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Full text of "History of Clinch County, Georgia, revised to date, giving the early history of the county down to the present time (1916): also complete lists of county officers, together with minor officers and also sketches of county officers' lives; with chapters on the histories of old families of Clinch County; also other information as is historical in its nature, comp. and ed. by Folks Huxford"

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JAMES W. STATEN 
First Representative from Clinch County. 



History 

of 

Clinch County, Georgia 

Revised to Date 

Giving the early history of the County down to the 

present time (1916) ; also complete lists of County 

Officers, together with minor officers and 

also sketches of County Officers' Lives; 

with chapters on the histories of 

old families of Clinch County ; 

also other information as 

is historical in its 

nature 



Compiled and Edited by 
FOLKS HUXFORD 



Fz9z 



COPYRIGHT APPLIED FOR 

1916 



1916 

The J. W. Burke Company 

.Macon, Georeia 



DEC 30 ISIS 



^C!,A453398 



Foreword 

IN the Fair Southland, fanned by the gentle sea breeze, musical 
with the song of the pines, where plenty of peace and con- 
tentment abound, no more favored section can be found 
than Clinch County. What hidden treasures, what immense pos- 
sibilities yet undeveloped, she offers to all who diligently seek 
them here! Her wealth lies not in mineral deposits, nor great 
water power, but in a salubrious climate, pure water, a fertile 
soil capable of the highest state of cultivation, good ranges for 
live stock, timbered lands, and a people than whom no better 
can be found anywhere in all our fair land. Many adverse cir- 
cumstances have retarded the development of the natural re- 
sources of the County, but the sun of a better day has already 
risen for her, and is scattering the mists before it and flooding 
the land with the rays of hope and prosperity. 



'4^'S 



Preface 

IN the preparation and compiling of this book, containing the history 
of Clinch County, I have done so with an eye single to the welfare 
of the County, a true exposition of the County and its history, and with 
the hope that in years to come it may, in the absence of any other book 
on the subject, be a reference book of Clinch County and her people. 

There are many details given in the following pages, which will, to the 
reader on first thought, appear to be superfluous and unnecessary, but 
the author recognizes the fact that details are often necessary to a com- 
plete understanding and an exhaustive review of a subject. I have 
endeavored to resist the temptation to extenuate, and the reader will 
pardon the author if it becomes wearisome in reading this book because 
of so many minor details given. 

A word in explanation of some of the chapters: 

In Chapter I, also in Chapter XIII, much is said concerning Irwin, 
Lowndes, Appling and Ware Counties, but the author is of the opinion 
that this is necessary as it relates to the early history of this County 
before its formation. 

In Chapter II, and in Chapter III, extended remarks are made on the 
earlier settlers of the County. This data is based on information gathered 
from descendants of these settlers and from other parties. I would not 
have the reader think that the settlers named in this connection, were 
the only ones living here at the time; far from that. 

In Chapter V is given information as to the soldiers who served in the 
Confederate Army from Clinch County. The author does not vouch for 
the correctness of all of this information, as it was by the merest chance 
and the hardest of investigating and inquiry, that these names were 
obtained. The names were given mostly by survivors now living of these 
companies, and the list of officers and men in each company will not be 
found complete, due to the obvious impossibility of the recollection of so 
many names that far back. 

In regards to Chapter VIII, treating on educational subjects, it was 
very difficult to obtain what information is given as the author had no 
access to the old minutes of the Board of Education further back than 



6 Preface 

1892. The information given is chiefly from the different acts of the 
Legislature right after the war, and from scattered papers in the Ordi- 
nary's office, while the list of members of the Board of Education is taken 
from the Grand Jury presentments. 

In presenting church history and family histories, the author has 
endeavored to be as correct, fair and authentic as possible. In the prep- 
aration of family histories, only a few are given, such as the larger fam- 
ilies of Clinch. County, although the ancestry of a few others are given, 
which reach very far back. 

The author offers no apology for the extensive chapter on the lives of 
Clinch County's officers. I believe this will form a valuable addition to 
this book, especially to a future generation. I believe that unless this 
information is given, those who follow after us will look back on the 
official list of county officers, and ask "Who was this officer? I never 
heard of him and do not know any of his people." This question is true 
to-day for I have been unable to find out anything about some of our 
earlier officers. 

Also I believe that the appended lists of minor officers, such as district 
road commissioners, jury commissioners, justices of the peace, etc., will 
be found interesting. 

I have been hampered in this undertaking by more than one obstacle. 
This is an undertaking never before undertaken in this County. I have 
found some people very skeptical about the idea of writing a history of 
our County. I have found some who are wholly indifferent to the past. 
I was also hampered by the loss of our court-house records which go no 
further back than 1867, and many of the books and records for many years 
after then were very poorly kept. 

The author has devoted a great deal of his time for the last two or 
three years to this undertaking, and has endeavored to eliminate all mis- 
takes, but this is very near impossible. Without the kind assistance of 
the following named patriotic citizens, I do not believe I could have com- 
piled this work. To them I am deeply grateful for their sympathy and 
help. I refer to the following residents of Clinch County: 

James R. Dickerson, Argyle; Charlton H. Smith, Homerville; W. H. 
Chauncey, Lyken ; Lee L. DuPont, DuPont ; Moses Tomlinson, Stockton ; 
John G. Griffis, Argyle; Ezekiel Mathis, DuPont; Mrs. Seward Smith, 



Preface 7 

Homerville; Mrs. Elizabeth E. Gary, Homerville; Irwin Corbitt, Pearson, 
R. F. D. ; Bankston E. Mattox and wife, Homerville ; John J. Drawdy, 
Homerville; R. G. Dickerson, Homerville; James B. Cornelius, Homer- 
ville; Mrs. Nancy Griffis, Lyken; P. M. Lee, DuPont, and Mrs. H. A. 
Mattox, Argyle. 

Out of the County residents: 

Judge J. L. Sweat, Waycross ; Joseph E. Bass, Kissimmee, Fla. ; Mrs. 
P. D. Clifton, Hahira; Lucian L. Knight, Atlanta; Mrs. M. S. Corbitt, 
Pearson ; George A. Dame, Inverness, Fla. ; Mrs. B. P. Jones, Valdosta ; 
Mrs. Mary A. Ray, Ray City ; J. G. King, Arcadia, Fla. ; Mrs. A. J. Caswell, 
Jacksonville, Fla.; Mrs. R. F. Laslie, Tarver; John L. Morgan, Lakeland, 
Fla.; Perry G. Ramsey, Gainesville, Fla.; John L. Smith, Screven; Jona- 
than O'Steen, Kirkland ; Mrs. Sherod Smith, Tampa, Fla. ; W. P. Smith, 
Nacogdoches, Texas; C. Strickland, Valdosta; N. A. Sirmans, Milledge- 
ville; S. C. Townsend, St. Marys; W. H. Tucker, Bradentown, Fla.; D. C. 
Carmichael, Manor; and "The Valdosta Times," Valdosta, the last named 
of which I had access to their files dating back to 1868; and Mrs. J. N. 
Griffin, Valdosta. 

Besides these, there are numerous others, which space forbids me to 
name. 



FOLKS HUXFORD. 



Homerville, Ga., 

July, 1916. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 

CHAPTER I. 

Ceding of the Lands Which Now Comprise Clinch 
County. — Origin of Appling County. — Origin of Irwin 
County. — Origin of Ware County. — Origin of Lowndes 
County. — First Settlers. — Primitive Condition. — Indian 
Troubles. — Growth of the County. — "Olden Times." — 
Land Grants. 

THE lands which now comprise Clinch County, were 
ceded by the Indians by a treaty made at Fort Jackson, 
in the western part of this State, August 9th, 18 14. 
There was no stipulated sum paid for the land, this being the 
only cession of lands by the Indians which the government 
did not have to pay for. This treaty was the culmination of 
a war caused by Indian outrages, which had been raging for 
about three years. General Andrew Jackson's crowning vic- 
tory over them at Horse-Shoe Bend on the Tallapoosa River 
in Alabama, caused them to sue for peace and the treaty of 
Fort Jackson was the result. Besides the lands ceded which 
lie now in Clinch County, other territory was ceded out of 
which about twenty counties in South Georgia have since been 
made. 

ORIGIN OF APPLING COUNTY. 

Four years after the treaty was made, Appling County 
was created by an Act of the Legislature approved December 
1 5th, 1 8 1 8. This county took in not only what is now Clinch 
County, but also Ware, Coffee and parts of several other 
counties. At the same time Irwin County was created. Two 
years later the first election for county officers was held in 
Appling County. The following were elected: William 
Carter, sheriff; John Bailey, Clerk of the Superior Court; 



lo History of Clinch County, Georgia 

James Mixon, coroner and Daniel S. Whitehurst, surveyor. 
Appling County was named for Col. Daniel Appling, a noted 
soldier of the Revolution. 

ORIGIN OF IRWIN COUNTY. 

Irwin County was created at the same time Appling 
County was, and was named in honor of Governor Jared 
Irwin, of this State. The first county officers were not com- 
missioned until 1820. Originally the line between Irwin and 
Appling Counties, extended along the line dividing the sev- 
enth and twelfth land districts of Ware County from the 
tenth and eleventh land districts of Irwin County. This 
caused most of the present Mud Creek district to be in Irwin 
County, as was also the Stockton district. 

ORIGIN OF WARE COUNTY. 

Ware County was created by an Act of the Legislature ap- 
proved December 15th, 1824. It was created out of lands 
theretofore situated in Appling County, and was named for 
Hon. Nicholes Ware, a United States Senator from this 
State. Early in the year 1825 an election was held in the new 
county for Justices of the Inferior Court, which at this time 
had charge of all county matters. The following justices 
were elected and were commissioned March 2nd, 1825 : Wil- 
liam Smith, Solomon Hall, John L. Stewart, Jr., Philemon 
Bryan and Absalom Thomas. The election for county of- 
ficers was not held until the next year, when the following 
were elected: William G. Henderson, sheriff; Joseph Bryan, 
clerk of the Superior and Inferior Courts; Zachariah Davis, 
surveyor, and Joshua Sharpe, coroner. At the same time 
that the Justices of the Inferior Court were elected in 1825, 
Philemon Bryan was elected the first State Senator from 
Ware County, while John L. Stewart was elected the first 
representative. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 1 1 

ORIGIN OF LOWNDES COUNTY. 

By an Act of the Legislature approved December 23rd, 
1825, Lowndes County was created. This county was cre- 
ated from lands formerly in Irwin County, which extended to 
the line dividing the tenth and eleventh land districts of Irwin 
from the seventh, twelfth and thirteenth land districts of 
Ware or formerly Appling. The new county was named 
for Hon. William L. Lowndes, a distinguished statesman of 
South Carolina. The first county officers were commissioned 
May 29th, 1826, and were: William Hancock, sheriff; Sam- 
uel M. Clyatt, surveyor; Henry Blair, clerk of the Superior 
and Inferior Courts; and Malachi Monk, coroner. The 
first State Senator from Lowndes was William A. Knight, 
while the first representative was Jonathan Knight, a notable 
instance of father and son being first representatives of a new 
county in legislative halls. 

FIRST SETTLERS. 

The first settlers in what is now Clinch County, that any 
authenticity can be vouched for, settled in the Mud Creek dis- 
trict, then a part of Irwin County, in December, 1822. They 
were John, William, and Moses Tomlinson, brothers; Josiah 
Sirmans, Sr., and his sons, and David Johnson. William 
Smith, a pioneer minister of the Primitive Baptist Church, 
also settled here about the same time, settling on Red Bluff 
Creek, then in Appling County. Very soon the Newberns, 
O'Steens, and Paffords settled here. Within a few years, 
came John Bennett, Benjamin Cornelius, Jeremiah Chancey, 
Lawrence Smith and Samuel Register. All of the families 
named are still represented in this county by numerous de- 
scendants. 

PRIMITIVE CONDITION. 

The primitive condition of the county before the whites 
became numerous, might easily be imagined. Forests of 
giant trees were everywhere, while game was in abundance. 



12 History of Clinch County , Georgia 

Indians roamed here and there with no permanent habita- 
tion. No such timber as could be found then can now be 
found. It has fell under the chopper's ax and has been the 
source of much profit and occupation. 

At the time Ware and Lowndes Counties were created, 
this part was very sparsely settled. Settlers were few and 
Indians were many. Gradually the country grew, but it was 
not until the advent of the Atlantic & Gulf Railroad, just 
before the Civil War, that any progress was visible outside of 
the increasing population. In the absence of railroads, paths 
and community roads were used. In the course of time, a 
stage road was opened through from Waresboro by Mag- 
nolia and into Lowndes County, "while another stage road 
reached from Troupville, in Lowndes, through Mud Creek 
and connected with the road to Waresboro. 

The oldest militia district in the county is the 586th, 
known as Mud Creek. From the records at Atlanta it is 
found that Hudson Tillery and James O. White were com- 
missioned Justices of the Peace in this district, February loth, 
1829. It was at that time a part of Ware County, and 
reached up into Coffee County. 

INDIAN TROUBLES. 

Troubles with the Indians began to take definite shape 
about 1836. It seems that the trouble originated in the 
State of Alabama on Terrapin Creek, and was caused by the 
efforts of the Creeks to join the Seminoles in Florida, who 
were about to take up the hatchet. The war lasted for about 
two or three years, when practically all the Indians in Geor- 
gia were deported to the West. 

During these troublous times, the whites built a fort about 
two miles north of Cane Creek and about six miles northeast 
of where Homerville now is. It covered about two acres 
of ground and was built by picketing pine poles about twenty 
feet long in the ground, side by side until an inclosure was 
made. These were braced together and made as impreg- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 13 

nable as possible. Inside, small houses were built and the 
fort was otherwise made as much a home as possible for the 
refugees. The settlers also had a place of rendezvous at the 
home of Benjamin Sirmans in the Mud Creek district. Set- 
tlers would often make their clearings as near the forts or 
places of safety as possible in anticipation of any expected 
attack by the Indians. 

Several expeditions were made against the Indians as far 
down as the Suwannee River and the Florida line. Tom 
Fulwood, a member of one of the expeditions, was killed on 
one of the expeditions, and scalped by the Indians. His 
body was recovered by his companions and buried some three 
or four miles from where Henry Lee now lives in this county. 

There were several companies of volunteers organized in 
this section for service against the Indians. A company of 
"scouts" headed by Captain Knowles did valiant service in 
this war; also companies under Captain John J. Johnson, an 
Englishman, and Captain John J. North, who subsequently 
became a citizen of Clinch, saw much service. Towards the 
Allapaha River, Captain Levi J. Knight commanded the 
pioneer troops as major and colonel. 

The following narrative of an engagement with the In- 
dians, is given on authority of Mr. Bryan J. Roberts, a 
wealthy pioneer citizen of Lowndes County, which is corrob- 
orated by others : 

"Some time in the fall of 1836, a squad of Indians raided 
the home of Mr. William Parker, not far from where Mill- 
town now is. They carried his feather beds out in the yard, 
cut them open, emptied the feathers and appropriated the 
ticks. They also robbed him of provisions, clothing and 
money in the sum of $308. Captain Levi J. Knight, in 
whose command Mr. Roberts was, was soon on trail of the 
squad and overtook them near the Allapaha River, not far 
from the Gaskins mill-pond. The sun was just rising when 
the gallant company opened fire on the savages. A lively 
fight ensued, soon terminating in the utter rout of the Indians, 



14 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

who threw their guns and plunder into the river and jumped 
in after them. A few were killed and a number wounded. 
One Indian was armed with a fine shot-gun; this he threw 
into the river. He also tried to throw into the stream a shot- 
bag, but it was caught in the limb of a tree and suspended 
over the water. Strange to say, it contained Mr. Parker's 
money, every cent of which was recovered. The fine shot-gun 
was fished out of the river and afterwards sold for $40, a 
tremendous price for a gun in those days. 

"Having driven the Indians from the dense swamp be- 
yond the river, Captain Knight marched his company as 
rapidly as possible in the direction of Brushy Creek in the 
southwest part of the county (Lowndes). In the distance 
they heard a volley of small arms. On arrival, they found 
that a battle had already been fought and the volley was only 
a last tribute of respect over the grave of a comrade-in-arms, 
Pennywell Folsom. Mr. Robert Parrish, who later became 
quite prominent and lived near Adel had his arm broken in 
this fight. Edwin Henderson was mortally wounded and 
died near the battlefield, and there were two others killed. 
The Indians lost twenty-two killed, besides a number wounded. 
The battle was fought in a swamp where Indian cunning was 
pitted against Anglo-Saxon courage, and in five minutes after 
the engagement opened, there was not a live redskin to be 
seen. 

"From this place Captain Knight marched his company 
across the Allapaha River into what is now Clinch County. 
The Indians after the last engagement had crossed the river 
and took a course southeastward to Cow Creek, about three 
miles below where Stockton now is. The whites traced them 
and found them near the creek. They surprised the savages 
at breakfast and the Indians, abandoning what little effects 
they had except their guns, hurriedly crossed the "Boggy 
Slue" and then went over the creek. The slue which had 
been so easy for the Indians to cross, delayed the whites, but 
finally crossing it they caught up with the Indians on the other 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 15 

side of the creek, where a short engagement occurred. Bill 
Daugharty had his horse shot from under him in this en- 
gagement by a very large Indian, and just as the Indian was 
about to fire at him, Mr. Daugharty shot the Indian. The 
Indian's body was not found until after the engagement was 
over, when it was found in some bushes. In this short en- 
gagement three Indians were killed and five made prisoners. 
No whites were killed, but Mr. Barzilla Staten was danger- 
ously wounded from which he afterwards recovered." 

Captain Knowles' company assisted in driving the last 
Indian from the great Okefinokee Swamp, and camped on one 
of the islands in the swamp for about three months, 
leaving the swamp only for provisions. A narrative is given 
on authority of Mr. Jesse Smith, who was in Captain 
Knowles' company, in which Mr. Smith relates an adventure 
with the savages. It was as follows : 

After the company had lost trail of a party of Indians 
whom they were hunting, Mr. Smith was in the lead of the 
whites that night. The night was very dark, and after hav- 
ing searched all day the search was almost given up, when 
in the grass not ten steps ahead, Mr. Smith saw the fire 
sparkle from the old flint and steel rifle, and he knew that 
they were in the midst of the Indians. The Indian's gun 
failed to fire and they saw it was a hand-to-hand battle in the 
darkness. Before Mr. Smith had time to move, the Indian 
sprang up and threw his arms around the horse's neck and 
held on. The fight seemed to be between the horse and the 
Indian, when the horse finally became so frightened that he 
dashed away. The horse ran until the clinging Indian was 
forced to give it up, and when Mr. Smith got his wits to- 
gether again he was miles away from his companions, with 
both hands clinched in the horse's mane. Then he had a task 
to find his comrades, which he did just about daylight. 

The great Okefinokee Swamp served as a place of refuge 
for the Indians during this war, and here they hid them- 
selves when hard pressed. General Charles R. Floyd made 



1 6 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

an expedition against the savages in the swamp and drove 
them totally out of the swamp and Into Florida. It had always 
been a mystery to the whites how the Indians were able to 
exist under circumstances of the most adverse character in 
the swamp, until one day an entrance to the "cow-house," 
an elevated fertile Island, was discovered by the scouts of 
General Floyd's army. Through an opening the Indians 
had driven a number of small, black cattle, which was found 
to be so numerous in this section when the whites first settled 
here. This solved the mystery, and the island has since 
been known as Floyd's Island. 

In 1838 fourteen thousand Indians were conveyed to lands 
beyond the Mississippi River, and after this the county 
enjoyed comparative peace from Indian troubles. It was very 
seldom after this that an Indian was seen. 

GROWTH OF THE COUNTY. 

After the Indian trouble ceased, this section began to grow. 
The citizens began to widen out their farms, settlement 
roads were made, new settlers came and several churches 
were organized. 

The only way in that day to get produce to market centers 
was to carry it In great caravans of wagons and carts drawn 
by oxen. The people of the community through which it 
passed would often load their produce or marketable stuff 
on these wagons and carts, giving the owner a part of the 
proceeds to carry it to market. A stage road which was 
built about this time from Holmesvllle in Appling County, 
to Troupvllle In Lowndes County, served as the principle 
highway. The principal person to engage in this business 
was James C. Smith, a wealthy pioneer citizen. He would 
often make Darien his destination, although Savannah and 
other ports were reached occasionally. The slow trip would 
consume as much as two or three months sometimes. In re- 
turning the wagons would bring such things as were needed 
by the settlers in their homes and on the farms. 




JOHN C. KIRKLAND 

First Clerk of Superior Court of Clinch County. 

This picture was taken about 1850. 



History of Clinch Comity, Georgia 17 

Waresboro was then the county seat of Ware County, 
and Troupville of Lowndes County. To these places the 
people of this section journeyed to attend court and to other 
such matters. The stage road led to Waresboro, while an- 
other one led to Troupville. The court-house at Waresboro 
in those days is described as being a large one-story log house 
with two small siderooms as offices; and during court the 
jury in a case would go off in the woods nearby in the charge 
of a bailiff, to make up their verdict. Since that time, Wares- 
boro has decreased to a mere village and Troupville is almost 
forgotten, and other cities have arisen to which the county 
seat has been moved. 

''olden times." 

During those days, the people lived in log houses with 
hewn floors and wooden shutters for windows. Everything 
bore a distinctly home-made appearance. The main portion 
of the people were not rich but a more honest and hospitable 
set could not be found. Among the wealthier families would 
be found from twenty-five to fifty slaves in each family. The 
white families living oftentimes miles apart, were of the 
kindliest disposition to each other. 

The people of what is now Clinch County, were not rich. 
The settlers were plain men, honest and thrifty. Their houses 
were simple buildings, situated generally near the few roads 
there were. The people did all their work except those who 
were fortunate enough to own slaves. Clothes were made of 
cloth manufactured by themselves. The women carded the 
cotton or wool with hard-cards into small rolls. These rolls 
they spun on spinning wheels into thread, which they dyed 
whatever colors they desired, and they wove the thread into 
cloth on home-made looms. Such looms and spinning-wheels 
have disappeared from usage and almost from existence al- 
though one is occasionally found in the homes of the people 
of Clinch County where it is kept as a rehc of the past, and 
an object of curiosity to the young. 



1 8 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

As has been said, the houses of the settlers were generally- 
built of logs and had but one room, the floor of which was 
made of split logs with the faces smoothed by an ax or 
hatchet. There were no lamps and candles were not often 
used. Blazing pine-knots in the fire-place generally served 
both for light and heat. In the summer season the people 
would go to bed early, almost with the coming of darkness, 
and in this way save building a hot fire for light and also 
to escape the mosquitoes. Likewise they rose early in the 
morning with the "break of day," often before daylight, and 
began the day's work. The children of the family, after 
working all day, would at night lie down in front of the pine- 
knot fire and learn to read and write. Many of the older 
citizens of the county still vividly remember those days. 

Cooking in those days was done in large, open fire-places 
in which was a crane for holding kettles and pots over the 
fire. When meat was roasted it was roasted on a spit hung 
before the fire. 

There were no railroads here in those days, and traveling 
long distances was usually done by means of vehicles called 
stage-coaches. The mails were carried in these vehicles. At 
certain places were kept relays of horses which the drivers of 
the stage-coaches used. 

LAND GRANTS. 

About that time great areas of land were granted by the 
State to individuals. In what is now Clinch County the 
lands were surveyed about 1822 and cut into squares of 490 
acres each, which were later granted by the State under the 
lottery system. It was sold on an average of five dollars per 
lot, and could be paid for by the installment plan, if desired, 
— one-fourth down and the rest in equal payments. These 
lots or squares of land of 490 acres each, were run into dis- 
tricts, each district containing from 500 to 650 lots. That is 
the present system of defining land in this county. 

Among the larger land owners who thus acquired lands in 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 19 

this county, were Hon. John Forsyth, Sylvanus Hitch, a cit- 
izen of Jones County, Ehjah Mattox, of Waresboro, Simon 
W. Nichols, of Jones County, James D. Shanks, of Lowndes 
County, and WilHam Lastinger, of Lowndes. 



CHAPTER II. 

Early Settlers. — Indian War Soldiers. 

A CCORDING to the best available information, the first 
yA-% permanent white settlers in what is now Clinch County 
were Josiah Sirmans, Sr., and his family, including his 
sons, Benjamin, Joseph, Jonathan and Abner Sirmans; also 
Moses, John and William Tomlinson, three brothers, and 
David Johnson, afterwards of Indian war fame. These came 
here in 1822 and settled near the Allapaha River in Irwin 
now Clinch County. 

Josiah Sirmans and his family came from Emanuel County. 
This early pioneer was born in 1767, and was married to 
Miss Artie Hardeman, a daughter of Thomas Hardeman, Sr. 
By this marriage he became an uncle of the three Tomlin- 
sons named above whose mother was a sister of Mrs. Sir- 
mans. He settled in what is now called the Mud Creek dis- 
trict, and lived there until his death in 1830. His sons were 
Benjamin, Abner and Joseph Sirmans, all of whom became 
prominent citizens of the county, while another son, Jonathan 
Sirmans, settled in what is now Berrien County, where his 
descendants of to-day are quite numerous. 

David Johnson was born in 1802 in this State, and his 
wife's name was Miss Nancy Burnett. By this marriage he 
had nine children, some of them holding county offices of 
trust and honor. Mr. Johnson afterwards engaged in the 
wars against the Indians and achieved renown. In those wars 
he achieved the rank of general, and has since been known as 
"General Dave" Johnson. It is doubtful if Clinch County 
ever had a better citizen than this noble man. 

Moses, John and William Tomlinson were sons of John 
Tomlinson, Sr. They came from Bulloch County and settled 
on the Allapaha River in the vicinity of the present town of 
Stockton. William was born in 1781, John in 1784 and 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 21 

Moses about 1788. Moses and William Tomlinson married 
and had several children and their descendants in Clinch 
County to-day are quite numerous. John Tomlinson who set- 
tled here, was a cripple from boyhood and could never walk; 
on this account he was better known as "Cripple" John Tom- 
linson. By judicious management he became very wealthy 
and at his death owned a good many slaves besides much 
other property. He is buried at Prospect Church in this 
county. 

About the next settler to come here was William Smith. 
He was born about 1763, and was a minister of the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church. He came here about 1823 and settled 
on Red Bluff Creek, where S. A. Lastinger now lives in this 
county. He lived here until his death, about 1845. He was 
buried at Arabia Church. He was married twice, and among 
his sons were John, Jesse, James M., and Manning Smith. 

Another old settler was Lawrence Smith, who came from 
South Carolina and settled in this section about 1825. He 
was married twice and among his sons were John, James C, 
David D., William E., Elbert M. T., and Frank Smith, the 
latter being a half-brother to the others. Lawrence Smith 
died in this county in 1859, ^"^ '^ buried on his old home 
place near Antioch Church. 

In 1824 another pioneer moved in, Jeremiah Chancey, 
who settled about five miles northwest of where Homerville 
now is. He came here from what is now Lowndes County, 
where he had previously lived a short while. He was born 
in North Carolina, September 5th, 1782, and married Miss 
Elsie O'Steen, who was a cousin of John R. O'Steen. They 
had eleven children. Later, Mr. Chancey settled about two 
miles northwest of Homerville, on lands now owned by S. L. 
Drawdy, where he died January nth, 1861. He was buried 
on his home place. His grave is unmarked, resting in an 
old field with a few others. 

James Pafford also came here about this time. He was the 
progenitor of the Pafford family in Clinch County. He was 



2 2 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

born March 19th, 1797, and died in October, 1838. He is 
buried at the Fender graveyard, on the Allapaha River. 

About 1830, John Bennett, of Sampson County, North 
Carolina, settled just above where Stockton now is. He lived 
here until his death, about 1851. He married Miss Sallie 
Register and by her had eight children. Numerous descend- 
ants throughout the county represent this old pioneer. He 
was about 80 years old at his death and was buried at Cow 
Creek Church. 

About the same time (1830), Col. Elijah Mattox settled 
at Waresboro, coming there from Tattnall County, where he 
was born in 1798. He later settled on the Florida line, just 
inside Clinch County. He had extensive land dealings and 
was well-known throughout the county. Colonel Mattox was 
aide-de-camp to Governor Charles J. McDonald. 

About 1833, Benjamin Cornelius settled here, coming from 
Pulaski County. He first settled near where Dame's Millpond 
now is, later moving to the place now owned by S. D. Find- 
ley, near Homerville. Mr. Cornelius was subsequently tax- 
receiver of Clinch County for more than twenty years, and 
died in 1874. 

Jonathan Knight moved from what is now Berrien County 
and settled on Suwannoochee Creek in this county in 1836. 
He was a native of what is now Berrien, where he was born 
in 1 8 17. He removed back to Berrien County in 1862, 
where he subsequently died. 

Other early settlers of this section were Barzilla Staten, 
Sr., and his sons, James W., Barzilla, Jr., and Quarterman 
B. Staten. The elder Staten was wounded in the Indian war 
and died about 1845. James W. Staten was the first repre- 
sentative from the new county of Clinch, while Quarterman 
B. Staten was a captain in the Confederate Army. 

John J. North, a native of South Carolina, was another early 
settler. He participated in the War of 1 8 1 2, and in the Indian 
war, serving as captain in the latter one. He lived here until 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 23 

his death In 1880. He is buried at the North Cemetery, 
above DuPont. 

David Stanford was a native of North Carolina, where he 
was born February 3rd, 1799. He came to this section in 
the thirties. He lived in the southwestern part of the county. 
His wife was Miss Agnes Aiken, by whom he had nine chil- 
dren, one of whom, Reubin Y. Stanford, was a captain in the 
Confederate Army. David Stanford died in May, 1871. 

Other early settlers were Juniper Griffis, Joel and Berry 
Griffis and Samuel Griffis. Juniper Griffis was born in 1808 
and lived to be 97 years old. Joel and Berry Griffis were 
distant relatives of Juniper Griffis, and lived below Homer- 
ville. Samuel Griffis was born in 1807 and married Miss 
Naomi Kirkland. The descendants of these men are quite 
numerous in the county to-day. 

Samuel Register was born in South Carolina in 1786, and 
settled here about 1830. He was the progenitor of the Reg- 
ister family in this section. He had twelve children, among 
them being Guilford, Ivy, David and William Register. This 
family has furnished Clinch County many good citizens. 
Samuel Register died in 1869. His grandson, S. W. Reg- 
ister, was clerk of the Superior Court of Clinch County 
fifteen years. 

George Harnage came to this section from Liberty County 
and settled in the western part of the county. He was born 
in 1807, and married Miss Annie Shaw, a daughter of Jerry 
Shaw, of Lowndes County. He was a deacon of the Prim- 
itive Baptist Church about forty years. He died about 1895. 
His descendants are also quite numerous to-day. 

Edmund Mathis was a native of North Carolina. To- 
gether with his brothers, John and James Mathis, they came 
to Bulloch County about 1820, and after living there several 
years, they came to this section. Edmund Mathis settled in 
what is now Clinch, while the other two settled in Berrien 
County. Edmund Mathis was one of the original members 
of Cow Creek Church when it was constituted in 1847, ^"^ ^f 



24 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Prospect Church, in 1859. His wife, who was Unity Reg- 
ister, was also a charter member. Edmund Mathis was com- 
missioned justice of the peace of the 66 ist district, then of 
Lowndes County, November 30th, 1838. 

John Mathis, a son of Edmund Mathis, was born in Bul- 
loch County and came with his father to this section about 
1830. He served as a justice of the peace, and after Clinch 
was created, was its coroner several years. He married 
Jemima Lee, daughter of Joshua Lee. 

Hillery P. Mathis, distantly related to the above named 
Mathises, was brought to this section an orphan by his uncle, 
James Edmondson, of Lowndes County. He was born in 
Bulloch County in 1821, and took part in the wars against 
the Indians. He married Martha, daughter of Samuel Reg- 
ister, Sr., by whom he had eleven children. 

Edmund Stafford was a son of Josiah Stafford, and was a 
soldier in the Indian war. Josiah Stafford died when Edmund 
was young and the guardianship of Edmund and his sister, 
Eliza, was vested in Duncan Henderson, by an order of the 
Inferior Court, of Ware County, dated September 2nd, 1833. 
The original letter of guardianship is still in the possession of 
descendants of Edmund Stafford. 

William B. North was commissioned a justice of the peace 
of the 719th district of Ware, now of Echols County, as 
early as 1832. 

About 1845 Richard H. Burkhalter, with his family, 
moved to what is now Clinch County from Pulaski County. 
He settled in the Mud Creek district, and was later ordinary 
of Clinch County. He died in 1862. He was the forefather 
of the Burkhalters of Clinch of to-day. 

About the same time, George J. Tatum settled here. He 
was born in originally Appling County August 31, 1823, 
and married Miss Lucy Joyce of this section, July 27th, 1844. 
They had twelve children. Mr. Tatum lived on what is 
known as the Frank Dickerson place above DuPont, for 
many years, previous to his removal to Hillsboro County, 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 25 

Florida, in 1867. From there he moved to Tatum Ridge in 
Manatee County, where he lived until his death, January 
9th, 1 9 10. 

Joshua Lee moved to a place about three and one-half 
miles north of where DuPont now is, in 1847, from Banks 
Mill in Berrien County. He lived there until his death in 
1857. He was a native of South Carolina, and his wife's 
name was Miss Martha Ford. They had several children. 
Both are buried at Prospect Church. 

John T. Roberts was a soldier in the Indian wars, and at 
his death lived in the io6ist district. He first lived below 
where Stockton now is, and when Cow Creek Church was 
first constituted in 1847 he was one of its original members. 
He served in the Confederate Army also. He was born 
December 7th, 18 10, and died March 24th, 1880. Among 
his children were Tharp and Isham Roberts. He married 
Candacy Tomlinson and had fourteen children. 

Elihu Morgan was another pioneer, and lived in what later 
became Echols County. He was born in 1795. Among his 
sons were Elihu, Jr., John and Joseph Morgan. He was a 
man of considerable means, owning in 1850 real estate to the 
extent of $6,000.00. 

Isaac Curry came from Tennessee and settled in this sec- 
tion about 1840. He was born in 1781 and died in Mud 
Creek, December 25th, 1856. His son, Charles W. Curry, 
who was born in Tennessee in 1828, is still living in Mud 
Creek. The elder Curry is buried at the Fender graveyard. 

Another old family to remove here in the early days of this 
section, was the Corbitts. Isham Corbitt was the progenitor 
of this family in this section, and was a native of Tennessee. 
1 he Corbitts, Currys and Paffords came from the same sec- 
tion and settled in the same section. The sons of this old 
pioneer were Harbird, Marshal, Newsom, Martin, William 
and Hiram Corbitt, the last named dying in infancy. Isham 
Corbitt died about 1855, and is buried in Berrien County. 

Another family of Corbitts, of no known relation to the 



2 6 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

above is that of Daniel Corbitt and his descendants. He 
came to this county about 1840 or 1845. He was born in 
1804 in South CaroHna. (See Corbitt family history.) 

Duncan Henderson lived in Ware County several years 
but settled in what is now Clinch during the forties. He was 
the first clerk of the Providence or Camp Branch Church, 
which was organized in 1844. He died about 1863. 

Acy Findley moved to what is now Clinch County about 
1845 from Jefferson County, Florida, and settled on Cow 
Creek. He died in 1873. 

John E. Taylor moved to this section about 1840 and set- 
tled on Cow Creek. He was a native of Chatham County, 
where he was born in 18 18. He died about 1893. 

David and Martin Fender were pioneers of the county. 
They settled here about 1840. Both lived to be very old 
men. David Fender, by his wife Mollie, had seven children, 
viz. : Charles, Jjcob, John, David, Bettie, George and Nellie 
Fender. David Fender, Sr., died November 14th, 1886, 
age 100 years. His first wife, Mary, died in June, 1853. 

Martin Fender was born September 6th, 1803 and died 
February 2nd, 1899, being the oldest man in the county at 
the time of his death. He was married three times and had 
several children. Other old members of this family were 
W. D. Fender, born 1818, died 1895 ; John D. Fender, born 
1823, died 1907; and J. L. Fender, born 1840 and died 1885. 

Irwin R. Booth was a minister of the Methodist Church 
and a native of Beaufort County, S. C, where he was born in 
1812. He died in 1896 and is buried at Antioch Church 
below Argyle. He came to this section about 1840. He was 
married twice. 

Abraham E. Smith, a native of Barnwell district. South 
Carolina, came here and settled on the adjoining lot of land 
to Homerville, in 1848. He sold it in 1866 and moved to a 
place about three miles from town, where he lived until his 
death in 1898. He was accompanied here by his brothers, 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 27 

John, Kit and Christopher J. Smith, the latter being known 
as Jackson Smith. 

John G. Rice was a native of Barnwell district, South 
Carolina, and came to this section about 1825 or 1830. He 
married and had seven children, his sons being Aaron, Dar- 
ley, Artemus and Lott Rice. He joined the Confederate 
Army in 1861 and died in 1863. He was an expert black- 
smith. 

Elias D. Waldron was born June 7th, 181 1, and died 
October 20th, 1894. He settled here about 1850 and lived 
about twelve miles south of Homerville. His wife, Nancy, 
was born in 1 8 1 1 , and died in 1892. 

Hiram Kight was an old settler of this county. He was 
born July loth, 181 1, and married Sarah, daughter of Law- 
rence Smith. He settled near the present town of Homer- 
ville about 1845, ^^^ lived there until 1863, when he sold out 
to Robert B. Crum. Later he lived below Homerville a 
few miles. Mr. Kight was a veteran of the Indian war and 
his widow now draws an Indian war pension. He was mar- 
ried a second time, Sarah Ann Griffis, who survived him. He 
died about 1890. 

Dr. L. C. Mattox settled on a place about three miles 
east of Homerville in 1855. He lived there until his death in 
1898. He was a very successful farmer. 

William Hughes settled in this county about 1840. He 
was born in South Carolina September 5th, 1812. He was 
married twice. He had several children. Mr. Hughes and 
his wife were murdered and robbed by three negroes late in 
the afternoon of November 6th, 1889. They were killed 
with axes. The negroes were captured and two of them 
hung while another was killed resisting arrest. This was the 
most brutal murder ever perpetrated in Clinch County. 
Among Mr. Hughes' sons were Francis M. Hughes, C. H. 
Hughes, Jeptha Hughes and James H. Hughes. 

Isaac Minshew, Sr., was a native of Scotland and came to 
this county in the early part of the last century. He finally 



2 8 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

settled on what Is known as the Reubin Jewell place in Clinch 
County and reared a family of ten children, and died there. 
Among his children were John, David, Jacob and Abram 
Minshew. The elder Minshew died about i860. 

Jacob Minshew, a son of the above, was born in this 
county February 1 8th, 1 834, and married Ellen Jordan. They 
had ten children, his sons being Henry, Isaac, John R., David 
J. and Lewis Minshew. The elder Minshew served in the 
Civil War and was later justice of the peace of the 1389th 
district. He died August 27th, 1907, and was buried at 
Camp Branch Church. 

John and Benjamin Stalvey were among the earlier set- 
tlers of this county also. Another of this family, B. S. Stalvey, 
lived in Echols County, where his descendants are now 
numerous. The latter was born February 22nd, 1829, and 
died October 8th, 1874, and is buried at Wayfare Church. 
He was elected tax collector of Echols County in 1861. Ben- 
jamin Stalvey lived in the 970th district of Clinch County 
and died January i8th, 1890. He has many descendants 
now living here. 

Cornelius and Henry Joyce, Jr., were early settlers of this 
section. They settled here about 1840. Henry Joyce, Sr., 
died about 1845, ^J^*^ his widow, Sarah Joyce, and Miles J. 
Guest were administrators on his estate. Cornelius Joyce 
was at one time sheriff of Clinch County, Henry Joyce 
served a term as tax collector of Clinch, and Miles J. Guest 
was sheriff of Ware County. 

William Lastinger was an early pioneer of the County. He 
settled here some time about 1835, and became quite 
wealthy. He owned a large tract of land above DuPont, 
which he traded to Joshua Lee in 1848, for the famous mill- 
pond now known as Banks Mill-pond, and also the land where 
Milltown, in Berrien County, is now situated. He reared a 
large family of children. Seaborn Lastinger, another mem- 
ber of this family, died in the Civil War in 1861 at Savan- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 29 

nah. He left one son, Seaborn A. Lastinger, who now lives 
on Red Bluff Creek, in this county. 

Other pioneers of this county were : 

Tharp and Isham Roberts and James Daugharty, who 
were living here in 1 833 ; Joshua Kirkland, Henry Daughtery, 
Moses Giddens, John Fender, Eaton and Barzilla Douglas, 
Richard Lee, Abraham Starling, Joel Griffis and Kindred 
Griffis, all of whom lived here in 1845 5 John Sears, William 
S. Bennett, William M. Thompson, James J, Lee, Allen 
Corbitt, John Brack, John Timmerman, William Touchston, 
James Whitehurst and Charles and George Kinard, all of 
whom lived here in 1850. Besides these might be mentioned 
John C. Kirkland, R. G. Dickerson, Shimuel Timmerman 
and Martin Nettles, 

INDIAN WAR SOLDIERS. 

Of those who took part in the Indian war of 1836-8, a 
complete list is not available. In compiling the following 
short list reference is had chiefly to the descendants of those 
named. The list given is not given as being complete but 
will serve to save the names of those given, in connection with 
this war, from oblivion. 

Levi J. Knight commanded the troops in this section as 
major and colonel. He lived all his life in what is now Ber- 
rien County, but he was closely identified with Clinch County. 
David Johnson attained the rank of general. He was a cit- 
izen of this county until his death in 1879. John J. Johnson 
and John J. North and Daniel E. Knowles were captains. 
The following served as privates: 

Bennett, John Emanuel, Acy Lastinger, William 

Chancey, Jeremiah Griffis, Juniper Miller, Martin L. 

Carter, Jesse W. Griffis, Joel Miller, David 

Corbitt, Daniel Henderson, Duncan Mathis, Hillery P. 

Cornelius, Edward Henderson, Jack Mathis, Edmund 

Cowart, Hillery Henderson, Berry North, William B. 

Dickerson, R. G. Johnson, William Newbern, John 

Daugharty, William Kirkland, John C. Newbern, George W. 

Daugharty, James Lastinger, Guilford Newbern, Thomas 



so 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



O'Steen, John 
Pafford, James 
Permenter, Barvil 
Rowell, James 
Rowell, David 
Roberts, John T. 
Roberts, Tharp 
Roberts, Bill 
Register, John 
Register, Guilford 
Register, David 



Register, Samuel 
Sirmans, Joseph 
Sirmans, Benjamin 
Sirmans, Abner 
Sirmans, Jonathan 
Sirmans, David J. 
Smith, Lawrence 
Smith, John, Sr. 
Smith, John, Jr. 
Smith, Jesse 
Smith, David D. 



Smith, James C. 
Staten, Barzilla 
Sweat, James 
Stafford, Edmund 
Tomlinson, William 
Tomlinson, Marcus 
Tomlinson, Levin 
Tomlinson, John 
Walker, John 
Walker, Wiley 



CHAPTER III. 

The Creation of Clinch County. — Act Creating Same. — The 
Organization. — Bonds of First Officers. — Magnolia. — Set- 
tlers. — Echols County Created from Clinch County. 

AFTER reading over the settlers named in the previous 
chapter and considering the condition of this section 
^ about the time the new County of Clinch was created, it 
will be easy to see that the conditions and the number of cit- 
izens fully justified the creation of a new county, and the 
name which was given the new county was for one who well 
deserved the honor. 

The new County of Clinch was named in honor of General 
Duncan L. Clinch, who had just died at his home in Macon. 
He had been a brave soldier in the War of 1812, and in the 
Indian wars in Florida during 1836-8, he served as brigadier- 
general. In the campaign of 1847 ^e was a strong candi- 
date for governor, but was defeated by Governor George W. 
Towns, who afterwards by a co-incidence, signed the bill 
creating a new county in honor of his opponent. General 
Clinch was born in Edgecombe County, N. C, in 1784, and 
died in Macon in 1849. For several years he lived in Cam- 
den County where he was an extensive farmer. Ex-Governor 
Duncan C. Heyward, of South Carolina, is a grandson of 
General Clinch. 

Among those back of the movement to create a new county 
might be mentioned James W. Staten, Elijah Mattox, John 
Tomlinson, Jr., and Benjamin Sirmans. Some of the most 
influential men of Ware and Lowndes Counties were in 
favor of it. 

In the Legislature of 1849-50, William A. McDonald 
was Ware's representative, and George Carter from Lowndes 
county. A bill was introduced at this session to create Clinch 
County, and was passed by a small majority on Monday, 



32 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

February 4th, 1850, the vote standing 53 yeas and 49 nays 
in the House. The records do not show the vote in the Senate, 
but it was passed and subsequently approved by the governor 
on February 14th, 1850. 

ACT CREATING CLINCH COUNTY. 

The following is a verbatim copy of the act creating Clinch 
County. Since then, several other laws have been passed 
which affect the boundary line of the county, notably the 
creation of Coffee and Echols Counties: 

"An Act to lay out and form a new county from the coun- 
ties of Ware and Lowndes and to provide for the organiza- 
tion of the same. 

"Section i. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Rep- 
resentatives of the State of Georgia in General Assembly met, 
and it is hereby enacted by authority of the same, that there 
shall be a new county laid out and formed from the counties 
of Ware and Lowndes, to be bounded as follows: commenc- 
ing at the mouth of Cane Creek where it empties into the 
Okefinokee Swamp, thence along said creek to the ford at 
Daniel Lane's, thence a direct line to the mouth of Reedy 
Creek where it empties into the Satilla River near John B. 
Wall's, then the river to be the line up to the county line, 
thence the county line to the Allapaha River, thence the river 
to be the line to the Florida line, to the Okefinokee Swamp; 
the territory thus included shall form a new county to be 
called the County of Clinch. 

"Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, that Elijah Mattox, 
Simon W. Nichols, Timothy Kirkland, Benjamin Sirmans 
and John J. Johnson be and they are hereby appointed com- 
missioners, with authority, at the expense of the new county 
hereby laid out, to employ a suitable person to run and dis- 
tinctly mark the lines thereof that are not designated in this 
Act, and they shall further be authorized and empowered to 
fix upon the site for the public buildings, which shall be as 
near the center of the county as is convenient or practicable; 




HON. S. W. REGISTER 
Clerk of the Superior Court Clinch County, 1893-1908. 




THE HOMERVILLE BRASS BAND. Organized 1915. 
Reading left to right, seated : C. A. Campbell, Flem C. Dame, Folks Hux- 
ford, E. J. Smith and W. H. Moncrief. 

Standing, left to right: T. R. O'Steen, Fred Dillon, H. C. Dickerson, 
George Dillon and J. R. Dillon. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 33 

and until there is a court-house built the Superior and Inferior 
Courts, and Court of Ordinary shall be held at the house of 
Jonathan Knight. 

"Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the commissioners 
hereinbefore named, shall have power and authority to pur- 
chase and receive titles to a suitable tract or parcel of land 
for the site of the public buildings, to lay out a town which 
shall be called Polk, and to sell and dispose of such number 
of lots upon such terms as they may think proper for county 
purposes; provided, nevertheless, the Inferior Court of said 
county shall have the power and be authorized to do and per- 
form all and every duty hereby required of the commis- 
sioners which may not have been performed previous to the 
time that said court are commissioned and qualified. 

"Sec. 4, And be it further enacted. That all officers, both 
civil and military, which may be included within the limits of 
the said new county, shall continue to hold their offices re- 
spectively as if commissioned as officers hereof; and said 
county shall form a part of the First Congressional District, 
and a part of the fifth Senatorial District and shall be at- 
tached to the Southern Circuit, and to the second Brigade 
of the Sixth Division, G. M. 

"Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That an election shall 
be held on the first Monday in April, next, at the house of 
Jonathan Knight, and at the different election precincts that 
are established by law which may be included within the 
limits of the said new county, for five justices of the Infreior 
Court, clerk of the Superior and Inferior Courts, a tax re- 
ceiver and collector, coroner and sheriff and a county surveyor. 

"Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That the justices of the 
Inferior Court as soon as convenient after they have been 
elected and qualified, shall meet at the house of the said Jon- 
athan Knight and from the best information they may be able 
to procure, make a selection of grand and petit jurors, and 
proceed to the drawing thereof as pointed out by law, for the 
ensuing Superior and Inferior Courts. 



34 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

"Sec. 7. And be It further enacted, That all actions now 
pending In either of the counties from which said new county 
is now taken wherein the defendant or defendants may now 
be Included in said county, shall be transferred with all papers 
relating thereto and the trial in said new county where the 
defendant resides. 

"Sec, 8. And be It further enacted, by the authority afore- 
said. That all laws and parts of laws militating against this 
Act, be and the same are hereby repealed. 

"Approved, February 14th, 1850." 

THE ORGANIZATION. 

Pursuant to the above Act passed by the Legislature, the 
commissioners named therein, viz.: Elijah Mattox, Simon 
W. Nichols, Timothy KIrkland, Benjamin Sirmans and John 
J. Johnson, proceeded to employ a suitable person to dis- 
tinctly run the lines of the new county which were not pointed 
out in the Act, and to decide on a suitable place for the court- 
house or county site. Elijah Mattox, one of the commission- 
ers, who was skilled In surveying, was selected to run the lines 
of the new county, and with some help the work was soon 
done. 

The commissioners met at the house of Jonathan Knight 
as pointed out In the Act. Mr. Knight lived about two miles 
north of where DuPont now is, and the house in which he 
then lived, is now standing, with some modifications, and is 
occupied by Mr. Charles H. North, who now owns the lot 
of land on which the house is situated. The house is one of 
the historic marks of the county, for It was here that the 
organization of Clinch County was perfected. 

The commissioners named in the Act were some of the best 
men In the new county. Elijah Mattox was previously clerk 
of the Superior Court of Ware County, also a former sur- 
veyor and representative, and at this time lived on the Florida 
line at Blount's Ferry. Simon W. Nichols moved here from 
Jones County, and was a large landowner. He was the father 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 35 

of the celebrated trio of brothers, — John C, William M., 
and Waver J. Nichols, who played such prominent parts in 
the future history of the county, Benjamin Sirmans was one 
of the first settlers of the county and was formerly a repre- 
sentative from Lowndes County several terms. Timothy 
Kirkland lived in what is now Coffee County, while John J. 
Johnson lived down in the vicinity of where Echols County 
now is. 

The election for county officers, which the Act above set 
out, called for, was duly held on the first Monday in April, 
1850, and the following officers were elected: J. C, Kirk- 
land, Clerk of the Superior and Inferior Courts; Charles 
Cowart, sheriff; Benjamin Cornelius, tax receiver; Ezekiel J, 
Sirmans, tax collector; David J, Blackburn, surveyor; Joseph 
L. Rogers, coroner. The following justices of the Inferior 
Court were elected: David Johnson, Isham F, Johnson, 
Hiram Sears, and Manning Smith, Although the Act called 
for five justices, for some reason only four were elected and 
commissioned. However, in 1852, Francis H. McCall was 
elected to fill out the term, but for some reason did not qualify, 
Elijah Mattox was elected surveyor soon afterwards owing 
to the failure of Blackburn to qualify. 

BONDS OF FIRST OFFICERS. 

It might be interesting here to give some particulars of the 
official bonds given by our first county officers, which is ob- 
tained from the records in the Executive Department at 
Atlanta : 

John C. Kirkland, who was elected clerk of the Superior 
Court, gave his bond dated June 24th, 1850, with Jonathan 
Knight and David J. Sirmans as securities; amount $3,000. 
His bond as clerk of the Inferior Court was given at the 
same time for $2,000, with Cornelius Joyce, Ezekiel J. Sir- 
mans and Jacob Lightsey as securities. 

Benjamin Cornelius did not qualify as tax receiver in 1850, 
owing to the fact that he was elected in 1849 ^s tax receiver 



36 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

of Ware County for two years. However, in 185 i, he was 
re-elected and qualified, and his bond, dated February 17th, 
185 I, was given for $2,000, with David J. Sirmans, James 
W. Staten and Jonathan Knig.ht as securities. 

Ezekiel J. Sirmans did not qualify as tax collector in 1850 
for the same reason as Mr. Cornelius, having been elected 
the year before to the same office in Ware County. Being 
re-elected in 1851, he gave bond, dated February 17th, 1851, 
for $2,000, with David J. Sirmans, Josiah Sirmans and 
James W. Staten as securities. 

David J. Blackburn, who was re-elected surveyor in 185 i, 
gave bond dated March 3rd, 185 i, for $3,000, with James 
Lee and William Hughes as securities. 

John Mathis, who was elected coroner in 185 i, gave bond 
dated February 17th, 185 i, for $500, with James W. Staten 
and Jonathan Knight as securities. 

MAGNOLIA. 

The county site, which by the Act creating the county, was 
to be called Polk, was finally located on lot of land No. 420, 
in the 12th land district. A part of this lot was deeded to the 
county to build the county site on. The name "Polk" was 
first given it, in memory of President James K. Polk, but by 
an act of the Legislature assented to January 15th, 1852, the 
name of the county site was changed to Magnolia. It has 
since borne this name. Magnolia was incorporated by an act 
of the Legislature approved February 20th, 1854. The 
corporate limits embraced eighty acres and the town was to 
be governed by five commissioners. 

The first court-house was not built at Magnolia until the 
winter of the year 1852.* The contract last let by the Inferior 
Court to John and Elias Moore, who built it. The building 
was quite a small one but amply met the demands of that day. 
It was destroyed by fire in 1856. It was replaced by another 
building which was subsequently removed to Homerville. 

^'Authority: Mr. J. R. Dickerson. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 37 

The town of Magnolia was never more than a small vil- 
lage. It was laid out on land which was drained on either 
side by small ponds and branches. It was situated as near the 
center of the county as practicable. There was a main street 
running through the town, east and west, and public build- 
ings were situated on the north side of the main street. The 
main street to-day Is a large lane running through and which 
divides fields. The fields are not cultivated with the excep- 
tion of an acre or two by negro tenants. Connecting with the 
main street on the west was a stage road which ran by where 
DuPont now Is, and connected with the stage road which ran 
from Troupville through the northern part of the county to 
Waresboro. The stage coaches in that day carried the mails 
and were as much a necessity then as the mail and passenger 
trains are to-day. 

Among the first settlers at Magnolia were John L. Mor- 
gan, who moved there in 1853; '^Iso David O'Quin, Reubin 
Y. Stanford and Robert F. White. The last three owned and 
operated stores there for a few years. The following cit- 
izens served as justices of the peace for the district In which 
Magnolia was located, during the several years following the 
creation of the new county; these citizens lived In or near 
Magnolia: Elliott Chancy, Jesse Smith, Aaron D. Dyals, 
Henry E. Peacock, Ellas Williams, Levi W. Carter, Abra- 
ham Strickland and Joseph J. Cohen. 

Robert F. White, mentioned above, was more familiarly 
known to his friends as "Bob" White, and occupied a two- 
story log house for his store and home. He was a justice of 
the Inferior Court of Clinch County three years. 

A narrative Is related which brings to mind Mr. White 
having a store at Magnolia. | In 1855 William M. Nichols 
who was then a young man, was a candidate for state senator 
from Clinch County, and General David Johnson, of Indian 
war fame, who was very popular, was his opponent. The race 
between them was very hot and there was much speculation 

JAuthority: Mr. J. B. Cornelius. 



38 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

as to who would be elected. Mr. White was a Nichols sup- 
porter, while Mr. David O'Quin who also ran a store, was a 
Johnson supporter. The stores of each one was made the 
headquarters for the respective adherents of the candidates. 
There was some strife which took place before the election. 
It took about two days after the election for all the returns 
to be received from the different parts of the county. When 
the vote was consolidated, it was found that young Nichols 
had defeated General Johnson by four votes. Great was the 
chagrin of the old fighter when he learned of his defeat, 
while joy of course pervaded the Nichols party. General 
Johnson was then about 52 years old, while Mr. Nichols was 
barely 21. 

The first Masonic Lodge in the county was established at 
Magnolia about 1855. When the county site was removed 
to Homerville the lodge was also removed, and the lodge 
to-day is known as Cassia Lodge No. 224 F. & A. M. The 
first worshipful master of the lodge at Magnolia was Hon. 
John L. Morgan, for many years Ordinary of Clinch County. 
Other charter members were David O'Quin, George W. 
Newbern, Jesse Smith, Shimuel Timmerman and Reubin Y. 
Stanford. The major portion of the records of the lodge 
was burned up with the burning of DuBignon Institute at 
Homerville in 1909. The lodge's home was then in the third 
story of the Institute. 

The court-house at Magnolia was destroyed in 1856. The 
cause of the fire was always thought to be incendiary, although 
no arrests were made. It seemed that a certain party, dis- 
satisfied with some legal proceedings against him, determined 
to destroy the court-house in the hope that justice would be 
thwarted. The records for the previous six years were de- 
stroyed, entailing a very severe loss on the county both finan- 
cially and in the value of the records. 

NEW SETTLERS. 
Among the settlers who mov^ed into the new county follow- 
ing its creation were John L. Morgan, Tarlton McMillan 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 39 

and Thomas G. Ramsey, Judge Morgan removed from 
Lowndes County and settled at Magnolia about 1853. Mr. 
McMillan came here in the same year. He is yet living at 
the ripe age of 90. Judge Ramsey moved in from Alachua 
County, Florida, and resided here until 1875. 

The O'Quins also settled here about this time. Two 
brothers, David O'Quin and H. D. O'Quin became quite 
prominent as county officers. Their father was Silas O'Quin, 
who lived in Wayne County. He was born July 20th, 1788 
and died in 1879, age 91 years. The children of Silas O'Quin 
were: Stephen, Jackson, H. D., Alexander, David, Charlton, 
George, Rebecca and Nancy O'Quin. David and H. D. 
O'Quin were the only ones who ever lived in this county. 

David D. Johnson also came here about this time. He 
came here from Dooly County in 1855 ^'""^ settled near the 
present village of Withers, on the place where S. W. Reg- 
ister afterwards lived. Mr. Johnson was born January 21st, 
1 8 13, and died in 1862, in the Civil War. His wife was 
Sarah Pate, who died in 1900. They had several children. 

W. J. Strickland moved here about this time from Tattnall 
County, where he was born October loth, 1829. His first 
wife was a daughter of Hiram Sears, but she did not live 
long after their marriage. Mr. Strickland's second wife was 
Charity Sears, daughter of Harrison Sears. He died at his 
home below Homerville, August 3rd, 1907. 

John W. Hodges came to this county a few years after it 
was created. He first lived about four miles east of Homer- 
ville, but during the war bought a home in Homerville and 
removed to town. His wife was Miss Elizabeth E. Darsey, 
of Liberty County, to whom he was married February 12th, 
1846. Mr. Hodges was born April 30, 1822 and died in 
Homerville December 26th, 1878. He was survived by his 
wife who is yet living. Mr. Hodges was a brother to Archi- 
bald Hodges, and was a member of the Baptist Church, 
being a deacon for many years previous to his death. 

James Touchstone and William Touchston were also early 



40 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

settlers, following the creation of the county. The former 
moved in from where Milltown now is, in 1851 and settled 
on Cow Creek. His death occurred in August, 1865, ^g^ 7^ 
years. William Touchston was distantly related to James 
Touchstone and settled here a few years before. 

John Q. Findley settled in Clinch County in 1850. He 
was a native of Tattnall County, and for several years was 
coroner of Clinch County. He lost his life in the Civil War. 

Capt. J. P. A. DuPont settled where the town of DuPont 
now is, about 1858. This illustrious man married a daughter 
of Simon W. Nichols. He died in 1863. A more detailed 
sketch of his life will be found elsewhere in this book. 

Also there was Matthew Fiveash, who moved to near 
v/here DuPont now is, about 1858. He died about 1886. He 
married Mary, a daughter of George Dame, Sr. Among his 
daughters were Mary, who married S, D. Findley, Eliza, who 
married Lucius Sirmans, Delilah, who married Frank Dick- 
erson, and Roxie, who married James O. Dampier. 

Levi Herren, Sr., moved here about this time. He was 
born in 1796, and was a native of this State. His wife. 
Charity Sears, was born in 1812. Mr. Herren had several 
children, among them: Levi Herren, Jr., and Mildred, who 
married Benjamin O'Steen, Mary, who married J. M. Jef- 
fords, and Olive, who married Freeman S. Walker, Jackson, 
who married Jane Arnold, and Mack, who married a Har- 
greaves. 

Charles Strickland came to Clinch County in 1849 ^"^ ^^^" 
tied on Red Bluff Creek on lands now owned by A. J. Lock- 
liear. He was a native of Pierce County, and married Lucrc- 
tia, a daughter of Hon. Benj. Sirmans. 

Robert F. Lanier was a minister of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, and was sent to Clinch County as a circuit lider 
in 1857. This early pioneer of Methodism of Clinch County 
was born in DeKalb County and married Miss Matilda Pick- 
run. He died in 1888 and was buried on the old home place 
of Dr. L. C. Mattox, near Homerville. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 41 

Also Ziba King came to this county about this time. He 
was a native of Ware County and was the first judge of the 
County Court of Clinch County. He subsequently removed 
to Desoto County, Florida, where he became very wealthy in 
the cattle business. He died in 1901. 

George W. Delk came to Clinch County from Ware just 
before the Civil War. He served as sheriff of Ware County 
in 1855-7, ^^^ was later a justice of the peace of the io6ist 
district. He was born in 1822 and died about 1895. 

Jonathan L. Morgan came to Clinch County in i860, and 
settled about ten miles south of Homerville. Here he lived 
until 1905, when he removed to Waycross. Mr. Morgan was 
born in 1832 in Appling County, and died May 5th, 1907, in 
Waycross. He married Susan, daughter of Abr. Hargreaves, 
of Ware County, and had four children. 

John C. Hargreaves was a son of Abraham Hargreaves, 
and was born June 5th, 1835. He married Parthena, a 
daughter of Thomas Morgan. He lived about ten miles 
south of Homerville. He came here about i860 and 
in 1876 removed to Florida, where he died the same year. 

John Gibbs settled here about 1855 or i860. He married 
Charity, a daughter of George Dame, Sr., and they had five 
children, viz. : George D. Gibbs, Willis B. Gibbs, Austin J. 
Gibbs, Martha E. Gibbs, who married J. B. Cornelius and 
Catherine, who married Jeptha Hughes. 

Henry P. Livingston came to this county in 1859 and mar- 
ried Palester, daughter of John J. North. He accumulated 
much property and leaving it to his wife and only child, sud- 
denly disappeared about 1864. He never did reveal where 
he came from and it has never been ascertained where he 
went to. His only child was J. H. W. Livingston. 

John Williams, Sr., was living here when the county was 
created. He was born in 1800 and his wife in 1798. His 
wife was Nancy Smith, daughter of William Smith and sister 
of John, Jesse and James M. Smith. Mr. Williams raised 
several children, among them being Hezekiah P. Williams, 



42 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

born 1830; Jackson S. Williams, born 1832; John Williams, 
Jr., born about 1835; and Elias Williams, who served as a 
justice of the peace in the 970th district a year or two; John 
Williams, Jr., served one term as representative from Clinch 
County. 

ECHOLS COUNTY CREATED. 

In 1858 Echols County was created by an Act of the Leg- 
islature, approved December 13th, 1858. The new county 
was named for General Robert M. Echols, and took a slice 
of Clinch County territory. The first election was held soon 
afterwards, and the following officers were elected and were 
commissioned April 15th, 1859: Jesse P. Prescott, clerk of 
the Superior and Inferior Courts; James S. Carter, sheriff; 
James P. Y. Higdon, ordinary; John E. McMuUin, tax re- 
ceiver ; Samuel E. Prescott, tax collector, James Carter, treas- 
urer; Duncan McLeod, surveyor and John Sellars, coroner. 
At the same time were elected the following justices of the 
Inferior Court: Noah H. Griffin, Robert Prine, John T. 
Allen, James R. Miller and Joshua T. Carter. 

Statenville, the county site of Echols County, was named 
for Capt. James W. Staten, the first representative from 
Clinch County, and was Incorporated December 13th, 1859, 
with the following town commissioners : Jesse P. Prescott, 
John T. Allen, R. W. McAlhaney, Benj. Stalvey and James 
S. Carter. 



CHAPTER IV. 

Homerville Opened Up. — Its History. 

IN February, 1853, Dr. John Homer Mattox, with his 
family, moved from their former home on the Suwannee 
River, near the Florida line, to where Homerville now 
is. He set to work, built a very substantial home and cleared 
a farm. The stage route ran by his home and on to Magnolia, 
and oftentimes the mail carrier would spend the night at Dr. 
Mattox's home. In fact, a relay of horses was kept at his home 
by the mail carrier. The stage road after leaving Waresboro, 
then the county site of Ware County, continued south by 
where J. C. Kirkland lived, thence across Cain Creek, thence 
by Hiram Kight's place, then by Dr. Mattox's place, on to 
Magnolia, and thence to Troupville, then the county site of 
Lowndes County. 

The nearest neighbors to Dr. Mattox were John Brack, 
who lived on what is now called the Stewart place, near 
Homerville; Robert G. Dickerson, who lived on lot of land 
425 above Homerville; Hiram Kight, who lived on lot of 
land 453 near Homerville; James C. Smith, who lived just 
across Cain Creek; Abraham E. Smith, who lived on lot 499, 
and Manning Smith, on lot 424, all these lots being in the 
seventh land district. 

About the time he had permanently established his home. 
Dr. Mattox began to call it "Homerville" and his mail was so 
addressed him. He called it after his own name, not thinking 
that later on, a town would be built up on the same lot of 
land and retain the name. This seems to have been the 
origin of Homerville's name. However, after the railroad 
came through, Homerville was designated by the railroad 
people as "Station No. 1 1," and as such the place was known 
for a good many years. Gradually the station number name 
was dropped and to-day is only a memory of the past. Dur- 



44 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

ing this time the mail was generally addressed "Homerville, 
Station No. ii, A. & G. R. R." Therefore, it can be seen 
that the original name given it by Dr. Mattox was still in 
use to a certain extent and has been since he so began to call it. 

A narrative is related by Hon. John L. Morgan, Jr., who 
formerly lived here, but who now lives in Lakeland, Fla., 
concerning the future of Dr. Mattox's place where Homer- 
ville was later built. It follows : 

One day in 1853, Dr. Mattox and Mr. John Stalvey were 
hunting deer on what is called Dogwood Island, which was 
then owned by Dr. Mattox. This island is a piece of land 
about a mile from Homerville entirely surrounded by creeks, 
and is called an island. Mr. Stalvey was one of the men of 
his time who was really to some extent a prophet. He had 
prophetic visions which were noted for their accuracy. He 
had previously lain down under a certain pine tree on this 
island and had a vision. So as he and Dr. Mattox were hunt- 
ing, he pointed Dr. Mattox to a certain pine tree and told 
him to go and look at the root of the tree and see where he 
(Mr. Stalvey) had lain down the day before and rested. 
Mr. Stalvey then told him he had had a vision here. Said he : 
"I saw a long, great road as far as I could see, extending each 
way (indicating east and west) . I do not know what kind of 
a road it will be, but I want to remember this incident, and 
some time, perhaps after I'm dead and gone a road will be 
run through this land. This is your land and the road will 
make it very valuable. That is my vision." So in after years 
when the Atlantic & Gulf Railroad came through this section, 
it came straight through this land, and tradition has it that 
the very tree under which Mr. Stalvey had his vision, was dug 
up to make way for the road. At the time Mr. Stalvey had 
the vision, the railroad was unthought of. 

In 1859, the Atlantic & Gulf Railroad was built through 
as far as where DuPont now is. The next year it was car- 
ried on through. It was built from Savannah in a south- 
western direction through territory rich in resources and 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 45 

which had never been opened up. The road was completed to 
Homerville in the fall of 1859. In order to induce the rail- 
road people to make his place a station, Dr. Mattox not only 
granted them a right-of-way through his lands, but gave them 
a beautiful square of land in the new town, containing about 
six acres on the south side of the road. The gift is evidenced 
by a deed dated November 29th, 1859, witnessed by John C. 
Reynolds and John Screven, J. I. C. and duly recorded. 

Dr. Mattox immediately set to work to have the county 
seat removed to Homerville from Magnolia. He had the 
new town laid off into town lots and encouraged people to 
move in from other places. Dr. Mattox offered to the In- 
ferior Court which had jurisdiction over the matter, to move 
the court-house to Homerville and pay all expenses of the 
removal and furthermore give the land whereon to place the 
building. Mr. J. P. A. DuPont, who was then opening up 
the new town of DuPont or Lawton, as it was then called, 
also desired the court-house removed to that point, claim- 
ing Lawton was more centrally located, which was true. But 
as he did not offer to pay the expenses of the removal, and 
furthermore a petition was presented signed by about 275 
citizens of the county asking the removal of the county site 
to Homerville, the Inferior Court decided to make Homer- 
ville the county site. 

An Act of the Legislature, assented to December 12th, 
i860, authorized the Inferior Court to remove the county 
site to Homerville. The body of the Act authorizing the 
removal, reads as follows : 

"Whereas, a petition signed by about two hundred and 
seventy-five citizens of said county, is presented, asking re- 
moval by the present General Assembly of the State of Geor- 
gia, of the site of the public buildings of said county, from 
Magnolia in said county, to Station Number 11, on the At- 
lantic & Gulf Railroad in said county; 

"And, Whereas, the Inferior Court have had executed to 
them a bond with good and sufficient security from one John 



46 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

H. Mattox that the said removal shall be made without 
expense to the County of Clinch; 

"Section i. The General Assembly of the State of Georgia 
do enact, That the Inferior Court of the County of Clinch, 
upon the passage of this Act, are authorized to remove the 
site of the public puildings of the County of Clinch from 
the town of Magnolia, in said county to Station Number 1 1, 
on the Atlantic & Gulf Railroad, in said county, on lot of 
land number four hundred and ninety-eight (498) in the 7th 
district of said county, at such time and upon such terms as 
they may deem advisable, and to the best interest of said 
county of Clinch, and the convenience of the citizens thereof." 

The court-house was moved to Homerville and rebuilt 
during the winter of 1859-60. John Moore and Martin S. 
Corbitt contracted to move the building to Homerville and 
Dr. Mattox employed Mr. Corbitt and Jackson S. Williams 
to rebuild it. The jail at Magnolia was not moved, and a 
new one was built at Homerville. The old jail which had 
only two rooms or cells, was built of good, sound logs and is 
yet standing on the site of old Magnolia, the most spectral 
of the relics of our old county site. 

Among the new comers to Homerville was John C. Kirk- 
land, who was one of the first to build a little store house of 
logs; in this he kept a small stock of groceries and liquors. 
Also Joel Strickland, John L. Morgan, Sr., and John J, John- 
son built homes here about the same time. The first store 
house built of planks or sawed lumber was built by John 
Bryan and Hugh Tedder. In this they placed a good sized 
stock of merchandise and employed Dr. Mattox to run the 
business a while until they could arrange their other affairs. 
Immediately after this store was opened up, Joel Strickland 
built what in later years was called the Crum House. It had 
several rooms in it and was from the first used as a hotel. In 
later years considerable additions were made to it under other 
OAvners. Mr. Strickland also built a small store house at the 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 47 

same time and a year later sold both the hotel and store to 
Charles Cowart, who ran them several years. 

The need for a saw-mill nearby soon developed itself, and 
Dr. Mattox accordingly began to take steps to build one. He 
and Cyrus S. Graves, a newcomer, entered into partnership 
and the machinery was bought in Savannah and put into 
use in the winter of 1860-61. Dr. Mattox furnished not only 
the money to finance the undertaking, but also furnished the 
timber. The mill ran along very smoothly until the outbreak 
of the Civil War, in the summer of 1861, when Mr. Graves 
joined the Confederate Army. The mill stopped running for 
awhile, and Dr. Mattox sold it to a Mr. Latimer, of Savan- 
nah, who employed James M. Nelms to run it; and Mr. 
Nelms managed it three or four years when the mill was 
finally closed down indefinitely. 

The beginning of the war cast a damper on the growth of 
the little town and for several years after Homerville was 
opened up there were only about two or three small stores, 
and perhaps eight or ten families who lived here. Many 
older residents of the county remember Homerville when it 
was only this big. 

After the county site was moved to Homerville, it became 
necessary to lay out new public roads leading from the county 
site, and for this purpose the Inferior Court appointed Fred- 
erick J. Mills, Dr. Mattox and Manning Smith, who laid out 
the public roads leading out from Homerville, some of which 
are in use to the present day. 

During the war, Dan H. Stewart refugeed to Clinch 
County from Savannah and settled at Homerville. He served 
as deputy clerk under David O'Quin, clerk of the Superior 
Court. He lived here a few years and removed back to Savan- 
nah after the war, where he died about 1868. Also there 
v»^as William M. Austin, James C. Cooper, Sylvanus Hitch, 
J. L. Sweat, Zibe King, George Goette and his son, F. M. 
Goette, William W. Griffin, John W. Hodges, L. A. Sir- 
mans, James L. Mitchell, John L. Morgan, Andrew J. and 



48 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

M. M. Caswell, who settled here either during the war or 
immediately following it. 

Mr. H. A. Mattox established a store at Homerville about 
this time. Also A. Loeb and Joseph Wiles, both German 
Jews, came here and opened up a large mercantile business 
with a barroom in connection, and for two or three years did 
a flourishing business. However, they removed about 1870 
to Jefferson County, Florida. Mr. E. T. Dukes came to 
Homerville in 1867, ^^'^ entered the mercantile business. 

Homerville's legal lights for a few years following the war 
were Charles S. Morgan, a young lawyer about 25 years 
of age, L. A. SIrmans, John C. Nichols, J. L. Sweat, who was 
admitted to the bar in 1869 and Simon W. Hitch, who was 
admitted in 1870. 

About 1866, William M. Nichols, together with a part- 
ner, A. S. Bigelow, opened up a turpentine business about 
two miles west of Homerville on the south side of the rail- 
road. This business continued about two years and dissolved. 
So far as is known, this is the first turpentine still operated in 
Clinch County, at least in and around Homerville. 

In 1866, another saw-mill was built at Homerville, on the 
south side of the railroad. It was owned by W. G. Norwood, 
while J. B. Porter managed the mill for Mr. Norwood. This 
business did not continue very long, and Mr. Norwood 
removed. 

About 1868, Mr. John L. Morgan, Sr., together with his 
son, John L. Morgan, Jr., established a steam saw and grist 
mill at Homerville. It was situated on the town lot whereon 
Calvitt Huxford now lives. Later Mrs. Amanda R. 
Strickland and Thomas C. and William R. Morgan became 
partners in this business. The latter two were sons of John 
L. Morgan, Sr. This business continued for a few years and 
for a long time was the only milling place for this part of 
the county. 

H. A. Mattox and H. P. Mattox, during the '70s, entered 
the turpentine and mercantile business in Homerville. At 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 49 

first Charles F. Mattox was a partner, but he died in 1884. 
The business continued on under the name of H. & H. Mat- 
tox, and for many years was about the largest business in 
Homerville. Their two or three stills were situated a few 
miles from Homerville, while the store was in town. 

Basil G. O'Bryan owned and operated a general store for 
a few years previous to his death in May, 1870. He was a 
native of South Carolina and married Miss Julia Mattox, a 
daughter of Elijah Mattox. After his death, Mrs. O'Bryan 
married John A. Whittington. 

About 1875 a new turpentine business was opened up at 
Homerville by Holliday, Lane & Company, new comers from 
South Carolina. Joseph W. Holliday, George B. Lane and 
Richard Jordan were the partners and the capital invested was 
$12,000. R. Julius Evans was employed as general manager 
part of the time they were here. The partners all finally re- 
turned to South Carolina and removed their business about 
1 88 1 Their still was located on the railroad square in town. 

Homerville's school system was very irregular prior to 
1895. The schools were taught by different individuals and 
sometimes there would be two schools being taught at the 
same time. About 1894, a movement was started which 
resulted in the erection of a new school building, which was 
named DuBignon Institute, in honor of Hon. F. G. Du- 
Bignon, one of the State's most gifted sons. The land 
whereon it was built was deeded by Mrs. M. M. Caswell 
and W. T. Smith to the school trustees, to be used for school 
purposes. This building was burned down in 1909, and the 
land reverted back to the owners. More about this school 
will be found elsewhere in this book. 

Previous to the erection of the new DuBignon Institute, 
a small frame house located on the Railroad Square, across 
the street from the Methodist Church, served as the school 
house. It was subsequently sold to the colored people, who 
removed it to another location and used it as a church. The 
location of this old building was very near a tract of land 105 



5© History of Clinch County, Georgia 

feet each way, which was deeded by Dr. Mattox to some 
school trustees In 1861 for school and Masonic purposes. The 
deed is dated June 25th, 1861, and is made to Dr. L. C. Mat- 
tox, Jacob Watson and Robert F. Lanier as trustees, and the 
land is described as being on the south side of the east corner 
of the square belonging to the railroad company. 

Homerville was first incorporated by an Act of the Legis- 
lature approved February 15th, 1869. The bill was intro- 
duced by Mr. Guilford Lastinger, who was then represen- 
tative from Clinch County. The Act named Allen (N.) 
Smith, Alfred Newbern, Joel Strickland, John J. Johnson 
and Basil G. O'Bryan as commissioners of the town to hold 
office until the first Saturday in January, 1870, at which 
time an election was to be held for their successors. These 
commissioners had all the power and authority that is usually 
vested in a mayor and council. They were to elect one of 
their number president of their body; after which they were 
to elect a marshal, treasurer and clerk. A feature about this 
Act was that all property owners as well as other qualified 
voters could vote for the election of the town's commissioners. 
The boundary or limits of the town by this Act reached one- 
half mile in each direction from the court-house, the boun- 
dary to be laid off square and parallel with the Atlantic & 
Gulf Railroad. The limit to which they could tax property 
in town was fifty per cent, of the State tax. 

No records are available as to the successors of these com- 
missioners, other than scattering evidences. In 1876, the 
president of the commissioners was J. L. Sweat, and the other 
commissioners were: H. A. Mattox, George B. Lane, Josia.h 
Sirmans, and W. A. Ecord. The clerk and treasurer was M. 
M. Caswell and the marshal was John A. Street. In 1883 
the town commissioners were: J. L. Sweat, president; M. M. 
Caswell, W. H. Gary, W. A. Ecord and Sherod Smith. The 
clerk was Joseph P. Mattox, treasurer was W. T. Smith. 
Thomas Singleterry was marshal. In 1895 the town commis- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 51 

sioners were: W. H. Gary, president, B. A. Whittington, 
George M. Dame, R. G. Dickerson and J. D. Mattox. 

Homerville was re-incorporated by an Act of the Legisla- 
ture approved December 23rd, 1896. The corporate limits 
were placed at three-fourths of a mile in every direction from 
the court-house, which is the present limits. Under this Act, 
W. H. Gary was elected mayor, and George M. Dame, R. G. 
Dickerson, J. D. Mattox and B. A. Whittington were elected 
councilmen. 

The charter granted in 1896 remained in force until 1907, 
when a new charter was granted by the Legislature. Under 
this Act, Col. S. L. Drawdy was appointed mayor, and W. A. 
Ecord, W. T. Dickerson, J. T. Dame and S. A. Sweat were 
appointed councilmen. 

The town owns the magnificent DuBignon Institute, in the 
western part of town, but the control of the school, such as 
the selection of teachers and the raising of revenue for school 
purposes, is vested in the local school trustees, an auxiliary of 
the County Board of Education. For the purpose of building 
this school building, a bond election was held in January, 
1 9 10, and as a result the issuing of about $8,000 in bonds 
was authorized with which to build it. 

The following is a list of the mayors since 1896: 

1 896-1 899— W. H. Gary. 

1899-1905 — R. M. Crum. 

1905 — A. H. Culpepper (resigned). 

1 905-1 906 — G. H. Cornelius. 

1 906- 1 907 — S. W. Register. 

1 907- 1 909 — S. L. Drawdy. 

1909-1911 — H. J. Dame. 

1911-1913 — H. J. Peagler. 

1913-19 14 — Flem C. Dame (resigned). 

1915-1916 — G. A. Gibbs. 

The following is a list of town clerks since 1895. 

1 895-1 896 — J. D. Mattox, 

1 896-1 897 — R. G. Dickerson. 



52 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

1 897-1 905 — J. D. Mattox. 

1 905- 1 906 — B. S. Guest. 

1 906- 1 907 — R. G. Dickerson. 

1 907- 1 909 — W. T. Dickerson. 

1909-1911 — J. F. Hughes. 

1911-1916 — A. J. Gibbs. 

The present town council is composed of S. A. Sweat, G. C. 
Hughes, J. F. Barnhill and S. S. Dillon. The town treasurer 
and tax collector is A. J. Gibbs. 

The Bank of Homerville is the only banking institution in 
the county, and was organized in 1903 with a paid-in capital 
of $15,000. Since then it has been increased to $25,000. The 
first officers of the bank were L. O. Benton, president; H. J. 
Peagler, vice-president; and M. A, McDowell, cashier. Its 
first directors were: L: O. Benton, H. J. Peagler, M. A. Mc- 
Dowell, George M. Dame, D. E. Kirkland, and S. C. Town- 
send. A year or so later Mr. Benton resigned as president 
and Mr. H. J. Peagler was elected in his stead. Col. W. T. 
Dickerson was then elected vice-president, which he has held 
ever since. Mr. Peagler served as president until his death in 
1913, after which Col. R. G. Dickerson was elected in his 
stead, and he is the present president of the bank. The cash- 
iers of the bank have been as follows: M. A. McDowell, 
1903-4; H. L. Lankford, Jr., 1904-5; H. J. Dame, 1905-7; 
H. M. Peagler, 1907-8; J. F. Hughes, 1908-11, and G. A. 
Gibbs, 1911-16. The present assistant cashier is H. C. 
Dickerson. The present board of directors are: R. G. Dick- 
erson, W. T. Dickerson, W. V. Musgrove, A. J. Gibbs, 
George M. Dame, J. T. Dame and S. A. Sweat. This bank 
is a strong institution and enjoys the patronage and confidence 
of the whole county. It is a State depository. 

In a commercial way. The Hughes Company ranks among 
the first in the amount of its business. This concern is a cor- 
poration incorporated in Brooks County, where it carried on 
an extensive business prior to its removal here in 191 1. G. C. 
Hughes, an extensive turpentine operator, and a native of 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 53 

North Carolina, is president, and G. O. Carroll, a native of 
Lowndes County, is secretary and treasurer and general 
manager. 

Another concern which carries on a large business is Dame 
Brothers, a partnership composed of Messrs. George M. and 
John T. Dame. This is the oldest existing establishment in 
Homerville, having been organized in 1890. Mr. J. T. Dame 
has served Clinch County as ordinary since 1905, while his 
brother has served two terms as county treasurer. 

Other old establishments are Preston Williams, who has 
been one of the town's merchants since about 1904; and 
Homerville Drug Company, Dr. J. G. Colwell, proprietor, 
which has been in business here since 1906. 

Besides these, there are S. A. Sweat & Company, general 
store; Sweat Feed Company, hay and grain; A. N. Cars- 
well, general store; R. M. McLaughlin, market; J. Leon 
Pafford, market; Homerville Grocery Company, E. D. Brin- 
son, proprietor, groceries; Clinch County Drug Co., B. E. 
Blitch, proprietor; Homerville Hardware & Furniture Com- 
pany, T. R. O'Steen, proprietor; and the City Bakery, Dr. 
L. S. Malone, proprietor. 

A modern garage is operated by Mr. H. M. Peagler, who 
has the agency for the Ford automobiles for this county. 

The town's telephone system was established in 19 10 by 
H. J. Dame, who sold it out in January, 19 14, to Claude 
Harvey, of Bronwood, Ga. Mr. Harvey removed here and 
took charge of the business. It is now under the manage- 
ment of the Homerville Telephone Company, a partnership 
composed of Mr. Harvey and W. J. Barlow. Their tele- 
phone lines penetrate Mud Creek district, and extend to every 
district in the county except Withers' and Moore's mill dis- 
tricts. There is also an automobile delivery business in con- 
nection with the telephone business. 

In 19 13-4, an electric light and water plant was installed 
by Messrs. J. F. Barnhill and J. H. Ferdon, two of the town's 
most substantial citizens. This need has been realized in 



54 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Homerville for several years and its advent was much desired. 
The water is pumped from a distance of about nine hundred 
feet beneath the surface of the ground. There are about 
twenty-six street lights, which are maintained by the town. 
As yet the town has no sanitary system. 

Elsewhere in this work will be found descriptions of 
Homerville's two fine churches and of its magnificent school 
building. These buildings are monuments to the town and 
would be a credit to much larger towns. 

Homerville's postmasters for the last twenty-five years, 
are few. Dr. Mattox, in the days of the stage-coach, was his 
own postmaster, before the town came into existence. For 
many years during and following the war, the two positions 
of postmaster and railroad and express agent was consoli- 
dated. Joel Strickland held this position here several years 
after the war, as did also Abraham Mallette. About 1875 
to 1 88 1, Josiah Sirmans was postmaster. After him was 
Sherod Smith, who died in 1891. The next postmaster was 
S. A. Sweat, who served until about 1894. Mrs. D. C. Gil- 
lican was postmistress until 1898, when D. E. Kirkland was 
was appointed. Mr. Kirkland was postmaster for fifteen 
years, or until his death, November 30th, 19 13. Folks Hux- 
ford then served a few months as acting postmaster, when 
Flem C. Dame was appointed and took charge in April, 19 14. 
He is the present postmaster. 

THE LIFE OF JOHN H. MATTOX. 

The founder of Homerville, John Homer Mattox, was a 
son of Col. Elijah Mattox, and was born in Tattnall County, 
March 26th, 1827. When he was quite a young boy, his 
father moved to Ware County, where they settled. 

The country was then wild, having no railroads, and was 
sparsely settled, but under the lead of such men as John H. 
Mattox, has grown wonderfully and has been developed 
very much. Colonel Mattox (Elijah Mattox), in the course 
of time was granted much land from the State, lying in this 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 55 

county. Among his many lots were the two on which Homer- 
ville is now located. These two lots eventually came into pos- 
session of John Homer Mattox, at the death of his father, 
along with other lots. This was about 1857. 

Homer Mattox doubtlessly saw the future of a town which 
might be built on this land. A railroad was coming its way 
and the site was very near the center of the county. About 
1859 the town was begun. 

Among his public gifts, Mr. Mattox gave six acres of land 
to the railroad as a means of inducing them to make his 
place a station. Another was the court-house grounds. 

While he never practiced his profession very much, yet he 
was a physician of no little attainments. His brother. Dr. L. 
C. Mattox, lived near town, and was a physican also. 

Dr. Mattox's home was a very unpretentious one, located 
in the southern part of town. It was built in a square shape, 
out of good lumber. The proof of the stability of the house is 
seen in the fact that it withstood the attacks of time for about 
fifty years. The land is now owned by Mr. J. F. Patterson. 

Mr. Mattox's wife was Miss Lucinda M. Sheffield. Their 
children were: Ruby; Tonnie, who married W. A. Norman; 
Emma, who married Thomas Fogarty ; B. E. Mattox; Lucius 
W. Mattox; Belle, who married William Parker; Homer 
O. Mattox; Jefferson D. Mattox, and William S. Mattox. 

His death occurred in Homerville, February i8th, 1895. 
He was buried in the Homerville cemetery. 



CHAPTER V. 

The Civil War Period. — Lists of Troops From Clinch 
County. — The Surrender. — Immigrants to Clinch County. 

WHEN Abraham Lincoln was elected President of 
the United States in i860, it became apparent that 
the North and the South was hopelessly divided. As 
a result the State of South Carolina seceded in December, 
i860, and following this the Legislature of Georgia called a 
State convention of delegates to be elected by the people, to 
decide whether Georgia should secede from the Union or not. 

In Clinch County, Hon. Benjamin Sirmans and Hon. T. 
G. Ramsey were elected as delegates to the convention and 
instructed to vote for secession. These gentlemen were prom- 
inent citizens of the county and had the welfare as well as the 
rights of their State and county at heart. Mr. Sirmans was 
an early pioneer of the county, settling here in 1822, and was 
a former State senator, while Mr. Ramsey had been living 
here since 1853, ^^^ was subsequently a justice of the In- 
ferior Court. 

When the convention met at Milledgeville on the i6th of 
January, 1861, with ex-Governor George W. Crawford as 
president, eloquent and fiery speeches were made for and 
against secession. On the final test vote, it was found that 
164 delegates favored secession, while 133 favored co-oper- 
ation with the fifteen other Southern States in securing con- 
stitutional guarantees for the protection of their rights and 
property. Following the result of the vote, Georgia was 
then declared a free and independent republic, while the peo- 
ple saw that an inevitable war would soon be on hand. In 
February, 1861, the Southern Confederacy, ill-fated though 
it was, was formed and Georgia entered it and thus became 
one of the Confederate States. 

It having become apparent that war was at hand, com- 



History of Clinch Comity, Georgia 57 

panics of volunteer troops were organized over the State. 
In Clinch County, a company was formed at Stockton in 
July, 1 86 1, which left for the front on July 31, 1861. It 
was attached to the 29th Georgia Regiment and known as 
Co. *'H." Francis M. Jackson was elected captain. 

A few months later another company was formed of 
Clinch and Ware County men. It was under the command 
at first of Col, William A. McDonald, and attached to the 
26th Georgia and known as Co. "K." 

Still a few months later another company was formed of 
Clinch County men at Homerville. It was organized March 
4th, 1862, and left for the front the 3rd of April. This 
company was under command of Captain John Riley O'Steen 
and was designated as Co. "G," 50th Georgia Regiment. 

On the ist of January, 1863, another company was made 
up at Homerville, which was attached to the 4th Georgia 
Cavalry and known as Co. "I." It was under the command 
of Col. John C. Nichols, who served throughout the war in 
this capacity. 

Other companies in which many Clinch County men en- 
listed were: Co. "G," 29th Georgia; Co. "I," 29th Georgia; 
Co. "C," 22nd Georgia Artillery; Co. "G," 51st Georgia 
Regiment; Co. "H," 4th Georgia Cavalry, and Co. "I," 12th 
Georgia regiment. 

The 29th Regiment was under the command of Col. W. J. 
Young and later Col. R. Spaulding. The 50th Georgia was 
under the command of Col. W. R. Manning, later Col. Peter 
McGlashan. The 26th Georgia was under the command of 
Col. Carey W. Styles, later Col. Edmund N. Atkinson, of 
Camden County, and the 4th Georgia Cavalry was under the 
command of Col. Duncan L. Clinch, Jr., of Camden County. 

During the war, this county was not invaded by any Fed- 
eral troops; no battles were fought here and in this respect 
the people fared better than those who lived in the northern 
part of the State. Many people came to this county from 
other sections, "refugeeing," as it was known. Supplies be- 



58 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

came very scarce and great suffering was found on nearly 
every hand for the want of the necessities of life. The 
"women-folks" and the slaves had to attend to the farm and 
raise the crops. 

Towards the last part of the great struggle, the age limit 
was extended out each way so as to take in all the available 
men of the Confederacy. Boys as young as sixteen, and men 
as old as sixty, were taken into the army, and many of our 
older men of the present day joined the Confederate Army 
when only lads. 

In 1863, when President Lincoln issued his emancipation 
proclamation, setting free the slaves of the seceding States, 
many of the slaves on the farms of Clinch County refused 
to go, and stayed on with their old masters. Among the 
slave-owners who were heavily effected by the freeing of the 
slaves were James C. Smith, William Register, Robert B. 
Crum, Benjamin Sirmans and his sons, John Tomlinson and 
Charles Strickland. 

LISTS OF TROOPS. 

The lists which are herewith given of the different com- 
panies that went from Clinch County, is given as gathered 
from various sources. It will be found to be reliable and in 
practically all cases is authentic. 

Those which are marked with an (*) were killed or lost 
in the war. Clinch County lost many good men in this war. 
Their ashes rest on the battlegrounds of the past and the 
memory of their heroic and patriotic devotion to a lost cause 
will serve to ever keep alive in the breasts of Clinch County 
men and women, love and reverence for the cause in which 
they and their comrades fought and died, and also to perpet- 
uate in the hearts of our people the memory of the glorious 
deeds and examples of self-sacrifice which were done and 
made time and again in the interest of their cause and their 
countrv. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 59 



<<y^>> 



CO. G 29TH GEORGIA INFANTRY. 

This company was organized of men, chiefly citizens of 
Berrien County, but had several Clinch County men in it. 
Only the names of a few privates from Clinch County are 
given : 

Captain : 

Levi J. Knight, later Edward Carroll. 

Lieutenants : 

Jasper Roberts, Simeon Griffin and John Hall. 

Privates : 

Mathis, James Touchston, Hardy Giddens, Matthew 

Mathis, Zachary Touchston, Richard Giddens, Moses 

Mathis, Ezekiel Powell, John W. McCranie, John 

Bradford, Clinton Powell, William McCranie, Richard 

Bradford, Berry Knight, George Touchston, Charles 
Bradford, Brinson 

CO. "k" 29TH GEORGIA REGIMENT. 

This company was organized chiefly in Berrien County, 
and was composed of men from Berrien, Lowndes and Clinch 
Counties. The list given below consists of only a portion of 
the company; not all is obtainable. The company was or- 
ganized in 1 861 at Milltown, in Berrien County. After it 
arrived at the front, it was reorganized and attached to the 
4th Georgia as Co. "H." Many changes were made in the 
personnel of the company before the war closed. 

Officers elected before the reorganization : 

John C. Lamb, captain. 
James W. Staten, 1st Lieut. 
Jonathan Knight, 2nd Lieut. 
Zack Parrish, 3rd Lieut. 

Officers elected at the reorganization : 

Thomas S. Wiley, captain. 
James H. Carroll, 1st Lieut. 
James W. Howell, 2nd Lieut. 
James H. Dasher, 3rd Lieut. 
Thomas F. Morgan, 1st Sergeant. 
C. S. Touchston, 2nd Sergeant. 
Burrill Bailey, Corporal. 



6o 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



Other sergeants were: 

Richard Tucker. 
Robert Chisholm 
E. A. Carter. 
Perry Zeigler. 



Other corporals 


were: 






J. w 


. Carter. 






John 


L. Tison. 






William Martin. 




Privates : 








Arnold, C. W. 




Fletcher, Gerry 


Mahon, David D. 


Allen, Hansford 




Findley, A. B. 


Nix, John 


Alderman, Richard 


Griffin, William 


Purvis, Babe 


Ansley, Joseph 




Gray, Jack 


Parmer, Alex. 


Baker, William 




Hightovver, Byrd 


Parmer, William 


Bryant, J. E. 




Harper, Jackson 


Roberts, William 


Byrd, William 




Howell, W. T. 


Rentz, Artemus 


Bevel, Granville 




Hurst, Dan 


Ross, James 


Baset, Jackson 




Herren, Charles 


Sirmans, Harris 


Clayton, Malidge 




Hewett, John 


Sirmans, Hardeman 


Clayton, Alford 




Johnson, J. S. 


Sirmans, Winfield 


Cook, Charles 




Jones, Thomas 


Swilley, Isham 


Clements, Walton 




Jones, Dr. 


Stuart, Thomas 


Clements, David 




Knight, John W. 


Touchston, William 


Chisholm, James 




Kinard, James 


Touchston, C. S. 


Carter, N. A. 




Lovejoy, J. L. 


Tomlinson, James 


Carter, Moses 




Lightsey, Geo. 


Tatum, George J. 


Carter, J. J. 




Lightsey, Samuel 


Tison, Simeon 


Collier, Henry 




Locke, John 


Tison, William 


Chandler, John 




Money, John A. 


Tucker, Richard 


Dees, Dan 




McMiilen, John 


Varns, Samuel 


Dees, Isaac 




McFadden, Isaac 


Vining, Jesse 


Duff, Mikell 




Morgan, E. C. 


Vining, John 


Duggan, Arch 




Moore, Levi 


Watson, J. W. 


Dasher, Thomas 




Martin, James 


Watson, Jacob 


Putch, Reubin 




Miley, Wilburn F. 


Waldron, L. 0. G. 


Futch, John 




Morgan, David 


Wisenbaker, A. D. 


Prazier, Byrd 




Moody, Thomas 


Wisenbaker, J. S. 


Pletcher, Samuel 




Moreland, Tige 


Youlds, Robert 


CO 


. "h 


" 2QTH GEORGIA 


REGIMENT. 



This company was organized at Stockton in 1861. After 
it arrived at the front a reorganization was had and new of- 
ficers elected. This regiment saw much hard service in the 
battles around Atlanta in 1864, '" which numbers of its 
men were lost. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



6i 



Officers elected at Stockton : 

Francis M. Jackson, Captain. 
Jonathan Knight, 1st Lieut. 
L. H. Roberts, 2nd Lieut. 
D. C. Lancaster, 3rd Lieut. 

Officers elected at reorganization : 

Reubin Y. Stanford,* Captain. 
W. H. O'Neal, 1st Lieut. 
Matthew Roberts, 2nd Lieut. 
Colonel W. Corbitt, 3rd Lieut. 



Privates : 

Burkhalter, James 
Booker, James* 
Byce, John* 
Byron, J. W. 
Corbitt, Monroe 
Corbitt, C. W. 
Corbitt, Reubin* 
Carson, Thomas 
Cartledge, Wiley* 
Clements, Lewis 
Cameron, E. L. F. 
Cameron, Dr.* 
Carter, Jesse W.* 
Corbitt, Newsom* 
Daugharty, Arthur 
Daugharty, Henry 
Dame, James W. 
Daugharty, James 
Dunaway, Zephaniah'' 
Dorminy, John 
Douglas, Millender* 
Dawson, Cornelius* 
Fiveash, George 
Fiveash, John* 
Green, Solomon* 
Green, Henry* 
Goff, James* 
Hart, Jesse 
Hilliard, John* 
Harnage, E. M.* 
Higgs, Elisha 



Higgs, Robert* 
Higgs, Jasper* 
Harnage, Guilford 
Hall, Jesse 
Henderson, Jim 
Johnson, William* 
Johnson, Bryant* 
Johnson, Joseph 
Jones, J. H. 
Johnson, W. P* 
Johnson, James* 
Jacobs, John* 
Kinard, George* 
Lightsey, C. B. 
Lastinger, Charles* 
Lastinger, James* 
Lastinger, Andrew* 
Lancaster, Acy* 
Love joy, Nathan* 
Lieman, Lewis* 

Lefler, * 

McCardle, Randle 
Mims, James 
McGill, Peter* 
North, Ephriam* 
North, Caliph* 
Nicholson, William* 
Newbern, Ashley* 
Newbern, Berry* 
Oliver, Charles* 



Permenter, James* 
Permenter, L. A.* 
Permenter, Wright* 
Roberts, Thomas* 
Roberts, Sherod 
Roberts, Steve* 
Reddish, Joshua* 
Stewart, Joshua 
Staten, Samuel 
Sherley, Jesse G.* 
Storeman, John 
Stanford, Mitchell* 
Sirmans, Abner 
Sutton, Moses 
Tomlinson, Moses 
Tomlinson, Guilford* 
Tomlinson, Levin 
Tomlinson, John G. 
Tomlinson, Aaron 
Tomlinson, Sherod 
Touchston, Steve 
Timmerman, John* 
Vining, Judson* 
Vining, James* 
Watson, John 
Worth, Wm. W.* 
Wandle, John 
Walden, Svlvester 
Waldron, L. 0. G. 
Wilson, John 



CO. G 5OTH GEORGIA REGIMENT. 

This company was raised at Homerville and organized 
March 4th, 1862. It was attached to Mercer's Brigade, and 
saw much service at Chancellorsville, Boonesboro, Freder- 
icksburg, Gettysburg and other battles that Lee's army was in. 



62 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



Captains: 



Lieutenants : 



Sergeants : 



Corporals : 



Privates 



John R. O'Steen,* 
Isaac Burkhalter.* 
Quarterman B. Staten. 



Quarterman B. Staten. 
Jacob Watson. 
Lyman A. Simians. 
William Roberts. 
Augustus Brack. 
John Sirmans.* 
Jacob S. Lightsey. 



Isaac Burkhalter.* 
Enoch Tomlinson. 
C. W. Curry. 
Mark Henderson. 
Augustus Brack. 
Guilford T. Lastinger 
William M. Austin. 
Martin S. Corbitt. 



Joseph Tomlinson.* 
Guilford A. Register. 
David Lastinger, 
John Sirmans.* 



Arnold, Henry* 
Arnold, Madison 
Alcox, Jesse 
Baxley, William R. 
Brady, John* 
Brady, Thomas A. 
Brady, Robert N. 
Brady, Lewis J. 
Brady, Samuel E.* 
Brady, Samuel* 
Bennett, William 
Bennett, James 
Bostic, Jesse S. 
Brown, William 
Bass, Archibald* 
Bass, David 
Brack, Washington* 
Chancey, Samuel 
Clemmons, James 
Cornelius, George 
Cowart, Kindred 
Corbitt, Manning* 



Corbitt, William* 
Douglas, James 
Griffis, Samuel 
Griffis, Eli* 
Guthrie, James* 
Griffin, Enoch 
Hunter, Madison* 
Hall, Fleming 
Hart, Berrien 
Harnage, George 
Harnage, Jerry* 
Harnage, Jacob 
Hughes, Isaac* 
Holland, Redding* 
Johnson, W. A. P. 
Johnson, William 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Riley 
Johnson, Thomas 
Jewell, Reubin 
Jones, Abner* 
Kirby, William 



Leggett, George 
Moore, William N. 
Minshew, Jacob 
Mizell, William* 
Nipper, Hiram 
Nipper, Joel* 
Register, S. W. 
Register, John T. 
Register, G. A. 
Roberts, James 
Roberts, Moses* 
Roberts, John* 
Roberts, Mark* 
Roberts, Isham 
Register, Miles 
Royals, William 
Riggs, William 
Smith, A. N. 
Sears, Hiram* 
Sears, James 
Starling, Tharp* 
Starling, Raymond 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



63 



Sirmans, Lewis* 
Stalvey, Moses 
Smith, Sirmans* 
Thomas, Colon 
Tomlinson, Harris 



Tonilinson, Nelion* 
Tomlinson, Thomas 
Vining, Jasper 
Walker, Henry- 
Walker, Joseph 



Whitehurst, Jackson 
Weaver, Peter* 
Waters, James 
Waters, Mack 



CO. I 4TH GEORGIA CAVALRY. 

This company was organized at Homerville, January ist, 
1863. It was attached to the 4th Georgia Cavalry under the 
command of Col. Duncan L. Clinch, Jr., of Camden County. 
This command was in the battles around Atlanta and also 
participated in the battle at Olustee, Fla. 

The following were its officers : 

John C. Nichols, Captain. 
Ezekiel J. Sirmans, 1st Lieut. 
George W. Newbern, 2nd Lieut. 
Harrison Jones, 3rd Lieut. 
John G. Tomlinson, 1st Sergeant. 
F. M. Jackson, 2nd Sergeant. 
Peter Williams, 3rd Sergeant. 



Privates : 
Aldridge, C. 
Aspinwall, Matthew 
Aspinwall, A. J. 
Bailey, B. H.* 
Byron, Charles 
Byrd, Jesse 
Burch, Charles 
Bowen, William 
Box, John 
Box, William 
Bennett, Wm. M.* 
Byrd, W. M.* 
Byrd, Parker 
Bland, Timothy* 
Cornelius, Edward* 
Carter, W. M. 
Cook, Charles 
Cox, James 
Cohen, W. M. 
Courson, John 
Carter, John 
Crawford, Reubin 
Chancey, G. W. 
Carver, Gabriel R. 
Cribb, Riley 
Dryden, Aldridge 
Dryden, Arch 



Dryden, B. C. 
Dyal, Aldridge 
Dyal, David 
Dickerson, J. R. 
Chancey, W. H, 
Fulwood, J. W. 
Faircloth, W. M.* 
Griffis, Elias 
Griffis, William 
Griffis, Joel G. 
Guess, Crawford 
Harris, G. W. 
Hall, Seaborn 
Gale, Thomas 
Herren, Jackson 
Hargraves, William 
Hargraves, Hope 
Hargraves, Sidney 
Hargraves, John C. 
Harris, James 
Higgs, Elisha 
Herndon, Isham 
Johnson, Riley 
Jones, John 
Johnson, William* 
Jewell, Levi 
Johnson, Robert 



Kight, Cuyler 
Kight, Henry 
Lee, James 
Murray, Isaac 
Murray, S, E. 
McDonald, Terry 
Mathis, H. P. 
Morgan, Lemuel* 
Morgan, Alex. 
Morgan, Joseph* 
Morgan, Thomas C. 
Martin, James* 
Martin, L. D. 
Morgan, J. T. 
Meeks, W. M. 
Meeks, H. 
Meeks, M. 

Norman, Richard G. 
Nail, J. 
Ryals, Robert 
Rich, John 
Rich, G. B. 
Roberts, S. 
Petty, John B. 
Stone, John 
Sikes, Joe 
Smith, J. H. 



64 



History of CUnch County, Georgia 



Smith, Willis 
Smith, C. H. 
Sirmans, B. J. 
Swain, Joel 
Stewart, Wm. 
Sears, John 
Stephens, John 



Starling, Wm. 
Skinner, Randal 
Strickland, C. 
Skinner, M. 
Thomas, T. E. 
Thomas, J. D. 
Thomas, W. M. 
Treist, Samuel 



Teston, James 
Thomas, Dave 
White, G. W. 
Williams, Elias 
Walker, F. S. 
Walker, W. M.* 
Walker, J. C* 



CO. "k" 26th GEORGIA INFANTRY. 

This company was organized of men from Clinch and 
Ware Counties, in 1861, and saw service in Virginia, The 
first captain was William A. McDonald, while Cuyler W. 
Hilliard was later elected. Both were residents of Ware 
County, while Thomas J. Ivey, the last captain, was at this 
time a resident of Clinch. Captain Ivey is buried in the old 
cemetery at Waycross. 



Captains 



William A. McDonald. 
Cuyler W. Hilliard. 
Thomas J. Ivey. 



First Lieutenants: 

Cuyler W. Hilliard. 
Thomas J. Ivey. 
John L. Morgan, Jr. 
John T. Harris. 
B. L. McLendon.* 

Second Lieutenants: 



Privates : 



William Miller. 
Vinson A. Hodges. 



Alcox, Jesse* 
Alcox, Henry* 
Agee, William 
Agee, John 
Box, Allen 
Box, Richard A. 
Agee, Andrew 
Box, Joseph 
Bailey, Aaron 
Bailey, Tharp 
Bailey, Joseph 
Boatright, C. J. D. 
Booth, James 
Booth, William* 



Booth, Jesse 
Bennett, Tom 
Bennett, D. H. 
Bennett, Randall 
Bennett, John 
Bennett, Martin 
Carmichael, John 
Carmichael, D. C. 
Courson, Pliney W. 
Courson, John T. 
Cason, B. 

Chauncey, John M. 
Chavmcey, Samuel 
Chauncey, Mark* 



Griffis, Joel 
Goette, Allen 
Goette, Jeff 
Hodges, Vinson A.* 
Hodges, Francis M.* 
Henderson, Andrew J. 
Henderson, J. T. 
Holt, Greenberry 
Harris, Joseph 
Hall, Bill 
Hall, Hiram 
Howell, Joe* 
Inman, James M. 
Johnson, Benj. 




H. J. PEAGLER 

Mayor of Homerville 

President of the Bank of Homerville and benefactor of the 

Homerville Methodist Church. Died 1913. 




R. G. DICKERSON 
Elected Representative 1914 and Elected State Senator 1916. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



65 



Jones, John* 
Jovce, William 
Jefferds, J. M. 
Kight, John 
Kight, James M. 
Miller, James* 
Moore, Elias L. 
Morgan, Martin Z. 
Morgan, Thomas F. 
Morgan, Hampton 
Morgan, Lemuel* 
McLendon, Ephriam 
Miller, Tom 
Miller, James M. 
Miller, John H. 
Murray, S. C. 
Nettles, James 
Nettles, Thomas 



Nunez, W. P. 
Nunez, Cole 
Riberon, David M. 
Roberts, Gray* 
Rowland, Bill 
Strickland, W. J. 
Smith, William 
Smith, Harrison* 
Smith, Lawrence 
Smith, Moses 
Smith, Manning 
Smith, Lewis 
Smith, Benjamin 
Smith, James M. 
Smith, Daniel 
Smith, Wade 
Smith, Allen 
Smith, Charles 



Smith, Alfred 
Stephens, James 
Sears, Hiram, Jr. 
Sweat, Farley 
Sweat, John F. 
Sweat, Rowland 
Sauls, Holliday 
Sauls, O. J. 
Summerlin, Payton 
Summerlin, Julius 
Summerlin, John 
Sweat, John, Jr. 
Tooten, Alex. 
WilHams, H. P. 
Williams, ^. S. 
Williams, Bill* 
Wilkerson, Jack 
White, Tom* 



JOHN R. O STEEN. 

John Riley O'Steen was one of Clinch County's ablest 
men and had he survived the war, it is probable that he 
would have achieved renown other than military honors. 
As it was, he gave his life in the interest of the Confederacy. 

He was born in Ware County, about 1825. His educa- 
tion was such as could be acquired from his parents or neigh- 
bors, as schools were practically unknown to this section. He 
grew up to be a fearless young man, energetic and industrious. 
By hard dint he accumulated several lots of land and other 
property. He married Miss Jane James about 1850, and 
had the following children: Eliza (Monk), Benjamin, Jon- 
athan, James A., Mariah (Bass) , Bryant and Daniel O'Steen. 
All these sons grew up to be among the county's best citizens. 
In 1858, Mr. O'Steen was narrowly defeated by John Wil- 
liartis for representative from Clinch County. 

The Civil War coming on, Mr. O'Steen joined himself to 
the cause with great fervor. In 1862 he joined Co. "G" 50th 
Georgia, and he was elected captain of his company. This 
regiment took part in all the important battles of the Army of 
Northern Virginia. At the battle of Boonesboro, Md., Sep- 
tember 4th, 1862, Mr. O'Steen was wounded quite seriously, 
and died on the 23rd of the same month. His service in the 



66 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

army was limited by death to six months and nineteen days. 
He was survived by his wife and seven children, the oldest 
of whom was hardly in her 'teens. 

REUBEN Y. STANFORD. 

Reuben Y. Stanford was a son of David Stanford, and was 
born in 1831. He was a brother-in-law to Hon. S. W. Reg- 
ister. He was commisisoned a justice of the peace of the 
1058th district, then of Clinch but now of Echols County, 
April 4th, 1855, and re-commissioned Jan. 15th, 1857. In 
1852 he was defeated for State senator by Benjamin Sir- 
mans, by seven votes. Mr. Stanford ran a store at Mag- 
nolia for a few years previous to the war. 

In 1 86 1 he joined the company of troops which was being 
organized at Stockton. At the re-organization of the com- 
pany, Mr. Stanford was elected its captain and served in this 
capacity until 1864. At the battle of Franklin, Tenn., he 
was seriously wounded in the leg and according to some, 
was captured and taken to a Federal hospital, where he 
died. Other versions are that he was not captured, but dis- 
appeared very mysteriously. He has never been heard of 
since and the account first given is regarded as the more 
probable of the two. 

ISAAC BURKHALTER. 

Isaac Burkhalter was a son of Hon. Richard H. Burk- 
halter and was born about 1830. He came with his father 
to this county about 1845, ^^'^ ^^ 1^57 was elected Justice of 
the Peace of the 586th district. He served four years. In 
1862 he joined Company "G" 50th Georgia, of which John 
R. O'Steen was captain. In 1862 he was elected captain of 
his company following the death of Captain O'Steen. He 
was captain of his company at the battle of Gettysburg, and 
was killed. Thus another distinguished son of Clinch 
County was given up on the altar of Southern rights. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 67 

OTHER CAPTAINS. 

The other captains who were citizens of this county, viz. : 
John C. Nicholls, Quarterman B, Staten, Francis M. Jack- 
son, served the people in various public offices, and their 
lives are treated elsewhere in this book. Captain Thomas J. 
Ivey resided at Homerville for a few years following the 
war, but at his death lived in Ware County. He is buried in 
the old cemetery at Waycross. 

THE SURRENDER. 

On April 9th, 1865, General Robert E. Lee, commander- 
in-chief of the Confederate Army, surrendered his army to 
the Federals, and was followed a few days later by General 
Joseph E. Johnston. By the first of June all the Confed- 
erates had surrendered, and thus the great war came to a 
close, leaving the whole South destitute and exhausted. 

IMMIGRANTS. 

During the war and for a few years following, there was 
a steady influx of new settlers. This county escaped the ter- 
rors of an invading army, which may account for the new 
citizens to some extent. 

Robert B. Crum removed to Clinch County and settled 
near Homerville in 1862. He came from Camden County. 
He and his wife were devoted members of the Methodist 
Church, and soon after their removal here organized about 
the earliest Sunday School in the county. 

Abraham Mallette was a relative of Mrs. Crum's, and 
came here from Camden County during the war. He was 
station agent here awhile. 

Thomas D. Hawkins also removed to this county during 
the war, from Camden County, and settled at Stockton. He 
was appointed ex-officio J. P. there in 1872, and held that 
office two terms, after which he removed back to Camden 
County. He was subsequently Mayor of St. Mary's a few 
years. 



68 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Henry H. Tullis "refugeed" to this county during the 
war, and settled in the vicinity of Homerville. He, like 
the other settlers, brought much property into the county, 
such as slaves, etc. He was born September 23rd, 18 18, and 
his wife's name was Miss Rebecca Isabella Ferns. They 
had several children, three of whom, E. M. and W. L. 
Tullis and Mrs. William Saunders, now live in this county. 
Mr. Tullis died in 1892. 

Alexander, Lewis and Robert S. Holtzendorf also came 
here during the great struggle, and settled at Stockton. They 
likewise came from Camden County. Alexander Holtzen- 
dorf was born in 1808 and died in 1887 at Stockton, where 
he is buried. His son, Robert S. Holtzendorf, was born 
in 1839 ^^^ was ex-officio J. P. at Stockton a few years 
prior to his death in 1892. James A. Holtzendorf, a son of 
R. S. Holtzendorf, is now and had been for many years 
railroad agent at Stockton. 

Daniel H. Stewart came to this county about 1863 and 
settled near Homerville. He served as deputy clerk under 
Clerk David O'Quin, and about 1867 removed back to 
Chatham County, where he shortly afterwards died. His 
wife, Elendor, survived him. 

William Gaines removed here about 1864, and settled in 
the Magnolia district. He lived on the lot of land whereon 
Mr. M. S. Eason now lives. Mr. Gaines was a native of 
Ireland, and served as county surveyor three years. He 
removed to Savannah about 1875. 

John G. Norton settled at Stockton about 1865, and 
engaged in the mercantile business, later in the saw-mill 
business. He was for many years a deacon of the Mis- 
sionary Baptist Church at Stockton. 

In 1861;, John L. Courson removed to this county from 
Charlton County, and settled in the Magnolia district. Next 
year he was commisisoned a justice of the peace of the 
970th district. 

Joel L. Sweat came to Homerville in 1866, and the next 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 69 

}ear was elected a justice of the peace. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1869, and Hved here about twenty years. He 
married a daughter of Sylvanus Hitch, of Homerville. 

Also about the same time E. T. Dukes located at Homer- 
ville and entered the mercantile business. In 1874 he re- 
moved to Quitman, Ga. He served one term as clerk of the 
Superior Court. 

Also about the same time, George Dame, Sr., and George 
A. Dame, his son, settled in this county. The elder Dame 
died in 1867, while the latter was subsequently elected Sur- 
veyor of Clinch County. 

John J. Drawdy removed to Clinch County in 1869 from 
Charlton County, and settled about three miles from Homer- 
ville. In 1 9 14 he removed into town, where he is now living, 
at the age of 86. His first wife was Elizabeth, daughter of 
James Patten, of Berrien County, and a grand-daughter of 
Joshua Lee, an old settler of Clinch County. His sons, C. 
C. and S. L. Drawdy are prominent citizens of Homerville. 

James Dampier and his family removed to this county 
about 1866 and settled several miles above Stockton. They 
came from Brooks County. A son, James O. Dampier, is 
now living, while a daughter, Angie, married George D. 
Gibbs, later J. J. Drawdy. The elder Dampier was born 
August 1st, 1823, and died July 15th, 1880. 

William W. Griffin, a Methodist minister, came to 
Homerville during or very soon after the war. He was sub- 
sequently elected Ordinary of Clinch County. He died in 
DeKalb County in 1879. 

Peter A. Herviant came to DuPont or Lawton as it was 
then called, shortly after the war, and served as station 
agent there for about forty years. He married the widow 
of J. P. A, DuPont. Mr. Herviant died in 1907. He was 
a native of Macon, Ga. 

In 1867 Thomas Jones settled in this county. He was the 
father of John C. Jones, for many years tax receiver of 



yo History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Clinch County, and of Thomas N. Jones. They were natives 
of Sampson County, N. C. 

Malcolm C. Futch came to this county from Berrien 
County about 1871, and settled in the Magnolia district. 
He married Amanda Smith, a daughter of Peter Smith, and 
had several children. He is yet living at the age of 80. 

In 1869, Solomon Mobley removed to this county and 
settled on the Suwannee River. He came from Appling 
County, where he was born March 13th, 1822. His wife 
was Mary Mann, and they lived in Appling County at 
Mann's Ferry on the Altamaha River. At the time Mr. 
Mobley removed to the Suwannee River, it was a wild, un- 
developed country, and no roads. He took the old trail 
established during the Indian war and built a log house 
down there to live in. It was not supplanted with a frame 
house until the advent through that section, about 1900, of 
the G. S. & F. R. R. Mr, Mobley raised eleven children, 
eight of whom are living. He died May 4th, 1907, and is 
buried at the North cemetery. 

John W. Langdale was a prominent citizen and early 
settler of the 1219th district. For many years this section 
of the county was very sparsely populated, even after the 
Civil War. The country was very wild, but of late years 
has been wonderfully developed. Mr. Langdale was born 
in Echols County in i860. He came to this county in 1884, 
and settled near where Council, Georgia, now is. His wife 
was Miss Nancy Burnsed; they had eight children. His 
son, John J. Langdale, is now a member of the Board of 
Education of Clinch County, and another son, Harley 
Langdale, is a prominent lawyer of Valdosta, where he was 
in 19 1 6 elected recorder of the police court. Mr. Langdale, 
Sr., died June 14th, 191 1. He had accumulated much prop- 
erty and was a highly esteemed citizen. His family was 
originally from South Carolina and settled first in Cam- 
den County, later in Echols County. 



I 



CHAPTER VI. 

Condition of the County Following the Close of the War. — 
Politics. — Condition of the County Treasury. — Burning 
of Court-House. — New Jail. — The History of DuPont. 
— The History of Stockton, — Temperance. 

4 FTER the great war closed, it left this portion of the 
AA South like the rest, desolate. But the people soon set to 
work with vim and energy to rebuild their burned homes 
and reclaim that which was lost and destroyed. The husbands 
and fathers lost in the war were replaced by growing sons, and 
the women took hold of the plow-handle and strived to earn a 
livelihood for the family with as much determination as the 
men. 

Clinch County shared in the desolation brought on by 
the war. Although there were no battles fought here, nor 
any armies encamped here, still the keenness of the war's 
desolation was felt. 

It was with the hardest difficulty that the people managed 
to pay the taxes for several years following the war. In 
many counties the time for collecting tax was extended for 
nearly a year beyond the regular time. In this county the 
grand juries at different terms of the Superior Court recom- 
mended that grand jurors receive one dollar per day for their 
services. At one term of the court it was recommended that 
no jury scrip be issued at all on account of the condition of 
the treasury. 

In i860, the value of property in Clinch County was, ac- 
cording to the tax books, $1,304,429. In 1868, the value was 
$448,257, a decrease of 65 per cent. The County had not 
fully recovered from it in 1884, for the value of property 
that year was only $792,484. The tax digest of Clinch 
County for 19 15 showed that the total value of all property 
In the county was $2,146,107, exclusive of the railroads and 



72 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

telegraph lines which amounted to $1,265,051 in addition to 
the other. The figures show the comparative condition of 
the county. 

POLITICAL. 

Following the close of the war, came the effort on the part 
of Northern schemers and renegade Southerners to get con- 
trol of the negroes and their votes, disfranchise the native 
Southern whites who participated in the war, and thus gain 
control of the country. 

The "Ku-Klux" clan, which played such an important part 
in other sections, was not operated here on an extensive 
scale, — indeed, no traces of it are found at all in Clinch 
County. 

Stringent orders were issued by the military authorities of 
the State, all aimed at those who aided the Confederate cause. 
In 1868, Rufus B. Bulloch, Radical candidate, was elected 
governor of the State, defeating John B. Gordon, the Demo- 
cratic candidate. Clinch County in this election gave a ma- 
jority for Bulloch, due to the preponderating vote of the 
negroes. Echols County went Democratic by a nice majority, 
while Lowndes went for Bulloch. In Valdosta, negro police- 
men, sworn in for the purpose, patrolled the streets during 
the three days of the election. At this same election, New- 
som Corbitt was elected State senator, Guilford Lastinger 
representative from Clinch County, and Martin S. Corbitt, 
tax collector of the county, on the Radical ticket. 

It is found from the records of the legislative session of 
1868 that our senator and representative voted for the four- 
teenth constitutional amendment, which was so particularly 
odious to the Southern people. But to have voted against the 
bill would have been hazardous and might have meant the 
loss of their seats. Moreover, there was a large number of 
negroes and northerners who served in this legislature, and 
Clinch County was very fortunate to have her own sons 
to represent her there. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 73 

Prior to the election, a Democratic mass meeting was held 
in Homerville, September ist, 1868. It was largely attended 
and in it were representative citizens from each section of 
the county. Mr. Basil G. O'Brian was elected chairman 
and Hon. David O'Quin, secretary. The purpose of the 
meeting was to elect delegates to the Democratic district con- 
vention at Blackshear to nominate a Democratic candidate 
for Congress from the first Congressional district. The fol- 
lowing delegates were chosen : David Johnson, U. VanGeisen, 
J. L. Sweat, L. C. Mattox, D. J. Sirmans, and C. A. Smith, 
and the following alternates were chosen : Z. King, David 
O'Quin, Thomas J. Ivey, D. D. Mahon, Simon W. Hitch, 
and W. W. Griffin. At this meeting, strong and vigorous res- 
olutions were passed not only pledging their support to the 
Democratic ticket, but also not to employ any negro, or sell 
any land to any negro or rent him land or otherwise in any 
way render any aid to any negro who worked or voted for 
the Radical ticket in the coming election. This is very im- 
portant, as it throws much light on the times. 

The Democratic district convention at Blackshear, to which 
the above named delegates were elected, met on Sept. i6th, 
1868, with the following delegates from Clinch present: 
D. J. Sirmans, C. A. Smith and Thomas J. Ivey. Hon. A. H. 
Hansell, of Thomasville, was nominated over three 
opponents. 

In 1870, at the next election, not one Radical was elected 
to office in Clinch County. The Radicals or Republicans, 
never afterwards elected any of their candidates in Clinch 
County. 

In 1876 a split occurred in the Democratic party in Clinch 
County, which resulted in the election of Lewis Strickland, 
independent candidate, to the legislature. The split seems to 
have been caused in the following manner: A meeting of 
Democrats was called by the chairman. Col. J. L, Sweat, to be 
held in Homerville on July ist, 1876, for the purpose of nom- 
inating a Democratic candidate for representative. The first 



74 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

matter to be attended to in the meeting was the election of 
delegates to the State Democratic convention in Atlanta to 
nominate a candidate for governor. A new chairman was 
elected, W. B. N. Crews. The chairman appointed a com- 
mittee to retire and select the delegates to Atlanta. This 
committee elected Sherod Tomlinson, J. G. Tomlinson, Irwin 
R. Booth, D. J. Sirmans, A. J. Caswell and J. L. Sweat as 
delegates. The act of the chairman in selecting a commit- 
tee was demurred to by a certain faction, but in vain. Lewis 
Strickland and the Mud Creek delegation withdrew, followed 
by a majority of the other delegates. The remaining dele- 
gates nominated Jonathan L. Morgan for representative, and 
adjourned in regular order. Mr. Strickland then declared him- 
self an independent candidate for representative, and although 
only 26 years of age, commenced an aggressive campaign. 

Great dissatisfaction followed, and the regular Demo- 
crats feared for the existence of the party in the county. A 
meeting was called for the third Saturday in July, following 
the meeting of July ist, to harmonize matters if possible and 
bring about some amicable settlement. In the meantime, 
Shimuel Timmerman declared himself also an independent 
candidate, as did also I. T. McLendon, Guilford Lastinger 
and A. B. Findley. The mass meeting to harmonize matters, 
was duly held and efforts made to get both Mr. Strickland 
and Mr. Morgan to come down and support a new candidate. 
Mr. Timmerman retired from the race, and endeavored to 
prevail on the others to do likewise, but they would not. 

The election was duly held in October following, and the 
vote resulted as follows: Strickland, 362; Morgan, 251; 
McLendon, 81; Lastinger, 26; and Findley, 15. Therefore, 
Mr. Strickland and his supporters were vindicated at the 
polls, Mr. Strickland was re-elected two years later as an 
independent. 

Harmony was finally restored in the party, which con- 
tinued until the advent of the Third Party, or Populists, 
about 1890. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 75 

BURNING OF COURT-HOUSE. 

During the summer of 1867 the court-house at Homerville 
was burned. Like the burning of the court-house at Mag- 
noHa in 1856, it was never ascertained how the fire originated, 
but it was generally thought to be incendiary. It was burned 
at night, and all the records for the previous ten years were 
destroyed, including the deed records. It happened at a most 
unfortunate time, for the county, as the county was in very 
poor condition following the close of the war. The destruc- 
tion of the records, especially the deed records, has been sadly 
realized of late years. 

A contract was soon afterwards awarded by the Inferior 
Court to James Russell, a resident of Homerville, for the 
building of a new court-house. Mr. Russell was a native of 
Scotland and a carpenter by trade. He also engaged in the 
saw-mill business a short while. 

During the interval between the burning of the old court 
house and the completion of the new one, a store house in 
Homerville was rented from Sylvanus Hitch, which served 
as a court-house until the new one was finished. The new 
building was a somewhat small-sized one, of two stories with 
stair-steps on the outside of the building. It was built of good 
lumber, and served until the erection of the new brick court- 
house in 1895-6. 

The Grand Jury at the September adjourned term, 1868, 
recommended that "the room upstairs in the court-house be 
reserved for religious purposes for the various denominations 
for all time to come." 

CONDITION OF THE TREASURY. 

The condition of the county treasury was like that of the 
State treasury at this time, — depleted, and the county in debt. 
The presentments of the Grand Jury at the March term, 
1868, shows the treasurer, David O'QuIn, had paid out 
$34.00 over and above what he received. 

The report of the committee of the Grand Jury at the 



76 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

September adjourned term, 1868, shows the county in debt 
$500 exclusive of the indebtedness for the court-house. This 
was caused by the building of the new court house. 

At the April term, 1869, ^^^ Grand Jury reported that the 
county was in debt $1,044.00 besides expenses of the present 
term of court; amount in treasury $122.00. At the June 
adjourned term, 1870, the indebtedness appears reduced to 
$700.00 of which $400.00 was the court-house debt. At the 
October term, 1871, the indebtedness was only $300.00; at 
this term of court, it was recommended that no jury scrip be 
issued. At the October term, 1872, the report signed by 
E. L. Moore, Aaron Moore and Moses Tomlinson, com- 
mittee, showed a balance in the treasury of $21.34. It appears 
that the county managed to keep a balance in the treasury 
from then on. 

TRANQUILITY. 

Although the freed blacks became a menace to the country, 
yet our county fared very well in this respect. By reference 
to the Grand Jury presentments, October term, 1869, it is 
observed that "the county and our people are to be congrat- 
ulated upon the improved condition of our community, both 
in reference to the suppression of crime as well as any dispo- 
sition to lawlessness." Later at the October term, 1871, it 
is noted that "our county is in a most tranquil state, there 
being little or no crimes committed or turmoil existing within 
our borders." 

NEW JAIL. 

For several years following the war, Clinch County did 
not have a jail in which to incarcerate her prisoners. About 
1 87 1 it became apparent that a new jail was needed. The 
Grand Jury, at the April term, 1871, recommended the build- 
ing of a new jail, but the succeeding Grand Jury discounte- 
nanced the plan and recommended that the county wait until 
it was in a more prosperous condition. 

At this stage of the matter, Col. J. L. Sweat appeared 



^ 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 77 

before the Grand Jury at the fall term, 1873, with a plan 
and set of specifications for a new jail, with the offer that he 
would bear one-third of the expense if the Grand Jury would 
recommend it built. It was duly recommended, and from the 
Ordinary's minutes It is found that after duly advertising for 
bids, the contract was let out by the Ordinary to A. E. Smith 
for $300.00. The size of the jail was twelve feet wide and 
eighteen feet long, two stories high, with double walls twelve 
feet high, built of hewn logs six Inches thick. It was a very 
small building compared to the present jail, but amply met 
the demands of the time. 

The Grand Jury, at the term of court following the com- 
pletion of the jail, unanimously voted its thanks to Colonel 
Sweat for his liberal and patriotic spirit In the building of 
the jail. 

DUPONT. 

The beginning of the town of DuPont may be traced back 
to about 1858, when Mr. J. P. A. DuPont removed his fam- 
ily to this point from Darlen, In Mcintosh County. He built 
an elegant home and in the course of a year a new railroad 
came through this section and by Mr. DuPont's home. 

With the building through of the railroad, came the re- 
moval of the county site from Magnolia to some point on the 
railroad. Mr. DuPont endeavored to have It removed to 
where he lived, which was called "No. 12" by the railroad 
people for many years, but Dr. J. H. Mattox offered the best 
Inducements to have it removed to the present town of Homer- 
ville. 

At first it was known as Suwannoochee, a name borrowed 
from the creek nearby, but later It was re-named Lawton, and 
as such was known until 1874, when the name was changed 
to DuPont by the Act of the Legislature Incorporating the 
town. 

The small station did not grow much until the war was 
over. In 1874 the town of Lawton was incorporated as the 



78 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

town of DuPont by an Act of the Legislature approved 
March 3rd, 1874. Under this act the following commis- 
sioners for the town were appointed: Peter A. Herviant, 
David J. Sirmans, Jacob Lightsey, Lucius Sirmans and B. W. 
Patterson. They were to serve until the first Saturday in 
January, 1875, and thereafter an election was to be held 
annually for their successors. The corporate limits were fixed 
at one-half a mile to extend in each direction from the depot. 

In 1884 the town was again incorporated by an act ap- 
proved December 20th, 1884. Under this charter the fol- 
lowing officers were appointed to serve until the next regular 
election for town officers: J. P. A. DuPont, mayor; B. J. Sir- 
mans, Peter A. Herviant, Jacob Lightsey, Sr., Jacob Moody, 
Sr., and Willis B. Gibbs, councilmen. The town election was 
to be held on the first Saturday in January of each year. 

In 1889, DuPont was re-incorporated as a city. The act 
placed all the powers of a city government in the officers, 
and a city court with a recorder, and a mayor and eleven 
aldermen. This act was passed at a time when the town had 
prospects of soon being a city and at a time when one or two 
new railroad lines were being contemplated running through 
by DuPont. The town's hopes failed to materialize and with 
this, the city government contemplated in the act creating it 
as a city, fell through. 

In 191 1, the charter granted in 1889, was repealed and a 
new charter granted, by an act approved August 19th, 191 1. 
Under this act DuPont was incorporated as a town, with the 
following officers to serve until the regular election for town 
officers to be held on the first Wednesday in December fol- 
lowing: C. M. McLamb, mayor; P. M. Lee, Ezekiel, S. Sir- 
mans, L. E. Cox, J. B. Coon, and P. A. Register, councilmen. 
Elections for town officers are held every two years beginning 
the first Wednesday in December, 1911. 

Among the early settlers of the town may be mentioned: 
William H. Clifton, Peter A. Herviant, W. J. Nichols, Jacob 
Lightsey, Jacob S. Lightsey, Lucius Sirmans and B. W. Pat- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 79 

terson. Subsequent citizens who became prominent were : T. 
McMillan, B. J. Sirmans, Lyman A. Sirmans, R. Lieberls, 
G. A. Register, P. A. Register and M. Sirmans. 

The following residents of DuPont have served as county 
officers: Jacob Lightsey, L. A. Sirmans, P. M. Lee, Augustus 
DuPont, G. A. Register, P. A. Register, Tarlton McMillan, 
J, B. Coon, and A. J. Gibbs. 

Several attempts have been made to have the county site 
removed to DuPont. The first as mentioned above, was when it 
was removed in 1859 from Magnoha to Homerville. Later, 
in 1885, it was again attempted and a petition circulated 
among the voters to call an election, which the Ordinary did, 
setting the date as July 3rd, 1885. In this election DuPont 
won by a majority of five votes, but the law requiring a two- 
thirds majority, it lost out. Still later, in 1893, another peti- 
tion was presented asking for an election, which was granted 
by the County Commissioners. It was held May 27th, 1 893, 
but in this DuPont lost again. This last time was about the 
time a new court-house was to be built, and naturally it was 
the proper time in which to decide whether to remove it to 
DuPont or not. Since then the agitation has died down, 
leaving Homerville the county seat. 

The founder of DuPont, as has been stated above, was 
Capt. J. P. A. DuPont, a man of signal ability, from Darien, 
Georgia. He died at his home where DuPont now is, in 1863. 
A sketch of his life is given elsewhere in this book. His sons, 
J. P. A. DuPont, Jr., Charlton DuPont and Lee L. Dupont, 
were all brilliant men. The last named is still a resident of 
DuPont, where he lives in the old family home erected 
before his father's death. 

In 1876 a new militia district was created with DuPont 
as the site of the district court-house. The first justice of the 
peace of this district was John T. Courson, the first ex-officio 
J. P. was David J. Sirmans, and the first constable was Willis 
B. Gibbs. 



8o History of Clinch County, Georgia 

The population of DuPont according to the census of 1 9 1 o, 
was 342. 

The present merchants of DuPont are: P. A. Register, 
P. M. Lee & Sons, and C. M. McLamb. The postmaster at 
DuPont for several years prior to his removal to Savannah 
about 19 1 2, was R. Lieberls, who also was a merchant. Fol- 
lowing his resignation, Mr. C. M. McLamb was appointed. 

STOCKTON. 

The land whereon the town of Stockton is now situated, 
was originally owned by Samuel Register, Sr., the progenitor 
of the Register family in Clinch County. When the Atlantic 
& Gulf Railroad was being constructed through the county, 
during 1858-60, Mr. Register anticipated the need of a sta- 
tion and town at this point, consequently he had the land run 
out Into town lots and settlers were induced to com.e and locate 
there. Mr. Ezekiel Clifton was employed by Mr. Register 
to lay off the land into town lots. In this task, Mr. Clifton 
was assisted by Moses Tomlinson, who later served the peo- 
ple as both ordinary and tax collector. Mr. Tomlinson was 
then only 19 years of age, and assisted as chain-carrier. 

When first settled, the little village was known as Regis- 
terville, in honor of Mr. Register. Subsequently the name 
was changed to Stockton, in memory of a Mr. Stockton who 
was in charge of the grading of the railroad while it was 
being built through by Reglstervllle. 

Among some of the first settlers were : Eli O. and Talbot 
S. Morgan; E. W. and R. B. Prescott, who owned a store 
there; K. M. Oppenheimer, who also ran a store; James G. 
Ocklngton, a lawyer; Lewis Levi and two other Jews, named 
Sterne and Davis, each of whom ran a store. William W. 
Peyton came here as a school teacher and subsequently served 
as a Justice of the Peace. Also about this time Samuel Staten 
settled there. Mr. Ocklngton, named above, lived at Stock- 
ton a year or so and removed. James W. Staten, who 
was the first representative from Clinch In the Legislature, 




Baptist Church, Homerville. Erected 1912 (above). 
Methodist Church, Homerville. Erected 1913 (below). 




Clinch County Court Huuse. Erected 1S9.3 (above). 
DuBignon Institute. Erected 1910 (below). 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 8 1 

built the first store house at Stockton. He contracted with the 
railroad company to furnish them cross-ties, and in connec- 
tion with this business he operated a commissary in which he 
enjoyed the patronage of the railroad employees at this point. 
Mr. Staten was one of the largest land owners in that section 
of the county. 

In the employment of Mr. Samuel Staten was a North 
Carolinean, J. W. Bryon, who, on account of his integrity, 
is worthy of mention. When the Civil War came on, he 
joined Co. "H" 29th Georgia, and went to the front. He 
served faithfully in this company until the close of the war, 
when he returned to his native State. 

Dr. Ulysses A. Rice came from North Carolina and set- 
tled in the vicinity of Stockton about 1857, and lived there 
until about 1861. He was an active member of the Baptist 
Church and had his membership at Carter's Bridge Church. 
Dr. Rice owned some very choice land in the vicinity of 
Stockton, which he purchased from James W. Staten, the 
purchase price being about $6,000.00. 

About 1868, the Baptist Church at Carter's Bridge on the 
Allapaha River, was moved to Stockton through the activity 
of John G. Norton, John Touchston and the pastor. Rev. 
Thomas Powell. The Methodist Church was subsequently 
erected. 

Among the new comers to Stockton following the close of 
the war were John G. Norton, Frank Sloat, N. E. Fry and 
John C. Humphreys. These men were prominently identified 
with different commercial enterprises in and around Stock- 
ton. Also there was G. G. Foreman, Alexander and Robert 
S. Holtzendorf and J. R. G. Hamilton, who removed there 
about this time. David D. Mahon came to Stockton about 
i860 from where Milltown now is, and subsequently served 
as a justice of the peace. 

Among the leading citizens of Stockton to-day, are J. Floyd 
Fender, Sr., Harris A. Tomlinson, James A. Holtzendorf, 



82 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Joseph S. Foreman, James A. Mathls and D. O. Johnson. 
The last named is president of the County Board of Educa- 
tion. The community around Stockton is almost as densely 
populated as the town is, and to mention by name a few of the 
leading citizens out of town, are: William B. North, a mem- 
ber of the Board of County Commissioners, E. Y. Fry, Staten 
B. Tomlinson, Moses Tomlinson, E. J. Futch, T. J. Johnson, 
I. W. Allen, C. K. Green and Charles S. Touchston. 

When the local school district plan was first inaugurated 
in Clinch County, Stockton was among the first to take it up. 
They have, within the last few years, erected an attractive 
and commodious school building. It is a two-story frame 
building. The present local school trustees are: James A. 
Mathis, J. Floyd Fender, Sr., and J. A. Holtzendorf. 

The present commercial enterprises of Stockton are : Holt- 
zendorf Brothers, H. A. Tomlinson and H. L. Tomlinson, 
and A. H. Timmerman, each of whom operates mercantile 
establishments : D. O. Johnson, who owns and operates a 
grist and saw-mill, J. Floyd Fender, Sr., turpentine operator, 
and Miss Mattie A. Dees, millinery and dry goods. Mr. H. 
L. Tomlinson is postmaster. 

Stockton is situated in the western part of the county, and 
is about two miles distant from the AUapaha River. The 
most fertile and productive land in the county is in this sec- 
tion and the farms around Stockton are numerous. This sec- 
tion is also very scenic. 

Stockton was among the leaders in the temperance cru- 
sade in Clinch County. At the request of the Stockton citi- 
zens, an Act was passed by the Legislature, approved Au- 
gust 31st, 1 88 1, which forever prohibited the selling of 
liquor and intoxicating drinks within the limits of Stockton, 
and it was made a misdemeanor for a violation of the same. 

County officers who have been elected while citizens of 
Stockton and vicinity: Shimuel Timmerman, Timothy Alder- 
man, Moses Tomlinson, Quarterman B. Staten, James W. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 83 

Staten, Jackson J. Taylor, J. R, G. Hamilton, John C. 
Humphreys, D. C. Fender, John Knight, W. B. N. Crews, 
William B. North and Joseph O. Rogers. 

TEMPERANCE. 

Following the war, license to sell liquor In Clinch County 
was very cheap. In the neighborhood of twenty-five dollars. 
It proved to be a very lucrative business and several bar- 
rooms were put up In Homervllle, DuPont and Stockton. 
Practically all the general stores had barrooms In connection. 
The misery and degradation, poverty and riotousness which 
follow In the wake of the barroom and its customers, were 
experienced here. As a consequence a heavy tax was soon 
placed on It. 

The town commissioners of Homervllle in 1876 placed the 
license to sell liquor at $100.00. In the Legislature of 1 880-1, 
our senator was C. A. Smith, and our representative was J. L. 
Sweat. These gentlemen secured the passage and enactment 
of a law, approved by the Governor August 3 1 st , 1 8 8 1 , which 
taxed, the selling of liquor In Clinch County at $1,500.00 per 
annum. This had a great beneficial effect. 

Still this tax did not prohibit the selling of liquor altogether. 
But in 1889, when the Board of County Commissioners was 
created, the act creating the board specified that the board 
had the right to fix the amount of liquor licenses in Clinch 
County, provided, they did not fix It at less than $10,000.00 
per annum. As no one could afford to pay this huge amount 
to sell liquor in a thinly-populated county as Clinch was. It 
barred the selling of liquor from the country. 

In a few years, an election was held under the local option 
law, and Clinch County went "dry" in this election. The 
county was under this law until the advent of the State prohi- 
bition law in 1908. 



CHAPTER VII. 

Proposed New Railroads. — Efforts to Remove County Site. 
— Newspapers in Clinch County. — The Populist Party. — 
County Court Re-Establis.hed. — First Board of County 
Commissioners. — New Jail. — New Court-House. — Camp 
of Confederate Veterans Organized. — Population of 
Clinch County. — Argyle. — Saw-Mill Enterprises. — The 
Waycross & Western Railroad. — The Okefinokee Swamp. 

IN 1886-7 a party of Clinch County citizens Interested 
themselves, together with some New York capitalists, 
with a view of building a railroad from Macon via 
DuPont to the Florida line; also a railroad extending from 
DuPont to the Florida line, with its ultimate destination 
Jacksonville, Fla., on the east, and extending from DuPont 
westward to Decatur, Ala. 

The first named road was incorporated as the DuPont, 
Macon & Florida Railway Company, by the Legislature by 
an Act approved September 22nd, 1887, with the following 
incorporators: Augustus DuPont, F. B. Sirmans, Peter A. 
Herviant, B. J. Sirmans, L. L. DuPont, M. Sirmans, H. G. 
Powell and John C. Humphreys, of Clinch County, and W^il- 
liam McCabe and John Lake, of New York City. 

The other road was incorporated as the DuPont, Decatur, 
Alabama and Florida Air-Line Railroad Company, by an Act 
of the Legislature approved October 22nd, 1887, with the 
following incorporators : Augustus DuPont, F. B. Sirmans, 
Peter A. Herviant, L. L. DuPont, J. B. Withers, H. G. 
Powell, B. J. Sirmans, Thomas Terry, Thos. G. Jenkins and 
John C. Humphreys, of Clinch County, and H. B. Plant, 
H. S. Haines, R. G. Fleming, George S. Haines, William 
McCabe and John Lake, mostly of New York City. 

Both of these roads were to be started within five years 
from the date of the charters, or unless it was done the char- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 85 

ters were to become null and void. But the idea of building 
of these roads never materialized, and the charters lapsed. 
It is safe to say that had these two roads been built and put 
into operation, they would have played a very important part 
in the upbuilding of Clinch County and this section. 

By an Act of the Legislature approved, September 28th, 
1 88 1, the Georgia, Southern & Florida Railroad Company 
was incorporated. The route named in this act was from 
Macon to Homerville or DuPont, thence to the Florida line. 
Later this act was amended by an amendatory act of the 
Legislature, approved October i6th, 1885, making the route 
from Macon via Valdosta, instead of by Homerville. Thus 
the town of Homerville lost a very important enterprise which 
has since become a very important factor in the upbuilding of 
the city of Valdosta. The road subsequently traversed the 
southern end of the county, along which several towns 
sprung up. 

It is safe to say that had the people of Homerville and 
the county seized the opportunity and offered the necessary 
inducements, and this road had come through Homerville 
instead of Valdosta, in that event Homerville might have 
been the size of Valdosta at present, while Valdosta would 
have been the size of Homerville. 

It was not built through the southern end of the county to 
Jacksonville until about 1900. The building of this road 
opened up a new section of the county hitherto undeveloped. 
Almost simultaneously with the completion of the road to 
Jacksonville, a big saw-mill was built by Eastern capitalists 
on the new road where it crosses the Suwannee River. The 
town which grew up here was named "Fargo." The partners 
in this enterprise were George S. Baxter, E. P. Long and 
Walton Ferguson. 

The town of Fargo was laid out on the banks of the Su- 
wannee River, and is to-day one of the most flourishing towns 
in the county. It has several stores, a large hotel and other 



86 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

establishments. The mills which are owned by G. S. Baxter & 
Company, are about the largest in the county. 

Within a very short time another large saw-mill was put 
up six miles East of Fargo, on the new railroad, by the Amer- 
ican Manufacturing Company, a corporation. Their mills 
are about as large as the Fargo plant. The place was called 
"Council," in honor of the principal owners of the mill, John 
M. and C. M. Council, of Americus, Ga. 

EFFORTS TO REMOVE COUNTY SITE. 

In the beginning, the town of DuPont had a very auspicious 
future, as the Florida Branch Railroad began here and run 
into Florida. For many years DuPont was situated at the 
head of the Florida business of the Plant System of railroads, 
and as such was a very important center. 

The fact that the town was centrally located in the county, 
together with its bright future, brought about a great senti- 
ment in favor of the removal of the county site from Homer- 
ville to DuPont. A strong petition was presented to the 
Ordinary in 1885 for an order calling an election to decide 
the question of the removal, which the Ordinary granted. 
Accordingly the election was called for July 3rd, 1885. 
When the day to vote had arrived, great barbecues and other 
attractions were given at DuPont and Homerville. At DuPont 
a public ball was given in DuPont Hall. The result was a 
majority of five in favor of the removal, but owing to the 
fact that it required a two-thirds majority, DuPont lost. 
The vote, given by districts, was as follows : 

For Dupont For Homerville 

Homerville __ 433 

DuPont 344 8 

Stockton 63 

Mud Creek 83 

Withers 30 

Magnolia __ 22 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 87 

Morgan Dist. i 12 

Low Deaver (i2i9)_ __ 21 

Argyle __ 8 

Rabbitville (io6i)__ _- 12 



Total 521 516 

In 1893 another attempt was made to remove the county 
site to DuPont, but failed. No record of the v^ote in this 
election is obtainable. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

About 1876 the first newspaper established in Clinch 
County which there is any record of, was established at 
DuPont by Mr. J. P. A. Dupont, named "The DuPont Oke- 
finokean." It enjoyed the patronage of the county, but in the 
course of a year or so, failed. It was a weekly paper. 

About 1882 a newspaper was established at Homerville by 
E. J. Benton, which was named "The Wiregrass Cracker." 
It became the official gazette of the county, but did not exist 
very long. From an old copy in the Ordinary's office, dated 
November 3rd, 1883, we note that the following lawyers' 
cards appear: J. L. Sweat, James P. Mattox and B. A. 
Whittington. The advertisements of the following merchants 
appeared: W. T. Smith, W. A. Ecord, Joseph P. Mattox and 
W. C. Newborn & Brother. 

Mr. Benton, the editor, was a man of much ability and 
intelligence, which he exhibited in several ways. He first 
came to this county as a minister, in an evangelistic meeting. 
He settled at DuPont, where he made one or two medicinal dis- 
coveries which he had patented. At the October term, 1878, 
of Clinch County Superior Court, he was admitted to the 
bar, after which he practiced law a short while. He was a 
great Sunday School worker, and was president of the Way- 
cross Sunday School District Association. 

In the early nineties, a newspaper was established at Du- 
Pont, devoted to the interests of the Populist or Third Party. 



88 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

This paper, named the "DuPont Guide," was edited by Mr. 
W. F. Miley, and took a leading part in its party's battles in 
Clinch County. This paper finally ceased to exist about 1 896, 
and as the official organ of the Populist Party in this section 
was succeeded by the "Douglas Breeze," edited at Douglas, 
in Coffee County, by Mr. A. B. Findley, formerly of Homer- 
ville. 

In the latter part of 1894, the "Homerville Chronicle" 
was established at Homerville by Mr. M. E. Tison. In 
November, 1897, this paper's name was changed to the 
"Clinch County News," the name which it now bears. The 
earliest copy of this paper obtainable is dated January nth, 
1895, which is Number 9, Vol. i, showing that the paper was 
only nine weeks old at that time. The following professional 
cards appear in this issue: R. G. Dickerson, B. A. Whitting- 
ton and S. L. Drawdy, lawyers; and Dr. G. R. Thigpen, all 
of Homerville. The advertisements of the following local 
merchants appear : C. Huxford & Company, C. Crawford, 
and Dame Brothers, of Homerville, and Wideman & Moody, 
of Argyle. The Crum House, of Homerville, and The Sir- 
mans House, at DuPont, had advertisements. 

The successive editors and publishers of this paper are : 
1894-5, M. E. Tison; 1896, R. G. Dickerson; 1897, I. R. 
Knight; 1897-8, M. E. Tison; 1899, Geo. M. Dame and 
S. W. Register; 1900-7, George M. Dame; 1908, Town- 
send & Dame; 1909, W. L. DuVall; 19 10, T. B. Hartig; 
1910, B. W. Cornelius; 1910, H. J. Dame; 1910-16, Flem C. 
Dame. 

THE POPULIST PARTY. 

About 1890 a new party sprang into politics. For a while 
it was known as the Third Party or Alliance, later as the 
Populist Party. Among some of its leaders in Clinch County, 
were: Dr. L. C. Mattox, M. S. Corbitt, W. A. Ecord, W. J. 
Strickland and James M. Kight. In 1890 Dr. Mattox was 
elected by this party as representative from Clinch County. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 89 

At the same time W. A. Ecord was re-elected clerk of the 
Superior Court by them. This was at the height of their 
power; after this they never did succeed in electing any other 
candidate in Clinch County. In recent years the party has 
disappeared from county politics. In 1898 the average vote 
received by them was 325 ; two years later it dwindled to an 
average of fifty. The party has probably had its day and has 
done the country some good. Some of the principles and 
laws it first advocated have since been enacted into law, among 
which might be mentioned the rural free mail delivery. 

COUNTY COURT RE-ESTABLISHED. 

In 1866 the first County Court of Clinch County was es- 
tablished with Hon. Z. King as the first judge and Col. L. A. 
Sirmans as the first solicitor. This court existed for about 
three years, when it ceased. There is no legislative act abol- 
ishing the court. In 1881 this court was revived, and Hon. 
Cornelius A. Smith was appointed judge. There is no record 
as to who was solicitor. In 1885 Col. B. A. Whittington 
was appointed judge. This court had its monthly and quar- 
terly terms. The monthly terms were held under Judge Smith 
on every second Monday, while the quarterly terms were 
held on the third Mondays in February, May, August and 
November, 

By an Act of the Legislature, approved October 19th, 
1885, the County Court of Clinch County was abolished to 
take effect when the term of Judge Whittington had expired. 

In 1 90 1 the County Court was again established after 
having been abolished fifteen years. Col. S. C. Townsend was 
appointed judge for four years and Hon. R. G. Dickerson was 
appointed solicitor. This court became the means of saving 
much money to the county although the criminal jurisdic- 
tion was limited to misdemeanors. Like the former County 
Court, it has its monthly and quarterly terms; the monthly 
terms being held on the first Monday in each month and the 
quarterly terms on the first Tuesday in January, April, July, 



90 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

and October. Hon. S. L. Drawdy is the present judge and 
Hon, W. T, Dickerson solicitor. 

An attempt was made to abolish this court in 1908, but 
failed. 

FIRST COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. 

The first Board of County Commissioners of Roads and 
Revenues was created by Legislative Act, approved August 
1 6th, 1889. Under this Act the following named citizens of 
the county were appointed commissioners : Isham Patterson, 
Frank B. Sirmans, Martin S. Corbitt, W. H. Gary and Fields 
D. Clifton. The commissioners were given entire charge of 
county matters and the clerk of the Superior Court was made 
ex-officio Clerk of the Board. From the Minutes of the Board 
in 1890 it is observed that the following were the commis- 
sioners: W. H. Gary, chairman, M. S. Corbitt, F. B. Sir- 
mans, Isham Patterson and John Knight. 

The Board was abolished by an Act of the Legislature, 
approved December 9th, 1893, and the ordinary resumed 
charge of county affairs. It remained thus until 19 15, when 
the Board of Commissioners was again created. 

NEW JAIL. 

The old jail, erected about 1872, was found to be 
insufiicient to meet the demands of the county, as it was not 
only too small, but was built of wood and was fast becoming 
useless. Accordingly a contract was let out by the County 
Commissioners in 1893 to the Manly Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of Dalton, Ga. The new jail was built of brick with 
improved steel cells and was two stories high. This jail is 
now being used as the county jail, but there is some desire on 
the part of many citizens to have a new jail built or some 
needed extensive improvements made. 

NEW COURT-HOUSE. 

Likewise, the court-house, erected just after the war, was re- 
placed with a new one during 1895-6. The following com- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 91 

mittee was appointed by the ordinary to superintend the erec- 
tion of the new building: James R. Dickerson, Peter A. 
Young, Moses Smith, W. F, Kirkland and D. C. Fender. The 
contract was let to T. J. Darling, a contractor of Waycross, 
Ga. The new building amply met the increased demands for 
a court-house and gave general satisfaction. It is two stories 
in height, with a spacious court room on second floor, besides 
Grand jury room and witness room. On the ground floor 
are halls running through and the following offices: Clerk 
Superior Court, Ordinary, County Court Solicitor, Tax Re- 
ceiver and Collector, County Commissioners, County Board 
of Education and Sheriff, while upstairs is the office of County 
Court. This is the present arrangement. 

The building faces the east, and is 50 by 80 feet in size, 
and has slate roof. The new court-house was built on the 
site of the old one. The land whereon the court-house and 
jail are situated, was given the county by Dr. John Homer 
Mattox, the founder of Homerville, as is evidenced by a deed 
dated October ist, 1884, and recorded in deed book "F," by 
W. A. Ecord., Clerk. 

The old court-house building was sold at auction and bid 
off by a committee of Primitive Baptist people, who moved 
the building to another part of town and remodeled it into 
a church. The committee was composed of Messrs. James 
A. O'Steen, S. L. Drawdy, George M. Dame, James R. Dick- 
erson and C. H. Smith. This church existed a few years 
and became so delapidated that it was finally abandoned and 
torn down. 

CAMP OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS. 

The first, only and last camp of Confederate Veterans in 
Clinch County, was organized September 4th, 1899. They 
elected delegates to the State and general reunions, and had a 
membership of forty-seven. The following were the officers 
elected: F. M. Jackson, captain commanding; W. A. Ecord, 
ist Lieut.; S. W. Register, 2nd Lieut.; Moses Tomlinson, 



92 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

3rd Lieut.; O. P. Register, 4th Lieut.; M. S. Corbitt, adju- 
tant; Isham Patterson, quartermaster; D. M. Riberon, com- 
missary; W. J. Stapleton, surgeon; Charles James, assistant 
surgeon: Jesse J. Grooms, chaplain; J. C. Anderson, treas- 
urer; James M. Kight, sergeant.-major; J. B. Ganos, officer 
of the day; C. H. Smith, colonel-sergeant; L T. McLendon, 
videt; James M. Inman, ist Col. Guard; Ivy Davis, 2nd 
Col. Guard. 

Gradually the camp declined, and finally no meetings were 
held. A lack of Interest was responsible for its falh 

POPULATION. 

The census of 1910 showed that Clinch County had 8,424 
persons within her borders. The area was 1,077 square 
miles, being the largest county in the State. The population 
decreased 308 compared with the census of 1900. The census 
also showed that there were 5,046 whites in the county and 
3,378 negroes. Those of the voting age numbered in 1900, 
2,561 men, and in 1910, 2,294. This included both races. 

The total number of illiterates were only 454, of which 
311 were negroes and 142 were native whites. 4,983 were of 
native parentage. The population of the county since 1870 
has been as follows: Census of 1870, 3,945; 1880, 4,138; 
1890, 6,652; 1900, 8,732; 1910, 8,424. 

Thus it is seen that the greatest stride in the county's popu- 
lation was between 1880 and 1890, when it increased over 
2,500. A school census taken in 19 14 showed that there were 
2,303 school children in the county, of which little over one- 
half were whites. In 1908, there were 1,285 white children 
in the county of school age. 

ARGYLE. 

About 1885 the town of Argyle came into existence. For 
many years it was nothing more than a mere station, but 
gradually it grew to be a town. This town is located in the 
eastern part of the county on the A. C. L. Railroad, and is 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 93 

but two miles from the Ware County line. It was first named 
Saussy, In honor of Clement Saussy and others who were heirs 
of Gasper J. Fulton. Mr. Fulton was a resident of Savan- 
nah and purchased the land whereon the town is located, in 
i860 from John Smith, of Clinch County. This land was 
originally granted by the State to James C. Smith in 1843, 
and he in 1845 sold it to Joseph Lane. In 1845 ^'I^*- Lane 
sold it to John Smith, a brother of James C. Smith, and Mr. 
Smith owned it until i860, when he sold it to Mr. Fulton. 

Among the early postmasters were I. H. Drawdy and C. 
W. Burt, and B. A. Harper. Later Mr. S. C. Patterson was 
postmaster, and following his resignation about two years 
ago, Mr. W. H. James was appointed. The population of 
the town, according to the census of 19 10, was 280. The 
name of the town was changed to "Argyle" in 1899. 

In 1908 the Argyle people unanimously voted In favor of 
creating a local school district, and since then have, by tax- 
ation and other means, raised about $1,500 and built a very 
nice school building on the outskirts of town, on the public 
road leading Into Argyle. It is a two-story frame building, 
with improved desks and other Improvements. It is known 
as the Union High School. The land and building were 
valued in 19 12 at $2,500 according to the report of the 
State School Commissioner. The present trustees of the 
school are: W. H. Hinson, B. A. Harper, A. B. Williams, 
S. C. Patterson and W. L. Hinson, wide-awake and energetic 
citizens. 

On August 26th, 1897, Saussy, as the town was then 
known, was visited by a very disastrous fire, entailing a loss 
of several thousand dollars. All of the business portion of 
town was destroyed. 

About 1907, the Bank of Argyle was chartered and estab- 
lished. Its first president was L. O. Benton, who organized 
the Bank of Homerville. In 1909 the bank closed its doors 



94 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

and liquidated Its business. The reason of its failure was 
due mainly to the adjacency of the bank at Homerville, 

SAW-MILL ENTERPRISES. 

Among the earlier saw-mill enterprises In Clinch County, 
was the one mentioned In Chapter 4, which Dr. J. H. Mattox 
and Cyrus S. Graves established at Homerville. Another 
early mill was that of William G. Norwood and James B. 
Porter at Homerville. Frank Sloat established a large saw- 
mill near Stockton about 1874, and later it became a partner- 
ship under the name of Sloat, Bussell & Co. Still later a 
mill was put up and operated near Stockton by Frye & 
Humphreys. 

One of the largest mills at the time was that operated by 
R. B. Reppard. At first Harry C. Reppard was interested In 
it, but he sold out his Interest to R. B. Reppard. Later, Mr. 
Reppard organized the Reppard Land, Lumber & Saw-Mill 
Company, a corporation. They acquired land and timber in 
nearly every section of the county. Their mill was located 
about four miles east of Homerville on the A. C. L. Railroad, 
and was operated several years. It was first organized about 
1879, ^^^ was operated about five years. The Southern Pine 
Company eventually acquired possession of this property. 

Another big plant was that of Paxton & Mattox, a few 
miles west of Homerville on the railroad. Originally it was a 
partnership composed of Miles Albertson and David B. Pax- 
ton, but about 1888, Mr. Albertson sold his Interest to H. 
P. Mattox, of Homerville, and It continued under the name 
of Paxton & Mattox. The place was called Clinch Haven, 
and for several years was one of the largest enterprises In the 
county. The business failed about 1895, and was acquired by 
Geo. F. Craig & Company, of Philadelphia. 

About 1 90 1 another plant was erected at the same point 
and the name of the place changed to "Cutting." The 
Southern Pine Company were the owners. In a few years the 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 95 

plant was dismantled, and for several years the place was 
deserted. 

But in 191 1 a company of North Georgia and Northern 
capitalists acquired a lease-hold to the land where their mills 
were erected, and purchased several thousand acres of tim- 
ber and land from Messrs. H. J. Peagler, W. K. Peagler, 
and H. M. Peagler. It was organized into a corporation and 
named The Georgia Lumber & Turpentine Company. They 
manufactured lumber and produced wood spirits of tur- 
pentine. 

In addition to the mills at Cutting, there are the mills at 
Fargo and Council, referred to before in this book. These 
are the largest plants in the county. 

WAYCROSS AND WESTERN RAILROAD. 

During 19 13 a movement was launched to construct a 
new railroad from Waycross through the northern part of 
Clinch County to Milltown in Berrien County. The princi- 
pal movers were John G. and Alex. K. Sessoms, of Waycross, 
and F. B. Sirmans, of this county. A charter was secured and 
work begun, and the road was completed to Milltown during 
19 1 5. It gave a new route for Milltown and Berrien County 
produce to Savannah and other markets, besides opening up 
a new territory. 

The president of the new railroad, which was named the 
Waycross & Western, was Alex. K. Sessoms, who was a 
native of Ware County. He was a son of Alex. K. Sessoms, 
Sr., who died about 1909. The elder Sessoms was very 
wealthy and possessed much property not only in Clinch 
County, but in Ware County and in Mexico and other places. 
In 19 1 5 Mr. Sessoms, the president of the road, was ap- 
pointed on the new Board of County Commissioners of 
Clinch County, although he had been in the county but a year. 

The vice-president of the road was Hon. F. B. Sirmans, a 
leading citizen of Clinch and an ex-Senator from the fifth 
district. Mr. Sirmans, whose home was in the Mud Creek 



g6 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

district, owned much property through the territory opened 
up by the new road. He had a nice tract of his land at a 
point on the new railroad, about a mile distant from his home, 
surveyed into town lots and a boom launched for a new town 
to be called Sirmans. The town lots were sold at auction 
and Mr. Sirmans had one of the largest cotton ginneries in 
the county established in the new town. Several stores were 
soon built. 

The mercantile establishments at Sirmans, are The Hughes 
Mercantile Company and James A. Mathis. There is an- 
other store there but is unoccupied. Mr. Sirmans, who had 
been postmaster for several years at his turpentine still, which 
was connected by rural route with DuPont, resigned, and 
Mr. W. W. Elliott, a former resident of Homerville, was 
appointed postmaster. 

At the same time, another new town came into existence 
on the same railroad. It was located In the Moore's Mill 
district and about a half-mile from Mr. E. C. Hodges' place. 
The name given to this place at first was "Hodges," but 
when a post office was applied for the name was changed to 
"Cogdell," on account of there being another post office In 
the State by the same name. 

Mr. Sessoms, president of the road, removed to Cogdell 
and built a nice home. He fenced about one thousand acres 
of wild land, which adjoined Cogdell, and soon had it 
stumped and cultivated. Mr. Sessoms has put up a modern 
cane mill at Cogdell, and besides, has been successful in secur- 
ing from the State Agricultural department a State experi- 
ment station for farm demonstration purposes at Cogdell. 

There is a saw-mill and shingle-mill at Cogdell and two 
stores. The postmaster is James A. Brown. Soon after the 
beginning of Cogdell it was seen that a school was needed, 
and wisely and time enough so, since there was not a school 
in several miles. A movement in which Mr. Sessoms and 
John B. KIrkland were the leaders, resulted in formation of 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 97 

a new local school district with Cogdell as the site of the 
school. This was in 19 15. A school building was immedi- 
ately built and the local school trustees being without funds at 
the time, Mr, Sessoms furnished the necessary funds until a 
tax levy could be made and revenue raised. 

The school building which was built, was built in bungalow 
style and neatly and durably constructed of good lumber. 
State School Supervisor F. E. Land, in a recent visit to the 
Cogdell school, pronounced the energetic work on the part 
of local citizens and the school to be one of the finest demon- 
strations in school work he had seen. 

THE OKEFINOKEE SWAMP. 

Over the eastern border line of Clinch County there ex- 
tends a part of the famous Okefinokee Swamp, one of the 
most extensive areas of submerged land on the North Ameri- 
can continent. 

When Ware County was created in 1824, it embraced the 
entire swamp, barring of course a portion which extends into 
Florida. It is the largest swamp on the continent with the 
exception of the Dismal Swamp in Virginia, and the Ever- 
glades in Florida. Up to about twenty years ago it remained 
unexplored and indeed some parts of it are yet unexplored. It 
is found to be a vast marsh with occasional lakes and islands. 
There is some of the best timber to be found, in the swamp. 

In 1 89 1 an Act was passed by the Legislature authorizing 
the Governor to deed the lands embraced in the swamp to the 
Suwannee Canal Company, a corporation. The promoters 
hoped to provide means to float the timber to the St. Mary's 
River and also to drain the swamp by means of a large canal, 
thus not only securing the timber but also reclaiming the land. 
But it was not successful. Within the last few years the 
Hebard Cypress Company, a corporation composed princi- 
pally of Pennsylvanians, has acquired this property, and has 
constructed a railroad from Waycross where the company's 



98 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

large mills are, to the swamp and has recently penetrated 
the swamp several miles with the railroad. 

In White's Historical Collections of Georgia, published in 
1854, the statement is made that the name "Okefinokee" is 
derived from two Indian words "ooka" and "finocau" ; the 
former of which means "water" and the latter "quivering." 
Originally the great swamp was called "E-cun-fi-no-cau," a 
compound meaning "quivering earth." But the Creeks pre- 
ferred the former expression. The author, Dr. White, says 
the swamp is thirty miles long and seventeen broad, and in 
it are several islands, one of which the Creeks represented 
to be among the most blissful spots in the world. 

The swamp lies partly in Clinch, while most of it is in 
Ware and Charlton counties. Billy's Island and Floyd's 
Island are large islands of this swamp, containing some fertile 
land. The Suwannee River originates in this swamp and 
flows southward through Clinch County into Florida. The 
town of Fargo is situated on the river. 

The following is taken from a description given by one 
well acquainted with the swamp: "Billy's Island is at this 
season of the year (November) a hunter's paradise. The 
only direct way to reach this place from Argyle or Homer- 
ville by Mixon's Ferry on the Suwannee River; thence three 
miles through the swamp over the 'causeway,' which was built 
by the soldiers during the Indian war in order to give battle 
to the great Indian chief 'Billy Bowlegs,' from whence the 
island took its name. Thence through the 'cow-house' and 
down the Suwannee River, which has its origin here. The 
water is black. The lake is on the west side of the island, 
and is not more than half a mile wide at any point. As to 
it being good hunting and fishing grounds there are no better 
to be found." 

Trout, perch, bream, jacks and cat-fish abound with an 
abundance of fine turtle. Bear, duck, deer, wild turkeys, 
panthers, and other wild game are also found. The swamp 
served as a great rendezvous for deserters during the Civil 
War. 



CHAPTER VIII. 
Educational. 

PRIOR to 1868 the control of school affairs was vested 
in the justices of the Inferior Court, five in number, to- 
gether with the ordinary and one citizen of the county- 
appointed by the judge of the Superior Court for four years. 
The clerk of the Inferior Court was secretary of the Board 
of Education, while the ordinary was ex-officio treasurer of 
the school funds. 

In 1870 this system was entirely changed and educational 
matters were vested in a Board of Education for each county 
to consist of one member from each militia district in the 
county, to be elected by popular vote. The Board was to 
select a secretary who was to be by virtue of his appointment 
county school commissioner. 

In 1872 this law was considerably modified and made bet- 
ter. Under the latter Act the control of education was placed 
in the hands of the board of five members to be elected by the 
grand jury. This board was to elect a secretary who was to 
be ex-officio county school commissioner. 

Later, in recent years, the election of the county school 
commissioner was placed in the hands of the qualified voters 
of the county instead of by the board. Under this law, Flem 
C. Dame was the first commissioner to be elected. 

Under the Act of 1870, above referred to, the following 
members of the Board of Education were elected, on the 
first Saturday in January, 1871, the date of the qualification 
of each one following their names: 

586th District. Josiah Sirmans, Sr April i, 1871 

970th District. H. D. O'Quin March 2, 1871 

I052d District. Moses Tomlinson June 3,1871 

io6ist District. Duncan Giddens March 4, 1871 



lOO History of Clinch County, Georgia 

1141st District. W. J. Strickland January 8, 1871 

1224th District. Elias L. Moore January 8, 1871 

Under the Act of 1872, referred to above the grand jury 
sitting at the April term, 1872, of Clinch Superior Court, 
appointed the following citizens of the county to serve on 
the Board of Education : 

D. H. Johnson, for 4 years. Qualified August 17, 1872 

H. A. Mattox, for 4 years, Qualified 1872 

W. J. Rives, for 2 years. Qualified 1872 

S. W. Register, for 2 years, Qualified July 6, 1872 

Chas. A. Griffis, for 2 years. Qualified July 7, 1872 

Under the law of 1870, the Board of Education, which 
was elected met and elected H. D. O'Quin as the first county 
school commisisoner and ex-officio secretary of the board. 
Mr. O'Quin qualified June 3d, 1871. He continued under 
the reorganized Board of Education, and was re-elected in 
1876, qualifying December nth, 1876, and served until 
1882, when he was succeeded by George W. Newbern. 

In his report to the grand jury, at the April term, 1873, 
Commissioner O'Quin stated that about $390 had been re- 
ceived by the county treasurer for educational purposes and 
paid out according to instructions; that about $800 would 
be received for this county for carrying on the schools for 
the fiscal year. He also stated that under the special school 
law it was the duty of the school board to organize public 
schools for three months in all parts of the county where 
practicable, and that the Board of Education desired and 
earnestly solicited the grand jury's co-operation in organiz- 
ing one or more schools in each militia district during the 
year. 

In reference to local taxation, the commissioner stated in 
his report: "The power of local taxation is lodged with your 
body this year on recommendation of the School Board. The 
Board in session to-day decided to recommend that as your 



History of Clinch County, Georgia lOi 

body has the power, that you exercise your discretion In the 
matter, it being the opinion, however, of the Board that tax- 
ation for educational purposes would ultimately be more 
beneficial than for any other purposes if properly applied, as 
our children would thereby be benefited longer after we have 
passed from the stage of action." 

The grand jury at the spring term, 1872, which elected 
the first board of education under the new school law, had 
this comment to make on the new school system: "We look 
with favor on the public school law and desire to see the 
new system fully tested and believe that with good manage- 
ment on the part of those clothed with the power of its ex- 
ecution it will redound In great and lasting benefit to the 
young and rising generation." 

In his report to the grand jury at the fall term, 1877, 
Commissioner O'QuIn stated that under the new law passed 
In 1876, making It the commissioner's duty to appoint school 
trustees for the different districts of the county, he appointed 
the following trustees: Sherod Tomllnson, J. B. Pafford and 
Martin S. Corbitt for Mud Creek; J. R. G. Hamilton, Louis 
Strickland and David O'Quin for Lawton ; George W. New- 
bern, William H. Ramsey and Wm. Griffis, for Homerville; 
and Isham Patterson, Jonathan L. Morgan and Solomon 
Mobley, for Morgan's district. He stated that he had 
licensed twenty teachers and contracted with sixteen to teach 
schools up to that time during 1877. 

A few figures on the school work and attendance in the 
county for the last few years are herewith given; in white 
schools : 







Average 


No. of 


Year 


Attendance 


Attendance 


Teachers 


1910 


1,230 


951 


43 


1911 


1,400 


1,000 


59 


1912 


1,296 


866 


47 


1913 


1,170 


820 


41 


1914 


1.323 


1,022 


45 



I02 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



The colored attendance for 19 14 was 637, with an average 
attendance of 383. There were 15 teachers employed. 





Amounts 


Year 


Received 


1910 


$6,633.24 


1911 


6,864.78 


1912 


6,^66.2,3 


1913 


7,181.24 


1914 


7,947.84 



Value of School 
Houses & Equipment 
$18,000 
19,700 
20,000 
25,600 
28,500 



Paid to 
Teachers 
$6,218.44 

5,767.62 

5.578-03 
5,711.90 

6,136.72 

From the minutes of the school board it is seen that the 
total value of school property in Clinch County in 1895, was 
$6,450.50. Only two schools, viz. : Homerville and DuPont, 
had patent desks. The value of the DuPont Academy was 
placed at $400 for the building and $369 for the fixtures, 
and the DuBignon Institute at Homerville was valued at 
$2,605 foi* the building and $578 for the fixtures. 

The following have served on the Board of Education 
since 1872 : 



Anderson, F. M. 
Booth, Jesse R. 
Caswell, A. J. 
Caswell, A. J. 
Corbitt, Irwin 
Cornelius, George 
Dickerson, R. G. 
Dickerson, Daniel 
Dickerson, J. R. 
Dickerson, J. R. 
Drawdy, J. J. 
Drawdy, J. J. 
Daugharty, G. W. 1904 
Eason, James T. 
Fender, D. C. 1894 

Griffis, William 
Griffis, Charles A. 1872 



1894- 
1875- 
1879- 
1905- 



1885- 

1876- 

1887- 



892 Knight, N. S. 1881-1892 
903 Kight, James M. 1881 

876 Lockliear, L. H. 1911-1916 
888 Langdale, J. J. 1913-1916 
910 Moore, John 1 882-1 886 
881 Mattox, H. A. 1 872-1 876 
875 Mattox, H. A. 1893 

893 Mattox, B. E. 1 889-1 892 
886 North, Wiliam B. 1 893-1904 

891 O'Quin, H. D. 1879-1884 

877 O'Quin, E. W. 1878-1880 

892 O'Quin, E. W. 1882-1886 
909 O'Quin, H. A. 1 89 1 
892 Pafford, J. Levin 1910-1916 
897 Pafford, Wm. M. 1903-1905 
877 Pafford, M. B. 1906-1910 
880 Register, S. W. 1872-1876 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 103 

Griffis, John G. 1904-1914 Register, B. S. 1913-1914 

Griffis, W. J. 1902-1903 Roberts, Tharp 1915-1916 

Gary, W. H. 1893 Rives, W. J. 1872-1875 

Hughes, F. M. 1898-1913 Smith, Moses 1900-1902 

HiUiard, M. H. 1910-1912 Smith, Benjamin 1894-1897 

Howell, W. T. 1 898-1 899 Smith, C. H. 1892 

Johnson, D. H. 1 872-1 874 Strickland, W. J. 1 877-1878 

Johnson, D. H. 1887-1890 Sirmans, F. B. 1887-1890 

Johnson, D. O. 1914-1916 Tomlinson,Sherod 1877-1880 

The following is a list of the trustees of the different 
schools of the county at present: 

Reedy Creek — J. C. Touchston, E. J. Futch, C. L. Stanley. 

Live Oak— H. W. Corbitt, J. H. Haskins, S. Been. 

Council — S. W. Evans, J. D. Langdale, J. F. Patterson. 

Consolidated — F. W. Burkhalter, P. A. Courson, James 
Z. Curry. 

Camp Creek — H. H. Guest, T. C. Conine, D. V. Tom- 
linson. 

Sirmans— M. B. Pafford, W. W. Elliott, Isaac Powell. 

Cogdell— J. B. Kirkland, R. A. Pafford, C. A. Hodges. 

Thigpen — C. S, Vining, J. J. Brack, Benj. Cox. 

Touchstone — I. D. Dickerson, J. T. Hughes, A. J. Joyce. 

Waldo — M. T. Burkhalter, B. F. Dickerson, Joshua Lee. 

DuPont— C. M. McLamb, L. C. Cox, C. H. North, C. C. 
Lee, J. T. Bramlett. 

Midway — A. B. Smith, H. C. Bennett, L. C. Strickland, 
W. V. Musgrove, James Smith. 

Red Bluff — W. O. James, A. J. Lockliear, Irwin Williams. 

Stockton — J. A. Mathis, J. A. Holtzendorf, J. F. Fen- 
der, Sr. 

Bird Pond — Tharp Delk, Irwin Corbitt, M. J. Guest. 

Anthon— H. W. Jordan, W. W. Willoughby, W. A. 
Taylor. 

Crisp — S. T. Howell, O. K. Courson, Velpo Tomlinson. 



104 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Bradwell— W. M. Wilson, William Corbitt, J. H. Ham- 
ilton. 

Fargo — B. B. Brown, F. F. Cornelius, J. F. Newman. 

Abbeville— W. M. Hughes, J. A. Mobley, M. K. Klrk- 
land. 

Ty Ty — M. T. Herren, L. V. Herren 

Thelma— M. H. Hllllard. 

Homervllle — R. G. DIckerson, C. M. KImrey, J. T. Dame, 
J. L. Hunter, C. H. DIckerson. 

Argyle — W. H. HInson, W. L. HInson, A. B. Williams, 
S. C. Patterson, B. A. Harper. 

Among the schools In Clinch County, DuBIgnon Institute, 
located at Homervllle, might be said to be the best In Its 
courses of study, faculty and equipment. The magnificent 
brick building, located In the western part of the town, with 
a campus of about six acres. Is ample to accommodate a 
town several times larger than Homervllle. It was built In 
1909-10 by the town; and In order to secure funds, with 
which to built the school, the citizens of the town unanimously 
voted for a bond Issue of $8,000. 

The original building was a two-story frame building, 
located In the northeastern part of town, and built about 
1894-5. It was built mainly by subscription. This building 
was used until the fall of 1909, when It was destroyed. The 
origin of the fire has never been ascertained; It caught In 
the third story which was a "half-story" used by the secret 
orders. After the loss of the old building, preparations were 
Immediately made for another one. The bond Issue was 
made and Mr. H. J. Peagler was selected by the town council 
to look after the building of same and as treasurer. 

The present school building has a touch of the old Spanish 
architecture In Its appearance, and Is two stories high. The 
first floor contains two large class rooms and two smaller 
ones. The second floor contains two small class rooms and a 
large auditorium with a seating capacity of about five hun- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



105 



dred. The building is equipped throughout with the latest 
desks and seats and has electric lights and water connections. 

The first school taught in the old DuBignon Institute was 
opened on the 7th of January 1895, under Professors W. 
E. Gullette and J. F. Eggleston. The school received its 
name in honor of Hon. F. G. DuBignon, one of the State's 
foremost men. In the commencement exercises of May 23-4, 
1895, Colonel DuBignon offered a gold medal for the best 
oratory. This was the occasion of much effort on the part 
of the young men of the school. The judges were Rev. W. J. 
Stallings, R. L. Clark and Hon. R. G. Dickerson. The 
medal was awarded to H. H. Baxley, a young visitor-student. 
His subject was "Principle." 

The following is a list of the principals of the school : 



W. E. Gullette 
J. F. Eggleston 
S. Preston Settle 
G. C. Ingram 
W. D. Stevenson 
H. C. Cain 
H. G. Fulton 
H. C. Cain 
S. Preston Settle 
W. B. Smith 
H. A. Kiker 



1895-1896 
1895-1896 

1896 
1896-1897 
1897-1898 

1898 
1898-1899 
1899-1902 
1 902- 1 903 
1 903- 1 904 
1 904- 1 905 



W. L. DuVall 
W. M. Avera 
C. C. Palmer 
H. Q. Avera 
W. M. Benge 
R. L. Lovell 
H. Q. Avera 
William Koehler 
A. A. O'Kelly 
Paul Moss 



1905-1907 
1907-1909 
1909 
1909-1910 
1910-1911 
191 1-1912 
1912-1913 

1913 
1913-1914 

1914-1917 



CHAPTER IX. 

History of Churches of Clinch County. 

METHODIST CHURCH, HOMERVILLE. 

THIS church is about the oldest existing Methodist 
Church in the county, having been established here in 
1875. There had been no edifice here previous to that 
time to worship in, and the few Methodists met occasionally 
at the court-house and worshipped. Also previous to this 
time, Robert B. Crum and his wife, of near Homerville, 
were in charge of a Sunday School here, although un-denomi- 
national it was nominally a Methodist school. 

The first church building was located on a small piece of 
land granted the church by the railroad company to be used 
by them so long as a church was situated thereon. The land 
was a part of the railroad square in town. The credit for the 
securing of this parcel of land for the church is due mainly 
to the efforts of Col. J. L. Sweat, of Homerville. Among 
the prominent members of the church during its infancy at 
Homerville, were H. A. Mattox and family, Robert B. 
Crum and family, Col. J. L. Sweat and wife and E. J. Ben- 
ton. Rev. William W. Griffin lived here for several years 
following the war, and preached for the Methodists occa- 
sionally. He was Ordinary of the county three years. 

The town lot whereon the parsonage was located, was 
bought of A. S. McLendon in 1883, the price being $250. 
It had a good dwelling on it and was used as a parsonage 
until 1 9 14, when the present parsonage was completed and 
occupied. The old parsonage and land was sold to Mrs. 
W. K. Peagler and the proceeds applied to the building of 
the new one, which is a neat and comfortable dwelling. The 
land for the new church and parsonage was given by that 
generous benefactor and member of the church, H. J. Peag- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 107 

ler, who died in the midst of his endeavors to build a new 
home for the Methodists. 

The present church building was built during 19 13-14, at 
an approximate cost of $6,500. It was during the pastorate 
of Rev, George H. Walker, a most progressive and wide- 
awake pastor, that the church was contemplated, begun and 
completed. This was his ambition from the time he took 
charge of his station in December, 191 1, when he at once 
saw the need of a larger and better building. 

Probably one of the most Interested members and generous 
donators In building the new church was Henry J. Peagler, 
one of the town's wealthiest citizens. He not only bought 
and gave the land to the church for its new home and par- 
sonage, at a cost of $900, but contributed still larger sums 
of money towards its erection, as well as much of his time 
and attention. In the midst of the building of the new edifice, 
which he was looking after on the part of the church, Mr. 
Peagler was stricken on October 31st, 19 13, with a serious 
attack of acute indigestion and died within an hour's time. 
Thus the church was deprived of one of its most active and 
influential members. A beautiful memorial window now 
adorns the church In Mr. Peagler's memory. After his death, 
Mr. W. V. Musgrove, a prominent business man of the 
town, took the matter in hand and due, chiefly to his efforts, 
the church was soon completed. 

The new church is located on the south side of the A. C. L. 
Railroad In the heart of town, and faces the right-of-way. 
It is situated on the lot formerly known as the Lyman A. 
SIrmans lot. Large oaks adorn the lot which made it such 
a desirable location for a new church, some of the oaks now 
standing were set out by Colonel SIrmans right after the war, 
when he owned the lot. The parsonage Is located to the rear 
of the church and faces the Railroad Square from the west. 

The following is a list of the pastors of the church since 
1875, as shown by the church records: 



io8 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



B. S. Key 




1875 I. F. Carey 




1894 


F. C. Bickley 


1876 


-1878 W. J. Stallings 


1895- 


1898 


Edward J. Benton 




1879 J. R. Jordan 




1899 


Lyman H. Green 




1880 C. E. Boland 




1900 


John W. Watts 




1881 J. P. Bazemore 




1901 


Edward J. Benton 




1882 J. M. Boland 




1902 


S. G. Childs 




1883 L. B. McMichael 




1903 


W. M. C. Conley 




1884 0. S. Smith 




1904 


C. Davis 




1885 A. B. Wall 


1905- 


1908 


W. J. Stalllngs 




1886 Aaron Kelly 


1909- 


1910 


S. R. Weaver 




1887 I. E. McKellar 




1911 


E. L. Padrick 




1888 GeorgeH. Walker 


1912- 


1914 


W. T. McMichael 


1888 


-1890 M. M. Leggett 




1915 


A. H. Bazemore 


1891 


-1893 M. M. Marshall 




1916 



The following is a list of the presiding elders of the dis- 
tricts in which the Homerville Church has been included 
since 1880: 



J. M. Marshall 


1880-1882 E. M. Whiting 


1898-1900 


J. D. Anthony 


1883-1884 J. W. Weston 


1901-1904 


P. S. Twitty 


1885 K. Read 


1905-1906 


W. F. Lloyd 


1 886-1 887 H. M. Morrison 


1907 


J. 0. A. Cook 


1 888-1 890 J. A. Harmon 


1908-1909 


G. G. N. McDaniel i89i-'92 Whitley Langston 


1910-1912 


K. Read 


1 893-1 894 P. W. Ellis 


1913 


C. E. Dowman 


1895 Isaac P. Tyson 


1914-1916 


P. S. Twitty 


1896-1897 


' 



The following is a list of the recording stewards of the 
Homerville district since 1880: 



J. L. Sweat 
H. A. Mattox 
D. O. Ratliff 
T. F. M. Sweat 
J. L. Waldrup 



1880-1887 W. A. Ecord 1903-1906 

1888-1896 B. A. Harper 1907-1908 

1 897-1900 J. L. Waldrup 1909-1913 

1 90 1 A. J. Gibbs 19 14-19 16 

1902 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 109 

The present stewards of the HomervIUe Church are: A. J. 
Gibbs, T. F. M. Sweat, J. L. Hunter, G. A. Gibbs, and 
C. M. Kimrey. 

The Sunday School of the Methodist Church at Homer- 
vIUe is probably the oldest existing school of its kind in the 
county. This school has been in active condition since 1876. 
Prior to this time there had been an undenominational school 
here led by Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Crum, who were Metho- 
dist members. This was before the Methodist Church was 
built. Following the organization of the Methodist Church 
at Homerville, came the reorganization of the Sunday School 
and the consequent turning over of the former undenomina- 
tional school led by Mr. and Mrs. Crum to the church. The 
Sunday School was reorganized May 7th, 1876, and named 
the Wesley Sunday School. At this time the following of- 
ficers were elected: C. Hussey, superintendent; N. W. 
Graddy, assistant superintendent; J. L. Sweat, secretary, and 
W. A. Ecord, treasurer. Fifty members were enrolled. After 
this, Mr. Hussey, who was a school teacher, left and Colonel 
Sweat was elected superintendent. But the present Sunday 
School nominally dates from 1863, as It was organized as 
above stated by Mr. Crum and his wife, although its actual 
church affiliations date only from 1876. The following is a 
list of Its superintendents to date : 

Robert B. Crum 1 863-1 876 Ezra McClaflin 1 897-1 899 

C. Hussey 1876 J. W. Brown (died) 1900 

J. L. Sweat 1876- 18 83 R. W. Sweat 1901 

W. A. Ecord 1 884-1 885 W. A. Ecord 1902-1907 

J. L. Sweat 1 886-1 887 T. F. M. Sweat 1908 

B. A. WhIttington 1888 A. J. Gibbs 1909-1913 

H. A. Mattox 1889-1895 T. F. M. Sweat 1914 

N. S. Knight 1895 A. J. Gibbs 1915-1916 

J. F. Eggleston 1 895-1 896 

From an old Sunday School record book for the year 1879 
it is found that the following were teachers and scholars, 



no History of Clinch County, Georgia 

which are herewith given as it is believed they will prove 
interesting. 

Bible Class — J. L. Sweat, teacher; Miss Mary Temples, 
Miss Nannie Hitch, S. M. Chapman, C. F. Hitch, W. J. 
Smith, Riley Smith, F. D. Kirkland, Seward Smith, Perry 
Moore, Miss Addie Crum, Mrs. H. P. Mattox, W. F. Dick- 
son, W. T. Smith, C. J. Shaw, Miss Mattie Gary, S. W. Hen- 
derson, W. A. Ecord, A. Morgan, Miss Lillie Crum, Mrs. 
D. W. Frobel, James P. Mattox, J. D. Mattox, Bryant 
Smith, A. B. Findley, H. P. Mattox, Miss Belle Mattox, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. G. Tomlinson. 

Class No. I. — Miss Addie Crum, teacher; Clara Narger, 
Lola Tomlinson, Minnie Crum, Minerva Smith, Alice Mat- 
tox, Lizzie Smith, Nannie Smith, Minnie Townsend. 

Class No. 2 — Miss Mary Temples, teacher; Imogene 
Mattox, Bettie Smith, Lizzie Ecord, Floy Caswell. 

Class No. 3. — Mrs. J. L. Sweat, teacher; Cora Sirmans, 
lola Roberson, Bitha Smith, Annie Watts, Lumpkin Smith, 
Rosa Smith, Mary Smith, Caroline Harnage, Lula Sweat, 
Pauline Smith, Jennie Smith, Maude Smith. 

Class No. 4. — S. M. Chapman, teacher; Remer Crum, 
Jimmie Caswell, Hamp Mattox, Jack Newbern, Willie 
Smith, Basil Mattox, Willie Norwood, Willie Mattox, John- 
nie Green, John H. Mattox, Jr., Jimmie Smith. 

Class No. 5. — James P. Mattox, teacher; Tommie Smith, 
Scott Dukes, Eddie Hinson, Isiah Fryer, John Smith, Ches- 
ter Harnage, Johnny Jones, David Smith, Reubin Stanford. 

Class No. 6. — Mrs. H. P. Mattox, teacher; Eddie Smith, 
Lee Sweat, Allen Caswell, Bennie Findley, Jim Ecord, Frank 
Caswell, Walter Mattox, Andy Caswell, Loddie Caswell. 

During the fall of 1878 the Methodists built a large taber- 
nacle on the Railroad Square in town, for holding revival 
and yearly camp-meetings in. It was a large open-air build- 
ing, circular shape, with a seating capacity of about two thou- 
sand people. Annually for many years some kind of a big 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 1 1 1 

meeting was held in it. The yearly meeting was an event of 
much importance; all the people for miles around attending 
and the meetings lasting for several days at a time. Among 
the leaders and those who donated much towards the building 
of the tabernacle were H. A. Mattox and R. B. Reppard. 

Gradually this beautiful custom dropped out of usage and 
at last there were no meetings held. The building began to 
decay from lack of repairs; so the church people finally sold 
it to H. J. Peagler in 1907, who tore it down and removed it. 

Another beautiful custom, followed for many years, was 
that of holding an annual Sunday School picnic at some pleas- 
ant point near Homerville. It was never held in town nor did 
the picnickers have to use the train to attend. Principal 
among the places where it was held were the Lewis Smith 
place, one mile from town ; the ford of Cane Creek, and the 
Stewart place, about two miles from town. On account of 
the hospitality of Captain W. H. Gary, it was sometimes 
held in his grove at his home on the edge of town. 

As has been above stated, Robert B. Crum and his wife 
were prominent members of the Methodist Church at 
Homerville for thirty or forty years. While Mr. Crum never 
held any political office, yet he was in other ways one of the 
town's most prominent citizens and the church's most zeal- 
ous workers, and not only him but his wife as well. A hand- 
some memorial window now adorns the new Methodist 
Church in Homerville in their memory. Therefore, a short 
sketch of this family will be appropriate: 

To Mr. and Mrs. Crum belongs the honor of establishing 
the present Methodist Sunday School in Homerville. This 
was in 1863, when the town was very small and county thinly 
populated. At first the school which they organized was un- 
denominational but with the formation of the Methodist 
Church at Homerville it became a part of that church. 

Robert Brazelle Crum was born in Camden County, June 
19th, 181 8, a member of an old family of that county. His 



112 • History of Clinch County, Georgia 

father was David Crum, who was a native of North Caro- 
lina and who located in Camden County in 1807. R. B. Crum 
married Miss Mary Ann Hutto, November 24th, 1842, by 
whom he had three children. Mrs. Crum's father was itiner- 
ant of the old Georgia Conference. She died in 1849. Four 
years later at an old preaching place called Mulberry Grove, 
Mr. Crum was married to Miss Margaret Malette, a mem- 
ber of an old Camden County family. This was on June 5th, 
1853. By his second wife, Mr. Crum had nine children, 
viz.: Robert Mallette Crum (died 1909) ; Vidella, who mar- 
ried D. W. Frobel, later Charles Gillican; Alice B. Crum, 
who married F. A. Exley; Margaret Eva Crum, who mar- 
ried H. J. Peagler (died 1902) ; Addie, who married Benj. 
Sirmans (died about 1892) ; Lillie L. Crum, who married 
Seward Smith; Rosa Minerva or Minnie Crum, who mar- 
ried James P. Mattox (died 1897) ' ^"d D. A. R. Crum, a 
prominent lawyer of Cordele, Ga. The latter is a former 
State senator and was prominently mentioned as a suitable 
person to be appointed judge of the newly created United 
States District Court for Georgia, in 19 13-14. 

In early life, Robert B. Crum joined the Methodist 
Church and was a steward of the Homervllle Church for 
about twenty years previous to his death. As a steward he 
was always on hand with his assessments and for his services 
was given a life membership In the American Bible Society. 

In the fall of 1862, Mr. Crum, with his family, removed 
to Clinch County and settled on the Hiram Kite place, about 
two miles from Homervllle, having previously visited this 
locality and bought the place. They lived there several years, 
later acquiring the hotel property formerly owned by Joel 
Strickland, In Homervllle. They then moved into town and 
ran the hotel continuously as "The Crum House" up to the 
death of Mrs. Crum In 1902; and after her death by her 
daughter, Mrs. Gillican, until 19 10. 

Mr. Crum's Civil War record began In 1861, when he 




W. T. DICKERSON 
Ex-Senator and Solicitor County Court. 




M. D. DICKERSON 

Solicitor-General Waycross Circuit 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 113 

joined the 4th Ga. Cavalry under Colonel Clinch, of Camden 
County, The next year, on account of his age, and in order 
to make safe his family and property then exposed to the 
enemy, he was relieved of his military obligations and re- 
moved to Clinch County. Later he joined the State militia 
and saw some service around Atlanta. Mr. Crum owned and 
controlled some eighty-odd slaves previous to the emancipa- 
tion of the slaves. 

Mr. Crum died very suddenly on the 12th day of Novem- 
ber, 1893, at the dinner table. He had been previously com- 
plaining of pains in the breast and spells of weakness, but his 
death was not so suddenly expected. Mrs. Crum survived her 
husband and continued to run the hotel until her death in 
1 90 1. She taught a class in the Sunday School for many 
years. Mr, and Mrs. Crum are buried in the Homerville 
cemetery. 

Another one of the most prominent members of the Homer- 
ville Church was Mr, Henry J. Peagler, of whom reference 
has been made to before in this chapter. He was born in 
Berkeley County, S. C, March 15th, 1852. When a young 
man he came to Georgia and became a turpentine employee. 
At first he was employed as a woods rider in Wayne County, 
later coming to Clinch County, where he was employed by 
H. & H. Mattox. Soon after coming to Clinch County he 
met and married Miss Margaret Eva Crum. They were 
married March 17th, 1881, by the Rev. John W. Watts, 
pastor of the Methodist Church. To them were born five 
children : Wellie K., Harry M., Lee, Lottie and Robert Peag- 
ler. Two of the children are dead. 

About 1887 Mr. Peagler, together with his friend, Calvitt 
Huxford, who came from the same county as Mr, Peagler, 
established a turpentine business in the northern part of the 
county at "Sandy Bottom." Later they opened up two other 
places. They continued in partnership until 1 896, when it was 
mutually dissolved. About this time Mr, Peagler acquired the 



114 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

old home property of the Crums, located near Homerville, 
where he built a beautiful residence in the place of the old 
one and removed there. He lived there until about 1910, 
when he moved into town. 

During all this time, Mr. Peagler continued to prosper, 
and soon became one of the wealthiest men in the county. 
When the Bank of Homerville was organized in 1903, Mr. 
Peagler became a large stockholder and was elected its first 
vice-president. Later he was elected its president and served 
in this capacity until his death in 1913. 

Mr. Peagler was an active member of the Methodist 
Church for about fifteen years previous to his death. He was 
a steward and trustee of the church for several years. He 
gave liberally of his means to the church and was always 
found in his seat at church. 

His first wife died in 1902, and after her death he mar- 
ried Miss Annie Belle Lanier, the beautiful young daughter 
of Mr. R. M. Lanier and a grand-daughter of Rev. Robert 
F. Lanier, a pioneer Methodist of Clinch County. Four chil- 
dren were born to this union, viz. : Allie, Fannie, James Mil- 
ton and Henri M. Peagler. 

Mr. Peagler's death occurred very suddenly October 31st, 
1 9 13, of acute indigestion. He was taken sick at the dinner 
table and died within a hour's time. His death was the occa- 
sion of much sorrow the town and county over. His demise 
was regretted by white and colored alike. His remains were 
buried in the Homerville cemetery, his pastor, Rev. Geo. H. 
Walker, conducting the funeral exercises. 

METHODIST CHURCH, DUPONT. 

This church was established about 1880. The present 
church building was dedicated October 29th, 1899, by Rev. 
M. C. Austin, of Brunswick. A handsome memorial window 
adorns the church in honor of Walter T. Lott, a generous 
benefactor of the church. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 115 

Among the earlier Methodists at DuPont, were Mrs. Eliza 
G. Herviant, Col. L. A. Sirmans and family, E. J. Benton and 
James T. Eason and family. At present there are very few 
Methodists in DuPont. Services are held once a month. The 
pastor of the Homerville Church is also pastor there. 

The folowing is a list of the pastors since 1 890 : 

W. T. McMichael 1889-1890 B. C. Prickett 1905 

A. H. Bazemore 1891-1893 A. B. Wall 1906-1907 

I. F. Carey 1894 J- S. Lewis 1908 

W. J. Stallings 1895-1898 Aaron Kelly 1909-1910 

James R. Jordan 1^99 I- E. McKellar 191 1 
C. E. Boland 1900 George H.Wlaker 1912-1913 

J. P. Bazemore 1901 F. L. Coleman 1914 

J. M. Boland 1902 M. M. Leggett 1915 

L. B. McMichael 1903- 1904 M. M. Marshall 1916 

The Methodist Sunday School at DuPont has at times been 
temporarily suspended. Due to the tireless efforts of a few 
it has been re-organized time and again. The following is a 
partial list of its superintendents since 1880: 

Edward J. Benton 1880-1881 W. S. Glenn 1901-1902 

James T. Eason 1887 A. J. Gibbs 1904- 1905 

James T. Eason 1891 M. S. Eason 1908 

L. A. Sirmans 1895 J- T. Bramlett 19 14 

Joseph Johnson 1900 J. D. Lyle 191 5 

For many years previous to his death, James T. Eason was 
one of the leading members of the Methodist Church at 
DuPont. He was born in Appling County, October 26th, 
1832, and was married December 28th, 1856, to Miss 
Louisa Victoria Mattox, daughter of Michael Mattox, of 
Tattnall County. By her he had ten children, viz. : Mary, 
who married W. W. Sever; Sarah, who married John Camp- 
bell; Julia R., who married H. W. Sever; Moses S. Eason; 
Victoria (died in infancy) ; James M. (died in infancy) ; 
Florida, who married A. S. McLendon ; Nannie, who mar- 



Ii6 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

ried C. M. Kimrey; Bessie, who married R. B. Hardy; Mc- 
Kenzie and George H. (died in infancy). Mr. Eason joined 
the Confederate army in May, 1862, and served in Co. "B" 
54th Georgia Regiment. 

Mr. Eason joined the M. E. Church in 1858 in Charlton 
County, while his wife joined in 1857. They lived in Charl- 
ton County until 1861, when they removed back to Appling 
County. In 1882 he removed to Clinch County, and settled 
about one mile from Magnolia. He lived here until a few 
years prior to his death, when he removed to DuPont, where 
he died. 

Mr. Eason was one of the prime leaders in building the 
Lott Memorial Methodist Church at DuPont. While liv- 
ing near Magnolia, he attended a Baptist Church nearby and 
although he was a Methodist, he was elected superintendent 
of its Sunday School, and soon had as good a school as could 
be found in the county. He worked hand in hand with Rev. 
George W. Newbern in the promotion of the cause. Rev. 
Newbern being the pastor of the little church nearby. All 
the while, Mr. Eason's membership was at Homerville, but 
later he moved it to DuPont. He was superintendent of the 
DuPont Sunday School a few years, and was elected a steward 
in 1883. His death occurred at his home in DuPont, Feb- 
ruary 26th, 1905, and he was buried in the North cemetery, 

BAPTIST CHURCH AT HOMERVILLE. 

This church was organized about 1880, the principal mem- 
bers being W. H. Gary and wife, A. J. Caswell and wife, 
George W. Newbern and C. A. Smith. The land for the 
purpose was deeded the church by Col. Simon W. Hitch in 
1882 to be used for church purposes so long as a church was 
located thereon. The church faces the first street east of the 
court-house, which runs north and south, and is on the west 
side of the street. It is surrounded by beautiful shade oaks. 

Until about 1880 the Baptists at Homerville had no edifice 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 117 

In which to worship, and the Methodists granted them the 
use of their church across the railroad. 

The first Baptist Church in the vicinity of Homerville, 
and where the Homerville Baptists worshipped, was at the 
ford of Cane Creek, three miles northeast of town. This old 
church was established about 1852. At this time a Rev. 
Ryals was pastor. Later, Rev. C. Aldridge, who lived at 
Magnolia, was its pastor. One of the deacons of this church 
was John W. Hodges. He was a deacon until its removal 
to Homerville. 

After the war, this church was abandoned, and the Bap- 
tists worshipped in the court-house at Homerville. This priv- 
ilege was granted by the grand jury in 1868, and it was availed 
of by both denominations. In 1875 the Methodist Church 
was erected and thev allowed the Baptists the use of their 
church until they could build one. 

Among the earlier Baptists at Homerville, before their 
church was built, might be mentioned Joel Strickland and his 
wife, John W. Hodges and his wife, Alfred Newbern and 
his wife, George W. Newbern and wife and A. B. Findley 
and his wife. Also there were A. J. Caswell and his wife and 
John C. Jones, who subsequently became prominent mem- 
bers of this church. 

The original church building was a frame building. This 
building Avas used up to 191 2, when the present brick struc- 
ture was completed. The present building is of white brick 
and cost about $2,000. It was begun in 191 1. The building 
committee consisted of Messrs. R. G. Dickerson, A. H. Cul- 
pepper. George M. Dame, J. S. Kirkland and D. E. Kirk- 
land. The contract was given to S. S. Dillon, a local con- 
tractor, who also built the Methodist Church here. The 
pastor of the church who began the movement to build the 
new church was that able man of God, Rev. G. Tom West, 
who lived at Willacoochee, Ga. Due to his untiring efforts 
and under his directions the present church was built. 



1 1 8 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

The present deacons of the church are Dr. A. H. Cul- 
pepper, J. S. Kirkland and George M. Dame, The Sunday 
School of the church was organized under the superintend- 
ency of Capt. W. H. Gary. He was superintendent for 
nearly twenty years previous to his death in 1901. Since 
that time, Dr. A. H. Culpepper, J. S. Kirkland, Prof. R. L. 
Lovell and George M. Dame have at different times served 
as superintendents. The present clerk of the church is J. S. 
Kirkland. 

The following is a list of the pastors since 1895 : 

C. C. Grace 1895-1896 G. Tom West 1905-1911 
M.P.Cain 1897 P. B. Butler 1912 

W. O. Dorsey 1898 Hugh F. Oliver 19 12-19 13 

John F. Smith 1899 Ernest M. Altman 1914-19 15 

J. C. Gillispie 1900-1901 Lester Lane 1916 

John F. Smith 1 901-1904 

Other pastors of this church were Revs. George W. New- 
bern, J. T. Stanley, Bennett, Vining and Poston. Rev. A. B. 
Findley was ordained to the ministry here in 1867, and serv^ed 
as pastor. 

A leading member of the church is J. S. Kirkland, named 
above. He is a son of the late J. C. Kirkland. He was born 
in 1864, and married Miss Mary Touchstone, a daughter 
of Mr. C. S. Touchstone, of Stockton, in 1904. He has four 
children. Mr. Kirkland lives on his farm near Homerville, 
and has served his church as a deacon, Sunday School superin- 
tendent and secretary, and as clerk. 

John C. Jones, although a cripple and could not walk, was 
one of the most faithful members of the church. He was 
for many years prior to his death in 1904, clerk of the 
church. He also took a great interest in the Sunday School. 
He had been tax receiver of Clinch County for over twenty 
years when he died. 

Capt. W. H. Gary came to Homerville about 1880 and 
was very instrumental in organizing the Baptist Church. He 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 119 

was a deacon of the church until his death in 1901, and also 
Sunday School superintendent and church clerk. He was clerk 
of the Homer\-ille Baptist Association for several years, and 
lor five years was clerk of the Smyrna Baptist Association of 
which the Homerville Association was formerly a part. To 
Capt. Gary may be attributed more than any one else the 
success and upbuilding of these associations. He was a county 
commisisoner two years, mayor of Homerville and a member 
of Board of Trustees of DuBignon Institute from its incep- 
tion. His wife was the widow of John W. Hodges. 

John W. Hodges was a leading Baptist at Homerville 
before the Baptist Church was established, and his death 
occurred before their church v/as built. As has been stated 
above, he was a member of the old Baptist Church at Cane 
Creek, and was deacon there for many years. He was born 
April 30, 1822, in Liberty County, and married Miss Eliza- 
beth E. Darsey, of that county, February 12th, 1846. They 
had no children. They removed to Clinch County In 1852 
and lived for several years four miles east of where Homer- 
ville now Is. With the coming on of the war he removed 
to town and joined the Confederate army. Mr. Hodges was 
a brother to Archibald Hodges, at one time a justice of the 
Inferior Court of Clinch County. He died In Homerville, 
December 26th, 1878, and was burled In the town cemetery. 

Another early Baptist at Homerville, was Alfred B. Find- 
ley. He was born January 1 5th, 1839, and served in Co. "K" 
29th Georgia, during the war. He was married August 
15th, 1866, to Miss Argent Newbern, daughter of Rev. G. 
W. Newbern. Mr. FIndley joined the Missionary Baptist 
Church and was, on October 15th, 1866, ordained to the min- 
istry. He served as deputy sheriff under Sheriffs Nelms, 
Courson and Johnson, and as Justice of the Peace at Homer- 
ville. Later, he removed to Coffee County and settled at 
Douglas, where he established a Third Party newspaper, 
and was appointed postmaster under Republican administra- 
tion. He is now living at Douglas. 



I 20 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

BAPTIST CHURCH, STOCKTON. 

This church was originally located at Carter's Bridge, on 
the Allapaha River on the Clinch County side of the river. It 
was constituted in 1861. It was in a prosperous condition for 
two or three years during the war, when it almost succumbed. 
Rev. Caswell Howell was its first minister. Among its first 
members were James Henry Carroll, James Touchston, 
Charles Herren, John Touchston and Charles S. Touchston, 
and Dr. Ulysses A. Rice. To-day Mr. C. S. Touchston is the 
only living member of the original membership. Dr. Rice was 
a native of North Georgia and lived down here several years. 
He contributed much of labor and money towards the build- 
ing of the church. When the war came on, Dr. Rice returned 
to his old home, the Touchstons moved their membership 
their membership to Macedonia Church in Echols County, 
which was nearer them, and other members removed their 
membership also. This left the church without support, and it 
was discontinued for a few years. Although the church build- 
ing remained, no efforts were made to revive it until 1 868. 

In 1868 several Baptist laymen, among whom were John 

G. Norton, David Cowart, John Touchston and . 

Collier, set themselves to the task and removed the church 
building to Stockton. Here the old church was the scene of 
many meetings for nearly fifty years. In 191 5 it was torn 
down to put up a new building in its place. When it was 
torn down much sound lumber was found in it which was 
put into the building in 1861; this same sound lumber will 
be used in the new building. 

Rev. Thomas Powell was its first pastor after it was moved 
to Stockton. When this faithful servant of the church, after 
after laboring there a few years, turned the church over to 
his successors, the church's membership had materially in- 
creased and the church was on a sound footing. 

The present pastor is Rev. Noah Tyler, who lives across 
the Allapaha River in Lowndes County. The deacons are 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 121 

Messrs. R. J. Bennett and C, S. Touchston, the latter of 
whom has served in this capacity for the last thirty years. 
Ollie Mathis is the church clerk. The church has a member- 
ship of about thirty-five. 

James Touchston, an early member of this church, settled 
on Cow Creek in 1851, removing from where Milltown now 
is. The next year he built a grist and saw-mill on Cow Creek, 
propelled by water. Mr. Touchston joined the Baptist 
Church in early life, and was an active member until his 
death in August, 1865. At his death he was 71 years old. At 
the time of his death his membership was with the Mace- 
donia Church in Echols County. Mr. Touchston's wife was 
Miss Rebecca Hutto, by whom he had ten children, viz.: 
John, William, Nancy, Jesse, James, Henry H., Isaac, Ra- 
chael, Chas. S., and Sarah Touchston. Two or his sons, Jesse 
and James Touchston, were killed in the war at Boonesboro, 
Md., in 1863. 

Charles S. Touchston, a son of James Touchston, Sr., 
joined the Baptist Church in i860, and in 1861 became a 
member of the Carter's Bridge Church. He was born April 
30th, 1845, where Milltown now is. When the Civil War 
came on, Mr. Touchston joined Co. "K" 29th Georgia Regi- 
ment, but was later transferred to Co. "H" 4th Georgia 
Cavalry. When the war closed he returned home and mar- 
ried Miss Mary E. Howell, daughter of H. H. Howell, of 
Echols County, December 28th, 1865. To them were born 
ten children. 

John G. Norton was very instrumental in removing the 
Baptist Church from Carter's Bridge to Stockton. For sev- 
eral years he was clerk of the church. He was born in South 
Carolina, February 3d, 1838. He settled at Stockton just 
after the war and subsequently engaged in the mercantile 
business. He also ran a ginnery. 

He removed to Lowndes County, below Naylor, and began 
farming. His death occurred February 4th, 1906, and he 



122 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

was buried at the Stockton cemetery. He was twice married 
and had several children. 

ANTIOCH METHODIST CHURCH. 

This church is situated several miles south or Argyle, and 
was for many years in the Homerville circuit. This church 
was established mainly through the efforts of Rev. Irwin R. 
Booth, who was a local preacher many years previous to his 
death in 1896. Among the early leading members of the 
church was Is.ham Patterson, James Harper, C. W. Inman, 
Herschel Inman, Ivy Davis and W. H. Hinson. 

The list of pastors have been the same as that of Homer- 
ville. The following is a list of the Sunday School superin- 
tendents at Antioch : 

John Inman 1876 Frank R. Booth 1 894-1 895 

C. W. Inman 1 880-1 881 Irwin R. Booth 1896 

George H. Lee 1 882-1 883 J. H. Inman 1897 

Ivy Davis 1 884-1 886 Russell Fulwood 1898 

Isham Patterson 1887-1889 W. H. Hinson 1900-1901 

Herschel Inman 1 890-1 892 J. W. Hinson 1908-1910 
Isham Patterson 1893 L. C. Capps 19 12 

As has been stated above. Rev. Irwin R. Booth was a 
leading member of the Methodist Church in this section for 
fifty years. He was born in Beaufort County, S. C, June 3d, 
1812, of religious parents. He joined the Methodist Church 
at the early age of nine and led a consistent life until his death. 
He married Miss Margaret Mixon in 1832; after her death, 
he married Mrs. Margaret Knowles, of Ware County, Sept. 
2 1st, 1868. Rev. Booth moved to Georgia about 1840 and 
with the exception of a short while lived in Clinch County 
until death in 1896. 

At the time of his death. Rev. Booth had been preaching 
nearly fifty years, and was one of the first Methodists to set- 
tle in Clinch County. He was superintendent of the Antioch 
Sunday School at the time of his death. The Sunday before 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 123 

he died he was on hand and conducted the school, although 
84 years old. His death occurred January i6th, 1896, and 
his remains were buried at Antioch Church. On Sunday, Au- 
gust 30th, 1896, the funeral services and last tribute of re- 
spect to his memory were held at Antioch. All the children, 
grand-children and other relatives and friends numbering 
several hundred, were present. The services were conducted 
by Revs. W. J. Stallings and C. W. Inman. 

Another prominent member of Antioch Church was Ivy 
Davis. He was a resident of the neighborhood of the church, 
and was long associated with church and Sunday School 
affairs. He was not only a steward but a Sunday School super- 
intendent several years, and for about five years was presi- 
dent of the Clinch County Sunday School Association. 

Mr. Davis was born in 1845, ^^'^ was married to Miss 
Miranda Smith, daughter of William E. Smith, January 21st, 
1868 and had several children. He died in 1913 at his home 
in Brunswick, Ga., where he had removed several years 
before. 

SHILOH METHODIST CHURCH. 

This church was located about four miles south of Argyle, 
and near the home of Mr. W. J. Strickland. It was estab- 
lished about 1875. The pastorate was supplied by the Homer- 
ville Church. Among the early prominent members of the 
Church were : W. J. Strickland, Peter Williams, John Florida 
Smith and H. C. Smith. 

The following is a partial list of its Sunday School super- 
intendents : 

Peter Williams 1 880-1 882 John E. Booth 1893-1895 

W. J. Strickland 1 882-1 884 Jesse Booth 1896 

Peter Williams 1 884-1 886 J. Jordan 1897 

John F. Smith 1 886-1 889 Andrew Pittman 1898 

Henry C. Smith 1890-1 891 A. J. Kight 1905 

James Fulwood 1891-1892 J. R. Jernigan 1910-1916 



124 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

METHODIST CHURCH, ARGYLE. 

This church was established in 1887, at about the time 
that the town of Argyle or Saussy, as it was then called, 
came into existence. The land for the purpose was deeded by 
Mrs. Virginia N. Fulton and Ida F. Saussy, heirs of Gasper 
J. Fulton, to the trustees of the Church September 8th, 
1887, to be used by the Church so long as used for church 
purposes. The trustees named in the deed were : W. A. Ecord, 
Peter Williams, N. S. Knight, and W. S. Fender. Those 
trustees, however, did not live at Argyle. Among the earlier 
Methodists at this point, were T. P. Jordan, S. R. Kirton, T. 
H. Miller, B. A. Harper, and J. R. Booth. 

The pastors of this church are the same as the Homerville 
Church. The following is a list of the Sunday School super- 
intendents since 1894: 

T. P. Jordan i 894-1 898 B. C. Martin 1908-1910 

T. H. Miller 1898-1900 J. C. Saville 1911-1913 

B. A. Harper 1900 R. J. Booth 1913-1914 

J. R. Booth 1901 Geo. W. Goodman 1914 

W. H. Hinson 1 902-1 903 S. C. Patterson 191 5-1 916 
Mrs. J. H. Inman 1 904-1 907 

PROVIDENCE, OR CAMP BRANCH CHURCH. 

This church Is of the Primitive Baptist denomination, and 
although located about a mile across the line in Ware County, 
has always been closely associated with Clinch County, there- 
fore the history of this church will not be amiss. 

A small band of Primitive Baptists met at this point and 
organized themselves into a church on the third day of Feb- 
ruary, 1844. They were constituted as a church on the first 
Sunday in March (March 2d), 1844. The following is the 
covenant of the original constituted members, copied from 
the church minutes. 

Covenant: For as much as Almighty God by His Grace 
has been pleased to call us whose names underneath subscribed 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 125 

out of darkness into his marvelous light and all of us have 
been regularly baptized upon a profession of our faith in 
Christ Jesus and have given up ourselves to the Lord and 
to one another in a Gospel church-way to be governed and 
guided by a proper discipline agreeable to the Word of God, 
we do therefore in the name of our Lord Jesus and by His 
assistance, covenant and agree to keep up the discipline of the 
church members in a most brotherly affection toward each 
other while we endeavor to punctually observe the following 
rules, viz. : in brotherly love to pray for each other, to watch 
over one another and if need be in the most tender and af- 
fectionate manner to reprove one another, that is if we dis- 
cover anything amiss to go and tell him his faults according 
to the direction given in our Lord's gospel, and not to be 
whispering and back-biting. We also agree with God's as- 
sistance to attend to our church meetings, observe the Lord's 
day and not absent ourselves from the communion of the 
Lord's Supper without lawful excuse, to be ready to communi- 
cate to the defraying of the church expense. 

These things we do covenant and agree to observe and 
keep sacred in the name and by the assistance of the Holy 
Trinity. Signed by the mutual consent of the members whose 
names are underneath subscribed. March 2d, 1844. 

John Minshew, Richard A. Bennett, 

Rachael Minshew, Tobitha Bennett, 

James J. Thomas, William S. Bennett, 

Duncan Henderson, Nancy Bennett. 
Belinda Henderson, 

After the organization was perfected. Rev. Isham Peacock 
was called as the first pastor of the church which call he ac- 
cepted. Duncan Henderson was then selected as clerk, and 
regular meeting days were fixed for both monthly and annual 
meetings. 

The following is a list of the pastors since the organiza- 
tion of the church, barring two periods when the list was not 
obtainable: 



126 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



Isham Peacock 
Reubin Crawford 
John Dryden 
Reubin Crawford 
H. Cowart 
John Dryden 
Reubin Crawford 
Daniel Palerson 
James M. Mullis 
Reubin Crawford 
Daniel Palerson 



1 844-1 845 

1 846-1 848 

1849-1854 

1855-1860 

1861 

1862 

1863 

1863 

1863 

1864 

1864 



James M. Mullis 
Jas. C. Williams 
R. H. Bennett 
E. W. Dilbern 
James A. O'Steen 
D. B. Sheffield 
James A. O'Steen 
W. H. Tomlinson 
H. J. J. Markey 
J. C. Hewett 
Richard A. James 



1871-1880 

1881-1882 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1894 

1895-1901 

1902-1905 

1906-1908 

1909 

1915-1916 



From about i9ioto 1915 the church had no regular pas- 
tor, while the minutes do not disclose anything relative to 
the period of 1 864-1 871 and 1 882-1 890. The following is a 
list of the church clerks since 1844, with the exception of 
1882-1890: 



Duncan Henderson i844-'49 
Richard A. Bennett i849-'59 
Asa Geiger 1 860-1 861 



W. P. Nunez 
J. H. Miller 
J. R. Dickerson 



1873-1880 
1881 
1890-1915 
William T. James 1861-1873 B.M.James 1915-1916 

Duncan Henderson, who was the first clerk, was born 
about 1800 and was a brother to John S., and Daniel Hen- 
derson. He married Miss Belinda Stafford, a daughter of 
Josiah Stafford. To them were born four children, viz. : An- 
drew J., Jack, David and Mary Henderson. His member- 
ship was with Providence Church until his death in 1863. He 
was for many years a trustee for the church property. 

CLINCH COUNTY SUNDAY SCHOOL ASSOCIATION. 

With the organization and spread of the Sunday School in 
Clinch County, came the organization of the Clinch County 
Sunday School Association. This is an association that has 
been very helpful and beneficial to the Sunday School cause in 
Clinch County. There are no records showing when it was 
organized, but we have traces of its existence as early as 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 127 

1883. Annual conventions have been held every year for 
over twenty-five years. The following is a list of its presi- 
dents and secretaries since 1896, with the years 1883 and 
1893 added, — the other years are not obtainable: 

Presidents — 1883, John G. Norton, Stockton; 1893, Ivy 
Davis, Saussy; 1896, A. W. Bridges, Ratio; 1897, E. M. 
Pafford, Stockton; 1898, W. D. Stevenson, DuPont; 1899, 
Ivy, Davis, Argyle; 1900, Ivy Davis, Argyle; 1901, Ivy 
Davis, Argyle; 1902, J. A. Kilpatrick, Argyle; 1903, H. J. 
Dame, Homervllle; 1904, A. J. Gibbs, DuPont; 1905, A. J. 
Gibbs, DuPont; 1906, Wm. M. Pafford, Mud Creek; 1907, 
Wm. M. Pafford, Mud Creek; 1908, A. J. Gibbs, DuPont; 
1909, A. J. Gibbs, Homervllle; 19 10, A. J. Gibbs, Homer- 
vllle; 191 1, R. G. Ratliff, Stockton; 191 2, R. G. Ratliff, 
Stockton; 19 13, A. J. Gibbs, Homervllle; 19 14, J. W. Tim- 
merman, Stockton; 19 15, G. A. Gibbs, Homervllle. 

Secretaries — 1883, J. L. Sweat, Homervllle; 1893, L. D. 
Ellington, DuPont; 1896, Levi Hill, Ratio; 1897, Benj. 
Smith Stockton; 1898, Benj. Smith, Stockton; 1901, W. H. 
Patterson, DuPont; 1902, G. H. Cornelius, Homervllle; 
1903, B. O'Quin, DuPont; 1904, J. C. Smith, Mud Creek; 
1908, L. H, Dame, Homervllle; 1909, W. B. DuVall, 
Homervllle; 19 10, W. B. Gibbs, Homervllle; 191 2, Folks 
Huxford, Homervllle; 19 13, Lizzie Day, DuPont; 19 14, 
Folks Huxford, Homervllle; 1915, Folks Huxford, Homer- 
vllle. 

The following have served as vice-presidents, a complete 
list of which is not obtainable: Peter Williams, 1883 ; L. C. 
Mattox, 1898; J. S. KIrkland, 1902; Benj. Smith, 1904; H. 
H. TImmerman, 1909; R. G. Ratliff, 1910; George M. 
,Dame, 1911-13 and 1916, and S. C. Patterson, 1915. 

PROSPECT CHURCH. 

This church is of the Primitive Baptist denomination, and 
was constituted January 22d, 1859. The first constituted 
members of the church were : Jacob Lightsey and Christina 



128 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Lightsey, Edmund Mathis and Labra Mathis, William 
Hughes, William Tomlinson and John Mathis, and Sarah 
Hutto. Rev. Isaac D. Hutto was for many years pastor. 
The present clerk of the church is James R. Morgan. This 
church is situated about four miles north of DuPont. The 
land for the church was deeded by Rowan B. Johnson in 
1859. 

WAYFARE OR COW CREEK CHURCH. 

This church was situated just across the line in Echols 
County, but has always been identified with the county. When 
it was first organized it was in Ware County, later in Clinch, 
then in Echols. It was constituted in 1847, ^"^ the first 
annual meeting was .had on Friday and Saturday before the 
fourth Sunday in September, 1847. The first constituted 
members were: John Roberts, Sr., Edmund Mathis, Unity 
Mathis, Harvey Mizell and Rebecca Mizell, John T. 
Roberts, John Mathis, James Johnson, Simon A, Blackman, 
Azilpha Tomlinson, Harvey Matthews, Elizabeth Register, 
and Rachael Howell. 

FIRST SUNDAY SCHOOL. 

There has always been much discussion as to who founded 
the first Sunday School in Clinch County. After much re- 
search and investigation, it seems that Eaton H. Howell was 
the founder of the first school of this kind in the county. This 
^2iS about 1856, or 1858. It was located between Homer- 
ville and Magnolia, and Mr. Howell was assisted by Geo. 
W. Newbern. Mr. Howell was teaching a day school there 
and was a young man about 25 years old. This school existed 
a few months, when it closed with the leaving of Mr. Howell. 

About the next Sunday School to be established in the 
county was at Homerville in the northeast section of town. 
It was established by Rev. Robert F. Lanier, Dr. L. C. Mat- 
tox and H. A. Mattox, in the school house. Regular Sunday 
School literature was used, and the school progressed nicely 



I 



History of Cl'incJi County, Georgia 129 

for perhaps a year or so. It was first established about 1861. 
Rev. Lanier removed to Lowndes County in 1863. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Crum were the organizers of 
probably the next Sunday School in the county, at least in 
Homerville. This was in 1863. This school was continued 
until the organization of a Methodist Church at Homerville, 
about 1875, when it became a Methodist school. This school 
had its trials and difficulties and several times was closed 
for short periods, but always opened up again. 



CHAPTER X. 

A Distinguished Family Connection. 

ONE of the most distinguished family connections in the 
State of Georgia, and especially of Clinch County, 
sprang through the illustrious Simon W. Nichols, one 
of Clinch County's pioneer citizens. Mr. Nichols was orig- 
inally a merchant of Savannah, but a few years after his 
marriage he became entangled in financial difficulties there 
through signing a friend bond in court, Mr. Nichols having 
to finally pay It. He first removed to Jones County, and 
settled at the old town of Clinton, where prosperity seems to 
have been his lot; he lived here for about fifteen or twenty 
years, finally coming to what is now Clinch County, where 
he died. 

Mr. Nichols married Miss Margaret Waver, a daugh- 
ter of Jacob Waver, of Savannah, who was a German emi- 
grant. The marriage took place on March 30th, 1821. By 
her he had seven cihldren, three sons and four daughters, 
and this coterie of children became, In after years, among 
the State's most gifted sons and daughters. 

William Montgomery Nichols, the oldest son, was once 
State Senator from Clinch County, and was married first 
to a Miss McCombs, and his second wife was Miriam, daugh- 
ter of Governor Wilson Lumpkin, of Georgia, who was twice 
Governor of the State and a United States Senator. 

Waver Jacob Nichols was a first-honor graduate of the 
Charleston, S. C, Medical College, and became one of the 
county's foremost physicians. 

John Calhoun Nichols, the youngest son, graduated from 
Washington & Lee University and took up the practice of 
law, becoming one of the State's ablest lawyers, and served 
two terms in Congress. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 131 

Eliza G. Nichols graduated from the LaGrange Female 
College and married J. P. A. DuPont, who was a son of 
Peter DuPont, an officer in Napoleon's army and who fought 
through the Napoleonic wars with Austria and Russia. 

Annie A. Nichols married Sylvanus Hitch, a native of 
Massachusetts, and a large land owner. She became the 
mother of Simon W. Hitch, for many years Solicitor-General 
of the Brunswick judicial circuit, besides other children. 

Delia H. Nichols married Green J, Foreacre, better 
known as Jonas Foreacre, a citizen of DeKalb County, who 
figured conspicuously in the battles around Atlanta and was 
wounded at the first battle of Manassas. 

Laura B. Nichols, the youngest daughter, was married 
after the war to W. T. Akers, a citizen of Atlanta. To 
write the history of these children and their families would 
be to take in nearly every section of the State. 

Simon W. Nichols lived at Clinton, in Jones County, for 
several years. Later he went to Roanoke, now Eufaula, 
Alabama, and lived about a year there. About this time, he, 
and Hon. John Forsyth, one of the State governors and also 
Secretary of State in Van Burens cabinet, began to grant 
lands in South Georgia, where the lands had recently been 
ceded by the Indians. Mr. Forsyth owned great areas of 
land in this county and Mr. Nichols looked after them as his 
agent, while Mr. Nichols himself acquired much land also. 

About 1839, William Register settled at what is now the 
old Register home-place, about twelve miles below Avhere 
DuPont now is. Mr. Nichols owned a good deal of land 
himself down here, and also a tract in Florida. While on a 
trip down there, he passed Mr. Register's place and spent a 
short while with him as they were intimately acquainted with 
each other. Mrs. Nichols expressed a desire to live here in 
the hope that her health, which was bad at the time, would 
change for the better. To this desire Mr. Nichols acquiesced 
and so in this way, this noted family became residents of 
what was then Ware but is now Clinch County. Mr. Nichols 



132 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

made his home on the adjoining lot of land to Mr. Register's, 
and here it was that the celebrated Nichols family was reared 
to manhood and womanhood. 

His death occurred at the home of his daughter, Mrs. 
Eliza G. Herviant (formerly DuPont) at Suwannoochee 
(now Dupont town) shortly after the war, and his remains 
were buried at Prospect Church near DuPont, in the county 
which he loved so well, and which he had been so instrumen- 
tal in bringing into existence. He was very active in bring- 
ing about the creation of Clinch County, and in the Act cre- 
ating the same, he was named as one of the commissioners to 
organize it. The lands upon which Magnolia was located 
were given by him to the county in order that the county 
site might be located there. 

Mr. Nichols, at the time of his death, was the highest 
Mason in the county, being a Knight Templar. He was a 
man of education and refinement, and in the educating of his 
children, he gave them the best schooling possible in those 
days. He was indeed a great man, liked and respected by his 
fellow citizens for the high degree of intelligence and citizen- 
ship which characterized him. 

His noble wife, who preceded him to the grave, was an- 
other one of those women whose noble traits of character 
and the love of home and family, endeared her to those who 
knew her. Indeed, it might be said of her: "None knew her 
but to love her; none named her but to praise." 



Peter DuPont was an officer in Napoleon's army, and dis- 
tinguished himself in the wars against Austria and Italy. He 
owned large estates in France, and after the war he was 
compelled to flee from the country following Napoleon's 
downfall, he went to Santo Domingo, where he acquired a 
large coffee plantation. He lived there a few years, but soon 
an insurrection of negroes drove not only him but his friend, 
Waver, and all the other whites away. Mr. DuPont, along 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 133 

with Mr. Waver, settled in Savannah. They had been fast 
friends for several years, both coming from France, and 
finally settling in Savannah, but they knew not that in after 
years their families would be connected by marriage. Mr. 
Waver's grand-daughter married Mr. DuPont's son some 
forty years later. 

At the same time that Peter DuPont came over here, he 
was accompanied by two brothers, Eugene and Paul DuPont. 
Paul went North, and Eugene South, but the latter has never 
been heard of since he left. Paul's descendants are today 
represented in Delaware by Henry A. DuPont and others, 
who own the noted DuPont powder plant. 

John Peter Augustus DuPont, a son of Peter DuPont, 
was born in the city of Savannah, August 31st, 18 19, and 
spent his childhood days there. He was a direct lineal de- 
scendant of Marshal Lefebvre, Duke of Dantzic, and of 
General Count DuPont, and in his veins coursed some of 
the best blood to be found. He was married about 1850 to 
Miss Eliza Green Nichols, daughter of Simon W. Nichols, 
and by her had three sons, viz. : J. P. A. DuPont, Jr., 
Thomas Charlton DuPont and Lee Lefebvre DuPont. The 
elder DuPont engaged in the cotton business in Savannah 
for a few years, exporting cotton to England and France. 
His son, L. L. DuPont, now has an old cotton report or table 
dated about 1840, showing the cost of cotton to produce it, 
cost to get it to England, and a table of prices for Sea Island 
and upland cotton at New Orleans, Savannah and Liverpool, 
and the equivalent value of cotton in English money from 
eight up to sixteen cents per pound. This table was prepared 
by Mr. DuPont and is in his own handwriting. 

After living in Savannah for several years, he removed to 
Darien, in Mcintosh County, where he engaged in the lum- 
ber business. He bought and exported timber for the cele- 
brated Epting firm in Germany, shipbuilders. His son, L. L. 
DuPont, also now has a measuring rod with a handle to it 
about a yard long, with which his father measured timber. 



134 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

After his marriage to Mr. Nichols' daughter, he acquired 
property in Chnch County, in the vicinity of where DuPont 
now is. A survey had just been made through this section 
(1857) for a proposed railroad, and Mr. DuPont decided 
to build his family a summer home at where DuPont now is. 
The summer months at Darien were very unhealthy, and in 
this way came about the building of a home for his family in 
another section to be used by them during the summer 
months. He had the lumber brought with oxen from Doctor- 
town, on the Altama.ha River, and when the lumber was laid 
down at the point where a town was later built, there was 
nothing but pine forests there. The railroad was not built 
until two years later. This site was also very desirable to 
Mr. DuPont's family, as Mr. Nichols lived just below this 
point 'a few miles. Mr. DuPont himself never lived in 
Clinch County, although generally regarded as one of the 
county's citizens. The house which he built was not finished 
until several years after the Civil War, owing to the out- 
break and continuance of the war. The original building, 
with some modifications or additions to it, is still standing in 
the town of DuPont, and is now owned and occupied by 
Mr. L. L. DuPont. 

The war coming on, Mr. DuPont threw himself enthusi- 
astically into the work of raising companies to go to the 
front. He raised practically every company that was raised 
in Mcintosh County during the first two years of the war. 
Although he was opposed at first to the war and had always 
been an opponent of slavery, he did not let this hinder him 
in rendering his services to his State and to the cause. The 
ladies of Mcintosh County presented him with a flag to be 
used in the last company he raised there. This flag, which 
had the Confederate bars on it, had in the place of the stars, 
an arch with three pillars representing Wisdom, Justice and 
Moderation, like that found on the Great Seal of the State. 
Mr. DuPont turned this company over to the State author- 
ities, but declined to part with his flag; and the flag is now in 



History of Clinch County , Georgia 135 

possession of Mr. L. L. Dupont, the only living son. It has 
the letters "M. R." in the center of the flag denoting the 
"Mcintosh Rifles," and around the arch referred to were 
thirteen small stars representing the thirteen Confederate 
States. 

Mr. DuPont's valuable life was destined to soon be cut 
short. He came to his home at Station No. 12, as it was 
called, and lived only a short while, his death occurring April 
1 8th, 1863. He was survived by his wife and two sons, the 
third son being born a few months after his death. His re- 
mains were carried to Savannah where they were buried in 
the family vault. 

His widow was married again just after the war was over 
to Mr. Peter A. Herviant, who was the first paymaster of the 
old Atlantic & Gulf Railroad, and who held that position 
until after his marriage to Mrs. DuPont. Mrs. Herviant had 
no children by her second marriage. Mrs. Herviant was a 
graduate of the LaGrange Female College, and was one of 
the most intelligent and well-versed women of her day. She 
was acquainted and could talk with much intelligence on most 
any subject brought before her. She was often looked to for 
counsel and advice on many subjects not generally regarded 
as belonging to woman's realm. In case of sickness she could 
administer medicine and give prescriptions as well as the most 
experienced physician. Her education was a finished one, 
and in her bright intellect was combined the highest degree 
of mental attainments with the lofty aspirations of the heart. 
Her generosity was unbounded and her door was always 
open to both the stranger and the acquaintance. Her de- 
meanor was such as to make all who came in contact with her 
at once to begin to like her. Mrs. Herviant was born October 
1 8th, 1825 at her parental home in Clinton, Jones County, 
and died at the home of her sister, Mrs. Akers, in Atlanta, 
August 17th, 1885. Her remains were buried in the family 
vault in Savannah. She was survived by her husband and 
two sons. 



136 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Her husband, Peter Alexander Herviant, was born in 
Macon, Georgia, February 7th, 1834, and died at the old 
family home in DuPont, September 4th, 1909. He came to 
DuPont shortly after the war and married Mrs. DuPont. 
After coming to DuPont, .he was appointed station agent 
there, which position he held until retired by the company 
on account of age, on a pension. He was possessed of an 
excellent education and that good grace and appearance 
which bespake of him a gentleman in every sense of the word. 
After his marriage into the DuPont family, he took charge 
of the rearing of the three sons besides the management of 
the large areas of land which belonged to his wife. His 
prudence and sagacity in business matters is well illustrated 
in the way in which he took care of the three sons. He never 
spent any of the funds which were dedicated to the education 
and raising of the boys, either on himself or foolishly on 
them. He did much for the uplift and upbuilding of the 
town and was looked upon as an honorable and progressive 
citizen. 

These three boys, J. P. A., Charlton and Lee L. DuPont 
inherited much of that wonderful brilliance of mind and 
ability and power from their parents. The eldest, John Peter 
Augustus DuPont, in later life known as Augustus DuPont, 
was born in Savannah, September 17th, 1856, where his 
mother was living at the time. He attended the State Uni- 
versity of Iowa' law department, and graduated with first 
honor. He was at once admitted to the bar there in 1880, 
but desiring to return home he came back to DuPont, where 
he settled for the practice of law. He also was a graduate 
of Roanoke College, Salem, Va., where he graduated with 
first honor. Very soon he was appointed on the Governor's 
staff of the State Militia, which he held seventeen years. Here 
he evinced some of the military genius displayed by his grand- 
father in the Napoleonic wars. At the time of his death he 
was one of the three men in the State eligible to the office 
of Adjutant-General. Mr. DuPont's ability as a booster 




LEE L. DUPONT 

The only surviving child of J. P. A. and Eliza G. DuPont. 




THOMAS CHARLTON DUPONT 
Died 1884 at age of 26. A most promising and brilliant young lawyer. 




PETER ALEXANDER HERVIANT 
A leading citizen of Clinch County. Died 1907. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 137 

and live worker Is shown by his three appointments to the 
Omaha and Paris expositions and the Nashville Centennial 
Celebration. To the first he was vice-president of the Georgia 
committee, and to the latter he received the following plaudit 
from Tennessee's governor, which speaks for itself: 

State of Tennessee — Executive Chamber. 

Nashville, December 30th, 1898. 
To All who shall see these presents, Greeting : 

Captain Augustus DuPont represented the State of Geor- 
gia at the Tennessee Centennial Exposition as Commissioner- 
General, and was one of the most active and one of the 
most intelligent representatives of the whole Union. His 
work was of the most distinguished character. It was a labor 
of love in honor of his own great State. Georgia owes him 
a laurel wreath and Tennessee gives to him through me, her 
governor, a tribute of praise. His presence here and work he 
did will not be forgotten by our people. The memory of his 
noble deeds, like the fragrance of roses, will linger with us 
through the years. 

I recommend him as a live, active man of the times, and 
worthy of that which is above price — the good name which 
he bears. 

(Signed) Robert L. Taylor, Governor. 
By order of the Governor: 
(seal) W. S. Morgan, Secretary of State. 

Mr. DuPont received the election at the hands of the Leg- 
islature as a commissioner from the State of Georgia to the 
Exposition Universelle at Paris in 1900, but unfortunately, 
he was taken sick about this time and prevented from going. 
It would have been a suitable trip for him to have visited the 
country of his forefathers in the capacity as a representative 
from his native State. 

In 1904 Hon. R. B. Johnson, representative from Clinch 
County in the Legislature, died, leaving a vacancy to which 
Mr. DuPont was elected at a special election held July i6th, 
1904. He was the unanimous choice of the county Demo- 



138 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

cratic Executive Committee, and in the election had no oppo- 
sition. Mr. DuPont took his seat and served through the 
session of 1904. 

In the next election for representative he did not offer for 
re-election. 

After this he lived in retirement at his home in DuPont, 
occupying, with his brother, the old family home. Mr. 
DuPont died February 27th, 19 13, at Savannah, where he 
had been taken a short while before for treatment. He was 
survived by a daughter, Eliza G. DuPont, who now resides 
in Charleston, S. C, since her marriage. 

The second son, Thomas Charlton DuPont, was born at 
Darien, November 27th, 1858. He was raised at DuPont, 
then called Lawton, and attended the law school of the Uni- 
versity of Georgia, from which he graduated with first honor 
in 1878, carrying off the gold medal for supremacy in ora- 
tory. The medal is now in the possession of Mr. L. L. Du- 
Pont. The next year he was admitted to the bar and located 
at Savannah for the practice of law. He practiced there two 
years, making many friends while there. After this he re- 
moved to Jacksonville, Florida, where he at once took a high 
place among the lawyers at the bar. His brilliant powers 
of oratory, together with his broad legal mind and his won- 
derful personality, all combined to make him one of the most 
popular and well known men in Jacksonville. He threw him- 
self into politics and was very instrumental in carrying Duval 
County for Governor Drew in the election. In 1884, Gov- 
ernor Drew placed his young supporter into the race for 
United States Senator. This young genius was making a 
winning race when he was taken sick with scarlet fever. He 
was brought to his mother's home at DuPont, where he 
lingered on the bed of affliction several weeks. The fever 
finally turned into a serious case of dropsy and death soon 
intervened, taking one of the State's most promising young 
men. His death occurred at DuPont, September 6th, 1884, 
and his remains were buried in the family vault in Savannah. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 139 

The Jacksonville Times-Union and many other newspapers 
printed eulogies of praise and the local bar at Jacksonville 
and Homerville adopted resolutions on his death. 

The Jacksonville Times-Union said in part: "In this brief 
career he has exhibited an instance of a powerful and evenly 
balanced intellect, with a greatness of heart, firmness of pur- 
pose, energy of action, moral loftiness, a splendid endurance 
under terrible suffering, and heroic death, as magnificent 
as it is unusual. Mr. DuPont removed to Jacksonville in the 
winter of 1880-81, where his talents gave him almost instant 
success. At that time he was beyond doubt, the handsomest 
young man in this city; of splendid physique, with a head of 
great beauty, dark eyes, of full habit, a rich, confident voice, 
and a musical laugh that made him altogether an attractive 
man. In his profession he was pre-eminently an advocate; 
he knew by instinct the secrets of human character, the weak- 
nesses and prejudices of men; his language was simplicity 
itself; his manner wholly unstudied and unaffected, but his 
magnetism was powerful and persuasive, and his words 
flowed forth from his lips a melodious torrent, sparkling with 
sunshine freighted with argument and subtlest persuasion. 
He was a born orator, a master of the minds of men." 

The youngest son, Lee Lefebvre DuPont, was born in 
Savannah, Oct. 23d, 1863. He has lived his life from baby- 
hood up in the town of DuPont. Here living in comfort- 
able quietude in the paternal home which he now occupies. He 
received a good education, entering in 1879 the famous Brad- 
well Institute, at Hinesville, Ga., and in 1881 entering 
Emory College at Oxford, Ga. He lacked five months of 
graduating from college, being called home on account of 
the illness and death of his brother, Thomas Charlton Du- 
Pont. Mr. DuPont married about 1903, Miss Addie Reg- 
ister daughter of Mr. O. P. Register, by whom he has two 
sons. To-day he is the owner of the old family holdings, 
consisting of several thousand acres of land and town prop- 
erty. He has in his possession many old curious and valuable 



140 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

articles handed down in the family, some of which have been 
mentioned. The only office which he ever held was that of 
justice of the peace at DuPont, to which he was commissioned 
December 8th, 1900, for four years. Mr. DuPont inherits 
much of the family's grace and courtliness of manners as well 
as courage and devotion to duty. In politics he is indepen- 
dent; he stands for that which he thinks is right and is not 
carried on the tide of public opinion. He looks with pride 
on the distinguished services of his ancestors, both paternal 
and maternal, and much of the nobility and high degree of 
grace is embodied in him, and will be exhibited in his two 
promising sons in later life. 



John Calhoun Nichols, a son of Hon. Simon W. Nichols, 
graduated from Washington and Lee University in early life.. 
He was admitted to the bar and practiced law at the Homer- 
ville bar for about thirty-five years. He resided in Clinch 
County just prior to and during the war. When the war 
came on, he, like his illustrious brother-in-law, Capt. J. P. A. 
DuPont, threw himself very enthusiastically into the cause. 
Raising a company of Clinch County men. He was elected its 
captain in 1862. This was Co. "F' 4th Georgia Cavalry. 
He served as captain throughout the war. Captain Nichols 
was one of the most beloved men in the army, and always 
exercised great care and interest in his men. 

Returning home from the war he practiced law at Homer- 
ville a while, but in a year or so removed to Blackshear, 
where he lived until his death. His practice soon became one 
of large extent and he became one of the most pre-eminent 
lawyers of the circuit. 

He was first married to Miss Mamie Clopton, a daughter 
of Hon. William Clopton, Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court of Virginia. By her he had several children. She died 
about 1 880, and he married Miss Ida Acosta, a very talented 
lady of Blackshear, who survived him. The marriage oc- 
curred May 1st, 1882, in Blackshear. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 141 

Colonel Nichols was State Senator 1874-75 ^f^d 1876-77, 
and was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention 
in 1876. He was a leading member of the legislature while 
senator, and in 1878 was elected to Congress, serving two 
years. In 1882 he was re-elected, serving through the ses- 
sion of 1883-84 and 1884-85. 

Colonel Nichols was a member of the Baptist Church and 
served as superintendent of the Baptist Sunday School at 
Blackshear a few years. His death occurred at his home in 
Blackshear, December 25th, 1894. It was the occasion of 
widespread sorrow and regret. In his death the State lost 
one of its brightest men. His remains were buried in Laurel 
Grove cemetery in Savannah, where the DuPont family has a 
vault. 



Another son of Simon W. Nichols was Waver J. Nichols. 
He was a physician by profession, and was born at Clinton, 
Jones County, in 1831. He graduated at the Charleston (S. 
C.) Medical College March 5th, 1854. He married Miss 
Mary B. Hall, of Dublin, Ga., and soon afterwards settled 
in Clinch County to practice his profession. He lived here 
the remainder of his life. Dr. and Mrs. Nichols had no 
children. 

Dr. Nichols was for many years the foremost physician 
of the county. He enjoyed a practice of large extent. To- 
gether with his brother William M. Nichols they were the 
owners of a great area of Clinch County land, which they 
gradually sold off. 

Dr. Nichols lived at DuPont. He never sought any polit- 
ical office or honor. His death occurred about 1890, and he 
was buried at the North cemetery. His widow died in 19 12. 



CHAPTER XI. 

Old Families of Cl'inch County. 

THE NEWBERN FAMILY. 

OF the Clinch County Newberns, Thomas Newbern 
was the progenitor. This old pioneer came to this sec- 
tion from South Carolina and settled in what is now 
Ware County, about 1820. He was married twice. By his 
first marriage he had three children, viz. : John, William C, 
and Dryden Newbern. By his second marriage he had five 
children, viz. : George W. Newbern ; Cassie, who first mar- 
ried Martin Nettles and later Chas. A. Griffis; Lucretia, who 
married Jack Lee ; also a daughter who married James Sweat, 
and one who married John Sweat. Thomas Newbern was a 
prominent citizen of his time. He was elected surveyor of 
Ware Cou;ity and commmissioned February nth, 1828. 
Two years later he was elected a justice of the Inferior Court 
of Ware County, to which he was commissioned April 2Bth, 
1830. He was also commissioned justice of the peace of the 
45 1 district of Ware County, April 3d, 1 833. He is the fore- 
father of many of Clinch's prominent citizens. 

John Newbern was born April 4th, 1801, and married 
Mrs. Argent O'Steen, a widow of the Indian wars. Bv her 
he had two children, Matilda, who married William John- 
son, and Vicy, who married Robert G. Dickerson, Sr. This 
old citizen lived in Ware until Clinch was created. He was 
elected sheriff of Ware County in 1832 and commissioned 
July' 23, 1832. He served one term. He was a member of 
the Primitive Baptist Church, and is buried at Arabia Church 
above Homerville. His death occurred November 18, 1863. 

William C. Newbern was born about 1805. He was mar- 
ried and had only one son, Alfred Newbern, who later be- 
came treasurer of Clinch County. William C. Newbern was 
a citizen of Lowndes many years, and was elected sheriff of 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 143 

that county in 1838. He was commissioned January 15th, 
1838, but resigned after a short service of a few months. On 
January 24th, 1845, he was commissioned a justice of the 
peace of the 658th district of Lowndes county, and on Feb- 
ruary 9th, 1850, was commmissioned a justice of the Inferior 
Court of Lowndes County. It is not known just when he died. 

Dryden Newbern was born in Georgia in 1794. He 
Tiarried Elizabeth, a daughter of Josiah and Artie Sirmans. 
He was one of the first settlers of what is now Clinch County, 
living and dying here. By his wife, Elizabeth, he had seven 
children, viz.: Thomas (born 1829), Martha, Ashley, Ber- 
rien, Jr. (born 1845), Caroline and Sallie, who married W. 
F. Kirkland. This old man had passed the four-score mark 
when he died. 

George W. Newbern, a half-brother of the above three, 
was born in Georgia, January ist, 1825. He was married 
about 1845 to Miss Rebecca Thomas, a daughter of Absalom 
Thomas, who was one of the first justices of the Inferior 
Court of Ware County. They had eight children, viz. : Ab- 
salom T. Newbern (born 1849), who was later a deputy 
sheriff of Clinch County; Matilda, who first married Martin 
Joyce, and later H. D. O'Quin; Vicy, who first married A. 
E. Smith, Jr., later E. J. Benton, Jr., and still later H. D. 
O'Quin; Belle, who married C. H. North; William C. New- 
bern, Jr.; Jackson Newbern; George W. Newbern, Jr., and 
Argent, who married A. B. Findley. Mr. Newbern, Sr., hefd 
several ofl'ices of trust and honor in Clinch County, and was 
the second clerk of the Superior Court. He was an able min- 
ister of the Baptist Church. He died in Homerville, July 
loth, 1892, and is buried at the North cemetery, near Du- 
Pont. A more detailed sketch .of his life will be found else- 
where in this book. 

Cassie Newbern was born about 1820. She was first mar- 
ried to Martin Nettles, and by him had seven children, viz. : 
Martin Nettles, Jr., Elizabeth, who married John C. Kirk- 
land; Martha, who married Warren Douglas; Thomas Net- 



144 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

ties, James Nettles, Mary Ann, who married Jordan Boyt, 
Berry Nettles, Julia Ann, who married Hampton Bennett. 
Her second husband was Charles A. Griffis, who she mar- 
ried in 1 854. To them were born two sons, John G., and Wil- 
liam D. Griffis. The latter moved to Pierce County in 1875, 
and in 191 2 was elected ordinary of that county. Mrs. 
Griffis died in 1883. 

Lucretia Newbern, who married Jack Lee, lived and died 
in Clinch County. She had several children. The other two 
daughters were Elizabeth and Mary Ann Newbern. Eliza- 
beth married James Sweat and after her death he married 
her sister, Mary Ann, who was a widow of his brother, 
John Sweat. James Sweat and John Sweat were residents of 
Ware County. 

THE SIRMANS FAMILY. ^ 

The Sirmans family, as has been stated before in this book, 
was one of the first to settle in what is now Clinch County. 
They came here in 1822 from Emanuel County and settled 
on the place where J. B. Strickland now lives in the Mud 
Creek district. Those who came were Josiah Sirmans, Sr., 
and his family, including his sons, Benjamin, Joseph, Jona- 
than, and Abner Sirmans. To-day their descendants are quite 
numerous in Clinch and Berrien Counties. 

Josiah Sirmans, Sr., was born in 1767, and married Miss 
Artie Hardeman, a daughter of Thomas Hardeman, Sr. To 
them were born Benjamin Sirmans, Sr., Joseph Sirmans, Jon- 
athan Sirmans, Abner Sirmans, Sr., Rachel, who married 
Eustice Studstill; Bettie Sirmans, who married Dryden New- 
bern, and Sarah Ann, who married an Adams, of Florida. 
At the time Josiah Sirmans,. Sr., settled here, it was then 
Irwin County, later Lowndes County. He did not live to see 
the Indian wars of 1836-38. He died January 6th, 1830, 
and is buried at the Fender graveyard on the Allapaha River, 
in this county. His grave is probably the oldest marked 
grave in the county. 




HON S. C. TOWNSEND 

Former Representative from Clinch County. 

Elected State Senator from Fourth District, 1916. 




SHERMAN L. DRAWDY 

A former Representative and Judge of County Court. 

Resigned the latter in 191G. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 145 

Benjamin Sirmans was born In Emanuel County, Febru- 
ary 6th, 1792. When thirty years of age he came with his 
father to this section. His wife was Miss Martha Johnson, 
a daughter of David Johnson, Sr., and a sister to Gen. David 
Johnson. Their children were : David J. Sirmans, Joslah Sir- 
mans, Jr., Ezeklel J. Sirmans, Cassle, who married John 
Smith; Lavinia, who married Aaron Tomlinson; Martha, 
who married Ellhu Morgan; Lucretia, who married Charles 
Strickland; Benjamin E. Sirmans, Lyman A. Sirmans, and 
Levi J. Sirmans. Benjamin Sirmans represented Lowndes 
County In the legislature several years and served one term 
as State senator from Clinch County. He was also a dele- 
gate to the secession convention in Milledgeville in 1861. 
He died May ist, 1863, and Is burled at the Fender grave- 
yard. His wife preceded him to the grave by about seven 
years. 

Joseph Sirmans was born in Emanuel County, May i6th, 
1808, and his wife's name was Miss Rebecca Smith, a daugh- 
ter of Rev. William Smith. He lived In the Mud Creek dis- 
trict and served one term as representative from Clinch 
County after the Civil War. His children were: Artie, Mary, 
John, Nancy, Matilda and Lucretia Sirmans. These were 
by his first marriage, and by his second marriage, to Mrs. 
Sallie Howell, he had a son, Isaac Sirmans. His first wife 
died In 1856, and his second wife died in 1887. He died 
October 7th, 1888, and was burled at the Fender graveyard. 

Jonathan Sirmans was born about 1 800. He lived in what 
Is now Clinch County a short while and removed to what Is 
now Berrien County. Here his descendants are quite numer- 
ous. He married Miss Martha Rouse, and they had several 
children. He died about 1875. 

Abner Sirmans, Sr., was born about 1793 ^^^ married 
Miss Bettie Kirkland, a sister of Timothy KIrkland. To 
them were born : Hester, Jinsie, Benjamin, Roxle, John, Tally 
and Abner Sirmans, Jr. The elder Sirmans was commis- 
sioned a justice of the peace of the 664th district of Lowndes 



146 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

County January 20th, 1829, and served four years. Subse- 
quently he removed to Early County, where he died in 1837. 
His son, Abner Sirmans, Jr., is now living at the age of 82. 

Rachel Sirmans was born in 1794, and married Eustice 
Studstill. Their children were : Manning, Jonathan, Rachel, 
Sarah and John Studstill. Eustice Studstill removed to Ala- 
bama, where he died in Russell County in 1837. His widow 
died in 1878 and is buried at the Fender graveyard. 

Bettie Sirmans, who married Dryden Newbern, was born 
in 1795, and their children were: Thomas, Martha, Ashley, 
Berrien, Dryden, Jr., Caroline and Sallie Newbern, — the 
latter married W. F. Kirkland. 

Notes on grand-children of Josiah Sirmans, Sr. : 

David J. Sirmans, a son of Benjamin Sirmans, was born 
March ist, 18 19, and married Eliza Wilkerson, a daughter 
of John Wilkerson, of South Carolina. To them was born : 
Lewis, who married Rachel Lightsey; Alice, Tully, Lucius, 
who married Eliza Fiveash, and Josiah, who married Fannie 
L. Lott, and Ezekiel S. Sirmans, who married Martha Reg- 
ister, and Benjamin, who married Ida Crum. Josiah Sirmans, 
3d, was postmaster at Homerville several years and died in 
I 881. His son, W. E. Sirmans, of Waycross, is a prominent 
real estate dealer of that city. 

Josiah Sirmans, 2d, was born March 25th, 18 17. He mar- 
ried Mary Roberts, a daughter of John T. Roberts, and their 
children were : Roena, who married Thomas Ridgall ; Phoebe, 
who married Lewis Holtzendorf, Benjamin J. Sirmans, who 
married Elizabeth Thane, David Sirmans, Malinda, who 
married David Dickerson first, and later Ellas L. Roberts, 
Lucretia, who married Frank L. Allen; Martha, who married 
W. L. Courson. The elder Sirmans was commissioned justice 
of the peace of the 664th district of Lowndes County, October 
15th, 1838, when he was just twenty-one years old. He died 
February 20th, 1880, and is burled at the Fender graveyard. 

Ezekiel J. Sirmans was born February 28th, 1824. He 
had three children by his wife, who was Eliza Bennett, viz. : 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 147 

Franklin B. SIrmans, Manassas Sirmans and Caroline Stal- 
vey. He was the first tax collector of Clinch County. He 
died April 28th, 1900, and is buried at the Fender graveyard. 
Franklin B. Sirmans was state senator from the fifth district 
three terms. 

Cassie Sirmans, who married John Smith, son of William 
Smith, was born about 18 10. Their children were: Martha, 
William S., Lavinia, Rachel, John W., Sirmans S., Charlton 
H., Nancy, General J., Herschel B., and David J. Smith. 
Mrs. Smith died about 1900. 

Lavinia Sirmans, who married Aaron Tomlinson, was born 
in 1822. Their children were Elizabeth, Lucretia, Nancy, 
Candacy, Melvina, Lorena, Josiah, Aaron and Charlotte 
Tomlinson. 

Martha Sirmans, who married Elihu Morgan, lived in 
Echols County. Their children were Benjamin, Joseph and 
Viola Morgan. 

Lucretia Sirmans, who married Charles Strickland, was 
born in 1827. Their children were: Martha, who married 
Elias L. Moore; Mary Ann, who married Daniel Dickerson; 
Louis Strickland, B. F. Strickland, Colquitt or Colly Strick- 
land, Isabelle Roberts, Allen J. Strickland, Lucinda, Joseph 
B., and Amanda, who married F. B. Sirmans; Lyman J. 
Strickland, and Kizzie Strickland. 

Benjamin E. Sirmans was born July 14th, 1831, the son 
of Benjamin Sirmans. He married Francenia E. Carroll, a 
native of North Carolina. To them were born David C, 
Maggie, Jesse, Joseph, William, Charlie, Martha, and Min- 
nie Sirmans. The elder Sirmans died November 22d, 1877, 
and was buried at the Fender graveyard. 

Levi Johnson Sirmans was born February 24th, 1837, the 
son of Benjamin Sirmans. He married Victoria O. Mattox, 
daughter of Hon. Elijah Mattox, and to them were born 
Cicero M., Helen, Ulysses, Julia, Octavius, John L., and 
Cornelia Sirmans. Mr. Sirmans for some time prior to his 
death lived in Lowndes County above Naylor, where he died 



148 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

May 6th, 19 15, the last member of the famous coterie of 
children of Benjamin and Martha Sirmans. 

Lyman A. Sirmans was born April ist, 1838, the son of 
Benjamin Sirmans. He was admitted to the bar and prac- 
ticed law in Homerville for several years. He married Miss 
Mollie Griffin, daughter of Rev. W. W. Griffin. To them 
was born two children, Noble A. Sirmans and a daughter, 
who married Frank A. Smith. Colonel Sirmans died April 
2 2d, 1910, at his home in DuPont. He is buried at the North 
cemetery. 

THE HARGREAVES FAMILY.' 

The Hargreaves, of Lancashire, were an ancient Saxon 
family at the time of the conquest by William the Norman, 
in the year 1052. Through all the vicissitudes of time and 
change for more than a thousand years they have been a 
powerful and distinguished family in their native land. 

The Hargreaves, of Georgia, are descendants from John 
Hargreaves, of Heir's House, Colne, Lancashine, England, 
who died about 1S20. His three sons, Abraham, Thomas 
and John, came to this country about 1825, and were first in 
South Carolina, but soon afterwards came to Georgia, set- 
tling in what is now the County of Coffee. 

Abraham Hargreaves married Rhoda, daughter of John 
Carver, and was the father of a large family. He died about 
1872 and is buried at the old Hargreaves homestead, near 
Millwood, Ga. 

His son, John C. Hargreaves, was born June 5th, 1838, 
and died September 13th, 1876. He was a corporal in Co. 
"I" 4th Georgia Cavalry, organized at Homerville, January 
1st, 1863. While on leave of absence from the army he was 
married to Parthenia, daughter of Thomas and Jane 
(Moody) Morgan, of Tom's Creek, Echols County, on Feb- 
ruary 5th, 1864. He was a brave and efficient soldier and 
fought until discharged at the close of the war. 

After the surrender, he settled in southern Clinch, near 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 149 

Wiregrass post office, and reared a family of five children. 
In 1876 he moved to southern Florida and settled on Tsala 
Apopka Lake, where the town of Inverness now stands. He 
died there in a few months and was buried in old Fort 
Cooper cemetery. After his death his family lived in Georgia. 

His children were: Linnie, first wife of George M. Dame; 
Abraham, who married Georgia Bazemore; Mary, who mar- 
ried Judson Taylor, of Tampa, Fla.; Bettie, who married 
Jesse W. Pennington, of Jasper, Fla., and Georgia, who mar- 
ried William Collier, and is now living in Valdosta, Ga. 

John Hargreaves was a man of ideal character and of un- 
usual intelligence, and is said to have been one of the best 
read men of his day. Sidney Hargreaves, late of Ware 
County, was a brother of John C. Hargreaves. 

Susan Hargreaves, a sister of John C. Hargreaves, mar- 
ried Jonathan L. Morgan, of Clinch County, and became 
the mother of A. H. Morgan, Mrs. Frank C. Folks, of Way- 
cross, and Mrs. Linnie Taylor. Mrs. Morgan died June 
28, 1 9 16, and was the oldest living member of the family. 
She was 82 years old. Linnie, another sister of John C. Har- 
greaves, married George Moody, son of Jacob Moody. 

An old single-barrel shot-gun or rifle, of the kind used a 
hundred years ago, is now in the possession of Mr. John H. 
Smith, of Clinch County. This gun was brought to America 
by x'\braham Hargreaves when he emigrated to this country. 

THE GRIFFIS FAMILY. 

The Griffis family is an old family of Clinch County, and 
like the Smiths, there are several branches of it. The ances- 
tor of one branch who settled in Clinch was Juniper Griffis, 
while Samuel Griffis, Sr., was the ancestor of another branch. 
Charles A. Griffis, with his uncle, Joel Griffis, was still an- 
other branch. 

Juniper Griffis and his descendants: 

Juniper Griffis was born in Appling County, February 
4th, 1808. He died in 1905, age 97 years, being the oldest 



150 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

man in the county at the time of his death. He married Miss 
Viney Sears, sister of Hiram Sears, and by her had five sons 
and five daughters. His sons were EHas Gfriffis, F. M. 
Griffis, William and Charles Griffis, Rhoda Griffis, a sister 
of Juniper Griffis, married William Corbitt (see Corbitts). 

Elias Griffis married Catherine Bailey, and their children 
were: Wilburn, Richmond, Juniper, Elias L., Viola, who 
married J. Walter James; Marietta, Matilda, who married 
L. H. Lockliear; and Lavina, who married A. J. Lockliear. 
Mr. Griffis served in the Civil War in Co. "I" 4th Georgia 
Cavalry. He became very wealthy, owning much land. He 
died about 1895. 

Francis Marion Griffis married Victoria Cowart, and 
their chiFdren were : Mary, Viney and John Griffis. He died 
January 28th, 1898. 

William Griffis was born in 1841, and married Olive 
Sears, a daughter of Hiram Sears, and their children were: 
Laura, Harriet, Berta, William and Charles Griffis. Mr. 
Griffis served one term as tax collector of Clinch County. 
He died in 19 15, at his home in Ware County at Millwood. 

Charles Griffis was born about 1835, and married Sallie 
Roberts, a daughter of John T. Roberts. Their children 
were: F. M. Griffis, Jr., Rebecca and Sarah Ann Griffis. He 
served in the Confederate Army, and died during the war 
at a hospital in Savannah. His widow later married George 
W. Delk, and to them were born seven children. 

Samuel Griffis was born in this State in 1807, and married 
Miss Naomi Kirkland, and by her had eight children. Among 
their children were Nancy, Rebecca, Sealy, Martha, and 
Joel G. Griffis. Samuel Griffis died April 27th, 1884. 

Joel G. Griffis was born in 1846 and married Nancy, a 
daughter of John S. Henderson, December 23d, 1869. They 
had several children. Mr. Griffis was for several years a jus- 
tice of the peace of the 1 141st District. 

Charles Griffis was an early settler of Appling County. He 
was a native of South Carolina, where he was born about 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 151 

1795. He lived and died in Appling County. His brothers 
were John, Joel, Richard and Berry Griffis. Of these broth- 
ers, two lived in Clinch County, Joel and Berry. Charles A. 
Griffis, a son of Charles Griffis, was born In Appling County 
October 30th, 1826. He married Mrs. Cassie Nettles, widow 
of Martin Nettles, and daughter of Thomas Newbern. To 
them two sons were born, John G., and W. D. Griffis. Charles 
A. Griffis served for about fifteen years as justice of the peace 
of the 1 06 1 St district. He died in Pierce County March i ith, 
1 9 14, at the home of his son, W. D. Griffis. 

Joel Griffis, an uncle of Chas. A. Griffis, was born in this 
State in 1803, and died about 1870. Among his children 
were John, born 1851; Elizabeth, born 1849; Noah, born, 
1855, and Joel Griffis, Jr. 

Berry Griffis, a brother of Joel Griffis, was born in 1808, 
and died about 1880. Among his children were Sarah, born 
1842; Berry, Jr., born 1845; Matilda, born 1846; James 
R., born 1848; Abraham, born 1850, and John Griffis, 
born 1852. 

Joel Griffis, Jr., was born October 9th, 1831. He lived 
many years where J. L. Morgan subsequently lived in the 
1 141st district, but later moved to where the town of Withers 
now is. He died February 9th, 1879. He had several chil- 
dren by .his wife, Sarah, among them being Mitchell, born 
1852; Samuel B., born 1855; A. R. G., born 1857; Rhoda, 
born i860; Harriet, born 1862; Candacy, born 1864, and 
P. W. Griffis, born 1869. 

Dixon Griffis, son of Berry Griffis, was born January ist, 
1844. He married Nancy, daughter of David D. Johnson, 
by whom he had a son, Lucius C. Griffis, and several daugh- 
ters. He was a mail carrier on the Homerville-Lyken route a 
few years prior to his death, July 6th, 19 10. 

THE SMITH FAMILY. 

Lawrence Smith was probably one of the most prominent 
members of the older Smiths of Clinch County. He was a 



152 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

native of South Carolina, but came to Georgia in early life. 
He was one of the earliest settlers of this county, settling here 
about 1825, on lot 424, in the 7th district. Later he removed 
and settled on lot 529, in the 12th district. He was married 
twice, first to Miss Nancy Smith, and after her death, to Miss 
Mary A. E. Braswell. His second marriage occurred October 
19th, 1856. He died October 19th, 1859, and is buried at his 
old home place. Mr. Smith was burned out by the Indians 
at the place where he subsequently died. 

The children of this pioneer were John Smith, James C. 
Smith, Katie, who married Peter Smith; William E. Smith, 
David D. Smith, E. M. T. Smith, Sallie, who married Hiram 
Kight, and Nancy, who married Elias Williams. By his sec- 
ond marriage two children were born, Laura and Frank 
Smith, who with their mother removed to Florida. Mr. 
Smith's widow later married Daniel Milton, of Columbia 
County, Florida. 

John Smith, named above, was born in South Carolina, 
June 2 1 St, 1 8 10, and came with his father to Georgia in his 
youth. On account of another citizen of the county having 
the same name, Mr. Smith was more familiarly known as 
John "Highead" Smith. He married Elizabeth StudstJill 
about 1 841, and to them was born seven children: Benjamin, 
Mary, who married E. D. Allen, Martha, who married 
James R. Dickerson; Lyman, John F., Elizabeth, who mar- 
ried Berrien Mills, and Emanuel Smith. He was a farmer 
and lived northeast of Homreville. His death occurred June 
14th, 1879, ^^^ he was buried at the Fender graveyard. His 
wife died February 24th, 1905. 

James C. Smith, named above, was born in South Caro- 
lina, March 23d, 18 13. He married in 1840 Miss Margaret 
Strickland, of what is now Pierce County. His wife having 
died in 1879, ^e married Miss Emma McLendon. By his 
first marriage he had the following children : Allen N. Smith, 
William T. Smith, Seward Smith, Ansel Smith, Martha, who 
married A. J. Caswell; Sarah, who married M. M. Caswell; 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 153 

Ellen D., who married Eli W. O'Quin first, and later John 
C. Jones; Miriam Lumpkin, who married William S. Mat- 
tox; Bettie, who married C. C. Drawdy; Mary, who married 
H. A. O'Quin; Kate, who married R. M. McLaughlin, and 
Elpha, who married Isaac T. McLendon. By the last mar- 
riage the following children were born : Lawrence C. Smith, 
Benny, Leila V., Lonnie Smith, John Devoy Smith and Min- 
nie Smith. James C. Smith, as stated elsewhere in this book, 
was among the first to engage in hauling and carrying pro- 
duce to Darien and other trade centers. He acquired much 
property. At first he lived on Cane Creek, not far from 
where Homerville now is, but later in the Magnolia district, 
where Harris Tomlinson now lives. He sold this during the 
war and moved to near Homerville, about four miles south. 
His death occurred October 20th, 1894, age 81 years. He 
was buried at the Homerville cemetery. 

Katie Smith, named above, married Peter Smith, and was 
born in South Carolina in 18 19. They lived on what is now 
the Peter Smith place in Magnolia district, for many years. 
They had the following children : Willie, Harrison, Law- 
rence, Nancy, Rowan, Eason, James M., Riley, and Bryant 
Smith. Mrs. Smith died about 1875, survived by her hus- 
band. 

William E. Smith, named above, was born in this State 
in November 27th, 1820. He was raised up in what is now 
Clinch County, and lived here until his death. He was first 
married to a Miss Wester, later he married a sister of W. J. 
Strickland, and still later Miss Martha Jernigan. He had 
several children, among whom were John Smith, Nicholas J. 
Smith, Lucretia, who married J. R. Booth, and Miranda, 
who married Ivy Davis. Mr. Smith first lived on the place 
how owned by J. F. Turner, but subsequently removed and 
settled on lot 457 in the 12th district, where he died. He 
died October 2d, 1894, and was buried at Antioch Church. 

David D. Smith, named above, was born in this State in 
1822. He married Miss Rachael Studstill, and by her had 



154 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

four children, viz. : John H. Smith, Sallie, who married John 
M. Hodges; Lawrence Smith (dead), and Manning Smith 
(dead). He lived for many years prior to his death where 
Mr. G. S. Darley now lives, near Homerville. He died 
about 1886. 

Elbert M. T. Smith, son of Lawrence Smith, was born In 
Ware County in 1833. He first married a Miss Floyd, later 
Miss Eunice, and later Edna, daughter of James M. Burk- 
halter. He lived for many years a few miles south of Homer- 
ville, but eventually removed to Lowndes Countv, where he 
died in 1901 at Hahira. He had ten children. 

Sarah Smith, named above, married Hiram Kight, and 
was born in South Carolina, April 14th, 1812. She married 
Mr. Kight in Ware County, and to them was born five chil- 
dren, viz.: James M., Peggie, who married Sherod Smith; 
John Kight, Mary and Cuyler Kight. Mrs. Kight died about 
1875. Foi* many years they lived near Homerville on the 
Crum place. 

Nancy, daughter of Lawrence Smith, who married Elias 
Williams, was born about 1830, in Ware County. Elias Wil- 
liams was commissioned a justice of the peace of the 970th 
district, May nth, 1852. He was killed about 1865. Mrs. 
Williams survived him many years. 

Another branch of the Smith family in Clinch County is 
that of the descendants of William Smith, who settled on 
Red Bluff creek in 1822. He brought with him a big stock 
of cattle and began farming. He was born about 1765, and 
his first wife was a Miss Piatt. Their children were : William 
S. Smith, who lived in Liberty County; Martha, who married 
Henry Dias ; Elinor, who married James Jones ; Nancy, who 
married John Williams, Sr., and John Smith, who married 
Cassie Sirmans. After his first wife's death, Mr. Smith mar- 
ried Miss Neter Stephens, and by this marriage were born: 
Manning, Jesse, James M., Rebecca, who married Joseph 
Sirmans; PoUie, who married Newsom Corbitt; Elizabeth, 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 155 

who married Rowan Pafford, Naomi, who married Thad- 
deus Sears, and Fannie, who married Martin Corbitt, Sr. 

William Smith was a member of the Primitive Baptist 
Church, and a minister of that faith. He was elected justice 
of the peace of the 586th district in 1830 and in 1833. ^^ 
died about 1845 ^^^ was buried at Arabia Church, which he 
helped to establish. 

Nancy, who married John Williams, Sr., was born in 1798, 
and among their children were John Williams, who married 
a daughter of John L. Morgan, Jackson S. Williams, Elias 
Williams and Hezekiah P. Williams. 

John Smith, son of William Smith, was born December 
22d, 1802. He married Cassie, daughter of Hon. Benja- 
min Sirmans, and by her had eleven children : Martha, who 
married J. W. Swain; William S., Lavinia, who married 
James Lee, Rachael, who married John C. Sirmans; John 
W. Smith, Sirmans S. Smith, Charlton H. Smith, Nancy, who 
married S. G. Saunders; General J. Smith, Herschel B. Smith, 
and David J. Smith. John Smith lived in the Mud Creek 
district and died June 8th, 1867. He is buried at Arabia 
Church. 

Jesse Smith, another son of William Smith, was born 
August 25th, 1820, on Red Bluff creek. He was in the 
Indian war of 1836-38, and soon afterwards married Miss 
Nancy Tomlinson, daughter of Moses Tomlinson, Sr., by 
whom he had five children: Sherod Smith, Cicero, John L., 
Fannie C, M^ho married Henry C. Moore, first, later John 
C. Jones, Matilda Smith, and Nancy, who married J. S. 
Mattox. Mr. Smith served as representative and as sheriff 
of Clinch County. He died in 1880, and is buried at the 
old Red Bluff Church in Clinch County. 

James Madison Smith, another son of William Smith, was 
born about 1830, in what is now Clinch County. He lived 
here all his life. He lived to be about 60 years of age. 

Rebecca, daughter of William Smith, married Hon. Joseph 
Sirmans, and was born in November, 181 1, and died Decem- 



156 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

ber 20th, 1852. They had six children. She is buried at 
the Fender graveyard. 

Manning Smith was another son of WilHam Smith, and 
was born about 18 15. He was commissioned a justice of the 
Inferior Court of Ware County in 1845, ^""^ \'^t\d the same 
position in Clinch. He married Miss Elizabeth Tomlinson, 
daughter of Moses Tomlinson, Sr., and had several children, 
among whom were Moses, Lewis, Elijah, Neter and Sarah 
Smith. 

Another branch of the Smiths in Clinch County was that 
of Abraham E. Smith, and his brothers. Kit, Jackson and 
John Smith. They came from Barnwell district, S. C, and 
settled iiT then Ware County, about 1845. Abraham E. 
Smith was born November 30th, 1824. In 1848 he pur- 
chased two lots of land near where Homerville now is (lots 
499 and 513, in the seventh district), of Thomas Hilliard. 
He lived on them for many years. He married and had sev- 
eral children. He died January 4th, 1899. 

Kit Smith was born in 18 12 and died in 1874. His 
wife, Nancy, was born in 18 14. Jackson Smith was born 
January 27th, 18 14, and died about 1875. John W. Smith 
was born in 1834, and his wife, Rebecca, in 1841. He died 
September 3d, 1867, and his wife in 1899. 

John J. Smith was a son of Abraham E. Smith, and the 
oldest son. He was born November loth, 1846, and mar- 
ried Mary, daughter of Dixon Bennett, in 1863. They had 
a large family of children. Mr. Smith joined Co. **H" 4th 
Georgia Reserves under Captain Peeples, in 1863, and served 
until 1865, when he was mustered out at Wilmington, N. C. 

There are other small families of Smiths who have lived 
in this county. William D. Smith was born in North Caro- 
lina in 1 82 1, and his wife, Ann R. Smith, in 1834. 

Peter Smith, as stated above, married Katie, daughter of 
Lawrence Smith, Sr. Mr. Smith was born in 18 17, in North 
Carolina and settled here about 1840. He died August 8th, 
1887, and is buried on his old home place. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 157 

THE CORBITT FAMILY. , 

Isham Corbitt was the ancestor of that branch of the Cor- 
bitts who now live in the northern part of Clinch County. He 
was a native of Tennessee, and came with his family to this 
section about 1 840. His wife was Millie Stokes and their 
children were : Harbird, Marshal, Newsom, Martin, Wil- 
liam, Wealthy, Sealie and Hillman Corbitt, the last named 
dying in his youth. Isham Corbitt died about 1855, and is 
buried in Berrien County. 

Harbird Corbitt was born in Tennessee, January 2d, 1802, 
and married Reinie, daughter of Benj. I. Boyett. Their chil- 
dren were : Reubin, Daniel, Irwin, Harbird, Warren, Reinie, 
Elizabeth, Newsom and James. Harbird Corbitt, Sr., died 
about 1865. 

Marshal Corbitt was born in Tennessee about 1805, and 
married a Miss Guthrie. Their only child was Diana, who 
married John Newbern, of Coffee County. After his first 
wife died, Mr. Corbitt married Martha Curry and had three 
children, Angeline, Isaac and Charles Corbitt. 

Newsom Corbitt was born in Tennessee in 1808, and mar- 
ried Pollie Smith. Their children were: William, Fannie, 
Wealthy, Martin S., Manning, Madison, Neter, Rebecca, 
Mary, Elizabeth, and John Corbitt. Newsom Corbitt Sr., 
later married Jane Lewis, but had no children by her. Mr. 
Corbitt served one term as State senator from Clinch County, 
1 868-9, ^"^ ^v^s several years a justice of the peace. 

Martin Corbitt was born in Tennessee in 18 10, and mar- 
ried Lydia Curry, a daughter of Isaac Curry. Their chil- 
dren were: William, M. L. ("Jewel"), Queen, Newsom, 
Elias, Lewis, Millie and Elizabeth Corbitt. Mr. Corbitt was 
first married to Fannie Smith, but she died leaving no 
children. 

William Corbitt was born in Tennessee in 18 18 and mar- 
ried Rhoda Griffis, a sister of Juniper Griffis. Their children 
were : Catherine, Martha, Polly, Sealy, Nancy, Jasper, Ma- 



158 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

riah, Eliza Ann, Relna Ann, and Charles Corbitt. Later he 
married the widow of Manning Cowart, Sr., but had no other 
children. 

There is another family of Corbitts in Clinch County that 
is very distantly related to the above. They are the descend- 
ants of Daniel Corbitt, who was born in South Carolina in 
1804. He came to this section about 1845, ^^^ married 
Polly Bennett, and their children were : Richard, Henry, 
John, David, Matilda, who married David Geiger; Fannie, 
who married Joseph Crews ; Nancy, who married T. L. Boyd, 
and Mary, who never married, and Junior Corbitt, who was 
killed in the Civil War. 

Richard Corbitt was born in 1835, and married Nancy 
Geiger. He died February 17th, 1903, and is buried at 
Providence or Camp Branch Church. A son, Randall Cor- 
bitt, served as treasurer of Clinch County, 1913-1915. 

THE MATHIS FAMILY. 

Hillery P. Mathis was brought to this section by his 
uncle, James Edmondson, as an orphan and was raised in 
Lowndes County. Later he settled in Clinch County and par- 
ticipated in the Indian wars. He was born in 1821 and mar- 
ried Martha, daughter of Samuel Register. To them were 
born eleven children : Wealthy, who married Moses Tom- 
linson; James A. Mathis, Bryant G. Mathis, John S. Mathis, 
Virginia, who married J. E. Jackson; Hillery C. Mathis, 
Daniel W. Mathis, and four others who died in infancy. Mr. 
Mathis was born in Bulloch County and died about 1895. 

Another branch of the Mathis family that moved to this 
section in pioneer days, was that of John, Edmund and James 
Mathis, brothers, who moved first to Bulloch County from 
North Carolina. After living in Bulloch some years they 
came on to this section, John and James settling in what is 
now Berrien County, where their descendants now live, and 
Edmund Mathis settled on the edge of the territory of Flor- 
ida, later removing to what is now Clinch County. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 159 

Edmund Mathis married Unity, daughter of Samuel Reg- 
ister, and by her had three sons, viz. : Tyre, Bunn and John 
Mathis, Jr. Mr. Mathis was one of the first members of 
Cow Creek Church when it was first organized in 1847, ^s 
was also his wife. When Prospect Church was constituted, 
in 1859, ^^ became one of the original members of that 
church also, moving his membership there. 

John Mathis, Jr., married Jemima, daughter of Joshua 
Lee, and by her had several children, among them being 
Ezekiel Mathis. The elder Mathis served Clinch County 
as coroner several years. He died about 18,65, and is buried 
at Prospect Church in Hamilton County, F^a. He was born 
in Bulloch County. 

Tyre Mathis married Nancy, daughter of Joshua Lee. He 
was a justice of the Inferior Court of Clinch County, 1853- 
1854, and is buried at Prospect Church in Clinch County. He 
was born in 1806 and died January 8th, 1891. 

Another branch of the Mathis family was Thomas Mathis, 
who married Eady, daughter of Samuel Register. He was 
born in 1808. Mrs. Mathis died February loth, 1869. 
Among their children was David G. Mathis. After his first 
wife's death, Mr. Mathis married Roxie Morgan, widow of 
Elihu Morgan. 

THE TOMLINSON FAMILY. 

Perhaps one of the oldest and most important families of 
Clinch County to-day is the Tomlinson family. The first 
Tomlinson to come here came in 1822, at the same time the 
Sirmans family came. They came from Bulloch County. 

In-Bulloch County resided John Tomlinson, who was prob- 
ably a^ldier of the Revolution. His wife was Miss Lucretia 
^^Jardeman, a daughter of Thomas Hardeman, of Virginia. 
#' There was born to them the three sons who later settled in 
what is now Clinch County, in 1822. 

In this connection it might be said that Thomas Harde- 
man had seven daughters, all of whom married into promi- 



i6o History of Clinch County, Georgia 

nent families. One of them married Jack Jones, and they 
had a son, Jack Jones, Jr., who married Mary, a daughter of 
Gen, David Johnson. To the latter were born two sons, 
Harrison and Mitchell Jones, who both became identified 
with Clinch County. Another daughter of Thomas Harde- 
man was Winnie, who married John Moore. To them was 
born John, Elias and Vinson Moore. Another daughter, 
Artie, married Josiah Sirmans, who was born in 1767, and to 
them was born those Sirmans brothers, who in later years 
became leaders in this county. 

Moses, William and John Tomlinson, Jr., were sons of 
John and Lucretia (Hardeman) Tomlinson, and emgirated 
to this section in 1822. They settled in the Mud Creek dis- 
trict, and it is their descendants who to-day form the Tom- 
linson family in Clinch County. 

Moses Tomlinson was born in 1793 and married Char- 
lotte or Lottie Monk, a sister of Malachi Monk. She was 
born in 1797 in South Carolina. To them were born: Lucre- 
tia, who married Jonas Driggers; Aaron, who married 
Lavinia Sirmans; Elizabeth, who married Manning Smith; 
Nancy, who married Jesse Smith; Martha, who married 
Martin Fender; Thomas, who married Mary Sirmans; Re- 
becca, w.ho married Henry Joyce; Sherod, who married 
Sarah Ann Burkhalter, and Enoch, who married Jemima Gid- 
dens, and two other sons, Needham and Joseph, who never 
married and were killed in the Civil War. 

William Tomlinson was born in 1781, and married Nancy 
Register, a sister of Samuel Register, Sr. To them were born : 
Harris, who married Rebecca Driggers; John, who married 
Zilpha Register; Candacy, who married John T. Roberts; 
Rebecca, who married James Harvey Mizell; Marcus and 
Levin Tomlinson, Also there was another son of William 
Tomlinson, named William S. Tomlinson, who served three 
terms as representative from Clinch County. The latter mar- 
ried Matilda Giddens. William Tomlinson, Sr., died in 




■SHIRLEY" 
The elegant home of Hon. R. G. Dickerson, Virginia Avenue, Homerville. 




Beautiful residence of Hon. J. F. Barnhill, Homerville 



History of Clinch County, Georgia i6l 

1866. His wife, Nancy, was born in 1782, and died about 
1873. They are the grandparents of Hon. Moses Tomlin- 
son, ex-ordinary of Clinch County. 

John Tomlinson, Jr., brother of Moses and WilHam Tom- 
linson, was born December iith, 1784, and died February 
17th, 1858. He never married and was crippled and could 
never walk; he amassed a considerable amount of property, 
such as cattle, slaves and land, besides much cash money. He 
spent his life among his relatives chiefly, and was carried 
from place to place by his slaves. He is buried at Prospect 
Church in this county. 

Grand-children of John and Lucretia (Hardeman) Tom- 
linson: 

Aaron Tomlinson, son of Moses Tomlinson, Sr., was born 
in 1818, and married Melvina, daughter of Tiner Corbitt, 
and to them were born Sallie, who married Jesse Lee; Nancy, 
v\^ho married Leonard Fender; Viola, Josiah, Moses, Eliza- 
beth, who married George Kinard, and later Daniel Brady; 
Lucretia, who married John Watson ; and Candacy, who mar- 
ried Cornelius Dawson; and Melvina, Charlotte, Rachael 
and Lorena Tomlinson. Mr. Tomlinson died about 1875. 

Eliazbeth Tomlinson, daughter of Moses Tomlinson, Sr., 
married Manning Smith, and Nancy married Jesse Smith. 
(See Smiths.) 

Martha Tomlinson, daughter of Moses Tomlinson, Sr., 
married Martin Fender, and to them were born Leonard, 
Bartlett, Rebecca, Sarah An, and Samantha Fender. She 
died about 1865. 

Thomas Tomlinson, son of Moses Tomlinson, Sr., married 
Mary, daughter of Hon. Joseph Sirmans. Their children 
were Rebecca, who married George Pierce; Harris, who mar- 
ried Melvina Kinard; Charlotte, who married Lucius Her- 
ren; Aaron, Jr., who married a daughter of William Bennett, 
and Needham who likewise married a daughter of William 
Bennett and Mary Tomlinson. Thomas Tomlinson was born 



1 62 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

June 26th, 1828, and died August 14th, 1897, and is buried 
at the Fender graveyard. 

Sherod Tomlinson, son of Moses Tomlinson, Sr., married 
Sarah Ann Burkhalter, daughter of Hon. R. H. Burkhalter. 
She was born in 1827. Their children were: John P. Lucius, 
Joseph (deceased), Moses, Matthew, Augustus M., Velpo, 
Wilham H., Annie, who married Moses C. Register; Amos 
B., and Ciby, who married Ratio Bridges. Sherod Tomlin- 
son was born February 6th, 1826, and died December 26th, 
1885. He served a short while as a justice of the Inferior 
court, also as coroner. 

Enoch Tomlinson, son of Moses Tomlinson, Sr., was born 
in 1834, and married Jemima Giddens. To them were born 
Duncan V., Joseph P., W. J. or Jasper, Enoch E., Lucretia, 
who married James A. O'Steen, and Jerushia, who married 
Bryant O'Steen. 

Harris Tomlinson, son of William Tomlinson, Sr., was 
born in 1828, and married Martha Driggers. To them was 
born John, Caroline, Harris, Jr., Staten B., Levin, Jonas, 
James, William, Jr., Rebecca, Lucretia, Sallie and Nancy, 
Martha and Zilpha Tomlinson. Mr. Tomlinson was born 
December 8th, 1828 and died May 4th, 1899. 

John Tomlinson, Jr., son of William Tomlinson, was born 
December 17th, 1804, and died November 8th, 1863. H!e 
married Zilpha, a daughter of Samuel Register. She was born 
February 4th, 1807, and died August 4th, 1883. Their 
children were William, who married Caroline Stalvey; Har- 
ris, who married Martha Stalvey; Elizabeth, who married 
Absalom Smith; Sallie, who married Benj. S. Stalvey; Guil- 
ford, who married Sarah Walden; Kittie, who married 
George W. Stalvey; Nancy, who married Moses Stalvey; 
Moses, who married Wealthy E. Mathis; Samuel, who mar- 
ried Elizabeth Mikell; Levin, who married Katie Moore; 
Penelope, who married D. C. Lancaster; John, who 
married Georgia Alderman, and Zilpha (never married). 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 163 

Candacy Tomlinson, who married John T. Roberts, was 
born in 181 1, and their children were Moses, John, Isham, 
WilHam, Tharp, SalHe, Rebecca, Lavinia and Matilda 
Roberts. 

Rebecca Tomlinson, daughter of William Tomlinson, Sr., 
who married James Harvey Mizell, had several children, 
among whom were William Mizell and a daughter who mar- 
ried Jas. Roberts. 

William S. Tomlinson was born in 1822 and married Ma- 
tilda Giddens. To them were born John G., Kizzie, Isbin, 
Matthew, George F., Mary and Alice Tomlinson. John G. 
Tomlinson was born January ist, 1846, and died July i8th, 
1893. Isbin Tomlinson was born in 1852, and died in No- 
vember, 1 89 1. 

THE BENNETT FAMILY. 

John Bennett came from Sampson County, N. C, about 
1830 and settled about two miles north of where Stockton 
now is in this county. He died about 1851, age about 80 
years. He married Sallie, a sister of Samuel Register, and 
to them were born Dixon, Felix, Abraham, Wiley, Redding, 
Polly, Bettie and Dicy Bennett. 

Dixon Bennett was born in 18 10, and died May 6th, 1871, 
He married Sallie Driggers, and their children were John, 
William, Mark, Matthew, Sallie, who married Ezekiel 
Mathis, and Mary, who married John J. Smith. 

Felix Bennett married Rebecca Smith, and their children 
were John, Felix, Redden, Dixon, Hansford, James, Rai- 
ford B., and Abraham Bennett. Felix Bennett, Sr., was born 
in 1 8 13 and died in 1863. 

Abraham Bennett was born about 1820, and married 
Katie McGill. Their children were Dixon, Jasper, Marion, 
Abram, Andrew, Lovedy, Tracie, Eliza and Flora Bennett. 

Wiley Bennett was born November loth, 1825, and mar- 
ried Luraney Harnage, daughter of George Harnage. To 
them were born Sarah Ann, who married D. J. Jeffords ; 



164 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Abram, who married Sarah J. Taylor; Jerry, who married 
Ida Maine; Lucinda, who married Henry Fender; Guil- 
ford, who married Mattie Tomlinson; Redding, J., who 
married Mary Whilden; Dicy, who married T. J. Smith; 
Henry, who married Minerv^a Harnage; Levi, who mar- 
ried Ola Bennett; Wiley; Nellie, who married Jesse Cham- 
bers; Ben S., who married a Miss Chambers. Wiley Bennett, 
Sr., died December yth, 1896. His wife was born in 1836, 
and died in 1873. 

Redding Bennett was born January 19th, 1829, and mar- 
ried Annie Harnage, daughter of George Harnage. Their 
children were Sallie; Christina, who married Henry Guthrie; 
James Seward, who married Malinda Register; Ambrose, 
who married Matilda Guthrie; Wiley, Levin, Mahala, 
Bethany, Minerva, Emaline, and Annie Bennett. Mr. 
Bennett died February 8th, 1905, and is buried at Cow 
Creek Church. 

There are other branches of the Bennett family in Clinch 
County, but they are not numerous. They are descended from 
Richard A. Bennett, who married Lavinia Newman, and 
who was many years a justice of the peace in Clinch County, 
and from John P. Bennett, who was born in 18 19, and died 
December 12th, 1907. 

THE DAME FAMILY. 

This family came from Cheshire, England, where they 
have been freeholders since the reign of Edward the Fourth, 
a period of about five hundred years. Where they formerly 
lived is now known as the parish of "Leighton-Cain Minshal 
Vernon," in the town of Nautwick in Cheshire. 

One of the most interesting stories of the English family 
is about Thomas Dame (or Damme, as it was sometimes 
spelled) who lived to a very great age. He was born in the 
year 1494, and died in 1648, age 154 years. He was buried 
in the churchyard of the parish of Church Minshal near 
Middlewick in Cheshire. The register of his death is still 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 165 

In existence, and is marked around with ink to call attention 
to the remarkable age. This is a copy of it : 



Thomas Damme, of Leiggton, buried ye 
20th of Ffebbruarie, being of the age 
of seven score and fourteen, 1648. 



His wife is also buried in Church Minshal. He is said to 
have danced a hornpipe at the celebration of the opening of 
the present bridge over the river Weaver at Church Minshal, 
he then being 104 years old. 

As nearly as can be found out, most of the family emi- 
grated during the Puritan troubles in England In the seven- 
teenth century, part going to Holland, where they are said to 
have established the Van Dam family, some to France, es- 
tablishing the Dalme family, one becoming a French General, 
and part coming to America. 

The first settlers of the name In America were John Dame, 
who settled In Dover, New Hampshire, In 1633, and be- 
came the ancestor of the Dame family In the New England 
States, and John Dame, who settled Virginia In 1638. John 
Dame, a lineal descendant of the original settler In Virginia, 
was an officer in the Continental army in the Revolutionary 
War, and commanded the Maryland Flying Corps. 

The Dame family In Georgia is descended from George 
Dame and Mary Greene, his wife, who lived in Christ 
Church parish, Middlesex County, Virginia. Their children 
were Mary, who married John Jarvis, and George, born 
March 9th, 1784, and John Dame. 

George and John Dame were soldiers of the War of 18 12, 
with England. George was a private, first in Capt. John 
Waller's company of the 9th Regiment of Virginia Militia, 
and later in Capt. Tom Faulkner's company of the 9th Reg- 
iment, and later served In the 6ist Regiment. John Dame 



1 66 History of Clinch County , Georgia 

was a private In the 21st Regiment of Virginia Militia, 
Gloucester County. After the War of 1812, they moved to 
Georgia, John settling in Jones County, and George in Mont- 
gomery County. The latter married Catherine Carter, a 
daughter of Elmore Carter and his wife, Delilah West, who 
were descended from the eminent Virginia families of those 
names. 

The children of George Dame and Catherine Carter were: 
Delilah, who married Fiveash; Elizabeth, who married 
Higgs; George Appling, who married Sarah Thigpen, 
Nancy, who married O'Quin; Margaret, who married Five- 
ash; Matilda (died single) ; Charity, who married Gibbs; 
Emaline, who married, first, W. H. Clifton, and then R. B. 
Johnson; James W., who married Fannie Minshew, and 
Martha, who married Hutto. 

After the war between the States, George Dame moved 
to Clinch County, but soon afterAvards died at the age of 
eighty-four, and with his wife is buried at the old Dame 
homestead near Dames' Mill, in this county. 

George Appling Dame married Sarah Thigpen, of Mont- 
gomery County, who was the daughter of Melancthon Thip- 
pen, and Barbara Ricks. Melancthon Thigpen was the son 
of Travis Thigpen and Hannah Hardy. Barbara Ricks was 
the daughter of Richard Ricks and Elizabeth Herren. These 
were all great slave-holding families of Middle Georgia. 

George Appling Dame, having strong religious scruples 
against the waging of war, but loyal to his State and having 
deep sympathy for the distress of her citizens, was put on 
detail duty, and gave practically all he had for the relief of 
the widows and orphans of his neighbors. He moved to 
Clinch County in 1864, and died in 1882. He is buried at 
Prospect Church near DuPont. The children of Mr. Dame 
and his wife, Sarah, were: Arlia, who married Harris Tom- 
linson; George Melancthon Dame, who married Linnie Har- 
greaves; William Henry Dame, who married Caroline Cor- 



History of ClincJi County, Georgia 167 

nelius; John Thigpen Dame, who married Olivia Brown, 
Kate Harwell, and Emma Smith, and Charles Elmore Dame, 
who died single. 

James W. Dame, brother of George A. Dame, married 
Fannie Minshew, and was the father of five children : Lillian, 
George Tecumseh, Jo.hn Minshew, Christopher Columbus, 
and James Willoughby Dame. Mr. Dame was born Sep- 
tember 15th, 1836, and died May 23d, 1891. He served In 
Company "H" 29th Georgia, in the Civil War. 

George A. Dame served as surveyor of Clinch County, 
while his son, George M. Dame, was long surveyor and also 
county treasurer. Another son, John T. Dame, is the pres- 
ent ordinary of Clinch County. H. J. Dame served a term as 
county attorney and several terms as mayor of Homerville, is 
at present school superintendent of Citrus County, Fla. Flem 
C. Dame served a term as county superintendent of schools 
and several terms as Mayor of Homerville. 

THE REGISTER FAMILY. 

The Register family is one of the most widely connected 
families of any in the county. The first one of this family 
to come here was Samuel Register, who removed to this sec- 
tion about 1825 or 1830. He had a large family. Also 
there were Sallle, wife of John Bennett, and Nancy, wife of 
William Tomlinson, Sr., who were Samuel Register's sisters. 

Samuel Register married Elizabeth Skinner. He was born 
December ist, 1786, and died April 8th, 1869, leaving a 
large estate. His children were: Guilford, David, John, Wil- 
liam, Samuel E., Elizabeth, who married William Patten; 
Martha, who married Hillery P. Mathis; Zilpha, who mar- 
ried John Tomlinson; Ivy Register, Eady, who married 
Thomas Mathis; Phoebe, who married Zachariah Lee, a 
daughter, who married Hillery Cowart, and one who married 
Moses C. Lee, and H. M. Register. 

Abram Register was another early settler of this county, 
living here in 1870. He was born in 1801, and seems to be 



1 68 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

a brother of Samuel Register. He married and had a daugh- 
ter, Harriet, who married John Hilliard. To them were 
born one son, Mitchell H. Hilliard. John Hilliard was 
killed in the Civil War. Mrs. Harriet Hilliard was born 
April 4th, 1833, and after the death of Mr. Hilliard mar- 
ried Peter Stalvey, who died about 1888. She died Janu- 
ary 8th, 1910. 

Guilford Register, son of Samuel Register, lived in Echols 
County, and was born in 18 10. He was the first represen- 
tative from Echols County to the Legislature. He died about 
1894. He lived in Hamilton County, Fla., several years 
prior to his death. 

William Register, a son of Saumel Register, lived in 
Clinch County, and was born September 29th, 18 14. He 
was married to Laurana, a daughter of George Harnage, 
May 24th, 1838. They had the following children, named 
in the order of their birth: 

Samuel W. Register, John T. Register, Guilford A. Reg- 
ister, Oliver P. Register, Abraham R. Register, Harris Reg- 
ister (died in infancy), Mary E. Register, who married 
Elsea Allen first, later J. D. Weaver; Martha Register, who 
married Ezekiel S. Sirmans, Moses C. Register, Orren Reg- 
ister and William J. Register. 

William Register accumulated much property. He died 
September 4th, 1893. He is buried at Cow Creek Church. 
His wife is also buried there. 

Zilpha Register, daughter of Samuel Register, married 
Jchn Tomlinson, and they had thirteen children (see Tom- 
linsons). She was born February 4th, 1807, and married 
Mr. Tomlinson about 1826. She died August 4th, 1883, 
and is buried at Cow Creek Church. Her son, Moses Tom- 
linson, was for two terms ordinary of Clinch County, and 
served eight years as tax collector. 

Phoebe Register, daughter of Samuel Register, married 
Zachariah Lee, a son of Joshua Lee, and they had a son. 
Perry M. Lee. Mrs. Lee was born August 15th, 1823, and 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 169 

married about 1847. She died January 26th, 1905, and is 
buried at Prospect Church. Perry M. Lee served as clerk 
of the Superior Court, and is now a county commissioner of 
Clinch County. 

Eady Register, daughter of Samuel Register, married 
Thomas Mathis, and they had a son, David G. Mathis. She 
was born about 1820, and died February loth, 1869. 

David Register, a son of Samuel Register, was for many 
years a justice of the peace of the 970th district. He married 
and had several children, among them Samuel Register, who 
now lives near Fargo. David Register died in 1859. Men- 
tion of his grandsons is made elsewhere in this connection. 

Samuel Register, Sr., was the owner originally of the land 
whereon the town of Stockton now is. He had it laid off 
into town lots and developed a station when the Atlantic & 
Gulf Railroad was built through. The town was at first 
called Registerville, but later Stockton. 

Samuel W. Register, a son of William Register, was for 
fifteen years clerk of the Superior Court of Clinch County. 
Another son, Guilford A. Register, served as tax collector. 

W. A. Register, a son of Samuel Register and grandson of 
David Register, was born in Clinch County, near where 
Fargo now is, February 4th, 1869. He went to Florida in 
1890, and engaged in the timber business in Liberty County 
for eight years, after which he went to Leon County, where 
he settled. He located near Woodville, Florida, and en- 
gaged in farming and stock-raising. He was elected a mem- 
ber of the board of county commissioners of Leon County in 
1904, and served six years. In 19 12 he was elected repre- 
sentative from Leon County in the Florida Legislature and 
served two years. He married Miss Cora Lee Ferrell, Dec. 
4th, 1898, and has six children. Mr. Register has been quite 
successful in his business and has accumulated much property. 

His brother, D. F. Register, also lives at Woodville, 
Florida. He was born in 1871, and removed to Leon 
County, Florida, in 1902, where he engaged in farming and 



170 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

stock-raising. His wife was Miss Alma Swearingen, of 
Clinch County. 

Another brother, Lee Register, removed to Jasper, Flor- 
ida, where he has served as representative from Hamilton 
County in the Florida Legislature. Still another brother, 
Guilford C. Register, has for the last ten years or longer, 
served as a deputy sheriff of Clinch County, and was for one 
term justice of the peace of the 1219th district. 

The children of Samuel W. Register, son of William Reg- 
ister, were Augustus Otis Register, Delia, who married Eli 
J. Futch; Malinda, who married J. S. Bennett; Henrietta, 
who married Harlen McLain; Effie, who married J. E. Jor- 
dan; Bertha, who married L. S. Malone; Meddie, who mar- 
ried D. E. Kirkland, and Jeannette, who married H. J. 
Griffis, and Victoria, who married M. H. Hilliard. 

The children of Guilford A. Register, son of William Reg- 
ister, were Elbert B. Register, Payton C. Register, Jasper D. 
Register, Isbin F. Register, Benjamin H. Register, Richard 
E. Register, Charles A. Register, Harriet, who married J. 
B. Coon. 

Orrin Register, son of William Register, was born March 
15th, 1858, and died in Lowndes County, where he had pre- 
viously removed, September i6th, 191 1. He married a 
daughter of James M. Burkhalter, and they had several 
children. 

Abraham R. Register, son of William Register, was born 
February 8th, 1846, and died at his home in the 970th dis- 
trict, October 5th, 1906. He married Elizabeth, daughter 
of Benj. Stalvey, and had a large family of children. 

John T. Register was born February loth, 1841, the son 
of William Register. He married and raised a large fam- 
ily of children, among whom were Perry A. Register, Lucius 
R. Register, Henry Register, Ben S. Register, Dallas G. 
Register. The elder Register died in November, 191 5. 

Oliver Perry Register was born January 2 2d, 1844, the 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 171 

son of William Register. He raised a large family. One 
of his daughters married Mr. L. L, DuPont. Mr. Register 
died in 19 12. 

THE MORGAN FAMILY. 

The Morgans, of Clinch County, are descendants from 
Berrien Morgan and his wife, Linnie Nesmith, who lived in 
North Carolina during the Revolutionary War. Berrien 
Morgan was a nephew of Daniel Morgan, the famous Amer- 
ican general, and was the grandfather of Gen. John H. Mor- 
gan, the great Confederate cavalry leader. There is a tra- 
dition in the family that they are of Welsh descent and col- 
lateral descendants of Sir Henry Morgan, Governor of 
Jamaica, and sometimes admiral in the English navy, later as 
a Buccaneer he spread terror to the gilded galleons of the 
Spanish main. 

The children of Berrien Morgan and his wife, Linnie 
Nesmith, were Solomon, Tom, Elihu, John, Brice and a 
daughter, who married Joseph Marshall. 

Elihu Morgan was born in 1795, and married his cousin, 
Linnie Nesmith. Their children were Elihu, Thomas C, 
John L., Joseph and several daughters. He owned real 
estate in 1850 to the value of $6,000, quite a considerable 
amount for those days. He lived in then Clinch but now 
Echols County. 

Thomas Morgan, son of Berrien Morgan, lived and died 
in Clinch County. He was born in 1796, and his wife, Eliza- 
beth, in 1 8 15. They had several children, among whom 
was Thomas F., Martin Z. and Jonathan L. Morgan, who 
removed to Clinch County in i860, from Appling County. 
Thomas Morgan lived to be about eighty years old. 

John L. Morgan was a son of Berrien Morgan, and was 
born in 1802. He died in 1888, and is buried at the Homer- 
ville cemetery. He was for many years ordinary of Clinch 
County. He had several children, among whom were his 
sons, John L. Morgan, Jr., Thomas C. Morgan, Joseph, 



172 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Hampton, Lemuel T., William R., and Quarterman B. 
Morgan, and a daughter, who married Hon. John Williams. 

Thomas C. Morgan, son of Elihu Morgan, Sr., married 
Jane Moody, and their children were Mary, Parthenia, 
George, LInnle, Granville, Sherod and Jonathan Morgan. 
Thomas C. Morgan married a second time, Ellen Penning- 
ton, and their children were Henry, Delia, Ellen, Linnle, 
Thomas and Staten Morgan. Parthenia Morgan married 
John C. Hargreaves. Her mother, Jane Moody, was a 
daughter of Isaac Moody, and his wife, Sarah Carter. 

Jonathan L. Morgan was born In 1832, and as above 
stated, was a son of Thomas Morgan. He married Susan 
Hargreaves, and they had three children, viz. : A. H. Mor- 
gan, Mrs. Frank C. Folks, Mrs. Linnle Taylor. The elder 
Morgan died In Waycross, May 5th, 1907. His son, Abra- 
ham H. Morgan, served one term as clerk of the Superior 
Court of Clinch County. 

George Morgan, son of Thomas C. Morgan, Sr., removed 
to Inv^erness, Fla., whence he carried 2,000 head of cattle, 
Sherod Morgan now lives In Hamilton County, Fla. Gran- 
ville Morgan, another son, now lives several miles below 
Homervllle. 

Other members of the Morgan family who have lived in 
Clinch County, are: Charles S. Morgan, born 1845, who 
was a lawyer at Homervllle a few years following the war; 
Jacob Morgan, born 1842 ; and John T. Morgan, born 1836. 

The Morgan family is widely scattered throughout the 
United States, and are all descendants of three brothers who 
landed in this country about 1660. Dr. John Morgan, a 
relative of Berrien Morgan, named above, established the 
first medical college in America at Philadelphia. It Is now 
the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania. 

THE LEE FAMILY. 

Joshua Lee was probably the earliest member of the Lee 
family to live in Clinch. He was a brother to Jesse Lee, 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 173 

who lived in this section and died here. Joshua Lee mar- 
ried Martha Ford, a native of North Carolina, while he was 
born in South Carolina. To them were born several children, 
among them being Zachariah Lee, who married Phoebe Reg- 
ister; Nancy Lee, who married Tyre Mathis; Jemima, who 
married John Mathis; and Sarah, who married Isaac D. 
Hutto, and Elizabeth, who married James Patten. Joshua 
Lee died about 1855, and is buried at Prospect Church. He 
removed to this county from where Milltown now is and 
settled four miles north of where DuPont now is, about 1 847. 

Zachariah Lee was born October 4th, 18 16, and married 
Phoebe Register, daughter of Samuel Register, Sr. They had 
a son, Perry M. Lee, who served one term as clerk of the 
Superior Court of Clinch County, and is at present a county 
commissioner of Clinch County. The elder Lee died May 
23, 1884. He is buried at the North cemetery. 

Nancy Lee, who married Tyre Mathis, was born in 1808. 
They had several children, among whom was Martha, who 
married James T. Touchstone, and Celie, who married 
Greenberry Holt. The children of Martha and James T. 
Touchston were Henry W. Touchston, William Touchston, 
Frank Touchston, Mrs. Rosetta Drawdy, Mrs. D. A. Smith, 
and Mrs. Annie Cornelius. Bettie, daughter of Mrs. Holt, 
married Joseph P. Smith, and among their children are Wil- 
liam and H. P. Smith, and Emma, who married J. T. Dame. 

Jemima Lee, who married John Mathis, was born about 
1 8 10, and they had several children, among them Ezekiel 
Mathis. 

Sarah Lee, who married Isaac D. Hutto, was born in 1820. 
Mr. Hutto was for many years pastor of Prospect Church in 
this county. They had no children, but had an adopted son, 
Jackson N. Hutto. 

Elizabeth Lee, who married James Patten, of Berrien 
County, was born about 18 15. They had ten children, viz.: 
William, Jethro, James, Jehu and Matthew Patten, Nancy, 



174 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

who married John F. Clements; Leta, who married Ivy 
Register; SalHe, who married John Crosby; Mary, who mar- 
ried John Clements, and Elizabeth, who married John J. 
Drawdy. Mrs. Patten died about 1880. 

Jesse Lee, brother to Joshua Lee, had several children, 
among them John and Moses Lee, and a daughter who mar- 
ried James O. Patten. Moses Lee lived in Berrien County, 
where his descendants are numerous. John Lee married 
Elinor Wetherington, and their children were : John Lee, 
Jr., Elinor, who married James Chisholm ; Julia, who married 
Levi Knight; Moses, who married Amanda Clements; Jesse, 
who married Sallie Tomlinson; James, who married Lavinia 
Smith; William J. Lee, who married Rhoda, daughter of 
John F. Clements and grand-daughter of Joshua Lee. 

There was also another family of Lees in this county. 
James J. Lee was born in 18 19. His wife, Jemima, was born 
in 1 82 1. They had several children. James Lee was born in 
1829, and his wife, Catherine, in 1833. They had seven 
children. Some of these lived in and near the Okefinokee 
Swamp. Henry Lee, born 183^;, is one of the oldest living 
members of this branch. 



CHAPTER XII. 

County Officers of Clinch County. 1 850-191 6. 

ORDINARIES. 

PREVIOUS to 1852, the Inferior Court had jurisdic- 
tion over estates, probates of wills, guardianships and 
other matters which the Ordinary has jurisdiction over 
at present, and the Inferior Court sat as a Court of Ordinary 
for that purpose; but in 1850 an Act was passed, amended 
in 1 85 1, creating the office of Ordinary in this State, 

(The word "removed" indicates removal from the county.) 
The following have been ordinaries of Clinch County 
since 1852 : 



Name 



Commiss 



Guilford Lastinger Jan. 27, 

Richard H. Burkhalter April 8, 

John L. Morgan Jan. 29, 

Hampton Morgan (removed) __ Feb. 16, 

William W. Griffin Aug. 21, 

John L. Morgan Nov. 9, 

Moses Tomlinson Jan. 18, 

John L. Morgan Jan. 27, 

Martin S. Corbitt Jan. 13, 

George Cornelius Jan. 7, 

William T. Howell Oct. 

John T. Dame Oct. 17, 

W. V. Musgrove 



oned 
852 
856 
858 
864 

868 
871 

873 
881 

885 
889 
900 
904 
916 



CLERKS SUPERIOR COURT. 



John C. Kirkland April 12, 1850 

George W. Newbern Jan. 14, 1852 

Archibald D. Laslie Jan. 10, 1854 

David O'Quin April 8, 1856 



Term of Office 
1852-1856 
1856-1858 
1858-1864 
1864-1867 
1868-187I 
1871-1873 
1873-1881 
1881-1885 
1885-1889 
1889-I9OI 
I 901 -I 905 
1905-I917 
I917-I92I 



185O-1852 
1852-1854 
1854-1856 
1856-1868 



176 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



Name Commiss 

H. D. O'Quin Aug. 21, 

James Tomlinson Feb. 7, 

Edward T. Dukes Jan. 18, 

Perry M. Lee Jan. 14, 

Cornelius A. Smith (resigned) __ Jan. 17, 

David O'Quin (appointed) Dec. 6, 

Abraham Morgan Jan. 13, 

Bryant R. Johnnson (resigned) _ Jan. 9, 

William A. Ecord March 4, 

Samuel W. Register (died) Jan. 6, 

A. O. Register June 25, 

Austin J. Gibbs Nov. 3, 

TAX COLLECTORS. 

Ezekiel J. Sirmans Apr. 12, 

Robert G. Dickerson Jan. 10, 

Moses Giddens May 17, 

Henry Joyce Jan. 10, 

Isaac D. Hutto Jan. 9, 

Charles Cowart Jan. 12, 

Jesse P. Prescott Jan. 13, 

Timothy Alderman Jan. 17, 

William M. Austin Feb. 16, 

Samuel W. Register Jan. 22, 

Martin S. Corbitt Aug. 21, 

Madison M. Caswell Feb. 7, 

William J. Rives Jan. 9, 

Guilford A. Register Jan. 13, 

William Griffis Jan. 8, 

Moses Tomlinson Jan. 7, 

M. M. Monk (resigned) Oct. 14, 

David C. Sirmans Oct. 17, 

Lucius R. Register Nov. i, 

C. H. Dickerson Nov. 3, 



ioned Term of Oflfice 


1868 


[868- 


[871 


1871 


[871- 


t873 


1873 


f873- 


[875 


1875 


[875- 


[877 


1877 


[877- 


[880 


1880 


[880- 


[881 


1881 


[881- 


[883 


1883 


[883- 


[884 


1884 


[884- 


^893 


1893 


[893- 


[908 


1908 


[908- 


[909 


1908 


[909- 


[921 


1850 


[850- 


[852 


1852 


[852- 


t853 


1853 


f853- 


[854 


1854 


[854-] 


[855 


185^ 


r8^^ 


[857 


1857 


[857-1 


[858 


1858 ] 


858-1 


859 


1859 


[859- 


[864 


1864 


[864- 


[866 


1866 


[866- 


[868 


1868 


[868- 


[871 


187I 


[871- 


[883 


1883 


[883- 


[885 


1885 


[885- 


[887 


1887 


[887-] 


[889 


1889 


[889-] 


[897 


1896 


[897-] 


[904 


1904 


[905- 


[907 


1907 


[907-] 


[909 


1908 


[909-] 


[921 




X 




W. V. MUSGROVE 
Elected Ordinary Clinch County, 191G. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



177 



TAX RECEIVERS. 

Name Commissioned Term of Office 

Benjamin Cornelius April 12, 1850 1850-1856 

Jesse W. Carter April 8, 1856 1856-1857 

Benjamin Cornelius Jan. 12, 1857 1857-1862 

Timothy Alderman Jan. 23, 1862 1862-1864 

Benjamin Cornelius (died) Feb. 16, 1864 1864-1874 

William J. Rives Jan. 14,1875 1875-1881 

John C. Jones (died) Jan. 13, 1881 1881-1904 

B. E. Mattox June 9, 1904 1904-1905 

J. B. Coon Oct. 17, 1904 1905-1921 

COUNTY TREASURERS. 

Prior to 1868, the clerk of the Inferior Court was treas- 
urer of the county. In 19 15 the treasurer's office was abol- 
ished and the county authorities authorized to select some 
banking institution in the county to handle the county's 
funds without charge, — to become effective January i, 19 17. 



N£ 



Commissi 



Riley Johnson (resigned) Aug. 21, 

Allen Smith (appointed) Nov. 28, 

Alfred Newbern Feb. 7, 

Henry C. Moore (died) Jan. 17, 

W. H. Gary (appointed) June 23, 

Sherod Smith (died) July 27, 

Lewis Smith Nov. 28, 

Andrew J. Caswell (died) Jan. 6, 

Chas. F. Hitch (appointed) Aug. 21, 

R. G. DIckerson (resigned) Sept. 12, 

George M. Dame (appointed) __Oct. 12, 

Perry A. Register Oct. 14, 

George M. Dame Oct. 19, 

John F. Hughes Oct. 8, 

T. F. M. Sweat Nov. 3, 

Randall Corbitt Oct. 19, 

W. H. Hunter Nov. i. 



oned 

868 
868 
871 
877 
891 
891 
891 

893 

893 

893 
896 

896 
898 
902 
908 
912 
914 



Term of Office 
1868 

1868-1871 
1871-1877 
1877-189I 
189I 
189I 
189I-1893 

1893 

1893 

1893-1896 

1896-1897 

1897-1899 

1899-1903 

I903-1909 

I909-I913 

I913-I915 

1915-1917 



J78 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



SHERIFFS. 

Name Commiss 

Charles Cowart April 12, 

Cornelius Joyce March 11, 

Thomas Mobley (resigned) Jan. 10, 

David O'Quin May 16, 

Shimuel Timmerman April 8, 

James Waters Jan. 13, 

Shimuel Timmerman Jan, 10, 

Jesse Smith Jan. 23, 

Shimuel Timmerman Feb. 16, 

Harrison Jones (left county) Jan. 22, 

William M. Austin Jan. 10, 

Joseph E. Bass Oct. 26, 

James M. Nelms Feb. 7, 

Robert N. Brady (killed) Jan. 18, 

David H. Johnson Jan. 14, 

John T. Courson Jan. 8, 

Jerry M. Jeffords Jan. 13, 

B. E. Mattox Jan. 8, 

Frank Dickerson Jan. 7, 

Bryant O'Steen Oct. 14, 

S. A. Sweat Oct. 10, 

Perry R. Lee Nov. 3, 

SURVEYORS. 

D. J. Blackburn April 12, 1850 

Elijah Mattox April 12, 1850 

D. J. Blackburn Jan. 10, 1852 

Joseph B. Johnson Jan. 12, 1854 

Joseph J. Cohen Jan. 12, 1857 

Elias H. Tyler Jan. 13, 1858 

Jesse S. Sineath Jan. 10, 1861 

T. T. McLendon Feb. 16, 1864 

Jesse S. Sineath Jan. 22, 1866 

William Gaines Aug. 21, 1868 



sioned Term of C 


1850 


185O-I 


185I 


[851-I 


1854 


[854 


1854 


[854-1 


1856 


[856-1 


1858 


[858-1 


1861 


[861-I 


1862 


[862-1 


1864 


[864-1 


1866 


[866-1 


1867 


[867-1 


1868 


[868-1 


1871 ] 


[871-1 


1873 1 


[873-1 


1875 ] 


[875-1 


1879 ] 


[879-1 


1881 ] 


881-1 


1887 ] 


887-1 


1889 ] 


889-1 


1896 ] 


[897-1 


1900 ] 


901-1 


1908 ] 


909-1 



1850 
1850- 
1852- 

1854- 
1857- 

1858- 
I86I- 
1864- 
1866- 
1868- 



Office 
851 
854 

856 
858 
861 
862 
864 

866 
867 
868 
871 
873 
875 
879 

881 
887 
889 

897 
901 

909 
921 



1852 
1854 
1857 
1858 
1861 
1864 
1866 
1868 

1873 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



179 



Name 



Isaac T. McLendon Jan. 18, 1873 

George A. Dame Jan. 14, 1875 

Jackson J. Taylor Jan. 17, 1877 

George M. Dame Jan. 13, 1881 

S. R. Kirton Jan. 9, 1895 

J. B. Coon Oct. 19, 1898 

F. F. Cornelius Oct. 17, 1904 

Thomas C. Conine Nov. i, 19 14 

CORONERS. 

Joseph L. Rogers April 

John Mathls Jan. 

John Q. FIndley Jan. 

John Mathls Jan. 

Sherod Tomllnson Feb. 

J. R. DIckerson Aug. 

James M. KIght Feb. 

John T. Courson Jan. 

Daniel DIckerson Jan. 

Benjamin O'Steen Jan. 

Stephen D, FIndley Jan. 

Guilford A. Register Jan. 

William Parker Jan. 

D. F. McDuffie Jan. 

Augustus M. Tomllnson Jan. 

George D. GIbbs (died) Jan. 

John B. KIrkland Jan. 

Tarlton McMillan Oct. 

W. R. FIndley (removed) Oct. 

C. W. Byrd (appointed) Dec. 

G. R. Thigpen (removed) Oct. 

B. F. Thomas Nov. 

John L. Cason 



Commissioned Term of Office 
873-1875 
875-1877 
877-1881 
895 
895-1899 
899-1905 
905-1915 
915-I92I 



12, 


[850 


16, 


[851 


i3» 


[858 


10, 


[861 


16,] 


[864 


21, ] 


[868 


7^ 


[871 


18, ] 


^873 


14, ] 


875 


17. 


[877 


13. 1 


[881 


9' ^ 


[883 


i3> ] 


[885 


8, 


[887 


7, J 


[889 


10, ] 


[891 


6,1 


[893 


14, ] 


[896 


i7> 1 


[904 


10, ] 


912 


19, ] 


912 


I, ] 


914 




916 



850- 

851- 

858- 
861- 
864- 

868- 

871- 
873- 

875- 
877- 

881- 

883- 

885- 

887- 

889- 

891- 

893- 
897- 
905- 
912- 

913 
915- 

917- 



851 
858 
861 
864 
868 
871 

873 
875 

877 
881 

883 
885 
887 
889 
891 
893 
897 
905 
912 

913 

917 
921 



i«o 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



COUNTY SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Previous to 1871 the control of school matters was vested 
in the justices of the Inferior Court, the Ordinary and one 
citizen appointed by the judge of the Superior Court, while 
the clerk of the Inferior Court was ex-officio secretary of the 
school board. This was amended in 1870, and later in 1872. 



Name 



Commissioned Term of Office 



H. D. O'Quin June 3, 1871 1871-1882 

George W. Newbern Jan. 16, 1882 1882-1892 

Charlton H. Smith May 30, 1892 1892-1899 

W. T. Dickerson 1899-19 11 

Flem C. Dame 1911-1914 

M. A. Cornelius 1914-1917 

Joseph O. Rogers 191 7-1 921 

JUSTICES OF THE INFERIOR COURT. 

This court, composed of five justices, exercised the powers 
of the County Court, Court of Ordinary and Board of County 
Commissioners. They were abolished in 1868. 

David Johnson Apr. 

Isham F. Johnson Apr. 

Hiram Sears Apr. 

Manning Smith Apr. 

Francis H. McCall Feb. 

Manning Smith Jan. 

David Johnson Jan. 

Tyre Mathis Jan. 

Timothy Alderman Jan. 

Solomon Wilkes Jan. 

William M. Nichols Jan. 

Archibald Hodges Jan. 

John L. Morgan Jan. 

Robert F. White Jan. 

Duncan Giddens Jan. 



12, 


1850 


1850- 


1853 


12, 


1850 


1850- 


1853 


12, 


1850 


1850- 


1853 


12, 


1850 


18^0- 


1853 


16, 


1852 


1852- 


1853 


17. 


1853 


1853- 


1854 


I7> 


1853 


1853- 


1854 


i7> 


1853 


1853- 


1854 


17. 


1853 


1853- 


1854 


17. 


1853 


1853- 


1854 


24, 


1854 


1854- 


1855 


24, 


1854 


1854- 


1858 


24, 


1854 


1854- 


1857 


24, 


1854 


1854- 


1856 


24, 


1854 


1854- 


1857 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



i«i 



Name 



Commissioned Term of Office 



i6, 



Jacob Lightsey Jan 

John J. North Apr. 8, 

William M. Nichols Jan. 12, 

John J. North Jan. 12, 

John L. Morgan Jan. 12, 

George W. Newbern Jan. 12, 

Manning Smith Jan. 12, 

Shimuel Timmerman Feb. 11, 

J ames Whitehurst Feb. 1 1 , 

Cornelius Joyce Feb. 11, 

John S. Henderson Jan. 29, 

Jonathan Knight Jan. 10, 

John L. Morgan Jan. 10, 

David Johnson Jan. 10, 

Jacob Lightsey Jan. 10, 

Sherod Tomlinson Jan. 10, 

Joel Strickland Sept. 10, 

William M. Austin Sept. 10, 

Robert G. Dickerson Sept. 10, 

Thomas G. Ramsey Sept. 19, 

H. A. Mattox Mar. 26, 

Quarterman B. Staten Jan. 23, 

R. B. Johnson Jan. 23, 

Charles Strickland Jan. 23, 

H. A. Mattox Jan. 23, 

John L. Morgan Jan. 23, 



855 
856 

857 
857 
857 
857 
857 
858 

858 

858 

858 

861 

861 

861 

861 

861 

861 

861 

861 

862 

864 

865 

865 

865 

86c; 

865 



CLERKS INFERIOR COURT. 

(Abolished 1868.) 

John C. Kirkland Apr. 12, 1850 

George W. Newbern Jan. 14, 1852 

Archibald D. Laslie Jan. 10, 1854 

David O'Quin Apr. 8, 1856 



855- 
856- 

857- 

857- 

857- 

857- 

857- 

858- 

858- 

858- 

858- 

861 

861- 

861 

861- 

861 

861- 

861- 

861- 

862- 

864- 

865- 

865- 

865- 

865- 

865- 



857 
857 
858 
861 
858 
858 
861 
861 
861 
861 
861 

865 

862 

865 
864 
865 
865 
865 
868 
868 
868 
868 
868 



1850-1852 
1852-1854 
1854-1856 
1856-1868 



i82 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

JUDGES COUNTY COURT. 

This court was created In 1866, and the first judge served 
until 1868, when he removed. It seems that there was no 
judge appointed in his stead until 1882. The court was 
abolished to take effect 1886. It was again established in 
1 90 1, and has been in existence ever since. The judge of the 
court is ex-officio clerk of the court under the present law. 

Name Commissioned Term of Office 

Ziba King (removed) May 10, 1866 1866-1868 

Cornelius A. Smith Apr. 11,1882 1882-1884 

B. A. Whittington Dec. 16, 1884 1884-1886 

S. C. Townsend (resigned) Nov. 2, 1901 1901-1904 

George H. Cornelius July 14, 1904 1904-1905 

Robert M. Crum Oct. 19, 1905 1905-1909 

B. W. Cornelius Nov. i, 1909 1909-1913 

S. L. Drawdy Oct. 28, 1913 1913-1917 

SOLICITORS COUNTY COURT. 

Lyman A. Sirmans May 10, 1866 1866-1868 

Robert G. Dickerson Nov. 4, 1901 1 901- 1907 

H. J. Dame Oct. 28, 1907 1907-1909 

Sherod Burkhalter Oct. 30, 1909 1909-1913 

W. T. Dickerson July 18, 1913 1913-1917 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. 

The Board of Commissioners of Roads and Revenues in 
and for Clinch County was created by Legislative Act in 
1889, and repealed or abolished in 1894. Again in 19 15, 
the board was created. The following is a list of those who 
have served as commissioners. 

1 889-1 89 1 — W. H. Gary, Chairman; Martin S. Corbitt, 
F. B. Sirmans, Isham Patterson, and John Knight; W. A. 
Ecord, clerk. 

1 891-1893 — W. H. Gary, Chairman; F. B. Sirmans, W. 
B. N. Crews, Martin S. Corbitt and Isham Patterson; W. 
A. Ecord, clerk. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



183 



1 893-1 895 — J. R. Dickerson, Chairman; F. M. Hughes, 
B. E. Mattox, F. M. Jackson and Isham Patterson; S. W. 
Register, clerk. 

191 5-19 1 7 — J. F. Barnhill, Chairman; Alex. K. Ses- 
soms, William H. Mobley, William B. North and Perry 
M, Lee; Folks Huxford, clerk. 

For the term 19 17- 1 921, John M. Smith has been elected 
in the stead of Alex. K. Sessoms, and the other members 
elected for a full term. 

REPRESENTATIVES FROM CLINCH COUNTY. 

James W. Staten 

James W. Staten 

Manning Smith 

William S. Tomlinson 

John Williams 

William S. Tomlinson 

William S. Tomlinson 

Jesse Smith 

Guilford Lastinger 

H. A. Mattox 

Joseph Sirmans 

J. R. G. Hamilton 

Lewis Strickland 

Lewis Strickland 

J. L. Sweat 

J. L. Sweat 

R. B. Johnson 

John C. Humphreys 

James P. Mattox (died) 

R. B. Johnson 

Lucius C. Mattox 

R. B. Johnson 

James M. Smith 

Robert G. Dickerson 

D. C. Fender 



I85I- 


[852 


1853- 


[854 


1855- 


[856 


1857- 


[858 


1859-^ 


860 


I86I-] 


[862 


1863- 


[864 


1865- 


[866 


1868- 


[870 


I87I- 


[872 


1873-1 


[874 


1875-1 


[876 


1877 




1878- 


[879 


1880- 


[881 


I882-] 


[883 


I884-] 


[885 


1886- 


[887 


1888 




1888- 


[889 


I890-] 


[891 


I892-] 


f893 


I894-] 


[89<; 


I896-] 


897 


I898-] 


899 



1 84 



History of Clinch County , Georgia 



S. L. Drawdy 1 900-1 901 

R. B. Johnson (died) 1902-1903 

Augustus DuPont 1904 

John F. Daugharty 1905- 1906 

S. C. Townsend 1907-1908 

S. L. Drawdy 1909-19 10 

B. A. Harper 1911-1912 

A. H. Culpepper 1913-1914 

R. G. Dickerson 1915-1916 

A. H. Culpepper 1917-1918 

SENATORS FROM CLINCH COUNTY AND THE FIFTH 
SENATORIAL DISTRICT. 

Note: From 1845 ^^ 1852 senators were elected from dis- 
tricts, but in 1852 this was changed back to the old way and 
each county elected a senator. This remained so until i860. 
Then Clinch County was embraced in the fifth senatorial 
district. 

Levi J. Knight 1851- 

Benjamin Sirmans 1853- 

William M. Nichols 1855-1 

James W. Staten 1857-] 

David J. Sirmans 1859-] 

Thomas Hilliard 1861-] 

— . — . 1863-: 



P. B. Bedford 1865- 

Newsom Corbitt 1868- 

T. A. Corbitt 1869- 

Mr. Kirkland 1871- 

George W. Newbern 1875- 

Willlam B. Folks 1878- 

Cornelius A. Smith 1880- 

William A. McDonald 1882- 

J. M. Wilcox 1884- 

F. B. Sirmans 1886- 

F. C. Folks 1888- 



852 
854 
856 
858 
860 
862 
864 
866 
869 
870 

874 
877 
879 
881 
883 
885 
887 
889 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 185 

J. W. Boyd 1890-1891 

F. B. Sirmans 1892-1893 

Leon A. Wilson 1894-1895 

Jeff Wilcox 1896-1897 

Robert G. Dickerson 1898-1899 

Lemuel Johnson 1 900- 1 90 1 

F. L. Sweat 1902-1904 

F. B. Sirmans 1905-1906 

George W. Deen 1907-1908 

Calvin A. Ward 1909-1910 

W. T. Dickerson 1911-1912 

J. L. Sweat 1913-1914 

Calvin A. Ward 1915-1916 

R. G. Dickerson 1917-1918 

BOARD OF TAX ASSESSORS. 

This body was created by Legislative Act in 19 13. The 
following gentlemen were appointed by the county authori- 
ties to this position : 

January i, 19 14 — Geo. M. Dame, Chairman, for six 
years; Columbus C. Lee, for four years; William T. Howell, 
for two years. 

January ist, 1916 — S. R. Kirton, for six years, succeed- 
ing W. T. Howell. 

1914-1916 — Secretary of the Board: A. J. Gibbs. 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE, CLINCH COUNTY, 185O-I916. 

586th or Mud Creek District. 

Name Commissioned Term of Office 

Hudson Tillery Feb. 10, 1829 1829-1833 

James O. White Feb. 10, 1829 1829-1830 

William Smith Nov. 9, 1830 1830-1833 

Stephen Williams Apr. 11. 1833 1833-1837 

William Smith Apr. 11, 1833 1833-1837 

James O. White Oct. 4,1837 1837-1841 

David Garrison Oct. 4, 1837 1837-1841 



i86 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



Name 



Commiss 



Joseph Ricketson Jan. 14, 1841 1841-1845 

Jo.hn P. Wall Jan. 14, 1841 1841-1845 

William Lastinger Jan. 24, 1845 1845-1846 

Jesse Smith Jan. 24, 1845 1845-1847 

Reubin Leggett Apr. 13, 1846 1846-1850 

Hiram Sears Jan. 29, 1847 1847-1852 

John Williams June 25, 1850 1850-1853 

Jackson S. Williams Aug. 20, 1852 1852-1853 

Newsom Corbitt Feb. 15, 1853 1853-1857 

William G. Aikens Feb. 15, 1853 1853-1857 

A. J. Lastinger Jan. 15, 1857 1857-1858 

Isaac Burkhalter Jan. 15, 1857 1857-1861 

Guilford Lastinger Jan. 22, 1858 1858-1861 

Newsom Corbitt Jan. 28, 1861 1861-1865 

Berrien Pafford Jan. 28, 1861 1861-1864 

David H. Johnson Mar. 28, i 864 1864-1865 

Newsom Corbitt Mar. 22, 1865 1865-1869 

David H. Johnson Mar. 22, 1865 1865-1869 

David H. Johnson May i, 1869 1869-1872 

A. J. Whitehurst Feb. 5, 1872 1872-1873 

Francis M. Jackson Jan. 20, 1873 1873-1874 

William J. Lee Aprl. 27, 1874 1874-1877 

Harris Sirmans Feb. 8, 1877 1877-1885 

C. C. Bridges Jan. 22, 1885 1885-1889 

C. F. Brack Jan. 26, 1889 1889-1893 

Randall Brogdon Jan. 26, 1893 1893-1901 

Joseph Powell Dec. 8, 1900 1901-1917 

970th or Magnolia District. 

David Register Nov. 18, 1839 1839-1841 

Cornelius Joyce Nov. 18, 1839 1839-1841 

David Register Jan. 14, 1841 1841-1845 

Benjamin Cornelius Jan. 14, 1841 i84i-i84<; 

Josiah Stewart Jan. 24, 1845 1845-1846 

D. J. Blackburn Jan. 24, 1845 1845-1847 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



187 



Name Commiss 

Benjamin Cornelius Aug. 26, 

John C. Kirkland Feb. 26, 

Elliott Chancey Sept. 21, 

Jesse Smith Sept. 21, 

Rowan B. Johnson June 7, 

Aaron D. Dyals June 7, 

Henry E. Peacock May 11, 

Elias Williams May 11, 

Ezekiel J. Sirmans Mar. 7, 

Jesse Smith Mar. 7, 

Levi W. Carter : Feb. 27, 

Abraham Strickland Sept. 27, 

Jesse Smith Jan. 24, 

Elliott Chancey Mar. 7, 

Jesse Smith Mar. 7, 

Joseph J. Cohen Nov. 27, 

Jesse Smith Feb. 26, 

William J. Brack Feb. 26, 

Thomas H. Womack Aug. 24, 

Ziba King Aug. 24, 

Allen Smith May 19, 

John L. Courson Mar. 20, 

Eli W. O'Quin Jan. 20, 

Eli T- Futch Mar. 23, 

M. H. HiUiard Jan. 18, 

W. B. Griffis Dec. 7, 

719th District. 
(Formerly in Clinch County, but now in Echols.) 

.Absalom E. Thomas Oct. 20, 1830 1830-1832 

Joseph Rodgers Oct. 20, 1830 1830-1832 

William B. North Sept. 12, 1832 1832-1833 

William McLelland Sept. 12, 1832 1832-1833 

William B. North Feb. 12, 1833 1833-1835 

John J. North Feb. 12, 1833 1833-1836 



>ioned T 


erm of Office 


1846 


[846- 


[850 


1847 


[847- 


[850 


1850 


[850- 


L851 


1850 


[850- 


[851 


1851 


[851- 


L852 


1851 


L851- 


1852 


1852 


[852- 


1853 


1852 


[852- 


^853 


1853 


t8S3- 


[854 


1853 


t853- 


[854 


1854 


[854- 


[855 


1854 


[854- 


[857 


1855 


[855- 


[857 


1857 


E857- 


[857 


1857 . 


[757- 


[859 


1857 


[857- 


[859 


1859 


[859- 


[860 


1859 


[859- 


[860 


i860 ] 


860- 


[864 


i860 


[860- 


[866 


1864 


[864- 


[867 


1866 1 


866-1 


873 


1873 


f873- 


[885 


1889 ] 


[889- 


[897 


1897 1 


[897- 


[905 


1904 


[904- 


[917 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



Name 



Commissioned Term of Office 



Amos Emanuel Dec. 3, 

Seaborn Lastinger Dec. 3, 

James Oglesby June 14, 

Stephen Tucker June 14, 

C. B. Mims Mar. 18, 

Jackson A. Lloyd Jan. 27, 

John Burnett Jan. 25, 

John J. North Jan. 25, 

James C. Green Jan. 20, 

Joseph L. Crews Jan. 20, 

Isham F. Johnson Mar. 10, 

Joseph L. Crews Mar. 10, 

James North Jan. 15, 

Isham F. Johnson Jan. 31, 

John Burnett Oct. 15, 

James North Oct. 15, 

James North Mar. i, 

Isham F. Johnson Mar. i, 

105 2d or Stockton District 

Jesse W. Carter Aug. 8, 1850 

Guilford Lastinger Aug. 8, 1850 

Sherod Tomlinson May 11, 1852 

Shimuel Timmerman May 1 1, 1852 

Richard H. Burkhalter Jan. 10, 1853 

Jesse W. Carter Aug. 9, 1855 

Cornelius B. Lightsey Aug. 8, 1855 

Thomas W. Griffin Jan. 15, 1857 

Cornelius B. Lightsey Jan. 15, 1857 

William W. Smith May 17, 1861 

W. W. Peyton May 17, 1861 

William W. Smith Jan. 28, 1865 

Barzilla Staten Jan. 28, 1865 

David D. Mahon Jan. 24, 1867 

David D. Mahon Sept. 22, 1869 



1835 


[835-1 


1835 1 


835-1 


1837 


[837-1 


1837 ] 


837-1 


1839 


[839-1 


1840 


[840-1 


1843 


[843-1 


1843 


[843-1 


1846 


[846-1 


1846 


[846-1 


1848 


[848-1 


1848 


[848-1 


1850 


[850-1 


1849 


[849-1 


1850 


[850-1 


1850 


[850-1 


1852 


[852-1 


1852 


[852-1 



1850- 
1850- 
1852- 
1852- 

1853- 
1855- 
1855- 
1857- 
1857- 

I86I- 
I86I- 
1865- 
1865- 
1867- 
1869- 



837 
837 
839 

840 

843 

843 
846 

846 

848 
848 
849 

850 
850 
850 
852 
852 
856 
856 



8£;2 
852 

853 
853 
855 
857 
857 
861 
861 
865 
865 
867 
869 
869 
872 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



189 



Name 



Commissioned 



G. G. Foreman Feb. 15, 

G. G. Foreman Jan. 20, 

J. R. G. Hamilton Feb. 9, 

W. S. Phillips Jan. 18, 

Moses Tomlinson Jan. 23, 

James R. Allen (died) Jan. 22, 

Isaac W. Allen Dec. 19, 

1 06 1 St or Moore's Mill Dis 

Archibald Hodges June 7, 

George W. Newbern June 7, 

Robert F. White Feb. 5, 

Jesse Dean Mar. 20, 

Robert F. White Jan. 10, 

George Cornelius Jan. 10, 

William Johnson Nov. 26, 

John C. Kirkland Mar, 16, 

Charles A. Griffis Mar. 2I 

John C. Kirlcland Jan. 15, 

Charles A. Griffis Jan. 15, 

John C. Kirkland Jan. 16, 

Charles A. Griffis Jan. 16, 

John C. Kirkland Jan. 22, 

Charles A. Griffis Mar. 22, 

William T. Bennett May 

William Griffis Mar. 15, 

K. C. Cowart Feb. 9, 

James R. Dickerson Mar. 

Jacob Minshew Jan. 22, 

George W. Delk Jan. 18, 

Irwin Corbitt _- Jan. 26, 

W. J. Corbitt (resigned) Jan. 

F. M. Cowart Feb. 10, 

F. M. Cowart (resigned) Dec. 21, 

A. J. Lockliear Mar. 19, 



872 

873 
877 

879 

883 

885 

908 

rict. 



Term of Office 
1872-1873 
1873-1877 
1877-1879 
1879-1883 
1883-1885 
1885-I909 
1909-1917 



1852 

1852 

1853 
1853 
1853 
1854 
1856 

1857 
1857 
1861 
1861 
1865 
1865 
1869 
1869 
1875 
1877 
1879 
1885 
1889 

1893 
1897 
19IO 

I913 
1914 

1917 



,1851 ] 


[85I-I 


,1851 ] 


[85I-I 


,1852 ] 


[852-1 


, 1852 ] 


[852-1 


,1853 ^ 


853-1 


.1853 1 


[853-1 


'I853 ] 


[853-1 


,1854 ] 


[854-1 


, 1856 


[856-1 


,1857 1 


[857-1 


,1857 


[857-1 


, I86I ] 


[86I-I 


, I86I 


[86I-I 


, 1865 


[865-1 


, 1865 


[865-1 


, 1869 


[869-1 


,1875 ] 


[875-1 


> 1877 


[877-1 


, 1879 


[879-1 


, 1885 


[885-1 


, 1889 


[889-1 


' 1893 


[893-1 


, 1897 


[897-1 


>, I9I2 


[9I2-I 


, I9I2 


[9I3-I 


, I9I6 


191 6-1 



190 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

1 141st or Wiregrass District. 

Name Commissioned Term of Office 

James North Aug. 11,1856 1856-1858 

Richard A. Bennett Aug. 11, 1856 1856-1857 

Richard A. Bennett Jan. 15, 1857 1857-1858 

Tarlton McMillan Mar. i, 1858 1858-1861 

George Conley (or Cauley) Mar. i, 1858 1858-1861 

James L. Bennett Jan. 28, 1861 1861-1861 

James Waters Jan. 28, 1861 1861-1861 

James North Aug. 20, 1861 1861-1865 

John R. Harris Aug. 20, 186 1 1861-1864 

Martin Z. Morgan May 4, 1864 1864-1869 

D. M. Riberon May i, 1869 1869-1873 

Ivy Davis Jan. 22, 1873 1873-1877 

George W. Thornton Feb. 9, 1877 1877-1885 

T. F. M. Sweat Jan. 22, 1885 1885-1889 

D. M. Riberon Jan. 26, 1893 1893-1897 

Joel G. Griffis Jan. 24, 1899 1899-1903 

W. A. Taylor Dec. 18, 1908 1909-1917 

1219th or Fargo District. 

Richard A. Bennett Oct. 13, i860 1860-1861 

Gideon Yelvington Jan. 16, 1861 1861-1862 

Richard A. Bennett Jan. 16, 1861 1861-1866 

John Daugharty Nov. 3, 1862 1862-1866 

George W. Waldron Mar. 20, 1866 1866-1869 

William C. Bennett Mar. 20, 1866 1866-1869 

Guilford C. Register Dec. 8, 1900 1901-1905 

W. T. Drew (resigned) Jan. 7, 1909 1909-1909 

A. L. Sirmans Sept. 14, 1909 1909-1917 

1224th or Homerville District. 

Lucius C. Mattox Mar. 20, 1865 1865-1867 

Moses Smith Mar. 20, 1865 1865-1867 

Allen Smith Jan. 24, 1867 1867-1869 

J. L. Sweat Jan. 24, 1867 1867-1869 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Name Commissioned 

John L. Morgan, Jr., (res.) May i, 1869 

Erie Edwards Aug. 10, 1869 

John H. Mattox Jan. 21, 1873 

Samuel Narger Feb. 9, 1877 

A. B. Findley Mar. 25, 1880 

Charlton H. Smith Jan. 24, 1881 

John H. Mattox (died) Jan. 22, 1885 

R. M. Crum (resigned) Jan. 9, 1897 

Charlton H. Smith Dec. 19, 1908 

1280th or DuPont District. 

John T. Courson Sept. 12, 1876 

Thomas G. Jenkins Mar. 22, 1877 

John A. Mikell Jan. 24, 1881 

John T. Courson (res.) Jan. 18, 1889 

D. H. Johnson Feb. 14, 1891 

Joseph Jones Jan. 8, 1897 

L. L. DuPont Dec. 8, 1900 

C. C. Lee (resigned) Dec. 7, 1904 

E. B. Register (resigned) Nov. 11, 1905 

C. M. McLamb (resigned) Nov. 14, 1906 

B. F. Hughes Jan. 15, 1915 

1389 or Argyle District. 

James R. Dickerson Jan. 22, 1885 

Peter Williams (resigned) Aug. 20, 1885 

James R. Dickerson Apr. 8, 1887 

J. R. Dickerson (resigned) Jan. 18, 1889 

W. J. Strickland Apr. i, 1891 

W. J. Strickland Jan. 26, 1893 

T. P. Jordan Jan. 12, 1895 

B. A. Harper (resigned) Jan. 12, 1899 

E, L. Tootle Mar. 25, 1916 

1365th or Withers District. 

S. W. Register Jan. 22, 1885 

S. W. Register (resigned) Mar. 23, 1889 



191 



Term of Office 



1869- 


1869 


1869- 


1873 


1873- 


1877 


1877- 


1880 


1880- 


I88I 


I88I- 


1885 


1885- 


1896 


1897- 


1905 


1909- 


I9I7 


1876- 


1877 


1877- 


I88I 


I88I- 


1889 


1889- 


I89I 


I89I- 


1897 


1897- 


1 901 


I90I- 


1905 


1905- 


1905 


1905- 


1906 


1906- 


I9I5 


I9I5- 


I9I7 


1885- 


1885 


1885- 


1887 


1887- 


1889 


1889- 


I89I 


I89I- 


1893 


1893- 


1895 


1895- 


1899 


1899- 


I9IO 


I9I6- 


I9I7 


1885- 


1889 


1889- 


I89I 



192 History of ClincJi County, Georgia 

NOTARIES PUBLIC AND EX-OFFICIO JUSTICES OF THE PEACE 
CLINCH COUNTY. 

586th District. 

Name Commissioned 

C. W. Corbitt Jan. 18, 1869 

Noah H. Griffin Aug. 19, 1870 

Lewis Holtzendorf Aug. i, 1872 

Lewis Strickland (resigned) July 22, 1872 

James E. Sharpe Jan. 15, 1876 

A. J. Whitehurst Jan. 24, 1877 

F. B. Sirmans Oct. 15, 1880 

D. J. Smith Jan. 31, 1885 

Thomas Conine Mar. 16, 1889 

Harris Sirmans (did not Q.)__Mar. 27, 1893 

D. J. Smith Apr. 20, 1894 

F. M. Anderson Nov. 2, 1896 

J. J. Grooms Oct. 26, 1900 

F. M. Anderson Apr. 22, 1902 

970th District. 

Cornelius A. Smith Mar. 4, 1869 

Bryant W. Douglas Feb. 16, 1872 

Wm. C. Joyce (resigned) Feb. 13, 1875 

David O'Quin (died) Jan. 15, 1876 

E. W. O'Quin Jan.31,1885 

H. A. O'Quin Apr. 18, 1898 

P. M. Lee Apr. 14, 1900 

B. S. Register x^pr. 22, 1902 

William Barlow June 7, 1906 

H. T. Hughes May 20, 1911 

Moses Melton Apr. 4, 1913 

105 2d District. 

Thomas D. Hawkins Aug. i, 1872 

John C. Humphreys (res.) Mar. 19, 1880 

James A. Ellis Apr. 3, 1884 



Perm of Office 


1869-] 


[870 


1870- 


[872 


1872- 


[876 


1872- 


1872 


1876- 


1877 


1877- 


1880 


1880- 


i88i; 


1885- 


1889 


1889- 


1893 


1893 




1894- 


1896 


1896- 


1900 


1900- 


1902 


1902- 


1918 


1869- 


1872 


1872- 


1875 


1875- 


1876 


1876- 


1884 


1885- 


1898 


1898- 


1900 


1900- 


1902 


1902- 


1906 


1906- 


1911 


I9II- 


1912 


I913- 


1917 


1872- 


1880 


1880- 


1884 


1884- 


1889 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



193 



Name Commissioned 

R. S. Holtzendorf Mar. 16, 1889 

J. J. Taylor Oct. 17, 1892 

E. R. Rhoden Nov. 2, 1896 

R. L. Rives Apr. 18, 1898 

J. D. Sellars Nov. 18, 1898 

J. Floyd Fender Oct. 27, 1902 

E. J. Futch June 7, 1906 

J. D. Sellars (removed) Aug. 9, 1910 

J. Floyd Fender Nov. 7, 19 13 

R. J. Bennett Apr. 15, 1916 

1 06 1 St District. 

James R. Dickerson Aug. i, 1872 

Ephriam McLendon Jan. 26, 1875 

Elisha Moore Apr. 8, 1887 

Tharp Roberts Apr. 22, 1896 

J. Walter James Apr. 22, 1900 

Tharp Roberts lApr. 22, 1902 

J. Walter James June 7, 1906 

Irwin Corbitt Mar. 30, 1915 



1 141st District. 

Thomas F. Morgan Mar. 4, 

John N. Brady Aug. 19, 

Isham Patterson Aug. i, 

Emory Manor Jan. 24, 

T. F. M. Sweat Oct. 15, 

D. M. Riberon (did not Q.) Jan. 31, 

Joel G. Griffis Mar. 13, 

t. F. M. Sweat Mar. 25, 

Ivy Davis Apr. 17, 

A. B. Griffis Apr. 17, 

William B. North Apr. 29, 

A. B. Griffis May, 12, 



869 

870 
872 
877 
880 
885 
886 
889 
891 
895 
905 
911 



Term of Office 
1889-1892 
1892-1896 
1896-1898 
1898-1898 
1898-1902 
1902-I906 
1906-I9IO 
I91O-1913 
1913-I916 
I916-I920 



1872-1875 
1875-1887 
1887-1896 
1896-I9OO 
190O-I902 
1902-I906 
1906-I915 
I915-I919 



1869- 
1870- 
1872- 
1877- 

i88o- 

1885 

1886- 

1889- 

1891- 

1895- 

1905- 

191 1- 



1870 
1872 
1877 
1880 
1885 

1889 
1891 
1895 
1905 
1910 
1919 



T94 History of Clinch Comity, Georgia 

1219th District. 

Name Commissioned 

A. N. Hagins Mar. 4, 1869 

James L. Crews Aug. i, 1872 

John A. Johnson Apr. 22, 1878 

S. A. Swearingen July 10, 1885 

J. L, Swearingen Apr. 8, 1887 

Peter A. Young (died) Mar. 17, 1891 

W. N. Gibson Apr. 18, 1899 

Peter A. Young, Jr Oct. 28, 1903 

1224th District. 

Robert G. Dickerson Jan. 16, 1869 

John C. Kirkland (died) Sept. 10, 1872 

Charlton H. Smith (resigned) _Dec. 5, 1905 

B. E. Mattox (did not serve) __Dec. 3, 1910 

C. M. Kimrey Mar. 30, 1915 

1280th District. 

Tarlton McMillan Oct. 22, 1868 

David J. Sirmans Aug. 28, 1876 

Z, T. Darby (resigned) Oct. i, 1880 

John A. Whittington Mar. 14, 1882, 

Willis B. Gibbs (died) July 2, 1885 

Thomas D. Colly (resigned) __ Apr. 9, 1892 

W. F. Miley Apr. 20, 1894 

W. J. Tomlinson Apr. 18, 1898 

D. H. Johnson (died) Apr. 22, 1902 

J. H. P. Johnson (resigned) Apr. 18, 1903 

Lyman A. Sirmans Apr. 29, 1905 

J. A. Mobley Nov. 25, 1907 

1365th District. 

J. J. Taylor May, 15, 1885 

Martin A. Taylor (removed) __ Oct. 13, 1893 
A. O. Register (removed) Oct. 26, 1900 



Term of Office 


1869- 


1872 


1872- 


1878 


1878- 


1885 


1885- 


1887 


1887- 


1891 


1891- 


1899 


1899- 


1903 


1903- 


I919 


1869- 


1872 


1872- 


1904 


1905- 


1909 


I9IO 




1915- 


I919 


1868- 


1876 


1876- 


1880 


1880- 


1882 


1882- 


1885 


1885- 


1892 


1892- 


1894 


1894- 


1898 


1898- 


1902 


1902- 


1903 


1903- 


1905 


1905- 


1907 


1907- 


I918 


1885- 


1893 


1893- 


1900 


1900- 


1902 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 195 

Name Commissioned Term of Office 

J R. Allen, Jr. (resigned) Apr. 22, 1902 1902-1905 

John H. McLain (resigned) Apr. 29, 1905 1905-1908 

E. C. Dedge Nov. 11,1908 1908-1910 

J. R. Allen, Jr Aug. 9, 19 10 19 10-19 18 

1389th District. 

James M. Kight July 2, 1885 1885-1898 

J. B. Kirkland (resigned) July 22, 1898 1898-1902 

J. R. Dickerson Apr. 22, 1902 1902-1915 

W.J.Patterson (did not Q.) __Mar. 30, 1915 191 5- 191 5 

W. H. James Nov. i, 1915 1915-1919 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE OF WARE, LOWNDES AND APPLING 
COUNTIES PRIOR TO 185O. 

The following information is given relative to justices of 
Ware County and of Appling and Lowndes Counties, as it 
gives the names of persons who became identified with Clinch 
County when it was created. 

451st District — Commissioned 

D. J. Blackburn Mar. 8, 1830 

D. J. Blackblurn Feb. 12, 1833 

Thomas Newbern Apr. 3, 1833 

Wm. G. Henderson July 2,1834 

John Inman, Sr Jan. 20, 1837 

Wm. S. Bennett Jan. 20, 1837 

Samuel G. Norman June 25, 1838 

Samuel G. Norman Jan. 14, 1841 

Samuel G. Norman Apr. 13,1846 

Thos. I. Henderson Nov. 28, 1851 

584th District — 

Jacob Lightsey Mar. 9, 1840 

Elias F. Stewart June 11, 1845 

R. G. Dickerson June 11, 1845 



196 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

LOWNDES COUNTY. 

664th District — 

Levi J. Knight Jan. 20, 1829 

Abner Sirmans Jan. 20, 1829 

John Mathis, Jr Jan. 23, 1833 

Levi J. Knight Oct. 15, 1838 

Josiah Sirmans Oct. 15, 1838 

Levi J. Knight Jan. 24, 1845 

William Patten Jan. 24, 1845 

658th District — 

David Mathis Jan. 20, 1829 

William Lastinger Nov. 20, 1838 

Wm. C. Newbern Jan. 24, 1845 

66 1 st District — 

Benj. Cornelius Jan. 23, 1833 

Edmund Mathis Nov. 20, 1838 

Jesse W. Carter Nov. 3, 1841 

Jesse W. Carter Dec. 14, 1846 

APPLING COUNTY. 

583d District — 

John Bennett Mar, 17, 1837 

John Bennett Apr. 6, 1842 

Elihu Morgan Mar. 12, 1838 

John L. Morgan Jan. 24, 1845 

George Eason Jan. 20, 1833 

Elihu Morgan Jan. 20, 1833 

443 d District — 

Silas O'Quin Jan. 14, 1841 

CONSTABLES. 

This list, as stated before, does not reach further back than 
1868. Each district is entitled to two constables, one for the 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 197 

justice of the peace and one for notary public. They are 
elected by the people, every two years, but In the absence of 
any election, the justices of the peace may appoint one for 
the unexpired term. Many of these named below were ap- 
pointed. The dates given Indicate when they qualified. 
This list is not complete on account of records. 



1224th District — 

Erie Edwards Jan. 4 

Ervin Johnson Jan. 23 

Pearson H. Robinson (rem. from office) _Apr. 5 
C. W. Boatrlght Dec. 31 

John J. Smith Jan. 2 

Abraham E. Smith Feb. i 

Archibald Bass Mar. 30 

J. C. Kirkland June 8 

Ervin Johnson Jan. 14 

George L. Newbern Sept. i 

J. R. Dickerson Jan. 11 

Sherod Edwards May 18 

J. F. Smith Feb. 26 

John F. Smith Jan. 22 

John A. Whittington Feb. 19 

Bankston E. Mattox Feb. 23 

Eason Smith May 10 

Henry Jurnigan March 5 

A. B. FIndley Nov. 26 

B. A. Whittington Jan. 6 

Eason Smith Jan. 19 

L. J, Sirmans June 22 

L. W. Mattox July 26 

Moses Thornton Nov. 7 

Thomas Singleterry Mar, 25 

Thomas Singleterry Jan. 8 

L. W. Mattox May 5 

John Singleterry Jan. 26 



869 
869 
869 

870 
871 
872 

872 
872 
873 
873 
875 

875 
876 

877 
877 
877 
877 
878 
878 

879 
880 
881 
881 
881 
882 
883 
884 
885 



198 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

J. S. Mattox Jan. 4, 1886 

L. W. Mattox Dec. 7, 1886 

K.C.Smith Jan. 6, 1887 

C. H. Smith Jan. 6, 1887 

C. H. Smith Jan. 24, 1889 

Samuel R. Smith Jan. 3, 1891 

John H. Mattox, Jr. Jan. 5, 1891 

S. D. Findley ^ Jan. 9, 1893 

W. S. Mattox Jan. 9, 1893 

J. G. Kirkland Jan. 22, 1894 

D. E. Kirkland Jan. 4, 1895 

S, A. Sweat Jan. 11, 1897 

E. W. O'Quin Jan. 15, 1897 

A. B. DuBose July 23, 1900 

J. D. Mattox Dec. 26, 1900 

K. C. Smith Jan. 7, 1901 

J. D. Mattox Jan. 3, 1905 

C. C. Smith Jan. 10, 1908 

C. W. Byrd Dec. 18, 1912 

Folks Huxford Jan. 25, 1915 

T. T. Peagler Oct. 9,191^ 

586th District — 

Charlton H. Smith Aug. 6, 1S69 

Cornelius Dawson Jan. 4, 1893 

D. J. Smith Aug. 17, 1874 

Sherod Burkhalter Feb. 21, 1881 

D. J. Smith Nov. 30, 1881 

A. W. Bridges Jan. 20, 1885 

M. L. Corbitt May 28, 1888 

F. M. Anderson Jan. 23, 1889 

D. J. Smith May3i,i890 

C. S. Vining Aug. 16, 1897 

A. W. Downing Feb. __, 1900 

C. S. Vining Sept. 2, 1907 

A. W. Downing Oct. 29, 191 2 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 199 

D. R. Fender Jan. 28, 1913 

A. W. -Downing Aug. 14, 1913 

J. R. Browning _Feb. 17, 1914 

D. B. Browning Apr. i, 1916 

970th District — 

E. W. O'Quin Sept. 6, 1869 

S. D. Findley Jan. 6, 1873 

M. C. Futch Feb. 19, 1876 

E. W. O'Quin Dec. 23, 1882 

Moses A. Thornton June 24, 1882 

B. R. Futch Jan. 4, 1886 

M. H. Billiard June 17, 1889 

P. A. Register Oct. 30, 1889 

James B. Dedge Sept. 27, 1890 

Harris Tomlinson Jan. 5, 1892 

G. W. Thompson Feb. 27, 1893 

M. H. Hllllard Feb. 6, 1893 

Harris Tomlinson Feb. 9, 1897 

B. T. Register Mar. 11, 1899 

P. W. Griffis Feb. 10, 1900 

I. W. Baldree July 22, 1.903 

G. B. Barlow June i, 1905 

S. B. Griffis Mar. 20, 1911 

1 05 2d District — 

D. C. Lancaster June 20, 1870 

John L. Courson Jan. 4, 1873 

S. M. Bennett Jan. 15 ,1873 

John L. Courson 1873 

Julian L. Clark Oct. 20, 1874 

J. T. Whilden June 2, 1875 

James A. Mathis Feb. i, 1879 

C. S. Touchston Sept. 29, 1883 

A. H. TImmerman Jan. 16, 1893 

Paul Pigue Feb. 13, 1893 



200 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

E. S. Knight Feb. 20, 1895 

W. M. Zeigler Jan. 11, 1897 

A. J. Jackson Mar. 22, 1897 

Lewis Dampier Mar. __, 1899 

Lewis Dampier Mar. 19, 1901 

A. W. Downing Feb. 12, 1903 

H. B. Phillips 1903 

L W. Baldree Jan. 4, 1909 

L W- Baldree Oct. 13, 1913 

N. B. Altman June 6, 19 14 

J. B. Amerson Feb. 6, 191 ?; 



1 06 1 St District — 

Peter Jeffords March 4, 

George W. Delk June 5, 

J. M. Jeffords Jan. __, 

Ashford Yeornans Apr. 28, 

Emanuel Smith Mar. 8, 

Jesse Hall Jan. 5, 

J. S. Delk Oct. II, 

J. S. Delk Jan. II, 

Jesse Hall Oct. 3, 

Manning Cowart Nov. 4, 

K. C. Starling Aug. 16, 

F. M. Dawsom Apr. 16, 

Waver Roberts May 24, 

Waver Roberts Mar. 8, 

K. J. Giddens Feb. 14, 

Frank Higgs 



869 
869 

873 
877 
881 
889 
891 

893 
895 
89^ 
897 
902 

899 
901 
909 

915 



1 141st District — 

John H. Miller June 26, 1869 

S. J. C. Blount Feb. 15, 1871 

J. V. Chancey Feb. 25, 1886 

*M. C. Futch Oct. 23, 1895 

C. H. Hilliard June 30, 1906 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 201 



J. M. Futch 

W. W. Willoughby 

1219th District — 

Robert F. Young Dec. 16 

Isaac Baldree Dec. 16 

Isaac R. Baldree Jan. 16 

Isaac W. Baldree Apr. 12 

John M. Young Jan. 18 

William Baldree Oct. 19 

G. C. Register Jan. 2 

R. M. Harrington 

J. I. Evans 

1280th District — 

Willis B. Gibbs Feb. 8, 

John A. Whittington 

Ezekiel Mathis Sept. 22, 

James L. Holloway 

S. M. Bennett June 24, 

J. H. W. Livingston June 7, 

Joseph P. Smith Jan. 20, 

J. H. W. Livingston Jan. 7, 

Joseph Jones Feb. 26, 

W. R. Brack Feb. 2, 

Alonzo Joyce May 2 5 , 

W. D. Blitch Jan. 20, 

W. R. Brack Aug. 5, 

James T. Johnson Jan. 8. 

Melvin Harris Jan. 7, 

C. H. North _Jan. II. 

C. H. North Apr. 21, 

D. D. Fiveash Dec. 31, 

W H. Dame Dec. 31, 

C. H. North Sept. 28, 

C. H. North Dec. 10, 

William E. Smith Mar. 13, 



905 
910 

892 
892 

893 
894 

896 

896 
900 
914 

915 



877 

879 
879 
880 
881 
882 
883 
886 
887 
891 
892 

893 
893 
89^ 

895 
897 

899 
900 

900 
901 
908 
913 



202 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

1365th District — 

J. S. Bennett June 3. 1885 

W. R. Keen Mar. 6, 1885 

S. M. Bennett Jan. 30, 1895 

J. J. Bennett 1916 



1389th District — 

HTram Danforth Jan. 23, 

W. R. Harben June 7, 

R. H. Dickerson June 7, 

John B. Kirkland May 13, 

R. H. Dickerson June 7, 

John B. Kirkland Sept. i, 

John J. Dickerson Feb. 2, 

B, A. Harper June 3, 

J. J. Dickerson Feb. 2, 

J. J. Dickerson Jan, 19, 

James W. James Dec. 24, 

Seward S. Griffis Dec. 24, 

Martin Corbitt Mar. 15, 



885 
888 
888 
887 
889 
892 

893 
893 
895 

899 
908 
908 
916 



CHAPTER XIII. 

A List of Ware and Lowndes County Officers Until the Cre- 
ation of Clinch County. — A list of Appling County Of- 
ficers, 1820-1826. — Jury Commissioners, 1869-1916. — 
County Registrars, 1895-19 16. — Notaries Public. — Road 
Commissioners, 1869-19 13. — Foremen of Grand Juries, 
1 867-1 9 1 6. — Sundry Other Officers. 

Sheriffs of Ware County, 1 826-1 850 — Commissioned 

William G. Henderson Feb. 11, 1826 

William B. Hooker Feb. 11, 1828 

Allen O'Steen Apr. 5, 1830 

John Newbern Jan. 23, 1832 

Thomas I. Henderson March i, 1834 

Miles J. Guest Jan. 28, 1836 

Richard Bourn Jan. 26, 1838 

David J. Miller Jan. 20, 1840 

Richard Bourn Jan. 20, 1842 

Miles J. Guest Jan. 16, 1844 

William Tomblin (resigned) Jan. 26, 1846 

Daniel Lott Feb. 8, 1847 

Burrell Sweat Jan. 22, 1848 

Clerks of Superior Court, Ware County, 1 826-1 850 — 

Joseph Bryan Feb. 11, 1826 

Thomas Hilliard Feb. 11, 1828 

Thomas Hilliard x\pril 5, 1830 

David J. Miller Jan. 23, 1832 

Elijah Mattox Mar. i, 1834 

John S. Henderson Jan. 28, 1836 

David J. Miller Jan. 26, 1838 

Geo. B. Williamson Jan. 20, 1840 

Thomas Hilliard Jan. 20, 1842 

Thomas Hilliard Jan. 16, 1844 



204 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

William A. McDonald Jan. 26, 

Geo. B. Williamson Jan. 29, 

Geo. B. Williamson Jan. 22, 



Surveyors of Ware County, 1 826-1 850 — 

Zachariah Davis Feb. 11,1826 

Thomas Newbern Feb. 11, 1828 

John O'Steen Apr. 5, 1830 

William Thomas Jan. 23, 1832 

William VanZant Mar. i, 1834 

D. J. Blackburn Jan. 28, 1836 

D. J. Blackburn Jan. 26, 1838 

Elijah Mattox Jan. 16, 1844 

Nathan Brewton Jan. 26, 1846 

Elijah Mattox Jan. 22, 1848 

Coroners of Ware County, 1 826-1 850 — 

Joshua Sharp Feb. 11, 1826 

Elisha Green Feb. 11,1828 

Wilkins Fulwood Apr. 5, 1830 

John Beasley Jan. 23, 1832 

Wilkins Fulwood Mar. i, 1834 

Wilkins Fulwood Jan. 28, 1836 

Wilkins Fulwood Jan. 26, 1838 

Nathan Sweat Jan. 20, 1842 

John Jourdan Jan. 16, 1844 

Wilkins Fulwood Jan. 26, 1846 

Justices of Inferior Court, Ware County — 

Note. — Only a few are given that are of particular in- 
terest to Clinch County. 
First Justices : 

William Smith Mar. 2, 1825 

Soloman Hall Mar. 2, 1825 

John L. Stewart, Jr Mar. 2, 1825 

Philemon Bryan Mar. 2, 1825 

Absalom Thomas Mar. 2, 1825 



846 

847 
848 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 205 

Others : 

Thomas Newbern Apr. 28, 1830 

James Fulwood Feb. 12, 1833 

Thomas HilHard Feb. 12, 1833 

John S. Henderson Mar, 10, 1835 

Thomas HilHard Jan. 17, 1837 

OHver Waldron Jan. 17, 1837 

Manning Smith Mar. 19, 1845 

James Inman Oct. 29, 1846 

Tyre Mathis Jan. 15, 1849 

Wm. A. McDonald Jan. 15, 1849 

Senators and Representatives from Ware County, 

1825-1850 — 

Senators Session Representatives Session 

Philemon Bryan 1825-1826 John L. Stewart 1825-1827 
Joseph Dyall 1 826-1 827 John J. H. Davis 1 827-1 830 

James Fulwood 1 827-1 835 Thomas HilHard 1 830-1 840 
Randal McDonald 1835-36 Josiah Stewart 1 840-1 841 
James Fulwood 1 836-1 839 Thomas HilHard 1 841-1842 
Elijah Mattox 1 839-1 840 Wm. A. McDonald 1842-43 
James Strickland 1840-1841 John S.Henderson 1843- 1845 
James Fulwood 1 841-1843 Thomas HilHard 1 845-1 847 
Jacob Lightsey 1843 -1845 Wm. A. McDonald 1847-50 

Note. — Each county was entitled to a State senator until 
1845. After this it was changed to senatorial districts, as it 
is now. In 1851 it was changed back and remained as of old 
until 1 86 1. This will fully appear by reference to the list of 
senators from Clinch County and the fifth district. 

Sheriffs of Lowndes County, 1 826-1 850 — 

William Hancock May 29, 1826 

Malachi Monk Jan. 29, 1828 

William Hancock Jan. 20, 1830 

Henry Blair Jan. 18, 1832 

Edward M. Henderson April 4, 1834 



2o6 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Martin Shaw, Jr Jan. 25, 1836 

William C. Newbern Jan. 15, 1838 

James S. Burnett : May 7, 1838 

James S. Burnett Jan. 20, 1840 

Morgan G. Swain Jan. 20, 1842 

Cyprian Brinson Jan. 16, 1844 

Thomas B, Griffin Jan. 13, 1846 

Richard Allen Jan. 22, 1848 

Clerks Superior Court, Lowndes County, 1826-18 50 — 

Henry Blair May 29, 1826 

William Smith Jan. 29, 1828 Until 1842 

William T. Johnson Jan. 20, 1842 

Duncan Smith Jan. 16, 1844 Until 1850 

Surveyors of Lowndes County, 1 826-1 850 — 

Samuel M. Clyatt May 29, 1826 Until 1842 

Jeremiah Wilson Jan. 20, 1842 Until 1850 

Coroners of Lowndes County, 1 826-1 850 — 

Malachi Monk May 29, 1826 Until 1832 

James Hightower Jan. 18, 1832 

John Hill Apr. 4, 1834 Until 1839 

A. Vann Jan. 28, 1839 

Daniel Humphrey Jan. 20, 1842 

Daniel Humphrey Jan. 16, 1844 

William McCardell Jan. 13, 1846 

William McCardell Jan. 22, 1848 

Senators and Representatives from Lowndes County, 

1826-1850 — 

Senators Session Senators Session 

William A. Knight 1 826-1 827 Levi J. Knight 1834-1835 
William Blair 1827-1831 John Pike 1835-1837 

Randall Folsom 1831-1832 Levi J. Knight 1837-1841 
Levi J. Knight 1832-1833 Samuel M. Clyatt 1841-1845 
Hamilton W. Sharpe 1833-34 *i 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 207 

Representatives Session Representatives Session 

Jonathan Knight 1826-1827 Israel F. Waldhour and 
Jesse Carter 1 827-1 828 Benjamin Sirmans 1840-41 

Benjamin Sirmans 1 828-1 830 George Carter and 
John Blackshear 1 830-1 833 John W. Spain 1 841-1843 

Henry Blair 1 833-1 834 George Carter and 

John Blackshear 1834-1837 William Jones 1843-1845 

Joshua Kemp 1 837-1 838 James McMullen 1 845-1 847 

Archibald Graham and Cyprian Brinson 1847- 1849 
Benjamin Sirmans 1838-40 George Carter 1849-1850 

Sheriffs of Appling County, 1820-1826 — 

Wniiam Carter Oct. 6, 1820 

Edmund P. Wester Jan. 16, 1822 

Joseph G. Jenkins Feb. 17, 1824 

Clerks Superior Court, Appling County, 1 820-1 826 — 

John Bailey Oct. 6, 1820 

John McAuley Jan. 16, 1822 

John McAuley Feb. 17, 1824 

Surveyors Appling County, 1 820-1 826 — 

Daniel S. Whitehurst Oct. 6, 1820 

John Stewart Jan. 16, 1822 

John L. Stewart Feb. 17, 1824 

Coroners of AppHng County, 1820-18 26 — 

James Mixon Oct. 6, 1820 

Daniel Campbell Jan. 16, 1822 

Malcolm Morrison Apr. 15. 1825 

Jury Commissioners, Clinch County, 1869-19 16 — 

Note. — (*) removed from County; (f) resigned. 

Set A. Dist. Appointed Term Expired 

Joseph Sirmans 586 March 23, 1869 June 1,1870 

David D.Mahon 1052 June 1,1870 June 1,1872 

Tohn W. HTodges 1224 June 1,1872 June 1,1874 

John W.Hodges 1224 April.., 1874 June 1,1876 



208 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 







Appointed 


Term < 


jxpired 


H. A. Mattox 


1224 


Mar. 4,1880 


Jan. 


1, 1886 


M. M. Caswell* 


1224 


Jan. 1,1886 


Jan. 


1, 1892 


W. H. Gary 


1224 


Jan. 1,1888 


Jan. 


1, 1892 


H. A. Mattox 


1224 


Jan. 1,1892 


Jan. 


1, 1898 


W. A. Ecord 


1224 


Jan. 1,1898 


Jan. 


1, 1904 


William T. Howell 


586 


Jan. 1,1906 


Jan. 


1, 1910 


S. R. Kirton 


1389 


May 4,1910 


Ma}^ 


4, 1916 


SetB. 










George W. Newbern 1224 


Mar. 23 1869 


June 


1, 1870 


Thomas G. Ramsey 


1224 


June 1,1870 


June 


1, 1872 


Thomas G. Ramsey 


1224 


June 1,1872 


June 


1, 1874 


H. A, Mattox 


1224 


April __, 1874 


June 


1, 1876 


G. G. Foreman 


1052 


Mar 4,1880 


Jan. 


1, 1886 


F. R. Sirmans 


586 


Jan. 1,1886 


Jan. 


1, 1892 


J. C. Humphreys* 


1052 


Jan. 1,1892 


Jan. 


1, 1898 


F. B. Sirmans 


586 


April 12, 1894 


Jan. 


1, 1898 


F. B. Sirmans 


586 


Jan. 1,1898 


Jan. 


1,1904 


B. E. Mattox 


1224 


April 13, 1906 


April 12, 1910 


B. E. Mattox 


1224 


May 4,1910 


May 


4, 1916 


SetC. 










James C. Smith 


970 


Mar. 23, 1869 


June 


1, 1870 


George W. Waldron 


1141 


June 1,1870 


June 


1, 1892 


James C. Smith 


970 


June 1,1872 


June 


1, 1874 


Alfred Newbern 


1224 


April _-,1874 


April 


__, 1876 


M. M. Caswell 


1224 


April __,1876 


June 


1, 1880 


Solomon Moblev 


1219 


Mar. 4,1880 


Jan. 


1, 1884 


W. B. N. Crews 


1052 


Jan. 1,1887 


Jan. 


1, 1890 


A. J. Caswell (died) 


1224 


Jan. 1,1890 


Jan. 


1, 1894 


James R. Dickerson 1389 


April 12, 1894 


Jan. 


1, 1896 


James R. Dickerson 


1389 


Jan. 1,1896 


Jan. 


1, 1902 


James R. Dickerson 1389 


April 17, 1902 


Jan. 


1,1908 


M. S. Eason 


970 


April 17, 1908 


April 15, 1914 


John M. Smith 


586 


April 17, 1914 


April 15, 1918 


SetD. 










Jonathan L. Morgan 


1141 


Mar. 4,1880 


Jan. 


1, 1884 


Charles H. North 


1280 


Mar. __, 1887 


Jan. 


1, 1890 


W. S. Fender* 


1052 


Jan. 1,1890 


Jan. 


1, 1894 


B. J. Sirmans 


1280 


April 12, 1894 


Jan. 


1, 1896 


B. J. Sirmans 


1280 


Jan. 1,1896 


Jan. 


1, 1902 


B. J. Sirmans* 


1280 


April 17, 1902 


Jan. 


1, 1904 


D. D. Fiveash 


1280 


April 25, 1904 


April 13, 1906 


0. P. Register 


1280 


April 13, 1906 


April 13, 1908 


O.P. Register (died) 


1280 


April 15, 1908 


Jan. 


1, 1914 


J. F. Daugharty 
SetE. 


1219 


Mar. 24, 1914 














Simon P. White 


1061 


Mar. 4,1880 


Jan. 


1, 1882 


Elisha Moore 


1061 


Mar. __, 1887 


Mar. 


1, 1888 


Isham Patterson 


1141 


Mar. __, 1888 


Jan. 


1, 1894 


Elisha Moore 


1061 


Jan. 1,1894 


Jan. 


1, 1900 


J. W. James* 


1061 


April 12, 1900 


April 17, 1902 


B. E. Mattox 


1224 


April 17, 1902 


April 


12, 1904 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 209 







Appointed 


Term expired 


George M. Dame 


1224 


April 25, 1904 


April 13, 1906 


W. H. Hinson 


1389 


April 13, 1906 


April 13, 1912 


W. H. Hinson 


1389 


April 13, 1912 


April 13, 1916 


SetF. 






( 


D. H. Johnson 


1280 


Mar. 4,1880 


Jan. 1,1882 


J. L. Morgan 


1141 


Mar. __, 1887 


Jan. 1,1888 


Ivy Davis 


1141 


, 1890 


Jan. 1,1896 


W. T. Rives 


1141 


April 17, 1896 


Jan. 1,1900 


W. j. Rives 


1141 


April 12, 1900 


April 12, 1904 


M. Co wart* 


1061 


April 13, 1906 


April 13, 1908 


Moses Tomlinson,t 


1052 


April 15, 1908 


April 15, 1910 


J. Flovd Fender 


1052 


Tune 28, 1910 


April 13, 1912 


J. Floyd Fender 


1052 


April 13, 1912 


April 13, 1916 



County Registrars, 1895-19 16 — 

(Terms: Two years each.) 

B. E. Mattox and C. C. Drawdy, Democrats, and C. C. 
Bridges, Populist, appointed Jan. 26, 1895. 

L. C. Mattox, Populist, vice C. C. Bridges, removed, ap- 
pointed Sept. 24, 1896. 

B. E. Mattox and C. C. Drawdy, Democrats, and J. M. 
Kig.ht, Populist, appointed July 18, 1898. 

B. E. Mattox and W. H. Gary, Democrats, and J. M. 
Kight, Populist, appointed April 12, 1900. 

J. T. Dame and J. F. Daugharty, Democrats, and J. M. 
Kight, Populist, appointed April 17, 1902. 

B. E. Mattox and R. M. Crum, Democrats, and J. M. 
Kight, Populist, appointed April 25, 1904. 

C. C. Drawdy, Democrat, vice B. E. Mattox, resigned, ap- 
pointed June 15, 1904. 

C. C. Drawdy and R. M. Crum, Democrats, and , 

Populist, appointed April 13, 1906. 

B. E. Mattox, R. M. Crum and B. A. Harper, Democrats, 
appointed Oct. 20, 1909. 

Geo. M. Dame, Democrat, vice R. M. Crum, deceased, 
appointed Dec. 24, 1909. 

B. E. Mattox, George M. Dame and B. A. Harper, Dem- 
ocrats, appointed , 1912. 

C. H. Smith, J. T. Dame and W. J. Wallace, Democrats, 
appointed March 25, 1914. 



2IO History of Clinch County, Georgia 

B. A. Harper, Democrat, vice W. J. Wallace, deceased, 
appointed May 15, 19 14. 

C. H. Smith, Folks Huxford and I. W. Allen, Democrats, 
appointed March 28, 1916. 

Commercial Notaries Public of Clinch County — 
(Terms: 4 Years Each.) 



Name 


District 


Appoir 


ited 


Simon W. Hitch 


1224 


Dec. 23, 


1868 


Lee L. DuPont 


1280 


Mar. 5, 


1894 


Robert L. Rives 


1219 


Mar. 5, 


1894 


B. A. Harper 


1389 


Oct. 27, 


1896 


Harrison H. Guess 


586 


May 8, 


1897 


W. B. Hamby 


1219 


May 21, 


1897 


NoDle A. Sirmans 


1280 


May 7, 


1898 


S. C. Townsend 


1224 


Oct. 25, 


1900 


W. B. Hamby 


1219 


June 17, 


1901 


Harrison H. Guess 


586 


Dec. 24, 


1901 


Jesse Grantham 


1224 


Mar. 3, 


1902 


C. J. Mainor 


586 


April 6, 


1903 


M. A. McDowell 


1224 


June 2, 


1903 


H. J. Dame 


1224 


Jan. 6, 


1906 


Harrison H. Guess 


586 


Jan. 13, 


1906 


J. Tom Faulk 


1224 


Jan. 23, 


1906 


John M. Agee 


1052 


April 9, 


1907 


S. R. Kirton 


1219 


Oct. 17, 


1906 


John F. Hughes 


1224 


Mar. II, 


1907 


H. M. Peagler 


1224 


Oct. 23, 


1907 


S. C. Patterson 


1389 


May 14, 


1908 


Harrison H. Guess 


586 


Jan. 13, 


1910 


H. J. Dame 


1224 


May 3, 


1910 


S. R. Kirton 


1219 


May 3, 


1910 


J. J. Langdale 


1219 


Aug. 8, 


1910 


John F. Hughes 


1224 


Mar. 14, 


191 1 


Calvin B. McRae 


1219 


Mar. 17, 


191 1 


G. A. Gibbs 


1224 


Dec. 20, 


191 1 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



21 I 



Name District 

C. A. Cotter 1224 

W. H. Myddleton 12 19 

F. F. Cornelius 12 19 
E. B. Register 1224 
Harrison H. Guess 586 
S. R. Kirton 1389 
J. J. Langdale 12 19 
Folks Huxford 1224 
W. H. Moncrief 1224 

G. A. Gibbs 1224 



Appointed 

Mar. 8, 1912 
June 25, 1912 
July 10, 1913 

Aug. 28, 1913 
Feb. 17, 1914 

iviar. 24, 1914 
July 4, 1914 

Nov. 18, 1914 
Oct. 26, 19 1 5 
Dec. 20, 1 91 5 



Road Commissioners, Clinch County, 1 869-191 5 — 
(Three Commissioners for each District.) 



586th District. 



Name 
D. H. Johnson 
D. H. Johnson 
A. J. Whitehurst 
W. J. Lee 
A. J. Whitehurst 
W. J. Lee 
W. J. Lee 
Harris Sirmans 
Harris Sirmans 
Harris Sirmans 
A. J. Whitehurst 
Elbert Burkhalter 
Harris Sirmans 
C. C. Bridges 
C. F. Brack 
C. F. Brack 
Randol Brogdon 
Joseph Powell 
Joseph Powell 
Joseph Powell 
Joseph Powell 
Joseph Powell 
Joseph Powell 
Joseph Powell 



James C. Smith 
William Register 
James C. Smith 
James Brown 



Name 


Name 


Ap 


pointed 


D. J. Sirmans 


W. S. Tomlinson 


Jan. 


18, 1869 


D. J. Sirmans 


W. S. Tomlinson 


Mar. 


4, 1871 


D. J. Sirmans 


W. S. Tomlinson 


Feb. 


23, 1872 


D. H. Johnson 


C. W. Curry 


Mar. 21, 1873 


D. H. Johnson 


C. W. Curry 


Feb. 


__, 1874 


Moses Smith 


C. W. Curry 


Feb. 


__, 1875 


D. H. Johnson 


C. W. Curry 


Jan. 


._, 1876 


M. S. Corbitt 


Moses Smith 


Feb. 


__, 1877 


C. W. Curry 


Moses Smith 


Feb. 


16, 1878 


D. H. Johnson 


C. W. Curry 


Jan. 


6, 1879 


D. H. Johnson 


F. B. Sirmans 


Feb. 


2, 1880 


Moses Smith 


F. B. Sirmans 


Apr. 


5, 1881 


Moses Smith 


F. B. Sirmans 


Mar. 


7, 1883 


Benj. Smith 


Jas. M. Corbitt 


Feb. 


25, 1887 


Benj. Smith 


Moses Smith 


Feb. 


25, 1889 


Moses Smith 


F. M. Anderson 


Feb. 


2, 1891 


John King 


S. L. Mainor 


Feb. 


6, 1893 


F. AL Anderson 


F. B. Sirmans 


Feb. 


4, 1901 


M. C. Tomlinson 


Tohn Pafford 


Jan. 


1, 1903 


F. M. Anderson 


"M. B. Pafiford 


Jan. 


2, 1905 


F. M. Anderson 


T. M. Smith 


Jan. 


7, 1907 


Marcus Tomlinson J. M. Smith 


Jan. 


4, 1909 


MarcusTomlinson J. M. Smith 


Jan. 


2,1911 


MarcusTomlinson L. H. Lee 


Mar 


3,1913 


970th 


District. 






Jesse Smith 


William Gaines 


July 


._, 1868 


Tesse Smith 


Benj. Stalvey 


Tan. 


18, 1869 


i::. A. Smith 


Matthew Fiveash 


julv 


5, 1869 


Elisha Higgs 


Geo. A. Fiveash 


Feb. 


12, 1870 



212 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



Name 


Name 


Name 


Appointed 


William Gaines 


Jesse Smith 


Geo. A. Fiveash 


Mar. 


4, 1871 


William Gaines 


l.W. Futch 


B. W. Douglass 


Feb. 


23, 1872 


Eli W. O'Quin 


J. W. Futch 


Jesse Smith 


Mar. 


21, 1873 


Eli W. O'Quin 


Wm. Tomlinson 


Jesse Smith 


Feb. 


__, 1874 


William Joyce 


Wm. Tomlinson 


Geo. A. Fiveash 


Feb. 


__, 1875 


Eli W. O'Quin 


M. C. Futch 


Nelion Green 


Jan. 


-_, 1876 


William Joyce 


M. C. Futch 


David O'Quin 


Feb. 


__, 1877 


William Joyce 


M. C. Futch 


David O'Quin 


Feb. 


16, 1878 


William Joyce 


M. C. Futch 


David O'Quin 


Jan. 


6, 1879 


William Joyce 


las. M. Smith Tr. 


David O'Quin 


Feb. 


2, 1880 


William Joyce 


M. C. Futch 


H. A. O'Quin 


Apr. 


5, 1881 


William Barlow 


J. M. Mobley 




Mar. 


7. 1883 


Eli W. O'Quin 


William Barlow 


Tas.M. Sm-ith 


Feb. 25; 1887 


Eli W. O'Quin 


E. J. Futch 


las. M. Smith 


Feb. 25, 1889 


Eli W. O'Quin 


Tas. M. Futch 


E. T. Futch 


Feb. 


2, 1891 


A. R. Register 


[as. M. Smith 


E. T. Futch 


Feb. 


6. 1893 


B. S. Register 


P. W. Griffis 


M. H. Hilliard 


Feb. 


4, 1901 


W. B. Griffis 


E. T. Futch 


M. H. Hilliard 


Jan. 


1, 1903 


W. B. Griffis 


J. H. Ferdon 


B. S. Register 


Jan. 


2, 1905 


W. B. Griffis 


Matthew Stalvev 


M. H. Hilliard 


Jan. 


7, 1907 


W. B. Griffis 


M. S. Eason 


M. H. Hilliard 


Jan, 


4, 1909 


W. B. Griffis 


M. S. Eason 


M. H. Hilliard 


Jan. 


2,1911 


W. B. Griffi? 


Matthew Stalvey 


M. H. Hilliard 


Mar. 


3, 1913 




1 05 2d District. 






D. D. Mahon 


Q. B. Staten 




Jan. 


18. 1869 


D. D. Mahon 


Q. B. Staten 


E. J. Sirmans 


Mar. 


4 


1871 


G. G. Foreman, 


Q. B. Staten 


E. J. Sirmans 


Feb. 


23 


1872 


G. G. Foreman, 


D. C. Lancaster 


John Knight 


Mar. 


21 


1873 


G. G. Foreman, 


Wm. Touchstone 


John Knight 


Feb. 


__ 


1874 


G. G. Foreman, 


Wm. Touchstone 


John Knight 


Feb. 


__ 


1875 


G. C. Foreman 


Wm. Touchstone 


John Knight 


Tan. 




1876 


J. R.G.Hamilton 


John Touchstone 


Tohn KnigHt 


Feb. 


__ 


1877 


T. R.G. Hamilton 


'William H. Green 


S. W. Register 


Feb. 


16 


1878 


"W. S. Phillips 


E. J. Sirmans 


S. W. Register 


Tan. 


6 


1879 


W. S. Phillips 


T. W. Howell 


S. W. Register 


Feb. 


2 


1880 


W. B. N. Crews 


Wm. Touchstone 


Tohn Knight 


Apr. 


5 


1881 


J. C. Humphreys 


D. M. Crews 


C. M. D. Howell 


Mar. 


7 


1883 


J. C. Humphreys 


W. B. N. Crews 


T. R. Allen 


Feb. 25 


1887 


T. C. Humphreys 


W. B. N. Crews 


j. R. Allen 


Feb. 


25 


1889 


R. S. Holtzendorf 


W. B. N. Crews 


T. R. Allen 


Feb. 


2 


1891 


J. Floyd Fender 


C. S. Touchstone 


T. R. Allen 


Feb. 


6 


1893 


James A. Mathis 


H. A. Tomlinson 


T. R. Allen 


Feb. 


4 


1901 


T. T. Tohnson 


M. M. Cowart 


T. R. Allen 


Jan. 


1 


1903 


E. T. Futch 


M. F. Timmerman H. A. Tomlinson 


Jan. 


2 


1905 


E. T. Futch 


J. A. Holtzendorf 


H. A. Tomlinson 


Jan. 


7 


1907 


I. W. Allen 


A. H. Timmerman Wm. Tomlinson 


Jan. 


4 


1909 


I. W. Allen 


A. H. Timmerman Wm. Tomlinson 


Jan. 


2 


1911 


I. W. Allen 


H. A. Tomlinson 


Wm. Tomlinson 


Mar. 


3 


1913 




1 06 1st District. 






Chas. A. Griffis 


Wm. T. Bennett 


John Smith 


Tan. 


18, 1869 


Chas. A. Griffis 


George W. Delk 


John T. Morgan 


Feb. 


12 


1870 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



213 



Name 
Chas. A. Griffis 
Chas. A. Griffis 
Chas. A. Griffis 
Chas. A. Griffis 
Chas. A. Griffis 
Chas. A. Griffis 
Chas. A. Griffis 
William Griffis 
William Griffis 
William Griffis 
William Griffis 
William Griffis 
Ehas Griffis 
George W. Delk 
Elias Griffis 
Irwin Corbitt 
Irwin Corbitt 
S. A. Lastinger 
S. A. Lastinger 
Newsom Corbitt 
L. H. Locklier 
L. H. Locklier 
Elias L. Griffis 



Name 
Duncan Giddens 
Duncan Giddens 
H. P. Williams 
H. P. Williams 
H. P. Williams 
H. P. Williams 
K. C. Cowart 
J. R. Dickerson 
J. R. Dickerson 
J. R. Dickerson 
J. R. Dickerson 
E. C. Hodges 
E. C. Hodges 
E. C. Hodges 
Matthew Cowart 
E. C. Hodges 
W. T. Corbitt 
W\ T. Corbitt 
W. T. Corbitt 
W. J. Corbitt 
W. J. Corbitt 
W. J. Corbitt 
Miles J. Guest 



Name 
J. R. Dickerson 
J. R. Dickerson 
J. R. Dickerson 
Simon P. White 
William Griffis 
Simon P. White 
John Moore 
John Moore 
Simon P. White 
Ephriam McLendon 
T. S. Williams 
Simon P. White 
John H. Smith 
F. M. Guest 
Elisha Moore 
F. M. Guest 
W. J. Griffis 
Rowan Mizell 
Manning Cowart 
J. W. James 
K. T. Giddens 
K. J. Giddens 
Manning Cowart 



1 141st District. 



W. J. Rives 
W. J. Rives 
David M. Riberon 
David M. Riberon 
Ivy Davis 
Ivy Davis 
Jerry Davis 
Ivy Davis 
J. L. Morgan 
J. L. Morgan 
J. L. Morgan 
J. L. Morgan 
Ivy Davis 
Ivy Davis 
Ivy Davis 
Ivy Davis 
J. C. McFoy 
J. C. McFoy 
W. H. Chauncey 
J. J. Riberon 
J. J. Riberon 
T. J. Riberon 
W. A. Tavlor 
B. F. Evans 
J. J. Riberon 



W. B. North 
W. B. North 
James North 
James North 
James North 
James North 
Tames North 
W. B. North 
John R. Inman 
John R. Inman 
John R. Inman 
John R. Inman 
Isham Patterson 
Isham Patterson 
Isham Patterson 
Isham Patterson 
Wm. P. North 
D. M. Riberon 
A. B. Griffis 
A. B. Griffis 
A. B. Griffis 
A. B. Griffis 
A. B. Griffis 
A. B. Griffis 
A. B. Griffis 



G. W. Waldron 
G. W. Waldron 
Isham Patterson 
Isham Patterson 
Isham Patterson 
Isham Patterson 
Isham Patterson 
G. W. Thornton 
G. W. Thornton 
David G. Mathis 
David G. Mathis 
David G. Mathis 

F. C. Folks 
David M. Riberon 
T. F. M. Sweat 

T. F. M. Sweat 

G. W. Daugharty 
G. W. Daugharty 
G. W. Daugharty 
L. T. Daugharty 
L. T. Daugharty 
T. F. Barnhill 

T. F. Barnhill 
T. F. Barnhill 
B. F. Evans 



Appointed 
Mar. 4,1871 
Feb. 23 
Mar. 21 
Feb. - 
Feb. -_: 
Jan. __ 
Feb. _- 
Feb. 16 
Jan. 6 
Feb. 2 
Apr. 5 
Mar. 7 
Feb. 25 
Feb. 25 
Feb. 2 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Mar. 



July -. 
Jan. 18 
Mar. 4 
Feb. 23 
Mar. 21 
Feb. - 
Feb. - 

Tan. __ 
Feb. -_ 
Feb. 16 

Tan, 6 
Feb. 2 
Apr. 5 
Mar 
Feb. 25 
Feb. 25 
Feb. 2 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 4 

Tan. 1 

Tan. 2 
Jan. 7 

Tan. 4 
Jan. 2 
Mar 



1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1883 
1887 
1889 
1891 
1893 
1901 
1903 
1905 
1907 
1909 
1911 
1913 



,1868 
, 1869 
,1871 
,1872 
, 1873 
, 1874 
,1875 
,1876 
,1877 
,1878 
,1879 
,1880 
,1881 
, 1883 
,1887 
,1889 
,1891 
, 1893 
,1901 
,1903 
,1905 
,1907 
,1909 
,1911 
,1913 



14 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



1219th District. 



Name 


Name 


Name 


Appointed 


John Sears 


Ichabod Foreacre James Lee 


Jan. 


18, 1869 


Hiram Sears 


Ichabod Foreacre 


John M. Dowling 


Mar. 


4, 1871 


Hiram Sears 


Solomon Mobley 


John Collins 


Feb. 


23, 1872 


Peter Lastinger 


John Jourdan, Sr. 


John Collins 


Mar. 


21, 1873 


Peter Lastinger 


John Jourdan, Sr. 


John Collins 


Feb. 


_-, 1874 


Solomon Mobley 


John Jourdan, Sr. 


John Collins 


Feb. 


-, 1875 


Solomon Mobley 


Ichabod Foreacre 


John A. Johnson 


Jan. 


._, 1876 


Solomon Mobley 


A. T. Jourdan 


Frank Daugharty 


Feb. 


__, 1877 


Solomon Mobley 


A. T. Jourdan 


Ichabod Foreacre 


Feb. 


16, 1878 


Solomon Mobley 


Ichabod Foreacre 


John A. Johnson 


Jan. 


6, 1879 


Solomon Mobley 


A. T. Jourdan 


John A. Johnson 


Feb. 


2, 1880 


Solomon Mobley 


Ichabod Foreacre 


John A. Johnson 


Apr. 


5, 1881 


Sam'l Swearingen 


A. T. Jourdan 


A. R. Mixon 


Mar. 


7, 1883 


Solomon Mobley 


A. T. Tourdan 


J. G. Mixon 


Feb. 25, 1887 


J. L. Swearingen 


William Griffin 


J. G. Mixon 


Feb. 


25, 1889 


J. L. Swearingen 


S. S. Mobley 


W. B. Griffis 


Oct. 


7, 1890 


J. L. Swearingen 


Aaron Foreacre 


Irwin Baldree 


Feb. 


2, 1891 


J. L. Swearingen 


Aaron Foreacre 


Peter A. Young 


Feb. 


6, 1893 


G. C. Register 


W. H. Moblev 


Henry Rives 


Feb. 


4, 1901 


G. C. Register 


W. H. Mobley 


John M. Young 


Jan. 


1, 1903 


G. C. Register 


W. H. Mobley 


John M. Young 


Jan. 


2,1905 


G. C. Register 


G. W. Daughartv 


John M. Young 


Jan. 


7, 1907 


W. T. Drew 


G. C. Register 


Peter A. Young 


Jan. 


4,1909 


A. L. Sirmans 


W. H. Rives 


John M. Young 


Jan. 


2, 1911 


A. L. Sirmans 


W. H. Rives 

1224th 


John M. Young 
District. 


Mar. 


3,1913 


J. L. Sweat 


John W. Hodges 


R. G. Dickerson 


Jan. 


18, 1869 


J. L. Sweat 


John W. Hodges 


R. G. Dickerson 


Mar. 


4, 1871 


Erie Edwards 


John H. Mattox 


Robert B. Crum 


Feb. 


23, 1872 


J. C. Kirkland 


John W. Hodges 


H. A. Mattox 


Mar. 


21, 1873 


J. C. Kirkland 


John W. Hodges 


H. A. Mattox 


Feb. 


-_, 1874 


John H. Mattox 


A. J. Caswell 


H. A. Mattox 


Feb. 


._, 1875 


J. C. Kirkland 


Alfred Newbern 


J. R. Dickerson 


Jan. 


__, 1876 


Samuel Narger 


Alfred Newbern 


James M. Kight 


Feb. 


__, 1877 


Samuel Narger 


H. A. Mattox 


James M. Kight 


Feb. 


16, 1878 


T. C. Kirkland 


H. A. Mattox 


James M. Kight 


Tan. 


6, 1879 


J. C. Kirkland 


H. A. Mattox 


C. H. Smith 


Feb. 


2, 1880 


Peter Williams 


W. H. Gary 


C. H. Smith 


Apr. 


5, 1881 


Moses Thornton 


A. J. Berg 


C. H. Smith 


Mar. 


7, 1883 


John H. Mattox 


Daniel Dickerson 


0. F. Mattox 


Feb. 


25, 1887 


John H. Mattox 


Daniel Dickerson 


John J. Smith 


Feb. 


25, 1889 


John H. Mattox 


Daniel O'Steen 


"S. R. Smith 


Feb. 


6, 1893 


Robert M. Crum 


Jonathan O'Steen 


S. R. Smith 


Feb. 


4, 1901 


Robert M. Crum 


Daniel O'Steen 


S. R. Smith 


Jan. 


1, 1903 


Robert M. Crum 


Daniel O'Steen 


S. R. Smith 


Jan. 


2, 1905 


C. H. Dickerson 


Daniel O'Steen 


A. B. Smith 


Jan. 


7, 1907 


T. B. Dickerson 


J. S. Kirkland 


A. B. Smith 


Jan. 


4,1909 


T. B. Dickerson 


J. S. Kirkland 


A. B. Smith 


Tan. 


2,1911 


C. H. Smith 


T. S. Kirkland 


A. B. Smith 


Mar. 


3, 1913 


T. G. Jenkins 


David J. Sirmans 


J. G. Tomlinson 


Feb. 


__, 1877 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



215 



1280th District. 



Name 


Name 


Name 


Appointed 


T. G. Jenkins 


David J. Sirmans 


J. G. Tomlinson 


Feb. 


16, 1878 


P. M. Lee 


David J. Sirmans 


Levin Tomlinson 


Jan. 


6, 1879 


P. M. Lee 


David J. Sirmans 


George Cornelius 


Feb. 


2, 1880 


R. B.Johnson 


David J. Sirmans 


George Cornelius 


Apr. 


5, 1881 


R. B.Johnson 


D. J. Sirmans, Jr. 


Tohn A. Mikell 


Mar. 


7, 1883 


P. M. Lee 


C, H. North 


John A. Mikell 


Feb. 25, 1887 


John T. Courson 


F. D. CHfton 


P. M. Lee 


Feb. 


25, 1889 


John T. Courson 


J. W. Holloway 


Artemus Rice 


Sept. 


9, 1890 


D. H. Johnson 


Augustus DuPont J. J. Hughes 


Feb. 


2, 1891 


D. H. Johnson 


J. H.W.Livingston J. A. Mobley 


Feb. 


6, 1893 


L. L. DuPont 


Joseph Jones 


P. A. Register 


Feb. 


4, 1901 


L. L. DuPont 


C. H. North 


J. P. Tomlinson 


Jan. 


1, 1903 


C. C. Lee 


C. H. North 


T. P. Tomlinson 


Jan. 


2, 1905 


C. M. McLamb 


Robert E. Lee 


F. M. Hughes 


Jan. 


7, 1907 


C. M. McLamb 


E. E. TomHnson 


F. M. Hughes 


Jan. 


4,1909 


C. M. McLamb 


E. E. Tomlinson 


F. M. Hughes 


Jan. 


2,1911 


C. M. McLamb 


E. E. Tomlinson 
1365th 


F. M. Hughes 

District. 


Mar. 


3,1913 


S. W. Register 


T. J. Taylor 


W. R. Reen 


Feb. 25, 1887 


S. W. Register 


T. T. Taylor 


W. E. Taylor 


Feb. 25, 1889 


S. W. Register 


T. T. Taylor 


Marion Bennett 


Feb. 


2, 1891 


P. M. Bennett 


M. A. Taylor 


John Griffis 


Feb. 


6, 1893 


A. 0. Register 


P. M. Bennett 


I. W. Griffin 


Feb. 


4, 1901 


J. R. Allen 


Seward Bennett 


John McLain 


Jan. 


1, 1903 


J. R. Allen 


Seward Bennett 


A. G. Bennett 


Jan. 


2, 1905 


J. E. McLain 


Seward Bennett 


A. G. Bennett 


Jan. 


7, 1907 


\V. M. Zeiglcr 


N. E, Baldwin 


A. G. Bennett 


Jan. 


4, 1909 


E. B. Allen 


A. T. Baldwin 


W. M. Zeigler 


Jan. 


2, 1911 


J. R. Allen 


E. C. Dedge 

1389th 


John McLain 

District. 


Mar, 


3, 1913 


J. R. Dickerson 


James M. Right 


I . R. Allen 


Feb. 


25, 1887 


J. R. Dickerson 


Tames M. Right 


T. R. Allen 


Feb. 


25, 1889 


W. H. Hinson 


F. M. Right 


N. J. Smith 


Feb. 


2, 1891 


W.J.StricklandJr 


■. T. P. Jordan 


W. M. Mainor 


Feb. 


6,1893 


W. H. Hinson 


Randal Corbitt 


B. A. Harper 


Feb. 


4, 1901 


W. H. Hinson 


J. J. Dickerson 


B. A. Harper 


Jan. 


1, 1903 


W. H. Hinson 


J. J. Dickerson 


B. A. Harper 


Jan. 


2, 1905 


W. H. Hinson 


D. J. Godwin 


B. A. Harper 


Jan. 


7, 1907 


W. M. Right 


D. J. Godwin 


B. A. Harper 


Jan. 


4, 1909 


J. R. Dickerson 


Randal Corbitt 


W. M. Right 


Tan. 


2, 1911 


J. R. Dickerson 


Randal Corbitt 


W. W. Right 


Mar. 


3, 1913 



Jailors of Clinch County — 

(This List is not complete.) 

M. S. Mcintosh Feb. 13, 1875 

Robert B. Crum May 13, 1876 



2i6 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Erie Edwards April 13, 1877 

A. B. Findley Aug. 4, 1879 

William D. Smith 1880 

K. C. Smith Mar. 6, 1885 

A. T. Newbern L 1894 

T. F. M. Sweat 1901 

C. W. Byrd 1911 

S. W. Elliott 1913 

Clerks of Court of Ordinary — 

L. A. Sirmans Sept. i, 1868 

Josiah Sirmans Aug. i, 1873 

H. C. Dukes, Dept May 4, 1874 

Josiah Sirmans Oct. 10, 1877 

S. L. Drawdy Feb. 14, 1889 

R. G. Dickerson Jan. 15, 1902 

Presidents of Board of Education — 

H. A. Mattox 1 872-1 876 James A. O'Steen i 898-1902 

A. J. Caswell 1 888-1 892 Jesse R. Booth 1902-1904 

N. S. Knight 1892 F. M. Hughes 1904-19 13 

H. A. Mattox 1892-1893 John G. Griffis 1913-1915 

Benjamin Smith 1893-1894 D. O. Johnson 1915-1916 

D. C. Fender 1 894-1 898 

Judges of Superior Court, Clinch County, 1850-19 19 — 
Note. — (*) resigned; (f)- appointed. 
I.Augustus H. Hansell Hawkinsville, Ga. 1850-1853 

2. Peter E. Love Thomasville, Ga. 1 853-1 855 

3. A. E. Cochran Brunswick, Ga. 1855-1859 

4. William M. Sessions Holmesville, Ga. 1859-1861 

5. A. E. Cochran Brunswick, Ga. 1861-1864 

6. William M. Sessions* Blackshear, Ga. 1864-1872 

7. John L. Harris (died) Brunswick, Ga. 1 872-1 879 

8. Martin L. Mershon* Brunswick, Ga. 1 879-1886 

9. Courtland Symmesf Brunswick, Ga. 1886 

10. Spencer R. Atkinson* Brunswick, Ga. 1 886-1 891 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 217 



II. J. L. Sweat 


Waycross, Ga. 


1891-1897 


12. Joseph W. Bennett* 


Brunswick, oa. 


1897-1902 


13. F. Willis Dartt 


Douglas, Ga. 


1902-1903 


14. Thomas A. Parker* 


Baxley, Ga. 


1903-1914 


15- J- W. Quinceyt 


Douglas, Ga. 


1914-1915 


16. James I. Summerall 


Blackshear, Ga. 


1915-1919 



Solicitors General, 1 867-1916 — 

1. J. S.Wiggins 1867-1869 6. J. I. Carter 1885-1889 

2. P. B. Bedford 1869 7. W. G. Brantley i889-'97 

3. A. J. Liles 1869-1871 8. John W. Bennett 1 897-'o9 

4. Simon W. Hitch 1871-1881 9. J. H. Thomas 1909-1910 

5. G. B. Mabry 1881-1885 10 M. D. Dickerson i9io-'i9 

Foremen of Grand Juries, Clinch County, 1 867-1916 — 

Note. — This information is given, as the author believes 
it will be of interest besides throwing light on the leaders 
of the day. The militia district numbers following each name 
shows the district in which the foreman lived. 



Term 


Name 


District 


Sept. 


1867 


John C. Kirkland 


1224 


March 


1868 


David D. Mahon 


1052 


Sept. 


1868 


Thomas G. Ramsey 


1224 


April 


1869 


John C. Kirkland 


1224 


Oct. 


1869 


John C. Kirkland 


1224 


June 


1870 


Thomas G. Ramsey 


1224 


April 


1871 


Cornelius A. Smith 


970 


Oct. 


1871 


Jesse Smith 


970 


April 


1872 


David J. Sirmans 


970 


Oct. 


1872 


William S. Tomlinson 


586 


April 


1873 


David J. Sirmans 


970 


Oct. 


1873 


John C. Kirkland 


1224 


April 


1874 


Francis M. Jackson 


586 


Oct. 


1874 


David H. Johnson 


586 


April 


1875 


Martin S. Corbitt 


I061 


Oct. 


1875 


Glover G. Foreman 


1052 


April 


1876 


Peter Stotesberry 


1052 



21 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



Term 




Name 


District 


Oct. 


[876 


David J. Sirmans 


1280 


April 


[877 


Charles Strickland 


586 


Oct. 


[877 


Francis M. Jackson 


586 


April 


[878 


David J. Sirmans 


1280 


Oct. 


[878 


Frank Sloat 


1052 


Oct. 


[879 


David O'Quin 


970 


March 


[880 


Charles Strickland 


586 


Sept. 


[880 


Peter Williams 


1224 


March 


[881 


Hamilton A. Mattox 


1224 


Oct. 


[881 


Francis M. Jackson 


586 


March 


[882 


Cornelius A. Smith 


1224 


March 


[883 


Madison M. Caswell 


1224 


Oct. 


[883 


F. B. Sirmans 


586 


March 


[884 


G. G. Foreman 


1052 


Oct. 


[884 


Benjamin Smith 


586 


March 


[885 


F. B. Sirmans 


586 


Oct. 


[885 


Cornelius A. Smith 


1224 


March 


[886 


Moses Tomlinson 


1052 


Oct. 


[886 


Francis M. Jackson 


586 


March 


[887 


Moses Tomlinson 


1052 


Oct. 


[887 


John J. Drawdy 


1224 


March ] 


[888 


Moses Tomlinson 


1052 


Oct. ] 


[888 


R. S. Holtzendorf 


1052 


March i 


[889 


John C. Humphreys 


1052 


Oct. ] 


889 


Martin S. Corbitt 


1 06 1 


March ] 


[890 


John C. Humphreys 


1052 


Oct. ] 


890 


WiHis B. Gibbs 


1280 


March i 


891 


Hamilton A. Mattox 


1224 


Oct. ] 


891 


Lewis Smith 


1224 


March i 


892 


Hamilton A. Mattox 


1224 


Oct. ] 


892 


Andrew J. Caswell 


1224 


March ] 


893 


John C. Humphreys 


1052 


Oct. ] 


893 


Martin S. Corbitt 


IO61 


April ] 


894 


William A. Ecord 


1224 


Oct. 1 


894 


Elisha Moore 


IO61 


April ] 


895 


E. J. Futch 


970 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



219 



Term 


Name 


District 


Oct. 


1895 


James R. Dickerson 


1389 


April 


1896 


B. E. Mattox 


1224 


Oct. 


1896 


E. J. Futch 


970 


April 


1897 


Moses Tomlinson 


1052 


Oct. 


1897 


Moses Smith 


586 


April 


1898 


Randal Brogdon 


586 


Oct. 


1898 


Elisha Moore 


1 06 I 


April 


1899 


Martin S. Corbitt 


I061 


Oct. 


1899 


J. R. Dickerson 


1389 


April 


1900 


B. E. Mattox 


1224 


Oct. 


1900 


F. B. Sirmans 


586 


April 


1901 


Samuel Cowart 


1280 


Oct. 


1 90 1 


R. M. Crum 


1224 


iVpril 


1902 


E. J. Futch 


970 


Oct. 


1902 


Augustus DuPont 


1280 


April 


1903 


William T. Smith 


1224 


Oct. 


1903 


James A. O'Steen 


1224 


April 


1904 


Frank Dickerson 


1280 


Oct. 


1904 


R. M. Crum 


1224 


April 


1905 


F. B. Sirmans 


586 


Oct. 


1905 


P. McK. Williams 


970 


April 


1906 


Perry M. Lee 


1280 


Oct. 


1906 


W. B. N. Crews 


1052 


April 


1907 


William A. Ecord 


1224 


Oct. 


1907 


Charlton H. Smith 


1224 


April 


1908 


F. B. Sirmans 


586 


Oct. 


1908 


A. H. Culpepper 


1224 


April 


1909 


H. J. Peagler 


1224 


Oct. 


1909 


F. B. Sirmans 


586 


May 


1910 


George M. Dame 


1224 


Nov. 


1910 


Warren R. Dickerson 


586 


May 


191 1 


F. B. Sirmans 


586 


March 


1912 


J. Floyd Fender 


1052 


Oct. 


1912 


S. R. Kirton 


1389 


March 


1913 


Acy H. Timmerman 


1052 


Oct. 


1913 


B. E. Mattox 


1224 



2 20 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Term Name District 

March 1914 S. A. Sweat 1224 

Oct. 1914 S. R. Kirton 1389 

March 19 15 George M. Dame 1224 

Oct. 1915 Moses S. Eason 970 

March 191 6 John F. Daugharty 12 19 

Clerks of County Court (old court) — 

Simon W. Hitch May 12, 1866 

John L. Morgan Aug. 27, 1866 

Robert L. King, Jr Feb. i, 1867 

Bailiffs County Court — 

Wilham M. Austin May 30, 1866 

James B. O'Quin June 4, 1866 

Allen Smith June 2, 1866 

J. J. Sweat Dec. 30, 1 907 

P. R. Lee Dec. 31, 1908 

Deputy Clerks County Court — 

M. A. Cornelius June 2, 1913 

Folks Huxford Dec. 8, 19 14 

Clerks Superior Court and Their Deputies — 

Clerks Term Deputies 

John C. Kirkland 1850-185 2 Jonathan Knight 

George W. Newbern 1 852-1 854 A. D. Laslie 

Archibald D. Laslie 1854-1856 

David O'Quin 1856-1868 John H. Mattox 

Dan H. Stewart 
Francis M. Goette 
J. L. Sweat 
L. Smith 

James C. Cooper 
H. D. O'Quin 1 868-1 87 1 George W. Newbern 

Alfred Newbern 
James Tomlinson 1 871-1873 Josiah Sirmans 

Edward T. Dukes 1 873-1 875 C.A.Smith 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



221 



Clerks 


Term 


Deputies 


P. M. Lee 


1875-1877 


A. J. Caswell 

M. M. Caswell 


Cornelius A. Smith 


1877-1880 
1880-1881 




David O'Quin 


Josiah Sirmans 


Abraham Morgan 


1881-1883 


N. J. Smith 

B. A. Whittington 
James P. Mattox 

C. C. Drawdy 
R. J. Pannal 
Perryman Moore 


B. R. Johnson 


1883-1884 


Isbin Tomlinson 


W. A. Ecord 


1884-1893 


I. H. Drawdy 
Roscoe W. Yates 


S. W. Register 


1893-I908 


A. 0. Register 
P. E. Findley 
J. E. Jordan 


A. O. Register 


I908-I909 


A. J. Gibbs 


A. J. Gibbs 


I909-I921 


G. A. Gibbs 


Deputy Sheriffs of Clinch County, Georgia — 


Sheriffs 


Term 


Deputies 


Harrison Jones 


1866-1867 


William M. Austin 


Joseph E. Bass 


1868-187I 


Erwin Johnson 
James M. Nelms 


James M. Nelms 


187I-1873 


John J. Drawdy 
John G. Tomlinson 
Joseph E. Bass 


Robert N. Brady 


1873-1875 


Erie Edwards 


David H. Johnson 


1875-1879 


A. B. Findley 
Erie Edwards 
Eason Smith 


John T. Courson 


1879-1881 


A. B. Findley 


Jerry M. Jeffords 


1881-1887 


John A. Mikell 
K. C. Smith 


B. E. Mattox 


1887-1889 


Jefferson D. Mattox 
William S. Mattox 



222 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 



Sheriffs 

Frank DIckerson 

Bryant O'Steen 
S. A. Sweat 



Perry R. Lee 



Term Deputies 

1 889-1 897 T. F. M. bweat 

Absalom T. Newbern 

1 897-1901 S. A. Sweat 

1 90 1- 1 909 Jerome J. Sweat 
J. Tom Faulk 
R. S. Williams 
John H. Mattox 
G. C. Register 

1909-19 17 George W. North 
G. C. Register 
A. Hargraves 
S. W. Elliott 



CHAPTER XIV. 

Sketches of Lives of Clinch County Officers, 1850-1916. 
Alphabetically Arranged. 

4 USTIN, WILLIAM M., was born in this State in 1 830, 
/-% Coming to Clinch when young, he settled here, and at 
various times was in the employment of the Atlantic & 
Gulf Railroad. The first office that he held in this county 
was that of justice of the Inferior Court, to which he was 
commissioned September loth, 1861. In 1862, when 
O'Steen's company was organized at Homerville for service 
in the Confederate Army, Mr, Austin enlisted and served 
as a sergeant in his company. Returning home, he was elected 
tax collector in 1864, and served two years. Under Harri- 
son Jones he served a short while as deputy sheriff, and in 
1867 was elected sheriff for the unexpired term of Mr. Jones. 
After this he was station agent at Homerville a while. By 
his wife, Harriet E. Austin, Mr. Austin had six children, 
viz. : E. A. Austin, Rosa, Bartow, Lealona, John and H. 
Austin, these names being obtained from an old census re- 
port for 1870. Subsequently Mr. Austin removed to Wayne 
County, where he died. 

BARNHILL, JOHN FRANKLIN, was born in Horry 
County, S. C, March 27, 1867, and came to this State at an 
early age. He married Miss Sula Johnson, of Bryan County, 
Georgia, November 5th, 1896, and they have three chil- 
dren, Leo, Audrey and Olney Barnhlll. In 1902 Mr. Barn- 
hill came to Clinch County and engaged In the turpentine 
business, in which he has become signally successful, finan- 
cially. He Is now one of the largest land owners In the 
county. He lived in the 1141st district at a place called 
Lyken until 19 13, when he removed to Homerville. He built 
a beautiful home at Lyken, and at Homerville has a still bet- 



2 24 History of Cl'uich County, Georgia 

ter residence. Mr. Barnhill was postmaster at Lyken for 
several years. Lyken was connected by a star route with 
Homerville. In 19 14-'! 5, Mr. Barnhill, together with Mr. 
J. H. Ferdon, bought and installed the town's light and 
water plant. In 191 5 he was elected on the town council, and 
was appointed on the Board of County Commissioners cre- 
ated by Legislative Act. Upon the organization of the 
Board in September, he was elected its chairman, which posi- 
tion he now holds. In 19 16 he was elected for the full term 
of four years beginning January' ist, 191 7, defeating A. B. 
Smith. Mr. Barnhill, although possessed of a meager edu- 
cation, is one of the best business men in the county, and his 
service on the Board has demonstrated his high character 
and business ability. 

BASS, JOSEPH EVERETT, was born in Sampson 
County, N. C, February nth, 181 1. When eighteen years 
old he moved to Sumter County, Georgia, where the present 
city of Americus now is. He engaged in the Cherokee Indian 
war when it came on, and after it was over he went back 
to his old home and married Miss Christian Cameron. Com- 
ing back to Sumter County, he lived there until a few years 
later. While in Sumter County, four children were born to 
them, David A. Bass, Archibald C. Bass, Mary J. Bass, and 
Joseph E. Bass, Jr. Moving to Irwinsville, in Irwin County, 
he was sheriff of that county for eight years. A itw years 
prior to the war he moved to Clinch County and settled three 
miles south of Homerville, but when the Civil War broke out, 
he moved his family to town. In 1868 he was elected sheriff 
of Clinch County, an office which he held three years. After 
his term of office expired, Mr. Bass served as a deputy under 
his successor, James M. Nelms, until 1872, when he removed 
to Orlando, Fla. Here he served as deputy sheriff four years, 
afterwards moving to Tampa, Fla., where he died August 
2f;th, 1897, ^g^ ^6 years. At the time of his death he was 
survived by seven children. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 225 

BRADY, ROBERT N., was born In this State In 1840, 
in what Is now Fulton County. He was born and raised on 
a farm which his father owned not far from where Atlanta 
now Is. Prior to the Civil War, Mr. Brady bought a pair of 
horses and a pair of mules and with a big wagon of 
merchandise, started out to trade in live stock and merchan- 
dise. He came to this section during the war, and married 
Miss Ann Marshall, of Berrien County, by whom he had two 
sons, Samuel H., and John Brady. When O'Steen's company 
was organized In Homervllle for service In the Confederate 
Army, Mr. Brady, together with his brothers, joined this 
company, serving until 1865. Returning home he opened up 
a store at Lawton, which he ran until his election as sheriff of 
Clinch County In 1872. In this election he defeated James 
North. Mr. Brady was commissioned January i8th, 1873. 
In 1874 he was killed by some parties who lived In the vicin- 
ity of the Okefinokee Swamp. Mr. Brady had a warrant 
for a party who lived in the neighborhood of the swamp, and 
after pursuing his man as far as the Everglades In Florida, 
captured him and carried him to Live Oak, Fla., and put 
him in jail, as Clinch County had no jail then. He returned 
home on a Friday night and at dinner the next day was called 
from his table by parties In front of his house, and as he 
emerged through the door was shot In the chest before he 
could hardly recognize his assailants. The sheriff's brother, 
Lewis J. Brady, was at the house at the time, and came out 
and engaged the crowd who proved to be relatives and con- 
federates of the man whom the sheriff had arrested. Lewis 
J. Brady was shot in the abdomen and died in a few minutes. 
The sheriff lingered after this for three months and six days 
and died from the effects of the shot in his breast. He could 
not speak above a whisper from the time he was shot until 
he died. Thus ended the life of a brave officer of the law, 
faithful to every trust. 



226 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

BURKHALTER, RICHARD H., son of Isaac Burkhal- 
ter, was born in Charleston, S. C, April 24th, 1806. When 
Richard was small his father moved to Pulaski County, Geor- 
gia, and there the son grew to manhood, and married Miss 
Senie Haskins, June 13th, 1827. To this union was born 
eleven children, four daughters and seven sons. In 1844 he 
removed to what is now Clinch County and lived here until 
his death. He was elected a justice of the peace of the 105 2d 
district in 1853, and served two years. In 1 8 5 6 he was elected 
ordinary of the county and served until 1858. Mr. Burk- 
halter was also married a second time, to Annie Belote, by 
whom he had five children. His second marriage occurred 
October 12th, 1848. Mr. Burkhalter died at his home in 
Mud Creek, November i6th, 1862. 

BURKHALTER, SHEROD, was born in Clinch County, 
March 24th, 1859, the son of James M. and Nancy Burk- 
halter, and grandson of Richard H. Burkhalter. He was 
raised on the farm and married Miss Sallie Corbitt, daugh- 
ter of Allen Corbitt, October 3d, 1879. They had six chil- 
dren. After the death of his first wife he married Lorena, 
daughter of K. C. Smith, and by her has one child. He was 
admitted to the bar in Florida November 5th, 1895, and 
later coming back to Georgia, was admitted here. He has 
been located at Homerville in the practice of law since 
January iith, 1902. Colonel Burkhalter was commissioned 
solicitor of the County Court, October 30th, 1909, and re- 
commissioned August 28th, 191 1, for two more years. He 
is an active member of the Baptist Church. 

BYRD, CUYLER WASHINGTON, was born in Pierce 
County, October i8th, 1859. After living in Pierce and 
Ware Counties some time, he removed to Clinch County, 
where, after farming several years, he entered the mercantile 
business with his son, Leon Byrd, in Homerville. In 19 12 he 
was elected constable of the 1224th district, and about the 
same time was appointed by the Ordinary as coroner of Clinch 



History of Clinch County , Georgia 227 

County, to succeed W. R. Findley, who had removed from 
the county. In 1914 Mr. Byrd removed to Ware County, but 
in 19 1 6 returned to Clinch county, where he is farming near 
Homerville. 

CARTER, JESSE W., served as justice of the peace of 
the 66 1 st district of Lowndes County for several years, being 
elected in 1841 and 1846. In 1850 he was elected and com- 
missioned a justice of the peace of the 105 2d district of Clinch 
County, and served until 1856. In 1856 he was elected tax 
receiver, and served one year. Mr. Carter lived in Clinch 
County until the formation of Echols County, when he be- 
came a citizen of that county. In the Civil War he was a 
private of Co. "H" 29th Ga. Infantry. He married Priscilla, 
daughter of Barzilla Staten, Sr., who died about 1846. Mr. 
Carter, together with William S. Roberts and Jonathan 
Knight, were the administrators of the estate of Mr. Staten. 

CASWELL, ANDREW J., was born in Tattnall County, 
February 7th, 1838. When the Civil War came on he joined 
and served in Co. "A" 29 Georgia, about three years. After 
the war was over he came to Clinch County and settled at 
Homerville, where he lived until his death. In 1867 he mar- 
ried Miss Martha Smith, daughter of James C. Smith, and 
by her had eleven children, nine sons and two daughters. For 
several years he engaged in the mercantile business in Homer- 
ville, afterwards purchasing a farm on the outskirts of town. 
He constructed the famous Caswell mill-pond near town, 
which is now owned by Hon. R. G. Dickerson. Mr. Caswell 
served several years on the Board of Education, qualifying 
November 22d, 1876. He served until 1890, being presi- 
dent of the Board several years. Under P. M. Lee, Mr. 
Caswell served as deputy clerk of the Superior Court. In 
1892 he was elected county treasurer, defeating W. H. Gary 
in the primary. Mr. Caswell received 218 votes and Mr. 
Gary 191. In the general election he defeated Lewis Smith, 
Third Party candidate, 314 to 173 votes. He was commis- 



22 8 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

sioned treasurer January 6"th, 1893, and was just getting 
acquainted well with the duties of the office when he was 
taken sick. After a short illness he died August 11, 1893. 
He was buried in the Homerville cemetery. His widow is 
now living in Jacksonville, Florida, where two of her sons, 
Drs. James M. Caswell and S. T. Caswell, practice medicine. 

CASWELL, MADISON M., was born in Tattnall 
County, on the Ohoopee River, February 23d, 1843. When 
the Civil War broke out, he enlisted in Co. "A" 29th Georgia, 
and served until the close of the war. In 1869 he came to 
Homerville, where he resided until about 1890, when he re- 
moved to Valdosta, where he now lives. Mr. Caswell mar- 
ried Sarah, daughter of James C. Smith, and by her .had sev- 
eral children. In 1870 he was elected tax collector of Clinch 
County, and was commissioned February 7th, 1871. By suc- 
cessive re-elections he was tax collector twelve years, which is 
the longest any collector has held the office. In April, 1876, 
he was appointed a jury commissioner, serving four years. In 
1886 he was again appointed a jury commissioner, but re- 
moved to Valdosta before his term expired. Under P. M. 
Lee, Mr. Caswell served as deputy clerk of the Superior 
Court. 

COHEN, JOSEPH J., was born in Ohio about 18 15, and 
came to Clinch County about 1850. He was a school teacher 
by profession. He married Zilpha, a daughter of John Wil- 
liams, Sr., and his wife, Nancy, but after a divorce married 
Mary Simpson and by her had a son, William Cohen. Mr. 
Cohen was elected a justice of the peace of the 970th dis- 
trict in 1857 and served two years. He was commissioned 
surveyor of Clinch County January I2th, 1857, and served 
one year. In the Civil War he enlisted in 2 2d Georgia Ar- 
tillery. While in the army he contracted a sickness which ter- 
minated in his death in 1863. His remains were brought 
home and buried at Arabia Church. The grave is not marked 
and its exact location in the cemetery is not known. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 229 

CORBITT, MARTIN S., was born near the site of Salem 
Church, in the northern part of Clinch County, May 12th, 
1840, the son of Newsom and Pollie (Smith) Corbitt. He 
married Lenora W. Pafford, of Coffee County, November 
26th, 1867, and by her had eleven children, viz.: Catherine 
Imogene, Maryan M., Newton R., William Manning, Henry 
Madison, Mastin Rabun, Frances L., Martha, Wealthy A., 
Rebecca V., and Levia Jane Corbitt. After his first wife died, 
Mr. Corbitt married Miss Minnie Faircloth, who was a 
native of Sampson County, N. C, August ist, 1899. To 
them were born Duvon C, Frazier S., and W. J. Corbitt. 
In the Civil War Mr. Corbitt served as a sergeant in 
O'Steen's company. Towards the close of the war he was 
permitted to return home on account of ill health. In 1868 
he was elected tax collector of Clinch County, defeating 
R. G. Dickerson, and served until 1871. In 1884 he was a 
candidate for Ordinary and in a very hot race defeated 
George Cornelius by one vote. He was commissioned Janu- 
iiry 13th, 1885, and served four years. In 1889 he was ap- 
pointed a member of the Board of County Commissioners, 
and served until 1891. With the formation of the Populist 
Party in Clinch County, Mr. Corbitt joined it, and became 
one of its leaders. He was its candidate for representative 
in 1896 and 1898, and for Ordinary in 1900. On April ist, 
1902, he removed from his old home in Clinch County to 
Pearson, in Coffee County, where he lived quietly until his 
death, eleven years later. He died on July ist, 19 13, and 
was buried with Masonic ceremonies at Salem Church in 
Clinch County. Mr. Corbitt was for years a member of the 
Methodist Church, having his membership at the old Fussell 
Church in Coffee County, later transferring it to the Pafford 
Church. He became a member of Salem Church later. Mr. 
Corbitt joined the Masons in 1867, and was a Master Mason 
until his death. For about twenty years before his death he 
was past master. He was greatly interested in his lodge and 
his church, and often rode miles in order to attend. Appro- 



230 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

priate resolutions were adopted by Satllla Lodge No. 163 on 
his death. 

CORBITT, NEWSOM, was born in Tennessee in 1808, 
the son of Isham Corbitt. With his father Mr. Corbitt re- 
moved to Clinch County about 1840. He married PoUie, a 
daughter of Rev. William Smith, and after her death again 
married, and raised a large family of children. He was 
elected a justice of the peace of the 586th district in 1853, 
and again in 1861, and 1865. In 1868 he was elected State 
senator from the fifth district, defeating C. A. Smith. He 
was elected on the "radical" ticket. In the senate he served 
on the committees on Deaf and Dumb Asylum, Agriculture 
and Manufactures, and Journal. He voted for the adoption 
of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the Federal 
Constitution. Mr. Corbitt lived to be about 75 years old. 

CORBITT, RANDALL, was born in Clinch County, 
February 25th, 1856, the son of Richard R. Corbitt. He was 
married to Miss Sarah Jane Geiger, December 12th, 1878, 
by whom he had ten children. Nine are living. In 191 2 Mr. 
Corbitt was a candidate for county treasurer, and defeated 
W. H. Hunter by one vote. He served one term ( 1 9 1 3-' 1 5 ) 
and was not a candidate for re-election. Mr. Corbitt lives 
on his farm a few miles north of Argyle, where he .has lived 
for many years. He is a member of the Primitive Baptist 
Church. 

CORNELIUS, BENJAMIN, was born in what is now 
Wayne County, May nth, 1801. Early in life he was married 
to Miss Sarah Hopson, of Pulaski County, and by her had 
five children, viz. : George, Cintha, Sabra, Martha Ann, and 
Edward Cornelius. He lived in Pulaski County several years, 
and about 1826 removed to Lowndes County and lived there 
two years. After this he returned to Pulaski and lived there 
until 1832, when he returned to Lowndes County. He was 
elected a justice of the peace of the 66 ist district of Lowndes 
County in 1833, and served a few years. About 1840 he re- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 231 

moved to what is now Clinch but then Ware County, and 
settled near the future Dame's mill-pond. Here he was 
elected a justice of the peace of the 970th district in 1841, and 
in 1846. After his wife died in 1845, M'*- Cornelius moved 
to the place now owned by Mr. S. D. Findley, near Homer- 
ville. 

In 1850 Mr. Cornelius was elected tax receiver of Ware 
County and commissioned April ist, 1850, but the election 
for county officers in the new county of Clinch coming on, he 
resigned and was succeeded by Daniel E. Knowles. He was 
elected the first tax receiver of Clinch County, in April, 1850, 
and by continuous re-election, held this office until 1874, with 
the exception of three years. During i856-'57, Jesse W. 
Carter was receiver, and in 1862 the offices of receiver and 
collector were combined by Legislative Act, and Timothy 
Alderman elected to this office. In 1864 it was restored as 
it formerly was and Mr. Cornelius was re-elected. In his 
last race in 1872 he was opposed by J. R. Harris, but easily 
defeate'd him. Mr. Cornelius died of paralysis at his home 
near Homerville, June 26th, 1874, and was buried at Pros- 
pect Church. He was a member of the Primitive Baptist 
Church and had his membership at Prospect Church. Next 
to John C. Jones, Mr. Cornelius served the longest in one 
office of any officer in the county. 

CORNELIUS, BENJAMIN WILLIS, was born in 
Clinch County, near Homerville, December 7th, 1878, the 
son of James B. and Martha E. (Gibbs) Cornelius, and a 
great-grandson of Benjamin Cornelius, tax receiver. He was 
raised on his father's farm and attended the DuBignon Insti- 
tute at Homerville. In 1904 he graduated from the Georgia 
Normal and Business College at Abbeville, and in 1905 from 
the Mercer Law School. He was admitted to the practice of 
law at Homerville and practiced here until 19 13, when he 
removed to Sherman, Texas, where he is practicing law now. 
On November ist, 1909, he was appointed by the Governor 



232 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

as judge of the County Court of Clinch County for four 
years from October 28th, 1909. W.hen his term expired, 
Judge Cornelius did not seek a re-appointment. He was mar- 
ried May 25th, 191 1, to Mrs. Alice Riddle, a member of an 
old Virginia family, who was previously a teacher of Elo- 
cution in DuBignon Institute. 

CORNELIUS, FERMAN F., was born near Homer- 
ville, February 6th, 1883, the son of James B. and Martha 
E. (Gibbs) Cornelius. He was raised on his father's farm 
and attended the Homerville schools. In 1904 he was nomi- 
nated for surveyor of Clinch County over R. J. Jewell and 
D. J. Smith, and commissioned October 17th, 1904. He 
served by re-elections until January i st, 1 9 1 5 , when he retired. 
Mr. Cornelius was married June 20th, 1905 to Miss Court- 
ney James, daughter of Rev. R. A. James, of this county, and 
has two children. For the past several years he has been 
holding a responsible position with the G. S. Baxter Co., at 
Fargo. 

CORNELIUS, GEORGE, was born in Lowndes County, 
March 29th, 1830, the son of Hon. Benjamin Cornelius, tax 
receiver. He was raised in Ware County. He married in 
December, 1855, Miss Mary Ann Lee, daughter of James 
Lee, by whom he had thirteen children, viz. : James B., 
Franklin, Angeline, Mary, Lucy, J. R. E., Sallie, Bartow, 
Martha, Clara and Minnie, also a son, George Jr., who 
died in infancy. Mr. Cornelius settled in 1855 on the place 
now owned by Mr. J. R. E. Cornelius, where he lived until 
his death. His first office was that of justice of the peace of 
the 106 1 St district, to which he was elected In 1853. He 
served about a year. In April, 1862, he enlisted in Co. "G'' 
ijoth Georgia Infantry, and served until the close of the war. 
Returning home, he went back to farming. In 1 884 he was a 
candidate for ordinary, but was defeated by M. S. Corbitt 
by one vote. In 1888 he was again a candidate and defeated 
Mr. Corbitt by 32 votes. He assumed charge of the office in 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 233 

January, 1889. In 1892 he was re-elected, defeating D. H. 
Johnson In the priary 354 to 78 votes. In 1896 he was re- 
elected, defeating Elisha Moore, his nearest opponent, by 20 
votes in the primary. In 1900 he was defeated for re-elec- 
tion by W. T. Howell by 134 votes. After his term of office 
expired Mr. Cornelius lived on his farm a few miles from 
DuPont, until his death, January 19th, 1907, age 77 years. 
He was buried at the North cemetery. He was survived by 
his wife and eight children. 

CORNELIUS, GEORGE HOPSON, was born in Clinch 
County, near Homerville, June 20th, 1880, the son of James 
B. and Martha E. (Gibbs) Cornelius. After attending the 
Homerville schools, he went to the Mercer Law School at 
Macon, where he graduated. He was then admitted to the 
bar in 1903. In November, 1904, he was married to Miss 
Annie Jack, of Knoxville, Ga., by whom he has four chil- 
dren. In 1904, Judge S. C. Townsend resigned as judge of 
the County Court, and Colonel Cornelius was appointed to 
the vacancy July 14th, 1904. He served as judge until Octo- 
ber, 1905. In 1906 Judge Cornelius moved to St. Peters- 
burg, Fla., and later to Tampa, where he is located at present, 
practicing law. 

CORNELIUS, MORRIS AUSTIN, was born in Chnch 
County, near Homerville, March ist, 1888, the son of James 
B. and Martha E. (Gibbs) Cornelius. After attending the 
Homerville schools, he taught school in Clinch County and 
several other counties, subsequently taking a teacher's course 
at Valparaiso University, Indiana. In 19 13 he was appointed 
clerk of the County Court, and in 19 14 was elected county 
school superintendent of Clinch County, following the resig- 
nation of Flem C. Dame. His term will expire January ist, 
1917. In 1915 Mr. Cornelius married Miss Winona Roberts, 
of Celina, Texas. 

COURSON, JOHN T., was born in Charlton County, 
March 22d, 1848, the son of John L., and Sarah Courson. 



234 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

When the Civil War commenced he was too young to go to 
the front but succeeded in enlisting in 1864, Co. "H" 6th 
Georgia Reserves. In 1865 his parents removed to Clinch 
County, and the next year he married Martha, daughter of 
Zachariah Lee, by whom he had ten children, eight of whom 
are living. In 1872 he was elected coroner of Clinch County, 
and served one term. In 1878 he was elected sheriff of the 
county and commissioned January 8th, 1879. H!e served 
one term of two years. He returned to his farm near DuPont, 
and was elected justice of the peace of the 1280th district in 
1889, an office which he held about two years. He had pre- 
viously served as justice of the 1280th district, being elected 
in 1876. He removed about 1891 to Hahira, in Lowndes 
County, where he has since resided. Mr. Courson is a mem- 
ber of the Primitive Baptist Church, and is at present in the 
mercantile business. 

COWART, CHARLES, was born in 182 1. He Hved in 
this county until about 1880 when he removed to Florida, 
where he died. His wife was Miss Nancy Tatum. They 
had several children, among them being Elizabeth, John, 
Phoebe, Eliza and Mary Cowart. In 1850 Mr. Cowart was 
elected the first sheriff of Clinch County and served about a 
year. On January 12th, 1857, he was commissioned tax 
collector of Clinch County, serving one year. 

COON, JOSEPH B., was born in Bradford County, Fla., 
August nth, 1867, the son of Dr. Isaac S. Coon. His father 
removed to Clinch County in 1873, and the son was given 
the benefit of the country schools. In 1898 he was elected 
surveyor of Clinch County, defeating J. L. Swearingen, his 
Populist opponent, by 229 votes. He was re-elected in 1900 
and 1902. In the primary of 1904 he was a candidate for 
Ordinary but was defeated. Soon after the primary, the nom- 
inee for tax receiver, John C. Jones, was taken sick and died, 
Mr. Coon announcing for the vacancy in the nomination. He 
was elected over strong opposition. He assumed charge of 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 235 

the office January ist, 1905, and has since been re-elected at 
each election. Mr. Coon was married to Miss Harriet Reg- 
ister, daughter of Hon. Guilford A. Register, March 25th, 
1902, and by her has two children. He is a member of the 
Primitive Baptist Church. 

CRUM, ROBERT MALLETTE, was born in Camden 
County, June 6th, 1854, the son of Robert B. and Margaret 
M. Crum. In 1862 his parents removed to near Homerville, 
and Mr. Crum was a resident of Homerville until he died. 
During 1 888-1 890 he was associated with his father in the 
mercantile business in Homerville. In 1896 he was elected 
justice of the peace of the Homerville district and commis- 
sioned January 8th, 1897; he was re-elected in December, 
1900 and December, 1904. The next year, 1905, he resigned 
to become judge of the county court, to which he was com- 
missioned October 19th, 1905, for four years. In 1909 Judge 
Crum was by the Governor appointed a state inspector of 
fertilizers, but a serious illness prevented him from taking up 
the duties of the position. He died at the Crum House in 
Homerville, December i8th, 1909, and was buried in the 
Homerville cemetery. Judge Crum was a Mason and an Odd 
Fellow. He was never married. 

CULPEPPER, ALEXANDER HAMILTON, was 
born in Warrenton, Georgia, April ist, 1852. His original 
name included the full name of A. H. Stephens, but he 
thought the name would be too long and consequently 
dropped the name "Stephens." He was admitted to the prac- 
tice of medicine in 1886 and practiced medicine in Atlanta 
until 1898. He removed to Homerville in March, 1898. Dr. 
Culpepper has served as town councilman a number of years 
and also as mayor of Homerville, in 1905. He was a candi- 
date for representative in 19 10, but was narrowly defeated 
by B. A. Harper. In 191 2 he was nominated by 1 1 votes over 
M. H. Hilliard, his nearest opponent. He served through the 
sessions of 19 13 and 19 14. The doctor was first married to 



236 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Miss Jennie Revlere, in 1874, by whom he had two sons and 
two daughters. After her death he married Miss Fannie 
Hardage, of Warrenton, in 1886. By this marriage there are 
five sons. Dr. Culpepper has served as county physician for 
the past eight years and for eighteen years has been local 
surgeon for the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. He 
is an active member of the Baptist Church at Homerville, 
and is a deacon of that church. He has also been Sunday 
School superintendent several years. 

DAME, FLEM CHARLES, was born in Clinch County 
at the place now known as Lyken post office, February 14th, 
1889, the son of George M. and Linnie (Hargreaves) Dame. 
With his parents he came to Homerville at the age of six 
months. He completed the DuBignon Institute high school 
in 1905 and graduated from the Georgia Normal College at 
yVbbeville in 1907. He taught in the public schools of Clinch, 
Montgomery and Irwin Counties, and in Florida for a period 
of several years, and in 19 10 was elected county school com- 
missioner of Clinch County over four opponents. In May, 
191 1, Hon. W. T. Dickerson resigned as county school com- 
missioner, which term had not expired, and Mr. Dame was 
elected to the vacancy by the Board of Education. Mr. 
Dame's regular term commenced January ist, 19 13, for 
which he was nominated. He served until April, 19 14, when 
he resigned to become post master at Homerville. He won 
the latter position on the merit of making the highest mark 
in a public examination in which there were a dozen competi- 
tors. He is at present postmaster, and is editor and owner 
of the "Clinch County News," a newspaper established in 
Homerville over twenty years ago. During the time he was 
county school commissioner, the title of the office was changed 
to county school superintendent by the Legislature. He also 
served two terms as mayor of Homerville, 19 13 and 19 14. 
Mr. Dame married Lillian Hughes, daughter of Jeptha and 
Catherine (Gibbs) Hughes, of near DuPont, in December, 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 237 

1910. They had two children, Chas. F., and Olive. He is a 
member of the Baptist Church at Homerville. 

DAME, GEORGE APPLING, was born in 1826, in 
Montgomery County, Ga., the son of George Dame and 
Catherine (Carter) Dame. He married Sarah Thigpen, 
daughter of Melancthon Thigpen. To them were born five 
children, viz: Arlia, who married Harris Tomlinson; George 
M., William H., John T., and Charles E. Dame. Mr. Dame 
removed to Clinch County in 1864. In 1874 he was elected 
surveyor of Clinch County and commissioned January 14th, 
1875 for two years. Mr. Dame died in 1882, and is buried 
at Prospect Church near DuPont. His widow is yet living. 

DAME, GEORGE MELANCTHON, was born June 
28th, 1856, on Cobb's Creek in Montgomery County, Geor- 
gia, the son of George A. Dame, Sr., and his wife, Sarah 
Dame. At the close of the war he moved with his parents 
to old Magnolia, in Clinch County. His education was 
obtained in public schools of the time. He taught in the pub- 
lic schools of Clinch County several years, and was married 
to Linnie Adiline, daughter of John C, and Parthenia Har- 
greaves, in 1881. Their children are: George Alva Dame, 
who married Rita de Muro; Herschel J. Dame, who married 
Luelle Drawdy; Lula, who married H. M. Peagler; Leland 
H. (single) ; Flem C. Dame, who married Lillian Hughes; 
Olivia and Linnie Dame. His first wife dying in 1905, he mar- 
ried Mabel Claire, daughter of Rev. H. C. Brewton, in 1907. 
They have one child, Louise Dame. Mr. Dame was a farmer 
from 1 88 1 to 1890 at Lyken post office, but in the latter year 
moved to Homerville, established himself in the mercantile 
business, which he runs at the present time, with his brother, 
the firm name being Dame Bros. He is a member of Homer- 
ville Baptist Church, a deacon of that church, and a Mason. 
For the past several years he has served as Chairman of the 
Democratic Executive Committee of Clinch County. He was 
twice a town commissioner of Homerville under the old char- 



238 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

ter and several times councilman under the new charter. He 
served as county surveyor from 1881 to 1895, and in 1896 
was appointed to succeed Hon. R. G. Dickerson as county 
treasurer. He held the office about two months and in 1898 was 
elected treasurer, defeating P. A. Register, his nearest oppo- 
nent by eight votes. In 1900 he was re-elected treasurer, de- 
feating John G. Griffis by 89 votes in the primary. At the 
end of the last term, he retired and has not since aspired for 
office. He has been a director of the Bank of Homerville 
since its organization. 

DAME, HERSCHEL JOHNSON, was born in Clinch 
County, May ist, 1883, the son of George M. and Linnie 
(Hargreaves) Dame. He finished the DuBignon Institute in 
1 90 1 and graduated from the Georgia Normal College at 
Abbeville in 1903. In 1904 he graduated from the Mercer 
Law School, and was president of his class. He then com- 
menced the practice of law and practiced at Statenville and 
Homerville. He was elected cashier of the Bank of Homer- 
ville and served in this capacity until 1907. In 1908 he mar- 
ried Luelle Drawdy, daughter of C. C. and Bettie (Smith) 
Drawdy. They have one child, Elinor, living. Col. Dame 
was, in 1907, appointed solicitor of the County Court, and 
served one term of two years. After this he practiced law 
at Homerville until 19 13, when he removed to Inverness, 
Fla. Here he was appointed county attorney and also became 
local counsel for the railroad company. In 191 5 there 
occurred a vacancy in the office of school superintendent of 
Citrus County, and Mr. Dame was elected to fill out the unex- 
pired term. In 1916 he was elected by the people for the 
full term over two opponents by a large majority. Mr. 
Dame established the first local telephone system in Homer- 
ville, which he sold when he removed to Florida. 

DAME, JOHN THIGPEN, was born in Montgomery 
County in 1864, the son of George A. and Sarah (Thigpen) 
Dame. In 1865 his parents removed to Clinch County. He 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 239 

was first married to Miss Olivia Brown, of Savannah, by 
whom he had two sons, Reva B. and Ray Dame. After 
her death, in 1 895, he married Miss Kate Harwell, of Homer- 
ville, iDy whom he had two daughters, Alma and Mary Dame. 
His second wife dying in 1901, Mr. Dame married Miss 
Emma Smith, daughter of Jos. P. Smith, of this county, in 
1904. They had three children, Olney, Emma and Hoke S. 
Dame. Mr. Dame was for several years a conductor on the 
old Plant System of Railways, but in 1890 came to Homer- 
ville and went into the mercantile business with his brother, 
George M, Dame. This business is still running. In 1904 
Mr, Dame was a successful candidate for Ordinary, defeat- 
ing J. B. Coon and W. T. Smith. He took charge of the 
office January ist, 1905, and in 1908 was re-elected, defeat- 
ing C. H. Smith, and in 19 12, defeated N. N. Langdale. His 
term of office expires January ist, 1917. Mr. Dame has 
served as a town councilman and a county registrar, and is a 
director of the Bank of Homerville. 

DAUGHARTY, JOHN F., was born in Clinch County 
November 7th, 1872, the son of Frank and Emily Daugh- 
arty. He was married May 8th, 1900, to Miss Emma Pat- 
terson, daughter of Isham Patterson. He entered the turpen- 
tine business and in this and other lines, has been very suc- 
cessful. He was elected representative in 1904, defeating S. 
C. Townsend and S. A. Pierce. He served through the ses- 
sions of 1905 and 1906. He did not offer for re-election. Mr. 
Daugharty lives at Edith on the Suwannee River, and has 
extensive holdings in Clinch County. 

DICKERSON, CHARLES H., was born in Clinch 
County, November 4th, 1871, the son of Daniel and Mary 
Ann Dickerson. He was raised on his father's farm near 
Homerville, and married Miss Lelia R. Eatman, September 
8th, 1892, by whom he had five children. After her death 
he married Miss Mattie Smith, a daughter of Lyman Smith 
and a great-granddaughter of Lawrence Smith, a pioneer 



240 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

of Clinch County. By his last marriage there are four chil- 
dren. In 1908 he was elected tax collector of Clinch county, 
defeating L. R. Register for re-election. In 19 10 he was 
re-elected, defeating John G. Griffis by 232 majority. In 
191 2, 1914 and 1916 he was re-elected. Besides being tax 
collector, Mr. Dickerson is a farmer. He is a Mason and a 
Woodman of the World. His oldest son, H. C, Dickerson, 
is assistant cashier of the Bank of Homerville. 

DICKERSON, DANIEL, was born in Ware, now Clinch 
County, December 27th, 1847, the son of Robert G. and 
Vicy (Newbern) Dickerson. He was raised on his father's 
farm not far from where Homerville now is. He married 
Miss Mary Ann Strickland, daughter of Charles and Lucre- 
tia (Sirmans) Strickland, July 15th, 1868, and to them was 
born one son, C. H. Dickerson. In 1874, Daniel Dickerson 
was elected coroner of Clinch County and commissioned Jan- 
nary 14th, 1875 ^^^ two years. In the Civil War Mr. Dick- 
erson joined Co. "C" 22d Georgia Artillery in 1 864, although 
only a youth. He died at his home near Homerville, Septem- 
ber 14th, 1906, of paralysis, and was buried at Arabia 
Church. He is survived by his widow and son. 

DICKERSON, FRANKLIN, was born in Clinch County, 
September 12th, 1855, ^^e son of Robert G. Dickerson and 
Vicy Dickerson. He was raised on his father's farm a few 
miles north of Homerville, and at the age of twenty married 
Miss Delilah Fiveash, daughter of Matthew Fiveash. He 
was married December 23d, 1875. They had six children, 
the oldest of whom Is Isaac D. Dickerson. In 1888 Mr. 
Dickerson was elected sheriff of Clinch County, over the 
incumbent, B. E. Mattox. By continuous re-elections he 
served until January ist, 1897. He did not seek re-election. 
Previous to his election as sheriff he was a farmer, but about 
1895 he entered the turpentine business with James M. 
Smith. Their still was located about ten miles south of 
Homerville. After a year or so of business, the partnership 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 241 

was mutually dissolved and Mr. Dickerson removed to 
DuPont, where he spent the remainder of his life, dealing 
principally in horses and mules. His death occurred at his 
home in DuPont, January 31st, 19 10, of Bright's disease. 
He is buried at Arabia Church. 

DICKERSON, JAMES RANSOM, was born in Ware, 
now Clinch County, December 8th, 1845, ^^e oldest son of 
Robert G. and Vicy (Newbern) Dickerson. He enlisted in 
Co. "I" 4th Georgia Cavalry in 1863 and served until 1865. 
He was married May 7th, 1867 to Miss Martha Smith, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Studstill) Smith. They 
have five children. Mr. Dickerson was elected coroner in 
1868 and served three years. In 1872 he was appointed the 
first ex-officio J. P. of the io6ist district and served five 
years. In 1879 he was elected justice of the 106 ist district 
and served five years. In 1885 he was elected the first justice 
of the 1389th district and served eight months. In 1887 he 
M^as re-elected justice and in 1889, but resigned December 
3d. In 1892 he was elected as a county commissioner and 
served on the board until it was abolished. He was chairman 
of the board during his term. In 1902 he was appointed ex- 
officio J. P. of the 1389th district, which he held until 1915. 
Mr. Dickerson is a member of the Primitive Baptist Church 
and was clerk of Providence or Camp Branch Church twen- 
ty-five years. He is a Mason, He also has served in other 
minor capacities, such as constable and jury commissioner. 

DICKERSON, MARCUS D., was born in Clinch County, 
February 12th, 1880, the son of David and Malinda (Sir- 
mans) Dickerson. He attended school as Jasper, Fla., and 
at Abbeville, Ga., and graduated in June, 1901, from the 
State University. After being admitted to the bar he settled 
at Douglas for the practice of law and formed a law part- 
nership with Col. W. C. Lankford. This partnership ex- 
isted for several years. He was appointed Solicitor of the 
City Court of Douglas in 1902 and elected in 1904, and 



242 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

served until 1908. He was married January i8th, 1905, to 
Miss Ethel Frink, at Douglas, by Rev. T. B. Stanford. In 
1 9 10 Colonel Dickerson was elected first solicitor-general of 
the Waycross Circuit, and was, in 19 14, re-elected without 
opposition. Colonel Dickerson is the first son of Clinch to 
occupy this office. 

DICKERSON, ROBERT G., was born in South Caro- 
lina, August ist, 1 8 17. His parents died while he was yet a 
child, and he was brought to this section and reared by Ben- 
jamin James. When the Indian war came on, Mr. Dicker- 
son participated in it as a volunteer. He married in 1844, 
Miss Vicy Newbern, a daughter of John and Argent 
(O'Steen) Newbern. They had eleven children, viz.: James 
R., Daniel, David, Franklin, Robert H., Thomas B., George 
L., Mary Ann, who married Jonathan O'Steen; Elizabeth, 
who married George L. Newbern ; Rachael, who married B. 
G. James, and Sarah Ann, who married H. J. Solomon. Mr. 
Dickerson was elected justice of the peace of the 584th dis- 
trict of Ware County in 1845, ^^^ commissioned June nth, 
1 845. In 1852, he was elected tax collector of Clinch County, 
and held this office one year. In 1861 he was elected a justice 
of the Inferior Court of this county and held it four years. 
On January i6th, 1869, he was commissioned the first ex- 
officio J. P. of the 1224th district (Homerville) and served 
until 1872. He qualified as a member of the Board of Edu- 
cation May 5th, 1875, and served one year. He died Octo- 
ber 2ist, 1884, ^^^ was buried at Arabia Church. 

DICKERSON, ROBERT G., JR., was born in Clinch 
County, October 27th, 1871, the son of David and Malinda 
(Sirmans) Dickerson. The elder Dickerson died when the 
son was eleven years old, and he worked on the farm until 
he was sixteen, when his mother re-married. He obtained his 
primary education in the local schools and after his mother 
married, he taught school about five years and took a course 
in the Florida Normal College at White Springs, Fla. In 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 243 

1892 he was appointed enrolling clerk in the Georgia senate. 
The next year he read law in the office of Hon. W. M, Ham- 
mond, of Thomasville. While thus studying law, the treas- 
urer of Clinch County, A. J. Caswell, died, and Mr. Dicker- 
son came back home and announced for the office. Although 
opposed by Chas. F. Hitch, a strong and popular man, he 
was elected by a majority of 307 votes. This was in 1893. 
Soon after this he was admitted to the bar in Thomasville. In 
1 894 he was re-elected treasurer for the full term. He opened 
a law office in Homerville, and has since practiced there. He 
was nominated for representative in the primary of 1896, and 
resigned the treasurer's office October 12th, 1896. The same 
day he was elected representative, defeating M. S. Corbitt, 
his Populist opponent by 255 votes. In the sessions of 1896 
and 1897, Colonel Dickerson served on the Finance, Educa- 
tion, Penitentiary and General Judiciary Committees of the 
House. It was during this session that he made a state-wide 
reputation on the public school and convict questions. His 
work on the finance committee in behalf of the public schools 
is considered one of the best managed pieces of legislation 
that has come before that committee. By hard and enthu- 
siastic work he impressed every member of the committee 
with the fact that the public schools of the State lacked money 
to make them sustaining, and his labors were rewarded with 
an additional appropriation of $400,000 for the common 
schools. In 1898 he announced for the Democratic nomina- 
tion for State senator, and was nominated by a majority of 
442 votes over his nearest opponent, Col. S. L. Drawdy. In 
the following general election he defeated W. A. Ecord, his 
Populist opponent, by 232 votes. In 1901, when the County 
Court of Clinch County was created, he was appointed solic- 
itor and served by re-appointments until 1907. In 1902 he 
was a member of the State Democratic Executive Commit- 
tee, and has been chairman of the county executive commit- 
tee several times. In 191 2 he was a member of the Georgia 
delegation to the National Democratic Convention, which 



244 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

nominated Woodrow Wilson for President. In 19 14 Colonel 
Dickerson defeated Dr. A. H. Culpepper for representative 
by 388 majority. He served through the sessions of 19 15 
and 19 1 6. He figured very conspicuously in the passage of 
the new prohibition law and the State Railroad legislation 
during the 191 5 session, championing each measure. Colonel 
Dickerson was married June 29th, 1897, to Miss Orie L. 
Moon, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Nelson Moon, of 
Scottsville, Va. The wedding took place at the home of the 
bride and was in important social event. Congressman W. G. 
Brantley was best man. Mr. and Mrs. Dickerson have four 
sons, the oldest of whom is R. G. Dickerson, third, who is 
studying law. Colonel Dickerson has been for several years 
a director of the Bank of Homerville, and was in 19 13 elected 
its president, succeeding H. J. Peagler, deceased. He has 
also served in various minor positions, such as town council- 
man and local school trustee and town clerk. 

DICKERSON, WALTER T., was born in Clinch County, 
February 8th, 1878, the son of David and Malinda (Sir- 
mans) Dickerson. After receiving a primary education in 
the common schools he attended the Georgia Normal College 
at Abbeville. Coming back home he taught school a few years 
and was in 1899 elected county school commissioner, succeed- 
ing C. H. Smith, resigned. Mr. Dickerson was just twenty- 
one years old. He was admitted to the bar in 1901 and 
formed a partnership with Jesse Grantham, which continued 
a year or two, as Dickerson & Grantham. He was re-elected 
county school commissioner successively until 191 1, when he 
resigned. He was in 19 10 nominated State senator by a 
majority of 434 over Senator F. B. Sirmans. He served 
through the sessions of 191 1 and 191 2. In 1913 he was ap- 
pointed solicitor of the County Court and re-appointed in 
19 1 5, which he now holds. Colonel Dickerson is vice-presi- 
dent of the Bank of Homerville, a position which he has held 
since 1905. He married Miss Tobitha Pearson, a daughter 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 245 

of Benaje Pearson, of Coffee County, by whom he has a 
daughter and two sons. 

DRAWDY, SHERMAN LEE, was born In Charlton 
County, April i8th, 1865, the son of John J. and Elizabeth 
(Patten) Drawdy. In 1869 his parents moved to Clinch 
County and settled near Homerville. He was raised up on 
his father's farm, but having a desire to study law, he began 
to study Blackstone and other standard commentaries at 
home; later he entered the law office of Hon. John C. Nichols 
at Blackshear, where he read law. Returning home, he was 
admitted to the bar at the October term, 1888, of Clinch 
Superior Court. Later he was admitted to practice in the 
higher courts. He has practiced law in Homerville since first 
admitted and has never formed any law partnerships. He 
was married January 24th, 1898 to Miss Lucy Moore, daugh- 
ter of Hon. Henry C. and Fannie C. (Smith) Moore. In the 
primary of 1900 he was a candidate for representative and 
defeated Hon. Rowan B. Johnson by 196 votes in the pri- 
mary, and in the general election easily defeated his Populist 
opponent, William Barlow. He did not offer for re-election. 
In 1908 he was again elected representative, defeating Judge 
S. C. Townsend after a very hot race. He served through 
the session of 1909 and 19 10. It was during this session that 
he introduced and passed the bill creating the new Waycross 
Judicial Circuit. In 19 13 he was appointed judge of the 
County Court of Clinch County for four years. He was 
mayor of Homerville 1907- 1909. He is a Mason and a 
Woodman. 

DUKES, EDWARD TAYLOR, was born in Thomas 
County, Ga., December 12th, 1846, but was reared in Brooks 
County. He joined the Confederate Army in May, 1864, 
Co. "B" ist Georgia Reserves, McLaw's Division. In 1865 
he was mustered out. Two years later he came to Homer- 
ville, where he engaged in the mercantile business. He was 
a candidate for clerk of the Superior Court in 1872, and 



246 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

defeated David O'Quin and P. M. Lee. He was com- 
missioned January i8th, 1873. He removed back to his old 
home in Brooks County in 1874, shortly before his term 
was out, leaving his deputies in charge of the clerk's office. 
He engaged in the mercantile business in Quitman, where he 
still lives. In 1870 Mr. Dukes was married to Miss Lucy E. 
Wade, and by her had a son, Edward Scott Dukes, who died 
upon reaching manhood. Mrs. Dukes died in 1871, and in 
1876 he married Miss Arie Bryan, who died in 1881. One 
daughter was born to them, Nellie Leland Dukes. Ten years 
after the death of his second wife, Mr. Dukes married Miss 
Mattie E. Roundtree, of Quitman, and they have one daugh- 
ter, Frances R. Dukes. 

DuPONT, AUGUSTUS, christened John Peter Au- 
gustus DuPont, Jr., was the son of Capt. J. P. A. DuPont 
and wife, Eliza G. Nichols, and was born in Savannah, Ga. 
September 17th, 1856, and with his family removed to Clinch 
County about 1858. He was raised up at Lawton or DuPont, 
and received a good education. He graduated from Roanoke 
College, Salem, Va., with first honors and also from the 
University Law School in Iowa in 1880. He soon returned 
home, however, and settled down, and resigned the practice 
of law. In 1 88 1, when DuPont was re-incorporated he was 
named its mayor. He was appointed on the adjutant-general's 
staff of the State militia, which he held for seventeen years. 
In 1900 he was elected as commissioner from the State of 
Georgia to the Paris Exposition, but was unfortunately taken 
sick and prevented from going. In 1904, Hon. R. B. John- 
son, representative from Clinch County, died, leaving a va- 
cancy to which the County Democratic Executive Committee 
nominated Mr. DuPont, who was elected at a special elec- 
tion held July i6t.h, 1904. In the next election he did not 
offer for re-election. Mr. DuPont served through the session 
of 1904. After this he lived in retirement at the old family 
home in DuPont, until his death In a local hospital in Savan- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 247 

nah, Feb. 27th, 19 13, and was buried in Valdosta. He was 
survived by a daughter, Eliza Gussie DuPont, who since her 
marriage resides in Charleston, S. C. 

ECORD, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS, was born in Lin- 
coln County, Ga., September 20th, 1846. When the Civil 
War broke out he joined the Confederate Army in 1861, 
joining Co. "G" 22d Georgia Regiment. He served through 
the war, being wounded at the Battle of Sharpersburg. After 
the war was over Mr. Ecord was mustered out at Appomat- 
tox court-house, and came back to Georgia and settled in 
Coffee County, where he married Miss Victoria Fussell, 
December 23d, 1871. In 1875 he removed to Homerville 
and entered the mercantile business. On January 30th, 1884, 
Mr, Ecord was appointed by the Ordinary as clerk of the 
Superior Court to succeed B. R. Johnson, who had removed 
from the county. Soon afterwards he was elected at a special 
election and commissioned March 4th, 1884, ^o'' the unex- 
pired term. In 1885 he was re-elected and by continuous re- 
elections served until 1893. When the Populist Party was. 
formed in Clinch County, Mr. Ecord joined it, and was their 
candidate for clerk in 1892, but was defeated by S. W. Reg- 
ister, his Democrat opponent. In 1898 Mr. Ecord was the 
Populist candidate for State senator, and in 1896 for clerk. 
His first wife having died, Mr. Ecord married March loth, 
1 90 1, Mrs. Eliza L, Mattox, daughter of Rev. Robert F. 
Lanier and widow of Dr. L. C. Mattox. By his first wife Mr. 
Ecord had four children, James Monroe, Atticus Haygood. 
George Pierce and Lizzie L. Ecord, who married H. L. Mat- 
tox. There are no children by his second wife. Mr. Ecord 
is a member of the Homerville Methodist Church, and in 
1900-6 was superintendent of the Sunday School. He has 
also served as church steward and as recording steward. To- 
gether with his wife, they own and operate the Ecord Hotel 
in Homerville. 



248 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

FENDER, DAVID C, was born about 1848, the son of 
W. F. and Anna Fender. He was reared at Stockton, where 
he lived until his death. He married Mattie, daughter of 
Barzilla Staten, Jr., May 4th, 1881, and they had several 
children. Mr. Fender Vv^as nominated for representative in 
the primary of 1898 over R. B. Johnson and J. H. Inman, 
and in the general election which followed, defeated Hon. 
M. S. Corbitt, his Populist opponent by 215 votes. He 
served through the sessions of 1898 and 1899 and was one 
of the most faithful members of the House in attendance. He 
was always present at each roll call. He did not offer for 
re-election. His death occured at his home near Stockton, 
October I4t.h, 1901. Mr. Fender was also a member of the 
Board of Education for several years and was its president 
four years. 

FINDLEY, JOHN QUINCEY, was born in Tattnall 
County, about 1820. He married Miss Lusina Findley, and 
by her had one child, William R. Findley. He came to Clinch 
County about 1850 and settled near the Echols County line, 
on Cow Creek. He was elected coroner of Clinch County 
in 1857 and commissioned January 13th, 1858. He served 
until 1 861. When the Civil War came on he left his farm 
and joined the Confederate Army, O'Steen's company, which 
was organized at Homerville, in 1862. The next year he 
died of pneumonia at Lynchburg, Va., while in the army. 
He was survived by his widow and son. Mrs. Findley died 
in 1909, 

FINDLEY, STEPHEN DECATUR, was born in Jef- 
ferson County, Fla., near Monticello, March i6th, 1843, 
the son of Asa Findley. When he was yet a boy his father 
removed to a place on Cow Creek in then Ware, later Clinch 
but now Echols County. Here he grew to manhood and when 
the Civil War came on he enlisted in Co. "G" 51st Georgia 
Regiment from Echols County, in March 1862. After the 
company arrived at the front, Mr. Findley, and a few of 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 249 

his comrades, were assigned to a company from Quitman 
County, under command of Captatin John P. Crawford. He 
was captured twice, the first time he was confined in Fort 
Delaware twenty-four days and paroled. He got back in the 
Confederate lines and re-enlisted. He was captured again, 
just three days before Lee surrendered, and put in prison, 
being released July 14th, 1865. Captain Crawford remarked 
of young Findley just before the surrender that Mr. Findley 
had answered to his name in the roll calls of the company 
more times than any other man in the company. Returning 
home, Mr. Findley married Miss Mary G. Fiveash, daugh- 
ter of Matthew Fiveash and his wife, Mary Dame. They had 
six children. He purchased a farm just above Homerville, 
where he settled October 9th, 1873; here he lived a few 
years, then moving to his present home a mile distant. In 
1880 Mr. Findley was elected coroner of Clinch County and 
commissioned January 13th, 188 1, for two years. Later 
he served as a constable of the 1224th district. He is now 
living in Homerville engaged in the hotel business. 

FINDLEY, WILLIAM RILEY, was born in Clinch 
County, May 25th, 1857, the son of John Q. and Lusina 
Findley. His father died in the war when the son was only a 
few years old, and the son was thus deprived of a father's 
help in his early age. Mr. Findley was reared on a farm, 
and married Mrs. Emma Weaver, of Randolph County, 
May 25th, 1882, by whom he has five children. About this 
time Mr. Findley settled near Homerville, where he lived 
until his removal to Berrien County in 19 10. He returned to 
Homerville in 19 14, and now lives on a farm near town. He 
was elected coroner of Clinch County in 1904, and com- 
missioned October 17th, 1904. By continuous re-elections he 
served until his removal from the county in 19 10. 

GAINES, WILLIAM, came to Clinch County during the 
Civil War and settled in the Magnolia district. He was a 
native of Ireland, where he was born in 1824. His wife. 



250 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Ellen, was a native of Canada, where she was born in 1829. 
They had four children, Mary A., John G., William F., and 
Helen J. Gaines, who were born in 1854, 1857, 1863 and 
1867, respectively. Mr. Gaines was elected county surveyor 
in 1868 and served until 1871. He later removed to Chat- 
ham County, where he died. 

GARY, WILLIAM H., was born in Hancock County, 
June 14th, 1834. He was married to Miss Mary Hannah, 
and by her had three children. Previous to and during the 
war, he was an employee of the Central of Georgia Railroad. 
From here (Savannah) he removed to Florida, locating at 
Ellabelle, where he entered the lumber business. He devoted 
some few years to this business, but as a financial venture did 
not succeed. He lost his wife there and shortly afterwards 
came to Homerville. Here he married Mrs. Elizabeth E. 
Hodges, widow of John W. Hodges, January 8th, 1880. 
There were no children by his second marriage. Mr. Gary 
lived a quiet life in Homerville, attending to his farm and 
such other work. He was a member of the Baptist Church 
and was very instrumental in organizing this church at 
Homerville. He served as church deacon, church clerk and 
Sunday School superintendent. He served several years on 
the board of jury commissioners, and when in 1889 the 
Board of County Commissioners was created, he was named 
on it, and was subsequently chosen as chairman of the Board. 
He held the office of county treasurer about a month follow- 
ing the death of Treasurer Henry C. Moore, in 1891. He 
was appointed treasurer by the Ordinary June 23d, 1891. He 
was a candidate for treasurer in 1892 for the full term, but 
was defeated by A. J. Caswell; also a candidate in 1896. He 
also was mayor of Homerville three or four years, and was a 
town commissioner under the old charter. His death oc- 
curred Sept. 14th, 1 90 1, age 67 years. He had previously 
been suffering of bone cancer in his head and this was the 
cause of his death. He was buried in the Homerville ceme- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 251 

tery. Resolutions of the Baptist Church speak loud praise 
justly due him. 

GIBBS, AUSTIN JAMES, was born in Clinch County 
four miles south of DuPont, December 23d, 1867. tie was 
raised on a farm and went to school about six months. He 
commenced clerking in a country store at the age of fifteen, 
acquiring most of his education in that way. He was married 
to Miss Lillie Harris, daughter of Joseph Harris, of DuPont, 
June 20th, 1895. There are no children. Mr. Gibbs enter- 
ed the employ of the railroad company and was agent at 
DuPont from May 11, 1902, until December 15, 1905, and 
resigned that position to enter the service of the G. F. & A. 
Railroad. He served as agent for that road at Quincy, Fla,, 
and Bainbridge, Ga., and as car accountant. He resigned this 
position to accept the management of the naval stores busi- 
ness of Cranford-Lastinger Co., at Sirmans, Ga., which posi- 
tion he held until he was elected clerk of the Superior Court. 
He was nominated in the primary over Hon. S. W. Register, 
and took charge of the office January ist, 1909. He served 
about two months as deputy under A. O. Register, his prede- 
cessor. He has since, by continuous re-elections, served as 
clerk, being re-elected in 19 16. 

GIBBS, GEORGE DAME, was born in Clinch County, 
June 25th, 1858, the son of John and Charity (Dame) 
Gibbs. He was raised upon a farm and in 1879 married Miss 
Angie Dampier, daughter of James Dampier, of this county, 
by whom he had four children. He was elected coroner of 
Clinch County in 1890, and commissioned January loth, 
1 89 1. He was taken sick with tvphoid fever and died at his 
home above DuPont, November loth, 1891, survived by .his 
wife and four children. His widow married John J. Drawdy 
in 1896. 

GIDDENS, DUNCAN, was bom in North Carolina in 
1 8 10, and came to this State a young man. His first wife's 
name was Savility, by whom he had several children. After 



252 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

her death he married a Joyce, He was commissioned a jus- 
tice of the Inferior Court January 24th, 1854, and served 
two years. He did not hold any other office. Mr. Giddens 
lived in the io6ist district, and .his death occurred September 
8th, 1881. 

GIDDENS, MOSES, was born in Appling, later Ware 
County, in 1 82 1. In 1840 he married Miss Pollie Mathis, by 
whom he had ten children. He came to what Is now Clinch 
County about 1836, and lived here for about forty years, 
afterwards moving to Coffee County, where he died. In 1853 
he was elected tax collector of Clinch County, and served one 
year. When the war broke out, Mr. Giddens joined Co. "G" 
29th Georgia Regiment, which was organized in Berrien 
County. He served through the war. His death occurred in 
January, 1906, age 85 years. 

GRIFFIN, WILLIAM W., was born in South Caro- 
lina in 1809, and early in life came to this State, where he 
lived until his death with the exception of a few years in 
Florida. He became an early convert to Methodism and was 
subsequently licensed to preach. He was the first stationed 
preacher of the M. E. Church at Thomasville. Later he 
joined the Florida conference and served as a presiding elder 
for a period, making the trip by buggy to Cedar Keys, thence 
by boat to Key West, where he was stationed a short while. 
Later he was transferred back to the Georgia conference 
and was stationed at Homerville, where his daughter, Mrs. 
L. A. Slrmans, was living. Here he lived several years, hold- 
ing the position of railroad agent awhile. In 1868 he was 
elected Ordinary, defeating J. L. Sweat. He served in this 
capacity three years. Subsequently Rev. Griffin, with his 
son-in-law. Colonel Sirmans, and their families, removed to 
Stone Mountain, in DeKalb County, where he died in 1879. 
His wife, Ann, was born in 18 16, and survived him. 

GRIFFIS, WILLIAM, was born in Ware, now Clinch 
County, March nth, 1841, the son of Juniper Griffis. He 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 253 

was raised on his father's farm, and when the Civil War 
came on he joined the Confederate Army at Waynesville, 
Ga., joining Co. "I" 4th Georgia Cavalry. He was captured 
in the winter of 1863, at Fort Gates, Fla., from which time 
until the close of the war he was held a prisoner by the Fed- 
erals. He was married March 12th, 1867 to Miss Olive 
Sears, daughter of Hiram Sears, of Coffee County, by whom 
he had three daughters and two sons. He was elected justice 
of the peace of the io6ist district in 1875, and served two 
years. In 1886 he was elected tax collector of Clinch County, 
and commissioned January 8th, 1887. He served two years. 
In the fall of 1888 he removed to Ware County and settled 
at Millwood, where he lived and farmed until his death, 
May 25th, 19 1 5. 

HENDERSON, JOHN S., known also as "Jack" Hen- 
derson, was born in this State May 9th, 1 807. He was among 
the first settlers of Ware County, and lived there until 1855, 
when he removed to Clinch County. He settled in Clinch, 
on the old T. F. Morgan place, but later moved to near 
Homerville, where fTe died. He was first married to Miss 
Pollie Fulwood, a sister of Hon. James Fulwood, of Ware 
County, and by her had three sons, William, John and Ran- 
dall Henderson. After his first wife's death, Mr. Henderson 
married in February, 1840, Miss Sallie King, a sister to 
Judge Ziba King. By this marriage they had the following 
children; Duncan J., Marcus F., James C, Alfred, Belinda, 
Nancy, who married Joel G. Griffis; Julius S., Martha, who 
married C. H. Smith; Simon W., and Bartow A. Hender- 
son. Mr. Henderson was a justice of the Inferior Court of 
Ware County, 1835-7, ^"^ clerk of the Superior and Inferior 
Courts of Ware County, 1836-8. He served as representa- 
tive from Ware County in the sessions of 1844 and 1845. 
After his removal to Clinch, he was elected to the Inferior 
Court in 1858, and served three years. After this he lived a 
retired life on his farm near Homerville until his death. 



254 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

March 25th, 1883. His remains were buried in the Homer- 
ville cemetery beside those of his wife, who died in July, 1879. 

HITCH, SIMON W., was born in Jones County, in 1848, 
the son of Sylvanus and Ann A. (Nichols) Hitch. When his 
father settled at Homerville, about the close of the war, 
young Hitch also came, and served awhile as clerk of the 
County Court under Judge Z. King during 1866-7. In 1870 
he was admitted to the bar at Homerville and practiced law 
at Homerville several years until his removal to Waycross, 
where he lived until he died. In 1871, he was at the age of 
twenty-three elected solicitor-general of the Superior Courts 
of the Brunswick Circuit, and held this office ten years. Col. 
Hitch remained in the active practice of law until 19 10, 
when he retired on account of age and health. Col. Hitch 
died in Waycross, September i8th, 1915, and was buried 
there. He was married and had several children. 

HITCH, CHARLES F., was born June 30th, 1855, in 
Jones County, the son of Sylvanus and Ann (Nichols) Hitch. 
He was reared principally in Homerville, and when a young 
man entered the mercantile business in Homerville. He mar- 
ried Miss Alice Mattox, daughter of H. P. Mattox, and by 
her had one child, Ruth Hitch. On the death of A. J. Cas- 
well, county treasurer, Mr. Hitch was appointed county 
treasurer August 21st, 1893, by the county commissioners. 
At the succeeding special election he was defeated by Robert 
G. Dickerson for the unexpired term. Mr. Hitch served as 
treasurer about one month. His death occurred June 30th, 
1894, and he was buried in the Homerville cemetery. His 
widow married D. O. Ratliff in 1896, and is now living in 
Bartow, Fla. 

HODGES, ARCHIBALD, was born in Liberty County, 
November 5th, 1804. He came to what is now Clinch 
County about 1850 and settled here. He married Fannie, 
daughter of George W. Delk, and by her had several chil- 
dren, one of them, Edward C. Hodges, still living in this 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 255 

county. Mr. Hodges, Sr., was elected a justice of the peace 
of the io6ist district in 1851 and held the office two years. 
On January 24th, 1854 he was commissioned a justice of the 
Inferior Court, which he held four years. Mr. Hodges died 
October 25th, 1862, at his home in the 106 ist district and is 
buried at Arabia Church. He was a brother of John W. 
Hodges, who came to Clinch in 1853. 

HOWELL, WILLIAM T., was born in Pulaski County, 
in 1847, ^^^ with his parents came to Clinch County at an 
early age. He joined the Confederate Army in 1864, Co. 
"H" 4th Georgia Cavalry, and served until the close of the 
war. He married Salina, daughter of Judge John L. Mor- 
gan, February iith, 1874, and by her had several children. 
After her death he married a daughter of P. W. Courson. 
In the primary of 1900 Mr. Howell defeated George Cor- 
nelius for Ordinary, and was elected in the general election 
following, defeating his Populist opponent, Martin S. Cor- 
bitt. He assumed charge of the office January ist, 1901, and 
served four years, and did not seek re-election. He was ap- 
pointed on the county board of tax assessors in 19 14 and 
served until January ist, 19 16. His death occurred at his 
home in the 586th district, January 20th, 19 16, and was 
buried at the Fender graveyard. 

HUNTER, WILLIAM HENRY, was born in Clinch 
County, November i8th, 1867, ^"^ was raised on a farm. 
He married Miss Mary Jane David, daughter of J. J. David, 
formerly of Clinch, but then of Lowndes County. To them 
were born nine children, eight of whom are living. Mr. 
Hunter was for many years employed by the G. S. Baxter 
Company at Fargo, in this county, but in 191 1 removed to 
Homerville and bought a farm and entered the grocery 
business. In 191 2 he was a candidate for county treasurer, 
but was defeated by Randall Corbitt by one vote in the pri- 
mary. In 1 9 14 he was again a candidate, and was elected, 
defeating George M. Bennett by forty-six votes. He took 



256 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

charge of the office January ist, 1915. His term of office 
will expire January ist, 1917, after which the treasurer's 
office is abolished by Legislative Act, passed in 191 5. 

HARPER, BENJAMIN A., the fourth son of Samuel 
S. and Sarah C. (Sellers) Harper, was born in Bucksville, 
S. C, February loth, 1869; with his parents he came to 
Clinch County at an early age. He married Mrs. Sarah J. 
(Carmichael) Kirkland, widow of Franklin D. Kirkland, in 
1 89 1. He served a short while as constable of the 1389th 
district and four years as postmaster at Argyle. In 1899 he 
was commissioned justice of the peace of the 1389th district 
an(f served until 19 10, when he resigned. In the primary of 
1 910 he was elected representative from Clinch County, by 
forty-seven majority over David J. Smith and A. H. Cul- 
pepper. He served through the sessions of 1911-12. He 
was licensed as local preacher of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, in 19 12, and served four years as supply for 
Glenmore charge. He is a Mason and Woodman of the 
World. 

HUGHES, FRANCIS MARION, was born in what is 
now Clinch County, September 28th, 1849, ^^^ son of Wil- 
liam and Nancy Hughes. He was married and had several 
children. He was reared upon his father's farm and farm- 
ing was his life-long occupation. In 1892 he was elected on 
the Board of County Commissioners and served two years. 
In 1898 he was appointed on the Board of Education and 
served as its president the last nine years of his life. His death 
occurred at his home near DuPont, August loth, 19 13, and 
he was buried at the North cemetery. 

HUGHES, JOHN FRANKLIN, was born in Clinch 
County, July 20th, 1875, the son of Jeptha and Catherine 
(Gibbs) Hughes, and a grandson of William Hughes, a 
pioneer citizen of Clinch. Mr. Hughes was reared on his 
father's farm near DuPont, and was married about 1904 to 
Miss Mary Register, daughter of O. P. Register, by whom 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 257 

he has one son. In 1902 he was nominated for county treas- 
urer, and elected over John G. Griffis by 202 votes. He was 
re-elected in 1904 and 1906, and retired from the office Jan- 
uary 1st, 1909. He removed to Homerville during his incum- 
bency as treasurer, and entered the grocery business. He 
operated this until 1908, when he was elected cashier of the 
Bank of Homerville. He held this position until 191 1, when 
he resigned and removed to St. Mary's, Ga., where he ac- 
cepted the same position with the Bank of Camden County, 
which he still holds. 

HUTTO, ISAAC D., was born in South Carolina in 18 18 
and came to Georgia when a young man. He married Sarah, 
daughter of Joshua Lee. They had no children, but adopted 
a son, Jackson Hutto, who was a son of James Newman, de- 
ceased. Mr. Hutto early in life joined the Primitive Baptist 
Church and was ordained a minister. He served Prospect 
Church as its pastor many years. In 1855 he was elected tax 
collector of Clinch County and re-elected the next year, serv- 
ing until 1857. He lived to be about eighty years old, and 
died at his home above DuPont. He is buried at Prospect 
Church. 

HUXFORD, FOLKS, was born in Coffee County, Novem- • 
ber i6th, 1893, the son of Calvitt and Kansas (Drawdy) <- 
Huxford. In 1906 his parents removed to Homerville. In 
1 9 10 he commenced working in the office of the clerk of the 
Superior Court, and worked there several years. In 19 15 he 
was appointed constable of the 1224th district, and the same 
year was elected the clerk of the Board of County Commis- 
sioners in September, which position he still holds. He was 
also appointed one of the county registrars in 19 16, and is 
deputy clerk of the County Court under Judge S. L. Drawdy. 
He married February 21st, 1913, Miss Orie L. Kirkland, 
daughter of D. E. and Meddie (Register) Kirkland, and by 
her has one daughter. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church. He served as acting postmaster at Homerville for 



258 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

about six months following the death of Postmaster D. E. 
Kirkland in November, 19 13. 

JEFFORDS, JERRY M., was born in Ware County, 
about 1845, ^"d was married to Mary Herren, daughter of 
Levi Herren, Sr., about 1868. He was appointed constable 
of the 106 1 St district in 1873 and served a few years, and 
in 1880 was elected sheriff of Clinch County, and commis- 
sioned January 13th, 1881. He was re-elected sheriff in 1882 
and 1884. Subsequently removed to Ware County where 
he died about 1908. He had a son, Harmon V. Jeffords, Jr. 

JACKSON, FRANCIS MARION, was born in Alabama, 
July 15th, 1825. When the Mexican War commenced, he 
enlisted in the army and saw active service in that war. Later 
he came and settled in Clinch County, and when the Civil 
War broke out Mr. Jackson was very instrumental in organ- 
izing companies in Clinch County for service in the Confed- 
erate Army. He was elected captain of Co. "H" 29th 
Georgia, and served as second sergeant in Co. "I" 4th Geor- 
gia Cavalry. After the war he was elected justice of the 
peace of the 586th district and served about a year. In 1892 
Captain Jackson was elected on the Board of County Com- 
missioners and served two years. He lived to the ripe age of 
87 and died October 12th, 19 12. He was buried at the 
Lovejoy graveyard. Captain Jackson was counted as one of 
the county's ablest and most intelligent men of his day, and 
was an excellent officer during the war. He married Miss 
Mary Griffin, daughter of Noah H. Griffin, of Clinch 
County, and they raised a large family of children. 

JOHTVSON, BRYANT R., was born in Clinch County in 
1 861, the son of Rowan B. and Alief (Tomlinson) John- 
son. He was raised on his father's farm, and at the age of 
twenty-one was elected cleric of the Superior Court, and com- 
missioned January 9th, 1883. The office in those days was 
not such a remunerative office, consequently after holding 
office about a year, Mr. Johnson removed from the county, 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 259 

leaving Isbin Tomlinson, his deputy, in charge. He subse- 
quently lived in Macon and was a railroad employee. He 
married Martha Ann, daughter of John Moore, and had 
several children. 

JOHNSON, DAVID, was born in this State, January 
29th, 1802, the son of David Johnson, Sr., and was one of 
the first settlers of the county. He took an active part in the 
Creek Indian war of 1836-38, and commanded a company in 
this war, and from this he earned the title of "General." He 
married Miss Nancy Burnett, and by her had: Rowan B. 
Johnson, Martha (drowned), David H. Johnson, Joseph 
B, Johnson, Bryant Johnson, Melvina, who married Harris 
Sirmans; William Johnson, Cassie and Eliza, who married 
Joseph Jones. Bryant and William Johnson were killed in 
the Civil War. When the first election for justices of the 
Inferior Court was held for the new County of Clinch in 
1850, General Johnson was elected one of the justices. In 
1 86 1 he was again elected, but was succeeded in the following 
September by R. G. Dickerson. General Johnson died April 
loth, 1879, ^g^ 77 years, survived by his wife and several 
children. 

JOHNSON, DAVID H., was born in what is now Clinch 
County in 1835, the son of General David Johnson. He 
married Rebecca Tomlinson, daughter of Harris Tomlinson, 
Sr., about 1856, and by her had several children, all daugh- 
ters except one, James T. Johnson. He was elected a justice 
of the peace of the 586th district in 1864; again in 1865 and 
J 869. In 1874 he v/as elected sheriff of Clinch County and 
commissioned January 14th, 1875. He was re-elected in 
1876 and served until 1879. On February 14th, 1891 he 
was commissioned justice of the peace of the 1280th district 
and served until 1897. April 22d, 1902, he was commis- 
sioned ex-ofl^icio justice of the peace of the same district and 
served until his death, which occurred at his home near 
DuPont, April 4th, 1903. 



2 6o History of Clinch County, Georgia 

JOHNSON, ISHAM F., was born in Liberty County, 
about 1810, and settled in this section about 1845. He was a 
brother-in-law of Elijah Mattox, Mr. Mattox marrying 
Lavinia Johnson. He was commissioned a justice of the 
peace of the 719th district of Ware County March loth, 
1848, also on March 31st, 1849, ^^^ March ist, 1852. He 
was elected one of the first justices of the Inferior Court of 
Clinch County in 1850, serving until 1853. Mr. Johnson 
married Miss Martha Darsey, of Liberty County, and had 
several children. He lived in the southern part of the county. 
He died about 1875. 

JOHNSON, JOSEPH B., was born in Ware, now Clinch 
County, in 1832, the son of General David Johnson. He 
lived in this county all his life. He was elected surveyor of 
Clinch County in 1854 and re-elected in 1856, serving until 
1857. Li the Civil War he was a private in Co. "H" 29th 
Georgia Infantry, and served throughout the war. He died 
October 12th, 1881. Mr. Johnson was never married. 

JOHNSON, RILEY, was born in what is now Clinch 
County in 1847, the son of John J. Johnson, for many years 
a resident of Homerville. He married Miss Lizzie Tison, of 
Homerville,, June 9th, 1 867, and by her had several children. 
At the age of twenty-one he was elected county treasurer of 
Clinch County, defeating James C. Cooper. His official 
bond for $4,000 is dated August 29th, 1868. He soon re- 
signed the office, and Allen Smith was appointed in the fol- 
lowing November for the unexpired term. In later years 
Mr. Johnson removed to Florida, where he died. 

JOHNSON, ROWAN B., was born in Lowndes County, 
November 29th, 1830, the son of General David Johnson. 
When he was only three years old his father removed to 
Ware (now Clinch) County, where he was raised to man- 
hood. When he was only sixteen years of age he was elected 
captain of the militia district at a time when it was regarded 
as a local distinction. In 1851 he was elected a justice of the 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 261 

peace of the 970th district and served about one year. He 
married in 1847, Miss Alief Tomlinson, daughter of John 
TomHnson, Sr., by whom he had two children, one of whom, 
B. R. Johnson, was in 1882 elected clerk of the Superior 
Court. In 1862 Mr. Johnson, Sr., enlisted in Co. "B" 2d 
Georgia Regiment, western division, and was commissioned 
captain. Returning home in 1865 he was elected a justice of 
the Inferior court, and served until that court was abolished. 
In 1862 Mr. Johnson's wife died, and he married Miss Caro- 
line Floyd, daughter of Jason Floyd, of Liberty County, by 
whom he had three children. His second wife dying in 1872, 
Mr. Johnson married Mrs. Emaline Clifton, widow of Wm. 
H. Clifton and daughter of George Dame, Sr. She died and 
he married Miss Carrie Day, of DuPont, who survived him. 
Mr. Johnson was elected to the Legislature four times and 
was as many times defeated for it. He was first elected in 
1884, defeating M. M. Caswell. In 1886 he was defeated 
by John C. Humphreys for re-election. In 1889 he was 
elected at a special election to fill out the unexpired term of 
James P. Mattox, deceased. In 1890 he was defeated for 
re-election by his Populist opponent. Dr. L. C. Mattox. In 
1892 he was again elected, defeating John C. Humphreys 
and Elias Grifiis in the primary and E. C. Hodges, Third 
Party, in the general election. In 1898 he was defeated in 
the primary by D. C, Fender, and in 1900 by Col. S. L. 
Drawdy. In 1902 he was elected, defeating Col. S. C. Town- 
send in the primary. He took his seat and served through the 
session of 1902 and 1903, and when the Legislature convened 
in 1904 he was taken sick, which proved to be his last illness. 
He died June 19th, 1904, and was buried at Prospect Church. 
He was seventy-four years old at his death. He was a very 
familiar figure in the legislative halls and was an able, and 
conservative legislator. 

JONES, JOHN C, was born in Sampson County, N. C, 
January 25th, 1852, and early in life his parents removed to 



262 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Wilcox County, Ga. From there they removed to Clinch 
County when John C. Jones was sixteen years old. In his 
youth he happened to a misfortune by being bitten by a snake, 
by which he came near losing his life. It left him a cripple 
the remainder of his life, completely losing the use of his legs. 
In 1880 he was elected tax receiver of Clinch County and 
commissioned January 13th, 1881. He was continuously re- 
elected over all opposition until his death. He had just been 
re-nominated for the office in 1904, when he died. He mar- 
ried in 1894 to Mrs. Fannie C. Moore, widow of Henry C. 
Moore, and daughter of Jesse Smith, and by her had two 
children, John T. Jones and Fannie L. Jones. His first wife 
having died, Mr. Jones married in 1902, Mrs. Ellen D. 
O'Quin, widow of E. W. O'Quin, and daughter of James 
C. Smith. Mr, Jones died at his home in Homerville June 
5th, 1904, of paralysis, and was buried in the Homerville 
cemetery. He was a very consistent member of the Homer- 
ville Baptist Church for many years, and was for several 
years prior to his death clerk of the church. 

JOYCE, HENRY, was born in Ware, now Clinch 
County, June 26th, 1831, the son of Martin Joyce. He mar- 
ried Rebecca, daughter of Moses Tomlinson, Sr., and by her 
had several children. On January loth, 1854, he was com- 
missioned tax collector of Clinch County and served one 
year. Mr. Joyce lived in the Mud Creek district and was a 
member of the Primitive Baptist Church. He died at his 
home March 21st, 1907, and is buried at Arabia Church. 

KIGHT, JAMES M., was born in Ware County, Septem- 
ber 9th, 1835, *^he son of Hiram and Sallie (Smith) Kight. 
He was raised in what is now Clinch County and since 1858 
has been living on his present farm about three miles South 
of Argyle. He was married in 1857 to Mary Strickland, 
daughter of Aaron Strickland, by whom he had five children. 
His first wife dying about 1900, Mr. Kight married Miss 
Adilene Kight, daughter of Thomas Kight, by whom he has 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 263 

one son. In 1870 Mr. Kight was elected coroner of Clinch 
County and commissioned February 7th, 1871 for two years. 
In the Civil War Mr. Kight served in the Confederate Army 
from 1862 to the close, in Co. "K" 26t.h Georgia Regiment. 
On July 2d, 1885, Mr. Kight was commissioned ex-officio 
justice of the peace of the 1389th district, an office which he 
held for thirteen years. When the Populist Party was formed 
in Clinch County, Mr. Kight joined them, and served as a 
Populist on the board of registrars of Clinch County for six 
years, beginning 1898. 

KING, ZIBA, was born in Appling County, later Ware, 
November 29th, 18 18. After Clinch was created he came 
to this county where he resided until 1868, when he removed 
to Manatee County, Fla. He was elected justice of the peace 
of the 970th district and commissioned August 24th, i860, 
and served four years. On May loth, 1866 he was com- 
missioned judge of the first County Court of Clinch County, 
and served about two years, when he removed to Florida. 
Judge King first settled in Manatee County, later in DeSoto 
County, Florida, accumulating a nice fortune there in the 
cattle business. He was married May 28th, 1868, to Fannie 
A. Tanley, but subsequently divorced, and later married Miss 
Florida Brewer, July 24th, 1870, by whom he had eight chil- 
dren. His death occurred March 7th, 1901, he was survived 
bv his wife and children and his remains were buried in the 
cemetery at Fort Ogden, Fla. A daughter of Judge King 
married J. E. T. Bowden, who in 191 6, was candidate for 
Congress from the eleventh district of Georgia. 

KIRKLAND, JOHN COBB, was born in Appling 
County, June 27th, 1824. He participated in the Indian war 
of 1836-38, although only a lad, and at the age of twenty- 
two was elected justice of the peace of the 970th district, then 
in Ware County. In 1850, when Clinch County was created, 
Mr. Kirkland was elected first clerk of the Superior and In- 
ferior Courts. He was commissioned April 12th, 1850, and 



264 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

served until 1852. In 1854 he was elected justice of the peace 
of the io6ist district being re-elected in 1857, 1861 and 
1865. He was one of the first settlers of Homerville, and in 
1872 was commissioned ex-officio justice of the peace of the 
Homerville district. He was reappointed in 1876, 1880, 
1885, 1889, 1893, 1897 and 1901, and held the office at the 
time of his death. Mr. Kirkland was first married to Miss 
Elizabeth Nettles, daughter of Martin and Cassie (New- 
bern) Nettles, and by her had five sons: Franklin D. Kirk- 
land, James Seaborn Kirkland, William G. Kirkland, John 
B. Kirkland and Joseph G. Kirkland. His first wife having 
died, Mr. Kirkland married Miss Vasti Stafford, daughter 
of Edmund Stafford, March 31st, 1872. By this marriage 
he had nine children, viz. : David E. Kirkland, Ada, Delia, 
Zilla, Edmund S., Emma, Kizzie, Berry C. and Thomas M. 
Kirkland. Mr. Kirkland died on his 80th birthday, June 27th, 
1904, after an illness of about two weeks, and was buried in 
the Homerville cemetery. His widow died in 1907. Mr. 
Kirkland had never been sick from the time he was a boy until 
his last illness, and his strength and vigor was maintained 
despite his advancing old age. 

KIRTON, SAMUEL R., was born in Georgetown, S. C, 
July 25th, 1867. His father died when he was about two 
years old, and was probate judge of his county at the time. 
In 1886 Mr. Kirton graduated from the South Carolina Mil- 
itary Academy in Charleston, with the degree of B.S. After 
being employed with railroad companies for some time as 
civil engineer, etc., he came to Clinch County in 1892, and 
was elected county surveyor in 1894. He was re-elected in 
1896 and served until January ist, 1899. He married Miss 
Nora Smith, daughter of Charlton H. and Martha (Hender- 
son) Smith, in September, 1897, and they had several chil- 
dren. Mr. Kirton was for several years employed by the G. 
S. Baxter Co. at Fargo, but for the last year or so has lived 
at Argyle, near where his farm is. He is a member of the 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 265 

board of tax assessors of Clinch County, having been ap- 
pointed in 19 1 6, and is also a jury commissioner. 

KNIGHT, JONATHAN, was born in originally Irwin 
County, January 17th, 18 17, the son of William A. Knight, 
He came to vv^hat is now Clinch County in 1836 and settled 
on Suwannoochee Creek, where he lived until 1863, when he 
moved back to Berrien County. He married Miss Frances 
Staten, daughter of Barzilla Staten, Sr., in 1835. To this 
union were born thirteen children, viz. : Barzilla, Sarah, 
Catherine, Kizziah, Elizabeth, William A., Margaret, 
Lovdy, Cinderella, Celesta Ann, Mary C, Ulysses A., and 
Matilda T. Staten, of whom five are living. Mr. Knight 
served in both the Indian and Civil Wars; in the Civil War 
he served as first lieutenant in Co. "H" 29th Georgia In- 
fantry. The only office which Mr. Knight held was that of 
justice of the Inferior Court, to which he was commissioned 
January loth, 1861. He was a justice until Sept. loth, 1861. 
Mr. Knight died October loth, 1886, and his remains were 
buried at Union Church on Allapaha River. 

KNIGHT, JOHN, was born in originally Irwin County, 

in 1826, and married Miss Dicy , and they had several 

children. He served through the Civil War in the Confeder- 
ate Army, and in 1890 was elected on the Board of County 
Commissioners and served two years. He died about 1900. 

KNIGHT, LEVI J., was born in Wayne County, Septem- 
ber 1st, 1803, and was reared in that county and married 
Mrs. Ann D. Herring, in July, 1827. He then moved to what 
is now Berrien County a few days after their marriage. Mr. 
Knight settled on Beaver-dam Creek, near the town of Rays 
City, and lived there until his death. He never did live in 
Clinch County, although closely identified with it. Mr. 
Knight participated in the Creek and Seminole wars from 
181 8 and 1836, the last several years of which he com- 
manded the pioneer troops in this section as major and colo- 
nel. When the Mexican War broke out, Mr. Knight en- 



266 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

listed and served as a captain of volunteers the greater part 
of that war, and when the Civil War broke out, or was im- 
minent, he mustered the Berrien County Minutemen at Nash- 
ville, Ga., and out of the 125 men more than 50 were over 
six feet two inches tall, of this company he was captain. 
When hostilities began the minutemen were mustered into 
the 26th and 29th Georgia Regiments, one of which, Co. 
"G" 29th Georgia, he became captain. Mr. Knight did not 
serve through the war on account of his old age and serious 
afflfction from asthma, from which he died in 1870. He was 
commissioned a justice of the peace of the 658th district of 
Lowndes County in 1829, and served until 1832, when he 
was elected State senator from Lowndes County. He was 
again elected justice of the peace and commissioned October 
15th, 1838. He served again as senator through the sessions 
of 1834-35 and 1837 to 1 84 1. In 1845 he was again elected 
justice of the peace and served four years. In 1851 he was 
elected State senator from the 5th district, which then included 
Berrien County, and served through the session of 1851-52. 
Mr. Knight was a delegate to the State constitutional con- 
vention of 1868 from the 6th district, which then included 
Clinch County. This was the last public service of Captain 
Knight. His death occurred February 23d, 1870, and he was 
buried at Union Church about ten miles from his home. He 
was one of the leaders of his day and an able man. 

LASLIE, ARCHIBALD D., was born in Telfair County, 
Ga., January 29th, 1825. He came to Clinch County when a 
young man and was elected clerk of the Superior and Inferior 
Courts and commissioned January loth, 1854. He served 
two years. He took up the study of medicine and graduated 
from a medical college and practiced medicine in Clinch and 
Echols Counties the remainder of his life. In the Civil War, 
Dr. Laslie joined Co. 'T' 29th Georgia regiment, first serv- 
ing as a private and later as assistant surgeon of his company. 
After the war was over he came back to this county and re- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 267 

sumed his practice, but in the winter of 1868-69 removed to 
Echols County, where he lived until his death. Dr. Laslie 
married Mrs. Catherine Davis, of Clinch County, February 
■23d, 1868, and by her had seven children: R. F. Laslie, 
Mrs. W. J. Coleman, Miss George Laslie, Mrs. J. W. Wil- 
son, Mrs. W. T. Duke, A. C. Laslie and C. B. Laslie. Dr. 
Laslie served Echols County as representative in the General 
Assembly of 1890-91, and was appointed by Legislative Act, 
a member of the Board of County Commissioners of Echols 
County, by an Act approved December 9th, 1 893. He served 
until 1895. He died April 27th, 1909, at his home in Echols 
County. 

LASTINGER, GUILFORD, was born in Bulloch 
County in 18 13, the son of William Lastinger. His father 
moved to what is now Clinch County, where he grew to man- 
hood. Mr. Lastinger first married a Miss Mikell, and after 
her death married Miss Isabelle Brack about 1865, by whom 
he had four daughters. In 1872 his second wife died, and he 
married Mrs. Lauraney Malone, widow of L. S. Malone, Sr., 
and formerly Cornelius, July 22d, 1 874, by whom he had one 
son. He was elected justice of the peace of the 105 2d district 
in 1850 and served two years. In 1852 he was elected the 
first Ordinary of Clinch County, and served four years. In 
1868 he was elected representative on the Radical ticket, 
and served through the sessions of 1868-69, and 1870. After 
this he never held any other office. He spent the declining 
years of his life with his daughter, Mrs. Belle Crosby, of 
Pierce County, where he died in 1896. Mr. Lastinger was 
a member of the Primitive Baptist Church and an ordained 
minister. In the Civil War he had six grown sons to go to 
the front, all of whom died or were killed except one, Guil- 
ford T. Lastinger, who is yet living. 

LEE, PERRY M., was born in Ware County, now Clinch 
County, about four miles north of where DuPont now is, 
February 14th, 1848, the son of Zachariah and Phoebe 



268 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

(Register) Lee. He was raised up near DuPont and has re- 
sided near there all his life. He was married to Miss Eliza- 
beth J. FIveash, . daughter of Matthew FIveash, November 
14th, 1867, by whom he had twelve children. In 1874 he" 
was elected clerk of the Superior Court of Clinch County and 
commissioned January 14th, 1875, for two years. Later Mr. 
Lee lived several years at the old county seat, Magnolia, 
v/here he was appointed ex-officio justice of the peace In 1900. 
He served two years. He removed to DuPont about this 
time, where he entered the mercantile business with two of 
his sons. In 1915, Mr. Lee was appointed on the Board of 
County Commissioners created by the Legislature, and In 
19 16 was elected for the full term, from the 1280th and 
970th districts. 

LEE, PERRY R., was born In Clinch County, January 
1 2th, 1878, the son of William J. and Rhoda (Clements) 
Lee. He was raised up on the farm and attended the public 
schools in Mud Creek and at HomervIUe. He was married 
to Miss Pearl Smith, daughter of Benjamin Smith, Febru- 
ary 2 2d, 1900, by whom he has four daughters. He was 
elected sheriff In 1908 over three strong opponents, and took 
charge the following January ist. He has since been re-elected 
in 1910, 1912, 1914 and 1916 over strong opposition. Pre- 
vious to his election as sheriff he was a farmer but removed to 
Homerville with the taking up of the duties of his office. 

LIGHTSEY, JACOB, was born in South Carolina, June 
17th, 1 8 10, and early In life came to this State and settled in 
Ware County. He married Miss Christina Rice about 1835 
and by her had several children. He engaged In the Indian 
war of 1836-38, and in 1840 was commissioned justice of the 
peace of the 5 84th district of Ware County. He served as State 
senator from Ware during 1844-45. ^^ 1^55 ^e was elected a 
justice of the Inferior Court of Clinch County and served 
until 1857. He did not hold any other office except as town 
councilman of DuPont. He died at his home near DuPont, 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 269 

April 17th, 1892. His wife preceded him to the grave by two 
years. 

McLENDON, ISAAC T., was born in Laurens County, 
Ga., March 19th, 1835, and came to this county about i860. 
In the Civil War he served a while in the Confederate Army, 
and was in 1 864 elected surveyor of Clinch County and served 
two years. He was again elected in 1872 and commissioned 
January i8th, 1873, for two years. He married Miss Elpha 
Smith, daughter of James C. Smith, May 20th, 1869, ^^i^ 
they had twelve children. Mr. McLendon taught school in 
and around Homerville for many years at different intervals. 
He was an active member of the Baptist Church at Homer- 
ville. His death occurred at his home in Homerville, April 
8th, 1 90 1, and he was buried in the Homerville cemetery. 
Mr. McLendon studied law and was admitted to the bar at 
Homerville in September, 1880, but never actively pursued 
this profession. 

McMillan, TARLTON, was bom in Barnwell dis- 
trict, S. C, on what was known as Squirrel Bay, July 27th, 
1826. In his early life he learned the blacksmith trade and 
also farmed more or less all his life. He came to this State 
in 1849 ^"d to Clinch County in 1853. When Dr. J. H. 
Mattox was clearing up a place, where Homerville now is, in 
1854, he employed Mr. McMillan to cut 3,000 rails for him 
■with which to enclose his field. Mr. McMillan therefore re- 
members very well the wild character of the county at that 
time and the beginning of Homerville. In 1855 he settled 
not far from the Suwannee River; here he was elected justice 
of the peace in 1858 and held the office for three years. He 
married Miss Margaret Strange in 1850, and they had ten 
children, six daughters and four sons. During the Civil War 
he was exempt from military duty three years and six months 
on account of being a blacksmith. During 1864 he was mus- 
tered in the army together with David Smith, another black- 
smith, and after giving both a test to ascertain which was the 



270 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

better smith, Mr. McMillan was relieved and he returned 
home. During the short time he was in the army, he was at- 
tached to Co. "I" 43d Georgia Regiment. He was discharged 
at Atlanta, Following the war, he settled at DuPont, where 
he was appointed ex-officio justice of the peace October 28th, 
1868, being the first officer of that kind to be appointed in 
the county. He served several years. Mr. McMillan was 
nominated for coroner of Clinch County in the primary of 
1896, defeating J. B. Kirkland, and was elected in the gen- 
eral election without opposition. He was re-elected in 1898, 
1900 and 1902. Since that time he has lived at his home in 
DuPont. He is now in his ninetieth year and is the oldest 
man in the county. He is well known and is a respected old 
man. 

MATHIS, JOHN, was born in Bulloch County about 
1 8 10, the son of Edmund Mathis, one of the original settlers 
of what is now Clinch County. After moving here he mar- 
ried Jemima, daughter of Joshua Lee, and had several chil- 
dren. He was elected coroner of Clinch County in 1851 and 
served until 1858. In 1861 he Avas re-elected coroner and 
served until 1864. He died about 1868 and was buried at 
Prospect Church in Hamilton County, Fla. 

MATHIS, TYRE, was born in Bulloch County, in 1808, 
the son of Edmund Mathis and brother to John Mathis 
(above) . He married Nancy, a daughter of Joshua Lee, and 
they had several children. He was commissioned a justice of 
the Inferior Court of Ware County January 15th, 1849, ^^^ 
resigned with the formation of Clinch County, and was 
elected to the same position in Clinch in 1853 and served one 
year. He died about 1880 and is buried at Prospect Church 
in Clinch County, 

MATTOX, BANKSTON ELIJAH, SR., was born in 
Clinch County, where Homerville now is, November 14th, 
1854, the son of Dr, John Homer Mattox, the founder of 
Homerville. He was educated in the local schools and has 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 271 

been living in Homerville all his life. He married Miss 
Nancy E. O'Quin, daughter of Hon. David O'Quin, January 
9th, 1878, and by her had seven children. In 1877 he was 
elected constable, and held that office one year. In 1886 he 
was elected sheriff of Clinch County and commissioned Janu- 
ary 8th, 1887, for two years. In 1892 he was elected on the 
Board of County Commissioners, and qualified October 31st, 
1892. He served two years. Mr. Mattox was elected at a 
special election in 1904, to succeed John C. Jones as tax re- 
ceiver, for the unexpired term. He was commissioned June 
9th, 1904. He served until the ist of January following. In 
19 1 2 and 1 9 14 he was narrowly defeated for this office. Be- 
sides these offices, Mr. Mattox has held several lesser posi- 
tions, such as county registrar, jury commisisoner and school 
trustee. 

MATTOX, ELIJAH, was born in Colleton district, 
S. C, July 15th, 1798, the son of John Mattox. When he 
was yet a lad the elder Mattox removed to Tattnall County,, 
where the young Elijah Mattox grew to manhood, receiving 
a good education. He married Miss Lavinia Johnson, of 
Liberty County, about 1820, and by her had ten children^ 
viz.: Carrie M. Mattox (died in infancy) ; Julia A. Mattox, 
who first married B. G. O'Bryan and later J. A. Whitting- 
ton; John Homer Mattox; Louisa A. Mattox, who married 
Judson Greene; Helen M. Mattox, who married H. A. Mat- 
tox; Victoria O. Mattox, who married L. J. Sirmans; Adilene 
A. Mattox, who married Randolph Boring; Cicero M. Mat- 
tox and James M. Mattox (died in infancy). About 1830 
Mr. Mattox removed to Waresboro, Ga., where he was 
elected clerk of the Superior and Inferior Courts in 1834, 
serving one term. In the session of 1839-40, Colonel Mattox 
was senator from Ware County. January i6th, 1844, he was 
commissioned surveyor of Ware County, and served one term, 
and was in 1848 again elected surveyor, serving two years. 
Under Governor Chas. J. McDonald, Colonel Mattox served 



272 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

as aide-de-camp a while, and about this time granted a large 
number of lots of land in Ware and adjoining counties, be- 
coming an extensive land owner. He was instrumental in the 
creation of Clinch County, and in the Act creating same was 
named as one of the commissioners to lay out and organize 
the new county. He was commissioned surveyor of Clinch 
County, April 12th, 1850, serving until 1851. His death 
occurred at his home at Blount's Ferry, January 21st, 1856, 
and was survived by his wife who was the executrix of 
his estate. Mrs. Mattox died in 1882. Mr. Mattox was 
admitted to the bar in his younger days, but never did pursue 
the profession. 

MATTOX, HAMILTON A., was born in Tattnall 
County, August 2d, 1834, the son of Michael Mattox, who 
was a brother to Elijah Mattox. He came to Clinch County 
when a young man and married Miss Helen M. Mattox, his 
cousin, April loth, 1856, and to them were born eight sons, 
five of whom are living. Mr. Mattox was one of the first 
to settle at Homerville, and during and following the war 
owned and ran a general merchandise business in Homerville. 
He served a short while in the Confederate Army in 1864 in 
Co. "I" 1 2th Georgia Regiment. He was commissioned a jus- 
tice of the Inferior Court of Clinch County March 26th, 1 864, 
and re-commissioned January 23d, 1 865, and served until that 
court was abolished. In the election of 1870, Mr. Mattox 
defeated D.H.Johnson for representative, and served through 
the sessions of 1871 and 1872. During his term as represen- 
tative he introduced and passed a bill requiring non-resident 
land owners to return the lands they owned in the county 
where the land was situated and not in the county of their 
residence. Later Mr. Mattox served as a jury commissioner 
for about twenty years. He was also a member and president 
of the Board of Education several years. About 1880 he 
entered the turpentine business with H. P. Mattox, and en- 
gaged in that until about 1896. After this he removed to his 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 273 

farm, about six miles east of Homerville, where he resided 
until his death, which occurred December 12th, 1906. He 
was buried in the Homerville cemetery. Mr. Mattox was a 
member of the Methodist Church at Homerville, and was for 
many years Sunday School superintendent and recording 
steward. 

MATTOX, JAMES POLK, was born in Tattnall County, 
November 15th, i860. When he was a young man he came 
to Homerville and began as a store clerk for H. & H. Mattox 
Co. Later he became interested in another business of the 
same nature. He studied law and was admitted to the bar 
at the March term, 1883, of Clinch Superior Court, and soon 
acquired a very lucrative practice. On February 19th, 1888, 
he was married to Miss Minnie Crum, daughter of Robert 
B. Crum. Colonel Mattox was elected to the Legislature 
in 1888 and took his seat in the House at the following ses- 
sion that fall. In Atlanta he was taken sick with typhoid- 
pneumonia about the time that the Legislature adjourned 
for the holidays. His death soon followed on January 13th, 
1889. His remains were brought back to Homerville and 
interred in the local cemetery. The Homerville bar passed 
resolutions on his death, an extract from which reads : "In .his 
untimely death from typhoid-pneumonia, a loving husband 
has been taken away, . . . and the county and State has 
lost a true public servant and our profession a worthy and 
respected member," His wife died in 1896. Colonel Mattox 
and his wife were active members of the Methodist Church, 
and were teachers in the Sunday School several years. He 
was a Mason. 

MATTOX, LUCIUS CORNELIUS, was born in Tatt- 
nall County, May 5th, 1829, the son of Hon. Elijah Mattox, 
He received his education under private tutorage and in 1849 
entered the Eclectic Medical College at Macon, where he 
graduated February 9th, 1851. After practicing medicine in 
Madison County Florida, for about two years, he came to 



2 74 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Clinch County and settled near Homerville, about two or 
three miles east. Dr. Mattox first married Miss Sarah A. 
Shinholser, of Macon, April 6th, 1854, and by her had six 
children, viz. : Gertrude, Oscar T., Mattie, Adilene, Rena, 
and Wilbur F. Mattox, In the Civil War he served as a sur- 
geon in the 5th Georgia Cavalry, and was wounded, not seri- 
ously, at Saltville, Va. After the war was over he came back 
home, where he was elected justice of the peace of the 1224th 
district and commissioned March 20th, 1865, ^"^ served 
until 1867. For many years after the war he was the only 
practicing physician in the county, or at least in the vicinity of 
Homerville. In 1890 Dr. Mattox was nominated by the 
Populists and elected representative from Clinch County, and 
served through the session of 1890-91. He served on the 
House committees on Agriculture, Insane Asylum, Temper- 
ance and Deaf and Dumb Asylum. In 1892 he was nomi- 
nated by the Populists as their candidate from the nth dis- 
trict for Congress, and received the support of the Republi- 
cans also. He received 6,078 votes to 1 1,091 cast for Henry 
G. Turner, the Democratic candidate. His first wife having 
died in 1882, Dr. Mattox married Miss Eliza Lanier, daugh- 
ter of Rev. Robert F. Lanier, of this county; there were no 
children by this marriage. Dr. Mattox was a member of the 
Methodist Church for many years, but in later years joined 
the Second Adventists and was ordained a preacher in that 
church. He was also a Mason. For two years prior to his 
death he was the Populist member of the Board of County 
Registrars. He was an active Sunday School worker also. He 
died June 21st, 1898, at his home near Homerville, and he 
was buried on his home place, beside his mother and first wife. 
His widow re-married in 1902 to Mr. W. A. Ecord. 

MOBLEY, WILLIAM H., was born in Appling County, 
near Mann's Ferry, Altamaha River, March 5th, 1865, ^he 
son of Solomon Mobley and his wife, Mary Mann. He 
was raised upon the farm and in 1893 married Miss Belle 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 275 

Morgan, of Echols County, by whom he has two children. 
He was appointed a member of the Board of County Com- 
missioners in 19 15, under Legislative Act, from the 1141st 
and 1219th districts, and was in 19 16 elected for the full 
term of four years. He is engaged in the mercantile business 
at Fargo, where he lives, and has extensive holdings in that 
section. 

MONK, MALACHI M., was born in Clinch County, in 
1868, the son of Hampton and Eliza Monk. He was mar- 
ried to Miss Armindie Herren, December 23d, 1888, and 
by her had several children. The only office he ever held in 
Clinch County was that of tax collector, to which he was 
nominated in the primary of 1896, defeating Hon. Moses 
Tomlinson. By successive re-elections he held the office until 
1903, when, owing to a shortage in his accounts, he turned 
the office over to his bondsmen and removed to Florida. It 
is generally thought that the shortage came about through 
careless handling of the funds and not through any criminal 
intent. He had employed various assistants in his office. 

MOORE, HENRY C, was born in Clinch County, Octo- 
ber loth, 1850, the son of John Moore. Early in life he 
became a cripple from rheumatism, and when twenty-six years 
old was elected county treasurer of Clinch County. He was 
commissioned January 17th, 1877, and by continuous re-elec- 
tions served until his death. He married Miss Fannie C. 
Smith, daughter of Jesse Smith, September 2d, 1879, ^'"^^ ^Y 
her had three daughters, viz. : Lucy, Lorena and Belle Moore. 
His death occurred June 17th, 1891, after a long and dis- 
tressing illness. The county commissioners in their report to 
the Grand Jury, at the October term, 1891, said in part: 
"Since the last session of your honorable body a Divine Prov- 
idence has seen fit to call to his last account our worthy treas- 
urer, Henry C. Moore, who has served the County of Clinch 
for the last fifteen years in that capacity. He has been the 
custodian of the moneys of this county, and during all the 



276 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

years with the demand that terminated his life, even yet when 
the Messenger of Death came, he left his books correct and 
the money on hand to a fraction of a cent. , . . " This 
tribute is signed by F. B. Sirmans, Isham Patterson and W. 
H. Gary, commissioners. 

MORGAN, ABRAHAM, was born in Appling County, 
October 8th, 1856, the son of Jonathan L. Morgan, who 
came to Clinch County in i860. He was raised on his father's 
farm about ten miles south of Homerville, and when he was 
sixteen years old he was employed by Josiah Sirmans, at 
Homerville, as assistant in his store, express and post office 
work. After the death of Mr. Sirmans in 1881, Mr. Mor- 
gan was elected clerk of the Superior Court of Clinch County, 
and commissioned January 13th, 1881, for two years. After 
his term of office expired he moved to Waycross, where he 
was appointed postmaster by President Cleveland, May 5th, 
1885. When this office was raised to the third-class, in 1887, 
he was re-appointed and continued as postmaster until the 
Republicans went into power. He was appointed postmaster 
at Haylow, Ga., in 1895, but in 1899 resigned and returned 
to Waycross, where he was employed as a clerk in the post 
office. In 1903 he was appointed assistant postmaster by W. 
A. McNeil, and re-appointed in 1905 by C. E. Murphy, and 
in 1 9 13 bv H. C. Bunn. Mr. Morgan is at present assistant 
postmaster. He married Miss Julia E. Wideman, of Clinch 
County, June 30th, 1886, by which marriage there are two 
children. 

MORGAN, HAMPTON, was born in Appling County 
in 1843, the son of Hon. John L. Morgan, Sr. In 1853 his 
father removed to Magnolia and in i860 to Homerville. In 
the Civil War he served a while in Co. "K" 26th Georgia 
Infantry, but in 1864 was elected Ordinary of the county at 
the age of twenty-one. He was commissioned January 14th, 
1864, for four years. He married about 1869, Miss Mary 
A. McDonald, a daughter of Rev. W. A. McDonald, of 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 277 

Ware County, and after her death married a Miss Sweat. He 
eventually removed about 1867 to Florida, where he died 
about 1895 at Ybor City. 

MORGAN, JOHN L., was born in Habersham County, 
Georgia, in 1802, and removed when he was a young man to 
Appling County. Here he lived until 1846. He married in 
1 8 19 Miss Fannie L. Harris, by whom he had nine children. 
He was elected justice of the peace of the 583d district of 
Appling County in 1845, but resigned the next year and re- 
moved to Lowndes County. He lived there until 1853, when 
he removed to Magnolia. Here he opened up a store which 
he continued to run until his removal to Homerville. In 1854 
he was elected judge of the Inferior Court and served four 
years. In 1861 he was again elected and served until 1868. 
He was elected Ordinary of Clinch County and commissioned 
January 29th, 1858, and re-elected in 1861, serving until 
1864. About 1868 Mr. Morgan, with his son John L. 
Morgan, Jr., established a gin and grist mill at Homerville, 
which, although equipped with the latest machinery, proved 
to be a failure. In 1871 Judge Morgan was re-elected Ordi- 
nary for two years. In 1880 he was again elected Ordinary 
and commissioned January 27th, 1881, for four years. Al- 
though past four score years during his last term of office, yet 
Mr. Morgan was strong and vigorous and he employed no 
clerk in his office. Judge Morgan's death occurred at his 
home below Homerville five miles, July 28th, 1888, age 86 
years. He was buried in the Homerville cemetery. Mrs. 
Morgan survived her husband and died about ten years later 
in Hamilton County, Fla. Judge's Morgan's sons are, in 
their order: Joseph, who was killed in 1861 in the war; John 
L., Jr. ; Hampton ; Lemuel T. (killed at Manassas) ; Thomas 
C; William R., and Quarterman B. Morgan. Judge Mor- 
gan was the first W. M. of the Masonic Lodge at Magnolia. 

MUSGROVE, WILLIAM VERNIE, was born Novem- 
ber 15th, 1880, the son of C. H. and Julie Musgrove. He 



278 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

worked on the farm and entered the turpentine business as 
a woodsrider, and after several years' hard work entered the 
business for himself. He has pursued the turpentine business 
for the last fifteen years and has been a successful operator. 
He married in 1900 Miss Alice O'Steen, a daughter of Jona- 
than O'Steen, and they have six children. Mr. Musgrove 
never aspired for any office until 19 16, when he announced 
for Ordinary. He was elected by a majority of 233 votes, 
defeating the incumbent, J. T. Dame. His term of office 
will begin January ist, 19 17. Mr. Musgrove's father, who 
was a native of Baker County, died March 23d, 19 15. 

NEWBERN, ALFRED, was born in 1830, in Lowndes 
County, the son of William C. Newbern, who was a justice 
of the Inferior Court and a sheriff of that county. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Moore, and by her had a son, George L. New- 
bern. The elder Newbern served as deputy clerk under H. 
D. O'Quin, and in 1870 was elected county treasurer. He was 
re-elected twice, and served six years. Mr. Newbern subse- 
quently removed to Florida, where he died at the home of 
his son. 

NEWBERN, GEORGE WASHINGTON, was born 
January ist, 1825, in Appling County. He married about 
1847, Miss Rebecca Thomas, a daughter of Absalom 
Thomas, of Ware County. They had eight children. In 1 851 
Mr. Newbern was elected clerk of the Superior Court of 
Clinch County and commissioned January 14th, 1852, hold- 
ing the office two years. January 12th, 1857 he was com- 
missioned a justice of the Inferior Court and served one year. 
In the Civil War he was second lieutenant in Co. "I" 4th 
Georgia Cavalry. Under H. D. O'Quin he served a while as 
deputy clerk of the Superior Court. In 1874 he was elected 
State senator from the 5th district, defeating Daniel Lott. 
In 1 88 1 he was elected county school commissioner and qual- 
ified January i6th, 1882. He served in this capacity until 
1892. Mr. Newbern was a minister of the Missionary Bap- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 279 

tist Church and served several churches In this county as 
pastor. He was one of the original members of the Masonic 
lodge organized at Magnolia. His death occurred July loth, 
1892, at his home In Homervllle, and his remains were burled 
in the North cemetery near DuPont. 

NICHOLS, WILLIAM M., was born In Jones County, 
April 9th, 1 830, the son of Simon W. and Margaret (Waver) 
Nichols. With his parents he came to Ware County, now 
Clinch, and at the age of twenty-four was elected a justice 
of the Inferior Court of Clinch County. He was the next 
year elected a State senator from this county, serving 
through the session of 1855-56. In 1857 he was re-elected 
to the Inferior Court and served one year. Mr. Nichols' wife 
was Miriam, daughter of Governor Wilson Lumpkin. After 
the war Mr. Nichols removed to Atlanta, where he became 
proprietor of the Kimball House. He died In Atlanta, Sep- 
tember 6th, 1882, and was burled there. His wife died 'about 
1908. They had no children. Mr. Nichols, with his brother, 
Dr. W. J. Nichols, owned much land in Clinch County, al- 
though the control of It was nominally in their father. 

NORTH, JOHN J., was born In Colleton district, S. C, 
November i6th, 1792. He came to this State at an early age, 
and In the Indian war of 1836-38 commanded the troops as 
captain in this county. He was elected a justice of the peace 
of the 719th district In 1833 and 1843, ^"^ served two 
terms. Mr. North was married three times and had twenty 
children Including those who died In their Infancy. His last 
wife was Rebecca, a sister of Tarlton McMillan, of this 
county. He was elected a justice of the Inferior Court of 
Clinch County in 1857, and served until 1861. He lived near 
DuPont, and his death occurred June 19th, 1880, age 88 
years. He is buried at the North cemetery near DuPont. 

NORTH, WILLIAM B., was born In Clinch County In 
1848, the son of James North. He was married September 
1 8th, 1877, to Harriet Stalvey, by whom he has several chll- 



28o History of Clinch County, Georgia 

dren. He has served eleven years on the Board of Educa- 
tion and for six years was ex-officio justice of the peace of the 
1141st district. About 191 1 he removed from the Wiregrass 
district, his old home, to about three miles below Stockton, 
where he owns a nice farm. He was appointed on the Board 
of County Commissioners in 191 5 by Legislative Act, from 
Stockton and Withers district, and in 1916 was elected for 
the full term. 

O'QUIN, DAVID, was born in Appling County, March 
1 2th, 1 82 1, the son of Silas O'Quin. He was married about 
1847 to Miss Matilda Higgs, of Ware County, and by this 
marriage had eight children, viz. : Eli W. O'Quin, H. A. 
O'Quin, Victoria, who married William Barlow; George W. 
O'Quin, Nancy E., who married B. E. Mattox, David H. 
O'Quin, and Janie, who married B. R. Futch. When Mag- 
nolia was founded he became one of the first merchants there, 
and in 1854 was elected sheriff of Clinch County, serving two 
years. He was elected Clerk of the Superior Court and In- 
ferior Court in 1856 and served by continuous re-elections 
until 1868. During the old days when Magnolia was at its 
best, Mr. O'Quin, whose home was very roomy, ran a hotel 
and his home was often a social center for the village. In 1868 
he did not offer for re-election, and his brother was elected 
clerk. From then on, he gave his time to farming. He was 
appointed ex-officio justice or the peace of the 970th district 
January 15th, 1876, and served in this capacity until his 
death. He was appointed clerk of the Superior Court in De- 
cember, 1880, to succeed C. A. Smith, resigned, and served 
about two months. He was a charter member of the Masonic 
lodge at Magnolia. His death occurred April 19th, 1884, at 
his home at Magnolia, and his remains were buried in the 
Homerville cemetery under the auspices of the local lodge 
of Masons. His widow died in 1895. 

O'QUIN, HANSFORD DUNCAN, was born in Appling 
County, in 18 16, the son of Silas O'Quin. He was elected 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 281 

Clerk of the Superior and Inferior Courts of Appling County 
and commissioned January 20th, 1846, serving two years. 
Later he came to Clinch County and taught school. He was 
admitted to the bar about 1867, and practiced Intermittently 
until his removal to Berrien County, some years later. He was 
elected clerk of the Superior Court of Clinch County In 1868, 
and served three years. In 1871 he was elected the first 
county school commissioner of the county, qualifying June 
3d, 1871. He was re-elected In 1876, and served until 1882. 
He was a member of the Board of Education 1 879-1 884, 
after which he removed to Berrien County, where he died 
about 1890. Mr. O'QuIn was first married to Mrs. Matilda 
Joyce, daughter of Rev. G. W. Newbern, and after her death 
to Mrs. Vicy Benton, also daughter of Rev. Newbern, and 
they had several children. 

O'STEEN, BENJAMIN, was born In Ware County, 
April 1 6th, 1849, the son of John R. O'Steen. He was raised 
upon his father's farm. He married September 22d, 1867, 
Miss Mildred Herren, daughter of Levi Herren, Sr. In 
1876 he was elected coroner of the county and commissioned 
January 17th, 1877, and held this office four years. He died 
December nth, 1901, and was buried at Arabia cemetery. 
Mr. O'Steen was a member of the Primitive Baptist Church. 

O'STEEN, BRYANT, was born in Clinch County in 
i860, the son of John R. O'Steen. His father was killed In 
the Civil War and he was thus deprived of a father's help at 
an early age. He was reared on the farm, married Miss 
Jerushia Tomlinson, daughter of Enoch Tomlinson, Decem- 
ber 22d, 1887, and they have several children. In 1896 he 
was nominated In the Democratic primary, defeating Peter A. 
Young, his nearest opponent, by thirty-one votes. In the 
ensuing general election, he defeated his Populist opponent, 
Moses S. Eason, by 187 votes. In 1898 he was nominated 
in the primary, defeating J. A. Smith, by 688 votes. 
In the following general election he defeated his Populist 



282 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

opponent, William Dame, by eighty-eight votes. He did not 
offer for re-election In 1900. Mr, O'Steen is a member of the 
Primitive Baptist Church. 

PRESCOTT, JESSE P., was born in South Carolina, in 

1824. He was married In 1845 ^o Miss Sarah , and 

came to what is now Clinch County In 1848. He was com- 
missioned justice of the peace of the 1058th district, then in 
Clinch County, September 21st, 1850, serving seven years. 
He was commissioned tax collector of Clinch County, Janu- 
ary 13th, 1858, and served one year. About this time Echols 
County was created, and Mr. Prescott's home was included In 
the new county. He was elected the first clerk of the Superior 
and Inferior Courts of Echols County, and commissioned 
April 15th, 1859. He held this office for about twenty-five 
years. By an Act of the Legislature, approved December 
13th, 1859, Statenvllle was incorporated and Mr. Prescott 
was named one of the town's commissioners. He was a mem- 
ber of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mr. Prescott died at 
his home In Statenvllle In 1904, and was buried in the local 
cemetery. His children were: E. J. W. Prescott, T. M. Pres- 
cott, H. D. Prescott, Miss A. M. and W. E. Prescott. 

RAMSEY, THOMAS GREEN, was born In Dooly 
County In 1823. While quite a boy his father moved with 
the family to Stewart; here he attended the "old field school," 
but finished his education at Cedartown Institute In Polk 
County. In 1 846 he went to Alachua County, Florida, his 
father's family having moved there the year before. In 1852 
he met Miss Elizabeth SIkes and they were married In 1853. 
In 1854 he removed to Clinch County, Georgia, not far from 
Milltown, where he farmed. In 1861 he, with Mr. Benjamin 
SIrmans, were elected delegates to the secession convention at 
Mllledgevllle, both voting for secession. Returning home he 
sold his plantation preparatory to moving back to Florida; 
but the war coming on he purchased and settled a place six 
miles south of Homervllle. Here he was elected one of the 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 283 

judges of the Inferior Court, being commissioned September 
19th, 1862. He served until 1865. ^^ 1875 he removed 
with his family to Montgomery County, where he purchased 
a farm on the Ocmulgee River, six miles below Lumber City. 
He lived here until 1884, when he moved to Arredondo, Fla. 
Here he engaged in farming and stock-raising up to the time 
of his death, September 13th, 1905. Of his family of eight 
children, three survive him. His son, Perry G. Ramsey, is 
now, and has been, several years sheriff of Alachua County, 
Florida. 

REGISTER, AUGUSTUS OTIS, was born in Clinch 
County, near Withers, November 20th, 1874, the son of S. 
W. and Mary Register. He was raised on his father's farm, 
and at the age of nineteen came to Homerville, when his 
father was elected clerk of the Superior Court, and assisted 
him in the office work for several years. In 1898 he was mar- 
ried to Miss Maggie Inman, a daughter of J. H. Inman, and 
by this marriage had four children. After his marriage he 
removed to a farm which he bought about six miles south of 
Homerville, where he lived a few years. He was commis- 
sioned ex-officio justice of the peace of the 1365th district, 
October 26th, 1900, but in the course of a year or so removed 
from the district. In 1905 his father appointed him deputy 
clerk of the Superior Court, serving until his father's death. 
In 1908 Mr. Register was elected at a special election to suc- 
ceed his father as clerk. His term expired December 31st, 
1909. In November, 1908, he appointed A. J. Gibbs his 
deputy and Mr. Register removed to Berrien County, where 
he has since resided. In 1908 his wife died, and he subse- 
quently married Miss Leola Shaw, of Berrien County. 

REGISTER, GUILFORD A., was born in Ware, now 
Clinch County, April 13th, 1842, the son of William Reg- 
ister. When the Civil War came on, he, with his brothers, 
joined Co. "G" 50th Georgia Infantry, in April, 1862, and 
served until the close of the war. Shortly after the war he 



284 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

married Rachel E., daughter of William Hughes, by whom 
he had seven sons and a daughter. In 1882 he was elected 
coroner of Clinch County, and was commissioned January 
9th, 1883, serving one term. In 1884 he was elected tax col- 
lector of Clinch County, and commissioned January 13th, 
1885, serving one term. For many years Mr. Register lived 
on his farm south of DuPont, but later lived in DuPont. 
After the death of his first wife in iQc; he married Miss 
Carrie Day, of DuPont, but had no children by her. His 
death occurred in DuPont, May nth, 191 1. He was buried 
in North cemetery. 

REGISTER, SAMUEL W., was born in Ware, now 
Clinch County, August 5th, 1839, the son of William Reg- 
ister. In early life he was a farmer and pursued that occu- 
pation more or less all of his life. He was married August 
1 8th, 1859, to Miss Mary Stanford, daughter of David 
Stanford. By this union were born eight daughters and one 
son, A. O. Register. Leaving his wife and child on the farm 
he joined Co. "G" 50th- Georgia Regiment in April, 1862, 
and served until the close of the war. He lost three fingers off 
his left hand in battle. He was in all the important battles 
of the army of northern Virginia. Returning home he was 
elected tax collector of Clinch County in 1865, ^^^ commis- 
sioned January 22, 1866, for two years. He was a member 
of the first Board of Education under the amended laws of 
1872. When the 1365th district was created in 1884 he was 
elected its first justice of the peace, being commissioned Janu- 
ary 22d, 1885. He served until October 7th, 1890, when he 
resigned to make the race for clerk of the Superior Court. He 
was defeated by his Populist opponent, W. A. Ecord, who 
was the incumbent. However, two years later, Mr. Register 
was elected by a large Democratic majority. He was com- 
missioned clerk January 6th, 1893, and served by re-elections 
until 1908. In the Democratic primary of 1908 he was de- 
feated by A. J. Gibbs. His death occurred shortly afterwards 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 285 

on May 17th, 1908, vertigo being ascribed as the cause of 
his death. The following day his body was taken in charge 
by the local lodge of Masons, of which he had been a member 
since 1867, and conducted to the cemetery at Cow Creek 
Church, six miles south of Stockton, where it was buried. He 
was survived by his wife and nine children. His widow died 
in 191 5. He was succeeded as clerk by his son, A. O. Reg- 
ister, his term not having expired. 

REGISTER, PERRY A., was born in Clinch County, 
May 24th, 1866, the son of John T. Register. He was raised 
on his father's farm and married Christina Copeland, daugh- 
ter of David Copeland, of Naylor. They have several chil- 
dren. In 1896 Mr. Register was nominated for county treas- 
urer, defeating W. H. Gary by 176 majority. He served dur- 
ing 1897-9, and was succeeded by George M. Dame. Mr. 
Register has since entered the mercantile business at DuPont, 
in which he has been very successful. 

REGISTER, LUCIUS C, was born in Clinch County, in 
1868, the son of John T. Register. He was raised on .his 
father's farm, and first married Miss Miriam Morgan, 
daughter of Martin Z. Morgan, of this county, and after 
her death married Miss Mary McCullers, daughter of John 
A. McCullers, of this county. He has five children. In 1906 
he announced for tax collector of Clinch County and was 
elected over strong opposition. He served one term. He 
lives on his farm near DuPont. 

RODGERS, JOSEPH O., was born and reared In Clinch 
County. He received his early education In the common and 
high schools of his native county, and graduated at The Geor- 
gia Normal College and Business Institute in 1906, later at- 
tending school at the University of Georgia. He made a per- 
manent certificate as a teacher In 191 1 and engaged In his 
favorite profession, teaching school, up till his election as 
county school superintendent In the spring of 19 16. He will 



2 86 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

take charge of this office January ist, 19 17. Mr. Rodgers' 
early ancestors were emigrants from Ireland and Wales to 
the Carolinas, thence to Appling County. His great-grand- 
father, Joseph L. Rodgers, was the first coroner of Clinch 
County; his grandfather, William Rodgers, born 1826, mar- 
ried Martha, daughter of George Harnage, of this county; 
his father, George Quarterman Rodgers, now lives in Echols 
County, at Walker, Georgia. Mr. Rodgers' mother was 
Sallie, the fifth daughter of Wesley Johnson, deceased, late 
of Clinch County. 

SESSOMS, ALEX. K., was born at Graham, Georgia, in 
Appling County, Sept. 21st, 1882, the son of Alexander Ses- 
soms, of Cumberland County, N. C, and his wife Lou W. 
Sessoms, of Sampson County, N. C. He lived at Graham 
until 1890, when the elder Sessoms removed to Sessoms, 
Georgia, where he engaged in the turpentine business, for 
two years, when they removed to Waycross. From 1895 to 
1900 the younger Sessoms went to school at Davis Military 
School, Winston, N. C, Gordon Institute at Barnesville, and 
the Georgia Technological School at Atlanta. In 1900 he 
went to Europe for three months and returning home he 
went to work in a door, sash and blind factory at Waycross, 
as a laborer at 75 cents per day. He worked there for three 
months. On January ist, 1901 he went to Jacksonville, Fla., 
as a shipping clerk in a wholesale grocery business and worked 
there six months. Returning to Waycross he was employed 
as shipping clerk for J. M. Cox Company, where he worked 
until the fall of 1903. He then went to Andalusia, Alabama, 
where he organized the Sessoms Grocery Company, a 
$75,000 corporation. In 1908 he gave up the management 
of this company and went to Mexico, where he organized 
and took the management of a ranch of half million acres. 
In the fall of 1908 Mr. Sessoms was called to Waycross to 
take charge of his father's extensive business on account of 
his failing health. His father died September 15th, 1909. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 287' 

In 191 1 Mr, Sessoms, in connection with Hon. F. B. Simians, 
and other incorporators, began the construction of the Way- 
cross & Western Railroad from Waycross westward, and in 
1 9 14 it was completed to Milltown, a distance of forty-five 
miles. Mr. Sessoms was elected president of the railroad, and 
gave his personal attention to the building of the road. On 
February 28th, 19 13, he married Miss Edna Sirmans, daugh- 
ter of Senator F, B. Sirmans, of this county, and went to live 
at Waycross. In 19 14 The Sessoms Land & Securities Com- 
pany was organized to take over the Sessoms estate lands, and 
in order to develop these lands into farms, Mr. Sessoms moved 
to Cogdell in this county, where he now lives. Since moving 
into the county, the companies he represents have spent 
$20,000 each year in building and opening farms. They con- 
template spending that much or more for the next several 
years. They have one of the largest and best farms in the 
State. Mr. Sessoms' companies pay ten per cent, of the total 
taxes of the county, an evidence of their importance to Clinch 
County industries. In 1915 Mr. Sessoms was appointed on 
the Board of County Commissioners, by Legislative Act, hav- 
ing been a resident of the county just about a year. Mr. Ses- 
soms is a most progressive man and all his ideas tend to- 
wards the upbuilding and developing of Clinch County and 
her resources. 

SIRMANS, BENJAMIN, was born in Emanuel County, 
February 6th, 1792, the son of Josiah Sirmans and his wife, 
Artie Hardeman. He was one of the first settlers of what is 
now Clinch County, having settled here according to his de- 
scendants, December 22d, 1822, on the place now owned by 
J. B. Strickland in the Mud Creek district. He lived there 
until his death. Mr. Sirmans became very wealthy, owning 
many slaves and much other property. He married Martha 
Johnson, a sister of Gen. David Johnson; she died December 
24th, 1856. To them were born ten children (see Sirmans 
family history) . He represented Lowndes County in the leg- 



288 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

islature through the sessions of 1828-29, 1838-39 and 1840- 
41. He was State Senator from Clinch County in the session 
of 1853-54. According to reports, he defeated George W. 
Newbern by thirteen votes in the race for senator, also Rowan 
Pafford by thirteen votes, and R. Y. Stanford by seven votes. 
When Clinch County was organized in 1850 Mr. Sirmans 
was appointed one of the commissioners to organize the 
county. When the call for delegates to the secession conven- 
tion at Milledgeville was made in January, 1861, Mr. Sir- 
mans was elected one of the delegates, voting for secession. 
His death occurred May ist, 1863, ^^^ his remains were 
buried at the Fender cemetery. He was one of the leading 
men of the county of his time, and is represented by numer- 
ous descendants in the county to-day. 

SIRMANS, DAVID J., was born in Emanuel County, 
March ist, 18 19, the son of Benjamin Sirmans, Sr. His 
father moved first to Appling and afterwards to Lowndes, 
now Clinch County, when David J. Sirmans was quite yo'ung. 
Mr. Sirmans served as a volunteer under Capt. John J. 
Johnson, Col. Brown's regiment, in the Seminole Indian war. 
In 1845 he was elected tax receiver and collector of Lowndes 
County, and held this office one term. In 1859 he was elected 
State senator from Clinch County, serving one term. Mr. 
Sirmans was married in 1840 to Miss Eliza Wilkerson, 
daughter of John Wilkerson, of South Carolina. She died in 
1886. By her he had several children. After his first wife's 
death, Mr. Sirmans married Lucinda, daughter of W. S. 
Roberts, of Echols County. He served as ex-officio justice of 
the peace of the 1280th district 1 876-1 880. For about fifty 
years prior to his death, Mr. Sirmans lived on a lot of land 
about five miles north of DuPont, which he granted from 
the State in 1843. He bought up other land surrounding, and 
was engaged in the turpentine business for several years prior 
to his death, but sold out shortly before his death. He died 
March 24th, 1905, of heart failure, and was buried at the 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 289 

Fender graveyard on the Allapaha River. He was a member 
of the Primitive Baptist Church. 

SIRMANS, EZEKIEL J., was born in Irwin, now Clinch 
County, February 28th, 1824, being the first white child born 
on what is now Clinch County soil. In 1847 he was elected 
tax collector of Lowndes County, and when Clinch was cre- 
ated he was chosen its first tax collector. He was first com- 
missioned April 12, 1850, but did not take up his commis- 
sion on account of holding the same office in Lowndes County. 
He was again elected and commissioned January i6th, 1851, 
and served one year. March 7th, 1853, he was commissioned 
justice of the peace of the 970th district and served a year. 
During the Civil War Mr. Sirmans was first lieutenant of 
Co. "I" 4th Georgia Cavalry. During his lifetime Mr. Sir- 
mans accumulated much wealth, which was inherited at his 
death by his children, Franklin B., Manasseh and Caroline 
Sirmans. He died April 28th, 1900, and was buried at the 
Fender cemetery. 

SIRMANS, FRANKLIN B., was born in Clinch County, 
September 22d, 1853, the son of Ezekiel J. Sirmans. He was 
raised on the farm and educated in the common schools, and 
when grown he engaged in farming, stock-raising and mer- 
chandising. In this he was very successful. He married Feb- 
ruary 28th, 1878, Miss Amanda Strickland, daughter of 
Charles Strickland, by whom he had two children. Chandler 
(died) and Edna, who married A. K. Sessoms. He was first 
elected State senator in 1886, and served through the session 
of 1 886-1 887. In 1892 he was again elected, defeating the 
Populist candidate by over 2,000 plurality. In 1898 he was 
defeated by R. G. Dickerson. In 1904 he was again elected, 
defeating S. L. Drawdy. In 19 10 he was defeated by W. T. 
Dickerson. Mr. Sirmans was appointed notary public and 
ex-officio justice of the peace of the 586th district, to which 
he was commissioned October 15th, 1880. He also was a 
County Commissioner for three years, 1 890-1 893. He was a 



290 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

member of the Jury Commissioners for about ten years. Mr. 
Sirmans' first wife having died, he was married April 27th, 
1905, to Mrs. Fannie L. Williams, daughter of A. Gill, of 
Jasper, Fla. There were no children by this marriage. For 
several years Mr. Sirmans was a turpentine operator, besides 
farming and stock-raising. He became very wealthy, due to 
his own business acumen, inheritance from his father's estate 
and his first wife's inheritance from her father. At his death 
Mr. Sirmans was about the largest property owner in the 
county. He died March 12th, 19 15, at his home near the 
town of Sirmans, in the Mud Creek district. Mr. Sirmans 
was very instrumental in the building of the Waycross & 
Western Railroad through the county. At his death he was 
its vice-president. He was also the founder of the town of 
Sirmans on the new railroad. His remains were buried at 
Fender graveyard with Masonic ceremonies. 

SIRMANS, JOSEPH, was born in Emanuel County, May 
1 6th, 1808, the son of Josiah Sirmans, Sr., and a brother to 
Benjamin Sirmans. When he was yet a lad his father re- 
moved to Irwin, now Clinch County, where they settled, 
Joseph Sirmans was married about 1830 to Miss Rebecca 
Smith, a daughter of Rev. William Smith, by whom he had 
six children, viz. : Artie, Mary, Matilda, Lucretia, Nancy and 
John Sirmans. His first wife having died in 1856, Mr. Sir- 
mans married Mrs. Sarah Howell, a widow, by whom he had 
one son, Isaac Sirmans. In 1872 he was elected representa- 
tive from Clinch County, and served through the session of 
1873-74. He was also a member of the Jury Commissioners 
for several years. He died at his home in the Mud Creek 
district October 7th, 1888, age eighty years. He was buried 
at the Fender graveyard. 

SIRMANS, LYMAN A., was born April ist, 1838, in 
what is now Clinch County, the youngest son of Benjamin 
Sirmans. He was admitted to the bar and practiced law in 
Homerville several years. He married Miss Mollie Griffin, 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 291 

daughter of Rev. W. W. Griffin, and by her had two chil- 
dren, Noble A. Sirmans and Mrs. Frank A. Smith. Col. Sir- 
mans enlisted in Co. "A" 20th Georgia Battalion, May 12th, 
1862. Later he joined O'Steen's company and was elected 
second lieutenant. When the County Court was first organ- 
ized in 1866, Colonel Sirmans was appointed its first solicitor, 
May loth, 1866. He served about two years. He removed 
about 1875 to DeKalb County, but later returned to Clinch 
County and settled at DuPont. Here he resumed his law 
practice in 1891;. He was a very active member of the Metho- 
dist Church at Homerville and at DuPont. At the latter 
place he was Sunday School superintendent a while. He died 
April 22d, 1910, at his home in DuPont, and was buried at 
the North cemetery. His widow died in 19 14. 

SMITH, ALLEN N., originally Allen Smith, was born 
in what is now Clinch County, Sept. nth, 1842, the oldest 
son of James C. Smith. He served in O'Steen's company dur- 
ing the war, and was in 1864 elected justice of the peace of 
the 970th district. He served three years and then removed 
to Homerville and was elected justice of the peace there 
in 1867. He resigned in 1868 and was appointed treas- 
urer of Clinch County to succeed Riley Johnson, who had 
resigned. He was appointed November 28th, 1868, and 
served until 1871. His books at the court-house are dis- 
tinguished for their neatness and preciseness. After this, 
Mr. Smith went to Blackshear, Ga., where he has kept his 
citizenship since. He married Miss Bettie Strickland, of 
Blackshear, daughter of Allen C. Strickland, and they had 
three children, Bessie, Lela V., and Moultrie J. Smith. Mr. 
Smith was elected Ordinary of Pierce County in 1885, and 
served eight years. Later he returned to Clinch County and 
lived a few years on his father's old home place. A daugh- 
ter married J. B. O'Neal, who is clerk of the Superior Court 
of Pierce County at present. 



292 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

SMITH, CHARLTON H., was born in Ware, now 
Clinch County, July 8th, 1846, the son of John and Cassie 
Smith. He attended Mercer University at Penfield, under 
Prof. S. P. Sanford in 1870. When the Civil War com- 
menced, Mr. Smith was too young to join, but in May, 1864, 
joined Co. "I" 4th Georgia cavalry and served until the 
war closed. In 1869 he was appointed constable of the 
586th district. He married Miss Martha Henderson, a 
daughter of John S. Henderson, September 21st, 1875, and 
by this marriage were born : Wilbur S. Smith, Ezekiel J. 
Smith, Lillie, who married S. B. Eatman; Nora, who married 
S. R. Kirton; Nettie, who married E. D. Brinson; Cora, who 
married S. A. Sweat, and Ivey, who married W. J. Patter- 
son. In 1878 he purchased a farm near Homerville and 
settled on it. In 1881 he was elected justice of the 
peace of the I2 24the district and commissioned January 
24th, 1 88 1 and served one term. He was elected constable 
of the 1224th district in 1887 and served four years. In 1892 
he was elected county school superintendent, and qualified 
May 30th, 1892. He was re-elected in 1896, but resigned in 
1899. He was commissioned ex-ofiicio justice of the peace of 
the 1224th district December 5th, 1905, to succeed J. C. 
Kirkland, deceased; he resigned this office December 19th, 
1908, and the same day was commissioned justice of the 
peace. To this office he was re-elected and commissioned 
December 21st, 19 12 for four years. He was an unsuccess- 
ful candidate for Ordinary in 190B. 

SMITH, CORNELIUS ASHLEY, was born June 30th, 
1 841, the son of William and Martha Smith. In the Civil 
War he joined the 31st Georgia Regiment and was wounded 
at the battle of Fredericksburg. Later he was in the Federal 
prison in Baltimore for six months but was exchanged. At 
the time of the surrender he was captain of his company. 
Following the close of the war he came to Clinch County, 
and married Miss Nannie Smith, daughter of Peter and Cath- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 293 

erine, November 15th, 1866. To them were born seven 
children, viz. : William P., Nannie, Tom, E. D., Ashley, 
Rena and Boynton Smith. He was commissioned ex-officio 
justice of the peace March 4th, 1869, but resigned Septem- 
ber 1 2th, 1870. He was appointed deputy clerk of the Super- 
ior Court under E. T. Dukes, and in 1876 was elected clerk. 
In 1878 he was re-elected, and in 1880 was elected State 
senator. He resigned the office of clerk shortly before his 
term was out, and took up his duties as senator. In 18.82, 
when the County Court was re-established, Mr. Smith was 
appointed judge of the same, being commissioned April i ith, 
1882. He held the office two and one-half years. For several 
years he was railroad and express agent here. About 1885 
Mr. Smith, with his family, removed to Texas and settled in 
Angeline County, where he was elected a county commissioner 
in 1898. He was a commissioner at the time of his death, 
which occurred at his .home in Lufkin, Texas, July 1 6th, 1 90 1 , 
age 60 years. The records in the clerk's office at the court- 
house attest the neat and correct way in which Mr. Smith 
kept the clerk's office while he was its occupant. His widow 
is yet living at Nacogdoches, Texas, while two of his sons 
occupy high positions with the Nacogdoches and Southern- 
eastern Railroad. 

SMITH, JESSE, was born in Appling County, on Red 
Bluff Creek, August 25th, 1820, the son of William Smith. 
Here he spent his boyhood days and figured very prominently 
in the Indian war of 1836-38. He joined a company of 
"scouts" under Captain Knowles and helped to drive the last 
Indian from the Okefinokee, the Indians' last stronghold. He 
was elected a justice of the peace of the 586th district of 
Ware County, and commissioned January 24th, 1845. He 
served two years. In 1850 he was elected justice of the peace 
of the 970th district and commissioned September 21st, 1850. 
He was re-commissioned in 1853, 1855, 1857, 1859, serving 
until i860. In 1 861 he was elected sheriff of Clinch County, 



294 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

and commissioned January 23d, 1862. He served two years. 
He was in Co. "I" 4th Georgia Cavalry a short while during 
the Civil War. In 1864 he was elected representative from 
Clinch County, serving through the session of 1 865-1 866. 
He was married soon after the Indian war to Miss Nancy 
Tomlinson, daughter of Moses Tomlinson, Sr., and by her 
had five children, viz. : Sherod, Cicero, John L., Fannie C, 
who first married Henry C. Moore, and later John C. Jones, 
and Matilda Smith. He was a member of the Primitive 
Baptist Church. His home was at Magnolia, where he lived 
previous to and during the Civil War. He was a charter mem- 
ber of the Masonic Lodge at Magnolia. Mr. Smith's death 
occurred in 1884. His wife died in January, 1880. Both 
are buried at Red Bluff Church. 

SMITH, JAMES M., was born in what is now Clinch 
County about 1 840, the son of Peter and Catherine Smith. 
He was married to Miss Amanda J. Futch, daughter of Mal- 
colm C. Futch, December 31st, 1874, and by her had ten 
children. The only ofllice which Mr. Smith held was that of 
representative from Clinch. He served through the session of 
1895-96. After his term was out. Governor Northen ap- 
pointed him immigration agent for Clinch County. But his 
death soon followed, October 23d, 1896, following a pro- 
tracted illness. He was buried at the Peter Smith family 
burial ground. Mr. Smith was engaged prior to his death in 
the turpentine business with F. Dickerson. 

SMITH, JOHN M., was born in Clinch County, March 
13th, 1880, the son of David J. Smith and his wife, Fannie 
Curry. He was reared on his father's farm, and on December 
22d, 1903, was married to Miss Avy Lott, of Coffee County. 
They have three children living, viz. : Orie, Chester and 
Chandler Smith. Mr. Smith, in the primary of 19 16, was 
elected county commissioner from the 586th and io6ist dis- 
tricts to succeed Alex. K. Sessoms, whom he defeated. He 
will assume his oflice January ist, 19 17. Besides this office, 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 295 

Mr. Smith has served as a district road commissioner and as 
jury commissioner. 

SMITH, LEWIS, was born in what is now Clinch County, 
in 1843, the son of Manning Smith, who was one of Clinch's 
first representatives to the legislature. When the Civil War 
came on, Lewis Smith joined Co. "K" 26th Georgia Infantry 
and served till Its close. He was married to Miss Roxie Mor- 
gan, daughter of Hon. John L. Morgan, Ordinary, January 
3d, 1870. They had several children. He lived one mile east 
of Homerville on the railroad, his place being now known as 
the "Lewis Smith place." He was elected treasurer of Clinch 
County in 1891 to succeed Sherod Smith, who died. He was 
commissioned November 28th, 1891, and served two years. 
Later Mr. Smith removed to Florida, where he died. 

SMITH, MANNING, was born in this State about 18 15, 
the son of William Smith, a pioneer of Clinch County. He 
took part in the Indian wars as a volunteer, and in 1845 was 
elected a justice of the Inferior Court of Ware County. He 
was commissioned March 19th, 1845 and served one term. 
When Clinch County was organized It embraced Mr. 
Smith's home and he was elected as one of the first justices of 
the Inferior Court of the new county In 1850, being commis- 
sioned April 1 2th, 1850. He served three years and was re- 
elected. He served until 1854, when he was elected to the 
Legislature as a representative. He served through the ses- 
sion of 1855-56. He was then re-elected to the Inferior 
Court and commissioned January 12th, 1857, serving four 
years. His death occurred during the Civil War. Mr. Smith's 
wife was Elizabeth Tomllnson, daughter of Moses Tomlln- 
son, Sr., by whom he had several children, among whom 
were Lewis, Moses, Neter and Sarah Smith. 

SMITH, SHEROD, was born In Ware, now Clinch 
County, October 6th, 1846, the son of Jesse Smith. He was 
employed by Lucius SIrmans, a merchant of DuPont, as 
bookkeeper at the time of his marriage to Miss Peggie Kight, 



296 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

daughter of Hiram and Sarah Kight. They were married 
May 27, 1877. To them were born seven children, three 
sons and four daughters. Later, Mr. Smith came to Homer- 
ville where he engaged in business on his own account. Sub- 
sequently he became postmaster and also express agent at 
Homerville, positions which he held up to his death. In 
1 89 1 he was elected treasurer of Clinch County, and was 
commissioned July 27th, 1891. He was elected at a special 
election to succeed Henry C. Moore, deceased. Not long 
afterwards Mr. Smith died at his home in Homerville, Octo- 
ber 2 1st, 1 89 1. His widow and children noAv live in Tampa, 
Florida. 

STATEN, JAMES W., was born in Appling County, 
August 29th, 1824, the son of Barzilla Staten, Sr., who died 
about 1845. His educational advantages were such as offered 
by the neighborhood schools, furnishing him with a knowl- 
edge of only the primary branches, and merely laying a foun- 
dation for the education which reading and observation be- 
stowed upon him after leaving the school house. Farming 
was his life-long occupation. He was one of the pioneers of 
Clinch County, and in April, 1850 was elected the first rep- 
resentative from the new county of Clinch to the Legislature. 
In 1852 he was re-elected, ably representing the county in 
legislative halls. In 1857 he was elected a State senator from 
Clinch County and served one term. In politics Mr. Staten 
was a Whig before the war, but joined the Democrats about 
i860, and after the Civil War he became one of the pillars 
of the Democratic Party in this section of the State. In 1861 
he entered the Confederate service as first lieutenant in Co. 
"B" 29th Georgia Regiment. He was elected captain of his 
company in Col. A. T. Mclntyre's Regiment. He served in 
this until the State troops were disbanded, after which he was 
on the Relief Committee and was in Atlanta just before it 
surrendered in 1864. He was also a member of the State 
convention which assembled at Milledgeville in 1858. In 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 297 

1858 Echols County was created and this made him a citizen 
of that county. In 1 876 he was chosen State senator from his 
district and re-elected two years later. He had the satisfac- 
tory record of having never been defeated for any office he 
offered for. In 1846 he married Miss Caroline E. Malloy, 
of Branchville, S. C. To them were born eleven children, 
viz.: W. F. Staten, Delia, John B., C. F., Fannie, Bailer, 
Catherine, Josephine, J. L., W. T., and Samuel Staten. 
Statenville, in Echols County, was named for Captain Staten. 
In later years he lived in Lowndes County, where he died 
March 3d, 1892, age 68 years. Captain Staten was a sincere 
man in all his actions, one of the solid type whose word was 
as good as his bond, totally devoid of all egotism and con- 
scientious in the discharge of his duty in its minutest detail. 
His daughter, Josephine, married J. N. Griffin, of Valdosta, 
and one of their daughters married Dr. L. G. Hardman, who 
made such a creditable race for Gov'ernor of Georgia in 191 4. 

STATEN, QUARTERMAN B., was born in this State 
in 1832, and was a brother of James W. Staten. His wife 
was Leacy Malloy, and they had about five children. In the 
Civil War he joined Co. "G" 50th Georgia, and was elected 
its first lieutenant; later he was promoted captain October 
25th, 1862. He served as captain until March 20th, 1863, 
when he resigned but was re-elected captain in July, 1863. 
He served until January 1865, when he came home and qual- 
ified as a justice of the Inferior Court, to which he was com- 
missioned January 23d, 1865. He served in this capacity 
until the court was abolished. He lived near Stockton and 
died about 1890. 

STRICKLAND, CHARLES, was born in what is now 
Pierce County, February 22d, 1822. When the Indian war 
of 1836-37 came on, he took part in the fighting against the 
Indians. In 1849 he settled on Red Bluff Creek on the place 
now owned by A. J. Lockliear. He lived here until 1864, 
when he moved up on the Allapaha River, where he lived 



298 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

until his death. Mr. Strickland married in 1847 Miss Lucre- 
tia Sirmans, daughter of Benjamin Sirmans. By her he had 
twelve children: Martha, who married Elias L. Moore; 
Mary Ann, who married Daniel Dickerson; Louis; Benja- 
min Franklin; Colquitt or Colly; Isabella, who married 
Bill K. Roberts; Allen J.; Lucinda, who married Lott; Jo- 
seph B.; Kizzie; Lyman J., and Amanda, who married F. B. 
Sirmans. When the Civil War came on, Mr. Strickland 
joined the 4th Georgia Cavalry, Co. "I" and served until 
January, 1865, when he returned home, having been elected 
a justice of the Inferior Court. He served on this court until 
it was abolished. Mr. Strickland was one of the wealthiest 
men of the county and farmed and dealt in cattle extensively. 
By reference to the census of 1870, it is observed that he had 
1,200 acres of cultivated land. Mr. Strickland's death oc- 
curred at his home in Mud Creek district, where J. B. Strick- 
land now lives, November ist, 1883. His remains were 
buried at Valdosta. 

STRICKLAND, JOEL, was born in this State in 1830. 
He married Miss Amanda Hodges, a sister of Archibald and 
John W. Hodges, and to them were born twelve children. 
Mr. Strickland was one of the first settlers of the new town 
of Homerville, and was engaged in the mercantile business 
and also operated a hotel a while. He was station agent here 
several years. He was elected a justice of the Inferior Court 
in 1 86 1 and commissioned September loth, 1861. He served 
four years. About 1880 he removed to Plant City, Florida, 
where he died about 1890. Mr. Strickland was a leading 
member of the Baptist Church at Homerville and was a 
charter member. 

STRICKLAND, LEWIS, was born in Clinch County, 
February 25th, 1850, the son of Charles and Lucretia Strick- 
land. He was probably the first white child born in the new 
county after its creation. He was commissioned ex-officio 
justice of the peace of the 586th district July 22d, 1872, and 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 299 

served until he resigned March 26th, 1875. He entered the 
mercantile business and dealt in stock cattle, in which he was 
eminently successful. In 1876 he announced as an indepen- 
dent candidate for representative and in the ensuing election 
defeated the regular Democratic nominee. In 1878 he was 
again elected as an independent candidate. Mr. Strickland 
was first engaged in business at Milltown, but later went to 
Valdosta, where he lived until his death. He was soon fol- 
lowed by his brothers, B. F., Colly and A. J. Strickland. Mr. 
Strickland engaged with some of his brothers in the cotton 
business, later they organized the Strickland Cotton Mills at 
Valdosta, and still later, the A. J. Strickland Fertilizer Com- 
pany, manufacturers and distributors of guano and other fer- 
tilizers. Mr. Strickland several years before his death joined 
the Republican Party and was subsequently chairman of the 
Republican district executive committee. In this capacity Mr. 
Strickland wielded a large amount of influence in Federal 
appointments in this section, under the Republican adminis- 
trations. Mr. Strickland's death occurred in Valdosta April 
3d, 1899, and he was buried in the city cemetery. He never 
married and his large estate was left to his brothers and sis- 
ters. Mr. Strickland, with his brothers in Valdosta, have been 
among the most potent factors in the upbuilding of Valdosta 
and its industries. 

SWEAT, JOEL L., was born in Ware County, Septem- 
ber 2ist, 1847, the son of Samuel and Maria Sweat, and a 
grandson of Nathaniel Sweat, a soldier of the Revolutionary 
War. He was raised in Pierce County and completed his 
education at the old Blackshear Academy. He enlisted in 
Confederate cavalry service in 1862, although a youth, and 
for three years was a brave soldier. In 1865 he located at 
Homerville, where he was in 1867 elected justice of the peace. 
Under David O'Quin he served as deputy clerk of the 
Superior Court. He also engaged in the mercantile business 
and was admitted to the bar in Homerville in 1869. Under 



jOO History of Clinch County, Georgia 

the administration of Governor James M, Smith he was a 
clerk in the executive department for a short while, and dur- 
ing the sessions of the Legislature of 1875-76, he was chief 
clerk of the House of Representatives. Returning to Homer- 
ville he resumed the practice of law, which very soon grew 
to be very lucrative and of wide extent. In 1880 Colonel 
Sweat was elected representative from Clinch County, de- 
feating A. B. Findley and Sherod Tomlinson. Two years 
later he was re-elected, defeating David J. Sirmans. In 1884 
lie was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention at 
Chicago and at St. Louis in 1888. In 1887 he removed to 
Waycross, where he has since resided, engaging in the active 
practice of law. In 1892 Judge S. R. Atkinson resigned as 
judge of the Superior Courts of the Brunswick Circuit, and 
Colonel Sweat was appointed by Governor Northen to fill 
the vacancy. When the Legislature met he was elected judge 
for the unexpired term, and in 1895 was elected for the full 
term. He very ably filled this position until January, 1899, 
when he retired and resumed the practice of law. During 
the Legislature of 19 13-14 he was State senator from the 
fifth district. Colonel Sweat was married to Miss Maggie M. 
Hitch, daughter of Sylvanus Hitch, January loth, 1869, and 
by her had three children. Colonel Sweat was for several 
years superintendent of the Methodist Sunday School at 
Homerville, and for seven years a recording steward of the 
church. His membership is now with the First Methodist 
Church of Waycross. 

SWEAT, SCREVEN A., was born in Ware County, May 
1 2th, 1872, the son of T. F. M. Sweat. He came with his 
father to Clinch County in 1880, and settled in the Wire- 
grass district. Later he came to Homerville, where he was 
appointed postmaster in 1894. He held this oflfice two years 
and in 1897 was elected constable of the 1224th district. 
Shortly afterwards Sheriff O'Steen appointed him deputy 
sheriff, in which capacity he served until 1901. In 1900 he 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 301 

was elected sheriff of Clinch County, defeating Ex-Sheriff 
Frank Dickerson by 255 votes. In the general election he 
easily defeated his Populist opponent, I. W. Baldree. By 
continuous re-elections he held this office until 1909, January 
I St, when he retired. He was not a candidate for re-election. 
Later he entered the mercantile business in Homerville. Mr. 
Sweat married Miss Cora Smith, daughter of Charlton H. 
Smith, of Homerville, 

SWEAT, THOMAS F. M., was born in Ware County, 
November 19th, 1847. He came to Clinch County in 1880, 
and settled in the Wiregrass district. Soon afterwards he 
was appointed ex-ofiicio justice of the peace of the 1 141st dis- 
trict and commissioned October 15th, 1880. He served until 
1885, when he was elected justice of the peace, serving four 
years. In 1889 he was again appointed ex-officio justice of 
the peace. Before his term expired he removed to Homer- 
ville, where he was appointed deputy sheriff and jailor under 
Sheriff Frank Dickerson. In 1901 he was appointed jailor by 
his son, Sheriff' S. A. Sweat. He also served a few years on 
the town council. In 1909 he was elected county treasurer, 
defeating J, S. Kirkland, W. A, Ecord and James L, Pafford. 
In 1 9 10 he was again elected treasurer, defeating Seward 
Smith, Randall Corbitt, J, D. Weaver and T. N. Stanfield. 
He did not offer for re-election in 19 12. Mr. Sweat was mar- 
ried in 1870 to Miss Alice , by whom he had six 

children, viz.: Screven A., Jerome J., R. W., Stella, who 
married W. K. Peagler; Kate, who married B. W. Wagner; 
Tressie, who married H. E. Darley. Mr. Sweat has long 
been a member of the Methodist Church, and has served as 
recording steward, Sunday School superintendent and church 
steward. He was engaged in retail hay and grain business 
in Homerville previous to his death, which occurred July 
I ith, 1916. 

TAYLOR, JACKSON J., was born in what is now Clinch 
County, December i8th, 1847, the son of John E, Taylor, 



302 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

who was a native of Chatham County. He was raised on his 
father's farm south of Stockton, and In 1876 was elected 
county surveyor, defeating George A. Dame, and In 1878 was 
re-elected. He married May 28th, 1882, Miss Cordelia 
Dampler, and after her death married In 1904, Miss Fannie 
Grooms. He had eight children. In 1886 Mr. Taylor joined 
the Methodist Church at Stockton, and subsequently served 
the church as steward for six years. Mr. Taylor Is a farmer 
and runs a grist-mill on Cow Creek. 

TIMMERMAN, SHIMUEL, was born In Edgefield 
County, S. C, November 24th, 1824, and when not yet 
grown came to Georgia. In 1850, when Clinch County was 
created, he was one of Its citizens, and In 1852 was elected 
justice of the peace of the I052d district, serving until 1853. 
In 1856 he was elected sheriff of Clinch County, serving two 
years. In 1858 he was elected a justice of the Inferior Court, 
serving three years. In 1861 he was again elected sheriff, 
serving until 1862. In 1864 he was re-elected, serving until 
1866. Mr. TImmerman married, about 1850, Miss Eliza L. 
FIndley, daughter of Acy Findley, and by her had eight sons 
and two daughters. Mr. TImmerman died at his home, near 
Stockton, May 26th, 1889, and was burled at Cow Creek 
(Way fare) Church. He was a member of the Primitive 
Baptist Church for many years. 

TOMLINSON, JAMES, was born In what Is now Clinch 
County, August 21st, 1846, the son of Harris Tomllnson, Sr. 
In the Civil War he served In Co. "K" 29th Georgia Regi- 
ment. After the war he taught school some, and was In 1871 
elected clerk of the Superior Court. He served two years. 
He was first married to Miss Mattie Floyd, of Liberty 
County, by whom he had two children; after her death, he 
married Miss Martha M. Mills, August 24th, 1874; after 
her death, he married Mrs. Calladonia G. Roberts, she died 
1906. For many years Mr. Tomllnson was a postal clerk on 
the railroad, his run being from Savannah to High Springs. 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 303 

He died April 27th, 19 10, and was buried in the city ceme- 
tery at Waycross. 

TOMLINSON, MOSES, was born in Lowndes, now 
Clinch County, December 29th, 1840, the son of John and 
Zilpha (Register) Tomlinson. He was raised on the farm, 
and in 1861 joined Co. "H" 29th Georgia Regiment. He 
was disabled by the loss of his left arm on the third anniver- 
sary of the date he joined the army, at the engagement near 
Jonesboro, Ga., August 31st, 1864. After this he returned 
home, and was, in 1872, elected Ordinary of Clinch County, 
defeating John L. Morgan. He was re-elected in 1876 and 
served until 1881. In 1883 he was elected justice of the 
peace of the I052d district and served two years. In 1888 he 
was elected tax collector of Clinch County and commissioned 
January 7th, 1889. He served in this capacity eight years, 
being defeated in 1896 by M. M. Monk. He was married 
March 1 2th, 1876, to Miss Wealthy E. Mathis, daughter of 
Hillery P. Mathis, by whom he had five sons and four 
daughters. In 19 10 he was appointed a jury commissioner, 
but declined to serve. Mr. Tomlinson has been urged fre- 
quently in the last few years to run for representative from 
Clinch County, but has declined on each occasion. His ripe 
experience and a master mind, even in his advanced age, 
would enable him to make Clinch County an excellent repre- 
sentative in the Legislature. As tax collector he made the 
county an efficient officer; among other things closing his 
books promptly on the twentieth of December as the law re- 
quires. 

TOMLINSON, SHEROD, was born in Irwin, now 
Clinch County, February 6th, 1826, the son of Moses and 
Charlotte Tomlinson. In early life he was married to Miss 
Sarah Ann Burkhalter, a daughter of Richard H. Burkhalter, 
and had ten children. May nth, 1852, Mr. Tomlinson was 
commissioned a justice of the peace of the 105 2d district and 
served three years. On January loth, 1861, he was commis- 



304 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

sioned a justice of the Inferior Court of Clinch County, and 
served until September loth, 1861. In 1861 he joined Co. 
"H" 29th Georgia Regiment and served until 1864, when 
he returned home and qualified as coroner, to which he had 
been elected. He served as coroner four years. In 1880 he 
was defeated for representative by Col. J. L. Sweat. During 
1 877-1 88 1 he was a member of the Board of Education. 
His death occurred at his home in Mud Creek, December 
26th, 1885. He was buried at the Fender graveyard. 

TOMLINSON, WILLIAM S., was born in Emanuel 
County in 1822, the son of William Tomlinson and Bettie 
Sirmans. He was a farmer all his life, and accumulated quite 
a lot of property. He married Matilda Giddens in 1846, 
and their children were John G., Kizzie, Isbin, Matthew, 
and George F. Tomlinson. Mr. Tomlinson was, in 1856, 
elected representative from Clinch County, defeating Man- 
ning Smith. He served through the session of 1857-58, and 
after missing one term, was, in i860, again elected repre- 
sentative and re-elected in 1862. He served through the ses- 
sions of 1861-62 and 1863-64. He lived many years on the 
place now owned by W. F. Kirkland, but at the time of his 
death lived with his son, Matthew Tomlinson. He died about 
1898, and is buried at North cemetery. His son, Isbin Tom- 
linson, was acting clerk of the Superior Court of this county 
a short while following the resignation of B. R. Johnson, in 
1883. 

TOWNSEND, SINCLAIR C, was born in Wayne 
County, June 3d, 1870. When he was about five years old 
his parents moved to Bradford County, Fla., and when not 
yet grown began teaching school. He taught in the fall and 
winter seasons and attended high school at White Springs 
during the spring and summer seasons. He graduated from 
the Florida Normal School and Business College at White 
Springs in 1892, and then taught school until 1895. He was 
enrolling clerk in the House of Representatives at Tallahas- 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 305 

see during the session of 1895. In May, 1896, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar at Thomasville, Ga., and a few days there- 
after was appointed deputy clerk of the Circuit Court of 
Bradford County, which position he resigned in October, 
J 896. He then came to Homerville and formed a partner- 
ship with Col. R. G. Dickerson for the practice of law. He 
was married August 31st, 1897, to Miss Effie Gillican from 
Wilmington, N. C. January ist, 1898, the law partnership 
of Dickerson & Townsend was dissolved and Colonel Town- 
send continued to practice alone. He was appointed judge 
of the County Court of Clinch County by Governor Candler, 
in 1 90 1, but resigned in 1904 before his term was out. In the 
primary of 1902 he was narrowly defeated for representa- 
tive by R. B. Johnson. In the primary of 1904 he was de- 
feated by J. F. Daugharty. In 1906 he was elected represen- 
tative, defeating E. J. Futch. During the ensuing session 
Judge Townsend introduced and had passed the present 
law providing for jury trial in the County Court. He opposed 
the present prohibition law, which was passed by the Legis- 
lature. He was defeated for re-election in 1908 by Col. S. L. 
Drawdy. In November, 1908, he was appointed by Governor 
Smith Solicitor of the City Court of St. Mary's, Ga., and 
moved there in February, 1909, and was re-appointed by 
Governor Brown in 19 12, which he still holds. Previous to 
his removal to St. Mary's he formed a partnership with Col. 
H. J. Dame, which was dissolved in 1909. On May 22d, 
1 9 13, he was appointed by President Wilson as collector of 
customs for the port of St. Mary's, which position he held 
until the collectorship was abolished and consolidated with 
the port of Fernandina, Fla. In 191 1 he was elected presi- 
dent of the County Officers Convention of Georgia at Savan- 
nah, and in 19 12 was re-elected at St. Mary's. 

THOMAS, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, was born in 
Clinch County, April 5th, 1882, and was raised on the farm. 
He was employed by Mr. D. E. Kirkland for several years 
and later entered the livery business. He was elected Coroner 
in 1 9 14, defeating Dixon Smith, and J. F. Newman. In the 



3o6 History of Clinch County , Georgia 

primary of 1916 he was defeated for tax receiver, running 
second on the ticket. He is not married. 

WILLIAMS, JOHN, was born about 1830, the son of 
John Williams, Sr., and his wife Nancy Smith. He was 
elected representative from Clinch County in 1859, defeating 
J. R. O'Steen. He served through the session of 1 859-1 860. 
He married a daughter of John L. Morgan, by whom he had 
three sons and a daughter, viz. : Sylvester, Lemuel and Pres- 
ton and Roxie, who married N. J. Smith. In 1864 Mr. Wil- 
liams was killed by a deserter from the Confederate army. Mr. 
Williams was acting as a recruiting officer in this section, and 
endeavored to arrest the deserter, but was killed. His slayer 
was later captured by a detachment of soldiers headed by 
Lieut. John L. Morgan, Jr., and brought to Homerville, 
where he was executed by being hung from a pine tree In the 
southern part of town. 

WHITTINGTON, BENJAMIN A., was born in Au- 
gusta, Ga., March 15th, 1856, the son of John A. Whitting- 
ton. He came with his parents to "Clinch County when he 
was twelve years old, and lived in Homerville until his death. 
In 1 88 1 he was admitted to the bar at Homerville, and under 
Abraham Morgan served as deputy clerk of the Superior 
Court a while. In 1884 he was appointed judge of the County 
Court of Clinch County, and served until the court was 
abolished. Colonel Whittington's wife was Miss Maggie 
Johnson, daughter of John J. Johnson, of Homerville. They 
had several children, of whom only one, Harry, lived to be 
grown. Colonel Whittington actively practiced law in Homer- 
ville until his death, which occurred August 5th, 1898, at his 
home in Homerville. He died of paralysis. His remains were 
buried in the Homerville cemetery. His death was the occa- 
sion of resolutions passed by the local bar at the succeeding 
term of Superior Court. Colonel Whittington was a member 
of the Methodist Church and of the Masons. He was for 
several years a member of the Board of Commissioners for 
the town of Homerville and later of the town council. 



EXTENSION OF 

CHAPTER XL 

THE LASTINGER FAMILY* 

THE progenitor of this family in America was John Las- 
tinger. He was a native of Germany and was born prob- 
ably about 1740. He came to America and landed at 
Charleston, S. C, about 1760. It is not known what was his 
wife's name other than he met her on the ship they were com- 
ing across in. In a few years this couple came to Georgia, and 
the records in Atlanta show that he was granted a land head- 
right of one hundred acres in 1767. In 1769 he was given a 
similar grant. Both of these grants were in St. Phillips parish, 
later divided into counties of Effingham and Chatham. 

The children of John Lastinger and his wife, were : George, 
born 1775; Milly, who married William Driggers; Andrew, 
born 1777, who married Mary Parker; Elizabeth (died in 
Infancy) ; Tobitha, who married a Bullard; David, whose 
wife was Dinah; Sarah, who married William Parker; and 
Hannah, who married John Groover, and a daughter who 
married a Weaver. 

Children of George Lastinger: Andrew, who married 
Sarah McDonald ;Shadarach; Polly, who married John 
Rymes; Elizabeth, who married a Willis; Fannie, who mar- 
ried Noah TIce, and Mehala, who married a McNeil. Chil- 
dren of Andrew Lastinger: Elisha; Barbara, who married 
William Youmans; Susan, who married Elijah Adams (died) 
and LaFayette Gault, second husband; Louisa, who married 
Timothy Alderman, tax collector of Clinch County; Alfred 
Lastinger; Mary, who married Harmon Adams; William; 

*I am indebted for this information to Mr. W. W. Lastinger, whose highly- 
interesting genealogical table of the Lastinger family was loaned to me to 
be guided by in the above sketch. The above is not given further than the 
third generation from John Lastinger. — Author. 



3o8 History of Clinch County, Georgia 

Clayton; Bartlett; Jackson, and Jane, who married B. T. 
Altman. 

Children of Milly and William Driggers: Jonas and Wil- 
laim Driggers, Jr. ; Sarah, who married Dixon Bennett, of 
Clinch County; Rebecca, who married Harris Tomlinson, of 
Clinch County; Ellen, who married Seaborn Lastinger, who 
was born in 1805, and two other daughters, names unknown. 

Children of Andrew Lastinger, born 1777 : Guilford, who 
was the first Ordinary of Clinch County; Sallie (died in 
girlhood) ; Seaborn, born 1805; Annis, who married James 
Lastinger, and William Lastinger, born 1804, who married 
Louisa English. Children of Guilford Lastinger by his first 
wife, Sarah Mikel: Andrew, who married Eliza Bostick; 
James, who married Nancy Corbett; Charles, who married 
Susan Whitehurst; Guilford T., who married Nicy Mc- 
Donald; David (never married) ; Annis (died in girlhood), 
and Seaborn, who married Sarah Bostick. Children of Guil- 
ford Lastinger by his second wife, Isabella Brack: Mrs. Ruby 
Eason, Mrs. Isabella Crosby, Mrs. Grant Steedley, and Mrs. 
Lee Powell. 

Children of William Lastinger, born 1804, died 1893, 
and who was an early pioneer of Clinch County : Henry A., 
who married Emma J. Senquefield; Peter C, married Syl- 
vania Ison; Seaborn, (never married) ; Annis, who married 
Robert Elliott; Elizabeth, who married William Wilkerson; 
Lacy E., who married Sophronia Williams; William H., 
married Georgia A. Jones; Joshua L., married Louisa Bow- 
den; Jane, who married William McDonald; Kansas, who 
married F. M. Smith; Nebraska, who married Dr. J. G. 
Edie, and Arizona, who married Robt. K. Turner. 

Children of David and Dinah Lastinger: James, John, 
Elias, Peter, William and Elizabeth, who married William 
May. 

Children of Sarah and William Parker: William, Jr., 
Calvin and Simeon Parker. 

Children of Hannah and John Groover: Elizabeth, who 



History of Clinch County, Georgia 309 

married a Millen; Barbara, who married James English; 
James, John and Abner Groover. 

The following Lastingers were lost in the Civil War: 
Andrew, James, Charles, David, Seaborn, Seaborn (2d), 
Elias, W. H., and Elias Lastinger (2d), while the following 
others participated: Guilford T., John, Henry A., Peter C, 
Lacy E., Wm. H., Joshua B., James, John (2d), and prob- 
ably others.