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Full text of "History of Colorado;"

978.8 
St7h 
v.2 
1541064 



GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



LLEN COUNTY PUBLI 



3 1833 01099 9495 



HISTORY 



O F 



COLORADO 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



CHICAGO 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 
1918 



©cbiratcb 

to tfjC 

pioneers of Colorabo 



1541064 




HON. HENRY M. TELLER 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



HON. HENRY M. TELLER. 

Among the men whose careers reflect honor and credit upon the state that has 
honored them, none has risen to a position of higher distinction or left more indelibly 
his impress upon the history of the nation than did Senator Henry M. Teller. His 
ability to thoroughly grasp every point in all the great problems of the country, to 
look at any question from the broad standpoint of future needs as well as present 
opportunities, made him the peer of the ablest statesmen of America. Removing to 
the west with its boundless opportunities, he became one of the builders of the great 
western empire and the recognition of the important part which he was playing made 
him not only a leader of public thought and action in Colorado but in the nation as 
well. 

Henry M. Teller was born upon a farm in Allegany county, New York, May 23, 
1830, and traced his ancestry back to Wilhelm Teller, who was born in The Netherlands 
in 1620 — the year that brought the first settlers from Holland to the new world. In 
1639 he crossed the Atlantic to New York, settling at Fort Orange, now Albany, where 
by appointment of the king he acted as trustee of one of the tracts of land in that 
region which were under royal control. In 1664 he became a resident of New York 
city, there spending his remaining days. He wedded Mary Dusen and had a son, 
William, and the line of descent is traced down through William (III) and William (IV) 
to Isaac Teller, who became a prominent physician of New York. During the Revolu- 
tionary war he volunteered for service as a surgeon and died while faithfully perform- 
ing his duties. He married Rebecca Remsen, a native of Brooklyn. New York, and 
their son, Remsen Teller, was born about 1769. He resided at Schenectady. New York, 
and married Catherine McDonald, of Ballston Spa, New York, a daughter of David 
and Sarah (DuBois) McDonald and a granddaughter of Colonel Louis DuBois, of 
Ulster county, New York, who won his title by service in the war for independence. 

John Teller, son of Mr. and Mrs. Remsen Teller, of Schenectady, New York, was 
born February 15, 1800, and married Charlotte Moore, whose birth occurred in Ver- 
mont in 180S and who passed away at her Illinois home in 1901, at the advanced age 
of ninety-three years. In early manhood John Teller removed to a farm in Allegany 
county, New York, and afterward established his home at Girard, Erie county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he remained for ten years and then went to Morrison, Whiteside 
county, Illinois, where he passed away in 1S79. 

No event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm life for 
Henry M. Teller during the period of his boyhood and youth. He was ambitious to 
enjoy excellent educational advantages and with that end in view he took up the pro- 
fession of teaching and earned the money that enabled him to complete his academic 
studies. He afterward became a student in the law office of Judge Martin Grover, of 
Angelica, New York, and was admitted to practice on the 5th of January, 1858. He 
then opened a law office in Morrison, Illinois, where he continued for three years, 
when he was attracted to Colorado, gold having been discovered at Pike's Peak. It 
was not the lure of the mines, however, that took him to the west but the belief that 
he might find opportunity to engage successfully in law practice in the newly devel- 
oping district. He opened an office at Central City in April, 1861, and after three 
years was joined by his brother, Willard, the firm of H. M. and W. Teller being thus 
established. He first came into prominence in 1865 ps the founder and promoter of 
the Colorado Central Railroad. He drew up the charter for the line and presented it 



6 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

to the legislature and for five years after the organization of the company acted as its 
president, placing the corporation on a sound financial basis that insured its future 
permanence. His splendid qualities of leadership won him prominence in various 
directions. During the Indian troubles of 1863 Governor Evans appointed him major 
general of the territorial militia and he thus served for two years. A contemporary 
writer has said of him: "His decision of character, his admirable common sense and 
his versatility as a lawyer, added to his earnestness and straightforwardness as a 
man, commended him in every way to the struggling pioneers of those days, and marked 
him as a leader in whatever field he might enter." 

Senator Teller was long a most prominent figure in connection with the political 
history of his state. Soon after taking up his abode at Central City he came into 
prominence as a political leader and in 1876, when Colorado was admitted to the 
Union, was enthusiastically chosen one of its two representatives in the United States 
senate. He drew the short term of three months and on the expiration of that period 
was elected for the full term of six years, serving from 1877 until 1883. His senatorial 
record forms an important chapter in the history of national legislation during that 
period. Soon after becoming a member of the senate he was appointed on a committee 
on privileges and elections and went to Florida to investigate the alleged frauds in 
the election of 1876. In 187S he was made chairman of a special committee to inves- 
tigate the alleged election frauds in the southern states and his report was a model 
document for thoroughness and close analysis of facts and conditions. As chairman of 
the committee on civil service he did efficient pioneer work in directing public atten- 
tion to the importance of radical changes and in the formulation of practical measures 
of reform and relief. When Chester A. Arthur as president formed his cabinet Senator 
Teller was chosen secretary of the interior and added new laurels to his already un- 
tarnished record by his devotion to the interests of the department and by .the energy 
and consummate judgment which characterized his work in connection with his 
position. On the 4th of March, 1885, with the termination of his service as secretary 
of the interior, he again became a member of the upper house of congress as successor 
of Hon. Nathaniel P. Hill. While seated in the national halls of legislation he was 
chairman of various important committees, including that on pensions, patents, mines 
and mining and also served as a member of the committee on claims, on railroads, 
judiciary, finance, appropriations and public lands. His legislative experience was 
most broad and he was regarded as authority upon many subjects of national concern. 
He never hesitated to freely express his honest convictions, even when at variance with 
other leaders of the party. This was manifest when he became the avowed champion 
of the free coinage of silver and until his death he remained a stanch advocate of 
bimetalism, believing that the act of 1873 in demonetizing silver proved most preju- 
dicial to the welfare of the nation and especially injurious to the interests of Colorado. 
He gave much time to the study of all problems relative to coinage, and that the people 
of Colorado recognized him as a most stalwart champion of their interests is shown 
by the fact that upon his return to the state, following the senate session of 1S93, they 
accorded him a most enthusiastic and brilliant reception. In the national republican 
convention of 1896 he labored most earnestly to make the free coinage of silver a plank 
in the party platform. Disappointed in this, he and his followers left the convention 
hall, and though his disappointment at the decision of his party was most keen, the 
people of his state rendered him their heartfelt thanks for his steadfast support of 
their interests. Senator Teller's work in behalf of Cuba constitutes one of the glorious 
pages of American history. The account of this has been given as follows: "On April 
15, 1898, in the United States senate, there was added to a joint resolution concerning 
the Island of Cuba the following paragraph, which was drawn and submitted by 
Senator Teller of Colorado: '4th. That the United States hereby disclaims any dispo- 
sition or intention to exercise sovereignty, jurisdiction, or control over said Island, 
except for the pacification thereof, and asserts its determination, when that is accom- 
plished, to leave the government and control of the Island to its people.' On May 22, 
1902, the senate having under consideration a bill to provide for the civil government 
of the Philippine Islands, Senator Hoar of Massachusetts said: 'I do not know how 
other men may feel, but I think that the statesmen who have had something to do w T ith 
bringing Cuba into the family of nations, when they look back on their career; that 
my friends who sit around me, when each comes to look back upon a career of honorable 
and brilliant public service, will count the share they had in that as among the bright- 
est, the greenest, and the freshest laurels in their crown. * * *' Speaking of Senator 
Teller, Senator Hoar said: 'I doubt whether any man who has sat in this chamber 
since Charles Sumner died, or whether all who sit here now put together, have done 
a more important single service to the country than he did in securing the passage of 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 7 

the resolution which pledged us to deal with Cuba according to the principle of the 
Declaration of Independence.' Senator Spooner of Wisconsin on the same day said: 
'I voted with great pleasure for the resolution offered by the senator from Colorado 
as wise, as statesmanlike, and from my point of view it was of infinite consequence. 
We declared to the world that in stepping between Spain and her revolting colony we 
had no purpose in the end to make of Cuba an American asset. It is important to a 
government which holds colonies that this principle of international law should be 
strictly observed, and I believe, if my friend the senator from Colorado will pardon 
me just a moment longer, that the resolution introduced by the senator from Colo- 
rado, and its adoption by the senate, had more to do than all other things in preventing 
a combination against us among the nations which hold colonies.' Senator Hale of 
Maine, speaking of the Teller resolution on the same day, said: 'I look upon it as a 
most providential thing in the course of this whole matter that the senator from 
Colorado had the forethought, the prescience, to submit that resolution and attach it 
to the proceedings, and thereby make it for us a constraining force from that day to 
this. I believe that had it not been for that declaration always standing before us as 
an outright and express pledge and agreement Cuba today would not be a free re- 
public. * * * The senator from Colorado, for initiating this most beneficent propo- 
sition, and the senator from Wisconsin, with the attitude that he held at that time, 
almost equal with him, are more to be thanked than any others for our having first 
made this promise and then kept it.' On the same day Senator Teller, after referring 
to the fact that the resolution had been condemned by some newspapers upon the 
ground that it prevented our taking Cuba, and that he had delayed for a long time to 
defend the resolution, said: 'I never could do it better than now, when the American 
flag has come down from Cuba, but, better still, a flag for Cuba has gone up. The 
American flag is the best flag in the world for Americans. It is not the best flag for 
men who do not want it. It is not the best flag for Cuba. Cuba's flag, not represent- 
ing a hundredth part of the power or glory of ours, is the flag for Cuba, and when the 
Filipinos shall put up their flag and ours shall come down, as I believe it will some 
day, it will be a better flag to them than ours can be, although you may administer 
your government with all the kindness and all the wisdom of which human beings are 
capable. The best flag is the flag that the men themselves put up. It is the only flag 
that ought to command the admiration and love and affection of the men who live 
under it, and it is the only flag that will. Liberty-loving men will never have any love 
for a flag that they do not create and that they do not defend.' " 

It was at Cuba, New York, June 7, 1862, that Senator Teller wedded Miss Harriet 
M. Bruce, a daughter of Picard Bruce, an Allegany county farmer, and they became 
parents of three children, all born in Central City, Colorado. Senator Teller was a 
thirty-second degree Mason and his high standing in the order is indicated by the fact 
that for seven years he was grand master of the state and was the first grand com- 
mander of the Knights Templar of Colorado, while in the Mystic Shrine he was hon- 
ored with the most important offices. In 1886 Alfred University conferred upon him 
the honorary degree of LL. D. We again quote from a contemporary biographer, 
who drew a most correct picture of Senator Teller while he was still an active factor 
in the world's work, de^'.h claiming him February 23, 1914, when he had attained the 
age of eighty-three ye&rs and nine months. The writer said: "Of the personal character- 
istics of Senator Teller, one of the most conspicuous is that quality which enables him 
to look ahead, discerning and measuring the political and economic influences which 
bear upon the welfare of the people. As a leader, he is calm and keen, maintaining 
such a steady control over his own mind and emotions as to throw upon others the 
same dispassionate spirit in the formation of their judgments upon public questions 
and men. Because of this wonderful self-control, Senator Teller has sometimes been 
called cold; but like the broad and deep ocean, his warm currents of sociability, kind- 
ness and sympathy flow beneath the surface of his character. From a character sketch, 
contributed to the Denver Evening Post by the brilliant writer, Fitz-Mac, the following 
extract is offered as a concise and striking estimate of Senator Teller's personality: 
'He has this mark of genuine greatness above any man I know in Colorado, or perhaps 
any that I personally know in public life, except Tom Reed, speaker of the house 
of representatives. He is simple. He is natural. He is without affectation. He is 
simple, because it is natural for him to be simple; and simplicity indicates the calm 
mind and clear vision as to the relation of things, their real values, It seems to me 
that the holy spirit of patriotism has descended upon Teller and enveloped him. and 
entered into his soul, and sanctified his purposes. He stands before the country as the 
tongue of Colorado, but he speaks not for Colorado alone, not alone for the United 
States, but for the humbler three-fourths of all humanity. Soberly, bravely and ably 



8 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

he is fighting humanity's holy cause for one and all, and it behooves us, as an intel- 
ligent, appreciative and generous people, to hold up his honored hands steadfastly, and 
stand by him with a courage as dauntless, as devoted as his own.' " 



EVAN E. EVANS. 



Evan E. Evans is prominently known in business circles of Denver as president 
and treasurer of the Evans Investment Company which is the owner of the Evans 
block and other buildings of the city. Here he was born on the 26th of June, 1863, when 
Colorado was still under territorial rule and when his father was serving as the second 
territorial governor. He is a son of Hon. John and Margaret P. (Gray) Evans, who 
are mentioned at length upon another page of this work. When the father passed 
away he was survived by his widow and three children, the daughter being Anne 
Evans, while the sons were William G. and Evan E., of this review. The mother 
passed away in Denver in 1906. 

In early life Evan E. Evans attended the public schools of Denver and afterward 
had the benefit of instruction in a boarding school in London, England, for two years. 
He next became a student in the Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois, of 
which his father had been one of the founders. He spent a year there and then went 
to Indiana, where he entered business life on his own account. Subsequently he re- 
moved to Los Angeles, California, where he engaged in merchandising from the early 
'80s until 1889. Returning to the east, he took up his abode in Chicago, where he 
engaged in the insurance business for several years, but in 1895 he again came to his 
native city, where he entered into the insurance and investment business, in which he 
has since been engaged. At the same time he has been identified with many other 
big business enterprises of city and state as a director and officer. His real estate 
holdings are extensive, important and profitable. 

In April, 1912, Mr. Evans was married in Hoboken, New Jersey, to Kathryn Farrel, 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Farrel, of Wheeling, West Virginia. Madelyn Evans, 
daughter by a former marriage, was born in New York city in 1903. Mr. Evans is a 
member of the Denver Athletic Club, also the Denver Country Club, the Denver Civic 
and Commercial Association, the Rocky Mountain Club of New York city, the Phi Kappa 
Sigma, a Greek letter fraternity, and other social organizations. He has never sought 
to figure prominently in public connections as his father did but has along the lines of 
business become recognized as one of Denver's most representative citizens and ranks 
equally high in social circles. 



HENRY BAAB, Sb. 



With business interests of Greeley, Henry Baab, Sr., is actively connected, being now 
engaged in the successful conduct of a grocery store in that city. He was born October 
22, 1855, in Germany, a son of Henry and Elizabeth Baab. He pursued his education in 
the public schools of the Rhine Palatinate and for three years was a high school pupil. 
Starting out in the business world in connection with the manufacture of flour, he 
worked in flour mills of that country for seven years. The favorable reports that 
reached him concerning America and its opportunities led him to cross the Atlantic 
to the United States and on the 7th of May, 1882, he arrived in Pennsylvania. He was 
afterward employed in flour mills in Pittsburgh for three and a half years and during 
that period he gained wide knowledge of the English language and the customs of the 
people among whom he had cast his lot. At length he started out independently in 
business in renting a flour mill in Butler, Pennsylvania. He had previously served for 
three years in the army in his native country and he came to the new world in order 
to get away from militarism. He has never had occasion to regret his determination 
to try his fortune on this side of the Atlantic. It was in 1887 that Mr. Baab came to 
Colorado, where he has since made his home. He took up a homestead claim in 1888 
and with characteristic energy began to till the soil, not a furrow having been turned 
nor an improvement made upon the land when it came into his possession. He carried 
on general agricultural pursuits with good success for a considerable period or until 
1906, when he disposed of his farm. For fifteen years he held the position of post- 
master in Wentz and for eighteen years he occupied a place on the school board, the 
cause of education finding in him a stalwart champion. He became actively identified 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 9 

with financial interests in Greeley as a director of the Greeley National Bank and 
acted in that capacity for six years. He has been engaged in the grocery trade since 
November, 1906, and in this connection has built up a good business. He carries a large 
and well selected stock of staple and fancy groceries and puts forth every effort to 
please his patrons, while his reasonable prices and honorable dealings are substantial 
elements in his growing prosperity. 

Mr. Baab was married in 1879 to Miss Margaret Dreisigacker and to them have been 
born the following children: August, Louis, Henry, Herman, Albert, Bertha and Willie. 
The religious faith of the family is that of the Baptist church and in his political views 
Mr. Baab has always been a republican since becoming a naturalized American citizen. 
He stands for progress and improvement in all that has to do with the public life of 
the community. He has never had occasion to regret his determination to come to 
the new world, for he here found the business opportunities which he sought and which 
have given him a good chance for advancement. He has wisely used his time, talents 
and opportunities and has long occupied a creditable position in the business and 
financial circles of Greeley. 



HON. EDWARD OLIVER WOLCOTT. 

Hon. Edward Oliver Wolcott, who was a most distinguished citizen of Colorado 
and the representative of his state in the national halls of legislation, serving as 
United States senator, was born in Longmeadow, Massachusetts, March 26, 184S, and 
had scarcely reached the fifty-seventh milestone on life's journey when called to his 
final rest, passing away on the Riviera, March 1, 1905, while traveling with his brother 
in Europe. His ancestral history is one of long and close connection with New Eng- 
land. The line is traced back to Tolland, Somersetshire, England, where lived Henry 
Wolcott, representative of a family that had there resided through many generations. 
The spirit of enterprise actuated this Henry Wolcott, who, leaving his mother country, 
sailed from Plymouth, England, on the 20th of March, 1630, and was one of the com- 
pany that settled at Dorchester, Massachusetts. After six years' residence there he 
went to Connecticut in 1636 and from that period to the present members of the 
Wolcott family have figured in connection with events which are indelibly stamped 
upon the pages of American history. One of the members of the family affixed his 
signature to the most famous American state paper — the Declaration of Independence. 
Washington appointed one of the members of the family to a place in his cabinet, three 
of the number have served as governor of Connecticut and one as governor of 
Massachusetts, while in more recent days others of the name have won fame and 
distinction, Edward 0. Wolcott becoming United States senator from Colorado, while 
his brother, Henry Roger Wolcott, serving as a member of the Colorado senate, became 
acting governor of the state, and his sister, Miss Anna Louise Wolcott, now Mrs. Joel 
P. Vaile, was elected regent of the State University in 1910. The Wolcott family are 
the possessors of a coat of arms, which includes three chess-rooks, the use of which 
was authorized by Henry V to one of the ancestors, who checkmated the king in a 
game of chess. It was Samuel Wolcott. great-grandfather of Senator Wolcott, who 
served with the American forces in the Revolutionary war. He was the father of 
Elihu Wolcott and the latter in turn the father of the Rev. Samuel Wolcott, who was 
born in South Windsor. Connecticut. July 2, 1813, and passed away at Longmeadow, 
Massachusetts, in February, 1886. He was a man of scholarly attainments who was 
graduated from Yale in 1833 and completed a course in the Andover Theological 
Seminary with the class of 1837. He afterward did missionary work in Syria and 
following his return to the United States was pastor of many of the leading Congre- 
gational churches. He was the author of many well known hymns, including the one 
which is so generally sung. "Christ for the World We Sing." 

The family has ever been noted for marked devotion to country and in 1864, when 
but sixteen years of age, Edward O. Wolcott displayed the patriotic spirit which had 
ever actuated his ancestors by enlisting in the One Hundred and Fiftieth Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry, with which he served in the defense of Washington. Following the 
close of the war he resumed his interrupted education, matriculating at Yale in 1866. 
After studying for a time there he took up the study of law at Harvard and completed 
his course in 1871. On the 20th of September of the same year he arrived in Colorado 
and for eight weeks engaged in teaching school at Blackhawk but at the end of that 
period entered upon the active practice of his chosen profession. In Christmas week 
of 1871 he removed to Georgetown, Colorado, where he made his home and practiced 




HON. EDWARD O. WOLOOTT 




HENRY R. WOLCOTT 



12 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

law until 1879. He then became a resident of Denver. Throughout the intervening 
period he had made steady progress in his profession and outside of his practice had 
become well known as the writer of various newspaper articles. In 1876 he had been 
elected to the office of district attorney and he was again called upon for public 
service when on the 4th of March, 1889, he became United States senator as the 
successor of Thomas M. Bowen. In January, 1895, he was reelected and for twelve 
years remained a member of the upper house of the national legislature. The split 
in the party over the question of bimetallism, together with other political complica- 
tions in the west, brought defeat to the republican party and prevented reelection for 
a third term. In this connection a contemporary writer has said: "It was a battle 
royal, and nerved by the great odds against him, Wolcott was never more magnificent 
in his oratory than in that campaign, when bearing aloft the banner of his party and 
leading an almost forlorn hope, he and what is commonly known as the 'Old Republican 
Guard' went to their defeat." 

Senator Wolcott was a man whose power and ability constantly expanded through 
the exercise of effort. In his early professional career he was a somewhat diffident 
speaker but at all times thoroughly earnest. As the years passed his oratorical powers 
developed and he was able to sway his audiences by the force of his logic, the 
strength of his reasoning and his employment of the most rounded rhetorical figures. 
His advancement in his profession was equally marked and continuous. His practice 
steadily grew in volume and importance and he became attorney and counselor for the 
Denver & Rio Grande Railroad and other large corporations. He was heard in con- 
nection with much important mining litigation and the field of his labor constantly 
broadened. He was never surprised by the unexpected attack of an adversary, for his 
preparation of a case was always thorough and exhaustive. Success in large measure 
came to him and although not seeking honors, honors were yet multiplied unto him. 
In 1901 President McKinley appointed him a delegate to negotiate for international 
bimetallism. Ever ready to listen to the arguments of any, his opinions were yet 
his own, founded upon the clearest reasoning, upon wide experience and notably keen 
insight. His life was strong and purposeful and far-reaching in its results, reflecting 
credit and honor upon a family name that has remained untarnished throughout the 
entire period of American history. 



HENRY ROGER WOLCOTT. 



A modern philosopher has said, "Not the good that comes to us, but the good that 
comes to the world through us, is the measure of our success;" and judged by this 
standard, Henry Roger Wolcott has been a most successful man, for he has done much 
to aid others, his philanthropic spirit being one of his most marked characteristics. 
His business success, whereby he has become a capitalist, has enabled him to con- 
tinually extend a helping hand where aid is needed. He was for a considerable period 
one of Denver's best known and most honored citizens and he has here many friends, 
although he is now living in the Hawaiian islands. He was born at Longmeadow, 
Massachusetts, on the 15th of March, 1846, his parents being Samuel Wolcott, D. D., and 
Harriet Amanda (Pope) Wolcott, while his brother was Edward O. Wolcott, at one time 
United States senator from Colorado. He was one of a family of eleven children, ten 
of whom attained adult age, the ones besides the Senator and Henry Roger Wolcott 
being: Samuel Adams, who died in New London, Connecticut, in 1912; Harriet Agnes, 
who became the wife of F. 0. Vaille, of Denver, and died there in August, 1917; the 
Rev. William Edgar Wolcott. who died in 1911 in Lawrence, Massachusetts; Katherine 
Ellen, the wife of Charles H. Toll, of Denver, Colorado, who was at one time attorney 
general of the state; Anna Louise, widow of Joel F. Vaile and formerly principal of 
the Wolcott School of Denver and regent of the University of Colorado; Clara Gertrude, 
living in Boston, Massachusetts; Herbert Walter, who makes his home in Cleveland, 
Ohio; and Charlotte Augusta, the wife of Colonel Charles Francis Bates of the United 
States Army. 

In the acquirement of his education Henry R. Wolcott attended the schools of 
Providence, Rhode Island, and Cleveland. Ohio. Yale University conferred upon him 
the honorary Master of Arts degree in 1896 and from Colorado College he received 
the same honor in 189S. Mr. Wolcott's identification with Colorado dated from 1869 
and for a brief period he was connected with mining interests in this state. In the 
spring of 1870 he secured a position in connection with the Boston and Colorado Smelt- 
ing Works at Blackhawk and soon afterward was advanced to the position of assistant 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 13 

manager and was given charge of the plant erected at Alma, Colorado, in 1873 in ad- 
dition to his position at Blackhawk. His marked ability and his faithfulness to the 
interests entrusted to his care are qualities indicated in the fact that when the com- 
pany erected larger works at Argo, near Denver, he was assigned to the position of 
acting manager of the new plant. He also became treasurer of the Colorado Smelting 
& Mining Company, and extending his efforts into still other fields, was elected to 
the directorate of the Equitable Life Assurance Society and became recognized as 
one of the foremost business men not only of Denver and of Colorado but of the entire 
west. He was largely instrumental in securing the erection of the Boston building 
and the Equitable building in Denver and he figured prominently in banking circles, 
being for a decade vice president of the First National Bank of Denver. In fact his 
name is widely known among prominent financiers of New York and New England as 
well as of the west. As the years passed he became extensively connected with mining 
interests and for a number of years was vice president of the Colorado Fuel & Iron 
Company and also was the president of the Colorado Telephone Company. 

Over the public life of Denver, Mr. Wolcott exerted a widely felt and beneficial 
influence. It was largely his effort that secured Fort Logan as a military post for 
Denver and he was instrumental in organizing the Denver Club, of which he became 
a charter member and of which he was president for many years. Whatever has 
been of benefit to city and state has been sure of his cooperation and generous aid. 
He has been most liberal in his donations to educational and charitable institutions 
and has been a stanch friend of Colorado College at Colorado Springs, which was es- 
tablished in 1879, and it was through his contribution and efforts that the Wolcott 
medal for excellence in public reading was established for the young ladies of the 
East Denver high school. 

Mr. Wolcott has been a prominent figure in political circles and his opinions have 
carried weight in the councils of the republican party. Gilpin county elected him its 
representative in the state senate in 1878 and he served for a four years' term at the 
same time when his brother, Edward Oliver Wolcott, was representing Clear Creek 
county in the upper house of the general assembly. Henry R. Wolcott was chosen 
president pro tern of the senate and because of this position was called upon during 
his term to serve as acting governor of Colorado. In this connection a contemporary 
biographer wrote: "He thus performed the functions of the gubernatorial office, which 
four of his family had exercised in Connecticut and Massachusetts." In 1882 he was 
the leading republican candidate at the state convention for the office of governor, 
but elements entering into the United States senatorial contest caused his defeat, 
although he was a very popular man for the position. He was defeated for governor 
at the state election in 1898 owing to chaotic conditions which were prevalent not 
only in Colorado but in the entire west in relation to political affairs. The strongest 
ties of affection and comradeship as well as the blood ties of a family relationship con- 
nected the two Senators Wolcott. They were companions on the European trip on 
which Edward Oliver Wolcott passed away on the Riviera, and the devotion of Henry 
Roger Wolcott to his brother was one of the strongest and most beautiful traits of 
his character. 

In club circles throughout the entire country Henry R. Wolcott is prominently 
and widely known, having membership in the Union, Union League and University 
Clubs of New York, also the Racquet and Tennis, Brook, Lambs, New York Yacht and 
Larchmont Yacht Clubs of New York; the Atlantic Yacht, the Manhasset, the Tavern 
Clubs of Boston; the Metropolitan Club of Washington; and the Denver and University 
Clubs of Denver. His splendid mental attainments and the moral force of his char- 
acter have made him popular wherever he is known. He is now residing in the 
Hawaiian islands but he counts his friends in Denver by the score. Extremely modest 
and free from ostentation, he has nevertheless been recognized as one of Denver's 
foremost philanthropists, his gifts to charitable and benevolent projects being many. 
His life has been filled with kindly acts, has been prompted by the most honorable 
purposes and has ever reached toward the highest ideals. 



EDWARD MAGEE SPARHAWK. 

The ideals and standards of life are fast changing. There has been too much truth 
in the statement that America was concentrating her attention too largely upon com- 
mercial activities to the exclusion of other interests, yet there have been many men who 
have never lost the vision of that broader life which takes into recognition the three- 



14 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

fold nature of man, physical, mental and moral, and that well rounded 
is the result of the attainment of perfection along each of these lines. While extensive 
and important business interests have claimed the attention of Edward Magee 
Sparhawk, he has at the same time recognized his obligations to his fellowmen and 
has put forth earnest effort to support and advance the standards of moral right and 
has been an active church worker. From the outset of his business career he has 
been identified with the steel industry and is now manager of sales at Denver for 
the Carnegie Steel Company. 

Mr. Sparhawk was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 10, 1868. His 
father, Samuel Sparhawk, was a native of Philadelphia, as was the paternal grand- 
father of E. M. Sparhawk. The father engaged in the mercantile collection business 
in connection with a brother and has now departed this life. His wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Sarah Axford, was a descendant of John Hart, one of the signers of 
the Declaration of Independence. To Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Sparhawk were born seven 
children, four sons and three daughters, of whom three are yet living. 

Edward M. Sparhawk after completing his education with a high school course in 
Philadelphia turned his attention to the iron and steel industry as a representative 
of the Reading Iron Works of Philadelphia and subsequently spent two years in the 
employ of the Crane Company. In November, 1S90, he arrived in Denver and became 
associated with the Carnegie Steel Company in February, 1891. His pronounced 
ability won him advancement to the position of manager in June, 1895. In 1901 he 
assumed the management of the interests of the Illinois Steel Company and in May, 
1903, was made manager of the American Sheet & Tin Plate Company. The next 
change in his business career brought him to the position of manager of the Ten- 
nessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Company in January, 1908. He is now controlling the 
interests of the four companies above mentioned in Denver, with offices in the First 
National Bank building, and broad experience has brought him to a most prominent 
and responsible position in this connection. His powers have grown through the 
exercise of effort and continued activity is keeping him intensely alert. There is no 
phase of the business with which he is not thoroughly familiar and, actuated by a 
spirit of enterprise, he has never allowed obstacles or difficulties to bar his path in 
the successful and honorable accomplishment of his purpose. 

On the 12th of September, 1898, Mr. Sparhawk was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Nancy Howard, a native of Iowa but a resident of Denver since 1890. She is a 
daughter of Henry and Amanda V. (Reiff) Howard. To Mr. and Mrs. Sparhawk have 
been born three children: R. Dale, eighteen years of age, now a student in Princeton 
University; and Elizabeth, sixteen years of age, and Helen, aged twelve, both in 
school. 

In his political views Mr. Sparhawk is a stalwart republican, believing firmly in 
the principles of the party as factors in good government. He is a member of St. 
Mark's Episcopal church, in the work of which he takes an active and helpful interest, 
serving now as senior warden and as chairman of the finance committee. He is also 
a member of the Denver Club and the Denver Athletic Club and the Denver Motor 
Club. The nature of his interests is further indicated by his membership in the 
Young Men's Christian Association and the Civic and Commercial Association. He has 
ever been active in business, in church and in sociological matters and has been 
a close student of the vital questions which have touched the welfare of mankind, 
keeping abreast with the best thinking men of the age in regard to all the significant 
problems which affect the race. 



MILES G. SAUNDERS. 



Miles G. Saunders is one of the most prominent representatives of the legal 
fraternity in Pueblo, where he has practiced his profession continuously during the 
past three decades. His birth occurred in Maryville, Missouri, on the 18th of July, 
1867, his parents being W. R. and Helen (Sims) Saunders. The father participated 
in the Civil war as a member of the Confederate army and throughout his active 
business career he followed farming in Nodaway county, Missouri. His family num- 
bered seven children, three sons and four daughters. 

Miles G. Saunders pursued his education in the public schools of his native city 
and then, in preparation for a professional career, began the study of law under 
the preceptorship of Judge Ramsay, of Maryville. He was admitted to the bar in 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 15 

in 18S7 and in the same year made his way to Colorado, entering the United 
States land office at Lamar. At the end of a year, in June, 1888, he came to Pueblo 
and has remained here continuously throughout the intervening period of three dec- 
ades. In 1891 he was elected city attorney and six years later was chosen to the 
office of district attorney. 

In December, 1891, Mr. Saunders was united in marriage to Miss Laura Jackson, 
a daughter of Joseph Jackson, of Maryville, Missouri. To them has been born one 
child, Esther. In politics Mr. Saunders is a democrat, while fraternally he is identified 
with the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 



A. C. FOSTER. 



Among Denver's progressive, prosperous and public-spirited citizens who have come 
to the top through their own efforts and are deserving of special mention in a volume 
of this character is A. C. Poster of the firm of Sweet, Causey, Foster & Company, 
bond and investment brokers, with offices in the Equitable building in Denver. He 
is a representative of an old and prominent family of Tennessee and was born in 
Nashville on the 25th of July, 1867, his parents being Hon. Turner S. and Harriet 
(Erwin) Foster, who were also natives of that state. The father was at one time a 
leading attorney of Nashville and later became judge of the district court, sitting 
on the bench for many years, presiding over his court with dignity, ability and honor. 
During the Civil war he enlisted for active service in the Confederate army and served 
throughout the entire conflict between the north and the south. He died in Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, in 1897 at the age of seventy-five years, having for many years 
survived his wife, who passed away in Nashville in 1869. They had a family of three 
children: Dr. John M. Foster, now living in Denver; Mrs. Charles S. Caldwell, whose 
home is in Nashville; and A. C. Foster, of this review. 

In early life A. C. Foster attended the Montgomery Bell Academy, from which 
he was graduated in 1884, and after leaving college went to Crosby county, Texas, 
where he engaged in ranch work as a cowboy, remaining in the southwest for three 
years. On the expiration of that period he arrived in Denver in January, 1S90, and 
turned his attention to the real estate business, in which he continued for a long 
period most successfully. He not only bought and sold property but was connected 
with speculative building and during that period erected some of the finest modern 
business structures of the city which stand as a monument to his enterprise, his bus- 
iness foresight and ability. This includes the A. C. Foster building on Sixteenth and 
Stout streets, which is one of the prominent office buildings of the city. When the 
boom started in Creede, Colorado, Mr. Foster removed to that place and continued in 
the real estate business there for a year, but on the expiration of that period he 
returned to Denver and became a bookkeeper for the Denver Hardware Company, 
with which he remained for two years. He severed that connection to accept the 
position of office manager with the Denver Hardware Company, with which he remained 
until the firm went out of business, when he was appointed receiver and continued 
as such until the property was sold. He next engaged in the brokerage business and 
ultimately became a member of the Denver Mining Exchange. He continued to handle 
stocks and bonds under his own name until 1897. 

On the 28th of October of that year Mr. Foster was united in marriage to Miss 
Alice Eddy Fisher, of Chicago, a daughter of Lucius G. and Katharine Eddy Fisher, 
of that city. Following his marriage he returned to Denver to take up his abode and 
gave up the brokerage business to accept the position of credit man with the Daniels 
& Fisher Stores Company. In that position he remained until the Daniels Bank was 
organized, when he became the cashier of the new institution, and so served until the 
Daniels Bank became the nucleus for the present United States National Bank of 
Denver, which is now one of the leading financial institutions of the west. It was 
organized by Mr. Foster in association with Gordon Jones, Henry T. Rogers and 
W. A. Hover, together with several other prominent business men of Denver. Mr. 
Foster was elected cashier and a director in 1904 and afterward was advanced to the 
position of vice president, in which capacity he continued until February, 1912, when 
he resigned to become a member of the bond house of Causey, Foster & Company. In 
1914 the firm name was changed to Sweet, Causey, Foster & Company and theirs is 
today the largest business of the kind in Denver. Mr. Foster's opinions on business 
methods are largely accepted as authority throughout the city and this section of 
the state, a fact which is indicated in his election to various offices that have to do 



16 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

with business development and progress. For two terms he was honored with the 
presidency of the Retail Credit Men's Association of Denver, was vice president of 
the National credit Men's Association and also vice president of the Investment 
Brokers' Association of America. He is on the board of directors of the Denver Branch 
of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. He is a man of notably sound judgment, 
keen sagacity and clear discrimination. He readily recognizes the possibilities and 
foresees the outcome of any business condition or situation and his strong purposes 
and intelligently directed efforts are fruitful of most gratifying results. 

Mr. and Mrs. Foster have become the parents of three children: Lucius F., who 
was born in Denver in 1898 and is now in the United States Naval Reserve, stationed 
at Nantucket island, Massachusetts; Katharine, who was born in December, 1906; 
and Cynthia, who was born in 1908 and is now attending the Wolcott School. 

Mr. Foster gives his political alelgiance to the republican party. He belongs to the 
Denver Club, the Denver Country Club, the Rotary Club, the Cactus Club and the Mile High 
Club and he is a member of the Art Commission of Denver. In a word, he stands for all 
those forces and interests which make for development and progress along material, intel- 
lectual, social, cultural, political and moral lines. His has been a notably successful 
career in business. Never fearing to venture where favoring opportunity has led 
the way, he has steadily progressed, achieving his purpose, while at the same time 
the public has been an indirect beneficiary in the promotion of business interests 
which contribute to the advancement and general prosperity of the city at large. 



HON. THOMAS MacDONALD PATTERSON. 

The career of the late United States Senator Thomas MacDonald Patterson holds 
many lessons for those whose start in life is set among inauspicious surroundings, and 
who desire to attain distinction and honor. No doubt Thomas M. Patterson was 
naturally gifted, but it stands to his credit that he made the right use of the opportuni- 
ties which presented themselves and employed them in a way which not oniy lifted 
him into an eminent position but cast honor upon his state. A brilliant lawyer and 
journalist, his name rose higher and grew deeper in the estimation and affection of 
the public until in 1901, as a fitting tribute to his qualities and the crowning point of 
his activities the greatest honor which his state had in its power to bestow was con- 
ferred upon him in his election to the United States senate. There his clear, logical 
judgment, his great legal learning and his oratorical powers found a suitable and 
fruitful field in which to employ his surpassing ability, in order to benefit the state 
which he represented, at the same time enhancing his reputation as a man who ac- 
complished what he set out to do — and he could leave his labors in the national halls 
of congress with the clear conscience of having wrought for the best interests of his 
fellow-citizens — unstintingly, unflinchingly, giving unsparingly the best that was in 
him. 

Thomas M. Patterson was born November 4, 1839, in County Carlow, Ireland, a 
son of James and Margaret (Montjoy) Patterson. The family was a prominent one 
in the north of Ireland, where his grandfather, James Patterson, was accounted a man 
of affairs, having acquired his earthly wealth as a stock dealer. He reared a family 
of five children and one of his sons, James, was a merchant and jeweler, first at 
Cavan, Ireland, and later in Liverpool, England. He married Margaret Montjoy and 
their son, the Senator, was of French Huguenot extraction on the mother's side. The 
middle name, MacDonald. was given Thomas Patterson in honor of a nephew of his 
grandmother, the former being a midshipman in the English navy, losing his life with 
Nelson at the famous battle of Trafalgar. The family, consisting of father, mother, 
the daughter Katherine and the sons, James and Thomas, came to the United States 
in 1849, when the latter was but ten years of age. 

Thomas M. Patterson in the acquirement of his education attended the public 
schools at Astoria, Long Island, until fourteen years of age, when he secured a 
clerical position in a department store conducted by Blackwell & Curtis at Astoria. 
In 1853 the family removed to Crawfordsville, Indiana, where Mr. Patterson learned 
the printer's trade, being for three years a member of the composing-room force of 
the Crawfordsville Review. From 1857 until 1S61 he assisted his father in the jewelry 
business and in the latter year he and his brother James enlisted under the Union 
flag. James Patterson was a member of the Eleventh Indiana Infantry, to which his 
brother also belonged, and was killed in the battle of Winchester. Desirous of securing 
higher educational advantages, Thomas Patterson entered Asbury College, now De Pauw 




HON. THOMAS M. PATTERSON 



IS HISTORY OF COLORADO 

University, in 1S62, remaining there until 1863, when he became a student in Wabash 
College, taking the junior course. The degree of A. M. was conferred upon him by 
De Pauw University in later years. On leaving Wabash College he began the study 
of law with M. D. White at Crawfordsville, Indiana, and after his admission to the bar 
in 1867 became a partner of Judge J. R. Cowan, with whom he continued in practice 
about five years, or until he removed to Denver in December, 1872. Mr. Patterson was 
therefore numbered among the eminent pioneer lawyers of his state, which later con- 
ferred upon him such distinguished honor. Already he had become prominent as a 
lawyer in Indiana and at once he entered upon a successful practice in this city, early 
demonstrating his legal qualifications. His judicial temperament, his complete knowl- 
edge of the law, his logical mind, his thorough learning — all these qualities combifted 
to make him an able member of the bar. At this period he was associated with Charles 
S. Thomas and they handled some of the most notable cases of that time, enjoying the 
full confidence and trust of the general public. It was in 1873 that Mr. Patterson was 
elected city attorney of Denver, and that he performed his duties ably and conscien- 
tiously is evident from the fact that he was reelected in 1874. He became at that time 
one of the leaders of the democratic party and was prominent in its councils. Mr. 
Patterson was a born leader and early in his career developed a genius for the control 
of men and events. He was more than a gifted public speaker, for he was a convincing 
orator who would carry his audiences with him and make them see his point of view. 
Hardly less brilliant was he as a writer. In his advocacy of anything that he believed 
to be right he was fearless and after having reached a decision as to what course to 
pursue he followed that course unerringly and always attained the desired results. 
Not only was he eminent as a party leader but he became a figure of historical signifi- 
cance, first in his state, then in the greater west, and later in the nation. In 1874 he 
was elected territorial delegate to congress, the first democrat chosen to that position 
in Colorado, and the honor must be accounted more signal because he had been a 
resident of the state for only a little more than two years. He labored unceasingly 
with democrats and republicans as the case demanded to promote the welfare of the 
territory and it was largely through his efforts that Colorado was admitted as a state 
in 1876. Mr. Patterson was nominated for both terms of the forty-fourth congress 
and retired in 1878 in order to resume the private practice of law. Great impetus was 
given the mining industry by the discoveries at Leadville, Aspen and elsewhere and 
this naturally was productive of extensive litigation. He was prominently connected 
with many of the leading law suits and thereby increased his practice, his undoubted 
ability inducing many to seek his services. In 1888 he ran for governor but was not 
elected. Senator Patterson was a delegate to the national democratic conventions of 
1876, 1880, 1888 and 1892 and a member of the national democratic committee from 
1874 to 1880. He was a member of the committee on resolutions in the national demo- 
cratic convention of 1892 and presented the minority report (in which no other joined) 
favoring a declaration for the free coinage of silver. It was voted down by a large 
majority but was adopted by the convention of 1896. He was a delegate to the national 
populist conventions of 1896 and 1900 and in the latter was chosen for the distinguished 
honor of permanent chairman. In 1892 he repudiated the nomination of Grover Cleve- 
land and was instrumental in carrying Colorado for Mr. Weaver. In 1896 he was elected 
presidential elector and held that office until 1899. 

The legal field, however, was not the only one in which Senator Patterson achieved 
prominence. In 1890 he became the proprietor of the Rocky Mountain News and 
later of the Denver Times, the News representing the morning and the Times the 
evening editions of these publications. It may be said that the seed for his great 
success as a journalist was sown in the little country newspaper office in Crawfords- 
ville. Indiana, where he learned the printer's trade, for there he first experienced the 
fascination connected with newspaper publication. Later on he disposed of his inter- 
est in the Times and still later sold his proprietary interest in the News. His editorial 
work gave clear evidence of his versatility and ability as a deep thinker and fluent 
writer and to his great credit may it be said that he used his talents always in the, 
advocacy of the rights of the masses against corporate control and aggrandizement. 
His editorials were as sweeping and masterly as the speeches he delivered in the 
national conventions of the democratic and populist parties. During his campaign 
tours, leading him through many states when advocating the election of Mr. Bryan, 
he delivered many brilliant philippics in behalf of the people against the enslavement 
of the money power. His speeches scintillated with poignant facts, incontrovertible 
shafts of logic and delicious humor. 

In 1901 he received the united support of the democrats, populists and several 
republicans for United States senator, all the votes of the legislature except nine being 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 19 

cast for him. Most valuable were his services to the state during the six years in which 
he sat in the upper chamber of congress in Washington. It is a record of battles which 
he fought faithfully and earnestly in behalf of the people and it is well known that 
he was always the champion of their rights and principles. It is but natural that a 
man of Senator Patterson's stamp, with his strenuous manner of advocating and 
maintaining his views, should engender political enmity, yet nothing swerved him from 
his duty as he saw it — even his political opponents united in paying to him personally 
the highest respect, appreciating his absolute sincerity. 

In Watertown, New York, in 1863, Thomas Patterson wedded Miss Catherine A. 
C. Grafton, a daughter of Dr. Samuel H. Grafton and a grandniece of Alexander 
Campbell, founder of the Christian church. Mrs. Patterson was as prominent in 
social circles of the state and capital as was the Senator in official life. She was 
connected with many movements undertaken in behalf of moral uplift, intellectual 
development and welfare principles. She was also deeply interested in church work 
and many were her charitable acts and kind deeds. She passed away July 16, 1902, 
and her demise, as well as that of two sons and two daughters, cast deep gloom over 
the remaining household, dimming the many successes that crpwned the Senator's 
brilliant career. 

On August 23, 1916, Senator Patterson expired and with his death closed a life 
which had been one of action, full of achievement and full of honor. Many were 
the tributes paid to the departed statesman and the sorrow felt on the occasion of his 
demise was sincere throughout the state. Beginning life's work in a minor clerical 
capacity in a little country town in Indiana, he attained to one of the greatest 
political honors in the nation, representing his state for seven years in the highest 
legislative body of the world. Moreover, he was not respected and esteemed for those 
achievements alone, but was judged by his qualities of character and heart, which 
underlaid and guided all his actions, — and was found not wanting. He was one of the 
people and remained a sincere champion of the people to the last. Therefore the 
inhabitants of the state of Colorado sincerely loved him and cherish his memory as 
that of a great and honest man who stood for their interests. 

The surviving daughter of Senator Patterson is Mrs. Richard C. Campbell, of 
Denver. Both Mr. and Mrs. Campbell occupy an enviable position in the social circles 
of the capital and are ever ready to cooperate in measures undertaken for the 
extension and enhancement of their city along any line, or the moral and material 
betterment of the people at large. To them were born three children: Thomas Patterson 
Campbell, who has followed the call of his country and is now serving as a lieutenant 
in the aviation service; Richard C. Campbell. Jr., recently a member of the Students' 
Army Training Corps at Dartmouth College and of the. class of '21, who died at Dart- 
mouth. October 5, 1918; and Katharine Grafton Campbell. 



AUGUST MOLANDER. 



August Molander is now practically living retired. Various business interests have 
claimed his time and attention and whatever he has undertaken has been carried 
forward to successful completion. He is still the owner of valuable farming property 
which he rents and his energies are now largely given to service as a member of the 
ditch board — a service which is of a most valuable character to the community. He 
was born in Sweden, January 24, 1870, a son of Charles and Matilda Molander. The 
father was a farmer of Sweden and came to America with his famliy in the year 
1886. In this country he devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits and also to 
railroad work for a considerable period and he is now living with his son Philip upon 
a farm about two miles from Ault. His wife passed away in 1902 and was laid to 
rest in Eaton. Their family numbered the following named: Anna, who became the 
wife of Carl Nelson; Charles; August; Ture, who died in 1913; Oscar; Selma; Alma, 
the wife of Harold Balmer; and Philip, who married Hattie Swanson. 

August Molander spent the first fifteen years of his life in his native country and 
whatever educational advantages he enjoyed were attained during that period, but 
his opportunities in that direction were somewhat limited and his most valuable lessons 
have been gained in the school of experience. At length he determined to try his 
fortune in the new world and with his brother Charles crossed the Atlantic. They 
did not tarry on the eastern coast but made their way at once into the interior of 
the country, settling at Oakland. Nebraska, where they began farming, meeting with 
substantial success in this undertaking. In the spring' of 1888 August Molander 



20 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

removed to Haxtum, Colorado. In the meantime his parents had come to the new 
world and the father, who was a very energetic and enterprising man, began farming 
in Colorado, where he had better opportunities than he could secure in Europe. He 
took up a claim there and August Molander assisted him in the development and 
improvement of the farm, aiding in the arduous tasks necessary to the transformation 
of wild land into productive fields. He also worked at times on the railroad, but owing 
to the unsettled condition of the country he returned to Oakland, Nebraska, where he 
began stock feeding, in which business he engaged until 1892. He then returned to 
Colorado and in the spring of that year took up his abode at Greeley, where he made 
his home from 1892 until 1895. He has been interested in farm properties at Ault and 
Haxtum since the latter year and he also began farming at Eaton in 1895. He 
purchased land at Ault in 1898 and today has a valuable tract of one hundred and 
sixty acres there. In 1899 he purchased another quarter section from A. J. Eaton 
and through the intervening period has been more or less actively connected with 
agricultural interests. In 1901 he took up his abode at Ault and concentrated his 
efforts and attention upon the development and improvement of his farm, comprising 
three hundred and twenty acres of land. In 1913 he began feeding sheep and he 
purchased two hundred and forty acres additional situated about two miles north 
of Ault. On that property he remained for four years. In 1917, however, he left 
the ranch and established his home in the town and at the present time he is renting 
his farms, from which he derives a very substantial annual income. He is also con- 
nected with the Smith Lumber Company and is one of the directors of the First 
National Bank. 

Mr. Molander was united in marriage on the 18th of February, 1903, in Oakland, 
Nebraska, to Miss Hilma Nelson, whose father was a farmer of that locality. Mr. 
and Mrs. Molander are members of the Congregational church and his political 
allegiance is given to the republican party. He is a director of the Ault Exchange 
and is interested in everything that has to do with the welfare and progress of the 
community in which he makes his home. He is one of the intelligent, energetic and 
progressive men of his community who is now serving as a member of the ditch 
board and his work in this connection receives almost his entire attention and is of 
a most valuable character. He stands for all those interests which are a matter of 
civic virtue and civic pride and cooperates earnestly in every movement for the 
'general good. He finds his chief diversion in motoring. He has led a busy life, is a 
man of generous nature and kindly spirit, and upright principles have guided him at 
all points in his career. While he had many hardships and difficulties to overcome 
in early manhood, he has steadily advanced and today is numbered among the men 
of affluence in his community. 



CHESTER STEPHEN MOREY. 

Indefatigable industry has constituted the basic element in the notable success of 
Chester Stephen Morey, and combined with this has been an initiative spirit that has 
enabled him to formulate plans which have been carried forward through his resistless 
will power to successful completion. There has been no spectacular phase in his career 
but a steadiness and a persistency of purpose that has accomplished results and although 
his youthful days were passed amid pioneer surroundings in a log cabin home that had 
no comforts and at times almost lacked the necessities of life, he is today one of the 
prosperous and also one of the honored business men of Denver, well known as the 
chairman of the board of directors of the Great Western Sugar Company, while for 
many years he has figured in commercial circles as the head of the C. S. Morey Mercantile 
Company. 

His birth occurred upon a farm in Medina township, Dane county, Wisconsin, 
March 3, 1847. He had only such educational advantages as the district schools of a 
frontier community afforded and then he could rttend only through the winter months, 
when his labors were net needed upon t'^e home form. H's fpther had secured a claim 
in Dane county and the family were eneaged-in the arduous task of developing wild 
land and transforming it into productive fields. But this meant years of continued and 
unremitting labor and when it seemed that the family lnd reached a turning point 
in their career leadine to success the father mortgaged the farm to invest in a con- 
templated railroad thpt after a time went into bankruptcy and caused them to lose the 
homestead. This caused the family to seek another dwelling place and with their few 
possessions in a covered wagon they traveled two hundred miles to the little settlement 




I HESTER S. MOREY 



22 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

of Modena, Buffalo county, Wisconsin, where they again faced the conditions of pioneer 
life with the development of a new farm. Their first crop there proved a bountiful one 
and as prices were high on account of the war this gave the family a little start. Chester 
S. Morey continued his education in the district schools near the new home through two 
winters and in the summer months aided in the labors of the fields. In January, 1864, 
however, the news reached the little town of Modena that it must furnish four soldiers 
for the army. If these were taken by draft it would probably take the heads of some 
of the few families in the neighborhood and to meet this contingency Mr. Morey and 
three young companions, all under eighteen years of age, volunteered, joining Company 
I of the Thirty-sixth Wisconsin Infantry. They spent a few days in barracks at La Crosse, 
Wisconsin, and were then sent to Madison. Mr. Morey became ill there and for a 
time was in a hospital, but on the 14th of June was able to rejoin his regiment, which 
was then before Petersburg, Virginia. He found that two of the boys who had enlisted 
with him had been killed and a third was wounded. Two days after reaching his 
regiment they went into battle, in which he narrowly escaped death. A contemporary 
writer has said in this connection: "His knapsack was torn from his shoulder and his 
waist belt severed by a bullet, which lodged in his bayonet scabbard. He took part in 
the battles of Strawberry Plains and Jerusalem Plankroad, after which he was again 
taken with severe illness, sent to City Point and thence to Emory Hospital, in Wash- 
ington, where he remained until November. Meanwhile his father had been drafted 
and sent to Sherman's army. As soon as able to march he went to the front and remained 
with his regiment, which was almost constantly engaged, to the close of the war. He 
was on the field at the surrender of Lee at Appomattox and marched in the final Grand 
Review at Washington. Mr. Morey was promoted to corporal and subsequently to the 
brevet rank of Lieutenant for gallantry in action." 

When Mr. Morey returned to his home he took with him two hundred dollars which 
he had saved from his pay as a soldier. In the meantime his father had passed away 
at Savannah, Georgia, and thus the management of the farm and the support of the family 
devolved upon the sou. He was ambitious to improve his education and saved from his 
earnings whatever he could. In the winter of 1865 and 1866 he was a pupil in the schools 
at Waterloo, Wisconsin, and in the succeeding winter became a high school student 
at Portage, Wisconsin. While there pursuing his studies he engaged in sawing wood 
evenings and mornings in order to pay for his board at his uncle's hotel. During the 
next winter he became a student in Eastman's Business College at Chicago, where he 
pursued a thorough course. He did not like farming and had a natural inclination for 
commercial pursuits, but he recognized that he must have adequate education to serve 
as a foundation upon which to build commercial success. After studying through the 
winter his capital was reduced to less than fifty dollars and he accepted a position as 
porter in the retail grocery house of Cobb & Thorne. His ability, trustworthiness and 
industry won him promotion and he was given a place on the clerical force in the office. 
In July of that year he went upon the road as a commercial traveler, representing the 
young but growing wholesale grocery house of Sprague, Warner & Company of Chicago, 
with whom he remained until failing health compelled him to resign. He spent the winter 
of 1871 at Clifton Springs, New York, in order to benefit his health, and in May, 1872, 
for the same reason came to Colorado. At that time his capital amounted to twenty- 
eight hundred dollars, the result of his savings as a commercial traveler, and he entered 
into partnership with W. L. Beardsly in the cattle business. Securing a broncho, he 
rode the range and himself branded about one thousand head of young stock, which he 
purchased. His health improved in the outdoor life and under the excellent climatic 
conditions of Colorado and in the summer of 1873 he again entered into business con- 
nections with Sprague Warner & Company, with headquarters at Denver, his salary to 
be three thousand dollars per year and expenses. His task was the development of the 
trade of the house west of the Missouri river. That he accomplished this task is indi- 
cated in the fact that his salary was annually increased until he was earning twelve 
thousand dollars per annum, and during eleven years' connection with the Chicago house 
he saved nearly twenty thousand dollars. In 1878 he made a very profitable sale of some 
Leadville real estate which he had acquired and this rendered him practically inde- 
pendent. On the 1st of January. 1881, he was admitted to a partnership in the firm of 
Sprague Warner & Company and a branch house was opened in Denver under his direction 
and management. The business was thus continued until 1884. when it was incorporated 
under the style of the C. S. Morey Mercantile Company, with Mr. Morey as the president, 
manager and the chief stockholder. Under his guidance the business has become one 
of the largest mercantile establishments in the west and the name of Morey is largely 
to the mercantile trade of Colorado what the name of Marshall Field is in the Mississippi 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 23 

valley. His resourcefulness lias caused him to extend his efforts into still other fields and 
he is connected with various important business enterprises and projects, prominent 
among which is the Great Western Sugar Company, of which he was the General Manager 
from the beginning of the corporation, and since the death of Mr. H. O. Havemeyer, in 
1907, was president and general manager up to 1916 when, due to age and ill health he 
retired from the presidency and became chairman of the board. In this connection he 
controls a mammoth industry, constituting one of the most important manufacturing 
interests of the state, a history of which will be found elsewhere in this work. 

On the 12th of December, 1876, Mr. Morey was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
L. Clough, a lady of many accomplishments, who was a daughter of John A. Clough, for- 
merly of Chicago, but who in 1870 established a real estate and loan business in Denver. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Morey were born a son and a daughter, John W. and Mary L., who with 
the father, were called upon to mourn the death of Mrs. Morey on the 27th of Feb- 
ruary, 1890. 

With the public life of the community Mr. Morey has also been connected. In 
1891 he was chosen a member of the board of education of district No. 1 in Denver and 
filled the office for three years. He had long been considering the establishing of a manual 
training department in the Denver schools and brought the matter before the board in 
January, 1892, offering the following resolution: "Ordered that a special committee be 
appointed to investigate and consider the subject of a manual training high school, with 
the view of adding a department of that kind to the schools of this district and report to 
the board, if desirable, a plan for the establishment of such a school." This was unani- 
mously adopted and Mr. Morey and James B. Grant were made the committee after which 
Mr. Morey instituted a thorough examination of the practical side of the proposition, 
visiting many schools of the kind in the eastern states with a view to learning of their 
methods of instruction and the mechanical appliances required for their conduct. His 
report was so satisfactory and conclusive that the board of education accepted it unani- 
mously May 27, 1892, and as a result the Manual Training high school of Denver was 
established and has since constituted an important factor in the educational facilities of 
the city. Mr. Morey has always been particularly interested in charitable and benevolent 
projects and is continually extending a helping hand where aid and assistance are needed, 
yet his gifts are of a most unostentatious character, frequently known only to the recip- 
ient. There are many charitable organizations, too, which have benefited by his generosity 
and for a number of years he was president of the Charity Organization Society, which 
numbers about sixteen organizations. He continued to act in that capacity until 1899 
and was also president of its board of trustees, in which office he served for many years. 
His work along charitable lines has, like his business career, been most systematically, 
carefully and therefore resultantly managed. For many years he has been chairman of 
the board of the Red Cross and very active in the work of the society. His son is now 
acting as manager of the Rocky Mountain division of the Red Cross. Successful as he 
has been, he has never allowed the accumulation of wealth to monopolize his time and 
attention. He has recognized his obligations to his fellowmen and, remembering his own 
early struggles, has ever been quick to encourage any individual who has shown a 
willingness to do. His friends name him as one who stands a man among men. 



COLONEL ROBERT STEWART MORRISON. 

Colonel Robert Stewart Morrison, the author of "Morrison's Mining Rights," which 
has appeared in fifteen editions, is regarded throughout the entire country as an author- 
ity upon the branch of jurisprudence in which he has always specialized. Colonel 
Morrison was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, October 7, 1843. He practiced in 
Pennsylvania until 1870 and then came to Denver and was also for a time actively 
engaged in practice in Georgetown. He specialized in mining law and is in active 
practice in Denver, having been identified with the bar of the city for forty-eight 
years. In the early days of his practice here he was associated with General Bela 
M. Hughes, one of the ablest lawyers that has ever represented the profession in this sec- 
tion, and who was among the earliest as well as among the foremost attorneys of 
Denver. 

On the 24th of April. 1873, Colonel Morrison was united in marriage to Miss Edel- 
rnira De Soto, a native of Peru, and to them were born three children: Edelmira; 
Ethel, the wife of Jean Francis Webb, Jr., of New York city; and Arthur R., who is 
now his father's partner in law practice. 



24 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

The military record of Colonel Morrison covers service for a short period in the 
Pennsylvania Militia as a member of the Fifteenth Regiment during the Civil War. 
His religous faith is that of the Catholic church. 



HON. JOHN BART GEIJSBEEK MOLENAAR. 

Hon. John B. Geijsbeek Molenaar, prominent in law and accountancy, has the 
honor of representing the royal government of The Netherlands as consul for the states 
of Colorado, Utah and New Mexico, with headquarters at Denver. 

Well known as he is in the business world, his greatest achievements are along 
the lines of commercial education, for he has written one of the standard works on 
public accountancy, has acted as instructor on this subject for many years, and has 
done much more toward raising the standards of his profession. 

He was born April 24, 1S72, at Lemele, Holland, and is the second son of Dirk 
Geijsbeek Molenaar, also a native of The Netherlands, who, however, now resides in 
Portland, Oregon. The father brought his family to America in 1893, first settling in 
New York city but later removing to Cincinnati, and finally to Portland, Oregon. 
He still lives there, a successful architect. He was married to Miss Wilhelmina 
Blikman-Kikkert, a daughter of Jan Blikman-Kikkert, owner of a large fleet of 
commercial freight vessels. She was born in the Lowlands in 1835 and passed away in 
Cincinnati at the age of sixty-three. 

John B. Geijsbeek received his preliminary education in the excellent schools of 
his native country in the City of Arnhem, and then entered the famous old University 
of Leyden where he passed his freshman year. Upon coming to this country he ma- 
triculated in the law department of the Denver University from which he was graduated 
in 1907 with the degree of LL.B. In 1910 he received from the same institution the 
honorary degree of M. C. S. (Master of Commercial Science). As a young man he 
fitted himself to become an accountant and followed that profession exclusively for a 
number of years in Holland, as well as in Denver, but since his admittance to the 
Colorado bar he has successfully practiced both law and accountancy. He has not only 
a good knowledge of law but a natural intuition for legal principles and has been 
connected with many important cases. He is a member of the Denver Bar Association, 
the Colorado Bar Association and is also connected with the American Bar Associa- 
tion. He has not only gained a prominent position in the profession but has a high 
standing as a financial adviser, is represented in the directorates of a number of 
leading corporations, and in that way also has contributed much to the upbuilding and 
growth of his city and state. He has been the unknown power behind the throne 
that has turned many an apparently inevitable commercial failure into a splendid 
success. His name is thus connected with many well known business enterprises in 
this state. 

Mr. Geijsbeek is considered an authority on advanced commercial education and 
has lectured extensively on this subject in the United States. His reputation is well 
established in the west and it has been largely through his instrumentality that 
commercial education has been added to the curriculum of a number of universities 
throughout the country. He has also written extensively on this subject and his 
publications have found the attention due them. 

Mr. Geijsbeek has gained fame as a translator and his book, "Ancient Double 
Entry Bookkeeping," published in 1914, enjoys a wide popularity on account of its 
intrinsic value and because its principles are set forth in terms which are readily 
understood. The work is based upon Lucas Pacioli's Italian Treatise (A. D. 1494), 
the earliest known writing on bookkeeping, and is enriched by reproductions, notes 
and abstracts from Manzoni, Peitra. Mainardi, Ympyn, Steven and Dafforne. Coming 
as he did from Holland twenty-five years ago without knowledge of American com- 
mercial practices and language, the author in his publication of "Ancient Double 
Entry Bookkeeping" recognized from his experience as an educator the lack of clearly 
expressed principles in accountancy and began researches that finally culminated in 
this published translation in English. It was the first time that the first known 
writings on this subject were published in this tongue although ages ago translations 
existed in the Dutch, French, Russian, German and Japanese languages. 

At every turn in the preachment of the scientific principles of his profession to the 
commercial mind, in the writing of a book and the establishment of schools to teach 
these principles, and in his successful efforts for the passage of the certified public 
accountants' law in Colorado, lie some of his many contributions to the history of 




HON. JOHN B. GEIJSBEEK MOLENAAR 



26 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Colorado. At this time he was secretary of the first examining board of the state 
and subsequently continued his educational labors along that line as the founder and 
later, for five years, as dean of the School of Commerce, Accounts and Finance of the 
University of Denver, and as instructor in practical and theoretical accountancy. This 
school was the third one to be established in the United States. His untiring efforts 
were further recognized when five successive times he was chosen chairman of the 
educational committee of the American Association of Public Accountants. 

During all this period he has been confronted by a dearth of practical exemplifi- 
cation, historical or otherwise, of the true foundation of what in modern times might 
be called the art of accountancy. This led him to publish his standard work. In this 
treatise he has welded into a well balanced whole the ancient and the modern plans 
of commercial education resulting in a work wherein so many public accountants find 
the fundamental principles from which to develop their professional ability. In 
promoting the science of accountancy Mr. Geijsbeek may be said to have reached an 
enviable goal, for he has succeeded in creating something a direct necessity to the 
profession. 

The work is dedicated as follows: "To my wife, Marie Lillie Schmidt whose initials 
(M. L. S.) I have always loved to connect with My Little Sweetheart, without whose 
patience, kindness, help and indulgence my contributions to the educational field of the 
professional accountant would not have been possible." 

On October 15, 1901, Mr. Geijsbeek was married in Cincinnati, Ohio, to Miss Marie 
Lillie Schmidt, a native of that city, and a daughter of Harry W. and the late Marie 
Lizette Albes Schmidt. Her mother was of French and Spanish descent. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Geijsbeek are known in social circles in Denver where he has made his home 
since 1899. 

He is connected with the Phi Delta Phi college fraternity and with Alpha Kappa 
Psi. He is prominent in club circles, belonging among others to the Denver Country 
Club and the Denver Civic and Commercial Club. He is a Christian Scientist, and 
during 1917 served as director of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, being deeply 
interested in the work of the church and doing everything in his power to increase its 
prestige. Fraternally, he is a member of the Masonic order and the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. 

Since taking out his naturalization papers in Covington, Kentucky, September 28, 
1898, Mr. Geijsbeek has made American interests his own, loyally supporting beneficial 
policies. He has traveled extensively in the United States and has come to love this 
wide land with its many peoples standing united for the same principles of democracy 
and liberty. The great success that has come to Mr. Geijsbeek can be ascribed to his 
natural ability, to his inherent qualities as an educator, to his unfaltering efforts and to 
his generally high conception of the duties of man. 

In 1917 there came to him a great honor — unsolicited and reluctantly accepted — 
The Royal Government of The Netherlands, in conjunction with President Woodrow 
Wilson, appointed him to the position of Consul. To his many occupations he at once 
added the duties of this office and faithfully discharges his official obligations to the 
satisfaction of both governments, and of his former as w.ell as his present countrymen 
but he asserts that the most difficult task he has ever encountered is that of being forced 
to remain neutral. 

The old Dutch family name, Geijsbeek Molenaar. has been abbreviated by Consul 
Geijsbeek to this form and under this name he is known to the professional and com- 
mercial world of this city and state. Great honors have come to him but it is only 
fair to say that they are well merited — that they have been bestowed upon one who is 
worthy and who carries them with justifiable dignity. 



HUGO S. MANN. 



Hugo S. Mann is president of the Mann-Aldrich Carriage Company, conducting 
business at No. 1300 Lincoln street in Denver. This business wUs established in 
October, 1910, and through the intervening period of eight years has steadily grown 
in volume and importance owing to the careful direction, business sagacity and unfail- 
ing enterprise of its president. Mr. Mann ccmes to the west from Massachusetts. 
He was born at Shelburne Falls, that state, on the 15th day of July, 1863, a son of 
the late Hugo Mann, who was a native of Germany and came to America in 1848, 
at which time he took up his abode at Shelburne Falls, where he resided until called to 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 27 

his final rest in 1900, when he was seventy-one years of age. He was a cutler by trade 
and followed that business throughout his entire life. In politics he became an earnest 
republican, was active in political and civic matters and for one term represented his 
district in the state legislature. He married Elizabeth Scheding, a native of Germany, 
who came to America with her parents about 1848 and also became a resident of Shel- 
burne Falls, Massachusetts, where she was married and still resides. She became the 
mother of seven children, six sons and a daughter. 

Hugo S. Mann, whose name introduces this review, was educated in the public 
schools of his native city and started out to earn his own livelihood when a youth of 
seventeen years. On leaving home he made his way westward to Colorado, and came 
to Greeley, following various pursuits, including that of riding the range in both 
Colorado and Wyoming. In 1883 he took up his abode in Denver and entered upon 
an apprenticeship to the Robertson-Doll Carriage Company. There he learned the 
carriage painting trade, which business he followed for eighteen years, after which he 
became a member of the firm and continued active in the management of the business 
until it was sold in 1910. In that year the Mann-Aldrich Carriage Company was organ- 
ized and business established. The company was incorporated in October to engage 
in the manufacture of automobile bodies and tops. The firm is one of the largest of 
the kind operating in the state at the present time, specializing in the bodies of 
pleasure motor cars. The company employs on an average of thirty-three workmen 
and while the business is largely local, the trade also extends to neighboring states. 
The business was established at Acoma and at Colfax and began in a small way with 
eight workmen. In 1912 the firm erected the present building, which was put up 
especially for the purpose for which it is being used. It is a three-story brick structure, 
one hundred by one hundred and twenty feet, modern in every way and thoroughly 
equipped in every detail. They occupy two-thirds of the building with the business 
and from the very beginning the growth of the trade has been most gratifying and 
satisfactory. As the directing head of the enterprise Mr. Mann displays marked bus- 
iness ability and energy, allowing no obstacles nor difficulties to bar his path if they 
can be overcome by persistent and earnest effort. 

On the 3d of November, 1891, Mr. Mann was married in Denver, Colorado, to 
Miss Florence G. Higgins, a native of New York city and a daughter of George H. 
and Helen (Tilton) Higgins, representatives of an old family of New York city. Mr. 
Higgins was a well known carpet manufacturer there. To Mr. and Mrs. Mann has 
been born a son, George H., whose birth occurred in Denver, July 5, 1894, and who 
is now with the Lord Strath cona Horse (R. C). 

Mr. Mann's military experience covers six years' service as a member of the 
Colorado Light Artillery. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and 
fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias, while his religious faith is 
that of the Baptist church. His is a notably successful career and one which should 
inspire and encourage others, for when he arrived in Cheyenne, Wyoming, he had 
but thirty-five cents in his pocket. His financial condition rendered it imperative that 
he secure immediate employment and his industry and capability after he had secured 
a position brought him promotion until eventually his experience, his industry and 
economy enabled him to engage in business for himself. He is today at the head of 
an important industrial interest of Denver and is classed with the representative 
business men of the city. 



ANSEL WATROUS. 



Ansel Watrous, editor of the Fort Collins Express, of which the McCormick 
Brothers are proprietors, was born in Conklin, Broome county, New York, November 
1, 1835, a son of Orrin J. and Jane E. (Smith) Watrous. The father was the eldest 
son of Ansel and Demis (Luce) Watrous and was born June 18, 1815, in Schoharie 
county, New York. He was but five years of age when his parents removed to Bridge- 
water, Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, where he was partially educated, completing 
his studies, however, in Montrose Academy. When seventeen years of age he was 
apprenticed to the printer's trade in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, there gaining a good 
practical working knowledge of the business. On the 16th of July. 1834, he married 
Jane Smith, who was born September 15, 1814. in the town of Franklin. Susquehanna 
county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Roswell Smith, who was a native of Hartford, 
Connecticut, and a descendant of one of the old colonial families. Six children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Orrin J. Watrous, Ansel, Henry O., Jerome A., Demis L., Eliza 



28 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

J. and Kate M. In 1844 the father removed with his family from the Empire state 
to Wisconsin, arriving at Sheboygan Falls on the 16th of September. There he 
resided until 1848, when he removed to Brothertown, Calumet county, Wisconsin, 
where he conducted a hotel and stage station for a year. In 1849 he took up his 
abode in Charlestown, Wisconsin, and began the erection of a sawmill on the Manitowoc 
river. While on a trip to Sheboygan, thirty miles distant, to get a load of mill 
machinery he was stricken with cholera and passed away on the 10th of September, 
1850. His family afterward returned to Broome county, New York. 

It was after this that Ansel Watrous whose name introduces this review was 
apprenticed to his father's cousin in Brooklyn, Pennsylvania, to learn the carpenter's 
trade. He remained in the east until 1855, when he returned to his former home in 
Wisconsin. Feeling the need of a companion and helpmate on life's journey, he was 
married December 25, 1856, to Miss Florelle Thompson, who was born July 27, 1831, 
in Stockton, New York, a daughter of Rufus and Susan (Schofield) Thompson. 

In November, 1860. Mr. Watrous was elected sheriff of Calumet county, Wisconsin, 
on the same ticket that was headed by the name of Abraham Lincoln, candidate for 
the presidency. Mr. Watrous was elected and occupied the office for two years. In th = 
fall of 1863 he was again chosen by popular suffrage to a position of public trust, 
being elected county clerk to fill a vacancy. He made so excellent a record that in 
1864 he was reelected for a full term and served for three years in that office. On his 
retirement from the position he took up contracting and building, in which he engaged 
until December 26, 1877, when he started for Colorado, arriving at Fort Collins on 
the 30th of that month. There he was employed as a salesman in the store of W. C. 
Stovers until June, 187S, when in company with Elmer E. Pelton. he founded the 
Fort Collins Courier. He remained as its editor for some time and retained his 
interest in the paper until February. 1916, when he became editor of the Fort Collins 
Morning Express, the oldest paper in Larimer county, which position he still fills, and 
is one of the well known representatives of the newspaper fraternity of the state. 

On various occasions Mr. Watrous has been called upon for public office. In 
1885 President Cleveland appointed him postmaster of Fort Collins and he occupied 
the position until June, 1889. He was twice an unsuccessful candidate on the demo- 
cratic ticket for the position of auditor of state, being made the candidate for the office 
in 1882 and again in 1884, but on both occasions went down to defeat with the 
entire party ticket. There are few men better informed concerning the history of 
his section of the state and in large measure of Colorado and he is the author of a 
work entitled, "History of Larimer County." He has ever been deeply interested in 
all that pertains to the welfare and progress of community and commonwealth and 
has supported all measures and interests which are a matter of civic virtue and of 
civic pride. Fraternally he is well known as a Mason, holding membership in lodge, 
chapter and commandery, while his life has been a thorough exemplification of the 
splendid teachings of 'the craft, which are based upon a recognition of the brotherhood 
of mankind and the obligations thereby imposed. 



JOSEPH ADDISON THATCHER. 

Joseph Addison Thatcher, who passed away October 25, 1918, was chairman of the 
board of directors of the Denver National Bank and one of the earliest representatives 
of banking interests in Colorado, ranking with those whose activities have contributed 
in most substantial measure to the upbuilding and development of the state. Honored 
and respected by all, there was no man who occupied a more enviable position in business 
and financial circles, not alone by reason of the success he achieved but also owing to 
the straightforward, honorable business policy which he ever followed. Although in his 
eightieth year, he was active as a factor in the world's work up to the time of his death. 
He was born in Shelby county, Kentucky, on the 31st of July, 1838. He came of English 
ancestry, his grandfather having been John P. Thatcher, a native of England, who in 
the early part of the eighteenth century settled in Virginia. His father, John Peniberton 
Thatcher, was born in 1789 and served as a soldier in the War of 1812. He married 
Patsy Hickman, of Frankfort, Kentucky, the daughter of W. H. and Patsy Hickman, 
representatives of an old Cavalier family prominent in Virginia during colonial days, 
the ancestral home being established in Spottsylvania county, Virginia. Early in the 
nineteenth century Jo'.in Pemberton Thatcher, then a young man, crossed the Blue Ridge 




JOSEPH A. THATCHER 



30 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

mountains to become a resident of Kentucky, and it was subsequent to that time that he 
married. 

Joseph Addison Thatcher acquired his preliminary education in the country 
schools of Shelby county, Kentucky, and afterward pursued a course in commercial 
law, banking and bookkeeping in Jones Commercial College of St. Louis, Missouri. 
In 1849 his parents removed with their family to that state, settling at Independence, 
where Joseph A. Thatcher afterward accepted a clerkship in the store of his uncle, there 
remaining for two years. In 1858 he was elected assistant secretary of the state senate 
of Missouri. He was twenty-two years of age when in 1860 he removed westward to 
Colorado, establishing his home in Central City. Five years later, or in 1865, he was 
married in Central City to Miss Frances Kintley, of St. Louis. 

With his removal to Colorado, Mr. Thatcher turned his attention to commercial 
pursuits and found that his former experience in his uncle's store now proved of great 
worth to him in the conduct of his independent mercantile venture. He also became 
identified with mining while a resident of Central City, but in 1863 made his initial 
step in the field of banking through accepting the appointment of cashier and manager 
of the banking house of Warren Hussey & Company, in which connection he conducted 
the business until 1870. He then purchased the bank and in connection with Mr. 
Standley, a successful gold miner, established the firm of Thatcher, Standley & Company, 
Mr. Thatcher becoming president, while Frank C. Young was chosen cashier. On the 
1st of January, 1874, the bank was converted into the First National Bank of Central 
City, Mr. Thatcher becoming president, with Otto Sauer as the vice president. Success 
attended the new organization and under Mr. Thatcher's competent direction the bank 
became a strong moneyed institution of that section of the state. He resigned the 
presidency in 1882 and removed to Denver, where he has since made his home. He 
at that time retired from active business and he spent the greater part of the years 
1883 and 1884 in travel through Great Britain and on the continent of Europe. But 
indolence and idleness were utterly foreign to his nature and with his return to his 
native land he again became an active factor in business circles, organizing in December. 
1884, the Denver National Bank, of which he was chosen president. The consensus of 
opinion on the part of the banking fraternity of Denver is that Mr. Thatcher was a 
man of fine physique and agreeable personality, with an air of refinement which seemed 
reminiscent of his southern ancestors. As a banker he was a man of sound common 
sense, quick perceptions and good executive ability. He was a very positive man and 
had the remarkable grasp of business affairs which is so essential to safe banking. When 
obliged to refuse credit, his frankness in giving his reasons retained the friendship and 
goodwill of the customer. He was public spirited and always interested in the move- 
ments and social life of his city and state. He was very charitable but his giving was 
always in a quiet and unostentatious way. The Denver National Bank as it exists 
today is largely a monument to the enterprise, foresight and business ability of Mr. 
Thatcher, who remained chairman of its board of directors until his death. 

Important and extensive as were his business connections, Mr. Thatcher never allowed 
the accumulation of wealth to monopolize his time and attention to the exclusion of 
other interests which make for a well-rounded development and for public progress. 
He was well known as a discriminating critic and a devotee of both art and music and 
he ever greatly enjoyed travel. He published a volume entitled "A Colorado Outing," 
which is of much interest to those who have visited the state. He was a generous con- 
tributor to musical organizations of Denver and was a patron of all those interests and 
activities which are of cultural value to the city or which led to its substantial improve- 
ment and upbuilding. His life was indeed of great worth and although he passed his 
eightieth milestone, in spirit and interests he seemed yet in his prime, retaining an active 
interest in all that had to do with Denver's welfare and improvement and with national 
progress and advancement. 



JAMES DALRYMPLE. 



James Dalrymple occupies the responsible position of state coal mine inspector, 
a position the importance of which can scarcely be overestimated in this state, where 
coal mining constitutes one of the chief sources of wealth and of business, activity. 
Mr. Dalrymple is a native of Scotland, born on the 13th of July, 1863, his parents being 
James and Agnes (Patton) Dalrymple, who were likewise natives of the land of hills 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 31 

and heather, where they spent their entire lives, the father devoting his attention to 
coal mining. They had a family of twelve children. 

James Dalrymple acquired his education in the public schools of Scotland but at 
the age of twelve years went into the mines and gained practical experience which 
has been of great benefit to him in his present position. He came to the United 
States in 1S81, landing at New York, after which he spent four years in coal mining in 
Pittsburgh. He was then attracted to the west with its possibilities for mining and 
made his way to Canon City, Colorado, where he engaged in coal mining. He was 
identified with all branches of activity having to do with coal products in various 
counties of the state, working his way steadily upward from the Bumble position of 
a mine worker to that of superintendent. He came to Denver as deputy state mine 
inspector in September, 1909, and in November, 1910, was appointed by the governor 
as mine inspector. He has been made chairman of the examining board of state mine 
officials and is considered the leading expert in his line in Colorado. He was appointed 
to his present responsible position after competitive examination, which gave him the 
highest standing among twelve. 

In October, 1883, Mr. Dalrymple was united in marriage to Miss Mary Hudson, 
a native of England, although their marriage was celebrated in Pennsylvania. To them 
have been born five children. James, twenty-nine years of age, who has charge of 
the rescue car of the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company and lives in Trinidad, is married 
and has two children. George A., twenty-seven years of age, is engaged in the coal 
business in Crosby, Wyoming. Henry D., a young man of nineteen years, is a graduate 
of the Denver high school. Robert, seventeen years of age, is a pupil in the Denver 
high school. Mary Agnes, aged fifteen, is also pursuing her education. 

Mr. Dalrymple turns to fishing as his recreation but allows nothing to interfere 
with the faithful performance of his duties, for which he is splendidly qualified by 
reason of his long practical experience in the mines, working his way steadily upward 
from a most humble position and acquainting himself with every phase of mine work 
and methods of operation. He is thus splendidly qualified for mine inspection and 
his opinions along this line are accepted as authority throughout the entire state. 
He has never had occasion to regret his determination to come to America, where he 
arrived when a youth of eighteen years, for in this land he has found the opportunities 
which he sought and in their utilization has won a substantial measure of success. 



JOSEPH WALTEB. LEE. 



Joseph Walter Lee, chief probation officer of Weld county and a resident of Greeley, 
was born in Passaic, New Jersey, April 30, 1880, a son of Thomas and Mary (Morris) 
Lee, who were natives of Manchester, England. The father came to America in 1860 
and after crossing the broad Atlantic took up his abode in Passaic, New Jersey, where 
he was living at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war. With patriotic loyalty to 
his adopted country he enlisted for active service as a member of a New Jersey cavalry 
troop and served for four years in defense of the Union, or until the close of the 
war. He then returned to Passaic, New Jersey, and afterward sailed the seas, while 
subsequently he removed to Michigan of which state he became one of the pioneers. 
He later came to Colorado, where he remained for four years, but in 1908 returned 
to Passaic, New Jersey, where he still makes his home, but is now living retired 
from active business. He has reached the age of eighty-three years, while his wife is 
eighty-two years of age. 

Joseph Walter Lee was reared and educated in Passaic, New Jersey, and in New 
York city. He won his Bachelor of Arts degree from the College of the City of New 
York and then took up the profession of teaching in the west. He came to Colorado in 
December, 1903, and has since made his home in this state. Here he followed teaching 
for fifteen years and proved a most capable educator, imparting readily and clearly to 
others the knowledge which he had acquired. In June, 1917, he was appointed chief 
probation officer of Weld county and has occupied that position continuously since, 
doing excellent work in enforcing attendance at the schools. In this he uses persuasion 
and argument, as well as the law which is on his side, and he puts forth every possible 
effort to maintain the highest educational standards. He has also been identified with 
other business interests. While at Hotchkiss. Colorado, he built and became general 
manager of the Hotchkiss evaporator, electric light plant and canning factory, which 
he operated from 1905 until 1909. He is a man of determined purpose, carrying forward 
to successful completion whatever he undertakes. He is now making a thorough survey of 
Weld county by instruction of the county court. 



32 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

In religious faith Mr. Lee is an Episcopalian. Politically he maintains an inde- 
pendent course. Fraternally he is well known, having membership with the Masons, 
the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He stands for 
all that he believes will prove an element in the uplift of the individual and the better- 
ment of the community at large and is a wide-awake, progressive man whose efforts 
in behalf of educational, progress have been far-reaching and effective. 



HON. ELIAS MILTON AMMONS. 

Hon. Elias Milton Ammons. president of the Farmers Life Insurance Company of 
Denver, ex-governor of Colorado, as well as one of the state's most conspicuous figures 
in public and private life, has had an identification with Colorado's growth and develop- 
ment that renders highly eligible for a work of this character a partial review of his 
career of nearly fifty years within the confines of the state. 

Elias M. Ammons was born July 28, 1860, on a farm near Franklin, Macon county, 
North Carolina, a son of Jehu Richard and Margaret Caroline (Brendle) Ammons. The 
ancestors of E. M. Ammons on his father's side were among the very first settlers in 
western North Carolina. The father of Jehu R. Ammons was Joshua Ammons, whose 
father was a Revolutionary soldier and fought in the struggle for independence. Joshua 
Ammons was a Baptist minister and his son. Jehu R.. was also educated for that pro- 
fession. The latter was one of fourteen children and at about the age of fourteen suf- 
fered a severe spell of sickness which resulted in impaired physical strength during 
his life thereafter. He was married in 1859 in North Carolina to Miss Margaret Caroline 
Brendle, who came from an old Pennsylvania Dutch family that settled in that section 
of North Carolina in an early day. Early in the spring of 1871, Jehu R. Ammons and 
his family removed to Colorado, arriving in Denver on April 1st of that year, after being 
delayed several days by a snow blockade at Hugo, Colorado, on the old Kansas Pacific 
Railroad. After coming to Colorado, Jehu R. Ammons was engaged at different times 
in the mercantile, mining and timber business. His death occurred in Douglas county 
on April 20. 1899. while his wife died in Denver on December 25, 1893. They had a family 
of six children, five of whom lived to adult ages, all being high school graduates. The 
eldest of the children was Elias M. Theodosia Grace, the second of the family, became 
a successful school teacher and was well known in educational circles, establishing the 
domestic science department in the Colorado Agricultural College. She never married 
and is now deceased. Farita H. gave her hand in marriage to Alonzo F. Polhamus and 
became the mother of eight children, seven of whom survived her. Anna J. Ammons is 
a well known school teacher of Denver. Gwendolyn wedded James McLaughlin and 
resides in Trinidad. Colorado. 

Elias M. Ammons was a boy of less than eleven years of age when he came to Colo- 
rado, up to which time he had attended school but very little, probably not more than 
a few weeks in all. Soon after coming to Denver he went to work in a woolen mill 
then located on West Larimer street, which employment was quite essential, as the 
family means were limited. The boy, being eldest in the family, had from the age of 
five worked at various t?sks such as his age permitted end contributed in no small way 
toward the family support. Severe losses had reduced the family finances, while the 
father was not physically robust, a condition dating from boyhood. In latter July. 1871, 
the family removed to Pleasant Park, where young Ammons worked on a ranch. In 
those days hay harvest was carried on by the use of scythes and the boy managed to 
do his share of the work with the others. Later Mr. Amnions' father went to Turkey 
Creek and the son was employed at various kinds of work, including lumbering. At 
this he skidded the first five thousand ties that went into the South Park Railroad. He 
drove oxen, hauling cordwood to the limekilns. His work was carried on entirely out-of- 
doors and during the severe winters, when the cold was intense, he kept at it just the 
same, even without gloves or overshoes. In fact he never had a pair of either until 
he was about grown. In the winter of 1874 the family removed to Denver, where young 
Ammons. after considerable difficulty, found employment as a fireman in a laundry. 
After three weeks' service in that capacity the laundry failed and he lost all his wages. 
He could not afford to remain idle, so secured work sawing wood in a woodyard. and 
was thus able to earn some money with which to purchase schoolbooks. He was anxious 
to secure an education and just as soon as it was possible for him to do so he started to 
school. It was in February, 1875, when he became a pupil at the old Arapahoe school 
that stood on the present site of the club building on Arapahoe street. Aaron Gove was 




HON. ELIAS M. AMMONS 



34 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the principal and to the encouragement and influence of this gentleman Mr. Amnions 
attributes no small part of the rapid progress he made in his studies. Here was an 
instance of a boy not having seen the inside of a schoolroom for over five years who 
when a little less than fifteen years of age was assigned to the fourth grade. Within 
two weeks he was promoted to a higher grade and in June, 1876, entered high school. 
He had few spare moments as a schoolboy. His summer vacation in 1875 was spent 
on a ranch, while during the school year he lighted the street lamps, as was the custom 
when gas was being used. To add to what he had to contend with, in the early part of 
1876 he suffered a severe attack of measles which weakened his eyes, resulting in a 
handicap under which he has labored ever since. He graduated from the East Denver 
high school in 1880. being a member of the fourth class to matriculate in that institu- 
tion. It would be difficult to find a young man who had mixed in with his school days 
such a variety of work and it simply goes to show what industry, adaptation and neces- 
sity will bring out of a boy. For four years he worked in the evenings, lighting the 
street lamps as previously mentioned;, and when not otherwise employed he gathered 
up discarded tin cans from which the solder was melted and sold, engaging as well in 
numerous other ways of making money. He hunted game for the market in the days 
when a deer brought a dollar and a half and an antelope one dollar, while elk and bear 
brought but little more. While thus engaged on the Gore range, and on the very last 
day of the hunting season in the fall of 1880, he was accidentally shot, receiving a dan- 
gerous wound in the head which incapacitated him for weeks. He had been doing some 
newspaper work, first in connection with the circulation department of the Times. He 
wrote up the Breckenridge boom for the Denver Tribune in 1880. After recovering 
from his gunshot wound he was for some time in the employ of the Denver Hotel Re- 
porter. In the spring of 1881 he was put on the circulation staff of the Times and in 
connection with this paper he remained for four and a half years, filling various posi- 
tions with credit to himself and satisfaction to his employers. Mr. Woodbury took him 
into the business office, and when that gentleman disposed of his interests, the new 
firm assigned Mr. Ammons to reportorial work. Soon he began to edit the telegraph 
for the Times, read the proofs and later was made city editor, while at the age of twenty- 
five he was made associate editor. In the fall of 1885 he was compelled to give up jour- 
nalistic work on account of his eyes — unfortunately, too, as he had acquired the reputa- 
tion of being a capable and promising man. His services were sought by other papers 
but the offers were declined. 

In taking up other work, Mr. Ammons turned his attention to the cattle business 
and in September, 1885, in partnership with Thomas F. Dawson, formed the firm of 
Dawson & Ammons. They began with eighty acres of land on the western line of 
Douglas county, about thirty miles from Denver, and with about twenty-five head of cat- 
tle. This business prospered from the beginning and subsequently became one of the big 
cattle outfits of that time in the state. Mr. Ammons was always the active manager 
of the business. A thoroughly practical man. he was familiar with every branch of it and 
perfectly competent to perform and judge the work of any employe, who was never 
asked to do more than Mr. Ammons would do himself. The firm of Dawson & Ammons 
continued until Mr. Ammons disposed of by far the larger portion of his stock and ranch- 
ing interests about the time he entered on his duties as governor of the state. While 
actively engaged in the cattle business Mr. Ammons made a close study of methods long 
prevailing in that industry and endeavored to improve on them. One practice in par- 
ticular that he sought to improve, and did, was that of finishing beef cattle in Colorado 
and which has ever since been followed by many growers in the state. His connection 
with that industry in Colorado included a period of depression and low prices which, 
contrasted with present-day returns, seem incredible. Steers known as good killers were 
sold for as low as two dollars and thirty-five cents per hundredweight, while fat cows 
that would average eleven hundred pounds were sold for as low as ten dollars each. 
Mr. Ammons took an active part in the organization of the cattle interests for protec- 
tion against theft and was a prime factor in the organization of the Colorado Cattle and 
Horse Growers' Association. He accepted the presidency of this organization to start 
the stock show and called its first meeting, from which has grown the National Western 
Stock Show, which has probably done more to stimulate the live stock industry in Colo- 
rado than any other one influence. He has ever since been president of this organiza- 
tion. He was one of the organizers of "the Middle Park Land and Live Stock Associa- 
tion, its first president and again its president at a later date. He was one of the or- 
ganizers of the First National Bank of Littleton and for several years served as one of 
its directors. He was interested in the Stock Yards Bank during the early days of its 
existence. He is a member of the Grange and Farmers Union as well as various other 



1541064 

• HISTORY OF COLORADO 35 

organizations that have drawn their membership largely from the agricultural class. 
He was for several years president of the Grand County Fair Association as well as a 
director of the Castle Rock Fair Association. He is now vice president of the State 
Board of Agriculture, of which board he has been a member since 1909. From boyhood 
he has been interested in forestry and has made a close study of the results of forest 
conservation, advocating br opposing practices that his practical experience has taught 
him to be right or wrong as the case may be. 

Mr. Ammons has always taken an active interest in education. He served on the 
school boards for many years, for a long period being a member of a local board, the 
president of a county high school board and a member of the Agricultural College board 
at the same time. He has ever been an advocate of practical and technical training 
and the making of the state's high schools more of a people's college for those who can- 
not attend universities rather than conducting them as preparatory schools for classical 
college courses. He has insisted that high school courses should be as complete as 
possible in themselves and still prepare pupils for college courses, should they be able 
to take them. Much work was done toward establishing elementary agricultural work 
in country high schools. He is now a member of the vocational training board. He 
was an active supporter of improvement in physical training. He believed that the 
plans in operation for the most part tended to overtrain those who needed little and 
to do nothing for those who needed it most. He has insisted that thorough physical 
training, best suited to the pupil, should be furnished — that stronger, better balanced 
citizens might be the result. In this connection it may be well to mention that for 
several years he has favored military training of all boys and young men in high schools 
and colleges on the principle that if it is advisable to teach our boys to be better govern- 
ing agents and more productive citizens, it is also necessary to train them in the art of 
protecting both government and production. 

On the 29th of January, 1889. in Denver, Mr. Ammons was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Fleming, a native of Indiana, Pennsylvania, and a sister of James. A. Fleming. Mrs. 
Ammons came to Colorado in the early '80s. Five children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Ammons, of whom three are now living. Bruce, who married Miss Margaret Gates, 
is a rancher of Grand county, Colorado. Elizabeth was educated at the Wolcott School 
and subsequently graduated from the Colorado Women's College, after which she took a 
special course in journalism at the University of Colorado and has been acting secretary 
to her father for several years. Miss Ammons is an accomplished equestrienne. Teller 
is a member of Company I, Three Hundred and Fifty-fourth Infantry, at the front in 
France, having joined the United States military forces in October, 1917. 

Though too young to vote, Mr. Ammons took an active part in the campaign of 
1880. He frequently represented the republican party in conventions but refused to act 
as a delegate to the national convention at St. Louis in 1896. On a previous occasion, 
before he was a voter, he had been chosen as a delegate to a state convention but de- 
clined on account of his age. In 1890 he became clerk of the district court but resigned 
after three months of service. In the fall of 1890 he was elected to the state legislature 
after one of the most exciting campaigns in the history of Douglas county. His opponent 
at that time was William Dillon, a brother of the noted Irish agitator. Mr. Dillon chal- 
lenged Mr. Ammons to joint debates, which were held in different precincts, and the 
interest was so intense that large crowds went from one to another to listen to the de- 
bates. In the legislature Mr. Ammons was one of three grangers who decided the speak- 
ership in the caucus. He made a strong fight on parliamentary rulings and evinced 
such familiarity with proper procedure of that character that the impression was created 
that he was a lawyer. While never having read law a day in his life, he had. however, 
debated in literary societies, where he acquired a thorough knowledge of parliamentary 
tactics. He served as a member of the judiciary committee while in the legislature. 
He was instrumental in the passage of the fee and salary bill, the Australian ballot law. 
appropriations for state roads in Douglas county, as well as numerous reform measures 
passed by that general assembly. He was no small factor in the election of Henry M. 
Teller to the United States senate. Mr. Ammons was a most ardent admirer of that 
worthy statesman, with whom the warmest friendship existed as long as he lived. Mr. 
Ammons made for himself a name and an acquaintance during his first term in the legis- 
lature such as few "first termers" have ever done in the state. He readily became known 
as a fighter who was both able and had the courage of his convictions. In addition to 
being credited by other members as being the hardest worker in the house, the predic- 
tion was made by close observers that he was destined to "go higher," which in the face 
of subsequent positions that he filled only shows the ample basis for those predictions. 
At the convention held for nomination in 1892. Mr. Ammons received the vote of every 



36 HISTORY OF COLORADO • 

delegate but himself, on secret ballot, and was reelected by an increased majority. He 
had proved so popular and shown such ability during his previous term that it was 
decided he should make the race for speaker of the house. He was elected to this posi- 
tion, being the youngest man on whom that honor had ever been conferred up to that 
time. In his rulings as speaker no appeal was ever sustained and at the extra session 
of'fifty-two days no appeal from his decision was ever taken. 'although the session was 
an exciting one and many matters of importance were brought to him for settlement. 
He declined to be a candidate for renomination at the conclusion of his second term. 
In 1896 he refused the chairmanship of the state silver republican committee and later 
in the same year declined the nomination for representative. When the national repub- 
lican party became a gold standard party, Mr. Ammons followed Senator Teller out of 
that party and helped to organize in Colorado the silver republican party. In fact he 
led the fight in the second congressional district convention in 1896 to instruct a bolt 
from the national convention under the leadership of Senator Teller in case the expected 
announcement of the gold standard policy should be made. He served at various times 
as a member of the state central committee for Douglas county, also as chairman of 
the county central committee and as chairman of the congressional district committee. 
On the 16th of September. 1898, in the silver republican senatorial convention of El Paso 
and Douglas counties, Mr. Ammons, without seeking the position, was nominated for 
state senator. In the election that followed a vigorous campaign he was chosen by more 
than five thousand majority, carrying every precinct in his home county of Douglas, as 
well as receiving an enormous majority in his opponent's home county. 

While in the Colorado senate he served during the first term as chairman of the 
printing committee and conducted its affairs at less expense than ever before had been 
done. He also was responsible for much important legislation among which he was 
author of the bill providing that the Columbine be established as the state flower; author 
of a bill establishing Teller county; author of legislation that took "picture gallery" off 
the ballot; and this was accomplished only after a bitter fight. In this session of the 
senate he was a member of the finance, live stock, and rules committees. During the 
second session of his term he was chairman of the finance committee in the senate and 
of the joint committee of both houses on finance, appropriation and taxation. During 
his service as such he was instrumental in reducing appropriations over six hundred 
thousand dollars, bringing them within the state's revenues. 

In 1901 Mr. Ammons was appointed president of the Live Stock Inspection Board 
and served for two terms. He was a candidate for lieutenant governor of Colorado in 
1904 and again in 1906, and while defeated both times, he just as often ran ahead of 
the ticket. In 1912 he was elected governor by more than fifty thousand plurality, receiv- 
ing a tremendously heavy vote from the country districts, as his labors and influence 
had largely been utilized in behalf of measures and movements affecting those localities. 
Governor Ammons served one term in accordance with the platform on which he was 
elected, which contained a one-term plank. Governor Ammons' administration was 
marked by the strictest economy as well as much constructive legislation, probably more 
than had characterized that of any of his predecessors. He was active in the establish- 
ment of schools of agriculture at Fort Collins and Fort Lewis and in pushing elementary 
agriculture in the schools of the state; also in securing appropriations for extension 
and institute work, in which he actively engaged in assisting college men. Civil service 
was put into force more effectively during his administration than during any time in 
the history of the state. During his administration a most effective public utilities law, 
including the abolition of railroad passes, was passed for the first time. A thorough 
taxation system, insuring more equitable distribution of taxes and furnishing the ma- 
chinery for a complete system, was also established. A highway system under which 
tremendous progress has been made in road construction, was put into effect and is 
being copied by many of the states of the Union. Agitation over both the banking laws 
and the insurance laws was ended by legislation covering these subjects very fully and 
which seems to have been perfectly satisfactory since that time. A law pronounced by 
both operators and employes as being the best in the country, was passed, controlling 
the business of coal mining. Legislation was enacted to assist agriculture, providing for 
the gathering of statistics; to further the cause of good seed; for the general promotion 
of agriculture and live stock growing. A law was passed to establish a county agri- 
culturist, with the idea of teaching those who come here from other countries, the best 
methods of growing crops and live stock under our climatic and other conditions. The 
employers' liability act was also liberalized. Better protection was provided for women 
and children and a commission appointed to investigate a report on a minimum wage 
for women. A bill was passed to regulate commission men. especially in relation to 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 37 

fruits and vegetables, but was referred and later defeated at the polls. A number of 
the boards were consolidated. In doing this, the dairy commission was put under the 
board of agriculture and the head of the live stock department made the commissioner. 
It was this legislature which passed the act for the election of United States senators 
by the people. Game and fish laws were made more efficient and the game and fish 
department provided with means for better support. The law for an eight-hour day 
was made effective. The initiative and referendum was perfected by legislation,, pre- 
venting fraudulent petitions and preventing state employes from circulating petitions. 
Appropriations were made and most effective work was done to protect the state's water 
from litigation from other states. Laws regulating "loan sharks" were passed. Automo- 
biles were licensed to provide a road fund. Official action was taken to provide for 
mountain parks and a system of parks throughout the state was advocated. The state 
was reapportioned for congressional and other purposes. An amendment to the con- 
stitution was proposed and adopted at the succeeding election, requiring equalization 
of values for taxation and limiting levy for state and county purposes, to prevent undue 
increase in taxation. Minimum teachers' salaries were established. A strong memorial 
to congress was adopted seeking to establish a national policy, advocating the control 
of the public domain, in favor of the settlement of public lands in the state and the 
development of its natural resources. The headless ballot which Mr. Ammons tried to 
secure at the time of the passage of the Australian ballot bill first in 1891 and which 
he tried to bring about by amendment while in the senate in 1899, was adopted and 
went into force with this administration. The mothers' compensation act was passed. 
An attempt was made to put all royalties on coal and other minerals on school and other 
state lands into the permanent fund. It developed that new legislation was necessary 
and this, through his influence, was secured at the session of 1917. 

A conference of governors was held at Colorado Springs in August of 1913 and 
proved to be one of the best attended meetings of these officials ever held. Mr. Ammons 
was a member of the executive committee for both 1913 and 1914. The second year 
conference was taken up largely by subjects relating to western development. In 1914, 
the governor called a conference of educational institutions, pioneer societies, historical 
societies, and others interested, to meet with representatives of the government to organ- 
ize, to secure cooperation with the federal government, with the purpose of eliminating 
duplication and meaningless names of mountains and streams and perpetuating in 
their places Indian and Spanish and pioneer names of historic value. The state being 
the great scenic section of the country it was deemed advisable from that standpoint, 
that the names of all points of interest should carry with them designations not only 
of historic value but of story value. The gathering, which met at the senate chamber 
in the state house of Denver, was the most notable of the kind ever called in the history 
of the state; it entered upon the work with interest and enthusiasm and though it did 
not later secure official recognition, as it deserved, it has already accomplished much 
good and will, doubtless, do more and more as time goes by. The governor was sec- 
retary of the Western Governors' Conference and active in securing an organized effort 
on the part of the western states for a better development of resources in, and settle- 
ment of, the public lands. On request of the executive committee he prepared a paper 
for the governors' council, which met at Boston in August, 1915. 

During his administration there occurred the worst industrial disturbance in the 
history of the state. There had been in existence for some time a strike in the northern 
coal fields and six weeks before he went into office, he was notified that a general strike 
of coal miners would be called. Every effort was made to prevent this but without avail. 
The contest was for recognition of the Union in District No. 15, comprising Colorado, 
New Mexico and Utah. To avoid interstate complications the strike was to be in one 
state at a time. Colorado was chosen as the first battle ground. The conduct of the 
strike was controlled from outside of the state, entirely on the side of the United Mine 
Workers and largely on the part of the operators. While the officers of the United Mine 
Workers sought conferences with the operators the latter insisted that this was only 
asked for in order to secure that much recognition of the Union and they refused to 
meet the strikers' officials. A great deal of violence ensued, resulting in the necessity 
for military control of the districts involved. The latter part of 1914 the strike was 
called off and the difficulties attending it so adjusted that the entire matter was taken 
care of before the close of that administration. It was said that the governor only 
had one peaceful day during his administration and that was the last day he was in 
office. This disturbance occupied most of the time and energies of the executive and 
interfered with many of the plans laid out for the development of the state. 

The biennial message delivered to the assembly at the close of the administration 



38 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

was a document that commanded unusual interest. At the close of its reading by Rep- 
resentative Fincher, there was such a demonstration of approval as has never been wit- 
nessed in the history of the state on such an occasion. A short time later, on an inci- 
dental visit to the house, a recess was taken and an enthusiastic reception given to the 
former governor; an incident that has never occurred at any other time in the state's 
history. 

In matters of legislation and public policy Governor Ammons has always been a 
progressive but never a radical one. He has maintained a wide acquaintance with the 
leading men of the state for nearly a half century. He has known personally every 
governor of Colorado and all but two of the territorial governors. His acquaintance has 
not only included the big men but the great rank and file as well. His political interest 
is that of a good citizen and his activities along those lines have not been for private 
gain. For many years he was a member of the Denver Civic and Commercial Associa- 
tion and in 1917 and 1918 was a director and head of the agriculture and live stock 
bureau. He is a member of the Democratic Club, the Denver Athletic Club, the Lions 
Club and the Sons of Colorado, and has served as president of this organization. His 
most striking personal characteristics are his sincerity, his simplicity of manner, his 
democratic spirit and his broad sympathies for, and his understanding of, the people. A 
predominant feature of his make-up is his persistency and determination. Few men in 
any walk of life, and still fewer who have attained his prominence, have had as many 
obstacles to overcome or endured the hardships that Governor Ammons has. His lack 
of early educational training and the handicap of impaired eyesight no doubt have been 
drawbacks, yet may have served to develop qualities to offset the handicap. 



NAT P. WILSON. 



Most interesting and ofttimes thrilling have been the events which constitute the 
life history of Nat P. Wilson, a prominent mining man of Denver and the president of 
the Ajax Metal Mining Company. He was born in Catawba county, North Carolina, 
October 12, 1860, a son of Jasper and Octavia Adelaide (Norwood) Wilson, both of whom 
were natives of North Carolina. In November, 1868, the family removed to near Lawrence, 
Kansas, where the father engaged in cattle raising and ranching and became one of the 
leading and successful cattle men of that state. He continued in the business for 
many years but eventually retired and took up his abode in the city of Lawrence, where 
he maintained his home until his death, which occurred in December, 1915, when he 
was eighty-four years of age. His widow is still a resident of Lawrence and is now 
eighty years of age. In their family were nine children, as follows: Mrs. Mary C. 
Herring, who is a resident of Lawrence, Kansas; Nat P., of this review; Newton S., who 
makes his home in Denver, is prominently identified with the oil business, and was, in 
association with Verner Z. Reed, one of the founders of the Mid-West Oil Company 
and has been general field manager ever since; Mrs. John H. Griffin, of Baldwin, Kan- 
sas; John W., who lives in Wyoming and is in the employ of his brother, Newton S., in 
the conduct of the Mid-West Oil Company; Thomas E., who passed away in Guthrie, 
Oklahoma, in 1917; Edward B., a resident of Lawrence, Kansas; and Arthur C. and 
Jasper B., who also make their home in Lawrence, Kansas. 

In early life Nat P. Wilson attended school in Lawrence and in Perryville, Kansas, 
and later became engaged in the cattle business with his father, that connection being 
maintained until the winter of 1878, when he left home and came to Colorado. He 
afterward located in Leadville, where he took up mining, and there he assisted in the 
development of such famous properties as the Little Chief, Robert B. Lee and other 
well known gold and silver producers, working for a time for Irving Hulbert, a large 
mine owner and the principal stockholder in the richest silver mine in the slate — the 
Robert E. Lee, which had a record of twenty thousand dollars to the ton. Mr. Wilson 
left Leadville in November, 1881, and went to northwest Idaho on a prospecting trip, 
but in the spring returned to the San Juan country, where he continued his mining 
activity. He operated the famous Boomerang mine in San Miguel county, Colorado, 
also the Saratoga, the Belle of the West and other mines at Ironton, Colorado, all of 
them very valuable mining properties and large producers. During this period he made 
a prospecting tour into the Gunnison country and assisted in developing that section in 
connection with its mines and mining interests. During the year 1883 he went to 
Alaska with Colonel George A. Jackson, a prominent and wealthy mine owner of Colo- 
rado, the purpose of their trip being to explore the country. They went up Cook's Inlet 
and spent several months in the wild and uninhabited northland but returned to Gunni- 




NAT P. WILSON 



40 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

son county, Colorado, in the winter. Mr. Wilson next made a trip with Colonel Jackson 
by way of pack train to Sonora, Mexico, for the purpose of examining the territory there 
and to secure a concession from the Mexican government permitting them to locate 
mining claims. They located the noted Cananea copper mines, which are situated about 
sixty miles south of Bisbee, Arizona. After staking out and filing their claims they 
returned to San Juan county, Colorado, and for several years thereafter Mr. Wilson 
managed and developed mining properties in the latter district, where he continued 
until 1893 with the exception of trips which he made two or three times a year to report 
on various properties in South America and Mexico. At length he entered the employ 
of D. H. Moffat and was sent to Cripple Creek on the 14th of November, 1893. He 
remained there for only a few months and then started out on a prospecting trip on 
his own account. In 1895 he took charge of the noted Moon Anchor mine, which he 
made a paying investment, it proving a large producer for six years. In the meantime 
he organized the Rio Grande Sampling Company of Cripple Creek and continued to carry 
on business under that name and at the same time developed his mining interests until 
1903. He then disposed of his mines in the Cripple Creek district and also his interest 
in the Rio Grande Sampling Company. 

In 1900 Mr. Wilson had decided to sell all of his holdings and retire, but his friend, 
Verner Z. Reed, a wealthy mine owner, called him back to Cripple Creek, where the 
latter was heavily interested in mining properties. For three years thereafter Mr. 
Wilson was continuously on the road, examining mine fields for Mr. Reed and others. 
In January, 1903, he was called to Rag Top mountain near Deadwood, South Dakota, to 
make some very important examinations on mines and milling property for some capi- 
talists of Colorado Springs. He completed this task in the middle of February and 
returned to Denver but had hardly reached that city before he was again sent to 
Mexico by New York capitalists to report on property which they controlled at Parral, 
Mexico. These were silver mines upon which he made the report that they were not 
worth working. After this Mr. Wilson again took up mining on his own account and 
extensively and vigorously prosecuted his interests in that connection for eight years. 
During this time he opened up three very valuable silver mines, including the noted 
Clarence mine, which was one of the old Spanish workings of three hundred and fifty 
years ago. This he has since sold. He still retains the other two properties, however, 
and has recently started active development work thereon after they had been practically 
inactive for seven years. Mr. Wilson and A. J. McWaters, a millionaire miner, have 
become known as the most daring pair in taking desperate chances in Mexico during the 
years 1913 to 1915, when the rebellious uprisings rendered life in that country very 
unstable. Nevertheless these two gentlemen opened up a road from Texas through the 
wilds of Mexico for a distance of three hundred miles, cutting a way through forests 
and proceeding through deep canyons. They had continually to be on the alert to 
dodge the rebel Mexicans and any roving bandit bands, but they successfully completed 
their task and brought out on mule trains over one million dollars in silver bullion in 
July, 1913, making the' trip in nineteen days with mules and Mexican servants. They 
crossed the Rio Grande river at the noted crossing, Ojinaga, Mexico, two hundred and 
eighty miles south of El Paso, where many Mexican battles have since been fought and 
where Colonel Langhorn of the United States army has had troops stationed almost 
continuously since 1914. Mr. Wilson has made many other trips fraught with adventure 
and danger in and out of Mexico, traveling on hand car and in automobile, the railroads 
in that country having been torn up by the warring factions. He was a warm personal 
friend and associate of John W. Benton, who was killed by the bandit Villa in Juarez, 
Mexico. A few days after the murder of Mr. Benton, President Wilson ordered a com- 
mittee of five Americans to go into Mexico to investigate the murder and make a report. 
The party was halted at the line. They were to have gone to Chihuahua, where the 
body of Benton was supposed to have been taken, but Villa had sent seventy-five of 
his men eighty five miles south of El Paso to watch the junction of the railroad and 
wagon road, thinking that the party might cross there by automobile. Mr. Wilson, 
knowing nothing of the arrangement, left El Paso with Frank Hynes and a chauffeur 
with supplies for his mines, and while proceeding along the road they were ambushed 
by this party of Villa's guards on reaching the junction; but on account of the notori- 
ously poor marksmanship of the average Mexican they escaped unhurt. After halting 
Mr. Wilson addressed the leader in Spanish, speaking the language as well as a Mexican, 
and after a two hours' parley they were allowed to proceed unmolested. This and 
many other similar escapes Mr. Wilson has had in this wild country. His son has on 
two occasions been taken prisoner in Mexico by the rebels and both times was sentenced 
to death and taken out to be shot, but on account of his remarkable self-control, his 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 41 

knowledge of the Mexican and his familiarity with the Spanish language he has 
managed to make his escape, persuading his guards to release him. On one of these 
trips, when he was captured, his wife was with him and was sent ahead on the same 
train while he was held captive. During the trying time of 1916, when President 
Wilson ordered all Americans to leave Mexico, Mr. Wilson and his son abandoned the 
Mexican field and made their way to Arizona, where they now own valuable copper 
mines in Cochise county, sixty miles east of Bisbee, which they are successfully 
operating. Mr. Wilson is likewise a director in various enterprises in Colorado and 
other sections. He has very large real estate holdings in Denver and in other parts 
of Colorado and he maintains offices in both Denver and in El Paso, Texas. 

On the 27th of December, 1887, Mr. Wilson was married to Miss Harriet L. 
Humphrey, of Ouray, Colorado, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Humphrey, her 
father being a very prominent public man of Ouray county and the father of D. B. 
Humphrey, now assistant state treasurer. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have become parents 
of three children. Aida, now Mrs. Joseph J. Calder, who was born in Ouray in 1888 
and was graduated from the Denver high school, is now a resident of Los Angeles, 
California. Mr. Calder is prominently identified with the Universal Film Company. 
W. H. Wilson, born in Ouray in 1891, was graduated from the Colorado School of 
Mines at Golden and from the University of Denver, which conferred upon him the 
M. E. degree. He is now operating mines with his father in Arizona and his experiences 
have been almost as varied and eventful as those which have fallen to his father's lot. 
He married Miss Cecil Bostwick, a native of Kentucky, Colorado. Howard H. Wilson, 
born in Ouray in 1895, is a graduate of the East Denver high school and is now leasing 
and managing two of his father's farms four miles from Denver. He was married in 
Denver to Miss Marie Lang and they have one child, Betty Alice. 

Mr. Wilson had many opportunities to fill public offices but has steadfastly declined. 
He is, however, a stanch supporter of the present government and the policies outlined 
in the present war by Woodrow Wilson. He has for many years been a member of the 
Denver Athjetic Club, also has membership in the Cripple Creek Club and the noted 
Toltec Club; of El Paso and there resides when in Texas. The life story of Mr. Wilson 
would match any tale of fiction if it were written at length. There is no phase of 
mining development in the west with which he is not familiar. He was at one time 
a partner and associate for ten years, from 1881 until 1891, of Colonel George A. 
Jackson who was the discoverer of the first pay gold diggings at the mouth of Chicago 
Creek, near Idaho Springs, where today stands a five thousand dollar monument erected 
to the memory of Mr. Jackson. Mr. Wilson is widely known to mining men through- 
out the entire country and his opinions are largely accepted as authority by those 
who know of the geological formation of the country. He has contributed much 
toward the development of the rich mineral resources with which nature endowed 
Colorado and the west and the value of his work in this connection cannot be over- 
estimated. His success has been the legitimate outcome of his untiring efforts, his 
practical knowledge of mining conditions and his keen sagacity. He manages gigantic 
interests with ease, has splendid powers of organization and is most systematic in all 
that he does. He lives at his country home at Westminster, about eight miles from 
Denver, and his successes enable him to enjoy all of the comforts and luxuries that 
life can offer. But he is still a very busy man who plays the game not so much to win 
but because of the keen delight which anyone should feel in the accomplishment of a 
difficult and honorable task. 



JULIUS PEARSE. 

Among the names that stand out prominently upon the pages of Denver's history 
is that of Julius Pearse. who was one of the organizers of the volunteer fire department 
of Denver and a pioneer fire chief of the city. In fact his efforts constituted a valuable 
element in the upbuilding of the fire department, with which he was long connected, 
while in later years he conducted business as a dealer in fire-fighting apparatus and 
supplies, his interests being carried on under the name of the Julius Pearse Fire 
Department Supply Company. 

Mr. Pearse was a native of Germany. He was born in March, 1847, and came to 
America when a youth just entering his teens. He lived with an aunt in Chicago 
and there acquired a common school and collegiate education. He also learned and followed 
the barber's trade there and continued his residence in Chicago until 1867, when he made 
his way westward to Denver. A year later he removed to Central City, Colorado, where he 




^ 




JULIUS PEARSE, Jr. 



44 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

engaged in mining until 1871 and then again took up his abode in Denver. He assisted in 
organizing the volunteer fire department and hose company and all of the older residents 
of the city will recognize the fact that his labors were an important element in upbuild- 
ing the system and promoting adequate service of fire fighting in Denver. He did 
much to advance the efficiency of the Woodie Fisher Hose Company, No. 1, of which 
he was elected foreman in 1873. It was about three years later that he was made 
chief of the volunteer fire department of the city, which at that time had developed 
a well equipped organization. He was also one of the organizers of the Colorado 
State Fire Association in 1876 and was chosen its first president. He belonged to the 
International Association of Fire Engineers and was an honorary member of the Denver 
police and fire departments. He became the third chief of the volunteer fire department 
in Denver and was the first chief engineer of the paid department, which was organized 
August 18, 1881. He acted as chief of the department from April, 1895, until September 
4, 1897, when he resigned his position to take up the business of selling fire-fighting 
supplies, which he did under the firm style of the Julius Pearse Fire Department Supply 
Company. He became the president of the company and so continued to the time of 
his death, with his son, Julius Pearse, Jr., as the secretary and treasurer of the com- 
pany. The business built up by Mr. Pearse and his son became one of the largest 
establishments in the west, dealing exclusively in fire-fighting equipment. As a member 
of the fire department he was cool, clear-headed and collected at all times — just such a man 
as the city needed in emergencies — and he thoroughly understood the duties of his 
position down to the minutest detail. At a conflagration he made each move count, 
not only on his own part but on that of the men as well, so that maximum results were 
accomplished at a minimum expenditure of time and effort. Mr. Pearse also became 
interested in real estate and mining properties and made judicious investments along 
those lines. 

It was after his removal to the west that Mr. Pearse was married in Canon City, 
Colorado, in 1874, to Miss Maggie Prosser and they became the parents of eleven 
children, six daughters and two sons yet surviving, as does also Mrs. Pearse. These 
children are Mildred, Margaret, Clio, Jane, Mrs. B. B. Morrison, Mrs. Gerald Pettibone, 
Julius and Earl. All are yet living in Denver with the exception of the last named. 

Mr. Pearse was connected with Lodge No. 17, B. P. O. E., and in the Masonic order had 
attained the Knight Templar degree and was a Shriner and also was a member of the 
London Fire Brigade and the United Commercial Travelers, and enjoyed the full con- 
fidence and warm regard of his brethren in those fraternities. He died April 27. 1917, 
at his home at 2528 Stout street, as the direct result of an injury to his foot received 
two years before, while he was examining a fire truck. Blood poisoning developed in 
the member and caused his demise. He was a resident of Denver for more than half 
a century and he left the impress of his individuality for good upon the community. 



JULIUS PEARSE. Jr. 

Julius Pearse, Jr., one of the best known young business men of Denver, now 
president of the Julius Pearse Company, dealers in fire apparatus and supplies and 
having the most extensive concern of the kind in the west, was born in Denver, Novem- 
ber 5, 1883, a son of Julius and Maggie B. (Prosser) Pearse, mention of whom is made 
above. The father, long and prominently connected with the volunteer and paid fire 
departments of the city, also engaged in business as a dealer in fire apparatus and 
supplies, starting out in the year 1874. In the '90s the business had expanded to such 
proportions that it required his entire time and care and as the years passed on con- 
tinued to grow until his fire apparatus and appliances were being sold in many of the 
western states. He died in Denver, April 27, 1917, at the age of seventy years. 

His son, Julius Pearse, who became associated with him in business, attended the 
public schools of Denver in early life and later became the active assistant of his father, 
starting in a minor position. He gradually advanced as he became familiar with the 
business and at length rose to the presidency of the company, which is a close corpora- 
tion. The business was incorporated on the 1st of June, 1917, with Julius Pearse as the 
president and general manager. He is also the secretary of the State Firemen's Asso- 
ciation and is the supervisor of the National Fire Extinguisher Exchange. His trade 
covers a very extensive territory. In fact over ninety-five per cent of all fire g<ods and 
apparatus sold in the west is handled by this company. 

On the 21st of March, 1914, Mr. Pearse was united in marriage to Miss Louise Kurtz, 
of Denver, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Kurtz. Fraternally he is connected with the 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 45 

Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Mr. Pearse is widely known as a representative 
of one of the pioneer families of Denver and is spoken of most favorably by reason of 
his individual worth. 



WALTER A. CARLSON. 



Walter A. Carlson is a representative and progressive young farmer of Weld county 
who has but recently passed the twenty sixth milestone on life's journey. He was 
born in Nebraska in December, 1892, and is a son of Gus J. and Mary Carlson. The 
father was a native of Sweden and in early life came to the new world. He has long 
been identified with agricultural interests and he and his wife are now living in Iowa, 
where he owns and cultivates an excellent farm of three hundred acres, which he has 
brought under a high state of development and to which he has added many substantial 
improvements. 

Walter A. Carlson acquired a public school education, but his activities in that 
direction were somewhat limited owing to the fact that he early began to assist in 
the work of the home farm. His training in that direction, however, was not meager 
and he soon became familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for 
the crops. He remained a resident of the Mississippi valley until 1908, when he 
determined to try his fortune in the west, believing that he would have better oppor- 
tunities in the new but growing country. Accordingly he made his way to Weld county 
in 1908 and six years ago he purchased his present farm, comprising one hundred and 
seventy acres of land situated on section 17, township 6, not far from Lucerne. Here 
he is engaged largely in the production of grain, hay, beets and potatoes and annually 
gathers good crops as the result of his careful and systematic management of his 
business interests. He is also engaged in feeding stock. He has never regretted his 
determination to remove to the west, for he here found the business opportunities which 
he sought and in their utilization has made steady progress. 

Mr. Carlson is a member of the Masonic fraternity and is loyal to its teachings 
and its purposes. He is regarded as an alert, energetic young man. possessed of many 
sterling traits of character, and those who know him speak of him in terms of warm 
regard. 



LOUIS STRAUB. 



One of the most prominent and popular figures in hotel circles in the west is Louis 
Straub, the proprietor and manager of Hotel Midland and also of the Great Northern 
Hotel of Denver. He is thoroughly familiar with everything required in modern hotel 
management and displays a most progressive spirit in the conduct of his interests. 
His life is an expression of that enterprise which has been the dominant factor in 
the rapid and substantial upbuilding of the west. He was born in Wathena, Kansas, 
February 25, 1869, a son of Alexander and Katherine (Frein) Straub. The father was 
an engineer and has now passed away. In the family were four sons: E. G, Frank, 
Charles and Louis. 

The last named, the youngest in the family, was educated in the public schools 
of St. Joseph, Missouri, and has been a resident of Denver since 1S85. Here he 
resumed his education, attending the Arapahoe street school for two years. After 
his textbooks were put aside he turned his attention to the hotel business and found 
in it a field of labor that has proven most congenial and also profitable. For a time 
he was hotel clerk for others, being connected with the Palmer House in an early day. 
He has engaged in business on his own account, however, since 1888 and has been at 
his present location for sixteen years. He has been identified with the Great Northern 
Hotel for a quarter of a century and owns and manages both the Great Northern Hotel 
and Hotel Midland. The former is located at 1612 Larimer street and the latter at 
the corner of Seventeenth and Arapahoe streets. Both are popular hostelries, liberally 
patronized, being conducted according to most progressive methods of modern hotel 
keeping. 

In 1890 Mr. Straub was united in marriage to Miss Rosie Corbett, a native of 
Denver, and they have one son, Thomas P.. twenty-four years of age, who was asso- 
ciated with his father in the hotel business. He enlisted, June 15, 1918, in the United 
States Aviation service, and is now at the Officers' Training Camp, Fort Collins. Fra- 



46 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

ternally Mr. Straub is an Elk. holding membership with Lodge No. 17, at Denver. He 
was appointed by Mayor Arnold in 1913 to the position of alderman of the third ward 
and in May, 1917, was elected a member of the new city council from the seventh 
district. He is an independent democrat in politics, for while he usually votes with 
the party, he does not consider himself bound by party ties. He is a man of fine 
personal appearance, affable and genial in manner, forceful and resourceful in business, 
and is known as one of the leading and popular hotel men of the west. His entire life 
has been devoted to this business and he has studied everything bearing upon success 
in hotel management. His plans are always carefully defined and promptly executed 
and he has put forth every effort to please, recognizing that satisfied patrons are the 



ROBERT S. GAST. 



Robert S. Gast, engaged in the practice of law in Pueblo as a member of the firm 
of Adams & Gast, has by reason of individual worth and ability in his profession won 
a creditable position in the front ranks of the legal fraternity in his section of the 
state. Pueblo numbers him among her native sons. He was born on the 27th of Sep- 
tember, 1879, his parents being Charles E. and Elizabeth S. (Shaeffer) Gast. At the 
usual age he entered the public schools and further continued his education in a pre- 
paratory school in Lawrence, New Jersey. He then entered Yale and was graduated 
within its classic walls in 1902, at which time the Bachelor of Arts degree was 
conferred upon him. A review of the broad field of business led him to the determina- 
tion to enter upon a professional career and with that end in view he matriculated in 
the Columbia Law School of New York and won his LL. B. degree upon graduation 
with the class of 1905. 

Mr. Gast then returned to his home in Pueblo and joined his father in practice as 
junior partner in the firm of Gast & Gast, an association that was maintained until 
his father's death on the 11th of May, 1908. He thus had the benefit of the experience 
of his father and with the passing years his own powers in the profession developed. 
The zeal with which he has devoted his energies to his profession, the careful regard 
evinced for the interests of his clients and an assiduous and unrelaxing attention to 
all the details of his cases, have brought him a large business and made him very 
successful in its conduct. His arguments have elicited warm commendation not only 
from his associates at the har but also from the bench. He is an able writer; his 
briefs always show wide research, careful thought and the best and strongest reasons 
which can be urged for his contention, presented in cogent and logical form and 
illustrated by a style unusually lucid and clear. Since his father's death he has been 
a member of the firm of Adams & Gast, which is accorded a very liberal clientage. 

On the 16th of May, 1908, Mr. Gast was united in marriage to Miss Corinne Busey, 
a daughter of Dr. A. P. Busey. Mr. Gast has always given his political allegiance fo 
the republican party, but while he keeps well informed on the questions and issues of 
the day and is therefore able to support his position by intelligent argument, he has 
never sought or desired office. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. His fellow townsmen attest his personal worth as well as his 
professional skill and the consensus of public opinion places him in the front rank 
among Pueblo's citizens. 



JOHN CALLIS. 



John Callis, district manager at Denver for R. G. Dun & Company, to which posi- 
tion he has attained through individual merit, was born in Slaidburn, Yorkshire, 
England, March 24, 1866, a son of William and Frances E. (Adshead) Callis, who were 
likewise natives of England. The father was a rector of the Episcopal church and 
died in his native land. The family numbered three sons and three daughters. John 
was the only one of this family who emigrated to the United States. This was in the 
year 1890. 

John Callis acquired his education in a boarding school, at the Gateshead High 
School for Boys at Gateshead, Northumberland, and under private tutors. He left his na- 
tive country when twenty years of age and for two and a half years resided at Lisbon, 
Portugal, being tutor to the son of Sir Hugh Glynn Petre, K. C. B., the British ambassa- 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 47 

dor, while later he spent one year as assistant principal in the Saltus grammar school 
at Hamilton, Bermuda. In January, 1890, he arrived in New York but did not tarry on 
the Atlantic coast. Making his way westward, he reached Denver in February of that 
year and became connected with the Dun Mercantile Agency as a reporter in the Denver 
office. He there remained from the 5th of February until October of the same year, 
after which he went to the Pacific coast, representing R. G. Dun & Company in various 
capacities in Spokane and Tacoma, Washington, and in Portland, Oregon. He served 
in that way until July, 1894, when he was made manager of the Spokane office, in which 
position he continued until March, 1902. He was then transferred to the New York 
office for special work. In July. 1902. he was appointed district manager of the Denver 
office and has since acted in that capacity. He has been steadily advanced from one 
position to another of larger responsibility and is today one of the trusted and capable 
representatives of that important commercial agency. 

Mr. Callis was married first to Miss Irene McClincy, a native of Portland, Oregon, 
and to them were born three children: Dorothy Frances Celia, twenty-two years of 
age; Eleanor Western, twenty years of age; and Winifred, who is twelve years of age. 
The last named is now in school. Having lost his first wife some years ago, Mr. Callis 
married in May, 1916, Lucille Austin Carter of Louisville, Kentucky. He has member- 
ship in the Denver Country, the Denver Athletic and the Denver Motor Clubs, also the 
Broadmoor Golf Club, of Colorado Springs, and LAlliance Franeaise. His civic interest 
is manifested by his membership in the Civic and Commercial Association and the 
Manufacturers' Association. He also belongs to the Denver Credit Men's Association. 
In Masonic circles he has attained high rank, belonging to Arapahoe Lodge, No. 130, 
A. F. & A. M.; Colorado Chapter, No. 29, R. A. M.; Denver Commandery, No. 25, K. T.; 
and El Jebel Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. He has been called to office in various clubs 
and societies to which he belongs. He was at one time vice president of the Denver 
Athletic Club and served for years as secretary of that club, was also at one time 
director in the Chamber of Commerce and chairman of its membership committee, when 
its membership increased from 600 to 1,600. He belongs to the Ascension Memorial 
Episcopal church and its teachings guide him in his life's relations. He turns to golf 
for recreation but never allows outside interests to interfere with the faithful per- 
formance of his duty to the company which he represents. As the years have passed 
he has prospered and is now the vice president of the Denver Factories Company. He 
has large property holdings on South Broadway rented to manufacturers. He stands 
high in business, club, .church and social circles — a man whom to know is to respect 
and honor because of his fidelity to high standards and manly principles in every 
relation of life. 



JOHN EDWARD ZAHN. 



John Edward Zahn, secretary and general manager of the United States Portland 
Cement Company, is one of Denver's well and favorably known business men. His 
great energy and push have not only contributed to the city's business development 
in a substantial way but have been solely responsible for his individual success. Within 
a comparatively few years he has attained a prominent position among the wide- 
awake and aggressive business men of Denver. A native of Chicago. Illinois, he was 
born February 23, 1871, and is a son of Peter and Margaret (Klingensmith) Zahn, 
both of whom were natives of Germany. The father came to the new world when 
about twenty years of age, becoming an early resident of Chicago. He learned the 
blacksmith's trade and afterward followed the business on his own account at Deer- 
field, Illinois, where he became proprietor of an extensive wagon manufacturing and 
blacksmithing establishment. He enjoys the respect and confidence of all who know 
him. He is now a resident of Chicago. His wife came with her parents to the new 
world when a young girl and was reared, educated and married in Chicago, continuing 
her residence in that city from 1867 to the time of her death in 1913. She was then 
sixty-six years of age, her birth having occurred in Germany in 1847. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Zahn were born three children: J. E.; Julia, now the wife of Edward J. Hintz; 
and George F. The last two are residents of Chicago. 

J. E. Zahn pursued his early education in the schools of Deerfield, Illinois, and 
afterward worked as a farm hand, while later he was employed in connection with the 
iron and steel business in Chicago until 1887, when he became connected with the 
bakers' supply business. He worked along that line as manager of credits to the age 
of eighteen years, when he came to Denver, arriving in this city on the 1st of Sep- 



48 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

tember, 1S90. He secured a position as bookkeeper with the Hax-Gartner Furniture 
Company, with which he continued for a year, and later he became associated with the 
Mouat Lumber Company of Denver, with which he remained until the firm failed 
during the widespread financial panic of 1893. With a capital of but five dollars 
and without any bright prospects before him, Mr. Zahn then embarked in the book and 
stationery business. He paid two dollars and a half of his capital for a month's rent 
and with the balance secured his first stock of goods. Associated with Mr. Zahn was 
E. H. Pierce and the firm later became known as the Pierce-Zahn Book Company. 
Under their capable management the trade steadily grew and the business became one 
of the leading enterprises of that character in Denver. Mr. Zahn remained an active 
factor in its control and management until 1906, when he sold out his interest in the 
company, which is still conducted by others under the original firm name. Turning 
his attention to mining and real estate interests, while thus engaged Mr. Zahn became 
connected with the United States Portland Cement Company and took active charge 
of its business in Denver in 1909. He has since built up a large and growing business 
and as the secretary and general manager of the company has won success and 
prosperity that reflects in no small degree to his credit. He is also largely interested 
in other manufacturing lines aside from his connection with the United States Port- 
land Cement Company. 

On the 19th of May. 1892. Mr. Zahn was married to Miss Lillie E. Miller, of Chicago. 
Illinois, a daughter of George and Mary Miller, also natives of that city. In politics 
Mr. Zahn has always maintained an independent course. Fraternally he is a Knight 
Templar Mason and is connected with the Royal Arcanum. He belongs to the Man- 
ufacturers Association and to the Denver Civic and Commercial Association, of both 
of which he is a director. He is a prominent member of the Denver Rotary Club, in 
the work of which he takes a very active part. He was for one year a governor of the 
international organization, his jurisdiction being over the states of Colorado, Montana, 
Utah, Idaho and Wyoming. He has been identified with various activities of Denver 
which are looking to the general advancement of the city along the lines of material 
progress and improvement and his life record indicates what may be accomplished 
through intensive effort and efficiency. 



DAVID HALLIDAY MOFFAT. 

Banker, miner, mine owner and railroad builder, the activities of David H. Moffat 
along these lines would alone entitle him to distinction as one of Colorado's most promi- 
nent, honored and representative citizens; but in other fields, too, he left the impress 
of his individuality upon the history of the state, for he was a man of benevolent spirit, 
constantly extending a helping hand where assistance was needed, speaking an encourag- 
ing word and giving his friendship to all who were worthy of it. These things endeared 
him to his fellow townsmen, while his business activities constituted an important element 
in the upbuilding of the state and the advancement of growth and progress in the west. 

David H. Moffat was born in Washingtonville. Orange county, New York, July 22. 1839, 
and had therefore passed the Psalmist's allotted span of three score years and ten when 
he was called to his final rest, his death occurring in New York city, March 18, 1911. His 
parents, David H. and Kathleen (Gregg) Moffat, were also natives of the Empire state, 
the father being one of the largest mill owners of the east, widely known as a manu- 
facturer and also prominent in legislative circles. The son attended the schools of his 
native town to the age of twelve years, when he secured employment in the New York 
Exchange Bank, now the Irving Exchange National Bank, of New York city. His initial 
position was a minor one — that of messenger boy, but he eagerly availed himself of every 
opportunity to gain knowledge concerning the banking business and his interest and 
fidelity were noted by the president, Selah Van Duser, who advanced him to the position 
of assistant teller. In 1855 he received word from an elder brother that a new bank was 
to be opened in Des Moines, Iowa, and that he could have a position therein if he so 
desired. Accordingly he made his way to Des Moines and became teller in the banking 
house of A. J. Stevens & Company. While thus engaged he formed the acquaintance of 
B. F. Allen, of Des Moines, a capitalist who was planning to open a bank in Omaha, 
Nebraska, and who offered him a position in the institution. Mr. Moffat accepted, becom- 
ing cashier of the Bank of Nebraska, and at the end of four years he closed the bank, 
paid its indebtedness in full and divided the surplus among the stockholders. 

The lure of the west was upon him and with a supply of provisions loaded on a 
wagon drawn by mules he started for Denver. He found on reaching his destination a 




DAVID H. MOFFAT 



50 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

settlement of a few hundred people, mostly prospectors, on Cherry creek. Mr. Moffat 
entered into partnership with C. C. Woolworth. of St. Joseph, Missouri, and they placed 
on sale in the new settlement a stock of books and stationery which they had purchased, 
Mr. Moffat to take charge of the selling end of the business, while Mr. Woolworth was 
to stay in St. Louis and attend to the buying. The stock was loaded on four wagons 
and three drivers were hired, while Mr. Moffat drove the fourth team on the journey 
across the plains. They arrived in Denver on the 17th of March, 1860, and the store was 
opened on Eleventh street, below Larimer street, on the other side of Cherry creek. Suc- 
cess attended the new undertaking and with the growth of the town the business was 
removed to a location on the north side of Larimer street, between Fourteenth and Fif- 
teenth streets. Mr. Moffat remained a partner in Hie business for a decade, but in the 
meantime was extending his interests and investments in other directions. On the 17th 
of April. 1865, the comptroller of the treasury department authorized the organization 
of the First National Bank of Denver, which was opened for business on the 9th of May, 
the original stockholders and directors being Austin M. and Milton E. Clark, Bela S. 
Buell, Jerome B. Chaffee. Henry J. Rogers. George T. Clark. Charles T. Cook and Eben 
Smith. Mr. Chaffee was elected the president, with H. J. Rogers as vice president and 
George T. Clark as cashier. The new banking institution took over the private bank of 
Clark & Company, which was located on Blake street, then the business center of the 
city. Little success attended the new institution, however, until 1867, when Mr. Moffat 
was elected cashier and an almost immediate change was noted in the business of the 
bank. He remained the controlling spirit in the institution until his death, being elected 
to the presidency in 1880. and the policy which he instituted and the progressive methods 
which he introduced were the salient features in the continued growth and success of 
the institution. 

It was in 1869 that, he became a directing factor in connection with railroad building 
and management in Colorado. He entered into association with Governor Evans and 
other prominent men of the state for the building of a railroad from Denver to Cheyenne, 
to connect with the Union Pacific at the latter place; and in 1870 a locomotive christened 
the David H. Moffat steamed into Denver. The discovery of the wonderful ore deposits 
in the Leadville district resulted in his next venture in railroad building. He was the 
organizer of the syndicate which constructed the Denver & South Park Railroad line, 
one hundred and fifty miles in length, which connected Denver with the Cloud City. 
With the discovery of the Creede mineral field Mr. Moffat urged the directors of the Rio 
Grande to build a line through Wagon Wheel Gap to place the new camp on the map, 
and upon receiving a negative answer to the proposition Mr. Moffat, with characteristic 
energy, replied: "Very well, then I will build it myself." With him. to plan was to 
perform. He had a similar experience in the opening up of the Cripple Creek district, 
when other railroad directors refused to build into the new gold camp. He therefore 
undertook the work of constructing the Florence & Cripple Creek road, which proved a 
very profitable venture. With the building of the Boulder Valley Railroad he was selected 
as treasurer of the company and personally built the extension from Boulder to the Mar- 
shall coal banks. In 1885 he was elected president of the Denver & Rio Grande and 
continued at its head until 1891. when he resigned. 

With his opportunity of acquiring broad and accurate knowledge of the mineral 
fields of the state, Mr. Moffat became the owner of some of the best mining properties 
in Colorado and became a multimillionaire through his operation of. such mines as the 
Maid. Henriette. Resurrection and Little Pittsburg at Leadville, and the Victor, Anaconda 
and Golden Cycle at Cripple Creek. He naturally became interested in banks and had 
large holdings in the Fourth National and the Western National Banks of New York city 
and was also one of the large stockholders in the Equitable Life Assurance Society of 
New York. He held a large amount of the stock of the Denver City Tramway Company 
and of the Denver Union Water Company. Perhaps no other single activity of his life 
brought him into such national prominence, however, as the building of the famous 
Moffat Road, which might well be termed the crowning achievement of his career. He 
had long hoped to place Denver on a direct transcontinental line of railway and he 
was sixty-three years of age when he announced his plans for the building of a road 
which should pierce the Rocky Mountains on an air line, establishing a direct route to 
Salt Lake City. This dream became an actual realization ere death called him. Some 
of the most difficult engineering problems were solved in the building of the line, which 
attracted the attention of engineers and scientists throughout the world. 

A contemporary writer has said of him: "Moffat was truly the 'Empire Builder.' 
His most daring dream, the construction of a railroad over the Continental Divide at 
sixty-three years of age. when most men are winding up the affairs of life, stamped him 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 51 

as a man of genius. He raised money where others would have failed; and when he 
failed he drew upon his own immense personal fortune to realize his dream. He came 
to Colorado first, intending to return east when he had made seventy-five thousand dollars, 
but he remained in the state for fifty years and won a fortune estimated to be twenty 
million dollars. He 'found a wilderness and left an empire.' Of his temperament, the 
incidents when, meeting discouragement in the quest for support of his railroad ventures, 
he remarked 'I'll build it.' illustrate the courage and tenacity of the man. There are 
three ways of making a fortune; by the great arteries of commerce which extend over 
the land, in other words, the railroads; by tracing the rich veins of minerals under the 
earth's surface; and by the great financial medium known as banking. Moffat amassed 
his fortunes by all three of these methods. He was quiet, unpretentious, lovable, a man 
of patience and courtesy, and never spoke ill of anyone. During the panic of 1893, when 
the banks of the country and the business firms were involved in the maelstrom of dis- 
aster, Moffat's First National Bank stood as a rock of Gibraltar, carrying through without 
a tremor and bringing with it numerous other institutions and business houses. It was 
the refuge which saved the fortunes of many men in that time of stress. His first venture 
in railroad building was when he assisted in the construction of the Denver Pacific, the 
first road into Denver. Before he died he had become interested in nine railroad under- 
takings, exclusive of his labors in building branches and in broad-gauging the Denver & 
Rio Grande system. He was preeminently a financier and in his plan to tunnel through 
James' Peak, thus throwing open to commerce the rich coal fields of Routt county, he 
proclaimed himself a master executive and man of initiative. The term 'Moffat interests' 
became a term commonly used. In other cities it would have been hard to find financial 
interests whose holdings were so largely in noh competitive enterprises. Moffat was 
regarded as severe and masterful in the direction of institutions and enterprises with 
which he was associated, and yet he had the happy fortune to escape practically all 
public criticism of painful character, when his institutions were involved in controversy 
with the people or the law. There was something about him which seemed to incline 
rebuke or reproach to stay its shafts. Perhaps this was an exhibition of that deep regard 
in the community for a man — a builder — who, in uprearing his own fortune, also advanced 
the material progress of the state, developed new country and commerce, gave employ- 
ment to human toil and kept his capital busy in enterprise." 

On the 11th of December, 1861, Mr. Moffat was married in Saratoga county, New 
York, to Frances A. Buckhout and they became parents of a daughter, Marcia A. Moffat, 
now Mrs. James A. McClurg, who has one daughter, Frances Moffat. Mrs. Moffat was a 
daughter of Edward A. and Mary A. (Bradshaw) Buckhout, of Saratoga county, New 
York, born June 15, 1843, in Mechanicsville, New York, and is descended from one of 
the famous Knickerbocker families of the Empire state. 

Mr. Moffat might have had any position within the gift of the people of the state 
had he so desired, but his ambition was not in the line of office holding. However, he 
served as adjutant general during the administration of Governor Evans and for four 
years was treasurer of Colorado during territorial days. He belonged to the Denver Club, 
the Union League Club of New York and the Chicago Club of Chicago. One who knew 
him well said of him: "His friendship takes not so much the smiling as the helping 
turn. I speak not of what he gives away in charity, but in a straight business way he 
has helped more men than any other man in the state. That would be little to say of 
him now because he is the richest man in the state, but it could have been truly said of 
him long before he became the richest man and actually was widely said." It may well 
be said that he was a man of genius and his record one of notable achievement, that the 
efforts of few have been so vital and dynamic a force in the upbuilding of the west; but 
it was his personal traits and the character of the man that so firmly established him in 
the affections and regard of his fellow citizens. He was not only honored but was loved 
by the people with whom he was associated and his democratic spirit rated men at their 
real worth. To count David H. Moffat as a friend was indeed an honor, but it was more 
— it was an intense joy. 



THOMAS SKERRITT. 



Among the names that appear prominently upon the pages of Denver's pioneer 
history is that of Thomas Skerritt, the date of whose arrival in the present capital was 
June 2, 1859. He continued a resident of the state throughout his remaining days, 
covering a period of fifty-four years. A native son of Ireland, he was born in Parsons 



52 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Town, Kings county, on the 16th of August, 1828, and remained a resident of that land 
until he reached the age of twenty years, when he came to the United States with his 
uncle, for whom he was named. His father had previously crossed the Atlantic and 
Thomas Skerritt made his way to the former's home in Michigan, there spending a 
year, after which he devoted six years to farming in Canada. He then returned to 
Michigan but afterward went to Chicago, where he resided until September, 1858, when 
he became a resident of Leavenworth Kansas. In April.. 1859, he started with oxen 
and wagon for Pike's Peak, reaching Denver on the 2d of June. 

In the meantime Mr. Skerritt had been married in Michigan, in 1858, to Miss 
Mary K. Skerritt. a distant cousin, who was born in Ireland and made the trip to 
the new world on a sailing vessel when a maiden of fourteen years. From the 
Atlantic seaboard she traveled to Michigan, where she joined a brother. Prom Den- 
ver, Mr. and Mrs. Skerritt went to Central City, where the latter was the first white 
woman in the town, and although she had a great fear of the Indians, she succeeded 
in braving all the perils of the plains and in courageously meeting all the hardships 
and privations of frontier life. Occasionally their cabin would be suddenly filled with 
a band of Indians who had stealthily approached. On various occasions they packed 
their household goods and removed to Denver when Indians were reported to be near 
or on the warpath, but each time they returned to find that the family home had not 
been destroyed. From Central City. Mr. Skerritt went over the range to Breckenridge, 
Colorado, but in the fall of 1859 returned to the Platte river and preempted a claim in 
1864. He resolutely took up the work of developing his land, on which he turned the 
first furrow. The flood of 1864 destroyed his crops and he afterward sold his property 
to Peter Magnus. He then located six hundred acres of ground where Englewood now 
stands and the family are yet owners of that property. It was Thomas Skerritt who 
laid out South Broadway from Englewood to Cherry Creek. This he accomplished by 
locking the back wheels of a wagon and making the trail along the prairie, it requiring 
three trips to sufficiently indent the soil so that the trail could be followed. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Skerritt were born eight children. Thomas M., whose birth 
occurred on the 24th of May, I860, and was claimed to be the first white boy born in 
the state, followed the profession of veterinary surgery at Englewood until called to his 
final rest in 1915. Joseph A., who was born on the 25th of May, 1862, is a resident 
farmer of Hudson, Colorado. He wedded Miss Millicent Halliday, by whom he has 
two children. Millicent and Thomas. For two terms he served as county assessor of 
Arapahoe county and for one term held the office of sheriff. George E., who was born 
in July, 1864, is successfully engaged in the automobile business at Englewood, Col- 
orado. He married Miss Iva Begg, of Terre Haute, Indiana. William, whose birth 
occurred in 1866, passed away at the age of thirteen years. Marguerite E., who was 
born January 28, 1S68, died in May, 1917. Mary E., who was born on the 13th of 
February, 1870. resides in Englewood. Harry W., whose natal day was October 6, 
1872, died on the 3d of October, 1916. Charles H., who was born on the 10th of July, 
1874, is engaged in the automobile business at Englewood, Colorado. The death of 
the mother occurred January 16, 1901, while Mr. Skerritt survived until May 28, 1913, 
when he, too, passed to his final rest. There was no phase of frontier life with which 
they were not familiar and they aided in planting the seeds of civilization upon the 
western plains, their labors constituting an important element in the development 
of the region in which they established their home. They were people of genuine 
worth, enjoying the warm regard of all with whom they came in contact, and the 
family has always remained a respected one of Englewood. 



HON. JOHN EVANS. 



No history of Colorado would be complete without extended reference to the Hon. 
John Evans, who was the second territorial governor and whose efforts in behalf of 
public progress and upbuilding were far-reaching, important and effective. With notably 
keen vision he saw into the future, recognized the possibilities of the state and worked 
toward desired ends, and even yet movements which he instituted and measures which 
he secured have not reached their full fruition but remain as factors for good in the 
state's development. 

Mr. Evans was born in Waynesville, Ohio, on the 9th of March, 1814, his parents 
being David and Rachel Evans. He was descended from an old Quaker family of 
Philadelphia, where his great-grandfather engaged in the manufacture of tools. His 
sons, Benjamin and Owen, afterward carried on the same business on Chestnut street 




HON. JOHN EVANS 



54 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

and the latter became the inventor of the screw auger. David Evans, father of John 
Evans, was the representative of the family who left Pennsylvania and penetrated into 
the Ohio wilderness, where through the wise conduct of his business affairs he accumu- 
lated a large measure of wealth. John was reared upon the homestead farm and had 
the opportunity at intervals of attending the district school, but his educational 
privileges were quite limited. However, upon attaining his majority he went to 
Philadelphia and pursued a course of study in the Clermont Academy which awakened 
in him the ambition to become a member of a profession. Accordingly he decided upon 
the study of medicine and won his M. D. degree upon graduation with the class of 
1838. He began practice upon the frontier of Illinois and in 1839 returned to Ohio, 
where he was united in marriage to Miss Hannah Canby, a daughter of Joseph Canby, 
who was an eminent physician of that state and an uncle of General R. S. Canby of 
the United States army. They established their home in Attica, Indiana, where Dr. 
Evans soon won wide and well merited reputation as a leading physician and surgeon 
and as a farsighted and successful business man. He became deeply interested in the 
deplorable condition of the insane wards of the state and his interest matured in well 
defined plans for the improvement of such conditions. His labors resulted in the enact- 
ment of a legislative measure in 1841 which provided for the building of an insane 
asylum, and on its completion he was appointed the first superintendent. In 1845 he 
was elected to a chair in Rush Medical College of Chicago and occupied that professor- 
ship for eleven years. While a resident of that city he became prominently identified 
with the Illinois State and the American Medical Associations and had much influence 
in those organizations, his sound judgment and advanced views being recognized by 
his colleagues and contemporaries in the profession. During the cholera epidemic of 
1848 and 1849, Dr. Evans published a monograph maintaining that the disease was 
contagious and demonstrated it by the lines of march of the disease as along the lines 
of travel, therefore advocating rigid quarantine. He also urged congress to establish 
a national quarantine. For a number of years be was the editor of the Medical and 
Surgical Journal and was the founder of the Illinois General Hospital of the Lakes, 
which was subsequently transferred to the Sisters of Mercy and was named Mercy 
Hospital. He was likewise largely instrumental in establishing the Methodist Book 
Concern and the Northwestern Christian Advocate, a publication of the Methodist 
church issued in Chicago. In fact he became one of the original promoters of the 
Methodist Church block and was among those who formulated the plans for its 
erection and aided in raising the funds. He was also among the promoters of the 
Chicago & Fort Wayne Railroad and for many years acted as managing director of the 
line. By adroit financiering he secured the right of way into the city and valuable 
lands for its terminals where the Union depot now stands. It was through his wise 
investments and successful operations in real estate that Dr. Evans laid the foundation 
for his very large fortune. He seemed to possess unerring judgment and insight con- 
cerning investments and in all of his business projects prospered. In 1852 and 1853 he 
served as a member of the city council of Chicago and introduced the ordinance pro- 
viding for the appointment of a superintendent of the first high school there. 

It was while a resident of Chicago that Dr. Evans was called upon to mourn the 
loss of his first wife, who bore the maiden name of Hannah Canby. He afterward wedded 
Margaret P. Gray, a daughter of the Hon. Samuel Gray, of Bowdoinham, Maine, who 
was a leading and prosperous attorney of that city. In religious faith Dr. Evans was 
a Methodist. He had united with the church while in Attica, Indiana, as a result of 
the teachings and eloquence of the renowned Bishop Simpson, with whom he became 
well acquainted. In 1853 he urged the necessity of founding a Methodist educational 
institution, believing that it was an opportune time for such a movement, and in con- 
nection with others selected a suburb of Chicago as the site for the school, and this 
suburb was afterward named Evanston in his honor. Within two years the university 
was established and his great sagacity in providing for the institution is shown in the 
fact that in connection with others he bought for the school property that is now in 
the heart of Chicago — and among the holdings of the University is the land which is 
today occupied by the Illinois Trust and Savings Bank and which with others, is still 
owned by the university. Dr. Evans endowed the chairs of Latin and also of mental 
and moral philosophy with fifty thousand dollars and subsequently increased the endow- 
ment to one hundred thousand dollars. He became the first president of the board of 
trustees of Northwestern University and occupied that position for forty-two years. 
He always seemed to take an advanced stand upon any vital public question and ever 
looked beyond the exigencies of the moment to the opportunities and the needs of the 
future. In 1861, in a public controversy with Judge Scates of the supreme court of 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 55 

Illinois, he persistently advocated the emancipation of the slaves and their enlistment 
in the Union army as one of the most effective measures that could be adopted for crush- 
ing out the rebellion. While a resident of Chicago he became a candidate for congress 
and was one of the most prominent speakers at the first republican convention, which 
was held in Aurora, Illinois. He was defeated, however, by the know-nothing or 
American party candidate. He was a warm personal friend of Abraham Lincoln and 
was a delegate to the state convention which nominated him as the state's candidate 
for the presidency. In 1861, President Lincoln offered Dr. Evans the governorship 
of Washington territory but this he declined. In 1862, however, he accepted the appoint- 
ment of territorial governor of Colorado to succeed William Gilpin, and in this con- 
nection a contemporary writer has said: "Great as his work had been in Indiana and 
Illinois, the full consummation of his beneficent efforts appears in more than three decades 
of usefulness to the people of Colorado. The interested reader will find the impress 
of his genius for the organization and completion of great works on every page of our 
local history. He has but to look over the streets of Denver, out upon the broad plains 
and toward the snow-crested ranges of our everlasting hills to discover the vast schemes 
of well directed progress which he devised and put in operation. He was the nrst 
citizen of the territory and afterward of the state, the leader of men, of cities and 
of universal development. What he has builded lends renown to the commonwealth and 
covers his name with imperishable glory." He had reached the age of eighty-three 
when the weary wheels of life at length stood still and Denver mourned the death of 
its foremost citizen — a man whose name ever reflected credit and honor upon the city 
that honored him. His work, however, was not limited by the confines of one city or 
of one state but was nation-wide in its scope and influence, and who can measure the 
beneficial results of his labors? 



BERT MARTIN. 



Bert Martin, well known as a leading attorney at law of Denver, was born in 
Centerville, Iowa, December 23, 1875, a son of Stephen and Elvira (Frost) Martin. 
During the pioneer epoch of Indiana representatives of the name settled in that 
state, where the birth of Stephen Martin occurred. His father was the Rev. Anthony 
Martin, a Methodist divine who became widely and prominently known and honored 
in the state of Iowa. He served as a member of the Greybeard Regiment from that 
state at the time of the Civil war and his son, Stephen Martin, also responding to the 
country's call for aid, enlisted in Company A of the Seventh Iowa Cavalry and served 
for four years and four months, being on duty in Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska and 
Kansas, engaged in defending the frontier. He was a harness maker by trade and 
followed that business at Centerville, Iowa, for many years but passed away at Grand 
Island, Nebraska, September 10, 1907, when he had reached the age of seventy-one 
years. His wife was born in Ohio and belonged to one of the old families of that 
state of Pennsylvania Dutch descent. She passed away May 28, 1915, in Denver, at 
which time she was living in the home of her son Bert and had attained the age of 
eighty years. By her marriage she had become the mother of eight children, four 
sons and four daughters. 

Bert Martin, the youngest of the family, was educated in the public schools of Iowa 
and in the Northwestern Normal School at Stanberry, Missouri, from which institution 
he was in due time graduated. After reviewing the broad field of business in order to 
decide upon a vocation which he wished to make his life work, he entered the Denver 
University for the study of law and completed his reading in the office of L. J. Stark. 
He was then admitted to practice in 1909 and became associated in the active work of 
the profession with his former preceptor, with whom he entered into partnership rela- 
tions under the firm style of Stark & Martin. This association was maintained until 
1913, since which time Mr. Martin has practiced alone, concentrating his efforts and 
attention upon the general practice of law. in which he has met substantial success. 
He has always prepared his cases with great thoroughness and care, is logical in his 
deductions and clear in his reasoning. He belongs to the Denver Bar Association. 

On the 1st of September. 1903. Mr. Martin was married at Hygiene, Colorado, to 
Miss Grace E. Chapman, a native of this state and a daughter of the late Clarence J. 
Chapman, who was a very prominent man, serving as a member of the state legislature 
and taking a very active and helpful part in promoting the interests of republican 
politics. He also served as irrigation superintendent of the first district. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Martin have been born two children: Dorothea, who was born in Denver, August 



56 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

18, 1911; and Helen, who was born in Denver, January 8, 1905, and passed away 
November 28, 1908. 

Mr. Martin has always been interested in manly outdoor sports and while in the 
Denver University served for four years on the football team and was captain of the 
track team two years and also manager of the Clarion College paper for two years. 
His political endorsement has ever been given to the republican party, in the work 
of which he has taken an active and helpful interest. He served as commissioner of 
both the city and county of Denver, having been appointed to fill a vacancy in 1908 by 
Governor Buchtel, and continued to serve in that position until the expiration of the 
term of Eugene McCarthy, who was his predecessor. He became election commissioner 
by virtue of an amendment to the city charter in June, 1915, and is still serving in 
that capacity and is president of the election commission. Fraternally he is identified 
with the Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. 
His religious faith is indicated by his membership in Grace Methodist church, of which 
he is a trustee. He is also a member of the athletic council of the Denver University. 
His interests are broad and varied and his activities have been of a character which 
have developed a well rounded manhood, resulting in continued progress along physical, 
intellectual and moral lines. He has ever held to high ideals of life and has put forth 
every effort to raise himself to their level. 



JOHN B. COSGRIFF. 



John B. Cosgriff. whose constantly broadening interests brought him prominently to 
the front as a merchant, sheepman and banker of Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and Idaho, 
was born September 17, 1860, in Colchester, Vermont, and passed away in Denver on the 
15th of June, 1918. He was a son of John and Ellen (Barry) Cosgriff. The former was 
born March 4, 1826, and departed this life January 19, 1898, after devoting his life to the 
occupation of farming. 

To the public and high schools of Burlington, Vermont. John B. Cosgriff was indebted 
for the educational advantages which he enjoyed and which qualified him for life's prac- 
tical and responsible duties. He dated his residence in Denver from 1879, at which time 
he began hauling freight between Denver and Leadville. He also assisted in building 
the Tabor Opera House, having a contract for its foundation excavation and also for 
the excavation work for the Union Depot. It is said that when the opera house was 
formally opened he had as his sole possession a fifty cent piece, which he was saving to 
attend the opening concert. Upon going up to get his ticket he dropped the coin between 
two boards of the sidewalk and could not recover it. Consequently he missed the concert, 
which he often said was the keenest disappointment of his life. 

It was in the early '80s that Mr. Cosgriff became interested in the sheep business 
in Carbon county, Wyoming, and with the development of his sheep industry he also 
became identified with commercial interests. He opened trading stores at Fort Steele 
and at Saratoga in connection with his brother, T. A. Cosgriff, and with the development 
of the business they were enabled to establish other stores at Rock Springs, Medicine 
Bow, Rock River, Opal and Granger, and banks at Rock Springs, Opal, Medicine Bow, 
Rock River, Larimer and Encampment, all of which were conducted under the name of 
the Cosgriff Brothers Company. In 1896, in association with his brother, Mr. Cosgriff 
purchased the First National Bank of Rawlins, Wyoming, and afterward organized the 
State Bank of Saratoga, Wyoming. In 1899 the brothers established a wholesale grocery 
house in Salt Lake City under the name of the Cosgriff-Enright Company and in the 
following year John B. Cosgriff and his younger brother, J. E. Cosgriff, purchased the 
control of the Commercial National Bank of Salt Lake City, afterward changing the 
name to the Continental National Bank. John B. Cosgriff was vice president and one 
of the directors of the bank to the time of his death. Wherever advantageous opportunity 
opened up he extended his business connections and his enterprise enabled him to readily 
recognize any favorable chance. He became a factor in the banking circles of Cheyenne 
when in 1903 he and his brother. Thomas A., purchased the First National Bank of that 
city, of which he continued a director and vice president until his life's labors were 
ended. He figured at other points in banking circles, becoming president of the Murray 
State Bank of Murray. Utah, of the Saratoga State Bank of Saratoga, Wyoming, and also 
as a director in banks at Caldwell. St. Anthony. Rexburg. Marysville and Soldier, all in 
Idaho, and in the Morrison-Merrill Lumber Company of Salt Lake City and the Miller 
Floral Company of Utah. He was also a director of the Mercantile Trust Company of 




JOHN B. COSGRIFF 



58 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Boulder. He was chairman of the board of directors of the Hamilton National Bank 
of Denver from 1909. when it was organized by himself and his brother, Thomas A., until 
his brother's death in 1915, when he succeeded to the presidency of the bank. He became 
a director of the First National Bank of Monte Vista, Colorado, and of the United States 
Bank & Trust Company of Grand Junction. Colorado. He furthermore extended his 
efforts into railroad circles by becoming president of the San Luis Central Railroad. 

Moreover, in connection with the development of the sheep industry, the Cosgriff 
brothers bought vast tracts of land in Wyoming and became known as the most promi- 
nent authorities on sheep in the country. In Chicago, Omaha and New York the name of 
John Cosgriff guaranteed quality in sheep and the big firms bid higher prices for his 
shipments than for any other. At least once a week in the selling season shipments of 
from fifteen to twenty-five thousand sheep passed through Denver from the great Cosgriff 
ranches, one of which is near Fort Steele and another near Rawlins. Wyoming. When 
other men were forced from sheep raising by the invasion of farmers, Mr. Cosgriff 
adjusted himself and his business to the changed conditions and continued on almost 
as large a scale as in the most prosperous years of the industry. He was one of the 
country's greatest experts on sheep and in addition to his Wyoming interests he owned 
large sheep interests in southern Utah. There is an old adage that power grows through 
the exercise of effort and this finds its exemplification in the life record of John B. 
Cosgriff, whose constantly expanding activities ever seemed to heighten his powers and 
broaden his opportunities. 

On the 30th of July. 1900, Mr. Cosgriff was united in marriage to Miss Bessie Marion 
Stewart, a daughter of William Dewitt Stewart, of Fairfax, Vermont, who follows the 
profession of the law, and of Mary (Spofford) Stewart, a native of Vermont. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Cosgriff were born four children, Ellen. Stewart. John William and Edward Bailey. 

Mr. Cosgriff turned for recreation to fishing and driving. He was a member of the 
Denver Athletic Club and the Denver Country Club and he also held membership with 
the Knights of Columbus. The only political office he ever filled was that of a county 
commissioner while a resident of Salt Lake City, and he served on the grand jury. His 
was a notable example of the chance that lies before every American citizen. Coming to 
the west empty-handed, he early demonstrated the fact that he was not afraid of hard 
work and in his industry he laid broad and deep the foundation upon which he builded 
his later prosperity. Moreover, he eagerly learned the lessons which each experience 
of life contained and he carefully counted the cost of every business venture His keen 
sagacity enabled him to readily discriminate concerning the worth of any opportunity 
and in the development of his business he studied the needs and demands of the growing 
country and was ready to meet these when occasion demanded. His success in the field 
of merchandising, or in sheep raising or in banking, along any one line would alone have 
entitled him to distinction as a representative business man of the west, but in each 
he carried forward his efforts to a notable conclusion, making his activities synonymous 
with the attainment of prosperity. 



LEWIS CLARK MOORE. 



Lewis Clark Moore, president of the First National Bank of Fort Collins, an 
institution of high standing and great moment to the community, was born in Findlay, 
Ohio, January 24. 1866. He acquired his education in the public schools of his native 
state and in the Eastman Business College at Poughkeepsie, New York. He came to 
Colorado in 1885, in the nineteenth year of his age, and after living at Idaho Springs, 
for a short time removed to Fort Collins in June, 1887. Soon after taking up his 
abode in the last named city he was appointed clerk of the county court and served 
in that capacity for about eighteen months. On the 1st of January, 1889, he accepted 
the position of bookkeeper in the First National Bank and was soon afterward pro- 
moted to the position of > assistant cashier, while subsequently he was advanced to the 
position of cashier of the bank, in which capacity he continued to serve for a number of 
years. He early evinced a keen insight into business matters and by the judicious invest- 
ment of his savings he began to accumulate considerable property and to be recognized as 
an important factor in financial circles. He is a careful, alert and methodical business 
man, a good judge of values and his progress upward on the ladder of fortune has 
been rapid and safe. He is rated as one of the most conservative men in Fort Collins 
and also as one of the most successful, owing to the soundness of his judgment and 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 59 

Ills keen sagacity in business affairs. Mr. Moore is a quiet, unassuming gentleman, 
and although wedded to his business, is a genial companion and is strongly attached 
to his home and friends. 

On the 6th of July, 1893, Mr. Moore was united in marriage to Miss Agnes Ferrier, 
of Liberty, Nebraska. Mrs. Moore came from Nebraska in 1890 and was assistant to 
the principal of the high school for three years prior to her marriage. She is a 
highly educated lady, cultured and refined, and is a leader in educational, club and 
church work in Fort Collins. 

Mr. Moore is a Master Mason, a Knight Templar, a member of the Mystic Shrine 
and has attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite consistory. He also 
has membership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks and with the First Presbyterian church of Fort Collins. In politics he 
is a Jacksonian democrat. 

Among his more important activities may be mentioned his efforts in behalf of 
irrigation. About 1905 he became interested in irrigation matters, the storage and 
conservation of water and its proper distribution. He was elected president of the 
North Poudre Irrigation Company in 1909, when that company was in a bankrupt 
condition, and after about nine years of operating the system he turned it over to his 
successor in a very prosperous and safe condition. At the present tirfe the system 
is equal to any of the great irrigation systems in northern Colorado. While he was 
president of that company, Halligan dam and reservoir and No. 15 reservoir were 
built and the company's canals were enlarged. Mr. Moore made no personal profit 
whatever by handling that company but added many millions of wealth to the county 
and state in directing and aiding it through its financial troubles. This was char- 
acteristic of the man. He recognized the value of the enterprse to the county if it 
was wisely controlled and he put forth every effort to make it of public benefit. He 
has always been actuated by devotion to the general good as well as by laudable ambi- 
tion in the attainment of individual success and his worth as a man and citizen is 
widely acknowledged. 



JOEL FREDERICK VAILE. 



Joel Frederick Vaile was for many years a distinguished citizen of Denver, 
prominently known as a lawyer and orator. In his chosen profession he won dis- 
tinguished honors by reason of his highly developed natural talents and ability. 
Indiana claimed him as a native son, his birth having occurred in Centerville, that 
state, on the 14th of March, 1848, while his last days were passed in Denver, where his 
death occurred April 3, 1916. Fortunate is the man who has back of him an ancestry 
honorable and distinguished and happy is he if his lines of life are cast in harmony 
therewith. In person, in talent and in character Joel Frederick Vaile was a worthy 
scion of the race from which he sprung. He was descended through the maternal 
line from Elder William Brewster, who with intrepid spirit led the band of Pilgrim 
fathers to the new world and was their recognized leader as they disembarked from the 
Mayflower and landed at Plymouth Rock in 1620. remaining their spiritual and temporal 
adviser for many years. Among his descendants were those who exerted marked in- 
fluence over public life and thought in their respective communities as the years 
passed on. One of the ancestors of Mr. Vaile was Colonel Benjamin Hammond, who 
participated in the battle of Bunker Hill and in many other important engagements 
which led up to the final victory that crowned the American arms in the Revolutionary 
war. The ancestral record of Joel Frederick Vaile was one of which he had every reason 
to be proud. His father, Rawson Vaile, was born May 20, 1812, and for nearly fifty 
years was a leading representative of the bar of Indiana, in which state he spent nearly 
his entire life, passing away at Kokomo in December, 1888. 

It was from his father that Joel F. Vaile inherited his love for the legal profession. 
In the acquirement of his education he attended the public schools of his native state 
and afterward continued his education in Oberlin College of Ohio, from which lie was 
graduated with the class of 1872. He then took up the study of law in his father's 
office and after two years' thorough preliminary reading was admitted to the bar 
and entered upon active practice in connection with his father. He was never an 
aspirant for political ofPee yet he ever took the keenest and deepest interest in public 
affairs and his opinions were of such soundness and his insight so keen that his ideas 
always carried weight with party leaders. Moreover, he possessed natural oratorical 
power and ability, which were developed in the course of his law practice and he ever 




JOEL F. VAILE 




MRS. AXXA W. VAILE 



62 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

had the faculty of holding the close attention of his hearers to any subject upon which 
he spoke. He was barely thirty years of age when he was chosen prosecuting attorney 
of the thirty-sixth judicial district of Indiana, which office he occupied during the 
years 1S78 and 1879, making a most creditable record by the able and fearless manner 
in which he discharged his duties. Speaking of this period of his career, a contempo- 
rary writer said: "The next year, 1SS0, was held the historic convention of the 
republican party at Chicago, where the Stalwarts, under the leadership of Roscoe 
Conkling, sought to force the nomination of the beloved Grant for the third time. 
Although it was a distinction invariably conferred upon the older members of the 
party, yet the people of Vaile's district elected him a delegate to this memorable gath- 
ering. There, as a young man, he saw and came into close personal contact with the 
giants in intellect whose names are enrolled oil the pages of national history. Al- 
though a great admirer of President Grant and warmly disposed toward the impetuous 
and commanding Conkling, Vaile could not support their program. He voted for the 
precedent established by Washington, and Garfield was nominated." 

Mr. Vaile's residence in Colorado dated from 1882, at which time he took up his 
abode in Denver and entered upon the practice of law. He formed a partnership with 
John A. Bentley and not long afterward became a partner of Senator Edward 0. Wol- 
cott, the firm being accorded a very distinguished position in the ranks of the legal 
fraternity in the state. In fact they were connected with the most important litigation 
tried in the courts of Colorado. Upon the death of Senator Wolcott in January, 1905, 
Mr. Vaile became general counsel for the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad. He was at 
different periods a partner in tire law firm of Wolcott & Vaile, of Vaile, McAllister & 
Waterman and of Vaile, McAllister & Vaile. His course as a member of the bar was 
ever characterized by a masterful grasp of every problem presented for solution. He 
was never surprised by an unexpected attack of the opposing counsel, for he studied 
his cases from every possible standpoint and was ready for defense as well as for 
attack. He was seldom, if ever, at fault in the citation of a legal principle and he 
most clearly recognized the relation between cause and effect. His reasoning was 
sound, his presentation of a cause clear and cogent and the court records bear testimony 
to the many favorable verdicts which he won. 

Mr. Vaile was married twice. On the 10th of August, 1875, at West Brookfield, 
Massachusetts, he wedded Charlotte M. White and they became the parents of two 
sons and two daughters: William N., an attorney of Denver; Gertrude, of Denver, 
who is a director of civilian relief of the Rocky Mountain division of the Red Cross; 
Louis Frederick, who is an officer of the Thirteenth Field Artillery, now in France; 
and Lucretia, who is head of the reference department of the Denver public library. 
Mr. Vaile was married a second time on the 4th of January, 1912. when Miss Anna L. 
Wolcott, of New York city, became his wife. She is of the noted Wolcott family, a 
sister of Edward O. and Henry R. Wolcott, and was the founder of The Wolcott School 
for Girls in Denver, mention of which is made elsewhere in this work. 

During the period of his connection with Colorado, Mr. Vaile became a prominent 
and active worker in the republican party and was one who exercised the strongest 
influence over its activities. In recognition of his ability his name was suggested a 
number of times as the choice of his party for United States senator. He felt that 
the pursuits of private life, however, were in themselves abundantly worthy of his best 
efforts and his ambition lay in the direction of attaining distinction in his chosen 
profession rather than in the political field. He held membership in the Denver Club, 
also in the University Club of Denver, the Denver Athletic Club and the Metropolitan 
Club of New York. He had attained the age of sixty-eight years when death called 
him on the 3d of April, 1916, while in Pasadena, California. A man of marked ability 
and personal worth, he left the impress of his individuality for good upon the public 
life and thought of Denver, where for many years he ranked as a leading lawyer. He 
was always called upon to meet where intelligent men where gathered in the discussion 
of important public questions and he held to high ideals in citizenship and in public 
affairs as well as in the life of the individual. 



MRS. ANNA WOLCOTT VAILE. 

Mrs. Anna Wolcott Vaile, prominent in the educational field and as an active 
worker for interests having to do with the welfare and progress of community and 
state as well as with the uplift of the individual, was born in Providence, Rhode 
Island, a daughter of the Rev. Dr. Samuel and Harriet (Pope) Wolcott. Among the 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 63 

Wolcott ancestry and others from whom she traces her lineage were those who were 
most prominent in connection with the colonial history of New England. Her brother, 
Edward O. Wolcott, was United States senator from Colorado and another brother, 
Henry R. Wolcott, was for years one of the distinguished leaders of the republican 
party in this state and is a most highly esteemed citizen. By reason of his position 
as speaker pro tern of the state senate he was called upon to perform the duties of 
the chief executive as acting governor of Colorado. 

On the 4th of January, 1913, Anna Wolcott became the wife of Joel F. Vaile, a 
former law partner of E. O. White and one of the eminent members of the American 
bar. He died in California, April 3, 1916. 

Mrs. Vaile had been educated in Wellesley College, where she prepared for that 
broad sphere of usefulness that has rounded out her splendid career. She was prin- 
cipal of Wolfe Hall of Denver from 1892 until 1898 and in the latter year became the 
founder and the principal of the Wolcott School for Girls in Denver, so continuing 
until 1913. In 1910 she was elected a regent of the State University of Colorado, occu- 
pying that position until 1916. She has also been a director of the School of American 
Archaeology and has at different periods served as vice president of the Colorado 
Society of the American Institute of Archaeology, as a director from Colorado of the 
General Federation of Women's Clubs, as state president of the Colorado Society of 
Colonial Dames, and as a member of the Civil Service Commission by appointment of 
the governor, besides various positions in local societies. She has been spoken of as 
"one of the most distinguished ladies of Colorado by reason of her own merit and as 
a representative of a broad culture and high ideals." A contemporary writer has said 
of her: "Anna Wolcott Vaile needs no mere recital of distinguished family connec- 
tions, for her own life as a lady of gracious manner and prominence as an educator 
give her an eminence that is her own." 



GEORGE K. ANDRUS. 



George K. Andrus. who for thirty-five years has been actively engaged in the 
practice of law, his identification with the Denver bar dating from 1895, was born 
in Saybrook, Ohio, July 4, 1857, a son of Alanson and Eliza (Cole) Andrus, both of 
whom were natives of Connecticut but removed with their respective parents to Ohio 
during infancy. The father devoted his life to farming and remained a resident of 
the Buckeye state until called to his final rest in the year 1906. He had long sur- 
vived his wife, who passed away in the year 187S. In their family were seven children, 
five sons and two daughters. 

George K. Andrus was the sixth in order of birth. In early life he attended the 
public schools of Ohio and completed a high school course at Austinburg. while in 
1877 he pursued an academic course, becoming thus well qualified for entrance to the 
university. Determining upon the practice of law as a life work, he became a student 
in the State University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and there completed his course by 
graduation with the class of 1882. He afterward removed westward to North Dakota, 
settling in Valley City, where he opened an office and followed his profession with 
good success until 1895, when he resolved to seek a still broader field of labor and 
removed to Denver, where he has since remained. He has built up a practice of large 
and gratifying proportions, his ability ranking him with the leading lawyers of the 
city. Court and jury recognize the strength of his argument, which never fails to 
impress his auditors and seldom fails to win the verdict desired. His ability is pro- 
nounced in marshaling the evidence and he is seldom, if ever, at fault in the applica- 
tion of a legal principle. Aside from his law practice he is well known in business 
circles as a director and the president of the Cleveland Loan & Building Association. 

In March, 1S85, Mr. Andrus was married in Edwardsville, Illinois, to Miss Minnie 
Estabrook, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Estabrook. They have become the 
parents of three children. Ralph Andrus, who was born in Valley City. North Dakota, 
in 1886, is a graduate of the law school of the University of Colorado and is now 
engaged in practice with his father. He married Miss Adelaide Ferris, of Carthage, 
Illinois, and they are the parents of two children, George and Hebe. Maynard, the 
second of the family, was born in Valley City, North Dakota, in 1893, and is a grad- 
uate of Oberlin College of Oberlin, Ohio, and also is numbered among the alumni of 
Harvard. He now resides in Denver. Dewey, born in Denver in 1898, is still a 
student in the schools of Denver. 

Mr. Andrus belongs to the Denver Bar Association and the Colorado State Bar 



64 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Association. His political allegiance is given to the republican party, but while well 
informed on the questions and issues of the day, he does not seek or desire office as 
a reward for party fealty. His religious faith is that of the Christian Science church 
and fraternally he is connected with the Masons and with the Odd Fellows. In the 
former organization he has taken the Knight Templar degree in Denver' Commandery, 
No. 25, and is also a member of the Mystic Shrine. His pronounced characteristics 
are such as ever command respect and confidence wherever he is known and most of 
all where he is best known, showing that his career will bear the closest investigation 
and scrutiny. Laudable ambition prompted his preparation for the legal profession 
and since starting upon the practice of law he has made steady progress. 



JUDGE HENRY C. THATCHER. 

The fame of Judge Henry C. Thatcher was that of virtue and ability and his name 
Is written in honor upon the pages of Colorado's history. He was the first chief justice 
of the state and when he passed away, at the comparatively early age of forty-two years, 
the press throughout Colorado bore testimony of the prominent part which he had 
played in shaping its judicial records, of his ability as a distinguished lawyer and of 
the high principles which actuated him in every relation of life. He came to Colorado in 
1866, being at the time a young man of twenty-four years, his birth having occurred at 
New Buffalo, Perry county, Pennsylvania, on the 21st of April, 1842. He was a son of 
Henry and Lydia Ann Thatcher, who, anxious that their children should have thorough 
educational training as a preparation for life's practical and responsible duties, enabled 
Judge Thatcher to supplement his public school education by study in the Franklin and 
Marshall College of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, from which institution he was graduated 
with the class of 1864. He determined upon the practice of law as a life work and began 
reading in preparation therefor at Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, and at the same time he 
edited the educational department of the Hollidaysburg Standard. In the spring of 1866 
he was graduated from the law department of Albany University of New York and in 
the fall of the same year came to Colorado, locating in Pueblo, where he opened a law 
office and began practice.' He remained an active member of the Pueblo bar save for the 
three years in which he served as chief justice of the supreme court of the state. In 
1869 President U. S. Grant appointed him United States attorney for Colorado and after 
discharging the duties of that position for a little more than a year he resigned. In 
large measure he left the impress of his individuality and ability upon the history of 
the state, especially in connection with the work of framing and executing its laws. He 
was chosen a member of the constitutional convention from his district on a non-partisan 
ticket, with scarcely a dissenting vote, and in 1876 he received the republican nomination 
for the supreme court and was elected to that high office. In drawing lots for terms, 
Judge Thatcher drew the short term of three years and by virtue of the law thus became 
chief justice. He proved himself the peer of the ablest members who have ever sat in 
this court of last resort, his decisions being marked by a masterful grasp of every 
problem that was presented for solution. With his retirement from office he resumed 
the practice of law in Pueblo, becoming senior partner in the firm of Thatcher & Gast. 
That relation was maintained to the time of his death, which occurred in San Francisco, 
California, whither he had gone for the benefit of his health. 

In 1869 Judge Thatcher was married, his first union being with Miss Ella Snyder 
and to them was born a son, William Nevin, on December 3, 1870, who died July 14, 
1891, in Chester, England. He was graduated with high honors in June, 1891, and had 
gone abroad with a party of college friends and was taken ill with appendicitis, dying 
from the effects of the operation. He is buried in Chester, England. There also were 
two daughters, Minnie and Flora, who passed away in infancy. The death of the wife 
and mother occurred in 1875 and in 1879 Judge Thatcher was again married, his second 
union being with Sallie Aschome, of Everett, Pennsylvania. They became parents of a 
son, Coolidge, who died in infancy. 

Every possible honor and many tokens of affection were paid Judge Thatcher in 
the funeral services, his remains being brought back to Pueblo for interment. The 
Denver & Rio Grande Railroad placed a special car at the disposal of the committee sent 
to meet the remains and at the time of the funeral services all the business houses 
and public offices of Pueblo were closed and the entire city as well as many residents 
from elsewhere in the state paid tribute to the man who for eighteen years had been an 
honored resident of Pueblo and who occupied a central place on the stage of public 




•FUDGE HENRY C. THATCHER 



66 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

activity in the commonwealth. Memorial meetings were held in his honor by the 
members of the bar of Pueblo, on which occasion Judge T. T. Player said: "In our 
grief for the irreparable loss which the community, and especially the bar, has sustained 
in the death of Judge Thatcher, there remains to us the sad pleasure of being able, more 
fully than was possible during his lifetime, to express the admiration, regard and affection 
with which our dead brother inspired all those who came in close contact with him. 
In his case there is no need to call to mind the injunction 'de mortuis nil nisi bonum.' 
During the eight years of his life when it was my privilege to know him, I have never 
heard anyone speak of him otherwise than in terms of the highest respect, and since 
his death his praises are in the mouth of all, and the universal grief which has been 
shown attests the sincerity of these expressions. His epitaph might fairly be written 
in the one word 'excellent.' He was an excellent lawyer, an excellent citizen, and, above 
all, an excellent man. Judge Thatcher was essentially a modest and somewhat reserved 
man, and it is more true of him than of anyone else whom I ever knew, that his good 
qualities grew upon you day by day. For this reason, those who knew him longest and 
best, mourn him most deeply. To such a one, whatever there is of rest in 'that undis- 
covered country from whose bourne no traveler returns,' must now be open, and we will 
find out more and more, day by day, that not he who has gone before, but we who are left 
behind, have suffered the loss. The state has lost one of its noblest citizens; the law 
has lost its leader; his family has lost a beloved husband, father, son and brother; and 
many of those present, besides myself, have lost a true and most disinterested friend. 
There are few of us, however, who have found this life so pleasant as not to be able 
to believe that our loss has been his great gain." 

In an address on the same occasion E. J. Maxwell said: "What shall I say of Judge 
Thatcher as a man? Recall the remarkable spectacle which was presented here last 
Tuesday, when the whole community was in mourning; when this courtroom and its 
approaches, the streets and avenues over which the sad procession moved, were thronged 
with citizens. It was not because of his greatness as a lawyer, not by reason of his 
having been chief justice of the state, not because of personal popularity, it was the 
grandeur of his character alone which had impressed itself on this community — character 
alone, which, notwithstanding the slurs of the cynical and the skeptic, the world admires 
and venerates for itself alone." 

Speaking of Judge Thatcher, Mr. Richmond commented on his character and his 
ability as follows: "Judge Thatcher as a citizen, as a man, as a scholar, as a lawyer 
and as a judge, had no equal in the estimation of his brethren of Pueblo county. Over 
nineteen years ago Judge Thatcher left his mountain home in Pennsylvania and made 
his pilgrimage by ox team across the prairies of the west, with Pueblo as the objective 
point. The trip was long, tedious and most dreary. After a weary journey, involving the 
possibility of being butchered by savage hands, he arrived in what is now known as the 
city of Pueblo, but which at the time of his arrrival was known as a trading point on 
the Arkansas river. He entered immediately upon the practice of his profession, under 
what was then known as the Colorado practice. In the now City of Canon, Colorado 
City, Trinidad and other southern points he was recognized from the first as an able 
lawyer and an upright man, and among his professional brethren as one thoroughly 
conversant with the ethics of his profession. It always seemed to me that he recognized 
the fact that no man could be a truly great lawyer who was not in every sense of the 
word a good man. He did not seek to shine with meteoric splendor, but hoped to achieve 
renown in the profession by studious habits and sterling integrity, believing that 
integrity and honor, with assiduity, would bring him fame in his profession and financial 
independence. He would not swerve from truth or fairness in any particular, and from 
the first to the day of his death he was able to stand the severest scrutiny of the public." 
The supreme court of the state also held a memorial service in honor of Chief 
Justice Thatcher, on which occasion Judge Elbert said: "It was my good fortune to 
know Judge Thatcher intimately and well. For years we were associated together upon 
this bench. For three years we came and went together in the discharge of our judicial 
duties, and in the enjoyment of a most intimate and delightful intercourse. Of these 
years I have nothing but pleasant memories. As a man he was upright in his work, 
generous in his impulses, faithful in his friendships and most kind and noble in his 
feelings and aspirations. Those who knew him best loved and esteemed him most. As 
a citizen he was active, public spirited and faithful in the discharge of his duties. 
Every good work, every institution for the advancement and elevation of his fellowman 
received his encouragement and support. Purity in public life and purity in political 
methods found in him a zealous advocate. It was as a jurist that I knew him best. He 
was a most excellent judge. He was pure, conscientious, clear-sighted and learned. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 67 

He was careful, painstaking and laborious. His investigations were most thorough, and 
no fact connected with the case he was considering escaped his attention. Judge 
Thatcher never wrote a slovenly opinion. He knew distinctly and clearly the conclusions 
he had reached and the process of reasoning by which he had reached them, and his 
statement and his argument was always clear, accurate and logical. His mind was 
analytical, and he treaded the intricate mazes of a difficult legal question with a steady 
step and clear eye that made him a most valuable member of this court and would have 
made him a valuable member of any court. Above all, he was pure and incorruptible, 
presenting a judicial character the purity of which was as the snow, and the integrity 
of which was as the granite. Had his life been spared, that it would have been one 
of great usefulness and value, and that he would have merited other positions of trust 
and honor cannot be doubted. We cannot, however, compute our loss. Of the value of 
such a life there is no measure. And thus dropping into his untimely grave all that 
is kind and generous in eulogy, we bid this good, true, upright and manly man farewell. 
We turn again to the struggles of life, the weaker it is true by reason of his death, the 
stronger it is also true by reason of his life." 

Charles E. Gast spoke of Judge Thatcher as follows: "The personal affection we 
cherished toward Judge Thatcher was a matter of growth; it had proportion to the 
intimacy of our associations with him. Those who knew him longest loved him best. 
He was not a person whose good fellowship shone with meteoric brilliancy at first 
acquaintance or who won a fleeting popularity by mere cordial handshaking. On the 
contrary, there was a seeming preoccupation in his manner which gave no clue or insight 
to the depths of hearty, generous feeling and strong personal attachment with which his 
nature was endowed. He was in all things sincere and made no effort to cultivate an 
artificial cordiality. Nevertheless, there are few men whose friendships were more exten- 
sive. With but a slight acquaintance one readily saw that his manhood was genuine, 
his bonhomie, if not brilliant, was an expression of a kind and generous heart, and 
accordingly no one commanded more lasting and endearing ties from all with whom he 
was brought into association. He was singularly free from malice; he had the ready 
appreciation of others' merits that is a distinctive mark of a large and liberal mind. 
During his practice of fifteen years at the bar Judge Thatcher won deserved distinction. 
His mind was vigorous and comprehensive, his habits of application unceasing. I was 
brought into intimacy with him years ago and can speak of the industry and painstaking 
care with which he was constantly extending the foundations of his legal acquirements 
by research and analysis. Probably his most distinguishing traits as a practitioner were 
his zealous devotion to his clients' interests and his exhaustive preparation of causes for 
trial or argument. As the first chief justice of this honorable court, he commanded the 
respect of the entire bar and has left behind him a memory that will long be cherished 
throughout the state. It was fortunate for the state that at the organization of this 
court, it should be presided over by one whose attainments in the field of jurisprudence 
and whose purity of character gave confidence that as a court it would earn the respect 
of the bar. As a judge he had a realizing sense of the ennobling dignity of the office. 
The scales of justice were with him evenly balanced, and the opinions which he delivered, 
while a member of this bench, evince that conscientious thoroughness and care that 
was always a marked characteristic of his legal training. Judge Thatcher had not com- 
pleted his career. He had possibilities before him, which, if he had been permitted to 
live, with a mind expanding and strengthening, he might have attained to his own 
credit and to the credit of the state. He had little to regret, everything to look forward 
to." 

Chief Justice Beck addressed the memorial meeting as follows: "My personal rela- 
tions with him were so intimate that I have experienced a feeling of sadness and sense 
of bereavement at this unexpected calamity which has befallen us that words do not fully 
express. It is hard to realize that he who so lately mingled with us in the very prime 
of life and apparently in the enjoyment of health, has been stricken down and now sleeps 
amid the great encampment of the dead, where all alike are 'wrapped in silence deep 
and still.' When, only a few weeks ago, I received the warm grasp of his hand, 
accompanied by his usual cheerful greeting, physical appearances gave no indications of 
his sudden dissolution, but on the contrary were more promising for length of days than 
to many of us who still survive. While his prospects for future success and future 
honors were never brighter, marvelous and sad to contemplate that in the brief interval 
the fell destroyer has done his work, and our professional brother and intimate friend 
has crossed the dark river, passing forever from the known to the great unknown. 
Incidents like this are well calculated to remind us that life is of uncertain tenure. They 
enable us to fully appreciate the simile, 'The trees and flowers fall down before their 



68 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

time and fade and wither in their bloom, and so do lives.' Although our brother's career 
•was comparatively brief, his was a busy life, and he accomplished much in the period 
allotted to him here. Endowed by nature with a comprehensive mind, which had been 
well cultured and disciplined by his mental exercise, gifted with good judgment and 
strong practical sense, he has risen to a leading position at the bar, and the force of 
his character and attainments has left an impress upon the fundamental law and upon 
the jurisprudence of the state. He gave valuable assistance in framing the one and in 
shaping the other, as the records of the constitutional convention and of the opinions of 
the supreme court bear conclusive testimony. His public services have been alike 
valuable to the state and honorable to himself. By his death the state itself has 
sustained a most serious loss. As the first chief justice of the supreme court of the 
state his opinions command respect for the research and ability displayed in their 
preparation, as well as for the soundness of the conclusions arrived at. Equally creditable 
is the spirit of the impartial justice which pervades all his judicial deliberations. 
Honesty of purpose and a strong sense of right were the controlling characteristics of 
his life, and, so far as we are advised, no one has been heard to say that Henry C. 
Thatcher ever intended to deal unjustly by him. These heartfelt tributes of respect which 
we are today offering to his memory, do but simple justice to the character of a good and 
noble man. Our tribute may be short-lived, but his valuable public services will be 
perpetuated in the history of the state, and the beauties of his life will long live in the 
hearts of his many friends." 



H. J. ALEXANDER. 



Not by leaps and bounds but along the path of steady progress, a path carved out by 
determined effort and close application has H. J. Alexander reached his present promi- 
nent and creditable position in financial circles of Denver as president of the First 
National Bank. He is also identified with several other corporate interests which have 
led to the substantial development and progress of business activity in the city and 
at the same time have had marked effect upon the upbuilding of his individual fortune. 

Mr. Alexander was born in Fairfield, Iowa, August 20, 1851, and is a son of the late 
William Knox Alexander, a native of Pennsylvania and a representative of an old 
Pennsylvania family of Scotch descent. He was a boot and shoe manufacturer, follow- 
ing that business in the Keystone state and afterward in Iowa, having become one of 
the early settlers of Fairfield, Iowa. He was also a Civil war veteran, responding to the 
country's call for troops and joining an Iowa regiment in which he served as captain. 
His political endorsement was given to the republican party and he took a very active 
interest in public affairs and civic matters and served as probate judge at Fairfield, Iowa, 
where his death ultimately occurred. He married Ann Elizabeth Fore, a native of 
Pennsylvania and a representative of one of the old families of that state, of Pennsylvania 
Dutch lineage. Mrs. Alexander has also passed away. Their family numbered six chil- 
dren, three sons and three daughters. 

H. J. Alexander of this review was the fifth in order of birth and while spending 
his youthful days under the parental roof he pursued a public school education in Fair- 
field, Iowa, continuing his studies to the age of sixteen years, when he started out in the 
business world on his own account. During two years thereafter he followed agricultural 
pursuits and through the succeeding two years engaged in clerking in a store. He 
afterward spent a year as deputy county clerk of Jefferson county, Iowa, and on removing 
westward located in Colorado Springs, where he engaged in ranching for a year. He 
then made his initial step in connection with the banking business by entering the First 
National Bank of Colorado Springs in the capacity of teller. He remained there for a 
year and a half and then removed to Lake City, where he was assistant cashier of the 
Miners & Merchants Bank for three years and cashier for four years. He next held the 
position of cashier in the First National Bank at Trinidad, Colorado, where he remained 
for seventeen years, and on the expiration of that period he removed to Denver, where 
he arrived in June, 1902. Here he became cashier of the Continental National Bank 
and remained with that institution and with the Capital National for ten years, when 
the latter was consolidated with the First National Bank and Mr. Alexander became its 
vice president, filling the position until 1915, when he was elected to the presidency, 
and has remained since as the head and chief executive officer of this strong moneyed 
institution. He is likewise a director and vice president of the International Trust Com- 
pany of Denver, a director of the First National Bank of Pueblo. Colorado, a director 
of the Denver Union "Water Company, treasurer and a director of the Denver Tramway 
Company and a director of the Seventeenth Street Building Company. His interests 




H. J. ALEXANDER 



70 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

and activities are thus broad and varied and constitute a valuable contribution to busi- 
ness activity and development in the city. For forty years he was connected with 
Thatcher Brothers, covering residence in Lake City, in Trinidad and in Denver. He is 
indeed a self-made man in the highest and best sense of the term. Starting out in the 
business world without financial assistance, he has steadily worked his way upward, 
carefully utilizing every opportunity for honorable advancement and gaining that 
broadening experience which has qualified him for further duties and larger responsi- 
bilities. Each year has chronicled his progress and noted the development of his powers, 
which have ultimately brought him to a most conspicuous and honorable position in 
the financial circles of the state. 

On the 27th of September, 1880, Mr. Alexander was married at Silver Creek, New 
York, to Miss Jennie Louise King, a native of the Empire state and a daughter of Delos 
G. and Adelaide (Woodbury) King. Mr. and Mrs. Alexander have become the parents 
of two children: Sidney King, who was born in Lake City, December 11, 1884, and passed 
away in Trinidad, Colorado, April 11, 1902; and Philip Knox, who was born September 29, 
1891, and is a lieutenant in the Three Hundred and Forty-first Regiment of Field Artillery. 

In politics Mr. Alexander has always been a stalwart republican. He belongs to the 
Masonic fraternity and is connected with the Denver Club and the Denver Country 
Club. His religious faith is that of the Methodist church. His military experience 
covers five years' service as a member of the state militia during his residence at Lake 
City. He is a forceful and resourceful man whose business balances up with the prin- 
ciples of truth and honor and who by the utilization of the opportunities that he has met 
has become a strong center of the community in which he lives. In his entire career he 
has displayed keen discernment and the faculty of separating the important features 
of any subject from its incidental or accidental circumstances and out of the struggle 
with small opportunities he has come finally into a field of broad and active influence 
and 



FREDERICK JOHN ALLNUTT. 

Frederick John Allnutt is engaged in the undertaking business in Greeley, having 
for a long time given his attention and energies to that pursuit. He was born in 
England on the 2d of October, 1873. his birthplace being at Croydon, in Surrey county. 
His parents were Benjamin and Hannah Allnutt, the former a well known grocer who 
for thirty years engaged in that line of business. He was an energetic man and both 
he and his wife were consistent and faithful members of the Baptist church. He died 
very suddenly in 1886, when his son, Frederick J., was thirteen years of age, his death 
occurring in Sydenham, England. His widow survived until 1892 and passed away 
in Bromley, England. Their family numbered seven children, including Annie, Sarah, 
Arthur, Frank, Ernest, George and Frederick John. 

The last named acquired his early education in the public schools of England and 
was employed in his father's grocery store there, thus receiving his initial business 
training. He left England, however, on the 17th of June, 1893, and sailed for New 
York. He did not tarry on the eastern coast, however, but made his way at once to 
Colorado because of lung trouble. He afterward worked for five years on ranches 
west of Eaton, being employed as a farm hand, hoping that the outdoor life would 
prove beneficial to his health. This result was accomplished under the bracing Col- 
orado climate and in the fall of 1898 Mr. Allnutt took up his abode in Greeley, where 
for one year he was employed by Dr. Hawes. He next spent two years in the employ 
of Thomas G. Macy, and during those three years was attending the Colorado State 
Teachers' College, graduating in the class of 1901. He then took up work with Mr. 
Macy as undertaker and embalmer and has been connected with him for seventeen 
years, and for the past thirteen years has been manager for Mr. Macy, the business 
having greatly prospered under his direction. He follows the latest scientific methods 
in all of his work and his uniform courtesy, tact and kindliness have made his service 
greatly appreciated by those to whom he is called to go in his professional capacity. 

On the 17th of June, 1902, Mr. Allnutt was married to Miss Anna Wolfenden, a 
daughter of A. B. Wolfenden, who was a machinist of Greeley and was at one time 
connected with the Singer Sewing Machine Company. Mrs. Allnutt was a successful 
teacher prior to her marriage. They have become the parents of three children: John, 
who was born May 6. 1903; Lloyd, whose birth occurred August 10, 1904; and Elizabeth, 
born January 17, 1912. All are now attending school. The two sons are attending 
the Junior high school and Elizabeth is in the training school of the State College. 
Mr. and Mrs. Allnutt and the children are members of the Congregational church. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 71 

Mr. AUnutt has membership in the Masonic fraternity, also with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks. He is a past noble grand in the Odd Fellows lodge and has been treasurer 
for twelve years. He is a director of the Commercial Club and is interested in all 
that has to do with the progress and upbuilding of the community in which he makes 
his home. Since coming to Colorado he has continuously resided here save for a brief 
period in 1908, when he went to Canada, remaining there one month for vacation 
purposes and one month in New York. He has acted as deputy coroner under Mr. 
Macy for several years aud his son John is making preparations to go into business 
with his father. On June 21, 191S, Frederick J. Allnutt was elected president of the 
State Funeral Directors and Embalmers Association of Colorado, this honor indicating 
his high standing in the profession. Mrs. Allnutt is much interested in social work 
and in club work in Greeley and the activities of the family are all directed along 
lines that work for the uplift of the individual and the betterment of the community at 
large. They are held in high esteem and the hospitality of the best homes is freely 
accorded them. 



JOHN B. HUNTER. 



John B. Hunter, filling the position of city engineer in Denver, was born February 
18, 1857, in Versailles, Woodford county, Kentucky. His father, Stewart Hunter, was 
a native of that state and a representative of an old Kentucky family of Scotch 
lineage. He became a successful farmer and during the period of the Civil war he 
removed from Kentucky to Logan county, Illinois, where he continued to reside until 
his death, which occurred March 25, 1873, when he was fifty-three years of age. After 
becoming a resident of Illinois he responded to the country's call for troops to aid in 
the preservation of the Union and served in the Tenth Illinois Cavalry, winning the 
rank of captain. He was wounded while on a boat on the Mississippi river and as a 
result was disabled for lurther military service. He wedded Mary Brown, a native of 
Georgetown. Kentucky, and a member of one of the old families of that state of Irish 
lineage. She long survived her husband and passed away in Kentucky at the advanced 
age of eighty-two years. By her marriage she had become the mother of eight 
children, six sons and two daughters, of whom three are yet living, namely: Mollie, 
who is the widow of M. H. Keil and resides at Versailles, Kentucky; A. C, who is a 
retired farmer also living at Versailles; and John B., of this review. 

The last named, the youngest of the family, was educated in the publie schools of 
Logan county, Illinois, having been but a little lad at the time of the removal of his 
parents to that state. His early life to the age of fourteen years was spent upon the 
home farm there and he soon became familiar with all the tasks that fall to the lot 
of the agriculturist as he tills his fields and harvests his crops. In 1873, when a 
youth of but sixteen years, Mr. Hunter removed to the west, with Denver as his 
destination, and for several years followed various pursuits in this city. In 1878 he 
became an assistant to Leonard Cutshaw, who was then city engineer, and while thus 
engaged succeeded in thoroughly acquainting himself with the profession and with all 
departments of civil engineering. In 1S91 he was elected to the office of city engineer 
and was reelected in 1893. He served as assistant engineer from 1895 until 1897 and 
was then reelected in 1899 and again in 1901. In 1904 he was appointed city engineer 
by Mayor Robert Speer and served until 1912. The following year he was elected 
commissioner of improvements of the city and county of Denver and occupied that 
position until 1916, when Mr. Speer was reelected mayor, and once more he appointed Mr. 
Hunter to the office of city engineer, so that in 1918 he has served for forty years in con- 
nection with the office. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, being 
connected with the Colorado branch. 

On the 27th of May, 1882, in Denver, Mr. Hunter was united in marriage to Miss 
Clara L. Livingston, a native of Carroll county, Illinois, and a daughter of William 
and Laura (Jacobs) Livingston, the former now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter became 
the parents of two children but both have passed away. In politics Mr. Hunter is a 
stanch democrat and has always been active in political and civic matters. In 1912 
he was a candidate for mayor against Henry Arnold but was defeated. Fraternally 
he is connected with all branches of Masonry, including Colorado Commandery No. 1 
and the Colorado Consistory No. 1. so that he is a Knight Templar and a thirty- 
second degree Mason. He also is a member of El Jebel Temple of the Mystic Shrine. 
He is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and since its organiza- 



72 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

tion has been a member of the Democratic Club. His is a notable career of faithful 
and efficient public service and whether as subordinate or official he has been most 
loyal in the discharge of his duties, his work ever being performed in a most capable 
manner. He thoroughly understands the broad scientific principles which underlie the 
work as well as all the practical phases of the business and many important improve- 
ment projects have been carried out under his direction. 



EDWARD BELL FIELD. 



Handicapped by ill health and starting out in the business world of Denver in the 
humble capacity of telephone operator, Edward Bell Field is today recognized as one of 
the eminent financiers and business executives in the state, with a genius for organiza- 
tion and management that has brought him to the presidency of The Mountain States 
Telephone & Telegraph Company. A native of Massachusetts, he was born in Chelsea, 
September 4, 1850, a son of James Barker and Eliza Ann (Bell) Field, both of whom 
were representatives of old New England families. The ancestry in the paternal line is 
traced back to Robert Field, who came to America on the second vessel that followed 
the Mayflower and settled at Odiorne's Point, near Rye Beach, New Hampshire, about 
1623. James Barker Field was born in Massachusetts, February 3, 1828, and in early 
life was a successful dealer in boots and shoes. Later he became a theatrical manager 
at Chelsea, where he resided to the time of his death. In early manhood he wedded 
Eliza Ann Bell, whose ancestry can be traced back in Boston to the year 1709. One of 
the family donated the ground on which the English high school of Boston is located 
and Edward Bell served his country in the War of 1812. In fact ancestors on both the 
paternal and maternal sides were very prominent among the early residents of Massa- 
chusetts. The death of Mrs. James B. Field occurred in 1861, when she was but thirty- 
four years of age. In the family were two sons, the younger being George F. Field, who 
passed away in Chelsea, Massachusetts, in 1876. The mother was the last person to be 
buried in the King's Chapel at Boston, where all of her ancestors were interred. 

In his youthful days Edward Bell Field attended the public schools of Chelsea, being 
graduated from the grammar school in 1865. He then secured employment in a whole- 
sale woolen house of Boston and outside of his regular hours in that establishment he 
was employed in connection with the theatre business and his investigating turn of 
mind led him to the study of many practical things and especially to the mechanism of 
the telephone. In the evening he pursued the study of biology and problems of psychical 
and social evolution. The earnestness with which he delved into these problems fore- 
shadowed the coming events of his later years. He was in the employ of Eagren, 
Bartlett & Company in the wholesale woolen business in Boston from the 1st of July, 
1865, until the 10th of November, 1879, when he suffered hemorrhages of the lungs 
and was ordered by his physicians to Colorado. He arrived in Denver on the 11th of 
November — an absolute stranger. He rapidly recuperated in this climate and on the 
10th of January, 1880, was able to accept a position as a telephone operator. It was 
then that his early study of the mechanism of the telephone proved of practical worth. 
Again he delved deeply into the study of electrical science and made rapid advance in 
his chosen field of labor. His capability and efficiency are indicated in the fact that 
after a year he was promoted to the position of manager of the operating department 
of the telephone company for the state of Colorado and further promotion came to him 
in 1882, when he was made superintendent of the company. His next advance, in 1884, 
brought him to the position of general manager and from this point he reached the 
presidency of the Colorado Telephone Company, operating the Bell telephone system 
throughout Colorado and some adjacent territory. He also became the head of the 
American District Telegraph Company and likewise extended his efforts into other 
business fields but made everything secondary to the telephone business. He bent his 
energies and efforts largely to the upbuilding of the company's interests, mastered every 
detail as well as the major principles upon which the business is founded and developed, 
and since called to the presidency he has concentrated his attention upon constructive 
effort, administrative direction and executive control. Constantly broadening his interests, 
he has built up a great telephone system in the west, which soon expanded beyond the 
borders of Colorado, the lines being extended into contiguous states, and ultimately it 
became necessary to enlarge the corporate powers and work of the company, which 
was then reorganized under the name of The Mountain States Telephone & Telegraph 
Company, with Mr. Field as the president. In this connection a contemporary writer 




EDWAED B. FIELD 



74 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

has said: "Mr. Field has a genius for organization and the promotion of large enter- 
prises, in which lie has always been eminently successful, thus becoming one of the 
leading business men and financiers of the west." It may be merely an unforeseen co- 
incidence, but his name includes that of the promoter of the telephone system and the 
promoter of the first Atlantic cable, and along the line of transmission of messages by 
wire Edward Bell Field has directed his efforts with the result that he has attained a 
foremost position in this great field of labor in the west. The Mountain States Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Company is operating in eight states. Mr. Field is also president of 
the A. D. T. Company and the Tri-State Telephone Company and has become a director 
of the First National Bank of Denver. 

On the 22d of January, 1872, Mr. Field was united in marrriage to Miss Mary Alice 
Legge at Newton, Massachusetts, a daughter of William A. and Martha Ann (Tarr) 
Legge, representatives of old New England families that were represented in the Revolu- 
tionary war, and Mrs. Field held membership with the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. To Mr. and Mrs. Field were born four children: Edward Bell; May Agnes; 
Martha L. and Grace W. Edward Bell Field, Jr., is the vice president and treasurer of 
The Mountain States Telephone & Telegraph Company and is also connected with various 
other important business enterprises. He married Elizabeth Field, of Virginia, a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Field, of Denver, and they became the parents of three 
children, James Barker, Pattie and John, all born in Denver. May Agnes and Martha 
L. Field were born in Chelsea, Massachusetts, and Grace W. in Denver. May A. is the 
widow of Ernest Fairchild, by whom she had one son, Edward Bell Fairchild, and Grace 
W. Field is now Mrs. John R. Marvin. Mrs. Mary A. Field passed away on March 11, 
1915, and on September 25, 1917, Mr. Field married Miss Anna J. Henry of Denver. 

Mr. Field gives his political endorsement to the republican party and for two years 
he served as treasurer of the Denver Chamber of Commerce and for two years was a 
trustee of Denver University under Governor Buchtel, being called to that office 
in 1907. He is president of the Denver Philharmonic Association, is a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce of the United States, of the American Academy of Political and 
Social Science, the Archaeological Institute of America and the American Economic 
Association. In Masonry he has taken the degrees of the Knight Templar commandery 
and the Mystic Shrine. He belongs to the Denver Club, the Denver Country Club, the 
Denver Athletic Club, the Cactus Club of Denver and is a member of the Alta Club of 
Salt Lake City. He likewise belongs to the Mile High Club of Denver, to the Rocky 
Mountain Club and the National Arts Club of New York city and to various other 
social and scientific organizations. He has indeed made valuable contribution to the up- 
building of the west. His success has had its basis in the habit of study which he 
formulated in his youth. With the development of his interests he has solved difficult 
and complicated financial and economic problems in the control of affairs of great magni- 
tude, yet the attainment of wealth has not been the end and aim of his life, for he has 
ever thoroughly understood his opportunities and his obligations. To make his native 
talents subserve the demands which conditions of society impose at the present time 
seems to be his life purpose, and by reason of his mature judgment and the clear insight 
which characterizes his efforts at all times, he stands as a splendid representative of the 
leading business man and capitalist to whom business is but one phase of life that does 
not exclude his active participation in and support of the other vital interests which go 
to make up human existence. 



EUGENE G. HOLDEN, M. D. 

Dr. Eugene G. Holden, engaged in the practice of medicine at Severance, is also 
identified with banking there and in a measure has extended his efforts into agricultural 
circles. He was born in Iowa in 1879. a son of Dr. Charles E. and Judith D. (Athearn) 
Holden, the former a native of New York, while the latter was born in Iowa. Charles 
E. Holden was taken to Iowa when but three years of age. He was the son of a farmer 
and spent his youthful days upon the home farm, early becoming familiar with the 
best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. But he did not care to devote 
his life to agricultural pursuits and turned his attention to the study of medicine. He 
qualified for active practice and afterward followed his profession in Iowa for many 
years or until 1899, when he removed to Longmont, Colorado, where he opened an 
office, there remaining an active practitioner until his demise, which occurred in 1910. 
His father-in-law was also a physician and Walter S. Athearn, a brother of Mrs. Charles 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 75 

E. Holden, became a distinguished educator at Drake University of Iowa and later was 
connected with a university at Boston, Massachusetts. He became widely known 
throughout the country as a man of eminent learning and ability. His sister, Mrs. 
Holden, is still living and now makes her home in California. By her marriage she 
became the mother of the following named: Eugene G., Carl, Callie, Mildred and 
Hazel. The last named, however, passed away in California. 

Eugene G. Holden acquired his early education in the Delta high school of Iowa 
and afterward attended Penn College. Having decided to follow in his father's pro- 
fessional footsteps, he began reading medicine and eventually became a student in the 
Keokuk (Iowa) Medical College. He has continuously practiced since 1903. He located 
first at Longmont, Colorado, where he remained until 1905. He then came to Severance, 
where he has since practiced, and he is spoken of throughout this section of Weld 
county in terms of the highest regard. While he gives the major part of his thought, 
attention and efforts to his practice, he is also vice president of the Farmers Bank of 
Severance and is part owner of a farm west of Pierce, comprising one hundred and 
sixty acres of rich and productive land. He also engages to some extent in buying 
and selling land. 

In 1906 Dr. Holden was united in marriage to Miss Ethel Kuppinger, who was born 
in West Virginia, and they have one child, Eugene, whose birth occurred in 1907. Dr. 
and Mrs. Holden occupy an enviable position in social circles. They are people or 
genuine worth of character and the hospitality of the best homes of their section of 
the state is freely accorded them. Dr. Holden has made for himself a very creditable 
position in professional circles and is held in high esteem by reason of the honorable 
and progressive course which he has followed in every relation of life. 



J. H. DANA. 

J. H. Dana, a prominent attorney successfully practicing in Denver, was born in 
Washington county, Iowa, September 28, 1868, his parents being William Bancroft and 
Nancy Jane (Williams) Dana, the former a native of Iowa, while the latter was born 
in Ohio, whence she removed to Iowa in early life. They were married in that state and 
in 1868 became residents of Kansas, settling on a farm in Montgomery county, where 
Mr. Dana continued to make his home to the time of his death, which occurred in 
1908. His widow still survives and yet occupies the old homestead in Montgomery 
county. 

J. H. Dana was the fifth in order of birth in a family of eight children, all sons. 
In early life he attended the district schools and also became a student in the Fort 
Scott Normal School. After completing his course there he devoted several years to 
educational work as a teacher, spending three years in that connection with the district 
schools of Montgomery county. He afterward became principal of the schools of Caney, 
Kansas, in which capacity he served for two years. In the meantime he began reading 
law and in 1896 was admitted to the bar. In connection with his law work he had served 
as editor and was proprietor of the Caney Times, but he sold the paper at the end of 
a year and concentrated his efforts and attention entirely upon law practice at Caney, 
where he followed his profession for three years. He was elected county attorney of 
Montgomery county and occupied that position acceptably for two years. In 1901 he left 
Caney to become a resident of Coffeyville, Kansas, where he entered into partnership 
with Thomas G. Ayres under the firm style of Ayres & Dana. This connection, however, 
was later dissolved and he became a member of the firm of Ziegler & Dana. He thus 
continued in successful practice until 1910, when he sold his interest to his partner 
and removed to Denver, seeking the broader field of labor offered in this city. He has 
since been active here in the legal profession and has made for himself a creditable 
name and place as an able attorney. His mind is naturally analytical and logical 
and he readily recognizes the relation between cause and effect. He loses sight of no 
point bearing upon his case and his ability to marshal the points in evidence at their 
greatest strength has been one of the salient features in his success. Mr. Dana is also 
heavily interested in a number of oil companies of Colorado and Wyoming and in some 
of these is a director. 

Fraternally Mr. Dana is a Mason and has attained the Knights Templar degree in 
the York Rite. He also has membership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Denver 
Athletic Club, while along strictly professional lines his connection is with the Denver 
City & County Bar Association, the Colorado State Bar Association and the American 



76 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Bar Association. He has become widely known through his professional and business 
activities in this state and stands deservedly high, his personal worth as well as his 
ability making for popularity among those with whom he has come in contact. 



EMILE JACQUES RIETHMANN. 

Emile Jacques Riethmann, of Denver, was for many years actively engaged in the 
dairy business and he still holds valuable farming interests in Adams county. He 
was born in Switzerland, March 5, 1844, and comes of genuine Swiss parentage. His 
father was John Riethmann and his mother Mary (Hunzicher) Riethmann. The former 
was a butcher by trade, following that pursuit in the old country. He came to the 
United States in 1848 with his wife and four children and settled first in Utica, New 
York, where he remained for two years. He then removed to Switzerland county, 
Indiana, where he followed the business of a drover. He took stock to the Cincinnati 
market overland and after residing for a number of years in Indiana left that state in 
1856 for Illinois. He remained, however, in the latter state for but two months and 
then removed to Des Moines, Iowa, while subsequently he established his home in 
Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he continued until 1859. He afterward followed his sons 
to Colorado, becoming one of the pioneer farmers of the state and contributing to its 
early development and progress. He reared a family of six children, two of whom were 
born on this side of the Atlantic. 

Emile J. Riethmann and his brother John left Council Bluffs, Iowa, on the 19th of 
February, 1859, en route for the west. The former was then a youth of fifteen years. 
Up to that time he had been reared upon his father's farm in Indiana and in Iowa, 
with the usual experiences of the farm-bred boy. With his brother he crossed the 
Missouri river on the ice and thence traveled across the plains with a party numbering 
five members. They followed the Platte River trail and arrived in the newly laid-out 
settlement of Denver on the 23d of March, 1859. The trip across the country was made 
with two horses and two mules. The "outfit" built seven log houses on the site of 
Denver, living in the first one which was constructed. The brothers soon began to 
prospect for gold at Arvada, on Ralston creek, but found none there and were persuaded 
to go to the Deadwood "Diggin's," now Russellville. They remained there for a short 
time and then went to the famous Gregory "Diggin's," now Central City, where they 
discovered a lode on the mountain. Lack of facilities and knowledge of quartz delayed 
their work greatly. The Riethmann brothers, however, were the first to get water up 
the mountains to the mines. They remained in the mining district until their father, 
John Riethmann, arrived in Denver on the 6th of June, 1859, and then sold out the 
mine, trading their share for two yoke of oxen and a wagon. In this way they traveled 
to Denver. The father took up his abode on a farm at the mouth of Sand creek, in 
Adams county, and the property is still in possession of his son Emile, who continued 
upon the home place until he reached the age of twenty4wo years, assisting materially 
in its early development and improvement. He drove the first milk wagon in Denver, 
using a team of oxen. When twenty-two years of age he established the Pioneer Dairy 
and continued in the dairy business in Denver for twenty-two years, on the expiration 
of which period he sold the business to the Cook Brothers, but he still retains his farms, 
all of which are in Adams county and are valuable properties, returning to him a 
most gratifying annual income. 

On the 28th of March, 1871, in Denver, Mr. Riethmann was united in marriage 
to Miss Mary Yesley, a native of Ohio, who came to Denver in the autumn of 1869. Her 
father was of Pennsylvania birth. To Mr. and Mrs. Riethmann have been born four 
children, but all have passed away. Cora, the eldest, became the wife of W. C. Gram, 
of Denver, and had one child, Lucille, who was reared by her grandfather. Nora died 
at the age of eighteen years, while William Luther passed away in infancy and John 
F. died at the age of twenty-five years. 

In his political views Mr. Riethmann has always maintained an independent 
course. His religious faith in the past years has been that of the Presbyterian church. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and he also 
belongs to the Swiss Gruetli Verein. In 1864 he was a member of the Home Guard 
Militia, which in that year went out to meet the Indians who were upon the warpath. 
He has at different times been called upon for public service. He was county com- 
missioner of Arapahoe county from 1886 until 1889, at which time the county included 
the district that now constitutes Arapahoe, Denver and Adams counties. He was also 




EMILE J. KIETHMANN 



78 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Swiss consul for the states of Colorado and Utah and the territories of Arizona and 
New Mexico, being appointed during the Cleveland administration on the 29th of 
October, 1896, and serving until 1902. He has been the president of the Fulton Ditch 
and is now president of the Burlington Ditch. In other words he has been closely 
associated with the development of irrigation interests and at all times he has been 
a student of conditions in this section of the country bearing upon the development 
of its material resources. He has contributed to the work of progress along that 
line as well as through his activity in public office and his worth as a man and citizen 
is widely acknowledged. 



HOBERT L. FRAZIER. 



Hobert L. Frazier is filling the office of deputy sheriff of Weld county and, further- 
more, deserves mention in this volume as a representative of one of the oldest and 
best known pioneer families of the state. He was born near Johnstown, Colorado, 
in July, 1880, a son of Sylvester and Eugenie (McCune) Frazier, the former a native 
of Ohio, while the mother's birth occurred in Kentucky. It was in the year 1S66 that 
Sylvester Frazier arrived in Colorado at a period when the work of progress and de- 
velopment seemed scarcely begun within the borders of the state. He turned his atten- 
tion to the live stock business, in which he engaged for many years, winning success 
by the careful and systematic manner in which he conducted his interests. He was 
afterward appointed to the position of under-sheriff of Weld county at the time when 
the county seat was at Evans, Colorado. He continued to act in that capacity for 
about four years and later was appointed under-sheriff at Greeley after the county seat 
was removed to the latter place. He continued to make his home in Greeley throughout 
his remaining days and was one of its valued and respected citizens. He served for 
two years during the Civil war in defense of the Union cause as a member of Company 
A of the Eighth Ohio Infantry and throughout his entire life his career was character- 
ized by marked fidelity to duty. He died in April, 1908, having for about eleven years 
survived his wife, who had passed away in September, 1897. 

Hobert L. Frazier was reared and educated in Greeley, Colorado, and after his 
textbooks were put aside he began farming on his own account, devoting about five 
years to agricultural pursuits. He was then appointed deputy sheriff and has since 
served in that capacity during the last three terms of office, or for a period of over 
thirteen years. This fact indicates most clearly that he has been thoroughly competent 
in the position and that he enjoys in the fullest measure the esteem of his superior 



In November, 1902, Mr. Frazier was united in marriage to Miss Ida Goetter, a 
daughter of Fred and Mary Goetter, who were natives of Germany and came to America 
in early life. After residing for a time in Illinois and Nebraska they removed to 
Colorado and Mr. Goetter took up the occupation of farming in this state, devoting 
his attention to general agricultural pursuits until the time of his retirement from 
active business about 1906. He afterward removed to Portland, Oregon, where he 
now resides, being most pleasantly situated in that beautiful city of roses. His wife is 
also living. To Mr. and Mrs. Frazier have been born three children, namely: Merle W. 
Frederick S. and Eugene H., all of whom are now in school. 

Mr. Frazier is a member of the Woodmen of the World. His political allegiance 
has always been given to the republican party since age conferred upon him the right 
of franchise and his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. Those who 
know him, and he has a wide acquaintance, esteem him as a man of genuine worth, 
enjoying in full measure the goodwill and confidence of those with whom he has been 
brought in contact. He is a representative of one of the old families of the state and 
has himself been a resident within its borders for thirty-eight years, so that he has 
witnessed much of its growth and development. 



WILLIAM H. SHARPLEY, M. D. 

Dr. William H. Sharpley, actively engaged in the practice of.medicine in Denver and 
also manager of health and charity for the city, has for a number of years been quite 
prominent in connection with public office and high honors have been conferred upon 
him. He was born in Norfolk, Virginia, and is a son of Mr. and Mrs. William Parker 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 79 

Sharpley, both of whom have passed away. He was educated in the public schools of 
Denver and in the University of Denver, from which he was graduated in 1898. He 
became a resident of this city in 1876, when but a youth, and was employed at various 
trades. In early life he was connected with newspaper work but became imbued with 
a desire to enter upon the practice of medicine and put forth every effort to prepare 
for a professional career. His earnings enabled him to pay his way through the uni- 
versity and after his graduation he entered upon the practice of medicine, in which he 
has since continued. He has won liberal and well deserved success, for he closely con- 
fines his attention to professional ' duties, keeps well informed concerning advanced 
thought and scientific investigation relative to the practice of medicine and surgery and 
in fact is interested in everything that tends to bring to man the key to the complex 
mystery which we call life. 

Dr. Sharpley was married in Denver in 1883 to Miss Kate Lennon, a native of 
Hannibal, Missouri, and a daughter of the late Colonel John and Elizabeth (Brown) 
Lennon. Mrs. Sharpley passed away March 5, 1910, leaving a daughter, Elizabeth, who 
is the wife of Earl M. Scanlan, of Denver. 

Dr. Sharpley is a democrat in his political views and has always taken a deep 
interest in politics and vital questions relative to the welfare and progress of his 
city. He has served as police surgeon from 1898 to 1904 and health commissioner from 
1904 to 1912. He was superintendent of the county hospital in 1913 and 1914 and was 
elected commissioner of social welfare and also mayor of the city, serving until 1915. 
Since the latter date he has been manager of health and charity for the city of Denver. 
He also represented his district in the state senate for four years and was elected a 
member of the second charter convention of the city. He now fills the position of 
a member of the state board of health. His high professional standing is indicated 
in the fact that he was honored with the presidency of the city and county medical 
society. He likewise belongs to the Colorado State Medical Association and to the 
American Medical Association. His military record covers four years' service in the 
early '80s with the Governor's guard. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America 
and his religious faith is that of the Episcopal church. Dr. Sharpley deserves much 
credit for what he has accomplished. He has steadily worked his way upward through 
persistency of purpose and individual effort and, not afraid of hard work, he was able 
to advance step by step. Feeling that the professions offered a broader field than the 
trades, he at length turned to a professional career and in the practice of medicine 
has found a work for which he is eminently fitted. He thoroughly understands the 
principles of the science of medicine and keeps in touch with the trend of modern 
thought and investigation, adopting those advanced ideas which are so rapidly working 
a transformation in medical science and which have gone far toward solving the 
problems of health. 



BENJAMIN F. HOTTEL. 



Benjamin F. Hottel is looked upon as one of the leading men of Fort Collins by 
reason of the importance of the business interests with which he has been connected, 
interests which have contributed in marked measure to the substantial upbuilding 
and material development of his part of the state. He was long identified with milling 
interests, was one of the promoters of the sugar factory at Fort Collins and is now a 
well known figure in banking circles as the president of the Poudre Valley National 
Bank, to which office he was called in January, 1910. 

Mr. Hottel comes to Colorado from the beautiful Shenandoah valley of Virginia, in 
which he spent the period of his boyhood and youth, while its schools afforded him his 
educational opportunities. His identification with the west dates from 1875. On leav- 
ing the Old Dominion he made his way first to Omaha, Nebraska, where he engaged in 
the wholesale grocery business, but later turned his attention to cattle raising by putting 
a herd of cattle on the rich pasture lands of Wyoming. He took up his abode at Fort 
Collins in October, 1877, then a young man of less than thirty years, but it is the 
young men who have been the builders of the west and Mr. Hottel belongs to that 
class. He possessed keen discrimination, personal couraee, indomitable energy and 
marked business ability. He believed that the Cache la Poudre valley had great 
opportunities and that its future was bright with industrial promise. He therefore 
became a factor in its development, first turning his attention to the milling business, 
for he had previously learned the trade in his father's old mill in Virginia. He there- 



80 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

fore became associated with Joseph Mason in operating the Lindell mills, then owned 
by Mr. Mason, and since that time, or lor a period of forty-one years, Mr. Hottel has 
made his home In Fort Collins. 

In February, 1880, Mr. Hottel purchased a half interest in the mill, and following 
the death of his partner, Mr. Mason, in 1881, he acquired the other half of the business, 
thus becoming sole owner. He continued to operate the mill until 1885, when he sold 
to the Colorado Milling and Elevator Company, but remained with that corporation 
as manager of the mill for several years. While identified with the Lindell mills he 
paid to the farmers of the Cache la Poudre valley millions of dollars for wheat and other 
grains and thus his work was of the greatest worth to the community. Forceful and 
resourceful, constantly broadening his activities, he became one of the leaders in the 
movement which resulted in securing one of the largest sugar factories in the state 
for Fort Collins, personally subscribing twenty-five thousand dollars for stock for the 
enterprise, after which he was elected president of the company. He became a prom- 
inent and active factor in banking circles when in January, 1910, he was elected presi- 
dent of the Poudre Valley National Bank, of which he has long been a stockholder and 
director. As head of the institution he has given his attention to executive manage- 
ment and control and his administrative direction of its affairs has brought excellent 
results. 

In 1875 Mr. Hottel was united in marriage to Miss Emma Mantz and they have 
become parents of a son and two daughters: Charles M.; Anna Josephine, now 
deceased; and Mary E. The family residence is at No. 215 South College avenue, In 
Fort Collins. Mr. Hottel and his family are of the Episcopal faith in their religious 
views, while his political support is given to the democratic party. He has never 
consented to accept public office save on two occasions, when, at the urgent solicitation 
of his fellow townsmen, he became a member of the city council as alderman from his 
ward. He is, however, a most public-spirited man and gives liberally of his time, his 
means and his efforts to assist any undertaking or project that is calculated to advance 
the material, social and moral welfare of the community. He stands among that class 
of broadminded, farsighted and progressive citizens who have been the real builders 
and promoters of Colorado, this state standing today as a splendid monument to 
their enterprise. 



ALLISON STOCKER. 



When a youth of but eleven years Allison Stocker began working at the carpenter's 
trade; today he is one of the leading contractors and builders of Denver, carrying on 
an extensive business under his name. The firm formerly was Stocker & Fraser, which 
had been in existence since 1892 and through all the intervening years, covering more 
than a quarter of a century, had been prominently identified with building operations, 
erecting many of the principal buildings of the city. The business is now conducted 
under the name of Allison Stocker, Mr. Fraser having retired. 

Mr. Stocker was born in St. Clair, Pennsylvania, August 11, 1862. His father, 
Matthew S. Stocker, was also a native of the Keystone state and was a son of Alexander 
Stocker, who was a native of Scotland and on coming to America took up his abode in 
Columbia county, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits. There he 
resided throughout his remaining days and eventually met an accidental death. His 
son, Matthew S. Stocker, was reared and educated in Pennsylvania and in young man- 
hood entered upon an apprenticeship to the carpenter's trade, which he followed in his 
native state until 1879. He then came west to Colorado with his eldest son, Alexander. 
They settled in Leadville, where he followed mining and prospecting, continuing his 
residence in Leadville until 1882, when he removed to Denver, where he lived retired 
from active life until called to his final rest in November, 1884, when sixty years of age. 
In early manhood he had married Elizabeth Allison, a native of Mauch Chunk, Pennsyl- 
vania, and a daughter of Joseph Allison, who was a native of England but came to 
America about 1825 and settled in Pennsylvania, where he spent his remaining days, 
occupying the position of mine superintendent. He reached the advanced age of eighty- 
six years. His daughter, Mrs. Stocker, died in Denver in 1903, at the age of seventy-two 
years. She had survived her husband for almost two decades and her remains were 
then interred by his side in Fairmount cemetery. In their family were eight children, 
four sons and four daughters, three of whom are yet living, namely: Allison, of this 
review; William; and Mrs. John H. G. Fraser, also a resident of Denver. 

Allison Stocker pursued his education in the public schools of St. Clair, passing 




^Zs^C^—x^lCcs*.* 



82 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

through consecutive grades to the high school of Pottsville, the county seat of Schuylkill 
county. While pursuing his studies he also took up a course of law under the direction of 
Congressman Strauss. He was only eleven years of age when he began working with his 
father at the carpenter's trade during vacation periods and in his youthful days he 
also engaged in clerking in a general store in his native county. In 1880 he came to 
Colorado, first settling at Leadville, where he arrived on the 29th of March. He was 
there associated with his father and a brother in mining and prospecting and also 
worked at the carpenter's trade in Leadville. For a time he was employed by the Denver 
& Rio Grande Railroad and on Christmas of 1882 he became a resident of Denver, where 
he worked as a journeyman carpenter until 1888. He then entered the contracting 
and building business on his own account and has steadily advanced in this connection 
until he has developed a business second to none in the state. In 1892 he became one of 
the organizers of the firm of Stocker & Fraser, which firm erected many of Denver's 
principal buildings, including the Young Women's Christian Association building, the 
Coronado block, the Colonial building, the Littleton Creamery, the Beatrice Creamery, 
Brown Brothers' building, the Spratlen-Anderson building, the McPhee & McGinnity 
building, the New Century building, the Sheedy building, the new Abattoir, the new Stock 
Yards Exchange building, the Ford Auto building, the O'Fallon, the Barteldes seed build- 
ing, the Denver Chamber of Commerce, the new Union Station and various others. 
Mr. Stocker is now one of the contractors on the new United States General Hospital. 
In fact his patronage exceeds in volume and importance that of any other contracting 
firm of the state and his position through many years has been in the foremost ranks 
of the contractors of Denver. Mr. Stocker is also vice president of the Merchants 
Bank and of various other important business corporations and he is a director of the 
Master Builders Association. Step by step he has worked his way upward along the line 
of his chosen vocation until his position has long been one of leadership. 

The same qualities which have fitted him for leadership in this connection have 
brought him prominently to the front in other relations. He is a very prominent figure 
in political and civic circles and after filling the office of county treasurer in 1912 and 
1913 he was elected state treasurer of Colorado on the republican ticket, filling the office 
in 1915 and 1916. He has been alderman of Highlands and in 1897 he represented the 
fifteenth ward on the board of aldermen of Denver. Of the Chamber of Commerce he has 
served as president and as director for a number of years. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Woodmen of the World, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Masons and 
has been particularly prominent in the last named. He is a past master of Highlands 
Lodge, No. 86, A. F. & A. M.; belongs to Highlands Chapter, No. 29, R. A. M.; Highlands 
Commandery, No. 30, K. T.. and in his life exemplifies the beneficent spirit of the craft. 
He also holds membership with the Denver Civic and Commercial Association, the Lions 
Club and the Boulevard Congregational church, in which he has served as superintendent 
of the Sunday school. These associations indicate much of the nature of his interests and 
the rules which govern his conduct, making him a man whom to know is to esteem and 
honor. 

On the 28th of July, 1884, in Denver, Mr. Stocker was married to Miss Blanch Roerig, 
a native of St. Clair, Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Henry C. and Ann Roerig. They 
have become parents of three children; Jessie, who was born in Denver, June 30, 1885, 
and died September 21, 1909; Harry S., who was born in Denver, December 4, 1886; and 
Ruth, who was born February 24, 1893. The family occupy a pleasant home at 2636 
West Twenty-seventh street, which was erected by Mr. Stocker thirty years ago. There 
is no record in this volume perhaps that indicates more clearly the value of a strong 
character, of persistent purpose and laudable ambition. Starting out to provide for his 
own support in early youth, working at the carpenter's trade when a lad of but eleven 
years, he has steadily advanced and as the architect of his own fortunes has builded 
wisely and well. 



JOHN D. HEINZMAN. 



A spirit of progress and enterprise has actuated John D. Heinzman at every point 
in his career and step by step he has worked his way upward until he ranks with the 
leading business men of Denver, where he is widely known as the president and man- 
ager of the Centennial School Supply Company, conducting an extensive business in 
school, church and opera house furniture and also school supplies. There has been 
nothing spectacular in his career and there are no esoteric phases in his life record. He 
has won his success through close application, persistent energy and untiring effort. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 83 

He was born in Prairie City, Illinois, October 27, 1862, a son of Frederick and Frederica 
(Buehler) Heinzman. The father, who was born in Germany, was a mason, builder and 
farmer. He came to the United States in 1852, after having fought through the German 
revolution of 1848. As he could not win liberty in his native land, he resolved to 
come to "the land of the free and the home of the brave" and cast in his lot with the 
early residents of Prairie City, Illinois. Both he and his wife have now passed away. 
They reared a family of ten children, six sons and four daughters, of whom eight 
are yet living. 

John D. Heinzman acquired a public and high school education in his native town 
and remained upon the home farm with his father until he attained his majority, 
early becoming familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the 
crops. He afterward removed to Nebraska, where he engaged in farming on his own 
account for two years. On the expiration of that period he took up a homestead claim 
in Cheyenne county, Kansas, and on leaving that district removed to eastern Colorado, 
where he also secured a homestead. In 1894 he came to Denver, having already been 
a resident of this state for seven years. He became connected with his present line 
of business as commercial traveler for Thomas Kane & Company of Chicago, with whom 
he was associated from 1889. He was given the eastern counties of the state as his 
territory and later he traveled throughout Colorado and in Oregon. In 1905 he began 
carrying the stock of the J. D. Heinzman Company and in 1908 merged his interests with 
those of the Centennial School Supply Company, of which he is the president. In this 
connection he is at the head of a very extensive and growing business, carrying a 
large line of school, church and opera furniture and school supplies of all kinds. The 
company has a warehouse of its own and handles a very extensive stock, selling largely 
throughout Colorado, Wyoming and New Mexico. The company also manufactures and 
handles kindergarten materials. They have a very extensive school supply business, 
built up along the legitimate lines of trade, and Mr. Heinzman has contributed in very 
substantial measure to the success of the enterprise. 

In December, 1896, occurred the marriage of John D. Heinzman and Mary Edith 
Bruce, a native of Mediapolis, Iowa, and a daughter of David R. Bruce. Fraternally 
Mr. Heinzman is connected with the Independent Order of Foresters, the Travelers 
Protective Association of America, and he has membership in the Rotary Club. He 
is an active worker and faithful member of the North Denver Presbyterian church, is 
chairman of its board of trustees and gives active assistance to various lines of church 
work. He is especially interested in the organization known as the Gideons and is its 
state secretary. This organization is doing Christian work among traveling men and 
placing the Bible in all hotels. Every avenue for effective work along the line of moral 
progress awakens his interest and his efforts of that character have been farreaching 
and resultant. Moreover, his entire career illustrates the fact that success and an 
honored name may be won simultaneously. 



GEORGE A. HODGSON. 



George A. Hodgson, a resident of Platteville, who at one time was county commis- 
sioner of Weld county, was born in Iowa county, Wisconsin, March 2, 1861. His father, 
David Hodgson, was born in England and was a lad of but twelve years of age when 
he accompanied his parents on their emigration to the new world. The family did not 
tarry on the Atlantic coast but made their way at once into the interior of the country, 
settling in Iowa county, Wisconsin, where David Hodgson was reared and educated. 
He there took up the occupation of farming as a life work and in 1860 he came to 
Colorado. After a brief period, however, he returned to Wisconsin, but in 1863 he 
removed with his family to this state and purchased government land near the present 
site of Platteville. He remained there with the Indians all around him and home- 
steaded, also securing a preemption claim. With characteristic energy he began the 
development and improvement of his property and continued its further cultivation 
with notable success until about 1890, when he put aside agricultural pursuits and 
concentrated his efforts and attention upon mining interests. He was one of the first 
men, or probably the very first, to put in an irrigation ditch in that locality, and this 
was done at a time when the workmen had to carry guns for protection against the 
Indians. He also invested in mining property and was interested in some gold mines 
at the time of his demise which still belong to his family. Throughout his later years 
he resided in Platteville and there passed away in 1915, when eighty years of age. In 



84 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

early manhood he had wedded Christine Hyde, who was born on Prince Edward Island 
and who passed away in 1911. 

George A. Hodgson, whose name introduces this review, spent his youthful days 
in the family home at Platteville and the educational opportunities offered by the public 
schools were those which qualified him for life's practical and responsible duties. After 
mastering the branches of learning taught in the district schools he continued his 
studies at Boulder for two years. He afterward devoted two years to government sur- 
vey work and then made his way to the North Park district with cattle. He continued 
in that country for about ten years and took up land in that region. He always called 
Platteville his home, however, and in time he purchased his father's farm and also 
some adjoining land which he improved, becoming owner of a tract of four hundred 
acres in all. He was thus engaged chiefly in the cattle business for a number of years 
or until he was appointed county commissioner. He raised the first sugar beets that 
were loaded on a car at Platteville and he has been identified with the initial steps in 
the improvement of conditions here in many ways. He is always on the outlook for 
opportunities to improve his personal interests or advance business in general and his 
labors have been farreaching and beneficial. 

In February, 1884, Mr. Hodgson was united in marriage to Miss Edith Lines, a 
daughter of John and Rachel (Yarnell) Lines, who were pioneer people of Colorado, 
taking up their abode in Platteville in 1876, upon their removal from Illinois to this 
state. Her father was a farmer by occupation and carried on general agricultural 
pursuits in this district throughout his remaining days, both he and his wife having 
now passed away. To Mr. and Mrs. Hodgson were born two children. Albert J., who 
was born in 1885 and is now cultivating his father's land, married Delia Camp and 
has two children, Marion E. and Mazella L. His wife died about 1913 and in May, 
1917, he again married, his second union being with Prances Johnson. The daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. George A. Hodgson died in infancy, almost at birth. 

In religious faith Mr. Hodgson is a Methodist and fraternally he is connected with 
the Elks Lodge No. 809, at Greeley. His political endorsement is given to the democratic 
party, of which he has long been recognized as a stalwart advocate. In 1912 he was 
appointed county commissioner to fill a vacancy and was afterward elected to that 
office, in which he served for four years and nine months. He was also mayor of 
Platteville for two terms and he occupied the position of deputy county surveyor of 
Larimer county while he resided there. He has always been a greaf hunter and fisher- 
man and knows every trail in Colorado that any one has ever traveled. He has traveled 
altogether one hundred and twenty-five thousand miles in motoring and hunting and 
business trips. He is a public-spirited man and many evidences of his devotion to the 
general welfare can be cited. He served on the county board at the time tBe present 
courthouse was built and was largely instrumental in securing for the county one of the 
best courthouses in the entire country, it being erected at a cost of four hundred and 
sixteen thousand dollars. He is now state inspector of bridges in Weld county and 
he has been the builder of many miles of highway in this county. Any plan for the 
development and improvement of community or state receives his endorsement and 
wherever possible he gives to any such project his practical aid. 



DAVID DUFF SEERIE. 



David Duff Seerie. contractor and manufacturer, born in Scotland, March 11, 1862, 
was a son of Edward and Margaret (Duff) Seerie, the former now seventy-nine years of 
age, while the latter passed away in May, 1917, at the age of seventy-five. He was 
educated in the public schools of Scotland, and coming to Denver in 1880, worked at his 
trade as stone cutter. From a small beginning Mr. Seerie worked up a large business, 
until he became not only one of the leading business men of Colorado, but also of 
the entire west. Thrift and energy, backed by faith in himself and good executive 
ability, together with a quick insight into the future and possibilities of Colorado, 
were utilized by him, in reaching his well deserved success. 

After obtaining a start, he became associated in 1885, with William F. Geddis, in 
the contracting business under the firm name of Geddis & Seerie. His partner, also 
one of the prominent men of the state, and with whom he was associated for many 
years, was, with Mr. Seerie, engaged in some of the largest and most important 
construction work in the west. The firm soon established a reputation that stood 
second to none, and obtained many large and responsible contracts. So success- 
ful was the firm that later they confined their operations only to large contracts. 




DAVID D. SEEEIE 



86 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

They built the Cheesman dam for the Denver Water Company. This dam, with the 
exception of the new Roosevelt dam, is the largest in the world. It contains the large 
Denver water supply, and in its construction, may well be considered one of the wonders 
of the west. Engineers from all parts of the world have favorably commented on its 
massive structure, solidity and safety of construction, as a gigantic piece of work that 
has been well and substantially built. This feat alone is sufficient to establish for them 
a lasting and permanent reputation of the highest character. They also constructed 
the large Pathfinder dam in Wyoming. A lasting monument to the well deserved repu- 
tation of Geddis & Seerie is the State Capitol building, which they constructed. It is 
the most imposing structure in Denver or the Rocky Mountain region. To their list 
of building achievements, must also be added the Brown Palace Hotel in Denver. 
Branching out into other fields they built the Omaha Post Office. 

There followed a period of dull times after the financial depression of a few years 
ago, and large contracts, which they only desired to take, being scarce, contract work 
in this section was discontinued, and here they branched into a new avenue of 
business in building up the Denver Sewer Pipe & Clay Company, of which they were the 
owners. This is one of the largest plants in the west, and the same success followed 
them in this new enterprise. The firm manufactures brick and sewer pipe, and their 
plant has developed into a vast enterprise that covers about thirty acres and employs 
three hundred men, and their payroll is one of the largest in Denver, the firm being 
one of the leading manufacturing establishments in the city. 

Mr. Seerie, during his active life was always public-spirited and one of Denver's 
leading boosters, which in fact, he had been since he came to Denver in 1880, for the 
faith he then had in the future and resources of Colorado, was a prominent feature 
in his own success to the very end. He was also active and prominent in public, civic 
and political life. He served as the last sheriff of old Arapahoe county, filling that 
office with honesty and high executive ability, employing in it the good common- 
sense methods he used in private business. He was a mason of high standing, having 
reached the thirty-second degree in that order, a Knight Templar, a past potentate, El 
Jebel Temple of the Mystic Shrine, an Elk, an Odd Fellow, and a member of the Denver 
Club, the Overland Club, (now the Lakewood Club) the Country Club and the Denver 
Athletic Club. He was a member of the Board of Public Works for two years and the 
Fourteenth street viaduct was built while he was on the board. 

Mr. Seerie was united in marriage in 1887, to Miss Margaret Price, a native of 
Iowa, born in Iowa City. She was an early resident of Boulder, Colorado, and died 
in 1906. They had no children. 

Mr. Seerie died in Denver, December 23, 1917, at the age of fifty-six years. 



CHARLES R. BELL. 



Charles R. Bell, a representative of the Denver bar, was born in Harrisburg. 
Franklin county, Ohio, March 20, 1853, his parents being Joseph Blackwell and Melinda 
A. (Heath) Bell. The father was born near Fairfax Courthouse, Virginia, his people 
having come to America in the early part of the seventeenth century, representatives 
of the name living in Virginia and in Kentucky through various generations. At the 
time of the Revolutionary war the patriotism of the family was manifest in active 
service of Charles Bell, the grandfather of Charles R. Bell, who was an officer of the 
American army and was present when Lord Cornwallis surrendered his sword to 
General Washington at Yorktown. Joseph Blackwell Bell was appointed postmaster 
of Harrisburg, Ohio, when Zachary Taylor was president of the United States. He 
was named in honor of Commodore Blackwell of the United States navy and for a con- 
siderable period he carried on merchandising in Ohio in addition to serving as post- 
master of his town. In 1856 he started with his family for Iowa, leaving his Ohio 
home for Iowa, locating in Winterset where the family resided until 1860, when in 
March of that year they started for Colorado. They traveled westward with a prairie 
schooner all the way from Iowa to Denver, the journey requiring forty days. After 
reaching his destination he opened a hotel' in Denver, which he conducted for several 
years, or until 1865. when he sold out to Peter Powell and turned his attention to the 
wholesale grocery business in connection with the firm of J. G. Vawter & Company. He 
was thus associated until 1867, when he removed to Cheyenne, Wyoming, where he re- 
mained until 1868 and then returned to Denver. He built a hotel at Littleton. Colorado, 
and continued its conduct throughout his remaining days, his death occurring in 1877. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 87 

He was a public spirited man and assisted materially in the upbuilding of Colorado. His 
widow long survived him and passed away at the home of her son, Charles R. Bell, in 1910, 
when seventy-two years of age. In the family were two children, the younger being 
Van Chilton Bell, who was born in Winterset, Iowa, in 1859, and died in Denver in 
1890. 

In his youthful days Charles R. Bell of this review was a pupil in the school con- 
ducted by Miss Ring in Denver and afterward attended another private school, conducted 
by Abner Brown. He later became a student in the Colorado Seminary and subse- 
quently returned to his native state to continue his studies in Oberlin College. After 
his textbooks were put aside he again came to Denver and began reading law in the 
office and under the direction of Judge Samuel H. Elbert, while later his reading was 
directed by Daniel E. Park, of Leadville. In 1881 he was admitted to the bar and has 
since actively followed that profession, being now a well known member of the Colo- 
rado bar. He served at one time as county attorney of Pitkin county, for he practiced 
at Aspen, Colorado, from 1881 until 1896, when he came to Denver. His incumbency 
in the office of county attorney covered the years 1881 and 1882 and he was afterward 
district attorney for Pitkin county in 1885. He likewise served as city attorney of 
Aspen in 1890-1. Since locating in Denver he has continued in the general practice of 
law and has been accorded a good clientage. 

On the 3rd of February, 1886, Mr. Bell was married to Miss Margaret E. McKnight, 
of Denver, a daughter of David S. and Nellie (Kricks) McKnight, of Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania. Mr. Bell belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, becoming a 
charter member of Aspen Lodge, of which he is also a life member and was the 
first exalted ruler of that lodge. He stands for those things which are most worth 
-while in community upbuilding, while in character development he has taken recog- 
nition of the principles which in every land and clime awaken confidence and respect. 



BENJAMIN JULIAN BARRON. 

Benjamin Julian Barron, widely known because of his extensive operations in the 
oil fields and also as a factor in financial circles in Denver, was born in New York 
city, April 21, 1876, a son of Michael and Jennie Barron. He acquired his education in 
the public schools of Boston, Massachusetts, and early became an oil operator. In 
young manhood he was a public accountant and mining operator in Arizona. He 
became a pioneer in the development of the oil shale industry in the United States and 
was president of the American Shale Refining Company, organized to treat shale by 
the continuous distillation process. This company has its property on Conn creek, in 
Garfield county, Colorado. Gradually extending his efforts and activities into various 
fields, Mr. Barron has steadily worked his way upward in connection with the develop- 
ment of the oil properties of the west and has thus contributed to general progress 
and prosperity as well as to individual success. He is now the president of the 
Boston-Wyoming Oil Company, the Northwestern Oil Company, the American Shale 
Refining Company, the Barron Securities Company, and president of several other 
oil companies. There is no question relative to oil development with which he is not 
familiar. He has studied the subject from the practical and scientific standpoint, 
readily recognizes the value of oil producing properties and districts and has so placed 
his investments as to win therefrom substantial success. 

On the 10th of September, 1917, in Chicago, Illinois, Mr. Barron was married by 
Dr. Wishart of the Second Presbyterian church to Miss Mae Eugenia Toomey, a daugh- 
ter of Peter and Margaret Toomey, of Aspen, Colorado. Fraternally he is connected 
with Elks Lodge, No. 489, at Globe, Arizona. The major part of his time and attention 
is concentrated upon his business affairs and his close application, thorough study, 
keen discernment and unfaltering enterprise are salient features in his steady 
advancement. 



RAY R. TAYLOR, M. D. 



Dr. Ray R. Taylor, actively engaged in the practice of medicine in Pueblo, where 
he is also filling the position of county coroner, is a native son of the city in which 
he resides, his birth occurring on the 27th of July, 1889. His parents were Dr. C. F. 
and Nancy A. (Robinson) Taylor, whose family numbered four sons and one daughter, 



88 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

of whom Ray R. is the fourth in order of birth. The family was established in Colorado 
in pioneer times and throughout his entire life he has resided in the city which is now 
his home, and his record stands in contradistinction to the old adage that a prophet 
is never without honor save in his own country, for in the place of his birth Dr. Taylor 
has made for himself a most creditable position as a representative of professional 



He began his education in the public schools at the usual age and passed through 
consecutive grades to his graduation from district No. 1 high school at Pueblo. He next 
entered the University of Colorado and in 1911 he won the Bachelor of Arts degree, 
while in 1913, on the completion of a medical course, he was granted his professional 
degree. He next served for a year and a half as interne in the county hospital and 
in that connection gained broad practical experience. He at once entered upon his 
professional duties and has been very successful in their conduct. He has always kept 
in touch with the trend of progressive thought in relation to medical and surgical 
work, broad reading acquainting him with the latest scientific discoveries and researches. 
He does not hastily discard old and time-tried methods and yet quickly takes up any 
new idea which his judgment sanctions as of professional worth. In 1915 he was 
elected to the position of county coroner and in 1917 was reelected to that office, in 
which he is now serving for the second term. 

On the 29th of December, 1916, Dr. Taylor was united in marriage to Miss Betty 
Lorraine, of Boulder, Colorado, and they have one child, Nancy. Dr. Taylor has always 
voted with the republican party and is a stanch advocate of its principles, believing 
that the party's platform contains the best elements of good government. He is 
identified with the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and 
along strictly professional lines his membership is with the County, Colorado State and 
the American Medical Associations. He is yet a young man but has already attained 
a position which many an older physician and surgeon might well envy and what he 
has accomplished in the past indicates that his future career will be well worth the 
watching. 



JUDGE JOHN WESLEY HENRY. 

No history of the third judicial district of Colorado would be complete without 
mention of John Wesley Henry, who was the first to occupy the bench of the district 
after the admission of Colorado into the Union. A native of Kentucky, he was 
born near the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln and in that locality was reared and 
acquired his early education. He was just emerging into manhood when he went to 
Dubuque, Iowa, attracted by the business interests which had sprung into existence 
with the development of the lead mines there. He afterward removed to St. Joseph, 
Missouri, where he took up the study of law and later engaged in practice for several 
years, while at the same time he was active as a local political factor. In the early 
'50s he became a resident of Kansas, at which period the state was in a condition of 
political turmoil and excitement. There he entered upon the practice of law and also 
became active as a supporter of democratic principles, but his peace-loving nature was 
at variance with the continuous trouble between the supporters of slavery and the free- 
soil people, and in 1859 with his family he left Kansas for Colorado, joining the caravan 
that was constantly proceeding across the plains toward the gold fields of Pike's Peak. 

After reaching the mountains Judge Henry made his way into the Gregory diggings, 
then the principal mining camp of the district, and for two or three years was engaged 
in washing gravel in the search for gold in the gulches, meeting sometimes with success 
and again with disappointment. At the same time he became actively interested in public 
affairs, aided in establishing local laws and government and occasionally practiced his pro- 
fession in the primitive miners' courts of that period. In 1863, however, he decided that 
he had had enough of the hills and with an inbred longing for the fertile valleys of a 
farming country, he removed to the Arkansas valley, settling on a ranch at the mouth of 
Chico creek, a few miles below Pueblo. There he turned his attention to the raising of 
cattle and corn, irrigated his land and continued its development in the face of many 
difficulties and hardships, not the least of which were the grasshoppers, which turned 
green fields into deserts in a day and were more dreaded than hostile Indians. As time 
passed on, however, conditions changed, many other settlers coming, and as the town of 
Pueblo grew there was a demand for active practitioners at the bar. While Judge Henry 
continued to reside on his Chico Creek farm, he also attended the courts of the Arkansas 
valley and became a familiar - figure at the Pueblo bar. The third judicial district at that 




JUDGE JOHN W. HENRY 



90 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

time included all the southern half of the terrritory from the Divide to New Mexico and 
from the western boundary of Kansas to the Utah line. Courts were held at Colorado 
City and later at Colorado Springs, at Canon City, Pueblo, Las Animas, Walsenburg, 
Trinidad and at San Luis de Culebra and Conejos over the mountains in the San Luis or 
Rio Grande valley. The court of the district during the territorial days was presided 
over by but two judges, covering the period from 1862 until 1876. The first judge was 
Allan A. Bradford, who was succeeded by Moses Hallett. Writing of Judge Henry, 
Wilbur F. Stone said in this connection: "Over this vast region, larger in extent than 
an average state, the lawyers of the old third district, with the judge and other officials, 
witnesses, litigants, Spanish interpreters and often prisoners for trial, used to travel from 
court to court in a motley caravan of wagons, ambulances, primitive buggies, horse- 
back and muleback, over dusty sagebrush plains and mountain ranges, fording rivers, in 
heat, snow, wind and dust, camping out at night where there was 'wood, water and 
grass,' fishing trout in the mountain streams, occasionally shooting an antelope, cooking 
their own 'grub,' smoking their pipes round the campfire, swapping stories, singing songs, 
sleeping in their blankets on the ground, holding courts within rude adobe walls with 
dirt floors, attending Mexican fandangoes at night — got up in honor of the court — and 
having more fun, legal and unlegal, than the bench and bar have ever seen since in the 
effeminate days of railroads and fine courthouses. After the adoption of the constitution 
in 1876, assuring our admission to statehood, there chanced to meet one day in the office 
of the writer of this sketch, at Pueblo, a number of members of the bar, including Judge 
Henry, (he had long been called 'Judge' in compliment), who, in course of conversation 
on the approaching change in government, said: 'Boys, I want to confide a personal 
desire of my own. I want to be the first judge of this district when we come in as a 
state. I am the oldest one in years of our early lawyers here, and I know that if I do 
not get that office first I shall never get it afterwards. I have never held nor sought 
office, as you all know, and I have a little natural ambition to be a judge for one term 
only, and on that to end up my professional career. I am outspoken about this and I 
•want you to be outspoken, boys, and say what you think about it.' With one voice all 
present declared the judge was entitled to it and should have it. The bar of the 
district saw to it that Judge Henry was nominated and elected at the first state election 
under the constitution. At the end of his six years' term he retired from the law, and 
with his faithful old wife went over to Los Angeles and bought a few acres of an orange 
grove where he spent the rest of his years in the quiet shade of his own vine and fig 
tree." 

Judge Henry was married about 1844 in Mercer county, Kentucky, to Ann Elizabeth 
Shoots, of an old Virginia family, and to that union were born the following children: 
Mrs. Martha Noble; Margaret, who became the wife of John A. Thatcher, the first 
merchant and afterward millionaire banker of Pueblo; and Edna, who became the wife 
of Perry Baxter, who was a partner of John A. and Mahlon D. Thatcher in their com- 
mercial and banking interests. Mrs. Henry passed away in St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1851. 
In 1854, Judge Henry married in St. Joseph, Missouri, Margaret Struby, no children 
being born of this union. After the death of his second wife the Judge made his home 
with his three daughters in Pueblo, staying with each one for a time — and it was while 
at the home of his daughter, Mrs. O. H. P. Baxter that he passed away, November 9, 1963. 

Judge Henry held membership in the Presbyterian church but was a Christian in 
the broadest sense of the term and his views were not limited to narrow denomina- 
tionalism. He was most upright in all that he did and said. He possessed a sense of 
humor that brightened many a weary day for his colleagues and contemporaries at the 
bar as they practiced their profession and traveled from place to place where courts were 
held. Again we quote from Wilbur F. Stone, who said of him: "Judge Henry was not 
such as can be called 'brilliant' as a lawyer, either by natural adaptation or experience 
in practice. Without the advantages of scholastic education, culture, varied experience 
in extensive practice or single devotion to the legal profession as a life business, he 
was of the old class of plain country lawyers; earnest, straightforward, trustworthy and 
utterly devoid of the cunning trickery of the 'smart' lawyer, or the pretentious theatrical 
attempts at oratory of the pompous pettifogger. From his earliest settlement in the 
Arkansas valley he was spoken of by his neighbors and acquaintances as 'Honest John 
Henry.' His administration as a judge was marked by justice, moderation and a shrewd 
sense of finding the path which led to the very right of a cause though it might be at the 
sacrifice of technicalities in form and manner. His rulings and decisions, always 
deliberate and impartial, seldom provoked contention, were void of offense and never 
gave occasion for an instance of 'contempt of court.' At that period — the infancy of 
litigation in a pioneer community— it is true that few if any great questions arose in 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 91 

the courts of that district, such as agitate the courts, the bar and the public at the 
present day; still, railroads were building over that region, and mining and irrigation 
companies were multiplying, and all bringing into the courts their newer questions of 
legal rights and claims, but the record of Judge Henry during his whole term of office 
gave general satisfaction to the bar and the community, his conduct without a taint of 
malfeasance, bias or prejudice, his personal character and reputation without a stain, 
and a blessed memory of unselfish good deeds and incorruptible integrity is his enduring 
monument." 



CHARLES A. CHASE. 



Charles A. Chase, a mining engineer of Denver, was born in Hartford, Wisconsin, 
November 4, 1876, a son of Albert E. and Emma J. (Jones) Chase. The father is a 
native of Vermont and the mother of Utica, New York, her father being Thomas Jones 
of that state. Albert E. Chase was a mining engineer and followed the profession for an 
extended period but is now living retired. A daughter of the family is Mrs. Porter J. 
Preston, now living in Denver. 

In the acquirement of his education Charles A. Chase spent three years as a pupil 
in the high school of Georgetown, Colorado, and afterward attended and graduated from . 
Central high school of Minneapolis. Minnesota, in 1893. Subsequently he entered the 
University of Colorado, from which he was graduated in 1898 with the Ph. B. degree. 
The following year he was made assayer for the Liberty Bell Gold Mining Company at 
Telluride, Colorado, and is still connected with the company, of which he is now the 
manager. He is also general manager of the Mogul Mining Company of Terry, South 
Dakota, and since 1912 has been consulting engineer to the Maxwell Land Grant Com- 
pany of Raton, New Mexico. He is manager for the Colorado molybdenum department 
of the Primos Exploration Company, with mines at Empire, Colorado. He is a member 
of the American Institute of Mining Engineers and served as chairman of its Colorado 
section. He is also a member of the Colorado Scientific Society, of which he was the 
president in 1917; he belongs to the Mining and Metallurgical Society of America. 

In 1901 Mr. Chase was united in marriage to Miss Ruth Hamilton, a daughter of 
Henry and Anna (Sanborn) Hamilton, of Washington, D. C. They have become parents 
of four children: Hamilton Chase, fifteen years of age; Elizabeth; David; and Charles 
H. The eldest three are in school. 

Politically Mr. Chase is a republican. He is a member of the Colorado Chi Chapter. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, at the University of Colorado and he belongs to the University 
Club of Denver. 



WILLIAM W. WATSON. 



William W. Watson, a valued and representative citizen of Eaton, where he is 
extensively and successfully engaged in the grocery business, was born in Oberlin, 
Kansas, May 30, 1887, a son of John and Elizabeth (Tauber) Watson, who in 1890 
removed from Kansas to Colorado, remaining for a brief period in Greeley, while later 
Mr. Watson opened up a coal mine northeast of Eaton. He is a native of England and 
is a direct descendant of Sir Robert Peel. When eight years of age his parents sailed 
for the new world and after a voyage of six weeks reached American shores. In the 
course of years, as stated, Mr. Watson came to the west and cast in his lot with the 
settlers of Eaton in 1890. He then opened up a coal mine northeast of the city and 
continued its operation until 1905. At that date he turned his attention to farming, 
securing originally eighty-five acres, while later he extended the boundaries of his place 
to include one hundred and twenty acres although he later sold thirty-five acres. He 
engaged in feeding stock and also was extensively engaged in the production of pota- 
toes, beans and other crops. His wife was born in Pennsylvania, while her father 
came from Germany and her mother from Holland. To Mr. and Mrs. Watson were 
born several children, of whom William W. of this review is the eldest. The others 
are: Thomas, who was born March 22, 1889; Greener, born March 17, 1891; John, born 
October 21, 1893; and Bessie, October 22, 1896. The second son, Thomas, died when but 
eighteen months old and the third son, Greener, died at the age of twenty-five years. 
He was a pupil in the public schools and afterward followed farming with his father 
until he attained his majority, when he took up a homestead twenty-six miles east from 



92 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Eaton, there carrying on the work of the farm until he suffered an attack of appendicitis 
and passed away, his remains being interred in the Eaton cemetery. John Watson is 
assisting his father in the farm work. The daughter Bessie is now attending the State 
University at Boulder, making a specialty of the arts course. The religious faith of 
the family is that of the Methodist church and Mr. Watson gives his political allegiance 
to the democratic party. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias. 

William W. Watson whose name introduces this review was a pupil in the public 
schools near his father's home and afterward worked for a real estate firm for a year. 
He then entered the Boulder Business College, where he pursued a course in stenog- 
raphy and bookkeeping, and subsequently he engaged in farming for one year. He 
then spent three years as bookkeeper with the Phillips Eaton Mercantile Company, 
on the expiration of which period he entered into partnership with A. E. Vance and 
established the Palace Grocery, with the conduct of which he was connected for five 
years. On the expiration of that period he retired from that connection. His father 
later purchased the business and William W. Watson is now conducting the store as 
his father's manager. He is a progressive and enterprising young business man, wide- 
awake and alert, and the interests under his control are being most capably and suc- 
cessfully managed. 

Mr. Watson was united in marriage in 1913 to Miss Nellie Alice Newbury, a daugh- 
ter of George Newbury, a native of Croydon, England. The grandfather of Mrs. 
Watson was a son of Sir Robert and Lady Blakiston, the former a post captain, which 
is next in rank to admiral. He was killed in the Peninsular war with Spain and 
Portugal. Sir Robert Blakiston was also connected with the Temple Vane family. 
The grandfather was Robert Newbury, whose son, George Newbury, came to America 
in early life. He was a practical nurse in Greeley and had charge of the Greeley Hospi- 
tal and also of a private hospital. He married Rosemary Roberts, of Norwood, Eng- 
land. Their daughter, Mrs. Watson, also had two years' training in St. Luke's Hospital 
in Denver and did private nursing in Denver and Eaton. Both her father and mother 
have now passed away. By her marriage Mrs. Watson became the mother of three 
children: John Robert, born October 5, 1915; Albert Greener, born September 29, 1916; 
and Marjorie Allene, born May 9, 1918. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Watson is an Odd Fellow and also an Elk. He like- 
wise belongs to the Commercial Club of Eaton and is a member of the fire department, 
a volunteer organization. He is greatly interested in all that has to do with the 
welfare and progress of his community. He was but three years of age at the time 
of the removal of the family to Colorado and he has since resided within its borders, 
so that for twenty-eight years he has been a witness of its growth and development 
and has become thoroughly imbued with the spirit of western enterprise and progress — 
a spirit that has been a dominant factor in the upbuilding of this section of the 
country. 



DAVID THOMPSON, M. D. 



Dr. David Thompson has been continuously engaged in the practice of medicine and 
surgery in Denver for more than a quarter of a century and enjoys an enviable reputation 
as one of the city's most skilled and successful physicians. His birth occurred in Harthill, 
Scotland, on the 12th of August, 1856, his parents being James and Elizabeth (Simpson) 
Thompson, who were also natives of the land of hills and heather. The latter spent her 
entire life in Scotland, passing away on the 26th of March, 1864, when forty-three years 
of age. James Thompson was a well known contractor of that country until 1874, when 
he emigrated to the United States and established his home in Pittston, Pennsylvania, 
where he followed the contracting business to the time of his demise, which occurred in 
1883, when he was seventy-four years of age. To him and his wife were born eight chil- 
dren, five of whom survive, as follows: James M., who is a resident of Dunmore, Penn- 
sylvania; John S., living at Parsons, Pennsylvania; Mrs. Bessie Brooks, of Denver; Mrs. 
Agnes McCormack, of Cleveland, Ohio, and David, of this review. 

The last named attended the school at Pittston, Pennsylvania, and supplemented the 
knowledge thus acquired by home study. When a young man of about thirty-three years 
he decided to come to the west, and on the 12th of July, 1889, arrived in Denver. Having 
determined to make the practice of medicine his life work, he entered the University of 
Denver, and in 1891 was graduated from the medical department of that institution. 
He at once entered upon the practice of his chosen profession here, and through the 
intervening period of twenty-seven years has become widely recognized as one of Denver's 



f§ 



mpS. 



DB. DAVID THOMPSON 



94 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

most capable, efficient and successful physicians. He well merits the liberal practice 
accorded him, for his professional skill has been demonstrated in the successful treatment 
of many difficult and obstinate cases. Dr. Thompson has membership relations with the 
Denver County and City Medical Society, the Colorado State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association. 

On the 30th of April, 1889, in Pittston, Pennsylvania, Dr. Thompson was united in 
marriage to Miss Addie Simpson, a native of that place and a daughter of Robert and 
Janette Simpson, of Pittston. The Doctor and his wife have two sons. Ralph S., who 
was born in Denver in 1893 and is a graduate of the Denver high school, still makes his 
home in Denver and is now chemist for the Denver Fire Clay Company. He wedded 
Miss L. Wynne Linsey, of Denver, by whom he has a daughter, Beverly Virginia, born 
in Denver on the 17th of May, 1918. David L. Thompson, whose birth occurred in Denver 
in 1898, was graduated from the high school with the class of 1918. 

Dr. Thompson gives his political allegiance to the republican party and fraternally 
is known as a charter member of the Knights of Pythias. His professional colleagues 
and contemporaries accord him high standing as a practitioner and his prosperity is all 
the more creditable by reason of the fact that it is due entirely to his own efforts. He 
owns an attractive residence on the west side in Denver, where the family is well known 
socially. 



WILLIAM A. DOLLISON. 



William A. Dollison, of Denver, is president of the Great Divide Petroleum & 
Refining Company, which has been operating extensively in oil fields in three states. 
He was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, February 9, 1868, and is a son of Harvey C. 
and Johanna (Lindsey) Dollison, both of whom were also natives of the Buckeye state. 
The grandfather in the paternal line came to America from Scotland and on the mater- 
nal side the family is of Pennsylvania Dutch lineage. Both grandparents were early 
settlers of Ohio and there Harvey C. Dollison and Johanna Lindsey were born, reared 
and educated. Their marriage was celebrated in Guernsey county, Ohio, and Harvey 
C. Dollison took up the occupation of farming, to which he continued to devote his 
attention and his energies up to the time of his death, which occurred when he was 
sixty-one years of age. His wife survived him for a long period, passing away in 1912 
at the age of eighty-two years. They had a family of six sons and four daughters. 

William A. Dollison, the youngest of this family, pursued his early education in 
the schools of his native county and when his textbooks were put aside began earning 
his living by clerking in clothing stores in Cambridge and Zanesville, Ohio. He con- 
tinued in the clothing trade altogether for four years and just prior to the time of his 
removal to Colorado he had charge of the largest clothing business in southeastern 
Ohio. He early displayed that quality which for want of a better term has been called 
commercial sense. In other words, he had marked ability in salesmanship and execu- 
tive power, which enabled him to carefully direct the interests under his control. 
On the 27th of January, 1899, he arrived in Denver and here he engaged in the cloth- 
ing business on his own account, continuing active in that field for three years. He 
then disposed of his store and became a factor in the public life of the community, 
being elected a member of the city council of Denver in 1904 and serving in that capac- 
ity until 1906. He then entered the office of the internal revenue collector in the 
position of deputy collector for Wyoming and Colorado and served in that capacity for 
two years. Subsequently he was connected with the state auditor's office, with which 
he continued until he became chief license inspector for the city of Denver. As such 
he remained until he was appointed to a position in the office of the district attorney, 
with whom he was connected for four years. On the expiration of that period he took 
the general agency for the Southern Surety & Bonding Company of St. Louis, Missouri, 
for the Colorado district and continued very successfully in that connection until he 
sold out in the fall of 1917. Prior to taking over the Southern Surety & Bonding agency 
he was appointed county clerk and recorder on the 1st of June, 1915, and occupied that 
position for one term, discharging his duties, as he always did in any public office, 
with capability, promptness and fidelity. On the 8th of October, 1917. he organized his 
present business and incorporated the Great Divide Petroleum & Refining Company, 
of which he is now president. The other officers of the corporation are: Charles E. 
Barrick, secretary-treasurer; and M. H. Mayers, vice president. This company is oper- 
ating in the proven fields of three states, holding leases and options on extremely well 
situated oil lands in Wyoming, Kansas and Oklahoma. The company was not organized 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 95 

for exploration purposes, but is primarily a drilling company, with the sole object 
of drilling the greatest possible number of wells for the largest possible production 
and the maximum profit of its stockholders. The company therefore is confining its 
operations to actually proven fields, where the opportunities for oil production are most 
favorable and the chances of disappointment are reduced to a minimum. In Wyoming 
the Great Divide Petroleum & Refining Company holds three hundred and twenty acres 
on the Geary dome, in the Big Muddy field, surrounded by some of the biggest oil 
companies operating in this country. They also hold valuable properties in Kansas 
and Oklahoma. They retain the services of a geologist of recognized authority — A. L. 
McKercher. 

On the 10th of June, 1894, Mr. Dollison was married to Miss Elizabeth W. Williams, 
of Zanesville, Ohio, and they have one child, William A. Dollison, Jr., who was born 
in Denver and is now attending school. 

Politically Mr. Dollison is a republican, active in the ranks of the party, and is 
now serving as chairman of the party organization in Denver. He is a self-made man 
who has worked his way upward entirely unaided and he is one of the popular citizens 
of Denver, who has made for himself a creditable place in business circles and whose 
opportunities for the future seem most bright. 



CHARLES F. MASON. 



Charles P. Mason is the president of the Mason Produce Company of Greeley, in 
which connection he has built up an extensive business. He deserves great credit for 
what he has achieved. He started out in the business world empty-handed but early 
realized the eternal principle that industry wins. His energetic effort, his keen busi- 
ness discernment and his honorable purpose have been the salient features which have 
won him substantial success. Mr. Mason was born on the 11th of December, 1855, in 
Waltham, Massachusetts, a son of Luther and Angeline S. (Kidder) Mason. The 
father was engaged in farming in Iowa and in early life had been connected with the 
mills of Waltham, Massachusetts, but with his removal to the middle west turned his 
attention to general agricultural pursuits. 

Charles F. Mason was a young lad when the family removed from New England 
to Iowa and in the public schools of the latter state began his education. After his 
studies were completed in the public schools he spent a part of three years as a stu- 
dent in a seminary, which he attended through the winter months. In 1878 he ar- 
rived in Greeley, Colorado, then a young man of twenty-two years, and took up the 
occupation of farming, purchasing eighty acres of land in Weld county. He had come 
from Iowa without any money and had many difficulties and hardships to face in those 
early days. Leadville was then just opening up as a mining center and constituted 
an excellent market for the produce which Mr. Mason raised. Denver had been the 
only market up to that time and through the intervening years Mr. Mason has watched 
with interest as Denver has grown by leaps and bounds, being transformed from a 
rough mining camp into a great metropolitan city with all of the advantages, im- 
provements and opportunities known to the older east. In those early days the wheat 
crop was largely the money crop and wheat often took the place of coin in the exchange 
of commodities. Mr. Mason found that the soil was very adaptable to potato raising and 
won a substantial measure of success in the production of potatoes, which he sold at 
Leadville. As the years have passed on he has gradually developed an extensive produce 
business and for the past three years has been the president of the Mason Produce 
Company, which enjoys a very extensive patronage. His business methods have been 
of a most progressive character and his close attention to his interests, his unfaltering 
enterprise and his determination have made the business a very successful and paying 
proposition. 

On the 30th of June, 1892, Mr. Mason was married in Greeley to Miss Mary E. 
Darling, a daughter of Willard and Abbie S. Darling, who were among the early colonists 
of Colorado. Her father was employed in connection with the agricultural development 
of Greeley and in time became one of the representative and successful farmers of Weld 
county. His wife was a very energetic woman, assisting him greatly, and in church 
affairs she took a very active and helpful part, being a consistent and earnest member 
of the Methodist church. To Mr. and Mrs. Darling were born two sons and two daughters 
and the sons became engaged in farming and won a substantial measure of prosperity. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Mason have been born four daughters, Alice. Laura, Luthera and Harriet. 
Alice graduated from the Colorado College, at Colorado Springs; Laura graduated from 



96 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the Agricultural College in 1918; and the two younger sisters are high school pupils. 
Mr. Mason and his family are active and consistent members of the Baptist church. His 
political allegiance is given to the democratic party but he has never sought or desired 
office as a reward for party fealty. He is a member of the Farmers Club and is interested 
in everything that has to do with the agricultural development and the general progress 
and prosperity of his community. He has served as president of the school board and 
president of the board of trustees of the Baptist church of Greeley, the cause of education 
finding in him a stalwart champion, for he believes that education is the bulwark of the 
nation. He has therefore given his children excellent advantages in that direction. His 
daughter Alice was a particularly earnest student and is now a successful teacher of 
languages, having been engaged in that connection in different parts of the state. Mr. 
Mason and his family are noted for their generosity in charitable and benevolent work 
and they are people of genuine worth, occupying an enviable position in those social 
circles where intelligence and true worth are received as the passports into good society. 



ROBERT WALTER SPEER. 



Robert Walter Speer was a man of vision and the vision crystallized in Denver's 
civic greatness. The great and beautiful city of today, with its broad thoroughfares, its 
magnificent boulevard and park systems, its splendid playgrounds, its great municipal 
auditorium, is the monument to his labors. He was a dreamer of dreams but the dreams 
took form in practical effort that placed Denver in many respects in a point of leader- 
ship among the great cities on the American continent. It was his absorbing passion to 
make it a city for all the people — a city of high physical, mental and moral attainments, 
and while many of his plans came to a tangible realization, he was engaged in the devel- 
opment of still other projects for Denver's improvement at the time of his death on 
May 14, 1918, but most of all in an effort to make Denver one hundred per cent in its 
efficiency in connection with the world war. A modern philosopher has said: "Not the 
good that comes to us, but the good that comes to the world through us, is the measure 
of our success." And judged by this standard, few men have attained the success of 
Robert W. Speer, who was known through the United States as the foremost municipal 
executive in America. For thirty years he was connected with the public life of Denver 
as an officer — years in which he closely studied every problem of the city, and when he 
came to be the head of the city government, his theories and his plans were not ill 
advised but were the outcome of sound judgment, broad experience and keen insight. 

A native of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, Robert W. Speer was born on the 
1st of December, 1855, a son of George W. Speer, who won distinction for gallantry while 
serving as an officer in the Union army during the Civil war. His mother, who bore the 
maiden name of Jane Ann Brewster, belonged to one of the leading families of the com- 
munity. After completing a public school education Robert W. Speer continued his 
studies in the Dickinson Seminary at Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and although this 
ended his school training, he remained throughout his life a close student of men, meas- 
ures, problems and affairs and came to be regarded as a man of most scholarly attain- 
ments when judged- by the breadth of his knowledge. It was not the learning that one 
gains merely from books but the learning that qualifies the individual for every duty as 
it comes successively to him. He was ever recognized as a man of most courageous spirit 
and early gave manifestation of this characteristic. When quite young, or about the time 
he attained his majority, he leaped into a lake and saved from drowning the lady who 
afterwards became his wife. At this time his health failed and he came west, seeking a 
drier climate. So greatly had his health been undermined that when he reached Colorado 
he was too ill to walk. He courageously took up the fight for life, just as in later years 
he took up the fight for principles which led to civic betterment and civic greatness. 
The outdoor life of the cattleman on the ranch restored his health, and when 
he felt it safe to take up indoor occupation again, he secured a clerkship in 
the carpet department of the Daniels & Fisher Stores Company, where he was 
paid a salary of eight dollars per week. In the meantime his love of the 
west grew and in 1882 he returned to Pennsylvania, where he wedded Miss Kate A. 
Thrush, of Lewiston, that state, whose life he had previously saved, and they entered 
upon an ideal married relation that covered thirty-six years. With his bride Mr. Speer 
returned to Denver. He had previously given up his position as clerk to enter the real 
estate business and, his ability becoming recognized by his fellow townsmen, he was 
elected to the office of city clerk two years prior to his marriage. This constituted his 




ROBERT W. SPEER 



98 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

initial step in Denver's public life and for thirty years he remained a most active and 
influential factor in municipal affairs. 

In 1885 Mr. Speer was appointed by President Grover Cleveland to the position of 
postmaster of Denver and in 1891 Governor Routt appointed him president of the Denver 
fire and police board. From Governor Adams he received appointment to the position 
of president of the board of -public works and became thereby ex officio member of the 
fire and police board. He was also appointed to the same position by Governor Thomas 
and so continued to serve until 1904. All through this period of office holding Mr. Speer 
was a diligent student of municipal government. He searched out the best principles 
utilized in the government of larger cities, read every authority upon municipal problems 
and when he was called to the mayoralty in 1904, he entered upon the duties of his 
position with high ideas and ideals, many of which were regarded as revolutionary but 
which through his practical efforts became tangible assets in the city's development and 
upbuilding. He was an indefatigable worker and he eagerly grasped his first real oppor- 
tunity to carry out his vision. For two consecutive terms he continued as Denver's 
mayor and transformed a straggly and somewhat unsightly western town into a city 
beautiful. Utility, sanitation, comfort and beauty all figured as dominant features in 
his plans. His labors resulted in the building of the Twentieth street viaduct and he 
was the first to suggest construction of the Colfax-Larimer viaduct. His efforts led to 
the paving and graveling of many of Denver's streets and his initiative brought about 
the building of extensive sanitary and storm sewer systems. He established the boule- 
vard and parkway systems and he felt that not only utility but beauty must be consid- 
ered and that the city's development should be upon a plan that would produce a har- 
monious whole. He therefore created and planned the civic center, regarded as one of 
the most beautiful and inspiring works of man. He carried forward a system of tree 
culture that won the plaudits of artists and horticulturists throughout the world. An 
unsightly dumping ground was transformed into beautiful sunken gardens and Cherry 
Creek, which for years had remained an unsolved problem of other city heads, was curbed 
by him through the building of a great retaining wall, along one side of which was con- 
structed a beautiful driveway that the city fathers named in his honor. Beauty entered 
into his plan for city lighting and unsightly telephone and telegraph poles were placed 
in alleys. He opposed the construction of buildings more than twelve stories in height 
because such would obstruct a view of the mountains; and to Denver's parks he turned 
his attention, establishing new parks and boulevards, from which he discarded the signs 
"keep off the grass." He also opened many playgrounds, especially in the more congested 
districts, that the children might have opportunity for healthful fun. He was also instru- 
mental in establishing the museum at City park, one of the finest and most complete in 
the world, and also in establishing the public bathhouses. His initiative resulted in the 
building of the Welcome arch and one of the public improvements in which he personally 
took greatest delight was the Auditorium, which will ever stand as a monument to his 
public spirit. "His greatest pleasure," said the Denver Times, "was had when the big 
building was thrown open free to the public for some great concert or other entertainment. 
Then, always, Mayor Speer, his expansive and genial smile spreading over his face and 
his eyes aglow with the joy he could not conceal had he tried, was to be found hastening 
here and there about the entrances, seeing that none was turned away." Free Sunday 
afternoon concerts were inaugurated at the Auditorium, held through the winter season, 
with summer concerts in the parks during the summer, and one of his chief delights was 
the fact that he persuaded Madame Schumann-Heink to give a free concert in the building, 
singing to fourteen thousand persons who otherwise could not have afforded to hear her. 
His orders on such occasions were that the boxes were to be reserved for the old and the 
feeble, the crippled and the ill, and he personally saw to it that such orders were carried 
out and that such guests were made comfortable. The story is told of him that on the 
occasion of the holding of a municipal Christmas tree and celebration at the Auditorium 
in 1916 the place had already become filled with a crowd of happy children and that the 
mayor surreptitiously slipped several through the entrances after the doors had been 
closed. Fearing for the safety of the little ones, the fire chief complained of this, where- 
upon the mayor acquiesced, promising not to open the doors again, but it is said that a 
few moments later a friend of his found him on the outside distributing dollars to thirty 
or more disappointed youngsters whom he had called into the alley for the purpose, 
instructing them to "spend it all for candy." With the building of the Auditorium he 
felt, too, that a great pipe organ should be installed and ere he had completed his second 
term in office he had seen fifty thousand dollars set aside for that purpose, but after his 
retirement from the mayoralty the money was used in other ways. For four years he 
was out of office and then at the demand of his fellow townsmen was recalled to the posi- 
tion, and still with the determination to have that organ for Denver, he personally raised 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 99 

more than thirty thousand dollars toward its purchase, after which the Rotary Club took 
up the work and raised the rest of the money needed, the city paying only for the installa- 
tion of the organ. He built Inspiration Point in order that citizens might study nature 
in a three-hundred-mile view of the Rockies. He encouraged land and water sports and 
proposed Mount Evans as a national park so the worker might enjoy Sunday outings. He 
also looked to the most practical phases of life and established a bureau whereby coal was 
furnished at cost when fuel prices soared and brought hardships to the consumer. It was 
Mr. Speer who originated the phrase "Give while you live," inducing many of Denver's 
wealthy men to bestow gifts upon the city that have resulted greatly in civic betterment. 

With the outbreak of the world war Mr. Speer recognized how closely his city should 
cooperate with the national government and put forth every effort to that end. He it was 
who originated the plan of paying the premium on a thousand dollars insurance for every 
boy who enlisted and it was his constant aim and purpose to have the city do its full duty 
in every respect in relation, to the war. It was therefore in keeping with his views 
and purpose that when he passed away Mrs. Speer requested that no flowers be sent but 
that the money be given instead to the Red Cross. It was after a brief illness that 
Mr. Speer passed away. Almost to his last hour he was planning and working for 
the city. Civic improvements were not his sole achievement, however. He systematized 
the municipal business of Denver and brought the city's government to the highest 
state of efficiency. It is seldom that such absolute recognition of one's worth comes to 
the individual as did to Mr. Speer. In 1912, after two terms' service as mayor, he 
retired from the office without asking reelection and went abroad. While in Europe 
he closely studied every form of municipal government, but during his absence com- 
mission government in Denver had become a chaotic thing and it was a universal 
feeling that a mistake had been made. The business men, the political leaders and 
in fact the whole city felt that desirable conditions could be restored only by one man 
and that was Robert W. Speer. It was therefore with the support of both parties that 
he was returned to the office in 1916. When he felt that he would have to accede to 
the public demand for reelection he undertook to draw up the present city charter, 
embodying all that he believed best of the many kinds of government he had studied. 
This resulted in giving Denver a charter that allows the mayor or city manager greater 
powev than is had by the chief executive in any other city, but at the same time checks 
his public acts and makes him responsible for the work of every city department. In 
choosing his coworkers Mr. Speer did not regard party lines. The members of his cab- 
inet were chosen two from the democratic ranks and two from the republican ranks. 
With his return to office he again took up the plans for the civic center which he had 
formulated in his second term and it was then that he said: "What finer use could 
wealthy citizens of Denver make of their money than to spend it making Denver more 
beautiful, in erecting monuments to themselves that will be of benefit and bring joy 
and light into the lives of others?" And with this thought in mind he at once approached 
numerous philanthropic and wealthy citizens, many of whom he found eager to cooperate 
with him, with the result that Denver secured statues and art works worth hundred and 
hundreds of thousands. 

It is said that Mr. Speer was an authority upon the laws of the city and the state 
and that he could quote many legal decisions upon any point that came up for debate. 
It was his custom to spend an hour or more each evening at his home reading books on 
municipal affairs or studying the city and state statutes. He was as mayor a strict dis- 
ciplinarian with his assistants and held the head of a department more closely to his 
tasks than any subordinate because of the fact that more responsibility devolved upon 
him. Though a strict disciplinarian, he was also most genial and it was his wish that 
every member of his cabinet would speak freely upon any subject under discussion, 
desiring that each should express his individual thought. Speaking of his personal char- 
acteristics, one who knew him well said: "Mr. Speer never forgot a friend, and I 
prefer to remember him as that kind of a man. His was a personal magnetism seldom 
seen in this world. In the words of Shakespeare, 'he grappled his friends to him with 
hoops of steel,' and where you found a friend of his you found a man who would die 
for him. If he was your friend he'd go to the utmost limit for you, and the more you 
met with adversity, the more you were attacked, the more you were condemned, the more 
trouble you were in, the tighter he clung to you and the harder he worked to help you. 
He was a leader of men. It was this loyalty and steadfastness that made him a leader. 
There never has been a man in Colorado who held his party in so firm a grip, and never 
a man who succeeded in drawing the two great parties together for the common good 
of the city." 

In an editorial the Rocky Mountain News said: "This community has suffered an 
irreparable loss in the death of Mayor Robert W. Speer. He made service to the city his life 



100 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

work. Denver's present commanding place with the outer world is due to his incessant 
labors for its upbuilding. He was childless. What he might have given to a family he 
gave to Denver. No other interest, outside of his devotion to his wife, was permitted 
to interfere with his life work — in truth his absorption in Denver's civic affairs for 
many years crowded out business and money making and political preferment. Money 
he cared nothing for so long as it left him free to work out his plans. Time and again 
he refused offers of high place away from here so that he might be free to live and 
work for the city that gave him a longer life than he was led to expect when a young 
man, for he, too, was one of the number that came here to seek health. Mayor Speer 
was known throughout the United States as the foremost municipal executive in 
America. He was a student of municipal affairs and was also a man of exceptional 
executive ability. Besides, he had a magnetic, persuasive personality, initiative and 
unlimited courage. Those who came to meet him in public affairs and in politics learned 
to love him as well as to admire him and were bound to him by chains of steel. * * * 
Mayor Speer's place in Denver and Colorado is not to be filled today or tomorrow. He 
towered above his contemporaries. He died as he lived, thinking of his city and planning 
to the last moment to make Denver count in the great national undertaking." 

The Denver Times said: "Two qualities were outstanding in Mayor Speer — modesty 
and faithfulness to his friends. As he came more and more into the limelight as an 
authority on municipal affairs, he bent more humbly to his work. The things that had 
been done were not worth talking about — it was the bigger things just ahead that 
occupied his attention. All the detail of city management, in addition to the broad 
planning which occupied most of his hours, could not have been attended to if Mayor 
Speer had not had the faculty of picking the right men for his assistants. When once 
a man had won his confidence, and had proved himself to Mayor Speer's own sat- 
isfaction, all the outside criticism in the world could not make the mayor 
abandon that friend. He saw the good in men from all walks of life. His appointees 
stepped into office in overalls and in broadcloth. But first they had to convince this 
shrewd judge of human nature that they were animated, like himself, with an honest 
desire to serve the people. 'Service' in fact was the Speer motto. He never grew so 
absorbed in his work that he drifted far from the everyday folk for whom his most ambi- 
tious plans were made. Mayor Speer could have done for any other city what he has 
done for Denver. There is no municipality in the country that would not have been 
the better for his directing influence. It is fortunate for Denver that, in its hour of need, 
it found such a man to lay the foundations for future progress. On the things that Mayor 
Speer has built, and along the plans that he has laid out, Denver cannot help but 
advance. The people of this city will never be content with a man who does not measure 
up in some degree at least to the Speer ideals. In the power of his example, as well as 
in the wonderful things he built for us in a material way, Mayor Robert W. Speer will 
live on in Denver." 

No more fitting epitaph could be written of Robert W. Speer than the words of one of 
his lifetime friends, "Denver is and always will be his monument." 



COLONEL DAVID CHILD DODGE. 

The close of a most useful, active and honorable career came on the 19th of July, 
1918, when Colonel David C. Dodge passed from this life. He had been one of the 
builders of Denver; one of the promoters of Colorado's development and greatness. 
For many years he had figured most prominently in connection with railroad con- 
struction throughout the west and his labors were far-reaching and most beneficial 
in their results. The attainment of wealth was not the end and aim of his work. 
He was actuated by a patriotic purpose of doing the best that he possibly could for 
the state and for the great western empire and he was continually striving to promote 
Colorado's welfare along many lines. His title was a complimentary one. His friends, 
recognizing his ability for leadership and the qualities that placed him above the 
great majority of his fellows, called him Colonel. He remained an active factor in 
the world's work to the last, although he had passed the eightieth milestone on life's 
journey. His keen mentality was undimmed and to the end he gave out of the rich 
stores of his wisdom and experience for the benefit of others. He had for years figured 
prominently in connection with railway building, with agricultural interests and with 
other business projects in Denver and the west. His interests long kept him a central 
figure on the stage of activity in Colorado's capital, where he was numbered among her 
most honored residents. 




L'OLONEL DAVID C. DODGE 



102 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Colonel Dodge was born in Shirley, Massachusetts, November 17, 1837, and was 
a descendant in the eighth generation of the first American settler of the name. Two 
brothers, Richard and William Dodge, came from England and settled in Salem, 
Massachusetts, about 1638. From them are descended almost all the Dodges in America, 
David C. Dodge among the rest. His parents were Levy and Susanna Ann (Woolley) 
Dodge, both natives of New England, their entire lives having been passed near Ayer, 
in the Old Bay state. The mother was a descendant of Joshua Bentley, one of the 
two American patriots who rowed Paul Revere across the Charles river on the mem- 
orable night when he made his famous ride in 1775 and "spread the alarm through 
every Middlesex village and farm" that the countryfolk might be up and to arms. His 
great-uncle was Dr. William Bentley, a noted scholar and linguist and a minister of the 
Unitarian faith at Salem, Massachusetts. His father was for many years actively 
engaged in farming. In the family were six children, Colonel Dodge being the youngest 
and last survivor. 

Colonel Dodge was a little lad of but three summers when he became a pupil in 
a country school taught by his oldest sister. Later he specialized in mathematics 
and physics as a student in the Lawrence Academy at Groton, Massachusetts. Although 
his textbooks were put aside when he was but fifteen years of age he had already 
acquired a thorough knowledge of algebra, trigonometry, theoretical surveying and 
other advanced branches of mathematics that proved of great worth to him in his 
later career as a railroad builder. In 1853, when a youth of fifteen years and three 
months, he left home and made his way westward to central Illinois. Here he 
remained until 1856, during which period he was employed in the engineering depart- 
ment of the Fox River Valley Railroad at Elgin, Illinois, and also was connected with 
the Wisconsin Central Railroad. In March, 1856, he removed to Clinton, Iowa, where 
he became connected with the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad in the position of 
general freight and passenger agent and also acted as paymaster for the road from 1857 
until 1862. In January, 1864, he was sent to Chattanooga, Tennessee, and spent several 
months in the commissary department of the Union army during the Civil war. From 
June until October, 1864, he was in the quartermaster's department at Memphis, and 
there narrowly escaped being taken prisoner when the house in which he was 
quartered, was raided by the Confederate General Forrest's cavalry. During his 
connection with the army, he was brought into close personal contact with General 
Thomas and the acquaintance thus founded, ripened into a warm personal friend- 
ship and mutual regard. Returning to Iowa in October, 1864, he became general agent 
for the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, at Nevada, Iowa, which town was at that 
time, the western terminus of the road. Later, upon the completion of the road to 
Council Bluffs, and the extension of the Union Pacific Railroad to North Platte, 
Nebraska, he was made general agent for the Northwestern lines, with headquarters 
in Denver, arriving in that city in June, 1865. He occupied that position until 1870, 
when he resigned and accepted a similar appointment with the Kansas Pacific Railway 
Company, which had completed its line to Denver, in August of that year. 

When the Denver & Rio Grande was completed, and opened for traffic, to Colorado 
Springs in 1871, Colonel Dodge became its first general freight and ticket agent. This 
position brought him into close association with General William J. Palmer, then 
president of the road, and the two men became fast friends — personal, as well as in a 
business sense, and this mutual attachment became a potent factor in the upbuilding 
of the west. To this personal partnership, if such it may be termed, General Palmer 
brought financial sagacity and ability, and Colonel Dodge a practical knowledge of 
the details of railroad building, and a rare executive capacity. These two men con- 
structed the Rio Grande system, extended it to Ogden, Utah, and made it an im- 
portant factor in the development of Colorado and the west, as well as in trans- 
continental traffic. The Rio Grande Western furnishes another striking example of 
the constructive genius, and efficient management, of Colonel Dodge, for many years 
its vice president and general manager. This road was later sold to, and consolidated 
with, the Denver & Rio Grande, and with one or both of these lines. Colonel Dodge 
had been continuously connected for thirty years. 

In 1885 he went to Mexico to manage the affairs of the Mexican National Rail- 
way. He became its second vice president in 1887. By the completion of long links 
and much extension the road developed into one of the two main trunk lines between 
Mexico City and the United States border. With his return to Colorado he entered upon 
the work of improving and making the Rio Grande & Western a standard gauge road 
and lived to see the fulfilment of his dreams through the extension of railway lines into 
all sections of the state. An incident in connection with the retirement of Colonel Dodge 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 103 

from his many years of railroad building and management may here be cited as an 
interesting sidelight showing the character and fairness of the man, and his willing- 
ness to share the fruits of his success with those who aided in bringing about a 
realization of his business ideals. When the sale of the Denver & Rio Grande had been 
consummated, one million dollars of the amount received was, at the wish and suggestion 
of General Palmer, cheerfully approved of by George Foster Peabody and Colonel 
Dodge, divided among the former employes of the system, from the humblest to the 
most exalted, and in amounts proportionate with the years of service and the importance 
of the service rendered — a just and generous recognition of loyal assistance, a graceful 
acknowledgment, too often withheld by our successful men. 

In 1901, Colonel Dodge concluded to retire from active life and for some time was 
not identified with any railway enterprises, but indolence and idleness were utterly 
foreign to his nature and in 1902 he began the erection of the magnificent Shirley Hotel, 
which is one of the finest hostelries of the west. He was afterward the head of the 
Shirley Investment Company and devoted much of his time to the hotel business. He 
also became active in the construction of the plant of the Great Western Sugar Com- 
pany at Loveland, the plant of the Western Packing Company at Denver and of the 
Denver Union Water Company. He also owned extensive and valuable realty holdings 
not only in Denver but throughout Colorado, his possessions including the Shirley 
stock farm, adjacent to Port Logan and not far from Denver. This is one of the 
most valuable and splendidly equipped dairy farms in the state. In 1908 Mr. Dodge 
became associated with the extension of the Moffat Railroad from Denver to Steam- 
boat Springs, Colorado, one of the most important engineering feats ever accomplished 
in the mountain regions of the American continent and one of the most beautiful 
scenic railroads in the world. He was planning for the reconstruction of the Moffat 
Road and for tunnel building almost with his last breath. The Denver Times said 
of him: "An adequate delineation of Colonel Dodge's Colorado career cannot be 
written in a few lines, nor can his value to Colorado and to Denver be summed up. 
Interested in everything that stood for the west and its good, he spent his entire 
life in laying the foundation of the great prosperity now enjoyed by the Rocky Moun- 
tain section. His fight for fair rates was only one of the great struggles he began 
for the benefit of Colorado — it will be the only one he did not complete, however. 
Colonel Dodge's strength of character, his world views on all subjects, his kindness, 
his intense Americanism made him a power felt and revered throughout the country. 
Quiet, undemonstrative, shunning the frivolous and bending every effort always toward 
the common good of his state and his fellow citizens, he had a circle of friends that 
spread around the globe. Among them he numbered famous generals, pioneers and 
frontiersmen, bankers and leaders in every walk of life." 

Colonel Dodge cared nothing for society in the' generally accepted sense of the 
term. He was a lover of home and his interest centered there. In New York city, 
in 1859, Colonel Dodge was married to Miss Emily K. Oatman, who passed away in 
Denver in 1897, and to them were born two children, Mary, deceased, and a son, George 
B. Dodge, who was born in Iowa and passed away in Denver, leaving three children. 
Lieutenant D. C. Dodge, who is now with the American army in France; John B. Dodge 
and Mrs. Carroll T. Brown. In 1899, in Normal, Illinois, Colonel Dodge was again 
married, his second union being with Miss Nannie O. Smith, who was long a successful 
teacher in the East Denver high school and who survives him. A highly cultured 
woman of keen mentality and innate refinement, this union proved a most happy one 
and Colonel Dodge found in her a willing helpmate in full sympathy with his hopes 
and aspirations. Her ' years of labor in educational work had developed in her a 
broadness of vision and the ability to visualize the details of complex business problems, 
with the result that during their entire wedded life, he made her his closest confidant. 
His business plans and undertakings were discussed with her, and it is difficult, if 
not wholly impossible, to correctly gauge the exact extent to which her sound judg- 
ment and counsel may have had part in aiding his success, even as it is likewise 
difficult to measure the extent of her influence in shaping the mind and moulding the 
character of the students under her guidance during her school work, and who have 
become the active men and women of today. A further exemplification of perfect 
confidence in her business judgment and sagacity was given by Colonel Dodge when 
he named her, in his will, executrix of his estate. 

Mrs. Dodge has also taken a quiet, though none the less earnest, interest in 
literary work and other activities of the day. As a writer, she has contributed articles 
to the press, on subjects of interest, that have attracted favorable notice. She is the 
author of a most interesting treatise on the Shakespeare-Bacon controversy — (published 



104 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

by The Wahlgreen Press, Denver, 1916) — which for careful analysis and sound reason- 
ing, coupled with lucid expression, shows a comprehensive grasp of a perplexing cryp- 
togram. 

Colonel Dodge held membership in the Unity church. He was deeply interested in 
all that concerned the welfare and upbuilding of the west and there are few who have 
contributed in greater measure to advancement and development in Colorado and that 
section of the country than he. The importance of his labors cannot be overestimated, 
for railroad building is the one indispensable feature in opening up vast areas to 
development and settlement. His work cannot be adequately measured until the pro- 
jects which he instituted have reached their full fruition in the state's development. 
Colonel Dodge passed away in Denver after an illness of only four days, on which 
occasion the Rocky Mountain News of July 20, 1918, wrote: "Amid the hills which 
kindled the fire of lifelong enthusiasm in the heart of a master builder, whose material 
accomplishments were the fulfilment of great dreams, spun for the commonwealth he 
loved as he loved no other, Denver will say farewell today to a devoted friend. For 
Colonel David Child Dodge, patriarch of big accomplishments, is dead. At the hour 
of four o'clock the last rites over the earthly body of this man who has spanned the 
ravines and climbed the steep mountain sides of the Rockies with railroads, and in 
whose shadow he is to lie, will be held. But the man of life, vigor and friendship will 
not die. His friends, who through pure affection for his sterling views of life christened 
him 'Colonel' Dodge, will carry his memory. The miles of railroads that stretch across 
the state will long remain a monument to a true vision and a sound judgment." 

When the history is written, 

Of the good state Colorado, 

With the names of Hunt and Palmer, 

Men who gave the state its greatness, 

D. C. Dodge's name will ever 

Stand among them for his wisdom; 

For his worth so quiet, useful, 

For his judgment, sane, impartial, 

For his kindness, strong and manly. 

And if in the distant future 

Men should cease his name to mention, 

Still the work he did so wisely, 

Will remain to bless the people. 

Better far than shaft or statue 

Made of bronze, and raised for glory. 

For it helps mankind, his brothers, 

Blesses state and town and city. 



DELPH E. CARPENTER. 



Delph E. Carpenter, who is a member of the Greeley bar and has aided in framing 
the laws of the state as a member of the general assembly, was born on the Carpenter 
homestead, near Greeley, Colorado, May 13, 1877. He is the second son of Leroy S. and 
Martha A. (Bennett) Carpenter, who are mentioned elsewhere in this work. He spent 
his early life upon the farm and in active connection with the live stock business, attend- 
ing the Greeley public schools and graduated from the Greeley high school with the 
class of 1896. He then entered the College of Liberal Arts of the University of Denver 
and in 1899 graduated from the School of Law of that institution with the degree of 
LL. B. He was admitted to the bar of Colorado immediately thereafter. Prior to his 
admission he was the trial attorney in justice court work for the office in Denver, in 
which he was serving his clerkship and upon admission he immediately commenced 
the practice of his profession in Greeley, where he has since remained. Immediately after 
his admission he devoted the first year of his professional career to litigation involving 
the famous Currier estate of Weld county, and thereafter engaged in a general practice 
but became more and more identified with irrigation litigation and in June, 1911, was 
engaged as directing counsel in the case of Wyoming vs. Colorado, involving the waters 
of the Laramie river, and since that time his practice has been devoted almost exclusively 
to irrigation litigation. He has been the managing and directing counsel on interstate 
litigation between Nebraska and Colorado appropriators involving the waters of the South 
Platte river since the commencement of that litigation and is identified as counsel with 




DELPH E. CABPENTEB 



106 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

a large number of irrigation enterprises of the South Platte drainage and somewhat with 
enterprises on the upper Arkansas river. He was identified with the Wyoming litigation 
through four political administrations, wrote the major portion of the 1916 brief and 
Volume One of the 1917 brief presented to the United States supreme court in that case 
and participated in the oral argument. 

Notwithstanding his professional career he has always been identified with the farm- 
ing and live stock interests of Weld county and is the owner of a considerable tract of 
agricultural and grazing lands in the Crow Creek valley fifteen miles east of Greeley 
and was the moving spirit in the construction of The North Side Extension Canal built 
for the irrigation of that valley. During the past ten years he has built up one of the 
finest herds of pure Bates or Milking Shorthorn cattle in the west, which are run in 
connection with his ranch. He has always been identified both in profession and business 
with the agricultural and irrigation interests of northern Colorado. 

On June 5, 1901, Mr. Carpenter was united in marriage with Miss Michaela Hogarty, 
the youngest daughter of Captain Michael J. Hogarty, U. S. A., and Sarah (Carr) 
Hogarty, who were natives of Ireland and of New York respectively. The Carpenter 
and Hogarty families were both identified with the Union colony and came to Colorado 
with that organization and invested and were largely, financially and otherwise, interested 
in the development of the Greeley district, contributing in a marked measure to its early 
progress and improvement. Captain Hogarty served throughout the Civil war, entering 
the army as a private, and at the close of the war was a lieutenant in the One Hundred 
and Forty-first New York Volunteer Infantry. He was then transferred into the regular 
army service with the same rank, serving in New York and Indian Territory until 1870, 
when he was retired from active service on account of a gun shot wound received in the 
eye during the Civil war. He joined the Union colony and located in Colorado, where he 
engaged in farming near Greeley for many years and finally in 1904 moved to National 
City, California, where he now resides and is actively identified with the affairs of that 
community. Mrs. Hogarty died at National City, California, January 10, 1918. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter have been born four children: Michaela, Donald, Sarah 
and Martha. 

Mr. Carpenter has always been identified with the republican party. He served as 
county attorney and as the first counsel of the town of Ault and also the town attorney for 
Eaton, Evans and other municipalities in Weld county. In 1908 he was elected as senator 
for the seventh senatorial district and served through the 1909, 1910, and 1911 sessions 
of the Colorado legislature and was the accredited republican leader of the senate during 
the 1911 session. During the 1909 session he was placed in charge of the affairs and work 
of the senate committee on agriculture and irrigation as well as serving as a member on 
the judiciary and other committees of that body. Before the close of the session he was 
appointed chairman of a special committee of three senators on irrigation investigation, 
particularly in relation to interstate streams ad interim and compiled the report written 
by that committee and included in the senate Journal of the 1911 session. His appoint- 
ment as chairman of this committee was made by a democratic senate and during a 
general democratic administration. During the 1911 session he championed the cause 
of the protection of the great irrigation reservoir interests of the farmers of Colorado 
in what came to be known as the "Carpenter Reservoir Bill," which caused protracted 
and bitter debate not only in both houses of the legislature, but later before the people 
when one of the sentences included in the bill as a compromise amendment was placed 
upon the ballot under the recently adopted referendum by the Direct Election League 
of Denver, who particularly desired to try out their reform on some agricultural meas- 
ure. He was from the close of the 1911 session of the legislature until the 1912 general 
election, almost weekly engaged, upon invitation, in addressing various farmers' gather- 
ings, business meetings and bar associations upon the question of the protection of the 
appropriations of water made by means of irrigation reservoirs as involved in the meas- 
ure under consideration and concluded his efforts in behalf of the interests of the irriga- 
tion farmers by preparing and presenting an elaborate brief upon the subject before the 
Colorado supreme court in a case then pending, where counsel for both sides conceded 
the correctness of the doctrine urged by Mr. Carpenter. The result of the referendum 
was the elimination of the compromise amendment to the original "Carpenter Reservoir 
Bill," thereby leaving the act as the law of the state without the encumbrance of the 
amendment. By the close of the campaign in favor of the general doctrine of protection 
of reservoir appropriations the public sentiment had become moulded in their favor and 
the law has since remained upon the statute books. Since the 1912 session, Mr. Car- 
penter has been called each session as an impartial adviser by the senate committee on 
agriculture and irrigation and has thereby exerted a continuing influence in behalf of 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 107 

legislation of benefit to the state and against revolutionary measures by means of which 
the agricultural and irrigation interests would have been injured or thrown into confu- 
sion. He has also during the past years acted as the confidential adviser from time to 
time of all the departments of state and irrespective of the political conditions obtaining 
and has held the confidence of state officials of all parties. 

Mr. Carpenter was the first native born citizen of Colorado to be elected to the 
senate of the state. At thirty-six years of age he was made directing counsel on interstate 
litigation and recently at the age of forty-one has been unanimously endorsed, without 
his solicitation, by the republican assembly of his county as their choice for a candidate 
for the United States senate. 

He is a member of the Local and State Bar Associations, is admitted to practice 
before all the courts of the United States as well as the courts of his own and adjoining 
states and the various departments of the national government. He is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity and of the Royal Arcanum, of which organization he was grand regent 
for a number of years. Although a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, he is a 
supporter of religious institutions in general. He is the secretary of The Union colony 
of Colorado and is identified with several live stock and agricultural organizations of the 
state. 



JAMES N. WRIGHT. 



James N. Wright is president of the firm of James N. Wright & Company, investment 
bankers of Denver, with offices in the First National Bank building. He has been at the 
head of this business since 1909 and through the intervening period the reliability of 
his business methods, his marked enterprise and sound judgment in investments have 
brought to him a very gratifying clientage. He is numbered among the native sons of 
Chicago. Illinois, born August 13, 1878. His father, Abner Miles Wright, was a native 
of Vermont and belonged to one of the old families of that state of English lineage. He 
became a successful grain dealer of Chicago and a member of the Chicago Board of 
Trade, with which he was thus identified in 1859. He continued active in the grain 
business in that city for many years and following his death his sons continued the 
business until 1903. He was very prominent in republican politics and was a candidate 
for mayor of the city, running against Carter H. Harrison. Sr.', at his second election 
as the candidate on a fusion ticket. He was a member of the "old guard" which stood 
stanchly for the nomination of U. S. Grant for the presidency on fifty-six ballots in 1868, 
being a national committeeman and was prominent in national politics as well as in 
municipal affairs in Chicago. It was Mr. Wright who instituted the fight on bucket shops 
in that city which later led to their abolition, and he stood at all times for high standards 
in business affairs and public life. He passed away in Chicago in 1890. at the age of 
fifty-nine years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Helen Sophia Hickox, was a 
native of Ohio, where her ancestors settled at an early day. The family is of English 
lineage, the ancestry being traced also back to Lord Pemberton. of the famous Pemberton 
family of Ireland, who was lord chief justice of the king's bench in Ireland and presided 
at the trial of the famous Rye House plot, which is one of the historic treason plots of 
England. Mrs. Wright passed away in Florida, November 30, 1916, at the age of seventy- 
four years. In the family were three children, of whom Charles H. Wright is now a 
resident of Evanston, Illinois, while Halle is the wife of Judge T. P. Warlow. of Orlando. 
Florida. 

James N. Wright, the youngest of the family, pursued his education in the public 
schools of Chicago and in the John B. Stetson University at De Land, Florida. When 
his textbooks were put aside he entered the grain business in connection with his 
brother, under the firm style of A. M. Wright & Company, and was thus engaged until 
1904, when he turned his attention to the bond business in Chicago, there remaining 
an active factor in financial circles until 1908, when attracted by the opportunities of 
the west, he came to Denver. The following year he established his present business, 
which was incorporated in 1913 under the name of James N Wright & Company, invest- 
ment bankers. He has been the head of the company since its establishment, directing 
its policy and shaping its interests. He has had long and valuable experience in this field 
and is a man of notably sound judgment and keen sagacity. 

On the 4th of October. 1906, in Chicago, Illinois, Mr. Wright was united in marriage 
to Miss Catherine Smith Rollo, a native of Chicago and a daughter of William F. and 
Mary Rollo. Her father is one of the oldest insurance men in Chicago, where the family 



108 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

has long resided. To Mr. and Mrs. Wright have been born four children: Mary Rollo, 
who was born in Chicago in 1907; James N., born in Chicago, January 13, 1909; Pem- 
berton, born in Denver, November 20, 1912; and Helen Sophia, born in Denver in 1916. 

Mr. Wright is still a member of the Union League Club of Chicago, while in Denver 
he has membership with the Denver Club, the Denver Country Club, the Mile High Club 
and the Cactus Club. He is also a member of the Chamber of Commerce and of the 
Denver Bond Dealers Association. He stands very high in business circles, enjoying 
the respect and confidence of colleagues and contemporaries, and his opinions in large 
measure carry weight. In politics he maintains an independent course, voting according 
to the dictates of his judgment with little regard for party ties. Fraternally he is a 
Mason, holding membership in lodge, chapter and commandery. He was president of the 
Denver Country Club in 1917, has been president of the Mile High Club since the 1st of 
January, 1918, and is a member of the board of governors of the Investment Bankers 
Association of America. 



WILLIAM V. HODGES. 



For almost twenty years William V. Hodges has been engaged in the practice of 
law in Denver, entering upon his professional career here following his graduation 
from Columbia University Law School. He came to the city well equipped by pro- 
fessional training for his chosen life work, and thoroughness and earnestness have 
marked him in the later years of his practice. He has ever prepared his cases with 
great thoroughness and care, and the tenacity with which he defends the right as he 
sees it and his ability to accurately apply legal principles to the points at issue have 
been among the salient features in his growing success. Mr. Hodges is a native of New 
York. He was born at Westville, Otsego county, on the 6th of July, 1877, and is a son 
of George L. Hodges, who was also born in the Empire state and is descended from an 
old Massachusetts family of English origin that was founded in America by William 
Hodges, who came from England in 1643 and settled at Taunton, Massachusetts. William 
V. Hodges of this review is a descendant in the eighth generation of William Hodges, 
the progenitor of the family in the new world. His ancestors throughout colonial days 
as well as later periods were characterized by a spirit of marked patriotism and loyalty 
and several served in official capacities during the period of colonial and Revolutionary 
wars with distinction and honor. His grandfather, James L. Hodges, became a leading 
and distinguished citizen of Colorado, where he exercised considerable influence as a 
representative of the republican party. The life record of George L. Hodges, the father, 
is treated in more detail on other pages of this work. 

William V. Hodges was a lad of about eleven years when the family removed to 
Denver, so that his education, begun in the schools of Westville, New York, was con- 
tinued in this city. He passed through consecutive grades to the high school and was 
graduated from the East Denver high school with the class of 1895. Having determined 
to make the practice of law his life work, he then entered the Columbia University Law 
School and won his LL. B. degree upon graduation with the class of 1899. Whether 
inherited tendency, natural predilection or environment had most to do with his choice 
of a profession, it is perhaps impossible to determine, but it is a recognized fact that 
the choice was wisely made, for since starting upon his professional career he has made 
steady progress. He entered upon practice in association with his father, George L. 
Hodges, and D. Edgar Wilson, under the firm style of Hodges, Wilson & Hodges, an 
association that was maintained until 1904. In that year the junior partner withdrew 
and became associated with Clayton C. Dorsey in forming the firm of Dorsey & Hodges. 
This partnership existed until 1911, since which time Mr. Hodges has practiced alone. 
He has not specialized along a single branch of the profession, but has continued in 
general practice and has been accorded a large and distinctively representative clientage 
that has brought him into close connection with much important litigation tried in the 
courts of the district. He holds membership in the Denver City and County Bar As- 
sociation, the Colorado State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. He 
is continually studying along the line of his profession and his knowledge is compre- 
hensive and exact. 

On the 3d of December, 1902, Mr. Hodges was married in Denver, Colorado, to Miss 
Mabel E. Gilluly, a native of Colorado Springs, Colorado, and a daughter of Joseph W. 
and Euphemia (Lawson) Gilluly, who were pioneer residents of Colorado Springs. Her 
father was for forty years connected with the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad Company 



WILLIAM V. HODGES 



110 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

and for many years was treasurer of the company. To Mr. and Mrs. Hodges have been 
born two children: Joseph Gilluly, who was born in Denver, April 30, 1909; and William 
V., born September 19, 1911. 

Mr. Hodges votes with the republican party, which he has supported since age con- 
ferred upon him the right of franchise. He belongs to the Denver Club, the Denver 
Athletic Club, the Denver Country Club, the University Club, the Denver Civic and 
Commercial Association, the Denver Mile High Club and to St. Anthony's Club of New 
York city. Appreciative of the social amenities of life, he has thus become identified 
with many of Denver's leading social organizations and his marked characteristics are 
those which make for personal popularity, while his developed powers in the line of 
his profession have brought him prominently to the front as a representative of the 
Denver bar. 



FRANK I. EWING. 



Since 1916 Judge Frank I. Ewing has filled the office of police magistrate and 
justice of the peace in Greeley, Colorado, having been elected to the position in that 
year. Being well versed in the law, he makes an excellent officer and has proven him- 
self absolutely impartial and fair in the discharge of his duties. He is a native son 
of his city, having been born in Greeley, February 4, 1876, a son of James L. and 
Elizabeth D. I. (Irwin) Ewing, natives of Pennsylvania. The father came to Colorado 
in 1875, being among the first to locate in Weld county, and here he farmed until 
1880, when he came to Greeley, where he built the Model Mill & Elevator Company, 
which he founded. For twenty-five years he has successfully conducted this business 
and has been exceedingly prosperous in his results. He today owns about one thousand 
acres of land in the neighborhood and is accounted among the well-to-do citizens of 
Greeley, where both he and his wife make their home. 

Frank I. Ewing was reared under the parental roof and received his primary 
education in the local public schools. He then entered the University of Colorado, 
from which he was graduated in 1901 with the LL. B. degree. Upon receiving his 
degree he practiced his profession in Denver for three years and then returned to 
Greeley, where he maintained an office until 1916, being in receipt of a fair share of 
legal practice. In that year he was elected to the office of justice of the peace and also 
has served as police magistrate since then. He administers his public duties well and 
his decisions are based upon a thorough understanding of the law. While he fully 
maintains the dignity of the court, he is inclined in the case of minor offenses to be 
lenient and has often proved himself not only judge of the accused but also friend. 

Judge Ewing is married and has three children, Eunice, Jim and Mary, all of 
whom are attending school. Outside of his professional interests he is the secretary 
of the Greeley Canning Factory Company. For one term he served as deputy district 
attorney, winning high public commendation, and politically he is a republican. His 
religious faith is that of the Congregational church and fraternally he is a member 
of the Masonic order, in which he has attained high rank, being a Noble of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is also a Knight of Pythias and belongs to the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks. Judge Ewing stands high among his colleagues and is a valued member 
of the bar of the state. There is "much that is commendable in his career and he has 
made many friends in Greeley, which has been his home since his birth. Those 
who have known him longest and most intimately speak of him in the highest terms 
of praise — a fact indicative of his reliable and permanent qualities of character. 



ELMER CLARK BARNES. 



Elmer Clark Barnes is principal of the Barnes Commercial School. In its conduct 
he has met a need of the business world for thoroughly trained people to enter upon 
important and responsible positions in business circles. His course of instruction is 
most thorough and comprehensive and was planned with a view to meeting modern-day 
needs. His efforts have been crowned with a notable measure of success. Professor 
Barnes is a native of Tallmadge, Ohio. His father. Sylvester E. Barnes, was also born 
in the Buckeye state and devoted his life to farming. He was a son of Sylvester Barnes, 
a native of Massachusetts. During the period of his residence in Ohio Sylvester E. Barnes 
was quite prominent in community affairs, serving as school commissioner and taking 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 111 

active part in promoting the moral progress of the community through his efforts as 
Sunday school superintendent. He married Rosemond Packard, a native of Hinckley, 
Ohio, and a representative of one of the old New England families. She, too, has passed 
away. To Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester E. Barnes were born eight children, Mary Eunice, 
Ella Rosemond, Emory Burton, Arthur Leroy, Elmer Clark, Hubert Treat, Harry Eugene 
and Raymond Packard. The last two are business associates of their brother, Elmer Clark. 

Spending his youthful days under the parental roof, Professor Barnes of this review 
began his education in the district schools and passed through consecutive grades to 
his graduation from the high school at Tallmadge with the class of 1888. He afterward 
attended Mount Union College, where he won the degree of Bachelor of Commercial 
Science in 1893. He took up the profession of teaching, which he followed for four years 
in the public schools, and afterward became connected with the Perkins & Herpel Business 
College of St. Louis, Missouri. Subsequently he spent five years in Hartford, Connecticut, 
as a teacher in the Huntsinger Business College, and in 1904 he came to Denver, where 
he established a school at his present location, and something of the marvelous growth 
of the undertaking is indicated in the fact that he opened his school with but four pupils 
and today there is an annual enrollment of fifteen hundred students under the care of 
twenty-four teachers. The business has been organized and incorporated under the 
name of the Barnes Commercial School, of which Professor E. C. Barnes is the president, 
with H. E. Barnes as secretary and R. P. Barnes as vice president. The last named is 
also teacher of salesmanship and advertising. The school is splendidly equipped. There 
are eight adding machines and one hundred and sixty typewriters, together with every 
other facility to promote the work of pupils along business lines. He has an expert for 
penmanship engrossing. The work of the school has been thoroughly systematized and 
organized and each department turns out efficient pupils, qualified to take up responsible 
positions in the line of work for which they have been trained. 

In 1898 Professor Barnes was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Hart, of Brimfield, 
Ohio, a daughter of M. M. and C. H. Hart. Mr. and Mrs. Barnes have one son, Emory 
Hart, who was born in 1909. Professor Barnes is a Mason, belonging to Denver Lodge, 
No. 5, A. P. & A. M. His religious faith is evidenced in his membership in the Plymouth 
Congregational church, in which he is serving as deacon and in which he has been Sunday 
school superintendent. His political support is given to the republican party and he 
keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day but has never sought or 
desired office. Since 1908 he has been a member of the Chamber of Commerce and he 
is interested in all those plans and measures which work for the advancement of the 
community, the extension of its trade relations and the upholding of its civic standards. 
His career has been a notably successful one and his school fills a want in the business 
life of the community, turning out most capable people. Professor Barnes is a man 
of marked force and great executive ability, of attractive personality, and actuated at 
all times by Christian principles, his course ever measuring up to the highest standards 
of manhood and of citizenship. 



EMMET C. McANELLY. 

Emmet C. McAnelly is filling the position of postmaster of Fort Collins, to which 
office he was appointed in 1914. In other connections as well, however, he has con- 
tributed to the upbuilding of Fort Collins, his name being especially associated with 
the development of the waterworks system of the town. Any plan or project for the 
public good may count upon his aid and cooperation and his views and his labors are 
at once practical and progressive. 

Mr. McAnelly comes to Colorado from the middle west, his birth having occurred 
at Bowling Green, Indiana, on the 6th of September, 1875. He is the eldest son of Judge 
Jefferson McAnelly, who removed with his family to Loveland, Colorado, in 1881 and in 
1884 established his home in Fort Collins, at which time Emmet C. McAnelly was a 
youth of but nine years. He therefore at once entered the public schools and passed 
through consecutive grades to his graduation from the high school. He later matricu- 
lated in the Colorado Agricultural College, from which he was graduated with high 
honors on the completion of an engineering course. He has since done important work 
in the line of his chosen profession and following his graduation has acceptably served 
for several years as city engineer of Fort Collins, while for a number of terms he did 
equally acceptable work as county engineer or surveyor of Larimer county. He was 
instrumental in laying out and building the new waterworks system of Fort Collins, 
including the filtration plant and the storage system, giving to the city an abundant 



112 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

supply of pure water. He is thoroughly familiar with all the scientific phases underlying 
his work and what he has undertaken has been successfully accomplished by reason 
of the practical methods he has ever pursued. 

Mr. McAnelly gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and his loyalty 
thereto, combined with his fitness for the position, led to his appointment to the office 
of postmaster of Fort Collins in 1914. He has since served and has made a most courteous, 
obliging and efficient officer, while in all matters of citizenship he stands for progress, 
development and improvement. 



BULKELEY WELLS, A. B. 



Mining constituted the first potent force in Colorado's wonderful development and 
has remained a strong element in the growth and progress of the state through all the 
intervening years. With the passing of time splendid organization has been introduced 
into the development of the rich mineral resources of the state and controlling these 
interests are men of master minds and executive force whose labors have been most 
resultant. To this class belongs Bulkeley Wells, who is connected with many important 
mining companies of the west. He was born in Chicago, Illinois, March 10, 1872, a son 
of Samuel Edgar and Mary Agnes (Bulkeley) Wells. After pursuing a course in the 
Roxbury Latin school he attended Harvard University and won his A. B. degree upon 
graduation with the class of 1894. The following year was spent as a machinist with 
the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company of Manchester, New Hampshire, and in 1895 he 
entered the employ of the Boston & Albany Railroad Company of Boston, continuing in 
that connection until 1896. Since the latter year he has been interested in metal mining 
and during the intervening years has operated extensively over the United States and 
Mexico in connection with the construction and operation of hydro-electric power plants 
at various points in the west. Something of the extent and value of his services in the 
material development of the state and the utilization of its natural resources and his 
force as a factor in the upbuilding of various districts in the west is indicated in the 
fact that he is now the president of the Western Colorado Power Company, president of 
the First National Bank of Telluride and president and managing director of sixteen 
metal mining properties, operating from Alaska to Oklahoma, while the Utah Power & 
Light Company and the Denver Rock Drill Manufacturing Company number him as a 
representative of their directorates. Thus from point to point he has extended his efforts 
and investments, his business connections constantly broadening in scope and importance 
until his work is of the utmost value to the state and to the west at large. 

On the 16th of October, 1895, Mr. Wells was married to Miss Grace Daniels Livermore. 
a daughter of Colonel Thomas L. Livermore, of Boston, and they are now parents of two 
sons and two daughters: Bulkeley L., born July 15, 1896, now an ensign in the United 
States navy; Barbara, born April 10, 1898; Dorothy L., January 15, 1900; and Thomas L., 
August 14, 1902. 

Mr. Wells' military record covers service as captain of Troop A of the First Squad- 
ron of the Colorado National Guard from February, 1904, until 1905; as adjutant general 
from April, 1905, until 1907; as colonel on the governor's staff from 1907 until 
1909; as colonel of the First Cavalry Regiment of the National Guard of Colorado from 
June, 1917, until August 4, 1917, at which time he was placed on the retired list with 
the rank of brigadier general. He has served on the Colorado board of corrections but 
resigned in 1918. He is well known, too, in club circles from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 
having membership in the Alta Club of Salt Lake City; in the Sutter of Sacramento; 
the Pacific Union Club of San Francisco; the El Paso and Cheyenne Mountain Country 
Clubs of Colorado Springs; the Denver and the Denver Country Clubs of Denver; the 
Knickerbocker Club of New York; the Racquet and Tennis Club of New York; the Rocky 
Mountain Club of New York; and the Harvard Clubs of New York, Boston and Colorado. 

His record is the embodiment of those characteristics which in this country consti- 
tute what we call a square man. In a word, there has been nothing sinister and nothing 
to conceal in all of his career. Placing a correct valuation upon his talents, he has so 
directed his efforts that the utilization of opportunities has brought him to the fore, mak- 
ing him a dynamic force in mining circles and an influencing factor in relation to many 
important problems and conditions which have to do with the welfare and upbuilding of 
city and state. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, having attained the Knight 
Templar degree in the York Rite and the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite. He 
likewise belongs to the Mystic Shrine and is also a member of the Benevolent Protective 




BULKELEY WELLS 



1U HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Order of Elks. Moreover, he has membership relations with the American Institute of 
Mining Engineers, the American Academy of Political and Social Science, the Colorado 
Scientific Society, the Navy League of the United States, the American Mining Congress, 
the Colorado Metal Mining Association, the United States Cavalry Association, the 
United States Infantry Association and the Mining and Metallurgical Society of 
America. He finds recreation in polo, tennis, hunting and shooting. His religious faith 
is that of the Episcopal church and his political allegiance is given to the republican 
party. Colorado has been particularly fortunate in having among its great mine owners 
men to whom law and order in every nook and corner of the state is an essential to 
prosperity. Bulkeley Wells is possessed of rare courage, which, added to a keen sense 
of justice, is largely responsible for his success in dealing with great bodies of men. 



CHARLES A. MURRAY. 



The high standing of Charles A. Murray as a representative of the Denver bar is 
attested by the court reports, which give indication of the many favorable verdicts 
that he has won for his clients. He is a strong and forceful lawyer, well informed on 
all branches of jurisprudence, and for nearly thirty years he has been an active prac- 
titioner in the city in which he still makes his home. He was born in Geneseo. New 
York, March 27, 1851, a son of James and Anna M. (Miller) Murray, who were likewise 
natives of the Empire state. In 1859 they removed westward to Indiana, establishing 
their home at Cambridge City, where the senior Mr. Murray engaged in farming and 
stock buying but was permitted to enjoy his new home for only a brief period, his death 
occurring in that state in 1866. His widow long survived him and died in Denver, 
Colorado. 

Charles A. Murray of this review is the only surviving member of their family of 
four children. His youthful experiences wese those of the farmbred boy until he reached 
the age of eighteen years. During that period he was from the age of six a pupil in 
the district schools and later he attended the Fairview Academy and continued his edu- 
cation in the normal school at Lebanon, Ohio. He next pursued a four years' course in 
Asbury (now DePauw) University at Greencastle. Indiana, from which he was graduated 
in June. 1875, winning honors in philosophy. Taking up the profession of teaching, he 
was given charge of the high school at Connersville, Indiana, where he remained from 
the fall of 1875 until the summer of 1877. During this period he devoted the hours 
which are usually termed leisure to the study of law and on the 20th of June of the 
latter year was admitted to the bar. He has never ceased to feel the keenest interest in 
educational work and in 1879 and 1880 was a member and secretary of the Connersville 
school board. He was called upon for further service there on the 6th of May, 1884, 
in his election to the office of mayor upon the democratic ticket, being also supported 
by the reform movement in republican ranks. He gave to the city a businesslike and 
progressive administration characterized by needed reforms and improvements and his 
work received the endorsement of his fellow townsmen in large measure. 

Mr. Murray's identification with Denver dates from 1889. In that year he took up 
his abode in the city and has since been an active member of this bar. He entered into 
a partnership relation under the firm style of Stuart & Murray and the name figures 
prominently in connection with the reports of many of the most important cases tried 
in various courts of the state: Mr. Murray was the leading counsel for the defense in 
the Tuttle-Meenan murder trial at Akron, Colorado, in which the six cattle men on 
trial for murder were all acquitted, two of them by the supreme court — a signal victory 
for Mr. Murray. He was also counsel in the fifteen-year contest between A. M. Adams 
and the wife of Bishop Warren over one hundred and sixty acres of land within the city 
limits of Denver, valued at one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. The case was heard 
four times in the supreme court of Colorado and was eventually won by the Adams 
family, who were the clients of Mr. Murray. The firm of Stuart & Murray also con- 
ducted the litigation for the Denver Telephone Company vs. the Colorado Telephone Com- 
pany and the case involving two hundred thousand dollars' worth of mining property at 
Leadville between the Brown heirs and the Gordon-Tiger Mining Company. For twenty- 
nine years a member of the Denver bar, Mr. Murray throughout the greater part of 
this period has occupied a place in the front ranks of the profession. In no field of 
endeavor is there demanded a more careful preparation, a more thorough appreciation 
of the absolute ethics of life, or of the underlying principles which form the basis of 
all human rights and privileges. Unflagging application and intuitive wisdom and a 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 115 

determination to fully utilize the means at hand, are the concomitants which insure 
personal success and prestige in this great profession, which stands as the stern con- 
servator of justice. Possessing all the requisite qualities of the able lawyer, Mr. Murray 
has given his attention in almost undivided manner to law practice and as a lawyer 
is noted for his integrity as well as for his skill in the masterly handling of the causes 
which are entrusted to his care. 

On the 27th of October, 1879, in Connersville, Indiana, Mr. Murray was married to 
Miss Olive H. Hurst, a daughter of Elijah and Maria Hurst, of a prominent Indiana 
family. They have become parents of two children. The daughter, Marcia, born in 
Connersville, Indiana, is a graduate of the Denver high school and of the University 
of Denver and is now the wife of William A. Eikenberry, by whom she has three children: 
Ruth, Betty and William Murray. The son, Charles B. Murray, was born in Denver 
in 1892 and was educated at the University of Denver, the University of Iowa, and in 
the Culver Military Academy. Experience gained in the latter institution will prove of 
great benefit to him, for he has volunteered for aviation service in connection with the 
present war and is now a lieutenant in the government service. He married Miss Jean- 
nette Norine and has one child, Barbara Murray, born in April, 1917. He is a repre- 
sentative of that splendid class of young manhood, college bred, who have put behind 
them all personal interests and considerations in order to aid in fighting the battle of 
democracy overseas. 

Charles A. Murray is a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon college fraternity. He 
is greatly interested in community affairs and public welfare and he was one of the 
organizers of the Washington Park Men's Club, of which he served for four years as 
the president. He belongs to the Denver Bar Association and the Colorado State Bar 
Association and he and his wife are active members of the Washington Park Methodist 
Episcopal church, in which he is serving as a trustee. He has been an active worker 
in behalf of temperance and in the campaign of 1906 was chairman of the Anti-Saloon 
League of the fourteenth ward of Denver, which in connection with other wards of the 
city voted out the saloons. He greatly enjoys travel and with his family spent some 
time abroad in the year 1907. He has no business interests aside from his profession 
save that, in connection with his former law partner, Judge T. B. Stuart, and his uncle, 
DeWitt C. Miller, he owns Lake Eldora, one of the most beautiful resorts in the Rocky 
Mountains, offering an ideal summer home. Throughout his entire career he has been 
actuated by the spirit of Lincoln's words: "There is something better than making a 
living — making a life," and he has ever held to the highest standards of manhood and 
citizenship. 



HENRY W. AVERILL, M. D. 

Dr. Henry W. Averill, engaged successfully in the practice of medicine in Evans, 
Colorado, was born in Warren, Vermont, April 4, 1876, a son of Wilson A. and Ida M. 
(Wiley) Averill, both of whom were natives of the Green Mountain state. The father 
has been a farmer of Vermont throughout his entire life and is still cultivating his 
land although he has now reached the age of seventy-four years. 

No event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm life for Henry 
W. Averill in his boyhood and youth. He divided his time between the duties of the 
schoolroom, the pleasures of the playground and the work of the fields. After attend- 
ing the common schools he continued his education in a seminary of Montpelier. Ver- 
mont, from which he was graduated with the class of 1898. He determined upon a pro- 
fessional career and with broad literary learning to serve as a foundation upon which 
to build the superstructure of his professional knowledge he entered the University 
of Vermont at Burlington, where he pursued the study of medicine for two years. He 
then came to the west and completed his medical education in Denver, being graduated 
from the Denver Medical College with the class of 1907. He afterward practiced in 
Idaho Springs and at Eagle, Colorado, and also was located for a few years in Denver, 
but eventually sold his practice there and entered the State University of Illinois at 
Chicago, where he completed a course in medicine as a graduate of the class of 1913. 
He then returned to Colorado, settling at Evans, where he opened an office and has since 
followed his profession. He is thoroughly in touch with the latest scientific researches 
and discoveries that are of benefit to the profession and in his chosen calling he is dis- 
playing marked skill and ability. He is very conscientious in the performance of all 



116 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

of his professional duties, is most careful in his analysis and diagnosis of a case and 
his judgment is seldom if ever at fault in determining the outcome of disease. 

On the 30th of March. 1918, Dr. Averill was united in marriage to Miss Henrietta 
Alice Reed, a daughter of C. Henry and Artemisia (Johnston) Reed. Her father was 
born in Massachusetts in 1844 and her mother is a native of Iowa, now fifty-seven years 
of age. Mr. Reed was a hotel man of Iowa for many years and about 1904 he removed 
with his family to Evans, Colorado, where he conducted mercantile interests until his 
death, becoming one of the enterprising and progressive business men of the city. He 
died October 3, 1911. and is survived by his widow, who is now conducting the store 
with the assistance of her daughter, Mrs. Averill. to whom the success and development 
of the business is largely due. 

Dr. Averill is serving as health officer, a position which he has occupied for several 
years, and as county physician for this district. He belongs to the Colorado Medical 
Society and also to the Weld County Medical Society and the American Medical Associa- 
tion. The religious faith of Dr. and Mrs. Averill is that of the Methodist church and 
fraternally he is connected with the Masons and the Odd Fellows, while both he and his 
wife are identified with the Eastern Star. They are most highly esteemed in the com- 
munity where they reside and the hospitality of the best homes is freely accorded them, 
their many sterling traits of character winning for them warm friendship. 



HON. GREELEY W. WHITFORD. 

Hon. Greeley W. Whitford, whose judicial service and active practice as a member of 
the bar places him in the front rank among eminent lawyers and jurists of Denver, was 
born in Rockville, Parke county, Indiana, June 5, 1856. His father, John W. Whitford, 
was a native of the state of New York and was descended from an old Rhode Island fam- 
ily of English lineage that was founded in America by Pasco Whitford, who came to the 
United States in 1680 and settled in Rhode Island. The great-grandfather, George Whit- 
ford, was born in that state during its colonial days and served in the American army as 
a soldier of the Revolutionary war, valiantly fighting for the cause of independence. John 
W. Whitford was accorded liberal educational advantages, completing a course by gradu- 
ation from the Indiana Asbury University, now the De Pauw University, under the Rev. 
Bishop Simpson, D. D. He took up the profession of teaching in early life and afterward 
prepared for the bar and was admitted under the laws of that state. He held the degree 
of Bachelor and Master of Arts. He met with an accidental death at Rockviile, Indiana, 
in 1858, when but thirty-eight years of age. He was the first republican candidate for 
congress in his district and was a recognized leader in political as well as professional 
circles. A man of brilliant mental attainments, he was broad minded and progressive and 
became a natural leader of public thought and opinion in the community in which he lived. 
In early manhood he wedded Jane Harlan, a sister of Senator James Harlan of Iowa and 
distantly related to Justice Harlan of the United States supreme court. Her brother, 
James Harlan, was the first republican senator of Iowa and was a very prominent and in-, 
fluential resident of that state prior to the Civil war. His prominence is indicated in the 
fact that Iowa chose him as one of her most distinguished sons, placing his statue in the 
hall of fame in the capitol at Washington. He was a warm personal friend of Abraham 
Lincoln and was made secretary of the interior during President Lincoln's second admin- 
istration. In fact his appointment was the last made by the martyr president. He con- 
tinued to serve for one year under President Johnson, at the end of which time he resigned 
and returned to Iowa. Later he was reelected to the senate, in which he served for three 
terms. The family name of Harlan figures most conspicuously and honorably upon the 
pages of American history. The family was founded in the new world by George Harlan, 
who came from Ireland and took up his abode on American soil during the early part of 
the seventeenth century, establishing his home in Pennsylvania. Thus in both paternal and 
maternal lines Mr. Whitford comes of ancestry of which he has every reason to be proud. 
His mother, surviving her husband for many years, passed away in Loveland, Colorado, 
in 1889, at the age of sixty-six. By her marriage she had become the mother of five chil- 
dren, four sons and a daughter. 

Greeley W. Whitford. who was the fourth in order of birth, pursued his education in 
the common schools of Indiana to the age of fourteen years, when the family removed to 
Mount Pleasant, Iowa, where he completed his studies in the Iowa Wesleyan University, 
of which his uncle. Senator Harlan, had served as president until his election to the 
United States senate. He worked his way entirely through the university. As a boy of 




HON. GREELEY YV. WIIITFOKD 



118 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

twelve years lie started out to provide for his own support and was apprentieai to tele- 
printing trade, which he followed in young manhood for a period of five years. He also 
took up the profession of teaching. After completing his studies in the university he 
entered the law office of the firm of Ambler & Ambler at Mount Pleasant and afterward 
continued his reading with the firm of Kinkaid & Whitford of Mount Pleasant, the junior 
partner being his elder brother. He completed his studies in 1882 and then successfully 
passed the required examination for aamission to the bar. He practiced in Iowa for sev- 
eral months and then removed to Whatcom, now Bellinghani, Washington, where he de- 
voted his attention to the general practice of law until 1887. In that year he removed to 
Denver, where he arrived on the 4th of July. He was practically a stranger in the city, 
although a brother, Clay B. Whitford, and his sister, Mrs. Mary Harlan Leedham, were 
living at Loveland. He entered into partnership with his brother for the practice of law 
under the firm style of Whitford & Whitford, an association that was maintained for two 
years. He then became the third partner in the firm of Rogers, Shafroth & Whitford and 
was thus connected for two years, at the end of which time he withdrew and entered into 
partnership relations with Frederick A. Williams under the firm style of Williams & 
Whitford. In 1894 he was elected district attorney and served almost the entire term 
when he resigned to become United States attorney. It was in 1897, when Mr. Whitford was 
appointed to the office of United States attorney by President McKinley and he filled that 
position most acceptably for a term of four years. He then resumed the private practice 
of law in connection with his brother and Henry E. May, under the firm style of Whitford, 
Whitford & May. Two years later, however, he withdrew from the firm and resumed 
practice independently. In 1895 and 1896 because of his experience as district attorney 
and United States attorney he was called upon to assist in the investigation of ballot box 
stuffing and other corrupt political practices and filled the position of assistant district 
attorney and ten years later, or in 1906, he was elected to the office of district judge and 
served upon the bench for a term of six years. His course was marked by a masterly 
grasp of every problem presented for solution and by notable devotion to duty. He is 
systematic and methodical in habit, sober and discreet in judgment calm in temper, dili- 
gent in research, and these qualities enabled him to take high rank among those who 
have served on the district bench of the state. His decisions show a thorough mastery of 
the questions involved, a rare simplicity of style and an admirable terseness and clearness 
in the statement of the principles upon which the opinions rest During his connection 
with the bench he figured most prominently in connection with a number of Colorado's 
historic labor troubles, and as a result of his rulings, which were sustained by the higher 
courts, he prevented much bloodshed and disorder which would have followed had he not 
carried out the law as provided in the statutes. Some of his decisions which at the 
time were thought to be unfavorable to the workingmen have since proven the wisdom of 
his course and have received strong endorsement from the public as well as from the 
members of the bar.' He stood firmly for what he believed to be right and his course 
often caused him to be the victim of indignities. He was even threatened with impeach- 
ment by labor leaders and their followers, who held indignation meetings and marched en 
masse around the capitol, seeking public support and comfort from the citizens. Un- 
daunted by this course and by the threats which were aimed at him, Judge Whitford 
stood true to his honest convictions, never faltering in his allegiance to his oath of office 
nor to the high standards of the profession which has ever been regarded as the conserva- 
tor of public rights and liberty. He is a valued member of both the Denver Bar Associa- 
tion and the Colorado State Bar Association. 

On the 4th of June, 1890, Judge Whitford was married to Miss Ida Spaulding, a native 
of Mount Pleasant, Iowa, and a daughter of the Rev. W. J. Spaulding, a graduate of De 
Pauw University, Indiana, and a noted clergyman of Iowa. Her mother bore the maiden 
name of Martha Berry. The Spaulding family was founded in Massachusetts in pioneer 
times and the Berry family was influential in Indiana at an early day, Dr. Lucian 
W. Berry being at one time president of Asbury. now De Pauw, University of 
Indiana. He was a noted preacher and was the grandfather of Mrs. Whitford. To 
Judge and Mrs. Whitford have been born three children: Lieutenant Kent S. Whitford. 
who was born at Mount Pleasant. Iowa, and is now in the artillery at Camp Jackson. 
South Carolina; Ruth Edna, who is a graduate of the Denver University and a teacher in 
the high school at Raton, New Mexico; and Helen Jane, who was born in Denver, was 
graduated in May, 1918, from the University of Denver and is at home. 

In politics Judge Whitford has always been a stalwart republican and has been an 
active worker in support of the political principles in which he believes and also of pro- 
gressive civic interests, yet he has never allowed political opinions to in any way bias 
his professional activity. He belongs to Union Lodge, No. 7, A. P. & A. M., and has also 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 119 

taken the degrees of chapter and conimandery. His religious faith is indicated by his 
membership in the Warren Memorial Methodist church. Of those who have sat upon the 
bench or have filled the office of district attorney, the record of none has been more fault- 
less in honor, fearless in conduct or stainless in reputation. 



CLINTON G. HICKEY, M. D. 



Dr. Clinton G. Hickey, a man of marked efficiency in the medical profession, who 
is vice president and acting president of the state board of health of Colorado and an 
active and successful practitioner in Denver, was born in Nicholville, St. Lawrence 
county, New York, October 16, 1858, and is of Irish, English and Dutch descent on the 
paternal side. His paternal grandfather, William Hickey, was the founder of the family 
in the new world, crossing the Atlantic to Canada in the early part of the nineteenth 
century. George Hickey, father of Dr. Hickey, was born at Renfrew, Ontario, Canada, 
January 9, 1833, and spent his last days in Nicholville, New York, where he passed away 
in 1882, at the age of forty-nine years. He was a harness maker and saddler by trade 
and successfully conducted business along that line at Nicholville during the greater 
part of his life. He was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
a devout Christian man who, strongly opposed to the liquor traffic, was largely instru- 
mental in curbing the evils which grow out of the sale and use of intoxicants. He also 
stood for those things which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride and was a 
most valued and respected citizen of Nicholville as well as one of its enterprising and 
successful business men. He married Esther Lowry. a native of Waddington, St. Law- 
rence county, New York, and a representative of one of the old families of the Empire 
state, of lowland Scotch descent on the paternal side, while on the maternal side, through 
the Walbridge family, she was of English lineage. The Lowry family has been repre- 
sented on American soil since colonial days. Mrs. Hickey died in the year 1863, at the 
age of thirty-three, and Is survived hy three of her four children, one son, Clarence, 
having died in childhood. The others are Emma J., Clinton G. and Mina A. Hickey. 

At the usual age Dr. Hickey became a pupil in the public schools of Nicholville, 
New York, and afterward attended the State Normal School at Potsdam, New York, while 
subsequently he entered the Albany (N. Y.) Medical College, from which he was gradu- 
ated with the M. D. degree in 1884. He then entered upon the practice of his profession 
at Gaylordsville, in the Housatonic valley of Connecticut, where he remained for three 
and a half years, after which he returned to the Empire state, opening an office at Burden 
and becoming resident physician and surgeon for the Burden Ore & Iron Company. He 
continued to act in that capacity for four years and then resigned his position, after 
which he pursued a post-graduate course at the New York Polyclinic. Thus splendidly 
equipped by broad study and wide experience for professional activity, he came to the 
west, arriving in Denver in November, 1891. Here he entered upon the general practice 
of medicine, in which he has since continued, and his marked ability has won for him 
a liberal patronage. He belongs to the medical society of the city and county of Denver, 
to the Colorado State Medical Society, the American Medical Association, the Denver 
Clinical and Pathological Society and to the hospital staff of the Hospital of the City and 
County of Denver. He is also vice president and acting president of the Colorado 
state board of health, now serving his fourth year in that connection, in which he has 
done very important work, particularly in the dissemination of that knowledge which 
prevents the outbreak and spread of disease through an understanding of the laws of 
health. For fourteen years he was connected with the Denver Medical College on the 
dispensary staff and was also one of the lecturers of the school. 

On the 21st of January. 1885. Dr. Hickey was united in marriage in Nicholville, 
New York, to Miss Jennie Simonds, a native of that place and a daughter of Titus S. 
and Mary (Chandler) Simonds, both now deceased. The Chandlers were early settlers 
of Massachusetts, arriving in the new world from England soon after the arrival of 
the Mayflower at Plymouth. Dr. and Mrs. Hickey have become the parents of three 
daughters and a son, but two of the daughters died between the ages of four and six 
years. The elder. Ethelwyn, was in her sixth year at the time of her death. Muriel 
died at the age of four years and four months and there were only four days between 
their deaths. The son, Dr. Harold Lowry Hickey, born in Denver, November 15, 1892, 
was graduated in June, 1913. from the University of Denver and in June, 1917, from the 
Northwestern University Medical School of Chicago. He has both the degrees of Bachelor 
and Master of Arts from the University of Denver. As assistant surgeon with the rank 



120 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

of lieutenant he is now serving in the Reserve Naval Force of the United States. Dorothy, 
born February 17, 1895, is the wife of Robert E. Sherer, representative of an old Chicago 
family. They were married June 27, 1917. She was graduated from the University of 
Denver with the Bachelor of Arts degree. Mr. Sherer is a nephew of Dean Howell of 
the University of Denver, where he completed his education, winning the A. B. degree, 
and it was while they were students in that institution that Mr. and Mrs. Sherer became 
acquainted. They now reside at Alabaster. Michigan. 

The career of Dr. Hickey is an interesting one, as it shows the result of strong 
purpose and creditable endeavor. At the age of eighteen he took up the profession of 
teaching, which he followed for two years in the district schools and for a year was 
a teacher in one of the upper grades in the schools of Nicholville. As a result of his 
teaching he was able to repay his father for money advanced to him for his medical 
education. He has remained throughout the entire period of his professional career 
an earnest and discriminating student of everything that tends to bring to man the key 
to the complex mystery which we call life. His reading has been comprehensive and 
he keeps in touch with the latest scientific researches and discoveries, but important 
as is his life work, he has never concentrated his efforts and attention upon medical 
practice to the exclusion of all other interests. He is an active and valued member of 
the Grant Avenue Methodist Episcopal church and for years has been chairman of its 
official board and chairman of the finance committee for the past twenty-three years. He 
is perhaps most largely known in connection with his social welfare work. He served 
for two years on the City Federation of Social Welfare and as president of the Adult 
Blind Home Association. He is ever cooperating heartily with organized movements 
for the uplift of the individual and the advancement of community interests and is 
continually studying the grave political, economic and sociological problems which 
affect the welfare, happiness and progress of the race. His studies result in practical 
efforts for the amelioration of the hard conditions of life for the unfortunate and he is 
numbered among those men who are throwing around them much of life's sunshine. 



SAMUEL N. WOOD. 



The honorable career of Samuel N. Wood is indeed an enviable one. While he has 
figured prominently in business and in connection w-ith public affairs in Denver for 
many years, his course has at all times been actuated by the highest standards of right 
and justice, and while he has won a considerable fortune, he has also made for himself 
a most creditable name and his career proves that success and an honorable name may 
be won simultaneously. Mr. Wood was born in Jordan, New York, May 2, 1844, a son 
of Smith and Rhoda (Hungerford) Wood. The father was also a native of the Empire 
state and belonged to one of its old families of English lineage. The mother was born 
in New York and her people were also early settlers there. Mr. and Mrs. Wood became the 
parents of two children. 

Samuel N. Wood was educated in the academy at Jordan, New York, and when 
sixteen years of age started out to earn his own livelihood. He was first employed 
as a bank clerk in Syracuse, New York, where he remained for several years and then 
entered upon a correspondence with Kountze Brothers of Denver, which led in 1870 to 
his removal to this city. He became assistant cashier of the Colorado National Bank, 
owned by the Kountze brothers, and there continued for seven years. Upon resigning 
that position he removed to Deadwood, North Dakota, being among the first settlers of 
that place, and there he organized the First National Bank of Deadwood, of which he 
was cashier and the principal stockholder. He continued to reside in that city for three 
years, on the expiration of which period he sold the bank and returned to Denver, pur- 
chasing a controlling interest in the First National Bank, which was then located at 
the corner of Sixteenth and Larimer streets. He continued with the First National as 
its cashier for twenty years and largely formulated its policy and promoted its success. 
Since that time he has lived retired, enjoying a well earned rest. 

Mr. Wood was married in Denver on the 1st of September, 1903, to Miss Louella 
Frisell, a native of Missouri and a daughter of Dr. Frisell, of Butler, that state. 

In his political views Mr. Wood has always been a republican and has served as 
president of the board of public works. During his term of office he was instrumental 
in securing the building of the Fourteenth Street viaduct and also a large amount of 
street building and paving. He is a member of a number of the most important clubs 
of Denver, including the Denver Club and the Denver Athletic Club, and he belongs 



122 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

also to the Chicago Club and to the Union League Club of New York, with which he has 
been identified for the past thirty-one years. His religious faith is that of the Episcopal 
church and its teachings have guided him in all of the relations of life, making him a 
man whom to know is to esteem and honor. He has now passed the seventy-fourth 
milestone on life's journey and his entire career has commended him to the confidence 
and goodwill of those with whom he has been associated. 



ROBERT H. NELSON, Jb. 



Robert H. Nelson, Jr., who was formerly the owner of the Jordan Garage in 
Pueblo, is now associated with the Crouch Brothers Grocery Company. He was born 
in New York city on the 12th of April, 1871, and is a son of Robert H. and Florence 
(Brombrush) Nelson. The family remained in the east until 1881. The previous year 
the father had come to the west and, after making preparations for his wife and chil- 
dren in Denver, was joined by them the following year. He there engaged in clerical 
work and both he and his wife are still residents of that city. 

Mr. Nelson of this review pursued his education in the public schools and in the 
West Denver high school but at an early age started out in the business world on his 
o>vn account, so that many of his most valuable life's lessons were learned in the 
school of experience. With his entrance into the business world he was identified 
with various mercantile interests and in January, 1916, he located in Pueblo. He had 
been engaged in the grocery trade at Penrose but sold his interests there after remov- 
ing his stock to Pueblo. He was also a partner in the Santa Fe Trail Garage but 
disposed of his interest in that business and purchased the Jordan Garage on the 
loth of December, 1917. This he conducted successfully for six months, handling 
the Mitchell car, doing all kinds of repair work and also dealing in automobile tires 
and accessories. On the 1st of June, 191S, he disposed of his interests in this con- 
nection and has since been associated with the Crouch Brothers Grocery Company, of 
which he is a valued and able representative. 

Mr. Nelson was married on the 9th of April, 1901, to Miss Maud Keys and they 
have made many friends during the period of their residence in Pueblo. His politi- 
cal allegiance is given to the democratic party but he does not seek or desire office 
as a reward for party fealty. Fraternally he is well known as a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and the Woodmen of the World. He belongs to the Commerce Club and 
to the Auto Trades Association and he is interested in all those forces that serve to 
advance the business welfare and promote the trade relations of his adopted city. In 
his own career he has made steady progress and his record is a most commendable 



john McGregor. 



John McGregor, general agent for Colorado of the Massachusetts Mutual Life 
Insurance Company with offices in Denver, exemplifies in his life many of the sterling 
characteristics of the Scotch race. He is a native son of the land of hills and heather, 
his birth having occurred in Beauly, Scotland, on the 20th of February, 1868, his 
parents being James and Isabella (McDonald) McGregor, who remained residents 
of their native land. The father in early life engaged in farming and for many years 
devoted his energies to the work of tilling the soil. He died in Scotland In March, 
1869, and is still survived by his widow, who is now eighty years of age. They had a 
family of four children, two of whom are deceased, while Duncan McGregor resides in 
England. 

John McGregor was a pupil in the public schools of Scotland and also attended 
the Dumfries Commercial College and Aberdeen College, from which he was in due 
time graduated. He then was employed in the postal service of the British govern- 
ment, in which connection he continued for several years prior to his emigration to 
the new world. At length he resigned in order to become a resident of America and 
made his way to Denver, where he arrived on the 23d of November, 1889. Later he 
was employed along various lines until he could secure a financial foothold. He en- 
tered the services of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad and in that connection worked 
in the offices of the auditor and treasurer, continuing with the road for three years. 
He then decided to embark in other lines of business and after looking over the field 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 123 

determined to give his attention to the insurance business. In 1892 he became cash- 
ier of the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company in the office at Denver and filled that 
position most efficiently for a number of years. He resigned, however, in 1902 to 
accept the general agency of the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company for 
the state of Colorado. He is considered by those who are capable of judging to be 
one of the most progressive and best qualified insurance men in the west today and 
his business is one of growing importance. It has already reached very substantial 
proportions and his well organized force is daily contributing to its continued growth. 

On the 23d of November, 1892, Mr. McGregor was married in Denver to Miss 
Mary A. Stall, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Stall of Newport, Kentucky. They 
are now parents of three children. Flora Bella, born in 1893 in Denver, is a graduate 
of St. Mary's Academy and attended Sinsinawa Academy in Wisconsin. Mary Eliza- 
beth, born in Denver in July, 1900, is attending the Loretta Heights School. Robert 
Bruce, born in Denver in June, 1909, is a pupil in the graded schools of the city. 

Mr. McGregor maintains an independent political course. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and he has attained the fourth 
degree in the Knights of Columbus. He is likewise a member of the Caledonian So- 
ciety and of the Life Underwriters' Association. He has never had occasion to regrei 
his determination to come to the new world, for here he has found the opportunities 
which he sought and in their utilization has made steady progress, being today at 
the head of a very substantial business, which has been thoroughly organized and 
built up through his indefatigable effort, enterprise and laudable ambition. 



HON. ROBERT E. WINBOURN. 

Hon. Robert E. Winbourn, a member of the Colorado bar, practicing at Greeley, 
was born in Weld county, near where Peckham now stands, on the 2d of July, 1882, a 
son of Thomas C. and Emma J. (Jackson) Winbourn, the former a native of Ala- 
bama, while the latter was born in Petersburg, Virginia. The father came to Colo- 
rado with his parents in 1863, the family home being established on the Platte river 
at Fort Lupton. The mother came to this state when a young maiden, in 1872, the 
Jackson home being established in connection with the Green City colony. Her 
father took up land and devoted his attention to ranching and to the raising of 
horses. Thomas C. Winbourn also devoted his attention to ranching and live stock 
interests and was thus busily and actively engaged until about 1908, when he retired 
and now resides at Fort Lupton, Colorado. He has been a very prominent and influ- 
ential citizen of his community. He was the first mayor of Fort Lupton, which town 
his father had incorporated, and through all the intervening years the family has 
been actively associated with its development and progress. The death of Mrs. Thomas 
C. Winbourn occurred at Fort Lupton, March 15, 1916. 

Hon. Robert E. Winbourn of this review was reared and educated in this state. 
He attended the Greeley high school and for a short time was a student in the Den- 
ver University Law School, after which he entered the George Washington Univer- 
sity at Washington, D. C. In 1908 he was graduated from the law department of 
the last nanied institution and afterward acted as private secretary to Hon. Robert 
W. Bonynge, who was for four years congressman from Denver. He later spent one 
year as prosecutor for the government on public land frauds and in 1910 he began the 
practice of law- in Greeley, where he has since remained. In the intervening period 
or eight years he has won for himself a very creditable position at the bar of Weld 
cuunty, his persuasive eloquence, the logic of his arguments and the strength of his 
position being potent factors in winning notable success. He is faithful to his cli- 
ents, fair to his adversaries and candid to the court, and in the trial of various cases 
which he has handled he has exhibited the possession of every faculty of which a 
lawyer may be proud — skill in presentation of his own evidence, extraordinary abil- 
ity in cross-examination, persuasiveness before the jury, strong grasp of every fea- 
ture of the case and ability to secure favorable rulings from the judge, combined with 
unusual familiarity with human nature and untiring industry. For two years he 
filled the office of county attorney of Weld county. He has also been called upon for 
oiher public service, acting for one term as a member of the state senate to fill a 
vacancy in that body. Aside from his profession he is interested in farming in Weld 
county and is the owner of a ranch. 

On the 28th of November, 1913, Mr. Winbourn was married to Miss Catherine 
Kehl, of Savannah, Illinois. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias, 



124 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Masonic lodge. Politically he has 
always been a republican. He stands tor all those forces which work for the uplift 
ot the individual and the betterment of the community at large and is a progressive, 
public-spirited citizen whose activities in behalf of Weld county have been farreaching 
and resultant. 



JUDGE TULLY SCOTT. 



Judge Tully Scott, associate justice of the supreme court of Colorado and a resident 
of Denver, was born July 12, 1857, in St. Paris, Ohio, a son of David and Mary J. 
(Lippincott) Scott. His grandfather in the paternal line was Tully Scott, a native of 
South Carolina and of Scotch descent. He became an early resident of Kentucky, where 
his father, David Scott, had received a grant of land. He afterward removed to Ohio. 
David Scott, the great-grandfather, served his country as a soldier in the Revolutionary 
war and for his services received this grant. Henry Clay Scott, a brother of the father 
of Judge Scott, was killed at Kenesaw Mountain while serving as a soldier in the Civil 
war. In the family of Tully Scott, Sr., were four sons, including the Rev. David Scott, 
father of Tully Scott of this review. He, too, was a Civil war soldier, holding the rank of 
first lieutenant in General Garfield's regiment — the Forty-second Ohio Infantry. He re- 
signed a pastorate to enter the service of the country in defense of the Union and assisted 
Garfield in raising his regiment, but after eleven months' service he had to resign on 
account of ill health. He was a Baptist minister and devoted the greater part of his life 
to the task of teaching the gospel. He married Mary J. Lippincott, a daughter of Henry 
Lippincott and a representative of the old Lippincott family of Pennsylvania. Her 
father was the founder of the town of Lima, Ohio, and she was the first white child born 
in Allen county. Her mother's brother, William Wood, was General Harrison's chief of 
scouts and was at the battle of Tippecanoe. It was in the year 1874 that Rev. David 
Scott removed with his family to Mitchell county, Kansas, where he took up a homestead 
and followed farming in connection with his work in the ministry. Much of the labor 
of the fields, however, was performed by his son Tully, while the father devoted his 
attention to pastoral service. To him and his wife were born nine' children, only three 
of whom are now living: Judge Scott, of this review; David, who is a resident of 
Kerman, California; and Lochiel W., who is a prominent merchandise broker of Kansas 
City, Missouri. 

Judge Scott was the eldest of the family of nine children and was a youth of sixteen 
years when his parents removed to Kansas, where for some time he concentrated his 
efforts and attention upon the development of the homestead. He taught school in 
the winter months and thus was able to meet the expenses of his college work and 
professional training. For a time he engaged in freighting between Waterville and Beloit, 
Kansas, a distance of one hundred miles, prior to the building of railroads in that section 
of the country. He took up the study of law under the direction of the firm of Cooper 
Brothers, of Beloit, Kansas, and had studied in the Kansas State Agricultural College. In 
1880 he was admitted to practice at the Kansas bar and opened an office in Beloit. Later 
he was appointed receiver of public moneys at Oherlin, Kansas, by President Cleveland 
and occupied that position from 1885 until 1889. He removed to Cripple Creek, Colorado, 
in 1901 and since that time has figured prominently in connection with public affairs and 
legal interests in the state. He was always accorded a large and distinctively representa- 
tive clientage and his marked ability ultimately won for him high judicial honors. In 
the meantime he became associated with legislative work in Colorado, having been 
elected a member of the state senate, in which he served from 1907 until 1911. In the 
latter year he was appointed presiding judge of the Colorado court of appeals and served 
for two years, while in 1913 he was elected associate justice of the supreme court of 
Colorado and has since occupied a place upon the bench, proving himself the peer of the 
ablest members who have sat in this court of last resort. 

Judge Scott has been married twice. On the 15th of July, 1885, he wedded Miss 
Emma J. Kempthorme, a native of Beloit, Kansas, and a daughter of James and Jane 
(Thompson) Kempthorme, of that place. Mrs. Scott passed away at Oberlin, Kansas, 
in 1888, leaving a son, Kempthorme Scott, who is now in the naval service of the gov- 
ernment as an instructor, having served for four years prior to the outbreak of the war 
against the central powers. In 1891 Judge Scott was again married, his second union 
being celebrated at Pana, Illinois, when Miss Harriet I. Hunter became his wife. She is a 
native of that state and a daughter of John W. and Martha (Vermillion) Hunter, who 
were very early settlers of Illinois. To this marriage has been born a daughter, Mira, 




JUDGE TTLLY SCOTT 



126 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

now the wife of Dr. Lorenz W. Frank, a prominent physician of Denver; and a son, 
Jack Garrett, a graduate of Colorado State University and now also in the naval service 
of his country. 

Judge Scott was long a prominent figure in political circles in Kansas and served 
as a member of the state central committee. He is a Mason, belonging to the Knight 
Templar commandery and the Mystic Shrine, is also connected with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks and with the Knights of Pythias. In the last named he has 
served as grand chancellor in Kansas and was a member of the supreme lodge 
of Knights of Pythias for six years, while for a decade he served as a mem- 
ber of the supreme tribunal and otherwise has been very active in that order and in 
Masonic circles as well. His efforts and attention, however, have largely been con- 
centrated upon professional interests and duties, and his logical grasp of facts and 
principles of the law applicable to them has been a potent element in his success. His 
career is characterized by a masterful hold of every problem presented for solution. 



CHARLES B. GRIFFITH. 



Charles B. Griffith is one of the enterprising young business men of Denver who 
has already made for himself a creditable position in financial circles, having a large 
clientele as an investment broker. He was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, June 30, 
1893. His father, Charles D. Griffith, was for many years a shoe manufacturer but 
is now living retired in his native city of Terre Haute. He has figured quite promi- 
nently in trade circles and was president of the Manufacturers' Association there. He 
was also one of the founders of the Traffic Club and a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce. In political affairs, too, he has exerted considerable influence and from 
1901 until 1903 he represented his district in the state senate of Indiana, having been 
elected on the democratic ticket. Fraternally he is a Knight Templar Mason and in 
his life has exemplified the beneficent spirit of the craft. He married Jessie Barrick, 
who also survives, and they have reared a family of three children, Grace, Helen and 
Charles B., all of Denver. 

Charles B. Griffith pursued his education in the schools of Denver, in the Culver 
Military Academy of Culver, Indiana, and in the Lawrenceville School at Lawrence- 
vllle, New Jersey, following which he entered the University of Colorado, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1915. He made his initial step in the business 
world by entering the bond department of the International Trust Company, with which 
he remained for a year and a half, after which he became associated with the bond 
house of Gregg, Whitehead & Company. He has become well known as a bond broker 
of the city, recognized as a young man of marked energy and enterprise, and he is 
rapidly building up a most desirable clientage. 

In June, 1917, Mr. Griffith was united in marriage to Miss "Virginia McCrea, of 
Denver. He belongs to the chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon in connection with the 
University of Colorado. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party and 
his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Christian Science church. He 
turns to literature for recreation and recognizes the fact that there is no keener joy in 
life than that which comes through intellectual stimulus. Western business enter- 
prise finds in him a worthy exponent and that which he has already achieved in finan- 
cial circles foreshadows the possibilities of the future. 



EARL T. SNYDER. 



* 



Among the younger attorneys of Greeley is Earl T. Snyder, who for about seven 
Jteen established in this city. He has been connected with a number of 
id important cases and has well demonstrated his ability to cope with 
problems. It is therefore but natural that his practice has increased 
'to year and today he enjoys a gratifying income from his professional 
was born September 29, 1885, at Greensburg, Pennsylvania, his parents 
being Dr. Z. X. and Margaret E. (Smith) Snyder, the former a native of Pennsylva- 
nia and the latter of Indiana. For a number of years the father was engaged in the 
hardware business in Greensburg and later became superintendent of schools of that 
city and also of the schools of Reading, Pennsylvania. He subsequently was president 
of the State Normal School at Indiana, Pennsylvania, but prior to this served as 




HISTORY OF COLORADO 127 

superintendent of public instruction for that state. It is therefore evident that his 
qualifications as an educator have been very high. In 1891 he came to Greeley, Colo- 
rado, having accepted the position of president of the State Teachers' College. In 
fact, it was he who was responsible for the establishment of this important school. 
At first instruction was given in a small rented building, but through his indefatigable 
energy he built up the institution to what it is today, one of the largest of its kind in 
the country, which has two thousand students. Mr. Snyder remained as president of this 
great school until called to his last reward, his death occurring November 11, 1915, when 
he had reached the age of sixty-five years. His widow survives. 

Earl T. Snyder was reared under the parental roof and received his education in 
Greeley, being about six years of age when his parents took up their residence here. 
He graduated from the State Teachers' College in 1904 and then entered the State 
University, graduating from the liberal arts department in 1907. Upon this prelim- 
inary literary education he built his professional learning, entering the law 
department of the State University in 1909 and graduating in 1911. He then came 
back to Greeley and here he has ever since been engaged in law practice. He started 
out in partnership with H. F. Bonnell, so continuing for some time, but Mr. Bonnell 
is now located at Loveland, Colorado. As Mr. Snyder became better known many 
important cases of litigation were entrusted to him and he has built up a reputation 
as a man who goes through with his cases. He demands the entire confidence of his 
clients, but he also merits that -confidence and makes the interests entrusted to him 
his own. He is eloquent in court, a quick, logical thinker, and readily makes his 
point before court and jury. He prepares his cases well and is ever ready to meet his 
antagonist. He is learned in the law and has been very successful in the application 
of precedents to cases which he has handled. In short, he achieves results and the 
public has come to know that he gives his best in order to uphold his client, yet he 
always enjoys the highest regard of his colleagues, as he holds to the highest stand- 
ards of professional ethics. 

On the 17th of September, 1913, Mr. Snyder was united in marriage to Miss Cora 
C. Broman and they have become the parents of two children. 

Mr. Snyder is a republican in politics and upholds the principles of that party. 
He belongs to the Masonic order and is a member of Occidental Lodge, No. 20, A. P. 
& A. M. His father was also a member of this order, having held very high office in 
the same. He belonged to the Denver Shrine and also to the Scottish Rite and was 
in possession of the honorary thirty-third degree, which was bestowed upon him in 
Washington, D. C. Mr. Snyder maintains his law office at Suite 313-14 Opera House 
building, and the family residence is located at No. 1730 Seventh avenue, Greeley. 
Both he and his wife are popular in the younger set of the city and their hospitable 
home is often the meeting place of their many friends. 



JOHN A. EWING. 



John A. Ewing, attorney at law, prominently known in professional connections 
in both Denver and Leadville, maintaining his summer home and an office in the 
latter city, was born in Kittanning, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, March 26, 1857, 
his parents being James H. and Eleanor (Rhea) Ewing, both of whom were natives of 
the Keystone state and were descendants of old American families, whose ancestors 
came from the north of Ireland and settled in Pennsylvania during the early part of 
the eighteenth century. James H. Ewing was a successful farmer and merchant, hav- 
ing conducted mercantile interests in Kittanning for many years. 

John A. Ewing was educated in the common schools of his native city and in 
the Saltsburg Academy, after which he attended the Indiana Normal School and 
also pursued a special course under private tutorship. Having determined upon 
the practice of law as a life work, he directed his reading and study in that direction 
and was admitted to the bar at Indiana, Pennsylvania, in 1880. Two years after- 
ward he determined to try his fortune in the west and removed to Colorado, settling 
first in Leadville, where he has since maintained an office. However, in 1903 he 
established an office in Denver, where his family is located, and during the years of 
his practice he has specialized largely in mining and corporation law, being particularly 
proficient along those lines. In fact, he has won a place among the leading attorneys 
of the state and his clientage is large and of a distinctively representative character, 
while colleagues and contemporaries attest his worth in the profession and his marked 
devotion to its highest standards of ethics. 



128 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

In 1898 Mr. Ewing was united in marriage to Miss Georgia M. White, a daughter of 
the late George G. White, of Leadville, who was a member of the Colorado constitutional 
convention from Jefferson county. Mr. and Mrs. Ewing have one child, Eleanor 
Eileen. Fraternally Mr. Ewing is connected with the Masons as a member of the 
lodge and chapter and in his life exemplifies the beneficent spirit of the craft, which 
is based upon a recognition of the brotherhood of mankind and the obligations thereby 
imposed. He has never had occasion to regret his determination to come to the west, 
for here he found the opportunities which he sought — opportunities which are con- 
stantly broadening with the rapid growth of this section of the country. With ability 
to utilize such opportunities, he has made steady professional advancement and is 
today regarded as one of the foremost representatives of the Denver bar. 



EDWARD D. QUIGLEY. 



Edward D. Quigley is a prominent mining man and early pioneer of Colorado, widely 
known in the state, so that his history cannot fail to prove of interest to the general 
public. He was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, May 15, 1843, a son of Michael ana 
Julia (Donohue) Quigley, who in 1849 came to the United States, crossing the ocean on 
the sailing ship Bodecia, which was nearly three months on the voyage, and settling at 
Jamestown, New York, where the family resided until 1856. They then removed west- 
ward to Wabasha county. Minnesota, where the father engaged in farming. 

Edward D. Quigley was the second child born to his parents. In early life he attended 
school in New York for a few months and afterward became a pupil in a country school 
of Minnesota. He was a youth of eighteen years when the Civil war broke out, and in 
1861 he responded to the call of his adopted country for aid. enlisting in the Third Minne- 
sota Volunteer Infantry under the command of Colonel Henry C. Lester. He remained 
at the front for three years and two months and participated in many prominent battles 
of the Civil war, including the engagements at Port Donelson, Willow Springs and Mur- 
freesboro. In the last named he was taken prisoner, and following his parole he returned 
to Minnesota, where he took a prominent part in the Indian campaign, the red skins 
having massacred many of the early settlers, destroyed much property, and had stolen 
and driven away the stock. They had also captured far over a hundred women and chil- 
dren, and the latter were taken along by the ruthless band and held captives while the 
Indians fought the soldiers at Woods Lake and Camp Release. At length the Indians 
gave up the fight, after many had been killed and wounded. About five hundred 
Indians were taken prisoner and one hundred and fifty women and children were 
then released. This put an end to the Indian outrages in that period and locality. 

In 1865 Mr. Quigley removed to Colorado and homesteaded on the land where the 
city of Greeley now stands. After he had perfected his title to the claim he sold the land 
for thirty-eight hundred dollars to Colonel Greeley, who laid out the present city. Mr. 
Quigley then went to Golden. Colorado, where he became deputy sheriff, and made many 
sensational arrests while discharging the duties of that position. He was very prompt 
and fearless and succeeded in apprehending many criminals of that district. In 1867 he 
went to Central City, where he conducted a wholesale flour and feed business, and there 
he remained until 1870, when he came to Denver and engaged in the real estate and land 
business. He devoted a decade to that undertaking, and in 1880 he erected the Granger 
flour mill, which he operated until 1882. He was deputy sheriff of Denver at the time 
Judge Elliott was on the bench. He afterward returned to Central City, Colorado, where 
he had some valuable mining property, and later he went to Idaho Springs, where he 
developed the famous Brighton mine, also the Bellman mine, and last but not least, he 
became president of the Hoosic Tunnel & Mining Company, in which he still owns the 
greater amount of the stock. He is still conducting extensive operations under that 
name, and he is likewise engaged in the real estate and loan business. He owns a number 
of valuable mining properties in Colorado, and his investments have been most judiciously 
and wisely placed. 

He resides at No. 1275 Lincoln street, in Denver, and the years have brought to him 
a measure of success that enables him to enjoy all of life's comforts and many of its 
luxuries. There is scarcely anyone living in the city today who is more familiar with 
the history of pioneer progress and development in Colorado than Mr. Quigley. In fact, 
his is a notable career, in which have occurred many thrilling incidents. The story of 
the Civil war is a familiar one to him. from his active experience on southern battle- 
fields. Enlisting when but eighteen years of age. he loyally did his duty until captured 
and paroled. He then aided in the protection of the settlers against Indian outrage and 




EDWARD D. QTJIGLEY 



130 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

depredation, after which he heard and heeded the call of the west, hesitating not before 
the privations and hardships of pioneer life in Colorado. He now is a member of Lincoln 
Post, Grand Army of the Republic. He is thoroughly familiar with everything that has 
gone to make up the mining history of the state, and he has been connected with many 
projects and enterprises which have been of .the utmost value in the development and 
upbuilding of the commonwealth. 



FRED G. CARPENTER. 



Fred G. Carpenter, son of LeRoy S. and Martha A. (Bennett) Carpenter, whose 
interesting life record is given on other pages of this work, is a well known representa- 
tive of agricultural ' interests in Weld county, living on section 30, township 6, range 
65, not far from Greeley. He is a native son of the county in which he still makes his 
home, his birth having occurred on the 15th of August, 1S81. He was reared in 
Colorado and after pursuing his early education in the district schools of Weld county 
continued his studies in the Greeley schools. He remained under the parental roof 
until he had attained his majority and then went to the state of Washington, where 
he remained for six months, after which he returned to Colorado and took up a home- 
stead near Barnesville. He proved up on the property in January, 1911, and still 
owns the place but has rented it since. In 1911 he returned to the old homestead 
and leased it, since which time he has given his attention to its further development 
and improvement. He has erected a nice bungalow upon the place and has a pleasant 
and attractive home, while concentrating his efforts and attention upon the cultivation 
of the crops best adapted to soil and climate. The farm is pleasantly and conveniently 
located near Greeley. 

On the 11th of September, 1917, Mr. Carpenter was married to Miss Fern Taylor, 
a daughter of Joseph E. and Flora (Knowlton) Taylor. The father is an engineer on 
the Chicago & Great Western Railroad in Iowa and the mother is now living in 
Greeley. Mr. Carpenter is a republican in his political views, while his religious faith 
is that of the Methodist Episcopal church. The sterling traits of his character are such 
as commend him to the confidence and goodwill of those with whom he has been 
brought in contact and he has a large circle of warm friends in this part of the state. 



HORACE N. HAWKINS. 



For a quarter of a century Horace N. Hawkins has engaged in the active practice 
of law at the Denver bar and is accounted one of the foremost representatives of the 
profession in this city. Thorough preliminary training and wide experience have made 
him most capable in handling intricate legal problems and from the outset of his career 
he has ever recognized the necessity for thorough preparation as well as the strong 
presentation of his cause before the court. A native of Tennessee, Mr. Hawkins was 
born in Dickson county, February 19, 1S67, his parents being Ashton W. and Sarah 
(May) Hawkins. The father was a native of Kentucky and of English descent. He 
became a member of the medical profession and engaged in practice for many years. His 
wife was born in Tennessee and both passed away in that state. 

Horace N. Hawkins acquired his preliminary education in the public schools of 
Huntington, Tennessee, and afterward entered Vanderbilt University, where he won the 
LL. B. degree, being graduated from that Nashville institution with the class of 1893. 
He was one of a family of six children, having three sisters and two brothers, namely: 
W. A., who is now a practicing attorney of El Paso, Texas; J. M., who is engaged in 
newspaper publication in San Diego, California; Mrs. G. G. Buford, living in Memphis, 
Tennessee; Mrs. C. A. Waterfield, a resident of Brownsville, Tennessee; and Mrs. J. D. 
Luten, whose home is in Waverly, Tennessee. 

As a member of this household Horace N. Hawkins spent the days of his boyhood 
and youth and entered upon the study of law at Huntington, Tennessee, being admitted 
to the bar in 1888. He was not content, however, with the training that he had already 
received and it was subsequent to this time that he entered Vanderbilt University, where 
he pursued a further course in law, which he completed, as previously stated, by gradua- 
tion with the class of 1893. The same year he sought the opportunities of the west, 
making his way to Denver, where he entered the law office of Thomas N. Patterson. 
who was afterward United States senator from Colorado. In 1895 Senator Patterson 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 131 

admitted him to a partnership and the third member of the firm was Edmund P. Richard- 
son. This association was maintained for a decade, at the end of which time Senator 
Patterson retired from the active practice of law and the firm of Richardson & Hawkins 
was then formed, maintaining a continuous existence until the death of the senior 
partner in 1911, since which time Mr. Hawkins has practiced alone. He is a strong 
and able lawyer, forceful and resourceful in the presentation of his cause and seldom 
at fault in the application of a legal principle. He is impressive in his utterances before 
the jury, always shows to the court that studied deference which is its due and while 
he gives to his clients the benefit of marked ability and unwearied service, he never for- 
gets that there are certain things due to the court, to his own self-respect and above all 
to justice and a righteous administration of the law which neither the zeal of an advocate 
nor the pleasure of success permit him to disregard. 

In 1896 Mr. Hawkins was united in marriage to Miss Prances Rubin, of Nashville. 
Tennessee, who passed away in 1912, leaving five children: Mary O'Neil, now twenty 
years of age, and Margaret, eighteen years of age, both students in Bryn Mawr College; 
Frances, fifteen years of age; Horace N., who is attending military school, and Agnes, 
aged respectively fourteen and eleven years. 

Mr. Hawkins is a member of the Denver Athletic Club, also of the Democratic Club, 
and of Phi Delta Theta, Alpha Chapter of Tennessee. His religious faith is indicated by 
his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, South. Along the strict path of 
his profession he is identified with the Denver City and County Bar Association, the 
Colorado State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. He was a member 
of the Colorado civil service board in 1909 and 1910, was a member of the Colorado state 
bar examining board in 1911 and 1912, and in 1909 he served as president of the Denver 
Bar Association. He has an impressive manner and marked ability and his professional 
attainments have placed his name high on the list of the prominent representatives of 
the Denver bar. 



ROBERT WILLIAM COMER. 



Robert William Comer is a valued and representative resident of Weld county, 
where for many years he has devoted his energies to general agricultural pursuits. It 
was reading American history that awakened in him the desire to become a resident 
of the United States. He was born in Gloucester. England, July 9, 1857. and is a son 
of William and Sarah Comer, who were likewise natives of Gloucestershire. The father 
was a prominent farmer who had five hundred acres of land. He engaged extensively in 
the dairy business and in the handling of shorthorn cattle and won many prizes with his 
herds. He specialized in the training of young men in progressive and scientific farm- 
ing and many came to him for instruction in that work. He died when in the prime of 
life, leaving a large family of twelve children. His wife was also deeply interested in 
progressive farming and was of much assistance to her husband. She attained a very 
advanced age, passing away in her eighty-sixth year, her remains being interred in 
Gloucestershire. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. William Comer were six sons and six 
daughters: Benjamin, Robert W., Frederick. George, Edward, Ernest, Mary, Fanny, Kate, 
Elizabeth, Annie and Agnes. Of these Edward died in 1908 while Fanny passed away 
in 1906. 

Robert William Comer of this review was a pupil in public and boarding schools 
of his native country and after his textbooks were put aside he turned his attention 
to the bakery business, which he followed for a few years. But the desire to come to 
the United States was aroused in him by his reading of American history and he made 
arrangements to leave his native land. After severing home ties he sailed for New 
York city, where he remained for a year and then went to Detroit. Michigan, where he 
occupied the responsible position of yardmaster with the Wagner Sleeping Car Company 
for six years. On the expiration of that period he came to Colorado, arriving in Greeley 
in April, 1886. Here he turned his attention to farming, at first owning a tract of sixty- 
five acres on what is now Ninth street in Greeley, being in the very heart of the city. In 
the intervening years he has carried on general farming and has prospered as time 
has passed by. He is today the owner of eighty acres of valuable laud which he has 
rented and he also owns land in Canada. 

Before leaving England, Mr. Comer was married in the Episcopal church in Gloucester. 
England, on the 9th of November, 1880. to Miss Hannah Stevens, a daughter of William 
Stevens, who was a shoe manufacturer of Gloucester. Mr. and Mrs. Comer have become 



132 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the parents of six children, but their son, Charles Gillette, was killed in a snowslide 
when twenty years of age. He had been married only six weeks at that time. He was 
an electrician and was regarded as exceptionally brilliant in his profession, displaying 
expert knowledge and skill along that line of business. His professional ability and his 
personal worth made his death the occasion of deep and widespread regret. Edith 
Mary, the eldest of the family, thirty-three years of age, became the wife of Ervin Funk, 
a farmer of Greeley, who died in Burlington in 1914, and in April, 1917, she became the 
wife of J. W. Burrows, who for many years was in the employ of the Burlington Rail- 
road Company, but is now farming in Canada. Robert, thirty-two years of age, married 
Bertha Hanson. He is engaged in farming in Canada, having extensive wheat fields 
and shipping his crop to Europe. He also raises cattle and horses. Torris, the third of 
the family, is twenty-nine years of age and wedded Miss Mary Gifford, her father being 
engaged in the hardware business at Fort Collins, and they have one son, Herbert Gifford, 
three years of age. Myra, the next of the family, is a graduate of the Birmingham 
Infirmary of Alabama and is an active member of the Red Cross. Gladys is engaged in 
the millinery business in Greeley. Of the family Robert and Charles and Edith were 
born in Detroit, while Torris, Myra and Gladys were born in Greeley. There are several 
grandchildren besides the one already mentioned. Annabel J. Funk is a daughter of 
Edith Mary and is now nine years of age, attending the South Ward school. Charles 
Irving, aged fourteen, is in the eighth grade in school in Canada. Robert has two chil- 
dren, Marshall Hanson and Elizabeth Hannah, aged respectively four and two years. 

Mr. Comer has mostly concentrated his efforts and attention upon farming and has 
thus provided liberally for his family. He has upon his farm something not usually 
found in connection with agriculture, for he raised two black bears of two hundred 
pounds each, which he caught on the Buckhorn in the year 1898. He is a member of 
the Episcopal church, having been confirmed in the Gloucester cathedral in England. 
His fraternal relations are with the Woodmen of the World and his political allegiance 
is given to the republican party, of which he has been a stanch advocate since becom- 
ing a naturalized American citizen. He has never been an office seeker, and his atten- 
tion has always been given to his business affairs, his close application and energy con- 
stituting strong features in his growing success. The only division in Mr. Comer's 
business interests was when for a period of twelve years he devoted his time equally 
between farming and the bakery and butchering business in the town. Whatever he 
has undertaken he has carried forward to successful completion and his persistency of 
purpose is one of the strong elements in his career. 



EDWIN M. BURGESS. 



Since 1881 Edwin M. Burgess has been a resident of Colorado. He arrived in 
the state when a youth of eighteen years and through the intervening period he has 
made steady advancement in a business way, the steps in his orderly progression 
being easily discernible. Promotion after promotion has come to him in recognition 
•of his faithfulness and capability until he is today vice president and general manager 
of the Mountain States Telephone & Telegraph Company, with offices in Denver. A 
native of New York, he was born in Hensonville on the 28th of October, 1863, and is a 
son of Sayres F. and Leva (Eggleston) Burgess. The father was a native of Middle- 
town, New York, while the mother was born in Unadilla, that state. Mr. Burgess 
devoted his life to furniture manufacturing and in 1859 he removed westward to 
Colorado, making the journey with an ox team. In 1860, however, he returned to New 
York becoming a resident of Hensonville. Both Sayres F. Burgess and his wife, have 
passed away, their deaths occurring at Marlborough, New York. In their family were 
two daughters and Edwin M. Burgess, the only son. 

The last named acquired his education in the public schools of Hunter and 
remained a resident of the east until he reached the age of eighteen years, when 
he heard and heeded the call of the west, making his way to Pueblo, Colorado. There 
he entered the employ of the Colorado Telephone Company, his duty being the 
installation of phones. From that point in his career he has steadily worked his way 
upward, continually gaining broader knowledge of the business through study and 
experience, each promotion bringing him added responsibilities, at the same time 
giving him a broader outlook and wider opportunities. At length he reached the 
position of general manager and in 1913 he was elected vice president of the company 
and continues in the dual office. 




EDWIN M. BURGESS 



134 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

On September 7, 1885, Mr. Burgess was united in marriage at Central City, Colorado, 
to Miss Bessie Lake, of that city, a daughter of David Lake, one of the pioneers of this 
state. They have become the parents of two children: Ralph L., born at Central City, 
Colorado, April 26, 1889, who is first lieutenant with the American Expeditionary 
Forces, doing special duty in France; and Elsa Leva, the wife of Dr. R. F. Lamberton, 
who is a physician of Denver. 

Fraternally Mr. Burgess is a Mason, belonging to Oriental Lodge, No. 87, A. F. & 
A. M. He is also a member of the Denver Club, the Denver Athletic Club, the Denver 
Country Club and the Lakewood Country Club and he is a devotee of golf, this healthful 
and interesting sport being his greatest recreation. A capable executive, he has come 
up through all the departments of telephone business to his present place of responsi- 
bility. At the same time he has maintained ever a courteous, affable manner and 
kindly disposition that has been the means of bringing to him a constantly increasing 
circle of friends as the circle of his acquaintance has broadened. There are no 
spectacular phases in his career and no esoteric chapters in his life history. His 
course has been marked by a persistency of purpose that has had its root in a laudable 
ambition and today he occupies an enviable place in the regard of his fellow citizens 
and his colleagues in the business world. 



CHARLES BAYLY. 



Prominent among the representatives of manufacturing interests in Denver is Charles 
Bayly, president of the Bayly-Underhill Manufacturing Company. Theirs is the largest 
concern in the west devoted to the manufacture of overalls. They own and occupy a 
four story and basement building, all of which is devoted to the business and in which 
they employ a force of two hundred and fifty operatives who are kept busy throughout 
the entire year in order to keep pace with their fast growing trade. 

Mr. Bayly comes to Colorado from Missouri, his birth having occurred in St. Louis 
county on the 27th of November, 1870. His parents were Charles and Matilda (Russell) 
Bayly, both of whom were natives of Virginia and in early life removed westward to 
Missouri, settling in St. Louis county. There the father engaged in farming and con- 
tinued to devote his life to agricultural pursuits in that locality until he was called 
to his final rest. His wife was educated in Virginia and they were married there. After 
the death of her husband she came to Denver, where she passed away. 

Charles Bayly was the youngest in their family of twelve children. He began his 
education in the schools of St. Charles, Missouri, and in early life came to Colorado, 
after which he continued his education at Durango. When his textbooks were put aside 
he became connected with the hardware trade in that city and there remained in business 
for some time. At a later period he managed a hardware store at Telluride and also 
at Ouray, Colorado. He conducted business in those places until 1900, when he came to 
Denver and bought the business of the estate of Mr. Underhill and carried on his manu- 
facturing under the old firm style. As the years have passed he has constantly increased 
his trade relations and today the house is represented upon the road by five salesmen. 
The business was incorporated in 1901 with Charles Bayly as president, William Bayly, 
of Los Angeles, as vice president and W. P. Yetter as secretary and treasurer. The 
plant is splendidly equipped with the latest improved machinery and time-saving devices 
and the operatives work under excellent conditions, and it is a recognized fact that 
capability and fidelity on the part of the workmen will win promotion as opportunity 
affords. Moreover, the business methods of the house have gained for it an unassailable 
reputation and this great enterprise stands today as a monument to the executive force 
and progressiveness of Charles Bayly. 

In Chicago. Illinois, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Bayly and Miss Hester 
Mooney, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William R. Mooney. of that city. They have become 
parents of two sons: Charles E.. born in Ouray, Colorado, in 1896; and Russell Henry, 
born in Colorado Springs in 1898 and now a student in the University of Colorado. The 
elder son enlisted in an ambulance corps of the French army in 1915 and has since 
been active in service in the great European war. Moreover, he has been decorated 
for bravery in action, receiving the "Croix de Guerre." In 1916 he enlisted in the ar- 
tillery branch of the French army and has done wonderful service in the cause of democ- 
racy. Mr. Bayly has his service diploma, received from the French commandant, a badge 
of honor of which lie may well be proud. 

Mr. Bayly belongs to the Denver Club, the Denver Athletic Club and also the Denver 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 135 

Country Club. In politics he maintains an independent course but is not remiss in the 
duties of citizenship, standing loyally at all times in support of those interests which 
are a matter of civic virtue and of civic pride. His business career has been marked 
by steady progress and his record indicates what may be accomplished when there is 
a will to dare and to do. 



CLAUDE H. SMITH. 



Claude H. Smith is well known in journalistic circles of Larimer county as the 
junior member of the firm of Smith & Ellison, publishers of the Loveland Herald. His 
birth occurred in Havensville. Kansas, on the 15th of December, 1885, his parents being 
Burton and Louisa (Handley) Smith, both of whom are natives of that state. The 
father followed merchandising for many years in Havensville and in Lincoln, Kansas, 
but since 1907 has been engaged in ranching at Chivington, Colorado. The mother is 
also yet living and both are widely and favorably known throughout the community in 
which they reside. 

Claude H. Smith pursued a high school course at Lincoln, Kansas, and subsequently 
attended the Art Institute of Chicago, while later he entered the Kansas State Agricul- 
tural College at Manhattan, taking up the study of architecture. He next was employed 
in Denver and in that line of work he remained with the firm of Ellis & Marshall for 
one year. Prior to entering college he was with the Capper Publishing Company of 
Topeka, Kansas, for three years and with the Arcanum Publishing Company of Chicago 
for about six months. In 1912 he came to Loveland. Colorado, and for three years was 
employed by the Loveland Publishing Company, purchasing the plant of the Loveland 
Herald at the end of that time in association with Mark A. Ellison, who has remained 
his' partner continuously since. Under their management the Herald has been improved 
and has enjoyed an extensive subscription and advertising patronage and they also con- 
duct a job printing business. Messrs. Ellison and Smith likewise established the Larimer 
County Democrat at Fort Collins in the spring of 1916, of which Mr. Smith was manager, 
but disposed of it to L. R. Rhodes in the fall of 1917. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Smith has supported the 
men and measures of the democratic party and for a time he served as deputy county 
clerk. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the First Presbyterian 
church, while fraternally he is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
High principles actuate him in every relation of life and he is a popular young man in 
both business and social circles of Loveland. 



OTTO BOCK. 

Holding to high professional standards and with thorough preliminary training. 
Otto Bock has made an excellent record as assistant United States attorney, which office 
he is now filling, Denver numbering him among her progressive and enterprising young 
men. He was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. February 21, 1881, a son of J. C. F. W. Bock, 
who was a native of Germany and came to America in 1868. He did not tarry on the 
Atlantic coast but made his way at once into the interior of the country, settling at 
Bloomington. Illinois, where he engaged in educational work, becoming a teacher in 
Lutheran parochial schools. Throughout his entire life he gave his attention to educa- 
tional activities and he was a graduate of the Lake Forest Normal School of the class 
of 1874. His political allegiance was given to the democratic party and he was a warm 
personal friend of Governor John P. Altgelcl. He resided at different periods in Caledonia, 
Wisconsin, in Milwaukee and in Chicago and spent the latter part of his life in Chicago, 
where he lived for twenty-two years, passing away in 1904 at the age of fifty-eight. 
His wife, who in her maidenhood was Minnie Koehler, was born in Wisconsin and was a 
daughter of August and Augusta (Wendt) Koehler, representatives of an old Wisconsin 
family of German lineage. Mrs. Bock passed away in 1909 at the age of fifty-two years. 
By her marriage she had become the mother of seven children, five sons and two daughters. 

Otto Bock of this review was the fourth in order of birth and was educated in the 
Lutheran schools of the middle west, acquiring his education under the direction of 
his father. He determined upon the practice of law as a life work and in preparation 



136 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

therefor entered the John Marshall Law School of Chicago, from which he was graduated 
in 1908 with the LL. B. degree. After leaving the public schools he was employed in a 
produce commission house of that city and it was from his earnings that he saved a 
sufficient sum to enable him to pursue a law course and continue his private studies. 
Because of ill health he came to Colorado in 1908, and in January, 1909, he passed the 
required examination for the bar and entered upon the practice of law, in which he 
continued until 1912. when he was elected justice of the peace on the reform movement 
ticket. He continued to serve in the justice court for a year and then reentered upon 
the private practice of law, in which he is still active. In the early part of 1914 he 
formed a partnership with Clifford W. Mills under the firm style of Mills & Bock and 
this association has since been maintained, their offices being in the Kittredge build- 
ing. In November, 1914. Mr. Bock became assistant United States attorney for Colo- 
rado, being selected for the position by Harry C. Tedrow, United States attorney. He 
has since served in the office and his record is most creditable. He is a strong and able 
lawyer who ever prepares his cases with great thoroughness and care and in argument 
he is logical, while his deductions are sound and his reasoning clear. He is a member 
of the Colorado State Bar Association, also of the Denver Bar Association and of the 
Law Club. 

On the 24th of August, 1911, Mr. Bock was united in marriage to Miss Hilda Scha- 
barum, a native of Milwaukee and a daughter of William and Anna (Wolff) Schabarum. 
They have become parents of three children but one has passed away. The others are: 
William, born July 10, 1912; and Richard, born November 24, 1913. The youngest son, 
born June 18, 1915, died in 1916. All were born in Denver. 

Mr. Bock is a member of the Emmaus Lutheran church, in which he is serving as 
an elder, and is president of the Lutheran Sanitarium at Wheat Ridge. He is a member 
of the Jefferson Club. He came to Colorado to regain his health, being threatened with 
tubercular trouble, and not only has he gained health, but also position and happiness 
in this state, of which he is a most loyal adherent, assisting at all times in everything 
that has to do with its progress, upbuilding and advancement. 



HON. JAMES E. GARRIGUES. 

Among the famous lawyers and eminent jurists of Colorado is numbered Hon. 
James E. Garrigues, justice of the supreme court of the state, who was elected to that 
office in 1910. His career began on a farm, while he subsequently took up school- 
teaching as a means of enabling him to study law. After coming to Colorado be 
occupied various important official positions until in 1910 he was elected to practically 
the highest office in the state — that of justice of the supreme court. 

Judge Garrigues has a most interesting genealogical record, its history dating 
back to the middle ages. For this record there is largely used a genealogy compiled 
by Carl Henri Nicolai Garrigues, of Copenhagen, Denmark, and Edmund Garrigues, of 
Massillon, Ohio, which was compiled in November, 1916. The progenitor of that branch 
of the Garrigues family to which Judge James E. Garrigues belongs was Jean Garrigues, 
from Perigord, France, a Huguenot, who married Marie de Franchimont, and both 
emigrated from France to The Netherlands, probably settling in The Hague in 1685 
as a result of the St. Bartholomew massacre and attendant troubles due to the revoca- 
tion of the Edict of Nantes. Another Jean Garrigues was in 1562 condemned by the 
parliament of Toulouse because of beresy. Pierre G. Garrigues, from Mazamet, 
brother of Jean G. Garrigues, the progenitor of the Philadelphia branch, was the pro- 
genitor of the old Brandenburg branch and the present Danish-American and Danish 
branches. The names of old French families such as "Garric," "Garrigues," "Lagar- 
rigue," originated from the Roman words "garric," meaning oak tree, and "garriga," 
meaning oak forest. There were six coats of arms, all bearing oak trees, and the 
family to which Judge James E. Garrigues belongs bears a coat of arms with five oaks. 
Garrigues. as spelled in old Latin documents, means oak woods. The historian, Tollin, 
who lived in Magdeburg about one hundred years ago, wrote in his history of the 
French colony there of the "famous family Garrigues." 

Jean Garrigues died a few years after his emigration to The Netherlands, being 
survived by his widow, and to this union three sons were born. Francois, born in 
France, was married at The Hague to Marguerite du Quenet (Duguenois), emigrated in 
1713 or 1714 with his wife and children to St. Christopher, West Indies, and at a later 
period to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, but this branch (Francois) became extinct in 




HON. JAMES E. GARRKiUKK 



138 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Europe and the United States of America in the next generation. Pierre G., the 
second son, had no descendants, but is supposed to have emigrated to Philadelphia. 
Mattheu (Matthew) Garrigues, the third in the family, is the great-great-great-grand- 
fathtr of our subject. 

Matthew Garrigues was born in France and in October, 1701, admitted as a mem- 
ber of the Reformed Communion at The Hague by testimony of the Church of Langue- 
doc. On May 2S, 1702, he was married at The Hague to Suzanne Rochet (Roche), who 
was also born in France and in 1713 or 1714 emigrated with their children to St. 
Christopher, on the Isle of Martinique, West Indies, and at a later period removed 
from there to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. During the first half of the eighteenth 
century they kept the Prince Eugene Inn at Philadelphia. He died in 1743 and is 
buried in Christ Church Ground, Tenth and Arch streets, Philadelphia. Matthew 
Garrigues had the following children: Marguerite Jeanne; Francois, born in 1704; 
Pierre; Samuel, born in the United States later than 1714; and Jacob Garrigues, Sr., 
the great-great-grandfather of James E. Garrigues. 

Jacob Garrigues, Sr., who was born in 1716, died May 12, 1798, in Morris county, 
New Jersey. There is some doubt as to whether he was born in St. Christopher, West 
Indies, or in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, but it is known that he moved to Morris 
county, New Jersey, from Philadelphia. The ancestral hom.e was near Rockaway, 
New Jersey. Jacob Garrigues, Sr., who died in Morris county. New Jersey, had the follow- 
ing children: David, Nancy, Isaac, Rebecca, Hannah, Sarah, Mary, and Jacob Garrigues. 
Jr., who was the great-grandfather of our subject. David, Isaac, Jacob and John of 
the above children were in Captain Gaston's Company and also in Captain Joshua 
Hall's Company in the Revolutionary war. 

Jacob Garrigues, Jr., was born in 1753 and died May 1, 1830. He married Mary 

, who died March 1, 1824. He had the following children: Daniel, a 

farmer, who had several sons and daughters and died in New Jersey at the age of 
eighty years: Elias, who was a blacksmith and whose death occurred in New Jersey; 
John Purson, also a blacksmith, who moved to Illinois and died about 1854; and James, 
grandfather of Judge Garrigues. 

James Garrigues, a school teacher by profession, was born and reared in New 
Jersey and died in Indiana at the age of sixty-four years and eight days. He was 
buried back of the Baptist church at Hogan Hill, on Manchester state road. The church 
is now removed and the graveyard has been abandoned. He married Elizabeth Godding, 
who died February 22, 1870, at the age of seventy-nine years and fifteen days. James 
Garrigues had the following children, all born in New Jersey. Mabel, born July 8. 

1812, first married Jackson, by whom she had several children, and 

following his death she wedded Samuel Conger. They had a family of two children, 
Arthur and May, and resided at Manchester, Dearborn county, Indiana. Jacob Henry 
was born December 25, 1813, and died April 7, 1838. Amzi G., born June 13, 1819, lived 
on a plantation in Winston county, Mississippi, having gone south when quite young. 
Mary, born April 8, 1821, married Austin Whitehead and her death occurred in Ripley 
county, Indiana. She was the mother of five children, Harriett, Theresa, William, Israel 
and Theodore, all of whom are deceased. Joseph, born February 29, 1824, followed teach- 
ing and later was a farmer near Trenton, Illinois, and is now deceased. Israel, born May 
8. 1S2S, was also a farmer residing near Trenton, Illinois, and is deceased. James Miller 
is the father of our subject. Elmer, born January 21, 1830, married Dorothy Noyce at 
Manchester, Indiana, and died in Kansas. The family of Elmer, including some daughters 
and three sons, John, James and Byrd, resided in Kansas City, Missouri. Byrd Garrigues 
had already attained prominence in railroad circles although he died when quite young. 
James was Pullman agent at Denver and was killed by a street car. John married Jennie 
Garrigues, his cousin, a daughter of Israel Garrigues, and they removed from Kansas 
City to Los Angeles, California. 

James Miller Garrigues, father of our subject, was born November 25. 1815, in 
Morris county, New Jersey. About 1836. when a young man, he settled on a farm at 
Manchester, in Dearborn county, Indiana. In his early youth he served an apprentice- 
ship to the harness trade in Newark, New Jersey, and later was a farmer and also a 
school teacher, being secretary of the board of education of his community. He made 
his home at Manchester, Dearborn county, Indiana, until his death. His wife was 
Harriet Tuthill and they had the following children: Henry G., who was killed during 
the Civil war while serving as a member of the Seventh Indiana Cavalry: Amzi, an 
Indiana farmer; Dr. Israel Dayton, a practicing physician of Brookville. Indiana: 
Fannie, the widow of Charley Carpenter; Harriet, a school teacher, who is the widow 
of Frank Redmond and resides at Beaumont, California, with her two children, Frank 
and Katharine: and James Edward. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 139 

James E. Garrigues was born October 6, 1852, at Manchester, Dearborn county, 
Indiana. He received his early education in the country schools, which he attended 
three months out of each year until he was eighteen years of age, working upon the 
farm during the other nine months. As farm work did not seem to hold for him sufficient 
interest to make it his life work, he then entered a Methodist college at Moores Hill, 
Indiana, pursuing his studies so ardently that he was able to complete three years' 
work in two. He then left college and began to teach school at Delaware, Ripley county, 
Indiana, where he remained for one year. From there he went to Trenton, Illinois, to 
the home of his uncle, Joseph Garrigues, and for six years he taught country schools 
in Illinois. During his vacations he read law in the office of G. Vanhoorebeeke at Car- 
lisle, Clinton county, Illinois, who afterward located at Grand Junction, Colorado. In 
1876 he removed to Malvern, Mills county, Iowa, where he was principal of the public 
schools. Another removal brought him to Glenwood, in the same state, where he con- 
tinued his law reading in the office of D. H. Solomon, and in 1877 he was admitted to the 
bar. He then went to St. Louis, Missouri, where he held a position in the general 
offices of the Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific Railroad, continuing there until 1880, when 
he was appointed local counsel for the Wabash Road for southwest Iowa, his head- 
quarters being at Malvern, that state. In this connection he gained wide and valuable 
experience in corporation law — experience which stood him in good stead later on. He 
remained in Malvern until February 22, 1883, when he removed to Greeley, Colorado, 
on account of his wife's health, and there he successfully continued in practice, readily 
demonstrating his ability and continually improving his opportunities. He became 
thoroughly experienced and as his knowledge grew his clientage increased and his 
standing among the men of his profession was more and more established. This may 
be readily recognized from the fact that he was elected district attorney for the eighth 
judicial district, continuing in that office until 1S94 by reelection, serving two terms. 
He then again took up the private practice of law, forming a partnership with Elbert 
C. Smith, but on March 26, 1903, during the administration of Governor Peabody, he 
was appointed judge of the district court for the eighth district and served until the 
next general election, when he was chosen by popular suffrage to fill out an unexpired 
term. At the expiration of this term, in 1906, he was again nominated and elected for 
the full term. In 1910 Judge Garrigues was elected one of the judges of the supreme 
court of Colorado for a term of ten years and is therefore still serving in the position. 
His eminent fitness for the office, his judicial, well trained mind and his general qualifi- 
cations give weight to his opinions, rendered in the highest tribunal of the state. Step 
by step he has gained one of the highest legal positions in the state and his success 
is entirely attributable to his unswerving allegiance to the righteousness of the law. ' 
Many of the most important decisions of the supreme court have been rendered by Judge 
Garrigues in conjunction with his fellow judges and his impress upon the legal history of 
the state is indelibly written. 

Judge Garrigues was married May 3, 1880, to Clara L. Boehner at Malvern, Iowa. 
She died March 25, 1896, and six children were horn of this union. Helen Jeannette, 
the eldest, became the wife of L. W. McGrew, of Tabernash, Colorado, and has two 
sons, James and Mac McGrew. Georgia, the next of the family, is deceased. Dwight 
Stanley makes his home at Zamboanga, in the Philippine islands. Edith became the 
wife of David Painter, now residing at Telluride. Colorado, and they have two chil- 
dren, David Sievert and Dwight Painter. Grace married Ross Phillippi, resides at 
Portland, Oregon, and has a son. Ross Phillippi, Jr. Edna became the wife of Kenneth 
Luman, of Salt Lake City, Utah, and their home is now in Big Piney, Wyoming, 
where he is engaged in the cattle business. They have one daughter, Phylis J. On 
January 19. 1911, Judge Garrigues married Alice Roberts, of Greeley, Colorado. Both 
take a most prominent part in the social life of Denver and their home is renowned 
for hospitality and good cheer. They take a deep interest in the moral, mental 
and material progress of the city and are connected with a number of movements 
which have to do with general uplift and the general welfare. 

Judge Garrigues is very prominent fraternally, having membership with the 
M:isons. the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Elks. He was made a Mason 
in Trenton Lodge, No. 109, A. F. & A. M., of Trenton, Illinois, in 1873. and after re- 
moving to Greeley joined Occidental Lodge, No. 20, in which he passed through all the 
chairs and served for two years as worshipful master. After removing to Denver to 
take his place on the supreme bench he took all the Scottish Rite degrees, thus be- 
coming a thirty-second degree Consistory Mason. He is likewise a member of El 
Jebel Temple of the Mystic Shrine and he was elected the first exalted ruler of Greeley 
Lodge, No. 809, B. P. O. E., serving in the office for two terms. His military record 



140 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

covers three years as a member of the First Regiment of the Colorado National Guard. 
He enlisted on the 27th of July, 1885, and was honorably discharged on the expiration 
of his three years' term. There is much credit due him for what he has achieved, for 
he has attained the high position which he occupies entirely through his own efforts. 
Coming of an ancient and distinguished family, he has again raised its escutcheon to 
a place of distinction and is an honor to a name which has been prominently connected 
with American and European history. 



PETER SEERIE. 



Peter Seerie, member of the Arm of Seerie & Varnum, contractors of Denver, was 
born in Dundee, Scotland, February 27, 1880, a son of Edward R. and Margaret (Duff) 
Seerie, who came to America in that year. They made their way to Denver and the 
father is now living retired in this city, but the mother passed away in Denver, May 11, 
1917. The family numbered eleven children, three of whom have departed this life. 
Those who survive are: Mrs. Elizabeth Findlay, Mrs. James Knox, Mrs. Charles Hall 
and Mrs. W. E. Russell, all of Denver; Mrs. Isabella Miller, of Dundee, Scotland; Edward, 
a Denver contractor, and Captain John D. Seerie of the United States Army. One son, 
David D. Seerie, who died December 23, 1917, was a prominent contractor. An extended 
sketch of him appears elsewhere in this work. William Smith Seerie died in Denver 
in 1907. 

Peter Seerie of this review was next to the youngest child in order of birth. In 
early life he attended the public schools of Denver, after which he entered the old Central 
Business College. Two years later he entered business with his brother as a contractor, 
becoming superintendent of work, and later he formed a partnership with Mr. Varnum, 
organizing the firm of Seerie & Varnum. During the existence of this firm they have 
erected many prominent buildings, including the county court house at Greeley, Colorado, 
and a number of sugar factories throughout the state. They were also the builders of 
the North Denver high school, of the First National Bank building at Lewiston, Mon- 
tana; the building of the Prewitt Reservoir Company at Merino, Colorado, and others 
of equal prominence. The firm is now engaged on a big government contract — the build- 
ing of the base hospital at Aurora, one of the suburbs of Denver. They also laid the 
foundation for the Colfax-Larimer viaduct in Denver. 

On the 7th of June, 1909, Mr. Seerie was married to Miss Elsa Himmilheber, of 
Denver, whose parents were pioneer people of the city, where her father was engaged 
in the contracting business. Mr. and Mrs. Seerie have two children: Margaret Frieda, 
born in Denver in 1911, and David Duff, born in Denver in 1916. 

In politics Mr. Seerie maintains an independent course, voting for men and measures 
rather than party. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons, having membership 
with both the York and Scottish rites. A self-made man, his advancement in business 
has been the direct outcome of his individual capability, earnestness and thoroughness. 
He has mastered every detail of the builder's art. and the importance of the contracts 
accorded him indicates to what success and prominence he has attained since taking up 
contracting work on his own account. 



ALONZO B. ULLERY. 

Alonzo B. Ullery, attorney at law of Denver, was born in Montgomery county, New 
York, near Fort Plain, December 17. 1854, a son of Henry B. and Elizabeth (Schramm) 
Ullery, both of whom were natives of the Empire state, where they spent their entire 
lives. In early manhood the father took up the occupation of farming and thus pro- 
vided for the support of the members of his household. He died in the year 1883. hav- 
ing for five years survived his wife, who passed away in 1878. In their family were 
four children: Alonzo B.; Mrs. Nancy K. Pollard, living in Asotin, Washington; Mrs. 
Mary E. Failing, a resident of Ottawa. Illinois; and Jacob G., whose home is in Brattle- 
boro, Vermont. 

After mastering the branches of learning taught in the public schools of his native 
town Alonzo B. Ullery attended the Fort Plain Seminary, pursuing a teacher's course. 
He decided, however, not to give his attention to the profession of teaching and became 
connected with the Fort Plain Spring & Axle Works. While thus employed he studied 




PETER SEERIE 



142 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

law in the evenings, while later he attended the Albany Law School, from which he 
was graduated on the 25th of Day, 1880. On the 1st of October of that year he arrived 
in Denver, where he entered upon the practice of his profession, and through the inter- 
vening years he has made for himself a position in the front ranks of the leading attor- 
neys of this city. He has been connected with much important litigation and he dis- 
plays marked ability in handling the cases entrusted to his care, while his devotion 
to his clients' interests has become proverbial. 

On the 5th of June, 1892, Mr. Ullery was united in marriage to Mrs. Emma Conrad, of 
Denver, the widow of John W. Conrad. They have had no children of their own, but 
reared a niece and a nephew of Mrs. Ullery whose mother died during their infancy and 
to whom Mr. and Mrs Ullery have been as own parents, giving them every advantage 
which they would have extended to their own children. They are as follows: Hector 
F. Johnson, who was born and educated in Denver, was a gun pointer on the United 
States Ship California of the United States Navy and put in four years in that service. 
He is now a resident of Denver. He has three sons, William, Charles and Hector, Jr. 
The adopted daughter is Mrs. Darline E. Koskoff, who was educated in Denver and is a 
musician of superior ability. By her marriage she has become the mother of a son. 
Grant Lynn Koskoff. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ullery attend the Baptist church, of which the latter is a member, 
and fraternally the former has for a quarter of a century been connected with the Knights 
of Pythias. He has concentrated his efforts and attention chiefly upon his law practice, 
and in a profession where advancement depends entirely upon individual merit he has 
made steady progress. 



WILLIAM 0. DARNELL. 



William 0. Darnell is proprietor of a meat market in Windsor. Weld county, in 
which connection he has built up a substantial business. He was born near Des Moines, 
Iowa, April 6, 1866, and is a son of Thomas Darnell, who was born in Indianapolis, 
Indiana, in 1829. The father was a farmer by occupation. On coming to Colorado in 
1882 he settled at Port Collins and in 1901 removed to Windsor. The latter's grandfather 
was a native of France, from which country he was driven at the time of stress and 
persecution during the last half of the eighteenth century. He crossed the Atlantic, 
becoming a resident of South Carolina about 1800, and later went to Indianapolis and 
was instrumental in freeing a number of slaves whom he had brought from the south. 
The great-grandmother of William O. Darnell on the maternal side was born in Germany 
and came to the United States in early life, settling in Ohio, near Columbus. Later 
representatives of the family removed to Illinois and subsequently to Iowa. The family 
was represented in the Black Hawk war. In the year 1861 Thomas Darnell and his 
family removed to Iowa, establishing their home near Des Moines, and it was in that 
locality that William O. Darnell was born five years later. He acquired his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of Des Moines and was graduated therefrom at the age of 
nineteen years. After leaving school he carried on farming for a few years on his 
father's land and then purchased a farm, of which he became owner about 1891. This 
comprised one hundred and sixty acres of land in Larimer county, Colorado, upon which 
he engaged in feeding stock. He afterward sold that property to the Fossil Creek Res- 
ervoir Company in 1901 and it was made the site of a large reservoir. Later he removed 
to Windsor, purchasing a tract of land a half mile west of the town. This he occupied 
until 1907, when he sold the property and purchased his present meat market, since 
which time he has conducted a successful and growing business. 

In Iowa, in 1887, William O. Darnell was united in marriage to Miss Ella E. Williams, 
a daughter of John and Kathryn Williams, the former a farmer who died many years 
ago. Mrs. Williams is still living in Fort Collins and is now eighty-four years of age. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Darnell have been born two sons. Otis L., born in 1888. became a 
mechanical engineer and was employed by the Great Western Sugar Company at Windsor, 
where he met with an accident in 1915. losing his right arm. He is now associated with 
his father in business. He was married in March. 1917, to Evangeline Roberts. Law- 
rence Charles Darnell, the second son, was born in 1907 and is attending the public 
schools. 

In politics Mr. Darnell is a stalwart republican but not an office seeker. He belongs 
to the Methodist church and. also has membership in the Independent Order of Odd Pel- 
lows. He is a conservative and dependable business man. pleasant in manner, kindly in 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 143 

disposition and thoroughly reliable in all of his transactions. He has never sought to 
figure prominently in any public connection, preferring to devote his leisure hours to the 
enjoyment of the society of his family at his own fireside. 



MRS. NANNIE S. REYNOLDS. 

Colorado has occupied a position of leadership on many important public questions. 
She was among the first states to give the right of public franchise to women and call 
them to her public offices, where they have in many instances most acceptably and 
capably served. The interests of Larimer county have been most efficiently promoted 
through the efforts of Miss Nannie S. Murchison in her position as county clerk and 
recorder, to which she was called by appointment in October, 1910, and since the expira- 
tion of her first term election has kept her in the position. 

Miss Nannie S. Murchison was born in Kewanee, Illinois, and is a daughter of Dun- 
can L. and Maria (North) Murchison. the former a native of Scotland, while the latter 
was born in Illinois and was of English lineage. Duncan L. Murchison came to America 
when a little lad of but six years in company with his parents, his father being one of 
the first settlers of Henry county, Illinois. He invested there in land and at one time 
owned about half of the county and extensively engaged in farming in that section of 
the state throughout his remaining days. His son, Duncan L., also became an agricul- 
turist. He was reared and educated in Henry county and when old enough to assume 
the responsibility began farming on his own account. He purchased land, which he 
developed and improved, and as the years passed he won a very substantial measure of 
success through his intelligently directed agricultural interests. He finally retired from 
active business, rented his farm and in 1904 removed to Greeley, Colorado, with the 
intention of locating permanently there, but after a very short illness passed away in 
March, 1905, when fifty-nine years of age. He had for a considerable period survived 
his wife, whose death occurred in November, 1889. 

Their daughter, Nannie S. Murchison, was reared and educated in Henry county, 
Illinois, and for three years in early womanhood taught music in Des Moines and in 
Adel, Iowa. She then went to Chicago for the further study of piano music, to which 
she gave her attention for some time, but was called to Colorado on account of the death 
of her father in 1905 and has always remained in this state. In that year she took up 
her abode in Fort Collins, where she entered the employ of the Port Collins Abstract 
Company, with which she continued until October. 1910, save that during that period she 
was absent for a year in Europe, where she was studying music in 1906-7. In connection 
with her duties as an employe of the Abstract Company she also taught piano, being 
recognized as one of the leading music instructors of the county. In October, 1910. she 
was appointed deputy county clerk and recorder of Larimer county and after occupying 
the position for four years was elected to the office and has since served, most efficiently 
discharging the duties of the position. 

On the 22d of August, 1917, Miss Nannie S. Murchison became the bride of Howard 
S. Reynolds, a well known violinist and teacher in the Conservatory of Music, a depart- 
ment of the Colorado Agricultural College. Mr. Reynolds is a native son of Colorado, 
his parents being William and Hattie (Nash) Reynolds, who were pioneer settlers of 
this state and now reside at Boulder. Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds are very prominent in 
the social and musical circles of Fort Collins. Her political allegiance is given to the 
democratic party. She is the only representative of the party who has held the office 
of county clerk and recorder in Larimer county in thirty years and her efficiency is indi- 
cated by her reelection to the position which she is now filling. 



CHESTER C. BENNETT. 

Chester C. Bennett, president of the Western Securities Investment Company, of Den- 
ver, was born May 25, 1865. in Lima, Rock county. Wisconsin. His father, George Bennett, 
was a native of New York, where the family settled at an early day but prior to 
that settlement was made by his ancestors in Vermont. George Bennett was a 
successful agriculturist and stock raiser of Rock county. Wisconsin, for many years, 
having cast in his lot with its pioneer residents in the year 1850. There he remained 
a respected and valued citizen of the community for his remaining years, passing away in 



1U HISTORY OF COLORADO 

1913 at the age of eighty-five. In early manhood he wedded Susan F. Osmond, also a 
native of the state of New York and of English parentage. She passed away at the 
old homestead in Rock county, which she occupied for more than fifty-five years, 
her death occurring in 1915, when she had passed the eighty-fourth milestone on 
life's journey. 

The family numbered five sons, of whom Chester C. Bennett was the fourth in 
order of birth. He mastered the elementary branches of learning in the district 
schools near his father's home and afterward attended Milton College in Rock county, 
Wisconsin. His early life to the age of eighteen years was spent upon the home farm 
and through the periods of vacation he assisted in the work of the fields, early becom- 
ing familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. His 
first vocation after leaving home was that of teaching, which profession he followed 
in Rock county for about eighteen months. He next entered the mercantile business 
on his own account at Janesville, Wisconsin, in 1888 and there he continued until 
1892, when he turned his attention to the real estate and farm loan business, con- 
tinuing successful operations in that field for some time. He not only engaged in 
buying and selling property on his own account but also handled real estate for others 
and likewise engaged in business as a merchandise broker, buying and selling 
established mercantile enterprises until January 13, 1902. The opportunities of the 
west attracted him and at the date mentioned he arrived in Denver. He has since 
figured prominently in financial circles of this city. He was one of the directors 
in full charge of the investments for the Colorado National Life Insurance Com- 
pany and continued in that company until the business was sold in 1912. Soon there- 
after he established and incorporated the Western Securities Investment Company, 
of which he became the president, and has so served to the present time. The com- 
pany today controls one of the largest businesses of the kind in the west and has 
many clients not only in Colorado but throughout neighboring states. Mr. Bennett 
and his associate officers are thoroughly informed concerning property values and 
securities of all kinds and are thus able to assist their clients in making judicious 
and profitable investments, bringing ready returns for their money. Mr. Bennett is 
also treasurer and a director of the Eastern Colorado Farm Loan Company and 
president of the Bennett-Bradford Ranch Company. He has displayed notable enter- 
prise and keen discernment in the conduct of his affairs and is a close student of 
everything in any way related to the business. He is constantly watching the trend 
of the times along business lines and his intelligently directed effort has placed him 
in a conspicuous, successful and enviable position in financial circles. 

On the 5th of November, 1889, Mr. Bennett was united in marriage in Janesville, 
Wisconsin, to Miss Laura C. Chapman, a native of that place and a daughter of 
Horace D. and Amanda E. (Louden) Chapman. Her father, who is now deceased, 
was for years roadmaster with the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company. 
Her mother belonged to an old and prominent family of Janesville. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Bennett have been born two children: Erminie, who is the wife of Harold J. Sanborn, 
a resident of Cleveland, Ohio; and Audrey E., who married Blaine B. Wallace, a 
lieutenant in the United States Army. 

Mr. Bennett gives his political endorsement to the republican party. Fraternally 
he is a Mason and he is identified with the Chamber of Commerce. His interests are 
thus broad and varied and he is a supporter of all those activities which work for 
the material development and the civic progress of his adopted city. Along the 
lines of an orderly progression he has advanced to a creditable place in business and 
financial circles of Denver and many of his fellow townsmen bear high testimony to 
his enterprise, his business ability and his sterling personal worth. 



PAUL B. GAYLORD. 



Paul B. Gaylord. of Denver, needs no introduction to the people of Colorado nor 
indeed to the people of the entire United States, for his name is known in insurance 
circles from coast to coast. Much has been written of him and more has been said 
and the story is always an inspiring one, for it is the story of achievement in the face 
of difficulties such as confront few men. for at times these difficulties have loomed 
large. An analyzation of his career shows that he has never allowed worry or dis- 
couragement to become a factor in his life, robbing him of that energy which should 
go into the accomplishment of a purpose and not into regret over existing circumstances. 
Where the path of opportunity has seemed closed he has marked out others and has 




PAUL B. GAYLOED 



146 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

ultimately reached his desired goal. He was born in Independence, Iowa, June 14, 1858. 
Whether the name of the town had anything to do with his career is impossible to 
determine, but the spirit of independence has always been his. His parents were Edward 
H. and Sarah (Rich) Gaylord. The father was born in Ohio and in the early '40s went 
to Iowa, traveling across the country and settling near Independence. He was employed 
in various ways, being at times, farmer, contractor, stockman and circus proprietor. 
In 1859 he came to Denver but returned eastward and located at Junction City, Kansas, 
where he engaged in stock raising for a number of years. In 1875, however, he again 
made his way to Denver and took charge of the Wall-Purcell stage-coach lines, con- 
tinuing to act in that capacity until his death, which occurred in 1887. During the 
period of the Civil war, however, he put aside all personal interests and considerations, 
for his duty to his country he felt was the dominant thing at the time, and he enlisted 
in the Sixth Iowa Cavalry, becoming captain of one of its companies. Later he was 
detailed to buy horses for the army and he continued in that service with the com- 
mission of captain until the close of the war. His wife removed to Iowa in her girl- 
hood and they were married in that state. She, too, passed away in Denver about 1887. 
Their family numbered six sons and daughters: Fred, who is now a prominent merchant 
of Junction City. Kansas; Hal, who is proprietor of the Kansas City Journal; Anna, 
living in Denver; Mrs. Sedgewick Rice, whose husband is a colonel in the United States 
army; Mrs. Harry K. Brown, of Denver; and Paul B. 

The last named was the second in order of birth. After attending the public schools 
of Junction City, Kansas, he became a postal clerk on the run between Kansas City and 
Denver. At the age of nineteen he took up his abode in Denver and became a collector 
on the Denver Tribune, but the paper soon passed out of existence and he sought employ- 
ment elsewhere, becoming connected with the firm of Porter, Raymond & Company, 
engaged in the real estate and insurance business. Here he found a congenial field 
and one that in the course of years has also proven profitable. He set to work to thor- 
oughly master every phase of the business, acquainted himself with insurance in prin- 
ciple and detail and eventually bought out his employers. T. C. Henry said of him: "I 
have known Paul Gaylord from his veriest boyhood. Twenty-five years ago he was on 
the Denver Tribune when I owned it. His steady advancement and splendid success 
are based, I know, upon his personal worth. He possesses that rare quality difficult to 
define — character." This character soon made for him a place in insurance circles and 
when the Continental Trust Company of Denver decided to establish an insurance depart- 
ment one of the officials inquired the way to do this. Another answered: "The best 
way is to see Paul Gaylord"; but another immediately added: "No. the best way is to 
get Paul Gaylord," and this suggestion was at once acted upon. He established the 
insurance business of the Continental Trust Company, was made vice president and a 
director and in the course of time developed an insurance business for the company 
of which not only the corporation but Denver was proud. He continued in charge of 
the insurance and real estate interests of the bank until it was merged into the Inter- 
state Bank, when Mr. Gaylord again took up the insurance business independently and 
now has the finest insurance offices and best business of this kind in the entire west. 
The secret of his success is not hard to find. The thoroughness with which he under- 
takes everything insures complete mastery of the situation and the overthrow of any 
difficulty or obstacle in his path. He has not only built up a business of mammoth 
proportions, but he has done much to advance the interests of insurance men through- 
out the entire country. He has been very active in a work that has recently reached its 
culmination in the adoption of a uniform blank in insurance circles. It was said that 
about ten years ago when he needed office held he faced the task of filling out many 
varieties of accounts current, and he felt that there should be some relief from such 
a condition. There were not only many forms of accounts current, but the daily reports 
and endorsement blanks were no better and Mr. Gaylord turned to the National Associa- 
tion of Insurance Agents for cooperation and brought the matter to the attention of 
the convention, which appointed a committee to consider the problem and work out 
a solution therefor, Mr. Gaylord being made a member of this committee, which made 
its first report at St. Paul in 1908. The first work of the committee had to do with the 
policy form. Samples of the form were submitted that would fit in the ordinary type- 
writer and could be manifolded with the daily report and the agent's record. The com- 
mittee also submitted a form of accounts current, both for graded and flat commission 
agencies, and a standard form of endorsement blank. The typewriter policy attracted 
immediate attention and companies began to adopt it in states where it was legal. 
The matter of blanks was referred to the joint conference committee, comprised of 
company managers and a committee of agents appointed by the National Association. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 147 

In an article in the Insurance Report there was a tribute to Mr. Gaylord for his efforts 
in this way, in which it said: "The culmination of years of effort to secure a uniform 
accounts current is reached in the approval by the national board of the form advocated 
by the National Association of Agents, to go into effect next January. It is interesting to 
know that the effort to adopt uniform forms originated with a Denver local agent, Paul 
Gaylord. Mr. Gaylord devoted many years of patient and energetic work to educate 
both the agents and the companies on the value of the plan." In a further tribute to 
Mr. Gaylord for his efforts in this connection the American Agency Bulletin said: "The 
forms adopted by the national board are different from those originally approved, but 
the companies are required not only to meet their own needs and those of the agents, 
but of the insurance departments as well, and the new blank has been drafted with 
these various needs in view. The main object— uniformity in all agencies and for all 
companies — has been obtained by concerted efforts through the agents' organization. Few 
agents perhaps realize how much time has been given and how much money has been 
expended in this effort, nor can they realize how necessary it has been to constantly 
agitate the matter in order to secure the results, which, now that they have accrued, 
are recognized as of great value, both to the companies and to the agents." 

On the 30th of October. 1889. Mr. Gaylord was married to Miss Kate Seymour, of 
Denver, a daughter of Colonel J. F. Seymour and a niece of Senator Jerome B. Chaffee. 
both prominent in Denver. Mr. and Mrs. Gaylord nave become parents of two children. 
Paul Lindley Gaylord, who was born in Denver in 1891. was graduated from the high 
school at Denver and from St. Matthew's Military Academy of Burlingame, California. 
and is now a lieutenant in the United States army. Ellen Seymour, born in Denver, 
July 4, 1893, is a graduate of the Corona school and the Dwight School for Girls, in New 
Jersey, and is the wife of George K. Thomas, of Denver, by whom she has one child. 
Katherine Edith, who was born in Denver. 

In his political views Mr. Gaylord is a republican and fraternally he is connected 
with the Masons, the Woodmen of the World, the Sons of Veterans and other organiza- 
tions. He is also identified with the Sons of the American Revolution and with the 
Pioneers' Society of Denver and the Denver Club. He has often been spoken of as 
the best loved man in Denver and the following lines were written to characterize him: 

"When you think you're feelin' glum, 
Smile! 

When the world seems on the bum, 
Smile! 

Trouble? — ain't no such a thing 

For the feller who kin sing. 

Let's make Happiness our king — 
Smile!" 
It has been his spirit of good nature that has brought Mr. Gaylord the high regard, 
the friendship and love of many with whom he has come in contact. He has been termed 
a prominent, popular and philanthropic citizen of Colorado and Denver has perpetuated 
his name in a prominent thoroughfare, Gaylord boulevard. It was through his efforts 
that Denver was given Cheesman Park, which originally was called Congress Park, so 
named by Mr. Gaylord and later became Cheesman Park, and many tangible evidences 
of his public spirit and devotion to the welfare of his adopted city may be cited. Mr. 
Gaylord has recently turned his attention to the oil fields and is president of the Inter- 
state Exploration & Oil Company. Some there are who think of Paul Gaylord as a rich 
man. It is true that he has accumulated a substantial amount of this world's goods, 
but he is richer still in his friendships, richer still in his honor and his good name. 
It is much to be called "The man with the smile." for in this is told the story of a 
predominant characteristic that may well cause others to pause and consider whether 
the worry or the smile is most worth while. 



JOHN A. WEAVER, M. D. 



For over twenty-one years Dr. John A. Weaver has been among the successful 
physicians and surgeons of Greeley and has large city and country properties. He 
has kept pace with the modern discoveries and inventions in medical science and by 
the application of his knowledge has been successful in many difficult cases. His 
practice is of a general nature and as the years have passed has increased until today 
he enjoys one of the largest clienteles in his part of the state. He was born near 



148 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

South Bend, Indiana, August 10, 1870, a son of the Rev. David H. and Malinda (Rupel) 
Weaver, natives of Ohio and Indiana respectively. The father was a clergyman and 
also a Civil war veteran, having served for three months during that conflict. He had 
enlisted from Ohio. After completing his term of service he proceeded from Ohio to 
Indiana, engaging in farming in the latter state. Until forty years of age he con- 
tinued along that line, but he then took up the ministry and preached as a member 
of the Baptist denomination until death claimed him in March, 1915. His wife had 
preceded him eleven years, passing away in 1894. 

John A. Weaver of this review was reared and educated in Longmont, Colorado, 
-whither his parents had removed in 1882. After completing his primary education 
lie studied pharmacy in Denver University and then was engaged in the drug trade 
for four years in different places. This led to his desire to make the medical pro- 
fession his life work and he therefore entered the State University, graduating from 
the medical department with the class of 1897. In that year he located in Silver 
Plume, where he practiced for two months, but not finding the locality to his liking, 
he came to Greeley and here he has been successfully engaged as a physician and 
surgeon ever since. 

In June, 1900, Dr. Weaver was united in marriage to Miss Cecile Rochat and to 
this union were born four children: John, Jr., whose birth occurred in March, 1903; 
Marian, born in August, 1907; Frances, in July, 1909; and Helen, in November, 1911. 
The family are of the Baptist denomination and interested in the work of that church. 

Politically Dr. Weaver is a prohibitionist and is thoroughly in accord with the 
aims and principles of that party. He served for two years as county physician and 
in this official connection earned the commendation of the public. He has farming 
interests in Weld county and also in Idaho and his land is largely devoted to the 
raising of wheat. Professionally he is a member of the Weld County Medical Society. 
Dr. Weaver maintains well equipped offices at 223 Opera House building, while the 
family residence is at No. 1405 Ninth avenue. He is popular not only among the 
general public but has many, friends in professional circles, who esteem him highly 
on account of his professional ethics. In his work he is always careful in arriving 
at a conclusion, but after once forming an opinion and reaching a decision is quick 
to act and is seldom at fault in finding the correct course to follow. A great many 
successful cases stand to his credit and as surgeon and physician he is in great 



TOM BOTTBRILL. 



Tom Botterill, president of Tom Botterill Incorporated, is numbered among the most 
progressive, popular and public-spirited citizens of Denver and among his friends is 
termed a "prince of good fellows." Moreover, his friends are found from coast to coast 
among automobile men. His business career has been characterized by steady progres- 
sion and enterprise and his rise to his present position is the result of honest dealing, 
indefatigable energy and straightforwardness in every business transaction. He was • 
born in Beverly, England, February 26, 1873, and is a son of Thomas and Jane (Clark- 
son) Botterill, who crossed the Atlantic to Canada. The father engaged in the hardware 
business in Winnipeg for some time but eventually sold out there and removed to Denver 
in 1889. In the latter city he turned his attention to the grocery business, in which he 
built up a large and gratifying trade, which he conducted to the time of his death in 
1910. His wife survived him for a number of years, passing away in Denver, September 
17, 1917. They had a family of four children: Frank, who is now living in Salt Lake 
City, Utah; Tom, of this review; Mrs. L. K. Reynolds, of Denver; and Mrs. D. J. Wylie, 
residing in Winnipeg. 

In his youthful days Tom Botterill was a pupil in the schools of Grimsby, England, 
and later he attended St. John's College in Winnipeg, Canada, from which he was grad- 
uated at the age of sixteen years. After leaving school he had ambitions to become a 
physician and therefore secured a position in a drug store at Medicine Hat, in Saskatche- 
wan, Canada, to better fit himself for his chosen profession by training in that connec- 
tion. He remained in that position for two years and by that time had lost all desire to 
enter upon the practice of medicine and surgery. He then came to Denver and secured 
a position with the Hendy-Meyer Machine Company, with which he was connected for 
a year. He afterward secured a position as a draftsman in an architect's office and at 
the same time he eked out his meager salary by delivering papers, establishing a news- 
paper route in connection with the Denver Times. He was thus engaged until the wide- 




TOM BOTTEBILL 



150 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

spread financial panic of 1893. He afterward became a bookkeeper for a bicycle house 
and from that position rose steadily until he became proprietor of the establishment and 
won a very substantial measure of success. In 1907 he bought out the George M. Pierce 
Automobile Company and from that beginning developed a notably successful business, 
conducted under the name of Tom Botterill Incorporated, of which he is president. This 
company has one of the finest show rooms and offices in the west. The building was 
erected by Mr. Botterill and is a two-story structure, facing on Broadway and covering 
a quarter of an entire block. On Thirteenth street the building extends a half block. 
The rear part of the building is used as the repair department, which is the most 
thoroughly efficient in the state as regards modern machinery, floor space and expert 
mechanical skill. They do any and all classes of automobile repair work and the depart- 
ment is most liberally patronized. In 1917 Tom Botterill Incorporated was organized, 
with Mr. Botterill as president, Prank Botterill, of Salt Lake City, as vice president, and 
W. D. Wright; Jr., of Denver, as secretary and treasurer. The company has the exclusive 
agency for handling in this district the Pierce-Arrow, Hudson and Dodge cars and their 
business has grown year by year until it is one of extensive and gratifying proportions. 
Mr. Botterill is president of the Wind River Petroleum Company, also of the Wind River 
Refining Company, of the Lander oil district of Wyoming. These companies are close 
corporations, the stock being sold only among the officers. They own and control a large 
body of oil lands in the Lander oil fields of Wyoming and have four wells now about 
ready for operation. The prospects indicate a very valuable oil property and tike busi- 
ness promises substantial and gratifying results. 

On the 12th of January, 1907, Mr. Botterill was united in marriage in Vancouver. 
British Columbia, to Miss Gertrude Clarkson, a daughter of William and Jane Clarkson. 
and they have become parents of two children: Thomas, Jr., who was born in Denver on 
September 17. 1908; and John, born March 9, 1911. Both are now attending school. 

In politics Mr. Botterill maintains an independent course, nor has he ever sought 
office. He renders, however, patriotic service as chairman of the Highways Transport 
Committee of the State Council of Defense. 

He is prominently known in club and social circles, holding membership in the 
Denver Athletic Club, of which he is a director, in the Rotary Club, in the Civic and 
Commercial Association, in the Merchants' Association, in the Automobile Dealers' Asso- 
ciation, in the Lakewood Country Club and several others, while his religious faith is 
indicated by his membership in the Episcopal church. He is one of the public-spirited 
citizens of Denver, interested in all that pertains to the welfare and upbuilding of the 
city and cooperating heartily in every movement that tends to advance the general good. 
His social nature has made him very popular and his unfeigned cordiality wins him 
friends wherever he goes. He may well be proud of what he has accomplished in a 
business way, but he may be prouder still of the fact that everyone is glad to call Tom 
Botterill a friend. 



CLARENCE J. MORLEY. 



Clarence J. Morley, an active and successful practitioner at the Denver bar, was 
born in Dubuque county, Iowa, on the 9th of February, 1869. His father, John Morley, 
a native of England, came to the United States with his father. John Morley, Sr., 
in 1853. John Morley, Jr., was a railway man, active in that line of business for 
many years, his death occurring in 1915. His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Mary D. Plaister. was also born in England and is still living. By her marriage she 
became the mother of three sons, Harold J., Clarence J. and William P. The first 
named is agent for the Western Pacific Railway Company at Marysville, California, 
and the youngest son is a farmer living at Las Animas, Colorado. 

Reared in his native state, Clarence J. Morley pursued his education in the public 
schools of Cedar Falls, Iowa, passing through consecutive grades to the high school, 
in which he completed his studies in 1884. He afterward spent three years as a 
stenographer and at the age of eighteen was appointed to the responsible position 
of court reporter for the tenth judicial district, in which capacity he served for four 
years. Removing westward, he made his way to Denver and thence to Trinidad, 
Colorado, occupying the position of court reporter in the latter place for four and a 
half years. On the expiration of that period he came to Denver, and having determined 
to engage in the practice of law as a life work, he here entered the law school of the 
University of Denver, in w r hich he pursued a thorough course of study and was 
therefrom in 1899. He attended night schools and provided for the expenses 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 151 

of his college course by his own labor. After his admission to the bar he was con- 
nected with the firm of Teller & Dorsey for ten years and since that time has 
practiced alone, concentrating his efforts and attention upon corporation and probate 
law, in both branches of which he is thoroughly qualified, having a comprehensive 
knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence bearing upon such cases. He prepares 
his cases with great thoroughness and care and his marked ability has Drought him 
prominently to the front. His practice is now extensive and of an important character 
and his devotion to his clients' interests has become proverbial. He enjoys . the 
highest respect and confidence of his professional colleagues and contemporaries and 
is a valued member of the Denver Bar Association and the Colorado State Bar Asso- 
ciation. 

In 1893 Mr. Morley was united in marriage to Miss Maude Thompson, of Cedar 
Falls, Iowa, a daughter of Josiah Thompson, who was one of the old-time merchants 
of that state. Mr. and Mrs. Morley have become the parents of four children: Katharine 
Maude, who is a graduate of the University of Colorado; Harold Thompson, twenty 
years of age, who is also a graduate of the University of Colorado; Clarence J., a 
youth of fifteen, who is a sophomore in high school; and Mary Clarissa, seven years 
of age, attending the public schools. 

Mr. Morley filled the position of public administrator for eight years and for 
four years has served on the state board of pardons, in which capacity he still con- 
tinues. In politics he is an active republican, interested in all that has to do with 
the success of the party and the adoption of its principles. His religious faith is 
indicated by his membership in the Warren Memorial Methodist Episcopal church, 
in which he is serving as a member of the board of stewards. He stands for all that 
is most worth while in the community, taking an active interest in plans and measures 
for the material, intellectual, social, political and moral welfare, and the weight of his 
influence is ever cast on the side of right, progress, reform and truth. 



JOSEPH D. GROSS. 



Agricultural and stock raising interests find a progressive, live and successful 
representative in Joseph D. Gross, who is prominently engaged along that line or 
business in Greeley, Colorado. He was born in La Crosse county, Wisconsin, August 
17, 1856, his parents being Dwight D. and Emily (Remington) Gross, natives of 
New York state. They were married in Waukesha, Wisconsin, to which city the 
father had removed when he was a young man, the mother having come to this place 
with her parents. Dwight D. Gross was a farmer by occupation, following that pur- 
suit in Waukesha, Wisconsin, and later in Nebraska, where both he and his wife 
passed away. The removal to the more western state was made in the spring of 1879. 

Joseph D. Gross received his education in the public schools of Genesee, Wiscon- 
sin, and in 1879 removed with the family to Nebraska. In 1882 he was united in 
marriage to a Wisconsin girl. Miss Mary Elizabeth Jolliff, the ceremony being per- 
formed in that state. After the wedding the young couple came to Nebraska, taking 
up their residence in Friend, where they remained until 1890, when they decided to 
move westward, coming to eastern Colorado and taking up their home in Logan 
county. In that locality they made their home for two and a half years and subse- 
quently again removed to Friend, Nebraska, which they made their abode for five 
more years. After that period Mr. Gross came to Greeley and in this city he has since 
been engaged in the cattle and sheep industry, being very successful along this line. 
While in former years his principal activity consisted in farming, he has in more 
recent years largely turned his attention to the feeding of both cattle and sheep, being 
engaged in that enterprise in partnership with his son, John M. Gross. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gross became the parents of four children, of whom three survive: 
John M., who is engaged in business with his father; Nita, at home; and Libby, who 
is also under the parental roof. Mr. Gross is a republican in politics and has always 
loyally supported the party in national issues. He is deeply interested in community 
welfare, having served as township assessor in Saline county, Nebraska, and also as 
a member of the school board, being deeply interested in the cause of education. 
Since coming to Greeley, however, he has devoted his entire attention to his private 
interests. Among the stock feeders of Weld county he takes a foremost rank and has 
earned a high reputation for honesty and fair dealiffg, his transactions always being 
above board. He therefore has built up a large trade and those who deal with him 
have absolute confidence in his business methods and that anything which they buy 



152 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

from him is as he represents it to be. Socially Mr. Gross is popular and fraternally 
he is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America. Both he and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, being interested in church and charitable 
work. They have made many friends since coming to Greeley and the hospitality of 
the best homes of the countryside is extended to them, while at their fireside their 
friends often gather, partaking of the good cheer which Mr. and Mrs. Gross are ever 
ready to extend to all their callers. 



JUDGE JOHN ADAMS PERRY. 

Judge John Adams Perry, occupying the bench of the district court of the second 
judicial district of Colorado, and since 1S84 an active member of the Denver bar, was 
born in Leavenworth, Kansas, on the 21st of August, 1857. His father, William Perry, 
was also an attorney, who was admitted to the bar at Columbus, Georgia, in 1854. He 
was a native of that state and after practicing his profession for a time in the south he 
removed westward to Kansas. He wedded Mary A. Riordan, a native of Castle Grace, 
Ireland, and they became early residents of Kansas, where Mr. Perry represented his 
district in the territorial legislature and also served as a member of the constitutional 
convention which framed the organic law of that state. His last days were passed in 
Denver, where his death occurred in October, 1861. 

Judge Perry of this review in the acquirement of his education attended the Montreal 
Academy at Montreal, Quebec, and afterward became a student in the St. Louis Uni- 
versity and was graduated in law from Columbia in 1882, having pursued a thorough 
law course in Washington. He was then admitted to the bar in the District of Columbia 
and in 1884 was admitted to the bar in Denver, in which year he opened an office in this 
city and has since continued in the practice of law. His practice was always extensive 
and of an important character. He is remarkable among lawyers for the wide research 
and provident care with which he prepares his cases and his ability in handling knotty 
legal problems, combined with his devotion to the highest professional ethics and 
standards, led to his selection for the bench, he being one of the candidates recommended 
by the Bar Association. His legal learning, his analytical mind, the readiness with 
which he grasps the points in an argument, all combine to make him a capable jurist 
and the public and the profession acknowledge him to be the peer of any man who has 
sat upon the bench of the district court. Judge Perry belongs to the Denver' County 
and City Bar Association and the Colorado State Bar Association. His political 
allegiance has always been given to the democratic party, but he holds public 
interests above partisanship and the general welfare before personal aggrand- 
izement. For recreation he turns to languages and is a linguist of superior 
ability. He speaks French, German, Italian and several other languages 
and he has been appointed by Italy to care for Italian interests in this city. He early 
recognized the fact that the keenest joy is that which comes from intellectual stimulus 
and reading and study have largely constituted his recreation. His personal qualities 
command for him the respect and honor of colleagues and contemporaries in the pro- 
fessionand of all who have met him in other relations of life. 



JOHN R. GARDNER. 



John R. Gardner, secretary and manager of the Merchants Fire Insurance Company 
at Denver, was born in Polo, Illinois, on the 15th of September, 1864, a son of Charles 
W. Gardner and a grandson of James Burnett Gardner of New York city, who was a 
cabinet maker by trade and was a descendant of Lord Gardner of England. It was 
James Burnett Gardner who removed westward from New York and became a resident 
of Polo, Illinois. Charles W. Gardner followed the occupation of farming for many 
years until he was called to his final rest. His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Catherine Reed, is a native of Glasgow, Scotland, and is still living, making her home 
with a daughter in Iowa. 

John R. Gardner, who is the eldest in their family of five children, acquired his 
early education in one of the old-time typical little red schoolhouses of Clay county, 
Nebraska, and when not busy with his textbooks he assisted his father in farm work 
and was thus engaged until he reached the age of twenty years. He then left home and 
went to Oakley, Kansas, where for five years he engaged in the livery business. He 




JUDGE JOHN A. PERRY 



154 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

was afterward for two years active in the commission business in Pueblo. Colorado, 
and in 1890 he became a resident of Denver. After locating in this city he spent one 
year in the employ of the Hanson Produce Company and later became connected with 
the N. B. McCrary wholesale grocery house, where he spent three years. On leaving 
that employ he secured a position with the Brown Mercantile Company, with which he 
was connected for two years, and later he purchased the grocery and meat business of 
the firm of Ford & Sulzer at Victor, Colorado, in which business he continued for six 
years. In 1903 he was made president of the Retail Merchants Association of Colorado, 
which position indicated his high standing in trade circles. In .1904 he was elected secre- 
tary and manager of the Retail Merchants Association and had entire charge of its in- 
terests. He conceived the idea and was the main factor in organizing the Merchants 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company, which operated as a mutual company until 1907. when 
it became a stock company under the name of The Merchants Fire Insurance Company, 
with Mr. Gardner as secretary and manager. This is the only local stock fire insurance 
company now in existence in Colorado. He is also the president of the Citizens State 
Bank of Victor, Colorado. 

In February, 1888, Mr. Gardner was united in marriage to Miss Emma L. Epard, of 
Colby, Kansas, a daughter of Simon and Jane Epard, both of whom are still residents 
of Colby, Kansas, and are natives of Ohio. To Mr. and Mrs. Gardner were born two 
sons. Guy N., now twenty-nine years of age. was born in Kansas, was a year old when 
brought to Denver and pursued his education in the schools of this city. After com- 
pleting the high school course in East Denver he attended the Denver University and 
later was associated with his father in business until 1917, becoming assistant secretary 
of the company. He was also secretary of the Fuel Administration of Colorado but 
after the declaration of war he enlisted in the aviation department of the navy and 
graduated on July 6, 1918, from the aviation department of the United States Navy, of the 
Boston Institute of Technology, and at present is studying balloons at Akron, Ohio. Clyde 
H.. aged twenty-seven years, was born in Pueblo, Colorado, and attended the Denver 
schools, completing his course in the East Denver high school, after which he, too, 
became associated with his father in business. For four years he was traveling special 
agent for the company but in May, 1917, enlisted in the quartermaster's department of 
the regular army and on the 29th of December of that year was sent to Jacksonville, 
Florida, and is now in the quartermaster's department of the United States Regular 
Army, stationed at Douglas. Arizona. Both the father and sons are members of the 
Masonic fraternity of Denver and Mr. Gardner has taken the degrees of the Scottish 
Rite and is a member of El Jebel Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. He likewise belongs to the 
Rotary Club and to the Lakewood Country Club. In politics he is a republican of the 
independent type, for he does not feel himself bound by party ties. His business career 
has been marked by steady advancement and step by step he has reached the prominent 
position which he occupies as a representative of insurance interests, being now an 
official in a company which is controlling an extensive business, all of which is under 
the immediate management of Mr. Gardner. 



WILLIAM E. STIMPSON. 



William E. Stimpson, state land agent at Denver, was born in Cheyenne, Wyoming, 
February 24, 1873, and is a son of George B. and Georgia A. (Martin) Stimpson, the 
former a native of Watertown, Wisconsin, and the latter of Millersburg, Kentucky. 
In the early '60s George B. Stimpson removed westward with his family, first settling 
in Denver, where he remained, however, for but a short period. He next became a 
resident of Cheyenne, Wyoming, where he engaged in the real estate and investment 
business. After a time he removed to Pueblo. Colorado, where he continued in the 
same line of business until his death, which occurred in 1892. He held a number of 
public offices of trust, serving as city clerk of Cheyenne and after his removal to 
Pueblo as county clerk. He was also postmaster of that city for a number of years 
prior to his death. His wife died in San Diego, California, in June, 1917, when she 
was sixty-five years of age. Their family numbered a daughter and a son, the former 
being Mrs. Adelaide Anderson Haynes, of Denver. 

William E. Stimpson accompanied his parents on their removal from Wyoming to 
Pueblo, attended the public schools of that city and eventually entered the real estate 
business there. During the Spanish-American war he was appointed superintendent 
of documents and stamps, with headquarters at Pueblo, and continued in that depart- 
ment until 1901, when he took up mining in the San Juan district of Colorado at 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 155 

Silverton. There he operated successfully for four years, after which he received 
appointment to a position in the state treasurer's office, where he continued for one 
term. He afterward secured a clerical position in the state land office and later was 
appointed to a position in the state auditor's office, serving for one term in each of 
these positions. In 1909 he decided to embark in business on his own account and 
opened an office for the purpose of practicing as a state land attorney before the State 
Land Office of Colorado. Wyoming and New Mexico, he being the only state land 
attorney in the United States. Mr. Stimpson is exclusive agent for state school lands 
and is one of the best informed men in Colorado on this class of real estate. His business 
has grown from a modest beginning to one of large proportions. 

On the 15th of February, 1911, Mr. Stimpson was united in marriage to Miss Ellen 
C. Jackman, of Colorado Springs, Colorado. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Masons as a member of Oriental Lodge, No. 87, while in the Scottish Rite he has attained 
the thirty-second degree. He is also a member of the Denver Athletic Club and his 
political allegiance is given to the republican party. A self-made man, he has worked 
his way upward entirely through his own efforts and his persistency and energy have 
been salient features in his growing prosperity. 



GEORGE OLIVER JOHNSON. 

George Oliver Johnson, president of District No. 15 of the United Mine Workers 
of America and a well known resident of Pueblo, was born in Leadville, Colorado, on 
the 4th of October, 1S82, his parents being Matthew and Barbara (Phillipson) Johnson. 
The father was a miner and came to Colorado in 1876. In this state he was married 
to Miss Barbara Phillipson, whose people were among the early pioneer residents of 
this part of the west. Mr. Johnson devoted his time and energy to the mining of coal 
and quartz. Both he and his wife are still living but have removed from this state to 
Seattle, Washington, where they now make their home. To them were born two sons 
and a daughter. 

The eldest of the family is George Oliver Johnson. He was educated in the public 
schools of Leadville and of Cripple Creek and went to work at an early age, since which 
time he has been dependent upon his own resources. In fact he has earned his 
living from the age of fourteen years, and at eighteen he started out as a miner and 
has since been identified with mining interests. He has always been active in union 
affairs and at the last election was the one that made the work of the organization 
successful. He defeated J. R. Lawson as president of District No. 15 of tne United 
Mine Workers of America. He had previously held other positions, working his way 
steadily upward to the one which he now fills. He did not leave his work to get 
votes but his position upon many questions affecting the union won him support 
and indicated in what high esteem he is held by the miners. 

On the 30th of September, 1903, Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma Jaeger and their children are Charles, Lorna, Matthew, Pansy and Thomas. 

In politics Mr. Johnson remains independent, supporting men and measures rather 
than party. He is interested in the state and its development and is a public-spirited 
and respected citizen who cooperates in many measures for the general good and who 
at all times stands for progress and improvement along those lines which are in har- 
mony with a democratic spirit. When leisure permits he enjoys fishing, to which he 
turns for recreation. 



FRANKLIN CURTIS GOUDY. 

Franklin Curtis Gcudy is an attorney at law who has won prominence in his pro- 
fession and at the same time has been an active factor in political and fraternal circles. 
A native of Haynesville, Ohio, he is a son of the late Abel Curtis Goudy, who was likewise 
born in the Buckeye state and belonged to one of the old families there, founded in 
Ohio by William Goudy, who was of Scotch descent. Abel C. Goudy became a successful 
merchant of Ohio. His wife bore the maiden name of Sciniette Vantilburg and was 
born in Ohio. She. too, belonged to one of the old pioneer families of that state and 
came of Holland Dutch ancestry. Members of the Vantilburg family participated in the 
War of 1812. 

The parents of Franklin C. Goudy died when he was a child. Thus, early left an 



156 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

orphan, he was reared by his uncle, Francis Vantilburg, and was educated in the public 
schools of Ohio and in Michigan University. He followed teaching for two terms in 
the district schools of Ohio, and later became assistant superintendent of the public 
schools of Marion, Iowa. While thus engaged, he devoted the hours which are usually 
termed leisure to the study of law, for he regarded teaching merely as an initial step 
to other professional activity, and in 1878 he was admitted to practice at the bar of 
Kansas. In February, 1879, he arrived in Colorado, settling first at Colorado Springs, 
where he remained for eighteen months. He then removed to Ouray, and there he prac- 
ticed successfully for a time and also served for three years as district attorney of the 
seventh judicial district. Subsequently he removed to Gunnison, Colorado, where he 
continued in the practice of law, and afterward he followed his profession in Montrose 
for two years. In 1888 he arrived in Denver, where he has since remained, devoting his 
attention throughout the intervening period of thirty years to the general practice of 
law, although he has largely specialized in irrigation law. He holds metabership with 
the Denver Bar Association, which has honored him with its presidency, and he also 
belongs to the Colorado State Bar Association and to the American Bar Association. 

At Valley Falls, Kansas, on the 10th of December, 1879, Mr. Goudy was united in 
marriage to Miss Ida J. Gephart, a native of Maryland and a daughter of S. C. and Eliza 
(Beall) Gephart. Mr. and Mrs. Goudy became parents of five children, of whom two 
sons are yet living: Franklin B., who is a member of the legal profession and resides 
in Denver; and Alfred H., who is at present in the United States military service at 
Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. 

In politics Mr. Goudy has always been a stanch republican and in 1896 entered upon 
a two years' term as county attorney of Denver. He has given stanch support to the 
party and its principles, putting forth every effort in his power to advance its interests 
and promote its success. He was a Blaine elector of 1884 and in 1900 was a candidate 
on the republican ticket for the office of governor. He has done very effective work along 
political and civic lines and he is also prominently known in fraternal circles. A member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, he was elected in September, 1916, for a term 
of two years to the office of grand sire of the United States and Canada. He has received 
all of the degrees of Scottish Rite Masonry up to and including the thirty-second and 
in the York Rite is a member of Coronal Commandery, No. 36, Knights Templar. Socially, 
he holds membership in the Denver Athletic Club and the Lakewood Country Club. His 
life measures up to high standards of manhood and citizenship and he is justly accounted 
one of the foremost and honored residents of Denver. 



HON. WILLIAM H. MALONE. 

Hon. William H. Malone, attorney at law and public trustee of Denver, was born July 
10, 1855, in Benton county, Mississippi, a son of the late Richard H. Malone, who was a 
native of Alabama and a descendant of an old Virginia family of Scotch-Irish lineage. 
The founder of the family in the new world came to America prior to the Revolutionary 
war and settled in Virginia. The grandfather, Booth Malone, was a Methodist minister 
of Virginia who became prominently known in that connection in both his native state 
and in Alabama. Richard K. Malone was a successful planter and slaveholder who died 
in Virginia in 1859, at the age of thirty-six years. His wife, who bore the maiden name 
of Mary Cole Cossitt, was a native of Connecticut and her ancestors were of French 
descent and became pioneer residents of Connecticut, where they located during the early 
part of the seventeenth century. The death of Mrs. Malone occurred in Denver in 1912, 
when she had attained the very advanced age of eighty-three years. She was the mother 
of five children, four sons and a daughter, of whom William H. Malone of this review 
was the third in order of birth. There was a half brother. Her children are: Helen 
M., now the wife of Frank W. Crocker, who since 1872 has been a resident of Denver; 
Booth M., former district attorney and district judge of the city and county of Denver; 
William H., of this review; and Richard H., who is a director of the Federal Reserve 
Bank of the tenth district and was formerly a well known cracker manufacturer of 
Denver. Robert E. MacCracken, the half brother, is engaged in the real estate business 
and is local representative of five western states in the American Exchange National 
Bank of New York city. 

William H. Malone pursued his early education in the public schools of Geneseo, 
Henry county, Illinois, and afterward attended Beloit College of Wisconsin, from which 
institution he was graduated in 1877. He then took up the study of law in the office of 
Lyman & Jackson, prominent attorneys of Chicago. He later continued his law reading 




HON. WILLIAM II. MALI >XK 



158 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

in the office of Wells, Smith & Macon of Denver and was admitted to the bar in 1880. 
He came to this city in the summer of 1878 and immediately after his admission to 
the bar he entered upon active practice, so that he has been a representative of the legal 
profession in this city for thirty-eight years. He has always concentrated his efforts and 
attention upon general practice and he is today one of the oldest attorneys actively con- 
nected with the profession in Denver. His experience was that which usually falls to 
the lot of a lawyer, who, unlike the merchant, cannot take up a business already estab- 
lished but must commence at the initial point, must plead and win his first case and 
work his way upward by ability, gaining his reputation and success by merit. His 
present prominence has come to him as the reward of earnest endeavor, fidelity to trust 
and recognized ability. He was admitted to practice before the supreme court of the 
United States in 18S6. He belongs to the Denver Bar Association and enjoys the 
regard of professional colleagues and contemporaries, who recognize his marked fidelity 
to the highest professional standards and ethics. 

On the 17th of April, 1890, Mr. Malone was united in marriage to Miss Anne R. 
Sullivan, a native of Kentucky and a daughter of the late Dr. Thomas Sullivan and 
Eliza Sullivan, representatives of a prominent old family of Louisville. Mr. and Mrs. 
Malone have become parents of three children: Anne, 'William H., Jr., and Mary Mar- 
garet. The first two were born in Denver and the last named in Yonkers, New York. 

In politics Mr. Malone has always been a stanch democrat since age conferred upon 
him the right of franchise. He was appointed to the office of public trustee in 1909 and 
served for four years, while in 1917 he was again appointed to the position and is now 
the incumbent therein, his later appointment coming to him in recognition of the capable 
service which he rendered during his first term in office. His family holds membership 
with the Presbyterian church. Mr. Malone started out in the business world a poor boy, 
and like Lincoln, attributes much of his success to his mother, saying that he had one 
of the best mothers that any man could have had, and that her teachings had marked 
influence upon his life. He has always been a close student of vital questions and issues 
of the day and has kept well informed on leading political, economic and social prob- 
lems. He has ever worked in the interests of the masses, especially for the poor in order 
to better their condition and ameliorate hard conditions of life. Mr. Malone was the 
author of the law on the initiative and referendum, recall of officers and recall of judicial 
decisions, and other laws of value and importance that are found on the statute books 
of the state. His entire career has been characterized by a spirit of progress that 
has brought splendid results for the individual, the " community and the common- 
wealth, and in his public service he has looked far beyond the exigencies of 
the moment to the possibilities and opportunities of the future and his labors have 
brought results which are of value not only to the present generation but which will 
remain of great worth to the state for years to come. 



WILLIAM GALT HUBBELL. 

William Gait Hubbell, postmaster of Fort Lupton, was born at Big Bend on the 
Platte River in Weld county. Colorado. January 2. 1877. and is a son of Dr. Stephen J. 
and Agatha Clarissa (Allen) Hubbell, who were natives of "Virginia. The father was a 
physician, who in 1859 removed westward to Weld county, establishing his home in 
Greeley when the work of development and improvement had scarcely been begun in 
this part of the state. At the time of the Civil war. however, he returned to Virginia 
and enlisted in the southern army, serving throughout the period of hostilities. He was 
shot through the left lung while engaged in duty. After the war he returned to Greeley, 
where he practiced his profession for four or five years, until Indian attacks rendered 
his home unsafe and he made his way to Port Lupton for protection. There he remained 
and practiced medicine for a considerable period, also conducting a drug store. He 
remained a leading and representative physician of the district for many years but 
retired from active practice in 1913. He continued, however, to conduct the drug store 
until the fall of 1917, when he sold and removed to Denver, where he is now residing, 
enjoying a well earned rest at the age of eighty-five years. His wife passed away on 
the 27th of January. 1918. For more than a half century they had traveled life's journey 
together and were one of the well known pioneer couples of the state. 

William G. Hubbell was reared and educated at Fort Lupton and in early life worked 
upon a farm. He also rode the range as a cowboy or puncher until he reached the age 
of twenty-five years, when he took up his abode in the town and secured employment 
in a store, in which he worked for two years. He was afterward employed at the milk 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 159 

condenser for a year and later engaged in general merchandising for two years on his 
own account, but at the end of that time sold the business and turned his attention to 
newspaper publication, purchasing the Port Lupton Press. This he conducted for three 
years, when he was appointed postmaster on the 3d of April, 1915. He was a partner of 
H. R. Waring in the ownership and conduct of the Press for two years and at the end 
of that time sold his interest in the business to his partner and assumed the position 
of postmaster. He is making a most excellent record in the office by the prompt, system- 
atic, and faithful manner in which he discharges his duties, always giving courteous 
attention to the patrons of the office and carefully safeguarding the interests, of the 
government in this connection. 

On the 1st of October, 1905, Mr. Hubbell was married to Miss Theodora Cronkhite 
and they have become the parents of two children: Clara Jean, born December 21, 1906; 
and Theodora Evelyn, born March 13, 1910. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hubbell are faithful members of the Episcopal church, and he votes 
with the democratic party. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons and the Elks 
and loyally adheres to the teachings and purposes of those organizations. Aside from 
his duties as postmaster he has some business interests, handling real estate and loans 
and acting as notary public. He has been a lifelong resident of Weld county and for 
forty years has been a witness of its growth and development, watching its transforma- 
tion from a wild western frontier district into one of the populous and prosperous counties 
of the state. 



FRANK M. BUTCHER. 



Prominent and honored among the business men of Denver is Prank M. Butcher, 
who occupies a leading position in financial circles as president of the Denver Stock 
Yards Bank. Well defined plans and carefully executed purposes have brought him to 
his present position through the steps of an orderly progression. Liberal educational 
opportunities qualified him for life's practical and responsible duties, and obstacles and 
difficulties in his path have seemed but to serve as an impetus for renewed effort on 
his part. Mr. Butcher is a native of Iowa, his birth having occurred in Villisca on the 
12th of August, 1875. His parents were Preston and Mary (McCollum) Butcher. The 
father was born in Ohio, as was the paternal grandfather. For many years Preston 
Butcher devoted his life to general agricultural pursuits but is now living retired. His 
wife was born in Preston county. West Virginia, and has passed away. In their family 
were eight children who are yet living. 

Frank M. Butcher acquired a public school education, supplemented by a course of 
study in the Kansas State University at Lawrence. Kansas, the family having removed 
to that state during his youthful days. For two years he engaged in farming in Kansas 
and for two years followed general merchandising there. His initial step in connection 
with the banking business was made at Blackwell, Oklahoma, where he entered a bank, 
in which he served as cashier for nine years. He then became national bank examiner 
in May, 1909, and continued to act in that capacity until the 1st of July, 1915, when he 
resigned to become identified with the Denver Stock Yards Bank as its cashier. He thus 
served until January, 1917, when he was elected to the presidency, and has since been 
at the head of the institution, concentrating his attention upon constructive effort, 
administrative direction and executive control. The bank has shown a steady growth 
throughout the entire period of his connection therewith. It is capitalized for one hun- 
dred thousand dollars, has surplus and undivided profits amounting to one hundred and 
twenty thousand, five hundred and twenty dollars, while its deposits have reached one 
million, eight hundred and sixty-seven thousand, two hundred and twenty-nine dollars. 
The other officers of the bank are: Henry Gebhard, vice president; Ira B. Casteel, vice 
president; W. Dale Clark, cashier, while James Brennan and Charles A. Gebhard. together 
with the officers, constitute the board of directors. 

In June, 1901, Mr. Butcher was united in marriage to Miss Mary Allen, of Lawrence, 
Kansas, and they now have a daughter, Mary, six years of age. who is attending school. 
Mr. Butcher is well known in Masonic circles, having taken the degrees of lodge, chapter 
and consistory, while with the Nobles of El Jebel Temple of the Mystic Shrine he has 
crossed the sands of the desert. He is likewise prominent in the Knights of Pythias lodge, 
in which he has filled all of the chairs in both the subordinate and grand lodges. He 
turns to golf for recreation and his interest in community affairs is indicated in his 
membership in the Civic and Commercial Association. He is in hearty sympathy with 
its well defined plans and purposes for the upbuilding of Denver, its improvement along 



160 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

lines of municipal beauty and adornment, the extension of its trade relations and the 
upholding of those interests which are ever a matter of civic virtue and of civic pride. 
As a business man he deserves much credit for what he has accomplished, for he has 
been dependent upon his own resources from early manhood, and it has been through 
the utilization of the opportunities that have come to him, resulting in the development 
of talent and ability, that he has reached his present position as a foremost banker of 
Colorado's capital. 



MELVILLE EMERSON PETERS. 

Melville Emerson Peters, for twenty-four years a member of the Denver bar, came 
to the outset of his professional career in this city well equipped for the onerous duties of 
the profession by previous experience and with the passing years his powers have 
broadened and deepened and he is accounted one of the foremost representatives of the 
legal fraternity in this state. He was born in Hillsdale county, Michigan, on the 7th 
of March, 1867, and is a son of William J. and Roxey (Troop) Peters, both of whom 
were natives of the state of New York and have now passed away. They had a family 
of eight children, four of whom are living. The ancestral line can be traced back to a 
brother of the Rev. Hugh Peters, who was one of the founders of Harvard University. 

The youthful days of Melville Peters were spent in the usual manner of lads of that 
locality and period. District school training was supplemented by a high school course 
in Coldwater, Michigan, in 1886 and 1887, after which he entered the University of 
Michigan for the study of law and was graduated with the class of 1891, at which time 
the LL. B. degree was conferred upon him. Admitted to the bar, he at once entered 
upon the practice of his profession in Coldwater, Michigan, where he remained for three 
years and then sought the broader field offered by a growing western city and became a 
resident of Denver. Here he has since concentrated his efforts and attention upon his 
practice. He is devotedly attached to his profession, is systematic and methodical in 
habits, sober and discreet in judgment, diligent in research and conscientious in the 
discharge of every duty. 

In 1907 Mr. Peters was united in marriage to Miss Lola M. Johnson, of Illinois. He 
is appreciative of the social amenities of life and has membership in both the University 
and the Denver Athletic Clubs, while along the strict path of his profession he is con- 
nected with the Denver County and City Bar Association, the Colorado State Bar 
Association and the American Bar Association. He is a broadminded man, interested 
in everything that has to do with welfare and progress in his adopted city and cooperat- 
ing heartily in well denned plans and measures looking to the general good, while the 
zeal with which he has devoted his energies to his profession, the careful regard evinced 
for the interests of his clients and an assiduous and unrelaxing attention to all the 
details of his cases have brought him a large business and made him very successful 
in its conduct. 



ORVILLE W. HAMPTON. 



Orville W. Hampton, widely spoken of as a leading business man of Denver, is the 
president of the First National Bank of Englewood. He was born in Humphrey, Nebraska, 
June 8, 1888. His father, William A. Hampton, was a physician and surgeon, devoting 
his life to that profession until he turned his attention to the banking business. He was 
a native of Ohio and the son of an Ohio farmer who had formerly lived in Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania, before removing to the Buckeye state. The same pioneer spirit took 
William A. Hampton to the west and after living for some time in Nebraska he estab- 
lished his home in Denver, where he has now retired from active business. He married 
Emma Grigsby and she, too, survives. They have been residents of Denver since 1906 
and are highly esteemed in this city, having an extensive circle of warm friends here. 

Orville W. Hampton largely acquired his education in the public schools of Alliance, 
Nebraska, passing through consecutive grades to his graduation from the high school 
with the class of 1906, when he was a youth of eighteen years. The family then came 
to Denver and he became manager with the Denver Transportation Company. He later 
went to Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and divided his time between Lancaster and Phila- 
delphia, where he was engaged in the jewelry and optical business for about three years. 
On the expiration of that period he removed to Newnan. Georgia, where he became man- 







I 



MELVILLE E. PETERS 



162 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

ager of a jewelry store, and later he became a resident of Yuma, Arizona, where he 
founded the Yuma National Bank, of which he became vice president and manager. He 
spent two years in that office, after which he became vice president of a live stock com- 
pany and devoted four years to these undertakings. He then transferred his activities 
to Los Angeles, California, where he was engaged in the brokerage business, having 
removed to the Pacific coast for the benefit of his health. He continued there for six 
months and then went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, and on his way back to the coast 
stopped at Denver. He established the Hampton Hardware & Furniture Company at 
Alamosa, Colorado, actively continuing in the business for four years. In October. 1916, 
he became identified with banking interests, becoming president of the First National 
Bank of Englewood. He has since figured prominently in financial circles in Denver 
and he is a member of the American Bankers Association and the Institute of American 
Bankers. He closely studies every question that has to do with the business and is 
actuated by a most progressive spirit in the conduct of the institution of which he is 
the head. He also has stock raising and farming interests, owning an excellent tract 
of- land in the San Luis valley of Colorado. This is well irrigated and drained and upon 
it he has high grade stock. 

Mr. Hampton is well known as a valued member of the Denver Athletic Club and 
also of the Lakewood Country Club. He is a Mason, having membership in Alamosa 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M., also in the chapter and commandery, and is a member of El Jebel 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He turns to golf for exercise, greatly enjoying a game on 
the links when his business interests permit. His has been an active and useful life, 
his efforts being resultant, and his success illustrates the possibilities for accomplishment 
through individual activity. 



ALFRED C. CROFT. 



Among the respected and valued citizens of Weld county is Alfred C. Croft, who has 
now attained the age of eighty years. He is an honored veteran of the Civil war, has 
been identified with the banking business at various points and has been actively engaged 
in farming in Weld county for a long period. He was born in Greenwich, Massachusetts, 
March 8, 1838, and is a son of Nathan and Adeline (Grant) Croft. Throughout his 
entire life the father followed farming, being at different times identified with agri- 
cultural pursuits in Massachusetts, Minnesota, Iowa and Wisconsin, |nd in connection 
with the tilling of the soil he engaged in raising live stock. His wife was an interested 
and active member of the Methodist church. 

Alfred C. Croft, whose name introduces this review, pursued his education in the 
public and high schools of Greenwich, Massachusetts, and was graduated in December, 
1854. The father removed with the family to Wisconsin and Alfred C. Croft took up 
business there as a farmer, continuing in the active work of the fields until July. 1861, 
when in response to the country's call for troops to preserve the Union he enlisted at 
Stoughton, Wisconsin, as a member of the Seventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He 
joined the army as a private but was made a non-commissioned officer, being appointed 
sergeant of his company, and finally he rose to the rank of captain. In the battle of 
South Mountain in Maryland he was wounded, losing the lower part of his left leg. He 
was carried to a hospital and there remained from the 16th of September, 1862, until 
the 21st of December, when by reason of his injuries he was honorably discharged. He 
had participated in a number of hotly contested engagements, including the battle of 
Gainesville and the second battle of Bull Run, where his command lost in that engage- 
ment forty-five men in killed and wounded. After being incapacitated for duty Mr. Croft 
was honorably discharged and returned to his Wisconsin home, where he remained until 
March, 1863, when he entered a commercial college in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in order 
to qualify for the business world. He was graduated from that institution in November, 
1863. after which he entered a large mercantile house in the capacity of bookkeeper 
and office manager, there remaining for a year and a half or until July, 1865, when he 
entered upon railroad work at North McGregor, Iowa. After four months, on account 
of the illness of his wife, he was forced to resign his position there in October, 1865, and 
for several months was out of business. In 1866 he received the appointment of post- 
master at Stoughton. Wisconsin, and acceptably served in that position for eight years, 
after which he resigned and removed to southwest Minnesota, where he engaged in 
newspaper work as owner, editor and publisher of the Rock County Herald. This under- 
taking proved a success and he continued to publish the paper for six years, at the end 
of which time he sold out in 1881 to A. L. Stoughton, who had formerly been foreman in 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 163 

the office. Mr. Croft was then out of business for a year and on the expiration of that 
period entered the service of the Rock County Bank at Luverne, Minnesota. He first 
held the position of head bookkeeper but was advanced to that of assistant cashier and 
remained with the bank for two years, at the end of which time his health gave way 
and he was not active in business through the succeeding five years. He again entered 
the bank as assistant cashier and there continued until 1901. During this time he left 
the bank, however, for one year and organized the First National Bank at Hills, Minne- 
sota, of which he became the president and so continued until 1903, placing the business 
of the bank upon a substantial basis. He then determined to follow Horace Greeley's 
advice and go west. In September, 1902, therefore, he arrived in Greeley, Colorado, 
where he has since remained. He has a ranch of one hundred and sixty acres ten miles 
from Greeley and east of Gilcrest. On this he maintains a small herd of high grade 
Jersey cows. His agricultural and stock raising interests are wisely, successfully and 
carefully conducted and show him to be a man of marked business enterprise. 

In Armenia, Juneau county, Wisconsin, on the 14th of September, 1864, Mr. Croft 
was united in marriage to Miss Anna Hofstater, a daughter of James and Susan E. 
Hofstater. The father was a farmer and died during the period of the Civil war in 
June, 1863. To Mr. and Mrs. Crpft have been born three children. Edward O. died in 
St. Paul in 1913 of cancer of the stomach. He was born in July, 1865, and passed away 
February 7. 1913, his remains being interred at Luverne, Minnesota. He had married 
Miss Ida M. Strever. a daughter of Hiram Strever, St. Paul, Minnesota, and a Civil war 
veteran. Edward was a painter and decorator and had two children, of whom Luverne 
died at the age of four years, while Geraldine, eighteen years of age, is a high school 
pupil and is fitting herself for teaching languages. Harry N., born in 1878, is on the 
ranch at Gilcrest. Alfred C, born in 1884, is an artillery officer now in France. He was 
an instructor of field artillery and greatly interested in military service. He was anxious 
to go to West Point but owing to unforeseen circumstances could not carry out this plan. 
In private life he is an expert accountant and civil engineer and he has sacrificed most 
willingly a business career to go to foreign lands to serve his country in her hour of need. 

In his political views Mr. Croft has long been a stalwart advocate of democratic 
principles. His wife is a member of the Baptist church. They are highly esteemed in 
Weld county, having made many warm friends during the period of their residence in 
Colorado. The career of Mr. Croft has been one of usefulness and honor and in various 
localities he has contributed to the world's work along the line of progress and improve- 
ment in business affairs as well as in progressive citizenship. He has ever been as true 
and loyal to his country and her needs as he was in her hour of peril when he followed 
the nation's starry banner on the battlefields of the south. 



P. H. CHAMBERS, D. D. S. 



Dentistry stands unique among the professions in that its successful representatives 
must be possessed of qualifications of a threefold character They must not only have 
intimate knowledge of the scientific principles of dentistry, but they must also possess 
marked mechanical skill and ingenuity, and added to this, must have that business dis- 
cernment which enables them to successfully control the financial end of the business. 
Dr. Chambers is well qualified in all of these respects and has made for himself a most 
creditable place as a representative of the dental fraternity of Denver. He was born 
in Lexington, Missouri. March 8, 1857, and is a son of Dr. P. H. and Mary (Wallace) 
Chambers, both of whom were natives of Lexington, /Kentucky, whence they removed 
to Missouri in early life. There the father became a well known physician and surgeon, 
residing for many years at Lexington, where his marked professional skill won for him 
a large practice. He continued to devote his attention thereto until his death, which 
occurred in 1903. He had long survived his wife, who passed away in Lexington in 1860. 

Dr. Chambers of this review was the second in order of birth in a family of four 
children. In his youthful days he was a pupi-1 in the public schools and mastered the 
branches of learning taught in successive grades until he became a high school pupil. 
After leaving the high school he entered the St. Louis Dental College at St. Louis. 
Missouri, and was graduated therefrom with the class of 1875. He then removed to 
southeastern Missouri and took up his professional work, in which he continued success- 
fully for three years, after which he removed to Fairfield, Illinois. There he remained 
for eight years and was successfully engaged in a lucrative practice at that point, but 
contemplating a change, he decided upon Denver and soon afterward came to this city. He 
has since ranked with the leading dental surgeons of his adopted city and is one of the 



164 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

four oldest members of the profession in the state in years of continuous connection 
with active practice. He has always been accorded a liberal practice and throughout the 
intervening years he has kept in touch with the latest researches and scientific discov- 
eries which have had to do with professional skill and efficiency. He belongs to the 
Denver Dental Society, of which he has been the president, and he also has membership 
in the Colorado State Dental Society. In addition to his profession he is president of 
the Minerals Recovery Company. 

On March 8, 1887, in Fairfield, Illinois, Dr. Chambers was united in marriage to 
Miss Anna Bennett and to them were born four children: Mrs. Sally Bryan, who pur- 
sued her education in the schools of Fairfield, Illinois; Mrs. Hattie Hudson, who was 
born in Fairfield in 1891 and later attended the Denver high school; and Lilburn, who 
was born in Fairfield, Illinois, in 1892, and is now in the aviation service of the United 
States Army with the rank of major. 

Dr. Chambers is identified with the Knights of Pythias and with the Fraternal Union. 
In politics he maintains an independent course, voting according to the dictates of his 
judgment without regard to party ties. His religious faith is indicated by his member- 
ship in the Methodist Episcopal church. Dr. Chambers and his family are widely and 
favorably known in Denver, where he has so long resided, and his personal worth as 
well as his professional ability have gained for him the high regard in which he is 
uniformly held. 



HON. JAMES W. McCREERY. 

At the bar of Greeley have been found many able men, capable of crossing swords 
in forensic combat with leading lawyers of any section of the state. Active in the trial 
of cases for many years, Hon. James W. McCreery has made for himself a creditable 
position among the strong members of the Greeley bar, carefully conducting the interests 
entrusted to his care and at all times proving most loyal to his clients. 

James W. McCreery was born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, July 13, 1849, a son 
of William G. and Mary H. McCreery. He was graduated from the State Normal School 
of Indiana, Pennsylvania, and then took up the study of law in the office and under the 
direction of the late Silas M. Clark, of Indiana, Pennsylvania, who at the time of his 
death in 1893 was state supreme judge. Justice Clark directed his reading until Mr. 
McCreery was admitted to the bar of his native state in the year 18S0. Feeling that he 
would have better opportunities for professional advancement in the west, he came to 
Colorado in 1881, making his way to Greeley, Weld county, where he was admitted to 
practice. He has since remained an active member of the bar of this district and is 
numbered among the able lawyers who hold to high professional standards and ethics. 
He occupies offices in the First National Bank building, utilizing the same suite of 
rooms for thirty-two years. He has long made a specialty of irrigation and corporation 
law and few members of the bar are more thoroughly informed concerning this branch 
of jurisprudence than Mr. McCreery. 

In August, 1883, was celebrated the marriage of Miss Mary M. Arbuckle and James 
W. McCreery and to them were born four children. 

In public affairs Mr. McCreery has figured prominently and his aid and influence 
have been potent forces for progress and for good. He served as state senator from 1888 
until 1892 and gave most thoughtful and earnest consideration to all the vital questions 
which came up for settlement. That his record was a commendable one is indicated in 
the fact that he was recalled to that position in 1896 and continued a member of the upper 
house of the Colorado legislature until 1900. His interest in the cause of education has 
always been deep and lasting and he was the author of the bill, and was instrumental 
in carrying it through the state legislature, establishing the State Teachers' College. 
This was in 1889 and the institution at that time was known as the State Normal School. 
He gave evidence of his continued interest by becoming a member of the board of 
trustees and for many succeeding years he was president of the board. Mr. McCreery is 
prominent and well known in Masonic circles, having attained the thirty-second degree 
in the Scottish Rite. At the present he is especially active in war work, having taken 
up with great vigor the causes of the Young Men's Christian Association and the Red 
Cross Society. In fact, during the past year he has devoted most of his time to these 
causes and has made numerous effective addresses in order to secure the largest possible 
public cooperation with these societies who do such untold good for our soldiers. His 
service as president of the board of the State Teachers' College, however, did not exhaust 




HON. JAMES W. McCREERY 



166 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Mr. McCreery's activities along this line, for he has also been a member of the board of 
education of Greeley, serving from 1910 until 1915 and doing much to further local 
educational standards. He is a lecturer on irrigation law in the University of Colorado 
and has the distinction of having written the article on irrigation and water rights in 
the "Modern American Law," and is a worthy and valued member of the Weld County 
Bar Association, the Colorado State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. 
He has been honored with the presidency of the state organization, which office he filled 
in 1907 and 1908. 

Mr. McCreery enjoys a large and lucrative practice and has one of the most extensive 
and complete law libraries in the state. His son, Donald C, is associated with him in 
practice and the firm has a most extensive clientele that has connected it with leading 
interests heard in the courts. For the past thirty-three years Mr. McCreery has also 
been extensively engaged in farming, being the owner of six hundred and forty acres 
of highly cultivated and productive land in Morgan county, Colorado. Along political 
lines he has always been a republican and throughout his entire life has been a stalwart 
champion of interests and measures which work for public improvement. 



RUSSELL W. FLEMING. 



Russell W. Fleming, of Fort Collins, was born in Bainbridge, Georgia, June 7. 1879, 
a son of William O. and Georgia (Williams) Fleming, who were likewise natives of 
that state. The father was a lawyer, serving also for some time on the bench. He was 
a soldier of the Confederate army throughout the period of the Civil war. He died in 
the year 1882, while his widow, long surviving him. departed this life in 1914. 

Their son, Russell W. Fleming, was reared in Georgia. He was admitted to the 
bar when nineteen years of age, after which he entered upon practice in his native state 
and remained a member of the Georgia bar until 1904. Leaving home, he made his 
way to Colorado and chose Fort Collins as the place of his location in 1906. He then 
opened a law office and through the intervening period of twelve years has continued 
in practice in Larimer county. 



JOHN W. HUNTER. 



It seems that Weld county, Colorado, is fortunate in its public officials, for 
practically all of the officers ever elected to public positions have not only turned out 
to be honorable and painstaking, but exceedingly efficient and result-bringing in their 
administration of public trusts. Among these is John W. Hunter, clerk of the district 
court of Weld county. He was born May 21, 1863, in Centerville, Iowa, a son of Jasper 
Newton and Elizabeth A. (Hodge) Hunter, the former a native of Indiana and the latter 
of Illinois. The father was an agriculturist by occupation and from his native state 
removed to Centerville, Iowa, at an early day. In 1865 he went to Nebraska, where he 
continued to engage in farming until 1885, when he came to Colorado, locating near 
Grand Junction and engaging in agricultural pursuits and the raising of live stock. 
He successfully continued in that occupation until his life's labors were ended, on Novem- 
ber 10, 1904. He was an honored veteran of the Civil war, having served for about 
one year with the Thirteenth Iowa Infantry. His widow survives him and now makes 
her home at Grand Valley, Colorado. 

John W. Hunter was reared and educated in Nebraska, his parents having removed 
to that state when he was only two years of age. When he was old enough he began 
to assist his father in the work of the farm and subsequently continued in the same 
line for a number of years. In 1889 he came to Denver and later took up land in Weld 
county six miles from Greeley, where he continued in farming until 1900. being quite 
successful in his labors. In that year he accepted the position of deputy county assessor 
and was so engaged for one term. At the end of that period he took up contracting and 
building and followed that trade with good results until January, 1913, when he was 
appointed to the position of clerk of the district court, which he has since held. He 
has proven himself a trustworthy and efficient official, standing high in the regard of the 
public and the court, his painstaking and systematic work finding merited appreciation. 

On December 31, 1889, Mr. Hunter was united in marriage to Miss Hattie M. Myers 
and to them were born two children. Frank H. was born January 31, 1891, and died 
February 5, 1918, shortly after his birthday. He was engaged as a farmer and carpenter 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 167 

in Paul, Idaho, and there he passed away. Carl C, the other son, was born September 
26, 1892. and after receiving intensive training with the United States Coast Artillery 
at San Francisco, was made sergeant and is now in France. 

Politically Mr. Hunter is a democrat and has given to his party his unquestioned 
support. He stands high in local councils of democracy and has served as chairman of 
the democratic county central committee. For twenty-four years he has been a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has held all the chairs in the lodge. He 
and his wife reside at No. 1325 Seventh street, Greeley, and many are the friends who 
partake of the hospitality of their pleasant home. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hunter have been 
much interested in mental and moral development and are ever ready to support measures 
for the uplift of humanity. 



THEODORE L. MEIER. 



Theodore L. Meier is at the head of one of the important commercial interests of 
Denver as the president of the O. P. Baur Confectionery Company, conducting business 
at No. 1512 Curtis street. He is very enterprising and progressive and has been active 
in the upbuilding of a business which is now the most widely known confectionery 
establishment in the west. Mr. Meier was reared in Louisville, Kentucky, and there 
pursued his education in the public schools. When a youth of fourteen he was appren- 
ticed to a confectioner, with whom he learned all phases and branches of the trade, and 
on completing his apprenticeship he sought larger fields in which to test out his efficiency 
in the line in which he had been trained. He was afterward employed in the leading 
confectionery establishments of Boston, New York and other eastern cities. Hearing 
favorable reports of the west and its wonderful opportunities, he concluded to seek his 
fortune in this section of the country and accordingly in the fall of 1878 he arrived in 
Denver, where he immediately found employment with the firm of Caldwell & Baur, 
who were pioneer confectioners of the city and had built up the leading business in 
their line. They were then located at the corner of Sixteenth and Lawrence streets. 
The business had been originally established during the early '70s and the present busi- 
ness is an outgrowth of that pioneer establishment. Several years after Caldwell & Baur 
had been conducting business Mr. Baur withdrew from that connection and established 
an individual business on Larimer street. Mr. Meier accompanied him and at that 
point the business developed rapidly and grew to such proportions that it necessitated 
a removal to the present location at No. 1512 Curtis street. This removal was made in 
1892. During the latter '80s Mr. Meier had become a member of the firm, the business 
being then conducted under the style of O. P. Baur & Company. That name was retained 
until Mr. Baur's death, when the business was incorporated, Mr. Meier becoming the 
president, with Mrs. Marie Baur as vice president and J. J. Jacobs, who has been with 
the company for fifteen years, as secretary and treasurer. The 0. P. Baur Confectionery 
Company is doing by far the largest business of the kind in the state. The company 
employs on an average one hundred and twenty-five people engaged in the manufacture 
of the entire product put out by the establishment. Their store is attractively and 
tastefully arranged and furnished and every effort is put forth to please the patrons. 
They manufacture high grade confectionery of a variety seldom found outside of New 
York. They have ever maintained the highest standards in the quality of their output 
and their candies have proven so uniformly satisfactory that their business has now 
reached most gratifying and substantial proportions. Mr. Meier through thorough pre- 
liminary training and long experience is splendidly qualified to carry on an extensive 
business of this kind. He closely studies the trade and its wishes and his efforts have 
been so directed that prosperity in large measure has come to him. He is also a director 
of the Home Savings & Trust Company of Denver. 

In this city, in 1892, Mr. Meier was united in marriage to Miss Edna F. Ervin, a 
native of Ohio, and they have one daughter, Doris, who is the wife of C. F. Mulconnery, 
a resident of Denver. There are also two grandchildren. 

Mr. Meier is much interested in political and civic matters and he takes an active 
and helpful part in charitable work in the city, constantly extending a helping hand to 
those who need assistance, seeking to ameliorate hard conditions for the unfortunate 
and shedding around him much of life's sunshine. Fraternally he is a Mason and has 
attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite. He is also connected with the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and he has membership in the Chamber of Com- 
merce and in the Lakewood Country Club. His ability has brought him prominently 
to the front in business connections, while his personal qualities are those which 



168 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

make for popularity among a large circle of friends. For forty years he has been a 
resident of Denver and throughout this entire period has occupied an enviable position 
in its business circles. 



CHARLES A. FINDING. 



Activity along many business lines, coupled with keen sagacity, sound judgment and 
determination to make the best possible use of his time and opportunities, has brought 
Charles A. Finding to the place which he now occupies as a wealthy, influential and 
respected man whose success is manifest in his investments in real estate, for he is the 
owner of some of the most valuable business property in Denver. He was born in St. Ives, 
England, February 22, 1850, a son of Joseph and Eleanor (Tomlinson) Finding. The 
father was a native of England and there learned the carpenter's trade, after which 
he engaged for many years in carpentering and building. Both he and his wife have 
passed away. They were the parents of nine children, but only two of the number are 
now living, the other surviving member of the family being a sister of Charles A. Finding, 
who makes her home in Rochester, New York. 

The youth of Charles A. Finding was largely devoted to the acquirement of an educa- 
tion. He was but seven years of age when brought by his parents to the new world, 
the family home being established in Newark, New York, where he pursued his studies. 
After his schooldays were over he entered the Bank of Monroe in Rochester, New York, 
in the capacity of bookkeeper. He was at that time seventeen years of age and he 
remained in the bank until he reached the age of twenty years. He then developed 
tubercular trouble and for the benefit of his health removed westward to Denver in 
1870. In the bracing climate of this city he soon recovered and for years has been a 
vigorous, healthy man. He did all kinds of work in the early days of his residence here, 
carefully saved his money and at length, through industry and economy, he was placed 
on the high road to success. As prosperity attended him he made judicious investments 
in real estate and he eventually became the owner of the Railroad block, one of the first 
fine office buildings erected in the city. It is a ten-story stone structure from which he 
derives a very gratifying and substantial income. In all business affairs he has dis- 
played sound judgment, readily discriminating between the essential and the nonessen- 
tial, and, moreover, he has displayed the power of uniting seemingly diverse elements into 
a harmonious whole productive of very gratifying results. 

It was in 1873 that Mr. Finding was united in marriage to Miss Martha Silverthorn 
and to them has been born a daughter, Mrs. D. F. Miner. Mr. Finding is a member 
of the Denver Athletic Club. He is widely known in this city, where he has now made 
his home for forty-eight years. Denver bore little resemblance to the present metro- 
politan center at the time of his arrival. It was a straggling western frontier town 
but it seemed to offer him possibilities for health and for business advancement. Both 
were soon secured here and Denver won a valued citizen who has made most substantial 
contribution to her upbuilding and her welfare. 



STEPHEN MAURICE EDGELL. 

Stephen Maurice Edgell, vice president of the Great Western Sugar Company of 
Denver, was born October 26, 1884, in St. Louis, Missouri, a son of the late George 
Stephen Edgell, who was also a native of St. Louis and a descendant of an old New Eng- 
land family early represented in New Hampshire and Vermont. The founder of the 
family in America was of English birth and came to the new world about 1636. Among 
the ancestors were those who participated in the struggle for American independence. 
George Stephen Edgell, the father, became a banker of New York city and for many years 
was president of the Corbin Banking Company which was founded by Austin Corbin, 
the maternal grandfather of Stephen M. Edgell of this review, who also founded the 
first national bank established in the United States, this being located at Davenport, 
Iowa. Austin Corbin became a man of national reputation by reason of the extent and 
importance of the business interests which he controlled and developed and which con- 
stituted an essential factor in general advancement. He was for years not only a lead- 
ing figure in financial circles but was also well known in railway connections as the 
president of the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company. George Stephen Edgell died 
in New York city in October, 1915, at the age of sixty-nine years. His wife bore the 




STEPHEN M. EDGELL 



170 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

maiden name of Isabella Wallace Corbin and was born in Brooklyn, New York, represent- 
ing one of the old families of New Hampshire of French Huguenot lineage and a descend- 
ant of Dr. James Corbin, who served as a surgeon in the Revolutionary war and in 
recognition of meritorious aid rendered to his country received from the United States 
government a large tract of land in the township of Newport, in Sullivan county, New 
Hampshire, which has since been in possession of the family and which has been con- 
verted by Austin Corbin into a game preserve. Mrs. Isabella Edgell still survives her 
husband and is living at Newport, New Hampshire. By her marriage she became the 
mother of three children, namely: Corbin, a lawyer by profession, located in New York 
but now with the American Red Cross; Stephen Maurice, of this review; and George 
Harold, who is professor of fine arts at Harvard University. 

After attending the Cutler school of New York, Stephen M. Edgell continued his 
education at Harvard, being graduated on the completion of the academic course with 
the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1907. He then entered the employ of the American Sugar 
Refining Company at Jersey City, New Jersey, as a day laborer and studied the sugar 
business in all of its departments in order to thoroughly familiarize himself with every 
phase and branch of the trade. He also spent a year in the factories of the Great Western 
Company and six months in the Brooklyn refinery and after leaving Brooklyn removed 
to Greeley, Colorado, in 1908, where he accepted the position of assistant manager of 
the Eaton, Greeley & Windsor factory. There he remained for five years, during the 
greater part of which time he acted as manager. He then became one of the directors of 
the company and, locating in Denver, entered the sales department. The following year 
or on the 26th of April, 1915, he became third vice president of the Great Western Sugar 
Company and has since filled that position, at the same time remaining a director of 
the Great Western Railway Company. 

On the 10th of December, 1914, Mr. Edgell was married in Warwick, Rhode Island, 
to Miss Elsie Aldrich, a daughter of United States Senator Nelson A. Aldrich, and they 
have one son, Nelson Aldrich, who was born in Warwick, Rhode Island, October 29, 1915; 
and a daughter born in Denver on June 30, 1918. 

Mr. Edgell gives his political endorsement to the republican party. He is a member 
of the Harvard Club, Racket and Tennis Club of New York; also belongs to the 
Denver Club, the Denver Country Club, the Lakewood Country Club, the Denver 
University Club and the Denver Motor Club. Along the lines indicated he 
takes his recreation and his religious faith is evidenced in his membership in the 
Episcopal church. While he is today connected with most important buisness interests, 
for which he has become thoroughly qualified by earnest study, close application and 
personal effort, he regards business as but one phase of life and does not allow it to 
exclude his active participation in and support of other vital interests which go to make 
up human existence. 



JOHN G. NEWMAN. 

John G. Newman has led a quiet but nevertheless busy and useful life and wherever 
he is known he commands the respect and confidence of those with whom he is brought 
in contact. He constitutes one of Sweden's contributions to the new world. He was born 
April 6, 1874, a son of Peter J. and Christine Newman. The father was a farmer by 
occupation. The mother died when her son John G. was but six years of age. leaving 
also two daughters: Ida M., who became the wife of Andrew Pearson, a farmer living 
northwest of Ault, by whom she has one daughter, Lily H. C. now eighteen years of 
age; and Selma A., the wife of Leonard Anderson, of Tacoma, Washington. 

John G. Newman was a little lad of but nine years when he left his native country 
and came with an uncle to the United States. His educational opportunities were those 
afforded by the public schools of Sweden and America and when a youth of but twelve 
summers he started out to provide for his own support and as the years have passed 
has since depended entirely upon his own efforts. He may truly be called a self-made 
man and deserves all the credit which that term implies. He began work as a farm 
hand north of Greeley, which occupation he followed for two years. He then went to 
work, at the age of fifteen years, as a section hand with a railroad gang with which 
he was connected for about three years, when he became foreman of a section gang. He 
continued in that line for about ten years or until 1899 and then took up farming west 
of Greeley which he followed for about a year. At the end of that time he established 
his residence on his present farm two and one-half miles northwest of Ault. and he is 
also owner of a farm of one hundred and sixty acres east of Ault. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 17i 

He arrived here a stranger and has made for himself a most creditable position in 
public regard. After cultivating a tract of rented land for a year he purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres, which he now devotes to the raising of potatoes, hay and sugar 
beets and also to the feeding of hogs and sheep. Both branches of his business are 
proving profitable and he concentrates his efforts and attention upon activities along those 
lines. 

In 1906 Mr. Newman was united in marriage to Miss Anna C. Rydberg, who was 
born in Sweden. She has several brothers and sisters, including: Alida, who became 
the wife of Arthur Bostrom, of Eaton; Lily, at home; August; Carl; and Reuben. 

Mr. Newman is a worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity. He belongs to the 
Ault Exchange and both he and his wife are active members of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, Mrs. Newman taking a particularly helpful interest in various branches of the 
church work. The career of Mr. Newman has been that of an enterprising and successful 
business man. When opportunity has permitted he has traveled considerably over the 
country, visiting California, Idaho, Washington and also various points in the east. His 
efforts and energies, however, have been mostly concentrated upon his business affairs 
and he is today numbered among the alert, energetic and progressive farmers of Weld 
county. 



THOMAS J. MONTGOMERY. 



Thomas J. Montgomery, engaged in the real estate, loan and insurance business at 
Fort Collins and actuated in all that he does by a spirit of enterprise that never stops 
short of the successful accomplishment of his purpose, comes to Colorado as a native 
son of Illinois, for his birth occurred in Macoupin county of the latter state on the 20t.h 
of September, 1849. His parents were John and Mercy (Loveland) Montgomery, natives 
of Illinois and Connecticut respectively. The father took up the occupation of farming 
in Madison county, Illinois, where he was born, but when he attained his majority h» 
removed to Macoupin county, where he purchased land and developed and improved a 
farm, continuing its cultivation throughout his remaining days. He also received a 
section of land from his father and was one of the most prominent and extensive agri- 
culturists of Macoupin county. He died in December, 1891, having for more than a 
quarter of a century survived his wife, who passed away in February, 1864. 

Thomas J. Montgomery, spending his youthful days under the parental roof, was 
early trained to the work of the fields during vacation periods. His education was 
acquired in the public schools of his native county and he early began working on the 
farm with his father. 

In the spring of 1866 he removed to the west with an uncle, locating first at Golden, 
Colorado. There he engaged in clerking in the store of Mr. W. A. H. Loveland, with 
whom he remained until 1867, where he also maintained a telegraph office in his store. 
In the spring of 1867 he was called to Fort Sedgwick, Colorado, as an operator for the 
Western Union Telegraph Company. He was later transferred from Fort Sedgwick to 
Mud Springs in the western part of Nebraska, and he continued there until fall, when the 
telegraph station was abandoned at that point and he was again called to Fort Sedgwick, 
being placed in charge of the office known as the old California Crossing, about fifty 
miles from Julesburg. Three months later he secured a position as night operator at 
what was known as Alkali Station but is now Paxton, Nebraska. In the spring of 1868 
he was transferred to Cheyenne, then the terminus of the Union Pacific Railroad, and 
remained there in the employ of that corporation until the winter of 1870, when he 
returned to Illinois. He then remained at home for a time or until 1877. During these 
years he worked for awhile as telegraph operator for the old North Missouri Railroad 
Company, now known as the Wabash Line. In 1877 he again became a resident of 
Colorado, going to Longmont, Boulder county, where he was assistant agent for what 
is now the Colorado & Southern Railroad. He occupied that position until October, when 
he was sent to Fort Collins, then the terminus of the Colorado Central. He opened the 
office at Fort Collins and continued to act as station agent and telegraph operator until 
July. 1881, when he resigned in order to turn his attention to the grain, feed, coal and 
farm implement business, entering into partnership with A. J. Ames and David Patton 
under the firm style of Ames, Patton & Montgomery. At the fall election of 1881 Mr. 
Montgomery was chosen county clerk and recorder of Larimer county, at which time 
he disposed of his interest in the business to his partners and on the 1st of January. 
1882, assumed the duties of his new position. He continued in that office until January, 



172 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

1886, having in the meantime been reelected. With his retirement from the position 
he turned his attention to the live stock business, in which he engaged for four years, 
and on selling his stock ranch he again took up his abode in Fort Collins, where he 
embarked in the real estate, loan and insurance business, in which he has since been 
engaged. 

In February, 1874, Mr. Montgomery was married to Miss Addie Eberman and to 
them were born two sons but the elder, Thomas, died in June, 1880, at the age of six 
years. The younger, Hugh L. Montgomery, is now assistant to the general man- 
ager of the American Gas & Electric Company of New York city. The wife and mother 
passed away in October, 1892, and in January, 1899, Mr. Montgomery was again married, 
his second union being with Helen E. Lunn, who was called to her final rest in 
November, 1904. 

Mr. Montgomery has always voted with the democratic party and in 1902 he served 
in the special session of the legislature of the thirteenth general assembly. He is well 
known as a loyal representative of the Masonic craft, belonging to the lodge, chapter, 
commandery and Eastern Star, and in his life he exemplifies the beneficent spirit of the 
order. He has long made his home in the west and has ever been interested in its 
upbuilding and development, much of which he has witnessed. Colorado has indeed 
found in him a loyal supporter and one who has put forth every effort in its behalf. 



RICHARD WENSLEY. 



Occupying a central place on the stage of commercial activity in Denver is Richard 
Wensley, president and sole owner of the business which is conducted under the name 
of the Bogue-Wensley Lead Company. In this connection he has become one of the 
foremost manufacturers of lead pipe and plumbers' supplies, heating and tinners' tools 
and supplies in the west. His business is located at Eighteenth and Blake streets, 
where he has a most modern and substantial manufacturing plant and office building, 
housing a business whose growing importance has placed it among the foremost com- 
mercial concerns of the city. Mr. Wensley is likewise well known as a representative 
citizen, deeply interested in the welfare and progress of Denver and cooperating heartily 
in many well defined plans for its further promotion. He was born in Albany, New 
York, on the 12th of August, 1872, and is a son of Richard and Emeline (Schoonmaker) 
Wensley, who were likewise natives of the Empire state, where they spent their entire 
lives. The father engaged in contracting and building and was for a long period 
actively and prominently identified with building operations in New York, where he 
is still living at the age of seventy-six years. His wife, however, died in Albany in 
1877, when but twenty-six years of age. 

Richard Wensley, their only child, spent his early life in Albany and supplemented 
his public school education by a course in a business college. He afterward secured a 
position in connection with the lumber business in Albany, where he remained for 
several years. On the expiration of that period he removed to New York city, where 
he engaged in the manufacture of shoe blacking, but eventually he decided to try his 
fortune in the west, which had had strong attractions for him from his early boyhood. 
He arrived in Denver in January, 1893, and after looking around secured a position 
with L. M. Bogue, who was then engaged in the manufacture of plumbers' lead pipe 
and similar products. He obtained the position of office boy and from that minor 
position steadily worked his way upward, each forward step bringing him a broader 
outlook and wider opportunities. He gained valuable experience, winning promotion, 
and learned thoroughly the lessons which each new position brought. At one time 
he drove a delivery wagon for the firm, but his responsibilities were increased from 
time to time and finally he was able to purchase an interest in the business and later 
took over the entire plant, which as the result of his able management and progressive 
spirit has been enlarged and rebuilt. This is a close corporation. Mr. Wensley is now 
the sole owner of the Bogue-Wensley Lead Company and is its president. This business 
has grown to large proportions under his wise direction and as the result of his inde- 
fatigable energy. Something of the growth of the trade is indicated in the fact that 
he now has forty-five employes. In the conduct of the business he manufactures 
plumbers' lead pipe, heating apparatus, tinners' supplies and hardware specialties and 
the worth of his output ensures a ready sale on the market. He is thoroughly pro- 
gressive, is persistent in purpose, straightforward in his dealings and indefatigable in 
energy. 




RICHARD WENSLEY 



174 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

On the 1st of July 1903, Mr. Wensley was united in marriage to Miss Maude Beau- 
champ Walker, of Denver, a daughter of Dr. Joseph R. Walker, a well known physician, 
who is now in the government service and is the oldest member of the Red Cross 
Society. Mr. and Mrs. Wensley have one child, Maude Emeline, who was born in 
Denver in 1904 and is now attending the Wolcott School for Girls. 

Mr. Wensley is a republican in his political views. He belongs to the Denver 
Athletic Club, the Denver Country. Club, the Lakewood Country Club and the Civic and 
Commercial Association. He likewise has membership in the Rotary Club and the 
Denver Motor Club. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks and in Masonry he has taken the degrees of the York Rite and has attained 
the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. He is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. His life has ever been actuated by high and honorable principles and 
the manly course which he has followed has gained for him the unqualified confidence 
and regard of all with whom he has been brought in contact. Moreover, his career 
should serve to inspire and encourage others, showing that success and an honored 
name may be won simultaneously. 



CHARLES T. AUSTIN. 



Charles T. Austin, special representative at Denver of the Mutual Benefit Life Insur- 
ance Company, was born in Detroit. Michigan, on the 19th of October. 1862, a son of 
Edmund and Ann (Spurway) Austin, both of whom were natives of England. The 
father was born in London and came to America in 1849, settling first at Brooklyn, 
New York, but soon afterward removed to Detroit, Michigan, when that city was a 
small town. There he resided to the time of his death. He was a building contractor 
and was quite successful, many of Detroit's representative buildings and historical land- 
marks having been erected by him. He was an intimate friend of Zach Chandler. A 
member of the Baptist church, he was a devout Christian and a mat of the highest 
integrity and personal worth. He possessed a fine tenor voice and for years sang in 
the choir of the First Methodist church. In politics he was a stanch republican and 
he was very active as a supporter of the principles of his party and as an advocate of 
all those interests which are of civic worth. He served for a year as a member of the 
city council during the early '70s. but while he was never active as a candidate for 
office he took part in much campaign work, belonging to glee clubs and musical organ- 
izations that sang in the wigwams and aided much in furthering the cause of the party. 
His wife was a native of Devonshire. England, and came alone to America on a sailing 
vessel soon after her future husband crossed the Atlantic. They were sweethearts in 
England and she made the trip in order to become his wife. They were married in 
Brooklyn, New York, and to them were born eleven children, seven of whom are still 
living. The mother, however, has passed away. 

Charles T. Austin was educated in the public and high schools of Detroit and when 
a youth of fifteen years started out to provide for his own support. He was first employed 
as a messenger boy by the firm of Gillette & Hall, grain merchants connected with the board 
of trade of Detroit. He continued with that firm for three years and after leaving the 
position he did not sever his connection with the grain trade but became a representative 
of the firm of Yeaton, Walker & Company of Detroit, with whom he continued for three 
years. In November, 1882. he removed to the west, arriving about the middle of that 
month in Denver. His elder sister, Annie Austin, was at that time a teacher in the 
Ebert school. Otherwise Mr. Austin had no acquaintances in Denver but was an entire 
stranger here and he had to make his way upward through dint of perseverance and 
through individual merit. His first position was that of cashier and bookkeeper for 
Birks Cornforth. a wholesale and retail grocery house on Fifteenth street. He con- 
tinued there as cashier for three years and afterward went to Sterling, Colorado, where 
he was employed as bookkeeper by the Sterling Merchandise Company. He continued 
with that house for some time and also rode the range in that section of the state for 
about two years, at which time cattle grazed on the open range. He has spent much 
time among the cowboys and range riders and many of the happy recollections of his 
boyhood days center around that life. He became an expert horseman and he can relate 
many an interesting tale concerning pioneer times in Colorado. At length he returned 
to Denver and entered the employ of Skinner Brothers & Wright, clothing merchants 
at Sixteenth and Lawrence streets. He occupied the position of cashier and bookkeeper 
and continued with that house for about five years. He next entered the employ of the 
Colorado National Bank, filling various clerical positions in the institution as he was 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 175 

advanced from time to time until he became assistant receiving teller. Subsequently 
he became paying teller of the Peoples National Bank, with which he continued until 
1893, when the bank suspended. Immediately afterward he reentered the employ of the 
Colorado National in a minor position and subsequently he took charge of the accounting 
department of the McNamara store for the Colorado National Bank, the store now being 
the property of the Denver Dry Goods Company. He was with the Denver Dry Goods 
Company for ten years and in May, 1894, he was one of the organizers and became a 
director and secretary and treasurer of the company. In association with Dennis Sheedy 
and W. R. Owen, he became one of the main factors in the upbuilding of that institution, 
which owns and controls one of the largest department stores in the west. At length 
he resigned his position and severed his financial connection with the business in 1904. 
He had contributed in marked measure to the results achieved. The business was estab- 
lished on a small scale and through the efforts of Mr. Austin and his associates had 
been built up until its net assets amounted to a million and a quarter dollars. At length 
Mr. Austin became interested in gold mining in Nevada but lost quite heavily in that 
venture, for his mining properties near Goldfield did not prove profitable. In November, 
1910, he again came to Denver, where he immediately entered upon his present business 
as special representative of the Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company in connection 
with G. A. Newkirk. In this business he has been very successful and has in force 
several million dollars in insurance which he has individually written, so that he is 
on the honor roll among the company's leading writers in the United States, having 
held that position for eight consecutive years. He became connected with the company 
because of his firm belief in it as one of the best and most thoroughly reliable insurance 
companies in the United States. Through his business operations in the insurance field 
he has largely recovered his fortunes lost through his mining operations and is today 
on the high road to substantial prosperity. 

On the 20th of June, 1890, Mr. Austin was united in marriage in Denver to Miss 
Virginia Cooley, a native of Baltimore, Maryland, and a daughter of Dr. John R. C. Cooley. 
The latter was a physician and surgeon, who rendered military aid to the Confederacy 
during the Civil war. His wife was Virginia Wyatt, who came from Petersburg, Virginia. 
Both were representatives of old families of that state. To Mr. and Mrs. Austin have 
been born two children: Jessie Virginia, now the wife of Joseph H. Weiner, a resident of 
Denver; and Charline Elizabeth, the wife of Albert J. Towar, of Detroit, Michigan, who 
is now a lieutenant in the United States service. 

Politically Mr. Austin is a republican, active as a worker in behalf of party prin- 
ciples yet not a politician in the sense of office seeking. He was on one occasion elected 
county treasurer but was cheated out of the' position. Fraternally he is connected with 
Elks Lodge, No. 17, and with South Denver Lodge, No. 93, A. F. & A. M.; with Colorado 
Chapter, No. 29, R. A. M.; Denver Commandery, No. 25, K. T.; Denver Council, No. 1, 
R. & S. M.; and El Jebel Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is also connected with the 
Denver Motor Club, with the Kennicott Duck Club, the Salesmanship Club, the Denver 
Civic and Commercial Association, and with St. Mark's Episcopal church — connections 
that indicate the nature of his interests and the rules which govern his conduct. His 
has been a life of intense activity and he has every reason to be proud of what he has 
accomplished in the business field. He displays salesmanship of high order, combined 
with notable enterprise, keen business discernment and the ability to readily read men. 
The results that he has accomplished are indeed gratifying and place him in the front 
rank among business men of the state. 



FRANK G. SCHLOSSER, D. D. S. 

Active among the successful representatives of dentistry in Denver is Dr. Frank G. 
Schlosser, who was born in Green Village, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, September 9, 
1859, his parents being Dr. Noah and Sarah Katherine (Maxwell) Schlosser, both of 
whom were born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, and the latter was a descendant 
of Molly Pitcher, the famous heroine of Revolutionary war days who upon the death of 
her husband, who was killed in action, took his place at the gun. The father of Frank G. 
Schlosser was a prominent member of the dental profession in the east and ranked very 
high as a practitioner in Pennsylvania and later in Denver. He removed to this city 
in 1883 and opened an office, continuing actively in the profession until 1888. His 
death occurred in 1909, when he had reached the notable old age of eighty-seven years. 
His wife passed away in Denver in 1914 when she. too. was well advanced in years. 



176 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

They were married in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, and to them were born five chil- 
dren: Frank G., of this review; Elmer E., who is an attorney at law practicing in 
Denver; G. A., of Denver; and Mrs. L. E. Spangler and Mrs. Alwida D. White, also of 
Denver. 

In his youthful days Frank G. Schlosser was a pupil in the public schools of Penn- 
sylvania to the time when he entered the State University. He studied there for one 
term and then entered the Chicago Dental College, from which he was graduated with 
the class of 1884, after receiving thorough training in preparation for the profession. 
He came to Denver in 1885 and has since built up a large and successful practice. He 
holds to the highest professional standards and is a member of the Denver City and 
County Dental Society and was dental examiner for the city of Denver in 1890 and 1891. 

On the 9th of May, 1888, Dr Schlosser was married to Miss Ella K. Brown and to 
them were born three children: Russell K., a graduate of the Denver Manual Training 
high school; Amy Ella, residing in Denver; and Katherine S. 

Dr. Schlosser is very prominent as a representative of the dental profession and 
that he has prospered as the years have gone on is indicated in the fact that he is the 
owner of a fine home in Denver and other valuable property. 



WILLIAM SMEDLEY, D. D. S. 

For more than half a century Dr. William Smedley has engaged in the practice of 
dentistry and with the passing years has kept in touch with the trend of modern progress 
which has characterized the profession. He dates his residence in Colorado from 1870, 
and Denver has numbered him among its honored residents throughout this period. 

He was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, May 4, 1836. His parents were Abiah 
T. and Agnes Few Smedley, of Quaker lineage. His mother passed away in 1899, at the 
notable age of ninety-three years, and the father's death occurred when he was but 
thirty-nine years of age, death resulting from a "neglected cold." In early life he 
attended school, public and private, in his native state and afterward became a student 
in the Foxboro English and Classical School of Massachusetts. He then taught school 
in the east for a few years. From his childhood his health had been poor, and so, with 
the primary purpose of regaining his health, but moved also by the pioneering spirit, 
he crossed the plains in 1862, going from Omaha to Oregon in a prairie schooner 
drawn by an ox team. After one year in the far west he returned to Pennsylvania and 
took up the study of dentistry, graduating from the Pennsylvania College of Dental 
Surgery in 1866. He began practice in West Chester, Pennsylvania, where he remained 
until 1870, when he again sought the healthful climate and opportunities of the new 
and growing west. He arrived in Denver on the 25th of September, 1870, where he 
has since continuously practiced his profession. His course has been characterized by 
notable progress. 

On the 4th of July, 1872, in Chester county, Pennsylvania, Dr. Smedley was married 
to Miss Mary Ellen Vickers, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Paxson Vickers. Her father was a 
prominent business man, somewhat active in politics, and at one time a member of 
the Pennsylvania legislature. 

Dr. and Mrs. Smedley have five children, all born in Denver. The eldest, Annie V., 
is the wife of D. F. Garrison, the cashier of the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company. Wil- 
liam Paxson is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Dental Surgery, and an ex- 
president of the Denver Dental Association, and also of the State Dental Association. 
Chester Earl was graduated from the University of Colorado at Boulder with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts, and later graduated from the law school of 
the Denver University, since which time he has become a well known attorney of 
Denver. He was a member of the state legislature during the session of 1913. Victor 
Clyde is a graduate of the dental department of the University of Pennsylvania, and 
has also served as president of the Denver Dental Association. Agnes M., graduated from 
Colorado College, is the wife of Dr. Max Giesecke, who is a graduate of the dental 
department of Denver University. Dr. Smedley's sons, William P. and Victor Clyde, 
and his son-in-law, Dr. Max Giesecke, are engaged in the practice of dentistry with 
him under the name of William Smedley & Sons. 

Deeply interested in his profession, he has read broadly and thought deeply and 
has kept in touch with the latest scientific researches and discoveries. He has always 
stood for the highest ethical principles and greatest scientific advancement of the pro- 
fession and to that end has aided in the organization and work of dental associations, 




-a.szu? 



ITS HISTORY OF COLORADO 

recognizing the fact that such associations are preeminently adapted to stimulate and 
educate their members and to raise the standard of the profession. 

He is a valued member of the Denver Dental Association, of which he was the first 
president. He was the first president of the Colorado State Dental Association and is 
now (1918) and has been since 1890 its treasurer. He is also a member of the National 
Dental Association. He is today the dean of the profession in Colorado. 

In politics, though a lifelong republican, he does not hesitate to support the best 
men irrespective of party. He was for seventeen years the president of the board of 
directors of North Side School District, No. 17, before the consolidation, the cause 
of education finding in him a stalwart champion and one who has done much for the 
furtherance of its interests. Fraternally he is connected with Union Lodge, No. 7, 
A. F. & A. M. ; Denver Chapter, No. 2, R. A. M ; Colorado Commandery, No. 1, K. T. ; and 
El Jebel Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He has been an active member of the Colorado 
Humane Society for over twenty-five years, in the work of which he has felt a deep 
interest. He was one of the early members of the Denver Chamber of Commerce, now 
the Denver Civic and Commercial Association, and in January, 1911, was made an 
honorary memb*er. He is a member of the Denver Philosophical Society and a life 
member of the State Forestry Association. He is a member of the Colorado Mountain 
Club and has climbed most of Colorado's highest peaks. 

Such a career illustrates the fact that old age need not suggest idleness nor want 
of occupation. In spirit and interests Dr. Smedley seems yet in his prime. There is an 
old age which grows stronger mentally and morally with the years and which continues 
to give for the benefit of others out of its rich stores of wisdom and experience. Such 
is the record of Dr. Smedley. 

"Though the snows of winter are on his head, 
The flowers of spring are in his heart." 



DANIEL A. CAMFIELD. 



The days of chivalry and knighthood in Europe cannot furnish more interesting or 
romantic tales than our own western history. Into the wild mountain fastnesses of the 
unexplored west went brave men, whose courage was often called forth in encounters 
with hostile savages. The land was rich in all natural resources, in gold and silver, in 
agricultural and commercial possibilities, and awaited the demands of man to yield up 
its treasures; but its mountain heights were hard to climb, its forests difficult to pene- 
trate, its densest tracts seemingly uncultivahle because of the lack of water. The estab- 
lishment of homes in this beautiful region therefore meant sacrifices, hardships and 
ofttimes death but there were some men brave enough to meet the conditions that must 
be faced for the purpose of reclaiming the region for civilization. Such an one was 
Daniel A Camfield, whose name is inseparably interwoven with the history of Colorado. 
He figured most prominently in connection with the development of its irrigation system, 
and because of the extent of his business affairs and his wide acquaintance his life 
record cannot fail to prove of interest to the readers of this volume. He was born in 
Providence, Rhode Island, November 26, 1863, and was there reared and educated. He 
made his initial step in the business world as an employe in a grocery store of Providence 
and when a youth of eighteen years he took a trip to the west to see the country. It 
was not by design or plan but by accident that he came to Greeley. He liked the climate 
and people and so sought work in this locality. He secured a position as a farm hand 
in what is known as Pleasant Valley and on attaining his majority he took up govern- 
ment land and in one way or another — by claim from the government, by purchase or 
trading — he acquired a large tract in the Crow Creek valley. Even then he saw visions 
of the future greatness of the section and started in to bring water to his land holdings, 
knowing that the soil was naturally rich and productive and that the only need was 
irrigation. His early days were fraught with the struggles of pioneer life, such as 
come to any man in a new country, but while most people secured one hundred and sixty 
acres or a half section as the basis of their labors. Mr. Camfield acquired thousands of 
acres and to the development of the immense tract devoted his thoughts, his time and 
his energies. His holdings reached nearly fifty thousand acres and gradually he enlarged 
the scope of his irrigation operations far beyond the limits of his own land and became 
largely responsible for the reservoir development of the Platte valley from Greeley to 
the Nebraska line. The irrigation enterprises with which he was connected and in 
which he was long the moving spirit would probably amount to between ten and fifteen 
million dollars. The execution of his plans involved the irrigation not only of parts 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 179 

of Colorado but also of Wyoming and New Mexico. His labors were therefore instru- 
mental in the reclamation of thousands of acres which are now highly productive and 
annually produce most substantial crops, adding greatly to the wealth of the state and 
to the resources of the country at large. In addition to his work in that connection 
Mr. Camfield was interested in many large business enterprises of a widely different 
character. "When Greeley needed better hotel accommodations he purchased the old 
Oasis Hotel, which he remodeled and to which he made additions until he converted it 
into the present modern Camfield Hotel, a well appointed and popular hostelry. Not 
long afterward he built the Farmers Trust building, directly opposite the hotel, and 
he became one of the organizers of the City National Bank. He was also part owner 
of the Tribune Republican Publishing Company and various other business interests 
profited by his cooperation and benefited by his sound judgment. 

In 1887 Mr. Camfield was united in marriage to Miss Lottie Atkinson and they 
resided on one of Mr. Camfield's ranches for a number of years but afterward took up 
their abode in Greeley. They became the parents of four children: John E., Elizabeth, 
Edna and Gladys. 

The life record of Mr. Camfield was one of continual effort. He was indefatigable 
in his labors and as the result of his unfaltering effort, his sound judgment and judicious 
investments his holdings constantly increased. His business responsibilities, however, 
became so great that it began to tell upon his nervous system and at times he suffered 
from acute indigestion, which was probably the cause of his death, which occurred 
when he was on a business trip in New York city, November 9, 1914. He was then but 
fifty-one years of age. It seems that he should have been spared for many years to 
come, for his labors were proving of the greatest benefit and worth as a feature in the 
state's development. He had the opportunity and the capacity to do a piece of work 
which was of vital significance to mankind and he utilized the opportunity to its full 
extent. The value of his service will be recognized for generations to come. His 
wealth was most honorably achieved. He always followed constructive measures and 
was never known to take advantage of the necessities of another in any business trans- 
action. His path, therefore, was never strewn with the wreck of other men's fortunes 
and in fact the entire countryside benefited by his labors, and today many of the most 
productive regions of Colorado have come to their present fruitfulness as the direct 
outcome of his enterprise and his wide vision. 



JACOB CALVIN JONES. 



Jacob Calvin Jones is numbered among Colorado's honored pioneer settlers, having 
arrived in the state in 1860. In the years which have since come and gone he has borne 
his part in promoting the agricultural development of the state and also has done much 
in behalf of public progress, especially while serving as mayor of Englewood, in which 
city he makes his home. He was born in Danville, Pennsylvania, September 21, 1838, 
a son of William and Elizabeth (Abel) Jones. The father was of Welsh parentage, while 
the mother was of Pennsylvania Dutch ancestry. William Jones became a boot and shoe 
manufacturer and also devoted a part of his time and attention to farming. His father- 
in-law lived to the notable old age of one hundred and twelve years. 

Jacob Calvin Jones was one of a family of ten children, but only two are now living, 
his brother being W. W. Jones, of Littleton. It was' in the year 1859 that Jacob C. Jones 
left home with two of his brothers, with whom he traveled as far as Quincy, Illinois, 
from which point he made his way alone to Colorado in the year 1860. The journey 
westward was made with an ox train. He had three yoke of oxen and a wagon, which 
he purchased in St. Joseph, Missouri, and with this equipment he accompanied a train of 
twenty-one wagons. He had thoughtfully considered Horace Greeley's advice: "Go west, 
young man, go west," and it was his purpose to establish his home and build up his 
fortunes in this part of the country. He already had two brothers here, William and 
Cyrus, who were engaged in hauling lumber over Bradford hill. For three months Jacob 
C. Jones remained in his brothers' employ, driving seven yoke of oxen. He then staked 
a claim on the Platte river, after which he made his way to Georgia gulch, where he 
remained during the summer of 1861 and until the following January. Later he and his 
brother William improved a farm of three hundred and twenty acres on the Platte river 
and owned and further developed the property until they sold out. They then took 
another tract of land on the east side of the river, improved it and remained thereon 
for two years. They next removed to a place where the powder works are now located 
and there resided until 1871, when the partnership between the two brothers was dis- 




JACOB C. JONES 




MRS. MARY ANN JONES 



182 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

solved, William Jones going to Colorado Springs, while Jacob C. remained upon the farm 
until twelve years ago. He also had a property of eighty acres on South Broadway in 
Englewood which was well improved, but he disposed of this in 1883 and took up his 
abode at his present place of residence. 

On the 11th of August, 1872, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Jones and Miss Mary 
Ann Marshall, of Marathon county, Wisconsin, and to them have been born a daughter 
and two sons: Eleanor Valencia, the wife of E. O. Raup, living upon the old Jones home- 
stead farm; Clifford Maxey, who is a wireless telegrapher in the government service 
at Norfolk, Virginia, and is thirty-three years of age; and Woodie Fisher, who is com- 
pleting a radio-wireless course at Cambridge, Massachusetts, preparing to enter the 
United States service. He is thirty-one years of age. 

Mr. Jones is a progressive republican and has long been prominent in shaping public 
thought and action in the community in which he lives. He was once appointed sheriff 
of Jefferson county but would not accept the position. He was, however, the first sheriff 
of Douglas county and assisted in organizing that county. For three terms he filled the 
office of mayor of Englewood and gave to the city a businesslike and progressive admin- 
istration. In fact, his course was of the greatest benefit to the community, for he was 
directly responsible for driving the lawless and immoral element from the town. His 
first election to the office was a contest between the gamblers and notorious resort 
keepers on the one hand and the better citizens on the other, Mr. Jones being made the 
standard bearer of the latter element. All subterfuges were tried by the sporting crowd 
to defeat him, including bribery, ballot box stuffing, threatening gun play and persua- 
sion, but all in vain. He was elected to the office and his work as chief executive of 
Englewood did much to restore law and order. Moreover, he introduced many progres- 
sive elements into the city life and did much for public benefit along various lines. Mr. 
Jones is a Mason of high rank. He has become a Knight Templar, has attained the 
thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite consistory and he has also crossed the sands 
of the desert with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine of El Jebel Temple. His life has been 
an exemplification of the beneficent spirit upon which the order is founded. There is 
no resident of Englewood who more surely deserves prominent mention in a history of 
Colorado than Jacob Calvin Jones, who for fifty-eight years has been a resident of this 
state and has therefore been a witness of practically the entire growth, development and 
improvement of this section of the country. His memory forms a connecting link 
between the primitive past and the progressive present. Here he has been a witness of 
the coming of modern-day civilization and at the same time has borne his full part in 
all movements and projects which have made for constant development — movements 
which have not only recognized immediate needs but have looked to future expansion. 



HON. WILBUR FISK STONE. 

[Taken from The History of Denver, by the Times-Sun Publishing Company, 
1901. (Copyrighted.) Written by J. C. Smiley, curator of the State Historical and 
Natural History Society.] 

The life history of Judge Wilbur Fisk Stone is one of more than usual interest. A 
descendant of an old English family, representatives of which were members of the 
Guilford (Conn.) colony, he was born at Litchfield, Connecticut, in 1833. In 1839 his 
father removed to the west and after brief successive residences in western New 
York, Michigan and Indiana, located in 1844, upon a large tract of farming land near 
Oskaloosa, in the then territory of Iowa. 

Our subject lived and worked with his father on the Iowa farm until he was 
eighteen years old, when he went to Indiana to build upon the educational foundation 
that had been laid in country schools previously accessible to him. After two years in 
the Rushville (Ind.) Academy, in which during part of that time he was an assistant 
teacher, he entered Asbury University at Greencastle, Indiana, where he remained 
until the close of his junior year, having earned his tuition by writing prize essays, 
and having provided for his personal needs by teaching country school during vaca- 
tions. Concluding another round as a country school teacher, he joined the senior 
class of the Indiana State University, at Bloomington, and after having been graduated 
with it, began the study of law while serving as a tutor in the classical department 
of the University; a position to which he had been appointed soon after his graduation. 
He subsequently entered the law department of the University and was graduated 
therein in 1858. 

Upon completion of his course in the law department of the Indiana State Uni- 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 183 

versity, Mr. Stone located at Evansville, in that state, to engage in practice, but was 
soon called to the editorial chair of the Evansville Daily Enquirer, which he occupied 
upward of a year, though in the meantime devoting part of his energies to 
legal work. In the autumn of 1859, he went to Omaha, Nebraska, on legal business 
and was detained by it through the following winter. Partly to relieve the tedium 
and partly to provide means of support, he became assistant editor of the Omaha 
Nebraskan, of which the present World-Herald is the successor. 

Having acquired the art of shorthand writing, then a rare accomplishment Mr 
Stone reported verbatim the proceedings of the Nebraska territorial legislature in 
session at Omaha, during that winter. Mr. Stone remained at Omaha until the spring 
of 1860, when he crossed the plains to Denver. In the summer of that year he joined 
the mining community at Tarryall, in the South Park, where he became a prospector, 
miner, and a practicing lawyer; and with that general section of the territory he was 
identified during the ensuing five years. Soon after Canon City was founded he went 
there as a settler, and with the late George A. Hinsdale, formulated a code of laws 
for the first people's court of that district. Upon the organization of Colorado territory 
he was elected a representative from Park county in the first territorial legislature, 
and in 1864, was reelected, and in 1862-65, served as assistant United States district 
attorney under General Samuel E. Browne. 

After his marriage at Bloomington, Indiana, in the winter of 1S65-66, to Miss 
Sarah Sadler, of that city, Mr. Stone located in Pueblo and resumed the practice of 
law. In 1868 he was appointed district attorney of the third judicial district and was 
subsequently elected to that position for a full term. In 1868, also, when the Pueblo 
Chieftain began publication, Mr. Stone became its editor, and so continued until 1873. 
He was instrumental in organizing the first Board of Trade in Pueblo, and became 
its treasurer and corresponding secretary. One of the active promoters of the Denver 
& Rio Grande Railroad, and a member of the company, he served as its general attor- 
ney until his election to the supreme bench of the state in 1877. In 1874, at Boston, 
he arranged with the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Company details of plans and 
agreements for extensions of its lines through southern Colorado. A member from 
Pueblo county, of the convention that framed the constitution of the state, in 1876, 
he served as chairman of the committee on judiciary, as a member of several other 
important committees and had been the choice of his party for president of the con- 
vention. The constitution having been ratified, Mr. Stone was unanimously nom- 
inated by the democratic party as its candidate for associate justice of the new state's 
supreme court, but, in common with the rest of the ticket, failed of election by a 
narrow margin. 

In 1877, Judge E. T. Wells, who had been elected a supreme judge for the long 
term of nine years, at that first state election, resigned. To nominate a candidate to 
succeed him, a convention of the lawyers of the state, representing both political parties, 
was held at Colorado Springs, and by which Mr. Stone was unanimously chosen for 
the high position. His election followed in the autumn of that year without opposition. 
Such recognition of popularity and professional ability was unprecedented, and of these 
proceedings that placed Judge Stone upon the supreme bench of the state, there has 
been no repetition. 

Judge Stone's term expired in 1886, and in 1887 he was appointed by Governor 
Adams, judge of the Arapahoe county criminal court, in which position he served until 
the spring of 1889, when the court was abolished by legislative enactment. He then 
(.ngaged in the practice of law in Denver, which he continued until the summer of 1891. 
Congress, by an act, approved March 3rd of that year, established the Court of Private 
Land Claims, for the purpose of adjudicating Spanish and Mexican land grant titles 
in accordance with the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, its jurisdiction extending over 
Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico; the court to consist of 
five judges appointed from different states by the president. On June 10, 1S91, 
President Harrison in response to requests from Colorado men of both political parties, 
and in recognition of his ability and fitness, appointed Judge Stone one of the judges 
of that court. His intimate knowledge of the western and southwestern country, of 
the Spanish language, and of the Mexican people, made him one of its most efficient 
members. He was selected by the court to visit Spain to investigate the archives at 
Madrid for information bearing on old Spanish grants in what is now Colorado and 
New Mexican territory; and on this duty, upon one of his several visits to Europe, 
he spent the winter of 1894-95 in the Spanish capital and at Seville. 

Scholarly, versed in French and German, as well as in Spanish and his mother 
tongue. Judge Stone is, aside from his learning and ability as a lawyer and a jurist, 
a man of high attainments, and a writer who clothes his subjects with many charms 



184 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

of expression. In the earlier days he was a frequent and always welcome contributor 
to Colorado newspapers. He has written freely upon the history of southern Colorado 
and New Mexico, and the historical review of Pueblo for the National Centennial 
Records of the United States government was prepared by him. His description of 
Mount Lincoln and its surrounding scenic magnificence, written and published in 
1864, still stands without equal as a word-picture of the majestic grandeur and beauty 
of nature's work in the Colorado mountains. 



BOOTH M. MALONE. 



Malone, Booth M., lawyer; jurist; city attorney, Beloit, Wisconsin, 1885-1890; 
president of school board, 1882-1885; superintendent of schools, 1882-1885; and, mayor 
of Beloit, 1883-1885; district attorney, Rock county, Wisconsin, 1885-1892; assistant 
district attorney (Denver), second judicial district of Colorado, 1892-1897; district 
attorney of the same district, 1897-1901; judge of the second judicial district (Denver) 
of Colorado, 1901-1907; was president of the Colorado Republican State League for the 
years 1894 and 1895; born in Benton county, Mississippi, and is the son of Richard 
H. and Mary (Cossitt) Malone. 

The town of La Grange, Illinois, and that of the same name in Tennessee, were 
founded by his mother's brother, F. D. Cossitt. In the list of well known philanthro- 
pists is her cousin, P. H. Cossitt, of New York city, liberal in his donations to public 
institutions, and the founder of several libraries. Mary Cossitt was born in Granby, 
Connecticut. 

He has one sister, Mrs. Frank W. Crocker, and three brothers, William H. and 
Richard H. Malone and Robert E. MacCracken, all living in Denver, Colorado. 

Richard H. Malone, the father of the subject of this biography, was born in 
Alabama and was a southern planter, but was educated for the ministry. He died at 
the outbreak of the Civil war, and when Booth M. was still a small child his mother 
removed with him and three other children to Chicago. In the latter city our subject 
spent his boyhood and early youth, and was there educated in the public schools and 
received his preparatory training. He matriculated in 1873, at Beloit College, from 
which he was graduated in 1877, with the degree of A. B. After one year as a law 
student in the office of Thomas S. McCelland of Chicago, Mr. Malone entered the 
Albany Law School, New York, graduating from that institution in 1880, with the 
degree of LL. B. He was then admitted to the bar in New York state. 

Forming a partnership with Samuel J. Todd, Mr. Malone entered upon the practice 
of his profession at Beloit, Wisconsin. In three years he succeeded to the large practice 
they had already established. In addition to his legal business, Mr. Malone soon 
became known as a political leader and man of affairs, and especially active in the 
municipal government. During his term of six years, from 1885 until 1890, as city 
attorney of Beloit, the city charter and ordinances were revised under his administra- 
tion, and two hundred thousand dollars in bonds negotiated in funding the city debt. 
He was elected mayor of Beloit in 1883 and reelected to that office in 1885, and during 
his official life in that position was known as one of the most public-spirited and pro- 
gressive chief executives of that city. He helped to procure railroad sidetracks for 
factories, secured streetcars and water works and was the efficient means of bringing 
several large factories to the city, the Berlin Machine Works. Beloit Iron Works and 
Fairbanks, Morse & Company being among the number. The experience obtained in his 
official career in Beloit, as well -as his thorough study of such questions, has made Mr. 
Malone an active leader, in later years, in the municipal reform movements in the city 
and county of Denver. Whfie a resident of Beloit, he also held the position for several 
years as superintendent of public schools, also serving as president of the school board. 

In the meantime his brother, W. H. Malone, had become a resident of Denver and 
was established in the practice of the law with Robert W. Steele, the late lamented 
chief justice of the Colorado supreme court. Through the flattering inducements then 
offered, Mr. Malone came to Denver in 1892 and became assistant district attorney to 
Robert W. Steele, who was elected to that office in 1892. In November, 1897, Mr. 
Malone was elected district attorney for Arapahoe (Denver) county, Colorado, for 
both the short and long terms. As assistant, and as district attorney, he won for 
himself the reputation of being one of the most brilliant prosecutors in the history of 
the state. As a jury lawyer, and in the cross examination of witnesses in criminal 
prosecutions, he had no superior in the state. Out of forty-seven murder cases, some 
of them, causes celebres in the west, Mr. Malone obtained convictions in thirty-nine. 




BOOTH M. MALONE 



186 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

He attained a front rank as a public speaker and orator. Although engaged in an 
extensive criminal practice, yet Mr. Malone also became a prominent attorney in civil 
suits, including railway, mining, and other litigation. He loves justice as a man, 
demands it as a lawyer and administered it as a judge. 

In 1900, Mr. Malone was elected judge of the district court (Denver) of Colorado, 
displaying the same ability on the bench that had characterized his career in public 
life and the practice of law. In the many criminal cases over which Judge Malone 
presided not one was ever reversed on appeal. He was noted as a strong, fair-minded, 
fearless and just judge. 

Since his retirement from the bench, Judge Malone has been engaged in the general 
practice of the law. In 1907 he was employed to go to Goldfleld, Nevada, and take 
charge of the prosecution of the celebrated case of the people vs. Smith and Preston, 
members of the I. W. W. charged with murder, and at a time of the intensest excite- 
ment in that state he secured the conviction of both men and followed the case 
successfully through the Nevada supreme court. He is a member of the bar of the 
supreme court of the United States. His latest noted case was, associated with Thomas 
S. Ward, Jr., in defense of Mrs. Stella Moore Smith, charged with killing her husband. 
The case attracted nation-wide attention and lasted several weeks. The jury acquitted 
Mrs. Smith within eleven minutes from the time the case was submitted to them. Mr. 
Malone's closing speech in that case was said to be "one of the greatest forensic 
efforts ever delivered in a courtroom in Colorado." 

Judge Malone is a Knight Templar, a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, 
a member of the Knights of Pythias, and of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 
He attends the Plymouth Congregational church and assists in its support. He is a 
republican but stands for the best men and the best things regardless of party. 

He married, July 1, 1878, Miss Alma M. Bennett, of Beloit, Wisconsin, daughter of 
Almon and Calista (Peck) Bennett, her father being a merchant and lumber dealer 
of that city. She was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and of the 
Plymouth Congregational church. Mrs. Malone died May 1, 1918. She was a woman 
of strong character and beautiful life. Her sweet personality was an inspiration to all 
who knew her. She was a filial daughter and a model wife, mother and friend. Who 
could be more? Mr. Malone ascribes most of whatever of success, or good he achieved 
in his life, to his wife's good judgment, wise counsel and sweet companionship. 

To Judge and Mrs. Malone were born the following children, all natives of Beloit, 
Wisconsin: Mary Louise, Helen Cossitt, William Bennett and Alma E. Malone. The 
three daughters are all married, Mary Louise, who was queen of the Colorado Festival 
of Mountain and Plain in the year 1901, to the distinguished young civil and hydraulic 
engineer, Elbert E. Lochridge, who built the present water works of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, where they are at present residing. Helen Cossitt, who attended Brad- 
ford College, married Emerson G. Gaylord, a banker, of an old and influential family 
of Chicopee, Massachusetts; and Alma E., who attended Smith College, is married to 
Paul Robertson Jones, of New York city, general auditor of the Doherty Gas Syndicate. 
William Bennett graduated from Yale College in 1909 and has since been the general 
manager of the credit department of the Knight Campbell Music Company but is now 
associated with the Doherty Gas & Electric Company as new business manager and is 
also president of the Chamber of Commerce of Sedalia, Missouri. William B. Malone 
married Miss Ada Goldsmith, of Wheaton, Illinois. 



JOHN P. S. VOGHT. 



John P. S. Voght, secretary of the United States mint at Denver, was born in Law- 
rence, Kansas, May 14, 1860. His father, John Voght, was a native of France and for 
many years was engaged in river transportation on the Missouri and Mississippi rivers. 
He was also one of the frontiersmen of Kansas and contributed in marked measure to 
the development and progress of those sections of the west with which he was identified. 
He married Josephine Vinot. a native of France, and both have now passed away. In 
their family were two children, the daughter being Mrs. Augustine V. Walter, who lives 
in Denver. 

John P. S. Voght acquired his early education in the public schools of Denver, to 
which city his parents removed on the 9th of October, 1860. He passed through con- 
secutive grades to the high school, which he left in 1877. He afterward attended the 
Northwestern University in Chicago and was there graduated with the LL. B. degree 
as a member of the class of 1881. He then returned to Denver and afterward engaged 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 187 

in mining at various points in the west, including Leadville, being proprietor of several 
mining properties. He later entered the government service, with which he has been 
identified for five years as secretary of the United States mint in Denver. 

In 1884 Mr. Voght was united in marriage to Miss Christine Bowman, of Newport, 
Rhode Island, a daughter of John Bowman. They have one child, Josephine, the wife 
of Lincoln R. Meeker, of Denver. Mr. Voght is deeply interested in the study of geology, 
of mining conditions and opportunities, and few men are better informed concerning 
these subjects in Colorado than he. His experiences have brought him wide knowledge 
and his reading has been comprehensive and thorough. His political allegiance is given 
to the democratic party, and he has been a lifelong follower of Henry George and a 
believer in the single tax. He is highly esteemed as a man of genuine worth and he is 
proving a most capable official in the position which he now occupies. 



HENRY MEAD. 



Henry Mead, residing at No. 1863 Tenth avenue in Greeley, was born in Genoa, New 
York, March 20. 1861, his parents being Stephen and Anna Mead. The father was a 
school teacher and farmer. He followed the profession of teaching in New York city 
and afterward gave his attention to agricultural pursuits in central New York. He was 
a son of Henry Mead, a soldier of the Revolutionary war. In religious faith Stephen 
Mead was a Presbyterian and his life accorded with his profession as a member of the 
church. 

Henry Mead, whose name introduces this review, completed a high school education 
at Moravia, New York, in March, 1881, when he was a young man of twenty years. 
Anxious to try his fortune in the west, he removed to Colorado in 1886 and for two 
decades was actively and successfully engaged in farming northwest of Greeley, where 
he owned and cultivated one hundred and sixty acres of land, which he highly developed 
and improved. In addition to carrying on his farm work in the cultivation of the cereals 
best adapted to soil and climate he became identified with banking and for twelve years 
was a director of the Farmers National Bank at Ault, which is a very profitable and 
prosperous financial institution of Weld county. 

In Eaton, Colorado, in 1897, Mr. Mead was united in marriage to Miss Alberta Newell, 
a daughter of Oliver Newell, of Burlington, Iowa. Mrs. Mead passed away in 1904. On 
the 2d of February, 1908, Mr. Mead was again married, his second union being with 
Grace A. Bates, a daughter of Albert Bates, whose father was a Canadian shipbuilder. 
Albert Bates was a miner at Helena, Montana, connected with the development of the 
gold mines of that state between the years 1864 and 1870, during which he won a sub- 
stantial measure of success. He afterward engaged in the bakery business in Solomon 
City, Kansas, for seven years and in 1877 he came to Colorado, where he followed the 
milling business, making his home in Fort Collins. He afterward removed to Aspen, 
Colorado, where he conducted a dairy business but because of ill health he went to 
Seattle, Washington, hoping that a change of climate might prove beneficial, and there he 
passed away in 1909. He was one of a family of ten children, six sons and four daughters. 
Mrs. Mead's mother was born in Exeter. England. Her grandmother was descended 
from Sir Thomas Bodley, the founder of the Bodleian Library of Oxford, England. Sir 
Thomas was twelve years of age when he was compelled to leave the kingdom on account 
of his religious views. He settled with the family at Geneva, Switzerland, and there con- 
tinued until the death of Queen Mary, during which time he studied under various 
renowned professors of that period. Upon the accession of Queen Elizabeth to the throne 
of England he returned with his father to that country and entered Magdalen College 
at Oxford in 1563. There he won the degree of Bachelor of Arts. The year following 
he was admitted a fellow to Merton College and in 1565 he read a Greek lecture in the 
hall of that college, which won him the Master of Arts degree. During the subsequent 
year he taught natural philosophy in the public schools. In 1569 he was one of the 
proctors of the university and for some time afterward officiated as public orator. Quitting 
Oxford in 1576. he made a tour of Europe and returned to his college after an absence 
of four years. He became a gentleman usher to Queen Elizabeth and in 1585 he married 
Anne Ball, a widow of considerable fortune. Soon afterward he was sent as ambassador 
to the kingdom of Denmark and also to several German principalities. He was next 
dispatched on a secret mission to France. On his return to England in 1597. finding 
his preferment obstructed by the interests of the lords of Burley and Essex, he retired 
from court and could not be persuaded to accept any public employment. He then began 



188 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the foundation of the Bodleian Library and soon after the accession of King James I to 
the throne he received the honor of knighthood. He died at his home in London in 
January, 1612, and was buried in Merton College chapel, where a memorial was erected 
to him crowned with his statue. He wrote the history of his own life to the year 1609. 
As stated, the line of descent can be traced down to Mrs. Bates, the mother of Mrs. Mead, 
who left England in August, 1869, in company with a friend from Devonshire. They 
were passengers on the steamship" City of Paris, on which Prince Arthur sailed, and they 
were en route to Halifax for six days. Mrs. Bates has a grandson in the Yeoman School, 
preparing for the navy. 

In his political views Mr. Mead is a stalwart republican, having stanchly supported 
the party since attaining his majority. He is also a member of the Masonic lodge and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and he holds membership in the Greeley Club. 
He is highly esteemed throughout the community, honored for his successful career and 
for his upright life. 



NATHAN GREGG. 



Nathan Gregg, well known in financial circles in Denver as a prominent investment 
broker, was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, on the 30th of December, 1873. His father, 
Nathan Gregg, was born in Alabama and in early life engaged in the wholesale grocery 
business but following his removal to Denver turned his attention to the lumber busi- 
ness. He took up his abode here in 1892 and continued a resident of the city to the time 
of his demise. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Belle Wilson and was also a 
native of Alabama, has passed away. 

Nathan Gregg is one of a family of six children, five of whom are yet living, three 
brothers and two sisters. He acquired his education in private schools at Shreveport, 
Louisiana, and then turned his attention to the line of business in which his father was 
engaged, spending a few years in the employ of the Mowat Lumber Company. He was 
afterward appointed military secretary to Governor Adams and served in that position 
through his term and also during a part of the administration of Governor Thomas. 
At length, however, he turned his attention to the investment business, which he has 
since carried on, being now senior member of the firm of Gregg, Whitehead & Company, 
investment bankers at the First National Bank building, who are members of the Denver 
Bond Dealers Association and the Investment Bankers Association of America. He is 
thoroughly familiar with the value of bonds and other investments and has won a large 
clientage, his business having now assumed extensive and gratifying proportions. 

In 1897 Mr. Gregg was united in marriage to Miss Isa Stearns, of Denver, who is 
a granddaughter of ex-Governor Hunt and is a recognized leader in the social circles of 
this city. Mr. and Mrs. Gregg have a son, Hamilton, nineteen years of age, who is a grad- 
uate of the East Denver high school. In club circles of the city Mr. Gregg is well 
known, having membership in the Denver Athletic Club, the Denver Country Club and 
the Denver Motor Club, and he is also a member of the Civic and Commercial Associa- 
tion, looking to the upbuilding of the city along material lines and to the advancement 
of its civic standards. His ideals in this connection are high and he puts forth every 
possible effort to secure their attainment. He is a man of genuine personal worth who 
has built up a business of extensive proportions, merit and ability bringing him to his 
present place in financial circles. 



SPERRY S. PACKARD. 



Sperry S. Packard, an able attorney of Pueblo and one whose professional interests 
now divide his attention with his active work in behalf of the Red Cross and other 
patiotic movements, was born in Ashkum, Iroquois county, Illinois, February 26, 1880, 
a son of Sidney M. and Jennie (Hayden) Packard. The father was a wheelwright and 
farmer, devoting his life to those pursuits up to the time of the Civil war, when his 
patriotic spirit was aroused by the attempt of the south to overthrow the Union and 
he joined the One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Illinois Infantry for active service at the 
front. He is still living but his wife has passed away. They were the parents of three 
sons and a daughter, and one of the sons, Dr. H. P. Packard, is now in Persia. 

Sperry S. Packard, whose name introduces this review, is the third in order of birth 
in the family and was a little lad of but seven years when the removal was made to 




NATHAN GREGG 



190 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Colorado, so that he acquired his education in the public schools and in the Centennial 
high school of Pueblo, from which he was graduated with the class of 1898. He after- 
ward attended Colorado College at Colorado Springs, there completing his course in 1902. 
He also pursued a business course in a commercial college and spent three years as a 
law student in the office of McCorkle & Teller, J. H. Teller of this firm being afterward 
a member of the Colorado supreme court bench. Mr. Packard was admitted to the bar in 
1905, ranking second in the class of twenty-three who at that time sought admission to 
practice in the courts of Colorado. He opened an office in Pueblo, where he has since 
practiced continuously and successfully, ranking today with the representative members 
of the bar in his section of the state. He has made a specialty of irrigation law for 
the past twelve years. 

On the 24th of June, 1909, Mr. Packard was married to Miss Ella L. Graber. of Colo- 
rado Springs, who is a graduate of the Colorado Springs high school and of Colorado 
College. They have become parents of two children: David, five years of age; and Ann 
Louise, two years of age. 

Mr. Packard's religious faith is indicated in his membership in the Pilgrim Con- 
gregational church. He votes with the republican party but has always avoided office. 
However, he has represented the sheriff on legal matters in the county. He belongs to 
the Chi Sigma Chapter of the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He also has membership 
with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, and in Masonry 
has attained the Knight Templar degree. He is fond of outdoor life and of athletics. 
He has always been greatly interested in the state and its development and has con- 
tributed much to projects of local improvement. At the present time he is doing active 
work for his country as a public speaker for the Red Cross and was chairman of the cam- 
paign committee of the Red Cross, which raised one hundred thousand dollars in Pueblo 
on the first drive. He has represented the attorney general in legal matters in Pueblo, 
and is a member of the legal advisory board for the Pueblo county draft board. He 
counts no effort or sacrifice on his part too great if it will promote the interests of the 
nation or in any way advance war work. He has always been one of the first to offer 
cooperation where aid has been called for. He belongs to the State Bar Association and 
to the American Bar Association, and his position in professional circles in Colorado is 
an enviable one. 



DAVID A. STRICKLER, M. D. 

With the broad foundation of medical science for general practice, Dr. David A. 
Strickler in recent years has specialized as an oculist and aurist and has attained an 
eminent position in that branch of the profession. Ever holding to the highest standards, 
he has continually broadened his knowledge through study and experience and has 
at all times kept in touch with the latest scientific researches, investigations and dis- 
coveries. 

A native of Pennsylvania, he was born at Chambersburg, Franklin county, on the 
26th of March, 1859, a son of Jacob Strickler, a native of Pennsylvania, who spent his 
entire life to the age of eighty years in Franklin county. He belonged to one of the 
old families of the state, of Swiss descent. It was founded in York county, Pennsylvania, 
about 1729. There the family were well known as leading members of the Mennonite 
church. They were a family of agriculturists and Jacob Strickler also carried on the 
work of the farm for many years but in later life became connected with industrial 
lines and held an interest in woolen mills and paper mills. For a time he was also 
superintendent of a turnpike company and through the conduct of his business won a 
very substantial measure of success as the years passed. He became one of the promi- 
nent and leading residents of his section of the state and that he was a man of excellent 
business ability and of marked personal worth is indicated in the fact that he was 
often called upon to act as trustee of estates. He held to the religious faith of his fathers, 
being an earnest member of the Mennonite church and a devout Christian. Politically 
he was a republican, but the honors and emoluments of office had no attraction for 
him. He married Anna Stouffer, a native of Franklin county and a representative of 
one of the old families of Pennsylvania, of Swiss ancestry, founded in America about 
the same time as the Strickler family. They. too. were Mennonites and in that faith Mrs. 
Strickler was reared and lived. She died in 1881 at the age of sixty five years, her birth 
having occurred in 1816. while Mr. Strickler, who was born in 1815. had readied the age 
of eighty years ere death called him in 1895. Their family numbered ten children, seven 
sons and three daughters, but only three of the number are now living: Jacob and Amos. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 191 

who are still residents of Pennsylvania; and David A., who was the youngest ot the 
family. 

To the age of eighteen years Dr. Strickler of this review spent his youth upon the 
home farm and began his education in the district schools, while later he pursued a 
literary course in the Chambersburg Academy. At length he determined upon the prac- 
tice of medicine as a life work and with that end in view became a student in the Hahne- 
mann Medical College of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated 
with the M. D. degree as a member of the class of 1881. Following his graduation he 
became resident physician in the Hahnemann Hospital, in which he remained for a 
year. He then sought a field of labor in the middle west and opened an office in Sterling, 
Illinois, where he continued for a year. During the succeeding two years he was at 
Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in general practice, and he also resided 
for four years in Duluth, Minnesota, where he devoted his attention to general practice 
for a time, but afterward concentrated his efforts and attention upon diseases of the 
eye, ear, nose and throat. During the following six years he was at St. Paul, Minnesota, 
and from that city removed to Denver, where he arrived in the fall of 1895. In the in- 
tervening period, covering twenty three years, he has been in active and continuous 
practice and now occupies a very prominent and commanding position in his profession. 
He pursued post graduate work in Philadelphia, New York and Chicago, covering various 
lines of professional activity. He held the chair of ophthalmology, oto-laryngology and 
rhinology in the medical department of the University of Minnesota from the time the 
department was created until he left that state, covering a period of seven years. Later 
he was registrar and dean, respectively, of the Denver Homeopathic College and its 
successor the Denver College of Physicians and Surgeons until, owing to efforts of the 
medical profession to diminish the number of colleges, it closed its doors in 1909. He 
is a man of pronounced professional ability, as is attested by the leading physicians of 
the state and by those elsewhere who know aught of his career. He is a fellow of the 
American College of Surgeons; a fellow of the American Medical Association, and be- 
longs to the Colorado State Medical Society and to the medical associations of the city 
and county of Denver; of the Colorado Ophthalmol ogical Society; the American Institute 
of Homeopathy; the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Oto-Laryngology, is presi- 
dent of the Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States, and has been a 
member of the State Board of Medical Examiners of Colorado for the past sixteen years 
and its executive officer for the past seven years. He was president of the Colorado 
Homeopathic Society in 1902 and 1903, belongs to the American Homeopathic Ophthal- 
mological & Oto-Laryngological Society, is president of the Park Avenue Hospital As- 
sociation of Denver and is a member of the staff of the City & County Hospital of Denver. 
He is a member of Advisory Board No. 3 (Medical for Colorado); the State Committee 
on National Defense (medical); and of the board of examiners for aviation service. He 
is chairman of the committee on public policy of the Colorado Medical Society and also 
the committee on public policy and legislation of the Medical Society of the City and 
County of Denver. These various membership connections and activities along the 
line of his profession establish his prominent position among the eminent practitioners 
of the west. 

In Duluth, Minnesota, in 1887. Dr. Strickler was united in marriage to Miss Ger- 
trude Olmsted, a daughter of Captain Allen Olmsted, who was a Civil war veteran, 
a member of one of the old families and a pioneer settler of Duluth, removing to that 
state from Iowa. He married Louise Lawyer and has now passed away. The death of 
Mrs. Strickler occurred in Denver in 1896, when she was thirty-five years of age. In 
their family were two children: Lynda Louise, who is a teacher in the high school 
of Denver; and Gertrude Aline. Both daughters are highly educated in the languages 
and in the arts. On the 1st of December, 1906, in Denver, Dr. Strickler was again mar- 
ried, his second union being with Mrs. Mary (Riggs) Bradner, a native of Canton, Michi- 
gan, and a daughter of Alfred Riggs. Mrs. Strickler's mother is still living, but her 
father has passed away. Prior to her marriage to Dr. Strickler she was the wife of Dr. 
William Bradner, a prominent physician of Denver, who died in 1895. Mrs. Strickler is 
a graduate of the dental department of the University of Denver, which conferred upon 
her the degree of D. D. S. in 1898. She still practices to some extent among her old 
patients. She is a woman of exceptional ability and qualifications, of liberal education 
and of noble character. 

Dr. Strickler is a member of the Masonic fraternity, having taken the initial degrees 
in the order in St. Paul. Minnesota, in 1895. He also belongs to the Elks lodge oil 
Denver and to the Lakewood Country Club. He is likewise a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce and is interested in all that has to do with the welfare and progress of his 



192 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

adopted city, but his time and attention are chiefly concentrated upon his profession, 
which is continually making heavier and heavier demands upon his energies. His prac- 
tice throughout the entire period of his residence in Denver has been large and im- 
portant. He is today a man of national reputation in his profession and he was chosen 
as one of the speakers at the annual congress held for the Cooperation for the Preven- 
tion of Medical Frauds, which was held at the Congress Hotel in Chicago on the 4th and 
5th of February, 1918, his subjects being medical education and licensure. This was 
the eleventh annual congress held. In preceding years he also took an active part in the 
proceedings. He is ever regarded as a most valued addition to any of the conventions 
of the profession and is a speaker of wide reputation who is always listened to with 
interest and attention, for he has carried his investigations far and wide, bringing to 
light many of nature's secrets and gaining especial prominence in the field to which 
he has now for many years devoted his attention. He is one of the eminent oculists and 
aurists of the west whose practice is largely the expression of the last word in scientific 
investigation. 



FRANK E. EDBROOKE. 



Frank E. Edbrooke, a Civil war veteran, a distinguished architect and a citizen of 
high personal as well as professional worth, was born in Lake county, Illinois, on the 
17th of November, 1840, but for many years has been a resident of Denver. His parents, 
Robert J. and Mary (Stanley) Edbrooke, were natives of England and of Perth, Canada, 
respectively. The father was born in 1809 and crossed the Atlantic to America in 1828, 
settling in Buffalo, New York, where he resided until 1836. He then took passage on 
one of the sidewheel steamers to Chicago, the trip covering two weeks. He arrived 
at his destination when Chicago contained a population of but two thousand at that 
time a settlement not being made between the government and the Indians for their 
lands in that locality. Mr. Edbrooke was a mechanical and structural engineer and 
followed his profession in Chicago to the time of his death. His wife also passed away 
there when forty-eight years of age. Their family numbered nine children, five sons 
and four daughters, all of whom have passed away with the exception of Frank E. 
Edbrooke. 

In his youthful days Mr. Edbrooke of this review was a pupil in the public schools 
of Chicago for a short period but his education was largely acquired through private 
study whenever opportunity gave him leisure for his textbooks. In early life he became 
an apprentice in order to learn the building business and with the outbreak of the 
Civil war he responded to the country's call for troops, feeling that his first duty was 
to defend the Union cause. He therefore enlisted with the first Twelfth Illinois Infantry 
under Colonel John McArthur at Cairo, Illinois. He became a member of Company G 
and served out the three months' term of enlistment, returning home with health 
somewhat impaired. He soon recovered, however, and for about a year worked at 
his trade, at the end of which time he again attempted to join the army but decided to 
try some other branch of service than the infantry. About that time Captain James 
R. Hyslop went to Chicago from New York and opened a recruiting office to enroll 
sailors, railroad men, mechanics, etc., for the marine service to form the First New 
York Marine Artillery, a branch of the United States Navy, as the captain called it, 
the purpose being to join Burnside's expedition in North Carolina for gunboat service. 
Mr. Edbrooke and his brother, together with three hundred other strong, healthy, 
patriotic, practical fellows, enlisted and were sent to New York, where they were 
quartered in some old marine buildings on Staten Island, where they remained for 
about six weeks for organization and equipment. They passed the medical examination, 
were sworn in and equipped with the regular United States Navy uniform. They also 
drew two hundred and two dollars in bounty from the city, county and state of New 
York and were credited to New York's quota. There seemed to be something mysterious 
about all of the proceedings in the organization but the enlisted troops asked no 
questions. About two weeks after receiving their bounty they were ordered on board 
a transport and taken to Newbern, North Carolina, where they were installed on an old 
wooden gunboat for distribution and remained for ten days under navy discipline. 
They were anchored out in the Neuse river about half a mile from shore and thence 
two hundred and twenty-seven of the men were sent down Pamlico Sound on a steamer 
and landed on Roanoke island, a low, flat sandy island about two miles wide and five 
miles long, which was used by the government as a base for military and naval supplies. 
The men were placed there to protect the island from invasion by the natives from 




FRANK E. EDBROOKE 



194 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the mainland, the nearest point of which was seven miles distant. On the island there 
was an old dilapidated fort, armored with four old rusty cannons, no two of the same 
caliber or design, and only one man was kept at the fort to fire a gun to notify the troops 
in case of threatened invasion. For a short time the men enjoyed their camp life but 
a malignant fever set in and nine-tenths of the boys were stricken and in many cases 
the disease proved fatal, so that within four wee!:s forty had succumbed and at one 
time there were less than twenty of them able co report for duty. They probably 
suffered from some form of malaria or yellow fever bit Uie officers could not or would 
not get any relief to the men. In the meantime, through correspondence with influen- 
tial friends at Springfield, Illinois, the troops learned that they were nondescripts as 
far as the United States army and navy were concerned and that no such branch of 
service as the Marine Artillery had ever been a part of the government armament. The 
Springfield friends brought the matter to the attention of Governor Yates of Illinois, 
who promptly presented the grievances of the troops to congress, then in session at 
Washington. The boys were anxious to find out whether they were soldiers, sailors 
or pirates. There was much dissatisfaction among them because of conditions and 
one morning several of the leading spirits called a meeting of all the boys who were 
able to attend to discuss the situation and form some plan to better their condition. 
Several letters from eminent authority at Springfield, Illinois, were read and freely 
discussed and they came to the conclusion that they had been decoyed and hook- 
winked in New York into this Marine Artillery business by fraud — a scheme that the 
government could not and would not recognize. They had enlisted in good faith to 
serve their country in the marine or naval service and not to be placed on a desert 
island to starve and die for want of proper food and medical attention. The boys placed 
the blame on their officers and decided to put the officers under guard, which they did, 
treating them well but guarding them closely. Of course, this was considered mutiny 
on the part of the boys but it accomplished their object of being removed from the island, 
for the news of conditions there was received by General Foster, in command at New- 
bern, and a steamer hove in sight with several companies of New York Hawking 
Zouaves on board. The troops were ordered on board the boat and about one hundred 
and fifty obeyed the command, while of the remainder of the company, those who had 
not succumbed to disease were in the hospital. When they reached Newbern they 
were turned Over to the Third New York Artillery. They were looked upon as mutin- 
eers and a tough lot and about two o'clock in the afternoon of the next day they were 
lined up in Fort- Totten for inspection and lecture, and three companies of armed 
infantry were lined up in front as their executioners. Mr. Edbrooke tells the story as 
follows: "General Hawk, a very venerable looking old gray-haired warrior, was the 
spokesman. After taking a good look at us he said: 'Men, you are here as prisoners 
with charges of mutiny against you. and you all know what that means. My orders 
are that you be divided into small squads and set to work under guards, who will 
see that you obey all orders issued to you or be punished.' He then said: 'If there are 
any of you now who intend to disobey those orders or refuse to do the work assigned 
to you, step two paces to the front' Every man in our company promptly stepped two 
paces to the front, and at that the old general lost his temper and turned to the three 
companies of infantry and said: 'Ready, take aim,' which they did, and we all cheered 
the poor old man. . "Men, you don't know what you are doing,' shouted the old gentle- 
man. 'In less than five minutes half of your number may be lying dead on the ground. 
Now, men, I will give you one more chance. Will you obey orders and go to work?' 
We all yelled in one voice, 'No,' and again cheered the poor old man. He was very 
angry, shaking his fist at us and making profane remarks; then, ordering the three 
companies to recover arms, carry arms, right face, marched them out of the fort, leaving 
us standing there. His bluff did not work. We broke rank and congratulated our- 
selves on being alive." 

Later in the day, however, the troops were broken up in squads of twelve and 
fifteen and Mr. Edbrooke, with fifteen companions, was quartered in a large Sibley tent 
in the fort, in charge of Company C, Third New York Heavy Artillery. There they 
remained as prisoners for about two months. The artillery officers tried to persuade 
the men to join their companies but to no avail. One day near the last of February 
orders came to pack up and prepare to leave the fort, and the men were then divided 
into small squads and marched off in different directions. Two of Mr. Edbrooke's 
squad were H. W. Hitchcock and a Mr. Calbreath. He and the others were marched 
down to the dock, ordered into a small rowboat and taken out to an old canal boat 
called the Gunboat Shrapnel, which was anchored about a half mile from shore. The 
guards put the "prisoners" on board the old craft with their traps and told them to 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 195 

remain there for further orders, but the guards never returned. The only occupant 
of the boat was a poor old gray haired negro. The men were left there without food 
and the next morning they nagged an old fisherman in his boat, who came over and 
took them ashore. They had to avoid the patrol guard and they bummed around the 
town for two weeks, sleeping and eating with the soldiers and negroes or wherever 
they could get anyone to take them in. They were often picked up by the patrol guard 
and taken before the provost marshal, who would tell them to join the quartermaster's 
department, which they would not do, and consequently were always subject to arrest 
by the patrol guard. At last they learned that congress had taken up their case and 
authorized the war department to muster them out of the marine service, as is shown 
by the congressional record of January, 1863, but because of red tape orders were not 
promptly executed. Mr. Edbrooke and Mr. Hitchcock learned that the Thirty-ninth 
Illinois Infantry had arrived in Newbern and started off to their camp three miles 
away, where they found Chicago friends and were entertained through the night. The 
next morning after breakfast Mr. Edbrooke went to the captain of Company K to get 
a pass to go to the city and secure the baggage which they had left on the boat 
Shrapnel. Their purpose if possible was to get back to Chicago, and meeting two 
negro wood-choppers who seemed to have on brand new pants, they made them exchange 
for the army trousers which the soldiers wore and paid them each seventy five cents 
pidditional. Then they continued into the city but were arrested by a sergeant and 
three patrol guards. The officer of the day read their pass and said: "You boys have 
suffered enough and you may go on." They then proceeded to a Jew clothing store, 
where they purchased cheap -civilian clothes. On reaching the dock they found that the 
steamship Dudley Buck had just arrived from New York and would leave for that city 
again the following Saturday. They went to the steward of the boat, telling him they 
wanted to work their passage back to New York. He replied: "I think you are deserters 
and I know you are not sailors, but I will see the captain." In a few moments he 
returned, saying: "If you will work your passage and pay me ten dollars each, we 
will take you," and with instructions to appear Saturday morning at ten o'clock, the 
men went away to find a hiding place until that time should arrive. The intervening 
days were spent in the loft of a small house occupied by a Rebel. They were forced 
to remain in hiding all day and at night they took turns in going out to get supplies 
of food. Promptly at ten o'clock on Saturday they reported to the steward and while 
they were waiting for the boat to sail the provost marshal of Newbern marched onto 
the boat with thirty patrol guards hunting for deserters, but Messrs. Edbrooke and 
Hitchcock had been well concealed. Various incidents, some exciting and dangerous, 
occurred before they eventually reached New York, which they did in a heavy fog. 
The two "Marines" were anxious to get ashore and finally when an old fisherman and 
his boy in a small boat came in sight they hailed him and as he pulled up to the 
Dudley Buck the two swung over into the rowboat by means of a rope. It was after 
much protest, in which he said that he could not make his way through the fog, that 
the owner of the rowboat finally took them ashore, landing them at the south end of 
Jersey City in some coalyards some two or three miles from the ferry, to which they 
walked, then crossed to New York city and bought second class tickets over the Michi- 
gan Central Railroad for Chicago. There Mr. Edbrooke reported to Captain James, the 
provost marshal of Chicago, through his father, who was an old friend of the captain's. 
The latter sent Mr. Edbrooke word that the Marine Artillery had all been mustered 
out by order of the war department and that he need fear no further trouble. On the 
19th of December, 1863, he again enlisted, this time joining Company E, Twelfth 
Illinois Cavalry, with which he served in the southwest in Tennessee, Mississippi, 
Louisiana, Alabama, Arkansas and Texas, and he was honorably discharged and 
mustered out on the 15th of June, 1866. At Springfield, Illinois, General Oaks told 
Mr. Edbrooke that he was the last Illinois volunteer to be discharged from the service. 

Another notable event of his military experience occurred in May, 1864, after 
his command had returned to New Orleans following the Red River campaign under 
General Banks. It was in August when Major Clayborn came into the quarters of the 
company, which he had previously commanded, and called for a volunteer to carry 
some important dispatches to General Cameron, in command of troops at Tipadore, 
thirty-two miles south of Napoleonville, on the bayou. He explained that the railroad 
connecting Tipadore with New Orleans had been cut off by the Rebels and was out of 
commission as far as the Union forces were concerned and that the dispatches in 
question had been sent to him from New Orleans by way of Donaldsonville, to be for- 
warded to General Cameron at Tipadore at once. He also stated that in his opinion 
one man could make the trip through the Rebel lines quicker and safer than a squad 



196 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

of twenty or thirty men and that was the reason why he called for a volunteer to 
make the hazardous journey. No one offered until finally Mr. Edbrooke raised up 
from his bunk and told Major Clayborn that he would go. The Major replied: "You 
are on the sick-list, (which was the truth), but since not another man has volunteered 
I accept your offer if you think you can stand the trip." Mr. Edbrooke said that he 
would risk it, whereupon he was handed the package of papers, which he concealed in 
his jacket pocket, and in fifteen minutes he was in the saddle and off for his destina- 
tion. The day was extremely hot and sultry and the road, which followed the bayou, 
was at the base of a levee bordering the water-way on the right and standing eight or 
nine feet high, with a tow-path on top where horses had traveled, hauling the boats on 
the bayou. On his way he passed through several towns where he saw tough looking 
men in front of saloons, who watched him as he went by at full speed with his Seven 
Spenser carbine carried at an advance, ready for business — and he was a good shot. 
The men probably thought he had a squad following him as they made no demonstra- 
tion while he was in sight. He kept his horse to the pace and arrived at General 
Cameron's headquarters after three hours of hard riding, delivering the papers to him 
personally. When the General learned that Mr. Edbrooke had no squad with him he 
said that it was a shame and that he should have had an escort of twenty or thirty 
men. He then called an orderly, whom he instructed to take Mr. Edbrooke to the 
soldiers' home for the night, saying: "And tell them there, there is nothing too good 
for this man and his horse in Tipadore." He then said: "Report at ten tomorrow 
morning," which Mr. Edbrooke did, receiving another sealed package, with instructions 
to deliver it to Major Clayborn on returning to Napoleonville. Refusing the proffered 
squad escort, Mr. Edbrooke then mounted his horse, saluted and started back alone. 
After traveling about twenty miles he felt himself getting dizzy and unable to see and 
the next he knew he was lying on his back in a garden in front of a large plantation 
liouse under a cluster of fine magnolia trees, where his horse must have carried him. 
A beautiful young girl was pouring water over his head from a gourd, with which 
she had restored him to consciousness. Speaking of this incident, Mr. Edbrooke said: 
"I had been sun-struck and was, of course, feeling very badly but managed to sit up 
and with some surprise beheld the fair vision before me. I asked her where I was, 
and she replied, — 'You are at my home. Your horse came in through the open gate 
and I found you lying here on the ground with your horse watching over you. * * * 
But you are a Yankee soldier and I hate you. I will save you if I can. I could hide 
you but I could not hide your horse. I could put you in the attic' 'You are very 
kind,' I said, 'but I must be going.' 'Well, then, wait a moment,' she replied, and 
running off and leaving me sitting on the grass, went into the house. In five minutes 
she returned with a plate full of roast pork, vegetables, etc., swimming in gravy — 
fine stuff for a sick man in my condition. I thanked her kindly but could not eat. 
Then she told me that twelve Rebel scouts had just left her home fifteen minutes before 
she saw me and that they might be back any moment and would surely kill me if they 
had the chance, since they despised and hated all Yankee soldiers. 'You had better 
be going,' she said, with growing nervousness, 'you are not safe here another minute,' 
and filling my hat with magnolia leaves and water, pulled it down over my head, 
drenching me. Amused at my evident shock from the cold liquid, she smilingly assured 
me that it was only water. Then she helped me mount my horse, saying: 'My best 
wishes go with you. Sometime come back and see me,' " but he never saw the good 
little Samaritan again. He was soon on the road, feeling somewhat better but very 
weak, and after traveling five miles he again felt the dizziness coming on and dis- 
mounted under a large shade tree by the roadside. As he sat there with his carbine 
on his knee a red-headed woman came out of a cottage nearby, shook her fist at him and 
■said: "You damn Yankee, I would like to kill you," and kept up her tirade until Mr. 
Edbrooke ordered her to go and get him some water or he would fire. The woman 
then obeyed but after bringing the water she crossed the road and five minutes later 
returned with four rough looking men, whose attention as they stood on the levee 
she directed to Mr. Edbrooke, who felt that under such conditions he must make his 
escape. Drinking some more water from the gourd and wetting the leaves in his hat 
again, he passed on by the cottage and rode upon the levee to see what the men were 
doing, but discovered no hostile movement among them. It was cooler upon the levee 
than upon the road, so he concluded to take the chance of riding up there although he 
knew he would be a good target for some bushwhacker's rifle. The cool air seemed to 
give him new life and, putting spurs to his horse, he at length reached camp and 
delivered his dispatches to Major Clayborn, who thanked him most heartily, and the 
boys all congratulated Mr. Edbrooke on his safe return and agreed that it was a 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 197 

chance in fifty that he made the trip and came through alive. For five days afterward 
he was in the hospital because of the sunstroke but soon after that event he and his 
command left Napoleoriville for Baton Rouge. As stated, he served until the end of the 
war, being the last Illinoisian to be mustered out. 

After the war Mr. Edbrooke continued his work as an architect and builder and 
entered the employ of T. B. Borst, a prominent contractor, for whom he was to build 
hotels and stations along the line of the Union Pacific. After completing that work 
he returned to Chicago and later was detailed to go back to Denver in the year 1879 
to erect the Tabor block, which was completed in 1882, in time for the opening of the 
lamous Tabor Opera House, on which occasion Miss Emma Abbott, the noted soprano, 
gave a concert. Since coming to Denver, Mr. Edbrooke has erected in this city 
buildings, the total valuation of which is over twenty five million dollars, and include 
such famous structures as the Brown Palace Hotel, the Denver Store, the Masonic 
Temple, the Presbyterian, the First Baptist and Universalist churches, the Ernest & 
Cranmer building, the Cooper building, the First National Bank building, the Gas & 
Electric building, the State Museum and many other public buildings as well as those 
owned by private individuals. He was awarded the second prize in competition for 
the best plan for the state capitol and was later given charge of the finishing of the 
building, of which he was advisory architect. He was for twenty years advisory archi- 
tect to the state board of capitol managers. In 1892 Governor Routt appointed him a 
member of the board of public works of Denver, as it was in the hands of the governor 
to do at that time. He is a director of the Denver Morris Plan Company and a director 
of the Seventeenth Street Building Company. He still maintains an office in the Tabor 
block, which was the first building that he erected in Denver, but he does not actively 
follow his profession at the present time having retired. He is now enjoying a well 
earned rest, spending much of his time in traveling in company with his wife. 

Mr. Edbrooke was married on Christmas Day of 1871, in Chicago, Illinois, to Miss 
Camilla S. Oilman, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Gilman, of Hallowell, Maine. They 
have no children of their own but have reared and educated two nephews, Frank S. 
and Roy W. Cross. The former is now sergeant-major in the United States Army, 
stationed at Fort Douglas, and the latter is a prominent architect of Chicago, who was 
graduated from the Pennsylvania School of Architecture. He has been serving as a 
member of the government commission engaged in railroad valuation, located at 
Chicago. He is also in the government service with the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission as United States lighthouse inspector. 

While Mr. and Mrs. Edbrooke spend much time in travel, when they are in Denver 
they occupy their magnificent residence on Seventeenth avenue, which Mr. Edbrooke 
built twenty-seven years ago and which has always been the abode of warm-hearted 
hospitality. He is a man of philanthropic spirit, giving generously to public movements 
and charitable enterprises, and he is one of Colorado's most eminent and distinguished 
Citizens. His life record is indeed an interesting one and there have been in it various 
thrilling chapters, especially those which cover his Civil war service. He attained 
the highest professional rank and his labors were ever of a character which con- 
tributed to the upbuilding and progress of the city with which he has been so long 
identified. Mr. Edbrooke has also attained high rank in Masonry, having reached the 
thirty-second degree. 



HOWARD L. HOXAX. 



Although Howard L. Honan has been a representative of the Denver bar only since 
1913, he has won a place of prominence in the ranks of the legal profession by reason 
of his marked ability and his resourcefulness in the presentation of his cases before 
the court. He was born upon a farm near Elmo, in Nodaway county, Missouri, November 
10, 1880. His father, Robert Honan, a native of Ireland, has devoted his life to agricul- 
tural pursuits and still makes his home in Nodaway county, where he has long been 
numbered among the successful farmers. He has been active and prominent in com- 
munity affairs, serving as school director there and having considerable influence in other 
directions. He married Hannah Hutchison, also a native of Ireland, who died in the 
year 1893. In their family were five children, of whom three are living. 

Howard L. Honan, spending his youthful days under the parental roof, began his 
education in the district school near his father's home and when not occupied with his 
textbooks assisted in the development of the home farm and after leaving school con- 
centrated his entire attention upon the work of the fields until he reached the age of 



198 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

twenty-two years. He then resumed his studies, becoming a student in Cornell College 
at Mount Vernon, Iowa, in which he completed an academic course. In 1907 he removed 
to Colorado, where he remained for a year and afterward entered the Missouri State 
University, in which he spent two years as a student in the School of Law. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1912 and located for practice in Boulder, Colorado, where he remained 
until 1913, when he came to Denver. Here he entered into partnership with Thomas 
Ward, an association that was maintained until 1917, since which time Mr. Honan has 
practiced alone. He is accorded a large clientage of a distinctly representative char- 
acter. He has proven most resourceful in handling his cases, is strong in argument, 
clear and logical in his deductions and forceful in driving home his point. 

On the 25th of November, 1917, Mr. Honan was united in marriage to Miss Augusta 
Forres, a daughter of Henry Forres, of San Antonio, Texas. Mr. Honan greatly enjoys 
a game of baseball or a boxing contest, appreciating the skill and science of both. He 
is identified with various fraternal and social organizations, holding membership in 
Columbia Lodge, No. 14, A. F. & A. M., of Boulder; South Side Lodge, No. 127, K. P., of 
Denver; the Phi Alpha Delta, a law fraternity; and also the Civic and Commercial As- 
sociation, being in hearty sympathy with its well defined plans and purposes for the 
upbuilding of the city. He is an active democrat, much interested in the success of 
the party because of a belief in its principles but never an aspirant for office. He prefers 
to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his profession and he is one of the respected 
and valued members of the Denver Bar Association. His influence and aid are ever given 
on the side of moral progress and improvement and he is a loyal member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. The career of Mr. Honan illustrates what may be accomplished through 
individual effort, perseverance and ambition. He had no financial assistance at the out- 
set of his career but was actuated by a laudable desire to make for himself a creditable 
name and place in professional circles. He utilized every honorable means to this end. 
He put himself through college and through the law school by working on newspapers, 
being at different times employed on the Columbia Statesman of Boone county, Missouri, 
and on the Missouri Farmer & Breeder. He carefully saved his earnings until his 
industry and economy had brought him sufficient capital to enable him to pursue the 
academic course which served as a broad foundation upon which to rear the super- 
structure of his professional knowledge. He then became a student in the Lincoln- 
Jefferson University and since winning his LL. B. degree he has concentrated his efforts 
upon his professional interests and activities, his devotion to his clients' interests be- 
coming proverbial. 



HON. HARRY CARSON RIDDLE. 

Much has been said and written concerning heredity and to what extent it influences 
and shapes the life of the individual. There is no one, however, who is not proud of an 
honored and distinguished ancestry or of an untarnished family name, and the record 
of the Riddle family is one of which Harry Carson Riddle has reason to be justly 
proud. He is descended from Scotch and Scotch-Irish ancestry. The founder of the 
family in the new world was John Riddle, who crossed the Atlantic at an early period 
in the colonization of the new world and who was a representative of one of the old 
families of the Highlands of Scotland. The great-grandfather, James M. Riddle, was 
admitted to the bar of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, on the 19th of November, 1814, 
and his son, George R. Riddle, also prepared for the bar and both became leading and 
prominent attorneys of Allegheny county. The latter wedded Mary Ann Williams and 
they were the parents of James H. Riddle, who was also born in Pennsylvania. Earlier 
representatives of the family served as soldiers of the Revolutionary war and in the 
maternal line Harry Carson Riddle is also descended from those who fought for Amer- 
ican independence. James H. Riddle did not follow the profession to which his father 
and grandfather had devoted their energies but became an expert accountant. He con- 
tinued to make his home in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, until 1881, when with his family 
he removed to the west, becoming a resident of Denver, where he still resides. He is 
now living retired, enjoying the fruits of a well spent life, and has reached the age of 
seventy-nine years, his birth having occurred February 24, 1839. At the time of the Civil 
war he responded to the country's call for troops, serving at the front with a Pennsyl- 
vania regiment, and his entire life has been characterized by equal devotion to the best 
interests of the country, for he is as true and loyal in days of peace as in days of war. 
He married Rosanna Elizabeth Carson, a daughter of David and Mary (Patterson) 
Carson, who were also natives of Pennsylvania and represented old families of that 




EON. HARRY C. RIDDLE 



200 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

state of Scotch-Irish ancestry. Mrs. Riddle is a direct descendant of Archibald Burns, 
the grandfather of Robert Burns, the sweet singer of Scotland, and other distinguished 
names appear on the family record, including the names of some who fought for Amer- 
ican independence. To Mr. and Mrs. James H. Riddle have been born five children, 
three sons and two daughters. 

Harry Carson Riddle, the eldest of the family, was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, 
on the 4th of February, 1869. He had the advantage of instruction in the schools of 
Allegheny, Pennsylvania, and completed his studies in the schools of Denver. He was 
a youth of seventeen years when he started out to earn his own living and his first 
employment was that of a range rider or cowboy. He devoted five years to stock 
raising interests and during that time his thoughts turned to the profession in which 
his grandfather and great-grandfather had won a creditable name and place. While 
still riding the range he secured law books, which he began reading, and later he more 
earnestly took up the study of law in the office and under the direction of Charles H. 
Brierley, with whom he remained for three years. He was admitted to practice in 
January, 1896, and at once entered upon the active work of the profession. He soon 
gave demonstration of the fact that he possessed the same qualities which had made 
his sires famous at the bar of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. His mind is naturally 
analytical, logical and inductive, his reasoning is clear, his deductions sound and his 
arguments strong and logical. It was not long before he had demonstrated his ability 
to successfully handle intricate and involved legal problems and he has always been 
accorded a large and distinctively representative clientage. He is a valued member of 
the Denver Bar Association and for two terms was one of its trustees and also chair- 
man of the grievance committee for one term. He likewise belongs to the Colorado 
State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. 

Aside from his professional activity Mr. Riddle has been quite prominent as a 
leader in political and civic affairs in Denver and is a stanch and stalwart advocate of 
the republican party. He has labored earnestly for many years to promote its interests, 
believing that the adoption of its principles will prove an important factor* in good 
government. He served on the first election commission of Denver under the new 
charter, which was adopted March 29, 1904, occupying that position for two years. In 
1906 he was elected judge of the district court and served upon the bench from the 
8th of January, 1907, until the 14th of January, 1913, or for a six years' term. His course 
as a judge was in harmony with his record as a man and lawyer, being characterized 
by marked devotion to duty and by a masterful grasp of every problem presented for 
solution. At the present writing, in 1918, he is a member of the state board of par- 
dons, having served since March, 1916, when he was appointed by Governor George A. 
Carlson, while the present governor, Hon. J. C. Gunter, reappointed him to the position. 
His activity in behalf of public interests has been of a still broader character, for 
he is now a member of the board of trustees and the vice president of the Westmin- 
ster University, a position which he has occupied for several years. He is an active 
member of the Central Presbyterian church, in which he has served as elder for a 
number of years, occupying that position at the present time. He has also been vice 
moderator for two years and he is interested in all that tends to advance the moral 
progress of the community. 

On the 27th of May, 1905. Mr. Riddle was married at the residence of Professor 
J. E. Ayers of Denver to Miss Elsie Carlton Ayers, a native of this city and a daughter 
of Professor J. E. and Anna (Rea) Ayers, members of an old and prominent family of 
Denver, connected with the city from the early '70s. To Mr. and Mrs. Riddle have been 
born a son and two daughters: Carson, who was born in Denver, March 23, 1906: 
Lucy Ayers, born August 7, 1907; and Elizabeth Rea, born April 4, 1911. Mrs. Riddle 
is a lady of broad and liberal culture. She was graduated from the academic depart- 
ment of Colorado College and afterward went to Chicago, where she pursued a special 
course in kindergarten work and was graduated. At the time of her marriage she 
was supervisor of kindergarten work at Fort Collins and had figured prominently in 
educational circles for several years. Like her husband, she is very active in religious 
and charitable work of the city and is continually extending a helping hand to those 
in need of assistance. She formerly served as president of the Ladies' Missionary 
Society of her church and is now president of the Parent Teachers Association in the 
Boulevard school district of Denver. She is thus studying deeply many questions 
relative to the training of the young and to the attitude and relation of the parent to 
the school and has done much for the social uplift of the community. Mr. Riddle 
belongs to the Interlachen Golf Club and also to the Lakewood Country Club — asso- 
ciations which indicate something of the nature of the interests to which he turns 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 201 

for rest and relaxation. Aside from his law practice he is a director in several mining 
companies of Colorado but his time and attention are chiefly concentrated upon his 
law practice and his devotion to his clients' interests is proverbial. 



CHARLES DENISON COBB. 



Charles Denison Cobb, deceased, attained prominence in various connections. He 
won for himself a most creditable position in insurance circles, was the grand master of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and for forty years was vestryman of St. John's 
cathedral of Denver and president of the Railway Mission Sunday school for a longer 
period, thus contributing in notable measure to the material, intellectual, social and 
moral progress of the city. He was born in the town of Columbus, Johnson county, 
Missouri, June 15, 1844, and had therefore almost reached the Psalmist's allotted span 
of three score years and ten when he passed away in Denver on the 9th of May, 1914, 
his remains being interred in Riverside cemetery. 

Charles D. Cobb was educated in the public schools of his native county and in the 
Irving Institute of Tarrytown, New York. He arrived in Denver in 1863 and for several 
years thereafter was employed as a clerk in Denver jobbing houses. In 1867 he became 
associated with Colonel Robert Wilson as a post trader and in government contracting 
at Fort Fetterman, "Wyoming. He continued in that connection until 1870, when he 
returned to Denver and organized a general fire insurance business, covering Colorado, 
Wyoming, Utah and New Mexico. He gave the greater part of his time and attention 
to the management of this business, although he was a prominent and active factor in 
the conduct of various other enterprises in Denver which contributed to the material 
upbuilding of the city. He was one of the organizers of the Commercial National Bank 
and became its vice president. He was likewise connected with other interests of a 
public and semi-public character. He participated in the organization of the Chamber 
of Commerce and became one of its directors and its vice president. He was also active 
in promoting the Riverside Cemetery Association, of which he long served as secretary, 
and his cooperation and aid were potent factors in the attainment of success in connec- 
tion with every enterprise or project with which he was identified. 

He was married in Denver September 3, 1868, to S. Ella Buckingham, youngest 
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Richard G. Buckingham, who died December 30, 1878. On 
November 25, 1880, he married Dr. Buckingham's second daughter, Florence. The wed- 
ding took place at the Buckingham home on Fourteenth and Champa streets, the 
present site of Denver's magnificent Auditorium. 

Mr. Cobb put forth effective effort in connection with the development of the educa- 
tional system of the city. From 1880 until 1884 he was a member of the board of 
education for School District No. 1 and in 1885, when the board of supervisors was 
added to the city's legislative department, he was elected one of its members. After 
two years' service in that position he was nominated by the democratic party as its 
candidate for mayor of Denver but was defeated by William Scott Lee, who received a 
small majority. Mr. Cobb was particularly well known as a prominent representative 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He filled all the offices in the local lodge and 
in the grand lodge was chosen grand master of the state and representative of Colorado 
in the sovereign grand lodge. During the- last two years of his life he was largely 
engaged in financing and erecting the Odd Fellows Temple on Champa street, a six- 
story fireproof building. He manifested the greatest enthusiasm in connection with 
the order and was much beloved by his fellow members of the organization. He co- 
operated heartily in every plan and project for the general good and aided in large 
measure in promoting the material, intellectual, social and moral progress of Denver. 
His ideals of life were high and he put forth every possible effort to secure their 
adoption. 



CLARENCE COBB. 



Clarence Cobb, a prominent figure in insurance circles in Denver, his native city, 
was born June 18, 1871, a son of Charles D. and Sarah Ella (Buckingham) Cobb, the 
latter a daughter of Dr. R. G. Buckingham, at one time mayor of Denver and a well 
known pioneer citizen. Clarence Cobb, in the pursuit of his education, attended the 
grammar and high schools of Denver and the Holbrook Military School of Briarcliff, 















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CLARENCE COBB 



204 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

New York. In 1891 he turned his attention to the insurance business in connectoon with 
his father and since the latter's death has been proprietor of the agency which was 
established in 1870, covering the states of Colorado, Wyoming and New Mexico. The 
business has assumed extensive proportions, both in the fire and automobile lines. 
Mr. Cobb like his father, is an ardent supporter of the things which tend to the up- 
building of his city and state and the uplift of humanity. He is a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce and of a number of prominent clubs; he was a member of the 
High School Cadets, Holbrook's Military School, and Troop B of the Colorado National 
Guard and is now a member of the executive committee of the Conservation Association 
of Colorado, Wyoming and New Mexico, an organization under the direction of the 
war department through the National Board of Fire Underwriters. 



IVAN S. SCHERRER. 



Ivan S. Scherrer is president and manager of the W. F. Thompson Mercantile Com- 
pany, wholesale dealers in grain and feed in Denver. He is widely known and popular 
in commercial circles and, moreover, he is entitled to representation in this volume as 
a member of one of the old pioneer families. He was born near Williamsburg, Iowa, in 
Iowa county, October 12, 1874. his parents being Louis and Mary (House) Scherrer. 
The father was a native of Alsace-Lorraine, while the mother was born in the state of 
New York. Louis Scherrer came to America with his parents at about the age of twelve, 
in the latter '40s. and took up his abode near Iowa City, Iowa, where he resided until 
1859. In that year he established a freight route across the plains, extending from 
the Missouri river to Denver, and later it was extended to Salt Lake City. He made his 
first trip to Denver in 1859 and often camped under a tree that stood on the north side 
of Wazee street, near Sixteenth street. He was engaged in freighting across the plains 
from 1859 until 1865, using ox teams as was the custom. Many are the interesting 
tales which he told of his early experiences while crossing the plains with caravans, when 
Indians lurked in the tall grass and buffaloes roamed over the broad prairie and when 
much of the now highly cultivated section of the west was a waste desert of sand dunes 
and sagebrush. In 1875 he removed with his family to Bennett, Colorado, his wife and 
children coming from Marengo county, Iowa, where for ten years they had resided upon 
a farm. From 1875 until 1891 they occupied a ranch near Bennett and during this 
period Mr. Scherrer concentrated his efforts upon the development of his property, which 
was principally devoted to stock raising. He was born in the year 1835 and was there- 
fore but fifty-six years of age when he passed away in 1891. His wife was a native of 
Utica, New York, but at the age of twelve years accompanied her parents on their 
westward removal to Iowa City, Iowa, and a few years later they left there, going to 
Salt Lake City, the journey across the plains being made with ox teams. They reached 
their destination on the day that the cornerstone of the Mormon Temple was laid. In 
the fall of 1864 the House family came to Denver from Salt Lake City and the daughter 
remained in Denver until the following year. 1865, when she became the wife of Louis 
Scherrer, the marriage being solemnized in the Broadwell House, then one of Denver's 
leading hotels. Their honeymoon was spent upon the plains in a trip made in a covered 
wagon to Omaha, Nebraska. It was certainly a very unusual wedding trip, for the 
Indians were on the warpath and the government required that companies of no less 
than one hundred men should be formed before they would be permitted to pass Fort 
Morgan. The leader of the band with which the bride and her husband made the trip 
told the federal authorities when they reached the fort that their band was one hundred 
and one men strong, for he had learned that Mrs. Scherrer was able to load and shoot 
as accurately as any of the men of the company. Before they reached Julesburg many 
evidences of Indian depredations were seen. Ranch houses had been burned by the 
score and near each scene of battle dead white men and their red foes were lying on the 
ground. When the party finally reached Julesburg they found the Indians had raided 
the post two days before and had burned it. The few soldiers who had been stationed 
there had been killed or taken prisoners by the enemy. On arriving at Omaha they 
outfitted again and crossed the plains with freight for the United States government 
to Fort Collins, which at that time was a government post, occupied* by a strong force 
of troops. In the fall Mr. and Mrs. Scherrer returned to Iowa, locating on a farm near 
Iowa City, where they remained until 1875. as previously stated, and again crossed the 
plains, this time with horse teams. They homesteaded a ranch near Bennett, Colorado, 
on the Kiowa creek, and there resided until the death of Mr. Scherrer in 1891, after 
which his widow removed to Denver, there remaining from 1893 until her demise, which 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 205 

occurred December 1, 1914. In the family were seven children: Walter W., who is 
living at Byers, Colorado; Mrs. Francis M. Dunn, of Denver; Mrs. Maggie A. Wis well, of 
Keenesburg. Colorado; Prank L., a resident of Ewing, Nebraska; Ivan S.; and Ella K. 
and Ralph E., who are also residents of Denver. 

Ivan S. Scherrer was but a year old when his parents returned to Colorado in the fall 
of 1875, when Colorado was yet a territory, and he pursued his education in the 
public schools of Bennett. After his studies were completed he engaged in ranching 
on his father's place until his removal to Denver in 1892, when he became connected 
with the business interests of the city. In 1894 he entered the employ of W. F. Thompson 
in the wholesale grain and feed business and in that connection steadily worked his 
way upward, remaining with Mr. Thompson as his manager until the latter's death in 
1903, after which he conducted the business for two years in the interests of Mr. Thomp- 
son's estate. In 1905 he purchased the business, which he has since carried on, and 
through the intervening period has been president and manager of the W. P. Thompson 
Mercantile Company. 

Fraternally Mr. Scherrer is connected with the Woodmen of the World. He also 
has membership with the Sons of Territorial Pioneers and his religious faith is indi- 
cated by his membership in the Presbyterian church. He has a wide acquaintance 
throughout Colorado, where he has spent practically his entire life, and there are many 
phases of pioneer experience with which he is familiar. He early became acquainted 
with all of the experiences and hardships which fell to the lot of the early ranchmen 
and he has rejoiced in the progress that has been accomplished since his parents pene- 
trated into the western wilderness. His father was one of the early freighters upon the 
plains and since that time the name of Scherrer has figured in connection with the 
substantial development, settlement and improvement of this section of the state. In 
his own business career Mr. Scherrer has steadily progressed, owing to his close applica- 
tion, his persistency of purpose and ready adaptability. His business methods have 
at all times commanded the highest confidence and regard and those who know him 
speak of him in terms of praise both as a representative of mercantile interests and as 
a citizen. 



MARK AUSTIN ELLISON. 



Mark Austin Ellison is engaged in the publication of the Loveland Herald as a 
member of the firm of Smith & Ellison. He was born in Tioga, Tioga county, Pennsyl- 
vania, on the 9th of February, 1876, his parents being George F. and Mary Elizabeth 
Ellison, the former a pioneer of Tioga county, where for many years he was engaged 
in farming and in the lumber business. Subsequently he established his home at Harri- 
son Valley, Pennsylvania, and there became agent for the New York Central Railroad. 

Mark A. Ellison was reared and educated in the Keystone state, and when his father 
accepted a position' with the railroad company, he began studying the work devolving 
upon a station agent, including telegraphy. Therefore on reaching the age of seventeen 
years he was put in railroad service as an extra man, acting as agent and operator at 
different stations along the line and also caring for the business of the American Ex- 
press Company at the same time. He next entered the employ of the M. S. Haskell Mer- 
cantile Company at Mills, Pennsylvania, with which he remained for two years. Having 
saved some money, he and his brother formed a partnership for the conduct of a general 
merchandise establishment at Mills, Pennsylvania, and carried on the business under 
the name of Ellison Brothers for two years. On the expiration of that period they dis- 
posed of their interests and Mark A. Ellison removed to Wellsville, New York, to become 
manager for B. McOwen & Company, an important concern that operated nine different 
establishments in as many localities. His connection with that house continued until 
1902, when owing to the illness of his parents, he returned home and accepted the posi- 
tion of buyer with the P. S. Schweitzer Mercantile Company, with which he remained 
for three years. In July, 1905, he came to Colorado and entered the service of the State 
Mercantile Company of Denver, which placed him in charge = of their business at La- 
fayette. At the end of three months, however, he removed to Loveland, there supervising 
the company's dry goods department for three years. He was afterward connected 
with the Doty-Dundon Company of Loveland for a year and then accepted a position 
with the Loveland Herald. In August, 1910, he was made editor, secretary and general 
manager of the publishing company and later purchased the paper in association with 
Claude H. Smith, with whom he has since conducted the same. It is a bright and 



206 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

interesting journal, devoted to the dissemination of local and general news, and has 
had a most successful existence under the present ownership. 

On the 30th of March, 1905, Mr. Ellison was united in marriage to Miss Lena Mae 
Keltz, by whom he has a son, Donald, who is now thirteen years of age. He is intimately 
identified with the religious, social and fraternal organizations of Loveland and has 
made many warm friends during the period of his residence here. 



ALEXANDER MEAD. 



Forty years have come and gone since Alexander Mead arrived in Colorado and 
in this period he has been a most active factor in promoting the development and wel- 
fare of the state through irrigation projects and through many other fields of activity 
which have been directly resultant in bringing about present day progress and prosperity 
in Colorado. Mr. Mead is a native of the state of New York. He was born on the 18th 
of December, 1841. and was a son of Alexander Mead. Sr., whose birth occurred in Venice, 
Cayuga county. New York. In both lineal and collateral branches the family has been 
distinctively American through many generations. Alexander Mead, Sr., devoted his 
life to the occupation of farming in the town of Venice, Cayuga county, where he owned 
one hundred and sixty acres of land which he brought under a high state of cultiva- 
tion, and in addition to raising the cereals best adapted to soil and climate there he also 
engaged in stock raising. He died in the year 1868, while his wife survived until 1880 
and both were laid to rest in the cemetery at Moravia, New York. Their religious faith 
was that of the Universalist church. 

Alexander Mead, whose name introduces this review, pursued his education in the 
academy at Moravia and at the age of seventeen years took up the profession of teach- 
ing, which he successfully followed for an extended period, imparting readily and clearly 
to others the knowledge that he had acquired. He worked on farms during the summer 
months, while the winter seasons were devoted to his duties as an educator and ultimately 
he embarked in the lumber business in Oswego county, New York, where he continued 
in manufacturing of lumber for four years. But the lure of the west was upon him and 
in June, 1878. he arrived in Greeley, Colorado, where he became connected with the 
agricultural implement business, which he conducted until 1883. He then sold out in 
that line and began dealing in land and stock and this constituted an initial step toward 
his activity in the field of irrigation work. He devoted much of his time to the building 
of ditches and reservoirs as well as to farming and he also bought and sold considerable 
land. For twenty years he was engaged in land development through the construction 
of ditches and reservoirs in Weld county and was the organizer of a company to build 
ditches in Wyoming and Colorado. His life work has been of signal value and usefulness 
to the community in which he has lived and to the west at large. He has developed 
farms adjoining Windsor, Ault and Greeley and has been largely interested in numerous 
development projects in the country which have brought water into hitherto arid dis- 
tricts and produced their present productiveness. It is said that Mr. Mead is the best 
posted man on northern Colorado irrigation in the state. In 1883 he organized a company 
in Arizona for the development of one hundred and twenty-five thousand acres of land, 
which he hoped to redeem through irrigation, but in- this work he met with such strong 
competition that he could not get his plans approved by the secretary of the interior 
and failed to win the support of the congressmen and senators of Arizona to throw open 
the land which had belonged to the Indians on the reservation. It seems that during 
the administration of President Grant the belligerent tribes of Indians, after they had 
been captured, had to be transplanted somewhere and the Colorado flatlands above Yuma 
were selected for this purpose. This land was called a reservation, although the Indians 
had no treaty rights granted them, but they had to be cared for and Colonel Dent was 
sent to look out for the wards of the nation and to try to improve their condition by 
furnishing water for irrigation purposes. He drove a tunnel through Headgate Rock, 
which lies above the town of Parker, Arizona, hoping to direct sufficient water into that 
district to irrigate the body of land, which would be of great advantage to the Indians. 
During the spring of the year the usual rise in the river occurred and flooded the land 
below the tunnel, shutting off the flow, so that the project was abandoned. Headgate 
Rock furnished the most feasible site for diverting water known at any point. The 
government project at Yuma, however, was being constructed, also the Salt River project 
near Phoenix and the Roosevelt dam. all of which have adjacent bodies of land to cover 
with water to offer to the settlers. Therefore the Mead project at Headgate Rock was not 
looked upon with favor in Washington. Obstructions were interposed and the plans 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 207 

submitted were not approved by the secretary of the interior. Mr. Mead and his asso- 
ciates in the company were therefore obliged to abandon the project after the plans for 
the work had been drawn up by John H. Quinton of Los Angeles. Had the plans been 
carried out, it would have cost the settlers approximately forty dollars per acre, which 
was about one-half the cost of the government projects, but the necessary legislative 
approval was not secured. Mr. Mead's efforts in the irrigation fields of Colorado, how- 
ever, have been of great benefit and value, transforming large arid tracts into valuable 
farming property. Moreover, in addition to his labors in that connection, he has mining 
interests in Nevada, including both gold and silver properties, and is vice president of 
a company operating at Fort Collins. 

In December. 1869, Mr. Mead was united in marriage to Miss Louise Avery, a daugh- 
ter of Edgar Avery, and to them have been born eight children, of whom seven are living, 
while one died at the age of sixteen years. Mabel, the eldest, is the wife of Tracy Marsh, 
a miner of Ely, Nevada, and they have one son. Edgar, who is the manager of the White 
Automobile Company of Denver, Colorado, married Irma Hendricks and they have two 
children. Dr. Ella Mead is a practicing physician of Greeley and is winning very gratify- 
ing success in her chosen line of work. Perry, who was born in 1881, attended the public 
schools and afterward became connected with the Goodrich Tire Company of Denver, 
while later he was associated with the White Automobile Company in connection with 
his brother. In 1916 he joined the United States army as a member of Battery B in 
Denver and is now captain in charge of a construction corps. He was called to service 
as a captain of the commissary department which was sent to Linda Vista, California, 
where he took charge of a construction corps. Later he was transferred to Port Sill, 
Oklahoma, and is in charge of Truck Company No. 380. called "The School of Fire." He 
was married but his wife died, leaving two children. Mildred, the next of the family, 
became the wife of Walter Starbird and resides upon a cattle ranch on the western slope 
near Meeker, Colorado. Alexandria is the wife of H. N. Stronach, a lawyer of Cheney, 
Washington, and now secretary of the State Normal School. Wilhelmina was graduated 
from the Normal School, studied for two years in Columbia College of New York and 
is now a well known artist and decorator. Liberal educational advantages have been 
accorded all the members of the family and the eldest daughter. Mabel, held the chair 
of languages in the Agricultural College of Colorado for a time. Nature has endowed 
the members of this family with strong intellectual powers and Mr. and Mrs. Mead have 
every reason to be proud of what their children have accomplished in the educational 
field. 

It is said that no man in northern Colorado is more widely known or more highly 
esteemed than Alexander Mead of this review. Mrs. Mead and her daughters are very 
active in church work and in social affairs and Mr. Mead is a most generous contributor 
to charitable and benevolent projects. In a word, the family occupies a very prominent 
and enviable position, especially in those social circles where true worth and intelligence 
are accepted as the passports to good society. A residence of forty years in Colorado 
certainly entiles Mr. Mead to rank with its pioneer citizens and throughout the entire 
period his efforts and ability have gone far toward the upbuilding of the state, the 
development of its natural resources and the promotion of its progress along many lines 
which have worked not only for immediate benefit but for future good as well. 



WALTER E. BLISS. 



Walter E. Bliss was admitted to the Colorado bar in 1909 and has since engaged 
in law practice in Greeley, where he is accorded a liberal clientage. He was born in 
Union county, Iowa, December 9. 1881, his parents being Stephen P. and Jeanetta Hart- 
man Bliss, who were natives of Vermont and Pennsylvania respectively. The father was 
a farmer and stockman and in an early day went to Iowa, locating there when Indians 
were still numerous in the state. He accompanied his parents to Iowa, the family home 
being established in Union county, and there Stephen P. Bliss as the years passed be- 
came a farmer, operating a tract of land successfully until 1883. He then left the Hawk- 
eye state in order to become a resident of Colorado and took up his abode at Colorado 
Springs, where he lived until 1885. In that year he arrived in Weld county, where he 
purchased land, which he continued to further cultivate and improve to the time of 
his death. He was the first man to break up an alfalfa field in order to raise potatoes 
thereon and he produced the largest crop of potatoes ever raised in Weld county to that 
time, averaging four hundred bushels to the acre. He died August 27, 1887, and is sur- 



208 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

vived by his widow, who yet remains upon the old homestead farm which he developed 
and improved. 

Walter E. Bliss was reared and educated in Colorado, being only four years of age 
when his parents removed to this state. He mastered the branches of learning taught 
in the public schools of Greeley and afterward took up the occupation of farming, which 
he followed for five years. He was ambitious, however, to enter upon a professional 
career and determined upon the practice of law as a life work. He began reading in 
the office and under the direction of Charles F. Tew, with whom he continued for a 
year and a half and then entered Michigan State University at Ann Arbor, where he 
pursued a two years' law course and was admitted to practice at the Colorado bar in 
1909. In due course he opened an office in Greeley, having well appointed rooms in the 
Opera House building, and as the years have gone by he has won a very large clientage. 
His practice is not only extensive but of an important character and has connected him 
with much of the notable litigation heard in the courts of the district. He is devoted 
to the interests of his clients, yet he never forgets that he owes a still higher allegiance 
to the majesty of the law, and he bases his success upon thorough preparation of cases 
and correct application of legal principles to the points at issue. He is the present 
county attorney of Weld county, to which position he was appointed in January, 1913, 
and some of the most important cases that have been heard in Weld county have been 
tried since he was called to this office, including the famous Union Pacific tax case. Mr. 
Bliss is also a stockholder of and attorney for the Weld County Savings Bank and is a 
stockholder in and attorney for the Home Gas & Electric Company. 

On the 5th of December, 1910, Mr. Bliss was united in marriage to Miss Artie M. 
Sterling, a daughter of Charles C. Sterling, of Toledo, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Bliss have 
become parents of three children: Valla H., who was born April 11, 1912; Charlotte E., 
born February 13, 1916 ; and Walter Sterling, born May 3, 1918. Mrs. Bliss is a member 
of the United Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Bliss gives his political endorsement to the democratic party but has never 
desired or sought office outside the strict path of his profession. He belongs to the Weld 
County Bar Association and that he enjoys the goodwill and confidence of his professional 
colleagues and contemporaries is indicated in the fact that he has been honored with the 
office of president of the bar association, in which capacity he is now serving. He 
has never regretted leaving the farm, for he has found his professional interests entirely 
congenial and his efforts in this field have brought him considerable prominence and well 
deserved success. 



GEORGE L. REED. 



George L. Reed is the president of The Boulder Creamery Company, a developing 
enterprise which has long since taken its place among the dividend paying commercial 
interests of Denver. Its management is based upon sound business principles and a 
spirit of progressiveness and initiative marks the conduct of its interests. Mr. Reed 
established the business by taking over an enterprise of the kind that had failed. He 
had had some previous experience along this line and his keen insight enabled him 
to recognize opportunities, while his unfaltering energy has enabled him to overcome 
all difficulties and obstacles in his path toward the goal of success. 

Mr. Reed is a native of Cedar county, Iowa. He was born November 25, 1S69, and 
is the eldest in a family of four sons and five daughters whose parents are William 
S. and Amanda (La Rue) Reed, who are also natives of Cedar county, Iowa. The Reed 
family was established in that state in early pioneer times. The ancestral line is 
traced back to England and the family was founded in the new world by Leonard 
Reed, who came to the United States about 1824. He took up his abode in Cedar 
county, Iowa, at an early date and devoted his life to the occupation of farming, spend- 
ing his remaining days in the Hawkeye state where he died aged about sixty-two years. 
William S. Reed was reared and educated in Cedar county, Iowa, and there took up the 
occupation of farming. In 1881 he removed to Fillmore county, Nebraska, and in 1907 
he became a resident of Morgan county, Colorado, where he followed farming until a 
few years ago but is now living retired in that county, making his home in Wiggins. 
His wife is a daughter of George La Rue, who was a native of France and became the 
founder of the American branch of the family. He, too, cast in his lot with the early 
settlers of Iowa. Mrs. Reed is also living and they are well known people of Wiggins. 

George L. Reed pursued his early education in the schools of Cedar county, Iowa, 
and afterward continued his studies in the high school in Fairmont, Nebraska. His 




GEORGE L. REED 



210 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

early life to the age of seventeen years was spent upon the home farm and then he 
started out to provide for his .own support. He was first employed by the Fairmont 
Creamery Company of Fairmont, Nebraska, his work being to collect cream through- 
out the country, through which he traveled with a wagon. He received as remunera- 
tion for his own labors .and the use of his team a dollar and ninety-two cents per day. 
He was thus employed for three years or until he reached the age of twenty. In 1890 
he removed to Crete. Nebraska, to become superintendent there, representing the 
Fairmont Creamery Company at that place. He occupied the position for five years 
and was then transferred to Fairbury, Nebraska, and became general manager for the 
company at that point. He continued in the latter position for six years and was with 
the Fairmont Company altogether for fourteen years. On removing to Boulder, Colorado 
in 1901, he became a butter sales agent for the Fairmont Company, Boulder being 
the company's distributing point in this state. He had been in Colorado for but a brief 
period when he learned that the Boulder Dairy Supply Company was about to go out of 
business. In fact it had failed. Thereupon Mr. Reed leased the plant and with a 
cash capital of one hundred dollars founded his present business, which has since 
developed and grown until it is the second largest in the state. After conducting the 
business for three months Mr. Reed had made such a success of the undertaking that 
his capital was increased to two thousand dollars and in 1911 the business was 
incorporated with a capital stock of fifty thousand dollars. In 1909 the main business 
was removed to Denver in order to secure better shipping facilities and today the firm 
employs on an average of one hundred people, while the output for 1917 was in excess 
of one million pounds of butter. Something of the growth of the business is indicated 
in the fact that during the first year at Boulder the output was thirty-six thousand 
pounds. Today the trade extends to all parts of the country from coast to coast and 
the products of The Boulder Creamery Company are unsurpassed for excellence, while 
the development of the business stands as an indication of the marked enterprise, 
initiative and discernment of George L. Reed. In addition to his connection with The 
Boulder Creamery Company, of which he has always been the president, Mr. Reed 
owns five sections of land and farms three sections near Greeley but makes the creamery 
business his chief interest, and at a recent date the capital stock has been increased to 
two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. It is his plan to gradually increase this to 
a half million or more as needed for the development of the business and it is hoped 
and believed that the business will become one of the largest of the character in the 
west. 

On the 15th of September, 1898, in Fairbury, Nebraska, Mr. Reed was married 
to Miss Genevra M. Curtis, a native of that state and a daughter of Sidney and Mary 
A. (Wiley) Curtis, the former now deceased, while the latter makes her home with 
Mr. and Mrs. Reed. To their marriage have been born two children: Donald La Rue, 
who was born in Boulder, Colorado, August 27, 1903: and Virginia, born June 28, 1911. 

Politically Mr. Reed is a republican but not an office seeker. He recognizes, how- 
ever, the duties and obligations of citizenship and always loyally supports the 
principles in which he believes. He belongs to Elks Lodge. No. 566, of Boulder, has 
been identified with the Modern Woodmen of America since 1892 and belongs to the 
Fraternal Union and the Royal Arcanum. He also has membership in the Denver 
Civic and Commercial Association, the Denver Manufacturers Association and the 
Denver Motor Club and he is interested in all of those things which are a matter of 
civic virtue and of civic pride. His religious faith is that of the Methodist church. 
He is truly a self-made nwn and as the architect of his own fortunes has buildad 
wisely and well. He began work on the farm, milking cows, when but ten years of 
age and from early youth has been dependent entirely upon his own resources, so that 
his life record illustrates what can be accomplished through individual effort and such 
a record should serve as an inspiration and encouragement to others, for he is today at 
the head of an extensive and growing business and one which is having much to do with 
advancing standards of creamery production in the country. 



ABRAHAM E. LIVERMAN. 



Abraham E. Liverman. manager at Denver for the Home Life Insurance Company 
of New York, ;n which connection he has built up a business of extensive proportions, 
comes to the west from La Crosse. Wisconsin, where he was born on the 1st of June, 
1864. his parents being Benjamin and Theresa (Marks) Liverman. both of whom were 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 211 

natives of Poland. The father came to America when a youth of eleven years, settling 
first in New York city, and in young manhood he traveled for the firm of Lord & Taylor, 
which at that time was one of the largest jewelry houses of New York city. This was 
prior to the era of railroad building and Mr. Liverman had to make his trips with teams. 
He traveled throughout New York covering the period that included the second decade 
of the nineteenth century. In 1855 he removed westward to Wisconsin, becoming a 
pioneer settler of La Crosse, where for years he was engaged in the ice business. In 
1883 he brought his family to Colorado, settling in Denver, where he resided until his 
death, which occurred in 1896, when he had reached the advanced age of ninety-five 
years. He came of a family noted for longevity, his father having lived to the venerable 
age of one hundred and four years, at which time he suffered a sunstroke while plowing 
in the fields, his death resulting. The mother of Abraham E. Liverman was also a 
native of Poland and in girlhood came to the new world in company with two brothers 
about the year 1830. She settled in St. Louis, Missouri, and was there married. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Liverman were born four sons and a daughter and three of the number 
are yet living, but the daughter has passed away. Those who survive are: Tobias B., a 
resident of Denver; Harry, who makes his home in Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Abraham 
E., of this review. The wife and mother passed away in Denver in 1902 at the age of 
ninety-five years. 

Abraham E. Liverman began his education in the public schools of his native city 
and when a youth of thirteen years started out to provide for his own support, his first 
employment being that of a messenger at La Crosse with the Western Union Telegraph 
Company. He later took up the study of telegraphy and engaged in work of that char- 
acter and in railroading for a period of twelve years. On coming to Colorado he entered 
the employ of the Union Pacific Railroad Company as general agent and was so engaged 
until 1895, when he accepted the general agency of the Home Life Insurance Company, 
which had recently been established. Through all the intervening period, covering 
twenty-three years, Mr. Liverman has been actively, continuously and successfully engaged 
in the insurance business and has contributed much to the success of the company, 
building up a large agency in Denver. When he took control this district had but a 
few policies and today the company is carrying insurance in force that approximates 
five million dollars. Not a little of the development of the business is due to the efforts 
and ability of Mr. Liverman, who has concentrated his attention and energies upon 
insurance interests, has carefully systematized the work in his district and has won a 
clientage of large and extensive proportions. He is also a director of the Denver Morris 
Plan Company. 

On the 23d of December. 1908, Mr. Liverman was united in marrriage to Miss Helen 
McPhail. a native of Toronto, Canada, and a daughter of Richard and Rose (Montgomery) 
McPhail. The latter is still living and makes her home in Denver. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Liverman have been born two children. Helen and Ruth, both of whom are natives of 
Denver, the former born January 22, 1912, and the latter on the 22d of February, 1914. 

In politics Mr. Liverman maintains an independent course. Fraternally he is associ- 
ated with the Masons as a member of Oriental Lodge. No. 87, A. F. & A. M., of Denver, 
having taken the initial degree in 1893. He is also a member of the Civic and Commercial 
Association and he is deeply interested in all that has to do with the progress and 
improvement of his city and its upbuilding along substantial lines. 



ALBERT McCOLLUM. 



Albert McCollum is engaged in general agricultural pursuits in Weld county, near 
Evans. He was born in Polk county, Iowa, August 22, 1858. His father, James McCollum, 
was born in Virginia, devoted his life to the occupation of farming and after living 
for a time in Polk county, Iowa, removed to the west, both he and his wife spending 
their last days in Evans, Colorado. Mrs. McCollum had a brother, Valerius Young, who 
was one of the early builders and promoters of Denver aiding largely in laying out the 
city. To Mr. and Mrs. James McCollum were born six children, namely: Caroline; 
Mary J.; Benjamin F; Isaac N.; Barbara, who passed away in infancy; and Albert, of 
this review. The mother was twice married and by her first husband had two children, 
Florinda and John Addison Kimler. 

Albert McCollum spent ten years of his youth as a public school pupil and afterward 
went to Kansas, where he remained upon his father's farm of one hundred and forty 
acres for four years. On the expiration of that period he arrived in Colorado with 
Evans as his destination. For fourteen years he rode the range and then concentrated 



212 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

his attention upon the production of crops. He is now the owner of sixty acres of land, 
devoted to the raising of beets, alfalfa and wheat. 

On the 20th of March. 1890. Mr. McCollum was united in marriage to Miss Angeline 
Pulliam, of Fort Collins, a daughter of Henry A. and Nancy E. (Crain) Pulliam, both 
of whom passed away in Missouri. The father was born in Callaway county, Missouri, 
while the mother was a native of Macon county. During the Civil war Mr. Pulliam 
enlisted for active service and did duty as a teamster. He was taken prisoner while 
at the front. During much of his business career he followed farming, milling and 
carpentering. At different periods the family has been prominently connected with the 
pioneer development of various sections of the country. The grandfather of Mrs. 
McCollum went to Missouri when there were only three families in Macon county. Her 
grandfather was a Virginian by birth and at one time was a large landowner there, 
as were also other members of the family. A great-great-granduncle and aunt of Mrs. 
McCollum were scalped by the Indians in North Carolina. The ancestral line is traced 
back to the Belleau family of England. 

To Mr. and Mrs. McCollum were born four children: Agnes, the wife of C. C. 
Prunty, town clerk of Evans, by whom she has two children, Barney Robert and Helen 
Arlene; Jessie, who is the wife of J. Edgar Rabb, of Butler, Pennsylvania; Elwood, who is 
engaged in the drug business at Evans; and Edith, who attends the State Normal School 
and is still under the parental roof. 

In his political views Mr. McCollum is a democrat and his religious faith is that 
of the Christian church. He finds his greatest happiness in promoting the welfare of 
his wife and children and takes no active interest in clubs or fraternal organizations. 
His business interests are concentrated upon farming and throughout his entire life he 
has carried on agricultural pursuits, always following the occupation to which he was 



THOMAS J. EHRHART. 



Thomas J. Ehrhart, who for many years has figured prominently in political 
circles, holding many important positions, the duties of which he has discharged with 
marked promptness and fidelity, was born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, January 28, 1859, 
a son of Jacob G. Ehrhart, who was born in Pennsylvania, as was his father. Jacob G. 
Ehrhart became one of Colorado's pioneer settlers, arriving in this state in 1860. He 
was a representative to the first state legislature and had quite a prominent part in 
molding public thought and opinion in Lake county, where he made his home. His 
political allegiance was always given to the democratic party. He died in the year 1878, 
while his wife, who bore the maiden name of Lovina Miller and was a native of Ohio, 
has also passed away. 

Thomas J. Ehrhart was their only child. He acquired a public school education, 
pursuing his studies to the age of seventeen years, after which he devoted his atten- 
tion to farming and to the cattle business at Centerville, Chaffee county, Colorado, for a 
few years. Whatever he has undertaken he has done with thoroughness and his 
care and persistency of purpose have been substantial elements in the attainment of 
his success. From early manhood he has been a stanch advocate and earnest sup- 
porter of the democratic party and on attaining his majority he was nominated for 
the office of county assessor, but was defeated at the election. When twenty-seven 
years of age he was chosen for the office of county commissioner. The capability 
which he displayed in the discharge of his duties led to his selection for more impor- 
tant ones and in 1896 he was elected to the house of representatives of the Colorado 
legislature. In 1898 he was chosen to represent his district in the state senate and 
was again elected to that position in 1906. He served as chairman of the finance com- 
mittee of the senate through two sessions and did very important work as a committee 
member, closely studying the vital questions which came up for settlement and seeking 
ever the welfare and advancement of the commonwealth. His present position is 
that of state highway commissioner. He was appointed by Governor Ammons on 
March 24, 1913, and served for four years, when he was appointed by Governor Gunter 
to succeed himself for another term of four years, ending 1921. 

In 1882 Mr. Ehrhart was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Evans, a native of 
Illinois and a daughter of Griffith Evans, who was born in Wales. The children of 
this marriage are as follows. Pauline is the wife of Brett Grey and has one child. 
Earl is married and lives on the old Ehrhart homestead, in Chaffee county, Colorado, 
where his grandfather, Jacob G. Ehrhart, settled in 1868, and which land now is owned 



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1 


1 \ 1 Jf vfa 


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THOMAS J. EHEHAET 



214 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

by Thomas J. Ehrhart, and has never been out of the family. Earl Ehrhart married 
Mary Higgs, and has two sons, Thomas J., Jr., born March 21, 1911, and Ward, born 
December 15, 1916. Jean, the third member of the family, is the wife of Frank Walker, 
of Fort Morgan, Colorado. 

Mr. Ehrhart is a member of the Elks lodge at Salida, Colorado, and of the Knights 
of Pythias lodge there. He also belongs to the Denver Athletic Club and is appreciative 
of the social amenities of life, possessing a genial nature that results in warm friend- 
ships. 



JAMES G. NOLL. 



Prominent among the most enterprising, progressive and prosperous business men 
of Denver stands James G. Noll, who has long occupied a central place on the stage of 
business activity, controlling most important interests in the lumber trade, being at the 
head of the James G. Noll Lumber Company. Kansas numbers him among her native 
sons. He was born in Kirwin, Kansas, on the 28th of January, 1880, a son of William H. 
and Charlotte (Prince) Noll. The father is a native of Illinois and, removing to Kansas, 
became identified with the lumber trade. For many years he concentrated his efforts 
and attention upon business of that character and developed his interests to extensive 
proportions but is now living retired. At the time of the Civil war he responded to 
the country's call for troops as an Illinois volunteer and rendered active aid in the 
preservation of the Union. His wife, who was born in Brooklyn, New York, is with 
her husband in Los Angeles, California, where they now occupy an attractive home. They 
have two living children, James G. and Lyell M. Noll. 

James G Noll acquired his education in the public schools of Atchison and of 
Greenleaf, Kansas, passing through consecutive grades to the high schoool, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1899. He turned to the lumber business, in which his 
father had long been active, becoming identified with a retail lumberyard, with which 
he remained for a year. He bent every energy to acquainting himself with the business 
in principle and detail and at the end of that time was given charge of a lumberyard 
at Barnes, Kansas. He afterward assumed the management of the lumberyard of the 
Central Lumber Company at Greenleaf and later when his father went to California, 
he assumed charge of his business at Greenleaf, Kansas. He came to Denver in 1907 
and established a general office for the Central Lumber Company. He afterward pur- 
chased a large interest in the business and incorporated the James G. Noll Lumber 
Company, of which he has since remained the head. This is today one of the extensive 
lumber corporations of the state, paying quarterly dividends through the Colorado Na- 
tional Bank and long since recognized as one of the most prosperous corporations of 
the city. The capitalization of the company is one hundred and fifty thousand dollars 
authorized preferred stock and three hundred and fifty thousand dollars authorized 
common stock. While the principal office is in Denver, branch offices are also main- 
tained at Spokane and Seattle, Washington, and at Clarksfork, Idaho. Mr. Noll brought 
to the development of this business large experience. There is no phase of the lumber 
trade with which he is not thoroughly familiar and his initiative and enterprise have 
enabled him to put forth various progressive methods which have been most resultant 
in the upbuilding of the trade. Today the company handles a most extensive volume of 
business, its ramifying trade interests covering a very broad territory, while the thorough 
organization of each department of the business has made this one of the most pros- 
perous commercial concerns of Denver. 

In 1902 Mr. Noll was united in marriage to Miss Fannie Maude Davison, of Green- 
leaf, Kansas, and to them have been born three children: Lila Marie, who is fifteen 
years of age; Violet Prince, thirteen years of age; and Mildred Alice, who is three 
years old. 

Mr. Noll is an exemplary representative of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Park 
Hill Lodge, No. 148, A. F. & A. M. While residing in Greenleaf, Kansas, he served as 
junior warden of his lodge. He has attained to the Knight Templar degree in Coronal 
Commandery, No. 3£, and has reached the thirty-second degree of Scottish Rite Masonry 
in Topeka Consistory, No. 1. He is also a member of El Jebel Temple of the Mystic Shrine 
and he has membership in the Elks lodge. He belongs to the Mountview Boulevard 
Presbyterian church, of which he is one of the trustees, and in the work of the church 
he takes a most active and helpful interest. He turns to golf and tennis for recreation, 
and that he is appreciative of the social amenities of life is indicated in his membership 
in the Denver Athletic Club and the Lakewood Country Club. He is likewise a member 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 215 

of the Givic and Commercial Association, which is ever looking to the further upbuilding 
and development of the city, and he heartily cooperates in all of its well defined plans 
and measures for Denver's improvement. The subjective and objective forces of life are 
in him well balanced, making him cognizant of his own capabilities and powers, while 
at the same time he thoroughly understands his opportunities and his obligations. To 
make his native talents subserve the demands which conditions of society impose at the 
present time is the purpose of his life, and by reason of the mature judgment which 
characterizes his efforts at all times, he stands today as a splendid representative of the 
prominent manufacturer and capitalist to whom business is but one phase of life and 
does not exclude his active participation in and support of the other vital interests which 
go to make up human existence. 



JAMES HUNTER WILSON. 



A notable career of successful achievement, guided by most sound business principles, 
is that of J. H. Wilson, the president, of the J. H. Wilson Saddlery Company. He has 
continued as the active head of the business for forty-one years and in all that time 
has practically sustained no reverses, his business having enjoyed a steady growth. 
Back of this continued success are principles which should receive the attention and 
inspire the efforts of all who wish to progress in business life. One of the principles 
which has ever guided him in his relations is that of meeting his every obligation. He 
has seen many of his competitors retire from business for one reason or another, some- 
times through failure, and yet the name of the J. H. Wilson Saddlery Company stands 
as a synonym for enterprise, progress and the most substantial qualities of business. 
Today Mr. Wilson ranks as a pioneer harness manufacturer in the state of Colorado, 
with an unassailable reputation for honesty in business, and in reviewing his career 
one cannot but feel that it is an exemplification of the old adage: 'An honest man is 
the noblest work of God." 

J. H. Wilson was born in Liberty, Union county, Indiana, March 13, 1848, and is 
a son of J. D. and Elizabeth (Hunter) Wilson, both of whom were natives of that state. 
The mother died when her son was but nine months old and he was reared by his father, 
who removed to Paxton, Illinois. The father was also a harness and saddlery manufac- 
turer and engaged in that line of business in Paxton, but when war was declared between 
the north and the south he volunteered in defense of the Union cause, joining the Sec- 
ond Illinois Cavalry as saddler for his regiment. He was employed in that work for 
the entire period of the Civil war. On taking up his duties with the government he 
was accompanied to his place of service by his young son, J. H. Wilson of this review, 
who became a general favorite with all the officers and men of the command and earned 
more money than the fighting men through selling papers, fruit and other handy things. 
On the day that General Grant went into Vicksburg, Mississippi, Mr. Wilson made a 
clear profit of sixty dollars by selling fruit to the soldiers. At the close of the war 
father and son returned to Paxton, where business was resumed, and the son learned 
the trade of making harness and saddlery under his father's direction and continued 
with him until he decided to follow the advice of Horace Greeley and go west. During 
this period young Wilson attended school at Bloomington, Illinois, for about eleven 
months, this being all the schooling he ever received. In 1876 he arrived in Denver, 
where he worked at his trade for a year, and then established a small harness and 
saddlery shop, which throughout the intervening years has developed into one of the 
foremost establishments of this kind in Colorado. He has displayed most able manage- 
ment in his business affairs. At the outset he had one assistant and they were perfectly 
able to take care of the trade, but today he employs a large number of expert work- 
men and has an office force to care for the correspondence and other like features of the 
business. His interests have always been most carefully, systematically and wisely 
conducted and for many years Mr. Wilson was the sole head of the undertaking, so 
that the business stands as a monument to his skill, his sagacity and his thorough 
reliability. In 1900, however, he admitted his son-in-law to a partnership but the business 
is still under the direct supervision and active management of Mr. Wilson. As the 
years have passed he has embraced his opportunity for judicious investment and has 
acquired some valuable property in Denver, where he also owns a fine residence. 

In 1869, in Paxton, Illinois, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth 
Wood, of that place, who died there in 1877. They were the parents of two children: 
Mrs. Florence Crane, who was born in Paxton and was graduated from the Denver 
schools, her home being now in Little Rock. Arkansas; and Mrs. Bertie Anderson, who 



216 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

was born in Paxton and resides in Denver. She has two children, Hunter and Junior 
Anderson. Mrs. Crane has a family of four children. Having lost his first wife, Mr. 
Wilson was again married in 1884, his second union being with Miss Florence Merrill. 
of Rossville. Illinois, and to them have been born two children: Mrs. Carrie Pontius 
and Jean. The latter was born in Denver and is still under the parental roof. The 
elder daughter was born in Denver, was graduated from the Denver schools and still 
makes her home in this city. She has two children. Harry and Jean. 

In politics Mr. Wilson has ever been an active worker, but votes more for the man 
than the party. He belongs to the Pioneers Society and is one of the well known and 
highly esteemed residents of Denver, where his name is synonymous with progressive- 
ness, enterprise and thorough reliability in business. 



POTTER STROBRIDGE HESSLER. 

Thirty-eight years have come and gone since Potter Strobridge Hessler arrived in 
Denver, where he has worked his way steadily upward in business connections until 
he is now at the head of a profitable enterprise as the president of the P. S. Hessler 
Mercantile Company. He has made steady advancement, developing his powers through 
the exercise of effort, and he is now controlling a profitable business concern. He was 
born in Trumansburg, New York, March 27, 1858. The family was founded in America 
by Henry Hessler, who was brought to this country during the Revolutionary war for 
the purpose of being made to do compulsory military service for the Britons. After 
the close of the war, when these soldiers were being loaded on ships for the return 
voyage, he made his escape and hid in the house of a friend, taking refuge in a 
clothes hamper in a closet, over which a number of clothes were hanging. The officer, 
in making a search for deserters, passed his hand through the clothes and, finding no 
one, went on. As soon as possible Henry Hessler went to New York, where he married 
Miss Margaret McConnell, a native of Ireland. He afterward removed to Canajoharie, 
New York, where he engaged in the tailoring business and there spent his remaining 
days. His name appears in the first government census of New York, taken in 1800. 

The grandfather and the father of Potter S. Hessler were both natives of the 
Empire state. The latter, Henry A. Hessler, was a highly educated man, being 
graduated from Hamilton College of New York. He originally studied for the ministry 
but never took up the active work of the church as a preacher. Instead he turned his 
attention to merchandising and was thus engaged at various periods in New York, 
Iowa, Ohio, New Jersey and again at Cazenovia, New York, where he passed away in 1874, 
at the age of fifty-eight years. For twelve years prior to his death he was an invalid. 
His wife bore the maiden name of Elizabeth A. Terry and was born in the state of 
New York. She was a descendant of James Terry, himself a descendant of pioneer 
settlers on Long Island and the founder of the family in America. He was of English 
lineage. The death of Mrs. Hessler occurred in Cazenovia, New York, in 1870, when 
she was forty years of age. She was the mother of three children but two of them were 
born of a former marriage. 

Potter S. Hessler was educated in the public and district schools of Cazenovia and 
afterward became a student in Cazenovia Seminary. He made his initial step in the 
business world when a young man of twenty-two years, although he had previously 
been employed on the farm of his uncle, Ephraim B. Hessler, in New York. After 
attaining his majority he determined to try his fortune in the west and in May, 1880, 
arrived in Denver a comparative stranger. After struggling through a year, during 
which he held various minor positions, he became an employe in the New England 
Blue Store, a retail grocery house at Thirty second and Larimer streets. It was 
supposed that he was an experienced grocery clerk and he had to make good in the 
position. He was ever alert and quick to learn. When he entered the store he did not 
know the difference between rice and tapioca nor how to tie up a good package, but 
he soon mastered these things, as he did other tasks which fell to his lot, and for* a 
year he continued in that establishment. He was afterward employed by various 
commission firms and from that time forward each step in his career advanced him 
steadily and brought him a broader outlook and wider opportunities. In 1885 he 
entered the commission business on his own account and from the beginning the new 
enterprise prospered. From time to time he had to seek larger quarters in order to 
meet the growing demand of his trade and in 1903 he established a wholesale grocery 
business at Nos. 1529 to 1539 Market street, while in 1915 a building was erected at 
the corner of Thirteenth and Wazee streets, at which point he has since conducted his 



218 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

interests. Gradually his trade has grown until today it is one of the 
Colorado. He occupies a store having a floor space of one hundred and fifty by seventy- 
six feet in the basement and three stories one hundred and fifty by sixty-six feet. The 
firm employs on an average from thirty-five to forty people, among whom are fifteen 
traveling salesmen. The business is largely confined to Colorado, for he has all that 
he can do to meet the demands of his trade in this state. 

Mr. Hessler has been married twice. In Denver, in 1883, he wedded Miss Rhoda 
Rodolph, a native of Wisconsin and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Rodolph. Her 
paternal grandfather was a captain in Napoleon's army and the grandmother in the 
paternal line was a daughter of one who was president of the Swiss republic. Her 
father was born in Switzerland and belonged to one of the old distinguished families of 
that country. He lived in Iowa, Wisconsin and in Illinois. Mrs. Hessler died in 
Denver in 1897 at the age of thirty-eight years, leaving a daughter, Elizabeth, who is 
now the wife of Lieutenant Howard R. Carroll, a native of Ohio, and by whom she 
has one son, Potter Hessler Carroll. The Carrolls are a well known family of Denver. 
In June, 1898, Mr. Hessler was again married, his second union being with Miss Florence 
A. Twining, a native of Wisconsin and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Twining, 
descendants of an old English family and early settlers of Pennsylvania and New York. 
There is one daughter of the second marriage, Helen A., who was married on June 28. 
1918, to Henry W. Brautigam, of Denver. The Hessler family home is at No. 674 Downing 
street. 

Mr. Hessler started out in life a poor boy and had a cash capital of but two hundred 
dollars when he arrived in Denver. From that point forward he has steadily progressed 
and is today one of the substantial citizens and business men of his adopted state, his 
success being the direct result and legitimate outcome of his own labors. In politics 
he is a republican where national issues are involved but at local elections casts an 
independent ballot. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, holding membership 
in Denver Lodge, No. 5, A. F. & A. M.; Colorado Chapter, No. 2, R. A. M.; Denver 
Council, No. 1, R. & S. M.; Denver Commandery, No. 1, K. T.; and El Jebel Temple, 
A. A. O. N. M. S. He is also a member of the Elks lodge of Denver and he belongs 
to the Denver Civic and Commercial Association. He is an attendant of the Christian 
Science church and he turns to motoring for recreation. He is widely known in busi- 
ness and social circles of the city, where for almost four decades he has made his home. 
He has therefore been a witness of much of its growth and development and as the 
years have passed on he has gained a most creditable place in commercial circles as 
well as in the regard of his many friends. 



FAXCHER SARCHET. 



Fancher Sarchet, who since 1906 has been an active and able member of the Fort 
Collins bar, was born in Linn county, Iowa. November 1, 1879. and comes of French 
Huguenot ancestry, being a great-grandson of one who bore the same name and who 
in 1806 became one of the founders of Cambridge, Ohio, while in 1809 he was chosen - 
the first county treasurer of Guernsey county, Ohio. With the passing years representa- 
tives of the name removed to the west, the family home being ultimately established 
in Linn county, Iowa, where Fancher Sarchet of this review was born and spent his early 
youth. His public school education was supplemented by a course of study in Cornell 
College, a Methodist institution at Mount Vernon, Iowa, which he entered at the age 
of seventeen, remaining a student there for three years. 

Mr. Sarchet was a young man of twenty when he became a resident of Colorado, 
settling first in Boulder, and later he took up the study of law in the office and under 
the direction of E. A. Ballard, an attorney of that city. He next became a student in 
the Denver Law School and following his admission to the bar located for practice in 
Fort Collins, where he has continuously remained since 1906. Along with those qualities 
indispensable to the lawyer — a keen, rapid, logical mind plus the business sense, and a 
ready capacity for hard work — he brought to the starting point of his legal career certain 
rare gifts, including eloquence of language and a strong personality. His is an excel- 
lent presence, an earnest, dignified manner and marked strength of character and these, 
combined with his thorough grasp of the law and ability to accurately apply its principles, 
have proven important factors in his effectiveness as an advocate. 

In 1908 Mr. Sarchet was appointed to the position of deputy district attorney under 
George H. Van Horn and the following year was reappointed by George A. Carlson, under 
whom he served until the latter became governor of Colorado in January. 1915. One 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 219 

of the newspapers of the state in this connection said: "Mr. Sarchet's career as a public 
official was marked by two dominant characteristics— the exercise of kindness and 
humanity and a fearless, vigorous prosecution of offenders. He is an open, fearless fighter, 
a careful, resourceful lawyer and a man of deliberate and mature judgment. While 
deputy district attorney for Larimer county, he had entire charge of the prosecution 
of bootleggers, and in the hundreds of prosecutions conducted by him, succeeded in con- 
victing practically every offender. In addition to this part of his public duties he had 
charge of many important felony cases, which he handled with great success. He also 
had entire control of all juvenile delinquents and in the discharge of this portion of 
his duties rendered marked service. His record is one of which Larimer county and 
the eighth judicial district may well be proud." 

It was in the year 1908 that Mr. Sarchet was married to Miss Nellie Herring, a 
daughter of Rowl Herring, of Laporte, and a niece of Judge H. I. Garbutt of Fort Col- 
lins. Mr. and Mrs. Sarchet have two children, a son and a daughter, Clark Herring 
Sarchet and Doris J. Sarchet. 

In politics Mr. Sarchet is a stalwart republican and an earnest worker in behalf 
of the party yet allows nothing to interfere with the faithful performance of his profes- 
sional duties and his devotion to his clients' interests is one of his marked characteristics. 



ALVIN E. LINDROOTH. 



Alvin E. Lindrooth is connected with one of the important commercial establishments 
of Denver, conducting business under the firm name of Lindrooth & Shubart, dealers in 
machinery, particularly mining machinery, and representing a number of the foremost 
eastern manufacturers. Their business is probably the largest of its kind in the state 
and its success must be ascribed in large measure to Mr. Lindrooth, who by his pro- 
gressive commercial methods has done much toward making this firm what it is today. 
Their field covers all of the territory up to the Rocky mountains and they continually 
employ three traveling representatives engaged in the sale of machinery. 

Mr. Lindrooth was born July % 1871, in Chicago, Illinois, in the year of the historic 
fire, and is a son of John H. Lindrooth, a native of Sweden, who in 1866 came to America, 
selecting Chicago as his home. There he became prominent as a landscape architect, 
having learned his profession in his native country. He was identified with the work 
of laying out the breakwater and the park system on the north side of the metropolis. 
His whole life was devoted to his profession and his thoughts and ideas culminated 
in most pleasing and effective results. The beautiful north side park system of the city 
of Chicago is a monument to his cooperative labors and in that way he contributed to 
the comfort and pleasure of present and future generations. He was highly esteemed 
by all who knew him and in professional circles took high rank, his eminent ability 
being recognized by all those who had a thorough knowledge of his work. It was not 
only Mr. Lindrooth's intimacy with the subject which led to his success, but it was his 
deep-seated love for the outdoors and his natural appreciation and taste for the beautiful 
that led him to attain the position which he did as a landscape architect. He died in 
Chicago in 1910 at the age of seventy-two years. His wife, also a native of Sweden, 
was Miss Anna Erickson before her marriage and with her parents came to America 
when only six years of age. She was a daughter of Eric Erickson, who with his wife 
and family became early settlers of Moline, Illinois, and there the father was engaged 
along manufacturing lines. He was quite successful in his industrial undertakings and 
occupied an enviable place among his fellow townsmen of Moline. Recognizing the 
justness of the Union cause, he took up arms when the Civil war broke out, although 
not native born, and served with distinction in an Illinois company from the beginning 
of the war until its close. He became prominent in Grand Army circles and passed many 
a pleasant hour with his comrades of the battlefields of old. Miss Erickson was reared 
and received her education in Moline and in that city she was joined in wedlock to 
Mr Lindrooth, six sons being born to this union, of whom our subject is the second 
in order of birth. The mother passed away in Chicago in 1916, at the age of sixty eight, 
as the result of an automobile accident, her sudden demise causing deep sorrow to her 
many friends and being a great shock to her family. 

Alvin E. Lindrooth received a public school education in Chicago and subsequently 
graduated from the Chicago Manual Training School, later taking an engineering course 
at Lewis Institute. He first intended to make that profession his life work and at the 
age of eighteen started out as a draftsman with the Link-Belt Company of Chicago. 
He soon proved his ability and. continuing with that firm, was advanced through various 



220 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

departments until he now holds the office of general representative of the firm, with 
location in Denver. He also represents other eastern manufacturing interests and, being 
able to demonstrate to his prospective customers the machinery which he represents 
on account of his technical knowledge, he is very successful as a manufacturers' agent. 
Moreover, he has an intuitive knowledge of salesmanship, which, in combination with 
his professional knowledge, has been the foundation of his success. 

On March 29, 1899, in Chicago, Mr. Lindrooth was united in marriag* to Miss Selma 
J. Marelius, a native of that city and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Marelius. both 
of whom make their home there. Mr. and Mrs. Lindrooth have become the parents of 
three sons, Charles N., Harold A. and John E.. all natives of Denver. 

Politically Mr. Lindrooth is a republican as far as national politics are concerned 
but in local issues he maintains an independent course, giving his support to measures 
and candidates according to their merits. His is a nature which naturally would not 
be guided by partisanship, preferring to select for himself the men whom he chooses 
to support, judging them entirely by their qualifications. Mr. Lindrooth is interested 
in athletics and since 1900 has been a well liked member of the Denver Athletic Club. 
He was reared in the Lutheran faith but is now connected with the Church of The New 
Jerusalem, of which institution he serves as treasurer, the church being of the Sweden- 
borgian denomination. Mr. Lindrooth came to Colorado on the 29th of April, 1898, an 
absolute stranger and therefore great credit must be conceded him for what he has 
achieved. He began his life work practically unaided and his success is due entirely 
to his own efforts. Mr. Shubart, his partner in the agency, arrived in Denver four years 
later and the business was thereupon established on January 1, 1904, and has since had 
a continuous and prosperous existence. 



HARRY W. J. EDBROOKE. 



Harry W. J. Edbrooke, a prominent architect and well known club man of Denver, 
was born in Chicago, Illinois, July 14, 1873, a son of Willoughby J. and Nellie (O'Brien) 
Edbrooke. The father was also born in Chicago, while the mother was a native of 
Maine, and their marriage was celebrated in the western metropolis, where Mr. Edbrooke 
attained considerable distinction as an architect. He was appointed by President Ben- 
jamin Harrison as supervising architect of the treasury department, with headquarters 
at Washington, D. C, prior to which time he made the plans and supervised the erection 
of many prominent structures in various parts of the country, some of which are par- 
ticularly famous, including the Tabor Opera House on Sixteenth and Curtis streets in 
Denver, which at the time of its completion was considered the finest and most expensive 
building for theater purposes in the entire country and still remains a most beautiful 
structure. He also planned and built the state capitol of Georgia, located at Atlanta, 
and many other of the leading public buildings of the country. He died in Chicago in 
1895 at the age of fifty-two years, having for twenty years survived his wife, who passed 
away in Chicago in 1875 at the comparatively early age of thirty-one. They were the 
parents of two children: Alice Edbrooke, who died in Chicago in infancy: and Harry 
W. J. Edbrooke, of this review, who is the elder. 

In his early boyhood days Harry W. J. Edbrooke was a pupil in the Oakland school 
of Chicago and after passing through preliminary grades became a student in the Hyde 
Park high school, while subsequently he entered the University of Illinois, in which he 
remained for two years. He next became a student in the Armour Institute of Technology 
and was graduated on the completion of an architectural course in 1898. He then entered 
upon his professional career in Chicago and was connected with various prominent 
architects and firms until 1904, when he began business independently. He continued to 
practice his profession in Chicago for four years and was then invited by his uncle, 
Frank E. Edbrooke, a prominent architect of Denver, to join him in that city and become 
his associate in business. He continued with his uncle until 1913, when the partner- 
ship was dissolved, and Harry W. J. Edbrooke has since practiced his profession alone. 
He has erected many of the finest business blocks and public buildings in Denver and in 
other sections of the country, including the W. H. Kistler building, the new building 
occupied by the A. D. Lewis Dry Goods Company, the Ogden and Thompson theater build- 
ings and various private residences. He was the architect of the country home for John 
C. Shaffer, also the apartment building of Dr. J. H. Tilden and others of equal note. 
For one year he was advisory architect for the state of Colorado but the office has now 
been abolished. 

Mr. Edbrooke is a member of the Colorado Chapter of the Institute of Architects. 



222 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

He belongs to the Civic and Commercial Association of Denver, also to the Denver Ath- 
letic Club, the Lakewood Country Club and the Denver Motor Club. He is likewise a 
member of Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity. Like his father, he has attained eminence in his 
profession, actuated ever by a laudable ambition that has prompted close study and has 
led to most desirable results. His personal popularity is widely recognized in club circles 
and warm regard is entertained for him by all who know him. 



JOHN W. HENDERSON. 



John W. Henderson, though one of the younger representatives of the Colorado bar, 
has already won a creditable measure of success during the comparatively brief period 
of his practice in Greeley, where he maintains offices in the First National Bank building. 
He is numbered among the worthy native sons of Greeley, where his birth occurred on 
the 5th of July, 1892, his mother being Mrs. Grace N. Allen. 

John W. Henderson pursued his early education in the public schools of his native 
city and subsequently prepared for the practice of his chosen profession as a student 
in the University of Colorado, which institution conferred upon him the degree of LL. B. 
in 1916. He at once entered upon the practice of law in Greeley and has already won 
an enviable reputation in this connection. The zeal with which he has devoted his 
energies to his profession, the careful regard evinced for the interests of his clients and 
an assiduous and unrelaxing attention to all the details of his cases, are bringing to 
him an ever increasing business. His high standing in professional circles is indicated 
in the fact that he has been chosen secretary and treasurer of the Weld County Bar 
Association. 

In politics Mr. Henderson is a republican, while his religious faith is that of the 
Congregational church. He is also identified with the Knights of Pythias and belongs 
to several legal and college fraternities, including Phi Delta Theta and Phi Delta Phi. 
He is now serving as treasurer for the Weld County Chapter of the American Red Cross 
and is chairman of the Home Service of that organization, and as a patriotic and loyal 
citizen devotes considerable attention to his duties in that connection. Mr. Henderson 
resides with his mother at No. 1508 Ninth avenue and is one of the most popular and 
esteemed young citizens of Greeley. 



HAL D. VAN GILDER. 



Hal D. Van Gilder, founder of the Van Gilder Agency, conducting a very extensive 
and successful insurance business in Denver, comes to this state from Iowa, his birth 
having occurred in Melrose on the 13th of August, 1875. His father, John W. Van Gilder, 
was a railway man and is now living retired in Los Angeles, California. The mother, 
who bore the maiden name of Dora Stuart, was born at Melrose, Iowa, and also survives. 
In the family were two sons, the brother of Hal D. Van Gilder being Dr. D. W. Van Gilder, 
who is located in Denver. 

Spending his youthful days in his native state, Hal D. Van Gilder attended the public 
schools of Albia, Iowa, passing through consecutive grades to his graduation from the 
high school with the class of 1893. He then went to the Chicago University, in which 
he spent two years as a student, and later he pursued a business course in the Bryant 
& Stratton Business College of Chicago. Subsequently he was with the Chicago Tribune 
and afterward with the Chicago Record for five years, acting as secretary to the man- 
agers of these papers and having in charge the educational department. In the year 1900 
Mr. Van Gilder arrived in Denver and was made deputy clerk of the district court, a 
position which he occupied for seven years. He afterwards turned his attention to the 
insurance business as a broker and later engaged in the insurance business on his own 
account, organizing the Sanger-Van Gilder Agency, which was established in 1911, and 
business was carried on in that connection for three years. In May. 1914, Mr. Van Gilder 
organized his present business under the name of the Van Gilder Agency, conducting an 
extensive insurance business, representing the American Surety Company, the Standard 
Accident Insurance Company, the St. Paul Fire & Marine Company, the Maryland Casualty 
Company, the Home Fire Insurance Company of Utah and the South Surety Company of 
St. Louis. His clientage is now extensive and each year marks an increase in his busi- 
ness, denoting close application, indefatigable energy and wise direction of his interests. 

In 1902 Mr. Van Gilder was united in marriage to Miss Mildred Slack, of Denver, 
a daughter of Willard L. Slack, and their children are: Del George, born on February 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 223 

20, 1905, now in school; and Beatrice, born September 5. 1909. Mr. Van Gilder is a 
Mason, belonging to Oriental Lodge, No. 87, A. F. & A. M., and has also taken the degrees 
of the chapter, the commandery and the consistory, thus becoming a factor in the various 
branches of the York and Scottish rites. He is likewise connected with El Jebel Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine. He enjoys golf and when opportunity permits takes a fishing 
trip. In politics he is a democrat and his religious faith is that of the Unity church, 
which is of the Unitarian denomination. He belongs to the Lakewood Country Club 
and to the Denver Civic and Commercial Association, thus cooperating in all well defined 
plans and measures for the upbuilding of Denver's best interests. Liberal educational 
opportunities well qualified him for life's practical and responsible duties and as the 
years have passed on he has made steady progress along lines that have led to substantial 
successes in his business career. 



HENRY AUGUST IRONS. 



With many phases of the pioneer development of Weld county the name of Henry 
August Irons is closely associated and the story of his life if told in detail would present 
a very interesting picture of pioneer experiences when this section of the country was 
the wild western frontier. Mr. Irons was born at Gloucester, Rhode Island, June 14, 
1850. and traces his ancestry back to some of the oldest and most prominent colonial 
families. Matthew Irons, who came originally from Scotland, settled at Boston in 1630. 
Another ancestor was Roger Williams, who came from London, although originally from 
Wales, and who arrived in Boston in 1631, while in 1636 he founded Providence, Rhode 
Island. Another ancestor was Joshua Windsor, who settled at Providence about 1638, 
and still another was Resolve Waterman Belcher, who located there as early as 1660, 
while the Whipple family was represented as early as 1700. Matthew Irons married 
Annie Brown, of Boston, and died in 1661. Their son, Samuel Irons, was baptized 
November 25, 1650, and died September 25. 1691. On the 13th of September, 1677, he 
married Sarah Belcher and they were the parents of Samuel Irons, who was born March 
17, 1680, and died December 30, 1720. His wife was Sarah Whipple, of Braintree, Massa- 
chusetts, whom he wedded May 3, 1709. They became parents of Samuel Irons III, who 
was born October 10, 1718, and died November 27. 1793. His wife was Hannah Waterman, 
a granddaughter of Roger Williams, through the first marriage of Marcy or Mercy Wil- 
liams, the youngest daughter of Roger Williams, to Resolve Waterman. Their son, 
Samuel Irons IV. was therefore a great-grandson of Roger Williams. He was born Feb- 
ruary 16, 1757, and died November 21, 1815. He married Huldah Colwell. who was a 
great-great-granddaughter of Roger Williams through the second marriage of his youngest 
daughter. Marcy, to Joshua Windsor. Samuel Irons and Huldah Colwell were own 
cousins. Their son, James Irons, was born July 16. 1793, and died in 1877. He married 
Huldah Steer and they were the grandparents of Mr. Irons of this review. Their family 
numbered six children: Will Henry, who was born in 1825 and died December 31, 1889; 
Salem, who was born in 1826 and became the father of Henry August Irons; Sarah, who 
died in 1910; John; Leander, who died October 24. 1906; and James. Of this family 
Salem Irons married Harriet Yeaw and they had a son, Henry August Irons of this 
review. The father died June 14, 1904. The name Irons probably comes from the French 
de Arns and it is probable that religious persecution drove representatives of that name 
as French refugees to Scotland, for practically all of the name of Irons came from Scot- 
land, although there is little of the characteristic Scotch in their appearance, while many 
traces of French features and complexion are to be found among them. Roger Williams 
was undoubtedly a native of Wales, although he early became a resident of England. 
With the exception of French and Welsh traits the ancestors have on the whole been 
of English blood and descent. 

In the fall of 1852 Salem Irons removed with his family to Chicago, Illinois, which 
at that time contained a population of forty-five thousand. Later he established his 
home at Wheaton and there assisted in building the Wheaton Seminary. In 1854 he 
removed to Morris. Illinois, and Mr. Irons of this review accompanied him and there 
resided until 1873. when he became a resident of Denver. After a few weeks, however, 
he removed to Greeley, where he remained for about eleven months, after which he 
returned to Illinois. Two years later, however, he again came to Greeley, where he 
has since made his home. When eleven years of age he began attending the rural 
schools near Morris, Illinois, and was reared amid pioneer conditions and can remember 
seeing deer going about in flocks of fifty or seventy-five His educational opportunities 
were limited to three months' attendances at school in the winter seasons and between 



224 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the ages of twelve and twenty-one years he worked upon the home farm seven miles 
south of Morris. Illinois. After reaching the age of fourteen he had charge of the farm, 
for his father was away much of the time operating a threshing machine through the 
country and Henry A. Irons had the management of the home place and much hard 
labor fell to him in consequence thereof. He worked with his father until he reached 
the age of twenty-three years and then began farming on his own account and also took 
up carpentering and bridge building near Morris. On coming to Colorado in 1873 he 
purchased a homestead below Hardin but afterward sold that property and returned to 
Illinois in the spring of 1874. He then worked in the hardware business for an uncle 
and afterward did contract work on bridges. He remained through the winter but in 
1875 returned to Greeley and began riding the range. He also cooked on the roundup 
and in the fall he bought a little bunch of cattle, with a partner. They conducted their 
interests together until 1878, when Mr. Irons left the cattle with his partner and began 
farming a tract of land north of Greeley. In the spring of 1879 he walked to Leadville 
from Colorado Springs, a distance of one hundred and forty miles, a man of the name 
of Kempton carrying their bags and blankets. Mr. Irons saw Leadville grow from a 
town of twenty-four hundred to twenty thousand that fall. He worked on getting out 
timbers for the Evening Star mine of Leadville, after which he returned to Greeley for 
the winter. He then again went to Leadville in the spring and prospected on Brush 
creek, a tributary of the Grand. Miners had previously been in the country, for there 
were still evidences of old sluice boxes that were put there in 1859. 

Returning to Greeley, Mr. Irons purchased land east of the city, becoming owner of 
one hundred and sixty acres, which is still in his possession. He acquired that property 
in the spring of 1882 and resided thereon until 1893, when he was elected county com- 
missioner and rented the farm, which he has since leased. Through the intervening 
period, covering twenty-five years, there have only been four renters upon it and he 
has always had a verbal contract with them, a fact indicative of the straightforward 
business methods which Mr. Irons has always pursued. 

In the fall of 1881 Mr. Irons was married in Morris, Illinois, to Miss May Keith, 
whose father was a farmer and a soldier of the Civil war, living at that time in north- 
eastern Iowa. She saw the burning buildings to which the Sioux Indians had set fire at 
the time of the Sioux massacre in 1863. Mrs. Irons was engaged in the millinery business 
in Morris, Illinois, prior to her marriage. She died in October, 1912, and her remains 
were interred at Morris, Illinois, she being then fifty-three years of age. They had a 
daughter, Blanche, who became the wife of J. 0. Custer, a distant relative of General 
Custer, and now engaged in banking with the First National Bank of Greeley. 

Mr. Irons joined the Masonic lodge at Gardner, Illinois, at the same time at which 
his father became a representative of the craft. He was then twenty-one years of age 
and he afterward became a member of the chapter. His political allegiance is given to 
the republican party. For three years he has been a director and vice president of 
the Farmers Mercantile Company, and this, with his other interests, claims his time 
and attention. His daughter, Mrs. Custer, is quite active in Red Cross work. Mr. Irons 
has for a quarter of a century, or since 1893, been a member of the Greeley Club. He 
has always taken an active part in interests for the public good and his work has been 
of signal benefit along many lines. 



ARTHUR D. QUAINTANCE. 



From pioneer times the name of Quaintance has figured upon the pages of Colorado's 
history and through the intervening years has stood as a synonym for progress and 
advancement in public affairs. The family is of English origin and was originally of 
the Quaker faith. The first representative of the name in America came to the new world 
from England many generations ago. The grandfather, Jesse Quaintance, was a pioneer 
of Colorado who removed to the west after living originally in Ohio. He arrived in this 
state in the latter '60s and established one of the first flour mills within the borders of 
Colorado, conducting business at Golden, where he continued to reside until called to his 
final home. He was the father of Brough P. Quaintance, who was born in Ohio and who 
accompanied his parents to Colorado during the pioneer epoch in the history of the 
state. When the family made the trip the grandfather brought with him across the 
plains, with an ox team, two large stones for crushing ore in Clear Creek and Black 
Hawk canyon and was engaged in that business in early days but subsequently established 
his flour mill. After the death of the grandfather B. P. Quaintance conducted the mill 
for a number of years and was also postmaster at Golden for sixteen years, while for two 




ARTHUR D. QTJAINTANCE 



226 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

years he filled the office of county treasurer there. In a word he has been a prominent 
and influential resident of that locality, where he is still engaged in the real estate and 
insurance business and is in charge of the Golden Building & Loan Association. In his 
business career he has ever been actuated by a spirit of advancement that has enabled 
him to utilize all the means at hand and to take advantage of opportunities that others 
have passed heedlessly by. His fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth and ability, 
have frequently called him to public office and in each position that he has filled he 
has rendered valuable service to the community. For some time he was city clerk and 
city treasurer as well as county treasurer. In politics he has ever been a stanch 
republican, giving unfaltering allegiance to the party, which he has supported since age 
conferred upon him the right of franchise. In early manhood he wedded Annie Belmore, 
a native of Maine and a descendant of one of the old families of Calais, Maine, of English 
and Scotch lineage. Mrs. Quaintance also survives and she has reared a family of four 
children, three sons and a daughter: Charles F., now a resident of Golden, president 
of the Golden Chamber of Commerce and Improvement Association, secretary of the 
Golden Building & Loan Association, and secretary of the Herold China & Pottery Com- 
pany, now the leading manufacturers of chemical porcelain in this country; Arthur D., 
who was born in Golden, Colorado, October 17, 1884; Cregar B., who is an attorney at 
law practicing in Denver; and Caroline, now the wife of R. S. Ransom, a prominent 
mining engineer of Newark, New Jersey, and New York city. 

Arthur D. Quaintance, whose name introduces this review, at the usual age became 
a public school pupil. After leaving the high school of Golden he entered the University 
of Michigan at Ann Arbor for preparation for the bar and won his LL. B. degree there 
upon graduation with the class of 1906. In the meantime, however, he had started out 
in the business world, being first employed in construction work on the Moffat Rail- 
road, and it was in that way that he provided the means that enabled him to pursue 
his university course. He was ambitious to enter professional life and immediately after 
his graduation from law school he established himself in the practice of his profession 
in Denver, where he has since remained. Advancement at the bar is proverbially slow 
yet within a comparatively short space of time Mr. Quaintance had won recognition as an 
able young lawyer whose powers were rapidly developing and who was proving his 
ability to successfully cope with intricate legal problems. He belongs to the Denver Bar 
Association and to the Colorado State Bar Association and the former has honored him 
with election to a vice presidency. Aside from his law practice he is a director of 
the White Automobile Company of Colorado. 

Mr. Quaintance gives his political support to the republican party and at the primary 
election, 1916, was presented as a candidate for district attorney for the first judicial 
district of Colorado. Fraternally he is a thirty-second degree Mason, loyally adhering to 
the teachings and purposes of the craft. A member of Denver Consistory No. 2, he has 
been a close student of the mysteries of Masonic lore and has been honored with official 
position as grand orator, the duties of which, he is especially well qualified to perform. 
As a public speaker, he is forceful and pleasing and, in this connection it may be 
noted that during his course of study at the University of Michigan, he was honored 
with the presidency of the Jefferson Society, the well known oratorical and debating 
society of the university. He is also connected with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Woodmen of the World. He 
belongs to the First Presbyterian church of Golden, in which he has served as treasurer 
for several years. That he is much interested in the welfare and progress of his adopted 
city is indicated in the fact that he holds membership in the Denver Civic and Commercial 
Association and cooperates in all of its plans and purposes to upbuild the city, to 
extend its trade relations and uphold its civic standards. He deserves much credit for 
what he has accomplished since starting out in life unaided, his persistency of purpose, 
his laudable ambition and his indefatigable energy gaining for him the place that he 
now occupies as a valued representative of the legal profession in Denver. 



MARY REED STRATTON, M. D. 

Dr. Mary Reed Stratton, most thoroughly trained for the practice of medicine and 
displaying marked skill and ability in the conduct of her professional interests, was 
born in Hudson, Wisconsin. February 1, 1869. a daughter of the Rev. James Stewart 
and Caroline T. (Miller) Reed, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. They 
removed to Wisconsin in early life and there resided for a number of years. The father 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 227 

was a prominent minister of the Presbyterian church and after leaving Wisconsin 
accepted a call to Chariton, Iowa. Later he came to Colorado, taking charge of the 
Presbyterian church in Alamosa, where he remained to the time of his death, which 
occurred in 1895, when he was fifty-seven years of age. He was a most earnest and 
zealous worker in behalf of his church, a forceful and fluent speaker, and his labors 
wrought great good in the moral progress and development of the communities in which 
he lived. His widow survives and is now a resident of Denver. Their family numbered 
six children, five of whom are still living: William A., who is a resident of Gainesville, 
Texas; Walter S., living in Denver; Helen F., who also makes her home in Denver; 
Ralph E., residing in Portland, Oregon; and Mary, of this review. 

In early girlhood Dr. Stratton attended school in Iowa and in Kansas and also pur- 
sued a normal school course in northern Missouri. She afterward attended medical 
college, becoming a pupil in the Northwestern University of Chicago, Illinois, in the 
women's department. There she was graduated in 1892 and entered upon the active 
work of the profession as house physician in the Girls' Industrial School of Iowa, where 
she remained for a year. In Chicago, Illinois, on the 10th of October, 1894, she married 
Charles J. Stratton, a son of Mr. and Mrs. William James Stratton. well known and 
prominent people of Elkhorn, Wisconsin. Charles J. Stratton was engaged in mining 
and was killed in a mine accident in the mountains of Colorado on the 18th of September, 
1898. He was a manufacturer in Lexington, Kentucky, and had come to Colorado in 
order to supervise some mining property in the Cripple Creek district in which he was 
interested. Dr. Stratton had given up her practice subsequent to her marriage but after 
her husband's death resumed her connection with the profession. By her marriage she 
had become the mother of one son. Jack Reed Stratton, born in Cripple Creek district, 
February 18, 1897. He is a graduate of the Augusta Military Academy, Defiance. Vir- 
ginia, and is now a non-commissioned officer in the United States army, stationed at 
Camp Funston. Kansas. After the death of her husband Dr. Stratton returned to the 
Northwestern University of Chicago and resumed her studies. In 1900 she finished her 
post-graduate work there, after which she became physician for the White Breast Fuel 
Company of Illinois, at one of their mines, Cleveland No. 4 Mine, in Iowa, continuing 
in that connection for four years. In 1904 she returned to Colorado and since 1907 has 
practiced in Denver. She has done excellent work in all branches of medical practice 
but is particularly proficient in the treatment of children's diseases, in which she spe- 
cializes. Dr. Stratton belongs to the Medical Society of the County and City of Denver, 
to the Colorado State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. She is now 
physician for the State Home for Dependent Children. She is also examining physician 
for the Home Life Insurance Company of New York at Denver. 

Dr. Stratton belongs to the Women's Benefit Association of The Maccabees. Her 
religious faith is indicated by her membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. She 
has become well known during the period of her residence in Denver, and has attained 
enviable professional prominence and success and her influence has been a potent force 
for good along many lines outside the path of her profession. 



CYRUS F. TAYLOR, M. D. 



Dr. Cyrus F. Taylor, the pioneer physician and surgeon of Pueblo county, has here 
practiced continuously since 1880 or for a period covering nearly four decades. As a rep- 
resentative of the medical profession he has met with well deserved success and the 
name of Taylor has long been an honored one in Pueblo and throughout the county. His 
birth occurred in Hope, Knox county, Maine, on the 21st of October, 1857, his parents 
being Cyrus and Caroline (Bowley) Taylor, who spent their entire lives in the Pine Tree 
state, where the father followed the occupation of farming. The family numbered three 
sons and a daughter. 

Cyrus F. Taylor, the eldest of the children, acquired his early education in the rural 
and high schools of his native state and subsequently continued his studies in the Maine 
Wesleyan Academy at Kents Hill. Having determined upon a professional career, he 
entered the Medical School of Maine at Bowdoin College, which institution conferred 
upon him the degree of M. D. upon his graduation with the class of 1880. He first 
located for practice at Liberty, Maine, there remaining from June, 1880, until the fol- 
lowing November, when he came west to Colorado, taking up his abode in Pueblo, where 
he has remained an active representative of the medical fraternity to the present date. 
There were only four physicians in the county at the time of his arrival and he is the 
only one of these early practitioners who is still active in the profession. He has ever 



228 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

kept in close touch with advanced thought and methods in medical practice and has 
long enjoyed an enviable reputation as a most progressive and successful representative 
of the profession. He is a valued member of the Pueblo County Medical Society and 
also belongs to the Colorado State Medical Association and the American Medical 
Association. 

On the 19th of November, 1881, Dr. Taylor was united in marriage to Miss Nancy 
A. Robinson, a former schoolmate. They became the parents of five children, as follows: 
Laura A., who is principal of the Riverside school, which has an attendance of over six 
hundred children of foreign-born parents and is one of the largest schools with such an 
attendance in Colorado; Guy M., who is engaged in the automobile business; Dr. Ray R., 
who is a successful medical practitioner of Pueblo and a sketch of whom appears on 
another page of this work; Cyrus F., Jr., also connected with the automobile business; 
and Ernest W., a high school graduate. 

Dr. Taylor is a republican in politics and has long been prominent and active in 
the local ranks of the party. In 1883 he w r as elected coroner and two years later was 
chosen county superintendent of schools, being reelected to the latter position in 1887 
and making a most excellent record in that connection. In 1889 he was made chairman 
of the republican central committee. He also served for two terms as school director 
in District No. 1 and the cause of education has ever found in him a stalwart champion. 
Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the 
Court of Honor and the Eagles and he is likewise a member of the Bowdoin Alumni 
Asociation. His religious faith is that of the Universalist church. He takes a deep 
and helpful interest in all matters pertaining to progress and development in community 
affairs and is well known and highly esteemed as a public-spirited, leading and influential 
citizen of Pueblo. 



GEORGE LINCOLN HODGES. 

The history of the growth and development of Colorado reveals the names of certain 
men whose personality and achievements are synonymous with the state's advance- 
ment, morally, intellectually and financially. If in any single field her advancement 
has been greater than in others, that one is in the administration of justice, for among 
the members of her bar have been enrolled the familiar names of eminent jurists 
and talented counselors. Standing preeminent among his fellows, and enjoying honored 
distinction, is George L. Hodges, whose career furnishes a striking example of the 
success that comes to him who strives, even without the adventitious aid of chance 
and fortuitous circumstance. 

Few possessions are more valued and wished for than strength, but it is not generally 
realized that only through long, patient and continued^ effort can it be attained. It is 
thought of as a happy accident or a native gift to be passively grateful for, rather than 
as the direct result of toil and effort. This principle is equally manifest in moral and 
mental strength, as in physical vigor. The strong mind has accumulated power through 
hard mental activity; much earnest study, much effort of thought, have combined to 
give that vigorous force and elasticity which, to its possessor, is so valuable a boon. 
We look with favor upon the man thus endowed: We admire his clear vision, his 
sound judgment, his keen discrimination: We envy the ease with which he detects 
the point of an argument, or solves an intricate problem, or applies a principle, but 
we do not see and seldom even imagine the toil and patience that constitute the true 
source of his admired strength. The obstacles overcome and the trials which have been 
so hard to bear, have called forth the fortitude and heroism, component parts of every 
noble nature. It has come to him through effort and sacrifice, and the more it has cost, 
the greater the reward. 

Born of a line of sturdy ancestry, active participants in the stirring affairs inci- 
dent to our nation's formative periods during the Colonial, Revolutionary and Civil wars, 
Mr. Hodges inherited those principles of industry, integrity and determination of 
purpose which have ever characterized his career. His father, James Luther Hodges, 
resided for many years in the Empire state and was a man of versatile attainments, as 
a farmer, also as a teacher in the public schools. In 1854, he went to Joliet, Illinois, 
and secured a contract for the building of the first high school in that city. He 
later applied for, and was appointed to, the position as the first principal of that school, 
while the assistant principal was none other than Anna Withall, whom he afterwards 
married. It is interesting to note that among the members of that first class in Joliet, 
were several young men who later became prominent in the business and financial 




GEORGE L. HODGES 



230 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

world, and among whom may be mentioned, Sir "William Van Horn, the builder of the 
Canadian Pacific Railway, and who, in recognition of this achievement, was knighted 
by Queen Victoria; Harlow N. Higginbotham, of Chicago, and Eugene Wilder, now a 
resident of Boulder, Colorado, where he has served as city clerk, publicist and is other- 
wise prominent in state and local affairs. James L. Hodges and Anna Withall were 
married at Joliet, Illinois, about the year 1855, the ceremony being performed by 
Bishop Vincent. Anna Withall was born in England and during her infancy, had 
come with her parents to America. The family took up their abode near Rochester, 
New York, where her father, the Reverend Elija Withall, continued his pastoral duties. 
She received the advantages of a thorough and careful educational training, and 
graduated with honor, from the well known Women's College at Albion. 

James L. Hodges, following his term of principal at Joliet, returned to New York 
where George L. Hodges was born on the old family homestead, near Rochester, 
August 7, 1856. The following year, the family removed to Minnesota where they were 
numbered among the pioneers of Olmsted county, which was largely settled by families 
from the same eastern neighborhood and the county seat given the name of Rochester. 

At the outbreak of the Civil war, and in response to President Lincoln's first 
call for volunteers, James L. Hodges enlisted in his country's service as a member of 
the Third Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and was commissioned as first lieutenant by 
Governor Ramsey, Minnesota's "war governor." He was subsequently elected captain 
of his company and afterwards served on the staff of General Steele, in which con- 
nection he was placed in charge of the military prison at Little Rock, Arkansas. He 
also participated in the suppression of the Indian outbreak at Fort Snelling, Minne- 
sota, and had won renown for military skill. When the war closed Captain Hodges 
was in Arkansas, and he remained there, making Little Rock his home. He was 
admitted to the bar and took an active and potential part in the affairs of the 
state during the period of reconstruction. He also served as a member of the 
Arkansas constitutional convention in 1868. In 1871, President Grant appointed him 
postmaster at Little Rock, but he resigned this office the following year. In 1873, he 
removed with his family to Oak Park, a suburb of Chicago where his wife died, in 
1874, at the age of forty-two years. In 1878 he removed to Colorado, locating at Lead- 
ville, where he at once entered public service as collector of United States revenue. 
Later, he made Gleuwood Springs his place of residence and was twice elected mayor, 
also served as judge of the county court of Garfield county. In 1884, President Arthur 
appointed him register of the United States land office, at Glenwood Springs. In 
September, 1894, he located in Denver and, in 1898, was appointed by President 
McKinley, assayer in charge of the United States mint, in that city, which office he 
held for many years. Judge Hodges was always a stalwart republican and served 
continuously for many years as a member of the republican state central committee, of 
Colorado. He was twice chosen chairman of this committee, and as such, conducted 
the McKinley presidential campaign of 1896. Thus it will be seen that James Luther 
Hodges had active part in the affairs of Colorado, and left upon the history of two 
states the imprint of his personality and character. He died in Denver, in December, 
1906, in his seventy-third year, rich in the respect and esteem of his fellow men. He 
was a member of the Loyal Legion and of the Grand Army of the Republic. He was 
also, a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite mason, having been a master mason for more 
than fifty years. 

George L. Hodges was but an infant when he went with his parents to Minnesota 
where he was subject to the rigors and the dangers of a frontier community. His 
educational advantages, though they may have been restricted* in a sense, were of a 
high character. His home surroundings were most favorable and the training there 
received, as well as his public school training, was supplemented by a course of study 
at the Wesleyan Seminary and also the State Normal School, at Brockport, New York. 
While the family home was established at Oak Park, Illinois, he further advanced him- 
self by taking a course in the Bryant & Stratton Business College and his first business 
experience came to him in closing up the receivership in the United States court, in 
which proceedings the well known soap manufacturer, B. T. Babbitt, was the com- 
plainant. While attending the Centennial exposition in Philadelphia, in 1876, he was 
united in marriage with Miss Ella Van Derveer, of Westville, New York. He entered 
upon the study of law in the spring of 1877 at Codperstown, New York, in the office 
and under the tutelage of Hon. Hezekiah Sturges, one of the three judges of the Canal 
appraisers court, remaining there until July, 1879, when he came to Colorado, locating 
in Leadville. He was admitted to the bar of Colorado in September, 1879, and con- 
tinued in active practice until October, 1883, when he returned to New York state and, 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 231 

in connection with his father in-law, he engaged in hop raising, in dairying and iu 
mercantile pursuits, in Chenango county, where he was also called upon for public 
service, filling the office of county supervisor. At the expiration of his term of office, 
he was tendered the unanimous renomination by both the democratic and republican 
parties, but he declined to again become a candidate. With the desire to again become 
an active practitioner at the bar, he was admitted to the New York bar in January, 

1886. In June of the following year however, he returned to Colorado and in October, 

1887, entered into partnership with S. H. Ballard of Denver. This association was 
continued until July, 1889, when Mr. Hodges withdrew and formed a partnership with 
Thomas W. Lipscomb. 

As the years passed, Mr. Hodges more and more largely specialized in corporation 
law and soon became known as an able practitioner in that particular field. In 1893, 
he was appointed general counsel, and made a director and a member of the executive 
committee of the Mexico, Cuernavaca & Pacific Railroad Company, constructing and 
operating a line projected from the city of Mexico to the harbor of Acapulco. He won 
distinction in his preparation and presentation of the answer of a federation of the 
employes of the Union Pacific Railway system, to the petition of the receivers for leave 
to put in operation new rules and regulations governing the basis of pay, and to reduce 
the scale of wages in Colorado and Wyoming. The hearing was held at Omaha, and 
resulted in April, 1894, in the vacation of the famous "Dundy" order, and in the 
maintenance of the rules, regulations and wage scale in force prior to the receiver- 
ship. He also had charge of litigation protecting the patent of the well known Wilfley 
Ore Concentrating Table. This litigation extended over a period of more than ten 
years and was won through the ability of counsel to make plain to the court the basic 
fact that the invention, though simple, was in reality, an advanced step in ore con- 
centration. 

Socially, and in part as a diversion from the exactions of his chosen profession, 
Mr. Hodges has been a diligent and discriminating student of the mysteries of Masonic 
lore and has advanced through the several grades to exalted honor. Holding member- 
ship in Colorado Consistory, No. 1, he is also past master of Denver Council of Kadosh, 
No. 1; a member of Denver Lodge, No. 5, A. F. & A. M.; Colorado Chapter, No. 29, 
R. A. M. ; and of El Jebel Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member, 
by succession, of the Loyal Legion, and an honorary life member of the Denver Athletic 
Club. 

To George L. and Ella (Van Derveer) Hodges, have been born three children: 
William V., of whom a personal sketch appears elsewhere in this work; Ella F., now 
Mrs. Norman Read, of Denver; and Erma C. 



M. N. ROBINSON. 



M. N. Robinson is actively identified with farming in Weld county, where he rents 
one hundred and eighty-three acres of good land that he has converted into rich and 
productive fields. He was born in Macon county, Missouri, on the 14th of November, 
1879, a son of J. W. and Sarah (Holmes) Robinson. The father was born in Shelby 
county, Missouri, while the mother's birth occurred in Davis City, Iowa, and both are 
still living. J. W. Robinson is a farmer by occupation and followed that pursuit in Macon 
and Shelby counties of Missouri, while subsequently he removed to Billings. Montana. 
He afterward became connected with the American Federation of Labor as a walking 
delegate and served in that capacity for many years but retired a few years ago. He 
holds membership with the Farmers Union, and he and his family are members 
of the Baptist church. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party. To 
him and his wife have been born the following named: M. N., of this review; Maud, 
the wife of 0. P. Floyd, a contractor of Great Falls, Montana, by whom she has three 
children; Grover E., who has responded to the call to the colors and is at Camp Kearny, 
California, being one of the non-commissioned officers of Company E of the One Hundred 
and Fifty-seventh Infantry; and W. O, who is with Company K of the One Hundred and 
Sixty-fourth Infantry in France, having enlisted with several boys from Montana, and 
after training arrived in France on Christmas day of 1917. 

M. N. Robinson acquired his early education in Clarence, Missouri, and left his 
native state when twenty-two years of age. For four years he had been employed at 
farm labor by his father and also engaged in farming to some extent on his own account. 
Attracted by the opportunity of the growing west, he came to Colorado at the age of 
twenty-two, arriving in Greeley, and after a few days he made his way to Lucerne. 



232 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

where he lived for five years. He worked as a farm hand for three years and then 
engaged in farming upon rented land for two years. In 1907 he removed to his present 
place and has since carried on general farming and stock raising. He here cultivates 
one hundred and eighty-three acres of land situated on section 1, township 6. range 66, 
and his business affairs are carefully and wisely directed. He has prospered as the years 
have gone on and in addition to general farming he has the place well stocked with 
cattle and horses for his own use. 

In December, 1904, Mr. Robinson was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Hammons, 
a daughter of J. C. and Kate (Morgan) Hammons. Her father was a farmer and cattle 
raiser who lived for many years in Benton county, Missouri, where Mrs. Robinson was 
born, reared and educated. Her brothers and sisters are Charley, Allie. Sarah, Bullard, 
Myrtle, John, Haston, Katie and Oscar. The mother passed away May 7, 1907, and was 
laid to rest in the cemetery at Fairfield, Missouri. The father is still living but has 
now retired from active business life and his youngest son carries on the home farm. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have been born four children: Selden, born May 31, 
1907; Frances, born in February, 1909; Byron. November 2, 1910; and Harold, November 
9, 1912. The parents are prominent members of the Baptist church at Eaton and in its 
work take a very helpful part. Mr. Robinson is serving on its board of trustees and 
was superintendent of the Sunday school for two years but resigned a short time ago. 
Mrs. Robinson is also active in war work. Fraternally he is connected with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Woodmen of the World and politically he is 
absolutely independent, voting for the men whom he believes will stand by the laboring 
classes. His has been a useful life and his genuine worth is attested by many with 
whom he has been brought in contact. 



MATTHEW D. McENIRY. 



Matthew D. McEniry in April, 1907, was appointed chief of the Denver field division 
of the United States General Land Office, a position which he has since continuously 
filled. He was born in Alliance, Ohio, January 15, 1868, and is the eldest of a family 
of four children born to Thomas and Julia (Quinn) McEniry, both of whom are natives 
of Ireland. 

The parents came to America in the early '50s, settling with their respective 
families in Oswego county, New York. In 1859 Thomas McEniry removed to Wisconsin, 
and following the outbreak of the Civil war, responded to the call of his adopted 
country for military aid, and joined the Seventeenth Regiment of Wisconsin Volunteer 
Infantry in October, 1861. He was in command of Company K of that regiment 
practically throughout the war period. He was wounded in action at Vicksburg, and 
lost part of one of his hands. 

After the close of hostilities Thomas McEniry removed to Ohio, where he was 
married in 1866, and where he remained until 1881. At that time he came to Colorado 
settling in Custer county, and engaged in mining at Silver Cliff and Rosita for a number 
of years. Later on he followed this pursuit in various parts of this state, New Mexico 
and Arizona. In 1905 the elder McEniry went into Mexico, where he continued in 
mining in the state of Sonora until the Mexican troubles commenced and he was finally 
driven out of there by Villa's insurgent army in 1914. At the present time, although 
seventy-nine years of age, he is engaged in mining operations, residing in New York 
city. 

Matthew D. McEniry's mother at the present time is residing in South Pasadena, 
California, and is seventy-two years old. The subject of this sketch has a brother, 
Michael S., residing there with her, and also a sister, Margaret. Another sister, Mrs. 
Mary E. Lockhart, now deceased, was married in Denver twenty-three years ago. 

In early life Matthew D. McEniry was a pupil in the public schools of Alliance, 
Ohio, and when sixteen years old took a position with the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & 
Chicago Railroad, as a telegraph operator at Alliance. Subsequently, for some eight or 
ten years, while with the railroad company, he engaged in newspaper reportorial work, 
and was a special correspondent for the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Chicago Herald, and 
a number of New York papers. While engaged in this newspaper work, he assisted 
Robert P. Skinner, of Massillon, Ohio, who is at present consul general of the United 
States at London, and who at that time owned the Massillon Independent, in creating 
the publicity for Coxey's schemes, which eventually led to Coxey's Army. On its march 
on Washington Mr. McEniry accompanied this army as special correspondent for a 
number of metropolitan papers, and also as a telegrapher, wherever the army camped. 




MATTHEW D. McENTRY 



234 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

During these years, in the '90s, Mr. McEniry was actively engaged in politics in 
eastern Ohio. Upon the election of President McKinley, he was tendered the appoint- 
ment of consul general to the Azores islands at St. Michael, which he declined. Subse- 
quently he was appointed by President McKinley as a special agent of the General 
Land Office, and upon his acceptance of this position was stationed at St. Cloud, Minne- 
sota, and Crookston, Minnesota, where he remained for five years. In the winter of 
1904-05 he was appointed chief of field division and assigned to New Orleans, Louisiana, 
where he remained that winter, then being transferred to a similar post at Fargo, North 
Dakota, in charge of the work of the General Land Office in North and South Dakota. 
He remained there until his appointment as chief of the Denver field division. In this 
latter position he has constantly had from fifteen to forty employes under his personal 
supervision. The work of his office pertains to the disposal of the public land of 
Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Nevada, and everything that has to do with fraud in 
the acquisition of these lands comes under his observation and action. 

Through his efforts the Colorado National Monument at Grand Junction was 
created, and he also made the initial report on the proposed Mount Evans National 
Park to the government at Washington. He is a close student of the involved and 
complex problems which have to do with the control and use of the public lands of 
the west, and with getting it into the hands of citizens. His sympathies have always 
been with the homesteader and the citizen who is trying to get a start by making a 
homestead entry or desert land entry on the public domain ; and an important rule of his 
office is to look after and assist the financially poor homesteader who is unable to cope 
with certain unscrupulous citizens familiarly known as "land hogs," who attempt in 
various ways to beat the poor citizen out of his lawful rights. 

On February 17, 1896, Mr. McEniry was united in marriage with Miss Eva M. 
Roach, a daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Jason B. Roach, of Alliance, Ohio. They are the 
parents of two children, Matthew D., who was born in Alliance in 1900 and is now a 
senior in East Denver high school, and John J., who was born at Crookston, Minnesota, 
in 1903, and is also a pupil in East Denver high school. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Roman Catholic church, and Mr. 
McEniry is a member of the Knights of Columbus. 



HON. JOHN A. GORDON. 



Hon. John A. Gordon has been for many years connected with the legal profession 
not only in general practice but also in many important positions of an official character. 
He is at present serving the federal government as assistant United States district 
attorney, with headquarters at Denver. He was born in Bedford county, Tennessee, a 
son of the late Samuel B. Gordon, a native of Tennessee, although a descendant of an old 
South Carolina family of Scotch extraction. The father was a son of David Gordon, an 
early settler of Bedford county, Tennessee, where he was successfully engaged as a 
planter. Samuel B. Gordon also followed that pursuit as a life work and occupied a 
prominent position in his community. Prior to the war he was a whig. He not only 
conducted his own interests with gratifying results but also took an active part in polit- 
ical life and served for several terms as treasurer of Bedford county. He passed away 
in 1890, when in his seventy-eighth year. He had married Miss Amelia Euliss, also a 
native of Bedford county and a descendant of a pioneer family of Tennessee of German 
origin. Her maternal grandfather was Martin Schoffner, who was of German birth and 
served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Mrs. Gordon died in December, 1898, in 
her native county having passed her eightieth birthday. She was the mother of twelve 
children, eight sons and four daughters, of whom John A. Gordon was the ninth in 
order of birth and the seventh son. 

He was educated in private schools of his native county and passed his youth up 
to his twentieth year upon his father's farm. At that period he entered the East Ten- 
nessee University, taking a junior course in that institution. He then sought the oppor- 
tunities of the southwest and moved to Wise county, Texas, where he assumed the 
position of deputy county surveyor. He continued as such for four years, but desiring 
to make the law Ills life work, studied the profession as his spare time permitted. His 
diligence and close application resulted in his admittance to practice before the Texas 
courts in 1880 and he immediately entered upon the actual practice of the law, winning 
a gratifying patronage by his serious efforts and the close attention which he devoted to 
any case given into his hands. In 1883 recognition of his legal standing came to him 
through his appointment to the position of assistant to the attorney general of Texas, 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 235 

the Hon. John D. Templeton, in whose office he remained for a year. His legal ability 
was further recognized when he was appointed by Governor John Ireland of Texas as 
district attorney, with headquarters at Decatur, covering four counties. He served in 
this important office during 1884 and 1885 and then again entered upon private practice 
at Decatur, Texas, continuing with increasing success until the latter part of 1887, when 
he made another removal, locating in Trinidad. Colorado, where he was soon established 
in private practice, gaining a large clientage. His vast experience and thorough under- 
standing of the law, his unfailing logic and his unfaltering diligence, combined with a 
deep consciousness, soon gained for him the confidence of the public, and the high stand- 
ard of ethics which he maintained won liim the esteem of his colleagues in the profes- 
sion. He continued in Trinidad as general counselor and attorney until 1898, having 
been nominated in the fall of 1897 by the democratic party to the position of supreme 
judge. However, Mr. Gordon did not consent to make the race. In 1898 he was appointed 
reporter to the supreme court and filled this office conscientiously and to the great 
satisfaction of the officers of the court, being so engaged until 1907, when he again took 
up private practice, and was so occupied until he received his present appointment as 
assistant United States district attorney, which office he has filled since the early part 
of 1915. He is eminently qualified for the work in connection with the office and has 
represented the interests of the federal government without fear or favor, his actions 
being dictated entirely by his conscience and based strictly upon the letter of the law. 

In 1901 Mr. Gordon was married in Denver to Mrs. Lethe (South) Porter, a daughter 
of Dr. W. L. and Louise (Brumley) South. The family was an old and prominent one 
of Trinidad, Colorado, later removing to Denver. 

Mr. Gordon is a stanch democrat and in his earlier days was very active in national, 
state and local politics. He is a member of the Denver and Colorado State Bar Associa- 
tions. He was reared in the Lutheran faith and fraternally he is connected with the 
Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Much credit is due 
Mr. Gordon for what he has achieved, as he has made his own way since he was twenty 
years of age and has succeeded in a profession in which success means tireless effort, 
and it must be ascribed to his perseverance that he has reached the goal. Mr. Gordon 
also has a military chapter in his life history, for he was a ranking officer of his class 
when in college and had he completed his studies he would have received the rank of 
captain. At that time, however, his means did not permit him to continue and he had 
to gain his admission to the bar by unremitting labor performed in those hours which 
others devote to leisure and recuperation. Mr. Gordon is popular in social circles of 
Denver and has made many friends among his fellow townsmen. His professional actions 
have ever been unimpeachable and the high rank which he has reached in the profession 
is not only to be ascribed to his ability but also to the high qualities of character which 
guide him in all the relations of life. 



CHRISTOPHER FIELD CLAY. 

Attacking everything that he does with a contagious enthusiasm, Christopher Field 
Clay has won for himself favorable criticism as one of the most prominent representa- 
tives of mining corporation law in Denver and the state of Colorado. He turns to recrea- 
tion with equal zest if leisure permits and it is his concentration of purpose and 
indefatigable energy that has placed him in the enviable position which he today occupies. 
A native of Richmond. Kentucky, he was born on the 19th of December, 1874, and was 
one of a family of children, of whom five are living, whose parents were Brutus Junius 
and Pattie A. (Field) Clay, the latter a daughter of Christopher I. Field. The father 
was educated in the State University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he completed a 
course in civil enginering. He is now living retired in Richmond, Kentucky. His wife, 
however, has passed away. 

Christopher Field Clay supplemented his early educational opportunities by study 
in the Dummer Academy of South Byfield, Massachusetts, and afterward attended Wil- 
liams College. During his college days he became a member of Delta Upsilon. His law 
course was pursued in the University of Colorado, in which he won his LL. B. degree 
as a member of the class of 1898. The" same year he was admitted to the bar and for 
two years thereafter was associated with the law firm of Thomas. Bryant & Lee. He then 
began practice independently and has concentrated his efforts and attention upon mining 
corporation law and today has few equals in that field of jurisprudence. He has also 
been admitted to practice in the state of Nevada. 



236 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Mr. Clay was united in marriage to Miss Elinor Wise, of Colorado, a daughter of 
D. L. Wise, a merchant of Boulder, and they have one child, Katherine Belle, sixteen 
years of age. who is a student in the Wolcott School of Denver. 

Mr. Clay is a Mason, belonging to Oriental Lodge, No. 87, A. F. & A. M., also to the 
chapter and commandery of Denver and to El Jehel Temple of the Ancient Arabic Order 
of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. In the lodge he is a senior deacon. He also has 
membership with the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. Mr. Clay belongs 
to the Lakewood Country Club, the Denver Country Club, the Denver Athletic Club and 
the Denver Motor Club. He is also identified with the Sons of the Revolution, being 
entitled to connection with that organization through both his maternal and paternal 
ancestry. He is likewise connected with the Denver Civic and Commercial Association 
and is in hearty sympathy with its well devised plans and projects for the upbuilding 
of the city' and the advancement of municipal affairs and interests. His religious faith 
is that of the Episcopal church and his political belief that of the republican party. He 
enjoys golf, fishing and hunting and is the owner of some fine dogs. He has made many 
trips for big game and enjoys considerable reputation for that which he has brought 
down. All these things, however, are made subservient to his law practice, which is 
of a most important character and has reached very extensive proportions. 



JOSEPH A. OSNER. 



Joseph A. Osner, engaged in railroad contracting and irrigation work at Denver, 
was born October 3, 1857, in Olyc.e, Ohio, a son of the late Joseph A. Osner, who was 
a native of Alsace-Lorraine and came to America at the age of twenty, settling in Ohio, 
where he resided for fifty-four years. He was engaged in the lumber business but 
during the period of the Civil war put aside all business and personal considerations 
and served for two years as a private in defense of the Union cause. His political 
allegiance was given to the democratic party and his religious faith was that of the 
Roman Catholic church. He died at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. His wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Christina Barnett, was a native of Switzerland and came 
to the United States with a sister, settling in Ohio, her marriage being celebrated in 
Oberlin, that state. She died in 1902, at the age of sixty-eight years. The family 
numbered eleven children, three sons and eight daughters. 

Joseph A. Osner was the third in order of birth. He was educated in the public 
schools of Clyde, Ohio, and at eighteen years of age started out to earn his own liveli- 
hood, being first employed at freighting between Kearney, Nebraska, and the Black 
Hills. After making one trip, however, he came to Denver, where he arrived in 1879. 
He then engaged in freighting from Denver to Leadville and continued in that work 
for two years, after which he turned his attention to the contracting business in a small 
way. As the years passed on his patronage steadily increased and he became one of 
the leading railroad and irrigation contractors in the west. He built the South Park 
Railroad, also parts of the Denver & Rio Grande, parts of the Union Pacific and the 
Burlington and has taken many large and important contracts for irrigation work at 
Lane Loveland, Greeley and other points. His business has reached very extensive 
proportions and places him among the representative men in his line in Colorado. In 
addition he is the owner of a large breeding farm on which he raises fine mules 
principally, but he also owns and has raised some fine pedigreed horses. Two of 
these are world record horses — Tommy Home, with a record of 2:04^4, made in the 
sixth heat of a seven heat race; and Braden Direct, with a record of 2:01^4, then a 
world's record. As a famous horseman Mr. Osner is known throughout the country. 
He is a member of the Oentlemen's Riding and Driving Club and has been interested in 
many track events. He was instrumental in promoting a matinee of races, the proceeds 
of which went to the Red Cross, and in this event his own horse, Little Joe, took part 
and Mr. Osner himself acted as starting judge, the matinee netting a very substantial 
sum for the Red Cross. 

On the 22d of July, 1878, Mr. Osner was married in Denver to Miss Minnie Wernert, 
a native of Toledo, Ohio, and a daughter of the late Joseph W. and Mary Wernert, of a 
very old Toledo family that was established there when the town was known as Fort 
Lawrence. Mrs. Osner is active in all charity organizations, also in Red Cross work 
and is a leader in social circles of the city. Mr. and Mrs. Osner have no children of 
their own but are rearing an adopted daughter, Laura Wernert. 

Mr. Osner and his wife belong to St. Elizabeth's Roman Catholic church and he is 
a member of the Denver Civic and Commercial Association. He is in hearty sympathy 




JOSEPH A. OSNEK 



238 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

with that organization in all of its efforts to promote the welfare of the community 
and does much active work in that connection. He finds his chief diversion in racing, 
fishing and hunting and is the owner of fine saddle horses. He has every reason to be 
proud of his splendidly improved farm and the thoroughbred horses thereon to be seen. 
His political allegiance is given to the democratic party, while fraternally he is identified 
with the Knights of Columbus and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 



MILTON SEAMAN. 



Milton Seaman is a progressive factor in the development of public utilities in 
Greeley, filling the position of superintendent of streets and the water and sewer depart- 
ment. He brings to the office thorough experience and has been successful in instituting 
a number of improvements which have greatly helped to make Greeley a modern city. 
He was born in Pennsylvania, October 10, 1861, a son of E. S. and Amelia (Ludwig) 
Seaman, also natives of Pennsylvania. The father was a contractor and builder and 
followed that line of business during all his life in his native state, where he passed 
his remaining days. His wife is also deceased. 

Milton Seaman was reared and educated in Pennsylvania, attending the public 
schools. His advantages along that line were cut short, for at the early age of eleven 
he had to take up work in order to provide for himself, laboring in the coal mines of 
Pennsylvania. He continued as a miner in that state until 1884, when he decided to seek 
the greater opportunities of the opening west and came to Greeley. Colorado, engaging 
in general teaming. That line of business he followed very successfully until 1898, when 
he was elected to his present position, that of street superintendent. He has now filled 
this important office for twenty years and his services have been considered very satis- 
factory by the public. Much of the progress that has been made in his city must be 
ascribed to his methods and his constant watchfulness and the wholesome and pleasant 
home life of the community is largely due to the stringent measures which Street Super- 
intendent Seaman enforces in order to keep the city clean. 

Mr. Seaman was united in marriage to Miss Laura King and to this union were born 
three children: Ray, deceased; and Lloyd and Roy. Lloyd makes his home on a large 
ranch in Wyoming, while Roy is at present with the United States forces in France. 
Mrs. Laura Seaman passed away and subsequently Mr. Seaman married Miss Lina Zook 
and to them were born two children: Mae, aged eighteen; and Ruth, fifteen years of 
age. The latter is attending school. 

Mr. Seaman maintains an independent attitude as far as politics are concerned, 
giving his support to those measures and candidates whom he considers of greatest value 
to the greatest number. He was brought up in the Lutheran faith, but the family attends 
the Methodist church. Fraternally he belongs to the Knights of Pythias and the Benevo- 
lent -Protective Order of Elks. That Mr. Seaman discharges his duties with absolute 
faithfulness and fidelity is evident from the fact of his long continuance in office. He 
possesses all those qualities which are necessary for the position and his long experience 
results in visible evidences of improvements. He has made many friends in Greeley 
and is popular in public, business and social circles. 



JOHN A. MOYER. 



John A. Moyer is the editor and publisher of the Daily Mining and Financial Record 
of Denver, the only daily paper published in the world devoted to mining interests. 
Mr. Moyer is a native of Ohio. He was born at Upper Sandusky in March, 1878, and 
is a son of P. and Eva (Reading) Moyer, both of whom were born on the other side 
of the Atlantic. They came to America when about twenty years of age and settled in 
Ohio. The father there engaged in farming and afterward he removed with his family 
to Topeka, Kansas, where he continued in active connection with agricultural interests. 
Both he and his wife are still living there. They had a family of seven children. 

John A. Moyer, who was the third in order of birth, spent his early life in Topeka. 
Kansas, where he pursued his education in the public schools, supplemented by study 
in a business college. He then started out in the newspaper field and in 1898 came to 
Colorado Springs, where he secured a position on the Colorado Springs Telegraph. He 
remained with that paper for about four years and then removed to St. Joseph, Missouri, 
where he was connected with the St. Joseph Gazette. His identification with that paper 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 239 

in various capacities covered six years, after which he moved westward to San Francisco, 
California, and became one of the owners of the Orchard and Farm, a weekly journal 
devoted to agriculture and orchardizing. He conducted that paper successfully for two 
years, after which he sold out and returned to Colorado, taking up his abode in Denver. 
For three years he was with the Denver Post and during two years of that time he was 
also business manager of the Kansas City Post. He afterwards secured an interest in 
the Daily Mining and Financial Record and on the 1st of March, 1916, was made general 
manager of the Union Printing Company, which corporation owns the Daily Mining and 
Financial Record. He is now giving his energies to the publication of the Mining 
Record, which is devoted to mining, oil and financial news. It is the only daily paper 
of the kind published in the world and has a very large circulation. It contains every- 
thing of interest to the mining man and there is nothing of importance to the mining 
interests of Colorado that does not appear in its columns. The news is thus widely 
disseminated and, moreover, the large circulation of the paper makes it a very valuable 
advertising medium. 

On the 9th of October, 1902, in Salt Lake City, Utah, Mr. Moyer was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Elizabeth Fuller, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Fuller, of Des Moines, 
Iowa. They now have two children: John Frederick Moyer, born in St. Joseph, Missouri, 
in 1904, and now a junior in high school at Denver; and Geraldine Virginia, who 
was born in St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1909, and is also attending the public schools of this 
city. Throughout practically his entire business career Mr. Moyer has devoted his activi- 
ties to newspaper interests and in this connection has become prominent and popular. 
He is a well known editor of Colorado and stands high in journalistic circles in the state. 



ED P. EPPICH. 



It is natural that in a large and growing city as that of Denver the insurance 
and investment business is of the utmost importance and along this line of activity 
Ed P. Eppich has achieved notable success, his office being located at No. 407 Bank block. 
He was born February 24, 1871, in Chicago, Illinois, a son of Christoph A. Eppich, a 
native of Germany, who in 1862 came to American shores, first settling in Canada. Three 
years later, or in 1865, he located in, Chicago, where he engaged in the shoemaking 
business. In later years he gave his attention to hotel keeping, but in 1879 he and his 
family moved westward and, selecting Denver as their future home, the father there 
engaged in the real estate business, being so occupied up to the time of his death, which 
occurred June 1, 1910, at the age of sixty-six years. Mr. Eppich always took a great 
interest in public policies and gave his entire support to the republican party. He made 
himself felt in party ranks and soon his ability was recognized when in 1886 he was 
elected a member of the Colorado house of representatives. He was active in committee 
rooms and also took his place on the floor of the house when occasion demanded in 
order to defend or introduce measures which he considered of vital importance. Always 
interested in the cause of education, he introduced a bill in the state legislature for free 
textbooks which at the time was defeated but later was passed by the house, the legisla- 
ture thereby recognizing the justness and necessity of the measure introduced by Mr. 
Eppich. In every sense of the word he was a successful man, for he not only gained 
material independence but took a deep interest in mental and intellectual development. 
It may be said that he became one of Colorado's best citizens, a man of high thought 
and high aims, who ever had at heart the welfare of his fellowmen. He considered no 
effort too great in order to give something to the world which he believed to be of lasting 
value and in his life he wrought for good and sowed many seeds which have come 
to fruition though he has passed away. He was married to Elizabeth Riegel, who was 
born in Germany and came to America between the years 1866 and 1867, making the 
trip unaccompanied by any relatives. She came directly to Chicago, where she became 
acquainted with her future husband, and there the marriage ceremony was solemnized. 
Mr. and Mrs. Eppich had eight children, four sons and four daughters, of whom Ed P. 
Eppich was the second in order of birth. The mother survives and is a resident of 
Denver. 

Ed P. Eppich was educated in the public schools of Denver, the family having 
removed to this city when he was eight years of age. He continued his education until 
he was seventeen years old and then discontinued his studies in order to strike out for 
himself. Being educationally well prepared and of a practical mind — in fact a wide- 
awake boy — he found no difficulty in obtaining employment and soon was installed in 
the office of Frith & Zollars, general agents for a number of fire insurance companies, 



240 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

his position being that of stenographer. He continued with this firm from 1887 until 
1890 and there he obtained a sound general business training and a fair knowledge of 
the fire insurance business. In 1890 the firm was dissolved and Mr. Frith then took 
over its local business. Mr. Eppich continuing with him for two years. In 1896 he formed 
a partnership with T. T. Frith — a fitting consummation of his career as an insurance 
agency employe. The firm of Frith & Eppich was then established and continued under 
this nomenclature for ten months, or until November 1, 1896, when Mr. Eppich estab- 
lished himself independently, and he has since continued for himself actively engaged 
in the fire insurance business. On account of his long experience, his natural ability 
and his pleasant, genial disposition, combined with his close application, his agency 
has prospered and he has seen his business increase from year to year as time has 
passed. In addition to fire he now handles practically all classes of insurance and con- 
sidered from every point of view the financial results obtained from the business are 
entirely satisfactory. Moreover, Mr. Eppich has branched out into the real estate field 
and he also places investments. Upon engaging along this line he closely studied the 
local markets and opportunities and is considered an expert, his advice being often 
sought on matters of general investment or such of a real estate nature. 

On the 1st of January, 1896, in Los Angeles. California, Mr. Eppich was united in 
marriage to Miss Louise E. Knecht, a native of Chicago, Illinois, and a daughter of 
Gustav and Sophie (Schaun) Knecht. both deceased, the latter a member of a well known 
Chicago family of German origin. To Mr. and Mrs. Eppich were born three children: 
Margaret S., whose birth occurred in Denver in October, 1896; Elinor M.. who was born in 
this city in January, 1898; and Karl E., who was born in this city in February, 1902. 

Mr. Eppich is proud of the fact that when he started out on life's activities at the 
age of seventeen he was what is called a boy on his own resources, but by diligent applica- 
tion and close attention to matters in hand he has worked himself up to the position 
which he now occupies and he may well be proud of this fact, as he has by his attain- 
ments demonstrated his resourcefulness, his honesty, his straightforward business policy 
and, in general, qualities which are a credit to any successful man. Politically he is a 
republican but has either grudged the time or else has not had the inclination to actively 
participate in public affairs, although he is never remiss in supporting any measure 
which may be undertaken for the benefit of his city, state or nation. All movements 
undertaken in the interests of humanity, in the interests of commercial growth, in the 
interests of intellectual progress, find his ready support with words, deeds and financial 
backing. He belongs to the Denver Civic and Commercial Association and to the Denver 
Athletic Club, evidencing through the latter connection his sincere belief in training as 
a means of keeping a sound body as a habitat for a sound mind. He was reared in the 
Lutheran faith and fraternally belongs to the Masons, being received into the order in 
Denver. He has attained high rank, being a Shriner and also is a member of the Scottish 
Rite. The life record of Mr. Eppich demonstrates what may be achieved if industry, 
ambition and good judgment point the way and his record should stand as an example 
to others who have to start out upon life's journey empty-handed and desire to reach 
success. 



JAMES DREHER MAITLAND. 

James Dreher Maitland, president of the Colorado Builders Supply Company and 
one of the representative business men of Denver, was born in Springfield, Ohio, July 2, 
1883, a son of William G. and Agnes S. (Dreher) Maitland, the former a native of Ohio, 
while the latter was born in Indiana. Removing westward, they first established their 
home at Lincoln, Nebraska, where the mother died in 1892. Afterward the father and 
his daughter and son came to Denver, where they arrived in the spring of 1895. Here 
Mr. Maitland has since resided and is engaged in the surety bond business. The family 
numbered but two children, the daughter being Mrs. John A. McCaw, of Denver. 

James D. Maitland, whose name introduces this review, is the younger and in 
early life he was a pupil in the public schools of Lincoln, while later he attended the 
University of Nebraska and in due course of time was graduated from the mechanical 
engineering department of that institution. He concentrated his efforts upon practical 
lines of business and became an employe of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad Company, 
with which he continued for about two years. He then resigned and removed to Union 
county, New Mexico, where he engaged in the live stock business on his own account 
and became one of the leading live stock dealers and cattle raisers of that section. 
He continued in Union county for three years and then disposed of his interests there, 




.IA.MKS IU.'KIIKR MA1TLAXD 



242 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

after which he returned to Denver. In the fall of 1906 he became interested in the 
Colorado Builders Supply Company, Incorporated, and now owns ninety-eight per cent 
of the stock of that company. The business is that of engineering and the manufac- 
turing and handling of all kinds of builders' materials and supplies, including fire- 
proofing, reenforcing steel, and in fact everything needed in the line of fireproof building 
materials. Mr. Maitland is the president and manager of the business, which has been 
developed through his efforts and has become one of the important and profitable 
commercial interests of the city. He is also an officer of the Maitland -Moritz Agency 
Company, conducting an insurance business, and this, too, is proving a growing and 
profitable concern. 

On the 25th of December, 1906, Mr. Maitland was married in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, to Miss Pauline C. Blythe, a daughter of James M. and Maude (Davis) Blythe, 
of Denver, Colorado, the former general manager of the Davis Iron Works of this city. 
Mr. and Mrs. Maitland have one child, Ann, who was born in Denver, on October 3, 
1915. 

Mr. Maitland is well known as a member of the Denver Athletic Club, the Denver 
Master Builders Association; Phi Delta Theta, and also holds membership in Park 
Hill Lodge, No. 148, A. F. & A. M. He is a prominent figure in business circles of 
Denver, his life illustrating what can be accomplished through determined and earnest 
effort, for through his persistency of purpose, close application and wide vision he 
has worked his way steadily upward. The course that he has ever pursued marks him 
as a man of high principles and Denver has profited by his cooperation, not merely 
along the line of its material development but also through his support of many plans 
and measures for the general good. 



WILLIAM L. CLINE. 



William L. Cline, pastor of the Christian church in Greeley and one who has done 
splendid work since entering the ministry, being recognized as one of the leading rep- 
resentatives of the Christian denomination in this section of the country, was born in 
Smith county, Kansas, March 30, 1881, a son of D. A. and Docia (Taylor) Cline. The 
father was born in Kentucky and removed to Kansas in 1879. He devoted his active life 
to farming and merchandising and was a resident of Kensington, Kansas, until 1908, 
when he removed to Holton, that state. In 1916 he came to Colorado to make his home 
with his son, William. He is a most earnest and active church worker and is an ardent 
supporter of the temperance cause, doing everything in his power to make Colorado a 
dry state. His time is now devoted to the advancement of work in this direction and 
his labors have been effective and resultant. William L. Cline of this review has a 
sister, Fanny, born in 1879, and a brother. Charles, born in 1886. He also has two half 
brothers: Harry, who works on a ranch; and Frank J., who is superintendent of the 
Towanda public schools. 

William L. Cline, whose name introduces this review, was a pupil in the country 
schools and in the schools of Kensington. Smith county, Kansas, between the ages of 
eight and seventeen years. His mother died when he was a little lad of but six years. 
His youthful days were devoted to study in the district schools, after which he took up 
the profession of teaching for a year, but then he became a student in Drake University 
and devoted two and a half years to studying for the ministry. On account of impaired 
health he came to Colorado and took up church work in the Arkansas valley, preaching 
for a year and a half in the First Christian church of Manzanola. He also traveled up 
and down the Snake river doing missionary work and bronco busting. In 1906 he went 
to the East Side Christian church of Denver, where he held meetings'. He afterwards 
became a student in the University of Colorado at Boulder and at every possible oppor- 
tunity, by university training, by broad reading and by intense study, he has advanced 
his knowledge and therefore promoted his power as a minister of the gospel. For four 
and a half years he engaged in preaching in the church at Berthoud, twenty miles north 
of Boulder, and before accepting his pastorate at Greeley he devoted seven years to dry 
farming and had the largest farm of the kind in the state, comprising six thousand 
acres. Upon this he raised forty thousand bushels of grain in two years — enough to 
keep five thousand soldiers for a year. At the present writing, in 1918, he preaches for 
the First Christian church in Greeley. At different times Mr. Cline has held evangelistic 
meetings and has been called the "boy evangelist." He has also proven a most 
capable agriculturist and now has twenty-five hundred acres in winter wheat. In 
a word his is a nature that thoroughly does anything that he attempts and his earnest- 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 243 

ness of purpose has been one of the strong elements in his success in a material way 
and in the upbuilding of his church. Sixteen years ago the Des Moines Daily News 
said in its issue of January 14, 1902: "Though a mere boy in years, Will Cline of Drake 
has twenty-five converts. He has returned from Ortonville, where he has been holding a 
series of meetings. He is a student of Drake University and on Sundays preaches 
in the surrounding towns near his home. At twenty years of age he closed one of the 
most successful meetings ever held by a student of the university. He is remarkably 
influential with young men and in the meeting his conversions included a large number 
of young men who united with the church. Mr. Cline has a very young appearance, is 
slightly smaller than the average man, frail and a decided blonde. He is a fluent speaker 
and very entertaining in conversation." The following year the Denver Post said: "Rev. 
W. Cline, a boy of twenty-one years, fresh from Drake University, has just closed one 
of the most successful revival meetings at the Christian church at Manzanola, Colorado, 
in the lower Arkansas valley. The series began January 18th and although many of the 
nights were stormy and there was a break of two weeks owing to the illness of the 
pastor, the interest was such that the house was crowded. The great power of this 
youthful minister is not of the kind that characterizes many of the profession. He 
does not appeal to the emotions nor burn brimstone to accomplish results. His manner 
in the pulpit is easy, his delivery is rapid and pleasing, and his logic is clear and con- 
vincing, while his manner is persuasive. That which most impresses his hearers is 
the beauty of the spirit of truth with which he seems so thoroughly imbued and which 
he reflects in his very countenance, in his everyday life and his personal work as well 
as in the pulpit." 

In the East Side Christian church of Denver, on the 3d of June. 1909, Mr. Cline was 
married to Miss Evelyn Hope McKee, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James McKee, the 
former president of the Live Stock Commission Company and prominently connected 
with the Denver stock yards, where he is spoken of in the highest terms. He is a native 
of Canada. Mrs. Cline was graduated from the East Denver high school and engaged 
in teaching. She became acquainted with Mr. Cline at one of the meetings at the East 
Side Christian church. To Mr. and Mrs. Cline have been born two children: John, who 
was born in July, 1911; and James, who was born in 1916 and received a premium as the 
first baby born in leap year. 

Mr. Cline is still a young man, having but passed the thirty-seventh milestone on 
life's journey. He has already, however, accomplished notable good in the world through 
his efforts in the ministry and he stands today among those whose labors are fraught 
with success in the effort to uplift the individual and advance the standards of the com- 
munity. A modern philosopher has said, "Not the good that comes to us. but the good 
that comes to the world through us, is the measure of our success"; and judged by this 
standard William L. Cline has been a most successful man. 



HON. CHARLES E. FRIEXD. 



Hon. Charles E. Friend, who is representing his district in the state legislature of 
Colorado and who is actively engaged in the practice of law in Denver, was born in 
Englewood, Kansas, on the 9th of October, 1886, a son of David M. and Anna (Jacobs) 
Friend. The father is a native of Pennsylvania and has devoted his life to blacksmithing. 
He now makes his home in Wyoming. His wife was born in Illinois and by their mar- 
riage they became the parents of two sons, the brother of Charles E. Friend being Orville 
H. Friend, now a resident of New Mexico. 

Charles E. Friend acquired his early education in the common schools of Oklahoma, 
to which state his parents removed in his early boyhood. He afterward spent a few 
months as a pupil in the schools of Pueblo. Colorado, and then from the third to the 
eighth grade was a pupil in the schools of Colorado Springs. He subsequently attended 
high school there as a member of the class of 1909 and in the same year he entered the 
Colorado College. In 1911 he matriculated in the Denver Law School, in which he pur- 
sued a three years' course, being graduated with the LL. B. degree in the class of 1914. 
He at once entered upon the active practice of his profession. Along with those qualities 
indispensable to the lawyer— a keen, rapid, logical mind plus the business sense and a 
ready capacity for hard work— he brought to the starting point of his legal career cer- 
tain rare gifts — eloquence of language and a strong personality. An excellent presence, 
an earnest, dignified manner, marked strength of character, a thorough grasp of the 
law and the ability to accurately apply its principles are factors in his effectiveness as 



244 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

an advocate. He has always continued in the general practice of law and his clientage 
is now large and gratifying. 

On the 1st of January, 1917. Mr. Friend was married to Miss Florence Bourland, of 
Decatur, Illinois, a daughter of Mrs. Flora Bourland. Mr. Friend has membership in 
Phi Delta Theta. a college fraternity, and in Phi Delta Phi, a legal fraternity. He is 
fond of athletics, in which he has been more or less active. He is also prominent in the 
work of the Methodist Episcopal church and Sunday school, doing everything in his 
power to advance the moral progress of the community. His political allegiance is given 
to the democratic party and he has been chosen to represent Jefferson county in the 
state legislature, of which he is now a member. He is doing important work in this 
connection, serving as chairman of the committee on revision and constitution and 
also as a member of the committees on temperance, fees and salaries, judiciary, roads 
and bridges, and state institutions. He is thus taking active part in much constructive 
legislation and is doing everything to uphold and further the progress and upbuilding of 
the commonwealth. 



ZDENKO von DWORZAK, M. D. 

An eminent American statesman has said, "In all this world, the thing supremely 
worth having is the opportunity coupled with the capacity to do well and worthily a 
piece of work the doing of which shall be of vital significance to mankind." The oppor- 
tunity came to Dr. Zdenko von Dworzak and was utilized by him in such a manner that 
he is today regarded as one of the leading specialists in the treatment of the nose, throat 
and ear in Colorado. He has carried his investigations and research work in the line 
of treatment of middle ear diseases with radium to a point in advance of many others 
and has made valuable contribution to the science of his profession. Dr. von Dworzak 
has been a resident of the United States for only ten years but has become a thorough 
American citizen in spirit and interests. Educated in the leading universities of Europe 
and of America, he has established himself among the leaders of his profession and is 
an authority upon the lines in which he specializes. 

Dr. von Dworzak was born in Olmiitz, Austria, on the 12th of November, 1875, and 
is a son of Dr. W. von Dworzak and F. Jelita von Dworzak, both of whom were of noble 
birth. Ttie father held a government position of the highest rank attainable, being a 
judge of the supreme court of Austria. This position is accorded only after many years 
of valuable public service and is a mark of honor extended only to people of rank. He 
passed away in Austria in 1895, while his wife died in that country in 1913. They were 
the parents of a daughter and a son, the former being Mrs. von Hominska, still living in 
Austria. 

The younger was Dr. Zdenko von Dworzak of this review, who attended the Jesuit 
College of Kalksburg and afterward became a student in the University of Vienna, where 
he pursued his medical course and was graduated in 1903. He was later required to 
visit the various clinics of Europe and did clinical work and attended lectures in the 
hospitals of Munich, Berlin, Heidelberg, Paris and Vienna. He came to America in 
1909 and accepted a position as instructor in Tulane University of New Orleans. Louisiana, 
but on account of his health was obliged to resign and was advised to remove to Denver, 
which he accordingly did. In the interval, covering nine years, he has built up a large 
and growing practice. 

He is a member of the Cactus Club and has won many pleasant social acquaintances, 
while professionally his membership extends to the Denver City and County Medical 
Society, the Colorado State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. 



THOMAS FRANKLIN DALY. 

Thomas Franklin Daly, president of the Capitol Life Insurance Company and also 
president of the Thomas F. Daly Agency Company, both of Denver, is a son of John 
and Margaret Daly and was born in West Superior, Douglas county, Wisconsin, in 
1858. He was educated in the public schools of northern Michigan, the family having 
removed to that state during his early boyhood. He began his active business career 
at the age of twelve years as an employe of the great Calumet & Hecla Copper Company, 
starting in as mill boy. Being of a mechanical turn of mind, he began practical 
study of engineering and during his continued connection with the company afore- 




THOMAS F. DALY 



246 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

mentioned, he advanced steadily, step by step, until he had attained the position of 
constructing engineer. In 1882 he came to Colorado locating in Leadville, where he 
engaged in engineering and many of the mills in that camp were constructed under his 
personal supervision. He later went into the Montana field, subsequently returning 
to Colorado, where he has continued to make his home, having been in the meanwhile 
actively identified with mining and also with other industrial and financial interests 
of the state. In 1886 he entered the field of insurance in which he has since been active 
and in which almost a third of a century's experience has made him familiar with 
every phase, and his thoroughness and enterprise have constituted the basic elements 
of his success. 

Prior to the organization of his own company, Mr. Daly was connected with some 
of the largest and best known insurance companies, including the New York Life; 
and was western manager for the London Guarantee and Accident, also general agent 
for the United States Life, with which he continued his connection for eleven years. 

Mr. Daly located in Denver in 1895, and in 1905 organized the Capitol Life 
Insurance Company, resigning from all other business connections in order that he 
might give his undivided attention to the interests of the new company. Subsequent 
results have fully justified the methods adopted and have substantially confirmed the 
judgment of the founder, for, under the able and experienced guidance of its president, 
the business has steadily expanded until today, the Capitol Life Insurance Company 
operates in eleven states and its books show twenty eight millions of insurance in 
force, and assets of two million seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 

In Leadville, Colorado, in 1887, Mr. Daly was united in marriage with Miss Elthea 
Belle Cooper, whose parents were from Galesburg, Illinois. They removed to Memphis, 
Tennessee, after the close of the Civil war, in which the father had served with dis- 
tinction, as a captain of artillery. To Mr. and Mrs. Daly have been born a son and 
two daughters: Clarence J., associated with his father in the insurance work as vice 
president of the Capitol Life Insurance Company; Imogene, now Mrs. William S. 
Fisher, of Denver; and Nelly J. 

Mr. Daly is well known in social circles, holding membership in the Denver, 
El Paso and Country Clubs while in political adherence, he has always been a stalwart 
advocate of the democratic party and principles. 



HENRY C. LIGHTER. 



Henry C. Lighter, justice of the peace and police magistrate at Fort Collins, was 
born in Morgan county, Illinois. July 12, 1844, a son of Andrew and Nancy J. (Pagett) 
Lighter, who were natives of Kentucky. The father was a farmer by occupation and in 
early life went to Illinois, where he followed agricultural pursuits until about 1846. He 
then removed to Oskaloosa, Iowa, where he took up government land but only lived 
for a year and a half thereafter. His wife survived for some time, passing away in 1865. 

Henry C. Lighter was but a year and a half old when his father died, and when 
he was a little lad of seven years his uncle took him back to Illinois and educated him. 
He was studying medicine when the Civil war broke out and, putting aside his text- 
books and other personal interests, he enlisted at the age of seventeen years, in 1862. 
as a member of Company E, One Hundred and First Illinois Infantry, with which he 
served for about two years, when he became ill and had to return home. While at the 
front he was taken prisoner. After the close of his military experience he returned 
to Iowa and took up the occupation of farming upon rented land, which he cultivated 
for a year. In 1870 he removed to Cass county, Iowa, where he purchased raw land 
which he developed and brought under a high state of cultivation. He operated that 
farm for five years, after which he sold the property and removed to Anita, Iowa, where 
he engaged in the hotel and livery business, occupying one barn there for thirty-two years. 
At length he sold his business there and in 1904 removed to Colorado, establishing his 
home at Fort Collins. For a few years he did not engage in business, enjoying a well 
earned and well merited rest. In 1910, however, he again became active in connection 
with the public interests of the community, being elected justice of the peace, to which 
position he has been reelected at each biennial period since that time. During his incum- 
bency in office he has tried almost two thousand cases, and out of three hundred and 
eighty-five criminal cases all but fifteen were bound over. 

Mr. Lighter was married on the 11th of March, 1869, to Miss Hattie J. Libby and 
to them were born three children: Effie May, Edwin C. and Henrietta. The wife and 
mother passed away March 30, 1914. after a short illness. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 247 

Politically Mr. Lighter has always been a stalwart republican and his religious faith 
is that of the Methodist church. He belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic and thus 
maintains pleasant relations with his old military comrades, with whom he marched 
to the defense of the Union in the Civil war. He owns a pleasant home and a ten-acre 
tract of land at the edge of Fort Collins and is nicely situated in life, his official duties 
making sufficient demand upon his energies so that time does not hang heavy on his 
hands, nor is the burden he is bearing too strenuous for a man of his years, for Mr. 
Lighter has passed the seventy-fourth milestone on life's journey. 



WILLIAM M. BARBER. 



William M. Barber, alert and energetic, constantly actuated by a desire for legiti- 
mate advancement in the business world, is now occupying the important and responsible 
position of superintendent of the sugar factory of the Great Western Sugar Company at 
Windsor, and is splendidly qualified for the duties and responsibilities that devolve upon 
him in this connection. Mr. Barber was born in Belleville, Kansas, in August, 1882, a 
son of Henry T. and Sarah B. (Isham) Barber, who were natives of Ohio and Virginia 
respectively. The father was a carpenter by trade and in early life removed westward 
to Kansas, where he engaged in farming for three years. He then became a resident 
of Oakland, Iowa, where he took up the work of contracting and building, which he 
followed for many years or until 1912. when he retired from active business and became 
a resident of Deer Wood, Minnesota. There he has since resided in the enjoyment of 
a rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves. As the architect of his own for- 
tunes he builded wisely and well. His wife died October 14, 1896. 

William M. Barber was reared and educated in Oakland, Iowa, and in early man- 
hood enlisted for service in the United States army, with which he was connected for 
three years, being stationed during that time in the Philippine islands for two years 
and four months as a member of Company F, Twelfth United States Infantry, being 
discharged as sergant. After his military experience was concluded he entered business 
life as a structural iron worker and was thus employed for a year. He afterward traveled 
over the country for another year and in 1904 he came to Weld county, Colorado, and 
accepted a position in the sugar factory at Eaton, where he remained for four months. 
He then came to Windsor and for a year was employed in the sugar factory in the latter 
place. Later he went to California, where he worked in a sugar refinery, assisting along 
mechanical lines for four months. He was next in the employ of the American Beet 
Sugar Company at Oxnard. California, for two months and on the expiration of that 
period he returned to Windsor, Colorado, where he again entered the employ of the 
Great Western Sugar Company. He was made beet end foreman and held that position 
for two years, after which he was advanced to the position of general foreman and 
so served for three years. He was next promoted to the assistant superintendency of 
the plant at Fort Collins, where he remained for a year and in 1917 was recalled fo 
Windsor to become superintendent of the factory at this place, in which position he has 
since served. His long experience in connection with the sugar industry has made him 
familiar with every branch of the business and he is thus splendidly qualified for the 
work to which he now gives his time and attention — the direction of the operation of 
the Windsor plant. The value of this industry can scarcely be overestimated at this 
time. Years ago Germany, secretly preparing for the war, began concentrating on the 
production of the four kinds of food which are needed to maintain men in a physically 
fit condition — proteids, fats, starches and sugar — and particular attention was given 
to the production of the sugar beet, until now that country produces much more sugar 
than its people can use. America, with no thought or desire to engage in military 
activity, pursued her peaceful way, but today, aroused by the struggle, she is putting 
forth every energy to produce foods that must sustain her armies, her allies and her 
people and thus the value of the sugar beet industry cannot be overestimated. Mr. 
Barber, therefore, is doing a work of great worth in this crisis and long and thorough 
training has well qualified him for the important duties that devolve upon him. 

On the 12th of March. 1907, Mr. Barber was united in marriage to Miss Zelma M. 
Forgy and to them have been born two children: Barbara M.. who was born April 12, 
1908; and William F., whose birth occurred March 15, 1917. The parents are members 
of the Episcopal church and Mr. Barber is also an exemplary representative of the 
Masonic fraternity. His political allegiance is given to the republican party, but while 
he is a stalwart advocate of its principles, he does not seek nor desire office as a reward 



248 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

for party fealty. On the contrary, he gives his time and his energies to his business 
interests and to such duties of citizenship as can be performed without taking office. 
He stands for progress and improvement in all those things which have to do with the 
upbuilding of community and commonwealth and his cooperation can always be counted 
upon to further public progress. 



JOHN WILLIAM SEYBOLD, M.D., D.D.S. 

Dr. John William Seybold, one of the best known dental surgeons of the west, devot- 
ing practically his entire time to dental surgery, occupies a fine suite of rooms in the 
Mack block in Denver, where he has several assistants. Constant study and experience 
have placed him in the front rank of the representatives of the profession, for he has a 
nature that could never be content with mediocrity. 

Dr. Seybold was born in Kearney. Nebraska, February 26, 1882, a son of William 
Leonard and Alice (Garnett) Seybold, the former a native of Ohio, while the latter was 
born in Alabama. They were early pioneers of Nebraska, where the father established 
himself in the cattle business. He continued to reside in that state for many years and 
afterward came to Colorado, where he spent three years. On the expiration of that 
period he returned to Nebraska and is still living at Kearney, where he is now active in 
cattle raising. His wife passed away there in 1895. William L. Seybold has been married 
twice and has become the father of five children, two of whom were born of the first 
marriage and three of the second. They are John W., Oscar. Samuel, Alice and Fred. 

Dr. John W. Seybold attended the public schools of Kearney, Nebraska, and after- 
ward entered the University of Illinois, from which he was graduated with the Bachelor 
of Arts degree. He then took up the study of medicine in that institution and won his 
professional degree as a member of the class of 1903. The same year he came to Denver 
and matriculated in the University of Denver, in which he won the degree of Doctor 
of Dental Surgery in 1908. Since that time he has devoted his entire attention to dental 
surgery, specializing in oral surgery and in gas oxygen anesthesia. He is a progressive 
young professional man whose reputation as an anesthetist already has spread far beyond 
the boundaries of Colorado. He is making very rapid strides in oral surgery and his 
progress will place him at the top before many years go by. His success is due to his 
own personality and stability of purpose and his qualities are such that he will never 
stand still but will keep pushing his business to the limit, ambitious to acquire the 
highest degree of efficiency possible. He belongs to the National Dental Association, the 
State and City Dental Associations, the Interstate Association of Anesthetists and the 
American Association of Anesthetists, and he practices in all of the hospitals in 
Denver. 

On the 4th of May, 1916. Dr. Seybold was married in Littleton, Colorado, to Miss Julia 
E. Fisher, whose father is well known as the deputy county clerk of Fairplay. Colorado. 
Mrs. Seybold has a wide acquaintance in hospital circles, for she is a graduate nurse of 
the Park Avenue Hospital of Denver and she is head assistant of her husband in his 
surgical clinic. 

Fraternally Dr. Seybold is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 
and he is an active and prominent member of the Denver Athletic Club. He enjoys sports 
of all kinds but is not active in secret organizations although a member of a few. He 
finds great pleasure, however, in bowling and in almost everything in the sporting line. 
He is an easy and fluent public speaker and when he expresses an opinion in public it 
is always worth while. His religion finds expression in his generosity and benevolence 
to the poor and needy. His professional colleagues and contemporaries speak of him 
in terms of high regard, while those who meet him socially entertain for him the warmest 
esteem. 



WALTER T. HOLLOWELL. 



Walter T. Hollowell, engaged in the undertaking business at Fort Collins, is num- 
bered among the substantial citizens that Indiana has furnished to Colorado, for his 
birth occurred in Salem of the former state on the 2d of June, 1857, his parents being 
Abraham and Priscilla (Trueblood) Hollowell, who were also natives of the Hoosier 
state. The father followed the occupation of farming in Indiana during the greater part 




DR. JOHN W. SEYBOLD 



250 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

of his life, but during the period of the Civil war he allowed no personal interest or 
consideration to check his patriotic spirit and enlisted as a member of Company E of 
the Fifty-third Indiana Infantry, with which he served throughout the period of hos- 
tilities between the north and the south, participating in a number of important engage- 
ments and also going with Sherman on the celebrated march from Atlanta to the sea. 
He died September 7, 1914, at the age of ninety-two years, his birth having occurred on 
the 5th of January, 1822. He had long survived his wife, who died in February, 1876. 

Walter T. Hollowell was reared and educated in Salem, Indiana, and remained at 
home until he attained his majority. He took up the printer's trade in early life and 
continued to follow that pursuit in different places until 1900. While at Hamburg, Iowa, 
he occupied the position of foreman on the Hamburg News for three years. He after- 
ward went to Dunlap, where he remained for a year and later took up his abode in Red 
Oak, Iowa, where he accepted the position of foreman of the Red Oak Express. Later 
he bought a third interest in the paper, which he subsequently sold to Thomas D. Murphy, 
the big calendar man. Mr. Hollowell remained at Red Oak from 1887 until 1900. He 
was also superintendent of the big calendar plant there and was thus connected with 
important business interests. In 1900 he came to Colorado, making Fort Collins his 
destination. Here he entered into partnership with a brother-in-law in the furniture 
and undertaking business, but eventually they disposed of their stock of furniture and 
Mr. Hollowell concentrated his efforts and attention upon the undertaking business alone. 
He has carried this on independently since and has a leading undertaking establishment 
of his section of the state, being accorded a very liberal patronage, for he is most con- 
scientious and careful in the conduct of his business and puts forth every effort to please 
his patrons. 

On the 11th of March, 1886, Mr. Hollowell was married to Miss Emma W. Krauss and 
to them has been born a son, Max K., who was born November 7, 1888, and who is cashier 
of the Great Western Sugar Company at Bayard, Nebraska. He married Miss Olive V. 
Law and they have two children, Walter and Betty Maxine. 

Mr. Hollowell is filling the position of county coroner, in which capacity he has served 
for four terms. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity and is secretary of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, which position he has filled for ten years. He is also connected 
with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and with the Modern Brotherhood of 
America, the Independent Order of Puritans and the Knights of Pythias. His political 
endorsement is given to the republican party and his religious faith is that of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Sterling traits of character have always been manifest 
throughout his entire career and his life has been actuated by high and honorable prin- 
ciples, making his life history an open book which all may read. 



JOHN AUGUSTIN GALLAHER. 

Among the prominent representatives of the Colorado bar is John Augustin Galla- 
her, attorney at law, who maintains offices at No. 410 Equitable building, in Denver. He 
was born May 29, 1873, in Savannah, Georgia, and is a son of John Gallaher, deceased, 
who was a native of Ireland, emigrating to America in 1848 and settling upon his arrival 
in this country in Savannah, Georgia, where he made his home during the remainder 
of his life. He was a wideawake, practical man of genial disposition and was very 
successful along mercantile lines. During the Civil war he offered his services to his 
new country and served valorously until honorably discharged from the army. He 
passed away at the comparatively early age of forty-eight years, in the year 1886. He 
was married to Beatrice A. McGloine, a native daughter of Georgia, born in Savannah, 
her parents being Mr. and Mrs. James McGloine, natives of Ireland, who made their home 
in Georgia during the early '40s. Mrs. Gallaher passed away at the old home in Savannah 
in 1900 at the age of fifty four years. In her family were four sons and one daughter, 
of whom John A. Gallaher is the second in order of birth. 

He received his education in the public and high schools of Savannah. In October, 
1902, he came to Denver and immediately entered the office of Wolcott, Vaile & Water- 
man, where he became well acquainted with legal methods and practices. He indus- 
triously applied himself to the study of the law while in those offices and in 1908 
entered the University of Denver and was graduated from the commercial department 
of that institution in 1911. On January 2, 1913, he was admitted to practice, acting 
during various periods before this time as a law clerk for the above firm. Since 1913 
he has been associated with Mr. Waterman and has also a large general practice of his 
own, specializing mostly in law as regards taxation. That he is expert in his line is 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 251 

evident from the fact that he has been made a member of the faculty of the University 
of Denver, teaching taxation and income. In a similar capacity he is connected with the 
School of Commerce, Accounts & Finance of Denver University and his course on taxa- 
tion is as follows: "A detailed discussion of taxes in general, the constitutional and 
statutory provisions applicable thereto, the rules of construction of income tax laws, 
the various questions which arise in the practical determination of what constitutes 
taxable income, and concerning the persons and corporations subject to the tax, also the 
matter of exemption and exceptions, deductions and allowances, the depreciation of 
property and equipment, the amortization of bonds, the time, form and manner of making 
income tax returns, collections 'at the source,' and the refunding and recovery of taxes 
illegally exacted. 

"A complete and systematic explanation of the inheritance tax law of Colorado 
and of the tax on estates of decedents under the federal revenue law; the operation 
of these laws as applied to estates of decedents, to executors and administrators of 
estates and to the individual; the transfer of stocks, bonds and other securities under 
the Colorado law and under the federal law. A thorough discussion of the federal tax 
revenue law. including the excess profits tax, the capital stock tax, stamp taxes, etc. 

"The aim of this course is to familiarize the student with the principles of the 
income tax law and the provisions of the federal revenue law as applied to business and 
to the individual, and by means of problems to show the practical working and applica- 
tion of all laws relating to taxation." 

On June 14, 1899, in Savannah, Georgia, Mr. Gallaher was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Marjorie Dooner, a native of Savannah and a daughter of William H. and Rosa 
A. (Gay) Dooner, the former deceased but the latter now a resident of Denver, having 
reached the age of eighty-two years. There were two children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Gallaher: Marjorie, whose birth occurred June 9, 1904; and Horace Augustin, who died 
when two years of age. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Gallaher are prominent socially in their adopted city and take 
part in many movements undertaken for the public good. They are interested in all 
that will contribute to material, moral and intellectual progress and they have made 
many friends among the intellectually select. Mr. Gallaher maintains political inde- 
pendence, giving his support to matters and candidates he considers of the greatest 
value to the greatest number. He is in no way a partisan and is ever ready to 
sustain all progressive measures which in his judgment will result to the best ad- 
vantage of his city and state. His religious faith is that of the Roman Catholic church 
and he belongs to the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Fraternally he is a 
Knight of Columbus, belonging to the Denver Council, and has taken the fourth degree 
in this order. He is now master of this degree in the jurisdiction of the states of Colo- 
rado and Wyoming. He belongs to the college fraternity Alpha Kappa in the University 
of Denver and also belongs to the Sons of Confederate Veterans, being a member of the 
finance committee of the national organization. He also served as a member of the 
health and recreation committee of the State Council of Defense and is always to be 
found among those patriotic Americans who are ready to support their country with 
deeds rather than with words. Professionally he is a member of the Denver Bar As- 
sociation. There is especial credit due Mr. Gallaher for the position which he has 
attained in life and the place which he has made for himself among the legal profession 
in Denver, as he came to this city an absolute stranger without means, having fought 
through to success by his own efforts. 



BENJAMIN H. FLORANCE. 



The maintenance of law and order in Greeley rests well in the hands of Benjamin 
H. Florance, chief of police and a man tried and found not wanting in his position. He 
was born in Parkersburg, West Virginia, August 27, 1866, a son of Loren and Elizabeth 
(Snyder) Florance, natives of that state. The father followed agricultural pursuits and 
business connected therewith, being a successful farmer and stockman in his native 
state, where he was so engaged during all of his life. With the exception of the first 
six months he served throughout the Civil war with the Fourteenth West Virginia 
Infantry. He died in February, 1910. rounding out a successful and resultant career, his 
wife having passed away many years before, in August, 1886. 

Benjamin H. Florance was reared and educated in Parkersburg. and upon com- 
pleting his lessons assisted his father in the farm work, so continuing until April, 1886, 
when he came to Colorado in order to profit by the greater opportunities of the new 



252 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

west. He spent two months in Denver sizing up the situation and deciding upon a 
locality and in June, 1886, came to Greeley, hiring out as a farm hand. Diligence and 
frugal habits provided him with the means to engage in farming on his own account 
and he continued thus for two years. At the end of that period he became connected 
with the firm of Randolph & Jacobs, who conducted a butchering and ice business. 
Later on he was placed in charge of the slaughter house, continuing with this firm for 
eight years, giving thereby evidence of his industry, trustworthiness and executive 
ability. Subsequently he engaged in the butchering business independently, locating in 
Windsor, Colorado, and there he conducted a shop for about six years with gratifying 
results, continuing in business until 1904. In the fall of that year he was elected sheriff 
of the county and so well did he perform his duties that he was reelected and served 
until January 10, 1911. Mr. Florance owned farming interests during all this time and 
after relinquishing his official position gave his entire attention to the cultivation and 
improvement of his farms, so continuing until May, 1917, when he accepted the position 
of chief of police of Greeley. His long and varied experience as sheriff well qualifies 
him for the office he now occupies and as head of the police department he has done 
much toward improving conditions in Greeley, holding down the criminal element by 
vigorously prosecuting undesirables. He has instituted modern methods in the depart- 
ment and is doing everything in his power to render to the public that safety which is 
essential to sound living and sound business. 

On the 31st of December, 1891. Chief Florance married Miss Bertha Frazier, a daugh- 
ter of Sylvester J. and Eugenia Frazier, extended mention of whom is made in connec- 
tion with the sketch of H. L. Frazier. Mr. and Mrs. Florance have three children: Belva 
L.. who married Elijah Bromley and they reside in Greeley; and Gladys and Effie, 
at home. 

Mr. Florance has always taken a laudable interest in public affairs and while a 
resident of Windsor, Colorado, served as alderman of the town, successfully promoting 
progressive measures. He also held a commission as deputy sheriff under Sheriff Mc- 
Affee. The interests aforementioned, however, do not cover all his activities, for he 
conducted the Florance & Herdman Electric Company in Greeley for two years and 
also was one of the original B-I promoters of the Lost Park & Antero reservoir. Thus 
it may be said that he has been connected with mercantile and agricultural pursuits, 
with electric and water projects, and has been successful in the direction of these 
various enterprises, also being a faithful and efficient public officer. Politically Mr. 
Florance is a republican and a stalwart champion of his party. His eldest daughter 
belongs to the Christian church, but Mrs. Florance and the other members of the family 
are of the Congregational denomination. Fraternally Mr. Florance stands high as a 
Mason, having attained the Knight Templar degree, and he also belongs to the Knights 
of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Woodmen of the World. 
In public and business circles he is well known and popular and both he and his wife 
occupy an enviable position in the social set of their community. 



HUBERT LINCOLN SHATTUCK. 

Hubert Lincoln Shattuck, attorney at law and former judge of the second judicial 
district of Colorado and well known as a leader in republican circles, was born in Phillips- 
burg, New Jersey, August 20, 1865. His father, Joseph C. Shattuck, is a native of New 
Hampshire and was a teacher by profession, in which field of activity he won prominence. 
He became the first state superintendent of public instruction in Colorado, having re- 
moved to this state in 1870 with the Union colony. He settled at Greeley and through the 
intervening years has had an important part in shaping public interests of the common- 
wealth. In 1874 he served as a member of the Colorado legislature and was influential in 
formulating the school laws and land laws of the state. He is now living retired at Uni- 
versity Park at the age of eighty-three years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Harriet Mason Knight, was a native of New Hampshire and died in January, 1910. 

Hubert L. Shattuck was a pupil in the public and high schools of Greeley, having 
been a little lad of but five summers at the time of the removal of the family to Colorado. 
He afterward attended the University of Denver, in which he completed a course of study 
in 1889 with the Bachelor of Science degree. He next entered the Denver Law School 
and won his LL. B. degree as a member of the class of 1893. During his college days he 
became a member of Beta Theta Pi. Admitted to the Denver bar in the year of his gradu- 
ation, he practiced alone for a time and then joined Halsted L. Bitter in the firm of Harris, 
Ritter & Shattuck. A later change in the partnership relation led to the adoption of the 




HI/BERT L. SHATTUl'K 



25i HISTORY OF COLORADO 

firm style of Ritter & Shattuck, the partners concentrating their efforts and attention upon 
general law practice. Mr. Shattuck was made clerk of the county court on the 15th of 
February, 1898, and so served until May 1, 1901. He has done important work along 
political lines as secretary of the republican central committee of his county in the year 
1906 and for many years as committeeman in his precinct. He has labored untiringly to 
advance republican successes because of a firm belief in the party principles and in 1906 
he was elected district judge of the second judicial district, taking his place upon the 
bench in 1907 and so serving for a term of six years. He then resumed the practice of 
law, entering into partnership with Greeley W. Whitford, under the style of Whitford & 
Shattuck, an association that was maintained for two years, at the end of which time 
the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Shattuck has since practiced alone. 

In January, 1900, Mr. Shattuck was united in marriage to Miss Katharine Porter, a 
daughter of Robert Porter, a California pioneer of 1853. Mrs. Shattuck was born in Hydes- 
ville, California, in January, 1869, and by her marriage has become the mother of five 
children: Edith Virginia, who is a student in the South Denver high school, belonging to 
the class of 1919; Robert C, born June 7, 1904, now in the South Denver high school 
with the class of 1922; and Katharine Porter, Frances Elizabeth, and Margaret Ritnor. 
The younger children are also in school. 

Mr. Shattuck is well known in Masonic circles, belonging to Temple Lodge, No. 84, 
A. F. & A. M.; Colorado Chapter, No. 29, R. A. M., of which he is past high priest; and 
Colorado Commandery, No. 1, K. T. He is past master of his lodge and he is identified 
with the drill corps of the Knight Templar commandery, which took the three thousand 
dollar prize at Louisville, Kentucky, in August, 1901, competing against crack companies 
throughout the United States. Mr. Shattuck is also a very active and prominent member 
of the University Park Methodist Episcopal church. He was formerly identified with 
Trinity church and for two years was Sunday school superintendent. He has also served 
on the official board of the church and has long had a class of boys in the Sunday school. 
He does everything in his power to promote moral progress and to establish in the minds 
of the young standards that will mold character throughout life. His father was a dis- 
tinguished pioneer and legislator of the state and through all the years down to the 
present time the name of Shattuck has figured conspicuously and honorably upon the 
pages of Denver's history, Hubert Lincoln Shattuck being today widely recognized as an 
able lawyer and as a progressive citizen, who throughout his entire life has measured up 
to the highest standards of manhood. 



LEO G. MANN. 



The legal fraternity of Greeley has in Leo G. Mann a representative who is not 
only successful as a lawyer but who always maintains the highest ethics and standards 
of the profession. His achievements have come to him not only because of his legal 
ability but because he takes a direct personal interest in every case in his hands and 
he has therefore gained the confidence of the general public, his reputation being built 
upon the fact that he has never slighted or betrayed a trust. 

Mr. Mann was born in eastern Kansas, September 26, 1881, a son of Charles E. and 
Margaret M. (Shedden) Mann, natives of Illinois. Both parents are proud of the fact 
that they are descendants of Union soldiers who participated in the Civil war. More- 
over, the two grandfathers and seven uncles of our subject were soldiers in that conflict. 
The father was a farmer and followed that occupation in Kansas and Illinois, but in 
1900 came to Boulder county, Colorado, where he purchased land, to the operation and 
improvement of which he gave his untiring efforts until 1913, when he retired in the 
enjoyment of a well earned and justly deserved competence. Both he and his wife now 
make their home in the city of Boulder. 

Leo G. Mann received his early education in Kansas and began his business career 
in Illinois. He was paying teller for the Appleton Manufacturing Company, a large 
industrial enterprise of Batavia, Illinois, and remained with that concern for six months, 
coming after this period to Colorado with his parents. In 1904 he entered the preparatory 
school in Boulder and applied himself to his course with such diligence and industry 
that within one year he received twelve out of the necessary fourteen points in order 
to enter the law school. In 1905 he therefore matriculated in the State University at 
Boulder and was graduated with the class of 1908, standing second highest in credits. 
In order to pay his expenses while attending law school he kept books and thus provided 
for his professional education entirely by his own efforts. He then began active practice 
in Ault, Weld county, and for six months served as town attorney. At the end of that 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 255 

period he entered into partnership with Judge John C. Nixon in Greeley, although 
he continued to maintain an office in Ault. This partnership remained in force until 
April 1, 1911, when the firm dissolved and Mr. Mann took his brother, Herbert E., into 
the office, the firm of Mann & Mann being then established. They enjoy a large and 
lucrative practice and have been entrusted with much important litigation, civil and 
corporation suits, and have won many notable cases before judges and juries. The office 
of the firm is at Nos. 219-20 Park Place building. Besides his legal practice Mr. Mann 
has extensive farming interests in Weld county and in managing these properties along 
modern lines is contributing toward the agricultural progress of his district. 

On June 28, 1909, Mr. Mann was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Lind, a daughter 
of Frank and Amanda Lind, the father a native of Sweden and the mother born in 
Omaha. Mr. and Mrs. Mann have two children: Lucille, whose birth occurred De- 
cember 13, 1910; and Dorothy, born November 9, 1912. 

Politically Mr. Mann is a republican and his religious faith is that of the Methodist 
church, in which organization he takes an active and helpful interest, being deeply con- 
cerned in the spread of religious and moral principles. He is assistant superintendent 
of the Sunday school and gives much of his time and thought to that organization. Mr. 
Mann takes a decided view in regard to the liquor question and was one of the important 
factors in eliminating the saloons in Boulder. He is secretary of the Plains Loan Realty 
& Investment Company, an organization devoted to buying tax titles, and of which his 
brother serves as vice president. In 1907 he was second county chairman of the pro- 
gressive party in Weld county and was also the first secretary of the organization. For 
four years he served as secretary of the Greeley Retail Credit Association, but gave up 
his position on account of political divergencies. Fraternally he is a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America and professionally he belongs to the Weld County Bar 
Association, in the organization of which he assisted. It is evident that Mr. Mann takes 
a very helpful part in promoting all measures undertaken for the public welfare and 
that every enterprise devoted to moral uplift finds in him a worthy champion. Well 
versed in the learning of his profession and thoroughly conversant with human nature, 
gifted with sagacity and tact, he is very successful before judge and jury and his high 
reputation as a lawyer is therefore justly earned. Mr. and Mrs. Mann reside at No. 1324 
Fifteenth avenue, Greeley, their hospitable fireside being a frequent meeting-place for 
their many friends. 



HARRY H. POST. 



Harry H. Post, a leading wholesale paper and wooden ware dealer of Denver and 
owner of the Reo Hotel, is regarded as one of the most popular and socially prominent 
of Denver's young business men. In a word, he is not so absorbed in business but what 
he can find time for the social amenities of life, nor is he so wrapped up in the latter that 
he weakens his powers as a forceful factor in the business world. He has that power 
of concentration which enables one to successfully do the thing at hand and then turn 
with equal capability to the next duty or interest. 

Mr. Post is a native of Republic county, Kansas. He was born September 2, 1872, a 
son of Moses J. and Mary E. Post, who were natives of Iowa and removed to Kansas, 
making the trip with oxen and a prairie schooner. The father engaged in farming in 
the latter state for some time and afterward turned his attention to the hotel business, 
which he carried on at Belleville, Kansas, for a number of years. He then disposed of 
his interests there and removed with his family to Denver in 1889. Here he established 
a wholesale and retail tobacco business, which he later sold and turned his attention to 
the merchandise brokerage business, handling all kinds of merchandise for the retail 
trade. He entered this business with his son, Harry H., and the partnership still con- 
tinues. Under their wise direction the business has grown from a small undertaking 
to one of the leading enterprises of the kind in the west. Later, in connection with 
his son, Mr. Post erected the Reo Hotel, one of the modern and leading hotels of Denver, 
at Thirteenth and Broadway. The upper floors are devoted to hotel purposes and con- 
tain seventy-five rooms with all modern conveniences, including telephone in each room, 
private bath and everything to promote the comfort of guests. The office and rest-rooms 
occupy a part of the first floor, while the other section of the ground floor along Broad- 
way and on the Thirteenth street side is used for stores, which always command a good 
rental and have never been idle since the building was erected in 1907. Mrs. Post is also 
living and spends much of her time in Los Angeles, California, for there Mr. Post, the 



256 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

father, is now practically living retired. Their children are George M., Harry H., Alonzo 
and Sadie. The three sons are in Denver end the daughter in Los Angeles. California. 

Harry H. Post attended school in Kansas and in Denver and after his textbooks 
were put aside became an employe of the firm of Craffey & Crowell. merchandise brokers. 
He occupied the position of city salesman and continued in that employ successfully for 
five years, when, in connection with his father, he organized the Harry H. Post Company 
for the conduct of a wholesale paper and wooden ware business in 1893. The firm con- 
sists of the father and brothers and the business has been developed to extensive and 
gratifying proportions. In addition to his connection with this and with the hotel, Harry 
H. Post is a director of the Hamilton National Bank. He is regarded as one of the repre- 
sentative financiers and business men of the city whose resourcefulness and forcefulness 
enable him to carry forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. 

On the 1st of January. 1900, Mr. Post was married to Miss Lydia C. Hamburger, a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Hamburger, who were pioneer citizens of Colorado. By 
a former marriage Mr. Post has a son. Ralph S., who was born in Denver in 1896 and 
is now a member of the United States Marines. A daughter born of the second marriage, 
Miss Harriette Post, whose birth occurred in Denver in 1900. is now a pupil in Miss 
Wolcott's School for Girls. Mr. Post's first wife was Miss Mayme Stover, whom he 
wedded in 1893 and who passed away in 1896. 

In his political views Mr. Post has always maintained a somewhat independent 
course although inclined toward the republican party. He belongs to the Motor Club 
and to the Optimists Club and is a member of the Civic and Commercial Association of 
Denver, which indicates his interest in the welfare and progress of the city and its 
development along the substantial lines which lead to public improvement and ad- 
vancement. 



AARON DENNISON LEWIS. 

Aaron Dennison Lewis is the president and manager of The A. T. Lewis & Son Dry 
Goods Company, one of the largest department stores of Denver. His life record is 
indicative of what may be accomplished through individual effort prompted by laud- 
able ambition. Progressive, self-reliant, and tempering progressiveness with a safe con- 
servatism, he has advanced steadily, and the steps of his orderly progression have 
brought him into the most important commercial relations. He has never hesitated to 
venture where favoring opportunity has led the way, and today is the head of an estab- 
lishment which employs nearly a thousand men and women. 

Mr. Lewis is a native of Roseville. Warren county, Illinois. He was born on Novem- 
ber 22, 1865, a son of Aaron Thompson and Amy Josephine (Russell) Lewis. The father. 
a native of New Brunswick, New Jersey, was born on March 19, 1831. and devoted his 
earlier life to farming and banking. He ranked for many years with the representative 
business men of Denver, and died at Greenwich, Connecticut, on January 20. 1907. The 
mother was born at Clymer, New York, from which place her family came overland to 
Illinois. There she married Mr. Lewis, and they made their home on a farm in Warren 
county near Roseville. Mrs. Lewis died in Denver on September 5, 1909. The year 1880 
witnessed the arrival of the family in Colorado. 

The son, Aaron Dennison Lewis, whose name introduces this review, opened a small 
country store at Breckenridge, Colorado, in 1888. and prospered in business there. He 
was ambitious, however, to secure a broader field, and realizing the town in which he 
was located could not support a store of more extensive proportions, he turned his atten- 
tion to Denver, and in 1890 with the money acquired through the sale of his Breckenridge 
store, he embarked in business with his father, who had decided to invest an equal 
amount in the new enterprise, although he had had no previous experience in store- 
keeping. Another partner was taken in, and the three organized the firm of Lewis, Son 
& Barrow, the management, development, and conduct of the business falling on the 
youthful shoulders of Aaron Dennison Lewis. The third partner shortly after relin- 
quished his interest, and the firm name was changed to A. T. Lewis & Son. and in 1902 
was incorporated as The A. T. Lewis & Son Dry Goods Company. The business has since 
its inception steadily increased, until today it is one of the largest and most important 
in the west. Recent improvements and extensive additions make it one of the most 
beautiful and perfectly equipped stores in the country. The relation of Mr. Lewis to 
his employes and to the public throughout his entire career has been based on his high 
conception of right and fair dealing. 

On the 8th of February. 1898. Mr. Lewis was married to Miss Luella Brand, a daughter 




AARON DENNISON LEWIS 



258 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

of George and Caroline Brand. They have two children : Flora Luella, the wife of Dudley 
Mayo, Jr., of Denver; and George Dennison, born in Denver, February 13, 1902, a student 
in Culver Military Academy. 

In matters of citizenship Mr. Lewis indicates the ancestry from which he sprung. 
He is the direct descendant of Edward Doty, who came to the New World on the May- 
flower in 1620 and whose name is inscribed on the Plymouth monument. In the paternal 
line the ancestry is traced back to Samuel Lewis, who came from Wales in 1732 and 
settled in New Jersey, and on the ancestral record appear the names of those who served 
in the American Revolution. Mr. Lewis stands for all that is progressive and valuable 
in citizenship, and is particularly active in the support of his country in this hour of 
national crisis. He is a member of the Denver Club, the Denver Athletic Club, the Denver 
Country Club, the Denver Civic and Commercial Association and the Retail Merchants 
Association. His religious faith is that of the Congregational church. He was active in 
the organization and served as the first president of the Denver Tourist Bureau, which 
organization has been most successful in bringing thousands of people to Colorado. 



R. LEE CRAFT. 



R. Lee Craft, special agent at Pueblo for the United States Bureau of Investigation, 
was born in Jamestown, Pennsylvania, on the 9th of September, 1888, a son of Kline W. 
and Estelle (Warren) Craft. The family came to Colorado in 1887, and the father 
engaged in the real estate business for many years, continuing active in that line until 
his death in 1901. 

Brought to Colorado during his early infancy, R. Lee Craft pursued a public school 
education in Pueblo, passing through consecutive grades to the high school, and when 
his textbooks were put aside he made his initial step in the business world. He was 
employed in various positions in Pueblo and afterward took up the study of law under 
the direction of W. S. Palmer and Lyman Henry, with whom he studied for several 
years, but he never took the bar examination. In 1914 he became identified with his 
present branch of government service as a local officer and has been twice promoted, 
being now special agent for the southern and western part of Colorado for the Bureau 
of Investigation, with headquarters in Pueblo. He has done important work in this con- 
nection, and his devotion to his duties is questioned by none. 

Mr. Craft was marrried in 1907 to Miss Edith M. Plumlee, of Kansas, and to them 
have been born three children, Mildred Lucile, Orville D. and Roger Lee. The religious 
faith of the family is that of the Methodist church. Mr. Craft has practically spent his 
entire life in Pueblo and has therefore witnessed much of its growth and development. 
He has ever been actuated by marked devotion to high American principles and standards 
of citizenship, and as an officer he has made an excellent record, doing especially valuable 
work at the present time. 



FRANK E. HICKEY. 



Frank E. Hickey, a member of the Denver bar, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
July 23, 1892. His great-grandfather, who was of Scotch birth, came to America while 
this country was still numbered among the colonial possessions of Great Britain, and 
after the Revolutionary war he removed to Canada. His son, Sephreness Hickey, how- 
ever, again crossed the border and took up his abode in Wisconsin, where he cast in 
his lot among the pioneer settlers. He was a well known lumberman of that early period. 
His son, Frank L. Hickey, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, at the same place where 
the birth of Frank E. Hickey of this review occurred. The father followed accounting 
and merchandising in Milwaukee for many years but ultimately became a resident of 
Denver in 1904 and is still engaged in business here as an accountant. He married 
Eva Wickens. a native of Montreal. Quebec, Canada, and of English descent. Her father 
was born on the Isle of Wight and became a resident of Canada about 1858, spending 
his remaining days there. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Hickey was cele- 
brated in Montreal, Canada, and they became the parents of two children, the younger 
being James C. Hickey, who is cashier of the United Fruit Dispatch Company of Denver. 

Frank E. Hickey, the elder, attended the public schools of Milwaukee and afterward 
continued his education in the schools of Denver. Subsequently he entered the Uni- 
versity of Denver for the study of law and was graduated with the LL. B. degree in 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 259 

June, 1914, while in September of the same year he was admitted to the bar. During 
his college days he was employed in the law office of Everett Owens and afterward in 
the office of Charles Sackmann and through his earnings was enabled to pay his way 
in the university. His plans to procure his education indicated the elemental strength 
of his character and the same persistency of purpose has characterized him since starting 
out upon the active work of the profession. Immediately after his admission to the bar 
he took up general practice, becoming a member of the firm of Irwin, Irwin & Hickey. 
This firm is accorded a liberal clientage that has connected its members with much 
of the important litigation tried in the courts of the district. Mr. Hickey is resourceful 
in presenting his cause, is strong in argument, clear in his deductions and sound in 
his reasoning. 

On the 26th of May, 1917, in Denver, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Hickey 
and Miss Edna Hawkins, a native of Indiana and a daughter of Joseph Hawkins, now 
deceased. In politics Mr. Hickey has always been a stalwart republican since attaining 
the right of franchise. Fraternally he is connected with the Independent Order of For- 
esters and the Court of Honor and his religious faith is evidenced in his membership in 
St. Paul's Episcopal church. Those who know him, and he has a wide acquaintance in 
Denver, where he has resided since his boyhood days, esteem him highly as a man of 
sterling worth and one whose advancement along professional lines is assured because 
he possesses the requisite qualities of the able lawyer — comprehensive knowledge of the 
principles of jurisprudence and ability to accurately apply these principles. 



WILLIAM H. GILL. 



Mercantile interests ever reflect the progressive spirit of a community, in fact, they 
largely make up this progressive spirit, for the growth and advancement of a city is 
due to a large extent to the modern ideas employed in its commercial establishments. 
Among the modern day merchants of Greeley, Colorado, is William H. Gill, secretary 
and manager of the Park Merchandise Company, a reliable, conservative and thoroughly 
up-to-date institution, enjoying an extensive trade, covering a large part of Weld county. 
To the success of the enterprise Mr. Gill has largely contributed and its continued 
growth and expansion must be ascribed to his indefatigable spirit, his new ideas, his 
executive ability and that foremost principle of every successful merchant to always 
please his patrons. 

Mr. Gill was born in Jefferson county. New York, May 18, 1860, a son of William 
H. and Almira H. (Otis) Gill, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of New 
York. The Gill family is an old and prominent one in the east, tracing their ancestry 
in America back to the year 1636. When yet a boy the father accompanied his parents 
from Vermont to New York and there he subsequently became a successful farmer and 
stockman, following that occupation in that state throughout his life. He and his brothers 
were noted throughout New York state as importers and raisers of thoroughbred Durham 
cattle, enjoying a very large business in this particular line. The father died in 1869, 
when comparatively young, and was survived by his widow for thirty-eight years, her 
death occurring in 1906. 

William H. Gill was reared in New York, completing his education in that state. 
Taking fate in his own hands, he then set out to make a living, making his way west- 
ward to Illinois, where he learned the butter and cheese business. The lure of the great 
west, however, was upon him and in 1879 he came to Colorado, locating in Greeley, Weld 
county, being employed by his brother-in-law, Bruce Johnson, who was engaged in the 
milling business. Mr. Gill continued as secretary and office man for Mr. Johnson for 
eight years and at the end of that time, in 1887, engaged in the mercantile business, 
becoming thoroughly familiar with this line. In 1892, in partnership with Bruce John- 
son, he established the Park Merchandise Company, which he has directed ever since. 
Thorough experience, noted executive ability, pleasant and affable ways and a thorough 
understanding of merchandise have been the salient factors in his success. The business 
policy which he has instituted is well tried and has made his firm one of the most reliable 
in his part of the state. Full value for money received and obliging treatment of cus- 
tomers are the watchwords of the house. Moreover, Mr. Gill has other interests, being 
senior member of the firm of Gill & Decker, which is engaged largely in ranching and 
stock feeding. He is also president of the Gill & Decker Improvement Company, which 
was formed to lay out a new townsite at Gill, Colorado, the name being given to the 
place in honor of our subject. Through this proposition Mr. Gill is not only furthering 
his own interests but is contributing toward the development of his community, creating 



260 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

a new residential section which will prove of lasting value to his city. In their stock 
farm Gill & Decker operate eleven hundred acres and in that connection they have at- 
tained a position among the leading stockmen of the state. The Park Merchandise Com- 
pany may be said to be not only "a" store of Greeley but "the" store, for it is the largest 
mercantile establishment north of Denver, and their patronage is not only drawn from 
the city but from a wide territory, extending far over Weld county. They carry well 
selected lines of goods, renowned for quality and reliability, and the firm name stands 
practically as a guarantee for the merchandise which they handle. 

In October, 1885, Mr. Gill was united in marriage to Miss Clara B. McQuiston, a 
daughter of John and Mary (White) McQuiston, the former born in Pennsylvania and 
the latter in Illinois. The father came to Colorado in 1867, becoming one of the pioneer 
farmers of his section, where he passed most of his life, his labors being ended in death 
in 1903. Mrs. McQuiston is still living. To Mr. and Mrs. Gill were horn three children, 
Gladys, Bruce and Alice, all of whom passed away when quite young. 

The interests mentioned, however, do not exhaust the activities of Mr. Gill, for he 
is also prominently connected with ditch and irrigation projects and in that way has 
greatly contributed to the agricultural upbuilding of his section. To get a conception 
of the importance of his activities along this line it may be mentioned that he and 
Mr. Decker are the largest water right owners in Colorado. Mr. Gill is president of the 
Cache La Poudre Reservoir Company and holds the office of vice president in relation 
to the New Cache La Poudre Company. His political belief is that of the republican 
party, but while he is much interested in all matters which affect the nation, state and 
his community, he is not an active politician, his many interests forbidding political 
activity. However, he is ever ready to lend a helping hand in promoting projects of a 
public nature and in connection with water right companies has done much toward 
promoting general prosperity. His religious faith is that of the Congregational church 
and both he and his wife take a helpful part in the work of the church. They reside 
at No. 1029 Eighth avenue. Greeley, and the hospitality of their home is renowned among 
their many friends. Fraternally Mr. Gill is a very prominent Mason, having attained 
the thirty second degree in this organization, and for thirty-three years he has been a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the honorable and helpful principles 
underlying these organizations guiding him in his conduct toward his fellowmen. 



MILTON SMITH. 



Milton Smith, a very successful and prominent attorney and business man of Denver, 
his practice at the bar placing him in the foremost ranks of the legal profession, while 
his business insight and sagacity have been manifest in his judicious investments in some 
of the most important corporate interests of the state, was born in Flatbrookville, Sussex 
county, New Jersey, on the 31st of January, 1866, a son of Samuel D. and Hannah A. 
(Bevens) Smith. The father was a native of Sussex county, New Jersey, and devoted his 
life to merchandising but has now passed away. The mother, also a native of that 
county, is now living with her daughter, Anna, who is the wife of William T. Pierson, 
of Newark, Wayne county, New York. 

There were but two children in the family, the son being Milton Smith, whose name 
introduces this review. He was educated in the district schools of Sussex county and in 
an academy of Ulster county, New York, after which he won a competitive scholarship 
for Cornell University, from which he was graduated with the class of June, 1887, win- 
ning the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. While at Cornell he became a member of 
the Chi Psi fraternity and he is also an honorary member of Phi Delta Phi, a law fra- 
ternity. Mr. Smith studied law in Ithaca, New York, and was admitted to the state bar 
in Binghamton in November, 1889. He went to Texas but was not pleased with that 
state and shortly afterward removed to Denver, where he arrived in 1889. For a time 
he was in law offices of others and in January, 1892, he entered into partnership with 
James H. Brown, a connection that was maintained for two years. On the expiration of 
that period he formed a law partnership under the firm style of O'Donnell, Decker & Smith, 
which was maintained from 1894 until 1897, when Mr. Decker withdrew and the firm 
style of O'Donnell & Smith was adopted. From January, 1902, until January 1, 1907, Mr. 
Smith practiced alone and then admitted Charles R. Brock to a partnership under the 
firm style of Smith & Brock. In 1913 they were joined by a third partner under the 
firm name of Smith, Brock & Ferguson, and this connection has since been maintained. 
They occupy a large suite of rooms in the Wight building at No. 1433 Champa street. 
This firm is one of the most prominent in Colorado, representing many large corpora- 




MILTON SMITH 



262 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

tions and companies, such as the Aetna Life Insurance Company, the Maryland Casualty 
Company and many others. Mr. Smith is likewise general counsel for the Rocky Moun- 
tain States Telephone & Telegraph Company of Colorado, also the Continental Oil Com- 
pany and is general solicitor for the receivers of the Salt Lake Railroad Company. He 
was the organizer of the Farmers' Reservoir & Irrigation Company, which owns much 
land, embracing miles of irrigation ditches and several lakes, including Stanley Lake 
and Milton Lake, the latter named in his honor. 

In 1893 Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Susan Jones and to them were 
born two children: Isabelle, twenty-one years of age, now a college student; and Milton, 
nineteen years of age, a student at Cornell. For his second wife Mr. Smith chose Miss 
Aimee Neresheimer. 

The only office that Mr. Smith has held is that of county attorney for two years and 
yet there is no man who has exercised a more potent influence over the politics of the 
state than he. From early manhood he has been active in democratic circles and he has 
done much to shape the policy of the democratic party in Colorado, serving for many 
years as chairman of the state central committee. In this connection a contemporary 
biographer has written: "With him, politics was a diversion — a game to be played hard 
for the several months each two years when he undertook control of his party's interests, 
but it could never be said of him that his devotion to politics interfered with progress in 
his profession. The law was always Mr. Smith's first concern and even in the hottest part 
of a political campaign he was ever the hard student, jealously guarding the interests of 
his clients as well as the political fortunes of his party's candidates. During a political 
campaign, Mr. Smith averaged eighteen hours' work a day. In those months he would 
keep a force of half a dozen stenographers from early morning till midnight. Rising 
before six o'clock, he would be at his office before break of dawn and have much of his 
private business cleared away before he appeared among the first at democratic state 
headquarters." At the end of twelve years as chairman of the state central committee 
Mr. Smith retired from his position as chairman but his advice and counsel have been 
continuously sought by his successors. He is a prominent figure in club and fraternal 
circles, holding membership in the University, Denver Country, Lakewood Country, Den- 
ver Athletic, Democratic and Denver Motor Clubs, all of Denver, and the Rocky Mountain 
Club of New York city. He is also a prominent Mason, having membership in the lodge, 
chapter and commandery at Palmyra, New York, and in El Jebel Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine in Denver. He is also connected with the Knights of Pythias and for recreation 
he turns to golf. He is a man of commanding appearance but of most gracious and 
affable manner, his personal popularity constituting an even balance to his professional 
and business prominence. 



ALBERT R. WEINHOLD. 



Energetic and possessed of the perseverance, determination and sagacity which are 
indispensable elements in the attainment of success along commercial lines, Albert R. 
Weinhold of Evans is conducting a good business as a dealer in flour, feed and coal. He 
was born in Wilson, Kansas, June 7, 1882, and is a son of Samuel and Catherine (Grill) 
Weinhold. the former a native of Pennsylvania, while the latter was born in Ohio. The 
father is a farmer by occupation and when a boy removed to Illinois, after which he took 
up agricultural pursuits and at a later period he became a resident of Wilson, Kan- 
sas. He purchased land there about 1871 and bent his energies to the cultivation and 
improvement of his farm, which he has since operated. He has developed the place 
along progressive lines and now has an excellent property. His wife died in October, 1916. 

Albert R. Weinhold spent his youthful days in the usual manner of the farmbred 
boy who divides his time between the work of the fields, the pleasures of the play- 
ground and the duties of the schoolroom. He pursued his education in the district 
schools of Wilson, Kansas, until he had mastered the elementary branches of learning 
and later he became a student in the Midland College at Atchison, Kansas. When his 
student days were over he returned to the home farm, upon which he lived for two 
years, and in 1904 he removed westward to La Salle. Weld county. Colorado, and later 
became a resident of Greeley. In 1906 he took up his abode in Evans. Weld county, and 
purchased thirty acres of land within the corporation limits of the town. He at once 
improved this property and has since continued its cultivation with the exception of 
the last five years, during which period he has rented the land to others. In 1912 he 
established a flour, feed and coal business at Evans and has since conducted the busi- 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 263 

ness, which has steadily grown in volume and importance, so that he is now enjoying 
a gratifying patronage. 

In May, 1906, Mr. Weinhold was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Zimmer and 
they became parents of four children: Albert Z., who was born in May, 1907; Catherine, 
in June, 1911; and Earl and Merl, twins, born in December. 1913. 

The religious faith of Mr. and Mrs. Weinhold is that of the Presbyterian church 
and their lives are guided by its teachings. Fraternally he is connected with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. Politically he is a democrat and has filled a number of 
local positions. He has been secretary of the school district, has served for two terms 
as a member of the town council and is the present mayor of the city, giving to Evans 
a businesslike and progressive administration that is recognizing its needs and its 
possibilities for development along civic lines. 



JOHN J. MORRISSEY. 



John J. Morrissey has for eleven years engaged in the practice of law in Denver. 
He was born in Berea, Ohio, on the 19th of January, 1883, and is a son of Thomas J. 
Morrissey, who was born in Dublin, Ireland, and on emigrating to the new world made 
his way to Boston. He afterward removed westward to Ohio and for many years was 
engaged in mill work but is now living retired in Berea at the age of sixty-nine years. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Katherine Ryan, was born in Canada and also 
survives. They had a family of five children who are yet living. 

John J. Morrissey acquired a public school education in Ohio and afterward attended 
the Baldwin University of Berea and was a student in the Baldwin-Wallace College, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1901. He spent three years in Baldwin Uni- 
versity and in 1904 he came to Colorado, with Denver as his destination. Here he entered 
the University of Colorado and was graduated on the completion of a law course as a 
•member of the class of 1907. The same year he was admitted to the bar and entered 
upon active practice in connection with Judge McCall under the firm style of McCall & 
Morrissey. A later change in the partnership led to the organization of the present 
firm of Morrissey, Mahoney & Scofield. He enjoys a large practice and is able in argu- 
ment, clear in his reasoning, logical in his deductions and at all times forceful in the 
presentation of his cause, which never fails to elicit the interest and attention of court 
and jury and seldom fails to win the verdict desired. 

In 1911 Mr. Morrissey was united in marriage to Miss Pauline Smith, a native of 
Colorado, and to them have been born two children: John J., four years of age; and 
Thomas George, three years of age. Mr. Morrissey has membership with the Knights 
of Columbus and with the Cathedral Catholic church. In politics he was quite active in 
early years but now maintains an independent course. He belongs to the Denver Bar 
Association and is well known in the ranks of the profession, where he has already 
made a most creditable position for one of his years, and judged in the light of past 
events, his subsequent career will be well worth the watching. 



HARRY B. TEDROW. 



Harry B. Tedrow, United States district attorney for the district of Colorado, was 
born at Woodburn, Clarke county, Iowa, May 6, 1875. His father, Joseph Leech Tedrow 
(1835-1912), a merchant, was born in Pennsylvania, lived until young manhood in Athens 
county, Ohio; in 1855 took up his residence in Iowa, and in 1887 removed to Hastings. 
Nebraska, where his last years were spent. He married Hester Ann Proudfoot, a native 
of Barbour county, West Virginia, whose people were pioneers of Clarke and Warren 
eounties, Iowa. She still survives. 

Harry B. Tedrow is one of a family of eight children, five of whom are living. His 
early schooling was received in the public schools of Woodburn, Iowa, and Hastings, 
Nebraska. He was graduated from the Hastings high school as a member of the class 
of 1892. He has been a resident of Colorado since 1896. For two years after coming to 
Colorado he was connected with the Rocky Mountain News, both in the business office 
and reportorial work. Later he entered the law school of the Denver University. Upon 
the declaration of the Spanish-American war in April, 1898. he responded to the call for 
troops, enlisting at Denver in the organization that became Troop B of the Second United 
States Volunteer Cavalry, popularly known as Torrey's Rough Riders. His regiment 



264 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

was assigned to the Seventh Army Corps under Major General Fitzhugh Lee. When 
the war was over he returned to Denver and on October 12, 1899, was admitted to the 
bar. In 1901 he practiced at Cripple Creek. From 1903 to 1906 he was associated with 
Richard H. Whiteley at Boulder. In the latter year he formed a business relation with 
Charles W. Franklin, a well known Denver attorney, under the firm name of Franklin 
& Tedrow, remaining in that connection in active practice in Denver until 1912. During 
a part of this time he was secretary of the Denver Bar Association. In 1912 he went 
to Boulder, where he has been associated with Arthur W. Fitzgerald, as Tedrow & Fitz- 
gerald, taking over the Whiteley practice in that city. He was county attorney of Boulder 
county in 1913-1914 and for nearly six years (1909-1915) a member of the board of 
pardons of Colorado. In 1914 President Wilson commissioned him United States attor- 
ney for the district of Colorado and renewed the commission in 1918. Mr. Tedrow be- 
came United States district attorney August 1, 1914, the day the great European war 
began, and his duties in the important office have taken an unusual course. Especially 
since April 6, 1917. when the United States entered the conflict, he has had the responsi- 
bility of a tremendous volume of perplexing government business of an administrative 
as well as legal nature for which no precedents existed. 

On April 22, 1903, Mr. Tedrow married Camilla Roberts, a Denver born young 
woman, daughter of Sidney E. and Eudora A. (Loomis) Roberts. Mr. and Mrs. Tedrow 
are the parents of two daughters: Irene, born August 3, 1907, and Imogene, born 
April 28, 1910. 



JAMES G. KILPATRICK. 



The material development, the moral progress and the civic affairs of Denver, all 
profited by the efforts of James G. Kilpatrick, who for many years was p. leading 
^business man and honored citizen of Denver. A native of Ireland, he was born in 
County Armagh, May 2, 1848, a son of James and Sarah (Gass) Kilpatrick. His an- 
cestors for generations lived in Ireland and in his native country James G. Kilpatrick 
acquired a good common school education. He was a youth of eighteen years when 
he came to the United States in 1866. In May of that year he became a resident of 
St. Louis, Missouri, and secured the position of bookkeeper in a notion house, becoming 
an employe of his uncle, James Gass, and there he remained for two and a half years. 
In 1869 he purchased land near Pleasant Hill, Missouri, and turned his attention to 
farming, but a little later he sold the property and removed to Baxter Springs, Kansas, 
where he entered commercial circles, and found a more congenial field to which he 
was evidently more adapted. He was employed as clerk and bookkeeper for about 
a year at Baxter Springs and then entered into relationship with Guren & Hunter 
and soon bought an interest in the firm, engaged in dealing in dry goods and general 
merchandise. A year later the firm of Hunter & Kilpatrick succeeded to the business, 
the junior partner remaining in the firm for about a year. They then sold their interests 
and in July, 1872, Mr. Kilpatrick removed to Denver. 

Throughout the period of his residence in this city he remained one of its repre- 
sentative merchants and business men. His original position was that of clerk in 
a dry goods store, but gradually he worked his way upward. After a short time he 
became bookkeeper for the firm of Smith & Doll, furniture dealers, with whom he 
remained for a year and a half. In 1874 he entered into partnership with Robert 
Brown, of Cincinnati. Ohio, and established a furniture store conducted under the 
firm style of Kilpatrick & Brown. This relationship was maintained until 1884, 
when Mr. Kilpatrick became sole proprietor of what was the first large retail and 
wholesale store in the state. A man of executive force, administrative ability, unfal- 
tering enterprise and unwearied industry, he built up the business to extensive 
proportions until the wholesale trade covered a wide territory. The house remains 
today one of the foremost commercial enterprises of the city. The business was 
continued under the style of Kilpatrick & Brown until the death of Mr. Kilpatrick, 
when the James G. Kilpatrick Furniture Company was organized, with Mrs. Annie 
L. Kilpatrick, the widow, as president and Julian T. Clarke, her brother, as vice 
president and general manager. A further change in organization has led to the 
adoption of the firm style of the Kilpatrick-Spengel Furniture Company, which exists 
today. This is the oldest furniture house continuously in business in Denver and 
has ever maintained a place in the front ranks of the commercial interests of the 
city. An extensive stock of medium-priced and high grade furniture is carried, 
displaying the output of leading manufacturers of the country. The substantial 



266 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

business methods established by Mr. Kilpatrick have ever been maintained and the 
house has ever borne the unsullied reputation which became associated with it under 
his guidance. 

In Denver, on the 28th of July, 1873, Mr. Kilpatrick married Annie Laurie Clarke, 
of East Haddam, Connecticut, a daughter of Jonathan Tillotson and Emma (Webb) 
Clarke, of East Haddam, and a descendant in the maternal line of the Willard family, 
the ancestry being traced back through eight generations to Colonel Simon Willard, 
one of the founders of Concord, Massachusetts. 

James G. Kilpatrick passed away in the city of Denver October 17, 1895, at the 
age of forty-seven years. A contemporary biographer has said: "Mr. Kilpatrick is 
remembered as a merchant of great enterprise, a progressive and public-spirited 
citizen, contributing in large measure to the advancement and prosperity of the city, 
and as an exemplary man in business and in all relations of life." At the time of his 
demise he was president of the Denver Athletic Club and was a devout member and 
active worker in the Central Presbyterian church, in which he served as a trustee. 
He was a member of the building committee of both the club and the church and 
supervised the erection of both buildings. By reason of the integrity of his business 
methods he left an untarnished name as well as a most substantial fortune. He 
exerted a marked influence for good and his example is one well worthy of emulation. 
Mrs. Kilpatrick survives her husband and resides in a beautiful home at No. 1541 
Logan street, in Denver. She has given evidence of her ability in business and 
enjoys great popularity in Denver's social circles, and through a residence in Denver 
of forty-five years has ever been classed with those women who have done much 
for the upbuilding of the state and the upholding of its social and moral status. 



FRED T. ANDERSON. 



Fred T. Anderson is a self-made man and one who deserves all the credit which 
that term implies. He came empty-handed to the new world and started out to provide 
for his own support. Since that time he has steadily worked his way upward and what- 
ever success he has achieved is the direct reward of his labors. He was born in Sweden, 
May 29, 1888, and is a son of Eric and Johanna Anderson, who in the year 1891 came 
to the new world and established their home in Sherman county, Kansas. The father 
devoted his attention to the occupation of farming, taking up a homestead claim, which 
he converted into productive fields. After eleven years spent in the Sunflower state 
he removed to Greeley, Colorado, and for four years rented a farm of eighty acres but 
later purchased land and successfully carried on general agricultural pursuits to the 
time of his retirement from active business. His energy and enterprise brought to him 
a substantial measure of success and the competence which he acquired enabled him 
to rest from further labor. Both he and his wife are still residents of Greeley. 

Fred T. Anderson was but two years of age when the family came to the new world. 
He pursued his education in the public schools near his father's home, but put aside 
his textbooks when quite young, for he was anxious to start out in the business world 
and earn his own living. He assisted his father in order to acquaint himself with the 
methods of farming and then decided to stay with his father for a time, remaining his 
active assistant for eight years. He next started out independently by renting a farm 
near Greeley, leasing eighty acres of land which he successfully cultivated for five 
years. During that period he carefully saved his earnings, so that at the end of the 
time he was able to take an advanced step by purchasing land, acquiring eighty acres 
two miles west of Kersey. He is a very ambitious, energetic young farmer who has 
made a success of life and has reason to be proud of what he has accomplished. His 
energies are intelligently directed and excellent results accrue. He is now chiefly 
engaged in the production of beets, potatoes, hay and grain. His farm presents a neat 
and thrifty appearance, indicative of the careful supervision and the practical and 
progressive methods of the owner. 

In 1912 Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Martha Anderson, who was 
born in Sweden, where her parents and the rest of the family still reside, having never 
come to the United States. Her father is a carpenter by trade and has been very suc- 
cessful. Mrs. Anderson came to the new world when a maiden of twelve summers and 
has since remained on this side of the Atlantic. By her marriage she has become the 
mother of two children: Ruth, who was born on the 12th of August, 1914; and Eleanor. 
born on the 13th of August, 1917. 

The parents are consistent and faithful members of the Baptist church and have 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 267 

taken an active part in promoting Red Cross work. Mr. Anderson gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party but has never sought or desired office, preferring to 
concentrate his energies and attention upon his business affairs, which he has always 
carefully directed, and by the wise conduct of his farm work he has gained a place 
among the substantial and highly respected residents of his part of the state. 



CARL H. COCHRAN. 



Carl H. Cochran, devoting his attention to an important and growing law practice 
in Denver, comes to the west from Illinois, his birth having occurred at Carmi, that 
state, on the 13th of January, 1873. He is a son of Sanford and Marie (Dickens) Cochran, 
who were also natives of Illinois, where they resided for some years and then removed 
with their family to Iowa, where the father is still engaged in the practice of law, but 
his wife has now passed away. 

Carl H. Cochran began his education in the public schools of Carmi, Illinois, and 
afterward continued his studies in a preparatory school at Tabor, Iowa. He next entered 
the University of Indiana at Bloomington and completed a course there in the class 
of 1892, at which time the LL. B. degree was conferred upon him. He was then admitted 
to the bar at Omaha, where he practiced for two years in association with his father, 
the firm having offices in both Omaha. Nebraska, and Council Bluffs, Iowa. He thus 
received his initial training and experience under favorable conditions, but believing 
the west offered still better opportunities, he came to Denver in 1897 and has since 
engaged in the practice of his profession. Mr. Cochran continues in the general practice 
of law, having never concentrated his efforts and attention along a single line. He is 
well versed in various departments of jurisprudence and most carefully and thoroughly 
prepares his cases, while the strength of his argument is based upon a clear under- 
standing of the facts and of the law applicable thereto. 

Mr. Cochran is a stalwart republican in his political views and has been very active 
in local ranks of the party. For twelve years he served as republican committeeman 
from the fifteenth ward, but though he works earnestly for the adoption of party prin- 
ciples and the success of party candidates, he does not seek nor desire official rewards 
for his party fealty. He is a Mason, belonging to Highlands Lodge, No. 86, A. F. & A. M.; 
to Denver Chapter, No. 39. R. A. M.; to Highland Commandery, No. 30, K. T.; and to 
El Jebel Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a past grand of United Lodge, No. 4. 
I. O. 0. F., and has membership in the Elks lodge. He turns to fishing and hunting for 
recreation and greatly enjoys those phases of outdoor life. For more than two decades 
he has been a member of the Denver bar and in this connection has made steady progress, 
working his way upward until his position is today a most creditable one in the ranks 
of the legal fraternity. 



JOHN H. McGILL. 



John H. McGill, devoting his energies to general agricultural pursuits on section 27, 
township 6, range 66, in Weld county, was born near Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, in April, 
1854, and is a son of William and Jane (Keyes) McGill, who were natives of Scotland. 
Coming to America in early life, they settled near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and there 
the father engaged in gardening with his brother. He was a marble cutter by trade but 
never followed that pursuit in the new world. He continued farming at Baden. Pennsyl- 
vania, throughout his remaining days and brought his land under a high state of cul- 
tivation and improvement. He died in August, 1899, at the age of seventy-six years, 
while his wife, surviving him for more than a decade, passed away in 1912, at the 
advanced age of eighty-four years. 

John H. McGill was reared and educated in Baden and continued his studies in the 
college at Sewickley, Pennsylvania, and when his textbooks were put aside he learned 
the trade of carpentering and stair building but did not find this a congenial occupation 
and turned his attention to gardening in Pennsylvania. He then had a chance to go to 
Columbus. Nebraska, with a colony and did so in 1880 but remained for only a short 
time. In the same year he came to Greeley. Weld county, and began work as a farm 
hand, being employed in that way for three years. He next rented land, which he con- 
tinued to cultivate and improve for about ten years, on the expiration of which period 
he purchased his present place of eighty acres, situated on section 27, township 6. 



268 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

range 66. With characteristic energy he began to improve and develop this property 
and now has one of the nicest farms in his part of the state. He has planted all of the 
trees upon this place and has continuously cultivated his land, which he has transformed 
into rich and productive fields. At the same time he has bought and sold several farms 
and has been very successful in carrying on this business. 

On the 24th of December, 1884, Mr. McGill was united in marriage to Miss Nancy J. 
Evans, a daughter of Henry J. and Mary (Foster) Evans, who were natives of the Key- 
stone state. Mrs. McGill was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, April 19, 1861, which 
was the day on which the first blood was shed in the Civil war. Her father was a river 
man and worked on boats as first mate, making a run between Pittsburgh and New 
Orleans. He followed that business throughout his entire life, his death occurring in 
July, 1915. He had long survived his wife, who passed away in 1901. To Mr. and Mrs. 
McGill were born seven children: William H., who is engaged in farming near Barnes- 
ville, Colorado; Ethel B., whose demise occurred on the 30th of March, 1891; Mabel F., 
at home; Margaret, who is the wife of Milton K. Eads. of Greeley; John Donald and 
Mary Dorothy, twins; and Joseph F. 

Politically Mr. McGill is a democrat and has served in several local offices, acting as 
constable and also as school director for six years. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Woodmen of the World and his religious belief is that of the Presbyterian church. 
His life has been one of industry and thrift. There has been nothing spectacular in his 
record but by persistency of purpose and indefatigable energy he has reached the place 
which he now occupies as a representative citizen and leading farmer of Weld county. 



HON. JAMES OWEN. 



Hon. James Owen, of Denver, lawyer and law maker, who has been identified with 
the legislative history of the state as a member of the senate and who for six years sat 
upon the bench of the district court, was born upon a farm in Marshall county, Iowa, on 
the 7th of June, 1872. Prior to this time his parents, Dr. William R. and Martha 
(Andrews) Owen, had become residents of Colorado. The father was born in Indianapo- 
lis. Indiana, and was the son of a Quaker preacher. The Owen family came to America 
with William Penn. The mother was a representative of one of the old families of 
Virginia but her birth occurred in Ohio. They became pioneer residents of Pueblo, 
Colorado, where Dr. Owen practiced as one of the first physicians. 

James Owen of this review pursued his education in the public schools of Pueblo 
until he had completed the high school course, after which he became a student in 
the University of Kansas at Lawrence and there won the Bachelor of Arts degree as 
a graduate of the class of 1893 pnd the LL. B. degree as a graduate of the class of 1895. 
For one year he also studied law in Chicago. Admitted to practice at the Kansas bar, 
he later returned to Colorado and has represented the profession as a practitioner at 
Pueblo, at Cripple Creek and at Denver, taking up his abode in the latter city in 1905. 
The public offices that he has held have been in the strict path of his profession. He 
served as district attorney of the fourth district and later was chosen to aid in framing 
the laws of the state as a member of the senate, representing the third senatorial dis- 
trict in the upper house of the general assembly from 1903 until 1905. In the fall of 
1906 he was elected judge of the fourth judicial district and served in that position 
for a term of six years, or until January, 1913. This district comprised seven or eight 
counties and his work upon the bench was of an arduous nature but was most capably 
performed, his decisions being strictly fair and impartial, based upon a thorough under- 
standing of the facts and of the law applicable to them. 

In 1896 Judge Owen was united in marriaee to Miss Winifred Churchill, a daughter 
of S. J. Churchill, and their children are: Margaret Owen, eighteen years of age, now 
a student at Wellesley College; James Churchill Owen, sixteen years of age, a third 
year student in the East Denver high school; and William Myron Owen, thirteen years 
of age, who is an Eagle scout. 

Judge Owen is a member of the Denver Club and of Phi Kappa Psi, a national Greek 
letter fraternity. He belongs to the various local, state and national bar associations 
and is a distinguished representative of the legal profession in Colorado. He is now 
attorney for the Midwest Oil Company and for the Midwest Refining Company, as well 
as for other large corporations. Nature endowed him with strong intellect and he has 
used his talents wisely and well. On several occasions he has been offered most re- 
munerative professional connections in New York city but his love for Colorado is 
such that he does not care to leave the state. His interest centers in his family and in 




HON. JAMES OWEN 



270 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

this commonwealth and while he is undoubtedly not without that laudable ambition 
which is so useful as an incentive in business life, he has never regarded the attainment 
of wealth as his sole aim but only as one factor in his activities. He has ever felt that 
there should be hours of leisure, hours of study, hours of recreation, as well as of 
business, and the wise use that he has made of his time has led to a splendidly balanced 
character, making Judge Owen one of the esteemed and honored residents of Colorado. 



CHARLES V. MULLEN. 



Charles V. Mullen, a native son of Denver now practicing successfully at the Colorado 
bar, was born November 6, 1884, his parents being Dennis W. and Anne (Hughes) Mullen. 
The father was born in County Galway, Ireland, in May, 1849, and the mother's birth 
occurred in Oneida county, New York. Mr. Mullen, Sr., was but seven years of age when 
brought to this country by his parents, who settled in Oneida county, where he acquired 
a common school education. He became a resident of Colorado in 1873 and nine years 
later, or in June, 1882, returned to New York for his bride, Miss Anne Hughes, then 
living at Oriskany Falls. Dennis W. Mullen became associated with his brother, J. K. 
Mullen, in the Colorado Milling & Elevator Company and he was also recognized as a 
leader in democratic circles throughout the state. He was widely known as "Honest 
Dennis," a title by which his friends and acquaintances frequently mentioned him. 
During -the period of his great activity in politics he became one of the founders of the 
Evening Post, which later became the Denver Post. He was one of those who were most 
influential in inducing Mayor Robert W. Speer to take an active part in politics and it 
was Mr. Mullen who influenced Mr. Speer to become a candidate for city clerk in 1884. 
Mr. Mullen, however, never accepted office himself save on one occasion when he was 
elected to represent his district in the eighth general assembly. His wife passed away 
February 19, 1915, and it is believd that his sorrow over her demise hastened his own 
death, which occurred May 19, 1916. In their family were four children, John J., Charles 
V., Edward and Raymond H. 

Charles V. Mullen was a pupil in the Franklin school of Denver and later attended 
the Sacred Heart College, from which he was graduated in 1904 with the Bachelor of 
Arts degree. He next entered Georgetown University at Washington, D. O, and was 
graduated on the completion of the law course in 1907, in which year he won the degrees 
of Bachelor of Law and Doctor of Philosophy. He then returned to Denver and entered 
upon the practice of his profession, in which he has since won an enviable reputation, 
working his way steadily upward and proving his ability by the competent and able 
manner in which he presents his causes before the court. He is a member of the City & 
County Bar Association, the Colorado State Bar Association and the American Bar Asso- 
ciation. Aside from his profession he is a director in a number of the leading business 
and manufacturing enterprises of the city. 

On the 26th of October, 1909, Mr. Mullen was married to Miss Mary Ann Dolan, a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Dolan, Denver pioneer people but now residents 
of Cheyenne, Wyoming. Mr. and Mrs. Mullen are members of the Roman Catholic church 
and he has membership with the Ancient Order of Hibernians. He is also a charter 
member of the Sons of Colorado. He has wide acquaintance in Denver, where his entire 
life has been passed, and his sterling traits of character have established him further 
in public regard. 



FRANK A. CHAFFEE. 



Frank A. Chaffee, manager of the Collins Cash Clothing Company at Fort Collins, 
was born near Loveland, in Larimer county, on the 30th of June, 1862, a son of A. R. and 
Sarah (Piper) Chaffee, who were natives of Michigan and of Pennsylvania respectively. 
The father was a lumber dealer in the east and in 1860 removed westward to Colorado, 
settling first at Georgetown, where he remained for a year and then took up his abode 
in Larimer county, where he entered land and began the development of a farm. He 
also worked for the stage company but later concentrated his efforts and attention upon 
his agricultural interests. He improved Ms place and continued its further development 
and cultivation throughout his remaining days. He raised large herds of cattle, giving 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 271 

his attention principally to the cattle industry. He departed this life April 30, 1908, 
and is still survived by his widow, who now makes her home with her son Frank. 

The latter spent his youthful days in Larimer county and is indebted to its public 
school system for the educational opportunities which he enjoyed. He remained with 
his parents until he had passed the period of minority and then came to Fort Collins, 
where he secured a clerkship in a clothing store. He was thus employed for ten years 
and in 1892, in company with others, he organized the Collins Cash Clothing Company, 
of which he has since been the manager. This company carries an extensive stock of 
ready-made clothing and men's furnishing goods and enjoys a very large patronage by 
reason of the integrity of its business methods and the enterprise of the proprietors, 
who put forth every effort to please their patrons. 

On the 10th of November, 1892, Mr. Chaffee was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Hawley and to them have been born two children, but one died when but three days old. 
The surviving daughter is Gladys M., who was born November 28, 1900. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church and Mr. Chaffee 
is also an active worker in the Young Men's Christian Association, in which he is serving 
as a director. He is likewise one of the trustees of the church and is deeply interested 
in all that has to do with the moral progress and development of the community. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Modern Woodmen of America, the Knights of Pythias 
and with the Masonic order. His political belief is that of the democratic party and for 
four years he filled the office of county commissioner of Larimer county, making an 
excellent record in that connection. He stands today as one of the progressive business 
men of Fort Collins and has contributed largely to the material, social, political and moral 
advancement of the community in which he makes his home. 



FRANK D. DARROW. 



Frank D. Darrow is well known in music trade circles, having been identified with 
the music business in Denver for the past eighteen years. During this time, The Darrow 
Music Company, of which he is president, has grown from a small beginning to one of 
the prominent music houses of the city, doing an extensive business throughout Colorado 
and adjoining states. 

A native son of the Empire state, he was born in Cazenovia, New York, April 26, 
1870. The founder of the Darrow family in the new world came from England in the 
early colonial days and settled in Connecticut. Of rugged Puritan stock, the family 
became active in the development and growth of New England, two of its members 
taking part in the Revolutionary war, one of them serving on the personal staff of 
George Washington. Some time later the grandfather of Frank D. Darrow emigrated 
to western New York which was then but little settled except by Indians who had made 
friends with the whites. Here the Darrow family prospered as hard working farmers 
and later established the town of West Eaton in Madison county, where William Harrison 
Darrow, father of Frank D. Darrow, was born. He was married to Margaret Anna 
Tackabury, who was also a native of New York state and belonged to one of the old 
New England families of English and Scotch descent. They were both consistent 
members of the Methodist church and devout Christian people. The death of Mr. Darrow 
occurred in 1878, while his widow lived to the advanced age of over eighty-two years 
and passed away on March 4. 1914, leaving five sons to mourn her loss. 

Frank D. Darrow, the youngest of his father's household was educated in the public 
schools of Cazenovia, New York, and in the Cazenovia Seminary. When he was twenty 
years of age the family moved to Denver. Arriving here in the fall of 1890, Mr. Darrow 
secured employment with the Denver Republican in a reportorial capacity and followed 
journalism for a period of ten years. He then started in the music business in a small 
way and by rigid adherence to strict business principles and earnest personal effort has 
built up an enterprise which is recognized as one of the large music houses of the west. 

From the time of its invention. The Darrow Music Company has featured the player 
piano, believing that it was the one logical and most complete musical instrument in 
the home. That this idea was correct is shown by the many thousands of these instru- 
ments which have been placed in the best musical homes and the further fact that today 
the leading piano manufacturers of the United States are making a very large percentage 
of player pianos. Under the direction of Mr. Darrow, this house has confined itself to 
the best standard makes of instruments that have an established reputation and to this 
is largely attributed the success of the business. The house has always maintained a 



272 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

high degree of integrity in its business dealings and gives credit for much of its success 
to the goodwill of its many patrons. 

On May 23, 1900, Mr. Darrow was married in Denver to Emma C. Cordts, a native 
of this state and a daughter of William Cordts. They have one child, Marguerite Louise, 
who has shown an aptitude for music and has become quite well known in musical circles. 

In politics Mr. Darrow follows an independent course. He is a member of the Denver 
Civic and Commercial Association and has taken an active interest in the upbuilding of 
the city and the extension of trade relations. His record has at all times been worthy 
of commendation and shows what may be accomplished by conscientious, intelligent effort. 



JOHN McNEIL. 



John McNeil has figured prominently in connection with the development of the 
fuel and mining interests of Colorado and is now extensively engaged in the operation 
of coal property in Routt county under the name of the McNeil Coal Company and 
also near Grand Junction, Colorado, as president of the Grand Junction Mining & Fuel 
Company. He was born in Coatdyke, Lanarkshire; Scotland, March 2, 1853. At the 
tender age of ten years he began his career in coal mining, toiling for over ten hours 
each day in a coal pit and devoting his evenings to study in a night school. In this 
manner, being a diligent student, he acquired a very fair knowledge of the essential 
English branches. Later he attended mining classes and obtained a technical knowl- 
edge of ventilation and coal mine gases and became an underground foreman of a 
colliery at Slamannan, Stirlingshire, at the age of twenty-one years. 

On the 31st of December, 1872, at Slamannan, Mr. McNeil was married to Miss 
Janet Allan Page and in August, 1876, with his wife and two baby boys, John, Jr., and 
David Page, emigrated to America. He went to Ohio and a few weeks later removed 
to Collinsville, Illinois, where he worked as a miner and contractor in shaft sinking 
in the Collinsville coal field. In the fall of 1878, with a baby girl added to his family, 
he came to Colorado and entered the employ of the Colorado Coal & Iron Company in 
the coal mines at Coal Creek, Fremont county. In 1880 he was engaged by the Canon 
City Coal Company, then owned by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Company, 
as superintendent in sinking and timbering Nos. 3 and 4 shafts. In 1882-3, in order 
to finish his education, he attended the Collegiate Institute at Canon City and in the 
class of 1884 was graduated as a mining engineer. Prior to his graduation, however, 
the legislature had created the office of state inspector of coal mines and Mr. McNeil 
was appointed to that position by Governor James B. Grant. As a test of fitness for the 
place, he with six other candidates passed a competitive examination before a state 
board of examiners appointed for that purpose, and having received the highest grade 
in this contest, captured the prize. He entered upon the duties of his office July 1, 
1883. With the consent of Governor Grant and by constant study during his leisure 
hours, Mr. McNeil was enabled and permitted to keep up with his class, and returning 
to the Collegiate Institute during the period of final examinations, he was graduated 
with honors on commencement day at the head of his class. Mr. McNeil was the first 
state inspector of coal mines in Colorado and held the office continuously from its 
inception until August, 1893, during the administrations of Governors Grant, Eaton. 
Adams, Cooper and Routt and also for six months under Governor Waite, the populist 
governor. He then resigned his position with eighteen months of his last appointment 
to run. By virtue of his office and the duties involved, Mr. McNeil was practically the 
general superintendent ex-officio of all the coal mines within the state for more than 
ten years. His annual reports exhibited both the wisdom and the importance of his 
supervision. They were thoroughly well prepared, terse and comprehensive, setting 
forth in detail, so that anyone who reads may readily understand the exact status of 
the coal mines of the state during that period. 

Immediately after resigning the position of state inspector of mines Mr. McNeil, 
desiring to be a "free lance" in his profession, opened an office as a consulting mining 
engineer and from that date to the present his record has been exceptionally good. 
From the start he has been retained by the Union Pacific Coal Company and other 
large coal mining interests, and for many years he has enjoyed the distinction of 
being consulting engineer for the Phelps-Dodge Corporation of 99 John street, New 
York, of their coal properties, now producing approximately five thousand tons of coal 
and eight hundred tons of coke per day at Dawson, New Mexico. 

To furnish employment for his four sons, John, Jr., David Page, Alexander Mc- 
Gregor and George Washington, in a business in which he was so very competent to 




JOHN McNEIL 



Vol. 11—18 



274 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

guide them, Mr. McNeil purchased, from time to time, tracts of coal land, now com- 
prising more than twelve hundred acres, at Cameo (in the vicinity of Grand Junction), 
Mesa county, during the past fifteen years, and opened thereon a coal mine with modern 
equipment, which produced during 1917 one hundred and forty thousand tons of bitu- 
minous coal. Three years ago Mr. McNeil and his sons formed The McNeil Coal 
Company and purchased valuable coal lands in Routt county and thereon opened a 
modern coal mine, from which was shipped over the Moffat Road during the past year 
(1917) seventy-two thousand tons of bituminous coal. The mine is located on the 
Bear river at MacGregor, ten miles west of Steamboat Springs. Mr. McNeil and his 
four sons are equally interested in the holdings of their respective coal companies. 

Mr. McNeil is married for the third time. The wife of his youth died in Novem- 
ber, 1S88. A year later he married Miss Elizabeth C. Buchanan, a daughter of the 
late J. M. Buchanan, who, prior to his death, ten years ago, was in business with 
Mr. McNeil. Mrs. Elizabeth McNeil died June *21, 1910, and on the 22d of November, 
1916, he married Miss Nellie T. Buchanan, a sister of his former wife. Mr. McNeil 
has seven children. His son, George W.. has the distinction of having been appointed 
to war work by President Wilson on the board of appeals of exemption boards for the 
forty southern counties of Colorado, with headquarters at Pueblo. This is the final 
court of appeals in draft matters. John, Jr., is general superintendent of the mining 
interests of the family. Alexander M. is secretary-treasurer and is in charge of the 
general office in Denver, while David P., a machinist by trade, has charge of the 
machinery at the mines and George W. has charge of the mercantile company stores 
at the mines. 

Mr. McNeil, though now in his sixty-sixth year, still enjoys excellent health with 
the vigor of younger years. He has been a resident of Denver since July, 1883, or for 
thirty-five years. In coal mining matters Mr. McNeil has examined more coal prop- 
erties and purchased greater areas of coal lands probably than any other man in 
America. Not only has he acted for himself in this matter but also for many others 
and especially for the Union Pacific Railroad under the Harriman administration, who 
alone expended millions of dollars on coal lands through Mr. McNeil. He reported on 
coal properties from the Gulf. of Mexico to the extreme northwestern coast and from 
California to Alabama and also on extensive coal fields in British Columbia, Canada. 
There is no feature of coal mining with which he is not thoroughly familiar and by 
reason of his prominence in the mining circles of the state he has contributed largely 
to the furtherance of its material interests and its development. At the meeting of 
The Rocky Mountain Coal Mining Institute of Wyoming, New Mexico, Utah and Colo- 
rado, held in the Broadmoor Hotel at Colorado Springs, Colorado, September 3-6, 1918, 
Mr. McNeil was unanimously elected president of the Institute. Colorado numbers 
him among her most representative and honored citizens. 



HUGH O. NEVILLE. 



Hugh O. Neville, attorney at law of Denver, where he has been engaged in active 
practice since 1911, was born in Daviess county, Missouri, on the 27th of March, 1876, 
a son of George and Elizabeth (Brown) Neville, the former a native of Kentucky, while 
the latter was born in Missouri. The father removed to Missouri in young manhood and 
engaged in stock raising and farming in Daviess county, becoming one of the influential 
and prominent agriculturists of that state, honored and respected by all who knew him 
to the time of his death, which occurred in February, 1918. For four years he served 
in the Union army, having enlisted with a Missouri regiment, and he acted as sergeant 
of his company. He was a son of Henry O. Neville, who was at one time a prominent 
resident of Kentucky and afterward of Missouri and who won his title of colonel as 
commander of the Thirty-fifth Missouri Regiment during the period of hostilities between 
the north and the south. George Neville was married in early manhood to Miss Elizabeth 
Brown, who was reared and educated in her native state and who passed away on the 
old homestead there in 1916. They were the parents of eleven children. 

Hugh 0. Neville, who was the seventh in order of birth in that family, spent his 
youthful days as a public school pupil in Daviess county, Missouri, and afterward 
attended the William Jewell College at Liberty, Missouri. He remained a student in 
the latter institution for three years and won a teacher's degree. He then taught school 
and became superintendent of schools of Buchanan county, Missouri, and retained that 
position for two years. In the meantime he devoted all of his leisure hours outside of 
the schoolroom to the study of law until he had qualified for the bar and was admitted 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 275 

to practice. He then gave up his position as superintendent of schools and entered 
upon the active work of the profession in St. Joseph. Missouri, where he engaged in the 
successful practice of law for eight years. Seeking a still broader field, he came to 
Denver in 1911 and has here since been an active member of the bar, enjoying a clientage 
that has constantly increased in volume and importance and that has connected him 
with much notable litigation tried in the courts of the state. He is a member of the 
Denver City and County Bar Association and also of the State Bar Association. 

In St. Joseph, Missouri, on the 10th of September, 1899, Mr. Neville was married 
to Miss Dessie Leftwich, a daughter of James B. Leftwich, of St. Joseph. They have 
become parents of two children: Esther, born in St. Joseph. May 27, 1901, and now a 
student in the University of Denver; and Glenn, who was born in St. Joseph, Missouri, 
in 1905 and is a graduate of the schools of Denver. 

Mr. Neville's military experience covers service with Troop F of the Third United 
States Cavalry at Key West and at Tampa during the Spanish-American war and he 
is a member of the Spanish War Veterans. He is also identified with the Independent 
Order of Odd Felows, with the Knights of Pythias and the Brotherhood of American 
Yeomen. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party and he keeps thor- 
oughly informed on the questions and issues of the day, although not an office seeker. 
He fully realizes the obligations and responsibilities of citizenship and he puts forth 
every possible effort to uphold community, commonwealth and national interests. 



MAJOR JOHN A. MARTIN. 



Major John A. Martin, who raised and for ten months was in command of the 
First Battalion, Second Colorado Regiment, that enlisted for service in the present war, 
is now engaged in the practice of law in Pueblo, and at the same time is doing in every 
possible way his full share to aid in the prosecution of the war and the support of the 
government. He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 10th of April, 1858, and is a son 
of Hugh and Ann (Bowen) Martin. His father was a soldier of the Civil war, enlisting 
for active duty with the Union army, and was assigned to service on a gunboat on the 
Mississippi river. He is now following the occupation of farming in Kansas but his 
wife has passed away. 

Major John A. Martin was the eldest in a family of five sons and one daughter. He 
acquired a public school education in Mexico and in Fulton, Missouri, and afterward 
took up the study of law in Colorado under private instruction. He had come to this 
state in 1887, and having determined upon law practice as a life work, he spent some 
time in the office of Fred A. Sabin, of La Junta, while later his preceptor was Dan B. 
Carey, now of Denver. He was admitted to the bar in 1896 and opened an office in 
Pueblo, where he has since remained in active practice, and although advancement 
at the bar is proverbially slow, he has steadily progressed and is today recognized as 
one of the strongest and ablest practitioners in the courts of his district. He has ever 
been most thorough and painstaking in the preparation of his cases and his presentation 
of a cause is always clear and logical. 

On the 6th of September, 1892, Major Martin was united in marriage to Miss Rose 
M. Chitwood, and to them was born a daughter. Stella, who is now the wife of Gordon 
W. Spencer. 

In his political views Major Martin is a democrat and has been very active in party 
ranks, his opinions carrying weight in its local councils and to a considerable extent 
shaping the policy of the party in the state.' He has served as a member of the general 
assembly of Colorado and for two terms has represented his district in congress. He 
has also been city attorney arid in all matters of public concern he is ever found on 
the side of progress and improvement. His entire career has been characterized by the 
wise utilization of his time and opportunities. He had no special advantages at the 
outset of his career and no financial assistance came to him. While he was studying 
law he devoted two years to the publishing of the La Junta Times and in 1887 he 
worked on the construction of the Colorado Midland Railroad, which was the first 
standard railroad across the plains. He recognized the value of such a line and set 
about to secure the fulfillment of his plans. The same spirit of determination has char- 
acterized him at every point in his career. While serving as city attorney he resigned 
his position to raise the First Battalion. Second Colorado Infantry, and was commis- 
sioned a major by General Baldwin. The company was recruited along the Arkansas 
valley and sent to San Diego, California, but because of his age Major Martin was hon- 
orably discharged and returned to Pueblo. While he did not find it possible to go across 



276 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the water and aid on the battle line in holding in check German militarism and stamp 
out German atrocities, he is nevertheless doing his full part in every possible way and 
is often heard on the public platform, where his enthusiasm inspires others with much 
of his own patriotism and loyalty. He is a man of high principles, greatly respected 
and loved by those with whom he has come in contact, and he is widely honored through- 
out the state. 



LEWIS CLARK RUSH. 



Lewis Clark Rush has been admitted to practice at the bars of Michigan, Illinois 
and Colorado and is now following his profession in Denver, giving his attention largely 
to corporation law. He was born in Chauncey, Illinois, December 29, 1887. His father, 
Louis Rush, is a native of Ohio and is now a farmer of Crawford county, Illinois, where 
he has extensive land holdings, his possessions aggregating one thousand acres. He has 
been very active and prominent in local affairs there, filling the office of county supervisor 
and serving in other public connections. He is a veteran of the Civil war, having gone 
to the front with an infantry regiment, with which he participated in various hotly con- 
tested engagements and also went with Sherman on the celebrated march from Atlanta 
to the s.ea. He married Grace Greer, who was born at Chauncey, Illinois, and is a daughter 
of Richard Greer, who was of Irish birth, as was his wife. The death of Mr. Greer occurred 
in Joplin, Missouri, when he had reached the advanced age of ninety-six years. In the 
family of Mr. and Mrs. Rush were seven children, three of whom have passed away. 

Lewis C. Rush pursued his early education in the district schools of Illinois and after- 
ward attended the Central Normal School of Danville, Indiana. His preparation for the 
bar was made in the University of Michigan, which conferred upon him the LL. B. degree 
upon his graduation as a member of the class of 1912, while in 1913 he received the LL. M. 
degree from his alma mater. He was admitted to the Michigan bar at Lansing in 1912, 
was admitted to practice in the courts of Illinois in 1913 and in the courts of Colorado 
in 1914. Following his removal to the west he was connected with the district attorney's 
office in 1914-15, after which he entered upon practice alone and has since given his atten- 
tion largely to corporation law. He is well versed in that branch of jurisprudence and 
is now the legal representative of various important corporate and business interests. He 
is regarded as a wise counselor and an able advocate and is making steady progress in 
the profession, having already gained a position that many an older member of the bar 
might well envy. In early manhood he devoted two years to teaching school and was 
made superintendent of schools when a young man of but twenty-four years. 

Mr. Rush is a Mason, belonging to Western Star Lodge, No. 26, A. F. & A. M., of Dan- 
ville, Indiana, also to Colorado Chapter, No. 29, R. A. ML, and Colorado Commandery, No. 
25, K. T., both of Denver. He has likewise crossed the sands of the desert with the Nobles 
of El Jebel Temple of the Mystic Shrine and he has membership with Denver Lodge, No. IT, 
B. P. O. E. He became a member of Kappa Sigma at Danville. Indiana, and he has ever 
been loyal to his pledges to these different organizations. His has been a well spent life — 
a career of usefulness which has won for him the honor and respect of all with whom he 
has been brought in contact. 



GEORGE W. DANIEL. 



George W. Daniel is postoffice inspector in charge of the Denver division, which 
embraces the four states of Colorado, New Mexico. Utah and Wyoming and includes 
twenty-five hundred offices. Steadily he has worked his way upward to this position of 
importance and responsibility and his course has been characterized at all times by 
the utmost fidelity to duty as well as by capability in discharge of the tasks which fall 
to his lot. Mr. Daniel is a native son of Arkansas, his birth having occurred in Searcy 
county on the 30th of October. 1859. His father. William P. Daniel, was a native of 
Georgia and was descended from an old family of Lynchburg, Virginia, of English origin. 
The family was started on American soil by William and John Daniel, who came from 
Cornwall, England, about 1640 and settled where Lynchburg, Virginia, was later founded 
Ancestors of Mr. Daniel were among the prominent factors in state and national affairs, 
including men of letters and of learning and of marked political influence. Among the 
family was John Moncure Daniel, who served with the rank of major in the Revolutionary 
war. The Daniel family was directly related to the Ball family of Virginia, which num- 




LEWIS C. BUSH 



278 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

bered among its members Mary Ball, who married into the Washington family a 
the mother of George Washington. 

William P. Daniel, father of George W. Daniel, on leaving his native state of 
Georgia removed to Arkansas, where he became a successful farmer. He took up his 
abode in the latter state about 1846, following the removal of the Cherokee Indians from 
that district, and he was one of the first white settlers who established a home on the 
south side of the Ozark mountain range. He served with the federal troops in the Civil 
war, becoming a member of the Third Arkansas Cavalry. He is a man of lofty patriotism 
and undaunted loyalty. He was wounded while at the front, and his army service under- 
mined his health, but though entitled to a pension he would under no circumstances 
accept government aid in recognition of what he had done for his country. In politics 
he has been a stalwart democrat since the reconstruction period. He exemplifies in his 
life the beneficent spirit of the Masonic fraternity, to which he belongs, and he holds 
membership in the Methodist church, being a devout Christian. His entire career has 
been actuated by high ideals and his word is as good as any bond solemnized by signature 
or seal. He is now living retired, enjoying the fruits of a well spent life and an untar- 
nished name, his career ever commanding for him the goodwill and confidence of those 
with whom he has been brought in contact. He married Lavinia E. Hatchett, a native 
of Tennessee and a representative of one of the old southern families of both Kentucky 
and Tennessee. Her father was Page Hatchett. a pioneer of Obion county, Tennessee, 
and of English lineage. He was a companion of and hunter with Davy Crockett, with 
whom he took part in hunting expeditions to the Reelfoot Lake region of Obion county, 
Tennessee. The great-grandfather of George W. Daniel in the maternal line was the 
progenitor of the American branch of the Hatchett family and the grandfather became 
a well known hunter and successful planter of Tennessee and of Arkansas and removed to 
the latter state at the same time the Daniel family took the trip. In fact, the two families 
were of the same wagon train. The parents of Mr. Daniel of this review were at that 
time young people and were married in Arkansas and to them were born eleven children, 
seven sons and four daughters. Both parents still survive and are among the honored 
residents of their adopted state. 

George W. Daniel, who was the second of the family, acquired his education in the 
public schools of his native county and in Marshall Academy at Marshall, Arkansas, 
while later he attended the Bellefonte Collegiate Institute at Bellefonte, Arkansas, and 
eventually continued his studies in the Arkansas Conference Seminary at Harrison, 
where he completed his course in 1879. His youthful days were spent upon the home 
farm until he reached the age of seventeen years, and during that period he underwent 
the hardships and privations of pioneer life and did all kinds of hard work incident to 
the settlement of a new country, including the building of log cabins, splitting rails, etc. 
He was ambitious to acquire a good education, however, and embraced every opportunity 
to further that end. After his graduation he entered upon educational work and for five 
years successfully engaged in teaching school in Arkansas and Texas, imparting clearly 
and readily to others the knowledge that he had acquired. During this time he also 
took up newspaper work and established and published the first newspaper of Searcy 
county, Arkansas, called the Searcy County New Era. It was published weekly and was 
of democratic policy. Mr. Daniel was identified with newspaper interests from the fall 
of 1886 until 1890. In June. 1887. he established a paper called the Boston Banner, 
which was published at Boston, Las Animas county, Colorado, and remained in the news- 
paper business altogether for five years. The venture, however, did not prove successful 
and in the early part of 1889 he came to Denver with financial resources completely 
exhausted. His first employment here was in driving a bobtail horse car but after a 
brief period he reentered journalistic circles as a reporter, concluding his reportorial work 
in June, 1890. with the Star, published at Pueblo. In July of that year he entered the 
postal service at Denver as a letter carrier, alter passing the civil service examination, and 
continued to act in that capacity until 1898. In the fall of that year he was transferred 
to New York in what is known as the ocean mail, or seaport service, continuing therein 
until March* 1906. During that period he crossed the ocean one hundred and eighty 
times and toured the continent of Europe, particularly England, France and Germany. 
In international postal matters he became quite expert in everything having to do with 
the foreign and domestic postal laws and service. In March, 1906, he was appointed by 
the postmaster general, George B. Cortelyou, after civil service examination, to the 
position of postoffice inspector. In August, 1915, he was made inspector in charge of the 
Denver division, with twenty-five hundred postoffices in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and 
Wyoming under his direction. 

In Searcy county. Arkansas, in November, 1882, Mr. Daniel was married to Miss 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 279 

Cynthia Frances Turney, who was born in Searcy county and belongs to one of the old 
Tennessee families. Her father, Dr. George Turney, removed at an early day to Arkansas. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Daniel have been born two daughters, Ethel and Uncas. The former is 
an artist of New York city, while the latter is an actress on the legitimate stage. 

Mr. Daniel is a democrat and stanchly supports the principles of the party. He 
belongs to Temple Lodge, No. 84, A. P. & A. M., and is a worthy exemplar of the teach- 
ings of the craft. He was elected and served as master of his lodge in the year 1898. 
Through the steps of an orderly progression he has reached his present high and enviable 
position in the federal service and there is perhaps no one in the west more thoroughly 
informed concerning the postoffice department in all of its ramifying interests and con- 
nections. He has faithfully served his country in this way for about twenty-eight years 
and his record remains an untarnished one. 



ALEXANDER G. FISK, D. V. S. 

Dr. Alexander G. Fisk, of Greeley, was born in Lawrence, Kansas, August 23, 1881, 
his parents being Harris M. and Ellen W. (Alexander) Fisk, the father a native of 
Vermont and the mother of New York state. The father was an engineer by profession 
being yet survived by his widow. 

Alexander G. Fisk removed with his parents from Lawrence, Kansas, to Grand Junc- 
tion when six years of age and in the latter place he received his education. He subse- 
quently entered Cutler Academy at Colorado Springs and then became a student in 
the Agricultural College at Fort Collins, Colorado, continuing his studies in a veterinary 
college at San Francisco, California, which he entered in 1904 and from which he was 
graduated in 1905. He first spent a short time in practice at Reno, Nevada, and then re- 
moved to Glenwood Springs, Colorado, where he followed his profession for about two 
years. On the expiration of that period he accepted an appointment in the United States 
bureau of animal industry and his duties in that connection again took him to California. 
After serving for some time in bureau work Dr. Fisk again entered upon practice in 
California, remaining in that state until his return to Colorado about a year and a half 
later. Subsequently he practiced in Denver for five years and at the end of that time 
took charge of the live stock department of the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company, with 
headquarters at Trinidad, Colorado. He continued with the corporation for five years 
and on severing his relations therewith came to Greeley, where he has been actively 
and successfully engaged in practice to the present time. 

On September 2, 1908, Dr. Fisk was married to Miss Evelyn Murray, a daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Murray, who were numbered among the old residents of Salem, 
Massachusetts. Dr. and Mrs. Fisk have three children: Morrell Lois, born February 
25, 1910; Lucille Marjorie. born September 11. 1912; and Dorothy Ellen, born July 1, 1914. 

Professionally Dr. Fisk is a member of the American Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion and the Colorado Veterinary Medical Society, having served as president of the 
latter institution for one year. Politically he is a republican and his religious faith is 
that of the Presbyterian church. He is a member of the Masonic order. He maintains 
offices at No. 818 Ninth avenue in Greeley and the family residence is situated at No. 
1112 Twelfth street. 



GUSTAV ANDERSON. 



The life record of Gustav Anderson is the story of rapid rise from obscurity to 
prominence. Starting out in the business world in a small way, he is now president 
of one of the largest laundries of the west, conducted under the name of the Silver 
State Laundry, and the strength of his purpose and ability finds its measure in his 
deserved prosperity. Mr. Anderson is numbered among the citizens that Sweden has 
furnished to the new world. He was born in that country February 8, 1872, a son of 
Andrew and Kerstin (Holmstrum) Anderson, both of whom were also natives of Sweden, 
where they spent their entire lives, the father there engaging in the occupation of 
farming up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1880. His wife also died in 
Sweden. They became the parents of five children. 

Gustav Anderson, who was the fourth in order of birth, attended the public schools 
of his native country and also pursued a business course in a local commercial college. 



280 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

At the age of nine years he left the parental roof as his father died when he was eight 
years old and the mother's death occurred only one year later. He was nineteen years 
old when crossing the Atlantic and made his way direct to Denver, where he arrived in 
1891. For a year he worked on a farm near the city and then returned to his native 
land to look after some important business matters. After putting his affairs there in 
shape he again made his way to Denver and secured employment at the home of General 
Pierce at Thirteenth and California streets. He remained with the general for two 
years and then purchased an interest in the Silver State Laundry, located at Thirteenth 
and Platte streets, where a small frame building was occupied. In delivery a horse 
and buggy was used, with a small box in the back for the parcels. His duties at that 
time earned him the munificent salary of eight dollars per week. At that time the 
laundry employed about fifteen people in the busy season. Mr. Anderson paid strict 
attention to his work and rose steadily. All the time he was looking to the future and 
with the savings from his earnings he invested in the business and in 1897 was elected 
to the presidency of the Silver State Laundry Company. In 1901, owing to the growth 
of the business it was found necessary to secure larger quarters at Twenty-fourth and 
Walnut streets. A modern building was erected there and all the latest improved 
machinery installed. Since then the building has been enlarged several times by the 
erection of additions and always more modern machinery added. The building as it 
stands today has three floors with one hundred and twenty-five by one hundred and 
fifty feet on the ground floor, while the second and third floors have a space of one hun- 
dred by one hundred and twenty-five feet. The plant also includes a large garage housing 
ten electric delivery cars and ten gasoline cars. The office is thoroughly modern in 
its elegant equipment, and something of the volume of patronage enjoyed by the firm 
is indicated in the fact that today they have one hundred and sixty-five regular employes 
to take care of their vast business. Mr. Anderson is also connected as vice president 
with the Pioneer State Bank at Seventeenth and Welton streets, one of the leading 
financial institutions of Denver and of which he was one of the organizers. He is recog- 
nized as a man of sound business judgment and of keen discrimination. 

In November, 1898, Mr. Anderson was married to Miss Augusta Anderson, of Denver, 
whose parents came to the west from Kansas. They have a family of four children: 
Genevieve, who was born in Denver in 1901 and is a graduate of the Manual Training 
school; Norma, who was born in 1904 and is attending high school; Evelyn, who was 
born in Denver in 1907 and is attending school; and Gladys, who was born in 1909 and 
is also pursuing her education. The family occupy a fine home in Denver. Every year 
Mr. Anderson takes a much needed vacation, driving to the North Park and Middle Park 
country and enjoying fishing there. He is an enthusiastic fisherman who has brought in 
many fine strings of rainbow trout, evidence of his skill being found in many photographs 
taken of his catch. 

Mr. Anderson is much interested in civic and community affairs. He is serving as 
one of the directors of the state board of training schools, under appointment of Governor 
Carlson in 1915. His political endorsement is given to the republican party and he is a 
firm believer in its principles but not a politician in the sense of office seeking. In 
Masonry he has attained high rank, being a Knight Templar and a member of the Mystic 
STirine. He also belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and he has mem- 
bership in the Denver Athletic Club, the Lakewood Country Club, the Civic and Commer- 
cial Association, the Manufacturers Association and several others looking to the welfare 
and benefit of the community at large as well as to the development of the social life 
of the city. 



JUDGE JOHN C. NIXON. 



Representative among the lawyers of Greeley and this section of the state is 
Hon. John C. Nixon, who has not only attained a conspicuous position in the private 
practice of the profession but has received wide recognition for his fair, strictly 
logical and learned decisions coming from the bench. He was born in Charlotte, 
Clinton county, Iowa, September 14, 1868, his parents being Azor M. and Sarah J. 
(Crouch) Nixon, both of whom were natives of Indiana. At an early day the father 
removed to Clinton county, becoming one of the pioneers of that section of Iowa. This 
was shortly after the Civil war. During that conflict he served for two years with 
Company B, Eighth Indiana Infantry, rendering gallant service in order to preserve 
the Union. 




JUDGE JOHN C. NIXON 



282 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

In Iowa he took up farming, which he followed for some time in Clinton county; 
afterwards he was established in the implement business at Gilman from which place 
he removed to Denison, where he likewise was engaged in the implement business. 
After closing out his interests there, the family removed to western Kansas, where he 
homesteaded and remained for three years. It was in the year 1881 that he came 
to Weld county, Colorado, here engaging in the implement business for one year, after 
which he sold out, entering upon a general merchandise business and continuing in 
that line for a period of several years. Once more he took up agricultural pursuits, 
actively tilling the soil for five years, and then retired in the enjoyment of a compe- 
tence which had come to him as the result of his former labor. He now makes his 
home in Greeley,' his wife having passed away February 22, 1914. 

John C. Nixon began his education in the public schools of Gilman and Denison, 
Iowa, continuing the same in Greeley, Colorado. After thorough preliminary prepara- 
tion he took a college course at the State University of Colorado, matriculating for 
the longer six year course, and upon graduating received the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. In 1902 he also graduated from the law department with the degree LL. B. 
Mr. Nixon was thirteen years of age when his parents came to this state and after 
completing his common school education he was employed as head clerk for three • 
years in the postofSce at Greeley. He also engaged in farming for five years in this 
county and is still interested to a considerable extent along agricultural lines in Weld 
county. After graduating from the law department in 1902 he accepted an important 
position with The Mills Publishing Company of Denver, publishers of Mills Annotated 
Statutes and other law books, acting for two years as the manager of this concern. 
He then returned to Weld county and opened an office in Greeley and has ever since 
practiced law. In 1907 Mr. Nixon was appointed county judge and with distinction 
served in that office until January, 1909. Judge Nixon has a mind well trained in 
the severe school of logic and close reasoning is to him habitual and natural. He 
is deliberate before court and jury, yet there is force to his eloquence and he has 
carried many important causes to a successful completion. He is thoroughly grounded 
in the law, and being a deep student of human nature, seems always to grasp the vital 
point in any case and upon that point centers his argument and he generally succeeds in 
convincing judge or jury. His opinions are always based strictly upon the law and he 
observes the closest adherence to professional ethics. 

Mr. Nixon has important interests outside of his professional work, being president 
of the Prosperity Investment Company of Greeley, holding valuable farm properties. 
There is much credit due Judge Nixon for what he has achieved, for he earned the 
means which enabled him to obtain his education. While attending the State University 
he worked during the summer months in the mines in order to earn the money to pay 
his tuition. Politically he is a republican and he was one of the organizers of the 
progressive party and in 1912 was a candidate for lieutenant governor on that ticket 
succeeding in getting more votes than the republican candidate. He holds membership 
in the Episcopal church and gives laudable support to that organization. Fraternally 
Mr. Nixon is quite prominent, having served as exalted ruler of Greeley Lodge, No. 
809, B. P. O. E. He also is a member of the Masonic order and the Eastern Star, being 
a past patron of the latter. Athletic sports have always been of great interest to Judge 
Nixon, he being actively interested in helping to establish and in playing with the 
University of Colorado's first ball team, and he still maintains an enthusiastic attitude 
toward any form of manly sport. In his community and county he is exceedingly 
popular, not only on account of what he has achieved, but because of the underlying 
qualities of his character, which have made possible his achievements. 



PETER O. HANSEN. 



Although a native of Denmark, Peter O. Hansen has become thoroughly imbued 
with the principles of this country and is today one of its most loyal citizens, appre- 
ciative of its institutions and its opportunities. He is engaged in the floral business 
in Greeley and success has attended his efforts, for he brings to his work not only experi- 
ence and knowledge, but that innate love for nature which is so necessary to attain 
success along his particular line. Moreover, he possesses good taste and these combined 
qualities and attributes secure for him a large and prosperous trade. 

Mr. Hansen was born in Flakkebjerg, Denmark, in April, 1880, a son of Peter and 
Inger (Hansen) Hansen, natives of Denmark. Both have passed away, the mother in 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 283 

1911 and the father in 1913. Their son, Peter 0. Hansen, received his early education 
in the schools of his native land. He first identified himself with the trade in that 
country and, having become well grounded as a florist, he bethought himself of the 
opportunities of America and decided upon emigration. After coming to the new world 
he located in the middle west, taking up his residence in Chicago in 1904. The big 
city, however, had no attractions for him and he remained only about ten weeks, going 
at the end of that time to Fort Dodge, Iowa, where he continued for two years, remov- 
ing from there to Springfield, Illi