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Full text of "History of Clinton County, Indiana : With historical sketches of representative citizens and genealogical records of many of the old families"

Gc M. L. 

977.201 
C61c-t 

v.2 
1490204 



GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



JC 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 02322 2356 



HISTORY 



OF 



CLINTON COUNTY 



INDIANA 



-k/v\<>. 

With Historical Sketches of Representative Citizens and 
Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families 



BY 
HON. JOSEPH CLAYBAUGH 



ILLUSTRATED 



1913 

A. W. BOWEN & COMPANY 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



p.-- 



1490204 



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HON. JOSEPH CLAYBAUGH 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



JUDGE JOSEPH CLAYBAUGH. 

Judge Joseph Claybaugh, supervising editor of this history, was born 
in Chillicothe, O., June 9, 1839. He was the son of Joseph Claybaugh, a 
distinguished minister and scholar, under whose tutelage he was prepared for 
Miami University. Judge Claybaugh began the study of law in the office 
of the Hon. R. P. Davidson, his brother-in-law, with whom he formed a 
partnership after his admission to the bar in 1861. 

Judge Claybaugh has been actively engaged in his chosen profession for 
fifty-two years, with the exception of six years, 1902 to 1908, when he was 
judge of the Clinton circuit court. After this half century of practice, Judge 
Claybaugh is now the senior member of the bar of this county. 

While on the bench, Judge Claybaugh sought to give force to that pro- 
vision of the Indiana Constitution, that "The Penal Code shall be founded 
on the principles of reformation rather than on punishment for crime." 
Whenever a person accused of crime was brought before him and there 
seemed any reasonable chance of reform, he would continue the case or 
suspend the sentence and give the accused a chance. Out of more than 
fifty cases thus disposed of by him, only three or four offenders failed to take 
the opportunity offered and as a consequence became law-abiding and useful 
citizens. It is this feature of his official life that Judge Claybaugh recalls 
with the greatest satisfaction. 

In politics, Judge Claybaugh is a Republican, and an ardent admirer 
of Abraham Lincoln. For years he has been a member of the Presbyterian 
church. In 1861, Judge Claybaugh was married to Miss Anna Valeria Feter- 
man, a daughter of Hon. Nathaniel P. Feterman, of Pittsburgh, Pa. Mrs. 
Claybaugh died March 10, 1909. 



368 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JAMES W. COULTER. 

To offer in a work of this province an adequate resume of the strenuous, 
useful and honorable career of the late James W. Coulter would be impossible, 
but, with others of those who have conserved the industrial and civic progress 
of Frankfort and Clinton count)', he may well find consideration in the noting 
of the more salient points that have marked his life and labors. He has long 
been a dominating power in connection with the retail business interests of the 
county-seat, later was a leading banker and financier here for many years, 
achieving a position as one of the substantial capitalists of this secton of 
Indiana, gaining his success through normal and worthy means, and lie stood 
for more than half a century as a singularly admirable type of the progressive, 
honorable and broad-minded man of affairs. He was a man of public spirit 
and patriotic impulses, was always ready to do his full share in promoting 
the general public weal, and was a gallant defender of the flag of his country 
during the momentous crisis of the sixties. His record is too familiar to the 
readers of this work to require any fulsome encomium here, his life speaking 
for itself in stronger terms than the biographer could employ. It left its im- 
print ur n those who came in contact with him ; and the youth, hesitating at 
the parting of the ways, could do no better than to follow the example he set. 
He reached the advanced age of seventy-five years, Heaven having lengthened 
out his life beyond the Psalmist's allotted three score and ten until he was 
permitted to witness the vicissitudes of the most remarkable epoch in >the 
world's business and inventive history, in all of which he was an interested 
spectator, playing, indeed, no small part in pushing forward the wheels of 
civilization in his own locality, having done much in promoting the material 
and moral welfare of the city of Frankfort, where he took up his residence 
when it was but a struggling village. Mr. Coulter was a man of sterling char- 
acter, conservative habits and pure thinking. He was even-tempered, patient, 
scrupulously honest in all the relations of life, hospitable and charitable, and 
his many kindly deeds were actuated solely from his largeness of heart, rather 
than from any desire to gain the plaudits of his fellow men. 

James W. Coulter was born April 24, 1838, in Pennsylvania. He was a 
scion of sterling old stock of the Keystone state, and was a son of John and 
Margaret (Given) Coulter, noted for their industry and honesty, being typi- 
cal of the rugged pioneer type. The subject of this memoir remained at 
home with his parents until he reached young manhood. Early in life he 
received a meager schooling, but being always of an investigating turn of 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 369 

mind and, remaining a student all his life, he became a well informed man. 
When young he came to Clinton county, Indiana, and located at Frankfort, 
and in due course of time he became one of the best known and most highly 
respected citizens of the county. He had the distinction of handling the 
first regular mail route into Frankfort, having carried the mail from Delphi 
on horseback to Frankfort. He also owned and operated a stage line between 
the two towns, carrying passengers, mail and express. 

When Mr. Coulter located in Frankfort it was but a small village of 
little importance in practically an unimproved locality, sparsely settled, with- 
out railroad connections and practically isolated from the outside world. Tak- 
ing an interest in tin >i : wth of the village into a b .11 and then its develop- 
ment into a city, he did much to promote the advancement of Frankfort to its 
present beautiful and prosperous condition, he having been one of the veteran 
business men of the city and county. 

When the First National Bank was organized Mr. Coulter was among 
the number of men wdiose names appeared on the original charter, and when 
the well-known institution was granted a new charter only a short time before 
our subject's death, his name was also among those who petitioned for it. He 
had been the president of the institution for the past thirty years, and under 
him and officials working under his direction, the bank has become one of the 
strongest institutions of its kind in the state, and stands as a monument to 
Mr. Coulter's work in the business world. He was a man of broad mind and 
conservative, his integrity being absolutely beyond cavil, and he therefore 
enjoyed to the fullest extent the confidence and esteem of the people of this 
locality. Keeping fully abreast of the times in all phases of the banking busi- 
ness, he was always quick to inaugurate such new methods of banking as were 
consistent with safe and honorable work in this connection. Beside being 
president of the bank, he was president of the Frankfort Loan and Trust Com- 
pany, and a member of the board of directors of the bank and trust company. 

On October 10, 1866, Mr. Coulter was united in marriage with Eliza A. 
Perrin, of Clinton county, who still survives. Mrs. Coulter was born Sep- 
tember 23, 1844, near Fincastle, Virginia., daughter of Henry C. and Susan 
(Secrist) Perrin, who came to Ross township, Clinton county, in 1846, and 
here lived the life of a pioneer farmer. Here she grew to womanhood and 
received such education as the old-time schools afforded. She is a descendant 
of one of the worthy and influential pioneer families of this locality. She 
proved a worthy helpmate to her able husband, and much of bis large success 
(24) 



370 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

in life was due to her sympathy and encouragement. Four children sruvive: 
Jeannette Coulter, Mrs. William C. Allen, of Reno, Nevada; Charles C. and 
Frank E., all of whom received excellent educational advantages and are well 
situated in life: all are popular with a wide circle of friends and all reflect in 
their daily lives the wholesome home training- they received. One daughter, 
Cora, died in young womanhood. A brother of our subject. D. A. Coulter, is 
living in Frankfort. 

On September 10, 1861, James W. Coulter, forsook the pleasures of 
home and business opportunities to do what he could toward suppressing the 
fierce rebellion in the Southland enlisting on that date for three years' service 
in ipany II, Thi d Indiana h • He proved to be a most faithful and 

gallant soldier and his rise from the ranks was rapid, being due to meritorious 
conduct on the field of battle and to his natural ability. He saw much hard 
service, risking fearlessly life and limb on many of the sanguinary fields of 
the South, and, with other members of the company who survived the awful 
carnage of that greatest civil conflict of which history treats, was mustered 
out at Indianapolis, September 10, 1864, with the rank of colonel. 

In 1866, in partnership with his brother, D. A. Coulter, he embarked in 
the clothing business in a room now occupied by the First National Bank in 
Frankfort. After being in the business for a short time he bought the interest 
of his brother, and soon after the completion of the building now occupied 
by the T. W. Coulter Sons' Clothing Store, he moved into that location. 
Through his honest dealings, his keen foresight and pleasant manners, he 
built up a large business, which continued to grow with advancing years, his 
hundreds of regular customers coming from all parts of Clinton county. He 
retired from the mercantile business in 1904. selling his interests to his sons, 
who have since conducted with much success the business established by their 
father, being, in fact, regarded as worthy sons of a worthy sire and ranking 
among Clinton county's leading business men of a younger generation. 

As a business man the elder Coulter was acknowledged one of the best 
clothing men in the state by manufacturers of the lines he handled. As a 
citizens he was one of the foremost in assisting to develop the town into a 
beautiful and prosperous citv. as before indicated in this review. 

Mr Coulter was a life-long member of the Presbyterian church and had 
always taken an active part in the work of the same, having served as an 
officer in the church at different times and always gave his best tune to its 
upbuilding He was a member of Franklin Lodge, No. 560, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and he lived up to the teachings of the order. He 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 371 

was truly a fine example of a man, being unpretentious, and a man among 
men, doing much to encourage young men just starting out in life, and 
through his kindly way; made for himself a wide acquaintance of loyal and 
admiring friends. Though he did not make known his work among his less 
fortunate fellow men, he took an active part in the charity work in the city of 
his residence, cheerfully assisting liberally the needy and unfortunate, and 
though but few knew of his acts of kindness and charity, hundreds were 
made happy by his acts. 

Mr. Coulter had been in declining health for a period eighteen months, 
but his condition had not been considered serious. In the autumn of 1912 he 
planned a trip to Gal I rn t, having intended to spend die winter following 111 
the west, hoping it would be beneficial to his health, but upon the advice of 
his physicians, abandoned the trip. During the months following he would 
show signs of improvement, but would suffer relapse, until he was finally 
summoned to his eternal rest from his beautiful, modern residence at 460 
West Clinton street, Frankfort, on Wednesday afternoon, May 21, 19 13. The 
somewhat unexpected news of his death proved to be a great shock to the 
entire city and county and was the occasion for profound regret and sorrow. 
Having spent the greater part of his life in this locality, where he rose to suc- 
cess by his own efforts alone, Mr. Coulter was one of the best known men in 
this section of the state, and he enjoyed the admiration and esteem of multi- 
tudes of friends. Frankfort's leading newspaper had the following to say, 
editorially, of the passing away of the lamented subject of this memoir: 

"In the death of James W. Coulter, which occurred yesterday, Frankfort 
lost one of its splendid citizens. In business and private life Mr. Coulter was 
noted for his honesty, strict integrity and his high sense of honor in all his 
dealings with his fellow men. He was a self-made man in every sense of the 
term, having started from the bottom and worked himself up to an enviable 
position in the city's commercial life. By his industry, perseverance and 
sound business judgment he accumulated a fortune, and his example was one 
that gives hope to every struggling young man and encourages him to strive 
unceasingly for success. And furthermore, he achieved success without sacri- 
ficing a single principle of Christian conduct and it was frequently said of 
him that he had not an enemy in the world. He represented the very highest 
type of citizenship and he was one of Frankfort's most useful citizens. One 
■of Mr. Coulter's leading characteristics was his kindness to all in misfortune. 
He practiced charity quietly, but extensively, and every year he gave freely 
of his money in relieving those in distress and worthy of help. His person- 



3/2 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ality was attractive, his manner genial, and lie was noted for his loyally to 
friends. No citizen of Frankfort was held in higher esteem, and his never- 
ceasing efforts for the uplift of the city have left their impress upon the com- 
munity." 



DAVID ALEXANDER COULTER. 

It is a pleasing task to write the biography of a gentleman who has been 
so long identified with the material activities of his own and other com- 
munities, as David Alexander Coulter, and who, in addition to his individual 
interests has not unfrequcntly been called to positions of honor and trust in 
the public service. He stand conspicuously forward as one of the leading 
men of his day and generation in Clinton county, and wherever known, his 
name passes current as a synonym for all that is upright and honorable in 
citizenship. Paternally, Mr. Coulter is descended from Irish ancestry, his 
grandfather John Coulter having been a native of the Emerald Isle and a 
Presbyterian minister of unusual scholarship and eloquence. He ended a 
useful and exceedingly brilliant career in Juniata county, Pa., where he located 
when a young man and where he married and reared a family. Among his 
children being a son, John Coulter, Jr., who was born in the county indicated, 
in the year 1813. 

John Coulter, Jr., a farmer by occupation, remained in his native state 
of Pennsylvania until 1854, at which time he came to Clinton county and 
purchased a farm in Ross township, where he resided until within a short 
period of his death, when be moved to Rossville, dying there, September 24, 
1864. In the vear 1836 he married Margaret Given, of Juniata county, Pa., 
a daughter of James and Nancy (Enslow) Given, of the same state; the 
father, a farmer and a representative citizen, who moved to Clinton county, 
in 1856, and a number of years later, changed his residence to Frankfort, 
where he and his wife lived retired lives to the end of their days. 

David Alexander Coulter, son of John and Mary Coulter, is likewise a 
native of Juniata county, Pa., where his birth occurred on the 21st day of 
December, 1846. He was reared to agriculture pursuits, received a common 
school education and devoted himself to farming in the county of Juniata, 
until 1863, when he came to Frankfort, and entered the business house of his 
uncles, A. B. and B. Given, for whom he clerked until the spring of the follow- 
ing year. He then resigned his position and enlisted in Company H, One 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 373 

Hundred and Thirty-fifth Indiana Volunteers, with which he served until 
discharged September 29th of the same year, doing garrison duty the mean- 
while with an occasional brush with the Confederate cavalry force under 
General Forrest. Upon his retirement from the army, Mr. Coulter accepted 
a clerkship with John Brown, a prominent merchant of Logansport, Ind., but 
in 1867, left that city and returned to Frankfort, where he formed a partner- 
ship in the clothing business with J. W. Coulter, which, under the firm's name 
of J. W. Coulter & Brother, lasted until 1871, when he disposed of his interest 
in the establishment to his brother and engaged in the coal and mining busi- 
ness at Rockville, this state. Before moving to the latter place, however, he 
took an active part in organizing The First Nation; Bank of Frank. if 

which lie was elected a member of the first board of directors. He also 
assisted in establishing The Park Banking Co., of Rockville, but in the above 
year, sold his coal interests in that town and returning to Frankfort again 
became associated with his brother, with whom he continued until 1878, under 
the same name as before. While thus engaged, the firm erected the imposing 
business block in Frankfort, now occupied by J. W. Coulter's Sons & Com- 
pany, one of the leading commercial establishments of the city besides con- 
tributing in various other ways to the material advancement of the place. 

Mr. Coulter, in 1878, bought his brother's interest in the clothing busi- 
ness and conducted same with marked success and profit until 1881, when 
he disposed of his stock to Coulter and Hockman, to become cashier of the 
Farmers' Bank of Frankfort, which responsible position he filled with credit 
and satisfaction until elected president of the institution in 1904. He has 
also been president of the water works system, of Frankfort, ever since its' 
organization, besides holding various other posts of honor and trust including 
that of auditor of the American Central Life Insurance Company, of Indi- 
anapolis; Commissary General of the Indiana State militia, with the rank of 
colonel on the staffs of Ex-Governors Mount and Durbin, in which capacity 
he served eight years; trustee of the Indiana State Prison at Michigan City; 
president for nine years of the School Board of Frankfort, during which 
time he was instrumental in erecting the present high school building of that 
city, one of the largest and most convenient edifices of the kind in northern 
Indiana, besides serving two terms in the common council and representing 
his Congressional district as a delegate in the Republican National Conven- 
tion, at St. Louis, in 1896, where he took an active and influential part in 
bringing about the nomination of William McKinley, for President of the 
United States. 



374 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 



Mr. Coulter, as indicated above, is a Republican in politics and for many 
years has been active in the affairs of his party in Clinton county. He be- 
longs to the Grand Army of the Republic, the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and in religion is a consistent and influential member of the 
Presbyterian church. He was married January, 1874, to Miss Mary Depew, 
of Park county, Indiana, who has home him three children, only one of whom, 
Maude, wife of George C. Cullom, of Frankfort, is living. Mr. Coulter's 
career has been one of great activity and usefulness and in the main, attended 
by remarkable business advancement and financial prosperity. He filled with 
credit and honor the various public positions to which called, and his official as 
well as his business and personal record, has eve/ been above reproach. He 
is essentially progressive in all he undertakes and endowed with the power 
to mould circumstances to suit his purposes. His success in overcoming ad- 
verse conditions and mounting to his present high and honorable station in 
the world of affairs, is such as few attain. Of strong convictions, positive 
character, insuppressible integrity, he is classed with the most intelligent and 
influential of Frankfort's representative men, and he holds a warm and abid- 
ing place in the hearts of his fellow citizens. 



OSCAR WILLIAM EDMONDS, M. D. 

This biographical record has to do with a man of unusual accomplish- 
ments, who has, for many years, been one of the best known of the worthy 
men who are making the city of Frankfort a good place in which to live. He 
has attained prestige through his individual efforts in every enterprise which 
he has entered upon, and has always been regarded as distinctly a man of 
affairs, who wields a potent influence among those with whom his lot has 
been cast. He is a man of lofty principles, honesty of purpose and deter- 
mination, and is conservative, ingenuous, and cautious. The word fail does 
not seem to hold a place in his category. He plans his campaign and then 
executes with sureness and dispatch. 

Oscar W. Edmonds was born into this world on March 25, 1S61, and 
was the son of Rheuden J. and Anna (Moore) Edmonds. R. J. Edmonds 
was a native of the Quaker state, being born in Bucks county, Pa., in the 
historic year of 1S12. the son of Augustus and Elizabeth (Ilines) Edmonds. 
R. J. Edmonds learned the cigar making trade early in life, then went into 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 375 

the grocery business. Ik died in West Carrolton, O., January, 1905. His 

wife, who was Anna L. Moore, was also horn in Bucks count)', Pa., and is 
still living in the city of West Carrolton, O. 

Augustus Edmonds was a native of Berkshire, England, and came 
to this country in 1779, and settled in Pennsylvania. Me was a gunsmith 
and civil engineer by trade, and was widely known through his ability as a 
mathematician. He served valiant!) in the Revolutionary war and for his 
services there was awarded, with the assistance of Gen. George Washington, 
five hundred acres of land near Mauch Chunk, which he afterwards sold for 
fifty cents an acre. lie died in Bucks county in 1872. His wife, Elizabeth 
Hines, was also a native of Berkshire England, and she died in 1869. Eleven 
ch :n, nine sons ami iwo daughters, were bon 1 diem. All of tin: boys 
participated in the Civil war, five of them being officers. 

The boyhood of our subject was passed in the state of Ohio, in German- 
town and West Carrollton. Until 188] he studied medicine with Dr. E. M. 
S. Beaver, a brother-in-law, at Albertus, Pennsylvania. He learned the rudi- 
ments of medical practice there, and thus equipped he entered the Starling 
Medical college at Columbus, O., graduating from that institution in 1886. 

He began the practice of his profession at Dayton, O., and continued 
there for two years with great success. He then went to Albertus, the home 
of his preceptor, and worked there for six more months. In September, 
1888, he moved to Frankfort, Ind., where he now resides, being numbered 
among the best medical men of the state. 

Dr. Edmonds has not confined all of his time and efforts to his pro- 
fession, as evidenced by the remarkable accomplishments he has made in 
public life and in the service of his community. He has been county coroner 
and city health officer, filling both offices with high merit. He has also been 
president of the Clinton County Medical Society ; was a professor of anatomy 
in the Dayton Medical University, and has made his name prominent in the 
medical circle of Ohio by his lectures in connection with that institution. 
In the year 1909, the people of Frankfort displayed their admiration for 
Mr. Edmonds by electing him mayor of the city. In this capacity he has 
served faithfully and wisely for the past four years. 

Dr. Edmonds was married September 13, 18S8, to Alice J. Hertzog, a 
native of Albertus, Pa., being born there March 29, 1865, the daughter of 
Nathan and Mary (Richardson) Hertzog. Her parents are also natives of 
Pennsylvania. 

Fraternally, Dr. Edmonds belongs to the Independent Order of Odd 



37& CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Fellows and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, I Tc is a member of 
the Methodist church, and voles the Republican ticket 



JOHN BARNER. 



There is an old saying that the dead are soon forgotten, hut in the case 
of the subject uf this review, the adage asserts an untruth. No man in the 
history of Clinton county lives today in the memories of the inhabitants in 
greater measure of esteem and reverence than John T '-:;rner. The life and 
ci. pment ot il I ind I m has been parallel with the growth 

of the county, and the prosperity and modernity of the community today is 
the direct result of the influence of such pioneers. Our subject's exemplary 
life is immured in the hearts of Clinton county's men, and his spiritual pres- 
ence, if not his material, is a guide to the faith and trust of his friends. Too 
fast we are losing these old men, these stalwart oaks of the primal forest, so it 
is with pleasure that we sketch the interesting details of Mr. Barner's career. 
A true patriot, a thorough business man, a devoted Christian, a successful 
farmer, quiet, unobtrusive, charitable and democratic — this is our estimate of 
the man. 

John Earner was born in Surrey county, N. C, near the Virginia line, 
January II, 1810, two years before the outbreak of the war with Great 
Britain. He was the son of Horatio and Elizabeth (Chrisman) Earner, and 
was one of three children. The other two, Mrs. Judith Barner Webb and 
Horatio, Jr., are now dead. John Barner's parents were American by birth, 
but claimed descent from French, German and Irish stock. In the year 1814, 
Horatio Barner, seeking new fields of endeavor, traveled in covered wagons 
across the Blue Ridge mountains and on into the southwest, until they 
reach Bledsoe county, Tennessee. On a farm here they settled, and the 
father took up his regular occupation as a mill wright. John Barner found 
little opportunity in the rough country to gain a school education, but by 
ceaseless industry, managed to gain the rudiments of an education, besides 
working on the farm and learning the cabinet making trade. 

On March 27, 1828, Mr. Barner, then but eighteen years of age, found 
that he must leave the parental roof in order to make a start in the world. 
In those days the young men left home with a traveling bag and a few dollars 
in their pockets, given to them by their father. It is to be imagined that thus 
Mr. Barner left his home in Pikevillc, Tenn. He traveled on foot, coursed 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 377 

his way along dusty reads, broke through almost impenetrable forests, and 
swam rivers until finally he readied the town of Bloomington, Ind. There, 
during the winter of iS_^ ; -i), he found employment at his trade of cabinet- 
making. In the spring months of 1829, lie went to Indianapolis, and in No- 
vember of the same year walked away from Indianapolis to Logansport, 
passing through the territory of this (Clinton) county. There were then but 
two houses from Eagle Creek to Logansport — Kirk's and Edward's. He 
borrowed a hatchet at an Indian camp on Sugar Creek and cut the first tree 
across the creek where the Michigan road line had been surveyed. The 
winter of 1829-30 he spent at Logansport with the Whites and Indians, re- 
turning to Indian, | larch, 1830 ' li 1 ! i< si .1 shop on the si 
the present Claypool hotel. In the spring of 1832, he loaded, his household 
goods in an ox wagon and left for this count}'. The ox wagon upset in Eagle 
Creek and broke an axle at Mud Creek. He made a new one out of a rail. 
Then one ox played out, leaving the wagon in the mud, and he walked eight 
miles, borrowed a horse collar, put it on the odd ox and reached the prairie 
country. Here he borrowed, out of the plow, another ox and arrived in 
Frankfort on Friday evening, May 19, 1832, making the trip in five days. 

Mr. Earner's settled career might be said to have dated from the time of 
his arrival in Frankfort, a town then "containing about twelve families and 
forty inhabitants, near an Indian camp." This was just before the beginning 
of the Black Hawk war, and the settlers were apprehensive of the Indians. 
Mr. Earner makes the sarcastic statement, in a memoir left by him, that many 
of the farmers "forted." 

Mr. Earner was appointed postmaster in 1834, and diligently served in 
that capacity until 1849. and then resigned only to take up the duties of 
clerk of the Clinton circuit court, an office to which he was elected in 1843, 
and which he held until 1850. After his retirement from the latter office, he 
was admitted to the Clinton county bar, and remained a member of it until 
his death on March 31. 1802, in Frankfort. 

On February 27, 1831, John Earner married Mary E. Darnell. They 
lived in Indianapolis until the following spring, when, as Mr. Earner relates 
in his memoir, "my wife, little boy and I, reached Frankfort by ox team." 
To them were born five children: John II., David P., Mrs. Mary E. Hill, 
Mrs. Judith B. Sample and Mrs. India S. Ghere. John H. Earner died April 
22, 1885, just about a year after his mother, who died June 21, 1884. 

During his life Mr. Earner was the secretary of the Clinton County Old 
Settlers' Association, an organization which he helped to form. For forty 
years he was also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



3/S CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

In speaking of Mr. Barner's church life, we conic to the most salient 
and controlling element in his life. Beginning with the day when he left his 
mother back in Tennessee and promised her to lead a Christian life, he has 
clung to his faith. In May, 1S31, he joined the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Old Wesley chapel in Indianapolis was the scene of his first labors in re- 
ligious life, and he served both as teacher and officer in the Sunday school 
in that church. In February, 1841, he assisted in organizing the first Sun- 
day school in Frankfort, and from then on he was either a teacher or 
officer in the school. For eighteen years he held the position of superintend- 
ent, for nearly sixty years he was a member of the official board of the 
church, and at the time of his death he was president of the board of trustees. 
He not only gave his church persi uial aid during his life, but assisted in every 
other way that he possibly could, and many enterprises have been suc- 
cessful under his guidance. This devout spirit extended into the daily 
routine of his family life. Among the quaint and beautiful customs of his 
home was the holding of a special prayer service before any member of 
the family departed upon a journey. 

Mr. Barner's reminiscences are intensely interesting, especially of the 
early pioneer days when he traveled overland searching for a home. These 
have been published in a small volume, together with remarks made by 
leading citizens of Clinton county, and resolutions passed by different organi- 
zations of which he was a member. Lack of space prevents extensive quoting 
from this booklet, and we regret that all can not be set down verbatim. 
Particularly to the point are the addresses made by Dr. Town, Rev. Thomas 
Meredith, Perry W. Gard, Joseph Claybaugh, Henry Y. Morrison, James 
V. Kent and Sam Van ton. 

It is the duty of the younger generation to follow the example set 
by this old pioneer, to revere the memory of such men as John Earner, 
and to teach the same to their children so that the good wrought by a clean, 
religious life will go on fore\ er. The manner of this teaching has been 
set down by Mr. Earner, who wrote: "Remember you arc under parental 
authority. Study and obey the laws of health; be industrious; use economy; 
be truthful ; read your Bibles ; treasure up the truths and wisdom, and practice 
the precepts; be charitable; use no strong drinks or tobacco; abstain from all 
species of gaming, and shun every appearance of evil, that you may be 
worthy representatives of the pioneers." 

It was Mr. Barner's boast that he had seen the development of Frank- 
fort through its every stage of growth from the time of its beginning as a 
backwoods village. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 37^ 

OLIVER CARD, M. D. 

No profession wins greater respect and admiration from the people than 
that of the medical man. lie is a servant of the public and a willing one. 
He must bear with him the confidences of many people. A father or mother 
entrusts to his care their dearest treasure — tbeir child, and he is the one who 
stands between life and death. To say that be must be deft, skillful and 
learned in his profession is not saying all ; he must also possess that assurance 
and confidence that is communicable, for therein lies half the battle. The sub- 
ject of our sketch is not now engaged in the medical profession, but for so 
many years was he identified with the leading and best physicians of Frank- 
fort, Ind., that bis name will ever be the emblem of fair, tactful and successful 
administration. 

Oliver Gard was born on January 12, 1842, in Switzerland county, 
Ind., the son of Jesse and Amanda (McHenry) Gard. Jesse Gard was born 
in Hamilton county, Ohio, March 8, 181 1, being the son of William and Sarah 
(Woodruff) Gard, who traveled from the Buckeye state to the Hoosier state 
many years ago, and settled in Switzerland county. William Gard, son of 
Jeremiah and Experience Gard, was born June 8, 1788, in Fayette county, Pa. 
He held the position of one of the leading men of Switzerland county in the 
early days and represented her in the first Legislature ever held in Indiana. 
He died April 14, 1827. lie is remembered by his successful work in agri- 
culture and the worthy descendants that have graced his name. He married 
in Ohio, and became the father of two children : Jesse, deceased, and Eliza- 
beth, of Switzerland county. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Gard 
married her sister who bore him three children: William P., of Kansas; 
Julia and Sarah J., all deceased. 

Jesse Gard, son of the above and father of our subject, remained with 
his parents until the death of bis father and then he was forced to assume 
largely the parental duties. In early manhood he married Amanda Mc- 
Henry, a young girl from Hamilton county, O. She was born January 
18, 1814, and lived to bring ten children to her husband: Perry W., de- 
ceased; Mrs. Charlotte McKowen, of Frankfort; James, deceased; Oliver, 
Sarah, deceased; Mrs. Cynthia Dronbcrger, of Terre Haute; Mrs. Eliza 
Conoway, of Union count)', Ind.; M. H., of Texas; and Edward E., a Wis- 
consin farmer. 

Dr. Oliver Gard moved when seven years of age with his parents to 
Clinton county. Here, amidst the rugged duties of the farm, he spent his 



380 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

early years. In the common schools he acquired a rudimentary education, 
and later, when seventeen years of age, he entered an academy at New Lon- 
di 11. where he studied industriously until the war of the Rebellion broke out. 
Tn September, 1861, Mr. Card enlisted in Company II, Third Indiana Cav- 
alry, in which he served until honorably discharged for physical inability in 
April, 1864. Mr. Card saw heavy service in the field, participating in the 
battles of Shiloh, Chickamauga, Jonesboro, and Perryville, and also served 
loyally for a time as hospital steward. On leaving- the army Mr. Card re- 
turned to Clinton county and formed a partnership with his brother Perry, 
earning- 011 an extensive mercantile and grain trade in the town of Middle- 
fork. 

In 1866, Mr. Card began the study of medicine with Dr. M. L. Martin, 
of Middlefork, under whose direction he continued a couple of years, making 
rapid progress in the meantime. He entered Rush Medical College, Chicago, 
in 1867. and completed the course there on February 3, 1869. He located in 
Middlefork with his preceptor and continued a most successful practice there 
until March, 1882, when he moved to the city of Frankfort, where he was 
likewise successful. In 1884, he was nominated by the Republican party to 
represent them in the state legislature, and while he ran far ahead of his 
ticket, he was defeated by the small majority of forty-five votes. In 1886 
he was elected to serve as clerk of the circuit court, being the first Republican 
eter elected to that office in the county. In 1890, he was re-elected to the 
same position, serving until November 1, 1895. Dr. Card has acted as 
president of the Clinton County Medical society and also belongs to the State 
Medical society of Indiana. In the educational world the doctor has always 
taken the greatest interest. As township trustee and member of the Frank- 
fort school board, he has always stood for improvement nad progress. In 
later years, Dr. Card discontinued his practice of medicine and entered the 
undertaking profession. Now he enjoys the reputation of being the leading 
undertaker and embalmer in Frankfort, Inch 

Dr. Card has been twice married, the first time in 1864 to Martha Bun- 
nell, of Howard county, the daughter of Ezra and Susan Bunnell, of which 
union three children were born: Minnie, wife of Prof. Lewis Rettger, of the 
State Normal school, Terre Haute; Mrs. Lennie Haynes, of Evansville, and 
Mrs Nina Pullen, of Union county. The mother of these children was called 
by death on March 4. 1871, and on May 14, 1873. Dr. Card married his 
present wife, India J. Merrick, born March 10, 1850, the daughter of John 
and Nancy (Tyner) Merrick. Six children have been born to her: Grace 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 381 

(deceased), Rush (deceased), Helen, Russell and two that died in infancy. 
Mrs. Garcl is a member of the Methodist church in Frankfort, and shares 
equally with her husband in the esteem of the people. 

In religion, the doctor is a Methodist and was a lay delegate to the gen- 
eral conference held in Omaha, Nebraska, 189-', and for many years after- 
ward was the efficient superintendent of the Sunday school at Frankfort. 
The doctor has a beautiful home in the city of Frankfort, and a great deal 
of valuable land out in the county. Be is classed, financially, as one of the 
most substantial citizens of Frankfort. 

Doctor Gard belongs to Clinton Lodge No. 54, in the Masonic frater- 
nity, in w hich he has passed all the chairs, and he al ■ > belongs to the 1 
chapter and commandery, in all of which he has held the highest official posi- 
tions. Fie is also a thirty-third degree Mason, having been elevated to same 
by his work in the order. He is an active member in Stone River Post No. 
65, Grand Army of the Republic, and past post commander ; he has belonged 
to the Improved Order of Red Men and Knights of Pythias, also to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Throughout his life he has been a 
strict advocate of temperance. 

Doctor Card served two terms in the State senate in T901 and 1903. He 
was elected mayor of Frankfort November 4, 1913. 



WILLIAM T. SIDWELL. 



There could be no more comprehensive history written of a city or a 
county, or even of a state and its people, than that which deals with the life 
work of those who. by their own endeavor and indomitable energy, have 
placed themselves where they well deserve the title of "progressive," and in 
this sketch will be found the record of one who has outstripped the less active 
and less able plodders on the highway of life, one who has not been subdued 
by the many obstacles and failures that come to everyone, but who has made 
them stepping stones to higher things and at the same time that he was win- 
ning for himself prestige in the business and financial affairs of life. 

William P. Sidwell was born in Rockville, Parke county, Ind., January 
31, 1857, and was the son of Levi and Margaret A. (Rice) Sidwell. 
Levi was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, March 25, 1813, and his wife, our sub- 
ject's mother, was born on March 17, 1S33. at Waveland, Ind. Levi was a 
son of Levi, Sr., who was born in 1770 in Pennsylvania. He was a son of 



382 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Needham Sidwell, who was a native of England, and came lo the stale of 
Virginia during the colonial days. Later lie left the ( >ld Dominion for Mary- 
land, and again left Maryland to move lo Ohio. By occupation lie was a 
lawyer and enjoyed the reputation of being one of die best pioneer attorneys 
the country afforded. He died in the year of 1799. 

Levi Sidwell, Jr. received a fairly good common school education in bis 
youth, and after leaving school be embarked in the dry goods trade. About 
the year 1840 lie moved to Rockville, Ind.. and conducted the same business, 
which he continued for the long period of forty years. Mr. Sidwell was a 
member of the Indiana Constitutional Convention of [851. He retired from 
actn nsiness lifi i 1880, and died in Indian 1 ' ; six years ago Muring 
his life Mr. Sidwell was a very prominent worker in the Presbyteran church. 
Before the war he was a Democrat, but at the beginning of that struggle he 
turned to the side of the Republicans. 

Levi Sidwell. Jr. was married on May 8, 1855, to Margaret A. Rice, a 
daughter of Tsaac and Narcissa Montague (Allan) Rice. The Rices were 
direct descendants of the famous Scotch church reformer, John Knox. The 
founders of the American branch of the Rice family originally came to Penn- 
sylvania, and the great-great-grandfather of our subject founded Rice's Fort 
long before the first gun was fired in the American Revolution. This fort was 
often used as a refuge by the pioneers and their families against the hostile 
Indian tribes. The fort was located in Washington county, in the state of 
Pennsylvania. Members of the Rice family also served with distinction in 
the Revolutionary war. After the close of that struggle the family traveled 
overland to Kentucky, taking several weeks to get there and undergoing many 
hardships while on the journey. The family reached a position of honor and 
trust in that state. 

The grandfather of our subject came, with a part of the family, in the 
early '20s to Indiana, settling in Waveland, Montgomery county. The mother 
of our subject graduated from the Waveland Academy, and after her gradua- 
tion was employed as a teacher for some time. Four children were born to 
her: William P., Nancy C, wife of C. N. Stevenson of Indianapolis; Mon- 
tague Rice, of Victoria. British Columbia, and Chauncey, who died at the age 
of twelve years. 

William P. Sidwell obtained an excellent education in his youth, and 
gradrited from the Rockville high school in 1877. He entered a bank in 
Rockville then as a bookkeeper, and stayed there one and a half years, then 
moved to Frankfort, Ind., and look a similar position in the First National 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 3^3 

Bank, serving faithfully in that capacity [or six years. He was promoted to 
the position of teller and he held this place for seven years. His next step 
was to the position of assistant cashier and in 1893 he was elected cashier. 

Besides his hanking interests Mr. Sidwell has found lime and oppor- 
tunity to enter upon almost every finnacial scheme that has been advanced in 
Clinton county. He was the organizer of the Frankfort Loan and Trust 
Company in 1901, and has keen secretary and treasurer of the same from the 
beginning. Also he helped organize the Heating Company and the Ice and 
Cold Storage Company. He is now secretary and treasurer of the Heating 
Company. He aided in putting in the first electric plant, which is now the 
city plant. He was a prime mover in the Frank* rl Industrial Association 
and was a director of the same. He. was one of the original stockholders ot 
the old Natural Gas Company, aiding the business of the company for four- 
teen years. 

Fraternally, Mr. Sidwell is a third degree Mason. In religious matters 
he is a Presbvterian and is an elder of the church. He is also treasurer of 
the Home Mi'ssion Committee of the Crawfordsville Presbytery. In politics, 
Mr. Sidwell follows the lead of the Republican party. 

Mr Sidwell married Caroline Charline Campbell, who was born in Win- 
chester. Indiana, the daughter of John A. and Sarah A. (Hamilton) Camp- 
bell the former a Presbyterian minister. Her people are of pure Scotch 
descent and were among the best known of Scotland's families. Three chil- 
dren have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sidwell : Chauncey and Keith, who 
died in infancy, and Paul, a twin of Keith's, who is a professor of English 
in Purdue University. 

LAWRENCE W. HARVEY. 

A hundred years ago sanitation and hygiene were not recognized as 
necessary elements of civilization. One reason was that the communities 
were not so crowded, people lived over wide areas, and unsanitary conditions 
had little chance to become existent. As the years passed, however, com- 
munities became more crowded, people were compelled to live in close prox- 
imity and hence there were ushered in various means of maintaining perfect 
cleanliness. Cities became congested and the problem became truly serious. 
The science of plumbing grew to be an important profession and today the 
plumber is in constant demand, for upon his skill rests the elimination of 



384 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

waste. Mr. Harvey has kept abreast of the times in all that pertains to his 
profession, and he- is now ranked as one of the best mechanics in Frankfort. 

Lawrence W. Harvey was born at Rensselaer, Ind., January [4, 1885, 
and was the son of Charles and Catherine (Caster) Harvey. Charles Harvey 
was born in Lafayette, Ind., in 1852 and is still living in the town of Rensse- 
laer. His wife also born in Lafayette, in 1860, is still living. 

Our subject attended the common schools of his home county, and then 
entered the high school. After leaving there he began learning the plumber's 
trade, and in 1003 he finished the same and began work as a qualified plumber. 
For six years he worked for the Frankfort Heating Company, and then went 
into business for himself. Some examples of his very efficient worl are to 
be seen in the Princess theater, Bankable Cigar Factory, Shartles store, 
Thrashers store, Hertz Dry Goods Company, M. B. Thrasher residence, 
Himmehvrights residence, four residences for Chris Arnkins, Ideal theater, 
William Pilsar residence, P. Armantrout's residence, and the home of Ben 
Pilser. Mr. Harvey now has his place of business on West Washington 
street, and carries a full line of plumbing and heating supplies. 

On April 8, 1909, Mr. Harvey was married to Tollis A. Preble, of 
Frankfort. She was born in Delphos, O.. November 6, 1889. No children 
have been born of this union. 

Fraternally, Mr. Harvey is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and politically is a Republican. 



JOSEPH COMBS. 



The ancestors of the Combs family in America were emigrants from 
Holland, and they settled in Monmouth county, New Jersey, some time prior 
to the Revolutionary war. The oldest member of the family known was 
John Combs, who was the great-great grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch. He was a soldvr in the war for Independence, and served as captain 
in Foreman's regiment of Continental troops, from March 20, 1777, till 
the date of his death, on September 2, 1779. One of his sons was John 
Combs, born in New Jersey, July 8, 1770, and on February 25, 1793, married 
Elizabeth Bowne. This man with his family, at an early date, settled in 
Butler county, Ohio, on a farm near Hamilton, where he died, September 
5, 1829. One of his sons, also named John, was born November 20, 1798. 
He was married to Jane Brown, and located on a farm three miles northwest 



-\ 




. 



k 



HON. JOSEPH COMBS 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 



3«S 



of Hamilton, Butler county, Ohio, where he spent all of his life. He practiced 
strict economy, became a man of considerable wealth, and was a very devout 
United Presbyterian, and with his wife and family were regular attendants 
at the church of thai denomination in Hamilton. 1' lied there on his farm 
in April, 1871, at the age of seventy-three years. Nathan B. Combs, the 
father of Joseph Combs, was the youngest son of the last named John 
Combs, and was born in Butler county, Ohio, April 16, 1831, and up to 
the twenty-second year of his age bis life was passed on his father's farm 
near Hamilton in that county. He had two older brothers, one James B. 
Combs, who, later settled in Washington, la., and William B. Combs, who 
made his home on a farm one mile southeast of Mulberry, in this county. 
John I!. Combs and William B. Coml 5 are sons of this member of the 
family, and now live near Mulberry, Clinton county, Indiana. 

Nathan B. Combs first visited this county in the year of 1853. and be- 
came acquainted with Mary Margaret Wright, to whom he was afterward 
mrrried. She was the daughter of James W. Wright and Sarah (Bald- 
ridge) Wright, and then lived with her mother on a farm in what was then 
known as the Twelve Mile Prairie (now a part of Jackson township), and 
about one mile west of the Prairie Center church, in Clinton county. 

In August, 1856, Nathan B. Combs and wife and family settled on a 
quarter section of land in the northwest corner of Washington township, 
about three miles east of Mulberry, in Clinton county, Indiana, where he 
and his wife spent the remainder of their days. The entire farm was then 
covered with as thickly grown and fine a body of timber as could be found 
in Indiana, consisting of oak, walnut, poplar, sugar maple, beech, ash, 
hickory and many other varieties. Many of the white oak, black walnut 
and yellow poplar were of gigantic size. Only a few acres of the timber 
had been deadened, and no clearing was done, and so before he could erect 
a house he had to cut and roll the logs and pile the brush, so as to make room 
for a building. This was quickly done and a log cabin for the family 
speedily erected, then a log stable and barn put up to shelter his horses 
and stock. Next a small p;s ch of ground was cleared and sowed to fall wheat, 
other timber was deadened, ground for corn in the spring was cleared, and 
thus in true, pioneer style he made a home for himself and family in the 
western wilderness. For nearly twenty years his nearest market was at 
Lafayette, Ind., seventeen miles away, where all of his crops and produce had 
to be hauled, and part of the way over bad roads. To make the trip in one- 
day he had to get up about three o'clock a. m., feed his horses, get breakfast, 
(25) 



386 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

so as to be able to start before daylight. Always having to face a west wind, 
when the weather was cold, he often walked beside the wagon the entire 
distance to keep from freezing. This was his regular occupation two or three 
days out of each week all winter long, in order to gel all of his crops to 
market. Spring and fall were always spent in clearing, ditching and fencing 
new ground for crops. On account of the dense growth of heavy timber 
this was a terrible task. The finest walnut, white oak and poplar was con- 
sidered fit for nothing but to be split into rails for building fences. Trees 
that would now be worth hundreds of dollars were worked up in this way. 
Field after field were thus cleared, fenced and sowed to grain, which yielded 
marvelous crops of wheat, corn, oats, clover, potatoes, etc. 

And so the life of Nathan B. Combs, like that of the other pioneers, was 
a hard one, but bis work was well done. He and his wife did their part in 
making the "wilderness blossom as the rose," and preparing this county for 
the enjoyment of the generations yet unborn. They accumulated consider- 
able property, and left a fine well improved farm of three hundred and fifty 
acres as a monument to their toil. Mr. Combs was a man of the strictest 
integrity, honest and honorable in all of his dealings. He was a firm be- 
liever in and supporter of the Universalist faith, though not a member of any 
church, and was a member of the lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, first 
at Jefferson, and then at Frankfort. In physical appearance he was not tall, 
but very large, weighing nearly three hundred pounds. He died in February, 
1897. His wife, Margaret Combs, died in August, 1893. 

Joseph Combs was one of a family of ten children, and was born No- 
vember 15, i860, on the farm where his parents lived in Washington town- 
ship, Clinton county. He grew up under the surroundings above stated, and 
so from his earliest recollection he was inured to toil. He assisted bis father 
and brother in clearing the land, fencing, ditching, and cultivating his father's 
farm, and this occupied the entire time of every year, except about three 
months in winter, when he attended the district school at the village of Hamil- 
ton, and where he acquired a common school education. At the age of 
eighteen he secured a license to teach, and for the next six years he taught 
in the district schools of the county. He made further preparation for 
teaching by attending several terms of the summer normal school in Frank- 
fort, conducted by County Superintendent W. IT. Mushlitz and R. G. Boone, 
superintendent of the Frankfort city schools. Later he also attended the 
the State Normal School at Terre Haute, Ind. 

In 1886 he began the study of law in the office of Judge J. C. Suit, in 
Frankfort, and the next year was admitted to the bar of the Clinton Circuit 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 3^7 

Court. March i, 1887, he formed a partnership for the practice of law 
with ]. C. Suit, under the firm name of Suit & Combs, which continued two 
years, and during which time he added to his previous study considerable 
knowledge of the principles of the law and the practice thereof in the 
Clinton Circuit Court. During the next two years he practiced alone, having 
his office in the Heifield building on the east side of the public square. In 
June, 1900, he was married to Leonora J. Seawright, daughter of James A. 
Seawright, of the city of Frankfort. In January, 1890, he made his first 
venture in politics, and announced his name as a candidate of the Democratic 
party for prosecuting attorney at the spring convention. His opponent 
was the late Francis M. Goldsberry, of Colfax, Ind., who was then one of 
the old time shrewd politicians. Combs had then had no experience v 
ever politically, and knew very few of the party leaders in the county, but 
he went industriously to work to get acquainted. The contest in the con- 
vention was quite spirited, and Combs was nominated by a very narrow 
margin. Then be had to meet Fred A. Sims, as his Republican opponent 
in the fall election. The county was then Republican, but the margin was 
so narrow as to make most elections hotly contested. On account of the 
strength and popularity of Sims, many of the Democratic leaders expected 
Combs to be defeated, but when the returns from the voting were all in 
it showed that he had won in a very close race. The final figures were, Sims 
3,000, and Combs, 3,012. He took charge of the office at once, diligently 
applied himself to a study of criminal law and practice, and soon became a 
vigorous and effective prosecutor, securing many convictions and allowing 
very few acquittals of persons charged with crime. The Farley murder 
case and Freeman Cooper forgery case were two of the notable causes which 
he prosecuted. The next year he was defeated for re-election by N. P. Clay- 
baugh, bis Republican opponent, along with all of his party on the county 

ticket. 

In December, 1892, he formed a partnership for the practice of law 
with O. S. Brumbaugh, attorney, under the firm name of Brumbaugh & 
Combs, which was a successful partnership and continuing for eight years, 
and doing a large business in this and surrounding counties. The Shcnken- 
berger murder case, the Toll Gate cases, and the Cornthwaite case, were 
some of the causes they were engaged in during this time. 

In June, 1901, he opened an office over the Clinton County Rank, and for 
the next seven years practiced alone. About the 10th of May, 1908, he 
announced his name as the candidate of the Democratic party for judge of 
the Clinton Circuit Court, before the Democratic county convention soon 



38S CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

to be held. His opponents were Joseph P. Gray, C. G. Guenther and W. R. 
Moore. He had only three weeks to make any canvass for the nomination. 

Mr. Gray, his strongest opponent, and his friends, were quite confident that 
Gray would be casilj nominated. Combs made as thorough a canvass as he 
could in the short time, and when the convention met it was apparent that 
it would be a close contest. Mr. Gray and his friends were still confident of 
the result, but were considerably surprised at the strength Combs was de- 
veloping. When the balloting began it became a neck and neck race, Combs 
having a slight lead in the first few ballots. On the fourth ballot Gray's 
friends rallied and bad a slight lead, and at the end of the fifth ballot Gray 
had . big lead and ■ 1- getting close to the nomination. Then Combs' friends 
made a heroic rail) and the sixth ballot closed with the following result, 
Gray 133, Combs 136. This settled the contest, and on the next ballot 
Combs received the number necessary to nominate. 

Then Mr. Combs discovered that he was in the fiercest political struggle 
of his life. He was the youngest man that had ever made the race for 
judge of the court. His opponent on the Republican ticket was Judge Clay- 
baugh, who had been a life-long attorney and one of the leading members of 
the bar, and had the prestige of six years on the bench to his credit, and 
many politicians believed that Combs stood no show of being elected. But 
general conditions were favorable to the Democrats, and unfavorable to the 
success of the Republican party, and Combs went quietly to work and assisted 
his chairman and committee to make a thorough organization of the forces of 
his party. In addition to organization be made an extensive personal can- 
vass in all parts of the county, and so was well prepared for the battle when 
election day came. When the balloting was over and the returns all in, it 
showed that Combs had won the election by a plurality of 103. 

He took the bench on November 12, 1908, a few days before he was 
forty-eight years old. From the first he has been a diligent worker and 
close student of the law and of the cases that come before him, always 
making it the rule to carefully study every ease he is called upon to try. 
He hat been impartial and fair in his rulings, always trying to give every 
one a square deal, regardless of who he is or what his station or position in 
life may be He has given quite general satisfaction and fully met the ex- 
pectations of his friends who placed their confidence in him and gave him 
their support. He has a strong leaning to the equity side of every case, and 
to do equity and justice to every one before him is his desire, so far as 
the rules and principles of the law will permit. He is a strong believer in 
law . orcement, and vet will deal leniently with prisoners ,1 he believes 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 389 

the good ol society does not demand harsh punishment, and has granted 
many suspended sentences in cases he thought the circumstances would justify 
him in so doing, and where it would help to reform the prisoner. He takes 
much interest in the Juvenile Court and in looking after the betterment of the 
condition of neglected, mistreated or delinquent children. 

In politics he is a life-long Democrat. He has long been a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, is a member of the Woodmen of the 
World, and a Royal Arch Mason. He is a member of the First Presbyterian 
church of Frankfort and one of the elders in that organization, and an 
active worker in the Sunday school. His family consists of his wife and 
one daughter, Eleanor Combs, sixteen years old, now in the third year of the 
Frankfort high school. Mr. Combs takes much interest in all affairs per- 
taining to the public schools and the cause of education in general, and in 
the betterment of the people of the city and county, lie is a diligent student 
of history and general literature, and has a large library. 

Nathan B. Combs, veterinary surgeon, and representative in the last 
session of the Indiana Legislature from Clinton county, at Mulberry, Ind., is 
a brother; also John Combs, retired farmer, at Mulberry, Ind., and Martin 
V. Combs, farmer, in North Dakota. Mrs. Jennie Swadener, Mulberry, Ind., 
Mrs. J. IT. Grover, Frankfort, Ind., and Mrs. A. W. Black, Los Angeles, Cal., 
are sisters. 



EUGENE O. BURGET. 



Prominent in the affairs of Frankfort, distinguished as one of the lead- 
ing men of Clinton count;, . and enjoying distinctive prestige in business circles 
far beyond the limits of the community honored by his citizenship, Eugene 0. 
Burget, of the People's Life Insurance Company, is entitled to specific mention 
in a work such as this volume, which is to present to the reader the life details 
of the men who have made for the progress of the county, men in every walk 
of life, and in every profession who have contributed part of their lives for 
the good of the community of which this is a history. Mr. Burget is a sound 
business man. a man of excellent ideals, and a man devoted to the duty which 
has come to rest upon his shoulders. In the financial history of the county 
Mr. Burget has been especially prominent, and his career in commercial life 
has been one of steady advancement. 

Eugene O. Rurget was born January 5, 1869 at Burget's Corner, this 
county, and he was the son of William M. and Permelia (Mott) Rurget. 



CLINTON COUNTY; INDIANA. 39 1 

the fall of Atlanta, and later took part in the battles of Columbia, Franklin 
and Nashville, and was honorably discharged June f>, 1865. Politically, he 
is a Republican. 

William M. Burget was thrice married. His first wile was Permelia 
Mott, daughter of Sayres Mott, and of this union the following children were 
born: May, born May 15, 1867, died September 20, [868: Eugene O., our 
subject; Lula, bom February 13, 1872; and Sarah, born July jo, 1874, and 
died the same day. The second marriage of Mr. Burget was to Sarah Long- 
fellow, daughter of John Longfellow, and of this union was horn Leon V.. 
June 10, 1880, died August 14, 1881. The third marriage of our subject's 
father was to Mrs. Hester J. McCreary, daughter of John M. aijd TTester 
(Mott) Dunn, and this union was blessed with the birth of four children: 
John P.. October 16, 1884; Earnest D., January 2, 1886; Minnie T., April 3. 
1887. and George E., May iS. 1888. 

Eugene O. Burget received a good education in his youth, and later 
graduated at the state normal school at Terrc Haute. Thinking that his 
excellent education would he of more value when supplemented by teaching, 
he entered that profession, and soon became principal of schools at Scircle- 
ville and again at Hillisburg. In this work Mr. Burget was successful. He 
was endowed with those qualities which make a good educator, and he had 
the happy faculty of imparting to others the knowledge he himself possessed. 
In 1894 Mr. Burget was appointed to the office of deputy auditor of Clin- 
ton countv. and in 1902 was elected to the office of auditor. For four years 
he filled this position acceptably to all his fellow citizens, performing well 
the duties required of him. After the expiration of his term he accepted a 
position in the Clinton County Bank as assistant cashier, and there be stayed 
one year. In 1907 he took a place with the People's Life Insurance Com- 
pany as secretary, and since has held that position in a very efficient and 
capable manner. 

On Time 28, 1889, he was united in marriage to Carrie Boyle, who was 
born in Michigantown, Indiana, on December 28. 1875, a daughter of Josiah 
L. and Mary Boyle, both of whom are now living in Frankfort. 

Fraternallv. Mr. Burget is rptite prominent in Frankfort. He is a 
Mason, a member of the York Rite and the Shrine, lie belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Indepen- 
dent" Order of Odd Fellows, and the Improved Order of Red Men. In 
politics be is a Republican, and in religious matters is a Methodist. 



CLINTON' COUNTY, INDIANA. 39 J 

the fall of Atlanta, and later took pari in the battles of Columbia, Franklin 
and Nashville, and was honorably discharged June C\ 1X1.5. Politically, lit- 
is a Republican. 

William M. Burget was thrice married, His first wife was Permelia 
Mott, daughter of Sayres Mott, and of this union the following children were 
born: May, born May 15, 1867, died September jo. 1868; Eugene O., our 
subject; Lula. born February 13, 1872; and Sarah, born July 10. 1874, and 
died the same day. The second marriage of Mr. Burgel was to Sarah Long- 
fellow, daughter of John Longfellow, and of this union was born Leon V., 
June IO, 1880, died August 14, r88l. The third marriage of our subject's 
father was to Mrs. Hester J. McCreary, daughter of John M. and Hester 
(Mott) Dunn, and Ibis union was blessed with the birth of four children: 
Tohn P.. October 16, 1S84; Earnest D.. January 2, 1886; Minnie T.. April 3. 
1887, and George E., May 18, 1S88. 

Eugene O. Burget received a good education in his youth, and later 
graduated at the state normal school at Terre Haute. Thinking that his 
excellent education would be of more value when supplemented by teaching, 
he entered that profession, and soon became principal of schools at Sctrcle- 
ville and again at Hillisburg. In this work Mr. Burget was successful. He 
was endowed with those qualities which make a good educator, and he had 
the happy faculty of imparting to others the knowledge he himself possessed. 
In 1894 Mr. Burget was appointed to the office of deputy auditor of Clin- 
ton county, and in 1902 was elected to the office of auditor. For four years 
he filled this position acceptably to all his fellow citizens, performing well 
the duties required of him. After the expiration of his term he accepted a 
position in the Clinton County Bank as assistant cashier, and there he stayed 
one year. In 1907 he took a place with the People's Life Insurance Com- 
pany as secretary, and since has held that position in a very efficient and 
capable manner. 

On Tune 28, 1889, he was united in marriage to Carrie Boyle, who was 
born in Michigantown, Indiana, on December 28, 1875, a daughter of Josiah 
L. and Mary Boyle, both of whom arc now living in Frankfort. 

Fraternallv. Mr. Burget is quite prominent in Frankfort. He is a 
Mason, a member of the York Kite and the Shrine. He belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd bellows, and the Improved Order of Red Men. In 
politics he is a Republican, and in religious matters is a Methodist. 



392 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JOHN A. ROSS. 

ll is the aggressive, industrious and capable man of affairs who makes 
the true history of a community, and it is to such men that biography is 
dedicated. In addition, the history of the community, aside from biography, 
is largely a record of the institutions established by tin's same class of men, 
and also a record of their accomplishments in the business and social life of 
the locality, and of their influence in the development of the county. With 
such values of biography in mind, we here set forth the leading facts in the 
life record of one of the leading citizens of Frankfort and one of Clinton 
con 3 public spirited and substantial men. who has long been prominent 
in the contracting and banking business circles. His record of a life well 
spent, of perseverance and steady advancement to a place of honor and dis- 
tinction in the commercial world, presents an example worthy of emulation 
by the rising generation. John A. Ross has led a life of integrity and use- 
fulness and his association with business and civic affairs in Frankfort has 
been notable and highly appropriate for permanent record. 

John A. Ross was born in Tippecanoe county, near LaFayette, Ind., 
January 26, 18O1, and was the son of Alexander and Mary (Johnson) Ross. 
Alexander Ross was of Scotch extraction, was born in Ireland, and was only 
thirteen years of age when he came to the United States, locating first at 
Lafayette, Tippecanoe county, Ind. He was united in marriage to Mary 
Johnson, a native of Sweden, who came to the United States when twelve 
years of age. 

John A. Ross, the subject of this sketch, is the eldest of eight children. 
He resided in the city of Lafayette until he reached his majority, and in that 
place received an excellent education, including a full course in bookkeeping 
and civil engineering. From the age of fifteen until twenty-one he was of 
o-reat assistance to his father who was a general contractor.- In [882, John 
A. Ross removed to Frankfort and engaged in the contracting business for 
one year and immediately made a success 'of his trade in the new location. 
In 1883 and 1884 he engaged in the. same occupation in Lafayette and in 
Huntington. Ind. After alteraling between Frankfort and Lafayette, he 
permanently located at Frankfort in 1888, and went into partnership with 
the late Tames A. Hedgcock for the purpose of doing a general contracting 
business, embracing gravel roads, bridges, street improvement, sewerage and 
erection of business blocks. The firm was awarded contracts for the im- 







-V 



\ 



\ 



\ 



JOHN A. ROSS 



v CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 393 

provement of many of the principal streets of Frankfort, miles of gravel road 
and a large number of the principal iron bridges of the county. In even- 
instance their work lias proved eminently satisfactory to all concerned, and 
stands as a monument to their ability and integrity as. public contractors. 
They were able at all times to furnish employment to hundreds of laboring 
men at a just and reasonable compensation, believing that "the laborer is 
worthy of his hire." The business of this firm was most successful. Street 
contracting, general contracting and the building of bridges and business 
blocks occupied the time of the firm from 1888 until 1890, the business 
amounting to thousands of dollars annually. 

In 1890 the firm established the Frankfort Brick works, with a capacity 
of three and one-half to four million brick annually, giving employment to 
sixty or seventy men. In the spring of 1894 their brick works were totally 
destroyed by fire, entailing a loss of sixteen to eighteen thousand dollars 
which was only partially covered by insurance. Not discouraged by this 
misfortune, the firm at once cleared the wreck and proceeded to rebuild the 
works on a large sctle and with increased facilities, and had one of the best 
equipped brick works in central Indiana. During all of these years, thus en- 
gaged in public works, giving employment to hundreds of men. this firm has 
never experienced the least trouble on account of strikes or dissatisfaction 
on the "part of the men in their employ. The firm of Ross and Hedgecock 
was merged into the Frankfort Construction Company, of which our subject 
is the president and largest stock holder. Many are the evidences of their 
work in Frankfort and the surrounding cities of the county: The Rossville 
high school, Michigantown high school. Forest high school, the first ward 
building at Frankfort, Ross block. Fatzinger block, Palmer hospital. Kelly 
block, both of the Key's blocks, the American National Bank building, the 
heating plant, the public library, and several garages stand today examples 
of their craft. Mr. Ross's firm also has to its credit miles of bitulitbic and 
asphalt streets in Anderson, Evansville, Ind., and other cities. During the 
last few years they have built approximately four miles of railroad bridges 
for the C. E. & I. and T. S. & W. railroads besides numerous county bridges. 
Mr. Ross personally contracts for large land deals, and the business in tbis 
line is rapidly increasing. 

Mr. Ross has taken an active interest also in many enterprises other 
than contracting. In the year of 1902 he helped organize the American 
National Bank of Frankfort, and was elected president. He has continued 
ever since to fill the position and has built up an excellent reputation in fulfill- 



394 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ment of the duties of that office. Mr. Ross also took a prominent part in the 
organization of the Frankfort Heath; Company and the Peoples Life Insur- 
ance Company, being the largest stockholder in each at the time they were 
organized. The people of Frankfort number him among the progressive and 
capable men identified with their financial interests, and do not hesitate to 
place full confidence in his ability. Mr. Ross has also invested in land near 
Frankfort, at this writing. He is the owner of one hundred and thirty acres 
of fertile and tillable land adjoining the city on the northeast and about six 
hundred acres elsewhere in the county. 

On February 12, 1884, Mr. Ross was united in jnarriage to Lola A. 
Curtis, the daughter of Charles i 1 Curtis, who was born in England and 
Esther (Rinard) Curtis, born in America, but of German extraction. Mrs. 
Ross was born in Lafayette, Ind., and of a family of eleven children, was the 
youngest. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Ross: Worley A., 
Carrie Venita, wife of Walter R. Dyer, of Boone, Iowa; Margaret Zola, and 
Dorothy Thelma. Mr. Ross's wife was failed to her death February 21, 
1907, after a beautiful life of religious devotion and love for her family and 
home. 

Fraternally, Mr. Ross is a member of the Knights of Pythias. Religi- 
ously, he is a Presbyterian and in political affairs is a faithful supporter of the 
Republican party. * 



GEORGE Y. FOWLER. 



George Y. Fowler, son of William A. and Sarah Fowler, was. bom in 
Perry township, Clinton county, March 11, i860. His parents came to Clin- 
ton county in an early day, the father being a native of Kentucky and the 
mother a native of Virginia. They married and settled on a farm near Col- 
fax, where the subject of this sketch was born and where he spent the early 
years of his life. The first tragedy in his young life occurred in 1867, when 
his mother died, and five years later, 1872, he was completely orphaned by 
the death of his father. The bodies were laid to rest and still repose in the 
old White cemetery in Perry township, where sleep others of the pioneer men 
and women who bravely undertook the task of reclaiming from swam]) and 
forest the fertile lands of that section of the county contiguous to Colfax. 

After the death of his father, being then at the age of twelve years, Mr. 
Fowler was given a home with relatives who resided on a Perry township 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 395 

farm ami there he remained about two years, attending the district school in 
the winter and making himself useful on tin- farm during the remainder of 
the time. While Mr. Fowler's experience in the actual work upon the farm 
was limited on account of his immature years he nevertheless bore his part 
and at a time before much advancement had been made in the production of 
labor saving farm machinery. It was before the day of the riding plow and 
the riding cultivator, it ante-dated the coming of the self-binder, and nearly- 
all of the modern methods for harvesting the grain and hay crops. It was 
during that era of strenuous effort when the farmers of Clinton county were 
putting their muscle to the natural obstacles to agriculture, and to this work 
Ah. ; owler gave tin- b< st that was in him in exchange for the home that was 
opened to him when a home was sorely needed. 

In 1874 came the turning point in his career and decided his course of 
future usefulness, for in that year he decided to prepare himself for the occu- 
pation of printing and to that end entered the office of the Frankfort Cres- 
cent as apprentice. The Crescent at that time was under the management of 
the veteran journalist. Staley, and located on the south side of the square in 
rooms over what is now known as the Spray grocery. In due time he com- 
pleted his apprenticeship and graduated as a journeyman printer, but remained 
in Mr. Staley's employ for several years afterwards, his connection with the 
Crescent in the capacities of apprentice, foreman, business manager and news 
writer extending over a period of eleven years. 

During that time Mr. Staley was in the Indiana legislature as repre- 
sentative from Clinton county and Mr. Fowler was practically in charge of 
the Crescent, and the experience thus acquired was a valuable asset to him in 
after years in carrying out his plans and fulfilling his ambition to be a pub- 
lisher of a successful newspaper. 

In 1885 he resigned his position on the Crescent, to go into business for 
himself. Together with his brother. Finley Fowler, and G. H. Hamilton, he 
established the Frankfort Weekly Times. Mr. Hamilton had been publish- 
ing a small weekly paper at Colfax called The Chronicle. This plant was 
destroyed by fire and new equipment was bought. After Mr. Fowler and his 
brother acquired an interest in the business the material was brought to 
Frankfort, making two medium-sized loads. In comparison with the present 
massive equipment of the Times this statement is interesting. The material 
was moved into two small rooms over the Epstein store and there the Times 
office was established in August, 1885. The old Chronicle at Colfax had 
quite a large circulation and this together with the new list of subscribers that 



396 CLINTON COX NTY, INDIANA. 

was secured in Frankfort and other points of the county gave the Times a 
very fair footing on the dale of the lust issue. 

Finley Fowler died in 1889 an 1 subsequcnl to dial sad event Mr. Fowler 
bought the interest of Mr. llamliton, and with the exception of about two 
years, during which time J. J. Aughe was part owner of the paper, has pub- 
lished The Times under his sole ownership and management. Originally the 
Weekly Times was an eight page, six column paper, half of il being what is 
known as "ready print. "' The proprietors were without a newspaper press 
and during the first few years of its existence the paper was printed on the 
Crescent press. The Times, however, gained immediate popularity with the 
public and the den >n its columns made by advertisers necessitated the 

addition of extra columns, so that inside of two years the paper was enlarged 
to a seven column quarto. At the same time the publishers purchased a 
press upon which to print their paper, and to stay within their means selected 
a Prouly, the cheapest newspaper press built at that time. It served the pur- 
pose, however, for two Years, when it became necessary to have a larger and 
faster press to keep up with the rapidly growing circulation of The Times. 
This time a Potter drum cylinder press was installed, at that time one of the 
most popular models of flat bed presses. By that time The Times had out- 
grown its original quarters and the office was moved to the second story of 
the Cohee building at the southwest corner of the square. Subsequently, an- 
other move was made to the Kelly building on West Clinton street to up- 
stairs rooms, and later the office was installed in the down-stairs room in the 
same building. It took a few years for The Times to get in on the "ground 
floor," but having once attained that desired location it has ever since re- 
mained there. The room in the Kelly block was the home of The Times 
until nine years ago, since which time it has occupied a building especially 
built for the purpose and known as the Times building, located on east Clin- 
ton street. The building is thirty-three by one hundred and thirty-two feet, 
two stories and basement, and was constructed to meet all the needs for the 
publication of a modern newspaper. 

In 1894. believing that the people of Frankfort and Clinton county would 
appreciate the advantages of a daily morning newspaper, Mr. Fowler 
launched The Morning Times, and has never regretted it, although the at- 
tempt to establish a morning daily at that time was rather hazardous and in- 
volved possible failure and financial loss. He was advised by friends not to 
attempt so radical an undertaking in local journalism, but acting upon the firm 
belief that the field was amply large for a morning paper, he brought out Ins 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 307 

hrst issue, and success has attendee] his venture from that day to this. The 
growth of The Morning Times has been little short of marvelous. Its popu- 
covcrs the count}', and lias, since the establishment of free rural mail delivery, 
that its value as an advertising medium has made ever increasing demand 
for space, necessitating frequent enlargements. The growth in circulation 
and business has also made repeated demands for new and holler equipment 
and these demands have been promptly met by the progressive publishers. 
When the linotype began displacing hand compositors, Mr. Fowler was among 
the wry first of the provincial daily newspapers to install a machine and this 
gave his leaders a quadruple allowance of reading matter. As The Morning 
Times grew the old Potter press became inadequate ti the demand foi : 

and so Mr. Fowler, in 1900, installed a Miehle press, the fastest flat-bed press 
then on the market. This served its purpose fairly well for a few years or 
until the circulation of the paper grew to such size that something faster upon 
which to print the paper was an imperative demand. So in igi2 Mr. Fowler 
installed a Webb perfecting press that cost a small fortune, but which will 
fulfill all the requirements for man}- years to come. The press prints from a 
continuous roll of paper and is capable of turning out one hundred completed 
and folded papers per minute. Four, eight or ten papers can be printed as 
desired. Mr. Fowler's policy of being a little in advance of the times ex- 
tends to his general equipment, and from a small beginning — two wagon 
loads of material — the plant has grown to its present large proportions. 

For several years past Mr. Fowler has been assisted by his sons. Max- 
well and Walter, who are now assuming a share of the burden which for so 
many years were visited upon one pair of shoulders, and the probability is 
that The Morning Times will be published by several generations of Fowlers, 
descendants of the man who was responsible for its start. 

On October it, 1882, Mr. Fowler was united in marriage with Christina 
Kramer, daughter of Edward and Mary Kramer, who were among the early 
settlers in Frankfort. Three sons, Raymond, George Maxwell, .and Walter 
Scott, have been born to them. While the publication of his paper and the 
conduct of his business has made stead)- and ever increasing demands upon 
Mr. Fowler's time he has nevertheless found time to fraternize with his 
fellow newspaper men. being one of the oldest members of the Northern 
Indiana Editorial Association, and, until very recently, a regular attendant at 
its meetings. Neither has he neglected the social side of life, being a mem- 
ber of three of Frankfort's leading fraternal orders — Knights of Pythias, 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and the Improved Order of Red Men. 



398 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

He is a member of the official board and also ibe board of trustees of ibe 
Methodist Episcopal church and was church treasurer for a long term ol 
years, during the pastorates of D ictors Hollingsworth, Ogden and Halstead. 



CAPTAIN GEORGE \V. BROWN, M. D. 

As the aristocratic Southland today loves the memory of Jeb Stuart's 
rollicking, courageous and daring cavalry troop, so docs the more astute 
North glory in the recollectioi ' ilder's Lightning Brigade, that hardy, 

manly and intrepid company of men who played so conspicuous a part in 
the campaigns of the Army of the Cumberland. On the bloody fields of 
Chickamauga and around Chattanooga these men from Indiana and Illinois 
fought, and they came to bear the reputation of being able to "lick anything 
that stood before them." Since those days of strife the men who composed 
the rank and file have scattered over the whole country. Some in the years 
since have filled the highest offices in the country, others have entered the 
different professions, some in the law courts have made their names famous 
and othres as financiers, have made distinct successes. The immediate sub- 
ject of this sketch was a member of the Seventy-second Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, which, along with the Seventy-fifty Indiana and the Ninety-eighth 
Illinois, made up Wilder's Brigade when it was organized at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, in September, 1862. His part in the activities of that famous brigade 
was a notable one and his conduct was ever that becoming a gentleman and an 
officer. 

Captain George W. Brown was born on a farm in Warren county, O., 
August 3, 1843. and was the son of Jeffrey and Mary (Irwin) Brown. In 
the spring of 1N5 ) our subject's father moved to Clinton county, and settled 
on a farm. Captain Brown's early education was obtained in the common 
schools of Rossville, which town was near to his home farm. At the age of 
.sixteen years he began the study of medicine, and, not being willing to depend 
solely upon his father for support while attending medical school, he taught 
school during the winter of '6l-'62. 

The call of the North for volunteers interrupted his plans, however, 
and his patriotism won. On July 23, 1862 he enlisted as a private in Com- 
pany K, Seventy-second Indiana Regiment. He served until November. 
1863, when he was detailed to return home and recruit, and he secured forty- 
six men, thus filling his company to the maximum. While he was fulfilling 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 399 

this order, on January 23, 1864, he was promoted to the rank of first lieu- 
tenant and on April [9, r86-|., he rejoined the regiment at Columbus, Tcnn., 
just before the beginning of the Atlanta campaign, and assumed command of 
bis company, the captain being absent on account of wounds. On |ulv 1, 
1864 our subject was advanced to the position of captain, and remained in 
command until the day they were all mustered out of the service. A booklet 
published on the occasion of the dedication of the Wilder Brigade monument 
on the battlefield of Chickamauga, the following appears descriptive of 
Captain 1 >ro\\ n : 

"Though not past his majority when he became commanding officer of 
Compam K, Captain Brown was a prudent, careful officer, always rea I 
duty and prompt to perform it. lli^ medical skill proved very valuable to his 
men and man)' a boy of Company K escaped a spell of sickness through the 
careful oversight and wise forethought of his company commander. lie was 
popular with his men, as is evidenced by (he fact that when the regiment 
arrived at Edgefield, Tcnn., on the way home at the close of the war, Com- 
pany K had one hundred and one men on its roll and found twelve recruits 
in camp waiting to join it. 

"Captain Brown is a genial, kind-hearted gentleman, an estimable citizen, 
highly respected by all who know him. He is generous to a fault, and in 
the practice of his profession has been to hundreds of sufferers the kind and 
considerate friend and counselor as well as the patient, skillful, medical at- 
tendant. For his old comrades he always has an open heart and cordial 
greeting, and they all delight to take him by the band and look into his always 
pleasant countenance." 

In October, 1865, Captain Brown entered the Rush Medical College at 
Chicago, and was graduated with high honors from that institution on Janu- 
ary 24, 1866. On February 12, 1866 be put out his sign in Frankfort, and 
he has since continued bis practice ih this city, fn June, 1889, he was ap- 
pointed 011 the Pension Examining Board of Clinton county, and was chosen 
its secretary, and served until September, 1893. In June, 1897, he was again 
appointed, and is still performing his duties on the board. 

On September 20, 1S05 Captain Brown was united in marriage with 
Laura Gentry, of Frankfort. Two children have been born to this union: 
Ada G., who died July r8, 1898, and Walter F. 

Fraternally, our subject is a member of the Masonic Order, being a 
Royal Arch Mason, lie also is a member of the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic. Religiously, be is a Presbyterian, and politically, a Republican. 



400 CLINTON (CI'XTV, INDIANA. 

DAVID S. BRANT. 

As long as histon is studied will the American people revere the heroes, 
who, between the years of 1861 and 1865, fought to keep as one a country 
that threatened to divide for all time. Monuments and fitting ceremonies 
mav celebrate the lives given so freely in those days in the cause of the land, 
but the true appreciation, the lasting one, will be in the thoughts of the 
people, that will be handed down from generation to generation until pos- 
sibly some day they will become a tradition, the recital of which will serve 
as a slogan for our childrens' deed- on the field of honor. The veterans are 
leaving us fast, leaving then Is for us I t upon, but yet ,: are 

manv left, an army of them. In the front ranks will be found one of the 
most honored and respected citizens of Frankfort. He is David S. Brant. 

Mr. Brant was born in Michigan township, Clinton county, January 31, 
1840, the son of Abram L. and Catherine (Wilson) Brant. The father was 
a native of New Jersey, and the mother was born in the state of Ohio. 
Abram Brant came to Clinton county in the early days of 1838, traveling 
overland in covered wagons, and settled in Michigan township where he fol- 
lowed his life-long trade, that of shoemaking. He raised a large family of 
eight children, and four of them still survive. 

In his early life, David Brant was educated in the common schools of 
Clinton county, and after leaving his desk in the school room he took up 
farming in the same county. 

In 1 86 1, when President Lincoln called for volunteers to fight for the 
preservation of the union, David Brant was one of the most eager to re- 
spond. On August 3, 1861, he handed his name to the recruiting officer as a 
member of Company C. Tenth Indiana Infantry. Colonel Mansoh, now fa- 
mous in the annals of Indiana's participation in the struggle, was the com- 
manding officer. The Tenth Regiment was assigned to the Army of the 
Cumberland, and with them went David Brant, participating in the brilliant 
and successful campaign of that division under the command of General 
Thomas. On September 19, 1864. Mr. Brant was mustered out in Indianapo- 
lis. He returned to his farm in Clinton county, and remained there until he 
decided to retire, whereupon, in 1890, he moved to Frankfort and resides 
there now- in comfort and peace. 

The lean and grizzled veteran that trudged hack to Indiana from the 
dust and heat of the army campaign was not to go without reward. A 
sweet-faced Michigan township girl waited patiently, Julia A. Fudge was 
her name, and on November 8, 1865, a year and two months after he was 



gam&d 



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c d a 






W,i * 



• 



{**£&+*&■• - 



DAVID S. BRANT AND FAMILY 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 4OI 

mustered out of the army, Mr. Brant married her. She- was the daughter 
of Moses and Mary (Harshbarger) Fudge. Moses Fudge came to Indiana 
from Rockingham county, Virginia, and the wife came from Ohio in 1833. 
The_\ settled in Michigan township, five miles east of Frankfort. 

To David Brant and wife (here have been born three children: Edward 
Bruce, Warren A., and Mary [Catherine, who is now teaching in Chicago. 

Mr. Brant has ever taken an active interest in the affairs of his com- 
munity, never hesitating to take up any task demanded of him by his fellow 
townsmen and always in a cheerful and willing mood. For three years he 
was drainage commissioner of Frankfort, and performed the duties of his 
office in very creditable manner. Mr. Brant is one of the bulwarks of the 
Grat \nny of the Republic, lending his picturesque and interesting char- 
acter to the aid of bis former comrades. The Progressive party found a 
strong supporter in Mr. Brant, and he bids fair to remain loyal. 



ISAAC fRWIN. 



To have fought in the days of '61, and to have made a record fur bravery 
and devotion to duty, is, in itself, adequate recommendation for a place in a 
volume such as the one in hand. Isaac Irwin's name is on the roster of those 
brave fellows who sacrificed their dearest possessions in order that the Union 
might not be disrupted. However, Air. Irwin's success in life after the close 
of the war would be of sufficient weight to insure permanent record. Mr. 
Irwin has been a hard and unflinching worker and therein lies the secret of his 
prosperity; he has made his own path of roses and has never won any reward 
without an equal expenditure of energy and labor. In Clinton county, Air. 
Irwin is numbered among the besi citizens and his scores of friends will testify 
to bis integrity and high ideals. 

Isaac N. Irwin was born in Center township, Clinton county, August 29, 
1845, and was the son of Robert S. and Rebecca (Gray) Irwin. Robert S. 
Irwin was born in Ross county, ()., January 14, 1818, a son of Samuel and 
Esther (Dean) Irwin. Samuel Irwin was born in Maryland, January 1, 
1782. and was but two years of age when taken to Kentucky, and but a few- 
years later to Ohio. He there grew to maturity and was married in Ross 
county to Esther Dean, who bore fourteen children: Catherine, Abigail, 
Jessup, Mesner, Gustin, |ared William. Samuel K., John. Robert S., Price, 
(26) 



402 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Asa, Nancv f., and lames L.j all o\ whom were burn in Ross count}', ( ). In 
1829, the parents of Robert S, Irwin came to Indiana and settled in Mont- 
gomery county, win re the father died on August rS, [834, in the Presbyterian 
faith, the mother surviving until January 27, 1865. 

Robert S. Irwin was reared to manhood in Montgomery county, Ind., 
and there made his home until he reached his majority. ITe then attended 
school in Jefferson county, and taught for three years in Tippecanoe and 
Clinton counties and elsewhere; then in 1843 he rented a farm in Clinton 
county, on which he resided as a tenant for six years. In 1850, he bought a 
farm of eighty acres of excellent land, in Twelve Aide Prairie, on which he 
lived until 1802. ' hen he came to the city to live, m account of the great 
convenience of natural gas, although he was yet the owner of two hundred 
and forty acres of land. On September 24, i8j.o, Robert Irwin was married 
to Rebecca Grav, who was born in Hamilton county. Ohio, a daughter of 
Tohn and Sarah (Douglas) Gray. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Irwin was 
blessed with the following children: Sarah M. Boyd, John S. (deceased), 
Isaac, Samuel, Rebecca (deceased), Jane Rail and Robert \Y. The mother of 
these children died December 5. 1855. In 1856 Mr. Irwin was remarried, 
his second wife being Elizabeth M. Smiley, who was the mother of the follow- 
ing children: Mary YYaite, Elizabeth, (deceased), Rosa Gentry, William 
(deceased) and Clara Ward. Mrs. Irwin died April 13. 1878. Robert S. 
Irwin was a Republican in politics and served two terms as township trustee 
and as justice of the peace four years. By occupation he was a farmer and 
his career was marked by a succession of useful acts to his fellow citizens and 
home community. He died on the sixteenth of February, 1895. 

On Washington's birthday in the year 1864 Mr. Irwin enlisted in Com- 
pany G, Eleventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served until August 9. 1S65. 
He' was in the Federal army under command of the famous Gen. Phil 
Sheridan, and went through the Shenandoah Valley, participating in the battle 
of Newmarket. Virginia, on May 15, 1864, when the Federals under General 
Sigel were defeated ^Winchester, Virginia, on September 19, 1864, when 
Schoheld's soldiers downed the rebels: Dinwiddie's courthouse, March 31, 
1865, federal victory; and Cedar Creek, Virginia, in October, 1864. Mr. 
Irwin was with Sheridan at the time that courageous general made his famous 
ride to rallv his routed troops. Although Mr. Irwin's term of service was 
short, enough action and excitement was crowded into the time to make up for 
the vcars he missed. 

After the war Mr. Irwin came back to Clinton county and farmed until 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 4O3 

1870, then entered the profession of school teaching. He continued suc- 
cessfully in this vocation until thirty-three years had passed, running the 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres at the same time, fie won a reputation 
for thriftiness and industry during these years, and made a good start toward 
the independence that is now his. In 1904 he moved to the city of Frank- 
fort and entered the real estate, rental, loan and insurance business, pursued 
that successfully for several years and is now listed as an exclusive pen-ion 
attorney. In this latter capacity, Mr. Irwin has prosecuted over two hun- 
dred and fifty cases and has been successful in most of them, as is proved by 
his constantly increasing business. Mr. Irwin, of course, belongs to the 
Grand Army of the Republic, and is one of the most able supporters of the 
encampment of his membership. In politics he is a staunch Republican, and 
religiously, is a Presbyterian. J_4:90i«2U4 

In August, 1866, Mr. Irwin was married to Rebecca J. Ball, a native of 
this countv. Their married life extended over a period of twenty years and 
then, in July, 1886, Mrs. Irwin was called to her death. Six children were 
born of this union: Everett F., a Hendricks county school teacher; Robert 
M., a stenographer at Indianapolis; Charles L., a stenographer at Columbus, 
Ind. ; Elizabeth, the wife of C. H. Flillis; and two others who are deceased. 
On August 15, 1888, Mr. Irwin was married the second lime, to Eliza M. 
Brookie, also a native of Clinton county. One child has been born of this 
union, Flossie L., a graduate of DePauw University and a teacher of Latin 
and English in the Scircleville high school. She is now living at home. 



OWEN E. BRUMBAUGH. 

It is not an easy task to give adequate description of the character of a 
man \ ho has led an eminently active and busy life in connection with the 
great legal profession and who has stamped his individuality on the plane 
of definite accomplishment in one of the most exacting fields of human 
endeavor. However, there is great satisfaction and much pride in adverting 
even in this cursory manner to the career of Owen E. Brumbaugh, one of 
the most able, conscientious and honored workers in the legal profession of 
Clinton countv, and one of the most conspicuous men of Frankfort. In 
civic life he has been prominent, and he has held the unqualified esteem of 
his fellow citizens since his entrance into the business life of the city. The 
fact that Mr. Brumbaugh has been honored with the highest public office in 



4°4 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the power of the city is sufficient proof of his able services and reputation of 

merit. 

Owen E. Brumbaugh was bom on his father's farm near the town of 
Rossville, Clinton county, Indiana, and is the eldest child of John W. and 
Martha (Kanable) Brumbaugh. 

John W. Brumbaugh, the father of our subject, was born near the 
village of Union, Montgomery count}', Ohio, and his mother, Martha Kana- 
ble, was a native of the state of Pennsylvania, She died, however, when 
our subject was less than four years of age, leaving him, his father, and his 
sister, Amanda, who is now the wife of John W. Myler, of Lebanon South 
Dakota. John W. Brumbaugh followed the trade of a carpenter, and many 
residences and other structures still stand in Clinton county that were con- 
structed by him. He was a self-made man and had considerable influence in 
his community. He was married the second time to Amanda D. Neher, and of 
this union the following children were born: Eliza A.. Susan C, Dennis 
M.. Jacob A., and Martha". In the year 1872 the father, with all of his chil- 
dren, moved to Illinois, settling near the town of Cerro Gordo, and there 
died in 1874. John W. Brumbaugh led and believed in an honorable and in- 
dustrious life, and his years were replete with beneficence properly bestowed. 
Owen Brumbaugh grew to manhood on his father's farm, working 
there and attending the common schools. At the age of seventeen he began 
teaching and continued in the smaller schools until the year 1875, when he 
accepted better employment in the intermediate and high school depart- 
ments of the Frankfort city schools. His own education was obtai ied in 
the country schools, as mentioned before; in the Frankfort normal schools, 
under the instruction of Prof. E. H. Staley; at the academy in Ladoga, 
Indiana, under Prof. M. B. Hopkins; at Salem College, Bourbon, Indiana, 
and at the Bryant and Stratton Business College of Indianapolis. 

Although he had made a success of his pedagogic efforts, Mr. Brum- 
baugh treasured the ambition to enter the legal profession, and utilized every 
opportunity to study the fundamental principles of the law. It was while 
engaged in teaching in the Frankfort schools that he entered the law office 
of Doyal & Gard. where he rapidly gained the prestige and experience that 
led to his being admitted to the Clinton County Bay in 1877, of which he has 
been a member ever since. 

His own practice commenced in 1878, when he was elected city attor- 
ney of Frankfort. His work has been decidedly active since that time, hav- 
ing practiced in the circuit, appellate, supreme and federal courts of In- 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. -l°5 

diana and also in the courts of adjoining stales. His practice has been a 
o-eneral one, including civil, probate and criminal cases, and, to Ins credit, it 
must be said that be has won the great majority of cases which he has en- 
tered. Consequently, his client, have the greatest confidence m his ability 
and do not hesitate to repose their full trust in his legal skill. 

Mr Brumbaugh, during the lasl twelve years, has been honored more 
than once with public office. As city attorney, president of the school board 
and as mayor of the city, he has given his constituents and patrons the bene- 
fit of bis hardest efforts. He has a b , devoted much of his time to municipal 
la* and municipal affair, and has successfully waged and won many legal 
controversies for the , i; of Fr; In 1896 Mr. Brumbaugh wa= 

mated E6r judge of the Clinton circuit court by the Republican party, with 
which be always affiliated, but together with his colleagues on the ticket, 
was defeated by force of the demand of the voters of. that tune for the free 
coinage of silver at tl ratio of sixteen to one, as proposed by the platform 
of the Democratic party. 

Mr Brumbaugh was married March 22, 1877, to Mary E. Magee, 
daughter of William and Jane Magee. Four children were born to them, 
namely: Ethel M., married to Charles E. Cooper, now farming in Texas; 
Jessie' Jean, married to William K. Sproule, Jr., cashier of National City 
Bank of Indianapolis; Olive H, at home, librarian at Frankfort and John 
N., who died at the age of five years. Mr. Brumbaugh is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



CARL WHISLER SIMS. 



Although a young man, Carl Whisler Sims fills a large place in the pub- 
lic eye and in business circles has earned a name and reputation far exceed- 
ing those of many men of greater age and wider experience in his special 
fietd of endeavor: He is a Hoosier by birth and a son of John T. and 
Malissa (Whisler) Sims, both representatives of well known families and of 
high social and moral standing in Clinton county, where for a number of 
years they have made their home. 

Carl Whisler Sims was born at Forest, Indiana, August 1 1882, and 
after finishing the common school course entered the Frankfort High School 
from which he was graduated with an honorable record as a diligent and 



406 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

capable student in [901. Subsequently he pursued the higher brandies of 
learning for two years in Hanover College and on leaving that institution 
began the struggle of life for himself in the grain business at Cyclone, 
Indiana, where he soon gained the confidence of the people and built up a 
lucrative patronage. After two years in the latter town he sold out and 
purchased the Monon Elevator, south of Frankfort, where he remained for 
a period of two years, when he disposed of the property and removed to 
Oakland, Indiana, where he bought an elevator and for one year conducted 
a very safe and satisfactory trade in grain. At the expiration of the time 
indicated he engaged in the same hue of business at Frankfort with his 

. under the name of the "J. '!'. Sims Grain Company," which partner- 
ship lasted until 191 1, when the subject purchased the enterprise and became 
sole proprietor, a position he has since retained. 

Since becoming the head of the concern, Mr. Sims has greatly enlarged 
and improved the plant with a corresponding increase in the business and 
now has an elevator with a capacity of 25,000 bushels and a mill which 
turns out 150 barrels of flour per day, besides dealing extensively in all 
kinds of grain and seeds and commanding a patronage second in magnitude 
and importance to no other establishment of the kind in his part of the state. 
He gives employment to an average of nine men throughout the year and 
his mill is taxed to its utmost capacity to meet the large and growing demand 
for his special brand of "Imperial Flour," which is noted for its excellence 
and has an extensive sale in both local and general markets, much being 
shipped to the larger trade centers throughout Indiana and other states. 

Mr. Sims is essentially a business man and as such occupies a com- 
mendable standing among his contemporaries and with the general public. 
He is likewise a man of action, actively interested in all that makes for the 
growth and betterment of his city and county and to a marked degree enjoys 
the esteem and confidence of his fellow men. Conserative and steadfast in 
his convictions, progressive in his ideas, liberal in the support of all worthy 
enterprises, and firm in his friendships, he is one of the most valuable and all- 
round citizens of Frankfort, an estimate in which all who know him will 
freely and cheerfully concur. Mr. Sims' first vote was cast for the Republi- 
can party, of which he has since been an earnest advocate and zealous sup- 
porter. In religion be is a Methodist and endeavors so to live that his daliy 
actions and influence will exemplify the beauty and worth of a living faith 
when practically applied to the affairs of man. lie is a Mason of high stand- 
ing, having risen to the thirty-second degree in that ancient and honorable 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 4°7 

fraternity, besides being a Sir Knight and an active member of the Benevo- 
lent and'Protective Order of Elks. He has a beautiful and attractive home 
in Frankfort, the presiding spirit of which is an intelligent and popular lady 
of excellent character and social standing who bore the maiden name of 
Florence Richey and to whom the subject was united m marriage June, 
m, i Mrs Sims, like her husband, is a native of the Hoosier state, having 
been bom in Scircleville, Clinton county, September 10, 1882. 



STEPHEN B. SIMS, M. D. 

Doctor Stephen B. Sims is a native of the city in which he reside, and 
a son of Cicero and Mary Caroline Sims. The mother previous to her mar- 
riage having borne the family name of Black, whose family sketch appears 
upon another page of this work. 

Doctor Sims was born May 15, l86x. He was reared in he place of 
his birth and after finishing the usual graded school course entered theh rank- 
fort high school, from which he was graduated with the class of 1878. 
Having early manifested a decided preference for the medical profession, he 
began his preliminary study of the same in the office of Drs. Cox and Adams, 
under whose direction he continued until entering Rush Medical College 
Chicago, Illinois, where he made creditable record as a fa.lhiu and diligent 
student and from which he received the degree of M. D. m the year 1884. 
Mediately following his graduation he began the practice o his profession 
at Frankfort with Doctor Knapp, one of the most successful men , of his 
calling in Clinton county, but at the expiration of one year severed his con- 
nection with his partner and during the ensuing seven years built up a large 
and lucrative professional business of his own. In 1892 he again became 
"ed with Doctor Knapp and the firm thus constituted lasted seven 
Irs since which time Dr. Sims has been in the practice alone and. as aP 
Sv indicated, is now one of the representative men of his profession ,n 

' "tor Sims' domestic life dates from May 8. 1888, when he was united 
in marriage with Miss Agnes M. Miner, of Frankfort who ^oved a 
wife and judicious helpmate, and who bore him one child, a daughtei Mar) 
I a gradate of St. Joseph Academy. Tipton, Indiana, and one ote in- 
telligent and popular young ladies in the city of her residence. Ihc hist 



40S CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mrs. Sims died in the year 1003. and subsequently, in 19116, he chose a 
second wife and companion in the person of Mrs. Sarah Guernsey. 

Politically, he is a Republican, and fraternally, belongs to the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks and Masonic order. 



JOSEPH ETHERTON HILLIS. 

In placing' the name of the late Joseph K liillis in the front rank of 
Clinton county's business men of a past generation, simple justio is done 
to a biographical fact, universally recognized throughout this section of 
the state by those at all familiar with his history. A man of rare sound- 
ness of judgment, wise discretion and business ability of a high order, lie 
managed, with tactful success, important enterprises, and so impressed his 
individuality upon the community as to gain recognition among its leading 
citizens and public-spirited men of affairs. What of the man and what of his 
work? This is the dual query which represents the interrogation at least 
nominally entertained whenever that discriminating factor, the public, would 
pronounce on,the true worth of the individual. The career of Mr. liillis 
indicates the clear-cut, sane and distinct character, and in reviewing the same 
from' an unbiased and unprejudiced standpoint, interpretation follows fact 
in a straight line of derivation. In this publication it is consistent that such 
a review be entered, and that without the adulation of ornate phrases. The 
city of Frankfort naturally takes pride in the work performed by Mr. Hillis, 
who stamped the mark of definite acomplishment on the highest plane of 
industrial activity, and consistently demands that he be given due relative 
precedence in a work which has to do with those who have lived and labored 
to good purpose in the great commonwealth of Indiana in times that are past, 
and thence permeated the great industrial and civic life of the nation in 
which he stood well to the forefront in representative citizenship, even if his 
career was such as to gain him no more tban a state reputation. His history 
and that of the latter-day progress of Clinton county is so indissolubly 
interwoven that they are pretty much one and the same, for he lived to see 
and lake a leading part in the upbuilding of the county and city of his choice, 
and during the years in which lie honored this locality with his residence 
no man stood higher in public esteem. 

Joseph E. Hillis, banker, financier and business man, who for more tban 
thirty years, had been a prominent figure in the commercial life of the 



f ^J^l/^ 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 4^9 

locality of which this history treats, and had succeeded well in his many 
and diversified enterprises, his own prosperity adding material advancement 
to the city and county along many lines of progress, was born near Madison, 
Jefferson county, Indiana, September jo, 1840. He received limited educa- 
tional advantages, and he began his business career when quite a young 
man and at eighteen was a general merchant at Michigantown. His next 
venture was at Zions\ ille, where he conducted the same lines of business as at 
Michigantown, success attending him at both places. His marriage to Jennie 
E. Avery, a lady of culture and refinement, look place at Zionsville, March 
19, 1872, and in the spring of the following year he came to Frankfort and 
with Elwood Avery engaged in tlu ,rocery business on quite an cxi 
scale on the west side of the public square. After disposing of that business 
Mr. Hillis was one of the organizers of the R. P. Shanklin & Company, 
wholesale grocery house. He remained in this business until his death. 
He also assisted in the organization of the Clinton County Bank, and was its 
president when he died. Its large success and widespread prestige in the 
financial world of northern Indiana was due for the most part in his 
perserverance, wise discrimination and sterling honesty in the management 
of its affairs. He was also interested in many other business ventures in 
Frankfort, all of which have prospered and increased his earnings and he 
was rated as one of the city's wealthiest men. He was deserving of a great 
deal of credit for what he accomplished alone and often in the face of 
obstacles that would have crushed the man of less heroic mettle, and all 
this along perfectly legitimate lines of endeavor. He owned one of the most 
attractive and modemly appointed homes in the county, which was always 
regarded by his many friends as a place of old-time hospitality and good 

cheer. 

Success came to Joseph E. Hillis as it does not come to everybody, and 
in the city where he had carved out the greater part of his fortune his was an 
honored name. Like others who have succeeded, he found that there 
is no sentiment in business, and while he at all times followed the rules of 
established ethics in his relations with his fellow men, both in a business 
and social way, he frequently stepped aside in his career to help others who 
needed encouragement and advice. And his assistance did not always consist 
of words. There are many men in Frankfort who can tell how they were 
started in business by Mr. Hillis and families who can bear testimony to 
his leniency in their efforts to acquire a place which they could call home. 

Death came to Mr. Hillis without warning, while at his place of business 
in the wholesale house mentioned above in Frankfort, on Monday, September 



4io 



CLINTON* COUNTY, INDIANA. 



2y, [904. He had been in apparently good health and was attending to 
business matters up to the very moment when stricken down. Interment 
was made in beautiful Green Lawn cemetery. 

Surviving Mr. Hillis is his widow. Their only child, Chalmers II.. a 
young man who seemed to have inherited many of his father's sterling 
virtues, especially in a business way. died June 14. 1913. A memoir appears 
elsewhere. Two sisters, Mrs. Buchanan and Mrs. O'Neil, both residing 
near Madison, Intl., survive our subject, and two brothers, Frank Hillis, of 
Logansport and Paul Hillis, of Kokomo, Ind. 

Personally, Mr. Hillis was a gentleman of pleasing and courteous ad- 
dress, his earnestness and candor, diplomacy and kindness never failing to 
make a deep impression on all with whom he came into contact and he in 
every way deserved the high esteem in which be was held by all who knew 
him. 



WILLIAM FRANK BURROUGHS. 

It seems that there is no start in life which so well prepares a man for 
his future career, no matter what he may choose to follow, as the boyhood 
years spent on the farm ; this is not strange to the contemplative mind, for in 
the first place the boy reared next to nature, to the fresh soil, surrounded by 
the clear air and amidst the growing, blooming vegetation, will be stronger 
physically and mentally than his city bred brother; and all will agree that 
health is the first prerequisite in the chase for success in this world. Many a 
man has bee handicapped, submerged and defeated because of lack of it. 
Another thing, the farmer boy knows few of the temptations that lead to 
ruin which the citv boy has to combat almost from the very cradle; the 
former uses his energy in wrestling with the plow, the unbroken colt, the 
quick-growing sprouts, and many other things in his every-day life, while 
all this pent-up energy of the city lad must seek outlet in various channels, 
so he gets into trouble or at least neglects to properly direct his energies in 
life's affairs and when manhood comes he is left behind by his stronger and 
more self-reliant, self-assured country contemporary. 

One of Clinton county's worthy young men who sprang from the rural 
districts is the present efficient deputy county clerk. William Frank Bur- 
roughs, who was born in Jefferson township. Boone county, Indiana, on a 
farm June 25, 1875. He is a son of John Henry and Mary Adaline (Carter) 
Burroughs. "The father was born September 30. 1813, on a farm which his 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 411 

father had entered from the government in the early settlement of this state 
and which is located in Franklin township, Montgomery county. The pater- 
nal grandparents of the suhject of this review were Uriel and Leannah 
(Bramblett) Burroughs. Uriel Burroughs was a descendant of an early 
Virginia family, his progenitors having emigrated to the Old Dominion dur- 
ing the great Cromwell's reign in England, and from that remote period to 
the present the name Burroughs has been a more or less prominent one in 
Virginia. Members of this old family have proven themselves to be genu- 
inely American in spirit and patriotism, and their names are to be found on 
the roster: of our armies in all our wars some of them having won distinc- 
tion as soldiers in the Revolutionary war. 

Uriel Burroughs left his home on the Atlantic seaboard in the year 
1813 and, with other westward-looking frontiersmen of that time, plunged 
into the wilderness and kept his course toward the setting sun until he reach- 
ed Scott county, Kentucky, and in 1826 moved to Montgomery county. In- 
diana, where, being attracted by the richness of the soil and the general 
beauty of the landscape and having the sagacity to foresee a great future for 
the Wabash county, he decided to establish the future home of the family 
here, and he accordingly entered wild land from the government, selecting a 
fine tract in what is now Franklin township. He was a man of courage and 
grit, one whom hardships had little to appall, so he soon had the heavy tim- 
ber cleared away and young crops growing. He prospered with advancing 
years and became one of the leading general farmers of that section of the 
country and there he spent the residue of his days, living there some forty- 
four years, passing to his rest in 1869. His wife, who shared with him the 
hardships and privations of a life on the then frontier of American civiliza- 
tion, was a Kentuckian by birth. Her death occurred in 1848. She pre- 
ceded her husband to the grave many years. The subject of this sketch is 
still in possession of the old rifle carried by his grandfather Burroughs, 
which he used in killing all kinds of wild game in the pioneer days. It is of 
the ancient hammered barrel type. Politically, Uriel Burroughs was a Demo- 
crat, and in religious matters a Baptist. He is remembered as a plain, honest, 
hard-working man, neighborly and hospitable. 

John II. Burroughs, father of our subject, grew to manhood on the 
home farm. Being the son of a pioneer, he found plenty of hard work to do 
as soon as he became of proper age, and he worked on the home place during 
his boyhood, attending the neighborhood schools during the brief winter 
months, receiving such educational advantages as was common in the country 



4 12 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

during that early period. lie turned his attention to general farming and 
stock raising when :. young man and continued to follow these lines with 
ever continued success until ;i few years ago, when, having accumulated a 
competency, he retired from active work and is now spending his old age in 
quiet, maintaining a comfortable residence at Shannondale, Montgomery 
county. His wife, known in her maidenhood as Mary Adaline Carter, was 
horn in Owen county. Indiana. March 3, 1855. and there spent her child- 
hood, and she and Mr. Burroughs were married in the year 1873. After 
only five year-; of happy married life she was summoned to her eternal rest 
50, 1878, when Willis Burroughs, our subject, was three rears 

old. She was buried at the villagi of Shannondale, Montgomcr county. 
Besides our subject one other chil'd was born to John II. Burroughs and 
wife, Clifford O., whose birth occurred on November 3, 1876. He died on 
April 18, 1904, when nearly twenty-eight years of age. The father of these 
children is a Democrat, but he has never been a public man. devoting his at- 
tention to his farming industry and his home. He is well known and well 
liked in his vicinity. 

William F. Burroughs grew to manhood on the home farm, as already 
indicated, and he did his share of the work there when a boy. He was given 
excellent educational advantages. After passing through the public schools 
of his home community he attended the Valpariso Normal School, at Val- 
pariso, Indiana, later attending Wabash College at Crawfordsville for one 
term. He had taken a general literary course, preparing himself for a teach- 
er, and after leaving school he followed that line of endeavor for a period of 
sixteen years in Montgomery and Clinton counties, where he won an envied 
reputation as an educator and during which period his services were in great 
demand in both the counties named, part of his teaching having been done 
in the latter county. For ten years lie was principal of the schools at Colfax, 
giving eminent satisfaction, as his long retention in that important position 
would indicate. He did , splendid work in building up the schools at that 
place and was popular with both pupils and patrons. He was progressive in 
his methods and kept fully abreast of the times in all that pertained to his 
work. Finally tiring of the monotony of the school room and taking an 
active interest in public affairs he became deputy clerk in the office of the 
circuit court January 1, 1912. the duties of which he is discharging at this 
writing in a highly acceptable manner. 

Politically, Mr. Burroughs is* a Democrat and has ever been loyal to the 
party of his ancestors. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 413 

Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic order, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Subordinat< and the Kncampment degrees, and is also a mem- 
ber of the Modern Woodmen at America 

Mr. Burroughs was married on August 12, 1903, to Nellie G. Hampton, 
who was born in Sugar Creek township, Montgomery county, Indiana, in 
October, 18S1. She grew to womanhood there and received a good educa- 
tion in the public schools. She is a daughter of Morgan and Amanda 
Hampton, both of whom were children of early settlers in Montgomery 
county. 

Two children hav been born to Mr, and Mrs Burroughs, John II., jr., 
who is attending school, and William M., the yoi 



I. M. CUE. 



Among the farmers of Clinton county, Tsaiah Marion Cue has been one 
of the most prosperous and intelligent. It may be said that he was born to 
the high calling of agricultural pursuits. His grandfather, William Cue, 
tilled the soil in Ohio, and his father, Lewis Cue, farmed in Indiana. Rut 
the subject of this sketch, Isaiah M. Cue, was not bounded in his ambition 
by the horizon of the farm. He gave his attention to local politics, and in 
time became one of the most astute politicians of Clinton count}-. 

In recognition of his merit and special adaptability, Isaiah M. Cue w ? as 
honored by his fellow citizens in 1910 with election to the office of county 
clerk. He polled the full strength of the Democratic party, and owing to his 
peculiar fitness for the office was given quite generous support by the mem- 
bers of other parties. This confidence time has proved was not misplaced, 
as Mr. Cue is easily one of the most faithful and efficient incumbents that 
the county clerk's office has ever had. Tie is thoroughly modern and up-to- 
date in his methods, and from his term will dale a new era in despatching 
the county's business. He is one of the men identified with the progress of 
his county. 

Tsaiah M. Cue was born November 11, 1855, near Michigantown, In- 
diana, the son of Lewis and Sarah (Floyd) )Cuc. TTe is of the old Buck- 
eye stock, his father having been born in Clinton county, Ohio, February 
11, 1817, and his grandfather hailing from the same stale. This carries him 
back in direct genealogy to the carl)- days of the government, the most 
momentous in many respects in all history. A notable incident in the family 



4I4 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

history is that William Cue, the grandfather, lived to be eighty years of 
age and was then killed by the falling of a dec. When Lewis Cue, the father 
of Isaiah, was fifteen years of age, his mother died, and in 1853 he moved 
from Ohio to Clinton county, Iowa, and subsequently returned to Clinton 
count)', Indiana, where he became a land owner and prosperous farmer, his 
death occurring in November, 1883. He married Sarah Floyd in Ohio, and 
five of eight children were horn to them there. The place of her birth was 
Clinton county, Ohio, and that of her death Clinton county, Indiana. She 
was horn June 15, [818. 

Isaiah M. Cue was given a common school education and put to work- 
on his father'.- Earn Thus he was given, in the judgment of economists 
and philosophers, the best possible equipment for a satisfactory and prosper- 
ous career. And he has proved the soundness of such judgment. On No- 
vember 20, 1883, he was married to Loretta E. King, who was born in Tip- 
ton county, Indiana, April 30, 1861. Four children are the fruit of this 
union. Carl, the eldest, is deputy clerk to his father; Oral is engaged at 
farm work, while Merle and Edith attend school. 

Mr. Cue is among the foremost Democratic politicians of Clinton county 
and is a stanch member of the Methodist church. In both political and re- 
ligious circles he is by common consent a leader, and such is the character 
of his leadership that it inspires the utmost confidence in those who follow 
it. He is one of those representative men whose intellectual attainments and 
benefactions immortalize them in county and state history. 



SAMUEL H. THOMPSON. 

Indiana sent many of her sons to the great struggle of 1861 to 18G5, and 
many of them did not return, nor is it known where their unmarked grave is 
placed. Nothing but the memory of the happy, youthful face that marched 
away is left for those who knew him. Others did return, covered with 
laurels, and today arc a reality, wells of information and interest, and their 
place in the hearts of their countrymen is secure and hallowed. The subject 
of this sketch was a soldier with an enviable record, and his presence today in 
the ranks of the living veterans is one of pride, merit and courage. 

Samuel II. Thompson put his birth date September 13, 1838, and the 
place Kirklin township, Clinton county, Indiana. Fie was the son of John 
M. and Ann (Holliday) Thompson, natives of the stale of Ohio. John 
Thompson was born on the first day of the nineteenth century in Clinton 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 415 

county, Ohio. The mother, Ann Holliday, was also born in Ohio, and in that 
state married Mr. Thompson. Soon after their marriage they moved to 
Indiana and settled in Clinton county, where the father began farming and 
was very >u< i essful. ! Hiring his life John Thompson was a Whig by politics, 
and on the formation of the Republican party he joined forces with them. 
Mr. Thompson was the father of twelve children: Sidney, Mary, Dclina, 
Joselia, and Robert, all deceased; Jane: Samuel; Manda; Sarah; John (de- 
ceased) ; Eliza; and Milford (deceased). 

Samuel Thompson received his education in a log school house with 
greased paper windows. After the war, on August 5, 187S, Mr. Thompson 
was married to Florence Kelly, a Clinton county girl, the daughter of Henry 
and Ann (Harley) Kelly. She was called by death in the year 1881. Two 
children were born to her: Ora H., born in 1879, died in 1896; Lenora M., 
born February 12, r88i, now married to William E. Burgis, of Kirklin, Ind. 
She also has two children, Florence and Mildred. 

Samuel II. Thompson began life with hard work on a farm and he con- 
tinued in this occupation until August 1, 1862. At that time the heat of the 
war reached him. Pie was engaged in the blacksmithing trade at the time and 
immediate!)' he dropped his tools and started for the front. On September 
4, 1862, he enlisted in Company A, Eighty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
under the command of Captain Gorham. During his service with this troop, 
Mr. Thompson smelt the smoke of many of the more important engagements, 
including Missionary Ridge and Chickamauga. He was with William 
Tecumseh Sherman on the famous march below Atlanta but when the army 
was divided he was sent back to join Hood. Later he was made a corporal 
of the twenty-third corps and sent back to Tennessee to take charge of his 
command. From there he participated in many smaller battles in and around 
Nashville, one being the conflict at Franklin. For a time he was on the sick 
list, but after recovering he joined forces again at Pulaski, Term. Again he 
suffered illness and he was returned to Nashville to mend. His next service 
began at Huntsville, Tenn., and he continued then without interruption. Mr. 
Thompson was honorably discharged at Knoxville, Tenn., June 6, 1865. and 
was later mustered out at Indianapolis, Ind. 

After the surrender of Lee at Appomattox, Mr. Thompson went into the 
merchandise business at Kirklin, Ind. and remained in it for about twenty 
years. In 1885, he gave up his interests in the merchant line and until 1895 
lived a retired life. Then he became active again, this time in the insurance 
business and has continued thus ever since. He was appointed postmaster 
of Kirklin, Ind., under President William P>. McKinley in September, 1898, 



416 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

and served eight and one-half years in that capacity, to the gratification and 
esteem of his friends. 

Mr. Thompson owns a palatial and comfortahle home in Kirklin, and 

frequently entertains his many friends. He is a member of the Free and 
Accepted Masons and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, both lodges at 

Kirklin. Mr. Thompson saw lit to change politically in 191 2, and he cast 
his lot with the Progressive party. 



CHALMERS HAYDEN HILLIS. 

That man lives not to himself alone, as stated long ago, is an assurance 
that is amply verified in all the affairs of life, but its pertinence is the more 
patent in those instances where persons have so employed their inherent 
talents, so improved their opportunities, and so marshalled their forces as to 
gain prestige which finds its angle of influence ever broadening in practical 
beneficence and human helpfulness. He whose productive activities are 
directed along legitimate and normal lines is by very virtue of that fact 
exerting a force which conserves human progress and prosperity, and the 
man of capacity for business affairs of importance finds himself an involun- 
tary steward upon whom devolves large responsibilities. To the extent that 
he appreciates these duties and responsibilities and proves faithful in his 
stewardship does he also contribute to the well being of the world in which 
he moves. The late Chalmers Ilayden Hillis, for a number of years one 
of the best known and most successful business men of Clinton county, 
was essentially a man who "did things" and this accomplishment was alto- 
gether worthy in all lines in which he directed his energies. As a man of 
ability, sturdy integrity and usefulness, and as a citizen representative of 
the utmost loyalty he merited the highest consideration of his fellow men, and 
his life record is eminently deserving of a place in this publica- 
tion, which touches those who have given to and sustained the civic and 
material progress and prosperity ami precedence of the city of Frankfort and 
adjacent country and therefore the state of Indiana. As was said at the 
death of the great Corsican, "His race was short, but it was useful, success- 
ful, brilliant," and when the Reaper, whose name is Death, gathered him in 
with the relentless scythe which spares neither "the flowers nor the bearded 
grain" all knew that the county bad sustained an irreparable loss. 

Mr. Hillis was born in Frankfort, Ind., May 25, 1876, the only child 
of Joseph Etherton Hillis and Jennie E. (Avery) Hillis. The father, who 
passed away in 1904, was for over three decades one of the leading business 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 4 1 7 

men of Clinton county, successful as a hanker, financier and merchant and 
a iv. n who did much to encourage the material and civic growth of the 
locality. He was born on September 26, [840, near Madison, Jefferson 
county, Ind. He was a son of Hiram and Louise (Etherton) Ilillis. He 
was reared on the home farm and received a common school education. He- 
began his business career unusually early. Leaving his native county he came 
to Michigantown and worked for R. S. Benfield in the general merchandise 
business, and, having a quick, plastic mind he soon mastered the ins and outs 
of the business and started a store of his own when only a boy. He and 
Elwood Avery conducted a store in Michigantown for some time, also in 
Zionsville. Finally 1< . ing in Frankfort he formed a partnership with 
R. P. Shanklin in the wholesale grocery business which he continued until 
his death. He was also president of the Clinton County Bank which he 
helped organize and was largely interested in many other lines of endeavor. 
A further sketch of his life and character will be found on another page of 
this A'olume 

During his early life Chalmers II. Hillis attended the public schools in 
Frankfort, and later attended Purdue University at Lafayette, Ind., also a 
business college at Danville, 111., making a splendid record for scholarship 
in all. Like his father he entered business early, being still in his teens when 
he took a position in the Clinton County Bank, holding the position of book- 
keeper there for many years, discharging his duties in the most careful and 
faithful manner. At the death of his father about nine years ago he was 
advanced to the position of assistant cashier, which he held to the entire- 
satisfaction of the officers of the bank, the board of directors and patrons 
of the institution. Several 3'cars ago he retired from the bank, resigning 
his position to give his time to the management of his personal affairs, which 
occupied a greater part of his time. He finally associated himself with W. G. 
Slagle and purchased the Lahr hotel at Lafayette, but disposed of his in- 
terest in the business about a year prior to his death. 

Mr. Hillis was popular among the young men of Frankfort and was a 
member of Frankfort Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, in 
which he was an active worker. Of his many good traits, one of his most 
characteristic was his devotion to his mother. He was of a nature that held 
him close to his home and his mother and he was happiest when in her com- 
pany. The two were almost inseparable, and his death was a severe blow- 
to the mother, equally as devoted to the son as he to her. He was of a 
jovial, genial disposition and made friends witli all with whom he came in 
contact. He had a personality that was pleasing and none knew him but 
(27) 



418 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

to esteem him. ITe was a young man with all the world and a bright future 
before him, and his passing away caused general regret and sadness in his 
city and county. He had been in declining health for over a year and had 
visited Southern California in the hope of being benefited, but returned to 
his home city in the spring of 1913, where he grew worse until the end 
which came on Saturday, June 14, 1013. He had remained unmarried. 



ROY AARON GHERE. 



The subject of this sketch is a fine example of the successful business 
man who, with a well defined purpose in life, overcomes all obstacles and In- 
consecutive effort, well balanced judgment and perseverance finally wins his 
way to independence and honor. Endowed by nature with keen practical 
intelligence, force of character and the courage of his convictions, he has 
filled with credit the various positions to which called from time to time and 
while still a young man became a forceful factor among his fellow- citizens 
and attained a standing of influence in the community second to that of few 
of his contemporaries. 

Roy Aaron Ghere, one of the leading business men of Frankfort, is a 
native of the city honored by his residence and a descendant of one of the 
old and prominent pioneer families of Clinton county. His ancestors were 
Pennsylvanians and among the intelligent and respected people of the county 
in which they long resided. His great-grandparents, David and Sarah Ghere, 
both natives of the Keystone state, migrated to Indiana in an early day and 
settled southeast of Frankfort, where David entered a large tract of public 
land from which he cleared and developed a fine farm, where he and his 
good wife lived after the usual pioneer customs until their respective deaths, 
which occurred some time prior to the late Civil war. In addition to culti- 
vating the soil he was a skillful blacksmith, and the shop which he estab- 
lished on his farm was among the first industries of the kind in the county 
and appears to have been well patronized not only by the citizens of his own 
community, but by those who lived in other and distant parts. 

Among the children of David and Sarah Ghere was a son, Aaron, 
whose birth occurred at Pottstown. Pennsylvania, in 1832. and who. when 
a mere child, accompanied his parents to Clinton county, where he grew up 
amid pioneer surroundings and took an active part in the development of the 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 410 

section of country in which he lived He was reared to agricultural pur- 
suits and in due time became nol onh a successful farmer, but also a very 
capable blacksmith, the shop be operated for a number nf years having stood 
on the site now occupied by the Methodist Episcopal church. 

After a useful life of sixty-two years Aaron Ghere was gathered to bis 
fathers, dying in 1804. bis wife, Elizabeth, having preceded him to the other 
world in the year 1854. 

William If. Ghere. son of the above parents and the honored father of 
the subject of this review, was born in Clinton county August 21, 1849, 
and, like so manv of his ancestor- obtained his livelihood by cultivating the 
soil. He followed that vocation witr success and profit until accumulating a 
sufficiency of the world's goods to enable him to retire, following which he 
was induced to become superintendent of the county infirmary, a position be 
filled with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of the public for a period 
of eight years, resigning the charge in 1901 and moving to Indianapolis, 
where he now resides. In politics be has long been an active worker in the 
Republican party and fraternally, holds membership with the Independent 
Order of Red Men and the Order of Maccabees, in both of which be has 
from time to time been honored with important official positions. His wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Cynthia Gaskill and to whom he was married 
in the year 1872, is likewise a product of Clinton county, having been born 
April 24, 1854, in Union township, of which her people were early settlers. 
She. too, is living in Indianapolis and, like her husband, is highly esteemed 
by the social circles of the capital city in which she moves. 

Roy Aaron Ghere, whose name introduces this article, and to a brief 
consideration of whose life and character the reader's attention is here re- 
spectfully invited, was born July ;. 1877. in Frankfort, Indiana, and re- 
ceived bis literary education in the high school of his native city, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1895. Actuated by a laudable desire to 
fit himself for the more practical duties of life, be subsequently entered the 
commercial department of the Northern Indiana Normal University at Val- 
paraiso, where he finished his course in due time and then entered the United 
States mail service, with which he was identified until 1910. Severing his 
connection with the postal service that year he became bookkeeper in the 
Farmers' National Bank of Frankfort, but a year later resigned the position 
to engage in business for himself, since which time he has been proprietor of 
one of the leading shoe stores of the city, and today occupies a prominent 



420 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

place among the successful merchants of the place. Mis store is extensively 
patri ed b)' those who cater to high class goods, and in addition to their 
sale lie also does a large repairing business, ■■ ploying several workmen 
selected with reference to their efficiency and skill in their line of work, lie 
carries a full and carefully selected stock and his patronage, satisfactory 
from tlie beginning, has already grown in magnitude and importance until, 
as already indicated, he stands today among the most progressive and suc- 
cessful shoe dealers in the city of his residence. 

From his boyhood Mr. Ghere has taken an active part in the growth 
of Frankfort and the development of its resources and for a number of 
year.- h name has appeared in icction with every important enterprise 

of the city. He has likewise been deeply interested in public and political 
matters, but not as an office seeker or aspirant for leadership, having been 
content to use his time and efforts for the common good and to support 
principles and measures which in his judgment make for the general wel- 
fare. In a partisan sense, he is not strictly speaking a politician, nevertheless 
he has the courage of his convictions on all the important questions of the 
times and is today recognized as one of the leading members of the Pro- 
gressive party in Frankfort, whose opinion and counsel always cany weight 
and command respect. 

Personally, Mr. Ghere is a most courteous and affable gentleman, popu- 
lar alike in business and social circles and not a little of his success as a mer- 
chant is attributable to his ability to win and retain warm friendships. He 
stands high in the esteem of all with whom he comes in contact and it is a 
compliment worthily bestowed to class him with the representative citizens 
of his city and county. Fraternally, he belongs to the B. P. O. E., the K. 
of P., and the K. and L. of H., in all of which orders he is an active and 
influential worker and not infrequently has he been called to fill positions of 
honor and trust in each. 

Katharine Aughe, who became the wife of Mr. Ghere June 21, 1901, 
was born in Center township, Clinton count}', on .September 25 of the year 
1876, being a daughter of Samuel and Jane (Smith) Aughe. a well known 
and highly respected couple of the community in which they resided. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ghere have a pleasant home which is brightened and cheered by 
the presence of three interesting children, Lawrence, Ruth and William, all 
pupils in the public schools of Frankfort. 



CLTNT0N COT .TV, INDIANA. 421 

WILLIAM FIELDEN MEEK. 

Tin- painter's ami decorator's art is a fascinating one, also one that re- 
quires artistic talent aid creative genius. Mi'. Meek has been successful in 
this vocation because lie possesses to a marked degree these same qualities. 
His work" is to he seen in many of the larger buildings, churches and resi- 
dences of Frankfort, and seeing it once, one understands the peculiar qual- 
ity of his art. Mr. Meek" is descended from a family of sturdy pioneers, 
men who blazed their way into the unknown west, and hewed their homes 
from the thick forest; Air. Meek did not follow the agricultural life as his 
forefathers, hut took up painting and decorating, knowing that there was 
more opportunity there for the full play of his ability. 

Our subject was born in the town of Greenfield, James Whticomb Riley's 
birthplace, on September 26, 1858, and was the son of Jared C. and Martha 
(Crockett) Meek. Jared C. Meek was horn June 15, 1828, the son of Jere- 
miah and Rebecca (Williams) Meek. 

Jeremiah Meek was a native of Kentucky. He came to Wayne county, 
Indiana, and entered a tract of land from the government. However, he 
sold this acreage anil went to Hancock county, this state, in the craly twen- 
ties and entered and bought a large amount of land, situated just where the 
court house at Greenfield stands. He was one of the very prominent men of 
his day, and was a judge of the county by virtue of a commission from 
President Harrison. He was also a Methodist preacher and circuit rider. 
He died about the year of 1S40. Mrs. Meek died in 1873. 

Jared Meek lived the typical life of a pioneer. In his earl)- years he 
learned the blacksmith's trade. He sold forty acres of land in order to get 
three months schooling. He followed the smithy's trade until his retire- 
ment from active life. When the Civil war began Mr. Meek enlisted in 
Company G. Fifth Indiana Volunteer Cavalry, under Captain Reuben A. 
Riley, the father of the Poet Riley. He served valiantly throughout the war, 
acting most of the time as a scout. He participated in the siege of Knox- 
ville, Tennessee, and was mustered out in 1865. with full honors. He re- 
tired from active life in 1890. History has it that he was the first white 
child born in the town of Greenfield. In 1852 he was married to Martha 
Crockett, who was burn in Xenia, Ohio, in 1S26, and was of Scotch descent. 
She died in 1883. Six children were horn to the union, two of whom — our 
subject and Nancy Barr. of Hood River, Oregon — are still living. Jared 
Meek was a Republican, a Methodist and was a third degree Mason. 



422 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

W. F. Meek obtained a very good common school education during his 
early life, and then learned the painting and decorating trade, which he fol- 
lowed ever since. In [S94 he located in Frankfort. Air. Meek lias had work 
on most of the large Mucks in Frankfort and many of the churches; he just 
finished the decoration of the new First National Rank. His work has ex- 
tended over all of this section of the Hoosier state. 

On October 12, 1888. he was married to Marie IS. DuLaney, who was 
born in Carrollton. Illinois, in i860. Five children— James C, Klizaheth 
M., George W., William E.. and Martha I., have keen horn of the union. 

Mr. Meek recalls many interesting stories of James Whticomb Riley, 
who was one of his boyhood friend; in Greenfiehh 



JOHN CALVIN SHANKLIN. 

It is the progressive man of affairs that make- the real history of a com- 
munity, and his influence as a potential factor in the body politic is difficult to 
estimate. The examples such men furnish of patient purpose and stead- 
fast integrity strongly illustrate what is in the power of each to accomplish, 
and there is always a full measure of satisfaction in adverting to their 
achievements in advancing the interests of their fellow men and giving 
strength and solidity to the institutions which make so much for the pros- 
perity of the community. Such a man is John C. Shanklin and it is emi- 
nently fitting that he should be accorded this space in the volume in hand. 
He is one of the prominent and representative men of Frankfort and enjoys 
the best regards and respect of the city's people. 

John C. Shanklin was born in Carroll county, Indiana, on November 
20, 1848, and was the son of John S. and Sarah G. (Young) Shanklin. John 
S. Shanklin came from Monroe comity, West Virginia, having been born 
there April 12, 181 1. and was the son of Robert and Betsey (Shirky) Shank- 
lin. Robert Shanklin was from Scotch-Irish stock, his family coming to this 
country in the year of 1748. Robert traveled to Monroe county. West Vir- 
ginia, in 1803. He settled there and lived the strenuous life of the poineer, 
besides raising a large family of children. John S. and his wife came to 
Carroll county, Ind., in 1835, and there they entered a section of land from 
the government, four hundred acres of which is yet in the possession of the 
family. He farmed until his death in October, 1888. During his life John 
S. Shanklin was a staunch Republican, and served as county commissioner 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 4 2 3 

for hvo tenM . lie was also an elder in the Presbyterian church. His wife 
denartcd this life in November, 1869. ... 

0lir subject, Tohn C. Shanklin, obtained his early scholastic training in 

the con: n schools and then spent two years in the Logansport Academy. 

\fter leaving this academy be farmed until thirty years of age near Brin - 
in t [ml.; also he was in the general store and gram busmess until 1890. 
F Inkfort was his next objective point and in this city he continued in the 
^ business for two years, in company with J. D. Fritch. n 1892 he 
S, a hardware store on south side of the scpiare, and is st Irumnn, 
this as an incorporation. He holds the ofl.ee of president Besdcs this 
Mr . Shanklin is president of the First National Bank of Frank- 
;; )rl and i9 fulfilling the duties of the same with die utmost fidelity and 

SUCC £ Mr Shanklin. on September 19. 1872, was united in marriage to Mary 
E Olds of Covington, Indiana, where she was horn September 19 1853. 
Sev. children ha~ been born to Mr. and Mrs. Shanklin: Bert G., Eldndg 
M., Blanche Quick. Harry C. Dick, Frank, died November, 1903; Andre. 

D " tle^. Mr. Shanklin is a member of the Masonic Order, and has 
attained the thirty-second degree, also is a member -of the ^^«*£ 
and Murat Shrine. He belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men. Re 
hlusly he holds membership with the Presbyterian church, and in politics 
isTltal worker for the Republican party. He served as county com- 
missioner for three yea,- very successfully. 



CAMERON L. AND J. PAUL MERRIMAN. 

„r TRVonHWt are the Merriman 
Prominent among the busmess men of Frankfort *™™ 

fort has gained a reputable place in the ro Frankfort owes 

the success of whatever -enterprise aundied by he it «n ^ ^ 

much to these same citizens, and .nduded I am , ^ ^ 

t^s sketch. Their offices over ^^^2„ that occur within 
strangers as typical «%£»£££££ the community and guided 
these offices arc known to be exer tor , M er riman Brothers 

by the strictest principles of integrity and bono,. 1 he Menimai 



424 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA, 

arc deservedly popular, and greal promise is given for their accomplishments 
in the future. 

Cameron L. Merriman, the senior member of the firm, is a native of 
Johnson county, Indiana, where he was born on May i<\ tSji. Ik' was 
educated in the same county, and after leaving school began teaching. Later 
he entered the profession i the ministry, and served admirably as a pastor 
for seventeen years. He resigned his pastorate on April 30, [913, in order 
to move to Frankfort and engage in his present business. 

J. Paul Merriman, the junior member of the firm, was also born in 
Johnson county, he in the ear 1885. Like his brother, he received a good 
high school education, and after leaving school engaged in farming foi 1 Few 
years, and later went into business in Franklin. Indiana. He remained in 
that city until he moved to Marion, where he remained for two years, when 
lie removed to Frankfort to enter in partnership with his brother in the 
real estate and insurance business. He belongs to the Led Men and attends 
the Baptist church. Cameron L. Merriman is also a Baptist. 



TAYLOR HARSHMAN. 



Luck plays a \ery unimportant part in the average man's career. We 
generally like to excuse our own shortcomings and account for the success of 
other men on the grounds of luck. A fertilized soil, rotation of crops, well 
fenced land, intelligently tilled fields, well kept machinery, painted houses 
and blooded live stock are not the result of luck, unless hard work intelligently 
directed, can be characterized as luck. 

One of the successful farmers and stock men of Washington township, 
Clinton county, who lias believed rather in persistent application and the ex- 
ercise of sound judgment (ban in luck is Taylor Harshman, owner of "Maple 
Wood Farm" in Section 11, which consists of one hundred and twenty-six 
acres, and where he has resided since 1876. 

Mr. Harshman was born in Carroll county, Indiana, September 18, 1847. 
He is a son of Moses Harshman, who was born March 26, 1821, in Butler 
county, Ohio. Moses was a son of Henry and Mary (Fogle) Harshman, who 
were the parents of nine children. Henry Harshman was killed by accident. 
Our subject's maternal grandfather, Christing Everding, was a native of 
Germany, who emigrated to the United States in an early day and settled in 
Maryland. The mother of our subject was known in her maidenhood as 






li 






| 









TAYLOR HARSHMAN AND FAMILY 



OLTNTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 425 

Elizabeth Evcrding, and she was a native of Ohio. I Fer death occurred at the 
advanced age of eighty-six years. To Moses Harshman and wife the fol- 
lowing children were born: Aaron (dec.), Taylor, of this review; Mary M., 
Susan J., Sarah A., Amanda M., Jasper N., Louisa (dec.), Alice E., Isabel E., 
Ida C, and Weaver. 

Tlie parents of these children belonged to the United Brethren church. 
The father was a Republican. 

Taylor Harshman grew to manhood on the home farm, and there he 
worked when a hoy, during the vacation period, attending the public schools 
in the winter months. He en£ iged in teaching for a period of ten years, giv- 
ing eminent satisfaction, his services being in great demand. When twenty- 
four years old, in 1872, he married Christie McN< ' LUghter of Alexander 
McNeal. Her death occurred in 1893 at the age of forty-six years. She was 
a worthy member of the United Brethren church. She left three children. Ora 
Ah. of Perry township; Alary B., and Everett of Blackwell, Okla. 

Air. Harshman, in 1897, married Margaret Nichols, who was horn, 
reared and educated in Clinton county. She is a daughter of Daniel and 
Mary (Harshman) Nichols. Her father died at the age of eighty years and 
her mother died when sixty-seven years old. They had four children: Mar- 
garet, who married Air. Harshman; Airs. Alary M. Clark, of Washington 
township, and Ann Eliza Routh (dec). 

Mr. Harshman has a well-kept and valuable farm, a pleasant ten- 
room house and he keeps a good grade of live stock. Politicallv, he is a 
Republican. 



JAMES McCLAAlROCH. 



At live o'clock Sunday morning. April 1, 1906, Airs. James McClam- 
roch, of Frankfoi., received a telegram from San Francisco, Cal., announc- 
ing the death of her husb nd just seven hours earlier. The news spread 
about the town rapidly and was the source of profound sorrow to the many 
friends of the deceased. The cause of Air. McClamroch's death was a 
complication of pneumonia and paralysis, lie was only thirty-six years of 
age when he died, and his demise was one of those universal losses that is 
felt in every fiber of a community. He was what you might justly term a 
young Napoleon in finance. Entering at an early age the Farmers' Bank 
in Frankfort, he manifested those brilliant qualities that under the stimulus 
of ample opportunity have made men famous in the financial history oi the 



426 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

country. He unquestionably bad Ibe genius for vast enterprises, and bad he 
lived to tbe maturity of his powers there- is every reason to believe that his 
achievements would have ranked him with the nation's most famous 
financiers. 

lames McClamroch was bom in Kirklin township, October _•<;. 1869. 
Be was the sun of the late Robert McClamroch. and the early years of his 
life were spent on his father's farm. Here he acquired his familitr sim- 
plicity of taste and manner that one sets only in close association with nature. 
The time spent in the fields is never wasted. The wide horizons that bound 
them give us more expansive views intellectually. Mr. McClamroch always 
thought that he was the better banker for first having been a farmer. In 
going from one vocation to the other he followed in the footsteps of his 
father, one of the most popular and influential men known in the history of 
Clinton count)'. 

The McClamroch family moved from the country homestead to Frank- 
fort when James was quite young, which gave him the advantage of attend- 
ance in the local schools and graduation with the class of iSSS from the 
high school. He then went to Purdue University and after a course there 
took the position of bookkeeper in the Farmers' Bank, in which his father 
was largely interested. At the time of his death he was cashier of the hank 
and a thorough master of the banking business. He knew well the infinite 
detail of finance and it was through his comprehension of its minutiae that 
he grasped the full scope of it. He was one of the powers in the business 
world that know their occupation from the ground up. Besides his con- 
nection with the Farmers' Bank. Mr. McClamroch was also interested in tbe 
Central Energy Telephone Company, the Frankfort Water Works Com- 
pany. W. M. Shafer & Co., wholesalers, the Wallace Manufacturing Com- 
pany, the Clinton Hotel, the Frankfort Brass Company and the Union Title 
and Guarantee Company. In addition to this varied and extensive local con- 
nection he was interested in oil wells in Delaware county and factories at 
Logansport and Anderson and owned large tracts of land in Indiana and 
Texas. Such extent and intricacy of ownership for one so young indicates 
unmistakably to an intelligent observer those faculties that in effecting vast 
combinations have revolutionized the whole industrial world. 

On March 1. 1893, Mr. McClamroch was united in marriage to Miss 
Ivy Spencer, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Marion Spencer of Frankfort. 
The issue of this union is three sons— John, Robert and James. In his 
religious affiliation Mr. McClamroch was a member of the Christian church. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIAN \. 427 

in which lie was a leader and contributed with extraordinary liberality to its 
advancement. He was a Knight Templar and a Scottish Rite, and was one 
of the most active and eminent memlv rs of the Masonic lodge in Frankfort. 
After all is said, perhaps the most eloquent tribute to his memory is that in 
his business transact inns, which were many and of much magnitude, lie was 
scrupulously honest and generous even beyond the point of exact justice. 
His ideals were of the pure and lofty type, and lie lived up to them as nearly 
as a man can come to the perfect pictures of his imagination. 



HENRY HERBERT THOMAS. 

Specific mention is made of many of the worthy citizens of Clinton 
count}- within the pages of this book-, citizens who have figured in the growth 
and development of this favored locality and whose interests are identified 
with its ever)' phase of progress, each contributing in his sphere of action to 
the well being of the community in which he resides and to the advancement 
of its normal and legitimate growth. Among this number is he whose name 
appears above, one who has identified himself with the best interests of the 
county and city of his home. 

Henry Herbert Thomas was bom in Tipton county on a farm, August 
18, 1848, and was the son of Minor L. and Cynthia (Jeffrey) Thomas. 
Minor L. Thomas was born in New York state in 1816 and was the son of 
David L. and Phoebe Thomas. They came from that state to Fayette county, 
Ind., being among the earliest settlers to this part of the state, and lived the 
usual bard life of the pioneer. David L. Thomas departed this life in 1862 
and his wife, our subject's grandmother, died in 1858. 

When the national horizon was obscured by the ominous clouds of the 
Civil war. Minor L. Thomas was running a saw and grist mill in Windfall. 
In the spring of 1862 he enlisted as a private in Company T, Fifty-fourth 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry. Air. Thomas served valiantly during bis active 
life in the army, but after the long and arduous siege of Vicksburg, in which 
he participated, he was seized with the dreaded swamp diarrhoea. He barely 
reached home, for three days after his arrival he was called to his death. I lis 
wife died in 1859. 

Henry H. Thomas attended the district schools until he was seventeen 
years of age, at which time he began work on the farm, dividing his time be- 
tween that occupation and teaming. His next step was into the stock" busi- 



42S CLINTON COUNTY, INPi \NA. 

lies? and in this vocation lie made a great success, remaining in the same about 
fifteen years. From 1876 until 1887, Mr. Thomas was in partnership with 
J. II Fear, then went into the wholesale produce hi siness, which he followed 
until [C)o6. In 1886 he was elected county clerk of Tipton count)', and so 
he abandoned his business during the term of his office. FTowever, in 1888, 
he was hack in the produce business with J. II. Fear, and in 1907 he sold out 
h rest in the firm. In 1901 he was elected joint representative of Tip- 

ton and Clinton counties, and served in that capacity to the full satisfaction 
of his constituents who had given him the office. In [910 he was a council- 
man-at-large in Frankfurt, but resigned after serving two years. Mr. Thomas 
■ an excel and well : fan ido acres in Montgomery 

county and 240 acres 111 Howard county, Ind. Besides the business interests 
mentioned, he is a stockholder and director in the First National Bank, and 
is interested in the Frankfort Loan and Trust Comapny and the Frankfort 
Heating Companv. Politically, he is a Republican, and has been very promin- 
ent in the work of the party. Fraternally, be belongs to the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, and in religious affairs is a Methodist. 

In 1878 Mr. Thomas was married to Henrietta Free, the daughter of 
Randolph Free, of Alexandria, Inch, who was a cabinet maker by trade. Both 
of Mrs. Thomas' parents are dead. 



ELI MARVIN. 



The present generation of Clinton county was never more honored and 
benefited by the presence of any man than that of Eli Marvin, capitalist, 
financier, friend, neighbor and gentleman. He was a noteworthy example 
of the American business man at his best, and in his sad death bis community 
lost a whole-souled, altruistic, amiable man, one of noble manhood and high 
ideals. In introducing the life details of Mr. Marvin's life, it is highly proper 
that we should quote the words of the Frankfort Crescent, written from an 
intimate knowledge of the man and his life: 

"The light of a great spirit went out when deatli won the victor; . There 
never was a soldier who went to death with greater fortitude. Eli Marvin, 
facing almost sure death, never gave up the light. The last three days, though 
suffering intense pain, this noble character did not waver. He felt that the 
one chance of an operation was worth the fight and be faced the crucial 
moment bravely. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 4 2 9 

"Indiana has few men thai will l>< as greatly missed as he who was 
taken. He was endowed by nature with gifts possessed by but few, being a 
natural orator, a brilliam conversationalist, a splendid companion and a 
Christian gentleman. Thoroughly conversant with the Bible, the lowly 
Nazarenc had no greater defender. There are many who have received a 
Christian inspiration from this forceful character, and many arc they who 
have been the better for the life that has just passed. No man greater loved 
his God than he and none had the touch of sympathy for bis fellowman in a 
greater degree. 

"Eli Marvin never gave up. Hi- whole life in business brought out tin's 
c ] iar; | in g] [any 1 s deal-. giv< n up by associa 

impossible, were forced to a successful conclusion by the indomitable will of 
this man. As he lived, so did his soul pass to the unknown. He had no 
complaints to make; though suffering indescribably he kept that energy that 
gave the physicians confidence in performing the last test. Nature, however, 
was exhausted. The long fight against death did not impair the will, though 
it did destroy the body. 

The slate has lost one of its distinguished citizens; Frankfort a man who 
has been to the fore in every improvement for the city's welfare; the friends, 
one who cannot be replaced, and the sorrowing family a devoted husband, 
an indulgent father and a loving brother. 

"Like all great characters, Eli Marvin was beyond criticism of the errors 
of mankind. Tie realized the imperfections of humanity and his breadth of 
mind did not permit the analysis of the frailities of human nature. Death 
could have taken no one where the sting would have been more deeply felt, 
or the loss m< re sincerely mourned." 

Eli Marvin was born in Boone county, Indiana, on August 9, 1850. and 
was a son of the late Senator Henry M. Marvin. Mr. Marvin's birth oc- 
curred at Northfield, in the county mentioned, and his early years were spent 
upon a farm. He attended the county schools and later was student in the 
Professor Hopkins school at Ladoga. After completing his education .Mr. 
Marvin began to teach schorl himself in Boone and Wayne counties, but did 
not continue in this occupation very long. During the early years of his life 
Mr. Marvin treasured the ambition to become a lawyer, and, with this pur- 
pose in view, read law al Buffalo, New York, with his great-uncle, Legrande 
Marvin, and was admitted to the bar of that state shortly before coming to 
Frankfort. However, he never practiced the profession, as he became active- 
ly engaged in business immediately upon his arrival in Frankfort. 



430 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Marvin began active service in the commercial Held before coming 
to Frank fori. In partnership with Adolphus Wysong he was engaged in the 
hardware business at Whin town, Indiana, and the firm was very successful 
in ever) way. In the fall of 1S73 Mr. Mars in and S. C. Booker engaged in 
the hardware business in Frankfort and in [884 the firm again sold out to 
J. If. Coulter and G. T. Dinwiddie. 

Mr. Marvin was actively engaged in the business of the Wallace Manu- 
facturing Company, and was one of the first directors of what is now the 
Clover Leaf railroad, when it was a narrow gauge. I le aided in building the 
road, giving of his time and money lo the enterprise. lie was interested also 
in the gravel roa f the county, and he was very successful in getting the 
farmers interested in and supporting the construction of them. At the time 
of his death Mr. Marvin was a director of the Indiana Southern Railway 
Company. 

Mr. Marvin was the builder of the water works in Frankfort, which is 
known as one of the best and most complete plants in the state. lie also 
built the water works plants at Green Bay, Fort Howard and Waukesha, 
Wisconsin, all of which he sold. He then engaged in the telephone business, 
taking over the plant built here by Mr. Murphy, of Indianapolis, and he was 
also the organizer of the Central Energy Telephone Association and was 
president of this company at the time of his death. Flc was instrumental in 
the building of the Indianapolis Southern railroad, running from Indianapo- 
lis to Swiss City, the line later being sold to the Illinois Central corporation. 
During the last years of his life Mr. Marvin was interested in the building 
of electric lines. 

In the building of water works systems Mr. Marvin was associated with 
George H. Norman, of Newport, Rhode Island, a financier and capitalist. 
Mr. Marvin was a member of the board of control of the Central Hospital 
for the Insane at Indianapolis; he held the place of treasurer of the board, 
and had been a member ten years at the time of his death. The Indianapolis 
and Newcastle traction line was over three-fourths completed at this time. 
Mr. Marvin was singularly successful in all of these undertakings, and it can 
be attributed to nothing but bis high business sense and bis indomitable will 
power. I-Ie was not the type of capitalist who made money by the blood of 
others; he was the opposite, for he never believed in extortion of any kind, 
and gave to every man his proper wage and treatment. These characteristics 
made him one of the most popular men of Clinton county, and everybody 
was bis friend. Mr. Marvin departed from this earth on July 25. 1909. 



430 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Marvin began active service in the commercial field before coming' 
to Frank fori. In partnership with Adolphus Wysong he was engaged in the 
hardware business at Whilt town, Indiana, and the firm was very successful 
in ever) way. In the fall of 1873 Mr. Marvin and S. C. Booker engaged in 
the hardware business in Frankfort and in [884 the firm again sold out to 
J. H. ('miller and G. T. Dinwiddle. 

Mr. Marvin was actively engaged in the business of the Wallace Manu- 
facturing Company, and was one of the first directors of what is now the 
Clover Leaf railroad, when it was a narrow gauge. I le aided in building the 
road, giving of his time and money to the enterprise, lie was interested also 
in the gravel roa I if the county, and he was ven successful in getting the 
farmers interested in and supporting the construction of them. At the time 
of his death Mr. Marvin was a director of the Indiana Southern Railway 
Company. 

Mr. Marvin was the builder of the water works in Frankfort, which is 
known as one of the best and most complete plants in the state. lie also 
built the water works plants at Green Bay, Fort Howard and Waukesha, 
Wisconsin, all of which he sold. He then engaged in the telephone business, 
taking over the plant built here by Mr. Murphy, of Indianapolis, and he was 
also the organizer of the Central Energy Telephone Association and was 
president of this company at the lime of his death. Flc was instrumental in 
the building of the Indianapolis Southern railroad, running from Indianapo- 
lis to Swiss City, the line later being sold to the Illinois Central corporation. 
During the last years of his life Mr. Marvin was interested in the building 
of electric lines. 

In the building of water works systems Mr. Marvin was associated with 
George H. Norman, of Newport, Rhode Island, a financier and capitalist. 
Mr. Marvin was a member of the hoard of control of the Central Hospital 
for the Insane at Indianapolis; he held the place of treasurer of the hoard. 
and had been a member ten years at the time of his death. The Indianapolis 
and Newcastle traction line was over three-fourths completed at this time. 
Mr. Marvin was singularly successful in all of these undertakings, and it can 
be attributed to nothing but his high business sense and his indomitable will 
power. I-Ie was not the type of capitalist who made money by the blood of 
others; he was the opposite, for he never believed in extortion of any kind, 
and gave to every man his proper wage and treatment. These characteristics 
made him one of the most popular men of Clinton county, and everybody 
was his friend. Mr. Marvin departed from this earth on July 25, 1000. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 43' 

On November 25, 1875, Mr. Marvin was married to Eliza Jam- Snyder, 
a daughter of one of the promising families in the comity. One son, Le 
Grande, survives him. Mr. Marvin was one of four hoys and five girls, only 
two of whom, Jesse and Charles, survive. Mrs. Marvin is still living in the 
city of Frankfort. Air. Marvin was a member of the Methodist church 
since he was seventeen years of age, and in every way his life was a Christian 
one. Fraternally, he belonged to the Masonic Order, the Knights Templar, 
and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Mr. Marvin was also a mem- 
ber of the University Club at Indianapolis. 



JESSE ELSWORTH RYAN. 

Among the citizens of Frankfort who are now in the prime of life and 
enjo} ing a success won by honest effort and fortitude, is the subject of this 
sketch, [esse E. Ryan. He is recognized by all who know him as being a 
man of high quality and excellent ideals. He is descended from a sturdy 
pioneer family, and has many inherited characteristics of thrift and energy 
which have insured the success he has made. Mr. Ryan has been versatile 
in his years of activity, having tried different vocations before he selected 
the tailoring trade as a life work. It was a wise choice for Mr. Ryan, for he 
has made good, and is an aid to the community, not only through his trade, 
but by hearty co-operation in whatever movement for the public good he may 
be asked to join. 

Jesse E. Ryan was born in Washington township, this county, on Octo- 
ber 13. 1S63, and was. the son of Jesse and Priscilla (Anderson) Ryan. 
Jesse." bis father, was born in the state of New York in 1805, and in com- 
pany with several brothers came to Clinton county in the later twenties and 
settled in Washington township, there following the trade of the black- 
smith until 1885, when he retired from active life. He died in 1S95. Dur- 
ing his life he was a Democrat politically, and religiously belonged to the 
Christan church. Mrs. Ryan died in 1S71. 

In his youth our subject received a good common school education, and 
then began the study of photography, thinking to take the same up as a life 
work. After four or five years spent in this manner he entered business as a 
mercantile salesman, continuing as such for twenty-five years. In 1910 he 
established his present business on south side square. His business as a tailor 
is supplemented by a repairing and cleaning department. In 191 1 he moved 



432 CUN l"\ ( "I XTV, I.MH \N \. 

liis sliop to West Clinton, and in January, 1913, lie moved to his present 
location in the Gilherl block. Here he has a large floor space, and lie carries 
a complete and appropriate line of suitings. Mr. Ryan originated the suit 
club iii Frankfort. 

Fraternally, Mr. Ryan is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the 
Loyal Order of Moose. Religiously, he is a Presbyterian, and in politics is 
an Independent. 

On June 25, 1907, lie was married to Nellie Wolf, a native of Chicago. 
There have been no children born to this union. 



FRANCIS M. HENDRICKS. 

The biographies of the representative men of a county bring to light 
many hidden traits of mind, character and courage, designed to increase the 
pride of their family and their community, and it is to be regretted that the 
people, as a whole, are not more intimately acquainted with the history of 
such men, in the ranks of whom may be found men of every occupation 
known to human art. The subject of this sketch is distinctly one of the fore- 
most citizens of Kirklin township and Clinton county, and as such has made 
his influence felt among his fellowmen for enterprise, integrity and honor. 

Francis M. Flendricks came into this life on September 27, 1859. in 
Kirklin township, Clinton county, being the son of Nathan and Sarah 
(Hunter) Hendricks. The father was born May 8, 1820, in the state of 
Virginia and moved to Ohio, where he lived until 1855, then traveled to bis 
present home in a covered wagon. Later, he went to Iowa, but found the 
opportunities in that state not so good as the county which he left, so he 
returned to this locality, and continued his trade of fanner and cabinet 
maker, at which he was a success. He was a Democrat in politics, and fra- 
ternally belonged to the Masonic order. The mother was born September 
17, 1S20, and died April 17, 1905; the father died April 7, 1877. Twelve 
children graced the name of Hendricks, namely: Milton, John, Benjamin, 
Sarah Jane, three unnamed, Lewis, Charles, Francis, Hattie and Olive. 
Francis and Lewis are the only one still living. 

The subject of our sketch received a common school education in Kirk- 
lin township, and then took up farming, which he has followed ever since. 
He owns two hundred and ninety-five acres of tillable land in the township. 
All but ten acres are well tiled and otherwise improved, lie has one of the 




MR. AND MRS. P. M. HENDRICKS 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 433 

hand-, hk-; and best equipped home; in Clinton county. U contains all 
the modern improvements, including a vacuum cleaner in every room. 

Mr. Hendricks married, on April 17. 1874, Hattie Roush, born October 
17, 1864, in Clinton county, the daughter of Nathan C. and Elizabeth 
(Neaves) Roush. Her father was I. n 1 )ctober S. 1834 in Clinton county, 
Ohio, and moved to Indiana when a boy. He still resides in this county. He 
served valiantly through the Civil War in Company G, Eighty-sixth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, fn this connection, il must be mentioned that Mr. Hend- 
ricks had three brothers in the war: Benjamin was killed while in uniform, 
and Milton died soon after returning. Airs. Hendricks, mother, was horn in 
Henry county, Kentucky, on June 6. 1841, and when eleven years of age 
came to Indiana on horseback with ' parents She was one of live chil- 
dren, including Howard, Fanny, Walter, and Willard. She received a com- 
mon school education. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hendricks one child has been born- — Morris G. His 
birth occurred July 5, 1SS6. He received grade and high school training, and 
later attended both Indiana University and Purdue University. He was mar- 
ried to Georgia Thompson on April 17, 1912, a girl born in Illinois on De- 
cember 24, 1886. 

Our subject declares allegiance to the Democratic party, but does not 
seek public office. His interest in bis farm and family has prevented him 
from joining any fraternal organizations. 



HOWARD HARSHMAN. 

This might well he called the age of successful young men, for il is no 
doubt true that men succeed earlier in their life work now than in past gen- 
erations. It is not uncommon now to find men retired at middle age, whereas 
his father and grandfather were compelled to work on to the end unless the 
infirmities of old age compelled them to cease. The biographer does not 
presume to offer an explanation. One of the well known citizens of Clinton 
county who has achieved a definite degree of success at an early age is 
Howard Harshman, the present able and popular county recorder, a man 
who has ambition not only to succeed in life but at the same time to confer 
some degree of goi 1 on his home community. 

Mr. Harshman was born in Perry township, Clinton county. May 17, 
1870. He is a son of Martin W and Ann Eliza (Henderson) Harshman, 
(28) 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 433 

handsomest and best equipped homes in Clinton county. Ii contains all 
the modern improvements, including a vacuum cleaner in every room. 

Mr. Hendricks married, on April \y. 1.874, Hattie Roush, born October 
17, 1864, in Clinton count)', the daughter of Nathan C. and Elizabeth 
(Neaves) Roush. Her father was born October 8, 1S34 in Clinton county, 
Ohio, and moved to Indiana when a boy. He still resides in tin's county, lie 
served valiantly through the Civil War in Company G, Eighty-sixth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry. In this connection, it must be mentioned that Mr. Hend- 
ricks bad three brothers in the war: Benjamin was killed while in uniform, 
and Milton died soon after returning. Mrs. Hendricks, mother, was born in 
Henry county, Kentucky, on June 6, 1841, and when eleven years of age 
came to Indiana on hoi ■hack with h arents She was one of live chil- 
dren, including Howard, Fanny, Walter, and Willard. She received a com- 
mon school education. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hendricks one child has been born- — Morris G. His 
birth occurred July 5, 18S6. He received grade and high school training, and 
later attended both Indiana University and Purdue University. He was mar- 
ried to Georgia Thompson on April 17, 1912, a girl bom in Illinois on De- 
cember 24, 1 886. 

Our subject declares allegiance to the Democratic party, but does not 
seek public office. His interest in his farm and family has prevented him 
from joining any fraternal organizations. 



HOWARD HARSHMAN. 

This might well be called the age of successful young men, for it is no 
doubt true that men succeed earlier in (heir life work now than in past gen- 
erations. It is not uncommon now to find men retired at middle age, whereas 
his father and grandfather were compelled to work on to the end unless the 
infirmities of old age compelled them to cease. The biographer does not 
presume to offer an explanation. One of the well known citizens of Clinton 
county who has achieved a definite degree of success at an early age is 
Howard llarshman, the present able and popular county recorder, a man 
who has ambition not only to succeed in life but at the same time to confer 
some degree of good on his home community. 

Mr. llarshman was horn in Perry township, Clinton county, May 17, 
1870. He is a son of Martin V. and Ann Eliza (Henderson) Harshnian, 
(28) 



434 CLINTO : COl \ I'Y, INDIANA. 

one of our well known and substantial old families, mention of whom is 
made on other pages of this work. 

I Inward Harshman was reared n the heme farm and educated in the 

on schools, lie began life foi himself as a farmer, which he continued 

until [80S, when lie engaged in the monument business with Howard A. 

Cann in Frankfort until 1907. The) built up a large and successful business 

with the city and county. In [908 be was elected recorder of Clinton county 

and he served his first term with such credit and general satisfaction that he 

was re-elected in the fall of 1912 and is now serving his second term in a 

manner that reflects much credit upon himself and to the praise of his con- 

5j provin me ' ' Jl-aroimd officials the county has ever 

onesty, fidelity and prompl as well as unfailing courtes) are his 

watchwords. 

Mr. Harshman was married February 19, 1803, to Ada °- Hackerd, who 
was born November 7, 1873, in Madison township, Clinton county, and there 
she grew to womanhood and was educated. She is a daughter of Joseph and 
Sarah F. Hackerd, a highly respected family of Madison township. To our 
subject and wife three children have been born: Joseph M., George A. and 
Flora F. 

Politically, Mr. Harshman is a Democrat and has been active in the 
work of his party. He is a member of the United Brethren church, and he 
is one of the prominent lodge men of the count)-, belonging to the Masonic 
Order, Council and Chapter, the Knights of Pythias, in which lodge he is 
master of finance. He is also a member of the Improved Order of Red Men. 



MARTIN VAX BUREN HARSHMAN. 
The great task of clearing the land of its timber in the early years can 
scarcely be realized by the people of today. Not a crop could be sown nor 
an orchard tree planted until the large forest trees had been cut down and 
removed with a team of horses or with fire. Even then the stumps were a 
great hindrance and it is doubtful if so much, as half crop could be raised 
until they had been pulled up or burned out. The amount of hard labor 
required 'to remove the dense forest growth in Clinton county seemed never 
to end, and all members of the family were required to assist early and late 
and at all seasons of the year. Martin VanBuren Harshman, now living 
retired in Frankfort, and his father before him had their share of this work, 
and they did it well, as may be surmised in looking over the old Harshman 
homestead. They came of a race that never quailed before obstacles and 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 



435 



hardships, never swerved aside from tasks, no matter how arduous or dan- 
gerous, it they believed it their duty to perform them, so il is no wonder 
that they succeeded and became leading citizens in Clinton county, for such 
men are those on win m the sunshine of fortune delights to shine and who 
are the true builders of empires. 

Air. Ilarsliman was born in Clinton county, Indiana, October 6, 1837. 
He is a son of Henry and Alary M. (Fogle) Harshman. Henry Ilarsliman 
was born in Virginia in 1797, and from there removed to Ohio with his 
parents when a boy, the family finally coming on to Clinton county, Indiana, 
in 1S29, thus being among the earliest settlers, finding here little more than 
a wildi -ness through ' hi h yet roamed red men and wild beasts in abund- 
ance. They located 01 eighty acres in what is now Madison township. On 
this they erected a log cabin and cleared the land, and here the elder Harsh- 
man farmed until his death, in 1843. He took an interest in public affairs, 
served as constable for a time, and politically he was a Democrat. He was a 
Dunkard in his religious faith. He and Mary M. Fogle were married in 
181S. She was born in Greene county, Ohio, February 3, 1800, and her 
death occurred on May 25, 1875. To Henry Harshman and wife ten chil- 
dren were born, of whom Martin VanBuren, of tin's sketch, is the only sur- 
vivor. He grew to manhood in a manner similar to other children of pio- 
neers, and he found plenty of hard work as soon as he was old enough to go 
to the field. He received a limited education in the old-time schools. He 
remained on the home place until he was twenty-four years of age, when he 
began- life for himself, later farming in Perry township until 1875, then 
moved on a farm in Washington township, where he remained until r885, 
then went to Kansas and farmed there until 1887. Returning from the 
Sunflower state he located in Madison township, Clinton county, and also 
farmed in Perry township. He subsequently established a store at Fickle 
station, which he conducted for eighteen months, then removed to Danville, 
Hendricks county, where he conducted a boarding bouse for two years. Then 
for nearly five years he traveled for a firm in Keokuk. Iowa. Retiring from 
active life in 1901 he came to Frankfort, where he has a pleasant home, and 
here he has since resided quietly. He is now seventy-six years old, and is 
one of the oldest native-born citizens in Clinton county. He talks most in- 
terestingly of the changes which be has noted taken place here since he was a 
boy. 

Politically, he is a Democrat, but has never been a public man, pre- 
ferring to devote his attention to his business and his home. 



43 (l CLINTOJS COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Harshman was married on November 28, 1861, to Anna E. Hen- 
derson, and of this union five children were horn, one which died in in- 
fancy; Manson ' : lives in Kansas; II trriet \'., the wife of Joseph A. Mc- 
Bride, of Washingl m township, Clinton county; Howard, of Frankfort, 
the present recorder of (lie county; Clara S. is the wife of Howard A. Cann, 
of Frankfort. 

The death of Mrs. Harshman occurred on April 4, [S75, and in August, 
1876, our subject married Mary jane McBride, whose death occurred in 
1887. In May, iSS8, he married a third thru, choosing Malinda Stover, 
whose death occurred in 1892. On July 4. T901, Mr. Harshman married 
hi lsI wife, beci a E ' loersfs. 



MELVILLE BEVENDGE WHITE. 

In the respect that is accorded to men who have fought their own way 
to success through unfavorable environment we find an unconscious tribute 
to the intrinsic worth of a character which not only endure the test, but 
gains new strength through the discipline. The gentleman to whom the 
biographer now calls the reader's attention was not favored by inherited 
wealth or the asssitance of influential friends, but in spite of this, by perse- 
verance, industry and wise economy, he has attained a comfortable station 
in life, making his influence felt for good in his community of Clinton county, 
where he is well known by reason of his honorable career and because of the 
fact that he is numbered among those patriotic sons of the North who as- 
sisted in saving the Union's integrity in the dark days of the sixties. 

Melville B. White was born December 9, 1S44, in Bloomingrave, In- 
diana, and was the son of Alexander and Nancy (Templeton) White. Alex- 
ander White was burn also in Bloomingrave on July 11, 1816, and he was 
the son of William and Nancy (Skinner) White. 

Alexander White spent practically all of his life in fanning, and was 
very successful in the pursuit of the same. At the time of his death, on 
August 3, 1905, he possessed one hundred and sixty acres of excellent land 
in Franklin county. He married Nancy Templeton, who was born in Frank- 
lin county in 1816, and who died in Wisconsin, where she and her husband 
had gone in the spring of i860 in hopes of benefiting her health. 

William White was born in Delaware in the latter part of the eighteenth 
century and came to Indiana before the year 1800, being one of the very 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 437 

fix st white men to penetrate the forests of this locality and brave the hard- 
ships therein. Mo I of his life was spent in the vocation of farming and he 
experienced the u! I life of tli neer of the day. 

Melville While received a g 1 common school education in the count} oi 

his birth He spent the early years of his life on his father's farm and was 
vet a bov in his teens when the fir I pun was fired in the Civil war. lie en- 
listed in Company C. Thirteenth Indiana Volunteci Infantry, and was at- 
tached to the Army of the Potomac, under General Grant. He partic.pated 
in all of the more important engagements of the Army of the Potomac In 
September 186; he was given an h norable discharge, at the time holding 
the rank of corp. il ' C his o Uter the close of his nuhtan career, 

Mr White began farming in Franklin count}', which he continued tor a 
couple of years, then conducted a dry goods business at Bloomingrave, In- 
diana until 1872. He then came to Clinton county, still following the same 
business and settled first in Rossville, where he stayed until 1901. He came 
to Frankfort in that year, and accepted a very lucrative position as cashier 
of the Central Union' Telephone Company, and here he has been since that 

yea "ln politics, Mr. White is a Progressive, and in 1900 was elected as 
councilman from the third ward of Frankfort, and in this capacity has given 
verv efficient service. Fraternally, Mr. White is a member of the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, and the Grand Army of the Republic He is a 
Methodist in religion and has always been a liberal supporter of the churck 
In June 1874 Mr. White was married to Emma C. McClure, oi 
Brookville. Indiana, she bavin- been horn there May 20, 1847. Two chil- 
dren have been born of this union: Oakley M.. of Indianapolis, and Lola 
R., at home. 

JOSEPH WILBUR PENCE. 

The history of Clinton county would be incomplete without appropriate 
ment ion of the life and character of Joseph Wilbur Pence, the present effi- 
cient deputy sheriff of Clinton county and one of the most popular men ever 
appointed to this responsible position. Mr. Pence is a native of Clinton 
county and a descendant of a long line of sturdy ancestry, many of whose 
sterling characteristics he inherits, as is indicated by the honorable and use- 
ful life he has lived and the influence for law and order lie has ever exerted. 



43'^ (LINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

llis grand f either, [ohn Pence, who was born in Rockingham county, Vir- 
ginia, December 31, (800, of German parentage, married in his native slate 
and at the age of twenty-seven, with three brothers, came to Clinton county, 
Indiana, and entered 320 acres of land <>n which the city of Frankfort now 
stands, lie was a typical pioneer of the time in which ho lived, strong, vigor- 
ous and courageous rind not only took an active part in the development of 
the country, but became a leading factor in the organization of the county 
of which he was elected the first treasurer. He was a man of high standing 
and generous impulses, a leader among the earl}' settlers of his community 
and me of the promin 1 I Democrats of his day and generation in the county 
of Clinton. On April u, 1824, he married Miss Judith Aughe, who was 
born April 11, 1806, in Rockingham county, Virginia, but later removed 
with her parents to Warren county, Ohio, where the nuptials indicated were 
duly solemnized. 

John and Judith Pence became the parents of eleven sturdy children 
and lived long and useful lives, the former dying July 31, 1882, the latter pre- 
ceding him to the unseen world on January 2d of the year 1874. 

Thomas Coke Pence, one of the eleven children of the above couple 
and father of the subject of this review, was horn in Frankfort, Indiana, on 
February 17, 1846. Fie married December 16, 1869, Miss Floretta Gaskill, 
wdiose parents were among the prominent pioneers of Clinton count)', and 
departed this life May 14, 1876, in the prime of manhood, being only thirty 
years of age when summoned to the "silent land." Fie, too, w-as a Democrat 
and an influential factor in his party, and like his father took an active part 
in public affairs. His wife, a most estimable lady, whose memory is cher- 
ished as a prici less heritage by her descendants, died January 2, 1874, at her 
home in Frankfort. 

Joseph Wilbur Pence was horn July 26, 1870, in the above city and has 
spent the greater part of his life in Clinton county with the varied interests 
of which he has been for a number of years actively identified. His educa- 
tional discipline included the usual public school course and when a young 
man he entered the railway service, but at the end of eight years resigned 
his position to engage in the express business at Frankfort, Indiana, where 
he remained for a period of three months, an efficient and faithful employe 
of both the Adams and American Express Companies. At the expiration of 
the time indicated he went to Jeffersonville, Indiana, where he was an 
employe in the state reformatory for a period of five months. He then 
engaged with the American Laundry Company of Frankfort and continued 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 439 

with the same until January i, ioi-,. when In .\.i- appointed dcpu(\ sheriff 
of Clinton count}', which honorahli and responsible position he has since 
most acceptably fil 

Mr. Pence h pported he prii [)1 of the Democratic party ever 

since attaining his majority, and is very popular, not only among bis political 
associates, but with tin- people irrespective of party ties. lie is a gentleman 
of pleasing address, easily approachable, affable and courteous in manner 
and in the full vigor of life. He manifests an abiding interest in all matters 
of local importance and is a useful and influential citizen as well as a fearless 
and popular public servant. Fraternally, be is identified with the R P. O. F.., 
the Masons, K. of ' Ben [-Ti I ially is held in hijrh esteem bv all. 



GEORGE B. McCLELLAN KNAPP. 

When crops grow in rotation and proper tillage methods are followed, 
they will suffer less from dry weather than when they are grown continually. 
This has been demonstrated in the season of 1913 on the farm of George B. 
McClellan Knapp. of Washington township, Clinton county, who evidently 
understands well the various secret^ of proper crop rotation and soil fertiliza- 
tion. Crop rotation is usually of more importance than the method of tillage 
used in this respect, although both are important. We should never lose 
sight of the fact that the soil must be well supplied with organic matter. 
Humus is absolutely necessary to the soil to make plant food available. 

Mr. Knapp, who is a commissioner of Clinton county, an office which 
he most creditably fills, and who is proprietor and owner of "Jersey Stock 
Farm," and a well known dealer of pure bred Jersey cattle, is a representa- 
tive of one of the fine old pioneer families of this locality. He was born on 
the old homestead here December io, 1864. lie is a son of Horace G. 
Knapp, who was born in New Jersey, the son of Daniel Knapp, also a native 
of that state. The mother of our subject was Martha E. (Mattix) Knapp, a 
native of Tippecanoe county, Indiana, a daughter of Giles Mattix. 

Horace G. Knapp located on the farm just north of that owned by our 
subject in an earl)" day and became one of the successful farmers of the com- 
munity. There he lived many years. His family consisted of seven chil- 
dren : Giles D., Mary F., Samuel O., Elizabeth II., George B. McClellan, 
our subject ; and Aaron. 



440 CLINTON COl N I'Y, INDIAN . 

The father was an extensive dealer in live stock and was a good and 
useful 

subjei I ol I sketch was reared on die >me farm and he worked 
there when a hoy. He received a good publi< school education. Upon 
reaching manhood he married Virginia P. Ldeavilon, a daughter of Joseph 
P. Heavilon, a sket h of '-.horn appears on another page of this wank'. 

( lur subject has one of the best farms in the township. On it stand an 
attractive ten-roomed residence and a good set of outbuildings. Ue has a 
large barn, forty-civ!!! b) eight feet, lie handles a great deal of live stock 
from year to year and no small part of his income derived from this source. 
air subject and wife tin lrcn haw been born: Martha Jose- 

phine, Helen, Ralph IT., Virginia and Joseph H., the last named dying when 
eighteen months old. 

Politically, Mr. Knapp is a Republican. He was elected county com- 
missioner in 1910 and is discharging the duties of the office in a manner 
that reflects much credit upon himself and to the eminent satisfaction of all 
•concerned. 



JAMES A. STEPHENSON. 

Among the best known and most progressive of our younger genera- 
tion of farmers is James A. Stephenson of Owen township, a man who has 
had the privilege of spending his life on the old homestead. We say privilege 
advisedly, for the biographer is of the opinion that all who have been per- 
mitted to live under the roof that heard their earliest cry esteem it a rare 
privilege, for there is a certain "charm which hallows us there," that we never 
find under any other roof, although perchance belter and more pretentious 
the environment in general. He has been glad to remain at home and has 
kept the house well repaired and the place well tilled and improved, so that 
it is today as valuable and productive as ever before since it was reclaimed 
from the virgin forest. 

Mr. Stephenson was born in Owen township, Clinton county, on the 
farm where he now lives, as before intimated. He is a son of William and 
Emeline (Brown) Stephenson, a highly respected early family, a complete 
sketch of whom appears on another page of this work, hence need not lie 
reported here. 

James A. Stephenson grew up on the home farm, where he worked bard 
when a boy during the summer months, and in the wintt time he attended 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 44] 

the rural schools in his district, receiving a >cry practical education. On Feb- 
ruary 20, 1901, he was married to Pearl Erb, who was born in Rossville, 
Ind., December 5, iS; 1. She is a daughter of John ai d Ida (Gchres) Kr!>, 
the latter bring a native - I Lehigh count}', Pennsylvania, and the former of 
Wabash county, Indiana. 

They grew up, were educated in the old-time schools and were married 
here. John Erb died December 5, 1907, and Mrs. Erb still lives at Rossville. 
Mrs. Stephenson grew to womanhood and was educated in the common 
schools at Rossville, and graduated from the high school at Rossville with the 
class of 1898. Our subject and wif< have had bul one child, Russell J. 
Stephenson, born Octo [O, 1909. 

Mr. Stephenson has always farmed and raised livestock of a general 
breed and he has met with a large measure of success with advancing years. 
He is a scientific farmer, having attended Miami University, at Oxford, O., 
taking a general course, which has made him of an investigating turn of mind, 
a close observer and a student of nature and science. He owns eighty acres of 
the old home place, where he lives, and he farms three hundred and forty- 
seven acres, all in one body. 

He thus farms on a large scale and he raises large numbers of cattle 
which he feeds for the market. He also buys and feeds hogs. No small por- 
tion of his annual income is derived from his judicious handling of livestock. 

Mr. Stephenson is a Republican in political matters, and fraternally he 
belongs to the Masonic Order and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
both at Rossville. 



SPAHR-MOREISON ABSTRACT CO. 

Naturally a count) rich in real estate values as Clinton county would 
also require of those engaged in the preparation of titles to its real estate a 
high standard of proficiency and a thorough knowledge of the business in 
which they are engaged. Not a little of the intrinsic value of land depends 
on the accuracy and clearness used in setting out the history of its title, and 
for this careful and painstaking labor people have learned to seek the most 
experienced, capable and competent men. The firm of which we write in 
this sketch lias won such a place in the estimation of the county and adjoin- 
ing communities, and there is not a land owner or a farmer who would 
hesitate to place explicit confidence in the service rendered by this firm, the 
Spahr-Morrison Abstract Compan}'. 



442 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

The Spahr-Morrison Abstract Company was organized September 24, 
i, m l i s the nco >sor to the late Union Title, Guaranty and Loan Com- 

pany, which was organized November 1, 1902. I'he business of the com 
pany consists in the drawing of accurate abstracts of land titles in Clinton 

count v. and the lending of money on farm and city property. When real 
estate is purchased, (lie buyer naturally should want to know the exact con- 
dition of the title, whether or not it is good and merchantable, and if not, the 
full nature of its defects. To inform the buyer of the exact condition of the 
property's title as the same appears in the public records of the county is the 
In, ,, 1 - ,,f th< pahr Morrison Abstract Company 

The member-- of this company are expert eir professioi and the 

abstracts furnished by them can be relied on implicity. The company pos- 
sesses a library of realty records unsurpassed in any county in the state and 
equaled by very few. Their record is complete so far as land titles in Clinton 
county are concerned. They can show you the name of every entryman and 
the respective owners of every tract or lot of land in the county, from the 
date of entry clown to the present time. If your tract of land is fractional, 
they have a copy of the original survey showing the number of acres it 
contains. They have in their office a copy of every will probated in Clinton 
county. They have a copy of every dedication and plat of every city and 
town in the county. Their records show the name of the mortgagor, the 
mortgagee, the amount of money borrowed, rate of interest and time when 
due of every unrclcased mortgage in the county. Their records, comprising 
the abstract books formerly compiled by the firms of John I.. Young, Card 
& Sheridan, William S. Sims, and the Morrison Abstract Company, all of 
whom sold their respective books to the late Union Title, Guaranty & Loan 
Company, constitute the original and only complete record system of the 
county. The members of the Spahr-Morrison Abstract Company are among 
the best known title men of the state; both are members of the Indiana Title- 
Association and the American Association of Title Men. 

Samuel A. Morrison, treasurer of the company, was born and reared in 
the city of Frankfort. He is a graduate of the local common and high 
schools. He is a son of James W. Morrison, in whose office he received the 
foundation for his education in the abstract of title profession. 

George M. Spahr, president and secretary of the company, was born and 
reared in Marion county, Indiana, but has been a resident of Clinton county 
since May 24, 1897. During the past sixteen years he has been engaged in 
his present profession. He was among the first to change the manner and 



CLINTON CO INDIANA. 443 

style of making abstracts from the brief and inaccurate chain of title method 
former!) adopted in tin ilder m< nlci> if the abstract profession to the 
present high standard ork, which is an exact copy of every essential 

detail of the instrument abstracted, as now turned out in abstracts made by 
tliis company. 



HARRY BOYD VAN EATON. 

It is a well authenticated fad thai access come; not as the caprice of 
cha is the leg resn I applied energy, unflagging rl 

ruination and perseverance in a course of action once decided upon by the 
individual. Only those who diligently seek the goddess Fortuna find her — 
she never smiles upon the idler or dreamer. Harry Boyd Van Eaton, a man 
well known in Boone and Clinton counties, now the popular and efficient 
city treasurer of Frankfort, clearly understood this fact early in life, so he 
did not seek am royal road to success, but sought to direct his feet along the 
well-beaten paths of those who had won in the battle of life along legitimate 
lines. Tfe had their careers in mind when casting about for a proper field 
of endeavor, and in tracing his life history it is plainly seen that the success 
which he has enjoyed was won by commendable qualities, and it is also his 
personal worth which has gained for him the good standing among his 
fellow citizens in this locality. 

Mr. Van Eaton was born in Boone county, Indiana, .September 17, 
1872. He is a son of Valentine Harlan Van Eaton and Harriet Elizabeth 
(Shumway) Van Eaton, natives of Union county, Indiana, from which 
they removed to Boone county in 1865 and there they spent the rest of their 
lives. The father was born at Brookvillc, January 29, 1833, a,1 J ms death 
occurred on April 30. 1873, near Thorntown. The mother of our subject 
was born at Dunlapsville, and her death occurred near Thorntown, April 20, 
1906. Valentine II. Van Eaton was a school teacher by profession and 
United States Senator LaFollette went to school to him. The former de- 
voted some of his time to farming, owning eighty-two acres in Union 
county. Politically, he was a Republican. lie belonged to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and to the Methodist church. His family consisted of 
seven children: Ludlow Ilarland, born October 28, 1835; Winchester Val- 
entine, born July iS, 1857; Danforth Irving, born September 22, i860; 
Rosella Harriet, born March 4. 1863, died December 8. 1893; Ulysses 
Grant, born May 4, 1S65, died October 14, 18(17; Theodore Potter, born 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

October 8 18GS; and Harry Boyd, of this review, who is the youngest child 
The subject of this sketch grcv up on th home farm and he attended 
the public school three mile ea Thorntown. Ele remained on the home 

pc TLrtte^n^ny^M,^^^^^* 
Thorntown, at which he worked for a period of seventeen T^J^ng 
one of the most skilled barben in the country. He came to luankfoU n 
"05 and here has since resided. In November, 1909 he was elected cy 
r 9 e °^ rel , and took office January i, 1910, and he is still m the office hav ng 
d i.-har,al the duties of the same in a manner that has been en 1 rely at - 
f! * to all .ed. II ' ery careful, painstaking and courteous 

official looking well to the interest of the county. At the primary of k;t 3 
h eived tC nomination for re-election, which fact proves that his fellow 
^ place implicit confidence in bin, Politically, he ,s a Republican and has 
been more or less active in the ranks. Fraternally, he belongs to die Ma 
sonic order, the Blue Lodge; the Improved Order of Red Men. and 
J oval Order of Moose. He belongs to the Methodist church. 

Mr Van Eaton owns property on Sims street. His wife was known 
in her maidenhood as Lena II. Rathfon, a daughter of John and Luanda 
(Norman) Rathfon, an old family of Frankfort, where Mrs Van Eaton 
ifew to womanhood and was educated. The father was killed about 1870 
by a hayfork. The mother, with whom our subject and wife are making 
their home, still lives in Frankfort. 

Two children have been born to our subject and wife, namely. Ralph 
N and Alary Elizabeth. They arc both attending school. 

Mrs. Van Eaton has one sister, Nola, wife of William Hodge, of 



Frankfort. 



JAMES W. BOYLES. 



The student who is interested in the history of Clinton county does not 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 445 

Personally, Mr. Boyles is a genial old gentleman, and is a very accommo- 
dating and entertaining man tn meet. 

James \V. Boyles was born in Green county, Ohio, on a farm February 
17, 1835, and was tbe son of John and Catherine (Skinner) Boyles. [ohn 
Boyles was born May 24, 179S, near Lexington, Kentucky, and spent the 
years of his youth in that state. Until 1839 he acted as an overseer on a 
tobacco plantation, (hen he moved to Clinton count)-, and bought one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Union townhsip. Here he spent his entire life, 
farming" until about four years prior to his death, which occurred January 
26, 1875. He was married December 15, 1S17. to Catherine Skinner, who 
was born in Kentucky on .April 1, 1802, and who died November 16, TS70. 
Mr. Boyles was a Methodist in religion, and politically was a Republican. 

Our subject, James \Y. Boyles, received a common school education in 
the limited pioneer schools, working on the farm during the time he was not 
in attendance at school. Mr. Boyles became an excellent agriculturist, hav- 
ing had his early training in that vocation under his father, who was con- 
sidered one of the most successful and industrious farmers of the pioneer 
community. Our subject has followed this vocation more or less all of his 
life, and also raised live stock on a large scale, becoming the owner of the 
finest animals in the county, and doing an extensive shipping business. Today 
his land is in excellent condition, well tiled and fenced and covered with the 
latest improvements, including a large home, commodious and attractive, also 
a large barn and outbuildings. Mr. Boyles owns an automobile, a Cole "30," 
out of which he derives a great deal of pleasure. Mr. Boyles is a Republican 
politically, and has served as county commissioner three terms of three years 
each, leaving his farm during the period of service, but returning immediate- 
ly after the expiration of his time in office. In religious affairs, Mr. I 
has always been a Methodist, and is a deacon in that church. 

April 2y, 1857, marked the date of Mr. Boyles' marriage to Man E. 
Bell, who was born in Butler count)". Ohio, October 20, 1836, and was the 
daughter of William and Man- Ann (Hamilton) Bell. William Bell, a na- 
tive of 1 vlvania. c ne to Clintc innty in 1842 and lived here 
his de, Iding eij icres of itered by his father from ll 
eminent and deeded to him when he came here. Mr. Bell, at different times 
in his life, was a Democrat and a Republican, but in church matters remained 
with one denomination, the Presbyterian. He served as squire of Union 
township, this countv, for quite a number of years. Mrs. Bell was a native 
of Ohio. 



44.6 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Boylcs there were born eight children, five girls and 
three boys; the boys all died in infancy. The girls are: Delcina, wile of 
Frank Wonders, of Frankfort; Carrie Bell, wife of l.anda Elliott, a farmer 
near Miehigantown ; Fannie May. wife of William Price, of Union town- 
ship; Anna Mamie, wife of Parks Robinson, near Sedalia; and Bessie E.. 
wife of Smith Salmon. 

In 1864 lie was drafted while threshing wheat, but bought bis release, 
paying eight hundred dollars. At that time he was the father of three 
small children. 



JEFFERSON PARKER HOLLOWAY. 

Tefferson Parker Ilolloway, owner of Pleasant View Farm, consisting 
of two hundred and eighty acres in section 10, of Perry township. Clinton 
cm, ,ly, was born in Boone county. Indiana, October 8, 1850. He is a son 
of Thomas Ilolloway, a native of Montgomery county, this state. The fam- 
ily is of English ancestry, and have been in America for many generations, 
proving to be excellent and loyal citizens all the while. Thomas Holloway 
grew to manhood on the home farm, and. being a pioneer child, found plenty 
of hard work to do when a boy in the development of the farm from the 
wilds. He received a meager education in the old-time schools. In early 
manhood he married Sally M. Truitt, a daughter of Anderson Truitt, of 
English descent and an early settler in this part of Indiana, where he secured 
government lai ' patent for " i same being si; 1 ed by Andre Jackson. 

One hundred and Lwenty acres oi this land .is ni .. »wned by the ibject of 
this sketch, constituting his home place. Anderson Truitt reared a large 
family, one son. Parker Truitt. is a prosperous farmer and well known 
citizen of this county. The mother of our subject died on the home farm at 
the early age of thirty two years, leaving five children: Enoch, a soldier in 
the Civil war and now living in Minnesota; Jefferson Parker, of ibis review; 
Tohn T.. I. N. and Mahala. The father of these children was a soldier in 
the One Hundredth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Company G, and saw con- 
siderable hard service. He was with General Sherman on his march to the 
sea through Georgia. He was shot in the mouth and lost seven teeth and 
part of the jaw. " He died at Danville, Illinois, at the age of seventy-two 
years. He was a member of the Methodist church. 

Tefferson P. Holloway spent his boyhood on the farm and there learned 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 44/ 

the various phases of general agricultural pursuits. I le had little opportunity 
to attend school, hut, remaining a student all his life, he is a well eclu< itcd 
man. 

In iN;<>, when twenty years of age Mr. Holloway married Mary E. 
Dukes, a woman of fine attributes of head and heart, who has proven to be 
an excellent helpmeet. She was horn January 12, 1853, and is a daughter of 
William S. Dukes, horn in Ohio, from which state he came to Indiana and 
lived in Boone county for many years. He was born in 1825 and died in 
[892 at the age of sixty-seven years. He was a leading farmer and extensive 
stock shipper of his community, a man highly respected by all. He was a 
member of the Methodist church and a trustee of the same for some time. 
The death of the mother occurred in 1912 at the advanced age of eighty-three 
years. She had remarried, her second husband being U: C. McKenzie, now 
deceased. 

Our subject began life for himself by renting land. Managing well he 
soon was enabled to purchase a farm of his own and each succeeding year has 
found him further advanced. He first purchased forty-five acres, then pur- 
chased the Truitt estate of one hundred and twenty acres, later adding to his 
holdings until h now has two hundred and eighty acres as stated above, con- 
stituting one of the most desirable and productive farms in the county, on 
which he carries on general farming and stock raising, reaping large annual 
rewards for his outlay of labor and good management. He has an attractive 
rural home in the midst of pleasant surroundings, and his outbuildings are 
large and convenient, everything about his place denoting thrift and pros- 
peritv. He always keeps an excellent grade of live stock, preparing large 
numbers for the market from time to time. His place is located three miles 
east of Colfax. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Holloway : Dr. William 
A., a graduate of Bellevue Medical College, Xcw York City, and post graduate 
of the Polyclinic Institute of that city, now one of the leading physicians of 
Logansport, Ind. ; Thomas C, educated in the State university at Blooming- 
ton, Ind., a successful farmer and stock man of Clinton county, owns a fine 
farm of one hundred acres, married, has two sons; Asher E., a graduate of 
electric engineering, from Purdue University, Lafayette, Inch, now married 
and living at San Diego, Cal. 

Fraternally, Mr. Holloway is a member of the Masonic Order at Colfax. 
Politicallv, he is a staunch Republican and has long been active in the interest 
of his party, and regarded as a local leader. He was elected to the stale legis- 



g CLINTON ("' NTY, INDIANA. 

, ature as representative from'tlii. county in 1907. He made a nolahlc tight in 
,-e-ard to the county license question ami the liquor law. 

* Personally Mr. Hollowa) is a nun of fine presence, one whom ,1 is a 
pleasure to meet. He is cordial, gentlemanly obliging and a ; ^» «j c ^ 
Lplary habits. Both he and his wife are worthy members of the Me hodist 
Episcopal church at Colfax, and they stand high m all circles m winch the) 
moved. 



CHARLES B. McCLAMROCH. 

Whether the elements of success in .his life are innate attributes of the 
individual, or whether they are quickened by a process of development is im- 
possible to clearly determine. Yet the study of a successful he whatever 
the field of endeavor, is none the less interesting and profitable by reason 
of the existence of this same uncertainty. In studying the life histo y of 
Charles B McClamroch, prominent business man and leading agriculturist 
of Kirklin township, Clinton county, and one of the substantial ana enter- 

ismo- citizens of f s section of Indiana, we find many quaht.es m Ins make- 
^pTt would insure success in any career if properly directed In his case, 

ha resulted in a life of good to the community, and to himself and family. 
The plend d success which has come to Mr. McClamroch is directly traceable 

1 he' s^nt points in his character. With a mind capable of planning he 
combled a win strong enough to execute his well-formulated purposes, and 
his great energy, sound judgment, keen discrimination and perseverance have 
resulted in the accumulation of a handsome property, and at the same tune 
he has proven himself in every way to be a worthy son of a worthy sue. 

Mr. McClamroch was bom December 8 186: in .KM* townsh p, 
Clinton county. He is a son of Robert and Elizabeth J (Ho ta^ 
Clamroch Robert McClamroch was born in Butler county Ohm. October 
24 1834- His ancestral record is traceable through several generations to 
Gotland, from which country his great grandfather emigrated to America 
fn our Colonial days, and settled in North Carolina, n tins state Ins son 
James McClamroch, grandfather of Robert McClamroch, was born grew to 
rnanhood, there married Elizabeth Cornell, and was the father o the ^ follow- 
ing children: Thomas, father of Robert ; jan.es, John, Mrs. Marti J Long- 
feflow and Mrs. Sarah Beal. Thomas McClamroch was born ,n Angus 1808 
in North Carolina, but a year later the family removed from that state to 
Butler county, Ohio, settling on a far,... There he gre* to manhood, and 






3 



g^?? %Jo^<^u^ 



CLINTON C'OI.'NTY, INDIANA. • 44') 

was united in marriage to Nancy Bildridgc, who was born in Ohio, November 
15. [815. The parents of Mrs. McClaniroch were Daniel anil Sarah (Woods) 
Baldridge, both natives of Ohio and members of old and highly respected 
families of Butlci county. Aftei hi marriage Thomas McClamroch engaged 
in fanning, which he carried on in Ohio until 1S3S. Then he emigrated to 
Indiana, locating in Boone county, where he purchased a tract of wild land, 
which he afterward cleared and developed into a good farm, fie possessed 
abilities as a trader, and during a residence in Boone county, covering a 
peril id of about eleven years, he became the possessor of over eleven hundred 
acres of land, besides other valuable property. In 1849 he moved to Indianap- 
olis, from which time until his death. December 15, 1850, he lived a life of re- 
tirement. He was a man of exi ,: judgment and intelligence, an earnest 
member of the Christian church, which he assisted liberally with his mea'ns, 
and until 1854 he supported the Democratic party, but after that year was a 
strong adherent of the principles taught by the Republican party. 

Robert McClamroch was four years old when brought by his parents 
to Boone county, Indiana. In his youth he assisted his father in the work on 
the farm, and such education as he gained was that afforded by the common 
schools, which he attended during the winter season until he was twenty- 
one years of age, when he entered what is now Butler College, then known 
as the Northwestern Christian University, at Indianapolis. He then accepted 
a position with the old Idianapolis, Cincinnati & Lafayette Railroad Company, 
now the Big Four, as bridge repairer, holding the position four years. Feb- 
ruary 7, 1858, he married Elizabeth J. Hollcraft, daughter of Abraham Holl- 
craft and wife, and of this union seven children were born: Mary F., mar- 
ried to C. K. Smith; Charles B., the subject of this sketch; Thomas (dec), 
Abraham A., James, Nancy, married to Nathan Frith (dec), then to H. C. 
McClamroch, and Grace, married to James Lucas The mother of the above 
named children, passed to her rest on November 8, 1896. 

For two years after his marriage Robert McClamroch engaged in farm- 
ing on the old homestead, removing then to Indianapolis, but not being sat- 
isfied with his residence in the capital city, he moved to ;t farm in Kirklin 
townshin. Clinton county. This was in the early sixties, ami here he continued 
to reside until the year 1891. Many years before this date, however, he had 
become an important factor in the business world. His mind had a financial 
trend anil he gradually became interested in banking affairs. This interest 
took practical shape in 1^74, when he was made director in the Farmers' 
Bank at Frankfort. In 18S1 he was made president of the institution, a place 
which his integrity and ability retained for him continuously up to the time 
v29) 



450 CLINTON CO! . IM" 

of his death. The- demands of his business in the county seat became such that 
in l89I he moved to Frankfort and retained his residence there up to the 
end, the final summons coming to him on January 22, 1900, at the family 

residence on South [ackson street. 

In a business wa } he was eminentlj successful, and he left what was 
babl) , thc largest estate in Clinton county, estimated at a fourth of a mil- 
lion dollars, his holdings consisting ,f several hundred acres of Clmton 
county real estate, city property, a larg, stock «n the banners Lank of iank- 
fort and valuable holdings of realty in [ndianapohs and Marion county. Ik 
also carried heavv life insurance. In attaining to this high position in the 
business and financial ...rid Mr. McClamroch retained to a remarkable degree 
the good will and . ^ 1 iiknce of those will, whom he bad transact, ns dany 
indeed, are there no* among Frankfort and Clinton county cozens who were 
materially helped b } him. In judging human nature he had few superiors, 
having the rare faculty of closely estimating a man as to his business and 
personal integrity. This endowment stood well to Ins advantage and to a 
of the institution of which he was the bead, but it can truthfully be saul tha* 
he never used this faculty as an oppressor. He was of decisive character open 
in his expression and tenacious in his purpose, and while never lostng sight of 
a full and complete regard for the rights and privileges of others, he was un- 
yielding in protecting that which he clearly thought his own. Personally he 
was unpretentious, unassuming and always courteous. He appeared to have 
no higher ambition than to be honest and successful, and none who knew bun 
well ever questioned but that he was both. In a social way he was pleasant 
and irenerous to his friends. 

At the time of Robert McClamroch's death lengthy tributes were paid 
ni „,bv the local press, which, to cop) in full would far transcend the limits 
of the' present article, so we quote only the toll-wing paragraph from The 
Frankfort Evening News, of January 22, 1900: 

"In the dcatli of Robert McClamroch Clmton county loses one of its 
most valued and hck, « d citizens. He was a man universally esteemed While 
a man of great wealth his success never excited the envy of the people, as is 
so frequently the case, and the writer has the first time to hear an ,1 word 
spoken of him. His charities, while not paraded, were many. There ate hosts 
Jf people throughout tins and adjoining counties w ho have been recipients 
of financial assistance of a substantial kind from this great-hearted modest 
m an who will bear witness to this statement. His interprets of the word 
charity was not indiscriminate giving but to help those who were willing to 
help themselves. He was never known to force an honest debtor and there are 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 151 

rrutny prosperous people today who owe their success to Mr. McClamroch's 
kindness in starting tlicm in business, lie was a splendid judge of human 
nature — could tell the worthy from the unworthy with wonderful accuracy, 
and n creditor was always safe in his hands. It was due to this rule which he 
adopted in earh life, that he won the admiration (and held it) of all with 
•whom he came in contact; due to this admirable trait of character that the 
genuine sorrow over his death exist: today throughout the community." 

Robert McClamroch was preceded to the grave by his estimable wife 
four years, she having passed to tlu silent land November 8, 1896, alter a 
lingering illness at the family residence in Frankfort. She was horn July 19, 
1835, grew to womanhood and was educated at Kirklin, Clinton county. She 
was a prominent member of the < !hri tian church, and was always active in its 
work. She was universally loved and respected by her large circle of acquaint- 
ances to whom she was endeared bv her many virtues. Kind and charitable, 
she was always the friend of the need) and distressed, a comfort in the hour 
of sorrow to those about her. The memory of her good deeds will continue 
to live on in the hearts of those wdio knew her. 

Charles B. McClamroch grew to manhood in Kirklin township, this 
county. His early education, which he received in the district schools there 
and in Frankfort, has been greatly supplemented by wide study and actual 
contact with the business world until today he is an exceptionally well in- 
formed man. 

Oil April 8, 1891, he married F.ffie Berry, who was horn in the year 
1871, in Jackson township, Clinton county, Indiana. She is a daughter of 
James and Louisa (Burchart) Berry, an influential and highly esteemed 
family of this county, and here Mrs. McClambroch grew to womanhood and 
received a common school education. She is a lady of many estimable at- 
tributes and is a favorite with a wide circle of friends. 

The union of our subject and wife has been graced by the birth of two- 
children: Mary, born June 7, 1895, and Charles, born April 8, 1903. 

Charles B. McClamroch began life for himself on the farm in Kirklin 
township soon after he had quit school. He had much natural ability as a 
judge of livestock and soon began buying and shipping on a large scale, be- 
ing very successful from the start, and he won the sobriquet of "The Kid 
Stock Buver." In this vocation he was nearly always thrown with much older 
men who marveled at his good judgment and tact. Although known widely 
as a business man and banker, he has always carried on a large live stock- 
business, raising large numbers annually and preparing them for the market, 
and he has for many years ranked among the most extensive and progressive 



452 i UNION COUNTY, INDIANA. 

general agriculturists of Clinton county. He owns four hundred and forty- 
seven acres in Kirklin township individually, and in partnership with his 
brother owns three hundred and twenty acres in another part oi the same 
township, lit.' lives in a commodious, modernlv furnished and attractive home 
on the former tract. Mis land is all under a high stale oi improvement and 
cultivation, a small portion being in timber and pasture. 

In the year 1908 he and Eli ]. Goar organized a state bank in the village 
of Kirklin, of which lie has been president for some time, discharging the 
duties of the same in a manner as to reflect much credit upon himself and to 
the eminent satisfaction of the stockholders and patrons of the bank, which 
is regarded as one of the soundest and safest banks of ibis part of the state, 
and its prestige and large success lias been due to the wise management, keen 
foresight and honest dealings of Mr. McClamroch. 

Politically, he is a Progressive, and while he is deeply interested in all 
public matters as affecting the general upbuilding of bis count}-, lie has not 
cared for the emoluments of office, preferring to devote bis exclusive atten- 
tion to bis large personal interests. Fraternally he belongs to the Masonic 
Order, Knights of Pythias, and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, all 
of Kirklin. He seems to have inherited many of the sterling traits of char- 
acter of his honored father, and is therefore popular with all classes and de- 
serving of the high esteem in which be is universally held. 



CATHARINE BEWSEY. 



The life of this estimable lady has been as an open book, and those who 
know her best find least to criticize, for she is the possessor of those praise- 
worth)- characteristics of head and heart that never fail to win friends and 
retain them. She is industrious and a good manager. She always finds time- 
to help others on the highway of life, and therefore knows thai happiness 
which is truest and which can only come with unselfish service. 

Mrs. Catharine l'.ewsev. widow of Manson A. Bewsey, of Colfax, Clin- 
ton county, was born in this locality, reared and educated here. She is a 
daughter of Isaac Goodnight, now deceased, for many years a prominent 
farmer of Perry township. Tie was a native of Virginia, of an excellent old 
family of that state, and here he grew to manhood and married Alvaline 
Davis on January 18, 1840. she being one of a family of ten children, born 
to John Davis, Sr.. a sturdy pioneer, who lived to be eighty-five years old. 



CLINTON COl'N IV, INDIANA. 



a'?:> 



Uvalinc Davis died May r 7 , ""M- She was one of two children, her broth- 
er [oel Goodnight, lives in Coif;, Mrs. Rewseys parents were both r 
bers" of the Christian church, the fathc, having been an elder in the same. 

M \ Bewsey was horn on the old homestead in Perry township March 
„ lS(ll He was a son of Samuel and Elizabeth ( Dukes) Bewsey, one of 
the best known of the early families of Clinton county, the Bewseys hav 
come from Ohio to Indiana in an earh day. The father of M. A. R« vv.sej 
died at the age of sixty-eight years, and the mother passed away at the age 
of sixty-eight years. They were married in 1840. They were both mem- 
1, ( ' the Methodist Episcopal church. Their children were Manson V. 
Favorite H and Mrs. Elmedia Pay™. The father was a soldier 111 tin I 
army during the Civil war, taking part in stopping Morgan's raid into Indi- 
ana He was wounded in the foot. 

M \ Bewsey was reared on the home farm and there assisted with the 
work when a box'. He received a good common school education. On De- 
cember -O 1882, he and Catharine Goodnight were married. They spent 
about twenty years on the farm in Perry township, where Mr. Bewsey be- 
came noted for his fine stock, especially horses. He made a pronounced suc- 
cess also in general farming, his farm always being well unproved and well 
tilled His splendid road horses and other fine stock were greatly admired 
by all who saw them, and he was regarded as one of the test judges oi horses 
in this section of the state. He finally removed to Colfax, where he had an 
attractive and modern bungalow, in winch his widow still res.de-. It is lo- 
cated near the Christian church, of which Mr. Bewsey was a leading mem- 
ber and a liberal supporter. He was a member of the building committee for 
some time, and when he was summoned to his reward on April 1. 1912. his 
loss was greatly deplored by the community and the church, for he was a 
useful citizen and a man who WM esteemed hy all who knew him lor Ins 
public spirit and exemplary personal habits. 

To Mr and Mrs. Bewsev one child was born, a daughter. Estella Edith, 
wh0 married Tess Pollett on August ,5. 1903. She passed to her rest at .be 
age of twenty-three years and ten months. She was a young lady of many 
praiseworthv traits and a favorite with her many friends. She had united 
with the Christian church February 3 . [902. Father and daughter are now 
sleeping side bv side in the cemetery at Colfax. 

Fraternally Mr. Bewsey was a charter member of the Knights of 
Pythias and was keeper of records and seal for about seven years; also a 
member of the Modem Woodmen. 



454 CLINTON COUNTY, 1X1)1 \X.\. 



JOSEPH A. McBRI] >Ii 



Foresight is one of the greatest assets of the individual. The average 
man has a good hindsight. We all know what we should have done yester- 
day, what investments ought to have been made last year. The real problem 
is to know what to do today. There have always been great opportunities 
in Clinton count} for the young and middle-aged men who were not afraid 
to go into the fields and work and wait for time to bring them recompense 
for their years of toil. Yes, both in the countn and in the town, there have 
been for a century, and are yet, great opportunities in Clinton county await- 
ing the man of foresight and industry. 

One of the well known citizens of Washington township who has been 
alert to the present day opportunities in the locality of which this history 
treats is Joseph A. McBride, who was born here on the old homestead Octo- 
ber 27. 1863. He is a son of Thomas McBride, deceased, one of the pioneer 
settlers of this county, who was born in Butler county, Ohio, and was a son 
of William McBride, who was born in Ireland, of Scotch-Irish parentage. 
He emigrated to the United States when young and here spent the rest of his 
life. Both William McBride and his wife, Sarah, are deceased and are 
buried in this township. They wore the parents of four sons and one daugh- 
ter. 

Thomas McBride was born in 1836, was reared amid pioneer condi- 
tions, and received a meager schooling in a log .school house. He married 
Margaret J. Fickle, also of a fine old family, a daughter of Joseph Fickle, 
who was a son of William Fickle, the latter having been one of the largest 
landowners in Clinton county, owning at one time two thousand and five 
hundred acres, most of it having been bought of the government. He came 
to this county about [832. Joseph Fickle's mother was known in her maiden- 
hood as Elizabeth Brown, a daughter of Judge Brown, a leading citizen here 
in his day. The following children were born to Thomas McBride and 
wife: Joseph A., of this review: Frank A., Ira. Charles and Alpv. Two 
children died in early life. The father was a Democrat, and both he and his 
wife are members of the United Presbyterian church. 

Joseph A. McBride was reared on the home farm and he received a 
common school education. He spent eleven years as a teacher, giving great 
satisfaction, his services being in much demand. He was married on March 
10, 1886, to Hattie V. Harshman. a daughter of Martin V. Harshman, a 
well known resident of Washington township, a son of Henry Harshman, a 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 45? 

pioneer of Clinton county, who came here from Butler county Ohio, in an 
earlv day Mrs McBride's mother was known in her maidenhood as Lliza 
Henderson. Her death occurred in ^ ? , leaving four children : Mamie O 
Hattic V., Sylvester 11., and Claude S. Her husband died m Frankfort at 
the age of seventy-seven years. 

Mr McBride owns the old Fickle homestead, one of the best farms in 
the township, and he has kept it well improved and well cultivated and the 
buildings carefully repaired. He carries on general farming and stock rais- 
ing He has a silo, ten by thirty feet. He is agent for a silo concern and 
has' sold forty within the past four months. He is an enthusiast on the silo 
question and knows all about its value to the tanner. 

To our subject and wife have been bom four children : Elsa P Elmer 
Earl died when' six years old: Thomas M. died when eight years old, and 
Ruth. Politically, our subject is a Democrat. 



WILLIAM J. CRULL. 



There is a great satisfaction to us, the younger generation, to know that 
our father, uncles, cousins, or any relation, enlisted in the armies that were 
formed in 1861 to expunge false aristocracy and slavery from the ourt^n 
states )ust as the veterans of the Civil war boasted of the deeds hen fathers 
accomplished in the Revolution or the War of i8». just so will their sons 
boast If their fathers' services in the Rebellion, ,n reeking prisons, smoky 
battlefields, and restless field hospitals. It is a gratification to write of the 
subject of this biography, for he was one of the rank and file that suffered 
through the four years in the early sixties. 

William J. Crull was born in Scioto county, O., Septembe, 6, 1836 the 
son of John H. and Sally (Squires) Crull. John Crull was a native of Oho, 
and he remained there all of his life. Nine children completed Ins family, 
three of whom still survive. 

William Crull spent the pleasant days of his youth ,n the common schools 
of the countv of his birth, and afterward utilized the training m imparting 
the same knowledge to others as a teacher. He ceased the pedagogic hf 
10 wever and entered the mercantile business, in winch he renamed 



soon 

until the southern slates seceded 



On May i 1861, Mr. Crull enlisted in Company F. One Hundred and 
Fortieth Ohio National Guard. The regiment was placed in the Army of 



456 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

West Virginia, under the command of General Crooks. Mr. (.'mil made an 
honorable and notable record while serving for the Federal cause, and in 
September, 1864, lie was mustered out at Galipolis, ( ). During the course 
of (Ik- four years' conflict, Mr. Crull made his mark by clever and careful 
work in guard and scout duty, both probably the most hazardous undertakings 
in military science. 

Mr. Crull came to this county in February, [880, and took up the agricul- 
tural work, lie continued successfully in this until he decided to retire in 
mjoo. Frankfort was chosen by Mr. Crull as a residence, and there he re- 
sides happily at this date. 

In May, [878, Mr. Crull married Emma D. Allen, the daughter of Moses 
and Rachel Allen, early settlers of this county who came from Ohio in 1834 
to go into the farming and stock' raising business. Both ot her parents are 
now dead. Two children have been horn to William Crull and wife, Fenton 
A. and William J. 

During his life, Mr. Crull has not cared to enter into public life, and so 
has held no public offices, lie is loyal to the Republican party, however, in 
more ways than one, and always does his share of the work of the Grand 
Arniv of the Republic, to which organization he is intensely devoted. 



JAMES GATH WEBSTER. M. D. 

The man who devotes his talents and energies to the noble work of 
administering to the ills and alleviating the sufferings of humanity pursues 
a calling which, in dignity, importance and beneficial results is second to no 
other. If true to his profession and earnest in bis efforts to enlarge his 
sphere of usefulness, he is indeed a benefactor of his kind, for to him more 
than to any other man are entrusted the safety, the comfort and in many 
instances the lives of those wdio place themselves under his care and profit 
by bis services. Of this class of professional men is Dr. James Gath Web- 
ster, of ColfaN, one of the pioneer physicians of Clinton county, whose 
name has long since become a household word throughout this localit) . a man 
who has stood for a long lapse of years with few peers and no superiors 
among the medical men here, during which long period of practice he has 
not only gained wide fame in his chosen vocation, but also established a 
sound reputation for uprightness and noble character in all the relations oi 
life. When but a vouth he realized that those who attained determinate 






■■-'- r% 



JAS. G. WEBSTER, M. D. 



CLTNTON COl'XTY, INDIANA. 4;- 

success in the medical profession there must be nut only given technical 
ability, but also a broad human which must pass from mere 

ment to be an actuating motive fulness. So he lias dignified and 

honored the profession by his able and self-abnegating services in which, 
through long years of close application, he has attained notable distinction 
and unqualified success. His long and useful life as one of the world's work- 
ers has been one of devotion, almost consecration, to his calling, and well 
does he merit a place of honor in a histon touching upon the lives and deeds 
of those who have given the best of their powers and talents for the aiding 
and betterment of their kind. Hi i lie most significant sense humanity's 

friend, and to those familiar with his Hf e there must come a feeling of 
gratitude in contemplation of his services and their beneficial results, dur- 
ing his practice in Clinton county, covering a period of thirty-five years, or 
since 1878. 

Dr. Webster was born at Bradford, Yorkshire, England, May 11, 1829, 
and is therefore in his eighty-fifth year, being one of the oldest practicing 
physicians of this part of Indiana, or indeed of the entire state. He is a 
descendant of a sterling old Anglo-Saxon family, being well connected 
and noted for intelligence and honest}- of principles. He is a son of a car- 
penter and joiner, his parents being George Tetley and Martha ((lath) 
Webster, both natives of Yorkshire, where they grew to maturity, were 
educated and married, and sj 1 lives until their emigration I 

United States in 1843, when the future doctor was fourteen years old. he 
being one of a family of eight children. They settled in Shelbyville, Indiana, 
when that city was but a straggling frontier village, and there the parents 
spent the rest of their lives and reared their children, becoming very com- 
fortably established through their industry. 

lames G. Webster received a common school education ami attended 
the county seminary, and having applied himself very carefully to such text- 
books as were obtainable in those early days he acquired enough knowledge 
to begin leaching which he followed with uninterrupted success for several 
years, or until he had saved enough to defray the expenses of a college course, 
for he had determined upon a career as doctor of medicine. He entered the 
New York Hygiene College, where he made rapid progress. Something of 
his high standing there is implied b\ the fact that he was retained as teacher 
in that institution, a position which be held in a manner that reflected much 
credit upon himself and to the entire satisfaction of college management, 
his fellow instructors and the students. After one month he entered the 
medical department of the University of the City of New York, which he 



458 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

thought better adapted to his needs. While in the metropolis he practiced 
his profession with success, doing special work in order to assist him in 
his college work and his profession in general. After five years, tiring of the 
work in the great city and desiring to be among homefolks in the quietude of 
a Hoosier village, he returned to Shelbyvillc, Ind., in 1868, and took up the 
general practice of medicine, meeting with great success from the start. 
Later he followed the tide of emigration which was then setting in strongly 
for the new state of Kansas and located for practice in the town of Eureka, 
where he spent six years, during which he enjoyed a large practice. Longing 
again for old associations at Shelbyville he left the Sunflower state and re- 
turned to his parental home where he continued to practice two years, then 
came to Colfax, Clinton county, in 1878, where he has continued in the 
successful practice of his profession for a period of thirty-five years, stand- 
ing in the front rank of his professional brethren in this section of the state, 
and, ever a student, he has kept full abreast of the times in all that pertains 
to his work. His library is large and composed of the best works on medical 
science obtainable, as well as much of the world's best general literature. 

Dr. Webster was married at Cincinnati, O., in 1875, to Lydia A. 
Fletcher, who was born at Moores Hill, Dearborn county, Indiana, and 
there she grew to womanhood and received her education. She was ever 
regarded as a lady of many estimable characteristics and has been a faithful 
helpmeet to her husband. This union was blessed by the birth of three sons, 
all of whom have been given excellent college educations. George is in the 
government service in the Philippines, being government examiner of ships 
in port; Charles has also been in the Philipines, engaged successfully in teach- 
ing; Frank was also engaged in educational work in the Philippines, teach- 
ing 'in a high school. The two last named have returned to the United 
States. 



WILLIAM R. GILMORE. 



One of the citizens of Perry township, Clinton county, who is deserving 
of the high esteem in which he is held throughout this locality, is William 
R. Gilmore, successful general farmer. He is one of our honored veterans 
of the great war between the states, having fought gallantly for the mainte- 
nance of the Union, sacrificing the pleasures of home, business opportunities 
and risking his life and limb in order that succeeding generations might enjoy 
to a fuller degree the fruits of peace in a united country. Such men are de- 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 45 C J 

serving even of greater respect than is shown them, for we oi the present 
generation cannot Fully realize what they had to go through with in order 
that the- serried hosts of rebellion might be put down'forever in this fair land 
of ours. 

Mr. Gilmore was born near the village of Putnamville, Putnam county, 
Indiana, on August _', 1842. lie is a son of Eli and Ellen (Brafford) Gil- 
more, both natives of Virginia, of old Scotch-Irish families, members of 
which have lived in the Old Dominion during a number of generations. 'I he 
maternal grandfather of our subject was James Brafford, who moved to 
Indiana in an early day and here spent the rest of His life. The parents of 
our subject grew up in their native community, were educated and married 
there, and to them twelve children were horn, an equal number of sons and 
daughters, namely: James, a soldier during the Civil war in the Ninth In- 
diana Volunteer Infantry, went to Colorado after the war, where he died; 
William R., of this review; Thomas II., Samuel, Jehu, Nancy, Martha, Vir- 
ginia, Ellen, Nancy (the second), and Mary Jane, (all eight deceased); 
Debby Ann Barker and John M., of Perry township. The parents of these 
children are both deceased, both having gotten well along in years before 
summoned to their rest. 

William R. Gilmore, of this sketch, was reared on the home farm and 
there he worked when a boy, receiving his education in the common schools 
of his community during the winter months, between crop seasons. When 
the Civil war came on he enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Six- 
teenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, under Capt. Sylvester Lane and Colonel 
Cruse. He began his military career at Clark's Hill, July 4, 1863, just as 
the backbone of the Confederacy was being broken at Gettysburg and Vicks- 
burg; but there remained, as it proved, plenty to do and our subject did his 
little part most faithfully, serving in several battles and skirmishes, such as 
Strawberry Plains and Tazewell, in Tennessee. He was honorably dis- 
' charged after his term of enlistment expired and returned home. 

Mr. Gilmore lived in turn in Mercer county, Illinois, near Aledo, Mis- 
souri, and near Ossawatomie, Kansas, finally returning to Indiana and locat- 
ing in Clinton county, where he has a line farm of seventy acres on which 
stands a good set of buildings and where he has made a comfortable living. 
He was married in 1875 to Bertie Alice Thompson, daughter of Joseph 
Thompson. Our subject has no children of his own, but is raising an adopted 
child, Claude Floyd, his sister's child. Politically, he is a Republican, hut 
lias never sought public honors, preferring to lead a quiet home life and at- 
tend strictly to his own business. 



460 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JESSF i: GHERF 

Prominent among the men of L'erry township. t linton county, who have 
attained a competence through their individual efforts is Jesse 11. Ghere, 
owner of Timber View Farm, of one hundred and forty-three acres in sec- 
tion 12, four and one-half miles east of Colfax. Despite his years, for he has 
recently passed his sixtieth mile-stone, Mr. Ghere is an active man, and gives 
close personal attention to his business, lie has -pent his entire life in the 
locality where he now resides, having been content with the advantages that 
(.'linton county had to offer, and he holds a high place in the estimation of his 
neighbors, who know him as a man of probit) and integrity. 

Mr. Ghere was born on March 20, 1853, in Jackson township, (."linton 
county, on the old Ghere homestead, lie is a son of Joseph Ghere, who was 
born in Pennsylvania in 1824. and who spent his earlier years in the old 
Keystone state, and when he reached manhood he married Mary Jane Is- 
grigg, who was born 111 1831. He was a son of David and Sarah (Tyson) 
Ghere, both natives of Pennsylvania. Eleven children were born to David 
and Sarah Ghere, Mrs. Sarah Price, Hiram and Joseph, being all that now 
survive. Joseph Ghere was seven years old when he came with his parents 
to Jackson township ibis county, and here he grew to maturity, received a 
common school educa ion and was 1 ried, an and his wife became par- 

ents of six children: Mrs. Martha W'ylev, Jesse 1'.., Mrs. Mary E. Cones. 
Mrs. Sarah A. Hinton, of Frankfort ; Samuel and Andrew A. The father of 
Toseph (mere died at the advanced age of eighty-three years, in njoj, and 
the mother was seventy-nine years old when she passed away. They both 
belonged to the United Brethren chruch, and were known for their honesty 
and hospitality, liked by all. 

)esse B. Ghere was reared on the home farm and there he worked hard 
when a boy. By close application he received a good common school educa- 
tion in a log cabin school. When twenty-eight years old he married Mintie 
Long, daughter of Samuel and Catherine ( Hall ) Long, of an excellent old 
pioneer family, both now deceased. The father was a native of Ohio, but in 
an early day he came to this state and located in Boone county, where he 
engaged successfully in farming. 

It was in 1906 that our subject came to Ins present farm, and since then 
he has made a number of good improvements. He has a neat home and good 
buildings in general, and on his place is always to be found an excellent 
grade of live stock. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 46] 

Two children have boon born I" Mr. and Mrs. Ghere : Lelia married 
Curtis C Pendrv, an express agent of Indianapolis; and Clifford Tyson now 
twenty-three years old, who lives at home, assisting Ins father with the work 
on the farm, having, h fact, practical charge oi the place. He received a 
good education in the common schools 

The Ghere family is one of the most highly respected in the county, and 
are noted for their industry and honesty. 



NUN BAILEY. 



It is with a degree of satisfaction that the biographer lias an opportunity 
at this juncture to write the following biographical memoir of the pioneer 
farmer and well known citizen whose name appears above, who has been lor 
many decades active in the affairs of Clinton county. The readers of this 
book, especially the younger generation, will doubtless gain inspiration from 
perusing these paragraphs to lead more industrious, kindlier and worthier 
lives, seeing what the life of Mr. Bailey has accomplished, not only individ- 
ually, but for the locality as well, affecting all with whom he has come into 
contact in an uplifting manner. He came with his parents to this section 
of the state in pioneer times and he assisted in bringing about the trans- 
formation of the lo lit} the wild uidition in which it was found .if the 
time of his arrival to iu- later day progress and improvement. 

Nun Bailey, who has spent the major portion of his life in Perry town- 
ship, he being now seventy-six years of age, was born on the old Bailey 
homestead in West Virginia in 1837. He is a son of Silas Bailey, and a 
grandson of Thomas Bailey, a soldier in the war of 1812, in which war, 
William Bailee, a son of the latter, also fought. Thomas Bailey was a son 
of [onathan Bailey, a horse trailer and dealer in old Virginia in the Colonial 
period and he bought and sold horses for the soldiers in the Revolutionary 
war. 1 fe was of Scotch-Irish ancestry. lie go! hold of a good deal of 
continental money, but by reason of its depreciation he lost most of his 
fortune. However, the government later redeemed this scrip or continental 
nione\ . 

Silas Bailey married Sarah Trotter, a native of West Virginia and a 
daughter of William Trotter, also a native of that slate. Silas Bailey and 
family removed to Ross county, Ohio, in 1838, thence to Tippecanoe county, 
Indiana, in 1839, ami soon thereaflei came on to Clinton count) where they 



462 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

established tlicir permanent home in Jackson township. Seven children were 
horn to Silas Bailey and wife: Melinda, Jam-, Nun (subject), William 
Thomas, a soldier in (he Civil war; Dorothy, Barbara, M. Jehu and Henry E. 

William Trotter, maternal grandfather i>] our subject, was a soldier in 
the war of 1812. Silas Bailey, mentioned above, started for the California 
gold fields, intending to go by water, in 1852, but died of cholera at Cleve- 
land. ('., and there he was buried. He left a widow and six children. The 
mother died at the age of sixty-three. The father of our subject was an ex- 
ceptionally large man physically, being six feet and six inches in height. 
Our subject had an uncle Trotter who was over six feet and seven inches 
tall. I Ic comes of a sturdy rac< on both sides of the house 

Nun Bailey was reared on the home farm where he found plenty if hard 
work- to do when a boy. He received a meager education in a log cabin 
school of the primitive type, the cabin being furnished with slab -cats, sod 
floor, greased paper for window panes, and a large stove in one end. He 
was married on April 1, 1869 to Matilda Ely. who was born in Montgomery 
county, Indiana, and there reared to womanhood, receiving a good common 
school education. She was a daughter of John Ely and wife, both natives 
of Ohio, from which state they came to Indiana in an early day and estab- 
lished the family home in Montgomery county where they spent the rest of 
their lives on a farm. 

Mr. Bailev is owner of a valuable farm of one hundred and fifty-three 
acre which he hi kept well improved and ill cultivated, and which has 
retained its original fertility under his skillful management. He curies on 
general and mixed farming and stock raising. He has a comfortable home 
and such outbuildings and improved farming implements as his needs re- 
quire. His family consists of five children: Laura, now living in this county; 
Guy. living in North Dakota; Jonah B., owns a good seventy acre farm in 
Perry township; [esse C, lives in Colfax, and Bertha, married to Floyd 
Frederick. The death of the mother of the above named children occurred 
on March 30, 1909. She was a good Christian woman, kind and neighborly 
and raised her children well, proving to be a faithful helpmeet to her hus- 
band during their married career of forty years. She was optimistic, always 
seeing the silver lining in the dark clouds (hat overcast life's sides for 
everyone. She was a worthy member of the Christian church, to which 'Mr. 
Bailey also belongs. He is a staunch advocate of the church and school work 
and has encouraged both all his life. He has always been noted for his kind- 
ness, steady habits and spirit of helpfulness. His home is known far and 
near as a place of old-time hospitality. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 463 

CHARLES A. DAVJS. 

The subject of this sketch is a native son of Clinton county and a repre- 
sentative of one of its sterling and honored families, lie has shown himself 
to he a man of marked individuality and enterprise, ranking among the most 
successful and popular oi our modern agriculturists, and he has labored not 
for himself alone, hut has found time to assist such worthy movements as 
have had for their objects the general improvement of his locality, whether 
in a material, civic or moral way, and no man stands higher in his community 
than he. 

Charles A. Davis, owner of The Oaks, a most desirable slock" and grain 
farm of Section -, Perry township, which place contains one bundled and 
seven acres, is the scion of one of our worthiest pioneer families, whose good 
reputation he has been careful in sustaining. He was horn on the old home- 
stead December 5, 1862. He is a son of William Davis, an early settler here, 
who was born in Ross county, Ohio. He spent his earlier years in the Buckeye 
state and there received such education as the old-time schools of his day af- 
forded, and married Edith Tharp, who was born in Gabon county, Ohio, on 
October 4, 1827. She was a daughter of James Tharp, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania. His wife was born near the city of Carlisle, that state. She was 
known in her maidenhood as Caroline Wicker, daughter of Thomas Wicker, 
who lived and died near Carlisle. James Tharp died in 1835. His family 
consisted of four sons and four daughters. The mother died at the age of 
sixty-five years. 

William Davis married Elizabeth Tharp when she was nineteen years 
old in Ross county, Ohio. John Davis was born in Virginia of an old fam- 
ily of that state. The mother, Catherine Stuckey, was born in Ohio. Her 
parents came to this country from Germany. The death of William Davis 
occurred in 1896 at the ape of seventy-two years. The)' were active work- 
ers in the Christian church of Colfax. Their children were Robert (de- 
ceased), I\Irs. Mahala Holt, Elsberry, now at home; John, at home; Darius 
(deceased) ; Charles A., of this sketch; Noah, living at Clark's Hill, Tippe- 
canoe county', and Mary Belle, married to William Hudson. 

Charles A. Davis was reared on the home farm and there did his share 
of the work during crop seasons, and in the winter time he attended the 
district schools. He was married on October 13, 1802, to Eliza J. Arbegust. 
a daughter of Benjamin and Anne (Lindsay) Arbegust. Two children 



464 



CLINTON I lU-.VTY, INDIANA. 



were born of this union, Ella wh died in childhood, and Coral, who is at 

home. 

\l,.mt this period Mr. Davis was elected county recorder In a large 
majority and he served for four years in a manner that reflected much credit 
upon himself and to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned. His books 
were in fine shape when he turned them over to his successor, for he was ac- 
curate, methodical and painstaking. He always looked out for the best in- 
terests of the county. After the expiration of his term of office he was en- 
gaged successful^ in the ahstract real estate business in partnership with 
William Milroy. He sold out his interest to Mr. Miiroy and has since en- 
extensivelv in the live stock shipping business and farming being an 
« , ent judge of all kinds of live stock. He keeps his fine farm well stocked. 
often having as many as three hundred sheep at a time. Fraternally, he is a 
member of the Masonic Order, and politically, he is a loyal Democrat. 



F. EMIL KNABE. 



The great empire of Germany has contributed a most valuable element 
of our national social fabric, and, among the worthy sons of the Teutonic 
fatherland, who stand as reputable and honorable citizens of Frankfort, 
lCCUpy a promii 'ace in the esteem and confidence of the 

public than the well known business man whose name appears a! Mr. 

Knabe will soon have resided in the city of Frankfort twenty year-, and 
it is evident, from the well wishes of the people towards him that he has 
"made good," as they say in business parlance, and has established an 
honorable reputation. | 

F Emil Knabe was horn in Leipzig, Germany. November 12. l86i, ami 
was descended from a family of florists. He spent his youth in the usual 
manner of the German youth, enjoying the benefits of the excellent primary 
educational system of his country. When he became of proper age, he en- 
tered the army, as is required by law, and served out his full turn oi three 
years in the military service. In 1893 he crossed the Atlantic to America, 
s, ttling first in the city of Washington, D. C. In .805. he came to Frank- 
fort and established bis present business as a florist, the rudiment, of this 
trade having been learned by him in Germany a- an apprentice. His estab- 
lishment now is the largest in the city, and in point of equipment and .puck 
service is one of the best in the state. Mr. Knabe has twelve thousand square 



- 





MR. AND MRS. FRIEDRICK E. KNABE 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 4(15 

feet of space in hi^ greenhouses, and grows the handsomest varieties of the 

common (lowers, as well as various species of the more uncommon and ex- 
pensive plants. lie has made a specialty of handling large contracts, often 
taking over the entire responsibilit) for the floral decorations of weddings, 
receptions, and other entertainments. Also, so satisfactory has been his 
work, that his efforts are frequently desired by outside towns. Mr. Knabe 
is a member of the American Florists Association. 

On January 7, 1904, Mr. Knabe was married to Augusta F. Kaiser, also 
a native of Germany, having been born in Urfurt, Germany, November 20, 
1875, am l coming to America in 1803. One child has been the result of this 
union, Frederick Otto, born March 17, 1908, and now in school. 

In political matters, Mr. Knabe takes the cause of the Republicans as 
the best, and in religious affairs holds membership with the Methodist church. 
Fraternally, our subject belongs to the Masonic order, the York Rite, the 
Knights and Ladies of Security, and the Woodmen of the World. 



MARION ANDERSON. 



The well known owner of Cherry Grove farm, Marion Anderson, has 
been contented to spend his life in Clinton county, and he has always had 
deeply at heart tin well-being and improvement of this locality, using his 
influenct whenever pi sible for tl unotion of enterprises calculated to be 

of lasting benefit, to his fellow men, besides taking a leading part in all move- 
ments for the advancement of the community along social, intellectual and 
moral lines. 

Mr. Anderson, who is a representative of one of our sturdy pioneer 
families, was born on February 14, 1S59, and is a son of James Anderson, 
Sr., who was born in Butler county, Ohio and was a son of Samuel Anderson, 
also a native of Ohio. The family is of Scotch-Irish descent. Samuel 
Anderson's wife was of an old Southern family and she was born in Virginia. 
Samuel Anderson and wife came to Indiana when the state was little less 
than a wilderness and here he found many things to discourage, but being 
of the true pioneer type he went to work with a will and soon had a good 
home established, first erecting a cabin in the woods, then clearing a place 
for his crops. Here he spent the rest of his life, dying at the age of eighty 
years. Mis family consisted of ten children: Jeremiah, who was a soldier in 
the Civil war, deceased; James and Elijah, both deceased; John. Samuel, Jr., 
(SO) 



466 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Griffith, Joseph, died when twenty-one years of age; Nancy, Almeda and 

Amanda. 

lames Anderson grew to manhood on the old home place, and, being 
a pioneer child, he found plenty of hard work to do when a hoy, helping to 
clear the land and develop a farm, build corduroy roads, log bams, etc. 
When twenty-one years old he married Catherine Young, daughter of David 
Young, a pioneer citizen, who married Anna Johnson. They are both long 
since deceased. The father lived in Frankfurt thirteen years prior to his 
death. The following children were horn to James Anderson and wife: 
Annie, Frank, deceased; Floyd, Marion, of this sketch; William is deceased, 
Jeremiah, Jennie Carrie, James. [>., Catherine, deceased. The death of the 
father occurred at the age of seventy-five years. He was a member of the 
Christian church and was a liberal supporter of the same, was a deacon for 
some time. His wife is still living and eighty years of age. 

Marion Anderson, of this review, was reared on the home farm and 
there worked hard when a hoy. He received his education in the public 
schools of his native community. When twenty-seven years of age he 
married Mary Leary, of an old family, daughter of Ignatius Leary, for many 
years a well known citizen of Frankfort. He was a native of County Kerry, 
Ireland, from which country he emigrated to the United States when young. 
While living in Brooklyn, Xew York, he married Ellen Curtain, a native 
of the same county in Ireland. Tin's couple came to Frankfort, inch, in 
1857, and here became well establi lied through their industry. Here the 
father's death occurred at the advanced age of eighty-four years. His family 
consisted of four children, namely: Mary, who married Mr. Anderson; Mar- 
garet Devitt, of Frankfort; Mrs. Julia Berkmeyer, and William S., who died 
at the age of fifty-three years. 

Mi. Anderson is owner of a finely improved ami productive farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres in Ferry township, which he manages in an 
able manner and which is well adapted in every way to general agricultural 
pursuits. He has a good residence and substantial outbuildings, and he 
raises an excellent grade of live stock, feeding large numbers from time to 
time for the market. His residence is one of the most attractive in the 
township and it stands in (he midst of beautiful surroundings, and his barn 
is also one of the most desirable in this part of the county. 

He has two sons, Frank J., born May 30, 1887, received both a good 
high school and business education, and graduated from Purdue University; 
in February, iqog, he married Zula Price, daughter of L T . S. Price, 
of Perry township, and here she was reared and educated. To this union 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 467 

one child, a son, has been horn, Hubert, whose birth occurred on November 
4, 791 1. Our subject's other son, Charles N., was born January 7, 1890. Jle 
attended school at Fnml t it and was later a student at Purdue University. 
Lafayette, Ind. He married Olena Weaver, of Frankfort, Ind. She is a 
daughter of Samuel Weaver and wife. 

Politically the subject of this sketch is a Republican, and he has been 
more or less active in public affairs for years. Fraternally, he belongs to 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows He is a member of the Christian 
church and his wife is a member of the Catholic church. They stand high 
in all circles in which they move. 



W. J. CRULL, JR. 

Thi.^ is a time of progress and development. Old methods arc being 
revised and old or previously accepted facts are being examined or questioned 
as never before. "Every man to his own business" no longer means that 
the knowledge of others is to be ignored by the successful business man or 
successful farmer. The successful business man, whether he be agriculturist 
or merchant knows more of the business in which he is engaged than any 
outsider can know; but this is no longer interpreted to mean that the suc- 
cessful busi ess man ma) not learn many useful and profitable facts 
principles from the outsider who has made a thorough studv of a large num- 
ber of business establishments and their methods. 

One of the successful young farmers and slock men of Washington 
township, Clinton county, who is quick to adopt a new idea, if it be practicable, 
no matter where it is obtained, is W. J. Crull, Jr. System seems to be the 
watchword on his farm, and consequently everything runs smoothly. 

Mr. Crull was born in this township and count}' on November 5, 1886. 
He is a son of W. J. Crull, Sr.. a prominent and well-to-do retired fanner 
and business man and a veteran of the Civil war. lie resides in an at- 
tractive home in the city of Frankfort, and is one of the most substantial 
citizens and large tax payers of the county. He owns two well improved 
and valuable farms in the western part of Washington township, aggregating 
four hundred and sixty-five acres, of as productive land as the township 
affords. Idle elder Crull was born in Ohio some seventy years ago, coming 
from a sterling old Buckeye family, noted for its industry and honesty. He 
was reared and educated in his native state, coming to Clinton countv when 



46S CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

a young man and here soon got well established through liis good manage- 
ment. He married Emma D. Allen, daughter of Moses Allen, also a fine 
old family. 

To'W. J. Crnll, Sr., and wife two children were born, F. Allen and 
W. J., Jr. 

\V. J. Crull, Sr., is a strong Republican, and has been more or less in- 
fluential in local party affairs in past years, lie i.^ a member of the local 
post of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

The immediate subject of this review was reared on the home place 
in this county and he was taught to work and to handle live stock when a 
boy. He obtained a good education in the common and high schools. 

On March 4, 1008, he married Mamie Harshman, who was born, 
reared and educated in Clinton county. She is a daughter of Edward Harsh- 
man, a sketch of whom appears on another page in this work. The union of 
our subject and wife has resulted in the birth of one child, Emma Lucille. 

Young Crull has charge of his father's large farm and he is making a 
pronoun: ed success in the management of the same, carrying on general 
farming and stock raising on a large scale, feeding annually large numbers 
of cattle and hogs for the market. He has a beautiful rural home and every- 
thing about the place denotes thrift and good taste. He is a young man of 
pleasing address and is well liked by all who know him, and, judging from 
his past excellent record as a business man he gives very promise of eventu- 
ally ranking among the leading agriculturists and stock men of the county. 



JOHN J. KALLNER. 



The people of Perry township, Clinton count)', point to John J. Kallner, 
the proprietor of the Tree Lawn Farm, as one of their most valued citizens, 
admiring him for his high moral character, for his life among them for many 
years has been as an open book. That they place implicit confidence in him 
is evidenced by the fact that they have selected him as their delegate to 
numerous conventions and to occupy several local offices in various lines of 
public service, the duties of which he has ever discharged witli credit to him- 
self and to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned. 

Mr. Kallner was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, in the north- 
western part, on April 14, i860. He is a son of Matthew and Rosa (Shafer) 
Kallner, an excellent and thrifty old German family, both parents having 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 4^9 

been bom in Germany, in which country they spent their earlier ycavs, and 
they became very comfortably established in the old Keystone state, the 
father toiling as a village blacksmith, having learned his trade in Germany. 
He became an expert iron and steel workman. His death occurred in 1S71, 
at the age of sixty-five years. He was known for his sterling honesty in all 
relations of life, and was a faithful member of the German Lutheran church. 
The death of the mother occurred at Portsmouth at the advanced age of 
eighty-seven years. Six children were born to these parents, four sons and 
two daughters; Jacob J., John J. (our subject), William, Caroline, David 
(deceased), and Margaret (deceased). 

The subject of thi -ketch grew to manhood in his native stale and when 
a boy assisted his father with his blacksmithing, and he received his educa- 
tion in the common schools. Early in life be came to Indiana and worked 
five years for W. J. Crull, of Frankfort, then rented a farm. He managed 
well and saved his earnings, and in due course of time purchased a good 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres in iSc/,. He is now the owner of a 
finely improved and productive farms of one hundred and seventy-three acres 
in Perry township, Clinton county, which is regarded as one of the best farms 
in the township. He has an attractive residence and substantial outbuildings, 
including a modern garage for his automobile, etc. Beautiful shade trees 
stand on the lawn and about the buildings, and an excellent grade of live 
stock is to be seen in bis fields. His place is pleasantly located two miles 
east of Colfax. 

Mr. Kallner was married in 1885, when twenty-five years old, to Soph- 
ronia Cunningham, daughter of Nicholas Cunningham and wife, of Butler 
county, Ohio, and a prosperous and highly respected family, owning a good 
farm in Jackson township. 

Four children, three sons and one daughter, have been born to our sub- 
ject and wife: Clayton C. married and now- living in Carroll county; A. B., 
at home, took a six months' course in the Marion Business College, now 
twenty-one years old; \. Fleet, sixteen years old; Ruth, eighteen years old, 
was graduated from the Colfax high school with the class of 191 3. 

Mr. Kallner is one of the leaders in the ranks of the Democratic party in 
Perry township, and bis advice is always sought at elections. He has done 
much for the success of the party in Clinton county In the year 1900 he 
was elected township trustee by a large majority, having been the first 
Democratic trustee Perry township had had for sixteen years. He proved to 
be a most efficient official. He has been chosen frequently as a delegate from 



470 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

his locality to township, county and state political and other conventions, 
and, being active, well read and a fluent talker he always makes his influence 
felt. He is a member of Masonic Lodge, No. 472, and lias been treasurer of 
the same for many years. He is also a member of Mercy Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias, and he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he 
is a trustee and a liberal supporter. His wife and daughter are also mem- 
bers of this church. 

Mr. Kallner is a stockholder in the Farmers' Elevator at Colfax and is a 
director in the same. Personally, he is a genial, friendly and helpful gentle- 
man whom everybody likes. 



JAMES ANDERSON 

Perry township, Clinton count}', has no more progressive farmer than 
James Anderson, although many may farm on a more extensive scale, yet 
he handles his place with such skill and sound judgment that he makes his 
acres produce more than is grown by some on much larger farms. He is 
a man of keen observation and is also a student of both nature and literature 
as they bear on the various phases of his vocation. 

Mr. Anderson, owner of Maple Grove farm, was born on the old 
homestead in Pen- township, this county, on September 25, i860. He is 
a son of James Anderson, Sr. This family was among the early settlers of 
the county, having located here in 1833 and from that early day to the 
present they have performed well their part in the work of development, 
and no family has been held in higher regard here than they. The paternal 
grandfather, Samuel Anderson, found upon his arrival a vast wilderness, in 
which the cabins of first settlers were as yet few and far between. He was 
a man of courage and resource and he set to work with a will to clear a 
place for his cabin and put out a crop, and in due course of time he was very 
comfortably established. His son, James, father of our subject, was born 
in 1830 and was therefore only three years old when he was brought to this 
locality. Here he grew to manhood and assisted in clearing and developing 
the home farm, growing up to know what hard work meant, and he had but 
meager opportunities to be educated. He devoted his life successfully to 
farming in Perry township. He was one of a family of ten children, 
seven sons and three daughters. James Anderson, Sr., married, in early 
manhood, Catherine Young, who was born and reared in Clinton county. She 
was a daughter of David Young, also a pioneer settler. To James Anderson, 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 47' 

St., and wife ten children wore born, six sons and lour daughters, some of 
whom died in early life. Among the number were Lloyd, Marion, Jerry, 
Mrs. Jennie Savers', Mrs S. M. Philips, Catherine, died in 1887, and James, 
Jr. Frank and William both died early. The death of the father of these 
children occurred in 1905 at the age of seventy-live years. Politically, he- 
was a Republican, and was a member of the Christian church, and was for 
many years an officer in the church. He was a good and useful man, liked by- 
all who knew him. 

James Anderson, Jr.. was reared on the home farm and there worked 
hard when a boy. He received his education in the public schools and the 
Frankfort high school, attending the latter two terms. He began life for 
himself as a railroader, being employed by the Clover Leaf Route for a 
period of eight years, during which he gave them very faithful and satis- 
factory service. Finally tiring of this line of work he rented a farm, the 
old homestead of his uncle, Elijah Anderson, and soon had a good start 
farming. He is now owner of a well kept place of ninety-four acres of rich 
land, on which he carries on general farming and stock raising. He has. 
a cozy residence and an excellent barn. He feeds considerable live stock 
from year to year. 

Politically he is a Republican, and he affiliates with the Christian church. 
He does his part in supporting good public measures. Mr. Anderson was. 
married June 25, 191 3. to Miss Emily Johnson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
A. M. Tohnson of Frankfort. He is a member of tin K. of P. order. 



CHARLES A. ERMENTROUT 

One of the enterprising business men and public-spirited citizens of 
Mulberry, Clinton county, is Charles A. Ermentrout, a man who would have 
succeeded in any line of endeavor or under any environment for he seems to 
possesses by nature those attributes that make for success wherever found. 
Such men are a distinct asset to any community. He is proprietor of a 
popular livery and feed stable. 

Mr. Ermentrout was born near Colfax, Montgomery county, Indiana, 
October 28, 1872, a representative of an old family of that section of the 
Hoosier state. He is a son of Joseph II. Ermentrout, who is now making 
his home with our subject. His father was an earl}- settler of Montgomery 
county, having come from Virginia to Indiana about the year 1832. The 
mother of our subject was known in her maidenhood as Mary Davis, and 



472 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

she was a native of Clinton county, of which section the Davises were early 
settlers. The mother of our subject is deceased. She left three children. Mrs. 
Clara Lanum, of Lafayette; Rena, who lives in White county, this slate; 
and Charles A., of this sketch. Politically, the father is a Democrat, and a 
member of the Baptist church, of which his wife was also a member. 

Charles A. Ermentrout was reared on the home farm, and he received 
his education in the public schools. Early in life he spent two years on a 
farm in South Dakota, later returning to Clinton county, where he engaged 
in farming. For some time he has been proprietor of the livery and feed 
barn at Mulberry, which is located near the center of the town, and near the 
railroad and traction lines. He has a large barn, seventy-five by one hun- 
dred feet, which is well arranged and well equipped for a general livery busi- 
ness. Eighty horses can be fed at a time. A good grade of horses is always 
kept and modern vehicles of all kinds, so that the traveling public is properly 
accommodated at all times. Most of the buggies are rubber tired. A good 
automobile is also kept, for those wishing to make long trips quickly. His 
rates are reasonable, and his barn is very popular and is known throughout 
the country. He keeps excellent help, his drivers being familiar with all the 
roads, nearby towns and even farms of this locality. 

Mr. Ermentrout was married in White county, Indiana, in 1896, to 
Rosa Utley, who has proven to be a most faithful helpmeet. She was born 
in White county and there was educated and grew to womanhood. She is 
a daughter of John Utley, a soldier of the Civil war. 

To our subject and wife one child has been born, Carroll H., who is now 
eight years old. 

Politically, our subject is a Democrat. 



SAMUEL G. FICKLE. 



It must be gratifying indeed, to know that our own family has been 
influential in the upbuilding of the locality in which we reside and that they 
have borne unstained reputations and that we have so ordered our daily lives 
before men in all vicissitudes of this none too pleasant world that our 
neighbors may conscientiously say of us that we have kept entirely un- 
tarnished the bright escutcheon of our family name. That is just what 
Samuel G. Fickle, successful fanner of Madison township, Clinton county, 
has done. Those who peruse the history of this locality are familiar with 
the facts of this fine old family which has honored Clinton county with their 



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CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 473 

homes since the earl)' days, and vvc are glad to herein set forth more of the 
personal side of their lives. 

Mr. Fickle, of this sketch, who seems to have inherited the thrift of his 
German ancestors and the wit of his Irish forebears, was born in Clinton 
tounty, on July n, i860. He is a son of Stewart G. Fickle and wife. 
William Fickle the first of the family born in America, first saw the light of 
day in Virginia in [7S4. When ten years old he removed with his parents 
from the Old Dominion to Perry county, Ohio, which country was then prac- 
tically a wilderness, and there he grew to manhood and married. lie became 
His son, Isaac Fickle, was born in Perry county, Ohio, April 2, 1815. There 
he grew to manhood and on February 14, 1838, he married Jane M. Miller, 
daughter of Robert and Nancy (Bell) Miller, natives of South Carolina, 
where the daughter was also born, the date of her birth being September 
24, 1816. Her father came to Clinton county, in 1829, locating in Madison 
township where he lived until 1841, then sold his property and moved to 
Mercer county, Illinois, where both parents died, her death occurring on 
December 22, 1863, leaving four children. 

Stewart G. Fickle, mentioned above, was born in Perry county, Ohio, 
and there he grew to manhood and married Fliza Durham, daughter of 
Dennis Durham and wife. They came to Washington township, Clinton 
county, and here they both died. 

Ten children were born to Stewart G. Fickle and wife: Dennis, a car- 
penter and contractor at Frankfort; Almeda, the widow of Andrew Ghere; 
Nancy, single, now living in Frankfort ;. and Samuel G., of this sketch. 
The death of the father of these children occurred in 1869 at the age of 
fifty-three years. Fie devoted his life to farming. His wife died at the age 
of forty years. 

Samuel G. Fickle grew to manhood on the farm and he received his 
education in the public schools. Fie was eight years old when his father died, 
and he went to live with Robert Fickle, a son of Isaac Fickle, and there 
grew to manhood. In 1879, when nineteen years old, he married Marinda 
McClary, who for a period of thirty-four years has proven to be a faith- 
ful helpmeet. She was born in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, and there reared 
and educated. She is a daughter of Harvey K. and Kate (Fink) McClary, 
natives of Ohio. The death of the father occurred at the age of seventy- 
two years, and the mother was sixty-two when summoned to her eternal 
rest. Eleven children were born to them: Fliza Jane, Marianda, who married 
Mr. Fickle; Byron, and Mrs. Olive Beck. 

Mr. Fickle located in Washington township after his marriage and 



474 CLINTON' COUNTY, INDIANA. 

here he lias engaged in farming on different farms. He has improved places 
and sold for a profit. He now owns two good houses and lots in Mul- 
berry, and formerly owned another which he sold. He has a substantial 
and modernly appointed large brick house in Mulberry. He has been very 
successful in his business life and can now live in comfort and without 
apprehension for the future. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Fickle the following children were born: Minnie, who 
received a good education in Lafayette at a business college, now in In- 
dianapolis; Nellie, married to John L. Davis, of Lafayette, parents of two 
children, Dorothy and Ruth; Alice M., at home, and Ida, attending school. 

Politically, Mr. Fickle is a Republican. He is a member of th< United 
Brethren church, as is also his wife. 



GEORGE 11. MILLER. 



The prosperity and substantial welfare of a town or community are in 
a large measure due to the enterprise and wise foresight of its business men. 
It is progressive, wide-awake men of affairs that make the real history of a 
community, and their influence in shaping and directing its varied interests 
is difficult to estimate. George H. Miller, the present able and popular cashier 
of the Citizens National Bank of Mulberry, Clinton county, is one of the enter- 
prising spirits to whom is due the recent substantial growth of the town whose 
interests he has at heart. With a mind capable of planning, he combines a 
will strong enough to execute his well-formulated purposes, and his great 
energy, keen discrimination and perseverance have resulted in material suc- 
cess. 

Mr. Miller comes of an old and influential family. He was born in this 
county, June 23, 1S68. He is a son of Aaron Miller, one of the highly es- 
teemed pioneers of the town of Mulberry, who is still living, being now 
seventy-one years of age. He was born in the state of Indiana, the son of 
Elias Miller, a native of the old Keystone state. Aaron Miller's wife was 
Caroline Moore, a native of Ohio. To Aaron Miller and wife the following 
children were born: George H., of this review; Stanley A., of Mulberry, man- 
ager of the Jay Grain Company; Frank, a farmer, and Bertha, the wife of 
Dr. Martin, of Frankfort. 

George H. Miller grew to manhood on the old homestead where he did 
his share of the chores when a boy. He received a good public school educa- 



CLINTON' COUNTY, INDIANA. 475 

tion. When a young man he started in life for himself by learning the brick- 
layer's trade, and then engaging in the hardware business which he followed 
successfully for a period of eighteen years, enjoing an extensive trade in this 
and and Tippecanoe counties. He carried a large and well selected stock of all 
kinds of hardware commonly used by the farmer, and he dealt honestly with 
his many customers so that he had no trouble in retaining them. 

In July, 1912, he became cashier of the Citizens National Bank, of Mub» 
berry, which position he has held ever since, to the eminent satisfaction of 
both patrons and officials. This is one of the sound and conservative institu- 
tions of the county of its kind and is rapidly growing. J. E. Combs is presi- 
dent and F. M. Goble, vice president. It occupies a substantial brick building, 
which cost five thousand dollars, and is well adapted to banking purposes. The 
upper story of the building is the Masonic hall. 

Mr. Miller was married in 1890 to Addie Gangwer, a woman of educa- 
tion and refinement, a daughter of Monroe Gangwer. Of this union three 
children were born, namely : Ruth, Howard ami Kenneth, the last named dying 
when fourteen years of age. 

Mr. Miller is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
of the Masonic and Knights of Pythias Orders. 



TILGHMAN HOWARD ALLEN. 

The true spirit of American progress and enterprise has been strikingly 
exemplified in the lives of such men as Tilghman Howard Allen, for many 
years one of the leading agriculturists of Clinton county, now living in hon- 
orable retirement in the town of Mulberry. A man whose energetic nature 
and laudable ambition enabled him to conquer many adverse circumstances 
and advance steadily. He has met and overcome obstacles that would have 
discouraged many men of less determination and won for himself one of the 
choice estates of this favored locality, and also a place among the enterprising 
men of the count)'. Such a man is a credit to any community and his life 
forcibly illustrates what energy and consecutive effort can accomplish when 
directed and controlled by correct principles and high moral resolves, and no 
man is worthier of conspicuous mention in a volume of this kind. 

Mr. Allen was born in Clinton county October 19, 1840. He is a son 
of John and Cynthia (Rush) Allen, natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio, re- 
spectively ; and of English and GermanAYelsh descent. John Allen was born 



476 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

in Greene county. Pennsylvania, Ma\ 5, 1805, and was the seventh son of a 
family of twelve children horn to Isaac Allen and wife, the former's ancestors 
having settled in the Keystone state at a period antedating the war of the 

Revolution. When twelve years old John Allen was taken by his parents to 
Butler county, Ohio, where, owing to the reduced circumstances of his father, 
he was early thrown on his own resources and for some time he followed 
river, rafting logs and lumber and various kinds of merchandise, corn. Hour, 
bacon, etc., to New Orleans. He was quite successful in this enterprise, but, 
while making what he proposed to he his last trip, suffered a severe financial 
loss b) the sinking of his boat and all its contents while it was tied to the 
bank as he was seeming fuel. The bank was undermined and a tree fell on 
the boat. In 1828 he located in (Union county, Indiana, where a brother 
had previously entered land, and he worked for the early settlers there until 
1853, when he invested his savings in a tract of land which he cleared and 
placed under cultivation. He was married in Butler county, Ohio, to Cynthia 
Rush, and they lived in a log cabin for a period of thirteen years. Occasion- 
ally he was engaged in hauling goods from Cincinnati to the village of Jeffer- 
son, and once while making a trip to Chicago he narrowly escaped death by 
drowning in the Tippecanoe river, which he attempted to cross on horseback. 

Moses R. Allen, brother of our subject, has a military record covering a 
period of three years in the Civil war. He enlisted on September 16, 1862, 
in Company 1, One Hundredth Indiana Volunteeer Infantry, under Capt. 
James N. Sims, and his first baptism of fire was at Vicksburg in the memor- 
able seige, in which he took an active part. He later participated in the pic- 
turesque battles of Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain, and in the 
spring of 1864 he was with General Sherman's army and fought throughout 
the strenuous Atlanta campaign, during the progress of which he was under 
fire almost continuously for about one hundred days and nights. After a 
great deal of service in Georgia the regiment participated in a battle near the 
town of Griswold, and entered the city of Savannah, December 23, 1864, 
thence went to Beaufort, South Carolina, marched through the Carolinas, 
capturing Branchvillc, Columbia, Georgetown, Bentonville, and finally reached 
Goldsboro, March 26, 1865, after having marched thirteen hundred miles 
and fought seventeen battles. Moses R. Allen was honorably discharged on 
June 20, 1865, with a fine record as a soldier for the Stars and Stripes. 

Tilghman Howard Allen, of this sketch, grew to manhood on the home 
farm and he received a common school education. He was one of a family of 
nine children. His father, John Allen, died September 28, 1876, and the 
mother passed away at the age of sixty-eight years. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 477 

On February 6, 1877,. Howard Allen married Mary A. Old, who was 
born July 26, 1854, and was a daughter of Edward and Mary Ann (Rodoc- 
ker) Old. The father was born June 26, 1835, in Ohio. He is living on a 
farm, but his wife died in 1892 at the age of fifty-nine years. Eight children 
were born to them: Mary Ann married Mr. Allen; Rachael Agnes died No- 
vember 4, 1885, at the age of thirty years; Malinda Jane married Thomas 
Rush; Samuel, Jacob and Charles all dying in childhood; Levina, born March 
I, 1886, died November 10, 1881 ; and Ada, wife of Clinton Harshman, born 
August 28, 1872, now living on the old homestead. 

Mr. Allen engaged successfully in general farming and stock raising on 
a large scale on his two fine farms of four hundred acres, two miles south and 
southeast of Mulberry. He remained I here until 1909, when, having accu- 
mulated a competency, he retired from active duties of life and purchased ten 
acres in Mulberry, on which stand a modern ten-roomed house, and here he is 
spending his declining years in quiet and comfort. His family consisted of four 
children : Cora S., John Edward, now in Shreveport, Louisiana ; Moses 
Rush, Jr., died when seventeen months old; and Lucretia, the youngest, now 
living at home. 

Politically, Mr. Allen is a Republican, and fraternally a Mason. He has 
always stood high among his many friends and acquaintances throughout the 
county. 



MRS. LAURINDA OHL MOORE. 

Words of praise and periods of encomium could not clearly convey the 
personal characteristics of the noble woman of whom the biographer now 
essays to write in this connection, for only those who have had the good 
fortune to know her personally can see the true beauty and individual traits, 
which have been the resultant, verj largely, of a long life of devotion to 
duty — a life filled with good deeds to others and led along worthy planes. She 
is one of those brave women who did so much to help their loved ones during 
the early days of the settling of our counties, and in the dread days of the 
Civil war when gloom and danger settled upon our fair land. Mrs. Moore 
lives in Washington township, Clinton county, where she has successfully 
managed a valuable landed estate of eighty acres, known as Oakwood, left 
by her late husband, George W. Moore, farmer and veteran of the war be- 
tween the states, and twenty acres more owned by Mrs. Moore. As a result 



47§ CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of her commendable characteristics she enjoys the friendship of a large circle 
of acquaintances in her community. 

George W. Moore was horn in Madison township, Clinton county, No- 
vember 21, 1842, on the old Zebulon Moore farm near Mulberry, the old log 
house in which he opened his eyes to the light of day is still standing. His 
father, Zebulon Moore, was born July 19, 1814, in Virginia, of an old southern 
family. There he grew up and when a young man married Nancy Mitchell, 
who was born April 12, 1818. His death occurred on the old home place 
in Clinton county, October 2, 1846, his widow surviving thirty-five years, 
passing away October 2, 1881. Two sons were born to them, George Wash- 
ington, of this sketch; and J. Smith. 

George W. Moore was reared on the home farm and received his educa- 
tion in the common schools. In 1S62 he enlisted in the One Hundred and 
Sixteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in which he served nine months, later 
serving six months in the Thirty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, proving 
to be a very faithful soldier for the Union. 

January 2, 1873, he married Laurinda Ohl, who was born in Clinton 
county September 26, 1856. She is a daughter of David Ohl, who was born 
in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, a son of John and Lydia (Wehr) Ohl, 
of Pennsylvania. David Ohl grew up in his native community and married 
Sarah C. Peter, daughter of William and Laura (Stinespring) Peter. The 
father was born in Pennsylvania and was a son of William Peter, Sr. To 
William and Laura Peter seven children were born, six of whom grew to. 
maturity, namely: Henry, Julia, Adam, Sarah C, Gustavus and Laurinda. 
The death of David Ohl occurred at the advanced age of sixty-eight years. 
His family consisted of three children : Mrs. Laurinda Moore, of this sketch ; 
William, and Mrs. Elizabeth McNelley. 

George W. Moore devoted his life successfully to general farming and 
stock rai . ing. He owned a good farm in Washington township, on which 
his widow still resides. This' place was well improved by him and on it 
stand a pleasant home. Mr. Moore was killed by the interburabn cars August 
17, 1903, at the age of sixty-two years. He was a hard working, honest, 
neighborly man who had the respect of all who knew him. He was a mem- 
ber of the United Presbyterian church. Mrs. Moore is a member of the 
Methodist church at Mulberry. 

Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Moore, namely : Zella, who 
married Charles W. Collins; Otto M. is operating the home farm; Giles S. 
is an inventor of considerable note, having a number of important inventions 
to his credit; Sarah Mildred died when nineteen vears old. 



CLINTON' COUNTY, INDIANA. 4/9 

JOHN T. PAYNE. 

One of the owners i I valuable farming interests in Clinton county is the 
gentleman whose name initiates this sketch, who resides in Perry township. 
His excellent properly has been acquired through his own persistency of pur- 
pose and determination, and the prosperity which is the legitimate reward of 
all earnest effort is today his. 

John T. Payne, proprietor of Locust Grove Farm, in section 3 of the 
above named township, is a descendant from one of the old and well known 
early families of this locality. He was born on the old Payne homestead in 
Perry township on Nova iber 9, 1859, and he has been contented to spend his 
life in his native community. He is a son of Elijah and Nancy Heston 
Payne, both natives of Ohio, the father having been born in 1825, the son of 
William Payne, a soldier in the war of 1812. It was in the pioneer days that 
the father of our subject look up his residence in Clinton county and here he 
worked hard, lived honestly, developed a good farm and lived to see the 
country progress from a wilderness to one of the foremost counties in the 
state. His children are, John T., of this sketch; Albert C, now living on the 
old home place; William F., died February 11, 1873; George W., died June 
16, 1872; Charles E., died October 6, 1895; Nancy J., born January 13, 1848, 
died in infancy; Sarah Ellen, Martha J., Lydia C. and Mary E. 

John T. Payne was reared on the home farm and there he did his full 
share of the work when a boy. He received his education in local public 
schools, and he has made farming his life work. 

He was married in 1890 to Elmeda Bewsey. She was born, reared and 
educated in Clinton county. She is a daughter of Samuel Bewsey, one of the 
well known and substantial residents of this county. Mrs. Payne has proven 
herself to be a faithful helpmeet. She has some valuable land, a part of the 
old home place. 

Mr. Payne carries on general farming and stock raising, paying par- 
ticular attention to the raising of draft horses. Pie sold one for which an 
offer of one thousand dollars was made at the Chicago Stock Show. His fine 
stock is admired by all who see them, owing to their superior quality. He 
understands well the can and training of livestock as well as general and 
mixed farming, and his place ranks with the best in the township. 

Four children have been born to our subject and wife: Blanche Opal, 
Flossie Gail, died at age of eight months; Doris Marie and Forest Hubert. 

Physical! v our subject is a man of robust health and size and a genial, 



480 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

jovial and obliging gentleman whom everybody likes. He is a member of 
the Christian church, and was a member of the building committee that erected 
the fine edifice of this denomination in Colfax. 

Airs. Payne was born on the old home place in this county, August 17, 
1865. Her mother's name was Elizabeth Dukes before her marriage. The 
Bewsey family came to Indiana in an early day. Mrs. Payne had three 
brothers; Man son A. (deceased) : A. W. and Favorite H., of Frankfort. The 
former, an influential citizen of Clinton county, who died in 1912, was a 
large farmer and horse dealer, active in church work and was a liberal sup- 
porter of the church. The father of Mrs. Payne died at the age of sixty- 
nine years. He was a member of the Methodist church. He w r as a soldier 
during the Civil war, and took part in repulsing Morgan's raid. Mrs. Payne's 
mother died at the age of sixty-seven years. She was also a member of the 
Methodist church. 



JOHN E. COMBS. 



Few can draw rules for their own guidance from the pages of Plutarch, 
but all are benefited by the delineation of those traits of character which find 
scope and exercise in the common walks of life. The unostentatious routine 
of private life, although in the aggregate more important to the welfare of 
the community than any meteoric public career, cannot, from its very nature, 
figure in the public annals, though each locality's history should contain the 
names of those individuals who contribute to the success of the material af- 
fairs of a community and to its public stability — men who lead wholesome 
and exemplary lives which might be profitably studied by the coming genera- 
tion. In such a class must consistently appear the name of John E. Combs, 
one of the leading business men and public-spirited citizens of Clinton county, 
and president of the Citizens' National Bank of Mublerry, an honor which 
was conferred upon him by the votes of the stockholders of that sound and 
popular institution, and he is also largely interested in agricultural affairs and 
stock raising. He is a man who leads a plain, industrious life, always en- 
deavoring to deal honestly with his fellow men and to contribute in every way- 
possible to the general public good in an unobtrusive manner. 

Mr. Combs was born March 24, 1853, in Madison township, near the 
town of Mulberry, Clinton county. He is a scion of one of our sterling old 
pioneer families, noted for its industry and honesty. He is a son of William 
B. and Susan Patterson (Richardson) Combs. The elder Combs who came 




MR. AND MRS. JOHN E. COMBS 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 481 

to Clinton county in 1852, became one of the prominent citizens of this local- 
ity. He was born in Butler county, Ohio, and was a son of John Combs, a 
native of New Jersey, where the family had long been well established. Susan 
Patterson Richardson, mentioned above, was a native of Butler county, Pa., 
and was a daughter of M. C. Richardson, a well-known citizen there in his 
day and generation. The death of William B. Combs occurred at the age of 
fifty-five years. His widow survived to the advanced age of eighty-one years. 
They were the parents of five children: John E., of this review; Sarah 
Frances, who married a Mr. Elliott, living at Elwood, Ind. ; William B., an 
extensive farmer and stock man of Madison township, this county; Malachi 
and Charles N. 

The father of the above named children owned a valuable farm of two 
hundred acres here and was a successful general farmer. He was a member 
of the Presbyterian church, and is an Odd Fellow and a Mason. 

John E. Combs was reared on the home farm, leading a life during his 
boyhood days not unlike that of other boys on the farm of his time. He re- 
ceived his early education in the public schools, which has been greatly sup- 
plemented in after life by wide home reading and by actual contact with the 
business world. He remained on the home farm until he was twenty-three, 
years old, when he married Tillie Steckel, representative of an excellent 
family, and herself a young lady of much promise. She met an untimely 
death in 1880, when only twenty-one years of age, being accidentally burned. 
She left one child, Ollie, who died when two years old. She was a member 
of the Reformed church. She. was a daughter of Joseph Steckel. Mr. Combs 
subsequently married Jennie Muse, a native of Lehigh county, Pa., of a 
highly respected family, and she has proven to be a worthy helpmeet in every 
respect. She is a daughter of Charles Muse, deceased. Our subject's last 
union has been blessed by the birth of six children: two sons and four daugh- 
ters: Cleveland, married to Bertha Kinney; Lulu, wife of E. Clapper of La- 
fayette, Ind.; Mattie B., Elizabeth B., William and Emma, who died in in- 
fancy. These children were all given good educational advantages, attend- 
ing the local schools and Purdue University, at Lafayette, Ind. 

John E. Combs has devoted his life principally to general farming and 
stock raising and he has long ranked among the leading men in these lines in 
the county. He owns a finely improved and productive farm of four hun- 
dred acres in Madison township. He has an attractive, large and modernly 
furnished home, and substantial and convenient outbuildings. He is a stock- 
holder in the Citizens' National Bank at Mulberry and has for some time 
been president of the same, doing much toward making this one of the leading 
(30 



482 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

banks of the county. Politically lie is a Democrat and is a worker for the 
parly. He takes a lead in all movements that are calculated to be of general 
good to the county in every way, and he is a man of exemplary habits, so 
that the high esteem in which he is universally held is well merited. Mr. 
Combs is a member of the Masons, I, O. O. F. and the K. of P. lie was 
postmaster at Mulberry for four years during Cleveland's administration. 



JOHN W, TIMMONS. 



One of the ml and up-to-date farmers of Perry township. Clinton 

county, and a man who has so ordered his course as to gain the respect and 
admiration of his fellow men is John W. Timmons. He has been a close 
student of the soil, noting its changes as well as the climate changes since he 
was a boy, and has farmed so skillfully and scientifically that his land has re- 
tained its original fertility and his outlay of labor is annually rewarded by 
handsome crops. 

Mr. Timmons was born September 27, 1864. He is a son of John Tim- 
mons, Sr., who was a native of Fountain county, Ind. Our subject is 
descended from a thrifty pioneer family, who did their part in clearing the 
wilderness. His paternal grandfather came to Indiana from Ohio in a very 
early day. Our subject's mother was known in her maidenhood as Harriet 
Wyant, a native of Virginia, and was a daughter of William Wyant, a soldier 
under Gen. William Henry Harrison in the war of 1812, and who fought at 
the great Indian battle of Tippecanoe, November 7, 181 1. After the war he 
returned to his home in Virginia, where he continued to reside until 1828, 
when he built a flat boat, in which be placed his household belongings and 
his family and drifted down the Kanawha river to the Ohio, and down that 
stream to Cincinnati, where he sold his boat and purchased a wagon and 
an ox team and came overland to Indiana, locating in Clinton county, three 
miles northwest of Colfax. Here he established the future home of the 
family. William Wyant's wife was a native of Ireland and she always 
retained a strong love for the old sod. 

To John Timmons, Sr., and wife was born the following children: 
Michael, Ezekicl, Elizabeth, David, Jane, Sophronia, John W., Jr., Alice and 
Delia. The father of the above named children died at the age of fifty-one 
years. Politically he was a Democrat, and he and his wife were members 
of the Methodist church. The mother survived to the advanced age of 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 483 

eighty-one years. The father was a very large man physically, weighing 
three hundred and twenty-five pounds, 

John W. Timmons, Jr., was reared on the old home farm and there he- 
worked hard when a boy, and received his educational training in the com- 
mon schools of his township. When twenty-two years old he married Ida 
Chenoweth, who was horn and reared in Clinton county, and here she was 
educated in the public schools. She is a daughter of William N. Chenoweth, 
a respected farmer of Perry township He was born on April 20, 1839, 
the son of Arthur Chenoweth, a native of Kentucky. William Chenoweth 
was married at the age of twenty-four years, while living in Montgomery 
county, Indiana, to Esther Dunbar, a widow. Of this union one child was 
born, Ida. wife of Mr. Timmons. 

Mrs Esther Chenoweth died at the age of twenty-six years, in 1866. 
Her mother's name was Bowers before her marriage. She was a daughter 
of Abner Bowers, an old soldier. 

The subject of this sketch has a productive and well improved farm of 
seventy-five acres, and here he carries on general farming and stock raising 
successfully. He has a pleasant dwelling and substantial outbuildings, in- 
cluding a garage. He owns a good forty horse power automobile. 

The following children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Timmons: Lela, 
wife of Prof. J. Sarig, of Cass county ; Walter, Russell, Carl and Eugene. 

Mr. Timmons was president of the local telephone company for four 
years, and its large success was due to his able management. He brought 
it out of a debt of three hundred and fifty dollars, and soon had it on a 
money making basis. He is a member of Masonic Lodge, No. 473, of which 
he served as master four years. Mrs. Timmons is a member of the Eastern 
Star, of which she has been matron for two terms, discharging the duties 
of her position in a most commendable manner. They are both members of 
the Christian church of Colfax. 



R. C. CARTER 

The subject of this sketch is one of the progressive agriculturists of 
Perry township, whose fine farm, known as Sunny Side, the name the 
great author, Washington Irving, gave his estate on the banks of the pictur- 
esque Hudson, ranks with the best in this locality, this attractive place having 
been improved by Mr. Carter to its present high state of excellency by years 



484 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of patient toil and skillful management. His success has been won entirely 
along the lines of old and time-tried maxims, 'honesty is the best policy," 
and "there is no excellence without labor," being among the oiks he has 
sought to follow. His place consists of one hundred and twenty acres, well 
Ideated in section 24. one of the best agricultural districts in Clinton county. 

R. C. Carter was born in Franklin county, Indiana, May 31, 1868. He 
is a son of William Carter, who was born in England near the world's 
greatest city, London. He came of a sterling old Anglo-Saxon family, noted 
alike for its industry and honesty. The date of his birth was 1832, and his 
death occurred in 1897 at the age of sixty-five rears. He emigrated to the 
United States in early life and here became well established and was respected 
by all who knew him, for he was industrious and honorable at all times. 
He was accompanied to this country by his parents, the family settling in 
Franklin count)-, Indiana, and there occurred the death of the grandfather 
of our subject. The mother of our subject was Rebecca Beasley before her 
marriage, and she, too, was a native of England, and her family brought 
her to Franklin county, Indiana, when she was a young girl and there 
established their new home, and there she grew to womanhood and received 
her education. .Only her mother came to America, her father having died 
in England. Her mother lived to be sixty-three years of age. Eight children 
were born to William Carter and wife, five of whom are living, four sons 
and one daughter: John, Joseph of Perry township; Richard, pi this review; 
Susanna, who lives in Jackson township, and Thomas, also of that town- 
ship. The father of the above named children followed farming all his life. 
Politically he was a Republican, and he and his wife belonged to the United 
Brethren church. 

Richard C. Carte, grew to manhood on the home farm and there worked 
when a boy. He received a good common school education, and he has de- 
voted his life to farming and raising live stock. His excellent farm lies 
three-quarters of a mile north of Manson. He keeps his place in a high 
state of improvement and cultivation. He has a cozy home in the midst 
of attractive surroundings and has substantial outbuildings. He handles at 
all seasons a good grade of live stock. 

Mr. Carter was married when twenty-two years of age, in Jackson town- 
ship, to Flora Goode, who was born in Boone county, this state, where she 
was reared and educated. She is a daughter of Philip Goode and wife, who 
finally removed to Jackson township, this county, and established a good home 
there. Mr. Goode was killed by accident at the age of fifty-three years in 
1896. Politically he was a Democrat, and he belonged to the United Brethren 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 485 

church, iii which he was a deacon and a steward. I lis family consisted of the 
following children: Levina, Flora, who married Mr. Carter of this sketch; 
Lew Wallace, Lulu. Ora, who was soldier in the Philippines; America, 
Birdie and Clifford. The mother of the above named children is still living, 
making her home in Jackson township, where she has a host of warm friends. 

To our subject and wife one child, a son, Guy, has been born, his birth 
having occurred in r8o,-.t. Pie is attending school in Frankfort, taking a 
business course. 

Mr. and Mrs Carter are members of the Christian church and are liberal 
supporters of the same. 



SAMUEL P.. SMITH. 

A well known and prosperous business man of Mulberry, Clinton 
county, is Samuel B. Smith, a man who has done a very great deal for his 
community, for he has always been more deeply interested in her welfare 
than in any other locality, and it is epiite natural that he should have been, 
this being his native home, the scene of his parents' struggles to rear their 
children, the scene where many things have happened to make it hallowed. 
To him, as to most of us, "there is no place like home." 

Mr. Smith was born in October, 1855, on a farm near Mulberry. He 
is a son of Israel Smith, one of the old and honored citizens of this com- 
munity, who was born in Lehigh count}-, Pennsylvania, September 24, 1829, 
a son of Christian Smith, also a native of Pennsylvania, and he in turn a 
son of Michael Smith, a native of Germany, from which country he emi- 
grated to the United States in the old Colonial period and settled in Penn- 
sylvania, where he spent the rest of his life. ^Christian Smith married Eliza- 
beth Miller, a sister of Eli Miller an early settler of Madison township, 
Clinton county. Christian Smith and family came to this county in 1839, 
locating two miles west of Mulberry, and there he worked at farming and 
shoemaking. He was, like most of the pioneers, a hunter, there being at this 
time of his settlement here, bear, deer, turkey and many other denizens of the 
wild. He obtained plenty of honey from bee trees in the forest. His family 
consisted of four children, namely ; Levi, Israel, Moses and Paul. His 
death occurred at the age of seventy-four years, and his wife lived to be 
seventy-six years of age. They were fine Christian characters, members of 
the Reformed church. Israel Smith, father of the subject of this sketch, 
grew up amid pioneer conditions and he worked hard assisting his father on 



486 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the home place. JTe received a meager education in the old log cabin schools 
of his day. When a hoy he learned the shoemaker's trade, which he fol- 
lowed in connection with farming. He became owner of some good prop- 
erty in Madison township. In 1852 he married Susan Clapper, who was a 
native of Pennsylvania, a daughter of Henry and Catherine (Kepharl) Clap- 
per, who emigrated to Randolph county in 1851, and here they spent the rest 
of their lives, the father dying at the age of seventy-four years and the 
mother at the age of seventy-eight. They were members of the Reformed 
church, and were the parents of ten children, six sons and four daughters. 
Israel Smith and wife have been married sixty-one years, mutually happy 
and helpful. They are an old couple whom everybody admires for their 
honesty and charitableness. Only two children were born to them, Samuel 
B., of this review; and Catherine Elizabeth, who married William Bates, 
they living on the old Smith homestead. The parents are members of the 
Reformed church, the father being a deacon and formerly elder in the same. 

Samuel B. Smith was reared on the home farm and he was educated in 
the district schools. On March 11, 1880, he married Jennie M. Nobcs, a 
woman of educaton and a successful school teacher before her marriage. 
She is a daughter of Rev. W. B. Nobes, now deceased. He was a prominent 
minister in the Methodist church. He was a native of the Isle of Wight. 
The mother of Mrs. Smith was known in her maidenhood as Matilda Burch- 
by, a native of Lancaster, England. The Nobes family emigrated to St. 
Louis, Missouri, later moved to Illinois, then to Cincinnati, Ohio, then to 
Jefferson county, thence to Tippecanoe county, near Lafayette. The father's 
death occurred at Flora, Indiana. He was a sincere minister of the gospel 
and a man greatly beloved by all who knew him. His wife died at the age of 
seventy-seven years. Three children were born to them, namely: C. E., of 
Lebanon, Indiana; A. C, of Indianapolis; and Mrs. Jennie M., wife of Mr. 
Smith. 

Samuel B. Smith has been engaged in the grocery and hotel business for 
a period of twenty-three years. He has built up a large and lucrative trade 
with the surrounding country, always carrying a fresh and general stock of 
staple and fancy groceries, and his hotel is pupular with the traveling public. 
It contains twenty-three rooms, w^ell furnished, and courteous treatment is 
given all guests. Cleanliness is the motto here. Excellent home cooking is 
found here and the hotel. is known to all traveling men who make this section 
of the state who are always glad to spend their time here when in Mulberry. 
Evervone is made to feel at home. As a musician and band leader Mr. 
Smith is well known, and he has been leader of the local band, one of the 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 487 

best in the county, for a quarter of a century. He is also a choir anil orches- 
tra leader of prominence and his services are in ^reat demand. He has been 
connected with the choir of the local Reformed church for a period of thirty- 
five years. He has also heen superintendent of the Sunday school and his 
wife has heen superintendent of the children's department for years. Tessie 
Smith, a daughter of S. B. Smith, is a teacher of music and has heen in 
charge of (he pipe organ at the church for three years. Mr. and Airs. Smith 
are both prominent in churh and Sunday school work. They both belong to 
the Reformed church. 

Four children have heen born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith : Perlin, married 
to Bert Seifert, of Chicago, has two children, Harold and Bertha; Jessie, at 
home; Violet Marie, born in 1900, died April 1, 1912, was noted for her 
talent as an artist and musician, and gave every promise of a brilliant 
future; Samuel B., Jr., the only son, died in early life. 

Mr. Smith is a Republican in politics, but is not a politician and was 
never an office holder. 



MRS. FRANCES COIN. 

This estimable lady is deserving of much credit for what she has accom- 
plished in the face of obstacles and discouragements that would have thwart- 
ed the purposes of others of less sterling fibre, and she has shown herself to 
be capable of managing successfully a large and valuable farm, being the for- 
tunate owner of The Oakland, one of the best stock and grain farms in Perry 
township, Clinton county, on which stands one of our most attractive rural 
homes. She is the possessor of many commendable attributes of head and 
heart and has long been a. favorite with a wide circle of friends' and acquaint- 
ances. ' 1 

Martin Coin, deceased husband of Mrs. Frances Coin, of this review, 
was one of the prominent agriculturists and stock men of this county. He 
was born in Cass county, Indiana, May 1, 1854, and his death occurred on 
November 17, 1907. He came of a worthy old family, noted alike for their 
industry and honesty. He was a son of Randolph and Eleanor (Ryan) Coin, 
both born in Virginia, and each representatives of fine old Southern families. 
There they spent their earlier years, finally coming to Cass county, Indiana. 
They each received such educations as the old-time schools afforded. They 
became well established in Cass county and there spent the rest of their lives. 

Martin Coin was reared in the Hoosier state and when a bov assisted 



4^8 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

with the general work on the home farm, and he received a good common 
school education. In early manhood he was married to Frances Coyner, a 
representative of one of the sterling pioneer families, who early settled in 
Perry township, this county, where Mrs. Coin was born, reared and edu- 
cated. She is a daughter of Jacob Coyner, who came of an old Maryland 
family, whose ancestors originally came from Germany, about the year 1700. 
The family became prominent in the old Oriole state, assisted in the develop- 
ment of the localities where they lived, fought in our early wars and en- 
couraged the work of the school and the church. The family finally moved 
to Indiana and became well established in Clinton county, known here for 
their honesty and industry, and many noble qualities of head and heart. 
Jacob Coyner left a large and valuable estate for his children. 

Mrs. Coin's valuable farm of one hundred and forty-seven acres lies 
three and one-half miles northeast of Colfax. Tt is well managed, well kept, 
everything denoting thrift and care. 

Mrs. Coin has one daughter, Mrs. Goldie Gladen, who was given ex- 
cellent educational advantages. She was married in 1908 to Walker Glad- 
den, a young man of much promise and fine character. They have one 
child, a daughter, Frances Marguerite, born February 11, 1912, and a son, 
Raymond, born July 26, 1909. 



PHAON STECKEL. 



There could be no more comprehensive history written of a community 
or county or even of a state and its people than that which deals with the 
life work of those who, by their own endeavor and indomitable energy, have 
placed themselves where they well deserve the title of "progressive." In 
this sketch will be found the record of one who has outstripped the less 
active and less able plodders on the highway of life, one who has been 
consistent in his life work and never permitted the "grass to grow under his 
feet," one who, while advancing his individual interests, has not neglected 
his full duties to the general public, at the same time upholding an honored 
family name. 

Phaon Steckel, for many years a prominent farmer and surveyor, now 
living in retirement in Mulberry, Clinton county, was born near Ellentown, 
Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, September 21, 1846. He is a son of Joseph 
Steckel, also a native of that county and state, his birth having occurred in 
181 1. He was a son of Peter Steckel, also born there. This was a sterling 



■ f *£> 














4 
5 



MR. AND MRS. l'HAON STECKEL 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 489 

old Pennsylvania German family. Joseph Steckcl grew to manhood in his 
native community and married Ann Maria Ludwig, who was born in his 
own county on September 28, 1827. In 1849 tnc Y ^^ Pennsylvania with 
their two children and came in wagons to Tippecanoe county, Indiana. Their 
first home there was a log cabin. They worked hard and became well estab- 
lished, buying land which they sold for a profit after improving. The two 
children mentioned above were Phaon, our subject, and Airs. Alary E. Bear. 
To Joseph Steckel and wife twelve children in all were born, an equal 
number of sons and daughters, namely: Lydia, Oliver, David, all died young; 
Phaon, Mrs. Mary E. Bear, Deborah (deceased) ; Joseph H., Mrs. A. Burk- 
halter (deceased) ; Ella J , married to Frank B. Elliott, whose sketch appears 
in this volume (deceased) ; Matilda, married to John E. Combs (deceased), 
Methusaleh, living in California, and Martin, living on a farm near Mul- 
berry. 

Joseph Steckel was a successful man in his life work and was prominent 
in church work, being an elder and deacon in the church. 

Phaon Steckel was reared on the home farm and was educated in the com- 
mon schools. He took up farming when a boy, and this has been his life 
work. He engaged in general farming near Mulberry, and when a young 
man he took up surveying at which he became quite expert. His services 
were in great demand, and he became one of the best known surveyors in 
' this section of the state. He has surveyed much land in Clinton county. 

Mr. Steckel was married at Anamosa, Jones county, Iowa, to Frances 
Tuel, who was born in Dubuque, la., and was there reared and educated. 
She is a daughter of John Tuel, who was a soldier in the Civil war, in which 
he saw much service. His wife, Martha Ellen (Kline) Tuel, is still living, 
being now eighty-four years old. John Tuel and wife were the parents of 
twelve children, six boys and six girls, namely: Frances Virginia, wife of our 
subject; George William, Laura Ann, died in childhood; John Gilbert, An- 
drew Warren, Abraham Douglas, Charles, Benjamin Rupert, Susan Cath- 
erine, Clara Viola, Mattie Jane, Ida May. 

Mr. and Mrs. Steckel are the parents of six children: Laura Ann, Mrs. 
Ida O. Kleinsmith, Clara B., married to David Ruch, of Clinton county; 
Christy Moleva, died young; Josephine May, married George Hacker, of this 
county; Thomas Emanuel, a teacher in the University of Indiana, and Laura 
Ann, married to Preston Kurtz, and living at Treichlers, Pa. 

Politically, Mr. Steckel is a Republican. His wife belongs to the 
.Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Steckel is a member of the Lutheran 
church. 



49° CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ROBERT F. BRADEN 

Jt is a mistake to farm on the theory that crop rotation is the only 
essential to soil fertility. It is true that an intelligent rotation of crops will 
generally result in increased yields, but unless the rotation includes one of 
the legumes or the land is heavily fertilized with manure, the rotation will 
really mean depletion. Rotation will have the effect of increasing the yields 
for a period of years and an increased yield naturally draws heavily upon the 
plant food element of the soil. Continued croping exposes the land to various 
weaknesses of the particular crop that is grown, and as no two crops extract 
the same proportion of plant food, the continually grown crop is bound to 
lessen the available fertility of one or more of the principal soil constituents. 
Rotation has the effect of making available all of the plant food element, and 
as the average soil is generally well supplied with fertile material, depletion 
will come that much sooner unless proper steps are taken to maintain the 
principal soil ingredients. 

One of the most extensive and successful general farmers and stock 
men of Washington township, Clinton county, who has well understood the 
subjects of crop rotation and fertilization, so that the original fertility and 
strength of soil has been retained on his fine farm, widely known as "Blue 
Grass Stock Farm," is Robert F. Braden, whose attractive home is located 
three miles west of the town of Jefferson. 

Mr. Braden was born on a farm in this locality on July 20, 1868. He 
is a son of William M. Braden, deceased, who was for many years one of 
Clinton county's leading citizens. He was born on the old Braden homestead 
in 1837, and here he spent his life engaged in farming and his father, Burr 
Braden, kept a store at Jefferson. He married Laura Watt daughter of 
Robert Watt, and here she was reared and educated. 

Burr Braden, our subject's paternal grandfather, was a farmer in 
Virginia, and he emigrated to Clinton county, Indiana, when this country 
was a wilderness and settled in the woods, but being a hard worker and a 
rugged character he soon had a good home established. His wife was a 
Miss Jenners, of a prominent old family of Virginia. Their family consisted 
of nine children: Hector, Mrs. Sarah Clark, William M., father of our 
subject; Robert F., Sr., a soldier in the Civil war, died at Lafayette where 
he was a prominent citizen; Alba„ Annie, Jennings, Addison, died in 1912 in 
Lafayette, and Mrs. Jeanctte Garrett of Frankfort. 

To William M. Braden and wife three children were born : Mary J., still 
living on the old home place ; Robert F., of this review, and Alba who died 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 49I 

when thirty-five years of age, leaving a widow and two children, William M., 
and Laura N. 

The subject of this review was reared on the home place and he assisted 
with the general work there when a boy. He received a good education in 
the public schools. He was married in 191 1 to Christine Dorner, who was 
"born, reared and educated at Frankfort. She is a daughter of Philip and 
Magdalene Dorner, a well known family of Frankfort. 

Mr. Braden has a well improved and valuable farm of over five hundred 
acres, and everything is under a superb system. On it stands an excellent 
set of outbuildings, and a good ten-roomed dwelling, neatly furnished. He 
is an excellent judge of live stock, and feeds large numbers of cattle and hogs 
annually for the market. He raises Percheron horses and his fine draft 
horses find a very ready market owing to their superior quality. He is 
owner of some of the best horses in the state, which are greatly admired 
by all who see them. 



J. FRANK SMITH. 



The biographies of representative men of a county bring to light many 
hidden treasurers of mind, character and courage, well calculated to arouse 
the pride of their family and of the community, and it is a source of regret 
that the people are not more familiar with the personal history of such 
men, in the ranks of whom may be found tillers of the soil, merchants, mechan- 
ics, teachers, professional men, business men and those of varied vocations. J. 
Frank Smith, secretary and manager of the Clinton Lumber Company, of Mul- 
berry, is one of the creditable representative business men of Clinton county, 
and as such has made his influence felt for the general good of his com- 
munity, and earned a name for enterprise, integrity and honor. 

Mr. Smith was born near Delphi, Carroll county, Indiana, December 16, 
1875. He is a son of James W. Smith a native of this state, and a representa- 
tive of an old pioneer family. He was a soldier in the Union army during 
the Civil war. He is still living and is an elder in the Christian church. 
He married Mary Jane Drummonds, who was called to eternal rest some 
five years ago. To this union six children were born. 

Our subject was reared On the home place and received his education 
in the public schools, and the high school. When a young man he was con- 
nected with the Voorhees Lumber Company, at Flora, Indiana, with which he 
remained for seven years, in the meantime learning the ins and out of this 



.-__ — 1 



49 2 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

line of business. He was engaged in the lumber business at Gaston, Indiana, 
for a period of four years. He then returned to Flora, Indiana, and was en- 
gaged in the retail hardware 'business in partnership o.ith his brother, Chas. E. 
Smith, under the firm name of Smith Bros, for a period of four years. 

Mr. Smith is secretary of the Mulberry Poultry Association. His hobby 
is the raising of fancy chickens, his specialty being White Orpingtons. He 
and his son, Don, devote a great deal of time to this and finding a ready sale 
over a wide territory for their chickens, which have taken many premiums at 
different poultry show s. He has for some time been secretary and manager 
of the Clinton Lumber Company, at Mulberry, and has done much toward in- 
creasing the prestige of this popular concern. 1 his is one of the largest and 
most widely known lumber firms in Clinton county, and an extensive business 
is carried on over a wide territory. A twenty thousand dollar stock of lum- 
ber is carried, of all kinds, carefully selected and prices are always reasonable. 
Everything that is needed in the construction of all kinds of buildings may be 
obtained here — lumber, laths, shingles, doors and sash, lime, cement and 
plaster, builders' hardware, Royal field fence, white cedar, red cedar and 
locust fence posts, sewer tile, paints, varnish and oils. 

Michael J. Gilmartin is president of the firm and Emma J. Smith vice-presi- 
dent and treasurer. 

A planing mill is maintained in connection with the large yard, and 
all kinds of fixtures for stores are turned out, also for banks or special home 
furnishings. Cement blocks, posts, columns for buildings, etc., are also manu- 
factured here. Their main building is fifty by seventy-five feet, two stories 
high, and the building is well adapted to the business. The office is neat and 
well arranged and tastily furnished. 

J. Frank Smith was married in 1896 to Emma J. Metsker, a daughter of 
David Metsker, now deceased. He was a soldier in the Civil war and was for 
a number of years a prominent Carroll count} - citizen. His death occurred 
in 1906. His widow makes her home with our subject. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith, namely : Huldah 
Blanche and Richard Don. 

Mr. Smith is a Republican, and he belongs to the Masonic order, of which 
he is secretary; to the Knights of Pythias, and to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, in which he has passed all the chairs. He belongs to the 
Christian church, as do also his wife and family. He has a large and beauti- 
ful home with all modern conveniences in Mulberry. 

Mr. Smith does an extensive wholesale lumber business, operating under 
the name of J. Frank Smith Lumber Company. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 493 

JOHN D. COOK. 

The firm of Cook Brothers, blacksmiths and wagon makers, of Mulberry, 
Clinton county, is one of the most popular and best known of its kind in this 
section of the state. It would be a credit to towns much larger than this. 
The firm has met with exceptional success, partly because these gentlemen have 
developed into experts in their line, and partly because they turn out honest 
work and never fail to deal with their fellow men as they would have them 
deal in return. The Cook brothers are also men of persistency and indomita- 
ble industry, and never let the grass grow under their feet. They are good 
citizens in every respect as all will gladh attest who know them well. 

The firm is composed of Jacob Cook, the senior member of the firm, 
and John D. Cook our subject. They have two large shops, one for horseshoe- 
ing and general blacksmithing, and one for wagon making. A number of 
skilled artisans are employed in each. John D. is in charge of the black- 
smith shop and Jacob superintends the wagon works. They both understand 
well all the ins and outs of the work that is constantly going on in both shops 
and each shop is under a superb system, and equipped in an up-to-date man- 
ner for prompt and high-grade work. They are kept busy, work coming 
to them from all parts of the county and there is a good demand for their 
wagons owing to their superior qualities of workmanship and material. 

John D. Cook was born near Mulberry, Clinton county, March n, 1864. 
He is a son of Philip Cook or Koch, as it is spelt in German, this being a 
German family. The father was born at Hesse-Darmstadt, and there he grew 
to manhood, was educated and learned the shoemaker's trade. He married 
Clara Heddrich, also a native of Germany. They remained in their native 
land until two daughters were born — Elizabeth, who lives in Mulberry, and 
Christina, who married Dr. Koons, who died, leaving two children, Mrs. P. V. 
Ruch and a son. After emigrating to America three sons were born to 
Philip Cook and wife: Jacob, member of the firm mentioned above; Henry, 
who is a successful druggist, who married and has one child; and John D., of 
this review. The death of Philip Cook occurred at the age of sixty-one years, 
his widow surviving until she was eighty-one years old. 

John D. Cook was reared on the farm and he received a common school 
education, besides attended the State Normal at Terre Haute. He began 
life for himself by teaching school two years, then entered the shop with his 
brother Jacob and learned the blacksmith's trade and wagon making and ne 
has continued in this line of endeavor to the present time with much success. 
He was married in 1894 to Margaret Peters, who was born, reared and edu- 



494 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

cated in Clinton county. She is a daughter of R. H. Peters. To this union 
one child was bom, Lena M. His first wife died in March, 1895. Mr. Cook 
was married again on August 13, 1896, to Amanda Jacoby, daughter of 
Moses and Christina (Kauffman) Jacoby, there were two children by the 
second wife: Lee, born May 20, 1898, and accidentally killed December 28, 
191 1, and Emma, born February 17, 1900, now attending high school. 

John D. Cook was elected township trustee in 1895 and served five years, 
during which time he did much to encourage education in his vicinity; also in 
securing good gravel roads and in making many other lasting improvements. 
In fact, it may be said that he made Madison township famous for its good 
roads. Politically, he is a Democrat. He belongs to the Masonic order, and is 
a member of the Lutheran church, to which his family also belong. 



WILLIAM J. LEADER. 



Although he himself would never admit such thing, being a modest 
man, William J. Leader is one of the best farmers in Washington township, 
and one of the most valuable citizens of the home-building class in Clinton 
county. He has sought to perform well the duties of good citizenship while 
laboring for his own advancement, and every movement which has had for 
its ultimate goal the bettering of local conditions, whether material, civic or 
moral has found in him an ardent advocate, for he has the best interests of the 
county at heart. 

Mr. Leader was born September 26, 1878, in Washington township, 
Clinton county. He is a son of David F. Leader, who died in 1898, He was 
a native of Pennsylvania, as was also his father, Charles W. Leader, of Ger- 
man ancestry. David F. Leader grew to manhood in his native state and 
there received his education. On May 12, 1870, he married Sarah F. Beil. 
She was a daughter of Jonathan Beil, of Pennsylvania. He died at the age 
of seventy-five years. His wife was Anna Fenstermaker before her mar- 
riage. She also died at the age of seventy-five years. The death of David F. 
Leader occurred in 1898 at the age of fifty-five years. For many years he 
operated a saw mill, sawing the material that went into the houses and barns 
of his locality for miles around, doing an extensive business. He finally 
moved to Clinton county and became owner of a good farm of one hundred 
and fourteen acres four miles east of Mulberry. 

William J. Leader, of this sketch, grew to manhood on the farm and 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 495 

received a common school education. When twenty-three years of age he 
married Margaret Ruch, a native of this township and a daughter of Martin 
Ruch, deceased, formerly a well known farmer here. Martin Ruch was a 
son of Peter Ruch, horn on April 12, 1809, in Pennsylvania, and who died 
December 19, 1881. Peter Ruch married Lucy Troxall, who was born Octo- 
ber 9, 181 1, and died May 9, 1886. 

To David F. Leader and wife five children were born: Anna, wife of 
Manson Hart, of Stockwell, Indiana; William J., subject of this sketch; 
Alva, living in California; Edna E., of Mulberry, and Robert, died when a 
child. 

Martin Ruch was born January 11, 1850. He married Amelia Rear, 
whose death occurred in 1877. To them four children were born, three of 
whom are deceased, the one living being Mrs. Flora Leibenguth, of Ross 
township, Clinton county. Mr. Ruch was married a second time, his last 
wife being Emma Deibert, who was born November 9, 1853. She is a daugh- 
ter of Nathan and Lavina (Landis) Deibert. By this second union eight 
children were born: Mrs. Margaret Leader, wife of our subject; Nathan, a 
soldier in the Philippine Islands ; Lucy, Calvin, Mrs. Anna Burns, Thomas, 
Elma, Garrett, and Ella. The mother of these children died February 13, 
1898. The father is a Republican and a member of the Reformed church. 

Mr. Leader is a member of St. Luke's Reformed church, and is superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school there, and active in church work in general. In 
a business way Mr. Leader is engaged in farming. 



FRANK MARION HINDS. 

One of the ablest and busiest contractors of Clinton county is the subject 
of this sketch, Frank M. Hinds, of Frankfort. His success is due to his uni- 
form method of accomplishing his best in whatever he undertakes, proof of 
which is shown in the many buildings in the city which are monuments of 
his ability in his chosen profession. Mr. Hinds' father followed the same 
vocation,, and under him our subject received his early training, learning the 
technicalities and other points that otherwise would have been the result of 
only years of patient and discouraging labor. 

Mr. Hinds was born in Madison, Indiana, March 10, 1846, and was the 
son of Jesse and Johanna (Jacax) Hinds. Jesse Hinds was a native of 
Zanesville, Ohio, and was a contractor by trade. His early work was in 



49^ CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Indianapolis, and there he built the first Union station, also a great many 
other blocks that are now replaced by new ones. He spent the latter years of 
his life in Frankfort. He died February 12, 1896. 

Our subject, after a good common school education, took up work with 
his father. In 1877 ne went to Frankfort and undertook contracting work 
for himself. Both opera houses, all of east side square except the I. O. O. F. 
hall and Cushwa block, Paris block, old first ward school building, old Bap- 
tist church, the addition to the Presbyterian church, Shanklin wholesale 
house, Fuller block, fire department, Wirt block, Frankfort, Kokomo & 
Western traction building, Young's block, the addition to Coulter hotel, 
Times building, telephone exchanges, and the township school houses in the 
county, all are the products of Mr. Hinds' building talents, and are among 
the finest structures of their kind in the state. Religiously, Mr. Hinds is a 
Presbyterian, and politically, is a Republican. 

In April, 1872, Mr. Hinds was married to Frances Rose, who was born 
in Zionsville, Indiana, in November, 1851, being a daughter of Col. A. D. 
Rose, of Civil war fame. Two children have been born to the union, name- 
ly; Philip R., a Frankfort contractor, and Rasemary, died July 22, 1894. Mrs. 
Hinds died May 20, 1908. 



MRS. EMMA McBRIDE GRICE. • 

The estimable lady whose name forms the caption of this article is well 
known to the people of Washington township, Clinton county, where she has 
long maintained her home and where her reputation is such as to win and re- 
tain a host of warm personal friends. Mrs. Grice has proven herself to be a 
woman of fine business acumen, managing her finely improved and pro- 
ductive farm in Section 4 with that care, discretion and foresight that in- 
sures abundant returns annually for the care and labor expended. 

Mrs. Emma McBride Grice is a native of this locality, and here she was 
reared to womanhood,, received a good education, and has lived continuously 
to the present time. She is the widow of Eli M. Grice, for many years one 
of the best known and progressive general farmers and stockmen. He was 
born in Delaware county, Indiana, near the city of Muncie in 1852, and there 
he grew to manhood and received a good common school education. As boy 
and man he was always noted for his industry and honesty. He was a son 
of Henry and Elizabeth (Hardrick) Grice, natives of Ohio, in which state 




ELI M. GRICE, DECEASED, AND WIFE 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 497 

they grew up and married, finally removing to Delaware county, Indiana, 
where they established a home, but later removed to Washington township, 
Clinton county, where they ended their days. Their family consisted of two 
sons and eight daughters. 

Eli M. Grice grew to manhood on the home farm, and it was in 1877 
that he and Emma McBride were married. She is a daughter of John Mc- 
Bride, a native of Butler county, Ohio, and a son of James McBride. The lat- 
ter was a native of Ireland, of Scotch-Irish parents. He emigrated to America 
in an early day and settled in Ohio. John McBride married Mahala Wyant, 
a native of Virginia, she was a daughter of William Wyant, of an old Vir- 
ginia family. He came to Montgomery county, Ind., when a young man and 
there settled. John McBride came here in the fall of 1857 and established the 
family home in the woods, and, being a hard worker, he soon had a good 
place developed from the wilds. Hi's family consisted of eight children, three 
sons and five daughters: William, James, Thomas, all deceased; Louisa, 
Elizabeth, Martha, Amanda, and Emma, our subject, the youngest. Elizabeth 
is the wife of William Fickle, of Mulberry. The father of the above named 
children died at the age of fifty-six years, while the mother lived to be 
eighty-seven years old. 

Mrs. Grice lives in a pleasant and attractive nine-room home, which 
has always been noted for its hospitality. Her valuable and well kept place 
is known as Woodland Park Farm, and it consists of one hundred and ninety- 
seven acres. Here general farming and stock raising are carried on success- 
fully, and the place is well improved in every way. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Grice five sons were born: William Henry, farmer, 
married to Laura Need, has two children, Alma Need and Marian Carroll ; 
John Wilson, farmer, married to Rosa Ann Lachner; Albert Ross, at home. 



SAMUEL P. THOMAS. 



Among the venerable and highly honored citizens of Madison township, 
Clinton county, is Samuel P. Thomas, who has devoted his life to agricul- 
tural pursuits. He is a scion of a gallant old Southern family, of Welsh 
origin, many of whose sterling traits seems to have been handed down to him, 
which caused him to succeed in his business life and at the same time win and 
retain a host of friends wherever he is known, and his career might well be 
emulated by the younger farmers of his vicinity, who are ambitious of making 
a success at farming and at the same time making good citizens. 
(32) 



49& CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Thomas was born June 30, 1839, in Jefferson. He is a son of 
Asahel W. Thomas, a native of Virginia, his progenitors having come from 
Wales to the Old Dominion in Colonial clays. The paternal grandfather of 
our subject was John Thomas, horn in Wales, from which country he emi- 
grated to Virginia, and served under General Washington in the Revolu- 
tionary war. The powder horn he carried in that memorable struggle is in 
possession of the subject of this sketch. After the war he returned to Vir- 
ginia, where he died. In that state Asahel W. Thomas grew to manhood and 
married Margaret Davis, who was a native of Ohio, and a daughter of George 
Davis, born in Ireland. He crossed the Atlantic ocean five times before 
finally settling down in the United States. He served as a soldier in the war 
of 1812. He eventually came to Madison township, Clinton county, where he 
spent the rest of his life. Asahel W. Thomas was a cabinet maker by trade 
and he followed the same for some time when he and his wife lived in Frank- 
fort. He made many of the old bureaus in the homes of this section of In- 
diana. He later lived at the village of Jefferson. His death occurred at the 
age of seventy-two years. He was first a Whig, later a Republican, and was 
a member of the United Brethren church. The mother of our subject was 
born in 181 1 and her death occurred at the age of seventy-one years in Mul- 
berry. Eight children were born to these parents, namely : George W., a 
soldier in the Civil war, died in Mulberry, leaving five children ; John M. 
died in Butler county, Kansas; Milton died in early childhood; Samuel P., 
subject of this sketch; Almira D. (deceased); Demars, Mary, Almeda and 
Drusilla J., all deceased. The subject of this review is the only one of the 
family living. 

The boyhood of Samuel P. Thomas was spent at Jefferson in this 
county, where he received a public school education. On October 19, 1862, 
he married Susanah Buck, who was born, reared and educated in Madison 
township and married here. She was a daughter of Nicholas Buck, a native 
of Pennsylvania, born there June 4, 181 1. His grandfather Buck was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary war. Nicholas Buck was a son of Andrew and 
Eve (Tox) Buck. Nicholas was three years old when his parents took him 
to Perry county, Ohio, in 1832. The family eventually came to Clinton 
county, Indiana, and entered eighty acres of government land in section 17, 
Madison township. Nicholas Buck married Catherine Burkhalter, a daugh- 
ter of Peter and Catherine (Berry) Burkhalter, born in Lehigh count}', 
Pennsylvania, in 181 7. Nicholas Buck was a blacksmith by trade. His 
family consisted of six children : George W., Mary C, James A., Susanah, 
Eliza Ann, and one who died in infancy. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 499 

Samuel P. Thomas has lived on his fine place of one hundred and ten 
acres, known as the Walnut Grove Farm, since 1870. and has been successful 
as a general farmer and stock raiser. He has a roomy, comfortable home, 
near a splendid walnut grove. He has paid considerable attention to stock 
raising, and now in his declining years, he having passed his seventy- fourth 
milestone, he finds himself very well fixed in every respect, surrounded with 
such luxuries as make a man of his simple tastes happy. He has three chil- 
dren : Zelda May, wife of Professor Kyger, of Frankfort, two children 
living; Lial Glen and Susan Jane; Nicholas A., engaged in insurance and light 
business in Mulberry, married to Nettie Shaffer, two children, Bessie and 
Park Thomas; and Dallas C., who died leaving a wife and one child, Cath- 
erine Irene. 

Politically, Samuel P. Thomas is a Republican, and he and his wife are 
members of the Methodist church. They are popular with all who know 
them, being friendly, neighborly and helpful. 



EDGAR SWACKHAMER. 

Among the men of influence in Clinton county who have interest of 
their locality at heart and who have led consistent lives, thereby gaining de- 
finite success along their chosen lines, is the subject of this sketch, Mr. Swack- 
hamer being regarded as one of the leading farmers of Perry township, 
owning an excellent farm in section 15, his highly productive landed estate 
being managed with that care and discretion that stamps him as a twentieth 
century agriculturist of the highest order, his place being known as Grand 
View Farm, which he has owned since coming here from the state of Iowa 
a number of years ago. He was born in Athens county, Ohio, near the town 
of Nclsonville, January 8, 1853. He is a son of Elijah and Caroline (Bates) 
Swackhamer, who removed to Clinton county in an early day and spent the 
balance of their lives here, becoming well established and well known The 
father, who was a native of Muskingum county, Ohio, died at the advanced 
age of seventy-five years. The mother, who was a native of Athens county, 
Ohio, is still living, making her home at Frankfort, Indiana, having attained 
the ripe old age of eighty-one years. Six sons were born to this couple: 
Edgar, of this review ; Clarence, Frank, living in Elwood, Indiana ; George, 
Morris, living in Jackson township, this county; and Charles. 

The subject of this sketch was reared on the home farm and there he 



5°° CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

worked hard when a boy, and during the winter months he attended the 
neighboring schools. When twenty-one years of age he went to western 
Iowa, locating near the Missouri river in Harrison county, near the town 
of Woodbine, that section then being a new country, There he engaged in 
farming and soon had a good start, and there he married in 1879 Mary 
Barnum, a woman who proved to be an excellent helpmeet. She was born 
near Woodbine, reared and educated there, and was a daughter of David 
Barnum and wife, pioneers in western Iowa, her mother having been known 
in her maidenhood as Lovina Palmer. Both these parents died at Woodbine. 
Our subject and wife continued to live in that vicinity until 1903, having 
the meanwhile developed one of the finest farms in that locality, when he sold 
out and came to Perry township, Clinton county, where he purchased an ex- 
cellent farm of one hundred and sixty acres, which is well improved and well 
kept, and on which stands a comfortable residence and good outbuildings, 
surrounded by large shade trees, his place being well located two miles east 
of Colfax. 

Seven children have been born to our subject and wife: Mrs. Caroline 
Copeland, of Vernon county, Missouri; Charles, now at home; Daisy mar- 
ried to a Mr. Robinson, now living at Woodbine, Iowa, a teacher in the 
public schools before her marriage; Jessie, living in Frankfort, Indiana; 
Ruby, engaged in teaching; Lovina, at home; and Birdina. These children 
all received good educational advantages. 

Politically, our subject is a Republican, and he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Christian church of Colfax. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is a strong advocate of education, 
religion and temperance. He is a man whose word is as good as his bond! 
He is hospitable, neighborly, and above criticism in all his relations with his 
fellow men. 



ALONZO E. TIMMONS. 



The habit of self-help is what has determined the distinctive business 
success and prestige of the gentleman whose career we now take under con- 
sideration, and who stands at the head of one of the leading industrial en- 
terprises of Clinton county, where, in the city of Colfax, he has built up one 
of the leading mercantile establishments in this locality, controlling a trade 
which ramifies throughout the county, and having the high reputation which 
is ever signicant of personal integrity and honorable methods. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 5 OT 

Mr. Timmons, who is proprietor of a dry goods and grocery store and 
who has been one of the prominent business men of Colfax for the past 
twenty-four years, was born in Clinton county April 3, 1859. on a farm. He 
is a son of Andrew J. and Susan (Whitesell) Timmons. an industrious old 
family of this county. The father was a gallant soldier in the Union army dur- 
ing the Civil war, serving in the Eighty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
having enlisted in 1861. He contracted a disease while in the army from 
which he finally died, when in the prime of life, at the age of thirty-five 
years. His widow is still living, making her home at Frankfort, this county, 
being now advanced in years. Five children were born to Charles J. Tim- 
mons and wife: Mrs. Elizabeth Shepherd, of Logansport, Indiana; J. S., 
Alonzo E., subject of this sketch; Mrs. Mary Tegener, and W. T., of Col- 
fax. The father was a Democrat in politics. 

Alonzo E. Timmons was reared on the home farm and worked hard 
when a boy. He received his education in the public schools. For twelve 
years he worked in Dawson's tile factory, one of the first concerns of its 
kind to be established in Indiana. Then for three years he traveled selling a 
patent tile machine, covering the states of Indiana, Ohio and New York, and 
'- was very successful in this work. He then took a clerkship for E. H. John- 
son, which he held for a period of thirteen years, his long retention being an 
indication of the excellent and satisfactory service he rendered. He subse- 
quently formed a partnership with Martin Dunbar, and for many years en- 
gaged successfully in the general mercantile business, building up a large 
trade with the surrounding country. He now has one of the largest and 
most popular stores in this locality, carrying a large and carefully selected 
line of dry goods, boots, shoes, staple and fancy groceries. His prices are 
always right, according to his hundreds of regular customers and his trade 
is constantly growing. He is scrupulously honest in his dealings with his 
fellow men, and is uniformly courteous. His store is neatly arranged with 
everything under a superb system, and it is a favorite stopping place, winter 
and summer, for the country people from all over Clinton county when they 
come to Colfax. 

Mr. Timmons was married in 1886 in Colfax to Junietta Swallow, a 
native of Indianapolis, where she was reared and educated. She is a daugh- 
ter of Benjamin and Caroline (Milburn) Swallow. The father was one of 
the brave sons of the North who fought against the hosts of rebellion in the 
sixties. The mother and father are both deceased. 

Mr. and Mrs. Timmons have one daughter, Mrs. Louise Griggs. 
Politically, Mr. Timmons is a Demcorat. Fraternally, he belongs to the 



502 CLINTON COUNTY, IXPJANA. 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Knights of Pythias and is active 
in lodge work, being also a member of the Maccabees and the Woodmen of 
the World. Mrs. Timmons belongs to the Presbyterian church. They have 
both been laborers for the general good of Colfax and vicinity in every way, 
and are highly esteemed by a very wide circle of friends and acquaintances. 



FRANK L. SUNIER. 



Those who have given the matter proper thought are unanimous in their 
opinion that there is no positive rule for achieving success, and yet in the 
life of the successful man there are always lessons which might well be fol- 
lowed by the youth whose fortunes are yet matters for future years to deter- 
mine. The man who gains prosperity is he who can see and utilize the op- 
portunities that are encountered in his pathway. The essential conditions 
of human life are ever the same, the surroundings of individuals differ but 
slightly, and when one individual passes another on the highway of life to 
reach the goal of prosperity before others who perhaps started out in their 
respective careers before him, it is because that individual has the power to 
use advantages which probably encompass the whole human race. Today 
among the progressive and well known business men of Frankfort, Clinton 
county, is Frank L. Sunier, proprietor of one of the largest and most up-to- 
date laundries in the state, and a man who, by his own hands and sheer force 
of will has worked himself up from a modest beginning, almost entirely 
without aid from any one. The qualities of keen discernment, rare discrim- 
ination, sound judgment and executive ability enter very largely into his 
makeup and have been contributing elements to the material success which 
has come to him. 

Mr. Sunier was born April 16, 1877, at Bluffton, Wells county, Indiana. 
He is a son of Jesse E. and Sarah (Reef) Sunier. The father was also born 
in the same vicinity as was our subject, and there he grew up and was edu- 
cated. He has followed the shoe business since early manhood and is now 
conducting a store in Bluffton, Indiana, enjoying a very extensive trade, 
owing to his wide acquaintance and his honesty and courteous treatment of 
his many customers from all over Wells county, and he is rated as one of 
the successful business men of that city. He has long been one of the pro- 
gressive men of Bluffton and has done much toward its general development. 
He served very acceptably as city councilman for a period of eight years. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 503 

He lias for some time been a leader in political and public matters there, 
being a standi supporter of the Democratic party. Religiously, he is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. His wife, who was also born 
reared and educated in Bluffton, is still living. The paternal grandparents of 
our subject were natives of Switzerland and Germany, and they emigrated 
to the United States in an early day. 

Frank L. Sunier grew to manhood in Bluffton and there received a good 
common and high school education. When but a boy he turned his attention 
to the laundry business and this has continued to be his life work, until he 
has mastered the ins and outs of the same and is recognized as one of the 
leading laundrymen of the state, having few peers and no superiors When 
only seventeen years of age he began an apprenticeship in a laundry in his 
native city and continued working there until he was twenty-two years old, 
when he became foreman of the Eagle Laundry at Fort Wayne, Indiana, one 
of the largest laundries of that city, and this important position he continued 
to hold for a period of eight years, discharging his duties in an eminently 
satisfactory manner to his employers and learning the business thoroughly. 
He then went to Vanwert, Ohio, where he continued the laundry business, 
remaining there for a period of eighteen months. Then, in 1909, he came to 
Frankfort, Indiana, and established the American Laundry on East Clinton 
street, and here he has been continuously engaged in the business for which 
he is so well equipped by both nature and training. He was successful from 
the first and his business has steadily and rapidly grown until it has now as- 
sumed large proportions. He has added to and improved his plant from time 
to time until he now operates one of the best and most modernly equipped 
laundries in the state. He has left no stone unturned whereby he might 
turn out better work and do it more promptly. He keeps a large force of 
experienced employes, and his business covers a wide territory. His fine 
plant is often visited by others in the same line of business who learn much 
from his methods. 

Fraternally, Mr. Sunier is a member of the Masonic Order, Tribe of 
Ben Hur, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and politically he is a Republican, but he has never sought public 
honors, being contented to devote his time exclusively to his business and his 
home. 

Mr. Sunier was married on September 29, 1901, to Telia DeLon"-, a 
native of Bluffton, where she was reared and educated. She is a daughter 
of J. S. and Mae (Brickley) DeLong, a highly respected family of Bluffton. 



504 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JAMES C. B. BEATTY. 

The making of pottery is one of the oldest trades of the world. From 
the collection of relics and other historical data, the first known living heing 
with anything akin to human intelligence, acquired the art of pottery. The 
primeval man fashioned his howls out of a stone or piece of wood, pro- 
ducing an utensil after much arduous work, which was crude, hut in a meas- 
ure effective. It was nof l° n £ until mud and clay were used in the making of 
pottery, but the art of baking did not become known until the ancient Egypt- 
iansdiscovered the process by mere accident. From then on, in all countries, 
among the American Indians, Aztec-, Greeks, Syrians and South Americans, 
the science of pottery developed until, in some places, it was an art, the 
quality of which we cannot reproduce in this enlightened twentieth century. 
The exquisite vases and utensils of the Greeks and Romans, also the Egypt- 
ians, were made by a process, the knowledge of which has been lost. We can 
imitate, it is true, but not reproduce. Commercialism has entered largely into 
the pottery trade by necessity, and the business is represented by many men of 
sterling character and high business ability. Mr. Beatty, of this sketch, is one 
of the most progressive of the pottery men of the state, and in Clinton county 
enjoys the esteem and respect of all of his fellow citizens. 

James C. B. Beatty was born at Fredericktown, Ohio, on April 1, 1876, 
and was the son of Isaac and Amy Ann Beatty. Isaac Beatty was born in 
Fredericktown in 1836, was raised on a farm, following agriculture all of his 
life. Mr. Beatty was descended from good Irish stock. He was called to his 
rest in March, 1895, after a -long life of usefulness and hard work. Mr. Beatty 
was a third degree Mason, a Democrat, and a Presbyterian, and at one time 
was township school director for a number of years. In 1850 he was united 
in marriage with Amy Ann Huston of Columbiana county, Ohio, and the)' 
lived happily together for more than forty years, she dying in 1891. She 
was the mother of twelve children, eleven of whom are living. 

James C. B. Beatty went to the common schools until he was eleven years 
of age, when he quit, and Ijegan to work on the home farm, continuing there 
until he was twenty-one. He then went to East Liverpool, Ohio, and took a 
two years' course in photograph) - , but gave that up, and went to East Pales- 
tine, Ohio, and began traveling for a pottery company in Indiana. He soon 
made his mark in the pottery field and was given the position of manager of 
the sales department of the Sehring Pottery Company of Ohio, in which po- 
sition he remained until 1908, when he came to Frankfort, Ind., and or- 
ganized the Beatty Pottery Manufacturing Company, with a capital of forty 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 505 

thousand dollars. This was in December of 1908. He also organized in 
1910, the Diamond Pottery Manufacturing Company, capitalized at twelve 
thousand dollars, and then the James C. Beatty and Son Manufacturing Com- 
pany, capitalized at ten thousand dollars, and doing a mail order business 
strictly, being the only pottery conducting business in that way in the slate. 
In 191 1 he went to East Palestine, Ohio, and organized the Consolidated 
Pottery Manufacturing Company, capitalized at one hundred thousand dol- 
lars, and now, Mr. Beatty is acting as secretary of this business firm. He also 
holds the position of general manager of the sales department of the IT. R. 
Wyllie China Manufacturing Company of Hutington, W. Va. All of these 
companies are in first-class order, which fact attests to the business ability of 
Mr. Beatty and his competence as an organizer. 

On March 20, 1903, Mr. Beatty was married to Gertrude K. Barner, i 
native and resident of Frankfort. One child has been born of this union, 
Newton Gaskill, born in Frankfort, Ind., April 10, 1904, and who is now 
attending school in this city. 

Fraternally, Mr. Beatty is a Mason, belonging to the York Rite. He 
also holds membership with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Mr. 
Beatty has been a great traveler all of his life, not only traveling for pleasure 
but in the pursuit of his business. He estimates that he has covered nearly 
six hundred and fifty thousand miles, and as he is yet a young man, his record 
when he quits .may be a world-beater. His son, Gaskill, from the time he 
was a year old until he was six years of age, accompanied his parents and 
traveled a total of 62,000 miles, visiting every city of 50,000 population and 
over between New York and Denver. Mr. Beatty is very gifted in language 
and mathematics, having cultivated a knowledge of these by self-training and 
readinsr. 



DAVID D KENNEDY 



Success is only achieved by the exercise of certain distinguishing qualities 
and it connot be retained without effort. Those by whom great epoch changes 
have been made in the industrial and political world began early in life to 
prepare themselves for their peculiar duties and responsibilities, and it was only 
by the most persevering and continuous endeavor that they succeeded in rising 
superior to the obstacles in their way and reaching the goal of their ambitions. 
Such lives are an inspiration to others who are less courageous. While David 
D. Kennedy, the well known and popular tailor of Frankfort, Clinton county, 



50f> CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

has not become a great captain of industry, yet judging from the record he 
is making, he has carefully laid the foundation fur large future success, some 
of which he has already achieved. 

Mr. Kennedy was born in Rush count)', Indiana, on a farm, October 15, 
1878. lie is a son of William M, and Sarah A. (Powell) Kennedy. The 
father was born in 1843 in Rush county, this state, the Kennedys have been a 
well known and highly respected family there from the pioneer period to the 
present time. William M. Kennedy grew to manhood on the farm in his native 
community and received such education as the common schools of his day 
afforded. Early in life he took up farming for his vocation and continued 
that line of endea\ or with successful results until a few years ago when he 
retired, having accumulated a competency, and is now spending his declining 
years in quiet in the town of Fairmount, Grant count)'. Mis wife was also 
a native of that county, born there in 1842. She was called to her eternal 
rest in 1912. Both the paternal and maternal grandparents of the subject of 
this sketch were pioneers of Rush county, becoming well known to the early 
residents there. 

David D. Kennedy grew to manhood in his native community and assisted 
with the general work on the farm when he became of proper age. He 
received a good common school education and spent two years in high 
school. He decided upon the tailoring business, and at once, after leaving 
school, began learning the same, taking the course of instruction taught by 
the noted J. J. Mitchell School of Cutting, in New York City. He made 
rapid progress in the same, and he began working at his trade at Fairmount, 
Indiana, where he continued with success for a period of four years as an em- 
ploye of the leading tailor there. He then went in business for himself in 
the same town and continued for a period of six years, building up a very satis- 
factory trade. His ability was recognized by all who had occasion to learn of 
his fine work and pleasing personal address, and the mammoth tailoring con- 
cern of Kahn Brothers, of Louisville, wholesale tailors, offered him a lucrative 
position as traveling salesman which he accepted. Between season trips he 
worked in Indianapolis at his trade. He continued with this firm for a period 
of four years as salesman, giving eminent satisfaction in every respect, being 
regarded as one of the firm's most efficient and trustworthy employes. After 
severing his connection with Kahn Brothers, Mr. Kennedy spent two years in 
the South as a clothing salesman, meeting with his usual success. A few 
years ago while Mr. Kennedy was spending the winter in the South, three 
Confederate bills were given him, $5.00, $20.00 and $50.00, dated February 
17, 1864, which are prized highly. In 191 1 he came to Frankfort, Indiana, 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 507 

and established a tailoring shop in the Fitzinger Block. He was successful 
from the start and his place has become quite popular and widely known, 
many of his customers coming from remote parts of Clinton county and near- 
by towns. He maintains a neat and modernly equipped shop, carrying a very 
extensive line of samples, and high grade and prompt service is his aim. 
Only the most skilled workmen are employed. He has a strong personality 
and is regarded as one of the most progressive and popular of the younger 
business men of Frankfort. 

Fraternally, Mr. Kennedy is a member of the Masonic order and the 
Knights of Pythias. Religiously, he holds membership with the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Politically, lie is independent, voting for the candidate 
whom he regards as best suited for the various offices sought. 

Mr, Kennedy was married on April 7', 1899, to Cornelia Rodman, of 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and she was summoned to an untimely grave at 
Fairmount, Indiana, on June 18, 1809. She was a young lady of pleasing 
personality and the possessor of many estimable characteristics. 



JOHN DAVID MILLER. 



The age of the twentieth century is productive of men of quick action, 
high resolve, and untiring labor and perseverance in the pursuit of everyday 
affairs. Among the counties of Indiana, Clinton has come to occupy a 
prominent position by virtue of the quality of citizens identified with the busi- 
ness interests of the county. In the main lines of commercial intercourse 
Clinton has excelled, and at this writing there are even more and promising 
lines being developed, which all point to a brilliant and successful future for 
the section. John David Miller has helped not a little in this growth, and 
he is today numbered among the representative men of his township and 
county Fair and liberal in all his dealings with his fellows, he numbers his 
friends by the hundreds. 

John David Miller was born in Madison township, this county, on De- 
cember 10, 1865, and was the son of Joseph O. and Martha A. (Hammel) 
Miller. Joseph Miller was born on March 8, 1832, the son of Jacob and jane 
(Mattix) Miller. 

Jacob Miller was a native of Ohio and came to Indiana in 1833 and 
entered eighty acres of land, later bought forty acres. He lived the usual 
life of the pioneer, clearing the land, building his home, and own improve- 
ments which, in those days, were very limited in number and character. The 



508 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

times were hard in Clinton county, for it was practically an uncultivated 
state, hut the land was rich, as it is now, so the reward for the struggle was 
entirely adequate. Jacob Miller died in 1856, and his wife died in 1892. 

Joseph Miller was a farmer during his life, and also an expert wheel- 
wright and shingle-maker. He occupied the position of a successful mer- 
chant for a few years, and was very successful in that undertaking. In 
politics he was a Democrat, and was always active in the support of that 
party, although he never sought public office. Mr. Miller was a third degree 
Mason, and a charter memher of the Jefferson lodge. In 1862 he was mar- 
ried to Martha A. Hammel, who was born in Madison township, this county, 
on October 2, 1845. a daughter of John and Elizabeth Hammel, who were 
among the very early settlers of this section of the county. Mrs. Miller is 
still living, and enjoying the comforts of a healthy old age. 

John David Miller obtained his education in the common schools, vary- 
ing his attendance there with his work on the farm. In 1889 he opened a 
grocery and butcher shop in the village of Hamilton, but.two years later, in 
1891, sold out, moved to Kingman, Fountain county, and in partnership with 
S. D. Alexander, opened a general store there. During the second adminis- 
tration of Grover Cleveland, Mr. Miller was appointed assistant postmaster 
of Kingman, and filled the office to the satisfaction of the citizens of the 
town. At the expiration of his term he went to Alexandria, Ind., and started 
in the grocery business; this was in 1897. However, his period of residence 
there was only for three months. His next move was to return to the old 
home farm in Madison township, where he remained until 1907, when he 
went into the grocery and butcher shop business again at Mulberry, and im- 
mediately made a success of this undertaking. On January 1, 1909 he was 
appointed deputy sheriff under John Mattix, a sketch of whom is on another 
page of this volume, and he served four years in a most commendable man- 
ner. The year 1912 marked Mr. Miller's election to the office of sheriff, 
and at the present time he is fulfilling the duties of that position. 

On April 17, 1892, Mr. Miller was married to Lilly M. Jacoby, the 
daughter of John and Mary C. Jacoby, who was born on January 29, 1871, 
in Ross township, this county. Two children have been born of this union: 
Bernice E., now at home, and Troy E., who is in school. 

Mr. Miller places his political faith in the Democratic party, under whose 
banner he has often won honors and office. He is a very active campaign 
worker. Fraternally, he is a memher of the Knights of Pythias and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. Religiously he belongs to the Christian 
church. 



CLINTON COUNTY., INDIANA. 5<](; 

NATE SIFTON, D. C. 

The world judges any new science by results. Theories look well on 
paper, hut unless they get us somewhere or do some definite, tangible thing 
we soon cast them aside. Judging from results, it would seem that the 
science of chiropractic is one of the most wonderful truths that has been dis- 
covered in the present age of man. For by its knowledge and application, it 
has been shown, man will be able to live long and be well. Chiropractic re- 
places all past theories of disease with a knowledge of the cause, and makes it 
possible for man to live much longer and be free from the multiform ills to 
which humanity is heir. For with the cause adjusted there can be no effect, 
the innate nature will be enabled to transmit and express life and health 
in all parts of the body, making it almost impossible for disease to exist. 
However, chiropractic is not related to the science of medicine, surgery, osteo- 
pathy. Christian Science, nor are chiropractors physicians, as they do not 
treat, heal or relieve diseases, and they do not pretend to do so. Their theory 
is that nature alone can treat, heal, relieve or cure, but must be unhindered. 
Chiropractic, it is claimed, makes it possible for nature to do this work. 
Chiropractic proves that the brain is the center of the nervous system and 
the spinal cord is the transmitter of impulses or nerve force from the brain 
to all parts of the bod)'. Any interference with the spinal nerves transmitting 
these impulses, results in abnormal performance of the functions of that part 
of the body to which those nerves lead and this abnormal condition is called 
disease. The trained chiropractor is able to instantly locate the point of in- 
terference and by his art, quickly and scientifically, by the mere laying on of 
the hands, adjust the veterbrae involved, thereby removing the cause — pres- 
sure on the spinal nerves. Then nature restores normal conditions which we 
call health. 

Clinton count)-, lias within her border a worthy representative of this 
great science in the person of Nate Si f ton, of Frankfort. He hails from the 
"north countree," the land of the "Lady of the Snows," his birth having 
occurred in the Province of Ontario, Canada, July 8, 1859. He is a son of 
John W. and Mary (Sweener) Si ft on. The father was born in London, 
Ontario, and tbere he grew up* and was educated. He devoted his life to 
farming and railroad contracting He was widely known to the railroad 
world of Canada and was a man of ability. His death occurred in 1903. 
His wife, mother of our subject, was born at Catham, Ontario, and was reared 
and educated in her native province. Her death occurred in 1SS2, more than 
thirty years prior to that of her husband. 



'5 K) CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Nate Sifton grew to manhood in Ontario and received a good edu, ation 
Early ,n life he took up gold mining and engaged in that line of endeavor 
with varying fortunes all over the Pacific coast country and i„ Alaska 
Studying law he was admitted to the bar, and practiced with success in Colo- 
rado and Alaska. Seized with sciatic rheumatism, he was practically in- 
capacitated for work for a period of six years. Finding relief through Chiro- 
practic after all known methods had failed, he decided to take up this science 
as a life work. After five years of investigation, study and practice, under 
the original methods, he entered the National School of Chiropractic at Chi- 
cago, 111 where he made a splendid record and from this institution he was 
graduated ,n ip. Soon thereafter he came to Frankfort and established 
an office over the M. B. Thresher store, and here he has remained enjoying 
a large and constantly growing practice, his patients coming from all over 
this section of the country. 

Mr. Sifton was married in January, 1905, to Anna Kelley O'Neil who 
was born in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, where she grew to womanhood and 
was educated. She is a daughter of Kelly O'Neill, who for many years 
figured prominently in the political affairs of Tippecanoe county. " His 
death occurred there ten years ago. The mother of Mrs. Sifton is living in 
-Lafayette, Ind. b 

Orde POlit H aI1 r M ''- I 5 ?? JS a Republica "- He is a '-mber of the Masonic 
Ordei, and religiously belongs to the Presbyterian church. 



PAUL PENCE. 



In placing the subject of this sketch in the front rank of Frankfort's 
business men simple justice is done to a biographical fact, universally recog- 
nized throughout Clinton county by men at all familiar with his history A 
man of judgment, sound discretion and business ability of a high order he 
has managed with tactful success important enterprises and so impressed' his 
mdividuahty upon the community as to gain recognition among its leading 
citizens and public spirited men of affairs. Mr. Pence is young in the com 
mercial life of Frankfort, but his efforts in his chosen occupation, that of 
stock buying, have been rewarded with unusual success, considering the time 
he has been active. fa 

Paul Pence was horn on May 8, 1871 and was the son of Charles R 
and Martha J. (Gaskill , Pence. Charles Pence, or "Dick," as be was known 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. .=,11 

to his friends, was one of the best known men in the county. He followed 
farming most of his life, but was in the milling and elevator business in 
Frankfort for about three years, and made a success of the enterprise. In 
time Mr, Pence became the owner of several hundred acres of fine farming 
land, and he tilled the acres in the most approved style, employing the latest 
and best farm machinery obtainable. Mr. Pence took a prominent part in 
the politics of his community and always preferred the Democratic ticket. 
In religious affairs he attended the Methodist church. In the summer of 
1861 Charles Pence was married to Martha J. Gaskill, and to them were 
born five children: Charles W., Paul, Delia, May Thatcher and Frank 
Earnest. Charles was stricken with hear} failure while working on his farm. 

Paul Pence spent his early life on the farm of his father, and attended 
the common schools of his vicinity. In the year 791 1 he came to Frankfort 
and entered upon the business of stock buying, which business be has gradu- 
ally increased in scope every year, and now has a large trade with the farmers 
of Clinton county. His work aids the agricultural people, and he has earned a 
reputation for honest dealing and wise judgment. Mr. Pence learned the 
rudiments of stock selection from his father during the nine years he spent 
on the farm, and this early training was not in vain, for' it enabled our sub- 
ject to start early without the embarrassment of learning the pitfalls by 
hard and bitter experience. 

In politics Mr. Pence has ever taken an active part, being affiliated with 
the Democratic party. He is chairman of the. Democratic committee of 
Clinton county. Fraternally, Mr. Pence belongs to the Masonic Order, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Improved Order of Red Men. 



SADIE E. GOLDSBERRY. 

The part women played in assisting the early settlers can not be under- 
estimated. By nature not as robust physically as their male companions, 
hardships and privations leaned more heavily upon them, but the women of 
that day who came with their husbands and families into the loneliness of 
what was then the wilderness were equal to the occasion. They not only did 
their full share of the hard manual toil, but helped to dispel the gloom, the 
sense of hopelessness which occassionally fell upon the setlters in their relent- 
less labor. Women of such caliber were the antecedents of the estimable 
lady whose name initiates this paragraph. The hardships and adventures of 



5 1 - CLINTON COUNTYj INDIANA. 

the careers of her mother and grandmothers would prove material for a 
volume. A study of her praiseworthy characteristics would indicate that 
Mrs. Goldsberry lias inherited many of their sterling attributes of head and 
I art, and she is doing a great work for the general amelioration of humanity, 
and is therefore deserving of specific mention in the histories of her section of 
the state along with other unselfish and noble workers in life's vast arena. 

Mrs. Saddie E. Goldsberry. well known president of the Relief Corps 
of Colfax, and esteemed as one of the most active and zealous women who 
is working for the moral and spiritual uplift of Clinton county, and who 
has long been a popular and efficient officer of the above named society, is a 
native of Boone count}-, Indiana, and there she was reared to womanhood. 
She received a good educational training in her native state, and, having re- 
mained a student all her life, is an exceptionally well informed woman on 
current topics of the times. 

She is a daughter of Thomas and Emma Herbin, natives of Monroe 
county, Indiana, where they followed farming. They were the parents of 
five children, three of whom survive: William and Sherman, farmers, of 
Colfax, and Sadie, subject of this sketch. Thomas Herbin, died in 1897 at 
the age of fifty years. Mrs. Herbin still survives. They were members of 
the Christian church. He was a Democrat. 

When nineteen years of age our subject was united in marriege to F. M. 
Goldsberry, for many years a leading criminal lawyer of central Indiana, 
and who served the Union most gallantly in her struggle to suppress the 
rebellion of the sixties, serving three years. He was one of the most active 
and influential men of Colfax during a past generation and did much for the 
material and civil progress of the town, ranking among her leading citizens, 
and he ably served the people of Clinton county in various official capacities 
for many years, always giving the utmost satisfaction. He had few peers and 
no superiors in the profession of law in this section of the state, and 
when, on February 19, 1913, he was summoned to his eternal rest, at the age 
of sixty-nine years, he having been born April 20, 1844, all realized that 
a good and useful man had gone whose place it would be exceedingly 
difficult to fill. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Goldsberry two sons were born: Fred M., who is 
attending high school, and Truman, also a pupil in the local schools. 

Mrs. Goldsberry's beautiful and neatly furnished home is often the gath- 
ering place for the many friends of the family. 

The officers of the Relief Corps are, Mrs. Sadie Goldsberry, president ; 
Mrs. Mary Roudebush, senior vice president ; Mrs. Nancy Herbin, junior 







Is 




CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 513 

vice president ; Mrs. Mary Lanum, chaplain; Mrs. Hattie Benfield, secretary. 

The Relief Corps owns the old Grand Army Hall where the local Post 
used to meet, and they are doing a most commendable work. 



C. F. GERY. 



Energy, sound judgment and persistency of effort, properly applied, 
will always win the goal sought in the sphere of human endeavor, no matter 
what the environment may be or what obstacles are met with, for they who 
are endowed with such characteristics, make stepping-stones of their adversi- 
ties to higher things. These reflections are suggested by the career of C. F. 
Gery, manager of the Colfax Grain Company, who, while yet young in 
years has shown himself to be the possessor of many commendable traits 
that never fail to win no matter what the vocation in life may be. With 
but little assistance of any kind he has forged his way to the front ranks 
among the representative young business men of Clinton county. 

Mr. Gery was born at Colfax, Indiana, December 10, 1888, and here he 
grew to manhood and received his education. He is a son of H. L. and 
Susan (Frees) Gery, a prominent and well known family of Colfax for 
many years, where the father engaged successfully in the mercantile business 
for a number of decades, building up an etxensive trade through his able 
management and honest dealings with his many customers. To H. L. Gery 
and wife six children were born, five sons and one daughter. Two of the sons 
are well known merchants of Colfax. The subject of this sketch is the 
youngest of the family. He began clerking in a store at an early age and 
gave evidence of rare natural business ability from the start and finally 
launched out in the grain business, and, learning rapidly the ins and outs of 
the same eventually became manager of the Colfax Grain Company, one of 
the largest business firms of its kind in this part of the state, and, owing to 
our subject's able management and courteous and honest treatment of pa- 
trons it is rapidly growing. Of this firm, John Waugh is president, William 
Tyson, secretary, and H. R. Woodburn, treasurer, the two latter being also 
trustees. The elevator has a capacity of one thousand bushels per day, or 
three hundred and fifty thousand bushels annually. The buildings arc large, 
substantial, up-to-date and commodious, equipped with all modern machinery 
and appliances, everything denoting thrift and good manaeement. Modem 
(33) 



5 '4 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

mill machinery lias been installed for grinding feed and corn chops of all 
kinds. Standard brands of flour and all kinds of feed are kept on sale, and 
their operations cover a very large territory. 

Mr. Grey was married on July uj, 1910, to \dah Estelle Reeves, who was 
born, reared and educated in Crawfordsille, Indiana, where her family has 
long been prominent, she being a daughter of William Reeves and wife. 

Politically, Mr. Gery is a Democrat, hut he has never been especially 
active in public affairs. Fraternally, he is a member of the Masonic Order, 
No. 417; also belongs to the Knights of Pythias, Mercy Lodge. 



HENRY CLAY JACKSON. 

Success has been worthily attained by Henry Clay Jackson, who is today 
accounted one of the prosperous farmers and business men of Clinton county. 
To his energy, enterprise, careful management and keen discernment his 
present station in life is attributed. He participated in that titanic struggle 
between the North and the South, and made a record for bravery and forti- 
tude. A bullet wound stopped his martial career before the end of the war, 
but his patriotism lasted and he aided the Northern cause in every way pos- 
sible. Mr. Jackson is admired and respected by everyone with whom he 
is acquainted, and indeed his life has ever been directed in the paths of right- 
eousness, and his ideals have been high. 

Henry Clay Jackson was born in Washington township, this county, 
June 7, 1846, and was the son of John and Margaret (McKy) Jackson. John 
Jackson came from the state of Maryland, being born there May 5, 1824, 
the son of Joseph and Anna CLemar) Jackson. Joseph was also born in 
Maryland, was a farmer, and died about the year 1834. After his death his 
widow and children came overland to Clinton county, and entered land from 
the government in Perry township. John Jackson followed farming and 
carpentering together all of his life, and politically was a Whig. He died in 
1854 in Tippecanoe county, Ind. His wife was Margaret McKy, and they 
were married in Jul)', 1841. She was a native of the Buckeye state, and 
died in 1846. 

As his mother died the same year as his birth, our subject was reared by 
his grandmother, who married a Hosea Baggs just before coming to Indiana. 
On February 21, 1862, Henry Jackson enlisted in Company A, Sixty-third 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was assigned to the Army of the Potomac. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 515 

After participating- in the second bailie of Bull Run. he was transferred to 
the Army of the Cumherland, remaining with this division until the battle 
of Resaca, Ga.. when he received a severe wound in the left shoulder which 
totally disabled that arm. Further active service being impossible, he went 
to Madison, Ind., and there went to school though the expense was to him 
.very heavy. On March 14, 1865. he was discharged honorably from the 
Union army. He then came back to the farm and stayed there until 1873, 
then moved to Hillisburg, where he went into the mercantile business, which 
he followed until 1883. He next came to Frankfort, and served as deputy 
sheriff under Jerome Clark from 1896 to 1900. During the term from 1904 
to 1908 he again served in this office under John W. Haggert. 

Mr. Jackson was married on December 28, 1S65 to Mrs. Sarah A. 
Barnes, a widow of an old soldier. She was a native of Clinton county, 
born here February 24, 1844, and had two children, both of whom are 
deceased. 

Politically, Mr. Jackson is a Democrat, and religiously is a member of 
the Methodist church. Fraternally, he is a Mason, third degree, and Past 
Worthy Master of the Order of the Eastern Star. He belongs also to the 
Grand Army of the Republic. 



HARRY ARLANDO MEIKEL. 

He who adds to the beauty of the world and makes it attractive 
through the sense of vision is a benefactor of his race though his name be 
unknown beyond the circumscribed limits of the little locality in. which the 
even tenor of his life is passed far from the maddening crowd. Such an in- 
dividual is Harry Orlando Miekel, the subject of this review, and the leading 
florist of Frankfort, through the medium of which calling he has done much 
to arouse a taste for something else than the merely practical and induce not 
a few to turn their attention to the cultivation of flowers — the most beauti- 
ful of nature's adornments and among the most precious of God's gifts to 
man. Mr. Meikel is a native of Indiana and of German ancestry, from 
whom he doubtless inherits his taste for the true, the beautiful and the good. 
His father, Charles P. Meikel, was born in Pennsylvania, of German par- 
entage, and his mother, who bore the maiden name of Mary E. Null, was a 
native of Cincinnati, Ohio, and a lady of much more than ordinary intelli- 
gence and natural refinement. Charles P. Meikel when a youth learned the 



5l(> CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

printer's trade and in due time became very experienced and skillful in the 
art preservative, as the several responsible positions he held with various 
publishers abundantly indicate. A number of years ago be located in Indian- 
apolis, Indiana, where he followed his chosen calling successfully until his 
death, in 1884, his wife surviving him ten years after that date. 

Harry Orlando Meikel was born in Indianapolis February 28, 1863, and 
received a good education in the schools of that city. While still a mere 
youth he manifested much more than ordinary interest in the growing of 
flowers and later decided to make floriculture his life work. In 1901 he 
came to Frankfort to engage in the business which proved successful from 
the beginning and to which he has devoted his attention with satisfactory 
financial results ever since. As already stated, he is today the leading florist 
in the city, being proprietor of an establishment consisting of 132 square feet 
of space on East Barner street, nearly all under cover, besides owning two 
acres of fine bottom land which he devotes exclusively to the cultivation of 
the different varieties of bulbous plants, which of recent years have become 
so popular with gardeners and others. 

Mr. Meikel has made a careful and systematic study of his vocation, 
keeps in touch with every advancement in floriculture and carries a full and 
complete stock of all kinds of flowers and plants for which there may be a 
demand. His place is a favorite resort of people of refined taste, as well as 
for the general public and his financial success has kept pace with the growth 
of his business, as is indicated by the respectable standing he occupies among 
the solid men of his adopted city. As a citizen he is public spirited and popu- 
lar, keenly alive to every laudable movement having for its object the mater- 
ial advancement of the community and the intellectual and moral welfare of 
the populace. 

In his political affiliations, Mr. Meikel is a Republican, but in no sense 
a partisan or aspirant for the honors and emoluments of office. His frater- 
nal relations include membership with the Knights of Pythias. Independent 
Order of Red Men and the Haymakers. Religiously, he has strong and well 
grounded convictions, being a sincere believer in the Sacred Scriptures and a 
respected member of the Presbyterian church of Frankfort, to which eccles- 
iastical organization his wife also belongs. He is a gentleman of domestic 
as well as refined tastes and has a pleasant home in the above' city which is 
presided over by an intelligent and gracious lady, to whom he was united in 
the holy bonds of wedlock August 1, 1900, and who previous to that time 
was Miss Ada A. Kelly, of Shelbyville, Indiana. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. z t \y 

GEORGE DAVIS. 

This representative and honored citizen of Colfax, Clinton county, has 
been distinctively the architect of his own fortunes. He has been true and 
loyal in all the relations of life and stands as a type of that sterling manhood 
which ever commands respect and honor. Mr. Davis is a man who would 
have won his way in any locality where fate might have placed him, for he 
has sound judgment, coupled with great energy and business tact, together 
with upright principles, all of which make for success wherever and whenever 
found. By reason of these principles he has won and retained a host of friends 
throughout Clinton county where he has spent his life and of which he is a 
native. He is one of the pioneer business men of Colfax, having been engaged 
successfully and continuously in business here for the past twenty-seven years. 
Mr. Davis was born in Clinton county, near Colfax, July 27, 1862, on a 
farm. He is a son of Joel Davis, who was born in Ross county, Ohio. The 
mother of our subject was Elizabeth Patton, of English descent, and a native 
of Indiana. The death of the father occurred at the age of sixty-eight years. 
Politically, he was a Democrat, and he belonged to. the Christian church. 
The mother is still living and resides with her daughter, Mrs. F. L. Shirley, 
in Clinton county. To this union of the parents of our subject seven children 
were born, four sons and three daughters. 

George Davis grew to manhood on the home farm, where he did his 
full share of the general work, and he received his education in the common 
schools of his home community. He learned the drug business when young 
and Jias followed the same in Colfax for a period of twenty-seven years, 
during which time he has enjoyed an ever growing trade with the city and 
surrounding country owing to the fact that he keeps a fresh and well selected 
line of drugs and drug sundries in a tastily arranged, up-to-date drug store, 
and deals honestly and courteously with his hundreds of patrons. He is re- 
garded as one of the best pharmacists in central Indiana. Everything found' 
in the modern drug stores in the large cities is to be had at his store. 

Mr. Davis was married in 1885 at Darlington, Montgomery county, 
this state, to Flora E. Murphy, a daughter of one of the honored and well 
known farhilies of that locality. There she grew to womanhood and re- 
ceived a good education. One daughter, Oma L., has been born to our sub- 
ject and wife. 

Politically, Mr. Davis is a Democrat. He is an active member of the 
Christian church, and has been superintendent of the Sunday school for 
about three years. His wife is also active in church and Sunday school 



5 ]l ^ CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

work. He is a liberal supporter of the chrrch, and took an active part in 
building the new Christian church edifice in Colfax in 1012, which is an 
elegant structure, well suited to the local congregation's needs in ever} way. 
Fraternally, Mr. Davis belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He is a lover of home and takes little interest in political work. He has a 
pleasant and modern residence, furnished with electric lights, furnace, hot 
and cold water, etc. In fact, it is one of the most desirable homes in Colfax, 
is neatly furnished and tastily kept, and is often the mecca for the many 
friends of the family who always find here genuine hospitality. 



T. W. DUNBAR. 



This is often called the automobile age, and such a phrase is not at all 
far-fetched, for during the past few years, we have seen the automobile al- 
most relegate the horse to the rear, at least in many sections of the country. 
It is a time saver, and, since time is money, as the wise Franklin said, the 
auto is therefore a money saver and money maker, and the pleasure in own- 
ing and operating one is not to be overlooked. The man who has become 
familiar with the automobile business in any of its phases is sure of a liveli- 
hood nowadays. A great many people know how to start and stop an auto, 
thinking that nothing else is required but everybody who owns, operates or 
has anything to do with one should know its mechanism, its possibilities and 
limitations, for many reasons. The machine handled by an expert will last 
much longer than one handled by a novice, besides the trouble that is to be 
expected if one knows little about them. 

It is safe to say that no man in Clinton county is more of an automo- 
bile expert than J. W. Dunbar, proprietor of the popular Dunbar garage at the 
city of Colfax. He became interested in them at the start, began studying 
them from every viewpoint and is now one of the most thoroughly up-to- 
date automobile men in the state; in fact, he is one of the pioneers in the 
automobile business, and he constructed one of the first machines to be built 
in Indiana. He has been an expert mechanic for many years, and his long 
experience in the study and operation of the automobile makes his ideas 
exceptionally valuable. He understands all the details and mechanical work- 
ings of the different makes, from start to finish, and is very thorough in all 
his work and every job he turns out is done in the best possible manner and 
may be depended on to be all right in every detail. His repair work- on 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 5 J 9 

machines for years has been regarded as far above the average and lie has 
had all the work he could turn out, many of his patrons coming from long 
distances, and they are never disappointed with the results. His aim is ever 
— accuracy and promptness. His large, modernly equipped and convenient 
garage building is twenty by eighty feet, is a one-story annex, well adapted 
in every way for the purposes to which it is put. Also adjoining is a sub- 
stantial two-story brick, forty by forty feet, which is devoted to his work in 
this line. He is prepared to promptly repair any make of machine, and he 
keeps all kinds of repairs and accessories to be found in the best garages and 
automobile repair shops everywhere. He has an extensive trade in Indian- 
apolis and Washington, Indiana, having been at one time foreman of a large 
machine shop in the latter town. 

Mr. Dunbar was born in Montgomery county, Indiana, January 28, 1863. 
He received a common school education, and in his earlier life engaged in 
farming and merchandising in Wright county, Iowa, and met with encourag- 
ing success at both. When a young man he learned the machinist's trade, and 
at the age of twenty-two was quite proficient in iron and steel work. He mar- 
ried Ida Blacher, and of this union one son has been born. 

Politically, Mr. Dunbar has been more or less active in public affairs. 
He was formerly a member of the town board ,and was at one time marshal 
of the city of Colfax, performing his duty in a manner that met with general 
satisfaction to all concerned. 



WILLIAM LADEN DAVIS. 

Agriculture in Clinton county has a worthy representative in the pecson 
of William L. Davis, of Jackson township. He is a large land owner, and his 
many acres are very productive, resulting from the best methods of tillage 
and care. Mr. Davis is honored and respected by his fellow citizens, because 
he has assisted them in every laudable enterprise they have ventured for the 
prosperity of the county. He is a man of the strictest integrity, and his every 
action is based upon the principles of doing right. 

Mr. Davis was born in Ironton, Ohio, on March 17, 1855, and was the 
son of John J. and Catherine (Marshall) Davis, the father being a native of 
Wales. John J. Davis first settled in New York state. He came to Ironton, 
Ohio, where he worked in furnaces, and also kept hotel for a number of 



520 CLINTON COUNTYj INDIANA. 

years, then to Fulton county, Illinois, where he spent eighteen years in farm- 
ing; then to Champaign county, Illinois, still farming. He died in 1888. Mrs. 
Davis died in June, 1908, in Champaign county. 

William L. Davis had a common school eudcation, after which he 
worked on the farm. He came to Clinton county in 1900 from Champaign 
county, Illinois, and now owns about three hundred and ten acres of land in 
Jackson township, all of which is tillable, well fenced, tiled and improved. 
For the last five years Mr. Davis has managed the place, but has led a retired 
life. 

Politically, Mr. Davis is a Progressive, but voted the Republican ticket 
from 1877 to 1909 — thirty-two years. At one time he was a township com- 
missioner in Champaign county, Illinois. He is a member of the Christian 
church, and is teacher of the men's Bible class of Antioch. He is a Mason at 
Frankfort, belonging to the Council, Royal Arch, the Chapter, Knights Tem- 
plar, and Commandery of Frankfort. 

On September 25. 1879, he was married to Mary E. Barrick, born in 
Champaign county, Illinois, December 28, 1857, the daughter of William R. 
and Louisa Barrick. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Davis: 
Fred R., on the farm; May died when five years old; Wood W., of Lebanon, 
Indiana; Ray H., of Frankfort; John W., of Los Angeles, California; and 
Merle C, wife of Charles T. Knobes, of Frankfort, Indiana. 



FRED P. KENNEDY. 

Among the leading contractors of Clinton county is Fred P. Kennedy, of 
Jefferson, Washington township, who is carrying on his chosen line of busi- 
ness with that care and discretion, that enterprise and foresight which are 
sure to find their sequel in definite success. He leaves no stone unturned 
whereby he may do better work and do it more promptly and satisfactorily, 
and, because of his honest and conscientious work he has won the good will 
and esteem of the people, and his services are in great demand all over the 
locality. 

Mr. Kennedy was born in Jackson township, Clinton county, in 1873. He 
is a son of David Kennedy, also a native of this county. The paternal grand- 
father of our subject was born in Ireland. David Kennedy married Anna J. 
Mattux, a native of this county, who is still living, having now reached the 
age of seventy-five years. The father is deceased. To David Kennedy and wife 






CLINTON COUNTY, INDIAN "A. CJ2I 

the following children were born: Louise, Henry T., Perton L, Mary Agnes, 
Minnie, Edward, Miltig and Fred P., our subject. 

Fred P. Kennedy was reared on the farm, and he received a good edu- 
cation in the common schools. When twenty-five years of age he married 
Julia Redinbaugh, who was born, reared and educated in this county, a 
daughter of John Redinbaugh and Usilla (Moudy), his wife, who now live in 
Arkansas. 

To our subject and wife six children have been born: Lela, Paul, Edna, 
Stanley, Lester, and David (deceased). 

Mr. Kennedy and family are members of the Lhnted Brethren church, 
and they stand well in the community. 

Mr. Kennedy formerly operated a threshing machine in this locality for 
a period of eighteen years, during which he became one of the best known 
threshers in the county, knowing well all the details of the business and be- 
ing able to cover more territory and thresh more bushels of grain in a season 
than any other man of his time. He is exceptionally well versed in steam en- 
gineering. He always looked to the farmers' best interests, did his work 
promptly and carefully, and always dealt honestly with them, so that he was 
hailed as the farmers' friend wherever he was known. During the past num- 
ber of years he has been engaged extensively in gravel road building and 
grading, in fact, does various kinds of contractu! and has been very success- 
ful in die same, turning out large jobs annually. 



R. F. PALMER, M. D. 



Doctor Palmer was born in Howard county, Ind., on June 17, 1855, and 
was the son of Judge Truman H. Palmer. Before taking up the details of 
our subject's life, it is fitting that adequate mention should be made of Judge 
Palmer, who was one of the noteworthy men of the count}'. 

Judge Truman Henry -Palmer, a native of Henry county, Ky., was born 
November 28. 1827, and was a son of William and rarmelia Palmer. The 
family first settled in Montgomery county, Ind., near Crawfordsville, in 
November, 1830, and came to Clinton county in February, 1844, where Judge 
Palmer received his early education under Prof. Milton B. Hopkins, who 
was afterward State Superintendent of Public Instruction. At the age of 
twenty, Mr. Palmer began teaching school, and continued in this occupation 
four years. At the age of twenty-four he married Margaret Ann Moore, 



522 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the daughter of Robert and Margaret Moore, of Clinton county. Soon after 
his marriage he moved to Kokomo, Ind., and, in connection with two associ- 
ates, started a cabinet shop. He was thus engaged for a period of three years, 
when, in consequence of failing health, he was compelled to cease. He then 
returned to the teaching profession, and at the same time improved his 
leisure moments by studying law. After a patient course of study he was 
admitted to the bar in March, 1857. The early days of his practice were 
not lucrative, however, and he experienced the "starvation period" of most 
young lawyers. In the year 1864 his practice began to increase, and people 
began to place confidence in the young lawyer. Thus in a few years his prac- 
tice became very remunerative, and he was regarded as one of the rising 
members of the bar. His political views were always in conformity with 
the principles of the Democratic party, and by this party he was nominated 
for the office of township clerk of Center township, Howard county, Ind., 
and although the Whigs had a large majority in the towi --hip, he was elected 
to the office. One year later, he was nominated for surveyor of Howard 
county, and, although making a good race, his opponent was elected to the 
office. 

In 1858 he returned to Clinton county, and four years later, 1862, made 
the race for surveyor against James Downer ; was elected by a handsome 
majority for the term of two years, and at the expiration of the term was 
elected a second time. In 1866 he was nominated by his party for the same 
office, but was defeated by one vote. Two years later, 186S, he was repre- 
sentative from Clinton county to the Indiana legislature, and served during 
the regular and special sessions of 1869. 1° J 8/0, he was elected common 
pleas judge, for the district of Boone and Clinton counties. He served the 
district in that capacity until the legislature abolished the court in 1873. A 
circuit court was then formed, composed of the counties of Boone and Clin- 
ton, and Judge Palmer was appointed by Governor Hendricks to preside over 
the court. At the special election in the fall of 1873 he was elected judge 
of this circuit. 

Judge Palmer, during his useful career, gained many friends by reason 
of his strong character, and his official record was one of which to be proud. 
In every position of responsibility awarded him by his fellow citizens, lie 
discharged his duty from conscientious principles and with impartial success. 
Ten children crowned the happiness of his married life — four boys and six 
girls. Tudge Palmer was a member of the Baptist church, and was an active 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 523 

and leva! supporter of that denomination. On November 18, 1903, he was 
called to his rest, his wife having died in October, 1899. 

Dr. R. F. Palmer, when only four years of age, was brought 1)}' his 
parents to Clinton county, where he received his earl)' school training, and 
then began the study of medicine in the office of Dr. G. W. Brown, with 
whom lie remained until attaining his majority. On February 22, 1877, he 
was graduated from the Hospital Cullcge of Medicine, of Louisville, and 
immediately began the practice of medicine at Frankfort, where he has since 
continued in his profession. 

Doctor Palmer was united in marriage on September 9, 1878, to Jose- 
phine Hillis at Michiga'ntown, Ind. She was the daughter of James and 
Mary (Etherton) Hillis, of Jefferson county, Ind.,' where her birth occurred 
April 17, 1856. 

On March 6, 1899, Dr. Palmer established the hospital in the city of 
Frankfort. The institution has been a distinct success ever since, and is one 
of the best equipped of its size in the state. The hospital accommodates 
eighteen patients, and twelve nurses are on duty by turns. 



WILLIAM C. HENDRICKS. 

William C. Hendricks is a young man who gives promise of attaining 
prominence in the journalistic circles of Clinton county, and should equal the 
record of his father, William G. Hendricks, who is well known as a capable 
printer and publisher. The Frankfort Daily News has earned the reputation 
of a progressive newspaper of metropolitan style, and it is through the efforts 
of Messrs. Hendricks, that the paper has been brought to its present excellent 
quality. The News is complete in every department, and is representative 
of the city of Frankfort, and county of Clinton. 

William C. Hendricks was born in the city of Plymouth, Ind., on Janu- 
ary 15, 188^, the son of William G. and Emma (Westling) Hendricks. 

William G. Hendricks was also born at Plymouth, Ind., November 26, 
1863, and today is the eldest surviving son of George and Wilhelmina Hend- 
ricks. He received his early education in the Catholic parochial schools at 
Plymouth. In 1882 he learned to be a telegrapher, and his first position 
as such was with the Pennsylvania railroad in his home town of Plymouth. 
He next accepted a place with the Nickle Plate railroad at Hibhard, this state, 
and later became employed with the Texas and Pacific railroad at Dallas and 
Sweetwater, Texas. These positions occupied his time until 1888. In 1890 



5-4 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

lie entered the newspaper field, purchasing a half interest in the Plymouth 
Republican. He sold this paper two years later and then removed to Indi- 
anapolis, where he conducted a job printing plant in 1898. In the latter year 
he returned to Plymouth, once more acquired the Plymouth Republican, 
which he sold to S. E. Boys in January, 1911. A short time afterward, he 
and his family moved to Logansport, and there he purchased a half interest 
in the Hendricks Brothers job printing plant. On January 2, 1912, he 
bought the Frankfort Daily Nezvs of Robert A. Brown. 

William G. Hendricks was married to Emma Westling on June 11, 1884. 
She was the daughter of John and Louise Westling, of Inwood, Tnd. Four 
children have been born to this union: Theresa, L. E., William C, Gertrude 
I. (deceased), and Cecil C. 

William C. Hendricks received a good education in Plymouth, in the 
Catholic schools of that city. He graduated from the Plymouth high school 
with the class of 1907, and then took a position as city editor of the Plymouth 
Tribune, which position he held until January, 191 1, when he obtained a 
place in the editorial department of the South Bend Times, one of the largest 
newspapers in the northern part of the state. He fulfilled the duties of this 
place with efficiency, until January, 1912, when he came to Frankfort, and 
went into partnership with his father in the management of the Frankfort 
Daily News. Clinton county is a progressive county, both commercially and 
socially, and consequently is a good field for the operation of a modern news- 
paper, which the News fills in every respect. 



TOSIE A. WELLER. 



The efficient and popular principal of the Frankfort Business College, 
widely known in educational circles throughout northern Indiana, was born 
in Spencer county, Ky., where she received her preliminary intellectual train- 
ing. After completing the prescribed course of Taylorsville Academy, she 
entered the Normal School and Business College at Bowling Green, Ky., 
from which, in due time, she was graduated, the discipline there acquired 
being afterwards supplemented by a full course in the Northern Valparaiso 
University, at Valparaiso, from which institution she received her degree in 
the year 191 1. In the meantime she taught seven years in the grade schools 
of Bowling Green, Ky., three years in the high school of Tracy, Minnesota, 
in both of which places she earned an honorable record as an efficient and 



CLINTON COUNTY, 1ND1 \.\'.\. 5_'5 

popular educator and stood high in the confidence and esteem of her pupils 
and the boards by whirl) she was employed, as well as of die general public. 
Had she seen fit to continue in general school win'.:, she doubtless would have 
attained distinctive prestige in the profession and become one of the leading 
teachers of the country. 

The year in which she finished her course at Valparaiso, Miss Weller 
established at Frankfort the Business College of which she is still the execu- 
tive head and which under her able and judicious management has rapidly 
grown in numbers and influence until, as already indicated, it is now one of 
the most thorough and popular institutions of the kind in northern Indiana. 
The college opened with an attendance of thirty-four students which number 
has steadily increased with each recurring year until the several commodious 
departments are now taxed to their utmost capacity to accommodate the many 
young men and women eager to prepare themselves for the duties of life by 
acquiring a thorough practical training, such as the school imparls. The 
curriculum, which has been carefully devised and prepared, includes the 
branches usually taught in such institutions, such as penmanship, bookkeep- 
ing, banking, stenography, typewriting, etc., also a complete training in 
English, without a knowledge of which one's business education, however 
thorough in the main, must of necessity be sadly defective. Miss Weller is 
a southern woman in the broad sense of the term and fills a large place not 
only in the public eye of Frankfort and Clinton county, but also in the 
intellectual and moral life of the city in which she lives — she has realized the 
needs of the rising generation for something more than a mere mental dis- 
cipline and with strong brain and hand, well balanced judgment and superior 
academic and professional training, has supplied the demand most generously 
and unsparingly. Dozens of the graduates of her school are today filling 
positions of honor and trust in many institutions and lines of industry in 
various counties, cities and states and there come to her almost continuously 
a constantly growing demand for the services of those whom she has pre- 
pared for the exacting duties which await them in the great practical world 
of today. Being still in the prime of life and usefulness and at the head of 
an institution in which the citizens of Frankfort take a pardonable pride, she 
has before her a future of still greater achievement and honor and it is hoped 
by her numerous friends that her span of life may be lengthened man}' years 
in which to help and bless the world by hci perseverance, activity and 
influence. 



526 . CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

VESPER E. HARDY. 

It is a notable fact that most of the celebrated artists nf history have not 
been men of elaborate school education. Indeed so conspicuous is this truth 
that metaphysicians have raised the question as to whether one born with 
the art instinct is fully qualified to grapple successfully with the stubborn 
rudiments and rules of the school books. Be that as it may, the subject of 
this review, Vesper Burton Hardy, gave early manifestation of the tempera- 
mental qualities, and like his great prototype, James Whitcomb Riley, first 
gave vent to his talent in the more or less artistic profession of sign writing. 
In this calling he became quite an adept bringing to bear upon its de\ elopment 
all the resources of a rich and ardent mind. Later on the accurate reproduc- 
tion of nature by photography appealed to him, and he made choice of that 
for his life work. He is now the leading photographer of Frankfort and 
his reputation for artistic effects extends far beyond the borders of Clinton 
county. 

Mr. Hardy is now in the prime of life and full vigor of his powers, 
having been born at Michigantown, Ind., December n, 1868. He is the son 
of Charles O. and Lucy M. (Edwards) Hardy. His father was born in 
Jasper county, New York, in 1840, and at the age of twenty-five went from 
there to Clinton county, Ind. This was in 1865, just after the termination 
of his service in the Civil war with the Fifty-sixth New York Volunteers. 
He settled in Michigan township and followed the trade of cabinetmaking. 
In 1 87 1, he went to. Frankfort, and was there engaged ten years or more in 
stave factories. With his savings he bought a truck farm southeast of 
Frankfort, from which he derived a comfortable living and a margin for the 
rainy day. He is a Republican and a Baptist and a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and Grand Army of the Republic. In 1867, 
he married Lucy M. Edwards, who was born in 1843, daughter of William 
and Barbara (Harnsherger) Edwards. He was born in Kentucky in 1816 
and she in Virginia in 1819. Both came to Michigan township, this county, 
she in 1828 and he in 1S34. The families of both became large land holders 
and farmed all their lives. Mr. Edwards also taught school during the 
winter months. He died in 1896 and his wife in 1905. 

The subject of this review, Vesper B. Hardy, received ample education 
in the common schools of Frankfort to meet the exactions of his business 
career, and takes special delight in supplementing the vocation of the studio 
with the pursuits of classic literature. He thus combines the best in literature 
with the art of his choice, and is consequently a man of exceptional cultiva- 



CLINTON COUNTY, INblANA. 527 

tion. Pie is well known and is very popular in the lodge circles of Frank- 
fort, being a member of the Odd Fellows, Flks, Knights of Pythias and a 
third degree Mason. He i> independent in politics. 

February 7, 1S93, Mr. Hardy married Theresa A. Gangwer, win 
born in Madison township, Clinton county. They have two children, Everett 
E. and Esther, both of whom are receiving all the advantages that the school- 
ing facilities of Frankfort can supply. The children are photographed at 
every stage of development by their father and by this series of interesting 
pictures one may see them growing to maturity. Incidentally, it may be 
said that the photographic work of Mr. Hardy has the finish, pose and accuracy 
that once characterized the renowned art photography of Morrison and Otto 
Sarony. 



JAMES LINCOLN REBSTOCK. 

James Lincoln Rebstock, at the present time is chief of the Frankfort fire 
department. The city as a whole attests to his capable leadership in this 
capacity, and an insight into his methods of work supply abundant proof 
that his success is due to a perfect system of fire fighting. As fire chief, 
Croker, of New York City, once said, it is not in putting out fires that effi- 
ciency is obtained, but in preventing them. So does Mr. Rebstock believe, 
and he is constantly taking measures and issuing warnings whereby a de- 
stroying blaze may not start. However, in case of fire, Mr. Rebstock knows 
exactly the canpaign to be waged against it, governed by the character and 
extent of the fire. In all his services are indispensable to the city, and bar- 
ring political injustice, his services will be retained so long as he sees fit to 
"handle the job." 

Mr. Rebstock was born May 19. 1865, in the city of Frankfort, Clinton 
county, and was the son of Amos Samuel and Esther (Kyger) Rebstock. 
Amos Rebstock came to Frankfort from the state of Ohio, starting a tan 
yard. He died at Seymour. Our subject's mother died when he was only 
six years of age. He then was taken and cared for by Charles P. Pence and 
wife until he was twenty-two, in the meantime obtaining a good common 
school education. In the year of 1887' he traveled to the state of Colorado, 
spending three years in Boulder county, working in a lime kiln. Cripple 
Creek was his next destination in 1891, where he located three claims, sell- 
ing them later at a handsome profit. He subsequently went to Idaho and 
Washington on prospecting trips, and then came back to Frankfort. He fol- 



?28 



CLINTON i "I VLV, INDIANA. 



lowed the vocation of the fanner for a period of three years, and also worked 
in the city. On February 14, 1909. he was appointed chief of the fire depart- 
ment, and under him the services of the city has improved wonderfully. An 
auto truck has also been added to the apparatus. 

November 2, 189S, marked the date of bis marriage to Maggie W. 
Hicks, a girl born in Illinois, later moving to Indiana. No children have 
been born to the union. 

In political matters Mr. Rebstock is a Republican. In fraternal mat- 
ters, he is a member of the Improved Order of Red Men, the Loyal Order of 
Moose, Woodmen of the World, and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. Re- 
ligiously, Mr. Rebstock attends the Methodist Eposcipal church. 



PETER DAVIS. 



Among the sturdy and enterprising farmers and popular public officials 
of Perry township, Clinton county, is the gentleman whose name introduces 
this biographical review, whose life has been one of industry and strict ad- 
herence to honor;, le principles, which has resulted in gaining a comfortable 
living and at the same time winning the esteem of his fellow men. 

Peter Davis, owner of Fairland Farm, and trustee of Perry township, 
having been elected to that office in 1908, is a descendant of an excellent old 
pioneer family of this county. He was born within a mile of where he now 
lives on December 9, 1868, and he has been content to spend his life in his- 
native community. He is a son of Joel Davis, now deceased, he having been 
a native of Ohio, and from which state he came to this township and county 
in an early clay and became a leading farmer here. He grew up on a farm in 
Ross count . Ohio, and attended tbc old time schools there, equipped with 
slab seats, puncheon floor and greased paper for window panes. In early life 
he married Elizabeth Patton, who made him a good wife and helpmeet. She 
is still living, being now advanced in years. To Joel Davis and wife seven 
children were born, namely: Jesse, George, John, Peter, Anna C, Sarah I., 
and Mary. The father of these children died at the age of sixty-nine years. 
Politically he was a Democrat and he belonged to the Christian church. 
His widow is also a faithful member of this church. He was one of the lead- 
ing members and most liberal supporters of the church in his neighborhood 
during his life time. 

Peter Davis was reared on the home farm and there was taught to 



CLINTON COl'NTY, INDIANA. 5-'0 

work, how to rotate crops, raise- live stock, etc. On .March 20, 1891, he mar- 
ried Leona Stook, (laughter of Ben and Margaret Stook, the father long since 
deceased. Air. Davis' first wife died some fourteen years ago. By this union 
four children were h rn: Flossie B., a teacher of c nsiderable local promi- 
nence; Ruby M., a graduate of Marion College, has a good position in In- 
dianapolis; Lena M.. attending high school- in Colfax, and Ferris Earl, now 
sixteen years old, attending high school. 

Mr. Davis was first owner of a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
and later bought the Isaac Goodnight farm. He now has a valuable and pro- 
ductive farm of two hundred and fifty acres, one of the best in Perry town- 
ship, and is carrying on general farming and stock raising on a large scale in 
a mai imping I im as among the leaders in thi I Id of endeavor in the 

county. He has a large and well arranged home, in the midst of fine shade 
trees, with numerous outbuildings, and about his place is always to be seen 
an excellent grade of live stock of all kinds. No small part of his annual in- 
come is derived from this source, since he understands well the proper care of 
stock. He has one of the largest and best orchards in the township, noted for 
its fine fruit of all kinds. He has become well established through his long 
years of good management and persistent work, and is now surrounded by all 
the comforts of life. 

Politically, Mr. Davis is a Democrat and is influential in public affairs 
locally. He has been a frequent delegate to count)' and state conventions. He 
is a stockholder in the Farmers' Elevator at Colfax. He is a jovial, well in- 
formed man, a rod mixer and general!)- popular throughout the county. 



OLIVER C. UNGER 



The raising and marketing of the pure bred hog is a growing industry 
in Indiana. There are many successful breeders in Clinton county. The 
man who, a half century or more ago, had the hog market here was the man 
who could raise his stock mainly without feeding corn. Many who formerly 
owned large timber land acreage, bought up a herd of half breed hogs in 
the fall and turned them "on the range" to keep alive on the mast and other 
nature's wild products during the winter, finishing them on a sparse feeding 
of wheat middlings or corn in the spring, have quit this practice entirely. 
Successful hog raisers in this part of Indiana — Clinton county and vicinity — 
follow the scientific methods of feeding and fattening hogs. They have pure 
(34) 



530 CLINTON C01 N'TV, INDIANA. 

bred hogs in the main Oliver C. Linger, of Forest township, a widel) known 
breeder of Durocs and other breeds of bogs, is one of the most successful hog 
men of this pari of il e stale and rashes in to the extent of several thousand 
dollars annually Fr i . his operations. He has done more, no doubt, than 
any other man in the county to encourage modern methods in stock raising 
and in sticking to well bred hogs. The influence of such a man to the good of 
a community can nol be easily estimated. 

Mr. Unger was bom May 17, 1S72 in Warren township, this count)'. 
He is a son of George \Y. and Elvira (Magart) Unger. The father was 
born May 28, [825, in Morgan county, West Virginia, and he moved to 
Springfield, O., in 1834, and lived there three vears, later removing first to 
Carroll count) and then to Clinton county, Indiana, where he became well 
established on a farm and soon ranked as one of our leading citizens. A 
fuller history of the Ungers will be found on another page of this work. 
Suffice it to say here that the progenitors of our subject were people of ster- 
ling worth anil did much for the communities in which they settled. 

Oliver C. Unger grew to manhood on the home farm and there did his 
full share of work during crop seasons, attending the public schools during 
the winter months. He also attended the State Normal for awhile, and was 
a student at the Valparaiso University. 

Mr. Unger has been twice married. His first wife, to whom he was 
wedded September 16, 1893, was Margaret A. Lucas, who was horn in Boone 
county, Indiana, March 9, 1875. She was a daughter of Pur'dine and Martha 
(Canada) Lucas. Her death occurred on October 29, 1901. Three children 
were born to this union, namely: Nellie Hazel, horn July 14. 1894, now at 
home; Carrie Canada, horn September 22, 1896, and Man-son Henry Martin, 
born December 14. 1898. On April 15, 1903. Mr. Unger married Grace 
Cleaver, who was bom in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, March 29, 1877. She 
is a daughter of William and Rowena (Payne) Clever. The father was born 
in Tippecanoe county, March 20, 1840; he has devoted his life to farming and 
is now living in Carroll county, this state. The mother of Mrs. Unger was 
born in Rossville. Clinton county, December 18, 1847. all( l sne ' too > is sti " 
living. William Cleaver was a soldier in the Civil war, having enlisted in 
Companv G. Tenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. September 19, 1861, and was 
honorably discharged for disability in 1862, afterwards re-enlisting in the 
One Hundred, and Sixteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in which he served 
six months, until the close of the war. 

Mr. Unger' s present wife received a good education in the common 
schools and Valparaiso University. She studied music in which she is 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. t^I 

specially talented, and successfully taught the piano for a period of eight 
year. One child of the second union, Harold DeVon, was horn on Septem- 
ber 4. iyo8. 

Mr. Unger has devoted himself to farming nearly all his life, but the 
live stock business has claimed the major part of his attention for many years, 
he having- been largely engaged in the hog breeding and raising business for 
seventeen years, lie owns seventy-five acres of valuable land, all tillable, but 
about five acres, which is timbered. The place is well tiled and on it is 
to be seen a comfortable borne and splendid set oi outbuildings. He has made 
most of the improvements now to lie seen on his place. He is one of the 
most influential stork men in central Indiana. He is a member of the Live 
Stock Association of Indiana, of the American Duroc Jersey Record Associa- 
tion, and the Howard County Fair Association. He is the oldest breeder 
of Duroc-Jersey hogs in Clinton count) - , having been in this business since 
1896, and has made a pronounced success of the undertaking. He has an 
extensive trade, finding a very ready market for his hogs not only in this 
county but in remote parts of the country. He raises a general breed of 
cows, keeps a good general breed of horses and has started several horses 
of his own on the Frankfort fair grounds. 

Mr. Unger is a member of the Indiana Corn Growers Association, and 
in this as well as the other associations of which he is a member, he is active 
and influential. He is a member of the Masonic lodge at Middle Fork, and 
of the Order of Eastern Star at Russiavdle. Religiously, he belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics, he is faithful in his support of 
the Democratic part)'. 

Persona •.•, Al r I'nger is a genial gentleman and a good mixer, and 
has a host of friends wherever he is known, not only because of his pleasing 
address but because of his honorable business methods. 



JOSEPH E. FICKLE. 

Farmers come nearer being their own business masters than any other 
class of workers. It takes considerable capital these days to go into farming, 
but a farmer does not need so much land as he has been taught he should 
have. Where one hundred and sixty acres has been considered a necessity 
for a good farm, forty acres will soon be regarded as plenty; and for some 
kinds of crops ten acres is all a man can properly care for. Intensive culti- 



532 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

vation with modern methods mala-- a successful faun out of few acres of 
land. Ownership and proper development of even a few acres will amply 
provide for the unproductive period in the lives of farmers. 

One of the men of Washington township, Clinton county, who has 
clearly demonstrated his ability to successfully manage either a few or many 
acres is Joseph E. Fickle, owner of "("lover Leaf Farm." He was born in 
Madison township, February 4, 1872. He is a son of William Fickle, for 
many years one of the prominent citizens of that township, who was called 
to his eternal rest on March 25, 1913. He was born in Ross township, 
Clinton county, in 1839. He was a son of Isaac Fickle, who moved from 
Ohio in 1832 to Clinton county, and was therefore one of the early settlers 
here, and from that time to the present the family has been influential and 
well known in this locality. William Fickle grew up on the old homestead 
which he helped clear and develop. Fie received his education in the old log 
school house in his district. Isaac Fickle was a native of Butler county, O. 
His family consisted of the following children: Joseph, Isaac, Hugh, John 
and William. The death of Isaac Fickle, Sr., occurred in 1889 at the age of 
seventy-six years. 

William Fickle was married in 1862 to Phoebe A. Thompson, who was 
born February 24, 1844, in Madison township, Clinton county. She is a 
daughter of William Thompson, who died in 1S67. The mother survived 
until 1906. 

The following children were born to William Fickle and wife: Mrs. 
Tryphena Horlacher, of Madison township; Alvin T., Joseph E., of this re- 
view: Charles R., Mrs. Ora Anderson, of Clark's Hill, Indiana; Floyd S., 
Loria L. and Elda Bennett, of Madison township. 

William Fickle was owner of two farms, aggregating two hundred and 
eighty-five acres in the vicinity of Mt. Pleasant church. Fie was a member 
of that church for a period of forty years. 

Our subject grew to manhood on the home place and there worked when 
a boy. He received a good common school education. When twenty-two 
years of age he married Pruda Akers, a daughter of Jacob G. Akers. 

Mr. Fickle moved on his present farm in 1899. The place consists of 
eighty acres, well improved, and he has a pleasant cottage, well furnished. 

His family consists of four children: Edith, Otis, Harold and Mildred. 

Our subject is a great Sunday school worker and has done much good 
in this field of work. He has a class of sixty-seven members at the local 
church which he teaches. He is often a delegate to Sunday school conven- 
tions where he always makes his influence felt for the general good. 



l.l.VTOX COl'XI V, IND1 SNA 



JAMES C. SHAW 



One df tlie highl) respected citizens of Howard comity, Indiana., in a 
past generation was James C. Shaw. Mr. Shaw was born near Rockford, 
Surrey count)-, X. C, January 31. 1828. His parents were of English and 
Irish descent. In August of the same year in which he was horn his | nts 
and grandparents removed to Indiana, both families hauling their goods in 
one four-horse wagon. After traveling for six weeks they arrived at 
Economy, Wayne county, and remained there until the following spring 
when they removed to a ^ettlemenl known as the Garner neighborhood, i n 
the same count)'. In the fall of [830 they moved from Wayne to Henry 
county, settling first near Millville, but two years later removing to near 
New Castle, where his father bought a fort)- acre farm. They remained here 
four years, when they again moved, this time going to Madison county, near 
Columbus. Here James remained with his parents nine years, at the expira- 
tion of which time he was seventeen years old, then began working for him- 
self. After four years of hard toil lie had succeeded in accumulating quite a 
sum of money for a boy in those clays, which he loaned indiscriminately and 
unfortunately lost. 

In November, 1840, Mr. Shaw married Eliza Manning. The loss of 
his money was quite a blow to the young husband, but he faced the matter 
bravely, and being young and strong he went to work clearing, making 
rails and cutting cord-wood for a living. The following year be took a 
lease of fifteen acres in the green woods and built a cabin, but owing to the 
severe illness of his wife lie was compelled to sell all of his stock and make a 
new start in life. He worked out by the month and then followed riving 
and shaving shingles until he bad again saved up enough money to begin 
farming. 

Mi Shaw j'. 1 bis con and p I hen, August 10, 1862, 

he left his young wife and five small children and enlisted in Company K, 
Eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in which he served gallantly for nearly 
three years in the fiercest part of the war. In the summer of 1863 he was 
with Grant at Vicksburg, and was in the engagements at Port Gibson, Jack- 
son, Champion Hills and Black River. While away at the front his wife 
died in January, 1864. He could not obtain a furlough and come home until 
in the following month. When he did come he found his home broken up 
and his children scattered. He remained long enough to secure homes for 
his children and then returned to his regiment with which he remained until 
the close of the war, being honorably discharged in [865. He returned to 
Indiana and soon thereafter on October 10. 1865, he married Margaret Fritz 



5.i ! CLINTON COL'XTV, I.\l)l\\\. 

oi H iward count) - . He and his second wife lived in Hancock count\ until 
the prin-- of i8f>6 when they moved tu Clinton count) and settled on a farm 
on which they spent the remainder of their lives [n due course of time they 
established a good home and developed a productive farm, providing well for 
their children, rearm- them in comfort and respectability and giving them 
proper educational advantages. Eight children were horn to (hem, live of 
whom survive at thi-. writing, namely: Christian I'., Mrs. Magnolia Johnson, 
Monroe C, Howard, and Mrs. Letitia May Oliphant. Three of their chil- 
dren died in infancy. 

In young manhood Mr. Shaw united with the Baptist church. In 1870 
he and his wife united with the Middlefork Baptist church with which they 
remained until the building of the Methodist Episcopal church at Cloverdale, 
near their home, when they joined the latter. The death of Mr. Shaw 
occurred on April n, 1901, and his widow passed away in March, 1006, at 
the age of sixty-nine years, six months and twenty-nine days. 



CLARENCE V. FICKLE. 



One of the progressive men of "Washington township, Clinton county 
is Clarence V. Fickle, owner of Elmdale Farm, which consists of ninety-five 
acres of choice land. He seems to he a man who possesses untiring energy, 
is quick of perception, forms his plans readily and is determined in their 
execution. His close application to business and his excellent management 
have brought to him the prosperity which is toda) his. He is a scion of an 
honored old family, whose good reputation he lias kept untarnished. 

Mr. Fickle was born August 29, 1875, on the old Fickle homestead 
in Clinton count)'. He is a son of Robert Fickle, who was born July 8, 1S41, 
on the old homestead, he being a sou of Isaac Fickle, who was born April 2, 
1815. he having been a son of William and Ann (Thompson) Fickle, early 
pioneers of this county. William Fickle was horn in Virginia in J 874, and 
his wife was born in County Antrim, Ireland in 1781. The father of William 
Fickle was a native of Germany, and he married an English woman The 
parents of Ann Thompson came to America when she was eleven years old 
and located in Philadelphia, but soon moved west to Perry county, O. The 
mother of Isaac Fickle died on September 14, 1857. On February 14, 1838, 
Isaac Fickle married Jane M. Miller, a daughter of Robert and Nancy (Bell) 



I I.IXTO.X COl" N TV, INIiIAXA. 535 

Miller, natives of South Carolina, where their daughter, Jane M. was also 
born, the date of her birth being September 24, 1816 Her father came to 
Clinton count)' in :ating in Madison township where he lived until 

1S41 when he sold hi- | >pcrty and removed to -Mercer count)', 111., where 
both parents died. Mrs. Jane M Fickle died December _'_'. 1863. leaving 
four children, William, Robert M., Nancy A., and Sarah E. 

Isaac Fickle again married, his second wife being Sarah E. Wade, 
daughter of William and Nancy E. (White) Wade. Tier family came from 
Pennsylvania to Jackson county, O.. (hence removed to Kansas, where the 
parents died. The second wife died January 7, 1877, leaving one child, 
Mary E., born July 19 1876. 

To Robert Fickle and wife two children were born, Clarence V., born 
August 29, 1875: and Ray C, bom September 25, 1879. Robert Fickle and 
his father were both elders in the United Presbyterian church. Isaac Fickle 
came to Clinton count)- in 1834 and spent the rest of his life here. He held 
the office of supervisor and also school director. 

Robert Fickle was reared on the old farm where our subject now lives, 
where he remained until his marriage in 1867 to Elizabeth Baird, daughter 
of Hugh Baird. To Robert and Ellen Fickle six children were born, four 
sons and two daughters: Hugh (deceased); Agnes J. (deceased) ; Clarence 
V., subject of this sketch; Ray C. living in Mulberry, this county; Jenny G., 
and Lester. The mother of the above named children died in 1886 at the 
age of thirty-eight years. The death of Robert Fickle occurred in 1898 
at the age of sixty-six years. 

Clarence V. Fickle was reared on the home farm and educated in the 
common schools. On May 11, 1898 he married Isa B. Holliday, who was 
born in Tippecanoe county, Ind., where she was reared and educated. She 
is a daughter o'f Pern' 1 lolliday, a native of Butler county, O. 

Our subject and wife have the following children: Russell C, born 
March 12, 1899; Otto P., born October 3, 1900; Robert D., born February 
10, 1905; and Raymond D., born May 12, 1911, 

Mr. Fickle has devoted his life to general fanning and stock raising with 
more than average success, and he is now owner of the beautiful farm men- 
tioned in the opening paragraphs of (his sketch. He always keeps a good 
grade of livestock. He has a pleasant home, neatly furnished, and a large 
barn and other good buildings about the place. Politically he is a Democrat 
and religiously is a member of the United Presbyterian church, in which he 
has been elder, like his father and grandfather before him. 



?.V> 



< UNTON i (n \ | v, INDIANA. 



FRANK I!. ELLIOTT 



An honorable retirement from labor in which to enjoy the fruits of for- 
mer years of toil and the enjoyment which life can offer in the serene autumn 
oi one s years, ls the fitting reward of a useful and active career, in which 
one, through keen discernment, indefatigable labor and honorable methods 
advanced steaddy toward the goal of prosperity. Such, briefly stated I, the 
record of Frank B. Elliott, who is now living retired in the town of Mulberry 
Clinton county, and who, through his long connection witli agricultural in- 
terests, has not only carefully conducted his farm, but so managed its affairs 
that he acqmred thereby a position among the substantial residents ol .he 
community. 

Mr. Elliott was born in Butler county, O., November 23, 1854, the son 
of James Rampley Elliott, a wagon maker. The father was born' in New 
England of a sturdy old family of Scotch-Irish ancestry. His wife, Maria 
Davis, was born in Butler county, O. The Elliott family moved from Butler 
count)-, O., to Madison township, Clinton county, when our subject was a 
small boy and here they located on a farm. 'Eight children, all of whom 
grew to maturity, were born to James R. Elliott and wife, namely: Almond 
D., a soldier during the Civil War, now living at Battle Ground, Ind.. Mrs. 
Nancy Blinn, living at Frankfort; John, a soldier in the Civil War, now de- 
ceased, leaving six children; James R., living at Elwood, Ind.; Frank B. and 
Orlando B. of Michigantown.- The father of these children lived to be eighty 
years of age. He was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and he and his wife were Methodists. The mother of our subject reached 
her eighty-first year. 

Frank B. Elliott was reared on the home farm and was educated in the 
public schools at Hamilton, Ind. He remained at home working on the farm 
while his brothers were fighting for the Union, he being but a lad at the 
time and not old enough for service. He continued to fill his accustomed 
place in the family circle until he was twenty-four years old. He then mar- 
ried Ella Steckel, a daughter of Joseph Steckel, of Mulberry, this county, 
she being one of the following children: Phaon, Mary, Joseph, ]>.. Louise, 
Ella, Matilda, Metlmsaleh and Martin. 

Mr. Elliott has devoted his life to general farming and has been suc- 
cessful all along the line. He is now owner of a valuable farm of one hun- 
dred and fifteen acres near Mulberry, and another of one hundred and eight- 
een acres in the same township, all well improved and well cultivated. He 
has a splendid brick, nine-room house in the town, which residence is mod- 



/ 




FRANK B. KLUOTT 



n\\ i v. i\ni w \. 



537 



ern throughout and neatly furnished. .Mrs. Ella Elliott was called to her rest 
in !()<)_• at the age of forty-seven years. She was the mother of two children, 
Joseph E. of Cincinnati, Ohio, and one who died young. Joseph E. Elliott 
is exceptionally talented in music, and while young in years has achieved a 
brilliant reputation as a musician, ranking anion- the best in the Middle 
Stales, according to the opinion of many who have heard his performances, 
which have been given both in the East and the West. He is a member of 
the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, one of the most noted in the country. 
He was given a musical education and is a man for whom the future is 
bright with promise. The mother was a good Christian woman, active in the 
Methodi t Episcopal 

In February, 1907. Frank B. Elliott married Mrs. Ida Wirt (nee Clark), 
daughter of David Clark, deceased. 

Mr. Elliott is a Republican, and has been active in local affairs. He 
served as county commissioner for a period of three years, during which 
he did much for the permanent good of the county, and was a popular official. 
He has been a frequent delegate to district and state conventions. Fra- 
ternally he belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He 
affiliates with the Methodist church. 



THOMAS NOBLE BUTLER. 

Live stock business strongly rivals agriculture as a means of prosperity 
in Clinton county. So closely allied are the two, however, that men in- 
variably carry one as a side line to the other. Mr. Butler is engaged almost 
exclusively in stock breeding, and he operates on a large scale. Some of the 
best horses and stallions in the northern part of the state are in his posses- 
sion, which fact has given him an excellent reputation among the stock men 
of the state and the country. 

Thomas Noble Butler was born in Edinburg, Indiana, August 12, 1862, 
the son of Daniel and Caroline (Flood) Butler. Daniel Butler was a native 
of the Buckeye state, and when but a young man he came to Johnson county, 
Indiana. In 1863 he moved to Lebanon, Indiana, where he entered the 
warehouse and distillery business and engaged in horse breeding. He died 
there in 1873. Mrs. Caroline Butler died in 190S. Daniel Butler was a loyal 
Republican, and attended the Presbyterian church. He was a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and was a thirty-second degree 
Mason. 



53& CLINTON COUNTV, INDIANA. . 

Our subject received a common school education in the city of Lebanon, 
and in 1895 he came to Frankfort, where lie began (he livery business. In 
1901 he sold out and moved back to Lebanon, continuing the same trade, 
Again, in 1904, he returned to Frankfort, where lie is now located, giving 
his time to the breeding profession, also the grain and feed trade. Mr. But- 
ler owns quite a number of fine stallions, chief among them being "Carter 
B.," register number 6304, and "Famous," number ("17028. The former is a 
black French draft stallion, and has sired nearly three hundred colts, over 
ninety per cent, of his services. The latter stallion is also much in demand, 
and is equal to "Carter B." Mr. Butler has builded a reputation mi these 
two animals alone. The first season for "Famous" was productive of sixtv 
colts. 

Mr. Butler was married to Carrie Shaw, the d tughter of John M. Shaw, 
of Boone county. She died in 1900. Two children were left to Mr. Butler: 
Ruby Cunningham, of Indianapolis, and Mary, of Lebanon. Mr. Butler was 
married the second time to Jane Swadner. 

Fraternally, Mr. Butler is a member of the Improved Order of Red 
Men, the Woodmen of the World, and the Loyal Order of Moose. Re- 
ligiously, he attends the Christian church, and politically, is a Republican. 



ARTHUR GRANT STRAESSER. 

Realizing the fact that persistent industry constitutes the basis of success, 
Arthur G. Straesser, a well known citizen of Frankfort, this county, sought 
no royal road to the goals of which he dreamed when a youth, but began to 
work earnestly and diligently in order to advance himself, and the result is that 
he is now numbered among the progressive, successful and influential citizens 
of the county. Mr. Straesser holds distinct prestige among the business men 
of the city of Frankfort, and his customers have ever found his laundry a place 
where they were insured fair and courteous treatment. Not only that, but 
his patrons know that they get the best work obtainable for the money. Mr. 
Straesser's laundry ranks among the best equipped and most efficient in the 
state. 

Arthur G. Straesser was born in Cropsey, Illinois, November 25, 1886, 
and was the son of John and Elizabeth (Kessler) Straesser. the father being 
a native of Pennsylvania and the mother of Illinois. John Straesser was 
one of the first settlers in Illinois, and helped break" the soil for their future 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 53<) 

home. lie lived the usual pioneer life of the time until his death in 1S94. 
Politically, he was a Republican, and religiously, he was a member of the 
Methodist church. He married Elizabeth Kessler in the spring of [880. She 
was born in LaSalle county, Illinois, on February 7, r86o, and is still living 
at Fairbury, Illinois. 

Mr. .Arthur Straesser received a good common school education, and 
then went into the laundry business at Fairbury, Illinois, lie then went to 
the west coast and acted as assistant foreman in the Excelsior laundry at 
Los Angeles, California, where he learned the methods of laundering which he 
later used in his own establishment with good effect. He remained here five 
years, and in 19 10 came to Frankfort, and purchased the Frankfort laundry. 
He is running this at the present time in the latest approved fashion. The 
most modern machinery is used, all of which has been installed under the 
direction of Mr. Straesser. Soft water alone is used. Altogether the machin- 
ery of the plant cost approximately ten thousand dollars. The laundry does 
an annual business of fifteen thousand dollars. 

On May 30, 1912, Mr. Straesser was married to Ruth H. Bridges, who 
was born in Filmore, Indiana, on August 5, 1892. One child, Charles \V., 
has been born to this union. 

Fraternally, Mr. Straesser belongs to the Masonic order, the Blue Lodge. 
Chapter, Council and Knights Templar. He is also a member of the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks. 



ISAAC F. STEVENS. 

Some people seem to forget that a fertile soil is a living, breathing 
thing, well fed by nature or by the hand of man, with the natural mineral 
elements and the organic matter necessary for the use of the soil bacteria 
in the manufacture of plant food, and for a delightful environment in which 
they can live and work". One man in Forest township who understands 
what it takes to keep the soil fertile and productive, not forgetting that it 
requires its regular feeding of the basic elements to go to make crops of all 
kinds is Isaac F. Stevens, one of our local advocates of "better seed selec- 
tion," "better preparation of seed bed." and "better cultivation." 

Mr. Stevens was born on December 5, 1847, in Rush county, Indiana. 
He is a son of S. B. and Margaret (Fithian) Stevens. The father was 
born in Maryland, and from that state he removed to Rush county, Indiana, 
when a bov, he and his brothers and sisters walking nearly all the way, for 



CJ40 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

they bad only one horse and a small wagon. The death of our subject's 
father occurred on September z, 1893. The mother of our subject was horn 
in Rush county this state, and her death occurred on August 6, 1850. S. B. 
Stevens spent his life on a farm, and he was a great horse trader. Politically 
he was first a Whig, later a Republican. He was twice married and he had 
fifteen children by the two wives, eight being by the first, wdio was our sub- 
ject's mother. Three of these are still living, namely: Ellen, Isaac R, of 
this sketch, and Elhanon G., George, Madora, Emily, Isabelle and Frances 
are all deceased. 

S. B. Stevens married for a second wife Angelina Harley, and to this 
union seven children were born, namely: A. \V., E. S., Martha (deceased), 
Clara, Mrs. Alzora Storms, Charles (deceased), and O. L. 

Isaac F. Stevens grew up on the home farm and received a limited edu- 
cation in the common schools. lie has been twice married. His first wife 
was Mary Collins, to whom he was wedded on January 17, 1872. She was 
born in Highland county, Ohio, and was a daughter of William and Sarah 
(Hiatt) Collins. She was called to her eternal rest on September 5, 1881. 
To this first union two children were bom, both of whom are deceased, 
namely: Lorenzo E., born November 23, 1876, died October 8, 1900; Wil- 
liam I., born October 4. 1874, died Apirl, 1876. Mr. Stevens subsequently 
married Louc ia Carter, who was born on December 25, 1S69, in Howard 
county, Indian.. She is a daughter of George W. and Loucretia. (Purvis) 
Carter.' The father was born in Ohio and the mother in Bartholomew- 
county, Indiana, the date of the former's birth being August 22, 1842, and 
that of the latter June 16, 1843. The father died in September, 1909, and 
the mother on July 22, 1895. The father was a veteran of the civil war, 
serving four years' in Company G, 89th Indiana Volunteer Infantry. 

One child has been born to our subject and his last wife, namely: 
Relbue, born October 11, 1899. She is now attending school. 

Mr. Stevens moved to Forest township, Clinton county, from Rush 
county in 1854 and settled southeast of the village of Forest, where he 
bought land and cleared it, developing it into a good farm on which he has 
made a comfortable living. He has thus lived continuously here for a period 
of nearly sixtv years during which his reputation has remained unassailable 
and he is well liked by all who know him. He owns sixty acres, all tillable 
and well tiled, his improvements having been made by himself. He formerly 
specialized in raising Hereford shorthorn cattle and Poland-China hogs, but 
he now raises Duroc hogs, Norman and Clydesdale horses, White Leghorn 
and Rhode Island Red chickens. 



CI. IN TON COUNTY, INDIANA. 



54' 



Fraternally he is a member of the .Masonic Order at Russiavillc, also a 
member of the Knights of Pythias ami the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, both of Forest. Lie attends the Methodist Episcopal church. Polit- 
ically he is a Republican, but lias never been especially active. 



WILLIAM E. BLAIR. 



It takes a farmer to succeed on a farm, just as it takes a clerical man 
to succeed in office work, an engineer with a locomotive, an architect in archi- 
tecture, or a musician in music. A man always a farmer can not move 
into town and make himself indispensable in an art studio, nor can the artist, 
the hand-organ man. the store sale-people, those from the factories or the 
law offices become prosperous very readily as tillers of the earth, or sales- 
men of its products. No greater disaster could come to the masses in cities 
than to thrust them unprepared into the strange situations they would en- 
counter in attempted farm life. Their story would be one of tragedy. One of 
the citizens of Forest township, Clinton count) - , who has ben wise enough 
to stick to one vocation all his life and who has therefore succeeded is William 
E. Blair. 

Mr. Blair was horn on August 2, 1857, in Decatur count}". Indiana, and 
there he spent his earlier years and received his schooling, removing to Clin- 
ton count)- in 1879, about the time he attained his majority, and here he has 
lived ever since and has engaged continuously in farming. He is a son of 
Joseph and Nancy (Evans) Blair. The father was born in Hamilton county, 
Ohio, where he spent his earl}' life and attended the old-time schools. He re- 
moved from that county to Decatur count}-, Indiana, in young manhood. He 
spent his life on a farm. Politically be was a Democrat. His death occurred 
in 1876. He was twice married, first in Ohio, this wife surviving but a short 
time. By his second wife, mother of our subject, three children were born, 
namely: Samuel, died in early life; William E., of this review ,and Lou, the 
youngest. 

On August _'_'. 1882, William E. Blair was married to Arabella Ashpaw, 
a sister of Charles Ashpaw, a sketch of whom appears on an other page of 
this volume, where a history of the Ashpaw family will be found. Mrs. 
Blair grew up in her native community and received a common school educa- 
tion. 

Five children, three of whom are still living, have been born to Mr. 



54- CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Blair and wife, namely: Mabel, born January i, r884, 'bed in May, 1903; 
Gladys, born in 1886, died in 1911; Emma, born in 1885; Ruth, born in 
1892; James Raymond, burn in 1S97. 

Mr. Blair's farm consists of one hundred and eighteen acres in Forest 
township, all tillable, but about eight acres. The place has a good natural 
drainage, and is also well tiled. Mr Blair has made his own splendid im- 
provements, lie raises Jersey cows and mixed bugs, draft and Norman 
horses, and Plymouth Rock chickens. 

Politically, he is a Democrat, and in religious matters belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is a trustee and an earnest worker. 



H. N. OL1PHAXT, M. D. 

The medical profession in Clinton county has an able representative in 
Dr. H. N. Oliphant, of Forest, who, although young in years has firmly 
established himself in his vocation and won the confidence and esteem of the 
people and his professional brethren in this section of the Hoosier state. 
He has, unquestionably, the natural endowments that go to make up the 
twentieth century medical man and also the necessary training, having long 
been a close student, leaving no stone unturned whereby he could advance 
himself, and deeming it a rare privilege to be able to bring surcease for hu- 
manity's multiform ills. He lias also shown a public spirit that is ever 
commendable, being always willing to do bis full share in the development 
of the community, and has so ordered his course as to keep untarnished the 
honored escutcheon of a worthy old family name. 

Dr. Oliphant was born April 30, 1880, in Hendricks county, Indiana, 
moving to his present home when young. His grandfather, William Oli- 
phant, entered land from the government in Clinton county and was an 
earlv settler here The Doctor is a son of Albert G. and Martha (Richards) 
Oliphant. The father was born in Clinton county, in 1X57. and here he 
grew to manhood, received such educational advantages as the early clay 
schools afforded, and here redded until shortly before the birth of our 
subject when he removed to Hendricks count)', afterwards returning here 
where he still makes his home. The Doctor's mother was born in 1857 in 
Hendricks county, this state, and she is still living. She was the second 
wife of Albert G. Oliphant. Of this union seven children have been born, 
five of whom are still living: Dr. 11. X.. of tin's review : Ora M., Herman 



CMNTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 543 

E., John T., and Mary, Pearl and Ruin - , twins, born in 1895, died young. 
The father of these children has devoted his life to general agricultural pur- 
suits. Politically lie is a Democrat. 

Dr. Oliphant grew to manhood on the home farm where he worked, 
when he became of proper age. lie received a common school education in 
Forest township, also attended high selin.il there. In 1901 he went to New 
York City and entered the Male Training School where he was graduated 
in 1903, after which he went to Chicago and entered the Illinois .Medical 
College, which is the medical department, of the Loyola University. Here 
he made an excellent record and was graduated with the class of 1908, dur- 
ing which time he spent one year in the work at the Illinois Medical Hos- 
pital. In June, 1008. he began the practice of his profession in Forest, 
Clinton county, and here he has remained to the present time, enjoying a 
large and growing practice. In June, 1908, he was on the honorary list of 
the Indiana Examination Registration Board of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Dr. Oliphant was married on June 6, 1908, to Florence K. Travis, of 
Janesville, Wisconsin, where she was born January 10, 1887. She is a 
daughter of William and Mary (Collier) Travis, both still living in Wis- 
consin, now retired, having spent their lives on a farm. 

The union of the Doctor and wife has resulted in the birth of one 
child, H. X., Jr., who was born May 1, 1909. 

Fraternally Doctor Oliphant belongs to the Masonic Order and the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, both at Forest. Politically he is a Demo- 
crat, and religiously he belongs to the Missionary Baptist church. 

Dr. Oliphant is surgeon for the Clever Leaf Route, also the Indiana 
Light & Heat Company's railway, having been appointed on the electric line 
in 1912, and has been surgeon for the first named road ever since he came 
to Forest. He has given eminent satisfaction to both companies. He is a 
member of the Clinton County Medical Society, the State Medical Society 
and the National Medical Association. He is a member of the surgical clinic 
for the well known institute of the Mayo Bros, at Rochester, Minesota. 

The Doctor enlisted for service in the Spanish-American war. in Com- 
pany C, One Hundred and Fifty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in 
April, 1908, under Captain D. F. Allen. He soon rose from private to as- 
sistant commissary sergeant, regimental, under Commissary Sergeant H. G. 
Swope. The company was sent to Chickamauga Park, Georgia, where it 
remained until after the war, its services at the front not being required. 
Dr. Oliphant was honorably discharged on November 4, 1898, at Indian- 
apolis. 



54-1 CMN MIX ( (i! \ I V, INDIANA. 

J. B. CASEY. 

In a country like Indiana the manufacture of draining tile is a large and 
important industry and ,i;i\ e^ employment to thousands of men, and innumer- 
able families are supported by reason of this industry. This state, it will be 
remembered, was originally a semi swamp, over, at least, a great pari oi its 
area, but the pioneers who settled here less than a century ago knew that a? 
rich soil as could be found on the continent was lying beneath the shallow 
water. The problem which confronted them was to drain the land and get 
it ready for the seed. Thus in working out this problem enormous work has 
been performed and vast money expended, but the results have certainly been 
gratifying and warranted the outlay. Most of the farms in Clinton county 
have had to be tiled and the work is still going on. Colfax has become a tile 
manufacturing center. Perhaps no individual here has a more expert knowl- 
edge of the proper manufacture of draining tile than J. B. Casey, manager of 
the M. J. Lee Drain Tile Company. 

Mr. Casey was born in Crawfordsville, Ind., some thirty-six years ago. 
He is a son of T. J. Casey, who was a pioneer brick manufacturer of Craw- 
fordsville. His family consisted of five children. 

T. B. Casey grew to manhood in his native city and received his educa- 
tion there, attending the common schools and Wabash College. During the 
Spanish-American war he enlisted in the One Hundred and Fifty-eighth In- 
diana Volunteer Infantry, under Capt. F. Alexander, and this regiment was 
mustered in and sent to Chickamauga Park, Term., where it camped, not 
being needed in Cuba, much to the regret of the regiment, which longed for 
active service against the Dons. Mr. Casey returned home with the regiment 
in the summer of 1898 and was discharged. He at once turned his attention 
to a business career, and, having learned the manufacture of tile as a boy 
under his father he quite naturally decided to continue in that field of en- 
deavor. He came to Colfax in 1902, and erected the tile plant mentioned 
above, and which he has since managed, and he has given every satisfaction in 
this connection, doing much to increase the efficiency and prestige of the 
same. 

The Lee company has a large tile plant at Crawfordsville and New Rich- 
mond, Ind., also. Their plant in Colfax is adjacent to both the Vandalia and 
Big Four railways. M. J. Lee is president; II. K. Lee, vice-president; Neil 
Casey, secretary; f. P. Casey, treasurer and manager. The Colfax plant was 
built in 1902, at a cost of seventy-two thousand dollars. It enjoys the dis- 
tinction of being the second largest tile factory in Indiana, and a very large 









! 



J. B. CASEY 



ci.i nton nirxi v, iNDi \.\ a. 545 

local business is carried on, ami llie products of the plant are shipped to all 
pari> of the country. Fifty skilled employes are on the payroll all the year 
round. The size of the tile manufactured here is from four to thirty inches 
in diameter. Large contracts are tal en hy the Lees for county ditching in this 
and adjoining counties. \11 the mai Inner) and appliances are modern and of 
the most approved type, insuring high grade work and rapid service. The 
plant is a model in every particular and is one of the most important in- 
dustries in Colfax and this section of the state. 

Mr. Casey is a member of the Sens of the American League, a charter 
member of the local post. Tie has remained unmarried. He is a good mixer 
among business men and stands high with all circles in which he chooses to 
im>\ 



CLINTON E. ORR 



It is encouraging to see enterprising and thinking young men like 
Clinton E. Orr remain in their native communities and engage in husbandry 
for it shows that that community is destined to be continuously progressive 
and a good place in w hich to live. 

Mr. Orr was born on April 15. iSjj, in Forest township, Clinton count)', 
and here he has been content to spend his life. He is a son of Nathan and 
Margaret (McOeland) Orr. The father was born January 29, [838, in Ohio 
from which state he removed with his parents to Clinton county, Indiana, 
when a small boy and here he grew to manhood and received a meager educa- 
tion in the common schools, for these were pioneer times and he had to do a 
great deal of hard work on the home farm, which was new and not very well 
improved. Fie has devoted his life to farming, having cleared and improved 
the fine farm on which he lived and lure he made a good income through his 
hard work and good management, Politically, he is a Democrat, but lias 
never tried to be a public man. lie is now living in retirement in a pleasant 
l^nie in the town of Scircleville, this state. His family consisted of six 
children, five of whom are still living, namely: Austin, Lorenzo, Eta, Alvin 
(deceased), Clinton E, and Ella. 

Clinton E. Orr grew up on the heme place and there did his full share 
of the work when a boy. During the winter months he attended tin neigh- 
boring schools. 

On September n, 10.01. he was united in marriage to Mary Davis, who 
was horn November l8, 1876 in Forest township, this county, and here she 
(35) 



54<i 



ni\ rV, INDIANA. 



grew to womanl <1 and received her education. \ full sketch of the Davis 

family may be found in an article on Charles S. Davis, to be found elsewhere 
in this volume, Mr. Davis bein» a brother to Mrs. Orr. 

Two children have been born to our subject and wife, namch : Mary 
Olive, born April 4, 1904; and Waldron, bom June 29, 1907. 

Air. Orr has always been a fanner, never caring to follow an}' other busi- 
ness, and be has remained in his native township, as already indicated. He is 
the owner of eighty acres, all under cultivation, but about fifteen acres. It 
is well drained and otherwise well improved, and on it stands a good set of 
buildings, including a pleasant home, fie makes a specialty of Jersey cows, 

a mixed breed of hogs and g 1 draft horses; also Rhode Island red 1 hickens. 

He is succeeding well in all line- of general farming and stock raising. 

Politically, Mr. Orr is a Republican, but he does not aspire to leadership 
in politics. 



JOSEPH I. BURNS. 



One of the most interesting men to spend an hour or so in conversa- 
tion with in Forest township, Clinton county, is Joseph T. Burns. He talks 
interestingly because he is a man of much experience and during his long life 
has been a spectator to many happenings out of the ordinary; and. further 
than that he possesses the happy faculty of being able to recall reminis- 
cences and tell of them in well chosen words. During his residence here 
of over a half century he has lived to sec momentous changes in every re- 
spect and he has taken part in them. lie ranked for many decades among 
the best known carpenters and builders in this section of the country, and be 
is now discharging in a commendable manner the duties of justice of the 
peace and those of secretary of the Forest Telephone Company. There is 
additional interest in setting forth his life record in this volume because 
of his care as a soldier for the Union during the dark days of the sixties. 

Mr. Burns was born September 19, 1842. in Hamilton county, O., and 
there his early boyhood days were spent, he having been nine years of age 
when he removed with the family to Clinton county in 1S51, where he 
has resided continuously ever since with the exception of three years, lie 
is a son of Peter and Nancy (Ingersoll) Burns. The father was born 
February 13, 1818', in Hamilton county, O.. and there also occurred the 
birth of' the mother on December 25. 18.7. The former .bed on Ma> 16, 
1874, and the death of the latter occurred on July 29. [890. Peter Burns 



CLINTON COl'NTY, INDIANA. 547 

received a good education for the earl} 1 days in the Buckeye state and he 
was a school teacher for ten years, then turned his attention to general 
farming, which lie followed the rest of his life. His family consisted of 
ten children, only four of whom are living at this writing, namely: Frances 
M. and Sarah Ann. both deceased; Joseph I., of this review; William A. 
idee. i. Elizabeth (dec.), David. Lydia (dec.), Mary lillen (dee.), James A. 
and Emil_\ \. 

[oseph 1. Burns grew up on the home place, and. being the son of a 
pioneer he found plenty of hard work to do when a boy, consequently his 
early schooling was limited to about six months in a log school house, 
equipped with its usual puncheon Moor, slab scats, greased paper for window- 
panes, and open lire-place, but he ha- become a well informed man through 
contact with the world and by wide home reading. 

Mr. Burns was married on October 29, 1865, to Lucy T. Lindle, who 
was born in Ripley county, Ind.. December 13. 1841. She is a daughter 
of Samuel and Elizabeth (Carrick) Lindle. These parents were born, 
reared and married in England, and there they resided until after their first 
child was born, finally emigrating to America and locating in Ripley county. 
Thence they moved to Henry county, this slate, when Mrs. Burns was five 
years old, and from there they removed to Clinton county in 1865. They 
spent their lives mi a farm. Mrs. Burns received a common school educa- 
tion. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hums five children were burn: Hannah I'",., born 
May 6, 1867, married H. W. Cochran, now residing in Forest, this county. 
taught school for several years; Lillian B., born September 20, 1869. mar- 
ried Payton Blanche, ami they live in Warren township, this county; Anna 
E., born March 2, 1872, died July 29. 1873; Laura L., born March 11. 187.;, 
died December 28. 1899; Samuel C. born December 2. 1877'. followed teach- 
ing for fourteen years, married Maude E. Ogle, now engaged in merchan- 
dising in the village of Forest. 

Toscph I. Burns learned the carpenter's trade when a young man and 
this he followed successfully for a period of thirty-three years, being known 
as one of the most skillful and conscientious workmen in Clinton county, 
and many buildings of all kind- stand in this locality as monuments to his 
art as a builder. He gave up his. trade some eight year- ago since which, 
time he ha- been secretary of the Forest Telephone Company, which posi- 
tion he still holds, his long retention being sufficient evidence of his satis- 
factory sen-ice. He was elected justice of the peace of Forest township 
in 1906 and is -till ably discharging the duties of this office, his decisions 



54>^ CLINTON imVlY, INDIANA. 

1) ing noted Cor their fairness to all concerned and for a clear interpretation 
of tlic law. lie is also engaged in the real estate business under the firm 
name of Burns & Johnson. He owns a home in Forest and several lots, 
besides twenty-five acres in Forest township, all tillable and well improved 
in every way, with tile, fencing, etc. I lis land is rented. 

Mr. Burns has been a Mason for a period of forty-one years, being a 
charter member of the local lodge, the Star, of which he was secretary for a 
period of thirteen years. He is also a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and has been financial secretary of the local lodge for a period 
of nineteen years; also a member of the Encampment and has been treas- 
urer of the latter. He is a member of the Rebekahs.. lie was district deputy 
of this count)- for a period of eight years for the last named lodge. Polit- 
ically he is a loyal Democrat. He was township assessor in Johnson town- 
ship for a period of six years. 

On August 5, 1862, Mr. Bums enlisted at Michigantown, Clinton 
county, in Company G, Eighty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, called then 
the "Crazy Eighty-Sixth," under Captain Segar. Mr. Bums saw consid- 
erable hard service, being in many engagements, including Perryville, Frank- 
lin, Nashville, Chattanooga and many skirmishes. He was with the troops 
in Alabama and Florida. Falling sick be was brought north to Louisville. 
He was honorably discharged on June 6, 1865, at Nashville, Tennessee. 



ARTIE M. AVERY 



To be called a success when one is scarcely middle aged indicates that a 
man has managed well and worked hard, but that is the very thing that Artie 
M. Avery, for many years a well known farmer and stock man of bores! 
township, Clinton county, has attained to. Such a man is eminently entitled 
to mention in any history of his locality, and the biographer is therefore glad 
to pen the following brief line bearing on his personal record and that of his 
immediate family. 

Mr. Avery was born on July 20, 1872, in Montgomery county. Indiana, 
but most of his life has been spent in Clinton county, whither he was 
brought when three years of age by his parents, Eli and Lou (Wick) Avery. 
The lather was born in Howard county, this state, on December 7, 1N45. 
and he died at Frankfort, Indiana. October 12, 18S1. The mother of our 
subject was born on October 8, [846, in Pennsylvania, and her death oc- 



CI INTON COTX'TY, INIll MA. 54'' 

curred on lulv _>, [875. These parents received common school educations. 
Eli Avery made his home principally at Frankfort, where he was for many 
years a clerk in the county treasurer's office, lie never engaged in farming. 
Politically he was a Democrat. His famib consisted of two children. 
Arista, born September 16, [867: and Artie M., of this sketch, h.h \ver\ 
was twice married, our subject being by Ids first wife. His second wiles 
maiden name was Sail} Rivers. She was hum in 1859, and is now living in 
Indianapolis. One child, Claude, horn to them March 31, [878. is now 
living in the town of Frankfort. 

Artie M. Avery received a common school education. On December 
17. [895, he married Dora A.ltic, wh < as a native of Michigan township, 
this county, the date of her birth being March 18, r88i. She is a daughter 
of Joseph and Mary (Cox) Attic. These parents are still living, making 
their home in Clinton count)-, engaged in fanning near Frankfort. Mrs. 
Avery received a common school education in her native community. 

Two children have been born to our subject and wife, namely: Eva, 
born August 7. 1908; and Edward, whose birth occurred on June 24, 1912. 

Mr. Avery has been engaged in general farming- and stock raising prac- 
tically all his life in Forest township, Clinton county, where he works one 
hundred and ten acres of valuable and well improved land, owned by 
Thomas Avery, an uncle, who is now living retired in Forest. It is all till- 
able but about thirteen acres, which is in woods, and the land is well tiled. 
Mr. Avery makes a specialty of raising Jersey cows, Chester White and 
Duroc hogs and a general breed of horses. 

Politically Mr. Averv is a Democrat. 



JOHN CAPL1NGER. 



Nature's remedies and methods for curing the ills of man, beast or 
soil are always the best and most economical. Every farmer must sooner 
or later learn, if he would succeed, that simple lesson that wherever the nec- 
essary mineral elements of plant food are deficient, he must not only return 
them in their natural form, but must make them available for plant food by 
supplying organic matter in abundance. This was well understood at the 
outset of his farming career by John Caplinger, now living retired, after 
a successful life as a farmer, in Ins pleasant home in Forest township. 
Clinton countv. In fact, he has always been a man who carefully noted 



550 CLINTON tin \i\, INDIANA. 

things, and built up a splendid system of general farming which brought 
ample returns, enabling him to retire and spend his old age in quiet. He is 
one nf our honored veterans of the great Civil war and a man who has done 
liis full share in the work of genera! improvement in his community and 
county. 

Mr. Caplinger was bom on August 13, 1843, in Adams county, Ohio, 
and there he spent his boyhood years and received such educational ad- 
vantages as the old-time schools afforded. When twenty-six years old he 
arrived at Middle Fork, Clinton count)-, March 25, [869, and he has con- 
tinued to reside in this county, eng 1 general farming and stock raising 
and for a period of ten years operated a saw mill, lie is a son of Moses and 
Martha ( Dillon) Caplinger. The father was horn in Highland county, Ohio, 
and he spent his life in that c tale, dying there on March 4, 1886, a highly re- 
spected citizen. The mother of our subject was born in Adams county, Ohio, 
and her death occurred on November 18, 1865. They spent their lives on a 
farm, and eight children were born to them: John, of this review: George, 
Susanna, Christopher and Cornelius, the others being deceased. 

John Caplinger received a common school education and this has been 
supplemented in after year- by extensive home reading and careful observa- 
tion. He often recalls with interest the scenes of the old log house which 
was the school room for the neighborhood. 

John Caplinger has been thrice married, first, on October 24, 1866, to 
Frances E. Morrison, wdio was born in Adams county, Ohio, a daughter of 
Joseph and Elizabeth (Baldwin) Morrison, both her parents being natives 
of that state, where they spent their lives on a farm. Our subject's first wife 
died on September 13. 1867, leaving one child, Frances E., who was born on 
July 7. [867. She married John Chamblin, and they live in Ohio, On August 
8, 1872, Mr. Caplinger married Laura E. Wright, who was born in Clinton 
county, Indiana. She is a daughter of Stanton and Martha (Goodhart) 
Wright, both natives of Indiana. Our subject's second wife died April 16, 
j 874. Of this union one child was born — Martha E., wdiose birth occurred 
on May 8, 1873. She married James Beauchamp, of Kansas City, Missouri. 
In November, 1903. our subject was again married, his last -wife being Mary 
Conover, who was born in Jefferson county, Indiana. May _', 1844. 

Mr. Caplinger began farming when a young man and this was his chief 
life work up to his retirement from active work some time ago, though lie 
ran a saw mill for some time in Warren township. 

Fraternally. Mr. Caplinger is a "Mason, belonging to the Forest Blue 



i MXTON ( "I N'TV, IXIU \\.\. 55 I 

lodge and the Commandery and Royal Arch at Frankfort. Politically lie is a 
Democrat, and in religion belongs to the Universalist church, lie was at one 
time constahle of Warren township, also township assessor, filling these 
offices to the entire satisfaction of the people. 

In 1864 Mr. Caplinger proved his patriotism to the government by en- 
listing for service in the Federal anm at Cincinnati. Ohio, in Company G, 
One Hundred and Fighty-firsl Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under Capt. George 
Kountz, and although he saw some considerable service he was in b t one 
battle, but that was a pretty hot one, that of Murphreysboro, Tcnnesee, din- 
ing Hood's campaign, and was fought on December 7. 1864. In this our sub- 
ject was wounded by a minie ball which passed through his right shoulder. He 
was honorably discharged on June 2, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana, tie 
formerly belonged to the Grand Army of the Republic. 



•ROBERT V. HEATON. 



The world has realized mure than ever during the past few years that 
the real source of progress is the farmer and his fields. Wall street and the 
stock markets, human subsistence, trades and vocations, education, and even 
our pleasures, depend solely on the agriculturist, and in turn the mechanical 
world has supplied him with contrivances for the ecenomy of labor and in- 
creased production, so that the ever growing demands of the hungry millions 
may be satisfied. The farmer has responded nobly to this situation and has 
modernized himself to every possible extent, and to the degree that the pres- 
ent type cannot be called a "rube," but a highly cultivated and educated 
citizen, with knowledge and habits the same as his city brother. Such a man 
is Mr. Heaton, whom we write of in this sketch, lie is a worthy and repre- 
sentative type. 

Mr. Heaton was born February 28, 1854, in Michigan township, Clinton 
county, Indiana, anil was the son of Alfred and Levici (Julian) Heaton. 
Alfred Heaton was a native of the Hoosier state and he died in rQ02. The 
mother was also born in Indiana. Both parents had a common school educa- 
tion, and the father followed farming all of his life, and was a Democrat. 
Six children were bom to the union, namely: one infant, Alice, Hester A.. 
and Vesper, all deceased, and James and Robert, now living. Robert, our 
subject, received his elementary education in Michigan township. 



.1.-1- CLINTON COUNT V, ixni.W" \. 

Mr. Heaton was married April 5, 1876, in Elizabeth Bceaboul, who was 
burn April 22, 1S53, in Fayelte county, Indiana, and was the daughter of 
Peter and Ann ( Parker) Beeabout. Six children have been born to our sub- 
ject and wife, namely: Claudius; Eva; Anyie married Orville Coy, who 
died June 7, 1912, leaving her with one child. Robert, both now living with 
our subject : Ethel (deceased), Erchel and Glenn (deceased). 

Air. Heaton has been a farmer all of his life in this county. lie has 
now retired from active work, however, but still manages his eighty acres 
of fertile and well improved land. Besides general fanning, he raise- [ersey 
and a mixed breed of cows, Poland China hogs, and Plymouth Rock chii kens. 

Religiously, .Mr. Heaton is a member of Cod's church, and in politics 1- a 
Prohibitionist. 



JOHN A. HARDING. 



There are certain trades that possess an indefinable charm, and among 
them is that of blacksmithing. The smithy's shop in the small town is a place 
where children congregate am! the politic- of the day are discussed by their 
elders. The smithy is a man of prominence and his invariable good nature 
makes him a friend to all. This quality has been immortalized in poetry and 
song, and ever, especially to the younger generation, the forge and anvil and 
the "mighty man" above them will linger long in their memories. Clinton 
county has her blacksmiths, among them John A. Harding, and about him we 
tell in this review. 

John Harding was born December 31, 1855, in Kirklin county, Indiana. 
He was the son of Samuel and Delilah (Thompson) Harding, natives of 
Ohio. Samuel Harding was born in Union county, Indiana, August 25, 1833, 
and in 1846 moved to Clinton county. He gained a common school education 
and after leaving the schoolroom he took' up the trade of blacksmithing in 
Kirklin, an occupation he followed nearly all of his life, shoeing horses until 
after he was seventy-five years of age. Twelve children made up bis family. 
They were: John, Robert (dec), Orlando C, Kate R., Lily L. (dec), O. T. 
( dec), Minnie ( dec. ), Frank S. and Pearl ; remainder not named, having died 
in infancy. 

John Harding attended the public schools in Kirklin during bis boyhood 
days, and spent his time otherwise learning the trade he was to follow from 
his father. 

Mr. Hardin:;' was married September 29, 1882, to Emma McKav, the 



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MR. AND MRS. J. A. HARDING. 



• ci.intox cor.vrv. Indiana. 553 

daughter of James and Margaret (Mart) McKay, and hern in Clinton county, 
Ohio, December 9, r86o. Her father died when she was hut a baby ,and the 
mother is cared for pari of the time now in John Harding's home in Kirk- 
liti. Mrs. Harding received a common school education, and is the mother 
of three children: John (i., horn June. [883; Fanny L., married to George 
Kulz. a Kirklin druggist, rind Anna L. 

John Harding Ins always followed the blacksmithing trade. He began 
with just a small shop and now owns a large and completely equipped place, 
also a two-story brick factory where he has the latest machinery installed for 
the making of buggies, farm wagons and implements t>\ use Lo the fanner. He 
also paints buggies and does much rub] . r tiring. Mr. Harding has, in the 
course of his studies in his chosen trade, invented a patent storm top for 
buggies and automobiles. He has obtained a patent on his contrivance and 
sells a number to Clinton count)- people. 

Mr. Harding belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men at Kirklin, 
and also is affiliated with the Masonic order. He is a loyal member of the 
Presbyterian church and is one of their strongest supporters. Politically, he 
believes in the principles of the Democratic party. 



MONROE C SHAW 



Monroe C. Shaw was horn in Clinton county, July 22, 1872, and died 
September 24. 1911. His life occupation was that of a farmer, his home- 
stead consisting of ninety-five "acres, all tillable except ten acres of woodland. 
A feature of the Shaw farm is that all its improvements were built by the 
owner. Besides tilling the soil, Mr. Shaw made of his place one of the 
finest stock farms in the state. Here he raised principally Shorthorn cattle, 
fine breeds of hogs and general pur] horses. His reputation as a stuck 
raiser was not confined to Indiana, but extended throughout Ohio and Illinois. 
The Shaw farm is one of the well known and attractive centers of Clinton 
county, people going there from near and far for the purchase of blooded 
horses, cattle and hogs. It has .contributed very largely to the fame of 
Clinton county and the state of Indiana as suitable regions for raising stock 
of the first quality. 

The subject of this sketch, was the son of James C. and Margaret 
(Fritz) Shaw. His father was born near Rock ford, Surry County, N. C, Jan. 
31, 1828, and died at his home near Russiaville, Ind., April 8. 1901, aged ~z 



554 CLINTON COl'NTV, INDIANA. 

years. The mother of Mr. Shaw was bom near Westmoreland. Somerset 
County, Pa., Aug. i_'. 1 838, and died near Russiaville, 1ml.. in March. 1906. 
She was a devoted wife and mother and active member of the Baptist church. 
She wa> united in marriage October 10, [865, to James C. Shaw, who was 
then at home after three years' service in the civil war. This was Mr. 
Shaw's second marriage. To him and his first wife were horn five children, 
as follows; William. John. Joseph, James and Catherine, and the children 
born of the second marriage were Christian. Monroe C, Howard, Maggie 
and Letitia. 

March 8, 1896, Monroe C. Shaw married Rosa !I. Bryan, who was born 
in Warsaw, Indiana. June 20, 1873, the daughter of James and Barbara 
(Breeding) Bryan. To them have been born three children, two of whom 
are living: Irene V., born December 1, 1896, and Beulah Lorea, born De- 
cember 25, 1907. Mrs. Shaw's father was a farmer and served in the 47th 
Ohio Infantry one year. She is the youngest of a family of six children, 
five of whom are living. The names of the others are Terry J., Lester J.. 
Acy A., fames and Catherine (dec.) Her. mother was born in Virginia 
January 1, 1838. and died July 16, 1901. 

Monroe C. Shaw affiliated with the Baptist church and was a Repub- 
lican in politics. It may be truly said of him that be lived and died in the 
realization of the Christian faith that lifts men above the friction of life and 
provides them a sphere of congenial and happy activity. In politics Mr. 
Shaw was no less ardent and active than in the discharge of his religious 
duties. To him the Republican party was something of an idealism, and be 
referred to its achievements in the cause of constitutional government and 
the liberty of the people with the utmost reverence and enthusiasm. Fidelity 
was a very marked trait with him. He was a true man in all the relations 
of life. 



BERT KERN. 



The life history of the subject of this sketch is such as to warrant 
praise and commendation. By honest dealings and hearty co-operation with 
his fellow men Mr. Kern has guaranteed a comfortable living to himself the 
rest of bis days on earth. The man is indeed fortunate who has done so. 
Besides his interests in agriculture, Mr. Kern has been versatile enough to 
make a success of other vocations, at present being conne led with one of the 
largest interurban systems in the United States. 



I I. INI nX (in \*TY, INDIA \'.\. 555 

Bert Kern was born in Jackson township, Clinton county, on December 
28, 1867, and was the sun of A. D. and Sarah (Young) Kern. The father 
was bom in the year 1840 in Boone count)' and lives in Clinton count)' with 
our subject. During his life he was a fanner and breeder of shorthorn cat- 
tle. J le still is active in the interests of the farm. The mother was born in 
Clinton county in .1843, ;nu ' sne passed from this life on February 18, 1910. 
Both parents 1 1 a common school education. Four children were burn to 
thein : Edward (deceased), D. S., Bert and Charles. 

Bert Kern received a common school education nad made his early start 
on the farm. Until 1 1 : agricultui cas the held of his endeavors, and then 
he went to work for the Indiana Traction Railway, holding the positii 11 I 
sub-station operator, lie was later promoted to sub-station foreman, and as 
such he still is making good. He owns twenty-six acre, of fertile and well 
tiled land here in this county, and besides general farming thereon he is rais- 
ing Chester White hugs. The home on the estate was built by our subject. 

On October 2j, r88S, he was married to Minnie B. Davidson, who was 
born December 12, 1870. the daughter of William and Luanda (Price) Dav- 
idson. One child has been born to them. Alta B., born January 3. 1890. She 
married Carl Hutchinson, and they live near our subject. 

Religiously, Mr. Kern is a member of the Christian church, and in 
political affairs is a Democrat. Although he has newer run for office he takes 
as much part in political activities as his other duties, which he considers 
paramount, will allow. 



WILLIAM S. RIDNOUR. 

Success has come to William S. Ridnour, undertaker and funeral direc- 
tor, of the village of Forest. Clinton count)', because he has worked for it 
along legitimate and well established lines, and at the same time has dealt 
honestly and conscientiously with his fellow men. He has always manifested 
an abiding interest in the general welfare of this community and his support 
could always be depended upon in furthering any laudable undertaking for 
the public weal. Tie. therefore, enjoys the good will and respect of a wide 
acquaintance. 

Mr. Ridnour was burn May 3, 7<S-_\ in Russiaville, Howard county, In- 
diana. He is a son of Adam and Sarah (Wilson) Ridnour. The father was 
born filly 5. 1846, in Tennessee, and there he grew In manhood, working hard 



55>) CLINTON COUNTY, INDIAN \. 

when a boy in gel a start in the world. lie remained in his native locality 
until after his marriage, when he removed to Indiana, locating the future 
home of the family in Howard county. ITis death occurred on September 17, 
joi 1. The mother of our subject was born in Knox county, Tennessee, Ma_\ 
[8, 1844. and her death occurred on October 19, 1911. Adam Ridnour de- 
voted his life to general fanning and stock raising and to the buying and 
selling of live stock, making that a business for many years. He raised 
Hereford and shorthorn cattle, Poland-China hugs and later Chester White 
hogs, and a great many mules. Politically, he was a Republican. He en- 
listed for service in the Civil war when only fifteen years of age. in 1862, in a 
Tennessee regiment, and served three years as gallantly as the older veterans 
of the army. 

Six children were horn to Adam Ridnour, four of whom are still living, 
namely: Mrs. Emma Jordan, Mrs. Delia Fitzer, William S., of this sketch, 
and Grant, the latter two being twins. Alice and Isaac W. are deceased. 

William S. Ridnour received a common school education in the schools 
of Howard count), Indiana, and during the summer months he worked on 
his father's farm. On April 7. 1895, he married Alona Blair, a native of 
Decatur county, Indiana, the date of her birth being May 4. 1876. She is a 
daughter of Leonard B. and Elizabeth (Parkeson) Blair, both natives of 
Decatur county and both now' deceased, the mother passing away when Mrs. 
Ridnour was young. Mr. Blair engaged in fanning all his life. Mrs. Rid- 
nour grew to womanhood in her native locality and received a common school 
education. s 

Three children, only one of whom survive, have been born to our sub- 
ject and wife, namely: Fern Madilene, born September 3. 1896, died in 
March, 1898; Arthur W.. born December 15, 1898, died November, 191 1. 
having been killed by a plavmatc with a rifle: Adam Omar, horn February 21, 
1904. now in school. 

Mr. Ridnour moved to Clinton county in February, 1906, to make his 
permanent home, but has traveled for four years, sightseeing, first in the 
northern states and Canada, and later in Iowa, the Middle West, and other 
sections, lie lived on a farm in Clinton county thirteen years all told, and 
he still owns a valuable farm of one hundred and twenty acres, all tillable but 
about five acres. It is well improved in every respect and has a good set of 
buildings. He keeps his place rented. While engaged in general farming he 
raised black cattle and shorthorns, the O. T. C. hogs and draft horses. He 
moved to the town of Forest in January. 1912, and went into the furniture 



CLINTON COT NTV, INDIANA. 55J 

and undertaking business, in partnership with a Mr. Lowery, under the lirm 
name oi Lowery & Company. He bought out his partner in July, 1912, and is 
now engaged in the furniture business alone .although he has a partner in the 
undertaking business, \V. L. Stout, the firm being Ridnour & Stout. IK as 
built up a growing business in both lines of endeavor, keeping a large and 
carefully selected stock of furniture and is well equipped as an undertaker. 
He lives in a pleasant home in Forest. 

Mr. Ridnour is a Republican in politics, and fraternally he belongs to 
the Knights of Pythias at Forest, lie made the race for sheriff of Clinton 
count\- in inio. but was defeated, lie belongs to the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 



GEORGE A. AUBLE, JR. 



Not everyone i< capable of making a successful newspaper man. It is 
true that thousands of young men just out of school take up the work be- 
cause it requires no special college course to get ready and all the implements 
necessary are a sharpened pencil and a pad of note paper; but these same 
thousands soon drop out and turn their attention to something else. Why? 
Not because the work is not fascinating or remunerative, but because a suc- 
cessful journalist is. in a measure, like the poet, born — especially gifted by 
nature. That does not mean that he is wiser than the average professional 
man, that Ire is a seer, a philosopher or genius, but that he has a peculiar fit- 
ness for this line of human endeavor. One of the men in Clinton count v 
who was undoubtedly marked by mother nature for this vocation is Georg 
A. Auble, Jr.. editor and publisher of the Forest Weekly News, one of the in- 
fluential newspapers of this locality. 

Mr. Auble was born March 5, [889, near Las Vegas, New Mexico, and 
is therefore yet only a young man. but nevertheless a successful newspaper 
publisher. He is a son of George A. and Emma S. (Nettinger) Auble. The 
father was born October 9. 1864. in Indianapolis, Indiana, and the mother 
March 29, 1805, at Geneseo, Illinois. She is a graduate of Ottawa, Illinois, 
high school, class of 1885. 'The father has been a successful implement dealer 
for nearly twenty years, and he was engaged in railroading for a period of 
seven years in the West. His family consisted of ten children: George A., 
Jr., Robert N., Ruth ('deceased). Frank IT.. Sydney, Mary (deceased), 
Woodard, Muriel, Fred and Mildred. 

George A. Auble. Jr., spent bis early boyhood in the West, and in 1804 



,-v N I LINTON Col X n , I \HI.\ \ \. 

removed with Ii i s parents to Forest, Clinton county, where lie attended 
school, being grdauated from the common schools here in 1904, and from 
the high school in 1907. lie attended Frank fori high school Iwo years, being 
graduated from that institution in 1909, after which he attended the Univer- 
sity of Indiana at Bloomington for a while. 

Air. Auble was married on December 24, [910, to Grace Robinson, who 
was born in Geetingsville, Clinton county, April 1 t, [891. She was a daugh- 
ter of William A. and Dean ( Beck) Robinson, an excellent old family of this 
locality, where they have spent their lives on a farm. Airs. Auble was edu- 
cated in the common schools of her community and at the high school in 
Frankfort. She was called to her eternal rest on December tS, toi 1. without 
issue. S was a young lady of many winning characteristics, and a favorite 
in her home community. 

After leaving school Mr. Auble engaged in the implement business for 
some time in Forest with his father. Later he purchased the Forest Weekly 
A T c:cs. of which he has since been edit >r and publisher. Tie has also been 
successfully engaged as an electrical contractor for some time, being a skilled 
electrician. He has made his paper a bright and newsy sheet, which goes into 
man)- homes in this vicinity. Tts subscription list is constantly growing and 
from a mechanical standpoint it is all that could be desired and ranks well 
with the weekly papers of the state. 

Politically, Mr. Auble is independent, and fraternally he belongs to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Forest, also the Modern Woodmen 
here. He is a member of the Baptist church, being superintendent of the 
Sunday school and is an earnest and influential worker in the church. 



WILLIAM H. KESTERSON. 

One of Cli ton county's most substantial and highly respected farmers 
is William TT. Kesterson, now living retired at his picturesque home in Jef- 
ferson township, after a long life of close work and excellent management on 
the farm, his place there being one of the choice and valuable farms of that 
section of the county. His residence of a score of rears here has been such as 
to bring to him the good will and esteem of his neighbors, for he has nut 
only been industrious but public spirited and honorable in his dealings with 
his fellow men. ITis record in Tippecanoe county, where he lived for some 
time, is equally good. Prior to that lie lived in IT: milton county, where he 



I 1,1. VI ( i\ CorXTV, IX III AN A. 551; 

was bom "ii January 7, 184O, lml lefl there when a boy fur Tippecanoe 
county, where Ik- remained until about twenh years ago. He also lived in 
Iowa a few years when a bov, also in Illinois. 

Mr. Kesterson is a son of Thomas and Susan | Norwood) Kesterson. 
The father was a native of Tennessee, from which stair he came to Hamilton 
county, Indiana, when a young man and there married. The mother of our 
subject was horn in Hamilton county, this state. These parents spent tin 
lives on a farm, and were honest, hard working people. Six children were 
born to them, four of whom are still living. Thomas Kesterson was twice 
married. His children were named Alary E,, who is now deceased; Spicy M., 
George, W illiam 11.. our subject; Lousina (deceased), and Delphina. 

William H. Kesterson grew to manhood on the home farm and he re- 
ceived a good common school education, mostly in Tippecanoe county and 
partly in Iowa, where he lived for four years. At Lafayette, in the fall of 
18(14. ne enlisted as a recruit in the Seventy-second Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry. Company E, mounted infantry, under Captain Mahon, and although 
he saw considerable service he was in no very important engagements. He 
was wifh the troops in Alabama and Georgia, going as far as the citv of 
Macon. 

Mr. Kesterson was married on November 12. 1858, to Lillian Douglas, 
who was born on October 9, 1858, in Clinton county, Indiana. She is a 
daughter of Morland and Jane (Craig) Douglas, both natives of Ireland, 
where they spent their earlier years, emigrating to America in an early da)' 
and here became well established through their industry. Mrs. Kesterson 
grew to womanhood in Clinton county and here receiv. d a common schoo 1 
education 

Seven children have been horn to our subject and wife, namely: Thomas, 
born November 23, 1869; Van, born January 31, 1871, ('deceased) ; Anna T-. 
born June 2y, 1872 : Frank, born December 1. 1874; Mattie, born March 6, 
1878; George S., born February 6, 1880; Herman, born March 28, TSS2. 

Mr. Kesterson began farming when a young man and made this his life 
work. He owned a finely improved and productive place of three hundred and 
twenty-four acres, all tillable but about twenty acres, which is in timber. It 
is well tiled and otherwise well improved and is one of the best farms of lack- 
son township. He carried on general farming on a large scale, and is still 
engaged somewhat in stock raising, formerly specializing in shorthorn cattle, 
and now' he makes a specially of Red Poll cows, Jersey hogs. Shire and 
Clydesdale horses. He understands well (he handling of all kinds of live 



5uO n. i x i ox cor \ n , I N iii \\.\. 

stock and no small part of his competency has been obtained in this manner. 

I le is a member of the Grand \rm\ of the Republic, is a Progressive in 
politics, leaning to the Republican party, however. Religiously, he belongs to 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Our subject's son, George S. Kesterson, enlisted for service in the 
Spanish-American war on September jS. 1899, at Frankfort in Company A, 
Thirty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, under Captain William 11. Col- 
lier, lie wa-- sent to St. Louis, where the company remained until October 
20th of that year, then went bv rail to San Francisco, leaving that city in 
November on a transport to Philippine Islands, by way of Honolulu, landing 
in the city of Manila in December, 1899. From there the compan) w; 1 : 

to Datangus, where it did guard duty, having a few skirmishes and remaining 
there until 1900. Then they were sent to Iloilo, remaining there until hoi 
on guard duty, and having several skirmishes. These troops were then 
ordered to San Francisco and were mustered out on June 30. 1901, in that 
city. Young Kesterson's experiences abroad were of much value to him and 
he talks interestingly of them. 



DAVID L. MABBITT. 



Some people forget that a worn soil is a hungry soil — a soil whose 
breathing is difficult because its organic matter is exhausted, and whose 
natural mineral elements of plant food have bee,n depleted by constant crop- 
ping — a soil that does not furnish a suitable home for the manufacturing 
bacteria — a soil that constantly pleads through its stunted, scrawny, half- 
nourished plant growth, for material with which to satisfy its hunger. One 
hundred bushels per acre crops are never grown on su.eh soil, and a resort to 
stimulants in the form of so-called "complete fertilizers" only hasten land 
ruin. One of the progressive farmers of Jackson township, Clinton count}-, 
who has long understood fully the above tacts and who has thus avoided 
wearing out his soil and lias kept it as strong as when it was in its virgin 
state by proper rotation of crops, the application of proper natural and arti- 
ficial fertilizer and other well established methods is David L. Mabbitt, who 
is at present trustee of his township. 

Mr. Mabbitt was born on May 21, 1862, in Owen township, this county. 
He is a son of \\ . 1.. and Catherine (Long) Mabbitt. The father was born 
on April S. i8_'o, in Union county. Indiana, and bis death occurred on Dc- 



MR. AND MRS. D. L. MABBITT 



I\l!l \.\".\ 



"1 



cember 13, k>i i. The mother was born nil ( 1 hi : i I hitler county , 

Ohio, and <lu was three vears old wli 11 I iren hn 11 ;ht her In Clinton 

count] in il :-,. I 1 " : ' 111 Mabbitt, 

paternal dfatb rlatid in J Irmi 

which state he rei - I ; ' .■ I ': ■ mil from there to Union 

Inch 111 ' in [815. Hi d ilh ccun I in \ ; in Clinton count \ on (he old 
Mabbitl hi unestead. He \\ 1 1 ; I 

came to Indiana on hoi ' nd d land from 11 it w hen 

this country was still a territory. Grandfather Long was hoi 1 in '■,•!-, and 
Grandmother Long was horn in Vin h tSo6. 

W. 1 . Mabbil ' reared li 

ti' >ns and helped le\ Hi 

scho 1 only ■ c month, but could read and write, rind was a self-made man. 
He followed farming all his life. He was a Democrat in politii 
never a candidate for office. He joined the Masonic Order in 1850, being a 
charter member of Middle Fork and Wild Cat lodges. His family consisted 
of nine children, only two of whom are now living. These were: Mrs. Martha 
Brown (dec), Warren (dec), George W., killed by lightning; Eliza (dec), 
Mrs. Lucinda Plott and David L., of this review, the only two living at this 
writing; Mrs. Emma Bronson (dec), Charles and "Frank also deceased. 

David L. Mabbitt grew to manhood on the home farm where he worked 
during crop seasons. He had excellent educational advantages, having at- 
tended the common schools in his home community and, later, Purdue Uni- 
versity at ■ Lafayette, 1ml. After leading school he engaged in the milling 
business for several years in Sedalia, this count}-, and built up a good trade, 
later trading his mill for a farm in Jackson township in [890. Thither he 
moved soon after, and here he has continued to reside to the present time with 
the exception of one year spent in Frankfort and two years in Sedalia. He 
has keen very successful as a genera! fanner, paying special attention to stock 
fi ranking am ng the leading feeders in the countv for many years, 

preparing annually large numbers of cattle and hogs for the market He 
owns one hundred and scventy-threi teres of valuable and well imp 
land, all tillable hut about thirty acre-, which is in woods. The place is well 
tiled and on it stand an excellent set of buildings. These improvements were 
made by Mr. Mabbitt himself. He has one of the most attractive rural homes 
in the county. He raises Jersey cows. Poland-China and mixed breeds of 
hoes; horses, mostly Norman and Percheron, and Plymouth Rock chickens. 

Mr. Mabbitt was married on December 24, 1885, to Laura A. Wilson, 
who was horn in Clinton countv, September 1^. 1865. She is a daughter of 
(36) 



V>_' CM NTOiN ( Dl'X'n . IN M \.N \. 

William B. and Nancy (Tinkle) Wilson. Mrs. Mabbitt's Grandfathei Wil- 
son came to Clinton county in an early clay. Her father, who is still living, 
has always been a carpenter. He is a native ol this county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson were the parents of four children: George, Joseph, 
Dora and Laura A., wife of our subject. Mrs. Wilson was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Wilson belonged to the 1. 0. O. F. and the 
Red Men. He has been a justice of the peace, and in politics is a Democrat. 

The union of our subject and wife has resulted in the birth of four chil- 
dren: Catherine A., burn September 14, 1887, married Karl Jackson. They 
live on a farm in Jack-son township, and have two children, Edward and Louis 
D. Louis D., our subject's second child, was bom on July 25, [890, 1 d in 
October, 1912, he married Catherine Tapkin. They live on the farm with our 
subject. Claude M. was born February 8, 1893, and died December 27, 1003; 
Ethel M., the youngest of the family, was burn on September 2, 1898, and is 
now attending school. 

Fraternally Mr. Mabbitt is a member of the Masonic Order, Frankfort 
Lodge, No. 54, also the Improved Order of Led Men, Woodmen of the 
World, and the Modern Woodmen, all of Frankfort. He is a member of the 
United Brethren church, and politically he is a Democrat, and has long been 
more or less active in local party affairs. Fie was appointed to the office of 
trustee of Jackson township in January. 1913, and is discharging the duties 
of this office in a highly satisfactory manner to the people. 



EDWARD F. SUHRE, M. D. 

1 ne name of Dr. Edward F. Suhre certainly needs no introduction by 
the biographer to the people of Forest township and Clinton county, where he- 
has proven himself to be a leading citizen in every respect as well as one of 
the successful and trustworthy physicians of this section of the Hosier state. 
Considering the excellent family from which he sprang and the earnest 
methodical methods which he has ever followed in his chief life work neither 

Dr. Suhre was born on February 23, 1869, in Indianapolis, Indiana. He 
is a son of Henry C. and Margaret (Menden) Suhre. The father was born 
in Germany in the year 1848, but the major part of his life lias been spent in 
the United States, whither he was brought by his parents when eight years 
old. The family located in Indianapolis and there he grew to manhood and 
received his education. Thee first settled in Cincinnati. Ohio, later moving 



< • 1 I NTON ( HI' \ I \ . INDIANA. 503 

to Hendricks county, this state, and fmalh to Indianapolis, wdierc their per- 
manent home was established and where Henry C. Suhre is still residing. 
lie received a farily good education, partly in German. He learned the cai 
penter's trade when a boy and this has continued to be his life work, or, more 
properly, contracting, for during the past fort}' years lie has been engaged 
successfully in building, being now in partnership with his son. Frank II. lie 
is regarded as a very skilled and honorable workman and a far-sighted busi 
ness man of honorable principles. 

The doctor's mother was also a native of Germany and was brought to 
America hv her parents when three years old. Her parents died when she 
was four years old. She is still living, having proved to lie a faithful mother 
and helpmeet. 

Of the union oi Henry C. Suhre and wite eight children were born: 
Dr. Edward \\\. our subject: Frank II.. Gertrude. Anna. Edith, Arthur: 
Walter (deceased), and one who died in infancy. 

Dr. Suhre grew to manhood in Indianapolis and there received a good 
literary education in the common and high schools. Early in lite he decided 
upon a medical career and with this end in view he attended the Indiana 
Medical College, in his native city for a period of four years, later attending 
the Central College of Physicians and Surgeons, where he made an excellent 
record and from which institution he was graduated with the class of 1897. 
Seeking a location he, later in the year of his graduation, came to Forest 
township, Clinton count}, where he has since remained successfully engaged 
in the general practice, having built up a lucrative and ever growing patronage. 
He has been very successful and has kept fully abreast of the times in every 
rsepect, being always a student, notwithstanding the fact that he is a very 
busy man. 

Dr. Suhre was married in April, [896, to Gertrude Isaacs, who was 
born in Indianapolis in the year iRCiij, where she grew to womanhood and 
received her education. She was a daughter of Alfred and Sarah (Webb) 
Isaacs, thi father a native of Kentucky. 

The deatli of Dr. Suhre's wife occurred on January 18, [90T. She was a 
lady of many estimable characteristics and a favorite with a wide circle of 
friends. The union of the doctor and wife was without issue. 

Politically, Dr. Suhre votes independently. Fraternally, he belongs to 
the Masonic Order at Forest ami the Commandery at Frankfort: also to the 
Knights of Pythias and the Improved Order of Red Men. 



564 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

BERT STRONG. 

The subject of this review has spent practically all of his life 111 Clinton 
count), and has ever commanded tlie esteem and confidence oi the people 
with whom he has been associated. 1 lis name has been prominently identified 
with the agricultural interests, as well as with divers other enterprises which 
he has been interested in and played a conspicuous part. Mr. Strong is just 
in the prime of life, and the accomplishments of the past are but a promise 
for larger and better ones in the future. 

Bert Strong came into this world on October 26, 1871, in Denton count)", 
Iowa, and was brought by his parents to Clinton count)', this state, when he 
was one year old. Be was the son of William and .Margaret (Schooley) 
Strong. William Strong was born January 15, 183-', in Boone count)-, In- 
diana, moved to Iowa after his marriage, lived there about three years, then 
moved to Prairie Center, Clinton count)', locating on a farm, where he lived 
until his death, on March 4, 1876. He was a farmer and a Democrat. The 
mother was born June 8, 1829, in the state of Delaware, and came to Boone 
county when she was twelve years old. She is still living. Both parents had 
a good common school education. Eight children were born to them, namely: 
James W., Mary A., Tirzah (deceased) ; John K., Allen, Lewis, Libbie Gold 
and Bert. 

Bert Strong received his early education in Perry township, graduating 
from the eighth grade. Since then he has farmed practically all the time, 
with the exception of three years, when he lived in Frankfort and ran a livery 
and feed barn in partnership with his brother. In 1895 he moved to the 
farm. In March. 1909, our subject sold the farm, which consisted of ninety- 
one acres, lie then purchased an estate comprising fifty-two acres, all tillable, 
well tiled, fenced and with the latest improvements, which he sold in October, 
1913. Mr. Strong is at present earning on general farming, also raises jer- 
sey cows, Poland China hogs and Shire horses. 

Mr. Strong has been married twice: the first time on October 25, 1895, 
to Anna Boyer, who was born in Tipton county. Indiana, in 1874, and died 
November 20, 1906. She was the daughter of Jacob Boyer. Three children 
were born to this fir -t union, namely: Almeda, William Floyd and Helen G. 

Mr. Strong's second marriage was to Artie E. Rude on April 17, k;<>S. 
She was bom in Clinton count)- August 1, [887, ani ' was t' 11 -' daughter of 
Richard and Mary A. Rude, natives of this stale, and both now bein° de- 



I I.I \ K i\ (in MTV, INDIAN \. 565 

ceased. One child lias been born t</Mr. and Mrs. Strong -Beulah A., burn 
January 15, 1 y 1 j . 

Fraternally, Mr. Strung is a member of the Improved Order of Red 
Men at Michigantown, and the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Frankfort. Re'-' 
ligiously, he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church near Cyclone. 
Politically, he is a Democrat. He was a member of the advisory board of 
Michigan township, and was overseer of the new school house for about six. 
months. 



JONATHAN C. GOFF 



Perhaps in no profession in the world is prosperity and success so uni- 
versal as in agriculture. A poor farmer is a rarity, especially in Clinton 
county, and if one is found who obtains a substantial living with difficulty it 
does not mean that he is a failure in life. Upon investigation it will be found 
that man)- times has he put his shoulder to a friend's wheel and aided others, 
whereby he hurt himself. Those arc the unnumbered heroes. However, that 
does not fit the case of our subject, for he is known as one of the most well- 
to-do men of the county and state, at the same time retaining all the qualities 
which make a popular man, which qualities in other men have often been 
dulled and stunted by the acquisition of wealth. 

Jonathan Goff was born April 10, 1852, in Johnson township, Clinton 
county, and was the son of Charles W. and Hester (Kerry) Goff. diaries 
Goff as a native of Indiana, having lived in both Clinton and Hamilton coun- 
ties. He followed fanning all of bis life, and in politics was a Democrat, Ik- 
died in [864. The mother was also a native of Hamilton county. Twelve 
children were bron to this union, five of whom, as follows, are living: Becky 
E. Kemp, Perry, Jonathan, Charles and Mary Bowman. 

Jonathan Goff has been twice married. His first wife was Lucinda 
Jane Rector, daughter of Moses and Rachel (Gibson) Rector, both natives of 
Indiana. She was born October 22, 1852, in Sugar Creek township, Clinton 
county. The wife died January T2, 191 1, leaving fourteen children, as fol- 
lows: Charles Victor, born October 17', 1872, and married to Amanda Rob- 
inson; Mrs. Mary Bartels, born May 18, 1876; Mrs. Dora Williams, born 
December 17. 1877; Mrs. Arzona Tnder, bom September 12, 1880; Mrs. 
Sylvia Kent, horn November 7. 1881 : Mrs. Daisy Myers, born June 25. 1883; 
Maggie F... born March 26, 1885. died January 20. 11)07: Amos S., born 



566 CLINTON' ( Ol NTY, INDIANA. 

March 29, [882, died April 12, 1903; Western J*'.., born September 7, 1889, 
married Madge Keys; Melvin M., born lebiuary 13, U897; Llelvie Pearl, 
burn September 15, 1897. The others were nut named. The second wile, 
whom Air. Goff married on April 30, 1913, was Mrs. Luly Thompson, nee 
Patrick. 

Our subject has been a fanner all his life, and it has meant prosperity 
and success to him from the beginning. Jn the year 1885 Mr. Goff. moved to 
the state of Nebraska and farmed there until November, J 897, when he re- 
turned to Indiana. . He is now living retired from the active duties of his 
farm, but sees to its proper management. Mr. Goff owns eight hundred and 
forty acres of land where he lives and two hundred more in Kirklin town- 
ship, near Cyclone. Of the farm here all is tillable except forty acres, which 
is in good pasture and timber land. The land is equipped with the latest im- 
provements, added by Mr. Goff himself. He has also dealt in live stock a 
little, at one time taking an interest in the breeding of Belgian horses. 

Fraternally, Mr. Goff is a Woodman at Hillsburg, and politically is a 
Democrat. 

Mr. Goff's second wife was previously married, twice, her first husband 
being James Cahoon and her second William Thompson. By her first mar- 
riage there were three children, Blanche, Oris and John, the latter deceased. 
She was a daughter of John and Christy Ann (Diehl) Patrick, natives of 
Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, who came to Clinton county, Indiana, in an 
early day. 



OLTVEP M. STROUP. 



Prominent mention is given in this volume to other members oi the 
Stroup familv, which family is among the best and most representative of the 
countv of Clinton. Oliver M. Stroup has upheld his end of the family repu- 
tation in a most commendable manner, and he well deserves mention in a 
work the extent of this volume. Agriculture has been his domain, and he i^ 
yet a young man, great prospects are ahead for him in the cultivation ot the 
soil, to say nothing of social and business successes. 

Oliver Stroup was born August 23, 1870. in Johnson township. Clinton 
county, and was the son of Jacob and Margaret (DeFord) Stroup. The 
father was horn January 9, 1830, in Madison county, Ohio, and was the son 
of Jacob and Xaomia (Debington) Stroup. lie followed the trade of the 



£■ 





/ 



KOSCIUSKO JARRELL, DECEASED 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 567 

farmer all of his life and tuday lives happily in retirement in Kempton, In- 
diana. The mother was a native of Indiana, but her parents, Edward and 
Julia (Rancipher) DeFord, were from Ohio. Twelve children were born to 
the union, and they are mentioned in the sketch of Jacob Stroup. 

Our subject received a good education in the schools of Johnson town- 
ship, and immediately embarked upon the vocation which is his life work — 
agriculture. General farming is his forte, although he raises Jersey Red 
hogs and a good breed of cattle on the side, also a Percheron and mixed 
variety of horses. Mr. Stroup owns one hundred and sixty-three acres of 
excellent land in this township. The acres are well tiled and fenced, and are 
extremely tillable and protable to the owner. Mr. Stroup built his own at- 
tractive home therein. 

Mr. Stroup was married to Mary A. Cunningham on September 21, 
1892. She was born in Johnson township on November 15, 1875, and was 
the daughter of Harvey and Harriet (Manes) Cunningham. Mrs. Stroup 
received a common school education. Eight children have been born to the 
union: Lavon, born April 9, 1894; Gladys, born June 8, 1896, died March 
3, 1900; Dewitt, born July 6, 1898, died March 8, 1900; Blanche, born June 
21, 1900; Maude, born May 12, 1902; Keith, born January 27, 1905; Dol- 
phin, born February 24, 1907; and Clifford, born September 27, 1909. 

Fraternally, Mr. Stroup belongs to the Masonic Order at Scircleville, 
and the Improved Order of Red Men at the same place. Politically, he is a 
Republican, but has never been a candidate for office. 



KOSCIUSKO JARRELL. 

The truth that life unfolds is that the most useful and desirable exist- 
ence is one that results in the greatest good to the greatest number of people, 
and though everyone does not reach the height of such a life, yet in a great 
measure each can win the success that commands the admiration of his fel- 
lows. High office and wealth is not essential to the higher life; it is really the 
men in humbler walks of life that accomplish the little deeds that work for im- 
mortality. The subject of this sketch is no longer on this earth, but bis 
kindly acts, his clean, wholesome, virtuous life burns as a torch to light the 
memories of those after him, and to encourage the imitation of his faultless 
life. "It is the little, unremembered acts of kindness and of love" that per- 
petuate the remembrance of one of Clinton county's noblest citizens, Kos- 
ciusko Jarrell. 



568 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA, 

Mr. Jarrell was born in Boone county, Indiana, March 29, 1854, being 
the son of William and Anna (Bennett) Jarrell. Both of his parents were 
natives of Indiana. The parents were educated in the common schools of 
Thorntown, in Boone county. William Jarrell followed the blacksmithing 
trade during his life and held a wide acquaintance among the farmers of the 
county. Seven children completed his family, one of whom, Lillian, is now 
living. 

After a period of attendance in the common schools, Kosciusko Jarrell 
began his life devoted to the pursuit of agriculture. When twenty-six years 
of age on May 5, 1880, he married Jennie Kersey, who was born in Boone 
county. June 7, 1861, the daughter of Albert and Elizabeth (Woods) Kersey. 
The wife's father was born in Kentucky, and died January 24, 1890; the 
mother also was a Kentuckian by birth. She passed from this life January 24, 
1873. Albeit Kersey was a Republican and a farmer throughout his life. A 
large family of nine children graced his home, and six of them are still liv- 
ing. They are Thomas, Mary, Jennie, Margaret, Marina and Emma. 

To Kosciusko Jarrell and wife there were born nine children, all of 
whom arc living. They are: Ray, born February 24, 1882, married to Jessie 
Barnett; Walter, born April 3, 1884; Ralph, born August 13, 1885, married 
to Lillian Burk; Charles, born May 14, 1887; Olive, born August 29, 1890; 
Carrie, born August 16, 1892; Robert, born July 27, 1894; David, July 20, 
1898, and Lena, born November 7, 1900. 

Until his death, May 24, 1909, Kosciusko Jarrell remained a farmer. 
He moved to Jackson township, Clinton county, in 1890, and settled upon two 
hundred acres of the very best land in the county, part of which is still cov- 
ered by valuable timber. Mr. Jarrell placed the land in a fine state of culti- 
vation, and has every square foot well tiled. His home was built by his own 
hand and is a worthy monument to its departed owner. 

Mr. Jarrell was always a member of the Christian church at Salem, in 
Boone county. He was faithful to the Republican party during his life, pre- 
ferring to support other capable candidates for office rather than to step into 
publicity himself. 



DAVID ROBERTSON. 



A careful, industrious farmer of Clinton county is David Robertson, one 
of the younger generation of agriculturists who are upholding the reputation 
of their fathers as tillers of the soil. Mr. Robertson learned many things of 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 569 

the vocation while he was youth, and as youthful impressions arc the strong- 
est and are the guides to future life, and as his father's teaching was perfect 
in class and technique, he has had no trouble ranking among the most suc- 
cessful and scientific of this county's farmers. His ancestors were good 
Hoosier people who early in the century broke the forests of Indiana in order 
that a home might be erected. 

Mr. Robertson was born on February 12, 1S80, in Howard county, In- 
diana, and was the son of Bryant and Alary Jane (Gullion) Robertson. The 
father was born April 8, 1845, m Rush county, and is still living in Forest. 
The mother was born in 1849 in Howard county, and survives. Both parents 
received a common school education and the father followed farming all his 
life. He was a Democrat. Eight children were born to the union': Minnie, 
Loren, David, Daniel, Martha, Pearl, Homer and Ernest. 

David Robertson received the usual common school training in Howard 
county, and then took up active farming. He moved in 1897 from Howard 
county to Forest township and then jumped to Johnson township, where he 
now lives. He has continued to farm ever since, and raises Jersey milch 
cows and Jersey hogs on the side. He has one hundred and ninety-six acres 
of land where he lives and which belongs to his wife's father. It is all tillable 
with the exception of twenty acres, which is in timber. On the estate is a fine 
home, which is a model for a country residence. 

Mr. Robertson was married on December 24, 1902, to Jennie Davis, 
who was born in this township on May 23, 1882, the daughter of William H. 
and Molly (Pruitt) Davis, farmers who now reside in Forest township. Three 
children have been born of this union: Lillie, January 10, 1903; William, 
July iP. 1906, and Mable Iretha, August 23, 1913. 

Religiously, Mr. Robertson is a member of the Methodist Protestant 
church, and politically a Democrat. 



JOHN LINCOLN SCHOOLEY. 

Under a popular government, like that of the United States, where the 
democratic idea of equality is as fully developed as the present imperfect 
condition of mankind will permit, we expect as its legitimate result the 
triumph of individual worth and energy over all the competition that wealth 
and class may array against them. Here the avenues of wealth and distinc- 



570 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

tion are fully opened to all, which fact enhances rather than detracts from 
the merits of those whose energy and integrity have triumphed over all ob- 
stacles intervening between an humble position and the attainment of these 
laudable ends. Mr. Schooley, of whom we "speak in this sketch, has won a 
place at the top of the ladder for himself, and he holds marked prestige 
among the self-made men of his county and who by the exercise of those 
talents and qualities which have been cultivated from his youth, has reached 
an honorable position in the public service and earned the respect and high 
esteem of his fellow citizens. 

John Lincoln Schooley was born in Marion county, Indiana, on Novem- 
ber 26, 1861, and wa.s the son of James W. and Agnes (Cones) Schooley. 
James W. Schooley was the son of James W., Sr., and Ruth (Greenwood) 
Schooley, and was born in Maryland on April 1, 1827. James YV. Schooley, 
Sr., was born in the state of Delaware in April, 1806, and was a son of 
Thomas Schooley. The information concerning the life of Thomas Schooley 
is very limited, consisting of the facts that he was born in Ireland and came 
to America prior to the American Revolution, following the farmer's life 
during his career. 

James W. Schooley, Sr., was a typical man of the sturdy pioneer class, 
and spent his useful life in farming. In the later years of his life he came to 
Marion county, Indiana, settling where North Indianapolis now lies. He 
died in 1848. Ruth Greenwood, his wife, was born in 1804 in the state of 
Delaware, and died in Kingman, Kansas, at the age of ninety-three years. 

James W. Schooley, Jr., received his early training on the farm, and 
up until the time he was fifteen years of age he followed that occupation. He 
has now retired from active life, and is living quietly in Seattle, Washing- 
ton. During his life Mr. Schooley was at different times a Whig, a Demo- 
crat, and a Republican. He was once elected by the Republicans in Caney 
township. Montgomery county, Kansas, as a trustee, and he served faith- 
fully as same for eight successive terms. Religiously, he was a member of 
the Christian church, and also held membership with the Grangers. He 
married Agnes Cones in 1848, a girl who was born in Marion county, this 
state, in 1828, and died in Boone county, Indiana, in 1871. 

To take up the details in the life of our immediate subject we may 
say first of all that his early education was of the best that Hoosier schools 
afforded. After completing the common schools he attended DePauw Uni- 
versity for one year. Leaving the Greencastle school he traveled to Kansas 
and spent seven years there in the real estate and insurance business, making 
a complete success of that work. To prove that he was a man of esteem 



CUNTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 571 

and reputation in Caney, we have but to point to the fact that he was elected 
police judge for three years and mayor of the city one term. Mr. Schooley 
next came to Indianapolis and entered the coal business. lie worked for A. 
Thayer for thre years, and then for two years conducted the same business 
for himself. The call of the farm was strong in Mr. Schooley, and conse- 
quently he followed his impulses., lie settled on a farm in Clinton county. 
renting the land. So quickly did success follow his efforts that he now 
owns his own farm of ninety-six acres in Kirklin township, this county. In 
1910 he was elected county assessor and is now filling admirably the respon- 
sibilities of that office, at the same time managing his farm. 

Politically, Mr. Schooley is a Republican, and has always been an active 
worker in the ranks. He places his religious faith in the Presbyterian church 
and is a ruling elder at Prairie Center Presbytery, as well as clerk of sessions. 

Our subject was united in marriage on December 3, 1887, to Emma 
Carrick, who was horn in Clinton county August 13, 1867, and died in In- 
dianapolis in 1898. Mr. Schooley married the second time on August 23, 
1900, to Rena j. Major, who was born in Clinton county February 16, 1868. 
One child has been born of this latter union, Margaret, who is now in the 
public schools. 



ARCHIE R. DAVIS. 



Among the younger generation of Johnson township, Clinton county, 
who have begun to make a reputation for business integrity, personal charm 
and industry is the subject of this sketch, the prominent young banker of 
Hillisburg, whose accomplishments to date have been many and worthy, and 
it is no idle prediction to say in this sketch that ere he has reached the three 
score and ten he will rank with the representative men of whatever commun- 
ity he may be associated with. 

Archie R. Davis was born May 9, 1885, in Forest township, this county, 
and was the son of S. M. and Hannah B. (Clark) Davis. S. M. Davis is also 
a native of this locality, being born here and died here on April 20, 1889. He 
had a good education and utilized this in the vocation of teaching for a num- 
ber of years. However, his main occupation was farming, and he voted the 
Democratic ticket. The mother was born in Clinton county on December 9, 
i860, and is still living at the home of our subject. The father was married 
twice, his first wife being Isabelle Blair, who died after giving birth to one 



57- CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

child which also died. By his second wife one child was burn, Archie R., our 
subject. 

Archie Davis received a very creditable education in the common and 
high schools of his native township, and began business life afterward on the 
farm. He stayed there until the year 191.2, when the Hillisburg Bank was or- 
ganized. W. A. Thomas was chosen to be president and John Dunn, vice- 
president ; our subject was made cashier, with Joseph Foreman acting as as- 
sistant cashier. The bank began business August 5, 191 2. with a capital stock 
of twenty thousand dollars, operating as a private bank. Our subject owns 
about three hundred and sixty acres of fine farm land in Johnson and Forest 
townships and it is all well tiled, drained and fenced. His mother owns part 
of this estate. Mr. Davis is building, at this writing, a commodious and up- 
to-date bungalow in Hillisburg. 

Mr. Davis was married on September 18, 1907, to Regina Stotter, who 
was born September iS, 1890, in Forest township, the daughter of Marion F. 
and Margaret (Johnson) Stotter, who were natives of Clinton county. The 
wife received a common school education at the place of her birth. Two 
children have been born of this union: Samuel S., October 31, 1908, and 
Mona M., May 26, 1912. 

Fraternally, Mr. Davis is a member of the Masonic Order, and politi- 
cally, a Democrat. He is an ardent member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 



SAMUEL C. COHEE. 



The rewards of indifstry and patient application to a single task are the 
same, no matter what the occupation, whether it is laboring among a crowd 
of ill-paid foreigners or occupying the highest chair in the land. Perse- 
verance, integrity, ambition, and sociability are qualites that go to make the 
Amercan man par excellence, and the subject of this sketch is the fortunate 
possessor of these qualities. Engaged in a business in which opportunities 
are afforded to cultivate friends, Samuel C. Cohee has never failed to add 
every day to his list. His affability and his genial attitude toward the af- 
fairs of life make everyone associated with him more optimistic, and in this 
day and age such an influence is profoundly needed. 

Mr. Cohee was born August it, 1858, in Frankfort, Indiana, the son 
of Ezekiel and Lydia (Michaels ) Cohee. His father was a native of Preble 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. ^JT, 

count}', Ohio, and came to Clinton county in early manhood to follow the 
trade of farming. Mrs. Cohee was a daughter of Frederich Michaels, one 
of the earliest pioneers of this county. She died in 1880, leaving six chil- 
dren to mourn her loss. 

Samuel Cohee lived upon the farm of his birth until he was ten years 
old, and then, at that tender age, was forced to begin supporting himself. It 
was work or starve with the young lad, and he worked and worked hard. 
He began teaming, then worked in a feed store, and finally took up draying. 
In 18S8 he had accumulated enough of the world's goods to start a livery all 
of his own. Accordingly he did so, and today his livery is one of the best 
and most completely equipped in the county. 

In 1875 Mr. Cohee was married to Ida Bell Wilson, of Kempton, In- 
diana, and to them there have been born three children. 

Politically, Mr. Cohee claims affiliation with the Democratic party, 
and has always used his best efforts in their behalf. Fraternally, he belongs 
to the Improved Order of Red Men. 



WILSON T. COOPER, M. D. 

The man of medicine occupies a place in the world alone ; no other pro- 
fession or trade or business holds the sacred trust and the emotional beauty 
of his; his work is hard, but it is inspired, and filled to the brim with the 
Saviour's loving kindness. The Latin phrase, amicus humani generis, friend 
of the human race, stands as a motto to his life, and should be engraved upon 
the monuments of time as symbolical of the medical profession. Dr. Cooper, 
of our sketch, is one of the oldest practitioners in the state, having about 
reached the Psalmist's allotment of three score and ten, but he still continues 
active practice, and is regarded as a necessity by numerous families of Clin- 
ton county. 

Dr. Cooper was born on April 20, 1844, in Rush county, Indiana, and 
did not come to Clinton county until 1871. He was the son of Stanley and 
Lucinda (Ward) Cooper, natives of Kentucky, and both now being deceased. 
The father moved to Rush county, this state, when he was eighteen years of 
age. Like his son, the father was a physician of the old-time variety. He 
practiced in connection with farming and often underwent man)' hardships to 
attend to his patients. The mother was born in Bonne county, Kentucky. 



57'4 CLINTON COUNTYj INDIANA. 

Thirteen children were born to them, (he five now living being John \Y., 
Amanda, Morgan, Helen, Wilson and Annie. 

Dr. Cooper's common school education was received in the schools of 
Rush county, and he later attended the Cincinnati College of Medicine and 
Surgery, and graduated from that institution in 1871. He came to this 
county, to Scircleville, in that year and began his general practice, which has 
continued with ever increasing success until the present time. He owns a 
pleasant office and home in the town above mentioned. 

On November 30, 1876, Dr. Cooper was married to Alice Guffin, who 
was born in Rush county. Indiana, on February 12, 1853. and was the daugh- 
ter of Andrew and Clara (Brooks) Guffin. Her father was a native of 
Rush county and her mother came from the state of Ohio. Nine children 
were born to Dr. and Mrs. Cooper: Clyde (deceased). Pearl. Stanley. Lucy. 
Andrew (deceased), Wilson (deceased), Clara, Charles and Horace 

Dr. Cooper has always remained loyal to the Republican party, and was 
the first Republican ever to be elected to the office of auditor of Clinton 
county, which position he obtained in 1886. 



JONATHAN S. SNYDER. 

Prominent among the agriculturists of Clinton county is Jonathan S. 
Snyder, whose name is the caption of this sketch. He has made for himself 
an enviable reputation among the farmers of Johnson township by reason of 
his honest dealings and persistent endeavor. He has ever supported any 
enterprise which worked for the common good, and his support has been 
more than a moral one. He well deserves a place in the work here in hand,, 
and it is our pleasure to recount the few salient facts in his life history. 

Mr. Snyder was born November 23, 1864, in Tippecanoe county, In- 
diana, and moved to Illinois in 1867, living there until 1903, when he came to 
Clinton county, where he now resides. Such is the travels of the son of 
Emanuel and Lavina (Click) Snyder. Emanuel Snyder was born in the 
vear 1830 in Germany and he was brought to the United States when he was 
two or three years old, settling successively in Ohio, in R-artholomew county, 
Indiana, and in Tippecanoe county. He died August 20, 1909, after a life 
spent in farming. He was a Democrat in politics. The mother was born in 
1835. near Columbus, Ohio, and she is still living in Illinois. Eleven children 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 575 

were born of the union: Catherine (deceased), Simon 1'., Martha Laurence, 
Henry D., Emanuel M., Jonathan, William, Irma, Maude Puesy, Perry and 
one child that died unnamed. 

After a good common school education, Jonathan S. Snyder took up 
farming, which he has continued to the present day in a highly successful 
manner. He also raises Duroc hogs and Jersey cattle. He owns one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of fertile land in this township and it is all tillable, well 
tiled and fairly well fenced. Mr. Snyder has found time away from farm- 
ing to take an interest in the Masonic order at Hillisburg and to support the 
Democratic party. 

On March 2, 1S93, he was married to Clarissa Buckingham, who was 
born in Vermillion county, Illinois, on February 21, 1867, and was the daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Eveline (Childs) Buckingham. Four children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Snyder : Horace and Homer, twins, born November 
18,1893; Russell, born May 27, 1895; and Glenn L., born December 15, 
1897; died March 31, 1909. 



JAMES STORMS. 



The career of James Storms, one of the most substantial and successful 
agriculturists of Clinton county, has ever been such as to warrant the trust 
and confidence of the business world, for he has conducted his transactions 
on the strictest principles of honesty and integrity. His co-operation with his 
fellow men has been unfaltering, being the result of sincere interest and 
regard for the interests of his county. Such men as he is what the world 
needs for the rapid and sure economic development. 

Tames Storms was born on July 6, i860, in Decatur county, Indiana, 
and was the son of John W. and Nellie (Byram) Storms. John Storms was 
born in Ripley county, this state, and died here in 1903: the mother was a 
native of Decatur county. Both parents had a common school education, and 
the father was a preacher of the Baptist church and a farmer. He was a Re- 
publican. Seven children were born to the couple : Izara. Sarah (deceased). 
Rachel, James, Scott, Lavona and John. 

After the usual common school education our subject began farming, 
and he has followed this successfully until the present. He owns ninety- 
three and one-half acres of tillable, well tiled and fenced land in this county. 



57'6 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

and lias added thereto all of the latest improvements incident to agricultural 
science. Besides general farming Mr. Storms raises Jersey cattle and a 
common breed'of hogs. Before moving to Johnson township, Mr. Storms 
had lived in Tipton county and in Sugar Creek township, this county. 

Mr. Storms was united in marriage to Alary I 7 .. Cox in April, 1883. 
She was horn in Sugar Creek township, Clinton county, in March, 1865, and 
was the daughter of Amberson and Millie (Alexander) Cox, who were 
natives of the Blue Grass state. Four children have been horn to Mr. and 
Mrs. Storms: Stella, July 7, 1885; Alta. July 8, [887; Roy, July 6, 1889, now- 
studying for the medical profession; and Given, June 1, 1896. 

Fraternally, Mr, Storms is a member of the Independent Qrder of Odd 
Fellows, No. 482, at Kempton, Tnd. Religiously, he is a Baptist, and politic- 
ally is a Republican. 



LEW WALLACE GOOD. 

Prominent among the agriculturists of Clinton county is Lew Wallace 
Good ,of Jackson township. This county boasts of her farmers, and Mr. Good 
occupies a prominent place among them. He is a true type of the sturdy In- 
diana farmer, clean, educated, bard-working and possessing a large share of 
native wisdom. 

Mr. Good is the third in a family of eleven children, namely: Leona, 
Flora, Lew, William, Rosie, Lulu, Ora, Clifford, America, Goldie and Katie. 
He was born in Jackson township on the fifteenth day of February, 1873, be- 
ing the son of Phillip N. and Josephine (Abbott) Good. His father was born 
January 31, 1848, near the little town of Mulberry, Ind., and died January 13, 
1896. Phillip Good had the advantage of a common school education, and 
utilized the start he gained there in a life of usefulness. He remained a 
farmer until his death, and always clung to the policies of a Jeffersonian 
Democrat. Josephine Good, the mother, was Josephine Abbott before mar- 
riage, and was born in Boone county in the year 1840, also educated in the 
early schools of that county. She still lives happily in Jackson township, 
Clinton county. 

Lew W. Good has always followed bis favorite occupation, that (if farm- 
ing. Early in bis life, he lived in the southeastern portion of the township and 
later moved to an estate just north of Frankfort, where be learned the rudi- 
ments of the agricultural art. In 1912 be came to his present home. At this 
place, Mr. Good owns one hundred and fifty-three acres of excellent tillable 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 57/ 

soil, which he manages, with the aid of the newest and best improvements. 
The whole of die faun lias been carefully tiled by the owner, and the hams, 
fences, and equipment placed in ship-shape condition. Besides this land, Mr. 
Good own 1 - thirty-nine acres of equally, valuable land in Warren township. 
In addition to his general farming efforts, Mr. Good is a thorough student 
of animal husbandry ; making a specialty of Hampshire hogs, Shorthorn and 
Jersey cows. 

Although never actively engaged in politics or public life, Mr. Good 
follows in the footsteps of his father, and is a Democrat clear through. His 
political views are not modeled after the dictation of the party in power, but 
after his own judgment of good and just government. He is also an enthusi- 
astic and capable member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

On June 18, 1899, Mr. Good was married to Vannie Douglass, also of 
Jackson township. She is the daughter of Robert C. Douglass and Mary 
(Pickering) Douglass, and was born November 26, 1881. She received a 
comman school education in the county of her birth. To Mr. and Mrs. Good 
there have been born five children: Oscar, born January 3, 1900; Ada, No- 
vember 22, 1901 ; Robert, March 14, 1904; Marvin, February 20, 1906, and 
Ruby, February 19, 1911. 



WILLIAM A. DUNN. 



The gentleman whose name heads this paragraph is regarded as one of 
the most progressive agriculturists of Michigan township, Clinton county, 
where he has spent his life. His well directed efforts in practical every-day 
affairs, his capable management of his business interests and his sound judg- 
ment have brought to him prosperity and his life demonstrates what may be 
accomplished by any man of energy and ambition who is not afraid to work 
and has the perseverance to continue his labors in the face of many dis- 
couragements which may seem to arise. In all the relations of life he has 
commanded the respect and confidence of those with whom he has been 
brought into contact. 

William A. Dunn was born on the first day of the year 1851, in Michigan 
township, Clinton county, and was the son of Zeth and Elizabeth (Pruitt) 
Dunn, the father having been bom in 1818 in Jennings coutv, Indiana, and 
died August 12, 1856. He was a farmer and a Republican, and moved here 
after his marriage, also lived in Bartholomew county for a time. The mother 
(37) 



5/8 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

was born July 12, 1S26, in Bartholomew county. Six children were born to 
the union, namely: Maggie Clark, Mary Miller, William A., John, Albert, 
anil Louisa (deceased). 

Our subject received a small education in Bartholomew county and after 
his father's death he moved to the above county with his widowed mother 
and there they stayed until the fall of 1865. Since that time Mr. Dunn has 
remained a farmer, and at present owns one hundred acres where he lives, all 
of which is tillable with the exception of two acres, which is in pasture. The 
land is tiled and fenced in approved fashion, and Mr. Dunn has built his own 
home. Mr. Dunn also owns another small farm west of here. He raises 
Jersey cows, Poland China mixed with Chester White hogs, and common 
breed of horses. Politically, Mr. Dunn is a Democrat. 

On October 22, 1878, Mr. Dunn was married to Laura Ileaton, who 
was born in Forest township on February 25, 1856, and was the daughter of 
Sanford and Rebecca (Nixon) Heaton, natives of Rush county, Indiana. 
The father was a farmer and a Democrat. Mrs. Dunn received a common 
October 4, 1878, married Clifford Crawford; Pearl, born October 12, 1880, 
married Bert Wood; Dillard, born August 5, 1884, married Mabel Zerfas ; 
Artie, born February 24, 1891. at home; Denzel, born May 16, 1S93, and 
Vera, born July 13, 1896. 



CHARLES L. FEARNOW. 

One of the enterprising young agriculturists of Johnson township, Clin- 
ton county, who possesses the respect and good will of all who know him 
and is classed with the representative men of the township in which he lives 
is Charles L. Fearnow. Our subject comes of Virginian ancestry, and well 
may he be proud to trace his lineage back to such a source. In the develop- 
ment of the agricultural division of Clinton history, he has played a promin- 
ent part, and the good part of it is that his career of activity is just a begin- 
ning, for Mr. Fearnow is just in the prime of life. 

Harrison Fearnow, our subject's father, was born June 5, 1843, > n Mor- 
gan county, West Virginia, and during the time of the Civil war he came to 
Ohio. He escaped to Ohio to avoid the impressment of the rebel army who 
were forcing men to serve their cause. His military career was confined to a 
period of scout duty. Mr. Fearnow is still living in this townshp south of our 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. z,Ji) 

subject. The mother, who was Martha Goodnight, was burn June 4, 1848, 
in Fayette county, Ohio, and she is still living. Harrison Fearnow engaged in 
the merchandise business 111 Ohio fur several years and was very successful at 
the same. In connection with his father, our subject's grandfather, he built 
the first grain elevator handled by scoops in this part of Clinton county. Har- 
rison Fearnow is now living a retired life, spending his winters in Florida. 
Politically, he is a Progressive. Our subject is one of four children : Lily 
(deceased), Charles L., Leslie (deceased), and Roy. 

Charles L. Fearnow was born March 14, 1S72, in Highland county, 
Ohio, and later moved to Fayette count}', the same state, where the family 
lived until the subject was five years of age. Then they moved to Clinton 
county, Johnson township, and here Charles L. has lived ever since. He owns 
one hundred and seventy-six acres of fertile land in this county, all of which 
is in as excellent condition as improved scientific methods can make it. Mr. 
Fearnow carries on general farming, and raises Polled Durham cattle and a 
common breed of hogs. He built his own commodious home on the estate. 

Mr. Fearnow was married on September 20, 1894, to May Howe, who 
was born January 18, 1870, in Fayette county, Ohio, the daughter of G. W. 
and Cynthia (Goodnight) Howe, who were natives of Ohio. Mrs. Fearnow 
received a common school education in her youth. Seven children have been 
born of the union: Warren, December 2, 1895; Emil, December 27, 1897; 
Meryl, December 10, 1899; Ralph, March 13, 1901 ; Robert, July 26, 1903; 
Ruth, September 10, 1906; and Don, April 5, 1909. 

Religiously Mr. Fearnow belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and 
is a Progressive in political affairs. 



JOHN C. SHOCKLEY 



In the list of honored and successful citizens of Clinton county is the sub- 
ject of this review, who has here maintained his residence for nearly a half 
century, winning a definite and lasting success by means of the agricultural 
industry, to which he has devoted his undivided attention during the years of 
his active business life. His career has been without shadow of suspicion and 
his many friends and acquaintances will attest to his integrity in business deal- 
ings, and the magnetic personality which has won the esteem of his fcllowmen. 

Mr. Shockley was born September 8, 1862, in Tipton county, Indiana. 



580 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

and moved with his parents in iNo_) to Clinton county, where he now lives, 
forty rods from the county line, lie was the son of Daniel B. and Jemima 
(Mclntire) Shockle) The father was horn in Madison county, ()., and moved 
to Tipton county J this slate, after his marriage li< followed farming all oi 
his life, he passed from active to retired life at an old age. and now lives to 
enjoy the fruits of a life well spent. The mother was horn in the same 
count)' and slate as her husband. Roth of them were handicapped in the mat- 
ter of education, because in their day schools were scarce and what there 
were could not be called efficient. Six children were horn to them: A. J.. 
James A. (dec). John (_'.,. our subject ; Arsitta. Sarah E., and G. \V. 

All the education our subject was able to get was in the common schools 
near Kcmpton, Tipton county. His life resolved itself shortly after leaving 
school into that of an agriculturist. His hundred and seventy acres of land 
here in Sugar Creek township are all tillable and well tilled, and the home, 
built by. Mr. Shockley himself, is one of the best in the township. In addition 
to general farming he carries on the breeding of all kinds of fine stock. Mr. 
Shockley also has two hundred and sixty-four acres in Tipton county, all till- 
able, south of Kempton, Ind. 

Mr. Shockley was married on November n, 1882, to Mary D. Rector, 
who was born in 1 86 1 in Sugar Creek township, the daughter of Robert and 
Mary (Searcy) Rector. Her father was a native of Indiana, and the mother 
came from the state of Kentucky. Seven children were born of the union of 
Mr, and Mrs. Shockley; O. W., Opal, Nellie, Fay and Ray, twins, and Cecil. 

Fraternally, Mr. Shockley belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, lodge at Kempton. Religiously, he attends the Christian, church, and 
politically believes in the Democratic platform. 



LINCOLN CON. 

Among the representative agriculturists and public-spirited men of Clin- 
ton county, who, while advancing their own interests, have not neglected 
their duty to the community at large, is Lincoln Cox, the honored subject of 
this sketch. He possesses many fine traits of character which arc inherited 
from his father, who was one of the hardy pioneers of this county and a vet- 
eran of the Civil war. Mr. Cox is one of the best known farmers and business 
me nof this community, and together with his large material reward, makes it 
appropriate that we should give the details of his worthy life in these few 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 581 

pages. It is regrettable that more scope is not afforded for a treatment (if 
this man. 

Lincoln Cox was born February 7. 1858, in Sugar Creek township, Clin- 
ton county, and was the son of Walter E. and A L ill s ( Alexander) Cox. The 
father was a native of Kentucky, and moved to Clinton county in 1840 when 
a boy, and here lie has followed farming all of his life. He was Republican. 
He died in January, 1879. The mother was also born in the "dark and bloody 
'ground" country, and she still resides in Kempton, lncl. Ten children were 
born to the union, the eight living ones being: John P.. Lincoln, Alary E. 
Storms. Elias, Laura J. Carter, Almira. Flora, and Noah. 

Our subject received a common school education in the schools of Sugar 
Creek township, and then took up farming, which was destined to be his life 
work. He has also paid much attention to the breeding of fine animals. He 
possesses two hundred and sixty acres of excellent soil, very tillable and well 
tiled, with the .exception of fourteen acres which is in woods and pasture. The 
late improvements which dot the estate are all by the hand of Mr. Cox himself. 

Mr. Cox was married to Louie Longfellow on October 22, 1888. She was 
born in Tipton county, Ind., July II, 1863, the daughter of William and Lu- 
anda .(Eliason) Longfellow.. She received a common school education in her 
youth. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Cox there have been born four children : 
Raymond, Walter, Cleo, and Inez (dec). 

Politically, Mr. Cox is a Progressive. For a term beginning in 1900, he 
served as county commissioner., the period of his activities in this capacity ex- 
tending over three years. 



GEORGE S. BOYER. 



The name of Boyer has been signicant in the agricultural development 
of Clinton coUtny since the early history of the locality, when the courageous 
pioneers blazed their way into the forests and endured the hardships in order 
to establish a home that their children might have lives of happiness and pros' 
perity. Our subject's father was one of the loyal legion of settlers who 
found a habitation of Indians and animals in the Floosier territory, and with 
primitive tools cleared their settlements. George S. Boyer has continued the 
work inaugurated by his father, and has upheld the family reputation for 
honesty of purpose, sympathetic cooperation with others, and obedience to 
the laws of ethics which civilization demands. 



582 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

George S. Boyer was 1x>rn in Sugar Creek township, this county, on 
November 26, 1862, and was the son of Francis M. and Catherine (Day) 
Boyer. The life of the father and mother are treated at length in the last 
half of this review. The father still resides in the township of his son's 
home. 

The Sugar Creek township common schools afforded a limited education 
to George Boyer, but he made the most of their advantages, and then took up 
active work in agriculture. He has so continued ever since, and also takes a 
great interest in the breeding of fine stock, particularly Poland China hogs. 
He owns one hundred and twenty acres of fertile land which is tillable with 
the exception of ten acres, which is in timber. The land is well tiled and the 
beautiful home on the estate was built by Mr. Boyer. 

On April 7, 1888, Mr. Boyer was married to Cora McKinney, who was 
born November 28, 1868 in Sugar Creek township, the daughter of James C. 
and Josephine (Ward) McKinney, and received a common school education 
in her youth. She was called to her eternal rest on September 6, 1906, after 
a life of religious devotion and good works ; she was a member of the Chris- 
tian church. Four children were born to this first union of our subject: 
Mrs. Ada Goodnight, December 4, 1891; Ethel, December 4, 1894, died in 
1895; Reona, March 16, 1897, and Georgia, September 10, 1902. Our sub- 
ject's first wife's sister married a Mr. Wainscott, and they have one child, 
Wayne Roy, born October 25, 1895. Mr. Boyer has raised the lad and loves 
him as if he wene his own. 

Mr. Boyer was married the second time on March 6, 1912 to Martha E. 
Batman, who was born August 14, 1870 in Putnam county, the daughter of 
Thomas W. and Martha A. (Anderson) Batman, both of whom are deceased. 

Mr. Boyer belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Pickard, 
Lodge No. 321. He is a member of the Christian church and politically is 
a Republican. He was elected trustee of Sugar Creek township in 1908 and 
is still fulfilling the duties of that office with satisfaction to everyone. 

Francis M. Boyer was born February 7, 1836 in Decatur county, Ind., 
and was brought to Clinton county by his parents when he was only two years 
old. He was the son of Leonard and Amelia (King) Boyer, who were born 
and reared in the states of New York and Kentucky, respectively. Very 
little education could be had by these two, and the father immediately took 
up farming. He was a Republican by politics Six children were born to 
them: Louvica, Francis M., Nancy, Celia A., Robert, and one not named. 
Louvica and the latter are deceased. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 583 

Francis M. Boyer and the father of George S. Boyer, received the usual 
education of the day and then hegan fanning in Sugar Creek township. lie 
owns fifty-seven acres where he lives and continues general work with the 
breeding of good stock, including Poland China hogs. He also owns thirty- 
six acres of good land south of here in the same township. With the excep- 
tion of a little woodland, all of his ground is extremely tillable and is well tiled 
and fenced. Mr. Boyer is reported to be the oldest living resident of this 
township. 

Francis M. Boyer was married on October 20, 1859 to Catherine E. 
Day, who was born October 17, 1840 in Clinton county, O., and moved to 
Boone county, Ind., when but a child. She was the daughter of Sylvenus 
and Jane (Ferguson) Day, respectively natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio. 
The father was a fanner. Our subject's wife had a good common school 
education. Ten children were born to them, seven of whom are still living: 
Lewis (deceased), George S., Leander and Leonard, twins (the latter de- 
ceased), Jane, William, Emma, Julia, Noah (deceased), and Bertha. 

Mr. Boyer belonged to the Improved Order of Red Men at Pickard Mills 
and is the oldest member of the lodge at the present day. He was also a great 
Granger. Politically, Mr. Boyer is a Republican and at one time in his earlier 
day was very conspicuous in state politics. 



CLARENCE G. SNODGRASS. 

Clarence G. Snodgrass was born April 25, 1887 in Kirklin township, this 
county, the son of Garrett and Laura (Bridgford) Snodgrass. The father 
was born in 1838 in Hancock county, Ind., and all of his active life followed 
farming successfully. He was a prominent Republican and was interested in 
the affairs of the Christian church. He died October 18, 1907. The mother 
was bom October 7, 1851, in Marion county, Ind., and she is still living in 
the town of Kirklin. Three children were born of the union : Clarence G. ; 
Robert., born March 26, 1891, a graduate of Wabash College, now an assist- 
ant professor there; and Mary, born December 18, 1893, now living with her 
mother. 

Our subject was married May 9,- 1909 to Ethel Fulkerson. She was 
born in Clinton county, Nov. 17, 1890, the daughter of Charles and Flora 
(Isgrigg) Fulkerson and received a good common and high school education 



584 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

in her youth. Two children have been born to our subject and wife: Vera, 
February _'8. 1910, and Vangel, April 1, 1912. 

After finishing the common schools in Clinton county our subject at- 
tended Purdue University, and then removed to take up farming in Clinton 
countv. His course while in Purdue was the agricultural one, which has an 
international reputation. At present he lives on his mother's farm in Kirklin 
township, comprising about three hundred and twenty acres, two hundred and 
forty acres where he lives, and the remainder near Cyclone. Ind. Of the 
two hundred and forty, one hundred and sixty are tillable, the balance being 
in good pasture and second growth timber. The place is well tiled and 
fenced, and the home is of the most modern. Of the eighty acres near 
Cyclone, all is tillable but sixteen acres. Aside from general farming our 
subject raises and breeds stock. 

He belongs to the Masonic Order of Kirklin and religiously is a member 
of the Christian church. Politically, be belongs to the Republican party. 



WILLIAM STEPHENSON. 

In the death of the late William Stephenson, president of the P>ank of 
Rossville and one of Owen township's leading agriculturists, Clinton county 
lost one of its most energetic men of affairs, who, through a long lapse of 
years was prominent in the various circles in which he moved and whose 
potent influence for good will continue to pervade the lives of those with 
whom he came in contact. As the day, with its morning of hope and promise. 
its noontide of activity and accomplishment, its evening of completed and 
successful efforts, ending in the grateful rest and quiet of the night, so was 
the life of this good and honored man. His career was a long, busy and use- 
ful one, fraught with much good to himself, his family and to humanity, and 
his memory will long be revered by those who bad occasion to be associated 
with him in. business, public or social life. His activities in a material way 
added to his individual prosperity and to the welfare of the locality of his 
choice. Devoting the major part of his time and attention to (lie further 
development of his industrial interests, he never allowed the pursuit of wealth 
to warp his kindly nature, but preserved hi> faculties and the warmth of his 
heart for the broadening and helpful influence of human life, being to the 
pnd a kindly, genial friend, neighbor and gentleman whom it was a pleasure 




WM. STEPHENSON, DECEASED 






CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 5S5 

to meet and who, in every respect, deserved the high esteem in which he was 
universally held. 

William Stephenson was born November 8, 1840, in Butler county, 
Ohio, where he spent his earlier years, received his education and remained 
until after the close of the Civil War. when he removed to Clinton county, 
locating in Owen township; where the rest of his life was spent. He was a 
son of Samuel and Jane (Stewart) Stephenson, both natives of Ohio, where 
the)' «rew up, were educated and married and spent their lives, having never 
come to Indiana. The family of Samuel Stephenson and wife consisted of 
eight children, all now deceased but one; they were named as follows: John. 
William, our subject; Jefferson, James, Robert, Alexander, Nancy, the only 
one living, and "Emma. 

William Stephenson began life for himself as a school teacher which he 
followed with much success for a period of fourteen years, during which his 
services were in great demand. When the Civil War came on he proved his 
courage and loyalty to the Union by enlisting for service in the federal army, 
in which he proved to be a gallant and faithful soldier. His military career 
is given in detail in the sketch of Morton Stephen, son, appearing on another 
page of this volume. 

William Stephenson was married on October 2, 1866, to Emeline J. 
Brown, who was born in Carroll county, Indiana, where she grew to woman- 
hood and received her education and lived until her marriage. The date of 
her birth was October 16, 1848, and she was a daughter of Samuel and Let- 
tie M. (Sibbit) Brown, natives of Lehigh county, Pa. 

To "William Stephenson and wife five children were born: Samuel and 
Belve Retta, both deceased, and Morton, Lillian and James. 

Mr. Stephenson went to housekeeping in Carroll county and he farmed 
there about eight years, then came to Owen township, Clinton count, locat- 
ing where his son, James Stephenson now lives and he continued farming 
and stock raising on a large scale the rest of his life, becoming one of the 
leading general agriculturists of the count} - , at the time of his death, Jan- 
uary 10, 1912. He owned at that time a well improved and valuable estate of 
four hundred and fifty-seven acres, all in Owen township and in .one body. 
He built his own home, a large, modernly appointed and cozy dwelling, 
equipped with electric lights and other modern conveniences, where his widow 
now lives, owning one hundred and sixty acres roundabout. He was also 
president of the Bank at Rossvillc, which he assisted in organizing, was also 
a director in the bank at Sedalia which he helped organize. 

Politicallv, Mr. Stephenson was a stanch Republican and active in local 



586 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

party affairs. He was elected to a term as representative in the state legis- 
lature in 1892, and filled this responsible office with credit and satisfaction to 
his constituents. He was a worthy member of the Presbyterian church, and 
belonged to the Grand Army of the Republic at Rossville. Fraternally he was 
a member of the Masonic Order at Rossville and the Knights Templars at 
Frankfort, and, according to those who knew him well, he evidently tried 
to carry into his everyday life the practical usage of the high principles 
taught by this time-honored fraternity. 

Mrs. Stephenson is a lady of refinement and her beautiful home is 
known to her many friends as a place uf hospitality of an old-time flavor and 
she has a host of warm friends throughout the locality. 



FRANK GOSSARD. 



A history of the loyal native sons and representative citizens of Clinton 
county would not be complete should the name that heads this review be 
omitted. During a useful and successful life he has labored diligently, not 
only to promote the interests of himself and family, but also those of the 
general public, being one of those neighborly, altruistic, generous-hearted men 
whom to know is to admire and respect. It is to such men that this locality 
owes its rise from the primeval prairies to one of the choice agricultural sec- 
tions of the Hoosier state. 

Frank Gossard was born March 17, 1866, in Johnson township, Clinton 
county, and was the son of Jacob and Sarah (Vanorsdall) Gossard. The 
father of our subject was born in Fayette county, Ohio, in January, 1826, 
and he moved to Indiana before his marriage. He now lives with a daughter 
in Tipton count}', this state. His life, in the main, was spent in farming. In 
1849 he traveled to New York; taking a boat there he sailed to Panama, 
crossed the isthmus, caught another boat and went up to California in search 
of gold. Unsuccessful as were many others, he finally returned home after 
two or three years to Ohio. The mother was born in Ohio in the year 1836, 
and still lives in Tipton count)- with a daughter. Sixteen children were born 
to them; the eight still living are: Mary Holmes, Oliver, Frank, Ada Finney, 
James, Artie, Hattie and Hariy. 

Our subject, Frank Gossard, received his education in the common 
schools of Johnson township and immediately afterwards "went back to the 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 587 

soil," so to speak, beginning an agricultural life. Fanning has always been 
his main occupation, although he was connected for a while with the poultry 
business in Illinois. At one time Mr, Gossard raised Poland China hogs ;md 
Red cattle on a very extensive scale; cattle and hog feeding being a specialty 
with him. He owns one hundred and twenty acres of excellent soil in John- 
son township, all of which is tillable, well tiled and adequately fenced. Mr. 
Gossard built his home, which is modernly appointed in every respect. He 
also owns one hundred and sixty acres of land in Randolph county, on which 
land our subject's oldest son lives at this time. 

On September iS, 1887, Mr. Gossard was married to Olta Welshons, 
who was born in Johnson township, Clinton county, in June, 1870, the daugh- 
ter of Daniel and Tamer (Overman) Welshons, who were farmers of the 
community. Mr. Gossard's wife received a common school education in her 
youth. Six children have been born to them, namely: Bernard, Charlotte, 
Garrett, Ralph (deceased), Marcus, and Frank, Jr., (deceased). 

Fraternally, Mr. Gossard belongs to the Masonic order at Scircleville, 
and is also a member of the Improved Order of Red Men. Politically, he is 
a Republican. He ran for county clerk in 1910, but was defeated along 
with the rest of the ticket. 



MRS. MARTAH SCOTT. 



In the development of a county there are many forces. Primarily the 
people within the borders determine the progress, but other minor elements, 
such as resources, fertility of land, navigability, climate, and topography, are 
great factors. To take up this primal factor, the people, history has been 
apt to dwell more emphatically on the men. True they have shouldered the 
responsibilities, and fought and labored for a home, but behind them there 
has been an inspiration, a stimulus, in the person of the woman. She has 
endured the same hardships and faced the same dangers, adding a touch of 
loving-kindness which lightened the burdens of the pioneer, and made life 
worth living. Such a woman in the development of Clinton county has l>een 
Mrs. Scott, whose life we take pleasure in sketching briefly for the benefit 
of posterity and the inspiration to the noble women who will yet live. 

Mrs. Scott was born July 19, 1842 in Sugar Creek township, and was 
the daughter of John C. and Elender (Ward) Amos. Her father was born 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

in the state of Kentucky and moved to Indiana before his marriage, lie was 

a fanner all of his life and voted the Republican ticket. At one time lie was 
a trustee of Sugar Creek township. The mother was also a native of Ken- 
tucky and died in August, 1S96. The father died in 1891. Both parents re- 
ceived the education given by the limited schools of their youth, and lived 
happily and long in the midst of prosperity. Eleven children comprised the 
family, three — our subject, John B., and Thomas still living. 

Mrs. Scott received a common school education, supplemented by the 
training of a good and careful home. On March 21, 1875, our subject was 
married to John Cunningham, who was born in Randolph count), hid., in 
1842, and he died in 1882. Just one child, Grace, was born to them, April 1, 
1877, in Sugar Creek township. After a common school education she mar- 
ried, November 17, 1896, Andrew J. Merrill, who was born in Clinton county, 
July 5, 1875. Mrs. Scott now lives at her daughter's home. To her daugh- 
ter there have been bom eight children: Paul, September 8, 1897; Von, April 
6, 1899; Lily M.' April 3, 1900; Carl, May 18, 1902; John, July 4, 1905; 
William C, July 23, 1907'; George, September 25, 1909; and Charles, Octo- 
ber 1, 191 1. The)' carry on general farming on their estate of eighty acres, 
and the land is very fertile and tillable, producing a good yield every year. 
Mr. Merrill belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the whole 
family attend the Baptist church. / 

Mrs. Scott was married the second time to Samuel Scott, 1x>rn in Marion 
countv, Ind., in 1842. He was a butcher and stock trader by trade. He 
died February 4, 1893. 

Both of Mrs. Scott's husbands served throughout the Civil war and each 
made an enviable record. 



TAMES M. FLFTCHFR. 



Under the old-fashioned method of grain farming the rush of work was 
limited to a few months of the year, and the labor was made easier by the use 
of farm machinery. . Under the new diversified farming, and especially be- 
cause of the care of more live stork, farm work demands the farmer's whole 
time the year round; and consequently social life, in spite of rural telephones, 
has declined. The biggest problem nowadays is to gel sufficient help. Women's 
work on the farm has been eased by running water, washing machines, and 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 581) 

man) things, but on most farms it is still necessary fur the women to help 
with the general chores and some take part in the work of harvesting the 
crops in the rush season. One of the farmers of Forest township, Clinton 
county, who has so carefully studied out the problems of modern farming as 
to eliminate much of its drudgery for both himself and the women folks of his 
family is James M. Fletcher, who seems to make a good living at the minimum 
expenditure of labor. 

Mr. Fletcher was born on March 9, 1871, in the above named township 
and county, and here he has been content to spend his life. He is a son of 
Thomas B. and Susan (Ransopher) Fletcher. The father was born in 1843, 
and he was brought, when a child, to this locality where he grew to manhood, 
receiving such educational advantages as the early day schools afforded, and 
here he has lived ever since, being now a resident of Johnson township. The 
farm which he developed he also cleared, bringing it up from the virgin 
natural state. He has devoted his entire life to farming. Politically he is a 
Democrat. The mother of our subject was born in 1844, coming to Clinton 
county, Tnd., in early life. She, too, received a limited schooling. She is still 
living. Nine children have been born to Thomas B. Fletcher and wife, namely : 
Mandy, Molly, Cora, and James M. of this sketch, all living; and John, Effie, 
Mill)', deceased, and two others who died in infancy. 

James M. Fletcher grew to manhood on the home farm and there assisted 
with his share of the work. He received a common school education. On Feb- 
ruary 3, 1896, he was united in marriage to Dove Adair, who was born in 
Clinton, county in 1871. She is a daughter of James W. and Myra (B'urgett) 
Adair, both of whom are still living. Here Mrs. Fletcher grew to womanhood 
and received a common school education. 

To our subject and wife nine children have been born, namely: Dayton, 
Virgil and Vernal, born March 6, 1899; Ethel, Mamie; Kenneth, born June 
22, 1904; Lena, Edith and James Lester. 

Mr. Fletcher has always engaged in farming in his native township. He 
owns one hundred and thirty acres, all tillable but about five acres, which is in 
pasture and- timber, and his place is well tiled and otherwise well improved. 
He makes a specialty of raising Jersey cows, Duroc hogs, draft horses and 
Plymouth Rock chickens. 

Fraternally Mr. Fletcher is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows at Forest and the Improved Order of Red Men at Scircleville. Politic- 
ally he is a Democrat. 



59° CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JOHN WILLIAM WELL-MAN. 

The pioneers of Clinton indeed taught well Another of the younger 
generation of agriculturists who has learned well the lessons of thrift and in- 
dustry from his fathers is the subject of this short review. Mr. Wellman has 
accomplished great things during the comparatively few years he has been en- 
gaged in his vocation, and it is reasonable to suppose that he will, in the 
future, earn even a larger and better reputation for labor well placed. He is 
representative of the best class of the community which we call Clinton county, 
and to his friends, neighbors, and business acquaintances, he bears a name for 
altruism and charity, though stern if the occasion demands. 

John William Wellman was born August ro, 1872. in Sugar Creek town- 
ship, Clinton county, and is the son of John M. and Nancy Ann (Rav) Well- 
man. The father was born in Rush county, Inch, and later moved to this place, 
taking up the work of farming, which he followed the rest of his life. He- 
was a Democrat before the election of Benjamin Harrison, but at that time 
became a Republican, and remained so until his death in 1900. The mother 
was a native of Clinton county, and her worthy and beautiful life extended 
over the period from 1834 to 1890, fifty-six years. Both the parents received 
common school educations in the pioneer schools, which were mostly de- 
scribed by the word experience. Seven children were born of the union: 
James A., George (dec), Sarah E. (dec), Charles. John W., Thomas J., and 
Eliza I. 

John William Wellman attended the common and high schools, and then 
began to teach school in Sugar Creek township. He also taught in Johnson 
township, this county. After tiring of the pedagogic life, Mr. Wellman set- 
tled down to farming and has successfully carried on the same ever since, 
with general breeding in addition, paying particular attention to fine Shire 
horses. He owns seventy-four acres of very tillable land in this township, and 
has it all well tiled. The beautiful home on this land is the handiwork of Mr. 
Wellman himself. 

Our subject was united in marriage on September 3, 1908, to Tdona 
Keever, who was born November 10, 1881, in Johnson township, Clinton 
county, and who is the daughter of Samuel J. and Helen (Merritt) Keever. 
Mrs. Wellman received a common school education, and taught school about 
twelve years prior to her marriage. No children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Wellman. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 591 

Our subject is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
politically is a Democrat. 



JOHN WILLIAM HART. 

A history of Clinton county ran point with no more pride to. any of its 
sons than the subject of this brief review, John William Hart. Born of par- 
ents who came to this county when the land was covered with heavy timber 
and wild animals and Indians were the inhabitants. Mr. Hart retains those 
qualities which his forefathers possessed and enabled them to combat tlje many 
privations incident to settling a virgin country. Our subject has won the 
esteem of his fellowmen by following the dictation of the Golden Rule in 
every phase of life. His business, social, moral, and intellectual qualities are 
worthy of emulation by all, and it is safe to prophesy that, in the years to 
come, when he will be known as an old man, that his name will rank well up 
in the record of merit and accomplishment. 

John William Hart was born November 13, 1847, m Kirklin township, 
Clinton county, and was the son of John G. and Harriet (Wallace) Hart. 
John G. Hart was born in December, 1820, in the state of Pennsylvania, and 
moved to Indiana in 1837, settling in Clinton county. He followed farming 
all of his life, and was very successful. He was a Republican politically. The 
mother, who was Harriet Wallace, was a native of the Old Domniion, being 
born in Virginia. She first moved to the state of Ohio, and then later came 
to Clinton county, in company with her parents. She died June 15, 1872. 
The father died April 20, 1880. Five children were born of the union : David, 
Syrenis, Perkins and Cora, all deceased, and John W., our subject. John G. 
Hart was married the second time to Mary Dunn, and Cora was the child by 
this wife. 

John William Hart had the advantage of a good common school educa- 
tion in his early days, and settled down to a farming life immediately after 
leaving school. He owns one hundred and seventy acres of fertile and tillable 
land in Sugar Creek township; twenty acres of which is slightly inferior, but 
valuable nevertheless. The place is well tiled and he has made his own im- 
provements, which are of a high order. Mr. Hart carries on general farming 
and breeding. He has retired from active work on the farm, and spends his 
time in managing. Politically, Mr. Hart is a Progressive. 

On November 21, 1872, our subject was married to Frances Wright, who 
was born September 15, 1853, in Sugar Creek township, Clinton county. She 



59 2 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

is Ihc (laughter of John R. and Allie Wright, both of whom were from the 
state of Virginia. Mrs. Hart's sister, Daisy Bowls, lives at the home of John 
W. Hart. 

The union of our subject and wife has been without issue. 



WILLIAM P. BOYD. 



One of the business men of Colfax, Clinton county, who has learned 
the secrets of success in life is William P. Boyd, proprietor of a livery, sale 
and feed stable, also a dealer in carriages, buggies and wagons, a man widely 
known about the county and respected by all, for his dealings with his fellow 
men have ever been above board, straight from the shoulder out and based 
on the highest standards of business ethics, so that his patrons and customers 
are always well satisfied with the treatment which he uniformly accords 
them; in short, he believes in the old adage of living and let live. While pass- 
ing through life he does not believe in laboring solely for his own agrandise- 
ment, but in giving a neighbor a helping hand occasionally, which is the true 
spirit of brotherhood and the true source of happiness. 

Mr. Boyd was born in Montgomery county, Indiana, on a farm, August 4, 
1 85 1, and he spent his boyhood years on a farm, assisting with the general 
work there, and during, the brief winter months he attended the common 
schools of this locality. He is a son of John Boyd and wife. The father, born 
in Ohio in 1829, spent his life in general farming and stock raising, and was 
an honest, industrious man who was liked by all his neighbors. In 1853 he 
removed with his family to Clinton county, when our subject was two years 
old, and settled in a heavily timbered section, establishing there the future 
home of the family. He set to work with a will, being a man of grit and 
perseverance, and, in due course of time, he had cleared his land, had a good 
productive farm under cultivation and was raising an excellent grade of live 
stock. There the parents of our subject spent the balance of their lives, the 
father dying there in July, 1900, at the age of seventy-one years, the mother, 
in Lafayette, Ind., in the year 1907, at the age of seventy-six years. Five 
children, one son and four daughters, were born to John Boyd and wife. 

The subject of this sketch devoted the earlier y r ears of his life to general 
agricultural pursuits and met with a large measure of success from the start. 
He was owner of a finely improved and productive farm of one hundred and 
forty acres, three miles east of Colfax, known as the Valley Stock Farm, and 




W. P. BOYD AND FAMILY 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 593 

which was regarded as one of the choice farms of that section of the county, 
and abundant harvests repaid Mr. Boyd annually for his toil and good man- 
agement. But finally deciding to enter the business arena he removed to 
Colfax a number of years ago and is now operating one of the most popuklV 
livery, feed and sale stables in this section of the country, being well equipped 
in the way of horses, buggies, etc., to accommodate the traveling public. He 
is also a dealer in buggies, wagons and carriages, handling an excellent line 
of standard makes on which he has built up a wide and constantly growing 
trade with the surrounding country. His barn is near the Union station and 
convenient to the business center of Colfax. It is thirty-six by sixty feet, 
with an addition of fifty by sixty feet. His carriage room is twenty by sixty- 
feet. His aim is always to give hi smany customers honest and satisfactory 
treatment, his prices and terms always being reasonable. 

Mr. Boyd was married in February, 1901, to Delia Phillips (nee Isen- 
barger), who was born in 1857 in Clinton county, and is a daughter of George 
and Annie Isenbarger. Mr. Boyd had formerly been married to Marion 
Phillips. 

To our subject and wife one son has been born, Charles A. Boyd, now 
fourteen years of age. Opal Davis also lives with them. 

Politically Mr. Boyd is a Democrat, and is a member of the Church of 
God. Physically he is of large proportions, being five feet and eight inches 
tall and weighing two hundred and ten pounds, but is very active and a good 
business man and popular in Clinton county, where he has lived practically 
all his life. 



BERTRAM W. SWACKHAMER. 

An enumeration of the representative citizens of Clinton county, Indiana, 
would be incomplete without specific mention of the well known and popular 
gentleman whose name forms the caption of this sketch. A member of an 
old and highly esteemed family, and for many years a public-spirited man of 
affairs, he has stamped the impress of his individuality upon the community 
in which he lives and added luster to the honorable name which he bears, 
having always been scrupulously honest in all his relations with his fellow men 
and leaving no stone unturned whereby he might benefit his own condition as 
well as that of his neighbors and friends, consequently he has won the favor 
of a great number of Clinton county people where he maintains his home. 
(38) 



594 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Bertram Swackhamer was horn July 22, 1SS0, in Hocking county, O., 
the son of Frank and Delia (Quigley) Swackhamer, both natives of Ohio. 
The father moved to Indiana in 1884 and stayed here a number of years and 
then returned to his native state where the family stayed for about five years, 
then again came to Indiana. He is still living in Madison county, enjoying 
a hearty old age. The mother likewise is still living. Frank Swackhamer 1 
was a farmer all of bis life, and consistently remained an adherent of the 
Republican party. Four children blessed the union: Bessie, Bert, Clifford 
and Laura. 

The subject of our sketch was fortunate in receiving a common school 
education, and then, after he completed the scholastic phase of his life, he 
began the pursuit of general farming. In this capacity he has remained ever 
since. He also makes a specialty of stock raising, taking particular pride in 
his breed of Duroc hogs. He owns one hundred and eleven acres of very 
tillable land, all well tiled but about five acres. The place is in a fairly good 
state of improvement. At the present time Bert Swackhamer resides on and 
rents his father-in-law's farm. 

On August 17, 1899, our subject entered into matrimony, choosing for 
his helpmeet Jennie Bond, born in Kirklin township, June 22, 1881, the daugh- 
ter of George E. and Ella (Wells) Bond. Three children have come to the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Swackhamer: Josephine, bom in 1904: Mary, born 
in 1907; and Georgie, born in 191 1. 

Politically, Mr. Swackhamer is a Republican. He is affiliated with no 
fraternal organizations, preferring to give his entire attention to his home 
and family. 



J. W. WILLS. 

Conspicuous among the representative business men and public-spirited 
citizens of Clinton count}' is the gentleman whose name heads this review. He 
has made his influence a good one in Kirklin township, being a man of sterling 
worth, whose life has ever been closely allied with the interests of the com- 
munity in which he lives, and whose career has been that of a man of moral 
character, honesty, and excellent social qualities, and whose efforts have been 
for the betterment of the members of the Clinton county citizenship. 

J. W. Wills was born June 15, 1858, in Clinton county, Ind., the son of 
Charles and Nancy (Rice) Wills. Charles Wills was born in the Buckeye 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 595 

state in [831, and came here, when four years old, with his parents, lie died 
July 5, 1906. The mother was born and died in Clinton county. The father 
was a fanner in early life, but in later days became a tanner, lie was a Demo- 
crat. Twelve children comprised his family, the following are the ones now 
living: Abraham, M. E., J E., J. W., 1!. M., and H. F. 

J. W. Wills received a common school education in Kirklin township, and 
entered life in the livery business, which he still carries on in addition to other 
pursuits. 

Mr. Wills was united in wedlock to Clara F. McKinsey on December 3, 
1902, an Illinois girl, the daughter of John R. and America (Cassady) Mc- 
Kinscj No children have been born to '.hem. 

In 1906, Mr. Wills went into the hardware business and later added furni- 
ture to the hardware stock. He now owns a well appointed store that would 
be a credit to any Hoosier town. He enjoys a lucrative business and in turn 
aids in any enterprise that may be for the good of his townsmen. He owns 
the whole business block in which his store is located, besides his livery barn, 
his pretty and comfortable home, other business blocks, and thirty acres of 
good tillable land near Kirklin, Ind. 

Mr. Wills is a loyal member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
at Kirklin, and contributes liberally to the support of the chapter. 



WILLARD C. WILLIAMS. 

Among the successful, self-made men of Clinton county whose efforts 
and influence have contributed to the upbuilding and general business activities 
of their respective communities, the gentleman of this sketch occupies a con- 
spicuous place. Being ambitious from the first,' he met the various viccissi- 
tudes and discouragements with a resolute determination, and in due time rose 
to a prominent position in the industrial circles wherein he was associated, 
besides winning the confidence and esteem of those with whom he was brought 
into contact, and today he stands as one of the most prominent men in Clinton 
county and most influential in Kirklin township. 

Willard C. Williams was born on January 2, i860, in Kirklin township, 
Clinton county, and was the son of Allen and Mary D. (Harley) Williams. 
The father was a native of Indiana, being born in Henry county in 1812, and 
moved to Clinton county when a boy He died in 1886. The mother was 



59^ CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

born in the state of Virginia in the year 1820, and was brought by her parents 
to this state when a small child. She died in 1900. They had common 
school educations in their youth, and chose to follow the occupation of farm- 
ing throughout their lives. Seven children blessed their life, namely: jasper 
(deceased); Louisa (deceased); Marcello; Martha; Willard, and two who 
died in infancy unnamed. 

Our subject benefited by the common schools in Kirklin township and 
took up farming afterward as a life work. He has ever since labored in the 
fields of his fine one hundred and seventy-five acre farm in Kirklin township, 
and has accomplished much. He makes a specialty of breeding fine stock, 
chiefly Poland China hogs, in which particular branch he is an expert. His 
land is all tillable, about a hundred acres of the estate being now in valuable 
pasture land. He has added all the modern improvements to his farm and 
has a beautiful and efficient residence thereon. 

Willard Williams was married in September, 1880, to Katy R. Harding, 
the daughter of Samuel and Delilah (Thompson) Harding. (See sketch S. 
H. Thompson, brother to Delilah). Mrs. Williams received a good common 
school education in her youth in the schools of her county. Three children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Williams, namely: Mrs. Minnie Hendricks, 
born 1882; Charles B., born 1884, married Eva Sims; and Floyd, born 
February 7, 1890, married to Blanche Childers. 

Fraternally, Mr. Williams belongs to the Masonic Order and Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows, both lodges at Kirklin. He is a Republican and 
at one time held the office of road supervisor in his county. 



EDWARD EARL TOMPKINS. 

Statisticians and historical writers, in summing up the control of the 
country's resources, do not place the stock handlers of Wall street in the rank 
of masters, the motive power of the national prosperity, but they regard the 
agriculturist, the native tillers of the soil, as the ones who propel the nation's 
destiny.' Their products are juggled and financed in questionable manner, 
it is true, but it is with them, primarily, that the power is derived whereby 
the United States may stand as one of the richest and most productive of the 
world's agricultural countries. It is a pleasure to relate the details of one 



, ; 1 u._^ ._ 



CLINTON COUNTYj INDIANA. 597 

of these hard-working farmers, and the subject of this sketch is worthy of 
even more than the limits of this work will allow. 

Edward Earl Tompkins was born in Champaign count)-, Illinois, on 
October 27, 1881, the son of Stephen and Mary Ann (Besore) Tompkins. 
The father was born in 1844, in Hamilton county, O., and came to Indiana 
in September, 1910, and has since followed farming. They had three chil- 
dren, viz. : Minnie May, Edward E., our subject, and Luttie Orvalein. The 
mother was a member of the Christian church. The father is in politics, a 
Democrat. Both reside in Frankfort, retired. 

Edward E. Tompkins received his education in the county schools of his 
home, and later attended the high school. He came to Clinton county in the 
year 1908, to take up agricultural work, which he has followed all of his life. 
He formerly managed the excellent farm of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Kirklin township, belonging to his father and enjoys many advantages of his 
well kept and modern estate. It is all in the highest tillable condition with 
the exception of twenty acres which are in pasture. 

Mr. Tompkins was united in matrimony to Anna Carry Ford, a 
young girl born in Miami county, Indiana, September 20, 1880, the daughter 
of Lewis N. and Laura (York) Ford, and in Miami county she received a 
common school and high school education. One child has blessed the union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Tompkins — Edward Ford, born July 16, 1911. 

Fraternally, Mr. Tompkins is a member of the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias, both lodges in Frankfort. He is 
a member of the Christian church and votes the Democratic ticket. 



CYRUS M. HANE. 



The hand of the journalist is truly mighty. No matter how big or how 
little he may be, his well-aimed remarks in the town sbeet carry double weight, 
and therefore his mission and responsibility are great. He must be judicious, 
clever, fair, and ever promoting the interests of the people whom he serves. 
The Kirklin Journal is a newspaper devoted to the welfare of the Clinton 
county pople. and carries the name of being a clean, interesting, and modern 
publication. This has been largely due to the untiring efforts of the publisher, 
whose name heads this review, and who, by his energetic efforts toward the 
betterment of the community, has won the friendship and support of the 
countv as a whole. 



598 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Cyrus M. Mane was born June 8, 1842, in Harrison county, O. His 
father was a native of Maryland, and served in the Civil war in the First Vir- 
ginia Infantry of the Union army. 

Cyrus Hane received a common school education which was interrupted 
in 1861, when he was nineteen years old, by the outbreak of the war. Mr. 
Hane enlisted in Company D, Second Virginia Infantry, under Captain (jib- 
son. This regiment was afterward changed by the war department to the Fifth 
West Virginia Calvary. He served the Union cause valiantly for Ins full 
time and then was honorably discharged. On February 14, 1865, he re- 
enlisted in Company G, Second United States Veteran Volunteer- Han- 
cock's corps, and served until Feb. 14, 1866. Mr. Hane participated in the 
second battle of Bull Run and several other engagements. 

In 1865 Mr. Hane was married in Mary M. Chapman, who died in T882. 
On October 21, 1900, he was again married to Emma Stotts, an Indiana 
woman. He has one child, Daisy E., by his first wife, and she how resides in 
Knox, Ind. 

Mr. Hane moved to the Hoosier state from Ohio, and first settled in the 
town of Mitchell, at which place he took charge of the Mitchell Commercial. 
Later he went to Elwood, Ind., and established the Ekvood Leader, and then 
to Knox, Stark county, Ind., where he assumed charge of the Stark County 
Republican. After four years there, he again traveled to Vernon, Ind., and 
had control of the Vernon Journal. He purchased the Kirklin Journal in No- 
vember, 1902, and for ten years has managed it with great success. A year 
ago he became associated with E. T. Jones, and they formed a working part- 
nership which now exists. 

Mr. Hane belongs to the Free and Accepted Masons, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, and Grand Army of the Republic. He is 
a member of the Presbyterian church at Kirklin, and in politics is a Progres- 
sive. 

E. P. Jones, partner of Mr. Hane, was born March 6, 1872, in Jennings 
county, Indiana, the son of Thomas C. and Lydia S. (Alley) Jones. Thomas 
C Tones was a Welshman, having been born in South Wales, England, in 
February, 1819. He moved to the United States when but a boy and first set- 
tled in Baltimore, Md. Later be moved to Ohio, at which place he was mar- 
ried. He came to Indiana in 1854. and there died in the month of July, 1893. 
Lvdia S. Jones, the mother, was born May 8, 1831, in Ohio, and she died 
October 18, 1887. The father was a wholesale furniture dealer by trade and 
he followed this all of his life. In the spring of 1861, he joined the ranks of 
the One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Company 






CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. ^99 

A, and served until s865 a> a first lieutenant; he was then honorably dis- 
charged. Six children came to his family, four of whom are living. These 
four are: Margaret, Louise, Maud, and E. P. 

After receiving a common school education. K. I'. Jones made his start in 
a pharmacy college. He took a position with a drug company in Colorado, 
and afterward, for a space of six years, was connected with the Rocky Moun- 
tain Telephone company. He has been a capable printer all of his life, and 
worked at his trade in North Vernon, Ind., just before coming to Kirklin to 
go into business with Mr. Hane. 

Fraternally, Mr. Jones belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men, the 
Knights of Pythias, and the Free and Accepted Masons. He is a member of 
the Presbyterian church, and attaches himself to the Democratic party. 



ROSWELL J. STOWERS. . 

The following is a sketch of a plain, honest business man, who by straight- 
forward methods and strict regard for the interests of his patrons has made 
for himself a reputation and won much prestige in the business circles of Kirk- 
lin, Clinton county. Not in the least seeking for fame, he has, however, many 
qualities and accomplishments to his credit which are worthy of emulation, 
and he commands the respect of all his fellows and their posterity through 
the sterling characteristics he possesses, heightened by his natural modesty and 
desire to escape the public gaze. The name of Roswell, our subject, is well 
known in Clinton county and spoken of with words of commendation. 

Roswell J. Stowers was born January 2-5, 1871, in Kirklin township, 
Clinton county, the son of Travis and Luanda ( Wolfe) Stowers. Travis 
Stowers was born in Virginia May 22. t8ii, and moved to Indiana in 1828, 
settling first in Johnson county and then in Clinton county in 1832. He died 
May 27, 1901. The mother was a native of Kentucky and died September 
16, 1888. Travis Stowers was a farmer all of his life, and made a distinct 
success of it. Politically he was first a Democrat, and then as a matter of 
principle, changed to the Republican party. Mr. Stowers was married three 
times. By his first wife he had fourteen children, and by his second, five. The 
latter five are: Stephen T., Disa W., Sarah A., Roswell J., and Lucinda. No 
children were born to the third wife. 

Our subject was fortunate in his younger days in getting a little better 
education than the ordinary youth could obtain in the common schools of the 







Goo 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 



county. He lived on his father's farm and learned thoroughly the agricultural 
art, although he never saw fit in his later days to put his knowledge into prac- 
tice, that is, to any extent. Mr. Stowers went into the fence and post busi- 
ness in 1897, and in 1905 he moved to Kirklin, and is now operating a coal, 
fence and post business under the name of Roswell J. Stowers. He owns his 
yards and his home and office, besides fifty-seven acres of vcrv good soil on the 
outskirts of Kirklin. 

On September 10, 1893. Mr. Stowers was married to Anna F. Trout, 
who was born in Boone county, Ind., the daughter of Marion and Elizabeth 
(Cockcrham) Trout. 

Nine children were born to Mrs. Stowers: Ruth, Jan. 12, 1894; Paul, 
Nov. 15, 1895; Carrie, Aug. 27, 1897; Lucile, Feb. 25, 1900; died Oct. 18, 
1901 ; Mary, Dec. 3, T901 ; died July 14, 1903 : Russell, June 14, IQOA: Geneva, 
March 25, 1908; Genave, May 30, 1910, and Vonita Berniece, June 1, 1912. 

Mr. Stowers is a member of the Wesley Methodist Episcopal church, and 
is a very active member, being the superintendent of the Sunday school. Po- 
litically, he regards the Prohibitionist party as the best. 



MORTON STEPHENSON. 

Every human being either submits to the controlling influence of others 
or wields an influence which touches, controls, guides or misdirects others. 
If he be honest and successful in his chosen field of endeavor, investigation 
will brighten his fame and point the way along which others may follow with 
like success. Consequently a critical study of the life records of the gentle- 
man whose name forms the caption of this sketch and his honored father may 
be beneficial to the reader, for theirs have been careers of usefulness and 
honor. 

Morton Stphenson, farmer of Section 33, Owen township, Clinton 
county, was born December 13, 1871, in Carroll county, Indiana, but the 
major portion of his life has been spent in Clinton county, he having been but 
two years old when his parents brought him here, where he has since resided. 
He is a son of William and Emeline (Brown) Stephenson. The father was 
born November 8, 1840, in Butler county, Ohio, where he spent his earlier 
years, removing to Carroll county, Indiana, after the close of the Civil War, 
in which he served as a member of the Fourth Ohio Cavalry, in which he 
enlisted on October 7, 1861, under Ceptain Lew Wilson. He proved to be a 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 601 

most faithful and gallant soldier fur the Union and saw much hard service, 
participating in numerous hard-fought battles. He was honorably discharged 
and mustered out of service October 31, 1864, under Captain Neill. He was 
promoted to corporal November 10, 1861, and later to sergeant, which rank 
he held when he was mustered out. William Stephenson was a well educated 
man and he taught school for a period of ten or fifteen years most acceptably, 
but fanning constituted his chief life work, and he prospered with advancing 
years, becoming one of the most substantial and influential men in his com- 
munity, and at the time of his death he was president of the Rossville Bank, 
which he helped organize. He also assisted in the organization of the Sedalia 
Bank. He took an active interest in public affairs and was a political leader in 
the county for many years. He was honored by his constituents by being 
elected as representative to the state legislature, serving during the sessions 
of 1892 and 1893 in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself and to 
the eminent satisfaction of all concerned, doing much for the general good of 
his locality. He was always an uncompromising Republican. Religiously, he 
was a stanch member of the Presbyterian church, and he held his membership 
in the same church from the time he came to this state until his death, which 
occurred on January 10, 1912, when past his three score and ten. He was a 
grand old man whom to know was to honor and admire, and he did much 
good in his community in a material, civic and moral way. He was a member 
of the Masonic Order, and belonged to the Grand Army of the Republic. 
His wife was born October 16, 1848, in Carroll county, Indiana, where she 
grew to womanhood, received a common school education and was married. 

To William Stephenson and wife five children were born: Samuel and 
Belve Retta, both deceased ; Morton, of this review ; Nancy L., and James A. 

Morton Stephenson grew to manhood on the home farm and he worked 
there during the summer months when he became of proper age. He attended 
the common schools during the winter months. On November 14, 1894, he 
married Maggie G. Shaw, who was born in Ross township, Clinton county, 
August 27, 1874. She is a daughter of P. W. and Catherine (Dellinger) 
Shaw. The father was born May 26, 1835, in Cumberland county, removing 
from there to Clinton county, Indiana. Here he married, and here he spent 
the rest of his life engaged in farming, his death occurring on Februar)' 9, 
1907. Mrs. Stephenson's mother was born May 22, 1840, in Cumberland 
county, Pennsylvania, and came to Clinton county, Indiana, at the age of 
twelve years, and she is still living on the old homestead in Ross township, 
Clinton county. 

Ten children were born to P. W. Shaw and wife: Mary B. (dec), Grant, 



. 



602 CLINTON COUNTY, IX DIANA. 

E, I... Florence X., James \Y., Maggie G., our subject's wife; Daniel R., John 
F., Harriett, and Jesse (dec). 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Stephenson: G. Loyal, 
born August 7, 1805. attending high school in Rossville; Opal Zoe, born 
April 22, 1900, and William Glenn, born May 7, 1911.. 

Mr. Stephenson has always engaged in general farming and stock rais- 
ing and has met with ever-increasing success. He started out on bis father's 
farm and there got a good foothold, and since his marriage he has lived on 
his present finely improved and productive farm of one hundred and eighty-. 
five acres in Section 33, Owen township. All of his land is tillable but about 
fifteen acres, and on it stands a pleasant and well furnished home and sub- 
stantial outbuildings He pays considerable attention to livestock, buving and 
selling large numbers of hogs and raising a good grade of general stock. 
Politically, he is a Republican and religiously a member of the Presbyterian 
church. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order of Red 
Men and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



WALTER S. MERR1TT. 



The record of the subject of this sketch is that of a young man, who, by 
his own efforts, has worked his way from a comparatively humble position to 
one of influence, honor, and esteem in the community in which he has chosen 
to live. His career has been one of unceasing industry and perseverance, and 
the notable methods he has employed have won for him the admiration and 
confidence of his fellow citizens of Kirklin township, Clinton county, whose 
interests he has always tried to promote and whose friendships he has always 
been careful to cultivate. 

Walter S. Merritt is a native of Clinton county, born at Scirclevillc, Ind., 
on January 2, 5883, the son of L. C. and Dorcas L. (Pruitt) Merritt. Our 
subject's father was born in Indiana in 1854., and spent bis entire life at 
Frankfort. His mother was also a native of Indiana. L. C. Merritt was a type 
of a successful man. He began life as a farmer, and by the time he had lived 
in Frankfort a number of years had won for himself a fine reputation as a 
gentleman and business man. He was clerk of the Clinton circuit court for 
eight years, finishing his term in 191 2. For six years be was a trustee. Five- 
boys completed his family, namely: E. B., Walter, John P., Hubert, and 
Lawson. 



CLINTON' COUNTY, INDIANA. 603 

Walter Merritt received a common school education and continued after- 
ward in the high school. He worked on the farm besides his work in school, 
and later went into the circuit court clerk's office with his father. He re- 
mained in this office for seven years. For one year he was with the State 
Board of Public Accounts, and then came here to Kirklin, where he took a 
position as cashier of the first National Bank. He is now holding the same 
office in a very acceptable manner. This bank was a private one for many 
years, then became a state bank, and, in 1908, it became a national bank with 
a capital stock of twenty-eight thousand dollars and a surplus of seven thou- 
sand. The president is C. B. McClamroch and the vice-president is A. F. Col- 
grove. 

Mr. Merritt belongs to the Free and Accepted Masons, the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, and the Knights of Pythias. He is a Republican in 
politics. 

On November 29, 1907. Mr. Merritt was married to Bessie Hicks, a girl 
born in Clinton county on December 15, 1887. She is the daughter of William 
and Margaret (Ballard) Hicks, both natives of Indiana. 



GEORGE MUNDELL. 

Occasionally, in glancing over the worthy citizens of a community, one 
perceives certain figures that stand out as types of social and industrial lead- 
ership. Such a one is, by necessity, versatile and skilled, and helpful to his fel- 
lows. George Mundell may be called a representative of this type. As a 
teacher, carpenter and farmer, Mr. Mundell has made his long life a benefit, 
a pleasure, and a satisfaction to himself, as well as to the others who have been 
so fortunate as to cross his kindly path. 

Mr. Mundell comes from old Kentucky stock, from the hardy settlers in 
the Blue Grass mountains. He is the son of James and Elenore (Rogers) 
Mundell, and was born on the seventh of December, 1848, in Jackson town- 
ship,. Clinton county. His father, James Mundell, was horn in the Kentucky 
hills in the year 1817. l>efore civilization had the opportunity to work much 
improvement among the people, ft was life governed by the long rifle, and 
justice, more often revenge, was quick. In this man-making life James Mun- 
dell was reared. Later he married Elenore Rogers, who was born in Clinton 
county, Indiana, in 1827, and who died in the year 1898. James Mundell 
moved to Indiana in 1829, when the well-cultivated fields of what is now 
Clinton county were but a wild and dense forest, populated mostly by Miami 



604 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ami Pottawatomie Indians. James Munclell died long before his wife, leaving 
this life in 1855. lli» life was consistent with the full-blooded race he sprung 
from. Always a farmer, and an old time Democrat, lie succeeded in life de- 
spite the handicap of a poor education. There were no schools in Kentucky at 
that time, and the intelligence acquired by children had to come from the par- 
ents. The practical quality of such training had its value, and is now the 
ideal sought by modern educational theorists. There were five children in the 
family, George Mundell being the first. The others were: Isaiah, horn May 
28, 1850, died March, 1903; Elijah, horn October 9. 1851 ; Benjamin, born 
April, 1853, and Joseph (dec). All of the children lived to have families of 
their own. 

Something of the strenuous training of the parents was imparted to 
George Mundell, but he had the advantage of a common school education, and 
a period of attendance in the Frankfort high school. On the fifteenth day of 
October, 1873, Mr. Mundell was married to Mary A. Hodge. She was born 
in Jackson township, Clinton county, August 17, 1852, of Scottish parentage. 
She was the daughter of James and Mary (Sims) Hodge. Both the father 
and mother were born in Scotland and were married there, having two chil- 
dren. The parents came to Terre Haute, Indiana, in 1836 and later settled 
in Clinton county. Mary Hodge was one of a family of ten children, four of 
whom are still living. Mary Hodge was educated in the common schools. To 
George Mundell and wife have been born eight children, namely : James 
Austin, born July 11, 1874, died May 10, 1881 ; Pearl R., born February 13, 
J876; Flora Alice, born March 2, 1878, died April 9. 1879; Walter E., born 
October 5, 1881 ; Minnie May, born August 30, 1883; Robert R., born August 
1, 1885; Lilas A., born October 20. '889, and Lenora, born March 2, 1892, 
died July 15, 1897. 

Mr. Mundell partially abandoned farming for a period of five years and 
taught school in Clinton county. His endeavors in the educational world were 
not limited to the public schools, for he has always been a worker in the 
Christian church Mr. Mundeir was a trustee and teacher in the Sunday school 
for thirty-one years. Such a record is enviable. Mr. Mundell also is a car- 
penter and he has followed this trade for many years. When Mr. Mundell 
moved to his present farm of sixty acres, he built his own home. The place is 
not too pretentious, but is comfortable and adequately fitted for an enjoyable 
and interesting life. Mr. Mundell now gives most of his time to general farm- 
ing, his land being very fertile and easily worked. 

Fraternally, Mr. Mundell is a stanch member of the I. O. O. F. and is 
also affiliated with the Masons. Politically, he is a Democrat. 



CLINTON COUNTY. INDIANA. 605 



ROBERT 11. IRWIN. 



The statement is often made that invariably the Indiana farmer is pros- 
perous, and that his city brother is variabh so. There is a reason for this seem- 
ing paradox, and it lies in the nature of the work in the rural, compared to the 
work in the urban community. In the former, the man progresses slowly, 
surely, and making every ounce of energy count for his profit. The life is 
slower, but not sluggish, and has a sure ultimate end. The latter type of man 
progresses by starts and bounds, short investments, devious business channels, 
a success and a failure all in a day, and nothing certain. The race resembles 
the fable of the tortoise and the hare. Perhaps one of the most typical of the 
"sons of the soil" is Robert II. Irwin, of Clinton county, Jackson township. 

Mr. Irwin was born April i, 1852, in the county in which he now lives. 
He was the son of Allen and Rosana (Cray) Irwin. Allen Irwin was a native 
of Ross county, O., where he was born on July 4, 1821. He moved to Indiana 
when he was still a boy and lived there until his death in 1887. Mont- 
gomery county was the first place Mr. Irwin settled when he came from the 
Buckeye state. While there he played a prominent part in the political game of 
the county, being a justice of the peace for eight years. He preferred the Re- 
publican political principles consistently. In his later life, Mr. Irwin culti- 
vatd his very excellent farm in Jackson township. Rosana Irwin, the mother, 
was born in Indiana in the year 1821, and died in 1865. Like her husband, she 
received a common school education. To them were born seven children, of 
whom Robert was the fourth. The others were : Sarah M., Albert (dec). 
Julia (dec), Joseph (dec), Mary (dec), and Percy (dec). 

Robert H. Irwin had a good common school education, beside two years 
spent in the academy at Frankfort, Ind. Ori December 25, 1874, he was mar- 
ried to Isabelle Douglas of Ohio, but she died in the autumn of 1883. Two 
children were born to them, both of whom are now dead. They were Mabel O. 
and Anna B. On the fifteenth day of December, 1887, Mr. Irwin married the 
second time, to Mary M, Hoover, an Indiana girl. She was born March 15, 
1854, the daughter of Enos and Ruhama (Shaw) Hoover. She received her 
education and lived her early years in the city of Frankfort: By this second 
marriage. Mr. Irwin has two children: Clarence, born 1889, died 1890, and 
Ralph H, born 1891. 

Besides his agricultural work, Mr. Irwin has taught in the schools of 
Clinton county- At the time of his second marriage he discontinued this work 
and devoted all of his time to the two hundred and forty acres he owns in 
Tackson township. This land is of the most excellent quality. The place has 



606 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

been well tiled by the owner and is in perfect condition, and a model estate to 
view. Mr. Irwin has a pretty and commodious house and there he has lived 
since 1882. 

Mr. Irwin has been an indefatigable church worker all of his life. At 
present he is a member of the Presbyterian church which he attends regularly. 
For several vears he was a deacon of the same institution. 



AMOS E. BARNETT. 

The subject of this sketch is a representative farmer and business man of 
Jackson township, Clinton county, and he is known as one of the alert, pro- 
gressive and most successful agriculturists of this section of the Hoosier state. 
In his efforts in his chosen occupation he has not allowed himself to follow 
blindly in a certain rut, but has studied and experimented, and thus has re- 
ceived the greatest returns for his untiring efforts, and at the same time so 
shaping his course as to win the confidence and respect of the community in 
which he lives, being a man of square business methods and a strong advocate 
of honest commercialism. 

Amos E. Barnett was born June 26, 1862, in Kirklin township, Clinton 
county. His parents were John and Nancy (Points) Barnett, both of whom 
claim Rush county, Indiana, as their birthplace. John Barnett's parents came 
to Indiana from Kentucky in the early days, traveling overland ; at that time 
William Barnett's father was a lad of ten years. John, Jr., traveled to Sugar 
Creek township, living there a very short time. He subsequently moved to 
Kirklin township and engaged in general farm work until 1868. In. that year 
he moved to Frankfort, Indiana, and entered the dry goods business. During 
the first year of his residence in that city, John Barnett was deprived of his 
wife, Nancy, by death. To them there had been born a family of eight chil- 
dren, namely: Malissa, Charles (dec), Mrs. Mary Maish, Ola (dec), Josie. 
Amos E., and William E. (twins), and Dora. 

Mr. Barnett began his use fid life with mental equipment furnished by the 
simple but effective public schools of his home county. On March 6, 18S4, he 
was married to Laura Cunningham, a Clinton county girl, the daughter of 
Nicholas and Kate (Majors) Cunningham. Her parents are still living in 
Tackson township, Clinton count}-, and are numbered among the oldest couples 
of the localitv. Eaura Cunningham received a common school education the 
same as her husband. On July 2. 1906, Eaura Barnett was removed by the 



^ , 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. fiO/ 

hand of death, leaving- an enviable recur-! as a womanly woman. She was very 
active during her life in the work of the Presbyterian church at her home. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Harnett eighl children were horn, seven of whom are still liv- 
ing. They are : Floyd, born January i . [885 : Mrs. Jessie Jarrell, horn April 22, 
1887; Mrs. Fay Strange, horn December 26, 1889; Fronie, March 14, 1893: 
Marie. September 19, 1806; Gertrude. March 14. 1899. and Doris, born March 
4, 1906. 

Amos F. Barnett moved to Jackson township, Clinton county, in the year 
1878. In this place, Mr. Barnett owns one hundred and sixty acres of excellent 
soil, well tiled and cultivated by his skillful hand. Besides this work on his 
estate, Mr. Barnett constructed his very comfortable home. The land is divided 
into two sections, one of eighty acres. w here he lives, and another of like area 
south of the first. 

Mr. Barnett belongs to the Frankfort Lodge of the Improved Order of 
Red Men, also is a member of the Woodmen of the World at the same city. 
Mr. Barnett believes in the principles of the new political party launched in 
TQI2, and does not hesitate to proclaim that he is a Progressive. 



CHARLES W. BRIDGES. 

Among the representative farmers of Clinton county is the subject of this 
sketch, who is the owner of a fine farm in Jackson township, and is carrying on 
the various departments of his enterprise with a discretion and energy which 
are sure to result in a definite success. Having always been a hard worker, a 
clever manager, and a man of economy, and being fortunately situated in a 
prosperous farming community, it is small wonder that he stands in the front 
rank of the agriculturists of his region. 

Charles W. Bridges was born in Hamilton county, O., on November 9. 
1858, being the son of Fimer C and Ellen (Jackson) Bridges. Elmer 
Bridges was a native of Ohio, being born in Hamilton county. He served 
valiantly in the Civil war with an Ohio regiment, and there met his death. 
Ellen Bridges, the mother, was born April 27, 1840, and now lives at New- 
port, Kentucky. Elmer Bridges, while he lived, was a farmer, and, politically, 
believed in the Republican party. Three children were horn to Mr. and Mrs. 
Bridges; namely, Charles, Frank, and Wesley. 

Charles W. Bridges was married the fust time to Susan May Baughman 
on September 16, 1880. She was born in Clinton county. Ind. On October 6, 






6o8 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 



1896, her death occurred. On March 30, 1898, Mr. Bridges married his sec- 
ond wife, who was \nna Hoover, a Clinton county girl, born February 4. 
1856, being the daughter of Enos and Ruhama ( Shaw) Hoover. 

From Hamilton county, O., Charles Bridges moved to. Clinton county, 
Ind., in the year October 6, 1870. Here he remained until 1889, when he re- 
turned to his native state. For six years he remained there and then made 
the return journey to Clinton count)-. Mr. Bridges entered the grocery busi- 
ness in Frankfort for a period of two years. In 1808 he moved to his farm in 
Jackson township, where he now lives in company with his wife. However,' 
feeling the weight of active care of his place, Mr. Bridges rents his farm and 
leads a retired life. There are forty acres in the farm, all tillable and well 
drained. The latest improvements have either been added personally or under 
the direction of Mr. Bridges. Besides farming and other pursuits mentioned. 
Mr. Bridges, in his versatile and interesting way, has engaged in fruit grow- 
ing enterprises and the truck business. 

Mr. Bridges belongs to the Woodmen of the World in Frankfort, and in 
politics is a Prohibitionist. He is a member of the Presbyterian church at 
Prairie Center, of which he is an elder and clerk, besides being superintendent 
of the Sunday school. 



AMOS P. HARLAND. 



Clinton county has had few better farmers or more loyal citizens than 
the Harlands of whom Amos P., of Owen township, is a most creditable 
representative. They have tried to keep well abreast of the times in all that 
pertains to general agricultural pursuits and it has been noticed that the land 
which they liave tilled has retained to a remarkable degree its original fertility 
and strength of soil and in some instances been made better. It is such men 
as they who have brought Clinton county up to a par with the best in the 
Hoosier state. 

Amos P. Harland was born on May 22, 1853, at Colfax, Perry town- 
ship, Clinton county. He is a son of James M. and Sarah A. (Purner) 
Harland. The father was born Jutte 21, 1821, in Monroe county, Kentucky, 
and when nine years old,' in 1830, he came with his parents to Clinton 
county, they being thus among the early pioneers. Here he grew to manhood 
and when the Mexican war came on he enlisted for service in 1846, fighting 
gallantly for his country until the close of the war. He seemed to be born 
for a military career and remained a soldier. In 1854, he was commissioned 



_ i - L 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 609 

captain, and when the Civil war broke out he became first lieutenant in the 
One Hundredth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was later promoted to 
captain of Company I, of that regiment, for meritorious service at the battle 
of Missionary Ridge. His first wife, Sarah Ann Punier, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, and her death - occurred in 1857. He was later married to 
Keturah Jones nee Bates, who is now deceased, but outlived her husband 
some time. Of this second union, there were horn two children, Charles 
and Retta, both living at this writing. Five children, four of whom are 
living, were born to Captain Plarland's first union; Rachael J., Amos P., of 
this sketch; Mary E., Sarah A., deceased, and John M. 

Amos P. Harland grew to manhood on the farm and he received a com- 
mon school education. On August 2J, 1877, he married Delilah E. Miller, 
daughter of George and Delilah (Tinkle) Miller, who was born in Owen 
township, Clinton county, April 2, i860. Here she grew to womanhood and 
received a common school education. The union of our subject and wife has 
been without issue. 

Mr. Harland moved from Perry township to Owen township, with 
his parents when he was a boy and here he has resided ever since, except from 
1880 to 1895, when he lived in Carroll county. He has always engaged 
in farming, and is the owner of fifty-seven acres of good land where he lives 
and on which he has a good set of buildings. He built his own home. He 
raises Shorthorn and Jersey cattle and Poland -China hogs. 

Politically, he is a Republican, and fraternally, he belongs to the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men at Moran. While not a member of any church he 
attends and supports the Methodist Episcopal church. Like his father be- 
fore him he bears a good reputation. 



WILLIAM E. BARNETT. 

In summing up the biography of such men as William E. Barnett, the 
impression comes that a life of subdued usefulness, no display, hut real sincere 
work, is the most satisfactory, and the pleasantest for the subject to contem- 
plate as the autumn days of life come. Mr. Barnett is still a young man, in 
spirit and body, and his capable services rendered to the community in u hich 
he lives have earned for him the esteem, the admiration, and the loyalty of a 
host of friends. Mr. Barnett and his large family are known in every house- 
(39) 



.^_ „ — : , — __ — ^ . __ _ 



6lO CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

hold in Clinton county, and his agricultural methods are spoken of in excel- 
lent terms by liis fellow farmers who are, after all. the best critics. 

Mr. Barnett is the son of John and Nancy (Points) Barnett, and was burn 
in Kirklin township, Clinton county, on June 26, 1862. John Barnett claims 
Rush county, Ind., as his birthplace and June 5, 1827, as the day. His parents 
were John and Bertha (Ames) Barnett who came to Indiana from Kentucky 
in a very early day, when John Barnett was ten years old. William Barnett's 
father was married on March 19, 1848, to Nancy J. Points, a young girl of 
Rush county, Ind. John Barnett traveled to Sugar Creek township, where he 
lived just a short time: he then went to Kirklin township and took up general 
farming work until 1868, then moved to Frankfort. Indiana. In that interest- 
ing Lit\ , Mr. Barnett engaged in the dry goods business. During the first year 
there Mr. Barnett suffered the loss of his wife, Nancy. To them had been born 
a large family of eight children. They are Malissa, Charles (dec), Mrs. Mary 
Maish, Ola (dec), Josie, Amos E. and William E. (twins), and Dora. 

William Barnett began domestic life on March 3, 1885, when he married 
Anna Moore, a young girl born in Jackson township, Clinton county, on No- 
vember 9, 1866, being the daughter of Thomas and Martha (Major) Moore. 
Thomas Moore is still living at the ripe old age of seventy-six years. He was 
born April 27, 1837, in the state of Indiana. Martha Moore, born October 29, 
1842, is also still living and enjoying excellent health. Anna Moore, before 
marrying Mr. Barnett, lived with her parents and went to the common schools 
of her county. To William Barnett and wife there have been born seven chil- 
dren. They are: Ethel, born October 3, 1888, married to Grover Dearth; 
Glenn, born June 1, 1890, still residing on farm and single; Ralph, born No- 
vember 5, 1892; Mary, born February 22, 1896; Maurice, born November 6, 
1888, died January 13, 1904; Harold, born February 8, 1902, and Helen, born 
November 17, 1907. 

The subject of this sketch started life with a good education from the 
public schools. Agriculture held the most fascination for him and he plunged 
into the work with a vim that has resulted in an elegant farm of one hundred 
and twenty acres of very tillable land in Jackson township, Clinton county. 
Mr. Barnett has improved his estate until it now is one of the best in the sur- 
rounding country, being well tiled and in condition to give the best yield. The 
owner is an enthusiastic stock breedei and delights in exhibiting his Poland 
China hogs, Jersey milch cows, and Percheron horses. 

Mr. Barnett is a loyal member of the Improved Order of Redmen, Frank- 
fort lodge, and also a member of the Frankfort local lodge of the Woodmen 
of the World. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 6l I 

Politically, Air Harnett is a Republican. He has since 1910 been serving 
on the advisory board of Jackson township. lie was road supervisor at one 
time for a period of two years. 

Mr. Barnett is active in the work of the Presbyterian church at Prairie 
Center, being at present an elder. 



JAMES M. ALLEN. 

There is something picturesque about the Hoosier pioneer, something 
strongly suggestive of primal power. That they came here when axes were 
needed to clear a space for a home, that they started the forces of progress, 
arouses our imagination, it is true; but there is that ineffable charm about 
them, heightened by time, that romantic picture of their life which makes us 
abhor hot city streets and which more strongly arouses our admiration and 
respect. These hardy men of the frontier are disappearing rapidly, but many 
are left who may relate of the stirring and doubtful days of the early nine- 
teenth century. As the Haddons, the Fairfaxes, the Beatties stood for Vir- 
ginia, so might the Allen family stand for Indiana, particularly Clinton county. 
James M. Allen is descended from this family, and his presence today places a 
landmark in the history of the state. 

James M. Allen is the son of Stephen and Mary (Ross) Allen, and was 
bom in Washington township, Clinton county, December 30, 1837. Stephen 
Allen moved from Butler county, O., in 1829 to the little t6wn of Jefferson, 
Washington township, Clinton county, being one of the first settlers in the 
county Previous to his migration to Indiana, Mr. Allen had been educated as 
well as the log schoul houses in Ohio could afford. After moving to his new 
home, Mr. Allen began in earnest to farm and, until his death on September 4, 
1878, continued that business. Until the Buchanan administration, Mr. Allen 
was a Democrat, but upon the formation of the Republican party he became 
a Republican, and renin ined so. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Stephen Allen, four of whom, Rachel, James, David, Almeda, are still living. 
Mary (Ross) Allen, the mother, was born in Ohio on October 5, 1804, and 
died February 13, 1876. She married Stephen Allen February 24, 1825. 

James Allen received his education in the public schools, and took up 
farming immediately after leaving there. October 2, 1867, marks the date of 
his marriage to Martha M. Koontz, a girl of Washington township, Clinton 
county, and daughter of George and Catherine (McNutt) Koontz. To them 



(>I2 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

have been born seven children, Ella, Mabel, Catherine, Bertha, Blanche, Lau- 
rence, anil Jennie. All of them are living". 

James Allen has fanned in Clinton comity since his youth. In (867, just 
after the turmoil of civil war days, lie moved to Jackson township. There Mr. 
Allen possesses two hundred acres of the best soil in Indiana, with a good, 
substantial home place upon it and complete ami modern equipment to aid in its 
management. Mr. Allen also owns eighty acres of other valuable land near his 
present home. In 1906 he moved, wiili his family, to Antioch, where he has 
since lived a retired life. 

Mr. Allen does not have any fraternal affiliations, but claims brotherhood 
with the Republican party, as his father did before him. 



JOHN II. BURFORD. 



From various pars of the Hoosier state good citizens have come to Clinton 
count)" and established permanent homes. Very few , comparatively speaking. 
have cared to move back to where they came from or to some otber locality, 
having found here all that they desired to make life worth living. This has 
been especially true with farmers, for here they have found as fine a soil as the 
state affords and good roads and railroad facilities, in fact, all that goes to 
make a civilized community. One of these gentlemen who is deserving of spe- 
cial notice here is John II. Burford, for many years a successful merchant, now- 
farming in Owen township. 

Mr. Burford was born October 3, 1849, m Harrison county. Indiana, on 
the Ohio river. He is a son of Cary and Ann (Shield) Burford. The father 
was born April 5, 1806, in Kentucky, and as a child, went with his parents to 
Floyd county, Indiana, where he grew to manhood. He married in Harrison 
county, Indiana. Later he moved there and engaged in the mercantile business. 
He subsequently moved to Illinois where he spent the rest of his life, dying in 
1879. The mother of the subject of this sketch was born in Tennessee, Feb- 
ruary 22, 1806, near the city of Nashville. Cary Burford devoted most of his 
life to the mercantile business with success. Politically he was a Democrat up 
to 1861, after that was a Republican. His family consisted of twelve children: 
Mary Jane. Catherine C, Margaret I'., Elizabeth and Marion, all deceased, 
and Jessie M., Carrie S., Nancy H., William T., and James C, all living. The 
eleventh child died in infancy unnamed. John Tl., of tliis sketch is the 
youngest. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. \ 613 

John II. Burford received a common school education. On November 23, 
1880, he married Martha Mcrrifield, who was born December i_>, 1849, in Mc- 
Lean county, Illinois. She is a daughter of Otha and Providence (Conoway) 
Merrilield. She spent her girlhood in Illinois and received a common school 
education. 

Two children have been horn to Mr. and Mrs. Burford: Ortha R., born 
September 16, 1883, now assisting his father in operating the home farm; and 
Clara C, horn in 1887. 

"Mr. Burford began life for himself in the mercantile business, which he 
followed with very gratifying results for about twelve years, but for some time 
he has been devoting his attention exclusively to general farming and stock- 
raising. He owns one hundred and sixty acres of valuable and well improved 
land in Section 11, Owen township, all tillable but fifteen acres, which is in 
woods. He built part of his home and all his buildings are substantial and con- 
venient. He keeps a good grade of livestock, feeding large numbers of cattle 
and Duroc hogs. He is very comfortably fixed and owns a standard make, five- 
passenger automobile. Politically he is a Progressive, and is an intelligent 
voter, keeping well informed on current events. 



HARRY R. PAULEY. 



Among the younger generation of farmers in Owen township, Clinton 
county, none seem to be more painstaking or ambitious than Harry R. Pauley, 
and, judging from what he has already accomplished, we may well expect him 
to rank among our leading agriculturists in future years. He believes not only 
in keeping at work, but in laying his plans well and in adopting the best of 
modern methods of agriculture. He is a student of the best agricultural jour- 
nal and also a student of mother nature, being ever a close observer, and noting 
carefully whatever may tend to serve his purposes. 

Mr. Pauley was born in Jackson township, Clinton county, May 13, 1883. 
He is a son of Allen A. and Susan J. (Maish) Pauley. The father was born 
September 1, 1857, in Jackson township, this county. The mother was born 
March 9, 1861, in Center township, Clinton county, and here they grew to 
maturity, were educated in the common schools and were married. They have 
devoted their lives successfully to general farming, and are now living in 
Frankfort. They have had four children born to them : Mrs. Myrtle Goeke, 
May (Ticen) Catron, both still living. 



614 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Harry R. Pauley grew to manhood on the home farm and he worked with 
his father there when growing up. He received a good common school educa- 
tion. On October 6, 1907, he married, Artie M. Catron, who was born May 21, 
1889, in Clinton county. Here she grew to womanhood and was educated in 
the public schools of her home community. She is a daughter of Jacob and 
May (Ticen) Catron, both still living. 

Four children have been born to our subject and wife, namely: Dorothy 
is deceased; Ruby is living; Ralph is deceased, and Wayne A. is the voungest 
child. 

Mr. Pauley began farming when but a boy and has continued in this 
vocation. In 1907 he removed from Jackson township, this county, to 1 loward 
county, Indiana, where he lived until 19] 1, engaged in farming. In that vear 
he returned to Clinton county and located in Owen township, where he now 
lives and where he owns a good farm of eighty acres, which is well improved 
and under a good state of cultivation, and on which stand a substantial set of 
buildings. He raises Shorthorn cows, Poland-China hogs and Norman horses. 

Politically he is a Republican, but is not an office seeker, and in religious 
matters he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



SANTFORD SHEETS. 



It is a good sign when so many of the residents of a county are found to 
have b°«en born within its borders. It indicates that they have found right at 
home all the oportunities necessary for the gratifications of their ambitions 
in a business, political and social way and it also indicates stability. One 
is reminded that "A rolling stone gathers no moss." That young man is 
the wises* who, when conditions will permit, remains in his native locality 
and addresses himself to tk? improvement of conditions he finds there and 
to his personal advancement along such lines as he may choose, selecting that 
for which he is best fitted by nature. 

Santford Sheets, farmer of Warren township, Clinton county, was born 
here October 8, 1855, and he has remained here and become a successful and 
good citizen. He is a son of Jacob and Delilah (Huffarl Sheets. The father 
was born in Augusta county, Virginia, March 20, 1830. He was five years 
old when his parents removed from the Old Dominion and located in Frank- 
fort, Clinton county, and here he grew to manhood, received his education and 
spent the rest of his life engaged in agricultural pursuits. His education 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 615 

was limited. He purchased eighty acres of land in Warren township, for 
which he paid two hundred and fifty dollars which he had earned by work- 
ing at twenty-five and fifty cents per day. He cleared ten acres, to fence 
which he carried rails on his back lie continued to work hard, the years 
brought success, and he became very comfortably established. Politically, 
he was first a Whig. He enlisted for service in the Civil war, in 1862, but 
served only about six months when he became ill and was discharged for 
disability. He returned from the war a Democrat. He reached the advanced 
age of eighty-three years, dying on March 6, 1913. The mother of our sub- 
ject, who is still living on the old home place here, being now advanced in 
years, was born in Augusta count}, Virginia, November 16, 1835 Her 
parents were among the early settlers of Clinton county. 

Seven children were born to Jacob Sheets and wife: Henry, Santford, of 
this sketch; Milton, Noah, Elizabeth and Ida M., all four deceased, and Adam. 

Santford Sheets grew to manhood on the home farm and he received 
a common school education, rather limited. On October 30, 1879. he married 
Priscilla Beard, who was born in Clinton county, October 10, 1857, and 
here she was reared to womanhood and received a common school education. 
She is a daughter of Martin and Delilah (Orbs) Beard, both parents being 
now deceased. 

To our subject and wife ten children were born: Oden, born December 
14, 1880, married Ola Ham; Roy, born October 16, 1882, married Goldie 
Armstrong; Maud, born in 1884; Russell, born September 20, 1886, married 
Nellie E. Wilson; Blanch, born December 30, 1888; Grace, born April 25, 
1890; Claude, born January 17, 1894; Fay, born 1896; Cleo, born April 29, 
1899, ar) d Leona, born December 27,, 1903. 

Mr. Sheets has always farmed and has always made his home in his 
native township. He is now owner of a valuable and well improved place 
of two hundred and sixty acres on which he carries on general farming and 
stock raising on an extensive scale. Forty acres of this place lies in Michigan 
township, the rest in Warren township. It is all tillable except about sixty- 
five acres. He built his own home which is on an equality with the best in 
the township and he has other good buildings on the place. He raises 
a general breed of live stock in large numbers. 

Politically, Mr. Sheets is a Republican and has been more or less active 
in local party affairs. In 1912 he made the race for treasurer, but was 
defeated in the landslide. He belongs to the Masonic order at Beard, and he 
is a member of the Methodist Protestant church. 



6l6 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JOHN H. CRUM. 

To be a native of the Old Dominion, the "mother of presidents" has 
always been deemed an honor and every Viginian is ready 1o make known the 
fact that he first opened his eyes to her fair skies. He takes a great pride 
in his family tree. And this is not strange for that great state has been the 
cradle of the nation from its early settlement. It has produced scores of the 
nation's greatest men, Presidents, statesmen, generals and literary men. Her 
sons and daughters have been noted for their chivalry, their gallantry, and 
their genuine culture from the first, and she is a state of almost unbounded 
resources as well as one of our most picturesque from a physical standpoint. 
One of these worthy sons is John H. Crum, well known farmer of War- 
ren "township, Clinton county, who is a scion of an excellent old Southern 
family. He was born in Roanoke county, Virginia, March 24, 1859. He ' s 
a son of William M\ and Elizabeth ( Kropff) Crum. The father was born April 
•' 9, 1833, in Franklin county, Virginia, and he died August 28, 1913. The 
mother was born March 23, 1836, also in Virginia, and her death occurred on 
December 9, 1886. Wiliam M. Crum subsequently married Catherine Crum, 
'also a native of Virginia. She is still living. These parents grew to maturity 
in their native state, were educated and married there, and there Mr. Crum 
learned the carpenter's trade which he followd in connction with farming 
• through his active life. His family consisted of twelve children, ten of whom 
are still living, namely: Mrs. Lucy J. Sheets, Martha E. Sheets, John H., 
of this sketch; Christopher J., Silas W., Wilbert Calvin, Winfield W., Minnie 
E., Emma F. and Andrew A. 

Tohn'H. Crum grew to manhood on the home farm in his native state, 
and there he received a public school education. He remained there until 
'■ 1866 when he moved to Missouri, remaining there a year, then returned to 
■Putnam county, and in 1874, came to Clinton county, locating in Warren 
-township. In 1877, -he went to Kansas where he remained until August, 
l 1880, when he came back to Warren township, Clinton county, and here he 
i has been engaged continuously in farming and stock raising. He owns one 
"hundred and sixty acres of well improved and productive land, eighteen acres 
of which is in woods. He made his own improvements and has a good home. 
He makes a specialty of Shorthorn cattle, Duroc, Hampshire and Poland- 
China hogs and general purpose horses. 

Mr. Crum married on December 17, 1885, Elizabeth J. Sheets, who was 
born March 1, 1866, in Warren township, Clinton county and here she grew 
to womanhood and received a common school education. She is a daughter 












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CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. OI7 

of Jacob and Delilah (Alborn) Sheets, a sketch of whom appears on another 
page of this work. The death of Mrs. Crum occurred on October 21, 1907, 
after a helpful and happy married life of twenty-two years. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Crum twelve children were born, namely: Francis 
Earl, June 26, 1886; Qurence R., December 10, 1888; Charles D., December 
17. 1890; Walter W., November 1, 1892; Jacob M., May 26, 1894; Tolin 
R., November 30, 1896; Nancy May. December 29, 1897; Artie F., Septem- 
ber 27. 1899; Clifton D., September 23, 1900; Chalmer J., January 25, 1902; 
Neva O., June 21, 1904; and William H., October 15, 1907. 

Fraternally, Mr. Crum is a member of the Masonic order at Beard. 
Religiously, he is a member of the Methodist Protestant church, and polit- 
ically, he is a Democrat. At the present time he is township assessor. He 
has also served as justice of the peace and as constable. As a public servant 
he lias discharged his duties most faithfully and to the eminent satisfaction of 
the people. 



JOHN R. BEACH. 



Most men are doing well if they make a pronounced success of any one 
thing in this world where there are failures and failures in every vocation, and 
when we see a rnan who has succeeded at several lines of endeavor we at once 
stamp him as a man of rare business acumen and foresight, sound judgment 
and industry. John R. Beach, well-known elevator man and agriculturist of 
Cambria, Owen township, Clinton county, is such a man. He followed mer- 
chandising, the grain business, farming and stock raising all with gratifying' 
results, and he ranks today among the substantial, progressive and influential 
men of this section of the county of which this history deals, and of which he 
has ever been deeply interested, doing whatever he could to further its inter- 
ests either in a material or civic way, and, being a man of unquestioned in- 
tegrity he has enjoyed from the outset the good will and respect of all with 
whom he has come in contact. 

Mr. Beach was born March 5, 1855, in Boone county, Indiana, near the 
town of Mechanicsburg. He is a son of Caleb S. and Mariah (Roseboome) 
Beach. The father was born March 5, 1814, in Ohio, where he spent most of 
his life, removing from the Buckeye slate to Boone county, Indiana, in 1854. 
The mother of our subject was born in Butler county, Ohio, and there grew up 
and spent her early life. To Caleb S. Beach and wife eleven children were 
born: Joseph H, Mary, Catherine, Martha. Jane and Addie, are all deceased; 
Sarah, Clarkson H, Emma, John R, our subject, and Ananias. 



6l8 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

John R. Beach received a common and high school education, attending 
high school at Lebanon for one term. On February 2, 1875, lie married Ella 
Davis, daughter of Ephraim and Jane (Downing) Davis. The father was 
born in Boone county, Indiana, August 13, 1853, and he devoted his active 
life to farming. Mrs. Beach received a good common school education. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Beach seven children have been born: Hallie. Cecil 
Clyde, Luther, Zora M., Roscoe, Opal G.. and Walter C. All these are living. 

Mr. Beach began life for himself on the farm where he remained until 
January 1, 1876, when he went into the mercantile business at Mechanicsburg, 
he following it for thirteen years and enjoying a large trade. Then he moved 
to Thorntown, this state, and bought grain one year, then went into the hard- 
ware and implement business there, which he followed with his usual success 
for a period of twelve years. In 1900, having traded his stock of hardware 
for a farm, he moved to Forest, Indiana, and operated a farm near there five 
years, then came to Cambria, Clinton count)-, and purchased the elevator and 
twenty-five acres of land nearby. He also owns ninety-three acres east of Col- 
fax and one hundred and fifty-five acres west of Winamac, Ind. He devotes 
most of his attention to his elevator and does a large and growing business, 
which extends over a wide territory. It has a capacity of twenty thousand 
bushels. He buys and sells all kinds of grain and is one of the best-known men 
in this line of business in this section of the state. He also sells clover and other 
seeds. He buys and feeds large numbers of sheep annually. 

Politically he is a Democrat. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias at 
Thorntown, and religiously is a member of the Methodist church. 



JOHN SHEETS. 



In Owen township, Clinton county, lives John Sheets, another of the old 
soldiers whom it is a delight to honor. They are getting fewer and fewer in 
numbers and their march is not as quick and full of meaning and fire as it was 
fifty years ago, when they were fighting for the perpetuity of the Union. But 
it thrills one to see them in their old uniforms, with their tattered flags flying 
and their forms bent as they hobble along on their canes at reunions, or on Me- 
morial Day or on the Fourth of July. And how interesting it is to hear them 
tell the story of the dreadful hardships they endured in the hospitals or on the 
harrassing marches, or in the battles and skirmishes, or in the prison hells of 
the Southern Confederacy. But their time is short now, so all persons should 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 6lQ 

join in honoring them for the sacrifices they made when they were young 
and full of the love of life, but which was offered free on the altar of their 
country. 

John Sheets was born August 13, 1S42, in Union township, Clinton 
county. He is a son of Samuel and Catherine (Shaffer) Sheets, who came to 
this section of the Hoosier state when it >vas a wild stretch of forest and un- 
known to the world in general, or at least very little known, and here estab- 
lished the future home of the family, The father of our subject was born in 
Virginia, as was also the mother, and there they grew to maturity and were 
married. Subsequently they removed to Clinton county, where they spent the 
rest of their lives. Both have long been deceased, the mother dying November 
20, 1871. The elder Sheets was a German and he could not read English. He 
devoted his life to farming, was first a Democrat and later a Republican. His 
family consisted of eleven children, three of whom are still living, namely : 
John, of this sketch; Andrew, and Mrs. Rebecca Ryan. 

John Sheets grew to manhood on the home farm and he received a com- 
mon school education. On August 20, 1862, he enlisted in Company K, Sev- 
enty-second Indiana Volunteer Infantry, under Captain Collins, and later he 
served under Captains Brown and Mclntire. He spent three years in the army 
and took part in some of the fiercest engagements of the war, including Hoo- 
ver's Gap, Chattanooga, and the many battles in the memorable siege of At- 
lanta, but was not under Sherman. He went back with General Thomas to 
Nashville. He proved to be a most faithful soldier for the Union, and was 
honorably discharged July 6, 1865. 

After his return home from the army Mr. Sheets resumed farming, which 
he has followed ever since. He owns a valuable place in Owen township, con- 
sisting of eighty acres, all tillable but two acres, and it has been well improved. 
He built his own home. He makes a specialty of raising Shorthorn cattle and 
Chester White hogs. 

Mr. Sheets was married April 13, 1866, to Lovina E. Harris, who was 
born in Wayne county, Indiana, April 6, 1843. She is a daughter of Jonas and 
Isabelle (Horsman) Harris. The father was born December 23, 1815. 

Nine children have been born to our subject and wife: Edward, born 
March 21, 1867; Newton, January 13, 1869; Albert, November 24, 1870; 
Oscar, November 8, 1872; Oliver C, October 2j, 1874; Nancy, September 9, 
1876; Belle, November 12, 1878: Amanda, July 4, 1880; John B., December 
22, 1884. They are all living and well situated in life. 

Mr! Sheets is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Also a mem- 
ber of the Masons and G. A. R. He is a Republican in politics. 



^ 2 ° CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JOHN \Y. THOMAS. 

Owen township, Clinton county, ran boast of a number of native horn 
fanners who, by their thrift, perseverance and good management, have forged 
to the front rank of Clinton county argiculturists, and of these the name of 
John W. Thomas, now living in retirement, should be included, as all will 
agree who know him well and have had occasion to observe his methods of 
farming and stock raising which have been of the best and most advanced, and 
have therefore rendered it possible for him to spend his old age quietly and 
surrounded by all the comforts of life. 

Mr. Thomas was born in the above named township and county, January 
4, 1859, on the farm where he is now residing. He is a son of Purnal K. and 
Eliza (Merrick) Thomas. The father was born in Ohio, April 25, iSjS, and 
there he grew to manhood, his wife having also been a native of that state. 
They were married in Franklin county, Indiana, and soon after they removed 
to Clinton county, establishing the future home of the family in what is now 
Owen township, and here they worked hard to develop a farm from the wilder- 
ness. His first wife dying in 1865, the elder Thomas later married Elizabeth 
Anderson. Six children were born by his first wife and four by his second 
wife. All of the first six are living, namely: Levi, Mrs. Helen Catron. William 
D., Indiana H.. John \Y., and Laura M. The children by the second marriage 
were Sarah N., Jennie Belle. Purnal A., and Hughy B. 

Purnal K. Thomas was a Republican in his earlier life, later a Democrat. 
He devoted his entire active life to general farming and was one of the sub- 
stantial men of his community. 

John W. Thomas grew up on the home farm where he worked bard when 
he became of proper age, and he received his education in the district schools. 
On February 20, 1883, he married Eda E. Ricker, who was born in Michigan 
township, Clinton county, April 23, 1864, and here she was reared to woman- 
hood and received a common school education. She is a daughter of Tames 
and Amanda (Popejoy) Ricker. The father was born May 21, 1855, in the 
state of Tennessee, from which he came to Clinton county in an early day and 
here developed a good farm by his industry. Here he still resides, making his 
home with his children, being now advanced in years. His wife was born 
August 30, 1838, in Indiana, and her death occurred October 6, 1905. 

The union of our subject and wife has been without issue. 

Mr. Thomas began farming for himself when a young man and this has 
continued to be his chief life work. He has prospered with advancing years 
and is now owner of a productive and valuable farm of three hundred and 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. ()2\ 

fifty-five acres, all in Owen township, all tillable hut about seventy-five acres, 
which is in good timber and blue grass. His land is well tiled and otherwise 
well improved, and he has a commodious and attractive home and substantial 
outbuildings. He carried on general (arming and stock raising" on an ex- 
tensive scale lor many years and accumulated a comfortable competency. He 
devoted much of his attention to buying, feeding and selling livestock of vari- 
ous kinds. His farm is now rented, lie merely overseeing it in a general way. 
Politically he is a Democrat, ami religiously a Universalist, and is a 
trustee in the local church. 



A. S. CAMPBELL. 



The biographer has learned that a great number of Owen township's 
farmers were born and reared within her boundaries, and we are glad to note 
that this is the case, because it shows stability, a trait that all people must 
possess who would win in the battle of life in any vocation, farming being not 
by any means the only one. It also shows that this is a fine township from 
every standpoint, else her sons would not have cared to remain here, but 
would have sought more promising fields elsewhere. Among the number of 
progressive native born citizens of this township who are devoting their brawn 
and brain to tilling the soil the name of A. S. Campbell should certainly be in- 
cluded, as all who know him well will readily acquiesce in such a statement, the 
reasons being too obvious to need comment here. Suffice it to say that he came 
of one of our excellent pioneer families, who redeemed the county of Clinton 
from the virgin wilderness. 

Mr. Campbell was born in the above named township and county on Sep- 
tember 22, 1850. He is a son of Mark and Agnes (Barclay) Campbell. The 
father was born in January, 1S18, in Pennsylvania, and there also the mother 
was born in 1822. There they grew to maturity, receiving limited educational 
advantages in the old-time schools, and there they were married, removing 
soon thereafter to Clinton county and establishing the future home of the 
family in Owen township. Here they worked hard, economized and left a good 
property for their children, and here they spent the remainder of their lives, 
the father dying in 1804, the good wife surviving sixteen years, dying in 1910. 
They were the parents of five children: Elias, A. S., our subject; Mrs. Sarah 
Boyle, William and Oliver, the two last deceased. 

A. S. Campbell grew to manhood on the old homestead, doing his share 
of the general work there when he was old enough. He received a common 



622 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

school education. On June 5, 1882, he married Laura Franklin, who was born 
in Carroll county, Indiana, April 16, 1S62. She was a (laughter of Nelson and 
Mary (Thompson) Franklin. She grew to womanhood in her native locality 
and received a common school education. Her death occurred on September 1, 
1902, after a mutually happy and helpful married life of twenty years. She 
was a woman of many commendable personal traits and was beloved by a wide 
circle of friends. 

Two children were born to our subject and wife : Mrs. Fthel White, born 
October 18, 1883, and Mrs. Blanche Douglass, born July II, 1888. They grew 
up in Owen township and received good common school educations here. 

Mr. Campbell went to farming for himself early in life and has made a 
success beyond the average person in that exacting field of endeavor. He is 
owner of a valuable and productive farm of two hundred acres, all under culti- 
vation but fifty acres. It is well tiled and otherwise properly improved, and he 
has a large house and barn. He carries on general farming and stock raising 
on an extensive scale and is regarded as one of the county's best agriculturists. 
Fie built his own home and made the present improvements, for the most part. 
He is a Republican, but is not active in politics. 



JACOB A. BOZWORTH. 



Among the men of Clinton county who has appreciated present day 
opportunities and have profited his ingenuity and persistency as an agricul- 
turist and stock raiser as a result of the exceptionally favorable conditions 
existing in the locality of which this volume treats is Jacob A. Bozworth, who, 
like many of our leading citizens hails from the great Buckeye state, but, like 
the rest of his countrymen, had the sagacity for seeing better opportunities 
in the newer country. That he made no mistake by casting his lot with us 
is seen from the fact that he has been enabled to retire from active life and 
spend his old age in the midst of comfort and plenty as a result of his good 
management and close application. 

Mr. Bozworth was born August 22, 1850 in Preble county, O. He is 
a son of William and Polly J. (Shaffer) Bozworth, a fine old pioneer family, 
mentioned in detail on other pages of this volume, hence their records will 
not be repeated here. 

Jacob A. Bozworth was reared on the home farm where he worked hard 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 623 

when a boy, and during the winter months lie attended the district schools 
receiving a practical education, about the same as most of his contemporaries. 

Mr. Bozworth was married April 25, 1877 to Jerusha A. Beck, who 
was born in Augusta county, Virginia, August 19, 1854. She is a daughter 
of William and Lucinda (Summers) Beck, both natives of Augusta county, 
Virginia. In 1856 they started to Iowa, but spent the winter of that year in 
Illinois, and there the wife died of typhoid fever and was buried at Mon- 
mouth. The father, with his two children, then went to a brother in Iowa, 
and, later, to another brother in Indiana, where he took for his second wife, 
'Mrs. P. M. Brown, of Clinton county. They located on a farm one-half mile 
east of Gettingsville, and here Mrs. Bozworth grew to womanhood and re- 
ceived her education in the common schools and the Normal school at Frank- 
fort, after which she taught school for a few years with much success. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bozworth: Mrs. Lucy 
Young, born in 1878; Rufus B., born in 1880, died in 1897; and Annis, born 
in 1883, married to Rolla Colby, and now living on our subject's farm. 

Jacob A. Bozworth began farming for himself early in life and each suc- 
ceeding year found him further advanced until he became one of the leading 
general farmers of Owen township where he has lived since early childhood. 
He is owner of a finely improved and productive farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres, all tillable but about eighteen acres, which is in woods. Mr. 
Bozworth built his own comfortable and substantial home and outbuildings 
and cleared most of his land, his place being known as Oregon Farm. This 
farm was bought by YVm. Bozworth, the father, a few years after the war. 
There was a deadening on it and the brothers cleared a small field and had 
it in corn when they read an article in a newspaper telling of corji that grew 
in the state of Oregon, sixteen feet to the tassel and ten and one-half feet to 
the ear. A short time afterwards corn was found on this farm which was a 
trifle taller than that mentioned in the newspaper story and some six inches 
higher to the ear. He has been very successful as a general farmer and stock 
raiser and his son-in-law operates the place, he living retired. He has 
made a specialty of raising Hereford cattle, Duroc hogs, draft and Belgium 
horses. 

Politically Mr. Bozworth is independent, but is inclined to prohibition, 
being a strong temperance man. Religiously, he is a member of the Presby- 
terian church, in which he is an elder and active worker. 



._._ — <;_ 



624 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

A. M. ROBISON. 

Eighty years nave dissolved in the mists of the irrevocable nasi since 
A. M. Robison, venerable and honored retired farmei of Owen township first 
saw the light of day, he being the oldest living native son of Warren town- 
ship, Clinton county. He has lived through one of the most remarkable, 
and in many respects the most wonderful, epoch in the world's history. 
There will never be another like it, for it embraced that period when the 
strong-armed homeseckcrs from the Eastern states invaded the Middle West, 
his father being among the number, and redeemed this splendid section of 
our great Union from the wilds, bringing it up through various stages to its 
present high state of cultivation and civilization. To all this our subject has 
been a most interested and by no means a passive, spectator, having sought 
to do his full share in the work of progress in the locality which he has 
ever taken a delight in seeing develop. He talks most interestingly of the early 
days when customs and manners were different, men and women were differ- 
ent — everything — in fact, unlike what our civilization is today. He and others 
who have come down to us from the pioneer epoch are of the opinion that 
those were better, al least happier times, than now, and this is, in the main, 
true. 

Mr. Robison was born November 27, 1833, in Warren township, Clinton 
county. He is a son of Andrew and Grizella (McAfee) Robison. The father 
was born in Warren county, Ohio, January 10, 1802, and there he grew to 
manhood, removing from there once in 1824 to Parke county, Indiana. In 
October, 1824, about the time of his removal from his home community, he 
married the mother of our subject, who was born in Warren county, Ohio, 
December 30, 1801, and whose death occurred in 1852. On March tX, 1832, 
the parents of our subject moved to Warren township, Clinton county, where 
they began life in typical pioneer fashion, erecting a log cabin and clearing up 
the land on which they settled, and here the father's death occurred on April 
5, 1877. He was a man or rare soundness of judgment and had a naturally 
fine mathematical mind. He became quite prominent in politics, was first 
a Whig and later a Republican. 

James H. Robison, paternal grandfather of our subject, was born in 
1772, served in the war of 1812 and died in 1814. His wife, Elizabeth Parks, 
was born in 1775, and her death occurred in 1855. 

Andrew Robison was twice married, first to Grizella McAfee, by whom 
five children were born, A. M., of this sketch, the youngest, being the only 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 625 

one now living. The others were John M., James H., Thomas P. and 
Margaret N. The father's second marriage was to Phoebe J. Emley, who 
was born in Michigan township, Clinton county, and who is still living. To 
this second union four children were born, three of whom are still living. 

A. M. Robison grew to manhood on the old home farm, where, being 
a pioneer child, he found plenty of hard work to do which he did uncom- 
plainingly. He received a meager education in the old-time schools of his 
day. November 16, 1865, he married Hannah A. Bate, who was born in 
Clark county, Ohio, January 4, 1837. She was a daughter of Josiab and 
Hannah A. (Jones) Bate, the father a native of New Jersey, and the mother 
of Ohio. The death of Mr. Robison's first wife occurred May 7, 1899. 
Eight children were bom of this union: Maggie M., born October 2j, 1866; 
James P., bom November 4, 1867; Andrew J., born January 8, 1869, died 
August 19, 1870; John E., born August 28, 1871 ; Emma E., born April 7, 
1874; Winfield M. and Grizella, twins, born October 4, 1876, the latter now 
living; Winfield, died October 5, 1882; and. Jessie B., born January 6, 1881. 

A. M. Robison began farming for himself when a young man and this 
continued to be his life vocation, with the exception of some time spent 
in working in the timber in the early- timbering days. He is owner of a 
valuable farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Warren township, and two 
and one-half acres where he lives in the village of Gettingsville, Owen town- 
ship. He has been very successful as a general farmer and stock man and 
is spnding his old age in the midst of plenty and comfort. 

He was one of the gallant Hoosiers who made up the great army in 
blue that suppressed the rebellion, having enlisted September 1, 1861 in 
the Third Indiana Light Artillery, under Captain Freyberger, in which he 
served faithfully until overheated and sent home; but in September, 1862, 
he enlisted in Company I, One Hundredth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serv- 
ing in the same about four months when he was sent home as a result of 
sickness. Upon his recovery he re-enlisted in the same company and regi- 
ment, February 22, 1864, in which he served until the close of the war, 
being honorably discharged July 22, [865. 

Politically, Mr. Robison is a Republican and has always been a loyal 
supporter of his party r . He ably served as a member of the county council 
.for a period of fourteen years, having been elected four times and is still 
incumbent of this office, the duties of which he has discharged to the satis- 
faction of all concerned. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. 
He attends and supports the Presbyterian church. 
(40) 



626 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 



NOAH L. BUNNELL. 



'I he life record of this venerable citizen of Moran, Owen township, is 
one of interest and instruction, for it lias been active, always so modulated 
as to be of the greatest service to those whom it touched. Mr. Bunnell has 
lived to see the transformation of a great country from the primeval forests 
and the wild prairies and he has performed well his part in this work. He 
is one of our oldest native horn citizens, and most all of his nearly four score 
years have been spent here, devoted to farming and merchandising. He grew 
up amid pioneer conditions and it is indeed interesting to hear him relate 
incidents of those early days, of the different custom- and manners prevailing 
then, of the hardships and privations, of the wilderness tilled with wild animals, 
and many things unknown to us of the present generation. 

Noah L. Bunnell was born January 29, 1S34. near the village of Jeffer- 
son, Ginton county. He is a son of Noah and Catherine (Conley) Bunnell. 
The father was torn in 1796 in New Jersey where he spent his early years, 
finally removing to Ohio then to Clinton county, Indiana, where he began 
as a typical frontiersman, erecting a log cabin and clearing and developing 
a farm, and there he spent the rest of his life, dying in 1871. He was a 
wheelwright by trade at which he worked in his earlier years, finallv devoting 
his attention to farming. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. His wife 
was born in Maryland in 1800, and her death occurred in 1875. To these 
parents five children were born, Noah L., of this review, the youngest, Harriet, 
James, Seneca and Mary, all four deceased. 

Noah L. Bunnell grew to manhood on the homestead near Jefferson 
and there he found plenty of hard work to do when a boy, and he received 
a meager education in the old-time rural schools. He married Julia A. Bell, 
who was born in Ohio in 1839. She was a daughter of William and Mary 
(Hamilton) Bell, and to this union five children were born : Mary C, James, 
Elver, Clyde and Thomas (deceased). 

Mr. Bunnell began life for himself on a farm where he remained until 
1864 then entered the mercantile field at Kilmore. Clinton county, where he 
remained three years, then went to Lafayette, where he remained in the same 
business until the Vandalia railroad was built through Clinton county, where- 
upon he returned here and laid out the town of Moran. Owen township, which 
was first called Bunnellsville, after our subject, but later was named Moran. 
Mr. Bunnell has remained at this place ever since and has built up a large 
and lucrative trade with the surrounding country, his store being a favorite 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 627 

gathering place for the people of this vicinity in their spare time, for they 
have always received honest, fair and courteous treatment at the hands of 
our subject. He carries an up-to-date stock of general merchandise at all 
seasons and his prices arc law-ays reasonable. He is also owner of a valuable 
and productive eighty acre farm adjoining Moran, on which land Mr, Bun- 
nell has a pleasant and well furnished home. At present he is assisted in his 
store by his son, Elver. 

Politically, Mr. Bunnell is a Republican and has always been faithful 
in his support of the parfv. Religiously, he belongs in the Methodic Episcopal 
church. 



TOHN F. BOZWORTH. 



Although like many of our best citizens John F. Bozworth, well known 
retired farmer of Owen township, is a native of Ohio, practically all of his 
life has been spent in Clinton county, for he was but two years of age when 
he was brought here by his parents and here he has resided ever since, 
or for a period of more than sixty years, during which he has lived to see 
and take part in wonderful changes, of which he talks very interestingly. He 
has from childhood, had the best interests of the county at heart and has been 
faithful in every duty as a citizen. 

Mr. Bozworth was born June 14, 1849, in Preble county, Ohio. He is 
a son of Wm. and Polly J. (Shaffer) Bozworth. The father was born October 
23, 1825, in Ohio where he spent his boyhood. He came first to Clinton 
county two years before his marriage, after which event he returned to his 
native state, but subsequently came back to this county, where he still lives, 
being now at the advanced age of eight-eight years. He is a fine old man, 
admired by everybody who knows him. He is a type of the rugged, honest, 
industrious pioneer who redeemed this country from the wilderness. His 
wife was a native of Tennessee. She has long been deceased, dying January 

John F. Bozworth was reared on the home farm and educated in the 
common schools. On September 7, 1873, he married Clara B. Haggard, who 
was born in Fayette county, Ohio, November 30, 1855 She is a daughter of 
James M. and Rebecca (Thacker) Haggard. They spent their lives on a 
farm, and are now both deceased 

Two children have been born to our subject and wife: Venora, born 



628 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

July 4, 1874, married Edward Silverthorn; and Nial, born June 26, 1882, 
married Mabel Jarvis. 

Mr. Bozworth has always engaged in farming and stock raising He 
lived in Sedalia for a period of five years, but was not satisfied wit!, his 
residence there and finally returned to the country, believing that the farm 
was best for him. He owns one hunched and thirty acres where he resides, 
and eighty acres just west of his home, his son living on the latter place. 
His home place is all tillable but five acres which is in woods pasture. He 
built his own home and made many valuable improvements alxnit the place 
His land is all productive and good for general farming. Although overseeing 
his farm in a general way, Mr. Bozworth is practically retired from active 
life. He owns a 1913, twenty-five horsepower, five passenger automobile of 
a standard make, and is well fixed to enjoy his after years in every way. 
Politically, he is a Democrat, but he has never been especially active in public 
affairs. 



JACOB A. MUMMERT. 



Jacob A. Mummert, for many years one of the leading general farmers of 
Warren township, now living in his pleasant home in the town of Sedalia, 
Owen township, was born in Cass county, Indiana, August 12, 1874. He 
is a son of Henry and Sarah Ann' (Plank) Mummert. The father was born 
December 25, 1844, in Adams county, Pennsylvania, and he has a good farm 
in Deer Creek township, Cass county, Indiana, where he has a good farm 
and where he has lived since boyhood, having come from the Keystone state 
many years ago. The mother of our subject was born August 6, 1850 in 
Cass county, Indiana, where she spent her life, dying there in November, 
1893. These parents received their education in the common schools, which 
they attended a few years during the winter months. In early life Henry 
Mummert learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed for a number of 
years, but finally turned his attention to farming. He had an exceptionally 
large family, seventeen children, fifteen of wnom are still' living; Amanda J., 
Laura A., Charles O., Jacob A., Hester E., William D., infant daughter 
died when three days old, unnamed; Franklin P., Emma S., Stella M., Martha 
G, Harry and Mary, twins; John H., Earle E. and Merle M., twins; a boy, 
unnamed, died in infancy. 

Jacob A. Mummert grew to manhood on the home farm in Cass county, 
and he received his education in the district schools there. On September 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 629 

8, J 897 he married Elsie V. Shaffer, who was horn in Owen township, 
Clinton county, May 14, 1877. She is a daughter of Andrew A. and Mary 
Shaffer, both now deceased. Airs. M'ummert grew to womanhood in her 
native community and was there educated in the public schools. Her union 
with Mr. Mummert has been without issue. 

Our subject began farming for himself when young in years. He re- 
moved from Cass county to Clinton county, in the spring of 1895, working on 
a farm until his marriage, then he rented and farmed for seven years, then 
purchased eighty acres of his own in Warren township in February, 1905, 
and lived there until the spring of 1912, when he moved to the town of 
Sedaiia, where he now lives, not retired, but looking after and helping on 
his farm, wherever a helping hand is needed. He was very successful as a 
general farmer and stock raiser. He now rents his fine farm of eighty acres, 
all of which is tillable but eleven acres, of which ten acres is in timber. He 
owns a thirty horse-power, Overland automobile, five passenger, 19 13 model, 
and he and his family enjoy trips over the country. Politically, he is a 
Democrat, but has never been especially active in public affairs. Fraternally, 
he belongs to the Knights of Pythias in Sedaiia. Religiously, he is a member 
of the Presbyterian church at Geetingsville and a liberal supporter of the 
same. ■ t 



JAMES N. BRANSTETTER. 

The methods followed by James N. Branstetter, successful fanner of War- 
ren township, Clinton county, alw ays bring success when persistently applied 
as they have been done in his case, for he is a man who lays his plans well be- 
fore beginning then execution. He realizes the fact that this is an epoch when 
farming must be done along somewhat different lines than it ever was before 
in the history of the world, and he has sought to find out everything possible 
regarding the most approved methods, being careful to accept those that were 
applicable to this soil and climate and just as careful to discard those which 
were not. So he has succeeded, as might be expected, for, besides knowing 
what to do and when to do it he has ever been an untiring and persevering 
worker. 

Mr. Branstetter was born in the above mentioned township and county, 
January 10, 1873. He is a son of Jacob and Ruthy (Harmon) Branstetter. 
The father, who was born in Clinton county, is still living, making his home 
in Russiaville. The mother of our subject was born in Tennessee and is also 



63O CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

still living. The elder Branstetter devoted his early life to general farming. 
but for the past fifteen years he lias been employed in a grain elevator in 
Russiaville, and has built up a wide and lucrative tr;:dc, and is one of the 
substantial business men of that section of the county. To these parents 
four children were bom: Mrs. Ella Lauchner, Mrs. Alice B. Haynes, Tames 
N., of this review, and Charles (deceased). 

The subject of this sketch grew to manhood on the home farm and 
received his education in the common schools. On February 22, 1899, he 
married Ethel J. Norris, who was born in Clinton county, Indiana, three 
miles east of Frankfort, in 1S7S. 1'here she grew to womanhood aid was 
educated in the public schools of that district. She is a daughter of William 
and Sarah J. (Fudge) Norris, both parents being natives of Indiana They 
devoted their activities to farming. The father is deceased", but the mother 
is still living. 

Seven children have been born to our subject and wife, namely: Morris, 
Fay, Vern, Eldo, James, Ruth and Charles. 

Mr. Barnstetter moved from Clinton to Carroll county, when a boy and 
there engaged in farming. Returning to Clinton county in 1898 he resumed 
farming here which he has followed with success ever since. He owns one 
hundred and sixty acres of well improved and well cultivated land, all tillable, 
but about eight acres which is in timber. He has a good home and good 
outbuildings. He raises a large number of live stock from year to year, 
handling Shorthorn and Hereford cows, Hampshire hogs and Shire horses. 

Mr. Barnstetter is a Democrat, and religiously, he belongs to the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. He is not a public man and yet his support may alwavs 
be depended upon in furthering any movement of general interest to his 
locality. 



HENRY; H. LAUCHNER. 

It is not often we find a person in what is usually designated as the 
East, who has come here from the scope of country known to the world as 
the West. There is perhaps no plausible explanation for this, but the fact is 
true, nevertheless. It may be because the former is the older and the 
latter the newer to civilization, and people are accustomed to think that there 
are better advantages in a new country than in an older one. This, how- 
ever, is often erronious. So, each year finds thousands traveling by train west- 
ward over the same routes, many of them that were followed by the ad- 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 63 1 

venturers and frontiersmen of a few generations ago, to the states west of 
the Father of Waters, but few indeed, comparatively come from the lands 
oi the setting sun to Indiana or other eastern states. There was an ex- 
ception in the case of Henry H. Lauchner, citizen of Owen township, Clinton 
county. 

Mr. Lauchner was born in the- state of Missouri, December 17, 1873. He 
is a son of James and Jerusha ( Pittsenberg'er) Lauchner. The father was 
born in Pennsylvania in the year 1833, and his death occurred in 1875 at the 
age of forty-two years. The mother of our subject was born in Indiana 
in September, 1835. She is still living, being now seventy-eight years of age. 
James Lauchner devoted his active life to farming. His family con isted of 
six children: Malinda (deceased) A. B-, W. W., Lydia, Mary and Henry 
H. v of this sketch. 

Henry H. Lauchner grew up on the farm, and he worked hard when 
a boy. He received a common school education in the schools of Clinton 
and Carroll counties. He remained with his mother many years after the 
death of his father. On March 5, 1903, he was married to Addie B. Far- 
low, who was born on March 22, 1882, in Carroll county, Indiana, and there 
she grew to womanhood and received a common school education. She 
was a daughter of John M. and Hannah (James) Farlow, both of whom are 
still living in Carroll county. 

Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Lauchner : Cecil, Kenneth, 
John, Eugene and Lois. All are living. 

Mr. Lauchner spent his earlier years in Missouri, finally locating in 
Clinton county, with the rest of the family, remaining here until 1888 when 
he removed to Carroll county where he was married. Subsequently he came 
back to Clinton county and located in Owen township where he farmed for 
some time. For the past twelve years he has been engaged in the merchandise 
business, and at present he is cashier of the bank of Sedalia, the duties of 
which he has discharged in a manner that has reflected much credit upon 
himself and to the eminent satisfaction of the stockholders and patron, i his 
bank was organized in 1900 with a capital stock of ten thousand dollars. It 
is a. private bank, and its president is Andrew S. Campbell, with W. O. 
Ball, vice president. The directors are A. S. Campbell, W. O. Ball, William 
S. Miller, Mark-wood Slipher and J. E. Silverthom. They own their own 
bank building and a large and successful business is carried on, the bank having 
a most excellent reputation. 

Mr. Lauchner owns a good home in Sedalia. He is a member of the 



632 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Masonic order, and politically, is a Democrat. He was elected trustee of 
Owen township j n iqnS and is still holding office to the satisfaction of all 
concerned. 



PHILIP M. SHEETS. 



The true measure of individual success is determined by what one has 
accomplished, and, contrary to the old adage that a prophet is not without 
honor save in his own country, a particular interest attaches to the career of 
Philip M. Sheets, farmer and musician of Warren township, Clinton county. 
Besides being a worthy scion of one of our sterling pioneer families, he is a 
native of this locality, where his entire life has been spent, arid he has so 
directed his abilities and efforts as to gain recognition as one of the repre- 
sentative citizens of the county. ' 

Mr. Sheets was born here on December 17, 1867. He is a son of David 
and Nancy E. (Thompson) Sheets. The father was born August 29, 1829, 
in Augusta county, Virginia, and his death occurred in 191 1 at the advanced 
age of eighty-two years. The mother of our subject was born in Ohio, and 
she too lived to an advanced age, dying in November, 1909. She was a well- 
educated woman and taught school for some time in her earlier years. David 
Sheets devoted his life to general farming and to carpentering. His family 
consisted of nine children, namely: John C, James H., Perry M., Zimri E., 
Mary M., Albert W., Elmer E., Philip M., and Wilda M. 

Philip M. Sheets grew to manhood on the home farm arid he received 
a comrhon school education. On' March 13, 1890, he married Emma F. 
Crum, who was born in Putnam county, Indiana, March 13, 1871, a daughter 
of William and Elizabeth (Kropff) Crum, both natives of Virginia. Mr. 
Crum, who died August 28, 1913, was a soldier in the Confederate army. 
His wife is deceased. 

To our subject and wife eight children have been born, namely: Frank 
O., born October 13, 1890, a member of the Beard band, playing second 
cornet on which he is quite proficient; Larnie A., born August 9, 1892, also 
a member of the Beard band, performing exceptionally well on the bass horn 
or tuba; Perry O., born August 18, 1894, plays the slide trombone in the 
Beard band, and equally gifted with his brothers; Alta E., born July 29, 
1896; Tola R., bom December 17, 1898; Virgil R, bron April 14, 1902; 
Boyce E., born December 7, 1905; Gail S., born January 26, 1907. 

Mr. Sheets has already engaged in farming in Warren township. He 



1 . 



(S; 



; ; - ( ■ ■ «, 



•v •■■- 




'*< * 




- I 




CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 633 

owns a good farm of seventy-five acres, lacking a fraction, and has a well 
improved place in every respect, especially as to tiling. He has a substantial 
and attractive home which he built himself. He handles a good many head 
of live stock of various kinds from year to year, a mixed breed of cattle, 
Chester White hogs, and draft horses. 

Mr. Sheets is by nature a gifted musician and he has found time to 
cultivate his taste in this direction, especially as to band music. He is presi- 
dent and manager of the Beard band, one of the best in Clinton countv. Ira 
Skidmore is director of the same. The services of this band are very fre- 
quently required throughout the county at various gatherings. It was or- 
ganized in 1909. It is composed of sixteen pieces. Mr. Sheets ; < bass 
drummer. 

Our subject is a member of the Methodist Protestant church, and he 
is a Republican in politics. 



.WILLIAM G. THOMAS. 



In meeting with the citizens of Clinton county, the biographer is some- 
what surprised to find so many of her native sons who have, at some period 
of their life, engaged in school teaching. Such a condition is not found in 
every county, by any means. For some two decades most of the teaching 
in district and public schools in general has been left to women, men pre- 
ferring to engage in other fields of endeavor. The demand for men teachers 
is always great and when such a successful teacher as William G. Thomas, of 
Warren township, drops out of the ranks, after many years of successful 
and praiseworthy service, it is deeply regretted by the people of his locality. 

Mr. Thomas, who is now successfully engaged in general farming, was 
born in Warren township, this county, August 2, 18S5. He is a son of Wil- 
liam D. and Elizabeth J. (Sharp) Thomas. The father was born August 10, 
1853, in Franklin county, Indiana, but is now making his home in Frankfort. 
The mother of our subject was born in Wisconsin, January 31, 1853, and she, 
too, is still living. These parents have spent their active lives on the farm. 
The elder Thomas is a Democrat and was township trustee in 1890, serving 
five years. He and his wife had only one child besides our subject Walter 
W., he being older than William G. 

The gentleman whose name forms the caption of this sketch grew up 
on the home farm and he received a common school education, later at- 
tending Valparaiso University. On September 4, 1906 he married Mabel M. 



._ . . *. 



634 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Hoflingsworth, who was born in 18S7 in Howard county, Indiana, a daughter 
of Charles and Molly (Stiffler) Hollingsworth. They are both living in 
Howard count} on a farm. In that county Mrs. Thomas grew to womanhood 
and received a common and high school education. To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
one child has been horn, Lucile May, whose birth occurred May 25, 190S. 

Mr. Thomas began life for himself by teaching school which he con- 
tinued for a period of twelve years in his native township, where he has 
given most satisfactory, service to both pupil and patron, and is regarded 
as one of the most efficient teachers in the rural schools of Clinton county. 
During that period he has worked on the farm during the vacation season. 
He owns eighty av res of good land which he has placed under a good state of 
cultivation and improvement, all tillable and well tiled. He lived on his 
father's old home place. He raises Shorthorn cows, a general breed of hogs, 
general purpose and draft horses. 

Fraternally, Mr. Thomas is a Mason and a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, both at Middlefork. He is a member of the Universa- 
list church, and in politics votes the Democratic ticket. 



WILLIAM S. RECORD. 

The old Buckeye state has long ranked as one of the best and greatest 
in the Union. She has been favored in position among the sisterhood of 
states, favored in the character of settlers that drove the Indians from her 
borders and redeemed her wildernesses, and she has furnished many of the 
nation's greatest nien, Presidents, statesmen, generals and authors. The rank 
and file of her citizens have ever been noted for their industry and honesty 
as well as their public-spirit and patriotism. She has sent perhaps more of 
her worthy citizens into Clinton county, Indiana, to help develop this locality 
into the fine agricultural section it is today r than any other state. So we owe 
her a deep debt of gratitude. One of this sturdy number is William S. 
Record, farmer of Warren township. 

Mr. Record was born in Adams county, Ohio, June 15, 1859, and there 
his earliest years were spent, he being five years old when he left there and 
located in Johnson county, Indiana, in 1864. Later he came on to Clinton 
county, locating in Jackson township, then moved to Michigan township, and 
in 1877 located in Warren township where he has since remained. 

Mr. Record is a son of Josiah and Nancy J. (Duffy) Record, both 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 6^ 

natives of Ohio, the father of Brown county, horn July 13, 1822, and the 
date of the mother's birth was January 18, 1825. His death occurred April 
12, 1880, and the mother passed away April 15, 1S89. They were the 
parents of four children: William S., of this sketch; Nelson, Henry and 
Charles. 

William S. Record was reared on the home farm and educated in the 
public schools. On October 6, 1881. he married Maria Whiteman, who was 
born in Michigan township, this county, February 12, i860. She is a daughter 
of Samuel and Alvina (Richardson) Whiteman, who lived on a farm in 
Michigan 'township, where Mrs. Record grew to womanhood, and she was 
educated in the public schools of that vicinity. Her death occurred August 
10, 1904. She was a good helpmeet and kind mother, and a woman who was 
spoken well of by all her neighbors. 

To our subject and wife eight children were born: Florence (deceased), 
Elby V., Samuel F., Gilbert O., Neva G., Beulah Glendola, Cloie Jane and 
Lenora M. 

Mr. Record has always followed farming. He is now owner of an ex- 
cellent place in Warren township, consisting of eighty acres, all in cultivation 
but four acres which is in timber. He has a comfortable home and his place 
is under good improvements and yields a comfortable livelihood under his able 
management. He makes a specialty of raising Shorthorn cows, Poland- 
China hogs and draft horses, also Plymouth Rock chickens. 

He is a member of the Methodist Protestant church, in which he is a 
steward. Politically, he is a Republican and has been a worker for the party's 
good. Five years ago he made the race for township assessor and was 
beaten by only two votes. 



WILLIAM E. RICE. 



It is a good sign to see so many of Clinton county's farmers who are 
native sons, men who have been content to spend their lives here, for it shows 
that this is a fine agricultural section and therefore her natives have not 
needed to go elsewhere in order to make a good livelihood by tilling the soil. 
It also shows that this is a good place to live in reference to climate con- 
veniences of advanced civilization and congeniality of people. When one 
goes into a community and finds that all the residents have come from other 
countries one begins to suspect at once that something is wrong whether it is 
apparent on the surface or not; but that does not seem to be the case in 
this instance. 



636 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

One of the successful' farmers of this county who has been content to 
spend his life here is William E. Rice, whose birth occurred on December 
13, 1866 in Warren township, Clinton county, and here he still resides. He is 
a son of William S. and Rebecca (Michaels) Rice. The father was born 
February 19, 1839, ' m Union county, Indiana, but left there with his parents 
when two years old,. the family locating in Clinton county, and here lie is still 
living, having devoted his life to general farming. The mother of our subject 
who was born in Clinton county, October 2, 1841, is also living. To these 
parents six children were born, four of whom are still living, namely : Sarah 
I., married to Mr. Beard; William E., of this review; Mrs. Minnie V. Ray, 
and Mrs. Bertha Kirkpatrick. 

William E. Rice grew to manhood on the home farm in Warren town- 
ship and there he assisted with the various work about the place when a boy, 
and during the winter months he attended the district schools in his neighbor- 
hood. 

On December 10, 1896, he married Maggie Ford, a native of Warren 
township, where she grew to womanhood, and was educated in the public 
schools. She is a daughter of William and Martha (Finney) Ford. Mr. 
Ford is now living in Michigan. His wife is deceased. Mr. Ford has devoted 
his life to farming. Politically, he is a Democrat. 

The union of our subject and wife has been without issue. 

Mr. Rice was taught the various ins and outs of general farming and 
stock raising by his father while at home and thus when he started out in 
life for himself on a farm he knew what to do and has gradually forged 
ahead. He owns eighty acres of well improved and productive land in 
Warren township, all tillable and well tiled. He built his own home and 
has a good set of outbuildings. He keeps good Jersey cows and raises a 
mixed breed of hogs and general purpose horses. 

Mr. Rice is a member of the Methodist Protestant church and politically 
is a Democrat. 



WARD WRIGHT. 



We are glad to note in passing over Clinton county so many of her 
young men engaged in farming. As a rule most boys reared in the country 
ought to remain there instead of hurrying off to some large city where, in 
course of a year's time, they will do far more hard and health-destroying 
work than they can possibly do on the average farm, and they are, taking 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 637 

it all in all. not so well paid for it, cither. The question of health alone is 
a big item when the young man from the farm begins to debate whether he 
will stay in his native community or whether he will go lo the city and try 
to carve out a career. Few young men can make the change without serious 
impairment of their physical powers. Besides the mental worries that more 
than counterbalance the so-called "pleasures" of the town are lacking, for the 
most part, m (he daily life of the ruralist. 

One of Clinton county's young farmers who has started well in his 
chosen vocation is Ward Wright of Warren township. He was born May 
26, 1880, in this township and county. He is a son of Newt W. and Amanda 
(Nunemaker) Wright. The father was born in Virginia, September 16, 
1848, and he spent his early life in his native state and received a common 
school education there. In 1872 he removed to Clinton county, Indiana, and 
is now -living in Frankfort, retired, after a successful life as a fanner and 
stock raiser. The mother of the subject of this sketch was born in this 
township and county, September 14, 1855. She too, received a common 
school education. Four children were born to these parents, named as 
tollows : Cora, Ward, Guy and Russell. 

Ward Wright grew up on the home farm in his native township, and he 
received a common school education here, also attending the high school at 
Forest for awhile. On June 17, 1901 he married Jessie Robison, who, was 
also born in Warren township, this county, the date of her birth being January 
6, 1881. She is a daughter of Milton Robison, a brother of Dr. John E. Robi- 
son, a sketch of whom, containing the history of the Robison family, is to be 
found on another page of this work. Mrs. Wright grew to womanhood in 
her native community and received a good education. She taught school 
tor some time before her marriage. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Wright, namely : Lucile, 
born December 20, 1902: Vera, born July 31. 1905; Mildred, born September 
24; 1906; and Herbert, born July 17, 1910. 

Mr. Wright has always engaged in farming. He is now operating his 
father-in-law's place of one hundred and sixty acres in Warren township, 
which he is keeping well tilled and well improved and is being suitably re- 
warded for his toil by good annual crops. The land is all under cultivation 
but about fifty-five acres. Mr. Wright carries on general farming and stock 
raising, making a specialty of Shorthorn cattle and Duroc hogs. He also keeps 
some good horses and mules. 

Politically, he is a Republican. He "belongs to the Presbyterian church, 
and is a member of the Masonic order at Frankfort. 



638 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

OWEN E. BEARD. 

It is a pleasure to live in the country when one can live as comfortably 
and do as well as Owen E. Beard, fanner and lock raiser of Warren town- 
ship, Clinton county, but unfortunately this can not he the cause with every- 
one, owing to various circumstances, but mostly because all do not work 
with the zeal, perseverance and determination of our subject; and we all know, 
or at least ought to know, that little is ever accomplished in this world along 
any line unless one has the characteristics mentioned above. 

Mr. Beard was born in the township and county where he now resides, 
and where he has always been too well contented +0 reside to move elsewhere, 
the date of his birth being recorded as November 13; 1866. He is a son of 
Martin and Delilah (Orr) Beard, one of our respected old families. The 
father was a native of the state of Ohio, where he spent his earlier years, 
finally coming to Clinton county, Indiana, where he became well established 
on a farm, devoting his entire active life to agricultural pursuits. He had 
the advantages of an exceptionally good education for his day and genera- 
tion and he was a man of considerable influence in his community. His death 
occurred on the home place here in February, 1892. His family was large, 
but only three of his children are now living, these were Mrs. Alice Sheets, 
Jesse F., and Owen E., of this sketch. 

Owen E. Beard grew : to manhood on the home farm and he assisted 
with the general work there during the crop seasons. During the winter 
months he attended the public schools in his district and received in that man- 
ner a very practical education. 

On June 5, 1900, Mr. Beard was married to Mrs. Louisa (Young) 
Coapstick. She was born February 18, 1851, in Clinton county, and is a 
daughter of Dr. R. O. and Margaret N. (Robison) Young. Dr. Young at- 
tended a medical college in Cincinnati, and followed the medical profession 
all his life with singular success. He came to Clinton county, Indiana, in 1835 
and was one of the leading pioneer physicians here. His family consisted 
of five children, namely: Robert, and Louisa, wife of Mr. Beard, of this 
sketch, both living; Mary, Hulda and Milton, all deceased. The parents of 
these children are also both deceased. Mrs. Beard was first married to A. H. 
Coapstick, November 7, 1871. A sketch of Mr. Coapstick appears else- 
where in this work. He has been deceased some eighteen years. The union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Beard has been without issue. 

Mr. and Mrs. Beard have one hnudred and sixty acres of well improved 
and productive land, all under cultivation but thirty acres, and they have 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 639 

a fine and modemly furnished home, which was built by Mrs. Beard's first 
husband in 1S51. It has been well kept and is in the midst of attractive 
surroundings. Mr. Beard has always been a farmer, and in connection with 
genera) farming he is raising Shorthorn cattle and Duroc bogs. He has been 
very successful as a business man. He has a splendid five-passenger auto- 
mobile of standard make. He is a Republican politically, and he and his wife 
are members of the Presbyterian church 



URIAH JONES, 



• Those who are content to lead the much-spoken of "simple life" are, 
no doubt, bappier than any other class The reasons are too obvious to need 
much setting forth here. Such people know little of the jar and fret, the 
contention and strife, the petty jealousies for place and power of those who 
choose the great marts of the land for their dwelling places, the latter never 
really knowing what the word "freedom" means in its broad and literal sense, 
in fact, they are bound in a kind of slavery that wears the better nature to 
shreds, then all sorts of unpleasant things follow from which it is hardly 
possible to flee. Uriah Jones, a plan farmer of Warren township, Clinton 
count)-, is a happy man because he has been wise enough to lead the "simple 
life" next to nature, away from the "harsh, jangled roar" of the city, and he 
is therefore in his autumn years not only contented but healthy, finding plenty 
to still live for and to do. He was born July 25, 1843, in Dearborn county, 
Indiana, and he was five years old when he moved to Clinton county with his 
parents, Thomas and Anna K. (Kile) Tones. Thomas Jones was born in 
Mercer county, Pennsylvania, in June, 1805, and his death occurred on 
September 16, 1869. The mother of our subject was born in Strassburg, 
German)', and her death occurred at the age of seventy-eight years. She 
came to America when young and met and married Thomas Jones in Pennsyl- 
vania, the date of tbeir wedding being January 10, 1822. The mother was 
educated in Germany, and was a bright woman, speaking several languages. 
Thomas Jones devoted his life to general farming. Politically, he was a 
Democrat. His large family of sixteen children are now all deceased but 
Uriah, of this sketch. 

Uriah Jones grew to manhood on the home farm and there he worked 
until reaching man's estate. He received a limited education in an old-time 
log school bouse, but has since become a well-informed man on general topics 



640 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

through home reading. On August 4, 1870, he married Charlotte Stod- 
'dard, who was horn in Frankfort, Ind., Decemher 29. 1852. She is a daughter 
of Abram and Catherine (Byers) Stoddard. These parents were horn in 
Pennsylvania and there grew up and were married, and from there they 
came to Clinton county, and. located in Frankfort, where Mr. Stoddard 
established a tailor shop, he having been the first tailor there. 

To Mr. Jones and wife six children were horn, namely: Albert, born 
May 12, 1872; William B., born April 5, 1874; Franklin Pierce, born August 
28, 1876; Martin V., born January 12, 1878; Milton Carrol, born April 25, 
1882, and Freddie- Grover, born September 12, 1884. 

Mr. Jones has followed farming all his life. He owns eightv acres in 
Warren township, most of which is under cultivation. He built his own 
home and make good improvements and is very comfortably fixed. He keeps 
Jersey cows and Chester White hogs. 

Politically, he is a Democrat, and in religious matters belongs to the Pres- 
byterian church. 



JOHN E. ROBISON, M. D. 

It is often said that a poet is born, meaning that the individual who 
essays to court the muses with success must have been peculiarly fitted by 
mother nature. It seems that the same phrase might be applied with equal 
truth to the successful practitioner of medicine. Of course the poet can go 
ahead and write without taking any special preparatory work in college. 
There is not much to be learned in the way of the "mechanical" part of his 
work, such as the laws of prosody, and on the other hand the phvsician must 
take a long and special course of study, but if he succeeds above the ordinary 
plodder he must be specially gifted by nature. Many men go through the 
prescribed routine of work under the law and obtain a diploma entitling them 
to practice medicine when they arc utterly unfit for this field of work and 
do more harm than good. One of the general practitioners of Clinton county 
who seems to have been peculiarly fitted for his chosen vocation is Dr. John 
E. Robison, of the village of Geetingsville, Warren township, for he has 
been successful from the first and has ingratiated himself into the hearts 
and affections of his patients. In due course of time he will doubtless 
rank among the leading, professional men of this section of the state. 

Dr. Robison was born August 28, 1871, in the above named township 
and county. He is a son of Andrew Ml and Hannah A. (Bate) Robison. 




33R. AND MRS. J. E. ROBISON 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 64I 

The father was born November 27, 1833, also in Warren township, Clinton 
county, having enjoyed the distinction of being the second white child born 
in Warren township. He was a son of Andrew Robison, Sr., one of the 
first settlers in this vicinity, who entered land here when the country round 
about was a wilderness and still roamed by red men and wild beasts. He 
began life in typical pioneer fashion, in a log cabin and cleared his land by 
hard work and perseverance. From that early day to the present this family 
has been well known and highly respected for thir industry and exemplary 
habits. The father of our subject, who has devoted his life successfully 
to general farming is still living, making his home in Owen township, this 
county. The mother of the doctor was born January, 1837, and her death 
occurred on May 7, 1899. Eight children were born to these parents, named 
as follows: Mrs. Margaret Smythe; James P., married Maud Bayles; An- 
drew (deceased),; Dr. John E., of this sketch; Mrs. Emma Erdle; Grizella 
and Winfield, twins (deceased), and Mrs. Jessie B. Wright. 

Doctor Robison was reared on the home farm and educated in the 
district schools in Warren township. First deciding to be a teacher, he at- 
tended the Danville Normal School in order to fit himself, after which he 
taught two terms, but deciding that his true bent lay along the line of a 
practitioner of medicine he abandoned the school room and began the study 
of medicine, in which he made rapid progress. He attended the Indiana 
Medical College at Indianapolis, where he made an excellent record and from 
which he was graduated, with the class of 1901. He soon afterwards located 
for practice in the village of Geetingsville, in his native township and county, 
and here he has since remained, enjoying a large and growing practice 
which extends all over this section of Clinton county. 

Doctor Robison was married June 23, 1901 to Sarah E. Miller, who 
was born in Ross township, Clinton county, March 7, 1874, and here she 
grew to womanhood and was educated in the public schools. She is a 
daughter of Christian and Jane (Troxell) Miller, both still living. Mr. 
Miller devoted his life to general farming in this locality. 

To the doctor and wife three children have been born, namely: Adeline, 
born July 8, 1902; Paul M., born October 12, 1905; and Lena Esther, born 
November 24, 1910. 

Doctor Robison is owner of eighty acres of valuable land in Tippe- 
canoe county, near Dayton, Ind., which is well improved. Fraternally, he 
is a Mason, being a member of the Council and Commandery, the Blue lodge 
at Beard and the Knights Templars of Frankfort. He is a member of the 
(40 



^4- CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Presbyterian church, and politically, is a Republican. He is a member of 
the Clinton County Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical Association, 
and the American Medical Association. 



ALVIS DEAN. 



The character of a community is determined in a large measure by 
the lives of a comparatively few of its members. If its moral and in- 
tellectual status be good, if in a social way it is a pleasant place in which to 
reside, if its reputation for the integrity of its citizens has extended into other 
localities,, it will be found that the standards set by the leading men have 
been high and theii influence such as to mould their characters and shape 
the lives of those with whom they mingle. In placing the subject of this 
sketch in the front rank of such men, justice is rendered a biographical fact 
universally recognized throughout Clinton county by those at all familiar with 
its history. Although a quiet and unassuming man, with no ambition for pub- 
lic position or leadership, he has contributed much to the material advance- 
ment of the community, and his admirable qualities and upright course of life 
have tended greatly to the development of the circles in which he has moved 
and the county. 

Alvis Dean was born on August 30, 1854 in Randolph county, North 
Carolina, and was the son of Robartis and Sarah (Lucas) Dean. Robartis 
Dean was also born in Randolph county, North Carolina, on August 27, 
1820, and was the only child of Wesley and Susan Dean. He died November 
II, 1908, a little over eighty-eight years of age. He led a very useful and 
worthy life, and was a farmer with the exception of a few years in his 
younger days when he taught school. In the year 1838 he was united in 
marriage to Margaret Lucas, and to this union were born the following 
children. Emeline, Caroline, Susan, Kizziah and Margaret. His second 
marriage was to Sarah Lucas, and to this union were born nine children : 
Isley, John W., Margaret L., Albert, Alvis, Robartis, Jr., John Milton, YV. R., 
and William H. In 1871 he came from North Carolina to Indiana and with 
the aid oi his family cleared many acres of dense timber land which then 
existed. Shortly after his arrival in this state he joined the Christian church, 
and during his whole life took an unusual interest in the welfare of that 
church. He bore the reputation of being a very pious man, and his friends 
and acquaintances revered him as the children loved him. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 643 

Alvis Dean received his education for the most part in the common 
schools of North Carolina, in fact, he attended the Indiana schools but one 
day [n 1871, on October 18, Mr, Dean came to Boone county, Indiana, 
but did not stay there many years, for in the autumn of 1880 he came to 
Clinton county and lias lived here ever since. Mr. Dean has always farmed, 
with the exception of two years, during which time he lived in Frankfort 
He moved there in 1910, but came hack to the farm in 1912. Mr. Dean 
owns eighty acres of excellent land in this county, all of which is tillable hut 
nine acres. The land is well tiled and equipped with other improvements 
which Mr. Dean himself built. Besides general farming. Mr. Dean deals 
quite successfully in stock raising. He handle- the Shorthorn variety of 
cattle, Duroc hogs, and English draft horses. He is known to have had the 
best breed of the latter class in the township. Fraternally, Mr. Dean is a 
Mason at Middlefork ; religiously, he belongs to the Missionary Baptist church, 
and politically, is a loyal Democrat. 

On September 22, 1878, Mr. Dean was married to Nancy Jane linger, the 
daughter of George W. and Elvira (Maggart) Unger, extended reviews of 
whom are given in another part of this volume. Five children were born to 
this union: one who died unnamed; Elsey E., born October 20, 1881 ; Elmer 
C, born June 18, 1883; Thomas C, born October 27, 1884, and Inez, born 
June 26, 1886. 



A. H. COAPSTICK. 



In the person of the late A. H. Coapstick, for many years a well known 
and progressive agriculturist of Warren township, Clinton county, we have a 
sample of a worthy race of people to whom the country is largely indebted 
for its development and progress. He was not a showy man, but simply 
a plain, industrious tiller of the soil, who worked hard to get a start in the 
world, provided well for his family, did his duty to his fellow man and made 
a good neighbor and citizens. To such as he Indiana owes much. Here and 
there scattered over the state in every county, they toiled and worker, cleared, 
grubbed and ditched, fought the hinderances of nature in the way of swamps 
and dense forests, gradually making hedaway, until in time we see beautiful 
■and highly cultivated farms as the result of their arduous labors. Such 
'were the farmers of the generation that has passed. They did not figure in 
public Hie, most of them. Their names were seldom mentioned in the 
papers, for they lived quiet, unpretentious lives, but it was their work and 







<M4 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

self-sacrifice that was gradually building up the state, adding to its wealth 
and beauty, until it became one of the finest agricultural regions in the world. 
Mr. Coapstick was a public-spirited man in all that the term implies, was ever 
interested in movements tending to promote the general welfare and withheld 
his support from no movement for the good of the locality so long honored 
by his residence. His personal relations witli his fellow men were ever 
mutually pleasant ami agreeable, and he was highly regarded by all, having 
been obliging and straightforward in all the relations of life. 

Mr. Coapstick was born in Carroll county, Indiana, April 20, 1849. He 
\\a ; a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Concannon) Coapstick. The father 
died when the subject of this memoir was nine months old, and soon there- 
after the mother moved with her children to Owen township, Clinton county, 
where our subject lived on a farm until he was fourteen years old, then started 
out for himself, having had but little chance to secure an education. He began 
life as a farmer which vocation he followed all his life with more than or- 
dinary success, accumulating one of the most desirable farms in Warren 
township, on which he built a substantial and attractive home in 185 1. 

Mr. Coapstick was married November 7, 1871 to Louisa Young, who 
was born, February 18. 185 1 in Clinton county. Indiana. She -is a daughter 
of Dr. R. O. and Margaret N. (Robison) Young. Dr. Young was a son of 
Robert and Jane (Ogle) Young, both natives of Dauphin county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Their family consisted of ten children, Dr. R. O. Young having been 
the fifth son and sixth child. Robert Young spent his early life in Pennsyl- 
vania from which state he came to Ohio in 1801. and established the future 
home of the family. He was a tailor by trade. 

Dr. Young attended the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, and followed 
the medical profession all his active life. He was very successful and prominent 
among the pioneers. He came to Clinton county in 1835. He and Mar- 
garet N. Robison were married on March 21, 1848. She was a daughter of 
Andrew Pobison. To Dr. Young and wife five children were born, two 
of whom are still Jiving, namely: Eobert, born February 9, 1850, married 
Sarah E. Taylor, who died in April, 1S85 ; Louisa, now the wife of Owen E. 
Beard, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume: Mary, born June 
15, 1853, died June 11 ; t886; Hulda. born May 21, 1858 (deceased), and 
Milton, born January 20, 1863 died April 1, 1803 The death of the mother 
of the above named children occurred on March iy; 1863, and Dr. Young 
later married Susanna Compton, on November 1, 1864. Her death occurred 
on March 15, 1908. Dr. Young has also been deceased some time. 







CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 645 

To A. H. Coapstick and wife four children were born, all now deceased, 
namely : Ida M., John and two who died in infancy. 

Mr. Coapstick was a Democrat politically, a member of the Presbyterian 
church, and a member of the Free and Accepted Masons Lodge No. 304 at 
jMiddlefork. He carried the sublime precepts taught by bis lodge and his 
church into bis even day life and was therefore a highly esteemed and in- 
fluential man and one of our best citizens, and when he was summoned to 
his. eternal reward on July 1. 1895, he was greatly missed from the township 
and county of his residence. 



BERLIE E. FRIEND. 



It is indeed gratifying to the biographer, in looking over such a county 
as Clinton, to see men so young in years as Berlie E. Friend, of Forest 
township, have such a splendid start as an agriculturist. It indicates that 
in due course of time he will rank, no doubt, among the foremost men of 
his line of endeavor in the locality. Many a young man starts out with the 
same ambition and determination as did he but desire ungratified is bad 
for most people ; they become discouraged after a time and slacken their pace, 
become indifferent, do their tasks half-heartedly and begin drifting with the 
current. The end is easily foretold — failure, not infrequently disgrace and 
ruin. 

Mr. Friend was born December 10, 1888, in this township and county. 
He is a son of Leonard and Martha E. (Davis) Friend. They were married 
July 30, 1879. The father was born March 1, 1855, m Indiana, and his 
death occurred in T894, March 24th. He came .to Clinton county when a 
boy and here grew to manhood, received such educational advantages as the 
early-day schools afforded and here he spent the rest of his life successfully 
engaged in farming. His only child was our subject. A history of the 
Davis family may be found in the sketch of Clint Davis, also that of Mrs. 
Laura B. Dunn, appearing on other pages of this volume. They are half 
brother and half sister to our subject's mother. 

Berlie E. Friend grew to manhood on his father's farm and there 
assisted with the work when he became of proper age. and he received his 
education in the common schools of his township. 

On December 1 >, 1906, Mr. Friend married Mary Alter, who was born 
in Forest township, this county, June 25, 1889, and here she grew to woman- 



646 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

hood and received her education in the public schools. She is a daughter of 
John T. and Melissa (Miller) Alter, both still living. To our subject and 
wife one child has been born, Clifton Friend, whose birth occurred on June 
5, 1908. 

Mr. Friend has always engaged in farming and has been very success- 
ful. He is owner of a productive and well improved place of one hundred 
and twenty acres, all tillable, and he has a good home and convenient out- 
buildings. He keeps Jersey cows, Duroc hogs and all-purpose horses, and 
carries on general stock raising and farming. 

Fraternally, he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Forest, and politically, he is a Republican. 

Our subject's mother was married a second time to W. H. Wells, a 
farmer, now retired, and living in Russiaville. She was born June 19, 1856, 
and died May 20, 1906. She had no children by her second marriage. 



HENRY MILTON BOZWORTH, 

Such a life as has been led by Henry Milton Bozworth, a highly respected 
farmer of Warren township, Clinton county, merits a record of good deeds, 
that the debt due it may be acknowledged and that it serve as a stimulus to 
others to endeavor to emulate it. But his record is too familiar to the people 
of the locality of which this history deals to recpiire any elaborate treat- 
ment here, his life work speaking for itself in stronger terms than the 
biographer could employ in polished periods. There is no doubt that this 
long continued strength of body and mind has been due to his conservative 
habits, wholesome living and pure thinking. He is known as a man who likes 
to see others succeed as well as himself, is hospitable and charitable, and un- 
desirous of the plaudits of his fellows. Every year finds him further ad- 
vanced in. a material way, and with a growing list of people whom he mini' 
bers as his friends. 

Henry M. Bozworth was born on April 7, 1854 in Owen township, 
linton county, and was the son of William and Polly J. (Shaffer) Bozworth. 
William Bozworth was born on October 23, 1825, in Preble county, Ohio, and 
moved to the Hoosier state before his marriage, settling in Clinton county, 
where he is still living, in Owen township, enjoying comfort and happiness 
in his last years. His has been a life well spent, as he has been a man who 
grasped opportunities and made himself useful, not only to himself, but to 



1 c. -'...'■"■■•/■.. ■■ 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 647 

. his associates. He followed farming all of his life, and was very successful 
in the pursuit of the same. Politically, he was a Democrat. Our subject's 
mother was born April II, 1828, in Union county. Indiana, and she died 
on January 23, 1877. She was the devoted mother of five children: John F., 
Jacob A., Mary E. Lawrence, Henry Milton and William A., all living. 

After receiving the usual common school education. Henry Bozworth 
began teaching school, but soon gave up this vocation in order to take up 
farming which was to be his life work. With the exception of a few \ ears in 
Carroll county, Indiana, Mr. Bozwell has tilled the soil of Clinton county, 
and has been identified with the commercial and civic interests of this 
locality. He has lived in Warren township for thirteen years. His work may 
be described as general farming, also stock raising, including a mixed breed 

' of cows, Duroc and Chester White hogs, and draft horses. Where he lives 
Mr. Bozworth possesses one hundred and forty acres of excellent land, all 
of which, but twenty-two acres, is tillable. His estate has the best im- 
provement, such as tiling, fencing and implements. Mr. Bozworth built 
his own home, which is one of the most noticeable of the country-side. In 
connection with his agricultural interests, Mr. Bozworth finds opportunity to 
devote his energy to outside things, being a great reader and a lover of 
pleasure. He enjoys the political game, and today is contented because he is 
with the party in power- — the Democrats. 

On August 8, 1878, Mr. Bozworth took as his wife Rebecca E. Haggard, 
the daughter of James and Elizabeth (Thacker) Haggard, and a native of 
Illinois, having been born there on August 22, 1858. Her father was born 
in Ross county, Ohio, on March 6, 1820, and died January 2, 1901. Mrs. 
Bozworth's mother was born on September 5, 1821, in the state of Virginia, 
married Mr. Haggard \ugust 14, 1842, and was called to her death October 

28, 1897. Mrs. Bozworth received a common school education, and for several 
terms taught in the Clinton county schools. Mrs. Bozworth was the mother 
of five children. Ellis L., born October 1, 1879; Letitia J., born November 

29, 188.1, died on March 21, 1885; James W., born August 3, 1883; Martha 
' E., born June 22, 1888, died February 2, 189 1 and Earl, born January 6, 1890, 

died February 25, 1891. Mrs. Bozworth died on the 12th of May, 1891. 

Mr. Bozworth was married the second time on May 28, 1893, to 

Elizabeth S. Wagoner, who was born* in Carroll county, Indiana, on May 

29, 1851, and was the daughter of Samuel and Catherine (Troxell) Wagoner. 
'Her father was born July 24, 1827, in the Buckeye state, and died on June 

20, 1908; the mother was born October 23, 1832, also in Ohio, near Dayton, 
'and she is still living in Carroll county, Indiana. Mr. Wagoner was a farmer 



648 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

all of his life, and a staunch Republican. To Mr. Bozworth's second mar- 
riage there lias been no issue. 



CHARLES E. McOUlNN. 

Examples of manhood that make lasting impression on the reader are 
worthy of record in the annals of history wherever they are found. By a 
few observations the biographer intends to convey in the following para- 
graphs, specifical'v. and yet without fulsome narrative, Mine idea of the high 
standing of Charles E, McQuinn, one of the well known and successful far- 
mers of Forest township, Clinton county. Those who know him will readily 
acquiesce in the statement that many elements of a solid and practical 
nature were^nited in his composition, and have won for him material suc- 
cess and the high regard of his fellow men in the locality of which this 
volume deals his life and achievements earning for him a conspicuous place 
among his compeers He is a man of kindliness and neighborly impulses, 
and he has sought to carry into his every-day life the precepts of the Golden 
Rule. 

Charles E. McQuinn was born on the sixteenth day of December, 1878, 
and his birthplace was in Forest township, Clinton county, Indiana. He 
was the son of John T. and Sarah C. McQuinn. John T. McQuinn is a 
native of Johnson county, Indiana, and was born February 18, 1842. Our 
subject's great-grandfather, Ezekiel McQuinn, was horn in Virginia on 
September 2, 1767. He was twice married, and to his first marriage were 
born six children: Ruth, Susannah, Elizabeth, Catherine, James and. Isaiah. 
His wife died while a resident of Virginia, and later Mr. McQuinn moved to 
Kentucky, where he married Elizabeth Coons, who bore him seven children: 
Strather, Sarah, John, Willis, Martin, Jephtha and Newton. In 1834, he 
moved to and settled on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Johnson 
county, Indiana, at Nineveh, and he and his wife were members of the old 
Baptist church society ihat erected their house of worship on a corner of 
his farm. Jephtha McQuinn, son of Ezekiel and father of John T., was born 
in Kentucky August io, 1818, and at the age of sixteen years came with 
his father to the new home in Indiana, and in 1840 married Luzina Chappell, 
daughter of John and Mary (Musselman) Chappell To this union were 
born the following children: John T., Mary E., and Rebecca A. The mother 
died when our subject was but eight years of age, and the father then mar- 



..___. . . : . — ' ■ ' ■ ■ 




CHAS. E. McQUINN AND FAMILY 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 649 

ried Elizabeth Musgrove, daughter of Nathan and Rebecca (Chappel) 
Musgrove, and the children of this marriage were William N., Newton A., 
Ira W., Levi and Silas H. 

John T. McOiiiiU' has been a farmer all of his life He owns an ex- 
cellent farm of one hundred and eighty-three acres, in a good state of culti- 
vation and improved with a new dwelling of good size and convenient in 
all respects. Mr. McQuinn married Sarah C. Crim, the daughter of John 
and Mary (Adams) Crim, natives of Boone county, Indiana. Seven children 
have been born of this felicitous union, and they are Oscar N.. Truda B.. 
Mary L., Charles E., William A., Dezza B., and Annie C. 

Charles E. McQuinn received a common school education in the county 
of his birth, and on December 25, 1900, was united in marriage with Jennie 
Orr, who was born in Johnson township, Clinton county, Indiana, on March 
II, 1878, the daughter of Curran Orr and Caroline (Scircle) Orr. Three 
children have been born of this union, and they are: John Owen, born 
December 12, 1901 ; Charles Oren, born December 9, 1905; and Morris 
Ralph, born April 18, 1912. 

Mr. McQuinn has always farmed, and, though yet a young man, he 
owns fifty-five acres of land here, all tillable and covered with the latest 
improvements in equipment. In fraternal matters, Mr. McQuinn is a 
Mason and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, both lodges 
being at Forest. Religiously, he is a member of the Christian church. 
Politically, Mr. McQuinn has been very prominent, and in 19 12 was elected 
by the voters to the position of county commissioner. At the present time he 
is discharging the duties of this office in a most acceptable manner. 

Mrs. McQuinn's father, Curran Orr, was born in Johnson township, 
Clinton county, on December 13, 1843. His grandfather, Matthew Orr, 
came from Scotland and settled in the state of New York. He was a stone 
cutter by trade, and became quite wealthy. He married Mary Eagles, and 
the two passed a greater portion of their lives in Coshocton county, Ohio. 
Matthew Orr, father of Curran, was born in that county, and at eleven years 
of age became a drover, which business he followed until reaching maturity. 
Later he engaged in canal boating. He came to Clinton county Indiana, in 
1839, when this was a wilderness, and accumulated much property, owning 
at the time of his death, one thousand two hundred and forty-five acres of 
Johnson county land. He could have purchased Lafayette and all it included 
when he first came for three hundred dollars. He was a Jackson Democrat, 
and held the first trusteeship of Johnson township. He married Armina 
Shaw, the daughter of Elijah Shaw, and the following children were born 



65O CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

to them: Jerry, Nathan, Thomas, James, Matthew, Curran, Alford, George, 
Catherine, Julia, Mary, William and John. The father died March 29, 
1870. 

Curran Orr was married to Caroline Scircle, the, daughter of George A. 
and Malinda (Ryan) Scircle. George A. Scircle was one of the first men 
to settle on Indian Prairie in Johnson township, and was-a large land owner. 
The town of Scircleville was named after him James Ryan, Mrs. Orr's 
maternal grandfather, was a soldier in the war of 1812. Curran Orr and 
wife were the parents of the following children: James M., Delia, Minnie 
C, Jennie, Adam C, and Eva S. 



JOHN UNGER. 



In the early days the state of Indiana was a tempting field to the ener- 
getic, ambitious, strong-minded men, and her various counties were filled 
with them during the time she was struggling to a position in the sisterhood 
of states. There was a fascination in the open prairie and thick forest of 
the Middle West presented to activity and originality which attracted men 
from the South and East, and induced them to brave all the privations and 
discomforts of frontier life for the pleasure and gratification of constructing 
their fortunes in their own way and after their own methods. It is this 
class of men more than any other who gave shape, direction, and character 
to the community Of the class just mentioned was the Unger family, one 
of the earliest to locate within the borders of the locality known now as 
Clinton county, and here the various members of the family have continued 
to play an important part in her affairs from that remote pioneer period to 
the present day. One of the best known members of this family is John 
Unger, who is a man of talent and fine personal traits of character, and for 
years has been one of the best known and most popular farmers of the 
county. 

John Unger was born April 7, 1854, in Howard county, Ind., and came 
to Clinton county, with his parents when he was only six years of age. John 
Unger was a son of George W. and Elvira (Maggart) Unger, whose life 
histories are recounted at length in the sketch of M. V. Unger, a brother of 
John. To give a brief synopsis, however, of these worthy parents we will 
say that George W. Unger was the son of George and Elizabeth ( Bailey) 
Unger, and was born in Morgan county, West Va., on May 28, 1825, and 



■■ ■ . ' i i La ; 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA, 65 1 

died ai December 20, 189.:, in Clinton county, hid. lie was married to 
Elvira Maggart on March : 851 a gir] who was born January 12, 1828, 
and lied February : i -. tel< I affice of 

magistrate in this county and was honored itl Ll position four successive 
'terms of four years each, [n r.886 he served on the United States jury 
rnally, be was a memb I th( Free and Accepted Masons, Middlefork 
Lodge No. 304. To his wile ivere born nine children, namely Sarah, John, 
David, Martin V., Nancy J., Calvin, Eliza E., and Oliver C 

John Unger attended the common schools of his home county when he 
was young, and .ben began his career in agriculture hi irk, in 

which be has met more thai the ordinary amount of success. Mr Unger's 
work consists of general fanning, supplemented by stock raising. His crock 
includes Shorthorn and a few Jersey cows, Duroc hogs, English shires, and 
Gold Lace and Wyandotte chickens. His stock bears a reputation in Clin- 
ton county as being of the blue ribbon variety, and Mr. Unger is very proud 
of his success in this line of endeavor. He is also a successful apiarist, keep- 
ing about fifteen hives of bees. He owns one hundred and twenty-nine and 
one-half acres of fertile land here, all tillable with the exception of three acres. 
The land is well improved in every respect, and is lasting testimony to Mr. 
Unger's skill as an agriculturist. Mr. Unger built his own home on his 
estate, and it is a splendid example of the modern farmhouse The visitor 
to the Unger homestead is always assured a cordial welcome, for our subject 
is imbued with that gracious hospitality which is productive of the esteem 
and respect of every acquaintance and friend. He is a "hail fellow well 
met," in all that that oft-repeated phrase connotes. 

On January 7, 187^ John Unger was married to Man/ K. Lucas, who 
was born August 16, 1854 in North Carolina, in Montgomery county, and 
was the daughter of Joel and Nancy (Graves) Lucas, natives of the Old 
North State. The father was a farmer and in politics a Republican. Mrs. 
Unger, accompanied by her parents, moved from North Carolina to Clay 
county, Ind., and later came to Boone county. Six children were born to 
Mr and Mrs. Unger, namely: Mattie B., born October 30, 1875, died 
October 3, 1880; Otis C, born April 22, 1878, married Donna Catron; 
George V., born July 7, 1880, married Olive CampbelJ ; David E., born May 
1, 1883, died April 9, 1887; John A,, born October 29, 1885, married Velma 
Catron; and Franklin C, born November 18, 1889, married Fern Vencill. 
Franklin C. Unger is a graduate of the noted school at Trenton, Missouri, 
with the class of 1909 Mrs. Unger died on February 16, 1913. 



.—*_!-- 



652 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Unger has acted as administrator in the successful settling up of 
two estates and is at present acting as guardian of a minor heir. Fraternally, 
he is a Mason at Middlefork. Religiously, he is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, having joined when he was thirteen years of age. Politic- 
ally, he is a Democrat, and was trustee of Warren township from 1900 to 
1904. 

Mary Katherine Unger (Lucas), daughter of Joel and Nancy Lucas, 
was born August 16, 1854, in Montgomery county, North Carolina. Died 
February 16, 191 3, aged fifty-eight years and six months. 

Al ihe age of six years, she with her parents, thirteen brothers and 
sisters, came to this state, the family settling in the western part of Boone 
county, where she grew to young womanhood. At the age of nineteen she 
united with the Mount Zion Methodist Protestant church, near her home. 

January 7, 1875, she was united in marriage to John Unger, who, to- 
gether with four sons and eleven grand children, one brother and two sisters 
still survive; two children, one daughter, Mattie Belle, and one son, David 
Edward, having preceded her to the home beyond. The sons living are 
Otis C, George V., John A. and Franklin C. Candace Routh and Hannah 
Dean, sisters, and Purdine Lucas, brother, are the only ones of the large 
family of brothers and sisters who still survive her. 

She was a faithful wife and loving mother, a kind and obliging neigh- 
bor. The deepest affection was shown by her for her four sons and her 
love was ever concerned with their welfare. 

During her last illness she requested her visiting minister to pray for 
her boys. Before she died she drew her husband down to her, and, with her 
arms lovingly around his neck, told him that Jesus had heard her prayers 
and al! was well and she was readv to go. 



PERRY E. STOMS. 



Perry E. Stoms is one of the later generation of farmers and stock 
raisers of Clinton county, native and to the mannei born, who form an im- 
portant element in the maintenance of the prosperity of the county and are 
helping greatly to extend its wealth. He is a son of an early pioneer of this 
part of Indiana who played an important part in developing the agricultural 
resources of this famous region. He is a man who keeps himself thoroughly 







CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 653 

posted upon leading events, political, religions, business and scientific, and is 
a man of decided views, adhering to his convictions with the natural 
strength of his character. 

Perry E. Stonis was born on September I, 1878, in Warren township, 
Clinton county, and is the son of Isaac H. Stoms and Jemima A. (Kingery) 
Stoms. Isaac II. Stoms is accorded a lengthy review on another page of 
this work, but it is fitting that a synopsis of his useful career should be writ- 
ten at this time. Isaac H. Stoms was born on the 16th of August, 1825, in 
New Jersey, the son of William and Phoebe (Hughes) Stoms. The par- 
ents were natives of New Jersey, and the father was a farmer all of his life, 
and a Republican. Isaac H. Stoms was one of five children: Mar) Jane, 
Isaac, Martha, Jacob and William, all deceased. After a common school 
education, Isaac H. Stoms moved from New Jersey to Dearborn county, 
Indiana, and then to Clinton county in the early forties. He died on August 
16, 1887, after an unusually prosperous life as a farmer. He served in 
Company F, Fifty-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil war. 
His marriage to Jemima Kingery occurred on July 20, 1871, and to the 
union two children were born — Dora May, born May 24, 1874, died in 
October, 191 1, the wife of John Hale, and Perry E., our subject. 

Perry E. Stoms had the advantage of an education in the common 
schools of his home county, and having learned the agricultural art from 
his honored father, he embarked soon after leaving school in the occupation 
of farming and stcok raising. He is, at present, farming in Warren town- 
ship, this county, and owns two hundred acres of excellent farm land, all 
tillable with the exception of thirty acres. The land is well ditched and 
otherwise improved according to the dictates of the twentieth century. Good 
fences surround and subdivide the estate. Mr. Stoms owns his own home in 
Middlefork, and it is a commodious and substantial dwelling. Besides gen- 
eral farming Mr. Stoms specializes in the raising of fine Jersey cows, a 
general breed of hogs and draft and general purpose horses. Mr. Stoms is 
proud of his stock, and is a frequent exhibitor. 

On December 24, 1900, Mr. Stoms was united in marriage with Bertha 
McAlrath, whao was born in Howard county, Indiana, on June 26, 1883, 
and was the daughter of Henry and Florence (Mor,ris) McAlrath. Her 
parents are natives of Indiana, and are both living at this writing. Mrs. 
Stoms received a common school education, also high school training at 
Russiaville, Howard county, Indiana There has been no issue to the union 
of Mr, and Mrs. Stoms. 



! _ 



654 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Mr. Stonis takes a large interest in the political life of the county, and 
has ever been a supporter of the Republican ticket. 



ISAAC H. STOMS. 



So long as there is a history will men and women love to read of their 
forefathers who braved the untracked forests of the West, so that homes 
might be built, and the resources of a new country opened up Their mis- 
sion was a heroic one ; they were not driven from the East bv religious op- 
pression, political stri <e, or any other thing such as our ancestors across the 
sea have had to experience; instead, they traveled over the mountains and 
struck this territory because there they believed awaited greater prosper- 
ity and, in consequence, better homes for their children. Their names are 
written in letters of gold, and will ever be perpetuated in the- annals of the 
country. One of the sturdy, God-fearing men was Isaac H. Stoms, a 
native of New Jersey. He came to Clinton county before there were any 
railroads, roads, bridges, and just a few settlements far apart, with homes 
scattered in the forest, surrounded by the native inhabitants, in the shape of 
animals and Indians. He was an honorable, courteous and sympathetic man, 
an indefatigable worker, and a man who held the esteem of every one who 
knew him. 

Isaac H. Stoms was born on August 16, 1825, in New Jersey, the son 
of William and Phoebe (Hughes) Stoms. These parents were natives of 
New Jersey, and the father died when our subject was a small child The 
mother died in 1878. The father was a farmer all of his life, and an active 
supporter of the Republican party. Five children were born to these par- 
ents : Mary Jane, Isaac, Martha, Jacob and William, all deceased 

In his youth our subject received a common school education He 
moved from his native state, New Jersey, to Dearborn county, Indiana, and 
then to Clinton county in the early forties. He entered the agricultural pro- 
fession and continued in it during his entire life. He was very prosperous 
in this vocation, and being a good trader, he possessed at the time of his 
death, on August 16, 1887', over eight hundred acres of excellent and tillable 
land. Mr. Stoms saw a little service in the Civil war, enlisting in 1864, at 
one of the last calls for volunteers, in Company F, Fifty-first Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry. During the short time he was permitted to serve, however, 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 655 

he performed well every duty which was assigned to him, and was, in every 
respect, a gallant soldier. 

On July 20, 1871. Mr. Stonis was married to Jemima Kingery, who 
was born in Union county, Indiana, on February 17, 1844, tne daughter of 
Joseph and Elizabeth (Morrier) Kingery. Her father was a native of the 
Old Dominion and died in August, 1863. Her mother came from the state 
of Pennsylvania, and she passed from this life in 1881. Both parents lived 
and worked on a farm all of their lives. The father was a hardy specimen 
of the American farmer, and was a stanch Republican all of his life. Two 
children were born to the union of our subject and wife: Dora May, born 
May 24, 1874, died October, 191 1, wife of John Hale; and Perry, born 
September 1, 1878, married Bertha McAlrath, and lives in Middlefork 

Mrs. Stoms was twice married. Her first husband was William Stoms, 
a brother of Isaac Stoms, our subject. William Stoms was born on August 
30, 1833, and was married to Jemima Kingery on March 4, i860. He was a 
soldier in the Civil war, enlisting in 1864 for a short term of service. His 
death occurred soon after the close of that conflict. Mrs. Stoms now lives 
in Middlefork, where she has a home and about three hundred and seventy 
acres of excellent farm land, all tillable but about sixty acres. The land is 
well tiled, fenced and improved in various other ways. Mrs. Stoms rents 
the whole of the land. 

Mrs. Stoms has been for forty years a member of the Middlefork Bap- 
tist church. 



JAMES B. HILL. 



The foundation of prosperity in Indiana is agriculture and the faithful 
husbandman can truly be called a pillar of the state, though in an incon- 
spicuous way. Such was James B. Hill, the memory of whose labors re- 
mains, though he has passed from this life. 

Mr. Hill was born in Hamilton, O., August, 1828. When he was but 
a lad of eight years his parents brought him to Tippecanoe county and 
settled on a farm where they remained during the life-time of the parents. 
The tribulations endured by the early pioneers were not unknown to the 
Hill family, but they weathered the hardships in grand style and succeeded. 

Mr. Hill was married to Mrs. Margaret (Southard) Ross, a widow, -on 
February 12, 1880. She was the daughter of Aaron H. and Nancy (Lemon) 



656 . CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Southard. Her father was^a native of New Jersey, and came to Butler 
county, Ohio, when but a baby. Afterward he moved to Jefferson, Ind., 
where he was a merchant, then to Frankfort. He has the distinction 
of being one of the earliest settlers in the county, following his trade as a 
merchant all the time. At one time it was estimated that he owned a large 
part of the east side of Frankfort. He had six children, four of whom are 
still living. No children were born to Mr. and Mrs. James Hill, but she 
has two children by her first husband, John F. Ross, they being Charles 
W. and John F. Ross. 

Mr. Southard was a merchant in Frankfort, all his life. He had no 
ambitions to shine in the limelight of publicity by entering political life, but he 
supported the Democratic- party very materially. He attended the Presby- 
terian church. 

James B. Hill was a farmer most of his life, following that vocation 
in Tippecanoe county until he moved to Frankfort about fifteen years ago. 
The remainder of his life he spent retired. Fraternally, he was a member 
of the Masonic Order, and in religion was a Presbyterian. 



M. R. CATRON. 



The farming interest of Warren township, Clinton county, arc carried 
on by an active and intelligent class of men who are thus performing their 
share in maintaining and extending the agricultural interests of this locality. 
Among them is the gentleman whose name is at the head of this sketch, 
and who is a member of one of the pioneer families of this section. Mr. 
Catron has wrought great improvements on his farm whereby it has become 
one of the best ordered farms in the western part of the county the soil 
being adaptable for full cultivation and valuable improvements on every 
hand adding to its worth and attractiveness. Mr. Catron is endowed with 
strength of mind and ability, and his sensible and practical views give him 
much prestige in his home community. He has achieved universal suc- 
cess and the esteem and respect of all. 

M. R. Catron was born on September 16, 1858, in Warren town- 
ship, Clinton county, and was the son of Andrew and Sarah (Proffit) 
Catron. Andrew Catron was a native of Tennessee, having been born there 
in 1822, and moved to Indiana after his marriage. He bought land in this 
county, and led the life of a farmer, passing from this earth in April, 1896. 




m 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 657 

The mother was born in 1828, in Tennessee, and died in October, 1903. 
These parents received, in their youth, the best education that the pioneer 
schools afforded. Ten children came to bless the union: one who died in 
infancy; Jacob L., Louisa I., John T, Sarah C, Adam, Henry Douglas, N. 
R., and Emma. 

M. R. Catron has followed farming all of his life, and has been sing- 
ularly successful at it. He owns one hundred and thirty-seven acres of 
good land, all tillable but twenty acres. The estate is well tiled, and is 
otherwise improved. Mr. Catron, himself, cleared part of the land, and 
built fencing. He raises Shorthorn cattle, a general breed of hogs, and 
general purpose horses. His stock is well cared for, and ranks high among 
the stock dealers of the county and state. 

Mr. Catron was united in marriage with Sarah Ridnour on April 9, 
1884. She was born in Warren township, Clinton county, on October 9, 
1859. Her parents were natives of Maryland, farmers, and the father 
was a supporter of the Democratic party. Mrs. Catron was given the bene- 
fits of a good common school education. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Catron eight children have been born: Elba, Lora, Fern, Curtis, Jesse, Cleo, 
William Bryan, and Arnold. 

In the political circles of Clinton county, Mr. Catron has always taken 
an active part. He is a staunch Democrat, and was once supervisor in 
Warren township. He is at present on the advisory board and his services 
in this capacity are very acceptable to everyone. Fraternally, he is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Middle fork, and is treas- 
urer of the lodge. In religious affairs, Mr. Catron belongs to the Univer- 
salist church. 



DR. OWEN A. J. MORRISON. 

One of the oldest practitioners of the county of Clinton and one who 
has made a success of his vocation in every way is Dr. Owen A. J. Morrison, 
of Middlefork, Warren township, and in a biographical work such as this it 
is highly appropriate and necessary that he should be given specific mention. 
Rapid progress has been made in the medical science since Dr. Morrison 
began active practice, but it must be said to his credit that he has kept abreast 
of the times in every particular, and has been successful, not only personally, 
but in the operation and technical side of his profession. Dr. Morrison is one 
(42) 



658 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of the pioneers of Indiana, and comes from a family who have made their 
name honored and respected in the county — indeed, in the state and country, 
and their activities have always been directed into a channel where some 
benefit would come to the community of their home and the people who were 
their friends. 

Dr. Owen A. J. Morrison was born on February 26, 1845. in Warren 
township, Clinton county, and was the son of James and Margaret (Spahr) 
Morrison. James Morrison was born February io, 1795, in Fleming county, 
Kentucky, moving to Ginton county in 1827, and entering land in Warren 
township in 1831. Before coming to Indiana, however, Mr. Morrison had 
moved to Ohio, where he followed farming and was a surveyor. He was 
one of the first men to come to the locality of linton county with the inten- 
tion of hewing a home from the wilderness. He succeeded in making good 
in this country, and lived a very active and useful life. He was a Democrat 
in politics, as are most of the Morrison family. He passed from this life in 
October, 1870. Our subject's mother was born July 27, 1800, in Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania, and moved from there with her parents to 
Ohio, where she married Mr. Morrison. She was called to her death on 
July 17, 1886. Both these parents had good educations, considering the 
character of the schools in those days. The father, for a time, taught school. 
Seven children were born to this union, and they are all deceased with the 
exception of our subject. The children were : John, Martin S., Henry Y., 
Sarah Jane, Margaret M., James and Owen. 

Dr. Owen Morrison obtained his early education in the schools of 
Warren townshjp, also received some schooling in Frankfort. In 1866 he 
attended a commercial college in Indianapolis, and afterward the Fort Wayne 
Medical College, from which institution he was graduated with the class of 
1880. He immediately took up the practice of his profession in Middlefork, 
Warren township, and is still active. He has prospered because he has 
never flinched from the sternest duty imposed upon him, and many times he 
has faced tasks and undergone hardships which were accomplished at great 
sacrifice to himself, but at all time he has been actuated by the divine charac- 
ter of his calling, the art of healing. Dr. Morrison owns his own home here 
in Middlefork, and it is one of the handsomest residences in the town He 
also owns his own office. 

On November 29, 1866, Dr. Morrison was married to Anna Johnson, 
who was born in Michigan township, August 11, 1848, being the daughter 
of William V. and Lucy (Fuel) Johnson. The father and mother were both 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 659 

born in Ohio, and the former was an honored attorney-at-law in Michigan- 
town, this county. Two children have been born to Dr. Morrison and wife, 
namely: William H., born January 31, 1870, married Hattie E. Shaffer, 
and now living in Frankfort; and Olive V., born May 11, 1868, and mar- 
ried to A. J. Ferrier. 

Since May, 1866, Dr. Morrison has been a member of the Masonic 
lodge; he now is enrolled in the Middlefork branch. Religiously, he is a mem- 
ber of the Universalist church. Until 1884 he voted the Democratic ticket, 
but in that year he changed to the Prohibition party. 



CALVIN UNGER. 



Perhaps no family in the history of Clinton county has occupied a more 
prominent position or has had more of an active part in the shaping of the 
county policy and history than the Unger family. The representatives of 
this large and illustrious family have spread into the four quarters of the 
globe, but Clinton county may claim the possession of their name and good 
works. From the sturdy and thrifty George Unger, who was born in the 
German Empire in the sixteenth century, and who came to this country at a 
time when states were being formed and French and English explorers were 
alternately discovering new country and fighting hostile Indians, down to 
the present generation, represented strongly in Clinton county, the line has 
been one worthy of history's proudest encomiums. The Ungers have not 
always trod the royal road to prosperity; reverses which may fall to any 
people of the earth have obstructed their way; ambitions have been crushed, 
ideals shattered, hopes blighted, and dreams dissolved, but the steely per- 
sistence of the Teuton of old has predominated, and success has come from 
myriads of deeds and activities right! v performed. Calvin Unger is typical 
of the Unger blood, and it is our pleasure to present the facts in his life 
history which shall prove his right to hold the name of Unger. 

Calvin Unger was born on October 5, 1861, in Warren township, Clin- 
ton county, Indiana, and was the son of George W. and Elvira (Maggart) 
Unger. George W. Unger was the son of George and Elizabeth (Bailey) 
Unger, who are given narrative treatment in the sketch of Martin V. Unger, 
a brother of our subject. George W. Unger was born on May 28, 1825, in 
Morgan county, West Virginia, and died on December 20, 1892, in Clinton 



66o 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 



county. He was married to Elvira Maggart on March 13, 1851, and she 
was born January 12, 1828, and died February 28, 1896. In 1866 George 
Unger was elected to the office of magistrate and was re-elected four suc- 
cessive terms of four years each. In 1886 he was drawn on the United States 
jury. Fraternally, he was a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, 
Middlefork lodge, No. 304. Nine children were borm to Elvira Unger, 
namely: Sarah, John, David, Martin V., Nancy J., Calvin, Eliza E. and 
Oliver C. 

Calvin Unger received a common school education in his youth. After 
leaving school he took up farming, which he learned in all its phases, and 
was trained properly by his father, so that it is nothing strange that he has 
made a success of his business. He has confined his farming activities to 
Warren township, and at present owns one hundred and thirty-five acres of 
excellent farm land, all tillable but about fifteen acres, and equipped fully 
with the most modern improvements, in tiling, fencing, farm building, and 
implements. Most of these improvements have been built by Mr. Unger, and 
it speaks well for his versatility and adaptability. Mr. Unger has a nice 
home on his estate, and it is of approved and convenient architecture. Mr. 
Unger raises a mixed breed of hogs, Jersey cows, and heavy draft and 
Shire horses. In the breeding of the Shire horses Mr. Unger has had unus- 
ual success. By careful mating and caution he has produced animals fifteen- 
sixteenths pure, and in one more season will have a pure Shire stock. Buff 
Orphington chickens are also raised on the Unger farm in large numbers. 

On August 16, 1884, Mr. Unger was married to Eliza E. Branstetter, 
who was born in Warren township, Clinton county, on the 25th day of 
October, 1868, the daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Harmon) Branstetter. 
Her father was a native of Ohio and a farmer by occupation. He. died 
March 4, 1876. Mrs. Unger's mother was born in Tennessee in 1844, and 
departed from this life on March 14, J909, To Calvin Unger and wife five 
children have been born, namely: Ada D., born August 26, 1885. died 
November 22, 1887; Alma G„ born December 22, 1887, married Mabel 
Catron; Nannie Gladys, born September 12, 1889, married Frank Ridnonr; 
Harry Glenn, born September 9, 1897 ; and Dallas G., born April 24, 1900. 

Fraternally, Mr. Unger is a Mason at Middlefork. The Methodist 
Episcopal church claims his membership, and he is a willing supporter of 
that institution. Politically, Mr. Unger is allied with the party now in power 
— the Democratic. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 66l 



JOHN BERRY. 



To such gentlemen as John Berry, well known agriculturist and stock 
raiser of Russiaville. Forest township, is the locality of which this volume 
treats indebted for its high rank as a farming section, its prestige and high 
standing as a rich and finely developed community. Mr. Berry is an adept 
at farming, and has one of the best managed and most orderly farms in his 
township. He is known to his neighbors as a man of sensible views and 
sound convictions on all subjects with which he is conversant, and, taking a 
great interest in tit general development of his community while he is labor- 
ing for his individual advancement, he has won and retained the respect and 
good will of all who know him. 

John Berry was born February 16, 1850 in Connersville, Ind., the son 
of George C. and Sarah (Middleton) Berry. George C. Berry was born on 
August 22, 1818 in Maryland. When eighteen years of age he came to 
Indiana, accompanied by his brother and began farming in the new country. 
They were the only members of the family who ever came to this territory. 
He died here in 1877. He farmed all of his life, and was noted for his 
versatility, being able to delve into most any profession, a literal Jack of all 
trades. Our subject's mother was born April 15, 1818, in Indiana, and she 
passed from this life in April, 1900. Mr. Berry was her second husband, 
and three children were born to them, namely: Mary E., born August 6, 
1846 (deceased) ; John and George, born November 6, 1854. Our subject's 
grandfather on his maternal side John Middleton was born on June 23, 1792. 
Both parents receh'ed the restricted education of pioneer times, and were well 
known and respectct in their home community. 

John Berry moved to Clinton county, with his parents, when two years 
of age. He was educated in the common schools during the time when there 
was no work to be done on the farm. At the present time Mr. Berry claims 
a residence within the borders of Forest township for a period of sixty-one 
years, an unusual record and one that speaks well for the prosperity of the 
community and the industry of our subject. He owns an excellent farm of 
one hundred and eighty acres, all of which is tillable but eight acres. The 
estate is well tiled, fenced, and the most modern equipment is used in the 
management of the place. Mr. Berry has a nicely furnished and appointed 
home thereon. Besides general farming, Mr. Berry raises Shorthorn cattle, 
Duroc hogs and general purpose horses. Fraternally, Mr. Berry is a Mason, 



662 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

a member of the Knights of Pythias, and the Eastern Star, all at Forest. In 
politics, he takes an active part in Democratic circles. 

Mr. Berry has been twice married, his first wife being Elizabeth Nunne- 
maker, and he was married to her on September 15, 1872. Two children 
were born to this union, Myrtle M. and Herman. Mrs. Berry was born in 
this county in 1849, anfl was the daughter of Joseph Nunnemaker. She 
departed this life September 15, 1882. 

On February 16, 1898, Mr. Berry was married the' second time, to 
Cora McKinney, who was born in the state of Kentucky in June, 1867, the 
daughter of David and Mary E. (Crosswhite) McKinney, and died in 
March. 1909. She was ihe mothei of two children, namely: Margie, born 
April 6. 1899, and Ophir J,, born May 21, 1905. 



JOHN A. MERRICK. 

To attain a worthy citizenship by a life that is always honored and 
respected even from childhood deserves more than mere mention. It is no 
easy task to resist the temptations of youth and early manhood and plant a 
character in the minds and hearts of associates that will remain an unstained 
figure for all time. One may take his place in life through some vigorous 
stroke of public policy and even remain in the hearts of friends and neigh- 
bors, but to take such a position by dint of the practice of an upright life and 
without a craving for exaltation and popularity, is worthy of the highest 
praise and commendation. John A. Merrick, one of the sturdy citizens of 
Forest township, Clinton county, is a man respected and honored, not be- 
cause of the vigorous training of his special talents, but because of his daily 
life, which is a record of real, true manhood. Strong and forceful in his 
relations with his fellow men, he has gained the good will of his associates, 
ever retaining his reputation among men for integrity and high character 

. John A. Merrick was born September 30, 1847, ' n the house where he 
now lives in Forest township, Clinton county. In the early days his father 
carried the cedar and pine trees to this place from Indianapolis on horseback. 
Our subject's father was John Merrick and his mother was, before marriage, 
Nancy Tyner, born in 1813, and the daughter of Rev. William Tyner. She 
died on September 24, 1870. John Merrick, subject's father, was born De- 
cember 17, 1815, in Pennsylvania, and moved to Ripley county, Indiana, 
when about eighteen years of age and came to Clinton county in 1S46. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 663 

When twenty-six years old, he married Nancy Tyner, and to this union 
there was born a family of six children, namely: O. M., William II., de- 
ceased; John A., India, Martha and George W. Mr. Merrick married the 
second time, in 1872, to Cynthia A. Hutchison, who was horn in Switzerland 
county, Indiana, on March 1, 1831. Mr. Merrick was a farmer all of his 
life, having cleared the land comprising his farm. He passed from this life 
in January, 1895. 

John A. Merrick, our subject, received a common school education in 
a log cabin school, which was the best the county afforded in those days. 
Later he attended Franklin College for a while, and graduated from the Ann 
Arbor Law School in 1873. After this event he returned to farming, which 
vocation he has followed untiringly all of his life. He is now managing 
the old Merrick home place in Forest township. There he owns one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, and ninety four acres in another farm of the same 
township. Of the one hundred and sixty acres all is tillable with the excep- 
tion of thirty-five acres, which is in woods. The land is well tiled, and other- 
wise improved in the most modern fashion, the equipment being the work of 
Mr. Merrick himself. With the exception of six years, which was spent in 
Frankfort in the practice of law, Mr. Merrick has carried on general farm- 
ing. He has retired from active work, but runs the farm, however, and in 
a most successful manner. Besides general crop cultivation, Mr. Merrick 
raises various kinds of excellent stock, including Shorthorn cattle, Duroc 
hogs and general purpose horses, mostly Norman. Mr. Merrick brought the 
first Jersey Red hog that was ever in this count)'. Mr. Merrick finds time 
to take an active interest in the affairs of the Baptist church, and in the 
political circles of the county he bears the reputation of being one of the 
staunchest defenders the Republican party possesses. 

Mr. Merrick was united in marriage on May 13, 1873 to Nancy J. Sims, 
who was born in Warren township, this county, on February 27, 1848, the 
daughter of Cicero and Mary (Black) Sims. Mrs. Merrick's father was 
born January 12, 1822 in Rush county, Indiana, and he moved to Clinton 
county in 1835, dying there July 6, 1913. Her mother was born June 6, 
1824, in Wayne county, Indiana, and is still living in Frankfort. She was 
married to Mr. Sims seventy-one years ago the first day of last March, which 
fact comes near to being a record for the state. Mrs. Merrick was the 
mother of four children, namely: Lulie, born on February 25, 1874, died 
in 1882; Martha, born November 11, 1875, married to Bert Ogle, after 



" 4 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

receiving a good education in the Frankfort high school and Franklin Col- 
lege; Mary, born September 28, 1878, died in 1882; McDade, born December 
15, 1 88 1, died in 1S82. 

Bertrand D. Ogle, the husband of Martha Merrick, was born September 
3, 1872, in Elizabethtown, Indiana, and was the son of John and Rachael H 
(Lough) Ogle. John S. Ogle was horn October 9, 1844, in Williamstown 
Kentucky, and was the son of John and Amanda Ogle. He died February 
5, IQ*3- In his early life he came with his parents to Westport, Bartholo- 
mew county, Indiana, from which place he moved to Clinton county in 1873 
In 1893 he entered the mercantile business at Forest, which he continued 
for a period of fifteen years, after which he retired to his farm. On August 
10, 1865, he was united in marriage with Rachael Lough, and to this union 
were born: Bertrand D., Mrs. Lee Kelly, of Talbot and Earl C, of Moran. 
Mrs. Ogle died on July 12, 1905; she was born November 3, 1846. 

Bertram Ogle received a common school education in the schools of 
Forest township, and then was in the general merchandise business at Forest 
for fifteen years, and was very successful in this undertaking. For the last 
four years, however, Mr. Ogle has farmed, owning one hundred and twenty 
acres of tillable and fertile land. All is well improved, tiled, etc., with the 
exception of eight acres. Mr. Ogle belongs to the Masonic Order at Forest, 
and takes an active part in the fraternal life of the town. Religiouslv, he 
is a Baptist and politically he is a Democrat, serving on the advisory board 
at the present time in Forest township. 

On April 29, 1903, Mr. Ogle was married to Martha L. Merrick the 
daughter of John Merrick of this sketch. No children have been born to 
this union. 



IRA H. BEARD. 



One of the best known and most representative agriculturists of War- 
ren township, Clinton county, is Ira H. Beard, a man who has worked hard 
and managed well at the same time has so ordered his ways that he has 
avoided offense to those with whom he has had dealings or come into con- 
tact with in any way, being a man with proper conceptions regarding right 
and wrong and one who believes in following the precepts of the Golden 
Rule in the every-day affairs as near as possible, consequently he has ever 
enjoyed the confidence of his neighbors and acquaintances. Mr. Beard has 
turned his attention to his farming interests, but he has more than once 



— 1 




MR. AND MRS IRA H. BEARD. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 665 

proved that he has the capacity for most any kind of business to which he 
cares to direct his attention. 

Ira H. Beard was born on April 14, 1865, in Warren township, this 
county, in the old Beard homestead, and was the son of Adam and Mary 
(Sheets) Beard. Adam Beard was born October 15, 1828 in the state of 
Virginia, in Washington county, and he was six years old when he left the 
Old Dominion with his honored parents, crossed the Wabash river in wagons, 
and settled in Clinton county. He undertook the usual occupation of the 
pioneer — farming, and he made a success from the start, although he was 
compelled to work hard and redeem his farm from the wilderness. The 
mother of our subject was born December 24, 183 1, in Virginia also, and she 
died April 11, 1904. Mr. Beard passed from this life October 18, 1904. 
Eight children were born of this union: Sarah, married Baltzer Gordon; 
Louisa A., Margaret C, Phillip M., Mary J., Rebecca, Ira H., and James A. 

Ira H. Beard attended the common schools, and later the high school at 
Frankfort, so that the advantages of a fairly good education were his. 
Naturally, he took up farming immediately after his departure from school, 
and in the agricultural profession he has continued ever since, also has 
confined his endeavors within the limits of Warren township. He owns 
fifty-three and one-half acres in this township, all of which is tillable but 
four or five acres. Mr. Beard farms a total of two hundred and eighty acres, 
all of which is well improved in every respect. He raises an excellent grade 
of live stock — Jersey cows, Poland-China and Duroc hogs, Hamiltonian 
driving horses, and general purpose animals. Fraternally, Mr. Beard is a 
member of the Woodmen of the World lodge at Frankfort, and is a Mason 
at Middlefork. He has been very prominent in the affairs of the Methodist 
Protestant church, having held office in that institution. In politics, Mr. 
Beard is a Democrat, and in 1908 was elected trustee of Warren township, 
Clinton county, and in this capacity he is now serving with much satisfaction 
to his constituents. 

On October 3, 1886, Mr. Beard was married to Mary L. Kreisher, who 
was born in Clinton county on September 13, 1866, the daughter of Selby 
and Margaret (Thompson) Kreisher, natives of Indiana. Mrs. Beard's 
father was a farmer all of his life, and in politics, a Democrat. To this 
felicitous union there has been born seven children, namely: Asa L., married 
Neva Walter, live in Terre Haute, attending State Normal School ; Lola 
G., Vein. G„ Pansy T, Paul R., and Mary R. Melvin Ottis, the eldest, 
died at the age of eighteen years. 

In 1887, Mr. Beard moved to a farm near Moscow, Idaho, where the 
family remained six years, and then returned to Clinton county. 



. . _. . .- ■ — — 



'666 Cl.liVJ'UN COUNTY, IX) [ANA. 

D rGLAS S. KEEVER. 

Success has :ome ! las S. 1 sve farm< u st< :1 raiser of 
Johnson txn nshi Clintoi • he hi night il : ng legitimate 

lines and lias not I )itered ih< it waiting for fate to bring him a fortune on a 
golden platter as if seer,- n; iv of the ambitionless are doing. He was taught 
early in life all la I and that little is to be expected in this 

wrold without effort, continuous and rightly directed, so he has never had 
any particular qualms of conscience when he has had a task to perform, 
whether trivial or m] ' Mot only has he been taught to work when 

work was to be done, but to do well, hi; ,'ei : ' h thy the 

attention. Thus it is not i be wondered at that he has succeeded admirably 
at his chosen vocation — that ol agriculture — the noblest and most important 
of all vocations. 

Douglas S. Keever was born December 30, i860, in Warren, Ohio, and 
was the son ,of Henry and Elizabeth (Strickland) Keever. Henry Keever 
was born in 1824, in Butler county, Ohio, and in 1882 he came with his 
family to Johnson township. Clinton county, and died here on August 3, 
1895. In the early days Mr. Keever followed the profession of school teach- 
ing, but later gave that, up in favor of farming, at which he was very success- 
ful. Our subject's mother was born in Warren county, Ohio, in 1831, and 
died January 15, 1910. She and Mr. Keever were married on. September 

10, 1848, and were the parents of eleven children: John W., born February 

11, 1849 ,died October 19, 1849; Emily A., born October 22, 1850: Hannah 
J., born March 18, 1853, William H., born August 4, 1855, died in 1869; 
Frederick W., born. September it, 1858; Douglas S. Matilda, born Septem- 
ber 17, 1863; Clement T born March 28, 1866; Harry L., born June 17 
1869; Edward, born October 23. 1873; and Walter, born April 5, 1876, died 
August 5, 1876. 

Douglas S. Keever received a good common school education in his 
boyhood in Warren county, Ohio, and then entered the profession of farm- 
ing, wherein he has remained until the present day. His place in Clinton 
count) comprises one hundred acres of excellent land, every foot of which 
is plow land, well tiled, and covered with commodious farm buildings. Mr. 
Keever built his own home, which is an excellent piece of architecture. In 
connection with his cultivation of crops, Mr. Keever raises Jersey and short- 
horn cattle, Duroc hogs, Shire and Belgian horses and Plymouth Rock 
chickens. Mr. Keever is a strong Democrat, and from 1904 to 1908 was 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 667 

assessor of Johnson township, the duties of which office he fulfilled most ac- 
ceptably to the people. He holds membership with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows at Scircleville. 

Mr. Keever has been twice married. He was wedded to Rosa Hobbs 
on December 17, 1887', who was born in this county on December 24, 1867, 
the daughter of William and Susan (McDaniels) Hobbs, natives of In- 
diana. Mrs. Keever was called by death on March 26, 1893, aiter a t> re °f 
usefulness and devotion to family and home. She was the mother of one 
child, Emmazette, born September 14, 1888, now married to Charles B 
Marshall, of Pittsburg, Kansas. Mr. Keever later married Addie M. Moore. 
on Maicli 26, 1904. She was born in Bracken county, Kentucky, the daugh- 
ter of William and Louanna (Smith) Moore. Her father was born on 
Christmas day, 1S52, and died in 1903 ; her mother was .born on December 
14, 1856, and is still living. To Mr. and Mrs. Keever have been born two 
children: Gerald, born July 18, 1909, and William H., born July 17, 191 1. 



WILLIAM C. BETTS. 



One of the most conspicuous figures in the present-day history of 
Clinton county, in the agricultural and commercial circles, is William C. 
Betts, of Forest township. Equally noted as a citizen whose useful career has 
conferred credit upon the community and whose marked abilities and pro- 
gressive qualities have won for him much more than local repute, he holds 
today distinctive precedence as one of the most successful men that ever 
inaugurated and carried to successful termination large and important un- 
dertakings. Strong mental endowment, invincible courage and a determined 
will, coupled with an honesty of purpose that hesitates at no opposition, 
have so entered into his composition as to render him a dominant factor in 
the financial and business world and a leader of men in important enterprises. 
He is essentially a man of affairs, sound of judgment and far-seeing in 
what he undertakes; and ever}' enterprise to which he has addressed himself 
has resulted in liberal financial returns, while at the same time he has won 
and retained the confidence and good will of all classes, and is eminently 
entitled to conspicuous mention in a volume the scope of the one in hand. 

William C. Betts was born August 7', 1848, in Forest township, Clinton 
county, and was the son of John and Matilda (Boggs) Betts. John Betts' 



C)68 ' CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

life history has been mentioned before in this volume in the sketch of our 
subject's brother, Albert E. Bctts, but it is well that we again sketch the 
important events in his interesting life. John Betts was born June 21, 1825. 
in Union county, Indiana, and came to Clinton county in the year 1836. lie 
entered eighty acres of land in Forest township from the government in 
1848, cleared this tract, and in 1859 sold it; then bought one hundred and 
eighty-five acres north of his original holding. Afterward he added to this 
estate, and at the time of his death, on May 4, 1899. was the owner of con- 
siderable property. In 1883, he moved to Galveston, Indiana, where he lived 
the rest of his days in retirement, although he served as justice of the peace 
for several years. Politically, Mr. Betts was a Whig, and later a Republi- 
can, and all of his life was noted for his great church work. Our subject's 
mother was born on September 12, 1829, at Munroe, Ohio, and moved to 
Middlefork, this county, with her parents when she was four years of age. 
She died December 29, 1878. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Betts: William C. ; Rachael and Henry, twins (deceased), and Albert E., 
of whom a sketch is given in this volume. 

Our subject's grandfather was Isaac Betts, and he was a native of 
Tennessee, moving from that state to Union county, Indiana. His wife was 
Nancy Creek, a native of Union county. Our subject's grandfather on his 
maternal side was Elicum Boggs, who was born March 21, 1800, in Ohio, 
and his wife was Rachael Shipley, also born in Ohio, on April 5, 1800; they 
were married in the Buckeye state; he died January 1, 1877, and she de- 
parted from this life March 2, 1875. Our subject's great-grandfather was 
William Betts, and his great-grandmother was Jane Davis Betts. This 
couple lived in Tennessee and held slaves in Virginia in the early clays be- 
fore the Civil war. 

William C. Betts received a common schools ipducation in the county of 
his birth, and later attended Franklin College for a period of two years. 
Mr. Betts utilized the education he obtained by entering the profession of 
teaching in the common schools of Clinton county. For ten years he fol- 
lowed this occupation very successfully. He also was active in the timber 
business for a time. During the remainder of the time Mr. Betts was occu- 
pied with farming. He owns three hundred acres of excellent farm land in 
this county with his wife, and eighty acres here, where he has lived for the 
past thirty-nine years. Mr. Betts also has one hundred and thirty-nine 
acres in Union county, Indiana, which ranks as among the best farms of the 
locality. Mr. Betts has now retired from the active work of the farm, and 



CLIN! '. C01 NTYj INDIANA. 669 

leaves the management of his acres in the hands of his children. They raise 
a fine grade of Duroc hogs, Poll Angus cattle and general purpose horses. 
Mr. Betts belongs to th ' lodg diddlefork, and has been a strong 

supporter of the order. He claims membership with the Baptist church and 
has held the same for over fifty years Politically, he is a Republican. 

On November 12, 1873. William C. Betts was united in marriage with 
Addie Buchanan, who was born in Monroe county, Indiana, October 22, 
1849, an d was tne daughter of John IT. and Matilda (Sanders) Buchanan. 
John H. Buchanan was born in Somerset. Kentucky, February 25. 182 1, 
and died July 12, 1890. Air. Buchanan was a farmer by trade, and was 
among the most prosperous of his state. He was a Republican, and during 
the Civil war fought stoutly for the Union cause. He enlisted in 1864 and 
served from then on to the close of hostilities. Her grandfather on the 
paternal side was Cyrus Buchanan, of Kentucky, who came to Indiana in the 
early days and settled in Monroe county, Indiana, where he raised a large 
family. He afterward moved to the state pf Iowa, and there he died. Airs. 
Betts' grandmother Buchanan was formerly Jane Knox; born in Kentucky, 
the daughter of Colonel John Knox, who was an officer in the Revo- 
lutionary war. She had six sons, all of whom fought in the Civil war, a 
truly great contribution to the country's cause. Mrs. Betts' mother was 
Matilda Sanders, the daughter of John Sanders, who was born September 
3, 1792, in South Carolina, and married Nancy Brisco, who was born Janu- 
ary 2, 1796, in Hawkins county, Tennessee; these two were married ^Ken- 
tucky on May 9, 1811, and then they moved to Monroe county, Indiana. 
Mrs. Betts' great-grandfather was Henry Sanders, and he was born in Per- 
quimans county, North Carolina, on October 26, 1751, and died February 
13, 1834, after a gallant record, including service in the Colonial army in 
the Revolutionary, war. Mrs Betts' great-grandmother was Dica Blake, the 
daughter of John and Morning Blake, and was born May 15, 1761, and de- 
parted from this life on July 5, 1841 

Mrs. Betts received a good common school education in her youth, and 
attended Franklin College, where she got acquainted with William C. Betts 
— a typical college romance. Mrs. Betts was the mother of seven children, 
and was always devoted to their welfare and upbringing. The children 
were: Mrs. Lincoln .Stevens, Mrs Willard Johnson. John and Clarence (de- 
ceased), Frank, Judson and Mrs. Claude Cochran. Mrs. Betts was called to 
her death October 28, 1912. For over fifty years she had been a loyal, mem- 
ber of the Baptist church, and was one of the most active supporters of the 



670 CI.I.NTOX COUNTY, INDIANA. 

same. "In the community her life was always above reproach. In her as- 
sociations with her friends and neighbors her conduct was characterized by 
truthfulness, kindness, charity, and love. She had many friends because she 
proved herself a friend in all that the term implies." She left a Husband 
the children mentioned, seven grandchildren, one brother, William Bu- 
chanan, of Frankfort, one half brother, Judson Buchanan, and one half 
sister, Mrs. Mary Revington, both of Chattanooga, Tennessee; also one step 
brother and cousin. Hon. Newel Sanders, United States senator from Ten- 
nessee. 



JOSEPH THOMAS EARL. 

Kentucky has contributed to Indiana many prominent families of the 
class of pioneers who followed Boone— the greatest of them all— into the 
Blue Grass region, and were especially suited to the needs of the new country 
north of the Ohio river. Many of the men who crossed that picturesque 
stream to found new homes for themselves were determined largely by the 
absence here of that curse to any countrj — slavery. However, the practice 
of that institution in the "dark and bloody ground country" was not by any 
means the only reason that the Earl family left there at the beginning of 
the nineteenth century and established' their homes in the primeval forests of 
Clinton county, for here, by hard work and persistent effort, they became well 
established and the name of Earl has been a familiar sound throughout this 
section of the Wabash country, which they have done so much to develop. 

Joseph Thomas Earl was born on February 4. 1837 on Coffee Creek, 
between Paris and Vernon, in Jennings county, Ind. He was the son of 
Thomas and Nancy (Bush) Earl. Thomas Earl was born in Kentucky in 
1803. and was raised in the mountains of that state. He came to Indiana 
with his parents. James and Hannah Earl, in 1808, and they first settled on 
Coffee Creek, where the subject of this sketch was born. Here Thomas Earl 
followed and learned the trade of the farmer, also became a very proficient 
tailor and shoemaker. In politics, he was a Whig, and served once as trustee 
of Richgrove township, Pulaski county, Ind., to which county he had moved 
in 185 f. Pie later moved to Tippecanoe county and it was here that he died 
in the early '90's. His father, our subject's grandfather, was an American 
soldie-- during the war of 181 2. Joseph T. Earl's mother was a native of 
Jennings county and died in the year of 1839. 



CLINTON COUNTY,, INDIANA. 67 1 

Our subject was raised on a farm, receiving at the same time an educa- 
tion in the common schools, which wore very limited in those days. He 
remained on his father's farm until he was sixteen years old, when he left, 
in order to work out for others. On February 2, 185 1 he went to Pulaski 
county, this state, and a little later to Tippecanoe county. He came to Clin- 
ton county in the early '90's, and he has stayed in this section of the Hoosier 
stat: ever since, building for himself a lasting reputation as a man of integrity 
and fair dealing in his cooperation with his fellow citizens. 

In 1861 when the first shadow of that great four years' conflict known 
as the Civil war began to be seen in the country, Mr. Earl enlisted in Com- 
pany H, Fifty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served the whole 
four years in the army of the Cumberland. He participated in all of the bat- 
tles fought by that division, fighting under Colonels McMullen, Leonard, 
Hines, Blanch and McGraw. Mr. Earl was singularly fortunate never to lose 
a drop of blood, although his clothing and hat was repeatedly punctured by 
the Confederate bullets. At the close of the war he was mustered out in 
Texas 

In 1 87 1 Mr. Earl took up proprietary medicine and immediately made a 
success of this undertaking and he has followed the same for forty years. 
He manufactures his own remedy and has a large sale in every part of the 
country. In the last few years, however, Mr. Earl has been systematically 
retiring from active business, in order to enjoy the last years of his life in 
comfort and leisure. His recollections of his long career are interesting and 
unusual. Among his memories are those of the time when, at the age of 
six years, he cut wood for the old wood-burning locomotive on the J. M. & I. 
railroad between Indianapolis and Madison. Mr. Earl was constable of 
Pulaski county at one time, also supervisor of the same county for two terms. 
Politically, Mr. Earl was a Republican but when the new Progressive party 
was formed in 1912 he joined their ranks. Religiously he is a member of the 
Missionary Baptist church. He owns his own commodious residence on 
West Armstrong street, where his .wife and himself are taking life easy. 

In 1858 Mr. Earl was united in marriage with Hester Mary Shigley, 
daughter of William and Sarah Shigley of Pulaski county, Ind. She was 
the mother of two. children : Lizzie Augustine, living at Francisville, Pulaski 
county; and Columbus Freeman, who is deceased. In 1894, Mr. Earl was 
married the second time, to Lavica Alice Cook, of Hamilton county Ind. 
She has been the mother of two children : Clara Violet, born May 20, 1895, 



672 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

married September 7, 1912, to J. E. Powell, of Frankfort; and Carrie Pansy, 
born May 11, 1898, married August 4, 1913, Thomas D. Smith, an electrician 
of Lafayette. 



CLARK R. VAN AUKEN. 

Clark R. Van Auken one of the leading farmers and stock men of 
Forest township, Clinton county, is one of those men of whom it is a pleas- 
ure to write. He is modest in the opinion of himself, not claiming the worth 
and importance that others are ready and anxious to ascribe to him. He 
is quiet and unassuming in manner, as such, characters always arc, and 
holds the high place that has been given him in the public favor of what he 
is, and not of what he claims. It is a grateful task to write of such a one, 
and the only danger is that sufficient merit will not be ascribed ; yet the 
hearts of his friends, and they are very many, will supply any lack of words 
on the part of the writer, or any failure to express happily the true thought. 

Clark R. Van Auken was born February 10, 1867, in Knox county, 
Illinois, and was the son of Calvin and Euphannas (Armstrong) Van 
Auken. The father was born in the state of New York on November 8, 
1832, and died October 24, 1899. The mother was born February 27, 1841, 
in England, and came to the United States with her parents when but a 
girl, and is still living, and enjoying the happiness of a healthly old age. 
Both parents had the limited education afforded by the schools of their 
day, and they followed agriculture as a life work, and were very prosperous 
in the vocation. Mr. Van Auken was a Democrat politically, but was never 
a seeker of public office or emolument. 

Clark R. Van Auken has been a farmer all of his life, following in 
the footsteps of his worthy father who taught him the fundamentals of the 
agricultural science. He moved here to Clinton county from Illinois in the 
year 1905, and owns two hundred and nine acres of excellent land, beside 
twenty acres which is owned by his wife. The land has all the modern 
improvements, and is all tillable with the bare exception of twenty acres. 
Mr. Van Auken takes great pride in the grade of his live stock; he raises 
Shorthorn cattle, Chester White hogs, and general purpose horses. He at- 
tends the Christian church, and both he and his wife are active workers in 
that institution. Politically, he belongs to the new party organized in 1912 
— the Progressive, and is one of the hardest fighters for their cause in 
Clinton countv. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 673 

On May 24, 1904, Mr. Van Auken was married to Delia Prosser, who 
was born in Douglas county, Illinois, on October i, 1879, lne daughter of 
Joseph and Letitia (Millsap) Prosser. Her father was born on March 
5, 1S34, in Ohio, and died in 1909. Her mother was born in Jackson county, 
Indiana, February 7, 1837, and she is still living in Illinois. Mrs. Van Auken 
received a common school education in her youth, and has always been 
known as a cultured, refined woman, and the possessor of many friends. 
No children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Van Auken. 



GEORGE W. DUNN. 



Few residents of Clinton county were so well and favorably known as 
the enterprising farmer and representative citizen who now rests in the sleep 
of eternity, but whose life is briefly told in the lines of this sketch. None 
stood higher than he in the esteem and confidence of the community in 
which he resided and for the material advancement of which he devoted 
much of his time and influence. Mr. Dunn was an advocate of good living 
and, during his active years, took prominent part in social and moral de- 
velopment, in which his efforts were rewarded with due meed of success, 
and the retrospective view of his life was pleasant and satisfying. Much 
of the present prosperity of the county is due to the efforts of such as he, 
and, although he was not a native of the county, his name will emblazon the 
pages of her history as a good citizen and loyal. 

George W. Dunn was born in Lawrence county, Ohio, on October 9, 
1857, and was of Irish extraction, but with a goodly mixture of Americans 
in his line for several generations. His grandfather, Armstrong Dunn, was 
a farmer of Lawrence county, Ohio, for many years, but had previously been 
a musician on board of one of the steamers plying the Ohio river. The latter 
part of his life, however, was passed in Hamilton county, Indiana, as a 
minister in the Baptist church. His son, Joseph Dunn, was also born in 
Lawrence county, Ohio, in 1833, and married Amanda Murphy, daughter of 
Archie and Elizabeth Murphy, the union resulting in the birth of the fol- 
lowing children: Jennie, Isaac E-, George W., Robert, Burton E. Louisa, 
Katy, Joseph H., Eva and Bertha. By trade Joseph Dunn was a carpenter, 
and, on moving to New Britain, Hamilton county, Indiana, became a con- 
(43) 



6/4 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

tractor and did an excellent business, lie and his wife were members of the 
regular Baptist church, in which he was a deacon for a number of years. 
His death took place February 22, 1889; his wife had previously died, Feb- 
ruary 22, 1879. 

George W. Dunn learned carpentering under his father, and for a num- 
ber of years worked at the trade in Clinton county. Later he became a 
farmer and gravel road contractor, at which he was a great success At the 
time of his death, on August 5, 1901, Air. Dunn was the owner of one hun- 
dred and seventy acres of excellent land, all tillable but a few acres The 
place had all the modern improvements to be obtained. Although the farm 
was not among the largest of the county it bore the reputation of being one 
of the most productive for the number of acres of any farm in the county. 
This was largely due to Mr. Dunn's skill in the agricultural profession. 
Mrs. Dunn, the widow, now carries on the work of the place, and is making 
a success of the undertaking. She does general farming and also raises 
Jersey cows, general purpose horses, and Plymouth Rock chickens. Mr. 
Dunn and his wife were both members of the Baptist church, and were very 
active in the work of the same. Politically, he was a Republican, and served 
as trustee of Forest township for six years. He was a member of the 
Knights of Pythias at Forest. 

Mr. Dunn was married on November 9, 1881, to Laura B. .Davis, the 
daughter of Hueston and Mary (Cowdry) Davis. To this union there were 
born the following children: Loren O., born February 4, 1883, married to 
Zora Beach, and now living in Burlington; Olney L, born January II, 1884, 
died July 17, 1884; Neva L., born August 5, 1885, died November 11, 1885; 
Mar}' C, born April 13, 1886, married to Earl B. Stevens, now living in 
Forest township; Marvel E., born June 19, 1892; Gaye M.. born April 20, 
1895. living at home; Joseph Hueston, born September 26, 1896; and Davis 
Perry, born April 3, 1899. 



HENRY ELDRIDGE SLEETH. 

Indiana has long been noted as one of the first states in the Union in 
the production of corn. This is due to two reasons, partly because of the 
richness of the soil and partly because of the skill employed by the farmers. 
They seem to understand better than the farmers of some sections of the 



CLINTi N COUNTY, INDIANA. 675 

United States the fact that thor mgli preparation of seed bed, intelligent selec- 
tion of seed and good cultival are -■ itall) essential and must be employed, 
but to attempt to grov the n aind ed bushel crop by ican ilone is 

like trying to build a house bj \ the roof be f on laying the founda- 

tion. The basis of a bumper corn crop is a fertile soil — a soil containing 
sufficient plant food elei roduci Lich abundant cro] in seen in 

this world-renowned corn belt -a soil so intelligently drained that these ele- 
ments in plain food solution shall not be weakened by over dilution. All 
this is well understood by Henry Eldridge Sleeth, one. of the up-to-date 
farmers of Forest township. Clinton county. 

Mr. Sleeth was born i i September ro, 1868 n Vhite county, Indiana. 
He is a son of Oliver Perrj Sleeth and Jane (Eldridge) Sleeth. The father 
was born near Fairfield, Ohio, M"v 2.\, 1822, and bis death occurred on 
January 25, 1876. He received a ;ood education and followed farming all 
his life in White count}-, Indiana. Politically he was a Republican. He and 
Jane Eldridge were married on October 31, 1850 in White county. She was 
born in Richmond, Indiana, on November 8, 1834, and she received a good 
education. She is still living, making her home with her children. She is 
now well on toward her four score milestone, and is a fine old lady of the 
pioneer type. 

Six children, four of whom are still living, were born to Oliver P. Sleeth 
and wife, namely: Stacey M., John C. (deceased), Mary Ella, Eliza Ann, 
Franklin Martin (deceased), and Henry E. of this review. 

Henry E. Sleeth grew up on the home farm and received a good common 
school education. On November 7, 1900 he married Jessie M. Collins, who 
was born in Forest township, this county, on August 1, T873. She is a 
daughter of Amaziah H. and Nancy (Carter) Collins, both now deceased. 

David B. Carter, an uncle of Mrs. Sleeth, made his home with our sub- 
ject, after the death of his wife, Levina (Collins) Carter, until his death, at 
which time he willed the old home place, where our subject now lives, to 
Mrs. Sleeth. The place is a valuable one, consisting of one hundred and 
ten acres, all tillable but about twenty-four acres. It is well improved in 
every respect, most of the tiling and improvements having been made by 
David Carter, who was a soldier in the Civil war, having enlisted in Com- 
pany G, Fifty-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in 1862, and later in Com- 
pany G, Eighty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. His death occurred on 
June 18, 1903. He studied law at one time, and was a good business man. 
He was an influential Republican. He had no children of his own, but 



676 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

reared several. He was a thirty-second degree Mason, a member of Murat 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine at Indian- 
apolis. 

Amaziah H. Collins, father of Mrs. Sleetli was also a soldier in the 
Civil war. He served in Company G, Eighty-ninth Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry. 

Mrs. Sleeth grew to womanhood in her native community and received 
a common school education. Two children have been born to our subject 
and wife, namely: John Collins, born June 28, 1906, and Henry Eldridge, 
jr., born July 24. 191 1. 

Mr. Sleelb 1 to Clinton ci unty in 1807 and here he has been en- 

gaged successfully in farming ever since. He makes a specialty of a cross 
between Duroc and Poland-China hogs, and raises general purpose horses. 

Politically he is a Republican. He belongs to the Masonic Order, the 
Blue Lodge, and the Knights of Pythias and both he and his wife attend the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 



W. I. H EATON. 



The subject of this sketch, W. I. Heaton, during his useful life which 
has now terminated, was a strong factor in the agricultural growth of Clin- 
ton county. Handicapped by ill health, he yet persevered, and gave to his 
brethren the utmost service that he was physically able to give, and this 
amounted to vastly more than many a man of rugged physique. Some men 
live by the efforts of others, and contrary to the laws of existence, appear 
to prosper under the unfair conditions. Mr. Heaton, however, was the 
antithesis of this type He was untiring in industry, sympathetic in friend- 
ship, altruistic to a fault, and in consequence won the unbounded esteem and 
admiration of his fellow citizens. It is our hope that the few words we may 
say here may serve as a monument to his honor, and point back to him as a 
worthy example, when hands yet unborn shall turn the pages of this book 
and the owners note the lives of their forefathers. 

W. I. Heaton was born February 22, 1846, in Clinton county, Ind., and 
was the son of David and Nancy Heaton. The father was born on 
February 1, 181 1 in the town of Eaton, Ohio, and was brought to Indiana in 
the early days by his parents, traveling overland and facing the hardships 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 677 

incident (o the life of the pioneer. He settled in Clinton county, and here 
remained all of his life, following" the vocation of farming continuously. 
He was a Republican in the political life of the times and religiously was a 
member of the Christian church. The mother of our subject was born in the 
state of Pennsylvania on August 20, 1814, and came to Frankfort, this 
county, in the early days with her parents. She died 1S9S, and her husband 
departed from this life in 1879. The couple were married in Frankfort on 
the 19th of February, 1835, and of the union were born eight children: 
Louise, Alary Abigail, Nancy, and Armina all living; Lucinda, Melissa. Wil- 
liam and Jefferson, deceased. 

W. I. Heaton received a common school education in his home county, 
at the same time working on his father's farm. He continued this work 
until his worthy parent died in 1879, whereupon he embraced other lines of 
endeavor, although adhering to agriculture as his chief vocation. Before 
many years, though, his health failed and he was compelled to forsake the 
active life and seek to regain his vigor and stamina. In this quest he was 
.unsuccessful and after a long struggle gave up his life on August 9, 1907. 
Clinton county lost a good and reputable citizen by his death, a man of high 
ideals and tenacity of purpose. 

Mr. Heaton was married on March 25, 1869 to Sarah L. Thatcher, the 
daughter of John and Catherine (Fisher) Thatcher. John Thatcher was 
born in Preble county, O., March 15, 1815, and his wife was born in Penn- 
sylvania, April 9, 1816. Both were among the early settlers of Clinton 
county. The father came here when but a boy, traveling with his parents 
from the state of Ohio. He lived on a farm four and one-half miles east 
of Frankfort, the farm consisting of one hundred and twenty acres of ex- 
cellent land. He stayed here until his death in 1899. His wife had pre- 
ceded him to the other world many years, she dying in 1875. Mr. and 
Mrs. Thatcher were the parents of eight children: Jacob M., born January 
16, 1840, a valiant soldier in the Civil war, serving three years and four 
months, now residing at Sedalia, Ind.; Peter F., born May 14, 1841, also a 
soldier in the Civil war for two years and three months, now deceased; 
Maria C, born February 11, 1843, living at Selma, Kan.; Mary A , born 
April 15, 1845, of Frankfort; Sarah L. (Heaton), born July 15, 1847. °f 
Frankfort; Jessie C, born February 7, 1850 (deceased); Phoebe ]., born 
June 20, 1853, now living at Buckner, Mo., and Cyrus D., born October it, 
1857, residing in Adrian, Mo. 

Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Heaton: Asa, born October 



()/X CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

14, 1871, traveling man living at Chicago; Nannie Heaton, born May 12, 
1875, living at Frankfort, and Pearlie, born October 10, 18S2 (deceased). 
Mrs Heaton enjoys good health at the present time and is living in her com- 
modious home at 257 North East street, Frankfort, which home she owns. 
She is a charter member of the Christian church in Frankfort. 



NICHOLAS T. RICE. 

The subject of this sketch. Nicholas T. Rice, ha? a life history which is 
interesting and complicated as a novel. The events in his life have true 
dramatic value, combining all of those forces of emotion and unusual inci- 
dents which make for literary values. It is not our intention in this sketch 
to write a short story, with plot and character, but in the straight narrative 
of trie main incidents of Mr. Rice's life, we assure the reader that therein is 
a wealth of good reading and interesting recital. Mr. Rice is a native of the 
great empire of Germany and is only another of those sterling and thrifty 
citizens who have been added to the American states by the Fatherland. 
Alhough Mr. Rice came to this country under the most adverse circum- 
stances and lived under the same conditions during the most of his early 
life, his later success evens up the economic scale of his career. Mr. Rice 
has ,;een the raw nerves of life, has felt the utmost cruelty of his fellow be- 
ings, and has survived tests of endurance that would have destroyed one 
with less hardihood, optimism and pugnacity. These latter qualities were 
instilled into his blood by generations of Teutonic ancestors, men who lived 
under the inexorable law of the survival of the fittest. Our subject sur- 
mounted the obstacles thrown in his path by hard and persistent labor alone; 
he experienced no break of fortune which would tide him over difficulty, but 
he v/as compelled to fight hard, literally breaking his path by sheer force of 
bravrn and stamina. 

Nicholas T. Rice was born in Frankfort-on-the-Main, Germanv on the 
23d of December, in the year 1846, the son of Troucham and Katherine 
Rice, both parents being natives of Germany. The father was a cooper by 
trade, following that vocation during his entire life Our subject's mother 
died when Nicholas was two or three years old, her death occurring either in 
1848 or 1849. After the mother's untimely death, Troucham Rice boarded a 
ship for New York, bringing with him our subject, who was then just a little 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 679 

lad, and a daughter. After a long voyage they landed in tin's country on 
October 3, 1850. The father made his living in New York by his old trade 
of the cooper, and continued thusly until his death in 1863. 

Nicholas Rice, feeling a touch of the wanderlust, ran away from home 
at the age of twelve years. He remained in the city of New York, and in 
some manner managed to eke out a living- — a marvelous accomplishment for 
a boy of his tender years and in the surroundings of a city. In order to 
obtain bread and butter the young Rice sold newspapers on the streets, 
shined shoes, and did any small job that he could get. He had lodgings 
during these precarious days at the Newsboys' Lodging House, a well known 
institution in New York at that time. Later, the Coopers Institute for Poor 
Boys sent forty boys and fifteen girls to Frankfort, Indiana, on the condi-. 
tion that they were to be given homes upon their arrival. Upon their com- 
ing, the farmers from the surrounding country assembled at the Methodist 
church in Frankfort, where the youngsters had been taken. Henry J. Zer- 
ing, a farmer northwest of Frankfort, had the first choice because he had 
brought the first wagon-load of children from the train. He selected the 
youthful Nicholas Rice, and he took the boy to his farm and provided him 
with all the comforts and necessities of life. Mr. Rice stayed on the Zering 
farm until he was twenty-two years of age, working hard, and learning the 
science of agriculture from Mr. Zering, who was considered one of the best 
agriculturists of the county. He obtained his schooling in whatever way he 
could, spending his spare time reading and thereby acquiring as much knowl- 
edge as could have been given him by the common schools of the period. 
While working for Mr. Zering, during the Civil war, Nicholas Rice ran 
away three times, in an endeavor to join the Union army. Each time, how- 
ever, he was caught and returned to the farm. At last he obtained consent 
to join the ranks, and, although he was still under age. he managed to enlist 
in Company F, One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. 
He did not get to serve long, as the war was about over. His enlistment 
was for the one-year period. His miliary record speaks well of his devotion 
to duty, although it was chiefly guard duty in the Shenandoah Valley. 

On November 4, i86q, Nicholas Rice was married to Julia F. Shaft*, a 
daughter of Samuel and Mary Shaft, farmers, and early settlers of Clinton 
county... She was one of six children. Our subject, after his marriage, rented 
a farm in this county, and established a home of his own. He followed agri- 
culture until 187 1 , when he moved to Frankfort and learned the trade of the 
brick mason. While in the City he suffered the misfortune of losing his wife; 



6SO CLINTON COUN IV, INDIANA. 

she died on February 9, 1874. After this occurrence he went back to farm- 
ing in 1878, and was again married, this time to Maggie Day, the daughter 
of Selvinaus and Mary Day, farmers if Clinton county. She was one of 
eight children. This wife died on June 7th, 1912. By his first wife Mr. 
Rice had one child, Eva B., who is the wife of John Lipp, a farmer three 
miles northeast of Frankfort, and the mother of the following children: 
Goldie, Graver, Maynard, Nicholas, John, Earl Lessie, and Hazel and Myra, 
twins. The oldest, Goldie, is at present keeping house for our subject, her 
grandfather. 

After the death of his first wife. Mr. Rice remained on his rented farm 
for ten years, and then removed to Frankfort. He became well known in 
this city and held many city offices. In 1889 he was elected street commis- 
sioner, and served in this capacity until 1896. He was later appointed city 
inspector under city engineer L. J. Hammond, and he also served four years 
under Charles Chaney. Mr. Rice was deputy assessor for eight years, jus- 
tice of the peace four years, and at present is inspector of the new streets 
being laid in Frankfort. He also holds an appointment as truant officer. 
Fraternally, Air. Rice is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Grand Army of the Republic. In religious affairs he is a deacon in 
the Christian church, and in politics votes the Republican ticket. Mr. Rice 
owns his own commodious residence on West Armstrong street, besides sev- 
eral other pieces of city property. 



SAMUEL GWYNN WATT. 

Clinton county has produced no better farmer and citizen than Samuel 
G. Watt, universally recognized as having been one of the most industrious, 
capable, and successful men of the county. He was for many years in- 
timately connected with the best interests of his community, and to his moral 
and material aid many of the improvements and items of progress of the 
county are indebted. He was one of the older settlers, living in this county 
at a time when the land was in the primitive state, and strenuous work was 
necessary for even the establishment of a home. 

Samuel G. Watt was born at Jefferson, Clinton county, on August 21, 
1837, and was the son of Robert and Jane McClellan (Fagundus) Watt. 
Robert Watt was a native of England, the family of Watt being one of the 




SAMUEL G. WATT 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 68l 

most prominent in English history and mentioned conspicuously in the 
various histories of that country. He graduated from Edinburg and was 
one of the best educated men in {he county. He came to this country in 
1828 and settled first in Lafayette, End., and in 1830 came to Jefferson, this 
county. He was a tailor by trade and was the first postmaster and squire 
of Jefferson, positions he held for twenty-seven years! Through his efforts 
the capital of Clinton county was almost located at Jefferson instead of 
Frankfort. He moved to a farm near Jefferson in 1859 and entered from 
the government a full section of land. He was married in 1828 and departed 
this life June 16, 1866. The mother of our subject was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, and lived a ' useful lii dying June 10, 1857. Seven children 
were born to Robert Watt and wife: Susan, James, Laura, Samuel G., 
Sarah, and two who died in infancy. With the exception of our subject 
and one sister all of the children died before reaching fifty years of age. 

Samuel Gwynn Watt received his early education at the common schools 
and at the Thorntown Academy. After his school days were over he im- 
mediately took up farming and so spent most of his active life: In 1902 
he retired, selling the sixty acres deeded to him by his father, and buying 
a beautiful home in the city of Frankfort, where he lived until his death 
on June 28, 1906. 

On April 28, 1863, Samuel Watt was married to Amelia McClurg, 
the daughter of William and Amanda (Parker) McClurg, the former a 
millwright of Tippecanoe county, and one of the early settlers. Mrs. Watt 
was one of six children. To Mr. and Mrs. Watt eight children were born: 
Mrs. Genevieve Culver, of Warren, O., has two children, Mary A. and 
Georgia Evelyn; Carrie, died in infancy; Bessie Watt, a registered nurse 
of Frankfort; Mrs. Lucille Lewis, of Frankfort; Robert Watt (deceased); 
Mabel, a nurse; Mrs. Edith Kendall, of Woodstock, 111.; and Mrs Ethel 
Johnson, of Frankfort, who has one boy, Paul G. Mrs. Watt is, since her 
husband's death, making her home w ith her two daughters, Bessie and 
Mabel, both of whom arc nurses and belong to the State Trained Nurses 
Association. 

It is interesting to pay a visit to the Watt home, for therein are found 
many interesting things connected with the early history of the county and 
family. They have desks, papers, manuscripts, the marriage certificate of 
their grandfather, and other old relics of the family, including two chairs 
which their grandparents used when they began housekeeping in the early 
days of the nineteenth century. The house in which Mr. Watt was born, 
in Teffcrson, is still standing and occupied. 



682 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

ROBERT F. DUNN. 

Among the well-to-do and reputable agriculturists and citizens of Clin- 
ton county, none occupy a more honorable position in tbe regard of his col- 
leagues than the gentleman whose name heads this article. Although Mr. 
Dunn has not been active in the farming circles of the county for twelve 
years or more, having entered the coal business, he is remembered as a suc- 
cessful man in that vocation, and this reputation has helped not a little in 
establishing his present popularity and lucrative trade. He is a man who 
has succeeded in the various lines of endeavor which have claimed his atten- 
tion because he has looked carefully to details, has exercised sound judgment 
and been uniformly fair in his dealings with his fellow men and consequently 
he has ever enjoyed their implicit confidence and good will and is in every 
way worthy of the position he has attained as a citizen of Clinton county. 

Robert F. Dunn was born on March 14, 1S60, in Hamilton county, 
Indiana, and was the son of Joseph and Amanda (Murphy) Dunn, whose 
biographies are upon another page of this volume. To say a word more, 
however, Joseph Dunn was born in Jefferson county, Ohio, and was married 
to Amanda Murphy there, coming to this county in 1859, and following the 
farming business, besides contracting and general carpentering. He was a 
Whig, and later a Republican. Ten children blessed his home, three of 
whom are living at this writing, these being Burton E., of Muncie, Ind. ; 
Amanda Morgan, of Indianapolis; and Robert F., our subject. 

Robert F. Dunn received a common school education in his youth in the 
county of his birth. About the year 1885 Mr. Dunn moved to Clinton 
county, Indiana, from Hamilton county, this state, and settled in Forest 
township, taking up farming, which he conducted very successfully until 
twelve years ago. \t that time he entered the coal business at Forest, Indi- 
ana (this county), under the name of the R. F. Dunn Coal Yard. He 
carries a full stock of the best anthracite, hard and soft coals and coke. 
He has a large patronage and his customers are always assured of full 
weight and minimum prices. Mr. Dunn owns his own business, also his 
beautiful and comfortable home here. In politics, he is a Republican, but 
has n'-wer sought public office. Fraternally he belongs to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Rebekahs and the Knights of Pythias, all lodges 
at Forest. He is a trustee in the Methodist Episcopal church of this town. 

On December 11, 1878 Mr. Dunn was married to Amanda Heady, who 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 683 

was bom in Hamilton count)-, Indiana, on November 19, 1S59, the daughter 
of Perry and Elizabeth (Castetter) Heady, also natives of Hamilton c mnty, 
Indiana. Mr. Heady was born in 1826 and died in April, 1864, after an 
active life of fanning. He was a "Democrat. Mrs Heady wa 1 ? born in 
1827, and died in January, 1873. To Mr. and Mrs. Robert F Dunn ten 
children have been born and they are: Earle, born September r, 1881 ; 
Emery Lee, born October 2, 1883; Roxy Gladys, born August 23, 1890; 
Frank G., born July 10, 1887; May Bell, born May 19, 1885, and died in 
1886; Esta E.. born April 23, 1893; Forest Clinton, born August 9, 1S96; 
and Ural Eugene, born January 4, 1899. Two infants, twins, died unnamed. 



ALBERT T. JOHNSON. 

In writing the biographies of a county it is a pleasure to discover a sub- 
ject who has spent his entire life in the county of his birth. Such a fact is a 
sure recommendation for the progressiveness and prosperity of the commun- 
ity. It augers well for the subject also, for it reveals a long-sightedness 
seldom found. The youth is invariably seized with the wanderlust at some 
time, and many men seek other fields of endeavor before they have matured 
enough to realize that it is best to utilize the home county as a place to live 
and thereby have the advantages of friends, history, and reputation with 
which to start life. Of course, there are exceptions. Mr. Johnson has made 
a splendid success of life because he has placed his faith in the county of his 
birth, seeing there as great opportunities as any place in the country; the fer- 
tile soil and high commercial standards of Clinton county have been benefited 
by his presence in many ways, and not a little of the richness of the territory 
can be attributed to his untiring efforts toward the betterment of his borne 
and friends. Mr. Johnson is a strong type of the Hoosier farmer- kind, 
sympathetic and genial, and yet with a certain sternness which is the defeat 
of those with dishonest intent and deceitful purpose. 

Albert T. Johnson was born on July 22, 1867 in Forest township, Clin- 
ton county, and was the son of Robert C. and Elizabeth (Dennis) Johnson. 
Robert C. Johnson was born in the state of Virginia and came to Indiana 
when but a boy, locating first in Henry county, and later here. His early 
education was meager, as the schools then did not present the advantages of 
the modern ones. He learned the agricultural science, however, and re- 
mained with that vocation all of his life. Before the war he was a Whig, 



684 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

but not believing in the principles of the party as they changed, he cast his 
support to the Republicans. By his first wife, Elizabeth Dennis, Mr. Johnson 
had six children, namely: Eliza, Lindlcy, William, Ellen, Albert T. and 
Barclay. He was married the second time to Abigail White, and had one 
child, Oliver T. Johnson farmer, of Adams county. 

Our subject's education was divided between the common schools of 
Forest township, this county, and Howard county. On February 22. tSSo, 
he was married to Ellen Venneman, who was born in Warren township, this 
county, in February, 1874, the daughter of Cornelius and Lorena (Morgan) 
Venneman, both of whom are deceased. 

Mrs. Johnson received a common school education. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnson there ' ave been born nine children, five boys and four girls, namely : 
Louie, Dcssie, Laben, Raymond, Glenn, Dwight, Effie, Ancle and Otlle. 

Mr. Johnson has been a farmer all of his life, and has been exceedingly 
successful in the pursuit of the same. He owns one hundred and twenty 
acres in Clinton county, and sixteen acres in Howard county, and all is till- 
able with the exception of seven acres. The land is well tiled and fenced, 
and Mr. Johnson has built thereon a comfortable and pretty home and mod- 
ern farm buildings. Besides general farming Mr. Johnson raises Durham 
and Shorthorn cattle, a general breed of hogs, and general purpose horses. 
Religiously, he is a member of the Friends church. In political affairs, he 
has always supported the Republican party, believing that its basic principles 
are the best for the country's prosperity. 



RUSSELL B. CLARK. 



One of the sterling young citizens of Frankfort and Clinton count) was 
Russell B. Clark, who on May 8, 1913, when only thirty-nine years of age, 
was stricken by the hand of Death, thus reversing the proper order of things 
as we have been taught to believe. It seems to us sometimes, that destiny 
has gone wrong, or that divine power has forgotten, when a young and 
promising man, in the prime of life should be snatched away. We do not 
declare in the words of the fool that "there is no God," but we wonder whether 
or not there is an explanation yet unrevealed to the knowledge of humanity, a 
reason why .the logical should not happen, and the illogical should occur. 
It oversteps the bounds of nature. Mr. Clark was a man who had begun to 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 685 

make a mark in the city of Frankfort, and he had won the esteem and re- 
spect of everyone with whom he had become acquainted. 

Russell B. Clark was born on the old homestead five miles southeast of 
Frankfort, February 24, 1874, the son of Francis Milton and Sarah Elizabeth 
(Buntin) Clark, sketches of whom occupy oilier pages of this volume. 
Francis Milton Clark was born in Tippecanoe county, Ind., November 3, 
1843, ancJ was tne son of Daniel D. and Julia A. (Belknap) Clark. Our sub- 
ject's grandfather was a native of Connecticut, and came to Tippecanoe 
county to farm. Francis M. Clark received his education in the log schools of 
his home county, and took up farming with his father until the outbreak of the 
Civil war. whereupon lie enlisted in Company G, Seventy-second Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, of the army of the Cumberland, and later was a part of 
Wilder's Brigade and participated in the Confederate victory at Chickamauga. 
Mr. Clark was married to Sarah Elizabeth Buntin, October 30, 1867', and of 
this happy union there were born: Lunetta, Russell B., and Roberta C. 

Russell B. Clark lived his early life on his father's farm, and during the 
winters attended the common schools. His education was also continued in 
the Danville Business College, of which institution he was a graduate, and at 
Wabash College where he spent a few years. Upon completing his educa- 
tion he took up farming as a vocation and continued the same very success- 
fuly until August, 1912, when he came to Frankfort, Ind., and purchased a 
beautiful home on South Clay street. His first business venture in this city 
was in the automobile line, when he bought out the Kernodle Automobile Com- 
pany on South Main street. Tn this line of endeavor, Mr. Clark immediatelv 
began to have success, and bis trade was constantly increasing. He acted 
for the Studebaker Company of South Bend, and placed many of their cars 
in this and surrounding counties. Besides this business, Mr. Clark owned 
and operated a fine farm of two hundred and forty acres southeast of the city 
and at one time owned land in the state of Texas and in Randolph county, 
Indiana. Among his financial enterprises he was a stcokholder in the People's 
Life Insurance Company and the American National Bank. In politics, Mr. 
Clark always supported the Republican party, even through the crisis of 
1912, when the split came. Religiously, he was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and in fraternal affairs was a loyal member of the Masonic 
order. 

In 1899 Mr. Clark was united in marriage to Gertrude Maish, daughter 
of ex-County Treasurer W. P. Maish. Mrs. Clark was one of seven chil- 
dren, namely: David B., of Frankfort; Gertrude, John W. and Walter S., 



680 ■ CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

both Clinton county farmers; Altha J., a trained nurse, and graduate of the 
Portsmouth Training School, Ohio; Homer C, a time keeper for the Mc- 
Dougal Cabinet Works; and Mary Lavone, a school teacher. Mrs. Clark's 
parents were among the early settlers of this county, her grandfather enter- 
ing land in this section of the state from the government. Both her father 
and mother are natives of this county. Her father is a farmer, and at one 
time filled the position of county treasurer, to which he had been elected. To 
-Mr. and Mrs. Clark there were born two children: Marjorie and Francis 
Willard. Both children are now living with their widowed mother. 



JOHN E. SHANKS. 



Agriculture has been the true source of man's dominion on earth ever 
since the primal existence of labor and has been the pivotal industry that has 
controlled for the most part all the fields of action to which his intelligence 
and energy have been devoted. In a civilized community no calling is so 
certain of yielding a compensatory return as that which is culled from a 
kindly soil, albeit the husbandman at times is sorely taxed in coaxing from 
mother earth all he desires or even expects; yet she is a kind mother and sel- 
dom chastens with disappointment the child whose diligence and frugality 
she deems it but just should be rewarded. One of those who have found a 
benefactress in Mother Earth is John E. Shanks, Avho, with his wife, is the 
owner of two fine farms in Clinton county and one of our most progressive 
agriculturists. He has never found allurements for any kind of work outside 
the realm of nature, and, having been a close student of the soils, climatic 
conditions, seed time and harvest and all the phases that contribute to hus- 
bandry, he has profited by his observations and is today well established and 
is reaping ample rewards for his outlay of labor, both physical and mental. 

Mr. Shanks is a descendant of two of the industrious and courageous 
pioneer families. He was born in Clinton county, Indiana, November 15, 
1862. He is a son of Stephen and Sarah (Walker) Shanks. The father 
was born in Ohio. November 29, 1829, and the mother's birth occurred in 
Rush county, that state, October 9, 1S30. The parents of each were farmers 
and both families removed in a very early day from their homes in the 
Buckeye state to Clinton county, bringing the parents of our subject here 
when they were young, and here they grew up, received such educational ad- 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 687 

vantages as the old-lime schools afforded and here they were married on 
April 24, 1853. Stephen Shanks became a prosperous farmer here, owning 
at one time almost a section of good land, but before his death he had dis- 
posed of all his landed estate and moved into the city of Frankfort. He 
was for many years a leading citizen in his locality and a trustworthy public 
servant. lie was justice of the peace of Johnson township for many years, 
also served as trustee of that township, and was county treasurer of Clinton 
county from 1870 to 1874. Politically, he was a Democrat, and in religious 
matters a Methodist. 

To Stephen Shanks and wife five children were born: Emmazet, died in 
infancy; James M., born December 20, 1856, died May 22, 1902; William 
R., born October 15, 1858, now living' retired in Frankfort; John E., subject 
of this sketch; and Willard D., born November 24, i860, died July 25, 1881. 

The death of Stephen Shanks occurred on July 27, 1903, and his wife 
passed away on December 22d of the same year. 

John E. Shanks was reared on the home farm and here he has spent 
his life, being well content to remain at home, which, as most everyone will 
agree, is the best place after all. He received his education in the schools at 
Frankfort. He and His wife are the owners of two farms, one consisting of 
one hundred and sixty acres in Union township, and one containing a equal 
acreage located in Michigan township. He also owns some valuable city 
property. He has kept his farm well improved in every respect, has care- 
fully rotated his crops, added proper fertilizers and kept the land from wash- 
ing until the soil is today better perhaps than it ever was, and he carries on 
general farming and stock raising on a large scale, and these are among the 
best farms in the county. He has kept the old home well repaired and the 
surroundings neat and inviting, and he has large, substantial barns and con- 
venient outbuildings of all kinds, everything present a thrifty, tastv ap- 
pearance. 

On April 8, 1885, Mr. Shanks was united in marriage with Emma I. 
Maish, daughter of David Maish and Altha (Norris) Maish, and to this 
union three children have been born, Lura, Dale and Carl. Lura is a graduate 
of the high school at Frankfort. Dale is taking the agricultural course at 
Ohio State University at Columbus, Ohio, after graduating from the Frank- 
fort high school. Carl attended the Frankfort high school for three years. 

Politically, Mr. Shanks is a Democrat and is more or less active in local 
public affairs. He was trustee of Union township for a period of four 
years, and in the fall of 1912 he was elected county commissioner to serve 






68S CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

three years and is at this writing discharging the duties of the office in a 
manner that reflects much credit upon himself and to the eminent satisfaction 
of all concerned. 



JAMES A. G. LYNCH. 



In a county such as Clinton, where there arc so many men of moral, 
intellectual, and business character, it is hard to determine who is the most 
worthy. Success in life, however, docs not determine character, nor docs 
strong character always insure monetary success in later years. There are 
some, though, who have found fortune early in life, and the worry of 
making a living cast aside, have ample opportunity to develop the other side 
of life, the aesthetic, the side which so few people in this world at this 
day find time to enjoy. At this writing Mr. Lynch has just passed his thirty- 
first year, but in those years he has made a practical and lasting success, 
and now has the pleasant thoughts of many years to come in which to enjoy 
the rewards of his work. 

James A. G. Lynch was born April 14, 1882 at Walton, Roane county, 
West Virginia, and was the son of J. W. and Mary A. (Looney) Lynch. 
He was one of a large family of children, namely: Harvey W., of Clendcnin, 
W. Va. ; Mrs. Permela B. Hively, Mrs. Phoebe Jane Robertson, Mrs. Eva 
Ann Donahue, William S., Mrs. Sarah F. Camp, all of West Virginia ; Sil- 
vin O., of Maxwell, N. M., and Woodard A. and Emerson E., both deceased. 

The father of our subject was a farmer all his life, and a Republican, 
in politics. He died February 12, 191 1. The mother is still living at Clen- 
denin, W. Va. Both were Christian Adventists in faith. 

Mr. Lynch, our subject, was born and reared on his father's farm in 
the state of West Virginia, and he remained there until his marriage. After 
the last mentioned event he went into the grocery business in Clay county, 
West Virginia, and followed that vocation until the next year, then moved 
on to his father-in-law's farm in Roane county, West Virginia, and later 
removed again to his father's farm. His next change was for Clendcnin, 
Kanawha county, West Virginia, where he commenced dealing in horses 
and oil royalties. 

Mr. Lynch today has interest in several oil companies, is president of 
the Kanawha Oil Company, and a stockholder in the Koontz Oil & Gas 
Company of Virginia. He also retains land of four hundred and fifty acres 
of oil fields with his brothers and sisters. Mr. Lynch came to Clinton 






V 






. 



^. ■-?*--' -Sag 



JAS A. G. LYNCH AND FAMILY 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 689 

county, this state, in 1911 and built his present beautiful home on West 
Kyger street, in Frankfort. Politically, he is a Republican. 

On June 4, 1903, Mr. Lynch was united in marriage with Lucy J. 
Lewis, the daughter of Edward and Mary M. Lewis, of Rockbridge county, 
West Virginia, a family which settled in Monroe county, that state, in the 
early days, and where our subject's wife was born. Her parents were ex- 
tensive farmers, at one time owning a total of seven thousand acres of land. 
All were Presbyterians by religious faith, and were among the best families 
of the New England states. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Lyncl : Beatrice, born August 16, 1903; James McChesney, born June 1, 
1905, and Ivan Paul, born March 22, 1907. 

Mrs. Lynch's brothers and sisters are: Prudence Campbell (deceased) 
Mrs. Fannie M. Simpson, of Wellsburg, W. Va. ; William A., (deceased) 
James McChesney, of Marietta, O. ; John Edward, of Wheeling, W. Va. 
and May Good, of Cotton, W. Va. 



HARRY BARNHART. 



In examining the life records of self-made men, it will invariably be 
found that indefatigable industry has constituted the basis of their success. 
True, there are other elements which enter in and conserve the advancement 
of personal interests, — perseverance, discrimination, and mastering of expe- 
dients, — hut the foundation of all achievement is earnest, persistent labor. 
At the outset of his career, Mr. Barnhart recognized this fact, and he did not 
seek any royal road to the goal of prosperity and independence, but began to 
work earnestly and diligently in order to advance himself. The result is that 
he is now numbered among the progressive, successful and influential citizens 
of Clinton county, where he conducts a thriving restaurant business and 
caters to the most fastidious of patrons. 

Harry Barnhart was born April 4, 1870, at Hawthorne, Illinois, and 
was the son of Benjamin and Sarah (Hollingsworth) Barnhart, both parents 
having been born in Illinois. The father was a farmer. Both parents died in 
the year 1876, after worthy lives devoted to their work and family. The 
Methodist church was their denomination, and in politics the father was a 
Republican. Five children were born of the union, including our subject. 

Harry Barnhart, being only six years of age when his parents died, was 
(44) 



f:yO CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

adopted by an uncle, and raised on his farm. The boy remained there until 
lie was eleven years of age, during which time he obtained as much education 
as possible from the common schools. At the age of eleven he went to the 
city of St. Louis, Missouri, and began to work in a restaurant. T I is work 
was hard here, and, being but a lad he was forced to undergo a great many 
embarrassments, but he staved on the job. and gradually began to progress. 
He worked in various restaurants and hotels until he had, by strict economy, 
saved enough money to begin for himself in the restaurant business. He 
selected Frankfort. Indiana, as his first location, and he started here in 1895. 
Mr. Barnhart had previously come to Frankfort in T892 and had worked 
for O. C. Parson. 

Since 1895 Mr. Barnhart has engaged in the trade of the restaurateur 
here in Frankfort, and his popularity in his chosen profession has constantly 
increased since his opening. Mr. Barnhart has the only restaurant in Frank- 
fort which has the approval of the state board of health. He has equipped 
his place of business with every modern device to insure cleanliness and 
quick service. His kitchen is of the new sanitary type, and is open at all 
times to the inspection of the patrons. 

In politics, Mr. Barnhart is a stanch Republican. Fraternally, he be- 
longs to the Woodmen of the World and the Loyal Order of Moose, of which 
latter lodge he is a trustee. Mr. Barnhart has invested his savings in Florida 
farm lands. He also owns his home at 8 Freeman street, and his place of 
business at 14 North Main street, on the west side of the square. 

In 1899 Mr. Barnhart was married to Ethel Hunt, the daughter of John 
and Sarah Hunt, of Kirklin, Indiana. Her father is a haybuyer and baler 
of that town, and the father of eleven children. 



STEPHFN SLIPHFR CLARK. 



One of the most versatile men in Clinton county, a man who had many 
interests in life and who was equally successful in all of them, is the subject 
of this sketch. He was descended from one of the hardiest of the pioneer 
families, and inherited a great deal of their aptitude for unceasing and 
capable labor. Mr. Clark was well equipped mentally and physically for a 
life of unusual activity, and he made the most of his advantages. As a 
teacher, farmer, and minister of the gospel, he won high esteem and affection 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 6y I 

from his fellow citizens, and lie well deserved their respect for in every un- 
dertaking with which he was identified lie employed the most horn I and 
commendable methods of procedure. 

Stephen S. Clark was horn in Butler county, Ohio, December 2 1831, 
and was the son of David C, and Mary Magdalene (Slipher) Clark 

David C. Clark was born January 15, T804, in the state of New Jersey 
and came to Ohio, accompanied by his parents when he was but an infant. 
He was raised on a farm, later becoming a farmer himself, also a bricklayer 
and plasterer. He obtained his earl)' education in the common school"; of his 
home county. He came to Indiana in 1832, settling on the farm now ov tied 
by William Rose in Ross township. Clintnn county, and entered several hun- 
dred acres of land from the government. His wife possessed an excellent 
estate, inherited from her father, and Mr. Clark also entered a fourth section 
five miles east of his main holdings. He moved to the quarter section in 
Ross township, and later came to Frankfort, dying there on December 31, 
1873. Mr. Clark cleared the land and prepared it for division among his 
children. He built his log home here, and during the first winter was com- 
pelled to live without doors, windows, or floor. Blankets were used to keep 
the cold out, and everv hardship experienced by the^pioneer was included in 
their life. Wolves and others animals prowled about the cabin at nights and 
added their mournful cries to the lonely hours. Mr. Clark was once a trus- 
tee of Ross township, and was a county commissioner in the early days. He 
was a member of the Missionary Baptist chruch, as were all of his family. 

David Clark was first married to Mary M. Slipher, the daughter of 
Stephen and Elizabeth (Flenard) Slipher, who were of German descent. 
and who settled in Ohio in 1804. Ten children were horn to this union: 
Elizabeth, Augustus E., Stephen S., Isaac Newton, Eliza J., Jonas D. Tilgh- 
man A. Howard, William Allen and David Austin (twins), and George W. 
William A. was a soldier in the Union army, and served faithfully through- 
out the whole Civil war. He and his brother, Isaac Neuron, were ministers. 
Mrs. Clark died in 1865. 

Mr. Clark was married the second time to Rebecca White, whose maiden 
name was Ivins. No children were born to this second union, and the wife 
died on August 10, 1896. 

To say a word more of our subject's ancestry, his great-great-great- 
grandparents on his father's side were English, while those of his mother 
were Germans. His great-great-grandfather. John Clark, was born in Long 



692 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Island, New York, in 1710, and he died on May 12, 1794. His great-grand- 
father, Samuel Clark, was born in New Jersey, December 9. 1752, and his 
grandfather, Stephen Clark, was born in New Jersey, June 6, 1778. 

Stephen S. Clark spent his early life on the farm. He received a good 
common school education, attended a private school, and was a student in 
Franklin College until small-pox broke out there, whereupon he quit, never 
to return. At this time Mr. Clark treasured the ambition to be a teacher, 
thinking that in this vocation his training and excellent education might be 
put to the best advantage. He was actuated in this resolve by more than 
pecuniary compensation; he was intensely interested in the educational de- 
velopment of his state, and believed that more rapid progress could be made. 
Accordigly, he entered the pedadogic profession, and continued for the long 
•period of twenty years, during which time he built for himself a lasting 
reputation as a successful and efficient instructor. Not only was he capable 
in the class room, but in the development of a definite system of teaching 
and the installation of new ideas he made his name noteworthy among the 
educators of the county and state. Many of his old pupils are among the in- 
fluential people of Clinton county today, and their respect and admiration 
for their former teacher has never diminished, and remains one of the pleas- 
antest memories of the days gone by. During the years in which he taught, 
Mr. Clark kept himself in perfect physical condition by work on the farm, 
with consequent greater vocational capacity and endurance. 

At the age of twenty, Mr. Clark's whole family became members of the 
Missionary Baptist church, and in the year of 1855 he himself was ordained 
a minister of this church. His vocation were then teaching, farming and 
preaching, and he was equally successful in all of them. None of these occu- 
pations could be called an avocation, for Mr. Clark's heart and soul were in 
everything he undertook to do. and his versatility was only an aid to his 
efficiency. He belonged to the Judson Association, and preached in a num- 
ber of churches. He devoted a great deal of his time and efforts to the 
church in Frankfort, and helped liberally in the building of the same. He 
was also a large contributor to the new church being built at this writing. 
The first church was damaged by a wind storm and rendered unfit for further 

use. 

On November 7, i860, he was married to Mary Jane Avers, of Frank- 
fort, the daughter of Albert G. and Abigail (Bunnell) Ayres. farmers. Two 
children were born of this union: Julia Magdalene, who died in infancy; 
and Elizabeth Stark, now living at Cleveland, Ohio, where her husband is 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 693 

pastor of the Glenvillc Baptist church. Mr. and Mrs. Stark had two chil- 
dren: Stephen Stevens, died in infancy, and Stephen Weeks, born Novem- 
ber 22, 1906. 

Stephen Slipher Clark, our subject, departed from this life on May 24, 
1913, after a career of usefulness and good deeds. As a teacher, primarily, 
he won an imperishable reputation in the county, and as a farmer and 
preacher, he added to the respect that is paid him. 



THOMAS A. GILLRTE 



The theory that success is the result of hard work and perseverance is 
scouted by many people of the twentieth century, and the reason, of course, 
is that many men have not known the necessity of building from the ground 
up. Their business has been established for them, their fortunes have been 
made by others, and so their view of life's vicissitudes is not the right one, 
although they are sincere in their belief. However, when facts are studied, 
it is proved that the element of success, to be true success, is obtainable only 
through the most persistent industry. Frankfort has many citizens who have 
won for themselves prosperity and position by dint of labor, and among 
them may be listed prominently Mr. Gillrie, of this sketch. He began life 
under hardship, but Spartan-like, fought through the discouraging first years, 
and today is enjoying the reward for his past work. 

Thomas A. Gillrie was born at Lavena Center, Michigan township, this 
county, on October 15, 1881, and was the son of James Andrew and Katie L. 
(Heimbach) Gillrie. James A. Gillrie was born in Lockport, New York, in 
1840, and was the son of Thomas Gillrie and Sarah (ITartsein Gillrie, and 
was one of four children, the other three being Charles H., W. L., and Edwin 
D. The Gillries were of Scotch and English descent and originally came to 
Canada, settling on the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia. The Hartsell family 
were originally of Germany, and they were among the early settlers of Lock- 
port, New York. James A. Gillrie, the father of our subject, was a carriage 
painter by trade, and died in the autumn of 1886 in Detroit, Michigan. Mrs. 
Gillrie, the mother, is now making her home with Thomas A. Gillrie. 

The early education of our subject was obtained at Momence. Illinois, 
in the common schools of that place. Tn 1886, after the death of his father, 
Thomas Gillrie came to Clinton county. He did not settle down right away, 



"94 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

but, in company with his mother, traveled quite extensively over the country. 
He finally returned to this county, and for the next twelve years clerked in a 
grocery store. Later he was connected with the Frankfort Steam Laundry, 
and was employed at the same for three years. This position lie resigned in 
order to engage in (lie restaurant hade. This establishment he still manages 
with great success, at all times using the latest and best methods in the 
operation of his place. Every article of equipment is sanitary and modern, 
and consequently his patrons are man)'. 

On September 3, 1910. Mr. Gillrie was married to Bessie 
Armantrout, who was one of the six daughters of William IT. and Sarah E. 
(Glick) Armantrout, retired fanners of Clinton count}-, having beer, among 
the earliest settlers of the community. These parents now live in Frankfort. 
Religiously, Mr. Gillrie is a member of the Presbyterian church, and be- 
longs to the Presbyterian Brotherhood. Fraternally, he also belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias and Woodmen of the World, and has business affiliations 
with the Merchants' Association of Frankfort. Politically, he is a Republican. 



ELISHA TOHNRON. 



^ Among those who have gained worthy prestige in the agricultural and 
business circles of Clinton county and have proved themselves loyal and pat- 
riotic citizens, is Elisha Johnson. This man is a fine specimen of the hardy 
pioneer. He found this county a wilderness and now sees it in full blossom. 
He belongs to that noble band of settlers now fast disappearing, and to 
whom we owe so much; they arc rapidly crossing to the other shore, but 
their good works remain. All about us we hear the falling of the trees of 
the primeval forest and with them are passing their living prototypes, the 
grand old men and women who grew up with them The children of the 
rising generation can never appreciate truly the lives of these old people and 
the flowers they place upon their graves soon fade, but they should be taught 
the principles which ruled the lives of these sacred dead that thev too may 
live to be happy and useful men and women. 

Elisha Johnson was born in Stark county, Ohio, January 15, 1828, being 
the son of Exum and Alice (Pinick) Johnson, the father a native of Virginia, 
and the mother from Ohio, both Quakers in religion, and farmers by occupa- 
tion. Both parents died in the state of Ohio. Our subject was one of nine 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. < .< ) \ 

children, two others of whom are living: James Johnson, a tanner of Den- 
ver, Colorado, and Charles Johnson, a shoe merchant of Ilobart, Indiana. 

Elisha Johnson received a common school education and worked on the 
farm until the year 1S54, when he removed to Howard county, Indiana, 
arriving there just after the departure of the last Indian across its borders. 
At this place, in company with his brother, Elijah, he opened up the first saw 
mill, using the first engine built in Indianapolis by Sinker, the castings 
being made for it at Madison, Indiana. After his brother's death. Elisha's 
son was associated with him in the milling trade until the father's retire- 
ment in 1903. In 1873 Elisha Johnson moved his mill to Clinton county, 
later moved to Illinois and then again back here after disposing of his busi- 
ness. Mr. Johnson had the contr^c; and built the first school house and 
Masonic hall at Russiaville. 

In that day the presence of liquor in the town of Russiaville was quite 
a disturbing element. Laws were useless because everyone drank, many to 
excess, and nobody attempted to stop the traffic. Inevitable, a company of 
reformers sprang up, and Mr. Johnson was one of the leaders. He hated 
the sight of intoxicants, and believed that a man once addicted to the drink 
habit was not beyond help, so he used his every effort to reformation, some 
of his charges becoming afterwards the best citizens of the town. 

Mr. Johnson was married on November 21, 1S56, to Sarah E. Hart, of 
Highland county, Ohio, the daughter of William and P>culah (Nordyke) 
Hart, natives of Clinton county, Ohio, and farmers all of their lives. She 
was one of nine children, one other of whom is living, Mrs. Nancy Proctor, 
of Russiaville, Indiana. Mr. Johnson's wife is a member of the Methodist 
church. Two children were born to our subject and wife: Arthur, who lives 
in Terre Haute, and has one boy, Omer, in school ; and Mrs. Anna Pippcr, of 
Sunnyvale, California, wife of a fruit grower. 

Religiously, Mr. Johnson is a Methodist, although he was born of a 
Quaker family and taught their faith. He is a member of the Masonic 
order, and politically has always been a Republican. 

Mr. Johnson owns his own home in Frankfort, and is well liked by the 
people of the city wherein he is spending the evening of his worthy life. 
His wife is still the same dutiful and faithful helpmeet of days past, and 
their companionship now, in the calm, after the storm of life, is beautiful 
and sacred beyond the power of mere words to paint. They stand as a 
monument for the younger generation to emulate in this prosaic century. 



696 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

JAMES ALLEN BIEBER. 

James Allen Bieber was born on June 4, 1840, in Lehigh county, 
Pennsylvania. He was the son of Solomon and Barbara (Gangwer) Bieber. 
James Bieber's great grandfather came from Loraine, Germany, and lo- 
cated on a farm on the Little Lehigh river, which is now three miles west 
of Allentown. At that time the great grandfather drove ninety miles to 
Philadelphia to market his grain. This farm has been handed down from 
father to son, and is now owned and occupied by Mr. Bieber's brother 
Henry. It was on this farm, and in the same stone house built by the 
grandfather that Mr. Bieber was born. Mr. Bieber's great grandfather, on 
his mother's side, came from Holland. 

Mr. Bieber's brothers and sisters are: Charles (dec), Henry, Sylves- 
ter (dec.), Milton, Angelina (dec), Isabell (dec), Emma Bieber Danner of 
Allentown, Pa.; Maria Bieber, and Loraine Bieber Greenwald (dec). 
Charles Keck (dec) of Allentown, an uncle of Mr. Bieber's, was associate 
judge of Allentown, and also president of the First National Bank of that 
city. 

When Mr. Bieber was sixteen years old his father died, and he was 
bound out by his guardian to learn the coachmaker's trade for three years. 
At the end of that time the Civil War broke out, and Mr. Bieber volunteered 
for a nine months' service. At the expiration of the nine months he was 
honorably discharged, but immediately re-enlisted for a three months' serv- 
ice and was made a sergeant. During Mr. Bieber's service he was at the 
front in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg and 
Chancellorsville. He was also at Gettysburg, although not in the actual 
fighting. Mr. Bieber was a member of the One Hundred and Twenty-eighth 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and fought against the famous Confed- 
erate general "Stonewall" Jackson. The first battle in which they met 
Jackson was at South Mountain, where the rebels were routed by the Union 
army. Three days later, at Antietam, the 128th Regiment, with General 
Mansfield in support of General Hooker, came on the field and n)ade a 
desperate charge on the rebel lines, over a field strewn with the dead and 
wounded from both sides. When the charge was made, the colonel and Gen- 
eral Mansfield were killed ; the division, however, carried the rebel works. 

In the spring of '63 Mr. Bieber's regiment was with General Williams' 
division and in General Slocum's corps, which division, at the battle of 



\ 




JAMES A. BIBBER. DECEASED 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 697 

Chancellorsville, was stationed along the plank road where Jackson stumbled 
upon them by mistake and suffered a defeat. Mr. Bieber fought under 
Burnside at the battle of Fredericksburg, one of the bloodiest battles of the 
war. lie helped to build the pontoon bridges across the Rappahannock. Mr. 
Bieber had several thrilling experiences during the war, although he never 
received a bullet in his body. He waded through swamps in mud to his 
waist, and was sick in camp without a nurse, and oilier incidents which test 
the nerve and vitality of a man. 

Mr. Bieber was educated in a school near the old homestead. After 
leaving the army Mr. Bieber became the teacher in this school. After a year 
spent in this fashion, he came west to Fremont, Ohio, in the spring of '64. 
Here he became the head clerk in the Betts Dr}' Goods store. 

In 1868 Mr. Bieber was married to Mrs. Maria McGee, and in the 
following year, 1869, they came to Frankfort, Ind. At that time there was 
no railroad to Frankfort and Mr. and Mrs. Bieber traveled by stage from 
Lafayette to this city. 

For a number of years Mr. Bieber was associated with the late P. J. 
Kern, one of Clinton county's pioneer carriage makers. Mr. Kern's car- 
riage business was quite extensive and much of the work and responsibility 
fell on our subject's shoulders, as he occupied the office of bookkeeper and 
head salesman. In this manner Mr. Bieber became known over the country 
and state. At the time of his death he conducted a carriage shop of his 
own where he manufactured on a small scale a special kind of storm top 
vehicle of his own invention. He was taken sick, however, and died on 
August 22, 1910, ..nd was buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Fremont, Ohio. 

A few years after Mr. and Mrs. Bieber came to Frankfort, they pur- 
chased a home on the southeast corner of Walnut and Jackson streets, and 
here they spent the remainder of their lives. .Mr. Bieber was reared in the 
German Reformed church. On coming west he brought his letter to the Pres- 
byterian church at Fremont, Ohio, and later to Frankfort. He was a man of 
sterling character, and a man of great earnestness and industry. He was 
a member of the Stone River Post, No. 65, Grand Army of the Republic, 
serving one year as commander of the post, and four years as chaplain. In 
politics he was a Republican and always supported the party. For thirty 
ye s he served as judge and inspector on the Board of Elections of his 
precinct. 

Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bieber: Mattie Van Doren 
Bieber and Daisy Josephine, both of Frankfort. Mattie is a graduate of 



6o,8 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

the Mrs. Blakcr's School of Indianapolis, a teacher's college, and for a num- 
ber of years had a private kindergarten in Frankfort, but is now engaged in 
the millinery business. She is a member of the Rebekah lodge and the 
Presbyterian church. Daisy graduated at the Frankfort high school, spent 
one year at Indiana University, one summer term at Cincinnati Art Acad- 
emy, and four years at the Herron Art Institute in Indianapolis. She is now 
engaged in teaching in this city. She is a member of the Presbyterian 
church. 

Mrs. Biebcr's maiden name was Ann Maria Josephine Mead. She was 
born January 1, 1837, m New London, Conn., and was the daughter of 
Henry Sanford and Mary (Larchar) Mead. The name Mead is recorded 
in the English College of Heraldry as early as 1569. Among the most 
prominent of the Scotch representatives of the family was the Earl of Clan 
William. The founder of the English branch was granted arms. The eagle 
in the crest of the arms was given to Sir Robert Mead for his services in 
the cause of the German Empire in the wars of Gustavus Adolphus. William 
Mead, the American ancestor, was born in England in 1600. He came to this 
country about 1630 and settled first in Massachusetts, then in Hempstead, 
Long Island, and finally in Greenwich, Conn. He is supposed to have been 
a member of a family of Saxon origin which settled in very early times in 
Somersetshire, but had removed to Essex during the reign of Hanry VI. 
John Mead, son of William, was born in 1685. He married Hannah, the 
daughter of William Potter of Stanford. Ebenezer Mead, son of John and 
Hannah Mead, was born in Greenwich, Conn., in 1663, and married Sarah 
Knapp. Jeremiah Mead, son of Ebenezer and Sarah Mead, was born in 
Greenwich in 1705 and married Hannah St. John of Norwalk. Stephen 
Mead, their son, was born in Stratford, Conn, about 1750. He was a soldier 
in the war of the Revolution, and served as a private in Captain David Ilait's 
company, Ninth Regiment of Connecticut militia, commanded by Lieutenant- 
Colonel John Mead. He was also in Captain Smith's company of the same 
regiment. His name appears on the payroll of the "company of householders 
at Greenwich." 

Stephen Mead married Rachel Sanford, the daughter of Captain Sam- 
uel Sanford of Reading, Conn. After the war Stephen moved to Pittsfield, 
Mass. He owned land now occupied as the village green of Pittsfield, and 
his granddaughter, Mary, was considered the most beautiful girl in the town. 
Ephriam Mead, son of Stephen, was born in Stratford, Conn., in 1773. He 
was a millwright by trade and a man of great inventive genius. He married 
Polly Strong. Henry Sanford Mead, son of Ephraim, was born in Pitts- 



CO I ;■..-..!■ X A . 699 

field, Mass., in r 18 H •:,< id ted from Wcsl Point and held an official 
position in guard the Im : us J Le wa ; c ate accou it at 

, \ ai 1 . archil daughter < |< pb A r ar- 

ren Larchar, son rre rchar, who , a >, I in tin Bon 

Homme Richard," th< fiagshi] , 1 John Paul Jones. He tool part 

in ■ 1 I mporl n engage) In I 

hi Henry San 1 ' t Ca Conn., in 1 1 S^ 

were: Edwin Henry, Hiram Warren, Mary Elizabeth Pease, Julia Frances 
Ellii 11 Ana Maria [osephine Bieber and Martha Louise Van Doren, all de- 
ceased Mrs. Mai ' : u I ' ■ irothci Edwin 1 ! Mead va a 11 an 1 if 

much proniin 113 For over fifty years as connected 

Willi the Peni sylvania ■ 1 113 of Nei ^ orl< (it;, and ranch of this 

time was assi iated with the prominent operators of the country His com- 
pany was a pioneer in the de elopment of the anthracite coal fields of the 
Wyoming region, and was remarkably successful. For a number of years 
and ai the time of his death he was president of the Pennsylvania Coal Com- 
pany. Mr. Mead was officially connected with a number of financial institu- 
tions, such as the Erie & Wyoming Valley Railroad Company, the Washing- 
ton Life Insurance Company and others. He was a member of the New 
York Chamber of Commerce, and of the American Geographical Society. 
Tiring of New York City life, Mr. Mead moved to the suburb, South 
Orange. N. J., and bought a beautiful plot of ten acres. On this he erected 
a handsome villa. He owned a large library and was especially fond of the 
study of languages, and his collection included almost every written lan- 
guage in the world. His country home, which he named "Spring Lawn," 
attracted others to this alii : - people of culture and refinement were 
induced to settle here. He at one time owned most of the land in South 
Orange. He was not oneer in the settlement of this place, bul a 

'" the - i '• lents tending to its development. 

He was a strong advoi rid assisted in securing a village charter for 

South Orange, served two terms as president of board of trustees, helped 
improve drainage, member of Meadow Land Association, and Orange Ath- 
letic Club, also South Orange Field Club. He was a man of striking per- 
sonal appearance. - ; aid, and with an open hand for "a deed of de- 
voted charity." 

Mrs. Bieber's brother, Hiram Mead, was a writer connected with a 
number of New York papers, among them the Times, also some English 
newspapers. He was also fond of traveling, and made a number of trips to 
foreign countries. Mrs. Bieber's sister, Mary Elizabeth, married John 



JOO CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Peso, cousin of President Hayes. .Mrs. Bieber's great great aunt, Betsey 
Metcalf, of Providence, R. I., without any intention on her part, became the 
founder of the manufacture of straw bonnets in America. Up to the time of 
1789, and when Miss Metcalf was fourteen years old, all straw hats had been 
imported from Europe and were consequently high in value. They were 
originally made in Italy, where a particular kind of wheat was cultivated 
for the purpose. Then they found their way into France and from there into 
England, thence to America. In the spring of 1798 an exceptionally pretty 
Dunstable straw was displayed in the window of a milliner's shop in Provi- 
dence. Betsey Metcalf looked at it longingry, but sighed as the priced was 
named to her. With true New England spirit she decided to make a bonnet 
with her own hands. During harvest time, she gathered some of the oat 
straw, split it with her thumb nail, and plaited it. Before long she had an ex- 
cellent imitation of the foreign braid. She sewed and shaped it, used com- 
mon starch for stiflening, and a flat iron for pressing. Soon afterwards, 
Betsey blossomed out in her new bonnet. All her friends admired it, and 
followed her example. The braiding of straw became the fashionable fancy 
work of the day. The new industry was promptly assailed by the press and 
pulpit, and some hypocritical divine pronounced it a great sin; it fostered 
feminine vanity, he declared, and woidd encourage envy and uncharitable- 
ness. Early in the present century a learned doctor wrote an essay on the 
"Manufacture of Straw Bonnets," in which nearly all the evils of the day 
were laid at the door of this dangerous innovation. Certain political econo- 
mists prophesied a famine as a result of cutting straw before the grain was 
fully ripe. For a short time Betsey Metcalf monopolized the trade, receiv- 
ing orders from customers for miles around. But the idea became general 
and everyone soon braided straw and shaped bonnets. 

Mrs. Bieber's girlhood days were spent in Pittsfield, Mass., and she was 
educated in the girl's seminary of that city. When just a young lady, Mrs. 
Bieber came west to Fremont, Ohio, to visit her sister. It was necessary for 
her to travel part of the way by water, being one week on Lake Erie. Yellow 
fever was raging at Sandusky, and ships were not allowed to land there. Con- 
sequently, she landed at Toledo and from there traveled by stage to Fre- 
mont. While on the lake they encountered a terrible storm, and the ship 
collided with and sank another vessel. 

While making an extended visit with her sister in Fremont, Mrs. Bieber 
became acquainted with Jonathan McGce, a prominent lumber merchant and 
manufacturer, and they were married. During the Civil War, Mr. McGee 
filled orders from the government for a great number of gun stocks. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 7OI 

Mrs. Bieber was president of the Soldier's Aid Society during the Civil 
War and was very active and energetic in making bandages, etc., and gather- 
ing in supplies and shipping them to the front. She was also prominent in 
church and social circles, being a member of the Congregational church, and 
on coming west brought her letter to the Presbyterian church. She was a 
woman of strong character, possessing the qualities of the old New England 
stock from which she came. She was sweet and kind of disposition, always 
sympathetic and interested in others. She kept young until the last by her 
live interest in the issues of the day. She was the mother of four daughters, 
namely: Lillis Jane McGee Hockman, the late Mrs. James T. Hockman, 
Grace McGee (dec). Mattie Van Doren Bieber and Daisy Josephine Bieber 
of Frankfort. 

Mrs. Bieber died on October 13, 191 2, and was buried in Oakwood 
Cemetery at. Fremont, Ohio. 



NATHAN T. JACOBY. 



In the history of Clinton county, as applying to the agricultural inter- 
ests, the name of Nathan T. Jacoby occupies a conspicuous place, for through 
the number of years he lived he was one of the representative farmers of the 
community, progressive, enterprising and persevering. Such qualities always 
win success, sooner or later, and to Mr. Jacoby they brought a satisfactory 
reward for his well directed efforts, and while he benefited himself and the 
community in a material way, he has also been an influential factor in the 
educational, political and moral uplift of the count}' in which he resided. 

Nathan T. Jacoby was born December 26, 1843. ni Clinton county, 
being the son of Peter and Mar} ( Peters) Jacoby, natives of Pennsylvania, 
who traveled overland to Clinton county in the early days, and entered land 
from the government around Mulberry. At one time they possessed seven- 
teen hundred acres of ground. The parents lived in their covered wagons 
until they had built a home of logs in which to live, and in the night, to keep 
off the wolves and other prowling animals, they built a circle of fires around 
the wagniis. Our subject was one of ten children, all of whom are dead with 
the exception of John Jacoby and Thomas Jacoby, both retired farmers of 
this county. Our subject passed away from this life on October 16, 1910. 

Nathan Jacoby attended the common schools in his youth and eagerly 



/< >2 ( ' i [ S ! ( I N hi \-n INDIANA. 

learned everything iheii limited va Hints could offer, then lie attended col- 
lege at Battle Ground, just north of Lafayette, in Tippecanoe count)-, then. 
during the winter nn nths, he taught ; and in the summer sp< it his time 

in farming. Until ctiri nenl ... he rei i ed active!} in the agri- 

cultural business, then he built himself a beautiful home in the cit\ of Frank- 
fort and moved there with his wife Sin- still reside: there. Mr. [acoby 
continued to keep hi? farms undei tin can ol competent nanagers and did 
so until his death. He owned two farms about two miles from town, one 
being of one hundred and thirty-two acres and the other of ninety-eight. 
Corn and wheat were grown extensivel) on these lands and their productive- 
ness rivaled the hi h I ( linto i i nnh had M : : in the 
cattle business and made quite a success of his efforts along that line. Mr. 
Jacoby was well known throughout the county on account of his reliable and 
honest methods, and he was called upon more than twenty times to settle up 
various estates. He never cared for public office, although he was a stanch 
Republican, but he was always ready to assist any enterprise that meant good 
for his community. He was also a great lover of his home, and after his 
daughter's marriage was planning to take a trip with his wife and see the 
world, but the death of his daughter interrupted for all time their fond plans. 

In 1866 Mr. Jacoby was married to Margaret C. Goble, the daughter of 
Israel and Elizabeth (Major) Goble. The parents were natives of Virginia, 
the father was a mason by trade. They came to Clinton county in an early 
day and experienced the same hardships that were undergone by Mr. Jacoby's 
parents. Mrs. Jacoby was one of nine children, all of whom are dead with 
the exception of herself and one brother, McAllen Goble, a retired farmer 
1: ing in Lafayette. She had two brothers. Thomas and David, who served 
through the Civil war as privates in Company D, Fifteenth Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry. 

One child, Delia, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Jacoby. She was married 
to William J. Brown, of Rossvillc, a farmer, but died two years afterward 
leaving one son. Ward B. Brown, who was born on January 16, 188 ... He is 
a graduate of the Frankfort high school and of Purdue University with the 
class of 1912. He is now proprietor of the Coulter House. He married 
Pauline Sharick, daughter of J. W. and Minnie (Reep) Sharick, of Ohio, 
on June 4, 1913. He is one of the most enterprising of the young business 
men of Frankfort, and he is sincerely liked by all of his many friends. 

Mr. Brown is a member of the Presbyterian church and of the Benevo- 



CLIXTOX COUNTY, INDIANA. 



lent Protective Order of Elks and Masonic orders and Phi Gamma Delta 

fraternity. He is a Republican in politics. He lives in Center township, 
O into n county, where he owns and operates a farm of one hundred ' 
thirty-two acres. His father is still living at Rossville, Indiana, where he is 
engaged in extensive agriculture and cattle business. 

Nathan Jacoby was affiliated with no lodges, but was a member of the 
Piresb\ terian church. 



JAMES MILTON BELL. 

To a very great extent the prosperity and welfare of the agricultural 
sections of Clinton comity is due to the honest industry, the steady persistence, 
the wise economy which so prominently characterized the farming people of 
Indiana. Among this number may be mentioned the subject of this short 
mecord,. who,, by years of thrift and unceasing labor, has not only acquired 
a material prosperity for himself, but has also won the esteem of the people 
with whom he has been associated, and left his indelible stamp upon bis com- 
munity. 

James- BdL Bell was born October 31,. 1846,. being the son of James and 
Jane (Givens) Bell,, both natives of Pennsylvania. The father was a fanner 
fcy occupation, and came to Clinton county in 184S and continued his 
vocation. He owned six hundred acres in this county, and was one of the 
hardest workers in inducing the first railroad to cross this locality. He was 
a Democrat in politics,, and was a member of the United Presbyterian church. 
The mother's parents were retired farmers, who came to Clinton county in 
i860. The father and mother died at the age of eightv-six years. The 
Givens family were originally from Ireland, and the Bell familv of English 
ancestry. 

James M. Bell was one of eight children:. Nancy Williams, of Burling- 
ton,. Eas. ;: Marr Hamilton, of Clinton county; Margaret Shortle (deceased) : 
John ML, our subject; John A. (deceased) : Joseph YY., Pawhtrska, Okla. ; 
Alice Thompson (deceased),, and Hiram J.,, of Clinton county. 

Our subject was educated in the common schools of the county where 
hie was brnm. He early learned the rudiments of the agricultural art, and he 
ffeimained a farmer nearly all of Ms life. For two years he was engaged 
iras the stave business in Frankfort and in the coal mining business in Parke 
county for three years. He retired from active life in 1901, and now leads 
a quiet life in his beautiful borne in Frankfort, Ind. He still owns two 



/04 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

hundred acres (if fertile and tillable land in Union township and excellent 
oats, corn and live slock are raised thereon. He has a tenant on his estate. 

Politically, Mr. Bell is a Democrat, and was a trustee of Owen town- 
ship for two terms, from 1886 to 1890, Religiously, he is a member of the 
Presbyterian church. Fraternally, Air. Bell belongs to the Improved Order 
of Red Men and the Tribe of Ben Uur. He is also president of the bann- 
ers' Mutual Insurance Company of Mulberry, this county. 

In the year 1870 Mr. Bell took as his wife Susan Wallace, the daughter 
of Benjamin and Christ} Ann (Thompson) Wallace, natives of Ohio, and 
farmers all their lives. The father died when Mrs. Bell was eight months 
old and the mother leparted this life in 1901. Two child;.'. ' beet 

born to Mr. and Mrs. Bell: Mabel, now Mrs. Brosier, of Dayton, ()., and 
Myrtle, now Mrs. Myer, of Rensselaer, Ind. The latter lias two children: 
Margaret and Jane. 

Mr. Bell and wife travel very extensively. They enjoy the balmy sea 
breezes of the Florida shores in the winter months, and spend the sweltering 
davs of summer, among he cool rocks of northern Maine. 



FRANK REED STEWART. 

Prominent in the affairs of Clinton county and distinguished as a cap- 
able citizen whose kindly influence was felt far beyond the confines of the 
community in which he lived, the subject of this sketch inspires an easy and 
pleasant task for the biographer. His magnanimity, his energetic and honest 
business methods live after him, for it is true that his bodily presence has 
disappeared. Men with large souls and willing hands are the elements that 
keep up civilization in the face of immorality, degradation, and dishonesty. 
Such a man was Frank Reed Stewart, of Frankfort, Inch, and his name has 
been engraved in the halls of Clinton county as one of her noblest citizens. 

Mr. Stewart was born in Clinton county September 9, 1866, being the 
son of Flenry and Nancy Ann Stewart. His father was a native of Mont- 
gomery county, and spent the days of his life in farming and stock raising. 
Flis mother was born in Clinton county. Henry Stewart was a great worker 
in the Antioch church during his younger days. At one time he owned all 
of the land where the little town of Antioch now stands, but he sold it to be 
plotted and made into town lots. Mr. Stewart led the singing in the church, 







£s v-asr^. 




FRANK REED STEWART, DECEASED 



CLINTON CXU NTY, INDIANA. 705 

and in those days that insured him the foremost place in the social affairs 
of the community, a position which lie filled admirably. 

Frank Stewart ivas educated on the farm and in the very. meager schools 
of that period. When twenty years of age, Mr. Stewart engaged in the 
furniture business, remaining for some time at that occupation. Subse- 
quently, the livestock trade appealed to him more strongly and he entered 
upon that calling, and continued until his death on February 16, 1911. 

In his endeavors in his chosen field of work, Mr. Stewart covered large 
territory, making trips to all the cities in the country, and he had a personal 
acquaintance with most of the leading stockmen of the United States. It 
was his custom to buy cattle and sheep in the West and ship them East to be 
sold on the market. Frequently, he made large shipments, approximating at 
times five thousand dollars. For a number of years, Mr. Stewart lived in 
the town of Darlington, Montgomery county, and his efforts were greatly 
responsible for the building up of that town. He was councilman for a few 
years. 

Mr. Stewart, on December 28, 1892, was married to Emma E. Miller, 
the daughter of Samuel and Harriet C. Miller. The father was of good 
Scotch-Irish blood and was a native of the Blue Grass state. Her mother 
came from a stock of Indiana farmers, and is able to trace her ancestry 
back to a very interesting period. She lost her mother when she was but a 
child, and then she helped keep house for her family until the day she mar- 
ried Frank Stewart. Her great grandfather fought in the Revolutionary 
War and her grandfather participated in the second conflict with Great Brit- 
ain in 1812, and also was the squire of Franklin, Ind., for a long time in 
those early days. Her grandmother on her father's side bore the name of 
Ross, and was descended from one of the signers of the Declaration of In- 
dependence in 1776, thus Mrs. Stewart is eligible to be a member of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution, a privilege which she never sought. 
An interesting little story of a great uncle, Thomas Miller, is to the effect 
that, in 1795, he was hunting in Kentucky and came upon five buffalos, one 
of which he wounded, when the herd attacked him furiously and drove him 
into a tree. He had to kill all of them before he could come down. A spoon 
made from a horn of one of these buffalos has been handed down in the 
family as an heirloom. Mrs. Stewart's father lived for fifty-two years on a 
farm given to him as a wedding present. He belonged, from an early day, to 
the Horsethief Association of his county. Mrs. Stewart has one uncle living, 
and he is in the ministry at Waynetown, Montgomery county, the Rev. John 
(45) 



- ,( CLINTI '' COI ITY, IND1.\ \'A. 

L Miller of the Baptisi clutrch. Her sisters and brothers living are: Will 
and Otto, farmers near Darlington Montgomen counts Homer, in the 
l)u incss in al : hi n ishing 

ate; Rui i making i in San l r ranci co, Cal ' 

Hopper, living near Lebanon Boo i untj Two brothers are dead. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart ha> liree children, Reid M.. Xoble i ; and Esther 
Rue, all of wl n u n< i\v lh ing. 

Mr. Stewart was a very public-spirited and generous man, and a great 
lover of his family and home. Rather inclined to a quiet disposition, he hesi- 
tated to hold public offices, bul took an interesl in politics. Me was a Re- 
pi can in j ind m to he del church and t i ; • i. >dges 
oi Free and Accepted M: n Knights of thi; , and the 1 lent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows. 



JESSE C. BL1NN. 

It is a pleasure to sketch the biographj of the old veterans of the Civil 
war, because their lives are interesting and surrounded by a glamor of ro- 
mance. We place them upon a pedestal in our minds and view them with 
wonder. To the younger generation the exciting days of '61 and '65 seem 
far away, and to be permitted the pleasure of hearing the talk of men to 
to whom the days seem but yesterday, is indeed a pleasure to be sought and 
cherished. The subject of this sketch faithfully played his part in the war 
drama, and lives today, a veritable magazine of reminiscences. Since the 
day of Robert E. Lee's surrender, Jesse C. Blinn has lived a life of valuable 
achievement in his chosen held, farming. 

Mr. Blinn places tin date of his birth on January 4, 1840, the place 
Center township, Clinton county. He was the son of Jacob and Lin nda 
(Thatcher) Blinn, who were among the earliest settlers in this count}-, hav- 
ing come here in tht n Warren count; I >., where they were 
married. The father remained a farmer all of bis life, and raised a family 
of six children: Adam (deceased ), Amos (deceased), Julia (deceased), 
George, Jesse C, and Mary. 

In his youth, Jesse Blinn attended the common schools and subsequently 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. The call for volunteers in 1S61 was an 
irrisistible attraction for him. and on September 19, 186] he enlisted in Com- 
pany K. Tenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Captain Shortle in charge. His 
regiment became a part of the famous Army of the Cumberland, commanded 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 707 

by General Thomas. Mr. Blinn was mustered out in Indianapolis, Ind., on 
September 19, 1864. His regiment had a brilliant war record, having par- 
ticipated in no less than twenty-two important battles. 

Mr. Blinn lost no time after his retirement from the army to seek the 
girl who had waited for him. He and Margaret E. Gaddis were wedded in 
1864. She was the daughter of John and Hannah Gaddis, very old settlers 
in the county. To them there have been horn two children, Ora and (dare. 

Mr. Blinn continued the work of fanning until the year 1 88 1 and then 
sought retirement, choosing Frankfort, hid., as his home. Mr. Blinn has 
been identified with several notable movements while he has lived there. 
F01 several years he was an energetic and worthy member of the city 
Mr. Blinn constructed the opera house in Frankfort, which ranks as one of 
the most complete and artistic theaters in the state of Indiana. Since build- 
ing it, however, Mr. Blinn has not taken active charge, but has kept it under 
lease. 

Mr. Blinn is a Methodist and a Republican, both of which are good 
affiliations. He has not taken an ostentatious position in his services to the 
community, 1 at has preferred to be numbered among the silent workers. 



TACOB HODGEN. 



As the young man of today spins through the picturescpie valleys and 
along level fields in his motor car and'see the white road thread itself like a 
ribbon tinder the wheels, he does not think of the day when his father or 
grandfather slowly toiled along through the same country in a slow-going 
wagon, over stumps and logs, fording streams, ever pushing into a new 
country. Nor docs he reckon that the cost of the car and the motor that 
hums so powerfully would have kept a pioneer family for many years in the 
midst of plenty- Their food was not bought — it was grown by themselves; 
their homes were not constructed by accomplished craftsmen — they were 
hewed and fitted and covered by the calloused hands of the home-maker. 
Watch one of these old heroes today when he gazes upon the evidences of. 
wealth around him and the twentieth-century youth He will smile com- 
placently and nod his head; he does not resent or criticise; he would be the 
first to help his own son have the comforts of the "best of them." Such a 



7 U '^ CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

man was Jacob Hodgen, and we regret that a fuller account of his interesting 
life may not be given in this sketch. 

Jacob Hodgen was born July o, 1831, in Clinton county, twelve miles 
north of Frankfo t, and was the son of William and Magdalene (Smith) 
Hodgen, who were natives of Kentucky, coming to Clinton count)- during 
the first years of the nineteenth century and following farming all of their 
lives. Our subject died May 5, 1907, being the last of a family of ten children. 

Mr. Hodgen received a meager common school education in his youth, 
but made up the deficiency in after life by reading and social intercourse. He 
began farming early, and continued the same until bis retirement late in life. 
He owned one hundred and sixty acres of excellent farm land, well tiled, 
tillable and fenced, south of Frankfort. Mr. Hogden conducted a grocery 
store in Frankfort for a time preceding his retirement from active life. 

In the year 1849, when the people rushed to the West in search of gold, 
Mr. Hodgen joined the train. Like so many others, however, unacquainted 
with the pitfalls of prospecting, he found his Midas-dream like the quest for 
the end of the rainbow. He soon returned home to this county. Before his 
death, Mr. Hodgen sold his farm and all other possessions with the ex- 
ception of his home in Frankfort. His widow now lives in comfort and 
plenty. 

In 1857 Mr. Hodgen married Mary McKinsey, the daughter of Mercer 
and Sarah (Elmore) McKinsey, both natives of Ohio, coming to Clinton 
county in the early days among the first families. She was born in 1838 in a 
log cabin and had a log cabin education. She used to help do the farm 
work, remembering the days when she followed her father and dropped corn 
in the furrows. She was ever a strong worker in the .Christian church. 
Noah and Hale, of Frankfort; Emma, of Kokomo; Kale, of Peru, and Mary- 
are the survivors in a family of ten children. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hodgen were born six children : Laban, Henry, Oscar, 
Anna, Josephine, and Magdalene. Laban, of Winamac, Indiana, has one 
daughter, Lenora, and three sons, Wilber, Howard and Noble. Lenora has 
two girls, Atterah and Mary Louise; Noble has two girls, Ruth Lenora and 
Ida Evelyn; Wilber has two boys, Rushton and Jack Laban; Howard is sin- 
gle. Henry Hodgen, Winamac, has two children, Fern and Earl, Earl has 
one boy, John; Oscar and Anna Hodgen are both deceased; Josephine makes 
her home in Oklahoma, and Magdalene lives with her mother in Frankfort. 

Politically, Mr. Hodgen was a Republican, and about fourteen years 



ci.i nton roi x L\ T ni \.\. 71 19 

be! re his dc;it1i became n strong Proliibitumist. \t one lime in the eighties 
h iclcl [Ik office of a 1 il . 1 I e Fraternally, he belonged I" lite So 
:n nl member ■ ■ f tin- ( hrist ian ■ h 



»HN O ' \l\ ! ; . 

We should indeed be provtd of the fact that there is no limit in this 
country to which natural ability, industr) and honesty may not aspire. One 
1 1 tin inpromisini rinding 1 eared in the 1 

en\ ironi rertheli 1 i tt< I rise to tin high 

-i station in tin land, and Lb qualities do nol have to be oi transcendenl 
character to enable him to accomplish this result, li is more the wax he does 
it and his skill in grasping the opportunities presented than to any remarkable 
qualities po.« essed by him. Accordingly, it is found that verv often in this 
country the chief executive of the nation or state and other high public 
officials possess no greater ability than thousands of others. They have 
simply taken better advantage of their opportunities than their fellows. And 
this truth runs through every occupation. The business man rises above 
his competitors merely by taking advantage of conditions which others over- 
look or fail to grasp. It is so with the subject of this review; he has ever 
been wide awake and industrious, and his reward has been an enviable success. 

John O. Frye was born in Morristown, Hamlin count)", Tennessee, on 
April 20, 1875. ^ L was the ~"" n °f John B. and Nancy (Cox) Frye, the 
fattier a native of Clinton county, and the mother of the state of Virginia. By 
trade the father was a tanner, and was an ardent member of the Christian 
church He died on May 18, r8gf '•'• r '. in the Civil war, and made 
there a splendid record being a corporal undei Capt. John \Y. Hannah, 
( ompan} v. One Hun - ; - Pwent; fourth Regiment of Indiana Volun- 
teers. Tie was en II I tin Twelfth clay of November, 1863. and honor- 
a •' m m rice August 31 1865 at Greensboro, N. C 

The mothei is still living with her son, Thomas, in Tennessee. Our 
subject was one of a family of eight, namely: Love H., a merchant of Ash- 
cillc, \ . C. ; William F a railroad man of Cincinnati; Thomas, a conductor 
on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad; James C, a farmer; T.illie B. Luttrell; 
Florence E. Smith, and Jennie B. Wilford, the two latter deceased. 

Ml". Frye spent his early days in the state of Tennessee, and received his 
early education in the common schools there. Before coming to Indiana, 



7IO CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

;ui<l after leaving school, he followed railroading for several years. In 
1893 he moved t<> Clinton county, and continued for a period of three years 
in the railroad business. He finally gave that up and entered the employ- 
ment of the Leseure Brothers, as clerk in their cigar store. His ability 
soon asserted itself and he was promoted to the position of manager, which 
same he held for five vcars. Having saved enough of the worldly goods he 
opened up a store of his own in 1911, and in 1913 he incorporated with the 
Leseure Brothers under the name of J. O. Fryc & Company, he being the 
president of the concern. Two stores are operated in Frankfort. The 
scope of their business is described by their advertising term: "Wholesale 
and retail tobacco dealers." Mr. Frye is also a stockholder in the People's 
Life Insurance Company and the Capital State Rank oi Indianapolis. 

Fraternally, Mr. Frye is one of the most prominent men in the county. 
His memberships include the Blue Lodge, Chapter, Council, Commandery, 
and Shrine of the Masonic Order; the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks; 
the Knights of Pythias; Improved Order of Red Men; Hay Makers; Tribe 
of Ben llur; Order of Eastern Star; Pythian Sisters; Travelers' Protective 
Association, and the Loyal Order of Moose. Politically, Mr. Frye is a Re- 
publican. In 191 2, he ran for the office of recorder of Clinton county, but 
was defeated by the narrow margin of twelve votes. He is a member of the 
Christian church. 

Mr. Frye was united in marriage to Georgia G. Comix, the daughter of 
John A. and Eva (Davidson) Comly, both natives of Clinton county. Mrs. 
Frye had one sister — Mrs. Isalake Auble, a school teacher at Forest, Ind. 
Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Frye: Evelena, Ellen and 
lohnnetta. 



HENRY M. MOORE. 



The most reliable history of a community, whether it be a township, 
county, or state, is one that embraces the lives of its people and. provides 
scope for the relating of the part they played in the upbuilding of the 
locality. Especially ought the lives of the progressive men be detailed, those 
men that stand out as types of good citizens. In this cursory review will be 
found tlie record of a man who has outstripped many ol his fcllowmen and 
has achieved a highly successful career in the agricultural and business 
world, and has made for himself a name honored by all his contemporaries. 
Henry M. Moore was born in Clinton county, Indiana, April 14, 1846. 



CLINTON COUNT Yj INDIANA. y \\ 

He was the son of William and Sarah E. Moore, of Ohio and Pennsylvania, 
respectively. The father was a carpenter by trade. The family came to In- 
diana from Ohio, and lived here two years, during which time our subject 
was horn. When he was two months old, the parents moved hack to Ohio, 
where they remained until 1865. Then they returned to Clinton county. The 
parents have both passed away and their bodies now He near Scircleville, Ind. 
Six children wen hern to their home: Carrie Miller, Mulberry, Ind.; Mary 
Rex, also of Mulberry; W. E. Moore, state of Kansas; Emma J. Moore, of 
Mulberry; Frank Moore, of Nebraska; and the subject. 

Henry M. Moore was educated in the comuon schools of Oxford, O. 
After leaving the realm of the pedagogue, he went onto the farm in Clinton 
county, and continued so until 1900, at which time he was appointed drain- 
age commissioner of Frankfort. So acceptably did he perform his duties in 
this capacity that he was chosen for four terms of two years each. After 
his service in Frankfort, he retired from active business life and fanning, 
and has since been leading a rather quiet life. 

Mr. Moore had a very brief experience in the Civil war. Mis intent 
was excellent, hut circumstances robbed him of his share of the glory. When 
he was old enough, Mr. Moore joined Company A, One Hundred and Sixty- 
seventh Ohio Volunteers, as a private, hut had only served four and one- 
half months when the army was discharged without Mr. Moore having had 
the pleasure of shooting a rebel. Captain James E. Stewart and Colonel 
Thomas Moore were the officers in command of his regiment. 

Although living a retired life, Mr. Moore still takes an interest in his 
farms, and occasionally in the breeding of Poland China hogs, a favorite 
pastime with him. lie owns one hundred and seven acres in Clinton county 
ami forty acres in Boone county, and rents both of the estates. He owns 
his home in Frankfort, a large and beautiful place on Washington avenue, 
and is content to enjoy its comforts. Mr. Moore is a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and is a Republican in politics. He is a member of 
no church. 

Mr. Moore married Maranda Baker, the daughter of Squire and fane 
Baker of Clinton county. Squire Baker was a native of Kentucky and the 
mother came from Ohio. Two children have been burn to Mr. and Mrs. 
Moore: Charles S. Moore, living in this county, and Edwin B. Moore, 
also of this county. 

Mrs. Moore's parents came to this county sixty-five vears ago when 
she was one year old. She remembers seeing main- herds of deer around 
in the county, and she herself drove four yoke of oxen t<> break the land 



"1- CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

her father entered mar Scirclevilli Fler husband, our sul)ject, remembers 
when there wen- only five houses on the east side of the branch running 
through Frankfort, and no railroad in the count) except the one across 
the Colfax corner. When Mr. and Mrs. Moore were first married they lived 
in a one room log cabin. Mrs. Moore had seven brothers and sisters: 
Elizabeth (deceased); Nancy A., of Scircleville; William M. (deceased), 
and Charles A.. John C, Addie Lee and Clara McKinsie, all of Kansas 



REV. M. M. WILES. 



The life record of Rev. M. M. Wiles, a highly respected fanner and 
minister of the Sugar Creek region, Clinton count}-, teaches that the road to 
success and position among men, whatever the station of life may be, is 
open to all who possess the courage and fortitude to seek the elusive goal. 
The life of our subject has been a life of good work-, it has acted for the 
material, moral and intellectual uplift of those with whom he has come into 
contact, and the impression made is deep, so deep that time and the passing 
of Reverend Wiles will not efface the lesson from the hearts of Clinton 
county. 

Reverend Wiles was born October 10, 1864, in Sugar Creek township, 
Clinton county, the son of Peter M. and Susan (Ray) Wiles, the father a 
native of Hamilton county., Indiana, being born there on July 1, 1841. He 
still lives on a farm near our subject, after a successful life of farming. He 
was a Democrat. The mother was a native of Sugar Creek township, this 
county, born there in 1836, and dying in t8/6. Two children were born of 
the union, our subject and Add B. After the mother's death, the father mar- 
ried again, this time to Elizabeth Hammond, a native of Hamilton county, 
who died in April, 1888. In 1890 the father was married for the third time, 
to Elizabeth Myers, who is still living. Our subject's grandfather was Adam 
Wiles. He entered land from the government in Hamilton county, and there, 
in one yard, he lived for sixty years. 

Rev. M. M. Wiles graduated from the public schools of Sugar Creek 
township. Mr. Wiles did not enter a regular theological seminary, but used 
his own resources to learn the profession. Naturally a great reader, ami hav- 
ing one of the largest private libraries in Clinton county, he found the best 
of literature open to him, and he studied diligently from 1891 to 1895, when 
he became the minister of the Sugar Creek Christian church, and he remained 




MR. AND MRS. M. M. WILES 



CLINTON C(>|\ i v, [Nil] \x \ -, , 

then- until a year or so ago, wlu-n he began preaching in Cass county, In- 
diana, carrying on the work in addition to his extensive operations in gen- 
eral fanning and stock raising. 

On September 13, 1SS5, Mr. Wiles ivas married to Edith A. Kingsolver 
who was born June 12, 1865, in Boone county, Indiana, the daughter of 
William and Mary Jane (Whitaker) Kingsolver. Her father was' born in 
Virgin.a in 1838, and died in December, 1800. The mother was a native of 
the Buckeye state, bring bom there on November 2, 1836, and came to In- 
diana with her parents when only a baby. She died February 9, 1908, in this 
state. Six children were born to the union, namely: Sanford, Milford Edith 
Samuel. Lucinda and Eliza. Our subject's wife received a good common 
school education in her youth. To our subject and wife the following chil- 
dren have been born: Lawrence, November 18, 1888, married to & Effie 
Rogers, have three children, Eldon, Susa and Eugene: Mary Susan, Inly 31 
1897, died July 29. 1902: Ethel M., February 3, 1900, now in school," and 
Carrie L., born June 22, 1903, also in school. 

Mr. Wiles has always farmed here in Sugar Creek township, in connec- 
tion with his work in the ministerial profession. He is living on his father's 
land, which comprises two hundred and seventy acres, all tillable with the 
exception of thirty acres. The ground is well tiled, and Mr. Wiles has [.laced 
upon bis estate the latest improvements to be had. He makes a specialty of 
Shorthorn cattle, Poland-China hogs, Percheron and Shire horses, 'and 
Brown Leghorn chickens, the selection being the best in the different classes 
of stock raising. Politically, Mr. Wiles is a Prohibitionist, and is not af- 
filiated with any fraternal organizations. 



ALBERT T. DENNIS. 



Among the capable men wlif.se integrity and depth of character have 
gained a prominent place in the community and the esteem and admiration 
of his fellowmen is the honored subject of this sketch. A leading farmer 
and stockraiser of Clinton county, and a man of very good views and high 
ideas, his influence has ever been for the betterment of his community and 
the vocation in which he is interested. He ranks among the leading agri- 
culturists of the county. 

Albert T. Dennis was born on April 15, 1844, Henry county, Indiana. 
the son of Benjamin and Clarkey Pool Dennis, the former a native of 



714 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Pennsylvania and the latter of North Carolina. Benjamin Dennis was born 
in 1795 an( ' was soldier in the American army during the war of iSu. 
Albert Dennis has four brothers and five sisters dead, and one brother living, 
William C. Dennis, of Greenfield, I ml., retired and father of a large family. 
The grandfather Dennis owned a half section of land in Pennsylvania, which 
he gave to the Shakers of Lebanon, ()., when he joined them. Benjamin 
Dennis had three brothers: John, Thomas and Elijah, and one sister, who 
stayed with the Shakers. 

Albert Dennis received his early education in a district school of 
Henry county, and later attended Earlham College in 1862-63, but was 
forced by sickness to abandon his course there. Albert was too eoung to 
enlist in the army during the Civil war, but he had two brothers win served, 
John and Thomas I'., the latter dying during his enlistment. Mi". Dennis 
moved to Frankfort in 1883, shortly after being appointed commissioner of 
drainage. Me filled this office in a very acceptable mannei for five years. 
For one year, Mr. Dennis clerked in a hardware store, and then went into 
the grocery business, where he stayed for eleven vcars. The call of the open 
field was too strong for him, however, and he retired from business life 
to look after his magnificent farm of two hundred and forty acres in Forrest 
township. This estate is in excellent condition, being one of the model 
farms of the state. Mr. Dennis raises corn and oats, and takes great pride in 
his cattle, sheep, and bogs. He now lives in Frankfort, in a very pretty 
and commodious home on East Clinton street. Part of the timber in the 
house was grown on the land where it stands. 

Mr. Dennis is affiliated with the Free and Accepted Masons, is a Quaker, 
of rather, belongs to the Society of Friends, and in politics votes the In- 
dependent ticket. 

In the year 1864, Mr. Dennis entered domestic life bv marrying Emily 
Caroline Waddell, the daughter of Charles and Euphemia Waddell, natives 
of Pennsylvania. Only one child was born to Mr. and Mrs. Dennis and it 
died while in infancy. 

Mrs. Albert Dennis is fortunate in possessing a very complete record 
of her large family of ancestors. Her grandparents were among the early 
settlers of the East, both being born on the shores of Maryland, and were 
married in North Carolina in the year 1799. Her grandparent- on the 
maternal side were Jacob and Sarah Roush of Pennsylvania, and the great- 
grandparents were John and Jane (Montgomery) Cook, of Cook county, 
Ireland. 

Mrs. Dennis's brothers and sisters are William 11.. of Rushville; Martin 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. /] 5 

F., of Indianapolis; Dilliha II., of Strawns, Intl. ; and two brothers and four 
sisters new dead. Her mother's brothers and sisters were lames, Archie, 
William, Samuel, Robert, David, John, Jane and Betsy, all of whom are 
dead. \\w father's brothers and sisters wen- Polly, Elizabeth, ( harles, 
Sallie, Nancy, Henry and Jennie, all now passed from this life. The brothers 
of her grandfather on her father's side were from Germanv and all of them 
have died. They were Peter Waddell. John, Jacob, Henry, Grotford and 
Katherine. Jacob Waddell's grandmother's maiden name was Willis. 



MAURK i HERTZ. 



There is a great deal of satisfaction to the biographer in setting before 
the reader the salient facts in the life of the gentleman whose name heads 
this paragraph, but whose soul has traveled to "'that undiscovered bourne 
from whence no traveler returns." His life was one of the highest in- 
tegrity, his name was synonymous with good deeds, and his influence in 
his home community was ever helpful and progressive. Today his memory 
is held in profound respect by all who knew him, and his record will go 
down in history as one worthy of emulation. 

Maurice Hertz brought with him from German}- frugality, economy, 
and industry; his Teutonic training gave him that wealth of education which 
only the German system affords, and although he left the Fatherland at 
the early age of sixteen, the schooling he possessed was far in advance 
of that of the American youths several years older. This element, when 
tempered with the Yankee grit and dash, makes a wonderful combination, 
which, has meant untold benefit to every section of the United States. The 
Germans have filled the best positions in the land, have entered all the 
professions, have tilled our lands, made our laws, and have fought under 
the stars and stripes. Their patriotism is unquestioned, and the President 
of the United States occupies an equal place in their affections with their 
beloved Kaiser. Such is the type of men represented singly in Mr. Hertz, 
and it is a source of much satisfaction to present the following in regard 
to his life. 

Maurice Hertz was born in the little town of Guntersblum, in the state 
of Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, on November 25, 1854, and was the son 
of Aaron and Jeanette (Wolt) Hertz, who represented the best families of 
the province of their home. Aaron Hertz lived under the German flag 



/Jo CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

a great part of his life hut went to South America, where he contracted a 
fever from which he ultimately died after returning to Germany. 

Maurice Hertz hoarded, a ship fc>r this countrj when he was hul sixteen 
years old. 1 1 i > travels first took him lo Tippecanoe county, Indiana, where 
he settled in the cit\ of Lafayette, and in this place he remained a number of 
years in the dry goods business. ITe next came to Frankfort, at this time 
being twenty-one years of age. !1< founded the Hertz' Dry Goods Coin- 
pan}, which concern he managed all of his life, making a success of it. 
and earning a reputation of being an honest and straightforward man of 
business. His friends were mane and they held, him in the highest esteem 
and respect all of his life. 

On March 21, t888, Mr. Hertz was united in marriage with Bella 
Moritz, the daughter of Mayer and Caroline (Frank) Moritz, both natives 
of Germany and who came to this country, settling first in Cincinnati, O., 
and later moving to the slate of New York. These parents were married in 
this country, and eight children afterward blessed the union: Moses, Her- 
man. Sigmund, .Charles, Albert, Henry, fsaac and Bella. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Maurice 1 tertz there were horn two children, Ruth .and 
Herman, both of whom now live at home in company with their mother. 

Mr. Hertz, during his life, shunned the oilers and inducements to enter 
public life or to hold political offices, lie believed in the Republican police 
and always was a liberal contributor to the support of the part v. Fratern- 
ally, he was affiliated with the Free and Accepted Masons and the Benev- 
olent Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Hertz departed from this life on August 26, 1905, at the age of 
fifty vears and nine months. 



WILLIAM B. KRAMER, Sr. 
The following is a brief sketch of a man who, by assiduous attention 
to his business affairs, has achieved success .among his fellows and has risen 
to an honorable [losition in the city where his interests are located. His 
record is plain, unadorned by strange or unusual incident, or dramatic 
episode, but is one of accomplishments. William B. Kramer is one of those 
estimable characters whose honesty and personality force them into notoriety 
of estimable form, which their modest}' does not court, but which their 
good nature does not resent. Mr. Kramer occupies an enviable position 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 7 ! , 

in Frankfort, by reason of his character and his material interesl in the 
affairs of his townsmen. 

Mr. Kramer was horn in Fredei • \. county, Maryland, Januan 31. 1836, 
the son of Frederick William am ; el (Schobl) Kramer. Fr< I 

Kramer was a native of Maryland, and descended from good German stock, 
his father having come to this country in 1769 from Berlin, Prussia. 1 It- 
served valiantly in the Revolutionary war under General George Wash- 
ington and left service at Valley Forge on account of frozen feet, lie died 
in Frederick's county, Maryland.. Frederick Kramer was the father of 
thirteen children, a typical pioneer family. These were: Sarah (dec 
Elizabeth (deceased). John A. (<] d William B., Daniel (dee . ' 

Anna M. (deceased), Phillip E. (deceased), James T. (deceased), Franklin 

B. (deceased), Mary C, Alice C., Levi- K , and Virginia. 

William Kramer was educated in the common schools of Maryland, 
and a I er leaving them, took up farming, which occupation he followed until 
the year of 1873, when he moved to Clinton county. Here he went into the 
planing mill and lumber business as a member of the firm known as Kramer 
Bros., and in 1903 this firm was incorporated with William Kramer at the 
head of the enterprise. It is now known as "Kramer Bros. Co.," and con- 
tinues to do a thriving business. 

In i860, Mr. Kramer married Elizabeth Trundle, the daughter of John 

C. and Elizabeth (Hays) Trundle. Her parents were natives of Maryland, 
Frederick count)-, spending their entire lives in this state. Six children, 
John F., Samuel B., William B., Nellie, Rowland and Bertha Leuelle, have 
been born of this union. Mr. Kramer was forced to suffer the loss of his 
wife by death in the year 1909. 

So far Mr. Kramer has not held any political or public offices, but 
contributes his services to the Democratic party. Mr. Kramer is a member 
of the A. F. & A. M and the Knights Templar. At one time he was a mem- 
ber of i"' state grand lodge of the latter order. 



ELIAS CAMPBELL 



The life of a man whose successful career is accomplished through 
achievements in the business world is not so replete with stirring, dramatic 
qualities as that of the man whose deeds have been the outcome of a military 
career. However, it is fully as commendable. Very fortunate is the man who 



718 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

may boast of a highly successful business career in addition to a career in the 
field. Such is the man we treat of in this sketch. He joined the ranks of 
the brave fellows who went to tin front in '61, and lie returned to civilian 
life tu valiantly serv< the interests of the public as loyally as he did the 
flag of his country. Mr. Campbell lias been in public office several times 
and has always acquitted himself well by reason of his integrity, altruism, 
and his delightful personality. 

Elias Campbell was born May 24, 1848, in Clinton county, the son of 
Mark and Agnes S. ( Barkley) Campbell. His parents came to this county 
in [848 from Franklin county, Peni >lvvania, i 11,1 found here a wilderness 
which they, undaunted, cleared for the making of their farm. Mark 
Campbell remained on this estate all of his life and brought up a family of 
five children there: Elias, Andrew, Sarah, William and Oliver, the last two 
named being dead at this writing. 

Elias Campbell attended the Clinton county public schools and soon 
mastered everything they had to offer, then turned to the business of farm- 
ing. Eighteen hundred and sixty-one and 1862 passed and the country was 
at a fever heat. Mr. Campbell resisted the temptation to drop his plow and 
don the blue uniform until May 7, 1803. Then, a lad of only fifteen years, he 
enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-fifth Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, which company was attached to the Army of Tennessee. He was 
discharged from this first service at Indianapolis in 1864, but immediately 
reenlisted in Company G. One Hundred and Fiftieth Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry, Army of the Potomac. This time he served until the end of the war, 
being mustered, out at Indianapolis in November, 1865. 

Until 1879, Mr. Campbell farmed and worked at the trade of car- 
pentering, then went to Sedalia, link, where lie entered the mercantile busi- 
ness. He continued here until 1888 While in this town he won the esteem 
and respect of everyone. He was recognized as a leader and lie justified 
every confidence placed in him. For ten years lie held the position of post- 
master there. After moving to the city of Frankfort Mr. Campbell quickly 
became idenitfied with the commercial and civic interests of that place. He 
served for four years as street commissioner in that city, and in 1898 he 
took the office of deputy revenue collector foi the United States in charge 
of a division of the seventh district of Indiana. He was appointed to this 
position under IX W. Henry of Terre Haute, and is still active in the 
furtherance of his duties. 

Mr. Campbell has been married twice, and each time be has been com- 
pelled to undergo the loss of bis wife by the band of death. His first wife 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. J\i) 

was Mary Young, the daughter of Dr. R. O. Young and Margaret (Robi- 
son) Young. Her father was one of the oldest practitioners in the county 
and was one of the earlier pioneers if Geetingsville, hid. Mr. Campbell 
married Miss Young in 1879, and ten years alter, 1889, she was called to her 
Maker. Mr. Campbell's second wife was Kale DeCamp, the daughter of 
Capt. Edward Reed DeCamp and Maria (Darr) DeCamp, early settlers 
of Clint' in county, who traveled there from the state of Ohio. Mr. Camp- 
bell's second wife died May 23, [910, Mr. Campbell has no children of his 
own, but lias one adopted daughter, ('.race Titus, who is now Mrs. Herman 
Nelson of Chicago. Before her marriage she graduated as a trained nurse 
from ill. Home Hospital at Lafayette, Ind., and then took a post-graduate 
course at Chicago. April 8, 1911, she married Mr. Nelson, who is an ad- 
juster for the Hart, Shaffner & Marx Company, clothiers of Chicago. 

Mr. Campbell is a Republican by polities, sticking to the Ci. O. P. when 
the split came in 1912. Fraternally, he is connected with the Free and 
Accepted Order of Masons, Knights of Pythias, and Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks, all chapters at Frankfort, where he resides. 



FRANCIS MILTON CLARK. 

Much has been written in history and literature extolling the brave 
deeds of the "boys in blue"; it is eminently fitting that much more should 
be written, and it should be inscribed on records that are permanent. When 
we think of the bright-faced boys of the early sixties who left home, 
mothers, sweethearts, wives, everything, to fight for a great cause, we 
feel that each one should have an individual record to perpetuate his share 
in the struggle for a union. It is with pleasure that the biographer seizes 
the opportunity to place in print the life of one of the veterans who stands 
'for the true type of soldier, besides being a successful man of the world. 

Francis Milton Clark was born in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, Novem- 
ber 3, 1843, the son of Daniel D. and Julia A. (Belnap) Clark. His father 
was a native of Connecticut, who in 1839 moved to Tippecanoe county and 
settled down to farming and stock raising. Three children added joy to his 
home: Anna A. (deceased) Francis M. and John (deceased). Politically, 
Daniel Clark was not active, but took great interest in the welfare of the 
county, practically securing the first railroad through the locality. 

In his early life. Francis Clark - atteneled a log cabin school in Tippe- 



7- () CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

canoe county, then, a- was tho custom for young men "f liis day, In- took up 
the pursuit of agriculture. In this > ccupation he was engaged at th< out- 
break of the Civil war. 

I >n August 8, [862, Mr. Clark entered the Northern armv, casting his 
lot with Compan) G, Sevent)'-second Indiana Volunteer Infantry, which 
regiment later was changed to a mounted troop, Col. C. O. Miller in com- 
mand. The troop formed a unit in the famous Wilder's Brigade, vrmv of 
the Cumberland. Willi ibis troop, Air. Clark served through the entire war, 
participating in the sanguinary battle of Chickamauga. Mr. Clark was 
mustered out July 7, 1865, at Indianapolis. 

For a short time .iter tin- war h< worked upon his farm, and < n ( lei ber 
30, 1867, he married Sarah Elizabeth Buntin, the daughter of Elihue and 
Margaret (Maddux) Buntin. The bride's parents were very earlv settlers 
in Clinton count)-, coming from Kentucky. Five children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Clark: Lunetta, married to Walter Paris, now dead; Roberta C, 
married to Finton Crull; Russell B. (deceased), married to Gertrude Maish, 
had two children, Marjory and Frances Willard ; Julia D. (deceased), and 
one that died in infancy. 

Mr. Clark has the reputation of being one of the largest land owners 
in the county, having six hundred acres in Clinton count)- and nine hundred 
acres in other places. In every way be is the typical self-made man, per- 
sistent, severe, but kindly, and always ready to extend a helping hand to a 
neighbor. He is an enthusiastic member of the Methodist church at Frank- 
fort, being president of the official board. In politics, Mr. Clark takes an 
interest, though be does not proclaim bis views. He is a Republican. 



JOHN T. PRICE. 



There is no vocation, however humble it may be, in which industry and 
perseverance, in company with an honest purpose, will not be productive of 
some measure of success, and in the business of farming these qualities are 
highly essential. Among the progressive farmers of the younger generation 
in Clinton county, who have already attained a large measure of success is 
Tohn Trice, of whom we speak in this cursory review. He is descended from 
good Kentucky stock, and has inherited many characteristics which have 
stood him in good stead in life's battle for supremacy. 

Mr. Price was born January 3, 1875, in Sugar Creek township, this 














HBP 



• o . 



M%. 



CLINTON COUNTY., INDIANA. "21 

county, and has lived within three miles of his home here all of his life. 
The date of his birth was the beginning of a life, the limits of which we 
can not prophesy, I m ; is safe to sa\ that in the years to come his works 
will be pointed to with pride by his children and his fellows. His father was 
William Price and the mother, before marriage, was Martha Wilson. The 
father was horn October 13, 1843, in Kentucky, and moved to Clinton 
county, Indiana, when he was only seven years old. lie died in 1910 after a 
long life of success in fanning. He was a soldier in the Civil War, serving 
four years three months and twenty days in Company E, Fortieth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry His two brothers and seven brothers-in-law were also 
in the service. William Price was .1 Democrat in politics, and always be- 
lieved in pure campaigns. The mother was horn in Sugar Creek township 
on August 9, 1851, and still lives on the old home place near the farm of 
John Price. Both parents received common school educations in their youth. 
Six children were horn to them: James, John, Charles A. (dec), George H. 
(dec), Tullia L., Tura and Ida F. (dec). 

Our subject was married March 7, 1897, l0 Celtic B. Ellis, the daugh- 
ter of Henry and Elizabeth (Brown) I-Tiis. She is a native of Montgomery 
county, Indiana. The father is a native of Ohio and the mother was reared 
in the county of her daughter's birth. The father is dead, but the mother 
still lives. Seven children have been horn to John Price and wife: Olive 
Fern, June 22, 1896; William Henry, November j 5, 1899; Flossie Myrtle, 
October 10, 1901 ; Raymond L., May 18, 1905; Bertha Florence, October 
10, 1908; Hazel Valentine, February 14, 1910, and Harvey Wbodrow. July 
20, 1912. 

The main part oi Mr. Price's activities is confined to general farming, 
stock shipping and breeding. Outside this he deals quite a little in real es- 
tate, and has interest.- in merchandise at the Pickard Mills. He owns 260 
acres of fertile land in 'sugar Creek township, all but thirty acres of which is 
tillable and well tiled and fenced. This comprises the home place, the im- 
provements on which were built by Mr. Price himself. In addition he has 
another one hundred and twenty acres in Sugar Creek township and one 
hundred and twenty acres in Adams county, this state, besides a house and 
lot in Union City, Ind. 

Mr. Price belongs to the Masonic Order at Pickard, also the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows and the Improved Order of Red Men at the same 
place. Politically, he is a Democrat. For a time he served on the advisory 
board here. He takes a great interest in education and is a strong advocate 
of the country schools. 
(46) 



J22 CLINTON COUNT}', INDIANA. 

MELVILLE FOREST BOULDEN, M. D. 

The medical profession has a worthy exponent in Clinton county in 
the person of Dr. Melville Forest Boulden, of Frankfort, who, because 
of his skill ami long years of practice here is well known throughout (his 
locality and who ranks high among his professional brethren in tin's sec- 
Lion of the I lousier state, lie was, it seems, well adapted by nature for the 
vocation, being in the first place, a student, who has kept well abreast of 
the times in everything that pertains to his work, and also the possessor 
of those personal traits which one must have in order to he popular with the 
masses. He is a man who can lie depended upon and his hundreds of 
patients know that they can repose the utmost confidence in him and rely 
upon his judgment. He is also of a sociable and optimistic nature, and 
believes in finding the silver lining to every cloud, maintaining that all clouds 
have such, and that the obstacles we daily encounter on the road of life 
should but set to arouse our combative nature and cause us to accomplish 
more rather than yield to the perverse rulings of fate. 

Dr. Boulden was horn August 4, i860, in Clinton count}-. He is a 
son of J. N. and Sarah Ann( EllmoreJ Boulden, who came to Clinton 
county as early as 1830 and here lived the life of pioneers, and took an 
active part in the early development of their community. They were frugal 
and hard-working, and consequently established a good home in due course 
of time. They were noted for their honesty, hospitality and true Christian 
impulses. To them nine children were born: Asa H., Horace G., William 
A., Mortimer D., Oliver J.. Hattie M., Charles E., Dr. Melville Forest, of this 
sketch, and Edward, who died in childhood. These children received ex- 
cellent educational advantages and some made noted teachers; four of the 
family being engaged in teaching at the same time. 

After attending the public schools at Frankfort, Dr. Boulden entered 
the Danville Normal, from which he was graduated in 1899, after which 
he taught school for six years in his native county, and was making a great 
success as an educator; but tiring of the school room, and believing that 
his true bent lay along another line, he entered the Kentucky School of 
Medicine at Louisville, where he made an excellent record during the three 
years he spent there. He then spent a year in the Illinois Medical College 
in Chicago from which he was graduated with the class of 1903. He then 
took a hospital course in Louisville, graduating September 30, 1903. Dur- 
ing his spare time from college he practiced his profession at Brookville, 
Ind., under Dr. Buckingham. In 190,] he located in Frankfort, where he has 



CLINTON COUNTY, INHIAXA. J2^ 

since remained, having buill up ;i large and lucrative practice and taking his 
place in the front rank of local medical men. He is one of the mosl suc- 
cessful general practitioners the county lias ever known, lie is a member of 
the Clinton County Medical Society and the Indiana Slate Medical Society. 
Under his brother, Charles E. Boulden, the doctor was deputy county sur- 
veyor. Politically, he is a Republican, and religiously, a member of the 
Christian chruch. lie belongs to th< Masonic Order, Blue Lodge and Chap- 
ter at Frankfort. 

Dr. Boulden was married in October, i8<)4, to Millie Buckingham, a 
lady of refinement and winning personality. She was born in Brookville 
Ind., June 15, 1875. She is a daughter of Erasmus and Jennie (Myers) 
Buckingham, a highly esteemed old family of Brookville, where Mrs. Boulden 
grew to womanhood, getting her education there and in the Franjkfort high 
school. 

The union of the doctor and wife has been blessed by the birth of two 
children, Herbert, born May 26, 1896, now attending school; and Beatrice, 
born September 24, 1900, also a student. 



REV. CLEM RICKETTS. 

On June 30, 1863, amid the primitive scenes of Sugar Creek township, 
Clinton county, as it \ s fifty years ago, with much of the landscape covered 
with forests, and thickets, and ponds, and swamps, Rev. Clem Ricketts, 
the subject of this sketch, first saw the light of day, and was reared on a 
farm amid clays when boys on the farm knew something of the trial-, hard- 
ships, and privations of those early days. The subject of this sketch was 
the son of John and Arilda Ricketts. John Ricketts was horn in 1812 in 
Fleming county, Kentucky, and moved to Rush county, Indiana, when a 
young man. Later he came to Clinton count}', which at that time was (juite 
new, and entered land from the government, but few people lived here at 
this time. The county had no natural drainage and much of it lay in 
swamps and flags, and willows, with deer and wild turkey, and prairie 
chickens and wild ducks abundant. Fevers and ague came with their toll of 
sickness and death. 

It was a time that called for strong sturdy manhood, and Mr. Ricketts 
with others gave his life to overcoming the wilds of nature, and to make the 
once howling wilderness to bloom as the rose; and in December 1888. he was 
laid to his rest. 



7-M CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Arilda Rickctts, the mother of the subject of this sketch, was born in 
Jennings county, Indiana, and shared with her companion the trials and 
hardships necessary to buikl for themselves a home and to rear a large 
family in those days, mam- limes joining with him in the work out in 
the fields. Thus, worn with a life of toil and hardships for nearly three 
score years and ten, she too, fell asleep. 

To this union, eleven children were born: James M., Priscilla Jane, 
Mary Ann. William L., John E., Nathan, Joseph II.. Clem, Sarah E., 
Ada M., and Charles VV. 

Clem Ricketts, the subject of this sketch, passed the years of his early 
life amid the scenes common to a life on the farm, working on the farm in 
summer and attending the district school in the winter season, and so 
complete the common school course. When 18 years of age, he made a 
journey to the state of Kansas in an immigrant wagon, which was the 
usual way of going in those days. On the 14th of February, 1884, he was 
married to Ella Cooper, the daughter of James M. and Sarilda Cooper, of 
Sugar Creek township, Clinton county, Indiana. Oi this union, one child 
was born, Daisv May, horn May 28, 1885, who is at this writing, the wife 
of Harry Kuhlman of Kirklin township, Clinton county. 

At the age of twenty-five, the Rev. Clem Ricketts having united with 
the Hills Baptist church near his home, felt that he was called to preach the 
gospel, and entered Franklin College to lit himself for that work. His 
first pastorate was his home church which both licensed and ordained him 
to preach. This church he served as pastor for nearly thirteen years, and 
saw, during those year's, a new commodious church house built, which he 
planned and carried to completion, and some two hundred and fiftv members 
received into the church. 

Except when he was in college he has always lived on the splendid, 
well kept farm of one hundred acres which he owns, and the time not given 
to study or church work, he spends working on the farm. In the spring of 
1908, Mr. Clem Ricketts realized the longing of main- years, in making an 
extensive voyage to the Holy Land, and many foreign countries, visiting 
Egypt, Athens, Constantinople, Rome, and Asia Minor, thence across Europe 
through llah - , Switzerland, Germany, France and England. This, within 
itself, was an education, giving him a wider range of vision as well as help- 
ing him to better understand the Rible, by visiting the scenes where the 
wonderful events ot the Bible occurred, and h\ studying the conditions of that 
unchanging country, where one may see the Rible lived toclav much the same 
as in the clavs of long ago; for the manners and customs of the people 



< I.I X 1 • - COUNTY, INDIANA ~ N 

there art.' as changeless as are her hills and plains and mountains and seas. 
Such a trip is what i i . •■' I enj et i cer take— a deepening 

and widening of life's current. 

Mr. Ricketts h:i: ah i \- I ■ ■ cl i'e in the church work I tl I'aptisl 
denomination. At carious times lie lias been pastor of main churches 
throughout the st; : nn . moderator of fudson Association, 

h; id ffer. c ol ■ rches, hut the call "1" lh< country appeal to him 

more than the city, and in his beautiful country home is probablv where lie 
will spend the remainder of liis days, amid the scenes he loves so well. 



Ji tSEPH H. RICKETTS, vTTY. 

Joseph 11. Ricketts, son of John Ricketts and brother of Rev. Clem 
Ricketts, was born in Sugar Creek town-hip, Clinton count)-, Indiana, October 
23. 1861. He passed his boyhood life on the farm, attending district school 
in the winter season and working on the farm in the summer. Completing 
the common school course, he afterwards went to Danville Normal School at 
Danville, link, and after completing a course there, he took up the work of 
teaching in the district schools and followed the same vocation for twelve 
yea . lie developed a fondness for law, and entered the law school at 
Washington, D. C, and while there, at the age of twenty-eight, he was nomi- 
nated at the Republican convention at Frankfort, Ind., for county representa- 
tive. 

He soon after returned home and entered the campaign with his 
party, taking a very active part, but at the election, he went down with his 
party, being defeated by only thirty-four votes. He afterwards was admitted 
to the bar and began the practice of law in Frankfort, Ind. lit- formed no 
partnership, but was associated with both attorneys Judge Doyal and Perry 
Card, and afterward- with Martin A Morrison He was elected chairman 
of the Republican ci unt) committee and in 189 was appointed city at- 

torney of Frankfort, which place lie held until his death. 

After he had become settled, the practice of law as his life work, he 
united with the Disciples church in the city of Frankfort, Ind. Joseph 11. 
Ricketts was a man among men. He was of the strictest integrity and with- 
al, a man of noble impulses, whose life was clean and above reproach. His 
quiet, unassuming life wen for him many friends. 1 le was a good lawyer, and 
his counsel in law was often sought. He was building up a great law 



/26 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

practice until in December, 1901, he was stricken with a deep seated cold 
which lingered with him until the following February, when pneumonia laid 
its hold upon him and February S, 1902, he passed into the great beyond. He 
still lives in the memory of many who knew him best, and who knew him 
to he a true man. 



C CERO SIMS. 



Over ninety years have dissolved in the mists of time, embracing the 
major part of the most remarkable century in all the history of the race of 
mankind, since the honored an.! 'titrable subject oi" this sketch first saw 
the light of day. Heaven bounteously lengthened out his life until he saw 
the crowning glory of this the most wonderful epoch of all the Eeons of 
time, and rewarded the consistent living of his youth and active manhood, 
his early years of industry and frugality, with an old age surrounded by 
comfort and plenty. Mr. Sims could well have felt that his had been a 
useful, successful and happy life — a life of sunshine ami shadow, of victory 
and defeat, according to the common lot of humanity since the world began, 
but nobly lived and worthily rewarded. He was a native of the section of 
the Hoosier state of which this volume treats and here he was content to 
spend his life, his long residence having won for him a very high place in 
the confidence and esteem of his many acquaintances and friends. He noted 
and took part in the wondrous transformation of this country from the 
pioneer days to the present, saw the wilderness transformed into one of the 
world's richest farming communities, saw the log cabins of the first settlers 
give way to pretentious modern dwellings, and Indian trails to superb turn- 
pikes. Me was always deeply interested in whatever tended to promote the 
prosperity of his native locality and the sections where he resided were greatly 
indebted to him for their material, educational and moral development. Tie 
used his influence for benevolent enterprises, was always friend and liberal 
patron of the church, which he believed to he the most potential factor for 
substantial good the world has ever known or will ever know. He merited 
in every respect the high esteem in which he was universally held. 

Cicero Sims, for a long period of years a well known teacher and attorney 
of this section of Indiana, was horn about eight rods from where the present 
court house at Rushville, Rush county, now stands. He was a son of 
Stephen and Elizabeth (McCarty) Sims. The father was born in Cocke 
county Tennessee, in the year 1792, he having been a son of William and 



Li.ix roN co i nty, ixdiana. yiy 

Amelia (Russell) Sun--. William Sim- was born in Culpepper county, 
Virginia, from which lie even uall) moved to Tennessee. The Sims were 
among the e;i U ill . ' m, I lid Dominion and Tennessee and became 

prominent in the variui • communities where they established their I 
being known as public-spirited, patriotic, progressive people. A number of 
them served gallantly in our \ irious wars, William Sim-, mentioned above, 
ha) i g had the distinction of servi on the staff of General Washington 
during the Rcvoluntionarv war. lie ;pent the latter part oi his life in Ten- 
nessee and died in that state. His widow eventually came to Indiana in 
a very earl}' day and died near tin. t< wn of Rrookville. In that earl} - period 
also came Stephen Sims, father of oui ubjeel to the Hoosier stale, settling 
near Rushville. He was a soldier in the war ol 1812, after which he re 
turned to Indiana He was a pioneer of Rush count)' and experienced 
the usual privations and hardships of that period. He was a rugged, hard- 
working, honest man who cleared the land of its primeval forest and de- 
veloped a good farm and a comfortable home by hard, persistent work. He 
was a leader in church, school and political work in his county and was re- 
garded as a leader in public affairs there. He was appointed school com- 
missioner for that county and had charge of the school lands there. Re- 
moving to Boone county, this state in 1834, he also became a leader of public 
affairs there during the two years of his residence, hut in 1836 came on to 
Clinton county, where he developed another farm. He built the early court 
houses at both Rushville and Connersville and he erected mam - of the best 
residences in that section of the state. Besides being a skilled carpenter 
and 1 milder, he was also an extensive brick- maker, and man}' of the sub- 
stantial brick residences he erected are still standing. Tlis death occurred 
in 1863. Politically, he was a Republican, and was active in the affairs of the 
party, n rehY >us mailers he was a Methodist. His wife was also a descend- 
ant of sterling Revolutionary stock. Her deatli occurred in Clinton county. 
Cicero Sims grew to manhood on the home farm, and being a son of 
a pioneer and growing up amid pioneer environment, he naturally found 
plenty of hard work to do. He received such meager educational training 
as the earh" schools of his time afforded, but, closely applying himself to such 
books as he could get, he acquired sufficient knowledge to teach, and he 
followed that profession for some time with much success. He was gifted 
by nature as a musician and taught music for quite awhile with equally 
gratifying results, his services as a musical director in the days when rural 
singing schools were in vogue, being in much demand. Tie rcmaied a student 
and studied law, making rapid progress in the same and engaged in the 



J72cS CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

practice of this profession for main vears in this locality. Being appointed 
pension agent, Ik- discharged the duties of that office for many years in a 
manner that reflected credit upon himself and to the eminent satisfaction 
of all concerned, fie retired from active duties sometime hefore his death, 
which occurred July 6, 1913, at his home in Frankfort. Though past 
ninety-one years <<i age, he had the appearance of a man much younger 
and was in fair possession of all Ids faculties. lie had lived a careful. 
abstemious life. 

Mr. Sims, was a Republican in politics and has always been loyal in 
his support of his party's principles. He was also prominent, in the .work of 
the Methodist Episcopal church foi many decades, holding meml 
in that denomination since carle life. On March 1. 1842, Mr. Sims, was 
united in marriage to Man- Caroline Black, who was horn June 6, 1824, near 
Centerville, Ind., when' she grew to womanhood and received, like her hus- 
band, the meager education of the old-time schools. She is the daughter 
of William and Isabella Black, early settlers of Wayne county, this state, and 
a well known family of the vicinity of the town of Centerville. Mrs. Sims, 
is still living, being past eighty-nine years of age. She has been a faithful 
helpmate to her husband, and has a host of warm devoted friends, To Mr. 
and Mrs. Sims were burn the following children: James N., born April 25. 
1844, a soldier in the Eighty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry during the 
Civil war, and died of camp fever at Memphis, Tenn., during the service; 
Sarah C, born in 1846, now the wife of Rev. O. M. Merrick, of Rossville, 
Ind.; Nancy J., horn in 1848, now the wife of A. J. Merrick, of Howard 
county; Isabelle E., horn in 1849, now the wife of J. W. Lee, of Frankfort; 
William M., horn in 1854, now living in Florida; Stephen B., born in 1861. 



JOHN T. GUM. 



One of the substantial native sons of Clinton county, who has been 
content to spend bis life in his native community, is John 1. Gum. a worthy 
representative of the agriculturists of this county. By close application he 
established those habits of industry when a boy which insured his success in 
later years, being able to extend, from time to time, the area of his posses- 
sions and activity. He has always used his influence in behalf of all moral 
and benevolent enterprises, and has been interested in whatever tended to 
promote the prosperity of this township and county. 



■ 



*! 



■ 

■ ■ 



- . - £ 






MR. AND MRS. JOHN I. GUM 



CLINTON COL'NTY, INDIANA. 7_'0 

John I. Gum was horn December 18, 1848, in Warren township, Clin- 
ton count)', Indiana, and was the sen of Charles and Rebecca (Nutter) Gum. 
Charles Gum was born September 2, 1802, in Virginia, moved to Indiana in 
1S37, and died in August, 1885. The mother was burn November 24, 1806, 
in tht Old Dominion also, and she departed from this earth on October 16, 
[806. Both parents received common school educations, and the father, 
by occupation, was a farmer all oi his life, and politically was a Democrat. 
Seven children blessed the union, and their names were: Anson P. (dec), 
Martha. Harrison (dec), Elizabeth (dec), Elmira (dec), John L.. and one 
wdio died without being named. 

John I. Gum, in his early years, received very little education. During 
the progress of the great Civil War he ran away from home with the pur- 
pose of enlisting in the Union army, which he did on October 12, 1863, at 
Lafayette, Ind., in Company A, Eleventh Indiana Volunteer Cavalry, under 
I. 1.. Laflcsh. During the subsequent years Mr. Gum performed every duty 
that was assigned to him with unswerving fidelity, most of his service con- 
sisting in guarding the railroad lines. He was honorably discharged on 
June 2, 1865, in St. Louis, Mo. He then returned to Clinton count)-, and 
took up farming, which was to remain his work for the rest of his life to the 
present time. 

He was married on February 10, 1867, to Nancy E. Gallegher, who was 
born October 28, 1850, in Clinton county, and was the daughter of John 
and Charlotte (Bogan) Gallegher, people from the state of Virginia, her 
father being a farmer and a Republican. 

Mrs. Gum received a good common school education. Five children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Gum, and they were: Lady L., born December 18, 
1868, married to Harrison Quick, died April 12, 1902, children, Grace and 
Lady Ruth; Charlotte R.. born February 25, 1871, married Harry D. White- 
man, lives in Frankfort, children, Hazel, Leslie, Clarence, Mar)-, and Irene; 
Lora Annette, born September 9, r 874, married William Taylor, children, 
Ethel F. and Cecil II., living with subject; Orlh Porter Harrison, born Sep- 
tember 13, 1882, died February 28, 1883, and Lennie Minnie Alice, born 
October 21, 1885, died December if), 1907, married to Fred Sanderson Feb- 
ruary 15, 1903, children, Beatrice Leora and Irwin B. 

John I. Gum has always farmed here, and owns one hundred and ten 
acres, all tillable but ten acres, which is in timber. On his farm are the latest 
improvements, including eighteen hundred rods of tiling. Our subject now 
leads rather a retin life, but carries on gem al farming and stock raising, 
including common cattle, Duroc and Berkshire bogs. He has not made a 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 



specialty of horses, although he owns a mare which has taken thirty-eight 
prizes at horse shows and fairs, etc., in the general purpose and coach classes. 
Politically, Mr. Gum is a Republican, and fraternally belongs to the Knights 
of Pythias at Michigantown. 



CHARLES C. GENTRY. 

Another one oi the native son- of Clinton county who has shown a 
marked versatility in being able to make a living in many different things is 

Charles C. Gentry, now proprietor of (he Palace theater in the city of 
Frankfort, one of the leading playhouses of its kind in this section of the 
state. He quickly adjusts himself'to new environments and makes a success 
of whatever he turns his attention to, and, being a gentleman who has the 
best interests of his town and county at heart and who believes in leading an 
honorable life, has the good will of his hundreds of patrons. 

Mr. Gentry was born in Center town ship, this count)', February iq, [856. 
He is a son of Dr. Z. B. and Charlotte R. (Tetlow) Gentry. Z. B. Gentry, 
the father, was a physician of the old school. He received hut a meager 
schooling, and learned medicine from persistent home study, and he became 
successful in his profession, enjoying a wide practice, which he attended 
to on horseback, riding all over the county. Politically, he was a Republican, 
and he did much for the general upbuilding of Clinton counlv in its earlier 
days. His death occurred on April 7, 1879, his widow surviving until March 
12, 1909, reaching an advanced age. 

Charles C. ('.entry grew up in his native (own and here he has keen 
content to spend his life, living to see many changes which have taken place 
here during that period of fifty-seven years. He was educated in the pubb'c 
and high schools of Frankfort. 

On October 15, 1S95, Mr. Gentry married Minnie D. Dory, who 
was born in Cambridge City, Ind., February 14, 18,7, a daughter of Joseph 
and Elizabeth (Groscourt) Dory. The mother is deceased, but the father is 
living and making his home with our subject. He is a locomotive engineer 
by profession, and politically is a Republican. 

The union of our subject and wife has been without issue. 
After Mr. Gentry left school he entered the mercantile field in which 
he remained until 1876 when he became assistant postmaster at Frankfort 
under W. H. Hart, and he remained in that capacity until 1885, giving 



emincnl sal : I ■ i : ' ■'■■ . I ; In ;■' charge oJ ll ' ii ! ' ' I i iarcl. 

Inter In ecnl inti < the railv ! Iiicl mai uinihci 

owns I i >] » ■ rn 

over ;i ) • ii csults lie i >\\ us n ileal hi nne, 

whicl himself, at 7m) East Wabasl ■slrecf, u In re In ha led 

.' | ■ " : ... . 

the f\ i d is, hutl ml Polii I I can 



\ i . i ■ ' 1 1 -j the cprcsei ai c< griuillu ists ami public spirit d inei "I 
Clinton co in . b i, ,\ 1 1 i 1 < advancing theii iwn intci sts, havi not neglected 
their duty to the communit\ ai large is Nicholas Peter, of Michigan town- 
ship;. Reared to a farming life, h ha: so applied his energies and ability as 
to attain a sneers- worthy the name-, while his present high standing in the 
community indicate Lhe apprecial n of hi: sterling character. 

Nicholas Peter was born into ihis world on September 8, 1843, in Tippe- 
canoi county, Indiana, and cap tin son of Daniel and Mar) (Burkhalter) 
Peter. Our subject came to Clinton county in 1871. settling first in Madison 
town si lip. 

Daniel Peter, his father, was born on the first day of September, 1807. 
in the slate of Pennsylvania, and moved to Ohio when hut a boy, later coming 
to Tippecanoe county. Pie died on December 22, 1889, after a long and useful 
fit' pen as a farmer, wagonmaker and millwright. He wa a Democrat 
until tli oi Vhral n hen he turned to the Republican 

party and there he cast hi: col vei afterward. The mother . 
( >hi 1 in the ye; on 1 England, and she died in July, 

Thesi parents recei 1 i'cn littli education for that time, 1ml could 
■ rite Ten children were bon 

living being: William, I Elizabeth, Nicholas, Calvin and ! 1 

Nicholas Peter received his early education in the common schools, 
mostly in Tippecanoe county, his birthplace. Being prepared for an agri- 
cultural career, he immediately entered into that vocation, lie moved 
to Michigan township in the spring of 1891, and onto a farm of one 
hundred and twenty acres, al! tillable with the exception of twenty acres. 
The land was well tiled. Besides general farming fie carried on stuck 
raisin"', making Poland China hugs. Shorthorn cattle, and a mixed breed of 



73-' CCINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

horses hi> specialty. Mr. Peter came here to Michigantown in February, 
191 J. and still owns a farm. He lias a fine two story home lure, and is 
living a retired life. Mr. Peter is a devoul member of tin. Methodist 
Episcopal church and votes the Progressive ticket. 

On May 11, [867, Nicholas Peter was united in marriage with Emma 
Rothenbcrger, who was born in Tippecanoe county, February 2(>, [848, the 
daughter of George and Lydia (Wallers) kothenberger. Her father was a 
native of Pennsylvania, a farmer all of his life, and died in 18X7. The 
mother of Mrs. Peter was also a native oi the Old Keystone state, and she 
departed this life in March, Ki<\v Mrs. Peter had the advantage of a good 
common school training. To Mr. and Mrs. Peter have been horn five children, 
namelv: Emerson, horn February 3, 1868, and married Dora Vergin, and 
living in Beard, this county; one died in infancy, unnamed: Dasiv, horn 
Aug; 1 2C), 1873, married Preston Newhart of this county; Mabel, born 
January 2, 1876, and died January 17, 1895; and Lydia, born March 31, 
1878, married to Clinton Maxwell. 



DR. WARD I. MARTIN. 



Until the last half century the medical profession was in a primitive 
state scientifically; men who specialized in that division of medical treatment 
were few and far between. However, the possibilities of dentistry became 
a realization; increasing population demanded men to devote their time ex- 
clusively to the trade, and consequently, improvement and progress attended 
the practice of the profession. Now, there is to he learned many things by 
the young man contemplating the dental trade; new appliances, methods and 
materials have been discovered and invented, and the modern dentist uses 
none of the primitive and painful methods once used in the care of the teeth. 
in fact, the only cure for the toothache seventy years ago was to pull the 
tooth, but now the maxim of the dentist is always "save a tooth at any cost." 
One who represents the best accomplishment of the profession 
county is Dr. Ward J. Martin. Tie has kept to the top of his pr 
keeping himself informed as to the latest improvements in technical and 
operative matters, and by exerting himself to please the many patrons who 
visit his office. 

Dr. Ward J. Martin was horn in Winchester, Indiana, on < )ctober 30, 
1873, and is the son of John K. and Ann Eliza (Quinn) Martin. John K. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 733 

Martin was a native of the county of Randolph also, having heen horn there 
on February 7, 1837, the son of Elisha and Susan (Kelley) .Martin. Elisha 
Martin came from near Cincinnati, Ohio, and was a brickmaker li\' trade 
during his life. As an artisan in this trade he was an adept, and held a 
r< 1 ; the making of hrick hy hand which has not heen surpassed to the 

presenl da In his later life he moved to Randolph county, Indiana, being 
one of the very first pioneers to the eastern county, and there he followed his 
old trade of brickm.'»king and building. 

John K. Martin received an excellent education and from his honored 
father learned the art of brick-making and building. He became pro! 
in this trade, and invented the first round tile in the state, making the same, 
and also the mold. He was the promoter of the only brick and tile manu- 
facturing plant in that section of the Hoosier state. During the Rebellion 
Mr. Martin was a first lieutenant in Company C, Sixty-ninth Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry, serving three years in the struggle and acquitted himself with 
honor. He was wounded in the fighting around Richmond, Kentucky, and 
subsequently discharged. He died on March 31, 1897. Mr. Martin was 
married to Ann Eliza Quinn on January 13, 1858 and she was the daughter 
of Marison and Dorinda Quinn, and was horn on November 3, 1837 at Eaton, 
Ohio. Fraternally, Mr. Martin was a member of the Masonic Order and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Politically, he was a Republican 
for maiv\ r years after the war, and once served as deputy United States 
marshal. Religiously, be was an Universalist. Mrs. Martin is still living. 

Ward J. Martin received a common school education and naturally 
learned the brickmaking trade, as had his father and grandfather lie fore him. 
He did not remain in this trade very long and possessing talent as a musician, 
secured a position with the Forepaugh circus, with which organization he 
traveled for seven years as a musician. Later, he was with the Diffenbaugh 
ten-cent circus in the same capacity. In 1892 Mr. Martin came to Frankfort 
and studied dentistry under Dr. J. J. Parr. Mr. Martin passed the examina- 
tion and all requirements given by the State Board in 1904, and immediately 
began active practice in this city, which he has continued to this day, with 
great success and satisfaction to his main- patrons. Fraternally, Dr. Martin 
is a member of the Independent Order of Odd bellows and the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, also the Knights of the Maccabees. In politics 
be supports the Republican party. 

On October 30, 1898, on bis twenty-fifth birthday, Dr. Martin was 
united in marriage with Edith Blake, who was born in Kokomo, Ind.. on 



734 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

March 24, 1873. Dr. Martin was saddened by the death of hi? wife on the 
25th of February, 1906. On Jul) 2, 1908 lie was again married to Mrs. 
Bertha Mortsolf, a native 0/ this county. No children have been horn to 1 'r. 
Martin. 



TAYLOR TOOPS. 

One of the best remembered and most highly respected citizens of Center 
township, Clinton county, of a past generation, who after a successful and 
honorable career, . have taken up their journey to that mystic clime, the 
"undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler return-." leaving 
behind him a heritage of which his descendants may well be proud — an un- 
tarnished name — was Taylor Toops, for a long lapse of years a successful 
tiller of the soil, having come to this locality when the rich soil had not yet all 
been redeemed from the primordial state, and here he played well his role 
in the drama of civilization. Tie was a man of industry and public spirit, 
willing at all times to do his full share in the work of development, never 
neglecting his larger duties to humanity, being obliging and neighborly, kind 
and genial, which made him popular with all classes and won the respect 
and good will of those with whom he came into contact, his long life of over 
four score years resulting in much good to those who came into contact 
with him, and his example is worth)" of emulation by the younger genera- 
tion. 

Mr. Toops was born September 6, 1832, in Jefferson, Washington 
township, Clinton county, Indiana. He was a son of Jacob and Sarah A. 
(Heavilon) Toops, the father was a native of Ohio and the mother of New 
York state. The former died in 1888 and the latter in 1874. Jacob Toops 
was a blacksmith by trade. His family consisted of seven children, three of 
whom are still living, namely: Taylor, subject of this memoir; Joseph, who 
was a soldier in the Civil war, is living; Mary Ann is deceased; Hector and 
Clinton, twins, are living; two others died in infancy unnamed. 

Taylor Toops grew to manhood on the home farm and worked hard, 
and, being a pioneer child, in a time when there was plenty of hard work 
for all and few schools to attend, his education w;rs very limited, but he was 
a man of extraordinary common sense and a strong character in every way. 
lie was married on February 23, 7863 to Dorothy Sweet, who was born 
near Dayton, Ind., March 5, 1836. She was a daughter of Senicha and 
Elizabeth (Boyd) Sweet. They were natives of Hamilton county, Ohio, 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 735 

from which they rem ivcd to Clinton county, Indiana, and spent Ihcil re 
maining years. Here Airs. Toops grew tu womanhood and received a com 
imni school education. 

Nine children, onh one of \vl 1 is deceased, were horn to L'avlor 

Toops and wile; they were named as follows: Ada, Zona, Etna, \ alen, Dond, 
Lanita. Merle, Dean, one died in early life. 

raylor Toop ' .jan farming .vhen a young man and made thai I i 
life work, becoming one ol the suca -ml farmers of his locality. He owned 
one hundred and sixty acres which he placed under a high state of improve- 
ment and cultivation. It was all tillable and well tiled, lie built a fine home 
on this land and was comfortabl) fixed in every way. He always bandied 
a g< grade oi live stock although was not an extensive stock raiser, paying 
more attention to general tanning. 

Politically, he was a Democrat, but he voted for the man whom he 
deemed best qualified for the office sought, being somewhat of an in- 
dependent thinker. He was supervisor of his township for a while, discharg- 
ing the duties of the office satisfactorily to all concerned. His wife preceded 
him to the grave a number of years, passing away on October 29, 1897. Mr. 
Toops had been a strong man physically most of his long life. About 1870 
he contracted stomach trouble which bothered him for about seven years, 
then passed away and from that time on to his death he was in good health. 
He was summoned to his final reward on April 9, 1913. He was not much 
of a public man, preferring to stay pretty close about home. Three of his 
children, Bond, Ada ami Yalcn, all unmarried, live on the homestead, which 
the)' operate successfully. 



JAMES A. GROVE. 

Another of Clinton county's substantial farmers is James A. Grove, 
who has led an eminently useful career, devoted to the interests of himself 
and community. Coming to this county when the land was just assuming a 
profitable state he grew up and learned the art of agriculture, becoming one 
of the respected citizens. Success such as his is the reward of perseverance 
and integrity. This cursory record herein set forth will, we hope, place be- 
fore the eyes of future generations a tale worthy of emulation. It is regret- 
table that more and adequate scope is not affarded in which to properly com- 
ment upon our subject's life. 

James A. Grove first saw the light of day on February -'4, 1864, in 



/.V' CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Fayette county, Ohio. He was the sou of Jacoh and Nancy (Armstrong) 
Grove. Jacob Grove was a native of the Old Dominion, and Nairn Grove 
came from the Buckeye state; the former died in 1866 and ik latl r in 
1888. Jacob Grove enlisted in 1862 in the ninetv day service, and after that 
time he reenlisted and served valiantly to the end of the conflict in i£ H< 

was a fanner by occupation. Seven children bore his name, as f 
Susan, .Abe, Henry, Agnes, Amis, Albert, James A., and Dora, who is de- 
ceased. 

James A. Grove was fortunate to receive a common school training 
in bi 1 - youth, after which he immediately took up farming. lie was married 
Jul_\- _'_', 1888, to Jennie M. Hillis, who was born in Johnson township, Clin- 
ton county, on December 13, 1808, the daughter of John and Savannah 
(Jackson) Hillis, natives of Rush county, Indiana. Mrs. Grove received a 
common and high school education. Six children were born to the union, 
namely: Verria, Hillis, Lloyd, Frank, Tbyrsa, and Thryl, who is deceased. 

Mr. Grove owns three hundred and twenty-five acres of land in this 
township and it is all tillable with the exception of forty acres which is in 
timber and pasture. The place is fairly well fenced and adequatel) tiled. 
On this place Mr. Grove carries on high class general farming. 

Fraternally, Mr. Grove belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men at 
Scircleville, and politically, is a Republican. He devotes his time to the in- 
terests of his chosen vocation. 



JOSEPH FOREMAN. 



In every community there are men whom, to lake away, would be to 
remove the stoutest pillars of the economic and commercial life, and thereby 
the community would deteriorate industrially, socially and in reputation. 
This is a strict and fundamental law in the science of economics. Clinton 
county is a remarkably developed locality in the light of the above definition. 
There are men who have grown up with the community, and have succeeded 
by the sweat of their brow. These are few in comparison with the many 
who have seen the mirage of success in distant lands, hut these few have 
reaped the reward of their perseverance and loyalty to the home town. 
Joseph Foreman is a grand example of this type, and as such it is our pleas- 
ure to narrate the few facts in connection with his life. 

Joseph Foreman was born June 7, 1869, in Johnson township, Clinton 
countv, and was the son oi Henry and Julia (Myers) Foreman. Henry 




\ 



\ 



\ 










MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH FOREMAN 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. JT)7 

Foreman was born in 1S..12 in- Henry county, Indiana, and moved [1 • 
county after his marriage, where lie followed the vocation of farming all of 
his life. Politically, he was a Democrat. He died 111 May 23, [877. The 
mother was burn in the year 1849 in the state of Missouri, and is slil 
three miles north of Hillisburg. She had as good an education as the 
of her day could afford, and at one time she taught school herself hour 
children were born of the union: Molly E. Armstrong, Joseph, Join 
Leah IT. After her husband's death Mrs. Foreman married the • 
to Jacob Kirkendall in 1880. , 

After a common school education, Joseph Foreman started in tin fann- 
ing business and continued this until March, 1908, when he moved to Hillis- 
burg and went into the retail business in partnership with Cartel . 
but sold out in 191 1. He then went into the elevator business under the firm 
name of Foreman & Davis, sole owners of an elevator, with capacit) of 
twenty-five thousand bushels. This elevator handles about two hundred and 
twenty-five thousand bushels per year. They buy and sell corn, wheat and 
oats, and handle salt, flour, feeds, etc. Our subject has a neat and attractive 
home in Hillisburg. He is assistant cashier in the bank at Hillisburg, also a 
director and stockholder. The Citizens' Bank has a capital of twenty thou- 
sand dollars. 

On September 20, 1892, Mr. Foreman was married to Mary D. Mann, 
who was born February 9, 1872, in Johnson township, this count) - , and was 
the daughter of Jacob and Harriett (Moore) Mann. Her mother was a 
native of Kentucky. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Lore- 
man: Edith, born February ,27, 1894, married to Archie Benge, and lives 
north of here on a farm, and Frances, born February 9, 1900. 

Fraternally, Mr. Foreman is a member of the Masonic Order at Hillis- 
burg, and also the Modern Woodmen. He attends the Methodist Protestant 
church. Politically, Air. Foreman is a Democrat, and for a term of four 
years, beginning in 1904 he served as trustee of Johnson township. 



GEORGE WINFIELD BENJAMIN. 

Few men of Clinton county were as widely and favorably known as the 
late George Winfield Benjamin. He was one of the strong and influential 
citizens whose lives have become an essential part of the history of this sec- 
tion and for years his name was a synonym for all that constituted honor- 
(47) ' 



yT,S CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

able and upright manhood. Tireless energy, keen perception and honesty 
of purpose, combined with every day common sense, were among his chief 
characteristics, and while advancing individual success he also largely pro- 
moted the welfare and prosperity of the community honored by his residence 

George \Y. Benjamin was born in Newark, N. J., on November 3, 
1852, and died on October 14, 1909. He was the son of Edward J. and 
Mary ( Hurd) Benjamin, who were both natives of the state of Nev Jersey. 
His family were originally from England, coming to this country in jailing 
vessels in the latter part of the eighteenth century. Edward J. Benjamin 
came to Clinton count}- when our subject was quite a small child, traveling 
overland in covered wagons, and settled on a farm near what is now Michi- 
gantown. In this place, favored by fertile lands and sunny skies, he remained 
all of his life, making a decided succt ss of school teaching. 

George W. Benjamin was educated in the common schools of this 
county, and thereafter followed railroading during early life. In later years 
he was in the coal business in Chicago. 

Mr. Benjamin was married on July io, 1872 to Anna B. Taylor, the 
daughter of John C. and Deborah (Ghere) Taylor. Mr. Taylor was a 
native of the Old Dominion, and came to Clinton county in a very early day. 
traveling by boat down the Ohio river and then debarking to make the re- 
mainder of the journey by wagon. He was a publisher all of his life. Eight 
children blessed his home: Howard (deceased), Mary, Anna B., Martha, 
Jennie C, Frank A., Charles C, and William (deceased). Both parents are 
now dead. 

Three children have been born to the union of our subject and wife: 
Jeannette M., of Frankfort; Francis B., of Detroit, Mich., and George YV., Jr. 

Politically, Mr. Benjamin was always a Republican, and took an active 
part in politics, but was never a seeker after public honors, preferring to 
spend bis ■ in the care of his business. He belonged to the Presbyterian 
church. 



HON. HENRY Y. MORRISON. 

That industry and sound judgment, combined with a wise economy both 
of time and money, are the surest contributing elements to success, was ex- 
emplified in the life ol the late Henry Y Morrison, who for a number of 
decades was one of the leading attorneys at law of Clinton county and one 
of the public spirited and useful men in civic affairs in Indiana. The cause 



CLINTON COUNTY/, INDIANA. 



739 



of humanity never had a truer friend than this valued gentleman who lias 
passed to the higher life. The stereotyped words customary on such occa- 
sions scorn but mockery in writing of such a man when we remember all the 
grand traits that wen; to make the character of this, one of nature's noble- 
men. In all the relations of life — family, church, state and society — he dis- 
played that consistent gentlemanly spirit, that innate refinement and unswerv- 
ing integrity that endeared him alike to man, woman and child. 

Henry Y. Morrison was horn in 1825, near West Union, Adams county, 
Ohio, and he was the son of James M. and Margaret (Spahr) Morrison. 
James Morrison, who was a native of Kentucky, was a farmer all his life. 
When a young man, he went to Adams county, Ohio, coming on to Indiana 
not long afterwards, and there, amid wild surroundings, developed a good 
farm. The Spahr family came from Washington count)-, Pennsylvania, 
where, for a number of generations, they have been very prominent. 

Henry Y. Morrison grew to manhood on the home farm and assisted 
with the general work about the place, attending the country schools during 
the winter months when he became of proper age. When but a boy he mani- 
fested a laudable ambition to enter the legal profession and with this end 
in view he went to Indianapolis and entered the law school in that city, where 
he made rapid progress and was admitted to the bar in Frankfort, Indiana, 
and here he spent the rest of his life successfully engaged in the practice of 
law with an evergrowing clientele, and taking rank among the leading legal 
lights in this section of the state, figuring in most of the important cases in 
the loca courts for many years and gaining a state-wide reputation. He was 
at one time a representative in the state Legislature, serving his district in a 
manner that reflected much credit upon himself and to the eminent satisfac- 
tion of all concerned. In this connection he will ever be remembered for his 
services to the state in view of the fact that he was the author of the famous 
drainage law in this state and it was through his efforts that the same was 
successfully put through the Legislature. From this untold benefits have 
been reaped, and to his wise foresight and keen discernment for the general 
welfare of coming generations of his state we owe much reverence to his 
memory. This one act alone marked him as one of our great men. 

Mr. Morrison studied law after he was married, beginning his career 
under Judge Carver. He was very successful in a financial way and became 
owner of some of as valuable land as Clinton county can boast, owning a 
five-hundrcd-acre tract, near the town of Forest, lint of this the family only 
retains about two hundred and sixty acres. He kept his place under a high 



74° CLINTON COl NT Y, INDIANA. 

stair of improvement and cultivation and always took a great deal of inter- 
est in it, keeping it well stocked. 

On February 28, 1N31, Mr. Morrison was united in marriage with 
Nancy A. Campbell, daughter of William and Peninah (Denman) Can pbell, 
a substantial and highly esteemed family. The father came from Pennsyl- 
vania and he devoted his life to agricultural pursuits, lie came to Clinton 
county, Indiana, when a young man. Peninah Denman came In 
Dayton, Ohio, and they were married in this county. 

Mr. Morrison was a faithful member and liberal supporter of the Presby- 
terian church and fraternally he belonged to the Masons and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fell ws, and he stood high in both church and lodge circles. 

Five children were born to Henry Y. Morrison and wife, named as fol- 
lows: James, who has been twice married, first to Selina Ayers, by whom one 
child, Samuel, was born, who married Clara Blinn, and they became the 
parents of one child, Bruce Blinn. James' first wife is deceased and he later 
married Alice Spahr, by whom six children were born : Ruth, Mary, Milliard, 
Esther, James W., Jr.. and Henry Y. Martin A., second child of the subject 
of this "memoir, married Lilian Thompson, and they became the parents of 
two children, Robert H. and Marilla M. ; the wife and mother is now de- 
ceased. Martin A. is one of Frankfort's leading attorneys and he is at. this 
writing congressman from this district, being a prominent Democrat. He 
was educated in the schools of Frankfort, later attending Butler College at 
Irvington. a suburb of Indianapolis. He studied law at the University of 
Virginia, from which institution he was graduated, after making a brilliant 
record. John, the third child of Henry Y. Morrison and wife, is also a well 
known Frankfort attorney and lives at home with his mother. Margaret, 
the next child in order of birth, married Luther Heichert, and she is now 
deceased ; the)' became the parents of one child, Clara, who married Charles 
Silverthorn, and they have one child, Martin, who is a great-grandson to the 
subject. 

The death of Henry Y. Morrison occurred on May 30, 1906, after a 
long, useful and successful life. Something of his high standing in Clinton 
county may be gained by perusing the following paragraphs reprinted from 
the Frankfort Morning Star, under date of Tuesday, June 19, 1906, which 
is an account of memorial services held to honor Mr. Morrison's memory, 
when eloquent tributes were given to a worthy and noble character, by the 
attorneys, the judge and his pastor: 

"Yesterday morning the Clinton County Bar Association held memorial 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 741 

services in honor of the late Hon. Henry Y. Morrison, one of the oldest 
members of the bar, and a man deserving of the high tributes paid his mem- 
ory yesterday by attorneys and clergymen. The meeting was held in the 
larg< on rt room and was well atti n led, among those present being tin 
of the man whose memory was being honored, and other member- of the 
family. A number of ministers were also present. As an evidence of the 
genuineness of the eulogies there were many lens in the eyes of th ■ < 
-spoke. Judge Claybaugh preside ! it the meeting. 

"The services were opened b\ the reading of the resolutions prepared by 
the committee, consisting of I). S. Holman, J. V. Kent and Joseph Clay- 
baugh, the resolutions containing a biographical sketch and reciting the splen- 
did service Mr. Morrison had rendered to Clinton county and paying tribute 
to (he noble qualities and ideals that influenced him in all of life's affairs. 

''Judge Kent then addressed the assemblage and in his earnest tribi te he 
told of how Henry Y. Morrison had worked to bring railroads to Frank- 
fort. 'He was a man of tremendous energy,' said Mr. Kent. 'All he 
wanted to know was, is it right? That question being settled in the affirma- 
tive, all else was a matter of detail that could be accomplished by hard work, 
and that he was ever ready to give for his county. If ever a man in this 
county deserved a monument in the court house square, that man was Henry 
Y. Morrison. The generations to come will reap the benefit of the tremend- 
ous energy of Henry Y. Morrison. He was a Christian man, a good man. 
Wherever he saw wrong stalking about, bis idea was to hit it and hit it hard. 
As a lawyer he was a man of wonderful energy. I never knew him to tiring 
a case he thought ought not to be brought. And then when the case was 
brought he threw his whole energy into it." The speaker paid a tribute to the 
deceased as a husband and father and spoke of the splendid family that he had 
reared. In concluding Judge Kent said that Mr. Morrison bad died in the 
triumph of a Christian faith. 

"W. R. Moore : 'The resolutions that have been read recite very faith- 
fully my knowledge of Henry Y. Morrison. He was a man of kindly nature, 
and I have ltwed him for the kindness he has shown to my friends. His 
persistent energy left its impress on bis community as no other man has. I 
remember his kindness to me when I was going to school here, and of how 
he would encourage me. He was a man of upright character, a lover of the 
right and ever the foe of that which debased.' The speaker then recited how 
Mr. Morrison had, with the assistance of a few others, conducted a vigorous 
fight on vote buying during a campaign and of bow the great -force of char- 



74- CLINTON COI TY, INDIANA, 

acler of the man had impressed it upon the minds of everybody and con 
them that he meant just what he said in even instance. 'And il was hut a 
short time ago,' continued Mr. Moore, 'that his own sun procl .1 those 
same principles in a speech at Crawfordsville. Ii was Henry Y. Morrison 
speaking through his son.' 

"J. W. Strawn : 'I remember very well when I first sav Henn "' 
Morri on. It was at a political speaking which m\ father took mi to— the 
first political speech I ever heard. Henry Y. Morrison was one of the speak- 
ers, and T came away feeling that lie was one of the greatest men in the world. 
I remember how, in later years, when T was first starting out in I 
law, he took me kindl) by the hand and encouraged me, and offered me all 
the help he could give. And as the years went by, that kindly interest con- 
tinued, lie was ever the same, kindly, encouraging true. There- was no 
false aristocracy about Henry Y. Morrison. He was a man whose honesty 
of purpose was never questioned, and we all learned that when his work 
went out we could always rely on it.' 

''Joseph r. Gray : 'It was not my good fortune to know Henry Y. 
Morrison while he was in active practice. All I know of that part of his life 
is what I have heard his neighbors and those who practiced with him say. 
and it has been a recital of naught but good. But I have met him many times 
personally, and it is my experience that one always knew where he stood on a 
question. He always stood for that which he believed to be best for his fel- 
low men, and he had the courage of his convictions. As has been said by 
others here, there was no deceit, no hypocrisy about the man. He stood 
•squarely on all questions and never equivocated.' In conclusion, Mr. Gray 
referred to the splendid drainage law that Mr. Morrison had passed, and 
which had increased the value of Indiana lands from ten to twenty fold. 

"Joseph Combs: 'I never knew Mr. Morrison as a lawyer, as he was 
retiring from practice about the time I was beginning to practice but I knew 
him as a man, as a citizen, and I know that he deserves the tributes paid to 
him here today. What has been said here today is the truth. He was a 
man in whose word you could rely.' 

"Charles Guenther: 'Henry Y. Morrison had practically withdrawn 
from practice when I entered upon practice. He left his impress on this com- 
munity in its material growth as well as in its educational and moral growth. 
He always stood for that which uplifted his fellow men.' At this point Mr. 
Guenther paid attention to Mr. Morrison's drainage law and to his efforts in 
securing railways for Frankfort. 'Frankfort is today a great railway cen- 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 743 

ter. Stop (o think about it, you can get on the cars here and go anywhere — 
north, south, oast, west. All honor to him to whom the honor of tins splen- 
did state of affairs is due! As a man lie had a character that we might all lie 
proud of. Henry Y. Morrison's word was as go<>d as his bond.' 

"I J. C. Sheridan: 'I always regarded Henry Y. Morrison as a. hading 
citizen, and my father and my grandfather always so regarded him.' Mr. 
Sheridan spoke of Mr. Morrison's drainage law that did so much for this 
e unt) 'When you say of a man that be was an honest man and n 

the community in which he resides, you have said about all that can be said 
about him. I venture to say that no man has erected to himself a higher 
monument than has Henry Y. Morrison. The monument is the esteem of 
l ople. By his efforts he has made this not only one of the gi t 

counties in Indiana, but one of the greatest in America.' 

"Rev. H. R. Stark, of the Presbyterian church, joined his tribute with 
the others. He said : 'If I had not been a minister, in all probability I 
would have been a lawyer. I take pleasure in adding a few words to what 
already has been said. I knew enough about Henry Y. Morrison, his quiet, 
modest manner, to greatly appreciate him as a man and especially as a Chris- 
tion. One of the things which impressed me was his thorough conscientious- 
ness. His was not a conscience that was elastic, that could be stretched here, 
there and fn any direction to meet any demand, but bis was a conscience 
keenly alive and sensitive to the higher things. His life was a daily sermon. 
He was a sermon clothed in flesh and blood. He was a good man. The 
meaning of good is fitted to an end. And so he was a good man. He was 
fitted to the end for which God creates man — to live in the world and by pre- 
cept and example teach uprightness, purity and Godliness.' 

"Judge Claybaugh : After telling of bis industriousness and of how- 
he impressed ever) - one as being possessed of a vigorous individuality, Mr. 
Claybaugh said: 'From the time I first knew him — many years ago — to the 
day of his death, he was a man whose word was never doubted. If he be- 
lieved he was right on a certain question he stayed with that question and 
went up or down with it.' Mr. Claybaugh then referred at length to the 
drainage law, of which Mr. Morrison was the father, and told of how it not 
only added wealth to the community, but health also. In the old days chills 
and fever were very common and the death rate was high by reason of the 
vast swamps that were everywhere, but which were drained by reason of the 
passing of the Morrison drainage law. '1 remember of bis kindness to me 
when I was a boy. lie would take me by the hand and say: 'Joseph, how 



7 i \ ci.iN ro: couxty, cndtana. 

arc you gelling along?' Or, 'I heard yon make a speech the oilier day, and 
I want to compliment you. Keep on in your work," etc. Judge Claybaugh 
then load the nana-- of Leander McClurg, John Earner, P. K. Higinbotlian, 
Marccllus Bristol Perry Gard, Allen E. Paige, Samuel H. Doyal, J. NT. 
Sim , Truman II. Palmer, Henry Y. Morrison, and said: 'All of these were 
my associates. When I look- around now there is not a single man living 
who was here when ! came to the bar. When a man dies the public > 
ally tin; correct estimate the man was.' In conclusioi 

Claybaugh read the address delivered by Iienrv Y. Morrison at the John 
Barner memorial meetins;." 



ALEXANDER A. CUNNINGHAM. 

The subject of our sketch, Alexander G. Cunningham, has made his 
name known in Johnson township lis' his agricultural and business ac- 
complishments and he is regarded highly by all of his friends. Mr. Cun- 
ningham comes from a pioneer family who settled in Clinton count} about 
the middle of the last century, and cultivated a farm where our subject now 
lives in contentment and material prosperity. 

Alexander (1. Cunningham was born in Johnson township, Clinton 
county, in a log cabin on the farm where he now resides. The date of his 
birth was December n, 1853, and he was a son of Willia and Elizabeth 
(Goodnight) Cunningham. The father was a native of the Old Dominion, 
being born in Virginia in 1806. He first moved to Ohio, living there until 
his marriage in 1850, and then coming to Clinton county, lie passed from 
this earth on April 1, 1864. The mother was born in 1820 in the state of 
Ohio and died October 20, 1907. The father and mother could not obtain 
a very liberal education in their youth. The father followed fanning all of 
his life, also the trade of the miller, and voted the Republican ticket Ten 
children were born of the union: Martha J. (dec), Sarah C. (dee.), lames 
A., William IT. (dec), Mary A., Elizabeth E., A. G., Louisa P.. (dec). J. W. 
(dec), and S. W. 

Alexander Cunningham attended the common schools of Johnson town- 
ship, this county, in his youth, and then took up agriculture, which he has 
followed continuously until the present time. At one time he raised Poland- 
China hogs on an extensive scale, and now keeps a few of the Duroc variety, 
also a good breed of Jersey cattle. His wife raises chickens. Our subject 
counts a total of one hundred and fifty acres in his holdings, nearly all of 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

which is tillable. The land is well tiled, fenced, and has the ldtest improve- 
ments. Politically, Mr. Cunningham is a Republican. 

On November 26. 1888, Mr. Cunningham was married to Mar; I .. 
Hargrave, who was born August 27, 1867, in Rockingham count.. 
Carolina, the daughter of Nathaniel and Matilda (Powers) Margrave. Her 
f her is a native of Virginia, born there December 1, 1837, and now lives 
ai >ng his children. The mother was horn in North Carolina in Mare 1 ., 1 8 [2, 
and died May 6, 1898. The father was a Democrat all of his life, and served 
four years in. the Confederate army in the Civil war. lie was the father 
of eleven children: Susan, Mary, Thomas II., John F., Joseph M., Ida \Y. 
(dec), Dell.' M. (dec), Dora P., Robert A. (dec), Arlis M. (dec), and 
C rover S. 

To our subject and wife there have been born eight children: Clarence, 
June 7, 1890, now in Purdue University; Frank W., a high school graduate 
and a student in agriculture at Purdue University, October 25, 1892, now at 
home; John C, April 27, 1895; E. Grace, June 14, 1897; Roy A., August 21, 
1S99; Eugene H., October 7, 1901, died March 30, 1904; Harvey, December 
11, 1903, died March 26, 1904, and Glenn YV., born June 16, 1907. 



MARTIN Y. UNGER. 



In every life of honor and service to the public we find a great amount 
of interesting incidents, yet in presenting the career of a person in written 
form, much of the interesting matter is superfluous, and has to he eliminated, 
and only the salient points given. So, in writing the account of Mr. Cnger, 
one of Clinton county's mos! influential anil public spirited citizens and agri- 
culturists, no attempt shall he made to recount all the points in his worthy 
and useful life, nor recite every incident, for it is deemed that only a few of 
them shall be sufficient to prove that he is eminently worthy of a place in this 
volume along with his fellows of high standing. The family of Cnger has 
been a notable and large one in the county, and an unusually strict record has 
been kept by each generation. It is our pleasure to reproduce portions of the 
compilation published by the family, showing the early history of the family. 

George Unger, the great, great grandfather, of the fifth generation, was 
born in Germany. He emigrated to this country in the latter part of the seven- 
teenth century, and settled in Pennsylvania where he lived to a ripe old age. 
His son, Nicholas, emigrated from Pennsylvania to Morgan county, West 
Virginia, where he was married to Elizabeth llullinger. 



74*5 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

"The Ungcr family up to this time were of small stature, but the Hull 
ingers were a large people, and the descendants from that time ba be 
large. To this ui ii n were b children— six boys and two girls, as 

follows: Daniel, John, Henry, Nicholas, George, Washington, Mary and 
Catherine, of whom we have no record excepting two, Washington, who lived 
in West Virginia to a good old age, and George, the fifth son, who was born 
February 18, 1796. lie stayed under the parental roof until he was called to 
serve his country in the war oi 1 S 1 _• When he returned home he was mar- 
ried to Elizabeth Bailey, December 25, 1817. To this union were born 
fourteen children— eight boys and ix girls, as follows: John. Mary fane, 
Nicholas, Henry, Hannah, George W., Thomas, Louisa, Samuel, Mariali 
Elizabeth, Andrew J., Rachel and Martin Van Burcn. In the fall of 1836, tin 
father and mother, with thirteen children (Elizabeth having died in Virginia) 
started with a four-horse team, in an old-fashioned Virginia wagon, that 
would hold fifty-five bushels of corn, with a ridge pole eighteen feet long, in 
search of a better place in which to rear their children and give them a start. 

Their intention was to go to Tippecanoe county, Indiana, but the roads 
were so muddy, and having been already four weeks on the road, they were 
obliged to stop in Clark county, Ohio, where they lived for three years. Dur- 
ing this time two of the children, Nicholas and Rachel, died, and one son was 
born. In the fall of 1837, with his brother, Washington, and Nathan Cump- 
ton, the father started West to look at the country. Their mode of traveling 
was on horseback. Not being suited, they failed to purchase land, and in a 
short time returned to his family in Ohio. Again in the fall of 1838 he went 
West, on the same horse he rode the first time. He went to Carroll county, 
Indiana, where, of Peter Duncan, he purchased land four miles north and 
three-quarters of a mile cast of Burlington. After which, he again returned to 
his family in Ohio. In the fall of 1830, with his wife and eleven children he 
set out for their new home in the green forests of Carroll count}', with the 
same horses and wagon they brought from Virginia. The father was taken 
sick, and not being able to ride in the wagon, had to ride on horseback. They 
made the trip of one hundred and ninety miles in two weeks. They settled 
in the green forest, and in about two weeks they had built a cabin, and having 
moved into it, the)' were once more at home. Tn the following summer he 
took sick and never recovered. He died on the 28th of June, 1840, leaving his 
wife and eleven children to mourn his death. The mother lived on the farm 
for about twenty years rearing all the children to be men and women, and 
lived to see them all married. A short time before she died she went to live 



CLINTON COUNTYj INDIANA. "] J\~] 

with her daughter, Louisa, where she died cm the igth oi September, i860, 
leaving ten children — seven boys and three girls. 

"From this union, there are at the present time, about two hundred de- 
scendants, who meet every two years on the first Sunday in September.* * * 

Our subject, Martin Y. Unger, was born October 8, 1857, being the son 
of George and Elvira (Maggart) Unger. George Unger was the son of 
George and Elizabeth (Bailey) Unger, who were mentioned in the intro- 
ductory paragraphs of this sketch. Our subject's father was born May 28, 
1825, in Morgan county, West Virginia, and died on December 20, 1892, in 
Clinton count)-, Indiana. He was married to Elvira Maggart on March 13, 
1851, and she was born January 12, 1828, and departed this life February 28, 
1896. In 1866 George Unger was elected to the office of magistrate and was 
re-elected four successive terms of four years each. In 1886 he was drawn 
on the United States jury. Fraternally, he was a member of the Free and 
Accepted Masons, Middle fork Lodge, No. 304. Nine children were born to 
the union, namely: Sarah E., John, David, Martin V., Nancy J., Calvin, Eliza 
E., and Oliver C. 

Martin V. Linger received a good education in the common schools of his 
day in Warren township. Later he attended the Lebanon, Ohio, Normal one 
term, and the six weeks' Normal at Frankfort and Russiaville. Using his 
education to the best advantage, he taught school for four years in Forrest 
and Warren township. He then took up active farming and continued very 
successfully until 1907, at which time he removed to the city of Frankfort. 
He still manages the farm, however, from his home there. The farm of three 
hundred acres is situated in Warren township, and is in the very best condi- 
tion — well tiled, fenced, improved, very tillable, and covered with the most 
modern structures, including an excellent barn. 

Mr. Linger was married to Lydia S. Harmon on November 2, 1879. She 
was born September 19, 1859. Fifteen children have been born to this union, 
nine of whom are now living. They are: Iva Blanche, born April 2, 1882, now 
the wife of II. Jacoby of Cutler, Indiana; Grace M., born June 25, 1883, the 
wife of E. Boynesworth of Cutler; Robert J., born April 29, 1886, now of 
Warren township; Lloyd M., born February 3, [888, thirty-second degree 
Mason, Warren township, married August 4, 1913, to Hannah Brookie of 
Cutler, Ind. ; Elva M., born February 18, 18S5, studying to be trained nurse 
in Indianapolis; Roy, born June 20, 1893, on farm; Sylvia C, born May 30, 
1895, ' n Frankfort high school; Artie L, born April 20, 1808, in school, and 
Helen, born April 8, 1905, in school. 



7-)8 gun roi l:oi i v, Indiana. 

Politically, Mr. I igcr is a Democrat, and he served as Drainage Com- 
missioner for Clinton count)' for a term of two years. 

Mr. Under is Woshipful Ma lei of Middle fork Lodge, Xo. ;,";. 
and Accepted Masuiis, and is n lhirl_\ second degree member, also mei 
the Knights Templar, Mural Shrine, and has filled all offices in the Hlne 
Lodge. 



GEORGE SMITH. 

No people thai go to maki :osmopolitan civilization have better 

habits of life than those who have originally conic from the great German 
empire, or are descendants of these people. They are all distinguished for 
their thrift and honesty, and these two qualities in the inhabitants of any 
country will in the end alone make that country great. When, with these two 
qualities, is coupled the other quality of sound sense, which they, as a race, 
seem to possess in large degree, there arc afforded such qualities as will en- 
rich any land and place it at the top of the countries of the world in the scale 
of elevated humanity. 

Among the second generation of Germans in Clinton county is George 
Smith, of Frankfort, well-known veterinary and public official and one of our 
worthy native sons, his entire life of sixty-five years having been spent here, 
and he is a representative of two of the sterling pioneer families of this 
locality. 

Mr. Smith was born at Rossville, Clinton county, January 27, 1848. He 
is a son of John 13. and Ann (Dehner) Smith, both born in Germany, from 
which country they emigrated to the United Stales with their parents when 
young in years and here they grew up and were married, finally locating 
in Rossville, where John If. Smith opened a harness shop, in 1832, and con- 
tinued in this business until 1852. being one of the first to engage in this line 
of endeavor in this section of the state. The country was sparsely settled 
and little improved when he came here. In 1852 he went into the general 
mercantile business in which he remained a few years when he sold out and 
took up farming, buying one hundred and sixty acres in 1854, where part of 
Rossville now stands. This he operated successfully until 1865, when lie sold 
out and moved to Kentland, Newton county, Indiana, where be purchased eight 
hundred acres and farmed on an extensive scale until his death, which oc- 
curred there in 1869. He had divided his eight hundred acre farm into eighty 
acre tracts, giving each of his ten children an eight}*. They were named as 



CLINTON CO I I'Y, INDIANA. ',']') 

follows: Lucas, died in infancy; Mary, died when nineteen years oJ aye; 
Elizabeth, died in tcji i ; [Tcnr\ L., died in iyo8; Joseph II., lives in Omaha, 
Nebraska; George, of this review; Sophia, lives in Portland, Oregon; I aro- 
line, li\-( in Omaha, \*el raska-; Jo! i . lives in Indianapolis; Amanda, lives 
at G >uncil Bluffs, Iowa. 

The death of the mother of the above named children occurred in 1900 
at Omaha, Nebraska, where she \v;i g her home. The father took much 

interest in public affairs and for som< time was justice of the peace and also 
trustee of Jefferson town hip, New ten county. Politically he was a Democrat, 
and in religious matters a Catholic. 

George Smith grew up in his native count)' and received a good public 
school ed ication. H n began I 1 which he continued for some time 

after his lather's death, and also at intervals between terms of office. In the 
fall of [873 he went back to Rossville, where be bought a general store, re- 
maining there until the spring of 1885, enjoying a good trade with the sur- 
rounding country. A great deal of his attention was directed to the practice 
of his profession from 18885 unl '' It<3 99- m which year he was elected county 
clerk, which office lie held for four years. At that time he moved to Frank- 
fort, where he purchased property and there he still resides. Before moving 
to the county seat he was trustee of Ross township for a period of eleven 
years. He was city councilman in Frankfort in 1905. He has been county 
chairman of the Democratic party during three campaigns. He has been 
treasurer of the Clinton County Fair Association since its organization. As a 
public servant he has been very popular with his constituents, performing his 
various duties with great fidelity and conscientiousness. 

Mr. Smith is now practically retired from active life, however, he looks 
after his fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Union township. 
Politically he is a loyal Democrat, and fraternally he belongs to the Knights 
of Pythias, the Improved Order of Ren Men, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Knights of Honor. 

Mr. Smith was married to Elenora Rose, daughter of Uriah and Eliza- 
beth (Masters) Rose, who located on a farm in Clinton county in 1866. To 
Uriah Rose and wife these children were horn: Mrs. Mary Smith, of Ross- 
ville; Tamzen Gaddis, of McCune, Kansas; Elizabeth Douglass, of Orlando, 
Kansas; William W., of Ross township, this county; Josephine, who died in 
1890; Elenora, wife of Mr. Smith, of this sketch; and two children who died 
in infancy. 

To George Smith and wife four children have been born, named as fol- 
lows: Ralph is cashier of the American National Bank, of Frankfort; he is 



CLINTON CO! NIY, INDIANA. 



married and has one daughter, Louise: G. Adrian, cashier of the Rossville 
Hank, at Rossville, Indiana; is married and lias three children: George Ed- 
ward, Marguerite and Rosemary. Frank E. is a successful physician of Chi- 
cago; Caroline, the youngest child, is at home with her parents. 



J. M. R. HENDRICKS. 



Those who know well J. M. R. Hendricks, successful farmer of War- 
ren township, Clinton county, will tell you that he is a man of courag self- 
reliance and of the utmost integrity of purpose, as a result of which he has 
during his entire life stood high in the estimation of his neighbors and friends 
and is therefore deserving of a place in the pages of this book. 

Mr. Hendricks was born on July 25, 1861. in Ross township, Clinton 
county, Indiana, and he has been satisfied to spend his life in his native com- 
munity, although long a resident of another township than that in which he 
first saw the light of day. He is a son of Samuel and Henrietta (Fink) 
Hendricks. The father was born near Rossville, Clinton county, in 1830, and 
his death occurred in 1902. The mother was born in Germany, and her death 
occurred in 1869. She had come west with her parents when young and here, 
in Clinton count)', met and married Mr. FIcndricks and they spent their lives 
on a farm, and to them five children were born, three of whom are still living, 
namely: Dorothy is deceased, William L. is living, J. M. R., subject of this 
sketch; Eldo L. is the youngest. 

The gentleman whose name heads this article grew to manhood on the 
old homestead and there did the usual chores commonly assigned to a lad on 
the farm. During the winter months, when he became of proper age he at- 
tended the neighboring school in his district, also supplemented hi-- public 
school education by studying at Ladoga and at Valparaiso, Indiana, and was 
therefore well equipped to enter life for himself, so far as education was con- 
cerned. 

On November 1, 1891, Mr. Hendricks married Jennett Walter, who was 
born in 1866 in Warren township, Clinton count)-, and here she grew to 
womanhood and was educated in the public schools. She is a daughter of 
Alexander and Martha (Steele) Walter, both parents being now deceased. 
They speii? their active lives on a farm. 

To our subject and wife three children have been born, namely: Ruth A., 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 75 1 

born December 29, 1892; Hilda PL, born May 27, 1895; Mary M., born 
October jo, 1S99. 

Mr. Hendricks has always been a fanner. He removed from Ross town- 
ship 1" Warren township in 1876. He i> owner of one hundred ami seventy 
acres, about fifty acres of which is not under cultivation. The rest is pro- 
ductivc and well improved and well tiled. The fifty acres mentioned is in 
woods pasture. He carries on genera! farming and breeding and feeding of 
farm animals. He lias a good set of buildings on his place and is very com- 
fortably fixed in every way. 

Fraternally he is a member of the Knights of Pythias at Frankfort and 
the Masons at Beard. He is a member of die Presbyterian church, and pi line- 
ally is a Democrat. He was elected trustee of Warren township in 1804, and 
served nearly five years in a manner thai reflected much credit upon himself 
and to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned. He was elected county com- 
missioner in 190S and served three years with his usual fidelity and satisfac- 
tion from January 1, 1910. 



GEORGE L. THOMPSON. 

Everywhere in our favored land are found men who have worked their 
way from comparatively humble beginnings to leadership in diverse avenues 
of endeavor and to positions of trust as custodians of the people's interest. 
Such an one is the well known gentleman whose name is the caption of this 
article, George L. Thompson, successful business man at Frankfort, signally 
fortunate in commercial affairs, and ranking with the capable and conscien- 
tious men of Clinton county. 

George L. Thompson was born in Michigan City, Indiana, on March 2, 
i860, and was the son of Charles C. and Martha (Nosworthy) Thompson. 
Charles Thompson, the father, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 
1837 and came to the Hoosier state in the 50's, and went into the contracting 
business, which he conducted successfully until his death on August 5, 18G5. 
Mrs. Thompson, the mother of our subject, died on January 3, 1870, after 
a life of much usefulness to herself and to her acquaintances. 

George L. Thompson received a common school education and then went 
into the First National Bank of Michigan City a short time, then took a 
position with the Ford- Johnson Chair Company as hook-keeper, which place 
he held for a period of six years, his long retention being ample proof of his 



75- < IJNTOM 101 XTV, I MH \.\.\. 

work. lie next moved to Frankfort, Indiana, and bought the old J. F. 
Morgan Lumber Yards in company with his Father-in-law, C. O. Denning, 
and this cstablishn [1 .- since been under the name of the Deming Thomp- 
son Company. Ii i- apitalized at twenty-five thousand dollars and iceupies 
one solid square in the heart of the city. 

Mr. Thompson was married on January 16, rSSs to Mary F. Fleming, 
and two children I been horn to the union- Coy C. and Frank D., both 

of whom are as ici ■ i with their father in the lumber business. 

Politically, Mr. Thompson is an Independent, and has never sought pub- 
lic office or emolument. Religiously, he is a Methodist, and fraternally is a 
Mason, York Rite md belongs to the Knights of Pythias. 



L. BRUCE MOORE. 



No history of Clinton county, purporting to give the life records of the 
men who helped make I he country and county what it is today, men who 
battled heroically against greater odds than we of today can conceive, men 
who were self-sacrificing and long-suffering, would be complete were there 
failure to make proper mention of the Moore family. Father and ;on have 
led and are leading careers which should be an incentive to others, for they 
are characterized by a high sense of honor, indomitable courage and inde- 
fatigable industry, and thus they have done much good in the community 
honored by their residence. 

L. Bruce Moore was born on February 16, 1854, on a farm south of 
the city of Frankfort, and was the son of William and Sarah (Pauley) 
Moore. 

William Moore was a native of the Buckeye state, having been born in 

Ohio in the year of 1828, the son of Robert and (Jenkins) Moore, 

Robert having come to Clinton county in the early 30's and farmed there 
until his death in 1866. William Moore came to Clinton count)- before his 
father, and in company with an aunt. After remaining here for a short time, 
he decided to depart for Iowa, in hopes that the country of that state would 
be more productive. He evidently found to the contrary, because he enlisted 
in that state in the American army which invaded Mexico. He served val- 
iantly throughout the war with the greasers, under the command of General 
Winfield Scott. After the closing of hostilities, Mr. Moore returned to the 
North, to Clinton county, Indiana, and entered upon a farming career, 



■ 



J 



X 
vi 






L. B. MOOUR 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 753 

which he continued until within a few years of his death in 1896. He was a 
Republican, and a member of the Presbyterian church. 

L. Bruce Moore, our subject attended the a rumon schools, and re- 
ceived a fairly good general education, the deficiencies of which lie afterward 
made up by home reading and observation. At the age of sixteen years he 
began teaching school in the winter months, and in the summer days he 
worked on the farm. When he had reached the age of maturity, twenty-one, 
he removed to Thorntown, Ind., with his parents, and for a period of eight 
years he worked at the fire insurance business (here. He then went to Leba- 
non, Ind., and took up Ihe same line of business, spending another eight 
years (here, years attended with unusual success. He next came to 
fort, this county, and conducted a coal business until 1900, when he gave 
it up in order to fill the office of township trustee, where he is now serving 
a term of two years. 

Politically, Mr. Moore is a Republican. Fraternally, he is identified with 
the Loyal Order of Moose. Mr. Moore is a justice of the peace in Thorn- 
town. 



FRANCIS B. SIMS. 



One of the most conspicuous of Clinton county's pioneers was Francis 
B. Sims, who succeeded, during his long and useful life, in building up a great 
prestige in this community, lie was altruistic and energetic in all affairs he 
undertook, and there was no man of the county who shared more of the com- 
mon esteem and admiration which is the reward for the man of accomplish- 
ment. He has passed into the oilier world, but behind him, he left many ex- 
amples of his efficiency as a business man. lie was one of that wast army of 
young men who left their homes during the Civil War and donned the blue 
to save the Union. 

Francis B. Sims was horn near the town of Middlefork, Clinton county, 
on the 7U1 of February, 1840, and was the son of Stephen and Nancy (Creek) 
Sims. Stephen Sims was horn in Cooke county, Tennessee, November 24, 
i/()j. lie was a son of William and Amelia (Russell) Sims. William Sims 
was a son of William and Martha Sims, and was horn in Culpeper county, 
Virginia, May 14, 1700, his parents being of Scotch lineage. Unto the mar- 
riage of William and Amelia ( Russell ) Sims was horn the following children: 
Rush county, where he resided till the death of his wife in 1834, at which 
Larkin, Mary A., Joshua, James, William, Elizabeth, Sarah, Stephen, 
Thomas, Anna, Martha and Lewis. The death of the mother of these chil- 
(48) 



7 54 



ll'XTY, IXIHAXA. 



dren occurred in 1X20, and four years later the father married, for a second 
wife. Fear Sturdivant, whose death occurred in the year 1840. From his 

native state, William Sims removed in the year 1 7X4, at which date he hecame 
a pioneer of Cooke count)-, Teniu .see, where lie resided till the year l8l 1, at 
which date lie removed to Franklin county, Indiana, where his death oc- 
curred August 2-. 1X45. His occupation was that of fanner, lie was a soldier 
in the Revolutionary War and served under General Washington. This sturdy 
pioneer and patriot was equally distinguished as a Christian. When the 
Methodist Episcopal church was really in its infancy in America, he hecame 
a member of this organization, and thereafter till death he remained a zealous 
and active member [lis son, Stephen Sims, father of our subject, wa nine- 
teen years of age when lie removed with his parents from Tennessee to In- 
diana in 1X1 1. The family settled near Brookville. In the year rXijj. Stephen 
married Elizabeth McCarty, who was horn at North Bend, Hamilton county, 
Ohio, in the year 1707. to which place her parents had only a short time 
previously removed from Baltimore county, Maryland. Thcv subsequently 
removed to Brookville, Indiana, where the daughter married Mr. Sims. Her 
father also was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. She bore her husband the 
following named children: Amelia. Rebecca, James X., William, fohn F„ 
Cicero, Mary J., Larkin, Sarah, Jesse, Lewis, Martha A., and William S. 

For a short time after his marriage Stephen Sims resided in Franklin 
county, then removed to Connersville, Fayette county, and from there to 
date he removed to Boone county, and settled near Middlefork, where he con- 
tinued to reside, fie died January [6, 1X63. The parents were life-long mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. The father held many positions of 
honor and trust. Like his lather he was first a whig in politics and upon the 
organization of the Republican part) be became a Republican. For years he 
was justice of the peace, and while residing in Boone county lie served as 
property appraiser; for two years he was an associate justice of Boone county. 
He also served as a school commissioner of Rush county for five years, and 
in 1850 was a delegate to the Indiana constitutional convention. In all these 
positions he discharged his duties with fidelity and creditable ability, lie was 
of ordinary education, hut of general intelligence and unusual menial energy. 
Tie was a soldier of the war oi l8l2, and in every sense of the term was one 
of the pioneers of Indiana. IK- was twice married and was the lather of nine- 
teen children by both marriages. lie began hie as a mechanic, and having a 
large familv to support, amidst the privations oi a new country, he acquired 
only a limited estate, and his children, as they grew to maturity, were com- 
pelled to resort to their own resources. 



CM N TON COUNTY, INDIA \'A. 



Our subject, Francis B. Sims, removed lo Forest after thirty-five years 
spent in working on a farm, and at tlie latter place lie established a brick 
yard. Liter he took bis brick business to Flora, Indiana, and continued with 
the une success as be had met with at the beginning. 

< )n March 2, i86r, Mr. Sims was married to Luc\ Cochran, who was 
born in Switzerland count}-. Indiana, on January 25, 1845, the daughter of 
Aaron and Laura (Morrison) Cochran. The family of the Cochrans was one 
of the largest and best known of that section of the slate, Aaron Cochran 
having come to that county from New York slate in the '40's. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Aaron Cochran there were born four children: Marietta, wife of George 
Trapp, of Elwood; Lucy Y, wife of Francis B. Sims, of Frankfort; [1 hn 
Wi iley, who at the age of eighteen enlisted in the Union army and died in 
Indianapolis of the measles; and Sarah I\. wife of John \Y. Guthridge, of 
Frankfort. After the death of Mrs, Cochran, Aaron Cochran was again 
united in marriage to Adaline Walters, and of this union were horn five chil- 
dren; William, Monroe,-, died in August, 1910; Walter, Cynthia A., wife of' 
A. Eikenberry, and India, wife of Charles Blair, all of Forest, Indiana. 

Our subject, Francis B. Sims, was always a devout worker in the Metho- 
dist church, and he never hesitated to contribute to any enterprise which 
meant the betterment of his home community. During the war, Mr. Sims 
served in Company F, One Hundred and Fifty-third Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry, and, according to the testimony of his former comrades, he was a 
valiant and courageous soldier. Mr. Sims was one of the kindest and most 
generous men, giving liberally of his money and time to worthy people or en- 
terprises. He donated brick to build several churches. Besides his family, he- 
was survived by one sister, Mrs. Naomi Brooks, who resides in Kansas. To 
Mr. and Mrs, Sims were horn the following children: Laura L., wife of 
Charles A, Ashpaugh. of Frankfort; Naomi Amelia, wife of fames L. Moul- 
der, of New Richmond; Delia Lenora, wife of A. A. Flora, of Denver, Colo- 
rado, October 30, rcjll, and Wallace Virgil, horn July 15, 1K87, and died 
March 15, 1888. 



WENDELL B. MONTGOMERY 



The interests of modern lite are so varied and complex and so wide in 
their influence that it requires a high standard oi intelligence as well as thor- 
ough technical training and executive ability of a superior order to manage 
successfully the main - lines of industry which are today the pride- and boast 



/?<> CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

of the present century of progress and prosperity. This is essentially Llic age 
ol the practical and nearly everywhere the man oi ideas, judgment, discern- 
mcnl and leadership is pretty mucl in evidence. Great things depend u 
great minds for their direction and the world is beginning to realize that the 
present generation is constantly developing leaders and captain- of industry 
that not only maki their influence an active and pi tential force in the world 
ol atiairs, but in a very large measure become th directors of progress in 
their respective spheres of endeavor. Such an individual must know and 
understand the widely diversified conditions of his country, the habits of the 
people, their methods of work and trade, their degree of intelligence, as well 
as their prejudice - would b me a forceful factor of the bod; politic 
and a true leader of the industry over which he has control. 

Such a man is the well-known subject of this review, one who by the 
vigor of his personality and mastery of his calling lias risen rapidly from a 
position as teacher in the public schools until he is now the manager of one 
of the largest and most important manufacturing plants in the city of Frank- 
fort, Indiana. Wendell B. Montgomery is an Ohio man and proud of his 
native commonwealth. He was born in the city of Cleveland, September 10, 
1873, the son of O. J. and Hattie (Shoemaker) Montgomery, both of whom 
are now living on a ranch near Great Falls., Montana, and have unbounded 
faith in the future growth and prosperity of the great northwest. 

Young Wendell enjoyed exceptional educational advantages as he grew 
up, having first finished the public school branches which supplemented by an 
attendance of several terms at Obei i in College and a business course in Bryant 
and Stratton's Commercial College, Chicago, eminently fitted him for the 
course of life he was subsequently to pursue and in which his success has been 
such as to make him one <>i" the rising men of his day and generation in the 
city of his residence. 

After finishing his academic and business training he taught school for 
several years, but not satisfied with the prospect of devoting his life to edu- 
cational work, he finally discontinued the profession and engaged with the 
New Washington Brick and Cumber Co., Washington, D. C, of which he was 
soon made manager. This place he filled with credit In himself and the satis- 
faction of his employers until 1905, when he-severed his connection with the 
enterprise and came to Frankfort, Indiana, where he has since held the po- 
sition of manager of "The National Handle Factory," a post oi great re- 
sponsibility and trust in which he has demonstrated unusual ability as an 
executive and leader of men. 



CL1NT0M COUNTY, INDIANA. 757 

Since engaging with the enterprise over which he now exercises control, 
Mr. Montgomery lias been untiring in his efforts to promote its interests and 
add t<> ils efficiency, in both of whii h his success has been signal and marked. 
The building has 1 1 enlarged r otherwise improved and the practical 
reconstruction of the works, together with the installment at intervals of ma- 
chinery of the latest and most approved pattern have so increased the capacity 
of the plant as to afford facilities for a business that has grown in magnitude 
with each recurring year and whose proportions at this time bespeak .-till 
greater enlargement in the no distant future, in order to meet the constantly 
growing demand for the output. It is needless to state that the success of the 
plant and its high standing in industrial circles is largely due to the ability and 
oversight of the manager who 1- familiar with ever) - detail of the bu 
and spares neither time nor pains to make it one of the leading manufacturing 
establishments of the kind in the state. 

In addition to his interest in the large and growing enterprise with which 
identified, Mr. Montgomery has not been unmindful of his duties as a citizen, 
as is indicated by his active participation in all laudable movements for the 
material, social and moral advancement of Frankfort and the general welfare 
of Clinton county. A reader, a thinker and a close observer, he has kept in 
touch with the trend of thought on the leading public questions and issues of 
the day and in politics is an ardent supporter of the Progressive Republican 
party, by which he was recently honored by being nominated for the office of 
mayor of his city, for which position he is now making an active, and, from 
indications, what promises to be a successful canvass. He is well liked by the 
people whose interests he has ever had at heart and should he be elected, will 
doubtless give Frankfort one of the ablest and most popular administrations 
in the history of the city. He is a gentleman of pleasing presence, courteous 
to all with whom lie has relation-, business or otherwise, and his friendships 
are limited only by the number of his acquaintances. In secret and fraternal 
wok, he is likewise active and popular, being a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and Travelers' Protective Association, in both of 
which his influence has had much to do in making the respective organiza- 
tions realize the purposes for which intended. 

In December of the year 1893, Mr. Montgomery was happily married 
to Miss Mary Ulmer, an estimable young lady of Bluffton, Indiana, who has 
borne him five children, namely: Hilhard, Ruth, Wendell P., Jr., Mildred and 
Beth, who, with their parents, constitute an interesting and happy family 
circle. 



758 CJ IN ro\ COUNTY, INDIANA 



RUSSELL ALLEN. 



One ut the honi veterans of the greatest civil war whicli hi torj 

records, and a vet itizen of Washington township, Clinton com 

lias long ranked among our best and most enterprising farmers is David Allen, 
a man who would lie appreciated a? a citizen anywhere, for he is a believer in 
hard, persistent v. honorable dealings with bis fellow men and at the 

same time is patriotii and public-spirited, having done much for the general 
improvement of the locality of his residence, both in a material and moral 
way, advocating right living and purity in politics. His place, known as Wal- 
nut Grove Earn . I in Section i l, of the toi hip above ; 
and is a model in ever} respect. This place has been very skilfully and ably 
managed of recent years by his son, Russell Allen, a worthy son of a worthy 
sire, who seems to have inherited main- of the commendable traits of his 
father, and he has spent his life on this farm, having been born here in [873. 
The place contains two hundred and seven acres and it lies five and one-half 
miles from Frankfort. 

David Allen, ex-county commissioner, was burn also on this farm, in a 
log house, in 1840, and he is a son of Stephen Allen, who was born in 1701), in 
Ohio, and he came to ibis county in 1830 among the pioneers, and developed 
the farm by hard work from the virgin soil. He was a son of Phillip Allen. 
of Scotch-Irish 'descent. The family lived in Butler county, Ohio, for several 
generations and there Stephen Allen grew to manhood and married Mary 
Ross, who was also a native of that county, and there the elder Aliens lived 
and died, Stephen Allen spent the rest of his life in Clinton county, Indiana, 
and was a well-known and highly respected citizen among the early settlers. 
His family consisted of eight children, five sons and three daughters, namely: 
Andrew J., deceased ; John, deceased; Elizabeth, Mrs. Rachael Groves, David, 
Almeda, Major and Smith B. The mother of these children died at the age 
of sixty-five years, while the father reached the advanced age of seventy-nine 
years. Political!}' hi was a Republican, and in 1830 he voted for General 
John C. Fremont. He and his wife were both members of the Christian 
church. 

David Allen was reared on the home place, and, growing up in pioneer 
times, he had plenty of hard work to do. He received a meager education in 
the old-time schools *>i his day. When the Civil war came on he enlisted in 
the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Company 
1 , under Col. William Wilson, of Lafayette. Our subject was soon sent to 
the far South and was stationed at Bridgeport, Alabama. He was honorably 



CLINTON CO I \IV, INDIANA. 750 

discharged in 1864, after which. he returned home and resumed farming. 
Seme years ago he sen ed as o mimissii mer of Clinton county with mm h credit 
to himscli and to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned. When twenty-one 

years oi age he married, in November, 1871, l ; .li/.;i M. Clark, wlio was 1 < in 
in Jefferson, this county, and there reared and educated. She is a daughter of 
John M. Clark, who came to Clinton county in 1836, and here lie spent the 
rest of his life, dying in Colfax. 

Russell Allen grew to manhood on the home place here and he did his 
share of the work when growing to manhood. He received a good practical 
education in the schools of Frankfort. Upon reaching manhood he married 
Lettie Lane, daughter of a prominent pioneer family here. She was horn on 
the old Lane homestead and here grew to womanhood and was educated in 
the schools of Frankfort. She is a daughter of Jesse Lane, mentioned on 
other pages of this work. 

To our subject and wife four children have keen horn, namely: Frances, 
deceased; Walter, Florence and David, Jr. Mr. Allen owns one of the choice 
farms of his township, which place consists of one hundred and eight acres. 
well improved and carefully kept. He has a good set of buildings and always 
keeps an excellent grade of live stock. 



DAVID B. HORLACHER. 

One of the chief concerns of every man in the productive period of life 
is to accumulate sufficient means to care for himself and his family in old 
age. Many men start out with the best of intentions, but err in business 
ji Igment and find themselves penniless in their declining years. Others 
seem to be followed by unfortunate circumstances classified under the general 
heading of "hard luck." There are now many people whose advancing years 
should entitled them to freedom from life's strenuous duties who are com- 
pelled to work hey. id their strength for the necessities of life. 

One of the citizens of Clinton county who while vet young and husky 
is laying by a competency to insure his old age free from want is David P.. 
Horlacher, farmer of Washington township, a man who is a creditable repre- 
sentative of one of our old families, his paternal grandfather. Levi Horlacher, 
having been one of the early day hotel men here, keeping a tavern in Jeffer- 
son as far hack as the thirties, which was a favorite stopping place for people 
passing to the western countries. David Horlacher, father of our subject, 



7^0 ci.ixtox co i . \. 

has alsi i hct-i i well know i man in [hi Incalih inn llic p x 

full . ! lim will be I mid b> llic reader on I >a f (his work. 

The immediate subji his review was 1 in Pel rn 

1 his full share of 1 
whei , ! d duri he disti chool 

He remained on his father's farm until he was twent\ eight y< 
fn Ja ary, m)(>j, Mi ' Flva M. Bail liter ol 

el Bailey, one of th< substantial farmers ol Pi Mrs. 

Horlacher's mother is still living, being eighty years of age Our subject 
and wife have one daughter, Evalyn Lavina, who was born February .5, 
1910. 

Mr. I , , inn of two hundred three and two-th 

He has two substantial ;e1 om set being erected this year. He 

•0 a standard make automobik ^.Iso is stockholder in the \merican 
National Bank and owns .tuck in the Clinton Grain Company. 

Fraternally. Mr. Horlacher is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows of Colfax. 



WILLIAM FREAS, SR. 



It is by no means an easy task to describe within the limits of this re- 
view a man who has led an active and eminently useful life and by his own 
exertions reached a position of honor and trust in the line of industries with 
which his interests are allied. But biography finds justification, nevertheless, 
in recording such a life history, as the public claims a certain property nterest 
in the career of every individual and the time invariably arrives when it be- 
comes advisable to give the right publicity. It is with a certain degree of sat- 
isfaction that the writer essays the task of touching briefly upon such a 
record as has been of the subject who now comes under this review. William 
Freas.., Sr., of Frankfort, is a man of high standing and influence in the in- 
dustrial circles with which he is identified. 

William Freas, Sr., was born October 7, 1850, in Allentown, Pa., and 
was the son of John and Rachel (Brown) Freas. John Freas was born in 
Alsace-Lorraine, France, and came t< > America in the early '40's with a 
brother. By trade he was a steel worker. In 1S6S he settled in Rossville, 
Clinton county, and later bought a farm five miles west of Frankfort, farm- 
ing the same until ln's death in 1882. Mrs. Freas died in 1896. 



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H. E. FREAS 



CUM TON COUNTY, I XI H \ XA. 76] 

William Freas, Si'., spent his early years, until he was twenty-two years 
old, on a farm. He (ben went to Sedalia, where he stacked lumber for the 
New York Lumber Company, and five years later, in 1877, lie came to Frank- 
fort and worked for Good & McPherson in the liquor business. He stayed 
with this firm a very short time, then worked for Nathan Fletcher nine 
years. In 1882 he went into partnership with Frank Lancaster in the liquor 
business on North Side square, and here he remained two years. At that 
period he branched out for himself. In tSSS he vent to Chicago, but was 
only engaged in business there for a period of six months, then came back 
to Frankfort and bought the block where the Freas Brothers are now located. 
Their place is known as the Elite Cigar Store, and the brands of stock kept 
are the best that can be obtained in the country and abroad. Our subject re- 
tired from active business in 1907. Mr. Freas is one of the stockholders of 
the First National Bank. Politically, he is a Democrat, and religiously a 
Lutheran. In fraternal matters he is a member of the Improved Order of 
Red Men and the Travelers' Protective Association. 

Mr. Freas was married, on August 25, 1872, to Amanda E. Burns, who 
was born in Allentown, Pa., on October 18, 1851, and was the daughter of 
John and Caroline (Kreutzer) Burns. Her parents came to this county and 
settled three and one half miles north of Frankfort. Her father followed 
farming until within a few years of his death, when he moved to Frankfort. 
Mrs. Freas died on September 6, 1905. She was the mother of two children: 
William M., Jr., and Harvey E. 

William Freas, Jr., was born on May 29, 1873, and in his youth re- 
ceived a common school education. At the age of twenty-one years he went 
into the cigar business on West Washington street, and here he stayed until 
1898, when he began work for his father in the liquor trade. In 1907 he 
opened a small cigar store at his present location, in partnership with bis 
brother. He is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks at 
Louisville, Ky., and in political life is a Democrat. Mr. Freas holds mem- 
bership with the Lutheran church. 

William Freas, Jr., was united in marriage on August 9, 1903, to Helen 
D. Hineburger, who v. is born in Rossville, Ind., April 17, 1875, lne daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Rosa (Seigfried) Hineburger. Joseph Hineburger was 
born in Yorkville, Ind., August 6, 1S51, and came to Clinton county when 
twenty years of age. He settled in Rossville, and in 1878 came to Frank- 
fort, where he worked as a carriage maker, and later worked in the grocery 
trade, which he has followed over since. Mrs. Hineburger was born near 
Schnccksville, Pa., on July 19, 1855. Both parents are living in this city on 



-fij CTJNTON mii'\TV, INDIANA. 

South Jackson street. Mrs. Freas, by her first marriage, was the muther of 
two children, namely: Mrs. Max Fowler and Horace. 

Harvey Frea.< was bom September 9, 1X70, and attended the common 
schools of Clinton county. He also graduated from the Frankfort high 
school in 1897. In the year of the Spanish-American war he enlisted in 
Company I, Our Hundred and riiirty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry 
under Captain 1 ). F. Allen. Harve) was commissioned commissar) sergeant 
of the company. In St. Louis he was transferred to the band of the same 
regiment and was made a sergeant of the band. His service included eigh- 
teen months in the Philippines, and every duty he was commanded to do he 
did with the utmost fidelity. In L90] he was honorably discharged from the 
army. He worked for his father in the liquor busin s in Frankfort until 
he went into partnership with his brother in the cigar trade. 

Fraternally, Harvey Freas belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks, the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Sp dish-American War 
Veterans. Pie casts his vote for the Democratic candidates, and attends the 
Lutheran church. 

In 1904 he was married to Mamie Cohee, a daughter of William and 
Jennie (Taylor) Cohee. Mrs. Freas lived only two years, dying on March 
25. 1906. In November, 1.007, Mr. Freas was married again, to Tracey 
Keene. 

The present cigar store of the Freas brothers was opened in April, 1912. 
The store is one of the finest of its kind in the state, being fitted with Opal- 
Onyx cigar fixtures, and a full line of cigars, tobaccos, and confections is 
carried. 



JAMES L. HORLACHER. 

A farmer when he has raised his crop lias performed only half his duty; 
the other half is selling, which determines his profit for the year's work. It 
is just as important for the agricultural producer to know what the markets 
are as it is for the lumberman, to coal and ore producers, or the manufacturer 
to know what his goods are worth in the market and what competition he 
must meet in his selling. One of the progressive farm* rs of Washington 
township, Clinton county, who not only understands raising good crops but 
also how to get the best prices is James L. Tlorlacher, representative of an 
old family here. 



CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 76} 

Mr. [-Iorlachcr was born on the okl homestead in this township, on May 
27. 1870. JTe is a son of David J Iorlachcr, deceased, who, for man) rears 
w; s one of the locality's leading agriculturists, lie was horn in Ohio, a son 
of Levi Horlacher, who kept a tavern in the early days. The family came 
to Clinton county in 1840. Levi FTorlacher was born in Lehigh o 
Pennsylvania, at Allentown, and was a son of Abraham Horlacher, who died 
in thai state. Levi first went to Ohio, where he married, later remo ig : 
this county. He grew up in Pennsylvania. He was a tailor by trade. Tie 
married Rebecca Brelsford. a native of Ohio. They came to this county in 
a wagon and kept a tavern for some time at Jefferson in the early dai - Thev 
moved to a farm in 184S, and there they spent the rest of their lives 
had five children, namely: David, father of our subject; Tohn, who was a 
soldier in the Civil war, Tenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, is deceased: 
Annie E. is deceased: E. M. is deceased; and Clark, the youngest. The 
father of the children lived to lie seventy-eight years of age. The mother 
also reached an advanced age. Politically, he was a Democrat, and was a 
member of the Lutheran church. 

David Horlacher was reared on the home farm and he received his edu- 
cation in the early-day schools. He became a very successful business man 
and well known and respected by all. He married Lavina B. Watt, daughter 
of James Watt, who was a native of Scotland. David Horlacher owned two 
or three valuable farms, aggregating four hundred and ten acres, on which 
he carried on general farming and stock raising on an extensive scale. His 
death occurred on July 27, 1909, at the age of seventy-one years. He was a 
man of fine Christian character. His wife, who was born in 1840, died at 
the age of fifty-four years, leaving five children, name!}': James L., of this 
sketch; David Bruce, Alba C, Mary L., who married a Mr. Dorner; and 
Sylvia L. 

James L. Horlacher was reared on the home farm and received his 
education in the public schools. When twenty-four years of age he married 
Nettie Whetstone, a school teacher, daughter of R. C. Whetstone, of Center- 
ville. Mississippi. Her mother was Evaline Netterville. To these parents 
ten children were horn, an equal number of sons and daughters, all still living. 
Mr. Whetstone was a cotton planter of the old south hut has lately retired 
and moved to town. 

Our subject spent five years in western Kansas, in the great wheat dis- 
trict of Thomas county. He finally returned to Clinton county and has 
since been successfully engaged in general farming here, owning a well im- 



7^4 CLINTON COUNTY, INDIANA. 

proved and well cultivated place of one hundred and sixty acres, his place 
being known as "Clear Water Valley Farm," named for Airs. Horlacher's old 
plantation home in the southland. He has a good home and such outbuild- 
ings a