kragnes township; Charles, 
who is married and lives on a farm in the same township; William, who is 
ni;irrie(l and lives at Hitterdal. in Clay county; Ida. who is married and lives 
on a farm in Xortli Dakota, and George, Minnie, Robert and Raymond, at 
home. 

Mr. Gilberv is a Republican and has served as a director on the local 
school Ixjard for thirteen years. lie was also a member of the township 
board for some time and was for a number of years a member of the board 
of supervisors of Kragnes township, a director and chairman of the board 
for some time. He has been active in the affairs of his locality since com- 
ing to Clay county, and has done much to develo[> the \aried interests of 
that community. 



2Z^2 CLAY AND NORMAX COUXTIF.S. MINN'KSOTA. 

ANDREW BYE. 

Andrew Bye, former memlier of the village council at Halstad an<l 
manager of the local plant of the Northwestern EJevator Company at that 
place, is a native son of Minnesota, born in Houston county, November 
-5. 1873, a son of Peter (). and Bergit (Ilcfte) Bye, both natives of \\w 
kingdom of Norway, who are now living in Grand Eorks county. Xnrth 
Dakota, where they have resided for years, among the substantial i)i(inccr 
residents of that section. 

Peter O. Bvc was burn in 1S44 and was leu years of age w hi-n iic- 
came to this country with his i)arenls, in 1854. the family settling in lions- 
ton county, this state, among the pioneers of that section of the state, and 
there he grew to manhood. In that county he married Bergit llefte. who 
liad conic to Minnesota with licr parents from Norway in the days of her 
girlhood, and after his marriage remained in that county until 1877, when 
he went pioneering over into North Dakota and settled in the township 
of Bentru, Grand ]-"orks county, where he and his wife still m.ikc then- 
home and where they are very comfortably situated. They are members 
of the Norwegian Lutheran church and their children were reared in that 
faith. There are six of these children, of whom the subject of this .sketch 
was tile fifth in order of birth, the odiers being Nellie. Inga. Glaus, .\nton 
and Theodore. 

Andrew Bye was four years of age when his parents moved from 
.Minnesota to North Dakota and he was reared on. a pioneer homestead 
farm in (iraiul I'orks county, in the latter state, receiving his schooling 
in the district school in the neighlxjrhood of his home, .^s a young man he 
started fanning on his own account in Grand Forks county and was thus 
engaged until he was twenty-five years of age, when he engaged in the 
grain business, buying grain at .Mapes. North Dakota. Six months later he 
was made buyer for the Minneapolis & Northern Elevator Company at 
Felton. in t^lay county, this state, and remained there, agent for that com- 
pany, for nine years, or until 1909, when he transferred his services to the 
Northwestern Elevator Company and was made agent and buyer for that 
c(imi)any at Halstad, where he ever since has rnade his home and where 
he has quite successfully managed the Northwestern elevator, becoming one 
of the best-known grain men in this part of the state. Since becoming a 
resident of Haltsad Mr. Bye has taken an active interest in local civic affairs, 
has served for two or three terms as a member of the village council and 
also served for two or three terms as village assessor. 



CI.AY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 253 

On December 30, 1901. Andrew Bye was united in marriage to Eliza 
Moe, a daughter of E. ]'. Aloe, of Caledonia, Xortli Dakota, and to this 
union one child has been liorn. Alpha Eugene, Ijorn at Felton on Februar\- 
1 1, 1903. The Byes have a very pleasant home at Halstad and take a proper 
part in the general social actixaties of the community. Mr. Bye is a mem- 
ber of the local lodge of the Modern Woodmen of America and takes an 
active interest in the affairs <if the same. 



JOHN SPENNIXGSBV. 



John Spenningsby, proprietor of a harness shop at Ada and formerly 
a farmer in Hegne township, Xorman county, was born in the kingdom of 
Norway on Se]:itember 16, 1S77, and was about six years of age when his 
parents, Knut and Julia (Braaten) Spenningsby, also natives of Norw^ay, 
came to Minnesota and settled in Xorman county, where tliey ever since 
have made their home. 

It was in 1883 that Knut Siienningsln' and his family came to Min- 
nesota, their destination being Ada. Upon their arrixal here Mr. Spen- 
ningsl))- located on a farm in Halstad township, but later bought a home- 
steader's right to a tract in Ile.gne township and there established his home, 
remaining there and improx-ing the same until 1903, when he retired from 
the farm and mo\ed to .\da, where he and his wife are now li\ing. They 
are memljers of Trinit}- Lutheran church (of the Hauges synod) at Ada 
and their children were reared in that faith. There are four of these chil- 
dren, those besides the subject of this sketch being Emil, Lewis and Inga. 

As noted above, John Spenningsby was but a child when his parent^ 
settled in X'^orman county and he .grew to manhood on the home farm in 
Hegne township, remaining there, a \-alued assistant to his father in tho 
development and improvement of the same, until the time nf his parents' 
remo\'al to Ada in 1903, when he also left the farm and located in Ada. 
In 1907 he started a harness shoj) in that city and has buill up a ]iros[)erous 
business in that line. 

In June. 1915. Jnhn S|)enning.sl:)y was united in marria.ge 4o Mrs. 
Serena X'elson. .Mr. and Mrs. Spenningsby are members of Trinity Luth- 
eran church and take a pn)]icr interest in clnu'cli work and other loc;:l 
.good works. 



254 CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

JAMES A SAUER. 

One of the genuine pioneers of Clay county, who was wilh'ng to take 
the hardships of tlie early days that he might acquire the soil and the home 
that was sure to rise in due course of time, was James A. Saucr, who is 
one of the leading general farmers of Spring Prairie township. 

Mr. Sauer was horn in Norway, October ii, 1864. He is a son of 
.Vndrew and Rachael (Sauer) Sauer, both natives of Xorway, where thev 
grew uj), married and made their home until 1870, when they brought 
ihcir fami!) to America, locating in Humboldt county. Iowa, where the 
I'atlier engaged in general farming until the spring of 1881, when he moved 
to Minnesota, taking up a homestead in section 26, Spring Prairie town- 
.ship. Clay county. His wife had died in Towa. He and his children de- 
veloped a good farm here on which he continued to reside until 1892, when 
he moved to Cromwell township, and there spent the rest of his life, dying 
in December, 1916. ha\ ing l>een retired for many years from active labors, 
leaving the real work of the farm to his son, Ole Sauer. He was a true 
])ioneer and had been very successful as a farmer and slock raiser. His 
family consisted of ten children, .\mbrose, A. K., Tina. Rachael, Belle. 
James A., Andrew. John, Samuel and Ole, all of whom are living. 

James A. Sauer was six years old when his parents brought him from 
Xorway to this country and he grew to manhood and atten.dcd the public 
schools in Humljoldt county, Iowa. He came to Minnesota with his father 
in 1 881 and started out for himself, taking u\> a homestead, the northwest 
quarter of section 2t of Spring Prairie township in Clay county. About 
three years later he secured the southwest ciuarter of the same section, as 
a tree claim, and has made his home on the latter quarter e\er since. He 
now owns a \aluable farm of three hundred and twenty acres, including the 
northwest (|uarter of section 20. Spring Prairie township, although he has 
sold his original homestead. He made extensive improvements on his land. 
erecting a large. comfortal>le residence and substantial outbuildings, and 
put out a tine gro\e. raising many of the trees from the seed. He has 
been very successful as a general farmer and stock miser, making all by 
his own efforts. 

In 1887 Mr. Sauer was married to Jennie Torgeson. a native of Nor- 
way, wiiere her parents lived and died, and from which country she came 
to America when young. To her unicm w-ith Mr. Sauer two children were 
born, namelv : .\ndrew and Gena. Mr. Sauer married a second time. No- 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 355 

vember 20, 1897, liis last wife being Minnie Torkildson, a daughter of 
Tonnes Torkildson, a native of Norwa}- and an early settler of Riverton 
township, Clay county. Tonnes Torkildson married Trene Larson, also 
a native of Norway, and there they made their home until immigrating 
to America in the spring of 1883. I" t'le fall of that year he homesteaded 
one hundred and sixty acres in Riverton township. Clay countv, improving 
the place and building a good home, and there he spent the rest of his life, 
dying in April, 1894. His widow still lives on the homestead, which now 
contains two hundred and forty acres, Mr. Torkildson having added eighty 
acres more to his original farm. His family consisted of six children, 
Ole, Gust, Abin, Louise, Albert (deceased) and Lena. To Mr. Sauer and 
his second wife eight children ha\e been born, Theodore, Gilbert, James, 
Rudolph, Mabel, Esther, Arthur and Alfred. 

Politically, Mr. Sauer is independent. He circulated personally the 
petition to organize Spring Prairie township, and also the petition for the 
organization of the first school district, which then included the entire town- 
ship and was appointed one of the first supervisors by the county board. 
He was later a memlier of the township board and is now chairman of tlie 
school board. 



OLE G. AHDGARDEN. 



Ole G. Midgarden, of Aloland township, is one of Clay county's farmers 
who seems to have the right idea about agricultural matters, and although 
he does not farm on so large a scale as some, he does his work in a scien- 
tific way and is making a comfortable living. Mr. Midgarden was born 
in Norway, September 2, 1849, a son of Gunder and Thorberg G. (Spokali) 
Midgarden, natives of Norway, where they spent their lives on a farm. 
They were parents of seventeen children, ten of whom .grew to maturit)'. 
namely: Tolef, deceased; John; Tore, deceased: Ole G.. of this sketch: 
Howard and Gunder, both living; Signe, who lives in Norway; Ingeborg, 
Halvor and Johanna. These children all came to America but Signe. 

Ole G. Midgarden spent his boyhood in Norway where he attended 
the common schools for a while, and also went to school a short time in 
America, whither he came in 1866, reaching Houston county, Minnesota, 
in June of that year, being a pioneer in that section of the state. He 
remained there until 1870 and then, with other settlers, came to Clay county 
and took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Moland town- 



256 CLAY AXD NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

ship and li\e(l iliiTc until 1874, when he sold out and went back to Xorway. 
remaining in his native land five years. At the end of that period he returned 
to .\merica and spent a few months in Wisconsin, then came on to Clay 
county, Minnesota, and rented land for about six years, after which time 
he bought one hundred and sixty acres in Moland township, where he has 
since made his home, making all the ]>resent improvements, including the 
erection of the buildings. He carries on general and mixeil farming. 

Mr. Midgarden was married in 1882 to Jorainl Thortvedl, who was 
born in Norway, from which country she came to Houston county, Minne- 
sota. When young, and when her people moved from that county to Clay 
county, she walked most of the way. helping dri\e the sheep and cattle. 
Three cliildren. all lix ing. were torn to Mr. and Mrs. Midgarden. namely: 
Thorherg Gundelki. Thcckla Linda Josc])hine and tiottfred Otto I.eandcr. 

Politically. Mr. Midgarden is a I^epublican. He has been treasurer 
of school district Xo. (> nearly all the time since he has lived in the district, 
with the exception of the period of his absence in Xorway. He is the 
treasurer at this writing. He was the third man to hold this oftice. He 
belongs to the Lutheran church. 



WILLL^M THOMPSOX. 

William Thompson, one of the real ])ioneers of Clay county, first clerk 
of I'-lkton townshi]). a position he held for many years, or until his removal 
across the line into Llmwood township, and the proprietor of a line farm 
of four hundred acres lying in Elmwood and Elkton townships, his home 
now being in the former township, is a native of Scotland, but has been a 
resident of this country since 1870 and of this part of Minnesota since 1878. 
and has therefore been a witness to and a participant in the development 
of this region since pioneer days. He was Ijorn in the city of Montrose, an 
important seaport town in Forfarshire, thirty-four miles southwest of Aber- 
deen, March 14. 1842, son of Dougal and Mary (Shand) Thompson, also 
natives of Scotland, the latter of whom spent her last days in her nati\e 
land; the former later coming to this country, his last days l)eing spent in 
?kIinnesota. Of the three children born to his parents, the subject of this 
sketch is tlie onlv survivor, his brother John having died at the age of four- 
teen vears, and his sister Mary, at the age of ten months. 

Dougal Thompson was a laborer in Montrose and was not in extra good 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LENSX 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONh. 




Ml;s. ANN THOMPSON". 




WII.I.IAM TlIOMrSOX. 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC "--■^Y 



ASTOR, LENSA 

TTLOEN' Four: U .1 IONS. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 257 

circumstances financially, hence his son William was given small opportuni- 
ties for acquiring much more than the rudiments of an education in his 
native land, never attending school at all until he came to this country long 
after he was grown. Before he was eight years of age William Thompson 
was set to work in ;l factory and worked there until he was sixteen years 
of age, when, he learned the stone-cutter's trade, including general masonry, 
and the early years of his manhood were spent in that form of labor. He 
married in 1866 and four years later, in 1870, determining that there 
was small opportunity for making much headway toward financial inde- 
pendence in his native land, decided to come to the United States. He left 
his wife behind until such time as he could see his way clear to the making 
of a home in this country, and after his arrival in New York City began 
working there at his trade. Two years later he was joined by his wife and 
his father and about six years after their arrival left there and came out 
to Minnesota with a view to finding a home on the free lands of the North- 
west. At Idaborn, this state, his father died and he remained there a 
short time before proceeding on to this part of the state. It was there 
that, together with a party of other Scotchmen, he became interested in the 
homestead proposition here in the Red River valley and about 1878 he 
and his companions drove up here seeking a location. One of the party 
had Iieen here for a short time previously and had left a few old tires on 
the open prairie, which was the landmark toward which the party journeyed. 
They arrived there about dark and their first night on the prairie was spent 
under the friendlv shelter of the stars. Mr. Thompson and his three com- 
panions staked out four (piarter sections and drew lots for the respective 
possession of the same. When the survey later was made and the town- 
ship lines run, it was found that Mr. Thompson's claim was just on the 
west edge of Elkton township. Without delay he erected a temporary 
house there and entered upon the task of developing and improving the 
place. Wheir settlers gradually began to fill up the region round about and 
b'.lkton township came to lie organized Mr. Thompson was elected first clerk 
of the township and by successive elections was retained in that position 
until his removal in 1896 across the line into Elmwood township, he mean- 
while having acquired additional land to the west of his homesteafl place and 
built a new and up-to-date set of buildings on the same. Ui)on his removal 
from Elkton town.ship a public township meeting was called in Elkton town- 
ship and appreciative resolutions were adopted expressing the sincere appre- 
ciation of the people of that township for the valuable services which Mr. 
(17a) 



258 CLAY AND NORMAN COLNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

Thompson had so long rendered as clerk, and a handsomely printed copy 
of the same was presented to him, a testimonial which, it is needless to say, 
is valued very highly by him. .Mr. Thompson now lias a well-improved farm 
of four hundred acres and has never regretted the decision that prompted 
him to come up intu the Red River country h.ick in the days of the beginning 
of the settlement here. 

Mr. Thompson's wife died at hei- new home in {•llmwuod town.ship in 
1899. She also was born in Scotland, and before her marriage was .\nn 
Lamb. Her father, also a native of Scotland, spent all his days in his native 
land, but the mother came to .\merica in 1872 and died at the iiome which 
she homesteaded in Elkton townshi)>. To .Mr. and Mrs. Thompson two 
children were born, Mary, who died in 1902, and John Dongal, who died 
in 1901. Mr. Thompson is a member of the Presbyterian church ami was 
one of the organizers of the local congregation of that church back in 
the early days. During the activities of the Good Templar societies many 
years ago, be was an active Good Templar and his influence in the com- 
munity in which he has resided from the \ery beginning of its settlement 
h;is ever l)een exerted in behalf of better conditions. 



WRIGHT WORKS. 



It will always l)e a mark of distincticju to have .served the Lnion during 
the great Civil War. The old soldier will receive attention no matter where 
he goes, if he will but make him.self known, and when he passes away 
friends will pay him a fitting eulogy for the sacrifices he made over a halt 
century ago on the sanguinary fields of battle in the Southland or in the no 
less dreaded prison, fever camp or hospital. One of these honored veterans 
in Clay countv is Wright Works, who is now living in retirement at Haw- 
ley after an active life as a farmer. 

Mr. Works was born in February, 1844. in St. Lawrence county, Xew 
^crk. He is a son of Joseph T. W. and Susan (Thornton) Works. Her 
father settled in New York state in the year 1807. Her death occurred 
in 1849 3t the age of thirty-six years. Joseph T. W'. Works was born 
in Cuyahoga county, New York, in October, 1803. He devoted his life to 
school teaching for the most part, and farmed some. He finally left his 
native state and located in Hardin county, Ohio, where his death occurred in 
1866 at the age of sixtv-two vears . His family consisted of four children. 



CLAY AND XOUMAX COLNTIES. MINN'ESOTA. 259 

namely: Wright, suljject of tliis sketcli ; Luciaii. ileceased ; W'aiien, who 
came to Cla}' county among tlie early pioneers in 1873, took ui) a homestead 
in section 20, Cromwell township, which he later sold and l;ought a farm 
in Hawley township, operating the same until 1907. when lie sold out and 
moved to the state of Washington, where he now resides, and Lena, the 
youngest child, who died when nineteen years old. 

Mr. Works is descended from an early founder of this great nation, 
one f)f his ancestors being one of three W^orks brothers who came ovcr 
from Ireland, aljout twenty years after the landing of the Pilgrims, and 
.settled in Massachusetts. Moreo\er. .\lr. Works is of Revolutionary stock. 
His grandfather, Asa Works, was a soldier in the Revolutionary W^ar and 
received a broken arm in the battle of Monmouth. .Vccording to tradition. 
In's mother's Grandfather Rounds and his father's (irandfather Mark were 
also soldiers in the Revolution. 

\\'right \Vorks grew to manhood in St. Lawrence county, Xew York, 
and there attended the common schools. He and all his brothers were sol- 
diers in the L'nion arm\- during the war between the states, and he and hi-- 
brother Lucian served in Company B, Sixtieth Xew \'ork Volunteer 
Infantry, the latter being only sixteen years old when he enlisted. He was 
with Sherman on his march through Georgia to the sea. Warren, who was 
in I lattery H. l'"ourth Xew York Heavy .Artillery, was also only sixteen 
when he enlisted in the sjjring of iH'')^. They all three came out of the 
service with wounds, but th'ise of Lucian and Warren were not serious. 
Wright, who was eighteen when he enlisted, took part in the great battle 
of Getty.sburg, where he was injured b\- a musket ball destroying his right 
eye, passing through the nose ami injuring the left side of his bead. He 
spent the latter part of his term of enlistment in the hospital. 

Wright Works returned home after he was honorably discharged from 
the army and engaged in farming in his nati\e state luUil 1S91, when he 
came to Clay county, .Minnesota, and lived with his brother Warren. He 
hrst bought eighty acres in Keene township, where he farmed until he moxed 
to section [9. Hawley to\\nsbi|). where he continued farming, buying a 
good ])lace there, which he sold in the fall of if)i6 and moved to the \-illage 
of Hawle\', where he has beei; lixing retired. He owns a ])leasant home 
there. 

Mr. Works was married at .Moorhead. .Mintiesota. in .\hiy. 1907. to 
.Maude Whaley. who was bori^ in .\pril, 1863, in London. England, from 
which country she came to America when ten years old. Tlie union of Mr. 



26o CLAV .WD NIIRMA.V COUNTIKS. MINNESOTA. 

and .Mrs. W'ork.s has resulted in the l)irili of a S(jn, Wright Works. Jr., 
who is ten years old at this writing. 

.Mr. \\'orks takes a good .American citizen's interest in his political 
parly. lie is a member of the local post of the Grand ^\rniy of the Repub- 
lic, of which he was commander for one year. He has served four terms 
as justice of the peace, discharging his duties in an able, faithful and accep- 
table manner. His decisions were always characterized by an accurate 
knowledge of the law and by fairness to all parties concerned. 



JACOB G.VRVEX. 



The late Jacob Garven, who died at his home in Alliance township, 
Clay county, on June 2, 1914, was bom in Wisconsin on August 30, 1867. 
and in the days of his young manhood came over into Minnesota and settled 
in Clay county, where he spent the rest of his life, becoming a substantial 
landowner and farmer. On June 17, 1892, at Barnesville, he married 
MrUhilda Peter, who was born in Germany, September 8, 1875, and who 
had come to this country with her parents, .\ugust and Hannah (Becker) 
l^eter, in 1891, the family coiuing on out to Minnesota and settling at 
Barnesville, where .August Peter spent the rest of his life, his death occur- 
ring in 1903. His widow is still living in Clay county, being now past 
eighty-two years of age. August Peter and wife were the parents of five 
children, of' whom Mrs. Garven was the fourth in order of birth, the others 
being Mary. Millie. Herman (deceased) and Bertha. Mrs. Garven's sis- 
ters are all married. 

It was in 1896 that Jacob Gan-en established his home in section 23 
of .\lliauce township and there he spent the remainder of his life, becom- 
ing a well-to-do farmer. He was the owner of seven hundred and twenty- 
three acres of land, now owned by his widow, and at his death in 1914 left 
his family in comfortable circumstances. He made all the improvements 
on his home place and hatl an excellent farm plant there. The management 
of this plant is now l)eing carried on by his widow and her sons, who are 
successfully engaged in general farming. In the summer of 1917 the Gar- 
vens were cultivating sixty-five acres of potatoes, in agreement with many 
other farmers hereabout that potatoes form one of the most profitable crop.-- 
that can be raised in the Red River valley. 

To Jacob and Mathilda (Peter) Garven were born eight children. 



CLAY AND XORMAX COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 261 

George, Alfred, Walter, Delia, Charles, Harold, Lester and Ernest, all of 
whom are living on the home place with their mother. The Garvens atteml 
the German Lutheran church and take an interested part in tiie work of 
the church, as well as in the general good works and social activities of 
the c'jnimunity in which they live. 



GLAUS P. LAMMERS. 



Glaus P. Lammers, a nati\e-horn German, l)ut wIkj has heen a resi- 
dent of this country fur more than thirt}--five years, and is now the owner 
of a fine farm in Elmwood townshi]). Clay county, was born in the h'ather- 
land in 1859. He is the son of Frenz and Anna (Keuh) Lammers. also horn 
in Germany and both of whom are now deceased. They were of the farm- 
ing class and trained their children to lives of usefulness and self-reliance. 
Frenz and Anna Lammers were the parents of the following children : John. 
Jurgen, Mary, Margaret, Catherine and Glaus P.. the subject of this sketch. 

Glaus P. Lammers was educated in the excellent schools of his nati\e 
land. For some time after leaving school, he worked at farm labor and 
later decided to try his fortune in America. He left Germany in 1882 
and, on his arrival in this country, came on out to Minnesota and settled 
on a farm in Elmwood township. He commenced farming on his own 
account and, after the lapse of some time, purchased a tract of land and 
proceeded to put it under cultivation. As he prospered in his farming, he 
added more land to his original holding and is now the owner of five hun- 
dred and twenty acres of prime land. He is now carrying on general farm- 
ing according to modern methods of agriculture and is iloing very well. When 
Mr. Lammers accjuired his present holdings, there were very few improve- 
ments on the place. He has, however, been to considerable expense to bring 
the farm up to a good standard in this respect and there are now on the 
place large and substantial outbuildings and a fine dwelling, and Mr. Lam 
mers and his family are here comfort^ibly situated. 

In 1886 Claus P. Lammers was united in marriage to Minnie I'oehk 
and to their union the following children have ])een born : Frank, who is 
married; bjnma. married; John, married; and Louie, Hulda, Edward and 
Anna, all at home with their parents. .Mr. and Mrs. Lammers are not mem- 
bers of any church, but their children have all been confirmed at the Lutlieran 
church. Mr. Lammers takes a good American citizen's interest in his 



262 CLAY AXn XIIKMAX COl-NTIKS. MINNESOTA. 

|K)litical ])arty ami lias sjiveii (jf his time and attention to the interests of 
the ])ul)iic for many years. He was elected to the tcnvnship board and served 
as a member for six years. He is now the treasurer of the school hoard, 
which ofifice he has been fillino^ for the past six years, and tt) the duties 
of which he yixes nnreniiltint;- care and attention. 



\\"TTJ.T.\M P. T.ARSOX. 

\\ illiaiu 1'. l.arson. an enerj^etic antl substantial yount; farmer of Kiver- 
ton township, this county, proprietor of a tine farm in section 29 of that 
township, also member of the school and township boards and in other ways 
identified with public affairs, was born on .\uiJiist 12, 187C). at Byron, Min- 
nesota. He is a son of Chris and .\lar\- (Jensen) Larson, both nati\es of 
the kingdom of Denmark and who were married in that counlr\- before 
coming to .\merica. 

Chris Larson was born in Denmark in i<'^47 and was educated ni the 
schools of that country. He worked at farm labor up to the time of his 
leaving the ok! country to try his fortune in the land of opportunity at 
this side of the .\tlantic. .\t the age of twenty-four, in 1871, he immigrated 
to America and came on out to Minnesota, settling on a farm at Byron, 
and there be farmed for the remainder of his life. He prospered in his 
farming o])eraiious and was regarded as an expert in the agricultural neigh- 
borhood where he made his home. He was married in Denmark about the 
year 1870, to Mary Jensen and his death occurred in January, 1914, at 
the age of sixty-five years. His wife's ]>irthplace also was in Denmark, 
her birth taking place in 1847, and she is still living on the home farm at 
liyron, vigorous in mind and body, at the age of seventy. They were rec- 
ognized in their home comnumity as active and influential residents, ever 
helpful in neighborhood good works. Chris Larson and wife were the par- 
cius of the following children: Jens, who is married: .Alfred: Lewis, mar- 
ried : Christine, marricfl, and William P., the .subject of this sketch, and all 
of who)n arc li\ing in the Inited States. 

William P. Larson was educated in the common schools of his home 
neighborhood in Byron and was reared on his father's farm. From boyhood 
he was an able assistant in the labors of developing and improving the 
home place and continued to work on the I'arm until 1902. In the latter 
\ear he ac(|uircd his present holding in Clay count}, in section 29. Rivertou 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 263 

township, wliere he is tlie owner of two Iiundred and forty acres of prime 
land, as good quality as any in the township, and a1)out twenty-five acres 
of which are given over to the raising of potato crops. Air. Larson carries 
on general farming and raises Dm-oc-Jersey hogs. Since the commence- 
ment of his o])erations he has heen quite successful, evervthing a1)out his 
farm teing in excellent condition and the impro\ements of a suhstantial and 
durahle character. 

Mr. Larson gives a good citizen's attention to puhlic affairs and lias 
served on the district school hoard for seven years and on the townshiii 
hoard for nine years; and in these representative capacities .he has given 
unqualified satisfaction. In other ways also he shows a warm interest in 
local civic affairs and in the general affairs of the community. He is a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is known to he an 
active supporter of the objects of that order. 



OLE OUAM. 



Another of the alert and perse\ering farmers of Highland Grove 
township, Clay county, who is making a success at his chosen life work is 
Ole Quam, who was born in Norway, April 6, 1875, a son of John and 
Unnia (Peterson) Quam, both also nati\'es of Norwa)', who immigrated 
to America in 1880 and came to Minnesota, locating in Eglon township. 
Clay county, where they spent about six montiis, then took up a homestead 
of eighty acres in the adjoining township of Highland Grove, where their 
son Ole now resides. Later John Quam bought an additional tract of one 
hundred and twenty acres, all of which he placed under good improvements, 
and carried on general farming successfully until his death. His widow- 
is still living on the home place. The family erected a fine group of build- 
ings and set out a large grove. Seven children were born to John (juani 
and wife, namely: Tnga, Ole, Christian, Se\erin;i, Anna, I'eter and John, 
all of whom are living. 

Ole Quam was five vears old when his parents brought him to America. 
He grew to manhoofl on the hrmie farm in Highland Grove township where 
he has continued to reside. He helped his father with the general work of 
the farm when a boy, and he attended the local rural schools in the winter 
time. He owns two hundred acres of the homestead, which he has kept 
well improved and under a fine state of cultivation, carrying on general 



264 CLAY AXD XORMAN CdUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

farming and stock raising successfully. He has taken an interested part 

in local civic affairs and for live years served as townsliip supervisor. The 

family iielped organize the United Lutheran church at llitterdal, but is now 
afiiliated witli the Synod church. 



WILLIAM SPRUNG. 



Among- the native-born citizens of Germany who have come to tiie 
United States' and engaged in general farming and the raising of .stock, 
is William Sprung, who was born in the Fatherland in 1871. He is the 
son of August and Rika (Lau) Sprung, who were also born in Germany 
and who remained there until thirty-three years ago. 

August Sprung was born in Gemiany in 1835. and in that country 
he followed the life of a farmer. In 1884 he decided to try his fortune 
in .Vmerica and arrived in this country after a voyage of about two weeks. 
He started out for Illinois and remained in that state for three months and 
then moved to Iowa, where he operated a farm for about nineteen years. 
At the end of that period he came up into the state of Minnesota and 
settled on a farm in section 19, Moland township. Clay county. There 
he established his home and continued to give his undivided attention to 
the labors of his farm and there spent the rest of his life, his death occurring 
in the fall of 1908. Prior to leaving Germany, .\ugust Sprung had for 
some years been married to Rika Lau, who came to America with her inisljand 
and the other members of the family, in 1884, and is now living with iier 
son, William, the subject of this sketch. To August Sprung and wife the 
following children were born : Otto, who is married ; .Anna, living in Clay 
county : William, .\ugust, Rudolph. Manda, and Edith, tlie latter four chil- 
ilren being deceased. Mr. Sprung was an acti\e and influential man of the 
district in which he had lived. 

^\'illiam Sprung was educated iit the sch(jols of Germany and in 1884 
came with his parents to .\merica and accompanied them to Illinois and 
later to Iowa, where under the careful training of his father he learned tlie 
rudiments of farming. He moved to Clay county in the spring of 190J 
and shortly afterward commenced farming on his own account. He is 
now the owner of three hundred and ten acres of |)rinie land, and plants 
an average crop of seventy-five acres to potatoes, all liis farming opera- 
tions being carried on in accordance with modern nietliods. In addition 




wd.i.iAM srraxr; and fajiily. 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC "--'RY 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES^ MINNESOTA. 265 

to his general farming' lie lias for some )'ears paid considerable attention 
to the raising of a good grade of live stock and now has some excellent 
Shorthorn cattle on his place. Mr. Sprung's farm is well improved and 
his outbnildings are snbstantial and modern in equipment. He has recently 
remodeled the dwelling house and has converted it into a modern residence, 
provided with all conveniences, including electric lights. He is accounted one 
of the substantial and progressive farmers of this section of the county. 

Mr. Sprung's maternal grandfather, Christian Lau, was a farmer in 
Germany, where he died at the age of sixty-two years. Mr. Sprung's 
maternal grandmother, Rika Lau, also died in Germany, at the fine old age 
of eighty-seven, her death occurring about 1898. 



WILLIAM H. RASEY. 



William H. Rasey, a well-known and successful lawyer, living at Ulen, 
Clay county, was born near St, James, Watonwan county, Minnesota, 
September 14, 1885, a son of Elwin Z. and Llelen Adele (Sargent) Rasey, 
the former of whom is a native of Hartford, Washington county, New York, 
being born November 2^, 1844, and the latter, a native of Fond du Lac 
county, Wisconsin. They are the parents of seven- children, namely: Roy 
S., Ruth A., Inez E., William H., Jessie A., Flora E., and Nina O. Both 
father and mother are living in St. James, Watonwan county, in substantial 
and well-earned retirement. 

\\^illiam H. Rasey received his elementary education in the schools 
of St. James, ]\Iinnesota, graduating from the high school of that place 
in 1905. In the same year, he entered Hamlin University to pursue a 
supplementary course of study. In Ihe fall of 1906, he took up a home- 
stead of government land in Williams county. North Dakota, and proved 
up his claim in the fall of the following year. Since the laws of Ontario, 
Canada, at that time allowed a homestead to be taken and proved up by an 
alien without his beconnng a British subject, Mr. Rasey went up into that 
])rovince in the spring of i()o8 and there filed a claim. In the fall of 
that year, he returned to his studies in Hamlin Lhiiversity and completed 
his sophomore year, but the following winter of 1909 and the spring and 
summer of 1910 he spent on his homestead, during which time he cleared 
fifteen acres and marketed the timber. Returning to Minnesota in the 
fall of 1910, he began a law course in the St. Paul College of Law, but 



266 CLAY Wn X()[<M.\X COrXTIKS. MINNESOTA. 



on the coniintj of the following sprin*;-. lie returned again to his Canadian 
claim, where he remained until the fall of 1913. occupying his time in 
working on his holding and in reading law. He then resumed his studies 
in the St. Paul College of Law. and in the summer of the following vear, 
proved up his claim in Ontario. He then returned to college, and in the 
spring of 191 5 came to Clay county and entered the law ottice of C. G. 
Dosland. in ^haorhead. He then, in the fall oi 191 5. located in the practice 
of his ])rofession at Lake Park, Becker county, Minnesota. His husiness 
in the nortiiwestern part of Becker county brought him to Ulen on his week- 
end trips, and. after three months, he decided to locate in Ulen. He came 
here January i. 1916, and has been here ever since engaged in general 
law ])ractice. 

in 1915. September 9, William II. k;i.se\ and liia Chainbanl, daugh- 
ter of F. G. and Emma C. (Torrey) Chambard, of Valley City, North 
Dakota, were united in marriage. Mrs. Rasey is a musician of considerable 
talent, having been a student of music practically all her life. She is teacher 
of both ])iano and voice and has attained great success as an instructor. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rasey are members of the Congregational church, in 
Lien, and are interested in all the activities of that church. Mr. Rasey 
is affiliated with the local lodges of .Ancient Free and .Acce])ted Masons, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of .\merica. 
He is a member of the Communitv Club, of which he is secretarv. 



JOHX LLVnXHl. 



John Lindahl. a venerable farmer of Spring Prairie township, Clay 
county, who has lived beyond the age of fourscore years, having reached 
the advanced age of eighty-four years, the last three decades or more of 
which have Ijeen spent in this locality, can relate tales of many interesting 
e\ents that have transpired here since this locality was first settled. He 
has witnessed with his own eyes the many changes that have taken place 
;ind in the processes which ha\e brought these changes about he has played 
no inconspicuous part himself. 

Mr. Lindahl was born in Sweden, .\ugust 8. 1833, a son of Johanas and 
Ingeborg Swenson. also natives of Sweden, farming people, who spent all 
their- lives in their native land. The father reached the unusual age of 
ninety-seven. Five of their children grew to maturity, namely : Carl, who 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 267 

came to Minnesota and died in Cla)- county; Sarah, wlio died in Sweden; 
Martha and Johanna, who also died in the old country, and John, whose 
name forms the caption of this biographical review. 

John Lindahl grew to manhood in Sweden and there attended the com- 
mon schools. Dn January i, 1857, he married Sarah Johnson, a native of 
Sweden, in which country her parents spent their lives on a farm. Mr. 
Lindahl lived in Sweden, where he followed farming, until the year 1884. 
when he came to the United States, but his wife antl some of their children 
did not follow him until 1885. Two of their sons and two daughters had 
preceded them here in 1882. Mr. Lindahl located first in Cass county. North 
Dakota, but after spending one summer there he moved across the river into 
Minnesota and about a year later settled on the farm on which he still lives 
in Spring Prairie township, Clay county, taking up a homestead, the north- 
east quarter of section 30. He endured the usual hardships and privations 
of pioneer life and by perseverance succeeded in de\eloping a valuable farm 
and a comfortable home, carrying on general farming and stock raisin.g 
until old age made it necessary for him to turn the active management of 
the place o\'er to his sons. Tlie\' have put up excellent new buildings, planted 
a large gro\e and made other important improvements. 

To John Lindahl and wife sixteen children have been born, named as 
follow: Martha, who lives in Sweden, the widow of Carl M. Dahl; Charles, 
will) died in infanc\' in Sweden: Charles, the second, who died in Alinne- 
sota at the age of twenty-seven years; Johanna, wife of Ole Lundeene, of 
Clay county; Johanas, who is a blacksmith by trade and lives in Minneapolis; 
Ligre, wife of T,. T. Larson, a farmer, of Spring Prairie township, Clay 
county; Christine, deceased, who was the wife of Nels Thompson, of Spring 
Prairie townshi]). a biographical sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this 
volume; I-'rank. who is farming on the home place; Gustav, who died in 
infancy in Sweden; Matilda, wife of P. P. Chandler, of Fargo; Carolina, 
wife of Theodore Ekroth, of Minneapolis; .\ugusta. wife of Gust Eurin, of 
Moorheafl ; Gust, who lives in Canada; Louise, a nurse in the L'nited States 
army, who spent three years in tlie Philippine Islands and who is now ( 1917) 
in Panama; Au.gust, who is at home and helping on the farm, and Amanda, 
the only one of the cliildren born in America, her liirth havin,g occurred \n 
Clay county. She is the wife of Herst Miller and hves at Stockwood. The 
Lindahls are mcniljers of the Lutheran church and have ever taken an inter- 
ested part in local church work. Mr. Lindahl is a Republican and has ever 
given his earnest attention to the causes of good local .government. 



268 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIKS, MINNKSOTA. 

JOHX H. BRAMAN. 

John H. Braman, a well-known antl substantial farmer of Alliance 
township, Clay county, was horn at Ludlow, Massachusetts, in January. 
1868, son of Albert H. and Augusta H. (Pike) Braman. the former of 
whom was born in Granville. .Massachusetts. July 14. I'^.v*^. and the hitler, 
in [-"ranklin, New Hampshire, Xoveniber 29, 1S39. who were married on 
Xo\ember 20, 1858, and continued to make their home in Massachusetts 
until in 1869, when they came West and settled in Iowa, remaining there 
until i8(S6, in which year they came up into Minnesota and settled in Clay 
county, where ihey are now living, honored pioneers of that county. L'pon 
coming up into the \\ei\ River country. Albert H. Braman homcsteadcd a 
cpiarter of a section of Iruid. the place where he is now living, in Alliance 
township. Clay county, and there established his home. In 1909 his house 
was destroyed by fire and he and his son erected a new and much more 
commodious residence, the two families making their home together, the 
father now lixing practically retired from the active labors of the farm, 
though still making his regular weekly trips to Moorhead with butter and 
eggs. Albert 11. Braman for many years took an active interest in local 
civic affairs and was for some time justice of the peace in and for his 
home townshij) and for iwehe years served as chairman of the Ijoard of 
township supervisors. To him and his wife six children have been born, 
of whom the subject of this sketch was the third in order of birth, the 
others ijeing as follow: Ella, deceased; Charles, of Moorhead; George, 
deceased: Grant, of Portland. Oregon, and Gertrude, of Thompson. North 
Dakota. 

John H. Braman was little more than an infant in arms when liis 
parents moved from Massachusetts to Iowa in 1869. and in the latter state 
he received the greater part of his schooling, having been seventeen years 
of age when the family nioxed from Iowa to Clay county. From the begin- 
ning of his residence here he has been an energetic factor in the lalKjrs of 
developing and improving his father's homestead place in Alliance town- 
ship and is now farming that place as well as a quarter of a section adjoin- 
ing, in section 12. which he homesteaded on his own account ujwn reach- 
ing his majority, and is doing well as a general farmer and stockman. In 
addition to his grain farming. .Mr. Braman has of late years been giving con- 
siderable attention to the raising of potatoes, and in the current season 
(1917) had out fifty acres of potatoes. He and his father have made all 



CLAY AND XORMAX COVXTIES, MINNESOTA. 269 

iIk- improvements on the place and have one of tlie best-equipped farm 
plants in tliat neighlic irhooct. John H. Braman has given a good citizen's 
attention to local civic affairs and for some time served as constable in 
his home township and is now treasurer of the local school board. 

In October, 1896. in Fargo, John H. Braman was united in marriage 
to Anna Johnk. whu was born in the city of Chicago in January, 1875, 
and to that union two children have been born, sons both, Alljert H., named 
for his grandfather, and Clifford. The Bramans have a very pleasant 
home and take a proper interest in the community's general social activities. 



THEODORE S. NELSON. 

Theodore S. Xelsun. cashier of the State Bank of Georgetown, Clay 
cuuntv, was born in iMJlmore county, Minnesota, June 23, 1879. a son of 
Severt and Barbara ( Moen ) Nelson, both natives of Norway, in which 
country they spent their earlier years. Severt Nelson immigrated tf) Amer- 
ica about 1862, locating among the early settlers of Fillmore county, Min- 
nesota. About 1 88 1 he came up to this part of die state and bought a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Hendrum township, Norman county, 
where he carried on general agricultural pursuits until 191 2, when he re- 
tired from active life and moved to the village of Hendrum. where be 
still makes his home. He is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church. 
His family consists of the following children: Cornelius. Theodore S.. 
Anton. Julia, Martin and Amanda. 

Theodore S. Nelson grew to m.-mbood on the home farm in Hendrum 
township. Norman count\-. and there attended the public schools, later be- 
coming a student in Concordia College at Moorhead. He worked with 
his father on the home farm until he was twenty years of age, then began 
working in a store at Twin Valley, in the eastern part of Norman county, 
remaining there seven months: then worked three months for G. T. Ing- 
berg in a store in the village of Hendrum. In 1901 he became assistant 
ca.shier of the State Bank of Hendrum and continued with that institution 
for three years. He then took a course in the Dakota Business College at 
Fargo, and in the spring of 1904. helped organize the State Bank of George- 
town and has been cashier of the same ever since, discharging his dutie> 
in a manner that has reflected much credit upon himself and to the entire 
satisfaction of both the stockholders and patrons; in fact, he has done much 



270 CLAY AND XORMAX COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

to increase tlie prestige and popularity of tliis sound and safe banking hou.->e, 
which has had a very satisfactory growth. He is also secretar\- and treas- 
urer t)f the h'anners Elevator Company at Georgetown, which operates 
one of the thri\ing elevators in Clay county. 

In i<)U4 .\Ir. Nelson was married to Burgetta Gunderson, a daughter 
of I'eter Gunderson and wife, of Hentlrum. where she grew to womau- 
liood and attended school. Mrs. Nelson was called to her eternal rest on 
\])ril 16. igiT). leaving three children, SyKester, Eunice and Hubert. 

Mr. Nelson is a Republican and is one of the leaders of his party 
in Clay county. He was treasurer of the Republican county committee 
in 1916; is treasurer of the village of Georgetown, and is also treasurer 
of the local school district. .\s a public .servant he has always discharged 
his duties in an able, faithful and credital)le manner. He is a member of 
the Masonic order and of the Norwegian Lutheran church. 



OLE S. N.Xin i'.IUI). 



Ole S. Narverud was born in Norway, l-'ebruary 26, 1855, a son of 
-Stengrim Ostenson and Birgit (Bakhus) Narverud. both natives of Nor- 
way, where they spent their entire life. They were the parents of eight 
children: Osten, Sunnev, Halvor. Ole S., Gurine. Barbro. Stengrim and 
Sivert. 

Ole S. Xarverud received his early education in the public schools of 
Norway, supplemented by attendance of i)ublic schools in Clay county for a 
few months after coming to this country. .\s a young man, he learned 
the carpenter trade, at which he worked for some time in his native country. 
In 1879 he came to .\nierica and located first in Goose Prairie township. 
Clay countv, Miiniesota, and three years later he bought one hundred and 
twenty acres of unimproved land in Highland (irove township. Clay county, 
and located on this land. He i)ut up buildings and improved the land, 
l)reaking the sod and clearing the land of the wild growth of underbrush, 
and in time had the land in a fair condition for the production of crops. 
He lived on this farm for seven years and during that time expended a vast 
amount of hard labor incident in putting the land in condition for culti- 
vation. In i8<Sq he sold the farm and worked out for about one year, and 
in July, 1890. he embarked in the hardware and implement business, at 
Hitterdal, in which he has continued ever since. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2/1 

Mr. Xarverud was married in 1882, to Gor Ostenson. and to this union 
eight children have Ijeen horn, namely : Bertha Gustina, Tillie, Gustav O., 
Henry, Stina, Olga, Mabel and Lillian. Mr. Narv^eriid and family arc 
members of the Synod Lutheran church. While living- on the farm Mr. 
Xar\erud ser\ed as superviosr of the township for six years. 



M.\RTn\ A. GIERE. 



Martin A. Giere, a farmer of Cromwell township. Clay county, was 
born in Olmsted county, Minnesota, April 19, 1861. He is a son of Amund 
and Kari (Jesme) Giere, both natives of Norway, from which country ihcy 
came to America, single, and were married in Dane countx , Wisconsin. 
Nels and Mari Giere, the paternal grandparents, natives of Norway, came 
to America in 1846, locating first in Dane county, Wisconsin, among the 
early settlers, driving out how. Milwaukee to Dane county with an ox-team. 
There the grandmother died ten years later. In 185(1 the grandfather, 
with the parents of the subject of this sketch, made the trip in a prairie 
schooner, drawn by an ox-team from there to Olmsted county, Minnesota. 
Amund Giere bought one hundred and sixty acres in Wisconsin, which he 
later sold, and then bought land in Olmsted county, this state, of the govern- 
ment, and there he developed a good farm, on which he spent the rest rif 
his life. His widow is still living there. Fifteen children were born to them, 
namely: Nels, Torbjern, Ole, Martin, Ingeval (deceased). Lew Columbus, 
Alfred (deceased). Otto Enoch (deceased) Alexandria, Tedman (who died 
m infancy), Technan Oscar and Josephine Emilia (twins), Amanda Matilda 
and Clara Louisa, both of whom died in infancy, and Alfred. 

Amund Giere, father of the above named children, was an intluential 
man in his locality. He served as treasurer of the school board from the 
lime it was organized until within a few years of his death. He helped 
organize the district he lived in. in Olmsted county, and also helped organize 
the first church in his community. This church was Iniilt of stone and he 
helped build it and remained an active church worker. This church has the 
reputation of being one of the finest rural churches in the state. Torbjern 
and Inga (Lee) Jesme, the maternal grandparents of the subject of this 
sketch, were natives of Norway, from which country they came to America 
in 1846 and located in Dane county, Wisconsin; later moved to Iowa and 



272 CLAY AN'D NORMAN COL^NTIES, MINNESOTA. 

then joined the parents of Martin A. Giere and spent the rest of tlieir hves 
with them, she living there twenty-five years and he thirty years. 

Martin A. Giere grew u[) on the farm and attended the common schools 
ill Olmsted county, and there he lx)ught one hundred and si.xty acres, which 
he improved and farmed until 1896, when he came to Clay county and 
located on his present farm in Cromwell township, his place consisting of 
two hundred and eighty acres, which is well improved and well cultivated 
and on which he has carried on general farming and stock raising, breeding 
Shorthorn cattle, in a very successful manner. He is also interested finan- 
cially in the Farmers Co-operative Creamery Company at Hawley, which he 
helped organize, and of which, for the first five years of its organization, 
he was president. 

In the fall of 1891 Mr. Ciere was married to .\nna Maria Fingerstjn. 
a daughter of Ole h'ingerson, and to this union the following children luue 
been born: Archie Oliver, who died when eighteen years of age; Amie 
Elvilta, Xels Rudolph, Helen Constance, Olga Maria, Logan, Morris and 
Alice. Mr. Giere is a Republican and is now township chairman, having 
been a member of the board for about fifteen vears. 



SOLOMON G. COMSTOCK. 

The lion. SuK^mon (i. Comstock, former member of Congress from 
this district and one of the well-known and successful residents of Moor- 
head, was born in Penobscot county. Maine, on May 9, 1842. He received 
his education in the local schools and was reared on the home farm, where 
he remained until he was of age. After completing an academic course of 
studv. he completed a course in law and was admitted to the bar in the year 
i86(). He later left his native .state and located at Omaha, Nebraska, where 
he was identified with the legal profession for a time. In the year 1871 
he came to Mof.rhead. where he has since resided. Here he engaged in the 
practice of his profession until 1884, when he engaged in die real-estate 
business. In this business he has met with much success, and although 
advanced in vears he is still one of the active business men of his home city. 

It was during his life as a practicing attorney that ^Ir. Comstock was 
elected to the position of county attorney, and while holding that office gave 
the most efficient service to the duties that were incumbent ui)on him. His 
abilitv as a lawyer and an advocate won for him the approval of a large 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX 

TTLDEN fOUNDATI.- 




MltS. SAKAll CO.MS'mCK. 




HON. !SOr.O.\[()N G. COMSTOCK. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2/3 

circle of friends wlio liold liim in the highest regard. In 1875, the voters 
of his district, recognizing iiis ahiHty and integrity, elected him to the Legis- 
latnre, a position he held for several terms, with credit to himself and 
honor to his constitnents. He was later elected to the fifty-first Congress 
of the United States and served in that body with distinction. 

In the year 1874, Solomon G. Comstock was united in ni.irriage to 
Sarah Ball, a lady of high intellectual ability, and one held in the highest 
regard and esteem. She has devoted her life to the interest of her husband, 
her family and the good that she might do in the community in which she 
has lived. To this union three children have l^een 1)orn : Ada Louise, Jessie 
M. and George M. Mr. and Mrs. Comstock are most hospitable people and 
bv their pleasing personalities and high ideals have had an elevating and 
substantial influence on the moral, educational and civic life of the district. 

Since coming to the state Mr. Comstock has taken the greatest interest 
in .ill local affairs, and has taken a i)rominent part in all enterprises that 
had a tendency to the greater growth and advancement of his section of 
the state. He secured the location of the State Normal School at Moorhead 
and donated to the state tlie site occupied by that institution. His greatest 
desire at all limes, has been for the general welfare of the community. His 
work in the real-estate Inisiness has given him an enviable position from 
which to work for a greater and a l)etter community, in one of the greatest 
sections of one of the greatest states in the Union. 



CHARLES F. SCHINDLER. 

Charles F. Schindler, one of the substantial and progressive farmers of 
Ilarnesville township, owner of eight hundred and eighty acres of prime 
land in that township and one hundred and sixty acres in Can;ida, breeder 
of a choice strain of Hereford cattle, is a native of Germany, but has been 
living in this country since he was nineteen years of age. Fie was born on 
October 4, 1853, a son of Joseph and Catherine Schindler, who lived and 
died in Germany. 

Joseph Schindler was born in Germany in 1814, was educated in the 
schools of that country and for the remainder of his life followed the occu- 
pation of a farmer. He died in his native land in 1868 at the age of fifty- 
four years. His wife, Catherine Schindler, was also born in Germany in 
1817 and died in- 1870, being then sixtv-two vears of age. They were the 
(i8a) 



274 CLAY Ax\D NORMAN COl'XTIES, MINNESOTA. 

parents of eleven children, Alexander (deceased). I'erdinaud (deceased). 
Joseph, Angus T., Charles, Louisa, l-"edoria, Marie, l>arl)ara. Catherine and 
Christine. These parents were prominent and influential residents of their 
home locality. 

Charles F. Schindler was educated in the excellent schools of Germany 
and lor a few \ears he helped his father on the farm. In 1872. at the aije 
of nineteen years, he immigrated to the L'nited States and went on to Con- 
cinnati, Ohio, where he remained for six months, lie then went to the 
city of St. Louis, Missouri, where he worked for two and a half years, at 
the end of which time he moved to St. Paul. Minnesota, in 1878 he came 
to Clay county and took a tree claim of one hundred and sixty acres of land 
in section 14. Rarnesxille township, and on this place he is now living. Me 
immediately .set to work to break the land and ])Ut out crops and he was 
successful in his agricultural operations from the very beginning. He con- 
tinued to add to his land holdings as time went on, and he is now the owner 
of eight hundred and eighty acres of the best quality of land in Barnesville 
townshij), two hundred acres of which, in section 2^. he has rented. lie 
carries on general farming and stock raising and is accounted one of the 
most substantial farmers in this section of the county. He has carried out a 
.systematic series of improvements and his outbuildings and dwelling house 
are among the best in the district. In addition to his land holdings in Clay 
county, Mr. Schindler is the owner of one lumdred and sixty acres of land 
across the border in Canada. On his home place he plants al)Out eighty acres 
of potatoes, and his cattle, forty-two head of Herefords, are of the best 
strain obtainalile. 

On June 10, 1888, Charles F. Schindler was united in marriage to Ennie 
Moran, who was born on October 18, 1866, in Paris, I'Vance. and who came 
with her parents to .\merica in 1872. Her parents are now dead. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Schindler the following chiUlren were born : August, who reside^ 
in Canada: Charlie, the captain of a vessel, who makes his home at San 
Diego, California; Christian, on the home tann: Louise, who died in 191 5: 
Victoria, wife of E. V. McDunn. of Barnesville: Madeline, a nurse in the 
Fargo Hospital, and Cecelia, at home. Mr. Schindler gives a good citizen's 
attention to local civic afifairs, with special reference to educational matter-;, 
and served several years as a director of the school board. He was also 
a member of the township board for a long period and in each of these 
public offices he applied himself to the duties with ability and energy. The 
lamilv are members of the Barnesville Catholic church. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2/5 

KXl'DT A. LEVERSON. 

Farming is Ijoth pleasant and pr(_)titaljle wlien entered into witii the 
spirit that has always dominated Knudt A. Leverson, one of the best tillers 
of the soil of Clay county, for he has never regarded it as drudgery and an 
undesirable occupation. He was born in Worth county, Iowa, May j;, 
1870, a son of Amos and Julia Isabell (Ouarve) Leverson, Ijuth natives 
of Norway, the former of whom came to America about 1849 and the latter, 
a year or two later, with her parents. Her father died in New York City 
shortly after reaching the New World, and the rest of the family came on 
to Wisconsin. Her parents were Teman and Kjersti (Sjong) Ouarve. The 
mother later moved to Worth county, Iowa, and finally to Spring Grove, 
^Minnesota, where her death occurred at the unusual age of ninety-six years. 
The father of the subject of this sketch located in Wisconsin upon his 
arrival in this country, but subsequently moved to Wnrtli enunty, Iowa. 
He devoted his active life to general farming. In 1898 he came up into 
Minnesota and located on a farm in Cromwell township, Cla\' county, where 
he lived until his death, and there his widow is still making her home. The 
place consists of three hundred and twenty acres of excellent land, well 
improved in every way. To these parents the following children w ere born : 
Betsie, wife of E. Bronsvold, of Clay county; Clara, wife of A. Holm, of 
Clay county; Temen, of Fargo; Levi, of Clay county: Knuch, the subject 
of this sketch; George, who resides at Hawley: Oliver, whd resides ncar 
Salem, North Dakota; Sanuiel. who resides on the old hduie farm, and 
Cora, deceased. 

Knudt A. Leverson grew to manhood in Worth counl)-, lnwa, and when 
a boy assisted his father with the general work on the farm, attending the 
public schools in the winter time. Upon lea\ing there he came to Minnesota 
and bought the farm on which he still resides, in Cromwell township. Clay 
coimty. He owns two hundred and forty acres of productive and well- 
cultivated land, all under excellent improvements, including a C(jmmodious 
residence and numerous outbuildings, all of which he has put up himself 
He carries on general farming and stock raising, keeping a good grade of 
Shorthorn cattle. He had been a cattle raiser a number of years before 
leaving Iowa. Besides his farming, he is interested financially in the Farm- 
ers Elevator Company at Hawley, which he helped organize. He is also 
a stockholder in the company which operates the co-operative creamery at 
Hawley. 



2/6 Cr.AV AND XORMAX Ci U' XTII'.S. .\f I XXICSOTA. 

On June S. 1S94. Mr. I.everson was niarrietl Id Julia Ixnulson. wlio 
was Iiorn in Iowa, where slie grew to womanliood and was educated in the 
ciiuiniDn schools. She is a daughter of lulling Knutsoii. a native of Xor- 
way, from which countr\- lie came to .\nierica when young. He has devoted 
his active life to general farming in Iowa, where he owns a good fariu. 
l)iu is now li\ing in retircmenl. To Mr. and Mrs. l,e\erson seven chil- 
ilren have heen born, namely: .Vdolph. Ida and Ruth (twins), Karling. 
Mvrtle, Alva and Cora (deceased). Mr. Leverson is a member of the 
Lutheran church. Politically, he is a Repuljlican. 



JOHN FORD. 

When Clav comitv was covered with prairie grass and wild animals 
roamed the \irgin plains over which wound Indian trails, John Ford came 
here from far-away lingland and assimied the life of a pioneer, voluntarily 
forsaking the advantages of civilization in its highest forms for the hard- 
ships and privations of life on the Western frontier. Me assisted in estab- 
lishing schools and churches and in introducing the general customs of 
modern life. 

Mr. Ford was born in Wiltshire, h-ngland, June jO, 1847. a son of 
William and Jane (Smart) Ford, both natives of England, where they 
grew up. married and established their home. The father was a baker 
bv trade and was also engaged in the grocery business. He and his wife 
both spent all their lives in England. They were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, namelv: James. decea.sed : Anna, who was next in order of birth; 
Thomas, who is a member of the Yeomanry, a military organization in 
Fmgland; John. William, F'lizabeth. Sidney and luiiily. 

John Ford grew to manhood in luigland and there attended school 
and was married. He came with the fust luiglish cijlony to settle in this 
part of the Red River country, arriving at Havvley on .\pril 17, 1873. In 
the following May, or about a month after his arrival, he took up a home- 
stead of one hundred and sixty acres in Cromwell township. He had the 
foresight and judgment to select good land in a community diat was bound 
to prosper in future }ears, and he has remained on his first purchase to the 
present time, or during a period of fort\-five years. He worked earnestly 
and managed well and in due course of time he had his land under a fine 
state of cultivation and a comfortable home established. Today there arc 



CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2"/ 

tew better or more lii<(hly improved farms in liis localitv. lie has a large, 
substantial (lueiling and numerous convenient farm buildings. Air. l-'onl 
planted a grove in the early days here, which is now large and inviting, a 
most valuable addition to his farm and a distinctive feature of the land- 
scapes thereabout, f^e later added one hinidred and si.xtv acres to his orig- 
inal farm, making one of the best three-hundred-and-twenty-acre farms in 
the tow-nship. He raises a large quantity of grain and big herds of live 
stock, especially sheep. He has been a breeder of Shropshire sheep for the 
past thirty years. He also raises Berkshire hogs and Red Polled cattle. 
Air. Ford is also a stockholder in the l-'armers Co-o])erati\e C"reamei-v at 
Hawley, which he helped organize. 

()n Au.gust 2(), ](<()■/. Mr. l-'ord married Alary ,\. I'arsuns, who al^o 
was born in Wiltshire, I'ji.gland, a dau.ghter of Xehemiah I'arsons, a car- 
[jenter In- trade, who spent his entire life in lui.gland. There Mrs. l-"ord 
.grew to womanhood and attended school. .Mr. and Airs. I-'ord ha\e one 
child, a sou. Siflney. who lives on the home farm, which he helps operate. 
roliticalK, Mr. l~ord is inilependent. He lieljjed organize Cromwell town- 
ship and was the first townshi]) assessor. He has also served as supervisor 
and as treasurer of the townshi]), ami has been a member of the local school 
board ever since the school district was organized, with the exception of 
one vear when lie was out of the count}'. \\'hcn the district was first 
organized it embraced the entire eastern half of the towiishij). known as 
district Xo. 44, which he helped to organize. \\ heo' it w ;is subdixided he 
helped to organize district Xo. 104. 



JOHX P. XVG.\.VRD. 



John P. Xy.gaard. former president of the \illage of Ilalstad, manager 
of the Halstad .\uto Company and of the electric-light ])lant in that villa.gc. 
a former deputx' Indian agent and former grand chief templar of the 
Independent Order of Good Templars for Alinnesota. is a native of the 
kingdom of Xorway. but has Iieen a resident of Alinnesota and of Norman 
count}- since he was about seven years of age. He was born near tltc 
city of Trondhjem, a seajxirt tow 11 of Xorwa}-, at the mouth of the Xid, 
Alav 7, 1874, son of I'. J. and Jonette (Moen) Xygaard, both natives 
of that country, the former of whom is now living at Halstad. an lionored 
pioneer resilient <jf Xorman count}-. 

P. J. X'vgaard was trained as a car])enter in his native land. He mar- 



278 CI. AY AXD XORMAX COL' NTIF.S, MIXXESOTA. 

ried on April 9, i860, and continued to make liis home at Trondhjem until 
1881, when he came to the United States with his family and proceeded on 
out to Minnesota, settling in Hendrum township. Xorman countv, among 
tile e.'irly settlers ot" that part of the county. In 1883. upon the estahlish- 
nient of the station at Halstad. he moved there and has ever since been a 
resident of that village. He lias one of the hrst houses built at Halstad 
and. in his xocation as a carpenter, did much of the building there at an 
early day. On .\pril (). i<;io. !'. |. .Xygaard and his wife celebrated the 
hftietb anniversary of their marriage, the "golden wedding" celebration 
being the occasion of a joyful gathering of the family and about si.xty 
guests. Of their seven surviving children there were si.x present, besides 
forty-three grandchildren and one great-grandchild. In the Nygaard fam- 
ily there are now li\ing the father, P. J. Xygaard, seven children, fifty-one 
grandchildren and fourteen great-grandchildren. P. J. Nygaard is a mem- 
lier of the United Lutheran church, as was his wife, and their children were 
reared in that faith. There were eight of these children, of whom the sub- 
ject of this sketch was the seventh in order of birth, the others being: 
Lovi.se, Karen. Jacob. Ingeborg. Hansine, Haldor and Ole, all of whom 
are living sa\e the last named, who died in 1883. 

John P. -Xygaard was seven years of age when his parents came to 
this country and be grew to manhood in the \illage of Halstad, where he 
still makes bis home. Upon completing the course in the village schools, 
he started in as a boilermaker and later worked for a year as a blacksmith 
lor the Rush ford Wagon Cf)mpany. He then took employment with Sule- 
rud & Lovesnes as a tinner and plumber, and worked for that company for 
fourteen years, or until in January, 191 3. when he helped to organize the 
1 lalstad .\uto Compan\ at Halstad and has since been manager of the 
same, the com[)any doing a general garage and auto-repair business. Mr. 
Xygaard also operates the Halstad light plant, which is owned by the Hal- 
stad .\uto Company, bor three years he served as president of the village, 
two years as trustee of the village board and for two years he served under 
William K. Johnson as a deputy Indian agent for this district. 

On June 7. 1895, Joli" I'- Xygaard was united in marriage to Jose- 
phine Griffin and to this union six children have been born, Esther, Orin, 
Elva. Vernon, Edna and John, the latter of whom died in infancy. Mr. 
X'ygaard is an ardent and active member of the Independent Order of Good 
Templars and has served a term as grand tem])lar for the state of Minnesota, 
a work in which he took much interest and in which his earnest efforts in 
behalf of temperance were widely felt throughout the state. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 270 

JOHN O. HILLESTAD. 

The business of the farmer is to make the farm produce the utmost 
possible at the lowest cost, and to be certain of a ready cash market for 
all that is produced. Thus the farmer who succeeds nowadays must use 
both his brain and his brawn. One of the tillers of the soil in Cromwell 
township, Clay county, who seems to be both a good planner and a hard 
worker is John O. Hillestad, who was born in Norway, July 12, i860. He 
is a son of Ole J. and Thora Christina (Hillestad) Hillestad, both natives 
i)i Norway, where they grew to maturity, married and established their 
home and where the mother still resides, the father dying several years ago. 
They never came to America. To these parents eight children were born, 
namely: Karin Ellina, John O., Hans, Peter, Sophia (deceased), Martin, 
Andrew and Gustav. 

John O. Hillestad spent his boyhood in Norway where he attended 
school. He came to Minnesota in 1879 and located in Fillmore county, 
where he remained four years, working as a farm laborer. He came to 
Clay county in 1883, driving up here with three horses and a buggy. He 
continued to work out on farms until 1887, when he moved on his present 
farm, in Cromwell township, as a "squatter," later buying the land from the 
railroad, when it was placed on the market. He worked hard improving the 
place, built a house and outbuildings and by perseverance and good man- 
agement has succeeded as a general farmer and stock raiser and now owns 
two hundred and forty acres. He not only has exceptionally fine farm 
buildings, but a large and inviting grove surrounding them. Mr. Hillestad 
has become one of the substantial men of affairs in his township and is 
a director in the Farmers Co-operative Creamery Company at Hawley. 
which he helped organize. Fie is also a stockholder and director in the Lake 
Park and Cuba b'ire Insurance Company. 

On December 24, 1884, Mr. Hillestad was married to Stena Maria 
Nelson, a native of Norway and a daughter of Andres Nelson and Helga 
(Flyhus) Eck. the former a native of Sweden and the latter of Norway. 
Thev came to .\merica in 1883, coming directly to Minnesota, and at once 
located in Parke township. Clay county, where they bought an eighty-acre 
farm, on which they established the family's future home, and there sjient 
the rest of their lives. Their family consisted of four children, namely : 
Jennie, who came to Wisconsin in 1S80, later came to Clay county, Minne- 
sota, where her death occurred some time ago; Siena Maria, wife of the 



28o tXAY AND NORMAN CULNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

subject of this sketcli; Ingeborg-. deceased; and Carrie, tlie youngest. The 
eldest daugliter came to .America alone, but the three younger children came 
with their parents in 1883. To Mr. and Mrs. Hillestad ten children have 
l)een born, namely; Oscar, .\lbert (deceased), Tilda, Henry, John, Sarah. 
Edwin, Carl. William and Ida (deceased). 

Politically, .Mr. Hillestad is an 'Tndependent." He has .served as town- 
ship supervisor and was township assessor for a period of fifteen years. 
-\s a public servant he has performed his duties ably and acceptably. He 
;inil his faniilv are meniliers of the Lutheran church. 



EUGENE J. HERRINGER. 

Eugene J. Herringer, abstractor and real-estate dealer, of Ada, former 
auditor of Norman county, former mayor and former clerk of Ada and one 
of the best-known and most progressive citizens of that city, is a native of 
Canada, but has been a resident of Ada since he was eighteen years of age. 

Upon completing his .schoolintj- in the public schools of his native 
province of Ontario, Eugene J. Herringer came to Minnesota and in Ma>', 
1882, located at .\da, where he ever since has resided. Upon his arrival 
there he secured employtnent as a meinber of Norman county's excellent 
teaching corps and for eight years sjjcnt his winters teaching school, the 
summers being employed at various forms of clerical labor. He then was 
engaged in the office of the auditor of Norman county and servetl as deputy 
county auditor for six years, at the end of wdiich time he was elected county 
auditor. In the succeeding election he was re-elected to that ofifice thus 
served for eight years as auditor of the county. Upon the completion of 
his term of public service Mr. Herringer engaged in the abstracting busi- 
ness as a partner in the Norman County -Abstract Company and about 1908 
became sole proprietor of the business of that company, which he since has 
conducted alone, at the same time giving his attention to his flourishing 
real-estate business, long having Ijeen recognized as one of the leading realty 
dealers in this part of the state. 

In addition to his considerable term of service in the court house, Mr. 
Herringer also has performed valuable service in behalf of the city of .\da. 
For five years he .served as clerk of that city and he also has served a term 
as mayor of the city, in all his public acts doing all in his power to advance 
the growing interests of his home city. 




KlCiKNlO .T. lIKUKI.XGKi: 



"HE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



LEnex 

^••D \TtONS 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 28 1 

CHARLES J. CEDERBERG. 

There came to our great western plains some tliree decades ago, "a 
youth to fortune and to fame unknown," Charles J. Cederberg, who, by 
perseverance and good management has become one of the progressive farm- 
ers of Highland Gro\e township. Clay county. He was liorn in Sweden. 
Movember 30, 1859, and is a son of Carl Cederberg and wife, fitting men- 
tion of whom is made in the sketch of August Cederberg, which appears 
on another page of this work. 

Charles J. Cederberg grew to manhood in Sweden and there attended 
the public schools. He also attended school a while after coming to the 
New World, for which he set sail from his native shores when twenty-tive 
vears of age. He came directly to Minnesota, arriving in the village of Haw- 
ley, Clay county, in March, 1884. He worked as a farm liand in that vicinity 
for two years, during which time he made his home in Hawley. He saved 
his earnings and in 1886 purchased the farm on which he has since made 
his home, the place consisting of eighty acres in Highland Grove town- 
shii). He has increased his holdings to two hundred acres, which he has 
bnniglit up to a high state of cultivation and improvement, putting up an 
excellent group nf buildings, and has been quite successful as a general 
farmer and stock raiser. Mr. Cederberg helped organize the Earmers Ele- 
vator Company at Hawley and was elected first president of the same, serv- 
ing thus two years; remaining a director until 1917, and a heavy stock- 
holder. He was also the .second president of the company, which |)osition 
he occupied two years, and did much for the successful growdi of the same. 

Mr. Cederberg was married on December 31, 1886. to IngelHDrg West- 
lierg, a nati\e of Sweden, where she si)ent her childhood. She came to 
America aknit 1882, taking up her residence at Hawley. To this mar- 
riage two children were born, Jennie and Selma. In iSq.). Mr. Cederberg 
was married again, his second wife being known in her maidenhood as 
Johanna Danielson, also a native of Sweden, in which country she grew to 
womanhood, immigrating to the United States in 1894 and coming directlx- 
to Hawlev, Minnesota. Two children have been bom to this second union, 
.\lma and Alice. 

Politically, Mr. Cederberg is independent. He helped organize the 
school district in which he resides and has been a member of the school 
1)oard ever since. He was elected township supervisor in 1888 and has 
continued a niemljer of the board e\cr since, with the excei^tion of about 



282 CI.AV AXD NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

three years ; chairman of the same chiring- the past eighteen years, w ilh 
the exception of the year 1916, when he was prevented from serving on 
account of illness. As a public servant -Mr. Cederherg has always performed 
his duties in an able, faithful and highly acceptable manner, for he has 
at heart the best interests of his community, which he always seeks to 
promote in every legitimate w'ay. 



CHARLES B. ROMKEY. 

Charles B. Romkey, a substantial and progressive farmer of Clay county, 
justice of the peace in and for Riverton township, former chairman of the 
township IxDard, former treasurer of the school board, and in other ways 
identified with public affairs, is a native of the state of Iowa, but has been 
a resident of this part of Minnesota for more than twenty years. He was 
born on January 4, 1873, near Burlington, Iowa, a son of Conrad D. and 
Catherine Romkey, natives respectively, of Prussia and of Hessen Darm- 
stadt. 

Conrad D. Romkey had a somewhat varied career. When yet not 
more than a mere boy he was with Xapoleon some few years before the 
final defeat of that great soldier, .\nother member of the Romkey family, 
a brother of Conrad D., had also military tastes and was one of Emperor 
William's body guards. Conrad Romkey immigrated to the United States 
in 1822. coming on to Defiance. Ohio, where he owned land and operated a 
lioat yard for several years. In 1854 he moved to Iowa, had a fine farm 
of land and continued the work of the farm for the remainder of his acti\e 
life. He was regarded as an excellent farmer and he and his wife were 
acti\e and influential residents of the district in which they had made their 
homes. Both lived to good ages. Conrad Romkey dying in 1880 and his 
widow in 1909. both deaths occurring at Burlington, Iowa. Mrs. Rom- 
key owned one-half of a section of land in Riverton township. Clay county. 
They were the parents of the following children : Frank C, deceased ; John 
H.. deceased: Edward W.. married; Emma, married; Carrie E., married: 
Sarah, married ; Anna, married, and Charles B., the subject of this sketch. 

Charles B. Romkey was educated in the public schools of Iowa and was 
reared on his father's farm, where he helped in the labors of the same for 
several years. He is quite a machinist, having operated several threshing- 
machine outfits and assisted also in the contract work on the Northern 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 283 

I'acific recentl}-. He has been a resident of Clay connty for upwards of 
twenty years and is recognized throughout the township as one of the most 
progressive and substantial farmers in the district in which he resides. He 
is now the owner of four hundred and si.xty-five acres of prime land, 
located in sections 9, 16 and 17. Riverton townsiiip. Mr. Romkev carries 
on general farming and since the commencement of his operations he has 
been t(uite successful, everything about his holdings being in excellent con- 
dition. He has carried out many \aluable improvements at considerable 
e.xpense, and his farming is managed according to modern methods of a.gri- 
culture. thus ensuring a maximum of profitable results. 

In the summer of 1897 Charles B. Romkev was united in marria,ge 
to Xellie M. Miller, who was born in Burlington, Iowa, in 1876. To this 
union two children ha\"e been b(irn, Horace C, aged seventeen, and Alargaret 
C. aged thirteen. .Mr. and Mrs. Romkey take a proper interest in the 
general social activities of the community in which they live, helpful factors 
in the promotion of all causes having for their object the common good 
of people ;ui(l district. .Mr. Romkey served as postmaster at Stockwood, 
for many years, giving general satisfaction to the patrons in the discharge 
of the duties of the office. He was chairman of the township board for three 
years: was treasurer of the district school board for six years, and is at 
present serving as justice of the peace. In many other ways also he has 
given of his time and energy to the interests of the public. 



PROF. SE\'ERT O. T.\XG. 

Prof. Seven ( ). Tang, superintendent of schools of Clay county and 
one of the best-known and most influential citizens of Moorhead, is a native 
of the neighboring state of Wisconsin, but has been a resident of Minne- 
sota since he was two }'ears of age, and is therefore as much a Minnesotan 
as one "native and to the manner born". He was born at Wauzeka, in 
Crawford county, \Msconsin, .\ugust 26, 1866, son of Ole and Sophia 
(Guam) Tang, natives of the kingdom of Norway, who came to this coun- 
tr\- in i8(')_> and ])n)ceeded on out to Wisconsin, settling first at Stougli- 
ton. in that state, and after spending the siunmer there moved to Madison, 
the capital of the state, where they remained for four years. .\t the end 
of that period they mo\ed to Wauzeka, where they remained until 1868, \v 
which \ear thev came o\-er intfi Minnesota and located at Albert Lea. where 



284 CI.AY AND XOKMAN COl ' N 11 ICS. M I X Nl'.SOTA. 

lliey resided until 1878. wlit-ii ilif\ came up into tliis part of tlie state and 
located in Lake Park townsliip. Becker county. A year later they moved 
over into Clay county and Mr. Tani^- lioniesteaded a tract of eightv acres in 
legion township, where he estahlished his home and where he and his wife 
spent the remainder of their li\es, honored pioneers of that section of the 
county. Ole Tans;- was a substantial farmer, and he added to his homestead 
tract until he became the owner of a tine farm of twi) hundred acres, which 
is now owned by his .son, I'rofessor Tant,'. (^le Tani^- ;ind wife were the 
l)arents of twelve children, of whom six are still living', those Ijesides I'm 
fessor Tang being: Susan, who marrie<l O. X. Larson: .\min. who nianie<l 
L. N. Larson, and Henry .M.. .Si>phia and Christian. 

Severt C). Tang was but two years of age when his ])arents mmed 
from Wisconsin to .\lbert Lea. this state, and was about thirteen years 
of age when they came up here and settled in Clay county. He completed 
the common-school course in the grade<l schools at Lake Park and then 
began teaching school, rendering service in the school roc)in during the 
winters and continuing a valuable aid in the labors of improving and develop- 
ing the home farm during the summers. He was thus engaged for two 
years, at the end of which lime he entered the State Normal School at 
Moorhead and was graduated froni that institution in t8()6, meanwhile 
continuing his teaching- service, thus working his way through the Xornial 
school. Following his gra(luati(jn, he continued teaching and, after three- 
years of service in the district school, was hired as grade teacher of the 
schools at Hawley. where he remained one year and then accepted the 
position of principal of the schools at Auburn. There he remained for 
three years, at the end of which time he was made principal of the schools 
at Xew York .Mills and was thus engaged when, in 19CH9. he was elected 
superintendent of the schools of Clay county, with his office at Moorhead. 
I'pon the expiration of that term of service two years later. Professor Tang 
was made principal of the consolidated .schools at Comstock and was thus 
engaged there for two years and six months, at the end of which tinu- he 
transferred his services to the new consolidated schools at Oak Mound, i le 
was engaged as principal of the schools last named when, on January o. 
19 1 4, he was appointed to fill an unexnired term in the office of superin- 
tendent of schools of Clay county and thus resumed his former official 
position. He then was elected county superintendent for a term of foiu' 
years and is still serving in that important public capacity, long having 
been regarded as one of the leading schoolmen in this part of the state. In 
addition to his official duties. Professor Tang retains an active interest in 



CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 285 

Ilis farming- operations and is the owner of a fine farm of two hundred 
and forty acres in Eglon township, having added to the old home farm, 
which he owns, a tract of forty acres. During his residence in Eglon tow ii- 
shij), he served for five years as assessor of that township and also served 
for twehc years as justice of the peace in and for that township. 

On July K), 191^), T'rof. Severt O. Tang was united in marriage lo 
Jennie Ronning. a former teacher in the schools of Clay county. Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. Tang are memhers of the Norwegian Lutheran church and 
take an earnest interest in church work, as well as in the general good 
work'- of the communitw iiclpful in advancing all worthy causes hereabout. 



A. T. XORBY. 



.\. J. Xorhy, merchant and banker at Ilitterdal. was born in Norway 
DU Januarv 12, 1867, a son of John G. and 'iliorena (Akre) Norby, bodi 
natives of that country. John G. Norby came to America in the spring of 
iH()j and located for one \ear in .Vllamakee county, Iowa. He then came 
to Minnesota, and for three years lived in Fillmore count\ . In 1871 he 
nio\ed to Becker countv and located on a farm two and one-half miles 
west of Lake Park, where he made hi'-- home until his death, which occurred 
on ^Larch 17. 1913. He owned two hundred and seventy acres at the time 
of his death. He was the father of ten children: G. J. Norby: Louise, 
who married C K. I'.keru : L. J., L. M.. \. J.. Henry (who died at the age 
of thirty-five). Hannah. Martin. William and Hilda. Mr. Norby was a 
member of the Norwegian church. 

A. J. Norby was educated in the [jublic schools of Lake Park, and 
worked on his father's farm until his marriage, in the summer of 1892. 
In that year he mo\-ed to Moorhead and was engaged in the general grocery 
business there until the spring of igi6. In that year he moved to Hitter- 
clal, opened uj) a general u-ierchandise store there and has been engaged in 
this business since. He is a successful business man and is ii-iterested in 
ihe promotion of ])nsiuess enterprises. He was one of die organizers of 
("lav County State Hank, of Hattcrd:il, and is at present one of the direc- 
tors of this bank. 

In 1892 Mr. Xorln- was married to I'lorence May Peck, daughter of 
\l. A. Peck, of Lake Park. Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Norby have four 
children: Sarah. Myrtle. Corrall and Lucile. They are members of the 
Svnod Lutheran church. Mr. Norbv is a member of the Yeoman lodge. 



286 CLAY AND NOUMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

CHRISTIAN NICKLAV. 

Christian Xicl<Iay, a proniinent and well-to-do farmer and owner of 
a fine farm of four hundred and forty acres of land in Barnesville town- 
ship. Clay county, treasurer of the township board for the lon.sj period of 
thirty-two years and treasurer of the district school hoard for l\ventv-t\vo 
years, was born in Dane county, Wisconsin, March r, 1861, a son of John 
and Susan ( Birk ) Xicklay, both of whom were natives of Germany and 
who immigrated to the United States while still young. 

John Xicklay was born in Germany in 1833 and was educated in the 
schools of that country, coming to America when about twelve vcars old. 
He moved from lUitifalo county. Wisconsin, to .Minnesota in 187c), driving- 
two teams: leaving Buffalo on May i, that year, and arriving at Barnes- 
ville, Clay coimty. at the end of twenty-eight days. He immediately home- 
steaded a farm in section 14. Barnesville township, and shortlv afterward 
took a tree claim of one hundred and sixty acres, south of Barnesville. Mr. 
Xicklay proceeded at once to break u[> his land and get it into a state lit 
for the |)lanting of crops and presently had things well luuler way, his 
labors from the very start being successful. He continued to operate hi> 
land for the remainder of his active life and died in Xovember, 1897. at 
the age of sixty-four years. His wife. Susan Birk. also was a native of 
(iermany. born in that country in 1835. She came to America when eighteen 
years old and four year;> after her arrival was married in Dane countv. 
Wisconsin, to John Xicklay. They were the parents of the I'ollowing chil- 
dren : Christian, the subject of this sketch ; Jacob, a farmer in l?arnesville 
township: .Anna, married and living in the state of Washington: Peter, in 
Humboldt township: l.izzie. married, living in Montana: William, a rail- 
road engineer, and John, a railroad conductor. The mother of these children 
died in 1905. 

Chri-stian Xicklay was educated in the i)ublic schools of Dane countv. 
Wisconsin, and in 1879 accomnanied his father to Clay county, and worked 
on the farm of the latter until he was twenty-three years old, at which 
time he made his first purchase of land. He bought eighty acres in Barnes- 
ville township and commenced the life of a farmer on his own account and 
as he prospered in his labors he continued to add to his holdings and 
is now the owner oi four hundred ;uid forty acres of excellent land in 
sections 11, 14 and 15. Mr. Xicklay has carried out many valuable improve- 
ments and his farms are now classed among the best in that section of 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 287 

Clay county, he being accounted one of the substantial and progTessi\e 
farmers of the township. 

On January 9, 1890, at Mankato, this state. Christian Nicklay was 
united in marriage to Anna Bruels, who was born on August 4, 1868, in 
Blue Earth county, Minnesota. To this union the following children have 
been born: George, Leo (married), Mary (married), Catherine, Dora, 
Anton, rVed, Francis (deceased), Edmond, Mathilda and Mildred (twins) 
and Olivia. The family are members of the Catholic church of Barnesville 
and are active in support of all its good works. Mr. Nicklay is a member 
of the Catholic Order of Foresters. He served as treasurer of the town- 
ship board for thirty-two years and has been treasurer of the district school 
board for twenty-two years, and in these representative public positions has 
rendered valuable service to the people of the district. 



EDWARD ALBERTS. 

The Inisiness of the farm ;ni(l ihe business of farming, while in many 
jioints analogous, are in realit\- (|uite distinctive. The former carries with 
it the consideration of dollars and cents in the employment of labor, the 
outlay of capital on buildings and improvements; the cost of raising crops, 
as against the revenue received after harvesting and sale, the maintenance 
and repair of machinery and implements, and the saving to be made possible 
if improved machinery be installed on the farm. One of the citizens of 
Cromwell township. Clay county, who understands all phases of farming 
is Edward Alberts. 

Mr. Alberts was born in (ioodhne county, Minnesota, November 30, 
1 868. He is a son of Klaus and Margaret (Bauman) Alberts, both natives 
of Germany, from which country they came to America when young and 
sina-le After their marriage thev located in Goodhue county, Minnesota, 
where they made their h<jme for al)out fifteen years, then moved to Dodge 
county, this state, where they spent the rest of their lives on a farm. Their 
family consisted of eleven children, all of whom survive at this writing 
but one daughter, namely: George, William, Hiram, Mary, Edward, Kale, 
Ida (deceased), Margaret, Elizabeth, Frank and T'.enjamin. 

Edward Alberts grew to manhood on the home farm and attendetl the 
public schools in Dodge county, this state. There he l)egan farming for 
himself. In the spring of 1899 he came to Clay county and located on 



j88 clav and xouman couxtif.s, mixnesota. 

the farm on which lie still resides, in Cromwell township, and here he 
has been very successful as a .general farmer and stock raiser. His place 
consists of three hundred and twenty acres. Me has erected an excellent 
sroup of l)uildiiigs and everything al)out the place is kept in shipshajje. 
indicating the good taste of the owner. He raises a large quantity of grain, 
much of which he feeds to live stock, preparing a number of carloads 
of stock annually for the markets, and is one of the l)est-known stockmen 
in Cromwell and adjoining townships. He was one of tlie organizers oi 
the Hawlev T-ive Stock .Shipping Association an<l is a member of the l)oar;l 
of directors of the same. 

On March 7. 1894. lulwanl .\lberts was married to I"~liza Carter, win. 
was born at Winona. Minnesota, a daughter of Harry and Sarali May 
Carter, natives of Devonshiie. h'.ngland. where they married. They came 
to America in 1875 and located at A\inona, Minnesota. Mr. Carter died 
there in 1879 and his widow now resides in Mantorville, Minnesota. 

Seven children ha\e been born to Mr. and Mrs. Alberts. Guy, Ralph, 
Esther, Russell (deceased). .Marjorie. Lloyd and Miklred. Mr. .Mberts 
is a Republican and is township supervisor. He belongs to the Union church 
at Hawlev. 



I':i)\\ARl) A. KASSI-:XBORG. 

.\nother of the painstaking farmers of Clay county, who has worked 
Iiard for the success he has won is Kdward .\. Kassenborg. who owMis a 
valuable farm. ])art of which lies in Kragiies town.ship and part in Morken 
township. He was born in Houston county, .Minnesota, in rS68, a .son of .\. 
G. and Tilda ( Krageness) Kassenborg, natives of Norway, who located 
in Houston county in pioneer days and established the family home on a 
farm. The following children were born to A. G. Kassenborg and wife: 
Mrs. Carolina Rergliu. wlm lives in Moorhead: .Mina .Augusta; Gilbert, who 
is unmarried and lives on a farm in Clay county; Mrs. Mary Moe, who 
lives in Moorhead: Edward, the subject of this sketch; Eliza, the wife of 
[ohn Olnes; Julia, who married Christ Twedten and lives in Crookston, 
Minnesota, and Malina, deceased. 

Edward A. Kassenborg grew up on the home farm in Houston county, 
and there he attended the common schools. He has devoted his life to 
general farming and stock raising and has been very successful. He came 
to Clav countv as a voung man and is now owner of a well-improved and 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 289 

well-cultivated farm of three huiidred and ninety acres, part of which lies 
in Kragnes township and part in Morken township. He makes a s]iecialty 
(if raising Shorthorn cattle. 

On Octoher 15. 1890, Edward .\. Kassenborg was married at Con- 
cordia church, Clay county, to Christina Kragnes, who was born in 1871 
in Houston county, this state. She is a daughter of Levi and Sarah (Oleson) 
Kragnes, natives of Xorway, the father born in 1837. They came to Minne- 
sota in an early day and located on a farm in Houston county. The father 
died in 1900. His widow is still living on the homestead in Houston count} . 
being now seventv-three years old. There were fourteen children in this 
family, eleven of whom are now living. 

Eleven chiklren have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Kassenborg-, namely: 
Dora, the eldest: Aha, at home; Mabel, who is working as a bookkeeper 
in St. Luke's Hospital at Fargo: Louise and Selvene, twins; Elmer, Florence, 
Edna, Bennie, Gilbert and Ernest. They all live at home but the three 
elder children. 

Politically, Mr. Kassenborg is a Republican. He served as Irea.surer 
of the school board in district No. 103, and was a director on the lioard for 
a period of twenty }ears. 



MONS 1. WANGEN. 



Anv man who works on the land, who feeds a field and watches the 
result, gains a real fundamental knowledge of the underlxing foundation 
on which rests all our civilization. Tt makes him a sober man, a thoughtful 
man ; and, if he experiments wisely, a hopeful optimist. Such a man is 
Mons J. Wangen, a farmer of S])ring Prairie township. Clay county. He 
was born in Norway on Septemlier i, 1851. He is a son of Johanas Mon- 
son and Carrie ( Aslaksdater) Wangen, both natives of Norway, where 
they grew to maturity, married and established their future home. They 
never came to America and died in their native country. He was a car- 
])enter by trade. To these parents seven children were born. 

Mons J. Wangen grew to manhood in Norway and there he attended 
the common schools. As a young man he learned the carpenter's trade 
under his father and in due course of time became an expert workman. He 
came to America about 1871, locating in Goodhue county, Minnesota, where 
he spent six vears. then came to Clay county with Ole G. l-'arsdale. a sketch 
(19a) 



290 CLAY AND XdKMAN COl'XTIKS, MINNESOTA. 

(if whom appears elsewhere in tins work. .\flcr lonkini; uver tliis sec- 
ticm of the state Mr. Wangeii took up a homestead of one hundred :uid 
sixty acres in section t,2. Spring Prairie town.sliip. wliich was the tn-'-t 
liomestead in tliat townsliip. He was therefore the first ])ioneer in this 
locaHty, and lie endured the usual hardshijis and privations incitlent td lite 
on the frontier in those days, hut he persevered, worked hard and has suc- 
ceeded, remaining- here ever since. He has hrought his place up to a 
high slate of improvement and cultivation and has huilt a cozy home and such 
.luthuildings as his needs require. He set out a large grove which is now 
\ery attractive, lie hegan with nothing, hut he has forged ahead unaided 
and is now verv comfortably situated. He passed through the lean yea'-s 
with hope for better times ahead, which finally came. 

On March 17. 1876. in Goodhue county. Mr. Wangen was married 
to Aiuta Olson, a native of Trogenlien. Norway, and a daughter of Ole 
Irneson and Anna I'eterson, also natives of Norway, who died there. Mr.s. 
Wangen came to .America in 1S74. To Mr. and Mrs. Wangen seven chil- 
dren have been born, namely: Caroline, John (deceased); Anna, wife of 
William Moore, of (dyndon; a son who died in infancy; Oscar and two 
daughters who died in infancy. 

Mr. Wangen is a Republican and has taken an active interest in local 
public affairs from the first. He heli)ed organize Spring Prairie township 
and was one of the first members of the township board. He l^elongs to 
the Lutheran church and built the church, donating his labor to the congre- 
gation. 



H. C. POSSEHL. 



H. C. Possehl. fanner and potato dealer of near Baker, in the southern 
jjart of Clav countv. and former postmaster at Baker, was born in Cook 
countv, Illinois. May 24. 1871. He is a son of Fred and Minnie (Schlede) 
Possehl, both natives of Germany, where they spent their earlier years. The 
father immigrated to America about t86i. locating in Dupage county, Illi- 
nois, where he worked out the first few years, then rented a farm. He con- 
tinued farming in that state, mostlv in Cook county, until 1892, when he 
moved to Franklin county, Iowa, where he farmed .seven or eight years. 
then retired from active life, locating in the town of Latimer, Iowa. In 
igri he moved to Minnesota, locating at Baker, where he has since lived 
retired. His wife died some \ears ago. Fred Possehl started out with lit- 



"~ CLAY AND XORMAX COINTIES. MINNESOTA. 29I 

tie capital, but bv perseverance lie became \er\- conifurtably establisheil 
through his own efforts. His family consisted of the following children: 
Sophia, Emma (deceased), Herman. H. C. Fred, Martha. Louis and Minnie. 

H. C. Possehl grew to manhood in Illinois and there he attended the 
puljlic schools, in Dupage county. He worked with his father on the fariu 
when a boy and when a young man he began farming for himself in iM-ank- 
lin county, Iowa, and became tlie owner of eighty acres there, where he 
remained until i()0_'. when he moved to Minnesota and bought the L. H. 
Uaker farm of two hundred and lifty acres adjoining the townsite of Baker, 
and in the following year he bought the general store from Mr. Baker 
and conducted the saiue with ever-growing success from 11)03 ""t'' ")'.t- 
enjoying a large trade with the peojile of the surrounding country, and 
carrying an extensive and well-selected stock. He also served as postiuastcr 
at the town of Baker during that period, giving entire satisfaction to the 
])eople and the department. While po.stmaster he was (jne of the princi])al 
jiromoters of the rural mail n^ute out of Baker. He subse(|uently bought 
the Evans farm of four hundred and eighty acres in section [O of Alliance 
toNvnship, and now operates both farms, carrying on general farming and 
stcjck raising on an extensive scale: also deals extensively in potatoes, main- 
taining a large modern warehouse on the Great Northern tracks at Baker. 
Mr. Possehl is also interested in the automobile business at Barnesville. 
His land is well improved and he has an attracti\e, modern and well- 
appointed home and large, convenient outbuildings, everything al)oul his 
place denoting good management, thrift and prosperity. He has been \ery 
successful as a business man and is one of the sul)stantial citizens of Cla\' 
county, also one of her most public-s]jirited citizens, always doing his 
part in furthering movements having for their object the getieral welfare 
of his town and county. Mr. Possehl raises a got)d grade of live stock, 
preparing large numl)ers for the markets annually, and is regarded as an 
excellent judge of stock. He keeps well abreast of the times in all that 
pertains to modern agriculture. 

On January 15. 191 1. Mr. Possehl was married to Rosa IJutenhoff. 
who was born at Franklin. Iowa, .September 18. 1880, a daughter of .August 
Butenhoft" and wife, natives of (iermany. To Mr. and Mrs. Possehl the 
following children have been born: Edward. Arthur, Rudcilph. Morence, 
Clara and Adaline. 

Mr. Possehl is a Republican and has served as town.shi]) supervisor, 
l-'or a i)eriod of fourteen years he also was a meiuber of the local school 
board. He lielongs to the German Lutheran church, to which his parents 



292 CLAY AND NOKM.W Col" Xll l-.S. .MINXKSOTA. 

also belonged. He is a man of nnqnestioned honesty ami his lielpful. yenial 
and neighborly characteristics have made him popular with all whom ho 
has come in contact. 



AUGUST FISCHER. 



Angnst Fischer, a retired lumberman of Georgetown. Cla)' county, was 
bom in the province of Ontario, Canada, December 14, 1854, a son of 
b'idilias and Celia (Gould) Fischer, both natives of Germany, where thev 
spent their earlier years. h'idilias b'ischer was a civil engineer and was 
\ery proficient in bis line. He immigrated to Canada when a young man. 
establi.shing his future home in Ontario, where he spent the rest of his 
life. His famil\- consisted of eight children, namely : .\ugust. Mary, Pauline, 
Lucas, John, Lena, George and Eliza. 

August Fischer grew to manhood in his native community and there 
attended the common schools. As a young man he learned the carpenter's 
trade, becoming an expert in the same, and he followed that vocation until 
he was twenty-eight years old. He left Canada in 1881 and came to Min- 
nesota, locating at Georgetown, Clay county, and has l^een there ever since. 
He has seen the ct)untry develoj) from a sparsely settled and little developed 
stretch of wild plains to its present high state of cultivation and improve- 
ment during his residence here of thirty-six years. He was local manager 
of the W. H. White Lumber Company for twenty-seven years, his long 
retention in this responsible position indicating that he gave eminent satis- 
faction to his cmijloyers, being able, faithful and reliable, ffe carried on 
an extensive trade with the people of this section of the state and kept 
an up-to-date and well-ecpiipped lumber yard. He resigned his position 
in 1915 and retired from the lumber business, and soon thereafter opened 
a billiard hall in connection with a soda fountain and owns the fixtures and 
liuildin^. He has met with success in this new venture anil his place is very 
popular. He is living practically retired and merely oversees his business. 

In 1883 Mr. Fischer was married to Mary Hoffman, a native of Michi- 
gan, who was reared in North Dakota, where she attended the common 
schools. She is a daughter of John and Grace (Schuler) Hoffman, natives 
of Germany. John Hoffman was a brewer in Germany for about fifteen 
years. He nuned to North Dakota in 1877 and took up a homestead. Both 
he and his wile are now deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. l-'ischer the following 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 293 

children ha\e lieen liorn; Clara. Alary, Kdward, August, Jr., Fred, Frank, 
Herbert, William and Claude. 

Air. Fischer is a Democrat. He served as justice of the peace for four 
years, as \-illage treasurer for four years, as health commissioner for si.v 
years and as clerk of his school district for thirteen years. Fie has been 
acti\e and influential in public affairs since locating at Georgetown and as 
a public serxant he has discharged his duties in an able and conscientious 
manner. He is a member of the Catholic church, in which lie was reared. 



JOFIX H. XORTHROP. 



John H. Xorthroi), farmer and grain Inner of (jeorgetow n. Clay county, 
was tjorn in Allegan count}, Michigan, May i8, 1863. Fie is a son nf 
Stephen and Mary (Osterhout) Xorthrop. The father was a native of 
the state of Xew York and when young he went to Allegan county, Michi- 
gan, where he engaged in farming until 1882, when he removed with bi-^ 
family to Minnesota, and settled on a farm in Moland tnwnship, Clay 
county, where he continued farming until 1885, in which year he moved 
to Aitkin county, this state, and there he sjjent the rest of his life on a 
farm. His wife died in 1873. Their family consisted of five children, 
Charles, .\lhert, .Mice, Jdbu IF and May, the last named of whom dieil 
when she was a child. 

John H. Northrop grew tcj manhood nn the farm in .Mlegau county. 
Michigan, being eighteen years old when lie came with tlie family to Min^ 
nesota. He received his education in the rural schools near Troy, Michi- 
gan. During the crop seasons he worked with his father raising the vari- 
ous crops adapted to this latitude. When nineteen years old he began 
farming for himself in Kragnes township. Clay county, and he has con- 
tinued general a.gricultural pursuits ever since, raising grain and live stock 
and his efforts have been amply rewarded. In r88c) he moved to Cass 
county, X'^orth Dakota, just across the river from Clay county, remaining 
tliere until 1903. when he movdl back to Clay county, locating at George- 
town and this has been his place of residence ever since. Since 1902 he 
has been local manager of the St. .Vnthony elevator and has built u\) a 
large and growing business with the surrounding country, making this one 
of the leading and pupular ele\ators in the county. He is owner of two 
hundred and twentv acres of \ahiable and well-impn i\ed land in section 



2(J4 I I.AV AM) XdKMAX COUN'TIES. M IN N'KSOTA. 

30. GeorgetDwii towiishii). l)ut lu- maintains liis residence in tlie \illage. 
where he lias a comtortahle lionie. 

.Mr. Xiirthro]) was married in iS(/) tn Helle Xortin-uii, who was Ixirn 
at Dowagiac, Michigan, a danghter of Charles 1). and Charlotte ( Sarbner ) 
Xorthro]). natives of that same place. Mr. Xorlhrop is a Democrat and 
is the present jiresident of the town council of Crcorgetown. He has done 
mucli in hnilding up his home town, whose interests he has e\er had at 
heart, ever seeking to promote tiie same along all legitimate lines. In his 
fraternal relations Mr. Xorthro]) is a mcmher of the Modern P.rotherhood 
of .\merica. 



U.\Xl)()l.ril M. WELM. 

Randolph M. W'eum, a successful merchant at Georgetown, Clay county, 
and postmaster of that village, was born in Xorway. March 2/. 1879. He 
is a son of Mons \'. and Johanna ( Landgaad ) W'eum. natives of Xorway, 
where the\ li\ ed and died. They w ere i)arents of six children, namelx' ; 
I'lllen. lidward. .\likel, John. Randolph M. and Jennie. 

lvaudoli)h M. \\ eum grew to manhood in Xorway and there he received 
a common-school education. He immigrated to America in 1900 and located 
;it Gardener, Cass county. .Xorth Dakota, just across the Red River of the 
.Xorth from Clay county, Minnesota, and there he worked out as a farm 
hand for two years, in the crop seasons, laming the w inter time he attended 
Concordia College, at Moorhead. In 1902 he came to Georgetown and 
began clerking in the general store of M. T. W'eum and S. S. Dalen. prov- 
ing to lie an alert, wide-awake, faithful and reliable emplovee. lie con- 
tinued as a clerk, saving his wages and mastering the various ins and outs 
of the general-merchandising business luitil 1909. when he purchased a 
third interest in the business and has since devoted his attention to the build- 
ing up of the store, which is one of the well-known and popular mercantile 
estal)lishments of Holy Cross township. He is the only member of the 
liini lixing at Georgetown. .A large and carefully selected stack of goods 
is carried, including^ everything used by the farmers and citizens of George- 
town, The lirni naiue is W'eum. Dalen & Company. 

Mr. W'eum has Ijeen postmaster at Georgetown for the jiast nine years 
• nid has gixen entire satisfaction in this capacity to both the people of his 
community and \o the ])ostoffice department, lieing i)rompt. faithful and 
]:ainstaking. He is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 295 

HANS L. JOHNSON. 

There is both ])leasure and pmht to be derivetl from farming when 
one goes about it in an intelligent and ambitious manner like Hans L. 
Johnson, of Cromwell township, Clay county, who has forged his way up 
from an early enxininment none too promising by sheer courage and per- 
severance. 

Mr. Johnson was born in Fillmore county, Minnesota. June 4, 1879. 
He is a son of Lewis C. and Karin Ellina (Hillestad) Johnson, both natives 
of Norway, from which country they came to America, single, the former 
locating in Freeborn county, Minnesota, in 1871. She came to Fillmore 
county, this state, in 1873, with her parents, wiio are mentioned on another 
page of this work. There she li\-ed with her folks until her marriage. 

Lewis C. Johnson was the son of Carl and Johanna (Peterson) Johnson, 
natives of Norway. Carl Johnson died in his native land and his widow 
came to Minnesota in 1873 and spent the remainder of her life in Fillmore 
county. Lewis C". Johnson and family came from Fillmore county to Clay 
county in 1882, driving an ox-team to a "prairie schooner." and located 
in Cromwell township, where he entered a homestead of one hundred and 
sixty acres, which be still owns. He put on all improxements, including 
an excellent .groU[) of buildings. He has a fine farm of two hundred and 
eighty acres. He also owns timber land in Becker county, this state. His 
family consists of fi\e children, namely: Johanna, Hans L,, Emma, Ida 
and Nora, all of whom are living. 

Lewis C. Johnson helped organize the first Lutheran church in his 
locality. He also helped organize the Farmers Co-operative Creamery Com- 
pany at Hawley, his interest in that concern now being owned liy his son, 
TI;ins L. The father has held township c>fiices nearl\- all bis active life. 
but is now retired from public life, as well as from active farming. He 
organized his home school district and served on the board of the same 
for many years, from the time of its organization until be was succeeded 
!)}• liis son, the subject of this sketch. 

Hans L. Johnson .grew to manhood on the home farm and was educated 
in the public schools of Clay county. He worked on the farm with his 
father when a bov and started life for himself as a young man by working 
in the Evans elevator at Hawley for six years, giving his emplo}'er entire 
satisfaction and becoming known as one of the leading grain buyers in this 
section of the state. He then took up farming on the old home place 



296 CLAY AND NUK.MAN COINTIKS, MINXliSOTA. 

in Cronnvell township, whicli he lias since operated with success, carryinj^- 
on general farming and stock raising on an extensi\e scale, and keeping 
the land well impro\ed and well cultivated. He also owns eighty acres 
of good land of his own. Init he lives with his father. Besides general 
fanning he raises a large acreage of potatoes each \car. also pays con- 
siderahle attention to dairying. 

On November 22, 1906, Hans L. John.son was unitcii in marriage to 
I'etra Solum, who was horn in Tanseni township, Clay county. M'here she 
grew u]) and attended school. She is a daughter of P. P. Sohun and wife, 
a sketch of whom will be found on another [)age of this work. Four chil- 
dren have been born to Hans L. Johnson and wife, namely: Leon, Harvev. 
Orpha and Bertram. 



ERNEST FREDERICK KRABBENHOFT. 

Ernest J'"rederick Krabbenhoft, chan-man of the board of supervisors 
of Elniwood township, one of the most substantial and progressive young 
farmers in Clay county and the proprietor of a fine farm of four hundred and 
sixty acres in Elmwood township, where he and his family ha\e an admir- 
able, modern establishment, is a native son of Clay county, born in the 
neighborhood in which he is now living, and has lived there all his life. He 
was born on June 10, 1880, son of Wolf C. and Mary (Jensen) Krabben- 
hoft, natives of Germany, who became pioneers of Clay county and the 
latter of whom is still living on the old home place in Elmwood township. 

Wolf Christopher Krabbenhoft was born in the Prussian i)rovince of 
Schleswig-Holstein in 1847 and in 1872 came to the United States and pro- 
ceeded on out to the Red l\iver country and homesteaded a tract of land in 
what later came to be organized as Elmwood township, Clay county, being 
the first permanent white settler in that township. He was the eldest son 
of his parents and had come to "spy out the land" for the family, who were 
desirous of setting up a new home in the land of the free far away to the 
west, and in 1874 his parents, W. 1". and Katherine (Jess) Krabbenhoft. 
and the fi\e other members of the family joined him here on his home- 
stead place, the Krabbenhoft family thus becoming recognized as among 
the very early settlers of that part of the county. \\". F. Krabbenhoft bought 
the homestead place from his son Wolf and in 1882 sold it to his vounger 
son, Henning, who is still living there and a biographical sketch of whom, 
together with further details of the .settlement of the Krabbenhoft familv 




y. 



Eh 
V. 

e 
y. 



\. 




Wdl.F C. KKAP.r.KNHOFT. 



CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 29/ 

in Clay couiitv. is presented elsewliere in this vi:)lume. After selling his 
homestead tract \\'olf C. Krabbenhoft bought another iract nearby and 
after his marriage in 1878 establislied his home there, continuing to make 
that his place of residence the rest of his life, his death occurring there in 
May, 1910. He was an excellent farmer and as he prospered he added to 
his holdings until he became the owner of eighteen hundretl and eighty 
acres of land and was accounted one of the best-circumstanced men in this 
part of the state. He had an admirable farm plant, in full keeping with 
his extensive operations, one of the features of which was a grain elevator 
•of his own. Air, Kral)benhoft's widow is still living on the old home place. 
She also was born in German}-, in 1856, Mary Jenson. and has been a resi- 
dent of this country since 1867. She has nine children, of whom the subject 
of this sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being as follow: 
Mamie, wife of John Connelly, of Glyndon township. Clay count}-; Richard, 
who is managing the home farm; Cora, wife of Fred Kuehl, of Glyndon 
township: Helen, wife of ^\'illiam W'usson, of Moland township, and Carl, 
Otto, Edna and Stella, at home. 

Ernest 1*". Kral:)l)enhoft "was reared on the honie farm in Elmwood 
township and received his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood. 
As the eldest son of his father he from the days of his boyhood was a 
valued aid in the dex'elopment of the extensive interests created by his father 
in connection with the big fan-1-1 and remained at home until his marriage 
in the fall of 1910, when he estaljlished his home on the farm on which 
he is now- li\-ing, in Elmwood township, and has since made his home there, 
he and his family being very comfortably situated. Mr. Krabbenhoft has 
a fine farm of four hundred and sixty acres, on which he has made excellent 
improvements, including a handsome, modern house electrically lighted and 
otherwise ef|uipped for the best comfort and convenience of the family. 
Air. Krabbenhoft carries on his farming operations in accordance with up-to- 
date methods and is doing verv well. He has for some time given his earnest 
attention to local civic ati'airs and is now serving as chairman of the board 
of supervisors of Elmwood township, to the duties of which im])ortant office 
he gives his most thoughtful and intelligent attention. 

On Xovember 9, 19 10, Ernest F. Krabbenhcjft was united in marriage 
to Rosalie Schroeder. daughter of Frank Schroeder and wife, and to this 
union one child has been born, a son, Ernest Frederick, jr. .Mr. and Mrs. 
Krabbenhoft take a proper part in the general social affairs of the commun- 
ity in which they live and give their thoughtful attention to all mattei-- 
having to do with the advancement of the common welfare thereabout. In 



298 CI.AV AND XOU.MAX COUXTH-.S. MIXXKSdTA. 

tlie Schroeder faiiiil\- tliere are twehe children ; Minnie. l''rank, Rniil, Clara. 
Rosalie, Christine, Otto, Henry, Herbert, Walter, Hulda and Margaret, all 
nf whom are all living in Clay county. Minnie is the wife of II. G. Wend- 
land. postmaster at Sabin. Clara i-~ the wife of Chris Legler. livins; i>n a 
farm. I lenr\- m.arrit'd i'dl;i Miller and lives near Moorhead. 



IS.V.VC JOXES. 



Isaac Jones, a well-known grain buyer of Baker, in the southern part 
of Clay county, was l>orn in Jackson county, Iowa, January 30, 1872. He 
is a son of William and Rowena Jones, the father a native of Crawford 
county. I'ennsyhania. and the mother, of Jackson couiUy. Iowa. Wil- 
liam Jones spent his boyhood in his native county in the old Keystone 
state and there attended the public schools. When a young man he came 
West, locating in Jackson county, Iowa, where he engaged in farming until 
1880, in which year he came to Minnesota, taking u\) a homestead of one 
hundred and sixt\- acres in Clay county, and tree-claiiued one hundred and 
sixty acres also, in Elmwood township. He worked hard clearing and de- 
\eloping his land, but by perseverance he made a good iiome and there he 
followed general farming imtil about 1897, when he rented his land out 
and retired from active life, moving to the village of Baker. He subse- 
([uently sold his farm to R. X. Lewis. He had been (piite successful during 
the last vears of his active life as a farmer and stock raiser. He spent 
his la.st days in Baker, his death occurring there in July, 1915. He was 
a member of the German Lutheran church, and his wife was a Presbyterian. 
To these parents four children were born, namely: Mary, the wife of 
I. M. Wright: Hcttie. wife of .\. C. Duke: Isaac, the subject of this sketch, 
ami Hannah, who is the youngest child. 

Isaac Jones grew to manhood in Jackson county, Iowa, and in l^lmwtjod 
township. Clay county. .Minnesota. He attended school in both, and later 
attended tlic high school at Barnesville. He grew up on his father's farm 
and assisted with the general work, remaining with his father on the farm 
until he was about twenty-seven vears old, when he started farming for 
himself in Elmwood township, continuing successfully thus engaged until 
1910, when he m<ived to Baker and for four years was manager of the 
local atTairs of the Anchor Grain Company. Since 1914 he has Ijeen buying 
grain for the Red River Seed and Produce Company, and is accounted one 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 299 

of the best-known i;raiii liuyers in tliis secti(jn (if the state ;ui(I one of 
the best-informed men in liis line. His work in connection with these 
two companies lias been entirely satisfactory to the stockholders and rdl 
concerned. 

On January 25, i<S99, Mr. Junes was married to Ella Lafayette, who 
was Ixirn in Iowa and was educated in the public schools. She is a daughter 
of James and Elizabeth Lafayette, the former of whom was born at St. 
Charles, Illinois, and the latter, at fronton, Ohio. James Lafayette was 
a carpenter. He died in June, 1914, at Plummer, Minnesota, at the age 
of eighty-four. Iii> widow, who is seventy-eight years of age, is living 
with her daughter, Mrs. Jones. T(j Mr. and Mrs. Jones two children have 
been tjorn, Hettie and Cdarence. Mr. Jones is a Democrat, but he has never 
Ijeen \-ery active in ]iuhh'c attairs. h'raternallv, he belongs to the Masonic 
Order and to tlie Independent Order of Odd I'eliows. 



.\LBERT il. lOHXSON. 



Albert H. Johnson, a farmer of Cromwell township. Clay county, was 
born on his father's homestead in Highland Grove township. Clay county. 
May 6, 1882. He is a son of Henry and Betse\- (Jensen) Johnson, both 
natix'es of Norw'ay, from which conntr\- they came to America in the early 
fifties, the parents of each accompanying- them. They all settled in Win- 
neshiek county. Iowa, and there the parents of each sjient the rest of their 
li\es and died. Henr\ Johnson came to Minnesota, in iS/6, accompany- 
ing a ])ig train of wagons to Moorheail. the overland journey requiring 
three weeks. He located on a farm in Highland Gro\e township, Clay 
county, taking u]) a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in section 
18, where he (le\'eloped a farm on which lie iii.ade his Jionie until kjoj, 
when he moved to the farm on which his scm. .Mhert H.. now lives, in 
Cromwell township. lie became one of the leading public men in Clay 
county, and was \ery active in politics. He was a delegate to county, state 
and national conventions of the Republican party. During the Civil War 
he served in Coni|)any (i. Twelfth Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Infantiy. He 
was a memlier of the township lioard in Highland Grc\e township for 
many years. He heli)ed organize the creamery at Hitterdal, also the one 
at Hawley, and was president of the former for some time. He hel])ed 
organize tlie Cniled Lutheran church at Hitterdal. His familv consisted 



300 CI, AY AND XDRMAN COVJN'TIKS. MTXN'F.SOTA. 

of llie folldwiuif cliildren : Ellen (deceased), Christina. Theodore, Han- 
nah (deceased), Matilda (deceased), and Albert H. 

Albert II. Johnson grew to manhood on the farm and was educaicd 
in the common schools. He remained with his father and helped him with 
the general \vnrl< on the farm an<l now operates the home place of one 
hundred and sixty acres in Cromwell township. The place was well im- 
))roved b\' Iiis father, who erected substantial buildings and l)rought a pvo- 
dncti\e farm up from the wild ])rairie sod. 

In the fall of 1914 -\lben 11. Johnson was married to Tilda Hillestad. 
who was born in Cromwell township. Clay county, where she grew up and 
attended school. She is a daughter of John O. Hillestad. a biographical 
sketch of wh<im api)ears elsewhere in this volume. To Mr. and Mrs. John- 
son two children have been born, namelv : Gundrn and Kaakon. Mr. 
Johnson is a Republican and has lieen a member of the school board in 
his district and has also served as justice of the peace in a very able and 
satisfactory manner. 



ANDREW O. HOUGLUM. 

.Xndrew O. Ilonglum. auditor of Clay county and one of the best- 
known residents of the city of Moorhead, was born in the neighboring 
cotinty of Becker and has l)een a resident of Minnesota all his life. He 
was born on a pioneer farm in Lake Park township, Becker county, April 
19. i<S75, son of Ole A. and Ragnhild (Sande) llouglum. natives of Nor- 
way, who came to Minnesota about 1867 and located in Goodhue county, 
whence, in 187 1. they came over to this part of the state and settled on a 
homestead farm in Lake Park township. Becker county, among the lirst 
settlers of that ])art of the county, and there established their home. Ole 
.\. llouglum s])ent his last days on that homestead farm and after his 
death his widow moved to the \illage of Lake Park, where her last days 
were spent. 

Reared on the homestead farm on which he was born. Andrew O. 
Houglum com])leted his schooling in the high school at Lake Park and 
for two years taught school in his home county. He then entered a busi- 
ness college at Minneajjolis and was graduated from the same in 1897. 
after which for a .short time he was engaged as a clerk in a store at Min- 
neapolis. He then returned to Lake Park, where he was engaged as a 
bookkeejier f<ir three \ears, at the end of which time he was appointed to 



CLAY A\D NOUMAX COUNTIES, JIINNESOTA. 3OI 

the position ot deputy auditor uf Clay county and nicived to Moorhead. 
where he since has made his home. For eight years Mr. Houglum oc- 
cupied the position of deputy county auditor and during that time made 
sucli an achiiirable record for pubhc service that he was elected counix- 
audit<ir and has since been retained in that ofifice by the people of the c<iunt\, 
his successi\-e elections never ha\ing jjeen contested. In aildition to his 
official connection Mr. Houglum also has an interest in the Houglum l*"ur- 
niture Cfjmpany. of Moorhead. and is a member of the Moorhead Com- 
mercial Club. He has for years given close attention to the affairs of 
the County Auditors Association of this state, was formerly treasurer of 
tlie same and is nnw a member of the committee of that association engaged 
in the labor of codifying and revising the laws relating to drainage. Mr. 
Houglum from the da\s of his youth has enjoyed singing, is an active 
member of t!ie Xnrrona Singing Society, of which for two years he was 
president, and is vice-president of the Scandinavian Singers Association 
of the Red l^iver Valley. He is a member of the local lodges of the Modern 
Woodmen of .\mcrica and of the Royal Arcanum. He is now in the mili- 
tary service of the United States, having first served as one of the three 
members of the registration board for Clay count}-, and is now a commis- 
sioned member of the local board for said county in connection with the 
military draft. 

In 1905 Andrew (). Houglum was united in marriage to Sophia Ebel- 
toft, daughter of I'eter Ebeltoft and wife, of Lake Park, and to this union 
four children ha\e been born, Celest, who died at the age of four years, 
antl Muryel, X'irgic and Audrey. Mr. and Mrs. Houglum are members 
of the I'nited Lutheran church. 



OLAL'S OLSON. 



The viewpoint of the twentieth-century farmer has changed greatly 
with his increased knowledge and he has discarded many of the early-day 
methods of tilling the soil One thing he lias learned to bear in mind is that 
it is often (|uite as impcirtant to do a thing at the right time as it is to do 
it at all. One of tlie careful farmers of Highland Grove township, Cla\- 
county, is Olaus Olson, who was Ijoni in Detroit townshi]), Becker county. 
Minnesota, December 13, 1872. 

Mr. Olson is a son. of Ole D. and Ragna ( Ingebrightsdatter ) Olson. 



302 CLAY AND XoKMAX COlXTir.S. M I X N" i:S()TA. 

liulh natives oi Hallingdale, Xorway. when.' tliev ijrcw to maturity, mar- 
ried and continued to reside until in May, 1S7J, the father proceeding directly 
{o Becker county, Minnesota, but the mother spent a few months in St. 
i'aul l)efore joining him there. His brother, Christ Olson, preceded him 
to Becker county b}' ti\e \ears. Christ is now a resident of Lake I'ark. 
Ole D. Olson took up a homestead in section 8, Cuba township, Becker 
county, in 1873 and there he has since made his home. His wife died on 
the homestead there, January 14, hji<k He has developed an excellent 
t'arm from the wild prairie. ])Ianting a large grove and erecting a substantial 
group of buildings. He now owns three hundred and twenty acres. He 
formerly owned more, but sold one hundred acres some time ago. He has 
been one of the leading men of his township. He helped organize the school 
district in which he lives and served as treasurer of the same from it-- 
organization in 1882 until 191 1. He also helped organize the Conference 
congregation (Lutheran) oi Cuba township and was treasurer of the same 
from the time of its organization for many years. Later he affiliated witii 
the United Lutheran church. To Ole I). Olson and wife nine children 
were born, namely: Olaus, Edolph, Mary, Carl, .Minnie (deceased), John 
(deceased), Minnie (second), John and Julia. 

Olaus Olson grew to manhood on the home farm in Becker couniy. 
working on the farm during the crop seasons. He attended the district 
schools of his home comnnmity and also attended school at Lake Park 
and at Detroit. .Minnesota. He remained at home until lie was twentv- 
iwo years old. when he began farming for himself on rented land in his 
nati\e county and later bought eighty acres in Cuba township, Becker county. 
He continued general farming there until 1901, when he moved to High- 
land Grove tt)wnhip, Clay county, buying one hundred aiul sixty acres of 
raw prairie land, which he has developed into a good farm and on which 
he still makes his home. He planted a large gro\e and erected good build- 
ings, and has met with encouraging success as a general fanner and stock 
raiser. Mr. Olson assisted in organizing the Hittcrdal I'armers Co-opera- 
tive Creamery, and was a member of the board of directors of the same from 
the second year of its organization until 191 7. He has been financially 
interested in the company from the start. 

On October tq. igoi. I\lr. Olson was married to Gundhild Midtdahl. 
a native of Norway and a daughter of Jorgen and Chestine (Moen) Midt- 
dahl, both natives of Norway, where they spent their earlier j'ears, immi- 
grating to America in 1881, locating in Highland Grove township, Cla\- 
county, where they took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres 



CLAY AND NOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA, 3O3 

and there they still reside. Their family consists of five children, Lewis. 
John, Gundhild, Sarah and Lena. Four chilclren have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Olson, namely: Ole, Clara, Gladys (deceased), and Gladys (second). 
Mr. Olson and family belong to the Norwegian Lutheran church. Politi- 
cally, he is independent. 



AUGUST CEDKRBERG. 



A farmer when he has raised his crop has performed only half his 
duty; the other half is in selling, which determines his profit for the year's 
work. It is just as important for the agricultural producer to know what 
the markets are as it is for the lumberman, the ore producer or the manu- 
facturer to know what his goods are worth in the market and what com- 
peition he must meet in his selling. One of the farmers of Highland Gro\e 
township. Clay county, who understands both the production and sale of 
his crops is August Cederberg, and therefore he has been successful. 

Mr. Cederberg was born in Sweden on November 9, 1857, a"<^I ^'''^'^ 
one of five children born to his parents. These parents spent all their lives 
in their native land. August Cederberg grew to manhood in his nati\e 
land and there attended the common schools. As a young man he worked 
on the farm until immigrating to .\merica in 1882. He located in Meeker 
county, Minnesota, but remained there only si.x months, then moved to 
Hawley, Clay county, and worked on the Northern Pacific railroad as a 
section laborer, being boss of the section gang part of the time. He save<l 
his earnings and finally bought eighty acres in section 32, Highland Gro\e 
township, which he improved and farmed so successfully that he was sub- 
sequently enabled to buy three "forties" in section 5, Eglon township. He 
is now owner of two hundred acres of excellent and well-impro\'ed land 
in Highland Grove township, having made all the improvements himself. 
His fields are well fenced and his land well tilled. He has a cosy dwelling 
and convenient outbuildings. In connection with general farming he raises 
graded stock, making a specialty of Shorthorn cattle. Besides the grains 
adapted to this latitude he raises several acres of potatoes each year. 

Mr. Cederberg was married to Anna Anderson, in Sweden on March 
25, 1882, shortly before his departure for the New World. She was born 
in 1858 in Sweden, of which country her parents were natives, and there 
she grew to womanhood and was educated in Sweden. Ten children ha\e 



304 CLAY AND XOKMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

been b(jrn to this union, namely : Gusta, Emma, Oscar and Anna, wlio arc 
all married; Ella, wlio lives in Fargo: Sarali. who is deceased, and Olga, 
Victor, Ida and George, who are at home. 

Politically, yir. Cederberg is independent, lie served at one time as 
road supervisor of his district, and he has been a director on the local 
school board for the past nine years. He is a member of the Mission church. 
He is a public-spiritetl man, always interested in the affairs of his township 
and readv to do hi> part in furthering any worthy movement, and lie i'' 
pojjular with the people of his locality, being helpful, neighborly and coni- 
jjanionable. 



W ILLIA.M RIPLEV TILLOTSOX. 

William Ripley Tillotson, one of the oldest and best-known lawyers 
in this part of Minnesota, former mayor of the city of Moorhead and for 
years a member of the school board in that city, secretary and treasurer and 
one of the organizers of the National Loan and Improvement Company 
at jMoorhead and in other ways actively identified with the interests of the 
city of which he has been a resident since its village days, is a native of 
the old Clranite state, but has been a resident of Minnesota for more than 
thirty-five j'ears and is thus thoroughly identified with the citizenship of 
the great Northwest. He was born at Bath, in Grafton county, New Hamp- 
.shire, April 22, 1856. son of Bradley P. Tillotson, a farmer, and in his 
youth was familiar with the labors of the farm. 

Mr. Tillotson obtained an ample educational equipment for the exacting 
])rofession to which he early devoted himself. Upon completing the course 
in the common schools of his home town he entered Dartmouth College 
and was graduated from the academic department of that excellent old insti- 
tution in 1877, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. T'ollowing his admis- 
sion to practice law. Mr. Tillotson remained for a while in the East, but 
presently he became attracted to the great ix)ssibilities then opening to the 
earnest settler in the Northwest and in 1882 came out to this part of Minne- 
sota and l)ecame a member of the firm of Burnham, Mills & Tillotson, enter- 
ing upon the practice of his profession at Moorhead, then little more than 
a lively frontier station, but giving promise of Ijecoming one of the chief 
cities in the then rapidly developing Northw-est, and has ever since made 
his home in that city. On January i, 1886, the firm became Burnham & 
Tillotson and so continued until 1898. when Mr. Burnham died. As one 







^^^^^^^^H 1h^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^I^H 


^^^^^^^^^S*^ '~ ^^^^m ^^^^^^m^ \ iilH^B .^^^^^^^^^1 



WILI>IAM R. TILLOTSOX. 



THE NEW YORK 
"^RARY 



■, LENOX 

.r;NDATinNS 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 305 

of the pioneer lawyers of this part of Minnesota, Air. Tillotson has a wide 
acquaintance throughout this part of the country and has done much to aid 
in tlie development of the region to which he became attracted more than 
tliirtv-live years ago. Twice he was elected mayor of Aioorhead and while 
serving in that important capacity did much to advance the interests of 
his home town. For many years he has been a member of the local school 
board and no one has done more to promote the development of the school 
s\stem in Alooriiead than he. He also for several terms served as a member 
of the library board of the city and in other ways has done his part as a 
good citizen in advancing the general cultural activities of the city. Air. 
Tillotson was one of the organizers of the National Loan and Improxement 
Company of Aloorhead, which was established in 191 1, and has been secre- 
tarv and treasurer of the same ever since its organization. 

On April 19, 1888, William R. Tillotson was united in marriage to 
Harriet C. Tanner, of Moorhead, and to this union two children have been 
born, Bradley P. and Francis AT. Air. Tillotson is a member of the Catho- 
lic church and his family are affiliated with the Episcopal churcli. He is 
a member of the local council of the Knights nf Columbus and in the atYairs 
of that organization takee- a warm interest. 



OSCAR GUXDERSON. 



The Gunderson family has long been well and favorably known in 
Clay county, being progressive and law-abiding citizens. Oscar Gunderson. 
a farmer of Highland Grove township, was born on the farm on which 
he still resides, July 8, 1877. He is a son of Olaf and Alarie (Olson) 
Gunderson, the father a native of Sweden and the mother of Norway. The 
paternal grandparents were natixxs of Sweden, where they spent their lives 
on a farm. Andrew and Karen Olson, the maternal grandparents, were 
both natives of Norway, from which countr\- they came to America about 
1872, locating at Decorah, Iowa, where they spent about six years: then 
came to Highland Grove township, Cla_\- county, Alinnesota, Andrew Olson 
and Olaf Gunderson making the overland trip here at the same time, driv- 
ing through in prairie schooners, but their families came by railwav- train. 
Air. Gunderson took u]) a homestead in the northwest quarter of section 
28. Highland Grove township — the place where his son, Oscar, now resides. 
(20a) 



306 CLAY AND XOK.MAX COrXTIES, MIXNESOTA. 

Andrew Olson located on the northeast quarter of section 28, and there 
he spent the rest of his life, iiaxini; made an excellent farm of the place. 
His widow spent her last years at the home oi Olaf (ninderson. 

Olaf Gunderson, father of the f;entleman whose name forms the caption 
of this sketch, grew to manhood in Sweden, l)ut was married in Norway. 
In 1874 he came to Decorah, Iowa, where he lived t\\o years, coming to 
Clay county, Minnesota, in 1876, as noted in the preceding paragraph. He 
develo])ed his homestead into an excellent farm, putting on a substantial 
group of buildings, and finally adding one hundred and sixty acres more 
to his original holdings. He carried on general farming and stock raising 
very successfully and became one of the leading men of his township. His 
family consisted of six children, namely: Carl, Andrew and Anna, wlui 
are now deceased: Oscar, the subject of this sketch, and Clarence and 
Gilbert. The father of these children and .Andrew Olson, his father-in-law . 
helped establish the United Lutheran church at Hitterdal. Mr. Gunder- 
son was also active in the organization of the local school tlistrict and was 
a member of the first school board, continuing a member of the same until 
his death. He was, at different times, a member of the township board. 
Oscar Gunderson grew to manhood on the home farm. He attended 
the local district schools and Concordia College, spending several terms 
at the latter. He has always lived on the home place, which he has kept 
w'ell-improved and well-cultivated. He owns two hundred acres, and in 
connection with general farming he makes a specialty of dairying, handling 
Holstein cattle. 

On February 21, 1902, Oscar Gunderson was married to Annie Sanden. 
who was born in Eglon township. Clay county, where she grew to woman- 
hood and attended the public schools. She is a daughter of John and 
Saralisa (Johnson) Sanden, both natives of Sweden, from which country 
they came to America, single, and were married in Moorhead, Minnesota. 
The parents of each lived and died in Sweden. John Sanden was alx)ut 
twenty-one years old when he came to .\merica, about the year 1866. His 
wife came about a year later. Ijeing eighteen years old ;it the time. She 
came directly to Lake Park, .Minnesota. He stopped a while at Superior, 
Alichigan, and at Duluth. Minnesota, before coming on to Clay count\ . 
Here he took up a homestead in Eglon tow nship, which he improved into a 
good farm on which he still resides. His wife is deceased. To these 
parents seven children were born, all living at this writing but one, namely : 
Annie, .Andrew, Hulda, Carl, Carl Johan (deceased), Oscar and Ellen. 
To Oscar Gunderson and wife seven children ha\e been born, namely: 



CLAY AXD XOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 307 

Laura, Herbert, John P. (deceased). Clarence, Ray, Lillian, Mabel and 
Clifford. 

Politically, Oscar (junderson is independent. He is miw ( 1917) ser\- 
ing his eleventh consecutive year as township assessor. He lias also served 
as school director and as treasurer for the past twelve or thirteen years, 
being treasurer at this writing. He was also justice of the peace at one 
time. He helped organize the b'armers Elevator Company at Hawley, of 
which he has been secretary since its organization, and is a heavy stock- 
holder in the same. He also helped organize the P'armers Co-operative 
Creamery at Hawley and has been financially interested in the same e\er 
since. Fie is a member of the Idawlev Li\'e Stock Shipping .Vssociatinn. 
Like his father before him he is one of the influential men of his township, 
always ready to assist in any movement having for its object the general 
good of all the people in this localil\ . 



IIILBRRT O. SKREL 



Hilbert O. Skrei, a well-known and energetic farmer of Goose Prairie 
town.ship, Clay county, owner of a compact and well-kept farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres in section 22, that township, and of ei.ghty acres 
in Montana, is a native .son of Minnesota, born on his father's homestead 
on Buffalo river, August 28, 1875. He is the son of Torge T. and C.unhild 
( Bervie) Skrei, natives of Norway. 

Torge T. Skrei was married in his native land and immigrated to the 
L'nited States in 1866. On arriving in this country he proceeded to Hous- 
ton county, this state, in which ])lace he lived for four x-ears. Some time 
Later he came to Clay county, where he homesteaded ;i tract of land in 
section 28, Moland township, and there spent the rest of his life. He 
died in 1895 ^'""^1 ^''■'^ widow died in 1908. They were the ])arents of three 
children, Signa, Hilbert O. and Theodore H. .\ re\ie\\ of the life of the 
latter appears on another pa.ge of this vokime and in it are .gi\'en further 
and extended details of the history of the Skrei family in this state. 

Hilbert O. Skrei was educated in the schools of Clay count\- and later 
worked on his father's fariu, where he was well trained in the rudiments 
of agriculture. In .\pril, 1917. he became the owner of one hundred ;ind 
sixty acres of prime land in section 22, Goose Prairie township, and is now 
enga.ged in .general farming ;ind contemplates adding blooded stock at an 



^OS CLAV A\D NOU.M A\ C'orXTlKS. MINNESOTA. 

earlv tlatc. lie raises wheat, corn, oats, rye ami potatoes on the home larin, 
and since tlie commencement of his operations he has met with a com- 
mendable measure of success. Mr. Skrei is also tiie owner of eighty acres 
in Montana. He Hved on tlie old place near Tdyndon liefore takini^- over 
his [)rescnt ho](lin<;'. 

In |une. \<)\(<. liilhert O. Skrei was united in marri.age to Enielia 
Dennison, who was horn in Augu.st, \Sj><. Tlie marrias^e took place in Gien- 
dine, Montana. Mr. Skrei is a memjjer of the Lutheran church and is 
carnestK interested in all its s^ood works, and he and his wife participate 
ni the social and cullural activities of the neighborhood in which tliey live, 
ever readv to assist in all movements tending to the welfare of tlie com- 
mimitv. 



GEORGK S. H.\U.\ES. 



The success wliich George S. Barnes attained would alone entitle him 
to special mention in a work of this character as one of the really promi- 
nent men of Clay county and of the state of Minnesota: hut in citizen- 
ship as well he did that which causes hi- name to be honored, for hi- 
labors were a factor in promoting the growth and development of the 
great Nortliwest. The real up-lmilders of a county, state or nation, arc 
not those wiio handle the reins of government, but those who give their influ- 
ence to contiiuious municipal progress, and who found, promote and control 
extensive business interests. Laudable ambition, ready adaptability to every 
contingency, and a capacity for hard work are and were essential elements 
of success, especially in the early jjioneer days, and in none of these elements 
was George S. Barnes lacking. It. therefore, is ntjt a matter of marvel 
that he occupied a pre-eminent position among the builders of Clay county 
;md the state, 'i'he eminence to which he attained was also due to the fact 
that he had the ability to recognize the opportune moment and to correctly 
ai)praise the value of a .situation and determine its possibilities. 

In the ])assing of George S. Barnes it is well for us to stop in the 
midst of the stress, luirry and turmoil that go to make up life as we live 
it — to consider the character of one who has quit the scene, to estimate 
his plan of life and to draw from it more clearly than we possibly could 
from mere theories a conclusion as to what makes this life of ours worth 
li\ing: and we who step aside from the c|uick march of our daily duties 
to do honor to the memory of the subject of this review will at the same 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 



3"9 



time i)a\' tril)ute io ;i lite wiiose theory and practice went band in hand. 
This theory of life was the simple hut difficult one that dut\ to God, neigh- 
bor, and self are one and the same, and the record of his long, husv years 
shows not only the discharge of that duty, but a force and serenity that 
could only come from a nature as gentle as it was strong, joined to a con- 
science as sensitive as it was tireless. The communitx' kudws only in pari 
of his public sjiirit, his liberality where any measures for the public good 
were concerned. All who were associated with him in business or financial 
matters recognized his absolute integrity as well .'is his fairness. His was 
the symi)athy of real wisdom, the gentleness of true force, the full \a!ue 
of a life well lived from day to day. 

George S. Barnes was born in Vermont in 1840, a son of I'bilo Barnc-. 
who died when George S. was a young man. The famih' liad long reside^l 
in Xew England. 'i"he subject of this review grew to manhood in Vermont, 
and attended the pui)lic schools, and there he resided until 1864, when he 
came to Ononoco, Minnesota, and bought a farm in Olmsted county, on 
which he resided until iSji, when be sold out and moved to Clay countv, 
and in partnership with I.. H. Tenney bought a farm near where the vil- 
lage of Glyndon now stands. His widow now resides on the original farm. 
He and Air. Tenne\' increased their farmin.g interests luitil thev operated 
about h\e thousand ;icres. carr\ing (jn general farnu'ng and stock raising 
on an extensive scale and with pronounced success all along the line. Neither 
of them resided on their land, but made their homes in Glyndon, where 
they opened a general store, the lirst store in the \'illage, and they also 
bought and cold grain in large quantities. 

.\fter the death of Mr. Tenney, a Mr. Bangs became a partner with 
Mr. Barnes in the .grain business. Mr. Barnes became associated with the 
Northern I'acific Grain Company, of which he was later president, in which 
capacity he had charge of the elevators along the Northern Pacific railroad 
all the way from .St. l\-tul. Minne.sota, to Tacoma, Washington, thus becom- 
ing one of the best-known .grain buyers of the .great Northwest. Mr. Barnes 
made ins home ;it Glyndon until 1883. wiien be moved to bargo. North 
Dakota, where he spent practically all of his life thereafter. However, he 
was li\-in.g at Glyndon at the lime of his de;ith, which occurred on Novem- 
ber 28, IQ12. 

On June H). 1864. .Mr. Barnes was married to Maria L. Paige, a 
native of Vermont, where she grew to womanhood and was educated and 
where her family had long been well and favorably known. .She is tlie 



3iO CLAY AND NOkMAX COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

inotlier of three children, namely: deorge S.. Jr.. Hector G. and .Marie, 
wife of Otto J. Morrow. 

.\lr. Barnes was a tlnrt\ -third degree Mason and was prominent in 
the affairs of that order: in fad, few men in this state ever attained to 
such a high position in this ancient order. He was an active memher of 
tlie Congregational church. Politically, lie was a Repuhlican. 

Such, in brief, is the life history of George S. Barnes. While .\mer- 
ica is the home of the self-made man. it is not so usual for an individual 
to ach'ance from a humble jiosition tn one of marked prominence — anrl 
such a course always awakens admiration and interest. Such was tlie life 
record of Mr. Barnes, and there was not a single esoteric i>hase in his career, 
his life ever being an open book. Diligent in business, he was also loyal 
in citizenshi]) and faithful in fricndshii) — while in his jiome he was a de- 
\()ted husband and father. 



lOHX RLOI" CARLSON. 

That period following the close of the Civil War. covering two or 
three decades, was characterized by the immigration of the pioneer element 
which made the great state of Minnesota what it is today. These home- 
seekers were sturd\-, heroic, sincere, and for the most i)art. u[)right and 
law-a])iding people, such as constitute tlie strength of the commonwealth. 
One of this sterling type of citizens is John Klof Carlson, a farmer of 
1 1 ighland Gro\e township. Clay county. 

.Mr. Carl.son was born in Sweden, October 24. 1H57. He is a son 
i>f Magnus and Lena CarLson, both natives of Sweden, where they grew 
to maturity, married and established their home, but immigrated to Amer- 
ica in icSog, when their son, John E., was twelve years old. The familv 
located at Rochelle, Ogle county, Illinois, but a year and a half later removed 
t(i Minnesota, locating near Brainard, where the father worked at con- 
struction work on the Xorthern Pacific. On April 2, 1871, he arrived at 
Lake Park, Becker county, and soon thereafter took up a homestead five 
miles northwest of the \ illage of Lake Park, in Cuba township. There he 
developed a good farm of one hundred and sixty acres, putting the wild 
])rairie land under cultivation, erecting a group of suitable farm buildings 
and planting a grove. There he and his wife spent the rest of their lives, 
influential factors among the other pioneer settlers in this locality. The- 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. ^11 

lather lielped organize Cuba township about five A-ears after he located 
tliere. He also helped organize the Eskjou Swedish Lutheran church of 
that township, and later was one of the organizers of the Swedish Grove 
Lutheran church. He was a successful farmer and a good citizen in every 
respect, having the respect and good will of all who knew him. Six chil- 
dren were born to Carl M. and Lena Carlson, named as follow : Frank, 
who makes his home at Lake Park, Becker county ; Emma, deceased ; Hanna, 
deceased; John Elof. the subject of this sketch; Carl W.. who lives at 
Lake Park, and Axel, who is deceased. 

John E. Carlson spent his childhood in Sweden, where he attended 
school a while. He had little opportunity to obtain an education after 
coming to Minnesota, for there were no schools in Becker county to which 
the children of the first settlers could go. However, by close observation 
and home reading and study he became, in due course of time, a very well- 
informed man. He assisted his father with the general work on the home- 
stead, for there was plenty of hard work for the entire family. He con- 
tinued to work with his father until 1880, when he homesteaded one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Highland (irove township, Clay county, where he 
has since resided — a period of thirty-seven years, during which he has 
seen the country developed from a vast, wild prairie to a fine farming lo- 
cality, dotted with attractive homes, numerous chiuxhes and school houses, 
and has played well his part in this transformation. He brought his land 
up to a high state of cultivation and impro\ement, setting out a large gro\e 
and erecting an excellent group of buildings, suitable to the needs of a 
thrifty farmer in this latitude. His farm is well located at Manitoba Junc- 
tion and he has been successful as a general farmer and stock raiser. 

On July 5, 1886, Mr. Carlson was married to Caroline Johnson, a 
native of Wisconsin and a daughter of .\nton JohnscMi Hanger, one of the 
early homesteaders of Highland Grove township, Clay county, Minnesota, 
where he still resides. A sketch of Mr. Hauger and family will be found 
on another page of this volume. Eleven children ha\e been born tri Mr. 
and Mrs. Carlson, named as follow: Lena, Josie, Manda, Jennie, who mar- 
ried Edward Eastman, who died in 191 3, leaving two children, Edward, 
Jr.. and Margaret. Mrs. Eastman and children now making their home with 
the subject of this sketch; .Anna, the fifth in order of birth; Emma, Carl. 
.Arthur, a daughter who died in infancv. unnamed, and Lillian and Roy. 

Mr. Carlsf)n helped organize Highland Grove township, also the school 
district in which he lix'es. He is now (1917) serving his second year as a 



T,\2 CLAY AND XOKMAX COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

member of the school hoard. He belongs to the Swedish Grove Lutheran 
church. Politically, he is independent. He has always been a helpful man 
in his township, doing much for its general development. 



ALONZO W ILSON. .M. 1). 

.\mong lilt real old settlers of Clay county there are few who ha\e 
a' wider acquaintance throughout this section of the Red River valley than 
has Dr. Alonzo Wilson, a well-to-do retired physician, of Moorhead, an<l 
an honored veteran of the Civil War, who has been a resident of Moorhead 
since the \car 1876 and who has conse(|ueutly been a witness to and a 
participant in the (le\ clnpnient of this region since pioneer days. Doctor 
Wilson is a native of the kingdom of Sweden, but has been a resident of 
this country since he was twenty years of age. He was Ixtrn in the year 
1834, a son of O. L. Wilson and wife, the latter of whom died on board 
vessel iiu the way to this country in 1854 and the former of whom later 
became a resilient of Clay county and here spent his last days, his death 
occurring in 1901. 

O. L. Wilson was a small landowner in his nali\e Sweden and he and 
his wife were the parents of five children. In 1854 he sold his farm and 
with his family sailed for the United States. During the voyage an epi- 
demic of disease broke out among the passengers and .Mrs. Wilson and one 
of the sons and two of the tlaughters (lied and were buried at sea. Mr. 
Wilson and his two remaining sons, the subject of this sketch and the 
hitter's younger brother, Peter Wilson, proceeded to Chicago upon their 
arri\al at j>ort and during the first winter of their residence in this country 
were engaged working in a wood yard in that city. The father and his 
\ounger .son remained in that city for a year or two, but the elder son left 
in the spring following his arrival for the Northwest and has ever since 
l)een a resident of Minnesota, .\fter his son. Doctor Wilson, had become 
established at Moorhead, O. L. Wilson joined lu'm here and his last days 
were spent on one of the Doctor's farms, his death occurring sixteen 
years ago. 

Peter Wilson, who died some years ago, was one of the pioneers of Clay 
county and was for years one of the best-known and most influential resi- 
dents of this county. Upon leaving Chicago he came u[) into the Northwest 
and was a resident of the Red River valley when Clay ccMuity was organized 



:e new yofk 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 3I3 

in 1872 and, with .Viulrew Holes, was appointed In Governor Austin as 
one of the two commissioners to set in motion the wlieels of government 
in the new county, as set out in the historical vokinie of this work. Before 
coming up here Peter Wilson had serxed as a soldier of the L'nion, a mem- 
ber of the Fourth Wisconsin Cavalry, and with that gallant command served 
for two years and six months, at the end of which time he was honorabh' 
discharged on a certificate f)f disability, he having suffered severe injuries 
when a horse fell on him. In additit)n to liaving been one of the earliest 
settlers of Clay county and one of the original commissioners of this countv, 
Peter Wilson also served for some tin'ie as justice of the peace, also as 
register of deeds and for three terms was auditor of the coiint\-, in all of 
his public ser\ice rendering a faithful account of his duty to the i^eople. l*"or 
years he was engaged in the hardware business at Moorhead, but later 
moved across the river to I'^argo. He left four ilaughters. Mrs. William B. 
Bartlett, wife of an attorney at Minneapolis; Mrs. Ross, a widow, living 
at Los Angeles, California, and two living at Cannon Falls, this state, these 
nieces being the only kinsfolk Doctor Wilson has in this coinitry. 

As noted above. Doctor Wilson was about twenty years of age when 
he came to this country in 1854. He had received an excellent education 
in his native land, completing his studies in the l^niversity of Lund, and had 
been engaged for a time there in teaching school. The first winter of his 
residence in this country was spent in Chicago and then, in the spring of 1855, 
he struck out for the Northwest and found employment in a lumber camji 
on the St. Croix river. In the spring of 1856 he went from Taylors Falls 
to Superior City and there became em])loyed as an agent to help retain land 
claims, at the s.ame time locating something more than a f|uarter of a sec- 
tion of land in his own behalf. Durin.g the winter of i85''>-57 he and three 
others formed a partnership in the lumber business and from the fall of 1857 
to the fall of i86r he was engaged in contract work, building wagon ixiads 
through the timber. In the fall of iS^i he enlisted for .service in the Union 
army, going out from Ft. Snelling with Company K. Fifth Iowa Cavalry, 
and was in active service for three years, the last year of bis service being 
spent in the Red River country fighting Indians. 

Upon the completion of his military service Doctor Wilson went to 
Wisconsin and seriously entered upon a design he long had cherished, that 
of the study of medicine, and after some preliminary study unflcr the pre- 
ceptorship of local physicians entered the Medical College at Keokuk and 
was graduated from that institution in 1870. Upon receiving his diploma. 
Doctor Wilson opened an office for the practice of his ])rofession at Keokuk 



^i4 n.AV AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNK.SOTA. 

and remained there until iHj(>. in wliich year he rejoined his brother I'eter 
at Moorliead and opened an oftiee for the practice of his profession in tliat 
city, continuing actixely engaged in practice until his retirement. Upon com- 
ing up here in 1876 Doctor Wilson honiesteaded a quarter of a section of 
land in Oakport township, C"iay county, at the same time taking a tree claim 
to an adjoining quarter section. He later added to his land holdings and 
at one time was the owner of no less than a thou.sand acres of land, all of 
which, however, he has closed out and is not now a landowner. Doctor 
Wilson is quite comfortably situated at Moorhead. Though now past eighty- 
three years of age, he retains much of his former physical vi.gor and con- 
tinues to take a hearty interest in current affairs. .\s one of the pioneers 
of Clay county, the Doctor has seen the development of this region from 
its primitive state to its present state of substantial development. His inein- 
ory of the early days hereabout is clear and distinct and he has long been 
regarded as one of the ablest and most accurate authorities on the history 
of this section of the famed Red Kixcr valley. 

Some time after locating at Moorhead Doctor Wilson married Ida 
Broberg, who died at the age of fortv vears. 'j'he Doctor has no children. 



STEX HANSOX. 



It is scarcely probable that in the future of the American republic 
another such periotl can occur when such a solid phalanx of strong-armed 
men and self-sacrificing women will take possession of a new country, dis- 
playing the courage and perseverance of the pioneer element that invaded 
the plains of Minnesota some four or five decades ago. One of this number 
is Sten Hanson, a venerable farmer of Highland Grove township. Clay 
county. 

Mr. Hanson was born in Sweden. I-'ebruary 7, 1838, and is, therefore. 
now in his seventy-eighth year. He is a son of Hans and Sigrid (Pehrs- 
datter) Stensun. both natives of Sweden, where they grew up and married 
and where the father's death occurred, after which the widow brouglit her 
children to America in 1868. After spending two vears in Winneshiek 
county, Iowa, they all came to Clay county, Minnesota, driving an ox-team 
to a covered wagon, in 1870, the trip requiring over a month in the early 
summer of that year. The family located in Highland Grove township. 
The country wa^ l)ut a wild prairie and had not yet l)een surveverl. The 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 3I5 

family located in what is now section ii, where the subject of this sketch 
nuw lives, having resided liere ever since, a period of forty-seven years, 
and lie is, therefore, one of the oldest pioneers in the county. Here his 
uKjther died in 1884. She had five children, namely: Gertrude and Anna, 
twins, the former of whom is deceased; Sten, the subject of diis sketch, 
and Peder and Hans. This family helped start the first church in Cla>- 
countv, which was a Xorwegian church, and later helped organize the Swed- 
ish (irove Lutheran church, which is near the old homestead and to which 
the family still belong. 

Sten Hanson was thirty years old when he came to America. Fie 
has devoted his acti\e life successfully to farming and has accumulated 
t\\M hundred and sixty acres, only eighty acres of which is a part of the 
original homestead, buying the rest as railroad land. He has erected an 
excellent group of farm buildings and early set out a magnificent gro\e. 
Being advanced in \ears he has not engaged actively in farming for many 
\ears. 

On June 24, 1866, in Sweden, .Mr. Hanson was married to Ringnel 
Svvenson, who was born and reared in Sweden. To this marriage ten chil- 
dren were born, all in .\nierica but one — the eldest. They were named 
as follows: Hans S.. Sven S., Severt (deceased). Caroline, Anna (deceased), 
Christine (deceased). Lewis, wlm is living, and Olaf, Severt and Sven, de- 
ceased. 

Sten Hanson helped organize Highland Grove township and later held 
township offices. He also assisted in organizing his school district and was 
treasurer of the same for many years. Politically, he is indejiendent. He 
has always been regarded as an industrious ;md useful citizen. 

.\nton Johnson, son-in-law of the subject of this sketch, was born in 
Sweden, December 6. 1872. He is a son of Johan and Johannah (Samuel- 
son) Johanson, both natives of Sweden, where they grew up, married and 
established their permanent home and where the mother is still living, the 
father dying there some time ago. They were parents of six children, all 
living at this writing. Anton Johtison grew to manhood in Sweden and 
there attended the comtnoii schools. When twenty years old, in 1892, he 
came to the L'nited States, stopping in Chicago. Illinois, a month : then spent 
a vear and a half at Escanaba. Delta county. Michigan. He then came 
to Clav countv, Minnesota, where he has since made his home. Here he 
was married on June 29, 1901, to Caroline Hanson, a daughter of Sten 
Hanson, the immediate subject of this sketch. She was born in Clay count}-. 
Minnesota, where she grew to womanhood, and was educated in the i)ubhc 



3l6 CLAY AXD XOR>r\X COIXTIF-S. MIXNESOTA. 

schools. Six children have been Ijorn to Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, '.lanicly : 
Salley, Adolpli. Carl. Grace, Henry and Morris. 

.Mr. Johnson has followed j^eneral farming- e\er since coming to Clay 
county and is now snccessfull)' operating the farm of his father-in-law. 
Politically, lie is independent. He was township supervisor and clerk of 
the local school hoard for a period of ten years and dischar.<jed his duties 
in hoth positions in a highly acceptable manner. 



S.\.\V1 T. SX.\RTL.\.\1). 

Saavi 1'. Snartland is one (.)f the many native-horn .Norwegians who 
have come to the L'nited States and to this part of Minnesota and become 
successful farmers. He was born in Norway on January 22, 1871, a son 
of Torkel and Gro (Salveson) Snartland, both also natives of Norway 
and who came to .\merica in 1880 and settled on a farm in Clay county. 

Torkel Snartland was born in Norway in 1837, and was etlucated in 
the schools of that countr\'. He engaged in the life of a farmer in his 
native land and at the age of forty-three years he and his family immigrated 
to this country an<l came on out to Minnesota and settled in Clay county. 
Here he resumed his fanning oi)erations and alMiut the year 1897, was 
in a position to purchase land for himself. He is still li\ing on the farm 
which he then bought and which is located in section 5. Moland township. 
Clay county. Some years before leaving Norway, Torkel Snartland was 
united in marriage to Gro Salveson, who was also born in Norway in 1847. 
and who met a tragic death in 1900, l)eing killed by lightning on her hus- 
baiurs farm. Torkel Snartland and wife were the jiarents of the following 
children: Saavi T.. owner of a half .section of land; Olaf, a general fanner: 
Mary, now a widow; Gonel,' married, and W'illa, married. Mrs. Snartland's 
lirother, Halxer Salveson, was one of the first settlers in this part of Min- 
nesota. 

Saa\ i .Snartland received part of his education in \'orwa\'. He came 
with his parents to this country in 1880 and lived on his father's farm. 
From boyhood he was an able assistant to his father in the labors of de- 
veloping and improving the home place. He is now engaged in fanning 
for himself and is the owner of a half section of prime land, on which 
he is engaged in general fanning and has done very well, being regar(le<l 
as one of the sulistantial agricultm-ists of Moland township. 



CI.AY AXD NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 3I7 

On Jul\ II. i8(;7, Saa\i Snartland was united in marriage to Helen 
Svenkenson. \\li<i was born in Clay county, Minnesota, a daughter of Gun- 
der Svenkenson and wife, natives of Norway. To Saavi Snartland and 
wife three children have been born, Thorance, Gladys anrl Gerard, all livin.t,' 
at home with their parents. Mr. Snartland takes a good citizen's interest 
in local civic affairs and was a director of the district school board for 
six years. He and his faniilv are members of the Norwe.gian Lutheran 
church and are warm supi^orters of all its good works. 

Olaf T. Snartland was Ijorn in Norway in .Uigust. 1S79, and came 
to this country with bis jiarents. He is the owner of one hundred and 
twentv acres of land and is engaged in general farming. All the improve- 
ments on his farm were carried out by his father. He was married in 
1904 to Lillv .\nderson. who was !)orn in Fargo, North Dakota, in 1883. 
They are the parents of the following children: Anna. Torkel, Jacob, 
(iertie, and an infant born in 1917. The family are members of the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran church and take a general interest in all the affairs of 
the communitv calculated to serve the public welfare. 



HERMA.V W. TOOP. 



Herman W. Joop, of I'ellon township. Clay county, has applied busi- 
ness principles to his farming and has used his mind as well as his brawn. 
He has therefore met with encouraging success all along the line. He was 
born in Germany on December 2, 1879. He is a son of Gustav and Tm i 
(Camps) Joop. both born in Germany, where they grew up and married 
and lived on a farm until in the seventies, when they came to .Vmerica. 
locating in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, where they lived several years, the 
father working in the steel mills. The_\- then returned to Germany and 
remained there a few years, then came to .America a second time and located 
in Blue Earth county. Minnesota, where they engaged in farming until 
T896, when the\ mo\ed to Felton townsbi]). Clay county, and located on 
the farm where their son. Herman W.. now resides. Here Gustav Joop 
farmed imtil his retirement and he now lives with his son, Ludwig. in 
Norman countv. His family consisted of six children, three of whom are 
still living, namely: Ludwig, Bertha and tierman W. 

Herman W. Joop spent his boyhood on the home farm in Blue Ivirth 
count}' and there he attended school. He came to Clay county with his 



3'^ CLAY AND XOK.MAN C()L-\TIKS. :M1 N N' HSOTA. 

parents ami as a youny- man took up railroad wurk as a tircnian on the 
Northern Pacific railroad, running between Fari^o and Jamestown. Xorth 
Dakota. He remained in railroad service until 1907 when he came hack to 
his father's farm, in January of that year, and has since operated it with 
success, owning; one hundred and sixty acres, which he operates in connection 
with his father's (|uarter section. lie keeps it all under a tine stale of 
cultivation and is making a pronounced success as a general farmer and 
Slock raiser. He raises a large acreage of potatoes each vear. 

Mr, Joop was luarried on December 16. 1903, to Clara I'arnow, who 
was born in Germany. She is a daughter of William and Othelia (P.erns- 
dorf) Parnow. both natives of Germany, where they grew up. married and 
e.stabli.shed their home on a farm. .Mr, Parnow came to .\merica ai)oui 
1893, his wife coming later. They located lirsl in Blue i'.arth count v, 
Minnesota, and in 1896. came from there to Clay count v and bought one 
hundred and sixty acres in Feiton townshi]), where thev lived until U)04. 
when they moved to a farm east of Thief Ri\cr h'alls, and there they both 
>till reside, owning a gOfKl farm of one hundred rind sixtv acres there, 
on which they have made extensive improvements, including the erection 
of good buildings. The following children were l)orn to Mr. and Mrs. 
I'arnow: Selma. Clara. Otto. Paul. William. Oscar, who is in the United 
.States navy: Frma, .\le\, wlm died when .seven davs old, and h'.rnest, who 
died when three years old. 

Three children have been Ixjrn to Mr, and Mr.^. Juop, namely: Walter, 
who died when three months old, and Myrtle and Elnora. Mr. loop is 
independent in his political views. He is a member of the Futhcran church. 



A.XDREW O. SOLWOLD. 

.A. man's life work is the measure of his success, and he is truly the 
most successful man \vho. turning his powers into the channel of an honor- 
able purpose, accomplishes the ol>ject of his endeavor. In the study of ever\- 
man's life we find some mainspring of action, something that he lives for. 
In .\n.drew O. Solwold. farmer of Goose Prairie townshi]), Clav county, 
it seems to have been an ambition to make the best use of his native and 
ac([uired powers. 

Mr, Solwold was born in .Xorway on June _'6, 1841. He is a son of 
Olaf P. and .Andrea (Eidshaug) Sohvold. both natives of Xorwav. where 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 319 

thev grew to maturity, married and established their home. The father was 
a farmer, also superintendent of forests for many years. His death occurred 
in his native land at the age of fifty-eight years. His widow later immi- 
grated to America, in i8Si, and spent her last years in Tacoma, Washing- 
ton, where her death occurred in 1897. She was born in 18 16. To these 
parents the following children were born : Peter, who is engaged in farm- 
ing in Keene township. Clay county: Andrew O., the subject of this sketch: 
Olaf, who owns a farm near Tacoma, Washington, it having been at his 
home that the mother of these children died ; Gunder, who also lives near 
that city; George, who lives in Utah, and Bertena, who died at Tacoma, 
Washington. 

Andrew O. Solwold grew to manhood in Xorway and there attended 
the comm.on schools, completing bis schooling at .\sker Seminary there. 
He immigrated to America in 187-' when thirty-one years old. He spent 
his first year in the New World at Oconomowoc, Waukesha county, Wis- 
consin, then came to Minnesota, and spent five years teaching school in 
[•'illmore county. He then came to Clay couny and took up a homestead 
near Hawlev, in section 12, Cromwell tow^nship, and there be developed 
an excellent farm, making all improvements. He engaged in general farm- 
ing and stock raising there with success until 1895, when he sold out and 
moved to his present farm, of one hundred and sixty acres in section 22. 
Goose Prairie township, which iiis wife owned. He ])urchased another 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres in the same section, and later bought 
forty acres more in that section. He now owns three hundred and sixt\- 
acres, comprising one of the best-improved and choicest farms in his town- 
.sliip. His wife inherited her farm from her mother. Mo is making a 
pronounced success as a farmer and raises large quantities of grain and 
large numbers of live stock annually. He has made all modern improve- 
ments, including the erection of good buildings. 

Mr. Solwold was married on the farm where he now resides on Decem- 
ber 6, 1884, to Maria Larson, who was Ijorn in Lafayette, Wisconsin, 
November 11, 1858, a daughter (jf .\ndrew and Nicoline (Grindvold) Lar- 
son, natives of Norway, from which country they came to America, locat- 
ing in Wisconsin, later coming to Clay county, Minnesota, the father 
renting land in Goose Prairie township, where he and his wife spent the 
rest of their lives, the father dying in 1880. The mother was born in 
1822 and died in 1903. To Mr. and Mrs. Solwold eight children have 
been born, namely: Olaf, who was graduated from the State Normal and 
the \'allev Citv Normal, is a school teacher by profession and lives at 



3_'0 CLAY AND XOR.MAX COLXTIES. MINNESOTA. 

liDine; Agnes, deceased; Borgliild. wlu) is inarried and lives on the home 
farm: Alt', who was graduated from the Park Region College at Fergus 
{-"alls, Minnesota, later taking an advanced course at the State Normal 
School, and is also a teacher hv profession, and Agnes. Ingeborg. .\lvilda 
and Dagmar, who arc also engaged in school teaching. They all recei\efl 
excellent educational advantages and are successful teachers. 

Politically. Mr. Solwold is independent. While living in Cromwell 
township he served as township clerk. He has also served as chairman 
of the township hoard in Goose Prairie township, also as supervisor of 
the latter, and was clerk of school district No. 95 for a period of twenty 
vears. He is a member of the Lutheran church, in which he is a deacon. 
He was also a deacon of the church of this denomination in his early days 
in Fillmore county. He is a well-informed man, having been a student 
and a wide reader, as well as a close observer, all his life and is well 
posted on c<irrcnt events, one of the leaders of public affairs in this locality. 



PETER .\. PETERSON. 

Peter .\. Peterson, whc for more than twenty years has held the 
important office of sheriff of Norman county, is a native of the kingdom 
of Norwav. but has lived in Minnesota since he was ten years of age and 
in Norman county since he was twenty -five, he having been a homesteader 
here back in pioneer days. He was born in 1857, son of Andrew and Bertha 
Maria ( Hanson ") Peterson, both natives of Norway and the former of whom 
died there when the subject of this sketch was nine years of age. The 
widow and her two sons, Peter and .\nton. a short tiiue afterward, in 1867, 
came to the L'nited States and proceeded on out to Minnesota, settling in 
iM-eeborn county, where the Widow Peterson presently married Sterner 
Hansijn and where she spent the remainder of her life, her death occurring 
in 1897. Her husband dieil a few years prior to that date. Her younger 
son, Anton Peterson, two years younger than his brother, Peter, is now 
living in Santa Cruz, California. 

As noted above, Peter A. Peterson was about ten years of age when 
he came w ith his mother to this state and located in Freeborn county. There 
he completed his schooling and early began work on a farm, becoming an 
excellent farmer. During the last two years of his residence in that county 
Air. Peterson owned a horse-power threshing-rig. which he operated with 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 32I 

much success througliout the neighborhood hi which he Uved. In 1879 Mr. 
Peterson married and in 1882 he and his wife drove over to this part of 
the state, bringing through some essential household articles, four horses and 
several cattle, the trip requiring twenty-three days. Upon his arrival here 
Mr. Peterson homesteaded a quarter section of land in section 10 of Strand 
township, Norman county, and there established his home, putting up a 
comfortable house and adequate farm buildings, and made other improve- 
ments on the place. After a while he sold that place to advantage and 
bought two hundred acres of railroad land in Bear Park township, which 
he proceeded to improve and on which he made his home until his election 
to the office of sheriff of Norman county in 1896, when he moved to Ada, 
where he ever since has made his home, occupant of the sheriff's residence ; 
for he ever since has occupied that office, his manner of conducting the 
affairs of the sheriff's office having so warmly recommended him to the 
voters of the county that he has been re-elected at each succeeding election. 
Sheriff Peterson had had ])revious public exi^erience before taking up the 
duties of the sheriff's office, for during his residence in Bear Park township 
lie was chairman of the board of township supervisors all but two years 
of the time he spent there and during the last two years of his residence 
there was township assessor. He also was acti\'e in the general affairs of 
the community and helped organize the creamery, company at Rindahl, the 
company that established the first real creamery in Norman county, and 
until he left the farm remained a member of the board of directors of that 
company. Not long after locating in Norman county iNlr. Peterson bought 
a horse-power threshing-rig and operated the same for two seasons, at the 
end of which time he bought the first steam-traction outfit in that section 
and for years operated the same widely over the four nearby townships. 
Strand, Sundal, Bear Park and Waukon, his experience as a threshcrman. 
including the time spent at that business in Freeborn county before he came 
up here, covering twenty-two years. For some years after moving to Ada 
Slierift' Peterson also owned and operated a livery stable in that city. 

In November, 1879, Peter A. Peterson was united in marria.ge to 
Helena Thronson, who was born on a pioneer farm in the vicinity of Calmer, 
in Winneshiek county, Iowa, daughter of Thron and Guri (Helgeson) 
Thronson, natives of Norway, who had located in Iowa in 1S54, and to 
tliis union seven children have been born, ;\Iary, who died in infancy, Mary 
(.second), Tillie. Bertha, Flby, Carl and Arthur. Slieriff and Mrs. Peter- 
(2ia) 



^22 CLAY AND XflR.MAN COl" XTUIS. MIX X ICSi ITA. 

soil are members of the Synod Lutheran churcli and were among the most 
active factors in the movement that resuUed in the erection of a churcli of 
that denomination east of Gary. 



PETER SANDERS. 



The country has many ad\antages over the cit}-. Likewise, it has its 
disadvantages — one of the greatest being tlie laci< of opportunity to gain a 
competence within a reasonable period of time. Many farmers have grown 
rich through increased valuation of their land ; others through carefull\ 
husbanding their resources, rigid discipline and economic living and good 
business ability, ofttinies combined with favorable seasons for their principal 
products. One of the successful 'farmers of Felton township, Clay county, 
is Peter Sanders. 

Mr. Sanders was born in Sweden, August 29, 1870. He is a son of 
Peter and Celia Sanders, both natives of Sweden, where they grew uj). 
married and made their home until 1884, when they came to America, 
locating at Vasa, Goodhue county, Minnesota, where the father followed 
the carpenter's trade, which he had learned in the old country when a 
voung man. He and his wife are still living at Vasa, many of the buildings 
of which town he helped erect during his residence there of over thirty 
vears. Six of the children born to these parents grew to maturity, namely : 
Peter. Jr.. .\nnie. Matilda, Albertina, John and .\lma. Two children died 
in earlv life. The parents of these children are members of the Swedish 
Lutheran church. 

Peter Sanders was fourteen years old when his parents brought him 
to America. He attended the ])ublic schools in Sweden, also went to school 
three months after coming to Vasa. .Minnesota. He began working out in 
Goodhue county as a farm hand, remaining there until 1887, when he 
came to Moorliead. where he worked in a brick yard for four years. During 
that period he learned the brick-making business thoroughly, but upon leav- 
ing Moorhead he turned his attention to farming, which he has continued 
ever since, in Clay county, and in Felton township since 1909. He operates 
a half section near the village of Felton. carrying on general farming and 
stock raising and during the summer months he also operates a hay bailer. 

Mr. Sanders was married in 1891 to Thresa Brandt, a native of Sweden, 
from which country she came to .\merica with her parents, Frank G. and 



CLAY AND NORMAN COrNTIES, MINNESOTA. ^2i, 

Johanna ( Peterson) Brandt, wlien young. She is ihc nnly child. Tier 
parents located in Clay count}', Minnesota, in 1879. The father died in 
Moorhead some time ago, but the mother is making her liduie with her 
daughter, Mrs. Thresa Sanders. 

Six chilflren ha\-e been horn tn Peter and Thresa Sanders, namely: 
Hilda. Edith, Carl,. I'" red, Lillian and .\lma. Mr. Sanders and family belong 
to the Swedish Lutheran church. I'olitically. he is a Uepuljlican. He has 
been a member of the township Imarrl since 1914 .and was chosen chairman 
of the board in 19 17. 



.WrOX JOHNSON HAUGER. 

As everyone knows, methods o{ farming are changing and we are 
learning many things tliat the husbandman of half a century ago did not 
know, or at least did not attach much attention to. .\ dif-ferent system of 
general agriculture has had to he adopted from that used hv the ]iioneers. 
for conditions ha\e changed in many respects : even the climate and the 
soil have changed, to say nothing of markets, methods of trans])ortation 
for the farmer's jiroducts and the laws of supply and demand. 

One of the careful and thoughtful farmers of Hi.ghland ( h-o\e town- 
ship. Clay county, was the late Anton Johnson Hanger, who was born in 
Norway, November 24. 1H35. He grew to manhood in his native land. 
attended the common scIkxjIs and was luarried there to Karen Christiansnn. 
also a native of Norway. They remained in their native land until iiS'17. 
when they came to America, by way of Quebec. Canada, proceeding thence 
to Wisconsin, locating near the town of Boscobel. Grant county, where 
they spent eight years nn a farm. Then the\' made the long o\erland 
journey by team to Clay county, Minnesota, where the father took u]) a 
homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Highland Grove township, 
which he developed into a good farm, erected suitable l;)uildin,gs and there 
continued general farming until his death. His wife died at the h(jme of 
their daughter. Mrs. John 1-1. Carlson, of Highland Gro\e township, dying 
while on a \-isit there. .\ sketch of Mr. Carlson and family will be found on 
another page of this work. Mr. Hauger later took up a tree-claim of one 
hundred and sixty acres just south of his homestead. Lie was one of the 
active men of his township. He helped to organize the Lhiited Lutheran 
church at Hitterdal, and was long a member of the official board of the 



3^4 CLAV AND NORMAN COUNTIKS, MINNESOTA. 

same. In the early days he also helped organize the Buffalo Lutheran con- 
i^regation. 

To Mr. and .Mrs. llauger six children were horn, namely: Carl }.. 
who was horn in Christiania. Norway; Christian A., who also first saw the 
light of (lav in that city: Olaf E., who was born on the train between 
(}uehec and Montreal, Canada, wliile the family was en route to the United 
States from XcDrway : Caroline .\., who married John E. Carlson, a farmer 
of Clay county, was born in Grant county, Wisconsin: Julia 1"., who was 
also horn in the last-named county and state, and Hans Martin, who was 
born in Ma\', 1875, and who died on the homestead at the age of thirteen 
rears. The death of Anton J. Hauger occurred on November 2'4, 1894. 



OTTO L. DAHL. 

An enterprising mercliant at Eelton. Clay county is Otto L. Dahl, who 
was horn at Sparta, Wisconsin. January 18, 1874. He is a son of Lauritz 
;ind Thea (Blegen) Dahl, l)oth natives of Norway, where they spent their 
earlier years, immigrating to America in 1865. establishing their future 
home at Sparta. Wisconsin. There the mother's death occurred in 1877. 
ill 1S84 the fatlier removed to Polk county, Minnesota, taking up a home- 
stead of one hundred and si.xty acres in Hill River township, which Ik- 
(levelopeil into a good farm through years of hard work and close application 
and there he still resides. He belongs to tlie Norwegian Lutheran church. 
He has onl\ two children, the subject of this sketch having a brother. 
Oscar J. 

Otto 1.. Oahl grew uj) in Wisconsin, attended the public schools at 
Baldwin, that state, and as a young man started clerking in a store at 
Woodville. his native state. He had a natural inclination to mercantile life 
and gave eminent satisfaction as a clerk, .soon mastering the various ins 
and outs of the business. He remained there until 1892, when he came to 
Polk county. Minnesota, and clerked in the store at Mcintosh for nine years, 
his long retention there being suf^cient evidence of his faithful and honest 
work. From 1901 to 1907 he devoted his attention to the picture busi- 
ness, then turned his attention to farming, filing on a claim of one hundred 
and sixtv acres in Red Lake county. Minnesota, in 1907, and he lived there 
until 1910, in which year he built a store and established Roland postofifice, 
in Red Lake county, remaining there four years, enjoying a very satisfactory 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 325 

business. He sold out in 1914 and soon thereafter made an extensive 
trip to Europe, visiting England, Holland, Germany. Denmark, Sweden 
and Norway. Upon his return home he purchased a farm in Polk county, 
Minnesota, but in the fall of 1914 he came to Felton and has made his 
home here ever since. He was manager of the Otto Dahl store, owned 
l)y his cousin. In January. 1917, he bought a partnership interest in the 
business and is now manager and resident owner of this popular and suc- 
cessful store. He has everything under a superb system and a large and 
well selected general stock of goods is carried. A brisk trade is carried 
on at all seasons with the people of Felton and the surrounding country. 

Mr. Dahl was married in 1907 to Anna Broin. who was born in ^^lin- 
nesota and was educated in the public schools. She is a daughter of John 
and Lena (Quale) Broin, natives of Wisconsin. Six children have liecn 
l)orn to Mr. and Mrs. Dahl, namely: Vernon, Arlie, Or\-ille, Otto, Doris 
and Llewellyn. 

Mr. Dahl was appointed postmaster at Felton in July, 1915, and lie 
has filled that office ever since in an able and creditable manner. Politicallw 
he is a Democrat. 



SWAN NELSON. 



Swan Nelson, proprietor i.f a fine farm of four hundred acres in Elk- 
ton township. Clay county, and one of the most substantial farmers of 
that part of the county, is a native of the kingdom of Sweden, but has been 
a resident of Alinnesota since the year 1881. He was born on Januar\- 
10, 1857, son of Nels and Cecelia (Swanson) Swanson. both also natives 
of Sweden, who spent all their lives in their nati\-e C(juntrv, the former 
dying in 1909 and the latter, in 1910. During the active years of hi- 
life Nels Swanson was a coachman. He and his wife were the parents of 
six children, three sons and three daughters, of whom the subject of this 
sketch was the first-born, the others being Edith, deceased; Cecelia, who 
is still making her home in Sweden ; Olaf, also a resident of his nati\e 
land, and August and Mary, deceased. The Sw^ansons were members of 
the Lutheran church and their children were reared in that faith. 

Reared in Sweden, Swan Nelson received his schooling there and, in 
1877. was married. About four years later, in March, 1881, he came to 
the LTnited States w'ith his family, his wife's widowed mother accompany- 
ing them, and proceeded on f)ut to this part of Minnesota, Hawley being 



T^26 CL.w AM) Xdk.M AX i()r.\rii:s. .mixxesota. 

his destination. l-"or a year after liis arrisal here Mr. Nelson was engaj^ed 
working on the farm x>f Nels 'J'iesei. in tiie Hawley neif^hhorhood, <ind 
llien homesteaded a quarter of a section of land in section 12 of Elktun 
township, in Clay county, where he established his hcinie and has ever since 
resided, one of the best-known and most substantial farmers in that part 
of tlie countw I'pon taking possession of his homestead tract Mr. X'elson 
planted a gro\ e and gradually im])roved his place, putting up good build- 
ings, and as he prospered added to his holdings by the piuchase of an addi- 
li<mal tract of two hundred and forty acres and now has a fine farm of 
four hundred acres. Though still making his home on the farm, Mr. Nelson 
has been practicalU retired from the active labors of the same for the past 
six vears or more, lie has ever taken an interested i)art in local affairs and 
for some years past has been serving as treasurer of the school district in 
wliich he lives. 

Mr. Nelson's wife died in 1906. She also was born in the kingdom of 
Su'eden, Helen Torkelson. and as noted above, her widowed mother. Elena 
(Johnson) Torkelson, came to this country with her. Mrs. Torkelson ever 
afterward made her home with Mr. and Mrs. Nelson and her last days 
were .spent there. Mr. Nelson has three children, Edith. Theodore and 
.\nna. The family has ever given proper attention to the general social 
affairs of the community in which they live and have been helpful in manv 
ways in a<lvancing movements designed to promote the common welfare.- 
thereabout. 



HALVOR OLSON. 



A large number of Scandinavians have immigrated to Minnesota where 
ihev have found broader opi)ortunities than existed in their native land, and 
they have been welcomed everywhere for reasons too obvious to mention 
in detail here. Clay county has been fortunate in securing a large number 
of these aliens, among whom was the late Halvor Olson, a skillful farmer 
of Eglon township, who, like others of his countrymen, benefited alike him- 
self and us after casting his lot in this locality, where he was highly esteemed. 

Mr. Olson was born in Norwa\- on January 1, 1843. ^'s parents were 
also natives of that country, where they lived and died on a farm. Thev 
were parents of the following children: Ole, who died in Norway: Halvor. 
the first, who came to .\merica and died in this ci>untr\-: Tom and Fiiii.'i, 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 327 

who also died in the I'nited States, and Halvor, the second, subject of this 
brief review. 

Halvor Olson, the subject of this sketch, grew to manhood in Norway 
and there attended the common schools. While living in his native land 
he engaged in farming. He crossed the .\tlantic in 1S69 and came to Min- 
nesota, locating in Houston county, where he lived two years, at the end of 
which time, in 187 1, he came up into the Red River country and home- 
steaded a c|uarter of a section of land in section 28 of Eglon townshi]). 
Clay county. The Indians still were numerous hereabout at that time and 
just about the time Air. Olson came here a white family was massacred 
by the redskins. During the spring of his arrival here Mr. Olson was 
stricken with typhoid fe\-er and notwithstanding the fact that he had to 
subsist on salt pork, his wonderful constitution pulled him through. He 
established his home on that homestead farm and there spent the rest of 
his life, and his widow is still living there. He worked hard develo[>ing the 
place from the wild prairie, and by perseverance and good management 
prospered with the advancing years, and later added one hundred acres to 
his original farm, in section 27, Eglon township, on which land he also 
made all improvements. He carried on general farming and stock raising 
extensively and became one of the leading farmers of his community. He 
built a comfortable home and a number of convenient outbuildings. Mrs. 
Olson has made considerable improvements since her husband's death and 
has managed the place successfully, continuing the work of the same along 
the lines which he had inaugurated. In connection with general grain and 
stock farming she raises a large cpiantity of potatoes, planting fifteen acres 
in 1917. A good grade of live stock is always to be found on the place. 

Mr. Olson was married at Lake Park, Eglon township. Clay count}', 
on January 3. 1882, to Anna Ness, who was born in Norway on December 
4. 1855. Her parents were natives of Norway, where they grew up and 
established their home, the father dying there in the year 1877. After 
his death Mrs. Ness came to Minnesota and died in Clay county, in 1892. 
Mrs. Olson came to .America in 1881, unaccomi)anied. She came to Min- 
nesota and located in Clay county, wlnere. not lon.g thereafter she met and 
married Mr. Olson, of this memoir. 

To the union of Halvor Olson and wife eight children were born, 
named as follow: Sophia, who is married and lives on a farm near Wadena, 
this state; Sarah, wdio is married and lives in Minneapolis: Oscar, who has 
remained on the home farm, which he is operating: Mollie. who has remainetl 
at home with her mother: Helen, who is married and lives at Lake Park, 



328 CLAY AXD NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

Minnesota ; Ella, w ho is married and makes her home on a farm in Eglon 

township ; Edward, who has remained with his mother and is assisting;' 

in running; the farm, and Mabel; who is also at home. These children 

were all educated in the district schools of Clay county. The family are 
meml)ers of the Solum Norwegian Lutheran church. 

The death of Halvor Olson occurred on his farm in Eglon tovvnshi)) 
in 1909. 



THOMAS N. SUPER. 



Thomas N. Sliper, a progressive farmer of Cromwell township, Clay 
county, was born in Norway on July 15, 1852. He is a son of Nels X. 
and Jaqumina (Peterson) Sliper, both natives of Norway, where they grew 
to maturity, married and established their home. They came to Canada 
in July, 1868, their vessel taking eight weeks to cross the ocean, and stopped 
first in Quebec ; and from there they came to ^^'inneshiek county, Iowa, 
where the father worked out until the spring of 187 1. when he came to 
Clay county, Minnesota, driving an ox-team to a covered wagon, also drove 
along his cows, and began life here in typical pioneer fashion, in June, 1871. 
He took up a pre-emption claim of one hundretl and seventy acres in 
Cromwell township, where his soi> Thomas X. now li\es. He later made 
it a homestead. He worked hard and managed well and placed the land 
under a fine state of improvement and cultivation and was one of the suc- 
cessful general farmers of Cromwell township. He spent the rest of his 
life on this farm, dying in 1888, his widow surviving until 1895. To these 
parents five children were bom, namely: Peter X., now deceased, wlm 
came to Minnesota in 1866 and settled in Houston count)-; Jacob, also 
deceased, who came to Minnesota in 1867 and settled in Houston county: 
Thomas N., the subject of this sketch: Kari, and Edward (deceased). The 
family hcljjed start the first Lutheran church in Clay county. 

Thomas N. Sliper spent his boyhood in Norway, where he attended 
the common schools. He was sixteen years old when he came with his 
parents to America, living with them in Quebec, Canada. Winneshiek county, 
Iowa, and Clay county. Minnesota. He worked hard, like all pioneer boys 
of that period, helping develop the new farm on the wild prairies. When 
he reached his majority he took uj) a homestead of one hundred and twenty 
acres and a tree claim of one hundred and thirty acres, in the same section 
in which his father had located. Upon the death of his father he bought 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 329 

out the Other heirs and now owns a total of about four hundred and fifteen 
acres, on which he for years carried on general farming and stock raising 
on an extensive scale, but is now retired from active labor, renting his farm. 
He formerly raised a large quantity of grain, also large numbers of cattle 
and hogs, and shipped many carloads of live stock to the market annually. 
He has a modern home, large barns and other first-class improvements. 
There is a large, fine grove by his home, which he set out many years ago. 
Politically, Mr. Sliper is a Republican. He has been township treasurer 
since 1887 and in other ways has taken an active and an earnest interest 
in the general public affairs of the community in which he has lived since 
pioneer days. 



C. B. BRODINE. 



C. B. Brodine, manager of the Felton Elevator Company at Felton, 
Clay county, was born in Sweden, September 29, 1855. He is a son of 
C. B. and Anna (Henrickson) Brodine, both natives of Sweden, where 
they grew up. married and established their home; in fact, spent their lives 
in their nati\e country. The father was engaged in the lianking business. 
To these parents eight children were born. 

C. B. Brodine grew to manhood in Sweden and there attended the 
public schools. In 1882 he immigrated to America and the first few years 
of his residence here traveled extensively, visiting" places of interest all 
over the United States. About 1887 he located on a farm near Luce, in 
Otter Tail county, Minnesota, carrying on general farming there several 
years. Later he bought and sold grain, also handled lumber. He came to 
Clay county, about 1898, locating on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, 
four miles .south of Felton, and continued farming there until 1905, when 
he rented out his land and moved to Felton and has since been manager 
of the Felton Elevator Company, building up a large and growing busi- 
ness. He handles feed, grain, flour, fuel and machinery. 

Mr. Brodine was married on November 14, 1890, to Ida Rassmuson. 
who was born in Wisconsin, a daughter of B. F. and Margarette (Larson) 
Rassmuson, natives of Denmark. To Mr. and Mrs. Brodine six children 
have been bom, Anna E., Ruth E., .\da M., Alonzo G., Calvin J. and 
Philip O. 

Politically, Mr. Brodine is a Democrat. While living on the farm in 
Flowing township he served for some time as chairman of the township 



33^ CI.AV AXl) XdKM AX CorXTIKS. .MIXXi:S()TA, 

hoard, also as assessor and clerk of the school district. Since locating in 
h'elton he has heen a member of the \illage conncil. clerk of the scliool 
district, and is at this writing- clerk of Felton township. As a public servant 
he has performed his duties in a faithful and satisfactory manner, and is 
always deeply interested in public affairs. 



XFT.S Il.\.\lArF.R. 



One of the leading farmers of Goose Prairie towiishrj). Clay county, 
is Nels Hammer, who was torn. May 3, 1862, in Norway. He is a son 
(if Nicholi and Inge (Torreson) Hammer, lioth natives of Norway, where 
they lived and died, the father passing away at the early age of thirty- 
eight, when his son. Nels, was five years old. He owned and operated a 
farm in his native land. His widow survived to 1881, reaching the age 
of lifty-seven years. They were parents of the following children; Mary, 
who is married and lives on the old homestead in Norway; Tom, who died 
when three years of age; Tom (second), who is a road master in Norway, 
having been in railroad service there many years; Olaf, who came to Min- 
nesota, and is farming a place of two hundred and forty acres in Keene 
township. Clay coimty ; Margaretta, who died in Norway, and Nels, the 
subject of this sketch. 

Nels Hammer spent his b(\vhood in Norwa)- and there attended school. 
He came to .\merica in 1882, coming directly to Minnesota. After working 
one summer for Peter Nelson on his farm in Eglon township. Clay county, 
he went to A\'i,sconsin, spent one year in the lumber camps at Rice Lake, 
then went to Dnunmond, that state, and continued to work in the timber 
and in a saw -mill there "for three and one-half years. He returned to Clay 
county in 188O and during the summer of that year worked on the Northern 
Pacific railroad — the branch through the village of Hitterdal. He worked 
for Ole Gunderson the next winter, then on a farm for one year. He 
then purchased his present farm of eighty acres in section 33, Goose Prairie 
township, later buying .-mother eighty, and he now owns a good farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres. It was all raw land when he bought it and 
he has placed it under a fine state of cultivation, erected a substantial group 
of buildings, set out a grove and otherwise improved it. Mr. Hammer carries 
on general and mixed farming and raises a good grade of Shorthorn cattle. 
He is one of the pioneers of his community and was the first man to 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 33 1 

borrow tlie sum of five dollars from the Hank of Havvley, just after it 
\\'as started. 

Mr. Hammer was married in Fargo, North Dakota, June i6, 1888, 
to Jennie Salvevokl, who was born in Norway, November 27, 186.5, ^nd 
who was about fourteen years of age when her parents brought her to 
America. Tlie family located in Otter Tail county, Minnesota, where the 
father spent the rest of his life on a farm, dying a number of years ago. 
The mother is still li\ing on the homestead there with her son. She is now 
about eighty years old. To Mr. and Mrs. Hammer eight children have 
been born, namely: Theodore who owns and operates the hotel at Hitter- 
dal, and Engar, Minnie, Nels, Jr.. Nora, Stella, Elmer and Lillian, who 
arc all at home. 

Politically, Mr. Hammer is independenl. He has been a member of 
the township board in Goose Prairie township for a period of twenty years, 
and chairman of the same part of the time. He is a member of the United 
Norwegian church, in which he is a deacon, and is an active worker in 
tlie same. 



NELS M. KLEPPE. 



Nels M. Kleppe, justice of the peace in and for Spring Prairie town- 
ship. Clay county, and for many years engaged in the grain business at 
A\erill. but who is now gix'ing his chief attention to his c|uarter-section 
farm in the immediate vicinity of that village, is a native of the kingdom 
of Norway, but has been a resident of this country and of Minnesota since 
he was an infant. He was born on November 22, 1885. son of S. R. and 
Nellie (Nelson) Kleppe, also natives of Norway, who came to this country 
in 1886 and located in N'ellow Medicine county, this state remaining there 
abi)ut sixteen years, at the end of which time they moved to Lyon count}-. 
In this latter county S. R. Kleppe spent his last days and his widow is still 
living there. Of the children born to them three surviv'e. those besifles the 
subject of this sketch being R^asmus and Sikke. 

.\s noted above. Nels M. Kleppe was l)ut a babe in arms when his 
parents came from Xorway to Minnesota ^ind his youth was spent in Yel- 
low Medicine countv. where he received the greater ])art of his schooling. 
After the family moved to Lyon county he became a valued assistant in 
the labors nf the home farm there and remained there until 1908, when 



2iS- CLAY AND NOKMAN COUNTIES. MINXKSOTA. 

lie came up into the Red River country and located at A\erill, being there 
engaged as grain buyer for the Minnesota & Western Grain Company, and 
continued thus engaged until 191 5, since which time he has been chiefly 
engaged in farming, operating a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
nearby the village. In the meantime, in 1912. he married Mrs. Effie Jolm- 
son, who was then and still is conducting a general store at Averill, and 
until he took up active farming assisted in the management of the store 
as well as looking after his grain business. Mr. Kleppe has given close 
attention to the general civic affairs of his home community since locating 
here and for tlie past six years has been sending as justice of the peace. 

Mrs. Kleppe was born, Effie Hawkins, on a pioneer farm in Rockwell 
township, in tlie adjoining county of Norman, daughter of Christian Inge- 
bright and Johanna John.son (Slater) Hawkins, the former a native of 
Norway and the latter of Sweden, who were married in Minnesota and 
became pioneers of Norman county, where Christian Hawkins spent his 
last days. His widow is still living. She was born in Sweden and was 
liut six years of age when she came to this country with her parents. 
I'eter and Mary (Johnson) Slater, who first settled in Wa.shington county, 
this state, later moving to Carver county, where they spent their last days. 
Christian Hawkins came to the L'nited States from Norway when about 
twenty-one years of age and located at Minneapolis, where he became en- 
gaged working at his trade as a tailor. He married about 1876 and about 
two years later, after a year spent at Fergus Falls, homesteaded a quarter 
of a section of land six miles east of Borup, in Norman county. Cpon 
his retirement from the farm he moved to Averill and later to Ada, where 
be died in May, 1905, at the age of sixty-four years. His father died in 
Norway and his mother later married again and came to this country. Chris- 
tian Hawkins helped to organize tlie first church established in the \icinity 
I if Borup. 

On OctoI)er 30. I1S97. Effie Hawkins was united in marriage to John 
Jolinson, who was liorn in .Sweden on September 17, 1867, son of John 
and Johanna Johnson, who spent all their lives in their native Sweden. When 
twenty years of age the younger John Johnson came to the United States 
and after a while located at Felton. in Clay county, later moving to Averill. 
where in March. 1898, he started the first store established in that village 
and also ojierated a farm in that \icinity. Mr. Johnson was for years a 
member of the school board at Averill and credit was due him for the move- 
ment which led to the erection of the school house there. Though reared 



CLAY AXD NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 333 

as a Lutlieraii he lielped to organize the Congregational church at Felton 
and also aided in the organization of the church at .Vverill. John Johnson 
died on February 20. 191 1, leaving a widow and four children, Clara. 
Evelyn, Leonard and Ruby. 



OLE H. GOL. 



Some people seem to forget that a fertile soil is a living, breathing 
thing, well fed by nature or by the hand of man, with the natural mineral 
elements and the organic matter necessary for the use of the soil bacteria 
in the manufacture of plant food, and for a delightful environment in which 
they can live and work. Ole H. Gol, a farmer of Highland Grove township, 
Clay county, has not overlooked this fact, and consequently he is making 
his farm produce good crops annually and is living comfortablv as a result 
(if his good management. 

Mr. Gol was born in Norway. Xo\eml)er 15, 1868. He is a son of 
Hans and Ragna (Tollefson) Tollefson, both natives of Norway, where they 
spent their li\es on a farm. Eight children were born to them, namel}- : 
Tollef Hanson, the first : Tollef Hanson, the second ; Berget Hanson, and 
.\rnna Hanson, all of whom live in Norway; Hans Hanson, who came to 
Minnesota and lives in Eglon township. Clay county: Nels Hanson, who 
lives in Norway: Ole H., the subject of this sketch, and Tngebright. the 
wife of Christ Erickson, of Parke township, Clay county. 

Ole H. Gol spent his boyhood in Norway and there attended the com- 
mon' schools. He remained with his parents on the home farm until alxnn 
1896, when he immigrated to America and came to Minnesota, locating on 
a farm in Eglon township. Clay county, where he remained about eight 
years, then removed to Highland Grove township, buying his present excel- 
lent farm of one hundred and sixty acres, where he has since been engaged 
in general farming and stock raising. 

In the spring of 1906 Mr. Gol was married to Emma Sophia West- 
lierg, who was born on her father's homestead in Highland Grove township. 
Clay county, where she grew to womanhood. She was educated in the local 
district schools. She is a daughter of Peter and Annie (Anderson) W'est- 
berg, both natives of Sweden, from which country they came to Minnesota 
when young and were married in Clay county in 1881. Mr. Westberg came 
directly to Clay countv in 1879 and was one of the pioneers in Highland 



334 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

Gro\e township, wlicrc he now owns a fine farm of two liundred acres, on 
which he lias made all the improvements. His family ctinsists of eiijht 
children, named as follow: lunma, the first (deceased): Lewis. Jennie, 
luiima (second), wife of Mr. Gol : .\dol])h. who lives on the Imnic fai'ni 
and assists his father in operating the place, and .\nnie. Minnie and Tilda. 
.\ separate sketch of the W'estherg familv will he fitund i)n another jiagc 
of this work. 

To Mr. and ^[rs. (iol one child has heen hum. a son. Ilelnier Knv 
Gol. Mr. Gol is a Repnhlican and lias always heen interested in the affairs 
of his home community. lie was a meniher of the village council at Mani- 
toha Junction. Clay county, where he lived a while many years ago. He 
and his famih- helou"- to the Xorwctrian Lutheran church. 



.\UGUST STIEXTXG. 



The name of August Stiening. hanker of Felton, is loo well known 
to the ])eople of Clay county to need any formal introduction by the bio- 
grapher. He was l)orn in Germany, July 17, 1868, and is a son of Carl 
and .\nna Maria (Knollmann) Stiening, both natives of Germany, where 
they grew up and married. The father was a wagon-maker by trade and 
he became a well-known manufacturer of wagons in Guernheim, Germanx'. 
but later in life he devoted his attention to the lumber and merchandise 
busine.ss. His family consisted of fi\e children, namely: Heinrich. who 
lives in Germany, a painter and decorator by trade; Carl, who died at 
\\ aterloo. Illinois: Wilhelm, who makes his home at Waterloo, lllinMs: 
Herman, who resided in Waterloo, Illinois, and is now deceased, and .August, 
who is the youngest of the family. 

August Stiening grew to manhood in Germany, and where he attended 
tile public schools and worked with his father when a young man. W'licn he 
w.is alK)ut twenty years old his father was appointed postmaster at Guern- 
heim. in 1888, but it was the understanding of the government that the 
son, August, was to run the office, which he did for a period of eight 
years, performing his duties in an able, faithful and acceptable manner. 
He had five carriers and two sub-stations under his direction. His health 
failing, he was advised, in 1896. to take an ocean trip in the hopes of 
restoring it. On September 3 of that year he sailed from his nati\e laml 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 335 

lor the New World. He came on West to Waterloo, Illinois, to visit 
his brothers and was so favorably impressed with the United States that 
he decided to remain here, so he sent back to Germany for his wife and 
two children. The first year he worked with his brother, Wilhelm, at 
Waterloo, painting and paper-hanging. In the fall of 1896 he purchased 
a farm of two hundred acres about six miles south of W'aterloo, erected 
a large brick house thereon and made other important improvements, living- 
there three years. There were good buildings on the place when he bought 
it, but his renter occupied them. In the summer of 1900 he was overcome 
by the heat while working in a cornfield. Believing that die climate of 
the Northwest would be better for him, he made an extensive trip, finally 
selecting the vicinity of Anamoose, North Dakota, and homesteaded one 
hundred and twenty acres six miles northwest of that town. He soon had 
a good farm improved there and, prospering through close application and 
good management, he now owns a half section. In 1904 he started buying 
grain for the Osborn McMillan Elevator Company at Martin, North Dakota, 
working for that firm about a year. He then worked for the A. D. Zien 
Company, wholesale liquor dealers of Duluth, Minnesota, as a traveling- 
salesman, but in a short time he accepted a similar position with the Jung- 
Brewing Company, of Milwaukee, being stationed at the company's branch 
house at East Grand Forks, this state, at good wages and all expenses paid, 
and was manager of the house there for eighteen months. In August, 
1910, he came to Clay county, as cashier of the First State Bank of Felton, 
and has held this position ever since, giving his usual satisfaction, being 
able, loyal and courteous to the patrons of the bank. He has also been 
treasurer of the Felton Rural Telephone Company. He and Otto Dahl 
built the first brick building in Felton — a bank building and store house. 
On September 5, 1H93, Mr. Steining was married to Johanna Meyer, 
and four clrildren have lieen born to tliem, namely : Maria Elizabeth, Carl 
H., Marie and Jenny. Mr. Steining is independent in his political views. 
He has been active and influential in the affairs of Felton since coming here, 
was for some tinie president (if the village, has done much for the upbuild- 
ing of the town and community, served for five years on the local school 
board and has also served as justice of the peace. He put in the first 
cement sidewalks in I'^lton and otherwise improved the place in a general 
way. He has been a leader among the people of this locality, is a man of 
progressive ideas and has discharged his duties as a ])ulilic servant in a 
capable and faithful manner. 



336 CLAY AXD .NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

LEWIS N. QUAM. 

Lewis N. Quam, one ol the wideawake Iwentielh-century farmers of 
Spring Prairie township, Clay county, was born in Steele county, Minnesota. 
October 25, 1856. He is a son of John N. and Anna (Lysne) Quam, both 
born in Sogan, Norway, wliere they grew up and married. In the spring 
of 1854 they came to America, locating in Dane county, Wisconsin, where 
they spent two years, moving from there to Steele county, in the southern 
Ijart of Minnesota, in the spring of 1856, making the journey from the 
I'adger state in a covered wagon, drawn by an o.x-team. Three other 
families came along at the same time, crossing the Mississippi river at 
.McGregor On tiie ferry. Mr. Quam took up a pre-emption claim in Steele 
county, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres. He made a splendid 
farm of it and operated the same until 1879, when he moved to Kandiyohi 
countv. this state, where he bought a farm on which he spent the rest of 
his life, dving some years ago, and there his widow still makes her home. 
To these parents ten children were born, five of whom died before reaching 
maturity. Those who grew up were as follow : Lewis X., the subject 
of this sketch; Nels, who lives in Willmar, Minnesota; Wilda, who lives 
in Kandiyohi county, this state; Metha, who lives in the state of Washington, 
and John, who took up a homestead in Bowman count)-. X'orth Dakota, where 
he is engaged in farming. 

Lewis X. Quam spent his boyhood on the farm in Steele county. Min- 
nesota. There he attended the district schools and later was a student in 
the Augustberg Seminary at Minneapolis two winters. In the spring of 
1882 he went to Montana, where he worked two summers and one winter 
in the Placer gold mines. He then returned to Minneapolis and was a 
student in the above-nained seminary for another four months. He then 
made a prospecting trip through Clay county, bringing horses, a wagon, 
plow, etc. He traded his three horses for a homestead right of one hundred 
and sixtv acres, in section 26 of Spring Prairie township. The following 
vear. 1885. he began developing the place and has resided there ever since. 
He prospered with advancing years through perseverance and good man- 
agement and added to his original holdings until he now owns a total of 
four hundred acres, all in one body. He has erected a handsome residence 
and substantial outbuildings, also planted large groves. He has been quite 
successful as a general farmer and stock raiser, operating on a large scale, 
and ranking among the leading agriculturists of his township and county. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 337 

In the fall of 1885 Lewis N. Ouam was married to Carrie Arneson, 
who was born in Norway. She is a daughter of Arne Arneson, who died 
in Norway, but whose widow came to America about the year 1897 and 
is still living, making her home with her daughter in Spring Prairie town- 
ship. Fourteen children have been torn to Mr. and Mrs. Ouam, namely : 
John A., Agnes M., Lalia Clarisa, Harry Edwin, Ralph W., an infant 
(deceased), Nina, Mathia, Andrew L., Goodhue N., Sophia May, Roy E., 
Anha Gladys, Lewis Norris, and Morrel O'Neil. 

Politicallv, Mr. Ouaiu is an "Independent." He helped organize the 
school district, which then comprised the entire township. He was the first 
school clerk and has held that office ever since in his district. As the county 
was settled there were a numljer of small districts formed from the old 
one. He is now chairman of the township board, which office he has held 
for fifteen vears. The Ouams iiavc a veiy pleasant home and have ever 
taken an interested and influential part in the general social activities of 
the community in which they live. 



PETER WESTBERG. 



Peter Westberg, one of the older farmers of Highland Grove township. 
Clay county, was born in Sweden, September 21, 1847. He is a son of 
Nels Peterson, a native of Sweden, where he grew up, married and lived 
until immigrating to the United States in 1879, following his son Peter, 
w ith whom he spent the rest of his life. His wife died in Sweden. 

The subject of this sketch grew to manhood in Sweden and there at- 
tended the public schools. He landed in America on October 20, 1878, and 
came to Minnesota, locating at Lake Park, in Becker county. In 1880 
he took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Highland Grove 
township. Clay county, and here he has lived continuously to the present 
time. He later jjurchased forty acres more, making him at present a fine 
farm of two hundred acres, all of which he has brought up to a high state 
of improvement and cultivation. He has a cozy residence and such out- 
buildings as his needs require. Mr. Westberg was a pioneer here, most of 
the land in his locality being raw prairie when he came here, and he has 
Ijeen very successful as a general farmer and stock raiser. 

Mr. Westberg was married in Clay county on June 23, r88i, to Annie 
(22a) 



338 CLAV AXD XORMAX CorXTIES, illXXESOTA. 

AiidersiMi, a native of Sweden, in which country she spent her girlhood and 
attended tlie common schools. She came to America the latter part of 1880. 
Her i)arents lived and died in Sweden. To Peter Westberg and wife nine 
children have been born, namely: Emma (deceased), Lewis, Jennie, Emma 
(second), Adolph, Annie, Minnie, Tilda and one who died in infancy. 

Adolph Westberg operates the home farm, having assisted his father 
with the crops and stock raising for years, and he still lives at home. He 
was married April 8, 191 5, to Anna Carlson, a daughter of John E. Carlson, 
a well-known farmer of Highland Grove township, a sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work. To Adolph Westberg and wife one child has been 
born, a son, Adolph Willard Westberg. 

Politically, Peter Westberg is independent and has nc\er .sought public 
honors or mixed up with political affairs. He helped organize the Ejska 
Lutheran church, of which he is an active member, he and his family taking 
an interested part in church work. 



IIEinLXN POSSEHL. 



.\nothcr member of the well-known Possehl family in Clay county, 
who is making a success as a general farmer is Herman Possehl, of near 
Baker, Barnesville township. He was born in Cook county, Illinois, August 
2. 1869, and is a son of Fred Possehl and wife, mention of whom is made 
at proper length in the sketch of H. C. Possehl, appearing on another page 
of this work, to which the reader is respectfully directed. Suffice it to say 
here that Fred Possehl was a native of Germany, from which country 
he came to the United States in young manhood and began life in Illinois, 
.starting with practically nothing: but by good management and hard work 
he forged ahead, farming in that state and later in Iowa, and now is living 
in retirement at Baker, Clay county, having accumulated a comfortable 
competency through his own efforts. He marriefi Minnie Schlede, also a 
native of Germany, and to their union eight children were born, namely : 
Sophia. Emma. Herman, H. C. Fred, Jr.. Martha, Louis and Minnie. 

Herman Possehl grew up on the home farm in Dupage county. Illi- 
nois, being but a child when bis parents removed there from Cook county, 
that state. He received his education in the public schools. As a young 
man he started farming in Franklin county, Iowa, where his family moved 
upon leaving Illinois. There he became owner of eighty acres, which he 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 339 

farmed until in February, 191 1, when lie sold out and came to Minnesota. 
He bought one hundred and sixty acres in section 6, Barnesville township. 
Clay county, and there he has since been successfully engaged in general 
farming and stock raising, and has since added another quarter section 
of land to his fine farm, in the same section. He also conducts a dairy, 
the output of which is constantly increasing. His place is well improved 
in every respect and he is regarded as one of the progressive general farmers 
and stock men of his township. 

Mr. Possehl was married in 1894 to Emma Hopkey, a native of this 
country, who was educated in the common schools. She is a daughter <if 
John and Minnie Hopkey, of Latimer, Iowa. Three children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Possehl, namely: Walter, Herman, Jr.. and Aleda. 

Politically, Mr. Possehl is a Republican and is at present a member of 
the board of supervisors of Barnesville township. He is a member of 
the German Lutheran church, in which faith he was reared. While living 
in Franklin countv, Iowa, he was assessor of his township. 



JOHN F. YOUNG. 



land 



bjhn F. Young, an energetic and substantial farmer, also renter ot 

and engaged in general farming, is a native of the Empire state, but 
has been a resident of Clay county for the past fourteen years. He is the 
son of John and Ann (Miller) Young, both of whom were natives of Eng- 
land and who left that country while yet young and came to the United 
.States. 

[ohn Young was born in England in 1838 and some years later immi- 
grated to the United States and went to Cortland county, New York, and 
there spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring about twenty- 
five years a.go. He was married to Ann Miller, who was also a native of 
England and who came to this country when a young girl. They were 
married in Cortland, New York. Mrs. Young died in the fall of the year 
1916. They were the parents of the following children: Wilfred, living; 
Jennie and Anna, deceased ; Ella, married ; Rose, married : \\'illiam, deceased : 
Henry, John and Nancy, the latter also deceased. 

lohn F. Youn.g, the subject of this sketch, was born in Cortland county. 
New York, in 1874. He was educated in the public schools and early 
decided to follow the V\ie of a farmer. He came to Minnesota in 1903 and 



_^4" CLAV AM) XOKMAN' COL" NTUCS, iM IXXICSOTA. 

immediately proceeded to rent some land in Clay county. He succeeded in 
his early venture and later ac(|uired a tract of land by purchase and is now 
the owner ot one hundred and fifty acres of choice land, in addition to which 
he rents three hundred and twenty acres. Me carries on general farming, 
including the cultivation of potatoes, and since the commencement of his 
operations he has lieen most successful, everything about his farni being in 
excellent ccmdition and the inipro\ements of modern class. Mr. Young 
contemplates raising Red Tolled cattle and success in this line is also pre- 
dicteil for him. 

In August, K)Oo, John 1-'. \ nung was united in marriage to Christina 
Larson, who was burn in Olmsted county, .Minnesota, in 1879. To this 
union the following children have been born : Ruth. Robert, Arthur and 
Helen. Mr. "N'oung takes a good citizen's interest in local civic afifairs and 
in the general aftairs of the community, but has never been a seeker after 
political office. i)referring to devote his time to his agricultural interests. 



AIT.UST F. HOPPE. 



August 1'. i ioppc. one of the progressive young fanners of .Mliance 
township. Clay county, the owner of a quarter section of fine land adjoining 
his father's place in that township, is a native son of Minnesota and has 
lived in this state all his life. lie was born at \\'inona in 1884, a son of 
.\ugust and Augusta Hopjie, natives of Germany, the former of whom was 
burn in iS5(>. who came to this country with their family in the early 
eighties and settled at Winona, this state, where they lived until about 
iX()5, when they came up intcj this part of the state and settled in Clay 
county, where they ha\e since made their home. August Hoppe is the 
owner of a half section of land in Alliance township and has developed 
a line bit of farm property there, his place being well improved and [)rofit- 
,ibly cultivated. His son .\ugust owns a quarter of a section adjoining, 
the [ilaces being in sections 20 and 21. .August Hoppe and wife have 
nine children. \\'illiam. I'red. Charles. I'rank. John. August. Bertha, .\nnie 
and Ida. Of these, Fred. /\ugust. Annie and Bertha are married. 

August 1'. Hoppe was about eleven years of age when his parents 
settled in Clay county and his schooling was completed in the .schools of 
his home neighborhood. From the days of his boyhood he was a valued 
aid in the laljors of improving and developing the home place and in time 



CLAY AND XORMAX COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 34I 

liecame the owner of :i ()uarter of a section of land atl joining his father's 
farm and since his niarrias^c in 1911 has made his home there. He has 
a modern house on tlie place and his well-kept farm plant is in keeping 
with the same, exer^'thing being up-to-date and indicative of the progressive 
spirit of the owner. Of late he and his father have been giving consider- 
able attentinn to potato culture and im his farm in the summer of 1917 
he had out aJiout twenty-hve acres of potatoes, while his father had out 
fortv acres. 

In [91 I .\ugust !•'. Hoppe was united in marriage to Charlotte Ernst, 
who was born in Clay county in 1891, and to this union two children ha\e 
been born, Harry and Louise. Mr. and Mrs. Hoppe have a very pleasant 
home anrl take a pro])er ]);u"t in the communitv's general social affairs. 



HAK.W OLSON. 



I lakan Olson, a well-known and progressive farmer, owner of a fine 
fa'-ni of one hundred and sixty acres in section 22, Rixerton township, this 
county, is a native of the kingd<im of Sweden, but has l)een a resident of 
this country fnr thirty years, or since 1887. He was born in Sweden in 
1866 and is a son of Ole H. and Anna Olson, also natives of the same 
coimtry and in which the_\- spent all their li\es. 

Ole H. Olson was born in Sweden in 1822 and was educated in the 
public schools of his native place. He was engaged throughout his active 
life as a farmer and died sevetiteen years ago, in 1900, at the age of seventy- 
two years. His wife, Anna ( )lson also was a native of Sweden, born 
there in 1833, aufl w;is educated in the schools (jf her home neighborhood. 
She died in 1903. at the age of seventy years. Ole H. Olson and wife 
were the parents of two children, Anders and Hakan. The parents of 
these children were members of the Swedish Lutheran church and took 
a proper interest in the affairs of same, active and influential residents of 
the district in which tliey lived. 

Hakan Olson was educated in the schools of his native Sweden and 
was reared on his father's farm. From boyhood he was a valuable assistant 
to his father on the farm and continued thus engaged up to 1887. In 
the latter year he left the old country and immigrated to the United .States, 
and on his arrival proceeded on out to b'argo. He began working for 
himself at farm lalxir, saving all the money possible with the view of 



34- CLAY AXD XOKMAX Ci IL' NTIKS. MIXXESOTA. 

acquiring- land ftir liiniseit. In this latter purpose he was successful and 
settled on his present farm eleven years ago. He is now the owner of 
one hundred and sixty acres of excellent land in section 22, Riverton town- 
shi]i, on which he carries on general farming', and since the commence- 
ment of his operations he has been very fortunate, everything about his 
farm disclosing an air of pros])erity. Mr. Olson has carried out a syste- 
matic series of improvements on his place and in the summer of 1917 
remodeled the dwelling- from the foundation up. 

In 1002 Hakan Olson was united in niarriage to Freda Knutson. who 
was born in Sweden in 1879. Mrs. Olson came to this country when about 
nine years old and later catne to reside in this county, her marriage taking- 
place at Moorhead. To Flakan Olson and wife the following children have 
been jjorn : John, Clara. Adolph, Olof, .\nnic, Henry, Herman and Lilly, 
;iil uf whom are living at home with their parents. The Olson family are 
members of the Swedish Lutheran church and are warmly interested in the 
aiTairs of the same, as well as in all the general community interests of the 
district in which they li\e. ^Ir. Olson takes a good citizen's part in the 
public and civic welfare of the township, but has nexci- been a seeker r.fter 
]>o!ilical office. 



KLLIXG HAUG. 

Elling- Haug. a well-known and substantial farmer of Keene township, 
owner of two hundred and twenty acres of splendid farming land, engaged in 
raising a fine grade of Shorthorn cattle, former supervisor of the towuiship 
and former clerk of the school board, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, 
but had been a resident of this county since he was nineteen years old. He 
is a son of Gilbert and Gunel Haug, both "natives of Norway and who were 
111' the farming class in that country. 

Gill)ert Haug, who died many years ago, at the age of sixty years, spent 
all his life in Norway, where he was a farmer, holding rented land. After 
the death of Gilbert Haug. his widow. Gunel Haug, came to America, about 
1S77, accompanied liy ;i brother and two sisters, and proceeded to the state 
of Minnesota, locating in the southern part of Minnesota, where she lived for 
one year. She then moved to Ulen township, Cla\- county, and took a home- 
stead f)f one hundred and sixty acres in section 18, and lived there up to the 
time of her death in 1889. Gilbert ;uid Gunnel Haug were the parents of 
tlie following children: Carrie, deceased: Maria, who died in 1915; Elling, 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 343 

ilu- subject of this sketch; Erick, married, wlio hves in section 2 of Keene 
township, and is the father of ten children; Mrs. Lizzie Broset, who hves in 
Ulen township, and Thea, who is married and Hves in Twin Valle3^ 

On arriving^ in this county Elhng Haug took charge of his mother's 
Immestead farm and worked it until the death of the mother, when it was 
sold. Later, he decided to begin farming life on his own account and home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres in section 2, Keene township, and im- 
mediately proceeded to the task of preparing the land for cultivation and 
soon had things going in good shape. Mr. Haug erected all the buildings 
to be seen on the place today and carried out many improvements, finally 
bringing the place up to a standard not surpassed in the township. He later 
bought an additional sixt_\' acres in section 3, of the township, improving the 
farm and bringing it up to date, and is now the owner of two hundred and 
twenty acres of choice land and on the two holdings is engaged in general 
farming and in the raising of .Shorthorn cattle. 

lulling Haug was united in marriage to Gurine Grandahl, a native of 
Norway, born there in 1863, who came to this country alone at the age of 
twenty years. Her parents lived and died in Norway. Mr. and Mrs. Haug 
are the parents of six children, namely : Mabel, living in Viding township ; 
Gena, working at Devil's Lake : Eline, at home : Emma, working at Devil's 
Lake, and Gilman ;ind Clarence, at home. Mr. Haug is a member of the 
Synod church, of which he acts as treasurer, and formerly served as deacon 
and trustee. He takes a good citizen's interest in public affairs and was clerk 
to the local school board for four years, and served as supervisor of the town- 
ship board for one term. He helped to organize the creamery and co-opera- 
tive store at Ulen and is a stockholder in the same. In all matters appertain- 
ing to the welfare of the community he is ever ready to lend a helping hand 
and is regarded as one of the progressive men of the township in which he 
lives. 



OLE M. STEEN. 



Ole M. Steen, one of tiie most painstaking farmers of Oakport town- 
ship. Clay countv, was l)orn in Norway, May 12, i860. Mr. Steen grew to 
manhood in Xorwa\- and there attended the common schools, also a military 
training school for officers. Upon completing his course he came to the 
United States in 1882, single, making the long continuous journey to Fargo, 
North Dakota. .Since then he has made his home in Clav countv, Minnesota. 



344 CLAY AXD NOKMAN CiirXTIES. MINXKSOTA. 

JULIUS A. HANSEN. 

Farming has become an exact science and tlie best and Ijriglitesl miniis 
in tlie country have not thought it beneath their dignity to give it the best 
of their efforts and genius. JuHus A. Hansen, of Highland Grove township. 
Clay county, is a type of our better class of farmers, a man who uses 
more brain than brawn in operating his place. 

Mr. Hansen was Ixjrn in Henry county, Illinois, October 20, 1876, 
a son of !''red and Anna (Johnson) Hansen, jjoth natives of Denmark. The 
father came to America with his parents in 1868, the family locating in 
Hcnr}- county, Illinois, where they resided until 1879, when they remo\e«l 
to Seward county, Nebraska, taking uj) a homestead on wliich the parents 
of Fred Hansen spent tKe rest of their lives. The father was a tailor l)y 
trade and followed that trade in Denmark, but after coming to the United 
States he followed farming. His name was Hans Hansen and he married 
.Marn Stena Beck. They were both natives of Denmark. Anna Johnson, 
mother of the subject of this sketch, was a daughter of Hans Christian 
Johnson and wife, also natives of Denmark, where the mother's death 
occurred. The father later came to .America and died in Nebraska. Their 
daughter, .\ima Johnson, was nine years old when her father brought her 
to America, in 1868. They located in Henr}- county. Illinois, where the\ 
resided until 1880. when he moved to Seward count), Nebraska, where he 
.spent the rest of his life. He was a farm laborer. The paternal grand- 
father was a soldier in the Danish army and fouglit in the war between 
his country and Germany. 

i'he i);irents of the subject of this sketch were married in Illinois and 
from there, in 1879, moved to Seward county, Xebra.ska, where the mother's 
death occurred in 1882, and where the father spent the rest of his active 
life engaged in farming. However, he farmed in Kansas for a while. He 
returned to Denmark in 191 3. where his death occurred. Two. children 
were Iwrn to Fred and .\nna (Johnson) Hansen, namely: Julius A., the 
subject of this sketcli. and Rosa. After the death of his first wife, Fred 
Hansen married Mrs. Margaret (Hansen) Johnson, a native of Denmark. 
who had one child, Emma Johnson, Ijy her former husband. She bore her 
second hu.sband five children, Rudolf. Fred (deceased). May. Walter and 
Harold. 

Julius A. Hansen grew up on the farm in Seward county, Nebraska, 
having been but six years of age when his parents moved there from Illi- 




.TIT.TIS A. TIANSKX AND FAMILY. 



THE NT 
PUBLIC 'i... 



ASTOR, LENOX 

TTLDEN fO':r:DATinNSj 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 345 

nois. He \\orkecl on the farm during the crop seasons and attended the 
common schools in the winter time. .Vs a yomig man he engaged in farming 
in Seward county, Neljraska. for himself, remaining there until the fall of 
1914, having made a decided success along general lines of mixed farming 
and stock raising. L'pon coming to Minnesota from Nebraska he located 
on his present farm in Highland, ()ro\'e t<i\vnship, Clay county. ])urchasing 
there one of the choice farms of the township, the same consisting of four 
hundred acres, which is well improved and on which he is carrying on general 
farming and stock raising with very gratifying results. 

On March 17, 1897, -^I''. Hansen was married to f'llsie Nelson, who 
was born in Henry county, Illinois. She is a daughter of Rasmus and 
Caroline (Palle) Nelson, both natives of Denmark, from which country 
they came to America, single, each coming alone, the father in 1869 '"'"■' 
the mother about 187J. They were married in Henry county, Illinois, and 
continued to reside there until 1894, when they removed to .Seward county, 
Nebraska, where they still live. They followed general farming until retir- 
ing some time ago. They now reside in the town of Cordova. Rasmus 
Nel.son is a son of Nels ;ind FJsie Jensen, both natives of Denmark, where 
they lived and died. The parents of Mrs. Rasmus Nelson also lived and 
died in Denmark. Two children, a son and a daughter, were born to Rasmus 
Nelson and wife, namely : Axel and Elsie. 

To Julius A. Hansen and wife eight children have lieen liorn: Alfred. 
Clarence, Anna, Arthur, Josei)h, Harvey, Elmer and Hazel. The Hansens 
are members of the Lutheran church. Politically Mr. Hansen is a Repub- 
lican. 



HAROLD O. WOLDAHL. 

Tlie tiller of the soil who has a true vision of twentieth-century farm- 
ing will utilize every acre of his land, raise a good grade oi live stock, 
purchase labor-saving machinery and will make his surroundings attractive 
in a general way. Then he will experience the full reward of his labors. 
Such a man is Harold O. Woldahl. of Goose Prairie township. Clay county. 

Mr. Woldahl was born in Norway on August 20, 1839. He is a son 
of Ole and Bertha (Woldahl) Roeros, and took his mother's maiden name 
upon coming to America.' His parents were natives of Norway, where 
they grew up, married and resided all their lives. The father died in 
1887, when past the age of seventy years. He owned two farms and en- 



346 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

gaged in fanning all his life. His wife, who was his junior b)- two vears. 
died the day following his death. To these parents eight children were 
born, namely: Jens, who died in Sweden in 191 5; Johanas, who lives on 
one of tlie farms which the father left in Norway ; Ole, who lives on the 
other farm which the father left; Berge, who is living with Ole; Johanna, 
who died when sixteen years old ; Elizabeth, now deceased, was a twin, 
the other child dying in infancy, unnamed; Harold, of this review, is the 
youngest of the family. 

Harold O. Woldahl spent his boyhood in Norway and was there edu- 
cated. He worked on the home farm with his father until 1881, when 
he immigrated to America and located in Blue Earth county, ^Minnesota, 
where he worked out as a farm hand. He then came to Clay county, 
arriving at Hawley on l-^ebruary 2, 1882. He worked for his cousin there 
for over a year, and in the spring of 1883 went to Otter Tail county, rented 
a farm, and while there was married. In the fall of 1883 he came to Goose 
Prairie township, Clay county, and bought the farm on which he now 
lives, his land lying in sections 31 and 32. He also owns land in section 
6, Highland Grove township. His excellent farm is well improved in every 
respect, all the improvements ha\ing been made by himself. His place 
consists of three hundred and twenty-three acres. He has been quite suc- 
cessful as a general farmer and stock raiser and makes a specialty of raising- 
Shorthorn cattle. 

Mr. Woldahl was married in Otter Tail county on May 23, 1883, to 
Merian Salvevold, who was born in Norway on March 16, 1858. She spent 
her girlhood there and attended the common schools. She came to America 
with her ])arents in 1880. the family locating on a farm in Otter Tail county. 
Minnesota, where the father took up a homestead, buying a right, and there 
establishefl a comfortable home and spent the rest of his life engaged in 
general farming, dying in 1890 at the age of sixty-five years. His widow- 
still lives on the old homestead there and is now (1917) seventy-nine years 
old. Nine children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Woldahl, namely: 
Berdia. who was Ijorn in 1885; Oscar, who is living on a rented farm one 
mile east of where his father resides: Johanna, who died in June. 1907: 
Edward, who li\es in Montana: John, who died in November, 1911 ; Minnie, 
who lives at home; Louis and Christ (twins), at home, and Malven. 

Politically, Mr. Woldahl is independent. He has been a member of 
the township board for many years and he also served as road boss several 
}-ears. He and his family belong to the Uniteil Lutheran church and he 
was formerlv a trustee of the same. 



CLAY AXD XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA, y ' 347 

LUDVVIG A. OPSAHL. 

Most farms succeed in spite of certain weaknesses. Some of these weak- 
nesses can be corrected ; others are due to conditions that cannot be im- 
proved, such as naturally poor soil, short growing seasons, steep hills and 
various things. No better example of a good general farmer than Ludwig 
A. Opsahl could be fimnd in Ulen township, Clay county. 

Mr. Opsahl was born in Norway, September 27, i860. He is a son 
'if .\ndrew and Anna (Larson) Peterson, both natives of Norway, where 
the^• grew up, married and, in fact, spent all their lives. They have been 
deceased many years. The father was a carpenter, and followed that trade 
during his active life. To the.se parents the following children were born: 
Lduisa, the eldest, who came to ,\merica when young and has remained in 
this country; Ludwig .\., the subject of diis sketch, and Maria, Olena and 
Christian, who are living in Norway, where they have always resided. 

Ludwig A. Opsahl spent his boyhood in Norway and there attended the 
common schools. He set sail for the shores of the new world in 1881, when 
twentv-one years old, and upcjn his arrival at port proceeded on out to Min- 
nesota, arriving at Red Wing in June of that year and at once began working- 
near there as a farm hand. He remained in that vicinity until 1886, in which 
vear he moved to L'len townshij). Clay county, and bought a relinquishment 
to a quarter .section, and later homesteaded the same. To this he later added 
eighty acres just across the road from his original holdings and also pur- 
chased one hundred and si.xty acres in section 7 of LJIen township. Mr. 
Opsahl has placed all his land under an excellent state of cultivation and im- 
provement, including the erection of a large modem home and numerous out- 
buildings, and has bv infinite effort and patience transformed the wild prairie 
into choice farming land. He set out a large grove when he first came here, 
which is now very attractive. He engages in general and mixed farming, 
raising a large (|uantity of grain ;uuuially; also prepares large numbers of 
cattle and hogs for market and makes a specialty of raising a good grade of 
Percheron horses. He handles Shorthorn cattle. 

In 1886 Ludwig .\. Opsahl was married to Elena Johnson, who was 
liorn in Norway, from which country her mother brought her to Minnesota 
when she was five years old, settling at Red Wing. She is a daughter of John 
and Sarah (Borstad) Melha, natives of Norway, where they grew up, mar- 
ried and established their home and where the father died when compara- 
livelv young, after which his widow lirought her children to the United 



34^ CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, M 1 N NK.SOTA. 

States. She remarried in Kcd Wing, this state, lier second hnsband heint; 
John Tildon. They i-emo\-ed to Norman county in the fall of 1881, Air. 
'J'ildon taking u|) a homestead there of one hundred and sixty acres in Home 
T.ake township, where he still lives, his wife, the mother of Mrs. Opsalii. 
d\ing (here a number of years ago. Slie had one cliild h\ her last liusband, 
Julia 'J'ildon. Seven children, all living, have been born to Air. and Airs. 
Opsahl, iiamel) : .\dolph. Joseph, Lewis. Rachael, Selma. Ole and Inez. 

I'olitically, Air. Opsahl is a Republican. He served as a member of the 
townsliip board several years ago and has been township chairman since 191 5. 



L. O. TORSTKXSON. 



Life is where things arc born and live and grow. (3n tlie farm is real 
life. It is not to be found in the city. Realizing this when young L. O. Tor- 
stenson. a farmer of Cromwell township. Clay county, took up agricultural 
pursuits and he has always been contented with his environment. 

Mr. Torstenson was born in Fillmore county, Alinnesota, and he is a 
son of Ole and Anna (Larson) Torstenson, both natives of Norway, where 
they grew up, were married and continued to make their home until 1S67. 
when they immigrated to America, locating in I'illmore county, Minnesota, 
where they lived on a farm until 1873, when they removed to Douglas county, 
this stale, where they spent the rest of their lives on a farm, the father dying 
in 1S83 and the mother in H)ii. To these parents six children were born, 
named as follows, and ail still living: Tosten O., L. O.. Belle, Otto, Knut. 
and Gulick. 

L. O. Torstenson grew to manhood on the home farm in Douglas county, 
and there he attended the district schools. He worked hard when a boy, as- 
sisting his lirolliers with the general work on the home farm, for when he 
was ten years old his father was killed in a runaway accident and the labors 
of developing the home farm fell on the brothers. Later L. O. Torstenson 
took charge of the farm and continued to operate it until 1897, in which 
vear he purchased the farm on whicli he now lives, consisting of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres. By perseverance and good management he has pros- 
pered a,s a general farmer and stock raiser and has added to his original hold- 
ings until he now has a total of two hundred and forty acres. However, he 
did not begin im[)r(iving his farm at once after coming to Clay county, but 
w orked out and rented land, for five years. Since about 1902 he has engaged 



CLAY -\XD XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. T,^g 

I 

in farming for himself on his own land. In connection with general and 
mixed farming he specializes in potato growing, planting a large acreage 
every year. He was formerly one of the stockholders and for two years a 
director of the I'anners' Elevator Company at Hawley. He is also a stock- 
holder in the Rollag Telephone Company at Rollag, also a stockholder in 
the Equity J'acking I^lant in Fargo. He is financially interested in the 
Xorthwestern Hospital in Moorhead. 

Politically. Mr. Torstenson is a Republican. He has served ten years 
consecutively as treasurer of the local school district and is still holding that 
])osition. He is unmarried. 



JOHX G. STICEN. 

It is a pleasure to look over a well-kept and productive farm like that 
owned by John G. Steen, of Spring Prairie township, Clay county, where 
he has long been regarded as a representative citizen and a man of many 
commendable traits, a useful and highly respected gentleman. 

Mr. Steen was born in Honefos. Norway, in 1864. and there he grew to 
manhood and attended school. He came to America, single, in 1882, and 
located first at Lake Park, Minnesota, from which point he traveled for the 
Xorlhern Pacific l'"lcv;itor Conipanx-. with which he remained seven years, 
.gi\ing the firm entire satisfaction and doing much to increase the business 
and prestige of the same. He then came to Spring Prairie township, Clay 
innnty, and wiih the exception of two years, during which he was engaged in 
tin- niercrmtile business in Sjiokane, Washingtcjn, has l)een here continuously 
e\er since 1897. living on his present farm all the while. Through hard work 
and perseverance he developed a fine farm from the raw prairie, and, adding 
lo his original farm, he now has three hundred and twentv acres of well- 
impri)\-ed land, nn wliich he has been very successful as a general farmer. 
He makes a specialty of raising Holstein cattle. 

Mr. Steen was married in Clay county to Bertha Thuney, a native of 
Goodhue count}', this state, and a daughter of Erick Thuney. They have 
iinly one cliild, I'.dwin Sleen, whose birth occurred on October 15, 1887. He 
grew up on the home farm and was educated in the ])ublic schools and in the 
State Xormal at .Moorhcad. He has remained on the homestead with his 
father and assists with the operation of the farm. He was married in 1910 
to I'jniK- Hougi-nd. who was l)orn in l"illniorc count\-, .Minnesota, and a 



350 CLAY AXD NORMAN CdVNTIES, .MINXESOTA. 

(laughter of Ole Hougnid. To this union two children have been born, 
Jarvis and Bernard Steen. Politically. John G. Steen is a nienihcr of the 
Nonpartisan League. He has served as township a.ssessor. 

Gulbrand Larson and wife, parents of the subject of this sketch, spent 
their entire lives in Norway. Four chililrcn were torn to them, naniely : 
Mary, who lives in Grand I'orks. .North Dakota; Mollie, who died in Moor- 
head, Minnesota; Carrie, who lives in Xorway, and John G., the subject of 
this sketch. F.rick and Martha Thuncy, parents of Mr. Steen's wife, were 
born in Norway, from which country they came to .\merica, locatiijg in 
Goodhue county. Minnesota, later moving to Clay county, where the mother 
is still living, the fatlier ha\ ing died some years ago. They were the parents 
of the following children : .\nna. Jacob. Ole. John. Susan. Minnie. Ik-rtha. 
Ida. l>ick and Julia. 



NILS A. kii:lstad. 



Nils A. Kjelstad. a farmer of Highland Grove township. Clay county, 
was born in W'armland, Sweden. November 4, 1870. Me is a son of .Andrew 
and Stena (Nelson) (lunderson. both natives also of the above-named local- 
ity in Sweden, where they grew to maturity, were married and established 
their home. There the mother's death occurred, after which the father 
immigrated t(j .\merica in 1880 and located at once in Highland Grove town- 
ship. Clay county, Minnesota, taking up a homestead of one hundred and 
sixty acres in section J9. lie was one of the pioneers of that locality and by 
hard work and perseverance he improved a good farm, which he continued to 
operate until about 1907, when he moved to Pelican Lake, in Becker county, 
this state. Two of the children by his first marriage arc living at this writ- 
ing, namcl}- : Nils A. and (iust. After locating in Clay county, .Andrew 
Ciunderson marrietl Ida Hammer, a native of \\'armla!id, Sweden, from 
which country she came to Minnesota when young. Tiirce children, all 
living, have been liorn to the second marriage. namcK': P.milia, the wife 
of L. R. Willis, and Fred and Oscar. 

Nils A. Kjelstad si)ent his childhood in Sweden, where he attended school 
for awhile, but received most of bis education in Clay county, being ten 
years oKl when his father brought him to .\merica. He assisted with the 
general work on the homestead and as a young man began farming for him- 
self, buying one hundred and seventy acres in 1894, in Highland Grove 
township. He at once began actively farming the same and soon had the 



CLAY AMj NOkMAX COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 35I 

land under a fine state of cultixation and improvement, erecting an excellent 
group of buildings, setting out a grove, etc. He transformed the bare 
prairie into one of the most desirable farms in the township, and has contin- 
ued to reside on the place to the present time, successfully engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising. Mr. Kjelstad helped organize the Farmers" 
l^levator Company at Hawley, the Farmers' Co-operative Creamery at Haw- 
lev, and the Rollag Telephone Company, and has been a stockholder in all 
three since their organization. 

In 1892 Nils A. Kjelstad was married to Anna M. Dahl, a native of 
Norway, where her parents lived and died. She came to Minnesota in early 
life. To this union has iieen 1)orn one child, Inga. 



FIDELIS MAROUART. 



One of the thrifty farmers of Georgetown township, Clay county, is 
Fidelis Marquart, who was born in Wittenburg, German}', September 23, 
1869. He is a son of Albin and Ludvicka (Stoehr) Marquart, both natives 
of Germany, where they grew up, married and established their home. The 
father was a soldier in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, and died a few 
months after his discharge from the army, his death being due to exposure 
during the war. In the spring of 1873, the mother of the subject of this 
sketch, accompanied by Iier father, Mr. Stoehr, brought her children to 
Canada, locating in the province of Ontario, but came on to Moorhead, Clay 
county, Minnesota, in 1874, and the following year moved to Georgetown 
township. In May, 1874, the mother remarried, her second husband being 
Jacob Wambach, of Ontario. Upon coming to Georgetown township he 
bought a farm in section 32. where he engaged in general farming until 
in March, 191 5, when he retired from active life and moved to Moorhead 
where he and his family now reside. 

To Albin Marquart and wife two children were born, I'idelis and Lena. 
The mother bore her second husband nine children, Joseph, Frank, Matthew. 
Carl Nicholas, Alphonse, Edmond. Catherine, Josephine and Afarie. They 
have one adopted son. named John. 

Fidelis Marquart was about four years of age when his mother brougiit 
him to Ontario, Canada. He grew to manhood in Clay county, Minnesota, 
and the first school he attended was in the old Hudson Bay building in 
Georgetown township, and later he was a student in tlic first school house 



35-; CLAY AND NdK.MAN COUNTIES. MINNKSOTA. 

Imilt in tliis townsliip. He worked on tlie home farm wlien a youny man. 
assisting to develop tlie virgin soil of the prairies into productixe liekls. 
On February 23, 1897, he married Mary Fahnlender. a daughter of Leonartl 
and Augusta (Guide) Fahnlender, who were early pioneers of Cass county, 
North Dakota, where they established their future home on a farm, and 
the following children were born to them; Joseph I'., John A.. Philip L., 
I'rank X., Catherine, Elizabeth and Alary, wife oi the subject of this sketch. 
In March. 1897, shortly after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Marquarl 
moved to their present farm of forty-seven and forty-two one-hundredths 
acres, in section 23, Georgetown township, on which their dwelling and farm 
buildings stand. They also own one lumdred and twent\' acres in section 
29, just across the road. Their home is near the townsite. Mr. Mar- 
quart has been successful as a general farmer and stock raiser and is paying 
more attention each year to stock raising and the dairy business. He has 
served thirteen years as township clerk and about seven years on the local 
school board. He has seven children. Leonard. Joseph, Eugene. Walter, 
.\Ibina, Magdalen and Frances. 



NELS THOMPSON. 



Nels Thomson, of Spring Prairie township, one of the scientilic farmers 
of Clay county, was bom in Sweden, September 2j, 1857. He is a son 
of Thomas and Asrena (Swanson) Parson, natives of Sweden, where they 
grew- up, were married and established their home; in fact, spent all of 
their lives there. The mother died in early womanhood, but the father 
survived to an advanced age, dying about the year 1915. To these parents 
seven children were born, all of whom are living at this writing, namely : 
Pehr. Elizabeth. Nels. Lena, Tilda, Nellie and .Axel. 

Nels Thompson spent his boyhood in Sweden, where he attended the 
public schools and where he made his home until 1882. when he crossed 
the Atlantic to the great western republic, locating first in North Dakota, 
w here he worked at different places, in railroad service. During this period, 
while not actively at work, he made his headquarters in Moorhead, Minne- 
sota. He followed railroading for about ten years for the Northern Pacific 
and the Great Northern and was section foreman at different places, mostlx' 
between Moorhead and various points in different directions. He saved his 
wages and in 1894 began fanning, but still continued to maintain his home 







3 

75 



3 



73 

1^ 







•TTf'l--' 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 353 

in Moorhead : but in 1896 moved lo his farm, the place he now occupies 
in Spring Prairie township. Although he owns but eighty acres he usualh' 
farms four hundred and eighty acres. He has erected substantial buildings 
and made other improvements on his land, including the planting of a large 
grove. The land was only a bare prairie when he came. He has worked 
hard and managed well and has been very successful as a general farmer 
and stock raiser. He purchased the land from a railroad company. Besides 
his large farming operations he is interested financially in the local tele- 
phone companv and in the Tilyndon creamery, also in the Northwestern 
Hospital at Fargo. 

In the fall of 1889 Mr. Thompson was married to Christina Lindahl. 
a daughter of |ohn Lindahl. a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this 
volume. Mr.s. Thompson passed awa}- in 1909, lea\ing four children, Emma. 
Oscar. Lilie and Thomas, who have received their schooling in the common 
schools of Spring Prairie township. 

Mr. Thompson is a Republican in politics and takes an active interest 
in local public affairs. He has been elected a member of the local school 
board four different times and is still serving, making twelve years in all 
when his present term is completed. He has served five terms on the town 
board and is now serving as a member of the board and is treasurer of the 
same. He is a member of the Lutheran church. 



GUST B.ACKMAN. 



.V pioperK- managed farmers" organization can be used to secure the 
farmers the benefits that "big business" secures from doing things on a large 
scale. Many have the idea that nothing can be done in this line unless 
there is a powerful organization, but this is a mistake — the successful co- 
oiierative enterprises have come from small beginnings. .\n advocate of 
such organizations is Gust Backman. a farmer of Highland Grove tovvn- 
shij). Clay county. 

Mr. Backman was born in S\n eden. December 21. 1858. He is a son 
* of .Vndrew and Cajsa ( Svenson ) Berg, both natives of Sweden, where 
thev grew up, married and made their home until 1881, when they immi- 
grated to .\merica, locating in Clay county, Minnesota, the father intyiiig 
forty acres of school land near the present farm of his son, Gust. He 
(23a) 



354 CLAY AND NORMAN CDUNTIES, MIN'NKSOTA. 

placed the land under cultivation, erected huiklings and there engaged in 
farming the rest of his active life. His wife died there in 1914, after 
which event he made his home with the subject of this sketch until his 
death in 191 6. These parents were members of the Swedish Lutheran 
church. Six children were born to them, as follow ; John, who is the 
eldest; Anna, the wife of Erick Anderson: (hist, the subject of this sketch: 
Mary, deceased: Mrs. Frank Johnson: Johannah, the wife of Ward Connel, 
and Mrs. Louis Dahlgren, the youngest. 

Gust Backman grew to manhood in Sweden, where he attended the 
public schools. In 1878, when twenty years old, he set sail for the shores of 
America, coming directly to Becker county. Minnesota, and he worked out 
as a farm hand at various places for a period of twelve years. He saved 
his wages and in 1891 bought eighty acres from a railroad company in 
Highland Grove township and he has contiimed tu make his home on the 
same to the present time, lie made all imjjrovements on it. erecting a good 
group of buildings and setting out a grove. He has since added another 
eighty and now has an excellent and well-kept farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres. He has carried on general farming and stock raising with 
gratifying results. He helped organize the Farmers Co-operative Creamery 
at Lake Park and has been a stockholder in the same ever since. He is 
also a stockholder in the Lake Park Telephone Company. He has done 
much to encourage the raising of a better grade of live stock in his county, 
and he makes a specialty of raising full-blooded N'orkshire hogs. Owing 
to their superior (|ualities they find a very readv market at fancy prices 
whenever he offers them for sale. 

Mr. Backman was married in 1886 to Emma Olson, who was born 
in Sweden. She is a daughter of Carl and Lottie (Erickson) Olson, both 
natives of Sweden, where they spent their earlier years and married. The\- 
came to the United States when their daughter Lmnia was about eighteen 
months old, about the year 1868. The family located first in Duluth, where 
they spent four years, coming on to Clay county, Minnesota, in 187J. 
locating among the pioneers. Mr. Olson liought railroad land in Eglon 
township, which he improved, establishing the family's future home there 
and where he carried on general farming until his death a numlier of years , 
ago. His widow still lives on the home farm. To these parents three 
children were born, all still living, namely: F.mina, wife of Mr. Back- 
man, the subject of this sketch: Amelia, who is the wife of John Lindberg. 
and .Alfred, who is operating the old home place in Eglon township. 

The union of Gust Backman and wife has resulted in the birth of five 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 355 

cliildren, namely : Amelia, Edith, Esther, Anna and Carl, all of whom 
are living at this writing. Mr. Backman helped build the present Agustana 
Lutheran cluircli in his vicinity. Politically, he is a Republican. 



OLE A. NYBAKKEN. 



Restlessness causes a large number of people to leave their parental 
halls and seek fortunes in distant lands. This is not necessarily the wander- 
lust spirit, which is often indulged in to the detriment of the individual, 
but merely the primitive force urging one to try to better one's condition in 
life. And this is the impulse that led Ole A. Nybakken, and many others 
of his countrymen to cast their lots with the people of Minnesota. 

Mr. Nybakken, who is engaged in farming in Goose Prairie township, 
Clay county, was born in >forway in 1863. He is a son of Andreas and 
Ingeborg Anderson, both natives of Norway, where they grew up, married 
and established their home and where they spent their lives, the father 
dying in 1912 and the mother in 1905. To these parents five children were 
born, Andreas, Jr., Ole, Evan, Christian, who died when twenty-six years 
old, and Andrus. 

Ole A. Nybakken grew to manhood in Norway, where he attended 
the common schools. In 1881, when eighteen years old, he immigrated to 
America, coming on West to Northfield, Minnesota, aufl he worked out as 
a farm hand in that vicinity until 1886, when he returned to Norway, 
s])en(ling one winter there; then returned to America and located in North 
Dakota, where he worked for a land company until 1894, when he came 
to Clay county, Minnesota, Iniying his present farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres — the old homestead, in section 30 of Goose Prairie township. 
Later he bought eighty acres in section 29. He has kept all his land under 
,L fine state of cultivation and improvement, replacing the original buildings 
on the homestead with modern substantial ones. He has been successful 
as a general farmer and stock raiser. He grows large crops of wheat, oats 
and flax, also large quantities of potatoes, having had twelve acres in tubers 
in 191 7. He also keeps a large herd of graded cattle. He is a stockholder in 
the creamery at Hitterdal. 

Mr. Nybakken was married in Minnesota in 1892 to Lizzie VVelo. and 
to their union six children have been born, namely : Ida. who died when 
two years old; Arthur, Oscar, Ernest, Clarence and Otto. They are all 



336 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNKSOTA. 

at iKinie at this writins^'. Mr. Nybakken served as a member of the school 
Ijoard a few year.s. He is a member of tlie I'nited l.utlieran clmrch and 
was formerly a trustee of the same. 



ANDREW OLSON. 



'i"o the honest, pu.shing, hard-working and enterprising farmers i^ due 
the prosperity, wealth and advancement of any community, and to their 
/cal. energy and integrity will its future prosperity be indebted, as it has 
lieen in the pa.st. Among the names that are prominent in agricultural circles 
in the northern part of (lay county is that of .\ndrew Olson, of l-'eltun 
tr)wnship. 

Mr. Olson was born in Ostra W'emmenhog, Malmohus Ian, Sweden, 
October it, i860. He is a son of Olla and .\nna ([-arson) Larson, both 
natives of Sweden, where they grew to maturity, married and established 
their home and where the father is .still residing, now advanced in age. 
He devoted his active life to farming in the crop seasons and working in 
a brewery during the winter months. The mother is deceased, liight chil- 
dren, two of whom died in infancy, were Ijorn to Olla and Anna Larson: 
six are living at this writing, namely. Inga, who lives in Sweden; .Andrew 
()., the subject of this sketch: I^rs, who lives in Sweden: Carl, who lives 
in Millelacs county, Minnesota, and Kerstic and Per, both of w'tioni make 
their home in Martin county, this state. 

Andrew Olson grew to manhood in Sweden and there attended the 
common .schools. He set sail for the shores of the Western reiniblic in 1889. 
proceeding to Chicago, where lie worked in a shop about three months: 
then worked on a farm near that city for six years, working out and renting 
during the last three years of that period. He then came to Minnesota, 
where he farmed on rented land in Martin count\- for six years. In the 
fall of i()02 he came to Spring IVairie townshii). Clay county, where he 
spent one wiiUer. and in the s])ring of 1903 he mo\ed to his ])resent farm 
in h'elton town.shi]). having bought one hundred and .sixty acres tliere in 
the fall of 1901. The land was only slightly improved and there was onl\- 
a small house on it. He put out a grove, erected suitable buildings and has 
made a comfortable living as a general farmer. 

On June 29. 1888, Andrew Olson was married to Matilda So))hia I'alm- 
quist. a native of Grolanda, Skaraborgs Ian. Sweden. She is a daughter 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 35/ 

of Carl and Kariii (Sveson) Palmqiiist, both natives of Sweden, uliere 
they grew up, married and established their home on a farm. The father's 
death occurred there some time ago and the mother is still living there. 
Their family consisted of the following children: Matilda S., wife of the 
subject of this sketch; Josephina, who li\es in Nebraska: Amanda, who lives 
in Sweden : Annie, who lives in Helena, Montana ; Carl Johan, who' makes 
his home in Sweden, and two other children who died in early life. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Olson seven children, all living at this writing, ha\e 
been born : Sellstiiie, .Annie, .Mice, Carl, Ellen, John and Clara. Mrs. Olson 
spent her girlhood in Sweden and there attended the common schools. She 
came to America in 1890. Mr. Olson has served as road boss. When a 
young man in Sweden he was under-military training for some time. 



P. N. RAMSTAD. 



One of the promising young business men of the southern part of Clay 
county is P. N. Ramstad, manager of the Baker Lumber Company at Baker. 
He was born at Ada, Norman county, Minnesota, March 8, 1889, a son of 
Peter and Christina (Skriver ) Ramstad, both natives of Norway, the mother 
born in the city of Christiana. Peter Ramstatl came to America as a young 
man with his parents, the family locating in Vernon county, Wisconsin, 
where he remained until in the seventies when he came to Minnesota, locating- 
at Ada, and there he and his brother engaged in the general-merchandise bus- 
iness for many years, and while living there he was elected register of deeds, 
serving in that office several years. He subsequently moved' to McDonalds- 
ville township, Norman county, where he followed farming until his death in 
1896. He was a memljer of the Norwegian Lutheran church. His famih 
consisted of seven children, Isben L., Carrie V., !'. N., ( )nin, Llla, Sigurd 
and Petra. 

P. N. Ramstad recei\'e(l his early education in the ])ul)lic schools of Ada 
and later studied in the agricultural dejiartment of the University of Minne- 
sota at St. Anthonv Park, St. Paul, .\fter leaving school he workeil with 
the Nonuan count)- surveyor for about three summers. During the winter 
months of that period he attended a business college in h'argo. In July, 1908, 
Mr. Ramstad started in the retail lumber business and was associated with 
the St. .Anthony & Dakota I'^levator Company for three years. He then 
worked for J. J. Ceib at Morris, Minnesota, for eighteen months then spent 



358 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

a year aiul a half at Tintali. in the employ of the Crescent I.uniher Com- 
pany. He was then employed by the Xortz Lumber Company at Brecken- 
ridge. this state, for six mtjnlhs ; then worked for the Knnk Sash and Door 
t'()ni|)an\- at Aliiineapolis for eight months. In April, 191 5, he came to 
I laker as manager of the Baker Lumber Company and has continued here in 
tliis capacity ever since. He knows thoroughly the various phases of the 
lumijer business, and has given eminent satisfaction to the firms with which 
he has ]>een connected, being honest, faithful, industrious, reliable and cour- 
teous to the trade. 

Mr. Ramstad was married in 1914 to .Anna Marie Moebius, a native of 
Minnesota, and a daughter of Frank and Elizabeth (Ritter) Moebius, natives 
of (iemiany. To Mr. and Mrs. Ramstad one child has been born, a son, Carl 
( ). Ramstad. iMaternally, the subject of this sketch is a member of the 
^ eiinien and of the Woodmen. 



LARS L GRINA. 



Lars L Grina. manager, secretary and treasurer of the Stenerson 
Brothers Lumber Company, with head office at belton. Clay county, was 
born at Pelican Rapids. Otter Tail county. Minnesota, June 2, 1876, a son 
of iver O. and Olea L. (Ohe) Gerina. 

Iver O. Grina has been a resident of Otter Tail county for more than 
forty years. Lie was born in Hadeland, Norway, April i, 185 1, and is a 
son of Ole H. and Martha O. (Moger) Grina, natives of the same country. 
The parents of Iver O. Grina came to America in 1854, only a few years 
after their marriage, .\fter crossing the Atlantic, a voyage that covered 
fifteen weeks, the couple took up their residence in Clayton county, Iowa : 
later the father bought a farm there on which he spent twenty years, then 
mo\ed to Otter Tail count)', Minnesota, where he joined his son, Iver O. 
Grina. Ole H. Grina bought two hundred and fifty acres of land, where 
he lived till he died in 1908, he then being eighty-eight years of age. His 
first wife died in 1874, and he subsequently married Betsey O. Hougtvet, 
who is also now deceased. By his first wife the following children were 
l)orn : Hans, who engaged in farming in Otter Tail county, and is now- 
deceased; Ole, a retired farmer of Pelican Rapids, that county; Iver O.. 
father of the subject of this sketch ; Peter, a retired farmer of North Dakota ; 
Martin, who is farming in North Dakota; Ellen, who died in Iowa; Edward. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 359 

who lives in North Dakota ; Alary, the first, and A'lary, the second, both of 
whom died in early life in Iowa, and another child, who died in infancy, 
unnamed. 

Iver O. Grina was reared on the home farm in Clayton county, Iowa, 
and there attended the public schools. When twenty-one years of age he 
came to Minnesota, settling in Trondhjem township. Otter Tail cottnty, pur- 
chasing the homestead owned by his brother, Hans. The land, which was 
only slightly improved, was cleared by Mr. Grina, and in years to come he 
had one of the choice farms of his locality. He subsequently bought one 
hundred and twenty acres of railroad land adjoining the home place. In 
the fall of 1 9 14 he sold his farm there and bought the homestead originally 
owned by his father in Norwegian Grove township, Otter Tail county, but 
he never moved to the place, renting it to his son, Joseph. Mr. Grina 
retired from active life in March, 1914, and moved to Pelican Rapids, 
Minnesota, where he has erected a modern residence. In 1913 he helped 
organize the Erhard State Bank, in which he is a director. Politically, he 
is a Republican, and served as clerk of his school district and as road super- 
visor while living on the farm. He and his wife are members of the 
Lutheran church. 

On July 17, iSjj. I\er O. Grina married Olena L. Ohe, a daughter 
of Lars and Ingebor (Waterud) Ohe, who w'ere among the earliest settlers 
of Erhard Grove township, Otter Tail county. The death of Mrs. Grina 
occurred on February 22, 1914. She was the mother of the following chil- 
dren : Ole, who has lumber interests in Halstad. Minnesota; Lars L., the 
subject of this sketch ; Melvin, who deals in implements, hardware and lum- 
ber in Erhard; Conrad, is manager of the local yard of Stenerson Brothers 
Lumber Company at Borup ; Joseph, who died in infancy ; Joseph, the second, 
who is operating his father's farm ; Inga and Theodore, who are employed 
by their brother. .Mehin. and Emma, wlio is at home with her father in 
Pelican Rapids. 

Lars L. Grina. the immediate subject of this sketch, was reared on tlie 
home farm in Otter Tail county, and attended the public schools at Pelican 
I'iapids. As a young man he started to work for the Stenerson Brothers 
Lumber Company, and has Ijeen with this firm since 1895. or during the 
past twenty-three years, starting in at Pelican Rapids, where he remained 
until 1900, when he was transferred to Felton, Clay county, and has l)een 
manager of the company's business there ever since, secretary and treas- 
urer of the company since its incorporation in 1908. He is also the largest 
stockholder in the companv and has been the principal factor in making 



360 CLAY AXi) NORMAX forXTlKS. M 1 N N ilSDTA. 

it one of the best-known and most successful luinl)ci" tirnis in this section 
oi the state. Mr. Grina is a close observer and has thoroughly mastered 
the various phases of the lumber business, keeping well abreast of the timo 
in the same. He established branch yards some time ago at r«orui). Halsiad 
and Erhard, Minnesota, but maintains the managing office at l-'elton. The 
business at each place is rapidly growing under his judicious direction and 
management, a large stock of lumber of all kinds. Icigethcr with the usual 
accessories for builders, being carried. The firm also sells fuel, and farm 
implements and does a large business in each de])artment. The c(jm])any 
is also interested in farming lands, owning six hundred and forty acres of" 
valuable land, on which general farming and stock* raising is carried <iu 
(.■xtensively and successfully. 

Lars 1. Grina was married to I'ansy M. Ciilbert, a native of South 
Dakota. She received her education in the State Nonnal .school of Moor- 
head, Minnesota, and taught school for a numlier of years before she was 
married to Mr. Grina. She is a daughter of Louis and Dorothy (Oker) 
Gilbert, of I'elton, Minnesota. To Mr. and Mrs. Grina three children ha\e 
been born, namelv : Gordon O., .\del Dorothv and Iver F„ 



JOHN" 1..\I1EV. 



John Lahey, a well-known farmer of h'elton lownshi]), Clav count), is 
making a success of his chosen life work. He was born in .Allamakee countw 
Iowa, on December ig, 1858, a son o£v Daniel Lahe\-, who followed farming 
in that count)' for many years in the early days there .and who is now- 
deceased. 

John Lahey grew to manhood on the home farm in his native state, 
assisting with the general work on the .same when a boy, and there he 
attended the district schools. As a young man he turned his attention to 
buying and shipping horses and cattle, being an e.\ce])tionally good judge 
of live stock, and he continued successfully in this line for about fifteen 
years, becoming widely known throughout the Northwest. He shipped large 
numbers of horses and cattle into Norman county when this section of 
the state of Minnesota was being settled and was quite successful in this 
field of endeavor. 

-\l30ut the year 1897 Mr. Lahey Ijought the farm on which he now 
resides in Felton township. Clay county, and there he has made hi< liome 




JOHN LAHEY. 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



> ION? 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 361 

since about 1905. He operates four huudred acres, a part of which he> in 
Felton township. Clay county, and part in Winchester township. Norman 
county. The excellent modern group of farm buildings, which he erected 
himself, are in I'^elton township. The land was a bare prairie when lie 
purchased it. but he has long had it all under a high state of culti\ati(jn. 
He set out a large grove which is now a valuable asset. He has been quite 
successful as a general farmer and stock raiser and has also given his 
active attention to the general business affairs of the community in which 
he lives, being a stockholder in the company which operates the co-operative 
potato warehouse at Borup. a stockholder in the Felton Rural Telephone 
Company and a stockholder in the Equity Packing Plants at Fargo, in 
the affairs of all of which concerns he takes a warm interest. Mr. Lahev 
was reared a Catholic. Politically, be is independent of party, reserving 
his right to vote for the men and the measures he regards as most service- 
;d)le to the public at large. 



.ANDREW CHRISTIANSON. 

Andrew Christiansen, a farmer of Egion township. Clay county, was 
born in Norway in 1870. He is a son of Knut C. and Parnelia (Rassmusson) 
Christianson, both natives of Norway, where the mother now resides, at the 
age of eighty years. The father died in 1896, at the age of sixty-eight years. 
He came to America about thirty-eight years ago and in the spring of 1880 
bought railroad land in Eglon township. Clay county, Minnesota, the ])lace 
on which his .son Andrew, now resides. Here he went to work with a will 
and in due course (jf time had a good farm under culti\ation and a very com- 
fortable home established. He was in the countv about a year before he 
selected a site for his future home, finally buying the place on which he spent 
the rest of bis life. He lived in a log house for a number of years. His 
family consisted of six children, named as follow: Christian, who is mar- 
ried and who lived in Clay county until the autumn f>i 19 16, when he remi>ved 
to Detroit, .Minnesota; Seivert, who is married and lives in Eglon township: 
Andrew, the subject of this sketch : Jacob, who lives on the home farm part 
of the time: Oscar, who 'resides in North Dakota, and Peter, who lives on 
the old homestead with the subject of this sketch. 

-Vndrew Christianson was two and one-half years of age when his 
l)arents brought him to Minnesota. He was reared on the home farm in 
Clav countv. received his education in the district schools, has always fol- 



362 CLAY AND NOKMAN COU XTIiCS. MINNKSOTA, 

luwed farming and has kept the liome farm well improved and well culti- 
vated. He built a new residence in 191 1. Mr. Christiansen owns two hun- 
dred acres in section 21 and forty acres in section 7 of Eglon township. He 
liuilt a large, modern granary in the summer of igij. lie raises a large 
amount of grain and considcraljle li\c stock each year, lie planted a line 
grove some years ago. He raises a large acreage of potatoes each \ear, 
having had out fifteen acres in the summer of 19 17, his land lieing in liif 
great northern potato belt. Mr. Christianson is unmarried. He is a mem- 
ber of the Hesfland X'orweeian Lutheran church. 



JOHN GEORGl'. lM';KKi.\S. 

One of the progressive citizens of Hawley. Cromwell township, is John 
(ieorge Perkins, who has long made his home in Clay county, the interests 
of which he has ever had at heart and sought to promote. He was born 
in I'linthan, Xottinghamshire, England, November 9, 1853. a son of Will- 
iam and Ann (Long) Perkins, both also natives of NottingJiamshire, the 
father born at Flinthan and the mother at Elston. They married in their 
native land, and there they continued to reside until 1873, when they came 
to Minnesota with the first English colony that settled at Hawley. in Clay 
county. Here William Perkins, father of John G., took up a claim of 
one hundred and sixty acres, in the spring of 1873, selecting a good trad 
in section 30 of Cromwell township. He developed the land into a i)ro- 
ductive farm, established a comfortable home and spent the rest of his 
life there. He made all improvements on the place, erecting the buildings 
.and planting a grove, planting the first trees in that neighborhood. He 
also took u]) two tree claims. William Perkin^ harl been a soldier in tlie 
old country, serving as a Yeoman cavalryman in a "Notts" (Nottingham- 
shire) regiment. He was a Methodist and helped organize the first church 
at Hawley. He also helped organize Cromwell township, and was for man\- 
years a member of the township board. He was one of the influential 
men in his locality, always active in public affairs, and was at one time a 
candidate on the Peojjle's party for county commissioner. He was one 
of the best-known and useful pioneers in Cromwell township, and highly 
respected by all who knew him. His family consisted of five children, named 
as follow: John G., the subject of this sketch: Mary Ann and Maria, who 
are both living: Sarah, decea.sed. and Charles, who is living on the old home 
])lace in Cromwell township. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 363 

John G. Perkins grew u[) in England, there attended the puljhc schools 
and Besthorp boarding school and was twenty years of age when lie came 
t(j the United States with his parents. He helped his father start the family 
home in Cromwell township, working hard, as did all sons of pioneer set- 
tlers in those days. In 1876 he began life for himself by pre-empting one 
hundred and sixty acres in section 18 of Cromwell township; later converted 
eighty acres of it to a homestead, and still later homesteaded an adjoining 
fifty-five acres. He also tree-claimed a quarter section in section 8 of the 
same township and now has one of the choice farms of his locality, having 
erected a modern and substantial group of buildings on it, placed it under 
a fine state of cultivation and has set out a large grove, which is now very 
attractive. He has met with much more than mediocre success, all along 
t!ie line, as a general farmer and stock raiser as a result of his perseverance 
and close application. 

In 1884 Mr. Perkins was married to Sarah Jane Harper, who was 
l»irn in Canada. She is a daughter of John Harper, now deceased, who 
moved from Canada to Minnesota, locating at New York Mills, in Otter 
Tail county, where he establi.shed the future home of the family. Thirteen 
children were born to John G. Perkins and wife, namely : John William. 
Elsie May, Annie Maude, Hazel, Eleanor, Frederick Lawrence, Earl, Pearl, 
James, Blanche, all living, and George and Frederick, wlm died young. The 
mother of these children died in 1910. 

Politically, Mr. Perkins is a non-partisan. He was township assessor 
a number of years ago and also was constable in the old days, when there 
was considerajjle lawlessness and when the duties of such an officer were 
much more strenuous than now. He has also served on the local school 
board in various capacities. 



ANDREW L. JELSING. 



Each man who strives to fulfill his part in connection with human 
life and human activities is deserving of recognition, no matter what may 
be the field of his endea\-or, for it is interesting to note the \arying con- 
ditions that have compassed those whose careers are brought to the atten- 
tion of the readers of history. 

An enterprising merchant of the village of Dale. Highland Gros-e town- 
ship. Clav countv. is .\ndrew L. Jelsing. who was born in Dodge county, 



364 Cl..\V AND XOK.M.W C()T■^TII^S. MINNESOTA. 

-Minnesota, March (>, 1870. He is a son of Lars I'ederson Jelsing and Maria 
Jelsing, both natives of Norway. The tatiier came to America in i<S6i, 
leaving liis wife in the old country until he could estahlisii the future home 
111' the family in tlie Xew \\'()rld. After s]>ending two \-ears near .Madison, 
Wisconsin, Lars I'ederson jelsing, in i8()3, returned to Norway, intending 
not to return to America, l)ut he subsequently came back and located in 
Dodge count), .Minnesota. He had not been there long until he was drafted 
for ser\ice in the Civil War. but he iiired a substitute. He brought his 
wife and three sons l^ack to .\iuerica with him. She was .Vnna Bang prior 
to her marriage, and their three children were named as follow: I'eter, 
who is li\ing, and .Martin and I'eder, deceased. The wife and mother died 
in Dodge county, and later Lars I'ederson Jelsing ^married Maria Christensen 
and to that union four children were born, all of vvhom survive at this 
writing, namely: .\ndrew L., the subject of this sketch: Randine, Hannah 
and Louis.i. riie father of these children continuetl farming in Dodge 
county until 1871, when he moved his family t(j Clay coiuits' in a c(j\ered 
wagon and bought railroatl land in Lglon township, on which he established 
the future home of the family : but two years later bought a homestead 
right, just across the line in I'>ecker county, of eighty acres, and li\ed there 
until 1893, later adding to his original holdings until he had a total of three 
hundred and twenty acres. He carried on general farming extensively and 
brought his place up to a high state of improvement. He retired from 
active life in i8()i, but continued to reside there until 1893, and thereafter 
spent the rest of his life among his children. His second wife died in 
1880. In 1883 he made anotiier trip to Norway. He helped organize Lake 
I 'ark township, Becker county, and als(j helped to organize Solum Lutheran 
church in Kglon township. His death occurred in Moorhead on .March 
10. 1908. 

Andrew L. Jelsing grew to manhood on the home farm. He attended 
the district schools and was a student for three years in the State Normal 
at Moorhead, living at home until he was twenty-one years old. He began 
life for himself as a teacher, which profession he followed for five years, 
in l^ecker and CIa\ counties, with marked success. He then took up grain 
bu\ ing at Winnipeg Junction, Cla\ county I which place i^• no longer on 
the map), and continued grain buying, for the most i)art, until the summer 
of 1908. In the meantime he served as justice of the peace and village 
recorder and also was a member of the school board. He helped incorporate 
the village, but when t,he railroad was relaid through the county, missing 
Winnipeg Junction by one mile, the town soon became extinct, its inhabit- 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 365 

ants moving to other places. Mr. Jelsing started the \illage of Dale, in 
Highland Grove township, where he has since resided. He purchased the 
townsite and laid out tlie town, huilt a store and began a general-merchandise 
business, which he has conducted with ever-increasing success to the present 
time, carrying a large and well-selected stock of goods and enjoying an 
excellent trade with the jjeople of the surrounding country. He was actixe 
in securing a postoffice for the town and was appointed postmaster when 
the office was first established, in March, icjio, and has discharged the 
duties of the same ever since. He is a notarv public and is clerk of the 
local school board. He was formerly justice of the peace at Dale. As a 
public servant he has discharged his duties in an able, faithful and acceptable 
manner, always taking a great interest in the affairs of his locality. Politi- 
cally, he is a Republican, and, religiously, he belongs to the Lutheran c!un-ch, 
being active in the work of. the same. 

On February 15, 1898, Mr. Jelsing was married to Lena L. Bjerke. 
a native of Lake I 'ark township, Becker county. She is a daughter of 
the late Lars C. Bjerke, and was liorn on January 29, 1873. Her father 
was one of the early homesteaders of that township. Mr. and Mrs. Jelsing 
have no children of their own, but the\ h.'t\ e ;ui adopted dau.ghter, June 
Jelsing, whom they have had from infancy. 



ED\V.\RI) ,\. TRONNLS. 

Edward .\. Tronnes. a substantial and progressive fanner, and stock- 
man of Hagen townshij), this county, owner of a fine farm of three hundred 
and sixty acres in that township, chairman of the townshiji board and inter- 
ested in public utilities, is a native son of Norway. l)ut has been a resident 
of the Laiited States since he was twenty-two years old, having immigrated 
in 1887. He was born on September 13, 1865, a son of Andrew and Carrie 
(Tronnes) Tronnes, both lx>rn in Norway, where they spent all their lives, 
Andrew Tronnes having been a farmer and engaged at that calling all his 
life. They were the parents of the following children: Andrew. Haaken, 
Edward .\.. Helge, Cornelius. Bertha. Carrie, Annie and an infant daughter. 
They were earnest members of the Lutheran church and their children 
were reared in that faith. 

Edward .\. Tronnes was educated in the schools of X orw ay and as- 
sisted his father in the work of culti\aling the small farm of which the 



366 CLAY AXD XORMAN Ci ir Vlll- s, \l I N N'KSnXA, 

senior Tronnes was the owner. In 1887, at the age of twenty-two years. 
H)(lward A. Tronnes immigrated to America and proceeded out to Min- 
nesota on arrival, locating in Norman county, and bought a homestead rigiu 
to one hundred and sixty acres of land in Home l.akc township and lived 
there five years, hut did not prove up. .\t the end of the latter peri(Hl 
he sold his right in the homestead and then took eighty acres of home- 
stead land in section 20. in llagen township. Clay count\ , and ])ro\ed u|i. 
He carried out manv \ahiahk' improvements and li\ed on that holding for 
about ten vears. at the end of which time he sold out and bought two hun- 
dred acres in liagen township, where he has since li\ed. Some time later 
he added another (piarter section in .section i(). same township, and has 
se\eral substantial buildings on the holdings, including a good barn, which 
Mr. Tronnes erected. ?Ie has also set out a fine grove that adds consider- 
ably to the appearance and value of the jjlace; He is engaged in general 
farming and siuck raising and since the ver\- commencement of his opera- 
tions has prospered, being now accounted one of the must substantial and 
])rogressive farmers in Hagen township. 

Immediately before leaving his native \'orwa\-, in 1887, Edward .\. 
Troimes was united in marriage to Oleanna Olson, also a native of Norw ay 
and a daughter of Ole and Carrie Olsou. who spent all their lives in that 
country. To Mr. and Mrs. Tronnes the following children were born : 
.\lfred, l-llla, Clara, Minnie. Inga. Melvin and .Amanda, all of whom arc 
lixiiig. The Tronnes family are members of the Lutheran church, the 
jewnagers Lutheran church having at its organization had valuable lielj) 
from .Mr. Tionnes. although he was at the time living across the line in 
.Vorman county. 

Mr. Tronnes gives a good citizen's attention to public affairs and he 
has now entered on his first year as township chairman and has been a 
member of the township board for about thirteen years, serving the peojjle 
witli tidelitx and abilitv. He is interested in the l'"armers store and also 
in the Farmers creamery at Ulen. in the organization of which he proved 
a valuable aid. He also assisted in the organization of the local telephone 
company, known as the Ulen and Twin \'alle\- Telephone Company, and in 
other wa\s he has given of his time and energies to the advancement f)f 
all movements calculated to serve the jjublic interests. 

All of Mr. Tronnes' brothers and sisters, with the e.Kcepti(jn uf .\nnie 
and Haaken, remained in Norway. Annie is now Mrs. Martin Tronnes, 
of Wisconsin, whose hu.sband was born in Norway, in which country they 
were married. Haaken was the first of the Tronnes familv to come to .\mer- 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. ^6/ 

ica. He located in Morris county, Minnesota, and in 1S84 came to Xorman 
county and filed on a homestead tract in Home Lake township. Ixit ne\er 
proved up. He later moved to Thief River Falls. Minnesota, and at the 
present time is living in Montana. 



HANS L. NORBV 



c 



Hans L. Norb\-, of Goose Prairie to\\n>hip. Clay county, has made a 
success as a farmer very largely because he has been willing to give up many 
of the old and anticpiated ideas of tilling the soil and has adopted such new- 
ones as were practicable in this latitude. 

Mr. Norby was born in Xorway in 1851, He is a son of Lars and 
Martha Henson, both natives of Norway, where they grew to maturity, mar- 
ried and established their home and where the mother died, in 1858, when 
her son Hans L., was about seven years of age. The father finally came to 
America and spent the last three years of his life at the home of his son. 
the subject of this sketch, where his death occurred in 1907, he then being at 
the advanced age of eighty-eight years. He ow^ned farming land in Becker 
ounty. Minnesota, which he sold when old age incapacitated him for active 
farming. The familv consisted of five children, namely : Hans L., the sub- 
ject of this sketch, the eldest; Mary, a widow, who lives in Xorth Dakota; 
Jens, who also makes his home in .Xorth Dakota; Carrie, deceased, and Ole. 
a resident of South Dakota. 

Hans L. Xorbv grew to manhood in Xorway and there attended the 
common schools. When twenty-three years of age, in 1874, he immigrated 
to the United States and began working out on farms near Mankato and 
.\lbert Lea. Minnesota, .\fter his marriage he worked at the carpenter's 
trade. He came to Cla\ comity and lived a year in Lake Park, then, in the 
fall of 1879, he moved to his present farm in Goose Prairie township, taking 
u]) a homestead of one hundreil and sixty acres in section 14. Mr. Xorljy 
worked hard and applied himself closely and in due course of time had the 
raw land under a fine state of cultivation. He made all improvements, in- 
cluding the erection of a splendid group of buildings. During his residence 
of thirty-eight years on this place he has accumulated a comfortable com- 
petency and is now able to retire from active life, even now (191 7) planning 
to sell or rent his place and move to Hawley. where he has long owned a 
commodious home and a large lot, which has lieen rented out. 



^6X C'l.AV AM) MiKMAN C( )r NTl KS, M 1 X ,\F.S( ITA. 

In 1878. ill Mankato, .Minnesota. Hans L. Norby was married to Anna 
'JlH)reson. wlio was born in Norway in 1852. and who came to America in 
1876 with Mr. .Vorhy's father, two brothers and a sister. To Mr. and Mrs. 
N'orI)v nine ciiildren iiavc l)een i)orn. namely: Theodore, who has a farm in 
.\orth Dakota: Inga. who is married and hves in Colorado: .\ima. who <hed 
in i88c), when four years of age: Albert, who lives at honie : .\lnia the sec- 
ond, who works in North Dakota: Oscar. wh<i is at lionie : i.aura, who i^ 
married and lives in Montana: John, who is married and has a jewelry store 
ill Clear I'.rook. Minnesota, and Nellie, who is at home. 

Mr. Xorby has been supervisor of (loose I'rairie township at intervals 
for twenty years. He belongs to the .Norwegian Lutheran ciiurch, of which 
lie has been a trustee for fifteen years, and has ever given proper attention 
to neighborhood good works. 



k()l!i:kr 1.. SCOTT. 



Some larmers who have cropi)ed their soils from year to year, taking 
everything off and returning nothing, when their crops fall off in yield 
until there are no profits, begin to realize that they will have to adopt ;i 
new systeiu or else abandon their farm. Those who are wise look ahead 
and lake proper steps to ])revent such a deplorable state of affairs from 
ever coming. Robert L. Sc<Jtt is one of the young fanners of Viding town- 
ship. Clay county, who believes in conserving the soil elements, in keeping 
W\< land from ever wearing out. 

.Mr. Scott was born at I'olo, in Ogle county, Illinois, I'ebruary (), 1881, 
a son of |. W. and Bessie ( l.awson) Scott, who remained in Illinois, on 
the home farm. He grew to manhood on the farm near I'olo, assisting 
with the general work on the .same when he became of proper age, and 
received his education in the schools of Polo, graduating from the high 
school there. He remained on the farm with bis parents until he was 
twenty-two vears old. then, in the spring of 1903, lie came to Minnesota 
and located on a farm in Viding townshi]). Clay county, and here he has 
remained to the ])resent time. He operates eleven hundred and twenty 
acres, carrxing on general grain farming and potato raising -on an extensive 
scale, specializing in Red River Valley seed potatoes, which he produces 
in great quantities everv vear. He understands every phase of successful 



CLAY AND NORMAX COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 369 

potato raising and his tine tubers find a very ready market owing to their 
superior quahty. 

On December i8. igo2. Robert I-. Scott was married to Emma Eh'zabeth 
Brantner. who also was born at Polo, in Ogle county, Illinois, and to this 
union three children have been born, Bessie Mabel, Jasper Michael, and 
Joseph Winfield. Mrs. Scott is one of the eleven childern, two sons and 
nine daughters, born to Joseph M. and Anna (Nye) Brantner, both of whom 
were born in Ogle county. Illinois, the former at Polo and the latter at 
Mt. Morris. Mr. Brantner is now a prominent farmer at Lime Springs, 
Iowa. Of the eleven children born trt him and his wife all are living. 

Mr. Scott is an advocate of advanced farming methods and keeps well 
read along these lines. He is vice-president of the Clay County Farm 
Bureau and has done much to make that influential organization a pronounced 
success. He was formerly township supervisor and has also held offices 
on the school board. He is a mem1)er of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Politically, he is a Republican. 



BERNARD F. TENNEY. 

Bernard F. Tenney, cashier and general manager of the First State 
Bank of Ada and for years one of the leading business men of Norman 
county, is a native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Min- 
nesota practicailx all the lime since his childhood. He was burn in San- 
<lusky, Ohio, May i. 1868. son of Major Luman H. and Frances D. 
(.\ndrews; Tenney, natives of that same state, who later came to Minne- 
sota and became prominent and iniluential residents of this part of the 
state in pioneer days. 

Major Luman H. Tenney. who took a very active part in the develop- 
ment of this part of the state during the time of the earh' settlement of this 
-section, was reared in Ohio and was little more than a boy when the Civil 
War broke out. He enlisted as a private in the Secpnd Ohio Cavalry and 
served with that command until the close of the war. being mustered out as 
a brevet major. Upon the completion of his military service Major Tenney 
ni;irried and made his home in Sandusky, Ohio, until 1869, when he came to 
-Minnesota and located at Duluth, where he engaged in the real estate and 
insurance business. In 1872. about the time of the organization of Clay 
(24a) 



3/0 CLAY AND NCIRMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

county as a civic entity, the Major came over to this ]iart of the state and 
located at Glyndon, where he acted as the agent for a Philadelphia company 
in the sale of lands thereabout and also took an active interest in promoting; 
the English colony wiiich settled in that neighborhood. Major Tenney also 
operated a general store at Gl}ndon and started the Xortliern Pacific elevator 
there and at some other points along the line. Ui)on locating there he took 
;i soldier's homestead and later considerably increased his personal land hold- 
ings. In addition to his other and varied interests, Major Tenney gave much 
attention to the general affairs of the community during the period of the 
establishment of a proper social order in that section and served for some 
time as superintendent of schools of Clay county, doing much in that capa- 
city toward the organization of an effective school system in the pioneer 
comnnniitv. His busv and useful career was interrupted in the very prime 
of his life, his death occurring in 1880. he then being thirty-eight years of 
age. Major Tenney was an active and earnest member of the Congrega- 
tional church and was one of the leaders in the organization of a church of 
that denomination at Glyndon. He was an ardent advocate of temperance 
and his inlluence in that direction was fell far and wide throughout this sec- 
liuii in an early dav. Maior -.wA Mrs. Tenney were tlie parents of four 
children. 

Bernard F. Tenney was but an infant when his parents came to this 
state from Ohio and settled at Duluth, and he was but a small child when 
thev presently moved over to Glyndon. There he spent his bo3'hood and 
then was sent East to complete his schooling, attending Oberlin College in 
Ohio and Amherst College in Massachusetts, from which latter institution he 
was graduated in i8go, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. U])on comi)!et- 
ing his schooling Mr. Tenney returned to Glyndon and for a time gave his 
attention to farming interests there, but presently returned to Ohio, where 
he remained until 1903, in which year he came back to Minnesota and with 
his business associates bought control of the Eirst State Bank of Ada and 
was elected vice-president of that concern, being installed as general man- 
ager of the affairs of the bank. Mr. Tenney later was elected cashier of the 
bank and ever since forming connection w'ith the bank has given his most 
earnest attention to the same, long having been recognized as one of the 
leading bankers 6f this part of the state. 

In 1893 Bernard F. Tenney was united in marriage to Sadie A. Sned- 
eker, of Melbourne, Florida, and to that union foyr children have been 
born, namely: Mary Erances, Luman H., who is now (1917) a member of 
the American Ambulance Field Service, serving "somewhere in the Balkans" 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 37I 

in the great ^V(ll■l(l W'ar ; Edward .\., who is serving in the United States 
Marine Corps, serving "somewhere in the United States,"' and William H., 
who is attending scliool at home. Air. and Mrs. Tenney are members of 
the Congregational church, in the various beneficences of which, they take a 
warm interest, as well as in the general social activities of their home cit}^, 
ever helpful in promoting all movements having to do with the advancement 
of the common welfare hereabout. 



OLE D. L.^RSON. 



Ole D. Larson, present president of the village of Hendrum and the 
oldest merchant in point of continuous service in that village, a well-to-do 
dealer in hardware and agricultural implements, may also be regarded as a 
pioneer of Norman county, having been actively identified with the afi^airs 
of Hendrum and vicinit}- since 1882. He was born in Manitowoc county, 
Wisconsin, February 11. i860, son of Lars and Martha ( Johanneson) Knul- 
son, both natives of Norway, who were married in their native land and 
shortly afterward, in 1852, came to the United States, locating at Port 
Washington, Wisconsin, whence, a year later, they moved onto a homestead 
farm in Manitowoc county, that same state, where they remained until 1883, 
when they came over into Minnesota and located on a farm in the neighbor- 
hood of Glenwood, in Pope count}', where they spent the remainder of their 
lives. Mrs. Knutson died in 1906 and Mr. Knutson survi\ed until 191 1. he 
being ninety-three years of age at the time of his death. They were earnest 
members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and their children were reared 
in that faith. There were nine of these children, of whom the subject of this 
^ketch was the sixth in order of birth, the others being Knute (deceased), 
Johannes (deceased), Bertha, Knute, who lives in Canada; Gabriel (de- 
ceased), Lizzie, who lives at Xome, Alaska: Martin and Clara (deceased). 

Reared on a pioneer farm, Ole D. Larson had little opportunity for 
acquiring extensive schooling in his youth. As a young m;ui he learned the 
carpenter trade and for twelve years was actively engaged in building opera- 
tions. In 1882, he then being twenty-two years of age, he had come over 
into Minnesota and up into the Red River Valley to take part in the then 
tlourishing activities of this i)art of the state, and at Hendrum became en- 
gaged as a carpenter. After his marriage in 1891 he established his home 
there and for a while continued his building operations, but in 1892 started 
in business there as a hardware dealer and has ever since been thus enga.ged, 



37- CLAY AND NOKMAN COL' Nil KS. M I NNICSOTA. 

lieing now the oldest mercliant in continuous business in that village. In 
addition to his general line of hardware and agiicultural implements, .Mr. 
Larson carries an excellent stock of furniture and is also the local agent fur 
the sale of the Overland automobile. He holds a claim to a tract of one 
hundred and twenty acres in Koochiching county. Mr. Larson for years 
lias given his earnest attention to local civic affairs, has served as a member 
ul die village council and as treasurer of the village and is now serving as 
president of tlie village, in all his public service having e\ er had at heart the 
best interests of the community which he has helped to build up. At live or 
six terms of court he has served as a member of the jury in Norman countv. 
It was on December 23, i8gi, that Ole D. Larson was united in mar- 
riage to Emma Bye, of Spring Grove, Minnesota, and to this union five chil- 
dren ha\e been born, Alva, lulmond (deceased), Edmond, Arnold and V'iola. 
Mr. and Mrs. Larson are members of the United Lutheran church, in the 
affairs of which they take a warm interest, and Mr. Larson has served as a 
member of the board of trustees, as treasurer and in other capacities as an 
ufHce bearer in the local congregation. 



JOHN LUDWIG SCHEIE. 

The late John Ludwig Scheie, one of the early settlers of Halstad 
township, Norman county, where he was the owner of three hundred and 
sixty acres of good farming land when his death occurred in 1904, was 
born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, December 2; 1855, a son of Andrew and 
Inger Sciieie, both of whom were born in Norway, where they grew up 
and married and who came to America about 1839 or 1840. At first the 
father, who was a cooper by trade, located in Rochester, New York, but 
desiring to acquire some of the new land which was being opened up for 
settlement in the West, gradually worked iiis way with his family in this 
direction and settled for a while in M.cHenry county, Illinois, moving thence 
northward into Wisconsin, settling in Muskego and later in Milwaukee, 
where John Ludwig Scheie was born. The date of the family's residence in 
the latter place was so early that only a few houses comprised the village 
which later has grown into such a metropolis. After a few years of residence 
in Wisconsin, the family moved into Minnesota and located in h'illmore 
county, from which point they later came up into this part of the state and 
settled in Halstad township. Norman county, where tiie parents spent the 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 373 

remainder of their lives. During his residence in Halstad township, Andrew 
Scheie Hved the Hfe of the pioneer that he was, developing his farm and, 
in his later years, preaching the gospel, as he was one of the first Lutheran 
ministers in this section of the country. He and his \vife were the parents 
of seven children, all of whom are dead but Anthony, a sketch of whose 
life appears elsewhere in this volume, the others having been Ellen Christina, 
.Anna, Hannah, Mehina, Caroline and John, the subject of this memorial 
review. 

John L. Scheie was only three years of age when his parents settled 
in Fillmore county, Minnesota, in 1858, and when they decided to come 
northward into Norman county, in 1876, he too, came to this county in the 
same year, in company with B. B. Larson and others from Fillmore county, 
and ' settled a quarter section in Halstad township, where he lived until 
1892. In that year he moved to an adjoining place, where his family still 
resides, and there died .on October 3, 1904, lamented by all who knew him 
as an upright man, a good neighbor, an excellent citizen and a loving parent 
and husband. 

On November 4, 1876, John L. Scheie was married to Bessie Thomp- 
son, who was born in Norway, a daughter of Knut and Bessie (Fossom) 
Fossom, both natives of Norway, who came to America late in life and 
located near Peterson, Fillmore county, Minnesota, on a farm where they 
si)ent the rest of their lives. They were the parents of seven children, 
nanio'y : Gilbert (deceased), Irvine, Tollef, Knut, Ole, Carrie, Ragnild (de- 
ceased) and Bessie. To Mr. and Mrs. John Ludwig Scheie were born three 
children, the eldest of whom is Emilie Bertina, who married Joseph For- 
bra.gcl and has three children ; Lutie, Willis and Lenioine. Mr. Forbragd 
now operates the old Scheie farm. The second in order of birth is Clara 
Albertina, the wife of Ole Strom. They live in Newburg, North Dakota, 
and are the parents of six children, Lester, Irvine, CHfiford, Walter, Morton 
and Orland. The youngest of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Scheie 
is Lottie Jeannette, who lives with her widowed mother on the old home 
place. 

Mr. Scheie, although a very busy man, found time to devote to the 
interests of education in his community, as he served as school clerk for a 
number of years. As a business, he followed well-drilling and for the most 
part hired his farming done. Fie was always concerned with the further- 
ance of the cause of Christianity, even out in the frontier districts of the 
North, as he, in company with his father, who was a pioneer minister, and 
a few others organized the Au.gustana Lutheran church. 



374 CLAV AND NOKMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

JENS FOSS. 

Jens Foss, a well-known and enterprising merchant of Shelly, is a 
native of the kingdom of Norway, but has been a resident of this country 
since he was nineteen years of age. He was born in the city of Drammen, a 
seaport town of Norway, July 2, 1874. son of Erick J. and Rerthine (An- 
derson ) h'ossen, natives of that same country, the former of whom was a 
cari)enter. who spent all his life in his native land. Erick j. i'ossen and wife 
were the parents of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch was 
the second in order of birth, the others being Caroline. Andrew. Bernhardt 
and Anna. 

Reared at Drammen, Jens Foss received his schooling in the schools of 
that city and remained there until he was nineteen years of age. when, in 
I.S93. he came to the United States and located at Portland, over in Traill 
ccuntv. North Dakota, where he secured employment and where he presently 
entered Bruflat Academy, perfecting there his somewhat limited knowledge 
of English. After a while he engaged in the luercantile business at Port- 
land, as a partner in a general store, and after two years, in 1902, catue over 
into Minnesota and started a general store at Shelly, in partnership with 
Carl llorte. also of Portland. In igi2 Mr. Horte sold his interest in the 
store to h'oss Anderson and the latter and Mr. Foss have since been engaged 
in partnership and have built up an excellent commercial establishment, hav- 
ing a tlourishing trade. Mr. h'oss also owns a quarter of a section of land 
in J'dlk countv and gives to his farming operations there considerable atten- 
tion. He is an energetic, capable business man and is widely known in 
business circles hereabout. 

In 1907 Jens Foss was united in marriage to Josephine Flesjer. who 
was born on a pioneer farm in the vicinity of Shelly, daughter of B. A. 
l-"lesier and wife, pioneers of Norman county, the former of whom is still 
living, making his home with Mr. and Mrs. Foss at Shelly. B. A. Flesjer 
was born at Stavanger. Norway. May 15. 1850. and when twenty years of 
age. in 1870, came to the United States and located in P'illmore coiuity. this 
state. There, in 1872. he married Olava Olson Holte and in that same year 
he and his wife came up into the Red River valley and settled in .Shelly 
township. Norman county, where they established their home and where 
Mrs. Flesjer died in 1910. Mr. Flesjer was one of the organizers of the 
Augustana (Lutlieran) church in that neighl:H)rhood and he and his wife took 
much interest in church work. They were the parents of eight children, of 
whom Mrs. Foss was the fourth in order of birth, the others being Emelia. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 375 

Bernhardt, Albert, Orlando, Palmer, Melissa and Manley. In 1915 Mr. 
Flesjer retired from the farm and moved to Shelly, where he since has 
made his home with Mr. and Mrs. Foss. 

To Jens and Josephine ( I'lesjer) Foss two children have been born, 
Frances and Orpha. Air. and Mrs. I-"6ss are members of the United Luth- 
eran church at Shelly and Mr. Foss has been a member of the board of 
trustees -of that cons^rej^ation ever since it was organized. He is a member 
of the local society of the Sons of Norway and of the local lodge of the 
Woodmen of America and in the affairs of these organizations takes an 
active interest. 



IVER KLOKSETH. 



Among the native-born Norwegians who ha\e come to America and 
engaged in general farming, is Iver Klokseth, a well-known and progressive 
farmer, former clerk of the district school board, and owner of a fine farm 
in Moland townshi]). Clay county. He was born on October 30, 1868, in- 
the kingdom of Norway, a son of Knut and Malena (Wold) Klokseth, also 
torn in that same country, but who came to this country about thirty-nine 
years ago. 

Knut Klokseth, who followed the occupation of a farmer in his native 
land, was born on October 17. 1825. He married in Norway to Malena 
Woid and about the year 1878 decided to try his fortune in tlie land of op- 
portunities at this side of the Atlantic. On his arrival in this country he 
came on out to Minnesota, where so many of his countrymen had already 
settled on farms, and located in Clay county. He became the owner of one 
hundred and fifty acres of prime land, on which he farmed for the remainder 
of his life, his death occurring on July 29, 1892. His farm, which was located 
in section 4, Moland township, was sold about fifteen years ago and the 
widow is now making her home with her son, Iver. Knut Klokseth was an 
industrious and capable farmer, a good citizen in every respect, a kind and 
indulgent husband ;ind father, and his death was generally regretted through- 
out the community. 

Iver Klokseth, at the age of about ten years, accompanied his parents to 
America and lived on his father's farm in Moland township. Before com- 
ing to this countr\- he had been attending school in Norway and continued 
his schooling in the township schools of Clay county. In his boyhood and 



376 Cl.AV AND NORMAN fOUNTIKS, MINNKSOTA. 

young- iiianliood he was a valua))Ie a;.sistaiil to hi^ father in the labors of 
developing and improving the home place. The other mem])ers of the fam- 
ily are; Ingeborg (Emma in iMiglish), who is married: Ida, married: 
( hristine, married, and Martin, married and living in Morken township. 

Iver Klokseth bought his [iresent farm, which now consists of two hun- 
dred and thirty-seven acres, about 1893. '^'"'^ land, which is of choice qual- 
ity and well improved, is situated in section 7, Moland township, and thirty 
acres are set out to the planting and cultivation of potatoes. Mr. Klokseth 
is regarded as one of the progressive and energetic farmers of the town- 
ship and he and his family are pleasantly housed in a comfortable dwelling. 

Mr. Klokseth was married on January 2~, 1892, to Hannah Ilolte, who 
was born on October 13th, 1871, in Houston county, Minnesota, and who 
died on May 28th, 1913. Three children were l)orn to this unitm, namely: 
Corinne. who is married, and Marie and Julia, who live at home with their 
father. Mr. Klokseth and his family are earnest members of the Lutheran 
church at Concordia, and he has served the congregation as trustee for sev- 
eral years. He was clerk of the township school board for six years and in 
cither \\a\s he has given of his time and energy to the public in behalf of all 
projects ha\ing for their purpose the common good of the community. 



LEVI THOKTXEDT. 



To a \isitor from the East one of the most impressive features of life 
here in the Red River valley is the sense of the amazing newness of things. 
\^''hen it is considered that men still in the very jiriiue of life were witnesses 
to and particijjants in the very beginning of a social order hereabout this 
sense of newness is accounted for. That all the wonderful development of 
this region has been accomplished within the life-time of persons still active 
in affairs is one of the wonders of the great work of "empire building" that 
has been carried on in the Northwest during the [)ast generation, and it is 
difficult for the Easterner to reconcile himself to the thought th;it all this 
has been accomplished during a single lifetime. 

One of the men who has been a resident of Clay county since the days 
of the early settlement of the same is Levi Thortvedt. a substantial farmer 
and landowner on the banks of Buffalo river in Moland township, who has 
been a resident of the place on which he is now living, in sections 28 and 
29, since the summer of 1870, when his father pre-etnpted the place and 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LENSX 
TILDEN' FOUNDATIONS. 




y. 



LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX 
TILDtN fOUNDAVlGNi 



CLAY AXD XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. }^-J-j 

there established his home, thus being one of the earHest settlers of Clay 
county. Levi Thortvcflt was born in the kingdom of Norway on January 
31, i860, son of Ole G. and Thone (SongedahH Thortvedt, natives of that 
same country, who shortly afterward came to the United States with their 
family and proceeded on out to Minnesota, locating in Houston county, 
where Ole G. Thortvedt Ijought a tract of forty acres of land and estab- 
lished his home, remaining there until he came up here into the Red River 
country, leader of what came to Ije known as the Buffalo River settlement. 

Ole G. Thortvedt was a good farmer and a man of push and energy 
and had, besides, the true pioneer instinct. In the spring of 1870 he Ijecame 
attracted to the good rejjorts that then were being heard regarding the possi- 
bilities awaiting settlers in the Red River country, which at that time was 
little known to white men save the Hudson Bay trappers and a few adven- 
turous souls that had pushed on out beyond the frontier. He interested twO' 
or three other families in his design, disposed of his interests in Houston 
county, equipped a fleet of "prairie schooners" in company with the Skrei 
family, H. Fendalstveit, O. G. Mid-garden" and George G. Muhle. O. G. Mid- 
garden later married Jorand Thortvedt, sister of the subject of this sketch. 
This party started out l3_\- ox-team in cjuest of a new home in the unsettled 
lands to the north, taking its departure-on May 14, 1870. When they reached 
Alexandria, where the lam! office then was located, the\- fell in with Ole 
Stronval, who had previously visited the Red River country, and he con- 
sented to accompany them on their trip north and to act as guide. By the 
4th of Julv they were in the vicinit}' of the Hudson Bay post at Georgetown 
and they spent the I-'ourth on the Dakota side — Dakota was then a territory. 
Pitching camp there, (Me G. Thortvedt left the teams and most of the party 
and with two of the other men struck south on foot, "spying out the land." 
Reaching a point five miles south of the present site of Fargo they decided 
that the land was too low and that tlie\- also were getting into somewhat too 
close proximit}' to what niigiit pro\'e to l_>e hostile Indians, as they heard the\- 
were on the "war-path." Returnin.g to their camp, which harl been pitched 
on the Dakota side of the \\ii(\. they h.-iving crime up the west trail, they took 
up the journey, crossing the river at Hutchinson's ferry, and set out south on 
the J^Iinnesota side. Presently they encountered Propfield. who had been 
employed here bv the Hudson Bav Company since 1858 and when he found 
that tlieir chief difificultv was the belief that the land was too low for profit- 
able settlement he advised them to seek lands on the banks of the Buffalo and 
volunteered to guide them thence and if this proved not to be just the kind 
of land thev wanted, thev had better go back home as it was the best in the 



378 i.\..\\ AXO XOKMAN COUXTIKS, M I \ X i;S( ITA. 

Xorthwest. In tluc time they pitched their camp 011 the banks of the river 
and l)eheld before them a i'lne prospect of <^ood high gronnd covered with a 
rank growth of prairie grass, and tliere tiie\- decided to settle. And tliis was 
the l>eginning of the Bnfialo River settlement. 

At first the bind was not snrveyecb One day our subject ;uid his sister 
were atteiuhng tlieir muskrat traps at the river. .\11 of a sudden they heard 
voices and saw men witli recb t)hie and yellow coats plunging into the river. 
I'be frightened buy and girl left the traps and ran screaming to the house — 
"Intlians are coming." The father came irom the woods and on investi- 
gation he found it was the surve\'Ofs who had come to survey the land. 

Ole G. Thort\edi pre-empted a quarter of a section in what presently, 
when the county was surveyed, was found t(j lie in sections 28 and 29, the 
site of the original cam]) of the Thortvedt party, and there put up a log shack 
and established his home, determined to gi\e the new country a try-out for 
ten \ears : with the reservation that if in tiiat lime other settlers were not 
attracted to the scene he would return to llouston county. But it was not 
long until the e.Kcellence of the location began to attract others and presently 
a thri\-ing settlement was established in that part of the county, although 
the first crops were destroyed by grasshoppers. bVoni the beginning Mr. 
Thortvedt was regarded as a leader in the community and when the town- 
ship was organized he was given the privilege of naming the same, which 
be did by .giving to it the name of his old home parish, Moland, in Norway. 
As he de\eloi)ed bis (|narter section, all of which was i)rairie land save for a 
fringe of trees along the river bank, he erected new and more commodious 
buildings and it was not long before he and his family had a comfortable 
home. He later bought an adjoining "forty" of railroad land at one dollar 
and twenty-tive cents an acre, and still later, when settlers began to come in 
and land values began to advance, Iwnght an "eighty." paying for the latter 
tract seven dollars and fifty cents an acre. When the Buffalo River settle- 
ment was started the nearest real trading point was at Alexandria, one hun- 
dred and forty miles away, and thence the .settlers were cotnpelled to drive 
for their necessities, the nearer trading point at the Hudson Bay Company's 
jjost at Georgetown charging such exorbitant prices for goods as to make 
trading there pr.icticdly jirohibitive save on emergenc)". .\t that time there 
wa-i a vehicle known as the Red River cart, a two-wheel rig, verv' clumsy, 
drawn by oxen and driven by half-breed Indians. This was the only means 
of transportation at that time. The creak and noise of the wooden cart 
wheels could be beard for miles. Sometimes as many as ninety carts would 
l)e seen in a train hauling furs for the Hudson Bay Company from Ft. Gary 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 379 

to St. Cloud and touk supplio Ijack again for that company. Ole G. 
Thortvedt antl lii.^ wife sjient the remainder of their lives in the home they 
had established on the l)anks of the Buffalo river, honored and influential 
pioneers of Clay count}-. They were members of the Lutheran church and 
were among the organizers of the local congregation of that faith in the 
community which they went through many hardships to help establish. 
They were the parents of four children, of whom the subject of this sketch 
was the third in order of birth, the others being jorand, Thone and Signe. 

About 1905, at a grain growers' con\ention in l'"argo, James Hill, tlie 
late great railroad magnate, was present and made a speech and at that time 
said in April, 1871, he had stopped at a homesteader's cabin on Buffalo 
river. Our subject was present and there was recalled to his mind the inci- 
dent of two ])ilgrims stopping at his father's home. One of them was the 
justly- famous great railroad financier. 

Levi Thortvedt was but a babe in arms when his parents came to Minne- 
sota from their native Norway and he was ten years of age when thev left 
Houston count}' and came u\> into the Red River country. He therefore 
has been a resident of this region since the days before Clay county was 
organized as a civic unit and. has been a witness to and a jjarticipant in the 
development of the county since pioneer days, a continuous resident of the 
place his father i)re-empted here in 1870 and which was the social center of 
that community in the days of the beginning of the Buffalo River settlement, 
the date of the settlement of the Thortvedt family there having been July 
9, 1870. Though his formal schooling necessarily was neglected b}' reason 
of the lack of properly organized schools durin.g pioneer days, Mr. Thortvedt 
has made up for that lack by wide and comprehensive reading and has long 
been regarded as one of the best-in fonned men in his community, as well as 
one of the most progressive and substantial farmers.. He is the owner of 
a fine farm of three hundred and forty-two acres and the new set of buildings 
he has erected on his place are electrically, lighted, the first buildings on the 
Buffalo river thus to lie lighted, Mr. Thortvedt securing his current from a 
water-power plant of his own invention erectecf some years ago on his farm. 
Air. Thort\'edt carries on bis farming in accordance with up-to-date methods 
and is doing very well. As one of the first settlers in that community, Mr. 
Thortvedt has always taken an earnest interest in the development of the 
same and has done his share in promoting public improvements,' ever taking 
an interested part in such movements as have lieen designed to advance the 
common welfare. 



380 CI. AY AND NOK.MAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

In 1882 Levi Thortveilt was iiiiitctl in niarriajje to Ingeborg Mid- 
.sjaarden Weum. wlio also was i^orn in tlic kin<((loni of Norway and who came 
alone to this country in 1880. To this union ten children have Ijeen born. 
Ole, Goodwin. l-21pha. Dora. .Stella. Adela. Orrabel. Eva. Morence and Nor- 
man, all of whom are livin"'. The Thortvedts have a very pleasant home and 
have ever taken an interested ]iart in the general social activities of the com- 
munity in which they live. They are members of the Lutheran church and 
take a proper interest in churcii work as well as in other neighborhood good 
works. 



JOSEPH (i.X.ARE. 



Josefjh Gaare. cashier of the lirst State Bank of I'erley. is one of the 
wideawake )oung business men of Norman county. He was born in Lee 
township, this county. May 4. 1884, on the old liome farm, a son of John 
O. and .Anna ( Kroshus ) Gaare. The father was iwrn in Norway, October 
13. 1858, and the mother was born in Winneshiek county, Iowa. Ole Gaare, 
the grandfather, was a native of Norway, as was also his wife, Sigrid. They 
came to America in 1866. locating in .\llamakec county. Iowa, remaining 
there until about 1880, when they came to Minnesota, accompanied by their 
son, John O. Gaare, father of the subject of this sketch, and settled in Nor- 
man county, where the grandfather spent the re.st of his life. He was a 
fami. His family consisted of the following children: John O.. Peter 
O.. Carrie, the wife of berdinand Baker, and Peder, who died when thirtv 
years of age. 

John O. Gaare was eight years of age when his parents brought him to 
the New World, and he grew to manhood on the farm in Allamakee county. 
Iowa, where he attended the public schools, .\bout 1880 he came to Minne- 
sota and bomesteaded one hundred and si.\ty acres in Clay county. Later 
he Ijought a farm in Lee township. Norman county, and operated lx)tli places 
for many years, farming on an extensive scale and meeting with much suc- 
cess, now l)eing the owner of three hundred and sixty acres of good farm 
land. Por the past thirty years Mr. Gaare has lived in Lee township. Nor- 
man count}-. His wife died in 1908. He has been in .some official position 
in his school <listrict for the past twenty-five years, and is treasurer at present. 
He is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church, of which he is secretary 
at this writing. His family consists of the following children : Clara. 
Joseph, Oscar, Selmer, Peter. Josephine. Hilda. Alice. Alberta and Emil. 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 381 

Joseph Gaare, the ininietJiate subject of this sketch, grew to manhood 
on the home farm and received his early education in the pubhc schools of 
Lee township. Later he was a student in the State Normal School at Moor- 
head and then took a course in the Metmjjolitan Business College at Min- 
neapolis. After leaving school he taught one term in Norman county, then 
spent six months in the office of the Ruber Threshing Machine Company of 
Alinneapolis. In 1906 he took a position in the First State Bank at I'erley, 
and in 1912 was appointed cashier of that popular and well-managed institu- 
tion, and has continued to discharge the duties of this responsible position in 
an able and satisfactory manner to the present time. Mr. Gaare is alsb pres- 
ident of the Perley Trading Company and is secretary of the Perley Live 
Stock Shipping Association. He served five years as recorder of the village 
of Perley. 

In 1911 Joseph Gaare was married to Anna Matilda Lee, a daughter of 
Jens O. Lee, which union has iDeen without issue. Politically, "Mr. Gaare is 
a Republican. He is a member of the Masonic order and of the local lodge 
lit the Modern Woodmen, being clerk of the latter lodge at Perley. He 
and his wife belong to the Norwegian Lutheran church. 



HENRY MARSDEN. 



Henry Marsden, a pi-ominent hardware merchani al Hendrum, is a 
native of the Emerald Isle, but has lieen a resident of Minnesota and of Nor- 
man county for nearly a quarter of a century. He was born at Cootehill, 
County Cavan, in the north of Ireland, October 21, 1871. a son of John and 
Catherine (Banner) Marsden, lx)th of whom were born in Manchester, Eng- 
land, and the former of whom was a stock breeder and miller at Cootehill. 
John Marsden and his wife were parents of six children, of whom the sub- 
ject of this sketch was the last born, the others being Fred, Arthur. George. 
Annie and Charles. 

Upon comjjleting his schooling Henry Marsden became interested in the 
work of his father's stock farm and remained at home until he was twenty- 
two years of age, when, in 1893, he came to the United States, following his 
elder brother, .\rthur Marsden, who had come to this country some years 
before, and joined the latter up here in the Red River valley, locating in 
Hendrum townshij), Norman county, where for the next few years he was 
engaged on a farm. In the spring of 1898 he formed a partnership with 



382 CLAV AM) XoKMAN L OU XTI K.>, M 1 N N'KSOTA. 

James Materson in tlu- lianlwarc business at Hendruni, a partnership which 
continued until the spring of igo6, when Mr. Marsden ])()ught his partner's 
interest in the Imsiness and has since been conducting the same alone, one 
of the leading merchants in the village. In addition to his general hardware 
business, .Mr. .Marsden carries a full line of agricultural implements and 
farm machinery and has done very well in his mercantile operations. Ever 
since locating at Ilendrum Mr. Marsden has taken a good citizen's interest 
in local civic affairs and served for one year as recorder of the village and 
for three years as president of the village, giving to his official duties his 
most i'ntelligent attention. In December, 1914, his wife. Mrs. Edith A. 
Marsden, who had been assistant principal of the Hendruni public schools. 
was commissioned postmistress of Hendruni. and the postoffice is now con- 
ducted in Mr. Marsden's store, a central point for ihe people of the village 
and surrounding country. 

It was on June 20. 191 J, that Henry Marsden was united in marriage 
to lulith .\. McXee. of Spring Valley. Minnesota, and to this union two 
children ha\e been born, I'rederick John and Winston Craig. Mr. and Mrs. 
Marsden are members of the Presb\terian church and take a warm interest 
in ciuuch work. Mr. ^larsden having served as a member of the board of 
trustees of the local congregation. They have a i)leasant home at Hendruni 
;md are helpful in jiromoting all movements designed to advance the com- 
mon welfare of the communitv in which thc\ live. 



OTTO .\LJ(;USTU.S CHRISTI.-XNSON. 

One of the w ell-known farmers of Oakport township. Clay county, who 
is deserving of the success he has achieved is Otto .Augustus Christianson. 
He was born in Clinton county, Iowa, on the site of the present city of 
Clinton, July 29. 1851. a son of Abraham and Catherine (Anderson) Chris- 
tianson. loth natives of Norway. In 1840 the mother went to France as a 
nurse, later returning to Norway, but in a short time started to America. 
single. On the same ship was Abraham Christianson. They made the long 
voyage to New Orleans, then up the Mississippi river to St. Louis. Mis- 
souri, where thev were married by a German Lutheran minister, through an 
interpreter : and then came on north to Clinton, Iowa, having made the entire 
trip from Norway by water. This w^as in the year 1844. They took up a 
homestead of eightv acres in Iowa, which farm is now the site of the Sunny- 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 383, 

side Nurseries at Lvous, a suburb of Clinton. The place was cleared and 
improved by the father of the subject of this .sketch and there he carried on 
farming until about 1855, when he removed to Houston county, Minnesota, 
where he pre-empted a large farm, on which he spent the rest of his life. 
The place is now known as the Bjornstad farm. After his death his widow 
remarried and located at Fulton, Illinois, across the Mississippi river from 
Clinton, Iowa, and there her death occurred. The father of the subject of 
this .sketch was t\\ice married before his marriage to Catherine Anderson. 
By his first marriage a daughter, Anna, was born. The following children 
were by his second marriage : Caroline, Katherine, Charles, who was a 
miner in Colorado and who served in the Civil War in a regiment from that 
state, and Matilda. By his third marriage two children were born, namely : 
.\niv Josephine, who died in infancy, and Otto A., the subject of this sketch. 

Otto A. Christiansen grew up on the farm and received his early edu- 
cation in the early-day schools of Houston county, studying for a time in tire 
Housion high school, and later was a student in the Caledonia Academy. 
.\s a boy and young man he worked out as a farm hand, also on steamboats 
on the Mississippi river and on railroads. In 1874 he came to Moorhead and 
])resently took a position in a warehouse of the firm of Barnes & Tenny at 
Ghndon, and later worked in the store operated by this firm, remaining with 
the firm about nine months. During the following winter Mr. Christiansen 
taught school in Moland township; in fact, taught two schools, alternately, 
at the same time. He then followed various occupations until the next win- 
ter, when he again taught school. He had clerked for a short time in the 
store of James Sharpe, who was one of the first merchants in Moorhead. In 
the spring of 1876 Mr. Christianson took up a homestead of one hundred 
and sixty acres in Oakport township and there he has since made his home, 
developing a fine farm from the wild prairie, being one of the early pioneers 
of that localitv. Wr. Christianson has added to his original farm until he 
now has a farm of five hundred and forty acres, all well improved and under 
a high state of cultivation. He has erected a splendid group of buildings on 
his land and has been very successful as a general farmer and stock raiser. 
He is a stockholder in the I'-armers" Elevator Company at Moorhead. which 
he helped organize. 

In 1878 Otto A. Christianson was married to Mina K. Juve, a daugh- 
ter of Ole Juve, a pioneer settler of Kragnes township. Clay county, who 
located there about 1877. To that union three children were born, Anna 
Josephine (deceased), Oscar A. and Milton (deceased). Mr. Christianson 
married for his second wife .\ndria Nel.wn, who was born in Denmark, a 



3^4 CLAY AND NORMAX COUXTIES, MINNESOTA. 

daughter of Ebbe Nelson, wlio H\ e<l and died in Denmark. To this second 
union eight children were borr, all living at this writing, and named as fol- 
low : Ruth, Alina, Daniel, who is a soldier ii> the Eighteenth Infantrv, reg- 
ular army of the United States, and at this writing (1917) is with the 
I'ershing expeditionary force in I'" ranee; Lillian, John, who is at this writ- 
ing a member of the Third Regiment, Minnesota National (luard, and is 
stationed at h't. .\dams; Clara, Milton aixl Catherine. 

Mr. Ciiristianson has always been active in the affairs of Oaki)ort lown- 
>iiili lie helped organize the township and was a member of the first town- 
sliip board: in tact, has been a menil)er of the i)oard most of the time since 
ihc township was first organized, being still on the same. He was formerly 
township assessor. He helped organize the first Sunday school, also the 
lirst church in his community, known as the Concordia Lutheran church, 
and later helped build the ])resent edifice for this congregation. 



GUSTAV O. LEE. 

Gustav C). Lee. a well-known, prosperous and progressive farmer and 
stockman, owner of a fine farm in Moiand township, Clay county, was born 
in Houston county, this state, on December 2, 1864, but has been a resi- 
dent of this county since 1871. He is the son of Ole and Asger Lee, lioth 
natives of the kingdom of Norway. 

Ole Lee was a farmer in Norway, where he was born in 1835. in 
1854 he immigrated to the United States and on arriving in this countrv 
came on out to the state of Minnesota and settled in Houston county, where 
he engaged in the life of a farmer for some years. In 1871 he and his 
family moved into Clay county and homesteaded a tract of land. I Ic 
immediately proceeded to put the land into a slate fit for cultivation, and 
there spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1873. two 
years after he had taken possession of liie farm. His wife, Asger Lee, also 
was born in Norway, in 1841 : came to .\merica in 1853 '^"^ ^^'is married 
in 1863 in Houston county, this state. She is now living with her sou. 
Gustav O., on his farm in Moiand township. Ole Lee and wife were the 
parents of the following children: Gustav O.. the first born, and Julia. Olaus 
and Andrew, who are deceased. 

Gustav O. Lee was but a boy of nine years of age when his father 
died and as he was the eldest child of the family he had to commence early 
to assist his mother in the work of caring for and supporting the family. 




OrSTAV O. LKE AXI> FAMILY. 



,.^ Lie LIBRARY 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 385 

and in consequence liis opportunity for an extended education was limited. 
He was married on Jidy 17, 1892, to Vila Swenkeson, who was born in 
1875 in Clay county, and who died, after a few years of married life, in 
1895. There were no children to the marriage. 

Mr. Lee is the owner of one hundred and ninety acres of the choicest 
<|uality of land, has between twenty and forty acres each year planted to 
jjotatoes, and in his farming- operations is doing splendidly. He carries 
on his farming according to modern methods of agriculture and is accounted 
one of the substantial farmers of this section of the county. Mr. Lee has 
effected many \aluable improx-ements on his holding and has remodeled and 
o\-erhauled the old homestead hduse, which is still in use. He raises a nice 
herd of Shorthorn cattle and his stock in this strain finds a ready market, 
at .good prices. 



JOHN T. REDLAND. 

John T. Redland, one of the real pioneers of Norman county, who was 
largely instrumental in the organization of the first school in Shelly town- 
ship, where he now lives the life of a farmer, who was one of the original 
organizers of Shelly township and one of its earliest officers, and who was 
one of the first men in this community to materially aid the establishment 
of a place of worship for the people of the neighborhood, was born in the 
amt of Stavanger, Norway, on November 28, 1844. He is a son of Thors- 
ton and Martha (Iverson) Johnson, who were both born on the Redland 
farm in the amt of Stavanger, in Norway. In 1854 the father and mother 
decided to bring their family to America, but that was no easy task in those 
days before the day of the steamship in its perfected state. For two long 
months they were at the mercy of the Atlantic in a small sail boat, but 
finally they landed at Quebec and from there proceeded on up the St. Law- 
rence by steamboat to Montreal. They then followed the different windings 
of the Great Lakes b}- di\erse means of transportation until they arri\ed at 
Chicago. The family remained in that city for only one month, owing to 
an outbreak of cholera there, and then they started for La Crosse, Wis- 
consin, by rail, horses and river boat, for at that time the railroad extended 
only ten miles west of Chicago. After a short stay in La Crosse, the family 
went to Coon Prairie. Wisconsin, where the father died and where the 
family remained until 1871. There were nine children born to Thorston 
(25a) 



386 CLAV AND NORMAN COL'NTIES, MINNESOTA. 

and Martha Johnson, of whom the subject of this sketch was the tiftli in 
order of birth, the others being Ann Catherine (deceased), Annie (deceased), 
Martha (deceased), Toletta (deceased), Carrie (deceased) and Iver (de- 
ceased). Two died in Vernon county, Wisconsin, in the days of the early 
settlement of that county, when tliere was no cemetery, and it was neces- 
sary to cut the coffin with a broadax. 

In 1 87 1 John T. Redland and his uKitlur st.irted Westward in a covered 
wagon drawn by a yoke of oxen, driving their cattle before them, crossed 
the Father of Waters by ferry at La Crosse and drove on northwestward 
through Minnesota, carefull\- scrutinizing the land as they passed over it. 
Finally, their wanderings had led them so far as what is now Norman 
county and there they settled in Shelly township, where Mr. Redland ha- 
since lived. One could not recognize in this populous and well-developed 
section the Xorman county of fifty years ago, for at that time Moorhead. 
in Clay county, boasted of only one house. No bridges spanned the streams 
swollen by the spring thaws, for each spring Mr. Redland, with the other 
settlers of the neighborhood, found it necessary to build a contrivance across 
the Wild Rice river by which they could cross, and this bit of pioneer civil 
engineering had to be repeated each spring, for when the river would start 
in upon one of its spring rampages, it would crumble the puny bridge 
like matchwood. Alexandria, which was one hundred and sixty miles away, 
was the nearest point where the settlers could gel provisions, but it was 
not reached by railroad, for Mr. Redland made the round trij) twice with 
a team of oxen, the trip requiring two weeks. 

W^hen Mr. Redland entered this section, it was a vast expanse of un- 
broken and unsurveyed prairie land, hence he took a "squatter's" claim, 
where he now li\es. Later, he pre-empted some land and purchased more 
from the railroad. He made several trips to St. Paul to buy railroad land 
for his neighbors, as their representative, thus exemplifying the spirit of 
brotherhood which flourished on the American frontier. After he had i)ui 
in his first crop, Mr. Redland was happy in the anticipation of a bountiful 
harvest, but the grasshoppers had other designs and absolutely stripped his 
fields of vegetation. Ere the next year, the railroad, w-hich had lieen creep- 
ing along so slowly, finally reached Breckinridge, and after that the pioneers 
did not find it necessary to make such long trips to their market. During 
his then short residence in the county. Mr. Redland had built his house, 
which undoubtedly was a settler's cabin, as the main tool he had at his 
disposal was a broadax. With the same clumsy tools he performed the 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 387 

sorrowful task of making a cofifiin for his brother, Iver, who died soon after 
I he famii)- had reached tlieir new home in the great Northwest. 

Soon other settlers came in and the population of what is now Norman 
county became sufficient to warrant its civil organization. Anthony Scheie 
was the first assessor in this part of the county and Mr. Redland was the 
second. At that time the assessor assessed a wide scope of territory in 
the niirthwest part of Norman county, for the present townships were 
not then organized. In this capacity, Mr. Redland served for eight years 
until he became asses.sor of the present township of Shelly, which he helped 
to organize. 

Mr. Redland's education, which was limited, was received in Wiscon- 
sin. Even though the schools of those days were rude as compared with 
the splendid system now extant in Norman county, he readily saw the necessity 
of giving the children of his neighborhod such educational advantages as 
the community could afford. Thus it is that the credit for the organization 
of the first school in Shelly township is due to Mr. Redland. In those days 
the law prescribed that a community must provide for a school house and' 
conduct a three-months term at its own expense before it could receive 
public or state aid. Since ATr. Redland was very anxious to bring this about, 
he hired a teacher at sixteen dollars a month and board and had the school 
conducted in his own home. He, himself, at times boarded the teacher and 
personally paid six dollars a month of the salary. In addition to this, he 
made trips to Crookston on skis in the bitter cold on school business. All 
of this was done by Mr. Redland that the education of the children of the 
community might not be neglected. For many years he served on the school 
board, but after the educational progress of the community seemed safely 
launched, he resigned. Not only did the school interests of the community 
demand Mr. Redland's time and resources, but he was also deeply interested 
in the establishment of a religious society. He helped to organize the first 
church in the community, the Marsh River Lutheran church, on August 
2, i<S72, at the house of Engel Lovesness. The society is still extant, but 
Mr. Redland has changed his membership to a church nearer his home. 

There are few pioneer settlements which have not had an Indian scare, 
and the one of which Mr. Redland was a member was no exception. It 
was in 1883 that the Indians seemed to be restless and the settlers were 
all nn the qui z'kr, for they organized a local comi)any for their own 
defense. Ha]jpily this organization was never called into active service. 
-Many Indians camped on the river near Mr. Redland's home to fish, but 
he alwa\s treated them kindly and did not incur their enmity. On this 



388 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

occasion, in 1883, he did nut feel so sure of liis safety. As he was on his 
way to board a train near Ada, in order to go to Crookston on business, 
he met thirty Indians. As they kept to their course and as Mr. ixedland 
had no hostile intentions, no breach of the i)eace was effected. 

On June 29, 1881, John T. Redland was united in marriage to Carrit' 
Sophia Morrison, who also was a native of Norway, born. March 18, 1862, 
a daughter of Mauritz and Sarah (Sorenson) Larson, natives of Norway, 
who lived and died there. To this imion six children have been lx)rn, namely : 
Mila Sophia (deceased), William Tenny, Stella, Rul)en, Ida and .Milton 
(deceased). Mr. Redlantl has always lived on the same farm since he 
came to Norman county ; however, he lived on different parts of the farm 
until he had proved up on that which he had pre-empted. After lie liad 
done this, he came to the tract which he had purchased from the railroad. 
In all, he is now the owner of three hundred and twenty acres of well- 
improved and valuable land, ha\ing built the valuable and substantial build- 
ings incident to the plant of a successful fanner. In addition to his many 
activities in behalf of the progress of this section, Mr. Redland has also 
been interested in making available better facilities in the comnnmity for 
the marketing of the farmers' grain. In doing this, he helped to organize 
the farmers elevator at Shelly. His son Ruben is interested in the creamery 
at Shelly and rents the home place. 



AXDRKW T. AABVE. 



The late .\ndrew T. Aabye, who was a well-to-do landowner in Lee 
township, .\orman count), and for years engaged in the mercantile business 
at Perley, in which i)lace he also had banking and other interests, had the dis- 
tinction of having been the first white child born in Goodhue coimty, this 
state. He was born on a pioneer farm in that county on October 24, 1854, 
and died at his home in Xorman county in 191 1. His widow, who is now 
living on the fine farm of four hundred and ei.ghty acres in section 29 of 
Lee township, lias done much in the way of improvement on that place since 
lier luisband's death, having erected a new set of substantial, modern build- 
ings, and is verv comfortably situated there. 

Andrew T. Aabye's father and mother were of Norwegian l)irtli but 
were married in this country, where they spent their last days, prominent 
pioneers of Goodhue count}-, this state. They came to diis country on the 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 389 

same ship. The vessel was destroyed by fire as it was approaching land and 
although all hands were saved, the passengers were compelled to take to the 
l>oats without their Ijelongings and thus the elder Aabye and the girl who 
shortly afterward liecame his bride landed in this country practically penni- 
less. The}- were enabled, however, to make their way out into the North- 
west and settled on a farm in Goodhue county, this state, among the very first 
settlers of that county, their eldest child, the subject of this memorial sketch, 
having lieen, as noted above, the first white perst^n born in that county. 
Despite the fact that he landed in this country destitute of world's goods, 
the elder Aabye became a successful farmer, the owner of two hundred acres 
of fine land in Goodhue county, and was worth thousands at the time of his 
death in tliat county about J901. He was four years older than his wife, 
who survived him about ten years, she being eiglity-six years of age at the 
time of her death. Of the children born to this pioneer pair, three are still 
living, Mrs. Ole I-'inney. of Georgetown township. Clay county: another 
daughter in Goodhue county, and another daughter in Olmsted county. 

Reared on the home farm in Goodhue county. Andrew T. Aabye grew 
u\) tliere familiar with pioneer conditions in Minnesota and remained there 
until 1SS2. three or four vears after his marriage, when he came up into the 
Red Ri\er \alley and bougiit a quarter of a section of land in section 29 of 
T.ee township. Xorman county, and there established his home, the place on 
which his widow is .still making her home. He later bought two adjoining 
(|uarter sections and ins widow is now the owner of fonr hundred and eighty 
acres of fine land, well ini])rove(l and profitably cuUivated. In addition to 
his extensive land interests. Mr. Aabye was one of the most influential 
factors in the development of the village of Perley. He opened a store at 
that place shortly after the establishment of tlie townsite and was engaged 
in mercantile business there practically all the time of his residence in 
.Xorman county. For ten years he was postmaster at Perley and in many 
ways helped to bring about substantial conditions there, one of the organizers 
of the First National bank and also active in promoting other local enter- 
])rises. His widow now owns the brick store building which she built on 
the same site on which he carried on Iiusiness and is continuing to operate 
the store, which is now managed by Mr. Erickson ; and the bank shares are 
now owned bv his son, Carl .Aabye. who is also managing the home farm. 

It was on May 28, 1878, in Goodhue county, this state, that Andrew 
T. Aabye was united in marriage to Inger H. \Tixland, who was born in 
Wisconsin on December 13, 1859. Her parents were both natives of the 
kingdom of Norway, but were married in Wisconsin, where the\- lived 



390 CLAY AND NORMAN COUXTIKS, M INNICSOTA. 

until moving to Cioodluie county, tiiis state, where the mother is still living, 
lieiiig MOW past eiglitv-tvvo years of age. The father bought a small farm 
ujion locating in Cioodhue county and added to the same luuil he became the 
owner of a fine farm of four hundred and eighty acres, which is still in the 
possession of the family. He died at the age of sixty-four. Mrs. .\abye 
has six brothers ;ind one sister, the latter of whom, .Mrs. Judge .\ndrew 
Hanson, lives in this part of the country, a resident of Fargo, North Dakota. 
Mrs. Aabye has three children, Olena. who married Gust Rrickson, of Parley, 
and has two children, Arthur and Mildred; Clara, who married Justus Berg, 
of Hendrum, and has one child, John Vincent, and Carl, managing the home 
faini. who married Stella Ness, and has one child. Susan Katrina. The 
.\al)\es have ever taken an interested part in the general good works and 
social activities of their home community and have done much to help pro- 
mote the substantial upbuilding of that part of the county. 



h:D\VARn T. STEXNES. 



Ivdward T. .Steime-;. the proprietor of three hundred an<l thirty acres 
of line farming land in llalstad township. Norman county, where he car- 
ries on general farming, was born on November 7, 1876, on the old home 
place where he still lives, the son of Theodore and Annie (Serum) Stennes, 
Ixjth of whom were natives of Norway, who came to Minnesota and were 
married in Norman county in the fall of 1873. The mother was the 
ilaughter of Ole and Annie J. (Norby) Serum, both natives of Norway, the 
latter nf whom sjicnt her last days in Minnesota, one of the pioneers of 
Norman countv. Ole .Serum was a farmer in his native country, and there 
he married .\nnie J. Norby. to which union seven children uere liorn. 
nanielv : .\. ()., one of the real pioneers of Norman county and a well- 
known resident of llalstad township: Ingeborg. Maret. Karen, Mollie, Annie, 
the wife of Theodore Stennes and the mother of the subject of this review-; 
and Ole. In 1862 the father. Ole Serum, was drowned while taking part in 
a log drive on the river not far from his home, and five years later his widow 
with four of her children, including .\nnie, came to the United States and 
settled in Fillmore count), Minnesota. There she remained until 1872. 
when she, accompanied by her son, A. O. Serum, and her daughter, Annie, 
came up into this part of the state and settled in Halstad t<jwnshii), Nor- 
man countv. 



CX-AY AND NORMAX COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 39I 

Theodore O. Stennes left his native land, Norway, and came to America 
in 1868. locating in I'illmore county. Minnesota. When the party, which 
inckided Annie Serum and her mother and brother, moved toward Nonnan 
county, Theodore Stennes. feeling- that greater opportunities awaited him 
in this then new countrx-, joined them. As soon as he arrived in Norman 
count}- he located on a (|uarter section in Halstad township. Three years 
later, he let his brother Hans have seventy acres of the first tract and they 
both proved up their holdings as hotnesteads. Theodore Stennes, Ijeing of 
the stufif of which real pioneers are made, immediately set to work to im- 
])r<)ve his holding, which was of bare prairie, by setting out groves and 
raising the necessar\- buildings. Soon his industry was rewarded and he 
was enabled to a<ld another quarter section across the road from his first 
tract and later a tract of timber land. Theodore O. and Annie Stennes 
were the parents of four children, of whom Edward T. is the second in 
order of birth, the others being a daughter, who died in infancy: Clara, who 
owns a millinery store in Halstad. and Olin, who has a hardware business 
at Wolf Point. Montana, and who married Alice Berger. Sometime after 
the death of his first wife. Theodore Stennes married Elizabeth Flogstad, 
who was born in Norway, the daughter of Ole and Gura Flogstad, and to 
this union one child has been born, Theodore, who works for his brother, 
Odin. Theodore O. Stennes anfl family were members of the Norwegian 
Tutheran church. t<' which denoniinatioi-i they alw'ays consistently and con- 
scientiously adhered, the father having helped to organize the Augustana 
Lutheran church, of which he was an officer during the greater part of his 
residence in Normai-i county. 

luKvard T. .Stennes. who has always lived on the old home place in 
Halstad township, received his common-school education in the district 
schools of his home township. Later, he decided to supplement his early 
training by attending Concordia College, at Moorhead, where he had one 
term. Much of his vocational training, however, has been derived from 
the school of experience here on his father's farm; that this has borne fruit 
is evidenced bv the splenrlid crops which Mr. Stennes reaps from his well- 
improved farm of three hundred and thirty acres. 

On February 4. 191 5, Theodore Stennes, Jr.. married LiUie Peterson, 
who was born in Halstad. Minnesota, January 21, 1895, the daughter of Sam 
and Christinia ( Liaunet ) I'eterson. Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Stennes are 
the parents of two children. Lloyd and Philip. Edward T. Stennes is an 
adherent of the Norwegian Lutheran denomination, being a member of the 
Augu'Jtana Lutheran church of which his father was such an active member. 



392 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Politically, Mr. Stennes is a stanch advocate of independent i)rinciples. He 
has never been a seeker after office. Of all movements in the community 
which are initiated for its moral and material betterment. Mr. Stennes is a 
hearty exponent and loyal supporter. 



WILHl-.I.M NICKEL. 



Wilhelm Nickel, deceased, formerly a well-known farmer of Hagen 
township. Clay cnuity. where he lived for several years, was a native of 
Russia, but had been a resident of this countr\- since 1878, first settlinsj in 
Cottonwood count}-, this state, and later becoming a prominent and inllu- 
ential citizen of Cla\ county, where he spent the remainder of his life since 
coming here in iSgcS. liis death, which was generally regretted, occui ring- 
in 1901. He was born in Russia on July 29, 1843, a son of Henry :md 
Katherine (Martins) Nickel, who were farmers in that country. 

Henr\- and Katherine Nickel were natives of Prussia and wlicu chil- 
dren, went with their respective parents to Russia, settling in the southern 
part of that country, where they spent the remainder of their lives, respected 
citizens of their home community. They were the parents of eight children. 
Henry, Katherina, Jacob. Maria, John, Elizabeth, Wilhelm and Helena, all of 
whom are deceased with the exception of Helena, who is living in Russia. 
Wilhelm was the only one of the famil\- to come to this country. 

Wilhelm Nickel was married on January 14. 1875, to Maria .Veufeld, 
also a native of Russia, in which country the marriage took place. In 
1878 they came to this country and located near Mountain Lake, Cotton- 
wood county, this state, coming to that part of Minnesota with the second 
Russian settlement. Wilhelm Nickel bought a tract of land in that place 
and continued to farm the same until iSi)8. in wliich \-ear he moved to 
Hagen township, Clay county, where he operated three hundred and twenty 
acres of prime land up to the time of his death in 1901, the same being now- 
in the jxjssession of his widow-. He carried out some substantial improve- 
ments, including a line l)arn, the other buildings now- on the i)lace being 
erected by his family. Wilhelm and Maria (Neufeld) Nickel were the 
parents of the following children; Cerhart, wdio was Ijorn in Russia and 
who died in that country at the age of two years; Maria, born in Russia, 
who died in Cottonwood county, this state; Wilhelm. born in Cottonwood 
county, who died in Clav countv ; Gerhart, born in Cottonwood countv, who 




Ml!. .\.\1> MUS. WlLHKIvM NICKEL. 



THE ^'"' 
PUBLIC 






CLAY AND XORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 39J 

died in Clay cijiint}-; .Mrs. A. F. Toavs, living at Wolf Point, Montana, and 
Henfy \\'., l>orn Seiittniher 7, 1886, in Cottonwood county, who came with 
his parents to Clay county. He has always lived on the home place and 
operates three hundred and twenty acres of land, one hundred and si.xty 
of which he owns, and ^>n which he carries on general farmino;, being re- 
garded as one nf the progressive and substantial farmers of Ha.gen tnwii- 
ship. 

On January 1, 19 12, Henr}- W. Nickel was unitetl in marriage to 
Susie Evert, who was born in Cottonwood county, a daughter of Jacob 
Evert and wife, natives of Russia. To Mr. and Mrs. Nickel three children 
have been born, W'ilhelm, Orlando and Ruth. The Nickel famil)', both 
sides, are meniljers of the Mennonite church. Mr. Nickel formerly was a 
member of the school board and he and his wife take a proper Interest in 
the .general social acti\ities of the comnuinitv in which they reside, factors 
for good in all that appertains to the welfare of the township. 

Mrs. Maria (Neufeld) Nickel was the daughter of T\e\-. fierhard 
Neufeld and wife, natives of Russia. The former was born in that country 
in iHjj. In 1878 he came to Cottonwood county with the Russian settle- 
ment and there died on December 15, 1916. He served as pastor for thirty- 
eight years at Mountain Lake. His wife, Anna Tiecroew, who also was 
born in Russia, died in that country. The\' were the i)arent> of the follow- 
ing children: Katherina, .\nna, li\ing in .North Dakota; Maria, who lie- 
came the wife of ^Vilhelm Nickel : Gerhart, Peter and Henry. .\11 the fore- 
going children, with .the exception of .\nna and Maria, are living in Cot- 
tonwood county. Three other children, Susie, Henr\- and John, died 
vouner. 



HARRY RICHARDS. 



Harr)- Richards, one of the most e.xtensive lantlowners and progressi\e 
farmers of Norman count}- and chairman of the board of directors of the 
First State Bank of Perley, is a native of the old Keystone state, but has 
been a resident of this section of the Red River valley since 1879 and is, 
therefore, very properly regarded as one of the real old settlers of this 
region. He was born at Erie, Pennsylvania, in August, 1858, son of John 
S. and Adelade P. (McAllister) Richards, the former of whom also was 
born at Erie and the latter, near Watertown, New York. 



394 CLAY AND NORMAN COUXTIICS, MINNESOTA. 

John S. Richards, who (hed in 1898, at the age of seventy-four years, 
was a successful coal operator at Erie,- engaged both in mining and johbing. 
Avas a member of the board of directors of the Second National I'ank of 
Erie and was for some years holder of the controlling interest in the Xnrth- 
western l""uel Company, of St Paul, having bought James J. Hill's interest 
in that concern. His widow died in 1912, she then being seventy-four 
years of age. They were the parents of three children, the subject of this 
sketch having two sisters, Mrs. Mary Metcalf, of Erie, Pennsylvania, and 
Mrs. Adelade Michener, a widow. 

Reared at Iirie, i'enns\lvania, I larry Richards completed his schooling 
in the Erie Academy and when twenty-one years of age, in 1879, cairie 
up into the Northwest country and located at Fargo, where he became en 
gaged in the coal business, details of which he had learned under the careful 
direction of his father, at that time one of the leadin.g coal men in tlie 
country, b'or about five years he continued in that business at P'argo and 
then, in 1884, he bought a tract of something more than a section of land 
in sections 18 and ig of Lee township. Clay county, and proceeded to im- 
prove and develop the same. When Mr. Richards took possession of that 
six-hundred-and-fifty-acre trad it was whcjlly unimproved, but it was not 
long before he had it under cultivation and had there erected a farm plant 
that was widel\- regarded as one of the Ijest in the Northwest. He has 
continued adding both to his land holdings and to the improvements on the 
place until now he is the owner of a great farm of thirteen hundred and 
five acres and a farm i)lant that is a model of modern convenience and 
effectiveness, the buildings on the place carrying insurance to the amount 
of twenty thousanil dollars. In addition to his general farming Mr. Richards 
has long gi\en close attention to the raising of live stock and in the summer 
of 1917 had ele\en thousand dollars worth of stock on the place. The 
farm house, the center of this admirable farm plant, is a large, modern 
house, ec|uipped throughout in strictly u])-to-date fashion, and Mr. Richards 
and his famih are \ery pleasantly and \ery comfortably situated. .\'ot 
only has Mr. Richards been successful in his farming operations, but he 
has given close attention to the general business activities of the commimity, 
helpful in many ways in promoting the various enterprises that have added 
so much to the development of this region. He was the organizer of the 
First State Bank of Perley and is chairman of the hoard of directors oi 
the same. 

In 1880, the year following his location at I'argo, .Mr. {Richards was 
united in marriage, at Erie, Pennsvlvania, to Sarah M. Eliot, who was born 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 395 

at that place in 1859, aixl tn lliis union two childrtni have Ikx-w Imrn, a 
son, John EHot Richards, and a daughter. Ruth KHot Richards, the latter 
of whom was graduated from a New Jersey college in the spring of i()i7, 
and the former, of Dartmouth College. John E. Richards reni;iins im the 
home place, aiding in the general management of the same. Marry Richards 
i> a Mason of high degree, having attained the Scottish Rite (thirty-second 
(le.gree) in that order, a charter member of the consistory of North Dakota 
and is a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, 
affiliated with El Zagal Temple at Fargo. He also is a member of the 
.Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and in the affairs of that order 
likewise takes a warm interest. 



SAMSON N. PETERSON. 

Samson N. Peterson, an enterprising merchant at Perley, Norman 
county, was born at Calamus, Iowa, January 21, 1864. He is a son of 
Nils and Kari (Hanson) Peterson, both natives of Norway, where they 
grew to maturity and attended school, and they were married in their native 
land in 1855. They came to America on their honeymoon and located on 
a farm near Calamus, Iowa, buying raw land, which they improved by hard 
work and perseverance, enduring the usual hardships and jMivations of 
pioneer life. The father still lives on the home place there, which he has 
now occupied for a period of sixty-two years, a record that tew men in 
his state can equal. He owns one hundred and eighty acres. His wife 
died on December 21, 1891. She was a member of the Norwegian Luth- 
eran church, to which Nils Peterson also belongs. To these parents three 
children were born, Hans, Samson N. and Cornelius. 

.Samson N. Peterson grew to manhood on the iiomc farm at ('alamns. 
Iowa, working hard during the croj) seasons, and in tlie winter attended the 
district schools, later attending the high school at Dewitt, that state, and 
was graduated therefrom. He began life for liimself as a teacher, in the 
fall of 1881, and continued teaching for ei.ght years with success, giving 
satisfaction both to pupils and patrons, and his services were in demand. 
During this period he taught four years in Norman county, Minnesota, hav- 
ing come here in 1886. In the fall of 1890 he began clerking in a store at 
Ada, and the following year took a position as clerk in the store of .\. J. 
Kroshus at Perlev, which |)osition he held two years, then clerked two years 



3y6 CI.AV AND NOK.MAN COUXTIIIS, M 1 X N'KSOTA. 

in the Aabye store there. He then went tu l'"argi). Xortli Dakota, and 
clerked one year: then had charge of a store at llorace, that state, seven 
years. In all these positions he gave his employers most satisfactory serv- 
ice, being faithful, alert and courteous to customers. During his period 
of clerking .Mr. I'eterson was a close observer and mastered the various 
ins and outs of the mercantile business, at the same time saving his earn- 
ings. Ui)on lea\ing Horace in 1904 he located in Perley, Minnesota, and 
bought out a general merchandise business, which he has since conducted 
with \ery gratifying results, carrying an extensive stock of well-selected 
goods and enjoying a large and growing trade with the town and surround- 
ing country. He has also been interested in the Lee l^levator Company 
there and has discharged the duties of secretary of the company during the 
past nine years. 

On .March 21. 18SS, .Mr. I'eterson was married to Bertha Margaret 
Johnson, who was born at Calamus. Iowa, antl who received a good educa- 
tion in the jtublic schools of Dewitt. liwa. She is a daughter of George 
and Bertha ( Christianson ) Johnson, natives of Norway, who were farming 
])eo])le of Clinton county, Iowa. Three children ha\e been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Peterson, namely: Xils. Beatrice and Laura. Mr. Peterson is 
a Republican and is a memlier of the village council of Perley and also 
clerk of the local school board. He belongs to the Norwegian Lutheran 
church in which he is a deacon, having held this office for many years, and 
is actixe in church work. 



ANDREW I. HAGEN. 



.\lbert J. Ilagen. the well-known owner of one hundred and ei.ghty 
acres of Heudrum township land, and director in the I'armers State Bank 
of the village of Hendrum, was born in Norway. September 21, 1859, the 
son of Johanas O. and 01a\a .\ndreasdatter ( Hagen ) Hagen, both born in 
Norwa}', where the\' were reared and were married, coming to America 
in 1867. I'\)r the first ten years after the family came to .\merica, they 
lived in Houston county, Minnesota, and \\'inneshiek county, Iowa, where 
the father worked as a farm hand, a carpenter and a tinner. In 1877 
Johanas Hagen, following the example of manv of his countrymen who 
had emigrated from the land of their nativity to this country, decided to 
push northward into Minnesota, where he could become the owner of some 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 397 

of the excellent land whicii was at that time being opened to settlement. 
In the year mentioned abo\e, he started to Xorman county hy train, and 
his family, with the hotisehold goods and a few farming in:plements, and 
two teams, one of oxen and the other of horses, followed oxerland with 
a party of settlers made up of three families, one of which was that of 
Ole N. Tommerdahl. In 1878 or 1879 the family homesteaded a cpiarter 
section of land in Hendrum township where Albert J. Hagen now lives, anfl 
there the father and mother lived until their deaths. 

The elder Hagen became a prominent pioneer in the township, for he 
was ever in the forefront during his residence there in the opening of the 
country to settlement. He helped to organize the township and the first 
church in the community, called the St. Paul Lutheran church ; the first 
postoffice of Hendrum was established -in the house on his homestead, two 
miles north of Hendrum \illage, and he was the first postmaster. To Johanas 
Hagen and wife were born eleven children, all of whom died young except 
the following six: Greta (deceased), Ole, Nickoli A. (deceased), Albert 
J., the subject of this review; John, who is lixing in Hendrum, and Martin, 
who died at the age of thirteen years. 

Albert J. Hagen recei\ed a very limited education in the common 
schools of Houston county before he came here with his parents in 1877. 
and has always lived in Hendrum township since he has resided in .Vorm.m 
county. After remaining several years on the home place, where he in 
dustriously applied himself to bringing the family's hokling under cultiva 
tion, he started out on his own account, buying eighty acres of railroad 
land in Hendrum township, and later he bought a pre-emption right to eightx' 
more acres and li\ed on the same for two and one-half vears, proving it 
up. After that he returned to the eighty-acre tract of railroad land and 
remained there eleven years, froin 1885 to 1896. He then took up his 
residence on his father's homestead, which he has improved by erecting 
excellent farm buildings and has since made that his home. He now is the 
owner of one hundred and eighty acres of well-improved land on which he 
carries on general farming. 

On July II, 1889, Mr. Hagen married Sophia Christianson, who was 
born in Norway, the daughter of Johan and Nikoline Christianson, who 
ne\'er came to America. To this union have been born the following chil- 
dren, all of whom are living: Olga, Julia, Matilda, .Alfred. Christian, Clara. 
Stella, Hilda and Margaret. The Hagen family are all members of the 
Lutheran denomination, in the affairs of which church they take a deep 
and serious interest. Mr. Hagen is "independent" in his political \iews 



398 CI.AV AND NOKMAN COfKTlKS, MINNESOTA. 

and takes a good citizen's interest in tlic welfare of liis coinnumiiv. liavin.t; 
served the township as to\vnshi[) clerk and as a nienil)er of the townsliip 
board for several years. Being- a jjrogressive citizen of his commnnitv. 
Air. Hagen has ever been interested in bettering the business agencies of 
iiis neighborhood and helped to organize tlie farmers ele\ator. tlie creamerv 
and the Farmers State Bank, all of Hendrum, and of the last cntcr])rise 
named, he has been a director since its organization. 



.\. (.',. .\.\.\i;.\S().\. 



A. G. Aanenson. manager and treasurer of the Fanners' Elevator Com- 
pany at .Shelly, former member of the cimncil of that village and one of the 
best-known grain men in Xorman county, is a native of the kingdom of 
Xorway. but has been a resident of this country since shortly after reaching 
his majority. He was born on July 26. 1865, a son of Aanen and Johanna 
C. (Aslaksen) Gnnderson. also natives of Xorway, farming people, who 
spent all their lives in their n;itive country and who were the parents of five 
sons, those besides the subject of this sketch being .\nton. Ole, John and 
Andrew S. Aamodt. 

Reared on the liDUie tarm, .V. (i. .Aanenson received his schooling in 
the schools of his native land and remained there until after he was of age, 
when, in July. 1887, he came to the United States and l(X-ated at Millsboro. 
Xorth Dakota, in the vicinity of which place he worked on a farm until the 
fall of that year, when he came o\er the line into Minnesota and for aljout 
two years thereafter was engaged in work on farms in the vicinity of Hal- 
stad. Mr. Aanenson then entered Hope Academy at Moorhead and was at- 
tending school there when Concordia College was established in that city. 
He entered Concordia and after a comprehensive course there began teach- 
ing school in X'orman county and was thus engaged for two or three years, 
at the end of which time he Ijegan farming in Halstad township. Two \ears 
later he left the farm and moved into the village of Shelly, where he ever 
since has made his home. It was in 1897 that Mr. Aanenson located at 
Shelly and until he became connected with the Farmers' Co-operative Ele- 
vator Company he was engaged as a clerk in various stores in that village. 
Some vears after the organization of the Farmers' Co-operative I^le\atnr 
Company he was installed as treasurer of the same and two years later was 
made manager of the company, as well as treasurer, and has since continued 



CLAY AND XC1R\[AX COINTIES, MINNESOTA. 3gy 

to serve in that responsible dual capacity, rendering an excellent service in 
behalf of the farmers of that neighborhood. Mr. Aanenson also has gi\en 
thoughtful attention to local civic affairs, has rendered service as a member 
of the village council and for the past fifteen years has been a member nf 
the local school board, performing a valuable service in behalf of the schuols 
of Shelly, which have been raised to a high grade of excellence. 

On November 3. r8c;4, A. G. Aanenson was united in marriage to 
Martha Marie Olson, daughter of Knute Olson, and to this union seven 
children ha\-e been born, .\rthur Rennett. Cora Olene. Hannah Christine. 
Alma Charlotte, Alvin Morris, Rernice Jeroma and Ardell Arnot. all of 
whom are living. The Aanensons have a very pleasant home at Shelly and 
take an interested part in the village's general social acti\-ities. Mr. and 
Mrs. Aanenson are members of the Lutheran church, in the various benefi- 
cences of which they ever have taken an actixe interest, and Mr. .\anenson is 
a member of the board of trustees of the local congregation. Fraternally, 
he is affiliated with the local society of the Sons of Norway and takes a 
warm interest in the affairs of that organization. 



OI.AF SOLWOLD. 



Olaf Solwold. a substantial and progressi\-e farmer of Keene lownsinp. 
Clay county, owner of two bnndred and forty acres of excellent land ;inrl 
raiser of a good grade of live stock, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, 
but has been a resident of this countr)- since he was eighteen years old, 
coming here in 1880. He was born in 1862, a son of Peter and .\nn;i Sol- 
wold, natives of Norway, who immigrated to America in 1880, accom- 
panied by their son. the subject of this .sketch. Peter Solwold is now 
living in Keene township at the advanced age of three score ;uid ten. His 
wife, Anna Solwold, died in rgof). They were the parents of the following 
children. Andrea (deceased), Carrie, Olaf. Harold ( dece.-iscd in Xorwav), 
Annie, Harry and Enger. 

Olaf .Solwold was educated in the schools of bis nati\e .Xorway and' 
at the age of eighteen years, in 1880, immigrated with his jiarents to this 
country and on arriving in Alinnesota located on the homestead of one hun- 
dred and si:-.ty acres in section 22. Keene townshi]), the latter being later 
sold. He W.1S a valuable assistant to his father in the work of improving 
and developir^ the liome place. He bought on his own account a homestead 



400 CI.AV AM) XOKMAN COINTIKS, MINNESOTA. 

trad of one 'nindred and sixty acres in section J4 and in conrse of time 
lionght eighty acres in section 23. Mr. Solwold is now engaged in general 
farming and .stock raising and is regarded as one of the progressive farm- 
ers of this i)art of tlie townshi]). He raises oats and l)arlev as well as 
other crops. He has carried out many suhstantial im[)r(jvements on his 
holding and has made an addition to the dwelling house, and his agricul- 
tural operations are conducted according to modern farming methods. 

Olaf Solwold was united in marriage to Anna Marie Olson, born in 
Norway in 1872, and who, at tlie age of eighteen, came to .\nierica in 
company with Olaf Solwold. who went hack to .X'orway in the fall of iSSg. 
returning in the spring with his hride-to-lx?. To this union the follow ing 
children have been horn : Peter, who is married and rents the .Mbertson 
place, in the south part of Keene township: Marion, who is married and 
lives in the state of Washington; Susie, who is visiting with .Marion: Ida, 
who is marrie<l and li\es on a farm east of Keene township: and Olaf. 
Bernard. Hannah. Laura, .\gnes and Kdna. living at home. Mr Solwold 
is a meml)er of the Synod church and is an earnest attendant on its services. 
He and his wife take a i)roper part in the general sociaJ and cultural 
affairs of the neighborhood in which they li\e. e\er ready to assist in all 
worthy movements intended to promote the best interests nf the c(jmniuniiy. 



O. (r hWRSUALE. 



O. G. Farsdale. head of the I'ar^dale Land .\gency at Glyndon, a sub- 
-slantial landowner and one of the best-known men in this section of the Red 
River valley, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, hut has been a resi- 
dent of this countr\- and of Minnesota since he was fourteen years of age. 
He was born at Faersdalen, two Norwegian miles from the \illage of 
Meraker, in the stift of Trondjhem, October 8, 185 1, son of Guttorm Olsen 
and Ingeborg ( Kirkeby) Farsdale, the former of whom also was bom at 
Faersdalen and the latter at .Meraker. who became pioneer residents of 
Minnesota and in this state spent their last days. 

Guttorm Olson harsdale was a road builder in his nati\e land, in 
1865 he crossed the .\tlantic with his family, the voyage requiring seven 
weeks in the making, and landed at Quebec, from which port he came to 
this state and settled on a farm in Goodhue countv. where he spent the rest 
of his life, one of the substantial and influential pioneers of that county. 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ASTOR. LENex 
I riLD£^ f OU.^.-PATIONS 




'J 
d 



OS 

P5 








FAMir.v or o. a, faijsdale. 



Tni, NEW YORK 

P"-nC LIBRARY 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 4OI 

His wife died in 1868, about three years after the arrival of the family 
in this country, and he afterward married Helena Olson, who is still living, 
now making her home in Spring Prairie township, Clay county. G. O. 
Farsdale died in 1872. By his first marriage he was the father of three 
children, those besides the subject of this sketch, the eldest, having been 
Mollie, who married N. E. Lundgren, and Ole, who died in Norway. To 
the second union one child was born, a son, Ole. 

As noted above, O. G. Farsdale was but fourteen years of age when 
he came to Minnesota with his parents in 1865. As a boy of ten he had 
been employed at herding cattle and had been thus engaged for three years 
before coming to America. He had not neglected his schooling, however, 
and after coming here pursued his studies in the schools of Goodhue county, 
taking advantage of the opportunity thus offered to perfect himself in 
the study of English, and for five winters was in attendance on the local 
schools, supplementing the same by attendance for one term at the Lutheran 
College at Decorah, Iowa. The death of his father in 1872, however, inter- 
rupted his college course and he returned home to look after the interests 
of the farm. He married in 1876 and for two years thereafter was engaged 
in the drug business at Cannon Falls. In 1877 he came up into the Red 
River \'alley and homesteaded a quarter of a section of land in section 6 
of Riverton township, Clay county, thus establishing himself as one of the 
pioneers of that section of the county. In the following spring he moved 
his family here and established his home on the homestead tract, which he 
proceeded to improve in substantial shape, erecting a good house and farm 
buildings tf> match, and there continued to make his home until 1909, in 
which vear he retired from the farm and moved to the village of Glyndon, 
where he established the Farsdale Land Agency and where he since has 
continued to make his home, extensively enga,ged in the real-estate business. 
In addition to his real-estate and other interests, Mr. Farsdale is the owner 
of fi\e hundred and sixty acres of excellent land in this state and is accounted 
one of the most substantial citizens of Clay county. It is probable that no 
man in the county has a wider or more accurate knowledge of real-estate 
\alues in and about Clay county than has Mr. Farsdale. Not only that. 
Init he has a practical knowledge of the needs of the agriculturist, based upon 
his \-ears of experience as a ])ioneer farmer, and he is thoroughl}- ;uid accu- 
rately posted on soil conditions throughout this valley. 

In 1882, when Riverton township came to be organized as a civic 
unit of Clay county, Mr. Farsdale was one of the leaders of tliat movement 
(26a) 



402 CLAY AND NDRMAN COUNTIKS, MINNESOTA. 

and for more than twenty years thereafter served as clerk of that town- 
ship. For abont the same lengtli of time he served as justice of the peace 
in and for that township and since his removal to Glyndon has served as 
assessor and as justice of the peace. In i8yo Mr-i-'arsdale helped to orjjan- 
ize the Populist party in his home county and in 1892 was that party's 
nominee for the stale Legislature. In 1902 he wa- the parly's nominee for 
state senator. Of late years Air. Farsdale has reserved to himself the ri^ht 
of independence in his political views and votes for the man rather than 
for the party, believing and maintaining that that way lies good citizen- 
ship, as well as the better conservation of the interests of all the people. 
In church and scho')l affairs Mr. h^arsdale has also given of his best and 
was one of the most active promoters of all good movements hercaboul in 
pioneer days. He helped organize the Riverton church and ihe Sprint; 
Prairie church and for many years served as secretary of the former. He 
was also one of the incorporators of Concordia College at Moorhead and 
has ever taken an active interest in the affairs of that excellenl and intluen- 
tial institution. 

On February 10, 1876, in Goodlme county, O. G. Farsdale was united 
in marriage to Inglew Alattson, who was born on July 27, 1855, and who 
is still living, one of the best-known and most highly respected pioneer 
mothers of Clav county, her influence for good in the days of the creation 
of a proper social order hereabout having endeared her to a wide circle 
of ac(iuaintances throughout ihe county. To that union eleven children have 
been l)oni. namely: Gusta\-. who died at th.e age of seventeen years: Ida 
Matilda, who married h>ank Johnson, of Dululh. this state, and has three 
children, h'lorence. Frances and Grace: Oscar P., living at M(M)rhea(l. who 
has been twice married, his first wife having been Ollie Ellingson and his 
second, Mrs. Mabel Mc.A.bee: Hannah B.. who married Leslie Hennessy, 
of Glenwood, and had one chiTd. now deceased: Helen L., who married 
Oscar Thompson, of Dululh, and has three children. Virginia, Carson and 
P)vron; .Anna Maria, wife of Rudolph Mans, of Glyndon: .\Ifred B., now 
living at Great Falls, Montana, who married Mabel Rudlang and has one 
child, a daughter. Eleanor: Inger Olivia, who married Elbert Rotto, also 
of Great Falls, and has one child, a son. Donald: Edwin H., who died 
at the age of one vear and twelve days: Edwin Gustav. now a traveling 
salesman, and an infant daughter who died on July 21, 1898. The l-'ars- 
dales are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and have ever taken 
an interested part in church work, as well as in other local good works 
and in the general social activities of the community of which they have 
been a part since pioneer days. 



CLAY Ai\D NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 4O3 

NELS T. ODEGAARD. 

The latt Xels T. Odegaard, who for years was one of the best-known 
citizens of Norman county, a substantial landowner, farmer and bridge 
l)uilder, who died at his home in Lee township in the summer of 1917, was a 
native of the kingdom of Norway, but had been a resident of this state 
since 1872. He was liorn on August 4, 1849, and remained in his native 
land until 1872, in which year he came tu ^Minnesota with G. I. Crosby and 
settled in Goodhue county, later coming up into the Red River country, 
where he spent the rest of his life. He was the second of the two sons 
born to his parents, Tora and Ranhild Odegaard, both of whom spent all 
their lives in their native country and both of whom died during the eigh- 
ties. The other son, Andrew, also is deceased. 

In 1879, the year of his marriage. Nels Odegaard bought the land on 
which his widow is now living, a quarter-section tract in section 23 of Lee 
'township, and there established his home. He later bought an adjoining 
twentv-acre tract and also a tract of forty acres in Georgetown township. 
Clay county. By original vocation Mr. Odegaard was a bridge-builder and 
upon coming up here did nuich work in that line, many of the bridges in 
this part of the state having been built under his skillful direction. Not only 
was he a good farmer, but he gave his attention to the general business 
affairs of the community, was one of the organizers of the local creamery 
company at Perley and a stockholder in the same, and was a stockholder in 
the l-armers and Merchants Bank of Perley, long being accounted one of the 
substantial residents of that section of the county. For some time he.served 
the public as township trustee and in other ways did his part in public 
.affairs, as well as in the general affairs of the community. Mr. Odegaard 
<lied on lulv 4, 1917. and his passing was much lamented in the community 
of which he had been a part since pioneer days, for he had done well his part 
in all his relations with his fellow men. 

It was on Tune 5, 1879. as noted above, that Nels Odegaard was united 
in marria-e on the old Crosbv place, to Anna Crosby, who was born in 
Norwav on Februarv 7, 1859. and who came to this state with her brother, 
G 1 Crosby in 1872, her mother having died in Norway when she was 
three years of age. There were born seven children in the family of Nels 
Odegaard. namelv : Th.eodore. who is married and \xho ,s now I'vng m 
North Dakota, where he is engaged in the buying of gram : Inga. wife of M. 
\ I arson of Perlev : Marv. who is home with her mother: Jens, who ,s 
now farming a three-hun<lred-acre farm belonging to h,s mother m the 



404 CLAV AND NORMAN COUXTIKS, MINNESOTA. 

neisihborliood of \\ ahpton : and X'elius. John and Alma, at home. Mr. 
Odegaard was an active meml)er of the Lutheran church, as is his widow, 
and did much toward jjromotint^ the various beneficences of the same. He 
was lon<,' a meml)er of the hoard of trustees of the local church, helped build 
the same and was a liberal contributor to the cause of church work. The 
l.iniily have a very pleasant home in Lee township and take an interested 
])an in the iictieral social activities and good works of the comniunitv. 



S. S. DALEN. 



S. S. Dalen, cashier of the Farmers and Merchants' Bank at Perley, and 
one of the leading business men of southwestern Xornian county, was born 
in Goodhue county, Minnesota, in 1863. He is a son of Syvert .\. and 
Synva ( Biekke ) Dalen, both natives of Norway, where they spent their 
earlier years, immigrating to America about 1842 and settling in Goodhue 
county. Minnesota, among the jjioneers. There thev developed a good f:irm 
by hard work and perseverance and established a comfortable home, contin- 
uing to reside there until the spring of 1882, when they removed to the 
\ icinity of Georgetown in Clay county, buying a farm of about one hundred 
and fifty acres along the Red river, and there they spent the rest of their 
li\es. They were memiiers of the Norwegian Lutheran church. Their fam- 
ily consisted oi nine children, namely; Bretha, who married Ole Finley; 
Xels, Andrew, Louis, John. ."^. S.. Anna, Gertie and Ole. 

S. S. Dalen spent his boyhood in Goodhue county, where he helped with 
the work on the farm and attended the public schools, later attending Will- 
mar College, at W'illmar. Minnesota, where he took a business course in 
1N87. After leaving school he began life for himself as a merchant, hand- 
ling a general line of goods at (jeorgetown. He enjoyed a good business 
with the people of that town and the surrounding country for many miles, 
and remained there until 1899. when he moved to Perley, where he has since 
resided. He became cashier of the Bank of Perley and there continued for 
seven years, at the end of which time he sold his interest in the bank and 
went to Moorhead and engaged in the clothing business there four years. He 
then went to the state of Washington and spent a year, then returned to 
Xorman county and farmed in the vicinity of Perley for three years, during 
which time he was also interested in a store at Hendrum. In 1914 Mr. 
Dalen again turned his attention to the banking business, organizing the 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 405 

Farmers and Merchants' Bank at Perley, of which he has since been cashier. 
The rapid .s^rowth of this popular and safe bank lias been due very largely 
ti) his able management and conservative methods and his honesty, prompt- 
ness and courtesy in dealing with his patrons. A general banking business is 
carried on and the bank has modern fixtures and equipment. 

Mr. Ualen is also connected with the First State Bank of South Haven, 
.Miniiesnta. and has an interest in a general store at Georgetown. He has 
been ver\' successful in a business way, being a man of sound judgment and 
foresight, energetic and persevering. Politically, Mr. Dalen is a Republican 
and while living at Georgetown served as treasurer of Georgetown township 
for ten years. He is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church, which he 
ser\'ed as trustee for about twelve years ; has always been a liberal supporter 
of the church and other worthy causes, and is active in church affairs. 

In 1890 S. S. Dalen was married to Bertha Ohnstad, a native of Nor- 
way. She received a commr}n school education. She is a daughter of Mons 
and Christine (Ohnstad) Ohnstad. natives of Norway. Three children have 
been horn to Mr. and Mrs. Dalen. namely : Clara, Sanford, who died when 
eight years of age, and Bernice. 



NELS J. ENGER. 



Nels J. Enger, a substantial farmer and well-known stock raiser of 
Halstad township, Norman county, where he owns two hundred acres ')f 
fine farming land, a present member of the Norman county board of county 
commissioners and a man who has been and is deeply interested in local 
business affairs, was born in Norway, August i6, 1859, a son of Jacob J. 
and Martha (Christopherson) Enger. The father and mother, who were 
both natives of Norway, decided in the early seventies that .America offered 
ihem excellent opportunities to establish themselves comfortably, as had 
been the experience of many of their countrymen, and immigrated to this 
country in 1872. They settled first in Fillmore county, Minnesota, where 
there were several of their friends, and awaited the oi^ening of some new 
territory northward where they could acquire a holding of the rich, new 
prairie .soil. In 1878 the parents, with some of their children, joined a party 
of settlers who were driving through to what was later organized into 
Norman county. It was on May 9 of that year that the little band of pio- 
neers struck out northward behind their horse teams, driving their cattle 



406 CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

before llieni and tliey arrived at their destination on June y, their juurr.ey 
requiring a little more than ;i month. The elder linger and wife were the 
parents of seven children, of whom the subject of this review was the young- 
est, the others being: Anna Elizabeth, who married and lived in Norway, 
rearing a family; a daughter, who died in infancy; Christ; Olaus J., now 
called Lewis J. ; Martha, who is dead, and Ellen. Jacob and Martha Enger 
did not establish a home in Norman county, but lived among their children 
until their deaths. 

Nels J. Enger received his early education in the schools of Norway 
and in Eillmore county. Minnesota. He was only seventeen years of age 
when he accompanied his parents northward into Norman county, but the 
buoyancy so characteristic of a youth of that age lent enthusiasm to his 
efforts to establish himself in that new land, and soon after he arrived in 
that territory, he plowed a furrow around the southwest quarter of section 
ID, in Halstad township and bought that tract when it was placed on the 
market as state land. Since this land was overgrown with small timber and 
underbrush, he bad no little difficulty in clearing it and putting it into 
condition for growing crops, but his ])ersistence trium])hed in the end and 
where formerl)- was an expanse of wild land be has now a well-improved 
.\nd carefully cultivated farm. On this, the home i)lace, lie has planted a 
fine grove and has raised adequate and substantial buildings. His industry 
has enabled him to add to his holdings and several years ago he bought the 
west half of the northwest quarter of section 15. in Halstad township. In 
addition to his general agricultural operations, he raises tlnjroughbred Aber- 
deen-Angus cattle. 

On March 29, 1887, Nels J. Enger was united in marriage to Bertha 
Orvick, who was born in Fillmore county, Minnesota, Deccmljer 8, 1868, 
a daughter of Jacob and llertha (Tollefson) Orvick. She came to Norman 
county with her parents in 1879, just one year after Mr. Enger came north- 
ward with bis parents. To Mr. and Mrs. Enger twelve children have 
been born: Edwin M., Selnia, Tenny, Nora. James, Ernest, Chester, Myrtle 
and Sella, all of whom are li\ing at home, and Edwin, Selma and Ijcnnie. 
deceased. 

.\ \ery obvious thing about Mr. Enger"s career thus far has been his 
marked activity in local civic and business affairs. He has served as town- 
ship supervisor and as a member of the township school board most of 
the time. His work in these capacities has so commended him to his nei.gh- 
bors that he was elected a member of the county board of commissioner- 
anfl is an incumbent of that office at the present time. He has also given 



CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 407 

of his time to the business interests of the community, since lie helped td 
organize the Halstad Farmers Lumber Company, the farmers ele\ator rmd 
the creamery at Halstad. In politics, Air. Enger is a stanch adherent (it 
the Republican party. He and his family are members of the Augustana 
Lutheran church and in the affairs of the same thev take an active interest. 



ELBERT A. MELDRUM. 

Elbert D. Meldrum, one of Norman county's most extensive landowners 
and most successful stock raisers, the owner of a splendidly improved farm 
of more than thirteen hundred acres in Lee township and long accounted 
one of the most progressive agriculturists in this section of the Red River 
valley, is a native of the great Empire state, but has been a resident of this 
part of the country since the early eighties and is, therefore, very properly 
regarded as one of the real "old settlers" of this section. He was born in 
the city of Buffalo, New York, in 1859, a son of Rol^ert O. and Julia Ettie 
(Brown) Meldrum, the latter of whom is still living at Buffalo, being now 
in the eighty-sixth year of her age. She was born at East Aurora, New 
York, of old Colonial stock, one of her ancestors having come over in the 
"Mayflower." Robert O. Meldrum was a native of Novia Scotia and came 
to the States with his parents in the days of his youth. He was one of 
the pioneer oil men in Pennsylvania and was quite successful in his opera- 
tions, having investments both in that state and in New York, and was 
al