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Full text of "The history of the collections contained in the Natural history departments of the British museum"

®t|p ®. H. Bill Ctbrarg 




Nnrtb (Earolttia &latP (EoIUq? 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



S025 14740 N 



This book must not be 
taken from the Library 
building. 






25M JUNE 58 FORM 2 



THE HISTOPtY 



OF THE 



COLLECTIONS 



CONTAINED IN THE 



NATURAL HISTORY DEPARTMF.NTS 



OF THE 



BRITISH MUSEUM 



VOL. I. 

LIBRARIES. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 
THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 
THE DEPARTMENT OF MINERALS. 



LONDON : 

PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM 

SOLD BY 

Longmans & Co., 39 Paternoster Row, E.G. ; B. Quaritch, 15 Piccadilly, W. ; 

DuLAU & Co., 37 Soho Square, W. ; Kegan Paul, Trench, 

Trubner & Co., Dryden House, 43 Gerrard Street, Soho, W. ; 

AND AT THE 

British Museum (Natural History), Cromwell Road, S.W. 

1004. 

{AIL rights reserved.) 



LONDON : 
PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, LIMITED, 
DURE STREET, STAMFORD STREET, S.E., AND GREAT WINDMILL STREET. 



PREFACE. 



The present history of the collections preserved in the four 
Natural History Departments of the British Museum h.is been 
produced at my suggestion, by the officers in charge of the 
collections. Mr. B. B. Woodward has written the history of 
the libraries ; Mr. George Murray, assisted by Mr. Britten, that 
of the Department of Botany ; Dr. Arthur Smith Woodward 
with valuable help from the late keeper, Dr. Henry Woodward, 
and from Dr. Bather, assistant keeper, that of the Department 
of Geology; and Mr. Fletcher that of the Department of Minerals. 
A second volume will contain the history of the collections in 
the Department of Zoology to which Mr. Edgar Smith, Dr. 
Bowdler Sharpe, Mr. C. O. Waterhouse, Mr. Boulenger, Mr. 
Oldfield Thomas, Mr. Jeffrey Bell, Mr. Pocock, Mr. Kirkpatrick, 
Sir George Hampson, and Mr. Lydekker, have each contributed 
a special section. 

The possibility of producing such a history as the present is 
a remarkable evidence of the care and efficiency with which the 
records of the Museum have been kept during the past century. 
The value of the book to workers in the various l)ranches of 
Natural History will be very great. It not only furnishes an 
interesting record of the names of hundreds who liave con- 
tributed to build up our science during the nineteenth century, 
but it will prove to be of assistance to investigators who are 
anxious to discover the present depository of .specimens or 
collections referred to in old publications and to compai-e then 



iv Preface. 

with later samples. It will also furnish to a very large number 
of persons, who at present are not informed on the subject, 
a correct idea of the variety, extent, and importance of the 
immense series of collected specimens which are here, carefully 
guarded and kept in orderly arrangement, " not only " (according 
to the terms of Sir Hans Sloane's will) " for the inspection and 
entertainment of the learned and curious, but for the general 
use and benefit of the public to all posterity." 

It* furnishes documentary proof of the steady yet rapid 
progress of the scientific value of the Natural History Depart- 
ments and of the care and accuracy with w^hich the responsi- 
bilities undertaken by the Trustees have been discharged by 
their ofiicers. 

E. Ray Lankester. 

March, 1904. 



CONTENTS 



THE LIBRARIES. 

PAGE 

Introduction vii-xvii 

1, — General Sketch op the Several Libraries in the British 
Museum (Natural History), with some Account of their 
Formation and Progress, from 1753 to the end of 1900. 1 

2.— Chronological Account of the Principal Accessions to the 

end of 1900 .5 

3. — List of Important Books, Manuscripts, and Drawings 
arranged under the Names of Authors and previous 
Owners .......••• 23 

4.— List op Current Serial Publications presented to the 

British Museum (Natural History) ..... 53 

A. — British Islands ^3 

B.— British Empire over the Seas 60 

C— Non-British 64 



THE DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 



1. — General Sketch 



79 



2.— Chronological Account op the Principal Accessions to the 

Botanical Collections to the end op 1902 ... 85 

3. Alphabetical List of the more important contributors to 

the Collection of Plants in the Department of Botany 129 



THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 



197 



1. — General Sketch 

2.— A Chronological Account of the Principal Accessions to 
THE Collections of Fossils in the Department of Geology 
to the end of 1900 ....-.•• 

3.— Alphabetical List of the more important Contributors to 

THE Collection op Fossils in the Department of Geology 2G0 



200 



VI 



Contents. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MINERALS. 

PAGE 

1.— General Sketch 343 

2. — Cheonological Account of the Principal Accessions to the 

Department op Minerals (1753-1903) . . . .353 

Series A. — Minerals 353 

Chronological List (1753--1903) referring to Series A. . 355 

Series B. — Eocks 388 

Chronological List (1753 1903) referring to Series B . . 388 

Series C. — Meteorites 405 

Chronological List (1753-1903) referring to Series C. . 406 

3. — Alphabetical List of the more important Contributors to 
the Collection of Minerals, Eocks and Meteorites in 

the Department of Minerals 412 



INTRODUCTION, 



The British Museum dates its actual foundation from the year 
1753, when an Act of Parliament was passed "for the purchase 
of the Museum or Collection of Sir Hans Sloane, and of the 
Harleian Collection of Manuscripts, and for providing One 
General Repository for the better Reception and more convenient 
Use of the said Collections and of the Cottonian Library and of 
the Additions thereto." 

Sir Hans Sloane, an eminent physician in London, was for 
sixteen years President of the Royal College of Physicians 
and in 1727 succeeded Sir Isaac Newton in the Presidential 
Chair of the Royal Society. He was throughout his long 
life a diligent and miscellaneous collector, having, as stated in 
the Preamble of the Act of Incorporation of the Museum, 
" through the course of many years, with gi'eat labour and 
expense, gathered together whatever could be procured, either 
in our own or foreign countries, that was rare and curious." 
His collection, which at the time of his death in 1753 was 
contained in his residence, the Manor House, Chelsea, consisted 
of " books, drawings, manuscripts, prints, medals, and coins, 
ancient and modern antiquities, seals, cameos and intaglios, 
precious stones, agates, jaspers, vessels of agate and jasp»'r, 
crystals, mathematical instruments, pictures, and other things,' 
which latter included numerous zoological and geological speci- 
mens, and an extensive herbarium of dried plants proser^ od in 
310 large folio volumes. 

According to the terms of Sir Hans Sloane's will, this colhx*- 
tion was purchased for the sum of £20,000— far Vx'low its 
intrinsic value — in order "that it might be preserved and 



viii Introduction. 

maintained, not only for the inspection and entertainment of 
the learned and the curious, but for the general use and benefit 
of the public to all posterity." 

The valuable collection of manuscripts formed by Sir Robert 
Cotton at the end of the sixteenth and beginning of the seven- 
teenth centuries was already the property of the nation, having 
been presented by his grandson. Sir John Cotton, in the year 
1700. The Harleian Collection was obtained by purchase at 
the same time as the Sloanian, and the three were brought 
together under the designation of " the British Museum," placed 
under the care of a body of trustees,* and lodged in Montagu 
House, Bloomsbury, purchased for their reception in 1754. The 
Museum was opened to the public on the 15th of January, 1759. 
Admission to the galleries of antiquities and natural history was at 
lirst by ticket only, issued on application in writing, and limited to 
ten persons, for each of three hours in the day. Visitors were not 
allowed to inspect the cases at their leisure, but were conducted 
through the galleries by officers of the house. The hours of 
admission were subsequently extended : but it was not until the 
year 1810 that the Museum was freely accessible to the general 
public for three days in the week, from ten to four o'clock. 
The present daily opening, with longer hours in summer, dates 
only from 1879. 

At the time of the foundation of the Museum, the site allotted 
seemed amply sufficient for its purposes ; but gradually, as the 
collections of all kinds increased, they outgrew the limits, not 
only of the origmal Montagu House, but even of its successor, 
the present classical building, completed in 1845 from the 
designs of Sir Robert Smirke. The erection of the magnificent 
reading-room in 1857 disposed for a time of the difficulty of 

* The Trustees under the Act of Incorporation were the Archbishop of 
Canterbury, the Lord Chancellor, the Speaker of the House of Commons, 
the Bishop of London, and the principal Officers of State for the time 
being ; six representatives of Founders' families ; the Presidents of the 
Koyal Society and College of Physicians; and fifteen other Trustees to 
be elected by them. Subsequently, the Presidents of the Society of 
Antiquaries and of the Royal Academy of Arts, a Trustee by special 
nomination of the Sovereign, and three more family Trustees were added 
to the Board. 



Introduction. ix 

finding accommodation for the ever-growing library ; but tlie 
keepers of other department's continued urgent in their demands 
for more space, and after much discussion of rival plans for 
keeping the collections together and obtaining the needful exten- 
sion of room by acquiring the property immediately around the 
old Museum, or for severing the collections and removing a 
portion to another building, the latter course was finally decided 
upon. At a special general meeting of the Trustees, held (jn 
the 21st of January, 1860, attended hy many members of the 
Government in their ofiicial capacity, a resolution, moved by the 
First Lord of the Treasury, was carried : " That it is expedient 
that the Natural History Collection be removed from the British 
Museum, inasmuch as such an arrangement would be attended 
with considerably less expense than would be incurred by pro- 
Adding a sufficient additional space in immediate contiguity to the 
present building of the British Museum." 

The House of Commons, in the Session of 18G3, sanctioned 
the purchase of part of the site of the International Exhibition 
of 1862 at South Kensington, with a view to appropriating it to 
the purpose of a Museum of Natural History. 

In January, 1864, the Commissioners of Her Majesty's Works 
issued an advertisement for designs for a Natural History 
Museum and a Patent Museum, to be erected on part of the land 
thus acquired, a plan which had been prepared by Mr. Hunt in 
September, 1862, from Sir Richard Owen's suggestions, being 
proposed as a model in respect to dimensions and internal 
arrangement. 

The plans of the various competitors were submitted to Her 
Majesty's Commissioners of Works, who awarded prizes to three 
of the number, giving precedence to that of Captain Francis 
Fowke, R.E., and then referred the three premiated plans to the 
Trustees of the British Museum. As the internal arrangements 
in Captain Fowke's plan did not meet with the approval of the 
Museum officers, he was desired to modify them in conformity 
with the requirements of the Trustees. He was engaged in this 
labour when his death occurred, in SepteiuV)er, 1865. 

Early in the year 1866, Mr. Alfred Waterhouse was invited by 



X Introduction. 

the Chief Commissioner of Works to take up the unfinished work 
of Captain Fowke ; but he found himself unable to complete the 
plan to his own satisfaction, and in February, 1868, he was 
commissioned to form a fresh design, embodying the require- 
ments of the officers of the Natural History Departments of the 
Museum. 

Mr. Waterhouse was not long in submitting to the Trustees his 
plan and model of the building, with a disposition of galleries as 
required, and these were formally accepted by the Trustees in 
April, 1868. It was nob, however, until February, 1871, that 
the working plans had been thoroughly considered, and received 
the final approval of the Trustees. 

The actual work of erection was commenced in the year 1873, 
and the building was handed over to the Trustees of the British 
Museum by Her Majesty's Commissioner of Works in the month 
of June, 1880. Immediately that the exhibition cases were 
completed, and the galleries were sufficiently dry to receive the 
collections, the great labour of removing the Natural History 
Collection from Bloomsbury was commenced. The departments 
of Geology, Mineralogy, and Botany were arranged in their 
respective sections of the Museum in the course of the year 1880, 
and the portion of the Museum which contained these departments 
was first opened to the public on April 18th, 1881. It was not 
until the following year that the cases destined to receive the 
larger collections of the Zoological Department were sufficiently 
near completion to allow of these collections following, and three 
more years were required before all the rooms could be brought 
into a state fitted for public inspection. 

The original collections of the Natural History Departments 
of the British Museum are, as stated above, those of Sir Hans 
Sloane. The addition to these of the collections of Sir Joseph 
Banks (1827), and the long continuous accession of new collec- 
tions during 150 years, some purchased and many presented by 
naturalists whose names are historical as authorities and bene- 
factors of science — has rendered the Museum at the present day 
the richest and most important in the world. The gradual 
development of the separate departments of Botany, Geology, 



Introduction. xi 

Mineralogy, and Zoology is narrated in the work now produced 
by the combined authorship of the various responsible officers of 
the Museum. The history given is not merely a general one hut 
forms an important record of the smaller as well as the larger 
collections which have been absorbed into the gi'eat series. Each 
section of the work devoted to one of the four Departments ;is 
at present constituted, viz. : Botany, Geology, Mineralogy, and 
Zoology, commences with a general sketch of the history of the 
Department. This is followed by a chronological account of the 
yearly additions to its collections up to (and in some instances 
beyond) the year 1900, and further by an alphabetical list of 
donors or of previous owners of collections now embodied in those 
of the Department which have importance either because they 
contain type-specimens or because of the scientific or historical 
associations of the name cited. In treating of the Department 
of Zoology it has been found convenient on account of the great 
size and variety of the collections to break up the account into a 
number of separate sections, each describing, according to the 
plan above explained, the collections representing a separate class 
or section of the Animal Kingdom. 

The genesis of these several existing Departments and the 
succession of their administrators are briefly as follows : — 

The first appointments of Officers to the newly-constituted 
Museum were made in 1756, when Dr. Gowin Knight was chosen 
as Principal Librarian, with three Keepers under him, viz : Dr. 
M. Maty for the Printed Books, Dr. C. Morton for the Manu- 
scripts, and Mr. James Empson for the remaining collections, 
entitled " Natural History Department." This Department, 
however, included all the Antiquities, Coins, and Medals. 
Empson had as his successive Assistant Keepers : H. Rimius 
(died 1757), W. Hudson (retired 1758), and the Rev. A. J. 
Planta (transferred to Printed Books, 1765). On Enipson's 
death in 1765, Maty was transferred from the Keepership of the 
Department of Books to that of the Department of Natural 
History, his Assistant Keeper being the celebrated Dr. Solaiuler, 
who had already been employed in the work of cataloguing from 
1763. Solander in 1768 obtained permission, on finding a sub- 



xii Introduction. 

stitute, to accompany Banks on the now famous voyage with 
Captain Cook. He returned in 1771, and, Maty becoming 
Principal Librarian in 1772, Solander was made Keeper of the 
Natural History Department in 1773. At the same time, J. O, 
Justamond was appointed Assistant Keeper, and was joined 
in that office in 1776 by the Rev. P. H. Maty; E. W. Gray 
succeeded Justamond in 1778. E. W. Gray was uncle of Samuel 
Frederick Gray, the Chemist, whose son John Edward Gray 
joined the Museum staff in 1824 and became one of the most 
prominent systematists of his time. 

On Solander's death in 1782, P. H. Maty succeeded to the 
Keepership, and the Rev. C. G. Woide to the vacant Assistant 
Keepership. When P. H. Maty died in 1787, E. W. Gray 
was appointed to the Keepership, and in 1791 the well-known 
naturalist, G. Shaw, became Assistant Keeper. 

In 1803 Taylor Combe was made an Assistant Keeper, with 
charge of the Antiquities and Coins. 

E. W. Gray died in 1806, and the following year the first 
important change was made, the old department being divided 
nto the " Department of Natural History and Modern Curiosi- 
ties," with G. Shaw for Keeper, and the " Department of 
Antiquities and Coins," of which T. Combe was made Keeper. 
Chas. Konig was added to the staff of the former as Assistant 
Keeper in the same year, and became Keeper in 1813 on Shaw's 
death. 

W. E, Leach was made Assistant Keeper in 1813, but retired 
in 1822, and was succeeded in 1823 by J. G. Children, transferred 
from the Department of Antiquities, which he had joined in 
1816. The department was further strengthened by the addition 
of J. E. Gray in 1824, G. R. Gray in 1831, and Adam White in 
1835. 

In 1827 the Banksian Herbarium was transferred to the 
custody of the Trustees, Robert Brown, its former custodian, 
being created " Keeper of Sir Joseph Banks' Botanical Collection." 
By the addition to this in 1835 of the Sloane Herbarium and 
other botanical collections in the charge of the Natural History 
Department, a " Botanical Branch '' was formed. 



Introduction, xiii 

A further and most important chani^'e in the constitution of 
the Department was introduced in 1H37 l)y tlie formation of two 
other Branches, the " Mineralogical and Geological Branch," 
under the Keepership of C. Konig, and the " Zocjlogical Branch,'* 
or which J, G. Children was promoted to be Keeper. 

Konig was succeeded in 1851 by G. K. Waterhouse, and 
Children in 1840 by J. E. Gray. 

The administration of the Department was greatly changed 
in 1856, by the appointment of Professor (afterwards Sir 
Richard) Owen as "Superintendent," and the conversion of the 
" Branches " into " Departments." The single " Natural Histoiy 
Department " thus became three distinct Departments, viz. : 
1, Botanical; 2, Zoological; ^, Mineralogical and Geological. 

In 1857 the "Mineralogical and Geological Department" 
was divided into the " Geological Department," under the former 
Keeper, G. R. Waterhouse, and the " Mineralogical Depart- 
ment," to which Prof. Story-Maskelyne was appointed as Keeper. 

Subsequent changes were mainly in the personnel of the 
staff, and were as follows : — 

On the retirement of Sir Richard Owen in 1884, he was 
succeeded by Prof, (afterwards Sir William) Flower, with the 
title of Director, and in 1898, on the retirement of the latter, ])y 
the present Director. 

The succeeding Keepers have been : — 

Botanical Department : J.J. Bennett (1859), W. Carruthers 
(1871), and G. R. M. Murray (1895). 

Geological Department: H. Woodward (1880), and A. S. 
Woodward (1901). 

Mineralogical Department: L. Fletcher (1880). 

Zoological Department : A. Giinther (1875). Since 1895, 
the Director for the time being has been the Acting- Keeper of 
Zoology. 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF OFFICERS, ASSISTANTS AND 
OTHERS CONNECTED WITH THE NATURAL HISTORY 
DEPARTMENTS. 



The initial prefixed to the name indicates in which division of the establishment 
the individual served — B, G-, M and Z standing for the several departments, 
O for the " Director's Office," and L for the " General Library." 

"ret " = retired. -^ -j- " jg prefixed to the date of death. 





ASSISTANTS. 


1 
Assistant Keepers. Keepers. 


Principal 
Librarian. 


1756 




Rimius, H. [tl757] ! Empson, J. [tl765] 


Knight, G. 

[11772] 


1757 




Hudson, W. [ret. 1758] i 




1758 




Planta, Rev. A. J. 
[transf. to Printed ! 
Books, 1765] 




1763 


Solander, D. 








1765 




Solander, D. 


Maty, Matt, 
[transf. from 








'Printed Books] 




1772 




1 


Maty,M.[tl776] 


1773 




Justamond-, J. 0. [dis- , Solander, D. 
missed, 1778] [tl782] 




1776 




Maty, Rev. P. H. 


Morton, C. 
[tl799] 


1778 




Gray, E. W. 




1782 




Woide, Rev. C. G. ■ ^latv. Rev. P. H. 
[transf. to Printed " [tl787] 
Books] 




1787 




Gray,E.W.[tl806] 




1791 




Shaw, G. 




1799 






Planta, J. 


1803 




Combe, T. [Keeper of i 
Antiq. in 1807] ' 


[tl827] 




1807. Antiquities ar 


id Coins were formed into a separate Departr 


Qent. 


1807 




Konig, C. 


Shaw, G. [tl813] 




1813 




Leach,W.E. [ret. 1822] 


Konig, C. [tl851] 




1821 


Samouelle, G. [? ret. 
c. 1841] 








1823 




Children, J. G. [transf. 
1 from Antiq. Dept., 








1816-22] 






1824 


Gray, J. E. 








1827 


(B) Bennett, J. J. 




(B) Brown, Robt. 
[tl858] 


Ellis, H. 
[ret. 1856] 


1831 


(Z) Gray, G. R. 








1835 


(Z) White, A. [ret. 1863] 









1835. The " Botanical Branch " was formed by the transfer of the custody of the 
Sloane Herbarium and other botanical collections to the custody of the " Keeper of 
Sir Joseph Banks' Botanical Collections." 

1837. The rest of the Department was sub-divided into the " Mineralogical and 
Geological Branch " and the " Zoological Branch." 



Chronological List of Officers, etc. 



XV 



Assistant Keepers. 



;l I'KKINTl 
DKNT. 



1M;I.N'IPA1, 

I.IBRAKIAN. 



837 

838 

839 

840 

841 
842 

843 

848 

850 
851 

856 



85"; 



858 
859 



(G) Richardson, G. F. 

:tl848] 
(Z) Cooper, D. [super- 

jiuni. ret. 1840-1] 

(Z) Baird, W. [tl872] 
(Z) Doubleday, E. 

11849] 
(G) Waterhouse, G. B. 
(G) Woodward, S. P. 

rtl865] 
(Z) Smith, F. 



(G) Sharman, R. [super- 
mini., ret. 1857] 



(Z) Children, 
J. G. [ret. 1840] 



(Z) Gray, J. E. 

[ret. 1874] 



(G) Waterhouse, 
G. R. [ret. 1880] 



Owen, R. 

[ret. 1884] 



Pauizzi, A. 
[ret. 1866] 



Coincident with the appointment of the Superintendent the several " Branches" 
were turned into "Departments." In 1857 the " Mineralogical and Geological 
Department " was sub-divided into the " Geological" and "Mineralogical" Depart- 
ments. 

(M) iMaskelyne, | 

M. H. N. Story- | 

[ret. 1880] I 



863 



866 
867 



(G) Woodward, H. 
(B) Carruthers, W. 

(Z) Giinther, A. C. L. G. 

(M) Lang, V. von [ret. 
1864] 

(M) Davies, T. [first 
joined establishment 
1858. tl892] 

(Z) Butler, A. G. 

O'Shaughnessy, A. W. E. 
[first joined establish- 
ment in 1861 (Printed 
Books), was attached 
to the Z. D. in 1863, 
to G. D. in 1864, and 
to the Superintendent 
from 1865. 11881] 

(Z) Waterhouse, C. 0. 



(Z) Smith, E. A. 
(G) Bennett, L. D. 

1869] 
(M) Flight, W. 

1885] 
(B) Trimen, H. 

1879] 



[ret. 
[ret. 
[ret. 



(B) Bennet, J. J. 

[ret. 1871] 



Jones, J. W. 

[ret. 1878] 



XVI 



Chronological List of Officers, etc. 



1869 



1871 
1872 



1875 



1876 

1878 



1879 



1880 



Assistants. 




1881 



1882 



(G) Kent, W. Saville 
[ret. 1873] 



(B) Britten, J. 

(G) Gordon, G. D. H. 

[ret. 1875] 
(Z) Miers, E. J. [ret. 

1885] 
(Z) Sharpe, E. B. 

(M) Lewis, W. J. [ret. 
1877] 

(G) Davies, W. [first 
joined establishment 
1843, ret. 1887] 

(B) Murray, G. K. M. 

(Z) Thomas, M. li. O. 
[in office 1876-78] 

(M) Fletcher, L. 

(Z) Ridley, S. 0. [ret. 

1887] 
(Z) Bell, F. J. 
(G) Etheridge, R. J. 

[ret. 1887]. 
(Z) Kirby, W. F. 

(B) Ridley, H. N. [ret. 
1888] 



(G) Newton, R. B. 

(B) Fawcett, W. [ret. 

1886] 
(M) Platnauer, H. M. 

[ret. 1883] 
(O) Fagan, C. E. [Office, 

B. M. 1873-81] 
(O) Isaac, J. F. [Clerk] 
(L) Woodward, B. B. 

[Printed Books 1876- 

81] 



(Z) Quelch, J. J. [ret. 

1886] 
(Z) Grant, W. R. Ogilvie 
(Z) Boulenger, G. A. 
(G) Woodward, A. S. 
(M) Miers, H. A. [ret. 

1895] 



(Z) Gray, G. R. 

[tl872] 



(Z) Giinther, 

A. C. L. G. 

(Z) Smith, F. 

[tl879] 



Keepers. 



(Z) Butler, A. G. 

[ret. 1901] 
(O) Taylor, J. T. 
(Assist. -Secretary, 
transferred from 
Office, B. M., to 
which he returned 
in 1884.) 



(B) Carruthers, 
W. [ret. 1895] 



(Z) Giinther, 
A. C. L. G. 

[ret. 1895] 



Pkincipal 
Librarian. 



Bond, E. A. 

[ret. 1888] 



(G) Woodward, 
H. [ret. 1901] 
(M) Fletcher, L. 



(G) Etheridge, R. 

[ret. 1891] 



Chronological List of Officers^ etc. 



X \ I I 





Assistants. 


Assistant Kkkpkks. i 


KKKI'KKS. DlKKrroK. 


I'UINf'M'AI. 
LIBRA 1! I AN. 


1884 




(O) Nichols, T.N. 


■Flower.W.H. 








(Assistant - Secre- 1 




[ret. 1898] 








tary) [ret. 1889] 








1885 


(Z) Pocock, R. I. [ret. 
1904] 


. 




1 




— 


(O) Holl, W. H. R. 
[Clerk] 






i 




1886 


(B) Gepp, A. 













(G) Crick, G. C. 













(Z) Gahan, C. J. 










— 


(Z) Kirkpatrick, R. 










1887 


(M) Prior, G.T. 













(Z) Dendy,A.[ret.l887] 













(B) Baker, E. G. 













(G) Bather, F. A. 










— 


(G) Gregory, J. W. [ret. 










1888 


1900] 
(B) Rendle, A. B. 








Thompson. 
E. M. 


1889 


(Z) Heron, F. A. 


(O) Fagan, C. E. 
(Assistant - Secre- 
tary) 











(Z) Austen, E. E. 










181)2 


(G) Andrews, C. W. 


(G) Woodward, 

A. S. 








— 


(O) Anderson, W. J. 

[Clerk] 










1894 


(M) Spencer, L. J. 










1895 




(Z) Smith, E. A. 


(B) Murray, 
G. R. M. 






— 


(Z) H amp son, G. 


(Z) Sharpe, R. B. 


(Z) Flower, Sir 
W. H. (Acting 
Keeper) [ret. 
1898] 






189G 


(B) Blackman, V. H. 










— 


(Z) Arrow, G. J. 










1897 


(M) Smith, G. F. H. 










1898 




(Z) Lankester, 


Lankester, 










E. R. (Acting 


E. R. 










Keeper) 






1901 


(Z) Regan, C. T. 




(G) Woodward, 
A. S. 






1902 


(G) Lang, W. D. 


(G) Bather, F. A. 









VOL. I. 



THE LIBRARIES. 



VOL. I. 



THE LIBEARIES. 



1. General Sketch of the Several Libraries in the British 
Museum (Natural History), with some Account of 
THEIR Formation and Progress, from 1753 to tjii: end 
OF 1900. 

The various Books, MSS., Drawings, and Maps in the Natural 
History Section of the British Museum are distributed as 
follows : — 

1. General Library (L.)*: — Comprising works treating of 
subjects common to two or more of the Departments, and hence 
mainly consisting of the publications of Scientific Societies, 
Academies, and such like Corporate Bodies, of Scientific Maga- 
zines, and of Works of Travel. 

Topographical Maps of all countries, the Admiralty Charts 
and the sheets of the Ordnance Survey [Scale 1 in. = 1 m.] are 
also kept there. 

Attached to the General Library are the Owen Collection 
of Drawings of zoological and paUTeontological specimens, and 
some MSS., including a collection, in course of formation, of 
the autographs of Naturalists, formed for the purpose of the 
identification of handwriting on labels, etc.,t and a collection 
of Photographs of Natural History objects and Museums. These 
drawings and photographs have not yet been arrangeil or 
catalogued. 

2. Botanical Department Library (B.)*: — Comprising such 
serial publications and separate works as deal with Botany (pure 



* In the following pages, to avoid constant repetition, the letters L, B, G, 
M, Z, already in use in the Library, are used for the purpose of distinguishing 
the several libraries. 

t A representative selection of the large and valuable collection of 
auto«;raplis of Naturalists formed by Mr. ('. Davies .SlK-rlxirn has ])een 
generously made available by him for purposes of consultation by the ofliccrs 
and students in the Museum, and has constantly proved most useful. 



4 Libraries. 

and applied), and a few on Pabeobotanj, besides a large number 
of valuable MSS., mostly from the Banksian Library. 

An extensive general collection of original drawings and of 
engravings of specimens of Plants arranged in separate series, 
supplementing the Herbarium; while there are besides many 
distinct collections of valuable drawings. 

A good collection of autographs of Naturalists, principally 
Botanists, has also been brought together for the purpose of 
identifying handwritings. 

3. Geological Department Library (G.)":— Embracing 
those serial publications and separate works that have to do with 
Geology and Palaeontology. 

There is a small collection of MSS. and of prints and drawings 
of specimens of Fossils, the latter not yet catalogued. 

An extensive series of the geological maps and sections of all 
countries is also included in this library. 

4. MiNERALOGiCAL DEPARTMENT LIBRARY (M.)* : — In addi- 
tion to serial publications and separate works more immediately 
connected with Mineralogy, Crystallography, and Petrology, 
there is a small collection of mineralogical (with a few geological) 
maps. 

5. Zoological Department Library (Z.)* :— Comprising 
serial publications and separate works on Zoology, with a few on 
Paltvozoology. 

Some of these are kept in the rooms of the various 
Assistants. 

Attached to this library is the Tweeddale Library of Ornitho- 
logical works, which is located in the Bird Room, and there 
is also a collection of works on Economic Zoology. 

There are some valuable MSS. and a large series of drawings 
of zoological specimens, but there is no systematic collection of 
them as in the Botanical Department. A collection of photo- 
graphs of specimens of animals is, however, in course of 
formation. 

This distribution has not in all cases been strictly adhered to, 
and some works of a general character are to be found in each of 

♦ For explanation of these letters, see p. 1, ante. 



Libraries. 5 

the departmental libraries. There is also a certain amount of 
duplication due for the most part to the need for working copies 
of some books. 

The several departmental librai-ies are under the char','e of 
the respective Keepers of the Departments, who usually relegate 
the task of immediate superintendence to one or other of their 
Assistants, an Attendant being told off in each case to pei-form 
the routine work. 

The General Library when first forined in 1S81 was governed 
by a Committee of the four Keepers of Departments, the 
Assistant in charge, Mr. B. B. Woodward, who was appointed in 
October of that year, reporting in the first instance (October, 
1881 to June, 1883) to the Keeper of Botany, subsequently 
(July, 1883 to April, 1884) to the Keeper of Zoology, and since 
May, 1884, to the Director, who from that time took over the 
control of this library. 

In February, 1888, it was resolved that a general alphabetical 
Authors' Catalogue of the whole library of the Museum, exclusive 
of minor separata, should be printed. With the aid of temporary 
assistance the cataloguing on a uniform system of all the 
libraries was thereupon begun, and, by 1897, so far completed 
that a grant for printing was obtained. The first sheet of this 
Catalogue was passed for press in January, 1898, and, by the 
end of 1900, sixty-six sheets (A-Endea.) had been printed off.* 



2. Chronological Account op the Principal Accessions 
to the end of 1900. 

1753. 

When Sir Hans Sloane's Collections became the property of 
the nation in 1753 his manuscript catalogues of them, the copy 
of his "Voyage to the Islands jMadera, Barbados . . . and 
Jamaica," etc., annotated in his own handwriting, with tlie 
original drawings of the specimens of Plants from which tlie 
plates were drawn, and a copy of Kay's " Historia Plantarum," 
which he had used in connection with his Herbarium, were kept 
with his collections instead of being incorporated with the 



* 'J lie first volume, A-D, was issued in August, UKKJ. 



6 Libraries. 

Library, and so may be held in some sense to have constituted 
the nucleus of the present collection of works on Natural History. 
Some volumes formerly in Sloane's library were transferred at 
later dates ; as were also some from Baron von Moll's library, 
which was acquired in 1815. 

1818. 

Z.* J. Abbot's original water-colour drawings of the Insects 
and Plants of Georgia, with manuscript descriptions, comprised 
in 17 volumes, formerly in the possession of J. Francillon, was 
purchased. 

1827. 

B. The first approximation towards the formation of a depart- 
mental library was in 1827, when the collections and library of 
Sir Joseph Banks were transferred to the Trustees, it being 
agreed that the Keeper of the Banksian Botanical Collections 
should also have exclusive care and management of the manu- 
scripts, with the drawings and copper-plates engraved. 

Under this agreement 149 volumes, chiefly systematic works 
used in the herbarium, that were either duplicates, or had 
manuscript notes in them, remained in what is now the Depart- 
ment of Botany with the Banksian collections of MSS. and 
Drawings. I Some other duplicate volumes from this Library, 
which forms an item of the Printed Books Department, were 
transferred at later dates to other of the Natural History 
departments. 

1835. 

Z. The collection of drawings formed Ijy Major-General T. 
Hardwicke were bequeathed with his collections in 1835, but 
remained in charge of the MSS. Department till the removal of 
the Zoological Collections to South Kensington, when they were 
transferred to the Zoological Department.; 

B. His botanical MSS. and drawings, however, were placed 
at once with the Banksian Botanical Collection. 

1841. 

B. An important collection of water-colour drawings of 
Plants, by Franz A. Bauer, " being that part of Mr. Bauer's 

* For explanation of these initials, see p. 1, ante. 
f For an enumeration of these, see pp. 2o-2G. 



Libra 



riefi. 



drawings made at the expense of the late Sir .)(».s«'ph Banks, 
baronet, which did not accompany his Library and Botanical 
Collections when transferred to the Museum, but was bequeathed 
by Sir Joseph to his late Majesty King Cieorge the Fourth," was 
presented by her late Majesty Queen Victoria. 

Z. A copy of Cramer's " Papillons exotiques," whicli belonged 
to Henry Seymer, of Handford, Dorsetshire, who had added the 
Linnean names and re-touched several of the coloured plates, w.-is 
presented by A. B. Lambert. 

1842. 

In this year the first systematic purchases of works for the 
departmental libraries appear to have been made. 

B. The autograph journal of H. Ruiz Lopez, kept during 
the botanical exploration of Peru and Chili made by him in 
company with J. Pa von (1777-83), his important manuscripts 
•' Sobre Quina " with other autographs, and their joint original 
descriptions of the Plants met with, were purchased at the sale of 
A. B. Lambert's libraiy. 

Z. The first book recorded as purchased by the Zoological 
Department was H. Milne Edwards' " Histoire naturelle des 
Crustaces." 

1843. 

B. and Z. The original water-colour drawings made by 
Ferdinand L. Bauer, the artist who accompanied Flinders on his 
" Voyage to Terra Australis " in 1801-3, comprising 202 drawings 
of Plants and 49 of Animals," were presented. 

1845. 

In the estimates for 1845 there appears for the first time a 
sum of money definitely allotted for the purchase of books for a 
departmental library, that of Mineralogy, which then included 
the present Departments of Geology and of Mineralogy. The 
following year it is reported that " the books purchased . . . have 
all been catalogued and bound with a distinctive ornamental mark 
on each volume." This grant was annually renewed. 
Among other accessions for the year wevQ : — 
Z. G70 foil, of water-colour drawings by native artists of tha 



* Not transferred from B to Z till 1S87. 



8 Libraries. 

Vertebrata of ISTepaul, presented by their collector, B. H. Hodgson, 
who added a further large series in 1858. 

67 original water-colour drawings of Vertebrata from King 
George's Sound and its neighbourhood^ with MS. notes by the 
draughtsman and donor, J. Neill. 

1847. 

B. 248 original water-colour drawings of Plants of British 
Guiana, by Sir R. H. Schomburgk, were presented in part by the 
Secretary of State for the Colonies, and in part by Sir R. H. 
Schomburgk himself. 

Z. Received the first annual grant for the purchase of books. 

1848. 

B. Received its first annual grant for the purchase of books. 

A collection of 30 water-colour drawings by a native artist of 
Chinese Plants, Birds, and Pish was acquired. The 16 drawings 
of Plants were incorporated with a similar set in the Banksian 
Collection (MS. No. 12), and the 11 drawings of Birds and 3 of 
Fish transferred to the Zoological Department and incorporated 
in the Banksian MS., No. 11. 

1853. 

Z. Gronovius' MS., containing the descriptions and illustra- 
tions of his Collection of Fish, was purchased with his collection 
at an auction in London. It was printed and issued as a 
Museum publication in 1854. 

1858. 

The " Mineralogical Department " was divided into the 
" Geological " and " Mineralogical " departments, and the 
library shared between them. 

B. A number of drawings by Ferdinand L. Bauer were 
bequeathed by Robert Brown. 

Z. A further series of water-colour drawings by native 
artists of the Vertebrata of Nepaul was presented by the collector, 
B. H. Hodgson, making with those presented in 1845 a total 
of 1,319 drawings, which have been mounted and bound in 
8 volumes. 



Llln 



aries. 



1859. 

B. The collection of more than 2,500 original water-colour 
drawings by James Sowerby for the ilhistrations to his "English 
Botany " were purchased with his herbarium. These have be<'n 
mounted on sheets, beside copies of the finished plates from the 
first and third editions. 

1861. 

B. The unpublished autograph Journals kept by L. A. 
Deschamps during his voyage as naturalist on La Brcherchf, 
under Entrecasteaux, and during his subsequent travels in Java, 
with materials for a Flora Javanica, water-colour sketches, and 
other notes and memoranda, as well as 111 water-colour drawings 
of specimens of Java Plants, made by, or for Dr. F. Noronlia, 
were presented by J. R. Reeves. 

Z. Deschamps' original sketches and autograph descriptions 
of the Mammalia of Java, presented with the foregoing. 

89 volumes of zoological works and pamphlets, including 
manuscript notes by C. R. Darwin and T. Bell on the Reptiles 
and Amphibia collected during the voyage of the Beagle, were 
presented by Dr. J. E. Gray, at that time Keeper of the 
Department. 

1862. 

B. A set of original water-colour drawings by James De 
Carle Sowerby and J. W. Salter for the illustrations to vol. i.-iv. 
of the Supplement to James Sowerby's *' English Botany " were 
purchased, and incorporated with those for the main work that 
had been acquired in 1859. 

1863. 

Z. An autograph MS. of the Rev. W. Ivirby, the entomo 
logist, entitled, "Musjeum Entom.ologicum Barhamense. Pars 
prima," was presented by the Entomological Society. 

1865. 

B. The botanical drawings and MSS. of R. A. Salis])urv 
were presented by Dr. J. E. Gray. 

1866. 

B. 29 sheets of original drawings by James De Carle Sowcrl >y, 
from which the illustrations to Dawson Turner's " Muscologiaj 
Hibernicse Spicilegium" were engraved, were purchased. 



10 Libraries, 



1867-68. 



G. The collection of drawings formed by Hugh Falconer 
in connection with his " Fauna Antiqua Sivalensis," and other 
writings on Indian Palaeontology, was presented. It included 
sketches for 20 unpublished plates to the " Fauna," sketches for 
18 plates of Ruminant remains, with manuscript explanations, 
and more than 220 drawings in water-colour, pen-and-ink, and 
pencil, by various artists {e.g. Dinkel, Kaup, etc.), with photo- 
gi'aphs, illustrating vertebrate remains, chiefly Indian. The 
whole are mounted and bound in two volumes. 

1869. 

Z. The Rev. AV. Kirby's manuscript Catalogue of British 
Staphylinidse, in 3 vols., was presented by Dr. J. E. Gray. 

1874. 

B. The original drawings and manuscript notes, with corre- 
spondence accompanying the herbarium of William Wilson, of 
W^arrington, were purchased. 

262 original drawings of Irish Lichens were purchased with 
the herbarium of Isaac Carroll. 

1875. 

B. Considerable additions were made to the Botanical Depart- 
ment collections of drawings ; 1,300 original water-colour drawings 
of Fungi, by W. G. Smith, and coloured engravings of upwards 
of 4,000 species of Algte being purchased. 

Z. A large number of zoological works and drawings (includ- 
ing 109 original water-colour drawings and pen-and-ink sketches 
of Fish, with 106 of Insects, Crustacea, and Arachnida, made by 
Arthur Adams during his voyage as naturalist on the Samarang, 
also the 65 original water-colour drawings of Chelonia, by J. De 
Carle Sower by, used for the illustrations in T. Bell's " Monograph 
of the Testudinata," and Sowerby and Lear's " Tortoises "), which 
had belonged to Dr. J. E. Gray, were presented by his widow. 

1876. 

B. The transcripts, by two daughters of Mr. Dawson Turner, 
of Sir Joseph Banks' journal kept on his voyage with Capt. Cook 



Libraries, 1 1 

round the world in 1768-71, and <ȣ his corrospondoncc now- 
bound in 20 volumes, was transferred from the ISISS. Department. 
This journal was printed under the editorship of Sir J. ]). Hooker, 
;ind published in 1896. 

Robert Brown's Notes, :SISS. and Diary from 1800 to l.^U3, 
which had been bequeathed to J. J. Bennett (his successor in 
the Keepership) and which had been allowed to remain in the 
Department, were presented ])y Mrs. Bennett. 

James Sower by 's original water-colour drawings for the 
illustrations to his " English Fungi," with 347 other plates, were? 
presented by the Rev. M. J. Berkeley. 

730 original water-colour drawings of the higher Fungi, by 
Mrs. A. Russell, were bequeathed by her. 

These two last have been incorporated in the systematically 
arranged collection of drawings of specimens of Fungi. 

1877. 

B. The accessions included 7,287 published engravings ; a 
number of original drawings of Indian Plants by Dr. De Crespigny, 
which, with 180 drawings by G. D. Ehret, were purchased. 

654 water-colour drawings by native artists, made under the 
superintendence of John Reeves, were presented by Miss Reeves. 

Z. 482 folios of water-colour drawings, made by native 
artists for John Reeves, were presented by Miss Reeves. 

1878. 

B. The departmental collection of drawings was increased 
l)y the purchase of 8,025 engravings and 42 original drawings, 
including 12 by G. D. Ehret. 

The correspondence of the Rev. A. Bloxam, and some manu- 
script notes of his on the Cellular Cryptogams of Leicestershire, 
were presented by his son. 

1879. 

B. A further increase of the collection of drawings was ni.ule 
by the purchase of 8,772 drawings and engravings. 

A set of original drawings of South American Blants and ot 
dissections of Plants, by John Miers, with the Catalogue of Ids 
herbarium, were presented by J. W. Miers. 

M. Considerable accessions were made to the Mineralogical 
Department Library. 



12 Libraries. 

1880. 

In view of the approaching removal of the Natural History 
Collections to South Kensington, and the consequent necessity of 
founding a Library for the use of the officers and students, a 
special grant, payable in yearly instalments, was voted by Parlia- 
ment, the first instalment being gi^anted for the following financial 
year. 

It was decided that the several departments should continue 
to purchase and hold such works as related to their special 
subjects, while a fifth, the " General Library," under the charge 
of a special Assistant, should be constituted to contain those 
works containing matter common to two or more departments. 

L. 2,048 volumes were therefore purchased this year for the 
General Library. 

B. 68 works from the library of John Miers, annotated by 
him in relation to the Plants in his herbarium, were presented by 
J. W. Miers. 

The collection of drawings and engravings formed by W. 
Wilson Saunders, with 2,517 other drawings and engravings; 928 
original water-colour drawings, by John Miller (otherwise J. S. 
Miiller), of the ramifications of Plants ; and 25 original water- 
colour drawings of Fungi, by AY. G. Smith, were purchased. 

G. A fine copy of William Smith's geologically coloured map, 
" A delineation of the Strata of England and Wales, with part of 
Scotland," was presented by Mr. (afterwards Sir) A. W. Franks. 

The set of original pencil drawings by A. Watelet, for the 60 
plates of his " Description des Plantes fossiles du bassin de Paris," 
with those for 21 unpublished plates and their description in MS. 
were purchased. 

M. The accessions numbered 603 volumes. 

Z. The first catalogue of the departmental library, contain- 
ing 1,700 titles, was j^rinted, and issued in November. 

188L 

B. R. A. Salisbury's notes and drawings of Ericaceous Plants 
were transferred from the Royal Gardens, Kew. 

M. The accessions numbered 860 volumes. The first catalogue 
of this library, containing 1,297 entries, of which 39 refer to maps, 
was printed. 

Z. The total number of works in this library was estimated 
at about 1,500 ; the accessions for the year being 182 works in 
377 volumes. 



Libraries, 13 

1882. 

L. 921 volumes had been transferred to this lil)r:iry from 
the Departments, and the extent of the collection at the end of 
the year was 7,659 volumes. 

B. The original water-colour drawings for the illustrations 
t«) Maund's " Botanic Garden," representing 1,248 Plants, were 
presented by the Misses Maund, 

13 folio volumes, containing original drawings of Indian 
IMants, formerly the property of Dr. Fleming, were purchased 
and have since been incorporated in the systematically arranged 
collection of drawings of specimens of Phanerogams. 

M. The accessions numbered 103 works. 

Z. 1,383 works in 2,350 volumes were added. A second 
edition of the Catalogue was issued in ^May. 

1883. 

L. The accessions numbered 2,261 volumes, of which 28 were 
presented and 79 transferred from other departments. 

B. 219 original pencil drawings of Mosses, by P. Brucli, 
used in illustrating the " Bryologia Europiea " of Schimper, 
Brucli and Giimbel ; 52 original drawings of Madagascar Orchids, 
by the Rev. W. Deans Cowan; and 210 original drawings, 
formerly the property of Dr. J. J. Roemer, were purchased. 

A considerable addition to the collection of Autographs of 
Botanists was made, and the whole collection arranged and 
mounted. 

M. 199 works were added. 

Z. 1,777 works in 2,358 volumes were added. 

1884. 

L. 2,114 volumes were added, of which 98 were presented 
and 148 transferred from other departments. The total number 
of volumes being 12,034. 

A Catalogue of this collection was issued early in the year. 

B. 87 original water-colour drawings of Cape Plants, l)y 
F. Masson, the botanical collector, were presented by Mr. C. Lee. 
These were subsequently incorporated with a series by the same 
author from the Banksian Collection, and mounted and bound. 

46 original water-colour drawings of Fungi, by W. G. Smith, 
26 original drawings of Sumatran and Javan Plants, by H. O. 
Forbes, and 5,003 plates were purchased and incorporated with 



14 Libraries. 

the systematically arranged collection of drawings of specimens 
of Phanerogams. 

22 coloured drawings by W. Roxburgh of Indian Palms, 
used in his " Plants of the Coast of Coromandel," were also 
acquired. 

A series of pen-and-ink drawings, with autograph descriptions, 
by G. J. Camellus, entitled " Descriptiones Fruticum et Arborum 
Luzonis," formerly in Sir Hans Sloane's Library, was transferred 
from the MSS. Department. 

88 autograph letters of Ray and his contemporaries were pre- 
sented by J. D. Enys, and the original MS. of Derham's "Life of 
Ray " purchased. 

G. 629 volumes and 302 pamphlets were added. A copy of 
William Smith's " New Geological Map of England and Wales,"' 
1827, was presented by Mr. Carruthers. 

M. 159 works in 305 volumes, and 36 pamphlets were 
acquired. 

Z. 1,274 works in 2,450 volumes were added, making a total 
of 6,556 works in over 10,000 volumes in the whole library. 

The third and last edition of the library catalogue was 
published in March. 

1885. 

L. 1,954 volumes were added, of which 139 were presented 
and 171 transferred from other departments. 

The total number of volumes in the library was 13,988. 

54 valuable large scale maps were presented, chiefly by the 
Governments of Cape Colony, New South Wales, South Australia, 
New Zealand, and Tasmania, being those of their respective 
colonies. 

B. 183 original water-colour drawings of the Plants of the 
Straits Settlements, made by Christopher Smith, were purchased. 

70 original water-colour drawings of Flowers, by G. von 
Spaendonck, were purchased. 

281 plates of British Fungi, from works by Dr. M. C. Cooke, 
were presented by him. 

1,415 plates of Plants, and 32 original water-colour drawings 
of Fungi, by W. G. Smith, were purchased. 

The last three series have been incorporated in the respective 
collections of drawings of specimens of Plants. 

G. 260 volumes, 121 pamphlets, and 41 maps were acquired. 

Three transcripts by Mary Anning, the celebrated fossil- 



Libraries. 15 

collector at Lyme Regis, of papers in llie Transactions of llu' 
Geological Society, were presented by Lord Knniskillcn. 

M. 32 works in 44 volumes were added. 

Z. 877 works in 1,1 7G volumes were ac(iuii<'d, includin'.,' 
a very fine copy of Audubon's " Birds of Amei-ica." 

1886. 

The Royal Society presented 134 miscellaneous works, which 
were distributed among the several liljraries. 

L. 1,313 volumes and 3 maps were added, of which 3ol 
volumes and 3 maps were presented and 20 volumes transferred 
from other departments. These included : — 

A set of De Bry's collection of Voyages (with the collation), 
presented by Lord Crawford. 

153 original water-colour drawings and pencil sketches, by 
T. Baines, the African explorer, were purchased. 

B. 212 books and pamphlets, and the whole of his mycolo- 
gical correspondence was bequeathed by C. E. Broome. 

Proofs on India paper of the illustrations to Stevenson's 
" Hymenomycetes Britannici " were presented by Mr. W. G. 
Smith. 

1,922 original water-colour drawings of British Plants, by Miss 
H. Moseley, were purchased. 

A series of original water-colour and pen-and-ink drawings of 
Plants, by M. J. Schleiden, of Jena, with the manuscript descrip- 
tion of them, were purchased, and have since been bound in 
9 volumes. 

115 original sketches (some coloured) of Bornean Orchids, 
Pitcher-plants, Ac, by F. W. Burbidge, were purchased. 

493 original drawings of Indian Plants ; and 42 original 
drawings of Orchids, by Miss Cooke, were acquired and have 
since been incorporated in the systematically arranged collections 
of drawings of specimens of Plants. 

G. 256 volumes, 1,115 pamphlets, 26 cases of MSS., and 
53 maps were added in the year. 

Of these 897 books and pamphlets, with 26 cases of original 
drawings and MSS., all relating to Brachiopoda, and formerly 
part of the library of Dr. T. Davidson, were presented by 
Mr. W. Davidson. 

226 pamphlets were accjuired from the library of Prof. J. 
Morris. 

M. 286 volumes and 208 pamphlets were added. 



16 Lib 



aries. 



1887. 

L. The collection was increased by the addition of 2,320 
volumes and 1,949 maps. Of these 210 volumes were presented 
and 13 volumes transferred from other departments. 1,462 sheets 
of charts were received from the Admiralty, and 439 sheets of 
the Ordnance Survey on the scale of 1 in. = 1 m. Both these 
sets have been kept up. 

The first contribution towards the collection of photographs 
was received this year. 

B. The manuscript records of the distribution of British 
Plants, collected by H. C. Watson for his " Cybele Britannica," 
were received from the Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew. 

G. 736 books, 226 pamphlets, and 259 maps were received, 
including 6 geological views and sections across various parts of 
England and Wales, by William Smith, presented by AV. Topley. 

M. 823 volumes and 134 pamphlets were acquired. 

Z. The ordinary increase was 590 volumes ; but the magni- 
ficent ornithological library formed by the ninth Marquess of 
Tweeddale, which was presented by his nephew, Capt. B. G. 
Wardlaw Bamsay, contained 698 works, in 2,560 volumes, with 
about 200 pamphlets, and formed the most important addition 
as yet received at any one time. 

5 volumes of beautifully executed water-colour drawings, by 
Japanese artists, of different breeds of domestic Pigeons, pro- 
bably executed for the library of some Japanese nobleman, were 
purchased. 

1888. 

The special grant for the purchase of books was all expended 
by 31st March of this year. A small annual grant for up-keep 
has since been allowed. 

L. 1,325 volumes and 970 maps were added, of which 305 
volumes were presented and 449 transferred from other depart- 
ments. The maps included 740 sheets of charts from the Admiralty, 
and 210 sheets of the Indian Atlas. 

B. Two volumes of Robert Brown's manuscript descriptions of 
Plants, discovered on a book-stall, were presented by Mr. J. Britten. 

200 orif'inal drawings of Plants were added to the collection. 

G. 168 volumes, 47 pamphlets, and 33 maps were acquired. 

M. 284 volumes and 44 pamphlets were added. 

Z. 355 volumes were acquired, bringing the estimated total 
in the library up to 9,489 works in 15,243 volumes. 



Libraries, 17 

1889. 

About 1,716 duplicate volumes and parts were transferred 
from the Printed Books Department, Bloomsbury, and divided 
among the several libraries. 

L. 1,010 volumes and 45 maps were added : of these 293 
volumes were presented and 439 transferred from other depart- 
ments. The total number at the end of year being 19,933 
volumes and 3,541 maps. 

G. 57 volumes and 409 pamphlets, with 47 maps were 
acquired, including Pt. i-iii and vi of William Smith's " New 
Geological Atlas " (purchased), and three volumes of manuscript 
notes and drawings by Caleb Evans. 

M. 182 volumes and 80 pamphlets were added. 

Z. The accessions amounted to 197 volumes and 477 parts, 
bringing the total up to 9,666 works in 15,440 volumes. 

Sir J. D. Hooker presented his drawings of Antarctic Fish, 
made during the expedition of the Erehus and Terror in 1839-43. 

1890. 

L. 691 volumes and 28 maps were added, of which 316 
volumes were presented, and 23 volumes with 26 maps were 
transferred from other departments. 

Sir John Evans, K.C.B., presented sets of the publications of 
the Linnean Society of London from 1877, and of the Zoological 
Society of London from 1868 : he has subsequently presented the 
succeeding parts as issued. 

B. The scientific correspondence of the Rev. M.J. Berkeley 
was presented. This included letters of C. E. Broome, whose own 
correspondence had been bequeathed in 1886. The two series are 
of great importance in connection with the Broome Herbarium. 

A copy of the rare and valuable " Salictum Woburnense," by 
J. Forbes, privately printed in 1829 by the Duke of Bedford, was 
presented by Mr. F. Justen. 

Drawings of 74 species of Victorian Fungi were received 
from the Victorian Government, through the President of the 
Victorian Commission at the Paris Exhibition of 1889, Baron 
Sir F. von Mueller. 

G. 101 books and 75 parts, with 59 pamphlets and 32 maps 
were added. 

M. 126 volumes and 119 pamphlets were acquired. 

Z. 128 volumes and 468 parts were added. 
VOL. I. c 



18 Libraries. 



1891. 



L. The accessions comprised 612 volumes and 48 maps, of 
which 203 volumes and 17 maps were presented, and 6 volumes 
and 31 maps were transferred from other departments. 

The Royal Society presented, by request of H. B. Brady, their 
copy of Soldani's rare work, " Testaceographia? ac Zoophyto- 
graphife parva3 et microscopicre tomus primus ( — secundus),'' the 
Society receiving Brady's copy with his library. 

G. 120 books and 293 parts, with 377 pamphlets and 193 
maps were added, including 227 pamphlets presented by the 
Royal Society. 

M. 207 volumes, 141 parts, and 3 maps were acquired. 

Z. 38 volumes and 681 parts were added. 

1892. 

L. 819 volumes and 28 maps were added, of which 275 
volumes and 25 maps were presented and 164 volumes transferred 
from other departments. 

B. 25 original water-colour drawings of Fungi by J. Bolton, 
executed 1788-94, were purchased. 

11 illustrations of species of MasdevalUa, used by Miss 
Woolward in illustrating her book on the genus, were presented 
by her. 

1,036 original water-colour drawings of Fungi, by G. E. 
Massee, were purchased and incorporated in the collection of 
drawings of specimens of Fungi. 

G. 376 books and pamphlets, with 242 parts and 51 maps 
were added. 

129 original water-colour drawings by A. T. HoUick and 
C. Berjeau, with 116 photographs and prints, of specimens 
illustrating the structure of " Eozoon " made for Dr. W. B. 
Carpenter, were presented by his son, the Rev, J. Estlin 
Carpenter. 

A manuscript catalogue of the Fossil organic remains in the 
Cabinet of Mrs. M. H. Smith, of Tunbridge Wells, with water- 
colour drawings by S. P. Woodward, who compiled the catalogue, 
W. H. Bensted, and others, was presented. 

M. 310 works in 203 volumes, 28 parts, with 196 memoirs 
and 5 maps were added. 

Z. 138 volumes and 708 parts were acquired, making the 
total for the library of 9,850 works in 15,843 volumes. 



Ijibraries. 19 

213 origincal water-colour drawings of British Animals, viz.: 
13 mammals, 122 birds, and 78 fish, executed by W. MacGillivray, 
between 1831 and 1841, were presented by his son. 

1893. 

L. The number of accessions was 705 volumes and 30 maps, 
of which 301 volumes and 28 maps were presented and 76 trans- 
ferred from other departments. 

Sir R. Owen's executors presented an extensive series of his 
MSS., including original autograph notes and illustrations for 
the Memoir on the Pearly Nautilus, of notes and synopses of 
lectures from 1828 to 1864, notes and sketches of remains of 
fossil Reptilia in various Museums, and a very large collection 
of original drawings by G. Scharf, J. Dinkel, J. Wolf, and other 
artists, of zoological subjects ; many being the originals for 
illustrations to Sir R. Owen's papers and memoirs. 

G. 334 volumes, 326 parts, and 33 maps were added. 

M. 91 works in 100 volumes and 18 parts, with 24 memoirs 
and 2 maps were acquired. 

Z. 53 volumes and 815 parts were added : the total for the 
library being 9,903 works in 15,962 volumes. 

1894. 

L. The increase for the year amounted to 723 volumes and 
64 maps, of which 273 volumes and 31 maps were presented, and 
42 volumes and 32 maps were transferred from other departments. 

39 water-colour drawings, by native artists, of Chinese Plants, 
Birds, Reptiles, and Fishes were presented by F. A. Philbrick, K.C. 

B. 50 original water-colour drawings of Flowers made from 
Nature, by J. Bolton, between 1785 and 1787, with manuscript 
title and preface dated 1788, were purchased. 

G. 331 volumes, 429 parts, and 536 maps were added. 

M. 144 works in 134 volumes and 10 parts, with 44 
memoirs and 12 maps were acquired. 

Z. 64 volumes and 799 parts were added. 

1895. 

L. 1072 volumes and 39 maps were added, of which 382 
volumes and 39 maps were presented and 121 volumes were 
transferred from other departments. 

38 volumes were presented by the Society of Antiquaries. 

c 2 



20 Libraries, 

B. The manuscript copy, in tlie handwriting of Sarah Sophia 
Banks, of the journal of Sir Joseph Banks, kept during his voyage 
to Newfoundland and Labrador in 1766, was purchased. 

2,449 water-colour drawings of British Fungi, by E. Wheeler, 
made between 1880 and 1895, were presented. 

24 original drawings, by S. T. Edwards, for " The New Botanic 
Garden " were acquired. 

G. 331 books and pamphlets, 406 parts, and 125 maps were 
added. 

M. 231 works in 159 volumes, with 123 pamphlets and 19 
parts were acquired. 

Z. 69 works in 74 volumes, and 776 parts were added. 

189 original water-colour drawings of marine Animals and 
Plants, taken during voyages between England and India by 
Mrs. H. Toynbee, in 1856-58, with manuscript notes, were pre- 
sented by Capt. H. Toynbee. 

1896. 

A large and valuable set of 187 Dissertations on various 
subjects was presented by the Royal University of Upsala. 

33 miscellaneous works were presented by the Linnean Society 
of London. 

Both these donations were distributed among the several 
libraries. 

L. 894 volumes and 19 maps were added, of which 507 
volumes and 16 maps were presented, while 25 volumes were 
transferred from other departments. 

185 water-colour, pen-and-ink, and pencil sketches, by 
G. Shaw, the former Keeper of the Natural History Section, 
with a portrait in oils of Sydney Parkinson, were presented by 
Mr. G. S. Parkinson. 

B. A series of notes and descriptions, with a few pen-and-ink 
and pencil sketches of Peruvian Plants, by A. Mathews, in 3 vols., 
was presented by Mr. F. Justen. 

A number of drawings by G. D. Ehret, S. T. Edwards, and 
W. G. Smith were purchased for the collection. 

G. 243 new works, 558 parts, and 247 maps were added. 
M. 151 works in 171 volumes, with 85 pamphlets and 25 
parts were acquired. 

Z. 47 works and 794 parts were added. 



Libraries, 21 



1897. 



L. The increase for the year was 786 volumes and 84 maps, 
of which 428 volumes and 83 maps were presented, and 35 
volumes and 1 map were transferred from other departments. 

B. 74 water-colour drawings of Plants by J. Lindley, with 
drawings by W. G. Smith and others, were purchased. 

G. 317 new works and 367 parts, with 105 maps were 
added. 

M. 125 works in 199 volumes, 61 pamphlets, and 28 parts 
were acquired. 

Z. 57 works in 60 volumes, and 858 parts were added. 

Three life-sized photographs of Apteryx, and the first of 
several life-sized photographs of Testudo daudinii, were presented 
by the Hon. Walter Rothschild. 

1898. 

L. The accessions numbered 1,109 volumes and 167 maps, of 
which 489 volumes and 165 maps were presented, and 15 volumes 
and 1 map transferred from other departments. 

G. 299 new works, 340 parts, and 303 maps were added. 

42 water-colour sketches, by R. Inwards, of fossils collected 
by him and given to the Museum in 1880, were presented by the 
author. 

Autograph manuscript notes, by J. Brown, of Stanway, chiefly 
relating to English Post-Pliocene deposits, with lists of the con- 
tained fossils, were presented. 

M. 31 volumes, 61 pamphlets, and 35 parts were acquired. 

Z. 58 works in 80 volumes, and 906 parts were added. 

1899. 

Series of publications of great value were received from the 
New South Wales and Queensland Governments, from the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture, from the Royal University of Upsala, 
and 51 books and pamphlets, dealing with Servian natural history, 
from Prof. P. S. Pavlovic, of Belgrade. 

These were distributed among the different departments. 

L. 1142 volumes and 219 maps were added, of which 660 
volumes and 143 maps were presented, and 98 volumes with 76 
maps were transferred from other departments. 

G. 194 new works, 360 parts, and 482 maps were added. 



22 Libraries. 

8 plates of original figures of Belemnites, by Martin Simpson, 
drawn for his " Fossils of the Yorkshire Lias," but not published, 
were presented. 

M. 53 works and 84 pamphlets, with 35 parts and 32 maps 
were acquired. 

Z. 53 works in 57 volumes, and 906 parts were added. 

1900. 

L. The accessions numbered 718 volumes and 338 maps, 
of which 372 volumes and 338 maps were presented, and 14 
volumes transferred from other departments. The collection of 
Photographs of Animals also received substantial addition, 105 
photographs having been presented. 

The extent of this collection at the end of the year was 
29,204 volumes, 4,605 maps, and 318 photographs, with 500 sheets 
of drawings in the Owen Collection. 

B. The set of original water-colour drawings, by W. G. 
Smith, of British Basidiomycetes was completed. 

The extent of the departmental library at the close of the 
year was 14,980 volumes, 335 MSS., and 5,392 pamphlets. 

G. 211 new works, 365 continuations, and 165 maps were 
added. 

No census of this library was taken till early in 1903, when 
it was found to contain 9,395 volumes of catalogued works, 
2,821 minor uncatalogued separata, 5,569 sheets of maps 
belonging to 286 sets, and 356 sheets of charts and diagrams 
representing 5 sets. 

M. 43 volumes and 60 pamphlets, with 568 parts and 
8 maps were acquired. 

It is computed that at the end of the year this collection 
comprised 6,339 volumes, 1,770 memoirs and pamphlets, and 81 
maps in 252 sheets. 

Z. 36 works in 65 volumes, and 1,134 parts were added. 

The extent of the collection at the end of the year was 
returned as 10,298 works in 17,167 volumes. 

According to a rough estimate based on the cataloguing 
returns, there were in the whole Museum at the end of 1900, 
75,202 volumes and 5,780 maps. This, however, is a low estimate, 
since it does not take count of continuations. 



Libraries, 23 



3. List of Important Books, Manuscripts, and Drawings 

ARRANGED UNDER THE NaMES OF AuTHORS, AND PREVIOUS 

Owners. 



(The initial of the Departmental Library in which the various works are 
kept is placed after each entry.) 



Her Majesty Queen Victoria 

In 184:1, her Majesty the late Queen Victoria presented a large series of 
water-colour drawings by Francis Bauer, " being that part of Mr. Bauer's 
drawings made at the expense of the late Sir Joseph Banks, Baronet, 
Avhich did not accompany his Library and Botanical Collections when 
transferred to the Museum, but was bequeathed by Sir Joseph to his 
late Majesty King George the Fourth " (B). 

Abbot (John) 

A collection of original Avater-colour drawings of the Insects and Plants 
of Georgia, by J. Abbot, with manuscript descriptions, in 17 volumes, 
formerly the property of J. Francillon, was purchased in 1818 (Z). Some 
of these figures have served as the types of new species. 

Adams (Arthur) [1820-1878] 

Adams served as Assistant Surgeon and ^N'aturalist on board the 
Samarang, in 1843-46. 109 w^ater-colour and pen-and-ink sketches of 
animals made by him during that voyage were presented in 1875 (Z). 

Agassiz (Jean Louis Rodolphe) [1807-1873] 

The Museum possesses a copy of this celebrated ichthyologist's 
" Modele de mes Cadres de Fossiles," annotated in his own writing. This 
was a privately-issued scheme, or table, circulated apparently with the 
view to obtain co-operation and assistance. The present copy came from 
the library of John Phillips (G). 

Alton (William) [1731-1793] 

Alton had charge of the Botanic Gardens at Kew, and was instru- 
mental in sending out Francis Masson, the collector {q.v.), some of whose 
drawings are in the Museum (B and Z). 

The original drawings for twelve out of the thirteen plates, drawn 
by various artists, for Alton's " Hortus Kewensis " form No. 17 of the 
Banksian MSS. (B). 

Allman (William) [1776-1846] 

Allman held the post of Professor of Botany at Dublin from 1809 to 
1844. An autograph MS. entitled "An attempt to illustrate a mathe- 
matical connection between the parts of Vegetables," &c. (B) formed part 
of Pi. Brown's collection, presented in 1876. It is apparently the original 
MS. of a paper read before the Royal Society in 1811 but not printed by 
that body : an abstract was privately issued by Allman in 1844. 

Anderson (John) [ -1847] 

Anderson accompanied Captain P. P. King in his circumnavigation on 
the Adventure (1826-30) as botanical collector. 

A small manuscript " List of Plants collected iu the Island of Chiloe 
in 1829-30" is preserved (B). 



24 Libraries, 

Anderson (William) [ -1778J 

Anderson served as surgeon's mate on the second voyage of Captain 
J. Cook to the Pacific (1772-75), and as naturalist on the third voyage 
(1776-78). His manuscript notes on the Birds observed on the second 
voyage, and his descriptions in MS. of the Plants and Animals of the 
third voyage formed the Banksian MS. No. 81 (B and Z). 

Anning (Mary), Miss [1799-1847] 

Autograph transcripts of three memoirs in the " Transactions of the 
Geological Society," with pencil copies of the accompanying ])lates, by 
Miss Mary Anning, the well-known fossil-collector at Lyme Pegis and 
discoverer of Ichthyosaurus, were presented in 1885 (G). 

Arendt (J. J. F.) 

Arendt was a botanical writer, apparently resident at Osnabriick. 
His autograph " Floriferti Osnaburgensis anomali . . . specimen primum," 
1848, is preserved in the Museum (B). 

Aublet (Jean Baptiste Christophe Fusee) [1720-1778] 

The French botanist Aublet was successively charged with the task of 
founding botanic gardens in the lie de France, Guiana, and San Domingo : 
he wrote a " Histoire des Plantes de la Guiane Francoise," and his original 
drawings for the plates of this work with many unpublished ones, and 
his maiuiscript descriptions form the Banksian MSS. Nos. 29, 58, 59 and 
60 (B). 

Baines (Thomas) [1822-1875] 

153 original water-colour and pencil sketches, being a portion of those 
made by this celebrated African explorer and artist during an expedition 
to explore the goldfields of Mashonaland, were purchased in 1886 (L). 
They in part illustrate his book on " The Gold Regions of South-eastern 
Africa," in which he supports the theory that the land of Ophir lay in 
Mashonaland, and his sketches include one of the old w^orkings near 
Maghoondas Village, in which district also he notes and depicts natives 
whose method of wearing their hair strikingly resembles that shown in 
drawings on Egyptian monuments. 

Banks {Sir Joseph), Bart. [1743-1820] 

The celebrated Library formed by Sir J. Banks was handed over to 
the care of the Trustees in 1827. The collection of books was placed 
in the Printed Book Department, with the exception of 26 works, 
numbering 149 volumes, chiefly systematic works used in the Herbarium, 
which were either duplicates or contained manuscript notes, by Solander, 
Dryander, and Robert Brown, and which, with the MSS., Prints and 
Drawings, remained in the custody of the Keeper of the Banksian 
Botanical Collections.* 

The manuscripts and drawings included the following important 
items, many of which are cited in Dryander's Catalogue of the Banksian 
Library : — 

* Some of these were afterwards traasferred to the Department of 
Manuscripts. 



Libraries, 25 

Depa/t- 
Title. Banksian ment 

Number, where now 
kept, 
AiTON (W.) [12 out of tlie 13 original water-colour 
drawings for Aiton's " Hortus Kewensis," by 
J. J^owerby, J. F. Miller, F. P. Nodder, G. D. Ehret, 

and Frauz Bauer] • 17 B 

Andeuson (W.) Genera nova Plantarum . . . in^ 
itinere nostro [i.e. Capt. Cook's third voyage, 
1776-78] visa, etc \ 81 

Descriptiones Plantarum, etc. 

Zoologia nova, etc. .... 

Characteres breves Avium . . . 1772-75 

Animals. [Descriptions of Animals observed on a 

Voyage to Canton, with original water-colour 

drawings.] 2 vol 84 & 85 Z 

AuBLET (F.) [Manuscript descriptions of Plants 

collected in French Guiana] .... 29 B 

[Original pencil drawings for the plates in his 

" Histoire des Plautes de la Guiane Fran9oise "] . 58 to 60 B 

[60 foil, of original unpublished drawings of 

Guiana Plants with manuscript descriptions . 61 B 

Banks {Sir J.) [Autograph Notes on useful plants] B 

[Various manuscript notes interspersed with 

Solander's q.v. infra] B 

Bartram (J.) [7 autograph letters to Dr. Fother- 

gill (1769-71)] 23 B 

Bartram (W.) [Original MS. of his "Travels 

through . . . Carolina. Georgia," etc.'] . . . 78 & 79 B 

[102 foil, of descriptions with bi drawings of 

the Plants and Animals of Carolina, Georgia, etc.] 23 B 

Bauer (Franz L.) [Original water-colour drawings 

illustrating the Germination of Wheat and the 

Diseases of Corn, with a large miscellaneous series 

chiefly of the more remarkable Plants that had 

flowered at the Royal Gardens, Kew, of which a 

further series was presented in 1841] . .... B 

Blair (P.) [Copies of Dr. P. Blair's Correspondence, "j 

1725-27] I 35 B 

[Manuscript] Catalogue of the . . . Botanical j 

discoverys. . .made by Dr. P. Blair, efc. . .j 

BoBART (J.) The Younger. [Copy by Sir J. Banks 

of a " Catalogue of Plants sent from Mr. Bobart 

...1689"] 94 E 

Bolton (J.) [Original drawings for the plates of 

his " Filices Britannicse "] 36 B 

Brewer (S.) [Manuscript copy by D. Solander of 

his] Botanical Journey through Wales in . . . 1726 

and 1727 95 B 

Browne (P.) [Autograph MS.] Catalogue of the ^ 

Plants of the English Sugar Colonies. . . 70 B 

Buchanan, afterwards Hamilton (F.) Enumeratio 

Plantarum quas in adeundo civitatem Barmanonim 

regiam . . . anno 1705 observavit F. Buchanan. 

[MS. with 53 drawings.] 2 vol 18 & 19 B 

Oaley (G.) [Autograph Journals of Journeys \ 

to New South Wales] . . •,•(.. B 

[Autograph] Descriptions of Plants of New j 

South Wales ' 



68 



26 Libraries. 

Depart- 
Title. Banksian meiit 

Number, where now 
kept. 
Castelvetri (G.) [Autograph MS.] Brieve raccoD to 

di tutte le Kadici ... in Italia, etc. 1614 . . 91 B 

CiRiLLO (D.) [MS.] Institutiones Botanicse, etc. . 66 B 

[Autograph letter to Brownlow, Earl of Exeter] 76 B 

China. [24 water-colour drawings of Fish by a 

Chinese artist at Canton] 11 Z 

[62 water-colour drawings of Chinese Plants, 

drawn under the superintendence of J. B. Blake, 

by a native artist] ...... 12 B 

[220 water-colour drawings of Chinese Plants 

and Animals, by a native artist.] 2 vol. . . 27 & 28 B 

CoLDEX, afterwards Fakquhar (Jane) [Autograph 

MS.] Flora Nov-Eboracensis, etc. . . [99] B 

DiLLENius (J. J.) [Original drawings by himself 

for pis. i-lxxix of his "Historia Muscoriim"] . 56 B 

Dryander (J.) [Manuscript Catalogue of the draw- 
ings of Animals in the Library of Sir J. Banks] . . . Z 

[Index to the Species of Plants described and 

figured by N. J. von Jacquin in his MSS.] . 

Massonii Flora Maderensis. [Autograph MS.] 

DuRAND (P.) De quibusdam Zoophitis quae in sinu 

Gibraltarico reperiuntur. efc [102] B 

Ehret (G. D.) [65 original water-colour drawings 

of Plants from the collection of Sir R. More] \ 16 B 

[Original drawings of Pare Plants, Fruits and/ [106 to 1 ;g 

Seeds.] 4 vol.. . . . . -l 109] ^ 

[17 original drawings of Plants collected by 

Banks in Newfoundland *] 

Ellis (W. W.) [115 original water-colour drawings 
of Animals made during Capt. J. Cook's third 
voyage, 1776-78] ...... 33 

Forster (J. G. A.) [201 foil, of original water- 
colour and pencil drawings of Animals made during 
Capt. Cook's second voyage, 1772-75.] 2 vol. . 6 & 7 

[Original water-colour and pencil drawings of 

Plants made during Capt. J, Cook's second voyage.] 

2 vol 8 & 9 

Gerard (J.) [MS. copy of his] Catalogus Arborum 
. . .ac Plantarum. . .in horto J. Gerardi. , .nascen- 
tium...l596 89 

HousTouN (W.) [Autograph] Catalogus Plantarum 

in America observatarum ..... 67 

[Autograph MS.] Plantse observatee circa ^ 

Kingston in. . .Jamaica, et Havanam in. . .Cuba . f 

[Autograph MS.] Nova Plantarum Ameri- f 

canarum genera, etc. . . . . . • j 

[Autograph MS.] Plantfe circa Veram Crucem i 

observatse > 69 

[Autograpli MS.] Nova Plantarum genera . ) 

India. [MS.] DeclaraQao das Aruores. . .Plantas 

. . . e Eruas virtuozas . . . seruem para se aplicar a 
varias doen9as declaradas pellos fizicos deste 
Anjenga. . . 1750 [228 water-coloiir drawings with 
manuscript descriptions] 22 



* Five drawings belonging to this set are placed with others used in 
illustrating Alton's " Hortus Kewensis." [Cy. supra, p. 23.] 



Libraries. 27 

„,.,, Depart- 

^^^^^- Banksian ment 

jS' umber, where now 

India [559 water-colour drawings of Bengal Plants, ^^ " 

painted by native artists, with their native and 
occasionally also the Linnean names. 3 vol. . 13 to 15 B 
Jacquin (N. J. von) Autograph notes and letters 
addressed to J. Dryander, with sketches and 

water-colour drawings _ B 

Johnson (T.) Iter Plantarum investigationis ergo 
suflceptam...inagrum Cantianum...lG29 . .^06 B 

HJ32. [Both in S. Dale's handwriting] . 

K0NIG (J. G.) [Autograph journals of his voyages. 
with lists and descriptions of East Indian (includ- 
ing Siam and Malacca) Plants, Animals and a few 

Minerals.] 21 vol 37 to 55 

L'Heritier de Beutelle (C. L.) [51 autograph 

letters to J. Dryander. 1785 to 171)0] , . [101] 

LiGHTFOOT (J.) [Transcript by Solander of his] 

Journal of a botanical excursion in Wales. [1775 ] 8(J 
LiND (J.) A Catalogue of such Chinese and 
Japanese plants whose Chinese characters are 

known and are botanically described, &c 

LiNN^us (C.) Foreliisningar ofver Djur-riket . . . 
1748 ; uppteknade of L. Moutin. 

Fundamenta botanica. . .1748 

Vaxt-riket...l74G-48 .... 

Sten-riket...l747 .... 

Diseten... 1748-49 .... 

LouREiRo (J. de) [Autograph MS.] Nova geneia 

Plantarum in Cochin China sponte nascentium, etc. 03 B 

M., R. [MS.] List of the different sorts of Grain, 
&c., cultivated in the Tanjore country [with 15 
water-colour drawings by a native artist] . . 07 B 

Maetyn (J.) and (T.) [Correspondence] . . [103] B 

Masson (F.) [54 water-colour drawings of Plants.) / B 

9 of Animals, and 2 views of Niagara] . .j " \ Z 

Monte Bolca. [8 foil, of . rough water-colour 
sketches of fossil Plants, and 12 of fossil Fish from 

Monte Bolca] [114] Gr 

MoNTiN (L.) [Autograph.] Beskrifning ofver eii 

resa. . .til Lapska fjallarne afvan Lulea stad . 83 B 

Park (Mungo) [20 water-colour drawings of Fish 
from the coast of Sumatra with manuscript 

descriptions of six species. 1792] Z 

Parkinson (S.) [40 water-colour drawings of 
Animals taken from specimens or drawings 
executed in India by order of J. G. Loten, and 
forming the originals of some of the figures in 
Pennant's " Indian Zoology," and " Quadrupeds "] 20 Z 

[Original water-colour drawings of PI ants 'j 

and Animals made during Capt J. Cook's first ( B 

voyage, 1768-71; with finished drawings by T. I 18 vol 

Burgis, J. Cleveley, Jas. Miller, J. F. Miller and / •• Z 

F. P. Nodder, made from the incomplete sketches.] ( 1 vol. 

19 vol ' 



71 


Z 


72 


B 


73 


B 


74 


M 


75 


B 



28 Libraries. 

Depart- 
Title Banksian ment 

Number, where now 
kept. 
Petiver (J.) [73 rough water-colour drawings of 
Cape Plants, some of which were used for the 
plates in Petiver's " Gazophyllacii naturae et artis 
decasnona"] ....... 88 B 

Plants. [124 rough coloured drawings of Plants, 

seemingly from old woodcuts] .... 62 B 

[418 foil, rough water-colour drawings of 

Plants and some Animals, with their names in 

Greek and Latin] ...... 63 B 

Plimier (C.) [H12 original water-colour and pen- 
and-ink drawings of Plants, many of which were 
published in his various works.] 5 vol. . . 1 to 5 B 

PuLTENEY (R.) [MS.] Flora Malabarica, etc. . 26 B 

[Autograph MS.] A Catalogue of Plants 

spontaneously growing about Loughborough, etc. . 90 B 

KoBiNSON {^ir T.) [MS. copy by Banks of] A 
catalogue of Plants observed in several parts of 
Wales in 1689 94 B 

Rome. [MS.] Flora ruderata Romana, etc. . . [100] B 

Seyffert (H. C.) Icones Fungorum, etc. [138 

original water-colour drawings] .... 65 • B 

Sherard (W.) [Autograph Notes and Observations 
on the first two volumes of Ray's "Historia 
Plantarum"] 80 B 

Solander (D. C.) [An extensive series of MSS. 
including notes and descriptions of Animals and 
Plants observed during the voyage with Banks 
to the South Pacific, and to Iceland, as well as 
indexes and lists compiled in connection with his 
curatorship of Banks' Collections and Library, 
and many of tliem containing notes in Sir J. 
Banks' handwriting . . . . . . . B and Z 

SowERBY (J.) [103 foil- of original drawings for 
No. 2-4 of Dickson's " Fasciculus Plantarum 
Cryptogam-arum Britannia}"] .... 21 B 

Stephens (W.) Catalogus Plantarum in Horto 
Dublinieusi. [MS. which, after p. 41, is in 
Stephens's own handwriting] .... 92 B 

Sweden. [192 original water-colour drawings on 

24pls. of Swedish Moths, Caterpillars and Spiders] 87 Z 

TiLLi (M. A.) [Autograph MS.] Specimen Plant- 
arum quse in Horto Medico Sapientise Pisanse 
locisque finitimis extant. 1713-30 . . . [Ill] B 

TouRNEFoRT (.1 . P. de) Catalogue des Plantes que 
M. P. de Tournefort trouva dans ses Voyages 
d'Espagne et de Portugal copie' de I'original, etc. 82 B 

Watltng (T.) [70 water-colour drawings of Animals 
and Plants made near Port Jackson, some of which 
were used in drawing the plates for J. White's 
"Journal of a Voyage to New South Wales "] . 34 B 

Young (AV.) A Natural History of Plants, contain- 
ing the production of North and South Carolina, 
etc. [302 water-colour drawings with manuscript, 
index and dedication] 24 and 25 B 



Libraries, 29 

In 1876, a transcript, by the daughters of Mr. Dawson Turner, of the 
original Journal kept by Sir J. Banks during his voyage with Capt. 
J. Cook, 1768-71, was transferred to the Botanical Department. The 
original, which had been deposited with the MSS. Department to 
become the property of the Trustees on the death of Lady KnatchbuU, 
was subsequently claimed and removed by Lord Brabourne, by whom it 
was sold in 1886 for £7 2s. Qd. The journal was afterwards printed from 
a transcript of the Dawson Turner copy, edited by Sir J. D. Hooker and 
published in 1896. 

Transcripts by the same hands of Banks' correspondence were trans- 
ferred with the Journal and are now bound in 20 volumes. 

In 1895 a copy by Miss S. S. Banks of the journal, kept by Sir 
Joseph Banks during his voyage to Newfoundland and Labrador in 1766, 
was accjuired (B). 

Barclay (George) [fi. 1835-1841] 

Barclay accompanied Capt. Belcher as botanical collector on board the 
Sulphur (1836-41). His autograph journal of the voyage is preserved in 
the Museum (B). 

Bartram (William) [1739-1828] 

William Bartram, son of the botanist, John Bartram [1701-1777] 
(seven of whose letters to Dr. Fothergill form the Banksian MS. no. 23), 
travelled in 1773 at the request of Dr. Fothergill through the southern 
iwrtions of the United States, and the original manuscript of his "Travels 
through . . . Carolina, Georgia," etc., and a volume of 102 fols, containing 
53 original drawings, with manuscript descriptions of the Plants and 
Animals of those districts, form the Banksian MSS. no. 23, 78, and 
79 (B). 

Bauer (Ferdinand Lucas) [1760-1826] 

F. L. Bauer, who accompanied Robt. Brown on Flinders' voyage to 
Australia, brought back a series of water-colour drawings of the Plants 
and Animals observed. 49 of his drawings of Animals (Z) and 203 of 
Plants (B) were presented by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty 
in 1843, and two portfolios of his drawings were bequeathed in 1858 by 
Ptobert Brown (B). 

His original drawings for some of the plates to A. B. Lambert's 
" Genus Pinus " are preserved in the Museum (B). 

Bauer (Franz Andreas) [1758-1840] 

F. A. Bauer was employed by Sir Joseph Banks in making drawings 
of Plants in the Poyal Botanic Gardens at Kew, the work being continued 
after Sir Joseph's death under the special provisions contained in his will, 
until the decease of Bauer. His drawings illustrating the " Germination 
of Wheat " and the " Diseases of Corn," with many others, were included 
in the Banksian Collection, and came to the Museum in 1827 ; but the 
extensive series of the drawings made at Kew after Banks' death and 
bequeathed to H.M. George lY., was presented to the Museum in 1841 
by her late Majesty Queen Victoria (B). 

His original drawings for the plates to Sir W. J. Hooker's *' Genera 
Filicum," and other works with 127 drawings of British Orchids, and 
some illustrating the form and structure of various parts of Plants, are 
preserved in the Museum (B). 

Other drawings of his were purchased in 1879 (B), while some 
illustrative of microscopic anatomy, done for Sir E. Home, were given in 



30 Libraries. 

1893 by the executors of Sir E. Owen, in whose collection of drawings 
they are (L). 

One of the 25 copies of vol, i of A. B. Lambert's " Genus Fimis" 
coloured by him, is in the Museum (B). 

Bennett (John Joseph) [1801-1876] 

Appointed assistant to Eobert Brown when the Banksian Herbarium 
was transferred to the British Museum in 1827, Bennett succeeded 
Brown as Keeper of the Botanical Department in 1858. Brown had 
bequeathed to him a number of books and MSS., which remained in the 
Department and were presented to the Trustees in 1876 by Mrs. Bennett 
(B). 

The original pencil drawings by J. and C. Curtis for Bennett and 
Brown's " Planta Javanica rariores," with proof engravings and hand- 
coloured proofs after letters of the plates are preserved (B). 

Berkeley (Miles Joseph) [1803-1889] 

Berkeley, the distinguished mycologist, presented 530 original water- 
colour drawings done by James Sowerby for the " English Fungi," in 
1876 (B). 

A series of his letters to C. E. Broome was bequeathed with the 
latter's correspondence in 1886 (B). Berkeley's own correspondence was 
presented in 1890 (B). 

Blair (Patrick) [fl. 1706-1728] 

Copies of the correspondence and a " Catalogue of the discoveries . . . 
made by Dr. P. Blair," botanist and surgeon, form the Banksian MS., 
No. 35 (B). 

Blake (John Bradby) [1745-1773] 

Sent out in 1766 to Canton as one of the Hon. East India Company's 
supercargoes, Blake devoted himself to Natural Science. A volume of 
drawings of Chinese Plants made under his superintendence by a native 
artist form the Banksian MS., No. 12. 

Bloxam (Andrew) [1801-1878] 

Bloxam w^ent as naturalist on the Blonde in 1824-25, and on his 
return entered the church, becoming Rector of Twycross, in Leicester- 
shire, and afterwards of Harborough Magna, in Warwickshire. His 
manuscript notes on the Cellular Cryptograms of Leicestershire, and his 
Correspondence (forming 1 vol.), were presented by his son in 1878 (B), 

Bolton (James) [fl, 1775-1795] 

The self-taught naturalist of HaUfax, Yorks., J. Bolton, etched the 
illustrations for his own works. 

His original drawings for the plates of his " Filices Britannic^e " form 
the Banksian MS., No. 36 (B). 

25 original water-colour drawings of Fungi, executed 1788-1794, were 
purchased in 1892 (B). 

50 original water-colour drawings of Flowers from Nature, made 
1785-87, were purchased in 1894 (B). 

Botanical Society of London. 

The manuscript of the " Proceedings," 1724-26, of this Society, 
which was a distinct Society from the later one bearing the same name 
(1836-57), is preserved in the Museum (B). 



Libraries. 31 

Brady (Henry Bowman) [1835-1891] 

Brady made a special study of the Foraminifera. A copy of 
Soldaui's rare work, " Testaceograpliiai ac Zoophytographiiii parva3 et 
microscopicai tomus primus ( — secuudus)" was at Brady's request 
presented to tlie Museum by the Eoyal Society in 1891, his own copy 
remaining in their possession (L). 

Brewer (Samuel) [fl. 1700-1742] 

As botanical collector for Dillenius and others, Brewer made a 
collecting tour through Wales. A copy in Solander's handwriting of his 
unpublished "Botanical Journey through Wales in . . ., 1726 and 1727," 
forms No. 95 of the lianksian MSS. (B). 

Broome (Christopher Edmund) [1812-1886] 

C. E. Broome, the mycologist, bequeathed his books and pamphlets 

to the number of 212 and the whole of his mycological correspondence 

with his Herbarium in 1886 (B). 

A further series of his letters addressed to M. J. Berkeley was presented 

with the latter's correspondence in 1890 (B). 

Brown (John), of Stanway [1780-1859] 

J. Brown was one of the pioneers in Pleistocene pala3ontology. His 
autograph notes, chiefly relating to English Post-Pliocene deposits with 
lists of the contained fossils, were presented in 1898 (G). 

Brown (Robert) [1773-1858] 

Brown accompanied the expedition under Flinders to Australia; as 
botanist ; in 1810 he succeeded Dryander as librarian to Sir Joseph Banks ; 
while from 1827 to 1857 he was Keeper of the Botanical Department. 

He bequeathed to the Tiustees two portfohos of drawings by Ferdinand 
L. Bauer " to be placed with the other productions of the same artist," 
and to his successor, J. J. Bennett, some books and pamphlets with 
numerous MSS., which were presented to the Trustees in 1876 by Mrs. 
Bennett (B). The more importrint of these were, his Diary from 1800 
to 1803, a Flora of Madeira, a List of Gaelic Plant Names, and Descrip- 
tions of Ferns, all in his own handwriting. 

Some of his autograph descriptions of Plants in two volumes were 
presented in 1888 by Mr. J. Britten (B). 

The original pencil drawings by J. and C. Curtis, for Bennett and 
Brown's" Plantaj Javanica3 rariores" are preserved, and also Brown's 
correspondence in 3 vols. (B). 

Browne (Patrick) [1720?-1790] 

While practising medicine in the West Indies, Browne studied their 
natural history, especially that of Jamaica. 

An autograph "Catalogue of the Plants of the English Sugar 
Colonies" forms No. 70 of the Banksian MSS. (B). 

Bruch (Philipp) [1781-1847] 

Bruch, who was an apothecary and botanist at Zweibriickeu, devoted 
much time to the study of Mosses. 

219 of his original pencil drawings of Mosses used in illustrating the 
" Bryologia Europa^a " were purchased in 1883 (B). 



32 Libraries, 

Buchanan, afterwards Hamilton (Francis) [1762-1829] 

Buchanan went out in 1794: as surgeon in the East India Company's 
Service. In the following year he accompanied the mission to Ava ; 
his autograph descriptions with 53 drawings of the plants he observed 
form the^'Banksiaa MSS., No. 18 and 19 (B). 

Buonamici (Giovanni Francesco) 

A transcript of Dr. Buonamici's original MS. " De Plantis qua3 in 
Melit» et Gaulo observantur" (written about 1670), marked "Ex 
Biblioth. Boisy, MS. No. 21 " is preserved (B). This work was printed 
as " Pugillus Meliteus," by F. P. Cavallini in 1689 under his own name, 
and reprinted by Briickmann in 1737 ; in both cases the Maltese names 
which appear in the MS. were omitted. 

Burbidge (Frederick William) [1847- ] 

Burbidge travelled in the Eastern Archipelago, paying especial 

attention to the botany of those regions. 

115 original sketches, some coloured, made in Borneo, of Orchids, 

Pitcher-plants, etc., were purchased in 1886 (B). 

Burgis (Thomas) [fl. 1776] 

Burgis was employed by Banks to make finished drawings of Plants 
from sketches by S. Parkinson, J. F. Miller, and others. Some of these 
are among the Banksian Collection of Drawings (B). 

Caesalpinus (Andreas) [1519-1603] 

A manuscript of the celebrated Italian physician and natural 
philosopher Cfesalpinus, entitled " A. Cffisalpini epistola de methodo Rei 
Herbarie pra3fixa horto suo sicco qui nunc Florentias in Bibliotheca D. 
comitis R. Pandulphini adservatur," Pisis, 1563, is in the Museum (B). 

Caley (George) [ -1829] 

Caley, who was at first employed in his father's stables, was led by 
his desire to know more about the herbs used for veterinary purposes, to 
study botany, and was later sent out by Sir Joseph Banks to collect 
in New South Wales. His autograph journals and descriptions of the 
Plants collected formed an item of the Banksian Collection (B). 

Camellus, or Kamel (Georgius Josephus) [1661-1706] 

Kamel went as Jesuit missionary to the Philippines. _ 

A volume of pen-and-ink drawings with autograph descriptions entitled, 
" Descriptiones Fruticum et Arborum Luzonis," formerly in Sir Hans 
Sloane's library, was transferred from the MSS. Department m 1881 (B). 

Carmichael (Dugald) [1772-1840] 

Two MSS. of D. Carmichael are in the Museum, viz. :— 
[Autograph] Catalogue of Plants collected in Mauritius and Bourbon 

[Autograph] Gramina Capensia [and descriptions of Cape Plants] (B). 
Carpenter (AVilliam Benjamin) [1813-1885] 

For some years before his death, the well-known naturalist. Dr. W. B. 
Carpenter, had been collecting materials for a Monograph on " Eozoonr 
These included 129 water-colour drawings, by A. J. HoUick and C. 
Berjeau, with 116 photographs and prints, now mounted and bound m 



Libraries. 33 

three volumes, that were presented by his son, the Rev. J. Estlin Cariienter 
in 1892 (G). ^ 

Carroll (Isaac) [1828-1880] 

262 original pencil drawings, roughly coloured, of Lichens, the work 
of I. Carroll, and his autograph Catalogue of the Plants of Iceland were 
purchased, with his Herbarium, in 1874 (B). 

Castelvetri (Giacomo) 

A manuscript entitled " Brieve racconto di tutte le Radici, di tutte 
I'Herbe et di tutti Frutti, che crudi, o cotti in Italia si mansiano," &c., 
4°. Londra, 1614, by G. Castelvetri, forms the Banksian MS. No. 91 (B). 

Cirillo (DoMENico) [1739-1799] 

The Italian doctor and naturalist, Cirillo, wrote largely on Botany. He 
corresponded with Brownlow, Earl of Exeter, and an autograph letter to 
that nobleman on Sicily, giving a list of the Flora, with the unpublished 
MS. of his " Institutiones Botanica? juxta methodum Tournefortianum " 
form the Banksian MSS. Xo. 66 and 76 (B). 

Cleveley (John) [1747-1785] 

Cleveley, the marine painter, was employed by Banks as draughtsman 
on the voyage to Iceland, and also to prepare finished drawings from the 
sketches made by Sydney Parkinson during Capt. Cook's voyage round 
the World in 1768-71. Many of these are among the drawings in the 
Banksian Collection (B). 

Golden, afterwards Farquhar (Jane) 

Jane Colden was daughter of Cadwallader Colden, the botanist, and 
G-overnor of New York. Her autogranh *' Flora Nov-Eboracensis " forms 
the Banksian MS. [No. 99] (B). 

Collinson (Peter) [1694-1768] 

Peter Collinson, the naturalist and antiquary, traded with the 
American Colonies, and some of his collections were in Sir Hans Sloane's 
Museum. His autograph " Account of the Introduction of American 
Seeds into Great Britain," 1766, is preserved (B). 

Cook (James) [1728-1779] 

Of MSS. and drawings relating to Capt. Cook's three celebrated 
voyages the Museum possesses : — 

First Voyage, 1768-71. 
A transcript of Sir J. Banks' journal (B). 
Copious manuscript lists and descrii^tions of the Animals and Planta 

collected. By D. C. Solauder (B, Z). 
A large collection, filling nineteen volumes, of the original drawings 
by S. Parkinson (with finished drawings prepared from his incom- 
plete sketches, by T. Bm-gess, J. Cleveley, J. Miller, J. F. Miller 
and F. P. Nodder) of the Animals and Plants obtained (B, Z). 
Second Voyage^ 1772-75. 

Short manuscript descriptions of the Birds observed. By A\'. Ander- 
son. 
The original pencil and water-colour sketches of Animals and Plants 
made during the voyage. By J. G. A. Forster (B, Z). 
Third Voijage, 1776-80. 
Manuscript descriptions of the Animals and Plants. By W. Ander- 
son (B, Z). 
11.5 original water-colour drawings of the animals observed. By 
W. W. Ellis (Z). 
VOL. I. D 



34 Libraries, 

Cowan (William Deans) 

52 original drawings of Madagascar Orcliids, by the Rev. W. D. Cowan, 
were purchased in 1883 (B). 

Crawford, James Ludovic Lindsay, 26^/i Earl of [1847- ] 
In 1886 Lord Crawford presented a set of De Bry's Collection of 
Voyages, 25 volumes and the volume on their collation (L). 

Crow (Francis) 

" A Catalogue of rare fossil Fruits ( of minute fossil Shells, etc.) 

from Sheppy Island," etc., in the collection of F. Crow of Faversham, 
1810, etc., with 831 pencil drawings is preserved in the Museum (G-). 

Cunningham (Allan) [1791-1839] 

As Botanical Collector to the Royal Gardens, Kew, Cunningham 
travelled in Brazil and New South Wales. Two of his MSS. are in the 
Museum, viz. : — 

[Autograph] Journal of the proceedings of Mr. J. Bowie and Mr. A. 
Cunningham . . . sent out to Rio de Janeiro to collect Plants. 

Original MS. of the " Few General Remarks on the Vegetation of 
certain coasts of Terra Australis," which was appended to P. P. King's 
" Narrative." 

Curtis (J.) and (C.) 

The original pencil drawings by J. and C. Curtis for the illustrations 
to Bennett and Brown's " Plantje Javanicee rariores " are preserved in the 
Museum (B). 
Dale (Samuel) [1659 ?-1739] 

S. Dale the botanist, practising as physician and apothecary at 
Braintree, Essex, was a friend of Ray, and corresponded with Sir H. 
Sloane. His autograph copies of T. Johnson's " Iter Plantarum investi- 
gation] s ... in agrum cantianum," &c., 1629 and 1632, form the 
Banksian Museum MS. No. 96 (B). 

Davidson (Thomas) [1817-1885] 

Davidson devoted his life to the study of the Brachiopoda. 

The whole of his MSS. and drawings in 22 volumes with his library 
of 897 books and pamphlets relating to the Brachiopoda were presented 
in 1886 (G). 

De Crespigny (Eyre Champion) [1821-1895] 

De Crespigny became Conservator of Forests in India and Super- 
intendent of the Botanic Gardens at Dapsorie. 

A collection of his original drawings of Indian Plants was purchased 
in 1877. 

Derham (AVilliam) [1657-1735] 

The original MS. of Derham's " Life of Ray" was purchased in 1884 (B). 
Deschamps (L. A.) 

Deschamps accompanied Entrecasteaux as naturalist on the Becherche 
during the expedition in search of La Perouse. 

His unpublished autograph journals kept during the voyage and on 
his subsequent travels in Java, with materials for a Flora Javanica, 
water-colour sketches of Javan scenery. Plants (B), and animals (Z), 
as well as other notes and memoranda were presented in 1861. 



Librarnes, 35 

Dilleniiis (Johannes Jacobus) [1687-1747] 

Dillenius, sometime Botanical Professor at Oxford, wliose principal 
work was an " Historia Muscorum," prepared his own illustrations for the 
plates: his original drawings for the tirst 79 plates of tliat work (the 
remaining 6 were drawn on the copper direct) form the Banksian MS 
No. 56 (B). 

His letters written to Brewer in 1726-28 are also preserved (B). 

Dinkell (J.) 

A number of original drawings, chiefly of fossil vertebrate remains, 
by J. Dinkell, form part of the Owen Collection of Drawings, presented 
in 1893 (L). 

Dryander (Jonas) [1748-1810] 

On Solander's death, Dryander became librarian to Sir Joseph Banks. 
His manuscripts in connection with the catalogue of Banks' Library, a 
manuscript catalogue of the original drawings of animals in that library 
(Z), his manuscript notes for a memoir on the genus Erica, an index to 
the sj^ecies described by Jacquin in the latter's correspondence with him, 
copious additions to Solander's MSS. and numerous manuscript lists, 
including one of the Plants collected by F. Masson in Madeira, as well as 
his correspondence (in 1 vol.), are preserved in the Museum (B). 

Edmonston (Thomas) [1825-1846] 

The young Shetlander, Thos. Edmonston, who was one of the 
naturalists on board the Herald, had specially studied the Flora of 
Shetland and added the Arenaria norvegica to the British Flora. His 
" Flora of Shetland " was published in 1845, and his autograph notes, 
begun in 1837, for this work are preserved in the Museum (B). 

Edwards (Sydenham Teast). [1769?-1819] 

Edwards was a botanical and zoological artist and editor of the " New 
Botanic Garden." Some of the original drawings for this work were 
acquired in 1895 and 1896 (B). • 

Ehret (Georg Dionysius) [1708-1770] 

Ehret came to England about 1740. He furnished illustrations, among 
other works, for Trew's " Plantas Selecta?," and P. Browne's " Civil and 
Natural History of Jamaica," and the original drawings for these illustra- 
tions are preserved in the Museum. 65 original water-colour^ drawings 
of Plants from the collection of Sir K. More and 4 volumes of original 
-drawings of rare Plants, Fruits, and Seeds, forming the Banksian ]\1SS. 
No. 16 [106-109], with 22 drawings of Plants collected in Newfoundland 
by Sir J. Banks (tive of which were used for illustrations to Alton's 
^' Hortus Kewensis "), came with the Banksian library. Of other draw- 
ings by Ehret, 180 were purchased in 1877 and a few others in 1878 
and 1896. The Museum also possesses an autograph autobiography and 
■other manuscripts of Ehret as well as a " Life " of him in the hand- 
writing of C. J. Trew (B). 

EUis (William AV.) 

Ellis appears to have accompanied Captain Cook on the latter's third 
voyage to the Pacific in the capacity of artist. 115 original water-colour 
drawings by him of the animals met with form the Banksian IMS. 
No. 33 (B). 

D 2 



36 Libraries. 

Enniskillen, William Willoughby Cole, 2>rd Earl of 

[1807-1886] 

Besides MSS. relating to his collection of fossil fish, Lord Enniskillen 
presented in 1885 three transcripts by Mary Anning, the famous fossil- 
collector of Lyme Regis, of papers in the " Transactions of the Geological 
Society " with copies in pencil of the plates (G-). 

Enys (John D.) 

A series of 88 autograph letters of J. Eay and his contemporaries (B) 
were presented by Enys in 1884. 

Evans (Caleb) [1831-1886] 

Evans made a special study of the geology of the London basin and 
south of England, and had special oppor'tunities of collecting from sections 
made during the main drainage works. 

His manuscript notes and drawings, in 3 volumes, were presented in 
1889 (G). 

Evans (^S'^V John), K.C.B. [1823- ] 

Sets of the publications of the Linnean Society of London from 1877 
and of the Zoological Society of London from 1868 were presented by 
Sir J. Evans in 1890, and he has given subsequent parts as they appear 
up to the present time (L). 

Falconer (Hugh) [1808-1865] 

Falconer served as surgeon on the Bengal Establishment of the Kon. 
East India Company. In association with his friend Captain Cautley 
he worked at the Sivalik beds. In connection with their joint work 
on the "Fauna Antiqua Sivalensis," he formed a large collection of 
drawings, which were presented in 1867 or 1868, and include : — 

Sketches for 20 plates of Sivalik fauna, including Colossochelys and 
Crocodile; sketches for 18 unpublished plates of Ruminant remains; 
53 drawings in water-colour and pen-and-ink of Indian fossils, including 
sketches for plates : and a collection of 170 drawings in water-colour, 
pen-and-ink, or pencil, of various fossil Mammalia and a Chelonian, 
drawn by J. Dinkel, J. J. Kaup, and others (G). 

Fleming (John) [ -1815] 

Indian medical officer and botanist. 13 folio volumes of drawings 
of Indian Plants that had been the property of Dr. Fleming were 
purchased in 1882, and are now incorporated in the systematically 
arranged collection of drawings (B). 

Forbes (Henry Ogg) [1851- ] 

26 original drawings of Sumatran and Javan Plants, made by Forbes 
during his travels in the Eastern Archipelago, were acquired in 1884 (B). 

Forbes (James), A.L.S. [1773-1861] 

Jas. Forbes was gardener at Woburn Abbey. A copy of the rare 
work " Salictum Woburnense," supposed to be mainly the work of 
Forbes, and privately printed by the Duke of Bedford in 1829, Avas 
presented in 1890. 

Forster (Johann Georg Adam) [1754-1794] 

J. G. A. Forster went as assistant to his father, J. R. Forster, on the 
second voyage of Captain Cook to the Pacific. His original w^.ater-colour 



Libraries, 37 

and pencil drawings of the Animals and Plants oOserved on that occasion, 
filling 4 volumes, form the Banksian M8S. No. G-9 (B and Z). 

Franks {Sir Augustus Wollaston) [1826-1897] 

In 1880 a copy of W. Smith's large Geological Map of England and 
Wales (1815) (G) was presented by Sir A. W. Franks. 

Gerard (John) [1545-1612] 

Besides his " Herbal," Gerard wrote a " Catalogus Arborum . . . ac 
Plantarum ... in horto J. Gerardi . . . nascentium . . . 1596," of which 
rare work a copy in manuscript forms the Banksian MS., No. 89 (B). 

Goodenough (Samuel), Bishop of Carlisle [1743-1827] 

The original drawings for the plates to Bishop Goodenough's " Obser- 
servations on the British species of Carex" in the Transactions of the 
Linnjean Society, vol. ii. and iii., are preserved in the Museum (B). 

Gray (John Edward) [1800-1875] 

Keeper of the Zoological Department from 1840 to 1875, Gray 
presented in 1861 to that DeiDartment 89 volumes of Zoological works 
and pamphlets, including the manuscript notes by C. E. Darwin, T. Bell, 
and himself on the Pteptiles and Amphibia collected during the voyage of 
the Beagle. He was a constant donor to his department thereafter (Z). 

In 1865 he presented the MSS. and botanical drawings of R. A. 
Salisbury (B). 

On his death in 1875 his widow presented many other works and 
drawings, of which last the most noteworthy are the original water-colour 
and pen-and-ink drawings of animals made by A. Adams on the voyage 
of the Samarang, and the 65 original water-colour drawings of Chelonia 
by J. de C. Sowerby used for the illustrations in T. Bell's " Monograph 
of the Testudinata," and Sowerby and Lear's " Tortoises " (Z). 

Gronovius or Gronow (Laurentius Theodorus) [1730-1777] 
Gronovv was a Senator of Leyden and one of the best ichthyologists 
of his day. His collection, and a manuscript description of it illustrated 
by numerous original drawings, were purchased at an auction in London 
in 1853 (Z). The manuscript was afterwards printed and issued in 1854 
as one of the Museum catalogues. 

Hansen (Georcxe) 

A number of original drawings of monstrous flowers of cultivated 
Orchids, by G. Hansen, Superintendent of the Foothill Agricultural 
Experiment Station of the University of California, were purchased about 
1890 (B). 

Hardwicke (Thomas), Major-General in the Indian Army 

[ -1835] 
Hardwicke formed an extensive collection of illustrations of Asiatic 
zoology, besides making himself some botanical draAvings and notes. The 
greater part of the collection is the work of native artists; but among 
the drawings of Fish (in addition to one of the four sets of drawings of 
Chinese Fish by a native artist that J. Beeves caused to be ]irepared) 
are included, some by Major Neeld, others by Major Farquhar, and 
copies from drawings by Buchanan Hamilton. There is also a series of 
drawings of Birds by T. W. Lewin. 



38 Libraries. 

The collection is composed of the following sets : — 

22 original -water-colour drawings of Plants made in the north-western 
provinces of India in 1796, with autograph descriptions (B). 

56 water-colour sketches of Plants from the neighbourhood of Pletten- 
burg Bay, S. Africa, by "C. H. W." and "I. W. B.," with autograph 
descriptions by Major-General Hardwicke, 1812 (B). 

Water-colour drawings of Indian and Chinese animals (Z), viz., 194 
Mammals, 1,230 Birds, 65 Birds'-nests and eggs, 366 Eeptiles, 813 Fish, 
545 Insects, 94 Insect larva?, 58 Insects of Nepaul, 97 Arachnida, 233 
Crustacea, 97 Mollusca and Radiata. 

Water-colour drawings of animals of various countries (Z), viz., 35 
Vertebrata and Jnvertebrata, 118 Mammals, 429 Birds, and 76 Birds by 
T. W. Lewin. 

These sets, which are bound in 32 volumes, were bequeathed by 
Hardwicke with his specimens to the Museum in 1835, a sum of money 
being at the same time left to defray the expense of publishing the 
scientific description of them. The latter intention was, however, frus- 
trated by a Chancery suit, instituted soon after his death. Some of the 
drawings w^ere used for plates in J. E. Gray's "Illustrations of Indian 
Zoology," and Jardine and Selby's " Illustrations of Ornithology." 

Hodgson (Bryan Houghton) [1800-1894] 

The Indian Civilian and Orientalist, Hodgson, was appointed Assistant 
Resident and, later, Resident in Nepaul. He made large zoological 
collections in Nepaul, supplemented by water-colour drawings of the 
Vertebrata, by native artists. These Avere sent home and presented to 
the Museum in 1845 and 1858 ; the drawings number 1,319 in 7 volumes 
(Z). 

Hooker (>S'/r Joseph Dalton), 6^.0.5. J. [1817- ] 
Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew, from 1865 to 1885. 
Hooker started on his career as Surgeon and Naturalist on the ErebuSy 
under Sir J. Ross, during the expedition to the Antarctic regions in 
1839-43. Autograph lists of the plants collected, with notes and drawings 
made during the early part of the expedition (B), and 28 water-colour 
drawings and pencil sketches of Antarctic fish (Z), some of which were 
utilised by Sir J. Richardson in illustrating his zoology of the voyage, 
are preserved in the Museum. 

Hooker {Sir AVilliam Jackson) [1785-1865] 
Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew, from 1841 to 1865. 
The original water-colour drawings by Franz A. Bauer for the plates 

to Hooker's " Genera Filicum " are preserved in the Museum (B). 

Horsfield (Thomas) [1713-1859] 

Horsfield practised as a physician in Java and Sumatra from 1799 
to 1819, when he became Keeper of the East India Company's Museum 
in London. 

His manuscript lists of Javanese Plants, with letters and 33 original 
pen-and-ink sketches showing dissections of the new or doubtful genera, 
1814-51, that accompanied his collection, are in the Museum (B). 

Houstoun (William) [1695-1733] 

Houstoun practised as a surgeon in the West Indies. His manu- 
script lists and descriptions of West Indian Plants passed, after the death 
of Philip Miller with w^hom he corresponded, into the hands of Sir J. 



Libraries, 39 

Banks, and form MSS. No. 67-69 (B) of the Banksian collection. The 
catalogue was published by Banks under the title of "Reliquiae Hou- 
stounianaj" (1781). 

Hunter (William) [1755-1812] 

The well-known Orientalist and Botanist, W. Hunter, was Medical 
Officer to the East India Company. 

His autograph " Outline of a Flora of Prince of Wales' Island " 
(Penang), is in the Museum (B). 

Inwards (Richard) 

In 1898, Mr. Inwards presented a series of 42 water-colour sketches of 
fossils obtained near Lake Titicaca, with a map of the district (G). The 
fossils had already been given in 1880. 

Jacquin (Nicholaus Joseph von), Baron [1727-1817] 

Jacquin, who was a Botanist of note, corresponded with Dryander. 
His autograph notes and letters, with sketches and water-colour drawings, 
were included in the Banksian Collection (B), 

Jensen (Fritz) 

43 pencil drawings, with manuscript explanations, of the vegetation of 
Lifu, Loyalty Island, made in 1876 by F. Jensen, were purchased (B). 

Johnson (Thomas) [ -1644] 

The Botanist and Apothecary, T. Johnson, became a prominent 
member of the Apothecaries' Company. The Society was in the habit of 
making botanical excursions, and Johnston published accounts of the 
results of their expeditions into Kent and to Hampstead Heath. Manu- 
scri^Dt transcripts by S. Dale of these, the earliest local Floras known, 
form the Banksian MS. No. 96 (B). 

Judd (John Wesley), C.B. [1840- ] 

In 1897, Dr. Judd presented three photographic facsimiles of maps 
and of a table by W. Smith (Q). 

Justen (Frederick) 

In addition to many minor presentations at various times, Mr. Justen 
gave in 1890 a copy of the rare and valuable " Salictum Woburnense " 
(B), and in 1896, three volumes containing notes and descriptions, with a 
few drawings, of Peruvian Plants by A. Mathews (B). 

Kaup (JoHANN Jacob) [1803-1873] 

Kaup was Inspector of the " Naturahencabinet " at Darmstadt. His 
original drawings for the illustrations to his " Catalogue of Apodal Fish 
in the . . . British Museum," 1856, are preserved in the Museum (Z). 
Water-colour drawings by him, chiefly of fossil vertebrata remains, are m 
the Owen Collection (L) and Geological Collection (a) of drawings. 
Kerr (William) [ -1814] 

As Botanical Collector for Kew Gardens, Kerr, afterwards Superinten- 
dent of the Botanical Garden, Ceylon, visited the Philippines. His 
autograph journal of a " Botanical Mission to the Island of Luconia in . . . 
1805 " is in the Museum (B). 
Kirby (William) [1759-1850] 

Two MSS. of the llev. W. Kirby, the entomologist and joint author 
with W. Spence of the famous " Introduction to Entomology," are in the 



40 Libraries. 

Collection : an autograph. MS. entitled " Musgeum Entomologicum Bar- 
haraense. Pars prima sistens Insecta M. Britanniaj indi^enje," which was 
presented with their collections in 1863 by the Entomological Society, 
and a manuscript catalogue of British Staphylinidfe in 3 vol. presented by 
Dr. J. E. Gray in 1869. 

Knowlton (Thomas) [1692-1782] 

Knovvlton began life as Superintendent of Dr. Sherard's garden at 
Eltham, and in 1728 entered the service of Kichard Boyle, 3rd Earl of 
Burlington, at Lanesborough, Yorks. He attained eminence as a botanist, 
and corresponded with many noted contemporaries, including S. Brewer. 
Knowlton's letters to Brewer between 1728 and 1741 are preserved in the 
Collection (B). 

K0nig (JoHAN Gerhard) [1728-1785] 

K0nig, a Danish Medical Missionary in Tranquebar, kept journals of 
his voyages with lists and descriijtions of East Indian (including Siam 
and Malacca) Plants, Animals, and Minerals. These form the Banksian 
MSS., No. 37-55 (B). An English translation of such portions as relate 
to the Straits Settlements appeared in the Journ. Straits Branch Roy. 
Asiatic Soc, Nos. 26 and 27 (1894). 

Lambert (Aylmer Bourke) [1761-1842] 

In 1841, Lambert presented a copy of Cramer's " Papillons exotiques," 
formerly the pi-oj^jcrty of H. Seymer, by whom it had been annotated 
and some of the plates re-touched (Z). 

At the sale of Lambert's librarj^ in 1842 the Museum acquired the 
MSS. of H. Ruiz Lopez and J. Pavon relating to their botanical exploration 
of Peru and Chili in 1777-88, and including the journal of the voyage 
and description of plants (B). 

The original drawings by Ferdinand L. Bauer for some of the plates 
to Lambert's " Genus Finus,^^ with one of the 25 copies of vol. i. coloured 
by Franz A. Bauer, are preserved (B). 

Lee (Ann), Miss [fl. 1769-1779] 

Ann Lee, daughter of James Lee, of Hammersmith, the Horticulturist, 
was an excellent flower-painter. 

19 water-colour drawings by her, mostly on vellum, illustrating the 
genus Mesenibryanthemum, are preserved in the Museum (B). 

Lee (Charles) 

In 1884, 87 water-colour drawings of Cape Plants by F. Masson (B) 
were presented by C. Lee, nephew of the foregoing. 

Lewin (Thomas W.) 

75 water-colour drawings of Birds by Lewin form part of the 
Hard wick e Collection of drawings (Z). 

L'Heritier de Brutelle (Charles Louis) [1748-1800] 

A series of 51 autograph letters from L'Heritier de Brutelle, one of the 
most celebrated French Botanists of his time, to Dryander, form one of 
the Banksian MSS. [No. 101] (B). 

Lightfoot (John) [1735-1788] 

The Rev. J. Lightfoot, some time Librarian and Chaplain to the 
Duchess of Portland, and the author of " Flora Scotica," kept a journal 



Libraries, 41 

of a botanical excursion made in Wales in 1775, of which a transcript by 
Solander forms the Banksian MS., No. 86 (B). 

Lind (James) [1736-1812] 

The Scotch physician J. Lind, visited China in 1766, and accompanied 
Banks on his voyage to Iceland in 1772, he subsequently became physician 
to the Royal Household at Windsor. 

A holograph " Catalogue of such Chinese and Japanese Plants whose 
Chinese characters are known and are botanically described: being an 
Index to find there [sic] Chinese characters in Kempfer's Amasnitates 
exotica," (fee, 1789, addressed to Sir Joseph Banks formed part of the 
Banksian Collection (B). 

Lindley (John) [1799-1865] 

An early autograph draft by the celebrated Botanist Lindley for his 
" Natural System of Botany " is preserved in the Museum (B). 74 water- 
colour drawings of Plants, by Lindley, were purchased in 1897 (B). 

Linne (Carl von) [1707-1778] 

A series of lectures delivered by the great Swedish Naturalist between 
1716 and 1749, and written down by L. Montin, form the Banksian MSS., 
No. 71-75 (B M Z). 

Linnean Society of London 

Presented, in 1896, 33 miscellaneous works. 

Lockhead (William) [ -1815] 

Lockhead was curator of the St. Vincent Botanic Garden. 

19 of his original drawings of West Indian Plants are preserved in the 

Museum (B). 

Lonsdale (William) [1794-1871] 

Lonsdale, who was some time Curator and Librarian to the Geological 
Society, made a special study of Fossil Corals. 

His unpublished autograph, "Report on some Fossil Zoantharia 
collected by Sir C. Lyell ... in Madeira and the Islet of Baxio during 
1854," is preserved in the Museum (G). 

Loureiro (Joao de) [1715-1796] 

The Portuguese Jesuit Loureiro, who travelled in Indo-China, and 
wrote a "Flora Cochiuchinensis," sent to England original descriptions of 
the new genera, that form the Banksian ]\IS., No. 93 (B). 

MacGillivray (William) [1796-1852] 

213 of the original water-colour drawings of British Animals 
(13 Mammals, 122 Birds, and 78 Fish) executed between 1831 and 1841 
by the celebrated Naturalist, W. MacGillivray, who was noted for the 
care and fidelity of his drawings, were presented in 1892 by his son 
P. H. MacGillivray (Z). 

MaconocMe (Alexander) 

Capt. Maconochie, Pt.N., Lieut.-Governor of Norfolk Island, gave to 
R. Brown a series of autograph " Reports on Norfolk Island," contammg 
natural history observations (B). 



42 Libraries, 

Mantell (Gideon Algernon) [1790-1852] 

Some water-colour drawings of fossils by the well-known Geologist, 
Dr. Mantell, are included in the " Catalogue of Fossil Organic Remains 
in the Cabinet of Mrs. M. H. Smith of Tunbridge Wells," which was 
presented in 1892 (G). 

Martini (Bartolommeo) 

Martini was author of a "Catalogus Plantarum a me in itinere 
montis Baldi inventarum," published in 1707. 

The manuscript of a further work by him dated 1715, entitled 
" Catalogo al fassiculo di Monte Baldo delle Piante naturali," is in the 
Museum (B). 

Martyn (John) [1699-1768], and (Thomas). [1735-1825] 

A series of the autograph letters of these Botanists form the Banksian 
MS. [No. 103] (B). 

Massee (George Edward) 

Some drawings of Fungi were presented in 1888 by Mr. Massee, now 
Principal Assistant, Royal Gardens, Kew. 

1,036 of his water-colour drawings of Fungi were purchased in 
1892 (B). 

Masson (Francis) [1741-1805] 

The first botanical collector sent out from Kew Gardens was F. Masson, 
who travelled in South Africa, the Canaries, Azores, Madeira, the West 
Indies and North America. 

A number (about 63) of his water-colour drawings of Plants and 
Animals made on these expeditions were in the Banksian Collection 
(BZ). 

In 1885, a further series of 87 of his water-colour drawings of Plants 
were presented by Mr. C. Lee (B). 

Mathews (Andrew) [ -1841] 

Some notes with a few pencil drawings of Peruvian Plants by the 
Botanical collector, A. Mathews, forming 3 volumes, were presented by his 
daughters in 1896 (B). 

Maund (Benjamin) [1790-1863] 

B. Maund combined in his person the callings of chemist, botanist, 
bookseller, printer, and publisher of " The Botanic Garden." 

The original water-colour drawings for this work wei-e presented in 
1882 (B). 

Miers (John) [1789-1879] 

The engineer and botanist, J. Miers, spent many years in South 
America. His MSS., including "A Catalogue of the Woods of Brazil" 
and original drawings of South American Plants and their dissections, 
as well as the works used and annotated by him, were presented by 
J. W. Miers in 1879 and 1880 (B). 

Miller (John), otherwise Miiller (Johann Sebastian) 

[1715?-1790?] 

Miiller, the draughtsman and engraver, came to England in 1744, and 
was always known after 1760 as John Miller. He published and projected 
several illustrated works dealing with Plants and Insects. 



Libraries. 43 

" A series of 928 drawings [in water-colour] of the leaves, stalks and 
ramifications of Plants . . . executed for the Earl of Bute, in the years 
1783-84," in 5 vols., was purchased in 1880 (B). 

Miller (John Frederick) [fl. 1775-1796] 

The son of John Miller (or Miiller), J. F. Miller became known as a 
draughtsman. 

He and his brother James were employed by Banks in making finished 
drawings from S. Parkinson's sketches of the Plants collected during 
Cook's first voyage round the world : he also accompanied Banks in 1772 
to Iceland as botanical artist. His water-coloured drawings so made form 
part of the Banksian Collection (B). 

Montin (Lars) 

Certain of Linnjeus' lectures delivered between 1746 and 1749, and 
written down by his pupil L. Montin, form the Banksian MSS. No. 71-75 
(B, M, Z), while the journal Montin kept on a journey he made in 1749 
to Lapland forms the Banksian MS. No. 83 (B). 

Moon (Alexander) [ -1825] 

37 original water-colour drawings by A. Moon, Superintendent of the 
Botanic Garden, Ceylon, with autograph descriptions of Ceylon Plants, 
are preserved in the Museum (B). 

Morandi (Giambattistia) 

Morandi, Knight, of Milan, was author of an " Historia Botanica 
Practica," etc., L744 : a manuscript draft for this work, said to be in his 
handwriting, entitled, " Erudimenta Botanica," etc., and illustrated by 
133 plates of his original drawings, is preserved (B). 

Morris (John) [1810-1886] 

226 pamphlets on Geological subjects from the library of Prof. Morris 
were acquired in 1886 (G). 

Moseley (Harriet), Miss [fl. 1836-1867] 

1,922 original water-colour drawings of British Plants, by Miss 
Moseley, were purchased 1886 (B). 

Moseley (Henry Nottidge) [1844-1891] 

Moseley formed one of the members of the scientific staff of the 
Challenger. His autograph journal of natural history observations 
made during the voyage was presented by him in 1883 (Z). 

Neill (J.) 

Neill, who was Deputy Assistant Commissary-General of Albany, King 
George's Sound, Western Australia, made, at the suggestion of Governor 
Grey, water-colour drawings of the Vertebrata of the district. 67 of these, 
some of which illustrate and are referred to in Eyre's "Journals of 
Expeditions of discovery into Central Australia" (1845), were presented 
by Mr. Neill in 1845 (Z). 

Nodder (Frederick Polydore) [ -1800?] 

The botanical draughtsman F. P. Nodder was employed by Banks to 
make finished drawings, from Parkinson's sketches, of the Plants collected 
during Cook's first voyage round the world, which drawings form part of 
of the Banksian Collection (B). 



44 Libraries. 

Noronha (Ferxaxdo) [ -1787] 

The Spanish botanist F. Noronha or Norofia, who did much at 
Manilla to the Eoyal Botanic Gardens, subsequently travelled in Java and 
Madagascar. 

A set of 111 water-colour drawings of Java Plants made by him, or 
for him, of which there is a similar set in the Royal Library at Berlin, 
were included among the MSS. and drawings of L. A. Deschamps, that 
were presented by J. E. Eeeves in 1861 (B). 

Owen {Sir Richard), K.C.B. [1804-1892] 

Sir Pu Owen was Superintendent of the Natural History Departments 
of the British Museum, 185(3-83. 

In 1893, Sir R. Owen's executors presented a large series of MSS. and 
original drawings including : — 

The original autograph notes made while dissecting the Pearly Nautilus, 
the successive drafts for poi'tions of the memoir, the author's interleaved 
copy of the completed memoir with his autograph notes and other 
memoranda as well as the original water-colour drawings from which the 
plates w'ere engraved, and proof impressions of the plates (L). 

The set of his manuscript notes and synopsis of lectures from 1828 to 
186-1 (L). 

Notes and sketches of remains of fossil Eeptilia in various Museums, 
made when preparing his British Association Reports on the British 
Fossil Eeptilia (G). 

A set of original water-colour drawings by W. Clift, Franz Bauer, 
Mrs. Marsli and others for the illustrations to Sir E. Home's papers (L). 

A very large collection of original drawings by various artists 
(e.g., G. Scharf, J. Dinkel, J. J. Kamp, Sir E. Landseer, J. Wolf) in 
water-colour, pen-and-ink and pencil, with photographs, all of zoological 
and pala30zoological subjects, mostly fossil Vertebrata, very many being 
the originals for illustrations in Sir E. Owen's own works (L). 

This collection though mounted and arranged has not yet been 
catalogued. 

Park (MuNGo) [1771-1806] 

Afterwards celebrated as an African explorer, Mungo Park went in 
1792 as surgeon on board the Worcester to Sumatra, where he made 
botanical and zoological observations. 20 water-colour drawings of Fish 
executed at the time with manuscript descriptions of six of the species 
were probably included in the Banksian Collection (Z).* 

Parkinson (George S.) 

In 1896, a series of 185 sketches in water-colour, pen-and-ink and 
pencil by G. Shaw, the zoologist, as well as a portrait of S. Parkinson 
the artist (L), were presented by Mr. G. S. Parkinson. 

Parkinson (Sydney) [1745?-1771] 

Parkinson accompanied Banks as draughtsman on Cook's first voyage 
round the world (1768-71). 

40 water-colour drawings of animals, mostly on vellum, made from 
specimens or drawings executed in India, by order of J. G. Loten, and 
including the originals of some of the figures in Pennant's "Indian 
Zoology " and " Quadrupeds," formed the Banksian MS. No. 20 (Z). 

* Cf. Trans. Linn. See. iii. (1797), pp. 33-38. 



Libraries, 45 

The large collection in 10 volumes of his water-colour drawings and 
pencil sketches of Plants and Animals made on the voyage round the 
world, with finished drawings made from his sketches by T. Bargis, 
J. Cleveley, Jas. Miller, J. F. Miller and F. P. Nodder, were also acquired 
with the Banksian Collection (B, Z). 

A portrait of Parkinson in oils was presented in 1806 (L). 

Pavon (Jose) [/. 1770-1825] 

The Spanish botanist, Pavon, accompanied Ruiz Lopez to Peru and 
Chili. 

In addition to the manuscripts named later under lluiz Lopez, the 
Museum possesses autograph lists of American and Spanish plants 
forwarded hj Pavon to A. B. Lambert (B). 

Petiver (James) [ -1718] 

A set of 73 rough water-colour drawings of Cape Plants, some of 
which were used for the plates to Petiver's " Gazophyllacium," forms 
the Banksian MS. No. 88 (B). 

The copv of Pvumph's " D'Amboinische Rariteitkamer," used by 
Petiver in the preparation of the " Gazophyllacium," and having an 
interlinear manuscript translation, was transferred in 1880 froni' the 
Printed Book Department : it would seem to have previously formed part 
of Sir Hans Sloane's library (L). 

Plumier (Charles) [1646-1704] 

The French botanist and traveller, C. Plumier, was author of many 
works on American Plants. 

312 original water-colour and pen-and-ink drawings of Plants many 
of which were used in illustrating his published works, form the Banksian 
MS. No. 1-5 (B). 

Ponthieu (Henry de) 

Autograph descriptions of some West Indian Plants, by H. de 
Ponthieu, a French West Indian Merchant, are preserved^ in the 
Museum (B). 

Pope (Clara Maria), Mrs. [ -1838] 

Eleven original water-colour drawings illustrating species and varieties 
of the genus Foeonia, executed in 1821 or 1822 by Mrs. Pope, the artist 
and flower painter to the Horticultural ''Society, are preserved in the 
Museum (B). 

Pulteney (Richard) [1730-1801] 

The original autograph of Pulteney's " Catalogue of Plants spontaneously 
growing about Loughborough," forms the Banksian MS. No. 00 (B). 

A manuscript " Flora Malabarica, Plantas sistans, quas H. van Eheede 
Drakenstein . . . prasbuit. Synonimis Linna^i, Raii and Rhumphii additis 
per R. Pulteney," forms the Banksian MS. No. 26 (B). 

The Museum also possesses his autograph " Catalogue of Englisli 
Plants," and unpublished "Flora Anglica abbreviata" (B). 

Ramsay (Robert George Wardlaw-), Captain 

The Ornithological Library of the Marquess of Tweeddale was i:re- 
sented in 1887 by his nephew, Capt. Wardlaw-Ramsay. The collection 
comprises 608 works in 2,560 volumes, besides some 200 pamphlets, and 
is kept for use in the Bird Room (Z). 



46 Libraries, 

Kay (John) [1627-1705] 

88 autograpli letters of the celebrated naturalist, J. Piay, and his 
correspondents, were presented in 1884 (B). 

The original MS. of Derham's Life of Ray was acquired during the 
same year (B). 

Keeves (John) [1774-1856] 

J. Eeeves, when Inspector of Tea at the East India Company's 
establishment in Canton, made careful study of the natural history and 
resources of the country. lie employed native artists in making water- 
colour drawings of the Animals and Plants. 

521 of these drawings of Animals (Z) and 654 of the Plants (B), were 
presented in 1877 with J\1SS. notes concerning the drawings of Fish, of 
which Sir J. Ptichardson states (Kept. Brit. Assoc, 1845, p. 188), that 
four sets were made, one of which was given to Major-Gen. T. Hardwicke 
whose collection of drawings was bequeathed to the Museum in 1835. 

Reeves (John Russell) [1804-1877] 

J. P. Peeves, the son of John Reeves, was in Hon. East India 
Company's service at Canton for thirty years and devoted to botany and 
horticulture. 

He presented in 1861 the unpublished autograph journals of L. A. 
Deschamps, kept on the voyage of the Eeclierche in search of La Perouse, 
and during subsequent travels in Java, with the notes for a Flora Javanica 
and the original sketches of Scenery, Animals and Plants, including 111 
water-colour drawings of Java Plants by, or made for F. Noronha (B, Z). 

On his death, Miss Reeves presented the collection of Chinese drawings 
which her father, J. Reeves, had formed (B Z). 

Roemer (Johann Jacob) [1763-1819] 

210 original drawings, formerly the property of Dr. Roemer, were 
purchased in 1883 (B). 

Rothschild {Hon. Lionel Walter) [1868- ] 

Life-size photographs of Apteryx and of giant Tortoises were presented 
in 1897 and subsequent years (Z G L) by the Hon. L. W. Rothschild. 

Roxburgh (William) [1759-1815] 

The botanist W. Roxburgh was surgeon on the Madras establishment 
of the Hon. East India Company and afterwards Superintendent of the 
Calcutta Botanic Garden. 

The manuscript copy of his " Flora Indica," containing autograph 
notes by him and by Robert Brown that are not in the piinted edition ; 
an index to the whole of his botanical MSS. ; 14 water-colour drawings 
of Malayan Plants, with one of a Cycas from the Moluccas : and some 
autograph descriptions, with 22 coloured drawings of Indian Palms and 
the drawings of the dissections, used in his " Plants of the Coast of 
Coromandel," are in the Museum (B) : the last-named was purchased 
in 1884. 

Royal Society of London 

The Royal Society presented, in 1886, 34 miscellaneous works, and, in 
1891, 227 geological and palseontological pamphlets (G), as well as, by 
request of H. B. Brady, a copy of Soldani's rare work " Testaceographise 
ac Zoophytographise . . . tomus primus ( - secundus) " (L). 



Libraries, 47 

Ruiz Lopez (Hipolito) [1754-1815] 

The Spanish botanist, Ruiz Lopez, was appointed to conduct an 
expedition for the botanical exploration of Peru and Chili in 1777. He 
was accompanied by J. Pavou, and the two returned in 1788. 

Their joint manuscript descriptions of the Plants procured, which 
formed the basis for their " Flora Peruviana et Chilensis," with lluiz 
Lopez's autograph " Relaciou historica del Viage" and his important 
manuscripts on Cinchona, were purchased at the sale of the Lambert 
Library in 1842 (B). 

Russell (Anna), Mrs. [1807-1876] 

730 of her original water-colour drawings of the higher Fungi were 
bequeathed by Mrs. Russell in 1876, and 5 more were presented in 
1886 (B). 

Salisbury (Richard Anthony) [1761-1829] 

R. A. Salisbury, the botanist, left his property to W. J. Burchell the 
explorer, on whose decease in 1863 the MSS. and drawings passed into 
the hands of Dr. J. E. Gray, by whom they were given to the Museum 
(B) in 1865. 

Salisbury's notes and drawings of Ericaceous Plants were transferred 
from the Royal Gardens at Kew in 1881 (B). 

Salter (John William) [1820-1869] 

J. W. Salter, the pala3ontologist, was apprenticed at the age of 15 
to James De Carle Sowerby and when working witli him prepared iUus- 
trations for the supplement to his English Botany. These original 
drawings were acquired with Sowerby's in 1862 (B). 

Saunders (William Wilson) [1809-1879] 

A number of drawings and engravings of Plants collected by W. W. 
Saunders were acquired in 1880 (B). 

Scharf (George) [1788-1860] 

A number of original drawings, chiefly of fossil vertebrate remains, 
by G. Scharf, form part of the Owen Collection of Drawings, presented 
in 1893 (G and L). 

Schleiden (Matthias Jakob) [1804-1881] 

A series of original water-colour and pen-and-ink drawings of Plants, by 
M. J. Schleiden, Professor of Botany at Jena, with manuscript descriptions 
of them, the whole bound in 9 volumes, were purchased in 1886 (B). 

Schmidt (Johann Carl) [1793-1850] 

The Museum possesses an autograph work by J. C. Schmidt, the 
Curator of the Shuttleworth Herbarium at Bern, entitled : — " Beschreibung 
der innlandischen Arten von Cuscuta " (B). 

Schomburgk (Sir Robert Hermann) [1804-1865] 

Sir R. H. Schomburgk, the traveller, acted as Commissioner for 

dehneating the boundary between British Guiana and Venezuela in 

1841-43. 

A manuscript of his memoir " On the Forest Trees of British Guiana 

and their uses," etc., read before the British Association in 1814, and 

subsequently to the Linnean Society, and printed by that Society in its 

proceedings, is preserved in the Museum (B). 



48 Libraries. 

A series of 248 original water-colour drawings of Plants of British 
Guiana was presented in 1847 in part by Sir Robert himself, and in 
part by the Secretary of State for the Colonies, Earl Grej^ (B). 

Seyffert (Heinrichus Christophorus) 

133 original water-colour drawings of Fungi, bv H. C. Seyffert, a 
physician at Possneck, form the Banksian MS. No. Qb (B.) 

Seymer (Henry) [1745-1800] 

A copy of Cramer's "Papillons exotiques" which had belonged to 
H. Seymer of Hanford, Dorset, who had added the Linnean names and 
retouched several of the coloured plates, was presented by A. B. Lambert 
m 1841 (Z). 

Shaw (George) [1751-1813] 

185 of his original water-colour, pen-and-ink and pencil sketches, by 
G. Shaw, Keeper of the Natural History Section of the British Museum, 
1807-13, were presented in 1896 (L). 

Sherard (William) [1659-1728] 

W. Sherard, the Botanist who was Consul at Smyrna, contributed 
some notes and observations on the first two volumes of Ray's " Historia 
Plantarum" and his MSS. endorsed by Ray, form the Banksian MS. 
No. 80 (B). 

Simpson (Martin) [1799-1892] 

M. Simpson, the Geologist, was author of several works on the 
geology and pala3ontology of Yorkshire. 

His original drawings of Belemnites for his book on " The Fossils of 
the Yorkshire Lias," consisting of 8 unpublished plates, were presented 
in 1899 (G). 

Sloane {Sir Hans) [1660-1753] 

The original manuscript catalogues of the natural history collections 
of Sir H. Sloane, 15 volumes in all, the copy of his "Voyage to the 
Islands Madera, Barbados . . . and Jamaica," &c., annotated in his own 
hand-writing, the original drawings for the plates to that work (bound up 
with the specimens from which they were made in the 8 volumes of 
Sloane's Jamaica Herbarium) and his copy of Ray's " Historia Plantarum," 
with marginal references to his herbarium, and autograph addenda, may 
be said to have formed the nucleus of the present Natural History 
Library (B, G, M). 

Some works containing manuscript notes by J. Petiver probably once 
formed part of his library (B L). 

A series of pen-and-ink drawings with autograph descriptions by 
G. J. Camellus, entitled " Descriptiones Fruticum et Arborum Luzonis," 
etc., from Sir H. Sloane's library, was transferred from the ]M[SS. 
Department in 1884. 

Smith (Christian) [1785-1816] 

A manuscript biography of Christian Smith, Prof, of Botany at the 
University of Christiania, who travelled in the British Isles, to Madeira 
and Tenerif and lost his life on Tuckey's Congo Expedition in 1816, is 
preserved in the Museum (B). 



Libraries. 49 

Smith (Charles Hamilton) [1776-1859] 

Smith's original MS. on "Horses, the Equidaj or freniis Equufi of 
authors," ilkisti-ated with 100 water-colour drawings, is pi-eservcd in the 
Museum (Z). It formed the basis for the volume in the *' Naturalists' 
Library." 

Smith (Christopher) [ -1806?] 

183 original water-colour drawings of Plants from the Straits Settle- 
ments by 0. Smith, Superintendent, Botanic Gardens, Moluccas, were 
acquired in 1885 (B). 

Smith (Edwin Dalton) [fl, 1823-1832] 

56 original water-colour drawings by E. D. Smith for the illustrations 
to R. Sweet's " Flora Australasica " are preserved in the ]\Iuseum (B). 

Smith (William) [1769-1839] 

Of the few but valuable maps, or their facsimiles, and memoirs by 
W. Smith, "The Father of English Geologv," the Museum i^ossesses 

1. " Observations on . . . AVater Meadows . . . with an account of 
Prisley Bog," l^^OG. 

2. Photograph of the original MS., in the possession of the Geological 
Society, of a Table of the " Order of Strata and their embedded Or<iauic 
remains, in the vicinity of Bath, examined and proved prior to 1799." 
This was dictated by Smith and written down by the liev, Benjamin 
Richardson at the house of the Rev. J. Townsend in 1799. It was revised 
and printed in the "Memoir to the Map" in 1815. This facsimile was 
presented to the Museum in 1897 by Prof. J. W. Judd. 

o. A coloured photogi'aphic reproduction of " A map of five miles 
round the City of Bath, on a scale of one inch and half to a mile . . . 
1799," geologically coloured the same year by W. Smith, of which the 
original is in the possession of the Geological Society, presented in 1897 
by Prof. J. W. Judd. 

4. A coloured photographic reproduction of the "General Map of 
Strata found in England and Wales . . . 1801 " [Scale 1 in. = 37 m. 
about], taken from the original in the possession of the Geological Society, 
presented in 1897 by Prof. J. W. Judd. 

5. A geological map begun in 1812 and completed in 1815 entitled, 
" A delineation of the Strata of England and Wales with part of Scotland" 
[Scale 1 in. = 5 m.], presented in 1880 by Mr. (afterwards Sir) A. W. 
Franks. 

6. " A Memoir to the Map," etc., 1815. 

7. "A new Geological Atlas of England and Wales" [Scales from IJ 
to 3^ m. = 1 in.], Pt. i.-iii. and vi. [Besides Pt. iv. and v. the maps of 
Wilts, Cumberland and Westmoreland are wanting.] Purchased 1889. 

8. " Strata identified by Organized Fossils," 181(5. 

9. " Stratigraphical System of Organized Fossils," 1817. 

10. Six coloured geological views and sections across various parts 
of England and Wales, 1817-19, formerly in the library of Smith's 
nephew, J. Phillips (afterwards Professor of Geology at Oxfonl), pre- 
sented by W. Topley in 1887. 

11. A new Geological Map of England and Wales " [Scale 1 in. = 
15 m.], 1827. Presented, in 1884, by W. Carruthers, who notes that it is 
identical with editions dated 1820 and 1828. 

12. " Synopsis of Geological Phenomena," 1832. 

VOL. I. E 



50 Libraries. 

In 1872 "A Book about W. Smith, LL.D., and the Somersetshire 
Coal-Canal," was projected by W. S. Mitchell ; his notes and photographs 
with geologically coloured keys were purchased, circa 1890 (Gr). 

Smith (WoRTHiNGTON George) [1835- ] 

In 1886 Mr. Worthington C Smith presented a set of proofs on India 
paper of his illustrations lo J. Stevenson's " Hymenomycetes Britannici" 
(B). 

A large series (upwards of 1,500) of water-colour drawmgs of Fungi, 
as well as a complete series of the British Hymenomycetes ; 39 water- 
colour drawings of British Orchidacea^ and 26 plates of pen-and-ink 
drawings of Pollen Grains, executed by Mr. Smith are in the Botanical 
Department Collection of Drawings, or exhibited in the Public Gallery 
(B). 

Society of Antiquaries 

Presented, in 1895, 38 miscellaneous works. 

Solander (Daniel Charles) [1736-1782] 

Solander, the Swedish botanist, and pupil of Linnteus, became Assistant 
Librarian at the British Museum and at the same time acted as librarian 
to Sir J. Banks. He accompanied the latter on Capt. J. Cook's first 
voyage round the world (1768-71), and the complete set of i)is auto- 
graph notes made during that voyage, from the original rough notes to the 
completed descriptions, with lists of the various local faunas and floras are 
preserved (B Z), as well as a series of lists of the Plants collected by 
W. Anderson during Cook's third voyage (1776-80) in the order in which 
they were arranged in the drying books in wdiich they were brought 
home (B). 

A "Florula India? Occidentalis" and a "Florula Capensis' contam 
complete lists of the then known species from those regions (B). 

A descriptive slip-catalogue of Animals and Plants,* which was 
intended to embrace all species then known, systematically arranged and 
kept in Solander cases, has since been bound and occupies, Animals 27 
(Z), and Plants 25 volumes (B). 

Lists and descriptions by Solander of the Plants (B), and Fish (Z), 
obtained during the visit with Banks to Iceland in 1772, as well as many 
other manuscnpts written in connection with his curatorship of the 
Banksian Museum, came with those before mentioned in that Collection. 

Many of the above manuscripts are interspersed with notes in Banks' 
handwriting. 

Soldani (Ambrogio) [1733-1808] 

A copy of Soldani's rare work " Testaceographiai ac Zoophytographiaj 
parvffi et microscopical tomus primus ( — secundus)," was by bequest of 
H. B. Brady presented by the Eoyal Society in 1891 (L). 

Sowerby (James) [1757-1822] 

James Sowerby, naturalist and artist, illustrated many works on 
natural history. _ , ,,tt , 

His oridnal drawings for Plates i., ii. and xn. of Alton's "Hortus 
Kewensis," form pait of the Banksian MS. No. 17 (B). 



* The Plant Catalogue practically formed the base of Alton's " Hortus 

Kewensis " and also relates to the Banksian Herbarium. 



Libi 



aries. 51 



The original dra wings for Xo. 2-4 of Dickson's " Fasciculus Plantaruni 
Lryptogamaruni Britannia?," foi-ni tlie Bauksian MS. No '>! (B) 
o r'^}^ ''"-"'?''^ water-colour drawings for the " Englisli Botany," over 
4500 m number, were purchased in 1859 (B). 

The original water-colour drawings for his " English Funfl," were 
presented m 18 /G, and have been incorporated in the collection of 
drawings of Fungi (B). 

Sowerby (James De Carle) [1787-1871] 

James De Carle Sowerby was well known both as a naturalist and 
artist. 

His original water-colour drawings for the illustrations to the " Sup- 
plement to English Botany " were purchased in 18G2 (B). 

29 iDlates of original water-colour drawings of mosses, dated 1803 
from which the plates to Dawson Turner's " IMuscologijc Hibernicie 
Spicilegiuin " were engraved, were purchased in 1866 (B). ° 

The set of 65 original water-colour drawings of Chelonia to illustrate 
J. Bell's "Monograph of the Testudinata," and subsequently utilised f.r 
Sowerby and Lear's " Tortoises," was presented in 1875 (Z). 

Spaendonck (Gerrit van) [1746-1822] 

70 water-colour drawings of Flowers after Nature, by G. Spaendonck 
the celebrated botanical artist at the Jardin des Plantes, Paris were 
purchased in 1885 (B). ' 

Stephens (William) [/. 1718-1732] 

A " Catalogus Plantarum in Horto Dubliniensi," in part in the hand- 
writing of AV. Stephens, Botanist and Lecturer at Trinity College, Dublin 
forms the Bauksian MS. No. 92 (B). 

Sweet (Robert) [1783-1835] 

The 56 original water-colour drawings by E. D. Smith for Sweet's 
" Flora Australasica " are preserved in the Museum (B). 

Thunberg (Carl Pehr) [1743-1822] 

An autograph " Flora Capensis " made some time prior to 1782 by the 
celebrated Swedish naturalist Thunberg (that is of interest as showincr 
the state of the work at that time as contrasted with its extension when 
first published in 1820), with a transcript in Dryander's handwritino- were 
among the Bauksian MSS. (B). ° 

Tilli (Michael Angelus) [1655-1740] 

An autogi-aph "Specimen Plantarum qua? in Horto Medico Sapienti;e 
Pisanaj locisque finitimis extant" 1713-30 (3 vol.), by M. A. Tilli, Pro- 
fessor of Botany at Pisa, forms the Banksian MS. [No. Ill], (B). 

Topley (William) [1841-1894] 

A set of the six views and geological sections of various parts of 
England and Wales, made by W. Smith in 1817-19 (G), was presented 
in 1887 by W. Topley, the Geologist. 

Tournefort (Joseph Pitton de) [1656-1708] 

A copy of the manuscript of the celebrated French Botanist Tournefort, 
entitled "Catalogue des Plantes que M. P. de Tournefort trouva dans 
ses voyages d'Espagne et de Portugal," forms the Banksian MS., No. 82 
(B). 

V 9 



52 Libraries. 

Toynbee {Mrs. Henry) 

189 original water-colour drawings of Marine Animals and Plants 
made by Mrs. Toynbee during voyages between England and India^ via 
the Cape, in 185G-58, with manuscript notes, were presented in 1895 by 
Capt. H. Toynbee (Z). 

Tweeddale; Arthur Hay, ^th Marquess of [1824-1878] 

The Marquess of Tweeddale, traveller and ornithologist, formed an 
extensive library, which, numbering 698 works in 2,560 volunies with 
about 200 pamphlets, was presented by his nephew, Capt. E. G. Wardlaw- 
Ramsay, in 1887 (Z). This collection is kept for use in the Bird Room. 

Upsala Royal University 

187 dissertations dealing with natural history sul)jects, and usually 
very difficult to obtain, were presented by the Royal University of Upsala 
in 1896. The University has since from time to time given other similar 
publications. 

Watelet (Adolphe) [1811-1879] 

Watelet, the palcTobotanist, was author of a " Description des Plantes 
fossiles du bassin de Paris," 1866. The original pencil drawings for the 
plates to that work, with 21 additional unpublished ones, and their 
descriptions in manuscript, were purchased in 1880 (G). 

V/atling (Thomas) 

Watling was sent out to New South AVales by J. Lee to collect plants. 
71 foil, of water-colour drawings of Natives, Animals, and Plants from 
the neighbourhood of Port Jackson form the Banksian MS., No. 34 (B;. 
Some oi these are the originals used in drawing the plates for J. White's 
" Journal of a Voyage to New South Wales " (1790). A further and 
very extensive series made between 1788 and 1792, and containing some 
figures of Birds that formed the types of J. Latham's descriptions in the 
supplement to his "General Synopsis of Birds," was purchased in 
1902 (Z). 
Watson (Hewett Cottrell) [1804-1881] 

The manuscript recoixls used in the compilation of Watson's " Cybele 
Britannica " were presented in 1887 (B). 

Wheeler (Edwin), of aifton [1833- ] 

2,449 water-colour drawings of British Fungi, made between 1880 
and 1895 by Mr. Wheeler, were presented in 1895 (B). 

White (John) [1788-96] 

White went as surgeon-general to Botany Bay. The original draw- 
ings by T. Watlincr used lor some of the plates of White's "Journal of a 
Voyao-e to New South Wales " are included in the Banksian MS. No. 34 
(B). " 
Wigg (Lilly) [1749-1828] 

An autograph " Catalogue of Esculent Plants," 1810, by L. Wigg, 
botanist, of Great Yarmouth, is preserved in the Museum (B). 

Wilson (William) [fi. 1799-1871] 

W. Wilson, the botanist, was au.thor of " Muscologia Britannica." 
His original drawings and notes, as well as his correspondence (filling 



Libr^ 



aries. 



53 



12 volumes) relating to Mosses, were purchased with liis Herbarium in 
1874 (B). 

Windt (L. E.) 

A manuscript on " The Barberry Bush, an enemy to Winter Corn," 
1806, translated from the German original of L. E. Windt, that was 
published 1806, is in the Museum (B). 

Wolf (Josef) [1820-1899] 

Original water-colour drawings of the Aye-aye, by Wolf, are included 
in the Owen Collection of Drawings (L). 

Woodward (Samuel Pickwortii) [1821-1865] 

A manuscript, " Catalogue of Fossil Organic Remains in tlie Cabinet 

of Mrs. M. H. Smith, of Tunbridge Wells," 1815, with water-colour 

drawings by S. P. Woodward (who compiled the Catalogue), W. 11. 

Bensted, and others, was presented in 1892 (G). 

Some original drawings by Woodward are included in the Davidson 

collection of drawings of Brachiopoda, which was presented in 1886 (G). 

Young (William) [fl, 1753-1784] 

302 water-colour drawings of Plants from North and South Carolina 
made in 1767 by W. Young, with manuscript title, index, and dedication, 
form the Banksian MS. No. 24 (B). 



List of Current Serial Publications Presented to the 
British Museum (Natural History). 



A.— BRITISH ISLANDS. 
Aberdeen. 

University of Aberdeen. 

Calendar. 1894-.")— > 

Alnwick. 

Berwickshire Naturalists' Club. 

History. Vol. ix — > ..... 
Barrow-in-Fukness. 

Barrow Naturalists' Field Club. 
Annual Report. Vol. xv — > 
Bath. 

Natur<d History and Antiquarian Field Club. 
Proceedings. Vol. vi, pt. 2— > 
Belfast. 

Belfast Natural History and Philosophical Society. 

Report and Proceedin>rs. 1871-2 — > 
Belfast Naturalists' Field Club. 

Annual Report and Proceedings. New Seriet 
Vol. ill, No. 0— > 



Date 

when 

presenta- 

ti(»u 

began. 


Initial of 
Library 
in which 
the Serial 
is kept. 


1894 


L 


1887 


L 


1902 


li 


1888 


L 


1887 


L 


1S9-J 


L 



Date 


Initial of 


when 


Liljraiy 


resenta- 


in which 


tioii 


the Serial 


began. 


is kept. 



54 Libraries. 



Birmingham. 

Birmingliam Natural History and Philosophical Society. 

Proceedings, Vol, vi— > IS 89 L 

Brighton, 

Avicultural Society. 

Avicultural Magazine. Vol. i (lS94)-> . . 1805 Z 

Brighton and Hove Natural History and Philosopliical 
Society. 

Annual Report. 1892-> 1892 L 

Bristol, 

Bristol Naturalists' Society. 

Proceedings. Series III, vol. v, pt. 3— > . .1888 L 

Burtox-on-Trent. 

Burton-on-Trent Natural History Society. 

Transactions. Vol. i— > ..... 18l»4 L 

Cambridge. 

Cambridge Pldlosopliical Society. 

Transactions. Vol. xiv— > 1885 L 

Proceedings. Vol. v, pt. 2^ .... 1885 L 

University of Cambridge. 
Annual Report of the Museums and Lecture Rooms 

Syndicate. Xo. l-> 1896 L 

Cardiff. 

Cardiff Naturalists' Society. 

ReiDort and Transactions. Vol, xix, pt, 2— > . , 1888 L 

Cheltenham. 

Cheltenham College Natural History Society. 
Report of the Proceedings. 189.")— > , . , 189G L 

Chester. 

Chester Society of Natural Science. 

Annual Report. No. 17— > 1888 L 

Proceedings. No. 4— > 1894 L 

Croydon. 

Croydon Microscopicd and Natural History Club. 

Proceedings. 1884-6— > 1886 I* 

Dorchester. 

Dorset Naturalists' Field Club. 

Proceedings. Vol. xx — > ..... 1900 L 

Douglas, Isle of Man. 

Isle of Man Natural History and Antiquarian Society. 

Yn Lioar Manninagh. Vol. 1— > . . . 1889 L 



DUBLIX. 






Boyal Dublin Society. 






Scientific Transactions. Vol. iii, no. 14— > . 


1888 


L 


Scientific Proceedings. Vol. v, no. 7— > 


1888 


L 


Economic Proceedings. Vol. i— >. 


1900 


L 


Boyal Irish Academy. 






Transactions. Vol. xxix, pt. 2— >. 


1888 


Ii 


Proceedings. Ser. II, vol. iv, pt. 6 — > . 


1888 


L 


University of Dublin. 






Xotes from the Botanical School of Trinity College. 






No. ]-> ' . 


1896 


B 


Calendar. 1882-> 


1888 


L 


University of Ireland. 






Calendar. 1889— > 


1889 


L 



Librar 



nes. 



o;j 



Dumfries. 

Dumfriesshire and Galloioay Natural Hisfo] 
Antiquarian Society. 
Transactions. l^S86-7— > 
Ealing. 

Ealing Natural Science and Microscopical Society 
Annual Report. No. o— > 
Eastbournp:. 

Eastbourne Natural History Society. 

Transactions. New Series. Vol. ii, pt 2— > 
Edinburgh. 

Edinburgh Field Naturalists' and Microscoiiical i 

Transactions. Vol. i — > 
Edinburgh Geological Society. 

Transactions. Vol. vi— > 
Fishery Board for Scotland. 

Annual Report. No. 3— > . 
Iloyal Physical Society. 

Proceeding.^. Vol. ix, pt. 3— > 
Royal Scottish Geographical Society. 

Scottish Geographical Magazine. Vol. iv, no, 
Boyal Society of Edinburgh. 

Transactions. Vol. xxxiii. pt. 2— > 
Proceedings. Vol. xiv, no. 125— > '. 

University of Edinburgh. 
Calendar. 1888-!;)-^ .... 

EpS03[. 

Epsom College Natural History Societii 
Report. No. ].-> . . 
Falmouth. 

lioyal Cormmll Polytechnic Society. 
Annual Reports. No. .-).")— > 
Felsted. 

Felsted School Natural Historu Society. 
Report. No. l-> . . . 
Folkestone. 

Folkestone Natural History Society. 
Proceedings. No. 1— > 
Glasgow. 

Geologicid Society. 

TiaUfactions. Vol. viii — > 
Natural History Society. 

Transactions. New Series, vol. ii— > . 
Philosophical Society. 

Proceedings. Vol. xviii — > 
University of Glasgow. 
Calendar. 18U4-5— > .... 
Gloucester. 

Cotteswold Natundist^" Field Club. 
Proceedings. Vol. ix, pt. 2— > 
Halifax, Yorks. 

Halifax Naturalist. Vol. i— > 



Date 


Initial of 


when 


Library 


resenta- 


in whicli 


tion 


the Serial 


began. 


is kept. 



'y and 



'ociety 



1888 



1888 



1889 



1889 


L 


1893 


a 


1886 


z 


1889 


Ii 


1888 


L 


1888 


L 


1888 


Ii 



1888 
1894 
1888 
1888 
1886 



1890 


G 


1888 


L 


1888 


Ii 


1894 


L 


1888 


L 


1896 


L 



56 



Libraries. 



Date 
when 
presenta- 
tion 
began. 



Initial of 
Library 
in which 
the Serial 
is kept. 



Herefoiii). 

Woolhope Naturalists' Field Chib. 
Traufeactions. 1881-2 — > 
Hull. 

Bull Scientific and Field Naturalists' Club. 
Transactions. Vol. i — > 
Ipswich. 

Suffolk Institute of Arclixolocjy and Natural History. 
Proceedings. Vol. x, pt. 3— > 
Kew. 

Kew Guild. 

Journal. 189:3— > .... 
Roi/al Gardens. 

i3ulletin. Vol. i-> .... 
Leeds. 

Geological Association. 

Transactions. Vol. i — > 
Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society. 

Eeports. No. Ixi — > .... 
Yorkshire Geologiadand Polytechnic Society. 
Proceedings. Vol. vii — > 

LiVEliPOOL, 

Liverpool Biological Society. 

Proceedings. Vol. i — > 
Liverpool Geological Association. 

Transactions. Vol. vii — > . 
Lii-erp)ool Geologicid Society. 

Proceedings. Vol. iii — > 
Liverpool Museums. 

Bulletin. Vol. i— > .... 
University of Licerpool. 

Calendar. 19UJ-2— > .... 
London. 

Admiralty. — Hydrographical Department. 

Admiralty Charts .... 

Board of Agriculture. 

Journal. Vol. i — > (2 copies) 
Chemical Neios. Vol. Iviii — > . 
Chemical Society. 

Journal. A'ol. Iv— > .... 

Proceedings. Vol. v— > 
City of London College Science Society. 

Journal. No. 4 — > .... 
City of London Entomological and Natural History 
Society. 

Transactions. 1891 — > 
Climate. Vol. i — >. .... 

Entomological Society. 

Transactions. 1899— > 
Geological Society. 

Quarterly Journal. Vol. xlv — > . 
Geological Survey. 

[Memoirs] ...... 

[The Maps are now supplied by the Ordnance Survey] 



1888 



1899 


L 


1901 


L 


1893 


B 


1887 


B 


1886 


G 


1891 


L 


1890 


Q 


1889 


Ii 


1889 


a 


1889 


G 


1897 


L 


1902 


L 



1887 

1894 

1888 

1889 
1890 

1889 



B, Z 

M 

M 

M 



1892 
1900 


L 
L 


1899 


Z 


1889 


G 




G 



Libraries. 



57 



Vol. 



London — continued. 
Geologists' Association. 

Proceedings. Vol. viii — > 
Joaruiil of Tropical Medicine 
Linneaii Society. 

Proceedings. Session 188' 
Journal (liotany). Vol. xxiii— > . 
^ ., (Zoology). Vol. XX— > . 
Transactions (Botany). Series II., vol. iii— > 
„ (Zoology). Series II., vol. iv— > 

London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine 
Vol. XXV— > . . . ... 

Mineralogical Society. 

Mineralogical Magazine. Vol. viii— > . 
Odontological Society. 

TratLsactious. Vol. xxxv— > 
Palxontographical Society. 

3Ionograpiis. Vol. xxxvii— > 
Pharmaceutical Soci'-ty. 

Journal. Vol. ?— > 
Royal Botanic Society. 

Quarterly Record. 18S0— > .... 

Pioyal Colonial Institute. 

Journal. Vol. xxiv— > 
Boyal Geographical Society. 

Proceedings. Vol. x, pt. H— xiv [cont. as]\ 
The Greogniphical Journal. Vol. i— > / * 
Supplementary Papers. Vol. ii, no. 2— > 
Year Book. 18<»8— > ..... 

Royal Horticultural Society. 

Journal. Vol. i— > 
Boyal Institution. 

Proceedings. Vol. xii— > .... 

Royal Microscopical Society. 

Jouraal. Vol. i— > 

Rotjal Society of London. 

Philosophical Transactions. Vol. 178— > 
Proceedings. Vol. xliii— > 
Year Book. 1896-7— > . . . . 

Selborne Society. 

Nature Notes. Vol. i— > .... 
Society of Arts. 

Journal. Vol. xl— > 

South-Eastern Union of Scientific Societies. 

South-Eastern Naturalist. 1900— > 
Sotith London Entomological and Natural Histor 
Society. 
Proceedings. 1M79— > 
Surveyors' Institution. 

Transactions. Vol. xxvi — > .... 

University of London. 
Calendar ....... 

Victoria Institute. 
Journal of the Transactions. Vol. xx— > 



Date 
when 
presenta- 
tion 
began. 


Initial of 
Library 
in wliicli 
the Serial 
is kept. 


1885 

i:);)i 


L 


1890 

1888 
1888 
1888 
1888 


L 
B 
Z 
B 
Z 


1888 


M 


1888 


M 


1902 


L 


1883 


G 


9 


B 


1892 


B 


1893 


L 


1888 


L 


1888 
1898 


L 


1889 


B 


1888 


L 


1882 


L 


1888 
1888 
1897 


L 
Ii 
Ii 


1890 


Ii 


1891 


Ii 


1902 


Ii 


1888 


Ii 


189:5 


L 




L 


1888 


Ij 



58 



Lihrari 



les. 



London — continued. 
Zoological Society. 

Proceedings. 1830— > . . . . . 

Transactions. Vol. i— > ..... 
Maxchestkr. 

ConcJiological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. 

Journal of Concliology. Vol. vi— > (2 copies) 
Literary and Philosophical Society. 

Memoirs. Series IV, vol. vii, no. 2 — > 
Manchester Field Naturalists' and Archaeologists' Society. 

Keport. 1860— > 

Manchester Geological Society. 

Transactions. Vol. xxi— > . . . • 

Manchester Microscopical Society. 

Transactions. 1884 — > . . . . . 

Manchester Museum. 

Notes. Xo. 1^ 

Eeport. 1889-90— > 

MARLBOKorCxH. 

Marlborough College Natural History Society. 

Eeport. No. 35— > ...... 

Newcastle-under-Lyne. 

No7-th Staffordshire Naturalists' Field Club. 

Annual Eeport. 1887 — > ..... 

Newcastle-vfi )N-Tyxe. 

Naturcd History Society of Northumberland, Durham 
and Newcastle-upon-Tyne. 
Natural History Transactions. Vol. viii, pt. 3 — > . 

NORTHAMPTOX. 

Northamptonshire Natural History Society and Field 
Club. 
Journal. Vol. i — > ..... 
Norwich. 

Norfolk and Noriuich Naturalists' Society. 

Transactions. Vol. iv, pt. 3 — > 
Norwich Castle Museum. 

Eeport. 1894^ 

Oxford. 

Oxford University Junior Scientific Club. 

Journal (afterwards Transactions). Vol. -l— > 
University of Oxford. 
Annual Eeport of tlie Delegates of the University 
Museum. No. 1 — > ..... 

Calendar. 1892— > 

Penzance. 

Natural History and Antiquarian Society. 

Eeport. 1892-3— > 

Perth. 

Perthshire Society of Natural Science. 

Transactions and Proceedings. Vol. i, pt. 2 — > 
Plymouth. 

Devonslt ire Association. 

Transactions. Vol. xxi— > .... 



Date 
when 
presenta- 
tion 
began. 


Initial of 
Library 
in whicli 
the Serial 
is kept. 


1875 
1861 


z 
z 


1892 


G,Z 


1895 


li 


1896 


li 


1891 


a 


1889 


L 


1897 
1895 


L 


1890 


L 


1887 


L 



1889 

1883 

1892 
1901 

1894 



1894 


li 


1892 


L 


1894 


li 


1892 


li 


1889 


li 



Libraries. 



:)0 



Plymouth — continued. 

Marine Biological Association. 

Journal. Vol. i— > ..... 
Municipal Museum and Art Gallery. 

Keport. No. 1 — > ..... 
Reading. 

Beading Literary and Scientific Society. 

Report. 1887— > 

Rochester. 

Rochester Naturalists^ Society. 

Rochester Naturalist. Vol. i, no. 20— > 
Rugby. 

Bughy School Natural History Society. 

Report. 1887-^ 

St. Peter's Port, Guernsey. 

Guernsey Society of Natural Science. 

Report. 1882— > 

Shrewsbury. 

Caradoc and Severn Valley Field Club. 

Transactions. Vol. i— > .... 

Caradoc Record of Bare Facts. 1891— > 

Shropshire Arclixological and Natural History Society. 

Transactions. Vol. xi, pt. 2— > . . . . 

Southampton. 

Ordnance Survey. 

Map of the British Islands on the scale of 1 in. = 1 m 

Cxeologically coloured . . . . . 

SOUTHPORT. 

Svutlipjort Society of Natural Science. 
Report. No. 1— > ...... 

Stanhope. 

Weardale Naturalists^ Field Cluh. 
Transactions. Vol. i — > . . . . . 

Stirling. 

Stirling Natural History and Archseological Society. 
Transactions. No. 1— > . . . . . 

Stratford. 

Essex Field Cluh. 

Essex Naturalist. Vol. i— > . . . . 

Taunton. 

Somersetshire Archseological and Natural History Society 
Proceedings. Vol. xxx — > . . . . . 

Watfokd. 

Hertfordshire Natural History Society. 

Transactions. Vol. i— > 

Wellington. 

Wellington College Natural History Society. 
Annual Report. Vol. xvii— > . . . . 

Wincantox. 

Wincanton Field Club. 

Annual Report. No. i— > 

York. 

Yorlcshire Philosophical Society. 
Annual Report. 1823— > .... 



Date 
when 
presenta- 
tion 
bet,^an. 


Initial of 
Li))iary 
in which 
the Serial 
is kept. 


1888 


L 


. 1900 


li 


. 1897 


L 


. 1888 


L 


. 1888 


Ii 


. 1889 


li 


1S99 
. 1899 


L 
I, 



1888 



1887 
1902 


Ii 
G 


1892 


Ii 


1901 


L 


1884 


L 


1887 


L 


1888 


L 


1881 


Ii 


1888 


Ii 


1901 


Ii 


18S6 


Ii 



60 



Libraries. 



B.— BRITISH EMPIRE OVER THE SEAS. 

1. ArsTEALiAN Commonwealth. 

A ustralasiau Association. 

Report. Vol. i— > ..... 
Adelaide. 

Public Library, Museum and Art Gallery. 

Report. 1884-5 — > ..... 
Eoyal Society of South Australia. 

Transactions. Vol. i — > .... 

Memoirs. Vol. i— > 

Brisbane. 

Department of Agriculture. 

Queensland Agricultural Journal. Vol. i — > . 

Annual Report. 1892 — > .... 
Queensland : Geological Survey. 

Bulletin. Nu. 1— > 

Annual Progress Report. 11)00— > 

Reports. 1891— > 

Queensland Museum. 

Annual Report. 1876— > .... 

Annals. Xo. 1 — > ..... 
Royal Society of Queensland. 

Proceedings. Vol. i — > .... 

HOBART. 

Itoyal Society of Tasmania. 

Papers, Proceedings and Report. Vol. i — > . 
jMei.bourne. 

iJepartment of Agricidture, Victoria. 

Journal. Vol. i — > ..... 

Bulletin. Vol. i— > 

Geological Survey of Victoria. 

Bulletin. Xo. 1— > 

Memoirs. X'o. 1 — > ..... 
Tublic Library, Museums and National Gallery o 
Victoria. 

Report. 1870-1— > 

Royal Society of Victoria. 

Transactions. Vol. i — > .... 

Proceedings. Vol. ii— > .... 
Peeth. 

Department of Agriculture, Western Australia. 

Journal. 1899— > 

Western Australia, Geological Survey. 

Bulletin. X'o, 
Sydney. 

Australian Mu>'eum. 

Records. Vol. i— 

Memoirs. Vol. ii- 

Report. 1885— > 
Geological Survey of New Soidh Wale 

Memoirs. Xo. 1— > 

Records. Vol. i — > 

Mineral Resources. Xo. 1 — > 



Date 
when 
presenta- 
tion 
began. 



1891 



1892 



Initial of 
Liljrary 
in which 
the Serial 
is kept. 



1884 
1900 


L 


1897 
18;J4 


Z 
Z 


1895 
1901 
1891 


G 
G 
G 


1897 
1896 


Ii 
L 



188: 



1885 



1902 
1902 

1903 
1908 



1892 



18.^9 
1881 


Ii 
Ii 


19(10 


Z 


1898 


G 


1890 

1889 
1886 


G, Ii 

Ii 
G, Ii 


1888 
1889 
1898 


G 
G 

G, M 



Libraries, 



61 



•Sydney — continued. 

Linnean Society of New South Wale>i. 

Proceedings. Ser. II, vol. i— > 

Abstract of Proceeding.s. 18S(J— > 
New South Wale>i : Department of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Gazette of New South Wales. 

Kepurt. 1891— > 
Neio South Wales : Department of Mines 

Annual Eeports. 1888— > . 
Neio South Wales Natural ids^ Club. 

Memoirs. No. 1— > 
Eoyal Society of New South Wales. 

Journal. Vol. xxiii— > 
University of Sydney. 

Calendar. 19(»:)-^ 



l.i- 



Datu 
when 
presenta- 
tion 
began. 



I88G 

188G 



1890 
1892 



1890 



1903 
1890 



1903 



2. British Guiana. 
Demerara. 

Eoyal Agricultural and Commercial Society of British 
Guiana. 
"Timehri." New Series, vol. i-xii, continued as 
Journal. 1900— > 1887 



Initial of 

Lihraiy 

in which 

the Serial 

is kept. 



L 
L 

Z 

L 

G, M 



3. Canada. 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

Noca Scotian Institute of Natural Science. 
Proceedings. Vol. v, pt. 3 — > 

^FONTREAL. 

Geological Survey of Canada. 

Annual Keport. Vol. iii— > 

Contributions to Canadian Paleontology. 
Ottawa. 

Royal Society of Canada. 

Proceedings. Vol. i— > 
St. John. 

Natural History Society of New Drunswiclc. 

Bulletin. No. i-> . . . . 
Toronto. 

Canadian histitute. 

Transactions. Vol. iii— > 

Annual Eeport. No. 1 — > ... 
TJnicersity of Toronto. 

Studies. No. 1— > . . . . 



1881 



Vol. 



1890 
1889 


Gr 


1884 


II 


1889 


li 


1885 
1888 


L 

L 



1903 



4. Ceylon. 
Colombo. 

Colombo Museum. 
Spolia Zeylanica. Vol. i-^ 

PliuADENIYA. 

Itoyal Botanic Gardens. 
Annals. Vol. i — > 
Circular and Agricultural Journal. 



1903 li, Z 



No. 18- 



1901 
1901 



62 



Lihr^ 



aries. 



5. India. 
Allahabad. 

Dejiartment of Land Becords and Agriculture: North 
West Provinces and Oudh. 
bulletin. No. 1— > . 
Bombay. 

Jiomhay Natural History Society. 

Journal. Vol. i, no. 3 — > 
Marine Survey. 

Administration Eeport. 1896-7 — > 
Calcutta. 

Asiatic Society of Bengal. 

Journal. Pt.'ll, vol. xxxv— > 
Proceedings. 18S6 — > 
Botanical Survey of Imlia. 

Records. Vol. i — > ...... 

Department of Revenue and Agriculture. 

The Agricultural Ledger. Vol. i. 1894— > . 
Geological Survey of India. 

Memoirs. Vol. xxiv— > 

Ptecords. Vol. xxiv— > ..... 

Palffiontologica Indica. Series XIII, vol. iv— > 

General Reports. 1897— > 

Indian Mu>'eum. 

Annual Report. 1884-5— > 

Illustrations of the Zoology of the R.I.M.S.S. Inves- 
tigator. Pt. i. 1892— > 

Boyal Botanic Gardens. 
Annals. Vol. i— > ...... 

Scientific Memoirs by Officers of the IMedical and 

Sanitary Departments of the Government of India. 

New Series. No. 1 — > ..... 

Survey of India. 

Notes. 1900-> 

Sheets of the Indian Atlas. Sh. i— > . 
LrcKNOw. 

Liiclcnoiv Provincial Museum. 

Annual Report. 1901— > 

Madras. 

Government Museum. 

Report. 1884-5— > 

Bulletin. Vol. i— > . . . ' . 
Trivandrum. 

Trivandrum Museum. 
Report. 1899-1900-> 



Date 
when 
presenta- 
tion 
began. 



1901 



Initial of 

Lil>iary 

in wliich 

the Serial 

is kept. 



1887 


L 


1897 


L 


1884 
1885 


L 
Ii 


1894 


B 


1898 


Z 


1891 

1891 
1891 
1898 


Gr 
Gr 

G 
G 


1885 


Z 


1893 


Z 


1888 


B 



1902 

1900 

1888 



1901 



1886 
1894 



1901 



B,Z 

L 
L 



G. New Zealand. 
Wellington, N.Z. 

New Zealand Institute. 

Transactions. Vol. xx— > . 



1890 



Libraries. 63 



Date Initial of 

when Liliiaiy 

presenta- in which 

tion the Serial 

Ijegan. is kept. 

7. South Africa. 
bulawayo, 

lihodesia Scientific Association. 

Proceedings. Vol. iv— > ..... 1908 L 

Cape Town. 

Cape Colony: Department of Agriculture. 
Annual Keport of the Geological Commission. 

1896-> 1902 G 

Report of the Marine Biologist. 189(J-> . . 1900 Z 

South African Museum. 

Annals. Vol. i-> 1898 L 

Report. 1883-> 1884 L 

South African Philosophical Society. 

Transactions. Vol. vii— > 1893 L 

Grahamstown. 
Albany Museum. 

Report. 1882-> 1897 L 

Records of the Museum. Vol. i— > . . . 1903 L 

Johannesburg. 

Geological Society of So^dh Africa. 
Transactions. Vol. iii— > 1898 G 

PlETERMARITZBTJRG. 

Geological Survey of Natal and Zxduland. 
Report. No. l-> . . . ... . 1902 G 



8. Straits Settlement.^. 

Singapore. 

Botanic Gardens Department. 

Agricultural Bulletin of the Straits and Federated 

J^Ialay States. Vol. i-> . . . . .1901 

Raffles Library and Museum. 

Annual Report. 1879-> . . . . . 1898 
Straits Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society. 

Journal. No. 1— > 1889 



9. West Indies. 

Bridgetown, Barbados. 

Imperial Department of Agriculture for the West Indies. 

West Indian Bulletin. Vol. i— > .... 189i> Z 

Agricultural News. Vol. i-> .... 1902 Z 

Kingston, Jamaica. 

Botanical Department. 

Bulletin. 1887-> 1^87 B 

Institute of Jamaica. 

Journal. Vol. i-> 1<^91 L 

Annual Report. 1879-S0-> .... 18^3 L 



64 



Libraries. 



C— XON-BKITISH. 

I. Argentine Kepublio. 



Date Initial of 

when Library 

pvesenta- in which 

tion the Serial 

began. is kept. 



Bl'enos Aires. 










Museo Nacional. 










An ales. Tom. iii, eiitr. 2— >. 


. 




1889 


L, G 


Comuuicaciones. Tom. i^. 


. 


. 


18U8 


L 


Cordova. 










Academia nacional de Ciencias. 










Boletin. Tom. iv— > . 


. 




1886 


L 


Actas. Tom. iii. pt. 2— > . 






1887 


li 


La Plata. 










Museo. 










Kevista. Vol. i— > 




. 


1891 


L 


Anales. Seccion Antropoldgica. No. i— > 


. 


1896 


G, Z 


r*onlo"ioa v Mitpt^I'^o'''^*' ^^ 




1892 


G 


Paleontoloo'ia A 


rgentina. No. 


1891 


G 






Zooloirioa. No. 


i-> 


. 


1893 


Z 



2. Austria-Hungary. 
Budapest. 

Magyar Ornithologiat Kozpont. 

Aquila. Vol. i—> 

Ckacow. 

Alicidemija Umietetnosci. 

Eozprawy. Ser. II, tom. i— > .... 

Sprawozdanie. Tom. xxvii— > .... 

Bulletin International. 1889— > .... 

Catalogue of Polisli Scientific Literature. Vol. i— > 
Lixz. 

Museum Francisco-CaroUnmn. 

Bericht. No. 3-> . . . . . 

Prague. 

(Leslie Aluidemie Cisare FrantUha Josef a. 
Rozpravy . . . Tfida II. Eoc. i— > 
Vestnik. Roe. viii— > ...... 

Trentschix. 

Trencse'n Vdrme^yei Termeszettudomdmji Egylet. 

Evkonyve. Evf. iv— > 

Vienna. 

Kaiserliche Akademie der Wissenschaften. (Math.-nat. 
Clause.) 

Anzeiger. Jahrg. xxv— > 

Sitzungsbericht. Bd. xcvi— > .... 

Denkschriften. Bd. liv— > 

Berichte der Commission fiir Erforscliung des 

Ostlichen Mittelmeeres. Pteihe ii— >. 
Mittheilungen der Erdbeben - Commission. Neue 
Folge. No. 1— > 



1894 



189i 


L 


1893 


Ii 


1892 


I. 


1901 


Ii 



1895 



1897 
1900 



1892 



1889 
1888 
1889 

1894 

1902 



Libraries. (35 



1889 


L 


1889 


L 


1889 


L 


1888 


li 


1889 


L 


1899 


B 


1898 


Z 


1899 


Z 



Date Initial of 

when Libiaiy 

presenta- in which 

tion the Serial 

Ka iserlich-lwn iglicli e Geolog ische Reichm mta It. 

Abhandhmgen. Bd. xvii— > . . ' . igno q. 

Jahrbuch. Bd. xli— > . . . \ * 1891 G 

Verhandlungen. 1891— > • . . ! . 1891 Q- 

KaiserUch-hdnigliches Naturhistorisches Ho/museum. 

Annalen. Bd. i— > •••... 1886 T. 

3. Belgium. 
Brussels. 

Academie Boy ale des Sciences, &c. 

IMcmoires. Tom. xlvii— > . . 

Memoires coiironnes. 4^. Tom. xlix— > 

8^. Tom. xli-> . . . ' 

Bulletin. Ser. Ill, torn, xiv, livr. 12— > 

Annnaire. 1S8G— > •.....' 
Musee du Congo. 

Annales, &c. Botanique. Ser. I— > 

Zoologie. Ser. I— > . . . . ! 

— — Ethnographie et Antbropologie. Ser. I— > 
Societe Beige de Geologie de Baleontologie et d'Hi/dro- 
Jogie. 

Bulletin et Me'moires. Tom. xvi — > , . . 1902 G 

Societe Entomologi que de Belgique. 

Annales. Vol. xxxii (1888)— > .... 1890 Z 

Me'moires. Tom. i— > .....* 1893 Z 

Vniversite lihre de Bruxelles. 

Recueil de I'lnstitut Botanique. Tom. v— > . . 1902 B 

4. Brazil. 
Belem. 

3Iuseu Goeldi. 

Boletim. Vol. i-> 1896 L 

Memorias. Vol. i— > . . ' . . . .1901 L 

Sao Joao d'El-Eei. 

Commismo Geographica e Geologica do Estado de Minas 
Geraes. 

Boletim. No. l-> 1898 L 

Sao Paulo. 

Commissao Geograpldca e Geologica de Sao Paulo. 

Boletim. No. 1— > I891 L 

Museo Paulista. 

Eevista. Vol. i-> 1896 L 

5. Chile. 
Santiago. 

Socie'te' scientifique du Chili. 

Actes. Tom. ii— > 1S9S L 

Valparaiso. 
Museo. 

Revista Cbilena. An. iii— > .... 1899 L 

Boletin. Ann. iii— > iS'j'J L 



VOL. I. 



66 Libraries. 

Date Initial ot 

wlien Library 

presenta- in which 

tion the Serial 

began. is kept. 

6. Costa Kica. 
San Jose. 

Instituto Fisico-Geografico. 

Boletin Vol. ii. (ll)0'2)-> 1903 L 

Mu^eo Nacional de Costa Rica. 

Inlbrme. 1894-> 1895 L 

7. Denmark. 
Copenhagen. 

Uanmarks Geologishe Underspgelse. 
I.Kaekke. Beskrivelse til geologisk Kort. No. 1— > 1897 G 

II. Eaekke [Memoirs]. No. l->. . . . 1897 G 

Dani<ke Biologislce Station. 

Keport. No. 3-> (1893-» .... 1903 L 

Kongeligt Danslc Vidensicahernes Selslmh. 

Det...skrifter. Bd. iv, afd. 7-> . . . 1888 L 

Oversigt over det. ..Forhandlinger. 1889— > . 1889 L 

8. Dutch East Indies. 
buitexzorg. 

Institut Botanique. 

Bulletin [Botany]. No. l-> .... 1899 B 

(No. xiii, &c.) Zoologie. No. l-> . . 1902 Z 

9. Egypt. 
Cairo. 

Institut £gyptien. 

Bulletin. Ser. II, torn, ix, no. 3-> . . .1900 L 

Me'moires. Tom. i— > 1898 L 

10. France. 
BESAN90N. 

Societed' Emulation du Doubs. 

Me'moires. Series VII, torn iii—>. . . . 1900 L 

Caen. 

Facultedes Sciences de Caen. 

Bulletin du Laboratoire de Ge'ologie. Anne'e I— >. 1895 G 

Grenoble. 

University' de Grenoble. 
Travaux du Laboratoire de Ge'ologie. Tome v— > . 1900 G 

La Eochelle. 

Societe des Sciences NatureUes de la Charente-In- 

Annales. ' No. 16-> 1889 L 

Marseilles. 

Faculte'des Sciences. 

Aimales. Tom. iii— > 1895 L 

Institut Colonial. 

Annales. Vol. i— > 1895 L 

Museum d'Histoire Naturelle. 

Annales. Tom. iii— > 1891 L 



Libraries. 



67 



torn. X, no. 2— > 



Paris. 

Museum (VHistoire JSaturelle. 

Nouvelles Archives. Ser. Ill, 

Bulletin. ]89o— > 
Service de la Carte Ge'ologique cMaiu'e'e de la F 

[Maps.] Sh. l-> .... 

Bulletin. Xo. 35— > . 
Socie'te' Entomologique de France. 

Aiinales. Tom. Ixviii (1898)— > 

Bulletin. 1900— > 
Socie'te' Ge'ologique de France. 

Bulletin. Se'r. Ill, torn, xix— > 
Socie'te' Ph ilomatldq ue. 

Bulletin. Ser. VII, torn, viii 
Socie'te' Zoologique de France. 

Causeries Scientifiques. Xo. 1— >. J901- 
Union Coloniale Frangaise. 

Quinzaine Coloniale. No. 99— > 
Eennes. 

Socie'te' Scientifique et Me'dicale de V Quest. 

Bulletin. Tom i— > [1892— >] . 
TJniverdte' de Eennes. 

Travuux Scientifiques. Tom i— >. 

EOUEN. 

Museum d'Histoire Naturelle. 
Actes. Tom. i— ^ 



11. Germany. 
Berlin. 

Deutsche Geologische Gesellschaft. 

Zeitschrift. Bd. xliv— > 
Edniglich-Preussische Akademie der Wissmschaften 

Abhandlungen. 1887— > ... 

Sitzungsberichte. 1894— > ■.".*'* 
Konigliche Friedrich-Willielms-TJniv'ersitdt. 

Xotizblatt (ies K. Botanischen Gartens und 

JAluseums. Bd. 1— > .... 
Dresden. • • • . . 

Bericbt iiber die Verwaltung der koniglichen Samm- 
lungen fiir Kunst und AVissenschaft. 1872— > 
Feankfoht-on-the-Maine. 
Neue Zoologische Gesellschaft. 

Der Zoologische Garten. Vol. xxxviii— > 
Senckenburgische Naturforschende Gesellschaft. 
Abhandluugen. Bd. xiv— > 

Bericht. 1880-1— > . . . ' ' ' 

Gera. • • . . 

Gesellschaft von Freunden der Naturwissenschaften. 

Jahresberieht. No. 4— > 
Heidelbekg. 

Geologische Landesanstalt des Grossherzoqthums Baden. 

Mitteilungen. Bd. 1— > . . ' . 

Geologische Spccialkarte & Erlaute'rungen. Blatt 1— > 



Date 
when 
presenta- 
tion 
began. 


Initial of 

Lil.iary 

in whic-h 

the Serial 

is kept. 


18110 

1.^9:) 


L 
L 


1884 
1894 


G 

a 


1 900 
1900 


z 

z 


1891 


G 


1884 


L 


1901 


Z 


1901 


L 


1903 


L 


1903 


Ii 



1884 



18!)2 



1897 

1SS7 
1882? 



18S7 



1891 
1>94 



G 



1S89 
1895 


L 
Ii 


1895 


B 


1886 


Ii 



F :i 



68 



Libraries. 





Date 


Initial of 




when 


Library 




presenta- 


in whicb 




tion 


the Serial 




began. 


is kept. 


HiLDESHETM. 






JFuseumsverehi. 






Bericht. 1892-> .... 


. 1899 


li 


Boemer Muf^eum. 






Mittheilungen. Xo. 1— > 


. 1897 


li 


Leipzig. 






Zeitschrift fur Physikalische Chemie. 






Band ii— > 


. 18S8 


M 


Magdeburg. 






NaturwissenschaftUcher Verein. 






Jahresbericlit. 1885— > 


. 1886 


L 


Stuttgart. 






Konigliches Minera lien-Kahinet. 






Mitteilungen. No. 1— > 


. 1896 


M 


Oberrheinucher Geologischer Verein. 






Bericht xxix— > ..... 


. 1899 


a 



12. Holland. 
Haarlem. 

Hollandsche Maatschappij der Wetemclia])pe7i. 

Archives Xeerlandaises des Sciences. Tom. xxii, 

livr 4-> 1888 

Nederlandsche Maatschappij ter Bevordering van 
Nijverlieid. 
Bulletin van het Koloniaal Museum. 1893— > 1895 

Extra Bulletin van het Kolonial Museum. Afl. 1— > 1894 
Hague, The. 

NederlaiuhcJie Entomologuclie Yereeniging. 

Tijdschrift voor Entomologie. 1857— > . . . 1881 

Entomologische Berichteii. No. 1— > . . . 1901 

NniEGUEN. 

Nederlandsche BotanUclie Vereeniging. 

Nederlandsch Kruidkundig Archief. 1900. Deel ii— > 1 900 



13. Italy. 

Act RE ALE. 

Accademia di Scienze, &g. 

Atti. Vol. i-> 

Bologna. 

Beale Accademia delle Scienze delV Istituto. 
Memorie. Ser. IV, tom. ix— > 
Kendiconto. 1887-8— > .... 
Genoa. 

Museo Civico di Storia Naturale. 
Annali Vol. i.-> 1870— > 
Begia Universita degli Studi. — Musei de Zoologia e 
Anatomia Comparata. 
Bollettino. Vol. i-> 1897 



1895 



1889 
18^9 



1890 



Libraries. 69 



1893 
1893 


L 
Ii 


1888 
1889 


L 
L 


1891 
1891 


L 
L 


1892 
1891 


Gr 

G 


1891 
1891 


L 



Date Initial of 

when Library 

presenta- in which 

tion the Seiial 

began. is kerjt. 

Milan. 

Museo Civico di Storia Naturale, 

Publishes in conjunction with the 
Societa Italiana di Scienze Naturali. 

Atti. Tom. i— > 

Memorie. Tom. i— > 

Naples. 

Reah Accademia delle Scienze Fisiche e Matematiche. 
Atti. Nova Serie, tom. i— > 
Reudiconto. Ser. II, tom. iii— > 
Pisa. 

Societa Toscana di Scienze Naturali. 

Atti (Memorie). Vol. ix— > .... 
Atti (Processi Verbali). Vol. vii— > 
Rome. 

Beal Comitato Geologico d'ltalia. 

Bollettino. Vol. xxii — > .... 
Memorie. Vol. vi— > ..... 
Turin. 

Beale Accademia delle Scienze. 

Memorie. Tom. xli— > .... 

Atti. Vol. xxvi— > . . . . 

Atti. Classe di Scienze fisich e matematiche. 

A^ol. xvii. (1881)— > 1904 

14. Japan. 

TOKIO. 

Geological Society. 

Geological Magazine. Vol. i— > .... 
Imperial University of Japan. 

Journal of the College of Science. Vol. vi, no. 4— > 
Zoological Society. 

Annotationes Zoologicse Japonenses. Vol. i. — > 

15. Mexico. 
Mexico. 

Idituto Geologico de Mexico. 

Boletm. No. 3— > 1896 G 

Sociedad Cientifica " Antonio Alzate." 

3Iemorias y Revista. Tom. ix— > . . . 1896 L 

16. Norway. 
Bergen. 

Bergens Bluseum. 

Aarsberetniug. 1883— > 1887 L 

Christiania. 

Norges Geologislce Undersogehe. 

[Memoirs.] No.-> 1 1891 G 

Drontheim. 

Kongeligt NoisJce VidensJcahers-Selskah. 

Uet . . . Skrifter. lS98-> 1899 L 

Stavanger. 

Stavanger Museum. 

Aarsberetnine:. 1890— > 1891 L 



1902 


G 


1891 


Ii 


1897 


Z 



Libraries, 








Date 

when 

pre?enta- 

tion 

began. 


Initial of 
Library 
in which 
the Serial 
is kept. 


. 


. 1895 
. 1895 


L 
Ii 



70 



Teomso. 

Troms0 Museum. 
Aarshefter. No. 10— > 
Aarsberetning. 1873— > 

17. Portugal. 

COIMBRA. 

Universidade. 
Annuario. 1896-7-> . . _ • . . .1897 Ii 

Archive Bibliograijhico. Vol. i— > . . . 1901 L 

LiSBOJf. 

Academia Real das Sciencias. 

Jornal. Ser. II, torn, vi^ 1900 L 

Commissao dos Servigos Geologicos de Portugal. 

[Memoirs] 1889 a 

Communica9oes. Tom. ii— > .... 1893 G- 

Oporto. 

Annaes de Sciencias Naturaes. Ann. iii . . . 1896 L 

18. ROUMANIA. 
BUKAREST. 

Societatea de Sciin^e. 

Buletinul. Annl i-^ 1897 L 

Jassy. 

Societe'des Me'deeins et des Naturalistes. 

Bulletin. Vol. vi, No. 4-> .... 1892 L 

19. EussiA. 
Ekaterinburg. 

UraVslcoe Obshchestvo Lyubltelet Estestvoznaniya. 

Zapiski. Tom. xiii, Part 2— > .... 1895 L. 

Helsingfors. 

Finlands Geologislca Under sokning. 

Kartbladet. No. 1— > 

Beskrifning till Kartbladet. No. 1— > . 

Bulletin. No. 6— > 

Moscow. i 

Soci^e'imperiale des Naturalistes du Moscou. 

Nouveaux Me'moires. Tom. xv— > 

Bulletin. 1887— > 

St. Petersburg. 

Academic imperiale des Sciences. 

Me'moires. Se'r. VII, tom. xxxv, No. 10— > . 

Bulletin. Nov. Se'r., tom. xxxii, No. 1— > 

Annuaire du Muse'e Zoologique. 1896— > (2 copies) . 
Cabinet de Sa Majeste. 

Travaux de la Section Ge'ologique. Vol. i— > 
Comite Ge'ologiqne. 

Memoires. Tom. ii — > . . . ... 

Bulletin. Tom. i-> 

Kaiserliclie Mineralogische Gesellschaft. 

Verhandlungen. Bd. xxviii — > .... 

Materialien zur Geologic Russlands. Bd. i— > 



1899 
1899 
1899 


a 
a 


1888 
1888 


L 
L 


1891 
1891 
1896 


Ii 
L 

L, Z 


1896 


G 


1885 
1885 


G 

a 


1892 
1892 


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Libraries. 



St. Petersburg — continued. 

liusslwe Entomologhicheskoe Obshchestvo. 

Horse, &c. Tom. xxxv— > ..... 
S.-Peterhurghskit Biologhlcheshil Laboratoriya (La- 
boratoire Biologique). 
Bulletin. Tom. i— > 

TiFLIS. 

KauJcasiscJies Museum. 

Bericht. 1892— > 

Izvyestiya. Tom. i— > . . . . ! 

iSammlungen. Bd. i— > ..,..* 
Warsaw. 

ImperatorsJdi Varshavshii Unlversltet. 

Kollektzii Zoologhicheskagho Kabineta...Umver- 
siteta. No. 1— > ...... 

Eabotni iz Laboratorii Zoologhicheskagho Kabineta 
Obshchestvo Estestvoispuitatelei (Socie'te cles Na- 
turalistes). 
Trudui (Travaux). Tom. i— > .... 



Bate Initial of 
when Liljiaiy 

presenta- in which 

tion the Serial 
began. is kept. 



1902 



189G 



1893 
1900 
19U0 



1896 
1896 



1892 



San Salvador. 
Museo Nacional. 
Amiales. Tom. i- 



20. Salvador. 



1903 



21. Servia. 
Belgrade. 

Institut Ge'ologique. 

Annales Ge'ologique de la Peninsule Balkanique. 

Tom. i-> 

Srpsha KraVevsha Akademlia. 



Ghlas. No. 1- 
Ghodishn'ak. 



No. 13-> 



1890 

1899 
1901 



22. Spain. 
Barcelona, 
Eeal Academia de Ciencias. 
Memorias. Ser. Ill, Vol. i— > 
Boletiu. Ser. Ill, Vol. i-> . 



1894 
1894 



23. Sweden. 
Stockholm. 

Kongliga Svensha Vetenskaps-Akademien. 
Handlingar. Ny Foljd, Bd. xxi, no. 9— > 
Bihaug till ... Handlingar. Bd. xiii-xxviii 
[Continued as :] . 
Arkiv for Botanik. Bd. i.— > . 

Kemi, Mineralogi och Geologi. Bd. i 

Zoologi. Bd. i. — > . 

. . Arsbok for ar. 1903— > . 
Ofversigt af . . .Forhandlingar. 1 888— > 



1888 



1888 



1888 



72 ■ Libraries. 

Date Initial of 

when Library 

presenta- in which 

tion the Serial 

began. is kept. 
Upsala. 

Kongliga Universitetet i Upsala. 

Irsskrift. 1885-> 1896 L 

Bulletin of the Geological Institution. Vol. i— > . 1893 G- 
Meddelanden fran...iMineralogisk-Geologiska Insti- 
tution. No. l-> 1896 M 

Kongliga VetensTcaps-Societeten. 

Nova Acta. Tom. xiv, Part 2-> . . .1891 L 

24. Switzerland. 
Geneva. 
Sociele cle Geograpliie. 

Le Globe. Ser. V, torn. xi-> .... 1900 L 

SlON. 

Society Muritliienne du Valais. 

Bulletin. Fasc. xiii-> 1892 L 

25. United States. 

American Microscopical Society. 

Transactions. Vol. xxiii — > ..... 1902 L 

Albany. 

Geological Survey of the State of New York. 
Annual Keport. No. 8— > 1896 Gr 

New York State Museum of Natural Ridory. 

Bulletin. Vol. i-> 1889 L 

Annual Eeport. No. 42— > 1891 L 

ArsTiN. 

Geological Survey of Texas. 
Annual Keports. No. l-> .... 1890 G 

Baltimore. 

Maryland Geological Survey. 

[Reports]. Vol. i-> . . . ... . 1898 G 

Berkeley. 

University of California. 

Annual Report. 1900— > 1902 L 

Bulletin of the Department of Geology. Vol. i— > . 1894 G 

Publications: Botany. Vol. i.— > . . . 1903 L 

Pathology. Vol. i.-> 1904 L 

Physiology. Vol. i.— > .... 1903 L 

Zoology. Vol. i.-> 1903 L 

Boston. 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 

Proceedings. Vol. xxiii — > ..... 1888 L 

Boston Society of Natural History. 

Memoirs. Vol. iv, no. 1— > 1891 L 

Proceedings. Vol. xxiv — > ..... 1890 L 

Occasional Papers. Vol. iv— > .... 1894 L 

Brooklyn. 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences. 
Museum Science Bulletin. Vol. i.— > . . . 1901 L 

Children's Museum Bulletin. No. i.-> . . 1902 L 

Children's Museum Notes. No. i. — > . . . 1904 L 

Coldspring Harbor Monographs. No. i — > . . 1903 L 



Libraries. 



73 



Buffalo. 

Buffalo Society of Natural Science. 
Bulletin. Vol. v, pt. 3— > , 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Harvard University. 
Bussey Institution. Bulletin. Vol. i, pt. 2— > 
Gray Herbarium. Contributions. No. 16^ 
Museum of Comparative Zoology. Bulletin 

Vol. i (1863)— > 

Memoirs. Vol. xiv— > . 

Chapel Hill. 

ElisTia Mitchell Scientific Society. 
Journal. 1883— > 
Chicago. 

Academy of Natural Sciences. 
Bulletin. Vol. ii, no. 3— > . 
Bulletin of the Natural History Survey. No 
Special Publication. No. 1— > 
Field Columhian Museum. 
Publications. No. 1— > 
Univer.nty of Chicago. 
University Record. Vol. i— > 
Botanical Gazette. Vol. xxx— > . 
Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati Society of Natural History. 

Journal. Vol. iv— > [Vol. xx— > two copies] 
Lloyd Library of Botany. 

Bulletin. No. 1— > .... 
Columbus. 

Ohio State Academy of Science. 
Annual Report. No. 9— > . 
Special Papers. No. 1— > . 
Denver. 

Colorado Scientific Society. 
Proceedings. Vol. i— > 
Des Moines. 

Loica Geological Survey. 

[Annual Reports.] No. 1— > 
Iowa City. 

State University of Iowa. 

Bulletin from the Laboratories of Natural Historv 

Vol. i, pt. 2-> ^ 

Jefferson City. 

Geological Survey of Missouri. 

Reports. Vol. i— > 

Las Cruces. 

New Mexico College of Agriculture. 
Bulletin. No. 1— > 
Lawrence. 

University of Kansas. 
Kansas University Quarterly. Vol. vii, pt. 2— > 
The University Geological Survey. Vol. iv— > 



Date Initial of 
when Library 
presenta- in wliich 
tion the Serial 
began. is kept. 



1898 



1888 
1809 

18S3 
1889 



1903 



1902 
1902 
1902 


L 
L 
L 


. 1896 


B, L 


1896 
1900 


L 
B 


. 18S9 


L 


1900 


B 


. 1901 

1900 


L 

L 


. 1885 


L 


189i 


Cr 


1890 


Ii 


1893 


a 


1893 


z 


1898 
1898 


ii 



74 



Libraries. 



Little Kock. 

Geological Survey of Arhansas. 

Aunual Eeports. 1888— > . . . . 

Los Angeles. 

Southern California Academy of Science. 

Bulletin. Yol. i— > 

Madison. 

Wisconsin Academy. 

Transactions. Vol. i— > . . . . 

Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey 

Bulletin. No. 1— > 

Med FORD. 

Tuft's College. 

Studies of Tuft's College. Xo. 1— > 
Milwaukee. 
Fuhlic Museum. 

Annual Keport. No. 1— > . . . . 
Minneapolis. 

Geological Survey of Minnesota. 

Botanical Studies. 1894— > 
Missoula. 

University of Montana. 

Bulletin. Biological Series. No. 1— > 
Montgomery. 

Geological Survey of Alabama. 

Reports— > ...... 

Bulletin. No. 1— > 

New York. 

American Geograpliical Society. 

Bulletin. Yol. xxxi— > . . . . 

American Institute of Mining Engineers. 

Bulletin. Yol. i^ . 

Transactions. Yol. i— > 
American Museum of Natural History 

Memoirs. Yol. i — > 

Bulletin. Yol. ii, no. 2-> . 

Annual Report. 1870 — > 

American Museum Journal. Yol 
Columbia College. 

The i^chool of Mines Quarterly. Yol. x— > 
Journal of Geography. Vol. i, no. 4 — > 
Neio York Academy of Sciences. 

Annals. Vol. iv, pt. 3— > 

Memoirs. Yol. ii — > .... 
Zoological Society. 

Annual Reports. No. 1 — > 

News Bulletin. No. 1— > 
Philadelphia. 

Academy of Natural Sciences Philadelphia. 

Proceedings. 1888— > 

■ [in sheets as issued]. 1891 — > 

Journal. Yol. ix, pt. 2 . . . 



Date Initial of 

when Library 

presenta- in whicli 

tion tlie Serial 

began. is kept. 



1894 



1902 



1899 



G 



1884 


L 


1899 


L 


1894 


Z 


1891 


L 


1894 


B 


1902 


L 


1894 
1894 


a 



1899 
1899 


M 
M 


189.5 
1889 
1889 
19U2 


L 
L 
L 
L 


1889 
1902 


M 
Ii 


1888 
1900 




1897 
1897 


Z 
Z 


1888 
1891 
1892 


Ii 
Ii 
Ii 



Libraries, 



75 



VuiLkD-Ehvaix— continued. 

American Philosophical Sociehj. 

Transactions. Vol. xix — > .... 
Proceedings. Vol. xxxi— > . . . [ 

Geographical Society. 

Bulletin. Vol. i, no. 2— > .... 
University of Pennsylvania. 
Contributions from the Botanical Laboratory 
Vol. i-> -^ 

PiTTSBUEGH. 

Carnegie Museum. 
Publications. No. 1— > .... 
Annals. Vol. i— > . . . . ! 

Memoirs. Vol. i— > . . , . . 
Portland. 

Portland Society of Natural Hixtory. 
Proceedings. Vol. ii, no. 2 — > 
Peixceton. 

Princeton University Bird Club. 
Bulletin. Vol. i-> 

EOCHESTEE. 

Geological Society of America. 

Bulletin. Vol. i— > 

Sacramento. 

California State Mining Bureau. 
Annual Eeports. x— > .... 
St. Lol'is. 

Missotiri Botanical Garden. 

Annual Eeport. Vol. i— > .... 
San Feaxcisco. 

California Academy of Sciences. 
Proceedings. Vol.'iv, pt. 2— > 
Occasional Papers. Vol. i— > 
Speingfield. 

Geological Survey of Illinois. 

Geology and Palaeontology. Vol. viii— > 
Illinois State Museum. 

Bulletin. No. 3— > 

Teenton. 

Geological Survey of Neiv Jersey. 

Annual Eeports. 1890— > 

Final Eeports. Vol. iii— > 
Uebana. 

Illinois State Laboratory of Natural History. 
Bulletin. Vol. iii, no. 15— >. . ... 
Washington. 

Biological Society. 

Proceedings. Vol. i— > .... 
National Academy of Sciences. 

Memoirs. Vol. i — > ..... 
National Geographic Society. 

National Geograi^hic Magazine. Vol. viii— > 
Philosophical Society. 

Bulletin. Vol. i— > 



Date Initial of 

when Library 

presenta- in which 

tion the Serial 

began. is kept. 



1898 
1893 

1894 



1892 



1899 



1899 
1902 
1902 


L 
L 
L 


1895 


L 


1901 


Z 


1892 


a 


1891 


a 


1891 


B 


1887 
1891 


Ii 


1891 


G 


1894 


G 


1891 
1899 


a 

G 



1888 


Ii 


1890 


Ii 


1899 


Ii 


1886 


L 



76 



Libraries. 



Vol. xi-> 



Vol. i-> 



Washington — continued. 
Smith wnia n Institution. 

Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge. Vol 

xviii— > ..... 
Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections. 
Annual Report. 1882— > . 
Annual Eeports : Bureau of Ethnology. 
United States Coast Survey. 

Eeports. 1866— > 
United States Department of Agriculture. 
Year Book. 1867— > . 
Farmers' Bulletin. Xo. 7 — > 

{Agrostology Division.) 
Bulletin. No. 1— > . 
Circular. Xo. 1— > 

{Animal Industry Division.') 
Bulletin. Xo. 7— > . 
Circular. Xo. 1 — > 
Eeport. Xo. 3— > 

{Biological Survey Division.) 
Bulletin. Xo. 1— > . 
Xorth American Fauna. Xo. 1-1— > 

{Botany Division.) 
Bulletin. Xo. 16-> . 
Circular. Xo. 1 — > 
Contributions from the U. S. Xational 

Vol. i— > 

{Entomology Division.) 
Bulletin. Xo. 6-> . 

Technical Series. Xo. 1— > 

Circular. Ser. II, no. 2 — > . 

{Fiber Investigations.) 
Eeport. Xo. 1— > 

{Plant Industry Bureau.) 
Bulletin. Xo. 1— > 

{Vegetable, Physiology and Pathology Division.) 
Bulletin. Xo. 1— > . . . ' . 

Circular. Xo. 6 — > 

United States Geological Survey. 
Annual Eeports. Xo. 8 — > .... 
Monographs. Vol. v — > .... 

Bulletin. Vol. i— > 

Professional Paper. Xo. 1 . 
AYater Supply and Irrigation Papers. No. 05— > 
United States National Museum. 

Bulletin. Xo. 1— > 

Special Bulletin. Xo. 1— > .... 
Proceedings. Vol. 1 — > .... 
Washington Academy of Sciences. 
Proceedings. Vol. i — > .... 



Herbarium 



Date 

when 

presents 

tion 

began. 



1886 
1886 
1884 
1886 



1888 

1899 
1899 

1899 
1899 

1899 
1899 
1899 

1898 
1899 

1899 
1899 

1894 

1899 
1896 
1899 

1899 

1899 



Initial of 
Library 
in which 
the Serial 
is kept. 



1899 


L 


1899 


L 


1890 


G 


1885 


G 


1885 


G 


1903 


G 


1903 


G 


1886 


L 


1897 


L 


1886 


L 



1899 



2G. Uruguay. 
Montevideo. 
Museo Nacional. 
Anales. Vol. i— > 



1896 



THE DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 



THE DEPAETMENT OF BOTANY. 



1. General Sketch. 



The Department of Botany, originally styled the Banksian 
Department, was established for the reception of the herbarium 
of Sir Joseph Banks, who had, shortly before his death in 1820, 
bequeathed it to Robert Brown, at whose demise it was to become 
the property of the British Museum : with Brown's consent, 
the herbarium might be removed to the Museum during his 
lifetime. In the first Report of the Banksian Department, dated 
7th December, 1827, Brown says that he has superintended its 
removal, and was then engaged arranging it. The following 
memorandum as to the contents of the herbarium was submitted 
to the Trustees in 1834 :— 

"The Banksian general herbarium, contained in cabinets 
consisting of sixty-seven cubes having eight drawers each, is 
arranged according to the Linnaean system, and by means of 
alphabetical and systematic indexes it may be consulted without 
difficulty. The number of species in this arranged herbarium is 
23,400, of which 20,856 are phanerogamous and 2,544 crypto- 
gamous plants ; the specimens of many, however, being more or 
less incomplete. Connected with the general herbarium there is 
a, collection of fruits and seeds, systematically arranged and 
contained in 64 drawers. There is also a collection of flowers and 
fruits, chiefly of the more rare or of succulent plants, preserved 
in spirits, and contained in 326 bottles. One of the presses 
contains 67 large specimens, chiefly parts of fructification, fronds, 
and sections of trunks of palms. A cabinet of four cubes con- 
tains several partial [special] collections, which, being the authentic 
materials of important botanical works, are kept separate, 
particularly Cliff'ord's herbarium, the principal authority foi- the 
plants described in one of Linnaeus's earliest and most celebi-ated 
works; Clayton's herbarium, from which Gronovius's 'Flora 
Virginica ' was entirely formed ; a considerable number of plants 
collected in the Levant by Tournefort and described in the 
' Corollarium ' to his ' Institutiones Rei Herbariae '; and others 



80 Botany, 

sent from Cochin-China by Loureiro, and published in the flora 
of that country, [There are] also, in five large folio volumes, 
the herbarium and drawings of Hermannus, chiefly of Zeylan 
plants, of which the ' Flora Zeylanica ' of Linnaeus is a systematic 
enumeration and description. The unarranged collections and 
duj^licates consist of 1,700 parcels. The unarranged collections 
and duplicates are disposed geographically, and are in progress 
of incorporation with the arranged herbarium, either as fur- 
nishing distinct species, or as completing the specimens of 
those already contained in a less perfect state. The additional 
species in these collections probably amount to nearly 5,000 
phanerogamous plants." 

In the following year certain other collections, until then in 
the charge of the principal librarian, were transferred to the 
Banksian Department. These, according to the following 
account submitted by Brown, comprised : — 

"1. Sir Hans Sloane's herbarium, formed by himself and 
other botanists, whose collections are kept distinct from each 
other in about 333 volumes, all of them in a tolerably good state 
of preservation ; they are all numbered on the backs, and may 
be referred to without difliculty. 2. Baron de Moll's herbarium, 
purchased by the Trustees, together with his library in 1816. 
3. A collection of Chelsea Garden Plants. Sir Hans Sloane 
in 1721 gave the freehold of the ground to the Company of 
Apothecaries on condition that 50 new plants should annually 
be delivered to the Royal Society till the total amounted to 2,000 
distinct species. The list of the 50 first [appeared] in the Philo- 
soi^hical Transactions for 1722, and that which completed the 
required number, 2,000, in 1761. It appears, however, that the 
Company remained tributary in 50 distinct species per annum 
till the year 1796, at which time the number of 3,750 was com- 
pleted in 75 large fasciculi, which are now extant in perfect 
preservation. Besides these herbaria there is also a collection of 
fruits and seeds in spirits of wine, and another of dried specimens 
of fruits and seeds, roots, wood, and other parts of vegetables." 

Of Sir Hans Sloane's important collection, some account 
follows. The Chelsea Garden plants are now incorporated with 
the general herbarium. The Baron de Moll's collection, according 
to the report of Konig and Baber, who went to examine his 
minerals before their purchase by the Trustees, contained 
specimens from Pallas and other eminent botanists, as well as 
plants collected by himself in the Alps ; this was probably 



Botany. 8 1 

incorporated with the general herbarium, bub no specimens can 
now be identified as coming therefrom. 



The Sloane Herbarium. 

This extensive herbarium, containing as it does the results of 
some of the earliest botanical investigations of China, India, 
and the New World, is of the greatest historical value. The 
plants are catalogued in two copies of Ray's " Historia Plant- 
arum " preserved in the Department, so that they can be easily 
consulted. 

The plants collected by Sloane himself in Jamaica occupy 
eight volumes, in which are included the drawings from which 
the plates in the " Natural History of Jamaica " were made ; 
Sloane's own copy of this work, with his MS. notes, accompanies 
the collection. Among the principal contents of the herbarium 
may be mentioned : the plants collected by James Cunningham 
in China, in 1698-1703 ; those from the Philippines, by Kamel, 
sent to Petiver in 1701, and described in the Appendix to Ray's 
" Historia Plantarum," vol. iii ; the collections of Petiver and 
Plukenet, containing a large number of the plants figured and 
described in their works ; American plants from Banister, 
Bartram, Catesby, Houstoun, Krieg and Vernon ; the collections 
of Hermann and Oldenland, from the Cape of Good Hope ; 
Kaempfer's plants from Japan (1691); plants from Jussieu, 
Tournefort and Vaillant ; and those of most of the contemporary 
English botanists — Buddie (an important British Herbarium), 
Doody, Philip Miller, Merrett, Ray, Sherard, Uvedale ; and from 
the gardens of Badminton, Oxford and Westminster. 

The Banksian Herbarium. 

The herbarium of Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820) is the 
foundation of the General Herbarium. At the time of its 
acquisition it was one of the most important in existence — not 
only on account of its extent, but as containing a large number 
of types of published species — and, owing to the freedom of access 
which was allowed to it, one of the most frequently cited in 
botanical works. Besides the invaluable collections made in 
Malaya, Brazil, South Africa, Polynesia, AustraHa and New 
Zealand, by Banks and Solander, in their voyage round the 
world with Cook in 1768-71, it contains the plants collected 

VOL. I. ^ 



82 Botany, 

by Banks in Great Britain at various dates and in Newfound- 
land and Labrador in 1766, as well as those obtained in Iceland 
in 1772. The herbarium was continually being enriched by 
purchase and exchange. Besides Hermann's herbarium, and 
the herbarium of Clifford upon which the " Hortus Cliffortianus " 
is based, a certain number of Linnaeus's types were obtained 
from Smith in 1786, when the Banksian herbarium was com- 
pared with that of Linnaeus. The collections of AVilliara 
Houstoun from Central America and the West Indies were 
pui'chased by Banks from Philip Miller, whose own her- 
barium, containing the types of many of the plants described 
in the "Gardeners Dictionary," ed. viii (1768), was acquired 
by Banks in 1774. In that year Banks arranged with the 
" Societas Unitatis Fratrum," or Moravian Brothers, to collect 
plants at Tranquebar, whence he received about 500 specimens in 
1775-78. In 1775 he purchased a large herbarium of Swiss 
plants, indicated in the herbarium as " Herb. Helvet.," collected 
by Dick; these Banks obtained through Dr. Pitcairn (1711-91), 
who had a botanic garden at Islington, specimens from which are 
in the herbarium. The collections of the Forsters and of Loureiro 
were acquired at about the same time. The plants collected by 
Alexander Russell (1715 ?-68) and his brother Patrick (1726- 
1805), who were at Aleppo in 1740-53 and 1755-71 respectively, 
were sent to Banks, and are described by him and Solander in the 
"Natural History of Aleppo," ed. 2 (1789). Other well-known 
London gardens contributed to the Banksian collection at this 
period : notably those of James Gordon at Mile End, James Lee 
at Hammersmith, William Malcolm at Kensington, and James 
Vere at Kensington Gore ; there are also a few specimens from 
the garden of Richard Anthony Salisbury at Chapel Allerton, 
Yorkshire. The most important collection of cultivated plants 
is, however, that from the Royal Gardens, Kew, which contains 
the types of the numerous species described by Banks's librarians 
Solander and Dryander (helped in the second edition by Brown) 
in Alton's " Hortus Kewensis " ; the MS. original descriptions of 
these and of a large number of other plants in the Sloane and 
Banksian herbaria are preserved in the Department of Botany. 
Jacquin's herbarium, consisting largely of plants cultivated by 
him in the Vienna and Schonbrunn Gardens and containing 
some of his West Indian plants, was purchased by Banks and 
is incorporated with his collection, which also contains specimens 
sent by A. L. de Jussieu from the Paris Garden. 



Botany, 83 

Among the more noteworthy of the Indian collectors are 
William Roxburgh ; Buchanan-Hamilton (who sent plants to 
Banks in 1794 and 1798); J. G. Koenig, who sent plants in 
1776 and bequeathed to Banks his herbarium and MSS. ; James 
Robertson, who collected in Bombay, Madras, China and Johanna 
Island in 1772-76. The most important Chinese collection is 
that made by Sir George Staunton during Lord Macartney's 
embassy to China in 1793. 

From Polynesia are the large collections of J. R. and G. Forster, 
made during Cook's second voyage (1772-75) ; also plants 
obtained during Cook's third voyage (1776-80) by David Nelson, 
who also collected in Australia and Timor ; William Anderson 
also collected during these voyages in the same countries. The 
specimens collected by Christopher Smith and James Wiles 
during Bligh's voyage to Otaheite (1791-93) were also sent to 
Banks. 

From the Cape there are, besides the very important collections 
of Francis Masson (1741-1805), who also sent plants to Banks 
from the Canaries and Azores, from the West Indies, and from 
North America and Canada ; about 1,000 specimens from 
Oldenburg, collected in 1772; and others from James Niven 
(1774?-1826), David Nelson {d. 1789), and Andreas Auge 
{fl. 1794). Among the collectors in tropical Africa may be 
mentioned William Brass {fl. 1790), who collected at Cape Coast ; 
Henry Smeathman (fl. 1750-87), who sent plants from Mada- 
gascar and Sierra Leone; and Christian Smith (1785-1816), 
whose important collections during the Congo expedition were 
described by Robert Brown. The principal contributor of 
Madagascar plants was John Vaughan Thompson {fl. 1807-29). 

Among New World collections, the most important is that of 
John Clayton (1686 ?-l 773), who sent 4iis Virginian plants to 
Gronovius ; they are the types of Gronovius's " Flora Yirginica " 
(1743-1762). The volume of South Carolina plants collected by 
William Young {fl. 1753-84), with an accompanying volume of 
crude drawings, was acquired by Banks from the Bute library in 
1794. Other early American collectors represented in the 
herbarium are John Bartram (1699-1777), and his son William 
(1739-1823); W. V. Turner, who collected in the "Cherokee 
country" in 1769; Peter Kalm (1717-79); William Clifton 
(^. 1765) ; Dr. John Mitchell {d. 1772); and Archibald Menzies 
(1754-1842). 

Among West Indian collectors may be mentioned Olof Swartz 

G 2 



84 Botany. 

(1760-1818), who contributed largely to the herbarium and 
worked at the material therein preserved, obtained by previous 
collectors; the results of his researches are included in his 
"Prodromus" (1783), where he pays a high tribute to Banks — 
" Non poterunt immortales perillustris hujus viri digne satis 
celebrari laudes " ; Henri de Ponthieu sent plants from the 
Caribee Islands in 1778; William Wright (1735-1819) and 
Roger Shakespear from Jamaica, the latter collected in 1777-82 ; 
Alexander Anderson {d. 1815), plants from Demerarain 1791 and 
later from the St. Vincent Garden, of which he was curator ; 
John Greg, plants from Dominica, collected 1777. 

Robert Brown's Herbarium. 

At the death of Robert Brown in 1858, his herbarium came 
into the possession of John Joseph Bennett, then Keeper of the 
Department of Botany. It mainly consisted of the very valuable 
and interesting collection made by Brown in his capacity as 
naturalist during the voyage of H.M.S. Investigator, commanded 
by Captain Flinders, on the coast of New Holland and Van 
Diemen's Land in 1802-5, and included nearly 3,900 species, 
among them being the types of Brown's " Prodromus Florae 
Novae Hollandiae." The herbarium during Bennett's lifetime 
was kept at the Museum, and was accessible to botanists ; it was 
largely employed by Bentham in the preparation of his " Flora 
Australiensis." On Bennett's death in 1876, the Museum 
became possessed of a complete and very fine series of the 
Australian plants, with all Brown's notes, and of the remainder 
of his herbarium ; this contained Australian plants from 
Baxter, Sturt, Mitchell and Labillardiere, Brown's own collec- 
tions in Timor and at the Cape, and various specimens from 
other collectors, including types of species described by Brown. 

Mr. Murray desires to state that advantage has been taken 
of Mr. Britten's unique knowledge of the history of the botanical 
collections. He, with Mr. Gepp's help, has completed the work. 



Botany, 85 



2. — Chronological Account of the Principal Accessions 
TO THE Botanical Collections to the end of 1902. 



1829. 

An extensive collection of Indian plants, made by Dr. Wallich, 
and presented by the East India Company ; further instalments 
were received in 1847 and 1849. 

1831. 

T. Drummond's " Musci Americani/' collected in North 
America during the second Land Expedition (1825-28) of Sir 
John Franklin : presented by Dr. Richardson ; another series — 
from the Southern States — was purchased in 1842. 

1834. 

400 Egyptian plants collected and presented by John G. 
Wilkinson, Esq. 

Plants of Georgia and Carolina collected by Beyrich : pur- 
chased. 

500 Chilian plants collected by Bertero : purchased. 

A small collection of Peruvian plants, made by A. Mathews : 
purchased : in 1840, 207 plants were purchased. 

1836. 

127 plants from British Guiana collected and presented by 
R. H. Schomburgk, Esq. ; in 1837, 400 plants were presented ; 
in 1838, 300; in 1839, 323; in 1843, 510 ; in 1844, 530 plants, 
with 125 specimens of woods and fruits. 

170 Arctic plants collected and presented by Sir George 
Back, R.K 

119 plants from Labrador collected and presented by Lieut. 
Bowen, R.N. 

250 woods and 135 plants from Brazil, collected by Blanchet : 
purchased ; in 1838, 180 plants were purchased. 



86 Botany. 

1837. 

172 plants collected during the Euphrates Expedition and 
presented by Col. Chesney. 

1838. 
1,300 Mexican plants collected by Berlandier : purchased. 

1839. 

405 South American plants collected by George Barclay 
during the voyage of H.M.S. Sulphur: presented by W. T. 
Aiton, Esq. 

503 Mexican plants collected by Hartweg : purchased ; in 
1841, 108 Guatemalan plants were purchased; in 1842, 66 plants 
from Guayaquil; in 1843, 609 Columbian and 138 Peruvian 
plants. 

1840. 

805 specimens of woods, purchased of B. Couch, Plymouth 
Dockyard. 

513 plants from Port Natal collected by Dr. Krauss : 

purchased. 

258 Nubian plants collected by Theodor Kotschy : purchased- 

1841. 

75 South AustraHan plants collected and presented by Mrs. 
Captain Grey ; in 1845, 265 plants were presented. 

2,433 plants collected in the Philippines, etc. by Hugh 
Cuming: purchased; in 1843, 113 orchids in spirit were pur- 
chased. 

1,907 plants from Syria, Persia, and Arabia, collected by 
Aucher-Eloy : purchased. 

803 plants and 160 woods from Brazil collected by Claussen : 
purchased ; in 1843, 100 woods were purchased. 

791 Brazilian plants collected by George Gardner : purchased ; 
in 1842, 358 plants were purchased ; in 1843, 140 cryptogams. 

313 Abyssinian plants collected by Schimper : purchased. 

126 Chilian plants collected by Bridges: purchased; in 1842, 
108 plants were purchased ; in 1843, 313. 

134 Brazilian plants collected by Martius : purchased. 



Botany, 87 

1842. 

170 Australian plants presented by Capt. Wickhara, R.N. 

358 Surinam plants collected by Hostmann : purchased ; in 
1843, 541 plants were purchased. 

The following were purchased at the sale of Lambert's Herba- 
rium ; 1,998 plants and 397 woods, barks, fruits, and seeds, from 
Peru, Mexico, and Spain, collected by Ruiz and Pavon ; 2,250 
Russian and Siberian plants collected by Pallas ; 453 plants 
collected during Cook's second voyage, and forming the younger 
Forster's Herbarium ; 674 Indian plants collected by Buchanan 
Hamilton ; 400 plants from French Guiana collected by Martin. 

1843. 

446 North American plants collected and presented by E. 
Doubleday, Esq. ; in the following year, 251 plants were 
presented. 

380 South African plants collected by Burke : presented by 
the Earl of Derby. 

90 plants from the east coast of China collected and presented 
by Sir Everard Home ; the following year, 51 plants were 
presented. 

1000 West Australian plants collected by J. Drummond : 
purchased; in 1844, 400 plants were purchased; in 1845, 345; 
in 1848, 400 ; in 1850, 552 ; in 1854, 450. 

228 plants of Columbia and New Granada collected by 
Linden: purchased: in 1844, 64 plants were purchased; in 
1845, 232; in 1868, 919. 

1844. 

595 South African plants collected and presented by Dr. 
Wallich. 

260 plants from Tenasserim collected and presented by Dr. 
J. D. Y. Packman. 

150 plants from the Canary Islands collected and presented 
by P. B. Webb, Esq. ; in the following year, 148 plants were 
presented. 

814 Persian plants collected by Theodor Kotschy : purchased ; 
in 1857, 504 plants from Asia Minor were purchased; in 1862. 
580 plants from Cilicia and Kurdistan ; in 1864, 232 plants from 
Syria and Cyprus; in 1867, 1,875 Persian. 



88 Botany. 

500 European mosses prepared by W. P. Schimper : purchased. 

175 plants from Chili collected by Renous : purchased. 

1 68 models of British Fungi made by J. Sowerby : purchased. 

1845. 

1,120 South American plants collected during the Voyage of 
Survey, in the Adventure and Beagle, by Capt. P. P. King, R.N., 
and presented by him. 

531 plants from Auckland and Campbell's Islands collected 
during Ross's Antarctic Voyage, and presented by Dr. J. D. 
Hooker; in 1847, 444 plants were presented ; in 1854, 439 New 
Zealand plants. 

247 plants from Guiana : presented by H. C. Rothery, Esq. 

713 plants from Florida collected by ChajDman : purchased. 

600 North American plants collected by Geyer : purchased. 

330 plants from Quito collected by Jameson : purchased ; in 
1846, 277 Columbian plants were purchased; in 1847, 102 
Columbian mosses ; in 1848, 127 plants from Quito; in 1849, 257; 
in 1850, 182 ; in 1857, 795; in 1858, 168. 

318 plants from Texas collected by Lindheimer : purchased ; 
in 1850, 457 plants were purchased. 

272 Chinese plants collected by Fortune : purchased ; in 
1846, 55 plants were purchased; in 1852, 70 plants, etc.; in 
1857, 52 plants, etc.; in 1860, a series of woods; in 1862, 100 
plants from China and Japan. 

228 Grecian plants collected by Heldreich : purchased ; in 
1849, 1,787 plants from Greece and Asia Minor were purchased. 

1846. 

715 plants from Australia and the Pacific Islands, collected 
and presented by Sir Everard Home; in 1853, 400 plants, with 
numerous cryptogams, were presented; in 1854, 174. 

1,500 South African plants collected by Zeyher : purchased ; 
in 1852, 55 woods were purchased. 

650 Caucasian plants collected by Hohenacker : purchased. 

580 plants from Buenos Ayres collected by Tweed ie : 
purchased. 

400 plants from the Canary Islands collected by Bourgeau : 
purchased ; the following year, 607 plants were purchased. 

1 60 Arabian plants collected by W. Schimper : purchased ; 
in 1880, 84 plants were presented. 



Botany. 



89 



131 plants from Java collected by T. Lobb : purchased; in 
1847, 213 plants from Java, Penang, and Singapore were 
purchased; in 1848, 48. 

1847. 

The collection of Edward Rudge, containing an arranged 
general herbarium of 4,138 species, and 772 plants from French 
Guiana collected by Martin : presented by Mrs. Rudge. 

485 plants from New South Wales collected and presented 
by Sir Thomas Mitchell. 

303 plants from Madagascar and Mauritius collected by 
Bojer : presented by the Society of Arts and Sciences, Mauritius. 

533 Bolivian plants collected by Bridges : purchased. 

132 Hepaticse Britannicse prepared by Maclvor : purchased. 
408 Pyrenean mosses and hepatics collected by Spruce : 

purchased. 

1848. 

650 Portuguese plants collected by Welwitsch : purchased ; 
in 1852, 200 plants were purchased; in 1853, 601; in 1856, 
125 mosses. 

412 Calif ornian plants collected by Hartweg : purchased. 

326 plants from New Mexico collected by Fendler : purchased ; 
the following year, 1,297 plants were purchased. 

1849. 

An extensive collection,. forming part of W. Griffith's Indian 
herbarium, was presented by the East India Company ; a con- 
tinuation was presented the following year. 

294 plants from North Persia collected and presented by 
Thomas Lynch, Esq. 

292 plants from the South of France and the Spanish Pyre- 
nees, collected by Bourgeau : purchased; in 1850, 270 Spanish 
plants were purchased; in 1864, 611 plants from the French 
Maritime Alps, Spain, Algeria, Armenia, and Lycia ; in 1865, 
178 European; in 1868, 1,080 plants from Corsica and Savoy. 

1850. 

236 plants from the Dutch possessions in India, collected Ijy 
Junghuhn and presented by Dr. de Vriese. 

118 plants from the Sandwich Islands and the West Coast of 
Africa, collected and presented by Lieut. W. Strickland, R.N. 



90 Botany. 

26 Syrian plants collected by W. K. Loftus : presented ; in 
1853 and 1856, 72 Oriental plants were presented ; in 1856, 207 
Assyrian plants were purchased. 

635 South American plants with specimens of wood, etc., 
collected by Spruce: purchased; in 1851, 378 plants, etc., were 
purchased ; in 1852, 367 plants, etc. ; in 1853, 422 ; in 1855, 405 ; 
in 1856, 256; in 1858, 664; in 1859, 363; in 1860, 300; in 
1861, 910; in 1866, 997; in 1867, 1,403 mosses; in 1892, 494 
hepatics. 

519 plants from New Mexico collected by C. Wright : pur- 
chased ; in 1853, 850 plants were purchased. 

396 Spanish plants collected by Blanco : purchased. 

208 plants from Algeria and Oran collected by George Munby : 
purchased. 

200 plants from Forfarshire collected by W. Gardiner : 
purchased. 

108 plants from New Zealand collected by Mossman : pur- 
chased; in 1850, 107 cryptogams were purchased; in 1860, 365 
"West Australian plants. 

1851. 

5,746 Brazilian plants collected by Gardner, being his own 
herbarium : purchased of his executors. 



1852. 

1,747 plants from Kumaun, Garhwal, and adjoining part of 
Tibet, collected by Capt. R. Strachey and presented by the East 
India Company. 

114 woods from Ceylon, collected and presented by F. Layard, 
Esq. 

A collection of Australian plants, chiefly from Allan Cunning- 
ham : presented. 

780 specimens, representing 293 species of British sea-weeds : 
purchased from Mrs. Griffiths. 

130 plants from Mount Olympus collected by Clemente : 
purchased. 

A collection of fruits and fungi from St. Domingo, collected 
by Salle: purchased; in 1855, 46 fungi from Vera Cruz were 
purchased; in 1857, 298 Mexican fungi ; in 1858, 524 Mexican 
plants and 275 from New Orleans. 



Botany. 91 

1853. 

151 plants from St. Domingo collected by Sir R. H. Schom- 
burgk : presented. 

250 plants from Ceylon collected by Thwaites : purchased ; 
in 1854, 433 plants were purchased; in 1855, 1,392; in 1857, 
234; in 1858, 152; in 1860, 166; in 1861, 105; in 1863, 129; 
in 1866, 113 ; in 1868, 117 ; in 1875, 445 cryptogams. 

150 South African plants collected by J. H. Bowker : 
purchased. 

100 plants from Moreton Bay collected by Strange : pur- 
chased. 

1854. 

550 Armenian plants collected by Huet de Pavilion : pur- 
chased ; in 1856, 363 Sicilian plants were purchased; in 1857, 
325 ; in 1867, 350 Oriental plants. 

388 South American plants collected by V\^. Lobb : purchased. 

316 Dalmatian plants collected by Botteri : purchased; in 
1867, 200 plants were purchased. 

309 plants from Kurdistan and Loristan, collected by Olguin : 
purchased. 

80 plants from New Zealand collected by T. S. Ralph : 
purchased; in 1859, 87 ferns were purchased. 

1855. 

720 Indian plants collected and presented by Drs. J. D. 
Hooker and T. Thomson; in 1859, 3,851 plants were presented ; 
in 1861, 2,395. 

546 Mexican plants collected by Botteri : purchased ; in 
1857, 470 plants were purchased. 

496 plants from the South Pacific Islands, collected by John 
MacGillivray : purchased; in 1860, 119 cryptogams from the 
New Hebrides were purchased; in 1862, 91 plants; in 1863, 
89 plants from Lizard Island. 

425 Oriental plants collected by Balansa : purchased; in 
1856, 487 plants were purchased; in 1857, 144 ; in 1858, 170. 

242 South Australian algse, collected by Ray : purchased. 

1856. 

450 plants from the South Sea Islands, etc., collected during 
the voyage of H.M.S. Herald (1852), and presented by Sir J. 
Liddell, C.B. 



92 Botany. 

257 plants of the same voyage, with 1,919 North American 
plants, chiefly collected by Sir John Richardson ; 852 West 
Australian plants collected by A. Collie ; and 477 miscellaneous 
plants with specimens of vegetable productions, were received 
from the Royal Naval Hospital, Haslar. 

222 plants from the Pyrenean Mountains, Australia, collected 
and presented by D. E. Cooper, Esq. 

144 plants from Tripoli and Central Africa collected and 
presented by Dr. E. Yogel. 

395 plants from Tunis collected by Kralik : purchased. 

182 Venezuelan ferns collected by Fendler : purchased. 

166 Spanish plants collected by Rossmassler : purchased. 

The following were purchased at the sale of the Horticultural 
Society's Herbarium: 1,460 plants from North- West America 
and California, collected by D. Douglas; 1,079 plants from 
Ceylon and 320 from the Sandwich Islands, collected by Macrae ; 
701 plants from West Tropical Africa, collected by G. Don; 
317 plants from South Africa and Madagascar, collected by 
J. Forbes ; 510 plants from the East Indies. 

1857. 

567 algae from Australia, 119 from the Friendly Islands and 

93 from Ceylon, collected by Harvey : purchased. 

337 Javanese plants collected by Zollinger : purchased ; the 
following year, 360 plants were purchased. 

218 Chilian plants collected by Ph. Germain: purchased; 
the following year, 484 plants were purchased. 

126 plants from Chagres collected by Fendler : purchased. 

22 woods, etc., from Madeira, collected by N. H. Mason : 
purchased ; the following year 400 plants were purchased. 

1858. 

964 Javanese plants, collected by Dr. Horsfield, including the 
types of Brown and Bennett's " Plantse Javanicae Rariores " : 
presented by the East India Company. 

The following were purchased at the sale of W. Gourlie's 
Herbarium: 1000 plants from Ohio, collected by J. Clarke; 635 
Corsican plants, collected by Soleirol ; 600 plants from New 
Zealand, collected by A. Sinclair ; 590 Indian plants, collected 
by Dr. T. Thomson; 535 plants from Spain, Italy and 
Algeria, collected by Balansa, Bourgeau, Durieu and Jamin ; 



Botany, 93 

184 plants from Panama and North- West America, collected by 
Seemann. 

625 Australasian plants collected by Leicliardt and Lynd : 
purchased. 

600 plants from Braemar collected by A. Croall : purchased. 

285 Calif ornian plants collected by Bridges : purchased. 

174 Ceylon woods collected by Wright : purchased. 

1859. 

James Sowerby's Herbarium, containing the types of the 
plants figured in " English Botany " : purchased. 

" Lichenes Hibernici exsiccati," prepared by Isaac Carroll : 
purchased; in 1874 and 1875, large Irish and Scandinavian 
collections, formed by Carroll, were purchased. 

1860. 

406 plants from Kentucky collected by Dr. Shortt and 
presented by Sir John Richardson, 

5,750 North American plants, forming Nuttall's Herbarium : 
purchased. 

889 plants from Ecuador collected by Louis Eraser : pur- 
chased ; the following year, 156 Guatemalan plants were 
purchased. 

Four centuries of " Lichenes ex herb, T. Salwey " : purchased 
1860-62. 

50 species forming fasc. 1 of Wirtgen's " Rubi Rhenani": 
purchased; in 1861, fasc. 2 was purchased; in 1862, 32 species 
of Mentha. 

186L 

134 West Himalayan plants collected by Captain P. Gerard : 
presented. 

757 plants, chiefly Russian, from Prescott's Herbarium : pur- 
chased. 

601 British lichens collected by W, Mudd : purchased ; in 
1865, 80 specimens, illustrating his monogi-aph of British 
Cladoniae, were purchased. 

594 plants from the Fiji Islands collected by Seemann : 
purchased; in 1865, 200 plants were purchased. 

375 plants from Alabama collected by S. B. Buckley : 
purchased. 



94 Botany. 

360 British mosses and 150 lichens collected by J. Sadler : 
purchased. 

337 British sea- weeds collected and presented by Miss Cutler, 
and 149 by Mrs. Gray. 

1,200 species forming 24 fascicles of the " Erbario Critto- 
gamico Italiano," Ser. I : purchased at various times between the 
years 1861 and 1871. (For Series II, see 1869.) 

300 plants from South-AYest Australia, collected by G. Max- 
well : purchased. 

258 British fungi and 51 Rubi collected by Rev. A. Bloxam : 
purchased; in 1866, 49 Rubi were presented; in 1870, 2,086 
fungi of Britain and France were purchased ; in 1875, a collection 
of lichens was purchased; in 1878, his scientific correspondence 
was presented by his son; in 1893, 46 Rubi were presented by 
the Linnean Society ; in 1896, 200 British and 300 New Zealand 
cryptogams were presented by F. T. Mott, Esq. 

254 plants from Senegal collected by Perrottet : purchased ; 
in 1862, 52 plants from Guadeloupe were purchased. 

208 Mexican plants collected by Jiirgensen : purchased. 

201 North American plants collected by Carey and Watson : 
purchased. 

176 plants from Madagascar and Mohilla collected by Boivin : 
purchased. 

159 Senegal plants collected by Adanson, Leprieur and 
Perrottet : purchased. 

136 plants from Mexico and Peru collected by Ruiz and 
Pavon : purchased. 

117 Senegal plants collected by Heudelot : purchased. 

100 species, forming two fasciculi of Ayres's " British Fungi " : 
purchased. 

74 plants from Martinique, collected by Belanger, Gamier 
and Perrottet : purchased. 

1862. 

A valuable series of plants collected during the 17th and 
18th centuries, including the herbaria of Ray, Dale, Rand and 
Nicholls : presented by the Apothecaries' Company. 

3,300 European plants, forming fasc. 1-33 of Billot's "Flora 
Galliie et Germanise exsiccata " : further instalments were pur- 
chased in 1865 and in 1867. 

2,542 cryptogams, forming the herbarium of George J. Lyon : 
purchased. 



Botany. 95 

2,000 plants, forming the type collection of Seemann's " Botany 
of the Voyage of H.M.S. Herald^' : purchased. 

974 species, forming fasc. 1-36 of Rabenhorst's " Lichenes 
Europsei exsiccati": purchased between the years 18G2 and 
1880. 

Decades 1-66 of Rabenhorst's " Hepaticse Europsese " : pur- 
chased between the years 1862 and 1880. 

800 species, forming cent. 1-8 of Rabenhorst's " Fungi 
Europaei," Ed. 2, Ser. i. : purchased. 

465 plants from New Grenada collected by Schlim : pur- 
chased. 

305 plants from Penang and Singapore collected by J. T. 
Walker : purchased. 

Baxter's " Stirpes Cryptogamicse Oxonienses " : j^urchased. 

46 British Salices, collected by J. E. Leefe : purchased ; in 
1870, 100 Salices were purchased ; in 1872 and 1875 further 
purchases were made. 

Count Limminghe's lichen collection : j^urchased. 



1863. 

457 Tasmanian plants collected and presented by Dr. J, 
Milligan; in 1868, 72 were presented. 

313 mosses and 74 hepatics from the Simplon Pass : presented 
by Prof. Gagliardi ; in the following year, 665 lichens were pre- 
sented. 

2,300 German plants, forming part of Reichenbach's " Flora 
Germanica exsiccata " : purchased ; in the following year, 500 
were purchased. 

218 plants and 450 fruits from Panama collected by Sutton 
Hayes : purchased ; in the following year, 1,102 plants were pur- 
chased. 

162 plants from the Zambesi collected by the Rev. J. 
Stewart : purchased. 

103 Compositse prepared by Schultz-Bipontinus : purchased; 
in 1866, 100 were purchased; in 1871, 253 ; in 1872, 870. 

The following were purchased of the Linnean Society : 690 
Australian plants collected by Ferd. von Mueller ; 340 crypto- 
gams from South Carolina collected by Ravenel; 250 Chilian 
Compositse collected by Gillies; 87 plants from Madagascar 
collected by Hilsenberg ; Dr. Pulteney's British Herbarium ; 
herbarium of South Carolina plants formed by Walter. 



96 Botany. 

1864. 

216 fungi presented by C. E. Broome, Esq. 

3,000 species, forming sixty livraisons of Desmazieres' " Plantes 
Cryptogames de la France " : transferred from the Department 
of Printed Books ; in 1888, 280 fresh-water algae : purchased. 

2,000 mosses, chiefly British, forming A. O. Black's Herbarium : 
purchased. 

Rabenhorst's " Algen Sachsens," comprising two hundred and 
fifty-nine decades, were purchased between the years 1864 and 
1880. 

Rabenhorst's "Fungi Europsei," Ed. 2, Ser. ii., containing 
forty -three centuries, were purchased between the years 1864 
and 1901. 

121 specimens, forming five parts of Rabenhorst's " Characese 
Europese," were purchased between the years 1864 and 1879. 

450 British fungi collected by M. C. Cooke : purchased ; in 
1865, 250 fungi were purchased; in 1867, 200; in 1870, 100; 
in 1872, 307; in 1874, 100 fungi and 50 Discomycetes ; from 
1872-74, 332 preparations, illustrating the structure and 
fructification of British fungi, were purchased; in 1895, 100 
fungi, chiefly Australian. 

539 Cuban cryptogams collected by C. Wright : purchased ; 
in 1865, 2,127 phanerogams were purchased; in 1870, 351 fungi; 
in 1884, 330 Graphidese; in 1886, 56 lichens. 

700 plants of the Rocky Mountains collected by Hall, 
Harbour and Parry : purchased. 

672 Pyrenean plants collected by Fourcade : purchased. 

550 plants from Palestine collected by B. T. Lowne : 
purchased. 

100 plants forming two fasciculi of Van Heurck's "Plantes 
rares ou critiques de Belgique" : purchased ; in 1868, 1869, and 
1870, other fasciculi were purchased. 

1865. 

1,500 British plants presented by Mrs. Anna Atkins. 

1,078 South African plants collected by T. Cooper: pre- 
sented. 

1,000 Tyrolese plants collected by Rupert Huter : purchased ; 
in 1866, 850 plants were purchased; in 1867, 300 ; in 1868, 425 
Dalmatian; in 1870, 375 Tyrolese; in 1872, 405 ; in 1875, 488 



Botany. 9 7 

from the Tyrol and North Italy; in 1876, 237 from South 
Europe; in 1881, 375 European. 

2,850 Venezuelan plants collected by Moritz : purchased. 

1,600 plants from Zululand collected by AV. T. Gerrard : 
purchased, 

400 Sicilian plants, forming first four centuries of Todaro's 
"Elora Sicula": purchased; in 1867, 1868, cent. 5, 6 were 
purchased; in 1869, cent. 7, 8; in 1871, cent. 9-12; in 1875, 
cent. 13, 14. 

369 Swedish plants collected by Nyman : purchased. 

273 European mosses contained in Schimper's " Pugillus 
Muscorum " : purchased. 

269 plants from the Shetland Islands collected by Ralph 
Tate : purchased. 

1866. 

Collection of ferns (upwards of 10,000) made by John Smith, 
of Kew : purchased. 

5000 microscope-slides of Diatomacea^, forming the entire 
collections of Gregory and Greville : purchased. 

600 German plants, forming first six centuries of F. Schultz's 
"Herbarium Normale " : purchased; in 1868, cent. 7-10 were 
purchased; in 1886, cent. 20, 21 (C. Keck, ed.) ; in 1887, 
cent. 22, 23; in 1888, cent. 24; in 1889, cent. 25, 26; in 1892, 
cent. 27-29 ; in 1894, cent. 30, and 31 (DGrfier, ed.) ; in 1897, 
cent. 32-34; in 1898, cent. 35, 36; in 1899, cent. 37-39; in 
1900, cent. 40; in 1901, cent. 41 ; in 1902, cent. 42, 43. 

536 specimens being SuUivant and Lesquereux's "Musci 
Americani exsiccati," Ed. II. : purchased. 

475 plants from Formosa collected by R. Oldham : purchased ; 
in 1870, 663 plants were purchased. 

400 species, being Mdlle. Libert's " Plant^e Cryptogamicai " of 
the Ardennes : purchased. 

370 specimens of Leighton's " Lichenes Britannici " : pur- 
chased ; the following year, 50 species were purcliased. 

112 plants from Old Calabar collected by AV. G. Milne: 
purchased. 

1867. 

1,300 plants from the East Indies and 1,000 from the 
Neilgherry Mountains, collected by Metz : purchased. 

835 marine alg?e collected by Kiitzing and others : purchased ; 
the following year, Kiitzing's entire collection of about 2,000 

VOL. I. II 



98 Botany. 

gatherings of DiiTtomacea?, together with notes and sketches, was 
purchased. 

785 plants and 42 woods from Egypt and Ethiopia, collected 
by Schweinfurth : purchased. 

18 fascicles of British alga* i3repared by J. Cocks : j^urchased. 

238 plants from Chontales, Nicaragua, collected by B. 
Seemann : purchased. 

227 plants from Senegambia and 25G from the Neilgherry 
Mountains, collected by Perrottet : purchased. 

Wirtgen's " Herbarium Rhenanum" : purchased 1867—71. 

134 cryptogams from South Africa and the West Indies, 
collected by Breutel : purchased; in 1871, 873 mosses from 
South Africa, Central and Arctic America ; purchased. 

1868. 

994 plants from Styria, Dalmatia, and Italy, presented by 
Dr. R. C. Alexander Prior. 

333 Australian plants collected and presented by Charles 
Moore, Esq. 

295 British lichens presented by Dr. HoU. 

4,824 cryptogams, being Hepp's herbarium : purchased. 

1,250 Bolivian plants collected by Mandon : purchased. 

1,093 Pyrenese plants collected by Petit : purchased. 

966 Algerian plants collected by Romain : purchased. 

954 plants from French Guiana collected by Sagot : pur- 
chased. 

588 Italian plants collected by Puccinelli : purchased. 

564 Chilian plants collected by Philippi : purchased ; in 1893, 
several specimens of Malvaceae were presented. 

544 plants from Martinique collected by Hahn : purchased ; 
in 1870, 444 plants were purchased. 

500 Californian plants collected by Bolander : purchased. 

100 microscope-slides of Eulenstein's " Diatomacea^ Typicie " : 
purchased. 

50 lichens from the Channel Islands collected by Larbalestier : 
purchased; in 1873, 230 lichens were purchased; in 1880, 350 
British and 150 Egyptian. 

1869. 

110 Australasian plants collected by Baron Ferd. von 
Mueller: presented; in 1878, 286 plants were presented; in 



Botany. 99 

1884, 30; in 1885, 783 ; iu 1886, 161 ; in 1887, 675 ; in 1889, 
402; in 1890, 692; in 1891, 343; in 1892, 164; in 1893,56; 
in 1894, 22. 

700 plants from Quito collected by Jameson and presented by 
J. N. Kuczinski, Esq. 

211 North American plants collected and presented by Dr. 
W. A. Bell. 

110 Styrian and 22 Sicilian plants collected and presented by 
the Chevalier Pittoni. 

48 plants from Gibraltar collected and presented by H. A. 
Hurst, Esq. ; in 1871, 62 plants from Lower Egypt were 
presented; in 1876, 99 Egyptian; in 1881, 200. 

2,000 Abyssinian plants collected by W. Schimper : j^ur- 
chased; in 1871, 90 mosses and hepatics were purchased; in 
1872, 270 plants ; in 1890, 224 plants were acquired by exchange ; 
in 1891,265. 

650 plants from the European collection formed by Dr. 
Rostan : purchased. 

416 fungi from South Carolina collected byllavenel: purchased. 

323 Nicaraguan plants collected by Ralph Tate : purchased. 

1,100 species, forming twenty-two fasciculi of the " Erbario 
Crittogamico Italiano," Ser. II., were purchased between the 
years 1869 and 1881. (For series I, see 1861.) 

The following, from IsT. B. Ward's collection, were purchased 
of his executors : 3,094 South African plants collected by Harvey, 
Ecklon, Stanger, etc. ; 1,014 Indian plants collected by Wight; 
784 North American plants collected by Gray, Sullivant, etc. ; 
560 Madeiran plants collected by Lemann, Lij^pold, etc. ; 431 
Malaccan jDlants collected by Griffith ; 225 Calif ornian plants 
collected by Coulter ; 2 1 3 North American Carices collected by 
Sartwell; 166 Swan River plants collected byMylne; 113 plants 
from the Fiji Islands collected by Harvey ; 96 North European 
Salices collected by Lsestadius ; 77 Athenian i^hxnts collected by 
Boissier. 

1870. 

67 plants from the Island of Banl^a, Malay Archipelago : 
presented by Dr. R. H. C. C. Scheffer ; in 1872, 276 Javanese 
woods were presented. 

2,625 Oriental plants collected by Haussknecht : purchased. 

100 British lichens collected by J. M. Crombie : purchased ; 
in 1871, 200 lichens were purchased ; in 1872, 100 : in 1873, 450 ; 

11 2 



100 Botany. 

in 1874, 450; ia 1877, 350; in 1890, 1,287; in 1891, 138; in 
1900, 54. 

250 critical British plants collected by W. T. Thiselton Dyer : 
purchased; in 1871, 100 plants, purchased. 

175 Juncace?e, and 165 Graminese, being Baenitz's published 
sets : purchased. 

100 plants from Old Calabar collected by Robb : purchased. 

82 fossil plants prepared by Norman: purchased; in 1871, 
73 fossil woods were purchased; in 1873, 122 fossils. 



1871. 

343 cellular cryptogams presented by Dr. W. Lauder 
Lindsay ; in 1874, a collection of fossil plants was presented. 

267 Cape plants collected by R. Trimen : presented. 

Auerswald's herbarium of 17,000 European and American 
plants : purchased. 

1,625 Scandinavian plants collected by Ahlberg : purchased. 

1,450 mosses, forming twenty-nine fasciculi of Rabenhorst's 
" Bryotheca Europaea," were purchased between 1871 and 1884. 

125 vascular cryptogams of Europe, forming five fasciculi of 
Rabenhorst's published set. 

1,030 Russian plants collected by Gruner, Bunge, Schweinfurth, 
Le Jolis, etc. : purchased; and 556 from Catherinslav and 371 
from Woronetz by Gruner. 

1,000 Yucatan plants collected by A. Schott : purchased. 

410 lichens of Italy collected by Anzi : purchased ; in 1875, 
a further 988 were purchased. 

400 North African plants collected by E. G. Paris: pur- 
chased; in the following year, 100 plants were purchased. 

400 Belgian cryptogams collected by Westendorp and 
Wallays : purchased. 

390 South American mosses collected by J. Weir : purchased : 
in the ensuing year, 189 plants were purchased. 

378 Russian plants collected by Golde : purchased ; in 1874, 
133 plants were purchased ; in 1875, 100. 

323 Malayan plants collected by A. C. Maingay : purchased ; 
in 1882, 135 Burmese lichens were purchased. 

304 British fungi collected by W. G. Smith : purchased ; in 
subsequent years 47 specimens and 216 microscope preparations 
were acquired. 

300 wood sections prepared by Nordlinger : purchased ; a 



Botany. 101 

complete series of his " Holzquerschnitte " was subsequently 
purchased. 

272 Salices collected by Wimmer : purchased. 

225 German fungi prepared by HoU and Schmidt : purchased. 

219 Italian plants collected by Liberato Sabbati, 1718 ; 
transferred from Kew. 

200 cryptogams collected by Kneiff and Hartmann : pur- 
chased. 

185 plants from the Island Sviatoi, Caspian Sea, collected l)y 
Bruhns : purchased. 

168 plants, forming Schultz's "Herbarium Florae Istriacae " : 
purchased. 

150 plants from the Engadine collected by J. L. Kriittli : 
purchased. 

125 Scandinavian plants collected by Zetterstedt : purchased. 

105 Portuguese plants collected by Daniel Sharpe : purchased. 

1872. 

Plants from Dr. J. A. Murray's Herbarium : purchased. 

1,800 rare French plants, collected by Jordan, Kralik, 
Grenier, etc. : purchased. 

880 New Caledonian plants collected by Pancher : purchased ; 
the following year, 73 woods and stems were purchased. 

650 Spanish plants collected by Graells : purchased. 

150 Scandinavian mosses and 650 lichens from Lapland 
collected by Hellbom : purchased; in 1891, 200 Scandinavian 
lichens were purchased. 

633 plants from Oregon collected by Elihu Hall : purchased ; 
the following year, 850 plants from Texas were purchased. 

700 " Schweizerische Kryptogamen " in 14 fascicles, by 
Wartmann and Schenck : purchased. 

385 North Italian plants collected by Cesati, Caruel and Savi : 
purchased. 

350 Corsican plants collected by P. Mabille : purchased. 

A complete set of Berkeley's " British Fungi " (350 specimens) : 
purchased. 

1,300 Austrian fungi prepared by F. von Thiimen : purchased 
1872-75. 

250 Scandinavian algffi collected by Areschoug : purchased ; 
in 1875, 150 algae were purchased. 

225 plants and 19 fruits from Cordova collected by E. 
Fielding : purchased. 



102 Botany. 

191 plants from Clierson, Russia, collected by Rehmann : 
purchased. 

187 plants from Malta and Italy, collected and presented by 
J. T. Duthie, Esq. : in 1873, 128 plants were presented ; in 1874, 
300 were purchased. 

150 plants from Crete and 90 from Martinique collected by 
Sieber : purchased. 

131 plants from Demerara collected by C. Appun : purchased. 

110 Cuban plants collected by Ramon de la Sagra : purchased. 

100 species, forming first two fasciculi of Lindeberg's 
"Hieracia Scandinavi?e " : purchased; in 1878, fasc. 3 was 
purchased; in 1888, 52 species of his "Herbarium Ruborum 
Scandinaviie." 

80 species, forming first two fasciculi of Nordstedt and 
Wahlstedt's Scandinavian " Characese " : purchased; in 1875, 
fasc. 3 was purchased. 

1873. 

3000 British plants : presented by Dr. Trimen. 

432 Burmese cryptogams collected and presented by S. Kurz. 

900 species, forming nine centuries of Karsten's " Fungi 
Fennise " : purchased. 

595 plants from Suez, Arabia and East Africa collected by 
Hildebrandt: purchased; in 1874, 264 plants from Zanzibar 
were purchased; in 1875, 411 East African; in 1878, 357; in 
1883, 707 from Madagascar; in 1884, 63. 

525 Calif ornian plants collected by Kellogg : purchased. 

The Moss herbarium of William Wilson was purchased. 

564 plants from Madagascar collected by Hilsenberg and 
Bojer : purchased. 

458 Madeiran plants collected by Mandon : purchased. 

384 Mexican plants collected by Ghiesbreght : purchased. 

375 grasses collected by Trinius : purchased. 

400 mosses from Normandy prepared by Etienne : purchased 
1873, 1875. 

256 New Caledonian plants collected by Yieillard and 
Deplanche : purchased. 

240 plants from Greece and Crete collected by Heldreich : 
purchased; in 1875, 255 plants were purchased; in 1886, 87; 
in 1888, 100 ; in 1889, 323 ; in 1896, 100; in 1897, 100. 

134 ferns from Guadeloupe collected by L'Herminier : pur- 
chased. 



Botany. 103 

106 Glumaceiie and 270 cryptogams from the Antilles collected 
hy Husnot : purchased. 

Three centuries of Plowright's " Sphseriacel Britannici " : pur- 
. based 1873, 1875, 1879. 

100 Welsh lichens collected by Rev. W. A. Leighton : pur- 
( 'lased; in 1875, 130 were purchased. 

60 West Australian plants collected by Brewer : purchased ; 
in 1893, 354 were acquired. 

Mougeot and Nestler's cryptogamic plants of the Vosges (15 
c aituries) : purchased. 

100 specimens of fungi prepared by J. English. 



1874. 

506 plants and a series of fruits from Hong Ivong collected 
and presented by the Rev. James Lamont. 

Herbarium of North Lancashire plants presented by ISIiss E. 
Hodgson. 

250 plants from Brisbane collected by Amaha Dietrich : 
purchased. 

209 ferns from Samoa, Tonga and Viti collected l)y E. 
Graeffe : purchased. 

150 Tyrolese lichens collected by F. Arnold : purchased. 

29 fascicles of Rehms' " Ascomyceten " were purchased between 
the years 1874 and 1902. 

100 Russian plants collected by Meinshausen : purchased ; 
the following year, 100 were purchased. 

24 cryptogams from Spitzbergen collected by the Rev. A. E. 
Eaton : presented; in 1876, 139 cryptogams from the Cape and 
124 from Kerguelen's Land were presented. 



1875. 

254 Indian plants collected and presented by C. B. Clarke, 
Esq. ; in 1879, 951 plants were presented; in 1881, 2,651 and a 
set of Cyrtandrace* ; in 1882, 2,335; in 1883, 182: in 1888, 
910 ; in 1889, 190 ; in 1890, 26 ; in 1891, 2,369 ; in 1892, 312 ; 
in 1893,490; in 1897, 564. 

510 South African plants collected and presented by P. Mac- 
Owan, Esq.; in 1876, 400 species were purchased; in 1886, 200 

473 British plants collected and presented by Miss Chandler. 



104 Botany. 

301 Chinese plants collected and presented by F. B. Forbes, 
Esq. 

Herbarium of Indian ferns of Col. Beddome : purchased ; in 
1885, nearly 10,000 plants were purchased ; in 1887, 58 mosses ; 
in 1890, 706 plants. 

773 Chilian plants collected by E. C. Reed : purchased. 

667 lichens from New Granada, being Lindig's study set : 
purchased. 

600 German fungi collected by Fuckel : purchased. 

Sixteen centuries of P. A. Saccardo's " Mycotheca Veneta": 
purchased between the years 1875 and 1881. 

450 specimens, Nylander and Norrlin's " Herbarium Lichenum 
Fenniae": purchased 1875-1882. 

Twenty-three centuries of Thiimen's " Mycotheca Univer- 
salis" : purchased between the years 1875 and 1884. 

The following were purchased from E. F. Nolte's Herbarium : 
1,285 plants from Schleswig-Holstein collected by Hansen ; 1,000 
Scandinavian plants forming Fries' " Herbarium Normale " ; 865 
species forming Funck's " Cryptogamische Gewachse " ; 611 plants 
from Greenland and Iceland, collected by Yahl and Hornemann ; 
200 German lichens prepared by Florke and 100 vascular crypto- 
gams by Reichenbach ; 200 algae of East Friesland prepared by 
Jurgens; 180 Oriental plants collected by Forskal ; 150 North 
American lichens and 82 New England plants collected by 
Tuckerman ; a large collection of Potamogeton, 52 species of 
Batrachium and 14 species of Najas ; and a number of types of 
plants described by Cavanilles, Delile, Thuillier, Allioni and 
others. 

100 plants forming George Don's " Herbarium Britannicum " : 
purchased. 

1876. 

The study set of Robert Brown's Australian plants and 
other specimens : bequeathed by J. J. Bennett. 

The second set of Welwitsch's African plants was acquired. 

The moss herbarium of James Dickson : purchased. 

360 plants from the Island of Rodriguez, collected by Dr. 
Bayley Balfour during the Transit of Venus expedition : pre- 
sented by the Royal Society; in 1879, a set of cellular plants 
was presented. 

294 Formosan plants collected and presented by the Rev. W. 
Campbell. 



Botany, 105 

200 plants from New Zealand collected and presented by Sir 
James Hector. 

160 palms from the Amazon region collected and presented 
by Dr. J. Trail. 

149 Cape plants collected and presented by Dr. Hahn. 

1877. 

The Herbarium of Robert James Shuttleworth, containing 
more than 170,000 specimens from all parts of the world; 
purchased. It included Roemer's Herbarium, and extensive 
collections made by Shuttleworth, in Europe ; by Frivaldsky, 
in Turkey ; Richter, in Hungary ; Mabille and Debeaux, in 
Corsica ; Bourgeau, in the Balearic Islands, Spanish Pyrenees 
and Rhodes ; Willkomm, in South Spain ; Auzendli and others, 
in Algiers ; Du Parquet, in Egypt ; Aucher-Eloy and Kotschy, 
in the Levant ; beside the published series of Reichenbach, Fries, 
Huet du Pavilion, &c., greatly enhanced in value by numerous 
critical notes by Shuttleworth. A very large number of North 
American plants collected by Lindheimer, Beyrich, Fendler, 
Blodgett, and especially by Rugel ; Mexican plants collected by 
Jurgensen, Hartweg and Berlandier ; and South American 
collections made by Hostmann, Linden, Gardner, Jameson, 
Mathews and others. The Asiatic portion contained a very fine 
and extensive series of the plants of Zollinger, from Java and 
Japan ; of Kollmann, from Java ; of Cuming, from the Philippines ; 
of Fortune, from China ; of Walker and Lobb, from Singapore ; 
of Campbell, Christie, Heifer and Wallich, from India ; and of 
Karelin and Kiriloff, from Dzungaria. The African collections 
comprise the plants of Schimper and Kotschy, from Nubia and 
Abyssinia ; of Brunner, from Senegal and the Cape Verde 
Islands; and of Drege, Krauss and others from South Africa. 
The Australian collections include the plants of Drummond, 
Preiss and Sieber. The cryptogams, which number 20,000, con- 
tain the collections of Schaerer, Desmazieres, Mougeot and Nestler, 
Kiitzing, Crome, Rugel, Braun, Schmidt and Kunze, AYartmann 
and Schenk, Salwey and many others. 

The herbarium of Hepaticse, formed by Hampe, containing 
upwards of 6,000 specimens : purchased ; in 1881, Hanipe's moss 
herbarium of about 25,000 specimens was purchased. 

1,098 plants collected by H. N. Moseley during the CJiaUcngcr 
expedition : presented by the Lords of the Treasury ; the following 
year, 1,606 plants were presented. 



106 Botany. 

1878. 

230 AVest tropical African plants collected by Kalbreyer and 
presented by Messrs. J. Veitch and Sons; in 1885, 20 plants 
were presented. 

114 Brazilian plants collected by E. Warming : presented. 

570 plants from the Samoan Islands collected hy Rca'. S. J. 
Whitmee : purchased. 

439 plants from Paraguay collected by Balansa : purchased ; 
in 1885, 914 plants were purchased. 

400 plants from East Lapland collected by Fellman : pur- 
chased. 

300 Grecian plants collected by Pichler : purchased. 

Twenty-nine fasciculi of Wittrock and Nordstedt's " Algse 
aquae dulcis exsiccata; " : purchased between the years 1878 and 
1897. 

Eight centuries of Ravenel's " Fungi Americani" : purchased 
between the years 1878 and 1882. 

175 plants from Uruguay and 136 from the Argentine 
Republic, collected by Lorentz : purchased. 

3,497 Syrian plants collected by G. E. Post : acquired at 
various dates between 1878 and 1902. 

78 ferns from Trinidad collected by Fendler : purchased ; in 
1880, 50 ferns were purchased; in 1881, 642 plants; in 1891, 
43 cryptogams were received. 

Kunze's " Fungi Selecti " (410 specimens) : purchased 1878-81. 

1879. 

The extensive herbarium formed by John Miers : bequeathed ; 
in 1880, 170 Brazilian woods together with spirit specimens of 
Burmanniacese, etc., were presented by his son; in 1887, 2,006 
ferns. 

Edward Newman's fern herbarium was presented by his son. 

230 plants from North Borneo, collected by F. W. Burbidge 
and presented by Messrs. Yeitch. 

A collection of plants from Damara-Land, made by T. G. 
Een : purchased. 

490 South African mosses collected by A. Rehmann : pur- 
chased ; in 1881, 942 plants were purchased; in 1883, 1,234; in 
1886, 697 mosses; in 1890, 106 hepatics. 

315 plants from New Zealand collected by S. Berggren : 
purchased ; in 1889, 58 fresh-water algae were purchased. 



Botany, 107 

Three centuries of Oudeman's "Fungi Neerlandici '' : pur- 
chased 1879-80. 

68 plants from the Eastern Archipelago collected by H. 0. 
Forbes : purchased ; in 1880, 165 plants were purchased ; in 1883, 
1,500 plants together with a series of fruits; in 1884, 990 plants 
and 120 fruits; in 1886, 911 plants and 74 woods ; in 1888, 1,020 
plants. 

31 South American plants collected by F. Simons : purchased ; 
in 1880, 25 plants were purchased; in 1881^ 150. 

1880. 

422 plants from Kurrum Valley, Afghanistan, collected and 
presented by Dr. J. E. T. Aitchison; in 1881, 196 plants were 
presented; in 1887, a set of plants collected during the Afghan 
Boundary Expedition. 

1,602 British plants collected and presented by T. R. Archer 
Briggs, Esq., between 1880 and 1891. 

2,482 British plants collected by A. French : purchased. 

984 North African plants collected by Gandoger : purchased. 

1,464 European lichens, chiefly British, and 189 preparations 
of cellular plants, purchased of W. Joshua ; and 850 cryptogamic 
slides purchased 1881-86. 

468 Spanish plants collected by Huter, Porta and Rigo ; in 
1891, 497 ; in 1892, 478 : purchased; in 1886, 168 plants of the 
Balearic Islands were purchased. 

443 Italian plants collected by Strobl : purchased. 

300 European alga; collected by A. Le Jolis : purchased. 

177 plants from the Argentine Republic collected by Hierony- 
mus : purchased. 

151 plants from Dzungaria collected by Schrenk : purchased. 

144 ferns from Madagascar collected by G. Shaw : purchased. 

800 Sicilian plants collected by Lojacono : purchased at 
intervals between 1880 and 1888. 

1881. 

1,027 South African plants collected and presented by Harry 
Bolus, Esq. ; in 1896, 70 plants were presented. 

British, European and other plants presented by A. Bennett, 
Esq. Similar contributions have been made by Mr. Bennett at 
intervals up to the present time. 

34 specimens from the Botanic Gardens, Saharanpur : pre- 
sented by J. F. Duthie, Esq. ; in 1882, 187 Himalayan plants 



108 Botany, 

were presented; in 1884, 590 Indian plants were acquired by 
exchange; in 1885, 350; in 1886, 276 ; in 1887, 1 4 cryptogams ; 
in 1888, 301 plants; in 1889, 349 plants were presented; in 
1891, 120; in 1895, 641 flowering plants and 98 cryptogams 
from Kashmir ; in 1896, 352 from Kashmir and 100 from Pamir ; 
in 1897, 150 North- West Indian cryptogams ; in 1898, 735 plants ; 
in 1899, 95; in 1900, 291 cryptogams. 

A collection of Japanese woods was presented by J. Bisset, 
Esq. ; in 1882, an extensive plant collection was presented ; in 
1889, 109 cryptogams. 

52 plants from Sussex, collected and presented by F. C. S. 
Roper, Esq. ; and 80 in 1882. 

345 British plants collected. by G. C. Druce, Esq., were pre- 
sented by him betAveen the years 1881 and 1902. 

1,554 North American flowering plants collected by A. H. 
Curtiss : purchased from 1881 to 1887; and 136 algae: pur- 
chased, 1896-98. 

1882. 

461 British plants presented by the Rev. AV. H. Painter ; 
others presented in 1883, 1884, and 1894, amounting in all to 
1,730. 

392 British plants from C. Bailey, Esq. ; in 1883, 116; in 
1884, 97 : presented. 

1,962 Mexican plants collected by C. C. Parry and G. Yasey : 
purchased. 

A collection of 1,155 preparations of Diatoms, made by 
Rev. E. O'Meara, was purchased. 

500 European Cryptogamia collected by P. Sintenis : purchased. 

475 plants from Arizona, etc., collected by J. G. Lemmon : 
purchased : in 1884, 605 plants were purchased : in 1886, 204. 

300 plants from Washington Territory, collected by W. A. 
Suksdorf : purchased; in 1883, 219 plants were purchased; in 
1884, 155; in 1886, 208 plants from Colorado. 

200 algce from Mauritius collected by Robillard : purchased. 

550 microscope-preparations of Belgian diatoms, forming 
ser. 1-22 of Van Heurck's "Types du Synopsis des Diatomees" : 
purchased at intervals between the years 1882 and 1885. 

1883. 

538 American plants presented by F. C. S. Roper, Esq. 
373 plants from Socotra, collected and presented by Prof. 
Bayley Balfour. 



Botany. 109 

27 Australian orchids presented by R. D. Fitzgerald, Esq. ; 
in 1885, 8, and in 1891, 200 orchids were acquired by presenta- 
tion and exchange. ' 

228 Chinese plants collected by Dr. Bretschneider : acquired 
by exchange. 

83 species of North American plants : acquired by exchange 
from Prof. Asa Gray; in 1884, 55 plants were acquired; in 
1886, 14 were presented. 

830 Caucasian plants collected by Brotherus : purchased. 

700 plants from New Zealand collected by T. Kirk : purchased ; 
in 1897, 90 plants were presented. 

531 plants from Madagascar collected by the Rev. R. Baron : 
purchased ; in 1884, 227 plants were purchased; in 1886, 379 ; 
in 1887, 124; in 1894, 196. 

497 alg?e from Morocco collected by Schousboe : pur- 
chased. 

The Rev. Hugh Davies's herbarium, containing the type- 
specimens of his " Welsh Botanologia " : purchased. 

An arranged collection of British mosses made by the Rev. 
H. H. Wood : purchased. 

450 plants from Madagascar collected by the Rev. W. Deans 
Cowan : purchased; in 1885, 25 plants : purchased. 

368 Californian plants collected by S. B. Parish : purchased ; 
in 1897, 110 plants were purchased; in 1898, 100. 

340 South African plants collected by Ecklon and Zeyher : 
purchased. 

250 French mosses collected by Roze and Bescherelle : 
purchased. 

290 specimens, forming the four fascicles of Carrington and 
Pearson's " Hepatica3 Britannicre exsiccataj " : purchased between 
the years 1883 and 1890. 

100 slides of Delogne's " Diatomees de Belgique " : purchased. 

250 specimens, forming fasc. 1-10 of E. M. Holmes's " Algo& 
Britannicre rariores " : purchased between the years 1883 and 
1900. 

22 orchids and 3 aroids were presented by Messrs. J. Veitch 
and Sons ; similar presentations, including 280 orchids and 50 
pitcher plants, were subsequently received. 

1884. 

Robert Pocock's herbarium of Kentish plants, j^resented by 
G. M. Arnold, Esq. 



] 1 Botany, 

A large collection of Indian plants, presented by A. P. 
Young, Esq. 

482 plants and IG fruits from the United States and Mexico 
collected and presented by William Carruthers, Esq. 

257 Kirkcudbright plants, collected and presented by F. E. 
Coles, Esq. i 

253 Australian plants collected and presented by the Rev. 
James Lamont ; in 1890, 109 were presented ; in 1891, 96 
mosses. 

112 plants from St. Helena collected and presented by F. E. 
Grant, Esq. 

110 plants from Shetland and Orkney collected and presented 
by Rev. W. E. Smith. 

193 British plants collected and presented by W. H, Beeby, 
Esq., between 1884 and 1891. 

The British herbarium and cryptogamic collection formed by 
Dr. J. F. Young were transferred from Kew Herbarium, together 
with the Botanical Record Club's collections of British plants ; 
in 1885 and 1887, further instalments were presented by the 

club. 

952 South African plants collected by J. Medley Wood ; in 
1885, 128 were acquired; in 1886, 138; in 1888, 89; in 1889, 
66 ; in 1890, 111 ; in 1892, 117 ; in 1894, 116 ; in 1895, 113 ; in 
1897, 158; in 1898, 95; in 1900, 138; in 1901, 118. 

121 specimens of A. Engler's " Aracese exsiccatte": acquired 
by exchange ; the following year, 100 specimens were acquired. 

The extensive collection of Roses formed by Alfred Deseglise, 
containing his type species and the materials on which his 
numerous monographs were based : purchased. 

An arranged collection of about 7000 alga? and 372 slides of 
diatoms, formed by G. Dickie : purchased. 

2,745 North American phanerogams and 164 cryptogams, 
collected by Marcus E. Jones: purchased; in 1887, 696 phane- 
rogams and 28 cryptogams were purchased; in 1896, 1,146 
phanerogams and 112 cryptogams; in 1898, 1,519 phanerogams 
and 141 cryptogams. 

976 plants from Asia Minor, collected by P. Sintenis : pur- 
chased ; in 1892, 362 Turkish plants were purchased; in 1893, 
''Iter orientale"; in 1895, 300 plants from Asia Minor; in 
1896, 239 from Armenia; in 1899, 1,585 from Porto Rico; in 
1900, 1,011 ; in 1902, "Iter transcaspico-persicum," cent. 1-4. 

4,900 specimens, forming centuries 1-49 of Sydow's "Myco- 



Botany. Ill 

theca Marchica " : purchased at intervals within, the years 
1884-99. 

483 Mexican plants collected by Schaftner : purchased. 

421 plants from Borneo collected by Grabowski : purchased. 

Four centuries of Peter's " Hieracia Nregeliana" : purchased, 
1885, 1886. 

289 Mexican plants collected by Kerber : purchased ; the 
following year, 400 plants were purchased. 

1885. 

617 South African plants presented by the Rev. W. Moyle 
Rogers. 

G. Maw, Esq., presented his collection of Crocus, consisting 
of 416 species, illustrating his monograph of the genus. 

315 plants collected by E. F. im Thurn during the expedition 
to Roraima, British Guiana : presented. 

313 plants from Morocco presented by John Ball, Esq. 

299 Tropical African plants collected by Sir H, H. Johnston : 
presented; in 1887, 109 plants w^ere presented ; in 1893, 54. 

210 British fruits and seeds collected and presented by 
Clement Reid, Esq. ; from 1890 to 1902, 183 were presented. 

116 Indian plants collected and presented by J. S. Gamble, 
Esq. ; in 1887, 747 plants were presented. 

28 Italian plants collected and presented by H. Groves, Esq. : 
in 1887, 511 plants were purchased.' 

10 orchids grown in the Botanic Gardens, Dublin, were pre- 
sented by F. W. Moore, Esq. ; in 1887, 59 were presented; and 
over 100 since. 

1,072 plants from Japan, China, and Manchuria, collected by 
Maximowicz, and 663 Turkestan plants collected by Regel, were 
acquired by exchange from the Imperial Botanic Gardens, St. 
Petersburg; in 1890, 467 plants collected by Maximowicz were 
similarly acquired. 

593 specimens of Kerner's " Flora exsiccata Austro-Hun- 
garica " were acquired by exchange ; further instalments were 
acquired at various dates. 

355 Javanese plants collected by Blume and others : acquired 
])y exchange. 

120 Californian plants collected by E. L. Greene; in 1886, 
59 plants were acquired ; in 1895, 185. 

2,275 South American plants collected hy R. Pearce : 
purchased. 



112 Botany. 

1,162 Arabian plants collected by H. C. Hart. 

437 plants from the Comoro Islands collected by L. Humblot : 
purchased; in 1887, 159 were purchased. 

200 specimens from MacOwan and Bolus' " Herbarium 
Normale Austro-Africanum " ; in 1887, 200; in 1888, 300; in 
1889, 211 ; in 1891, 100; in 1892, 100; in 1893, 200; in 1896, 
135; in 1898, 73; in 1899, 200. 

315 Australasian algte collected by Harvey : purchased ; in 
1900, 67 algae were acquired by exchange with Trinity College, 
DubHn. 

165 specimens of Austin's " Hepaticse Americanse " : pur- 
chased; in 1893, 45 specimens were acquired by exchange. 

160 East Friesland cryptogams, chiefly mosses, prepared 
by Eiben : purchased, 1870, 1885. 

154 East Tropical African plants collected by the Rev. W. E. 
Taylor: purchased; in 1886, 929 plants were purchased; in 
1887, 1,459 ; in 1888, 670. 

144 South African Iridae from Zeyher and Pappe's collection : 
purchased. 

129 Bedfordshire mosses collected by J. Saunders : purchased. 

135 specimens, forming lief. 1-6 of Herpell's " Sammlung 
priiparirten Hutpilze " : purchased between the years 1885 and 
1892. 

230 species, forming fasc. 1-5 of Earlow, Anderson and 
Eaton's " Algse exsiccatse Americse Borealis " : purchased between 
the years 1885 and 1889. 

1886. 

An arranged collection of about 40,000 British and foreign 
fungi, containing many type species : bequeathed by C. E. 
Broome, Esq. 

1,323 Australian plants, with several fruits, gums, etc., col- 
lected and presented by the Rev. T. S. Lea ; the following year, 
54 Australian and 125 Hawaiian plants were presented. 

209 Japanese plants collected and presented by C. Maries, Esq. 

191 plants from Uruguay presented by J. C. Mansel-Pleydell, 
Esq. 

186 ferns from Perak collected by the Rev. B. Scortechini : 
presented ; the following year, 49 species of Loranthus and Ficus 
were presented. 

156 plants from Manitoba collected and presented by R. 
Miller Christy, Esq. 



Botany. 113 

74 Indian plants collected by G. Watt : presented ; the fol- 
lowing year, 174 gatherings of Arctic diatoms and 5G Indian 
algae were presented. 

523 Australian algge collected by J. Bracebridge Wilson, and 
presented from time to time, 1886-93. 

Plants from Western America and the Pacific Islands col- 
lected by Archibald Menzies, with the herbarium formed by 
Zier : acquired by exchange. 

188 specimens of Ficus, 26 of Pedicularis, and 21 of Primula 
were acquired, by presentation and exchange, from Sir G. King 
and Major D. Prain, successive directors of the Royal Botanic 
Gardens, Calcutta; in 1887, 86 Indian and Malayan plants; in 

1888, 447 ; in 1889, 415 ; in 1890, 375 ; in 1891, 613 ; in 1892, 
338; in 1893, 537; in 1894, 670; in 1895, 748; in 1896, 453; 
in 1897, 798; in 1898, 824; in 1899, 161; in 1900, 513; in 
1901, 380; in 1902, 250. 

29 Canadian fruits collected by Profs. John and James M. 
Macoun; in 1887, 1,427 North American plants; in 1888, 294 ; 
in 1889, 234; in 1891, 1,122; in 1893, 207; in 1894, 534; in 
1895, 101 ; in 1896, 333; in 1897, 75. 

2,051 mosses and hepatics, chiefly species described by Dr. 
S. O. Lindberg : purchased. 

1,347 plants from the Himalayas and Tibet, collected by the 
brothers Schlagintweit : purchased; in 1900, 703 plants were 
purchased. 

1,300 specimens, forming thirteen centuries of Mougeot, 
Dupray, and Roumeguere's " Algues de la France," together with 
three supplementary centuries of " Reliquiae Brebissonianse " : 
purchased between the years 1886 and 1892. 

450 "Bryaceae Scandinaviae exsiccatae," in 15 fascicles, by 
Hartman : purchased. 

447 Californian plants collected by C. R. Orcutt : purchased ; 
the following year, 400 plants were purchased. 

424 Mexican plants collected by C. G. Pringle : purchased ; in 

1889, 158 were purchased : in 1890, 358; in 1893, 534; in 1894, 
255 ; in 1895, 429 ; in 1896, 225 ; in 1897, 300 ; in 1898, 160 ; 
in 1899, 160; in 1900, 260; in 1901, 190. 

362 Grecian plants collected by Orphanides : purchased ; in 
1887, 360 were purchased ; in 1890, 320. 

215 plants from New Mexico collected by E. Palmer: pur- 
chased ; in 1887, 683 Mexican plants were purchased ; in 1888, 
453 Californian ; in 1889, 160 were presented ; in 1893, 29 

VOL. I. I 



114 Botany, 

Mexican Malvacea3 were presented ; in 1895, 302 Mexican plants 
were purchased; in 1896, 280 plants and 22 fruits; in 1898, 680 
plants ; in 1899, 423. 

197 plants from the Pacific Coast collected hy T. Howell : 
purchased. 

750 specimens, forming fasc. 1-15 of Hauck and Richter's 
" Phykotheka universalis " : purchased between the years 1886- 
1896. 

200 specimens, forming fasc. 1-4 of De Toni and Levi- 
Morenos' " Phycotheca Italica " : purchased between the years 
1886 and 1892. 

Wittrock's "Erythrfeaj exsiccatse" (fasc. 1, 2) : purchased; in 
1890j fasc. 3, 4 were purchased. 

1887. 

750 plants from Pernambuco, collected and presented by the 
Rev. T. S. Lea, Messrs. H. N. Ridley, and G. A. Ramage, and 
200 plants from Fernando de Noronlia collected by Mr. Ridley 
and presented by the Royal Society. 

160 plants from Demerara and 86 from British Guiana, col- 
lected and presented by G. S. Jenman, Esq. : in 1890, 367 plants 
from British Guiana were presented. 

294 British plants presented by the Rev. T. A. Preston. 

101 Jamaican plants collected by AV. Fawcett, Esq., and 
acquired by exchange; in 1888-1893, collections of fruits and 
seeds were presented; in 1889, 129 plants; in 1896, 84 crypto- 
gams; in 1897, 191 plants; in 1898, 52 ferns; in 1899, 167 
plants; in 1900, 85 ferns; in 1901, 100 plants. 

198 Portuguese plants acquired by exchange. 

The British herbaria of Thomas Moore and Thomas Knowlton, 
and Rev. Kirby Trimmer's herbarium of British mints, received 
from the Director, Royal Gardens, Kew. 

The herbarium of Dr. H. F. Hance, containing the types of 
the Chinese plants described by him : purchased. 

Maze's marine algas of Guadeloupe, 1,509 specimens: pur- 
chased. 

642 plants from Malasia and Abyssinia collected by O. 
Beccari : purchased. 

580 Central and South American plants collected by F. 
Lehmann: purchased; in 1888, 806 plants were purchased; in 
1890, 1,975. 



Botany, 115 

289 Galitzian plants collected by B. Blocki : puicbised ; in 
1888, 240 Polish plants were purchased ; in 1894, 96 Galitzian. 

176 plants from Nyasa-land collected by W. Bellinghani : 
j)urchased. 

1888. 

819 plants from the Eastern Archipelago, collected l)y T. 
Lobb and presented by H. J. Veitch, Esq. ; in 1894, 400 plants, 
chiefly ferns and pitcher-plants from Borneo, were purchased. 

530 plants from Africa and Syria, collected and presented by 
Dr. Schweinfurth ; in 1890, 179 Arabian plants were acquired 
by exchange. 

440 South African plants collected and presented l)y G. F. 
Scott Elliott, Esq. ; in 1889, 67 cryptogams from Madagascar; in 

1890, 118 plants; in 1892, 456 North African plants and 246 
from Sierra Leone; in 1893, 1,158 from Sierra Leone; in 1895, 
a collection from Ruwenzori. 

305 plants, with 95 woods and 25 fruits, etc., from the 
Bahamas, collected by Baron Eggers and presented by a joint 
committee of the Royal Society and the British Association ; in 
1900, 268 plants from St. Domingo were purchased. 

245 European fungi, chiefly British, presented by W. AV. 
Strickland, Esq. 

161 Cyrenian plants collected and presented by "W. Barbey, 
Esq. 

145 plants from St. Thomas, West Africa, presented by Prof. 
Henriques. 

68 British plants collected and presented by the Rev. E. S. 
Marshall; in 1889, 254 plants were presented ; in 1890, 209 ; in 

1891, 306; in 1892, 261 ; in 1893, 390; in 1895, 431 ; in 1896, 
342; in 1898, 348; in 1899, 247 ; in 1900, 203 ; in 1001, 352; 
in 1902, 280. 

807 South American plants collected by H. H. Rusby : 
purchased: in 1893, 29 cryptogams were purchased: in 1895, 
251 plants; in 1896, 377. 

A collection of plants from Nyasa, made by John Buchanan : 
purchased: in 1893, 690 plants and 52 woods, etc.: purchased: 
in 1896, 435 plants. 

650 slides of Diatomacete, prepared by 11. L. Smith, and 114 
by Norman : purchased. 

172 Brazilian plants, with spechnens of fruits, woods, etc., 
collected by G. A. Ramage : purchased ; in 1889, 398 plants from 

1 2 



116 Botany. 

Dominica were presented by a joint committee of the Ptoyal 
Society and the British Association; in 1890, 87. 

Hough's sections of American woods : purchased ; 1887-1902. 

1,390 herbarium specimens and 690 microscope preparations 
of British algne, prepared by T. H. Buff ham : purchased at various 
dates between the years 1888-96. 

33 fascicles of P. Sydows' " Uredineen," containing 1,650 
specimens ; purchased at various times since 1888. 

1889. 

A herbarium of 2,383 lichens, formed and presented by 
Horatio Piggot, Esq., including Dr. Deakin's collection; in 1890, 
53 British fungi were presented. 

455 Australian algae collected and presented by G. Clifton, 
Esq., R.N. ; the following year, 110 algae were presented. 
228 cryptogams presented by J. D. Llewellyn, Esq. 
213 Malaysian plants collected and presented by H. N. 
Ridley, Esq. ; in 1890, 629 plants were presented ; in 1891, 758 ; 
in 1893, 4,096 ; in 1894, 1,877 ; in 1895, 14 fruits, etc. ; in 1896, 
841 plants and 345 woods; in 1898, 180 plants; in 1899, 79; in 
1901, 70 plants and 86 woods, etc. 

52 slides of Indian fungi, prepared and presented by Surg.- 
Major A. Barclay; in 1890, 30 slides were presented; in 1892, 
505 slides and a large collection of herbarium specimens were 
purchased. 

35 algse from Madras collected and presented by E. Thurston, 
Esq. ; in 1902, 102 marine phanerogams and algae were presented. 
A series of algae from the Baltic, collected by Prof. Reinke, 
was acquired by exchange. 

4,429 microscope preparations, chiefly of cryptogams, made by 
Prof, de Bary : purchased. 

2,928 species, being the plants of Haussknecht's "Iter 
Graecum " : purchased. 

A collection of ferns from Assam, made by C. W. Hope : 
purchased. 

A small collection of plants from Kina Balu, North Borneo, 
formed by J. Whitehead : purchased; in 1897, 152 plants from 
the Philippines were presented. 

390 plants from Spain and Portugal, collected by Rev. R. P. 
Murray : purchased ; in 1898, 400 plants from the Canary 
Islands were purchased ; in 1900, 139 plants were presented. 



Botany, 117 

208 Mexican plants collected by W. Schumann : purchased. 

121 preparations of fossil plants from Sir J. D. Hooker : 
purchased. 

100 plants from Stanley Falls, Congo, collected by F. Hens: 
purchased. 

Briosi and Cavara's "I Funghi Parassiti " : purchased, 1888- 
1900. 

1890. 

The herbarium formed by Dr. R. McCormick, R.N., and 
containing plants collected during Parry's Arctic Expedition, 
1827, Ross's Voyage of the Erebus and Terror, and the Expedition 
in search of Franklin : bequeathed. 

3,137 microscope-slides of cryptogams, being the collection of 
John Ralfs, Esq.: presented by his son; in 1892, his crypto- 
gamic herbarium of 1,968 specimens : purchased. 

The herbarium of G. M. Ferro : presented by the Director, 
Royal Gardens, Kew. 

221 Cape algas collected and presented by L. A. Boodle, Esq. 
130 plants from the Andes collected and presented by E. 
Whymper, Esq. 

452 plants from the Sandwich Islands collected by Hillebrand : 
acquired by exchange. 

603 Bolivian plants collected by M. Bang: purchased; in 
1892, 510 plants were purchased ; in 1893, 452. 

469 plants from Asia Minor collected by J. Bornmiillcr : 
purchased; in 1891, 317 Anatolian plants were purchased; 
in 1894, 315; in 1895, 208 Persian plants; in 1896, 442; in 
1897, 279. 

Three fasciculi of Dahlstedt's " Hieracia exsiccata " : pur- 
chased ; the following year, fasc. 4 was purchased. 

243 Malayan plants collected by C. Curtis: purchased; in 
1891, 200 were presented ; in 1894, 133. 

194 plants from Honduras collected by Rev. J. Robertson: 
purchased. 

155 cryptogams from Tonkin collected by Balansa: purchased. 
113 plants from Natal collected by Mrs. C. S. Clarke: 
purchased. 

1891. 
420 plants from Gwalior collected and presented by C. 
Maries, Esq. 



118 Botany. 

160 ferns from St. Yincent collected by H. H. and G. W. 
Smith : presented by a joint committee of the Royal Society and 
the British Association ; in 1892, 190 plants were presented; in 

1893, 295. 

A collection of ferns from Grenada made by R. V. Sherring 
was presented by the same committee. 

60 algfe, being the types of Bornet and Flahault's " Revision 
des Nostocacees " : presented by Prof. Flahault. 

23 Cape cryptogams collected and presented by W. Tyson, 
Esq. ; in 1892, 69 cryptogams were presented; in 1893, 166; in 

1894, 57; in 1895, 63; in 1896, 23. 

The cryptogamic herbarium formed by H. AY. Ravenel and 
consisting of 1,950 mosses and hepatics, 4,500 lichens, 1,100 alga? 
and 7,000 fungi : purchased. 

Herbarium of 4,490 species of plants from New Granada, 
formed by Jose Triana : purchased. 

2,706 West Chinese plants collected by Dr. A. Henry : pur- 
chased ; in 1895, 384 Formosan plants were purchased. 

1,350 North Chilian plants collected by August Borchers : 
purchased. 

601 plants from Szechuen and the Tibetan frontier, collected 
by A. E. Pratt: purchased; in the following year, 170 plants 
Avere purchased. 

1,700 species, forming thirty-four fasciculi of Krieger's " Fungi 
Saxonici" : purchased from time to time since 1891. 

300 British fungi collected by G. Massee : purchased. 

201 plants from Madagascar collected by J. Cloisel : pur- 
chased. 

189 plants from Paraguay collected by T. Morong : purchased ; 
in 1892, 340 plants were purchased; in 1894, 79 plants and 3 
fruits. 

100 mosses, forming first century of Ule's " Bryotheca Bra- 
siliensis": purchased; in 1895, cent. 2 was purchased; in 1899, 
445 Brazilian cryptogams. 

1892. 

George Davies's herbarium of about 20,000 British and exotic 
cryptogams presented. 

199 North American cryptogams presented by Prof. Farlow ; 
in 1895, 59 lichens were presented. 

234 characese from Alex. Braun's herbarium were acquired 
by exchange. 



Botany, 119 

100 Appalachian mosses collected by Austin : acquired ]jy 
exchange. 

565 specimens forming AVainio's " Lichenes Brasilienses 
exsiccati " : purchased, 

348 Dahurian plants collected by F. Karo : purchased. 

590 specimens, forming eleven fasciculi of Seymour and 
Earle's " Economic Fungi," with supplement : purchased at 
intervals between the years 1892 and 1900. 

1 50 preparations of " Champignons de France " by Tempere 
and Dutertre : purchased; the following year, 100 more were 
purchased. 

250 specimens, forming five jDugilli of Cavara's " Fungi Longo- 
bardise exsiccati" : purchased between 1892 and 1896. 

30 species, forming fasc. 1 of H. and J. Groves's " Characeae 
Britannicse " : purchased; in 1900, fasc. 2 was purchased. 

Revs. E. F. and W. R. Linton's fascicles of " British Rubi " : 
purchased 1892-97; similar sets of Willows and Hieracia were 
purchased between 1895 and 1901. 

150 specimens of Migula, Sydow and Wahlstedt's " Characeae 
exsiccatse," 6 fascicles : purchased between 1892 and 1901. 

1893. 

The collection of Diatomacere made by Mr. Julien Deby : 
purchased. 

Edward Jenner's herbarium of algae, containing over 6,000 
specimens : purchased. 

1,097 cellular plants collected by W. R. Elliott in Dominica 
and St. Vincent were presented by a joint committee of the 
Royal Society and the British Association. 

A collection of plants from East Equatorial Africa made and 
presented by Dr. J. W. Gregory. 

472 plants from Borneo, collected by G. Haviland ; in 1894, 
261 ; in 1895, 200 ; in 1896 (with C. Hose), 108. 

220 plants from Milanji, Nyasa, collected by A. Whyte, Esq., 
and presented by Sir H. H. Johnston. 

138 West Australian and 72 Corean plants, collected and 
presented by J. H. Veitch, Esq. 

133 plants from Uruguay collected by O. V. Aplin, Esq. 
99 South African plants collected by Rudolf Schlechter : 
acquired by exchange ; in 1894, 101 plants were purcliased ; in 
1895, 96; in 1897, 1,010; in 1898, 1,120; in 1899, 540; in 
1901, 445. 



120 Botany. 

299 West Australian plants collected by J. A. Brewer : pur- 
chased. 

235 cryptogams from the Cameroons, collected by Dusen : 
purchased. 

231 specimens, forming nine fasciculi of Husnot's " Hepaticfe 
Gallise": purchased in 1893 and 1901. 

350 specimens lienauld and Cardot's " Musci America? septen- 
trionalis" in 7 fascicles: purchased at intervals between 1893 
and 1901. 

699 mosses, 597 lichens and 166 fungi, from Labrador and 
Newfoundland, collected by Rev. A. C. Waghorne : purchased 
at various times, 1893-99. 

1894. 

Herbarium of 883 specimens of British fresh- water alga>, 
formed by Dr. A. H. Hassall : presented. 

233 slides of Mycetozoa prepared and presented by A. Lister, 
Esq.; in 1895, 832 slides, 397 herbarium and 112 exhibition 
specimens were presented; in 1898, 88 specimens and 28 slides; 
in 1901, 22 specimens and 5 slides. 

173 plants from Hadramaut, Arabia, collected by W. Lunt ; 
presented. 

94 plants from Kolguev Island, collected and presented by 
A. Trevor Battye, Esq. 

110 African plants collected by C. Hoist: acquired by ex- 
change with the Royal Botanic Museum, Berlin ; the following 
from various collectors were similarly acquired : 298 Tropical 
African plants, 46 Japanese and 292 cellular cryptogams; in 
1895, 442 Tropical African plants; in 1896, 928 plants from the 
Cameroons and Argentine Republic; in 1897, 384 cryptogams 
from Asia, Africa and South America ; in 1900, 916 plants. 

108 slides of British Hepaticee, prepared by Mrs. Tindall : ac- 
quired by exchange ; the following year, 159 slides were acquired. 

1,100 specimens of plants from Matto Grosso, Brazil, collected 
by S. Moore : purchased. 

500 specimens of Eriksson's " Fungi parasitici Scandinavici '■ : 
purchased. 

161 Oriental plants collected by J. Wagner : purchased. 

125 Bulgarian plants collected by Stiibfny : purchased ; in 
1895, 118 plants were purchased ; in 1899, 68 ; in 1902, 240. 

300 specimens, forming 6 fascicles of P. Sydow's " Ustila- 
gineen": purchased at various dates since 1894. 



Botany. 121 

1895. 

246 East Tropical African plants collected and presented by 
Dr. Donaldson Smith; in 1900, 210 plants were presented. 

213 East African plants collected and presented l)y F. J. 
Jackson, Esq. 

Prof. D. H. Campbell presented 146 microscope-slides, illustra- 
ting his researches on archegoniate plants. 

108 British plants collected and presented by W. A. Shool- 
bred, Esq. ; in 1898, 96 plants were presented. 

The first portion, consistmg of 5,000 specimens of the Stephani 
collection of Hepaticae : purchased; in the following year, the 
concluding portion, consisting of 6,920 specimens, was purchased. 

1,233 plants and 68 woods from Kilimanjaro collected by AV. 
Volkens : purchased. 

400 species, forming first four centuries of Rehmann and 
Woloszczak's " Flora Polonica exsiccata": purchased; centuries 
5-9 were acquired later. 

348 plants from South Texas and 297 from the Sandwich 
Islands collected by A. A. Heller: purchased; in 1896, 249 
plants from Hawaii were purchased ; in 1897, 277 from New 
Mexico. 

300 plants from Coolgardie, West Australia, collected by 
S. Moore : purchased. 

1,075 specimens, forming twenty -three fasciculi of Collins, 
Holden, and Setchell's " Phycotheca Boreali- Americana," with 
supplements : purchased at various dates between 1895 and the 
present time. 

350 specimens, forming seven fasciculi of Jaczewski, Komarov 
and Tranzschel's " Fungi Rossise exsiccati " : purchased between 
the years 1895 and 1900. 

100 species, forming first two fasciculi of Tiselius' " Potamo- 
getones Suecici" : purchased; in 1897, fasc. 3 was purchased. 

31 species, forming fasc. 1 of Arthur and Hoi way's " Ure- 
dinese exsiccata^ " : purchased; in 1899, fasc. 2 (55 sp.) was 
purchased; in 1901, fasc. 3 (28 sp.). 

1896. 

3,705 specimens of fungi and lichens from Weddell's herbarium 
were presented by the Linnean Society. 

Collection of Diatomaceie, containing 3,582 slides : bequeathed 
by F. C. S. Roper, Esq. 



122 Botany. 

300 plants from British North Borneo collected and pre- 
sented by Governor Creagh ; the following year, 162 plants were 
presented. 

25 plants from Kolguev collected and presented by Col. H. W. 
Feilden; in 1898, 302 plants from Novaya Zemlya were pre- 
sented ; in 1902, 45 Cape plants. 

597 plants from Minnesota collected by Conway Macmillan : 
acquired by exchange, 

1,334 plants from Sequoia Region, California, collected by G. 
Hansen: purchased; in 1899, 392 plants were purchased. 

The Bracebridge Wilson collection of Victorian alga^, contain- 
•n^ 1,485 specimens and 140 slides : purchased. 

Seventeen centuries of Ellis and Everhart's " Fungi Colum- 
uiani," ed. 2 : purchased at intervals since 1896. 

588 Chinese plants and 30 fruits collected by Father Hugh : 
purchased; in 1898, 970 plants were purchased; in 1899, 844; 
m 1900, 735; in 1901, 1,045. 

529 plants from Madagascar collected by Dr. C. J. Forsyth- 
Major : purchased. 

276 plants from French Congo and Gaboon, collected by G. L. 
Bates: purchased; the following year, 100 plants were purchased. 

200 " Schweizerische Kryptogamen " from "Wartmann and 
Winter : purchased. 

360 specimens, forming nine fasciculi of Johnson's "North of 
England Lichen-Herbarium " : purchased between the years 1896 
and 1900. 

Two centuries of Romell's " Fungi exsiccati j^raesertim Scandi- 
navici " : purchased. 

163 species, being Fiedler's " Beit rage zur Mecklenburgischen 
Piezflora": purchased. 

100 plants from Lombok collected by A. H. Everett : 
,)urchased. 

1897. 

433 plants from Somaliland collected and presented by Mrs. 
Lort Phillips. 

133 Australian plants, mostly types of species described by 
the donor — F. M. Bailey, Esq. 

100 Tasmanian mosses collected and presented by W. A. 
vVeymouth, Esq. 

92 Scottish fungi collected and presented by D. A. Boyd, 
Esq. ; in 1899 and 1900, 20 micro-fungi were presented. 



Botany, 123 

Collections of Phytoplankton from the Atlantic presented by 
Capts. Rudge and Milner, whose collection was subsequently 
augmented. 

99 Brazilian plants collected by F. Sellow : acquired Ijy 
exchange. 

1,180 plants from Costa Rica collected by Durand and Pittier : 
purchased. 

700 plants from Asia Minor collected by W. Siehe : purchased ; 
in 1899, 142 plants were purchased. 

545 dried orchids and sketches by John AVcathers : pur- 
chased. 

466 plants and 40 woods from the Cameroons collected by G. 
Zenker: purchased; in 1898, 362 plants were purchased; in 
1899, 340; in 1901, 207 plants and 55 woods; in 1902, 288 
plants. 

275 " Musci Gallise," prepared by Husnot : purchased. 

320 species, forming thirty-two decades of Cummings, Williams 
and Seymour's " North American Lichens " : purchased, 1897-99. 

Six centuries of American algse, prepared by Miss Tilden ; 
purchased in 1897, and at subsequent dates. 

172 specimens, being Eaton and Faxon's "Sphagna Boreali- 
Americana " : purchased. 

Howie's " Musci Fifenses" (112 species) : purchased. 

100 specimens of Koehne's "Herbarium Dendrologicum " : 
purchased; in 1900, 135 specimens were purchased. 

Two centuries of Fleischer and Warnstorf's " Bryotheca 
Europsea meridionalis " : purchased, 1897, 1898. 

200 specimens, forming four fascicles of P. Sydow's " Phyco- 
myceten and Protomyceten " : purchased in 1897 and 1902. 

100 Shropshire mosses collected by R. de G. Benson, Esq. : 
purchased ; in 1898, 157 were purchased. 

1898. 

627 Cape plants collected and presented by Major A. H. 
Wolley Dod ; the following year, 1,239 plants were presented. 

591 Rhodesian plants collected and presented by Dr. F. 
Rand; in 1902, 280 plants from the Transvaal were presented. 

578 mosses and hepatics from Charles LyoU's herbarium : 
presented by Mrs. K. Lyell ; the following year, 1,120 specimens, 
including LyelFs reference set, were presented by Sir L. Lyell, 
Bart. 



124 Botany. 

346 plants and 14 fruits from Christmas Island, collected by 
C. W. Andrews and presented by Sir John Murray. 

192 West African plants collected and presented by J. AV. H. 
Migeod, Esq. 

169 plants from Sivas, Asia Minor, collected and presented 
by r. R. Maunsell, Esq. ; in 1901, 180 plants from Van, Armenia, 
were presented. 

92 Siamese plants collected by Dr. Haase and presented by 
S. S. Flower, Esq. 

70 Tibetan plants collected and presented by A. H. Savage- 
Landor, Esq. ; in 1902, 34 plants from North Beluchistan were 
presented. 

Collections of Phytoplankton, from the Atlantic, presented 
by Capt. C. S. Tindall ; from the Indian Ocean, presented by 
Capt. Cowie ; and from the Indian Ocean and China Sea, pre- 
sented by Capt. Leigh ; with a large collection of organisms from 
the surface and the intermediate depths of the North Atlantic, 
made by Messrs. Murray and Blackman. 

146 North American j)lants collected by G. R. Vasey were 
acquired by exchange with J. N. Rose, National Herbarium, 
Washington, U.S.A. 

The herbarium of Emile Bescherelle, containing 18,300 mosses 
and hepatics, and many types : purchased. 

1,600 South African plants collected by F. Wilms: purchased; 
in 1900, 473 plants were purchased. 

494 North African plants collected by Sven Murbeck : 
purchased. 

Twelve centuries of D. Saccardo's " Mycotheca Italica " : 
purchased, 1898-1902. 

203 Floridan plants collected by G. N. Collins : purchased. 
113 East Indian hepatics collected by Schiffner : purchased. 
109 North American cryptogams collected by Small : pur- 
chased. 

108 plants from New Guinea collected by C. Lauterbach ; 
purchased. 

Bauer's " Bryotheca Bohemica," three centuries : purchased 
1898-1902. 

81 mosses from Tahiti collected by Nadeaud : purchased. 
70 slides of British fresh-water algae prepared by W. 
West, Jun. : purchased; in 1899, 504 were purchased; in 
1900 314. 



Botany, 125 

1899. 

321 plants from Tropical Africa collected and presented by 
Lord Delamere. 

227 plants from Chinese Turkestan collected and presented 
by Capt. H. H. P. Deasy. 

188 Arabian plants collected and presented by Dr. A. S. G. 
Jayakar. 

162 plants from the West Indies, collected by Dr. Gregory 
and presented by a joint committee of the Royal Society and the 
British Association. 

154 Samoan cryptogams collected by the Rev. T. Powell : 
presented. 

153 microscope-preparations of diatoms from St. Vincent, 
West Indies, presented by E. Grove, Esq. 

Collections of Phytoplankton, from South Atlantic, presented 
by Capt. A. Turbyne ; from North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, 
presented by W. L. Browne, Esq. ; and from the Red Sea, Indian 
Ocean, North Pacific, etc., presented by Capt. G. K. Wright, 
R.N.R. 

Eight centuries of " Kryptogamse Exsiccatte " of the Vienna 
Hof museum : acquired by exchange, between the years 1899 and 
1902. 

120 Himalayan mosses collected by Mrs. Bradford were 
acquired by exchange; in 1901, 108 Indian cryptogams were 
acquired. 

109 lichens collected during the Hassler Expedition, and 
106 during the U.S. Exploring Expedition : acquired by 
exchange. 

7,703 slides of marine algae, mostly Florideae, prepared by Prof. 
Schmitz : purchased. 

Herbarium of 3,121 British mosses, formed by Rev. H. G. 
Jameson : purchased. 

648 plants from Colorado collected by Baker, Earle, and 
Tracey : purchased ; in 1900, 725 plants were purchased. 

500 species, being Linhart's " Fungi Hungarici" : purchased. 

338 plants from Sarawak collected by E. Bartlett : j)ur- 
chased. 

250 plants from Costa Rica collected by A. Tonduz : pur- 
chased ; in 1900, 519 plants were purchased; in 1902, 109. 

625 specimens, forming twenty-five fasciculi of Vestergren's 
" Micromycetes Selecti" : purchased in 1899 and subsequently. 



126 Botany, 

219 plants from the Cascade Mountains, Washington, collected 
by O. D. Allen : purchased. 

200 " Micro-Fungi Britannici," by Yize : purchased. 

Reichenbach and Schubert's " Lichenes exsiccati " (125 speci- 
mens) : purchased. 

Krieger's Schiidlicher Pilze unserer Kultur-gewiichse "' (100 
specimens) : purchased. 

iSTine fascicles of Kneucker's " Carices exsiccatse " : j^urchased, 
1899-1901. 

Delogne and Gravel's " Hepatiques de I'Ardenne " (GO 
specimens) : purchased. 

250 specimens of Fleisclier's " Musci Archipelagi Indici " : 
purchased 1899-1902. 

1900. 

670 Guatemalan plants collected and presented by Capt. J. 
Donnell Smith. 

163 Hepaticje from West Scotland collected and presented by 
Symers M. Macvicar, Esq. 

149 plants from Klondike collected and presented by J. B. 
Tyrrell, Esq. 

134 Chinese plants collected and presented by W. H. Shocklev, 
Esq. ; the following year, 179 Siberian plants were presented. 

223 North African plants collected by Cosson : acquired ])y 
exchange. 

179 plants, chiefly Australian, acquired by exchange with the 
Botanic Gardens, Sydney ; the following year, 192 plants were 
acquired. 

114 plants, chiefly South African, acquired by exchange; in 
1902, 143 plants were acquired. 

The Fern Herbarium of 2,000 specimens, formed by Sir 
Bawson W. Rawson, w^as purchased. 

Ellis and Everhart's " North American Fungi '' (3,600 speci- 
mens) : purchased. 

831 plants from Baram District, Borneo, collected by C. 
Hose : purchased : in 1902, 800 plants from Borneo and North 
Celebes were purchased. 

250 Irish Hepaticse collected by D. McArdle : purchased. 

Warnstorf's "EuropaischeTorfmoose"(238 species): purchased. 

143 South American hepatics collected by Dusen : purchased ; 
in 1902, 325 mosses were purchased. 

Kneucker's Cyperaceae and Juncaceae (120 species), and 
Graminepe (300 species) : purchased, 1900-1902. 



Botany. 127 

1901. 

171 South African plants presented by Dr. S. Schonland ; tlie 
following year, 60 plants were presented. 

153 plants from Buenos Ayres collected and presented by 
Ernest Gibson, Esq. 

104 plants collected by Capt. Parry during his three voyages : 
presented by Lord Walsingham, 

1,059 Gulf Coast plants collected by S. M. Tracy : purchased ; 
the following year, 454 plants were purchased. 

822 Georgian plants collected by R. Harper : purchased ; the 
following year, 365 plants were purchased. 

805 plants from Kunene-Zambesi collected by H. Baum : 
purchased. 

471 West Australian plants collected by E. Pritzel : pur- 
chased ; the following year, 544 plants were purchased. 

428 Mexican plants collected by E. O. Wooton : purchased. 

237 plants from New Mexico, collected by F. S. and E. Earle: 
purchased. 

180 Siamese plants collected by Zimmerman : purchased. 

176 Brazilian cryptogams collected by A. Robert : purchased. 

161 specimens of Equisetum from Wirtgen's " Pteridophyte 
exsiccata '' : purchased. 

1902. 

Mr. Thos. Comber's collection of diatoms, consisting of 2,926 
microscope-slides, and a large number of photographic negatives, 
and prints : presented by his widow. 

413 South African plants collected and presented by Capt. 
Barrett-Hamilton. 

130 Patagonian plants collected and presented by H. Hesketh 
Prichard, Esq. 

94 plants from Johannesberg collected and presented by 
H. T. Ommanney, Esq. 

W. H. Pearson's Herbarium of Hej^aticye, containing 9,000 
specimens : purchased. 

1,029 Tropical African plants collected by T. Kiissner : 
purchased. 

395 " Plantte Amurica? " collected by F. Karo : purchased. 

270 West Australian plants collected by L. Webster ; purchased. 

266 plants from Margarita Island, Venezuela, collected by 
O. O. Miller : purchased. 



128 Botany. 

218 European cereals prepared by J. Percival : purchased. 

200 species of Paulin's "Flora exsiccata Carniolica": pur- 
chased. 

143 plants from German East Africa collected by W. Busse : 
purchased. 

105 plants from Vermont collected by W. W. Eggleston : 
purchased. 

100 plants from Vancouver Island collected by C. O. 
Rosendahl and C. J. Brand : purchased. 



Botany. 129 



3. — Alphabetical List of the more important Contributors 
TO THE Collection of Plants in the Department op 
Botany.* 



Abel (Clarke). [1780-1826] 

Chinese plants in Herb. Banks, " the only part of his herbarium tliat 
escaped the wreck of the AlceHe'' including types of the new species 
described by Brown in the " Narrative " of Abel's journey into the interior 
of China. 

Adair (Patrick). [/. 1696] 

Plants fruni the Cape and Johanna Island in Herb. Sloane. 

Afzelius (Adam). [1750-1837] 

Plants from Sierra Leone in Herb. Banks, and mosses in Herb. Hampe. 

Ahlberg (A.). 

1625 species of Scandinavian plants, purchased 1871. 

Aitchison (James Edward Tierney). [1836-98] 

422 species collected in the Kurrum Valley, Afghanistan, 1879, 
presented 1880 ; 196 species collected in Afghanistan, 1880, i)resented 
1881 ; set of plants collected in Afghan Boundary Expedition, 1884:-85, 
presented 1887. 

Alton (William) [1731-93] and his son William Townsend 
Alton [1766-1849] 
Were successively Directors of the Royal Gardens, Kew (1759-1841). 
In that capacity they sent to Banks, or to his librarians, Solander aud 
Dryander, the novelties grown in the Gardens ; these were described by the 
two last-named. The novelties were published in the "Hortus Kewensis'' 
(ed. i, 1789 ; ed. ii, 1810), and the types of these are in the Banksian 
Herbarium; the original MS. descriptions are also preserved in the 
Department. The younger Alton also presented in 1839 a collection of 
plants formed during the voyage of H.M.S. Sulphur to S. America. 

Alexander (William Thomas). [1818-72] 

Mosses of Chusan, etc. (1845-16), acquired with Herb. Wilson. 

Allen (0. D.). 

219 plants from the Cascade Mountains, Washington, purchastxi 1899. 



* Only collections amounting to a hundred or more siiecimens are 

included in this list, except in the case of smaller collections of special 
interest. 

VOL. I. ^ 



130 Botany. 

Anderson (Alexander). \d. 1811] 

Plants from Demerara (1791) from N. America, and from the St. 
Vincent Garden (1785-86), of which he was curator, in Herb. Banks. 

Anderson (John). \d. 1847] 

Plants from Chiloe (1829-30) with MS. list. 

Anderson (William). \d. 1778] 

Plants collected during Cook's second and third voyages to Australia, 
New Caledonia, the Pacific Islands, &c., in Herb. Banks. 

Andersson (Nils Johan). [1821-80] 

Mosses collected in South America, Oceania, &c., during the voyage of 
the Eugenie (1851-53), acquired with Herb. Hampe. 

Andrews (Charles William). [1866- ] 

278 plants collected on Christmas Island, presented by Sir John 
Murray, including types of the novelties described in the monograph on 
the island. 

Andrews (Joseph). [Ji. 1710-57] 

His herbarium of British plants, presented by Miss Hemstcd. 

Anzi (Martino). [1812-83] 

" Lichenes exsiccati Italiae (ex herb. Massalongo) ", 360 specimens in 
10 fascicles (1855-56) ; *' Lichenes rariores Langobardi," 578 specimens 
in 14 fascicles (1861-73); "Lichenes Etruria? rariores," 53 specimens 
(1863); *'Cladonia3 cisalpina3," 85 forms (1863); "Lichenes rariores 
Veneti (ex herb. Massalongo) ", 175 specimens in 4 fascicles (1863) ; 
*' Lichenes exsiccati minus rari Italias superioris," 400 specimens in 
8 fascicles (1865). These were purchased 1871-75. 

Aplin (Oliver Yernon). 

133 plants from Uruguay, acquired 1893. 

Appun (Carl Ferdinand). 

131 plants from Demerara, purchased 1872. 

Areschoug (Johan Erhard). [1811-87] 

" Algaj Scandinavica?," 84 s]iecimens in 3 fascicles (1840, 41) ; also 
Series II, 400 specimens in 8 fascicles (1861-72), purchased 1872-75. 

Arnold (Ferdinand Christian Gustav). [1828-1901] 

Lichens from the Tyrol and Bavaria, purchased at various dates from 
187-J. 

Arnott (George Arnold Walker). [1799-1868] 

]Mosses from his herbarium, purchased as part of Wilson's herbarium 
in 1873 ; 600 microscope-preparations, purchased with the Deby diatoms 
in 1893. 

Arthur (Joseph Charles) and Edward W. D. Holway. 

" Uredineaj exsiccatas " of North America, 114 specimens in 3 fascicles, 
purchased 1895-1901. 



Botany. 131 

Atkins (Anna, Mrs.), [d. 1871] 

Herbarium of British plants, presented 1865. 

Aublet (Jean Baptiste Christophore Fusee). [1773-78] 

An extensive collection of Truiana plants, including numerous types for 
his " Histoire des plantes de la Guiane Francaise," in Herb. Banks. 

Aucher-Eloy (Pierre Martin Remi). [1792-1838] 

1907 i)lants chiefly from Syria, Persia, and Arabia, ])urchased 1841 ; 
subb-eqneutly supplemented by additions from the Shuttlewoith collection. 

Auerswald (Bernhard). [1818-70] 

Herbarhim of 17,000 specimens, chiefly from Central Europe, Spain, 
the Ural territory, Mexico, and Labrador, purchased 1871. 

Auge (Andreas), [ji. 1820] 

Numerous plants from the Cape in Herb. Banks. 

Ayres (Philip Burnard). [d. 1863] 

"Mycologia Britannica," .100 specimens in 2 fascicles (1845), pur- 
chased 1861. 

Back {Sir George) [1796-1878] and Richard King. 

170 North American plants, collected, 1833-35, during the expedition 
to the Hudson Bay territory in search of Captain Pioss, presented 1836. 

Backhouse (James). [1825-90] 
Set of British Hieracia, purchased 1863. 

Baenitz (Carl Gabriel). 

165 GramiDa3 and 175 Juncacea?, purchased 1870. 

Bagnall (James Eustace). 

89 Warwickshire Paibi, presented 1881, and 20 Staffordshire mosses, 
presented 1895. 

Bailey (Charles). [1838- ] 

605 British plants, presented 1882-84. 

Bailey (Frederick Manson). 

141 Australian plants, mostly types of species described by him, 
presented 1897-99. 

Bailey (Liberty Hyde). [1858- ] 

78 Carices from North America, obtained by exchange, 1897. 

Baker (Carl F.), Earle, F. S., and S. M. Tracy. 

1 :]73 plants of Colorado", purchased 1899-1900. 

Baker (John Gilbert). [1834- ] 
110 British plants, presented, 1887-88. 

Balansa (B.). [d. 1892] 

1,226 plants from Asia Minor, etc., purchased, 1855-58^ 315 i)hanei-o- 
gams and 593 cryptogams from Paraguay, purchased, 1885. 

K 2 



132 Botany. 

Balbis (Giovanni Battista). [1765-1831] 

Plants in Herb. Roemer, acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Balfour (Isaac Bayley). [1853- ] 

Collections (phanerogams and cryptogams) made in Rodriguez during 
the Transit of Yenus expedition, presented by the Royal Society, 
1876-78. 373 plants collected in Socotra, 1880. 

Ball (John). [1818-89] 

313 plants from Morocco, i)resented 1885. 

Bang (Miguel). 

1,565 Bolivian plants, purchased 1890-93. 

Banister (John), [d. 1692 or 1696?] 

Two volumes of specimens in the Sloane Herbarium (vols. 91, 92). 

Banks (Sir Joseph). [1743-1820] 
See introductory note. 

Barbey (William). [1842- ] 
161 Cyrenian plants, presented 1888. 

Barclay (Arthur). [1852-91] 

His collection of 505 microscope-preparations and numerous specimens 
of Uredineai and other micro-fungi illustrating his memoirs, purchased 
1892. 

Barclay (George). 

Collections made during the voyage of H.M.S. Sidjjlmr, 1836-41 in 
New Guinea, Peru, Mexico, Brazil, etc., presented by W. T. Alton, 1839, 
and by the Lords of the Admiralty, 1896. 

Barham (Henry), [d. 1726] 
West Indian plants in Herb. Sloane. 

Baron (Richard). [1847- ] 

1,457 plants from Madagascar, purchased 1883-92. 

Barrett-Hamilton (Lieut. Gerald Edwin Hamilton). 
413 plants from South Africa, presented 1902. 

Bartlett (Edward). 

338 plants from Borneo, purchased 1899. 

Bartling (Friedrich Gottlieb) [1798-1875] and Georg Ernst 
LuDwiG Hampe. 

A set of their cryptogams, chiefly from the Harz Mountains, acquired 
with Herb. Shuttleworth in 1877. 

Bartram (John). [1699-1777] 

A large number of specimens from Georgia and Carolina (1765-66) in 
the Banksian Herbarium, which also contains a few from Carolina from 



Botany, 133 

his son, William Bartram (1739-1823) : specimens in tlie Sloaue 
Herbarium (vols. 332, 334). 

Bates (G. L.). 

376 plants from French Congo and Gaboon, purchased 1896-97. 

Batters (Edward Arthur Lionel). 

40 specimens and 35 microscope-preparations of British marine alga?, 
presented 1890-92. 

Baxter (William), [ji. 1830] 

South Australian plants acquired with Herb. Brown. 

Baudin (Nicolas). [1750-1803] 

Specimens from Australia in Herb. Banks. 

Bauer (Ernst). 

"Bryotheca Bohemica," 300 specimens, purchased 1898-1902. 

Baum (H.). 

805 plants fi'om Kunene-Zambesi, purchased 1901. 

Baxter (William). [1787-1871] 

" Stirpes cryptogamicic Oxouienses," 100 specimens in 2 fascicles 
(1825-28), purchased 1862, 1873. 

Beaufort (Duchess of). 
See Somerset. 

Beccari (Odoardo). [1843- ] 

642 plants from Abyssinia and Malasia, purchased 1887. 

Becker (Alexander). [1818-1901] 

Set of plants from Sareptn, purchased. 
Beddome (Lieut.-Col. Richard Henry). [1830- ] 

Herbarium of Indian plants, containing about 10,000 species, collection 
of Indian ferns, among them many types of his " Ferns of British India " 
and of his other works, purchased. 

Beeby (William Haddon). [1849- ] 

193 British plants, presented at intervals since 1884. 

Ben (William M.). 

211 species collected in the Survey for the Pacific Railroad between 
Fort Wallace, Kansas, and Santa Fe, presented 1869. 

Ben ( ). 

Plants collected at the Cape in 1727, in Herb. Sloane. 

Bellingham (William). 

176 plants from Nyasa-land, purchased 1887. 

Bennett (Arthur). [1844- ] 

A large number of plants of various countries, especially European and 
British, presented at frequent intervals since 1881. 



134 Botany. 

Bennett (George). [1804-93] 

Specimens of Australian plants, presented at intervals from 1859. 

Benson (Richard de Gylpyn). [1856-1904] 

257 Shropshire mosses, purchased 1897, 1898. 

Berggren (Sven). [1837- ] 

Collection from New Zealand (240 phanerogams and 75 alga?), pur- 
chased 1879. 

Berkeley (Miles Joseph). [1803-89] 

His " British Fungi," 350 specimens in 4 fascicles (1836-i3), purchased 
1872 ; numerous authentic specimens acquired with Herb. Broome. 

Berlandier (Jean Louis), [d. 1851] 

1300 species of plants from Texas and Mexico, purchased 1838. 

Bertero (Carlo Giuseppe). [1789-1831] 

500 plants from Chili, purchased 1834. 

Bertoloni (Antonio). [1775-1869] 

Plants in Herb. Eoemer, acquired with Herb. Shuttle worth. 

Bescherelle (Emile). [1828-1903] 

His exotic mosses, about 14,800 specimens, containing the plants 
described in his memoirs on the mosses of the French Colonies, etc., 
and authentic specimens from the older French botanists ; also his Euro- 
pean and exotic hepatics, about 3,500 specimens, purchased in 1900. 

Beyrich (Karl), [d. 1834] 

Phanerogams from Georgia and Carolina. Brazilian mosses in Herb. 
Hampe. 

Billot (Paul Constant). [1796-1863] 

His " Flora exsiccata," a collection chiefly of French and German 
critical plants, published at intervals from 1846, and purchased. 

Bisset (James). 

Extensive collections of Japanese plants (phanerogams and crypto- 
gams), presented 1882 and 1889. 

Black (Allan Osmond), [d. 1864?] 

His herbarium of mosses containing 2,000 specimens, chiefly British, 
purchased 1864. 

Bladh (Pehr Johann). 

Sent plants to Banks from Macao and Canton. 

Blake (John Bradby). [1745-73] 
Chinese plants in Herb. Banks. 

Blanchet (Jaques Samuel). [1807-75] 

315 Brazilian planes and 250 woods from Brazil, purchased 1830-38. 

Blanco (Antonio). 

396 plants from the province of Jaeu, Spain, purchased 1850. 



Botany. 135 

Blandow (Otto Christian). [1778-1810] 

" Musci frondosi," 250 specimens in 5 fascicles, purchased 1875, 

Blinkworth (Richard), [fl. 1830] 

A large collection of plants from Kumaon, presented. 

Block! (Bronislaus). 

625 plants from Galicia and Poland, purchased 1887-94. 

Bloxam (Andrew). [1801-78] 

His herbarium of fungi, containing 1,500 British specimens, 500 from 

North and South America, and 58(3 collected in the south of France by 

Nylander and by lioussel, was purchased in 1870. Collections of his 

lichens, mosses and Rubi were acquired at various dates from 180 1 to 

1896. 

Blytt (Axel). [1844 ?-98] 

Norwegian plants. 
Boerhaave (Hermann). [1668-1738] 

His herbarium, consisting largely of plants from the Leyden Garden, 
forms part of Herb. ISloane. 

Bohler (John). [1796-1872] 

"Lichenes Britannici," 112 specimens in 8 fascicles (1835-37), 
purchased 1862. 

Boissier (Pierre Edmond). [1810-85] 

Spanish plants acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Boivin (Louis Hyacinthe). [1808-52] 

176 Mascarene plants, purchased 1861 ; mosses acquired with Herb. 
Bescherelle. 
Bojer (Wenzel). [1800-56] 

303 Mascarene plants presented by the Society of Arts and Sciences 
of Mauritius, 1847. 

See aho Hilsenberg. 

Bolander (Henry N.). 

500 Californian plants, purchased 1868. 
Bolus (Harry). [1834- ] 

1100 South African plants, presented 1881-96. 
See aho Macowax and Bolus. 

Boodle (Leonard Alfred). [1865- ] 

221 marine algi^ from the Cape of Good Hope, presented 1890. 
Borcliers (August). 

1350 plants from Chili, purchased 1891. 

Bornmiiller (Josef). 

1,083 plants from Asia Minor and 929 from Persia, purchased 
1890-97. 
Botanical Record Club. 

Herbarium of British plants transferred from the Herbarium of the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, 1884, and later portions, presented by F. A. Lees, Esq. 



136 Botany, 

Botteri (Matteo). 

1,016 Mexican plants, purchased 1855-57; 516 Dalmatian plants, 
purchased 1854, 1867. 

Bourgeau (Eugene). [1813-77] 

1,007 plants of the Canary Islands, purchased 1846; 4,113 i)lants 
from the Mediterranean region, purchased at various dates. 

Bowdich (Thomas Edward). [1790-1824] 

A few plants collected during his mission to Ashantee, 1819. 

Bo wen {Lieut). 

119 species of Labrador plants, presented 1836. 

Bowie (James), [d. 1869] 

Collection made with Allan Cunningham in Brazil (1814-17), in 
Herb. Banks ; large collection of plants collected at the Cape 1817-23, 
presented by W. T. Alton. 

Bowker (James Henry), [fl. 1853-85] 
150 plants from the Cape, purchased 1853. 

Bowles (Edward Augustus). 

Cultivated specimens of Crocus, etc., presented 1901-3. 

Boyd (D. a.). 

112 micro-fungi of Ayrshire, presented 1897-1900. 

Bradford (Mary, Mrs.). 

228 cryptogams from India, acquired in 1899 and 1901. 

Braithwaite (Robert). [1824- ] 

" Si)hagnacta3 Britannicaj," purchased 1877. 

Brass (William), [fl. 1790] 

Plants from West Coast of Africa in Herb. Banks. 

Braun (Alexander). [1805-77] 

Cry])togams acquired with the herbaria of Shuttleworth and Hampe. 
See Rabenhorst. 

Brebner (George). 

82 microscope-preparations and 28 specimens of British marine alga?, 
acquired at various times, 1885-1897. 

Bretschneider (Emil). [d. 1901] 

228 Chinese plants collected by him and presented by F. B. Forbes, Esq. 

Breutel (Johann Christian). 

322 Muscineffi from 8. Africa, purchased 1867-71 ; 380 from Central 
America and 305 from Greenland and Labrador, purchased 1871. 

Brewer (James Alexander). \Ji. 1838-90] 

354 plants from Western Australia, acquired 1893. 
Breyne (Johann Philipp). [1680-1764] 

Plants from Dantzig in Herb. Sloane. 



Botany. 137 

Bridges (Thomas). [1807-65] 

533 plants from Bolivia, purcliased 1847, and 285 from California, 
purchased 1858. 

Briggs (Thomas Richard Archer). [1836-91] 

1602 British plants, chiefly from Devon and Cornwall, presented 
1880-91. 

British Herbarium. 

For the convenience of British botanists the British plants have, since 
1859, been separated from the General Herbarium — an arrangemcat 
adopted since 1859, when the herbaria of Edward Forster, James 
Sowerby, and Mrs. Robinson were combined as the nucleus of the British 
collection. 

Briosi (Giovanni) [1846- ] and Fridiano Cavara [1857- ] 
" Funghi parassiti delle l^iante," 350 specimens in 14 fascicles (1888- 
1900), purchased 1889-1900. 

Britton (Nathaniel Lord). [1858- ] 

111 plants from North America, acquired by exchange, 1892. 

Broome (Christopher Edmund). [1812-86] 

His herbarium of fungi, containing about 40,000 specimens, many of 
them being the types of species described by him and by Berkeley, and 
8 vols, of his correspondence, bequeathed 1886. In this collection were 
included sets of specimens published by Cooke, Phillips, Plowright, Vize, 
Fuckel, Piabenhorst, Ravenel, Rehm, von Thuemen, Wagner. 

Brotherus (A.). 

830 plants from the Caucasus, purchased 1883. 

Brown (Robert). [1773-1858] 

See p. 84. 

Browne (Samuel), [d. before 1703] 

A folio volume of plants (with notes) sent by him from Fort 
St. George (Madras) to the East India Company in 1697, and presented 
by the Company to the Ptoyal Society ; an account of the collection, by 
Petiver, is in Phil. Trans. Other specimens from Browne are in the Sloane 
Herbarium. 

Bruce (Arthur). [1725 ?-1 805] 

Herbarium of British plants, purchased at the Linnean Society's sale, 
1863. 

Bruhns (Alexander). 

185 plants from island of Sviatoi, Caspian Sea, purchased 1871. 

Brunner (Samuel). [1790-1844] 

Plants from Senegambia and Johanna Island, acquired with Herb. 
Shuttleworth. 

Buchanan (Francis) afterwards Hamilton. [1762-1829] 

Collection of Avan plants sent to Banks 1794, with MS. descriptions 
and drawings : see Journ. Bot., 1902, 279 ; collection from Chittagong 
sent to Banks, 1798; 674 Dlants from Nepaul, Mysore, and Malabar, 



138 Botany. 

purchased at Lambert's sale, 1842, including tlie types of D. Don's " Flora 
Nepalensis." 

Buchanan (John). [1855-96] 

1125 plants from Nyasa-land, presented 1893-96. 

Buckley (Samuel Botsfoed). [1809-84] 
375 species of Alabama plants, purchased 1861. 

Buddie (Adam), [d. 1715] 

Herbarium of British plants in Herb. Sloaiie, vols. 114-130: MS. 
relating to these in Sloane MSS. 2970-80. 

Buflfham (Thomas Hughes). [1840-96] 

1390 specimens and 690 microscope-preparatioDS of British algaj, 
purchased at various dates, 1888-96. 

Bunbury {Sir Charles James Fox). [1809-86] 
Plants from South Africa. 

Burbidge (Frederick William). [1847- ] 

230 plants from North Borneo, presented by Messrs. Veitch, 1879. 

Burke (Joseph). [Ji. 1839-46] 

380 species of South African plants, presented in 1843 by the Earl of 
Derby, who employed Burke as a collector. 

Busse (Walter). 

143 plants from German East Africa, purchased 1902. 

Caley (George), [d. 1829] 

Large collections from x^ustralia and the West Indies. 

Campbell (Charles William, C.M.G.). 

80 phanerogams from Eastern Mongolia, presented 1901. 

Campbell CDouglas Houghton). [1859- ] 

150 microscope-preparations illustrating his memoirs on the structure 
and development of mosses and ferns, presented 1895, 1896. 

Campbell (W.). 

2i»4 plants from Formosa, presented 1876. 

Carmichael (Dugald). [1772-1827] 

Mauritius and Bourbon plants, with MS. catalogue. 

Carrington (Benjamin). [1827-93] 

Hepatics and mosses acquired with the herbaria of Wilson and 
Pearson. 

Carrington (Benjamin) and William Henry Pearson. 

[1849- ] 
"Hepatica; Britannica^," 290 specimens in 4 fascicles (1878-90), 
purchased 1883 and after. 

Carroll (Isaac). [1828-80] 

His "Lichenes Hibernici," 1 fascicle of 40 specimens, purchased 1859. 
3,968 Irish and Scandinavian lichens, and numerous phanerogams 



Botany. 139 

and cryptogams collected in Ireland, Lapland and Iceland, purchased 
1874, 1875. 

Carruthers (William). [1830- ] 

470 species of plants from the United States and Mexico, collected 
and presented, 1884. 

Camel (Teodoro). [1830-98] 

100 specimens of Junci, purchased 1887. 

Catesby (Mark). [1679 or 1680-1749] 

Two volumes of specimens in the 81oaue Herbarium (212, 232). 

Cavanilles (Antonio Jose). [1744-1804] 

Sent plants to Banks, which are in his herbarium; a small collection 
was jnirchased at Lambert's sale, 1842. 

Cavara (Fridian6). [1857- ] 

" Fungi LongobardicT?," 250 specimens in 5 fascicles (1802-9G), 
purchased. 

See also Briosi. 

Cesati (Yincenzo) [1806-83] and T. CarueL 

" PIanta3 Italia; borealis." 

"Challenger" Expedition. [1873-76] 

A set of the plants collected, presented by the Pioyal Society. 

Chalmers (James), 

" Alga^ Scotici^i," 50 specimens in 1 vol. (1826), purchased 1880. 

Chandler (Elizabeth, Miss). [1818-84] 

473 British plants, presented 1875. 
Chapman (Alvan Wentworth). [1809-99] 

713 species of Florida plants, purchased 1845. 

Chauvin (Francois Joseph) [1797-1859] and Roberge. 

" Algues de la Normandie," 200 specimens in 8 fascicles (182G-1838), 
acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth in 1877. 

Chelsea Garden. 

< Plants forwarded in annual instalments of fifty to the Poyal Society, 
in accordance with Sir Hans Sloane's deed of conveyance to the Apothe- 
caries' Company, 1722-61. 

Chesney {Col. Francis Rawdon). [1789-1872] 

i)9 plants collected in the Euphrates expedition, presented by tlie 

Board of Control 1837; many described in Bertoloni's "Miscellanea 

Botanica," pt. i (1842). 

Christy (Robert Miller). [1861- ] 
156 plants from Manitoba, presented 1886. 

Clapperton (Hugh). [1788-1827] 

Plants collected by Walter Oudney (1790-1824), Dixon Denham 
(1786-1828), and Huoh Clapperton during tiieir expedition to Central 
Africa (1822-24), presented to Robert Brown and bequeathed by him. 



140 Botany, 

Clarke (Charles Baron). [1834- ] 

11,155 specimens of Indian plants, presented 1875-1897. 

Clarke (C. S., Mrs.), 

113 plants from Natal, purchased 1800. 

Clarke (Joseph). 

1,000 plants from Ohio, purchased 1858. 

Clarke ( ). 

Plants collected in Virginia (1729), Carolina, Antigua, Montserrat 
(1734), and Bermuda, in Herb. Sloane. 

Claussen ( ). 

800 Brazilian plants and 260 woods, purchased 1841. 

Clayton (John). [1686 or 1693?-1773] 

The types of the "Flora Virginica" (17C2), acquired by Banks from 
Oronovius, the author of the " Flora." 

Clemente (Simon de Roxas) and Leblech. 

"Plantas de Andalucia, 1803," purchased with Shuttleworth's 
herbarium. 

Clementi (Giuseppe). [1812-73] 

130 plants from Mount Olympus, purchased 1852. 

Cleve (Pehr Teodor) [1840- ] and J. D. Moller. 

Their diatoms, 324 microscope-preparations in G parts (1877-82), 
purchased with the Deby coUectiou in 1893. 

Clifford (George). [1685-1760] 

His herbarium, containing the plants described by LioDc-eus in the 
" Hortus Cliftbrtianus" (1737) ; bought by Banks in 1791. 

Clifton (George). [/. 1853-90.] 

565 Australian marine algai, being types quoted in Harvey's 
" Phycologia Australica," presented 1889, 1890. 

Clifton (William), [fl. 1765] 

A few plants from Florida in Herb. Banks. 

Clinton (G. W.). 

Plants of Buffalo, New York. 

Cloisel (J.). 

201 plants from Madagascar, purchased 1891. 

Cocks (John). [1787-1861] 

" Algamm fasciculi," 180 British specimens in 18 parts (1855-60), 
purchased 1867. 

Coles (F. R.). 

257 Kirkcudbrightshire plants, presented 1884. 



Botany, 141 

Collie (Alexander). \d. 1835] 

852 plants of Western Australia, presented by the Lords of the 
Admiralty 1856. 

Collins (Frank Shipley), Isaac Holden [1832-1903], and 
William Albert Setchell. 
"Pliycotheca Boreali- Americana," 1,075 specimens in 23 fascicles 
(1895-1902), purchased. 

Collins (G. N.). 

203 plants from Florida, purchased 1898. 

Collinson (Peter). [1694-1768] 

Specimens in Herb. Banks from his garden at Mill Hill. 

Comber (Thomas). [1837-1902] 

His valuable collection of diatoms, consisting of 2,926 microscope- 
slides, 2,225 photographic negatives and lantern-slides, an illustrated 
descriptive catalogue in MS., and a quantity of herbarium material, 
presented by his widow, 1902. 

Commerson (Philibert). [1727-73] 

Specimens in Herb. Banks, and others acquired with Herb. Brown. 

Cooke (Mordecai Cubitt). [1825- ] 

" Fungi Britannici exsiccati " (1865-72), 700 specimens, also 850 
British and 300 exotic fungi, and 332 preparations for the microscope, 
purchased 1864-95. The second edition of his " Fungi Britannici," 600 
specimens (1875-77), formed part of C. E. Broome's herbarium. 

Cooper (Duncan E.). 

222 plants from Melbourne, piesented 1856. ^ 

Cooper (Thomas). 

1,078 plants from South Africa, presented by W. W. Saunders, 1865. 

Cosson (Ernest Saint-Charles). [1819-89] 

223 specimens from North Africa, acquired by exchange 1900. 

Couch (Benjamin). 

A collection of 805 specimens of woods, purchased 1810. 

Coulter (Thomas). [1793-1843] ; 
225 Californian plants, purchased 1869. 

Courten (William). [1642-1702] 
Plants in Herb. Sloane. 

Cowan (William Deans). 

450 Madagascar plants, purchased 1883. 

Creagh (Charles Vandeleur, C.M.G.). 

462 plants from Borneo, presented 1895-96. 

CroaU (Alexander). [1809-85] 

600 plants from Braemar, purchase I 185?. 



142 J^otany, 

Crombie (James Morrison). [1833- ] 

His " Lichenes Britannici," 200 specimens (1874, 1877), also 2,929 
British and exotic licliens, purcliased 1870-1900. 

Crome (Georg Ernst Wilhelm). [1780-1813] 

120 mosses illustrating his " Sammlimg Deutscher Laiibmoose," 3 
parts (1803-6), purchased. 

Crueger (Hermann). [1818-64] 

West Indian Muscinea?, acquired with the collections of Hampe and 
Stephani. 

Cuming (Hugh). [1791-1865] 

A selection fi-oni his Chilian collections (1827-31), purchased 1834 ; 
2,433 plants from the Philippines, Malayan Peninsula, Sumatra, and 
St. Helena, purchased 1841. 

Cummings (Clara Eaton), Robert S. Williams^ cand Arthur 
Bliss Seymour. 
"Decades of North American Lichens" (1897-99), 320 specimens, 
purchased 1897-99. 

Cunningham (Allan). [1791-1839] 

Collection made with James Bowie in Brazil (1814-17) in Herb. Banks ; 
collection of Australian plants, made 1818-26, presented by William 
Townsend Alton. 

Cunningham (David Douglas). 

21 microscope-slides and specimens, being the types described in his 
paper on Mycoidea parasitica, presenti'd by the Council of the Linnean 
Society, 1878. 

Cunningham (James), [d. 1709?] 

An important collection of Chinese plants made at Amoy, 1698-1703, 
including specimens from Chusan, etc. in Herb. Sloane. See Bretschneider, 
*' European Botanical Discoveries in China," 34-44 and " Early European 
Eesearches in China," 36-88. 

Curtis (Charles). 

V.l specimens of Dipterocarpea^ presented 1888; 243 plants of Penang, 
purchased 1890; 333 Malayan plants, presented 1891-94. 

Curtiss (Allen Hiram). [1845- ] 

His x-)ublished fascicles of North American flowering plants, purchased 
1881-87, containing 1554 specimens; and 136 " Alga3 Floridanaj," 
purchased 1896-98. 

Cutler; (Catharine, Mss). \d. 1866] 

946 specimens, representing 337 species of British algcT, presented 
1861. 

Dahlstedt (Hugo Gustaf Adolf). [1856- ] 
400 Hieracia from Scandinavia, purchased 1890-91. 

Dale (Samuel). [1659-1739] 

Plants presented by the Company of Apothecaries, 1862. 



Botany, 143 

Dalziel (John M.). 

80 Chinese plants, presented 1902. 

Daniell (William Freeman). [1818-65] 

Small collections from West Africa ami Ciiina, presented 1817-01. 

Davies (George). [1834-92] 

His lierbarium of about 20,000 Britisli and exotic mosses, hepatics and 
lichens, presented by his widow, 1892, 

Davies (Hugh). [1739?-1821] 

Herbarium of Welsh plants, containing types of his " Welsh Botan- 
ology," purchased 1883. 

Davy (Joseph Burtt). [1870- ] 
14(3 British plants, presented 1891. 

Deakin (Richard). \_d. 1873] 

His herbarium of Italian and British lichens, about 1500 specimens, 
presented by Horatio Pig'j;ot in 1889. 

Deasy {Ga;pt. Henry Hugh Peter). 

22(3 plants from Chinese Turkestan, presented 1899. 

De Bary (Heinrich Anton). [1831-88] 

His collection of 4,429 microscope-preparations, illustrating his memoirs 
on plant-anatomy and parasitic diseases, purchased 1889. 

Deby (Julien Marc). [1826-95] 

A collection of 12,541 microscopic-preparations of Diatomacea^, 
consisting of a large series systematically arranged, a series of spread 
slides, the entire collections of Hardman and of Donkin, a series from 
Walker Arnott, the sets published by Cleve and Moller, by Tempere and 
Peragallo, and others ; also a remarkable series of type slides, purchased 
1893. 

Delamere {Lord). 

321 plants from Tropical Africa, presented 1899. 

Delise (Dominic Francois), [d. 1841] 

" Lichens de France " (1828), acquired with Herb, llalfs. 

Delogne (Charles Henri). 

His "Diatomees de Belgique," 100 microscope slides in 4 fascicles 
(1880-81), purchased. 

Delogne (C. H.) and Fr. Gravet. 

"Hepatiques de I'Ardenne," GO specimens in 6 fascicles (1868-70), 
purchased 1899. 

Denham (Dixon). [1786-1828] 
/See Clai'PERTON. 

Deplanche (Emile) [1824-75] and Eugene VieiHard. 
25G specimens of New Caledonian plants, purchased 1873. 



144 Botany, 

De Ponthieu (Henri). 

Plants from the Caribee Islands, 1778, in Herb. Banks. 

Deseglise (Alfred). \d. 1883] 

Herbarium Rosarum, a ver}^ large collection of critical Roses from 
various collectors, containing all tlie species described in his works, 
purchased 1884. 

Desmazieres (Jean Baptiste Henri Joseph). [1796-1862] 

"Plantes crvptogames de France," 2,200 specimens in 4-4 fascicles 
(1825-51) ; edition li, 1850 specimens in 37 fascicles (1836-51), acquired 
with Shuttle worth's herbarium in 1877 ; edition ii, series ii, 800 speci- 
mens in 16 fascicles (1853-60). 

De Tabley {Lord). [1835-95] 

Numerous contributions to British Herbarium, 1870, etc. 

De Toni (Giovanni Battista). [1864- ] 

" Herbarium Phycologicum," 2 decades (1896), purchased 1898. 

De Toni (G. B.) and David Levi-Morenos. [1863- ] 
" Ph ycotheca Italica," 200 specimens in 4 fascicles (1886-89), purchased. 

Dick ( ). 

" Herbarium Helveticum "—collection of Swiss plants, purchased by 
Banks from Dr. Pitcairn in 1775. See Journ. Bot., 1902, 388. 

Dickie (George). [1812-82] 

His arranged collection of about 7,000 alga_^ and 372 diatom slides, 
purchased 1883. 

Dickson (James). [1738-1822] 

" Hortus siccus Britannicus," 1789-93. His collection of mosses an-l 
hepatics, containing the types of his published species, was purchased 
from his daughter in 1876. 

Dietel (Paul). 

A set of his Uredinere, purchased with Herb. Barclay in 1892. 

Dietrich (Am alia). 

250 plants from Brisbane, purchased 1874. 

Dillenius (Johann Jakob). [1687-1747] 

Plants from Wales in Herb. Sloane ; mosses in Herb. Banks. 

Dombey (Joseph). [1742-96] 

Specimens of S. American plants in Herb. Banks. 

Don (George). [1764-1814] 

"Herbarium Britannicum," 1804, purchased 1875; other examples 
incorporated in British Herbarium. 

Don (George). [1798-1856] 

701 species from AVest Tropical Africa, including many of the types of 
Hooker's "Niger Flora," purchased 1856. 



Botany, 145 

Donkin (Arthur Scott), [fl. 1858-73] 

486 microscope-preparations, acquired with the Deby collection in 
1893. 

Doody (Samuel). [1656-1706] 
Numerous specimens in Herb. Sloane. 

Doubleday (Edward). [1811-49] 

697 North American plants, presented 1843-44. 

Douglas (David). [1798-1834] 

1,460 plants from North-west America and California, containing; many- 
types published in Hooker's " Flora Boreali Americani," purchased 1856 
from the Royal Horticultural Society. 

Drege (Johann Franz). [1794-1881] 

A set of his S. African collections, acquired with Shuttleworth's 
herbarium. 

Drouet (Henri). [1829- ] 

Plants from the Azores, acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Druce (George Claridge). [1860- ] 

358 British plants presented at intervals from 1881. 

Drummond (James). [17841-1863] 

3,597 plants of Western Australia, purchased 1843-54; others 
acquired with Robert Brown's Herbarium. 

Drummond (Thomas), [d. 1835] 

" Musci Americani" collected in North America during the second 
Land Expedition (1825-28) of Sir John Franklin, presented by Dr. 
Richardson ; another series — from the Southern States — was purchased in 
1842. 

Du Bois (Charles). [1656-1740] 

Sent plants to Petiver and Plukenet, which are in Herb. Sloane. 

Durand (Philippe). 

Plants collected at Tangier, 1798-1807. See Cosson, "Compendium 
Florae Atlanticae," i, 14. 

Durand (Theophile) and Henri F. de Fabrega Pittier. 

1180 plants from Costa Rica, purchased 1897. 

Durieu de Maisonneuve (Elly). 
439 plants from Paraguay, purchased 1878. 

Durieu de Maisonneuve (Michel Charles). [1796?-1878] 
"Plantae selectae Hispano-Lusitanicae," 1835, acquired with Herb. 
Shuttleworth. 

Dusen (Per). [1855- ] 

235 mosses and hepatics from the Cameroons and 468 from Chile and 
Patagonia, purchased at various times, 1893-1902. 

VOL. I. ^ 



146 Botany, 

Duthie (John Firminger). [1845- ] 

615 plants of Italy, Malta, etc., presented 1872-74 ; 4,140 Indian 
flowerino; plants and 553 crvpto^ams, acquired at various dates between 
1881-1900. 

Dyer (William Turner Thiselton) afterwards Sir W. T. 
Thiselton-Dyer. [1843- ] 
250 critical British plants, presented 1870, and 100 critical British 
jDlants, purchased 1871. 

Earle (F. S. and E.). 

237 plants from New Mexico, purchased 1901. 

Eaton (Alfred Edwin). 

24 plants from Spitzbergen, presented 1874 ; 139 lichens and algae 
from the Cape, presented 1876 ; 129 lichens and algae from Kerguelen's 
Land, presented by the Council of the Eoyal Society. 

Eaton (Daniel Cady) [1834-95], and Edwin Faxon. 

" Sphagna Boreali-Americana," 172 specimens, purchased 1897. 

Ecklon (Christian Friedrich) [1795-1868] and Karl Ludwig 
Phillipp Zeyher. [1799-1858] 
340 South African plants, purchased 1883 ; specimens from these 
collectors were also added from Herb. Shuttle worth and from Herb. N. B. 
Ward ; mosses acquired with Herb. Hampe. 

Een (T. G.). 

Collection of phanerogams from Dammara Land, containing numerous 
types described in Journ. Bot., purchased 1879. 

Eggers {Baron Henrik Franz Alexander). [1844- ] 

305 plants from the Bahamas, collected by him and presented by the 
Royal Society, 1888. 206 plants from St. Domingo, purchased 1900. 

Eggleston (Willard Webster). 

105 plants from Vermont, purchased 1902. 

Ehrhart (Friedrich). [1742-95] 

" Plantae cryptogamae Linnaei," 32 decades (1785-93) ; " Phytophy- 
lacium" (8 decades), 1780. 

Eiben (C. E.). 

" Ostfrieslands Laubmoose," 150 specimens in 3 parts (1866-69), 
purchased 1870 and 1885 ; " Brack- und Salz-wasseralgen," 1 decade 
(1870), purchased 1885; " Diatomeen der ostfriesische Inseln und 
Kiisten," 10 microscope slides (1870), acquired with Herb. Deby 1893. 

Elliott (George Francis Scott). [1862- ] 

440 South African plants, presented 1888; 118 Madagascar plants, 
presented 1890 ; 456 North African plants, presented 1892 ; 1,399 plants 
from Sierra Leone, presented 1892-93 ; collection of plants from 
Euwenzori, presented 1895. 



Botany, 147 

Elliott (William Robert). 

1,097 cellular cryptogams collected in St. Vincent and Dominica, 
presented by the West India Exploration Committee, 1893. 

Ellis (Job Bicknell) [1829- ] and Benjamin Matlock 
Everhart. [1818- ] 
"Nortli American Fungi," 3,600 specimens in centuries (1878-98), 
purchased 1900 ; and " Fungi Columbiani," continued by C. L. Shear and 
subsequently by Elam Bartholomew, 17 centuries of specimens (1894, etc.), 
purchased at intervals since 1896. 

Endress ( ). 

Plants of Pyrenees collected 1831, acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Engelmann (Georg). [1809-84] 
100 specimens of Juncus, purchased 1886. 

Engler (Heinrich Gustav Adolf). [1844- ] 

His " Araceae exsiccatae" ; 3271 plants from Tropical Africa, Sandwich 
Islands, Japan, Brazil, etc., acquired by exchange from the Berlin Museum 
at various dates from 1884. 

'' Erbario Crittogamico Italiano." 

Series 1(1858-64), 1,200 si^ecimensin 24 fascicles; series ii (1864-81), 
1,100 specimens in 22 fascicles ; purchased at various times 1861-81. 

Eriksson (Jakob). [1848- ] 

"Fungi parasitici Scandinavici," 500 specimens in 10 fascicles 
(1882-95), purchased. 

Ernst (Adolf), [d. 1900] 

A small collection of plants from Caracas. 

Etienne (G.). 

" Mousses de la Normandie," 200 specimens in 4 fascicles (1870-74), 
purchased. 

Eulenstein (Theodor). 

" Diatomacearum species typicae," 100 microscope-preparations (1867), 
purchased 1868. 

Everett (A. H.). 

100 plants from Lombok, purchased 1896. 

Fabricius (Philipp Konrad). [1714-74] 

Plants from the Helmstadt Garden, of which he was curator, in Herb. 
Banks. 

Farlow (William Gilson). [1844- ] 

476 cellular cryptogams from North America, Hawaii, etc., presented 
at various times, 1889-1902. 

Farlow (W. G.), C. L. Anderson and D. C. Eaton. 

" Algae Americae borealis," 230 specimens in 5 fascicles (1877-89), 
purchased. 

l 2 



148 Botany, 

Fawcett (William). [1851- ] 

688 Jamaica phanerogams and 221 cryptogams, presented at intervals 
since 1887. 

Feilden {Col. Henry Wemyss). [1838- ] 

60 phanerogams from Disco, Greenland, presented 1876; 25 plants 
from Kolguev, presented 1896 ; 302 from Novaya Zemlya, presented 1898 ; 
45 plants^from the Cape, presented 1902. 

Feilding (J. B.). 

Malayan grasses, presented 1893. 

Fellman (N. J.). 

400 plants from East Lapland, purchased 1878. 

Fendler (August). [1813-83] 

1,729 phanerogams from New Mexico, purchased 1848-57 ; 182 ferns 
from Venezuela, purchased 1856 ; 128 ferns from Trinidad, purchased 
1878-80 ; 43 cryptogams from Trinidad, purchased 1880. 

Ferguson (William). [1820-87] 

Set of his Ceylon algae acquired with Herb. Dickie. 

Ferro (Giovanni Maria). [1603-73] 

Herbarium in three volumes, presented by the Director of Kew 
Gardens in 1890. See Journ. Bot., 1890, 278. 

Fiedler (Carl Friedrich Bernhard). [1807-69] 

" Musci frondosi," 150 Mecklenburg species in 3 fascicles (1842-43), 
purchased ; " Beitrage zur Mecklenburgiscben Pilzflora," 163 specimens 
in three parts, purchased. 

Fielding (E.). 

225 plants from Cordova, La Plata, purchased 1872. 

Fitzgerald (Robert David). [1831 ?-92] 
235 Australian orchids, presented 1883-91. 

Flahault (Charles Henri Marie). [1852- ] 

60 types illustrating the " Revision des Nostocacees heterocystees " of 
Bornet and Flahault, presented 1891. 

Fleischer (Max). [1858- ] 

"Musci Archipelagi Indici," 250 specimens in 5 fascicles (1898), 
purchased. 

Fleischer and Warnstorf. 

" Bryotheca Europaea meridionalis," two centuries of mosses (1896, 
1897), purchased. 

Florke (Heinrich Gustav). [1764-1835] 

"Deutsche Lichenen," 200 specimens in 10 fascicles (1815-21), 
purchased 1875. 

Fogg (S. A., Miss). 

132 Australian algae, purchased 1877. 



Botany. 149 

Forbes (Francis Blackwell). [1839- ] 
301 Chinese plants, presented 1875. 

Forbes (Henry Ogg). [1851- ] 

4,654 plants from the Eastern Archipelago, including types of the 
species described in his " Naturalist's Wanderings " and elsewhere, 
purchased 1879-88. 

Forbes (John). [1798-1823] 

317 plants from South Africa and Madagascar, purchased 1856. 
Forskai (Pehr). [1736-63] 

Numerous specimens (types for his " Flora ^gyptiaco-Arabica ") in 
Herb. Banks, and 180 plants acquired with Herb. Nolte, 1875. 

Forster (Edward). [1765-1849] 

Herbarium, principally of British plants, presented by Robert Brown. 

Forster (John Reinhold) [1729-98] and George. [1754-94] 
Plants collected during Cook's second voyage (1772-75) presented to 
Banks on their return; herbarium of George Forster purchased at 
Lambert's sale (1842), described by D. Don as his " entire herbarium, 
from which he published his Florula of South Sea plants " ; another set 
of G. Forster's plants is in Pallas's Herbarium, purchased at the same 
sale. In 1776 Banks bought for £400 all the drawings made during the 
voyage, 

Forsyth Major (Charles Immanuel). [1843- ] 
439 phanerogams from Madagascar, purchased 1896. 

Fortune (Robert). [1813-80] 

549 specimens of Chinese plants, purchased 1845-62. 

Fothergill (John). [1712-80] 

Numerous plants in Herb. Banks from his garden at West Ham. 

Fourcade (Charles). [1826 ?-91] 
672 Pyrenean plants, purchased 1864. 

Fraser (Charles). \d. 1831] 

Plants from the north-west interior of Australia, collected 1818. 

Fraser (Louis). 

352 South American plants, purchased 1860-61. 

French (Alfred). [1839-79] 

Herbarium of Oxfordshire plants, purchased 1880. 

Fries (Elias Magnus). [1794-1878] 

" Herbarium normale Plantae Scandinavicae," Cent. 1-10, purchased 
1875; "Scleromyceti Sueciae," 300 fungi in 30 decades (1819-22), pre- 
sented by the Council of the Linnean Society, 1896. 

Fries (Thore Magnus). [1832- ] 

"Lichenes Scandinaviae," 75 specimens in 3 fascicles (1859-()o), 
presented by the Council of the Linnean Society, 1896. 



150 Botany. 

Frivaldsky (Imre). [1799-1870] 

Oriental plants acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Fuckel (Karl Wilhelm Gottlieb Leopold). [1821-76] 

"Fungi Pthenani,'' edition i with 2700 specimens in 27 fascicles 
(1863-74), bequeathed with Herb. Broome, 1887, and edition ii with 
600 specimens in 6 fascicles (1874), purchased. 

Funck (Heinrich Christian). [1771-1839] 

"Cryptogamische Gewachse des Fichtelgebirgs," edition i (1800) 
incomplete ; edition ii, 865 specimens in 42 fascicles (1806-38), purchased 
1875. 

Funck (Nicolas) [1816-96] and Louis Joseph Schlim. 

Plants from Venezuela acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Gagliardi (G.). 

74 hepatics, 313 mosses and 665 lichens from the Siraplon Pass, 
presented 1863-64. 

Gaillard (A.). 

90 Venezuelan fungi, purchased 1890. 

Gamble (James Sykes). 

863 Indian plants, presented 1885-87. 

Gandoger (Michael). [1850- ] 

984 plants from North Africa, etc., purchased 1880. 

Gardiner (William). [1808-52] 

200 Forfarshire plants and 250 cryptogams, purchased 1850. 

Gardner (George). [1812-49] 

Ceylon plants acquired with Herb. Miers ; herbarium of Brazilian 
plants (5,746 species), containing numerous types described by him and 
other botanists, purchased from his executors, 1851. 

Garovaglio (Santo). [1805-82] 

"Muschi dell' Austria inferiore," 6 decades of specimens (1836), 
purchased 1899. 

Gasparrini (Guglielmo). [1804-66] 

Italian plants acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Gepp (Ethel Sarel, Mrs.). 

196 British marine algae and 111 slides, presented 1892. 

Gerard {Gen. Patrick). [1842- ] 

134 plants from the Western Himalaya, presented 1861. 

Germain (Philip). 

702 plants from Ohih, purchased 1857-68. 

Gerrard (William Tyrer). [d. 1866] 
1600 plants from Zulu-land, purchased 1865. 



Botany. 151 

Geyer (Charles Andreas). [1809-53 J 

GOO plants from Illinois, Missouri, and Oregon, purcliased 1845. 

Ghiesbreght (August). 

384 Mexican plants, purchased 1873. 

Gibson (Ernest). 

153 plants from Buenos Ayres, presented 1901. 

Gill (William John). [1843-82] 

A small collection of Chinese plants, presented 1877. 

Gillies (John), [d. before 1837] 

250 Chilian Compositae, purchased 1863 ; other specimens acquired in 
Shuttleworth collection. 

Golde and Meinshausen. 

811 plants from South Russia, purchased 1871-75. 

Gordon (James) \d. 1780]. 

Plants from his garden at Mile End (1753-76) in Herb. Banks. 

Gottsche (Carl Moritz). [1808-92] 

Many authentic specimens of hepatics described by him, acquired with 
Her}). Hampe in 1881. 
See Rabenhorst. 

Grabowsky (Henri Emanuel). 

407 plants from Borneo, purchased 1884. 

Graeffe (Eduard). 

209 ferns and 30 lichens from Samoa, etc., purchased 1874. 

Graells (Mariano de la Paz). [1818 ?-98] 

650 Spanish plants (" Herbarium Castellanum ") purchased 1872. 

Gray (Asa). [1818-88] 

Specimens of N. American plants, including many types, presented at 
various dates. 

Gray (Edward Whitaker). [1748-1806] 
Plants from Oporto, sent to Banks in 1777. 

Gray (Maria Emma, Mrs.). [1787-1876] 

149 alga3 from Swanage, presented 1861; 201 species, named by 
Agardh, presented 1870. 

Greene (Edward Lee). [1843- ] 
364 Californian plants, acquired 1885-1)5. 

Greenstock (W.). 

Collection from Natal, purchased 1880. 

Gregory (John Walter). [1864- ] 

Collections from East Equatorial Africa, collected by him and pre- 
sented 1893 ; plants from Dominica and Antigua, presented 1899. 



152 Botany, 

Gregory (William). [1803-58] 

His collection of diatoms, 1,434 slides, purchased 1866. 

Greville (Robert Kaye). [1794-1866] 

5,248 microscope preparations of Diatoms, containing his types, pur- 
chased 1866. 

Grey (Eliza Lucy, Mrs.). 

340 specimens of South Australian plants, presented 1841, 1845. 

Griffith (William). [1810-45] 

A large collection of Bhotan plants presented by the Hon. East India 
Company, 1849-50 ; 431 species of Malacca plants, purchased 1869. 

Griffiths (Amelia W., Mrs.). [1768-1857] 

780 specimens, representing 293 species of British sea- weeds, purchased 

1852. 

Gronovius (Johannes Fridericus). [1611-71] 

Herbarium containing Clayton's Virginian plants, purchased in 1794 
bv Sir Joseph Banks from John Earl of "Bute, who bought it for £90 in 
1778. 

Grove (Edmund). 

153 microscope preparations of diatoms from St. Vincent, presented 
1899. 

Groves (Henry). [1835-91] 

539 Italian plants, presented 1885-87. 

Groves (Henry, [1855- ] and James [1858- ] ) 

" Characeae Britannicae" (60 specimens in 2 fascicles), purchased 1892, 
1900 ; 78 British plants, presented from 1881 to the present time. 

Gruner (Leopold). 

927 plants from South Russia, purchased 1871. 

Gunn (Ronald Campbell). [1808-81] 
Tasmanian plants. 

Gussone (Giovanni). [1787-1866] 

Italian plants, acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Hackel (Eduard). 

72 specimens of Festuca, presented 1887. 

Haenke (Thadd^us). [1761-1817] 

See Presl. 
Hahn (Ludwig). [1836-81] 

988 plants from Martinique, purchased 1868-70 ; 149 plants from the 
Cape, presented 1876 ; mosses acquired with Herb. Bescherelle. 

Hall (Elihu). [1822-82] 

633 Oregon plants, purchased 1872 ; 850 Texan plants, purchased 1873. 

Hall, Harbour and Parry. 

700 i^lants of the Bocky Mountains, purchased 1864. 



Botany, 153 

Hamilton. 

See Buchanan. 

Hampe (Georg Ernst Ludwig). [1795-1880] 

Collection of 4,934 hepatics, purchased 1878 ; moss herbarium of 24,032 
specimens, purchased ] 881, each containing numerous types. The mosses 
and hepatics of his " Vegetabilia cellularia " were purchased with Herb. 
Shuttleworth in 1877. 

Hanbury (Daniel). [1825-75] 

Specimens chiefly of economic plants, presented 1853-72. 

Hance (Henry Fletcher). [1827-86] 

Herbarium containing 22,437 specimens, including types of the 
Chinese plants described by him, purchased 1887. 

Hansen. 

13 centuries (1,285 specimens) of plants from Schleswig-Holstein , 
purchased with Herb. Nolte, 1875. 

Hansen (George). 

1,596 plants from California, purchased 1896-99. 

Hardman (Lawrance). 

His entire collection of nearly 30,000 select diatoms, typical of all the 
most celebrated deposits, and mounted on 1,444 slides, purchased as part 
of Deby's collection in 1893. 

Hardwicke (Thomas), [d. 1835] 

247|plants from Mauritius, sent to Banks, 1811-12 ; 1,482 specimens 
of woods from South Africa and St. Helena, bequeathed 1836. 

Harlow (James), [fl. 1660-80] 

Plants collected in Jamaica, presented to Sloane by Sir John Rawdon. 

Harper (Roland McMillan). 

1,187 plants from. Georgia, purchased 1901-2. 
Hart (Henry Chichester). 

1,162 plants from Mount Sinai, etc., collected during the Palestine 
Exploring Expedition, acquired 1885. 

Hartman (Robert Wilhelm). [1827-91] 

" Bryaceae Scandinaviae," 450 specimens in 15 fascicles (1857-74), 
purchased. 

Hartweg (Carl Theodor). [1812-71] 

1,833 plants from California, Central and South America, presented 
1839-48. 

Harvey (William Henry). [1811-66] 

Numerous South African and Fiji phanerogams, purchased 1869 ; 
1,199 algae from Australia, the Friendly Islands, and Ceylon, acquired at 
various dates between 1857 and IDOO. 

Haslar Hospital. 

Collections received from, see p. 92. 



154 Botany. 

Hassan (Arthur Hill). [1817-94] 

His herbarium, containing 883 specimens, the types of his work on 
the " British Freshwater Algae," presented by his widow, 1894. 

Hauck (Ferdinand) [1849-89] and Paul Richter. 

" Phykotheka Universahs," 750 algae in 15 fascicles (1885-96), 
purchased. 

Haussknecht (H. Carl), [d. 1903] 

3,668 plants from Asia Minor and the Caspian region, purchased 
1870 ; 2,928 plants from Greece, purchased 1889. 

Havers (T.). 

82 plants from the Falkland Islands, presented 1874. 

Haviland (George Darby). [1857- ] 
1,031 Bornean plants, received 1893-97. 

Hayes (Sutton), [d. 1863] 

1,320 plants from Panama, purchased 1863-64. 

Hector {Sir James). [1834- ] 

200 New Zealand plants, presented 1876. 

Heldreich (Theodor von). [1822-1902] 

3,220 plants from Greece, purchased at various dates from 1845 to 

1897. 

Heifers (Johann Wilhelm). \d. 1840] 

Published set of Indian plants (" Fl. Indian Orient.") acquired with 
Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Hellbom (Pehr Johan). [1827-1903] 

750 lichens and 250 mosses from Scandinavia, purchased in 1872 and 
1891. 

Heller (A. Arthur). [1867- ] 

625 plants from New Mexico and 291 from the Hawaiian Islands, 
purchased 1895-97. 

Henriques (Julio Augusto). 

198 specimens of Portuguese plants obtained by exchange, 1887 ; 142 
plants from St. Thomas, "West Africa, presented 1888. 

Hepp (Philipp). [d. 1867] 

His cryptogamic herbarium containing 2,406 lichens, 778 mosses and 
1,640 algae, purchased 1868 ; also his " Flechten Europas," 962 specimens 
in 32 fascicles (1853-67), purchased 1874. 

Hermann (Paul). [1640-95] 

His herbarium in 4 vols, of Ceylon plants (with a few from the Cape 
of Good Hope). It was sent in 1745 by Augustus Giinther, an apothecary 
at Copenhagen, to Linnaeus, who based upon it his "Flora Zeylanica"; 
the specimens are named in Linnaeus's hand. It afterwards came into the 
possession of Count Adam Gottlob Moltke, at whose death it was bought 
by Prof. Treschow of Copenhagen, who sold it to Sir Joseph Banks for 
£75. A full account of its contents will be found in Journ. Linn. Soc. 



Botany. 155 

(Botany) xxiv, 129-155. A small collection from the Cape and plants 
from the Leyden Garden are in Herb. Sloane. 

Henry (Augustine). [1857- ] 

3,090 Chinese jjlants, purchased 1891, 1895. 

Herpell (Gustav). 

" Sammlung praparirter Hutpilze," 135 fungi, in 6 fascicles, 1880-92. 

Heudelot. 

117 plants from Senegal, purchased 1861. 

Hieronymus (Georg Hans Emo Wolfgang). [1846- ] 
177 plants from Argentina, purchased 1880. 

Hildebrandt (Johann Maria). [1847-81] 

1,700 plants from Arabia and East Africa, purchased 1873-84 ; 707 
plants from Madagascar, purchased 1883-4. 

Hill (John). [1716-75] 

Collection of British plants incorporated in the British Herbarium. 

Hillebrand (William). [1821-86] 

452 specimens of plants from the Sandwich Islands, acquired by 
exchange 1890. 

Hilsenberg (Carl Theodor) [1802-24] and W. Bojer. 

Collection of Madagascar plants, purchased 1830 ; 651 Madagascar 
plants, purchased 1863, 1873. 

Hirase (Y.). 

114 marine algae of Japan, presented 1901. 

Hobson (Edward). [1782-1830] 

" British Mosses and Hepaticae," 174 specimens in 2 volumes (1818 
and 1822). 

Hodgson (Elizabeth, Miss). [1814-77] 

Herbarium of North Lancashire plants as recorded in Journ. Bot. 
1874, presented. 

Hohenacker (Rudolph Friedrich). [1798- ] 

650 Caucasian plants, purchased 1846 ; " Algae marinae," 600 speci- 
mens in 12 fascicles (1852-62), purchased. 

Holl (C. Friedrich), Johann Karl Schmidt [1793-1850], and 
Gustav Kunze [1793-1851] 
" Deutschlands Schwaemme," 225 specimens in 9 fascicles (1815-19), 
purchased. 

Holl (Harvey Buchanan). [1820-86] 

295 British lichens, presented 1868 ; also his herbarium of lichens and 
mosseSj presented 1886. 

Holmes (Edward Morell). [1843- ] 

" Algae Britannicae rariores," 250 specimens in 10 fascicles (1883- 
1900) ; also 204 cryptogams, acquired 1876-1900. 



156 Botany. 

Home {Sir Everard). [1756-1832] 

141 plants from the east coast of China, presented 1843-44: ; 1,286 
plants from Australia and the Pacific, presented 1846 and 1853. 

Hooker {Sir Joseph Dalton). [1817- ] 

1,404 species, being all the phaenogamous and great part of the 
cryptogamous plants of New Zealand collected during the voyage of the 
Erebus and Terror, 1839-43, presented 1845-54. 

Hooker {Sir J. D.) and Thomas Thomson. 

6,246 Indian plants, presented 1855-61. 

Hope (Charles William Webley). [1832-1904] 
A collection of Assam ferns, presented 1889. 

Hoppe (David Heinrich). [1760-1846] 

"Hortus botanicus Ratisbonensis," 3 fascicles (1807-9), and "Fungi 
epiphylli," 2 decades (1809-10) ; published set of phanerogams ; all 
acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Homeman (Jens Wilken). 

Plants from Greenland and Lapland, acquired with Herb. Shuttle- 
worth and Herb. Nolte. 

Horrell (Ernest Charles). [1870- ] 

245 British mosses, mostly Sphagna, purchased 1903. 

Horsfield (Thomas). [1773-1859] 

Herbarium of Javanese plants, containing the types of Brown and 
Bennett's " Plantae Javanicae Ptariores," presented by the Directors of the 
Hon. East India Company, 1858. 

Hose (Charles). 

1,631 plants from Borneo and Celebes, purchased 1900-2. 

Hostmann (F. W.). 

1,168 plants of Surinam, purchased 1842-43. 

Houstoun (William). [1695-1733] 

His herbarium, drawings, and MSS. were bequeathed to Philip Miller, 
from whom they were purchased by Banks. Specimens grown by Miller 
in Chelsea Garden from seed sent by Houstoun are in Herb. Sloane 146 
and 316. The plants were collected by Houstoun in Jamaica, Havana, 
Vera Cruz and Campeachy, and are the types of numerous descriptions 
in Miller's " Gardeners Dictionary," ed. viii (1768), and of " Reliquiae 
Houstounianae " (1781). 

Howell (Thomas). [1842- ] 

197 plants from the Pacific coast, purchased 1886. 

Howie (Charles). [1811-99] 

" Musci Fifenses " (c. 1860), 112 specimens, purchased 1897. 

Huet de Pavilion (E. and A.). 

1,588 specimens from Sicily and the East, purchased 1854-67. 



Botany, 157 

Hugh {Father). 

3,707 plants from Central and Northern China, purchased 189G-1901. 

Humblot (Leon). 

596 plants from the Comoro Islands, purchased 1885-87. 

Hunt (Thomas Carew). [d. 1886] 

Plants from the Azores, acquired with Herb. Miers. 

Hunter (Robert). [1824 ?-97] 

A small collection of Bermudan ferns, presented 1877. 

Hurst (Henry Alexander). [1825 ?-82] 

409 plants from Gibraltar and Egypt, presented 1869-81. 

Husnot (Pierre Tranquille). [1840- ] 

" Musci Galliae," 900 specimens in 18 fascicles (1870-97) ; " Hepaticae 
Galliae," 231 specimens in 9 fascicles (1873-1901) ; also 106 Glumiferae 
and 270 cryptogams of the Antilles, purchased 1873 and subsequently. 

Huter (Rupert). 

2,698 European plants (Dalmatia, the Tirol, N. Italy and Spain), 
purchased 1867-80. 

Jack (Joseph Bernhard) [1818-1901], Ludwig Leiner 
[d. 1901], and Ernst Stizenberger [1827-95] 
•' Kryptogamen Badens," 1,000 speciniens in 21 fascicles (1860-66), 
purchased. 

Jackson (Frederick John). 

213 plants from East Africa, presented 1895. 

Jacquin (Nicolaus Joseph). [1727-1814] 

His herbarium, purchased by Banks and incorporated in the Banksian 
collection. 

Jaczewski (Arthur de), Waldimir L. Komarov and 
WoLDEMAR Tranzschel. 

" Fungi Rossiae," 350 specimens in 7 fascicles (1895-99), purchased. 

Jameson (Hampden Gurney). [1852- ] 

His herbarium of British mosses containing 3,121 specimens, purchased 

1899. 

Jameson (William). [1796-1873] 

2,757 phanerogams and 181 mosses from Columbia and Ecuador, 
purchased 1846-69 ; and a set of mosses acquired with Herb. Wilson. 

Jan (Georg). [1791-1866] 

" Flora Italiae super.," acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Jayakar (A. S. G.). 

188 plants from Arabia, presented 1899. 

Jenman (George Samuel). [1845-1902] 
630 plants from British Guiana, presented 1887-90. 



158 Botany, 

Jenner (Edward). [1803-72] _ 

Herbarium of freshwater algae, containing 6,000 specimens, purchased 
1893. 

Johnson (William). . n ^ • i 

" North of England Lichen-Herbarium," 360 specimens m 9 fascicles 

(1894-1900), purchased. 

Johnston {Sir Harry Hamilton). [1858- ] 
461 plants from Tropical Africa, presented 1885-93. 

Jones (Marcus E.). 

5,193 North American phanerogams and 445 cryptogams, purchased 
1884^98. 
Jordan (Alexis). [1814 ?-97] and others. 

1,800 rare French plants, purchased 1872. 

Joshua (William). 

His lichen herbarium, containing 1,464 specimens representing 97b 
species, purchased 1880; 1,039 microscope-preparations of cellular plants, 
purchased at various times, 1880-86. 

Joshua (W.) and E. M. Holmes. 

"Microscopical Slides of British Lichens," 48 specimens in one fasci- 
culus (1879), purchased 1880. 
Junghuhn (Franz Wilhelm). [1812-64] 

236 plants from Java, presented 1850. 
Jurgens (Georg Heinrich Bernhard). 

"Algae aquaticae" of East Friesland, 20 decades (1816-24), purchased 
1875. 
Jurgensen ( ). 

208 Mexican plants, purchased 1861. 

Juratzka (Jakob). [1821-78] 

Austrian and Hungarian mosses acquired with Herb. Hampe. 

Jussieu (Antoine Laurent de). [1748-1836] 
Plants from the Paris Garden in Herb. Banks. 

Kaempfer (Engelbert). [1651-1716] 

Japanese plants (collected 1691-92) in Herb. Sloane 211. The Coniferae 
form the subject of a paper by P. A. Salisbury m Journ. Science and 
Arts, ii, 309-314 (1817). 

Kassner (Theodor). 

1,029 Tropical African plants, purchased 1902. 

Kalbreyer (E.). 

230 plants from Wsstern Tropical Africa, presented 1878. 

Kalm (Pehr). [1715-79] 
. Specimens from Canada in Herb. Banks. 



Botany. 159 

Kamel (Georg Joseph). [1661-1706] 

A Jesuit missionary to the Piiilippines, sent a collection to Petiver in 
1701, which is now in Herb. Sloaae (vols. 153, 231, 233). A volume 
containing Kamel's figures and MS. descriptions of this collectiou (Bibl. 
Sloane 5,288) was transferred to the Department of Botany from that of 
MSS. in 1884 ; the descriptions were printed in the Appendix to vol. iii. 
of Ray's " Historia Plantarum," pp. 43-94. Other descriptions by Kamel 
form Sloane MSS. 4,078 and 4,081. 

Karelin (GhrIghoru SIluich) and Porphyrius KirilofF. 
A set of their collections in Central Asia, 1841-44. 

Karo (Ferdinand). 

348 plants from Dahuria, purchased 1892 ; 392 " Plantae Amuricae," 
purchased 1902. 

Karsten (Peter Adolf). [1834- ] 

" Fungi Fenniae," 1000 specimens in 10 centuries (1865-70), purchased 
1873. 

Keir (Walter), [fi. 1699] 

Sent plants from Malacca and China to Petiver, acquired with Herb. 
Sloane. 

Kellerman (William A.) and W. T. Swingle. 

" Kansas Fungi," 50 specimens in 2 fascicles (1889), purchased 1899. 

Kellogg (Albert). [1813-87] 

525 Californian plants, purchased 1873. 

Kerber (Ed.). 

689 Mexican plants, purchased 1884-85. 

Kerner von Marilaun (Anton Josef). [1831-98] 

90 critical Salices, purchased 1883 ; his " Flora exsiccata Austro- 
Hungarica," acquired at various dates. 

Kiggelaer (Franz). 

Collection of Cape plants, made in 1701, in Herb. Sloane. 

King {Sir George). [1844- ] 

6,391 Indian and Malayan plants, presented at various intervals from 
1886. 

King {Capt Philip Parker). [1793-1856] 

1,120 plants of extra-tropical South America, collected during the 
voyage of survey in the Adventure and Beagle, and presented by him 
1845 ; plants collected in Chili, 1826-27. 

King (Richard), [fi. 1833-36] 
See Back. 

Kirk (Thomas). [1828-97] 

700 New Zealand plants purchased 1883, and 89 presented later; 
hepatics acquired with the Stephani collection. 



160 Botany, 

Kitaibel (Paul). [1757-1817] 

Types of his Hungarian plants acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Kitton (Frederic). [1828-95]. 

*' Norfolk Diatoms," 50 slides in 2 series, purchased 1885 and 1893. 

Klonne (J.) and G. Muller. 

64 microscope-preparations of bacteria, purchased 1885. 

KneifF (Friedrich Gotthard) \d. 1832] and Emanuel Fried- 
rich Hartmann. 

"Plantae Cryptogamicae " of Baden, 200 specimens in four fascicles 
(1828-30), purchased 1871. 

Kneiff (Friedrich Gotthard) \d. 1832], and Maercker. 

" Musci frondosi," of Alsace, 250 specimens in 10 fascicles (1825-32), 
acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Kneucker (J. Andreas). 

Sets of German Cyperaceae, Juncaceae and Graminae, purchased at 
various dates. 

Knight (Charles). 

100 New Zealand lichens, purchased 1877. 

Koehne (Bernhard Adalbert Emil). [1848- ] 

" Herbarium Dendrologicum," 335 specimens purchased 1897-1900. 

Koenig (Johann Gerhard). [1728-85] 

Sent Indian plants to Banks, 1776 ; herbarium and MSS. bequeathed 
to Banks. 

Kotschy (Theodor). [1813-66] 

4,263 plants from the Orient, Levant, and Nubia, purchased 1840-67. 

Kralik (Jean Louis). [1813-92] 
395 plants from Tunis, purchased 1856. 

Krattli (J. L.). 

165 plants from the Engadine, purchased 1870. 

Krauss (Ferdinand). 

513 plants from Natal, purchased 1840. 

Krieg (David), [fl. 1699-1703] 
Maryland plants in Herb. Sloane. 

Krieger (Karl Wilhelm). 

" Fungi Saxonici," 1700 specimens in 34 fascicles (1885-1902), pur- 
chased; "SchadHche Pilze unserer Kulturgewachse," 100 specimens in 
2 fascicles (1896 and 1899), purchased 1899. 

Kutzing (Friedrich Traugott). [1807-93] 

" Algarum aquae dulcis Germanicarum decades xvi " (1833-36), 
purchased ; 835 marine algae, purchased 1867, and his entire collection 
of Diatomaceae, nearly 200 gatherings, purchased 1868. 



Botany. 161 

Kunze (Johann). [cl 1881] 

"Fungi select! exsiccati," 410 specimens in 8 fascicles (1875-79), 
purchased 1878-81. 

Kurz (SuLPiz). [1833 ?-78] 

_ 432 cryptogams of Burmah, presented 1874 ; other specimens acquired 
with the collections of Hampe and Stephani. 

La Billardiere (Jacques Julien Houton de). [1755-1834] 
Specimens from Australia in Herb. Banks, Herb. Brown, and Herb. 
Pallas; mosses and hepatics iu Herb. Bescherelle and Herb. Stephani. 

La Peyrouse (Philippe Picot). [1744-1818] 

Plants from Pyrenees in Merb. Poemt'r, acquired with Herb. Shuttle- 
worth. 

Laestadius (Lars Levi). [1800-61] 

06 species of Salix, purchased 18(39 from Herb. N. B. Ward. 

Lagasca (Maeiano). [1776-1839] 
A few plants in Herb. Banks. 

Lambert (Aylmer Bourke). [1761-1842] 

Among the purchases at the sale of his collections in 1842 were the 
herbaria of Pallas, Piuiz and Pavon, and George Forster, with Indian 
plants from F. Buchanan Hamilton, and plants from French Guiana 
collected by Martin, 

Lament (James). 

499 Hong Kong plants, presented 1874 ; 362 Australian phanerogams 
and 96 mosses, presented 1884, 1890-91 . 

Landor (A. H. Savage). 

70 plants from Tibet, presented 1898. 

Larbalestier (Charles Du Bois). 

"Lichenes Caesarienses et Sargienses," 280 specimens in about 
6 fascicles (1867-72), purchased 1868, 1873 ; " Lichen Herbarium," 
360 specimens in 9 fascicles (1879-81), purchased 1880 and subsequently; 
" Lichenes yEgyptiaci," 22 specimens, purchased 1880 ; a series of rare 
British lichens, purchased 1880. 

Lauterbach (Carl). 

108 plants from New Guinea, purchased 1898. 

Lawrence {Sir James John Trevor). [1831- ] 

Specimens of cultivated orchids, presented at intervals since 1885. 

Lawson (Isaac), [fl. 1737-47] 
Plants from Padua in Herb. Sloane. 

Lawson (John), [d. 1712] 

Carolina plants in Herb. Sloane. 

Lawson (Marmaduke Alexander). [1840-96] 
100 Indian plants, presented 1887. 
vol. i. m 



162 Botany, 

Lay (George Tradescant). \d. 1845] 

A small collection from Macao, collected during Beechey's voyage in 

1827. 

Lea (Thomas Gibson). [(7. 1849?] 

Cincinnati mosi^es acquired with Herb. Wilson. 

Lea (Thomas Simcox). 

§1,377 Australian plants, 125 from Hawaii and others from Brazil; 
presented 1886-87. 

Leche (Johan). [1704-64] 
Swedish plants in Herb. Banks. 

Ledebour (Karl Friedrich von). [1785-1851] 
A few ]dants in Herb. Banks. 

Leefe (John Ewbank). 

" Salictum Britannicum," purchased 1862. 

Lehmann (Friedrich Carl). [1850-1903] 

3,369 plants from Central and South America, purchased 1887-93. 

L'Herminier (Fi^lix Louis). [1779-1883] 

134 ferns of Guadaloupe, purchased 1873 ; a series of mosses from 
Guadaloupe in Herb. Hampe and Herb. Bescherelle. 

Leichardt (Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig). [1813-48] 

A collection of Australian plants, purchased 1858. 
Leighton (William Allport). [1805-89] 

"Lichenes Britannici," 410 specimens in 13 fascicles (1851-1867), 
and 230 Welsh lichens, purchased at intervals 1866-1875. 

Le Jolis (Auguste Francois). 

" Algues marines de Cherbourg," 280 specimens in 14 fascicles 
(c. 1863), purchased 1880. 

Lemmon (John Gill). 

2,284 plants from Arizona, etc., purchased 1882-86. 

Lesquereux (Leo). [1800 ?-89] 

North American plants, and cryptogams from the Jura, acquired with 
Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Libert (Marie Anna, Mdlle.). [1782-1865] 

" Plantae cryptogamicae " of the Ardennes, 400 specimens in 4 fascicles 
(1830-37), purchased 1866. 

Liebman (Frederik Michael). [1813-56] 
Mexican hepatics acquired with Herb. Hampe. 

Limminghe {Count Alfred de). \d. 1861] 

A large series of lichens, purchased 1862 ; among them are a number 
of specimens from Commerson, which were given by Jussieu to Dr. 
H. A. Weddell and by him given to Mr. Gray, who presented them to 
Gount Limminghe, 



Botany. 163 

Lindberg (Gustap Anders). [1832-1900] 

Brazilian Muscineae acquired with the collectious of Hampe and 
Steph'rini. 

Lindberg (Sextus Otto). [1835-1889] 

2,057 mosses, including many authentic specimens, from liis herbarium, 
purchased 1886. 

Lindberg (S. 0.) and E. Fr. Lackstrom. 

" Hepaticae Scandinavicae," 50 specimens (1874), purchased 1875. 

Lindeberg (Carl Johan). [1815-1900] 
"Hieracia Scandinavicae exsiccata," purchased. 

Linden (Jean Jules). [1817-98] 

1,143 plants from Columbia, purchased 1843-68. 

Lindheimer (Ferdinand). [1801-79] 
775 plants from Texas, purchased 1845-50. 

Lindig (Alexander). 

The types of his lichens from New Granada, 667 specimens, purchased 
1875 ; also the types of his mosses, acquired with Herb. Hampe. 

Lindsay (William Lauder). [1829-80] 

343 lichens and other cryptogams, presented 1871 ; plant-remains 
from New Zealand, Scotland, etc., presented 1874. 

Linhart (Gyorgy). [1844- ] 

" Fungi Hungarici," 5 centuries (1882-86), purchased 1899. 

Linnaeus (Carl). [1707-78] 

The herbarium of PAfJL Hermann {q.v.) contains the i)lants on 
which Linnaeus's "Fiora Zeylanica " is based, with names in his MS. A 
few specimens were obtained by Banks from the Linnaean herbarium by 
exchange with Sir J. E. Smith. Clifford's herbarium, containing the 
plants described by Linnaeus in the " Hortus Cliffortianus " (1737) was 
bought by Banks in 1791. 
See Clifford. 

Linton (Edward Francis) [1848- ] and William Richardson 
Linton. 

Sets of British Eubi, Salices, and Hieracia, purchased 1892, etc. 

Lister (Arthur). [1830- ] 

1,101 slides and 619 specimens, illustrating his Monograph of the 
Mycetozoa, presented 1894-1902 ; 110 British Mycetozoa with 36 coloured 
drawings, presented 1890. 

Llewelyn (John Dillwyn). 

99 freshwater algae and 129 lichens, presented 1889. 

Lobb (Thomas), [d. 1894] 

711 plants from Malasia, purchased 1846-48; 819 plants from the 
Eastern Archipelago, presented by H. J. Veitch, Esq., 1888; 400 plants 
from Borneo, purchased 1894. 

M 2 



164 Botany. 

Lobb (William). [1809-63] 

388 phanerogams and cryptogams from Western North America » 
purchased 1854. 

Loftus (AViLLiAM Kennett). [c. 1821-58] 

305 plants from Persia, Syria, etc., presented 1850-56. 

Lojacono-Pojero (Michele). [1853- ] 

1,000 Sicilian plants, purchased at various dates from 1880. 

Lojka (Hugo). 

" Lichenes Hungarici," about 450 specimens (1873, etc.), purchased. 

London (George), [d. 1713] 

His herbarium (1673), consisting largely of cultivated plants, in Herb. 
Sloane. 

Lord (Job), [fi. 1704] 

Carolina plants in Herb. Sloane. 

Lorentz (Paul Gunther). [1835-81] 

136 plants from Argentina, purchased 1878 ; mosses of Bavaria, etc. 
acquired with Herb. Hampe. 

Loureiro (Juan). [1715-96] 

Sent in 1774, a small collection of Cochin-China plants to his friend 
Capt. Riddel, in the E.I.C. service, who presented them to Banks. See 
Journ. Bot., 1902, 389. 

Lowe (Richard ThOxAias). [1802-74] 

68 plants of Mogador, presented 1859 ; part of his herbarium, con- 
taining a series of the typical plants of bis " Manual Flora of Madeira," 
bequeathed by him 1875. 

Lowne (Benjamin Thompson). 

550 plants from Palestine, purchased 1864. 

Ludwig (Christian Friedrich). [1757-1823] 

" Kryptogamische Gewiichse des Riesengebirge " (c. 1795), acquired 
with Herb. Shuttleworth in 1877. 

Lund ( ). 

228 plants from Finmark, etc., presented 1843. 

Lunt (William). 

156 plants from Hadramaut, Arabia, presented by J. T. Bent, 1894. 

Lyell (Charles). [1767-1849] 

1,673 cryptogams fiom his herbarium, including his reference-set of 
British hepatics, presented 1898-99. 

Lyle (Thomas), [d. 1859] 

Collection of mosses, acquired with Wilson's Herbarium. 

Lynch (Thomas Kerr). [1818-91] 

294 plants from Northern Persia, presented 1849. 



Botany, 165 

Lyon (Georgp: Jasper). [1816-62?] 

His herbarium, consistino- of 2,542 cryptogams from various quarters, 
piircliased 1862. 

Mabille (Jules P.). 

350 Corsican phanerogams, purchased 1872. 

McArdle (David). 

250 Irish hepatics, purchased 1900. 

Macarthur {Sir William), [fi. 1848-63] 
245 Austrahan plants, presented. 

Macartney {Lord). 
See Staunton. 

Macbride (ThoxAias H.). 

62 specimens of North American Mycetozoa, acquired by exchange, 
1892-94. 

McCormick (Robert). [1800-90] 

Collections formed during the Arctic and Antarctic expeditions, 
1827-53, bequeathed by him. 

MacGillivray (John), [d. 1867] 

795 plants from islands of the South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, 
purchased 1855-63, and 218 from Brazil and the Atlantic islands, pre- 
sented by the Admiralty, 1856. 

Macgrigor {Sir James), [ji. 1799-1829] 
Mauritius plants collected about 1820. 

Maclvor (William Graham). \d. 1876] 

"Hepaticae Britannicae," containing 132 species, purchased 1847. 

Macmillan (Conway). [1867- ] 

597 plants from Minnesota, acquired by exchange, 1896. 

Macoun (James Melville). [1862- ] 
240 Canadian plants, presented 1896. 

Macoun (John). [1832- ] 

2,087 ])hanerogams and 1,875 collected during the Geological Survey of 
Canada, and presented at various dates from 1887. 

MacOwan (Peter). 

910 South African plants, presented 1875-76. 

MacOwan (Peter), and Harry Bolus. 

A series of plants, forming their " Herbarium Austro-Africanum," 
acquired in 1885 and at various later dates. 

Macrae (James), [fl. 1823-30] 

1,079 plants of Ceylon and 320 from the Sandwich Islands, purchased 
1856. 



166 Botany. 

MacRitchie (William). [1754-1837] 

Scottish plants from R. Brown's Herbarium, acquired 187G. 

Macvicar (Symers M.). 

178 of the rarer hepatics Irom Scotland, presented from time to time, 
1899-1902. 

Maiden (Joseph Henry). [1859- ] 

372 plants, chiefly Australian, acquired by exchange, 1900-2. 

Maingay (Alexander Carroll). [1836-69] 
323 plants from Malaya, purchased 1871. 

Malbranche (Alexandre FRANgois). [1818-88] 

" Lichens de la Normandie " (1863), incomplete set of 100 specimens 
presented by the Council of the Linnean Society, 1896. 

Malcolm (William). [/. 1778-1805] 

Plants in Herb. Banks from his garden at Kensington. 

Malinvaud (Ernest). 

63 critical species of Mentha, presented 1900. 

Mandon (Gilbert). [1799-1866] 

1,250 plants from Bolivia, purchased 1868, and 458 from Madeira, 
purchased 1873 ; mosses acquired with Herb. Bescherelle. 

Mansel-PleydeH (John Charles). [1817-1902] 

191 plants from Uruguay, presented 1886, and numerous additions to 
the British Herbarium presented at various intervals. 

Maries (Charles), [d. 1902] 

209 Japanese plants, presented 1886 ; 420 plants from Gwalior, 
presented 1891. 

Markham {Sir Clements Robert). [1830- ] 

Specimens of Cinchona from the Government plantation at Ootaca- 
mund, presented 1873. 

Marschall von Bieberstein (Friedrich August). [1768- 
1826] 
Plants in Herb. Banks. 

Marsden (William). [1754-1836] 
Plants from Sumatra in Herb. Banks. 

Marshall (Edward Shearburn). [1858- ] 

A large series of specimens of critical British plants, presented at 
various intervals from 1888. 

Martin (Joseph). 

About 400 Guiana and Cayenne plants, purchased at Lambert's sale, 
1842 — "this collection was found in the French ship of \va.r VUnion^ 
a prize captured by two British privateers in 1803 " : 772 Guiana plants, 
presented 1847. 



Botany. 167 

Martius (Karl Friedrich Philip von). [1794-1868] 
134 Brazilian plants, acquired 1841 ; mosses in Herb. Hampe. 

Mason (Nathaniel Haslope). [ -I860?] 
400 Madeira plants, purchased 1858. 

Massee (George Edward). [1847- ] 
300 British fungi, presented 1891. 

Masson (Francis). [1741-1805] 

Was sent to the Cape from Kew Gardens in 1772 at the instance of 
Banks, and subsequently on other collecting expeditions ; his plants from 
all the localities visited are in Banks's Herbarium. He collected at the 
Cape in 1772-73 and again in 178G-95 ; in the Canaries and Azores, 
1776-78 ; in the West Indies, 1779-80 ; in Spain and Portugal in 1783 ; 
in North Africa, 1783 ; and in North America and Canada (where he 
died) in 1797-1805. There is also in the Department a volume of his 
drawings, from which descriptions of several new species have been 
drawn up. 

Masters (Maxwell Tylden). [1833- ] 

A small collection of Indian grasses and Cyperaceae, with original 
drawings by the late Dr. Wight, presented 1875. 

Mathews (Andrew), [d. 1841] 

Collections of Peruvian plants, purchased 1834 and 1840. 

MaunseU (F. R.). 

169 plants from Sivas, Asia Minor, presented 1898 ; 180 plants from 
Van, Armenia, presented 1901. 

Maw (George). [1832- ]. 

416 specimens of crocus with 72 specimens of corm-tunics, forming 
the collection illustrating his monograph of Crocus, presented 1885. 

Maximowicz (Carl Ivanovitch). [1827-91] 

1,539 Japanese and Manchurian plants, acquired by exchange, 1885. 

Maxwell (George). 

300 plants of South-Western Australia, purchased 1861. 

Maze (Hippolyte Pierre). [1818-92] 

1,509 marine algae, representing the species described in Maze and 
Schramm's " Algues de la Guadaloupe," purchased 1887. 

Meerseveen ( ). 

CuUection of Cape plants in Herb. Sloane, ]Hirchased 1757. 

Meisner (Karl Friedrich). [1800-74] 

Plants from various localities, with notes, acquired with Herb. 
Shuttleworth. 

Melvill (James Cosmo). [1845- ] 

157 plants, mostly Australian, and 44 algae from IMauritius, presented 
at various dates from 1881. 



168 Botany, 

Menzies (Archibald). [1754-1842] 

Plants from western Coast of America and Pacific Islands in the 
Banksian Herbarimn ; another collection, which included the herbarium 
of John Zier, was acquired by exchange from New College, Edinburgh, 
1886. 

Merrett (Christopher). [1614-95] 

A large number of plants, mostly from English and foreign gardens, 
were purchased by Sloane and are in his herbarium. 

Metz ( ). 

2,300 plants from the Nilgherries, etc., purchased 1867. 

Meyen (Franz Julius Ferdinand). [1804-1840] 

Mosses and hepatics from Manilla, acquired with Herb. Hampe. 

Miers (John). [1789-1879] 

His herbarium of phanerogams, containing the types of the species 
described in his numerous systematic works, together with an extensive 
series of South American plants collected by hnuself and others, sup- 
plemented by additions from other regions, Avith his oiiiiiual drawings 
and notes, bequeathed 1879. His fern herbarium, containing 2,006 
species, was presented by his son, J. W. Miers, Esq., in 1887. 

Migeod (J. W. H.). 

123 plants from West Africa, presented 1898. 

Migula (Walter), Paul Sydow, and Lars Johan Wahl- 
stedt. 

"Characeae exsiccatae," 150 specimens in 6 fascicles (1892-1901), 
purchased. 

Miller (Charles). [1739-1817] 

Sent plants from Sumatra to Banks in 1778. 

Miller (0. O.). 

266 plants from Margarita Island, Venezuela, purchased 1902. 

Miller (Philip). [1691-1771] 

His herbarium, consisting largely of plants cultivated in Chelsea 
Gardens, of which he was curator 1722-70, was bought by Banks in 
1774 and incorporated in the Banksian collection ; it contains the types 
of his " Gardeners Dictionary " and a large number of American plants 
from W. Houstoun. Other plants from Miller are in the Sloane 
Herbarium. 

Milligan (Joseph). [1807-1883?] 
529 Tasmaninn plants, presented 1863-68. 

Milne (William Grant). \d. 1866] 

112 plants from Old Calabar, purchased 1866. 

Mitchell (John), [d, 1772] 

Plants from Virginia in Herb. Banks. 



Botany. K'g 

Mitchell {Sir Thomas Livingstone). [1792-1855] 

485 plants from New South Wales, collected on an exiiedition into 
the interior and presented by him, 1847. 

Montagne (Jean Fran9ois Camille). [1784-1866] 

Many types of cryptogams acquired with the collections of Hampe 
VVilson, Bescheielle, and others. 

Moon (Alexander), [d. 1825] 

373 plants from Kandy, Ceylon, collected in 1819 and sent to Banks. 

Moore (Alexander Goodman). [1830-95] 

179 British plants and a set of Irish hepaticae, presented at various 
dates from 1863. 

Moore (Charles). 

333 Austrahan plants, presented 1868. 

Moore (David). [1807-79] 

Irish mosses, acquired with Herb. Wilson. 

Moore (Frederick William). [1857- ] 

Specimens of orchids cultivated in the Botanic Gardens, Dublin, 
presented at intervals from 1885. 

Moore (Spencer le Marchant). [1850- ] 

1,100 plants from Matto Grosso, Brazil, including the t3'pes of his 
enumeration in Trans. Linn. Soc, Ser. 2 (Bot.), iv, 265-516, purchased 
1894 ; 300 plants from Coolgardie, W. Australia, including the types of 
his enumeration in Journ. Linn. Soc. (Bot.) xxxiv (1899), purchased. 

Moore (Thomas). [1821-87] 

British Herbarium, presented by the Director of the Royal Gardens. 
Kew, 1887. • j » 

Moritz (Karl). [1796-1866] 

2850 Venezuela plants, purchased 1865 ; mosses and hepatics acquired 
with Herb. Hampe. 

Morong (Thomas). [1827-94] 

608 ])lants of Paraguay, purchased 1891-94. 
Moseley (Harriet), [d. 1867] 

Herbarium of British plants, accompanying her collection of drawings, 
purchased 1886. 

Mossman ( ). 

108 phanerogams and 107 cryptogams of New Zealand, purchased 
1850-51; 365 plants from King George's Sound, S. Australia, purchased 
1860. => o , ,1 

Mougeot (Antoine), Ch. Manoury, L. Dupray, and Casimir 
Roumeguere. 

"Algues de France," 13 centuries (1883-91), and 3 centuries of 
" Rehquiae Brebissonianae " (1886), purchased 1886-92. 



170 Botany. 

Mougeot (Jean Baptiste), [1776-1858], J. Antoine Mougeot, 
Christian Gottfried Nestler, [1778-1832], and Wilhelm 
Philipp Schimper [1808-80]. 
"Stirpes cryptogamae Yogeso-Rlieuanae," 1,500 specimens in 15 

fascicles (1810-60), purchased 1873. 

Mudd (William). [1830-79] 

" Liclienes Britannici " 300 specimens in 3 fascicles (1861), included 
in a purchase of 601 British lichens made in 1861 ; 80 specimeus illus- 
trating his " Monograph of the British Cladoniae," purchased 1865. 

Mueller {Sir Ferdinand Jakob Heinrich von). [1825-96] 

4,220 plants from Australia and New Guinea, presented at various 
dates from 1863. 

Mueller (Karl August Friedrich Wilhelm). [1818-99] 

Many types of mosses, acquired Avith the herbaria of Hampe and 
Bescherelle. 

Muller (Walther Otto). 

" Cladoniaceen von tSTord-Deutschland," 50 specimens, purchased 1870. 

Munby (Giles). [1813-76] 

208 jDlants from Algeria, purchased 1850. 

Murbeck (Svante Samuel). [1859- ] 
494 plants from North Africa, purchased 1898. 

Murray (Johann Andreas). [1740-91] 
A selection from his Herbarium, acquired 1872. 

Murray (Richard Paget). [1842- ] 

390 plants from Iberian Peninsula, purchased 1889 ; 400 from the 
Canaries, purchased 1898 ; 139 from the Canaries, presented 1900. 

Mussin Puschkin {Count Apollos). 

206 Caucasian Plants in Banksian Herbarium, received 1804. 

Nadeaud ( ). 

" Mousses de Tahiti," 81 specimens, purchased 1898. 

Naegeli (Karl Wilhelm von). [1817-91] 
300 specimens of Hieracia, purchased 1884. 

Neger (F. W.). 

" Uredineae Austro-Americanae," 50 fungi, issued as a supplement to 
Sydow's " Uredineen," purchased 1897. 

Nelson (David), [d. 1789] 

Austrahan, Cape, and Timor plants in Banksian Herbarium. 

Nichol (E., 3Irs.). 

S(^ plants from the Falkland Islands, presented 1899. 

Niven (James). [1774?-1826] 

South African plants in Banksian Herbarium. 



Botany. \ 7 1 

Noe (Wilhelm). 

"Herbarium Noeanum " (eastern plants), acquired with Herb. 

Shuttleworth. 

Nolte (Eenst Ferdinand). [1791-1875]. 

An extensive selection of plants from bis herbarium, incluaino- 
specimens from Forskal, Cavanilles, Delile, Thuillier, Allioni, etc., a 
complete set of Fries' Herbarium Normale, and Hansen's plants of 
Scldeswig-Hol stein, purchased 1875 (see p. 104). 

Nordstedt (Carl Fredrik Otto), [1838- 1 and Lars Joiiwn 
Wahlstedt. 

"Characeae Scandinaviae," 120 specimens in 3 fascicles (1871-71), 
purchased. 

Norman (George). [1823-82] 

155 microscope-preparations of Diatomaceae, purchased 1888, 1890. 
Norrlin (J. P.) and William Nylander. 

" Herbarium Lichenum Fenniae," 450 specimens in 9 fascicles (1875- 
82), purchased 1875 and subsequently. 

NuttaH (Thomas). [1786-1859] 

His herbarium containing 5,750 species, including tj-pes of the North 
American plants described in his works, purchased 1860. 

Nylander (William). [1822-99] 

1,279 species of lichens, purchased 1874-79 ; these include his 
" Herbarium Lichenum Parisiensium," 150 specimens in 3 fascicles 
(1855-57), and a series of 78 from the Eastern Pyrenees (1872). 

Nyman (Carl Fredrik). [1820-93] 

269 phanerogams and 100 mosses from Swedeu, purchased 18G5. 

Oersted (Anders Sandoe). [1816-72] 

Mosses of Costa Pica, acquired with Herb. Hanipe. 

Okamura (Kintaro). 

" Algae Japonicae," 50 specimens, purchased 1899. 

Oldenburg ( ). [d. 1774] 

About 1,000 Cape plants, collected 1772, in the Banksian Herbarium. 

Oldenland (Henrik Bernhard). [/. 1737] 

" Hortus siccus Capensis " sent to Petiver, and acquired by Sloane. 

Oldham (George). 

168 mosses from New Zealand, purchased 1862. 

Oldham (Richard). [1837-64] 

1,138 plants from Formosa, purchased 1866-70. 

Olguin ( ). 

309 plants from Kurdistan and Luristan, purchased 1854. 



172 Botany. 

O'Meara (Eugene), [c. 1815-80] 

His collection of Diatomaceae, 1155 microscope-preparations, purchased 
1882. 

Ommaney {Cajpt. H. T.). 

94 plants from Johannesburg, presented 1902. 

Orcutt (Charles Russell). 

824 Californian plants, purchased 1885-87. 

Orphanides (Theodor Georg). [1817-86] 
1,012 Grreek plants, purchased 1886-90. 

Ortega (Casimiro Gomez). [1740-1818] 
Plants in Banksian Herbarium, sent in 1777. 

Oudemans (Cornelius Anton Jan Abraham). 

"Fungi Neerlandici," 3 centuries (1875-79), purchased 1879-80. 

Oudney (Walter). [1790-1824] 
See Clapperton, Hugh. 

Packman (J. D. V.). 

260 plants from Tenasserim, presented 1844. 

Painter (William Hunt). 

1,730 British plants, presented at various dates from 1882. 

Pallas (Peter Simon). [1741-1811] 

His herbarium containing the types of Gmelin's Flora Sibirica and of 
Pallas's own publications ; also specimens from Thunberg, Banks, Forster, 
Steller, Georgi, Merk, &c. ; from 2,000 to 2,250 species, purchased at 
Lambert's sale, 1842. 

Palmer (Edward). [1833- ] 

3,196 plants from New Mexico and California, purchased 1886-99. 

Pancher (Jean Armand Isidore). 

880 plants fiom New Caledonia, purchased 1872. 

Paris (Edouard Gabriel). 

500 plants from North Africa, purchased 1871-72. 

Parish (Samuel B.). 

578 Californian plants, purchased 1883-98. 

Park (MuNGo). [1771-1805] 
A small collection of African plants. 

Parrv (Charles Christopher) [1823-90] and George Vasey 
fl822-93] 
1,962 Mexican plants, purchased 1882. 

Parry {Sir William Edward). [1790-1855] 
Plants collected during his Arctic voyages, 1820. 



Botany. I73 

Pavon (Jos6). 

South American plants acquired witli Herb. Slmttlewortli. 
See also lluiz and Pa vox. 

Pearce (Nathaniel), [c. 1780-1820] 

A small collection of Abyssinian plants made 1809-19. 

Pearce (Richard). \d. 1868] 

2,275 plants from South America, purchased 1885. 

Pearson (William Hexry). [1849- ] 

His herbarium of hepatics, about 9000 specimens, including the types 
of his book on the "Hepaticae of the British Isles" and of his other 
memoirs, purchased 1902. 

Percival (John). [1863- ] 

Set of European cereals, purchttsed 1902. 

Perrottet (George Samuel). [1793-1870] 

481 plants from Senegal, 256 from the Nilgherris, and 52 from 
Guadaloupe, purchased 1862-07 ; mosses acquired with the collections 
of Hampe, Bescherelle, Stephani and Wilson. 

Peters (Albert). 

400 European Hieracia, purchased 1885-86. 

Petiver (James), [d. 1718] 

His numerous and important botanical collections from many parts of 
the world, were purchased by Sloane and form part of his herbarium. 

Philippi (Rudolf Amandus). [1808- ] 
564 plants from Chili, purchased 1868. 

Phillips (LoRT, Mrs.). 

451 specimens from Somali-land, presented 1897. 

Phillips (William). [1822- ] 

"Elvellacei Britannici," 201 specimens in 4 fascicles (1874-81), 
bequeathed by C. E. Broome, 1886. 

Pichler (Thomas). 

300 species of Greek plants, purchased 1878. 

Piggot (Horatio). 

2,383 specimens of British and foreign lichens, including Dr. Bichard 
Deakin's herbarium, presented 1889 ; also 54 British fungi, presented 
1890-92. 

Pinard (C). 

Plants from Caria (1843), acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Pire (Louis). 

•' Mousses de la Belgique," 50 specimens (1870), purchased 1899. 

Pitcairn (William). [1711-91] 

Plants from his garden at Islington, in Kerb. Banks. 



174 Botany. 

Pittier (Henri de Fabrega). 

117 plants from Costa Rica, purcliased 1808. 

Pittoni (Giuseppe C. de). 

132 plants from South Europe, presented 1869. 

Plant (R. W.). 

100 South African plants, purchased 1853-57. 

Plo Wright (Charles Bagge). [1849- ] 

"Sphaeriacei Britannici," 3 centuries of Fungi (1873-78), purchased. 
Also 86 British Fungi, presented at various times, 1884-99. 

Plukenet (Leonard). [1642-1706] 

A folio volume, "Herbarium vivum" of cultivated plants. His 
principal collections are incorporated in the Sloane Herbarium. 

Pocock (Robert). [1760-1830] 

Herbarium of British plants, presented by his biographer, Mr. 
G. M. Arnold, 1884. 

Poeppig (Eduard Friedrich). [1798-1868] 

South American plants acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth ; crypto- 
gams with the collections of Hampe and Stephani. 

Pohl (JoHANN Emmanuel). [1782-1834] 

Brazilian plants, some acquired with Brown's herbarium. 

Polakowsky (Hellmuth). 

A set of his "Flora Costaricensis," purchased 1875. 

Poore (Dyke, Miss). 

117 marine algae from Jersey; purchased at various times, 1862-85. 

Porta (PiETRo) [1852- ] and Gregorio Rigo. [1841- ] 
1,611 Spanish and Balearic plants, purchased 1880-92. 

Post (George ED^yARD). 

1,655 Syrian plants, acquired 1878-1902. 

Powell (Thomas), [d. 1887] 

154 Ferns and other cryptogams from Samoa, presented 1899. 

Praeger (Robert Lloyd). [1865- ] 
480 British plants, purchased 1894. 

Prain (David). [1857- ] 

1,403 plants from the Calcutta Herbarium, acquired by exchange 
1899-1902. 

Pratt (Antwerp E.). 

771 plants from Szechuen and the Tibetan frontier, purchased 1891. 

PresGott (John D.). \d. 1837] 

757 plants, mostly Russian, purchased 1861. 



Botany. 175 

Presl (Karel Boriwog). [1794-1852] 

A small set of his "Reliquiae Haenkeanae" acquired with Ilerb. 
Shuttleworth. 

Preston (Thomas Arthur). [1833- ] 

294 British. plants, presented 1887-88. 

Prichard (H. Hesketh). 

130 plants from Patagonia, presented 1902. 

Priestley {Sir "William Overend). [1829-1900] 

A collection of British Carices, with the parts of the inflorescence and 
fruit carefully dissected and drawn, presented 1889. 

Pringle (Cyrus Guernsey). [1838- ] 

3,435 Mexican plants, purchased at various dates from 1S8G. 

Prior (Richard Chandler Alexander). [1809-1902] 

994 plants from Styria, Dalmatia, and Italy, and a large number of 
South African plants, presented 1868. 

Pritzel (Ernst). 

1,015 i)lants from West Australia, purchased 1901-2. 

Puccinelli (Benedetto). [1808-50] 
588 Italian plants, purchased 1868. 

Pulteney (Richard). [1730-1801] 

Herbarium of British plants, purchased 1863. 

Rabenhorst (Gottlob Ludwig). [1806-81] 

His published sets : " Algen Sachsens " and " Algen Europas," about 
2.600 specimens in 259 decades (1848-79) ; " Klotschii Herb. Mycolog. 
Ed. II," 800 specimens in 8 fascicles (1855-58) ; " Fungi Europaei," 
43 centuries (1859-79), continued by Winter, and subsequently by 
Pazschke; "Cryptogamae vasculares Europaeae," 160 specimens in 
5 fascicles (1858-72) ; " Bryotheca Europaea," 1,450 mosses in 29 fascicles 
(1858-84), completed by Winter; "Hepaticae Euro])aeae," 66 decades 
(1856-79), pubhshed by collaboration with Gottsche; "Lichenes 
Europaei," 974 specimens in 36 fascicles (1855-79) ; " Characeen Euro- 
pas," 121 specimens in 5 fascicles (1857-78), published by collaboration 
with Al. Braun and Stizenberger ; " Diatomaceae exsicc. totius terrarum 
orbis," 100 specimens (1871) ; " Lichenes Cliinenses," 36 specimens (1873). 
These were purchased at various dates from 1862. 

Ralfs (John). [1807-90] 

"British Algae," 40 specimens published c. 1850; his microscope 
preparations of algae, 3,137 slides, ]iresented by his son in 1890 ; his 
herbarium of cryptogams containing 1,968 specimens, purchased 1892. 

Ralph (Thomas Shearman). [1892?] 

167 plants from New Zealand, purchased 1854-59. 

Ramage (G. A.). 

172 plants from Brazil, purchased 1888 ; 485 plants from Dominica, 
presented by the Council of the Koyal Society. 



176 Botany. 

Rand (Isaac), [d. 1743] 

His herbarium, presented by the Apothecaries' Company, 1862, from 
which selections were made for the British collection. 

Rand (Richard Frank). [1856- ] 

988 plants from South Africa, presented 189S-1902. . 

Ravenel (Henry William). [1814-87] 

" Fungi Caroliniani," 5 centuries (1852-60) ; " Fung;i Americani," 
8 centuries (1877-82) ; his herbarium, consisting of 14,550 cryptogams, 
amongst which are the types of 152 new species, was purchased in 1891. 

Rawson {Sir Rawson William). [1812-99] 

2,000 South African and West Indian ferns, purchased 1900. 

Ray (John). [1627-1705] 

His herbarium of European plants, presented by the Apothecaries* 
Company, 1862. 

Reed (Edwyn C). 

773 plants from Chili, purchased 1875. 

Regel (Albert). [1815-92] 

663 Turkestan plants, acquired by exchange, 1885. 

Rehm (Heinrich). 

"Ascomycetes exsiccatae,'' 1,450 Fungi in 29 fascicles, in progress 
since 1874, purchased. 

Rehmann (Anton). 

2,176 phanerogams and 1,293 cryptogams from South Africa, pur- 
chased 1881-90. 191 plants from Cherson, purchased 1872. 

Rehmann (Anton) and Woloszczak (Eustache). 

"Flora Polonica exsiccata " (900 species), purchased 1895-1902. 

Reichenbach (Heinrich Gottlieb Ludwig). [1793-1879] 

" Florae Germaniae exsiccata " (phanerogams and cryptogams), 
purchased. 

Reichenbach (H. G. L.) and C. Schubert. 

" Lichenes exsiccati," 125 specimens in 5 fascicles (1822-24), incom- 
plete, purchased 1899. 

Reichenbach (Heinrich Gustav). [1823-89] 
107 Orchideae, presented 1876. 

Reid (Clement). [1853- ] 

393 specimens of fruits of British plants, presented 1885-1902. 

Reinsch (Paul Friedrich). 

59 microscope-pre|:arations of algae from the Cape and Kerguelen's 
Land, purchased 1876. 



Botany. 177 

Renauld (Ferdinand) and Jules Cardot. 

" Musci Americae septentrionalis," 350 specimens in 7 fascicles 
(1802-1901), purchased. 

Renous ( ). 

175 plants of Chili, purchased 1844. I 

Requien (Esprit). [1788-1851] 
Set of his Corsicau plants, purchased. 

Renter (Georges FRANgois). [1815-72] 

Spanish plants acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. I 

Richardson {Sir John). [1787-1865] | 

1,919 plants of North America, including types described in Hooker's I 

" Flora Boreali- Americana," presented by the Lords of the Admiralty 185G. I 

Richardson (Richard). [1663-1741] 1 

Plants in Herb. Sloane. I 

Ridley (Henry Nicholas). [1855- ] i 

750 plants from Pernambuco, presented 1887 ; 200 from Fernando | 

Noronha, presented by the Royal Society; 8,618 plants and 428 woods i 
from Malasia, presented at various dates from 1889. 

Robb {Br.). 

100 Calabar plants, purchased 1870. 

Robertson (James). 

Plants from Johanna Island, Bombay, Madras, China, and St. Jago, 
sent to Banks 1772-76. 

Robertson (James). 

194 plants from Honduras, purchased 1890. j 

Robinson (Benjamin Lincoln). I 

205 North American plants, presented 1895-1902. 

Robinson {Mrs.), [d. 1847] 

Herbarium of British plants, bequeathed 1847. i 

Roemer (Johann Jakob). [1763-1819] 

His herbarium, containing many types of Roemer and Schultes's 
" Sy sterna Vegetabilium," acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Rogers (William Moyle). [1835- ] 

617 specimens of South African plants, presented 1885 ; 65 specimens { 

of Rubi, presented 1898. I 

Rohr (Julius Philipp Benjamin von). [1737-93?] 

West Indian plants in Herb. Banks. j 

Remain (Ch.). ^ 

966 Algerian plants, purchased 1868. 
vol. I. N 



178 Botany. 

Romell (Lars). [1854- ] 

" Fungi exsiccati praesertim Scandinavici," 2 centuries (1890 and 
1895), purchased 1896. 

Roper (Feeeman Clarke Samuel). [1819-96] 

151 British plants, presented 1881-90; 538 American plants, presented 
1883 ; collection of diatoms, consisting of 3,580 slides, bequeathed 1896- 

Rosendahl (C. O.) and Carl J. Brand. 

100 plants from Vancouver Island, purchased 1902. 

Rossmassler (E. A.). [1806-67] 
166 plants from Spain, purchased 1856. 

Rostan (Edouard). [1835-95] 
650 European plants, purchased 1869. 

Rothery (Henry Cadogan). 
247 Guiana plants, presented 1845. 

Roxas (Clemente y Rubio Simon) [1777-1827] and Leblech. 

Plantas de Andalucia, 1803, acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Roxburgh (John), [ji. 1809] 
Plants from the Cape. 

Roxburgh (William). [1751-1815] 

Large collections from various parts of India and plants from St. 
Helena in the Banksian Herbarium ; others acquired with Herb. Shuttle- 
worth. 

Royen (Adrian von). [1705-79] 
Plants from East Indies in Herb. Banks. 

Roze (Ernest) [1833-1900] and Emile Bescherelle. 

" Muscinees des environs de Paris," 250 specimens in 10 fascicles 
(1861-66), purchased 1883. 

Rudbeck (Olof). [1660-1740] 
Plants from Lapland in Herb. Sloane. 

Rudge (Edward). [1763-1846] 

Arranged general herbarium of 4,138 species and 772 plants from 
Guiana collected by Martin, including many types described by Rudge, 
presented by Mrs. Rudge, 1847. 

Rugel (Ferdinand). [1806-79] 

240 plants from south Europe, purchased. 1874 ; a large collection of 
Florida plants, containing numerous types, forming part of the Shuttle- 
worth herbarium, purchased 1877. 

Ruiz (Lopez Hipolito) [1754-1815] and Jose Pavon. 

Herbarium containing 1,500-1,750 species, with a separate collection of 
fruits and of Cmchona barks, and the original MSS. relating to their 
travels in 1777-1788, jjurchased at Lambert's sale, 1842. 



Botany. X79 

Rusby (Henry Hurd). 

1,435 South American plants, purchased 1888-96. 
Russell (Alexander [d. 1768] and Patrick [1726-1805]) 

A large collection of plants from Aleppo in the Banksian Herbarium 
tlie types of the descriptions (by Banks and Solander) in the " Natural 
History of Aleppo," ed. 2, ii. 237-271 (1794). 

Ruysch (Frederick). [1638-1731] 

Herbarium formed in Holland about 1657, in Herb. Sloane. 
Ryan (John), [fi. 1797] 

West Indian plants in Herb. Banks. 

Sabbati (Liberato). [6. 1714] 

Herbarium in two folio volumes, dated 1768, transferred from the 
Department of MSS., 1871. 

Sabine {Sir Edward). [1788-1883] 

Plants collected in Arctic expeditions, 1818-20, from Herb. R Brown 
Herb. K. Forster, etc. ' 

Saccardo (Domenico). [1872- ] 

" Mycotheca Italica," containing 12 centuries of Fano-i (1898-1903) 
purchased. ° '^' 

Saccardo (Pier' Andrea). [1845- ] 

"Mycotheca Yeneta," 1600 specimens in 16 centuries (1874-81) 
purchased in 1875 and subsequently. 

Sadler (John). [1837-1882] 

360 British mosses and 150 lichens, purchased 1861. 

Sagot (Paul Antoine). [1821-89] 

954 plants from French Guiana, purchased 1868. 

Sagra (Ramon de la). [1798-1871] 
110 plants from Cuba, purchased 1872. 

Salisbury (Richard Anthony). [1761-1829] 

Plants from his garden at Chapel Allerton, in Herb. Banks. 
Salle (Charles). 

1,143 plants from Mexico, New Orleans, etc., purchased 1855-58. 
Salt (Henry). [1785?-1827] 

Collection of Abyssinian plants presented to Banks ; list by Pobeit 
Brown in appendix to Salt's " Voyage to Abyssinia," 1814. 

Salvador y Riera (Juan). [1683-1726] 

Plants from the Balearic Islands (1711-12), in Herb. Sloanc. 

Salwey (Thomas), [d. 1878] 

4 centuries of British lichens, issued under the title, " Licheues centum 
ex herbario T. Salwey," purchased at intervals, 1800-62. 

N 2 



180 Botany. 

Sartwell (Henry Parker). 

213 Carices of North America, purchased 1869. 

Saunders (James). [1839- ] 

147 phanerogams and 192 mosses, mostly from Bedfordshire, acquired 
1882-99. 

Saunders (William Wilson). [1809-79] 
A large collection of plants, purchased 1874. 

Sauter (Anton Eleutherius). [1800-81] 

Muscineae of the Eastern Alps, acquired with Herb. Hampe. 

Schaerer (Ludwig Emanuel). [1785-1853] 

" Lichenes Helvetici," 650 specimens in 26 fascicles (1823-52), 
purchased 1874 ; a second edition was acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Schaffner (S. Wilhelm). 

483 Mexican plants, purchased 1884. 

SchefFer (Rudolph Herman Christian Carel). [1844-80] 
276 woods from Java, presented 1872. 

Scheuchzer (Johann Jakob). [1672-1733] 

Grasses and other plants in Herb. Sloane. 

Schiede (Christian Julius Wilhelm) \d. 1836] and Friedrich 
Deppe. 

A set of their Mexican collections. 

Schiffner (Victor Felix). [1852- ] 

113 hepatics from the Malay Archipelago, purchased 1898. 

Schimper (Wilhelm). [1804-78] 

828 Abyssinian and Arabian plants, jmrchased at various dates from 
1841 ; 2000 Abyssinian plants, including all the types of his " 1863-68 " 
collection, purchased 1869. 

Schimper (Wilhelm Philipp). [1808-80] 

"Musci Europaei," 500 specimens (1840), purchased 1844; his 
"Pugillus Muscorum Europaeorum," 273 specimens, purchased 1865. 

Schinz (Hans). [1858- ] 

456 plants from various localities, chiefly South African, acquired by 
exchange, 1893-1902. 

Schlagintweit, the Brothers. 

2,050 plants from the Himalayas and Tibet, purchased 1886, 1900. 

Schlechter (Friedrich Reichardt Rudolph). [1872- ] 
3,317 South African plants, purchased at various dates from 1893. 

Schleicher (J. C). 

Published centuries of Swiss plants, acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Schlimm (Louis). 

465 plants from New Granada, purchased 1862. 



Botany, 181 

Schmitz (Friedrich). [1850-95] 

His collection of 7,457 microscope preparations of marine algae, being 
the types of his Florideae as classified in Engler and Prantl's " rflanzcn- 
familien," purchased 1899. 

Schomburgk {Sir Robert Hermann). [1804-65] 

2,341 plants from British Guiana, presented at various dates from 
1836. 

Schonland (Selmar). [1860- ] 

251 plants from South Africa, presented 1901-2. 

Schott (Arthur Carl Victor). [1814-75] 

1,000 plants collected in Yucatan in 18G5, purchased 1871. 

Schousboe (Peter Kofod Anker). [1766-1832] 

497 " Algae Schousboeanae," mostly from Tangier, collected by 
Schousboe and edited by Kralik and others, purchased 1883 ; 92 phane- 
rogams from Morocco, purchased 1873. 

Schrenk (Alexander Gustav). [1816-76] 
151 plants of Dzungaria, purchased 1880. 

Schultz (Friedrich Wilhelm). [1804-76] 

" Flora Germanica et Galliae " (1836-53), continued as " Herbarium 
Normale " (1856- ), purchased at various dates. 

Schultz (Karl Heinrich, Bipontinus). [1805-67] 
1,226 Compositae, purchased 1863-72. 

Schumann (Walther). 

208 Mexican plants, purchased 1889. 

Schwanecke (Carl). [1821- ] 

Mosses of Porto Eico, acquired with Herb. Hampe. 

Schweinfurth (Georg August). [1836- ] 

1,494 plants from East Africa and Arabia, juirchased at various 
dates from 1867 ; Tirolese plants, collected 1857, acquired with Herb. 
Shuttle worth. 

Scortechini (Benedetto). [1845-86] 

237 phanerogams and ferns from Perak, presented 1884-86. 

Seemann (Berthold Carl). [1825-71] 

450 plants from the South Sea Islands, etc., collected during the 
voyage of H.M.S. Herald (1852), and presented by Sir J. Liddell, C.B. ; 
594 plants of Fiji (" Plantae Vitienses "), purchased 1861 ; and upwards 
of 2,000 species from Eskimo-land, Panama, Mexico and Hongkong, being 
the types of "Botany of the Voyage of H.M.S. Herald" putchaseil 18G2; 
238 plants from Nicaragua, purchased 1867. 

Sello or Sellow (Friedrich). 

Brazilian plants collected 1815-17; others acquired with Herb. 
Shuttleworth, etc. 



182 Botany. 

Sendtner (Otto). [1814-59] 
Austrian and Dalmatian Muscineae. 

Seringe (Nicolas Charles). [1776-1858] 

" Mousses Helvetiques," edition i with S^decades (1804-6), and edition 
ii with 100 specimens (1809) ; series of Viola, with printed tickets and 
notes ; acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Seymour (Arthur Bliss) and F. S. Earle. 

" Economic Fungi," 590 specimens in 11 fascicles with supplement 
(1890-99), purchased. 

Shakespear (Roger). 

Plants from Jamaica and South America, collected 1777-82, in Herb. 
Banks. 

Sharpe (Daniel). [1806-56] 

105 plants from Portugal, purchased 1871. 

Shaw (G.). 

144 Madagascar ferns, purchased 1880. 

Sherard (William). [1659-1728] 
Plants in Herb. Sloane. 

Sherring (Richard Vowell). 

Collection of ferns from the island of Grenada, presented by the West 
India Exploration Committee, 1891. 

Shockley (W. H.). 

134 plants from North China, presented 1900; 180 plants from 
Siberia, presented 1901. 

Shoolbred (William Andrew). [1852- ] 
204 British plants, presented 1895-98. 

Short (Charles Wilkins) [1794-1863] 

406 plants from Kentucky collected by him, and presented by Sir 
John Eichardson, 1860. 

Shuttleworth (Robert James). [1810-74] 

His extensive herbarium, purchased 1877 ; for contents, see p. 105. 

Sibthorp (John). [1758-96] 
Plants from Greece in Herb. Banks. 

Sieber (Franz Wilhelm). [1789-1844] 

Plants from New Holland, Crete, and Martinique, purchased 1872. 

Siehe (Walter). 

842 plants from Asia Minor, purchased 1897-99. 

Simons (F. A. A.). 

82 East African plants, purchased 1877 ; 206 South American plants, 
purchased 1879-81. 



Botany, 183 

Sinclair (Andrew). \d. 1861] 

600 New Zealand plants, purchased 1858. 

Sintenis (Paul). 

500 European cryptogams, purchased 1882; 2,077 Oriental plants, 
purchased 1884-1902 ; 2,499 plants from Porto Rico, purchased 1899- 
1900. 

Small (John Kunkel). [1869- ] 

52 "Mosses of the Southern United States," and 58 "Lichens of 
North America," purchased 1898. 

Smeathman (Henry). [/. 1750-87] 

Plants from Sierra Leone and West Indies in Herb. Banks. 

Smith (A. Donaldson). 

456 plants from East Tropical Africa, presented 1895 anc 1900. 

Smith (Annie Lorrain, Miss). [1854- ] 

271 British marine algae and 112 slides, presented 1892-94; 84 
specimens and 78 microscope-preparations of British micro-fungi, pur- 
chased at intervals from 1894 to 1903. 

Smith (Christopher), [d. 1806?] 

Plants collected (with James Wiles) on Bligh's voyage to Otaheite, 
1791-93; and plants and drawings from the Moluccas, "1796-1805, in 
Herb. Banks. 

Smith (Christian). [1785-1816] 

Plants from Madeira, Tenerifife, etc. (1815), and the Congo (1816), 
described by K. Brown in the Appendix to Tuckey's " Narrative of 
Expedition to River Zaire," 1818. 

Smith (Hamilton L.). 

" Species typicae Diatomacearum," 750 preparations for the microscope, 
purchased 1888. 

Smith (Herbert H.) and George Whitfield Smith. 
[1860- ] 
635 plants from St. Vincent, collected by them, and presented by 
the West India Exploration Committee, 1891. 

Smith {Sir James Edward). [1759-1828] 

Plants in Herb. Banks from the Linnean Herbarium acquired by 
exchange with Banks. 

Smith (John). [1798-1888] 

His herbarium, containing upwards of 10,000 ferns and a large 
collection of flowering plants, chiefly garden specimens, purchased 
1865-66. 

Smith (John Donnell). [1829- ] 

670 plants from Guatemala, presented 1900. 

Smith (W. E.). 

110 plants from Orkney and Shetland, presented 1884. 



184 Botany, 

Smith (William). [1808-57] 

His collection of Diatomaceae, comprising 729 slides and 512 
diatomaceous earths. 

Smith (WoRTHiNGTON George). [1835- ] 

304 sjDecies of British Fungi, purchased 1871 ; and 47 Fungi and 216 
microscope-preparations, acquired at various times, 1877-99. 

Societas Unitatis Fratrum (Moravian Brethren). 

About 500 specimens sent to Banks from Tranquebar, 1775, 1778. 
See Journ. Bot. 1902, 388. 

Soleirol ( ). 

035 Corsican plants, purchased 1858. 
Solms-Laubach (Hermann 6rra/ 2m). [1842- ] 

Algarviau mosses (1866), acquired with Herb. Hampe. 

Somerset (Mary), nee Capel, Duchess of Beaufort. [1630?- 
1714] 
Plants from her garden at Badminton in Herb. Sloane. 

Sowerby (James). [1757-1822] 

His herbarium containing the types of the plants figured in *' English 
Botany," purchased 1859 ; models of 168 British Fungi, made by Sowerby 
during the preparation of his book on " English Fungi," purchased 1844. 
A Guide to Sowerby's Models, written by Mr. Worthington G. Smith, 
has been published by the Department. 

Spegazzini (Carlo). [1858- ] 

" Decades Mycologicae Italianae," 120 fungi (1879), purchased 1880, 
and "Hongos Sud- Americanos," 5 decades of Argentine fungi (1881), 
purchased 1882. 

Spruce (Richard). [1817-93] 

408 mosses and hepatics from the Pyrenees, purchased 1847 ; 4,235 
phanerogams and 2,467 cryptogams from the Amazons and Andes, 
purchased at various dates from 1851 ; 850 plants from the Tirol, 
purchased 1866. 

Statter (John Whewell). [1829-96] 

980 specimens of Australian and British plants, presented 1902. 

Staunton (Sir George Leonard). [1737-1801] 

A larse collection of plants made during Lord Macartney's embassy to 
China, 1793, and sent to Banks. 

Stenfort (F.). 

" Algues marines," 48 French Algae with text (1874), purchased. 

Stenhammar (Christian). [1783-1866] 

" Lichenes Sueciae exsiccati," edition ii, 240 specimens in 8 fascicles 
(1 860-65), presented by the C'ouncil of the Linnean Society in 1896. 

Stephani (Franz). 

11,920 hepatics, being a series of co-types from his herbarium and 
illustrating his numerous memoirs, purchased 1895, 1896. 



Botany. ISo 



Stewart (James). 

162 plants from Zambesi, purchased 1863. 

Strachey {Sir Richard) and James Edward Winterbottom 

[1803-54]. 

Himalayan herbarium (1,747 species), presented by the East India 
Company, 1852. 

Stfib^ny (V.) 

551 plants from Bulgaria, purchased 1894-1902. 

Strickland {Lieut. Walter). 

118 plants from West Africa and the Sandwich Islands, presented 
1850. 

Strickland (W. W.). 

202 British and 84 foreign fungi, presented at various times, 1888- 
1895. 

Sturt (Charles). [1796-1869] 

Australian plants, acquired with Brown's herbarium. 

Suksdorf (Wilhelm N.). 

674 plants from Washington Territory, purchased 1882-84, and 208 
from Colorado, purchased 1886. 

Sullivant (William Starling). [1803-73] 

" Musci Alleghanienses," containing 215 mosses and 77 hepatics, 
acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth in 1877; numerous specimens com- 
municated by him to Wilson and to Hampe are now incorporated in the 
general collection ; " INlusci Boreali-Americani," edition ii, prepared by 
Sullivant and Lesquereux, 536 specimens, purchased 1866. 

Swartz (Olof). [1760-1818] 

Plants (mostly from West Indies) in Herb. Banks ; Swartz worked in 
the Banksian Herbarium in 1786. See Journ. Bot. 1897, 20. 

Sydow (Paul). 

"Mycotheca Marchica," 49 centuries of German fungi (1888-99), 
purchased (century i was published by Zopf and Sydow) ; " Uredineen," 
1,650 fungi in 33 fascicles (1888, &c.), purchased ; " Ustilagineen," 300 
fungi in 6 fascicles (1894, &c.), purchased; " Phycomyceten uud Pro- 
tomyceten," 200 fungi in 4 fascicles (1897, &c.), purchased. 

Tate (Ralph). [1840-1901] 

269 plants from the Shetland Islands, purchased 1865; 323 plants 
from Nicaragua, purchased 1869. 

Taylor (James). 

100 plants from Davis Strait, purchased 1861. 

Taylor (Thomas), [d. 1848] 

Numerous types of mosses, hepatics and lichens, acquired with Herb. 
Wilson, 1873. 



186 Botany. 

Taylor (W. E.) 

1922 plants from East Tropical Africa, presented at intervals between 
1882 and 1888. 

Tedlie (Henry). [1792?-1818?] 

Plants collected during Bowdich's mission to Ashantee ; list on 
pp. 470-74 of the published account of the mission. 

Tempere (J.) 

" Genera des Diatomees," 150 microscope-slides^in 6 sets (1888-1900), 
acquired with the Deby collection in 1893. 

Tempere (J.) & Dutertre (E.). 

" Champignons de France," 250 microscope-slides in 10 sets (1892-93), 
purchased. 

Tempere (J.) & Peragallo (H.). 

" Diatomees du monde entier," 625 microscope-slides in 25 sets 
(1889-95), acquired with the Deby collection in 1893. 

Tempere (J.) & Petit (Paul). 

" Diatomees de France " (continued by Tempere & Peragallo), 400 
microscope-slides (1887-1900), acquired with the Deby collection in 1893. 

Tenore (Michele). [1780-1861] 

Italian plants, acquired with Herb. Shuttle worth. 

Thedenius (Knut Eredrik). [1814-94] 

"Musci Sueciae," fascicles 6 and 7 (1839), forming a continuation of 
the set published by Sv. Joh. Lindgren, and subsequently completed by 
Sillen, acquired with Herb. Hampe. 

Thomas (Emmanuel) [1788-1859] and Philippe Thomas. 

\d. 1831] 
Plants collected in Switzerland, Corsica and Sardinia, acquired with 
Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Thompson (John Vaughan). [fl. 1807-29] 
Plants from Madagascar. 

Thomson (Thomas). [1817-78] 
Indian plants. 

See Hooker and Thomson. 

Threde (H. C). 

" Algen der Nordsee," 100 specimens in 5 parts (1832-34), acquired 
with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Thumen (Baron Eelix Charles von). [1839-92] 

"Fungi Austriaci," 1,300 siDecimens in centuries (1871-75) ; "Mycotheca 
Universalis," 2,300 fangi in centuries (1875-84); "Pilze des Wein- 
stockes," 25 fungi (1878) : purchased at various times, 1872-84. 

Thunberg (Carl Pehr). [1743-1822]- 
Plants from Japan and the Cape in Herb. Banks. 



Botany, 187 

Thurn (Everard Ferdinand im). 

315 plants from Roraima, presented 1885. 

Thurston (Edgar). 

131 Indian marine algae, presented 1889, 1900. 

Thwaites (George Henry Kendrick). [1811-62] 
2,861 specimens of Ceylon plants. 

Tilden (Josephine E.). 

" American xilgae," 6 centuries, purchased. 

Tindall (Ella M., Mrs). [1850- ] 

267 microscope-preparations of British, hepatics, acquired by exchange, 
1894, 1895. 

Tiselius (Gustav August). [1833- ] 

" Potamogetones Suecici exsiccati," purchased 1895-97. 

Todaro (Agostino). [1818-92] 

Set of Sicilian plants, purchased at various intervals. 

Tonduz (Adolphe). 

878 plants from Costa Rica, purchased 1899-1902. 

Tournefort (Joseph Pitton de). [1656-1708J 

Collection from the Levant made about 1702; other collections in 
Herb. Banks. 

Tracy (S. M.). 

1,513 plants from Southern United States, purchased 1901-2. 

Trail (James William Helenus). [1851- ] 
160 palms from the Amazons,. presented 1876. 

Trevor-Battye (Aubyn Bernard Rochfort). 
94 plants from Kolguev, presented 1895. 

Triana (Jose Jeronimo). [1828-90] 

Herbarium of New Grenada plants, containing 4,490 species, pur- 
chased 1891. 

Trimen (Henry). [1843-96] 

Herbarium of British plants (about 3,000 sheets), presented in 1873, 
and specimens from Ceylon, etc., presented at various times. 

Trimen (Roland). [1840- ] 

192 plants from the Cape, presented 1871. 

Tuckerman (Edward). [1817-86] 

20 forms of Potamogeton from Northern United States, presented 
1849 ; " Licbenes Americae Septentrionalis," 150 specimens in 6 fascicles 
(1848-54), purchased 1875 ; 82 plants of New England, purchased 1875. 

TuUidelph (Walter). 

Plants from Antigua, collected 1729, in Herb. Sloane. 



188 Botany, 

Tweedie (James). [1775-1862] 

A collection of Buenos Ayres plants, purchased 18-16. 

Tyrrel (J. Burr). 

125 plants from Klondike, presented 1900. 

Tyson (William). 

401 algae from Cape Colony, presented from time to time, 1891-96. 

Ulef (Ernesto). 

" Bryotheca Brasiliensis," 2 centuries, purchased in 1891 and 1895 ; 
*' Herbarium Brasiliense," 445 cryptogams, purchased 1899. 

United States Exploring Expedition. [1853-56] 
106 lichens from the North Pacific, acquired by exchange 1899. 

Uvedale (Robert). [1642-1722] 

Plants from his garden at Enfield in Herb. Sloane. 

Vahl (Jens Lorenz Muestue). [1796-1854] 

Plants from Iceland, Greenland, etc., acquired with Nolte's herbarium. 

Vaillant (Sebastiex). [1669-1722] 

Plants from the Paris Garden in Herb. Banks. 

Van Heurck (Henri). 

400 Belgian plants, purchased 1864-70 ; " Types du Synopsis des 
Diatomees de Belgique," 550 microscope-slides in 22 series (1882-85), 
purchased. 

Veitch (Harry James). [1840- ] 

140 plants from Juan Fernandez, S. America, and Java from various 
collectors, presented 1877 ; 40 ]dants from Costa Rica, presented 1872 ; 
species of Nepenthes, presented 1876 and 1878. 

Veitch (James Herbert). 

138 plants from West Australia and 72 from Korea, presented 1893. 

Vere (James), [fi. 1798] 

Plants from his garden at Paddington in Herb. Banks. 

Vernon (William). [/. 1688] 

Plants from East Indies and Maryland in Herb. Sloane. 

Vestergren (Tycho). 

" Micromycetes rariores selecti praecipue Scandinavici," 625 specimens 
in 25 fascicles (1899, etc.), purchased. 

Vieillard (Eugene Deplanche Emile). [1824-75] 
256 plants from New Caledonia, purchased 1873. 

Vienna, K.K. Naturhist. Hofmuseum. 

"Kryptogamae exsiccatae," 8 centuries (1894-1002), acquired by 
exchange. 



Botany. 189 

Vize (John Edward). 

"Fungi Britannici," 2 centuries (1873, 1875), bequeathed by C. E, 
Broome, 1887; "Micro-fungi Britannici," fascicles iv-vi, 300 specimens 
acquired 1899; "Micro-fungi exotici," 40 specimens (1883), acquired 

1887, 

Vogel (Eduard). [1829-56] 

144 plants from Tripoli and Bornou, presented 185G. 

Volkens (W.). 

1,173 plants and 68 woods from Kilimanjaro, etc., purchased 1895. 

Waghorne (Arthur Charles). 

699 mosses, 597 lichens and 166 fungi of Newfoundland and Labrador, 
purchased at various times, 1893-99. 

Wagner (Hermann). 

" Cryptogamen-Herbarium," 125 specimens in 5 parts (1854-55); 
second series, 100 specimens in 4 parts (1854-62), bequeathed by C e' 
Broome in 1886, 

Wagner (J.). 

160 plants from the East, purchased 1894. 

Wahlenberg (Goran). [1780-1851] 

Lapland plants acquired with Herb. Shuttle worth ; Norwegian plants 
in Herb. Banks. 

Wainio (Edvard August). 

565 " Lichenes Brasilienses," purchased 1892. 

Walker {Lieut. -Col George Warren), [d. 1844] 
305 plants from Singaj^ore and Penang, presented 1862. 

WaUace (Alfred Russel). 

Ferns collected in Borneo, 1863. 

WaUich (Nathaniel), olim Nathan Wolff. [1786-1854] 

A collection of East Indian and Malayan plants, presented by the 
East India Company at dates from 1829 to 1849 ; 595 South African 
plants, presented 1844. 

Wallis (GusTAv). [d. 1878] 

Muscineae from the Philippines (1870) and New Granada (1871-75), 
acquired with the Hampe and Stephani collections. 

Walter (Thomas). [1740 ?-83] 

His herbarium (1786-88) containing many of the plants described in 
his " Flora Caroliniana " (1788) : it was presented by him to John Fraser, 
whose son gave it to the Linnean Society in 1849, and it was purchased 
for the Department at the sale of the Society's surplus collections in 1863. 

Ward (Nathaniel Bagshaw). [1791-1868] 

Collections from his executors, 1869, see p. 99. 



190 Botany, 

Warnstorf (Carl). 

"Europaische Torfmoose," series i-iv (1888-1894), 238 specimens, 
purchased 1900; " Deutschlands Lebermoose," 93 specimens (c. 1880), 
purchased. 

Warren (John B. L.). 

See De Tablet. 
Wartmann (Bernhard) [1830-1902] and B. Schenk. 

" Schweizerische Kryptogamen," 700 specimens in 14 fascicles 
(1862-69), purchased 1872 and 1896 ; also centuries viii and ix (1880, 
1882), edited by B. Wartmann and G. Winter, purchased 1896. 

Watt (George). [1851- ] 

74 species of Indian plants, presented 1886 ; Diatomaceae and other 
fresh-water algae collected by him in the Manipur expedition, presented 
1887. 
Weale (James Philip Mansel). 

Asclepiadaceae and Orchidaceae from Cape Colony, presented 1877. 
Weathers (John). [1867- ] 

545 specimens and sketches of orchids, purchased 1897. 
Webb (Philip Barker). [1773-1854] 

298 Canarian plants, presented 1844—45. 
Webster (Leonard). 

270 plants from West Australia, purchased 1902. 
Weddell (Hugh Algernon). [1819-77] 

213 lichens from his herbarium, presented 1874. 
Weir (John), [d. 1898] 

390 mosses, chiefly South American, purchased 1871 ; 64 lichens and 
74 New Granadao, and 51 Brazilian phanerogams, purchased 1872 ; also 
plants from Miers's herbarium. 

Welwitsch (Friedrich Martin Josef). [1806-72] 

1701 Portuguese plants, purchased 1848-58. 

The second set of his collections in Angola, etc., was acquired by the 
Trustees in 1876, in accordance with a decision of the Court of Chancery. 
These specimens are the types for the Catalogue of his plants prepared in 
the Herbarium by Mr. W. P. Hiern, Dr. Rendle, and other botanists, and 
issued by the Trustees in 1896-1901. 

West (William). [1875-1901] 

893 microscope-preparations of British fresh-water algae, purchased 
from time to time, 1898-1900. 

Westendorp (Gerard Daniell) and Wallays (A. E. P.). 

" Herbier Cryptoaamique," 1,400 Belgian cryptogams in 28 fascicles 
(1845-60), purchased 1871. 

Weymouth (W. A.). 

100 species of mosses from Tasmania, presented 1897. 
Wheler (Sir George). [1650-1724] 

Plants from Greece in Herb. Sloane. 



Botany, 191 

Whitehead (John). [1860-99] 

Collections of plants from the Philippines, presented 1895, 1897. 
Whitfield (Thomas). 

90 plants from West Tropical Africa, presented 1843-48. 
Whitmee (S. J.). 

52 plants from Ellice and Gilbert groups, 370 from Samoa, 148 from 
Lifu, Loyalty Islands ; purchased 1 878. 

Whyte (Alexander). 

220 plants from Milanji, E. Tropical Africa, enumerated and described 
in Trans. Linn. Soc. Bot., Ser. 2, vol. iv. 

Wickham {Capt. B.N.). 

170 Australian plants, presented 1842. 

Wight (Robert). [1696-1872] 
1100 Indian plants, purchased 1869. 

Wiles2(JAMEs). [fl. 1790-1805] 

Plants collected (with Christopher Smith) on Blio-h's vovao-e to 
Otaheite, 1791-93. "" " ° 

Wilkinson (Sir John Gardner). [1797-1875] 
400 species collected by him in Egypt, presented 1834. 

Willkomm (Heinrich Moritz). [1821-95] 
Spanish plants acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth. 

Wilms (Friedrich). 

2,073 South African plants, purchased 1898-1900. 
Wilson (John Bracebridge). [1828-95] 

523 Australian algae, presented 1885-93 ; his collection of Victorian 
algae, containing 1,485 sj^ecimens and 140 microscope-slides, purchased 
1896. 

Wilson (William). [1799-1871] 

His herbarium of British and exotic mosses and hepatics, consisting of 
upwards of 50,000 specimens, critically annotated and illustrated with 
innumerable pencil drawings. This large and important collection was 
purchased in 1873 ; in it are contained the materials upon which 
Wilson based his " Bryologia Britannica " (1855) and his descriptions of 
the mosses of Ross's Antarctic expedition, Seemann's "Voyage of the 
Herald," Drummond's mosses of the Southern United States, and other 
collections ; also numerous authentic specimens of the greatest utility 
from notable herbaria, and gatherings of mosses from mo'^t parts of the 
world (c/. Journal of Botany, 1875, p. 180). In 1874 Wilson s lichens 
and fungi and supplementary mosses were purchased ; in 1900, 437 of 
his British mosses were acquired by exchange from Warrington Museum. 

Wimmer (Friedrich). [1803-68] 

272 specimens of Salices, purchased 1871. 
Winterbottom (James Edward). [1803-54] 

See St R ACHE Y. 



192 Botany. 

Wirtgen (Philipp). [1806-71] 

732 critical plants from the Rhine region, purchased 1863-70. 

Wittrock (Veit Brecher). [1839- ] 
Set of critical Erythraeae, purchased 1886-91. 

Wittrock (V. B.), O. Nordstedt^ and Nils Gustap Lager- 
heim. [1860- ] 
"Algae aquae dulcis exsiccatae praecipue Scandinavicae," 1,400 
specimens in 29 fascicles (1877-96), purchased 1878-97. Lagerheim's 
connection with this set began with fasc. 26. 

Wolley-Dod {Major Anthony Hunt). 

1,866 South African plants, presented 1898-1902. 

Woloszczak (Eustache). 

" Flora Polonica exsiccata," purchased. 

Wood (Henry Hayton). [1825-82] 

Collection of mosses, chiefly British, purchased 1883. 

Wood (James Medley). 

2,339 South African plants presented and acquired by exchange from 
1884 to 1901. 

Woolward (Florence, Miss). 

Specimens of Masdevallia, presented 1889-99. 

Wooton (Elmer 0.). 

428 Mexican plants, purchased 1901. 

Wright (Charles). [1811-85] 

1,369 plants of New Mexico, purchased 1850-53 ; 2,127 phanerogams 
of Cuba, purchased 1865. 

Wright (Edward Perceval). [1834- ] 
Plants from the Seychelles, presented 1871. 

Wright (William). [1735-1819] 
Jamaica plants in Herb. Banks. 

Wyatt (Mary, Mrs.). 

" Algae Damnonienses," 237 specimens, chiefly from Devonshire, 
issued in 4 fascicles and a supplement (c. 1833-40), partly purchased 
from Mrs. Griffiths in 1852 and the rest acquired with Herb. Shuttleworth 
in 1877. 

Yates (James). [1789-1871] 

Collection of Cycadaceae, presented 1866. 

Yerbury (Major). 

57 plants from Aden, presented 1884-85. 

Young (Alfred Prentice). [1841- ] 

A large collection of Indian plants, presented 1884. 



Botany, 193 

Young (James Forbes). [1796-1860] 

His British herbarium and collection of cryptogams, transferred from 
the Kew Herbarimn, 1884. 

Young (William), [fl. 1753-84] 

Folio volume of Carolina plants collected in 1767 ; figures of the same 
in another volume. 

Zenker (Gkorg). 

1,515 plants from the Cameroons, purchased 1897-1902. 

Zetterstedt (Johan Emanuel). [1828-80] 

" Grimmieae et Andreaeae exsiccatae," 50 critical specimens, chiefly 
Scandinavian, acquired with Herb. Wilson in 1874. 

Zetterstedt (J. E.) and Wickbom (J. A. O.). 

50 phanerogams and 75 cryptogams of Scandinavia, purchased 1871. 

Zetterstedt (J. E. and P. L.). 

Published set of Norwegian phanerogams. 

Zeyher (Karl Ludwig Philipp). [1799-1858] 
1,500 plants from South Africa, purchased 1846. 

Zier (John), [d. 1796] 

Herbarium and MSS. acquired by exchange from New College, Edin- 
burgh. See Journ. Bot. 1886, 101. 

Zimmermann (Oskar Emil Rheinhold). \d. 1903] 

120 microscope-slides of fungi, purchased 1880. 

Zimmermann (Albrecht). 

180 Siamese plants, purchased 1901. 

Zollinger (Heinrich). [1818-59] 
697 plants of Java, purchased. 1857-58. 

GEORGE MURRAY. 



VOL. I. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 



o 2 



THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 



1. General Sketch. 



The collection of fossils was originally assigned to the com- 
prehensive Department of Natural History, which remained 
undivided until 1837, when Mr. Charles Konig, who had been 
Keeper since 1813, was relieved of the care of Zoology and 
Botany, and became Keeper of the newly-formed Department of 
Geology and Mineralogy. He had already displayed a predilec- 
tion for organic remains, having published an account of the 
fossil human skeleton from Guadaloupe in the Philosophical 
Transactions for 1814, and an illustrated work on some of the 
fossils in the British Museum under the title " Icones Fossilium 
Sectiles " (London, 1820). Mr. Konig was succeeded as Keeper 
by Mr. George Robert Waterhouse in 1851 ; and the Depart- 
ment gained additional strength by the appointment of Professor 
(afterwards Sir Richard) Owen as Superintendent of the Natural 
History Departments in 1856. With the help of Dr. Samuel P. 
Woodward, who had been Assistant since 1848, and Mr. William 
Davies, who had been an Attendant in the Museum since 1843, 
the collection of fossils and minerals had now become so 
important, that in 1857 the Department was further sub-divided 
into those of Geology and Mineralogy, Mr. Waterhouse 
retaining the Keepership only of the former. Immediately 
afterwards, in 1858, Dr. Henry Woodward was appointed an 
Assistant, and on the death of Dr. S. P. Woodward in 1865, he 
became chiefly responsible for the arrangement of the Inverte- 
brata, and devoted himself specially to researches on the 
Arthropoda. Mr. William Davies was occupied with the 
arrangement of the Vertebrata, working chiefly in association 
with Professor Owen, and in 1875 he was promoted to the rank 
of Assistant. On the retirement of Mr. AYaterhouse in 1880, 
Dr. Henry Woodward became Keeper of the Department of 
Geology ; and the removal of the collection to the new Natural 



198 Geology, 

History Museum at South Kensington then afforded the much- 
needed space for expansion. In 1881 Mr. Robert Etheridge 
■was transferred from the Geological Survey to fill the newly- 
established office of Assistant-Keeper of Geology, and the staff 
assumed its present number, namely, a Keeper, an Assistant- 
Keeper, and four Assistants. Mr. Etheridge retired in 1891 
after accomplishing much work on the collection of British fossil 
Invertebrata, and was succeeded as Assistant-Keeper by Dr. 
Arthur Smith Woodward, who had been an Assistant since 
1882, occupied with the arrangement of the fossil Vertebrata in 
general and the cataloguing of the fossil Fishes in particular. 
Dr. Henry Woodward retained the Keepership until the end of 
the century, installed the collection in the new Galleries, and 
arranged for the publication of a long series of Catalogues, 
especially of the fossil Vertebrata, which added greatly to the 
value and usefulness of the Department. 

Naturally the collection of fossils increased slowly at first, 
but during recent years its growth has amply kept pace with 
the more rapid progress of discovery and research. The first 
important addition to the original Sloane cabinet was Brander's 
collection of Upper Eocene shells from the Hampshire cliffs 
received in 1766. In 1813 it was enriched by the fossil man 
from Guadaloupe, which was deemed one of the most startling- 
discoveries of the time. In 1818 to 1822 Cuvier made some 
donations to illustrate his work on fossil bones, which was then 
attracting universal attention. Mantell similarly presented 
specimens to explain his pioneer discoveries in Sussex, until his 
whole Museum was purchased by the Trustees in 1839. The 
unexpected discovery of a hysena den at Klirkdale, Yorkshire, 
made classic by Buckland's description, was illustrated imme- 
diately by a donation from Messrs. Salmond and Gibson in 1823. 
The equally remarkable discoveries of marine reptiles in the Lias 
of Dorsetshire and Somersetshire were to be best appreciated 
by a study of the collection of Thomas Hawkins, which was 
purchased in 1834 and 1840. An Irish Deer was first mounted 
in the Museum in 1844, and the American Mastodon was 
acquired in the same year. At this period, indeed, the exhibition 
of extinct animals was beginning to be imposing, as may be 
realised by a reference to the early popular writings of Mantell. 

At the same time, stratigraphical geology and fossil Inverte- 
brata were by no means neglected. In 1816 the Museum was 
fortunate enough to obtain the original collection of fossils made 



Geology. 199 

by William Smith, the "Father of English Geology," to 
illustrate his work " Strata Identified by Organized Fossils," 
which was published in the same year. Private collections, like 
that of Gilbertson, were also acquired in rapid succession. The 
most important addition of this kind was James Sowerby's 
Collection, which was purchased in 1860, and contained most 
of the original British fossils described in his "Mineral Con- 
chology." 

As the British Dependencies and Colonies were gradually 
explored, nearly all the pioneer collections of fossils reached the 
Museum. Cautley presented his Vertebrata from the Siwalik 
Formation of India in 1840; Bain, Atherstone, and others sent 
fossil Reptilia from the Karoo Formation of South Africa ; Sir 
Thomas Mitchell, Sir Daniel Cooper, Dr. George Bennett, 
Mr. G. F. Bennett, and others contributed extinct Marsupials 
and other Vertebrata from Australia ; while the Hon. Walter 
Mantell and many other explorers in New Zealand sent 
important collections of remains of the extinct birds of that 
country. The Department of Geology, in fact, now comprises 
most of the original type-specimens of the fossil Vertebrata 
discovered in the British possessions. 

Discoveries abroad have also received much attention, and 
among unique acquisitions may be enumerated the Pomel and 
Bravard Collections of French Tertiary Vertebrata purchased in 
1851-52, the Archseopteryx purchased in 1862, the Van Breda 
Collection of Maastricht and other fossils purchased in 1871, 
and the Forsyth Major collection of Lower Pliocene Mammalia 
from Samos purchased in 1889-90. Even the Arctic Regions 
are well represented by fossils collected by the Nares expedition 
in 1875-76, by the McCormick Collection bequeathed in 1890, 
and by the Spitzbergen fossils obtained by Dr. J. W. Gregory 
during the Conway Expedition in 1896. 

During recent years many classic collections made by British 
palaeontologists have been acquired by the Department of 
Geology. Among these are the Egerton and Enniskillen 
Collections of fossil Fishes; the Leeds Collection of Oxfordiau 
Reptilia; the Davidson Collection of Brachiopoda ; the Brodie 
Collection of fossil Insects ; the Nicholson Collection of Stroma- 
toporoids ; the Williamson Collection of Carboniferous Plant- 
sections ; and the Rufford Collection of Wealden Plants; 
besides several others of less extent. 



200 Geology. 



2. A Chronological Account of the Principal Accessions 
TO THE Collection of Fossils in the Department of 
Geology to the end of 1900. 



The following list of acquisitions, arranged in chronological 
order, includes only those collections and noteworthy specimens 
which have proved of special importance in the progress of 
Palaeontology or are associated with its history. The records of 
the early years are unfortunately very incomplete. Under each 
of the later years, important general collections (if any) are 
mentioned first, while the other acquisitions are recorded approxi- 
mately in zoological order, beginning with the Mammalia. 

1753. 

The collection of fossils was begun by that contained in the 
Museum of Sir Hans Sloane, Bart., which in this year was 
purchased for the nation and formed the foundation of the 
British Museum. 

1759. 

On January 15th, the collections having been removed to 
Montague House, the Museum was opened for study and public 
inspection. 

1763. 

A piece of silicified wood from Antigua was presented by 
Mr. Andrew Lessly. Tertiary shells from Sicily were presented 
by Mr. Thomas Hollis of Corscombe, Dorset. 

1766. 

The series of Eocene shells and other remains from the 
Hampshire cliffs, collected and presented to the Museum by 
Gustavus Brander, F.R.S., was completed this year, and described 
in a special work by Dr. Solander ("Fossilia Hantoniensia, tfec," 
1776). 

1767. 

Some remains of Mastodon americanus, from the banks of the 
river Ohio, U.S.A., and a molar tooth of Mastodon humboldti, 



Geology. 201 

from an unknown locality in South America, were presented by 
the Earl of Shelburne. A mandibular ramus of M. americanus 
in this collection was described and figured by John Hunter, 
Phil. Trans., vol. Iviii. (1768), p. 34, pi. iv., figs. 1, 3; while 
the South American tooth was subsequently figured by Falconer 
and Cautley, "Fauna Antiqua Sivalensis," pi. xl., fig. 10, under 
the name of M. andium. 

1781. 
The Royal Society's collection of "natural and artificial 
curiosities," presented to the Museum this year, comprised 
several fossils. 

1784. 

A mandibular ramus of Mosasaurus cam/peri, froDi the Upper 
Cretaceous of Maastricht, was presented by Dr. Peter Camper, 
through Sir Joseph Banks, Bart. 

1791. 

A pair of antlers of Irish deer (Cerviis cjiganteiis), from 
Ireland, was presented by Lord Cremorne. 

1795. 
Tertiary shells and corals from Jamaica were presented by 
Dr. Broughton. 

1799. 

The bequest of Rev. Mordaunt Cracherode, containing many 
common fossils, was received. 

1813. 
A human skeleton in coral limestone from Guadaloupe, West 
Indies, captured on the taking of the Island from the French by 
Sir Alexander Cochrane, R.N., was presented by the Lords of 
the Admiralty. This specimen was described by Mr. C. Konig 
in Fhil. Trans., vol. civ. (1814), p. 107, pi. Hi. 

A skull of Bhinoceros antiquitatis from Siberia, was presented 
by Mr. Charles Elter. 

1816. 

Fossils from Wiltshire were presented by ^liss Etheldred 
Benett. They included sponges from the Upper Greensand of 
Warminster, figured in a small work by the donor. 

The British fossils collected by William Smith to illustrate 
his "Strata Identified by Organized Fossils" (181G), were 
purchased. 



202 Geology, 

1817. 

Miss Benett's donation was continued. 

" Specimens illustrative of the Mineral Geography of the 
South Downs, from G. A. Mantell, Esq." — apparently Dr. 
Mantell's first donation. 

"Four large specimens of Ichthyolites from Loughborough" 
(probably Dapedius orhis from the Lower Lias of Barrow-on- 
Soar), were presented by the Countess of Aylesford. 

Cretaceous fishes from the Lebanon were collected and 
presented by Lady Esther Stanhope. 

A skull of Bos primigenius from Athol, Perthshire, was 
presented by Mr. Da^dd Inglis, and subsequently described 
and figured in Owen's " British Fossil Mammals and Birds," 
pp. 501-2, figs. 208, 210. 

1818. 

Miss Benett's donation was continued. 

Various fossil remains from the Gypsum Quarries near Paris, 
were presented by the Administration of the Jardin des Plantes, 
through Baron Cuvier. 

1819. 

Part of the vertebral column of IcJithyosaurus, from Lower 
Lias, Lyme Begis, was presented by Sir Everard Home, Bart. 
Dr. Mantell's donation was continued. 

1822. 

Tertiary shells from Barbados were presented by Mr. G. B. 
Greenough. 

A series of coloured plaster casts of mammals from the Paris 
Gypsum, preserved in the Paris Museum of Natural History, and 
described and figured in Cuvier's *' Ossements Fossiles," was 
presented by Baron Cuvier. 

Fossil bones obtained by Mr. Whidbey from the cavern of 
Oreston, near Plymouth, were presented by Mr. William Clift. 
This is part of the first collection of cavern remains made in 
England. 

1823. 

Miss Benett's donation was continued. 

Fossil remains from the Kirkdale Cave, Vale of Pickering, 
Yorkshire, were presented by Messrs. William Salmond and 
John Gibson. 



Geology. 203 

1824. 

Mr. Gibson's donation was continued. 

Shells from the Crag of Suffolk and Norfolk were presented 
by Rev. G. R. Leathes. 

1825. 

Among the donations were : 

A tooth of Iguanodon in Wealden sandstone, from j\Ir. M. B. 
Durrant ; plaster casts of teeth of Iguanodon, from Dr. G. A. 
Mantell ; and " A new variety of the Nave Encrinite," from 
Mr. George Cumberland of Bristol. 

1826. 

A specimen of Ichthyosaurus from the Lias of Balderton, 
Nottinghamshire, was presented by Dr. Bland. 

1827. 

A Paramoudra (large flint) from the Chalk of Norfolk was 
presented by Rev. John Gunn. 

The Sommering collection was purchased. 

1828. 

Further donations were received from Dr. G. A. Mantell. 

Mr. J. S. Pratt of Bath, presented a specimen of the 
Lansdown Encrinite, described by Dr. J. E. Gray as Apiocrinites 
pratti. 

Fossils from the Braunston Crag, and fossil wood from the 
submerged forest of the Norfolk coast, were presented by Mr. 
Samuel Woodward of Norwich. 

Tertiary wood from Antigua was presented by Mr. J. A. 
Wood. 

Bivalve shells from the Coal-Measures of Newcastle, were 
presented by Mr. W. Norris of Bury. 

1829. 

Three teeth of Iguanodon in Wealden sandstone from Sussex, 
were presented by Dr. G. A. Mantell. 

Freshwater marl from the Isle of Wight containing seed- 
vessels of Chara, was presented by Mr. (afterwards Sir) Charles 
Lyell. 

Fossil plants from the Lower Oolites of Scarborough, were 
presented by Mr. John Williamson. 



204 Geology. 

1830. 

Mammalian remains from Kent's Cavern, Torquay, were 
presented by Rev. J. M'Enery. 

Nine fossil corals were presented by Mr. S. P. Pratt. 

A fossil cycad from Portland was presented by Miss Benett. 

1831. 

Tertiary shells from Italy, were presented by the Marquess 
of Northampton. 

A Pentacrinite from Farleigh, near Bath, was presented by 
Miss Benett. 

1833. 

Further donations were made by Dr. G. A. Mantell. 
Fossils from the London Clay of Highgate Archway were 
presented by Mr. N. T. Wetherell. 

1834. 

A collection of Liassic Ichthyosaurs and Plesiosaurs, illus- 
trative of Hawkins' " Memoirs on Ichthyosauri " (1834), was 
purchased from Mr. Thomas Hawkins. 

Plaster casts of the more important bones of Megatherium in 
the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, were presented by 
the President and Council of the College. 

Plaster casts of North American Trilobites, described in a 
Monograph by Jacob Green, M.D., were presented by Richard 
Harlan, M.D., and Jacob Green, M.D., of Philadelphia. 

Secondary fossils, chiefly from Purbeck, were presented by 
Mr. (afterwards Sir) W. C. Trevelyan. 

The John Finch Collection of Tertiary MoUusca from Mary- 
land, described by Thomas Say, Journ. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philad., 
vol. iv. (1824), pp. 124-155, pis. vii.-xiii., was purchased. 

1835. 

Coal-plants from Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, were presented 
by Mr. J. B. Ford. 

Fossils from the Carboniferous Limestone of Derbyshii^e were 
presented by the Marchioness of Hastings. 

1836. 

Silurian Trilobites were presented by the Earl of Cawdor 
and Thomas A. Knight, Esq. 



Geology. 205 

1837. 

A further series of Mammalian bones and teeth from the 
Kirkdale Cave, Yorkshire, was presented by Mr. W. Salmond. 

The first instalment of a collection of MammaHa {Bino- 
iherium, Mastodon, Arc), from the Lower Pliocene of Eppelsheim, 
was purchased from Dr. Kaup. 

Some fish-remains from the Oligocene of Canton Glarus 
Switzerland, were purchased through Prof. L. Agassiz. 

Numerous German Triassic and Jurassic fossils were purchased 
from Dr. Braun. Some English and French Jurassic and 
Cretaceous fossils were presented by Sir Henry T. De la Beche. 
A few Palaeozoic fossils, chiefly Brachiopods, from Tasmania, 
were purchased from Dr. J. Lhotzky. 

1839. 

The most important event of this year was the purchase of 
the collection of Wealden and Cretaceous fossils of Dr. Gideon 
A. Mantell, which had for some time been exhibited as the 
Mantellian Museum in Brighton. 

More German Jurassic fossils were purchased from Dr. 
Braun. A few Invertebrata, chiefly Lamellibranchs and Echino- 
derms, from the Tertiary of Malta, were presented by Miss 
Emilie Attersol. 

A few Cretaceous plant-remains from the Iguanodon quarry 
at Maidstone, were presented by Mr. W. H. Bensted. Lower 
Jurassic plant-remains from Yorkshire, were purchased from Dr. 
Peter Murray of Scarborough. 

A collection of silicified fern-stems {Psaronius, <fec.) from the 
Permian of Saxony, including the originals of Cotta's "Die 
Dendrolithen " (1832), was purchased from Dr. C. Bernhard 
Cotta. 

1840. 

The additions to the collection of fossil Vertebrata were 
specially remarkable this year. 

The extensive series of remains of Tertiary Mammalia 
collected in the Siwalik Hills, India, by Major (afterwards 
Colonel Sir) Proby T. Cautley, was presented by him to the 
Museum. 

Additional Liassic Ichthyosaurs and Plesiosaurs, illustra- 
tive of Hawkins' "Book of the Great Sea Dragons" (1840), 
were purchased from Mr. Thomas Hawkins. The type-specimon 
of Plesiosaurus rugosus, Owen, from the Lower Lias of Granby, 



206 Geology. 

Nottinghamshire, was presented by the Duke of Rutland. 
Specimens of Ichthyosaurus, from the Upper Lias of Whitby, were 
also purchased. 

Among fishes, the unique type-specimen of Holoptychius 
nohilissimus, Agassiz, from the Upper Old Red Sandstone of 
Perthshire, was purchased from Rev. James Noble. A slab of 
Keuper Sandstone from Coburg, exhibiting several specimens 
of Dictyopyge socialis, was also purchased. 

A fine slab of Lower Lias from Watchett, Somersetshire, 
covered with " aggregated iridescent ammonites " {Psiloceras 
2)lanorhis), was acquired by purchase. 

184L 

Remains of the cave bear (Ursus s]pelee.us) from the Sophia 
Cavern, Muggendorf, Franconia, were purchased through the 
Earl of Enniskillen. Bones of Pleistocene Mammalia from the 
caverns of Minas Geraes, Brazil, were purchased from Mr. 
Claussen. Fragments of Mastodon, &c., from Burma and from 
Perim Island, Gulf of Cambay, were presented respectively by 
Lieut. -Col. Burney and Miss Pepper. 

The type-skull of Steneosaurus hrevior, Tate and Blake, from 
the Upper Lias of Whitby, was purchased from Mr. Ripley. 

A slab of Petworth marble, from the Wealden of Sussex, 
was presented by Mr. George Thornton. 

The Gilbertson Collection of Carboniferous fossils from 
Lancashire and Yorkshire, was acquired by purchase for the 
Department of Zoology. 

1842. 

The MacEnery Collection of Pleistocene Mammalian remains 
from Kent's Cavern, Torquay, was purchased at a sale. Skulls 
of male and female Irish Deer {Cervus giganteus), from Ireland, 
were purchased through the Earl of Enniskillen. 

A skeleton of Pelagosaurus hrongniarti, a head of Ichthyo- 
saurus, and other fossils from the Upper Lias of Whitby, were 
purchased from Mr. Ripley. 

1843. 

A skeleton of the Irish Deer (Cervus giganteus), composed of 
the bones of several individuals, was presented by the Yen. 
Archdeacon Maunsell, and first mounted for exhibition in the 



Geology. 207 

following year. Some Mammalian remains from Kent's Cavern, 
Torquay, were purchased from Mr. Heggerty. 

Miss Baker's collection of Jurassic fossils and Pleistocene 
bones from Northamptonshire, was acquired by purchase. 

A few fossil Mollusca from Cutch were presented by Lieut. T. 
Postans. 

1844. 

The most important acquisition of this year was the series of 
remains of Mastodon americanus from Missouri, purchased from 
Mr. Koch. 

A further collection of fossil Mammalia from the caverns of 
Minas Geraes, Brazil, was purchased from Mr. Claussen. 

The Rev. C. Green's collection of Mammalian and other 
remains from the Forest Bed and other superficial deposits of 
the Norfolk coast, was acquired by purchase. Some Pleistocene 
Mammalia from the Thames Valley were purchased from Mr. 
Ball. 

A fine slab of Triassic flagstone from Turner's Falls, Massa- 
chusetts, U.S.A., showing tridactyle footprints, was purchased 
from Dr. Deane. 

1845. 

A very extensive collection of Pleistocene Mammalia from 
the province of Buenos Ayres, Argentina, purchased from Senor 
de Angelis, included among other specimens the greater part of 
the skeleton of Megatherium americanum, and a unique skull and 
mandible of Mastodon (andium or Immholdii). 

The unique skull of Eleplias ganesa, with large tusks, from 
the Pliocene of the Siwalik Hills, India, was presented by 
Captain (afterwards General Sir) William Erskine Baker, and 
was mounted for exhibition in the following year. A skull of 
Eleplias insigms, also from the Siwalik Hills, was presented by 
Dr. Hugh Falconer. 

A further purchase of fossil Mammalia from Eppelsheim was 
made from Dr. Kaup. A few Pleistocene Mammalian remains 
from Kent's Cavern, Torquay, were presented by llev. Upton 
Richards. 

Bones of Dinornithidse from New Zealand were purchased 
from Mr. Percy Earl. 

Numerous small purchases from dealers added much to the 
collection of fossil fishes. 

A selection of miscellaneous Jurassic fossils from the collec- 



208 Geology. 

tion of Dr. James R. Johnson, of Hot Wells, Bristol, includ- 
ing the type-specimen of Pentacrinus jolmsoni, was acquired by 
purchase. 

Portions of Pterijgotus angliciis from the Old Red Sandstone 
of Forfarshire, were presented by Mr. (afterwards Sir) Charles 
Lyell. 

1846. 

Important remains of Halitherium scUnzi, from the Lower 
Miocene of Hesse Darmstadt, were purchased from Dr. Kaup. 
Many Pleistocene Mammalia from Essex were also acquired by 
purchase. 

The type-skull of Crocodilus spenceri, from the London Clay 
of Sheppey, was purchased from Mr. E. Spencer. Two slabs of 
Triassic flagstone with Reptilian footprints {Brontozoum gigan- 
teum) from Greenfield, Massachusetts, U.S.A., were purchased 
from Miss Baker. 

The type-specimen of Cephalaspis lijelli, from the Lower Old 
Red Sandstone of Glammis, Forfarshire, was presented by Mr. 
(afterwards Sir) Charles Lyell. The type-specimen of Lepidotus 
fittoni, from the Wealden of Sussex, was presented by Mr. W. J. 
Martin. 

Some Australian Palaeozoic Brachiopoda, collected by Dr. 
Jeunneret, were presented by Lord Stanley. 

A fine specimen of Stigmaria ficoides, from Coal Measures, 
near Nottingham, was presented by the Duke of Rutland. 

1847. 

The collection of Tertiary Mammalia from Hesse Darmstadt, 
especially from Eppelsheim, received important additions by 
purchase from Dr. Kaup. Additional Pleistocene Mammalia from 
the Thames Valley, were also acquired by purchase. Remains of 
Elephas and Zeuglodon from Texas, U.S.A., were purchased at a 
public auction. The skull of the large Buhalus palseindicus, and 
other Pleistocene Mammalian remains from the Narbada Valley 
India, were presented by Mr. Charles Eraser. The type-skull of 
Mastodon perimensis, from the Pliocene of Perim Island, Gulf of 
Cambay, was presented by Captain G. Fulljames. 

A fine skeleton of Stencosaurus bollensis, from the Upper Lias 
of Boll, Wiirtemberg, was purchased from Dr. Kaup. 

Fossil fishes from the Old Red Sandstone of Scotland, were 
presented by Dr. Hugh Falconer and Mr. (afterwards Sir) 



I 



Geology, 209 

Norman M'Leod. Some fish-remains from the Siwalik forma- 
tion were presented by Major (afterwards Colonel Sir) Proby T. 
Cautley. 

A collection of Miocene shells and corals from Touraine, was 
purchased from Mr. Mathieu. Specimens of amber from the 
Baltic coast, containing insects and plant-remains, were pur- 
chased from Dr. Berendt. 

1848. 

Another instalment of Mr. Charles Eraser's donation of 
Indian fossil Mammalia was received. A few Mammalian 
remains from Perim Island, Gulf of Cambay, were presented by 
Dr. Buist. 

A large collection of Lower Tertiary Mammalia, with a few 
other vertebrate remains, from Auvergne, France, was purchased 
from the Abbe Croizet. 

Remains of an ostrich, Struthio asiaticus, from the Pliocene of 
the Siwalik Hills, India, were presented by Colonel Colvin. A 
large series of bones of Dinornithid^e, Aptornis, and other birds, 
collected by the Hon. Walter B. D. Mantell in the superficial 
deposits of New Zealand, was acquired by purchase. 

The type-specimen of Plesiosaurus doNcJwdeirus, from the 
Lower Lias of Lyme Regis, was purchased at the sale of the late 
Duke of Buckingham. Some Cheirotherian footprints from the 
Trias of Cheshire, were purchased from Mrs. E. Slone. 

A large and miscellaneous collection of fossils, chiefly from 
Germany and France, was purchased from Mr. Paul Mohr. It 
included a slab of Upper Lias from Wiirtemberg covered with 
fine examples of Pentacrinus. 

A few British Palaeozoic Brachiopoda were presented by Dr. 
Thomas Davidson. Some Paleeozoic Brachiopoda from the Arctic 
Regions were presented by Sir John Richardson. 

Some rock-specimens with fossil Mollusca and silicified wood, 
from the interior of Northern Australia, were presented by Sir 
Thomas Mitchell. 

1849. 

The first instalment of a large collection of British fossils, 
chiefly Jurassic and Cretaceous, was purchased from Mr. William 
Cunnington. Invertebrata from the Upper Greensand of War- 
minster, were purchased from Mr. John Baker. 

Some Pleistocene non-marine Mollusca from Copford, Essex, 

VOL. I. P 



210 Geology, 

were presented by Mr. John Brown, of Stanway. Upper Liassic 
Brachiopoda from Ilminster, were presented by Mr. Charles 
IMoore. A few fossils, chiefly Brachiopoda, from the Wenlock 
Limestone, were presented by Mr. John Gray, of Hagley. 

A series of Tertiary invertebrate fossils from Sind, India, 
was presented by Captain (afterwards General Sir) William 
Erskine Baker. 

1850. 

The most important general collection acquired during this 
year was that of Frederic Dixon, of Worthing, purchased from 
his executors. It consists chiefly of fossils from the Chalk and 
Eocene formations of Sussex, and includes many specimens 
described and figured in Dixon's " Geology and Fossils of 
Sussex." 

Among Yertebrata, Mr. Searles Wood presented his valuable 
collection of Reptilian and Mammalian remains from the Upper 
Eocene (or Oligocene) of Hordwell Clifl', Hampshire, including 
several described and figured specimens. Capt. Kellett and 
Lieut. Wood presented a series of Pleistocene Mammalia from 
Kotzebue Sound, Alaska ; and Mr. D. Sharpe presented a few 
similar remains from Erith, Kent, and Grays, Essex. The restored 
model of the shell of the giant tortoise, ColossocJielys atlas, from 
the PHocene of India, was completed under the direction of Dr. 
Hugh Falconer, and prepared for exhibition. 

Mr. S. P. Pratt presented Hippurites and Sph^rulites from the 
Cretaceous of France. Miscellaneous purchases included Miocene 
fossils from Malta, Chalk fossils from Kent and Norfolk, Oxford 
Clay fossils from Wiltshire, Silurian Trilobites and Crinoids 
from Dudley, and Devonian Corals and Stromatoporoids from 
Devonshire. 

185L 

The Pomel Collection of fossil Yertebrata, chiefly Mammalia, 
from the freshwater Tertiaries of Central France, including some 
described and figured specimens, was an important acquisition by 
purchase. A few similar Mammalian remains from the Mayence 
Basin were also purchased. Some well-preserved fishes of the 
genera Palseohalistum and Prolates, from the Upper Chalk of 
Mont Aime, Marne, France, were purchased from Baron Ponsort. 
An ischium apparently of Megalosaurus, from the Stonesfield 
Slate, was presented by Mrs. Townsend. 

Dr. J. J. Bigsby presented an important collection of Palseo- 



Geology, 211 

zoic Invertebrata from various localities in North America ; and 
Mr. J. N. Pearson gave some Ordovician brachiopods, corals, 
ifec, from Cincinnati, Ohio. The purchase of the Klipstein 
Collection added a valuable series of Invertebrata from the St. 
Cassian beds of the Tyrol, including specimens described in 
Klipstein's " Beitriige zur geologischen Kenntniss der Oestlichen 
Alpen," 1843. Among miscellaneous purchases, the acquisitions 
of Jurassic Invertebrata from France are noteworthy. 

1852. 

The general collection of about 2000 fossils bequeathed by 
Miss Cowderoy was received this year. It is especially rich in 
Eocene and Oligocene Mollusca from Hampshire and the Isle of 
Wight. 

Among Vertebrata, the most conspicuous donation was that 
of the " Fossil Fox of Oeningen " {Galecynus oeningensis, Owen), 
from Sir Roderick I. Murchison. About 300 mammalian remains 
from the Pleistocene of Essex, including some unique described 
and jSgured specimens, were presented by Mr. John Brown, of 
Stanway. A large collection of Mammalian remains from the 
Tertiary and Pleistocene beds of France was purchased from Mr. 
Auguste Bravard. Fossil fishes from the Miocene of Oran, 
Algeria, were purchased. 

Among Invertebrata, Sir Robert Schomburgk presented a 
good collection of Tertiary shells and rock-specimens from San 
Domingo, West Indies. Mr. Charles Darwin presented two 
South American fossil brachiopods, described in his " South 
America." Mr. George Tate, of Alnwick, presented some Car- 
boniferous and Permian brachiopods from the North of England. 
Mr. S. P. Pratt presented a few Nummulites from France and 
Spain. The numerous purchases included shells from the Tertiary 
beds of France and Italy, from the Cretaceous and Pakeozoic 
formations of Belgium, and from many British rocks. 

1853. 

A selection of about 100 vertebrate, and 1000 invertebrate 
fossils from the second collection of the late Dr. G. A. Mantell 
was purchased from his executors. Among other valuable speci- 
mens, it comprised many bones of Iguanodon from the Wealden 
of Brook, Isle of Wight. 

Two other general collections were obtained from abroad. 
jNIr. Daniel Hanbury presented some Devonian Brachiopoda 



212 Geology, 

from China, described by Dr. Thomas Davidson {Quart. Joimi. 
Geol. Soc, 1853), and also Pleistocene Mammalian teeth from 
Chinese caverns, which he had purchased in the apothecaries' 
shops at Canton. Mr. W. K. Loftus, a Boundary Commissioner, 
presented a collection of Cretaceous and Tertiary fossils, chiefly 
Hippurites and Nummulites, from Persia. 

The collection of fossil Mammalia was much enriched by a 
series of remains from the Pliocene of the Yal d'Arno, Italy, 
collected and presented by Mr. J. B. Pentland. A valuable 
series of mammalian remains, including skulls of the cave-bear, 
from the caverns of Sundwig, Westphalia, collected by Mr. B. 
Yan Becke, was purchased at a sale. The unique palate of 
Antliracothermm magnum, from the Lower Miocene of Flonheim, 
Hesse Darmstadt, was also acquired by purchase. 

Among Reptilia, the Wilcox Collection, chiefly Chelonia from 
the Purbeck Beds, was purchased. Some noteworthy specimens 
of Ichthyosaurus and Plesiosaurus, from the Lower Lias of Lyme 
Regis, were also added. 

The Astier collection of Mollusca, chiefly Cephalopoda, from 
the Cretaceous and Jurassic of the Basses Alpes, was obtained by 
purchase. A large collection of Belgian fossils was similarly 
acquired from Prof. L. G. de Koninck. Rev. P. B. Brodie presented 
some Jurassic insects and other remains ; Mr. N. T. Wetherell, 
some London Clay Gasteropoda; and Mr. S. P. Pratt, some 
Palaeozoic Brachiopoda from Spain. 

1854. 

A large collection of Pleistocene Mammalia from the Pampa 
Formation of the Argentine Republic was purchased from Mr. 
Auguste Bravard. 

Important additions were made to the collection of Hippurites 
from the Cretaceous of France and Portugal, notably a dona- 
tion from Mr. S. P. Pratt. Mr. Charles Stokes' collection of 
Silurian Cephalopoda from Drummond Island, Lake Huron 
(some described in Trans. Geol. Soc. London, 1824 and 1840), 
was purchased from his executors. Series of Russian Silurian 
Mollusca and Brachiopoda, and Polish Miocene Mollusca, were 
presented by Sir Roderick I. Murchison. Mr. H. W. Taylor's 
collection of English Chalk fossils was purchased from his 
executors. A large collection of Mollusca from the Miocene of 
Bordeaux, was purchased from Mr. Deshayes. Mr. Charles 
Darwin presented a few fossil Cirripedes. 



Geology, 213 

1855. 

The valuable collection of Lower Tertiary Vertebrata, made 
by Barbara, Marchioness of Hastings, was purchased this year. 
Besides other specimens from Montmartre, near Paris, and f i-om 
the Mayence Basin, it comprised about 1500 bones and teeth cf 
Mammalia and Reptilia from the Eocene and Oligocene of Hamp- 
shire and the Isle of Wight. 

A large collection of Silurian In\'ertebrata from Bohemia 
was purchased from Mr. J. Barrande. Many French Jurassic 
Mollusca were also purchased, some from Mr. Tesson. Anions 
British Jurassic fossils, the most noteworthy were some fine 
Apiocrini (Bradford Encrinites), purchased from Mr. Wood. 
Tertiary Echinoids from Sind and Java were presented respec- 
tively by Major (afterwards Sir) William Erskine Baker and 
Mrs. Pfeiffer. 

1856. 

The most important acquisition by purchase this year was 
the series of fossil bones of birds (chiefly the extinct Moas) and 
other animals collected by the Hon. Walter B. D. Mantell in 
New Zealand. The skeleton of Pachjornis elephantoims was then 
reconstructed by Prof. Owen from the new material in this 
collection. 

Mr. John Lubbock (now Lord Avebury) presented part of 
the skull of a musk ox {Ouibos moschatus) discovered by him in 
the Pleistocene Thames gravels at Maidenhead, Berkshire. Mr. 
J. M. Geils presented some remains of Elephas armeniacus from 
Asia Minor. 

Among numerous acquisitions of Invertebrata were two 
valuable donations of Tertiary fossils from Jamaica and the 
Canaries, presented by the Hon. Edward Chitty and Sir Charles 
Lyell, Bart., respectively. 

Total number of acquisitions, about 6700. 

1857. 

The Tesson Collection, consisting chiefly of fossils from the 
Jurassic formations near Caen, Normandy, was a remarkable 
acquisition. Besides Invertebrata, it comprised some well-pre- 
served fishes and unique remains of Teleosaurus and Pelagosauruts, 
some of the latter described by Deslongchamps. 

Valuable additions were made to the collection of Pleistocene 
Mammalia. Large series of bones and teeth of extinct marsupials, 



214 Geology, 

including Biprotodon, from superficial deposits in Australia, were 
purchased at a public auction. A skull of an Irish Deer was 
presented by the Earl of Enniskillen. Mammalian remains from 
a submerged forest, met with in excavating the Jarrow Docks, 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, were presented by Messrs. Harrison and 
Hodgson. 

The first vertebrae of the gigantic extinct lizard, Megalania 
prisca, were received with other fossil Mammalia from Australia. 
A skull of the Triassic Cijamodus (then named Placodus), pur- 
chased this year, proved that this animal was a reptile, not a 
fish, as previously supposed. 

A further instalment of the Barrande Collection was pur- 
chased. Donations chiefly of English Jurassic and Cretaceous 
Invertebrata were continued by Mr. S. P. Pratt. A collection 
of Tertiary Mollusca from Belgium was purchased from Mr. 
Binkhorst. Series of Tertiary Mollusca from India were pre- 
sented by Lieut.-Col. Sykes, from Madeira by Sir Charles Lyell, 
Bart., and Mr. James Yate Johnson. 

Total number of acquisitions, 9880. 



1858. 

The series of Pleistocene Mammalia w^as increased by the 
purchase of the large collection made by the Rev. John Layton 
from the Norfolk coast and the bed of the North Sea. Plaster 
casts of skulls of Diprotodon and NototJierium, from Australia, 
presented by the Trustees of the Australian Museum, Sydney, 
were also valuable additions. Among earlier Mammalia, a 
collection of remains of Dinotherium and other genera from the 
Middle Miocene of Sansan, France, was purchased from Mr. 
L. Saemann. 

Among purchases of extinct reptiles may be mentioned the 
type-skull of the giant turtle {Ghelone gigas) from the London 
Clay of Sheppey ; a Teleosaurian skull from the Upper Lias of 
Whitby ; various other Liassic reptilian remains, including the 
first skull of Dimorpliodon macronyx from Lyme Regis ; and some 
bones of Iguanodon from the Wealden of the Isle of Wight. 

A large collection of Cretaceous and Tertiary fossils from 
Switzerland and the adjoining parts of Germany, was purchased 
from Dr. Briickmann. About 200 Middle Eocene Mollusca 
from Stubbington, Hampshire, were purchased from Mr. Henry 
Keeping. 



Geology, 215 

1859. 

The largest collection acquired this year was that of York- 
shire fossils purchased from Mr. William Bean, of Scarborough. 
Besides numerous Invertebrata, this collection included an 
extensive series of Oolitic plants from Gristhorpe and Haibuin 
Wyke, some described by Brongniart, Lindley and Hutton, 
Phillips, and Bunbury. Count Strzelecki's collection of fossils 
from New South Wales, described in his work on that country, 
was also an important acquisition by purchase. 

Among Yertebrata, a series of skulls of Bos longifrojis, from 
the Irish peat-bogs, was presented by Dr. Wylde. A collection 
of fossil reptiles from the Karoo formation of South Africa, 
including the first evidence of the genera Ptijchognathus, 
Galesanrus, and Cynochampsa, was transmitted by Sir George 
Grey, Governor of Cape Colony. Some remains of Stagonolqns^ 
from the Trias of Elgin, were presented by Dr. James Taylor. 
Old Red Sandstone fishes from Tynet Burn, Banffshire, were 
presented by the Duke of Richmond. Oligocene fishes from 
Canton Glarus, Switzerland, were presented by Miss Elizabeth 
Warne. 

Among Invertebrata, British Cretaceous fossils were pre- 
sented by Mr. W. Cunnington, and specimens of the newly- 
described Carboniferous Crinoid, Woodocrinus, by Mr. E. Wood. 

Some examples of Calamites, from the Coal Measures of 
Saxony, were presented by Dr. Alexander Petzholdt to illustrate 
his memoir on that genus. 

Total number of acquisitions, 3550. 

1860. 

The Sowerby Collection, illustrating James Sowerby's 
" Mineral Conchology of Great Britain," was purchased from 
James de Carle Sowerby. It was the first extensive collection 
of type-specimens of British invertebrate fossils acquired by the 
Museum. 

The second instalment of the collection of Pleistocene Mam- 
malia and non-marine Mollusca made by Mr. John Brown, of 
Stanway, was bequeathed to Prof, (afterwards Sir Richard) 
Owen and presented by him to the Museum. 

Yaluable additions were also made to the collection of fossil 
Mammalia and Reptilia from the Siwalik Hills, India, by a 
donation from the Secretary of State for India. The fine skull 



216 Geology. 

of Elephas namadicus, from the Pleistocene of the Narbada 
Valley, figured in Falconer and Cautley's "Fauna Antiqua 
Sivalensis," was purchased from the United Service Museum. 

Among invertebrate fossils received were many donations, 
including Tertiary shells from South America,"^ from Mr. 
W. G. Lettsom; shells from a raised beach in Teneriffe, from 
Sir Charles Lyell, Bart. ; and PHocene shells from Tejares, 
Malaga, collected by Dr. Henry Woodward. 

Total number of acquisitions, about 10,000. 



1861. 

Few additions were made to the collection of fossil Mammalia. 
The most important was a series of remains of extinct Marsu- 
pialia from Australia, presented by Sir Daniel Cooper, Bart., 
and the Governors of the South Austrahan Museum. 

Among fossil Reptilia, the most important acquisition was 
the unique skeleton of Scelidosaurus harrisoni, from the Lower 
Lias of Charmouth, Dorset, purchased from Mr. James Harrison, 
who discovered and prepared the specimen. The first evidence 
of a Plesiosaurian from New Zealand (Pleslosaiirus australis of 
Owen) was received as a donation from Mr. T. H. Cockburn 
Hood. Three fine specimens of Ichthjosaiirus from the English 
Lias were purchased. 

Six specimens of Archegosaurus decheni, from the Lower 
Permian of Rhenish Prussia, were presented by Prof, (after- 
wards Sir Richard) Owen. The Lower Devonian Climatius 
scutiger and Acanihodes mitchelli, from Mr. James Powrie, were 
among the donations of fossil fishes. 

The greater part of the collection of Dudley Upper Silurian 
fossils made by Mr. John Gray, of Hagley, was purchased and 
formed the most important acquisition of Invertebrata during 
the year. The Gilbertson Collection of Yorkshire Carboniferous 
fossils (purchased 1841) was transferred from the Department of 
Zoology. A further instalment of the Cunnington Collection 
was purchased. 

A collection of fossil leaves from a Tertiary formation on the 
banks of the Mackenzie River, Canada, was presented by Sir 
John Richardson. Some Carboniferous plants from Zwickau, 
Saxony, were purchased. 

Total number of acquisitions, 5522. 



Geology, 2 1 7 

1862. 

This year was noteworthy for the acquisition of the Arclne- 
opteryx, which was purchased, with a large series of fossil fishes 
and reptiles from the Lithographic Stone of Solenhofen, Bavaria, 
from Dr. Hiiberlein of Pappenheim. 

A gigantic tooth of Pliosaunis grandis, from the Kimmeridge 
Clay of Dorset, was the jSrst of a long series of small donations 
from Mr. J. C. Mansel (afterwards Mansel-Pleydell). Footprints 
of Rhynchosaurus on Triassic sandstone from Brewood, South 
Staffordshire, were presented by Rev. Henry Housman. Tri- 
dactyle footprints from the Trias of Connecticut, U.S.A., were 
presented by Prof. E. Hitchcock. 

The first important remains of Labyrinthodonts, Capitosaurns 
and Trematosaurus, from the Trias of Germany, were acquired by 
purchase. A plaster cast of two associated vertebrie from the 
Coal Measures of Nova Scotia, named Eosaurus acadianus by 
Prof. O. C. Marsh, of Yale University, was presented by the 
discoverer — his first benefaction to the Museum. 

Among Invertebrata may be mentioned a new Hippurite 
(Barrettia monUifera) from the Cretaceous of Jamaica, presented 
by the discoverer, Mr. Lucas Barrett ; also many purchases, 
including Fterycjoius from the Upper Silurian of Lanarkshire, 
Crustacean remains from the English Lias, Gault, and Green- 
sand, many other Tertiary, Cretaceous, and Jurassic fossils from 
England, Asteroidea from the Lower Ludlow of Herefordshire, 
and a series of Silurian fossils from Ohio and Indiana, U.S.A. 

Many Carboniferous plants from Airdrie and Burdiehouse 
were also purchased. 

Total number of acquisitions, 3144. 

1863. 

An extensive selection from the Saull Collection was purchased 
from the Trustees of the Metropolitan Institution. Besides 
several important remains of fossil reptiles described by Prof. 
Owen, it comprised some of the invertebrate fossils described in 
Sowerby's " Mineral Conchology." 

Dr. J. W. (afterwards Sir William) Dawson, of McGill 
University, Montreal, presented a series of specimens to illustrate 
his recent discoveries of land-shells and small land-reptiles (or 
amphibians) in the decayed erect tree-trunks of the South 
Joggins Coal Measures, Nova Scotia. 



218 Geology. 

A second instalment of the Haberlein Collection was pur- 
chased, comprising chiefly Insecta, Crustacea, Cephalopoda, and 
Plant ae. 

Plaster casts of the much-discussed Neanderthal and Engis 
skulls were acquired by purchase. Some remains of Hyo^otanmSy 
from the Oligocene of the Isle of Wight, were presented by 
Mr. F. E. Edwards. 

Some fossil Chelonia were purchased from the collection of 
Prof. Thomas Bell. More remains of Plesiosaurus australis, and 
other extinct marine reptiles from New Zealand, were presented 
by Mr. T. H. Cockburn Hood. Supposed fossil eggs of reptiles 
from the Great Oolite of Cirencester were presented by Mr. 
Joshua Brown. 

A fine skull of the gigantic Labyrinthodont, Metopias 
diagnosticiis, from the Keuper of Wiirtemberg, was included in 
the Haberlein Collection. 

Numerous Jurassic and other English invertebrate fossils 
were purchased from the collections of Prof. John Morris and 
Mr. William Buy. Some almost unique specimens of Mero- 
stomata (Eiiryptcrus lanceolatus and Slimonia acuminata) from the 
Upper Silurian of Lanarkshire, and specimens of the newly- 
discovered Cambrian trilobite, Paradoxides davidis, were also 
purchased. Cretaceous fossils collected by Captain Mansell, R.N., 
in the Lebanon, were presented by Dr. J. D. (afterwards Sir 
Joseph) Hooker. Palaeozoic fossils, chiefly ferns, from Tasmania, 
were presented by Dr. Joseph Milligan. 

Dicotyledonous leaves from the Tertiary of Disco, North 
Greenland, were presented by Mr. J. W. Taylor. 

Total number of acquisitions, 3053. 

1864. 

The most important acquisition of this year was a collection 
of remains of Pleistocene Mammalia associated with human 
bones and implements, discovered by the Vicomte de Lastic in 
a cavern on the banks of the Aveyron, near Bruniquel, Tarn- 
et-Garonne, France. The collection was purchased from the 
discoverer. 

A nearly complete skull of the mammoth, Elephas p'imigenius, 
was extricated from the Thames brick-earth at Ilford, Essex, 
under the direction of Mr. William Davies and Dr. Henry 
Woodward. Anothei' important collection of Pleistocene Mam- 



Geology, 219 

malia, including Biprotodon, from Queensland, was presented by 
Sir Daniel Cooper, Bart. 

A fine collection of fossil Reptilia from the Trias of AViirtem- 
berg, including unique specimens of Belodon, Tcratosmirus, and 
Chelytlierium, was purchased from Dr. KapfF. The type-specimen 
of Plesiosmirus rostratus, from the Lower Lias of Charmouth, was 
also purchased. 

Very numerous additions were made to the collection of fossil 
fishes, especially to the series from the Devonian, Permian, 
Triassic, and Liassic formations. 

The first specimen of the supposed Laurentian Foraminifer, 
Eozoon canadense, was presented by Sir William E. Logan. The 
type-specimen of the Jurassic star-fish, Solaster moretonis, from 
the Great Oolite, was presented by the Earl of Ducie. Kemains. 
of Fterijcjotus anglicus from the Lower Old Red Sandstone of 
Forfarshire, were purchased. 

Total number of acquisitions, 4651. 

1865. 

The purchase of a large selection from the collection of Dr. 
J. S. Bowerbank secured for the Museum this year an important 
accession of British Mesozoic and Tertiary fossils, including 
many described specimens of various groups. In addition to the 
remains of animals, the collection comprised a very large series 
of fossil fruits from the London Clay of Sheppey. 

A plaster cast of the carapace of the gigantic extinct arma- 
dillo, Glyptodon reticulatus, from the Pampa of Buenos Ayres, was 
obtained by exchange with Prof. H. A. Ward. Actual bones of 
this animal and Megatheriiim, Toxodon, Mastodon, etc., from the 
Pampa formation of Buenos Ayres and Uruguay, were also 
presented by Captain John Parish, R.N., and Mr. David A. 
Stoddart. Other noteworthy acquisitions among Mammalia were 
skulls of Bos longifrons from Lough Gur, Limerick, presented by 
Mr. J. F. W. De Salis ; and a large tusk of mammoth, dredged 
off the coast of Norfolk, presented by Rev. Greville J. Chester. 

The unique skull of Pliosaurus grandis and the mandible of 
another Pliosaur, from the Kimmeridge Clay of Dorset, were 
presented by Mr. J. C. Mansel (afterwards Mansel-Pleydell). 
Important remains of Scclidosaanis and Pleslosaurus, with various 
fishes, Crustacea and MoUusca, from the Lower Lias of Charmouth^ 
were purchased from Mr. James Harrison. 



220 Geology, 

Some Cretaceous fishes collected in the Lebanon by Rev. 
Canon H. B. Tristram, were acquired by purchase. 

Among Invertebrata, the Saxby Collection, consisting chiefly 
of Cretaceous Mollusca from the Isle of Wight, was purchased. A 
nearly complete body of Pterygotus anglicus, from the Lower Old 
Red Sandstone of Forfarshire, was presented by Mr. James Powrie. 

Some Devonian plants from North America were presented 
by Dr. J. W. (afterwards Sir William) Dawson. 

Total number of acquisitions, 10,079. 

1866. 

Another collection of Mammalian remains, including evidence 
of a new gigantic kangaroo, Palorchestes, from the Pleistocene of 
Queensland, was presented by Sir Daniel Cooper, Bart. Other 
remains of Scelidotherium and Mylodon, with a nearly complete 
carapace and other fragments of Ghj^itodon^ from the Pampa 
formation of Buenos Ayres, were purchased. 

Additional Reptilian remains from the Kimmeridge Clay of 
Dorset were presented by Mr. J. C. Mansel (afterwards Mansel- 
Pleydell). A fine example of a new Plesiosaur {PJesiosaurus 
laticeps), a small Ichthyosaurus communis, and other remains of 
reptiles and fishes from the Lower Lias of Dorset, were acquired 
by purchase. 

Skulls of Capitosaurus and Trematosaurus from the Trias of 
Wiirtemberg, and a fine skeleton of Archegosaurus decheni, from 
the Lower Permian of Rhenish Prussia, were also purchased. 

A collection of Cretaceous fossils from Bogota, a series of 
Tertiary shells from the Vienna Basin, and some Silurian In- 
vertebrata collected by Dr. Gustaf Lindstrom in Gotland, were 
among the most important purchases of Invertebrata. A col- 
lection of Arenig fossils from Pembrokeshire was presented by 
Dr. Henry Hicks and Mr. J. W. Salter. 

Total number of acquisitions, 406 L 

1867. 

A large series of vertebrate fossils from the collection of the 
late Dr. Hugh Falconer, was presented by Mr. Charles Falconer. 
It comprised numerous remains of Proboscidea, the skull of an 
Irish Deer, bones and teeth of Hipjpojpotamus from Sicilian 
caverns, and a skull of Crocodilus hombifrons from the Siwalik 
formation of India. 



Geology, 221 

The type-skull of Dinotherium gigantemi, the type-skull of 
Borcatherium naui, and the type-jaws of Tajyirus prisms from tlie 
Pliocene of Eppelsheim, Hesse-Darmstadt, were obtained by 
exchange with Dr. T. Oldham, who had purchased them from 
Dr. Kaup. 

A fine head of Iclithyosaiirus platyodon, from the Lower Lias 
of Lyme Regis, a Pliosaurian paddle from the Portland Stone, 
a Pterosaurian wing-bone from the Purbeck Beds of Dorset 
and a series of reptilian and fish-remains from the Neocomian 
Phosphate Bed of Potton, Bedfordshire, were purchased. 

Among Invertebrata several specimens figured in Sowerby's 
" Mineral Conchology " were acquired by purchase towards the 
completion of the Sowerby Collection. Other type-specimens 
described in the Monographs of the Palaeontographical Society 
by Sharpe, Morris and Lycett, Edwards and Haime, and Duncan, 
were purchased. A few additional specimens figured in Dixon's 
" Geology of Sussex " ; Cambrian Trilobites described by Belt 
(Geol Mag., vols. iv. and v.) ; Neolimulus falcatus described by 
H. Woodward {Geol. Mag., vol. v.) ; and a few Carboniferous 
Crinoids described by Fort-Major Thomas Austin, were also 
purchased. Three type-specimens of Brachiopods from the 
Neocomian of Upware, Cambridgeshire, were presented by Mr. 
J. F. Walker. A series of fossil insects enclosed in amber from 
the Baltic coast was purchased. 

A series of Middle Eocene plant-remains, collected by Mr. 
Wm. Stephen Mitchell, from Alum Bay, Isle of Wight, was 
obtained by the aid of a grant from the British Association. 
Microscope-sections of fossil plants, made by Mr. William Nicol, 
were purchased from Mr. James Bryson. Carboniferous plants 
from Kosloo, on the Black Sea, and from ISTagpur, India, were 
also purchased. 

Total number of acquisitions, 9156. 

1868. 

Various important Mammalian remains, noticed by the late 
Dr. Falconer in his " Palaeontological Memoirs," were received as 
donations. Among these were some Pleistocene Mammalia from 
the Gower Caves, Glamorganshire, presented by Col. E. B. Wood ; 
an upper jaw of Hhinoceros etruscus from Tejares, Malaga, Spain, 
presented by Prof. D. T. Ansted ; and a mandibular ramus of 
Mastodon andium, from Chili, presented by the Trustees of the 
Canterbury Museum. Remains of Trogontherium, described in 



222 Geology, 

Owen's " British Fossil Mammals," were presented by Sir Charles 
Lyell, Bart. 

Valuable acquisitions by purchase, from the Lower Lias 
of Lyme Regis, included the greater part of the skeleton of a 
Pterodactyl, Dimorphodon macronyx, and a nearly complete skeleton 
of Ichthyosaurus tenuirostris — both subsequently described by Owen 
in the Monographs of the Pahieontographical Society. The type- 
skull of Placodus gigas from the Bavarian Muschelkalk was 
also purchased. Mr. Mansel-Pleydell continued his donations of 
Kimmeridgian Reptilian remains. 

An important small collection of Yertebrata, including the 
skeleton of a Rodent, remains of Coluber, Crocodiliis, and Palseo- 
hatrachus, from the Miocene Lignite of Rott, near Bonn, was 
purchased. With this collection were about 150 fossil insects, 
including many described by Von Heyden and H. Hagen in 
Palaeontographica, vols, viii., x., and xiv. 

A very fine slab of Pentacrinus fossilis from the Lower Lias 
of Lyme Regis, and many Hippurites from the Cretaceous of 
Aude, France, were purchased. Some type-specimens of brachio- 
pods, from the Neocomian of Upware, were presented by Mr. 
J. F. Walker. 

Purchases of fossil plants included specimens from Clallam 
Bay, Washington Territory, U.S.A. ; from Vancouver ; and from 
Skedegate Bay, Queen Charlotte's Islands. 

Total number of acquisitions, 10,372. 

1869. 

A valuable collection of remains of Prehistoric Mammalia 
from a freshwater deposit in the valley of the Lea, near Waltham- 
stow, Essex, was obtained by purchase from Mr. Joseph Wood. 
In addition to human remains, it comprised bones and teeth of 
wolf, fox, beaver, horse, wild-boar, red deer, roebuck, fallow deer, 
reindeer, elk, ox, and goat. The discovery was described by Dr. 
H. Woodward {Geol. Mag., vol. vi. 1869). 

Mr. J. C. Mansel-Pleydell continued his donations of Kim- 
meridgian Reptilia, presenting this year the type-specimens of 
Ischyrosaurus manseli and Steneosaurus manseli, described by Mr. 
J. W. Hulke. The unique tail of the Pterodactyl, Dimorphodon 
macronyx, from the Lower Lias of Lyme Regis, described by Prof. 
Owen, was purchased with various other English Reptilian 
remains. 

The collection of fossil Fishes was enriched by the purchase of 



Geology. 22.'] 

a series of specimens from the Oligocene slates of Canton Glarus, 
Switzerland, finely prepared by Emile Meyrat. The unique jaw 
of an extinct Cestraciont from the Oolite of Caen, Normandy, 
described as Strophodus mcdius by Owen, and showing for the 
first time the arrangement of the Stro]phodus-tQQt]i in the mouth, 
was also purchased. Some English Chalk fishes, notably a head 
of Pacliyrliizodus gardneri, were included in the Toulmin Siuitli 
Collection mentioned below. 

Among fossil Tnvertebrata, Dr. W. T. Blanford presented an 
important series, chiefly Jurassic, collected by him in Abyssinia. 
The second instalment of the collection of Mr. John (xray, of 
Hagley, comprising Upper Silurian trilobites, crinoids, and corals, 
was purchased. Other Wenlock Limestone fossils from Dudley 
were purchased from Mr. Charles Ketley. A large collection of 
English Jurassic fossils was purchased from ]Mr. R. Etheridge. 
The late Mr. Toulmin Smith's collection of Cretaceous sponges, 
including the originals of his own descriptions, was purchased 
from his executors. Many Crag Mollusca from Norfolk and 
Suffolk, including type-specimens described in Mr. Searles Wood's 
" Supplement," were purchased from Mr. Edward Charlesworth. 
A collection of Miocene Mollusca from Maryland, U.S.A., was 
also purchased. About 150 bivalved Crustacea, purchased from 
Prof. T. Rupert Jones, illustrated his " Monograph of the Fossil 
Estheri^." 

A large series of Tertiary leaves, collected by Mr. Edward 
Whymper in Greenland, by means of grants from the British 
Association and the Royal Society, was presented by Mr. Robert 
H. Scott. 

Total number of acquisitions, 7226. 

1870. 

A complete skeleton of the hornless female Irish Deer, Cervus 
hihernicus, was purchased from Dr. E. P. Wright. Numerous 
teeth of Pliocene Mammalia from a cavern near Ching-King-Foo, 
China (some described by Prof. Owen in Quart. Journ. Geol. 
Soc. vol. xxvi.), were purchased from Mr. Swinhoe, of Formosa. 
A series of Marsupial remains from the Wellington Caves, New 
South Wales, was presented by the Trustees of the Australian 
Museum, Sydney; and other bones from the same caves were 
presented by Prof. A. M. Thomson. 

Two eggs of Aepyornis from Madagascar were purchased. 
Bones of Dinornis casuarinus from Glenmark Swamp, New Zealand, 



224 Geology, 

were presented by Mr. W. Reeve ; while gizzard-stones and 
tracheal rings of Dinornithid?e were presented by Prof. Owen. 

The type-sjDecimen of Plesiosaurus manseli from the Kim- 
meridge Clay of Dorset, was presented by Mr. J. C, Mansel- 
Pleydell ; and numerous other remains of reptiles and fishes from 
the same formation, and from the Neocomian bone-bed of Pot ton, 
Bedfordshire, were purchased. 

A collection of Labyrinthodonts, with a few fishes, from the 
Coal Measures of Jarrow Colliery, Kilkenny, Ireland, was pur- 
chased from Mr. W. B. Brownrigg. The Thomas Baugh Collection, 
chiefly consisting of fish-teeth from the Carboniferous Limestone 
of Shropshire, and the Charles W. Peach Collection of Old Red 
Sandstone Fishes from Caithness, were also acquired by purchase. 

Among important purchases of fossil Invertebrata may be 
mentioned some specimens of Placocystis from the Wenlock 
Limestone ; a fine Apiocrinus from the Bradford Clay of AViltshire; 
type-specimens of Cretaceous and Tertiary Entomostraca, including 
the Bosquet Collection ; Oolitic fossils from Brora, Sutherland ; 
and a series of Tertiary shells collected by Mr. Hauxwell in 
the valley of the Amazon, and described by Dr. H. Woodward 
{Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., ser. 4, vol. vii.). 

Silicified wood from the desert near Cairo, described by Mr. 
Carruthers as Nicolia oweni, was presented by Prof. Owen. A 
fine Araucarian stem from the Lower Lias of Lyme Regis was pur- 
chased. A large series of plant-remains, from the Coal Measures 
of the Forest of Wyre, was included in the Baugh Collection. 

Total number of acquisitions, 7620. 

187L 

The most important acquisition of this year was the collection 
of the late Prof. Yan Breda, of Haarlem, purchased from his 
executors. It comprised fossils from the Miocene of Oeningen, 
the Lignites of Rott, near Bonn, the Upper Cretaceous of 
Maastricht, the Lithographic Stone of Bavaria, the Keuper of 
Wiirtemberg, and the Permian of Thuringia. From all these 
horizons there were unique type-specimens of Vertebrata, besides 
numerous Invertebrata. 

The Wetherell Collection, chiefly of London Clay fossils, 
purchased from Mr. N. T. Wetherell, was also of gi^eat value, 
comprising many type-specimens described by Edwards, Bell, 
Owen, and Darwin. 



I 



Geology, 225 

Series of Pleistocene Mammalian remains from Queensland, 
presented by Mr. Richard Daintree, and from Buenos Ayres, 
presented by Senor Luis J. Fontana, included many important 
new specimens. Remains of beaver from the Cambridgeshire 
Fens were purchased. 

The type upper jaw of Teleosaurm inrgarkinus, from the 
Kimmeridge Clay of Dorsetshire, was presented by Mr. J. C. 
Mansel-Pleydell. The type-specimen of the extinct Chimteroid, 
Ischyodus orthorhinus of Egerton, from the Lower Lias of Lyme 
Regis, was purchased. 

Some Upper Silurian Crinoids, Cystideans, Trilobites, other 
Crustacea, and two Starfishes, were purchased from the collection 
of Samuel Allport. Some Ordovician Trilobites from North 
Wales, including the type-specimens of GaJymene daviesi and 
Ogygia angustissima and other specimens figured by Salter, were 
purchased from Mr. G. Davies. Polished sections of Carboni- 
ferous Corals, prepared with a gi'ant from the British Association, 
were presented by Mr. James Thomson. A huge ammonite, 
39 inches in diameter, and regarded as Psiloceras lilanorhe, 
from the Lias near Rugby, was purchased, (See " Mem. Geol. 
Surv. U.K., Jurassic Rocks," iii., p. 163.) 

A few slabs of shale with fossil plants from the Coal Measures 
of Rhymney, South Wales, were presented by Mr. Coles Child. 

Total number of acquisitions, 4789. 

1872. 

After the death of Sir Roderick I. Murchison, a selection 
from his collection was presented by his nephew and heir, Mr. 
Kenneth Murchison. Besides an extensive series of Invertebrata, 
chiefly Devonian and Silurian, it comprised many fossil fishes, 
among others the type-specimen of Aechmodus leachi from the 
Lower Lias of Lyme Regis. 

Pleistocene Mammalian remains from Queensland and Buenos 
Ayres were presented by Dr. George Bennett and Senor L. J. 
Fontana respectively. 

A footprint of Dinornis in modern beach-sandstone from 
New Zealand, was presented by Mr. T. H. Cockburn Hood. 

Reptilian remains from the Karoo formation of Cape Colony, 
including Pariasatirus, Tajnnocephalus, and GaJesanrus, were pre- 
sented by Dr. W. Guybon Atherstone. A fine Ichthyosaurian 
head from the Lower Lias of Lyme Regis, and a complete shell 
VOL. I. Q 



226 Geology. 

of Pleiirosternum from the Purbeck beds of Swanage, were 
purchased. 

A unique specimen of the extinct Chimi^roid fish, Squalornja 
polyspondtjla, described by Mr. W. Davies {Geo!. Mag., vol. ix., 
1872), was acquired by purchase. 

The first instalment (Univalves) of the F. E. Edwards 
Collection of Eocene Mollusca from the south-east of England, 
including the specimens described in Mr. Edwards' Monograph 
published by the Palaeontographical Society, was purchased. 

Total number of acquisitions, 36,986. 

1873. 

The valuable general collection of fossils made by Dr. Bright 
of Bristol was presented by Mr. Benjamin Bright. 

Among Mammalia the most noteworthy addition was a series 
of remains of pigmy elephants, collected and described by Dr. 
A. Leith Adams, and acquired by purchase from him. A 
cranium and other bones of the Miocene Sirenian, Halitherivm, 
from Hesse-Darmstadt, were also purchased. Some Pleistocene 
Mammalian remains from the Porcupine River, Canada, were 
presented by Rev. Robert Macdonald Dr. George Bennett's 
donations of fossil Marsupialia from Queensland were continued. 

The unique skull of the bird with denticulated jaws, 
Odontoptenjx toliapica, from the London Clay of Sheppey, was 
purchased from Mr. B. M. Wright. 

Some Reptilian remains from the Kimmeridge Clay of 
Weymouth, including a large humerus described by Mr. Hulke 
as Getiosaiirus himerocristatus, were acquired by purchase. Half 
of the type-specimen of Dolichosaurus longicollis from the Chalk 
of Kent, was also purchased. 

A unique specimen of Fteraspis crouchi, showing scales, from 
the Lower Old Red Sandstone of Worcestershire, was presented 
by Prof. E. Ray Lankester. 

The second instalment of the F. E. Edwards Collection of 
English Eocene Mollusca, comprising over 13,000 specimens, was 
purchased. Numerous British fossil Invertebrata from the 
collections of Mr. S. Allport and Rev. Charles Croft, were also 
purchased. A remarkable group of star-fishes, Oreaster hulhiferus, 
from the Upper Chalk of Bromley, Kent, was prepared by 
Jeremiah Simmons and sold by him to the Museum. 

Total number of acquisitions, 18,501. 



Geology. 227 



1874. 

Remarkable additions to the series of British Pleistocene 
Mammalia were made this year by the purchase of Sir Antonio 
Brady's collection from the Thames Brick-earth at Ilford, Essex, 
and Mr. J. J. Owles' collection obtained from trawlers off the 
eastern coast, especially from the Dogger Bank. Valuable 
remains of Marsupialia from the Pleistocene of Queensland, were 
received as donations from Dr. George Bennett and others. 
The jaws of the extinct ungulate, Homalodontotherium cunning- 
hami, from the Tertiary of Patagonia, described by Sir William 
Flower {Phil. Trans. 1874), were presented by the Lords of the 
Admiralty through Dr. Cunningham. The unique skull of the 
primitive Sirenian, Prorastonms sh'enoicles, from Jamaica, was 
presented by Prof, (afterwards Sir Richard) Owen. 

A nearly complete skeleton of Binornis maximus, now exhi- 
bited in the Department of Zoology, was obtained by exchange 
with the Canterbury Museum, Christchurch, New Zealand. 

A large part of the skeleton of a gigantic Dinosaur, described 
as Omosaurus armatiis by Owen, was dug out of the Kimmeridge 
Clay at Swindon by Mr. William Davies, and presented to 
the Museum by the Directors of the Swindon Brick and Tile 
Company. 

An extensive series of fish-remains from the Lower Old Red 
Sandstone and Upper Silurian of the neighbourhood of Ludlow, 
including several type- and described specimens, was presented by 
Mr. Robert Lightbody. The first well-preserved fossil fish, a 
Palseoniscid, from the Karoo Formation of Cape Colony, was 
presented by the Trustees of the Albany Museum. 

A series of Tertiary fossils from the Sinai peninsula and 
Egypt was collected and presented by Prof. John Milne. A 
fine collection of Crinoidea from the Lower Carboniferous of 
Burlington, Iowa, U.S.A., was purchased from Mr. C. Wachs- 
muth. A slab of JEozoon canculense from Canada was also 
purchased. 

Total number of acquisitions, 3103. 

1875. 

Another large instalment of the Cunnington Collection was 
purchased, including Mammalian remains from Wookey Hole, 
Pleurosternum from the Purbeck Beds, fishes from the Purbeck 

Q 2 



228 Geology, 

Beds and Kimmeridge Clay, and numerous Crustacea, Echino- 
derma, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, and Sponges, of which many were 
type-specimens described in the Monographs of the Palseonto- 
graphical Society. 

Numerous fossil Mammalia from the Red Crag of Suffolk 
were purchased from Mr. E. Charlesworth. A natural cast of a 
Sirenian brain, Eotherium aegy])tiacum, from the Eocene of 
Egypt, was presented by Prof, (afterwards Sir Richard) Owen. 
Bones of ox, stag, wild-boar, and beaver from the excavations 
for the Thames Embankment, "Westminster, were presented by 
the Metropolitan Board of Works. Marsupial remains from 
Queensland and New South Wales were presented by Dr. George 
Bennett and Mr. W. L. R. Gipps. 

Various described bones of Cncmiornis, Aptornis, and other 
birds from the surface deposits of New Zealand, were pre- 
sented by Prof. Owen. Bones of the Great Auk, discovered 
by Prof. John Milne in Funk Island, off Newfoundland, were 
purchased. 

A small, l3ut valuable collection of Cretaceous fishes from 
Mount Lebanon was pui'chased. 

An important collection of fossils from New Zealand, chiefly 
Cretaceous and Cretaceo-Tertiary Invertebrata, was presented 
by Dr. (afterwards Sir James) Hector. About 5000 EngHsh, 
French, North German, and Austrian Tertiary Mollusca, from 
the collection of the late F. E. Edwards, were purchased. 

Specimens of Glossoptcris and silicified wood from New South 
Wales were presented by Mr. W. L. R. Gipps. 

Total number of acquisitions, 10,711. 



1876. 

Some valuable collections of fossil MammaUa from caverns 
were obtained this year. The results of the Brixham Cave 
exploration, described in Phil Trans. 1873, were presented by 
the Council of the Royal Society. A few remains from the 
Oreston Caves, near Plymouth (obtained by the late Mr. Joseph 
Cottle of Bristol), were purchased. A large collection made by 
the late Captain Fox Brome in caverns and fissures in the rock 
of Gibraltar, described by Prof. Busk {Trans. Zool. Soc, vol. x. 
1877), was presented by the Governor of Gibraltar. 

A collection of Mammalian remains from the Middle Pur- 
beck Beds, Durdlestone Bay, Dorsetshire, described in Owen's 



Geology, 22H 

"Mesozoic Mammalia" (Mon. Pal. Soc, 1871), was purchased 
from Mr. S. H. Beckles. 

A skull of Dicynodon leonice^s and another fragment of t\ut 
same, from the Karoo Formation of Cape Colony, were presented 
by the Hon. W. Guybon Atherstone. 

A series of freshwater Tertiary fish-remains from Padang, 
Sumatra, described by Dr. Giinther (Geol. Mag., 1876), was 
presented by Herr R. D. M. Verbeek. 

The important collection of Mr. Samuel Sharp, chiefly con- 
sisting of Invertebrata from the Jurassic of Northamptonshire, 
was acquired by purchase. Six Oligocene shells from Brocken- 
hurst, figured in Wise's " New Forest " (1863), were presented by 
Mr. John R. Wise. Numerous Pliocene Mollusca from Sicily, 
and Tertiary Mollusca from the Amazons, were purchased. A 
collection of fossil corals from the Carboniferous Limestone uf 
Clifton, was presented by Mr. Swinfen Jordan. 

Some specimens of Glossojpteris from Natal were presented ))y 
Rev. George Smith. 

Total number of acquisitions, 5531. 

1877. 

The most important acquisition of this year was a general 
collection of fossils presented by the Hon. Robert Marsham (now 
Marsham-Townsend). Besides many unique and valuable English 
fossils, it included some Cretaceous fishes from Ceara, North 
Brazil. 

Mr. Charles Falconer added to his former donation (1867) 
some Mammalian remains from the Siwalik Hills, India, ami 
other localities, also some Tertiary shells and cycads from India. 
Dr. George Bennett presented additional specimens of Marsu- 
pialia from Queensland, and Rev. W. B. Clarke presented the 
type-jaw of Sthenurus minor of Owen from New South Wales. 

Some Reptilian remains, including the type-specimens of 
EcMnodon hecJdesi described by Sir Richard Owen, from the 
Purbeck Beds of Durdlestone Bay, were purchased from Mr. S. H. 
Beckles. 

A second series of Cretaceous fishes from the Lebanon was 
purchased. 

A collection of Miocene plant-remains from Hiiring, Tyrol, 
including specimens described by Baron von Ettingshausen, was 
purchased. 

Total number of acquisitions, 4702. 



230 Geology, 



1878. 

A valuable collection of Vertebrata from the caverns and 
rock-lissures of Malta was presented by Rear-Admiral T. A. B. 
Spratt. It comprised remains of pigmy elephants described by 
Busk (Trans. Zool. Soc, vol. vi.), and fragments of Chelonia 
described by Leith Adams (Quart Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. xxii.) ; 
also some remains of lairds subsequently described by Lydekker 
(Proc. Zool Soc, 1890). 

A skull of Toxodon platensis from the Pampa of Buenos Ay res 
was purchased from Mr. Frank Day. A rostrum of Ziphius 
planirostris, dredged off Southwold, was presented by Dr. C. R. 
Bree. 

The type-skull of Stencosaurus stejyhani, from the Cornbrash 
of Dorset, was purchased from Mr. Darell Stephens. A fine 
Plesiosaurian skull, from the Lower Lias of Charmouth, was 
purchased from Rev, T. L. Montefiore. 

The collection of fossils from the English Chalk, made by the 
late Mrs. Smith, of Tunbridge Wells, was purchased from Mrs. 
Bishop. It included several valuable reptilian and lish remains, 
besides Invertebrata, figured in Dixon's " Geology of Sussex. "^ 
Some Cretaceous fishes, Crustacea, &c., collected by Rev. Prof. 
E. R, Lewis in the Lebanon, were purchased from Mr. R. 
Damon. 

A few conodonts from the Sub-Carboniferous of Ohio were 
presented by Dr. G. J. Hinde. 

Mr. John Rofe's collection of Carboniferous Limestone fossils, 
chiefly Crinoidea, was presented partly by himself, partly by his 
executor. Some Upper Silurian Crustacea from Lanarkshire, 
were purchased from Dr. Robert Slimon. A few fossil shells 
and fish-teeth from the Tertiary of Coquimbo, Chili, were 
presented by Mr. C. J. Lambert. 

Numerous Palaeozoic Invertebrata, shells from Raised Beaches, 
and Tertiary leaves, collected by Captain H. W. Feilden while 
with the Nares Expedition (H.M.SS. Alert and Discovery) in the 
Arctic Regions, were presented by the Lords of the Treasury. 

A large collection of Tertiary plant-remains from Austria, 
including many type- and described specimens, was purchased 
from Baron Constantin von Ettingshausen. A few Tertiary 
leaves from Euboea were purchased from Mr. R. Damon. 
Total number of acquisitions, 6379. 



I 



Geology. 231 

1879. 

A bequest from the late Sir Walter C, Trevelyan, Bart., 
added many important British fossils and some Tertiary shells 
from Italy. The purchase of the collection of English Chalk 
fossils made by Mr. J. Rand Capron, also formed a valualjle 
acquisition this year. 

A skull of Bos primigenius from Ilford was acquired Vjy 
purchase. Four teeth of Ovihos moschatus from Thames deposits 
near Crayford, Kent, were presented by Mr. R. W. Cheadle. A 
series of vertebrate remains and freshwater shells, obtained by a 
Committee from the caverns of Borneo, was presented by tlie 
Council of the British Association. 

Numerous fossil Invertebrata from Australia were presented 
by Mr. R. L. Jack, Mr. H. Y. Lyell Brown, and the executor of 
Mr. Richard Daintree. Some Lower Silurian Graptolites from 
Victoria, described by Mr. R. Etheridge {Ann. May. Nat. Hist., 
1876), were purchased from Mr. Philip Ewen. 

Some Tertiary Mollusca from the Upper Amazons, described 
by Mr. Etheridge (Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. xxxv., 1878), 
were presented by Mr. C. Barrington Brown. 

Additional fossil plant-remains from Austria, including some 
type-specimens, were purchased from Baron von Ettingshausen. 

Total number of acquisitions, 4555. 

1880. 

The largest accession this year was due to the transfer of 
about 50,000 non-British fossils from the Museum of Practical 
Geology, Jermyn Street. 

The type mandibular ramus of Clmropotamus cuvieri, from the 
Eocene of Sealield, Isle of Wight, was presented by Rev. W. D. 
Fox. Some Pleistocene Mammalian remains from San Angelo, 
Mexico, were presented by Mr. Patrick Geddes. 

The type-skeleton of Dinornis parvus, from New Zealand, was 
purchased from Mr. W. J. Upton. The skull of ArijiUorms 
longipennis, a bird from the London Clay of Sheppey, was 
purchased from Mr. W. H. Shrubsole. 

The type-skull of the horned tortoise, Miolania owcui, from 
the Pleistocene of Queensland, was presented, with associated 
vertebrate remains, by Mr. G. F. Bennett. A nodule of Lower 
Lias from Bennington, containing part of a skeleton of Plcsio- 



232 Geology. 

saurus noticed in Nichols' " History of Leicestershire," was pre- 
sented by Major Harlowe Turner. A plaster cast of the type- 
specimen of Plesiosaiiriis cramptoniy in the Dublin Museum, was 
acquired by purchase. A Teleosaurian skull from the Upper 
Lias of Whitby, and the type-specimen of Pelobatochelys hlakei, 
from the Kimmeridge Clay of Weymouth, were purchased from 
Prof. J. F. Blake. The type-skull of Chelone gigas, from the 
London Clay of Sheppey, was purchased from Mr. W. H. 
Shrubsole. Eggs of turtles from a consolidated beach in the 
Island of Ascension, were presented by Lieut. Haggard, R.N. 

The Weaver Jones Collection of Carboniferous and Old Red 
Sandstone fish-remains from the West of England, was acquu-ed 
by purchase. Many well-preserved fishes collected by Mr. Jex in 
the Lower Old Red Sandstone of Forfarshire, were purchased 
from Mr. R. Damon. 

A large collection of English Cretaceous fossils was purchased 
from Mr. J. S. Gardner. The James Armstrong Collection of 
Lower Carboniferous fossils from the Glasgow district, was also 
purchased. Some Tertiary fossils from Patagonia were presented 
by Dr. R. W. Coppinger. Palaeozoic fossils from Bolivia were 
presented by Mr. R. Inwards ; similar fossils from New South 
Wales were presented by Prof. A. Liversidge; others from 
Tasmania were purchased from Mr. P. J. Smith. A collection of 
New Zealand fossils was purchased through Dr. (afterwards Sir 
James) Hector. Devonian fossils from Belgium were purchased 
from Mr. G. E. Gavey. A collection of Silurian Entomostraca 
was purchased from Prof. T. Rupert Jones ; and a collection of 
American Carboniferous Echinoderms, from Mr. R. Damon. 

An important collection of English Eocene plant-remains was 
purchased from Mr. J. S. Gardner. Fossil wood and leaves from 
the Mackenzie River, Canada, described by Prof. O. Heer, were 
presented by the Council of the Royal Society. 

Total number of acquisitions, 55,496. 



188L 

A few bones of Elephas, from the Pleistocene of Belgrade, 
were purchased from Mr. E. M. Grant. 

Plaster casts of some detached bones of the type-specimens 
of toothed birds (Hesperornis, Ichthyornis), from the Chalk of 
Kansas, were presented by Prof. O. C. Marsh. 

Two remarkable skeletons of Neusticosaurus j)usillus, collected 



Geology, 233 

from the Upper Trias of Wiirtemberg by ]Mr. Julius Hoser, were 
acquired by purchase. The type-skull of Aelwosmtrus felinuSy 
from the Karoo formation of South Africa, was presented by Mr. 
Thomas Bain. The bony tail-sheath of Miolania oweni^ from the 
Pleistocene of Queensland, was presented by Mr. G. F. Bennett. 

Jaws of PrognatJiodus guentheri (= Myriacanthus paradoxiis)^ 
from the Lower Lias of Lyme Regis, described in " Catal. Foss. 
Fishes, B. M.," pt. ii., were purchased from Mrs. H. Dollin. 

The collection of Tertiary and Cretaceous fossils made by 
the late Mr. W. Harris, of Charing, was purchased from his 
daughter. A collection of English Chalk fossils was presented 
by the Earl of Ducie. An extensive selection from the miscel- 
laneous collection of the late Prof. J. Tennant, was purchased 
from his executors. Cretaceous fossils from Bahia, Brazil, were 
presented by Mr. Joseph Mawson. A collection of Menevian 
fossils from St. David's, was purchased from Mr. R. Damon. 

Some fossil corals from Sind, described by Prof. P. Martin 
Duncan, were presented by the Director of the Geological 
Survey of India. A fine slab of Devonian Crinoidal Limestone 
from Newton Bushell, South Devon, was presented by Mr. W. 
Vicary. 

Diatoms from the London Clay were presented by Mr. W. H. 
Shrubsole. Coal-plants from St. Etienne, France, were presented 
by Mr. C. Chantre. 

Total number of acquisitions, 1936. 

1882. 

The most important acquisitions this year were the collections 
of the late Sir Philip de Malpas Grey Egerton, Bart., Trustee 
British Museum, and of the Earl of Enniskillen (first instalment), 
which were obtained by purchase. These collections, which were 
made conjointly, consisted chiefly of fossil fishes, but also included 
many other valuable specimens. 

The dried neck and legs of Dinornis didhius, showing skin 
and other soft parts, from a fissure in New Zealand, were 
purchased from Mrs. Squires. Some fragments of Acpyornis 
from Madagascar were presented by Mr. James Porter. 

The collection of Wealden Reptilia from the Isle of Wight, 
made by the late Rev. W. Fox, was purchased from his executors. 
The type-specimen of Thecospondylus horncri, from the Wealden 
of Tunbridge Wells, was presented by Dr. A. C. Horner. A 



234 Geology. 

fine head of Iclitliyosaurus jplatyodon, and other valuable remains 
of reptiles and fishes from the Lower Lias of Lyme Regis, were 
presented by Sir F. Seymour Haden. Eggs of turtles from a 
consohdated beach in the Island of Ascension, were presented by 
Surgeon T. Com-y, R.N. 

Another selection from the collection of the late Prof. J. 
Tennant, was purchased ; and numerous British fossils were 
presented by Mrs. Burnett. Welsh Silurian and Cambrian 
fossils were presented by Mr. David Homfray. Tertiary shells 
from Dalmatia and Croatia, were presented by Prof. S. Brusina ; 
from Bordighera, by Mr. J. G. Goodchild. Tertiary fossils from 
Gippsland, Victoria, were presented by Mr. W. H. Grigson. 
Mesozoic fossils from Japan, were presented by Prof. John 
Milne; from Baliia, Brazil, by Mr. Joseph Mawson. A large 
collection of fossil Entomostraca and Foraminifera (including 
Lonsdale's specimens from Portsdown), w^as purchased from 
Prof. T. Rupert Jones. 

Another large collection of fossil plants from Austria was 
purchased from Baron Constantin von Ettingshausen. 

Total number of acquisitions, 16,316. 

1883. 

The second and final instalment of the collection of the Earl 
of Enniskillen was purchased. Among miscellaneous specimens, 
this included a complete skeleton of the Irish Deer (Cervus 
giganteus), and the type-specimen of Plesiosaurus macrocephalus 
from the Lower Lias of Lyme Regis. 

A large selection from the series of remains of Pleistocene 
Mammalia and implements collected by Mr. Pengelly while 
exploring Kent's Cavern, Torquay, under the direction of a 
Committee of the British Association, was presented by Lord 
Haldon and the Council of the British Association. 

The first part of an important collection of fossil Mammalia 
from the Oligocene Phosphorites of Caylux and other localities 
in S. France, was purchased from Mr. B. Stiirtz. Remains of an 
Irish Deer {Cervus giganteus) from Russia, were purchased from 
Mr. P. A. Hoist. A carapace of the extinct armadillo, Hojplo- 
pJiorus ornatus, from Buenos Ayres, was purchased from Mr. E. 
Gerrard. 

Part of the upper jaw of Megalosaurus hucJclandi, from the 
Inferior Oolite of Sherborne, Dorset, described by Owen (Quart. 



Geology. 235 

Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. xxxix., 1883), was presented byMr.E.Clemin- 
shaw. Plaster casts of HhampJwrhynchus phyllurus and a femur 
of Atlantosaurus immanis were presented by Prof. O. C. Marsh. 

Some Pteraspidian fishes, including the type -specimen of 
Holaspis sericeus, from the Lower Old Red Sandstone of 
Herefordshire and Monmouthshire, were presented by Dr. D. M. 
MacCullough. The type-specimens of Semionotus capcnsis from 
the Stormberg beds (Trias or Rhiietic) of South Africa were 
presented by Dr. Hugh Exton. Lower Carboniferous fishes from 
Eskdale (Jex Coll.) and Upper Cretaceous fishes from the 
Lebanon (Lewis Coll.) were purchased from Mr. R. Damon. 

Brachiopoda from the Wenlock Shale of Shropshire were 
presented by Mr. J. F. Walker. Graptolites and micro-sections 
of tabulate corals were purchased from Prof. H. A. Nicholson. 
Devonian star-fishes from Bundenbach, Rhenish Prussia, were 
purchased from Mr. F. Braun. Corals and Stromatoporoids 
from the Devonian of Torquay were presented by Mr. E. B. 
Luxmoore. Carboniferous corals from Northumberland were 
presented by Prof. H. A. Nicholson. A few bivahed shells from 
the Coal Measures of Staffordshire, were presented by Mr. John 
Ward. Some Liassic insects were presented by Rev. P. B. 
Brodie. A collection of Post-Tertiary fossils from the Clyde was 
presented by Dr. David Robertson. 

Total number of acquisitions, 14,575. 

1884. 

The second portion of the collection of fossil Mammalia from 
the Oligocene Phosphorites of Caylux and other localities in 
S. France, was purchased from Mr. B. Stiirtz. A plaster cast of 
the restored skeleton of Halitherium schinzi, from the Lower 
Miocene of Hesse Darmstadt, was purchased from Prof. R. 
Lepsius. Marsupial bones from river deposits in King's Creek, 
Queensland, were presented by Mr. C. H. Hartmann. Mammalian 
remains from Pen Park Cave, Westbury-on-Trym, were presented 
by Mr. Spencer G. Perceval. The type-tooth of Macacns iiVwcenns 
from Grays, Essex, and other Mammalian remains, were presented 
by Sir Richard Owen. The parts of a human skeleton, described 
by Owen, from Thames mud at Tilbury Docks, were presented 
by the Directors of the E. and W. India Docks Co. 

A fine skeleton of Ichthyosaurus tenuirostris, from the Lower 
Lias of Street, Somersetshire, was presented by jMr. Alfred 



236 Geology. 

Gillett. A collection of bones of Iguanodon and Goniopholis, with 
a few fish-remains, from the Wealden of Sussex, was purchased 
from Mr. Charles Dawson. The type-specimens of Tritylodon and 
Rliytidosteus from the Stormberg Beds, Orange River Colony, 
were obtained by exchange with the Bloemfontein Museum. A 
unique uncrushed skull of Loxomma alhnanni, from the Coal 
Measures of Coalbrookdale, was presented by Mr. George Maw. 

Numerous fossil fishes from the Upper Cretaceous of the 
Lebanon (E. R. Lewis Coll.) and from the Kimmeridgian of 
Cirin, Ain, France, were purchased from Mr. R. Damon. A 
gigantic fish-spine from the Carboniferous Limestone of Bristol, 
described by Mr. J. W. Davis under the name of PhoderacantJins 
grandis, was presented by the Earl of Ducie. The type-specimen 
of Atherstonia scutata, from the Karoo Formation of Cape Colony, 
was presented by the Hon. W. Guybon Atherstone. 

A valuable miscellaneous collection of fossils, chiefly British, 
was presented by Mr. Charles Westendarp, Some Greensand 
fossils from Blackdown were presented by Mr. W. Vicary. Car- 
boniferous and Devonian fossils from Devonshire were presented 
by Mr. J. E. Lee. Lower Carboniferous fossils from Scotland 
{James Armstrong Coll.) were presented by Prof. T. C. Archer. 
4Silurian and Cambrian fossils from Wales were presented by Dr. 
H. Hicks. Eocene Ostracoda were presented by Prof. J . Morris ; 
Post-Tertiary Ostracoda from the Clyde, by Dr. D. Robertson. 

A continuation of the Gardner Collection of Lower Tertiary 
plants, with a series of other British Cretaceous and Tertiary 
fossils, was acquired by purchase. 

Total number of acquisitions, 10,011. 

1885. 

The most important acquisition of this year was the extensive 
■collection made by Mr. John Edward Lee and presented by him 
to the Museum. A miscellaneous collection was also presented 
by Prof, (afterwards Sir) Joseph Prestwich. 

Pleistocene Mammalia from the Cae Gwyn and Ffynnon 
Beuno Caves, Vale of Clwyd, were presented by Dr. Heni-y 
Hicks and Mr. E. B. Luxmoore ; from the Coygau Cave, 
Carmarthenshire, by Dr. Hicks ; from Windy Knoll and the 
Creswell Caves, Derbyshire, by Prof. W. Boyd Dawkins. Part 
of the upper jaw of a young Elephas from the Creswell Caves 
was also presented by Mr. A. T. Metcalfe. Bones of Pleistocene 



Geology. 237 

Mammalia, especially Hippopotamus, from Ban-iiigtoii, Cambridge, 
were purchased from Mr. H. Keeping. A nearly complete 
skeleton of Bhjtina gigos from Behring Island, was purchased 
from Mr. R. Damon. A nearly complete skeleton of Mylodon 
rohustus, from the Pampa of Buenos Ay res, was purchased from 
Mr. E. Gerrard. Plaster casts of Dinocerata, from the Eocene 
of North America, were presented by Prof. O. C. Marsh. Some 
Mastodon teeth from the Siwalik Formation of Perim Island 
were presented by Diwan Wajeshankar Gowreeshankar. 

Additional remains of Iguanodon from the Wealden of Sussex 
were purchased through Mr. Charles Dawson. Specimens of 
Stereosternum tumidiim, from the Permo-Carboniferous of San 
Paulo, Brazil, were purchased from Mr. B. Stiirtz. Remains of 
Miolania from Lord Howe's Island were presented Ijy Mr. R. D. 
Fitzgerald. 

Some Elasmobrancli teeth from the Yoredale Rocks of 
Wensleydale, Yorkshire, were purchased from Mr. AV. Home. 

Small Silurian Brachiopoda from the Wenlock Shales were 
presented by Mr. George Maw. Culm Trilobites from Devon- 
shire were presented by Dr. Henry Woodward. Devonian 
fossils from South Africa were presented by Mr. AV. E. Balston. 
English Jurassic Corals were presented by Mr. R. F. Tomes. 
Jurassic and other fossils from Meux' boring and the Richmond 
boring in the London Basin, were presented by Prof. J. W. Judd. 
Cephalopoda from the Grey Chalk and Gault of the Kentish 
coast, were purchased from Mr. J. S. Gardner. Indian fossil 
Echinoids were presented by the Director of the Geological 
Survey of India. Miocene Mollusca from Morocco were presented 
by Mr. John Ball. English Crag Mollusca, from the Searles 
Wood Collection, were presented by Mrs. S. V. Wood. Mollusca 
from the Pliocene of St. Erth, Cornwall, were purchased from 
Mr. H. Keeping. Pliocene shells from Latakia, Syria, were 
presented by Dr. G. E. Post. Post-Tertiary Mollusca collected 
by Mr. J. S. Gardner at Husavik, Iceland, were presented by 
the Council of the Royal Society. 

Wealden plants from the neighbourhood of Hastings, were 
presented by Mr. Philip Rufford. Plants from the Radstock and 
Forest of Dean Coalfields, collected by Mr. R. Kidston, were 
presented by the Council of the Royal Society. Lower Tertiary 
plants from Ireland, collected by Mr. J. S. Gardner, were also 
presented by the Council of the Royal Society. 
Total number of acquisitions, 40,662. 



238 Geology, 

1886. 

The most important acquisition of this year was the collection 
of Recent and Fossil Brachiopoda bequeathed to the Trustees by 
the late Dr. Thomas Davidson. 

Remains of Scelidotherium from the Pleistocene of Tarapaca, 
Peru, subsequently described by Mr. R. Lydekker (Proc. Zool. Soc, 
1886), were presented by Senor Don Modesto Basadre. Marsupial 
remains from the Pleistocene of Queensland were presented by 
Dr. George Bennett. Proboscidian and other Mammalian teeth 
from the Siwalik Formation of Perim Island, Gulf of Cambay, 
were jDresented by Col. J. W. Watson. Some Pleistocene bones 
from the Karnul Caves, Madras, were presented by the Director 
of the Geological Survey of India. Bones of Rodentia and other 
small mammals from the caverns of Corsica, were purchased from 
Dr. Forsyth Major. 

The fine skeleton of Hyperodapedon gordoni, from the Triassic 
sandstone of Elgin, subsequently described by Huxley (Quart. 
Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. xliii., 1887), was presented by Rev. 
George Gordon. The counterpart of the tyj^e-specimen of 
Lepidotosaiirus dujji, from the Magnesian Limestone of Durham, 
was presented by Mr. W. C. Stobart. The type-specimen of 
Clemmys watsoni, from the Siwalik Formation of Perim Island, 
was presented by Col. J. W. Watson. A maxilla of Iguanodon, 
from the Wealden of Sussex, described by Mr. J. W. Hulke 
(Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. xlii. 1886), was presented by 
Mr. Henry Willett. 

Two Eocene fishes (Diplomystus and Mioplosus) from the 
■Green River Shales of Wyoming, U.S.A., were presented by 
Sir John Lubbock, Bart, (now Lord Avebury). 

The Henry Johnson Collection of AVenlock and Carboniferous 
fossils from the Dudley district, was acquired by purchase. A 
large collection of Palaeozoic fossils from Devonshire was pur- 
chased from Mr. Townsend M. Hall. Silurian Corals and 
Trilobites from Yorke Peninsula, and Cretaceous and Tertiary 
fossils from various localities in South Australia, w^ere presented 
by the Director of the Geological Survey of South Australia. 
British Cretaceous fossils were purchased from Mr. J. S. Gardner. 
Oligocene Mollusca from Headon Hill, Isle of Wight, and 
Pliocene Mollusca from St. Erth, Cornwall, were presented by 
Mrs. S. V. Wood. Additional Pliocene Mollusca from Latakia, 
Syria, were presented by Dr. G. E. Post. Tertiary Mollusca 



Geology, 239 

from Muddy Creek, Victoria, were presented by ]Mr. J. Dennant. 
Fossil Mollusca from Greenland were purchased from jMr. E. 
Whymper. Two blocks of Eozoon canadense were presented by 
the Director of the Geological Survey of Canada. London Clay 
Foraminifera were purchased from Mr. C. D. Sherborn. The 
type-specimens of Necroscilla imlsoni and Eoscorpius anrfUcus, from 
the Coal Measures, were presented by Mr. Edward Wilson. 

Tertiary plants collected by Mr. J. S. Gardner in the Island 
of Mull and Ireland, were presented by the Council of the Royal 
Society. Similar plants from Bournemouth and Alum Bay, 
England, and Chiavon, Italy, were purchased from Mr. J. S. 
Gardner. Tertiary plants from Greenland were purchased from 
Mr. E. Whymper. 

Total number of acquisitions, 37,821. 

1887. 

Valuable additions to the collection of British fossils were 
made by the purchase of selections from the collections of the 
late Dr. Harvey B. HoU, Dr. Thomas Wright, and Mr. Caleb 
Evans. 

A few more mammalian remains from the Siwalik Forma- 
tion of Perim Island were presented by Col. J. W. Watson. A 
human calvaria, found in excavations for the docks at Tilbury, 
was presented by Mr. Donald S. Baynes. 

Some feathers of Binornis from New Zealand were purchased 
from Sir Walter Buller. Part of a skeleton of Dinornis struthioulcs 
was presented by Mr. N. Chevalier. 

Additional Dinosaurian bones from the Wealden of Sussex 
were purchased through Mr. Charles Dawson. Some Dinosaurian 
bones from the Karoo Formation of S. Africa, EusJcelesaurus and 
Orosaurus, Huxley {Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. xxiii., 1867), 
were presented by Prof. T. H. Huxley. 

A few Cephalaspidian fishes from the Ledbury Passage Beds 
were presented by Mr. G. H. Piper. Elasmobranch teeth from 
the Carboniferous Limestone of Ticknall, Derbyshire, were pur- 
chased from Mr. Edward Wilson. The type-specimen of Holo- 
centrum melitense, from the Miocene of Malta, was purchased 
from the Duke of Argyll. Some nodules containing fishes, from 
Glacial Clay, Bindalen, Norway, were presented by j\Ir. Henry 
Tryon. 

Miscellaneous rocks and fossils from a deep boring at 



240 Geology, 

Richmond, Surrey, were presented by Mr. Colette Homersham. 
Palaeozoic fossils from South Africa were presented by Mr. W. 
Carruthers ; from Western Australia, by Mr. E. T. Hardman. 
Mesozoic fossils from the Lake Eyre District were presented by 
the Director of the Geological Survey of South Australia. 
Tertiary fossils, chiefly Mollusca, from the Murray River, near 
Adelaide, South Australia, were presented by Mr. William 
Evans. Eocene Mollusca found between Cap d'Ailly and 
Dieppe, were presented by Colonel L. Worthington Wilmer. 
Oligocene fossils collected by Mr. Heniy Keeping in the Isle of 
Wight were presented by the Council of the Royal Society. 
Post-Tertiary shells from the Solomon Isles were presented by 
Mr. H. B. Guppy and Dr. H. B. Brady. Carboniferous 
Crinoids and a specimen of Pentacrinus fossilis figured in 
Buckland's " Bridgewater Treatise " were presented by Rev. 
Canon J. E. Jackson. 

Fossil plants collected by Mr. R. Kidston from the Somerset- 
shire Coal Measures were presented by the Council of the Royal 
Society. 

Total number of acquisitions, 8370. 

1888. 

A second selection from the collection of the late Dr. Thomas 
Wright was purchased from a dealer. Another valuable general 
collection of British fossils, including some almost unique Chalk 
fishes, was purchased from Mr. Frederick Harford. A collection 
of Cretaceous and Tertiary fossils, chiefly from Sussex, was 
presented by Mr. P. E. Coombe. 

An important series of Mammalian remains, collected by 
Dr. Hans Pohlig in the Lower Pliocene deposits of Maragha, 
Persia, was purchased from a dealer. A carapace and other 
remains of Glyi^odon, from the Pampa formation of Buenos 
Ayres, were also acquired by purchase. A model in papier 
maclie of the skeleton of Dinoceras mirahile, from the Eocene of 
Wyoming, U.S.A., was presented by Prof. O. C. Marsh. A fine 
last lower molar of Mastodon angustidens, from the Red Crag of 
Foxall, Sufiblk, was purchased from Mr. G. C. E. Ker. 

Additional bones of Wealden Dinosaurs from Sussex were 
purchased through Mr. Charles Dawson. Footprints of Igiiano- 
don from Hastings (figured Quart. Journ. Geol. Sac, vol. x., 
1854), were presented by Mr. S. H. Beckles. An imperfect 



Geology. 241 

skeleton of Metriorhynchus from the Oxford Clay of Peterborough 
was presented by Mr. Alfred N. Leeds. Teleosaurian remains 
from the Great Oolite of Northampton were purchased from 
Mr. Thomas Jesson. Remains of Reptilia, Pisces, and MoUusca, 
from the Cretaceous of Bahia, Brazil, were presented by M\\ 
Joseph Mawson. 

The first specimens of Cladoselache, a pectoral fin and a tail, 
from the Upper Devonian of Ohio, were presented by Prof. J. S. 
Xewberry. Devonian fishes from Canada, collected by Mr. Jex, 
were purchased from ^Ir. R. F. Damon. The type-specimen of 
Cleithrolepis extoiii, from the Karoo Formation of Orange River 
Colony, was presented by Dr. Hugh Exton. The type-specimen 
of TJirissops portlandicus, from the Portland Stone, was presented 
by Mr. Frederick Harford. 

A miscellaneous collection of fish-remains, shells, etc., from 
the Eocene deposits north of the Sea of Aral, was presented by 
Mr. W. Bateson. Many microscope-slides of invertebrate fossils 
{ParJceria, etc.) were presented by Dr. John Millar and Mrs. 
Millar. Some Palaeozoic fossils from Kashmir were presented 
by Colonel God win- Austen. Devonian and Silurian fossils from 
Galicia were presented by Prof. L. Szajnocha. Remains of 
Trilobites from the Penrhyn Slate Quarries, Bethesda, were 
presented by Mr. E. B. Luxmoore. Palaeozoic Ostracoda were 
purchased from Mr. J. W. Kirkby ; Fuller's Earth Ostracoda 
from Prof. T. Rupert Jones. Bracklesham Ostracoda were 
presented by Prof. J. W. Judd. The Robert G. Bell Collection 
of Crag Mollusca and Polyzoa was purchased fi'ora his executors. 
Bivalves from the Norwich Crag were presented by Mr. R. E. 
Leach. Several collections of Post-Pliocene Mc^llusca were 
received as donations, namely : one from Barnwell, Cambridge, 
presented by Mrs. McKenny Hughes; from Clapton, Essex, 
presented by Mr. J. E. Greenhill; from the Post-Pliocene 
Manure Gravels, Wexford, collected by Mr. Alfred Bell, 
presented by the Council of the British Association; from a 
raised beach at Udde valla, Sweden, presented by Mr. R. M. 
Thorburn ; from Japan, presented by Prof. John Milne. Fora- 
minifera from Hungary were presented by Dr. ]Max von 
Hantken. 

An additional collection of Austrian fossil leaves was pur- 
chased from Baron Constantin von Ettingshausen. 

Total number of acquisitions, 12,576. 

VOL. I. B 



242 Geology. 

1889. 

The most important acquisition this year was a series of 
Lower Pliocene MammaHa from the Island of Samos, collected 
by Dr. C. I. Forsyth Major and sold by him to the Trustees. 
A valuable collection of fossils from the Eocene and Jurassic of 
Madagascar, illustrating a paper by Mr. R. B. Newton {Quart. 
Journ. Geol Soc, vol. xlv., 1889), was presented by Rev. R. Baron. 
^Miscellaneous collections of British fossils were presented by 
Mr. Frederick Harford and Mr. George Clifton; and another 
was purchased from Mrs. Baber. 

A plaster cast of the type-specimen of Phenacodus primsevus, 
from the Lower Eocene of Wyoming, was purchased from Prof. 
E. D. Cope. A plaster cast of a skull and mandible of Brontops 
rohusius, from the Eocene of Wyoming, was presented by Prof. 
O. C. Marsh. Remains of Pleistocene Mammalia from the 
Bench Cavern, Brixham, near Torquay, were purchased from 
Mr. W. Else. A molar of Elephas meridionalis from Dewlish, 
Dorset, was presented by Mr. J. C. Mansel-Pleydell. An antler 
of an elk from Cleveland, Yorkshire, was presented by the 
Christy Trustees. A mandible of Elephas primigenius from 
Siberia (Cattley Collection) and a skull of Bhytina from Behring 
Island, were acquired by purchase. 

Additional bones of Wealden Dinosaurs from Sussex were 
purchased through Mr. Charles Dawson. Remains of OphtJial- 
mosaurus, Metriorhyncltus, and Steneosaurus, from the Oxford 
Clay of Peterborough, were presented by Mr. Alfred N. Leeds. 
A specimen of Ichthyosaurus intermedius, from the Lower Lias 
of Barrow-on-Soar, showing the integument of the paddle, was 
presented by Mr. Montagu Browne. 

A unique group of Cephalaspis murchisonl from the Ledbury 
Passage Beds, and Cephalaspidian remains from the same forma- 
tion, were presented by Mr. G. H. Piper. Large specimens 
of Bhinohatus hugesiacus and Hypsocormus insignis, from the 
Bavarian Lithographic Stone, were purchased from Mr. B. 
StUrtz. Fish-teeth from the Upper Cretaceous and Eocene of 
Belf^ium were presented by Mr. Houzeau de Lehaie. Three 
specimens of Priscacara, from the Green River Shales, Wyoming, 
were presented by Mr. T. A. Rickard. Portions of the Rhaetic 
bone-bed from Aust, with fish-remains, were presented by Mr. 
Spencer G. Perceval. 

Palaeozoic and Tertiary fossils from Australia and Tasmania 



Geology, 243 

were presented by Mr. (now Sir) C. Purdon Clarke. 8ome 
Silurian fossils from the collection of the late Mr. John Gray, 
of Hagley, were purchased from Mr. F. H. Butler. Tremadoc 
fossils from Shineton, Shropshire, were purchased from Mr. Henry 
Keeping. Cephalopoda from the Muschelkalk near Hallstatt 
were purchased through Dr. E. von Mojsisovics. Paris Eocene 
Mollusca were presented by Mr. E. de Boury, and Barton 
Clay Mollusca by Mr. R. Etheridge. Pliocene Mollusca from 
Florida were presented by Mr. Joseph AVillcox. Marine 
Mollusca from British Glacial deposits were presented by Mr. 
R. D. Darbishire. Non-marine Mollusca from the Barnwell 
Gravels, Cambridge, were presented by Rev. E. S. Dewick. 
Scolithus and Arenicolites from the Cambrian of Durness were 
presented by the Duke of Argyll. Fossil corals from Barbados 
were presented by Colonel H. W. Feilden. Microscope-sections 
of Foraminiferal and other skeletons, illustrating some of his own 
papers, were presented by Mr. H. J. Carter. Nummulites from 
Mentone were presented by Mr. E. B. Luxmoore. 
Total number of acquisitions, 10,192. 

1890. 

The most important acquisitions this year were a first 
instalment of a collection of Oxfordian Reptilia, purchased from 
Messrs. Alfred N. and Charles E. Leeds, and a first instalment 
of a collection of Wealden Plants purchased from Mr. P. J. 
Rufford. The second instalment of Dr. Forsyth Major's collection 
of Lower Pliocene Mammalia from Samos was also purchased. 
The late Mr. Robert Damon's collection illustrating his " Geology 
of Weymouth and the Isle of Portland," and additional British 
fossils from the Gavey and Thomas Wright Collections, were 
acquired by purchase. jNIiscellaneous British fossils were pre- 
sented by Mrs. Leif child. The Goldenberg Collection, chiefly 
from the Lower Permian of Rhenish Prussia, was purchased 
from Prof. Schenk of Leipzig. The McCormick Collection of 
fossils from the Arctic Regions, Madeira, Kerguelen Land, the 
Falkland Islands, and Tasmania, was received as a bequest. 
Miscellaneous Tertiary and Post-Tertiary fossils from Barbados 
were presented by Mr. A. J. Jukes-Browne. 

Mammalian remains from a Turbary at Walthamstow were 
presented by Mr. J. E. Greenhill. A few bones and teeth of 
Bliinoceros and other remains from surface deposits, Sarawak, 

R -1 



244 Geology, 

Borneo, were presented hy Mr. A. H. Everett. A skull of 
Oreodon culbertsoni, from the White River Formation of Dakota, 
was presented by Prof. Joseph Leidy. 

Specimens of Palseaspis aiuericana, from the Upper Silurian 
of Pennsylvania, were presented by Prof. E. W. Claypole. 

A second collection of Cephalopoda and other MoUusca, from 
the Trias of Hallstatt, was purchased through Dr. E. von 
Mojsisovics. Jurassic Cephalopoda from Dorsetshire were pur- 
chased from Mr. 8. S. Buckman. Cretaceous and Tertiary 
MoUusca from Montana were presented by Mr. E. S. Cameron. 
Mollusca and other fossils from the London Clay of Eareham 
were presented by Mr. J. W. Elwes. Miocene Mollusca and 
other fossils from Malta were presented by Dr. (now Sir) John 
Murray. Pleistocene non-marine Mollusca from various localities 
in the Thames Valley were presented by Mr. F. C. J. Spurrell 
and Mr. B. B. Woodward ; from Staines, by Mr. J. Allen Brown ; 
from Moorfields, by Mr. T. Warburton ; from Blackfriars Road, 
by Mr. C. J. A. Meyer ; from Fulham, by Mr. F. Chapman ; and 
from the Lea Valley, by Mr. J. E. Greenhill. A few American 
Palseozoic Crinoids and Blastoids were presented by Dr. F. A. 
Bather ; some Devonian Pentremites from Kentucky, by Mr. 
Hugh Kimbley. Cambro-Silurian Sponges from Canada were 
presented by Sir J. William Dawson. Syringosphsera from the 
Karakoram, Kashmir, was presented by Dr. William King. 

Specimens of the Glossoijteris Flora from South Africa were 
presented by Mr. D. Draper, Mr. G. J. Lee, and the Council of 
the Royal Society ; from Argentina, by Dr. H. D. Hoskold. 

Total number of acquisitions, 7057. 

189L 

The collection of the late Mr. S. H. Beckles, purchased from 
his widow, formed a most important accession to the general series 
of British fossils. A valuable collection of Eocene and Mesozoic 
fossils from the south of England, was also purchased from 
Mr. J. B. Ogle. A collection of Chalk fossils, chiefly from 
Burham, Kent, was presented by Mr. S. J. Hawkins. Fossils 
from the Red Chalk were purchased from Mr. Thomas Jesson. 

A newly discovered frontlet of Saiga tatarica, from the 
Thames deposits at Twickenham, was presented by Dr. J. R. 
Leeson. Remains of bison and reindeer dug up in Buckingham 
Palace Road, were presented by the Duke of Westminster. The 



Geology. 245 

antlers of Cermis elaphus, from tufa at Alport, near Bakewell, 
Derbyshire, described by R. Barber {Phil Trans., 1785, p. 353), 
and subsequently by H. Woodward {GcoL Mag., 1898, p. 49, pi. ii.), 
were presented by Mr. Frank S. Goodwin. A skull of Titano- 
iliermm and a skull of Hijsenodon Jiorridus from the White Kiver 
Formation of Dakota, were acquired by purchase. 

A restored skeleton of Pachyornis rohastm from New Zealand 
was purchased. 

Important remains of Iguanodon and other Wealden Dinosaurs 
were contained in the Beckles Collection. Another instalment 
of the Leeds Collection of Oxfordian Reptilia was purchased. 
The supposed reptilian eggs, Oolith'S hafhomcde, from the Great 
Oolite, described by J. Buckman {QuaH. Jonrn. Geol. Soc, 
vol. xvi.), were presented by the Earl of Ducie. 

Unique Chalk fishes were contained in the Beckles and 
Hawkins Collections. A fine slab of Portheus, two specimens of 
Empo, and one of IcJithjodectes, from the Chalk of Kansas, were 
acquired by purchase. The Weston Collection of fishes from the 
North Staffordshire coalfield was purchased. A few Devonian 
fish-remains from Spitzbergen were presented by Dr. A. S. 
AVoodward. 

Some Palaeozoic fossils from the Falkland Islands were 
presented by Dr. H. H. Hoffert. A series of Mesozoic and 
Palaeozoic Entomostraca was purchased from Prof. T. Rupert 
Jones Two Tertiary Brachyurous Crustacea from Akita, 
N Japan, were presented by Mr. B. Clarke Thornhill. Fossil 
insects from the Tertiary of Wyoming and Colorado were 
presented by Mr. R. C Hills. Jurassic Ammomtes from 
8omaliland were presented by Mr. J. G. Nicholson. Miocene 
Mollusca from Java were presented by Mr. Julien Debey. 
Pleistocene non-marine Mollusca from Brentford and Kew (Belt 
Coll.), were presented by Mrs. Belt; from Chelmsford and 
Portland, by Mr. B. B. Woodward; from Whitehall, by Mr 
W J Lewis Abbott. Pleistocene Mollusca from N. Italy and 
8 France, were presented by Mr. Clement Reid. An important 
collection of Devonian Echinoderma, especially Asteroidea and 
Ophiuroidea, from Bundenbach, Rhenish Prussia, was purchased 
from Mr. B. Sturtz, who had described many of the specimens. 
A collection of Palaeozoic Crinoidea, including type- and figured 
.specimens, was purchased from Mr. J. G. Grenfell Ci'eUceous 
Echinoids from Algeria were purchased from Mr. B. hturtz. 
-Some Brachiopoda from the Inferior Oolite of Dorsetshu-e, were 



246 Geology. 

presented by Mr. J. F. Walker. A collection of slides of Polyzoa 
and other minute organisms was purchased from Mr. G. R. Vine. 
Fossil corals from Barbados were presented by Mr. G. Firth 
Franks ; from Antigua, by Mrs. E. Turner. 

Eocene plants from Florissant, Colorado, were presented by 
Mr. R. C. Hills. A few Wealden plants from Hastings were 
purchased from Mr. P. J. Rufford. 

Total number of acquisitions, 15,211. 

1892. 

The Widger Collection of remains of Pleistocene Mammals 
a,nd Birds from the Tor Bryan Caves, Torquay, was purchased 
from Mr. F. H. Butler. A similar collection from the Heathery 
Burn Cave, Durham, was presented by Rev. Canon Greenwell. 
A piece of skin of the Mammoth from Siberia was obtained by 
exchange with the Imperial Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg. 

A plaster cast of the hind limb (without the phalanges) of 
Brontornis hurmeisteri, from Lake Argentino, Patagonia, was 
presented by Dr. F. P. Moreno. Bones of Dodo from Mauritius 
were presented by Sir Charles Cameron Lees. 

Among Reptilia the most important acquisitions were the 
type-skeleton of Pariasaurus haini, an incomplete skeleton of 
Pariasaurus homhidens, and other remains obtained by Prof. 
H. G. Seeley from the Karoo Formation of South Africa^ 
presented by the Council of the Royal Society. A unique skull 
with shoulder-girdle of ProcolopTion trigoniceps, from the same 
formation, was presented by Dr. Hugh Exton. Remains of 
Iguanodon, from the Wealden of Sussex, were again purchased 
through Mr. Charles Dawson. Another instalment of the Leeds 
Collection of Oxfordian Reptilia was purchased. Two complete 
shells and other remains of Testudo grandidieri, fi'om caverns in 
Madagascar, were purchased from Mr. H. Grose-Smith. 

The portion of the Leeds Collection purchased this year 
included many important fish-remains from the Oxford Clay of 
Peterborough. Two Jurassic fishes (Lycoptera sinensis) from 
Shantung, China, were presented by Mr. H. M. Becher. The 
John Plant Collection of fish-remains from the Coal Measures, 
near Manchester, was purchased. ImjDortant fishes from the 
Devonian of Canada, and fragments of Pteraspis cormihica 
from the Devonian of Cornwall, all collected Vjy Mr. Jex, were 
purchased from Mr. R. F. Damon. Selachian teeth from the 



Geology. 247 

Tertiary of Bissex Hill, Barbados, were presented by Col. 
H. W. Feilden. 

Miscellaneous Invertebrata, collected by the late Mr. W. F. 
Jennings of High worth, from the Mesozoic rocks of Britain, were 
presented by Miss Ethel A. Thomas. Collections of Invertebrata 
from the Inferior Oolite of Yeovil and from the Oxford Clay of 
St. Ives, were purchased from Mr. Henry Monk and Mr. T. Jesson 
respectively. The type-specimen of Palaeotermes ellisi, from 
the Lower Lias of Barrow-on-Soar, was pi-esented by Mr. 
Montagu Browne. Up^Der Silurian Ostracoda were purchased 
from Prof. T. Rupert Jones. British and French Eocene 
Mollusca were purchased from Mr. J. S. Gardner. A slab of 
shell-marble from La Luz, New Mexico, was presented by 
Mr. O. H. Howarth. Pleistocene non-marine Mollusca from 
Bohemia were purchased from Dr. Anton Fritsch. Pleistocene 
Mollusca from Barbados were presented by Right Rev. Bishop 
Mitchinson ; from Malta, by Mr. J. H. Cooke. Pleistocene non- 
marine Mollusca from Grays and the Kennet Valley (J. Pickering 
Collection), were presented by the Council of the Geologists' 
Association. Miocene Echinoids from Malta were presented by 
Mr. J. H. Cooke. A unique specimen of Amplexiis from the 
Carboniferous Limestone of Weston was purchased from Rev. 
H. G. Tomkins. A collection of slides of Foraminifera and other 
minute organisms, made by the late Prof. W. K. Parker, was 
purchased from Prof. W. N. Parker. The collection of the late 
Dr. W. B. Carpenter, illustrating his researches on Eozoon 
canadense, was presented by Rev. J. Estlin Carpenter. Fora- 
minifera from the Upper Chalk of Taplow were purchased from 
Mr. F. Chapman; from the Tertiary of Trinidad, from Mr. 
R. J. Lechmere Guppy. Specimens of Radiolarian marl from 
Barbados were presented by Mr. A. J. Jukes-Browne. 

Remains of Glossopteris and associated plants, collected by 
Mr. Edgar Hall in New South Wales, were presented by Mr. 
W. H. Shrubsole. Another instalment of the Ruflford Collection 
of Wealden plants was purchased. 

Total number of acquisitions, 11,781. 

1893. 

The most remarkable acquisitions this year were remains of 
extinct lemurs, Hippopotamus, Aepyornis, crocodiles, etc., from 
the superficial deposits of Madagascar, purchased from Mr. 



248 Geology, 

C. F. Wills and Mr. Joseph H. Fenn, and through Mr. Edward 
Gerrard. Among these fossils was the type-skull of Megaladapis 
madagascariensis, described by Dr. Forsyth Major. 

Middle Miocene Mammalia from La Grive-St.-Alban (Isere), 
France, were purchased from Dr. Forsyth Major. Mammalian 
remains (with a few Mollusca), collected by Mr. J. H. Cooke in 
the Har Dalam caverns, Malta, were presented by the Council of 
the Royal Society. An important series of Pleistocene Mammalia 
from Cray ford and Erith, Thames Valley, was presented by Mr. 
F. C. J. Spurrell. A mammalian tooth from the Wealden of 
Hastings was presented by Sir John Evans. 

A skeleton of Aptornis defossor, found by Mr. W, S. Mitchell 
at Castle Rock, South Island, New Zealand, was purchased from 
Mr. A. Hamilton. Remains of Dinornithidt^, including scapulo- 
coracoids, from New Zealand, were purchased from Dr. H. O. 
Forbes. Remains of ApTianapteryx, from the Chatham Islands, 
were purchased from Mr. E. Gerrard. Pleistocene bird-bones 
from Corsica and Sardinia, described Ijy Mr. R. Lydekker (Proc. 
Zool. Soc, 1891), were purchased from Dr. Forsyth Major. 

The type-jaws of Pariasaurus russouwi, from the Karoo 
Formation of South Africa, obtained and described by Prof. 
H. G. Seeley, were presented by the Council of the Royal 
Society. The type-skull of Steneosaurm harom, R. B. Newton, 
from the Jurassic of N. W. Madagascar, was presented by Rev. 
R. Baron. Plaster casts of the type-specimens of Triassic Reptilia 
from Elgin, described by Mr. E. T. Newton (Phil Trans., 1893), 
were purchased. More Oxfordian Reptilia from the Leeds Col- 
lection were purchased. Wealden Reptiles, Fishes, and Plants 
were purchased from Mr. P. J. Rufford. 

A collection of Lower Devonian Fishes, with a few Crustacean 
and Plant-remains, from Forfarshire, was purchased from Rev. 
Hugh Mitchell. Some Lower Carboniferous Elasmobranch teeth 
from Mjatschkowa, Moscow, were also purchased. The largest 
known dentition of Myliohatis {M. joentoni), from the Eocene near 
Cairo, was presented by Surg. -Cap t. R. H. Penton. 

A large series of Silurian fossils from Gotland was collected 
and presented by Dr. F. A. Bather. Remains of Olenellus from 
the Lower Cambrian, Caer Caradoc, were purchased from Mr. 
R. F. Damon. Gault Ostracoda and Foraminifera were purchased 
from Mr. F. Chapman. Some Cephalopoda from the Carboni- 
ferous Limestone of Ireland were presented by Dr. A. H. Foord. 
Inferior Oolite Nautili were purchased from Mr. S. S. Buckman. 



Geology, 249 

Eocene Mollusca from the Paris Basin, formerly in the collection of 
Miss Etheldred Benett, were presented by Mr. J. Benett-Stanford. 
Miocene Mollusca from N. Carolina were presented by Mr. 
Joseph Willcox. Additional Lower Devonian Asteroids from 
Bundenbach were purchased from Mr. B. Stiirtz. Crinoids from 
the Trenton Limestone were purchased from Dr. H. M. Ami. 
►Specimens of Palaeozoic Crinoidal limestone from N.W. of Cabul, 
Afghanistan, were presented by Mr. A. L. Collins. The G. R. 
Vine Collection of Polyzoa and the W. Gamble Collection of 
Cretaceous Polyzoa, were purchased. Specimens of SaltercUa 
from the Lower Cambrian of Sutherland, were presented by the 
Duke of Argyll. 

Two cores of Carboniferous sandstone and Carboniferous 
plant-remains from the Dover boring were presented by Mr. 
Francis Brady. Plants from the Forest of Dean Coalfield 
were purchased from Mr. T. Stock. Remains of the Glossopteris 
Flora from South Africa were presented by Mr. David Draper. 
Two specimens of Arthrophycus, obtained by Mr. G. E. Ferguson, 
probably from a Palieozoic formation in the interior of Gold 
Coast Colony, were presented by Prof. J. W. Judd. 

Total number of acquisitions, 11,948. 

1894. 

Two important general collections were acquired this year by 
purchase, namely : (1) that of Prof, (afterwards Sir) Joseph 
Prestwich from the Coal Measures of Coalbrookdale, and (2) 
that of Mr. T. Jesson from the Cambridge Green sand. Two 
extensive collections from the Cretaceous of Bahia, Brazil, were 
presented by Mr. Samuel Allport and Mr. Joseph Mawson 
respectively; the former had been described in the Quarterly 
Journal of the Geological Society, 1859 ; the latter contained 
the first evidence of Pterodactyls from South America. 

Lower Pliocene Mammalia from Samos, including a skull of 
Orycteropus, were purchased from Mr. B. Stiirtz. A mandibular 
ramus of Mastodon Jmmholdti from Brazil was included in Mr. 
Mawson's donation already mentioned. Miscellaneous bones of 
Mammalia and Aepyornis from Madagascar, were purchased from 
Messrs. J. H. Fox & Co., E. Gerrard, and J. T. Last. An antler 
of Reindeer and a skull of Bison from Thames deposits at 
Twickenham, were presented by Dr. J. R. Leeson and Mr. G. B. 
Lafian. 



250 Geology. 

Middle Miocene bird-remains from La Grive-St.-Alban, were 
purchased from Dr. Forsyth Major. A sacrum, humerus, and 
radius of Harpagornis moorei from Oamaru, New Zealand, were 
presented by Dr. H. 0. Forbes. 

Remains of large Dinosauria from the Jurassic of South West 
Madagascar, described by Mr. R. Lydekker (Quart. Journ. Geol. 
Soc, vol. li., 1895), were purchased from Mr. E. Gerrard. 
Dinosaurian bones from the Wealden of Sussex were purchased 
through Mr. Charles Dawson. Skulls and other remains of 
Pliosauria from the Oxford Clay of Peterborough were purchased 
from Mr. Alfred N. Leeds. A small Cretaceous Dolichosaurian 
from the Island of Lesina, Dalmatia, was purchased from Mr. B. 
Stiirtz. 

Fish-remains from the Upper Silurian of Oesel, Baltic Sea, 
collected by Mr. A. Simonson, were purchased from him and 
from Dr. F. Krantz. Specimens of Palseospondylus gunni, 
obtained by Mr. Donald Calder from the Old Red Sandstone of 
Caithness, also plates of Homosteus milleri from the same forma- 
tion, were purchased from Mr. F. H. Butler. Plates of Astero- 
lepis maxima from the Upper Old Red Sandstone of Naii'n, were 
presented by Dr. R. H. Traquair. The John Ward Collection 
of Fishes and Amphibia from the Coal Measures of Staffordshire, 
was acquired by purchase. 

Silurian and Devonian Invertebrata from Herault, France, 
were purchased. Part of the Madeley Collection of Silurian 
Invertebrata from Dudley, was obtained by exchange. Jurassic 
Invertebrata from Gloucestershire and Dorsetshire were pur- 
chased from Mr. S. S. Buckman. Some Tertiary limestones 
from Borneo were presented by Mr. A. H. Everett. A specimen 
of Triarth'us hecli, showing appendages, from the Utica Slate, 
New York, was presented by Prof. O. C. Marsh. Tertiary 
Mollusca from Alabama were purchased from Mr. G. B. Sowerby ; 
Pliocene Mollusca from Monte Mario, near Rome, from Mr. A. 
Martinetti; and English Crag Mollusca (collected by the late 
Mr. Robert Bell), from Mr. R. F. Damon. Cretaceous Mollusca 
from the Umtamvana River, Natal, were presented by the 
Government of Natal; Oligocene and Miocene Mollusca from 
Bordeaux were presented by Messrs. G. F. Harris and H. W. 
Burrows ; and Miocene Mollusca and Corals from Antigua, were 
presented by Mr. A. J. Jukes-Browne. Crinoids from the Carboni- 
ferous Limestone of Alveston, Bristol, were purchased from 
Mr. T. Stock. Tertiary Polyzoa from New Zealand, labelled 



Geology, 251 

and partly described by Mr. A. W. Waters, were purchased 
from Mrs. H. Tabor. Some Calci-sponges from the English 
Inferior Oolite, described by Dr. Hinde in his "Monograph of 
British Fossil Sponges " (Palseontographical Society), were pre- 
sented by Mr. R. F. Tomes. Nummulitic limestone from Murren, 
Bernese Oberland, was presented by Sir John Lubbock, Bart, 
(now Lord Avebury) and Mr. R. Etheridge. Gault Foraminifera 
were purchased from Mr. F. Chapman. 

A large collection of fossil plants from the Coal Measures of 
Radstock, Somersetshire, was presented by Mr. James McMurtrie. 
An additional instalment of the Rufford Collection of Wealden 
plants was purchased. 

Total number of acquisitions, 16,305. 

1895. 

Several important private collections were acquired this year.. 
A large selection of English fossils (except insects) from the 
collection of Rev. P. B. Brodie, was purchased. English Jurassic 
and Cretaceous fossils, collected by Mr. W. C. Lucy, were pre- 
sented by Mr. Edward Power. The collection of the late Mr. 
J. W. Hulke, chiefly Dinosaurian bones from the AVealden of 
the Isle of Wight, was presented by Mrs. Hulke. The collection 
of the late Mr. James W. Davis, chiefly fossil fishes, was pur- 
chased from Mrs. Davis. Prof. H. A. Nicholson's collection of 
Stromatoporoids was purchased. Another instalment of the 
Madeley Collection of Upper Silurian and Carboniferous fossils 
was purchased from Mr. R. F. Damon. A collection of flints 
and Mammalian bones, illustrating the Pala?olithic floor at 
Crayford described in Quart. Joiirn. Geol. Soc, vol. xxxvi. (1880), 
was presented by Mr. F. C. J. Spurrell. 

A plaster cast of the calvaria of Pithecnnthrojjus crecinif 
from Java was presented by Dr. E. Dubois. A skull and horn 
of Bhinoceros antiqidtatis from Siberia were purchased from INIr. 
R. F. Damon. A skull of Titanotlierium from the White River 
Formation of Dakota was purchased from Prof. H. A. Ward. 
Lower Pliocene Mammalia collected by Dr. Forsyth Major at 
Olivola, North Italy, were purchased through Mr. F. H. Butler. 
Remains of Hippopotamus and Aepyornis from jNIadagascar, 
collected by Rev. James AVills, were also purchased. 

Another important donation of fossil Reptilia (CynognaiJim, 
GompJiognatJms, &c.), collected by Prof. H. G. Seeley in the 
Karoo Formation of South Africa, was received from the Council 



9n9 



Geology. 



of the Royal Society. A few Oxfordian Reptilia were pur- 
chased from Mr. Alfred N. Leeds. Dinosaurian teeth from the 
Portlandian of Aylesbury were presented by Mr. J, Alstone. 
A plaster cast of a skeleton of L/iianodon hernissartensis was 
obtained by exchange with the Brussels Royal Museum of 
Natural History. 

A fragment of Belonostomus swccti, ivom. the Cretaceous of 
Queensland, was presented by Mr. George Sweet. 

Invertebrata and plants from the Jurassic and other forma- 
tions of Madagascar, partly described by R. B. Xewton {Quart. 
Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. li., 1895), were presented by Rev. R. Baron. 
Jurassic Invertebrata from Xormandy were purchased from 
Mrs. J. F. Blake. Invertebrate fossils and Radiolarian Chert 
from the Lower Culm Measures of North C(jrnwali, described 
by Howard Fox and G. J. Hinde {Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. li., 
1895), were presented by those gentlemen. A fine Scorpion 
{Ci/clojjhihalnuLs) from the Lower Permian of Bohemia, was 
purchased from Prof. J. Kusta. Specimens of TriartJirus hecli, 
showing appendages, from the Utica Slate, New York, were 
presented by Prof. O. C. Marsh. A slab of Uintacrinus from 
the Chalk of Kansas, described and figured {Proc. Zool. Soc. for 
1895), was purchased from Mr. H. T. Martin. Eighty-eight 
Echinoderms of the Madeley collection were purchased. Speci- 
mens of Archanodon JuTcesi, from the Upper Old Red Sandstone 
of Llanvaches, Monmouthshire, w^ere presented by Mr. Percy 
Hawkins. Non-marine Mollusca from the Thames deposits at 
Twickenham were presented by Dr. J. R. Leeson. Specimens 
of BracJiiospongia from the Ordovician of Kentucky were pre- 
sented by Prof. O. C. Marsh. Sponges from the Coral Rag and 
Chalk of Yorkshire were purchased from Mr. S. Chadwick. 

A unique specimen of Cycadeoidea gig ante a ^ from the Purbeck 
Beds of Portland, described by A. C. Seward {Quart. Journ. 
Geol. Soc, vol. liii., 1897), was purchased from Mr. R. F. 
Damon. Fossil plants from Inferior Oolite, Scarborough, were 
also purchased. 

The collection of deep-sea deposits made by H.M.S. Challenger 
was received from Dr. (now Sir) John Murray. 

Total number of acquisitions, 9366. 

1896. 

The most important acquisition this year was the late Prof. 
W. C. Williamson's Collection of Carboniferous Plants, especially 



Geology, 253 

microscope-sections, purchased from his executors. A unique 
collection of remains of fossil birds from the Santa Cruz 
formation of Patagonia, described by C. W. Andrews (Trans. 
Zool. Soc, vol. XV., 1899), was purchased from Dr. Florentino 
Ameo-hino. The residue of the late Sir Joseph Prestwich's 
Collection, including flint implements, was presented by Lady 
Prestwich. A large selection from the Collection of the late 
Mr. W. Pengelly was presented by Mrs. Pengelly. A selection 
from the late Mr. T. J. Slatter's Collection of Jurassic fossils, 
with a few Mammalian remains from Evesham, was purchased 
from Miss P. Slattei-. 

A valuable collection of Mammalian remains, with a few 
lower organisms, fi'ora the White River Formation of Dakota, 
U.S.A., was purchased through Prof. W. B. Scott. Bone-breccia, 
with remains of Burra,in/s, Perameles, S:c., from the Wombeyan 
Caves, New South Wales, was presented by Dr. R. Broom. A 
skull of Bos primifjenius from Twickenham was presented by Dr. 
J. R. Leeson. 

A nearly complete skeleton of one individual of Dinornis 
maximus from New Zealand was purchased from Mr. C. A. 
Ewen. 

A few additional Reptilia from the Oxford Clay of Peter- 
borough were purchased from iSIr. Alfred N. Leeds. Remains 
of Microsauria from the Coal Measures, South Joggins, Nova 
Scotia, were presented by Sir J. William Dawson. Some remains 
of Reptiles and Fishes from the Cretaceous near Bahia, Brazil, 
were presented by Mr. Joseph Mawson. 

Specimens of Palseoqwndylus and other Fishes from the Old 
Red Sandstone of Caithness, were presented by Mr. James Reid. 
An important small collection of fish-remains from the Upper 
Old Red Sandstone of Scaat Craig, Elgin, was purchased from 
Major Lambart Brickenden. Three specimens of Cladosclache 
from the Upper Devonian of Ohio (William Clark Collection), 
were purchased from Prof. E. W. Claypole. 

Miscellaneous fossils from the Rh^etic, Aust Cliff, were pur- 
chased from Mr. F. Ellis. Invertebrata from the Lower Lias of 
Somersetshire were presented by Mr. Spencer G. Perceval ; 
from the Gault of Okeford Fitzpaine, Dorset, by Miss Lowndes. 
Fossils from the Salt Range, India, were presented by Mr. F. G. 
Brook Fox ; from Somaliland, by Mrs. E. Lort Phillips. Lower 
Carboniferous Invertebrata from Mjatschkowa, Moscow, were 
purchased from Mr. R. F. Damon ; Miocene Invertebrata from 



254 Geology, 

Malta, from Mr. J. H. Cooke ; Cretaceous Invertebrata from 
the Lebanon, from Rev. C. H. V. Gollmer. Trilobites from the 
Culm Measures near Barnstaple were presented by Mr. J. G. 
Hamling ; from the Silurian of Mount Stephen, British Columbia, 
by Mr. George de Wolf. Lower Pliocene Mollusca from North 
Italy, noticed by Gwyn Jeffreys {Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 
vol. xl., 1884), were presented by Colonel Godwin- Austen. 
Pleistocene Mollusca from the Rubble Drift of Portland and 
Sangatte (France), were presented by Rev. R. Ashington Bullen. 
Non-marine Mollusca from deposits near London, were presented 
by Dr. Frank Corner. Tertiary Mollusca from Australia and 
Tasmania were purchased from Mr. R. F. Damon. Jurassic and 
Cretaceous Echinoids from France were purchased from Mr. 
A. Michalet. The late Mr. G. W. Shrubsole's Collection of 
Palaeozoic Polyzoa was presented by Mr. George Shrubsole. 

Plant-remains from the Miocene lignites of the Siebensebircre, 
near Bonn, were purchased from Mr. B. Stiirtz. 

Total number of acquisitions, 16,262. 



1897. 

Mr. A. C. Savin's Collection of Yertebrata, chiefly Mammalia, 
from the Forest Bed Series of Norfolk, was acquired by purchase. 
A second instalment of Dr. Forsyth Major's Collection of Lower 
Pliocene Mammalia from Olivola was also purchased. Remains 
of pigmy elephants obtained by Dr. Hans Pohlig from the 
caverns of Sicily, were purchased from Dr. F. Krantz. Some 
jaws of Rodentia from the Fish River Caves, Blue Mountains, 
New South "Wales, were presented by Mr. H. Spearing. Limb- 
bones of Gemjornis newtoni from Mulligan Springs, South 
Australia, were received in exchange from Prof. E. C. Stirlinf^. 

Important remains of Reptilia from the Oxford Clay of 
Peterborough, were purchased from Mr. Alfred N. Leeds. Jaws 
of Eiiskelesaurus and other remains from the Karoo Formation of 
South Africa (described in Ann. & Mag. Nat. Hist., ser. 6, 
vol. xiv., 1894), were presented by Prof. H. G. Seeley. A 
specimen of Bhamphorhynchus gemmhigi, showing the palate, 
from the Lithographic Stone of Eichsttidt, was i:)urchased from 
Dr. F. Krantz. 

Specimens of Atlierstonia and other Pal?eoniscid fishes from 
the Karoo Formation of South Africa, were presented by Prof. 
H. G. Seeley, Mr. T. J. Haughton, and Mr. S. Kemper. 



Geology. 255 

Fossils from the neighbourhood of Nagpur, Central India, 
were bequeathed by the late Rev. Dr. John Hunter ; from 
British Honduras, were presented by the Administrator of the 
Colony ; from the Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary of Algeria, 
were purchased from Mr. R. F. Damon. Lower Carboniferous 
Invertebrata from the Pennine Hills and the Isle of Man were 
presented by Messrs. J. Barnes andW. F. Holroyd; Lower Jurassic 
Invertebrata from Somersetshire and Dorsetshire were purchased 
from Mr. Henry Monk. Some Bohemian Trilobites from the 
Barrande Collection were purchased from Dr. Anton Fritsch. 
Tertiary and Cretaceous Mollusca from Galveston, Texas, were 
purchased from Mr. J. A. Singley. The Worthen Collection of 
American Palaeozoic Echinoderms, chiefly Blastoideaand Crinoidea, 
was purchased. Polyzoa from the Irish Chalk were presented 
by Mr. Joseph Wright ; other Cretaceous Polyzoa were presented 
by Dr. H. P. Blackmore, Mr. C. J. A. Meyer, and ISIr. H. A. 
Hinton. A specimen of Nummulitic Limestone from Singhe La, 
Himalaya, was presented by Mr. T. D. La Touche. 

Remains of the Glossopteris Flora from South Africa, described 
by A. C. Seward {Quart Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. liii., 1897), were 
presented by Mr. David Draper. 

Total number of acquisitions, 7562. 

1898. 

The most important collection acquired this year was that of 
Fossil Insects made by the late Rev. P. B. Brodie, purchased 
from his executor. The collection of the late Mr. G. H. Piper, 
consisting chiefly of fossils from the Upper Silurian and Passage 
Beds at Ledbury, was also purchased from his executor. A 
nearly similar but comparatively small collection made by the 
late Rev. T. T. Lewis, of Aymestry, was purchased from Mr. 
T. Bryan Ward. The Castelli Collection, chiefly Tertiary fossils 
from N. Italy, was purchased from Mr. R. F. Damon. 

Part of a skull of BaUena aiistralis from a river deposit at 
Villa Constitucion, on the Parana, Argentine RepubHc, was 
presented by Mr. A. C. Gostling. Jaws of cave-bear from a 
cavern at Isturitz, Bayonne, were presented by Mr. George 
Greenwood. A tooth of Elasmotheriiim from Saratov, Russia, 
was presented by Mr. Karl Masing. 

The skull and other remains of a bird {PropliPcthon shrnh- 
solei, Andrews, Proc. Zool Soc, 1899), from the London Clay of 



256 Geology, 

Sheppey, were purchased from Mr. W. H. Shrubsole. A plaster 
cast of the type-specimen of Archseopteryx siemensi, in the Berlin 
Museum, was purchased from Dr. F. Krantz. Bones of birds 
from the Chatham Islands were purchased through Mr. J. D. 
Enys. 

A fine skeleton of Ichthyosaurus platyodon, from the Lower 
Lias of Stockton, Warwickshire, was presented by Mr. Michael 
Lakin. Wealden Dinosaurian bones from Sussex were purchased 
through Mr. Charles Dawson. A Reptilian egg from the Oxford 
Clay, Peterborough, was presented by Mr. Alfred N. Leeds. 

A la.rge specimen of Squatina alifera and other fish-remains 
from the Lithographic Stone of Nusplingen, Wiirtemberg, were 
purchased from Mr. B. Stiirtz. Three Characinoid fishes from a 
Tertiary Lignite at Taubate, San Paulo, Brazil, were obtained 
by exchange with the San Paulo Museum. Valuable Cephal- 
aspidians were contained in the Piper Collection. 

Palaeozoic Invertebrata from Tasmania were presented by 
Mr. T. Stephens; from Russia by Dr. F. A. Bather. A few 
Upper Carboniferous Invertebrata from Shansi, China, were 
presented by Mr. W. H. Shockley. Remarkable preparations of 
Eurypterus from the Upper Silurian, Island of Oesel, were 
purchased from Dr. G. Holm. MoUusca from the Carboniferous 
Limestone of Yorkshire were presented by Rev. Addison 
Crofton. American Pak^ozoic Polyzoa were purchased from 
Mr. E. O. Ulrich ; English Cretaceous Polyzoa from Mr. W. 
Gamble ; and French Cretaceous Polyzoa from Mr. F. H. Butler. 
Specimens of Radiolarian Chert from Japan were presented by 
Dr. T. Kochibe. 

Another instalment of the Rufi"ord Collection of Wealden 
plants was purchased. Remains of the Glossopteris flora from 
the Transvaal were presented by Dr. F. H. Hatch ; from 
Tasmania by Mr. T. Stephens. 

Total number of acquisitions, 13,012. 

1899. 

A large collection of fossils, including Mammalia, obtained 
by Mr. Jex from Patagonia, was purchased from Mr. R. F. Damon. 
An extensive series of Tertiary fossils from Anguilla, Dominica, 
Antigua, and Barbuda, in the West Indies, was collected and 
presented by Dr. J. W. Gregory. The latter included remains 
of the Rodent Amhlyrhiza in cave-breccia from Anguilla. 



Geology. 257 

Remains of the large Megaladapis insignis from Madagascar 
were purchased from Mr. R. F. Damon. A skull of Castoroides 
ohioensis from the Pleistocene of Illinois was obtained by exchange 
with the U.S. National Museum. 

Part of the skeleton of a gigantic Dinosaur, Ceiiosaurus Icudai, 
from the Oxford Clay of Peterborough, was purchased from 
Mr. Alfred N. Leeds. 

A small series of Teleostean Fishes from the Chalk of 
Bohemia was purchased from Dr. Anton Fritsch. Thdodiis and 
Birkenia from the Upper Silurian of Lanarkshire were purchased 
from Mr. F. H. Butler. Specimens of Pteraspis from Antigonish 
Co., Nova Scotia, were presented by the Director of the 
Geological Survey of Canada. 

Silurian Invertebrata from Ontario, Canada, were presented 
by Col. C. C. Grant. Devonian Invertebrata from the Eifel 
were presented by Mr. Upfield Green. Some fragmentary 
duplicates from a collection of Jurassic fossils from Franz Josef 
Land were presented by Messrs. F. Jackson and A. Harms worth. 
English Chalk Invertebrata were presented by Dr. Rowe, 
Mr. C. D. Sherborn, Mr. George Potter, and Mr. W. McPherson. 
The Dowker Collection of Cretaceous and Tertiary fossils from 
Kent was purchased from Miss E. F. Dowker. Miscellaneous 
Entomostraca were purchased from Prof. T. Rupert Jones. 
Mollusca and Corals from the Great Oolite of Fairford, Gloucester- 
shire, were purchased from Miss A. T. Slatter. Tertiary 
Mollusca from Victoria, Australia, were purchased from ^Ir. 
F. H. Butler ; from Florida, from Messrs. Sowerby and Fulton. 
Specimens of Silurian Crinoidal Limestone from Szechuen, China, 
were presented by Mr. F. W. Styan. A second instalment of 
the E. O. Ulrich Collection of American Pala?ozoic Polyzoa was 
purchased. Some Polyzoa and other fossils from the Chalk of 
Riigen were purchased from Mrs. Agnes Laur. The late Dr. 
George Busk's Collection of Tertiary and Mesozoic Polyzoa, 
including type-specimens described in his Monograph of the 
Polyzoa of the Crag, was presented by the Misses Busk. 

Total number of acquisitions, 9780. 

1900. 

The important collection of British fossils, chiefly of Paheozoic 
age, formed by the late Mr. G. H. Morton, of Liverpool, was 
purchased from Miss Morton. An almost unique collection of 
VOL. I. s 



258 Geology, 

PalEeozoic fishes from the Upper Devonian of Ohio, comprising 
Dinichthyids and Elasmobranchs, was purchased from Dr. 
William Clark, of Berea. 

An extensive series of Mammalian remains, chiefly of Lemurs, 
from the caverns of Madagascar, was purchased from Mr. 
F. Sikora. A reconstructed skeleton of Hippopotamus madagas- 
cariensis, from superficial deposits in Madagascar, was purchased 
from Dr. Forsyth Major. A few bones of Lower Pliocene 
Mammalia from Maragha, Persia, were presented by Mr. 
R. T. Giinther. Mammalian remains from the Phosphorites of 
southern France were purchased from Mr. B. Stiirtz ; from the 
Tertiaries of Patagonia, from Mr. R. F. Damon. A tusk of 
Trichechodon and other Mammalian fossils from the Red Crag 
of Suffolk were presented by the Committee of the Ipswich 
Museum. 

A pelvis, vertebrae, and limb-bones of Hesperornis, from the 
Chalk of Kansas, were purchased from Mr. Handel T. Martin. 

The nearly complete wing-bones of a gigantic Pterodactyl, 
Pteranodon, from the Kansas Chalk, were also purchased from 
Mr. Martin. Important remains of Mosasauria {Platecarp^is, 
Clidastes, and Tylosaurus) and Fishes (Anogmius, etc.) from the 
same formation, were purchased from Mr. C. H. Sternberg. 

Freshwater Tertiary Fishes from the Lignite of Taubate, 
San Paulo, Brazil, were presented by Mr. John Gordon. Addi- 
tional Fish-remains from the Upper Silurian of Lanarkshire were 
purchased from Mr. F. H. Butler. 

Miscellaneous British Fossil Invertebrata were purchased 
from Mr. T. D. Palin. Some Ordovician and Silurian fossils 

from Ontario, Canada, were presented by Col. C. C. Grant, and 
others were purchased from Dr. H. M. Ami. Two pieces of 

fossiliferous Carboniferous Limestone from Siam were presented 

by Mr. W. Mahon Daly. Marine Triassic Lamellibranchs from 

the Malay Peninsula, described by R. B. Newton {Proc. Malac. 

Soc. London, vol. iv.), were presented by Mr. H. F. Bellamy. 

Fossils from the English Chalk were presented by Mr. W. 

McPherson ; from the Red Chalk of Hunstanton, collected by 

Mr. Westmoreland, were purchased through Mr. Spencer G. 

Perceval; from the French Chalk, were purchased from Mr. 

Clemenceau. Miocene and other fossils from Lake Urmi, N.W. 

Persia, described by R. B. Newton and J. W. Gregory {Journ. 

Linn. Soc, Zool., vol. xxvii., 1899), were presented by Mr. R. T. 

Giinther. Cretaceous Mollusca from Somaliland were presented 



Geology, 259 

by Mr. J. B. Parkinson ; Eocene Mollusca from Oman, Araljia, 
by Lieut.-Col. A. S. G. Jayakar. Tertiary Mollusca from Japan 
were purchased from Messrs. Sowerby and Fulton. British 
Jurassic Nautili were purchased from Mr. S. S. Buckman. Two 
specimens of Ctenostreon, from the Jurassic near Basle, Switzer- 
land, were presented by Prof. R. Burckhardt. Newly-described 
Asteroidea and Ophiuroidea from the Lower Devonian of 
Bundenbach were purchased from Mr. B. Stiirtz ; Eocystis 
primsevus, from the Lower Cambrian of New Brunswick, was 
presented by Dr. G. F. Matthew. Specimens of Pieroconns 
minis, from the Lower Devonian of Bedruthan, N. Cornwall, 
were presented by Mr. Howard Fox ; supposed Coelentera from 
the Lower Cambrian, Mt. Granville, New York, were presented 
by the Hon. C. D. Walcott. 

Remains of Naiadites from the Rhsetic of Bristol were pre- 
sented by Mr. W, H. Wickes. 

Total number of acquisitions, 11,226. 



260 Geology, 



3. Alphabetical List of the more important Contribu- 
tors TO THE Collection of Fossils in the Depart- 
ment of Geology. 



Abbott (W. J. Lewis) 

Collected and presented non-marine Mollusca from Thames deposits at 
Whitehall, 1901. 

Adams (Andrew Leith) [ -1882] 

Between 1848 and 1873 Leith Adams was an army surgeon, and made 
many observations in Natural History while on foreign service. In 1865 
he visited Malta to report on an epidemic of cholera, and while there he 
explored some of the ossiferous fissures, from which he obtained numerous 
remains of pigmy elephants (Elephas melitensis, &c.) and a large rodent 
(Leithia melitensis). This collection was described by Leith Adams in 
his " Notes of a Naturalist in the Nile Valley and Malta " (1870), and 
was purchased by the Trustees of the British Museum in 1873. 

Admiralty, Lords of the 

Presented human skeleton from Guadaloupe in 1813, jaws of Homalo- 
dontotherium from Patagonia, 1874. 

Agassiz (Louis) 

Oligocene fishes from Canton Glarus, Switzerland, purchased 1837. 

Albany Museum, S. Africa 

Presented Palaioniscid fish from Karoo Formation, 1874. 

AUport (Samuel) [1816-1897] 

In early life Allport spent eight years at Bahia, Brazil, and while 
there he made an important small collection of fossils from the Cretaceous 
rocks of the neighbouring coast, which he described in 1859 {Quart. 
Journ. Oeol. Soc^ and presented to the British Museum in 1894. On his 
return to England, Allport settled in Birmingham, where he conducted 
those petrological researches by which he is best known. At the same 
time he made and himself prepared a valuable collection from the Silurian 
rocks of the neighbourhood, and this was purchased in 1871 and 1873 : 
many of the Trilobites, Molluscs, and Echinoderms were specially fine, 
the last yielding two co-types of Tlienarocrinus calUpygus. 

Alstone (John) 

Presented Dinosaurian teeth from Portlandian of Aylesbury, 1895. 

Ameghino (Florentino) 

In 1895 Dr. Ameghino, now Director of the National Museum, Buenos 
Ayres, described a remarkable series of bird-remains from the Santa Cruz 
Formation of Patagonia (BoL Instit. Geograf. Argent.). This collection 
of 380 specimens, made by his brother Carlos Ameghino, was purchased 
by the British Museum from Dr. Ameghino in 1896. 



Geology, 261 

Ami (Henry M.) 

Crinoids from Trenton Limestone, purchased 1893. 

Ordovician and Silurian fossils from Ontario, Canada, purchased 1900. 

Angelis (de) 

Pleistocene Mammalia from Buenos Aires, purchased 1845. 

Ansted (David Thomas) 

Presented jaw of Rhinoceros etruscus from Tejares, Malaga, 1868. 

Archer (Thomas Croxen) 

See Armstkong, J., 1884. 

Argyll (George Douglas Campbell, Eighth Biihc of) 

Presented Scolithus and Arenicolites from Cambi'ian of Durness, 1889, 
Salterella from Cambrian of Sutherland, 1893. Also sold to the Museum 
a Miocene Berycoid fish {HoJocentrum meUtense) from Malta, 1887. 

Armstrong (James) [1832-1892] 

One of the founders of the Glasgow Geological Society and joint author 
of a " Catalogue of Western Scottish Fossils." " His private collection was 
one of the best illustrations of the palaeontology of the Glasgow area, and 
is now preserved in the Museum of Science and Art, Edinburgh, while a 
small part is in the cabinet of Dr. Hunter of Carluke, Lanarkshire [now 
in Kilmarnock Museum] "( (7eoZ. Mag., 1893, p. 94). A portion, how- 
ever, consisting of 282 Carboniferous fossils, was transferred to the 
British Museum in 1884, through Prof. T. C. Archer, Director of the 
Edinburgh Museum. In 1880 the Trustees bought, through the dealer, 
E. W. Janson, 252 specimens of Scottish Carboniferous Ostracoda col- 
lected by Armstrong. 

Astier (J. E.) 

Astier was a Professor at the College of Grasse (Var), and author of a 
" Catalogue descriptif des Ancyhceras appartenant a letage neocomien 
d'Escragnolles et des Basses-Alpes " (1851). In 1853 the Trustees bought 
from him 1323 specimens of Cephalopoda from the Jurassic and Cre- 
taceous strata of the Basses Alpes, representing 543 species, many being 
specimens figured in the above-mentioned work and by A. d'Orbigny in 
the " Paleontologie francaise." They are accompanied by oblong paper 
labels in Astier's own hand, with a border of printed ornament. 



at Grahamstown, Cape Colony, Atherstoue had his attention 
A. G. Bain {q.v.) to the Fossil Reptiles of the Karoo For- 
these he found many important specimens, and in 1872 and 



Atherstone {The Hon. William Guybon) [1813-1898] 

Resident 
directed by A. 

mation. Of these he found many important specimens, 
1876 sent to the British Museum valuable donations, described in Owen's 
"Catalogue of Fossil Reptiles of South Africa" (1876). He also dis- 
covered a PaL'i^oniscid Fish {Atherstonia scutata) of which he presented 
the type-specimen to the British Museum in 1884. As one of the 
founders of the Albany Museum, Grahamstown, he enriched it with part 
of his collection. 

AttersoU (Emilie, Miss) 

Presented Maltese Tertiary Invertebrata, 1839. 



262 Geology. 

Austin (Thomas, Fort-Major) [1795-1881] 

Having early retired from the army, with the loss of a leg, Major 
Austin settled for the rest of his life in Bristol. Among other scientific 
studies he devoted much attention to Fossil Echinoderms, especially the 
stalked forms, upon which, either alone or in conjunction with his son 
Thomas, he pubhshed several papers in the Annals and Magazine of 
Natural History between 1842 and 1851. The " Monograph on Kecent 
and Fossil Crinoidea " by the same authors was begun in 1843 and 
stopped unfinished in 1849. Austin's own collection is in the Bristol 
Museum, but several of the specimens illustrated in the Monograph have 
come into the possession of the nation, e.g. Pentacrinites hriareus, 
frontispiece; P. johnsonii, pi. xv., and Poteriocrinus jpentagonus, pi. xi., 
f. 2a, from the J. E. Johnson collection, 1845; Extracrinus hriareus^ 
pi. xii., f. lb, from Canon J. E. Jackson, 1887. Of several specimens 
from the Carboniferous Limestone of Cleveland Bay, found by Miss Rich 
and purchased from Wm. Rich, 1867, those figured on pi. ix., ff. 4a, b, c, 
and pi. xi., f. 2d, have been identified. 

Austin (Thomas, Junior, Civil and Mining Engineer) 

See Austin, Thomas, Fort-Major. 

Australian Museum, Sydney 

Presented plaster casts of skulls of Diprotodon and Nototherium in 
1858, and Marsupial remains from the Wellington caves in 1870. 

Avebury (John Lubbock, \st Baron) 

Presented part of skull of musk-ox (Ovibos moscliatiis) from Maiden- 
head in 1856, two Eocene fishes {Diplomystus and Mioplosus) from 
Wyoming in 1886, and Nummulitic Limestone from Mlirren in 1894. 

Aylesford {Countess of) 

Presented Ichthyolites from Loughborough, 1817. 

Baber (James) [ -1887] 

While carrying on the business of an oil-cloth manufacturer in Knights- 
bridge, Baber accumulated a large collection of fossils, which was always 
open to public view, and was more than once alluded to by his friend. 
Prof. John Morris. It is supposed to have contained the type of Nautilus 
haheri, Morris and Lycett, 1850, but this specimen has been lost sight of. 
On the owner's death the collection was broken up, a selection of a mis- 
cellaneous character being acquired by the British Museum in 1889 from 
]\Irs. Baber, while another portion was selected for the Museum of 
Aberdeen University, and the remainder was disposed of by auction at 
Stevens' Rooms in 1890. 

Bain (Andrew Geddes) [ -1864] 

For many years Bain was engaged in constructing roads in Cape 
Colony, and in the course of this work he first noticed the remains of 
Fossil Reptiles in the Karoo Formation of that country. He sent all 
specimens found by him to England, where most of them were described 
by Owen. His first collection, including the original skulls of Oudenodon 
haini and Dicynodon leoniceps, was presented by him to the British 
Museum in 1853. Other important donations followed, and after his 
death, his son, Mr. Thomas Bain, who was also a road surveyor, continued 



Geology. 263 

to add to the collection. The Invertebrata and two Fishes, described by 
D. Sharpe and others in A. G. Bain's memoir " On the Geology of Soutii 
Africa" (Traws. Geol. Soc, 1856), are preserved in the Museum of the 
Geological Society. 

Baker (Anne Elizabeth) [1786-1861] 

The sister of George Baker, Miss Baker contributed to his great 
" History of the County of Northampton " (1822-41) the chapters on 
geology and botany, and herself published a " Glossary of Northampton- 
shire Words and Phrases." Lack of support forced Baker to sell his 
library and collection of MSS. in 1842, and in the following year the 
geological collection was purchased for the Museum from his sister. It 
comprised Pleistocene vertebrates and Jurassic vertebrates and inverte- 
brates, all from Northamptonshire, including a Fossil Fish — a Lepidotus 
from Nine Churches — figured by Miss Baker in the " History " and 
mentioned by Agassiz (Foissons fossiles). Gummed on the specimens 
are white paper labels with the localities in a fine, clear handwriting. 

Baker (John) 

Invertebrata from Upper Greensand, Warminster, purchased 1849. 

Baker (General Sir William Erskine) 

Presented skull of EJephas ganesa from Siwalik formation of India in 
1845, Tertiary Invertebrata from Sind in 1849 and 1855. 

Ball (John) 

Pleistocene Mammalia from Thames Valley, purchased 1844. 

Ball (John, F.R.S.) 

Presented Miocene Mollusca from Morocco, 1885. 

Balston (William Edward) 

Presented Devonian fossils from South Africa, 1885. 

Barnes (John) 

Presented English Lower Carboniferous Invertebrata, 1897. 

Baron (Richard) 

The Kev. E. Baron, a missionary in Madagascar, has studied the 
theology of that country and published papers tliereon in the Antana- 
narivo Annual and in the Quarterly Journal of the Geological 
Society (1889 and 1895), these latter being accompanied by descriptions 
of the fossils collected by Mr. Baron, from the pen of Mr. II. B. Newton. 
These specimens have been presented by Mr. Baron to the British 
Museum, and comprise 250 Eocene and Jurassic fossils, given in 1889 ; 
the type-skull of Steneosaurus haroni, Pt. B. Newton, received and 
described in 1893 ; and 135 fossil invertebrates and plants, handed over 
in 1895. 

Barrande (Joachim) [1799-1883] 

In 1831, Barrande settled in Bohemia as tutor, and subsequently 
steward, to Prince Henri de Chambord, and soon turned li is attention to 
elucidating the geology and paleontology of the Lower Palaeozoic (Cambrian 



264 



Geology, 



to Devonian) rocks of his adopted country, publishing the results mainly 
in the great work, entitled " Systeme Silurien du Centre de la Boheme," 
of which the first volume was issued in 1852, and which is still continued 
by a committee. His vast collections were made by specially retained 
and systematically instructed workers, and the greater part, including the 
specimens figured in his works, was bequeathed to the "Museum des 
Konigreichs Bohmen " in Prague. An extensive series of fine specimens 
was, however, sent by Barrande to the British Museum, in three separate 
lots, during the years 1854-6, and these were purchased in the Januaries 
of 1855, 1856, and 1857. The following is the resume of the three 
sendings, certified as correct by Barrande himself : — 



Trilobites 

Crustace's divers 

Ce'phalopodes 

Pterupodes 

Gasteropodes 

Ace'phale's 

Brachiopodes 

Echinodermes 

Graptolites 

Polypiers . 

Tncertae Sedis 

Fucoides 



Spp. 


Specimens 


200 


1515 


24 


104 


132 


595 


29 


]46 


115 


446 


46 


229 


138 


1516 


9 


47 


15 


181 


22 


81 


11 


40 


3 


10 



'44 



4860 



Each specimen is accompanied by a lithographed label, giving its 
name, horizon, and locality ; and thus, though not the actual originals, 
the collection is a most important aid to the study of Barrande's publica- 
tions. It has been supplemented by subsequent purchases from the 
Bohemian Museum, through Dr. A. Fritsch, e.(/., of Tiilobites in 1897. 

Barrett (Lucas) 

Presented a Hippurite {Barrettia moniUferci) from the Cretaceous of 
Jamaica, 1862. 

Basadre (Don Modesto) 

Presented remains of Scelidotherium from Pleistocene of Tarapaca, 
Peru, 1886. 

Bateson (William) 

Presented Eocene fossils from the Sea of Aral, 1888. 

Bather (Francis Arthur) 

Collected and presented Silurian fossils from Gotland in 1893; Pleis- 
tocene shells from New Zealand and Palreozoic crinoids from North 
America in 1894 : various Russian fossil Invertebrata in 1898. 



Baugh (Thomas) 

Collected fossils from the Carboniferous Limestone of Shropshire and 
associated formations ; his whole collection, including many teeth and 
spines of fishes, purchased 1870. 



Geology. 265 

Baynes (Donald S.) 

Presented remains of human skeleton from Tilbury Docks, 1887. 

Bean (William) 

The son of a market-gardener, to whose business at Scarborough he 
succeeded, Bean was also a cousin of William Smith and a pioneer in 
Yorkshire geology. In association with John Williamson (father of 
Wm. Crawford Williamson) he amassed, during the first half of the 
nineteenth century, such a collection from the Yorkshire coast as can 
never be made again. A few of his fossils went with Williamson's 
collection to the founding of the Scarborough Museum; in 1844 some 
were presented to the Museum of the Yorkshire Geological Societ\% now 
at Leeds ; others are in the York Museum. But in 1859 the finest 
specimens of Bean's collection, numbering 2588 and representing 1392 
species, were bought by the Trustees. They included a remarkable series 
of Oolitic plants "from the shales of Gristhorpe and Haiburn, near Scar- 
borough, some of which are the originals described by Adolpli Brongniart, 
Lindley and Button, Prof. J. Phillips, and Bunbury ; sponges from the 
Chalk of Flamborough ; corals and molluscs from Malton ; cephalopods 
from the Lias, Kelloway Rock and Speeton Clay; and molluscs and 
mammals from the Postpliocene of Bridlington. The specimens are 
provided with oblong white paper labels, often gummed on, written in a 
neat, rounded, back-hand, surrounded by a ruled ink line. 

Beche {Sir Henry T. de la) 

Presented English and French Jurassic and Cretaceous fossils, 1837. 

Becher (H. M.) 

Presented Jurassic fishes {Lycoptera sinensis) from Shantung, Ciiiua, 
1892. 

Beckles (Samuel Husband) [ -1890] 

Beckles was a resident of St. Leonards and made a large collection of 
fossils from the Wealden strata- of that neighbourhood, besides acquiring 
a few important specimens from the Chalk of Sussex and from other 
formations. He discovered footprints of Iguanodon in the Wealden 
sandstone near Hastings, and described these in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc.y 
1851, 1852, 1854, 1862. He also obtained valuable portions of skeletons 
of Iguanodon and other Dinosauria from the same formation, which were 
described by Sir Ptichard Owen in the Monographs of the Palaiunto- 
graphical Society. In 185G, with the aid of a grant from the Royal 
Society, Beckles explored the Purbeck Beds near Swanage, and 
made the most important collection of Mesozoic :Mammalian remains 
hitherto known from Europe. This exploration furnished evidence of two 
species of a new genus, Plagiaulax, described by Falconer in Quart. 
Journ. Geol. Soc, 1857; and the whole collection was subsequently 
described by Owen in his "Fossil Mammalia of the Mesozoic Formations" 
(Pal^ont. Soc, 1871). With the Mammalia were also remains of dwarf 
crocodiles and other Reptilia described by Owen in the Monographs ol 
the Palieontographical Society. The Purbeckian collection_was jnuchased 
by the Trustees from Beckles in two instalments in 187(!, 1877. One 
slab of footprints of Iguanodon was ])repented by him in 1888. The 
Wealden and general collection, comprising about _ 500^ Vertebrata and 
2000 Invertebrata, was imrchased from his executor in 1801. 



266 Geology. 

Beecke (B. van) 

Collected Mammalian remains from caverns of Sundwig, Westphalia ; 
this collection purchased at a sale, 1853. 

Belcher {Admiral Sir Edward) [1799-1877] 

Appointed in 1852 to the command of an expedition to the Arctic in 
search of Sir John Franklin, Belcher published in 1855 an account of it 
entitled " The Last of the Arctic Voyages." His collection of Arctic 
fossils was transferred from the Museum of Practical Geology in 1880. 

Bell (Alfred) 

See Bell, Robert George. 

Bell (Robert George) [1833-1888] 

Robert Bell, who, with his brother Alfred, was known as a careful 
worker in the British Pliocene rocks, was often employed as a collector by 
others. Thus the Museum possesses three collections made by him. 
First, his own, bought of his executors in 1888, and comprising 2730 
specimens of Lamellibranchia, Gasteroi)oda, and Polyzoa, from the Crag, 
mounted on cards, named, and accurately localised. Secondly, a series of 
Pliocene shells from St. Erth, Cornwall, referred to by Bell and P. F. 
Kendall {Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1886); this was the property of 
S. V. Wood, jun., by whose widow it was presented in 1886. Lastly, a 
collection of 3391 Crag MoUusca from Suffolk, representing 420 species, 
some figured in S. V. Wood's Monograph (Palfeont. Soc.) ; this was the 
property of a Mr. Groom {alias Groom-Napier, styling himself Prince of 
Mantua and Duke of Montferrat), from whose executors it was purchased, 
through R. F. Damon, m 1894. 

Bell (Thomas) 

Fossil Chelonia purchased from his collection, 1863. 

Belt (Mrs.) 

Presented non-marine MoUusca from Pleistocene deposits of Brentford 
and Kew, 1891. 

Benett (Etheldred) [17 -1845] 

" For more than a quarter of a century. Miss E. Benett," of Norton 
House, near Warminster, Wilts, " pursued with ardour and success the 
investigation and collection of the organic remains of her native county. 
... To her zeal and talents and the liberal encouragement she gave the 
local collectors, we are in a great measure indebted for our knowledge of 
the fossils of the Chalk and Greensand of Wiltshire, and more particularly 
of those in the neighbourhood of Warminster and Tisbury. . . . Her best 
specimens w^ere liberally presented to any individual or public museum 
when the advancement of science would be thereby promoted " {London 
Geol. Journ.). The encouragement of local collectors led to many of 
her specimens being ingenious reconstructions from fragments of several 
individuals or even species {Op. cit., p. 128). No such suspicion, however, 
attaches to the fossil sponges discovered in the Greensand by Geo. Warren 
of Warminster, collected for the most part by J. Baker of that place, and 
described and figured by Miss Benett in " A Catalogue of the Organic 
Remains of the County of Wilts " (privately printed, 1831), as well as in 



Geology. 267 

a MS. volume presented to the Geological Society in 1816. Among 
nmnerous references to Miss Benett by Mantell, we read that "An 
elegant Memoir on the Wiltshire Fossils, by this accomplished lady, 
appears in Sir R. C. Hoare's 'Wiltshire'" ("Medals of Creation," 1844, 
i. p. 260). 

Several donations of Wiltshire fossils were made by Miss Benett 
between 1816 and 1830. In 1831, she presented " a fine specimen of a 
new species of Pentacrinus from Farleigh, near Bath," and in 1841 some 
crinoids and other fossils from the Carboniferous Limestone, all the latter 
with a small printed label, " Whatley, nr. Frome, Somerset." Finally, in 
1893, 112 Eocene shells from Grionon, collected by Miss Benett in 1822, 
were presented by Mr. J. Benett Stanford. Other museums that profited 
by Miss Benett's liberality were those of Bristol and of the Geological 
Society. Many of her specimens were figured in Sowerby's "Mineral 
Conchology," but are now lost sight of. It appears that, on her death, 
the mosf valuable of the specimens remaining in her collection were 
purchased by Thomas Wilson of Newark, Delaware, U.S.A., to be 
incorporated in a very extensive collection in all branches of natural 
history that he was forming at Philadelphia (London Geol. Journ., 
part 2, p. ii. of wrapper). This collection is now in the possession of the 
Philadelphia Academy. 

Bennett (George) [1804-1893] 

While in medical practice in Sydney from 1836 until his retirement,. 
Bennett employed his leisure in natural history researches. He collected 
the fossil bones from the river deposits of New South Wales and Queens- 
land, and, from 1872 onwards, sent numerous donations to the British 
Museum for description by Owen. Most of these remains were referable 
to marsupials, but there were also some vertebra} of the gigantic lizard^ 
Meqalania prisca. Mr. G. F. Bennett, his son, also collected similar 
bones, and in 1880 he transmitted to the Museum the original skull and 
tail-sheath of the horned tortoise, Miolania oweni. 

Bennett (G. F.) 

See Bennett, George. 

Bennie (James) [1821-1901] 

As fossil-collector to the Geological Survey of Scotland, Bennie 
discovered several interesting species, and his name was associated with 
the blastoids Phxnoschisma benniei and Astrocriuiis (i.e., Zijgocrinus) 
henriiei, of which he presented 27 specimens to the Museum m 18y(). 
In 1888 he presented 9 microscope-slides of sponge-spicules Irom the 
Carboniferous of Ayrshire, many of which had been figured by Dr. G. J. 
Hmde in his Monograph of British Fossil Sponges (PahTontogr. b)0c., 
1887-88). 

Bensted (W. H.) 

Presented Cretaceous plant-remains from Maidstone, 1839. 

Berendt (Georg Carl) 

Amber containing insects and plant-remains, purchased 1847. 

Bigsby (John Jeremiah) [1792-1881] 

In early life, Bigsby, who is best known as author of the "^pesaurus 
Siluricus" (1868) and "Thesaurus Devonico-Carboniterus (18 < 8), 



268 Geology, 

travelled much as a Medical Officer in Canada in connection with the 
Boundary Commission, and made a large collection of Palaeozoic fossils 
both in that country and in the north-east part of the United States. 
The results of his researches were published chiefly in Silliman's 
American Journal of Science between 1820 and 1827. He presented 
his collection to the British Museum in 1851. Other specimens from the 
Lower Palaeozoic rocks of Canada, presented by him to the Museum 
■of Practical Geology, were transferred to the British Museum in 1880. 

Binkhorst (J. F.) 

Belgian Tertiary Mollusca, purchased 1857. 

Birch (Colonel) 

In 1820, some Chalk Echinoderms and some fossils from the Dorset- 
shire Lias were presented by this gentleman, who lived at Bath. The 
rest of his collection, which was sold at auction on May 15, 1820, by 
Bullock " in his Egyptian Hall, Piccadilly," included valuable remains of 
Pteptilia and Crinoidea from the Lias of Lyme and Charmouth, many 
<3ollected by Miss Mary Anning. (See G. A. Mantell, London GeoJ. 
Journ., p. 13 ; 1846). Several of these were bought for the British 
Museum, which also possesses the copy of the sale- catalogue that belonged 
to " the fossil shop at Lyme," signed Joseph Anning. 

Bishop (Mrs.) 

See Smith [Mrs.] M. H. 

Blackmore (Humphrey Purnell) 

Presented Cretaceous Polyzoa, 1897. 

Blake (John Frederick) 

Teleosaurian skull from Upper Lias of Whitby and FelohatocheJys 
hlakei from Kimmeridge Clay of Weymouth, purchased 1880. Jurassic 
luvertebrata from Normandy, purchased from Mrs. J. F. Blake, 1895. 

Bland 

Presented Ichthyosaurus from the Lias of Balderton, Nottinghamshire, 
1826. 

Blanford (William Thomas) [1832- ] 

Dr. Blanford, late of the Geological Survey of India, accompanied an 
expedition to Abyssinia in 1868 as geologist. He published a volume, 
"Observations on the Geology and Zoology of Abyssinia," in 1870. He 
presented his collection of Abyssinian fossils, including the specimens 
described in his work, to the Museum, 1869. 

Bloemfontein Museum 

Skulls of Tritylodon longsemis and Rhytidosteus capensis from the 
Karoo Formation of South Africa, obtained by exchange, 1884. 

Bosquet (J.) 

Cretaceous and Tertiary Entomostraca, purchased 1870. 



Geology. 261} 

Boury (E. de) 

Presented Paris Eocene MoUusca, 1889. 

Bowerbank (James Scott) [1797-1877] 

A wealthy citizen and distiller of London, Bowerbank accumulated,, 
mainly from British localities and from every horizon, a large collection of 
fossils, which served as the basis of important researches by himself and 
others, and was always open to scientific students. Many of the specimens 
are described in the Monographs of the Pala^ontographical Society, of which 
he was founder and first president. He wrote a book on the " Fossil 
Fruits of the London Clay" (1840), but is chiefly known for his later 
researches on Sponges. His collection of fossils was purchased for the 
Museum in two instalments in 1865. It included, besides the Fruits just 
mentioned, reptilian remains from the London Clay, Chalk, and Wealden ; 
Crustacea from the London Clay, Greensand, and Oolite ; Cirripedia and 
Polyzoa from the Crag; Lower Tertiary Mollusca ; Chalk Echinoidea 
— all figured in the Monographs of the Palaiontographical Society. 
There were many other fossils of all kinds, some figured in various 
works. No special form of label ever accompanied the Bowerbank 
specimens. 

Brady {Sir Antonio) [1811-1881] 

Brady began to collect mammalian remains from the Thames brick- 
earth near his residence at Ilford, Essex, in 1844. In his later years, he 
was aided by William Davies (Assistant in the Geological Department ol" 
the British Museum), who prepared a "Catalogue of the Pleistocene 
Vertebrata in the Collection of Sir Antonio Brady," privately printed in 
1874. All the specimens bear printed labels according to this Catalogue. 
The whole Collection w^as purchased in 1873. 

Brady (Francis) 

Presented Carboniferous cores from Dover boring, 1893. 

Brady (Henry Bowman) 

Presented Post-Tertiary shells from Solomon Islands, 1887. 

Brander (Gustavus) [1720-1787] 

Of a Swedish family, but born in the city of London, Brander met 
with success both in business and civic afi'airs, and, as a patron of the 
arts and sciences, he was elected a Trustee of the British Museum. 
While at his country residence at Christchurch, Hants, he collected 
Eocene fossils " out of the cliffs by the sea coast between Christchurch 
and Lymington, but more especially about the cliffs by the village of 
Hordwell "—from Barton Cliff, according to Mantell (" Geol. I. of W.," 
p. 124). A set of these, chiefly consisting of mollusc shells, was 
presented by him to the Museum in 1765, and was described by his 
fellow-countryman, D. C. Solander, an ofiicer of the Museum, in a work 
entitled " Fossilia Hantoniensia collecta, et in Musaeo Britannico deposita 
a Gustavo Brander," London ; 1776. In this book 131 specimens were 
figured and many new species described, but the collection was doubtless 
larger. Now, however, only 124 specimens are recognised as having 
belonged to it, and some of these may belong to subsequent donations of 
the same kind, which w^ere made by Brander. Forty-two of these 



270 Geology, 

specimens are regarded as the originals of Solander's figures, and they are 
included in Mr. R. B. Newton's " Systematic List of F. E. Edwards' 
Collection," published by the Trustees in 1891. The original labels if 
there were any, have long been lost, and those now preserved on the 
back of the tablets are in the handwriting of S. P. Woodward. The 
collection has occasionally been referred to as " The Solander Fossils ; 
next to the Sloane Collection, it is the oldest in the Geological 
Department. 

Braun (F.) 

German Triassic and Jurassic fossils, purchased 1837, 1839. 

Braun (F.) 

Devonian star-fishes from Bundenbach, purchased 1883. 

Bravard (Auguste) 

Like Pomel {q.v.) a native of Auvergne, Bravard made a collection 
of Tertiary Mammalia and other Vertebrata from Vaucluse, Allier, and 
Puy-de-D6me, with some Pleistocene bones (chiefly Ursus) from the 
caverns of Lozere. Deported, for political reasons, to Cayenne, he 
contrived in 1852-53 to make another valuable collection chiefly of 
Mammalia from the Pampa Formation of the Argentine Republic. These 
two collections were carefully catalogued by him, and each specimen was 
numbered in accordance with the catalogue, which was intended to be 
the basis of Memoirs never published. The French collection w^as 
purchased by the Museum from Bravard in 1852, the South American 
collection in 1854. 

Bree (C. R.) 

Presented rostrum of ZipMufi planirostris from Southwold, 1878. 

Brickenden (Major Richard Thomas William Lambart). 
[1809-1900] 
Major Brickenden published a few notes on the geology of Moray, 
Scotland {Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc. 1851, 55), and made a fine collection 
of about 100 fish-remains from the Upper Old Red Sandstone of Scaat 
Craig, near Elgin. This collection was briefly referred to in the last of 
the aforesaid notes, and was sold by him to the Museum in 1896. In 
the early part of his career, Brickenden also collected fossils in Sussex, 
and found at Cuckfield the first kno^vn mandibular ramus of Iguanodon, 
which he developed and presented to Mantell (see Fhil Trans., 1848, and 
*' Petrifactions and their Teachings," p. 241). 

Bright (Benjamin) [ -1900] 
See Bright, Richard. 

Bright (Benjamin Heywood) [1787-1843] 
See Bright, Richard. 

Bright (Henry) [ -1870] 
See Bright, Richard. 



Geology. 271 



Bright (Richard) [1754-1840] 

The history of this interesting collection, now divided between the 
Departments of Geology and Mineralogy, is somewhat complicated, so 
that it is well to tabulate the names and relationships of those connected 

with it, 

Richard Bright, Senior 

(1754-1840) 

Henry Benjamin Heywood Richard (M.D.) Robert Samuel 

(d. 1870) (1787-1843) (1789-1858) 

Benjamin (Donor) 
(d. circa 1900). 

Kichard Bright, Senior, lived at Ham Green, on the Avon, near Bristol, 
in which city he was a merchant and banker. A commercial connection 
with the mines of Cornwall made him an early collector, and in this he 
was assisted by William Smith and Eichard Phillips. It was in the 
fields adjoining his house at Ham Green that the now well-known deposits 
of sulphate of strontian were first discovered. He took advantage of the 
examination of caves in the Mendips and elsewhere to gather one of the 
earliest series of the bones of extinct mammals. To these he added fossil 
vertebrates from other localities, such as fishes from Monte Bolca and the 
Lebanon, and even the remains discovered at the base of the Himalayas 
a few years before his death. He was one of the founders of the Bristol 
Institution (1822), and to it he presented some interesting specimens. 
J. S. Miller, in his " Natural History of the Crinoidea " (1821), mentions 
having used specimens obtained by Richard Bright " from the transition 
limestone on his estate near the Malvern Hills." 

Henry, the eldest son, who inherited Crawley, is not known as a 
geologist, but he " had a turn for science and was a collector, especially of 
chalk and flint fossils." 

The second son, Benjamin Heywood, went to live at Brand Lodge, 
and when the railway from Malvern to Ledbury was made through the 
Brockbury estate, he gave great attention to the cutting, and collected 
many Silurian fossils. These were kept at Brand Lodge, and are specially 
mentioned by Murchison, who borrowed many of them to figure in his 
*' Silurian System " (see p. 414 of that work). It is possible that these 
were among the specimens handed over by Murchison to the Geological 
Society ; but they have not been identified either there or in the British 
Museum. 

The reputation that the third son, Richard, gained as a geologist, 
through studies at Bristol, in Iceland, and in Hungary (see Trans. Geoh 
Soc.) was eclipsed by his fame as physician at Guy's Hospital and as 
discoverer of the disease that bears his name. It is highly probable that 
he contributed specimens to his father's collection, as he appears also to 
have done to both the Geolo.iiical Society and the Bristol Institution. 
But this was only in his earlier years. 

The fourth son, Robert, who remained in Bristol as a merchant, 
cultivated art and literature rather than science, but is of interest because 
it was to him that Rule sold the piece of Moa bone that he had brought 
from New Zealand in 1839— the first portion of a Dinornis that came 
to this country, and the fragment from which Owen inferred the 
existence of this extinct race of gigantic birds. 

It thus appears that there were three Bright collections : the Bristol 
one, chiefly minerals and vertebrates; the Brand Lodge one, chiefly 
Silurian invertebrates ; and the Crawley one, chiefly Chalk invertebrates. 



272 Geology, 

On the death of Ricbard Bright, senior, Ham Green was left to BenjamiD 
Heywood, who sold it, and either took the whole collection to Brand 
Lodge or handed it over to Henry at Crawley. In any case, when 
B. H. Bright died three years later, his son Benjamin inherited Crawley, 
and presented the collection to the British Museum in 1873. The onerous 
task of repacking was accomplished hy William Davies of the Geological 
Department. Besides the valuable minerals and the vertebrate remains, 
there were over 3000 fossil invertebrates, chiefly British, but from having 
been left in rooms exposed to damp, mice, and nesting birds, all manu- 
scripts and labels had perished. 

[For details of family history thanks are due to Dr. J. Franck Bright, 
Master of University College, Oxford, and a son of Dr. E. Bright.] 

Bright (Richard) [1789-1858] 
See Bright, Eichaed. 

Bright (Robert) 

See Bright, Eichaed. 

British Association 

Presented Middle Eocene plant remains from Alum Bay, Isle of Wight, 
in 1867 ; remains of Yertebrata and Mollusca from the caverns of Borneo, 
1879. 
Brodie (Peter Bellinger) [1815-1897] 

Brodie's love for geology begun under the influence of Wm.^ Clift, 
curator of the College of Surgeons, was fostered by Sedgwick at 
Cambridge, and he was the first to collect land and fresh-water shells 
from the^Pleistocene deposit of Barnwell. In 1838 he went as curate to 
Wylye, north of the Yale of Wardour, where he discovered Archxoniscus 
hrodiei. Appointed in 1840 to a curacy in Buckinghamshire, he collected 
in the Portland and Purbeck beds near Aylesbury. For the next thirteen 
years he was rector of Do^^^l Hatherley in the Yale of Gloucester, and 
collected largely in the Eha^tic, Liassic, and Oolitic rocks of the district, 
reading geological papers before the Geological Society and the Cotteswold 
Field Chib. °From 1853 imtil his death he was vicar of Eowington, 
Warwickshire, where he occasionally met with rare fossils in the Keuper 
Formation, and extended his researches to the Upper Silurian of Hereford- 
shire and the Jurassic rocks of Northamptonshire and Leicestershire. All 
specimens collected by him bore an exact record of the formation and 
locality whence they were obtained, sometimes with other memoranda, 
the labels being in his own handwriting on miscellaneous scraps of paper, 
and usually gummed to the matrix. Brodie's general collection of over 
25,000 fossils included many valuable type-specimens, and an extensive 
selection from it was purchased by the Trustees of the British Museum in 
1895. The rest was dispersed among various museums abroad, the 
principal part being purchased by the University of Yienna. His special 
collection was that of fossil insects, illustrating his small volume, "A 
History of the Fossil Insects in the Secondary Eocks of England " (1845), 
prepared with the aid of Prof. J. 0. Westwood, and several later papers. 
This unique collection, the principal work of his scientific career, was 
retained by Brodie until his death, and was purchased by the Trustees 
from his executors in 1898. Brodie also made several small donations to 
the Museum from 1853 onwards. His numerous gifts to the Warwickshire 
Natural History Society, of which he was elected president in 1894, 
embrace many rare and fine fossils. In addition to the fossil insects, the 



Geology, 273 

specimens at various times acquired by the nation from Brodie include the 
types of the following species : — Eurypterus hrodiei, H. Woodward ; 
Alaria solida. Patella iuornata, and Solarium cotteswoldix, all of Lycett ; 
Thracia hrodiei, 11. B. Newton ; Teudopsis brodiei, Carruthers ; Lingula 
oviilisy Sowerby ; L. hrodiei, Davidson ; Acroura brodiei, OphiohpiH 
ramsayi, Echinohrissus hrodiei, and Hemicidarisbrillensis, all of Wright ; 
Actinometra chelfonensis, Antedon incurva, and A. laticirrn, all of P. H, 
Carpenter ; Montlivaltia victorite and M. ruperti of Duncan ; Craticularia 
calathus and Flatychonia brodiei of tSollas; Araucarites brodiei, 
Carruthers; and Equisetum brodiei, Buckman; besides a large number 
of other figured specimens. 

Brome (Capt. Fox) 

Collected mammalian remains from the caverns of Gibraltar, presentc-d 
by the Governor of Gibraltar, 1876. 

Broom (Robert) 

Presented bone-breccia with remains of Burraniys, Ferameles, &c., 
from the Wombeyan Caves, New South Wales, 1896. 

Broughton 

Presented Tertiary shells and corals from Jamaica, 1795. 

Brown (C. Barrington) 

Collected and presented Tertiary Mollusca from the Upper Amazons, 
1879. 
Brown (Henry Yorke Lyell) 

Presented fossil Invertebrata from Western Australia, 1879. 

Brown (John) [1780-1859] 

Brown's attention was attracted to geology while working as a stone- 
mason at Braintree and Colchester. On retiring from business in 1830, he 
removed to Stanway, near Colchester, and devoted the remainder of his 
life to scientific research and to the collection of fossils in Essex. He 
discovered and preserved a large series of Pleistocene Mammalian remains, 
and also collected Pleistocene non-marine Mollusca at Copford. In 
addition to supplying the museums at Oxford and elsewhere with Crag 
fossils, he made small donations to the British Museum in 1849 and 1852, 
and bequeathed the whole of his collection to Sir Richard Owen, who 
transferred it to the Museum in 1860. 

Brown (John Allen) 

Presented Pleistocene non-marine Mollusca from Staines, 1890. 

Brown (Joshua) 

Presented supposed fossil eggs of reptiles from the Great Oolite of 
Cirencester, 1863. 

Browne (Montagu) 

Presented a specimen of Ichthyosaurus intermedius, from the Lower 
Lias of Barrow-on-Soar, showinii integument of paddle, 1889 ; a fossil 
insect, Falxotermes ellisi, from the same formation and locality, 1892. 

Brownrigg (W. B.) 

Remains of Labyrinthodonts and a few fishes from the Coal Measures 
of Kilkenny, Ireland, purchased 1870. 

VOL. I. T 



274 Geology, 

BrUckmann 

Cretaceous and Tertiary fossils from Switzerland and adjoining; parts 
of Germany, pm-chased 1858. 

Brusina (Spiridion) 

Presented Tertiary shells from Dalmatia and Croatia, 1882/ 

Brussels Royal Museum of Natural History 

Plaster cast of skeleton of Iguanodon hernissartensis received in 
exchange, 1895. 

Buckingham (Duke of) 

Type-specimen of Flesiosaurus doUchodeirus from the Lower Lias, 
Lyme Regis, purchased at his sale, 1848. 

Buckman (James) 

See Buckman, S. S. 

Buckm.an (Sydney Savory) 

Mr. Buckman, now resident near Clieltenham, lias studied especially 
the Jurassic rocks of the south-west of England, and made a collection 
chiefly of Mollusca and Brachiopoda, the horizons of all his specimens 
being determined with the utmost exactness. The British Museum has 
purchased from him several small series of these fossils since 1890 ;^ but 
the type-specimens of his Memoir on "Inferior Oohte Ammonites" 
(Pal^ontogr. Soc.) were purchased from him by the Woodwardian 
Museum, Cambridge. Mr. Buckman has also made several donations, 
including fossils formerly in the cabinet of his father, Prof. James 
Buckman. 

Buist 

Presented Mammalian remains from Perim Island, 1848. 

Bullen (Robert Ashington) 

Collected and presented Pleistocene Mollusca from the Rubble Drift of 
Portland and Sangatte (France), 1896. 

Buller {Sir Walter) 

Feathers of Dinornis from New Zealand, purchased 1887. 

Burney {Lieut-Col) 

Presented Pliocene Mammalian remains from Burma, 1841. 

Burckhardt (Rudolph) 

Presented Ctenostreon from Jurassic of Basle, 1900. 

Burnett {Mrs.) 

Presented various British fossils, 1882. 

Burrows (Henry W.) 

Collected and presented Oligocene and Miocene Mollusca from Bor- 
deaux, 1894. 
Busk!! (George) [1807-1886] 

After twenty-five years' practice as surgeon, Busk devoted himself 
to scientific pursuits, especially to the study of Polyzoa, of which he 
wrote the British Museum Catalogue (1852-54). He also collected fossil 



Geology, 275 

Polyzoa, and prepared a " Monograph of the Crag Polyzoa " (Palaeontogr. 
Soc, 1859), based largely on the collections of S. V. Wood and J. S. Bower- 
bank (qq.v.). His own collection of 772 specimens, including some 
described in his Monograph, was presented to the Museum by the Misses 
Busk in 1899. 

Butler (Francis H.) 

A dealer from whom numerous purchases have been made, iucludiiig 
the Thomas Wright Collection (1887), part of the John Gray Collection 
(1889), the Widger Collection of Pleistocene Mammalia, &c., from the Tor 
Bryan caves, Torquay (1892), plates of Homosteus milleri from the 
Caithness Old Red Sandstone (1894), Dr. Forsyth Major's Collection of 
Pliocene Mammalia from Olivola (1895), French Cretaceous Polyzoa 
(1898), and Upper Silurian Fishes from Lanarkshire (1899 aud 1900). 

Buy (William) 

Buy was a labouring man who lived at Chippenham, Wilts, and 
collected fossils in the neighbourhood, especially the wonderfully pre- 
served Cephalopoda from the Oxford Clay of the Great Western Railway 
cutting at Christian Malford. His collection was made use of by 
J. Morris in preparing his " Catalogue of British Fossils " (1854). In 
describing a "very fine belemnite" in the Museum {B. puzosianus), 
Mantell tells his readers that it was " collected by Mr. Buy . . . who is 
well known for his skill and sagacity in discovering and developing 
fossils of this kind " (" Petrifactions and their Teachings," p. 458 ; 1851). 
The Museum made several purchases from him between the years 1846 
and 1863. 

C alder (Donald) 

Collected numerous fish-remains from the Old Red flagstones of Caith- 
ness, including \}\'3ites of Homosteus purchased through F. H. Butler, 1894. 

Cameron (E. S.) 

Presented Cretaceous and Tertiary Mollusca from Montana, 1890. 

Camper (Peter) 

Presented mandibular ramus of Mosasaurus camperi from the Upper 
Cretaceous of Maastricht, 1784. 

Canada, Geological Survey of 

Presented Pteraspis from Nova Scotia, 1899. 

Canterbury Museum 

Presented jaw of Mastodon andium from Chili, 1868. 

Canterbury Museum, N.Z. 

Nearly complete skeleton of Dinornis maximus received in exchange, 
1874. 

C apron (J. Rand) 

Mr. Capron, a solicitor of Guildford, made an important collection of 
about 1400 Chalk fossils, especially fishes, from the south-east of England, 
and sold it to the Museum in 1879. All the specimens bear printed labels 
indicating the })recise locality whence they were obtained. 

Carpenter (J. Estlin) 

/S'ee Carpenter (W. B.). 

T 2 



276 Geology, 

Carpenter (Philip Herbert) [1852-1891] 

The fourth son of W. B. Carpenter, and author of the " Challenger '* 
Eeports on Crinoidea, Carpenter was associated with R. Etheridge, 
Junior, in the preparation of the " Catalogue of the Blastoidea in the. . . 
British Museum" (1886). In connection with this work he obtained 
specimens, chiefly from Spain, and, after figuring, presented them to the 
Museum. 

Carpenter (William Benjamin) [1813-1885] 

In his later years Dr. Carpenter accumulated an extensive series of 
specimens, preparations, and drawings to illustrate the nature of Eozoon 
canadejise, and its resemblances to various Foraminiferal skeletons and 
mineral structures. At the time of his death this research was incom- 
plete, and the whole collection of materials was presented to the British 
Museum by his son, Rev. J. Estlin Carpenter in 1892. 

Carruthers (William) 

Presented Pala30zoic fossils from South Africa, 1887. 

Carter (Henry John) [1813-1895] 

While a medical officer in Bombay, Carter occupied himself with 
researches on sponges and the skeletons of other low invertebrates. He 
also studied the geology of Western India and collected fossil specimens of 
the groups in which he was interested. He made five small donations to 
the Museum between 1882 and 1889, including Foraniinifera, sponges, 
and stromatoporoids, some illustrative of his own writings. He also 
collected about 100 fragments of Vertebrata from the Trias near Sid- 
moutb, Devonshire, where he subsequently resided. This collection was 
described by A. T. Metcalfe in the Quarterly Journal of the Geological 
Society (1884), and was presented by Carter to the Museum in 1883. 

Castelli (F.) 

A selection of 1272 North Italian fossils was purchased through 
Mr. R. F. Damon from the Castelli Museum, Leghorn, on its dispersal in 
1898. The mammalian fragments included teeth of Semnojnthecus^ 
Aiitilope, and Hipparion from Lower Pliocene, Casino, described by 
Ristori and Forsyth Major; also teeth of Equus cahallus Irom Monte 
Tignosa, described by Forsyth Major. 

Cautley (Sir Proby T.) [1802-1871] 

Colonel Cautley and Dr. Hugh Falconer (q.v.) devoted their leisure 
for eight years to the discovery of mammalian and reptilian remains in 
the Lower Pliocene sandstones of the Siwalik Hills, India. The wliole 
collection, contained in 214 cases, each weighing about 4 cwt., was sent to 
England in 1840 by Cautley, who offered it to the Geological Society, but, 
for want of room, it had to be declined and was placed in the British 
Museum, whose masons were occupied for several years in extracting the 
fossils from their hard matrix. A few fish-remains from the same 
formation were subsequently presented by Cautley in 1847. The collection 
was intended to form the subject of Falconer and Cautley's "Fauna 
Antiqua Sivalensis," for which many plates were drawn, but of which 
only nine small fasciculi were published (1844-47). Falconer's notes on 
the specimens, with copies of many unpublished figures, were included in 
his posthumous " Palajontological Memoirs," edited by (3harles Murchison, 
M.D., F.R.S, 



Geology. 277 

Cawdor {Earl of) 

Presented Silurian Trilobites, 1836. 

Chadwick (Samuel) 

Collected fossil sponges from Coral Rag and Chalk of Yorkshire, 
purchased 1895. 

^' Challenger " Deep-Sea Deposits 

On the completion of Messrs. Murray and Renard's Report on the 
Deep-sea Deposits collected by the Challenger, the whole series ot 
specimens was received by the Department of Geology in 1895. 

Chantre (C.) 

Presented Coal-plants from St. Etienne, France, 1881. 

Chapman (Frederick) 

Collected and presented Pleistocene non-marine Mollusca from Fulham, 
1890. Collected and prepared Foraminifera and Ostracoda from the 
Chalk and Gault, purchased 1892-94. 

Charlesworth (Edward) 

Sold many fossils to the Museum, including the Crag Mollusca 
described in Searles Wood's " Supplement," 1869, and various Mammalian 
remains from the Red Crag, 1875. 

Cheadle (Robert W.) 

Presented teeth of Ovibos 7noschatus from Crayford, 1879. 

Chester (Greville J.) 

Presented tusk of mammoth from Norfolk coast, 1865. 

Chevalier (N.) 

Presented part of skeleton of Dinornis struthioides from New Zealaml, 
1887. 

Child (Coles) 

Presented Coal-plants from Rhymney, South Wales, 1871. 

Chitty {Hon. Edward) 

Presented Tertiary fossils from Jamaica, 1856. 

Christy Trustees 

Presented antler of elk from Cleveland, Yorkshire, 1889. 

Clark (William) 

Dr. Clark, of Berea, Ohio, collected remains of fishes from the 
Cleveland Shale (Upper Devonian) of the district in which he resided. 
He sold several important specimens to the Museums of Columbia aiul 
Harvard Universities, and a few specimens of Cladoselache to tlie 
British Museum in 1896 ; but the greater part of his collection, ujtwards 
of 200 specimens, was purchased by the Trustees in 1900. It comprise.l 
numerous specimens of Cladoselache and various Arthrodira, besides one 
Palaeoniscid, all described in papers by Prof. E. W. Clay pole. 

Clarke {Sir Caspar Purdon) 

Presented Paleozoic and Tertiary fossils from Australia and Tasmania, 
1889. 



278 Geology. 

Clarke (William Branwhite) 

Presented jaw of Stheimrus minor from river deposit, New South 
Wales, 1877. 

Claussen (P.) 

Dr. Claussen studied the geology of the province of Minas Geraes, 
Brazil, and explored some of the caverns, from which he obtained a 
collection of bones, chiefly mammalian, recorded by him in the Bulletin 
of the Eoyal Academy of Brussels (1841), and sold to the British Museum 
in two instalments in 1841 and 1844. 

Claypole (Edward Waller) 

Presented specimens of Palxaspis americana from the Upper Siluiian 
of Pennsylvania, 1890; sold specimens of Cladoselache from U.Devonian, 
Ohio (W. Clark CoU.), 1896. 

Clemenceau 

Collected fossils from French Chalk, purchased 1900. 

Cleminshaw (Edward) 

Presented upper jaw of Megalosaurus hucMandi from the Inferior 
Oolite, Sherborne, 1883. 

Clift (William) 

Presented mammahan bones discovered by Mr. Whidbey in Oreston 
cavern, 1822. 

Clifton (George) 

Presented a collection of British fossils, including fish-remains from 
the Portland Stone (Caturus cliftoni, &c.), 1889. 

Cochrane {Sir Alexander) 

Obtained the fossil human skeleton from Guadaloupe, presented by 
the Lords of the Admiralty, 1813. 

Collins (A. L.) 

Presented Pala?ozoic Crinoidal limestone from Afghanistan, 1893. 

Colvin (Col.) 

Presented remains of ostrich, StrutMo asiaticns, from Siwalik Forma- 
tion, India, 1848. 

Conry (Thomas) 

Presented eggs of turtles from a consolidated beach. Island of 
Ascension, 1812. 

Cooke (John Henry) 

For some years Mr. Cooke was a schoolmaster in Malta and in- 
vestigated the geology of the Maltese Islands, publishing papers in 
the Geological Magazine (1891), the Quarterly Journal of the Geo- 
logical Society (1893), and elsewhere. He presented 14 Pleistocene 
Mollusca and 44 Tertiary Echinoidea from Malta to the Museum 
in 1892. He also explored the Har Dalam Caverns, with the aid of a 
Government grant, and the first selection of 200 specimens from his 
collection of mammalian remains, described in the Proceedings of the 
Pioyal Society (1893), was presented to the Museum by the Council of 



Geology. 270 

that Society in 1893. Other selections from the latter collection were 
presented to the Museums of Valetta, Bologna, and Edinburgh. 

Cookson (George) 

The Eev. G. C'ookson, of Writhlington, made a collection of foBsils 
from the Oolite below the Bradford Clay at Ancliffe ( = Avon cliff), near 
Bradford, Wiltshire, about the year 1825. A list in his writing })reserved 
in the Geological Department, mentions 163 specimens. Many of those 
were figured in the " Mineral Conchology " of J. Sowerby {(j.v.) and 34 
specimens have been identified in the Sowerby collection. 

Coombe (G. Augustus) 

Kesident at Peppering, near Arundel, Coombe collected Tertiary and 
Cretaceous fossils in Sussex. He both lent and gave specimens to 
Mantell, and assisted Dixon in the preparation of his "Geology and 
Fossils ... of Sussex" (1850). In 1888, 447 specimens from this col- 
lection, including some fine fish-remains from the Chalk, were jjresented 
to the British Museum by Mr. P. E. Coombe. None of the specimens 
bore labels. 

Coombe (Percy E.) 

See Coombe, G. Augustus. 

Cooper {Sir Daniel) 

Presented marsupial remains from the river deposits of Queensland, 
1861, 1864, 1866. 

Cope (Edward Drinker) 

The collection of fossil Vertebrata made by Prof. Cope was acquired 
after his death by the American Museum of Isatural History, New York. 
A plaster cast of the unique type-specimen of Fhcnacodus primu'vus 
contained in it, was purchased from him in 1889. 

Coppinger (Richard William) 

Coppinger was surgeon on board H.M.S. Discovery, during the Alert 
and Discovery Arctic exploring expedition in 1875-76, under the command 
of Sir George S. Nares, to whose narrative of the voyage he contributed a 
Report on the Petermann Glacier. The fine series of fossils which he 
collected duriui^ the expedition, together with the specimens obtained by 
Captain Feilden, Lieut. Aldrich, Dr. Moss, and Mr. Hart, were described 
by Mr. R. Etheridge, Senior, in his paper on the " Pahuontology of the 
Coasts of the Arctic Lands visited by tlie late British Expeditious, etc." 
(Quart. J our 71. GeoL Soc, 1878). The collection, which includes the 
specimens figured by Mr. Etheiidge, was presented to the Museum by 
the Lords of "the Treasury in December, 1878. 

Corner (Frank) 

Dr. Corner has collected extensively from the superficinl deposits of 
the London district. In 1896 he presented to the Museum some non- 
marine Mollusca from these formations. 

Cotta (C. Bernhard von) [1808-1879] 

This eminent geologist, who from 1842 to 1874 was professor at 
Freiberg in Saxony, was initiated in the study of fossil botany by his 
father Forstmeister Heinrich Cotta, who had made a large collection ot 
fossil woods and " Staarsteine " from the Permian rocks near Chemnitz 



280 Geology, 

{PsaroniuSy Tempskya, MeduUosa, etc.). To their investigation young 
Cotta returned from his studies in Freiberg and Heidelberg, and thus was 
one of the earliest to use the microscope in determining the structure of 
fossil plants. His results were published in "Die Dendrolithen in 
Beziehung auf ihren inneren Bau" (1832). During a short visit to 
London, he made the acquaintance of the botanist Robert Brown, and, on 
his return to Saxony to assume the post of teacher at the forestry institute 
in Tharandt, became the intermediary between the British Museum and 
his father, with the result that, in 1839, half of the latters collection, 
containing several of the figured specimens, was bought by the Trustees. 

Cottle (Joseph) [1770-1853] 

This well-known Bristol bookseller and poet, the friend of Words- 
Avorth and Coleridge, explored the Oreston caverns near Plymouth in 
1822-23, and published an account of his observations in an appendix to 
his work on "Malvern Hills" (1829). About sixty teeth and bones 
discovered by him were purchased by the British Museum in 1876, but 
the greater part of his collection is in the Bristol Museum. 

Cowderoy (Miss) [ -1852] 

This lady lived in Portman Square, where she had gathered about 
2000 fossils of both vertebrates and invertebrates, mainly from the 
Eocene and Oligocene beds of England and Nice, but also from the 
Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks of Britain. The collection was bequeathed 
by her to the Trustees. 
Cracherode (Clayton Mordaunt) [1730-1799] 

Though ordained a minister of the Church of England, Cracherode 
devoted his time, talents, and ample fortune to the collection of books 
and rarities of art and nature, all which were bequeathed by him to the 
nation. The shells and minerals, though forming a relatively small part 
of the collection, were valued at £2000. They included one hundred fossil 
animals and six fossil plants, some of which had been obtained from Lord 
Bute's collection. Several can still be identified by bearing a small oblong 
ticket of white paper with truncate corners, on which is the catalogue 
number preceded by ZZ in the case of animals, and AAA in the case of 
plants. There are in the Mineral Department, two distinct MS. lists of 
this portion of the Cracherode collection (which used to be exhibited to 
the public with the Cracherodean minerals), and with one of them the 
numbers and signs correspond. These lists are of some interest as giving 
tlie names used by the older naturahsts, e.g., "the Anthropomorphus 
DudJeyensis or Dudley fossil." Some specimens have been marked by a 
later hand with a pink disc bearing the name "Cracherode." 

Cremome {Lord) 

Presented pair of antlers of Irish deer, 1791. 

Croft (Charles) 

In his younger days, the present editor of the KeighUy News resided 
in Shropshire, and made a collection of Trilobites and other fossil inverte- 
brates from the Cambrian, Ordovician, and Silurian rocks of the neigh- 
bourhood, especially a fine series from the Bala beds of Ty-Isaf. When 
Mr. Croft moved to Plymouth, he sold to the British Museum a selection 
from this collection, representing 572 species, mainly trilobites. These 
specimens, acquired in 1873, are neatly labelled in his own hand, on 
oblong tickets of bluish paper. 



Geology. 281 

Crofton (Addison) 

Presented Mollusca from the Carboniferous Limestone of Yorkshire, 
1898. 

Croizet (UAhhS) 

An inhabitant of the Auvergne, Croizet publislied observations on its 
geology. He collected a series of vertebrate fossils, chiefly Mammalia, 
from the Oligocene and Miocene freshwater deposits, and st»ld a selection 
to the British Museum in 1848. His collection also includes some antlers 
of reindeer from a rock-shelter at Neschers, a few cut by man, and one 
bearing the incised figure of a horse. 

Cumberland (George) [1752-1848] 

After passing through the course at the Koyal Academy as an honorary 
student, Cumberland visited the art-treasures of Italy, and in 1792 settled 
in Bristol, where he studied the local geology and collected fossils, 
especially crinoids, sending his results to the Geological Society, which 
occasionally published them in its Transactions and always kept his 
donations. In 1826, Cumberland published his little " lleliquiaj Con- 
servatffi" with admirable lithographs by himself and his wife. In it, 
under the name Amphora, he first described the genus now called 
Amphoracrinus. A specimen of the " 2nd species " of this, collected on 
the borders of Yorkshire and Lancashire, had been presented by him to 
the British Museum in 1825, as " a new variety of nave encrinite." The 
specimens of Apiocrinus figured in this book, with other fossils of his 
collection, were bought by J. Heywood, M.P., for the Manchester 
Geological Society in 1842, and were transferred to the Museum at the 
Owens College in 1864. Cumberland was the first to find Marsupites at 
Brighton, and figured some in his book. Subsequently he distributed 
privately, as an appendix to " Reliquiae," various plates illustrating fossil 
crinoids. His collection as a whole Avas mentioned by the West of 
England Journal (1835) as the finest in Bristol, and fossil fishes from it 
were lent to Agassiz. 

Cunningham (Robert O.) 

Dr. Cunningham discovered the jaws of Homalodontotherium cunning- 
hami in the Santa Cruz Beds of Patagonia, presented by the Lords of the 
Admiralty, 1874. 

Cunnington (William) [1813- ] 

As grandson on the mother's side, of William Cunnington, F.S.A., of 
Heytesbury, Wilts, an active geologist and a friend of Wm. Smith, 
Mr. Cunnington had early opportunities of seeing his collection of fossil 
sponges, and so, at the age of seven, began his own collection from the 
flint-heaps by the roadside, and a little later from the Chalk-pits of 
Upavon. Subsequently settled at Devizes, where he was honorary 
curator of the local museum from its commencement in 1853, he seized 
the numerous opportunities aftbrded by the construction of the railway 
there, as also at Farringdon, Swindon, Chippenham, and Trowbridge, to 
amass a remarkable collection and to become familiar with the geological 
details of the country (see Quart. Journ. Oeol. aS'oc, 1850, pp. 453 and 
454). Mr. Cunnington also made purchases from Wm. Buy ('/.?'.), e.g., 
of a Belemnoteuthis described by Owen {Phil. Trans., 1844) and by 
himself {London Oeol. Journ., 1847) ; from T. Berrett of Steeple Ashton, 
and (after the decease of Miss Benett [<j.v.']), from J. P>aker. Thus, 
before he left Wiltshire in 1874, his collection contained more than 



282 Geology, 



20,000 specimens, and was the subject of frequent references in the 
Wiltshire Archxologi^, and in Murray's "Handbook of Wiltshire"' 
(1859). So early as 1849 the Museum bought several British fossils- 
from Mr. Cunnington. In 1859 he presented Cretaceous invertebrates, 
and in 1861 a further purchase was made from him. In 1865, at the 
special request of Murchison, he sold to the Museum of Practical Geology 
a fine series of Upper Greensand Sponges, many subsequently described 
by Dr. G. J. Hinde. In 1875, when the reduction of his collection was 
imperative, the British Museum had the first choice and purchased, in 
two instalments, several thousand specimens of Cretaceous and Jurassic 
fossils from Wiltshire, These included, among the Cephalopoda, many 
type-specimens of D. Sharpe (Palseontogr. Soc, 1853-55) ; among Crus- 
tacea Decapoda numerous specimens figured by T. Bell (Pateontogr. 
Soc.,1860); Cretaceous Brachiopoda figured by T. Davidson ( Palajontogr. 
Soc, 1852) ; and many of T. Wright's types of Cretaceous Echinoderma 
(Pala^ontogr. Soc, 1862-67). There was also yet another fine series of 
sponges from the Upper (jreensand of Warminster and the Lower Green- 
sand of Farringdon (see Dr. Hinde's " Catalogue of Fossil Sponges in the 
British Museum,*' 1883). Mr. Cunnington has subsequently made 
isolated donations of valuable specimens, amonf: them being blastoids and 
crinoids from Kentucky and Alabama, collected by his uncle, John 
Cunnington, resident for many years in the latter State. Mr. Cunningtou's 
series of Wiltshire mammalian remains, as well as a few local specimens, 
were presented by him to the Devizes Museum. It is worth noting that 
he never came into possession of any of his grandfather's collection, all of 
whose fossils were purchased soon alter his decease by Dr. C. H. Parry of 
Bath, while his collection of antiquities was bought by Sir 11. C. Hoare^ 
and is now in the museum at Devizes. 

Cuvier {Baron Georges) 

Presented mammalian remains and plaster casts of the same from the 
Gypsum Quarries near Paris, 1818, 1822. 

Daintree (Richard) 

Presented Marsupial remains from the river-deposits of Queensland, 
1871. Collected Australian fossil Invertebrata, presented by his executor, 

1879. 

Daly (W. Mahon) 

Presented Carboniferous Limestone from Siani, 1900. 
Darwin (Charles) 

Presented two South American fossil brachiopods, 1852, and some 
fossil Cirripedes, 1854. 

Darbishire (Robert Dukinpield) 

Mr. Darbishire, of Manchester, has studied and collected the marine 
shells from the Glacial Drift of central England. In 1889 he presented 
to the Museum his collection from the Drifts of Macclesfield, Blackpool, 
(iarston, Worden Hall, and Kelsey Hill, altogether about 1400 specimens. 
The Macclesfield Collection was described by him in the Memoirs of the 
Literary and Philosophical Society of Manchester (1865), also tabulated 
in Geol. Ma;)., vol. ii, p. 298. 

Damon (Robert) [1814-1899] 

This well-known Weymouth dealer in natural history specimens made 
a private collection of about 400 Dorsetshire fossils to illustrate his 



Geology. 1%?> 

" Geology of Weymouth and the Isle of Portland " (Ed. 2, 1884), m the 
Supplement to which nearly half of the specimens were figured. The 
collection was purchased by the British Museum from Mr. Damon's 
executor in 1890. 
Davidson (Thomas) [1817-1885] 

Born at Muir House, Midlothian, Davidson spent much of his youth 
on the continent of Europe, in the study of both art and science. While 
in Rome, at the age of twenty, he was attracted by Leopold v. Buch to 
the study of the Brachiopoda, and to this group he devoted the rest of his 
life, gathering at his Brighton residence a large collection of both recent 
and fossil forms, and writing numerous papers, which were illustrated by 
his own crayon. His magnum ojnis was the "Monograph of British 
Fossil Brachiopoda" published by the Palaeontographical Society 
(1850-1886), but he also wrote on the brachiopods of other countries 
from France to China, and published through the Linnean Society a 
monograph of Recent Brachiopoda. The first of many donations to the 
British Museum was made by him in 1848, and his entire collection of 
specimens, drawings, and illustrative books and pamphlets, bequeathed b\- 
him to the Trustees, was handed over by his son, Mr. Wm. Davidson, in 
1886. It comprises 1796 named species and 22,831 specimens, which, by 
the direction of the testator, are kept apart in one series. To it, however, 
have in better accordance with the spirit of his will, been joined various 
specimens described by him and previously presented. The specimens 
are all accompanied by Davidson's own carefully-written MS. labels. 

Davies (Griffith) 

Collected Ordovician Trilobites from North Wales, purchased 1871. 

Davis (James William) [1846-1893] 

Resident at Chevinedge, Halifax, Davis was much interested in fossil 
fishes and in the geology of Yorkshire, on which subjects he published 
several papers. His collection of fossils consisted chiefly of fish-remains 
from the Yorkshire Coal -Measures and the Dorsetshire Lower Lias, with 
a few others from Carboniferous, Rhaitic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary rocks. 
They included many specimens, especially those from the Coal-Measures 
and Lias, described in his own ])apers. A selection of 324 specimens 
from this collection was purchased by the Museum from his executor 
in 1895. 
Dawkins (William Boyd) 

Collected and presented Mammalian remains from Windy Knoll and 
Creswell Caves, Derbyshire, 1885. 

Dawson (Charles) 

Mr. Dawson, residing formerly at Hastings, now at Uckfield, collected 
the remains of Dinosauria and other Reptilia from the Wealden near 
Hastings. His first collection was purchased by the Museum in 1884, 
and further small instalments were added in the years 1885, 1887, 1888, 
1892, and 1894. The bones of Jguanodon are especially noteworthy, and 
niclude the type-specimens of I. daivsoni, 1. fittoni, and /. holling- 
toniensis, described by Mr. Lydekker in the Geological Magazine 
(1889). 
Dawson {Sir John William) 

This well-known Canadian geologist presented a few specimens illus- 
trating his researches, namely, land-shells and small land-reptiles from 



284 Geology. 

the Coal Measures of Nova Scotia in 1863, North American Devonian 
Plants in 1865, and some Canadian Carabro-Silurian Sponges in 1890. 

Day (Frank) 

Obtained skull of Toxodon platensis from the Panipa of Buenos Ayres, 
purchased 1878. 

Deane (James) 

Triassic footprints from Turner's Falls, Massachusetts, U.S.A., pur- 
chased 18-i-l. 

Debey (Julien) 

Presented Miocene Mollusca from Java, 1891. 

Dennant (J.) 

Presented Tertiary Mollusca from Muddy Creek, Victoria, 1886. 

Deshayes (Gerard Paul) [1797-1875] 

This eminent French naturalist resigned his medical practice, and, in 
the words of Lyell, " sacrificed his existence to make himself, for the 
benefit of science, the first fossil conchologist in Europe." He spent much 
of his time collecting fossils, especially from the Tertiary rocks of Europe, 
to assist those conchological and stratigraphical studies that brought him, 
through Sir Charles Lyell, into cordial relations with English naturahsts. 
He wrote a " Catalogue of the Conchifera, or Bivalve Shells, in the 
Collection of the British Museum," 1853-1854 ; and during those years 
the Trustees purchased from him collections, chiefly of Mollusca, from the 
Eocene and Miocene of the Paris Basin and Boideaux. The rapid 
progress subsequently made in the classification of those rocks soon 
rendered these series, with their insufiiciently detailed labels, of less value 
than was expected. Deshayes' main collection is in the Ecole des Mines, 
Paris. 

Dewick (Edward S.) 

Presented Pleistocene non-marine Mollusca from the Barnwell Gravels, 
Cambridge, 1889. 

Dixon (Frederic) [1799-1849] 

While practising as a physician at Worthing, Dixon made from the 
rocks of the neighbourhood a collection of fossils, which he worked out 
with peculiar skill. This was the basis of a work on "The Geology and 
Fossils of the Tertiary and Cretaceous formations of Sussex " in which he 
had the co-operation of the leading specialists in palaeontology, and for 
the better illustration of which he borrowed specimens from other 
collectors, such as J. S. Bovverbank, F. E. Edwards, G. A. Coombe, Mrs. 
Smith of Tunbridge Wells, W. D. Saull, N. Wetherell, and others 
mentioned on p. 55 of his work. Specimens already in the British 
Museum were also figured therein. The volume should have been 
published in 1850, the date on the title-page, but its author died when it 
was only two-thirds printed. Finally, under the editorship of R. Owen, 
it was completed and published in 1852 {vide Woodward and Sherboru, 
*'Brit. Foss. Vert.," p. 17). Dixon's collection, which was purchased 
from his executors in 1850, contained over 4000 fossils from the Tertiary 
beds of Bracklesham and Bognor and from the Chalk, besides other 
miscellaneous specimens. The figured specimens of Tertiary molluscs 
have been notetl by Mr. R. B. Newton in his "Systematic List of the 
Edwards Collection"; the figured specimens from the Chalk bear the 



Geology. 285 

numbers of plate and figure, which were pencilled on them when the work 
was published. 

DoUin {Mrs. Harriet) 

A dealer of Lyme Regis from whom various Lower Lias fossils were 
purchased, including a unic[ue specimen of dentition of Prognathodus 
(/uentheri, 1881. 

Dowker (George) [1828-1899] 

Mr. Dowker, resident near Wingham, Kent, published many obser- 
vations on the geology of eastern Kent (Froc. Geol. Aasoc. and elsewhere), 
and collected a large series of fossils from the Et)cene and Cretaceous 
formations of that district. A selection of about 650 specimens from this 
collection was purchased by the Museum from Mr. Dowker's executor 
in 1899. 

Draper (David) 

Presented remains of the Glossopteris Flora from South Africa, 1890, 
1893, 1897. 

Dubois (Eugene) 

Presented a plaster cast of the calvaria of Pithecanthropus erectus from 
Java, 1895. 

Ducie (Earl of) 

A donor of many valuable fossils, including SoJaster moretonis from 
the Great Oolite in 1864:, English Chalk fossils in 1881, Phoderacanthus 
grandis from the Carboniferous Limestone of Bristol in 1884, and supposed 
Eeptilian eggs from the Great Oolite in 1891. 

Durrant (M. B.) 

Presented a tooth of Iguanodon in Wealden sandstone, 1825. 

Earl (Percy) 

Bones of Dinornithidse from New Zealand, purchased 1845. 

Edwards (Frederick Erasmus) [1799-1875] 

As a member of the London Clay Club and a founder of the PaL^onto- 
graphical Society, Edwards devoted himself to the study of the British 
Eocene Mollusca. Beginning with the London Clay in 1835, he extended 
his researches over the Eocene strata of Sussex, Hampshire, and the Isle 
of Wight, where, assisted by Mr. H. Keeping, he made the most com|)lete 
collection ever attempted by any geologist. He described his specimens 
in the London Geological Journal (1847), the Geologist (I860), the 
Geological Magazine (1865), and above all, in the Monographs of the 
Pala3ontographical Society (Vols, for 1848, 1852, 1854, 1855, 1858), tlie 
work being continued by S. V. Wood (Vols, for 1859, 1862, 1870, and 
1877). The first connection of Edwards with the British Museum was 
the purchase of some Cetacean remains from the Suffolk Crag from him in 
1851. In 1863 he presented remains of Eyopotanius from tlu- Isle of 
Wight Oligocene. In 1867 there was purchased from him a large series 
of Tertiary plants and invertebrates from various British localities, 
includiDg cirripedes, figured by Sowerby and Darwin, corals figured by 
Edwards and Haime {Monogr. Palseont. Soc, 1850), Serpala figured by 
Sowerby, also Tertiary molluscs from Germany and the Vienna basin. 
The Mollusca from Vienna were named and labelled by Dr. Hoernes. 



286 Geology, 

The bulk of his collection of British Eocene and Oligocene Mollusca, 
numbering 39,000 shells and containing the originals of his various 
publications, was purchased in 1872-1873, a second series of foreign 
specimens being bought through Mr. W. Kinsey in 1875. A systematic 
list of the British collection, by Mr. R B. Newton, was published by the 
Trustees in 1891. All the Mollusca are still preserved on the original 
paper-covered tablets, labelled in Edwards' own hand. 

Egerton {Sir Philip Malpas de Grey) [1806-1881] 

Sir Philip Egerton, tenth Baronet, an elected Trustee of the British 
Museum, studied geology under Conybeare and Buckland, and after 
graduating at Oxford travelled abroad with his college friend, Lord Cole 
(afterwards Earl of Enniskillen). He began scientific work with his 
companion by exploring some of the caverns of Franconia, where the 
joint researches resulted in a large collection of remains of the Cave Bear 
and other Pleistocene Mammalia. Journeying to Neuchatel about 1830, 
Egerton and Lord Cole became acquainted with Louis Agassiz, who 
aroused their interest in fossil fishes and induced them to become life- 
long collectors of these fossils. They decided to form two distinct 
cabinets, but to share acquisitions and the counterpart-halves of unique 
or valuable specimens. Their early collections were largely used by 
Agassiz when preparing his "Recherches sur les Poissons fossiles" 
(1838-44), and they contain a large proportion of his type-specimens, 
besides other specimens labelled and noticed by him. In later years, 
Egerton himself also described many of his own fossils. The whole of 
the collection, including the cave bones and miscellaneous fossil Inver- 
tebrata, in addition to the fossil fishes, was purchased from the executoi"s 
of the late Sir Philip Egerton in 1882.' 

Ellis (Frederick) 

Collected fossils from the Rha3tic of Aust Cliff, a selection purchased 
1896. 
Else (William) 

Collected Mammalian remains from the Bench Cavern, Brixham, near 
Torquay, a selection purchased 1889. 

Elter (Charles) 

Presented skull of Rhinoceros anticjuitatis from Siberia, 1813. 

Elwes (J. W.) 

Presented fossils from the London Clay of Fareham, 1890. 

Enniskillen (William Willoughby, Third Earl of) [1807- 
1886] 
Lord Enniskillen (at first Lord Cole) collected in association with Sir 
Philip Egerton (q.v.), and his complete collection was purchased in two 
instalments in 1882 and 1883. In addition to the fossil fishes and 
Franconian cave bones, this collection included several valuable fossil 
Vertebrata, notably a skeleton of Cervus giganteus from Ireland, and the 
type-specimen of Plesiosaurus macrocephalus from the Lower Lias of 
Lyme Regis. 

Enys (John Davies) 

Obtained for the Museum a collection of bones of birds fiom the 
Chatham Islands, purchased 1898. 



Geologxj, 287 

Etheridge (Robert) 

Before the former assistant-keeper of the Geologic;il Department 
entered Government service as palaeontologist to the Geological Survev, 
he lived at Bristol and here made a collection of fossils froni~the Silurian', 
Devonian, Carboniferous, and Jurassic rocks of the neighbourhood, with 
a few from elsewhere. On coming to London in 1869, Mr. Etheridge 
sold the whole series of 2342 specimens to the British ^Museum. They 
were marked in ink with letters referring to localities and horizons, as 
explained in a M8. list accompanying the collection. 

Ettingshausen (Constantin Freiherr von) [1826-1897] 

After being for a few years attached to the Geologische lleichsanstalt 
at Vienna, Baron von Ettingshausen became, in 1854, Professor at the 
Medical and Surgical Military Academy in that city, and in 1871 went 
to Graz as Professor of Botany. He was exceedingly active in collecting, 
and was accustomed to bring home great masses of matrix to be split by 
the winter frosts. Thus he was able to supply valuable collections to 
many museums, especially the Geologische Reichsanstalt and Natur- 
historisches Hofmuseum in Vienna, the Landesmuseum of Steiermark, 
the University of Graz, and the British Museum. The last-mentioned 
made extensive purchases from him between the years 1878-1882, during 
which years he spent much time in London arranging and examining 
portions of the jNational Collections, the results of his study being printed 
by the Royal, Geological, and Palceontographical Societies, and in other 
British publications. The material bought from von Ettingshausen 
represented, often by some of the original figured specimens, the Tertiary 
floras of Styria (notably that of Parschlug), Bohemia, Carniola, and the 
Tyrol, the Triassic floras of Lunz in Austria and Raibl in Carinthia, and 
the Liassic of Fiinfkirchen in Hungary ; it included important series 
from the Palaeozoic rocks of Bohemia, Moravia, and Styria, the Tertiary 
of Alum Bay, and various other specimens. Most of the specimens bear 
a number on a white label 1 cm. square, also a similar label in one of 
several colours indicating the supposed habitat of the plant when living ; 
some are provided with the name and locality on a lithographed label m 
Ettingshausen's own hand ; but the majority are without such labels. 
A list of Ettingshausen's writings, in many of which these specimens were 
referred to, was published by R. Hoernes {Mitth. naturwiss. Ver. 
Steiermark, xxxiv., p. 77 ; 1898). 

Evans (Caleb) [1831-1886] 

While employed in the Chancery Pay Office and residing at Hamp- 
stead, Evans in 1855 took up the study of geology, and collected fossils 
from the excavations for new sewers in London, and in the railway 
cuttings close at hand, supplementing this work by vacation studies at 
the seaside. Thus he accumulated a large collection, some tyjje- 
specimens from which were bequeathed by him to the Geological Society. 
A selection from the remainder of his collection was, after his death, 
bought from Mr. E. Westlake. It comprised 2172 specimens from Neoco- 
mian, and 1556 from Tertiary rocks, the large majority being invertebrates. 
Most of Evans' papers were published by the Geologists' Association, the 
most notable being " On some Sections of Chalk between Croydon and 
Oxtead, with Observations on the Classification of the Chalk." 

Evans {Sir John) 

Presented a Mammalian tooth (Bolodon) from the Wealden of Hastings, 



288 Geology. 



Evans (William) 

Presented Tertiary fossils from the Murray River, South Australia, 

1887. 

Everett (A. H.) 

Presented Mammalian remains from Sarawak, Borneo, in 1890, and 
Tertiary limestones from Borneo in 1894. 

Ewen (C. A) 

Excavated a nearly complete skeleton of Dinornis maximus in New 
Zealand, purchased 1896. 

Ewen (Philip) 

Collected Lower Silurian Graptolites from Victoria, purchased 1879. 

Exton (Hugh) 

Presented fossil Fishes from the Stormberg Beds of South Africa, 
namely, Semionotus capensis in 1883, and Cleithrolepis exfoni in 1888 ; 
also a unique specimen of Frocolophon trigoniceps from the Karoo For- 
mation in 1892. 

Falconer (Hugh) [1808-1865] 

To our knowledge of the fossil Mammalia, Falconer published 
important contributions, which were collected in his " Palteontological 
Memoirs," edited by Charles Murchison in 1868. In 1830 to 1855 he 
was on Government service in India, and co-operated with Col. Cautley 
(q.v.) and others in collecting and describing the fossil mammals of that 
country. In 1842, when he came to England on sick leave, he brought 
with him valuable collections, most of which he presented to the India 
House and to the British Museum, devoting much time to their study 
and arrangement in the latter institution. He also placed a few speci- 
mens in the museum of the Geological Society. On his final return to 
Europe, after his retirement, he travelled much in pursuit of liis 
researches, and amassed a small collection of mammalian remains, which 
was presented to the British Museum in 1867 by his executor, Mr. 
Charles Falconer. This collection included a few Indian fossils, and a 
large series of remains of Hippopotamus from caverns near Palermo, 
Sicily. 

Feilden (Henry Wemyss) [1838- ] 

Col. Feilden was naturalist to the Alert and Discovery Arctic 
exploring expedition in 1875-6 under Sir George Nares, to whose 
narrative of the voyage he contributed Appendices relating to ethnology, 
Mammalia, ornithology, and, with C. E. de Pvance, an appendix "On the 
Geological Structure of the Coasts of Grinnell Land and Hall Basin," as 
well as a separate paper on the " Geology of the Coasts of the Arctic 
Lands visited by the Expedition" (Quart. Journ. OeoL Soc, 1878). The 
Paleozoic fossils collected during the expedition were described by Mr. R. 
Etheridge, Senior (torn, cit.), while the fossils of Miocene age, coUecttd 
by Messrs. Feilden and Moss (a surgeon to the expedition) from Dis- 
covery Bay, were sent to Prof. 0. Heer of Zurich for determination. 
Mr. Etheridge says : " The series collected by Captain Feilden are all so 
carefully noted, labelled, and localised, that their history is complete and 
satisfactory." The collection was presented to the Museum by the Lords 
of the Treasury in December, 1878. 



Geology, 289 

Fenn (Joseph H.) 

Collected vertebrate remains from superficial deposits of Madagascar, 
purchased 1893. 

Ferguson (G. E.) 

Obtained ArthrojjJiycus from Gold Coast Colony, presented by Prof. 
J. W. Judd, 1893. 

Finch (John) 

Finch ^vas a professional geologist, a member of the Philosophical 
Society of Birmingham, and an authority on the Tertiary deposits of ihe 
United States. In 1834 he sold to the Trustees his collection of American 
fossils, comprising 400 specimens from Tertiary strata, representing over 
150 species, 100 specimens from the Upper Secondary, and 100 from 
Transition beds. 'Ihe Tertiary series contained most of the types and 
figured specimens of T. Say's " Account of some of the Fossil Shells of 
Maryland" (Journ. Acad. Nat. ScL, Fhiladelphia, iv,, p. 124; 1824). 
The specimens were unfortunately without labels, so that only 21 (about 
half) of those figured can now be identified (see R. B. Newton, Geol. 
Mag., dec. iv., vol. ix., p. 303 ; 1902) ; many of these bear, written in 
ink, either " N. Amer." or the specific name. Finch also presented to 
the Museum a plaster cast of a trilobite on January 9th, 1836. 

Fitzgerald (R. D.) 

Presented remains of Miolania from Lord Howe's Island, 1885. 

Fontana (Luis J.) 

Presented Mammalian remains from the Pampa of Buenos Ay res, 
1871-72. 

Foord (Arthur Humphreys) 

Collected and presented Cephalopoda from the Carboniferous Lime- 
stone of Ireland, 1893. 

Forbes (Henry Ogg) 

Collected remains of Dinornithida? from New Zealand, purchased 1893. 
Presented bones of Harpagornis moorei from New Zealand, 1894. 

Ford (J. B.) 

Presented Coal-plants from Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, 1835. 

Fox (F. G. Brook) 

Presented fossils from the Salt Range, India, 1896. 

Fox (Howard) 

Presented Invertebrate fossils and Radiolarian Chert from Culm 
Measures of North Cornwall, 1895 ; specimens of Fteroconus minis from 
Lower Devonian, Bedruthan, Cornwall, 1900. 

Fox (J. H. & Go.) 

Bones of Mammalia and Aepyortiis from Madagascar, \ urchased 1894. 

Fox {Bev. William Darwin) [ -1882] 

Fox collected reptilian remains, chielly of Dinosauria, from the 
Wealden cliffs of the Isle of Wight in the neighbourhood of Brixton, 
where he lived, 'ihe collection of about 500 specimens included the 

VOL. I. U 



290 Geology. 

types of HypsiJophodon foxi, Huxley ; Polacanthua foxi, Hulke ; Orni- 
thopsis hulkei, Seeley ; Aristosuchus pusiUus, Seeley ; and Hylxo- 
champsa vectiana, Owen. The important series of remains of Hypsilo- 
phodon was catalogued in a MS. volume by J. W. Hulke, and used in 
his description of this dinosaur {PhiJ. Trans., 1882). The whole col- 
lection was purchased from the executors of Fox in 1882. Fox had 
previously presented the right mandibular ramus of Choeropofamus 
ieri, Owen (1841), which he found in the Eocene of the Isle of Wight. 



cut 



Franks (Godfrey Firth) 

Presented fossil Corals from Barbados, 1891. 
Fraser (Charles) 

Presented Indian fossil Mammalia, 1847-4.8. 

Fritsch (Anton) 

Pleistocene non-marine MoUusca, Trilobites from the Barrande Collec- 
tion, and Cretaceous Teleostean Fishes from Bohemia, were purchased 
respectively in 1892, 1897, 1899. 

Fulljames {Capt. G.) 

Presented type-skull of Mastodon perimensis from the Pliocene of 
Perim Island, 1847. 

Fulton (Hugh) 

Tertiary Mollusca from Florida, purchased 1899. 

Gamble (W.) 

Mr. Gamble has collected Polyzoa from the Chalk in the neighbour- 
hood of Eochester, Kent, especially at a locality near Chatham, described 
by him in G. K. Vine's " Eeport on Cretaceous Polyzoa" {Pep. Brit. 
Assoc, 1892). Two collections of about 165 and 629 specimens 
respectively were purchased from him in 1893 and 1898, and described in 
Dr. Gregory's " Catalogue of Cretaceous Bryozoa in the British Museum." 

Gardner (John Starkie) 

While occupied with researches in the Gault and associated deposits 
at Folkestone, Mr. Gardner obtained the services of the local collector, 
John Griffith, to make a unique collection of fossils from these strata. 
This collection, comprising the type-specimen of Mauisauriis gardntri, 
Seeley, as well as many fossils described by Mr. Gardner himself, was 
purchased by the Museum in five instalments in 1876, 1880, 1884, 1885 
and 1886. Other researches on the Eocene Flora, published by the 
Pala?ontographical Society and elsewhere, led Mr. Gardner to make large 
collections of plant-remains from Alum Bay, Bournemouth, Studland, and 
continental localities. These he sold to the Museum in 1880, 1881, 1884 
and 1886. Under the auspices of the Eoyal Society and British Associa- 
tion, Mr. Gardner also collected Tertiary plants in Mull and the Korth 
of Ireland, and these were received by the British Museum in 1886. 

Gavey (George Edward) 

Devonian fossils from Belgium and British fossils, purchased respec- 
tively in 1880 and 1890. 

Geddes (Patrick) 

Presented Pleistocene Mammalian remains from San Angelo, Mexico, 
1880. 



Geology. 09 [ 

Geils (J. M.) 

Presented remains of FJeplias armeniacus from Armenia, 185G. 
Oerrard (Edward) 

Numerous fossil Verfcebrata have been purcliased from this well- 
known dealer, including a carapace of Iloplophorus ornatas and a skeleton 
■of Mylodon rohiistus from the Pampa of Buenos Ayres in 1883 and 1885, 
remains of Aphanapteryx from the Chatham Islands in 1803, and Mada- 
gascar fossils in 1894. 

Gibraltar (Governor of). 

Presented Mammalian remains collected by Capt. Fox Brome from 
the caverns of Gibraltar, 1876. 

Gibson (John) 

Presented Mammalian remains from the Kirkdale Cavern, 1823-24. 

Gilbertson (William) 

In the second volume of his " Illustrations of the Geology of York- 
shire," 1836, Professor John Phillips writes as follows : " My greatest 
obhgation is to Mr. Gilbertson of Preston, a naturalist of high acquire- 
ments, who has for many years explored with exceeding dihgence and 
acumen a region of mountain limestone remarkably rich in organic 
remains. The collection which he has amassed from tlie small district of 
Bolland is at tliis moment unrivalled, and he has done for me, without 
«ohcitation, what is seldom granted to the most urgent entreaty ; he has 
«ent me for deliberate examination, at convenient intervals, the whole 
OF HIS MAGNIFICENT COLLECTION, accompanied by remarks dictated by 
long experience and a sound judgment. He had proposed to publisli an 
account of his discoveries, and especially of the Crinoidea for which no 
man in Europe had equal materials, and had made a great number of 
careful drawings for the purjDOse ; but all these, as well as the specimens, 
he placed at my disposal — a striking proof of liberal and genuine devotion 
to science. An attentive examination of this rich collection rendered it 
unnecessary to study minutely the less extensive series preserved in other 
cabinets." 

" Most of the figures of fossils are taken from specimens in Mr. 
Oilbertson's collection, because these were generally the best that could 
be found." Gilbertson was a pharmaceutical chemist and obtained his 
specimens largely by purchase, thus acquiring the collection of Dr. 
Alexander Moore of Preston, which included many specimens figured in 
Sowerby's " Mineral Concholog}'." He presented a few crinoids to the 
Oeological Society in 1826 and in 1841, but in the latter year the rest of 
his collection was purchased by the Trustees. It consisted of 2646 
specimens, thus distributed: Corals, 103; Echinoderms, 613; Bivalves, 
1041 ; Univalves, 810 ; Crustacea, etc., 79. In addition to the specimens 
from Bolland are some from the Coal Measures of Lancashire. As the 
collection was purchased by Dr. J. E. Gray and was for many years 
retained in the Zoological Department, most of the specimens bear the 
circular register ticket of that department, replacing Gilbertson's original 
numbers. Labels in faded brown ink in the hand-writing of Phillips, 
and signed ^, are occasionally preserved. The collection was accompanied 
by a detailed MS. list, which denoted by " P." the specimens figured by 
Phillips, as mentioned above ; by " Z. J.," the blastoids figured by 
G. B. Sowerby in the Zoological Journal ; by "S." or "Sow," specimens 



292 Geology, 

figured by J. Sowerby in the " Mineral Conchology " ; and by " Gr. M.,'' 
numerous specimens figured in his own manuscript, which unfortunately 
has disappeared. 

Gillett (Alfred) 

Presented a skeleton of IcJdJiyosaurus tenuirostris from the Lower 
Lias of Street, 1884. 

Gipps (W. L. R.) 

Presented Marsupial remains from the river deposits of New South 
Wales, 1875. 

Godwin- Austen {Col H. H.) 

Presented Palaeozoic fossils from Kashmir, 1888, and Lower Pliocene 
Mollusca from N. Italy, 1896. 

Goldenberg (Friedrich) [1799-1881] 

Goldenberg studied the Lower Permian flora and fauna of Pthenisb 
Prussia, and made a collection of fossils in illustration of his work. From 
this collection 155 specimens, chiefly animal remains from the neighbour- 
hood of Saarbriicken, were purchased by the British Museum from 
Professor Schenk in 1890. The selection included 8 specimens figured in 
Goldenberg's "Fauna Sar^epontana Fossilis" (1875-77). 

Gollmer (C. H. V.) 

Collected Cretaceous Invertebrata in the Lebanon, purchased 1896. 

Goodchild (John George) 

Presented Tertiary shells from Bordighera, 1882. 

Goodwin (Frank S.) 

Presented antlers of Cervus elapkus from tufa at Alport, Derbyshire, 
1891. 

Gordon (Bev. George) 

Presented skeleton of ITyperodapedon gordoni from Trias of Elgin, 
1886. 

Gordon (John) 

Presented fossil Fishes from Lignite of Taubate, San Paulo, Brazil, 
1900. 

Gostling (Archibald C.) 

Presented skull of Baloena aitstralis from river deposit at Villa 
Constitucion, Argentine Ptepublic, 18ii8. 

Gowreeshankar {Biwdn Wajeshankar) 

Presented Pliocene teeth of Mastodon from Perim Island, 1885. 

Grant {Col. Charles Coote) 

Collected and presented Ordovician and Silurian fossils from Ontario, 
Canada, 1899, 1900. 

Grant (E. M.) 

Bones of Elephas from the Pleistocene of Belgrade, purchased 1881, 



Geology. 293 



Crray (John) 

As an iron- master, Jolm Gray of Hagley, near Stourbridge, owned 
quarries in the Wenlock Limestone at Dudley, whence the stone was 
■extracted for use as a flux. His workmen saved the fossils for him and 
he purchased others from elsewhere, and thus thrice amassed a splendid 
collection. His first was one of those to which Murchison acknowledges 
his indebtedness in the " Silurian System." In 1861, it contained 2730 
specimens, and of these the Museum purchased 2366. The rest, it is said 
in the documents referring to the transaction, were destineil for the 
Museum of Practical Geology ; but just a j'-ear later he sold to the 
Museum a series of trilobites from the Wenlock Shale of Malvern. 'Jlie 
first series comprised : 103 trilobites, including many figured by Salter 
(Mem. Geol. Surv. and Palseontogr. Soc), the type of Lichas grayi and 
other Lichas figured by Fletcher; 241 echinoderms, including types of 
Lepidaster grayi, Pseudocrinus magnificus, and presumably Fisocrinus 
pilula, also specimens of Pseudocrinus hifasciatus and Ajnocystis pentre- 
moides figured by Forbes; 199 corals, including the type of Ileliolites 
grayi; 1823 shells of molluscs and brachiopods, including specimens of 
Leptaena and Siphonotreta figured by Davidson; and the types of 
Chiton grayanus and C. wrightianus, the latter subsequently referred to 
Turrilepas. A selection from Gray's second collection was bought in two 
instaln:ients in 1869, and amounted to 775 Wenlock fossils from Dudley, 
all classes of invertebrates being represented. On Gray's death his whole 
collection was taken over by the dealer, F. H. Butler, and from him 
in 1889 the Trustees purchased 337 selected specimens of invertebrates 
fi-om the Wenlock beds of Dudley and of plants from the Coal Measures. 
A few other interesting specimens that came to light later on were also 
purchased. The remainder were dispersed by Mr. Butler in the course of 
business, and some of these also have ultimately found their way to the 
Museum, in the Madeley and other collections. Specimens from the Gray 
collection are readily recognised from being fixed with chalk and gum on 
a thin wooden tablet covered with a smooth purplish-brown paper, and 
provided with a label written on white paper. 

Green {JEtev. Charles) 

Green, of Bacton, Norfolk, collected fossils, chiefly Vertebrata, from 
the Forest Bed and the Fens. Many of his specimens were described in 
Owen's "British Fossil Mammals and Birds." His collection was pur- 
chased by the Museum in 1843. 

Oreen (Jacob) 

Presented plaster casts of North American Trilobites, 1834. 

Crreen (Upfield) 

Presented Devonian Invertebrata from the Eifel, 1899. 

-Greenhill (J. E.) 

Collected and presented non-marine Mollusca from river-deposits at 
•Clapton, Essex, 1888, and Mammalian remains from a Turbary at 
Walthamstow, 1890. 

Greenough (George Bellas) 

Presented Tertiary shells from Barbados, 1822. 

Greenwood (George) 

Presented jaws of cave-bear from cavern at Isturitz, Bayonne, 1898. 



294 Geology. 

Greenwell (Canon William) 

Presented Mammalian remains from Ileatliery Burn Cave, Durham, 
1892. 

Gregory (John AValter) 

While assistant in the Department of Geology, Dr. Gregory, now 
Professor of Geology at Melbourne, made an important collection of fossils- 
in Spitzbergen in lb96, and a large collection of Tertiary and Pleistocene- 
fossils, including bones and teeth of the rodent AmhlyrMza in the West 
Indies in 1899. These collections were received as donations in the years- 
mentioned. 

Grenfell (J. G.) 

While a master at Clifton College, Mr. Grenfell collected the crinoids- 
of the Carboniferous Limestone in the Gorge of the Avon, as well as many 
from Clitheroe and the neighbourhood of Preston, Lancashire, and pub- 
lished a valuable paper on them in 1876 {Proc. Bristol Nat. Soc. L). His- 
collection of 61 specimens, purchased by the Trustees in 1891, contained 
the types of Rhodocriaus verisimiUs and Gilbert socrinus konincki, with 
figured examples of Poteriocrinus plicatus and Phodocrinvs verus. The 
specimens were numbered in correspondence with a MS. note-book, 
presented with the collection; but some of the specimens therein? 
mentioned were not received. The collection had been exammed by 
Major Austin, who agreed with Mr. Grenfell's determinations. 

Grey [Sir George) 

Presented fossil Reptiles from the Karoo Formation of South Africa^ 
1859. 
Grigson (W. H.) 

Presented Tertiary fossils from Gippsland, A^ictoria, 1882. 

Grose- Smith (Henley) 

Shells and other remains of Tcstudo grandidieri from caverns of 
Madagascar, purchased 1892. 

Guenther (Robert Theodore) 

Mr. Guenther, of Magdalen College, Oxford, visited northern Persia m 
1898, and collected a few mammalian bones from the Lower Pliocene of 
Maragha, besides 145 invertebrate fossils, chielly Miocene, from the- 
neighbourhood of Lake Urmi. The collection was described by Dr. 
J. W. Gregory, Mr. P. B. Newton, and others, in Mr. Guenther's paper 
"Contributions to the Natural History of Lake Urmi" (Journ. Linn. Soc^ 
[Zool.'] 1899), and presented to the Museum by the collector in 1900. 

Gunn (John) 

Presented a Paramoudra from the Chalk of Norfolk, 1827. 

Guppy (H. B.) 

Presented Post-Tertiary shells from the Solomon Isles, 1887. 

Guppy (Robert John Lechmere) 

Collected Tertiary Foraminifera from Trinidad, purchased 1892. 

Haberlein (Karl) 

Habeilein was a medical practitioner in Pappenheim, Bavaria, where 
are great quarries in the Lithographic Stone (Lower Kimmeridgian). In 



Geology. 205 

consideration of professional services rendered to the quarrymen and their 
families, he was able to amass a valuable collection, comprising the original 
specimen of Archxopteryx macnira described by Owen {Phil. Trans., 
1863) and 1703 other fossils— namely, 23 reptiles, 204 fishes, lll;> 
invertebrates, 145 plants, and 122 miscellaneous. The whole coll(.'cti"n 
was purchased by the British Museum in two instalments iu 18G2-G3, the 
total sum paid to Haberlein being £700. 

Haden (Sir Francis Seymour) 

Presented a head of Jchthi/osaunifi platyodon and other reptiks and 
fishes from the Lower Lias of Lyme Regis, 1882. 

Haggard {Lieut, R.N.) 

Presented eggs of turtles from a consolidated beach in the Island of 
Ascension, 1880. 

Haldon (Lord) 

Presented Mammalian remains and implements from Kent's Cavern, 
Torquay, 1883. 

Hall (Edgar) 

Collected remains of Glossopteris Flora from New South Wales, 
presented by Mr. W. H. Shrubsole, 1892. 

Hall (TowNSHEND Monckton) [1845-1899] 

Residing at Pilton, near Barnstaple, Hall devoted himself to the 
geology of North Devon, contributing papers to the Transactions of 
the Devonshire Association and the Geological and Mineral ofjical 
Magazines. Many of his specimens were figured in T. Davidson's 
Monograph of Devonian Brachiopoda ; and his collection formed the basis 
of a valuable paper " On the Relative Distribution of Fossils throughout 
the North Devon Series " (^i^ar^. Journ. GeoJ. Soc. xxiii. Proc. p. 371; 
1867). A selected series of 237 fossils, including plants, fishes, and all 
classes of invertebrates, was bought from him in 1886. 

Hamilton (A.) 

Skeleton of Aptornis defossor from New Zealand, purchased 1893. 

Hamling (Joseph G.) 

Collected and presented Trilobites from the Culm Measures near 
Barnstaple, 1896. 

Hanbury (Daniel) 

Presented Devonian Brachiopoda from China, and Mammalian remains 
from Chinese caverns, 1803. 

Hantken (Max von) 

Presented fossil Foraminifera from Hungary, 1888. 

Hardman (Edward T.) 

Collected and presented fossils from Western Australia, 1887. 

Harford (Frederick) 

For many years, Harford relieved the tedium of a city life by the 
preparation of Chalk fossils. His specimens were collected chit-tly by 
Joseph Wood in the neighbourhood of Cuxton and Burham, Kent, but 
scarcely any of them bore a record of the locality whence they were 



296 Geology, 

obtained. His collection was mentioned in Dixon's "Geology of Sussex" 
(1850). Besides the beautifully-prepared Chalk fossils, especially fishes, 
Harford accumulated a few specimens from other formations, some of 
them valuable. Tiie greater part of the collection, numbering 1108 
specimens, was purchased from him in 1888. In the same year he 
presented to the INIuseum the type-specimen of Thrissops portlandicuf^, 
A. S. Woodw., from the Portland Stone; and in 1889 he handed over 
to the Trustees the residue of his collection as a donation, to be used 
partly for distribution as duplicates to other museums. 

Harlan (Richaed) 

Presented plaster casts of North American Trilobites, 1834. 

Harmsworth (Alfred) 

Presented duplicates from a collection of Jurassic fossils from Franz 
Josef Land, 1899. 

Harris (George Frederick) 

Collected and presented Oligocene and Miocene ^Mullusca from 
Bordeaux, 1894. 

Harris (William) [1797-1877] 

Harris collected fossils in the Chalii pits near Charing, Kent, especially 
from a detritus of Danian ag'\ He lent and presented specimens to 
several paleontologists engaged in research, notably Touhnin Smith, 
W. C. Williamson, and Prof. T. Piupert Jones. A selection of about 
240 specimens from the collection left at his death was purchased by the 
Museum from his daughter in 1881. ]t comprised Jcbth}osaurian 
remains figured in Dixon's " Geology of Sussex," various fish-remains, 
Brachiopoda described by Davidson, and Furaminifera and Entomostraca 
desciibed by Prof. Ptupert Jones. 

Harrison (James) 

Collected fossils from the Lowfr Lias of Lyme Piegis and Charmouth 
and prepared the skeleton of Scelidosaurus Jiarrisoni, purchased 1861, 1865. 

Harrison & Hodgson {3Iessrs.) 

Presented Mammalian remains from a submerged forest at Jarrow, 
Kewcastle-on-Tyne, 1857. 

Hartmann (C. H.) 

Presented Marsupial remains from river deposits of Queensland, 1884. 

Hastings (Barbara, Marchioness of) [1810-1858] 

Barbara, Baroness Grey de Euthjm, married (1) the second Marquis 
of Hastings (d. 1844) ; and (2) Commodore Hastings (afterwards Admiral 
Sir Hastings) R. Yelverton, G.C.B. (d. 1878). With the aid of Mr. Henry 
Keeping, she collected fossil Yertebrata, chiefly Mammalia, from the 
Eocene'and Oligocene of Hordwell (Hampshire) and the Isle of Wight. 
She also acquired specimens for comparison from Moutmartre, Allier, and 
the Mayence Basin. The collection included several specimens described 
by Owen, and many unique fossils described by later authors. The 
greater part of it was purchased by the Museum from the Marchioness in 
1855, and a few additional specimens were purc'iased at her sale at 
Stevens' rooms in the same vear. 



Geology. 297 

Hatch (Frederick Henry) 

Presented remains of the Glossopteris Flora from the Transvaal, 1898. 

Haughton (Thomas James) 

Presented Pala^oniscid fishes from the Karoo Formation of South 
Africa, 1897. 

Hauxwell 

Collected Tertiary shells from valley of the Amazon, purchased 1870. 

Hawkins (Percy) 

Presented Archanodoii jahesi from Upper Old Ked Sandstone of 
Llaavaches, Monmouthshire, 1895. 

Hawkins (Samuel James) 

Hawkins collected and prepared a fine series of fossils, especially 
fish-remains and two Pterosaurian bones, from the Chalk of Blue-bell 
Hill, Burham, Kent. He presented the collection of about 515 specimens 
to the British Museum in 1891. 

Hawkins (Thomas) [1810-1889] 

From the Lower Lias of Somersetshire and Dorsetshire, Hawkins, of 
Glastonbury, collected skeletons of Ichthyosaurs and Plesiosaurs " which 
ills anatomical skill, and untiring perseverence and patience, enabled him 
to dissect from the rock, in a state of integrity previously thought 
unattainable." His more important specimens figured in his curious 
works, " Memoirs on Ichthyosauri " (1834), and " The Book of the Great 
Sea-Dragons " (1810), were purchased by the British Museum in 1834, on 
the valuation of Dean Buck land and G. A. Mantell, the latter of whom 
remarks that " They had been obtained with so much labour and expense, 
and were so admirably put together, and chiselled out with so much skill, 
that the sum awarded for them was scarcely sufficient" (Zo?ic?o7i Oeol. 
Jonrn., p. 16 ; 1846). A subsequent collection of equal importance was 
purchased in 1840. He presented other portions of his collection to the 
Universities of Oxford and Cambridge. 

Hector {Sir James) 

Presented Cretaceous and Tertiary fossils from New Zealand, 1875, 
ani collected other similar specimens, purchased 1880. 

Heggerty 

Mammalian remains from Kent's Cavern, purchased 1843. 

Hicks (Henry) 

Collected and presented Arenig fossils from Pembrokeshire in 1865, 
various Welsh Cambrian and Silurian fossils in 1884, and Mammalian 
remiins from caverns in the Yale of Clwyd, 1885. 

Hills (R. C.) 

Presented Tertiary insects and plants from Wyoming and Colorado, 
U.S.A., 1891. 

Hinde (George Jexxixgs) 

Presented Conodonts from the Sub-Carboniferous of Ohio, 1878; 
Invertebrate fossils and Radiolariaa Chert from the Culm Measures of 
N. Cornwall, 1895. 



298 Geology. 

Hinton (Henry Arthur) 

Presented Cretaceous Polyzoa, 1897. 

Hitchcock (Edward) 

Presented Triassic footprints from Connecticut, 1862. 

Hoflfert (H. H.) 

Presented Palaozoic fossils from the Falkland Islands, 1891. 

HoU (Harvey Buchanan) [1820-1886] 

A pupil in field geology of Sir H. de la Beche and Rogers of Pennsyl- 
vania, Holl retired to Malvern in 1862 and carried out valuable studies 
on the geology of the Malvern Hills {Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1864-65). 
He also published papers on the Inferior Oolite in the middle and south of 
England (ojx cit., 1863), and on the older rocks of south Devon and east 
Cornwall (op. cit., 1869). He wrote several papers on fossil sponges and 
Entomostraca, the latter in conjunction with T. Rupert Jones (1865-69). 
Holl's collection, purchased from his executor, W. H. Holl, Esq., Q.C.> 
consisted of 414 slides of Foraminilera and Ostracoda, the latter including 
the specimens figured by Jones and Holl, and 1205 invertebrate fossils. 
from various British formations, especially those discussed in the above- 
mentioned papers. Among them were a figured specimen of Homaloriotus 
johannis, and types of Mesozoic corals figured by P. Martin Duncan, yiz.^ 
Cydolites heard, Montlivaltia holli, M. jpainsiuickl, and Septastrea haimei 
(PalcTontogr. Sue). 

Hollis (Thomas) 

Presented Tertiary shells from Sicily, 1763. 

Holm (Gerhard) 

Prepared specimens of Eurypterus from the Upper Silurian of Oesel, 
purchased 1898. 

Holroyd (William Firth) 

Presented English Lower Carboniferous Invertebrata, 1897. 

Hoist (P. A.) 

Remains of Cervus giganteus from Russia, purchased 1883. 

Home (Sir Everard) 

Presented vertebral column of Ichthyosaurus from the Lower Lias of 
Lyme Regis, 1819. 

Homersham (Colette) 

Presented rocks and fossils from a deep boring at Richmond, Surrey, 
1887. 
Homfray (David) [1822-1893] 

By profession a lawyer, resident at Portmadoc in North "Wales, 
Homfray spent his leisure in searching for fossils in the Pala30zoic rocks- 
of the neighbourhood, where he discovered many new forms, especially in 
the Tremadoc beds. He also worked the Menevian strata of Maentwrog 
and St. Davids with equal success. He was most generous in giving 
away even his finest specimens, and among other Museums that chiefly 
benefited by his labours were the Woodwardian at Cambridge, and the 
Manchester Museum. The latter contains several of hh trilobites and a 



Geology. 299 

Ctenodonta, described Ly Hicks and by Salter. Ilomfray's first donation 
to the British Museum consisted of 20 Treniadoc fossils, mostly trilubites, 
in 1867; while in 1882 he presented 37'J fine fossils from the lower 
Pala30zoic rocks of Wales. 

Hood (T. H. Cockburn) 

Presented Plesiosaurian remains from Kew Zealand, 18G1, 18G3; a 
footprint of Dinornis in modern beach-sandstone from New Zealand, 

1872. 

Hooker {Sir Joseph Dalton) 

Presented Cretaceous fossils collected by Capt. Mansell in the Lebanon, 
1863. 

Home (William) 

While in business in Leyburn, Mr. Home made a large collection of 
Elasmobranch teeth from the Yoredale Kocks of Wensleydale, Yorkshire. 
'J'he greater part of it, including the type and other specimens described 
by J. W. Davis, was purchased by the late Mr. William Reed for the 
York Museum. A valuable second selection from this collection, how- 
ever, w^as purchased by the Trustees of the British Museum in 1885. 

Horner (A. C.) 

Presented Thecosj^ondi/Ius liorneri from the Wealden of Tunbridge 
Wells, 1882. 

Hoser (Julius) 

Skeletons of Neusticosaunis jjusillus from Upper Trias of Wiirtemberg, 
purchased 1881. 

Hoskold (H. D.) 

Presented specimens of the Glossopteris Flora from Argentina, 1890. 

Housman (Henry) 

Presented footprints of Rhynchosaurus from Trias of South Stafford- 
shire, 1862. 

Houzeau de Lehaie (A.) 

Presented Upper Cretaceous and Eocene fish- teeth from Belgium, 1889. 

Howarth (Osbert Henry) 

Presented a slab of shell-marble from La Luz, New Mexico, 1892. 

Hughes {Mrs. McKenny) 

Collected and presented non-marine Mollusca from Barnwell gravels, 
Cambridge, 1888. 

Hulke (John Whitaker) [1830-1895] 

Ihis eminent oculist pursued researches among ^Mesozoic Reptilia, 
especially Dinosauria, Ichthyosauria, and Crocodilia. He described several 
specimens discovered by Mr. Mansel-Pleydell and Pev. W. Fox, and he 
himself made a collection of Dinosaurian remains from the Wealden of 
the Isle of Wight. This collection of nearly 400 si)ecimens, including 
the type-specimen of Iguanodon seeiyi and figured specimens of Jlypsilu- 
phodonfoxi^ was presented to the British Museum with other miscellaneous 
fossils by Mrs. Hulke in 1895. 



300 Geology. 

Hunter (Robert) [1823-1897] 

As missionary at Nagpur, central India, from 1847 to 1855, Hunter 
pursued geological researches in that region with Rev. Stephen Hislop. 
He collected fossils in both the Nagpur district and other parts of^ India, 
and his whole collection, of about 1700 specimens, was received by the 
British Museum as a bequest in 1897. 

India, Geological Survey of 

Presented fossil Corals from Sind, 1881. 

India, Secretary of State for 

Presented Mammalia and Peptilia from the Siwalik Formation of 
India, 1860. 
Inglefield {Admiral Sir Edward Augustus) [1820-1894] 

In 1852, Inglefield undertook a voyage to the Arctic in the Isabel, in 
search of Sir John Franklin, and in the following year published an 
account of the expedition, with remarks on the physical geography, 
geology, etc., of Davis Straits, and its east and west shores, by P. C. 
Sutherland, surgeon to the expedition. His collection of fossils was 
transferred from the Museum of Practical Geology in 1878. 

Inglis (David) 

Presented skull of Bos jorlmigenius from Athol, Perthshire, 1817. 

Inwards (Richard) 

Presented Palseozoic fossils from Bolivia, 1830. 

Jack (Robert Logan) 

Presented fossil Invertebrata from Austraha, 1879. 

Jackson (Frederick) 

Presented duplicates from a collection of Jurassic fossils from Franz 
Josef Land, 1899. 

Jackson (J. E.) 

Presented Pentacrinus fossil is and Carboniferous Crinoids, 1887. 

Jardin des Plantes, Paris 

Presented fossils from the Gypsum Quarries near Paris, 1818. 

Jayakar {Lieut.-Col. A. S. G.) 

Presented Eocene MoUusca from Oman, Arabia, 1900. 

Jennings (W. F.) 

Collected English Mesozoic Invertebrata, presented by Miss Ethel A. 
Thomas, 1892. 

Jesson (Thomas) 

Mr. Jesson began his collection at Cambridge, when he obtained a fine 
series of fossils from the Cambridge Greensand, including some unique 
l)ones of birds described by Prof. Seeley (Quart. Journ. Oeol. Soc, 1876), 
and a few small Chelonian skulls described by Mr. Lydekker (loc. cit.y 
1889). At the same time he collected from the Red Chalk of Hunstanton. 
Subsequently removing to the neighbourhood of Northampton, Mr. Jesson 
devoted attention to the Great Oolite of that district and the Oxford Clay 



Geology. 301 

of St. Ives. Some Teleosaurian remains from the Great Oolite were 
purchased from him by the British Museum in 1888, hut the greater i)art 
of his collection from that formation was acquired by the Northami.ton 
Museum. Selections of 1730 fossils from the lied Chalk, including; 
Polyzoa described by Gr. II. Vine, 1010 fossils from the Oxford Clay o? 
St. Ives, and 2709 fossils from the Cambridge Greensand were purchased 
from him by the British Museum in 1891, 1892, and 1894 respectively. 

Jeunneret 

Collected Australian Palaiozoic Brachiopoda, presented by Lord 
Stanley, 1846. 

Jex 

A collector for the dealer R. Damon and his successor, B. F. Damon. 
Obtained Scottish Old Red Sandstone and Carboniferous Fishes purchased 
at various times from Damon. Also collected fish-remains from the 
Devonian of Canada, purchased from Damon, 1888 and 1892, and 
Mammalia from the Santa Cruz beds of Patagonia, purchased from 
Damon, 1899. 

Johnson (Hexry) [1823-1885] 

In the exercise of his profession as a civil and mining engineer in the 
Midlands, H. Johnson of Dudley had many opportunities for collecting 
fine specimens of fossils. These " he cherished with personal care and 
skilful manipulation, exhibiting their parts and characters clearly and 
with judgment, so that the palaeontologist visiting his wonderfully rich 
collection, not only saw specimens better than he had seen before, but 
always found a judicious selection of doubtful or unknown forms... 
separated for examination by the specialist " {Geol. Mag , 1885, p. 432). 
On Johnson's death, 2524 selected fossils from his collection were purchased 
through the dealer, R. Damon. Of these 1551 were from the Wenlock 
Beds, and consisted of 28 sponges, 466 corals, 211 echinoderms, 192 
arthropods, 25 annelids, 136 polyzoans, and 493 molluscs ; 973 were from 
the Carboniferous rocks of the neighbourhood, and of them 759 were 
plants, 79 arthropods, 105 molluscs, and 30 the remains of fishes. The 
best known of these choice specimens is the type of Eucladia j'ohnsoniy 
H. Woodward. 

Johnson (James R.) [ -1845] 

In medical practice at Hot Wells, Bristol, Johnson was a wealthy 
collector of fine fossils. His collection is mentioned in the West of 
England Journal (1835) as "particularly distinguished by the truly 
gigantic Ichthyosaurian remains which it contains." It was visited by 
Agassiz when he came to England to study fossil fishes. At Johnson's 
death, his collection was sold at Stevens', and, as the Austins say, " the 
treasures which it had taken a long life to accumulate were disj^ersed 
throughout the civilised world." A catalogue of the sale is in the library 
of the Geological Department. The British Museum then obtained a 
number of specimens of varied nature, including several ]\[esozoic fishes 
and some remains of Crinoidea, a few of the latter figured by T. and T. 
Austin (q.v.), notably the wonderful group from the Upper Lias of 
Bridport, described by them under the name of Fentacri n us Johnson i. 

Johnson (James Yate) 

Presented Tertiary MoUusca from Madeira, 1857. 



302 Geology. 

Jones (Thomas Rupert) 

In the course of his researches on fossil Foraminifera and Entomostraca, 
Prof Eupert Jones collected important series of specimens, purchased 
from' him in 1869, 1880, 1882, 1888, 1891, 1892, and 1899. 

Jones (W. Weaver) 

A resident of Cleobury Mortimer, Weaver Jones collected teeth and 
spines of Elasmobranch Fishes from the Carboniferous Limestone of 
Oreton, and a few remains of Bothriolepis, &c., from the Upper Old Eed 
Sandstone of Farlow, Shropshire. Some of the fish-teeth were figured by 
Morris and Roberts (Quart. Journ. Geoh Soc, 1862). The collection of 
140 specimens was purchased by the Museum from Mr. Jones' executor 
in 1880. 
Jordan (Swinfen) 

Presented Carboniferous Corals from Clifton, 1876. 

Judd (John Wesley) 

Presented fossils from borings in the London Basin, 1885 ; Ostracoda 
from the Bracklesham Beds, 1888 ; and Arthrojohycus from Gold Coast 
Colony, 1893. 
Jukes-Browne (Alfred John) 

Presented Tertiary and Post-Tertiary fossils from Barbados, 1890 and 
1892 ; Miocene Mollusca and Corals from Antigua, 1894. 

Kapflf 

Collected Picptilia from the Trias of Wiirtemberg, purchased 1864. 

Kaup (Johann Jacob) [1803-1873] 

Dr. Kaup was Inspector of the Grand-Ducal Cabinet of Natural 
History at Darmstadt, from 1840 until 1873, and devoted special 
attention to the fossil Mammalia discovered in the Miocene deposits of 
Hesse-Darmstadt. He made a private collection of these fossils and sold 
it in instalments to the British Museum in the years 1837, 1845, 1846, 
and 1847. He finally sold the unique skull of Dinotherium giganteum, 
described by himself and A. v. Klipstein, and other important associated 
mammalian fossils, to Dr. Thomas Oldham, who allowed the British 
Museum to purchase them in 1867. Many of the specimens acquired by 
the Museum are described in Kaup's "Ossements Fossiles " (1832-41) 
and in other memoirs by him. 

Keeping (Henry) 

A well-known collector from whom were purchased Middle Eocene 
Mollusca from Stubbington, Hampshire, 1858; Pleistocene Mammalian 
remains from Barrington, Cambridge, 1885; and Tremadoc fossils from 
Shineton, Shropshire, 1889. Also collected Oligocene fossils from the 
Isle of Wight, presented by the Council of the Royal Society, 1887, and 
assisted in making the collections of F. E. Edwards and the Marchioness 
OF Hastings (q.v.). 
Kellett [Oapt.) 

Presented Pleistocene Mammalia from Kotzebue Sound, Alaska, 1850. 

Kemper (S.) 

Presented Palasoniscid fishes from the Karoo Formation of South 
Africa, 1897. 



Geology. 303 

Ker (G. C. E.) 

Molar of Mastodon angustidens from the Red Crag of Foxall, Sufl'ulk, 
purchased 1888. 

Ketley (Charles) 

Living at Smethwick, near Birmingham, Ketley utilised the op])or- 
tunities afforded to him as a civil and mining engineer, of collecting 
specimens from the Wenlock Beds and Coal Measures of Dudley, 
Malvern Tunnel, and the district. The Museum made small purchases 
from him in 1866, 1869, 1870, 1873, 1874, and among these a series of 
the rare cystid Flacocystls, and another of the coral Goinophyllum, are 
noticeable. Specimens from his collection are in many other museums, 
e.g. the Woodwardian at Cambridge ; but on his death his main col- 
lection was acquired by the Mason College, now Birmingham University, 
a few remaining in the possession of his son, Mr. C. B. Ketley. One 
of the latter, figured by Bather (1891) as Thenar ocrinus ccdJipyyus, 
ultimately reached the Museum in the collection of Mr. W. Madoley. 

Kidston (Robert) 

Collected Coal-plants from the Eadstock and Forest of Dean Coalfields, 
presented by the Council of the Royal Society, 1885, 1887. 

Kimbley (Hugh) 

Presented Devonian Pentremites from Kentucky, 1890. 

King (William) 

Presented Syringosphxra from the Karakoram, Kashmir, 1890. 

Kirkby (J. W.) 

Collected Palaeozoic Ostracoda, purchased 1888. 

Klipstein (Augustus von) [1801-1894] 

Appointed Professor of Mineralogy at Giessen in 1836, Klipstein at 
once entered into correspondence with the British Museum, but it was 
not until he had published his " Beitrage zur geologischen Ktnntniss der 
Ostlichen Alpen" (1843) that the bargaining began seriously. At last, in 
1851, the Trustees bought from him a collection of 6147 specimens, 
mostly from the St. Cassian beds, and including all those specimens in his 
own possession that were figured in the above work. Most classes of 
Invertebrata were representtd, as well as the reptilian fragments de- 
scribed by H. V. Meyer in the same book, and a few fish-rtniains. The 
collection further comprised specimens from other Triassic beds and other 
localities of the Tyrol, e.g. Mnschelkalk, Wengener Schichten, and 
Eaibler Schichten, also Cretaceous corals from Gosau, and Tertiary 
fossils from Brandenberger Thai, N. Tyrol. The collection was divided 
into 1030 lots, numbered consecutively, and each with one or more labels 
in Klipstein's handwriting, usually on pink paper. Not merely is this 
the chief collection of Keuper fossils in the Museum, but its value to the 
student may be judged from Zittel's statement that Klipstein increased 
the St. Cassian fauna by more than 300 species, " deren Begrunduug und 
Beschreibung freilich manches zu wiiupchen lasst." Other series of 
Klipstein's collecting are to be seen at Budapest and elsewhere, but that 
in the British Museum is the one by which his work must be interpreted. 

Knight (Thomas A.) 

Presented Silurian Trilobites, 18SG. 



304 Geology, 

Koch (Albert C.) 

About 1840 Koch brought a large collection of remams of Mastodon 
americanus from Missouri and exhibited them to the public _ at Exeter 
Change in London. This collection was described by Koch himself in a 
small pamphlet entitled, " Desciiption of the Missourium" (Louisville, 
1841) and it was reported on by II. Owen {Proc. Geol. Soc, 1842). It 
was ultimately purchased by the British Museum in 1844, and many of 
the separate bones were used in the reconstructed skeleton now placed at 
the entrance to the gallery of Fossil Mammalia. 

Kochibe (T.) 

Presented Radiolarian Chert from Japan, 1898. 

Koninck (Laurent Guillaume de) [1809-1887] 

Though Professor of Cl)emistry at Liege, de Kouinck's title to fame 
rests on his " Description des Animaux Fobsiles qui se trouvent dans le 
Terrain Carbonifere deBelgique" (1842-51), and subsequent works of 
similar nature. In 1853, on coming to London to receive the WoUaston 
Fund of the Geological Society, he sold to the British Museum a col- 
lection of Belgian fossils, representing 500 species from the Carboniferous, 
125 from the Devonian, and 250 from the Tertiary rocks, in all some 
3000 specimens. These weie accompanied by loose labels in de Koninck's 
small angular hand on oblong bits of white paper. 

Krantz (A. and F.) 

Numerous purchases have been made, especially of Continental fossils, 
from these dealers. They include pigmy elephants from the caverns of 
Sicily, 1897. 

Kusta (J.) 

Collected fossils from the Lower Permian Gas-coal of Bohemia, 
including a fossil scorpion (^CydoiMhalnms) purchased from him, 1895. 

Laffan (George Bastable) 

Presented antler of Pieindeer and skull of Bison from Thames deposits 
of Twickenham, 1894. 

Lakin (Michael H.) 

Presented skeleton of IcJitJiyosaurus pJati/odon from Lower Lias of 
Stockton, Warwickshire, 1898. 

Lambert (C J.) 

Presented Tertiary shells and fish-teeth from Coquimbo, Chili, 1878. 

Lankester (Edwin Ray) 

Presented a unique specimen of Pferaspis crouchi, showing scales, 
from the Lower Old Red Sandstone of Worcestershire, 1873. 

Last^(J. T.) 

Mr. Last has collected zoological specimens in Madagascar for the 
Hon. Walter Piothschild. In 1894 he found some fossil bones in the 
marsh deposits of the island, and sent them to the British Museum, which 
purchased some of them directly from him, others through Mr. E. 
Gerrard. Among the remains was the orij,inal skull of Megaladapis 
madagascariensis, Forsyth Major. 



Geology. 305 

Lustic (St. Val, Vicomte de) 

In 1863, the Vicomte de Lastic made a scientific exploration of the 
cavern of Bnmiquel on his estate in Tarn-et-Garonne, and obtained a 
large collection of remains of reindeer and other mammals associated with 
bones and implements of m;\n. In 1 864, Owen, having first taken care to 
visit the cavern with the Vicomte, purchased his collection for the 
British Museum, and subsequently described ttie human remains and the 
jaw^s of horses {Phil. Trans., 1869). The human bones and remains of 
associated animals, with a few implements, are preserved in the Depart- 
ment of GeoL )gy ; but the princijial objects of human workmanship are 
in the Department of British and Media3val Antiquities at Bloomsbury. 

Laur {Mrs. Agnes) 

Collected Polyzoa and other fossils from the Chalk of Rii^en, purchased 
1899. 

Lay ton (James) 

1'he Rev. James Layton was for some years Curate of Catfield, 
Norfolk, and made a valuable collection of the lars;er Mammalia from the 
Furest Bed, which was purchased by the Museum in 1858. Some of his 
observations were published in the Edinburgh Journal of Science (vol. vi.). 

Leach (R. E.) 

Presented bivalves from the Norwich Crag, 1888. 

Leathes (G. R.) 

Presented shells from the Crag of Suffolk and Norfolk, 1824. 

Lee (John Edward) [1808-1887] 

Born at Hull, Lee early made the acquaintance of Prof. John Phillips 
— then at York— and was by him led to the study of geology. During 
travels, on account of his health, through Scandinavia, llussia, and other 
parts of Europe, and later, when settled first at Monmouth and finally at 
Villa Syracusa, Torquay, he amassed a very large collection of fossils, 
which he presented, to the British Museum in 1885. A '* Hough 
Catalogue " of it, printed for private circulation in 1880, gave the number 
of specimens as 21,854, representing over 9750 species. Some of the 
specimens were collected by himself, others were bought from dealers, 
but to nearly all are attached labels in his own handwriting. The 
collection includes many type and figured specimens of plants and 
invertebrates. Among them may be specially mentioned the types of 
various sponges from the Yorkshire Chalk, described by Lee in 1839 
(Mag. Nat. Hist.); a considerable number of brachiopods, mostly 
Devonian, figured in Phillips' " Palaeozoic Fossils of Devon and Cornwall " 
(1841), and by Davidson (Palfeontogr. Soc); types of EuomphaJus 
serpens and Goniatites excavatus figured by Phillips {op. cit.) ; Goniatifes 
multilobatus, Beyr., figured by F. Roemer {GeoL Mag., 1880); tlie 
trilobites lUxnus murchisoni and Ilomalonotus johannis, figured by 
Salter (Palfeontogr. Soc, 1865-67); the unique specimen of Tricoelo- 
crinus leei, Whidborne (1889). Lee published a few papers, reference to 
which and to other fossils in his collection will be found in his " Notebook 
of an Amateur Geologist," 1881. 

Leeds (Alfred Nicholson) 

For about thirty years Mr. Leeds, of Eyebury, Peterboroush, has, 
with great skill, collected the remains of re[>tiles and fishes from the 

VOL. I. X 



306 Geology. 

Oxford Clay near Peterborough. His first collcctiori, made in associatioD 
with his brother, Mr. Charles E. Leeds, was purchased from hitn by the 
Museum in four instalments in 1890, 1891, 1892 and 1893. Several 
subsequent small purchases have added important specimens to the series, 
notably a nearly complete Plesiosaurian skeleton in 1897, and the tail and 
two limbs of a gigantic Dinosaur in 1899. This collection comprises 
many type and unique specimens of Dinosauria, Crocodilia, Plesiosauria, 
Ichthyosauria, and fishes, described by J. Phillips, J. W. Hulke, H. G-. 
Seeley, R. Lydekker, C. W. Andrews, and A. S. Woodward. 

Leeds (Charles E.) 

See Leeds, Alfeed Xicholson. 

Lees {Sir Charles Cameron) 

Presented bones of Dodo from Mauritius, 1892. 

Leeson (John Rudd) 

Dr. Leeson, with Mr. G. B. Laflfan, has investigated the Thames- 
deposits at Twickenham (see Quart. Journ. Geol. Sac, 1894). He pre- 
sented to the British Museum the fossils there found, namely, a unique 
frontlet of Saiga tatarica in 1891, remains of Pieindeer and Bison in 1894, 
and a skull of Bos j^trimigenius with Mollusca in 1896. 

Leidy (Joseph) 

Presented a skull of Oreodon culbertsoni from the White River 
Formation of Dakota, 1890. 

Leifchild {3Irs.) 

Presented miscellaneous British fossils, 1890. 

Lepsius (Richard) 

Plaster cast of restored skeleton of HaUtherium scliinzi from Lower 
Miocene, Hesse Darmstadt, purchased 1884. 

Lessly (Andrew) 

Presented silicified wood from Antigua, 1763. 

Lettsom (W. G.) 

Presented Tertiary shells from South America, 1860. 

Lewis (E. R.) 

The late Professor in the Syrian Protestant College, Beyrout, made a 
large collection of the various organisms found in the Upper Cretaceous 
of the Lebanon. He specially collected the fishes, and described his 
work in the Geological Magazine, dec. 2, vol. v. (1878), pp. 214-220. 
His collection was acquired by the dealer, R. Damon, of "Weymouth, from 
whom the Trustees of the British Museum purchased a first selection in 
1878, 1883, and 1884. A selection was subsequently purchased by the 
Edinburgh Museum of Science and Art. I'he whole collection of fish- 
remains was described by J. W. Davis (Trans. Hoy. Duhlin Soc, ser. 2, 
vol. iii., 1887). The British Museum possesses the specimens on \vhich 
H. Woodward founded the species Squilla lewisi and Limulus syriacus 
{Quart. Journ. Geol. Sac, 1879). 

Lewis (T. T.) 

Mr. Lewis, of Aymestry, assisted Murchison in investigating the 
Upper Silurian of the district in which he resided, and made a large 



Geology. 307 

collection of the local fossils (see Geikie, " Life of Muicliison," i., p. 242 ; 
1875). Most of these specimens were given to Murchison or sent abroad • 
but a small remnant of the collection, including some T^Iollusca named 
and partly described by J. W. Salter, was purchased by the British 
Museum from Mi-. T. Bryan Ward, of Aymestry, in 1898. 

Lhotzky (John) 

In 1837 this gentleman presented 18 specimens of fossil invertebrates 
(Brachiopoda, etc.), collected by himself from the Palaeozoic rocks of 
Tasmania. " Labels in red ink, attached to several specimens, relate to 
my day-book." He also presented some specimens to the Geological 
Society. 

Lightbody (Robert) [ -1874] 

Mr. Lightbody resided at Ludlow and collected Lower PahTozoic 
fossils. On his death in 1874, he bequeathed his collection in three 
]mrts to the British Museum, the Lndlow Museum, and the Mancliester 
Museum. The British Museum received the type-specimen of a Cambrian 
Trilobite, Erinnys 7'amidosa, from St. Davids; an undescribed star-fish 
from the Upper Ludlow of Leintwardiue ; and about 70 fish-remains from 
the Upper Silurian and Lower Old Bed Sandstone, including several 
specimens of Fteraspis and Cephalaspis, described by Prof. Ray Lankester 
ia his "Cephjilaspidas" (Pateontogr. Soc, 1868-70). All the specimens 
were well labelled by Lightbody himself. 

Lindstrom (Gustaf) 

Collected Silurian Invertebrata from Gotland, purchased 18G6. 

Liversidge (Archibald) 

Presented Paloeozoic fossils from Xew South Wales, 1880. 

Loftus (W. K.) 

Presented Cretaceous and Tertiary fossils from Persia, 1853. 

Logan {Sir William EDMOiifD) 

Presented Eozoon canadense, 1864. 

Lowndes (Miss) 

Collected and presented fossils from 'the Gault of Okeford Fitzpaine, 
Dorset, 1896 ; described by Mr. R. B. Newton, Proc. Dorset Nat. Fidd 
Club, vol. xviii., 1897. 

Lubbock {Sir John) 

See AvEBURY, Baron. 

Lucy (W. C.) 

Collected English Jurassic and Cretaceous fossils, presented by[Mr. 
Edward Power, 1895. 

Luxmoore (E. Bouverie) 

Explored the caverns of the Yale of Clwyd with Dr. Henry Hicks, 
and presented the resulting collection in 1885. Also ])resented Devonian 
Corals and Stromatoporoids from Torquay, 1883; Trilobites from the 
Penrhyn Slate Quarries, 1888 ; and Nummulites from Mentone, 1889. 

X 2 



308 Geology. 

Lyell {Sir Charles) 

During his foreign travels, when occupied with geological researches, 
Sir Charles Lyell made several small collections. In 1844, accompanied 
by Sir J. William Dawson, he collected a series of Carboniferous Inverte- 
brata, which were studied by de Yerneuil and enumerated, with his 
memoranda, in Lyell's " Travels in North America," 1845. This col- 
lection was presented to the Museum of Practical Geology, whence it was 
transferred to the British Museum in 1880. Fossil Invertebrata from the 
Canaries were presented by him to this Museum in 1856 and 1860, from 
Madeira in 1857. The type-specimen of Cephalaspis hjeUi and bones of 
Trogontherium described in Owen's ♦' British Fossil Mammals," were also 
among Sir Charles Lyell's donations, which began in 1829. 

MacCullough (D. M.) 

Collected and presented Pteraspidian fishes from the Lower Old Pted 
Sandstone of Herefordshire and Monmouthshire, 1883. 

MacDonald (Robert) 

Collected and presented Pleistocene Jtlammalian remains from the 
Porcupine Eiver, Canada, 1873. 

MacLeod {Sir Norman) 

Presented Old Eed Sandstone Fishes from Scotland, 1847. 

McCormick (Robert) [1800-1890] 

In his capacity as naval surgeon, McCormick was sent three times to 
the West Indies, while in 1827 he went with Parry to the Arctic, and in 
1839 with Ross to the Antarctic Piegions. In 1852 he again visited the 
Arctic Piegions, leading a boat expedition up the Wellington Channel. He 
bequeathed to the nation 250 fossils, chiefly Brachiopoda, collected by him 
in the Arctic Regions, Madeira, Tasmania, the Falkland Isles, and 
Kerguelen Island, and occasionally referred to in his book, " Voyages of 
Discovery in the Arctic and Antarctic Seas and round the World" 
(1854). 

McEnery (John) [17 -1841] 

For many years Chaplain, at Tor Abbey, McEnery dented his leisure 
to the exploration of the caverns near Torquay. While collecting the 
mammalian remains, between 1825 and 1829, he accumulated many notes 
and drawings, which he would have published had his appeal for sub- 
scriptions been responded to. These remained unpublished until 1859, 
when Mr. Edward Vivian edited the MSS. and used the prepared plates 
of illustrations in a posthumous work, "Cavern Researches." On the 
death of McEnery, his collections and MSS. were dispersed by auction, 
and a large series of the specimens from Kent's Cavern was purchased by 
the Trustees of the British Museum in 1842, Some of McEnery's 
fio-ured specimens are in this collection, others in that of the Geological 
Society, and a few in the Torquay ;Museum. The collection of J. E. Lee 
{q.v.) contained 106 " original specimens of McEnery from Kent's Cavern, 
bought at Newton." 

McMurtrie (James) 

Alderman McMurtrie, of Radstock, manager of the Somerset estates of 
Lord Carlingford, devoted about thirty years to the collection of fossil 
plants from °the Somersetshire Coal Measures. His valuable collection 
was studied and partly described by !Mr. R. Kidston, and the greater part 



Geology. .'{09 

of it, comprising 263 specimens, was presented to the Museum by ^Ir. 
McMurtrie in 1894. 

MacPherson (William) 

Collected and presented fossils from tlic English Chalk, 1899, 1900. 

Madeley (William) 

For many years secretary to the Dudley and Midland Geological 
Society, Mr/ Madeley, who formerly lived in Dudley, was in a goo<l 
position to acquire choice specimens, of which he always carefully noted 
the locality and precise horizon. His collection included a metatypc of 
Botryocrinus jyinnulatus, originally in the J. Gray collection, and a co- 
type of Thenarocrinus caUipygus. He also puichased a metatypc of the 
latter species from the Ketley collection. On moving to his present 
residence in Stourbridge, Mr. Madeley sold a number of his specimeus to 
the dealer, K, Damon. In 1894 the Museum received, as an exchange, 
80 of those specimens, consisting of Wenlock corals and Polyzoa, while, 
in the following year, it purchased the remainder, namely, 33 Cystidea, 
including a valuable series of Flacocystis, and 55 Crinoidea, inckuiing the 
figured specimens. 

Major (Charles Lmmanuel Forsyth) 

In the course of his researches on extinct Mammalia, Dr. Major has 
made several important collections, among which m^iy be mentioned those 
of Lower Pliocene Mammalia from the Island of Samos and from Olivola 
(N. Italy), Miocene Mammalia and Birds from France, small Pleistocene 
bones from the caves of Sardinia and Corsica, and remains of Mammalia 
and Birds from the surface deposits of Madagascar. One part of the 
Samos Collection was purchased frf)m Dr. Major by the British Museum 
in two instalments in 1889 and 1890 ; while the other part was purchased 
by Mr. Barbey of Geneva. The Olivola Collection was purchased by the 
Museum in two instalments in 1895 and 1897. French, Corsican, and 
Sardinian fossils w^ere purchased by the Museum in 1893, 1894, and 1900. 
Madagascar fossils, including important remains of Aepyoruithes, obtained 
with the aid of a government grant, were presented to the Museum by 
the Council of the Royal Society in 1898. A reconstructed skeleton of 
Hippopotamus madagascariensis, from Madagascar, was purchased by 
the Museum from Dr. Major in 1900. Many of these specimens have 
been described by Dr. Major himself in various British and foreign 
publications. 
Mansel-PleydeU (John Clavell) [1817-1902] 

Mansel, who assumed the name Mansel-Pleydell in 1870, was a 
landowner in Dorsetshire, who devoted much attention to the geology 
and natural history of that county. He collected the local fossils and 
presented them as he acquired them, partly to the British ^luseum, 
partly to the Dorset County Museum. His earliest donations to the 
British Museum, beginning in 1862, were reptilian remains from the 
Kimmeridge Clay, nearly all of importance, and described by J. W. 
Hulke and P. Owen. One of his latest donations, received m 1889, was 
a tooth of Elephas meridionalis, discovered by himself, with other 
remains of the same animal, in a fissure in the Chalk at Dewlish, Dorset 
(see 0. Fisher, Quart Journ. Geol. Sac, 1888). He also presented in 
1897 fish-remains figured by Egerton (18G9), and, in 1884, the types ot 
two Oolitic corals, Dimorphoseris oolitica and Thamnastrxa manseli ot 
Duncan. 



310 Geology. 

Mantell (Gideox Algernon) [1790-1852] 

For several years a medical practitioner at Lewes, Sussex, Mantell 
collected fossils from the local chalk-pits. His geological researches also 
extended to the sandstones and clays of the Sussex Weald, in which he 
was the first di.<coverer of Dinosauria, Crocodilia, fishes, and plants. He 
published "The Fossils of the South Downs" (1822), besides more 
popular works, among which " Petrifactions and their Teachings ; or, a 
Handbook to the Gallery of Organic Remains in the British Museum" is 
of particular interest to a student of the Museum's history. In 1835 he 
removed to Brighton, and his collectic>n, containing more than 20,000 
specimens, was there arranged for public exhibition by the Sussex 
Scientific Institution as the Mantellian Museum, with G. F. Eichardson 
as curator, in the ho^Des that it would form the basis of a County IMuseum. 
Each specimen bore a small yellow oval label numbered in ink to 
correspond with a MS. Catalogue prepared by himself. In 1817, he 
presented to the British Museum a few specimens to illustrate his 
forthcoming first work; and, in 1825, he added a tooth of the newly- 
discovered "/^?;a?^oc?ow. In 1839, disappointed that the municipality of 
Brighton would not acquire his collection, he sold the whole of it to the 
British Museum at a considerable loss. It was especially valuable as 
containing not only the "Wealden Eeptilia, the Maidstone Greensand 
Iguanodon, and other fossils described in detail by Mantell himself, but 
also Chalk and Wealden Fishes described by Agassiz in his " Recherches 
sur les Poissons Fossiles " ; it also included various specimens bought at 
the sale of James Parkinson's collection {q.v.), but not all of these can 
now be identified. In later years, when settled in Chester Square, 
Pimlico, Dr. Mantell continued to collect Dinosaurian remains from the 
Weald, and other fossils. After his death a selection from this second 
collection, comprising 100 vertebrate remains and over 1000 invertebrates, 
was purchased by the British Museum in lb53. 

Mantell {The Eon. Walter Baldock Durrant) [1820-1895] 
The eldest son of Dr. G. A. Mantell left England about 1810 for New 
Zealand, where he ultimately held important public positions. He was 
one of the earliest and most systematic collectors of bird-bones from the 
superficial deposits of that country. He also discovered the nearly- 
extinct Notornis manteUi, of which his original specimens are in the 
Department of Zoology. A few bones of Dinornithidfe sent by him to 
Dr. G. A. Mantell, and described by the latter {Quart. Journ. GeoL 
Soc, 1848), were purchased by the Museum in 1848. A large collection, 
obtained by Mantell chiefly from the old cooking-places of the Maories, 
was purchased in 1856. 

Marsh (Othniel Charles) 

Presented casts of several remarkable American fossil Yertebrata 
described in his works, including Eosaurus acadianus (1862), Cretaceous 
toothed Birds (1881), BhamphorhyncJws phyllurtis (1883), Dinocerata 
(1885), a skeleton of Dinoceras mirahih (1888), and a skull and mandible 
of Brontops rohustus (1889). He also presented a specimen of the 
Trilobite, Triarthrus hecH, with appendages, in 1894, and BracMospongia 
from the Ordovician of Kentucky, in 1895. 

Marsham-Townsend {Hon. Robert) 

Presented a valuable collection of British fossils and some Cretaceous 
Fishes from Brazil, 1877. 



Geologij. 31 L 

IVIartin (Handel T.) 

Collected fossils from the Chalk of Kansas, includincr Viatacrinus and 
the wing-bones of Pteranodon, puichasod in 1895 and 1000. 

aVEartin (William) [1767-1810] 

The son of a hosier of Marsfield, Nottinghamshire, Martin spent his 
childhood on the provincial stage. But in his twelfth year, taking 
'drawing-lessons from James Bolton of Halifax, he also imljilx-d from him 
a taste for natural history. He earned his living as a drawing-master, first 
iit Burton-on-Trent, then at Buxton, and at Macclesfield from 1805 to his 
•death. He collected fossils in the neighbourhood and wrote various 
papers on them. His best-known work is " Petrificata Derbiensia" 
(1809). Many of the specimens figured in this book were handed by 
his widow to James Sowerby, who refigured them in his "Mineral 
'Conchology," and thus they came with the Sowerby Collection to the 
British Museum. It is not known where the other originals of 
"" Petrificata Derbiensia " now are; but in 1833 some were in the small 
but good collection of Martin's coadjutor. White Watson, F.L.S., of 
Bakewell (see Mag. Nat. Hid. vi., p. 130). The Department possesses 
a representation of the " Strata in Beverley Liberty, Yorkshire," inlaid in 
local rocks, " By W. Watson." 

Martin (W. J.) 

Presented the type-specimen of Lepidotus fittoni from the Wcalden of 
Sussex, 1846. 

Martinetti (A.) 

Collected Pliocene Mollusca from Monte Mario, Ptome, purchased 1894. 

IVEasing (Karl) 

Presented tooth of Elasmotherium from Russia, 1898. 

Mathieu (M.) 

Collected Miocene shells and corals from Touraine, purchased 1847. 

Matthew (G. F.) 

Presented Eorystis primsevus from Lower Cambiian, New Brunswick, 

1900. 

IVEaunsell {Ven. Archdeacon) 

Presented a skeleton of the Irish Deer, 1843. 

Maw (George) 

Presented a skull of Loxomma allmanni from the Coal ^Measures of 
Coalbrookdale, 1884, and some Silurian Brachiopodn, 1885. 

Mawson (Joseph) 

While occupied with the construction of railways in Bahia, Brazil, Mr. 
Mawson has made a valuable collection of Cretaceous Rfiptilia, Pisces, and 
Mollusca from that region. It has been presented by him to the ^luseum 
in several small instalments from 1881 onwards, and comprises the 
type-specimens of Lejndotus maiusom', MegaJurus maicsoni, and Acrodus 
nitidus^ besides the first evidence of Pterosauria from Brazil, described 
by Dr. A. S. Woodward (Ann. Mag. Naf. Hist, 1898-1902). There 
are also remains of Pleistocene Mastodon and Megatherium in the 
collection. 



312 Geology, 

Metcalfe (Arthur T.) 

Presented an upper jaw of young Elephas from Ores well Caves, 1885. 

Metropolitan Board of Works 

Presented Mamrnalian bones from excavations for the Thames 
Embankment, Westminster, 1875. 

Meyer (C J. A.) 

Presented Pleistocene non- marine Mollusca from Blackfriars Koad, 
1890 ; Cretaceous Polyzoa, 1897. 

Meyrat (Emile) 

Prepared fossil fishes from the Oligocene slates of Canton Glarus^ 
Switzerland, purchased 1869. 

Michalet (Alphonse) 

Though engaged in business as a flower-merchant, both in Leipzig and 
at his residence near Reyuier-Six-Fours (Var), Mr. Michnlet has found 
time to make geological excursions in Algeria and to publish studies on 
the Bathonian and Cenomanian rocks near Toulon and their Echinoids 
IbuV. Soc. Geol. France, 1895, 1901). The former of these papers led 
to a correspondence with Mr. Michalet and to the purchase of some 
specimens from him in 1896 ; a larger purchase was made through the 
dealer, R. Damon, in 1897. These may be summarised as follows:— 
1195 Molluscs, 3289 Brachiopods, and 246 Corals, from the Senonian, 
Turonian, and Neocomian rocks of Provence, and from the Bathonian, 
Lias, and Muschelkalk of Var, also 435 Echinoderms and 4 Foraminifers 
from the Tertiary, Cretaceous, and Jurassic rocks of Algeria. All the 
specimens were provided with loose white paper labels in Mr. Michalet's. 
handwriting. 

Millar (John) 

Presented microscope-slides of fossil Invertebrata, 1888. 

Milligan (Joseph) 

Presented Pala3ozoic fossils from Tasmania, 1863. 

Milne (John) 

Collected and presented Tertiary fossils from Sinai and Egypt, 1874 ; 
discovered bones of Great Auk in Funk Island, off Newfoundland^ 
purchased 1875 ; presented Mesozoic fossils and Post- Pliocene Mollusca 
from Japan, 1882, 1888. 

Mitchell (Hugh) [1822-1894] 

Living at Craig, near Montrose, Mitchell made a collection of about 
220 fossils from the Lower Old Red Sandstone of Forfarshire, including 
some important fishes, among which were the type-specimens of Climatius 
scutiger, Egerton, Eiithacantlius grandis, Powrie, and Ischuacanthus 
gracilis, Egerton. This collection was purchased by the Museum from 
Dr. Mitchell in 1893. 

Mitchell {Sir Thomas) 

Presented fossil Mollusca and silicificd wood from northern Australia,. 
1848. 



Geology, UZ 

Mitchell (W. S.) 

Discovered skeleton of Apfornis defosaor at Castle Rock, S. Island, 
New Zealand, purchased from Mr. A. Hamilton, 1893. 

Mitchell (W. Stephen) 

Collected Middle Eocene plant-remains from Alum Bay, Isle of 
Wight, presented by the Council of the British Association, 18G7. 

Mitchinson {BigJit Bev. John, Bishop) 

Collected and presented rhjistocene MoUusca from Barbados, 1892. 

Mohr (Paul) 

Collected numerous fossil;-', chiefly from Germany and France, purchasci^ 
1848. 

Mojsisovics (Edmund von) 

The former Vice- Director of the Imperial Geological Survey of Austria, 
who is well known as a writer on Triassic Cephalopoda, obtained for the 
British Museum a collection of 1300 Mollusca, chiefly Cephalopoda, from 
the Upper Trias of Hallstatt. It was purchased in two instalments in 
1889 and 1890. 

Monk (Henry) 

Mr. Monk, of Yeovil, collected fossils from the Inferior Oolite in the 
neighbourhood of that town. A selection of 580 Invertebrata from his 
collection was purchased in 1692, a second collection being purchased iii 

1897. 

Montefiore (T. L.) 

Plesiosaurian skull from Lower Lias, Lyme Regis, purchased 1878. 

Moore (Charles) 

Presented Upper Liassic Brachiopoda from llminster, 1819. 

Moreno (Francisco P.) 

Presented plaster cast of hind limb of Brontornis from Lake Argen- 
tine, Patagonia, 1892. 

Morris (John) 

Collected miscellaneous English fossil Invertebrata, purchased 1863. 
Presented Eocene Ostracoda, 1884. 

Morton (George Highfield) [1826-1900] 

Morton was occupied for forty years with geological researches near 
Liverpool, where he lived, and in North Wales. He published a volume 
entitled "The Geology of the Country around Liverpool," in ]863,. a 
newer edition of the same in 1891, and an Appendix in 1897. Besides 
mapping the Liverpool district, his most important work was the detailed 
examination of the Carboniferous Limestone of North Wales, described m 
a series of jiapers published by the Liverpool Geological Society and in 
one read before the Geological Society of London (Quart. Journ., 1898). 
His collection illustrated his researches, and also compiised many valuable 
Palaiozoic fossils older than the Carboniferous, besides a jaw of Fhasco- 
Jotherium from the Stonesfield Slate. It was well catalogued ami labelled: 
by himself, and the greater part of it (a selection of 4000 specimens) waa 
jmrchased by the British Museum from his executor in 1900. 



314 Geology. 

Murchison {Sir Roderick Lmpey) [1792-1871] 

During his explorations on the continent of Europe, and among the 
lower Paleozoic rocks of these islands, the founder of the Silurian System 
made very large collections. Many of his specimens went to the Museum 
of the Geological Survey, of which he was long director; others, and 
especially most of those figured in the " Silurian System," to the Museum 
of the Geological Society. Many, however, were presented by him to the 
British INIuseum at intervals from 1842 onwards. Of these the most 
important was the figured counterpart half of the skeleton of the so-called 
fossil fox, bought by Murchison from a physician at Oeningen in 1828, 
•developed by G. A. Mantell, described by R. Owen as Galecynus, and 
presented in 1852, the less important half going to the Geological Society. 
In 1854 Murchison presented over 800 British Silurian fossils, with others 
from the Silurian of Russia, the Tertiary of Poland, and the Cretaceous 
of the Austrian Alps. In 1872, his nephew and heir, Mr. Kenneth 
Murchison, presented a large series of fossils from various European 
formations, selected from the museum of Sir Roderick. On their receipt 
these were furnished with slips of blue paper on each of which is written 
*" Murchison Colin." 

Murray (Sir John) 

Presented ^Miocene Mollusca and other fossils from l\Talta, 1890. 
"Transmitted the Challenger collection of deep-sea deposits, 1895. 

IVIurray (Peter) 

Collected Yorkshire Lower Jurassic plant-remains, purchased 1839. 

aVEuseum of Practical Geology 

The collections of foreign fossils were transferred from this Museum 
to the British Museum in 1880. They included specimens collected or 
•contributed by Risk Allah Effendi, W, G. Atherstone, R. A. Godwin- 
Austen, A. G. Bain, H. Bauerman, Sir H. T. de la Beche, Sir Edward 
Belcher, J. J. Bigsby, Bonehard, Bosquet, AV. Buckland, J. Clark, Lieut. 
€ockburn, J. Crawford, Sir J. William Dawson, Earl of Enniskillen, 
E. Forbes, P. de la Harpe, R. Haul, Sir James Hector, 0. Heer, 
J. D. Hooker, Evan Hopkins, W. Hottelart, E. Hubbert, Hudson's Bay 
Company, Capt. Ibbetson, Capt. Inglefield, J. B. Jukes, T. Kjerulf, Koch, 
L. G. de Koninck, A. Krantz, Linton, Sir William E. Logan, W. Lonsdale, 
Sir Charles Lyell, McChesney, G. A. Mantell, H. Milne-Edwards, John 
Morris, Lieut.-Col. Munro, Sir Roderick I. Murchison, Hon. Miss Murray, 
€apt. Nelson, Osborne, A. Phillips, Poole, S. P. Pratt, Sir Joseph Prest- 
wich, T. Reeks, Ramain, E. Renevier, James Russell, J. G. Rutland, 
L. Saemann, F. Sandberger, Lieut. Sankey, Sir Robert Schomburgk, 
Sir H. Seymour, Sir Warington W. Smyth, Admiral Sir Thomas B. Spratt, 
Stokes, Capt. Strachey, Sutherland, D. Thompson, G. P. Wall, and the 
Ross Antarctic Expedition. 

ITatal, Government of 

Presented Cretaceous Mollusca from Natal, 1894. 

Newberry (John Strong) 

Presented fins of Cladoselache from Upper Devonian of Ohio, 1888. 

Nicholson (Henry Alleyne) [1844-1899] 

Among other researches the late Professor of Natural History at 
Aberdeen Liniversity devoted much attention to the Stromatoporoids, of 



Geology, 3 1 5 

which he formed a large collection, the hasis of liis " Monogra|ih of the 
British Stromatoporoids " (PaLToiitogr. Soc, 188n, 1888, 1800, IBOL^. 
It was purchased by tlie Museum through Mr. F. II. Butler in 1805. 

Nicholson (J. G.) 

Presented Jurassic Ammonites from Somaliland, 1801. 

Nicol (William) [1768-1851] 

The inventor of the Nicol prism was also the first to devise a method 
of making thin slices of fossils, rocks, and minerals for microscopic exam- 
ination. 313 slides of fossil wood made by him were purchased from 
J. Bryson in 1867. 

Noble (James) 

Discovered type-specimen of Iloloptycltius nohilissimiis from Upper 
Old Pted Sandstone of Perthsliire, purchased 1840. 

Norris (W.) 

Presented bivalve shells from Coal Measures of Newcastle, 1828. 



Northampton {Marquess of) 
Presented Tertiary shells from I 



Tertiary shells from Italy, 1831. 

Ogle (Joseph B.) 

Mr. Ogle made an important collection of Middle Eocene fossils from 
Bracklesham Bay. About 1200 specimens, chiefly Mollusca, were selected 
from his collection and purchased from Mr. Ogle in 1801. 

Owen {Sir Richard) 

Many specimens given personally to Sir Richard Owen were presented 
by him to the Museum. They included the John Brown Collection 
(q.v.), s\-)ec\mens oi Archegosau7-us decheni from Rhenish Prussia (1861), 
gizzard stones and tracheal rinus of Dinornithidaj from New Zealand 
(1870), the skull of Frorastomus sirenoides from Jamaica (1874), the 
natural cast of a Sirenian brain from the Eocene of Egypt (1875), and the 
type-tooth of Macacus pliocenus with other Mammalian remains (1884). 

Owles (J. J.) 

Mr. Owles, resident at Great Yarmouth, obtained from the local 
fishermen a valuable collection of Pleistocene ^Tammalian bones, dredged 
off the eastern coast and the Dogger Bank. The collection comprised 
about 300 specimens and was described by William Davies {GeoJ. Mag. 
1878). It was purchased by the Museum from Mr. Owles in 1874. 

Palin (R D.) 

Collected miscellaneous British fossil Invertebrata, purchased 1000. 

Parish (John) 

Presented Mammalian remains from the Pampa of Buenos Ayres, 1865. 

Parker (William Kitchen) [1823-1800] 

While occupied with his early researches on the Foraminifera, Prof. 
Parker made a small collection of these organisms, recent and fossil. 
In 1802, 2000 slides mounted by him were purchased from his executor. 

Parkinson (James) [ -1824] 

Parkinson was in practice as a surgeon in Hoxton fnnn 1785, or 
earlier, to his death. He wrote numerous medical and iKditical l>ooks, but 



316 Geology. 

is best known as author of "Organic Eemains of a Former World" 
(1804-11), in the compilation of which he examined "the numerous 
valuable specimens " in the British Museum. The figures, however, were 
chiefly drawn from specimens in his own " tolerably large and systematic 
cabinet, obtained from the museums of Mr. Strange, Lord Donegal, 
M. Calonne, and of several other collectors " (" Org. Rem.," I., p. vi.). 
Among names elsewhere mentioned is that of Sir Ashton Lever. Mantell 
calls it a "matchless collection" {Lcndon Geol. Joiirn., p. 14). Unfor- 
tunately it was dispersed by auction in x\pril, 1827, at very low prices. 
"A great number of the zoophytes," says Mantell (Joe. cit.\ "were 
purchased by an American gentleman for a few pounds, sent to the 
United States, and w^ere consumed by fire, with the museum in which 
they were contained." Mantell himself bought a bear's skull from 
Gailenreuth, and other specimens, which came ultimately to _ the 
British Museum. Others came in like manner through the Enniskillen 
collection. In the Sowerby collection, specimens marked with a "P" 
Avere bought at the Parkinson sale. The original of Vol. IIL, pi. xvi., 
f. 19, CoromiUtes diadema, bought by Rev. Thos. Image, of Whepstead^ 
Bury St. Edmunds, was eventually obtained for the nation from Mr. W. 
Nelson Last, of Bury St. Edmunds. Among other museums to which 
Parkinson's specimens found their way, are those of Cambridge ("Life of 
Sedgwnck," p. 280), of Oxford, and of Haslemere {Museums Journ., ii., 
117). To the Geological Society he presented various specimens in 1813 
and 1814, but his name does not appear in the old records of donations to 
the British Museum. 

Peach (Charles William) [1800-1886] 

Peach was in the coastguard service, and began his geological studies 
on the south coast of Cornwall. He was one of the earliest discoverers of 
fossils, including fish-remains, in the Devonian rocks of that county, and 
his first collection is now in the Penzance Museum. He removed to 
Wick, Caithness, in 1853, and again began to discover fossils, notably 
fishes, in the Old Red Flagstones of the clifi's near Wick, and invertebrates 
in the Silurian limestones of Durness, Sutherland. His Scottish col- 
lection, purchased by the British Museum in 1870, comprised 41 Silurian 
fossils from Durness, 130 Old Red Sandstone fishes and crustacean 
remains, 185 Jurassic fossils from Brora, and some Old Red Sandstone and 
Carboniferous plants. Many of the fishes bear small descriptive labels or 
notes in Peach's own handwriting. 

Pearson (J. N.) 

Presented Ordovician fossils from Ohio, 1851. 

Pengelly (William) [1812-1894] 

Pengelly resided at Torquay and superintended the excavations in 
Brixham Cave and Kent's Cavern, which were respectively undertaken 
by the Royal and Geological Societies in 1858-59, and by the British 
Association in 1864-79. He also explored the Happaway Cave in 1862-63. 
Besides these researches, geological work and the collection of fossils in 
the Devonian, Carboniferous, Cretaceous, and Tertiary rocks of Devon- 
shire and part of Cornwall, also occupied him for many years. The 
collection of remains from Brixham Cave, described by Prof. George Busk 
{Phil, Trans., 1873), was presented to the British Museum in 1876. The 
first selection of the Kent's Cavern collection, described in the British 
Association Reports, was presented to the Museum by the Council of the 
British Association and Lord Haldon in 1883, while the second selection 



Geology, 317 

was presented to the Torquay Museum. Most of Pengelly's Devonian 
fossils were purchased by the Baroness Burdett-Coutts for the Oxford 
Museum. From what remained of his coUection at his death, a first 
selection comprising Pleistocene Mammalia from the llappaway Cave, 
various Devonian, Carboniferous, and Greensaud fossils, was presented to 
the British Museum by Mrs. rengelly in 1896 ; while a second selection 
was presented to the Museum of Practical Geology. 

Pentland (Joseph BxS.rclay) [1797-1873] 

Pentland studied in Paris under Cuvier, and became interested in 
fossil Vertebrata. He collected a fine series of Upper Pliocene mammalian 
remains from the Val d' Arno, Italy, and presented it to the Museum 
in 1853. Jllppopotamus pentlandi was named after him. 

Penton (R. H.) 

Presented dentition of Myliuhatls pentoni from Eocene near Cairo, 
1893. 

Pepper {Miss) 

Presented Mammalian remains from Perim Island, 1841. 

Perceval (Spencer George) 

Presented Mammalian remains from Pen Park Cave, Westbury-on- 
Trym, 1884; pieces of Khsetic Bone-bed from Aust, 1889; and Inverte- 
brata from the Lower Lias of Somersetshire, 1896. Arranged the 
purchase of the Westmoreland Collection of Red Chalk fossils, 1900. 

Petzholdt (Alexander) 

Presented Calamites from the Coal Measures of Saxony, 1859. 

Pfeiffer {Mrs.) 

Presented Tertiary Echinoids from Java, 1855. 

Phillips {Mrs. E. Lort) 

Collected and presented fossils from Somahland, 1896. 

Pickering (J.) 

Collected Pleistocene non-marine Mollusca from Grays and theKennet 
Valley, presented by the Council of the Geologists' Association, 1892. 

Piper (George Harry) [1819-1897] 

While resident at Ledbury for nearly fifty years Piper devoted much 
attention to the geology of the district. When the Hereford and Worcester 
railway was constructed, he studied the Ledbury station section of the 
Upper Silurian and Passage Beds, and made a large collection of the 
fossils obtained. Among the^^e were unique specimens of Ccphalaspidian 
fishes, especially Ccphalaspis murchisuni, Auchenaspis egertoni, and 
Didymaspis grindrodi, presented by Mr. Piper to the British jMiiseum 
in 1887 and 1889, and described in the British [Museum "Catalogue of 
Fossil Fishes," Part 11. The remainder of his collection, comprising 150 
fish-remains and about 1650 Upper Silurian Invertebratn, was purchased 
from his executor in 1898. 

Plant (John) [1820-1894] 

Major Plant, curator of the Silford Museum, collected fish-remains 
and other fossils from the Coal JNIeasures of Collyhurst, IManchester. His 
collection of about 450 si^ecimens, including the type-specimen of 



318 Geology, 

Madlnichthys planti, and four fragments of Platysomidfe described by 
Dr. Traquair, was purchased from him by the British Museum m 1892. 
All the specimens bear a printed locality-label. 

Pohlig (Hans) 

Among other important researches, Prof. Pohlig, of Bonn, has collected 
mammalian remains from the Lower Pliocene of Maragha, Persia, and 
from the caverns of Sicily. The former collection was noticed by him in 
the Quarterly Journal of the aeological Society (1886), and part of it 
was purchased by the British Museum through the dealer, R. Damon m 
1888. The second collection comprised pigmy elephants, of which some 
typical remains were purchased by the Museum through Dr. F. Krantz 
in 1897. 

Pomel (Auguste) [1821-1898] 

A native of Auvergne, Pomel while yet a boy was drawn by 
A. Bravard (q.v.) to the study of the Tertiary rocks of central France 
and their fossils, especially the mammals. He contrived opportunity to 
continue his scientific work while undergoing his seven years of enforced 
miUtary service, and the French Geological Society and Academy of 
Sciences published valuable communications from Sergeant PomeL 
Deprived at last of the hospitality of the barracks, he resumed work with 
Bravard in the deposits of Perrier, Debruge, and Cu^uron, and made notes- 
for a proposed illustrated catalogue. In 1851, Pomel was sent to the 
Great Exhibition in London, and used the opportunity for study at the 
British Museum, where the services he was able to render were so much 
appreciated that, it is said, he was offered a post. He sold his collection 
of fossil vertebrates to the Trustees but decUned the appointment, 
preferring to live in his own country. He had not reckoned on the cou2y 
d'etat of December. While extricating vertebrate bones at St. Gerand- 
le-Puy, he was pursued by gendarmes for a too zealous repubhcan. 
Bravard was transported to Cayenne, but Pomel hid until his sentence 
was commuted to banishment to Algeria. Here he at once produced his 
♦'Catalogue Methodique et Descriptif des Vertebres Fossiles decouverts 
dans le Bassin de la Loire " (1853), in which many of the British Museum 
specimens are mentioned, and then quitted the study of his Auvergne 
fossils for ever. Bat he could not give up his science; his energy 
remained, and he became eventually Director of the Geological Survey of 
Algeria. 

Ponsort (Baron) 

Collected fishes from the Upper Cretaceous of Mont Aime, Marne, 
purchased 1851. 

Porter (James) 

Presented remains of Aepyornis from Madagascar, 1882. 

Post (G. E.) 

Presented PHocene MoUusca from Latakia, Syria, 1885, 1886. 

Postans (T.) 

Presented fossil MoUusca from Cutch, 1813. 

Potter (Geokge) 

Presented Invertebrata from English Chalk, 1899. 



Geology. 319 

Power (Edward) 

Presented the W. C. Lucy Collection of English fossiU, 1895. 

Powrie (James) 

Presented fossil Fishes and a neai-ly compl-^te body of Pteryqotns 
angh'ciis from the Lower Old Red Sandstone of Forfarshire, 18»jl, 1865. 
His large collection from the same formation and locality was purchased 
later by the Edinburgh Museum of Science and Art. 

Pratt (Samuel Peace) [1789-1863] 

An enthusiastic student of many sciences, Pratt finally turned to 
geology in 1812, and during the rest of his long life collected many 
valuable specimens, with which he was most generous. In 1823 he went 
to Bath, where he resided for sixteen years, and this renders it probable- 
that he was the donor, on March 8th, 1828, of " An undescribed crinoidal 
animal imbedded in Limestone from Bath," although J, E. Gray, who 
described it as Apiucrinites prattii {Phil. Mag., 1828), referred to him 
as Mr. J. S. Pratt. At any rate, two years later, S. P. Pratt was a donor 
to the Natural History Departments of the Museum. His first work was 
on the freshwater formation at Binsted, Isle of Wight, wliere he discovered 
Anoplotherium and Palxotheriiim (Trans. Geol. Sac, 1831). After this 
he travelled much on the continent, studying and writing on bone-caves- 
near Palermo (1833), on the geology of Normandy (1837), of Bayonne 
(1843), of the Astuiias (1815), and of Catalonia (1852). Pratt made 
numerous donations to the Geological Department, e.g., in 1816, some 
remarkable Tertiary fossils including the gregarious cyprinodont fish 
Lebias cephalotes from Aix in Provence; in 1850 and 1851, various 
fossils from the Mesozoic formations of southern England and a series of 
Rudista3 and allied forms from the Chalk near Toulon ; in 1854, a further 
series of those curious molluscs, some of which were figured by S. P. 
Woodward (Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1855) ; in 1852 nummulites, crinoids, 
and other invertebrates, from the Eocene of Biarritz, Nice, Barcelona, etc., 
among which the type of Peiitacrinus pratti, Austin, is noteworthy^ 
in 1853, brachiopods and other invertebrates from Asturias, the latter 
yielding specimens subsequently figured by Etheridge and Carpenter 
(" Catalogue of Blastoidea," 1886). Finally, in 1857, Pratt presented about 
1000 selected specimens of invertebrates, chiefiy from P)ritish Mesozoic 
rocks. Many of his specimens were placed in the Museum of the 
Geological Society, others in the Museum of Practical Geology, the 
foreign specimens among the latter being transferred to the British 
Museum in 1880. 

Prestwich (Sir Joseph) [1812-1896] 

During his long series of researches, Prestwich accumulated a large 
collection illustrating his work, and this was acquired by the British 
Museum in three instalments. The first, comprising 1755 specimens 
chiefly of British Eocene invertebrates and plants, was ])resented by the 
Professor in 1885. The second portion contained 1314 Carboniferous and 
Silurian fossils from Coalbrookdale, referred to in his memoir on the 
district (Trans. Geol. Soc, 1840), also a few Vertebrata from the Crag,, 
and some Pleistocene mammalian bones from Bedford ; it was purchased 
in 1894, and w^as accompanied by a MS. catalogue by Prof. T. Hupert 
Jones. The third more miscellaneous portion, including some PaL^olithic 
Implements and the Eolithic Implements from Kent described in "Some 
Controverted Questions of Geology," was presented by Lady Prestwich m 



320 Geology. 

1896 ; with it was a MS. catalogue compiled by Prof. T. Eupert Jones. 
Few of the fossils bear any distinctive labels. 

Keeve (W.) 

Presented bones of Dlnornis casuarinus from Glenmark Swamp, New 
Zealand, 1870. 

Held (Clement) 

Presented Pleistocene Mollusca from N. Italy and S. France, 1891. 

Keid (James) 

Presented FalaeospondijliLs and other Fishes from the Old Eed Sand- 
stone of Caiihness, 1896. 

Rich (William) 

This dealer, who had a shop opposite the British Museum, also kept 
a small establishment at Bristol, in which he was helped by his sister, 
Miss A. liich, a very active and careful collector. She was one of the 
earliest to collect from the Lower Carboniferous Limestone series at 
Clevedon Bay, and the Austins acknowledge the help obtained from her 
in their "Monograph on Crinoidea" (see esp. pp. 71, 92). In 1867 the 
Trustees purchased from Piich 13 palatal teeth, 2 trilobites, and 287 
remains of crinoids, collected as above, and including specimens of 
Poteriocrinus pUcatus (PI. ix., 4 A-c) and F. pentagonus (PI. xi., f. 2d) 
figured by the Austins. The originals of PI. ix. ff. 1 and 2a are not now 
to be found and probably never reached the Museum. 

Kichards (Upton) 

Presented Mammalian remains from Kent's Cavern, 1845. 

Richardson {Sir John) 

Presented Arctic Paleozoic Brachiopoda, 1848, and Tertiary leaves 
from the Mackenzie River, Canada, 1861. 

Richmond (DuJce of) 

Presented Old Red Sandstone Fishes from Tynet Burn, 1859. 

Rickard (T. A.) 

Presented a Fish, Priscacara, from the Eocene of Wyoming, 1889. 

Ripley 

A collector and dealer in the fossils of the Whitby Lias, from whom 
were purchased a skull of Steneosaurus and a skeleton of FelagosauruSy 
1841, 1842. 

Robertson (David) 

Presented Post-Tertiary fossils from the Clyde, 1883, 1884. 

Rofe (John) [1801-1878] 

That Rofe was early a keen geologist is shown by the " Observations 
on the Geological Structure of the Neighbourhood of Reading," contributed 
by him to the Geological Society in 1834 {Trans. G. S., 1837). Later 
on, while resident for twenty-five years at Preston as engineer to the 
gas-works, he made a fine collection of fossils, mainly Crinoids and 
Blastoids, from the Carboniferous Limestone of the neighbourhood, and, 
on his retirement, devoted himself to the study of their internal anatomy, 
on which he published valuable papers in the Geological Magazine. 



Geology, 321 

In 1862, he presented a few invertebrates from Thornley Quarry, Chipping, 
including two figured specimens of Orthoceras. In 1864, he presented 
the type of Amphoracrinus hrevicalix (Geol. Mag., Jan., 1865), and in 
1865, 50 specimens of Crinoids and Blastoids in ilhistration of liis ])aj)er 
published the same year. Crinoids figured and described in 1869 and 187.'j, 
together with other Carboniferous fossils, over 1500 in all, were presented 
by him two months before his death, after which the rest of his collection 
of Paleeozoic fossils was presented by his executors. Many of the 
Crinoids bear the marks of his study in the form of plates picked out 
with paint ; but there are no individual labels. 

Rowe (Arthur Walton) 

Presented Invertebrata from English Chalk, 1899. 

Rowley (Robert R.) 

Professor of G-eology at Louisiana, Mo., Mr. Rowley has published 
papers on Blastoidea in the Kansas City Scientist (1891), and in the 
American Geologist (1893-1902). In 1894 the Museum purchased from 
him 16 Blastoids from Louisiana, ranking in some cases as metatypes. 

Royal Society of London 

Presented its collection of "natural and artificial curiosities," 1781. 
Among these were the original specimen of Steneosaurus chapmani from 
the Whitby Lias, originally described by Chapman in Fhil. Trans., 1758 ; 
a Plesiosaur from the Lias of Elston, Newark, described by Stukeley 
in Phil. Trans., 1719 ; and a tooth ot Mastodon, desciibed in Grew's 
" Catalogue of Rarities in Gresham College," 1681. 

Ruflford (Philip James) [1852-1902] 

On coming to reside at Hastings, Rufford devoted himself to collecting 
fossils from the Wealden strata of the neighbourhood, especially at 
Ecclesbourne and Fairlight. Here he obtained a fine collection of 
Wealden plants, some of which were presented by him to the British 
Museum in 1885, whila others were purchased at nominal valuations m 
1890, 1891, 1892, 1893, 1894, and 1898. These were described in 
Mr. A. C. Seward's "Catalogue of Wealden Plants," published by the 
Trustees in 1893, 1894, and 1895. Attached to many of the specimens 
were labels pointing out features of interest, and these greatly assisted 
the describer. Some of the above-mentioned purchases included various 
Wealden fossils, both vertebrate and invertebrate, among which should 
be mentioned the vertebra of Morosauriis hrevis figured by Mr. Lydekker 
(Quar^t. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1893), and a head of Lepidotus mantelli, 
figured in the "Catal. Foss. Fishes B. M.," Part iii. Other specimens 
were presented by Ruftbrd to the Brassey Institute, Hastings. 

Rutland (Duke of) 

Presented type-specimen of Plesiosaur us rugosus from the Lower Lias 
of Granby, 1840; a specimen of Stigmaria ficoides from Coal Measures 
near Nottingham, 1847. 

Saemann (Louis) [1821-1866] 

Having for about ten years served in the well-known establishment 
of Dr. Krantz at Bonn, Saemann in 1850 set up fur himself as a dealer 
in Paris. He published important papers on stratigraphical paheoutologv, 
especially of Mesozoic rocks. Among the nimierous important collections 
bought from Saemann between 1853 and 1870, mostly from the Mesozoic 

VOL. I. ^ 



322 Geology. 

rocks of France, and including the Astier collection {q.o.), was a series 
of 160 Lower Carboniferous Crinoids and Blastoids from Burlington, Iowa, 
containing 70 species determined by James Hall of Albany, purchased 
in 1862. 

St. Petersburg, Imperial Academy of Sciences 
Piece of skin of Mammoth from Siberia, by exchange 1892. 

Salis (J. F. W. de) 

Presented skulls of Bos longifrons from Lough Gur, Limerick, 1865. 

Salmond (William) 

Presented Mammalian remains from Kirkdale Cave, 1823, 1837. 

Salter (John William) 

Presented Arenig fossils from Pembrokeshire, 1866. 

San Paulo Museum 

Fishes from Tertiary Lignite at Taubate, San Paulo, Brazil, by 
exchange 1898. 

Saull (William Devonshire) 

A merchant in the City of London, Saull accumulated at 15, Aldersgate 
Street a remarkable collection of fossils and antiquities, spoken of by 
Mantell as " his interesting museum, to which visitors are, with great 
liberality, admitted every Thursday at twelve" (" Geol. I. of W.," 
Ed. iii., p. 232; 1854). The owner himself personally conducted the 
visitors, and such was his zeal for popular education that he left the 
collection with all his money to a body of trustees so that it might be 
kept for the public. The trustees founded the Metropolitan Institution 
in Cleveland Street, Fitzroy Square, and transferred the collection thither, 
packed up in wine-hampers. In those hampers it remained, while the 
money was devoted to carrying on a school, which gradually became 
little more than a place of evening amusement for the young men and 
women employed at large shops in the neighbourhood. The collection 
proving a difficulty, the trustees decided to sell it, and were engaged in 
so doing in 1863, when Mr. John Calvert took the remaining seven 
van-loads off their hands. The British Museum had already selected— 
and paid for — such specimens as could be seen to be still of value in the 
lamentable state to which the collection had been reduced. Among the 
200 fossils thus acquired were the sacrum of the Iguanodon and other 
specimens figured in Owen's "British Fossil Keptiles " (Pala?ontogr. Soc), 
also a large number of Invertebrata named and labelled by James 
Sowerby, and supposed to include some of the type-specimens of his 
" Mineral Conchology"; their identification, however, is doubtful. 

Savin (Alfred C.) 

Mr. Savin, a resident of Cromer, made a large collection of vertebrate 
lemains, chiefly mammalian, from the Forest Bed Series of the Korfolk 
Coast. The bones bear numbers in white paint, corresponding with the 
exact records of their discovery entered in Mr. Savin's MS. Catalogue. 
The collection is described by Mr. E. T. Newton in " Vertebrata of the 
Forest Bed Series" (1882) and "Vertebrata of the Pliocene Deposits of 
Britain" (1891), published by the Geological Survey. It also afforded 
material for description by Piols. Leith Adams and Ptay Lankester. The 
whole series of 1898 fossils was purchased by the Trustees in 1897. 



Geology. 323 

Saxby (Stephen M.) 

W. H. Fitton says that " Mr. Saxby, of Mouotfield near Bonchuich 
(Isle of Wijiht) . . ., a zealous and judicious collector," lent him various 
specimens {Quart. Journ. Oeol. Soc, iii. Proc. p. 326*). One of these 
formed the type of Nautilus saxhii, Morris, 1848. A series of fossil 
Mollusca from the Isle of Wisht was purchased of Saxby in 1865, and 
included that type-specimen (47,019). Further references to his collec- 
tions from the neijihbourhood of B jnchurch are made by Mantell (" Geol. 
Isle of Wight," 1854), who gives his address as ]>ellevue House, Ventnor. 

Schomburgk (Sir Robert Hermann) [1804-1865] 

In 1830 Schomburgk went to the West Indies and spent ten years in 
important geographical researches. In 1841 he was a member of the 
Boundary Commission for British Guiana. During these expeditions he 
collected many Tertiary fossils, which he presented to the, ]\[useum in 
1852. Other specimens collected by him were received from the Museum 
of Practical Geology in 1880. 

Scott (Robert Henry) 

Presented Tertiary leaves collected by Edward Whvmper in Green- 
land, 1869. 

Scott (William Berryman) 

Arranged purchase of Mammalian remains from the White Ptiver 
Formation, Dakota, 1896. 

Seeley (Harry Govier) 

With the aid of a Government Grant, Prof. Seeley visited Cape Colony 
in 1889 to collect fossil Reptilia from the Karoo Formation. He obtained 
numerous important specimens, including skeletons of Fariasanrus 
haini, P. homhidens, Cynognathus crateronotus, and remains of other 
genera and species, described by himself (Phil. Trans., Quart. Journ. 
Geol. /Soc, and Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist.). These fossils were received 
as a donation through the Council of the lloyal Society at various dates 
from 1892 onwards. 

Sharp (Samuel) [1814-1882] 

While a boy at Stamford, Lincolnshire, Sharp studied the Oolitic rocks 
around his house with Prof. J. Moms and other geologists, and made a 
large and valuable collection of fossils. In 1857 he moved to Daliinuton 
Hall, near Northampton, where he continued to collect from the Jurassic 
rocks, availing himself of the numerous excavations then being carried on 
for raising the iron ore of the Northampton Sand. The <.'.eneral results of 
his observations were published by the Geological Society of Lou'lou 
{Quart. Journ., xxvi. p. 354, 1870 ; and xxix. p. 225, 1873). 
Sharp's collection was also utilised by J. Morris in his " Cat;ih)gue 
of British Fossils," and in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, ix., Proc. p. 317. 
Sharp placed many of his geological specimens in the Northampton 
Museum, of which he was a founder ; but a selection of over 1500 of the 
better specimens, especially those illustrating the papers just mentioned, 
was purchased for the British Museum in 1876. The specimens, which 
are carefully labelled in a bold upright hand, comprise invertebrates of all 
clasess, from the Oolitic and Liassic series of Northamptonshire, Lincoln- 
shire, and Rutland, reptiles from the same rocks, and mumm.ils from the 
Forest-bed and Drift of the eastern counties. The fiiiured and described 
Si3ecimens include an incrusted Chara (Geol. Mag., 1868), the types of 



324 Geology, 

Stellaster sharpi and Astropecten cotteswoldix var stam/ordensis, and 
another A. cotttswoldix, all tigured by T. Wright (Pala^ontogr. Soc), also 
the type of Penxus sharpi, H. Woodward {Rep. Brit. Assoc, for 1868) 
from the Lower Lias, Northampton. The rest of the Sharp collection 
was acquired by the Mason College, Birmingham, and is now in the 
museum of the University : in addition to Jurassic fossils, it contains an 
excellent stratigraphical series, from the Cambrian to Recent. 

Sharpe (Daniel) 

Presented Pleistocene Mammalian remains from Erith and Grays, 
1850. 
Shelburne {Earl of) 

Presented remains of Mastodon americanus and a molar of Mastodon 
humboldti, 1767. 

Sherbom (Charles Davies) 

Collected London Clay Foraminifera, purchased 1886 ; English Chalk 
fossils, presented 1899. 

Shockley (W. H.) 

Presented Upper Carboniferous Invertebrata from Shansi, China, 1898. 

Shrubsole (George William) [1827-1893] 

Resident in Chester from 1853 until his death, Shrubsole was a 
geologist and archaeologist with many interests, but made a special study 
of the Palseozoic Polyzoa, and collected an important series of these 
fossils, notably from the Bala and Carboniferous Limestones of North 
AVales, the Wenlock Limestone of Dudley, and Magnesian Limestone of 
Northumberland. He published several papers on the subject (Quart. 
Journ. Geol. Soc. 1879-1882), and his collection was presented to the 
British Museum by his son, Mr. George Shrubsole, in 1896. Mapy 
Ordovician fossils from the Glyn Ceiriog district were presented by him 
to the museum of the Chester Society of Natural Science, of which he 
was a founder. 

Shrubsole (William Hobbs) 

Resided for many years at Sheerness and collected fossils from the 
London Clay cf Sheppey. Discovered skull of Argillornis longipennis, 
purchased 1880; skull of Chelone gigas, purchased 1880; Diatoms, 
presented 1881 ; and Prophaethon shruhsolei, purchased 1898. 

Sikora (F.) [ -1902] 

Mr. Sikora was a skilled collector and obtained many important 
bones of extinct Lemuroids and other vertebrates from the caverns of 
Madagascar. Some of these were purchased from him in 1900 by the 
British Museum, others by the Vienna Museum. The former have been 
and are being described by Dr. Forsyth Major, the latter by Dr. Lorenz 

Simmons (Jeremiah) 

An expert collector of Chalk fossils, from whom many specimens were 
purchased. He prepared the unique group of Ortaster hulbiferus, pur- 
chased 1873. 

Simonson (A.) 

Mr. Simonson collected remains of Tremataspis, Auchenaspis, and 
other Ostracoderms, in the Upper Silurian of Oesel, an island in the Baltic. 



Geology. 325 

A small selection of specimens was purchased from him in 1804, and 
a Tremataspis from his collection was subsequently purchased through 
Dr. Krantz. 

Singley (J. A.) 

Collected Tertiary and Cretaceous MoUusca from Galveston, Texas, 
purchased 1897. 

Slatter (Ann Taylor) 

Miss Slatter was sister to T. J. Slatter {q.v.) of Evesham. Having 
been attracted by numerous fossil corals scattered over the surface of a 
ploughed field at Fairford, Gloucestershire, she not only collected these, 
but subsequently obtained beautiful specimens from excavations made for 
the purpose in the underlyinii bed, which was at the base of the Cotn- 
brash. She gave many of her specimens to Mr. Brown of Cirencester, 
who lent them, among others, to P. Martin Duncan for description. Miss 
Slatter's own specimens were examined, and some of them described, by 
Mr. R. F. Tomes, notably the type of Bathycoinia slatter i (Quart. 
Journ. OeoJ. Soc, 1883 and 1885). In 1899 the Trustees purchased 
from Miss Slatter 695 corals including several of the described specimens, 
and about 100 other Oolitic Invertebrata. 

Slatter (Thomas James) [1834-1895] 

While serving as clerk and manager in various branches of the 
Gloucestershire Bank, Slatter studied the geology of the county, and 
made a large collection, chiefly of Jurassic fossils, which were carefully 
labelled in his own small and neat handwriting. On his retirement, he 
settled with his collection at Evesham. Many of the corals collected by 
himself and his sister Anne (q.v.) were studied by 11. F. Tomes. Nearly 
5000 specimens selected from this collection were ])urchased by the 
Museum from Slatter's executor in 1896. In the selection was included 
a fine antler of reindeer from the river-gravels near Evesham. 

Slimon (Robert) 

Collected Upper Silurian Crustacea from Lanarkshire, purchased 1878. 

Sloane (Sir Hans) [1660-1753] 

In this place, it is only necessary to recollect the facts that among 
Sloane's collections of natural history objects, were those he made in 
Jamaica, 1687-88, and the valuable cabinets of William Courten acquired 
by Sloane on the latter's death in 1702. A general account of Sloane's 
collection as it existed at Chelsea is given in the Genthman^s Magazine, 
1748 (pp. 301-302). The collection, as purchased by the nation in 1763 
included many "extraneous fossils, comprehending petrified bodies, as 
trees, or parts ot them, herbaceous jilants, animal substances," etc., 
describ'^d as being a collection " the most extensive and most curious that 
ever was seen of its kind." In " The General Contents of the British 
Museum," Ed. i., 1761 ; ii., 1762, we fitid the following fossils mentioned : 
Helmintholithi [corals], Cochlites, Ammonit^e, Ostracites, Anomia? 
[ Brachiopods], Conchites, Pectiuites, P]chinites, Belemnites, Asteri.T, 
Trochites and Entrochi, Ichthyolithi, Zoolithi [Mammal bones], Pliyto- 
lithi. The collection was of a very miscellaneous character, and com- 
prised common fossils not only from Britain, but also from abroad. Each 
specimen bore a register-number, written in ink on a square ticket of 
white paper, and was entered in a MS. Catalo'jjne, which is preserved in 
the Library of the Department of Geology. Two bits of petrified wood. 



326 Geology. 

and 84 invertebrate fossils from the collection can still be identified with 
certainty, about a dozen others being less certain; further, seveial fish- 
remains bear the Sloane labels ; and a few Mammalian fragments are still 
duly marked. No. 528 is noteworthy as "An Echinites from Agostino 
Scilla's Collection " : Scilla's book was published at Naples in 1670, and a 
Latin translation at Rome in 1724. 

Slone {Mrs. E.) 

Cheirotherian footprints from Trias of Cheshire, purchased 1848. 

Smith (George) 

Presented Glossopteris from Natal, 1876. 

Smith {Mrs. M. H.) 

This lady, who lived at Mayo House, Tunbridge Wells, not only 
purchased valuable specimens from quarrymen and collectors, but col- 
lected herself, especially from the Chalk, and worked with the microscope 
until prevented by blindness. She presented fossils to Mautell and the 
Brighton Museum, and a few to the Biitish Museum ; and her collection was 
utilised by F. Dixon in his " Geology of Sussex." A MS. " Catalogue of 
Fossil Organic Remains" in her cabinet, compiled and illustrated by 
S. P. Woodward, with other drawings by W. H. Bensted, G. A, Mantell, 
and J. Delve>^, is preserved in the Library of the Geological Department. 
On Mrs. Smith's death the collection passed to her daughter, Mrs. Bishop 
of Bramcote, near Nottingham. She also died before long, and in 1878 
the greater part of the collection was sold to the British Museum by the 
second Mrs. Bishop. It consisted of 248 complete specimens and about 
130 fragments, and included the type-specimen of DoUchosaurus longi- 
co/^ts, Owen, with specimens oi Pterodactylus conirostris, FolyptycJiodou 
interruptus, Flesiosanrus, and Chelonians, all figured by Owen in either 
the first or second edition of Dixon's book, and in his " Reptilia of the 
Cretaceous Formations" ( Palffiontogr. Soc, 1851); type-specimens of 
Saiirocephalus Janciformis^ Agass., Pacliyrhizodus basalis, Dixon, with a 
.specimen of Edaphodon manfelU also figured in the same woik ; fine 
specimens of Enoplocytia Jeachi and E. sussescensis, some figured ; 
Greasier coronatus, Goniaster regidaris, and the type of G. smithisey 
figured by Forbes in Dixon. A cabinet of small Chalk fossils from 
Mrs. Smith's collection was bequeathed by Mr. Bishop, who died in 1877, 
to the then proposed Nottingham Musemii, while a small collection, 
arranged by his first wife, was retained by his widow. Mrs. Bishop, who 
subsequently moved to Watfoi'd (Herts), presented the Museum with the 
above-mentioned catalogue in 1892. 

Smith (P. J.) 

Palaeozoic fossils from Tasmania, purchased 1880. 

Smith (Toulmin) 

Smith, who lived at Highgate, devoted many years to the investiga- 
tion of the British Cretaceous sponges, especially those known as 
Ventriculites, on which he published papers in the Annals and Magazine 
of Natural History, in 1848. His collection, purchased from his widow 
in 1869, included no less than 1060 specimens of such sponges, com- 
prising those described by him. It also contained some shells from the 
London Clay of Highgate and reptilian and fish remains from the Chalk, 
the latter including the jaws figured by him {London Geol. Journ., p. 22) 
and subseQuently referred to Fachyrhizodus gardneri. In the same 



Geology. 327 

year, Miss Toulmin Smith presented a scrap-book containing figures and 
diagnoses of the VentriculitidiB of the Chalk, partly from Toulmiii 
Smith's papers, partly in MS. Smith h^d previously presented a col- 
lection of Cretaceous sponges to the Manchester Museum. 

Smith (William) [1769-1839] 

The "Father of English Geology" made a collection of fossils to 
illustrate his " Strata Identified " and other works. It was purchased 
in 1816. 
Sommerring (Samuel Thomas von) [1755-1830] 

This eminent anatomist made, from the Lithographic Stone of 
Bavaria a small collection of fossils, which was purchased in 1827. It 
included the type-specimens of Lacerta gigantea {Geosaurus, Cuvier) and 
Crocodilus priscus {Aeolodon, Meyer) described by Sommerring himself. 

South Australian Geological Survey 

Presented South Australian fossils, 1886, 1887. 

South Australian Museum 

Presented Marsupial remains from x\ustralia, 1861. 
Sowerby (James) [1757-1822] 

Well known for his work in many branches of Natural History, 
Sowerby set an enduring mark on British PaUeontology by the publica- 
tion of "The Mineral Conchology of Creat Britain," whicii appeared in 
parts from 1812 to 1846, being carried on after Sowerby's death by hi& 
son and fellow- worker, James de Carle Sowerby, with some assistance 
from George Brettingham Sowerby the first, and J. W. Salter. James 
Sowerby himself presented various Secondary fossils from France in 1821, 
but the "Sowerbv Collection" was purchased of J. de C. Sowerby in 
1860. It consisted of about 5000 fossils from all parts of England and of 
every geological age, and included the majority of the specimens figured 
in the" " Mineral Conchology." These latter were marked by circular 
paper tickets of a dull bluish-green tint and 7 ' 2 mm. in diameter. The 
Sowerby Collection, as then received, contained specimens from many 
older collections, the most noticeable of which were those of Jas. 
Parkinson, Wm. Martin, and the Rev. George Cookson Qi'i-v.). The 
remainder of the specimens figured in the "Mineral Conchology" were 
in various collections and some can no longer be traced. A good pro- 
portion of them have, however, since found their way to the British 
Museum in the collections of J. S. Bowerbank, P. B. Brodie, F. Dixon, 
F. E. Edwards, W. Gilbertson (including that of Alex. Moore), G. A. 
Mantell, S. Y. Wood, and N. T. Wetherell {qq.v.). 
Sowerby (George Brettingham, the First) [1780-1854] 

The second son of James Sowerby {q.v.) assisted his father ami 
brother in the preparation of the " Mineral Conchology," and was one ot 
the conductors of the Zoological Journal, to which he contributed 
descriptions of Blastoids in the collection of Wm. Gilbertson (q.v.). 
Sowerby (James de Carle. Son of James Sowerby (q^v.) )^ 

Spearing (H.) 

Presented jaws of Rodent ia from New South Wales, 1897. 
Spencer (E.) 

The type-skull of Crocodilus sqienceri, purchased 1846. 



328 Geology. 

Spratt {Vice-Admiral Thomas A. B.) [1811-1888] 

While surveying in the Mediterranean, Spratt made geological obser- 
Tations on many of the little-known coasts, partly in association with 
Prof. Edward Forbes. He forwarded some small donations of fossils to 
the Museum at different times, until in 1878 he presented an important 
collection of remains of pigmy elephants and hippopotamus, with a tew 
bones of birds and land tortoises, irom the Zebhug Caves, Malta. The 
remains of elephants in this collection were described by G. Busk (Traom. 
Zool. Soc, vol. vi.); the Chelonia by Leith Adams {Quart Journ. Oeol. 
Soc, 1866); and the birds by Mr. Lydekker (Froc. ZooL >S'oc., 1890, 
and " Catalogue of Fossil Birds in the British Museum," 1891). 

Springer {Hon. Frank) [1848- ] 

Associated with C. Wachsmuth {q^h) in the formation of a large 
collection of Crinoidea at Burlington, Iowa, and in the production of 
important works on their structure and classification, Mr. Springer, who 
is now a leading barrister in New Mexico, has, since the death of his 
colleague, continued to publish jiapers, notably *' Uintacrinus ; its 
Structure and llelations" (190]). Remarkable specimens illustrating 
tijis memoir were presented by Mr. Springer in 1900. 

Spurrell (Flaxman) 

Dr. Flaxman Spurrell and his son, Mr. Flaxman C. J. Spurrell, of 
Belvedere, made an extensive collection of Pleistocene Mammalia from 
Thames deposits at Crayford, Kent. Some of the specimens were 
described or noticed by Falconer, Dawkiiis, and Sanford. The greater 
part of the collection, comprising the skull of Fells ho and numerous 
other important specimens, was presented to the Museum by Mr. F. C. J. 
Spurrell in 1893. Mr. F. C. J. Spurrell's own collection of implements 
and bones Irom a Pala3olithic floor, described in tlie Quarterly Journal 
oi the Geological Society (1880), was presented by him to the Department 
of Geology in 1895. 

Spurrell (Flaxman C. J.) 
See Spurrell, Flaxman. 

Squires {Mrs.) 

Dried neck and legs of Dinornis didinus from a fissure in New 
Zealand, purchased 1882. 

Stanhope {Lady Esther) 

Collected and presented Cretaceous Fishes from the Lebanon, 1817. 

Stanley {Lord) 

Presented Australian PalaBozoic Brachiopoda collected by Dr. Jeunneret, 

1846. 

Stephens (Darell) 

Discovered type-specimen of Steneosaurus stephani in Cornbrash of 
orset, purchased 1878. 

Stephens (T.) 

Presented remains of Glossopteris Flora from Tasmania, 1898. 



Geology. 329 

Sternberg (C. H.) 

A well-known collector of Kansas Chalk fossils, from whom were 
purchased specimens of Flatecarjpus, CUdasteSj Tylosaurus, and b'ishes 
in 1900. 
Stirling (Edward Charles) 

Discovered limb-bones of Genymmis newtoni from Mulligan Springs, 
South Australia, obtained by exchange 18137. 

Stobart (W. C.) 

Presented counterpart of type-specimen of Lepidotosaunis duffi, from 
the Magnesian Limestone of Durham, 1886. 

Stock (ThOxMas) 

A collector of fossils, from whom %vere purchased Coal-plants from the 
Forest of Dean (1893), and Crinoids from the Carboniferous Limestone of 
Alveston, Bristol (1894). 

Stoddart (David A.) 

Presented Mammalian remains from the Pampa Formation of Uruguay, 
1865. 
Stokes (Charles) [1783-1853] 

" A respected member of the [London] Stock Exchange, full of vast 
research in the Natural History Sciences, and remarkable for literary 
and antiquarian, musical and artistic knowledge," Mr. Stokes, while 
assiduously engaged in business, devoted his means and leisure to the 
advancement of science. " He collected rare and interesting specimens at 
any cost," says Edward Forbes, " not for their own sakes, but to place at 
the disposal of any competent person." Among those who acknowledged 
such help were Murchison, J. S. Miller {Nat. Hist. Crinoidea), A. Brong- 
niart, and James Parkinson. Trilobites and zoophytes were among his 
favourite subjects. In the Transactions of the Geological Society (ser. 2, 
vol. v., 1837), he published a paper on the petrifaction of wood, and another 
on "Some species of Orthocerata'' (1840). On January 15th, 1823, he 
presented to the Museum "two specimens of Entomolithes in Shistus 
from France," and in 1827, several varieties of agatised wood. His 
collection, purchased from his executors in 1854, in addition to corals and 
other invertebrates, comprised an extensive series of Orthocerata, chiefly 
from North America, including the type-specimens figured by himself 
(op. cit.) and by J. J. Bigsby (1824). Many of his specimens are in the 
Museum of the Geological Society, and others in the Museum of Practical 
Geology, from which some foreign Jurassic Ammonites collected by him 
were transferred in 188iJ. His fossil fishes, mentioned by Agassiz, came 
to the Museum in the Enniskillen and Egerton collections. 

Strachey {Sir Richard) [1817- ] 

When a captain in the Bengal Engineers in the years 1848-49, Sir 
Richard Strachey was employed" by the Indian Government in scientific 
researches of a miscellaneous nature in the Northern Himalayas. He 
read before the Geological Society a paper " On the Geology of part of the 
Himalaya Mountains^ and Tibet" {Qtiart. Journ., 1851). The Silurian, 
Carboniferous, Triassic, and Jurassic fossils mentioned therein, were 
developed by him, mounted on tablets, and presented to the Museum of 
Practical Geology, where they were described by J. W. Salter and H. F. 
Blanford in a pamphlet entitled, " Paleontology of Niti, etc reprinted 



330 Geology, 

with slight correction for private circulation from Colonel E. Strachey's 
forthcoming work on the physical geography of the Northern Himalaya," 
Calcutta, 1865. The complete work, however, never appeared. The 
specimens were transferred to the British Museum in 1880; they are 
accompanied by the old label of the Geological Survey, and many of them 
bear the collector's number, written on the stone in ink. 

Strzelecki (Paul Edmund de, Count) [1796-1873] 

Strzelecki was a German traveller, who during twelve years explored 
or visited both North and South America, part of the West Indies, the 
South Sea Islands, Tasmania, the Javanese Islands, part of China and 
the East Indies, and Egypt. In 1839, he discovered the existence of 
gold in the Australian colonies, and is best known by his " Physical 
Description of New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land," 1845, in 
which many fossils chiefly of Perrno-Carboniferous age were described. 
He sold his collection of 135 fossils from New South Wales, including 
those described in his book, to Prof. John Morris, from whom it was 
bought by the Trustees in 1859. Two of the figured specimens of 
Si^henopteris are, however, in the Museum of the Geological Society. 

Sturtz (Bernhard) 

This well-known dealer in minerals and fossils at Bonn, made a special 
collection of Lower Devonian star-fishes from Bundenbach in connection 
with his researches published in Palceontographica (1886, 1890). The 
original collection of 112 specimens was purchased by the Museum from 
Mr. Stiirtz in 1891, while small additions, similarly acquired in lb93 and 
lUOO, illustrate his subsequent papers (VerhandL rtcd. Ver. Preuss. 
Rheinland, 1., Ivi.). Each specimen bears a detailed label in Mr. Stiirtz's 
handwriting, with his name printed on it. 

Sutherland (Peter C.) 

In 1850-51, II.M.SS. Lady Franklin and >S'o2)Am, under the command 
of Wilham Penny, voyaged to Baffin Bay and Barrow Straits in search 
of the missing crews of H.M.SS. Erebvs and Terror, i.e., the Sir John 
Franklin expedition. Sutherland was surgeon to the expedition. The 
fossils he collected, with others belonging to Captain Ommanney, Mr. 
Pickthorne, and Mr. Donnett, were described by J. W. Salter in an 
appendix to Sutherland's account of the voyage (Vol. ii., pp. ccxvii- 
ccxxxiii). Sutherland's collection was transferred from the Museum of 
Practical Geology in 1878. 

Styan (F. AV.) 

Presented Crinoidal limestone from Szechuen, China, 1899. 

SurgeonSj Royal College of 

Presented ])laster casts of bones of Megatherium to complete model of 
skeleton, 1834. 

Sweet (George) 

Discovered and presented a specimen of Belonostomiis sweeti from the 
Cretaceous of Queensland, 1895. 

Swindon Brick and Tile Company 

Presented Omosaurus arrnatus Irom the Kimmeridge Clay of Swindon, 
1874. 



Geology. 331 

Swinhoe (Robert) 

Teeth of Pliocene Mammalia from a cavern near Ching-King-Foo, 
China, purchased 1870. 

Sykes {Lieut. -Col.) 

Presented Tertiary MoUusca from India, 1857. 

Szajnocha (L.) 

Presented Devonian and Silurian fossils from Galicia, 1888. 

Tabor {Mrs. H.) 

Tertiary Polyzoa from New Zealand, purchased 1894. 

Tate (George) 

Presented English Carboniferous and Permian Brachiopoda, 1852. 

Taylor (Henry William) 

Taylor was, says E. Forbes, " well-known for his fine collection of 
Chalk fossils, which he spared neither time nor expense to bring together." 
In 1854, the Museum purchased from his executors many very choice 
fossils, chiefly star-fishes, sea-urchins, crustaceans, and fishes. 

Taylor (James) 

Presented remains of Stagonolepis from Trias of Elgin, 1859. 

Taylor (J. W.) 

Presented Tertiary leaves from Disco, Greenland, 1863. 

Tennant (James) 

A lecturer on Geology and Mineralogy and a dealer from whom many 
specimens were purchased. An extensive selection from his private 
collection of English fossils was purchased from his executors in 1881-82. 

Tesson 

Resident in Caen, Tesson, who was a friend of the Deslongchamps and 
other geologists, made a fine collection chiefly from the Jurassic rocks of 
Normandy, but including specimens from other horizons and localities. 
A few molluscs were acquired from Tesson in 1855, but the main collec- 
tion was purchased by the Trustees in 1857. It contained the type- 
specimens of Ammonites tessonkmus, d'Orbigny (Paleontologie Franfaise, 
1842) and Teudopsis hunelii, Deslongchamps (Mem. Soc. Linn. Nor- 
mandie, 1835), some brachiopods referred to by Davidson, and unique 
remains of Teleosaurus and FeJagomurus described by Deslongchamps. 

Thomas (Ethel A.) 

Presented the W. F. Jennings' Collection of miscellaneous English 
fossil Invertebrata, 1892. 

Thompson (D'Arcy Wentworth) 

Presented a paper model of Pterichthys made by Hugh Miller, 1898. 

Thomson (A. M.) 

Presented Marsupial and Rodent remains from the Wellington Caves, 
New South Wales, 1870. 

Thomson (James) 

Presented polished sections of Carboniferous Corals, 1871. 



332 Geology. 

Thorbum (R. M.) 

Presented Post-Pliocene Mollusca from Uddevalla, Sweden, 1888. 

Thomhill (B. Clarke) 

Presented two Tertiary Brachyurous Crustacea from Akita, N, Japan, 
1891. 

Thornton (George) 

Presented slab of Petworth marble, 1841. 

Tomes (Robert F.) 

Presented English Jurassic Corals, 1885; Calci-sponges from the 
Inferior Oolite, 1894. 

Tomkins (H. G.) 

Discovered a remarkable Coral, Am^yhxus, from the Carboniferous 
Lim.estone of Weston, purchased 1892. 

Touche (Tom Digues la) 

Presented Nummulitic Limestone from Singhe La, Himalaya, 1897. 

Townsend {Mrs.) 

Presented a Dinosaurian ischium from the Stonesfield Slate, 1851. 

Traquair (Ramsay Heatley) 

Presented plates of Asterolepis maxima from the L^pper Old Eed 
Sandstone of JNairn, 1894. 

Trevelyan {Sir John) 

Agassiz, in " Piecherches sur les Poissons Fossiles," writes, " a 
Wallington, le musee de Sir John 'i'revelyan m'a paru tres remarquable ; il 
contient surtout une collection magnifique de coquilles et d'echinodermes." 
The Museum was inherited by his son. Sir Walter Calverley Trevelyan 
{q.v.), but it is interesting to note here that a lower molar of Elephas 
2)rimigenius from St. Audrie's, Somersetshire, mentioned by Sir John in 
a note to Dean Buckland (Five. Geol. Soc, 1842), was presented by 
Mr. Si:)encer George Perceval in 1902. 

Trevelyan {Sir Walter Calverley) [1797-1879] 

The son of Sir John Trevelyan, the fifth baronet, of Nettlecorabe, 
Somersetshire, and Wallington, Northumberland, Trevelyan early turned 
to geology, and the Ceological Society published papers by him from 
1829 to 1846. In the latter year, he succeeded to the title and to his 
father's museum at Wallington, w^hich he extended. It contained "a 
good series of British and Italian fossils, valuable collections. of minerals 
and recent shells, a good series of Ethnological specimens, together \vith 
a general Natural History collection of objects, most of which he had 
himself obtained during his travels." He bequeathed to the British 
Museum a valuable series of fossils comjDrising: a type-specimen of 
Amblypterus nemopterus, Agassiz ("Poissons Fossiles") and other fish 
remains of Carboniferous age ; specimens of Cephalasjns JyeJli from 
Forfarshire; a large series of vertebrate remains from Kent's Hole, 
Torquay ; coal-plants from Burdie House ; various invertebrata from the 
Carboniferous and Magnesian Limestones; and Miocene shells from 
Italy. Other museums that benefited by his liberality in the matter of 
fossils were the Museum of Practical Geology and the Oxford Museum. 



Geology. 33iJ 

A part of his collection was inherited by his nephew, Mr. Spencer 
George Perceval. 

Tristram (Henry Baker) 

Collected Cretaceous fishes from the Lebanon, purchased 1865. 

Tryon (Henry) 

Presented nodules containing Fishes from Glacial Clay, Biudaleu,. 
Norway, 1887. 

Turner {Mrs. E.) 

Presented fossil Corals from Antigua, 1891. 

Turner {Major Harlowe) 

Presented a FJesiosaurus from the Lower Lias of Bennington, 1880. 

Ulrich (Edward O.) 

Mr. Ulrich, of Newport, Ky., is well known for his writings on the 
American Palaeozoic Polyzoa pubhshed in the Journal of the Cincinnati 
Society of Natural History (1879-1890), in the American Geologist, in 
the eighth volume of the Geological Survey of Illinois (1890), and 
especially in the Beport of the Geological Survey of Minnesota (1886 and 
1895). In 1898 the Trustees purchased from him 370 specimens of 
American Palaeozoic Polvzoa, representing 720 species and varieties, and 
named by Mr. Ulrich, followed in 1899 by 38 specimens and 500 micro- 
scope-slides prepared from the same fossils. 

United Service Museum 

Skull of Elephas namadicus from the Pleistocene of the Narbada 
Valley, India, purchased 1860. 

U. S. National Museum 

Skull of Castoroides ohioensis from the Pleistocene of Illinois, by 
exchange 1899. 

Upton (W. J.) 

The tvpe-skeleton of Dinornis parvus from New Zealand, purchased 
1880. 
Van Breda (Jacob Gigsbertus Samuel) [1788-1867] 

The collection of Prof. Van Breda, of Leyden, was catalogued in a 
small pamphlet "Apercu General de la Collection Paleontologique Van 
Breda," and comprised about 1900 fossils from the Miocene of Oeningen, 
the Upper Cretaceous of Maastricht, and the Lithographic Stone of 
Bavaria. Some of the Fishes from Oeningen and Bavaria, and Chelonia 
from Oeningen and Maastricht, were described in memoirs by Dr. T. C. 
Winkler. Three Pterodactyls were described by H. von Meyer. The 
remains of Mosasaurus and Turtles from Maastricht, many collected by 
Van Breda's father-in-law, Peter Camper, are specially valuable. The 
whole collection was purchased by the British Museum from Prof. Van 
Breda's executors in 1871. 

Verbeek (R. D. M.) 

Presented fossil Fishes from Tertiary Lignite at Padang, Sumatra^ 
1876. 



334 Geology. 

Vicary (William) 

Presented a slab of Devonian Crinoidal limestone from Newton 
Bushell, 1881 ; Greensand fossils from Blackdown, 1884. 

Vine (George Robert) [ -1893] 

Vine, of Shrffield, contributed Reports on Fossil Polyzoa to the British 
Association (1880-84 and 1890-92), and several papers on the same 
subject to the Geological Society (Quart. Journ., 1882-90), and the 
Yorkshire Geological Society (Proc, 1889-92). His collection of 1695 
s])ecimens, mounted and labelled by himself and referred to in these 
writings, was purchased from him by the British Museum in 1893. 
Other specimens described by Vine were acquired in the collection of 
T. Jesson (q.v.). 

Wachsmuth (Charles) [1829-1896] 

Wachsmuth collected crinoids and other fossils from the Lower 
Carboniferous limestone near Burlington, Iowa. At the invitation of 
Agassiz, he visited Cambridge, Mass., in 1865, and then proce<derl to 
Europe, where, after studying in various museums, he came to the British 
Museum, to which he sold two Burlington crinoids (1866). On his 
return to America his collection was utilised by himself and othei's 
for serious study, and was eventually sold to Agassiz. Wachsmuth 
then made a second collection, which he brought with him on his 
second visit to Europe in 1874, and sold to the British Museum. Again 
he settled down, this time in co-operation with Mr. Frank Springer, 
to make perhaps the finest collection of crinoids in the world, and to 
begin that series of remarkable papers which culminated in the " North 
American Crinoidea Camerata" (1897). In 1887, Mr. Springer studied 
the fossil crinoids in the British Museum, then newly arranged according 
to Wachsmuth and Springer's classification, and effected an exchange of 
great benefit to the national collection. The 316 specimens of crinoids 
and blMstoids acquired in 1874, and the 83 specimens received in 1888 
^' contain many of the finest examples in the Museum, and some which 
are in their way unique, notably the splendid calyx of Megistocrinus 
evanfii" (GeoJ. Mag., 1896, p. 190). In the first collection, the fossils 
from the Lower Burlington limestone are provided with yellow card 
labels ; those from the Upper Burlington limestone have red ones. 

Walcott (Charles Doolittle) 

Presented impressions of Medusee from Lower Cambrian, Mt. Granville, 
New York, 1900. 

Walker (John Francis) 

Presented type-specimens of Brachiopoda from the Neocomian of 
TJpware, 1867-68; Brachiopoda from the Wenlock Shale, ]883; and 
Brachiopoda from the Inferior Oolite of Dorsetshire, 1891. 

Warburton (T.) 

Presented Pleistocene non-marine MoUusca from Moorfields, 1890. 

Ward (Henry A.) 

Made plaster cast of carapace of GJyptodon reticulatus, obtained by 
exchange 1865 ; prepared skull of Titanotherium from the White River 
Formation of Dakota, purchased 1895. 



Geology. 335 

Ward (John) 

Resident at Longton, Staifordshire, Mr. Ward has been occupied for 
forty year-! in collecting the fossils, especially fishes and labyrhithodonts, 
of the North Staffordshire Coalfield.' He has always noted the exact 
horizons of his specimens with special care ; and all are marked with a 
white oblong label, partly printed and bearing his name, with particulars 
added in his own clear handwriting. A set of 1072 selected fossils, 
comprising many type-specimens and other specimens described by 
Kgerton, John Young, an<i Traquair, was purchased by the Trustees in 
1894. Another and smaller selection was subsequently purchased by the 
Edinburgh Museum of Science and Art. 

Ward (T. Bryan) 

See T. T. Lewis. 

Warne {Miss Elizabeth) 

Presented Oligocene fishes from Canton Glarus, 1859. 

Watson (J. W.) 

Presented fossil Vertebrata from the Siwalik Formation of Periin 
Island, 1886-87. 

Westendarp (Charles) 

Mr. Westendarp was an ivory merchant in the City of London. In 
1877, he presented a few fossils collected by himself in Weimar, and, in 
1879, some Post-Pliocene Gastropods from East Africa. In 1884, he 
made a large donation of 778 specimens of various kinds from all parts 
of the woild. Among them may be mentioned a fine palate and mandible, 
with the milk-dentition, of Elepkas primigeuius, together with other 
vertebrate remains, from the Pleistocene of llford, and numerous vertebrate 
remains from the Pleistocene travertine of Weimar. 

Westminster {Duhe of) 

Presented remains of Bison and Ptcindeer dug up in r.uckinghara 
Palace Koad, 1891. 

Westmoreland (J.) 

Collected fossils from the Red Chalk of Hunstanton, a selection 
purchased through Mr. S. C Perceval, 1900. 

Weston (Joseph) 

For many years a resident of Fenton, Staffordshire, Mr. Weston made 
a small but valuable collection of fossil fishes from the North Staftbrdshire 
Coalfield. The specimens were well labelled in his own handwriting, the 
labels being miscellaneous scraps of white paper. The whole collection, 
consisting of 200 vertebrate remains and 100 invertebrates and plants, was 
purchased in 1S91. 

Wetherell (Nathaniel Thomas) [1800-1875] 

Being in medical practice at Highgate, Wetherell was attracted by 
the excavations for Highgate Archway, and made a large collection of 
the London Clay fossils from that and other localities in the north of 
London. As a member of the London Clay Club and a founder of the 
Palfcontographical Societv, many of his specimens were figured in the 
publications of the latter body. He also collected fossils from the Glacial 
Drift of Finchley and Muswell Hill, and tiiis collection is now in the 



336 Geology. 



Museum of Practical Geology, with the exception of a series of 50 banded 
flints described by S. P. Woodward (Oeol. Mag. 1864), which were 
presented to the British Museum in 1865. Wetherell made many other 
donations to the Museum, beginnins: in 1833 with fossils from Highgate 
Archway, and continuing till 1874, when he gave many hundred portions 
of Boiirgueticrinus from the Chalk of Gravesend. His main collection, 
however, was bought through J. Tennant in 1871, making tbe total 
number of specimens received from him nearly 5000, all which have been 
marked "Wetherell Coll.," while many bear labels in his own hand- 
writing. Among the more important specimens in this collection may 
be mentioned : a " sternum of a small wader " from the London Clay, 
figured by Owen (" Brit. Foss. Mammals and Birds ") ; teeth of Mosasaurus 
from the Chalk, figured in Mantell's "Medals of Creation"; tooth of 
Ftychodus, figured in the Geologist; the type of Loricula j^ulcheUa, 
G. B. Sowerby, 1843, re-figured by Darwin (Palajontogr. Soc, 1851); 
some thirty type and figured specimens of London Clay Crustacea, 
described by T. Bell (Palaaontogr. Soc, 1858), and one subsequently the 
type of Squilla tveihereUi, H. Woodw. (1879); many of the types of 
Nautilida^, as Aturia ziczac, Nautilus parkinsoni, N. soiverhyi, figured 
by F. E. Edwards (Pala3ontogr. Soc), and two N. centralis figured in 
Sowerby's "Mineral Conchology"; numerous type and figured specimens 
of other Eocene Mollusca described by F. E. Edwards and S. V. Wood 
(Paljeontogr. Soc), including a Voluta figured in the "Mineral Con- 
chology," also Cypraiidffi figured in the Oeological Magazine (1865) ; 
pearl-bearing Inoceramus and Gryphcea {Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist.) ; Tere- 
hratula semiglohosa, figured by Davidson ; six types of Polyzoa, figured 
by Busk (GeoL Mag., 1866); the types of Coelopleurus wetherelU and 
Ophiura wetherelU, described by Forbes (Palseontogr. Soc, 1852); 
Clionites manteUi (Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist.) ; and flint implements from 
Hornsey, figured in the Geologist. The collection also included the 
41 fossils of various kinds found in a well on Hampstead Heath, and 
figured by J. de C. Sowerby (Trans. Geol. Soc, 1840). 

Whidbey (J.) 

Collected Mammalian remains from cavern of Oreston, near Plymouth, 
presented by Mr. Clift, 1822. 

Whymper (Edward) 

Collected Tertiary leaves in Greenland, partly presented by Mr. P. H. 
Scott in I860, partly purchased in 1886. Also collected fossil Mollusca 
from Greenland, purchased 1886. 

Wickes (W. H.) 

Collected and presented remains of Naiadites from Rhsetic, Bristol, 1900. 

Wilcox (of Swanage) 

Collected Kept ilia, chiefly Chelonia, from the Purbeck Beds of 
Swanage, purchased 1853. 

Willcox (Joseph) 

Presented Pliocene Mollusca from Florida, 1889; and Miocene 
Mollusca from Korth Carolina, 1893. 

Willett (Henry) 

Presented maxilla of Iguanodon from Wealden, Sussex, 1886 ; and a 
jaw of Lepidotus maximus from the Kimmeridge Clay of Shotover, 1892. 



Geology. 337 

Williamson (John) [1774-1877] 

The cousin of William Dean, and the father of W. C. WilHamson 
{<l-v.\ began life as a gardener, but coming under the influence of 
William Smith, he became a pioneer in Yorkshire geology, and was one of 
the original discoverers of fossil plants in the Inferior Oolite of that 
county, notably at Gristhorpe. The genus Williamsonia was named 
after him, and many of his specimens were described by Adolphe 
Brongniart. Williamson presented a small collection of these plants to 
the British Museum in 1829; but the main part of his collection formed 
the nucleus of the Scarborough Literary and Philosophical Society's 
museum, of which he was appointed keeper. 

Williamson (William Crawford) [1816-1895] 

During the latter half of his life, while occupied with researches on 
the organisation of the Carboniferous Flora, the well-known Professor of 
the Owens College accumulated a series of about 2000 microscope-slides 
illustrating his work. In collecting and preparing the material, he was 
assisted by Messrs. William Cash, James Spencer, Thomas Hick, George 
Wild, James Lomax, and other residents in the northern coalfields. Each 
specimen bears a number corresponding with a record in the descriptive 
MS. catalogue compiled by Prof. Williamson. The whole collection was 
purchased by the Trustees in 1896. He presented his collection of 
Yorkshire fossils, specimens of coal, and sections of Carboniferous plants 
to the Manchester Museum, Owens College ; it contained a few specimens 
figured by himself and by Lindley and Hutton. 

Wills (C. F.) 

Collected remains of Yertebrata from the superficial deposits of 
Madagascar, purchased 1893. 

Wills (James) 

Mr. Wills, a missionary in Madagascar, collected several important 
remains of Aepyornithes and HijD^opotamus, which were purchased from 
him by the Museum in 1895. 

Wilmer (L. Worthington) 

Presented Eocene Mollusca from Dieppe, 1887. 

Wilson (Edward) 

Collected Elasmobranch teeth from the Carboniferous Limestone of 
Ticknall, Derbyshire, purchased 1887. Presented the type-specimens 
of Necroscilla wilsoni and Eoscorpius anglicus. from the Coal Measures, 
1886. 

Wise (John R.) 

Presented Oligocene shells from Brockenhurst, 1876. 

Wolf (George de) 

Presented Trilobites from Mount Stephen, British Columbia, 1896. 

Wood (Lieut.) 

Presented Pleistocene Mammalian remains from Kotzebue Sound, 
Alaska, 1850. 

VOL. I. Z 



338 Geology. 

Wood (Edward) 

Wood was a manufacturer who lived at Richmond, Yorkshire, and 
amused himself by investigating the Carboniferous rocks of Swaledale, 
from which he gathered a valuable collection of fossils. Here he dis- 
covered a bed crowded with specimens of the crinoid described by his 
friend Prof, de Koninck as Woodocrinus, 1854. Five of the earliest 
known specimens were presented by Wood to the Museum in 1859. He 
also gave a fine slab covered with specimens of the fossil to the Carlton 
Club, of which he was a member. Other specimens of his collecting 
found their way, through the dealer J. R. Gregory, to the Museum. 
After AVood's death, his collection was bought by Wm. Reed, of York, 
who presented it, with his own large collection, to the museum of the 
Yorkshire Philosophical Society. 

Wood (E. R.) 

Presented Mammalian remains from the Gower Caves, Glamorgan- 
shire, 1868. 

Wood (Joseph) 

Collected Mammalian remains from a Turbary near Walthamstow, 
purchased 1869. 

Wood (J. A.) 

Presented fossil wood from Antigua, 1828. 

Wood (M.) 

Collected Ajoiocriuus from the Bradford Clay, purchased 1855. 

Wood (Searles Valentine) [1798-1880] 

From 1826 for about ten years Searles Wood lived in Suffolk and 
collected fossil shells from the Crag of that county and of Essex. On 
moving to London, he was associated with Lyell in the classification of 
the Tertiary formations, and continued his study of their molluscs. He 
was one of the members of the " London Clay Club." This led to 
the preparation of his monograph of the Mollusca of the Crag, the 
opening volume of which formed the first publication of the Pala3onto- 
graphical Society (1847). Subsequent volumes, with supplements, were 
issued at intervals down to 1882. The main work, however, was com- 
pleted earlier, and in 1852 Mr. Wood presented to the Zoological 
Department of the British Museum his unrivalled collection of British 
Pliocene fossils, containing, with but two or three exceptions, all the 
specimens up till then described and figured in his monograph, as well as 
Cirripedia figured by C. Darwin, Entomostraca figured by T. Rupert 
Jones, and Foraminifera figured by Jones, Parker, and Brady — all in the 
monographs of the Palseontographical Society. A supplementary collec- 
tion containing such specimens, subsequently described, as were in the 
author's cabinet, was presented by Mrs. S. V. Wood, junior, in 1885, to 
the Geological Department, to which all of the original collection preserved 
by the Zoological Department had in 1884 been transferred wdth the 
approval of Mr. S. V. Wood, junior. Mr. Wood also presented to the 
Museum in 1850 the valuable collection of vertebrate remains, including 
the unique jaws of Alligator hantoniensis and Microchoerus eriiiaceus, 
which he had, in 1843-1845, extracted from the Eocene Freshwater beds of 
Hordwell Cliff, Hants, and partially figured and described in the London 
Geological Journal (1846-47). Others were described in Owen's 
" Reptilia of the London Clay " (Palagontogr. Soc, 1849). 



Geology. 339 

Wood (Searles Valentine, Junior) [1830-1884] 

The son of the former, he continued his work and collection, and was 
corresponding with reference to the final transference of the whole to the 
Geological Department, when he died on December 14th, and the donation 
was completed by his widow, who also, in 1886, presented the collection 
of St. Erth fossils made for S. V. Wood by Robert Bell {q.v.). 

Woodward (Arthur Smith) 

Presented Devonian fish-remains from Spitzbergen, 1891. 

Woodward (Bernard Barham) 

Presented Pleistocene non-marine MoUusca, from the Thames Valley, 
Chelmsford, and Portland, 1890-91. 

Woodward (Henry) 

Collected and presented Pliocene shells from Tejares, Malaga, 18G0. 
Presented Culm Trilobites from Devonshire, 1885. 

Woodward (Samuel) 

Presented fossils from the Braunston Crag, and wood from a sub- 
merged forest on the Norfolk coast, 1828. 

Worthen (Amos Henry) [1813-1888] 

The late State Geologist of Illinois amassed a very large collection, of 
which the more important specimens were purchased by the State after 
his death. A valuable residuum, however, came into the hands of his 
third son, Mr. Thomas A. AVorthen, of Warsaw, 111., from whom in 1897 
the British Museum acquired 499 Echinoderma, comprising 2 echinoids, 
20 cystids, 85 Mastoids, and 392 crinoids, mostly from the Lower 
Carboniferous rocks of N. America, but a few from older strata. They 
are for the most part accompanied by labels in Prof. A. H. Worthen's 
handwriting. Since Worthen himself was a student of Crinoidea, and 
since his collection had also been utilised by James Hall, the determina- 
tions have a special value (see F. A. Bather, " Genera and Species of 
Blastoidea," p. x., 1899). 

Wright (Bryce M.) 

Many fossils were purchased from this dealer, including the unique 
skull of Odontopteryx toliapica from the London Clay of Sheppey, 
1873. 

Wright (Edward Perceval) 

Skeleton of female Irish Deer, purchased 1870. 

Wright (Joseph) 

Presented Polyzoa from the Irish Chalk, 1897. 

Wright (Thomas) [1809-1884] 

A native of Paisley, Wright was for the last fifty years oC his life in 
practice as a physician at Clieltenham, where he devoted his leisure to 
palaeontology. In addition to thirty-two papers contributed to the 
Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society, the Fi'oceediiiys of the 
Cotteswold Field Club, and the Annah and Magazine of Natural 
History, he wrote for the Palaaontographical Society, monographs on 

z2 



340 Geology, 

Jurassic and Cretaceous unstalked ecliinoderms, and on Liassic Ammonites. 
The collection of Mesozoic fossils amassed during these laboius was 
purchased of the dealer, F. H. Butler, in 1887. In addition to numerous 
ammonites and echinoids figured by himself, it contained types and 
fio-ured specimens of Edwards and Haime's Latimseandra ^ davidsom, 
IxosmiUa zvrighti, and MontUvcdtia troclwidei^ ^ho P. Martm Duncan s 
types of Septastrsea haimei (1867) and SymphyJha etheridgei (18 < 2), all 
in the monographs of the PahTontographical Society. 

Wylde (W. R.) 

Presented skulls of Bos longifrons from the Irish peat-bogs, 18o9. 

A. S. WOODWARD. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MINERALS. 



( 343 ) 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MINERALS. 



1. General Sketch. 
1753-1807. 



When the British Museum, established in 1753, was first 
opened for study and inspection on January 15, 1759, the 
collections had been arranged in thirty-eight rooms of Montagu 
House, Bloomsbury. The income from the invested funds of the 
Trust being small (=£900 a year) and quite insufficient for the 
provision of a large staff of warders, it was long impossible to 
give to the public, indiscriminately, free access to the rooms 
containing objects of great intrinsic value ; admission of the 
public was therefore by ticket, and visitors were escorted through 
the Museum in parties of fifteen at a time, not more than 
ten minutes being allowed for the inspection of the contents of 
any room. As only a small number of visitors (120) could be 
thus escorted through the Museum in a single day, previous 
application for tickets was necessary, and the applicant had 
then to wait some time, possibly weeks, until informed that the 
turn for admission had arrived. 

Nor did the funds of the Trust allow of the provision of 
a large literary and scientific staff; only two officers could be 
provided to take care of the whole of the Natural History 
specimens, Animals, Plants and Minerals ; for a long time these 
officers could be remunerated only at an extremely small rate, and 
their attendance was therefore required for only two hours a day 
on alternate days. Until the year 1807, all the officers of the 
Natural History Department had been zoologists or botanists, 
who gave no special attention to the study of minerals. 

It thus came about that, until the end of the 18th century, 
the development and arrangement of the Mineral Collection 
made virtually no progress ; the general collection was incomplete, 
preserved in closed cabinets, and classified according to a system 
which became out of date ; the only exhibited specimens were the 
large ones placed on the tops of the cabinets, and some selected 



344 Minerals, 

lesser specimens arranged under glass in two small table-tops. 
And until the British Museum could be made more accessible 
to the public, the arrangement of additional specimens in a way 
which would admit of their easy inspection was not a matter of 
pressing importance. 

But those who took a great interest in the science of 
mineralogy felt that there ought to be in the metropolis of the 
Empire a well-arranged series of the best illustrations of the 
mineral products of Nature; and, in the year 1799, during the 
keepership of Dr. Edward Whitaker Gray, F.R.S., the Trustees 
took an important step towards supplying the acknowledged 
want by purchasing the minerals which had been collected by 
Mr. Charles Hatchett, F.R.S. ; in the same year, on the death of 
the Rev. Clayton Mordaunt Cracherode, F.R.S., who had long 
been one of the Trustees, a collection of well-selected mineral 
specimens came to the Museum by bequest. Thereupon, a small 
series of the Cracherode minerals was arranged under glass 
for facility of inspection, various other specimens were arranged 
in wall-cases, and the Sloane and Hatchett specimens in general 
were incorporated into a single systematic collection preserved 
in 210 drawers; it was probably classified according to the 
Linnsean system. 

1807-51. 

Assistant-keeper of Natural History . . 1807-13 
Keeper of Natural History . . . 1813-37 

Keeper of Minerals {i7ichidi7ig Fossils) . 1837-51 

Charles Dietrich Eberhard Konig, F.R.S. 

A further step was taken by the Trustees in 1807 ; in that 
year Mr. Charles Konig (formerly Konig), on his appointment 
as assistant-keeper of the Department of Natural History, was 
instructed to give, in the first place, the whole of his available 
time to the preparation of a catalogue of the systematic collec- 
tion of minerals. During the following forty-four years, the 
care of the Minerals was entrusted to him, first as an assistant- 
keeper (1807-13) and afterwards as a keeper (1813-51) ; for 
that long space of time he was the only officer of the Museum 
directly concerned with the arrangement and development of the 
Mineral Collection. But after 1813, when he became keeper of 
the Department of Natural History, not only Minerals but also 
Plants and Animals claimed his regard ; and, though he was 
eventually relieved of the charge of the Recent Plants and 



Minerals, 345 

Recent Animals, which were assigned to special departments 
of Botany and Zoology respectively, he retained till his death 
in 1851 the keepership of not only the Minerals but also the 
Palaeontological specimens. 

During his long term of office, there were great changes as 
regards both the Mineral Collection in particular and the British 
Museum in general. In the first place, the acquisition, in the 
year 1810, of the fine mineral collection which had been brought 
together by the Rt. Hon. Charles Greville, raised the Museum 
collection to the first rank among the collections of the world. 
In the second place, satisfactory arrangements having been made 
with respect to the safeguarding of the various collections in 
the Museum, it became possible in 1811 to grant to the general 
public free access to the rooms on four days of the week, and to 
dispense with tickets of admission. 

The arrangement of the minerals in glazed table-cases instead 
of closed cabinets now became very desirable, and the saloon of 
Montagu House, a large room, was placed by the Trustees at the 
service of Mr. Konig for this purpose. In the course of the next 
four years (1811-15), the necessary table-cases were provided and 
the minerals were arranged for exhibition ; Mr. Konig adopted 
for their arrangement an independent modification of the 
Wernerian system of classification then in vogue. The table- 
cases were twenty-four in number and one-fourth the size of the 
largest in the present mineral gallery; the number of drawers 
had been increased to 640. In the immediately succeeding 
years (1816-23), the collection was further increased by the 
purchase of the Beroldingen, Moll and Monticelli collections, 
and also by numerous timely purchases of isolated specimens. 

When the present building at Bloomsbury was erected in 
place of Montagu House to contain the large and growing 
collections of the British Museum, the minerals were at first 
arranged (1830-32) in the " Long Room " of the eastern wing ; 
Mr. Konig took the opportunity of this change of position to 
re-classify the collection once more, and this time adopted the 
improved chemical scheme which had been proposed in 1824 by 
Prof. Berzelius. At the same time he dispersed the still very 
incomplete set of British minerals which he had begun to isolate 
from the general collection as early as the year 1816: his later 
experience had led him to the conclusion that it is on the whole 
more advantageous to have only a single systematic collection ; 
for each mineral species the British are then in close proximity to 



346 Minerals. 

the foreign specimens, and directly comparable with them. In 
1834 the exhibited specimens occupied sixty-one table-tops, each 
of them half the size of the long cases in the present gallery. 

On the completion of the new building the minerals were 
transferred to, and re-arranged in, the rooms on its northern 
side (1838-44), where they remained till the removal to South 
Kensington in 1880. 

After his promotion to the keepership of Natural History in 
1813, the general demands upon Mr. Konig were so great that 
only a comparatively small portion of his time could be given 
to the Mineral Collection, especially in later years; it was 
virtually impossible for him to do any mineralogical work other 
than that involved in the comparison, selection, registration, 
arrangement and labelling of the specimens. 

1851-57. 

^Keeper of Minerals {inchiding Fossils), 
George Eobert Waterhouse, F.R.S. 

During the interval 1851-57, Mr. G. R. Waterhouse, F.R.S., 
palaeontologist, was keeper of the composite department. 

As already mentioned, Mr. Konig, during his forty-four years 
of office, had been the only member of the staff directly concerned 
with the care of the Mineral Collection; after his death in 1851, 
none of his colleagues was specially qualified to develope the 
mineralogical section of the composite department ; their interests 
had been, and remained, entirely paljeontological. It thus came 
about that for six years after Mr. Konig's death there was no 
mineralogist at all on the Museum staff. 



1857-80. 

Keeper of Minerals, 
Mervin Herbert Nevil Story-lNIaskelyne, M.A., F.R.S. 

Assistants. 



Thomas Davies . 
Viktor von Lang, Ph.D. 
Walter Flight, D.Se., F.R.S. 
William James Lewis, M.A. 
Lazarus Fletcher, M.A., F.R.S. 



1862-> 
1862-64 
1867-> 
1875-77 
1878-80 



In 1857 the Trustees were enabled to bring the unsatis- 
factory state of affairs to an end. In that year new arrangements 



Minerals. 347 

were made according to which the minerals were Ukewise allo- 
cated to a special department ; and in August of the same year 
Mr. M. H. N. Story-Maskelyne, Professor of Mineralogy at the 
University of Oxford, was appointed keeper. It was impossible 
for the Trustees to provide him at once with much assi-stance, 
scientific or general. The first appointment was that of Mr. 
T, Davies, who was made attendant in the following February ; 
the duties corresponding to that grade are not scientific. 
Although Mr. Davies, who was then in his twenty-first year, had 
had few educational opportunities, and was entirely ignorant of 
mineralogy, he had a remarkable capacity for the recognition and 
remembrance of the minute details of specimens, and his natural 
talents and his usefulness, especially at that stage of development 
of the mineral collection, became so manifest that in 1862 he 
was promoted to the scientific grade of assistant. Trained up 
under Mr. Maskelyne, he became a valued colleague, and gave 
important help in the qualitative section of the departmental 
work until his death in 1892, twelve years after Mr. Maskelyne 
had retired. 

Before 1857 little importance had been assigned to the 
statement of localities of specimens, and there were scarcely any 
locality-labels with the exhibited portion of the Collection ; there 
were no labels at all with the unexhibited specimens, many 
thousands in number. The latter were preserved in drawers in 
the Gallery and Basement of the Museum and were entirely 
unarranged. In the course of several years, Mr. Maskelyne, 
aided solely by Mr. Davies, was able to furnish locality-labels 
from the documents contained in the archives of the department ; 
further, he examined, sorted and arranged into species all the 
unexhibited specimens, at the same time setting aside the dupli- 
cates for future disposal. 

The ends of many of the cabinets were altered, glazed and 
fitted, thus making it possible to exhibit those mineral specimens 
which are too large to be placed in the table-tops. 

During the keepership of Mr. Maskelyne, the Mineral Collec- 
tion was completely re-arranged, the classification adopted being 
the crystallo-chemical system published by Prof. Gustav Rose of 
Berlin in 1852, instead of the purely chemical system as amended 
in 1847 by Prof. J. J. Berzelius and Prof. C. F. Rammelsberg, 
which had been on the point of being adopted by Mr. Konig in 
1850. In addition to two large private collections, the Allan- 
Greg and Koksharov, numerous isolated specimens were acquired 



348 Minerals, 

by purchase, presentation or exchange, and incorporated with 
the systematic collection; special attention being given to the 
improvement of the series of Meteorites, which was separated by 
Mr. Maskelyne from the systematic mineral collection itself in 
1863-64, and arranged in two small special wall-cases. 

In 1857 the Museum was in no way equipped for the making 
of scientific research on minerals, so necessary for their accurate 
discrimination ; there was virtually no physical apparatus, and 
there was no chemical laboratory at all; further, the necessity 
of avoiding any risk of the destruction of the Museum by 
fire made it impossible to allow the use of gas and to fit up 
laboratories, or even use a blowpipe, within the building. Yet, 
as early as 1861, a microscope with a revolving graduated stage 
and an eye-piece micrometer was constructed, under the keeper's 
directions, for the examination of thin sections of meteorites 
with the aid of polarised light ; and a reflective goniometer, 
provided with a telescope, was specially designed for the depart- 
ment for use in the measurement of crystals. "With these 
instrumental aids the beginning at least of research became 
possible; though at a heavy cost to Mr. Maskelyne, his eyes 
being soon permanently injured through the strain rendered 
necessary by the weakness of the available illumination. For 
short periods of time, Dr. V. von Lang (1862-64), now Professor 
of Physics in the University of Vienna, Mr. W. J. Lewis (1875-77), 
now Professor of Mineralogy in the University of Cambridge, 
and Mr. L. Fletcher (1878-80), served as assistants during 
Mr. Maskelyne's keepership, and gave help more especially in 
the crystallographic examination and in the registration of the 
specimens. Further, in 1867, a departmental chemical laboratory 
was fitted up in a private house outside the Museum precincts, 
and Dr. W. Flight was appointed assistant ; during his tenure 
of office he gave much help in the chemical analysis of the speci- 
mens, but his position of isolation in an outside laboratory had 
the great disadvantage of preventing his close association with 
the general departmental work. The provision of a chemical 
laboratory, however, made it possible to submit specimens to a 
more critical examination than previously. 

All the time of the departmental staff which could be spared 
from administrative work was devoted to chemical, goniometrical 
or microscopical research on the specimens. 



Minerals, 349 

1880-1903. 

Keeper of Minerals. 

Lazarus Fletcher, M.A., P.R.S. . . . 1880— > 

Assistants. 

Walter Flight, D.Sc, F.R.S ->1885 

Thomas Davies — >1892 

Henry Maurice Platnauer, B.Sc* . . 1880-83 

Henry Alexander Miers, M.A., F.R.S. f • • 1882-95 

George Thurland Prior, M.A 1887-> 

Leonard James Spencer, M.A. . . . 1894— > 

George Frederick Herbert Smith, M.A. . . 1897-> 

After Mr. Maskelyne had retired from office, a step rendered 
necessary by his candidature for the House of Commons, Mr. 
Fletcher was promoted to the vacant keepership in June, 1880. 
In the following month he was called upon to remove the 
Minerals from Bloomsbury to South Kensington, and to rearrange 
them in the new Natural History Museum. 

Some idea of the nature of this task may be formed if it be 
pointed out that the cabinets of the table-cases at Bloomsbury 
were to be made use of in the new Gallery, but that the glazed 
table-tops were to be left behind ; that the new table-tops were 
then lying on the gallery-floor at South Kensington, and had as 
yet no supports ; that differences of illumination of the old and 
new Galleries, and differences of construction of the cabinets, 
made it necessary that the relative positions of the cabinets in 
the Gallery at South Kensington should be completely different 
from the relative positions in the Gallery at Bloomsbury ; that 
every cabinet had for some time to be turned upside down 
during the process of being fitted to the new floor ; that many of 
them had to be cut in two because of the interference of the 
structural columns of the Gallery, and new mahogany ends had 
afterwards to be made and fitted to them. Such a series of 
operations involves great practical difficulties when the specimens 
to be removed and arranged are numerous, fragile, and require 
to be cautiously handled, or are small portable, and of great 
intrinsic value, and must be kept under lock and key. 

The transfer of the specimens and the fitting of the cabinets 
to the floor having been accomplished, the exhibited portion of 
the systematic collection was increased by the addition of 
specimens selected from the reserve series in the drawers; the 



* Curator of the York Museum. 

t Professor of Mineralogy at the University of Oxford. 



350 Minerals, 

space available for the exhibition of specimens belonging to the 
systematic collection being one-fourth larger than before. 

Afterwards, Mr. Fletcher conceived the idea of providing 
both the ordinary visitor and the scientific student with the 
means of acquiring a systematic knowledge of the contents of 
the Mineral Gallery. AVith this end in view, he selected, in the 
first place, a series of specimens to serve as an introduction to 
the study of Meteorites, and prepared a corresponding guide-book 
(1881).* This introduction having been found of great service 
to the public, he continued the work, and by 1884 and 1895, 
similar series of specimens elaborately labelled, and similar 
guide-books, constituting introductions to the study of Minerals 
and Rocks respectively, were completed f ; these specimens are 
arranged in the ten window-cases provided in the year 1883 for 
the northern side of the Gallery. 

When the Collection was at Bloomsbury, all the labels were 
hand-written, and mostly of a temporary character ; in the 
course of the re-arrangement at South Kensington printed labels 
have been designed and furnished for all parts of the collec- 
tion, namely species-labels, locality-labels, pseudomorph-labels, 
and labels for the large specimens and introductory series. There 
are now nearly 17,000 printed labels exhibited in the Gallery. 

All the vertical glazed fronts of the table-cases, formerly 
fixed, were in 1881 made removable, and the ends of the cases 
have been provided with new fittings. 

Fittings have likewise been made for the wall-cases, which 
have themselves been provided since 1880, and specimens have 
been selected and mounted for exhibition therein. One of the 
wall-cases now contains a beautiful series of polished slabs of 
Ornamental Stones ; most of the others contain large specimens 
of minerals and rocks, specially selected and mounted. 

At Bloomsbury no space was available for the exhibition of 
rock-specimens ; an elaborately labelled series of typical rock- 
specimens has now been arranged in the eleven window-cases 
on the southern side of the Gallery. 

The Pseudomorphs, at one time arranged in six of these cases, 
have been transferred to three additional table-cases provided for 



* Introduction to the Study of Meteorites, with a List of the Meteorites 
represented in the Collection. 6^. 

t Introduction to the Study of Minerals, with a Guide to the Mineral 
Gallery. 6d. 

Inf,roduction to the Study of Rocks. 6d. 



Minerals, 351 

the Pavilion, at the eastern end of the Gallery ; the Isolated 
Crystals and Crystal Models, at one time in some of the window- 
cases, have been transferred to two wall-cases at the western end 
of the Gallery. 

Since 1880, the selection, registration, incorporation, labelling 
and arrangement of the specimens, and the formation and cata- 
loguing of the Departmental Library, have made great demands 
on the staff of the Department, but time has been nevertheless 
found for research on the specimens. For this purpose the 
Department has been gradually equipped with an excellent set 
of the most modern apparatus necessary for the physical and 
goniometrical investigation of minerals, and good illumination has 
been provided for use with the instruments ; the chemical laboratory 
is no longer isolated from the Museum, but has been fitted up in 
the building itself. 



As the purchase of entire systematic collections of minerals 
generally involves the acquisition of many duplicate and inferior 
specimens, only few such collections have been acquired by the 
Trustees ; of these the more important have been the Hatchett 
and the Cracherode Collections (1799), the Greville Collection 
(1810), the Monticelli Collection (1823), the Allan-Greg Collection 
(I860), and the Koksharov Collection (1865). 

Most of the mineral specimens in the Museum Collection have 
been singly selected, each on its own merits, after direct com- 
parison with specimens already acquired ; a collection of specimens 
offered for presentation or sale to the Trustees is thus generally 
represented in the Museum Collection by a merely miscellaneous 
set of specimens, and in many cases by only a single one. 

All the collections and isolated specimens acquired since the 
foundation of the Museum have been incorporated together to 
form a single General Collection; in the course of this incor- 
poration many thousands of duplicates and inferior specimens 
have been set aside, and afterwards either presented to local 
museums and institutions, or exchanged to mineral collectors and 
foreign museums for specimens more useful to the British Museum, 
or have been otherwise disposed of. 

Since the year 1837, when the General Register of specimens 
was begun in each Department of the Museum, the mineral 
specimens have been systematically numbered and entered 
therein; the General Register thus gives a complete and 



352 Minerals, 

continuous record of the growth of the Collection since that year. 
In the case of the Allan-Greg collection (1860), all the specimens 
had been numbered and catalogued before the collection became 
the property of the Trustees, and their entry in the General 
Register was unnecessary. 

Further, all the mineral specimens acquired before 1837 have 
likewise been numbered and entered in the General Register, 
unless they bear affixed labels referring to special registers or 
other documents preserved in the Department — for instance, the 
Sloane, Cracherode, Durazzo, Beroldingen, Heuland, or Aylesford 
Catalogues. 

The General Register of specimens preserved in the Mineral 
Department extended on December 31, 1903, to seventeen 
volumes of foolscap size with 86,807 entries; but of these the 
earlier entries (1-26,480) correspond, not solely to minerals, but 
also to palseontological specimens : after the death of Mr. Konig, 
in 1851, specimens belonging to the latter kind were entered in a 
special register, and in 1857 assigned to a special department. 
The number of entries in the General Register is only a rough 
approximation to the number of specimens acquired for the 
Museum ; for in some cases two or more specimens belonging to 
the same species or gi'oup have been entered under a single 
number, especially where the material is fragmental. Indeed, 
where there is little or no individuality, as is generally the case 
with minerals, the number assigned to the quantity of specimens 
may be without real importance : for example, a material may be 
studded with thousands of crystals and yet, being in one piece, it 
is reckoned as a single specimen ; if it be diminished in size by 
the removal of the material connecting the crystals, it may 
become, not part of a specimen, but thousands of specimens, each 
more or less different from the others. 

The exhibited specimens (1903) are placed on upwards of 16,000 
separate trays, each carrying one or more specimens ; further, 
there are 2400 exhibited specimens for which no trays are 
required. The total number of drawers, almost all containing 
specimens, is 4276. 

Affixed to every specimen in the Mineral Department is a 
number referring in most cases to the above-mentioned " General 
Register," and in the remaining cases to one or other of a set of 
Lists or Catalogues. Every specimen, exhibited or unexhibited, 
is provided with a printed or manuscript label. 



Minerals. 353 



2. Chronological Account of the Principal Accessions to 
THE Department of Minerals (1753-1903). 

The specimens preserved in the Mineral Department are 
conveniently discriminated into three series, briefly and con- 
veniently designated Minerals, Rocks and Meteorites. 

Series A.— MINERALS. 

The Collection of Minerals is arranged in two Divisions, 
namely, the Introductory Series and the Systematic Collection ; 
to the latter several small collections are auxiliary : — 

Div. I. The Introductory Series, which comprises some of the 
best of the mineral specimens, is exhibited in the 
first four window-cases (I-IV) of the Gallery. 
The specimens have been selected, arranged and 
labelled, to serve as an Introduction to the Study of 
Minerals. 

Div. II. The Systematic Collection. — -The finest and the most 
instructive specimens of the Systematic Collection 
are exhibited in forty -one table-cases (1-41) in the 
Gallery ; most of the remaining specimens are in 
the drawers of the table-cases and wall-cases of 
the Gallery and Pavilion. Many of those speci- 
mens which are too large to be exhibited in the 
positions proper to them as members of series are 
exhibited in the lower parts of the table-cases of 
the Gallery, or are mounted on separate tables or 
pedestals, and are then adjacent to the corre- 
sponding specimens of smaller size ; but most of 
the finer large specimens are brought together as 
a special collection and are exhibited in the wall- 
cases (H, J, K) of the Pavilion. 

A complete list of the mineral species and varieties repre- 
sented in the Collection, with a reference to the location of the 
specimens in the Gallery, is published under the title of The 
Student's Index to the Collection of Minerals. 

VOL. I. 2 A 



354 Minerals. 

The following collections are auxiliary to the Systematic 
Collection : — 

la. A series of Isolated Crystals and Models of Crystals, 
illustrative of crystalline form ; part is exhibited in two 
wall-cases (D, E) of the Gallery. 

16. A series of Slices of Crystals prepared for examination 
by transmitted polarised light ; they are preserved in 
the drawers of a special cabinet. 

Some of the crystals and slices of crystals are those of 
native products (minerals) ; others are those of illustrative 
products in the formation of which human action has 
intervened, and which are therefore generally called 
" artificial." 

2. A collection of PseudomorpJis ; the best and most instruc- 

tive specimens are exhibited in three table-cases (44, 45, 
46) in the Pavilion ; the remaining specimens are in the 
drawers of those cases. 

3. A series of specimens illustrative of the Forms of Silica, 

arranged and described in 1884 by Professor John 
Kuskin ; exhibited in table-case 47 in the Pavilion. 

4. A collection of Enclosures, illustrating the enclosure of 

one mineral by another ; exhibited in a portion of table- 
case 42 in the Gallery. 

5. A small set of so-called " Artificial Products " identical in 

their essential characters with, or closely allied to, recog- 
nised mineral species ; some are exhibited in a portion 
of table-case 42 in the Gallery. 

6. A collection of polished slabs of Ornamental Stones ; 

exhibited in a wall-case (A) of the Corridor, near the 
entrance to the Gallery. 

7. The most interesting of the Becent Accessions are kept 

together for a time, and before being incorporated with 
the Collection are exhibited in table-case 43 in the 
Gallery. 

It may be added that mineral species are defined, not by 
means of type-specimens, but by means of numerical quantities 
which specify the crystalline form and chemical composition of 
the substance ; figures of actual mineral specimens have thus 
little or no classificatory value and are rarely published. 



Minerals, 355 



Chronological List (1753-1903) referring to 
Series A. — Minerals. 



1753. 

Of the four collections which in 1753 were brought together 
to form the British Museuro, only one, that of Sir Hans Sloane, 
Bart., F.R.S. [1660-1753], of London, contained natural history 
specimens. In the year 1687, Sir Hans (then Dr.) Sloane had 
sailed to the West Indies as physician to the Governor of 
Jamaica (the Duke of Albemarle), and during his fifteen months' 
stay there had collected natural history specimens, more especially 
plants. Evelyn's Diary records a visit made to this collection on 
April 16, 1691. Later, in 1702, he inherited the miscellaneous 
collections which had been gathered together by his friend, 
Mr. "William Courten [1642-1702], of London, long known as 
Mr. Charlton (or Charleton). During his long residence and 
travels on the Continent, Mr. Courten, a grandson of the first 
Earl of Bridgewater, had availed himself of his opportunities for 
obtaining remarkable specimens ; according to Evelyn's Diary, 
the collection was, in 1686, so extensive as to occupy ten rooms 
of the Middle Temple, and the museum was then a place of 
frequent and fashionable resort. Sir Hans Sloane was Secretary 
of the Royal Society for nineteen years [1693-1712], and 
President for fourteen years [1727-1741]; like Mr. Courten, 
he had many opportunities of becoming acquainted with, and 
acquiring, natural products of special interest. In 1718, on the 
death of Mr. James Petiver [1658-1718], of London, Sir Hans 
Sloane purchased the extensive natural history collections which 
had been formed by that indefatigable naturalist. In 1748, the 
Sloane Museum, at that time in the Manor House, Chelsea, was 
of such importance that it was honoured by a visit from the 
Prince and Princess of AVales ; the Prince, on leaving, is reported 
to have expressed to Sir Hans Sloane the opinion that it would 
conduce to the benefit of Learning, and redound to the great 
honour of Britain, if the grand collection could be established 
for public use. 

The Sloane mineral specimens, however good they may have 

2 A 2 



356 Minerals, 

been for the time in which they were collected, were later 
replaced by others which better illustrated the characters of 
minerals. Neither Mr. Courten nor Sir Hans Sloane had made 
a special study of minerals ; in their time the interest of a 
mineral specimen was generally limited to the yield of valuable 
metal or to the utility as an ornamental stone. For it was not 
till twenty years after the death of Sir Hans Sloane that crystal- 
line form was discovered to be a specific character of unorganised 
matter ; till then, attention had rarely been paid, in the collecting 
of mineral specimens, either to excellence of crystalline develop- 
ment or to variety of crystalline form. Further, oxygen being 
still undiscovered, chemistry had not yet entered upon its 
modern phase. The sharp definition of mineral species and their 
scientific arrangement were alike impossible. 

The point to which mineralogy had attained during the life- 
time of Sir Hans Sloane himself is well illustrated by the scheme 
of classification adopted for the mineral section of his manuscript 
catalogue, the making of which was begun in the early years of 
the eighteenth century, and was continued till his death. The 
minerals were distributed into the following classes : (1) Precious 
Stones ; (2) Metals ; (3) Ambers, Bitumens, Ambergris, &c. 
(including Sulphur) ; (4) Salts, Earths, Clays ; (5) Talcs, Micas ; 
(6) Crystals ; (7) Flints, Fossils, kc. The assignation of the 
specimens to these classes was very imperfect, and there was 
much overlapping ; that of Precious Stones, for example, 
included Bristol Stones, Agates, Touchstone, Loadstone, many 
Flints, and also Stones of Curious Shapes. In the will of Sir 
Hans Sloane it was expressly stated that the catalogue had 
been prepared in great haste. The total number of entries in 
the mineral section, which occupies three volumes, is 8649. 
Other volumes contain an elaborate set of indexes. 

Most of the Sloane specimens now preserved in the Collection 
are worked articles (cups, bowls, boxes, knife-handles, (fee.) of 
agate, jasper, rock-crystal, and other varieties of quartz. Mention 
may also be made of faceted pebbles of amethyst and aquamarine 
from India, a cut turquoise, two specimens of amber, and the first 
described specimen of columbite. 

1758. 

A mocha-stone, set in an enamelled ring : presented by the 
Duke of Noja. 



Minerals, 357 



1765. 



A polished, oval slab of brown and yellow jasper : presented 
by the Earl of Exeter. 

1777. 

Two large, polished slabs of labradorite, showing change of 
colour on change of incidence of the light ; from Nain, Labrador : 
presented by the Rev. Benjamin La Trobe. 

1782. 

Malachite from China : presented by Mr. John Duncan. 

1790. 

Atacamite (" copper sand ") from Atacama, Chili : presented 
by the Abbe Rochon. 

1797. 

Two mamillary masses and a polished slab of malachite ; 
from the Urals : presented by the Rev. Robert Nares, F.R.S. 

1799. 

Owing to the smallness of the income of the Trust, there was 
little money available for the purchase of specimens of any kind, 
natural or artificial, and in fact no purchases of minerals were 
made between 1753 and 1799. In the meantime the science of 
mineralogy had made immense progress ; more especially, the 
importance of crystalline form as a character of minerals had 
received general recognition. Further, there had been great 
activity in the principal mining districts of Great Britain, such 
as Cornwall, Derbyshire and Lanarkshire. Splendid specimens 
had been obtained from the English and Scotch mines, and yet 
the minerals were scarcely represented in the National Collection. 
Under these circumstances the Trustees, notwithstandmg the 
poverty of the Trust, seized an opportunity offered to them, and, 
acting on a report made to them by the Rt. Hon. Charles 
Greville, F.R.S, Mr. Philip Rashleigh, and the Rt. Hon. Sir 
Joseph Banks, F.R.S., purchased the mineral collection of Mr. 
Charles Hatchett, F.R.S. [1765-1847], of London, still remem- 
bered by chemists for his discovery of the metal to which he 



358 Minerals. 

gave the name coliimbium. The collection, which consisted of 
nearly 7,000 specimens, mostly small, was particularly useful in 
its representation of British minerals. Further, Mr. Hatchett, 
in the course of his travels on the Continent and by means of 
correspondence, had obtained many good illustrations of foreign 
minerals. From Count Apollos de Moussin Poushkin, for 
example, he had received a large number of Russian specimens, 
a manuscript list of which is preserved in the Department. 

In the same year, 1799, on the death of the Rev. Clayton 
Mordaunt Cracherode, F.R.8. [1730-1799], of London, who had 
been elected a Trustee of the Museum in 1784, a fine collection 
of books, prints, coins, medals, gems, minerals and shells came 
to the Trustees by bequest. The mineral specimens were many 
of them choice examples; as may be estimated from the fact 
that, though only 838 in number, their cost to the collector 
was nearly twice as much as was paid by the Trustees for 
the far more extensive collection which had been formed by 
Mr. Hatchett. There is a detailed manuscript catalogue of the 
collection. Special mention may be made of : — ^polished slabs of 
labradorite and lapis lazuli ; crystallised specimens of blende, 
tetrahedrite, argentite, pyrargyrite and heulandite. 

1800. 

Iron-pyrites with blende, copper-pyrites, pearl-spar, calcite 
and quartz, all crystallised ; from ChiH : presented by Mr. 
Archibald Menzies. 

1807. 

A crystal of boracite, in gypsum, from Liineburg, Hanover : 
presented by Mr. Joseph Planta, F.R.S. 

1809. 

189 specimens of Peruvian minerals, chiefly ores; a manu- 
script list of them, received at the same time, is preserved in the 
Department : presented by Lord Grenville. 

1810. 

The Rt. Hon. Charles Greville, P.C, F.R.S. [1749-1809], of 
London, son of the Earl of Warwick and nephew of Sir William 
Hamilton, died intestate in the year 1809, and it became 



Minerals. 359 

necessary to realise his property for division among his next-of- 
kin. The property included a collection of minerals which he 
had been forming for more than 30 years, and had arranged in 
his house at Paddington Green. Its nucleus was the collection 
of Baron Ignaz von Born [1742-1791], of Prague, described by 
Baron Born in the Litliophylacium Bornianum, and purchased from 
him by Mr. Greville before the second part of that catalogue 
was published [1775]. To this was probably added the collection 
of the Marchese Ippolito Durazzo [1754-1818], mineralogist and 
afterwards botanist, of Genoa ; of this collection an undated 
manuscript Latin catalogue is preserved in the Department ; the 
epoch of formation of the collection and catalogue is roughly 
indicated by the system of classification, which was the one 
published by A. F. Cronstedt in 1758. Count de Bournon, long 
a political refugee from his own estates and country, obtained 
employment in connection with several mineral collections in 
England, one of them being that of Mr. Charles Greville. He 
was occupied with its arrangement from 1794 to 1806, and 
during the same interval of time gave advice as regards further 
acquisitions. The Greville collection eventually became the 
finest assemblage of minerals which had been seen in England, 
and was declared by Eaglish mineralogists and Count de Bournon 
in 1810 to be in most parts equal, and in many parts superior, 
to the best Continental collections. A sum of money was 
specially voted by Parliament for the purchase of the collection, 
numbering about 14,800 specimens, for the British Museum. 
The faceted precious stones of Mr. Greville did not form part of 
this purchase, but had been disposed of separately : but the 
precious stones in their native condition were well represented 
in the collection ; there were fine series of crystallised diamond, 
ruby, sapphire, emerald, topaz and rubellite. 

More especially may be mentioned the following : — 

Rubellite : the largest and most remarkable crystal, or 
parallel growth of crystals, in this and probably in any 
other collection. It was given by the King of Ava to 
Colonel (then Major) Michael Symes when the latter was 
on an Embassy to that country in 1795. 

Corundum : a rough deeply worn piece which had long been 
used in a family of Indian lapidaries. 

Atacamite : crystallised ; from South America. 

Datolite from Arendal, Norway. 

Euclase : an isolated crystal from Minas Geraes. 



360 Minerals, 

Aragonite : a unique group of large crystals from the 

neighbourhood of Glasgow. 
Calcite : a group of twinned and simple crystals from 

Derbyshire. 
Cromfordite : two very fine crystallised specimens, of extreme 

rarity, and, until 1851, the best that were known: from 

Derbyshire. 
Apatite : a group of extremely fine, large crystals from 

Russia. This occurrence appears to be represented in 

Russian collections by only two, rather smaller, specimens. 

Various volcanic minerals from Guadaloupe, West Indies ; 
an amber necklace, supposed to be of Roman workmanship, 
found in Lincolnshire : presented by Sir Joseph Banks, Bart. 
F.R.S. 

1811. 

Chrysoberyl from Greenfield, New York : presented by 
Prof. Archibald Bruce. 

Copalite ("Highgate resin") from Highgate, Middlesex: 
presented by Mr. Snow. 

Platinum from South America : presented by Mr. F. Bauer. 

1812. 

A specimen of surturbrand (lignite) from Iceland : presented 
by Sir Joseph Banks, Bart., F.R.S. 

1813. 

A small nugget of gold, weighing 57 grains (3-69 grams), 
from County Wicklow : presented by Sir Joseph Banks, Bart., 
F.R.S. 

1814. 

Silver in calcite, from Peru : presented by Don Hipolito 
Unanue. 

1815. 

Iridosmine with platinum, gold and magnetite, from the 
Urals : presented by Dr. W. H. Wollaston, F.R.S. 

The library and the Natural History collections of Baron 
K. E. von Moll [1760-1838], of Salzburg and Munich, were 
purchased ; many minerals of great scarcity and beauty, especially 
from Salzburg and Tyrol, were thus added to the Collection. 



Minerals. 361 



1816. 



The collection of Baron F. C. von Beroldingen [1740-1798], 
of Hanover and the Palatinate, was purchased in 1816, many 
years after his death, from his nephew Count J. I. von Beroldingen, 
the Wiirtemberg Minister in London : the specimens, about 14,000 
in number, are small in size and of mediocre quality, but had at 
the time of acquisition a certain amount of interest by reason of 
their localities, or as illustrating the ideas developed by the 
collector in his published works — more especially his " Bemcrk- 
nngen avf einer Beise durch die Pfdlzischen mid Zweyhriickschen 
Quecksilher-Bergwerhe" published in 1 788. A manuscript German 
catalogue in two volumes is preserved in the Department. 

1817. 

Berzelianite, yttrocerite, and other recently-discovered Swedish 
minerals : presented by Professor J. J. Berzelius. 

Yttrotantalite from Sweden : presented by Sir Joseph Banks, 
Bart., E.R.S. 

Wavellite from Devonshire : presented by Dr. William 
Wavell. 

1818. 

Amber, graphite, and other minerals from Greenland : pre- 
sented by Captain (afterwards Sir) Edward Sabine, F.R.S. 

A waterworn mass of copper, brought by Mr. Samuel Hearne 
from a spot 29 or 30 miles S.S.E. of the mouth of the Coppermine 
river, British North America, in 1771 : presented by the Hudson 
Bay Company. 

Melilite, and other Vesuvian minerals: presented by Earl 
Compton (afterwards Marquess of Northampton). 

1819. 

Three specimens of ilvaite from Elba: presented by Mr. 
Marryat. 

1820. 

Calcite and copper-pyrites from the Ecton mine, Staffordshire : 
presented by the Duke of Devonshire. 

Several specimens of graphite, showing the mineral in different 
kinds of matrix, from Borrowdale, Cumberland : presented by 
Mr. Henry Banks. 



362 Minerals 



1821, 



Hatchettite from Merthyr Tydvil, S. Wales : presented by 
Mr. Charles Hatchett, F.R.S. 



1822. 

Silver in ealcite, from Chili : presented by Mr. Alexander 
Caldcleugh. 

Two polished slabs of jadeite from China : presented by 
Sir Abraham Hume, Bart. 

1823. 

Aragonite from Buckfastleigh, Devonshire : presented by 
Prof. William Buckland, F.R.S. 

A large collection of Vesuvian products, upwards of 2000 in 
number, brought together by Dr. Teodoro Monticelli [1759-1846], 
for many years Professor of Chemistry at Naples, was purchased 
in 1823; the results of the study of these products are given in 
Monticelli and Covelli's Prodromo della Mineralogia Vesiwiana, 
1825. A manuscript list of the specimens of the collection, in 
the handwriting of Prof. N. Covelli, is preserved in the Depart- 
ment. Many of the best specimens of crystallised Vesuvian 
minerals now in the Museum came as part of the Monticelli 
collection. 

1824. 

Gold with aikinite, in quartz, from Beresovsk, Urals : presented 
by Mr. J. M. Raikes. 

1825. 

Brilliant, greenish-yellow crystals of pyromorphite on the 
matrix, from Wheal Alfred, Cornwall : presented by Mr. J. 
Taylor, F.R.S. 

A series of cut and polished precious and other ornamental 
stones, in which class of material the Museum Collection was 
then very deficient, was purchased from Mr. H. C. G. von Struve 
[1772-1851], at the time when he was Russian Minister-Resident 
at Hamburg. The specimens, which numbered about 300, in- 
cluded two large star-sapphires, weighing 88 and 30 carats 
(nearly 18 and 6 gi*ams) respectively, and also specimens of ruby, 
topaz, hyacinth, chrysolite, chrysoprase, cat's-eye, precious opal, 
carnelian, chalcedony, onyx, amethyst, rock-crystal with mineral 
enclosures, and amber. 



Minerals. 363 



1826. 



Zeolites, opal, &c., from the Faroe Islands : presented by Sir 
AValter C. Trevelyan, Bart. 

Boracite from Llineburg : presented by Captain W. Miiller. 

1827. 

Hatchettite from Merthyr Tydvil, 8. Wales: presented by 
Mr. Hill. 

Minerals from Ceylon : presented by the Rev. George 
D'Oyley, D.D. 

1828. 

A collection of choice specimens from the Harz Mountains, 
the large groups of crystals of calcite and of pyrargyrite being 
especially fine : presented by His Majesty King George the 
Fourth. 

1829. 

Garnet, magnetite and tourmaline, from Haytor, Devonshire : 
presented by Mr. Shirley Woolmer. 

Native gold from Beresovsk, Urals, and some other Russian 
minerals : purchased. 

1830. 

Staurolite from Brittany ; kermesite from Saxony ; epidote 
from Norway : purchased. 

1831. 

Malachite from Linares, Spain : presented by Captain 
S. E. Cook (afterwards Widdrington), R.N., F.R.S. 

Topaz from Brazil ; rhodochrosite from Saxony ; chessylite 
from Chessy, France ; apatite from St. Gotthard : purchased. 

1832. 

Childrenite from Crinnis mine, Cornwall : presented by 
Mr. T. H. Holdsworth. 

Haematite on lava from Vesuvius : presented by the Marquess 
of Northampton. 

Scorodite on limonite from Antonio Pereira, Ouro Preto, 
Brazil : purchased. 

A large crystal of rose-coloured corundum from St. Gotthard : 
purchased. 



364 Minerals, 



1833. 



Turquoise from Persia : presented by Sir Gore Ouseley, Bart. 

Worked articles of agate and heliotrope : presented by Lady 
Frances Trail. 

Two faceted green tourmalines : purchased. 

A suite of specimens of alluvial and other gold, brought 
together by Captain G. F. Lyon, R.N., during his stay in the 
principal gold districts of Brazil : purchased. 



1834. 

A very large mass of aluminite from Newhaven, Sussex : 
presented by Dr. G. Mantell, F.R.S. 

After the death, in 1832, of the Dowager Countess of Ayles- 
ford, her extensive collection of minerals came into the possession 
of Mr. Henry Heuland [1777 ? — 1856], mineral dealer of London, 
from whom many choice specimens selected from the Aylesford 
collection were purchased by the Trustees in 1834: the two- 
volume manuscript catalogue of this collection is now preserved 
in the Department. At various times other fine specimens 
were purchased from Mr. Heuland, particularly from his private 
collection, 

1835. 

Diallage, cuprite, and other minerals from Cornwall : presented 
by Mr. Ashurst Majendie. 

Chessylite from Chessy, France : purchased. 
Native copper from the Bank mines, Siberia : purchased. 
Amethyst from Porcura, Transylvania : purchased. 
Native gold from Sweden and Transylvania : purchased. 



1836. 

Well crystallised specimens of cerussite, calamine (large green 
rhombohedra from Chessy), beryl, mimetite, gold, argentite, 
rutile, barytes, idocrase, apatite, and fluor : presented by Mr. 
R. Simmons, F.R.S. 

Large crystals of sulphur on the matrix ; from Coiiil, Cadiz, 
Spain : purchased. 



I 



Minerals. 365 



1837. 

Total acquisitions 378,* including : — 

Magnesite, and other minerals from India : presented by 
Dr. P. M. Benza. 

Gold, diamond, and other minerals from Brazil : presented by 
Dr. Jose Estevao ClifFe. 

Apatite from St. Gotthard and Ehrenfriedersdorf ; rhodo- 
chrosite from Schneeberg, Saxony ; copper-glance from C(jrnwall ; 
chessylite : purchased. 

1838. 

Total acquisitions 250, including :— 

Twenty-four Sicilian ambers : presented by Mr. G. Gravine. 

Witherites from Northumberland : presented by Mr. Robert 
Stokoe and Mr. Benjamin Leadbeater. 

A large mass of crystallised pyromorphite, of a rich gi'een 
colour, from Hofsgrund, Baden : purchased. 

A large twin crystal of quartz (rock-crystal), grouped with 
simple crystals on the matrix, from La Gardette, Dep. Isere, 
France : purchased. 

1839. 

Total acquisitions 194, including : — 

A series of Egyptian minerals and ores : presented by Sir 
J. Gardner Wilkinson, F.R.S. 

A very large dodecahedral crystal of almandine, from 
Eahlun, Sweden : purchased. 

Various American minerals : purchased. 

Native silver, from Norway : purchased. 



1840. 

Total acquisitions 183, including : — 

Crystallised vivianite in the interior of an Irish deer's tooth, 
from Ireland : presented by Sir Philip de M. G. Egerton, Bart., 
F.R.S. 

A crystal of diamond in the matrix, from Brazil : purchased. 



* The General Register of the new acquisitions for the INIuscum was 
begun in 1837. 



S66 Minerals. 



1841. 



Total acquisitions 158, including: — 

A cup made of jadeite : presented by Lieut.-Col. H. Burney, 
to whom it had been given by the King of Ava. 

Crystallised native silver from Kongsberg, Norway: purchased. 

Faceted stones (diamond, ruby, cymophane, sapphire, zircon, 
topaz and dichroite) : purchased. 

Euclase, ilmenite, magnetite and topaz, from Brazil : pur- 
chased. 

Group of crystals of black tourmaline and white apatite 
from Bovey Tiacey, Devonshire : purchased. 

1842. 

Total acquisitions 209, including : — 

Harmotome, strontianite, Ac, from Strontian : presented by 
Sir Robert H. Inglis, Bart., F.R.S. 

Tscheffkinite from the Ilmen Mountains, Russia : presented 
by Mr. H. Christie. 

Various minerals and rocks, from India : presented by 
Dr. P. M. Benza. 

Indian idol, carved in sapphire : purchased. 

1843. 

Total acquisitions 126, including : — 

Carnelian, jasper and chalcedony, from India : presented by 
Mr. S. Law. 

Mispickel, allanite and gadolinite, from Norway : presented 
by Prof. B. M. Keilhau and Prof. T. Scheerer. 

Fine crystals of linarite on the matrix, from Roughten Gill, 
Caldbeck, Cumberland : purchased. 

1844. 

Total acquisitions 205, including : — 

Three specimens of greenockite : presented by the Earl of 
Cathcart. 

A table with stand, made of cannel coal from the Wemyss 
mine, Fifeshire : purchased. 

Two isolated crystals of euclase from Brazil : purchased. 

Greenish-yellow serpentine pseudomorphous after large crystals 
of olivine ; from Snarum, Norway : purchased. 



Minerals. 367 



1845. 



Total acquisitions 93, including : — 

A large specimen of beekite from Devonshire : presented by 
the Marquess of Northampton. 

Mellite, a group of crystals on lignite from Thuringia : 
presented by the Earl of Aylesford. 

A large crystal of apatite from Hammond, New York : 
purchased. 

A group of pseudomorphous crystals (haytorite), from Haytor 
mine, Dartmoor, Devonshire : purchased. 

1846. 

Total acquisitions 238, including :— 

A group of pale flesh-red rhombohedra of chabazite (acadiaUte) 
on the matrix, and a group of brick-red rhombohedra of chabazite 
with stilbite in a rock-cavity ; both from Wasson's Blufl*, Bay 
of Eundy, Nova Scotia : presented by Mr. W. G. Lettsom. 

1847. 

Total acquisitions 333, including : — 

An enormous group of large, colourless, prismatic crystals of 
gypsum from Reinhardsbrunn, Gotha, Germany : presented by 
H.R.H. the Prince Consort. 

About 100 specimens of amber from the Prussian coast, many 
of them enclosing insects : purchased. 

A very pretty specimen of chalybite, pseudomorphous after 
fluor, consisting of a hollow cube of chalybite, in the centre of 
which is a mound of tarnished copper-pyrites surmounted by 
divergent prisms of white quartz ; from Virtuous Lady mine, 
Tavistock, Devonshire : purchased. 

1848. 

Total acquisitions 186, including: — 

About 120 mineral specimens bequeathed by Mrs. Ann 
TattenaU. 

1849. 

Total acquisitions 189, including : — 

Calcite — a large group of small, yellowish, acute rhom- 
bohedra gi'ouped in twin position ; from Bernmda : presented by 
Mr. Thomas Baring. 



368 Minerals. 



1850. 



Total acquisitions 240, including : — 

Two groups of dark-green crystals of epidote on the matrix, 
from Traversella, Piedmont, Italy : presented by Mr. W. G. 
Lettsom. 

Two specimens of fluor ("The Couttet rose-fluors ") from 
Switzerland : presented by Prof, John Ruskin. 

A fine group of pink crystals of apophyllite from Samson 
mine, Andreasberg, Harz : presented by the Marquess of 
jSTorthampton. 

Sixty-two crystals of diamond : purchased. 

Spodumene, a large crystal, from Chesterfield, Massachusetts : 
purchased. 

1851. 

Total acquisitions 167, including : — 

A very large group of crystals of galena, with rhombohedra 
of calcite and some blende, from Great Laxey mine, Isle of Man : 
presented by the Proprietors of the mine. 

Graphite, a mass weighing 32 lb. (14 J kilograms) : presented 
by Messrs. Pilcher and Sons. 

1852. 

Total acquisitions 62, including : — 

A small gold nugget, weighing 516 grains (33-4 gi'ams), from 
Queen Charlotte's Island, British Columbia : purchased. 

1853. 

Total acquisitions 67, including : — 

A group of crystals of witherite from Fallowfield mine, 
Hexham, Northumberland : purchased. 

1854. 

Total acquisitions 73, including : — • 

Several crystals of parisite from Muso, Colombia : presented 
by Mr. E. W. Marks. 

A colourless, transparent, w^aterworn mass, weighing 12 lb. 
13 oz. (5*812 kilograms), of topaz with cleavage-surfaces, 



Miyierals. 369 

probably from Ceylon ; before being recognized to be topaz, it 
had for some time been in use as a door- weight in Fleet Street, 
London : purchased. 

A large specimen of chessylite, encrusted with large crystals ; 
from Chessy, Dep. du Rhone, France : purchased. 



1855. 

Total acquisitions 163,. including : — 

Jade from New Zealand : presented by Sir George Grey, 
K.C.B. 

Greenland minerals, including fine columbites : presented by 
Mr. J. W. Tayler. 

1856. 

Total acquisitions 200, including : — 

A large prismatic crystal of quartz, with sharply defined 
negative crystals and a large cavity enclosing liquid and a bubble : 
purchased. 

1857. 

Total acquisitions 112, including : — 

Specimens of jarrowite : presented by Prof. Richard Owen, 
F.R.S., and Mr. J. Hodgson. 

Argentite from Freiberg, Saxony : purchased. 



1858. 

Total acquisitions 723, including : — 

Zeolites, and other minerals from Scotland and the Faroe 
Islands : presented by Mr. P. Dudgeon. 

The "Latrobe" gold nugget, well crystallised in cubes and 
weighing 23 oz. Troy (717 grams) ; from Mclvor Mount,^Victoria ; 
raised May 1st, 1853, in the presence of His Excellency C. J. 
Latrobe, the Governor of the Colony : purchased. 

Brilliant crystals of heulandite encrusting the matrix ; from 
Berufjord, Iceland : purchased. 

A group of large, black octahedra of spinel, with crystals of 
diopside, phlogopite and calcite ; from Amity, Orange County, 
New York : purchased. 

A series of silver-bearing minerals from Chili : purchased. 

VOL. I. 2 B 



370 Minerals. 



1859. 



Total acquisitions 3185, including : — 

A magnificent group of white and colourless, lamellar crystals 
of cerussite, many of them twinned ; from Logylas mine, 
Aberystwith, Cardiganshire : presented by Mr. J. Taylor, F.R.S. 

Orthite from Hittero : presented by Mr. R. P. Greg. 

Brilliant twinned crystals of bournonite on crystals of 
quartz, a large specimen; from Herodsfoot mine, Liskeard, 
Cornwall : purchased. 

A large series of crystals, 2624 in number, brought together 
by Dr. A. Krantz [1809-1872] of Berlin and (after 1850) 
Bonn; it contained specimens of veiy rare minerals such as 
euclase and wagnerite, and was rich in series of felspars, hemi- 
morphite, augite, chrysolite, beryl, phenakite, sapphire, zircon : 
purchased. 

1860. 

Total acquisitions 9944, including : — 

An extensive series of beautifully crystallised zeolites (apo- 
phyllite, stilbite, scolecite, &c.), frequently aggregated together 
to form very large groups ; from the railway cuttings in the 
Syhadree Mountains, Bombay : presented in 1860 and 1861 
by Mr. James Berkley, Chief Engineer of the Great Indian 
Peninsula Railway. 

Sloanite, larderellite, caporcianite, and other minerals from 
Italy : presented by Cavaliere Sloane. 

The Allan-Greg Collection, consisting of about 9000 speci- 
mens : purchased. Its formation had been begun by Mr. Thomas 
Allan, F.R.S. [1777-1833], of Edinburgh, and it included a set of 
Greenland minerals, brought together by Mr. Charles Giesecke 
during seven years' residence in that country ; some of the 
Greenland specimens were purchased about the year 1808. 
In the enrichment of the collection and in its arrangement 
Mr. Allan was much assisted by Dr. (afterwards Prof.) Wilhelm 
von Haiclinger, more especially while the latter was resident 
in Edinburgh [1823-1826] ; much of the material referred 
to in Haidinger's earlier papers belonged to the Allan Collec- 
tion. After Mr. Allan's death the collection was purchased 
by Mr. R. H. Greg ; and, still later, it was added to by his son, 
Mr. Robert P. Greg, then of Norcliffe Hall, near Manchester. 
The chief value of the collection to the British Museum consisted 



Minerals, 371 

in its magnificent series of British minerals, of which, if the 
Cornish minerals be excepted, it was the finest collection known ; 
the Manual of the Mineralogy of Great Britain and Ireland, by 
R. P. Greg and W. G. Lettsom, published in 1858, was based 
on that material. The collection was also peculiarly rich in 
Norwegian minerals, and the series of chessylite and idocrase 
were extraordinarily good. The specimens had been catalogued 
and numbered before the collection was purchased by the 
Trustees. 

A series of Italian minerals : purchased. 

A large mass of native copper from Lake Superior : purchased. 

A selection of specimens from the collection of Prof. Nuttall, 
including a very fine group of crystals of kyanite from Massa- 
chusetts : purchased. 

1861. 

Total acquisitions 1472, including: — ■ 

Eudialyte, sapphirine and allanite from Greenland : presented 
by Mr. J. W. Tayler. 

Forty specimens of zeolites from Nova Scotia : presented by 
Dr. A. C. Cogswell. 

A series of specimens from the Campbell collection. In 18G1, 
on the death of Mr. James R. Campbell, of Cheltenham, the 
Trustees were permitted to make a selection from the well-chosen 
specimens, upwards of 3000 in number, which had been brought 
together by him ; as a result nearly 500 specimens were pur- 
chased in this and the following year, and further, three remark- 
able specimens were presented by his widow ; one of the latter 
being a radiating group of crystals of erythrite, of a rich crimson 
colour, on a matrix of crystallised quartz, from Schneeberg in 
Saxony. 

Very large crystals of rutile from Lincoln County, Georgia : 
purchased. 

Two hundred specimens from the collection of .Mr. William 
Nevill : purchased. 

A large group of twinned prismatic crystals of calcite, with 
smaller acicular crystals, on the matrix, from Wheal Wrey, 
Liskeard, Cornwall : purchased. 

A group of large, opaque, ash-grey crystals of spodumene in 
quartz, from Huntington, Massachusetts : purchased. 

A pohshed sphere of perfectly clear and flawless quartz 
(rock-crystal), from Japan : purchased 

2 B 2 



372 Minerals. 

1862. 

Total acquisitions 1074, including : — 

Numerous so-called artificial crystals, prepared by Dr. Carl 
von Hauer, of Vienna, and shown in the Austrian Court of the 
Exhibition which was held in London in the year 1862 : pre- 
sented in the same year. 

A series of specimens of turquoise from Wadi Maghara^ 
Arabia Petrsea : presented by Major C. Macdonald. 

A sharply developed, perfectly transparent and colourless, 
cube of salt (halite) on the matrix, from Wieliczka, Galicia, 
Austria : presented by the Austrian Government. 

A large mass of green turquoise with smooth, round surfaces, 
and a large crystal of ruby spinel : purchased. 

Fine crystals of dioptase on the matrix, from Kirghiz Steppes, 
Siberia : purchased. 

1863. 

Total acquisitions 595, including : — 

Specimens of chalcedonic minerals from Uruguay : presented 
by Mr. W. G. Lettsom. 

A very large, water-worn and polished mass of jade, weighing 
1156 lb. (524 kilograms), from Battugol, Irkutsk, Siberia : 
purchased. 

A group of large cubes of fluor of a bluish-green colour, with 
zonal bands of colour ; some faces are partly coated with 
pyrites ; from Menheniot mines, Cornwall : purchased. 

1864. 

Total acquisitions 617, including: — 

A large mass of graphite from the Alibert mine, near 
Battugol, Irkutsk, and other Siberian specimens : presented by 
Mr. Iv. P. Alibert. 

A twinned crystal of Iceland spar, bounded by numerous 
faces, and weighing about 3 cwt. (150 kilograms) : purchased. 

A group of large cubes of greenish fluor, some faces being 
encrusted with crystals of calcite ; from Menheniot mines, Corn- 
wall : purchased. 

A group of twinned cubes of argentite ; [this specimen, 
having been protected from the light, has retained its bright 
lustre] ; from Himmelfahrt mine, Freiberg, Saxony : purchased. 



Mmerals. 373 

1865. 

Total acquisitions 3620, including : — 

Several fine large specimens : — a polished mass of Iceland spar ; 
harmotome f rom Strontian; chessylite from Chessy; along branch 
of crystallised native copper from Lake Superior ; celestite from 
Sicily : presented by Prof. John Ruskin. 

A collection (about 3250 specimens) formed by General 
N. I. Koksharov [1818-1893], of St. Petersburg. This purchase 
enriched the Museum with an admirable series of Russian, 
and, in particular, of Siberian minerals, the finest specimens of 
which are rarely offered for sale beyond the borders of the 
Russian Empire. The collection had served as material for the 
valuable series of Memoirs published by General Koksharov 
under the title of 31ateriaUen zur Mineralocjie Busslands [1853- 
1891]. The collector, being at the same time Director of the 
Mining School at St. Petersburg, had exceptional opportunities 
afforded to him. Worthy of special mention are : — several large 
crystals of phenakite, isolated or in the matrix, from the emerald 
mines, Ekaterinburg, Urals ; and a suite of six magnificent, 
isolated crystals of topaz, smoky brown in colour and transparent, 
from the XJrulga river, Nertschinsk, Transbaikal. Other species 
well represented are alexandrite, euclase, emerald, tourmaline, 
perofskite, idocrase, columbite, crocoite and apatite. 

1866. 

Total acquisitions 668, including : — • 

Small, yellowish-green, acicular crystals of pyromorphite, 
thickly encrusting the matrix ; from Roughten Gill, Caldbeck, 
Cumberland : by exchange. 

A large specimen of pharmacosiderite with numerous crystals ; 
from Redruth, Cornwall : purchased. 

Rhombohedra of lilac-blue calcite, certain faces being en- 
crusted with quartz crystals ; from Tankerville mine, Shelve, 
Shropshire : purchased. 

Gold ores from Borneo : purchased. 

1867. 

Total acquisitions 778, including : — 
; A large octahedron, with artificially polished faces and rounded 
edges, of ruby spinel, from Ava, Burma : purchased. 



374 Minerals, 

Fine crystallised specimens of barytocalcite, from Alston, 
Cumberland : purchased. 

Two large faceted phenakites, perfectly clear and colourless, 
and other specimens of cut gem-stones from Russia : by purchase 
and exchange. 

1868. 

Total acquisitions 690, including : — 

A large mass of salt (halite) with a reddish tinge, crystallised 
in cubes on the surface ; from Salt Kange, Punjab, India : pre- 
sented by Mr. E. L. Brandreth. 

Beryl, a large faceted " aquamarine," from Siberia : purchased. 

Groups of very large twinned crystals of bournonite, from 
Cornwall : purchased. 

140 specimens of minerals, chiefly Scotch : purchased. 

1869. 

Total acquisitions 624, including : — 

A remarkable parallel growth of crystals of rubellite, of a 
deep colour from Ava : presented by Mr. C. S. J. L. Guthrie. 

A nugget of platinum, weighing 1350 grains (87*5 grams), 
from Nijni-Tagilsk, Urals • presented by H.I.H. the Duke of 
Leuchtenberg. 

A very large mass of brown crystals of pyromorphite, on the 
matrix, from Braubach, Nassau : purchased. 

Collection of specimens of native gold from Wales : 
purchased. 

About one hundred specimens of Swedish and Norwegian 
minerals : purchased. 

A very large crystal of black quartz, from Tiefen Glacier, 
Switzerland : purchased. 

Fine, isolated crystals of epidote, from Knappenwand, XJnter- 
sulzbachthalj Salzburg : by purchase and exchange. 

1870. 

Total acquisitions 548, including : — ■ 

Crystals of sapphire and zircon, from Siam : presented by 
Mr. Henry Alabaster. 

A nugget of native gold, weighing 1 oz. 145 • 5 grs. Troy (40 ' 53 
grams), from the washings at Helmsdale, Sutherland : purchased. 

Fine calcites, fluellites, and other minerals, from Cornwall : 
purchased. 



Minerals, 375 

1871. 

Total acquisitions 509, including :— 

Chilclrenite and several other mineral specimens: presented 
by Mrs. Atkins from the collection of her father, Mr. J. G. 
Children, F.R.S. 

Twenty specimens of Iceland spar : purchased. 

Amethyst, small hexagonal prisms, with trigonal terminations, 
thickly covering the surface of the matrix; from Guanaxuato, 
Mexico : purchased. 

Olivine— a large faceted peridot, of a rich green colour : 
purchased. 

A magnificent series of specimens of cuprite, in various forms, 
from Cornwall : purchased. 

1872. 

Total acquisitions 529, including :— 

Various Canadian minerals: presented by Prof. H. A. 
Nicholson, F.R.S. 

A large mass of gold-quartz— portion of a rich quartz-lode ; 
from San Rafael, Costa Rica: presented by the Monte del 
Aquacata Mining Company. 

Large crystals of manganite on the matrix, with a little white 
barytes, from Ilfeld, Harz : purchased. 

Fine crystals of epidote, from Knappenwand, Untersulz- 
bachthal, Salzburg : purchased. 

1873. 

Total acquisitions 1080, including :— 

The collection of mineral specimens which had been brought 
together by Mr. Richard Bright [1754-1840], of Bristol, and 
had been added to by his second son, Mr. Benjamm Heywood 
Bright [1787-1843]: it was presented to the Museum by Mr. 
Benjamin Bright [ 1 -1900], only son of the latter. British 
minerals, especially celestite, gothite, agate, &c., from the neigh- 
bourhood of Bristol, are well represented ; of foreign mmerals, 
special mention may be made of red corundum from St. Gotthard, 
and large crystals of idocrase from Egg, Norway. 

Various American minerals : by exchange. 

A very large, dodecahedral crystal of magnetite : purchased. 
Diamond crystals, isolated and in the matrix, with a series 
of minerals found accompanying them, from the Diamond Fields 
of South Africa : purchased. 



376 Minerals. 



1874. 



Total acquisitions 535, including : — 

Two large, isolated crystals of parisite from Muso, Colombia : 
presented by Mr. Gustav Lehmann. 

Wulfenite, friable mass of brilliant, honey-yellow lamellae, 
from Tecoma mine, Lucin District, Utah : by exchange. 

A large specimen of bromlite, covered with small crystals, 
from Bromley Hill, Alston, Cumberland : purchased. 

Fine specimens of zeolites from Bombay : purchased. 

Seventy specimens, chiefly zeolites, from Bergen Hill, Kew 
Jersey : purchased. 

A very large, cavernous and botryoidal, mass of sard from 
India : purchased. 

1875. 

Total acquisitions 585, including : — 

A series of specimens of cassiterite from ISTew England, 
New South Wales : presented by the Bev. G. F. Wright. 

A large nugget of platinum, weighing 3 lb. 320 grains Troy 
(1142-5 grams), from the Urals : purchased. 

Minerals from Spain, and gold ores from the Philippines : 
purchased. 

One hundred specimens of Mexican minerals, including : — 
calcite, group of white, sharply defined scalenohedra, from 
Valenciana mine, Guanaxuato ; and quartz pseudomorphous after 
calcite, from Guanaxuato : purchased. 

Quartz, group of prismatic crystals of colourless rock-crystal, 
from La Gardette, Isere, France : purchased. 

A large, white, opaque crystal of analcite, from Fassathal, 
Tyrol : purchased. 

A flawless, polished sphere of Iceland spar (calcite) : purchased. 

200 specimens of Peruvian minerals : purchased. 



1876. 

Total acquisitions 598, including : — 

Specimens of corundum and associated minerals from North 
Carolina and Pennsylvania ; also various other minerals from the 
United States : presented by Dr. Joseph Leidy. 



Minerals. 377 

Crystallised specimens of blodite from the Mayo salt mines, 
Punjab, India : presented by Dr. H. Warth. 

A remarkable specimen of quartz (" cotterite ") with a peculiar 
pearly lustre, from Bock Forest, County Cork : presented by 
Miss G. E. Cotter. 

Large, white, hexagonal prisms of aragonite, on the matrix ; 
from Herrengrund, Hungary : by exchange. 

An enormous, scalenohedral crystal of calcite (Iceland spar), 
partly coated with bunches of stilbite ; the crystal, which is 
upwards of two feet (60 centimeters) in length, has been cleaved 
and mounted to show the wide separation of the two images 
resulting from the double refraction of the mineral ; from 
Rodefjord, Iceland : purchased. 

Large, parallel group of orthoclase crystals, virtually forming 
a single one, with smoky quartz, on graphic granite; from 
Alabaschka, Mursinsk, Urals : purchased. 

About fifty specimens of Swedish minerals, including large 
crystals of pyrosmalite on the matrix : purchased. 

1877. 

Total acquisitions 905, including : — 

A magnificent group of large, transparent, scalenohedral 
crystals of proustite, which, having been protected from the 
light, have retained both their colour and their transparency ; 
from Chaiiarcillo, Chili : presented by Mr. H. Ludlam. 

Thirty specimens, mostly from Brazil ; including quartz, 
pyrrhotite and chalybite, from San Juan del Bey mine, Minas 
Geraes : presented by the Hon. B. Marsham-Townshend. 

About sixty specimens of Spanish minerals : by exchange. 

About forty specimens of Vesuvian and Sicilian minerals : 
purchased. 

About one hundred specimens of Swedish minerals : 
purchased. 

Fluor, an extremely large mass of "Blue John"; from 
Derbyshire : purchased. 

Very brilliant, transparent crystals of pale-greenish apatite, 
from Knappenwand, Untersulzbachthal, Salzburg ; purchased. 

Beryl ("aquamarine"), a long hexagonal prism with basal 
plane, transparent, but much flawed, and a group of topaz crystals, 
stained yellowish, with smoky quartz ; from Adun-Tschilon, 
Nertschinsk, Transbaikal : purchased. 



378 Minerals. 



1878. 



Total acquisitions 417, including : — 

Specimens of the newly discovered minerals eosphorite, 
triploidite, dickinsonite and lithiophilite ; from Branchville, 
Connecticut : presented by Prof. E. S. Dana. 

Coquimbite, erythrite, itc, from Chili : presented by Dr. 
Joseph Leidy. 

A large, pale-coloured, opaque, altered crystal of enstatite 
from Bamle, Norway : purchased. 

&ennerite from Transylvania : purchased. 

A large crystal of yellow corundum from Ceylon : purchased. 

A beautiful octahedron of pink fluor on smoky quartz, from 
Switzerland : purchased. 

1879. 

Total acquisitions 395, including : — 

Senarmontite, several large colourless octahedra on the 
matrix, from Mine d'Hamimad, Constant! ne, Algeria : presented 
oy Prof. A. L. O. L. Des Cloizeaux. 

A large series of Indian minerals : transferred from the India 
Museum, London. 

Sixty-five specimens, mainly zeolites and borates, from Nova 
Scotia : purchased. 

Films of gold on one face of a large crystalline mass of 
bismuth ; from Bolivia : purchased. 

Magnetite — very brilliant dodecahedra, on the matrix ; from 
Nordmark, Sweden : purchased. 



1880. 

Total acquisitions 281, including : — • 

Bright crystals of columbite from Standish, Maine ; and various 
other minerals : presented by Prof. N. Story-Maskelyne, F.R.S. 

Various minerals from New Mexico, including turquoise 
and gold : presented by Mr. F. M. Arny. 

A large, isolated, tabular crystal of apatite, of a pale-violet 
colour in one part ; from Schwarzenstein, Zillerthal, Tyrol : 
purchased. 

A dark-green crystal of enstatite from Bamle, Norway ; 
purchased. 



Minerals. 379 

1881. 

Total acquisitions 259, including : — 

A gi'oup of crystals of uranocircite, of a beautiful siskin-green 
colour, on the matrix ; from Falkenstein, Saxony : j)rcsented by 
Prof. A. H. Church, F.R.S. 

Crystals of xanthoconite, with clear crystals of proustite ; 
from Mina Dolores I., Chanarcillo, Chili : purchased. 

A large group of sulphur crystals from Girgenti, Sicily : pur- 
chased. 

Spodumene, a fine faceted " hiddenite," of a rich green colour : 
purchased. 

A splendid group of large, transparent crystals of barytes, 
from Przibram, Bohemia : purchased. 

Numerous crystals of tourmaline (rubellite) projecting from 
the surface of a block of granite ; from San Piero, Elba : 
purchased. 

1882. 

Total acquisitions 488, including : — 

Leadhillite, hemimorphite, etc., from Leadhills and Wanlock- 
head ; amazon stone from Tongue, Sutherlandshire ; and other 
minerals : presented by Mr. Patrick Dudgeon. 

Chlorargyrite, native silver, argentopyrite and other minerals, 
from Chili : presented by Mr. P. A. Eck. 

Chlorargyrite, a large pure mass, from Florida mine, Taltal, 
Atacama, Chili : presented by Mr. George Hicks. 

A large, colourless, transparent, doubly terminated crystal of 
quartz, from Switzerland : presented by Mr. C. S. Bement. 

A splendid specimen of coralloidal aragonite (flos ferri) from 
Eisenerz, Styria : purchased. 

An isolated crystal (a well-developed rhombic dodecahedron) 
of lapis lazuli ; from Bokhara : purchased. 

A very fine, twinned crystal of copper-pyrites from Freiberg, 
Saxony : purchased. 

1883. 

Total acquisitions 272, including: — • 

A very fine crystal of pyrrhotite from Morro Yelho, Minas 
Geraes, Brazil : presented by Mr. F. Tendron. 

A very large crystal of colourless quartz from Madagascar : 
jDurchased. 

A group of large, white crystals of adularia from Berg Scopi, 
Graublindten, Switzerland : purchased. 



380 Minerals. 

Fluorescent amber, cut and polished, from Catania, Sicily 
purchased. 

1884. 

Total acquisitions 535, including : — 

Forty gem-stones — ruby, spinel, sapphire, etc., mostly faceted : 
presented by Mr. J. Brukowsky. 

About fifty specimens of agate and chalcedony : presented by 
Prof. John Ruskin. 

A very large group of prismatic crystals of stibnite from Mount 
Kosang, near Saiyo, Island of Sikok, South Japan : purchased. 

Amethyst — many pyramidal crystals encrusting the matrix ; 
from Uruguay, South America : purchased. 

Fine crystals of emerald from Stony Point, North Carolina : 
purchased. 

1885. 

Total acquisitions 495, including : — 

Dawsonite, phlogopite (a large crystal), meneghinite, etc., from 
Canada : presented by Dr. B. J. Harrington. 

Large, dark, scalenohedral crystals of calcite, enclosing copper- 
pyrites j from Ecton mine. Leek, Staffordshire : presented by the 
Proprietors of the mine. 

A very large, simple crystal of staurolite from Brittany : 
presented by Mr. C. Seidler. 

Tetrahedrite crystals, coated with tarnished copper-pyrites, on 
the matrix ; from Herodsfoot mine, Cornwall : purchased. 

Brilliant crystals of black smoky quartz, on granite ; from 
Tavetschthal, Graubiindten, Switzerland : purchased. 

1886. 

Total acquisitions 568, including : — 

Thirty-seven specimens of Indian minerals : presented by 
Mr. H. B. Medlicott, F.R.S. 

Copper minerals from Mammoth mine, Utah : presented by 
Mr. R. Pearce. 

A large slab of golden-yellow cat's-eye (quartz) and another 
of blue, asbestiform crocidolite, from the Asbestos Mountains, 
South Africa : presented by Mr. Sydney Cowper. 

Group of green, fluorescent cubes of fluor on the matrix ; 
from Weardale, Durham : purchased. 

Brilliant, tabular crystals of wulfenite, of a rich vermilion 
colour, on the matrix ; from Arizona, U.S.A. : purchased. 



Minerals, 381 

1887. 

Total acquisitions 920, including : — 

Several fine large masses of precious opal in the matrix; 
from Queensland : presented by Prof. N. Story-Maskelyne, F.R.S. 

The " Colenso " diamond, a large yellowish octahedron, with 
rounded edges and triangular markings on the faces, weighing 
130 carats (27 grams) ; and the " Edwardes" ruby (corundum) : 
presented by Prof. John Ruskin. 

Several deep-red crystals of almandine, embedded in mica- 
schist ; from Fort Wrangell, Alaska : purchased. 

Brilliant, greenish-blue crystals of apatite, implanted on large 
crystals of orthoclase and quartz, on granite; from LuxulUan, 
Cornwall : purchased. 

1888. 

Total acquisitions 260, including :— 

A group of brilliant crystals of apophyllite of a very pale- 
purplish shade of colour ; from Guanaxuato, Mexico : purchased. 

Five large, isolated, pyramidal crystals of scheelite from 
Rothlaue, Gutannen, Switzerland : purchased. 

A large group of crystals of witherite from Fallowfield mine, 
Hexham, Northumberland : purchased. 

A laro-e group of numerous prismatic crystals of calcite, with 
one twinned crystal of much larger size, on a matrix of red iron- 
ore ; from Egremont, Cumberland : purchased. 

1889. 

Total acquisitions 402, including :— 

A large crystal of black tourmaline, with sharp termination ; 
from Madagascar : presented by the Rev. J. Wills. 

Various American minerals : presented by Colonel J. Willcox. 

An aggregate of large, green cubes of fluor, from Muscolonge 
Lake, Jefferson County, New York : purchased. 

A selection (58 specimens) of faceted precious stones (sphene, 
spinel, sapphire, zircon, etc.), from Mr. J. R. Gregory's collection : 
purchased. 

1890. 

Total acquisitions 586, including :— 

Specimens of awaruite (terrestrial nickel-iron) and serpentme, 
from New Zealand : presented by Prof. G. H. F. Ulrich. 

A fibrolite hatchet from France : presented by Mr. C. Seidler. 



382 Minerals, 

Asbestos, a mass of long, white fibres, from Yaltellina, 
Lombardy, Italy : presented by the United Asbestos Company, 

A pale-blue, doubly terminated crystal of topaz, from Ala- 
baschka, Mursinsk, Perm, Russia: purchased. 

1891. 

Total acquisitions 458, including : — 

A large crystal of sphene, from Risor, Norway : presented by 
Mr. A. L. Collins. 

Various minerals from Ceylon, one of which was afterwards 
found to be a new species and named baddeleyite : presented by 
Mr. J. Baddeley. 

A fine, large group of white, prismatic crystals of laumontite, 
on the matrix ; from Felso-Csertes, Deva, Hunyad, Transylvania : 
purchased. 

1892. 

Total acquisitions 504, including : — 

A large mass of botryoidal malachite from Copper Queen 
mine, Bisbee, Arizona : presented by Dr. James Douglas. 

Silicified wood, a polished section of a tree trunk ; from 
Holbrook, Apache County, Arizona : purchased. 

A large, isolated, prismatic crystal of diopside from Hull, 
Quebec, Canada : purchased. 

Small, brilliant crystals of black blende, scattered over 
crystallised quartz ; from Alston, Cumberland : purchased. 

A very fine group of large, purple cubes of fluor, the crystals 
being in part transparent and showing zonal bands of colour ; 
from Weardale, Durham : purchased. 

Large cubes of galena on the matrix, with small, curved 
rhombohedra of pearl-spar and small crystals of blende and 
quartz ; from Alston, Cumberland : purchased. 

Clusters of large, brilliant crystals of sulphur on the matrix ; 
from Girgenti, Sicily : purchased. 

1893. 

Total acquisitions 1023, including : — 

550 specimens, chiefly from Cornish mines, selected from the 
extensive collection of Mr. J. C. AVilliams, of Caerhays Castle, 
Cornwall, a collection made by his father and grandfather ; 
presented by Mr. J. C. AVilliams. Of these may be specially 



Minerals, 383 

mentioned : — a very large mass of corussite, as delicate silky 
needles, from Pentire Glaze mine, Padstow, Cornwall ; and a 
unique specimen of Cornish spangolite. 

Crystals of selenite, of extraordinary size, from Wayne County, 
Utah : presented by Dr. J. E. Talmage. 

A large crystal of colourless, transparent Ijlodite, very sym- 
metrically developed on all sides ; from Warcha Mine, Salt 
Range, Punjab, India : presented by the Director of the 
Geological Survey of India. 

150 specimens, chiefly American, selected from the collection 
made by Colonel Joseph Willcox, of Philadelphia : purchased. 

A large, isolated crystal of dolomite, with smaller crystals in 
twin position ; from Switzerland : purchased. 



1894. 

Total acquisitions 407, including : — 

Thirty-six specimens, mostly English, selected from the 
mineral collection made by his mother. Lady Cust : presented 
by Mr. L. Cust. 

Quartz, a large " butterfly-twin " ; probably from Brazil ; 
purchased. 

A polished slab of pink, mottled thulite ; from Lexviken, 
Trondhjem, Norway : purchased. 

A large, square prism of scapolite, with basal plane and four 
obliquely placed pyramid-planes ; from Briekke, Bamle, Norway : 
purchased. 

A set of rare tellurides, including several fine crystals, from 
Cripple Creek, Colorado, brought together by Mr. Milton Moss : 
purchased (1894-1901). 

Copper, cerussite, marshite, silver, embolite, anglesite, wulfe- 
nite and chessylite, all in fine examples ; from Broken Hill, New 
South Wales : purchased. 

1895. 

Total acquisitions 606, including : — 

Broggerite from Moss, Norway : presented by Prof. W. C. 
Brogger. 

Mackintoshite from Texas, and ruby from North Carolina : 
presented by Mr. W. E. Hidden. 

Eifty-eight crystals, which had belonged to the collection of 
Prof. Gustav Hose of Berlin : purchased. 



384 Minerals. 

An extensive collection of crystals of calcite, being part of 
the material used by Prof. F. Sansoni for his memoirs on. the 
crystallography of that species : purchased. 

Finely crystallised specimens of lorandite and realgar, from 
All char, Macedonia : purchased. 

1896. 

Total acquisitions 112, including: — 

Crystallised masses and groups of chessylite and malachite 
from Copper Queen mine, Bisbee, Arizona : presented by Dr. 
James Douglas. 

A large, regularly developed cube of purple fluor, from 
Weardale, Durham : presented by Miss Caroline Birley. 

A large suite of crystals of edingtonite, several of large size, 
from Bohlet, Sweden : purchased. 

A well-crystallised specimen of cromfordite from Monte Poni, 
Sardinia : purchased. 

1897. 

Total acquisitions 896, including : — • 

Specimens of gold ores from the various gold-fields of 
Australia : presented by Mr. J. C. F. Johnson. 

New minerals (tripuhyite, derby lite and lewisite) from Brazil : 
presented by Dr. E. Hussak. 

A specimen consisting on one side of yellow, scalenohedral 
crystals of calcite, and on the other of small curved rhombohedra of 
pink dolomite together with cubes of galena and small tetrahedra 
of copper-pyrites ; also a large, isolated, scalenohedron of yellow 
calcite ; both from Joplin, Jasper County, Missouri : purchased. 

A large, isolated, twinned crystal of adularia, from 
Switzerland : purchased. 

A crystal of erubescite from Frossnitz-Alj^e, Pregratten, Tyrol : 
purchased. 

A selection (200 specimens) from the collection formed by 
Bergrath F. C. L. Koch ; chiefly from the Harz : purchased. 

1898. 

Total acquisitions 255, including : — 

A large suite of very delicately crystallised specimens of 
aragonite from the Sterkfontein caves, Barnett, Transvaal : 
presented by Mr. H. P. Thomasset. 



Minerals, 385 

Sapphires and spinels, from Siam : presented by Mr. IL 
Warington Smyth. 

A reticular mass of twinned crystals of cerussite, and other 
minerals, from Broken Hill, New South Wales : purchased. 

A long, hexagonal crystal of phenakite, with terminal planes ; 
from Kragero, Norway : purchased. 

Large crystals of cryolite, grouped together in parallel position, 
and other minerals from Greenland : purchased. 



1899. 

Total acquisitions 551, including : — 

Dodecahedral crystals of argyrodite, encrusting a mass of 
pyrargyrite ; from Colquechaca, Potosi, Bolivia : presented by 
Mr. Avelino Aramayo. 

A large specimen of andorite, encrusted with numerous large 
crystals ; from Itos Atocha mine, Oruro, Bolivia : presented by 
Mr. Thomas J. Hooper. 

A collection (forty-six specimens) of Bolivian minerals, in- 
cluding augelite, stannite, andorite, wolfsbergite : presented by 
Sir W. Martin Conway. 

A specimen of barytes, consisting of seven large, brownish 
crystals showing zonal growth, on a matrix of dolomite dusted 
over with red haematite; from Goose Green mine, Frizington, 
Cumberland : purchased. 

An isolated twin of rock-crystal (quartz) from Japan : pur- 
chased. 

A large, sharply defined, hexagonal prism of green, opaque 
beryl, from Moss, Christiania Fjord, Norway : purchased. 



1900. 

Total acquisitions 443, including : — 

About one hundred representative minerals from Japan : 
presented by Dr. T. Kochibe, Director of the Geological Survey 
of Japan. 

A large, scalenohedral crystal of proustite, with a smaller 
crystal intergrown, of a rich red colour and nearly transparent ; 
from Chaiiarcillo, Chili : purchased. 

A large, isolated, twinned crystal of orthoclase, of a grey 
colour ; from Tvedestrand, Nedeniis, Norway : purchased. 
VOL. I. 2 c 



386 Minerals. 

A group of cubes of purple fluor, encrusted with brilliant 
bipyramidal crystals of quartz, on a matrix of dolomite; from 
Weardale, Durham : purchased. 

A suite of brilliant crystals of crocoite, of long prismatic habit, 
some isolated, others confusedly grouped together ; from Dundas, 
Montagu County, Tasmania : purchased. 

Stolzite, a large piece of matrix encrusted with crystals of 
two kinds : — (a) scattered crystals, of pyramidal habit with basal 
plane, and of a red colour ; (b) a crystalline crust of thin, tabular 
crystals of a yellow colour ; from Broken Hill, New South Wales : 
purchased. 

1901. 

Total acquisitions 311, including : — 

Rare minerals from Greenland : by exchange. 

Fine beryls and rubellite, from Russia : purchased. 

Fine suite of calcites and barytes, from Cumberland : pur- 
chased. 

A crystal of topaz, weighing 137 lb. (62 kilograms); from 
Stetersdalen, Norway : purchased. 



1902. 

Total acquisitions 603, including : — 

A collection of gold tellurides and other gold ores from 
Western Australia : presented by the Government of Western 
Australia and various Western Australian companies. 

A large, yellow crystal of barytes from Dalmellington mine, 
Frizington, Cumberland : purchased. 

Calaverite with coloradoite, petzite and tennantite, on a 
matrix of greenish sericite-schist ; from the Associated Gold 
Mines of Western Australia, Kalgoorlie, AV. Australia : pur- 
chased. 

Albite, quartz and sphene — a large group of crystals on the 
matrix ; from Ofenhorn, Binnenthal, Switzerland : purchased. 

An aggregate of very large, white crystals of aragonite, with 
some sulphur, from Sicily : purchased. 

A fine group of large, tabular crystals of epidote of a dark 
green colour, with small crystals of quartz ; from Prince of Wales 
Island, Alaska : purchased. 

A suite of tourmalines from California : purchased. 



Minerals. 387 



1903. 



Total acquisitions 324, including :— 

A remarkable crystal of wollastonite, in gi'eat part changed 
into opal, from Santa Fe, Chiapas, Mexico: presented by Mr. 
H. F. Collins. 

A magnificent crystal of kunzite, a lilac-coloured variety of 
spodumene, from California : presented by Major A. H. Davis. 

An extremely fine group of large rhombohedra of rhodochrosite 
from Colorado : presented by Mr. C. S. Bement. 

Fine specimens of cerussite from Broken Hill, New South 
Wales : presented by Mr. A. L. Lane. 

An enormous crystal of gadolinite, weighing 211 kilograms, 
from Sweden : purchased. 

A series of about 55 specimens, selected from Mr. T. Hoh- 
mann's private collection of South American minerals, including 
fine crystals of atacamite, caracolite, paralaurionite, schwarzem- 
bergite, and specimens of teallite : purchased. 

A remarkable suite of fine, doubly-terminated and parti- 
coloured crystals of tourmaline, from California : purchased. 

A fine suite of large twinned crystals of cinnabar, from 
Central China : purchased. 



U c -5 



388 Minerals 



Series B.— ROCKS. 

The Collection of Rocks is arranged in three main 
Divisions : — 

Div. I. The Introductory Series, exhibited in six window- 
cases (V-X) of the Gallery. The specimens have 
been selected, arranged and labelled, to serve as 
an Introduction to the Study of BocJcs. 

Div. II. The Systematic Collection, exhibited in twelve window- 
cases (XI-XXII) of the Gallery. The specimens 
have been selected, arranged and labelled, to serve 
as examples of the kinds and varieties of Rocks. 

Div. III. The Topographical Collection, preserved in drawers. 
The specimens are arranged according to localities. 

Those specimens which are too large to be placed in the posi- 
tions proper to them as members of the series, for instance, basaltic 
columns, are mounted on separate pedestals or are placed in two 
wall-cases (F, G) of the Gallery. 

Further, an auxiliary collection of polished slabs of marbles 
and other ornamental rocks is exhibited in a wall-case (A) of 
the corridor. 



Chronological List (1753-1903) referring to 
Series B. — Rocks. 

1764. 

A table-top inlaid with Vesuvian products : presented by the 
Earl of Exeter. 



1768, 1769, 1772 and 1779. 

Specimens of lavas, and a series of large polished sections of 
volcanic bombs from the dolomitic breccias of Monte Somma, 
Vesuvius : collected and presented by Sir William Hamilton, F.R.S. 



Minerals^ 389 



1811. 

A collection of about fifty specimens of schists, slates, lime- 
stones, &c., from the North and East Coast of Australia, made 
by Captain M. Flinders, R.N., of HM.^. Investigator, in 1801-3 : 
presented by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. [See 
Flinders, Voyage to Terra Australis, London, 1814.] 



1816. 

A small collection of gneisses, schists, &c., made by Dr. C. 
Smith and Mr. Tudor at the mouth of the Congo in 1816 : 
presented by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. 
[Described by Mr. C. Konig in Captain Tuckey's Narrative of an 
Expedition to exjjlore the Biver Zaire, usuallij called the CongOj 
appendix vi, pp. 486-488, London, 1818.] 



1820. 

A series of nepheline-syenites and other rocks from Sierra 
Leone, collected by Dr. H. Nicoll : presented by Earl Bathurst. 



1821. 

Rock-specimens collected in the Expeditions to the Polar 
Regions : presented by the Lords Commissioners of the 
Admiralty. [A description of the rock-specimens, collected 
by Sir W. E. Parry during the expedition of 1819-20, was 
given by Mr. C. Konig in the Quart. Journ. Set., 1823, vol. xv, 
pp. 11-22.] 

1823. 

Rock-specimens collected by Sir W. E. Parry during his last 
voyage to the Polar Seas : presented by the Lords Commissioners 
of the Admiralty. 

A large and representative series of volcanic products (lavas 
and ashes, &c. of various eruptions) from Vesuvius, Ischia and 
the Campi Flegrei : collected by, and purchased from. Prof. T. 
Monticelli. 



390 Minerals. 

1825. 

A collection of about 70 specimens of granites, sandstones, 
limestones, basalts, kc, made by Captain Hugh Clapperton in the 
Soudan : presented by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. 
[They were described by Mr. C. Konig in Denham and Clapper- 
ton's Narrative of Travels and Discoveries in Northern and Central 
Africa in 1822-24, appendix xxiii, p. 247, London, 1826.] 

1826. 

A collection of about fifty specimens of granites, dolerites, ttc, 
made by Lieut, (afterwards Rear- Admiral) H. W. Bayfield, R.N"., 
during a survey of Lake Superior : presented by the Lords 
Commissioners of the Admiralty. 

1827. 

Two specimens of flexible sandstone from Itacolumi Moun- 
tain, Minas Geraes, Brazil : presented by Viscount Strangford. 

1829. 

A collection of about thirty specimens of granites, quartz- 
felsites, sandstones, (fee, from the Sinai Peninsula : collected and 
presented by Lord Prudhoe (afterwards Duke of Northumberland). 
[A list of a duplicate set of these rocks, presented to the Royal 
Dublin Society by the Duchess of Northumberland, and a 
description of the journey from Cairo into Arabia Petrsea, 
during which the specimens were collected, are given in Journal 
of the Boyal Dublin Society, LS59, vol. ii, pp. 161-175.] 

1837. 

Total acquisitions 147,* including : — 

A collection of rock-specimens from India (chiefly from the 
Nilgiri Hills) : presented by Dr. P. M. Benza. 

About forty specimens of serpentines, dolerites, etc., from the 
shores of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, sent by Lieut. Bo wen, R.N. : 
presented by H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex. 



* The General Kegister of new acquisitions for the Museum was begun 
in 1837. 



Minerals, 391 



1839. 

Total acquisitions 1800, including : — 

A series of 979 specimens of variegated clay from London and 
the vicinity : presented by Mrs. Swan. 

About sixty specimens of schists, serpentines, breccias, etc., 
from Egypt and Arabia Petriea : collected and presented by 
Sir J. Gardner Wilkinson, F.R.S. 



1841. 

Total acquisitions 305, including : — 

About 300 specimens of phonolitic and basaltic lavas from the 
Canary Islands : collected and presented by Mr. P. Barker Webb. 
[See P. Barker Webb and S. Berthelot, Histoire Naturelle des ties 
Canaries, Paris, 1839.] 

1842. 

Total acquisitions 205, including : — • 

A series of polished slabs of marbles from Derbyshire and 
Staffordshire : purchased. 

1844. 

Total acquisitions 702, including: — 

The rock-collections made by the Antarctic Expedition of 
1839-43 under Sir James Clark Ross, including specimens from 
Kerguelen Land, Cape Horn, Cockburn Island, South Victoria 
Land, Tasmania, the Little Island of Trinidad, St. Paul's Rocks 
and Falkland Islands: presented by the Lords Commissioners 
of the Admiralty. [The specimens collected during the three 
voyages southwards into Antarctic regions have been described 
by Mr. G. T. Prior in Mineralogical Magazine, 1899, vol. xii, 
pp. 69-91 ; and those from the Little Island of Trinidad in 
Mineralogical Magazine, 1900, vol. xii, pp. 317-323.] 



1845. 

Total acquisitions 341, including :— 

A collection of about 300 specimens of granites, schists, sand- 
stones, limestones, etc., from South Australia: presented by 
the Governor, Sir George Grey, K.C.B. 



392 Minerals 



1846. 

Total acquisitions 45, including : — 

A collection of about forty specimens of schists and slates from 
the Himalayas : presented by the Earl of Aylesford. 

1848. 

Total acquisitions 81, including : — 

A collection of about fifty specimens of rocks and minerals 
from north Australia : presented by Sir T. L. Mitchell. 

Nineteen specimens of rocks and minerals from Aden : pre- 
sented by the Dii-ectors of the East India Company. 

1851. 

Total acquisitions 45, including : — 

Rock-specimens collected by the Arctic Expedition of 
H.M.S. Pioneer: presented by the Lords Commissioners of the 
Admiralty. 

1855. 

Total acquisitions 139, including : — ■ 

Limestones, schists and slates from the mountain ranges of 
western Persia, and of volcanic rocks from Lake Yan, etc., 
collected and presented by Mr. W. K. Loftus. [See Quart, 
Journ. Geol Soc, 1851, vol. vii, p. 263; 1854, vol. x, p. 464; 
and 1855, vol. xi, p. 247.] 

1868. 

Total acquisitions 356, including : — 

A series of volcanic rocks of Scotland and the north of 
England : purchased. 

1869. 

Total acquisitions 336, including : — 

A series of basalts and phonolitic trachytes containing 
riebeckite, collected by Dr. W. T. Blanford, F.R.S., during the 
Abyssinian Expedition of 1868 under Sir Robert Napier: 
presented by Dr. Blanford. [See Blanford, Observations on the 
Geology and Zoology of Abyssinia, London, 1870 ; also G. T. Prior, 
Mineralogical Magazine, 1899, vol. xii, pp. 92-95.] 



Minerals. 393 

About 200 specimens of volcanic rocks from Ireland, collected 
by Mr. P. Doran : purchased. 

A series of about 100 specimens of schists and slates, and 
phonolitic volcanic rocks containing riebeckite and a'girine, 
collected by Dr. W. Schimper in the neighbourhood of Adowa 
and Axum, Abyssinia : purchased. [They have been described 
by Mr. G. T. Prior in Mineralogical 3Icujazine, 1899, vol. xii, 
pp. 253-273.] 

1870. 

Total acquisitions 121, including: — • 

A collection of about 100 specimens of volcanic bombs and 
lavas from the Laacher See : purchased. 

1872. 

Total acquisitions 973, including : — 

About 900 miscellaneous rock-specimens (chiefly volcanic), 
from German localities (Rhenish Prussia, Baden, Hesse, Nassau, 
Saxony) : purchased. 

1873. 

Total acquisitions 303, including : — 

About 200 specimens of dolerites, schists, conglomerates, etc., 
from South Africa (Namaqualand, Transvaal, etc.), collected by 
Mr. E. J. Dunn : by exchange. 

A supplementary collection (about 100 specimens) of volcanic 
products from the Laacher See : purchased. 

1874. 

Total acquisitions 288, including : — 

A small collection of rock-fragments from Mull and Arran, 
illustrating his papers in the Quart. Joiirn. Geol. Soc, on the 
Tertiary eruptive rocks of the Western Islands of Scotland : 
presented by Prof. J. W. Judd, C.B., RR.S. 

About fifty specimens of basaltic rocks from Fifeshire and 
Skye : presented by Mr. Thomas Davies. 

A collection of "Exeter trap" and other volcanic rocks 
(about thirty specimens) from Devonshire : presented by Mr. W . 
Yicary. 

A collection of about thirty-five specimens of volcanic rocks 
from the Charnwood Forest district, Leicestershire : by exchange. 



394 Minerals 



1875. 



Total acquisitions 264-, including : — 

A collection of rock-specimens illustrating the geology of 
Newfoundland : by exchange. 

A collection of Swedish rocks, including specimens of the 
porphyries of Elfdalen : purchased. 

1876. 

Total acquisitions 1208, including: — 

About 150 specimens of basaltic lavas, etc., from the Island of 
Pvodrigues, collected by Prof. I. Bay ley Balfour, F.R.S., during 
the "Transit of Venus" expedition of 1874-75: presented by 
the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. [These rocks were 
described by Prof. N. S. Maskelyne, in Philosophical Transactions, 
1879, vol. clxviii, pp. 296-301.] 

A collection of about 40 specimens of andesitic rocks from 
Hungary : presented by Prof. J. Szabo. 

A large series (500 specimens) of volcanic rocks (andesites, 
trachytes, basalts, etc.) from Italy, Lipari Islands, Hungary and 
Bohemia : presented by Prof. J. W. Judd, C.B., F.R.S. 

A series of large polished slabs of Numidian marbles from the 
quarries of Fratelli del Monte, Oran, Algiers : presented by 
Cavaliere Giovanni Battista. 

A collection of Cornish el vans (70 si3ecimens) : presented by 
Mr. Thomas Davies. 

A collection of about 150 specimens of trachytes, basalts and 
other volcanic rocks from New Zealand : by exchange. 

A rock-collection (about 100 specimens) from the Transvaal : 
by exchange. 

A set of Vesuvian rocks (about 90 specimens) : purchased. 

1877. 

Total acquisitions 3148, including: — 

A series of andesitic rocks from the districts round Schem- 
nitz and Kremnitz, Hungary : presented by Prof. J. W. Judd, 
C.B., F.R.S. 

A large series of gneisses, schists, slates, limestones, etc., from 
north Greenland, Grant Land, etc., collected chiefly by Colonel 
H. W. Feilden during Sir G. S. ISTares's Arctic Expedition of 



Minerals. 395 

1875-76; presented by the Lords Commissioners of the 
Admiralty. 

Specimens of volcanic ash, etc., from the vicinity of Keswick, 
Cumberland : collected and presented by the Rev. J. Clifton 
Ward. 

A series of about thirty specimens of basaltic rocks from 
the neighbourhood of Edinburgh : presented by Mr. J. H. 
Sanderson. 

A large collection (over 2000 specimens) mainly of British 
igneous rocks, formed by Mr. Samuel Allport, of Birmingham, 
together with the microscopic sections prepared by him for his 
petrological researches on British Carboniferous dolerites, etc. : 
purchased. 

A large series of Italian minerals and rocks, including 
marbles from the various quarries in the vicinity of Carrara ; 
collected by Cavaliere G. P. Jervis : purchased. 

1878. 

Total acquisitions 136, including: — 

A collection of thirty-six specimens of the pitchstones and 
quartz-felsites of the Island of Arran : presented by Prof. T. G. 
Bonney, F.R.S. 

Rock-specimens from St. Davids, Pembrokeshire, illustrating 
papers on the Pre-Cambrian rocks of Wales in the Quart. 
Journ. Geol. Soc. : collected and presented by Dr. Henry 
Hicks, F.R.S. 

1879. 

Total acquisitions 5302, including :— 

A large collection (about 600 specimens) of volcanic rocks 
from various European localities (Auvergne, Vosges, etc.) : 
presented by Mr. H. Ludlam. 

In this year, owing to new arrangements adopted in regard 
to the India Museum, London, various rock-collections (about 
4500 specimens), chiefly from India, were transferred to the 
British Museum. The more important are as follows : — 

A large series (about 500 specimens) of gneisses, schists, 
limestones, sandstones, basalts, etc., from Gay a, Bhagalpur, 
Shahabad and Goruckpur : collected by Dr. F. Buchanan 
(afterwards Hamilton), in 1810-14. 

A large series (about 300 specimens) of andesitic and 



396 Minerals. 

basaltic lavas, limestones, etc., from Java : collected by Dr. 
T. Horsfieldin 1816. 

A large collection of schists, slates, granites, etc., 
from Kumaon and southern Tibet, made by Captain 
(afterwards Lieut.-Gen. Sir) R. Strachey, illustrating the 
geology of part of the Himalayas. (See Quart. Journ. Geol. 
Soc, 1851, vol. vii, p. 292.) 

Collections of basalts (the Deccan traps), laterite, etc., 
from Bombay, made by Colonel W. H. Sykes and by 
Dr. G. Buist. 

A series of specimens (limestones, sandstones, slates, etc.), 
illustrating the geology of the Punjab Salt Range and of the 
Cashmere Hills : collected by Dr. A. Fleming about 1853. 

A series of rock-specimens collected by the brothers 
(Hermann, Adolph and Robert von) Schlagintweit when 
on a scientific mission to India and High Asia, between the 
years 1854-58. 

1880. 

Total acquisitions 41, including : — 

A collection of basaltic rocks from the neighbourhood of 
Burntisland and Kinghorn, Fifeshire : presented by Mr. W. 
Carruthers, F.R.S. 

1881. 

Total acquisitions 382, including : — 

An illustrative series of the rocks constituting Dr. Hicks's 
three divisions of his Pre-Cambrian Group of St. Davids ; and a 
collection illustrating his papers on the Pre-Cambrian rocks of 
Ross-shire : presented by Dr. Henry Hicks, F.R.S. [The micro- 
scopic characters of these rocks were described by Mr. T. Davies 
in appendices to papers by Dr. Hicks. See Quart. Journ. Geol. 
Soc, 1878, vol. xxxiv; 1879, vol. xxxv ; and 1884, vol. xl ; also 
Geol Mag., 1880.] 

A series of specimens from the St. Gotthard Tunnel, with 
geological tables and sections; collected by Dr. F. M. Stapff: 
purchased. 

A collection of about 260 specimens of the basaltic and 
trachytic lavas of Auvergne : purchased. 

A large slab of flexible sandstone from 60 miles west of 
Delhi, India : purchased. 



Minerals. 397 



1882. 



Total acquisitions 266, including : — 

A collection of about 250 rock-specimens from Scotland, 
chiefly from Perthshire and the Island of Arran : presented by 
the Council of the British Association. 

1883. 

Total acquisitions 167, including: — 

A series of andesites, dacites, basalts, limestones, etc., from 
the Salomon Islands : collected and presented by Mr. H. B. 
Guppy, M.B., Surgeon of H.M.S. Larh 

1884. 

Total acquisitions 85, including : — 

A collection of the granites of the Harz : purchased. 

1885. 

Total acquisitions 194, including: — 

Specimens of obsidian and of calcareous and siliceous tufa 
from the Yellowstone Park, U.S.A. : presented by Mr. \y. Car- 
ruthers, F.R.S. 

1886. 

Total acquisitions 977, including : — 

A series of polished specimens of protogine from Mont Blanc : 
presented by Mr. Richard Fort. 

A collection of about 150 specimens of granites, dolerites, 
quartzites, etc., from Western Austraha : presented by Mr. 
E. T. Hardman. 

A collection of about 400 specimens of granites, gneisses, 
schists, etc., from South Australia, including a series of rocks 
from the Barossa and Echunga Gold-fields : presented by the 
Government of South Australia. 

A collection of granulites and schists from Saxony, illustrating 
Lehmann's Untersuchungen iiher die Entstehung der altl- rij stall in- 
ischen Schiefergesteine, Bonn, 1884: purchased. 

A collection of 266 specimens of schists, etc., from the Mont 
Cenis Tunnel : purchased. 



398 Minerals. 

1887. 

Total acquisitions 664, including : — 

A collection of about eighty typical rock-specimens from 
Sweden : presented by the Director of the Geological Survey of 
Sweden. 

About 200 specimens of phonolites, basalts, etc., from the 
Island of Fernando Noronha, collected and presented by Mr. 
H. N. Ridley. [Specimens belonging to this collection have 
been described by Mr. T. Davies in Journ. Linn. Soc, 1890, 
vol. xxvii, pp. 86-94, and by Mr. G. T. Prior in Mineralogical 
Magazine, 1897, vol. xi, pp. 171-75.] 

A large series (about 400 specimens), of volcanic rocks from 
Japan : purchased, 

1888. 

Total acquisitions 595, including : — • 

A series of about 100 specimens of basaltic lavas, etc., from 
the Azores : purchased. 

Collections of volcanic rocks from the Malverns, Inner 
Hebrides, Charnwood Forest and the Lizard : purchased. 

1889. 

Total acquisitions 505, including : — 

A collection (about 133 specimens) of granites, quartz-felsites, 
etc., from China and Borneo: presented by Mr. J. W. Bassett- 
Smith, Surgeon, R.N. 

About sixty specimens of limestones, schists, etc., collected in 
Somaliland by Captain S. King during an expedition from Zaila 
to Mount Eilo : presented by Prof. T. Rupert Jones, F.R.S. 
[Described by Miss C. A. Raisin in Geological Magazine, 1888, 
p. 414.] 

A small collection of granites, felsites, etc., from Sokotra, 
made by Colonel M. Gosset : presented by Prof. T. Rupert Jones, 
F.R.S. [Described by Miss C. A. Raisin in Geological Magazine, 
1888, p. 504.] 

A collection of rocks from Madagascar : presented by the 
Rev. J. Wills. 

Gneisses, schists, granites and diorites from Guernsey : 
collected and presented by Mr. B. B. Woodward. 

A series of volcanic rocks from Germany : purchased. 



Minerals. 399 

1890. 

Total acquisitions 1050, including : — 

A collection of about 700 specimens, chiefly of volcanic 
rocks, made by the Challenger Expedition of 1873-76 ; including 
specimens from Teneriffe (basalts and phonolites), Cape Verde 
Islands (basalts, etc.). Island of Fernando Noronha (phonolites, 
basalts), Ascension Island (trachytes, basalts), Tristan d'Acunha 
Island (basalts), Falkland Islands (diabase, slates), Marion Island 
(basalts), Kerguelen Island (basalts, phonolites, etc.), Heard 
Island (basalts), Fiji Islands (andesites), Banda Island (andesites), 
Moluccas (andesites), Philippines (andesites, limestones, etc.), 
Juan Fernandez (basalts), Sandwich Islands (basalts, limestones), 
St. Paul's Rocks (serpentine), Azores (trachytic lavas), St. Thomas 
(diorites), Bass Straits (granites) : presented by the Lords Com- 
missioners of the Admiralty through Sir John Murray, K.C.B., 
F.R.S. [These rocks have been described by Prof. A. F. Renard 
in Petrology of Oceanic Islands, Challenger Beports, Physics and 
Chemistry, 1882, vol. vi, part vii.] 

A selection from the rock-specimens collected by Deputy 
Inspector-General R. McCormick, R.ISr., during the Arctic Expe- 
dition of 1827, the Antarctic Expedition of 1839-43, and the 
Franklin Search Expedition of 1852-53 : bequeathed. 

About 50 specimens of basaltic lavas, of various dates, from 
Mount Etna : purchased. 

1891. 

Total acquisitions 282, including : — 

A small collection of basaltic lavas from Kilauea, including 
specimens of the lava stalactites described by Prof. E. S. Dana 
(Amer. Journ. Sci., 1889, ser. 3, vol. xxxvii, p. 441): presented 
by Mr. Armstrong Smith. 

A collection of the metamorphic rocks resulting from the 
granite-intrusion at New Galloway ; described by Mr. S. Allport 
and Prof. T. G. Bonney, F.R.S., in Proc. Boy. Soc, 1889, vol. xlvi, 
p. 193 : presented by Mr. S. Allport. 

A collection of about 100 small specimens of basaltic and 
phonolitic lavas from St. Helena: presented by Mr. R. L. 
Antrobus. [Some of these specimens were described by Mr. 
G. T. Prior in Mineralogical Magazine, 1903, vol. xiii, p. 256.] 

A collection of about 50 specimens of the nepheline-syenites 
and associated camptonitic dykes of ]Montreal : collected and 
presented by Dr. G. C. Hoffmann. 



400 Minerals. 



1892. 



Total acquisitions 526, including : — 

A collection of about 70 specimens of the cossyrite- and 
anorthoclase-bearing lavas of Pantelleria : purchased. [Some of 
these specimens were described by Mr. G. T. Prior in Minera- 
lojical Magazine, 1903, vol. xiii, p. 254.] 

A collection of about 1 00 specimens of basaltic and phonolitic 
lavas from Gran Canaria : purchased. [Some of these specimens 
were described by Mr. G. T. Prior in 3Iineralogical Magazine, 
1903, vol. xiii, p. 255.] 

A large series (about 200 specimens) of granites, gneisses, 
schists, limestones, &c., from the Island of Corsica ; collected by 
Prof. C. de Stefani, of Florence : purchased. 

A series of polished slabs of modern Continental marbles 
from France, Belgium, Italy, Spain and Numidia : purchased. 

1893. 

Total acquisitions 700, including : — 

A series of 369 specimens of British rocks (chiefly volcanic) 
collected by Mr. S. Allport, together with the microscopic 
sections prepared by him : purchased. 

A large series of granites, schists, variolitic diabases, quartz- 
felsites, &c., from the Island of Elba : purchased. 

1894. 

Total acquisitions 1030, including: — 

About 100 specimens of sandstones, limestones, shales, <tc., 
from Matto Grosso, Brazil : collected and presented by Dr. J. W. 
Evans. [Described by him in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1894, 
vol. 1, p. 85.] 

About 100 specimens of gneisses, schists, dolerites, &c., from 
Bechuanaland : collected and presented by Mr. F. E. Harman. 

A series of basalts, granites, limestones, Arc, from Torres 
Straits : collected and presented by Prof. A. C. Haddon, F.K.S 
[Described in Trans. Boy. Irish Acad., 1894, vol. xxx, p. 419.] 

A series of crystalline limestones and granulites from Ceylon : 
collected and presented by Lord Colin Campbell. 

A large series of leucitic lavas and tuffs from the neighbour- 
hood of Rome, collected by Dr. J. S. Rodriguez : purchased. 
[Described by him in Note sidle rocce vulcaniclie e ^rinci^almente 
su i tufi dintorni Immediati di Boma, Rome, 1893.] 



I 



Minerals, 401 

A large series of granites, gabbros, schists, limestones, etc., 
om the Island of Giglio, collected by Prof. C. de Stefani, of 
Florence : purchased. 

1895. 

Total acquisitions 708, including : — 

A series of rock-specimens from Devonshire, selected to show 
the relations between the Devonian and metamorphic rocks : 
collected and presented by Mr. A. R. Hunt. 

Variolitic diabases from the Fichtelgebirge (described in 
Quart. Joiirn. Geol. Soc, 1891, vol. xlvii, p. 45), and schists 
and variolites from the Cottian Alps (described in Quart. Journ. 
Geol. Soc, 1890, vol. xlvi, p. 95) : collected and presented by 
Prof. J. W. Gregory, F.R.S. 

A collection of 115 specimens illustrating the contact-effects 
of the granite and syenite in the schist-region of the Elb- 
thalgebirge : purchased. 

1896. 

Total acquisitions 632, including : — 

About 100 specimens of gneisses, schists, dolerites, etc., from 
Sierra Leone : collected and presented by Mr. G. F. Scott Elliot. 
[Described by Miss C A. Raisin in Geological Magazine, 1893, 
p. 440.] 

A series of granites, sandstones, camptonitic dyke-rocks, etc., 
from Egypt, collected by Mr. G. F. Scott Elliot : presented by 
Miss C. A. Raisin. [Described by her in Geological Magazine, 
1893, p. 436.] 

1897. 

Total acquisitions 1663, including: — 

A series of specimens (with sections) of the deposits of the 
Nile Delta, obtained during the boring operations at Zagazig 
undertaken by the Royal Society : presented by the Royal 
Society (Delta Boring Committee). 

A series of about 300 small specimens of rocks and minerals 
from the Karakoram Himalayas : collected and presented by Sir 
W. Martin Conway. [Described by Miss C. A. Raisin and Prof. 
T. G. Bonney, F.R.S,, in Proc. Boy. Soc, 1894, vol. Iv, p. 468.] 

472 thin sections of rocks (mostly veinstones, el vans, green- 
stones and granites of Cornwall) from the collection of the late 
Mr. John Arthur Phillips, F.R.S. : presented by Mr. A. G. Phillips. 
VOL. I. - D 



402 Minerals. 

A series of about 100 specimens illustrating the geology of 
the Southern Transvaal : collected and presented by Dr. F. H. 
Hatch. [Described in Quart Journ. Geol Soc, 1898, vol. liv, 
pp. 73-99.] 

A series of about seventy small rock-specimens from Siam ; 
collected by Mr. H. Warington Smyth : presented by the Royal 
Department of Mines and Geology, Siam. 

A series of over 300 specimens of gneisses, schists, slates, etc., 
from Italian and Alpine localities, collected by Cavaliere G. P. 
Jervis to supplement the series previously obtained from him : 
purchased. 

Seventy-three polished slabs of modern marbles from Italy 
and Switzerland, and of antique marbles from the ruins of 
ancient Ptome : purchased. 

1898. 

Total acquisitions 1022, including : — • 

A large, polished block of orbicular granite from Kangasniemi 
Finland : presented by Baron A. B. de Schulten. 

A large series of rock-specimens illustrating the geology of 
the neighbourhood of Portsoy, Banffshire : collected and presented 
by Mr. J. Buie. 

A series of rock-specimens from Mongolia and the Province 
of Liao Tong, Manchuria : collected and presented by Mr. W. H. 
Shockley. 

1899. 

Total acquisitions 490, including : — 

A large polished slab of green marble from La Toma, 
Argentina : presented by Dr. F. P. Moreno. 

A column of basalt, 14J feet (4*4 meters) long, from Rhenish 
Prussia : presented by ^he Directors of the London Basalt Stone 
Company. 

A collection of over 100 specimens of gneisses, schists, 
ferruginous shales, etc., from the Ingwenya Berg and Embabaan 
district. West Swaziland : presented by Mr. Sydney Ryan. 
[Described by Pr^. T. Rupert Jones, F.R.S., in Geological 
Magazine, 1899, pp. 105-111.] 

A small series of volcanic rocks and limestones from the 
neighbourhood of Lake Urumia, Persia : collected and presented 
by Mr. R. T. Gunther. [Described by Mr. G. T. Prior in Geogr. 
Journ., 1899, vol. xiv, pp. 521-523.] 

A series of about 60 specimens of andesitic lavas, etc., from 



Minerals, 403 

the Andes (Aconcagua, Tupungato, etc.) : collected and presented 
by Mr. E. A. FitzGerald and Mr. S. Vines. [Described by Prof. 
T. G. Bonney, F.R.S., in Fitzgerald's Highest Andes, appendix A, 
London, 1899.] 

Rock-specimens from the Davos district (described Quart. 
Journ. Geol. Soc, 1899, vol. Iv, p. 381) and from the Manod and 
Moelwyns, Wales (described in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc.j 1891, 
vol. xlvii, p. 368) : collected and presented by Mr. A. Vaughan 
Jennings. 

1900. 

Total acquisitions 1058, including : — 

A large polished slab of orbicular granite from Kortfors, 
Orebro, Sweden : presented by Dr. H. M. Biickstrom. 

A series of about 150 specimens of schists, sandstones, phono- 
iitic rocks, etc., from Lake Tanganyika, Ruwenzori and Uganda : 
collected and presented by Mr. G. F. Scott Elliot. [Desciibed 
Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1895, vol. li, pp. 677-679.] 

A series of 50 specimens of schists, felsites, phonolites, etc., 
from Tropical East Africa, collected by Mr. M. Fergusson : 
presented by the Lake Tanganyika Expedition Committee. 
[Described by Mr. M. Fergusson and Mr. G. T. Prior in Geological 
Magazine, 1901, p. 362.] 

A series of kenytes, basalts and phonolites from Mount 
Kenya : collected and presented by Prof. J. W. Gregory, F.R.S. 
[Described by him in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1900, vol. Ixvi, 
p. 205 : see also G. T. Prior, Mineralogical Magazine, 1903, 
vol. xiii, pp. 228-263.] 

A collection of 58 typical rock-specimens from Japan : presented 
by Dr. T. Kochibe, Director of the Geological Survey of Japan. 

A collection of rock-specimens from the Christiania district, 
illustrating descriptions by Prof. W. C. Brogger (ErujHivgesteine 
des Kristianiagehietes, I, 1894; II, 1895; III, 1898): purchased. 

190L 

Total acquisitions 405, including : — 

A large collection of typical rock-specimens from India, which 
formed part of the India Exhibit at the Paris Exhibition of 1900 ; 
presented by the Director of the Geological Survey of India. 

A series of about 200 specimens of granites, schists, felsites, 
andesites, &c., from the north-east coast of Siberia: collected 
and presented by Mr. W. H. Shockley. 

2 D 2 



404 Minerals. 

A series of rock-specimens from the Bolivian Ancles : collected 
and presented by Sir AV. Martin Conway. [Described by Prof, 
T. G. Bonney, F.R.S., in Sir Martin Conway's The Bolivian 
Andes, London, 1901, appendix, pp. 366-386.] 

1902. 

Total acquisitions 1155, including : — 

A series of rock -specimens, including granites, basalts and 
phonolitic rocks from Cape Adare, siliceous slates and grits 
from Duke of York Island, and basalts from Franklin Island, 
Mount Terror, etc. : collected by the Antarctic Expedition of 
the Southern Cross, under Mr. C. E. Borchgrevinck : presented 
by Sir George Newnes, Bart. [Described by Mr. G. T. Prior 
in the Beport on the Collections made hy the Southern Cross 
Antarctic Expedition, published by the Trustees of the British 
Museum, 1902.] 

A large collection of ferruginous schists, phonolitic rocks, 
basalts, nephelinites, etc., from the Uganda Protectorate : pre- 
sented by Sir Harry H. Johnston, G.C.M.G. [Described by 
Mr. G. T. Prior in Mineralogical Magazine, 1903, vol. xiii, pp. 
228-263.] 

Collections of rock-specimens (with microscopic sections) from 
the Malverns, north Wales and Cornwall, illustrating papers in 
the Quart. Jour7i. Geol. Soc. : presented by Mr. F. Rutley. 

Microscopic sections of rocks from St. Davids, illustrating 
papers of Dr. Henry Hicks, F.R.S. in the Quart. Journ. Geol, 
Soc. : presented by his widow. 

1903. 

Total acquisitions 278, including : — 

A collection of rock-specimens from the Assynt district, 
Sutherlandshire ; presented by the Director of the Geological 
Survey of Great Britain and Ireland. 

A small collection of rock-specimens from New South Wales : 
presented by the Department of Mines and Agriculture of 
New South Wales. 

A series of rock-specimens from Ashantee : collected and 
presented by Mr. N. Samuel. 

A collection of 73 specimens illustrating the effects of 
contact-metamorphism : purchased. 



Minerals. 405 



Series C— METEORITES. 



A complete list of the Meteorites represented in the Meteorite 
Collection, with a statement of the total weights of the specimens 
representing each Fall, is given with the Introduction to the 
Study of Meteorites. 

The collection is arranged in two divisions :— 

Div. I. The Introdmtorij Series, exhibited in case IV of 
the Pavilion. The specimens have been selected, 
arranged and labelled to serve as an Introduction 
to the Study of Meteorites. 

Div. II. The General Collection is exhibited in three cases 
(I-III) of the Pavilion. The specimens of the 
General Collection are, for convenience, arranged 
in three classes, namely :— Meteoric Irons, Sidero- 
lites and Meteoric Stones; each class is then 
sub-divided into meteorites of known and un- 
known dates of fall; the specimens belonging 
to the former sub-division are arranged in the 
order of date of fall, while those belonging to the 
latter sub-division are arranged topographically. 

The following chronological list gives the year 
in which each recognised meteoritic fall was first 
represented in the Collection. 



406 



Minerals, 



Chronological List (1753-1903) referring to 
Series C— Meteorites. 



Year of 
acquisition. 



1776 
1778 



1799 

1802 



1803 
1804 
1810 



1814 
1817 
1819 



1820 
1821 
1824 
1826 
1828 



1831 
1839 



1840 
1841 

1842 
1843 

1844 
1845 



Falls 
added. 



Names of the additional Falls represented. 



PalJas : presented by the Imperial Academy of Sciences, 

St. Petersburg. 
Otumpa : small fragments presented by the Koyal Society. 

(The large mass, weighing 1400 lb. (600 kilograms), 

was presented in 1826 by Sir Woodbine Parish, 

K.C.B , F.R.S.) 
Senegal River (Hatohett collection) : fragment purchased. 
Kralcliut tmd Wold Cottage: fragments presented by 

Sir Joseph Bank^, Bart., F.R.S. (The main mass 

of the latter meteorite was purchased by the Trustees 

in 1838.) 
Siena : presented by Sir Joseph Banks, Bart., F.E.S. 
UAigle: presented by Prof. J. B. Biot, of Paris. 
Barhotan, Cape of Good Hope, Elhrgen, Endsheim, Salles, 

Tabor, and Wekon, all of th(.m in the Greville collection : 

purchased. 
Bed Biver : presented by Prof. A. Bruce, of Xew York. 
Stannern: presented by the Imperial Museum of Vienna. 
Mooresfort : presented by Mr. J. G. Children, F.R.S. 
Cliantonnay : purchased. 

Limerick : presented by Dr. Blake, of Dublin. 
Mehille Bay (Ross's Iron): presented by the Lords 

Commissioners cif the Admiralty. 
Berlanguillas : purchased. 
Timochin : purchase d. 
Bendego Birer and Juvinas : purchased. 
Le'ndrto : purchased. 
Agen : purchased. 
Imilac : presented by Sir Woodbine Parish, K.C.B , F.R.S. 

(Two small fragments were presented by Mr. W. 

BoUaert in 1857; the large mass, weighing 450 lb. 

(204 kilograms), was presented by Mr. George Hicks, 

of Xewquay, in 1879.) 
Bitburg : presented by Mr. Henry Heuland. 
Cold Boliheveld: 2 specimens, (1) presented by Mr. E. 

Charlesworth ; (2) presented by Sir John Herschel, 

Bart., F.R.S., and Sir Tliomas Maclear, F.R.S. 
Nanjemoy (Mantell Collection): purchased. 
Zacatecas: presented by Mr. J. Parkinson. 
Burlington : by exchange. 

Chateau-Benard, Drake Creel: and Little Tiney : purchased. 
Cocke County and Bichmond : purchased. 
Akharpur : presented by Sir Proby T. Cautley. 
Guilford County and Walker County: purchased. 
Uabb's Mill, Chandakapur and Lockport : purchased. 
Arva: purchased. 



Minerals. 



107 



Year of 



Falls 



acquisition. . added, 



1846 



1847 
1848 
1849 
1850 



1861 



13 



Names of the additional Falls represented. 



1855 


1 


1856 


1 


1858 


1 


1860 


34 



15 



1862 



41 



Easgaf a : by exchange. . 

Aqram, Charlotte, Chassigny, Borgo San Dontno, Ihph 
Fossil, Jonzac, KharJwr, Luotolaks, MauerMrcheti, 1 les- 
cowitz, Smithland and Toluca : purchased (Largo 
masses from Toluca VaUey were purchased in ISOO, 
1866 and 1873, respectively.) 
Bishopville, Carthage and Linn County : purchased. 
Braunaic, Murfreeshoro' and SeeJasgen: purchased. 
Asheville and Chesterville : purchased. „ , , , 

AlcUworth, Caharras County, Chancallas, Uonolala ;ind 

Buff's Mountain: purchased. 
Seneca Ever : purchased. 

Madoc: presented by Sir Wm. E. Logan, h .U.h. 
Les Orme^ : purchased. , , ., o i 

Bustee, Durala and Shalha: presented by the Secretory 

of State for India. . , , ^. 

Alois, Au^son, Bethany (Lion Kiver; Springbok River; 
Mukerop; a specimen was presented m lb^-1 by tiio 
Trustees of the South African Museum), Charsonnlh; 
Eichstddt, Forsyth, Girgenti, Gnarrenhurg, Gruneb>rg 
Giitersloh, Hainholz, Kuleschovha, Mezo-Madaras Uesel, 
Orange River, Parlograd, Petersburg, Putnam County 
Salt River, Sanchez Estate, Sarepta, Sere^, Tazewell, 
Toidou^e, Ti/cson (another specimen of which was pre- 
sented in 1863 by the Town Authorities of San Iran- 
cisco), Tula (of which a fragment was presented in IS.,- 
by Dr. J. Auerbach) and Union County, all of them m 
the Allan-Greg Collection : purchased. 
Jeioell Hill (Duel Hill), Nebraska, Nelson County and ^ew 
Concord: purchased. i i u,r ♦!.« 

Dhurmsala: two specimens, the one P^^sentetl by the 
Secretary of State for India, the other by Mr. G. Lennox 

A^samrFMpiir, Manegaum and Moradahad : presented 

by the Asiatic Society of Bengid. 
Pequ: presented by Dr. Thomas Oldham, F.K.S. 
Alessandria, Cere^^eto, Erxleben, Lissa, Lixna, Luponna<, 

Scliellin and Zebrah : by exchange. 
Zaborzika: purchased. 
Cranbourne: weight 3i tons: presented by ^f^; J'^'"" 

Bruce; (the mass arrived at the :^ru^eum in lb -a). 
Butsura, Khiragurh, Mhow, Segou-he and I niballa : pre- 
sented by the Asiatic Society uf Bengal. 
Per//i .-presented by Mr. William Ncvill. 
Nellore and Parnallee : presented by Sir W m. P. Utiu. on, 

Bd^'iuydiltz, Braliin, Doronm^k, Heredia, Macao, Mainz 
and^<.I>ems-lFe.s<rem: by exchange. 

Aumieres, Bethlehem, Black 3Iountain, Bruzo*, iastne 
CMborne, Coopertown, Deal, Forar., Jarrtsoniouuy^ 
Jackson CouJy, Kakou-a KUleer, ^^;;!';.;;;!';^),.J) ,; 
Marshall County, Milena. Monte ^'^'^'']^^^J^''^^ 
Countu, Pohlitz, .-clucetz, Steinbach (Ritterhg un ana 
Bre&ach), Vouill^ and Wayne County: purchased. 



408 



Miner ah 



Year of 

acquisition. 


Falls 
added. 


1863 


41 


1864 


11 


1865 


3 


1866 
1867 


1 

22 


1868 


2 


1869 


20 


1870 


5 



Names of the additional Falls represented. 



Joel Iron: presented by Mr. L. Joel, Vice-Ccnsul at 
Cobija. 

Kaee : presented by Sir Thomas Maclear, F.E.S. 

Kusiali: presented by Dr. Thomas Oldham. F.E.S. 
Vaca Muerta : presented by Mr. Taylour Thomson. 

Albarefo, Apt, Asco, Bachmut, Biahj^toclc. Blan^lw, BorJait, 
Canellas, Denton County, Duruma, Epinal, Grosnaja, 
Kaba, Klein- 3Ienoiiu Klein- Wen den, Krasnoi-Ugol, La 
Caille, 3Ia>'sing, Marmande, Nagy-Diivina, Kulles, 
Ohniny, Pittshurg, Santa liosa, Sierra Blanca, Slolodka, 
Soutli-Eai't Missouri, Stavropol, Tabarz, Trenzano, 
Uden, Utreclt, Wessehj, W older s Iron, Yanhuitlan: by 
exchange. 

Darmstadt and Nublehorougli : piirclia^ed. 

Agra : presented by Mr. AN'illiam Xevill. 

Lutschaunig Stone : presented by Mr. Alfred Lutschaunig. 

Manbhoom : presenteil by Dr. Thomas Oldham, F.E.S. 

Buschhof, Caney Fork, 'Dakota, Fillistfer, and Tourinnes- 
la-Gros^e : by exchange. 

Obernkirchen, Orgu eil, nnd Verkhne-Vdinsk : purchased. 

Nerft: presented by Professor C. C. A. Grewingk, of 
Dorpat. 

Ski: presented by Professor T. Kjerulf, of Christiania. 

Supuhte: presented by the Secretary of State for India. 

Copiapo; purchased. 

Gopalpur and Slierghotty : presented by the Trustees of 
the Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

Jamkheir and Shytal : presented by the Government of 
India. 

Knyahinya: presented by the Hungarian Academy of 
Sciences, Budapest. 

Muddoor and Foklira : presented by Dr. Thomas Oldham, 
F.E.S. 

Aumale, Bear Creek, Charcaa, Coahuila (the Bonanza 
Iron); (one of the masses, known as the Butcher Irons, 
was purchased by the Trustees in 1876), Frankfort (Ky.), 
Mascombes, Molina, Fampanga, Benazzo, Bussel Gulch 
and Taney County (Newton County) : by exchange. 

Barranca Blanca, Cerro Cosina, Hacienda de Bocas and 
St. Mcmin : purchased. 

DanieVs Kuil : by exchange. 

Fultusk (Lerici) .- purchased. 

Goalpara, Khetri and Fulsora : presented by the 
Trustees of the Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

Kr'dhenberg : presented by Dr. G. Xeumayer, of Hamburg. 

Vdipi : presented by the Secretary of State for India. 

Bjelaja Zerkov, Danville, Dolgovoli, Dundrum, Esnandes, 
Frankfort (Ala.), Juncal, Lodran, Frambanan, Slavetic, 
Tadjera and Trenton: by exchange. 

Hassle, Ornans and Victoria West : purchased. 

Moti-ka-nagla : presented by the Trustees of the Indian 
Museum, Calcutta. 

Auburn and Losttotcn : by exchange. 

Cle'gue'rec and San Francisco del Mezquital : purchased. 



Minerals, 



409 



Year of 
acquisition. 



1871 

1872 

1873 

1875 



187G 



1877 



1878 
1879 



1880 
1881 



1882 



1883 



1884 
1885 



Falls 
added. 



11 



of the additional Falb rcijresciited. 



10 



10 



11 



C. ILimlin, of Maine, 



Smit]i'.< Mounfaiii and 
G. D. Hinriclis, of Iowa, 
Hungiiriun Academy of 



Searsmont : presented by Dr. Aug. 

U.S.A. 
Staunton: by exchange. 
Howard County, Ihbenhuhren, 
Stewart County, by exchang<\ 
West Liberty: presented by Dr. 

U.S.A. 
Zsaddny : presented by the 

Sciences, Budapest. 
Angers, Bandong, Beude, Khairpiir, Orvinio, Sanguis and 

fjahe': by exchange. 
Lanc^ Bind Oczeretna : purchased. 
Rowton : presented by the Duke of Cleveland. 
Shingle Springs: presented by Mr. E. N. Winslow, of 

Hyannis, ]Mass., U.S.A. 
Nash County, Vernon County and Waronda : by exchange. 
Gnrram Konda : transferred from the India ^Museum. 
Jhung: presented by Mr. A. Brandnth, of Calcutta _ 
Verhhne-Dnieprovsk : presented by Professor Kouhbmi, of 

St. Petersburg. /> ., • 

Dyrdpur, Judesegeri, Nagaria. NedagoUa, Santa Lathanna 

ami Sitathali : by exchange. 
Stalldalen: purchased. ^ x- ^ i 

Cronstad : presented by Mr. John Sanderson, of ^atal. 
Soho-Banja : by exchange. ^ , , nr 

Mount Hick^ and Serrania de Varas : presented by Mr. 

George Hieks, of Xewquay. „ t 7 

Butler, Casey County, Cynthiana, Dandapur, Sakorlca, 
Rochester, Warrenton aud Whitfidd County: by ex- 
change. 
FstherviUe : pm-chased. _. , . ., x- n 

Middlesbrough: presented by the Directors of the North 
Eastern Railway. . . , 

aiulafinnee, Lexington County, Smithsonian von and 

Tieschitz : by exchange. 
Veramin : presented by the Shah of Persia. 
Cabeza de Mayo, Cangas de Onis, Gross-Liel>enthal, Huvgen, 
Kerilis, Mocs, Roda, Sevruhoro, Tennanlm and \ aii- 
lovlca : by purchase. , , , . r t 

Ogi • presenter! by Mr. Naotaro Xabcshima, of Japan. 
Gnadenfrei, Licit Creeh and Nagaya : by excljange. 
Alfianello, Greenbrier County, Favlovha and Lancho de la 

'Vila : purchased. 
iSouii-Cap-ai -(7e- Qnmzac: by exchange. „ . _^ . 
Barratta (micro-sections) : presented by ^rofe^gor A 
Liver.idge, F.R.S., of Sydney. (A fragment of the 
meteorite was presented by the same donor m l^^'-) 
Chandpur and Firthalla: presented by the Director of 

the Geological Survey of India^ 
Iranpahj presented by IMr. Henry Hanks, of San 

lIc'^]'bUi': presented by the Governors of the Jamaica 

Y^uXin: presented by the Rev. Charles G. Nicolay, of 
Perth, Western Australia. 



410 



Minerals. 



Year of 
acquisition. 


Falls 
added. 


1886 


6 


1887 


6 


1888 


14 


1889 


9 


1890 


13 


189] 


25 


1892 


7 


1893 


10 


1894 


11 



Names of the additional Falls represented. 



CliiU (Desfrt of Atacama), Emmittshurg, Kilcino, La 

Becass^e, Le TeiUeul, refropavlovsk, Quin^ay and Tom- 

hannock Creek: by exchange. 
Nejed: purchased. 
Jennifs Creek : presented by Dr. John N. Tilden, of Xew 

York State. 
Nammiaidhal : presented by the Director of the Geological 

Survey of India. 
Nenntmanjisdorf : presented by Dr. H. B. Geinitz, of 

Dresden. 
Grand Bapids : by exchange. 

Glorieta Mountain and Independence County : purchased. 
Djati Pengilon : presented by the Government of the 

NetherLinds. 
Lalitpur : presented by the Director of the Geological 

Survey of India. 
Ahert Iron and Tysnes : by exchange. 
Fort Duncan and Scottsville : purchased. 
Angra dos Reis, Chail, Itapicuru-Mirim, Karakol and 

Minas Geraes : by exchange. 
Alatyr, Assist , Auhres, Iron Creek, MornanSy Pavlodar, 

Poicder Mill Creek, Tahory and Tomatlan : purchased. 
Bhagur and Kalomhi : presented by the Bombay BraLcli 

of the Royal Asiatic Society. 
Cape Girardeau and Utah : by exchange. 
Bella Boca, Bluff, Cleveland, De^ciibridora and Eagle 

Station : purchased. 
Santa Barbara : by exchange. 
Pirgunje: pait by purchase and part by exchange. 
Bielokrijnit^xliie, Brcnham Tou-nship, Carlton, Collesripoli, 

Dona Inez, Farmington, Jtlica, Llano del Inca, Miglieja, 

Wetland 2inA Winnebago County : purchased. 
TJiunda : presented by Professor A. Liversidge, F.R.S., 

of Sydney. 
BischtUbe, Cabin Creek, Carcote, Coura, Hammond Town- 
ship, Holland's Store, Ilimae, Laurens County, Linnville 

Mountain, Mazopil, Nagy-Vdzsony, Pacula, Schonenbergy 

Ssyromolotovo and Summit: by exchange. 
Baldohn, Cation Diablo, Croiv Creek, Jamestoicn, Kendall 

County, Meroditas, Pipe Creek, Puquios and Waldron 

Ridge: purchased. 
Kahangarai : presented by the Director of the Geological 

Survey of India. 
Fukntomi, Jodzie, Sao Julido de Moreira, Toubil Eiver 

(Taiga) and Yemhigaliara: by exchange. 
Indarh : purchased. 

Cachiuyal and Montlivault : by exchange. 
Aleppo, Bath, Beaver Creek, Croes Boad^, Kenton Countyy 

Ke>:en, Lundygdrd and Virba : purcliased. 
Bherai : presented by the Xawab of Junagadh, India. 
Makariwa: pretented by Professor G, H. F. Ulrich, of 

Duuedin, Xew Zealand. 
Bridgeicater, Codilla Peak, Hex Biver Mountains, Morris- 
town, Oroville and Piairie Dog Creek : by excbange. 
McKinney, Pan de Azucar and Plymouth : purchased. 



Minerals. 



411 



Year of Falls 
acquisition, added. 



1895 



1896 



1897 



1898 



1899 



1900 

1901 I 7 



11 



10 



H 



16 



1902 



Names of Ibe additional Falls represeutcd. 



13 



1903 18 



Total Falls 55iJ 



Bishimpnr and Bori : presented by the Director of the 

Geologieal Survey of India. 
Concepcion: presented by Mr. W. Taylor, of KIgin, N'.I). 
Launfon and Zabrodje : purchasLMl. 

Ambapur Nagla : presented by the Director of the Geo- 
logical Survey of India. 
Madrid : presented by Don INIiguel Merino, of ^Madrid. 
BalUnoo, Canton, CaiAtan Ihinrfe, Fisher, Kohdad, Lahorely 

Lesve>t, Long Island and Sacramento Mountains: pur- 
chased. 
Nawalpali: presented by the Director of the (ieologic;il 

Survey of India. 
Arlington, Forsyth County, Locust Grove, Ngairt, 

Mooranoppin, Mnngindi, Xocoleche, lioehourne and 

Thurlow : purchased. 
Gamhat: presented by the Director of the Geological 

Survey of India. 
AugustinovJca, Ottaica, Fricetown and Zavid : by ex- 
change. 
Kansada, Langon, Mount Joy, Mount Stirling, Oscuro 

Mountain, Rosario, San Angdo, Hactschemhoje and 

Tonganoxie : purchased. 
Caperr: presented by Dr. F. P. Moreno, of La Flatti 

Sluseum. 
El Ranchito (Bacubirito) : presented by ^Ir. 0. II. 

Howarth, of London. 
Zomba: presented by Sir A. Sharpo, C.B., 1v.C.:M.G., His 

Majesty's Commissioner for Biitisli Central Africa, Mr. 

J. F. Cunningham, and Mr. J. ^McClounie. 
Allegan, Central Missouri, Deep Springs. Ellenbor»\ Hayden 

Creels, Higa^hi Koen, Indian Valley Toirnship, La 

Frimitiva, Luis Lopez, Meuselbach, Murphy, Xess Citij 

and Tombigbee River : purcliased. 
Cacaria,Chupaderos, Illinois Gii'ch, Mart, Moder.Hma, Xagij 

Borove', Oakley and St. Generiere County: parcliased. 
Dotiga Kohrod and Kodaihanal : presented by the Director 

of the Geological Survty of India. 
Guarena, hidio Rico, Niagara and Surprise Springs: by 

exchange. 
Casas Grandes: ■pnrchascdi. 
Sindhri: presented by the Director of the Geological 

Survey of India. 
Algoma, Bjurbole and Tarapaca : by exchan-e. ^ _ 
Admire, Apoala, Crumlin, Cuernavam, Frjhen, Gilgom^ 

N Goureyma, Nochtuisk arxi] Rhine Villa: imrchnsed. 
Carata^h: piesented by His Highness Kiamil Pasha.^ 
Andover, Linum, Mount Browne, Mount Dyrring, Falezieux, 

Saline Toicnship, San Cristohd, Sena, Sierra de h» 

Ternera and Toke-ucld-mura : by exchange. _ 

Ari^pe, Bath Furnace, Finmarhen, Francedlh; llnttt<, 

Marjalahti and Reed City : puichased. 



412 ^[inerals. 



3. Alphabetical List of the more important Contributors 
TO THE Collection of Minerals, Rocks and Meteorites 
in the Department of Minerals. 



His Majesty King George the Fourth. [1762-1830] 

Presented, in 1828, a collection of chcdce specimens from the Harz 
Mountains ; the large groups of crystals of calcite and pyrargyrite being 
especially fine. 

H.R.H. Albert, Prince Consort. [1819-1861] 

Presented, in 1847, an enormous group of large, colourless, prismatic 
crystals of gypsum, from Reinhardsbrunn, Gotha, Germany. 

H.R.H. Augustus Frederick, Buhe of Sussex. [1773-1843] 
President of the Pioyal Society [1830-1838], and Trustee of the 

British Museum. 

Presented, in 1837, about 40 sppcimens of serpentines, dolerites, etc., 

from the shores of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, sent by Lieut. Bowen, R.N. 



Admiralty, Lords Commissioners of the. 

Presented, in the years 1811, 1816, 1821, 1823, 1825, 1826, 1844, 1851, 
1877 and 1890, various rock-collections, obtained by exploring expeditions 
sent out by Great Britain ; also, in 1819, small fragments of the Melville 
Bay meteorite (Ross's Iron). 

Alabaster (Henry). 

Presented, in 1870, crystals of sapphire and zircon from Siam. 

Alibert (Iv. P.). 

Presented, in 1864, with other Siberian specimens, a l^rge mass of 
grai)hite from the Alibert mine, near Battugol, Irkutsk ; a large polished 
boulder of jade, weighing 1156 lb. (524*4 kilograms), from the same 
district, was purchased from him in 1863. 

Allan (Thomas). [1777-1833] 

Thomas Allan, F.R.S., an Edinburgh banker, devoted his leisure to 
mineralog}^, and began the formation of what was ultimately the finest 
private collection of minerals in England. Many specimens were collected 
by him in England, Ireland, Fiance, Faroe Is^lands, etc. ; others were 
given to, or exchanged with, him by all the well-known mineralogists 
iind collectors of the day. He acquired Giesecke's {q.v.) collection of 
Greenland minerals. In the enrichment and arrangement ot his collection, 
Allan was much assisted by Haidinger {q.v.), more especially during the 
years 1823-1826, whilst the latter was resident in Edinburgh; much of 
the material mentioned in Haidinger's earlier papers belonged to this 
■collection. After Allan's death the collection was purchased by 
K. H. Greg {q.v.), from whom it was purchased by the Trustees in 1860. 



Minerals. 413 

Allport (Samuel). [1816-1897] 

On Ms return from Brazil, Allport settled in Birmingham and gave 
his spare time to petrographical researches. 

His collection of over 2000 specimens, mainly of British igneous rocks, 
together with the microscopic sections prepared by him for his researches 
on British Carboniferous dolerites, was purchased in 1877. Further 
smaller collections were presented by him in 1891 and 1893. 

Antrobus (R. L.). 

Presented, in 1891, a collection of about 100 small specimens of 
basaltic and phonolitic lavas from St. Helena. 

Aramayo (Felix Avelino). 

Bolivian Minister in London [1898-1903]. 

Presented, in 1899, crystals of argyrodite, encrusting a mass of 
pyrargyrite, from Bolivia. 

Arny (F. M.). 

Presented, in 1880, various minerals from New Mexico, including 
turquoise and gold. 

Asiatic Society of Bengal. 

Presented, in 1861, fiagments of the Assam, Futtehpur, Manegaum 
and Moradabad meteorites; and, in 1862, of the BiUsura, Khiragurh, 
3Ihow, Segoiulie and Umhcdla meteorites. 

Atkins {Mrs. Anna). 

Presented, in 1871, childrenite and several other minerals from the 
collection of her father, J. G. Children {q.v.). 

Auerbach {Dr. Johann Alexander). [1815-1867] 
Keeper of Minerals in the Topographical Institute of Moscow. 
Presented, in 1862, a fragment of the Tula meteorite. 

Austrian Government. 

Presented, in 1862, a sharply developed, perfectly transparent and 
colourless, cube of salt (halite) on the matrix, from Galicia. 

Ava {King of). 

^See BuRNEY (Lieut.-Col. H.) and Symes (Col. Michael). 

Aylesford (Louise, Countess of). [?-1832] 

Made an extensive collection of minerals, which, after her death, 
passed into the possession of Henry Heuland, mineral dealer of London ; 
from him many choice specimens, selected from this collection, were 
purchased by the Trustees in 1834 and subsequent years; the two-volume 
manuscript catalogue of the Aylesford collection is now preserved in ^ the 
Mineral Department. 

Aylesford (Heneage, 5^^ Earl of). [1786-1859] 

Son of the Countess of Aylesford mentioned above. 

Presented, in 1845, a group of crystals of mellite on lignite from 
Thuringia ; and, in 1846, a collection of about forty specimens of schists 
and slates from the Himalayas. 



414 Minerals, 

Backstrom {JDr. Helge Mattias). [1865- ] 
Professor of mineralogy in the Hogskola, Stockholm. 
Presented, in 1900, a large polished slab of orbicular granite from 

Kortfors, Orebro, Sweden. 

Baddeley (Joseph). 

Brought back from Ceylon various mineral specimens, which he 
presented in 1891 ; one of them was afterwards found to be a new species, 
and was named baddeleyite. 

Balfour {Prof. Isaac Bayley). [1853- ] 

Collected specimens of basaltic lavas, etc., from the Island of 
Piodrigues, during the " Transit of Venus " expedition of 1874-1875 ; 
they were presented by the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury in 

1876. 

Banks (Henry). 

Presented, in 1820, several specimens of graphite, showing the mineral 
in different kinds of matrix, from Borrowdale, Cumberland. 

Banks {Sir Joseph, Bart). [1743-1820] 

President of the Eoyal Society [1778-1820], and Trustee of the 
British Museum. 

Presented various specimens ; among them, in 1802 and 1803, frag- 
ments of the K/'ciJihut, Wold Cottage, and Siena meteorites ; in 1812, a 
specimen of surturbrand from Iceland ; in 1813, a small nugget of gold, 
weighing 57 grains (6 * 69 grams), from County Wicklow ; and, in 1817, 
yttrotantalite from Sweden. 

Baring (Thomas). 

Presented, in 1849, a large group of small twin-crystals of calcite, from 
Bermuda. 

Basset- Smith (Percy William). 

Surgeon in the Pioyal Navy. 

Presented, in 1889, a collection (about 130 specimens) of granites, 
quartz-felsites, etc., from China and Borneo. 

Bathnrst (Henry, 3rd Earl). [1762-1834] 

Presented, in 1820, a series of nepheline-syenites and other rocks 
collected by Dr. H. Nicoll in Sierra Leone. 

Battista {Gavaliere Giovanni). 

Presented, in 1876, a series of large polished slabs of Numidian 
marbles from the quarries of Fratelli del Monte, Gran, Algiers. 

Bauer (F.). 

Presented, in 1811, a specimen of platinum from South America. 

Bayfield {Bear-Admiral H. W.). 

For upwards of a quarter of a century in command of the survey of 
the Gulf of, and the liiver, St. Lawrence. 

; Collected during a survey of Lake Superior a series of granites, 
dolerites, etc. ; the specimens (about fifty) were presented by the Lords 
Commissioners of the Admiralty in 1826. 



Minerals. 415 

Bement (Clarence S.). 

Presented, ia 1882, a large, colourless, transparent, doubly terminated 
crystal of quartz, from Switzerlind; and, in 1903, an extremely fine 
group of large rliombohe'lra of rhodochrosite from Colorado. 

His fine collection of unusually perfect mineral specimens was pur- 
ciiased in 1900 for the American Museum of Natural Uistory. 

Bengal, Asiatic Society of. 

See Asiatic Society of Bengal. 

Benza (Dr. P. M.). 

Presented, in 1837 and 1842, various minerals and rocks from India. 

Berkley (James John). [1819-1862] 

Chief Engineer of the Great Indian Peninsula Eaihvay. 
Presented, in 1860 and 1861, an extensive series of beautifully 
crystallised zeolites from the railway cuttings in the Syhadree Mountains, 
Bombay. 
Beroldingen (Franz Colestin, Baron von). [1740-1798] 

Baron von Beroldingen, a Swiss by birth, spent most of his life in 
Hanover and Khenish Bavaria, where he held various ecclesiastical 
appointments. He travelled much for the sake of increasing his know- 
ledge of mineralogy and geology, and amassed a large number of mineral 
an(f other specimens. His collection of minerals, consisting of about 
14000 specimens, was inherited by his nephew, Count von Beroldingen, 
and purchased from the latter in 1816. The specimens are small in size 
and of mediocre quality, but at the time of acquisition they filled gaps in 
the Museum collection, and in addition had some interest as illustrating 
the ideas developed by the collector in his published works— more espe- 
cially his "Bemerkungen auf einer Pteise durch die Pfiilzischen und 
Zweybriickschen Quecksilber-Bergwerke," published in 1778. A manu- 
script German catalogue in two volumes is preserved in the Department. 

Beroldingen (Joseph Ignace, Count von). [1780-?] 

Nephew of Baron von Beroldingen, mentioned above; Wiirtemberg 

Minister in London. 

His uncle's collection was purchased from him in 1816. 

Berzelius {Prof. Jons Jacob). [1779-1848] 

The famous Swedish chemist. 

Presented, in 1817, specimens of berzelianite, yttrocerite, and other 
Swedish minerals. 

The British Museum Collection of Minerals was arranged for many 
years according to Berzelius's chemical system. 

Blot {Frof. Jean Baptiste). [1774-1862] 

Distinguished as a physicist. 

Presented, in 1804, one of the VA'kjU meteoric stones. 

Birley {Miss Caroline). 

Owner of a valuable collection of fossils and minerals. 

Presented, in 1896, a large cube of purple fluor from Weardale, 
Durham ; and also various specimens at other times. 

Blake {Dr.). 

Presented, in 1819, a fragment of the LimerlcJc meteorite. 



41 6 Minerals, 

Blanford {Br. William Thomas). [1832- ] 

Late of the Geological Survey of India; in 1868 accompanied to 
Abyssinia, as geologist, the army commanded by Lord (then Sir Robert) 
Napier, and collected a series of rock-specimens, which he presented in 
1869. (The specimens are described in his book, " Observations on the 
Geology and Zoology of Abyssinia," London, 1870 ; some also by Mr. 
G. T. Prior in the *' Mineralogical Magazine," 1899, vol. xii, pp. 92-95). 

Bollaert (W.). 

Presented, in 1857, two small fragments of the Imilac meteorite. 

Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society. 

Presented, in 1889, fragments of the Bliagur and Kalambi meteorites. 

The Ptoyal Asiatic Society (of London) has founded several branches 
in India, which must not be confounded with the Asiatic Society of 
Bengal (q.v.). 

Bonney {Prof. Thomas George). [1833- ] 

Professor of geology at University College, London [1876-1901]. 
Presented, in 1878, a collection of pitchstones and quartz-felsites from 

the Island of Arran, and has published descriptions of several collections 

of rocks presented to the Museum. 

Born (IGNAZ, Baron von). [1742-1791] 

The collection formed by Baron von Born, and described by him in 
the Lithoijliylacium, was purchased by Greville {q.v.); it formed the 
nucleus of the latter's collection, which was purchased from the heirs-at- 
law by the Trustees in 1810. 

BoTirnon (Jacques Louis, Count de). [1751-1825] 

Owing to the political unrest in France, Count de Bournon was long 
resident In England, where he obtained employment in connection 
with several mmeral collections. From 1794-1806 he gave much of 
his time to the arrangement of the Greville collection. The mineral 
bournonite is named after him. 

Bo wen {Lieut. B.N.). 

Sent about forty rock-specimens from the shores of the Gulf of 
St. Lawrence ; the specimens were presented to the Trustees by H.R.H. 
the Duke of Sussex in 1837. 

Brandreth (A.). 

Presented, in 1877, a fragment of the Jliuiig meteorite. 

Brandreth (E. L.). 

Presented, in 1868, a large mass of salt (hahte) from Salt Range, 
Punjab, India. 

Bright (Benjamin). [?-1900] 
See Bright (Richard). 

Bright (Benjamin Heywood). [1787-1843] 
See Beight (Richard). 



Minerals, 417 

Bright (Richard). [1754-1840] 

Richard Bright, senior, was a merchant and banker in Bristol, and 
resided at Ham Green, on the Avon, near that city. A commercial 
connection with the mines of Cornwall made him early a collector of 
minerals and fossils. His second son, Benjamin Heyvvood [1787-1843], 
added to the collection ; the latter's only son, Benjamin ['?-1900], 
presented it to the Trustees in 1873. British minerals, especially 
celestite, gothite, agate, etc., from the neighbourhood of Bristol are well 
represented in the coUectioo. Of foreign minerals, si)ecial mention may 
be made of red corundum from St. Gotthard, and large crystals of 
idocrase from Egg, Norway. 

British Association, Council of the. 

Presented, in 1882, a collection of about 250 rock-specimens from 
Scotland. 

Brogger (Prof. Waldemar Christopher). [1851- ] 

Distinguished as a geologist and mineralogist. 

Presented, in 1895, a specimen of broggerite, from Moss, Norway ; 
a collection of rock-specimens from the Christiania district, illustrating 
descriptions by him {Eruptivgesteine des KristianiagehieteSj I., 1894 ; 
II., 1895 ; III., 1898), was purchased from a dealer in 1900. 

Bruce (Prof. Archibald). [1777-1818] 

Presented, in 1811, a specimen of chrysoberyl from Greenfield, New 
York ; and, in 1814, a fragment of the Bed River meteorite. 

Bruce (James). 

Presented, in 1862, the large Cranbourne meteorite, weighing 3| tons, 
which arrived at the Museum in 1865 ; it is by far the largest meteorite 
in the collection. 

Brukowsky (J.). 

Presented, in 1884, various gem-stones, mostly faceted. 

Buchanan, afterwards Hamilton {Dr. Francis). [1762- 
1829] 

Distinguished as a botanist. 

Collected, in 1810-1814, a large series of rocks from Gaya, Bhagalpur, 
Shahabad and Goruckpur ; the specimens were incorporated in the India 
Museum and transferred to the British Museum in 1879. 

Buckland {Prof William, Bean of Westminster). [1784-1856] 
Presented, in 1823, a specimen of aragonite from Buckfastleigh, 
Devonshire. 

Budapest, Hungarian Academy of Sciences. 

Presented, in 1867 and 1875 respectively, fragments of the Knyaliiiiya 
and Zsadday meteorites. 

Buie (James). 

Presented, in 1898, a large series of rock-speciincns which he had 
collected to illustrate the geology of the neighbour hood of Portsoy, 
Banffshire. 

VOL. I. 2 E 



418 Minerals. 

Buist {Dr. G.). 

Collected basalts (the Deccan traps), laterite, etc., from Bombay ; tbe 
specimens were incorporated with the India Museum and in 1879 trans- 
ferred to the British Museum. 

Burney {Lieut.-Col. H.). 

Presented, in 1841, a cup of jadeite, which had been given to him by 
the King of Ava. 

Calcutta, Trustees of the Indian Museum. 

Presented, in 1867, fragments of the Gopalpur and STiergliotty 
meteorites, and, in 1870, of the Muti-ka-nagla meteorite. 

Caldcleugh (Alexander). 

Presented, in 1822, a specimen of silver in calcite from Chili. 

Campbell {Lord Colin). [1853- ] 

Presented, in 1894, a series of crystalline limestones and granulites, 
which he had collected in Ceylon. 

Campbell (James R.). 

On the death of Mr. Campbell, of Cheltenham, the Trustees were 
permitted to make a selection from the well-chosen mineral specimens, 
upwards of 3000 in number, which had been brought together by him ; 
as a result nearly 500 specimens were purchased in 1861 and 1862, and 
further three remarkable specimens were presented by his widow, one 
of the latter being a radiating group of crystals of erythrite, of a rich 
crimson colour, on a matrix of crystallised quartz, from Schneeberg in 
Saxony. 

Carruthers (William). [1830- ] 

Keeper of the Botanical Department of the British Museum [1871- 
1895]. 

Presented, in 1880, a collection of basaltic rocks from the neighbour- 
hood of Burntisland and Kinghorn, Fifeshire; and, in 1885, specimens of 
obsidian and of calcareous and siliceous tufa from the Yellowstone Park, 
U.S.A. 

Cathcart (Charles Murray, 2nd Earl of). [1783-1859] 

Discoverer, in 1841, of a new mineral, found in excavating the 

Bishopton Tunnel near Port Glasgow, to which after him (Lord Greenock, 

as he then was) the name of greenockite was given. 
Presented, in 1844, three specimens of the mineral. 

Cautley {Sir Proby Thomas). [1802-1871] 
Projector and constructor of the Ganges Canal. 
Presented, m 1843, a fragment of the Akharpur meteorite. 

Charlesworth (Edward). [1813-1893] 

Presented, in 1839, a specimen of the Cold Bokkeveld meteorite. 

Charleton, or Charlton (William). 

>5'ee CouKTEN (William). 



Minerals, 419 

Children (John George). [1777-1852] 

Keeper of the Zoological Department of the Britisli :\Iiiseum TISOT- 
1840]. ^ 

Presented, in 1817, a fragment of the Moore^fort meteorite. In 1871, 
after his death, childrenite and several other miueral specimens from his 
collection were presented by his daughter, Mrs. Atkins.' 

Christie (H.). 

Presented, in 1812, a specimen of tscheffkinite frcm Ihiien Mountains, 
Eussia. 

Church (Arthur Herbert). [1834- ] 

Professor of chemistry at the Koyal Academy. 

Presented many specimens, including (1881) a group of crystals of 
uranocircite from Falkenstein, Saxony. 

Clapperton {Capt Hugh, B.N.). [1788-1827] 

Collected (1822-1824) a series of granites, sandstones, limestones, 
basalts, etc., in the Soudan ; the specimens (about 70) were presented by 
the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty in 1825. 

Cleveland (Harry George, itl Duke of). [1803-1891] 
Presented, in 1876, the Bowton meteorite. 

Cliffe {Br. Jos6 Estevao). 

Presented, in 1837, gold, diamond and other minerals from Brazil. 

Cogswell {Br. A. C). 

Presented, in 1861, 40 specimens of zeolites from Nova Scotia. 

Collins (Arthur Launcelot). [1868-1902] 
Mining engineer. 
Presented, in 1891, a large crystal of sphene from Risor, Norway. 

Collins (Henry F.). 

Mining engineer. 

Presented, in 1903, a remarkable crystal of wollastonite, in great part 
changed into opal, from Santa Fe, Chiapas, Mexico. 

Compton {Earl, afterwards '2nd Marquess of Northam^pton). 

See Northampton (Spencer Joshua Alvvyne, 2nd Marquess of). 

Conway {Sir William Martin). [1856- ] 

Slade professor of Fine Art at the University of Cambridge, and a 
well-known explorer. 

Presented, in 1897, a series (about 300 small specimens) of rocks 
and minerals from the Karakoram Himalayas ; in 1890, a collection 
(46 specimens) of Bolivian minerals; and, in 1901, a series of rock- 
specimens from the Bolivian Andes. 

Conyngham (G. Lennox). 

Presented, in 1861, a fragment of the Dhurmsala meteorite. 

Cook, afterwards Widdrington {Cai^t. Samuel Edward, R.N.), 
[?-1856] 
Presented, in 1831, a specimen of malachite from Linai e^, Spain. 



420 Minerals. 

Cotter {Miss G. E.). 

Presented, in 1876, a remarkable specimen of quartz (" cotterite ") 
discovered by her in Rock Forest, Coimty Cork. 

Courten, otherwise Charleton, or Charlton (William). 
[1642-1702] 
William Courten came of a family which, especially during the life- 
time of his grandfather. Sir William Courten, occupied a pre-eminent 
position amongst the great mercantile traders of the day, but which about 
the date of his birth met with misfortune, mainly owing to political disturb- 
ances. William Courten himself seems to have had little or no disposition 
for mercantile affairs. To avoid the turmoil caused by the litigation for 
and against the family estates, he retired to Montpelier, and, dropping his 
own name, assumed that of Charleton (or Charlton). Here he devoted 
himself to the enrichment of his museum, which, on his return to England 
after fourteen years' absence, he arranged in ten rooms in the Middle 
Temple. At his death his large collections passed to Sir Hans Sloane 
(q.v.), his residuary legatee. 

Cowper (Sydney). 

Presented, in 1886, a large slab of golden-yellow cat's-eye (quartz), 
and another of blue, asbestiform crocidolite, from the Asbestos Mountains, 
South Africa. 

Cracherode {Bev. Clayton Mordaunt). [1730-1799] 

Trustee of the British Museum [1784-1799]. 

A member of an ancient family, long resident in Essex, Cracherode 
passed most of his life in London. Although he took orders in the 
English Church, and held for a time the curacy of Binsey, near Oxford, 
he neither sought nor obtained further preferment, but devoted all his 
leisure to amassing a fine collection of books, prints, coins, medals, 
gems, minerals and shells, all of which came to the Museum by bequest 
in 1799. Many of the mineral specimens were choice examples, and 
their cost to the collector had been considerable. A detailed manuscript 
catalogue of the collection is preserved in the Department. Special 
mention may be made of : —polished slabs of labradorite and lapis lazuli ; 
crystallised specimens of blende, tetrahedrite, argentite, pyrargyrite and 
heulandite. 

Cunningham (J. F.). 

Presented, in 1899, one of the Zomha meteoric stones. 
Cust (L.). 

Presented, in 1894, 36 specimens, mostly English, from the mineral 
collection made by his mother, Lady Cust. 

Dana (Edward Salisbury). [1849- ] 

Professor of physics and curator of mineralogy at Yale University. 

Presented, in 1878, specimens of the newly-discovered minerals 
eosphorite, triploidite, dickinsonite and lithiophilite from Branchville, 
Connecticut. 

Davies (Thomas). [1837-1892] 

Assistant in the Mineral Department of the British Museum [1862- 
1892]. 

Presented, in 1874, about 50 specimens of basaltic rocks from Fifeshire 
and Skye ; and many other specimens in subsequent years. 



Minerals. 421 

Davis {Major Alexander Henry). 

Presented, in 1903, a magnificent crystal of kunzite, a lilac-culoured 
variety of spodumene, from California. 

Denison {Sir William Thomas, K.C.B.). [1804-1871] 
Governor of Madras [1861-1866]. 
Presented, in 1862, the Nellore and Parnallee meteorites. 

Des Cloizeaux (Alfred Louis Olivier Legrand). [1817- 
1897] 

Professor of mineralogy at the Natural History Museum, Paris. 

Presented, in 1879, senarmontite, several large colourless octahedra on 
the matrix, from Mine d'Hamimad, Constantine, Algeria. 

Devonshire (William George Spencer, 6<A Bulce of). 
[1790-1858] 
Presented, in 1820, calcite and copper-pyrites from the Ecton mine, 
Leek, Staffordshire. 

Doran (Patrick). 

Collected about 200 specimens of volcanic rocks in Ireland which 
were purchased in 1869. 

Douglas {Dr. James). 

Metallurgist, of New York. 

Presented, in 1892, a large mass of botryoidal malachite from Copi>er 
Queen mine, Bisbee, Arizona; and, in 1896, crystallised masses and 
groups of chessylite and malachite from the same locality. 

D'Oyly {Bev. George, B.D.). [1778-1846] 

Brother of Sir John D'Oyly, Bart., who htld various high official 
positions in Ceylon, and doubtless sent over the mineral specimens from 
Ceylon, which Dr. D'Oyly presented in 1827. 

Dudgeon (Patrick). [1817-1894] 

One of the founders of the Mineralogical Society; gave to the 
Edinburgh Museum of Science and Art his large collection of mineral.*, 
which was especially rich iu Scottish specimens. 

Presented, in 1858, zeolites and other minerals from Scotland and the 
Faroe Islands ; and, in 1882, leadhillite, hemimorphite, etc., from Lead- 
hills and Wanlockhead, amazon stone from Tongue, Sutherlandshire, and 
other minerals. 

Duncan (John). 

Presented, in 1782, a specimen of malachite from China. 
Dunn (Edward John). 

About 200 specimens of dolerites, schists, conglomerate?, etc., from 
South Africa (Namaqualand, Transvaal, etc.), collected by him, were 
obtained by exchange in 1873. 
Durazzo {Marchese Ippolito). [1754-1818] 

Mineralogist and afterwards botanist, of Genoa. 

His collection of minerals was probably acquired by Grevillo (7.V.) ; 
an undated manuscript catalogue of the collection is preserved in the 
Department. (The epoch of formation of the collection and catalogue 
is roughly indicated by the system of classification, which is the one 
published by Cronstedt in 1758.) 



422 Minerals, 

East India Company, Directors of the. 

Presented, in 1848, 19 specimens of rocks and minerals from Aden. 

(After the Mutiny the powers of the Company were taken over by the 
Crown in 1858. Hence, for specimens presented at a later date, see India, 
Secretary of State for.) 
Eck (F. A.). 

Presented, in 1882, chlorargyrite, native silver, argentopyrite, and 
other minerals, from Chili. 

Ecton Mine, Proprietors of the. 

Presented, in 1885, large, dark, scalenohedral crystals of calcite, 
enclosing copper-pyrites, from Ecton mine. Leek, Staffordshire. 

Egerton {Sir Philip Malpas de Grey, Bart). [1806-1881] 
Trustee of the British Museum ; much interested in geology, especially 

fossil fishes. 

Presented, in 1840, crystallised vivianite, contained in the interior of 

an Irish deer's tooth, Irom Ireland. 

Elliot (George Francis Scott). 

Botanist. 

Presented, in 1896, about 100 specimens of gneisses, schists, dolerites, 
etc., which he had collected in Sierra Leone; and, in 1900, about 150 
specimens of schists, sandstones, phonolitic rocks, etc., which he had 
collected in British East Africa. 

Evans {Br. John William). 

Geologist. 

Presented, in 1894, about 100 specimens of sandstones, limestones, 
shales, etc., which he had collected in Matto Grosso, Brazil. 

Exeter (Brownlow, Wi Earl of). [1725-1793] 

Presented, in 1764, a table-top inlaid with Yesuvian products; and, in 
1765, a polished oval slab of brown and yellow jasper. 

Feilden {Col. Henry Wemyss, C.B.). [1838- ] 

Collected a large series of gneisses, schists, slates, limestones, etc., from 

north Greenland, during Sir G. S. Nares's Arctic Expedition of 1875-1876 ; 

the specimens were presented by the Lords Commissioners of the Ad- 
miralty in 1877. 

Fergusson (Malcolm). 

Collected a series of about 50 specimens of schists, felsites, phonolites, 

etc., from Tropical Easr Africa ; the specimens w^ere presented by the 

Lake Tanganyika Expedition Committee in 1900. 

FitzGerald (Edward Arthur). [1871- ] 

Climber and explorer. 

Presented (with Mr. S. Vines), in 1899, a series (about 60 specimens) 
of andesitic lavas, etc., which they had collected in the Andes. 

Fleming {Br. Andrew). 

Collected, about the year 1853, a series of specimens (limestones, 
sandstones, slates, etc.), illustrating the geology of the Punjab Salt Range 
and of the Cashmere Hills ; the specimens were incorporated in the India 
Museum, and transferred to the British Museum in 1879. 



Minerals. 423 

Plinders {Ca^t. Matthew, H.N.). [1774-1814] 

Hydrographer and discoverer. 

Collected a series of schists, slates, limestones, etc., on the north and 
€ast coasts of Australia in 1801-1803 ; the specimens (about 50) were 
presented by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty in 1811. 

Tort (Richard). [1856- ] 

Presented, in 1886, a series of polished specimens of protogine from 
Mont Blanc. 

Oeinitz {Br. Hanns Bruno). [1814-1900] 

Director of the Koyal Mineralogical Maseum at Dresden [1857-1900]. 
Presented, in 1886, a fragment of the Nenntmannsdorf meteorite. 

Giesecke (Charles Lewis). [1761-1833] 

Carl Ludwig Metzler (afterwards Giesecke) collected minerals during 
a six years' residence in Greenland. In 1811, the ship containing the 
specimens collected by him was captured by a French privateer, retaken 
by an English frigate, and with its cargo sold by auction at Leith ; many 
of the specimens were acquired by Thomas Allan {q.v.). In 1813, 
Giesecke returned from Greenland with another collection, and visited 
Allan at Edinburgh. Through the latter's instrumentality, he was 
shortly afterwards appointed director of the Museum of the Royal Dublin 
Society. 

Gosset {Col. M.). 

See Jones {Prof. Thomas Rupert). 

Gravine (G.). 

Presented, in 1838, twenty-four Sicilian ambers. 

Great Britain and Ireland; Director of the Geological 
Survey of. 

Presented, in 1903, a collection of rock-specimens from the Assynt 
district, Satherlandshire. 

Great Laxey Mine, Proprietors of the. 

Presented, in 1851, a very large group of crystals of galena with 
rhombohedra of calcite and some blende, from the mine. 

Greg (Robert Hyde). [1795-1875] 

After the death of Thomas Allan (^.v.), his mineral collection was 
privately purchased in 1835 from his executors through Prof. 1 rail, ol 
Edinburgh, by Robert Hyde Gr.g, a Manchester merchant, to whose 
residence, Norcliffe Hall, Cheshire, the collection was moved in the lollow- 
ing year, 1836. E. H. Greg, although possessed of some knowledge ot 
mfueralogy, was better known as an economist and antiquary, and tor 
some years after it came into his possession no additions ^^ere niade to 
the collection. His son, Robert Philips [1826- , took up the subject 

with great vigour, and for three years, 1848-1851, sP^'^t f.^^^^^^^'^^^^^ 
sums in bringing the collection up to date by the acquisi ion ot new 
specimens, mSstfy through various dealers R. P. Greg ^^ ^ "kno^n to 
liineralogists as joint author with W. G. Lettsom of a " M.nual of he 
Mineralogy of Great Britain and Ireland" published ^° ^.f ;;^| J ^^'^^ 
contains many allusions to specimens in the Allan-Greg col ctK.n In 
1860, the collection was purchased by the Trustees from R. U. C^re, 



424 Minerals, 

thr-ough his son. It consisted at that date of about 9000 specimens, all 
of which were numbered and arranged. Its series of British minerals, 
with the exception of Cornish specimens, was the finest known. The 
collection was also rich in Norwegian minerals, and the series of chessy- 
lite and idocrase were extraordinarily good. It also included specimeiis 
of twenty-seven meteorites which were at that time unrepresented in the 
Museum. 

Greg (Robert Philips). [1826- ] 
Son of Kobert Hyde Greg ((/.v.). 

Gregory (James Reynolds). [1832-1900] 

Mineral dealer, of London. 

A selection (58 specimens) of faceted stones (sphene, spinel, sapphire, 
zircon, etc.) was purchased from his collection in 1889. 

Gregory (John Walter). [1864- ] 

Assistant in the Greological Department of the British Museum [1887- 
1900] ; professor of geology and mineralogy at the University of Melbourne 
since 1900 ; director of the Geological Survey of Victoria since 1901. 

Presented, in 1895, variolitic diabases collected by him in the 
Fichtelgebirge, and schists and variolites collected by him in the Cottian 
Alps ; and, in 1900, a series of rock-specimens collected by him during 
his expedition to Mount Kenya in 1892-1893. 

Grenville (William Wyndham, Baron). [1759-1834] 

Distinguished as a statesman. 

Presented 189 specimens of Peruvian minerals, chiefxy ores, in 1809 ; 
a manuscript list of them, received at the same time, is preserved in the 
Department. 

Greville {Bt. Eon. Charles Francis, B.C.), [1749-1809] 

The Ptt. Hon. Charles Greville, P.O., F.R.S., of London, son of the 
first Earl of Warwick, and nephew of Sir William Hamilton, died intestate 
in the year 1809, and it became necessaiy to realise his property for 
division among his next-of-kin. The property included a collection of 
minerals which he had been forming for more than thirty years, and had 
arranged in his house at Paddington Green. Its nucleus was the collection 
of Baron von Born {(l.v.), which was purchased from him by Greville, 
To this was probably added the collection of the Marchese Ippolito 
Durazzo {q.v.). Between 1794 and 1806 Count de Bournon {q.v.) gave 
much time to the arrangement of Greville's collection, and during the 
same period gave advice as regarded further acquisitions. The collection 
became eventually the finest assemblage of minerals which had been seen 
in England, and was declared by English mineralogists and Count de 
Bournon in 1810 to be in most parts equal, and in many parts superior,, 
to the best Continental collections. A sum of money w as specially voted 
by Parliament for the purchase of the collection, numbering about 1480O 
specimens, for the British Museum. The faceted stones of the Greville 
collection did not form part of this purchase, but had been disposed of 
separately; but the precious stones in their native condition were well 
represented ; there were fine series of crystallised diamond, ruby, sapphire, 
emerald, topaz, and rubellite. It also included fragments of the following 
meteorites: — Barbotan, Cape of Good Hope, Elbogen, Enshheim, Salles, 
Tahor find Weston, all of which had been unrepresented in the Museum 
Collection. 



Minerals, 425 

Grewingk (Constantin Caspar Andreas). [1819-1887] 
Professor of mineralogy at the University of Dorpat [1857-1887]. 
Presented, in 1865, a fragment of the Nerft meteorite. 

Grey {Sir George, K.C.B.). [1812-1898] 

A famous explorer and statesman. 

Presented, in 1845, a collection (about 300 specimens) of granitos, 
schists, sandstones, limestones, etc., from South Australia ; and, in 1^55, 
a specimen of jade from New Zealand. 

Gunther (Robert Theodore). [1869- ] 

Fellow and tutor of Magdalen College, Oxford. 

Presented, in 1899, a small series of volcanic rocks and limestone!?, 
which he had collected in the neighbourhood of Lake Urumin, Persia. 

Guppy (Henry Brougham). 

Surgeon of H.M.S. Lark. 

Presented, in 1883, a series of andesites, dacites, basalts, limestones, 
etc., which he had collected in the Salomon Islands. 

Guthrie (C. S. J. L.). 

Presented, in 1869, a remarkable parallel growth of crystals of 
rubellite, of a deep colour, from Ava. 

Haddon (Alfred Cort). [1855- ] 

Lecturer in ethnology at the University of Cambridge. 

Presented, in 1894, a series of basalts, granites, limestones, etc., whicb 

he had collected at Torres Straits. 

Haidinger (WilheLxM Karl von). [1795-1871] 

Haidinger, born at Vienna, early displayed a bent towards mineralogy, 
and, in 1812, studied with Prof. Mohs at Graz, accompanying him i-j 
Freiberg on the latter's transference to that town in 1817. He remained 
there five years, and, in 1822, travelled to France and England. He 
made the acquaintance of Thomas Allan {q.v.), an Edinburgh banker, 
and rendered him great assistance in the formation and arrangement of 
his fine mineral collection. During the years 1825 and 1826, he accont- 
panied Allan's son, Robert, on a scientific journey through marly the 
whole of Europe. For thirteen years (1827-1840) he was with his brothers 
at their porcelain factory in Elbogen, and, in 1840, succeeded Mohs at 
Vienna. Here he founded the union of the " Freunde der Naturwissen- 
schaften," from which sprang the Academy of Sciences and numerous other 
scientific societies. In 1849, he was appointed director of the new 
Geologische Pteichsanstalt, a post held till his retirement in 1866. 

Hamilton {Br. Francis). 

See Buchanan, afterwards Hamilton {Dr. Francis). 

Hamilton {Ut. Hon. Sir William, K.B.). [1730-1803] 

British Minister at the Court of Naj^les. 

Presented specimens of lavas, and a series of large polished sections 
of volcanic bombs from the dolomitic breccias of Monte Somma, \ esuvius, 
in the years 1768, 1769, 1772 and 1779. 
Hamlin {Br. Augustus Choate). [1828- ] 

Of Maine, U.S.A. 

Presented, in 1871, a fiagment of the Scarsmont meteorite. 



426 .Minerals. 

Hanks {Frof. Henry G.). 
Of San Francisco. 
Presented, in 1885, a fragment of the IvanpaJi meteorite. 

Hardman (Edward Townley). [1845-1887] 

Presented, in 1886, a collection (about 150 specimens) of granites, 
dolerites, quartzites, etc., from Western Australia. 

Harman (Frederick E.). 

Presented, in 1894, about 100 specimens of gneisses, schists, dolerites, 
etc., from Bechuanaland. 

Harrington {Dr. Bernard James). 

Presented, in 1885, dawsonite, phlogopite (a large crystal), meneghinite, 
etc., from Canada. 

Hatch {Dr. Frederick Henry). [1864- ] 

Geologist and mining engineer. 

Presented, in 1897, a series of about 100 rock-specimens, which he 
collected to illustrate the geology of the southern Transvaal. 

Hatchett (Charles). [1765-1847] 

Charles Hatchett, F.R.S., of London, devoted the earlier part of his 
life to the study of mineralogy and chemistry, and is still remembered by 
chemists for his discovery of a new metal to which he gave the name 
<;olumbium. His extensive mineral collection, numbering some 7000, 
znostly small, specimens, was purchased in 1799. The collection was 
particularly rich in British minerals, and, in addition, Mr. Hatchett, in 
the course of his travels on the Continent, and by means of correspondence, 
had obtained many good illustrations of foreign minerals; from Count 
A polios de Moussin Poushkin, for example, he had received a large number 
of Russian specimens, a manuscript list of which is preserved in the 
Department. The collection also included a fragment of the Senegal River 
meteorite. Hatchett presented, in 1821, a specimen of hatchettite (the 
mineral species named after him) from Merthyr Tydvil, South Wales. 
Hauer {Dr. Carl Ritter von). [1819-1880] 

Of Vienna. 

Prepared numerous so-called artificial crystals, which were shown m 
the Austrian Court of the Exhibition held in London in the year 1862 ; 
the specimens were presented in the same year. 
Hearne (Samuel). [1745-1792] 

Explorer. 

Brought, in 1771, a large water- worn mass of copper from a spot 
■29 or 30 miles S.S.E. of the mouth of the Coppermine river, British 
North America ; the specimen was presented to the British Museum by 
the Hudson Bay Co. in 1818. 

Herschel {Sir John Frederick William, Bart). [1792- 
1871] 

Distinguished as an astronomer. 

Presented, in 1839, a specimen of the Cold BoMeveld meteorite. 

Heuland (Henry). [1777?-1856] 
Mineral dealer, of London. 
Many specimens have been acquired through him, notably those 



Minerals. 427 

selected from tlie extensive collection belonging to the Countess of 
Aylesford {q^.v.) ; be also presented, in 1831, a fragment of tlie Bithurg 
meteorite. 

Hicks (George), p-1902] 

Of Newquay. 

Presented, in 1879, the large mass, weighing 450 lb. (201 kilograms), 
of the Imilac meteorite, and also the Mount Hicks and Serrania dt 
Varas meteorites ; and, in 1882, a large pure mass of chlorargyrite from 
Florida mine, Taltal, Atacama, Chili. 

Hicks {Dr. Henry). [1837-1899] 

Presented, in 1878, rock specimens which he had collected at 
St. Davids, Pembrokeshire ; and, in 1881, a similar series together with 
a collection from Pioss-shire, illustrating his papers on the Pre-Cambrian 
rocks published in the Quart. Journ. Oeol. Soc. The corresponding thin 
sections were presented by his widow in 1902. 

Hidden (William Earl). 

Presented, in 1895, mackintoshite from Texas, and ruby from North 
Carolina. " Hiddenite," a rich green variety of spodumene, was named 
after him ; a fine faceted specimen was purchased in 1881. 

Hill (?). 

Presented, in 1827, a specimen ;of hatchettite from Merthyr Tydvil, 
South Wales. 
Hinrichs {Dr. Gustavus Detlef). [1836- ] 

Of Iowa, U.S.A. 

Presented, in 1875, a fragment of the West Liberty meteorite. 

Hodgson (Joseph). [1788-1869] 

Presented, in 1857, a specimen of jarrowite. 

Hoffmann {Dr. George Christian). 

Assistant-director of the Canadian Geological Survey. 

Presented, in 1891, a collection (about 50 specimens) made by him of 
the nepheline-syenites and associated camptonitic dykes of Montreal, and 
also several minerals. 

Hohmann (Theodor). [1843-1897] 

Mining engineer in Chili. . . 

A series of about 55 specimens, selected from his private collection ol 
South American minerals, was purchased in 1903. 

Holdsworth (T. H.). 

Presented, in 1832, childrenite from Crinnis mine, Cornwall. 

Hooper (Thomas J.). 

Presented, in 1899, a large specimen of andorite, encrusted with 
numerous large crystals, from Itos Atocha mine, Oruro, Buhvia. 

Horsfield {Dr. Thomas). [1773-1859] 

Keeper of the Museum of the East India Company, London [1820-18o9]. 

Collected, in 1816, a large series (about 300 specimens) of andositic 
and basaltic lavas, limestones, etc., from Java ; the si>cciinens were 
incorporated with the India Museum, and transferred to the lintisli 
Museum in 1879. 



428 Minerals, 

Howarth (Osbert Henry). 

Of London. 

Presented, in 1899, a fragment of the El Randdto (Bacubirito) 
meteorite. 

Hudson Bay Company. 

Presented, in 1818, a waterworn mass of copper, brought by Samuel 
Hearne from a spot 29 or 30 miles S.S.E. of the mouth of the Coppermine 
river, British North America, in 1771. 

Hume {Sir Abraham, Bart.). [1749-1838]. 

Presented, in 1822, two polished slabs of jadeite from China. 

The fine mineral collection brought together by him is in the posses- 
sion of the University of Cambridge. 

Hungarian Academy of Sciences. 

See Budapest, Hungarian Academy of Sciences. 

Hunt (Arthur Roope). 

Presented, in 1895, a series of rock-specimens, which he had collected 
in Devonshire ; the specimens were selected to show the relations between 
the Devonian and metamorphic rocks. 

Hussak {Dr. Eugen). 

Of the Commissao Geographica e Geologica de Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Presented, in 1897, new minerals (tripuhyite, derbylite and lewisite) 
from Brazil. 

India, Director of the Geological Survey of. 

Presented fragments of the Chandpur and PlrtliaUa meteorites in 
1885, of the Nammianthal meteorite in 1886, of the Lalitpur meteorite 
in 1887, of the Kahangarai meteorite in 1892, of the Bishunpur and Bori 
meteorites in 1895, of the Amhapur Nagla meteorite in 1896, of fthe 
Nawalpali meteorite in 1897, of the Gamhat meteorite in 1898, of the 
Donga Kohrod and Kodaikanal meteorites in 1901, and of the Sindhri 
meteorite in 1902 ; also a large crystal of colourless, transparent blodite, 
very symmetrically developed on all sides, from Warcha Mine, Salt 
Kange, Punjab, India, in 1893 ; and, in 1901, a large collection of typical 
rock-specimens from India, which formed part of the India Exhibit at the 
Paris Exhibition of 1900. 

India Museum, London. 

In 1877, fragments of meteorites, including the Gurram Konda stone, 
and, in 1879, various mineral specimens and rock-collections, were trans- 
ferred from the India Museum. 

India, Secretary of State for. 

Presented the Bustee, Durala and one of the Shalka meteoric stones 
in 1860, a fragment of the Dhurmsala meteorite in 1861, one of the 
Supuhee meteoric stones in 1865, and the Udipi meteorite in 1869. 

Indian Museum, Trustees of the. 

See Calcutta, Trustees of the Indian Museum. 

Inglis {Sir Robert Harry, Bart). [1786-1855] 
Trustee of the British Museum. 
Presented, in 1842, harmotome, strontianite, etc., from Strontian, 



Minerals, 429 

Jamaica Institute, Governors of the. 

Presented, in 1885, a fragment of the Luclcy 17111 meteorite. 

Jennings (Alfred Vaughan). [1864-1903] 

Demonstrator of geology and botany at the Royal College of Science, 
Dublin. 

Presented, in 1899, rock-specimens, which he had collected in the 
Davos district, and in the Manod and Moelwyns, Wales. 

Jervis {Cavaliere Guglielmo Paget). 

Curator of the Reale Museo Industriale Italiano, Turin. 

A large series of Italian minerals and rocks, including marbles from 
the various quarries in the vicinity of Carrara, collected by him, was 
purchased in 1877; and a series (300 specimens) of gneisses, schists, 
slates, etc., from Italian and Alpine localities, to supplement the earlier 
series, was purchased in 1897. 

Joel (Lewis). 

Vice-Consul at Cobija. 

Presented, in 1863, a meteoric iron found in the Desert of Atacama, 
Chili. 

Johnson (J. C F.). 

Presented, in 1897, specimens of gold ores from the various gold-fields 
of Australia. 
Johnston {Sir Harry Hamilton, G.C.M.G.). [1858- ] 

Presented, in 1902, a large collection of ferruginous schists, phonolitic 
rocks, basalts, nephelinites, etc., from the Uganda Protectorate, of which 
he was Commissioner (1899-1901). 

Jones {Prof. Thomas Kupert). [1819- ] 

Presented, in 1889, about 60 specimens of limestones, schists, etc., which 
had been collected in Somaliland by Captain S. King during an expedition 
from Zaila to Mount Eilo, and a small series of granites, felsites, etc., 
which had been collected by Col. M. Gosset in Sokotra. 

Judd {Prof. John Wesley, C.B.). [1840- ] 

Professor of geology since 1876 at, and dean since 1895 of, the Poyal 
College of Science, London. 

Presented, in 1874, a collection of rock-fragments from Mull and 
Arran, illustrating his papers in the Quart. Joiirn. Oeol. Soc. on the 
Tertiary eruptive rocks from the Western Islands of Scotland; and, in 
1877, a series of andesitic rocks from the districts round Schemnitz and 
Kremnitz, Hungary ; and many other specimens in subsequent years. 

Junagadh {Naivah of). 

Presented, in 1894, a fragment of the Bherai meteorite. 

Keilhau {Prof. Balthazar Mathias). [1 797-1 S.")8] 

Presented (with Prof. Scheerer), in 1813, mispickel, alhuiite and 

gadolinite, from Norway. 

Kiamil (Ms Eiglmess, Pasha). 

Presented, in 1903, a fragment of the Caratash meteorite. 

KmC{Oapt. S.). 

See Jones (Prof. Thomas Rupert). 



430 Minerals, 



Kjerulf {Trof. Theodor). [1825-11 

Director of the Geological Survey of Norway. 
Presented, in 1865, a fragment of the Ski meteorite. 

Koch {Bergratli Friedrich Carl Ludwig). [1799-1852] 

A selection (200 specimens) from his collection of minerals, mainly 
from the Harz, was purchased in 1897. 

Kochibe (Dr. Tadanori). 

Director of the Geological Survey of Japan. 

Presented, in 1900, about 158 representative minerals and rocks from 
Japan. 
Koksharov {General Nicolai Ivanovich). [1818-1893] 

Koksharov was the son of the Director of Mines at Beresovsk, in the 
Urals, and, following in his father's footsteps, became a mining engineer 
in the Imperial Service. In 1845, he was appointed professor, and, in 
1872, Director of the Mining Institute at St. Petersburg, a post held till 
his retirement in 1891. His private collection (about 3250 specimens) 
was purchased in 1865, and the Museum was thereby enriched with an 
admirable series of Kussian, and, in particular, of Siberian minerals, the 
finest specimens of which are rarely offered for sale beyond the borders of 
the Kussian Empire. The collection had served as material for the 
valuable series of memoirs in ten volumes, published by General 
Koksharov under the title of " Materialien zur Mineralogie Kusslands " 
(1853-1891). His position as Director of the Mining Institute at St. 
Petersburg afforded him exceptional opportunities for the acquisition of 
fine specimens. 

Koulibini {Prof,). 
Of St. Petersburg. 
Presented, in 1877, a fragment of the Verhhne-Dniejprovsh meteorite. 

Krantz {Br. August). [1809-1872] 

Mineral dealer of Berlin and, after 1850, of Bonn. 

A large series of crystals (2624 in number), brought together by him, 
was purchased in 1859 ; it contained specimens of very rare minerals, 
such as euclase and wagnerite, and was rich in series of felspars, 
hemimorphite, augite, chrysolite, beryl, phenakite, sapphire and zircon. 

Lake Tanganyika Expedition Committee. 

Presented, in 1900, a series (50 specimens) of schists, felsites, phono- 
lites, etc., collected by Mr, M. Fergusson in Tropical East Africa. 

Lane (A. L.). 

Presented, in 1903, fine specimens of cerussite from Broken Hill, New 
South Wales. 

La Trobe {Bev. Benjamin). 

A prominent Moravian Minister. 

Presented, in 1777, two large, pohshed slabs of labradorite (showing 
change of colour on change of incidence of the light), from Nain, 
Labrador. 

Latrobe (Charles Joseph). [1801-1875] 
Governor of Victoria. 
The " Latrobe" gold nugget, weighing 23 oz. Troy (717 grams), and 



Minerals, 431 

well crystallised in cubes, was so called in his honour, having been raised 
in his presence at Mclvor Mount, Victoria, on May 1st, 1853; the nuf^fret 
was purchased in 1858. 

Law (S.). 

Presented, in 1843, carnelian, jasper and chalcedony, from India. 
Leadbeater (Benjamin). 

Presented, in 1838, witherites from Xorthumberland. 

Lehmann (Gustav). 

Presented, in 1874, two large, isolated crystals of parisite from Muso, 
Colombia. 

Leidy {Br. Joseph). [1823-1891] 

Presented, in 1876, specimens of corundum and associated minerals 
from North Carolina and Pennsylvania, and also various other minerals 
from the United States ; and, in 1878, coquimbite, erythrite, etc., from 
Chili. 

Lettsom (William Garrow). [?-1887] 

Joint author with K. P. Greg {q.v.) of a " Manual of the Mineralogy 
of Great Britain and Ireland," published in 1858. 

Presented, in 1846, a group of pale flesh-red rhombohedra of chabazite 
(acadialite) on the matrix, and a group of brick-red rhombohedra of 
chabazite with stilbite in a rock-cavity, both from Wasson's Bluff, Bay of 
Fundy, Nova Scotia ; in 1850, two groups of dark-green crystals of epidote 
on the matrix, from Traversella, Piedmont ; and, in 1863, specimens of 
chalcedonic minerals from Uruguay. 

Leuchtenberg (H.LH. the DuJce of). [1843-1891] 

President of the Imperial Mineralogical Society of St. Petersburg 

[1865-1891]. 

Presented, in 1869, a nugget of platinum, weighing 1350 grains 

(87 • 5 grams), from Nijni-Tagilsk, Urals. 

Liversidge (Archibald). [1846- ] 

Professor of chemistry at the University of Sydney. 

Presented, in 1885, thin sections, and, in 1897, a fragment of the 
Barratta meteorite ; and, in 1891, a slice of the Tliunda meteorite. 

Loftus (William Kennett). [1821 ?-1858] 

Arch^ologist and traveller. 

Presented, in 1855, limestones, schists and slates, which he had 
collected in the mountain ranges of western Persia, and also volcanic rocks 
from Lake Van, etc. 

Logan {Sir William Edmond). [1798-1875] 

Director of the Geological Survey of Canada [1842-1870]. 
Presented, in 1856, a fragment of the Madoc meteorite. 

London Basalt Stone Company, Directors of the. 

Presented, in 1899, a column of basalt, 14 i- feet (^4 '4 meters) long, 
from Ehenish Prussia. 

Ludlam (Henry). [1824-1880] 

Henry Ludlam devoted his leisure to mineralogy, and brought together 
an extremely fine collection, in which were included the collections made 



432 Minerals, 

by Charles Hampden Turner and William Nevill ; it was bequeathed by 
him to the Museum of Practical Geology, London. He presented to the 
British Museum, in 1877, a magnificent group of large, transparent, 
scalenohedral crystals of Chilian proustite, which, having been protected 
from the hght, have retained both their colour and their transparency ; 
and, in 1879° a large collection (about 600 specimens) of volcanic rocks 
frorn various European localities (Auvergne, Vosges, etc.). 

Lutschaunig (Alfred). 

Presented, in 1864, a meteoric stone, found in the Desert of Atacama, 
Chili. 
Lyon {Ca^t. George Francis, B.N.). [1795-1832] 

A suite of specimens of alluvial and other gold, brought together 
by him during his stay in the iDrincipal gold districts of Brazil, was 
purchased in 1833. 

McCloiinie (J.). 

Presented, in 1899, one of the Zoniba meteoric stones. 

McCormick {Beputy Inspector-General Robert, B.N.). [1800- 
1890] 
A selection from the rock-specimens collected by him during the 
Arctic Expedition of 1827, Antarctic Expedition of 1839-1843, and the 
Franklin Search Expedition of 1852-1853, came to the Museum in 1890 
by bequest. 

Macdonald {Major C). 

Presented, in 1862, a series of specimens of turquoise from Wadi 
Maghara, Arabia Petr^a. 
Maclear (Sir Thomas). [1794-1879] 

Astronomer Royal at the Cape of Good Hope [1833-1870]. 

Presented, in 1839 and 1863, respectively, specimens of the Cold 
Bokheveld and Kaee meteorites. 

Majendie (Ashurst). 

Presented, in 1835, diallage, cuprite and other minerals from Cornwall. 

Mantell (Dr. Gideon Algernon). [1790-1852] 

Geologist. ^ T . . , ,, , 

Presented, in 1834, a very large mass of alummite from IN ewhaven, 

Sussex. A fragment of the Nanjemoy meteorite was purchased from him 

ia 1839. 

Marks (E. W.). 

Presented, in 1854, several crystals of parisite from Muso, Colombia. 

Marryat (?). 

Presented, in 1819, three specimens of ilvaite from Elba. 

Marsham-Townshend {Hon. Robert). [1834- ] 

Presented, in 1877, thirty specimens, mostly from Brazil, including 
quartz, pyrrhotite and cbalybite, from San Juan del Key mine, Minas 
Geraes. 

Maskelyne (Mervin Herbert Nevil Story-). 
See Stoky-Maskelyne (Mervin Herbert Kevil). 



Minerals, 433 

Medlicott (Henry Benedict). [1829- ] 

Director of the Geological Survey of India [1876-1887]. 
Presented, in 1886, thirty-seven specimens of Indian rocks. 

Menzies (Archibald). [1754-1842] 

Presented, in 1800, iron-pyrites with blende, cop])er-i)yiitcs, poarl-spar 
calcite and quartz, all crystallised, Irom Chili. 

Merino (Miguel). 

Astronomer at Madrid. 

Presented, in 1896, a fragment of the Madrid meteorite. 

Mitchell {Sir Thomas Livingstone). [1792-1855] 
Australian explorer. 
^ Presented, in 1848, a collection (about 50 specimens) of rocks and 
minerals from northern Australia. 

Moll (Karl Ehrenbart, Baron von). [17G0-1838] 

From 1790 to 1804 Baron von Moll was Chancellor of the JOxchcqucr of 
the Electorate of Salzburg. He then retired from i)ublic life, and devfjted 
his leisure to scientific pursuits at Munich, and later at Augsburg. His 
library and natural history collections were purchased in 181") ; many 
minerals of great scarcity and beauty, especially from Salzburg and the 
Tyrol, were thus added to the collection. 

Monte del Aquacata Mining Company. 

Presented, in 1872, a large mass of gold-quartz, portion of a rich quart/.- 
lode, from San llafael, Costa Rica. 

Monticelli (Teodoro). [1759-1846] 

Monticelli, a benedictine, was for two years [1792-1794] profc.sf>or of 
ethics at the University of Naples. The following years, till 1800, were 
spent in prison, as a result of his participation in the political disturbances 
of the time. He was appointed professor of chemistry at the University 
of Naples in 1808. His large collection (upwards of 2000 specimens) of 
Vesuvian products, both minerals and lavas, etc., was purchased in 1823. 
The results of a study of these products are given in Monticelli and 
Covelli's " Prodromo della Mineralogia Vesuviana," 1825. A manuscript 
list of the specimens, in the handwriting of Covelli, is preserved iu 
the Department. Many of the best specimens of crystallised Vesuvian 
minerals now in the Museum came as part of the Monticelli collection. 

Moreno {Br. Francisco P.). 

Director of the Museum of La Plata. 

Presented, in 1899, a large polished slab of green marble from 
La Toma, Argentina, and a fragment of the Caperr meteorite. 

Moss (Milton). 

Mining engineer, of Cripple Creek, Colorado. 

Brought together, during the years 1894-1901, an excellent suite of 
rare tellurides, including several fine crystals, from Cripple Crct-'k, which 
were purchased from him. 

MUller {Capt. William). [?-1846] 

Presented, in 1826, boracite from Liiueburg. 
VOL. I. i? F 



434 Minerals. 

Murray {Sir John, K.C.B.). [1841- ] 

The collections, obtained by the Challenger Expedition of 1873-1876, 
were presented, in 1890, by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty 
through Sir John Murray. 

Nabeshima (Naotaro). 

Of Japan. 

Presented, in 1883, the Ogi meteorite. 

Nares {Bev. Robert). [1753-1829] 

Presented, in 1797, two mamillary masses and a polished slab of 
malachite from the Urals. 

Netherlands, Government of the. 

Presented, in 1887, a fragment of the Djati-Pengilon meteorite. 

Neumayer (Dr. Georg Balthasar). [1826- ] 
Of Hamburg. 
Presented, in 1869, a fragment of the Krdhenherg meteorite. 

Nevill (William). 

Presented in 1862 and 1864, respectively, fragments of the Perth 
and Agra meteorites; in 1861, 200 mineral specimens from his collection 
were purchased from him. 

His collection of minerals was acquired by Henry Ludlam (q.v.). 

New South Wales, Department of Mines and Agri- 
culture. 

Presented, in 1903, a small collection of rock-specimens from New 
South Wales. 

Newnes (Sir George, Bart). [1851- ] 

Presented, in 1902, the series of rock-collections, obtained by the 
Antarctic Expedition of the Southern Cross under Mr. C. E. Borch- 
greviuck, which he had organised and despatched. 

Nicholson (Prof. Henry Alleyne). [1844-1899] 

Presented, m 1872, various Canadian minerals. 
Nicolay (Bev. Charles G.). 

Of Perth, Western Australia. 

Presented, in 1885, the Youndegin meteorite. 

Nicoll (Dr. H.). 

Collected a series of nepheline-syenites and other rocks from Sierra 
Leoue, which were presented by Earl Bathurst in 1820. 

Noja (Giovanni Caraffa, Duke of). [1715-1768] 

Presented, in 1758, a mocha-stone, set in an enamelled ring. 

North Eastern Railway Company, Directors of the. 

Presented, in 1881, a fragment of the Middlesbrough meteorite. 
Northampton (Spencer Joshua Alwyne, '2nd Marqiiess of). 
[1790-1851] 

President of the Royal Society [1838-1848] and Trustee of the British 
Museum. 

Presented, in 1818 (when he was still Earl Compton), melilite and 



Minerals. 435 

other Vesuvian minerals ; in 1832, hasmatite on lava from Vesuvius ; iii 
1845, a large specimen of beekite from Devonshire ; and, in ISoO, a fine 
group of pink crystals of apophyllite from Samson mine, Andreatiber*.', 
Harz. 

Northumberland (Algernon Percy, Ath DuJce of). [1792- 
1865] 
Presented, in 1829, a collection (about 30 specimens) of granites, 
quartz-felsites, sandstones, etc., from the Sinai Peninsula. 

Nuttall {Prof. Thomas). [1784-1859] 

A selection of specimens from his collection, including a fine group of 
kyanite crystals from Massachusetts, was purchased in 1860. 

Oldham {Dr. Thomas). [1816-1878] 

Superintendent of the Geological Survey of India. 

Presented, in 1861 and 1863 respectively, fragments of the Ptrpi 
and Kusiali meteorites. 

Ouseley {Sir Gore, Bart.). [1770-1844] 

Presented, in 1833, a specimen of turquoise from Persia. 

Owen {Prof. Sir Richard). [1804-1892] 

Superintendent of the Natural History Departments of the "British 
Museum [1856-1884]. 

Presented, in 1857, a specimen of jarrowite. 

Parish {Sir Woodbine, K.G.B.). [1792-?] 

Presented, in 1826, the large Otumpa meteorite, weighing 1400 lb. 
(600 kilograms), and, in 1828, a fragment of the ImiJac meteorite. 

Parkinson (John). 

Presented, in 1840, a fragment of the Zacatecas meteorite. 

Parry {Sir William Edward). [1790-1855] 

Collected during the expedition to the Polar regions of 1810-1820 
various rock-specimens, which were presented by the Lords Commissioners 
of the Admiralty in 1821. 

Pearce (Richard). 

Presented specimens at various times ; among them, in 1886, copper 
minerals from Mammoth mine, Utah. 

Persia {SJiah of). 

Presented, in 1882, a fragment of the Veramin meteorite. 

Petiver (James). [1658-1718] 

His extensive natiual history collections were purchased m 1-18 by 
Sir Hans Sloane {q.v.). 

Phillips (A. G.). 

Presented, in 1897, many thin rock-sections from the collection ot hi9 
father, J. A. Phillips. 

Pilcher and Sons {Messrs.). 

Presented, in 1851, a mass, weighing 32 lb. (14-5 kilograms), of 
graphite. 



436 Minerals. 

Planta (Joseph). [1744-1827] 

Principal Librarian of the British Museum [1799-1827]. 

Presented, in 1807, a crystal of boracite, in gypsum, from Liineburg, 
Hanover. 
Poushkin {Count Apollos de Moussin). 

Included in Hatchett's {q.v.) collection, which was purchased in 1799, 
were many Russian specimens, which he had received from Count 
Poushkin ; a manuscript list of them is preserved in the Department. 

Prudhoe {Lord, afterwards ith Duke of Northumberland). 
See Northumberland (Algernon Percy, 4:th Duke of). 

Raikes (J. M.). 

Presented, in 1824, gold with aikinite, in quartz, from Beresovsk, Urals. 
Raisin {Dr. Catherine Alice). 

Presenter], in 1896, a series of granites, sandstones, camptonitic dyke- 
rocks, etc., from Egypt, collected by Mr. Gr. F. Scott Elliot, and has pub- 
lished descrijitions of several collections of rocks presented to the Museum. 

Ridley (Henry Nicholas). [1855- ] 

Assistant in the Botanical Department of the British Museum [1880- 
1888]. 

Presented, in 1887, about 200 specimens of phonolites, basalts, etc., 
which he had collected in the Island of Fernando Noronha. 

Rochon {Abhe Alexis Marie). [1741-1817] 

Distinguished as an astronomer and navigator. 

Presented, in 1790, atacamite (" copper-sand ") from Atacama, Chili. 

Rodriguez {Dr. Jos£ Santos). 

A large series of leucitic lavas and tuffs from the neighbourhood of 
Rome, collected by him, was purchased in 1894. 

Rose (GusTAv). [1798-1873] 

Professor of mineralogy at the University of Berlin. 

Fifty-eight crystals, which had belonged to his private collection, v/ere 
purchased in 1895. 

The British Museum Collection of Minerals was re-arranged (1858- 
1862) by Mr. Maskelyne according to Rose's crystallo-chemical system. 

Royal Society. 

The Delta Boring Committee presented in 1897 a series of specimens 
(with sections) of the deposits of the Nile Delta, obtained during the 
boring operations at Zagazig undertaken by the Royal Society. 

Ruskin {Prof John). [1819-1900] 

Slade professor of Fine Art in the University of Oxford. 
Presented, in 1850, two specimens of fluor (" the Coutte rose-fluors ") 
from Switzerland ; in 1865, several large specimens, including; a polished 
mass of Iceland spar, harmotome from Strontian, chessylite from Chessy, 
a long branch of crystallised native copper from Lake Superior, celestite 
from Sicily ; in 1884, about 50 specimens of agate and chalcedony (which, 
when arranging a case to illustrate the " Forms of Silica," he presented to 
supplement the specimens in the collection); and, in 1887, the"Colenso" 
diamond, a large yellowish octahedron, weighing 130 carats (27 grams), 
and the "Edwardes" ruby (corundum). 



Minerals. 437 

Rutley (Frank). [1842-1904] 

Presented, in 1902, collections of rock-specimens (with microscopic 
sections) from the Malverns, North Wales and Cornwall, illustrating his 
papers in the Quart. Joiirn. Geol. Soc. 

Ryan (Sydney). 

Presented, in 1899, a collection (over 100 specimens) of gneisses, 
schists, ferruginous shales, etc., from the Ingwenya Berg and Emhahaan 
district. West Swaziland. 

Sabine (Sir Edward). [1788-1883] 
Pi-esident of the Ptoyal Society [1861-1871]. 
Presented, in 1818, amber, graphite, and other minerals from Greenland. 

St. Petersburg, Imperial Academy of Sciences. 

Presented, in 1770, a fragment of the Pallas meteorite. 

Samuel (N.). 

Presented, in 1903, a series of rock-specimens, which he had collected 
in Ashantee. 

San Francisco, Town Authorities of. . 

Presented, in 1803, a specimen of the Tucson meteorite. 

Sanderson (John). [?-1881] 
Of Natal. 
Presented, in 1878, a fragment of the Cronstad meteorite. 

Sanderson (J. H.). 

Presented, in 1877, a series (about 30 specimens) of basaltic rocks 
from the neighbourhood of Edinburgh. 

Sansoni (Prof. Francesco). [1853-1895] 

An extensive collection of crystals of calcite, being j^art of the material 
used by him for his memoirs on the crystallography of that species, was 

i:)urchased in 1895. 

Scheerer {Prof. K. J. A. T.). [1813-1875] 
Bee Keilhau {Prof. B. M.). 

Schimper {Br. Wilhelm). [1804-1878] 

Collected in the neighbourhood of Adowa and Axnm, Abyssinia, a series 
(about 100 specimens) of schists and slates, and phonolitic rocks containing 
riebeckite and a3girine ; the specimens were purchased in 1809. 

Schlagintweit (Hermann [1826-1882], Adolpii [1829-1857], 
and Robert [1833-1885], von). 
Collected a series of rock-specimens, when on a scientific mission to 
India and High Asia between the years 1854-1858 ; the specimens were 
incorporated in the India Museum, and transferred to the British Museum 
in 1879. 

Schulten (August Benjamin, Baron dk). [185G- ] 
Lecturer in cliemistry at the University of lielsingfors. 
Presented, in 1898, a large polished block of orbicular granite from 

Kangasniemi, Finland. 



438 Minerals, 

Seidler (C). 

Presented, in 1885, a very large, simple crystal of staurolite, and, in 
1890, a fibrolite hatchet ; both from France. 

Sharpe {Sir Alfred, C.B., K.C.M.G.). [1853- ] 
His Majesty's Commissioner for British Central Africa. 
Presented, in 1899, two of tlie Zomha meteoric stones. 

Shockley (W. H.). 

Presented, in 1898, a series of rock-specimens, collected by him in 
Mongolia and the Province of Lia Tong, Manchuria; and, in 1901, a series 
(about 200 specimens) of granites, schists, felsites, andesites, etc., collected 
by him on the north-east coast of Siberia. 

Siam, Royal Department of Mines and Geology. 

Presented, in 1897, a series of about 70 small rock-specimens from 
Siam, collected by Mr. H. Warington Smyth (q.v.). 

Simmons (Richard). 

Presented, in 1836, well-crystallised specimens of cerussite, calamine 
(large green rhombohedra from Chessy), beryl, mimetite, gold, argentite, 
rutile, barytes, idocrase, apatite, and tluor. 

Sloane (Cavaliere). 

Presented, in 1860, sloanite, larderellite, caporcianite and other 
minerals from Italy. 

Sloane {Sir Hans, Bart.). [1660-1753] 

Secretary [1693-1712], and President [1727-1741], of the Koyal Society. 

Sir Hans Sloane, Bart., studied medicine at Paris and Montpelier, and 
at the latter place made the acquaintance of his future friend, William 
Courten (q.v.). In 1687, Sloane sailed to the West Indies as physician 
to the Governor of Jamaica (the Duke of Albemarle), and during his 
fifteen months' stay there collected natural history specimens, more 
especially plants. On his return to London in 1689, he settled in practice 
in Bloomsbuiy Square, and was rapidly successful. His natural taste for 
collecting seems to have been stimulated by Courten, and as early as 
1691 EvelyD, in the Diary, recorded a visit made to his curiosities. On 
Courlen's death in 1702, Sloane inherited the whole of his valuable 
collections, and, in 1718, purchased that of Petiver. In 1742, the 
entire collection was moved to the Manor House, Chelsea, and, in 1753, 
acquired for the Nation. 

Smith (Armstrong). 

Presented, in 1891, a small collection of basaltic lavas from Kilauea, 
including specimens of the lava stalactites described by Prof. E. S. Dana. 

Smith {Dr. Christen). [1785-1816] 

Director of the Botanical Gardens of the University of Christiania. 

Made (with Mr. Tudor), in 1816, a small collection of gneisses, schists, 
etc., at the mouth of the Congo ; the specimens were presented by the 
Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty in the same year. 

Smyth (Herbert Warington). [1867- ] 

Secretary of the Department of Mines at Johannesburg, Transvaal. 
Collected in Siam a series of about 70 small rock-specimens, which 
was presented in 1897 by the Royal Department of Mines and Geology, 
Siam : presented, in 1898, sapphires and spinels from Siam. 



Minerals, 430 

Snow ( — ). 

Presented, in 1811, copalite (" Highgate resin") from Ili-'h<-:ite. 
Middlesex. o o . 

South African Museum, Trustees of the. 

Presented, in 1874, a fragment of the JJelliany meteorite. 

South Australia, Government of. 

Presented, in 1886, a collection (about 400 specimens) of granites, 
gneisses, schists, etc., from South Australia, including a scries of rocks 
from the Barossa and Echunga goldtields. 

Stapflf {Dr. Friedrich Moritz). [1836-1895] 

Selected a series of specimens from the rocks met with during the 
boring of the St. Gotthard Tunnel : the series, with geological tables 
and sections, was purchased in 1881. 

Stefani {Prof. Carlo de). [1851- ] 

Of Florence. 

Collected large series (about 200 specimens) of granites, gneisses, 
schists, limestones, etc., from the island of Corsica, and of granites, 
gabbros, schists, limestones, etc., from the island of Giglio; the former 
series was purchased in 1892 and the latter in 1894. 

Stokoe (Robert). 

Presented, in 1838, witherites from Northumberland. 

Story-Maskelyne (Mervin Herbert Nevil). [1823- ] 
Keeper of Minerals in the British Museum [1857-1880], and professor 

of mineralogy at the University of Oxford [1856-1895]. 

Presented specimens in various years, including the following : — in 

1880, bright crystals of columbite from Standish, Maine, and other 

minerals; and, in 1887, several fine, large masses of precious opal, in the 

matrix, from Queensland. 

Strachey {Lieut-Gen. Sir Richard, G.C.S.L). [1817- ] 

Made a large collection of schists, slates, granites, etc., IVoni Kumaun 
and southern Tibet, illustrating the geology of part of the Himalayas ; 
the specimens were incorporated in the India Museum, and transferred 
to the British Museum in 1879. 

Strangford (Percy Clinton Sydney, 6//* Viscomt). [1780- 
1855] 
Presented, in 1827, two specimens of flexible sandstone from Itacoluini 
Mountain, Minas Geraes, Brazil. 

Swan {Mrs.). 

Presented 979 specimens of variegated clay from London and tiic 
vicinity in 1839. 

Sweden, Director of the Geological Survey of. 

Presented, in 1887, a collection of about 80 typic;i.l nH-k-.^pocini(Mis 
from Sweden. 
Sykes {Col William Henry). [1790-1872] 

Collected basalts, etc., from Bombay; the specimens were incorporated 
with the India Museum, and, in 1879, transterred to the British Museum. 



440 Minerals, 

Symes {Col. Michael). [1753?-1809] 

The largest and most remarkable crystal, or parallel growth of crystals, 
of rubellite, known to exist, was given by the King of Ava to Col. Symes, 
when the latter was on an Embassy to that country in 1795 ; it was 
acquired for the Trustees, in 1810, by the purchase of the Greville 
collection. 

Szabo {Prof. Jozsef). [1822-1894] 

Presented, in 1876, a collection (about 40 specimens) of andesitic 
rocks from Hungary. 

Talmage {Br. James Edward). 

Professor of geology at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City. 
Presented, in 18^3, crystals of selenite, of extraordinary size, from 
Wayne County, Utah. 

Tattenall {Mrs. Ann). 

Bequeathed about 120 mineral specimens, which were acquired by the 
Trustees in 1848. 

Tayler (John William). [1822- ] 

Presented, in 1855, Greenland minerals, including fine columbites ; 
and, in 1861, eudialyte, sapphirine and allanite, from Greenland. 

Taylor (John). [1789 ?-1 863] 

Mining engineer. 

Presented, in 1825, brilliant, greenish-yellow crystals of pyromorphite 
on the matrix, from Wheal Alfred, Cornwall ; and, in 1859, a magnificent 
group of white and colourless lamellar crystals of cerussite, many of them 
twinned, fi'om Logylas mine, Aberystwith, Cardiganshire. ' 

Taylor (W.). 
Of Elgin, N.B. 
Presented, in 1895, a fragment of the Concepcion meteorite. 

Tendron (Frederick). 

Presented, in 1883, a very fine crystal of pyrrhotite from Morro Velho, 
Minas Geraes, Brazil. 

Thomasset (H. P.). 

Presented, in 1898, a large suite of very delicately crystallised speci- 
mens of aragonite from the Sterkfontein caves, Barnett, Transvaal. 

Thomson (Taylour). 

Presented, in 1863, a fragment of the Vaca Muerta meteorite. 

Tilden {Br. John N.). 
Of New York State. 
Presented, in 1886, a fragment of the Jenmjs Creek meteorite. 

Trail {Lady Frances). 

Presented, in 1833, worked articles of agate and heliotrope. 

Treasury, Lords Commissioners of the. 

Presented, in 1876, about 150 specimens of basaltic lavas, etc., from 
the Island of Rodrigaes, which had been collected by Prof. I. Bayley 
Balfour during the " Transit of Veuns " Expedition of 1^74-1875. 



Minerals, .\.\\ 

Trevelyan {Sir Walter Calverley, Bart.), [l 707-1879] 
Presented, in 1826, zeolites, opal, etc., iVom tiio Faroe Islands. 

Tudor ('?). 

See Smith {l^r. Christen). 

Ulrich (Georg Heinrich Friedrich). [1830-1900] 

Professor of mining and mineralogy at the University of Otagu, 

Dnnedin, New Zealand. 

Presented, in 1890, specimens of awaruitc (terrestrial mckcl-iron) 

and serpentine, from New Zealand; ami, in 18UI, a fi-agin<iit ol the 

Makariioa meteorite. 

Unanue (Hipolito). [1755 (1758?)-! 833] 
Secretary of the Philosophical Society at liinia. 
Presented, in 1814, silver in calcite, from Peru. 

United Asbestos Company. 

Presented, in 1890, asbestos (a mass of long, wlnte fibres) from 
Valtellina, Lombardy, Italy. 

Vicary (William). [1811-1903] 

Presented, in 1874, a collection of " Exeter trap" and other volcanic- 
rocks (about 30 specimens) from Devonshire. 

Vienna, Imperial Museum of. 

Presented, in 1814, a fragment of the Staaacrn meteunte. 

Vines (Stuart). 

See FitzGerald (Edward Arthur). 

Ward {Bev. James Clifton). [1843-1880] 

Presented, in 1877, specimens of volcanic ash, etc., whicli he had 
collected in the vicinity of Keswick, Cumberland. 

Warth (Dr. H.). 

Presented, in 1876, crystallised si)ecimens of bloditc from the Mayo 
salt mines, Punjab, India. 

Wavell {Br. William). [?-1829] 

Presented, in 1817, a specimen (from Devonshire) of wavellite, a 
mineral species which had been named after him. 

Webb (Philip Barker). [1793-1854] 

Presented, in 1841, about 300 specimens of phont-litir and basaltic 
lavas, which he had collected in the Canary Islands. 

Western Australia, Government of. 

Presented, in 1902, a collection of gold tcllurides and other gold ores 
from Western Australia. 

Western Australia, Mines of. 

Various companies presented, m VMVl, :^old tellundcs and -th.r gold 
ores from Western Australia. 

3n 

aft 



Widdrington {Gapt. Samuel Edward B.N.). 

See Cook, afterwards Widdrington {Capt. Samuel Edward h.^.). 



VOL. 



442 Minerals. 

Wilkinson {Sir John Gardner). [1797-1875] 

Antiquary and archaeologist. 

Presented, in 1839, a series of Egyptian minerals and ores, and about 
sixty specimens of schists, serpentines, breccias, etc., from Egypt and 
Arabia Petrsea. 

Willcox {Col. Joseph). 

Presented, in 1889, various American minerals: 150 specimens, 
chiefly American, selected from his collection, were purchased in 1893 
from his son. 
Williams (John Charles). [1861- ] 

550 specimens, chiefly from Cornish mines, selected from the exten- 
sive collection of Mr. J. C. Williams, of Caerhays Castle, Cornwall— a 
collection made by his father and grandfather— were presented by bmi m 
1893. Of these may be specially mentioned :— a very large mass ot 
cerussite, as delicate silky needles, from Pentire Glaze mine, Padstow, 
Cornwall ; and a unique specimen of Cornish spangolite. 

Wills {Bev. J.). 

Missionary in Madagascar. 

Presented, in 1889, a large crystal of black tourmalme, with sharp 
termination, and a collection of rocks, from Madagascar. 

Winslow (E. N.). 

Of Hyannis, Mass., U.S.A. 

Presented, in 1876, a fragment of the SUngU Springs meteorite. 

Wollaston (Dr. William Hyde). [1766-1828] 

Distinguished as chemist and as the inventor of the reflective 
goniometer. 

Presented, in 1815, iridosmine with platinum, gold and magnetite, 
from the Urals. 
Woodward (Bernard Barham). [1853- ] 

Assistant in Charge of the General Library, British Museum (Natural 
History). 

Presented, in 1889, gneisses, schists, granites and diorites, which he 
had collected in Guernsey. 

Woolmer (Shirley). 

Presented, in 1829, garnet, magnetite and tourmaline, from Haytor, 
Devonshire. 

Wright {Itev. George Frederick). 

Presented, in 1875, a series of specimens of cassiterite from New 
England, New South Wales. 

L. FLETCHER. 



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