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Full text of "History of Colorado;"

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978.8 
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1541066 



GENEALOGY COLLECTfON 



3 1833 01099 9511 



HISTORY 

O F 

COLORADO 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME IV 



CHICAGO 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 
1919 



Bebicatcb 

to tfjf 

$uineer£( of Colorado 



1541066 




NATHANIEL P. HILL 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



NATHANIEL PETER HILL. 

In the halls of congress Nathaniel P. Hill was one of the most influential and 
commanding figures; in his own state of Colorado he was a leader among the citizens, 
and one who was repeatedly delegated by them to carry the name and interests of the 
Centennial state before national bodies. Nathaniel P. Hill was of rare ancestry, traces 
of which can be identified as far back as Robert de la Hull, who "came into England 
with ye Conqueror"; this ancient warrior lived at the hamlet of Hull, now the Court of 
Hill, Shropshire. From him the line may be noted down to Sir Moses Hill and his son, 
Peter, who, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth in 1573, accompanied the earl of Essex, 
at the head of the English troops, to suppress the trouble known as O'Neill's Rebellion, 
for which services the Hills were given large estates. Nathaniel Hill, the great-grand- 
father of Senator Hill, came to the United States with wealth and located at a Scotch- 
Irish settlement west of the Hudson river, then on the westernmost frontier, and 
known as Dwarskill, in the precinct of Hanover, but now known as the town of 
Crawford. Orange county. New York. His second son, Peter, (1751-1795) was a captain 
in Colonel James Clinton's Regiment of minute men at the age of twenty-four; he 
was in command of his company, with two lieutenants and sixty-flve men, on duty at 
Fort Constitution, February 13, 1776. and was at Fort Montgomery, October 6, 1777. 
Captain Hill's second son. Nathaniel Peter, father of Senator Hill, was a lieutenant of 
cavalry in the War of 1812 and was captain of the Orange Hussars for many years 
thereafter. He served in the New York general assembly for four terms and was a 
.iudge of the court of common pleas from 1823 to 1825. 

Nathaniel P. Hill, our immediate subject, was born at the old homestead in 
Orange county, New York, February 18, 1832, and died in Denver. Colorado, May 22, 
1900. The homestead mentioned was located about three miles east of Montgomery, 
New Y'ork. Nathaniel P. was the third of seven children and. after the death of his 
father, he succeeded his brother, James K.. in the management of the home farm, at 
the same time attending Montgomery Academy. He entered Brown University in the 
year 1853, there majoring in chemistry and graduating with honors in 1857. From 
1859 until 1864 he occupied the chair of chemistry at Brown. 

His knowledge of metallurgical subjects, particularly the chemistry processes. 
and his success at Brown University, resulted in certain capitalists of Providence and 
Boston seeking his services. These men had been offered a tract of land in Colorado, 
called the Gilpin grant, and they requested Mr. Hill to investigate the tract and report 
upon its characteristics. So it was that in the year 1864 he came to Colorado by 
Concord coach. Blackhawk was his destination and he arrived at a time when that 
camp had reached a turning point owing to the lack of scientific methods of treating 
ores. This brought a subject to his attention which was to result later in a change of 
metallurgical processes to which the entire subsequent history of the state is due. In 
a word, the free gold quartz had practically been dug out and was succeeded by re- 
fractory copper, iron and other ores; rich in gold, but which could not be worked in 
the stamp mills. 

Mr. Hill twice more visited Colorado in 1865, endeavoring to arrive at some method 
of handling the ores. In pursuit of this knowledge he crossed the Atlantic to Swansea, 
Wales, where he further studied the ore reduction methods used in the world known 
smelters there. In the same year, 1866, he made a second trip to Swansea, carrying 
with him samples of Colorado ore and which he proved to be amenable to the processes 
there used. With this valuable knowledge he returned to the states and quickly 
interested Boston and Providence capitalists in the future of the Blackhawk field. 
These men subscribed two hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars and the Boston 
& Colorado Smelting Company was organized in 1867; this company began the active 
smelting work at Blackhawk in January, 1868. The business grew to such an extent 
that in 1873 a branch was established at Alma, Colorado. Products were received from 
7 



8 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

all parts of the mining west and the capital was increased to the sum of one million 
dollars, and a larger establishment built at Argo, in the suburbs of Denver. 

In addition to the above interests, Mr. Hill became identified with the United 
Oil Company, which controlled the larger part of the oil output of Florence, Colorado. 
He was president of the Colorado Smelting & Refining Company, the Denargo Land 
Company and many other enterprises connected with the development of the west. 

In politics Nathaniel P. Hill was a republican and quickly became a party leader. 
He became noted as a foe of monopolies, although he himself was heavily interested 
in many corporations. His first office of political nature was that of mayor of Black- 
hawk in 1871. Then in 1872 and 1873 he was a member of the territorial council. 
In January, 1879, at the republican caucus he was nominated for United States 
senator and elected for a term of six years, his term beginning March 4, 1879, when 
he succeeded Jerome B. Chaffee. During his service in the national law-making body 
Senator Hill accomplished many conspicuous deeds and was the instigator of many 
acts by congress. He was the author of the bill for the removal of the Uncompahgre 
Utes from southwestern Colorado to the Uintah reservation in Utah, also a bill appro- 
priating money for the sinking of artesian wells. The section of school land in the 
mineral districts, having been exempted under the law donating to the state two sec- 
tions in each township, was of no value to Colorado, so Senator Hill introduced a bill 
to take other land in lieu of the sixteenth and thirty-sixth sections, found to be 
mineral, and this finally became a law in 1884. The sum of three hundred thousand 
dollars was secured by appropriation for public building in Denver by the terms of 
another bill which Senator Hill sponsored. He took a prominent part in the debate 
over the tariff bill in 1883, championing the wool interests of Colorado and demanding 
that the tariff of 1867 be unchanged. He took special interest in fighting the railroad 
land grabbers and exposed a stupendousi fraud connected with the New Orleans, 
Baton Rouge and Vicksburg land grant. His speeches on the postal telegraph and on 
the silver question are among the most intelligent and virile upon those subjects. The 
service Senator Hill rendered to his state and country during his years in congress 
were not unrewarded, for in 1891 President Harrison nominated him as one of the 
three members of the International monetary commission, a position of high honor and 
trust. His last public appearance occurred in the year 1893, when he acted as repre- 
sentative of the Denver Chamber of Commerce to the bimetallic conference at Chicago 
and Washington. As the owner of the Denver Republican for a number of years. 
Senator Hill moulded to a great extent the republican policies of the state. 

Senator Hill was married in July, 1860, to Miss Alice Hale, who was born in 
Providence, Rhode Island, in January, 1840, and who died in Denver, Colorado, July 
19, 1908. She was of New England stock, of that family which gave Nathan Hale, the 
patriot. In Denver Mrs. Hill was a social leader and became a woman loved and 
respected by reason of her charitable and philanthropic work. She was the founder of 
the kindergarten system in the city and was one of the chief workers for the Young 
Women's Christian Association building. For twenty years she was the regent of 
the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association. The Hill mansion, located at the corner of 
Welton and Fourteenth streets and now headquarters for the Mountain division of the 
Red Cross, was for many years the center of the social activities of the city. Four- 
teenth street was then the best residence street of Denver and the Hill home occupied 
a prominent position in the neighborhood of the residences of the Berger, Kountze and 
other notable families. To Senator and Mrs. Hill were born three children, namely: 
Crawford Hill of Denver, Mrs. Franklin Price Knott of Santa Barbara, California, and 
Mrs. Lucius M. Cuthbert of Denver. 



HON. LAWRENCE C. PHIl'PS. 

Hon. Lawrence C. Phipps, United States senator from Colorado, former member 
of the Colorado State Council of Defense and member of the National Finance Com- 
mittee of the American Red Cross Association, is furthermore known in financial 
circles of Denver by reason of his extensive investments in various corporations and 
as a stockholder and director in various commercial, mining and agricultural interests. 

Mr. Phipps was born in Amwell township. Washington county, Pennsylvania, 
August 30, 1862, a son of iho Rev. William Henry and Agnes (McCall) Phipps, the 
former a native of England, while the latter was bom in Dumfries. Scotland. He 
graduated from the high school at Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, at the age of sixteen 
years, and later won the honorary degree of Master of Arts from Denver University. 




LAWRENCE C. PHIPPS 



10 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Soon after leaving school he began work in the iron mills in the capacity of night 
weigh clerk in one of the Carnegie plants and from that time until 1901, when the 
Carnegie interests were sold to the United States Steel Corporation, he advanced from 
one position to another and was finally admitted to a partnership in the concern, 
together with other young men who had been selected by Mr. Andrew Carnegie as 
being most deserving of such recognition. At the time of the sale of the Carnegie 
plant Mr. Phipps was vice president and treasurer of the company. He then retired 
from active business and removed to Colorado, where he has since made his home. 
He has important business investments in the west and maintains offices in the Ga,s 
& Electric building of Denver. He was chairman of the board of directors of the 
Denver & Salt Lake Railroad and a director of the Nevada-California Electric Corpora- 
tion, owning a power line operating in California and Nevada, serving the Goldfleld 
district of Nevada and the mining and farming districts of southern California. 

Long before entering public life Mr. Phipps took a very active interest in move- 
ments intended for the general development and upbuilding of the city of Denver as 
well as the entire state of Colorado. He has constantly reached out along lines of 
helpfulness and of public pr.jgress and in July, 1904, he founded the Agnes Memorial 
Sanatorium for the treatment of tuljerculosis and endowed the institution with a 
fund producing an annual revenue of seventeen thousand dollars. He has closely 
studied all vital questions bearing upon the welfare and upbuilding of city, state and 
country. In 1913 he was selected as president of the Colorado Tax-Payers Protective 
League, organized for the betterment of state and city administrations. He took a 
most active interest in the development of the Moffat road and made large investments 
in irrigation projects in northwestern Colorado with a view to developing the territory 
served by that road. He is one of the large stockholders in the Eastern Colorado Farm 
Loan Company and is one of the largest contributors to the fund being raised by the 
Denver Civic and Commercial Association foi assisting farmers in cultivating additional 
land. He is also interested in the Denver Morris Plan Company, which loans money to 
deserving citizens, thereby keeping them out of the hands of the loan sharks. 

On the 5th of September, 1885, Mr. Phipps was united in marriage at Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, to Ibrealla Hill Loomis, who passed away in July, 1888, leaving a son, 
Lawrence C. Phipps, Jr., and a daughter, -^ho is now Mrs. William White. Later Mr. 
Phipps wedded Genevieve W. Chandler, of Pittsburgh, on the 22d of April, 1897. This 
marriage was annulled by law in 1904. They had two daughters, Dorothy Chandler 
and Helen Chandler Phipps. On the 25th of January, 1911, Mr. Phipps wedded Mar- 
garet Rogers, a daughter of Judge and Mrs. Piatt Rogers, of Denver, and they have two 
sons. Allen Rogers and Gerald Hughes. The eldest son, Lawrence Phipps, Jr., who is 
the father of three children, volunteered for military service in 1917, and completed his 
course in the balloon school, earning a commission as second lieutenant. 

The religious faith of Mr. Phipps is that of the Episcopal church. He turns for 
recreation to golf, shooting and fishing, which he greatly enjoys. He is prominently 
known in club circles, being a member of the De'nver, Denver Country, University, 
Cactus, Denver Athletic and Mile High Clubs of Denver; the Bankers and Engineers 
Clubs of New York; the Pittsburgh and Duquesne Clubs of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; 
and the California, Los Angeles Country and the Brentwood Country Clubs of Los Angeles. 
His political allegiance has always been given to the republican party and he has 
long exercised considerable influence over public thought and opinion in relation to 
vital political questions and activities. In the fall ^of 1918 he was elected on the 
republican ticket to the office of United States senator by a majority of thirty-four 
hundred, succeeding John F. Shafroth. His efforts in brlialf of public welfare since 
the entrance of the country in the war have been most pronounced. He was one of the 
first life members of the American Red Cross, and when the Colorado Division was 
organized in 1913 he became chairman of the Denver Chapter, which position he held 
continuously, with the exception of one year, until he entered the recent senatorial 
campaign. Immediately after the declaration of war against Germany he was nam.ed 
by President Wilson a member of the National Finance Committee of the American 
Red Cross. 

He was made chairman of the Mountain Division, comprising the states of Colorado, 
Wyoming, Utah and New Mexico, for the second Liberty Loan drive. The results 
obtained in that campaign compared most favorably with those reached in any other 
division, being approximately two hundred end thirty-six per cent of the amount asked 
for by Washington headquarters, as against an average of one hundred and seventy- 
six per cent for the entire country. He was also made a member of the Colorado State 
Council of Defense and his deep interest in Denver's welfare, upbuilding and develop- 
ment is further indicated in the fact that he is serving on the board of directors of 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 11 

the Denver Civic and Commercial Assocjation. He has been a dynamic force in the 
promotion of all those activities, individual and public, with which he has become 
identified, the results achieved o'ertopping both private and public anticipations. 



JOHN GOOD. 



Almost sixty years have been added to the cycle of the centuries since John Good 
became a resident of Denver, as he arrived in this city, then a western frontier village, 
in 1859. Through all the intervening years until his death he had been an interested 
witness of its growth and development and took an active part in promoting its 
progress and improvement. His labors, too, were an element in the advancement of 
the interests of the state, for he had been closely associated with mining, with railroad 
building, with banking and with real estate activity. He passed the eighty-fourth mile- 
stone on life's journey before answering the final summons, passing away November 
22, 1918. in Denver. His birth occurred at Uhrweiler, Alsace-Lorraine, then a part of 
France but taken over by Germany in 1871. His natal day was October 14, 1834, his 
parents being Jacob and Elizabeth (Kiefer) Guth. It was in 1854 that Mr. Good 
of this review changed his name from Guth to the form that he afterward used — that of 
John Good. His father was born in 1800 and was a large landowner and farmer of 
France and afterward of the United States, leading a busy, useful and active life of 
eighty-six years, his death occurring in 1886. His wife was the daughter of Philipp 
and Elizabeth Kiefer. She had two brothers, George and Philipp, who fought with 
Napoleon and perished in the memorable retreat from Moscow, being then respectively 
eighteen and seventeen years of age. 

John Good was a pupil in the public schools of his native town until 1854, when 
at the age of twenty years he determined to try his fortune in the United States, his 
cousin, John T. Good, of Uhrweiler, having come to the new world in 1837, settling 
in Akron, Ohio. John Good joined his cousin at Akron and engaged in business with 
him, there remaining for about five years. He was one of the pioneer settlers of Den- 
ver, arriving in this city in 1859 with his ox team and wagon. In that year he estab- 
lished one of the first general merchandise stores in Denver, its location being on 
Blake, near Fifteenth street. To secure goods he had to make sixteen trips across the 
plains, hauling all his own freight, and one of these trips required ninety days. There 
was always danger of Indian attack, but he bravely and fearlessly made the journey 
in order to secure the stock necessary for the conduct of the business. He conducted 
the store for only a short time, however, for while he was absent on one of his trips 
the man whom he left in charge of the store suddenly made his departure after dispos- 
ing of the entire stock, and when Mr. Good returned he found an empty store. In 1859 
he became associated with Charles Endlich in organizing the Rocky Mountain Brewery 
Company, thus founding the first brewery in Colorado. They conducted the business 
until 1864, when Mr. Good sold out to his partner, but upon the latter's death six 
months afterward he resumed ownership and control of the plant. In 1871 Philip 
Zang purchased the brewery, which was thereafter conducted under the name of the 
Philip Zang Brewing Company. In 1901 Mr. Good consolidated the Milwaukee and 
Union breweries into the Tivoli-Uuion Brewing Company, of which he became the presi- 
dent and treasurer, continuing as such until his death. He did not confine his efforts 
to a single line, however, but reached out along many fields of usefulness in business. 
Forceful and resourceful, he became one of the organizers and promoters of the old 
German Bank, organized under the laws of Colorado on the 3d of March, 1874. The 
German National Bank was the outgrowth of the German Bank, its charter as a na- 
tional bank being secured in April, 1877. Mr. Good was elected to the vice presi- 
dency of the institution and also became a member of the board of directors. He 
saw the possibilities for Colorado's development along various other lines and became 
one of the promoters and first stockholders of a number of railroad enterprises, in- 
cluding the Denver & Pacific, the Denver & Gulf Railroad and the Denver & South 
Park Railroad. He likewise extended his efforts into the field of real estate and 
also became a large investor in mining properties as well as in railroads and in 
banks. His interests and activities constituted a potent element in the growth and 
material development of city and state. 

In May, 1862, Mr. Good was united in marriage to Miss Rosalia M. Wagner, a 
daughter of J. Christopher and Anna Barbara (Meyer) Wagner, of Mishawaka, In- 
diana, and a niece of Serephine Meyer, who was a judge of the supreme court and 
during the Civil war served as colonel of the One Hundred and Seventh Ohio Regi- 



12 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

ment. He had two sons, Turine and Tulius Meyer, who were members of his 
regiment and were Isilled in battle. A third son. General Edward Meyer, was con- 
nected with the Nineteenth Ohio Volunteers. Mr. and Mrs. Good became the parents 
of six children, as follows: Leonora R., who is now the wife of J. E. Hasier, of New 
York city; Carrie, who gave her hand in marriage to J. J. Reilly, of Salt Lake City; 
Louis; Nellie; Louis Wagner; and John Edward, who was graduated from Yale Uni- 
versity as a member of the class of 1895. 

Mr. Good gave his political allegiance to the republican party in state and na- 
tional matters, while in local affairs, he supported issues and men, who, according to 
his judgment would be of greatest benefit to the welfare and progress of the city, 
irrespective of political party. He was twice elected city treasurer of Denver, filling 
the office from 1875 until 1878 inclusive. He was one of the organizers and charter 
members of the old Lotus Club and exercised marked influence over the social as 
well as the political and business interests of the city. In fact Denver ranked him 
with her leading men and his public-spirited devotion to her welfare was widely 
recognized. 



ORA HALEY. 



Ora Haley, of Denver, was until his retirement from business a few years ago the 
largest individual range and aittle owner in Wyoming and western Colorado and ranks 
with the well known pioneer settlers of the two states. He first visited Denver in the 
spring of 1865, when he drove a bull team into the city, — then a young man of about 
twenty years. He was born in East Corinth, Maine, nineteen miles from Bangor, and 
at thirteen years of age he started to carve out a career for himself. At Bangor, where 
the family had many friends, he spent the first few years of his independent life and at 
nineteen years of age was in Iowa, beginning life anew in the strenuous west. This 
was about the year 1864 and it was in the following spring that he drove the bull team 
across the country to Denver. The life of a "bullwhacker" appealed to him and he 
continued freighting in the hills until he finally decided to go into the butchering 
business at the new Blackhawk camp. 

In 1868 Mr. Haley settled in Albany county, Wyoming, locating first at old Fort 
Sanders and later at Laramie, where he again turned his attention to the butchering 
business, from time to time making small ventures into cattle raising. Almost from the 
outset he became a leader in his part of Wyoming. He was elected to the lower house 
of the territorial legislature in 1871 and was a member of the council in the legislative 
session of 1881. He was also one of the county's representatives in the first state legis- 
lature in 1890 and gave thoughtful and earnest consideration to vital questions which 
came up for settlement and was a cooperant factor in shaping the destiny of the state 
during its formative period. Always a stanch republican, he was and still is one of the 
strongest supporters of Senator Warren. 

In 1877 Mr. Haley was still operating a meat market in Laramie, but he had already 
made his brand, a cut of a heart, famous on what is still known as the Heart ranch on 
the Little Laramie. In 1880 he started the Two Bar brand in what was then Routt 
county, but the district has since been made a part of Moffat county. Soon he had hold- 
ings on the Snake, on Lay creek, on Elkhead creek and in Brown's Park. His ranch 
near Laramie contained about thirty-six thousand acres and in all he was the owner 
of about sixty thousand acres. In 1888 he obtained possession of the Hutton ranch 
and his ranches finally extended for twenty-five miles along the Laramie river. His 
cattle interests gradually grew and developed until he attained a position of leadership 
as the largest individual range and cattle owner in Wyoming and western Colorado. 
In business affairs his vision has always been broad, his sagacity keen and his judg- 
ment sound, and whatever he has undertaken he has carried forward to successful 
completion. About seven years ago, or in 1912, he disposed of much of his range, the 
Clay Springs Cattle Company of Hackberry, Arizona, buying the Moffat county holdings. 

It was in the early '90s that Mr. Haley became one of the principal stockholders of 
the First National Bank of Laramie and afterward acted as its vice president for many 
years. His bank interests were disposed of about the time that he sold his Moffat 
county ranch and he then retired to Denver, where he now owns a palatial home and 
some of the valuable business and office buildings of the city, notably the West Hotel 
and the Cooper building. His business interests and investments are looked after by 
his son. Ora B. Haley, and his extensive holdings in Logan county are supervised by 
his partner, Mr. Harris. 



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ORA HALEY 



14 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

In Omaha, on the 8th of January, 1872, Mr. Haley was married to Miss Augusta 
Pfeiffer, of that city, a daughter of Frank A. and Susan (Maddox) Pfeiffer. Mrs. 
Haley in her paternal line comes of German ancestry, while on the maternal side she 
is descended from the well known Maddox family of Virginia, prominent in the days 
of the Revolution. Mr. and Mrs. Haley have three children living. These are: Mattie, 
now Mrs. Arthur A. Smith, of Sterling, Colorado; Annie, now Mrs. R. L. George, of 
Laramie, "Wyoming; and Ora B., who married Maud Hunn, of Denver. There are 
eleven grandchildren, of whom Ora B. Haley has six— Carla M., Mabel Augusta, Juliana 
B., Ora B. Jr., Patricia and Charles T. Mrs. R. L. George has three children— Adelaide 
H., Ora H. and Ann H., while Mrs. Arthur A. Smith is the mother of two, Nancy 
Augusta and an infant daughter. Mrs. Haley is most domestic in her tastes, devoting 
her time to the welfare of her home and family, promoting the comfort of husband 
and children and extending a most warm-hearted hospitality to their many friends. 
The career of Ora Haley has constituted an important factor in the development of the 
west and he has been associated with every phase of the state's progress and upbuilding 
from pioneer times to the present. 



JOHN FRANCIS CAMPION. 



John Francis Campion, a Denver capitalist whose success had its foundation in the 
rich mineral resources of the state, to the development of which he brought energy, 
persistency of purpose and keen discernment, became well known through business con- 
nections all over the west. It is said that what a man does and what he attains depends 
largely upon his opportunities, but the well balanced man mentally and physically is 
possessed of sufficient courage to venture where favoring opportunity is presented, and 
his judgment must determine the real value and worth of every opportunity. Not all 
days in the career of John Francis Campion were equally bright, but he managed to 
turn threatened failures into victory and dispersed the clouds of defeat with the sun 
of prosperity. 

Mr. Campion was born on Prince Edward Island in December, 1849, a son of M. B. 
and Helen (Fehan) Campion, who were also natives of Prince Edward Island and 
were of English and Irish lineage. For many generations the family had been exten- 
sive landowners in England. The first representative of the name in the new world 
was John Francis Campion, Sr., who crossed the Atlantic with his wife and children 
and settled on Prince Edward Island, where he and his wife lived to an advanced age, 
the former passing away at the age of seventy-five, while the latter reached the seven- 
tieth milestone on life's journey. 

M. Brevort Campion, who was one of their family of nine children, four sons and 
five daughters, became a successful shipbuilder and owner, building his own vessels in 
his own shipyards, and as captain he was able to sail any craft. He not only figured 
prominently in connection with the commercial activity of the island but was also a 
recognized leader in political circles, first as a supporter of the liberal party and after- 
ward of the conservative party. He was chosen to represent his district in the Prince 
Edward Island parliament and he was especially prominent in the administrative 
affairs of the island. The last twenty years of his life were passed in Colorado and 
he became a leading citizen of Leadville and was also widely known throughout the 
state. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Helen Fehan, was a daughter of Dr. 
Fehan, a prominent physician on Prince Edward Island, who lost his life one stormy 
winter's night while crossing the Northumberland strait, which has a width of nine 
miles. 

To Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Campion were born four children and as a member of that 
household John Francis Campion spent his youthful days as a public school pupil in his 
native locality and in the Prince of Wales College at Charlottetown. to which he re- 
turned in 1862, his parents having previous to that time removed with their family 
to California. The brothers. John F. Campion, then seventeen years of age. and George 
Campion, a youth of fifteen, anxious to participate in the Civil war in the United States, 
ran away from college and attempted to enlist in the American navy, but because of 
his youth the younger brother was rejected. After passing the necessary examination 
John F. Campion was accepted and assigned to a position as assistant quartermaster. 
He was on duty on the ship Dolphin and carried to General Sherman the first dis- 
patches he received at Savannah, after completing his famous march to the sea. With 
difficulty and danger the boat proceeded to the entrance of the Savannah river, ther€ 
being many sunken vessels in the harbor, while a great conflagration raged along the 
wliarves, immense quantities of cotton being then in flanies. 




JOHN F. CAMPION 



16 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Following the close of the war John F. Campion returned to California on a visit 
to his parents, who were then residents of Sacramento, and turning his attention to 
mining, he became interested in the development of the rich mineral resources of 
the west as miner, prospector and mine owner. In 186S he discovered the White Pine 
silver mine but after making a fair start in its development lost all that he had in that 
venture, amounting to about five thousand dollars. He afterward took up mining at 
Eureka, Nevada, where he developed and sold valuable properties and won substantial 
fortune through his operations there. Subsequently he went with his father and brother 
to Pioche, Nevada, where he continued mining, becoming the owner of the Pioche- 
Phoenix, a valuable silver property. He organized the PiochePhoenix Mining Com- 
pany but was compelled to make a hard fight for the property, as other claimants 
attempted by force to assert their alleged rights. Mx. Campion, however, succeeded 
in holding the mine until the courts awarded him formal possession thereof. 

After disposing of his interests in Nevada, Mr. Campion went to tlie new mining 
camp of Leadville, Colorado, in April, 1879, and there bought, developed and sold 
various properties, also retaining valuable interests in that district. He became the 
owner of the Bison, Reindeer, Elk and Ibex mines, the last better known as the Little 
Johnny. He began the development of all these properties, naming them for animals. 
The Ibex became one of the richest mines in the west and has given out great fortunes 
to many of its operators. Mr. Campion was the general manager of the Ibex Mining 
Company, was also president of the Napite Mining Company of Breckenridge, a director 
of the Carbonate National Bank of Leadville, the vice president of the Seventeenth 
Street Building Company of Denver, vice president of the Denver National Bank, vice 
president of the Denver, Northwestern & Pacific Railway Company (Moffat Road), 
president of the Northwestern Terminal Company and president of the Big Horn Min- 
ing and Cattle Company. Thus he extended his efforts over a broad field, contributing 
in substantial measure to the material upbuilding of the state. In business matters 
his judgment was seldom, if ever, at fault and his keen discernment enabled him to 
readily recognize every difficulty as well as every opportunity of a situation. Avoid- 
ing the former and utilizing the latter to the best possible advantage, he built up his 
fortunes along substantial lines, employing constructive methods, so that his path was 
never strewn by the wreck of other men's failures. 

In the year 1895-6 Mr. Campion erected a palatial home at No. 800 Logan street and 
there installed a happy family. It was on the 15th of April, 1895, in Denver, that he 
wedded Miss Nellie May Daly, a sister of Thomas F. Daly, and their children are: 
John F., Jr., born June 26, 1896; Helen; Phyllis; and Roland, born September 12, 1901. 
John F. Campion, Jr., prepared for college at Exeter and left Dartmouth in his junior 
year for service in France, where he is a member of Company C, Three Hundred and 
Second Heavy Tank Battalion. 

Mr. Campion was a member of various clubs, including the Denver Club, the Den- 
ver Athletic Club and the Denver Country Club. He was one of the promoters and 
organizers of the Colorado Museum of Natural History, of which he was chosen presi- 
dent and in this connection directed one of the most interesting attractions at City 
Park. While engaged in mining at Breckenridge he formed the acquaintance of Pro- 
fessor Edwin Carter, who had made a splendid collection of the fauna of Colorado, 
including the bison and many other rare specimens of natural history. This most 
valuable group of Rocky Mountain wild animals was in danger of loss by fire, or want 
of attention, being stored in the cabins of the owner. Mr. Campion, assisted by Joseph 
A. Thatcher and others, obtained the old Carter collection, and made il the nucleus 
for the museum at City Park. He was also a patron of art, being president of the 
Municipal Art League, and that his Interests extended into other lines is indicated in 
the fact that he was a trustee of Agnes Memorial Sanitarium. Any man of generous 
impulses and broad views can give money away to worthy objects, so while Mr. Cam- 
pion's contributions to charity and benevolence were real and creditable, his signal 
service was in the vigor he lent to the pioneer era in making this region habitable 
and in bringing its resources to light. Such careers are too near us now for their 
significance to be aopraised at their true value, but the future will be able to trace 
the tremendous effects of their labors upon the society and the institutions of their 
time. The possibilities of high position afforded in the United States to industry and 
fidelity have never been better illustrated than in Mr. Campion's case. Starting out 
in the world without special advantages, he came to be possessed of wealth and) of 
high social position, with a mind enriched by books and art and a constant mingling 
with men and women of the highest_ education and accomplishments. He came to be 
possessed of almost everything that men covet as of value and this was won through 
his unaided exertions. It is well, too, that so successful a life should have found time 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 17 

for the finer things which our self-made men are so prone to overlook — aid in money 
and personal attention to schools, collection of rare objects of beauty from all over 
the world and the artistic adornment of his city and of his home. His career was 
an illustration of the fact which Carlyle has expressed: "The obstacles in the paths 
of the weak become stepping stones for the strong." 



WILLIAM RILEY CALLICOTTE. 

William Riley Callicotte ranks among the great men of the state and nation, and 
yet it is but a comparatively small circle that knows intimately how vast his labors have 
been in the preparation for and in the espousal of notable reform legislation. As 
national delegate of the National Farmers Educational and Cooperative Union much 
of his time is spent in Washington. It was the farmers union committee, of which he 
is one of the most active members, that brought about the establishment of the Bureau 
of Markets ; that fought side by side with others and most effectively for the parcels post, 
now long in operation. It was also his committee that secured the amendment to the 
anti-trust law exempting farmers and labor unions from its drastic provisions. The 
establishment of the National Children's Bureau was the work of the Farmers Bureau 
and other evidences of the important work performed could be cited. Mr. Callicotte is 
now and has tor many years been vice president of the National Farmers Educational 
and Cooperative Union, with a membership of three million. For years he has been 
closely studying problems that have to do with agriculture and those engaged therein. 

His early training was that of the farmbred boy. He was born upon a farm near 
Franklin, Johnson county, Indiana, July 12, 1847. His father was John Bailey Callicotte, 
while his mother bore the maiden name of Elender Thomas. The son pursued his 
education in the schools of Clarinda, Iowa, but at fifteen years of age entered the army, 
serving until he was eighteen in the Twenty-fifth Missouri Infantry and the First 
Missouri Engineers. As an engineer he assisted in laying the bridges for Sherman's 
famous march to the sea. It was when on this mission that he was among those who 
captured Captain Charles S. Thomas, of Georgia, now United States senator from Colorado 
and a close friend of Dr. Callicotte. The latter was at Shiloh, also participated in the 
siege of Vicksburg, was present at the capture of Atlanta and at the capture of Savannah 
and of Raleigh, at the battle of Jonesboro, Georgia, and at the capture of Fort McAllister. 
After witnessing the surrender of General Johnston to General Sherman he returned home 
at the age of eighteen years and after the death of his parents he reared and educated 
his younger brothers and sisters, three of whom are now engaged in teaching. Dr. Calli- 
cotte also followed the profession of teaching and in the early days supplemented his 
efforts in that field by acting as county surveyor. For ten years he successfully taught 
school in Iowa and in 1880 came to Colorado. He was for four years principal of the 
high school at Leadville and for six years he was city and county superintendent of 
schools at Aspen, Colorado. Under Governor Waite he was called to state office, serving 
as fish and game warden for two years, and during all this period he was likewise engaged 
in farming, while later he entered the business of fish culture, which he still follows. 
His activities in behalf of farming interests and the agriculturists of the country have 
been of the most far-reaching importance. In addition to his labors as vice president 
of the National Farmers Educational and Cooperative Union, he assisted in organizing 
the National Farm Federation, which includes all federated farm organizations of the 
United States. The headquarters are in Washington and as the representative of the 
organization Dr. Callicotte framed the bill! "for the conservation of food and the pro- 
duction of live stock." This is about to become a law and will save animals to the nation 
by drastic measures. Approximately nine hundred thousand head of cattle now allowed 
to perish by the neglect of owners will be saved. This will compel stockmen to see that 
herds on storm-swept plains are more properly looked after in the future. 

In state legislation Dr. Callicotte's work has been just as elTective. The pure seed law 
and the present herd law were drafted by him. The first bill for the initiative and 
referendum in this state was drafted by Michael Lorenz, private secretary to Governor 
Waite, and Dr. Callicotte. The first great fight in this state for the Australian secret 
ballot was initiated by Dr. Callicotte in 1886. It will thus be seen that his studies and 
labors have covered a broad scope and that he has taken the initiative in bringing 
about many reforms which are now recognized as of great value to commonwealth and 
country. But the work that has been nearest to his heart is as an officer of the State 
Bureau of Child and Animal Protection. This position he has held for nearly fourteen 
years and he has traveled over the state many times seeing that the law for the physical 



18 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

examination of school children has been properly complied with; also educating teachers 
in the methods of detecting defective children; seeing that parents provided for the 
care and cure, if possible, of defective children. He organized the first classes in moral 
and humane education at the Teachers College in Greeley and seven years ago the 
first class in this course was graduated. Prompted by the keenest interest in his fellow- 
men and in the welfare of every individual, he has supported all those interests which he 
has believed to be for the physical, mental and moral benefit of the race. His studies 
and researches have been most comprehensive and his labors have been promoted along 
scientific and humanitarian lines. 

Dr. Callicotte was married in Iowa to Miss Duly A. Aiken and to them have been 
born the following named: Alta Pearl, now Mrs. John Funk; Maud E., now the wife 
of Roy D. Maxfield; Jesse D„ a farmer at Carbondale; and Willard Ellen. 

In the career of Dr. Callicotte may be found many of the characteristics which were 
manifest in his Huguenot ancestry. Fleeing first from France to England, later repre- 
sentatives of the family crossed the Atlantic to Virginia, thus founding the American 
branch. The same spirit which caused his ancestors to seek religious liberty has led 
Dr. Callicotte to seek liberation for all those people whose opportunities and chances 
are in many ways curtailed by environment, by inherited tendencies or by oppression. 
His labors have been largely of a constructive character, seeking not only to do away 
with the old but to institute new methods and measures, reaching out along continually 
broadening lines. The citizens of Colorado and the statesmen at Washington have 
come to regard him as authority upon many problems which he has presented to public 
attention and in many instances his advanced opinions have become crystallized in state 
and national legislation. 



FRANK S. BYERS. 



Frank S. Byers has for almost six decades been a resident of Colorado and two 
years ago was chosen for the honored position of president of the Society of Colorado 
Pioneers. A son of William N. Byers, mentioned elsewhere in this work, he was 
born in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1855, and was therefore but a little child when he 
came to Denver with his father on the 7th of August, 1859. During his youthful 
days he attended the common schools of the town, for Denver was then a western 
frontier village, and also worked in his father's newspaper oflSce. In 1867-68 he car- 
ried the pony route of the Denver News, attending to his duties after school and 
was one of Denver's first news carriers. The money which he earned he saved and 
this he judiciously put into the cattle business with John Evans, thus launching 
forth upon a business line in whicli he later became very prominent. He afterward 
had the benefit of instruction in the Agricultural College at Lansing, Michigan, in 
1870-71. In 1S68, however, he had entered the live stock and cattle business, begin- 
ning by gathering cattle on the Arkansas river in connection with Governor Evans 
and William Dailey. He was the first settler, with stock to remain, in what is now 
Grand county, then a part of Summit county, where he went in June, 1874, with 
cattle. With the passing years he took a very prominent and active part in the 
development of that region. He served as county treasurer and also as commis- 
sioner of Grand county and he carried the first mail into the county in 1878. He 
aided in the organization and was the first president of the Bank of Grand County, 
which was the first financial institution in that civil division of the state. At the 
present time he is largely living retired, deriving a substantial income from well 
placed investments. 

Mr. Byers has been married twice. In 1877 he wedded Elizabeth McQueary and 
for his second wife he chose Mary W. Sullivan, of New York, who was teaching in 
Denver, their wedding being celebrated January 1, 1885. Mr. Byers has one child, 
Grace, who was born in July, 1880, and is the wife of H. C. Boston, of Fort Lupton. 
They have become the parents of a son, Byers C. Boston. 

The name of Byers from pioneer times has been most closely associated with 
the history of development and progress in Colorado and has ever stood as a syno- 
nym for that which is of value and benefit to the individual and to the community 
at large. Frank S. Byers has for twenty-five years been active in humane work. 
He succeeded his father on the board of the Humane Society and for ten years 
prior to that time was a volunteer agent of the society. He is now its firstj vice 
president and for the past fifteen years has been officially connected with the State 




FRANK S. BYERS 



20 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Humane Society, taking his father's place in May, 1903. He is also a member of 
the State Board of Child and Animal Protection and he is continually reaching out 
a helping hand to alleviate the hard conditions of lite for the unfortunate. For 
six years Mr. Byers has served as a director of the Pioneers Society, has been its 
first vice president and in 1916 was elected to the presidency. He has a great fond- 
ness for horses and holds the state pole record and also most of the running race 
records of the track, being an active and prominent member of the Gentlemen's 
Driving and Riding Club. 

No feature of Denver's history in its more salient points is unfamiliar to him 
and with many events which have contributed to its progress and upbuilding he 
has been closely associated. He is a worthy scion of an honored race, while his 
life record is measured by individual accomplishment and not by the acts of an- 
cestors. 



DAVID J. VAN BRADT. 



Among those who are successfully practicing at the Fort Morgan bar and whose 
ability places them in the front rank of the leading lawyers of their section of the 
state is numbered David J. Van Bradt, a Canadian by birth and a loyal son of his 
adopted country. He was born in Canada. December 10, 1872, a son of Milton and 
Anna (McGuire) Van Bradt, who were also natives of Canada. The father was a 
farmer whose ancestors came from the Mohawk valley of New York and were 
obliged to leave their home there at the time of the American Revolution. They 
went to Canada, where land was purchased. Milton Van Bradt became a farmer 
of that country and there carried on the work of the fields for many years, or until 
1914, when he retired from active agricultural life. He now resides at York, Haldi- 
mand county, Canada, but in 1915 was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who 
passed away in February of that year. 

David J. Van Bradt was reared and educated in Canada, attending the public 
schools until he reached the age of twelve years, after which he worked upon his 
father's farm to the age of sixteen. He then determined to devote his attention to 
music and at eighteen years of age left home> going to Buffalo, New York, where 
he taught music and also worked his way through college. He likewise pursued a 
high school course in Buffalo and later attended the Buffalo Law School. He com- 
pleted his studies in the latter institution in 1896 and afterward was employed in 
a law office for two years. He then took up the practice of law on his own account 
in Buffalo and there resided until January 2, 1908, when he came to Colorado, making 
his way to Fort Morgan, where he entered into partnership with his brother, Irving 
Van Bradt, who had removed to this state in 1905. The partnership relation between 
them was continued until January 9, 1917, when their professional connection was 
dissolved, the brother having been appointed to the office of assistant attorney gen- 
eral. Since that time Mr. Van Bradt of this review has practiced alone and he is 
accorded a liberal clientage, to the interests of which he is most loyal. He has wide 
and comprehensive knowledge of the principles of jurisprudence and is seldom it 
ever at fault in the application of such principles to the points in litigation. His 
careful analysis, the thoroughness with which he prepares his cases and the earnest- 
ness with which he presents his cause before the court combine to win for him most 
gratifying success and he is now accorded a place among the leading members of 
the bar of this section of the state. 

On the 13th of September, 1899, Mr. Van Bradt was married to Miss Odelia Bal- 
lard, a native of Hamburg, New York, and to them have been born four children-. 
Milton Irving, born July 14, 1900, who, in March, 1917. volunteered in the aviation 
section and since then has been in the First Aero Squadron, having gone to France 
for active service in August, 1917; Harriet E., born July 28, 1901; Catherine, who 
passed away in February, 1903; and Eimon, born February 13, 1904. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
fraternally Mr. Van Bradt is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and with the Homesteaders. He also belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks, having membership in Lodge. No. 1143, of Fort Morgan. He and his family 
occupy a pleasant home at No. 916 Lincoln street which he owns, and in addition 
he has farming interests comprising one hundred and sixty acres of valuable farm- 
ing land in Morgan county. At all times he is a patriotic and loyal citizen and at 




DAVID J. VAN BRADT 



22 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the present time he is serving as county attorney, having been appointed to the 
office in January, 1913, since which time he has been the Incumbent in the position. 
He served as deputy district attorney from January, 1913, until January, 1917. He 
has also served as government appeal agent in the selective draft since the begin- 
ning of the war and has devoted at least halt of his time to that work without 
compensation, even paying his own expenses. He is putting forth every effort in 
his power to advance the interests of his country in this great world struggle, actu- 
ated by the most patriotic spirit and by the highest ideals. 



HON. GEORGE CONRAD FAHRION. 

Many there are who would accord to George Conrad Fahrion the place of prom- 
inence among the citizens of Elbert county. For thirty-seven years he sat upon the 
bench of the county court and, although a democrat, was never defeated in a county 
which has a normal republican majority. The record of no other county Judge In 
the history of the state can parallel this, and the fairness and impartiality of his 
decisions constitute an unblemished record. Judge Fahrion was born in Leonberg, 
Wurtemberg, Germany, in April, 1832. and came of that fine stock of Germans who 
preferred to live under the flag of a free country rather than under the military rule 
of the fatherland. He was seventeen years of age when he came to the new world 
and in 1860 he made the trip by team across the plains 'to Colorado. Here he soon, 
took advantage of the opportunities denied him in his native land and homesteaded 
some of the best land in Elbert county. He had been educated at Stuttgart, Germany, 
and throughout his life he remained a student of books and of events and was a close 
and keen observer of men and their motives. He came to Colorado when they needed 
men to fight for the Union cause and he soon enlisted. His service was largely along 
the Mexican border and he rendered valuable aid to his adopted country there. Today 
his widow is on the government pension roll, a tribute to his valor and honorable career 
as a soldier in the Civil war. 

It was in 1865 that Mr. Fahrion was married to Miss Elizabeth Swena, of Denver, 
and with his young bride he removed to Elbert county. He was identified with farm- 
ing and cattle raising for many years and at one time owned as high as two thousand 
acres of land. In 1918 his heirs sold a thirteen hundred acre tract which had been 
left to them by their father. There are five sons and one daughter in the family, 
including Mrs. E. N. Wood, who is secretary of the Kiowa school board. 

George Conrad Fahrion possessed a mind judicial in character and one that could 
not be swerved by personal prejudice. Wliile he had not pursued the study of law in 
early manhood, he was called to the bench and for thirty-seven years served as county 
judge, being again and again re-elected on the democratic ticket in a republican county. 
He was the most noted representative of the county bench in the state. Time and again 
he called litigants before him and settled their disputes without the expense of lawyers 
or court costs. From all over the county people who had trouble over property rights 
would come to him and agree to let him decide the case privately. His clear vision 
and his sterling Integrity made his name a synonym for uprightness and fair dealing 
In every household. He was county judge of Douglas county during the period when 
Elbert county was created and there began a career on the bench which continued to 
the time of his death, on December 6, 1909. His picture now occupies the place of honor 
on a wall of the Elbert county courthouse. His record should ever be a source of 
inspiration and encouragement to those who knew him and his memory remains as a 
benediction to all with whom he came in contact. 



OSCAR LEE YOUNG. 



Oscar Lee Young, the president and manager of the Kansas-Colorado Oil & Re- 
fining Company of Denver, was born in Allen county, Ohio, September 3, 1850, a son 
of William and Jane (Ralston) Young. The father was born in Maryland and the 
mother in Pennsylvania. They became residents of Ohio in early life and there the 
father followed the occupation of farming. He afterward removed from Ohio to 
Dekalb county, Indiana, where he passed away, and his wife also died in that locality. 

Oscar Lee Young is the only surviving member of a family of nine children. 
Three months out of the year he attended the country schools and during the remainder 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 23 

of the time devoted his attention to farm work, but by diligent night study he secured 
sufficient information to enable him at the age of sixteen years to take up teaching 
in the country and village schools of Ohio. He afterward entered the law office of 
Judge L. M. Ninde, of Indiana, and was admitted to general practice in the courts of 
that state in 1876. He entered upon the practice of law at Fort Wayne, Indiana, and 
afterward removed to Duluth, Minnesota, where he remained for twenty years a 
prominent figure of the bar of thai city. For fifteen years of that period he devoted 
his attention to corporation work, especially in regard to laws affecting the mines and 
mining Interests. His knowledge in that department became so widely recognized 
and his fame spread abroad to such an extent that the officers of one of the larga 
corporations decided to make Mr. Young an offer to devote his entire time to the in- 
terests of the corporation and relinquish all outside practice. From that time he 
was connected with a number of very important cases for the said corporation. At 
length, however, he severed his connections and in 1917 came to Denver, where he 
immediately began investigating oil interests with the result that he entered into 
active association with the Kansas-Colorado Oil & Refining Company, which has hold- 
ings in the Wyoming fields, where operations are now being conducted. Of this com- 
pany Mr. Young is the president and is most wisely and carefully directing its 
interests. He is also preparing to open law offices in Denver and his established 
reputation as an expert on mining law will undoubtedly insure him an extensive 
clientage. He belongs to the Denven Bar Association and the Colorado Bar Associa- 
tion as well as to the Minnesota State Bar Association. 

On the 24th of May, 1882, Mr. Young was united in marriage to Miss Jane M. 
Walker, of Fort Wayne, Indiana. They became parents of two children, of whom 
one has passed away. Walker R., born in Butler, Indiana, in May, 1885, was grad- 
uated from the high school of Duluth, Minnesota, and from the University of Idaho 
and is now with the United States government in the engineering department reclama- 
tion service, located in Denver. He married Miss- Marguerite Bush, of Boise, Idaho, 
and they have one child, Jane Bush Young, who was born in Boise. They are main- 
taining their home in Denver. 

With limited opportunities in youth, Oscar Lee Young has nevertheless steadily 
advanced, wisely utilizing the talents with which nature endowed him and taking ad- 
vantage of every opportunity offered. Step by step, therefore, he has progressed until 
he has long occupied an enviable position in legal circles and is today also well known 
as a prominent representative of oil interests. 



HENRY RICHARD PHILLIPS. 

Henry R. Phillips, prominent in railroad construction work and contracting, has 
been a resident of Colorado from the pioneer epoch in its history. He was born in 
Garnett, Kansas, April 12, 1870, a son of E. C. and Stella J. (Barnheiser) Phillips, the 
former a native of Ohio and the latter of Indiana. The mother removed to Brecken- 
ridge, Colorado, with her parents when but nine years of age and they were married 
at Golden. In early life E. C. Phillips also removed to the west and was one of those 
hardy trail blazers whose efforts constituted an initial element in the early development 
of this state. Afraid of neither man nor beast, he engaged in freighting and braved 
the dangers and hardships of pioneer life. His freighting trips took him between St. 
Joseph, Missouri, and Butte, Montana. During the Civil war he volunteered for active 
duty and served his country through four and a half years of that crisis, enlisting in an 
Ohio regiment. In the early days of railroad building he gave up his freighting outfit 
and became a railroad builder through Kansas, continuing in that work for many 
years. At a later period in his life he resided at Longmont, Colorado, where he passed 
away in March, 1912. His widow survives and is still a resident of Longmont. In their 
family were four children: Henry R., of this review; Mrs. A. H. St. Clair, of Longmont; 
Mrs. L. C. Rash, and Mrs. Charles C. Lewby, also living in Longmont. 

Henry R. Phillips was a pupil in the schools of Salina, Kansas, after which he 
entered college as a student in the WeSleyan University there, in which he pursued a 
business course. He then returned home to become the active assistant of his father 
in railroad construction work and continued with him along that line of business for 
fifteen years or until 1905, when he decided to conduct business on his own account in 
that way. Removing to Denver, he organized the Phillips Construction Company, with 
offices in the Railroad building, and has since been very successful as a railroad builder 
and contractor. His business has taken him to various parts of the country and his con- 



24 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

tract work has been of a most important character along various lines aside from rail- 
roading. He and his associates had the contract for the building of a considerable 
portion of the pipe lines for the Denver Union Water Company, also built the interurban 
street car line between Denver and Boulder and has executed many other large and 
notable contracts. His business is conducted under the name of the Phillips Construc- 
tion Company, of which he is the president. 

In 1894 Mr. Phillips was united in marriage to Miss Maude Cushman, who was bom 
in Boulder, Colorado, and died in Salina, Kansas, in 1901. She was a daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Washburn Cushman, of Longmont, Colorado. In 1907 Mr. Phillips was again 
married, his second union being with Miss Anna Belle Davis, of Denver. Mr. and Mrs. 
Phillips are well itnown socially and receive the hospitality of many of the best homes 
of Denver. Mr. Phillips belongs to the Denver Motor Club and is widely and favorably 
known. The extent and importance of his business interests have gained him a large 
acquaintance in various sections of the country and his ability has brought him promi- 
nently to the front along the line which he has chosen as a life work. One element 
of his success is undoubtedly the fact that he has always continued in the field of labor 
in which he made his initial business step. He has never dissipated his energies over 
many lines but has concentrated his efforts and attention with the result that he has 
gained expert knowledge and skill in his particular field. 



WILLIAM J. BARKER. 



"William J. Barker, vice president and general manager of the Denver Gas & 
Electric Light Company, has risen to his present position by a method which has 
come to be known all over the world as distinctively "American." This means that 
ability met with its reward wherever someone was needed for the next higher job. 
By the exercise of his native powers, whereby these powers have grown and developed, 
William J. Barker has reached the notable place which he occupies today in connection 
with one of the leading corporations of his city. 

Mr. Barker was born in London, England, December 24, 1855. In 1869 he came to 
America to fight his way to the top. It was, however, much of a boyish adventure — 
this coming to America, for first of all he had worked his way to Australia on a sail- 
ing vessel — an experience that gave him some notion of what hard toil means in this 
world. But in this, as with everything else he has since done, he mastered the "sail- 
ing" business and there was nothing in connection with a full-rigged craft that he did 
not know. 

On one of these trips and while still a very young man, Mr. Barker made his 
way to New York and the hustling, bustling spirit of America appealed so strongly to 
him that he decided it would be worth his while to anchor here for life. He finally 
landed in Cleveland, Ohio, and worked as an engineer. With a mind trained to look 
for and apply needed mechanical improvements, he soon attracted the attention of 
employers. The climax was reached when he came into the employ of E. W. Rollins, 
a great genius whose success was based largely upon his ability to put the right man 
into the right place. Mr. Barker was now given every opportunity to develop his 
talents along mechanical lines. When electric lighting was needed in Denver, it was 
to W. J. Barker that the Denver company turned for effective installation. He found 
Denver an ideal spot for the best work along his new lines. He found in the office 
of the general manager, Frank Frueauff, now president of the Denver Gas & Electric 
Light Company, one of the most progressive minds in the industrial world. Later 
there came into office Robert W. Speer, one of the greatest mayors the country has 
known. The result of this combination is the "best lighted city in the world." At the 
time of the triennial conclave of the Knights Templar the illumination was of so 
unique a character that Mr. Barker and his associates in the work achieved a nation- 
wide fame. In fact the lighting at all of the great national conventions held in 
Denver has done much to make these gatherings memorable. No city in the country 
has a "Movie Row" as wonderfully lighted as is Curtis street. In the street lighting 
of Denver it was Mr. Barker who supervised the work, suggesting many valuable im- 
provements to Mr. Speer and the Art Commission which had general charge of the 
matter. He has now for some years been the general manager of the company and 
the wheels run as smoothly in the large Gas & Electric Light building on Champa 
and Fifteenth streets as the myriad clusters of lights that have made this structure 
the greatest feat in illumination in America. 

A friend, in writing of Mr. Barker's more intimate life, has said: "His hand 




WILLIAM J. BARKER 



26 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

is open to those in need; he is a booster of the first rank; he believes in Denver and 
always does his sBare; he never forgets the friends of his youth; the worthy and 
deserving never appeal to him in vain; he enjoys companionship; he is a never 
failing friend; he Is a good husband and father; all in all he is a man, and when he has 
finally been gathered to his fathers there will be real mourning in ranks high and low, 
and it can be well said of him: 'The world was brighter and better for Bill Barker 
living in it.' " 



AKTHUR L. HOYT, M. D. 



Dr. Arthur L. Hoyt, a well known and representative citizen of Akron, is the 
efficient treasurer of Washington county. He was born in Monticello, Iowa, on the 
12th of January, 1867, a son of Lyman and Adeline (Hallett) Hoyt, who were natives 
of New York and Michigan respectively. In 1850 the father removed to Iowa, locating 
in Jones county, where he purchased and improved a tract of land which he successfully 
cultivated throughout the remainder of his life. His demise occurred on the 4th of 
April, 1879, while his wife was called to her final rest in April, 1882. 

Arthur L. Hoyt was reared in the state of his nativity and after completing his 
more specifically literary education went to Iowa City to enter the medical department 
of the State University, which institution conferred upon him the degree of M. D. in 
1896. He first located for practice at Popejoy, Iowa, where he remained for six years, 
and next removed to Dows, Iowa, there successfully following his profession until 1911. 
In that year he came to Colorado for the benefit of his health and took up his abode 
in Akron, Washington county, where he opened a drug store. He did not practice 
medicine but continued in business as a druggist until the 1st of January, 1915, when 
he was elected county treasurer, in which capacity he has since served. In this con- 
nection he is making a most creditable and commendable record, discharging his duties 
with marked promptness, ability and faithfulness. He has farming interests in this 
state and has now long been numbered among the substantial and esteemed citizens 
of his community. 

On the 15th of March, 1888, Dr. Hoyt was united in marriage to Miss Louetta Swisher, 
a daughter of Philip O. and Margaret Elizabeth (Swisher) Swisher, by whom he had 
three children, namely: Otto J., who is engaged in the jewelry business in Akron; and 
Phillip Otho and Audrey Lyman, both of whom died in infancy. Dr. Hoyt gives his 
political allegiance to the republican party, while his religious faith is that of the Pres- 
byterian church. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America. 



ROBERT WILBUR STEELE. 



Denver's history records no more illustrious name than that of Hon. Robert Wilbur 
Steele, whose developing powers brought him to the highest judicial position within the 
gift of the people of the state. He lives in the memory of his friends, enshrined in the 
halo of a gracious presence, as a man of marked professional ability and the highest 
sense of personal honor. He was born in Lebanon, Warren county, Ohio, November 14, 
1857, and was the second in a family of five children, an elder sister and younger brother 
passing away in early life. His parents were Dr. Henry King and Mary Frances 
(Dunlavy) Steele. The former was born in Dayton, Ohio, April 1, 1825, and was a son 
of Dr. John and Cornelia (King) Steele, who were representatives of pioneer families 
of Ohio and Kentucky. After attending Center College at Danville, Kentucky, Dr. Henry 
Steele pursued a course in medicine and surgery at the University of New York and 
became a successful practitioner of Dayton, Ohio, to which city his father had removed 
from Kentucky in 1812. The latter was a son of Robert Steele, who was one of the 
founders of Transylvania College at Lexington, Kentucky. Thus it was that he came 
of an ancestry honorable and distinguished and his own lines of life were cast in 
harmony therewith. Dr. John Steele cared for the sick and wounded in the Dayton 
Military Hospital in 1812 and Dr. Henry Steele was surgeon of the Forty-fourth Ohio 
Infantry and later of the Eighth Ohio Cavalry in the Civil war. 

During this period the family largely resided at Dayton, Ohio, and there Robert 
Wilbur Steele began his education. He was not a robust, but was always a likable lad 
and was greatly beloved by his relatives. It was the desire to improve the condition 




DR. ARTHUR L. HOYT 



28 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

of his son's health that led Dr. Henry Steele in 1870 to remove with his family from 
Ohio to Colorado. That was the year which distinctly marked the ending of the 
pioneer epoch and the beginning of an era of modern day development. Dr. Steele 
became a most prominent and influential resident of Denver, was appointed a member 
of the state board of health in 1S79 and again called to the office in 1891. He was 
among the organizers of the Colorado Medical Society in 1871 and served as its presi- 
dent in 1875, while in 1877 he became the first dean of the medical department of the 
University of Denver. He passed away January 20, 1893, and the Steele Memorial 
Hospital has been most appropriately named in his honor. 

Robert Wilbur Steele was a youth of but thirteen years when he accompanied his 
father to Denver and he became a member of the first graduating class of the city, 
completing his course in 1877. Almost from the time of his arrival in Denver he earned 
all of his own spending money and it was not long before he was substantially con- 
tributing to his own support. He was employed in the Union Bank in a minor capacity 
and also acted as collector for Dr. Williams, who was associated with Dr. Steele in 
practice. In those early years he spent his summer vacations upon a ranch owned by 
his cousins, in the San Luis valley, near Villa Grove, and the outdoor life contributed 
much toward the development and maintenance of his health. In his schooldays he was 
not a particularly brilliant scholar, set off from others by his intellectual attainments, 
but is well remembered by his classmates, owing to the charm of his personality and 
his ability as a speaker. He won the prize in the third Woodbury contest for oratory, 
which was held June 14, 1876, on which occasion he declaimed Webster's famous oration 
in reply to Hayne. Even in his schooldays he manifested a deep interest in politics, 
coupled with the capacity of readily making friends— traits of character which are of 
unmistakable worth to the political leader. Of him at this period in his life it was 
written: "Sincerely democratic in his thought and attitude toward others, affable 
to all of whatever rank or station, just in his judgments, yet always willing to find an 
excuse for the weak or misguided, he had all the dangerous weapons of the demagogue, 
yet without any of the demagogue's disposition to use them wrongfully. He was inter- 
ested, though not so profoundly as in later years, in the fundamental principles and 
problems of government; he had a lively and active interest in men as men; and he was 
also interested in the practical problems of political organization and in the results 
that may be accomplished by the union and coordination of individuals in political 
parties." He seemed to turn naturally to the study of law, having almost intuitive 
interest in questions which concerned legal practice, while his oratorical ability also 
constituted a potent force in his chosen life work. He began his reading in the office 
and under the direction of the firm of Wells, Smith & Macon, very prominent attorneys 
of Denver, and the next year he became a student in the Columbian University, now 
the George Washington University of Washington, D. C. The climate of the east, 
however, proved detrimental to him and in 1879 he returned to Colorado and resumed 
his law studies with the firm of Wells, Smith & Macon, being admitted to the bar in 
1881. Not long afterward the board of commissioners appointed him clerk of the county 
court of Arapahoe county, of which Denver was then the county seat, and he devoted 
his attention for three years to these duties, during which time he completed the study 
of law, history and general literature. In 1S84 he resigned to engage in the active 
practice of his chosen profession. 

On the 28th of February, 1884, Judge Steele was married to Miss Anna B. Truax 
and they became the parents of three sons and two daughters: Henry; William; 
Frances Edwina, who died in early childhood; Robert, born in 1891; and a daughter, 
Jane, who is yet a resident of Denver. 

It was not long after his marriage that Judge Steele formed a law partnership with 
William H. Malone, and he continued actively and successfully in the private practice 
of law until called to the office of district attorney. In 1885 he was appointed land 
attorney for Colorado for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Company, which 
was extending its line through the state, and in the capacity of attorney Mr. Steele 
became familiar with the districts through which the line was being built and utilized 
his opportunity for judicious investment, acquiring large land holdings, from which 
he afterward derived a handsome income. Moreover, he became extensively interested 
in land law practice, in which field of jurisprudence he was regarded as an expert. 
Thus he was steadily advancing along professional lines and at the same time his inter- 
est and activity in politics was bringing him prominently to the front in that connection. 
In the fall of 1890 he was elected chairman of the republican central committee of 
Arapahoe county, at which time there were two very decided factions in -republican 
ranks. He immediately set to work to heal the breach and with notable tact and 
ability brought the two opposing sides together. He was elected to the office of district 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 29 

attorney and his course was generally endorsed as that of an extremely fair-minded 
and capable man, who. as one of the local papers expressed it, was "a prosecutor and 
not a persecutor." 

Up to the year 1893 Colorado was the leading state among those which advocated 
the silver standard and, when owing to conditions which have become a matter of 
history sliver declined rapidly in value causing the financial failure of various banks 
throughout the state, the investments of the firm of Steele & Malone were not exempt 
from the wide disaster and suffered heavy losses. Many there were who at that time 
tooli refuge behind the bankruptcy law, but the standards of conduct to which Robert 
Steele adhered were too high to admit of such a course. We again quote from a 
contemporary biographer: "In the dark days of 1S93 he wrote for the relief of others 
a bankruptcy law that gained high repute for its mingled mercy and justice, but for 
himself he claimed no clemency. Men saw and respected the quality of his character 
and the integrity of his purpose and gladly accorded to him the one thing he asked — 
the time to meet their claims. Only those most Intimately in his confidence knew the 
burden he carried through the years, or how much strength and time tliat might well 
have been devoted to better things went toward the discharge of that indebtedness. 
For nearly twenty years he faced his task and performed his duty and when the end 
came he went to the great hereafter a free man, having discharged not only every 
personal debt, but also every one that had been assumed by him as a result of business 
entanglement or association with other men." 

In January, 1895, Mr. Steele was appointed to the office of judge of the court of 
Arapahoe county. His work upon that bench did much toward the development of his 
attitude toward his fellowmen. He always believed in tempering justice with mercy 
and he regarded the law as a safeguard and protection rather than as a means of 
punishment. Moreover, it was an added experience in his life which was further 
qualifying him for the graver and more responsible duties that were to devolve upon 
him in his election to the supreme court bench. At this period of his life he was not 
only studying legal problems but was keeping in touch with the best thinking men of 
the age in regard to all the questions which were paramount and vital before the people. 
He had always been a republican in politics but when the party became divided upon 
the silver question he followed the leadership of Senator Teller, not because he had the 
highest regard and respect for that statesman, but because he recognized the importance 
of the silver issue to the welfare of Colorado. He was an independent thinker and his 
study and intelligence convinced him that the silver problem involved fundamental 
principles affecting the rights and the interests of the common people. He therefore 
could no longer call himself a republican while the republican party plainly declared 
itself opposed to the maintenance of the monetary system that had been the established 
practice from the earliest days of the republic. A silver republican party was the 
necessary and logical result and in 1898 Judge Steele became a candidate for reelec- 
tion to the bench, receiving also the endorsement of the people's, the democratic, the 
Teller silver republican and the national people's parties, receiving two-thirds of the 
total number of votes cast at that election. Judge Steele while serving upon the bench 
inaugurated what was known eCs juvenile field day. In his position as county judge 
he was succeeded by Judge Ben B. Lindsey, who enjoys a world-wide reputation as the 
promoter of a court established exclusively for juvenile offenders. Judge Lindsey freely 
and frankly acknowledged the value and importance of Judge Steele's services in this 
great work of reform. Writing to him some years afterward, he said: "You were the 
first judge to enforce our law of 1899, which contained the germ of the present juvenile 
laws." Judge Steele in the course of his judicial career rendered many important deci- 
sions which have found their place upon the state records. He delivered a dissenting 
opinion in the Moyer case and from all parts of the country came to him letters endors- 
ing his position. Possibly the most notable tribute to the strength and convincing logic 
of the minority opinion was that of Chief Justice Gabbert, who delivered the original 
opinion of the court and who considered it advisable, after the minority opinion had 
been presented, to file an extraordinary and supplementary opinion, in which he 
practically admits the overwhelming truth of Justice Steele's main points. It was in 
January, 1900, that Robert Wilbur Steele was called to the ofiice of supreme court judge 
of Colorado, and when destiny brought him to a higher tribunal he had ah-eady received 
nomination by acclamation at the hands of his party as its candidate tor the office, a 
second term, and his reelection was generally conceded. Death, however, intervened 
and on the 12th of October, 1910, he passed to the home beyond. The life of Robert 
Wilbur Steele was dominated by the spirit of democracy— a democracy that believed 
that "All men are created free and equal," and it was his constant effort to uphold 
democracy in its highest and best sense. It permeated his actions in every relation of 



30 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

life and his opinions upon the bench. In this regard he stood far in advance of many 
of his fellows, so much so that his course at times awakened the opposition of even 
his associates upon the bench and led to his filing various dissenting opinions. It is 
said that while the decisions from which he dissented were being written into the 
recorded law of the state the people were gathered to the support of the standards he 
had raised. "His clear, authoritative and unanswerable presentation of the primitive 
principles of American free government was a great rallying cry that brought the 
invincible hosts of democracy to his aid and swept to oblivion the structure that had 
been raised against his protest. Within two years from the time when his presence 
in the supreme court ceased, the right to defend it and the principles he maintained 
were reestablished and confirmed, even though in some of these cases the majority 
decision yet stands as the highest judicial authority. A beautiful and well merited 
tribute was paid to his memory by one who was long associated with him and who 
said: "From his ancestors of the Ohio valley Robert Steele drew his patriotism, his 
aptitude for culture and learning and his strong inclination toward those traits of 
mind and body that are most aptly summarized in the expression, 'an American gentle- 
man.' Those hereditary dispositions were fixed and strengthened by the associations 
of his youthful years. His education and his environment in early Denver confirmed 
his democracy of thought and feeling toward everyone that shared his highly prized 
right of American citizenship. His work as district attorney inculcated respect for law 
and order and gave him practical experience in dealing with the demoralizing and dis- 
integrating forces of modern society. In the county court he profited by the study of 
human nature and learned to judge motive and impulse as well as the legal issues that 
were presented to him. In the activities and associations of politics he encountered the 
complicated problems of matching great principles of human rights and liberties to 
the trivial, selfish and often sordid conditions of local government. In the supreme 
court his mental powers, stimulated by responsibility, rose and expanded to the meas- 
ure of their opportunity and proved equal to the demands that were made upon them. 
* * * The unfolding of his personality through the years was something more than 
the shaping of a material being through the incidence of events. It was rather the 
progressive triumph of a master spirit, embodied in earthly form, rising ever to the 
level of higher opportunities and using every experience gained and power won as 
instruments for the achievement of better things. From the central fire of his personal 
integrity, the genial light and warmth of honesty, kindliness, unselfishness, gentle 
humor, patience, meekness, temperance, humility, and faith in the eternal righteous- 
ness of God and man, irradiated his pathway for his own blessing and for the benefit 
of all with whom he had to do. * * * The broadness of his mental vision and the 
range of his active interest were befitting to a judge who was called upon to deal with 
the widest variety of personal and property rights and possessions. 

"He loved the free air of God's great outdoors. He loved the trees and the beautiful 
flowers that cover the ungardened meadows of the remote highlands; he loved the birds 
that build their nests where none may see or make afraid; he loved the wild, shy beasts 
that live on the wide upper pastures, that shelter themselves in the groves of aspen and 
spruce, or that lurk in the willow thickets along the mountain streams. He transferred 
his kindly thought and care to the animals of the cities. He was instrumental in pro- 
moting the anti-docking laws and in establishing Denver's trafiic squad, when he saw 
the horses slipping on the icy pavement. He wore but two badges, that of the Loyal 
Legion, which indicated the honorable service of his father in the Civil war, while the 
other was that which commissioned him as a humane oificer to intervene in the name 
of the state for the protection of animals abused or neglected. But with all his interest 
in the world of nature, Robert Steele's chief concern was with the world of man. He 
shared as best he might the burdens of the common people in the common ways of life, 
and gave himself freely to service in the place and the manner in which he could do 
the most good. He loved the children and liked to play with the little ones of his own 
household. His juvenile field day in the county court showed his fatherly interest was 
extended to the fatherless. He gave substantial proof of his Interest in the Steele 
Hospital and in beneficent work of that character. He was also much interested in 
educational matters, but was no respecter of persons along the lines of wealth and 
station. Men invariably accorded to him the respect he merited but he never claimed 
their tribute to his mental or moral worth. He was scrupulously honest and honorable 
in small matters as well as large, according to the faultless guiding of an inner sense. 
He was temperate, walking always in the light of that reason that despises intemper- 
ance in thought, in word and in action as a folly even worse than crime. He was pure 
himself in word and in deed. He was brave under circumstances that would have 
tried the courage of any man." 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 31 

Such are the words and phrases, not of empty eulogy or lavish encomium, but of 
the sober judgment of the men of his own day and of his personal acquaintance, the 
painstaking portraiture for the benefit of the men of other times and of other states, 
of one of whom it may be said in sober truth and exactitude: 
"None knew him but to love him, 
None named him but to praise." 

To the young men of Colorado, and especially to the young lawyers of the Denver 
bar, Judge Steele was a model, an example, an inspiration, a friend and helper. He 
had a high sense of the ethics and the responsibilities of the legal profession, and 
scrupulously upheld its honor both as an attorney and a judge. But he also had a 
most kindly interest in and regard for the young men around him and he always did 
wTiatever he could to help them along the path he had pursued. The beautifully 
illuminated seal upon the certificate issued upon admission to the bar is a mark of his 
consideration, for he arranged its colors with his own hand, thinking that "the young 
men ought to have something better than a plain seal in black and white." His interest 
in them they returned with something warmer and more personal than the respect due 
to an older and wiser man, with something more affectionate than the honor paid to the 
judge who was eminently successful in the profession they had chosen for their own. 
They loved him because he appealed to the best that was in them, as men and aa 
Americans. He had faith in them, as he had faith in the nation to which he gave the 
unstinted measure of his service and devotion. 

Patriotism and love of humanity were the guiding stars of his career — not rival 
and inconsistent objects of his regard, but harmonious parts of a resolute purpose. 
To those high ideals his life was consecrated, not in the formalism of a conscious 
statement, but rather in the expression of a lifetime of loyalty and truth. As in the 
county court he had guarded the interests of the widows and orphans, so in the higher 
tribunal he defended the inheritance of liberty. The citizens of the republic were his 
wards; the usurpers of the people's rights were his adversaries; freedom was a sacred 
trust committed to his keeping; and he recognized no other treason so vile as that of 
the public oflicial, in legislative, executive or judicial position, who would use the power 
entrusted to him for the people's welfare to betray their trust. 

He held ever a supreme faith in the American republic; a glory in its historic 
achievements; a pride in its wealth, its resources, its strength, its prosperity, and in 
all the magnificent accomplishments of its civilization. He felt a steadfast confidence 
in its future, believing that through all its diflSculties and dangers things would come 
out right in the end, because he believed in the people, in their patriotism and in their 
love of truth and justice. 

Through the distraction and the temptations of an age when the conditions in state 
and nation seemed to appeal as never before to the selfishness, to the avarice and to 
the ambition of men's natures, Robert Steele kept faith with the people and with himself. 
He did his full part to hand on to Americans of the future the full measure of the 
inheritance of freedom with which he had been endowed; and he never doubted that 
there would always be men of his own mould, who would carry forward his work as he 
had sustained the work of others, and that, amid the struggle for wealth and the strife 
of selfish ambition, there would always be those who would resolutely pursue the higher 
way, and who, guided by reason and enlightened by truth, would strive, fearlessly and 
unfailingly, according to the full measure of their powers and opportunities for liberty 
and justice and humanity. 



JAMES M. MORRIS. 



James M. Morris, engaged in the raising of live stock and poultry in Arapahoe 
county, was born in Canada, October 21, 1857, a son of Michael and Mary (O'Shea) 
Morris, the former a native of Ireland, while the latter was born in Canada. The father 
came to America in the '40s and enlisted for service in the Mexican war in 1844. 
He remained ■ with the army for three years or until honorably discharged in San 
Francisco in 1847, then devoting three years to gold prospecting, along which line he 
was very successful. At the end of that period he went to Canada, where his death 
occurred May 16, 1916, at the age of ninety-four years. His wife also passed away in 
that country. They had a family of eleven children, eight of whom are living. 

James M. Morris spent his youthful days in his native country and was a young 
man of about twenty-one years when in 1878 he came to Denver. The following year 
he removed to Leadville, where he resided for a short time, and was there engaged in 



32 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the live stock business. In 1909 he purchased a ten acre tract of land, whereon he 
now resides in Arapahoe county, and in addition to giving his attention to the raising 
of live stock, he is also engaged in the poultry business. Both branches of his activity 
are proving profitable and his success is well deserved. He is likewise one of the 
directors of the irrigating ditch and is thus active in promoting general farming 
interests. 

In 1883 Mr. Morris was married to Miss Flora McGillis, a native of Canada and a 
daughter of Angus and Anna (McDonald) McGillis, the former now deceased, while 
the latter is still living. To Mr. and Mrs. Morris were born three children, but all 
have passed away. The parents are members of the Catholic church, and in his political 
views Mr. Morris is a democrat. He is a self-made man whose prosperity has been 
gained since coming to Colorado. At one time he was engaged in merchandising in 
Nebraska for three years, but the greater part of his life since he has attained his 
majority has been passed in this state and his close application and unfaltering energy 
have been the salient features in bringing to him the measure of success which is now 
his. 



CHARLES H. REYNOLDS. 



Charles H. Reynolds, vice president of the board of water commissioners, is one 
of Denver's leading citizens, who has taken an important part in the public life of the 
city, having promoted a number of interesting and far-reaching measures for a greater 
and more beautiful Denver. He has served in numerous public positions and semi- 
public oflices, and in these connections has wrought much good for his fellow citizens. 
He was born in Kendall county, Illinois, August 28, 1848, his parents being Augustus 
Spencer and Sarah (Beach) Reynolds, both of whom were natives of Saratoga county. 
New York, whence they removed to Illinois in the early days in the history of that 
state — in 1844. The father there remained until 1849, when the seemingly fabulous 
reports of gold discoveries in California induced him to join the gold seekers and by 
way of the overland route he traveled to California. He spent a short time in the gold 
fields of that state but then returned to Illinois and entered the postal service in 
Chicago, remaining in that connection for thirty-five years. In 1895 he came to 
Denver, where he passed away fourteen years later, at the age of ninety-one years. 
His wife preceeded him to the beyond, passing away in Denver, at the age of eighty- 
two, in 1902. 

Charles H. Reynolds was the only child born to this union. He attended school in 
Chicago for a number of years and after putting aside his textbooks was connected 
with business interests in that city until coming to Denver in 1873. Here he entered 
the internal revenue service under Dr. Morrison and continued in the government 
employ for about two years. Desirous of having a business of his own. he then opened 
a hardware store which he successfully conducted from 1876 until 1880, in which latter 
year he organized the Austin-Reynolds Passenger and Baggage Express, remaining 
at the head of this business from 1881 until 1889 and deriving considerable profit from 
this enterprise. In 1890 he was elected secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, his 
qualifications well fitting him for this important position. That Denver has become 
one of the most popular convention cities and a haven for tourists is largely due to the 
untiring efforts of Mr. Reynolds. He continued as secretary of the Chamber of 
Commerce for two years, or until 1891. and his service earned for him the entire 
approval of all of its members and the commendation of the general public. All 
recognized his peculiar fitness for his work in this connection and spoke highly of 
his energy in pursuing a given object. The results of his labors as secretary are still 
seen and his work is yet bearing fruit. In 1891 Mr. Reynolds retired from the Chamber 
of Commerce and organized the Western Steam Laundry Company, which is now 
one of the largest enterprises of its kind in the city and of which he has since been 
president. 

In November. 1871, Mr. Reynolds was united in marriage to Miss Alice Goss, of 
Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, a daughter of Joshua and Cynthia Goss. Mrs. Reynolds 
passed away in 1915. On January 1, 1918. he contracted a second union with Miss 
Anabel Holland, of San Diego, California, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Holland. 
Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds occupy an enviable position in the social circles of Denver, 
extending a truly warm-hearted hospitality in their home at 1600 Pennsylvania street. 
Their friends in Denver are legion and all of them are equally enthusiastic in praise 
of their high qualities of heart and mind. Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds maintain a summer 




CHARLES H. REYNOLDS 



34 HISTORY OF COLORADO * 

home at Buffalo, Colorado, where they spend most of their time during the hot season. 
Outside of the office of secretary of the old Chamber of Commerce, Mr. Reynolds has 
held many public and semi-public offices and in all of these has contributed towards 
the development and beautification of his city. He served as director and treasurer 
of the Chamber of Commerce and during his term signed all of the bond issues of the 
organization. For two years he ser.ved as president of the Mountain and Plain 
Festival Association and was also connected with the Convention League, at different 
times filling the offices of president, treasurer and director. This league he assisted 
in organizing after having resigned from his position as director and treasurer of the 
Chamber of Commerce. He was also a member of the depot commission and was a 
director during its existence. The work of this commission was of tremendous value 
and had a far-reaching influence. It brought into harmonious cooperation a combina- 
tion of interests, that for years had defied all similar efforts and made impossible, the 
superior depot facilities now enjoyed by the city. He served as a member of the 
Denver park board and it is largely due to his efforts that Denver today has such 
beautiful parks, which give it a nation-wide reputation. At present he serves as vice 
president of the board of water commissioners, having been elected to this position 
in August, 1918. This; board was only recently organized and has taken over the 
Denver Union Water Company, whose stockholders received bonds in lieu of their 
stock certificates. As member of this newly created and very important board Mr. 
Reynolds is doing very valuable work in the interests of his fellow citizens. His busi- 
ness and public interests being very important, Mr. Reynolds has found little time for 
club work, his only connection in this regard being with the Denver Athletic Club, of 
which he is a life member. In the Masonic order he belongs to Lodge No. 33, A. F. 
& A. M.. and also is a Knight Templar of Denver Commandery, No. 25, and a Shriner. 
His political affiliations are with the republican party, with non-partisan leanings. 

Mr. Reynolds has achieved a success in business life which is truly remarkable, 
considering that he began with nothing. He has earned the proud American title 
of self-made man. Moreover, he has not considered his own benefit alone in pursuing 
his life work but has ever been cognizant of his duties as a citizen and has cooperated 
in many ways to promote the welfare of his fellows. He has many friends in Denver, 
which has now been his home for forty-five years, so that he is numbered among the 
honored pioneers of the city. Those who know him longest speak of him in the 
highest terms of praise, for they know best his admirable qualities. 



WOODFORD A. MATLOCK. 



It is impossible to determine what would have been the condition in the west had 
it not been for the oil discoveries, so important has the development of the oil fields 
become as a source of prosperity and progress beyond the Mississippi. Opportunities 
in this direction have called forth the efforts and enterprise of many men who have 
made for themselves notable places in the business world, men of marked energy, of 
keen foresight and perseverance. With development projects Woodford A. Matlock 
has long been connected and he is now fiscal agent for the Kinney Oil & Refining 
Company, with office in Denver. He was born in Bowling Green. Kentucky, September 
18, 1870. His father, Woodford A. Matlock, was a native of Kentucky and his grand- 
father was also born in that state. He, too, bore the name of Woodford A. Matlock, 
so that the subject of this review is of the third generation to be so called. His 
father was an active business man but is now deceased. His mother, who bore the 
maiden name of Amanda Cochran, was a native of Kentucky and is now living in 
California. At the time of the Civil war Woodford A. Matlock, father of the subject 
of this review, responded to the call of the country to preserve the Union and Joined 
the Eighth Kentucky Cavalry, with which he did active duty in defense of the stars 
and stripes. ' ' 

Woodford A. Matlock, Jr., came to Greeley. Colorado, with his father in 1872, at 
which time he was but two years of age. The days of his boyhood and youth were 
there passed and he acquired a public school education in Greeley. He afterward 
took up the work of telegraphy as an operator, entering upon that field when but 
fifteen years of age, and for a quarter of a century he followed railroad interests:, 
Gradually he was advanced in that connection until he became traffic manager of 
the Cripple Creek Railway. The next change in his business career brought him into 
close relations with the McNeil-Penrose Company in connection with land development 
enterprises and afterward he developed the Maxwell land grant in Mexico. He then 



1541066 




WOODFORD A. MATLOCK 



36 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

turned his attention to tlie oil business and is now fiscal agent for the Kinney Oil & 
Refining Company. Each change that he has made in his business connections has 
brought him a broader outlook and wider opportunities, marking a step forward in 
his career. 

In 1893 Mr. Matlock was united In marriage to Miss Jessica Shadony, of Jennings, 
Indiana, and they have become the parents of four children. Their eldest son, Paul 
B., born August 16, 1896, is now a lieutenant in the Twentieth Infantry, United States 
Army, stationed at the present time at Fort Douglas. Woodford A., bearing the name 
in the fourth generation, is a student in Princeton University of New Jersey with 
the class of 1920. Bruce King, fourteen years of age, is a student in the Denver high 
school. Jessica, a little maiden of nine summers, is also in school. 

Mr. Matlock belongs to the Country Club, the Denver Athletic Club, to the Lake- 
wood Country Club and to the Civic Association. He Is much interested in shooting, 
golf and other sports, to which he turns for recreation when leisure permits. He 
belongs to the Central Christian church and its teachings have guided him in all of 
life's relations. As a member of the Civic Association he manifests his deep interest 
in the welfare and, progress of Denver and its upbuilding along those lines which 
are a matter of civic virtue and of civic pride. What he has accomplished represents 
the fit utilization of his innate talents and his life record is indicative of the power 
that may be developed in the individual through the exercise of effort. 



ROSE KIDD BEERE, M. D. 



Among various professional fields in which western women have rapidly forged 
their way to the front in the past quarter of a century is that of medicine — and in this 
line of work Dr. Rose Kidd Beere of Denver is among the most able. 

She is nationally known through her activities in medical and charitable enter- 
prises, and through her war service contributions during the Spanish-American con- 
flict and tlie recent World war, of the efficient labor that is the result of her fine 
physical strength and tremendous vitality, reinforced by a vivid personality. 

After the battle of Santiago in 1898 Major Kidd, her father, a Civil war veteran, 
wrote to her, "This is the first war of our country in which our family has no part. 
I am too old and your boys are too young. 

"Do you remember the sealed fruit can we found in the 'spring house,' after the 
peach canning for the military nospitals in Indianapolis, at the close of the Civil 
war — containing a few unpeeled peaches, some bits of broken blue dishes, and your 
little china doll, minus an arm and a leg— your contribution of your treasures to the 
returning 'Yanks' of that day — labeled 'From Rose to the Soldiers'?" 

It was in answer to that communication that Dr. Beere wired: "You take care 
of my boys and I'll represent our family in this war. I can't raise a regiment, or 
carry a gun, but I can help nurse the men who do." 

Dr. Beere wore a two-star service pin during the World war but neither son 
represented by those stars did better work for America than their mother during 
her term as representative of the Colorado Springs Red Cross, in Manila, in 1898-99. 

Dr. Beere was born in Wabash, Indiana, a daughter of Meredith Helm and Milll- 
cent (Fisher) Kidd, both of whom were natives of that state, her father being a 
prominent member of tlie Indiana bar. 

On the paternal side she is descended from English forebears. Sir Francis Drake 
and the Corys, the Hampton and Jones families of Virginia, and the DeCamps of New 
Y'ork, originally from Holland. On her mother's side she is descended from the Stearns 
and Fishers of New England and the Ingersolls and Steelmans of New Jersey, the first 
Frederick Steelman holding a large grant of land from the king in the sixteen hun- 
dreds, including Great and Little Egg Harbors, and the country where Atlantic City 
now stands. 

At the outbreak of hostilities between the North and South. Dr. Beere's father, 
Meredith Kidd, organized the Thirteenth Indiana Battery, of which he was made cap- 
tain. Subsequently he was transferred to the Eleventh Indiana Cavalry, with the rank 
of major. The close of the war found him a lieutenant-colonel of infantry of an 
Indiana regiment. 

After the war he was commissioned a major of the Tenth United States Cavalry. 
Owing to frequent troubles with the Indians, the cavalry was kept on the frontier in 
those days. Major Kidd was commanding officer at the time Fort Larned, Kansas, 
was built and later was stationed at Fort Sill, then Indian Territory, now Oklahoma, 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 37 

and built Camp Supply. His name became linked with the development of the west 
as that of a brave and fearless officer and an honored and respected man. 

In the early '70s he resigned from the army and returned to Wabash. Indiana, 
where he resumed the practice of law, in which he continued until his death in 1908. 

The mother of Dr. Beere, Millicent Fisher, was a daughter of the Hon. Stearns 
Fisher, who was one of three men to pledge their private fortune to equip the first 
regiment that went from Indiana to the Civil war. He was a close friend and asso- 
ciate of Governor Morton, the great war governor of that state. Mrs. Millicent Fisher 
Kidd died at the family home in Wabash, Indiana, in 18S1, after twenty-four years of 
happy married life. She was a woman of broad sympathies and beautiful character. 

It was during the years of her early girlhood at frontier posts that Dr. Beere 
acquired her love for the independence and freedom of western life. She recalls many 
interesting incidents of those days; the spring raids of the lordly Cheyennes, the 
thieving Kiowas and bloodthirsty Comanches, when they came down on the post picket 
.lines or settler wagon trains, painted and be-feathered, their blankets flying, their 
naked bodies weaving on their ponies, their war whoops shrilly echoing, to stampede 
horses and secure supplies; the issue days at the posts when the wide circle of squat- , 
ting Arapahoes surrounded the huge piles of flour, sugar, bacon, and herds of ration 
beef. She rode her pony with the officers and scouts when, buffalo or antelopes sighted, 
a party would set out for fresh meat. She remembers a headquarters dinner given by 
her father, to General Hancock and staff, at Fort Larned, before the railroad was 
built, when the wild turkeys were served with snowbird stuffing and the decorations 
were deer and antelope heads, with wolf and buffalo robes for souvenirs. She lived in 
the heart of the excitement following the Beecher's Island fight and the Custer mas- 
sacre. 

All these are childhood memories, but later, when married and living in New Mexico, 
she was in the path of Geronimo's band, on its career of murder and devastation as it 
swept through the southwest with General Miles on its trail, and a young second lieu- 
tenant named Pershing, who was with the cavalry at that time. 

Dr. Beere is the eldest of a family of five children: Edmund Stearns; Lelia 
Christine (Mrs. Thomas A. Nottzger of Wichita, Kansas); Alice Mary, of Los Angeles, 
California; and Dr. Helen Mcllvaine (Mrs. Thomas O., of Huntington, Indiana). 

In her girlhood she attended the army post schools, and St. Mary's Academy, 
of Leavenworth, Kansas, the well known girls' school of that day, later being gradu- 
ated from the high school of her native city. "■ 

At Topeka, Kansas, in May, 1883, she became the wife of Edmund Burke Beere, 
an attorney of Las Cruces, New Mexico, and a son of the Reverend Robert Beere, a 
Presbyterian minister of Valparaiso, Indiana. 

There were three sons of that marriage, all born in Las Cruces: Robert Morrison, 
the eldest, a well known newspaper man; Donald Meredith, graduate of West Point 
Military Academy and regular army man (a lieutenant-colonel of the Three Hundred 
and Twenty-first Field Artillery, National Army, in France) ; and Stearns Kidd, 
formerly in commercial life, a sergeant of the One Hundred and Forty-fourth Infantry 
in France, during the great war. 

Following the death of her husband. Dr. Beere returned to the east, and entered 
the Woman's Medical College of Northwestern University at Chicago, Illinois, winning 
her professional degree upon graduation with the class of 1892. She practiced in 
Durango for three years, coming to Denver in 1895 as superintendent of the State 
Home for Dependent Children, which position she occupied until she went to Manila 
in 1898 as a representative of the Colorado Springs Red Cross, the first woman granted 
permission to go to the islands on a government transport. She sailed from San Fran- 
cisco in August, accompanied by seven nurses sent by the California and Oregon Red 
Cross organizations. 

This little band of pioneer volunteers served for a year in the hospitals of the 
Eighth Army Corps, establishing diet kitchens, doing surgical dressings and general 
nursing. Dr. Beere returned to Denver with the Colorado regiment to which she had 
endeared herself by her heroic and untiring devotion. 

In 1900 Governor Orman appointed her a member of the State Board of Arbi- 
tration, the only woman who ever served in that capacity. The same year she was 
appointed assistant county physician, in which position she did excellent work at the 
County Poor Farm, segregating the tuberculous patients and inaugurating numerous 
other reforms for the benefit of the inmates. For ten years she was attendant officer 
and medical inspector of the Denver public schools, establishing while in that position 
a much needed dental clinic for the school children of the poor. 

In 1912 she was appointed superintendent of the County Hospital and assistant 



38 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

health commissioner, by Mayor Arnold. On her retirement from this position (being 
the first woman to have served as such) the staff of one hundred physicians and 
surgeons passed resolutions to the effect that her administration had been the most 
efficient, economical and satisfactory that the hospital had ever known. It was due 
to the social service department, inaugurated at the hospital by Dr. Beere, that the 
Church Convalescent Home was founded. 

After serving one term as head of the hospital, she established a private sanatorium 
in Denver, for mental and nervous diseases, known as "Rest-A-While." 

Dr. Beere is a member of the Medical Society of the City and County of Denver, 
and also of the Colorado State Medical Society. She is recording secretary of the 
Colorado Medical Women's War Service League, and chairman of the committee of 
that organization for hospitals in the home zone. She was instrumental in gathering 
a ton of children's clothing in December, 1917, half of which was sent through the 
American Women's Hospitals to the orphans of France, and the remainder to Belgium. 

Dr. Beere is a capable, energetic woman, of rare courage and fine intellect, high 
spirited, independent and companionable. To all her public work she has brought 
great efficiency through her medical experience and broad social sympathies. 



WILLIAM K. BURCHINELL. 



For forty-three years William K. Burchinell has been a resident of Colorado and is 
now filling the position of secretary of the board of capitol managers at Denver. Various 
chapters in his life record indicate his faithful service in connection with public affairs, 
not the least important of which covers his record as a soldier of the Civil war, when 
he valiantly followed the stars and stripes on southern battlefields and aided in defense 
of the Union. He was born in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, in October, 1846, and is de- 
scended from ancestors who came from England to America with Lord Baltimore and 
settled in Maryland. Representatives of the family participated in the Revolutionary 
war and marked loyalty to this land has always been one of the salient characteristics 
of the Burchinells. Thomas Burchinell, the father of William K. Burchinell, was born 
in Maryland and became a successful architect and builder. His birth occurred at Ches- 
tertown, Maryland, and his education was acquired in his native state. In 1835 he re- 
moved to Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, where he resided to the time of his death, which 
occurred in 1877, when he was sixty-five years of age, for his natal year was 1812. In 
early manhood he had married Ann Maria Wilson, a native of Baltimore, Maryland, who 
belonged to one of the old families of that state, of English lineage. She, too, was born 
in 1812 and died in 1857 at the age of forty-five years. 

William K. Burchinell was the fifth in order of birth in a family of three sons and 
three daughters. Two of the sons died in Colorado, one in Leadville and the other in 
Boulder. They were Thomas Wilson and John Emery Burchinell. The former became 
a resident of Colorado in 1879 and John E. Burchinell established his home in this state 
in 1893. 

William K. Burchinell acquired his early education in the public schools of Altoona, 
Pennsylvania, and afterward continued his studies in an academy at Hollidaysburg, 
Pennsylvania. He was then apprenticed to learn the trade of engine making in the 
Baldwin Locomotive Works at Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, but he did not find that 
pursuit to his liking and after eight months' service there he ran away from home in 
1862, when a youth of but sixteen years, and joined the Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry 
for active service in the Civil war. He was first attached to Company L of that regiment 
and later to Company K and he continued at the front until the close of hostilities. Fol- 
lowing the battle of Chickamauga he was transferred to the signal corps of the regular 
army, with which he continued to the end of the war, being mustered out at Nashville, 
Tennessee, in July, 1865. He participated in every engagement, from the battle of Stone 
River in 1862 to the battle of Franklin in front of Nashville in December, 1864. Although 
often in many hotly contested engagements he was never wounded or taken prisoner. 
He became one of the organizers of the first Grand Army post in Pennsylvania, which 
was formed under the name of the Veterans' Union, and later he organized another post, 
of which he served as adjutant. After the close of the war he was a clerk in the quarter- 
master's department in the spring of 1866 and later he entered into partnership with his 
father in the planing mill business at Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, where he continued 
until the wide spread financial panic of 1873, when the business was closed out. It was 
about that time that he was elected a member of the state legislature, in which he served 




WILLIAM K. BURCHINELL 



40 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

for a term. He was afterward appointed receiver at the land office at Pairplay, Colorado, 
the appointment coming from President Grant during his second administration. Later 
he was appointed by President Hayes when the land office was removed to Leadville, 
Colorado, in 1879, and he continued to act in that capacity until 1883, or for a term of 
eight years in all. He arrived in Colorado in February, 1875, so that for forty-three years 
he has continued a resident of this state. From 1883 he has made his home in Denver, 
taking up his abode in this city in December of that year. Here he engaged in the 
machinery business until 1891, being president of the Denver Machinery Company, 
dealers in mining machinery. In the fall of the latter year he was elected sheriff of 
Arapahoe county and was reelected in 1893, serving until 1896, and upon the death of 
his successor, who occupied the position for two years, Mr. Burchinell was appointed to 
fill the unexpired term of Mr. Webb. Upon his retirement from the office in the fall 
of 1898 he became connected with mining interests in Colorado and Mexico. On the 6th 
of February, 1906, he was appointed to his present office, which position he has since 
continuously filled, serving for twelve years as secretary of the board of capitol managers. 
He is most prompt, systematic, efficient and faithful in the discharge of his duties and 
has thus been retained throughout the entire period in the office. 

Mr. Burchinell was married in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 21, 1872, to 
Miss Samantha A. Cunningham, a native of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, and a daughter 
of Josiah and Ann (Moore) Cunningham, representatives of an old and prominent family 
of Huntingdon. Mrs. Burchinell passed away in Denver, July 18, 1907, at the age of 
fifty-eight years. Two children were born of that marriage. Ann, whose birth occurred 
in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. January 12, 1874, is now the wife of J. Grattan O'Bryan, 
a resident of Seattle, Washington. Edna, the younger daughter, died in Philadelphia In 
1881. 

In politics Mr. Burchinell has always been a stanch republican and in early manhood 
took quite an active part in political affairs. He is prominently known in Masonic 
circles, having been made a Mason in Mount Moriah Lodge. No. 300, A. F. & A. M., on 
the 12th of October. 1868, in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. He has since taken all the inter- 
mediate degrees up to and including the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and 
has ever been a loyal and faithful follower of the craft. Since leaving home to become a 
soldier of the Civil war he has been dependent upon his own resources and has ever 
been actuated by a spirit of loyalty and progress in business and official life, just as he 
was when he followed the nation's starry banner on the battlefields of the south. 



JOHN G. KENNEDY. 



John G. Kennedy, deceased, was for a considerable period actively associated with 
farming- interests in Arapahoe county, near Aurora. He was born in Ireland on the 24th 
of June, 1S44, a son of John and Mary (Gleason) Kennedy, both of whom were natives 
of the Emerald isle. The mother died in her native land, but the father afterward came 
to America, crossing the Atlantic in 1864, at which time he took up his abode in Han- 
cock, Michigan. He there resided for five years and in 1869 removed to Colorado, settling 
in Denver, where his remaining days were passed. 

John G. Kennedy spent the period of his minority in the green isle of Erin and was 
a young man of twenty years when he accompanied his father on the emigration to the 
new world. He also came to Colorado with him and in Georgetown, this state, was united 
in marriage to Miss Sarah Curtin, who was born in New York, a daughter of Charles 
and Katherine (Ryan) Curtin, who were also natives of Ireland. Coming to the new 
world, they established their home in the Empire state, where they continued to reside 
until called to their final rest. Their family numbered eleven children. 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy began their domestic life in George- 
town, where they lived for seven years and then removed to a ranch in Arapahoe county, 
upon which Mr. Kennedy continued until he passed away in the year 1902. His business 
interests were extensive and of a most important character. Adding to his possessions 
from time to time, he acquired thirty-four hundred acres of land and as the years passed 
carried on stock raising extensively. He carefully studied the needs of the stock and 
knew just what breeds of cattle and horses were best adapted to climatic conditions here. 
He was very thorough in all that he did. painstaking in all of his business affairs and 
possessed excellent executive ability combined with unfaltering energy and enterprise 
These qualities therefore won him substantial success as the years passed. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy were born six children: John W.; Mary F., who is a high 
school graduate and has been successfully engaged in teaching for thirteen years; Patrick 




JOHN G. KENNEDY 



42 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

E.; Katherlne, deceased; Helen N., who Is a high school graduate and Is also teaching; 
and Ruth W., who is a graduate of the Sacred Heart high school. The family are all 
members of the Catholic church, of which Mr. Kennedy was an adherent. Mrs. Kennedy 
still owns seventeen hundred acres of the land acquired by her husband and carefully 
and wisely manages her business interests. Almost a half century has passed since the 
family home was established in Colorado and throughout the intervening period the name 
of Kennedy has been a synonym for progressiveness along agricultural and stock raising 
lines. Mr. Kennedy, passing away in the year 1902, left behind him a large circle of 
friends who entertained for him warm regard and high esteem because of his well spent 
life, his intelligently directed activity and his fidelity to every trust reposed in him. 



W. E. HARDY. 



W. E. Hardy, conducting business under the name of the W. E. Hardy Motor 
Company at Denver, was born in Pratt county, Kansas, March 4, 1885, a son of Cleo 
E. and Frances Virginia (Martin) Hardy. The father's birth occurred at Ravenswood, 
West Virginia, while the mother was a native of Gallipolis, Ohio. They removed to 
Kansas at an early day and the father became a pioneer cattleman and rancher of 
that state. After living there for some time he disposed of his interests in Kansas 
and removed to Converse county, Wyoming, where he has since been engaged in cattle 
raising and ranching. His wife passed away in Denver in December, 1909. There 
were five children in their family: William H.. who is now engaged in merchandising 
at Freeman, Missouri; Virgil C, living in Akron, Ohio; Mrs. Theodore Bruning, of 
Denver; W. E., of this review; and Mrs. H. M. Munn, whose home is in Los Angeles, 
California. 

In early life W. E. Hardy attended the country schools of Kansas and after his 
textbooks were put aside applied his time to learning the candy maker's trade in 
Kansas City, Missouri. He continued to follow the trade for a number of years, asso- 
ciated with various prominent firms, and during that period he saved his earnings, 
until his capital was sufl^cient to enable him to engage in business on his own account. 
On the 3d of August, 1903, he arrived in Denver, where he opened a real estate and 
loan office, conducting that business successfully for thirteen years, after which he 
sold out. In 1917 he established what was known as the Moore-Hardy Motor Com- 
pany, handling the Stephens motor cars and Staude tractor for Ford cars. After a 
time he purchased the interest of his partner and has since conducted the agency very 
successfully on his own account under the name of the W. E. Hardy Motor Company 
and his location is considered to be one of the finest on Broadway. 

On the 26th of July, 1911, Mr. Hardy was married to Miss Genevieve M. Johnson, 
of Denver, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Johnson, well known and prominent 
pioneer people of Colorado. The father is now deceased, but the mother, Mrs. Augusta 
Johnson, still lives in Denver. Mr. and Mrs. Hardy have one child, Marjorie, who 
was born in Denver in February, 1915. 

Mr. Hardy maintains an independent course in politics. He is well known in 
trade circles and belongs to the Auto Trades Association, to the Denver Automobile 
Association and to the Denver Civic and Commercial Association, all of which have 
been organized to advance business interests in Denver. He is a man of alert dis- 
position and energetic spirit, carrying forward to successful completion whatever he 
undertakes, and his enterprise has placed him in the front rank among the automobile 
of the city. 



ZOPHAR L. HOLDEN. 



Zophar L. Holden was born February 14. 1870, on the ranch whereon he now resides 
in the beautiful Bijou basin in the northern central part of El Paso county. He is 
a son of D. M. and Isabelle (Hayden) Holden, both of whom were born in the state of 
New York. They came to Colorado in the '60s, making the overland trip to the 
Bijou basin from the Empire state. The father homesteaded one hundred and sixty 
acres of land and preempted an equal amount and continued purchasing prop- 
erty from time to time until his landed possessions were very extensive. In 1S88 he 
retired from active business life and removed to Colorado Springs. His family num- 
bered six children, of whom L. W., the eldest, resides upon a ranch seven miles south- 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 43 

east of Bijou Basin. Zopliar L. is the next of tlie family and resides on the home ranch 
which he purchased from his father. Edna, who wag the wife of Robert McCoy, of 
Colorado Springs, passed away in November. 1918. Olive is a trained nurse now living 
in Arizona. Erma is the wife of Harry Mclntire, a resident of Arizona. J. D. is on 
a ranch near Steamboat Springs, Colorado. 

Reared to the occupation of farming, Zophar L. Holden has always continued busi- 
ness along that line and is today one of the most prominent and prosperous agricul- 
turists of this section of the state, his landed possessions embracing thirty-three 
hundred acres. He is a leading and well known sheep farmer, feeding about fifteen 
hundred head of sheep. He has a most attractive and commodious two-story resi- 
dence upon his farm, together with large and substantial buildings and sheep pens. 
The buildings are all in good repair and well painted and everything about his place 
is kept in first-class shape. He is a most progressive farmer and stockman and his 
business ability is manifest in the excellent appearance of his place. He is a stockholder 
of the Peyton Bank of Peyton. Colorado. 

In 1S93 Mr. Holden was united in marriage to Miss Violet Baldwin, a daughter 
of E. E. Baldwin, of Elbert, Colorado. Mr. Holden gives his political allegiance to the 
democratic party but has never been an aspirant for office, preferring to concentrate 
his efforts and attention upon his business affairs, which are wisely and carefully 
directed and bring to him the merited success of earnest and persistent labor. His 
entire life has been passed upon the ranch which he yet occupies and he is thoroughly 
familiar with the history of the development and upbuilding of this section of the 
state and at all times has borne his part in promoting the work of general improve- 
ment, stanchly supporting all measures which are a matter of civic virtue and of civic 
pride. 



WILLIAM DAVID HOOVER. 

Comparatively few men look far into the future. They are concerned mostly 
with questions and interests which bear directly upon the present hour, its difficul- 
ties and its advantages and do not recognize the exigencies and the opportunities which 
a later hour may bring forth. There are men, however, with keen sagacity and broad 
vision who look beyond the moment and see in conditions of the present the £orer 
shadowings of future events. Such a man is William David Hoover, who has been 
most prominent in connection with the development, in late years, in the growing 
of sugar beets and in beet sugar manufacture, which has come to be one of the chief ' 
industries of the state. His work in this connection has been most vital and he has 
borne an important part in promoting interests which have become a feature in the 
development of the Great Western Sugar Company. 

Mr. Hoover comes to Colorado from Ohio. He was born in Miamisburg. that state, 
December IS, 1S62, a son of Abel and Clara Elizabeth Hoover, both of Dutch ancestry, 
whose respective parents had removed to Ohio from the Dutch settlement of Pennsyl- 
vania. He was educated in the public schools of Miamisburg, being graduated with 
honors from the high school there. Both his father and grandfather being engaged 
in agricultural implement manufacturing, William D. Hoover entered into this line of 
work after his graduation. It is interesting to note in this connection that the firm 
was among the earliest manufacturers of binders that used twine in Ohio. Until 1890, 
Mr. Hoover was interested with his father in the manufacture of harvesting machinery 
and twine but in that year removed to Akron, Ohio, where he organized the Western 
Linoleum Company, of which he became vice president and general manager. His 
arduous duties in this connection, however, undermined his health and in 1S97 a 
change of climate was considered advisable and he came to Colorado. He thoroughly 
interested himself in the resources and possibilities of this new state and in 1899 
he was one of the first men to recognize the vast possibilities of the beet sugar industry 
in Colorado. On September 11, 1S99, his first prospectus for the Loveland factory was 
issued. The Loveland factory was later built by other interests and is today one of 
the largest producers of beet sugar in the country. Subsequently he became inter- 
ested in the preliminary work for beet sugar development at Eaton and Windsor, 
being president and general manager of such plants for a year or two. Later he was 
active in the preliminary work in the South Platte valley, which resulted in the con- 
struction of the new factory at Sterling, but he was later not connected therewith. 
His undaunted energy and sincere enthusiasm as to the future of this industry con- 
vinced others and he succeeded in establishing other factories in the South Platte 



44 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

district, thus becoming one of the important factors in founding beet sugar manu- 
facture in this state. These factories are now an integral part of the Great Western 
Sugar Company, of which Mr. Hoover is manager of public relations. The importance 
of his position is most poignantly recognizable in these days when the sugar question 
has become one of vital national significance. After his work in the South Platte 
valley Mr. Hoover and his associates established the sugar factory at Monte Vista, 
which has long since been removed to Lovell, Wyoming, and which is today also part of 
the Great Western Sugar Company's interests. 

In 1885 Mr. Hoover was married to Miss Elizabeth Hunt, of Miamisburg, Ohio, 
and they have two children: Edwin H., who is a gunner in the Thirty-fifth Infantry 
of the United States army; and Donald H., who at this writing has graduated from 
the Western Reserve Medical School and has entered the medical division of the 
United States army as a lieutenant. 

In the civic life of the city of Denver, which Mr. Hoover makes his home, he 
has always been deeply interested and has ever been a leader in movements for the 
development, advancement and trade expansion of city and state. Fraternally he is a 
Mason but is not active in the affairs of the order. The family home is located at 
No. 1119 York street and is one of the handsome residences of that section of Den- 
ver. There Mr. and Mrs. Hoover entertain their many friends, cheerful hospitality 
always prevailing at their fireside. 



STORRS H. HALL. 



Storrs H. Hall is a partner in the firm of Hall Brothers, proprietors of the Western 
Holstein Farm and also of the Cooperative Milk Company of Denver. In this con- 
nection he has become known as one of the leading breeders of thoroughbred Hol- 
steins in Colorado and the west. The story of his life is the story of earnest endeavor 
and continuous progression to the goal of success. He was born in Cleburne, Texas, 
September 14, 1878, a son of William S. and Mary (Wheeler) Hall, both of whom were 
natives of Massachusetts and in early life went to Wisconsin, crossing the country 
with ox team. In 1874 they removed to Texas, where the father devoted ten years 
to the cattle business, and in 1884 he became a resident of Denver, Colorado, where he 
established a livery stable, which he conducted for two years. He next concentrated 
his energies upon farming in Arapahoe and Jefferson counties and at the present time 
he is engaged in mining in Clear Creek county, Colorado. He has reached the age of 
seventy-two years, while his wife is living at the age of sixty-eight. They had a 
family of six children, of whom four are living, Carlos, Storrs H., Mrs. Kittle Mcintosh 
and Ira. 

In early life Storrs H. Hall attended the country schools and afterward had the 
advantage of training in the city schools of Denver. He subsequently turned his atten- 
tion to dairying, in which he engaged for a short time, and later he worked for 
wages for two years. In 1898 he became interested in the Holstein dairying business 
in connection with his brother and they established what is known as the Western 
Holstein Farm of about sixteen hundred acres in Jefferson county. Upon it they now 
have one hundred head of thoroughbred Holstein cattle and milk cows. At the head 
of the herd is one of the best known thoroughbred Holsteins in the country. Western 
Ascalon Colantha Boy, registered as No. 116,247. On the 1st of May. 1918, the Hall 
Brothers had a large sale, in which they disposed of all of the animals of their great 
milking and milk and butter bred Holstein cows and heifers which had no registra- 
tion papers. There were about one hundred and thirty of them, in ages from one to 
ten years, constituting one of the best lots of milking and milk and butter bred animals 
ever offered for sale, representing over thirty years of intelligent breeding, and 
selection of the kind that makes good. The Western Holstein Farm is situated on the 
Morrison road, five and a half miles southwest of Denver. The Hall Brothers are 
now owners of a herd of thoroughbred Holsteins, including Sir Colantha Lass, No. 
45,670, a well known show bull that has won many ribbons, and champion of the state. 
They have done much to improve the grade of stock raised in Colorado and to stimulate 
an interest in high bred cattle. They were also the organizers of the Producers Dairy 
in Denver in January, 1918, with Storrs H. Hall as secretary and treasurer. The 
president is M. E. Penrose, while C. W. Hall is vice president of the company. With 
twenty delivery wagons they cover the city in the distribution of their dairy products 
and they have thirty-five employes. Storrs H. Hall is also a director and treasurer 
of the Western Holstein Dairy Company. 




STORRS H. HALL 



46 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

On the 23d of April, 1903, Mr. Hall was married to Miss Nellie B. Ashton, of 
Denver, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George J. Ashton, of a well known Denver family. 
They have two children: Clyde S., who was born in Denver in 1904 and is now 
attending high school; and Irene, born in Denver in 1906. 

In politics Mr. Hall maintains an independent course, nor has he ever sought 
office. For six years he was a member of the school board of Jefferson county and the 
cause of education finds in him a stalwart champion. He is an exemplary representa- 
tive of the Masonic fraternity belonging to Lodge No. 61, A. F. & A. M., and he also 
belongs to the Civic and Commercial Association of Denver. Of a nature that could 
never be content with mediocrity, he has steadily worked his way upward, actuated by 
a laudable ambition that has resulted in the attainment of notable success. He has 
taken no steps backward. His career has been marked by steady progress and he js 
today one of the best known breeders and raisers of Holstein cattle in the state. 



JAMES E. JEWEL. 



There are many points of interest in the life record of James E. Jewel, a well 
known attorney at law of Fort Morgan, a prominent breeder of registered Holstein 
cattle in Morgan county, a veteran of the Civil war whose loyalty to his country was 
not only manifest on southern battlefields but has also been evidenced in his atti- 
tude toward public questions throughout his life. Ohio claims him as a native son, his 
birth having occurred in Montgomery county on the 19th of October, 1847, his parents 
being Aaron W. and Susanna (Peck) Jewel, who were natives of Miami and of Mont- 
gomery county, Ohio, respectively. The father was of Welsh lineage, while the mother 
was of German descent. Aaron W. Jewel was a carpenter by trade and followed that 
pursuit until he reached the age of thirty-five years, when he turned his attention 
to farming and also took up the practice of law in Iowa. He removed to that state 
in 1854, settling at Brandon, in Buchanan county. It was after his removal to the 
west that he studied law. He also entered land there and developed and improved 
a farm, devoting his remaining days to its further cultivation. In his law practice 
his clientage connected him with most of the important cases that came up in the 
southern part of the county. He died upon the old homestead in March, 1886, and 
is survived by his widow, who now resides at Vinton, Iowa, at the notable old agd 
of ninety-three years. In the family were nine children, eight of whom are living. 

James E. Jewel was reared and educated in Buchanan county, Iowa. His early 
school privileges were very limited, being confined to about six months' attendance 
at a district school. After he had attained his majority, however, he continued his 
studies, working his way through au academy and through Western College, while 
still later he attended Cornell College at Mount Vernon, Iowa. He took up the study 
of law in the State University at Iowa City and was graduated there with the class 
of 1877. Locating for practice at Independence. Iowa, he followed his profession at 
that place from 1S77 until 1900, when he removed to Chicago, where he continued 
until September, 1901. At that date he became a resident of Fort Morgan, Colorado, 
where he engaged in farming and in stock raising and also in the buying of wool 
and sheep. He purchased eight hundred acres of land under the Morgan ditch and 
at that time was the largest landowner under the ditch and the largest owner of 
water rights. With characteristic energy he began the development and improve- 
ment of his ranch property and his labors soon wrought a marked transformation in 
the appearance of the place. In 1908 he opened a law office and has since actively and 
successfully followed his profession. He has ever prepared his cases with great thor- 
oughness and care and has displayed marked ability in presenting his cause to the 
courts. In 1910 he sold his land under the Morgan ditch, which he had purchased at 
from twenty to twenty-five dollars per acre, for one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
per acre. In 1913 he bought one hundred and sixty acres under the Bijou ditch and 
has improved it at a cost of ten thousand dollars. It is now stocked with pure bred 
Holstein cattle and Berkshire hogs and is the best improved farm in northeastern 
Colorado, lacking in none of the accessories and conveniences found upon the model 
farms of the twentieth century. He also makes a business of feeding cattle during 
the winter months. In 1908 he lost twenty thousand dollars in feeding sheep, but 
.undeterred by this he has continued his efforts and his success has placed him among 
the foremost stock raisers of his section of the state. His property interests also in- 
clude a fine modern residence at No. 123 East Platte avenue, in Fort Morgan, which 
at a cost of ten thousand dollars. 




JAMES E. JEWEL 



48 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

On the 5th of March, 1871, Mr. Jewel was married to Miss Mahala Roszell, 
ter of Hiram and Mary (Dole) Roszell, who were natives of Kentucky. The father 
was of French ancestry and devoted his life to farming. In early manhood he removed 
to Indiana and in 1848 went to Benton county, Iowa, where he carried on farming 
throughout his remaining days, his death occuring in 1883, while his wife passed 
away in 1880. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. Jewel were four children. Fred B., bom 
June 25, 1872, was engaged in the hotel business in Missouri and in the fall of 1918 
expected to take charge of and operate his father's farm, but on his way from Missouri 
by automobile he and his wife were stricken with the influenza, and died at Marshall, 
Missouri. Jed Lake, bom August 26, 1875. is engaged in the laundry and newspaper 
business in Chicago and is said to have the finest laundry in the United States. Ray 
W., born January 3, 1883, is engaged in the wholesale oil and gas business at Pueblo, 
Colorado. Helen M., born March 11, 1891, is at home. 

Mr. Jewel has a most interesting military record, for on the 27th of October, 
1864, when he was a youth of but seventeen years, he enlisted at Dubuque, Iowa, as 
a member of Company C, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, with which com- 
mand he was engaged in active duty until transferred to Company C of the Twelfth 
Iowa Infantry, which regiment had reenlisted. He then served until the close of 
the war and was. mustered out with a most creditable military record on the 18th 
of December, 1865, at Mobile, Alabama. He was engaged in the two days' fight at 
Nashville, Tennessee, under General Thomas, was also in the siege of Mobile and took 
part in the siege and capture of Spanish Fort and of Fort Blakely, the latter being 
captured after General Lee's surrender. 

Mr. Jewel is a stockholder and the president of the board of directors of the 
Farmers Union Cooperative Creamery Company of Fort Morgan and is a stockholder 
in the Farmers Union Elevator & Mercantile Company. He likewise belongs to the 
Farmers Union and fraternally is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and with the Grand Army of the Republic. His political allegiance is given to 
the republican party and he is allied with the more progressive wing of the organ- 
ization. He has voted for every republican since President Grant was a candidate for 
office in 1868. His religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal church and he 
has been identified therewith since reaching the age of nineteen, or for fifty-one years. 
He is supporting a student in a preparatory school in China. Throughout his entire 
life his aid has ever been given on the side of progress and improvement and his per- 
sistent purpose has enabled him to accomplish excellent results not only for the ad- 
vancement of his individual interests but for the benefit of the public fortune and wel- 
fare. Those who know him, and he has a wide acquaintance, esteem him as a man 
of genuine worth. 



JOSEPH RAMSEY HEWITT. 



Joseph Ramsey Hewitt, who identified his interests with those of Elbert county 
in February, 1918, when he purchased his present large ranch in the vicinity of 
Elizabeth, was born upon a farm near Elizabeth City, North Carolina, on the 21st of 
May, 1874. a son of Henry and Mary Ellen Hewitt, whose ancestral line can be traced 
back through five generations in the Old North state. 

In the public schools of his native city Joseph R. Hewitt pursued his education 
and was identified with agricultural interests in the south until 1900, when he left 
North Carolina and removed to Wyoming, settling near Saratoga, where for six years 
he again carried on agricultural pursuits. In February, 1918, he purchased his present 
large ranch, which is one of the valuable properties of Elbert county. He has always 
employed the most progressive methods in the development and cultivation of his 
fields and his progressive spirit has been manifest in the excellent improvements 
placed upon his land. 

In New Jersey, on the 7th of September, 1905, Mr. Hewitt was married to Miss 
Elizabeth Belle Davis, who in the maternal line is a descendant of the Sawyer fam- 
ily that for generations has occupied one of the old colonial homes near Elizabeth 
City, North Carolina, the bricks and material having been brought from England. 
One end of the building is blue and the other red. It is still standing in a good 
state of preservation. It was originally built by a noted tory family who later returned 
to England, and the property was purchased by the Sawyers during or about the time 
of the Revolutionary war. The great-great-grandfather of Mrs. Hewitt on the mater- 
nal side and also the great-great-grandfather on the paternal side were high sheriffs 



HISTORY OF COLaRADO 49 

of Pasquotank county. North Carolina, during the Revolution, one succeeding the other 
in that position. Mrs. Hewitt has one brother who is federal district judge, located 
at Trenton, New Jersey. He was democratic leader in the state senate of New Jersey 
when President Wilson was governor of that state. Two other brothers are, the 
Rev. Quinton C. Davis, of Durham, North Carolina, and the Hon. James Mercer Davis, 
of Mount Holly, New Jersey. To Mr. and Mrs. Hewitt have been born three children, 
Joseph Ramsey, Jr., Quinton Davis and Elizabeth Davis. 

Mr, and Mrs. Hewitt hold membership in the Baptist church and take an active 
interest in its work and upbuilding. Their aid is always found on the side of right, 
advancement and improvement and throughout his life Mr. Hewitt has been actuated 
by a progressive spirit that is manifest in his business, and citizenship relations as 
well. During the period of his residence in Elbert county he has gained the respect of 
all with whom he has been brought in contact and is rapidly winning many friends. 



HON. JOHN G. LILLEY. 



Hon. John G. Lilley, deceased, left the impress of his individuality and ability 
upon the history of the state, not only by reason of his active and prominent connec- 
tion with agricultural interests but also as a legislator and as a factor in the develop- 
ment of the state along many other beneficial lines. His life record, therefore, should 
find a prominent place upon the pages of Colorado's history. 

A native of England, John G. Lilley was born at Gillsboro on the 12th of June, 
1833, his parents being John and Ann (Buck) Lilley, who were born at North Gills- 
boro, England. About 1847 they removed from their farm at that place to Birkenhead, 
Cheshire, where the father engaged in the laundry business until his death In 1886, 
having for three years survived his wife, who died in 1883. Both were members of 
the Church of England. 

John G. Lilley was a youth of fourteen when the family home was established in 
Cheshire and for six years he was employed in the Birkenhead market. On reaching 
the age of twenty he bade adieu to friends and native country and sailed for the new 
world, attracted by the business opportunities which he believed he might secure on 
this side of the Atlantic. He spent a few days in Portland, Maine, and then went 
to New Brunswick, where he remained for ten days, after which he changed his plans 
and shipped as a steward on a vessel bound for Ireland. He remained on the Emerald 
isle for six weeks, while the vessel was anchored in Cork, after which he returned to 
his home in England and devoted a year to the butchering business. At the end of 
that time he once more crossed the Atlantic, landing at Boston, Massachusetts, whence 
he made his way to La Crosse, Wisconsin, where he engaged in the butchering busi- 
ness from 1854 until 1860. In the latter year he came to Colorado and settled in 
Denver, which was then a little mining town. For two years he devoted his attention 
to prospecting in the mountains and in 1S62 purchased the farm whereon he continued 
to reside from that date until his demise. His purchase, made in February, 1862, 
established his ownership to one hundred and sixty acres of land adjoining the town 
of Littleton. As the years passed and lie prospered he added to his holdings until 
within the boundaries of his place were comprised three hundred and eighty acres. 
At a later period, however, not wishing to have the care of so extensive a property, 
he sold all but one hundred and fifty acres of his land. He not only most progressively 
developed his farm property and met with substantial success in that undertaking but 
also became one of the builders of the Rough and Ready grist mill in 1868. This 
mill soon won the reputation of manufacturing the finest flour in the state, and for 
years its products were shipped as far east as Boston, commanding the highest prices 
on the market. Twice during Mr. Lilley's connection with the mill the plant was 
destroyed by fire but was immediately rebuilt. He also became the senior partner in 
the firm of Lilley & Coberly, which took extensive contracts for supplying ties for the 
building of the Kansas Pacific Railroad. These ties were secured on the Divide and 
taken to the territory between Littleton and Sheridan. In executing his contracts Mr. 
Lilley utilized forty wagons, each drawn by seven yoke of oxen, for hauling over the 
trail. These oxen, together with much other live stock, were stolen and driven off by 
the Indians, the herder escaping the red-skins by hiding in a dug-put. A man of 
marked business enterprise, Mr. Lilley never faltered in the accomplishment of his 
purpose and in his vocabulary there was no such word as fail. Wlien one avenue of 
opportunity seemed closed he recognized the fact that he could carve out other paths 
whereby he might reach the desired goal and as the years went on he carefully and 

Vol. IV— 4 




HON. JOHN G. LILLEY 




MRS. ALICE JAMES LILLEY 



52 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

wisely directed liis business efforts with tlie result that he won most substantial success 
in that connection. 

Mr. Lilley was always a republican and when the currency question became a 
paramount issue he stood with the silver wing of the party. He was for more than 
a quarter of a century president of the school board in his district and in 1872 his 
fellow townsmen sent him as their representative to the state legislature, where he 
took a most active part in supporting those measures which he believed would be of 
benefit to the commonwealth. He was particularly earnest in his advocacy of legisla- 
tion having to do with the cattle industry in the state. In 1879 he became county 
commissioner of Arapahoe county and served most capably in that position for three 
years. He was familiar with every phase of pioneer life and experiences and in 1864 
became captain of a company that was organized to protect life and property from 
the raids of the Indians. This company was called into active service in 1868 to 
suppress the Utes and Cheyennes, who had been most troublesome. At all times Mr. 
Lilley took a most active and helpful part in promoting every movement or project for 
the benefit and welfare of community, commonwealth and country. He was a pro- 
gressive citizen, highly honored because of his sterling personal worth, and when 
death called him in April, 1909, his loss was deeply felt by many friends as well aa 
by his immediate family. 

It was in 1855 that Mr. Lilley returned to England, where on Christmas day he was 
married to Miss Louise Ann Hay, after which he brought his bride to his new home. 
He was at that time residing in La Crosse, Wisconsin. Some time later they came to 
Colorado, where Mrs. Lilley remained until called to her final rest on the 7th of May, 
1895. Mr. and Mrs. Lilley became the parents of ten children: William H., a resident 
of Jefferson, Colorado; Anna, deceased; Maggie, the wife of Frank Soper; Fred; Lucy, 
who has also passed away; Harry; Marcia L., the wife of Charles Watlington; Josepha, 
the wife of J. Sherman Brown; Benjamin E.; and John G. 

In 1898 Mr. Lilley was again married, his second union being with Miss Alice 
James, a native of Missouri and a daughter of Leroy B. and Sarah (Tilton) James, 
both of whom were natives of Missouri. The mother died in that state and the 
father afterward came to Colorado, where he passed away in 1909. They had a family 
of nine children, three of whom survive. To Mr. and Mrs. Lilley was born a daughter, 
Alice, who is now the wife of Earl Radcliffe, of Littleton. 

Mrs. Lilley is a highly educated woman who was graduated from the high school 
at Louisiana, Missouri, and taught in that state for several years. She then came 
to Colorado and was a teacher in Littleton, acting as assistant principal of the high 
school of that place for a decade prior to her marriage. She afterward took up the 
dairy business, in which she still continues and she is now conducting a most exten- 
sive business, having a herd of one hundred and fifty cows. The product is sold at 
wholesale in Denver, averaging two hundred gallons per day throughout the year. 
She has all the latest dairy equipment, such as milking machine and everything found 
in a first-class dairy establishment. Her ranch comprises one hundred and fifty acres 
of fine bottom land, all of which is irrigated. There are two large silos upon the 
place, eighteen by forty feet. She utilizes two big motor trucks to deliver milk in 
Denver. Another attractive feature of the farm is a fine orchard containing various 
kinds of fruit. She is extensively engaged in raising corn and alfalfa, and all of the 
latest improved farm machinery to facilitate the work of plowing, planting and harvest- 
ing is found upon her place. There are also large poultry buildings and she is making 
a specialty of raising fine chickens. In addition to her ranch property she owns many 
valuable building lots in the village of Littleton and a fine residence there. She is also 
a stockholder in the Nevada Irrigation Company, which has one of the best water rights 
in the state. 

Mrs. Lilley's literary talent in her younger years was manifest in the writing of 
several fine poems, but her extensive business affairs at present leave her little oppor- 
tunity for activity of that kind. She is a member of the Presbyterian church and she 
has exercised a widely felt and beneficial influence in the community along lines of 
moral and cultural development. Her efforts during her labors in the educational 
field, were not limited to the curriculum of the school room but were broad enough to 
include the all important feature of character building and moral worth. She was 
largely instrumental in securing the establishment of a public library in Littleton, 
having been one of the original committee of three, chosen for that purpose. She also 
sponsored, and brought about, the organization of a literary society among the pupils 
of the high school, and was president of the Reading Club, an organization which was 
the nucleus of the Woman's Club of today. In looking back over the past, with due 
consideration, and giving credit for the part she has had in community building, it is 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 53 

difficult, if not wholly impossible, to accurately gauge the exact extent ot her influence 
in moulding the minds and shaping the characters of the boys and girls who came 
under her influence as pupils, and who have become the active men and women of 
today, many of whom, freely acknowledge to her in person, their gratitude for her 
interest in their welfare. A lady of splendid traits of heart and mind as well as of 
marked business ability, she commands the highest respect of all and those who know 
her are proud to call her friend. 



RAA'MOND REEVES. 



Raymond Reeves, vice president of the W. E. Moses Land Scrip and Realty Com- 
pany of Denver, was born at Brownwood, Texas, July 22, 1S85, and was therefore a 
young man of twenty-four years when in 1909 he became a resident of Denver, where 
he has now made his home for a decade. His parents, William Bush and Paulinei 
(Murray) Reeves, are both natives of Tennessee. The father became one of the pio- 
neer settlers of Texas, where he engaged in educational work. As a teacher he gained 
a very wide reputation and became recognized as one of the most prominent repre- 
sentatives of the school interests of the Lone Star state, being now retired. He 
makes his home at Gorman, Texas, where he has now lived for many years, and there 
he and his wife reared their family of three children: Charles E., now living in Des 
Moines, Iowa; Mrs. J. C. McDearman, of Cookeville, Tennessee; and Raymond, of this 
review. 

The last named, after attending the public schools of Brownwood, Texas, entered 
the Haskins Normal College, from which he was graduated and then took up the 
profession of teaching, which he followed for three terms, continuing in educational 
work in Eastland county, Texas. Subsequently he entered Cumberland University 
at Lebanon, Tennessee, for the study of law and won his LL. B. degree as a graduate 
of the class of 1907. He was then admitted to the bar at Chattanooga, Tennessee,; 
where he entered upon active practice, continuing successfully in his chosen calling 
there until 1909, when he removed to Colorado, establishing his home in Denver. 
Here he became connected with The W. E. Moses Land Scrip and Realty Company as 
field attorney and gradually advanced through various departments until he was 
elected vice president of the company, in wliich capacity he now serves. This company 
is conducting an extensive real estate business, tlieir clientage steadily increasing and 
their profits thereby accruing. 

On the 22d of July. 1909, the twenty-fourth anniversary of his birth, Mr. Reeves 
was united in marriage at Cisco, Texas, to Miss Ina Owen, a daughter of Dr. and 
Mrs. Almus Owen, the former a very prominent member of the medical profession 
in the Lone Star state. Mr. and Mrs. Reeves have a son, Malcolm Patterson, who 
was born in Denver, April 24, 1910, and is now a pupil in the Park Hill school. 

In his political views Mr. Reeves is a democrat, having always supported the party 
yet never seeking or desiring office. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons, 
being a Knight Templar and member of the Mystic Shrine, and also with the Knights 
of Pythias, the Woodmen of the World and is identified with the Denver Motor 
Club and the Denver Civic and Commercial Association, while his religious faith is 
indicated by his connection with the Park Hill Methodist Episcopal church. 



GEORGE ELLIOTT COAK. 



George Elliott Coak, identified with general farming interests in Jefferson county; 
•was born in Buffalo, New York, February 20, 1855, and is a son of K. Jones and 
Jemima (HoUenbeck) Coak. The father was a blacksmith by trade and thus pro- 
vided for the support of the family. The mother was one of the nearest heirs to the 
old Trinity Church estate in New York. The ancestral line dates back to pre-Revo- 
lutionary days, the great-grandfather serving in the war for independence. 

George E. Coak of this review was educated in the district school of Flint, Michi- 
gan, and in a business college at Kalamazoo, that state. He then entered upon a mil- 
itary career by enlisting in Company K of the Fourth United States Infantry and with 
his regiment went to Fort Laramie, Wyoming, where he remained on active duty for 
five years. Following his discharge he engaged in farming and stock raising in 
Nebraska from 1883 until 1889 and also in the operation of a sawmill. He after- 



54 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

ward came to Colorado, settling near Broomfield, and is now the owner of ten acres of 
land. He also leases and farms considerable other land and devotes his energies and 
attention to the production of general crops. He is an active, diligent man and is 
meeting with well merited success in his undertakings. 

At Raw Hide Buttes, Wyoming, on the 20th of January, 1S82, Mr. Coak was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary K. Weber, a daughter of John and Mary Weber. Mrs. Coak 
was born in the state of Washington, which was then a territory, her birthplace being 
near the mouth of the Columbia river. She was reared and educated in the north- 
west. By her marriage she has become the mother of seven children: Amelia, who 
is now the wife of W. D. Bradley and has two children, George and Herman; Mary, 
the wife of H. A. Bancroft and the mother of one child; Sarah, deceased; George, who 
married Josephine Bohm and has a daughter, Georgia B.; Helen, who was the only 
woman acting as billing clerk with the Wells Fargo Express Company until the busi- 
ness of that corporation was taken over by the government; and Albert and Thomas. 
The son, George, is now a construction engineer on active duty in France. 

Mr. Coak is a valued member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belong- 
ing to United Lodge. No. 4, of Denver, in which he has passed through all the chairs. 
His wife is also active in the Rebekahs, has filled all of the offices and has been a del- 
egate to the Grand Lodge and also district president. Mr. Coak gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party and is at all times loyal to any cause which he 
espouses. His genuine worth has gained him high regard and he has many excellent 
traits of character which have brought to him the friendship and goodwill of those 
with whom he has come in contact. 



WALTER EVANS WHITE. 



The true measure of success is determined by what one has accomplished and, as 
taken in contradistinction to the old adage that a prophet is not without honor save in 
his own country, there is particular interest attaching to the career of Walter E. White, 
since he is a native son of the city where he has passed his active lite and so directed 
his ability and efforts as to gain recognition as one of its representative residents and 
able lawyers. He is actively connected with a profession which has important bearing 
upon the progress and stable prosperity of any section or community and one which 
has long been considered as conserving public welfare by furthering the ends of justice 
and maintaining individual rights. Mr. White was born in Denver, November 21, 1872. 
His father, Jonathan E. White, a native of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, was born on 
the 28th ot February. 1833, and was a little lad of but three years when the family 
removed to Ohio, settling near Mansfield. There Jonathan E. White was reared and 
educated and in March. 1859, he removed westward to Colorado, taking up his abode 
in the frontier village ot Denver, where he spent his remaining days, living to see Denver 
develop into a most progressive city of metropolitan proportions and opportunities. Here 
he passed away December 17, 1904, at the age of seventy-one years. During the greater 
part of his active life he was engaged in agricultural pursuits and was quite successful. 
During the last decade of his earthly existence he lived retired, enjoying tlie fruits of 
his former toil. He belonged to one of the old families of Pennsylvania, of Dutch descent. 
When he started westward it was with the intention of going to California, but he arrived 
in Denver on the 31st of March, 1859. and then started for Pike's Peak, where he arrived 
in May. For three or four months of his early Aay in Colorado he was at South Clear 
Creek, where he worked a claim and then returned to Denver, settling on a ranch a 
mile south of the city. He afterward purchased the land, upon which he lived from 
1865 until 1889 and concentrated his entire time and energies upon the development, 
cultivation and improvement of this place, which has since been divided into town lots 
and is now the site of many attractive residences. In 1890 he took up his abode in the 
city, where he resided until his death. The Pioneers' Society, of which he was the fourth 
member to pass away, drew up resolutions expressing their grief over his demise and 
bearing evidence of his honorable and upright life. He was familiar with all phases 
of frontier life. On leaving Ohio, on his western trip, he stopped first in Cedar county, 
Iowa, and in the tall went to Mills county, intending to start on his western trip from 
that point. But just as he was ready to start with a party of friends, the governor of 
Iowa issued a proclamation to the effect that unless the party numbered one hundred, 
well armed and equipped, they could not cross the plains because the Sioux Indians were 
on the warpath at that time. Accordingly Mr. White, not being able to carry out his 
plan of reaching the Pacific coast, went to Calhoun, Nebraska, and from that place to 




"WALTER E. WHITE 



56 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Desoto, in the same state, where he remained for four years. In 1856 he took a con- 
tract to build some farm houses and a blacksmith shop and to break two hundred acres 
of land on the Omaha Indian reservation. Before the contract could be completed he 
and the men were ordered into the service of the state by Governor Cummings on ac> 
count of trouble with the Indians. He returned to Desoto in 1857 and engaged in the 
mercantile business, there residing until 1859. In the meantime he was appointed a 
deputy city marshal. He was afterward elected to the same oflice and after retiring from 
that position he removed to Denver. Here again he became identified with pioneer life 
and development and was among the early agriculturists of his section of the state. 
His business affairs were always wisely and carefully conducted and by reason of his 
close application and unfaltering energy he won a most gratifying measure of success. 
His remains are interred in Fairmount cemetery of Denver. He married Alice Lutz, 
who came to Colorado in 1870 and in the early days taught school. Here she met and 
married Mr. White, whom she survives, still making her home in Denver. They became 
the parents of two children, the daughter being Laura, now the widow of Charles 
H. Green. 

Walter E. White, the only son and the younger of the two children, was educated 
In the public and high schools of Denver and also attended the University of Colorado, 
from which he was graduated in 1897 with the LL. B. degree. His early life was spent 
upon the home farm and he became familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil 
and caring for the crops but determined to enter upon a professional career and after 
his graduation took up the practice of law. becoming associated with the firm of Benedict 
& Phelps. He continued in various law offices until 1905, when he entered upon active 
practice independently and has since given his attention to general law work. He is 
now accorded a liberal clientage and his ability has enabled. him to successfully solve 
many involved and intricate legal problems. 

On the 24th of October, 1900, in Denver, Mr. White was married to Miss Edna C. 
Curtis, a native of this city and a daughter of Nathan S. and Anna J. Curtis, the former 
now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. White have become the parents of a son, Curtis, who was 
born in Denver, September 7, 1904. 

In politics Mr. White maintains an independent course. He belongs to the Denver 
Bar Association but has never been active in fraternal or club circles. He was captain 
of the East Denver high school cadets during his school days and as a representative 
of one of the pioneer families of the city he has witnessed much of the growth and 
development of Denver, having spent his entire life here, covering a period of forty- 
six years. His youthful days were passed in the old home which his father built in 
1859 at the corner of West Twelfth and Bryant streets, in the South Fairview addition. 
Great have been the changes which have occurred since that time and the transforma- 
tion that has been wrought as the work of progress and improvement has been carried 
steadily forward. Energy and enterprise have produced notable results and at all times 
Mr. White has lent his aid and cooperation to plans and movements for the general 
good. In addition to his law practice he is now serving as president of the Platte Valley 
Canning Company, one of the successful industrial enterprises of Colorado. He is a pop- 
ular member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. 



DUNCAN MATHESON. 



Duncan Matheson was not alone the founder of the thriving town of Matheson, 
Colorado, but ranked for over forty years as one of the leading sheep men of the 
state. It was due largely to his initiative that Elbert county became one of the most 
prominent sheep feeding sections of the west. He saw and utilized possibilities in this 
direction and the results achieved were most gratifying. 

Duncan Matheson was born in Gairloch, Ross-shire, Scotland, in November, 1849, 
and came to America in 1871, settling first in Chicago, where he remained for three 
years. When he left that city he made his way direct to Colorado, where he arrived 
in May, 1874, and his experience in sheep raising was at once put to practical use on 
the bottom lands of Elbert county. He entered the employ of Colonel Holt, of the 
Holt Live Stock Company, and later he formed a partnership with John Cameron, an 
association that was maintained for a few years. Seven years after Mr. Matheson 
arrived in America, his brother Hector, now located at Hugo. Colorado, joined him and 
they formed a partnership in the sheep industry. In 1876 Duncan Matheson located a 
homestead that included the site of the present town of Matheson in the southern part 
of Elbert county. With hard work and knowledge of the business he developed his 




DUNCAN MATHESON 



58 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

flocks, which grew in number, and added to his land until the Matheson sheep range 
was one of the largest In the county. After being joined by his brother. Hector 
Matheson, they operated their joint holdings together until 1886. ■ Duncan Matheson 
then became sole owner of what had been their united interests, while Hector Mathe- 
son purchased a large ranch in Lincoln county in 1896, which he is still operating. 

Duncan Matheson was united in marriage to Miss Jessie Morgan, a Scotch lassie 
who had removed to Kansas with her parents in 1881. Six children were born of 
this marriage, of whom Donald and Robert were drowned in the Big Sandy in 1899. 
The others are: John; William; Norman, who is now in France, with the Ameri- 
can troops; and Mrs. Henry Beuck, the young wife of one of the largest ranch owners 
of Elbert county. 

Duncan Matheson passed away, May 20, 1915, at St. Francis Hospital in Colorado 
Springs. He was laid to rest by his fellow members of the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks in the cemetery at Colorado Springs. His worth was indeed widely acknow- 
ledged. He possessed the sterling traits which have ever characterized the Scotch 
people — industry, integrity and perseverance^and he left the impress of his individ- 
uality and ability for good upon the history of the section in which he lived and 
labored. 



JOHN McEWEN FOSTER, M. D. 

Dr. John McEwen Foster, engaged in the practice of medicine in Denver, was born 
in Nashville. Tennessee, January 11, 1861, a son of Turner Saunders and Harriet 
(Erwin) Foster, the latter a daughter of James and Margaret (Caldwell) Erwin. The 
father. Turner S. Foster, was bom in the year 1820, devoted his life to the practice 
of law and passed away in the year 1898. 

Dr. Foster, who was the third in order of birth in his father's family of five chil- 
dren, pursued his early education in the public schools of Nashville, Tennessee, and 
afterwards became a student in the Montgomery Bell Academy of Nashville. He next 
entered the University of the South at Sewanee. Tennessee, and having determined 
upon the practice of medicine as a life work, he matriculated in the medical depart- 
ment of the University of Tennessee, from which he was graduated in 1891. In Sep- 
tember, 1889, he first visited Colorado, and after completing his medical course in 
1891 took up his abode in Denver, where he has since made his home, devoting his 
attention to the active practice of his profession, in which he has won substantial 
success. After completing his course in the University of Tennessee he had gone to 
New York, where for a time he was house physician in the City Hospital on Ward's 
island, retaining that position for a year and a half, during which he gained the 
broad and valuable training and knowledge that only hospital experience brings. 
He afterward traveled throughout Europe, visiting the various medical centers of 
learning of the old world and the noted hospitals on that side the Atlantic, particu- 
larly in Berlin, Vienna, Paris and London. He pursued special courses on diseases of 
the eye, ear, nose and throat and remained abroad for several years. He is today 
regarded as an eminent authority upon ophthalmology, otology, rhinology and laryngol- 
ogy in this section of the west. He is continually carrying his studies forward, thus 
promoting his efficiency, and he has won more than local renown as professor and 
lecturer at the University of Colorado and at the University of Denver, where he has 
given special courses on diseases of the ear, nose and throat. He is now serving on 
the staffs of St. Joseph's Hospital, St. Luke's Hospital and the Children's Hospital of 
Denver and is likewise connected in a professional capacity with the Denver City 
& County Hospital. He holds membership in the Denver City and County Medical 
Society, the Colorado State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. 
He is likewise a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Otology and 
Rhinology and the American College of Surgeons. He is ex-eye and ear surgeon for 
the Colorado Midland and the Colorado Southern Railways, and is examiner for the 
eye and ear on the board of examining surgeons for United States pensions in Denver. 

On the 29th of December, 1885, at Memphis, Tennessee, Dr. Foster was united 
in marriage to Miss Bessie Bethel, a daughter of Captain and Mrs. W. D. Bethel. 
They have become the parents of three children. William B., born in Denver in 1890, 
is now engaged in ranching in Weld county. Colorado. Pinckney Bethel, born in Den- 
ver in 1894, is married and makes his home in Denver but is now connected with the 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 59 

quartermaster's department of the regular army. John McEwen, Jr., born in 1899, is 
attending school at Salisbury, Connecticut. 

Dr. Foster belongs to the Denver Club and to the Denver Country Club and is 
appreciative of the social amenities of life although his profession makes heavy de- 
mands upon his time and energies. He has won for himself most favorable crit- 
icism as a lecturer and educator as well as a medical practitioner in the field in 
which he specializes and his pronounced ability is attested by colleagues and contem- 
poraries. 



HARVEY S. HAMILTON. 



Cheyenne Wells perhaps never lost a more valuable and more valued citizen 
than Harvey S. Hamilton, who was long identified with its banking and other busi- 
ness interests and contributed in most substantial measure to the development and 
upbuilding of his section of the state. He was born in Lebanon, Indiana, March 5, 
1841. a son of Henry and Polly (Parks) Hamilton, who were southern people and 
in 1S48 removed from Indiana to Iowa. 

Harvey S. Hamilton took up the profession of teaching when a young man but 
afterward turned his attention to carpentering, which he followed for three years. 
At a subsequent period he engaged in the lumber business in California, rafting lum- 
ber on the bay. He remained in the Golden state for three years, after which he 
returned to Iowa, where he again spent a few months. He then came to Colorado, 
settling at Cheyenne Wells in 18S7. Here he purchased an interest in a mercantile 
store in connection with Mr. Hickman. Cheyenne county was organized in January, 
1889, and with its development and progress Mr. Hamilton was associated to the time 
of his death. He continued to engage in merchandising with fair success until 1893. 
In 1896 he entered the field of banking, being instrumental in organizing the Cheyenne 
County State Bank, of which he was a half owner. He remained president of the 
bank from the beginning until his death, which occurred on the 1st of January, 1912. 
He proved a friend in need to many. On many occasions people who could not get 
anyone to endorse their personal notes, when hard pushed for money, would take their 
case to Mr. Hamilton, who after carefully considering the question would endorse the 
notes, so the cashier of the bank would then loan them money. He was very liberal and 
just in everything, had confidence in the integrity of his fellowmen and rarely was this 
confidence betrayed. He indeed proved a friend in need and a friend indeed and there 
are many who have reason to revere his memory for his timely assistance to them. In 
1908 he, with the Hickman brothers, purchased the controlling interest in the bank of 
Windsor, Colorado, while in 1906 he had become identified with the sheep industry. 
During the last six years of his life he was in ill health but he remained active in 
business to the last and successfully and wisely controlled his interests. The capital 
of the Cheyenne County State Bank of Cheyenne Wells was increased from fifteen 
thousand to forty thousand dollars, showing the success of the institution. Mrs. 
Hamilton still remains a member of its board of directors. As the years passed Mr. 
Hamilton prospered, winning a substantial measure of success which the most envious 
could not grudge him, so worthily was it gained and so honorably used. He was 
also interested in the Keyless Lock Company, now the American Keyless Lock Com- 
pany, and he owned land in Florida and had large real estate holdings in Colorado, 
making judicious investment of his money in farm property in the state. 

On the 30th of May, 1889. Mr. Hamilton was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
Woodrow, a daughter of Jeremiah and Parmelia (Byers) Woodrow, both of whom n-ere 
natives of Ohio and were among the pioneers there, Mr. Woodrow following farming 
and prospering in his undertakings. He passed away October 2, 1918. The maternal 
grandfather, Ed Byers, was born in Kentucky and was a great hunter and trapper 
of southern Ohio. His wife lived to be one hundred and five years of age, passing 
away in the year 1884. She lived through the period when all manner of work was 
done by the women of the household and she spun many a hank of flax thread. The 
father of Mrs. Hamilton was a cousin of President Wilson. Mrs. Hamilton was the 
second child in her father's family. She was educated in the public schools and 
later took up dressmaking. She came to Cheyenne county, Colorado, in 1888 and 
here met Mr. Hamilton. They were married in 1889, their marriage being the first 
on the records of Cheyenne county. For thirty years she has lived in her present 
home. At the time of her arrival there were in Cheyenne Wells but two stores, a 
depot, a land office and a schoolhouse. Her garden produced the first rose that ever 



60 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

bloomed in Cheyenne county. To Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton was born a son, Harry 
Woodrow Hamilton, whose birth occurred January 19, 1899". He acquired a public 
school education and after his father's death he and his mother went to Ohio in order 
to forget their deep sorrow. They lived in that state for three years and then re- 
turned to Cheyenne Wells, where the son completed his education in the high school. 
He did some splendid work in manual training, especially- along the line of cabinet 
work, evidence of which is seen in his home. On the 11th of December, 1917. he 
went to Denver to enlist in the first division of Company B of the Marine Corps and 
was sent to Mare Island. After a few months he was promoted to first private and 
several responsible duties were assigned him, including guard duty at the navy yard. 
He was afterward one of seven selected to go to Virginia to prepare for overseas 
service and left for France in October, 1918. 

Mrs. Hamilton is very prominent in Red Cross work and is chairman of the 
chapter of Cheyenne county. Since her husband's death she has purchased the ele- 
vator at Cheyenne Wells and she is also interested in the cheese factory, which is a 
profitable concern. It was her son who conceived the idea of investing therein about 
two years ago and the mother carried out the plan. No woman has for a longer period 
been a resident of Cheyenne Wells than Mrs. Hamilton, who is thoroughly familiar 
with every phase of its history and development. She is most highly esteemed by rea- 
son of her personal worth and the memory of her husband is enshrined in the hearts 
of all who knew him because of his sterling traits of character, his business ability, 
his spirit of accommodation and friendliness. His record is indeed one well worthy 
of emulation and there are many who might profitably follow his example. 



MRS. IDA L. GREGORY. 



Strong in its purpose, beautiful in its simplicity and most fruitful in its results, the 
life of Ida L. Gregory has added new luster to the record of womanhood in Colorado. Im- 
bued in early life with the noble purpose of assisting the young, she has devoted many 
years to educating those who by an untoward fate have been surrounded by hardships, 
temptations or uninviting environment, and to the work of the juvenile court she has also 
given her thought, time and energy, being for many years the active associate of Judge 
Ben B. Lindsey. Hundreds of boys and girls have been befriended by her and the influence 
of her life work extends to thousands of homes. 

Mrs. Gregory was born in Bolivar, Missouri, April 18, 1860, a daughter of Silas and 
Laurinda (Cleveland) Sturdavent. The former was a son of Abel Sturdavent, of Holland 
Dutch descent, who was born in the land of the dikes and on coming to the new world 
settled in Lawrenceburg. Kentucky. The maternal grandfather. James H. Cleveland, was 
born in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky, and was a cousin of Grover Cleveland. He became one 
of the first followers of Alexander Campbell, founder of the Campbellite or Christian 
church, and was a minister of the gospel until his death in 1869. 

Mrs. Gregory pursued her early education in the grammar and high schools of 
Brooklyn, Indiana, being there graduated with the class of 1877. She afterward spent 
four years as a student in St. John's Academy and won the Bachelor of Arts degree upon 
graduation with the class of 1881. Later she taught five years in the Gregory free night 
school at Denver, continuing the work from 1898 until 1903. She became president of the 
Colorado Art Club and one day while the art students were giving an exhibit a poor boy 
gazed longingly in at the window and then started down the street. Mrs. Gregory watched 
him from the inside, and seeing him hasten on, she called after him. inviting him to 
enter. "I ain't got the price," he said and again turned away. But Mrs. Gregory assured 
him that she had and while conducting him through the art exhibit they talked to each 
other of their plans. It seems that the boy had desired an education but had had no op- 
portunity to meet his desire. Mrs. Gregory had dreamed of founding a night school and 
hoped that money and opportunity might be forthcoming toward that end, but after her 
conversation with the boy she decided that now was the opportune moment for opening the 
school and asked the lad to bring his brother and any other boys of the neighborhood who 
desired education. That night the school was opened with an attendance of five, with 
Mrs. Gregory as the sole instructor. The school was maintained for about five years, 
during which time the attendance steadily grew and Mrs. Gregory gathered about her, as 
the occasion demanded, other teachers, some of whom gave their services gratuitously 
until the school numbered about four hundred and fifty pupils under the charge of ten 
teachers. Its worth has long since become recognized by city authorities, by philanthro- 




MRS. IDA L. GREGORY 



62 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

pists and others and In the end it was taken over by the board of education of Denver. 
This constituted, however, the initial step in night schools in Denver. 

Mrs. Gregory had charge of the University School of Music from 1900 to 1910 and dur- 
ing this period became the active assistant of Judge Lindsey. She had been appointed 
probation officer in 1903 and this gave her excellent opportunity to study the youth of the 
city, to learn of his environment, his temptations and his needs. In 1906 she was ap- 
pointed chief probation officer and assistant judge and in 1907 she was appointed clerk of 
the Denver Juvenile court, in which capacity she is still serving. In this connection she 
became the active assistant of Judge Lindsey, sitting with him upon the bench in all 
cases relative to delinquent boys, girls and women. These cases are tried in the utmost 
privacy with only the parents present. Mrs. Gregory has the distinction of being the first 
woman in the United States to receive an appointment of associate judgeship and often in 
the absence of Judge Lindsey she presides over such cases, taking full charge of the court 
and carrying on the work fully as well as the judge. Her keen insight into child nature 
has made her invaluable and Judge Lindsey accepts with implicit confidence her decisions 
in the cases she handles. She has sat with him in thousands of cases relating to chil- 
dren and has acquired a fund of information in regard to juvenile court work in all of 
its ramifications which makes her one of the authorities in this much studied field. 

It was on the 26th of October, 1881, in Indianapolis, that Ida L. Sturdavent was mar- 
ried to Thomas Gregory and she has a daughter, Maud Sturdavent Gregory, who is now 
in the employ of the government in Washington. D. C. Mrs. Gregory was the first presi- 
dent of the Colorado Arts Club, belongs also to the Wednesday Current Events Club and 
to the Poets & Artists Club of Colorado. Her religious faith is that of the Divine Science 
church. Her religious belief actuates her at every point in all of her busy life. Mrs. , 
Gregory conceived the idea and was the main factor in organizing the Colorado Junior 
Reserves, the pioneer organization of its kind in the United States. The Denver Times, 
on May 17, 1918, editorially said in part: "The proposed organization will be known as 
the Colorado Junior Reserves. Plans to give every boy between the ages of sixteen and 
eighteen a course of training under efficient drill-masters to be appointed by Adjutant- 
General Baldwin, that cannot fail to be healthful for them. And to build their character, 
to give them initiative and self-confidence, to inspire them with patriotism, to mold them 
at the formative stage of life into strong virile men. assets to their community. These 
things they will be blessed with even though the call of war never comes to them. * * * * 
Credit for the idea should go to Mrs. Gregory, a pioneer in work among Denver boys. It 
is constructive effort of the kind that Colorado's sister states will watch and emulate. 
And it is one more step the state will have taken toward bringing this war to the quickest 
possible conclusion." 

Who can measure her usefulness or indicate the true force of her example? Sympa- 
thetic, kindly, gentle and yet firm when occasion requires, she has dealt with thousands 
of children, winning their confidence and starting many a one on the road to higher and 
better things. She is a believer in the goodness of every individual and has closely fol- 
lowed the admonition of Browning: "Awake the little seeds of good asleep throughout 
the world." 



MARTIN HER STROM. 



The record of Martin Herstrom is the history of one who through successive steps 
has advanced from newsboy to the ownership of one of the largest forge plants west 
of the Mississippi. He is entitled to considerable credit and distinction for what he 
has accomplished. With borrowed capital he has more than made good and is one of 
the best known foundrymen and forge owners in the west. He was born in Chicago, 
January 10, 1870, a son of Martin and Anna ( (Kopen) Herstrom, who were natives of 
Herstrom Hall, Norway. They came to America in early life, settling in Chicago, and 
in 1880 removed to Denver, where the death of the father occurred in 1885, while the 
mother survived until 1913. They had a family of six children: Martin, of this review; 
Mrs. C. T. Wright, of Huntington, Indiana; Haakon, of Denver; Mrs. Harry Dickson, of 
Fort Scott. Kansas; Thomas, who was killed in a wreck on the Union Pacific Railroad in 
1906, being a fireman on that road; and Louis, of Seattle, Washington, who is connected 
with the Seattle Union Record. 

Brought to Denver when a lad of ten years, Martin Herstrom pursued his early 
education in the Broadway school and subsequently attended college. He later worked 
on the Republican and the Tribune and then began learning the blacksmith's trade. Ad- 
vancing in that connection, he became foreman in the shops of the Burlington Railroad 




MARTIN HERSTROM 



64 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Company and occupied that responsible position for a number of years, it bringing to him 
broad and valuable experience. Anxious to engage in business on his own account, he 
organized the American Forge Works. By 1904 he had progressed as far as it was 
possible on a salary basis and he therefore decided to begin business on his own account, 
so with a borrowed capital of seventy-flve dollars he made the initial step in the establish- 
ment of what has since developed into one of the largest forge plants in the west and one 
of the best equipped in the country. He employs a force of thirty-five men, working 
night and day on government work at the present time. He has always been accorded 
a liberal patronage and his business has long since reached profitable proportions. He 
has one of the most modern forge plants west of New York. The output is in demand in 
all parts of the world, particularly in connection with heavy mining machinery, manu- 
facturing forged steel shoes, dies and balls for ball mills. His work has ever been 
characterized by the utmost thoroughness and his energy and determination have 
enabled him to overcome all obstacles and difficulties in his path and make his way 
steadily upward to success, his patronage growing year by year. 

On the 28th of December, 1892, in Denver, Mr. Herstrom was married to Miss Metta 
Rose, of Denver, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Monteville Rose, representing a well known 
family of Denver and Missouri in which state Mrs. Herstrom was born at Sturgeon. They 
have become parents of four children. Merle Rose, born in Denver, is a high school 
graduate. Martin, Jr., born in Denver, May 13, 1900, was also graduated from the high 
school and is chief bugler on the United States Battleship Delaware and was on active 
duty in France with the marines and on the North sea. He sounded the bugle at the 
visit of King George and Queen Mary to the Grand Fleet, assembled for the auspicious 
occasion in the North sea. Emily Phyllis, born in Denver, is a noted toe dancer and 
as representative of her art has traveled throughout the country. She is now attending 
Mrs. Speer's exclusive school for girls, learning French and Spanish. Dorothy Fain, 
born in Denver is still a pupil in the public schools. 

In politics Mr. Herstrom maintains an independent course. Fraternally he is a 
Mason of high rank and a member of the Mystic Shrine and he also beloogs to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. At the early age of fourteen he was the champion 
roller skater at Belmont and Hanson's rink at Denver, and won the seventy-five mile 
race open to all, covering over seventy-five miles in six hours which at that time was a 
world's record. Mr. Herstrom is also prominent socially, having organized the Silver 
Leaf Social Club and the Shakespeare Literary and Debating Society. His religious 
faith is that of the Christian Science church. Guided by a sane philosophy of life, actuated' 
by a laudable ambition and characterized by a determined purpose, Martin Herstrom, 
who begaft earning his living by selling papers, is today a prominent representative of 
industrial activity in Colorado's capital. 



ADAM -WOEBER. 



Adam Woeber, builder of wagons, carriages, street cars and automobiles, in which 
connection he has developed a business of extensive proportions, is still active along 
this line although he has now passed the eighty-first milestone on life's journey. He was 
born in Bavaria, Germany, in April, 1S37, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Alois Woeber, who 
were likewise natives of Bavaria, whence they came to America in 1840, when their 
son Adam was but three years of age. They settled in Cincinnati, Ohio, where the 
father took up work at the blacksmith's trade, which he had previously learned and 
followed in his native land. He remained in Cincinnati until 1853, when he removed 
to Davenport, Iowa, where he resided to the time of his death, which occurred in the 
early '60s. His wife passed away in Davenport in 1872. In their family were five 
children. 

Adam Woeber, the youngest of the household, was a pupil in the public schools of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, after which he learned the moulder's trade and in 1853 he accom- 
panied his parents on their removal to Davenport, Iowa, where he learned the trade 
of wagon and carriage making. This he followed from 1853 until 1867 in Iowa, when 
he left the Mississippi valley and made his way across the plains to Denver, Colorado. 
When he had found a suitable location he established a wagon and carriage making 
plant, having brought his stock and men with him from Iowa. He succeeded so well 
in the new undertaking that he has remained in the business to this day. In 1882 he 
built all of the street cars for Denver, Salt Lake City, Grand Junction, Pueblo, Colo- 
rado Springs and Fort Collins, Colorado. The Woeber Company has built practically 
all of the cars since that time for the Denver Traction Company and of recent years 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 65 

Mr. Woeber has devoted much attention to automobile manufacturing. Himself an 
expert workman, he has been enabled to wisely direct the labors of those in his em- 
ploy and has developed his plant along the most progressive lines, equipping it with 
the latest improved machinery. 

In 1854, at Davenport, Iowa, Mr. Woeber was married to Miss Gertrude Hommes, 
who passed away in Denver in 1900. In the family were four children of whom three 
are living, Rudolph L., Josephine and Clara. 

Mr. Woeber remains still a very active and well balanced business man, retaining 
the vigor of one of middle age. In politics he is independent and from 1870 until 
1872 was an alderman of Denver. He has ever been keenly Interested in the welfare 
and upbuilding of the city in which he has so long made his home, having removed 
to Denver during the pioneer epoch in its development, and through all of the inter- 
vening years he has cooperated heartily in every project for the general good. He is 
a devout communicant of St. Elizabeth's Catholic church. 



CONVERSE C. BARNET. 



Converse C. Barnet is today district manager of the Toledo Scale Company, 
manufacturers of counter and heavy capacity scales. Ohio numbers Mr. Barnet 
among her native sons, his birth having occurred in Camden, that state, on the 26th 
of November, 1867. His father, William Barnet, also born in Ohio, belonged to one 
of the old families of that state and of Pennsylvania that came of French ancestry. 
The founder of the American branch of the family settled in the new world prior 
to the Revolutionary war and the family was represented in the colonial army in 
the struggle for independence. William Barnet, the father, was for many years 
senior partner in the firm of Barnet & Whiteside, who were engaged in the manu- 
facture of flour, and in sheep and cattle raising at Camden, Ohio. He became very 
prominent in that section. At the time of the Civil war he put aside all business and 
personal considerations in order to respond to the country's call for troops, enlisting 
in an Ohio company. He was engaged in active duty along the Maryland and Ohio 
borders. When the country no longer needed his aid he resumed his business activities 
and made for himself an enviable position in agricultural and manufacturing circles. 
He was born in 1833 and had therefore reached the age of seventy-eight years when he 
passed away in Cincinnati, Ohio, December 31, 1911. He had married Celia Amanda 
Duggins. whose name was originally spelled Duggan. She was born in Ohio, August 
16, 1837, and is descended from Irish ancestry, the family being established in New 
England at a very early day, while later representatives of the name became pioneer 
settlers of Ohio and Indiana. Mrs. Barnet survives her husband and is living in 
Cincinnati, Ohio. By her marriage she became the mother of five children but 
only two are now living. Converse C. and Bertha. 

The former pursued his education in the public and high schools of Eaton, Ohio, 
being graduated with the class of 1885. The following year he was a student in the 
Richmond Business College of Richmond, Indiana, from which he was graduated, 
and he later attended the Longley Business College of Cincinnati, Ohio, in which he 
completed a course by graduation in 18S8. On the 1st of January, 1887, he had become 
identified with the Eaton Manufacturing Company of Eaton, Ohio, having charge of 
the clerical force. He continued there for eighteen months, after which he completed 
his preparation for a business career as a student in the Longley Business College of 
Cincinnati. After leaving that school he entered the office of the Frisco Railroad 
Company at Cincinnati in the commercial agent's department, there remaining for 
several months. He was afterward with the Pullman Palace Car Company as assistant 
to the manager in the Cincinnati office and continued in the Pullman service for a 
year and a half. He next removed to Sidney, Ohio, and was associated with the Sidney 
School Furniture Company, having charge of the sales force from the spring of 1890 
until the spring of 1893. This was his first commercial experience along salesman- 
ship and constituted his initial step to his present success. He afterward served as 
a salesman with the company from 1893 until 1897 and later was in the furniture 
business with the Miner & Moore Furniture Company of Cincinnati, as salesman, 
from 1897 until 1899. He then returned to Sidney and was a salesman with the Sidney 
School Furniture Company until March. 1899, when he entered the employ of the 
National Cash Register Company, being given charge of the prospective business 
department, a very important department of the service. He remained in that con- 
nection, largely developing the trade of the house, until the spring of 1906, when he 



66 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

entered into active connection with S. F. Bowser & Company, Incorporated, at Toronto, 
Canada, having charge ot the Canadian traveling force. He there remained for a year 
in that connection. He served the company consecutively as sales manager, field 
superintendent and district manager, having been made district manager for Colorado 
on the 1st of January, 1913. He made a most creditable record during his six years' 
connection with this position and as district manager he built up for the company 
a business of extensive proportions in the sale of gasoline oil tanks, pumps and storage 
systems. He had his headquarters in the Gas and Electric building in Denver. He 
now is district manager of the Toledo Scale Company. 

On the 23d of August, 1893, Mr. Barnet was married in Troy, Ohio, to Miss Jean 
MacKinzie, a native of that place, daughter of James and Lydia (Robbins) MacKinzie. 
Mr. and Mrs. Barnet have one child, Corinne, who was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, March 
15, 1895. 

Mr. Barnet is connected with the Knights of Pythias. He holds membership also 
in the Denver Civic and Commercial Association and is an associate member of the 
Denver Manufacturers Association, thus being active in promoting interests of value 
in connection with the upbuilding and improvement of the city and the extension of 
its trade relations. He belongs to the First Baptist church, in the work of which he 
takes an active and helpful part. His various connections have been the motive force 
of his continued advancement in business life until his position today is one that 
places him in the front rank of the business men of the city. He is most energetic 
and determined in all that he undertakes and never stops short of the successful 
accomplishment of his purpose. 



A. NEWTON PATTON. 



Knowledge of the law with ability to accurately apply its principles has made A. 
Newton Patton a prominent attorney at the Denver bar as a specialist in bonds and pub- 
lic and corporation securities, while business acumen in other directions has led to his 
selection as the president of The Denver Title Guarantee Company. He is actively identi- 
fied with interests having to do with the upbuilding of the city of Denver and the pros- 
perity of the state. A substantial proportion of Denver's and Colorado's citizenship came 
from Ohio and to this class A. Newton Patton belongs. He was bom in Highland, Ohio, 
on the ISth day of July. 1867. His parents were Andrew Newton and Mary McCullough 
(Fairley) Patton. His earlier ancestors were natives of Kentucky, belonging to the 
earliest settlers of that state, whither they migrated from Virginia, and originally from 
England and Scotland. His father served in a judicial capacity in Ohio for over twenty 
years and was prominent with the legal profession until his death. He had attained the 
venerable age of eighty-seven years when he passed away in 1899. Both Mr. Patton's par- 
ents were educated in Ohio. Their family numbered nine children, of whom A. Newton 
Patton of this review is the youngest. One of his brothers, James F. Patton, enlisted for 
service in the Union army at the outbreak of the Civil war when he was only sixteen 
years of age and was assigned to a regiment stationed on the frontiers of Wyoming to 
protect the government telegraph lines from the Indian raids. He was stationed at Fort 
Laramie and Fort Casper. Wyoming, in 1863 and while repairing and guarding the tele- 
graph lines in the Sweetwater district, which had been cut by a party of Sioux Indians on 
the warpath, he was shot, the bullet piercing the right lung and going clear through his 
body. Of fourteen men who were sent out on that particular expedition only three re- 
turned alive, one of these being "Jim" Patton. After careful examination by the post 
surgeon his case was pronounced hopeless and he was given until the next morning to 
live. He secured a number of morphine tablets prescribed by the army surgeon and in 
the absence of his attendant he took a greater number of these to relieve his pain than 
had been prescribed. Immediately he fell into a deep sleep, from which he awoke Just 
seventy-two hours afterward. While he was in that condition his wound was kept thor- 
oughly cleansed by the crude method of a clean cloth being used to clear out the wound 
by passing it entirely through his body, and from the time he awakened his condition 
began to improve and in eleven months he had entirely recovered. He had scarcely re- 
gained his normal condition when he was again accidentally shot by a soldier cleaning 
his gun. this time in the abdomen, and once more he was given up to die, but his almost 
superhuman strength enabled him to weather this crisis also. Surgeons from various 
sections pronounced both wounds incurable. Not another one out of thousands of simi- 
lar cases known to surgery had ever survived, his last wound being very similar to that 




A. NEWTON PATTON 



68 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

which caused the death of President James A. Garfield. Mr. J. F. Patton is still living, 
making his home in Ohio, and is today enjoying fairly good health. 

In early life A. Newi^on Patton of this review attended the public and high schools, 
of Greenfield, Ohio, from which he graduated. He then came to Denver and entered the 
law department of the University of Denver as a law student, matriculating in 1893. He 
had the honor of being the first law student to matriculate in that institution, so that his 
name is the very first one on the register of representatives of the bar v/ho are numbered 
among the alumni of the University of Denver. He began practice immediately after 
graduation, and has since become an authority on bond, title and trust laws. He has 
specialized along that line in his practice and has developed ability in that field of 
jurisprudence. Hjs opinions are recognized as authority on questions of that char- 
acter. In 1914 he organized The Denver Title Guarantee Company, of which he has 
since become the president. This is now one of the leading corporations of Its kind 
In Colorado. He is also attorney for a number of mining, irrigation and industrial 
corporations. 

On the 12th of October, 1898, Mr. Patton was united in marriage to Miss Lucia Cas- 
sell, of Denver, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William J. Cassell, well known and promi- 
nent people of the city, identified with Denver's interests from pioneer times and es- 
pecially with the temperance and reform work of the state. Mr. and Mrs. Patton are 
proud of their three children. Lucia Cassell Patton, born in Denver in 1900, a graduate of 
the North Denver high school and who was a student in the University of Colorado, is 
at present teacher of French, Spanish and mathematics in the Kiefer, Oklahoma, high 
school. Marietta Elizabeth, born in Denver in 1902, is a senior in the North Denver high 
school; and Newton Cassell Patton, born in Denver in 1906, is now attending the Aaron 
Gove school of Denver. The religious faith of the family for many generations has been 
that of the Presbyterian church. In social circles they occupy a highly respected posi- 
tion. 

Mr. Patton is Identified with various fraternal organizations, belonging to the 
Masons, the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of 
The Maccabees, the Woodmen of the World, the Modern Woodmen of America and the 
Junior Order of American Mechanics. Along strictly professional lines he is a member of 
the American Bar Association, the Colorado State Bar Association and the Denver Bar 
Association, being an ex-president of the last. He is also connected with the Civic and 
Commercial Association. His political endorsement has ever been given to the republican 
party and for nine successive years he served as a member of the council of the city and 
county of Denver. He was a member of the committee which organized the department 
of building and loan associations of the state of Colorado. In the republican primary 
election of 1918 he was one of his party's candidates for district judge of the second ju- 
dicial district, within and for the city and county of Denver. Mr. Patton has always 
stood loyally for the best interests and activities in society and state affairs and the 
ability which he has displayed and prominence to which he has attained in business 
circles enable him to speak with authority, while his support of any proposition secures 
to it a large following. 



JACOB D. GUMAER. 



Jacob D. Gumaer is the general manager of the Parlin & Orendorff Plow Company 
at its large branch house in Denver and he is regarded as one of the most popular men 
in the implement trade in the Mountain States country, while Denver classes him as 
an honored and respected citizen. He has made his home in the Queen City of the Plains 
for many years and is therefore widely known. He was born in Sullivan county. New 
York, April 21, 1857, and is a son of Peter and Esther (Smith) Gumaer, both of whom 
were born in the Empire state, where they were reared, educated and married. The 
father engaged in the manufacture of flour on his own account for many years and passed 
away in New York, after which his widow removed to Kansas, where her last days 
were spent. They had a family of five children. 

Jacob D. Gumaer of this review was the third in order of birth in the family and 
in early life was a pupil in the public schools of Sullivan and Tompkins counties in 
New York. In the latter county he also attended the Monticello Academy and following 
his graduation from that institution he went to New York city, where he entered the 
wholesale grocery business, continuing actively in that line for three years. He came to 
Colorado, March 29, 1879, locating in Denver, and immediately secured a position with 
the firm of Hartig & Patch, with whom he remained for two years. In 1881 he went 



70 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

to Kansas City and entered into the farm implement business with the Smith-Keating 
Implement Company and became the traveling representative of the house. For nine 
years he was manager of the Racine-Sattley Company of Denver and Kansas City, Mis- 
souri, for the states of Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico and Kansas. He returned to 
Denver in July, 1901, to take over the management of the Parlin & Orendorff Plow Com- 
pany. Denver branch. This is one of the largest farm implement manufacturing con- 
cerns and plow companies of the west. They have a very extensive plant in Denver, 
requiring a man of long experience, wide knowledge and ability to carefully direct its 
interests. Mr. Gumaer thoroughly understands every phase of the business, the value 
of the mechanical construction of its output and at the same time his long experience 
in salesmanship splendidly qualifies him for the management of that branch of the 
business — the introduction of its goods to the trade and the development of its patronage. 
Mr. Gumaer's business record covers thirty-flve years of intense activity intelligently 
directed. What he has accomplished represents the fit utilization of his time and talents. 
He has at different periods been connected with leading implement houses of the country 
and every change that he has made has indicated a marked step in advance. He has 
telegrams in his possession indicating the regret of a house that was losing his services 
and also telegrams from other houses desiring to at once seal the contract that would 
secure his services. His name is indeed a well known one in implement trade circles 
of the west and he is very popular among the men engaged in this line of business. In 
1917 he was elected to the office of president of the Hardware. Implement and Paint Club 
and made the opening address at the convention of the State Hardware Implement 
Dealers' Association in January, 1918. 

On the 8th of March, 1892, Mr. Gumaer was united in marriage to Miss Anna Cold- 
water, of Lyons, Kansas, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Coldwater, who were natives 
of Illinois. Mrs. Gumaer has become the mother of two children: Frank, who was 
born in Newton. Kansas, March 10, 1893. and is a graduate of the Denver high school; 
and Esther, who was born in Newton, May 23, 1896, and is also a graduate of the high 
school of Denver and a graduate in music of the Denver Conservatory. She is well known 
and popular in musical circles of the city. 

Mr. Gumaer holds membership with the United Commercial Travelers. Politically 
he maintains an independent course, not caring to ally himself with any party but pre- 
ferring to cast his ballot according to the dictates of his judgment. He is a self-made 
man who has reached a point of prosperity, his advancement being due entirely to his 
capability and earnest effort. His close application, the integrity of his course, his 
progressive spirit and his indefatigable energy have been the salient features in bringing 
him to the creditable and responsible position which he now fills. The fine home which 
he occupies is an indication of his success and of his well directed energy and thrift. 
His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the City Park Congregational church, 
of which he is an officer and trustee. 



JOHN B. MAYERS. 



John B. Mayers, who for a quarter of a century has been engaged in the ice, 
business in Littleton and who has served as mayor of his city, was born in Wurtem- 
berg, Germany, December 29. 1843, a son of Kaspar and Rosina Mayers. He was 
brought to the United States by his parents when twelve years of age. arriving on 
the 1st of September, 1856. He attended school in his native land until ten years of 
age and as he is a well read man, well informed on many subjects, his higher educa- 
tion must be ascribed entirely to his own efforts. Of a studious mind, he has an 
insatiable appetite for good literature and has especially delved into history, both 
religious and secular. Continuing along this line, he later in life studied Buckle's 
"History of Civilization in England," deriving keen satisfaction from this critically 
authentic work. At the age of fourteen he made his debut in the world of hard 
knocks and disillusions — willing to work and ambitious to conquer — but without a 
cent. He has made of life a success and is therefore entitled to the proudest title 
bestowed in America — that of a self-made man. When this country was thrown into 
that bitter struggle, arising out of the conditions of the south, clashing with the 
principles of the north, Mr. Mayers gave his services to his newly adopted country and 
continued throughout the Civil war, his record being more extensively given below. 

When twenty years of age he began learning the butchering business, at which he 
continued for many years. On the 16th of February, 1876, he arrived in Denver and 
again became identified with the butchering business, forming a partnership with 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 71 

Henry Weinrich, their location being at Arapahoe and Eighteenth streets. There he 
continued for four months and fourteen days. He then walked to Littleton, where 
he arrived June 2, 1876, with forty dollars of borrowed money. Throughout the inter- 
vening period he has largely made Littleton his home, being absent for only a brief 
time during all the intervening years. He first engaged in the butchering business 
and in the conduct of a hotel for two years, cooking tor the men who were engaged 
on railroad construction. On tha 1st of July. 1878, he went to Leadville, where he 
engaged in prospecting but was not fortunate in striking gold. He then turned his 
attention to contracting and made some money in that way, but after four years he 
left Leadville and again came to Littleton. For ten years he was engaged in the 
artesian well business and made some money in that connection. His next venture 
was in the ice trade and for a quarter of a century he has been an ice merchant of 
Littleton, a fact that indicates his success. He has built up a big business and for 
many years has enjoyed an extensive and gratifying patronage. 

Mr. Mayers was first married in Dayton, Ohio, on the 27th of May, 1866, to Miss 
Barbara Waters, who passed away in 1912. The children of that marriage are: Charles 
W.; Ella, the wife of George Griffith, living in Idaho; Fannie, the wife of R. W. Cand- 
ler; and Mary, the wife of S. N. Playford. of Utah. For his second wife Mr. Mayers 
chose Lunette Dailey Harrigan and they were married in Denver on the 16th of 
November, 1914. 

Mr. Mayers' military record covers service with Company E of the Seventy-First 
Ohio Infantry, in which he fought for four years and four months during the Civil 
war. While working as a lineman near Cumberland, Tennessee, he was taken prisoner, 
but was paroled. On parole he went to Dayton, Ohio, and was exchanged in February, 
1863, then rejoining his regiment. He was wounded in the battle of Shiloh and he 
participated in the battle of Missionary Ridge, went to Nashville. Tennessee, and he 
was also in the Atlanta campaign and thus loyally defended the Union throughout the 
entire period of hostilities between the north and the south. Mr. Mayers has always 
been interested in the welfare and progress of the city in which he has so long made 
his home and has served as alderman, while for one term he was mayor of Littleton. 
He has not adhered to any political party but maintains an independent attitude, 
voting for men and measures that he thinks are most valuable to the country. He 
is widely known as a progressive business man and his enterprise has brought to him a 
substantial measure of success. 



THOMAS BAYARD BURNITE. 

Thomas B. Burnite is the president of the Western Engineering Specialties Com- 
pany of Denver and as such is at the head of an extensive and prosperous business, 
with headquarters in the Boston building. Through business and social connections 
he has become one of the best known citizens of Denver, highly esteemed by all with 
whom he has been brought in contact. He was born in Felton, Delaware, July 6, 1879, 
a son of Wilbur H. and Marie Lindale Burnite, the former a native of Maryland, while 
the latter was born in Delaware. The father was well known in connection with public 
life in Delaware, where he served for two terms as state treasurer and held other im- 
portant offices. He was also a member of the state legislature, serving as representa- 
tive and as state senator one term each. In business lite he was a manufacturer of 
lumber and operator of a sawmill producing ship keels, and he was also owner of 
large peach orchards. He died October 21, 1918, and is survived by his widow, who 
resides at Snow Hill, Maryland. Their family numbered six children: Martha; Lindale, 
a resident of Denver; Clara; Thomas B; James Hyland; and Pauline. 

In his boyhood days Thomas B. Burnite attended the country schools of Felton, 
Delaware, and afterward entered the Williamson Technical and Trade School at Phila- 
delphia Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated in 1900. After leaving that 
school he secured a position with the Deane Steam Pump Company of Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, and remained with the firm for a year, when he went with the Chicago 
Pneumatic Tool Company of Franklin, Pennsylvania, and Cleveland, Ohio, as designing 
engineer for two years. He next entered the Schenectady Locomotive Works as a 
member of the engineering staff and continued in that position for two years, after 
which he resigned and accepted a position with Charles C. Moore & Company, of 
San Francisco, California, on power plant designing, with which he was thus con- 
nected for two years. In July, 1906, he came to Denver, after the earthquake and 
fire, and organized The Western Engineering Specialties Company, which under his 



72 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

guidance has developed into a prosperous industry. They are general agents for tht 
T. L. Smith concrete mixers, Telsmith gyratory crushers, Byers hoisting engines, 
Byers auto-cranes, Erie City Iron Works engines, Kimball elevators. Hill pumping 
machinery, Chicago Pneumatic Tool Company compressors and pneumatic tools, and 
Parsons trench excavators and back fillers, and Elgin motor driven street sweepers. 
They take large contracts for mining machinery and equipment. The business was 
incorporated in 1908 with Mr. Burnite as president and treasurer. 

On the 17th of December, 1902, Mr. Burnite was married to Miss Marion Craw- 
ford of Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Captain Robert Crawford, U. S. N., 
who has passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Burnite have become parents of three children: 
Thomas Bayard, Jr., born in Denver, January 27, 1907; Jean, in 1913; and Marion, in 
1915. 

Mr. Burnite is a prominent Mason. He has passed up through both routes and 
has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and the Knight Templar 
degree of the York Rite, and is a Shriner. He is also a member of the Denver Athletic 
Club and the Lakewood Country Club, and he is a member of the Jovian Order, a 
national electrical engineers' association, in which he has the title of Atlas, and is a 
member of the Denver Civic and Commercial Association. His religious faith is that 
of the Presbyterian church. His aid and influence are always on the side of progress 
and improvement, of truth, reform and advancement. His business enterprise and 
thorough reliability have constituted the foundation upon which he has builded his 
success, while the sterling worth of his character has gained for him the high regard 
of all with whom he has been associated. 



GRANT S. PECK, M. D. 



Dr. Grant S. Peck of Denver, was born in Swatara, Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, 
on September 10, 1864, being the fourth son and the seventh child in a family of 
eleven children born to the late John F. and Angeline Peck. The family was founded 
in America by four brothers who came to the new world prior to the Revolutionary 
war, one of these being the great-grandfather of Dr. Peck. During the Civil war, his 
father who was also a native of the Keystone state, organized Company C, One Hundred 
and Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry, of which he was chosen captain by his 
company. He was with that command for three years and his military record was 
one of distinction and honor. In the spring of 1865 he became a resident of southern 
Michigan, settling on a farm in Berrien county where he devoted his attention to 
farming and to the lumber trade. He died at this place in 1909, at the age of eighty 
years. His wife prior to her marriage bore the name of Angeline Stober. She, too, is 
a native of Pennsylvania and a representative of one of the old families of that state. 
Mrs. Peck is still living and is yet enjoying good health, making her home in Buchanan, 
Michigan, at the age of eighty-seven years. 

Dr. Peck acquired his preliminary education in the public schools of Berrien 
county, Michigan, and afterward attended the State Normal College at Ypsilanti, 
Michigan, and the Northern Indiana Normal School, from there going to Wheaton 
College at Wheaton, Illinois, for one year. The succeeding five years he was engaged 
in teaching in the public schools of Michigan during the winters, providing for summer 
schooling at the Northern Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso, Indiana, excepting 
one year which was spent pioneering in South Dakota, holding government land. 
Later, deciding to take up the medical profession, he matriculated in the University 
of Michigan from which he was graduated in 1890 with the degree of M. D. Following 
his graduation he settled in New Buffalo, Michigan, where he engaged in general 
practice for a year. He then returned to his alma mater to become house surgeon 
and assistant professor of practice and materia medica in the University of Michigan, 
there remaining until 1892, when he came to Denver and was associated with Dr. 
Norman G. Burnham, with offices at 708 Fourteenth street. His connection with Dr. 
Burnham was maintained for seven years; he then moved his offices to 1427 Stout 
street, there remaining until 1912, when he removed to his present location in the 
Majestic building, specializing in the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and 
throat. 

He belongs to the American Medical Association, the American Institute of Homeo- 
pathy, the Colorado State Homeopathic Society, the Colorado State Medical Society 
and the Twentieth Century Medical Club. He is conscientious iu his practice, faithful 
to the interests of his patients, and his highly developed power ranks him with the 




DR. GRANT S. PECK 



74 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

leading physicians of Denver and the state. His own labors provided the means of 
his education and his success is the merited and direct reward of his perseverance 
and ability. 

During the World war he held an appointment from the president as medical 
examiner and member of Local Exemption Board No. 6, his associates on this board 
being Mr. W. P. Horan and Mr. W. N. W. Blayney. 

He also served for ten years as professor of the eye, ear, nose and throat in the 
Denver Homeopathic College and was registrar of that college for two years, while 
for twenty-four years he was eye, ear, nose and throat surgeon for the Denver Orphans' 
Home and of the People's Tabernacle free clinic for fifteen years. He served on the 
staff of the County Hospital for a number of years; is examiner for a number of the 
old line life insurance companies; was at one time president of the State Homeopathic 
Medical Society, the Denver Homeopathic Club and of the Twentieth Century Medical 
Society. 

He has pursued post graduate work at various times, taking several courses of 
lectures in clinics in the New York Ophthalmic Hospital, in the New York Eye and 
Ear Hospital and the New York Polyclinic. He was the first vice president of the 
American Institute of Homeopathy, serving in that office in 1913-14. 

On the 6th of October, 1S92, Dr. Peck was married in Birmingham, Michigan, to 
Miss Edla A. Park. 

Dr. Peck belongs to Oriental Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; Colorado Chapter, No. 29i 
R. A. M.; Denver Commandery, No. 25, K. T.; and to El Jebel Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is treasurer and one of the directors of the Denver Athletic Club, belongs 
to the Denver Country Club, the Lakewood Country Club, the Denver Civic and Com- 
mercial Association and to the Denver Rotary Club. 

His associates in every relation entertain for him high respect by reason of hi^ 
ability, his personal worth and his public-spirited devotion to the welfare of city, com- 
monwealth and country. 



HIRAM G. WOLFF. 



The history of any state is but a record of the lives of those men whose activities 
have had to do with its building up and development. Thus in the history of Colorado 
there are few men living today who will more fully measure up to that standard of 
eligibility than Hiram G. Wolff, of Denver. Nearly three score years have passed since 
Mr. Wolff, then a boy of sixteen, came into the territory of Colorado. Here he resided 
continually during the territorial days and on into the days of statehood; during this 
long period his identification with various lines of development has been a substantial 
contribution to Colorado's progress. 

Hiram G. Wolff was born October 23, 1845, at West Liberty, Ohio county, Virginia, 
His father, John B. Wolff, who was born at Martinsburg, Virginia, July 7, 1S16, was 
the owner and editor of the Wheeling Argus prior to the Civil war; always an aboli- 
tionist, later a republican. His mother was Caroline J. Hedges, a native of West Liberty, 
Virginia, one of the F. F. V.'s. The father of John B. Wolff was Joseph Wolff, a veteran 
of the War of 1812 and the Mexican war, and was enlisted in the service of his country 
in the War of the Rebellion. He lived to be ninety-four years of age. The father of 
Caroline J. Hedges was Hiram Hedges, who married Miss Hannah Forman and crossed 
the Allegheny mountains into the upper Ohio valley prior to the Revolution and settled 
near what is now the city of Wheeling, West Virginia. 

John B. Wolff went to Kansas during the border ruffian troubles of 1857, in which 
he took an active part helping to bring in Kansas as a free state. In August, 1859, he 
came to Colorado, leaving his family in Kansas, but returned in the fall to join them 
at Leavenworth. In 1860 he removed to Colorado. In the spring of 1S62 the family, 
consisting of the mother and eight children, Hiram G., the oldest, then sixteen years 
of age, with two teams of oxen crossed the plains from Leavenworth, Kansas, to join 
the father on his claim on Clear creek, near Denver, which was afterward known as 
the Wolff homestead, near Arvada. The family belonged to that class of hardy pioneers 
known as "Pike's Peakers," who knew no such thing as failure, and while others returned 
to the "States" discouraged, they remained to help break the way and lay the founda- 
tion on which this great commonwealth now stands. With no schools in which to 
educate their growing children, with the most meager facilities for inter-communication, 
their auto a lumber wagon, their engine a yoke of cattle, their chauffeur the father or 




HIRAM G. WOLFF 



76 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

son, their fuel, an ox goad, they put their hands to the plow and never thought oi 
looking backward. 

In 1868 the father returned to the east in an attempt to collect from the govern- 
ment pay tor stock stolen by the Indians, in their depredations of 1864, 1865 and 1866. 
This took him to Washington, where he remained until his death, leaving the care and 
support of the family to the older boys. For eleven years the older boys worked 
together to accomplish this end, sent the younger children to school, built a home for 
the mother and maintained it until her death years later. This home had the dis- 
tinction of being the first house of any pretension built in what was afterward the town 
of Highlands. 

Of the family of ten, only three remain: Hiram G., who resides in Denver; John, 
who resides at Boulder, Colorado; and Mrs. Ella Leimer, who lives with her son, 
Walter A., in Denver. Albert, having recently departed this life, lived at the old home- 
stead for fifty-six years. 

Hiram G. Wolff, the subject of this sketch, attended school in Clear creek valley 
in a log schoolhouse, which he helped to construct in 1863. This was one of the first 
Bchoolhouses erected in the territory of Colorado. It was burned down after a "watch 
meeting" on the night of December 31, 1864. After a time a new frame district school 
was built at Arvada and this he attended during the four winter months, and worked 
on the farm and in the garden eight months of the year until his majority. 

In 1862 Mr. Wolff became market gardener and farmer; a pioneer in fruit raising 
in this part of Colorado. In the fall of 1863 he drove a team from Denver to Des Moines, 
Iowa, for his first installment of nursery stock, returning to Denver, December 16, 1863. 
This venture was only partially successful because of floods and ravages of grasshoppers, 
but perseverance finally brought ample success. The nursery and fruit-raising business 
was continued for many years and thousands of the fruit and shade trees in and around 
Denver and throughout this section of the country came from his nursery. The trees 
around the courthouse at Denver are products of his nursery. He was the first to engage 
in the ice business in Denver and drove the first ice wagon, at which time one wagon 
served the whole town. 

Mr. Wolff was thoroughly familiar with the Indian troubles from 1864 to 1866, 
having seen people who were scalped by the Indians. He was personally acquainted 
with Colonel Chivington, who commanded the Colorado Third Regiment in the memorable 
Sand Creek fight, which ended the Indian troubles in Colorado. He has seen all the 
notable floods in Cherry creek since May 19, 1864, and can tell familiar details of each. 
He has seen Judge Lynch deal with the horse thieves and noted criminals of the early 
days. Mr. Wolff has met every president since Lincoln; has known every governor of 
Colorado; and every mayor of Denver since 1860. 

Mr. Wolff was one of the first residents of what after became the town of High- 
lands, building the first house on the hill west of Denver, at a time when there were 
not enough resident males within the boundary to fill the offices of the newly organized 
town. He took a most active part in the development of that growing suburb, as well 
as in the city proper, securing franchises for the first electric street car lines con- 
structed in Highlands. He organized and was president of the Rocky Mountain Lake 
Street Car Company, and constructed and operated the line to Rocky Mountain Lake; 
raised the subsidy which built the West Twenty-ninth avenue street car line, graded 
the street and had the cars running in thirty days; secured the franchise for the 
Berkeley motor line, afterward turning it over to the tramway; secured all the electric 
franchises for the Tramway, for all the lines in what was then the town of Highlands; 
and secured the electric light franchise for the town of Highlands for a less rate than 
the city of Denver was at that time paying. He circulated the petition for opening 
the county road, which afterward became Federal boulevard, the longest and best 
boulevard in or near Denver; organized the Fourteenth Street Viaduct Association 
to provide a way over the railroad tracks for residents of the north side; was its presi- 
dent and after years of persistent effort and continual opposition by the city mayor 
and council board of public works and the railroad companies succeeded in the comple- 
tion of the present Fourteenth street viaduct. 

Mr. Wolff worked for twenty years for a system of parks and viaducts, with varying 
success. He caused the old city charter (a franchise granted by the legislature) to be 
amended by the legislature, permitting the city council to divide the city into park 
districts, only to have the proprietors of the two daily newspapers personally oppose 
the plan, to its utter defeat. He was a member of the charter convention which formed 
the present city charter. His efforts in this convention were devoted to getting such 
provisions into the charter as would assure a comprehensive park system, realizing the 
natural advantages to be gained by dividing the city into park districts, and allowing 
each district to secure its own park system by issue of district bonds. This was bit- 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 77 

terly opposed by some who now claim to be the originators of the plan and system. 
It required two years of persistent effort to get the first district unit of the system 
through, namely, the Highland park. This secured for the city more than four hundred 
acres of lakes and land, for a very nominal cost; next the Washington park system, 
and the Montclair park and boulevards. About this time the late Mayor Speer seemed 
to realize the possibilities and took up the civic center and boulevards and worked out 
a comprehensive park and boulevard system equaled by few cities in the world and 
one that future generations will refer to with pride. The real fight of this same charter 
convention was over the provision for viaducts. The railroads opposed this by all the 
means usually employed but without success. The result was the present Twentieth 
street and Colfax viaducts. 

Mr. Wolff has had more than fifty years of experience in irrigation. He helped to 
construct the first large ditch in Colorado — the Rocky Mountain ditch, taking water 
from Clear creek near Golden, using a yoke of cattle and a home-made wooden scraper, 
in the years 1862, 1863 and 1864. He has been an officer and director in this company 
fifty years, and is at present the president and manager of the company, which position 
he has held the past thirty years. This ditch waters some eight hundred gardens west 
of the city— the most sought after lands in Colorado. He was the president and prin- 
cipal owner of the Farmers Highline (Arapahoe) ditch, when its decrees were produced, 
also interested in the Church and other ditch and reservoir enterprises of the state. 
He caused the district irrigation law known as the "Church law" to be rewritten and 
placed on the books, the abuse of which has resulted in much turmoil in irrigation 
enterprises, though the law in itself is a very good one. He organized the Inter Moun- 
tain Water Company for the purpose of bringing seven hundred cubic second feet of 
water from Williams river to the Platte river water shed for irrigation purposes. This 
was opposed by the government and the Union Water Company, the Colorado Central 
Power Company and others, but the decrees were finally granted and work commenced, 
but the completion was defeated by the action of the government and collapse of irriga- 
tion securities. He is and has been a strong advocate of bringing absolutely pure water 
across the range for Denver's domestic supply and for power purposes for street and 
city lighting, using Cheesman, Antero and Lost Park reservoirs water for irrigating 
lands near Denver. Mr. Wolff is said to be one of the best posted men in Colorado on 
all lines of irrigation matters. 

He organized the Higgins Investment Company, a holding company for the property 
of the late L. L. Higgins, and has been a director and officer in this company since its 
organization. He has been actively engaged in irrigation and real estate enterprises 
for many years, platted several additions to Denver, some of which bear his name. His 
fruit place in Highlands is now occupied by the Mullen Home for the Aged. 

He is a member of the Colorado Pioneers Association and was a member of the 
board of trustees of the Central Presbyterian church, during the building of that edifice. 
He bought the tour corner lots where the Equitable building now stands from the late 
Henry C. Brown for twelve hundred dollars, where the Seventeenth Street Presbyterian 
church was built in 1872. These lots are now said to be worth six hundred thousand 
dollars. He was a charter member of the Chamber of Commerce, also a member for 
years of the Real Estate Exchange and other associations. A director in several banks 
prior to the panic of 1893 and directly thereafter. At one time was one of the heaviest 
tax payers in the city and county of Denver. The panic of 1893 and subsequent depre- 
ciation of real estate stripped him of everything, so he has been compelled to start at 
the beginning again. His long and honorable connection with the real estate business 
in Denver has won for him the highest standing and a reputation for straightforwardness 
and integrity not surpassed by any of his contemporaries. 

In his political connection he has always been a stalwart republican. The keen 
and active interest manifested by him in political matters has never been prompted 
by pecuniary consideration but solely by his public spirit and genuine desire for the city's 
good and progress. While never having held a political office, his work and influence 
have been of distinct value to the residents of Highlands as the residents of the old 
western district well remember. It is doubtful if the city of Denver has a private citizen 
living today whose interest in civic betterment and whose activities have been of such 
distinct value and with less personal gain. His labors in connection with the securing 
of franchises, viaducts, park systems and boulevards have invariably been without 
remuneration. 

Mr. Wolff was twice married. His first wife. Miss Sara A. Carver, was one of the 
pioneer school teachers of Denver and a daughter of Professor Henry Carver, who was 
one of the first principals of the Denver public schools before the Denver district owned 
a single school building. This wife died in 1895, and in 1897 he married his present 
wife, Jean A. Carver, a sister of his first wife. He has a son, Frank C, born October 22, 



78 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

1873, who is married and lives in Los Angeles, California, and this son has one daughter. 
Another son, Hiram B., born May 25, 1898, is registered in the navy and is in his junior 
year at the Colorado University, taking the course in chemical engineering. 

Mr. Wolff's wonderfully well preserved condition is more becoming of one twenty 
years the junior of his three score and ten. He has the happy faculty of growing old 
gracefully which seems but the just reward for a regular, temperate life. He has 
never used whiskey or tobacco in any form. 



HARRY E. MULNIX. 



Harry E. Mulnix, state treasurer of Colorado and one of the best known men In 
the state, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, October 15. 1856, a son of the late 
Alexander Mulnix, who was likewise a native of the Keystone state, where his an- 
cestors had lived for several generations. Mingled strains of Scotch and Irish blood 
flow in his veins and through succeeding generations there has been manifest in the 
family a force of character that has made its representatives substantial and valued 
citizens of the various communities in which they have lived. The founder of the 
American branch of the Mulnix family arrived In the new world shortly after the 
Revolutionary war. Alexander Mulnix was a successful farmer, who spent his entire 
life in Pennsylvania. He wedded Mary Margaret Sampson, a native of the Keystone 
state and a representative of one of tlie old Pennsylvania families of Scotch-Irish 
descent. His wife died' in Pennsylvania, in 1902, at the age of eighty years. Her 
family numbered eight children, six sons and two daughters. 

The youngest of the household was Harry E. Mulnix. who is indebted to the public 
schools of Pittsburgh for his early education, which was supplemented by study in the 
Iron City College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1875. He started 
out to provide for his own support when a youth of eighteen. His second employment 
was that of a clerk in mercantile lines and his first position was that of a bookkeeper 
with the firm of Harshaw & Templeton. His initial experience was therefore of a 
broadening character that qualified him for further advancement. In 1878 he came 
to Colorado, arriving in Pueblo on the 17th of May. In the fall of that year he 
removed to Trinidad and there he engaged in general merchandising. While a resident 
of that city he served for four years as a member of the city council and was acting 
mayor of the city when but twenty-three years old. In 1887 he entered the railroad 
contracting business, which he followed until 1893. In 1892 he was the candidate for 
state treasurer but went down to defeat in the democratic landslide of that year, 
although leading his ticket in a manner that Indicated great strength throughout the 
state. In 1894 he was elected state treasurer on the republican ticket and served for 
one term of two years, after which, in 1896, he was nominated for the position of 
secretary of state but declined the proffered honor. In 1898 he was again nominated 
for the position of state treasurer but refused to become a candidate. His party thus 
acknowledged his powers of leadership as well as his efficiency and ability in office. 
From 1898 until 1914 he followed his profession as a certified public accouiTtant. In 
the latter year he was nominated for the office of state auditor, to which he was 
elected. His incumbency in 1915 and 1916 was one noted for a degree of efficiency that 
has seldom been attained and never surpassed in the management of a state office in 
Colorado. It involved the handling of over forty millions of dollars of staffe funds, 
without having to account for a single penny. In 1916 he was the imanimous choice 
of the republican assembly for the office of state treasurer, thus obviating the necessity 
of a primary campaign, and in the election that followed, while he was defeated, he 
ran seventy-five thousand six hundred votes ahead of his ticket. The democrats carried 
the state by seventy-six thousand five hundred and eight. This was one of the most 
remarkable instances of personal political strength ever shown in the political history 
of the state. Resuming his practice of accountancy together with the management 
of other private Interests, Mr. Mulnix continued until assuming the duties of state 
treasurer in January, 1919, to which he was elected in the fall of 1918. Mr. Mulnix 
owes much of his great popularity in the state to the unquestioning faith the people 
have in his unswerving integrity. When out of office he has been for nearly two de- 
cades the official auditing authority for most of the counties of the state. He has 
uncovered no little in the way of wilful wrongdoing and in the way of accounting 
errors due to mistaken methods. In all cases he acted with such tact that publicity 
was avoided, wrongs were quietly made good and penalties were imposed, but never 
with the blare of trumpets. In most of the courts of the state his methods of book- 




HARRY E. MULNIX 



80 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

keeping have been adopted. It is this element of personal contact with county officials 
that has endeared him to leading citizens of both parties throughout the state and 
gave them, too, an insight into the absolute trustworthiness of the man. 

Mr. Mulnix has always been a stalwart republican since becoming a voter. He 
perhaps has a more extensive acquaintance throughout Colorado than any other man 
in the state. His democratic manner, his innate courtesy and politeness have always 
been prominent characteristics, which are probably surpassed only by his admirable 
family lite and ideal devotion to the rearing and training of his children. His hosts 
of friends know and address him as "Harry" without the least thought of indignity or 
affront. His kind-heartedness and generosity are seldom appealed to in vain by worthy 
causes. A deserving appeal invariably meets with response and has never been turned 
away without help of some kind. 

Mr. Mulnix has been married twice. In Trinidad, Colorado, he wedded Miss 
Sophia A. Lewelling, who was the first American white child born in southern Colorado, 
a daughter of Jefferson W. and Anne Lewelling. Jefferson W. Lewelling was a pioneer 
of this state, coming to Colorado in 1860. He was also a Civil war veteran, enlisting 
from Colorado for service in that struggle. Both he and his wife are yet living and 
are residents of Dodge county, Kansas. To Mr. and Mrs. Mulnix were born five chU- 
dren, three of whom survive. Sophia Jane is the wife of Colonel E. J. Boughton, who 
is a colonel on General Pershing's staff and prior to his participation in the war was 
an attorney of Denver. To him and his wife have been bom three children, Elizabeth 
J., Edward J. and Evelyn J., all born in Colorado, as was Mrs. Boughton. Harry B. 
Mulnix, the eldest son of Harry E. Mulnix, married Edna Olcott and died in Denver, 
October 13, 1917, at the age of thirty-flve years, leaving a son, Harry Olcott, who is 
nine years of age. Llewellyn Grant, the next member of the family, is a resident of 
Denver and is office manager of the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company 
of this city. He married Lucy Fortune and they have a daughter, Barbara. Robert 
C, the next of the family, married Novella Stull, of New York, and is engaged in the 
automobile business in Denver. He and his wife have a daughter, Charlotte Louise. 
Anna May, the next member of the family, became the wife of William J. O'Brien 
and died, leaving a son, James Llewellyn. Mrs. Mulnix passed away October 23, 1889, 
at the age of twenty-six years. On the 4th of September, 1907, Mr. Mulnix was again 
married, his second union being with Miss Grace Alice Strayer, a native of Indiana 
and a daughter of Calvin and Alice Strayer, the former now deceased, while the latter 
resides with Mr. and Mrs. Mulnix. 

Mr. Mulnix is a member of the Colorado Society of Certified Public Accountants 
and is a member of the American Institute of Accounts. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He also belongs to the Denver Civic 
and Commercial Association and is interested in all that has to do with the welfare, 
progress and upbuilding of the city and the extension of its trade relations. He has 
ever figured prominently in public connections, nature seeming to have qualified him 
for leadership. The integrity of his motives is never questioned and his progressive- 
ness has led him to take a forward step in such a way that he has drawn with him a 
large following. He is public-spirited in the true sense of giving his time, efforts and 
ability for the welfare of community and commonwealth, even at the sacrifice of his 
personal interests. Stanoh as he is in his republicanism, he places the general good 
before partisanship and is unfaltering in his support of measures which he believes 
will benefit city and state, while over the record of his official career there falls no 
shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil. 



FRANK H. POTTER. 



Frank H. Potter, conducting business at Brush as a general merchant and under- 
taker, was born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, October 4, 1868, a son of Alexander W. Potter, 
who is of Irish descent, while the mother was of Scotch lineage. She died when their 
son was an infant. On coming to the new world the father first located in Ohio in 
company with his parents and afterward removed to Mount Pleasant, Iowa, where his 
father was engaged in the shoe business. Alexander W. Potter took up the trade of 
bricklaying and was thus employed for a time but after the outbreak of the Civil war 
put aside all business and personal considerations and responded to the call for troops, 
enlisting in Michigan. He served throughout the period of hostilities between the 
north and the south and on one occasion was wounded. After the war he removed to 




FRANK H. POTTER 



82 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Denver and worked at his trade for many years but is now living retired and makes his 
liome in Los Angeles, California, where he is enjoying a well earned rest. 

Frank H. Pcftter was reared at Council Bluffs, Iowa. His youth was spent upon a 
farm in Iowa, and there he received his education, and early became familiar with the 
best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. Later he learned the machin- 
ist's trade and followed steam engineering for fifteen years. In 1903 he came to Brush 
and for a year was at Fort Morgan before taking up his abode in the town where he 
still resides. Here he established a furniture and undertaking business in partner- 
ship with J. A. Yenne, of Fort Morgan, and in 1908 he sold the furniture stock but 
has since continued in the undertaking business. He is also manager of a department 
of the Nelson Mercantile Company, of which his wife is one of the owners. They 
carry aij immense stock of goods, occupying two floors and basement, and Mr. Potter 
is recognized as one of the most progressive merchants of this section of the state, actu- 
ated by a spirit of progress and enterprise in all that he does. 

In October, 1902, Mr. Potter was united in marriage to Miss Lena Yenne, a daugh- 
ter of J.; A. Yenne, who is mentioned elsewhere in this work. To Mr. and Mrs. Potter 
was borri one child, Helen, whose birth occurred June 9, 1907. The wife and mother 
passed away on the 17th of July of the same year and on the 20th of May, 1915, Mr. 
Potter was again married, his second union being with Miss Clara Nelson, a daughter 
of Ole and Christina (Christenson) Nelson, who are mentioned below. Mr. and Mrs. 
Potter are consistent members of the Presbyterian church and he is a faithful fol- 
lower of Masonic teachings, belonging to the lodge, chapter, commandery, the Mystic 
Shrine and the Eastern Star. He likewise has membership with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Rebekahs and also with the Knights of Pythias. Politically 
he is a republican, believing firmly in the principles of the party, and he has been 
called upon to serve in some public positions, acting as county coroner of Morgan 
county and also as mayor of Brush. He is of a high type of American manhood, loyal 
to each interest entrusted to his care and thoroughly reliable as well as progressive in 
business; 



OLE NELSON. 



Ole Nelson, who was a most enterprising, far-sighted and sagacious business man, 
the founder of the Nelson Mercantile Company, was born in Denmark on the 16th of 
June, 1854. He partially acquired his education in that country, where he remained 
until he reached the age of eighteen years and then sought a home in the new world. 
Crossing the Atlantic to America, he made his way first to Chicago, where he resided, 
however, for only a brief period. He then went to Hampton, Iowa, where he pur- 
chased and improved a farm and as the years passed he continued its cultivation until 
sixteen years had been added to the cycle of the centuries. In the spring of 1896 he 
arrived in Brush, Morgan county, Colorado, and purchased land within the borders 
of the county, carrying on farming for a year. At the end of that time, however, he 
abandoned agricultural pursuits and removed to Brush, where he established business 
under the name of the Nelson Mercantile Company. He opened a store and from 
the beginning his trade constantly increased, so that he found it necessary to enlarge 
his stock from time to time in order to meet the growing demands of the business. 
He developed one of the most important commercial interests of the county and was 
active in its control and management until his den>ise, which occurred on the 26th 
of January, 1913, when he had reached the age of nearly fifty-nine years. 

In early manhood Mr. Nelson was married to Miss Christina Christenson, also a 
native of Denmark, born on the 19th of December, 1864. She still survives her hus- 
band and now makes her home in California. By her marriage she had five children: 
Ida M., who is now a student in the University of Denver; Elizabeth A., the wife of 
W. J. Clark, residing in Los Angeles. California; Clara, the wife of Frank H. Potter, 
mentioned elsewhere in this work; Bflie N., the wife of R. C. Grigg. of Brush, Colorado; 
and Uriel, who is at home with his mother. 

Mr. Nelson served on the town council of Brush for a long period and was county 
assessor while in Iowa. Mrs. Nelson still owns the old home farm and two residence 
properties, one of which is situated in Brush. Mr. Nelson erected the first brick build- 
ing in Brush and contributed in very marked measure to the development and progress 
of the town as the years passed by. In addition to promoting one of its chief com- 
mercial interests he was the vice president of the Stockmen's National Bank, His 
worth and ability were widely recognized and in his passing the community lost one 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 83 

of its most valued citizens. He was a loyal and exemplary member of the Masonic 
fraternity, of which he served as treasurer for five years, and his religious faith was 
that of the Lutheran church, which found in him a faithful follower. 



RAY E. HAVERLAND. 



Ray E. Haverland is a member of the well known firm of Hoch & Haverland, 
prominent lumber dealers of Otis, Colorado. Although he is yet a comparatively young 
man he has attained a success in commercial life which entitles him to be numbered 
among the successful business men of his section of the state. He was born in Elgin, 
Nebraska, in February, 1883, a son of Samuel and Esther (Ball) Haverland. natives of 
Wisconsin, who in 1876 went to Nebraska, where they took up a homestead in Antelope 
county, which the father successfully cultivated until 1910, when he removed farther 
west, taking up his home in Yuma county, Colorado, where he was engaged in thei 
coal business for four years. He is now living retired, having accumulated a com- 
fortable competence through his years of labor and industry and resides in Y'uma. 
The mother of our subject is also living. 

Ray E. Haverland was reared under the parental roof and received his education 
in Antelope county, Nebraska, where he attended the county schools. Upon complet- 
ing his education he decided upon the carpenter's trade as a profitable occupation and 
learned that trade, at which he worked tor about eight years. At the end of that 
time, in 1909, he came to Y'uma county, Colorado, and took up a homestead claim, 
which he improved to some extent but later sold. He was also connected with the 
lumber business for two years while following the carpenter's trade in Yuma and 
Nebraska. In 1913 he formed a partnership with H. C. Hoch and they engaged in 
the lumber business at Otis, Mr. Haverland having had practical charge of the enter- 
prise ever since its organization. His sound business judgment, his indefatigable 
energy and his thorough knowledge have enabled him to extend the enterprise con- 
siderably, and today their business is a profitable one. He has always followed honor- 
able methods and his reputation as a reliable dealer and trustworthy business man is 
thoroughly established. 

In September, 1906, Mr. Haverland was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Realim 
and to them were born two children: Hazel G., January 1, 1908; and Harry E.. Febru- 
ary 2, 1911. In his political affiliations Mr. Haverland is a republican but, although 
interested in the success of his party, has never been a politician in the sense of office 
seeking. His religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the work 
of which he takes a laudable and helpful interest, and fraternally he belongs to the 
Royal Highlanders. Outside of his lumber interests he is a stockholder and director 
in the Farmers State Bank of Otis, which institution has greatly prospered since its 
foundation, only a few years ago. As a public-spirited citizen, as a business man and 
in private life Mr. Haverland enjoys the great esteem and respect of all who know 
him and is most highly rated by those who know him best, this indicating the true 
worth of his character. 



EDWARD L. CLOVER. 



Edward L. Clover, attorney at law of Denver, was born in Hardin county, Iowa, Jan- 
uary 25, 1861, a son of Gerettus and Susan D. (Maddox) Clover, both of whom were 
natives of Indiana. In 1858 they removed westward to Iowa, where Mr. Clover engaged 
in farming, thus providing for the support of his family. In 1863. however, he 
established the family home in Grundy county, Illinois, where both he and his wife 
passed away and were laid to rest. During the period of the Civil war Mr. Clover 
responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting as a private in the Sixteenth 
Iowa Infantry, with which he served under the old flag for thirty-seven months and 
during this period was on the firing line in many of the most hotly contested battles 
of the war. In the family were two children but one son, Thomas P., has passed away. 

The younger, Edward L. Clover of this review, was a pupil in the public schools of 
Illinois and of Oswego, Kansas, and also attended a private school in Oswego, Kansas, 
whither his parents had removed in 1879, returning to Illinois in 1882. After master- 
ing the common branches of learning he took up the study of law in an attorney's 
office of Oswego. Kansas, and was admitted to the bar there in November, 18<5l, but 



84 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

did not immediately enter upon the active practice of the profession, devoting his 
attention to other pursuits for five years. He then opened a law office at Morris, 
Grundy county, Illinois, and became a prominent member of the legal fraternity there 
during the nineteen years in which he engaged in his chosen profession in that city. 
For three terms he filled the office of city attorney of Morris, making a most creditable 
record in that position. In 1907 he decided to come west and after a careful survey 
of the field determined to locate in Denver. Subsequent results have justified this 
determination, for in the intervening years he has built up a large practice and is 
today regarded as one of the representative atlorneys of the Colorado bar. 

On the 20th of May, 1883, Mr. Clover was united in marriage to Miss Jessie M. 
Coles, of Gardner, Illinois, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Coles. They have one 
child, Inez H., who was born in Morris, Illinois, and is a graduate of the high school 
of Joliet, Illinois, and of a girls' school at Evanston, that state. She makes her home 
in Grundy county, Illinois and has become the mother of two children, Edward F. 
and Elizabeth Harford. 

Mr. Clover gives his political allegiance to the democratic party, which he has 
supported since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He is a Master Mason, 
loyal to the teachings of the craft, and he also has membership with the Sons of Vet- 
erans. Along strictly professional lines his connection is with the County and City 
Bar Association, with the Colorado State Bar Association and the American Bar 
Association. Those who know him, and he has gained a wide acquaintance, esteem 
him as a man of genuine personal worth and high professional attainments, while as 
a citizen he stands loyally in support of all that has to do with public progress and 
improvement. 



DAVID BROTHERS. 



Among Denver's citizens who became octogenarians was numbered David Brothers, 
whose connection with the city dated from early pioneer times. He made the trip 
across the country from Wisconsin in the year 1859 and cast in his lot with those early 
settlers who were laying the foundations for Denver's future development and great- 
ness. He was born near London, England, May 16, 1838, being one of twelve children 
whose parents were John and Mary CWightman) Brothers. He was but six years of 
age when he began to assist in farm work and was employed in agricultural pursuits 
In his native country until he reached young manhood, when he bade adieu to friends, 
family and native land and sailed for the United States, believing that he might have 
better business opportunities on this side of the Atlantic. Making his way to Wisconsin, 
he there resumed the occupation of farming, which he followed in that state for four 
years. On the expiration of that period he came to Colorado, arriving in 1859. In 1869 
he purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land in Jefferson county. He then took 
up farming on his own account and was so engaged for more than a third of a century, 
bringing his fields under a high state of cultivation and transforming his land into 
a rich and productive farm. In 1903, however, he put aside the active work of the 
fields and retired from business, removing to Denver, where he resided »mtil the time 
of his demise. He was interested in the Central Savings Bank, of which he had been 
a director since 1892. 

On the 30th of June, 1879. in Denver, Mr. Brothers was married to Mrs. Thomasine 
(Thomas) Manhart, a daughter of Francis and Elizabeth (Meyers) Thomas. The 
Thomas family was early established in Indiana, where Francis Thomas w£is born, 
while his wife, Elizabeth (Meyers) Thomas, was descended from an old Virginia 
family. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas subsequently removed to Missouri and in that state 
Mrs. David Brothers was born. Later the family went to Kansas, where Mr. Thomas 
became owner of two fine ranches. In the spring of 1860 they again took up their 
course toward the west, starting for Colorado with ox teams, the father, mother 
and six children riding in a light wagon or buckboard. They were one month in 
making the five hundred miles to Pike's Peak, which was then the slogan, as the 
name of Colorado was hardly known. During their westward journey no troubles 
were incurred with the Indians, who always remained friendly and were frequently 
entertained at their camp. The Thomas family located at Globeville, now a part of 
Denver, where Mr. Thomas acquired land. They were the parents of nine children, 
of whom four daughters survive, as follows: Mrs. Brothers. Mrs. Anna Manhart, Mrs. 
Laura Ramsey and Jlrs. Emma Corfman, all residents of Denver. Mrs. Brothers was 




DAVID BROTHERS 



86 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

but ten years of age when brought to' Colorado, where she was largely reared and 
received her education. 

Mr. Brothers gave his political allegiance to the republican party, which he had 
supported since becoming a naturalized American citizen. He belonged to the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church of Highlands, of which his widow is a devoted attendant, and 
to the Denver Civic and Commercial Association, connections which indicated the 
nature of his interests and the rules which governed his conduct. He ever stood for 
progress and improvement in public affairs, for integrity and honor in the life of 
the individual, and his course made his an honored name. Death called him on the 
24th of November. 1918. He lived to see many changes in the great west and in the 
world at large. Born during the presidential administration of Martin Van Buren, he 
saw the introduction of the telegraph and the telephone and the extension of a most 
wonderful system of railroads over all parts of the country. Moreover, he lived to 
see the country emerge triumphantly from four different wars— the Mexican, the Civil, 
the Spanish-American and the World war, so recently and so brilliantly won. He 
was ever keenly interested in great world movements and in his home locality he bore 
his full share in the work of general development and progress. 



G. A. NEWKIRK. 



G. A. Newklrk arrived in Denver an absolute stranger. Today he is widely known 
in social and business circles and has won an enviable position as the general agent 
at Denver for the Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company of Newark, New Jersey. 
He has advanced steadily to this position since starting out in the business world in 
a humble capacity, yet all days in his career have not been equally bright. Obstacles 
and difBculties have arisen but perseverance and determined effort have enabled him 
to overcome these and steadily push forward to the goal of prosperity. 

Mr. Newkirk is a native son of New York. He was born at Fort Hunter, Mont 
gomery county, August 14, 1857, and comes of Dutch ancestry, belonging to that class 
of Knickerbockers who founded the Empire state. Three brothers of the name came 
to the new world and the progenitor of the branch of the family to which G. A. Newkirk 
belongs was one of the first settlers in Amsterdam, now New York city. Later repre- 
sentatives of the name participated in the Revolutionary war and still others In the 
War of 1812. His father. Abraham Newkirk, was born in the Empire state and became 
a successful farmer there. Ultimately, however, he removed to the west, taking up his 
abode in Denver, Colorado, in 1890. There he lived retired to the time of his demise, 
which occurred in 1904, when he had reached the age of seventy-six years. His wife 
bore the maiden name of Catherine Snook and was born near Fort Hunter. New York. 
She, too, belonged to one of the old families of that state, of Scotch descent. Her death 
occurred in Fonda, New York, in 1883, when she was fifty years of age. The family 
numbered seven children, four sons and three daughters, of whom G. A. Newkirk is the 
third in order of birth. 

While spending his youthful days to the age of thirteen years upon the home farm 
G. A. Newkirk attended the district schools and then put aside his textbooks, since 
which time he has learned his lessons in the school of experience. Starting out to earn 
a living, he was first employed in scraping broomcorn on a neighboring farm. He 
afterward took up clerking in a variety store at Fultonville, New York, thus gaining 
his first experience along commercial lines. He afterward followed clerical work in 
this store for three years, and at the age of seventeen, in order to secure thorough 
training for business duties, he entered the Eastman Business College at Poughkeepsie, 
New York, in which he completed a commercial course. He then removed to New York 
city and secured employment with John H. Starin, who was largely engaged in the 
transportation business and was a steamboat owner. He acted as cashier for Mr. Starin 
at Glen Island, the celebrated summer resort in Long Island Sound, continuing in 
that position for a year, after which he returned to Fonda, where he secured a position 
In a general store, there remaining until the death of his mother, which occurred in 
March, 188.3. 

Mr. Newkirk afterward removed to the west, arriving in Denver on the 5th of 
April of that year. He had no acquaintance in the city but he believed that individual 
effort and ability would gain him a start, and after a time he obtained a clerkship in 
the store of J. J. Joslyn, with whom he was connected until December 31, 1884. At that 
date he turned his attention to the life insurance business, becoming a solicitor for 
the Washington Life Company, with which he continued until December 31, 1886, or 




G. A. NEWKIRK 



88 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

for a period of two years. He afterward entered the employ of the Mutual Benefit Life 
Insurance Company as general agent on the 22d of March, 1887, and has continued in 
the position to the present time. He is today in point of time and service the oldest 
general agent of the Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company of Newark, New Jersey, 
and also dean of the insurance business in Denver, and he has built up his agency from 
a small business to one of large proportions. He now has an organization in which he 
employs twenty-five solicitors and he ranks with the leading insurance men of the 
west. His advancement has come as the direct result of his close application, his inde- 
fatigable energy and his sound judgment. 

In Denver, in 1S92, Mr. Newkirk was united in marriage to Miss Emma L. Milheim, 
a native of Denver and a daughter of John Milheim. Politically Mr. Newkirk main- 
tains an independent course. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons. He was 
made a member of the organization in Fultonville, New York, in 1878 and now belongs 
to Union Lodge, No. 7, A. F. & A. M., to the chapter and to Colorado Commandery, 
No. 1, K. T. He also has membership with the Denver Athletic Club and the Denver 
Motor Club, with the Sons of the American Revolution and with the Denver Civic and 
Commercial Association. His interests as thus indicated are broad and varied and 
yet more than all else his interest centers in his home and his activities are directed 
toward the furtherance of the welfare and happiness of his wife and daughter. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Newkirk was born one child, Grace, who is now the wife of Edwin M. Tucker, 
of Denver. Mrs. Newkirk is quite an active Red Cross worker. In a word, their aid 
and influence are always given on the side of advancement and improvement and they 
are continually reaching out a helping hand to assist others. Through thirty-five years 
as a resident of Denver Mr. Newkirk has indeed become widely and favorably known 
and in the city has a circle of friends almost coextensive with the circle of his 
acquaintance. 



D. EDGAR WILSON. 



D. Edgar Wilson has during the period of his residence in Denver, covering 
twenty-two years, gained distinction as a leading lawyer and citizen whose loyalty 
and progressiveness in public affairs place him among those who are taking a fore- 
most part in the development of Denver. He comes to the west from Baltimore, Mary- 
land, where his birth occurred on the 12th of April, 1874, his parents being Dr. David 
and Frances O. (Smith) Wilson. The father was born in Martinsburg, Pennsylvania, 
March 30, 1825, and after pursuing his early education in the public schools of Bed- 
ford county, Pennsylvania, became a student in the Logansport Academy at Logansport, 
Indiana, and later in the Washington County Male and Female Seminary at Salem, 
Indiana. He was afterward for two years a student in the medical department of 
the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia and was later a student at and 
graduated with the degree of M. D. from Washington University at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, in 1868. He taught in the public schools of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
in early manhood. An earnest desire to become an active force in the work of the 
ministry led him to join the Maryland Annual Conference of the Methodist Protestant 
church at Baltimore, Maryland, in March, 1845, and he largely devoted his time, 
thought and energies to his holy calling. He was first married March 6, 1856, to Annie 
M. Zollickoffer, whose death occurred May 29, 1870, and on the 12th of December, 1872, 
he wedded Frances O. Smith, who died September 6, 1907. He had four daughters 
and two sons: Carrie F.; Annie M., the wife of Major James C. Ord; Jennie F., the 
wife of Major Joseph C. Byron; E. Blanche, the wife of Joseph H. Hampson; Daniel 
Z.; and D. Edgar. Dr. Wilson was active in the organization of and became one of 
the charter trustees of the Western Maryland College at Westminster, Maryland, in 
1868. He was elected a representative to the General Conference of the Methodist 
Protestant church in 1874, 1877, 1880 and 1896 and was elected to the presidency of 
the Maryland Annual Conference for three successive years, beginning in 1874. On 
the 17th of June, 1880, he was commissioned post chaplain of the United States army 
and retired from active army service March 30, 1890. His last days were passed 
in Denver, where his death occurred February 28, 1906. His ability as a preacher, 
his tender and effective ministrations in the pastorate, his polished manner, and his 
sympathetic soul gave him great power. His character for piety, fidelity to duty and 
ability were recognized outside of his own church circles. Companionable, genial, 
generous, true, intelligent, any man could feel sincerely grateful whose privilege it 
was to number him among his friends. He was a well informed man. He read much. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 89 

was conversant with the theological literature of the age, and an author of some 
reputation. 

In the army he never lost the respect and confidence of the officers and soldiers. 
Dr. Wilson did not only win the respect of the men, but his interest in them, his 
uniform urbanity, and pleasing manner, won their confidence and their love, and 
made him one of the most popular officers in his regiment. 

D. Edgar Wilson was the fifth in order of birth in his father's family. He was 
reared in the atmosphere of a refined and cultured home and began his education under 
private tutors. He afterward attended the Western Maryland College at Westminster, 
where he won his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1893. He pursued his university course at 
George Washington University of Washington, D. C, and was graduated with the LL. B. 
degree in 1S95, while the following year the Master of Laws degree was conferred upon 
him. He was admitted to practice in the District of Columbia in the fall of 1896 and 
entered upon the active work of his profession in Washington. The following year, how- 
ever, he removed to Denver, was admitted to the bar here and has since been in active 
practice in this city. His ability and the thoroughness of his work have brought him 
connection with much of the important litigation in the courts of the district and his 
capability and power are recognized by his colleagues and contemporaries. He has also 
figured in business circles of the city as a director of various corporations. 

On the 10th of February, 1904, Mr. Wilson was married to Miss Dorothy E. Webb, a 
daughter of Jean FYancis and Mary Elizabeth Webb, of Denver, formerly residents of 
Lebanon, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have one daughter, Grace Eleanor, who was bom 
in Denver, December 19, 1910, and is attending the city schools. 

Mr. Wilson belongs to the Mile High Club, is a member of Temple Lodge, No. 84, 
A. F. & A. M., and of the Junior Order of American Mechanics. He is a member of the 
Denver Bar Association and the Colorado Bar Association. Outside the strict path of 
his profession he is perhaps most widely known as an ardent republican and one who 
has occupied a position of leadership in connection with party affairs in Denver. For 
two terms he served as a member of the city council, being first elected in 1904 and 
reelected in 1906, and during his connection with the city council he served on various 
important committees. He has ever been a believer in progress and one who is fear- 
less in the expression of his honest convictions, who places the public welfare before 
personal aggrandizement and seeks the benefit of the community rather than of self. 
He has taken a most active interest in patriotic work, has been a member of the board of 
managers of the Colorado Society of the Sons of the Revolution for a number of years 
and in 1913 and 1914 was state president of that society. 



JOSEPH H. HARRISON. 



Joseph H. Harrison was born in Manchester, England. His parents, Mark and 
Rebecca Harrison, gave him the notable traits that go to build up what the world calls 
a good reputation and what is inherently character. In the spring of 1872 he came from 
England to the United States, settling in Philadelphia. For a time he was employed in 
a store in that city and later went to Wilkes-Barre, where he took a position in a general 
store. During these formative years he acquired not alone a fundamental knowledge of 
business, but also laid the basis for an education which has made him one of the best 
informed men in the state. 

In January, 1881, Mr. Harrison came to Denver and in 1882 he became general agent 
for the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company of Philadelphia. Later he was elected a 
member of the executive committee, and afterwards second vice president of the agency 
organization of the company; positions which he still holds, being classed among the 
most capable men in his line. 

In 1906 Mr. Harrison was elected as a republican to the state senate and perhaps 
his most notable work in that body was the assistance he rendered in the preparation 
and enactment of an insurance measure which has since been used as a model by other 
states. He was the father of a proposed amendment to the constitution making judges 
appointive; but the progressive spirit was not yet strong enough to pull it through. It 
passed the senate but failed of passage in the house. One of the evils of the state at 
that time was the inability to convict in cases where those working in a fiduciary capacity 
and whose compensation was derived from commissions could, and in numerous cases 
did, appropriate to their own use the funds collected for and belonging to others. He 
had a bill prepared and succeeded in passing it through both houses, making such acts 
of misappropriation the crime of larceny and punishable accordingly; the effect of which 



90 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

has been to reduce very largely the number of such cases which had been quite numerous 
theretofore. 

On February 13, 1912, President William Howard Taft appointed Senator Harrison 
postmaster of Denver, and during his incumbency (he retired from the position April 
1, 1915), the new post office, one of the finest in the land, was planned and constructed. 
The adoption of many improvements incidental to the interior arrangements, under con- 
sideration by the committee at Washington, with whom he was frequently called in con- 
ference, were suggested by Mr. Harrison. His work as postmaster was made notable by 
his introduction of new systems for handling the funds of the post office, and the general 
delivery patrons. He revolutionized the methods employed for the supervision and regu- 
lation of the work of the employes in the interests of the clerks and carriers, no less 
than in that of the post office department itself, for which he was highly commended 
by the authorities at Washington, who, after investigation. Introduced these improve- 
ments in many other post offices over the country. 

Senator Harrison has been a factor in promoting the welfare and upbuilding of 
the state in general, and Denver in particular. After becoming its general agent, he 
induced The Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company of Philadelphia, a conservative 
Quaker institution, to adopt a program of investments in Colorado which in time secured 
to its citizens an aggregate sum of over twenty million dollars, which, invested in first 
mortgages, enabled our enterprising people to build up one of the most beautiful and 
substantial cities (Pueblo and Colorado Springs included) in the country as evidenced 
by its business blocks and dwellings, some of which the Senator had built on his own 
account. 

Mr. Harrison was married to Esther Abrahams, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 
May 14, 1884. The death of his wife, a few years ago, came as a shock to the entire 
community, for she had endeared herself to all by her philanthropic activities, to which 
she devoted many years of her life. Senator Harrison is the father of three sons, all 
natives of Denver: Mark M., born November 7. 1885, now in business with his father; 
Samuel A., born January 1, 1891, who enlisted in the United States army in the fall of 
1917, was commissioned as a lieutenant of Company D, Twenty-fifth Infantry, in Sep- 
tember, 1918, and Is stationed at Rockwell Field, San Diego, California; and Horace L. 
Harrison, born February 24, 1893, an ensign in the United States navy. Engineering 
Division, with headquarters at Washington, D. C. 

Senator Harrison has always played a prominent part in the philanthropic, civic, 
social and political activities of the community, as an ofllcer, director, or member of 
many of such organizations. His activities cover a wide field in the progress and 
advancement of the community. 



JOHN RICHARDS CHAMPION. 

The name John Richards Champion is indelibly impressed upon the history of 
the development of the mining interests of Colorado. He was born in the Breage 
mining district of Cornwall, England, on the 20th of May, 1856, a son of the Rev. 
John and Elizabeth (Richards) Champion, the former a minister of the Methodist 
church. 

He acquired a common school education and throughout his life was a deep and 
earnest student of mining and mining methods, in which field of labor he became very 
successful, occupying positions of trust and importance. He came to the new world 
in 1877 and for thirty-nine years was identified with the development of the rich 
mineral resources of Colorado. His ability won him recognition in that field and he 
was called to various places of responsibility. During the last sixteen years of his 
life he was superintendent of the Yak Mining and Tunnel Company at Leadville, 
Colorado, his high efficiency being indicated in the fact that he was so long retained 
in that important position. 

It was in Leadville on the 3d of June, 1890, that Mr. Champion was married to 
Miss Nellie M. Lazenbey, a daughter of Charles and Helen Lazenbey, the former a 
mining man of Leadville. Mr. and Mrs. Champion became the parents of two daughters: 
Claire L., now the wife of Joseph E. Purcell, Jr., of Fairplay, Colorado; and Edith L., 
a successful teacher in the high school at Arvada. In October, 1910, Mr. (;;hampion 
removed with his family to Arvada where he erected a handsome and commodious 
dwelling. In August. 1916, he retired from active business life and on the 22d of 
May, 1917. after a brief illness, was called to his final rest. 




JOHN R. CHAMPION 



92 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

In his religious faith Mr. Champion was a Methodist, adhering to the teachings 
of his boyhood. He was well known in Masonic circles, being received as an entered 
apprentice at Georgetown, September 4, 1880. He was raised to the master's degree 
in Leadville, April 11, 1883, and he served as worshipful master of Leadville Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., for the term of 1888-9. He was afterward secretary of the same lodge 
from 1891 until 1897 inclusive. He became a member of Leadville Chapter, No. 1, 
R. A. M., on the 1st of July, 1886, and was elected high priest in 1890. He was made a 
Knight Templar of Mount of the Holy Cross Commandery, No. 5, on the 20th of 
December, 1893, and served as its eminent commander in 1901. He likewise had 
membership relations with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and he was 
ever most loyal to his professions and to his obligations. His political allegiance was 
given to the republican party and he kept well informed on the questions and issues 
of the day, but he never sought or desired office, preferring to concentrate his energy 
and his thought upon his business interests and duties. He was a self-made man in 
the highest and best sense of the term, carving out his own fortunes and shaping his 
career in most honorable fashion. 



REV. ALANSON MOODY VIR DEN. 

Rev. Alanson M. Vir Den, of Hugo, Colorado, is one of the most forceful preachers 
of the Methodist Episcopal church known to this state. For thirty years he has ex- 
pounded the gospel and it is due to his untiring efforts and his convincing arguments 
that six thousand people have joined the church. His fame is not only known to Colo- 
rado but he is a man of national reputation, and his unselfish efforts are so eager and 
carrying that he has succeeded in bringing back to God many lost souls. Twenty-one 
churches were built and rebuilt because of his earnest appeals and largely through his 
efforts the present Methodist Episcopal church in Hugo was erected. He was born in 
Ohio, March 16, 1863, a son of William A. and Mahala (Drake) Vir Den, both natives 
of Ohio, the father being engaged along agricultural lines in that state. The grandfather 
on the mother's side belonged to the famous Drake family of which Sir Francis was the 
best known member. A great-grandfather on the father's side is said to be descended 
from that Duke of Aleni;on who was the commander in chief of the army which was vic- 
toriously led by Joan of Arc. The great-grandparents of our subject were driven out of 
France at the time of the French revolution. 

Alanson M. Vir Den was the eldest in a family of six children and the only one to 
take up a profession. He received his primary education in Ohio and then attended the 
Ohio Northern University of that state for two years, while subsequently he studied in 
Valparaiso University for three years. His desire to lead his fellow beings to pursue a 
true Christian life influenced him to take up theological studies and for two years he at- 
tended the Garrett Bible Institute of Chicago. He entered upon his ministerial duties 
in South Dakota, beginning to preach in a little sixteen-by-twenty sod church, his humble 
congregation consisting of about forty members. This was in the year 1888. He con- 
tinued to preach in South Dakota, near Huron, which was one of the live towns of that 
day, for some time, subsequently was for eleven years engaged in church work in In- 
diana and for five years in Ohio and then removed to Oklahoma on account of the health 
of his wife. In 1913 Mr. Vir Den's health also gave way on account of his untiring labors 
and he decided upon removal to a more congenial climate, settling at Rush Creek, Colo- 
rado, where he homesteaded a farm of three hundred and twenty acres. He has trans- 
formed this tract into a beautiful place of residence, creating from a v.'ildemess produc- 
tive fields, instituting modern improvements and facilities and putting up suitable 
buildings. Following the most progressive methods and ever ready to embrace new 
ideas if found practical, he has made his farm one of the valuable properties in the 
neighborhood. He gives considerable attention to dairying, keeping Brown Swiss cattle, 
and his principal crops are corn, barley and a new grain which has been imported from 
Africa called feteretia and also Sudan grass, which are considered two of the finest and 
highest grade crops in that country. Rev. Vir Den makes his home in Hugo. Colorado, 
and has taken a deep interest in the moral and intellectual development of the commu- 
nity. He has been helpfully interested in building the present Methodist Episcopal 
church here and in other ways has proven himself a public-spirited citizen who is 
always ready to lend a helping hand or give a good word to those who are in sorrow 
and distress. He has now been a member of the Oklahoma Methodist Episcopal Church 
Conference for fourteen years and for thirty years he has preached the gospel to such 
good purpose that six thousand people have been taken into the church. Through his 




^/^ ^^^^H^^inv ^ llL ^9KJ 



94 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

efforts and earnest appeals twenty-one churches In different parts of this country were 
built or rebuilt and, in fact, his work has been of national importance in the spread of 
true Christianity. Moreover, Mr. Vir Den has been instrumental in educating for the 
church twenty young men and women, who are now preaching the gospel or are engaged 
in other Christian work. The Vir Den family is of French extraction and our subject is 
proud of his descent. In his forceful oratory he injects strength of expression by using 
the simplest language, preferring the plainest words in order to make his statements 
carry to his hearers. In preaching the Christ and exhorting his audiences he is so 
positive and convincing that it is practically impossible to escape from the righteous- 
ness of his arguments, and his conversions therefore are but the natural outcome of his 
personal (appeal. He is "^not a man to impress by outside appearances — that means a 
man who seeks to impress by clothes and mannerisms, but he is a man who by five 
minutes jaf his presence wins his audiences, who acclaim him as one of them, and their 
kind. Ajman of the masses, he is with the masses and stands for the masses. In his 
work he jlias been ably assisted by bis wife and they are inseparable in their Christian 
work. Tjhey cheer and strengthen each other and in his home Mr. Vir Den finds that 
inspirati(jin which ever guides him to new effort. Both are students of human nature 
and by closely applying this quality they have succeeded in touching the human heart 
and convincing the soul. Mr. Vir Den uses all his force, all the noble earnestness of his 
soul and lall his physical powers in order to combat sin in all of its forms as prevalent in 
modern Society and he is particularly insistent in regard to temperance. Mrs. Vir Den 
sometimejs assists her husband on the platform and sometimes she preaches herself. 
Their home in Hugo is a cheerful American abode, and the outcast or the one whom 
life has played hard, the oppressed and the distressed, all receive encouragement, help 
and sympathy there. 

The Stroud (Okla.) Democrat says of Rev. Vir Den: "Rev. A. M. Vir Den, formerly 
Methodist Episcopal pastor at Edmond, Newkirk and Kingfisher, but now in charge of 
the Methodist church at Pawhuska, is no doubt the most energetic, original and most 
industrioiis minister of the gospel in this state. Mentally, physically and nervously 
he is a compound of eccentric Ijorenzo Dow, belligerent Peter Cartwright and laughter 
exciting Sam Jones. He has been and still is one of the hardest workers in Oklahoma. 
He is fearless, eccentric, humorous and full of pure religion." This is the impression 
which Rev. Vir Den created in Oklahoma. What the people of his native state of Ohio 
think of his work is evident from the following extract from the Lima Gazette: "Rev. 
A. M. Vir Den is certainly a man desperately in earnest — a fearless, uncompromising 
preacher. He strikes quick and hard and hits the center every time. All who heard 
him were profoundly impressed with his zeal for leading men to better things. He is 
undoubtedly a winning speaker. He awakens in men at once a desire for nobler living; 
men can scarcely refrain from acting at once on their better feelings. He is unique in 
his manner and methods, as well as in his presentation of the truth. His illustrated 
lecture, 'Life's Golden Pathway,' was attended by an army of young people. An adequate 
description of this lecture could not be given in a few words. One must hear it to 
fully appreciate its excellence. Sam Jones never spoke more directly or fearlessly than 
Mr. Vir Den. They learned that the speaker knew how to talk to men, for he demon- 
strated by trend of thought and incidents that he knew his subject. Men were pro- 
foundly stirred and lasting impressions for good made." 

Charles N. Haskell, governor of Oklahoma, speaks of Mr. Vir Den in the highest 
terms, expressing his pleasure at having been able to attend one of his lectures, and 
Senator Robert Owen of the same state speaks highly of the value of his lectures, which 
"combine humor, pathos and instruction." H. B. Brown, president of Valparaiso (Ind.) 
University, says: "His addresses and sermons are inspiring and uplifting," and Con- 
gressman Bird McGuire of Oklahoma says: "He entertains his audience continuously 
from the first to the last and imparts to his audience information and not misinforma- 
tion. I regard him as one of the most entertaining speakers I have ever known." 

In 1SS8 Rev. Alanson Moody Vir Den was united in marriage to Docia Grace Hawk, 
who was born in southern Ohio, a daughter of Charles E. Hawk, one of the bravest men 
who took up the cause of the Union. For four years he served in the Civil war as a 
member of the Thirty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and participated in many of the 
hotly contested and sanguine engagements, serving mostly under Sherman in the eastern 
army, and with him he made the famous march to the sea. He married Christina 
Barger, who was born in Ohio of German descent. When General Morgan was on his 
famous raid through the southern part of that state Mrs. Vir Den and older brothers 
and sisters, as well as her mother, slept in the sugar camp in order to let General 
Morgan have the use of her bed. To Rev. and Mrs. Vir Den were born the following 
named children. Frances Pearl, who was born in 1S89, pursued her early education in 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 95 

the public schools, subsequently attended the Defiance high school, of Defiance, Ohio, 
from which she was graduated, and later the State Normal School in Oklahoma. On 
September 6, 1908, she married Ed G. Klein, who is a professor of English literature in 
that state. He is very prominent in the democratic party of his commonwealth, being 
at present chairman of the Democratic Club of the state. Earle Alanson Vir Den was 
born January 5, 1S92. He received his college education in the Central State Normal 
School of Edmond. Oklahoma, and in the Southwestern College of Winfield, Kansas. 
He was connected for five years with the Dunbar Bell Ringers, one of the best known 
musical organizations of its kind in the country, and was under The Ridpath-Horner 
Lyceum Bureau. Since this country entered the war he has enlisted and is now a 
member of an artillery band in France belonging to a Heavy Artillery unit of the 
Thirty-fourth Division, U. S. A. Miner Raymond, who was born December 3, 1895, at- 
tended the Central State Normal School of Edmond, Oklahoma, being also a graduate of 
the City High School of Oklahoma City. He spent three years in New York city in order 
to train his voice for grand opera and Martinelli and some other Italian singers have 
expressed their opinion that he is the greatest American born tenor. In July, 1918, his 
patriotism prompted him to enlist in the United States navy and at present he is 
battalion adjutant at the Fort Pelham naval training station and is considered one of 
the best trombone players in the navy. Blanche Marie, who was born June 1, 1897, also 
attended the Central State Normal School of Edmond. Oklahoma, having previously 
graduated from the Oklahoma City high school. She married William Jennings Quilliam, 
of Oklahoma City, a graduate of the Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Stillwater, who at the age of twenty-two years was appointed state food inspector and 
was probably the youngest official of t'his kind in the country. 

In fraternal circles Rev. Vir Den is well known, having long been connected with 
several of the foremost orders of this country. He has been a Royal Arch Mason since 
1890, having received that degree in Valparaiso, Indiana. Since 1893 he has been a 
valued member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and in 1896 he joined the 
Modern Woodmen of America. Although Rev. Vir Den is now numbered among the 
prosperous agriculturists of his part of the state, owning a valuable farm property, his 
greatest success lies In the work which he has accomplished as a teacher of Christianity 
and right principles of living. He is repaid for his arduous work by the consciousness 
of having accomplished things for humanity which are greater to him than are riches, 
and his achievements in life may be summarized in the words of a modern philosopher, 
who has said: "Not the good that comes to us, but the good that comes to the world 
through us, is the measure of our 



ROLANDUS G. WALKER, M. D. 

Dr. Rolandus G. Walker, whose ability in medical circles won him prominence, his 
knowledge and skill being attested by professional colleagues and contemporaries, was 
born in Paris, Ohio, on the 14th of July. 1867, a son of Albert and Sarah (Brownewell) 
Walker, who were representatives of old families of Ohio. He pursued a public school 
education, supplemented by study in Mount Union College, from which in due time he 
was graduated. He next entered the Ohio Wesleyan University, where he completed a 
thorough course of study in preparation for the practice of medicine, after which he 
located in Canton, Ohio. Later he was a resident of Lewisville, Ohio, for two years. He 
arrived in Denver in 1906 and opened an ofl^ce on Court place, where he continued in 
active practice for eleven and a half years. His professional skill and ability soon 
became recognized and he was accorded a liberal practice. Constant study kept him in 
touch with the onward trend of the profession and his wide reading was manifest in the 
excellent results which attended his efforts. As a business man, too, he became widely 
known. He was interested in the Jefferson County Power & Light Company of Golden, 
Colorado, and was otherwise well known in business and commercial connections as well 
as in mining. 

On the 29th of May, 1890. at Paris, Ohio, Dr. Walker was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary E. Meyer, a daughter of Frederick and Mary (Wolfe) Meyer. They became the 
parents of a daughter and two sons; L. Leland, Harry Hugh and Mary Lucile. Mrs. 
Walker, who is well known socially and in spheres where other cultured women meet 
and exert their efforts in support of worthy movements, is a member of the Eastern Star 
and the Royal Neighbors. 

Dr. Walker was prominently known in fraternal and church circles. He was a 
thirty-second degree Mason and member of El Jebel Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He 



96 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

was past master of his lodge and served in various other offices in the order, among 
them as past patron of the Eastern Star. He held membership with the Odd Fellows, 
the Modern Woodmen of America, the Royal Neighbors, the Junior Order of American 
Mechanics and with the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. His membership relations 
also extended to the Denver Athletic Club. His religious faith was that of the Presby- 
terian church. He held membership in the Central Presbyterian church, in which 
he served as deacon for three years and for a number of years was usher, taking a very 
active and helpful part in its work. His political belief was that of the democratic 
party and while residing in Lewisville, Ohio, he served as health officer. Along strictly 
professional lines he was connected with the Denver City and County Medical Society 
and served on its board of censors. He was a member of the council of the Denver 
Civic and Commercial Association and he stood stanchly in support of all those things 
which have to do with civic advancement, cooperating in many well defined plans and 
measures for the public good. He was one hundred per cent American, was an active 
worker in the Liberty Loan drives and stood as a splendid type of American manhood 
and chivalry. Death called him when he was but little over fifty years of age. It 
seemed that he should have been spared for many years to come and yet in the five 
decades covered by his earthly career he accomplished much for the benefit of his fellow- 
men and for the organized community in which he lived. Denver had reason to class 
him with her valued and representative citizens and his friends, who were legion, will 
cherish his memory for years to come. His demise occurred on the 21st of March, 1918, 
after but four days of illness. 



SAMUEL JOHN THOMAS. 



Samuel John Thomas, deceased, was the organizer and the president of the 
Merchants Bank of Denver, one of the strong financial institutions of the metropolis 
and a city, county, state and United States depository. Through well formulated 
plans, carefully executed, he brought the establishment to its present position, while 
he made for himself a creditable name and place as a financier. His birth occurred 
in Gainesville, Florida, October 10, 1871, his parents being Dr. G. P. and Omerea 
B. (Fraser) Thomas, both of whom were of southern birth, having been natives of 
South Carolina. In early life they removed to Florida and the father became a 
well known and prominent member of the medical profession of that state, where 
he continued to reside to the time of his death. His wife also passed away in 
Florida. 

Samuel J. Thomas was the youngest in their family of five children. In his 
early life he attended the public schools of Gainesville, Florida, and afterward 
entered the' State University, from which he was graduated with the Bachelor of 
Arts degree as a member of the class of 1888. After leaving the University he 
established himself in the mercantile business at Gainesville, where he remained 
until 1908, and during that period made steady progress not only along commercial 
lines but also became identified with the banking business as a representative of the 
Dutton Bank of Gainesville. He became one of its heavy stockholders, servfd as one 
of its directors and took an active interest in shaping its financial policy. At 
length, however, he disposed of all of his interests in Florida for the purpose of 
removing to Denver. He came to this city on the advice of his physician, as hi."* 
health had become impaired. Here he sought rest and recuperation and was engaged 
in no business for a year. At the end of that time his health and strength had 
so improved that he again became an active factor in the business world. He 
organized what is now the Merchants Bank and managed its affairs most success- 
fully to the time of his demise, making it one of the most substantial banking insti- 
tutions of Denver. From 1912 he had been its president and a member of the 
board of directors. The other officers are: Dr. F. L. Bartlett and Allison Stocker, 
who are vice presidents: C. R. Cotton, cashier; and G. F. Hudson, assistant cashier, 
while on the list of directors appear the names of E. M. Ammons, who is the presi- 
dent of the Farmers Life Insurance Company; Dr. Bartlett, who is a capitalist; H. 
J. Bourk, of the Brule & Bourk Commission Company; Carl P. Schwalb of the 
Denver Terra Cotta Company; Allison Stocker of the firm of Stocker & Fraser, 
building contractors; and Chris Irving, president of the Chris Irving Company. 
The bank is capitalized for seventy-five thousand dollars and its deposits amount 
to five hundred and sixty-five thousand dollars. Courtesy and accommodation are 
made the watchwords of the bank and from its establishment the business has 




SAMUEL J. THOMAS 



98 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

steadily grown. Mr. Thomas was also the president of the S. J. Thomas Realty 
Company and conducted a considerable business in that direction in connection 
with banking. 

On the 10th of October, 1895, at Greenville, South Carolina, Mr. Thomas was 
united in marriage to Miss Anna Hamilton Hill, born in Abbeville, that state, May 12, 
1875, a daughter of Judge and Mrs. R. E. Hill. They became the parents of one 
child, Samuel John, who was born in Gainesville, Florida, November 1, 1896, and is 
now an officer in the United States army. He became a student at the New Mexico 
Military Institute, at Roswell, New Mexico, and upon coming to Colorado with his 
parents, served as a member of Troop E, Colorado National Guard. When his 
country entered the great war, in 1917, he promptly volunteered but was unable to 
meet the physical requirements of the service. Persisting in his efforts, he entered 
the Officers Training School, at Camp Gordon, where he won a commission as 
second lieutenant and was assigned to active duty. 

Mr. Thomas was a member of St. Thomas Episcopal church of Denver, to which 
his family also belong. He was also a member of Park Hill Lodge, No. 148, A. F. & 
A. M., and he was likewise identified with the Knights of Pythias and the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks. His political allegiance was given to no party. He 
preferred to maintain an independent course, voting according to the dictates of 
his judgment without regard to party ties. He stood for progress and improvement 
in community affairs as well as in individual life and he gave active aid and co- 
(iperation to all movements which he believed would prove of real public worth. 
Such qualities made him a man of genuine worth in his community, so that when 
death called him on the 25th of September, 1918, his demise was the occasion of 
deep and widespread regret. He left to his family that good name which is rather 
to be chosen than great riches, but his possessions were also extensive, his record 
proving that prosperity and an honored name may be won simultaneously. 



FRANK R. COFFMAN, M. D. 



Prominent among the leading physicians of Colorado stands Dr. Frank R. Coff- 
man, who in his practice has made a specialty of stomach, intestinal and rectal dis- 
eases, in which branch of the profession he has developed eminent ability. Ever 
studying along progressive lines, he has kept in touch with the latest scientific re- 
searches and discoveries and his practice is the embodiment of the most progressive 
thought in this field. Dr. Coffman is a native of Columbus. Ohio. He was born Octo- 
ber 25, 1868, of the marriage of Milton H. and Abbie H. (Knight) Coffman, who were 
also natives of Columbus, where they were reared, educated and married. In early 
life the father turned to merchandising and after a few years he extended liis busi- 
ness from one city to another in southeastern Ohio until he had become the owner 
of a chain of seven large stores in that section of the state and accordingly ranked 
with the foremost merchants of Ohio, his ramifying trade interests reaching out 
over a very broad territory. Whatever he undertook he completed and he never 
stopped short of the successful accomplishment of his well defined purposes. He 
engaged in grain buying in connection with mercliandising and was the owner of 
a fleet of one hundred grain carrying canal boats on the Erie canal. In a word he 
was a man of marked business capacity and vast resourcefulness, of undaunted energy 
and of keen foresight. His business affairs represented the investment of a large 
amount of capital and also represented notable administrative direction and executive 
control. Obstacles and difficulties in his path seemed but to serve as an impetus for 
renewed effort on his part. He died in southeastern Ohio at the comparatively early 
age of forty-four years. After the death of her husband Mrs. Coffman removed to 
Smith Center, Kansas, where she remained until her demise, which occurred in 1915. 
when she had reached the age of seventy-five. In the family were two children, the 
younger being Bruce Coffman, a resident of Yuma, Colorado, who is editor and pro- 
prietor of the Yuma County Times, a well known newspaper of that section of the 
state. 

The elder son. Dr. Coffman of this review, pursued his early studies in the public 
schools of St. Clairsville, Ohio, and afterward entered the academy there, while later 
he became a student in the office of a well known physician of that city, who directed 
his reading in preparation for the practice of medicine for several years. He was 
also engaged in teaching school for a time in Ohio before his removal to Denver. On 
coming to Colorado he entered the Gross Medical College and completed his prepara- 




DR. FRANK R. COFFMAN 



100 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

tion for the profession as a graduate of the class of 1S90. Immediately afterward he 
removed to Castle Rock, Colorado, where he engaged in private practice for two years 
with a fair measure of success. He then accepted a position as physician and surgeon 
with the Southern Pacific Railway Company and removed to Roseburg, Oregon, where 
he made his headquarters while serving as surgeon for that corporation, remaining 
there from 1892 until 1899. In the latter year he returned to Colorado to take up his 
duties as division surgeon with the Denver & Rio Grande Railway, having headquarters 
at Minturn, Colorado, from 1899 until 1903. In the latter year he returned to Denver 
to become medical inspector and commissioner of the board of health and continued 
actively in that service for eight years. He also engaged in the private practice of 
medicine and at length resigned his public office in June, 1916, for the demands of a 
growing private practice were such as to make it imperative that he give all of his 
attention to his work in that connection. He is regarded as one of the most success- 
ful physicians and surgeons of the city. He has taken a number of post-graduate 
courses, specializing in stomach, intestinal and rectal diseases, and he is an authority 
upon questions relative thereto. His last post-graduate work was done in the New 
York Post Graduate Hospital and also in Detroit, Michigan. 

On the 17th of July, 1890, Dr. Coffman was united in marriage in Castle Bock, 
Colorado, to Miss Helen M. Lapham, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lapham, 
of Denver, and they now have one child. Max, who was born in Roseburg, Oregon, 
in 1895. He is a graduate of the Manual Training high school of Denver and was 
a student for three years in the University of Colorado, and later a chemist with the 
Great Western Sugar Company. In September, 1918, he entered the Chemical Warfare 
Service of the Untied States government, in connection with the war department, at 
Yale University. 

In his fraternal relations Dr. Coffman is a Mason. He has attained the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite and is also a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. He like- 
wise has membership with the Woodmen of the World and he is now serving as a 
member of the state board of health, while along strictly professional lines his con- 
nection is with the Denver City and County Medical Society, the Colorado State Medi- 
cal Society and the American Medical Association. He holds to high professional 
standards and ideals and is ever careful to conform his practice to the most advanced 
ethics of the profession. 



ROSA E. BACHMAN. 



The education of the young has ever been a most important problem of any, but 
particularly the newer districts, and Washington county is to be congratulated upon 
having such an able superintendent of schools as is Rosa E. Bachman, of Akron, who 
is well fitted and highly qualified to fill this important office. Under her administration 
the school system of the county has been greatly improved and education here made 
noticeable forward strides. Born in Mount Carmel, Illinois, she is a daughter of W. P. 
and Elizabeth (Riel) Kingsbury, the former born in Ohio and the latter in Illinois. 
The father was an agriculturist by occupation and removed to Illinois in the early days 
of the history of that state. There he acquired land which he cultivated to good advan- 
tage for many years and then once more moved westward, going to Nebraska. He sub- 
sequently retired and resided in Ponca, that state, during the balance of his life, his wife 
also having passed away. 

Mrs. Bachman was reared under the parental roof and received her primary educa- 
tion in Mount Carmel, Illinois, where she attended the public schools. She also studied 
at Ponca and Wayne, Nebraska, and in the latter place she attended normal school, sub- 
sequently teaching in Nebraska for five years. In 1909 she came to Colorado and 
attended the State Teachers College at Greeley, graduating from that institution with 
tlje class of 1912. While att&nding school in Greeley she made her residence in Akron, 
Colorado. She then taught in rural schools in Washington county and also for two 
years in the primary schools at Akron. She displayed rare qualities as a teacher and 
soon demonstrated that she was fitted for higher office. In 1913 she was elected county 
superintendent of schools and has since served in that important capacity. She not only 
thoroughly understands the needs of the scholars but is equally able to judge of the 
capabilities of the teachers. She sees to it that the latter are always kept informed 
of the latest methods of obtaining results and has succeeded in making the force of 
teachers in Washington county more efficient and of greater benefit to the schools. More- 
over, she is an able organizer and administrator and has made her office one of real 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 101 

importance in regard to educational progress in Washington county. Slie has improved 
school facilities and has seen to it that where schoolhouses or school equipment were In 
need of improvement such Improvement was made. Therefore she has made good 
use of her official position in furthering the interests of the public, who well realize the 
importance attaching to her work. 

In October, 1914. Rosa E. Kingsbury was united in marriage to R. Bachman, a 
successful agriculturist of Washington county. He is prominent in fraternal circles, 
being connected with the blue lodge of Masons and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the principles of brotherhood underlying these organizations guiding him in his life's 
relations. 

Mrs. Bachman takes a great interest in war service work and is thoroughly patriotic. 
She is chairman of the Woman's Council of Defense and also chairman of the Junior Red 
Cross and devotes a great deal of her time to this important work. She is a member of 
the Parent-Teachers Association, in the proceedings of which she takes a leading part, 
and was the organizer of the Boys and Girls Club of Washington County. Fraternally 
she belongs to the Eastern Star and to the Rebekahs. Her religious faith is that of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and she is much interested in the work of that organization 
and charitable institutions. Politically she is a republican, supporting the party plat- 
form and party principles. Mrs. Bachman has done much to promote the cause of educa- 
tion in Washington county as well as other public causes here, as is evident from her 
record. She has proven herself a citizen of the first class and underlying all of her work 
there is a loyal and unwavering patriotism. 



CHARLES WILLIAM SEITZ. 

Charles William Seitz, of Denver, is the president and manager of what is one 
of the largest industrial enterprises in the state of Colorado, known as the Mountain 
Iron Works Company. The company is a close corporation and the business estab- 
lished by Mr. Seitz in a small way has developed until the enterprise is scarcely 
second to anything of the kind in the west. A most modest beginning was made 
with a capital of about thirty-five dollars in cash and for nearly two weeks this 
was all of the money which Mr. Seitz had at his command. He had to buy supplies 
for his foundry and also meet the demands of his household, then consisting of 
himself and his parents. He faced the situation, as he has many other trying prob- 
lems since that time, bravely, courageously and with determination. Step by step 
he has advanced, enlarging and extending his efforts as opportunity has offered, and 
today his name figures most prominently upon the pages of the history of manu- 
facturing in the west. 

Such a life story should serve as a source of encouragement and inspiration 
to all who have the will to dare and to do. Charles W. Seitz was born in Cahokia, 
Illinois, now within the boundary lines of East St. Louis, February 12, 1875, a son 
of Fred and Louise Seitz, who were of European birth but came to America in 
early life and established their home on Cahokia creek, where the father engaged 
in farming. In later years he disposed of his farm and removed to St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, where he conducted a hotel for an extended period. In 1891, however, he 
came to Colorado, settling in Valverde, where he engaged in gardening and where 
he still makes his home. His wife passed away in St. Louis in 1879. They had a 
family of six children, four of whom survive, namely: Fred, who is connected with 
the Tacoma Times of Tacoma, Washington; Mrs. Tina Shelton, residing in Texas; 
Bertha, living in Denver; and Charles W., of this review. 

The last named, the youngest in the family, attended the public schools of St. 
Louis, Missouri, but at the early age of ten years put aside his textbooks and began 
work for the Missouri Car Wheel Company, now the American Car & Foundry Com- 
pany. There he remained until 1890, when he came to Denver and secured a posi- 
tion in the employ of Thomas Walker at Fourteenth and Wazee streets. In that con- 
nection he completed his trade as a moulder and subsequently went to work for 
Alfred Cordingly in the Queen City Foundry. He remained a faithful, capable and 
efficient employe there for nine years and then in 1902, with a small amount of 
money, he began business on his own account under the name of the Western 
Foundry Company. He struggled through one year with limited capital, but ere the 
close of the year his trade had substantially increased and he leased a lot on Twelfth 
street, between Market and Wazee streets, whereon was a foundry. Later, he sold 
his interest in the property at a handsome profit. He afterward operated the Colo- 




CHARLES W. SEITZ 




MRS. CHARLES W. SEITZ 



104 HISTORY OF C0L0R7\I>0 

rado Gray Iron Works tor a year and at the end of that period, or in 1909, he 
purchased the ground and erected thereon the first buildings that now constitute a 
part of the plant of the Mountain Iron Works Company. Since the beginning he 
has greatly improved this property and has made addition after addition in build- 
ings and equipment until the plant now occupies a solid block of ground and is 
one of the busiest centers to be found in the industrial district of the city, with 
from eighty-five to one hundred and twenty-five workmen. At the present time 
they have a large allotment of government work and contracts on hand and their 
activities are constantly broadening in scope. This is destined to become one of 
the most prosperous industrial institutions of the west, with more than one hundred 
thousand dollars invested in buildings and improvements, while other thoroughly 
modern types of buildings are soon to be added. The foundry is today an important 
industrial enterprise of Denver, which was incorporated in 1906 as a close corpora- 
tion, of which Mr. Seitz has always been president and general manager, while his 
wife has been secretary and treasurer. Mr. Seitz still remains one of the active 
workers in the establishment and all of the business is conducted under his imme- 
diate personal supervision. He is unassuming and at all times approachable and 
is constantly among his employes, working with them and assisting them. Besides 
his present large contracts for government work, he has done much for the following 
corporations: the Colorado & Southern Railway, the Denver & Salt Lake Railway, 
the Western Chemical Corporation, the Great Western Sugar Company and many 
smaller concerns. 

On the 2d of December, 1896, in Denver, Mr. Seitz was married to Miss Clara 
W. Wedell, of this city. She was born in Yankton, South Dakota, but from girl- 
hood was reared in Cheyenne, Wyoming. She was a daughter of Cornelius and 
Susan (Holzwarth) Wedell. Mrs. Seitz has taken not only a keen but active 
interest in the business affairs of her husband, and has rendered most helpful influ- 
ence as well as material assistance, sharing with her husband credit for the 
building up of the business in the days when their combined help was quite neces- 
sary for the success that came later. They have become parents of four daughters 
and one son. Frank W. Seitz, who was born in Denver, was accidentally drowned in 
Cherry creek, July 15, 1913, on his twelfth birthday. The daughters are: Irene 
Louise, born in Denver in 1906; Lillion May, in 1908; Elsie Beatrice, in 1911; 
and Kathleen Maria, in 1916. The three eldest daughters are now in school. 

In politics Mr. Seitz maintains an independent course. He belongs to the Denver 
Manufacturers Association and his time and interests have largely centered upon 
his business affairs. Working his way upward unaided and alone, his progress has 
been continuous and his diligence has wrested fortune from the hands of fate. In 
no other land is the opportunity for individual progress so great as in the United 
States. Unhampered by any traditions of caste or class, the Individual may prove 
his worth and his intelligently directed industry becomes the means of his pros- 
perity. 



JOHN WESLEY BAKER. 



John Wesley Baker, owner of a farm in the Wolfcreek district of Elbert county, 
•was born at Lexington, Indiana, in 1867. a son of John H. and Susanne Baker. In the 
paternal line he comes of German ancestry, his grandfather having left Germany to 
establish a home in the new world. He made his way to Indiana, where representatives 
of the family have since lived. On the maternal side Mr. Baker comes of French and 
Irish lineage and his great-great-grandfather, who was of English and French descent, 
•was born in Illinois. 

With the removal of his parents to Avon, Illinois, John Wesley Baker there pur- 
sued his education and in 1884 he came to Colorado, where he entered upon railroad 
■work, being connected with the Burlington & Missouri and afterward with the Denver 
& Rio Grande systems. About fourteen years ago he homesteaded in Elbert county and 
has since given his time and energies to the development of his farming interests. He 
has greatly extended his holdings, adding to his farm from time to time as his financial 
resources have permitted until he is today owner of one of the most excellent farm 
properties in the Wolfcreek district. His place is equipped with modern machiney, sub- 
stantial buildings and every accessory found upon the model farm of the twentieth cen- 
tury and the methods which he employs in the production of his crops are most gratify- 
ing and resultant. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 105 

On the 16th of February, 1897, in Denver, Mr. Baker was united in marriage to 
Miss Maud Sturns, a daughter of Washington Sturns, who was a native of Indiana, and 
Josephine Sturns, a native of Sweden. Mrs. Baker was born in the building in which 
the constitution of Colorado was framed. To Mr. and Mrs. Baker have been born three 
children, Washington Edward, Harold Wesley and Linnie Ruth. 



JOHN SLATTERY. 



John Slattery, who was born in the state of New York in 1860, passed away in. 
Colorado in 1902. He was a son of Daniel and Alice (Ryan) Slattery. He pursued 
his education in the public schools of New York and when still a boy came to Colorado, 
after which he engaged in mining. At a later date he settled in Boulder, where he took 
up the occupation of farming, which he followed for nine years. He then removed to 
Central City, where he again engaged in mining, and later was connected with the 
Cripple Creek district and sought a fortune in the mines in Leadville. He met with 
only a fair measure of success in his work as a miner, however, and settled on a ranch 
near Denver, where he engaged in farming to the time of his death. He became the 
owner of one hundred and sixty acres of land, which he converted into rich and produc- 
tive fields and from which he annually gathered large harvests. He was also interested 
quite extensively in mining in Leadville and his various business affairs and investments 
brought to him a gratifying measure of prosperity as the years passed. 

Mr. Slattery was married in Leadville, Colorado, to Miss Jane Gully, a daughter of 
Thomas and Temperance Ann (Powell) Gully. Mrs. Slattery was born in Tipperary, 
Ireland, and with her parents came to Colorado during her girlhood, after which she 
attended school in Central City. By her marriage she became the mother of three chil- 
dren, Katherine, Thomas and John, all deceased. The religious faith of Mr. Slattery was 
that of the Catholic church and Mrs. Slattery is also a communicant thereof. She is a 
member of the Altar Society and has worked most earnestly for it. At his death Mr. 
Slattery left his widow in very comfortable financial circumstances owing to his careful 
business management in former years and he also left the priceless heritage of an un- 
tarnished name, for in his business dealings he had been straightforward and honorable, 
having won creditable success as the years passed by. 



LOUIS J. STARK. 



For twenty years Louis J. Stark has been a representative of the Denver bar, having 
begun active practice in 1899. He was born at Johnson Creek, Wisconsin, May 27, 1873, 
and is a son of John and Mary ( (Bieck) Stark, both of whom were pioneers of Wisconsin, 
the father following the occupation of farming. He died at Johnson Creek in 1898 and 
there the mother also passed away in 1907. 

Louis J. Stark was the sixth in order of birth in a family of nine children. He 
entered Lawrence University at Appleton, Wisconsin, in his fifteenth year but before 
completing the course there, changed to Northwestern College at Naperville, Illinois, from 
which he was graduated on the completion of the college course with the class of 1895. 
The degrees of B. S. and LL. B. were conferred upon him by Northwestern College. 
Determining upon the practice of law as a life work, he then matriculated in the law 
department of the University of Wisconsin in the fall of 1895. Removing to the west, 
he entered the law school of Denver University in 1897. At the outbreak of the Spanish- 
American war he volunteered for active service as a member of a regiment of Colorado 
troops but became ill with typhoid fever and was honorably discharged. After his 
recovery he entered upon the practice of law in 1899 and has become a successful mem- 
oer of the Denver bar. 

On the 23d of April, 1902, Mr. Stark was united in marriage to Miss Lillian Hutton, 
of Denver, Colorado, a daughter of John and Mary Hutton. They have become parents 
of six children. Ethel, born in Denver in 1903, and Annie D., in 1904, are attending 
high school. John H., born in 1906, Louis B., in 1908. and Henry L., in 1910, are all 
in the public schools. Meritt W., the youngest, born in 1916 is the life of the household. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stark are members of the Unitarian church. He belongs to the Denver 
Bar Association. His political endorsement is given to the republican party. In 1912 he 
was a candidate for congressman, and in 1916 for the office of district attorney for the 
city and county of Denver, but was defeated. In 1916 he served as chairman of the 



106 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Booth Charter Committee at the time the present charter was adopted. He has actively- 
advocated that the judiciary should be independent of politics and that the judges be 
selected by the members of the legal profession. During his practice he was attorney for 
the Italian, Austro-Hungarian. German and Mexican consulates, and has also been 
connected with many important cases in our courts. 



ADOLPH JOSEPH ZAXG. 



Time gives the perspective which places every individual in his true position in 
relation to the community of which he has been a part, and in the instance of Adolph 
Joseph Zang time serves to heighten the regard in which he is held, for it is recog- 
nized that his labors have been a most important element in the upbuilding of the 
city of Denver and of the state at large. For many years he figured prominently as 
a banker and mine owner and, following constructive lines, he built up business in- 
terests of extensive proportions. He also acquired large property holdings and was 
at the head of the Zang Realty & Investment Company. 

A native of Louisville, Kentucky, Mr. Zang was born on the 14th of August, 1856, 
a son of Philip and Elizabeth (Hurlebaus) Zang. The father was born in Aschaffen- 
burg, Bavaria, Germany, and coming to America in 1853. established his home in 
Philadelphia, but the following year removed to Louisville, Kentucky, where he founded 
a brewery in 1859, conducting it for ten years under the firm style of Zang & Com- 
pany. He then removed to Denver, where he established the Rocky Mountain Brew- 
ing Company, and during the period of his residence in this state he recognized and 
utilized the opportunities offered by the natural resources of Colorado. He became 
one of the founders of the Vindicator Consolidated Gold Mining Company and he 
furthermore contributed to the early development of the state through his coopera- 
tion and support of many of its pioneer industries. 

His son, Adolph Joseph Zang, after acquiring his early education in a private 
school in Louisville, Kentucky, conducted by Professor Heilman, went to Germany, 
where he spent two years in further study. He made' his initial step in the business 
world in connection with the firm of J. Dolfinger & Company of Louisville, dealers in 
queensware, and his business enterprise and capability contributed much to the suc- 
cess of the undertaking. Attracted to Denver, he became a resident of the city in 
1882 and entered into business in connection with his father. Their interests in the 
brewing business, however, were sold to an English syndicate in 1889. but the firm 
insisted that Mr. Zang remain in the capacity of president and general manager and 
he so continued until 1912. However, he was extending his efforts in many other 
directions as the years passed and his investments showed the soundness of his judg- 
ment and gave proof of his belief in Denver and her future. He was one of the 
organizers of the Schlrmer Insurance & Investment Company, which later developed 
Into the banking house conducted under the name of the German American Trust 
Company of Denver, now the American Bank & Trust Company. He was instrumental 
in developing this into one of the foremost financial institutions of the west and 
served as one of its directors from the time of its organization until his death, as 
well as the first vice president. He was one of the founders of the famous Vindicator 
Consolidated Gold Mining Company, operating large and heavily producing prop- 
erties in the Cripple Creek district of Colorado, and at the time of his demise was 
its president. The town of Goldfield owes its establishment to Mr. Zang, who was 
its founder. Extending his activities in mining, he became one of the directors 
of the Cresson Consolidated Gold Mining & Milling Company and one of its largest 
stockholders. He did much to assist in the legitimate development of the mining 
industry, not only in Colorado but throughout the west, and was never afraid to 
back his judgment by the investment of his own resources. He made extensive pur- 
chases of land in the state and founded the Zang Realty & Investment Company. He 
was the owner of one of Colorado's model farms, comprising four thousand acres and 
situated only a few miles from Denver. This was devoted largely to the breeding of 
pure blooded horses, for Mr. Zang was a true lover of the noble steed and his horses 
were exhibited throughout the entire country, winning many blue ribbons. He im- 
ported from Prance a number of the finest animals that could be purchased, among 
them a Percheron stallion which won prizes at practically every large horse show in 
France and the United States. 

On the 29th of March, 1881, Mr. Zang was married to Miss Minnie Louise Vogt, 
a daughter of William P. Vogt, a jeweler of Louisville. Kentucky, and they became 




ADOLPH J. ZANG 



108 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the parents of the follo^'ing named. Philip Adolph, who is mentioned at length on 
another page of this work; Adolph Frank, vice president of the Vindicator Consolidated 
Gold Mining Company, secretary of the Cresson Consolidated Gold Mining Company, 
secretary of the Adolph J. Zang Investment Company, director of The Rare Metals 
Ore Company and treasurer of The Ferro Alloy Company; Gertrude, the wife of 
Charles Leedom Patterson; Minnie Elizabeth; and Louise Adelgunda, the wife of 
John Henrj' Morrison. 

The family circle was broken by the hand of death on the 28th of September, 
1916, Mr. Zang having been taken suddenly ill while on a trip of inspection to the 
Vindicator mine. His death was the occasion of the deepest regret because of his 
wide acquaintance and his many admirable traits of character. He was a Scottish 
Rite Mason, an Elk. a life member of the Denver Athletic Club and was a member 
of every civic and commercial organization of Denver, all of which profited by his 
cooperation and his public spirit. One of his most marked characteristics was his 
love of literature and his taste along that line was most discriminating. His library 
was equaled by but few private collections in the United States, either in its size, its 
range or in its intrinsic value. A contemporary writer said of Mr. Zang: "He was 
essentially and before all else a devoted and home-loving man, domestic in all hig 
tastes and neglecting no opportunity to cultivate the beautiful things of life. He 
was a (j-ue and liberal philanthropist, never making known his beneficiaries but giv- 
ing freely to charities of all kinds. He was most democratic in his attitude toward 
all men, a man of imposing stature, lovable and genial to an extreme and loyal not 
only to his friends but to the world." 



JOHN GULLY. 



John Gully was one of the representative farmers of Colorado who through well 
directed efforts accumulated extensive holdings and in course of time became the 
owner of eleven hundred and twenty acres of land in Arapahoe county. His life record 
should serve to inspire and encourage others who have to begin business, as he did, 
empty-handed. He was born in Tipperary, Ireland, June 24, 1850, and his life activities 
covered the intervening years to the 29th of May, 1915. when he nearly had reached 
the age of sixty-five years. He was a son of Thomas and Temperance (Powell) Gully 
and in 1862 came to Colorado with his parents, this being fourteen years before the 
state was admitted to the Union. They crossed the plains with team and wagon, and 
Mr. Gully acquired his education in the schools of the mining towns of Central City, 
Blackhawk and Silver Plume as the family removed from place to place. When he 
was sixteen years of age he went to Tollgate with his parents and there worked upon 
the home ranch, assisting largely in the development and cultivation of the property. 
When about twenty-one years of age he took up one hundred and sixty acres of land 
in Arapahoe county and, as the years passed on, kept adding to his possessions from 
time to time, as his financial resources increased, until he accumulated eleven hun- 
dred and twenty acres. He engaged extensively in raising live stock and also carried 
on dry farming to the time of his death. His methods were practical and his work 
was characterized by a progressiveness that brought good results. His sons are now 
operating the ranch and are raising wheat and live stock. They have inherited the 
industrious spirit of the father and their labors are being attended with excellent 
results. 

On the 20th of September. 1892, Mr. Gully was united in marriage to Miss Eliza- 
beth Clifford, a daughter of Patrick J. and Mary Ann (Maher) Clifford. Mrs. Gully 
was born in Ottumwa, Iowa, and was educated in the public schools of that state. She 
made progress in her studies and won a teacher's certificate there, after which she 
engaged in teaching in Iowa for two years. Later she went to Colorado and taught 
for several years or up to the time of her marriage. She proved a capable teacher. 
Imparting clearly and readily to others the knowledge that she had acquired. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Gully were bom five children: Mary Frances, James Edward, John 
Thomas, William Anthony and Elizabeth Alphonese. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church, to which Mr. 
Gully always adhered. His political allegiance was given to the democratic party 
and on several occasions he was offered the nomination to public office but always 
declined. He preferred to give his thought, attention and effort to his business affairs 
and by reason of the sound judgment which he displayed in the conduct of his farm- 
ing interests he became one of the prominent ranchmen of Arapahoe county. John 




JOHN GULLY 



no HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Gully was a man of striking personality and charm of manner which, endeared him 
to those who knew him well. His integrity was unquestioned and in all of his deal- 
ings with his fellow men, he applied the principle of the Golden Rule. Coming to 
Arapahoe county when that section of the state was practically an unbroken wilder- 
ness, he manifested his confidence in the future of the country by meeting the priva- 
tions, and even the dangers, with smiling fortitude, and it may truly be said that he 
had no small part in the development of Colorado's greatness. Those who knew him, 
and he had a wide acquaintance, esteemed him for his sterling worth and when death 
called him on the 29th of May, 1915, there were many who deeply regretted his pass- 
ing and who yet cherish his memory. 



AARON GOVE. 



For thirty years — the entire formative period of Denver's school system — Aaron Gove 
was in charge of the educational interests of the city. While at the outset of his task 
there were other school districts within the limits of the city, District No. 1, of which he 
was the head, comprised the greater part of the population. Later he became superin- 
tendent of all the merged districts. This was his life work. From the time that he 
was three years old until he was sixty-five, with the exception of the period during 
which he was a participant in the Civil war, he was never out of a schoolroom. He 
not only became one of the great educators of the country, honored in 1S87-8 by the 
presidency of the National Educational Association, but proved himself a wise and care- 
ful administrator and financial manager. 

From 1864 until 1874 he was in charge of the schools at Normal. Illinois. During 
that period he was mastering his profession and demonstrating his energy and capacity 
at teachers' institutes and on the lecture platform. 

In 1874, while on a lecture tour, he received the curt information that he had been 
elected superintendent of the Denver schools at a salary of twenty-five hundred dollars 
a year. "Kindly wire acceptance" was the laconic conclusion of the message. He wired 
that he would "look them over" and incidentally they might "look him over." Not yet 
sure that he could get his release from Normal, he made his way to Denver and found 
the town was just recovering from a bitter school board quarrel. 

On his arrival members of the board kept in close touch with him, hoping that the 
story of the quarrel would not reach his ears. But Roger W. Woodbury, then publisher 
of the Times, al«o a native New Hampshire boy. finally getting to him, said: "Mr. Gove, 
I'm mighty sorry for you. You're undertaking an impossible job." That night, at twelve 
o'clock, Mr. Woodbury put the file of the Times under Mr. Gove's eyes, so that he might 
learn the entire story of the fight which was still in the air. But there was enough 
fighting blood in Mr. Gove to make him feel that the "impossible job" was worth while. 
He went back to Normal and asked for a release. He was told that he could not be 
spared that year, but he secured his release. In 1874. therefore, he assumed his position 
under the law creating the East Denver school district. 

Mr. Gove found the district in debt for seventy-five thousand dollars and its fifteen 
year bonds drawing twelve per cent, interest in the hands of New England banks. His 
first attempt in financing, failed of success. Though the legislature, at his suggestion, 
passed a law permitting refunding of school bonds, his offer under the law to the New 
England banks to substitute thirty-year six per cent, bonds for their twelve per cent, 
holdings failed to persuade his fellow Yankees. But during his entire term of office, 
there was but a single further instance of a bond issue to meet a school debt. This was 
after congress had given the school district the present East Denver high school site, 
compelling the erection of a school building within a year. There was local opposition 
to the law and it took two terms of congress to get it through. It was asserted that the 
people didn't want the site, but Superintendent Gove, then in Washington, telegraphed 
to Robert W. Steele, later chief justice, to send him a petition favoring the measure. 
It took the active young attorney less than a week to find a thousand people who wanted 
that block of ground. Senators Jerome B. Chaffee and Henry M. Teller saved the day on 
the last day of the session. Senator Morrill of Vermont fought hard to defeat it. Dr. 
Bancroft, battling for Jarvis Hall and Judge France, believing that the property should 
be a park and not a school house site, also lost out. The bond issue provided for the 
west wing. In seven years the entire building was completed and when the last nail 
•was driven there was not a penny of indebtedness on the structure. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 111 

When Aaron Gove came to Denver, his first great fight was to establish tlie high 
school grades in the district. Here he demonstrated, at the very outset of his local 
career, his capacity for diplomacy. He was a shrewd observer of men, his power in 
that direction being above even his rare skill as a schoolmaster and as a manager. There 
were four elements opposed to his effort to establish high school grades. The Methodists 
were, generally speaking, against the plan. They had just secured a charter for what is 
now the University of Denver, but Governor John Evans, who had been with him at 
teachers' institutes in Illinois, promised Mr. Gove his support and he kept his word. 
Mr. Gove once said: "My reliance was Governor John Evans. When he promised me 
that my public high school should not be antagonized, I knew he meant what he said." 
He was also opposed by the Episcopalians, who were building up Jarvis Hall, but 
stanch friends in that denomination also stood by him. The Catholics also fought him, 
but there too he was able to find many broad-minded men who, while they did not wish 
openly to assist him, saw to it that the antagonism was not continued. There were in 
the community many southerners who had come from sections where the free common 
school had never been planted. These, too, he won over; and so at last he established 
his high school in the third floor of the school building on the site of what is now the 
Club building. 

He had with him for twenty years the best men in the community as members of 
his school board. In those years Fred Steinhauer. E. M. Ashley, Peter Gottesleben, L. C. 
Ellsworth, Dr. Stedman, K. G. Cooper, George W. Kassler, C. S. Morey and Governor 
Grant were wise enough to appreciate the services of a great educational expert and 
gave lavishly of their time and ability in the public service. There was no contention. 
Progress was rapid and the great school system which ranks among the finest in the 
nation was established on a firm and sound foundation. 

When in 1904 Mr. Gove gave up his school work, he became identified with the 
great sugar industry of Colorado. Here again, his remarkable mind quickly assimilated 
what was necessary in those years to successfully maintain that most important enter- 
prise. Documents prepared by him for legislative reference have been pronounced 
among the ablest presented at congressional hearings. 

Mr. Gove was born in Hampton Falls, New Hampshire, September 26, 1839, the son 
of John Francis and Sarah Jane (Wadleigh) Gove. He was graduated from the Illinois 
Normal University in 1861. Then began his military career. He entered the service of 
the United States as a private of Company B, Thirty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
September 18, 1861, and was commissioned second lieutenant on the 26th of September. 
He became first lieutenant and adjutant on the 6th of September, 1862, and was mustered 
in as adjutant on the 12th of December of that year. The regiment was organized at 
Camp Butler, Illinois, moved to Ironton, Missouri, September 20. 1861, and was on duty 
there until March, 1862. It was sent in the expedition to Fredericktown, Missouri, from 
the 12th to the 25th of October, 1861, and participated in a skirmish at Big River Bridge, 
near Potosi on the 15th of that month. It was also in action at Fredericktown on the 
21st of October. From March until May, 1862, the regiment was attached to the Second 
Brigade of the Army of Southeast Missouri and then to the First Brigade of the First 
Division of the Army of Southwest Missouri, Department of Missouri, until July, 1862. 
It was next at Helena, Arkansas, in the District of Eastern Arkansas, Department of 
Missouri, until October, 1862, and afterward with Harris' Brigade, Benton's Division, 
Davidson's Army of Southeast Missouri, until January, 1S63. Its next assignment was 
to the First Brigade, First Division, District of St. Louis, Missouri, Department of 
Missouri, until March, 1863, and to the First Brigade, Fourteenth Division, Thirteenth 
Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, until July of the same year. Its next assign- 
ment was to the First Brigade, First Division, Thirteenth Army Corps of the Army 
of the Tennessee until August, 1863, and afterward to the Army of the Gulf until April 
1864. 

The record of his service has been given in official documents as follows: "Moved 
to Reeve's Station, Missouri, March 3. 1862. Steele's expedition to White River, Arkan- 
sas, March 23— May 10. March to Batesville, Arkansas, thence to Helena. Arkansas, May 
25 — July 14. Action at Hill's Plantation, Cache River, July 7. Duty at and near Helena 
till September 1, participating in numerous expeditions. Ordered to Sulphur Springs, 
September 1, Friar's Point, September 28. Moved to Pilot Knob, Missouri, thence moved 
to Van Buren, Arkansas, November 15. Campaign through southeast Missouri, Decem- 
ber 1862. to March 1863. Ordered to Ste. Genevieve. March 5, thence to Milliken's Bend, 
Louisiana, and duty there till April 25. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand 
Gulf, April 25-30. Battle of Port Gibson, May 1. Fourteen-Mile Creek, May 12. Battle 
of Champion's Hill, May 16. Big Black River Bridge, May 17. Siege of Vicksburg, 



.112 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Mississippi, May 18 — July 4. Assaults on Vicksburg, May 19 and 22. Hill's Plantation, 
June 22. Surrender of Vicksburg, July 4. Advance on Jackson, Mississippi, July 5-10. 
Big Black River July 5. Siege of Jackson, Mississippi, July 10-17. Duty at Vicksburg 
till August 20. Ordered to New Orleans, Louisiana, August 20. Duty at Carrollton, 
Brashear City and Bervsrick till October. Western Louisiana campaign, October 3 to 
November 10. Served detached as aide-de-camp on staff of General C. C. Washburn, 
commanding First Division, Eighteenth Corps, October and November, 1863, and as 
division ordnance officer on staff of General N. J. T. Dana, January to April, 1864. Ex- 
pedition to New Iberia, Louisiana, October 3-6, 1863, and to Vermillion Bayou, October 
8-30. Ordered to New Orleans, Louisiana, November 10, thence to Texas, November 12. 
Capture of Mustang Island, Matagorda Bay, November 17. Fort Esperanza, November 
27-30. Duty at Indianola and Lavacca, Texas, till March, 1864. On veteran leave 
March and April. Moved to New Orleans, Louisiana, April 18-29, thence to Brashear 
City, May 17, and duty in District of La Fourche till June. Resigned June 18, 1864, and 
honorably discharged from service on the strength of a surgeon's certificate. Brevetted 
captain and major. United States Volunteers, March 13, 1865, 'For gallant and meritori- 
ous services during the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi.' " ' 

Nature seems to have designed Mr. Gove for the educational field and the school 
system of Denver stands as a monument to his ability and efficiency. Impossible as it 
is for most men sixty-five years of age to make a change in their life work, Mr. Gove 
accomplished this and became a successful factor in connection with the development 
of the sugar industry of the west. 

Mr. Gove was married February 13, 1865, to Caroline Spofford of North Andover, 
Massachusetts. She died in Denver, September 29, 1916. There were four children of 
this marriage, Frank E. Gove, Aaron M. Gove, Mrs. Henry Hanington and Mrs. John G. 
McMurtry, all of Denver. In politics Mr. Gove is a republican. He has been commander 
of the Loyal Legion, is a thirty-third degree TWason and was for three years grand 
commander of the Knights Templar of Colorado. Dartmouth College in 1878 conferred 
upon him the degree of Master of Arts and in 1888 he received from the University of 
Colorado the degree of LL. D. He is a member of the Denver Club and the University 
Club. Now at the age of seventy-nine years, without invidious distinction, he may be 
characterized as one of the foremost and honored residents of Denver. 



RAYMOND H. TURVER. 



Raymond H. Turver, of Denver, who is general sales agent for the Pacific Coast 
Shredded Wheat Company, has in large measure that quality which has been termed 
commercial sense, but which when analyzed is found to be composed of close applica- 
tion, keen sagacity, thorough study of tasks and the capability of reading and under- 
standing the men with whom one deals. Possessing all these requisites of successful 
salesmanship, Raymond H. Turver has made for himself a creditable position in busi- 
ness circles. He was born in Niagara Falls, New York, October 16, 1S80, a son of 
Charles Henry Turver, who was a native of England and came to America at the age 
of eight years, being apprenticed to a family crossing the Atlantic. Their home was 
established in southern Wisconsin and there he was reared and educated. 

Charles H. Turver served an apprenticeship at the carpenter's and builder's trade, 
which he followed successfully throughout the remainder of his life. In 1874 he became 
a resident of Rochester, New York, which was his home until 1879, in which year 
he removed to Suspension Bridge, now Niagara Falls, where he was engaged in busi- 
ness as a general contractor to the time of his death, which occurred November 28, 
1910, at the age of sixty-two years. He was active in civic matters and greatly inter- 
ested in labor problems and conditions bearing thereon. He was a prime factor in 
promoting a bill presented before congress to regulate the importation of Canadian 
labor, opposing the course of employing Canadians who resided in their own country 
but earned their living across the American border. He was also a champion of various 
other measures which he believed would benefit labor and business conditions in this 
country. In politics he was an ardent republican but was never an aspirant for office. 
He married Stella Harroun, who was born at Niagara Falls and is a direct descendant 
of John Quincy Adams and John Adams, two of the presidents of the United States, 
and of Captain Abner Adams, who commanded a company in the Revolutionary war 
and had charge of a line of forts and communications between Albany, New York, and 
the Niagara frontier. Mrs. Turver is still a resident of Niagara Falli. By her marriage 
she became the mother of fdiir children, two of whom have passed away, while those 




RAYMOND H. TURVER 



114 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

still living are Raymond H. and Charles Henry, the latter a resident of Lewiston, 
New York. 

Spending his youthful days in the place of his nativity, Raymond H. Turver acquired 
his education in attendance at the public and high schools there to the age of eighteen 
years and then started out to earn his own livelihood. He first served an apprentice- 
ship with the Erie Railroad Company at Niagara Falls as a telegrapher, remaining 
there for eighteen months. He was afterward with the New York Central as telegraph 
operator and billing clerk, which position he continued to fill until the fall of 1902, 
when he entered the employ of the Shredded Wheat Company, accepting the position 
of clerk in the filing department. After two months' service he was advanced to the 
sales department, being placed in a clerical position, and there he continued for six 
months. Being desirous of learning the business in all of its phases and departments, 
he was transferred to the branch office at Toronto, Ontario, as office assistant and sales- 
man and remained in that city for two years. He then returned to the home office 
at Niagara Falls as assistant in the sales department, occupying the position until 
190S, when he was promoted to general sales agent of the office at Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota, where he successfully and creditably managed the business for the company for 
three years. He was then placed in charge of the Denver office, arriving in this city 
on the 2Sth of December. 1911. In the intervening years he has developed the business 
to a large extent, greatly increasing the trade through his territory, which embraces 
Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and New Jlexico. Throughout practically his entire business 
career he has been connected with the Shredded Wheat Company — a fact which is 
indicative of his marked ability, trustworthiness and indefatigable energy. Step by 
step he has advanced from a humble position, acquainting himself with every phase 
of the work that has come under his direction, and today as sales manager for this 
district he is controlling a trade of large and growing proportions. 

On the 24th of November, 1904, at Niagara Falls, Mr. Turver was married to Miss 
Maude E. Cannon, a native of that place and a daughter of William E. and Elizabeth 
(Vogt) Cannon, the former now deceased, while the latter is still living. They belonged 
to old and well known families of Niagara Falls. Mr. Turver's military experience 
covers eight years' service as a member of the Third Regiment of the New York 
National Guard at Niagara, with which he served as a non-commissioned officer. He 
is an active member of the Warren Methodist Episcopal church and has been a worker 
in the Sunday school, having formerly served as secretary. He belongs to the Denver 
Civic and Commercial Association and is helpfully interested in all those things which 
have to do with the upbuilding of the city. He also has membership in the Denver 
Motor Club and the Kiwanis Club, serving as chairman of the membership committee 
in the latter. He is likewise an officer in Arapahoe Lodge, No. 130, A. F. & A. M., and 
in the Scottish Rite bodies, attaining the thirty-second degree in Colorado Consistory, 
No. 1, A. & A. S. R., on the Sth of April. 1915. He is likewise a past councilor of the Junior 
Order of United American Mechanics. His has been an active and useful career, charac- 
terized by progressiveness and marked devotion to duty whether in business life, in 
social connections or in citizenship. 



HON. JAMES PHILIP MAXWELL. 

Hon. James Philip Maxwell, of whom it is said he has never had a superior as pre- 
siding officer in the state senate, has at various times been called upon for public 
service although usually it has not partaken of a political nature, and the record of 
none has been more faultless in honor, fearless in conduct or stainless in reputation. 
Mr. Maxwell was born upon a farm in Walworth county, Wisconsin, on the 20th of 
June, 1839, and is a son of James A. and Susan (Vreland) Maxwell. The father was 
born in the Empire state in 1814 and passed away in 1892, having long survived his 
wife, who died in 1852. 

When James Philip Maxwell was seven years of age his parents removed to Bara- 
boo, Wisconsin, and there he attended the public schools, remaining a resident of that 
city until he reached the age of twenty. His early educational privileges were sup- 
plemented by a course in the Lawrence University' of Appleton, Wisconsin, where he 
was graduated as a member of the class of 1859. He left his native state in the spring 
of 1860, well qualified for life's practical and responsible duties, and with a strong 
will to succeed, sustained by the stimulating knowledge of having back of him an 
honorable ancestry, while his home training was such as developed admirable traits 
of character. His grandfather, Colonel James Maxwell, had been a pioneer of Wal- 




HON. JAMES P. MAXWELL 



116 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

■worth county, Wisconsin, had been chosen, to represent his district in the territorial 
legislature and had served with distinction as a colonel in the Wisconsin State Militia. 
His father, James A. Maxwell, was a merchant and landowner, who exerted consider- 
able influence in shaping public thought and action in Walworth and in Sauli counties 
of Wisconsin. In 1860 he removed westward to Colorado and engaged in the sawmill 
business at Boulder. He assisted in the construction of a wagon road known as the 
Boulder and Blackhawk road and operated it for several years. He was not only 
Identified with the material development of his locality but with its moral progress 
as well. He was one of the organizers of the Methodist Episcopal church at Boulder 
and continued as an active and helpful member and generous supporter thereof until 
his demise. 

James P. Maxwell was the eldest of a family of six children and was in his four- 
teenth year at the time of his mother's death. His youthful experiences were those of 
the farmbred boy but his ideas of life were broadened by contact with the world as 
he went out to further his education as a student in the I^awrence University at Ap- 
pleton. He pursued a classical course and won the Bachelor of Arts degree upon 
graduation with the class of 1859. In 1860 he joined his father in Omaha, Nebraska, 
and then traveled across the plains with horses to Denver, where he arrived on the 
10th of June after having spent six weeks en route. He made his way to Central City, 
afterward to Nevadaville and to Lump Gulch, where he became identified with placer 
mining. In the year of his arrival he was elected sheriff of the Gold Dirt District 
and occupied that position for one year, subsequent to which time his attention was 
given to lode-mining in Leavenworth Gulch. In 1863, however, he entered into part- 
nership with his brother-in-law. Captain C. M. Tyler, in the conduct of a lumberyard 
on South Boulder creek, where they erected a mill and manufactured lumber, for 
which they found a market in Central City, Blackhawk and Cheyenne. Mr. Maxwell 
also became the associate of his father in the operation of a sawmill at the mouth of 
Four Mile creek and in 1867 removed from South Boulder to Four Mile, but in 1870 
became a resident of Boulder. He was thus actively associated with the pioneer de- 
velopment of the section in which he lived, becoming identified with the initial busi- 
ness enterprises and taking an active interest in promoting progress along various 
lines. 

The personal worth and the marked business and executive ability of Mr. Max- 
well caused him to be selected at various times for important public positions. He 
served as deputy United States mineral and land surveyor through appointment of 
the United States surveyor general of Colorado and in later years has given much 
time to survey work of that character, thereby acquiring a very thorough knowledge 
of the geography and resources of the state. Having taken up his abode in Boulder, 
he was chosen in 1872 to represent his district in the territorial legislature and the 
value of his service in that connection was demonstrated in his reelection two years 
later. In 1876, following the admission of Colorado into the Union, he became a mem- 
per of the first state senate and served as president pro tern during the session o£ 
1879 and, according to a contemporary biographer, "presided over that body with dis- 
tinguished ability. He was thoroughly conversant with the rules and with parliamen- 
tary practice. His decisions were prompt, just and impartial, his bearing forceful, 
dignified and admirable and the general assembly from first to last has had no su- 
perior presiding officer." In 1878 Mr. Maxwell was elected mayor of Boulder and 
served as chief executive of the city until ISSO, when he resigned, after which he 
filled the office of county treasurer for two years. From 1882 until 1888 Mr. Maxwell 
engaged in government surveying in western Colorado and in the latter year was 
made state engineer under appointment of Governor Cooper and was continued in that 
position until 1893 by Governor Routt. In 1896 he was again elected to represent his 
district in the state senate and in the eleventh session was chosen president pro tem. 
Private business interests had occupied his attention in the interval prior to 1899, 
at which time he was appointed city engineer of Boulder and was regularly elected to 
the office in 1900. For about thirty years he continued active in surveying and min- 
ing engineering and in 1911 he entered the First National Bank of Boulder as a di- 
rector and vice president and in 1912 was elected to the presidency, which position 
he still fills. There are many tangible evidences of his public spirit, his devotion to 
duty and to the welfare of the state which may be cited. He assisted in obtaining 
an appropriation for the State University and while state engineer he had charge of 
irrigation, reservoirs, bridge building and roads throughout the state of Colorado. 

At different times Mr. Maxwell has directed his efforts into various fields. He 
has engaged quite extensively in the cattle business and he was president of the 
Silver Lake Ditch Company which in 1S8S began the construction of the highest 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 117 

irrigation ditch in the country from Boulder canyon. He was instrumental in hav- 
ing Silver lake stocked with fish and he became the president of the Steamboat 
Springs Company, which laid out Steamboat Springs in Routt county. He also laid out 
Maxwell's addition to Boulder, consisting of fifteen acres, and he became the owner 
of the Maxwell block in Boulder. 

On the 23d of January, 1S63, in Gilpin county, Colorado, Mr. Maxwell was united 
in marriage to Miss Francelia 0. Smith, a native of Wisconsin and a daughter of N. 
K. Smith, who came to Colorado in pioneer times and passed away in Boulder in 1S94. 
Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell became the parents of three sons and two daughters: Clint J.;' 
Mark N.: Helen F., who died in January, 1899, at the age of thirty years; Maria O., 
who became the wife of Charles R. Burger, who occupies the chair of mathematics 
in the School of Mines at Golden, Colorado; and Ray, who died in 1897 at the age of 
nineteen years. 

In politics Mr. Maxwell has always been a republican. Fraternally he is well 
known as a Mason, having taken the degrees of the Scottish Rite and he belongs to 
the Mystic Shrine. He was elected grand commander of the Colorado Grand Comman- 
dery of Knights Templar and various other official honors have been conferred upon 
him in his Masonic connections. He is likewise a member of the Denver Society and 
the American Society of Civil Engineers. His career has been one of eminent useful- 
ness and honor. None has ever questioned the integrity of his motives and seldom has 
the correctness of his position been doubted. He has labored earnestly and persis- 
tently for the right as he has seen it and his work in behalf of the state, its develop- 
ment, its upbuilding and its welfare, has been most earnest and effective. 



EDWARD J. MORELAND. 



Edward J. Moreland, who is engaged in ranching in El Paso county and is also the 
manager of the elevator at Peyton, was born December 30. 1S67, in Perry county, Indiana, 
a son of James H. and Martha Moreland. The father was a native of Ohio and removed 
with his family from Indiana to Olney, Richland county, Illinois, during the early boy- 
hood of Edward J. Moreland, who was there reared and educated. In 1885 the latter 
went to Kansas and for a short period engaged in freighting out of Garden City, Kansas. 
Afterward he was connected witli, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway Company, 
being employed as foreman of the track gang until the road was completed to Colorado 
Springs. He then took up his abode at Peyton, where he preempted one hundred and 
sixty acres of land and also took a timber claim of one hundred and sixty acres. Later 
he purchased other tracts, adding to his place from time to time until his landed posses- 
sions now aggregate fourteen hundred and forty acres. The ranch is devoted to general 
farming. He raises various crops best adapted to soil and climate and is also extensively 
engaged in raising stock, keeping from one hundred to one hundred and fifty head of 
cattle upon his place in the winter. In 1917 he raised five hundred and sixty bushels of 
beans on a forty acre lot, which is a record crop for dry farming. He is the president 
of The Peyton Farmers Cooperative Elevator Company and in this connection is also 
conducting a profitable and growing business. 

In his political views Mr. Moreland is a socialist. He is a highly respected citizen 
of Peyton, active and industrious and a recognized leader among the residents of that 
locality, his worth being acknowledged by all with whom he has come in contact. 



ELMER E. SCHLOSSER. 

Elmer E. Schlosser, attorney at law, was born in Chambersburg, Franklin county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1861, a son of Dr. Noah and Katherine (Maxwell) Schlosser, who were 
also natives of Franklin county, where four generations of the family had previously 
been represented. The ancestral record can be traced directly back to an early period 
in the seventeenth century. Dr. Noah Schlosser was a prominent member of the dental 
profession for many years. In early life, however, he was a minister of the Methodist 
Episcopal cliurch and during the period of the Civil war served as chaplain of his regi- 
ment. He afterward took up dentistry, which he followed in Denver from 1883 until the 
time of his death, which occurred in 1909, and throughout the entire period was accorded 
a liberal patronage, for his marked ability placed him in the front rank among the 
ablest members of the profession. His wife survived him for several years, passing away 



118 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

In Denver in 1914. Their family numbered five children: Dr. Frank G., Maxwell D., 
Elmer E., Mrs. A. D. White and Mrs. Henry W. Spangler, all of Denver. 

Elmer E. Schlosser was reared in the place of his nativity and in early life was a 
pupil in the public schools of Carlisle. Pennsylvania. Later he became a stenographer 
and telegraph operator at Elmira. New York, taking up the work at the age of eighteen 
years and continuing active in that line until liis removal to Denver on the 12th of 
April, 1883. Here he entered the law office of Pence & Pence, under whose direction he 
continued his reading until admitted to the bar in May, 1891. He has since engaged 
in active practice and by reason of individual merit and ability has steadily worked his 
way upward, being at times connected with much of the important litigation tried in 
the courts of his district. He is very careful and painstaking in the preparation of 
his cases, is strong and logical in argument and clear in his deductions. He belongs to 
the Denver City and County Bar Association and also to the Colorado Bar Association. 

On the 31st of January, 1S91, Mr. Schlosser was married in Denver to Miss Gertrude 
Ramey, who was born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas C. Ramey, representatives of a prominent old family of the Keystone state. 
Mr. and Mrs. Schlosser have become the parents of a daughter, DeRugh, who was 
graduated from the North Denver high school and is now the wife of F. E. Brainard. 
She was born in Denver in 1899. 

In his political views Mr. Schlosser has always been a republican since age con- 
ferred upon him the right of franchise but has never been an office seeker, preferring to 
concentrate his efforts and attention upon his professional interests, which have con- 
stantly grown and developed until he now has a large and distinctively representative 
clientage. His legal learning, his analytical mind, the readiness with which lie grasps 
the points of an argument, all serve to make him an able advocate and his ability is 
combined with an excellent presence, an earnest manner and marked strength of char- 
acter. 



CHRIS IRVING. 



Chris. Irving, prominent in the busy industrial life of Denver, having by honest 
dealing and thorough workmanship become a leading figure in the business life of 
the community, is now president of the Chris Irving Plumljing & Heating Company, 
which is the largest and oldest concern in this line of work in the state, having through 
the years of its existence executed many important contracts not only in Denver but 
throughout the west. 

The life story of Chris Irving is one of earnest endeavor crowned with substantial 
success. He was born in Scotland, May 9, 1860, a son of William and Margaret 
(Richardson) Irving, who were also natives of Scotland, where they spent their entire 
lives, the father passing away in 1869, while the mother died in 1870. There were 
three children born of this union, of whom Chris Irving is the only survivor. He 
was left an orphan at a tender age. His education was acquired in the schools of 
Glasgow, Scotland, but when a youth of only thirteen years he laid aside his text- 
books and went to work. He served an apprenticeship at the plumber's trade covering 
a term of six years and after having received his papers went to Edinburgh, Scotland, 
where he secured a position in his chosen vocation. Eighteen months later he went 
to London, England, where he worked at his trade for various prominent iirms through 
a period of ten years. While thus engaged he installed the plumbing and heating 
plants in many of the most prominent public and private buildings of the city and 
these are still doing service. 

In 1890 Mr. Irving decided to come to the United States and first located in New 
York city, where he remained for eight months. He then made his way westward 
to Denver and for two years was employed by various firms but in the meantime was 
watching for an opportunity to engage advantageously in business on his own account. 
He carefully saved his earnings until his economy and industry had brought to him 
sufficient capital to enable him to take the desired step, which was done in 1892. In 
many of the large buildings throughout Denver and the state he has installed the 
plumbing and heating systems, securing important contracts of this character while 
still alone in business and after the organization of the present Chris Irving Plumb- 
ing & Heating Company. His work is found in the new Denver Federal building and 
post office, also in the State Museum, the Colorado National Bank building and other 
of the large and fine structures of the city. One recent contract of the firm Involved 
the expenditure of more than two hundred thousand dollars for the plumbing and 




CHRIS IRVING 



120 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

heating system in tlie two million dollar Broadmoor Hotel of Colorado Springs. 
Their latest contract is for all the plumbing as well as the high pressure steam heat- 
ing in the Government Recuperation Camp buildings at Aurora. Colorado, and is the 
biggest job of the kind, calling forth the most expert knowledge, experienced manage- 
ment, punctilious execution and reliable workmanship with vast resources and exten- 
sive facilities, ever performed by a Colorado plumbing firm, and will cost approximately 
half a million of dollars. These and many hundreds of other buildings in which their 
work is found constitute the testimonial of the ability and prominence of the firm. Their 
work is of the highest possible standard and they are alive to every improvement in 
the trade and the methods of heating and plumbing installation. The business was 
incorporated in 1900 with Mr. Irving as the president, James Flockhart as vice presi- 
dent and Stephen J. Slattery as secretary. In addition to his connection with this 
important and growing business Mr. Irving is a director of the Merchants Bank. 

In 1898 Mr. Irving was married to Miss Annie C. Murray, of Denver. In politics 
he maintains an independent course and fraternally he is identified with high degree 
Masonry as a member of the various branches of the York Rite and the Mystic Shrine. 
He is also connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is a member 
of the Denver Civic and Commercial Association. His high standing along the line 
of his chosen vocation is indicated in the fact that he is a valued member of the 
Colorado Master Plumbers' Association and in 1913 and 1914 was president of the 
National Master Plumbers' Association. Unaided and alone he has worked his way 
upward, dependent upon his own resources from the age of thirteen years, careful 
analysis of his life history bringing to light the fact that industry has been the broad 
foundation upon which he has built his success. 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN WOODWARD. 

Colorado was fortunate in its pioneers — fortunate in having within its borders in its 
early days men who could apply to its development the resources of modern science. 
To this class belongs Benjamin Franklin Woodward, to whose skill and energy Colorado 
owes the speedy construction of telegraph lines which brought the news of the mo- 
ment to its doors, accelerated its trade and thoroughly modernized its communities. 

Benjamin F. Woodward was born in Newark, Ohio, June 25, 1834. His father, 
Thomas H. Woodward, was a plow manufacturer, who invented many improvements on 
the cast iron plow of that period. He was born in Massachusetts, where the family had 
been prominent since 1634 — not many years after the founding of Plymouth colony by 
the Pilgrims. The family of Thomas H. Woodward, which had early removed to Ohio, 
later settled in Rochester, New York, where Benjamin F. Woodward went to school until 
his thirteenth year. In 1847 the family removed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and 
there Benjamin F. Woodward soon obtained a position with the Atlantic & Ohio Tele- 
graph Company, which a little later was merged with the Western Union. At the age 
of eighteen he became the Pittsburgh office manager for that corporation. A remarkable 
capacity for administration soon brought the young man to the attention of men of 
large means and William McCutcheon, a wealthy wholesale grocer, offered him a co- 
partnership and unlimited capital to establish a mercantile business in the west. This 
offer he accepted, although but twenty-one years of age, and from 1856 until 1862 he 
conducted business at Fulton, Illinois. 

In that city Mr. Woodward was married in 1861 to Miss Helen S. Bassett, a daughter 
of Dr. William Bassett. Failing health compelled him to seek a milder climate and 
through the influence of General Thomas T. Eckert, who had never lost sight of his 
Pittsburgh protege, Mr. Woodward obtained the position of cipher operator at General 
Peck's headquarters at Suffolk, Virginia. There he remained until 1863, when he was 
made manager of the Denver office of the Pacific Telegraph Company, then building 
its line from Julesburg. Colorado, to Denver. In the latter city he began his great 
constructive work for the new west. He was not alone the Denver manager for the 
company but supervised the construction of the new telegraph line. On the 10th of 
October, 1863, he opened his office in Denver, using at first the pony express to carry 
and bring his messages from the daily changing terminals of the telegraph lines, until 
finally, when the wire was extended to Denver, the unique service by pony express 
was discontinued. 

In 1S65 the Pacific Telegraph Company became a part of the Western Union, with 
Mr. Woodward as manager. He had in those few years established a reputation for 
business capacity and sterling integrity so that the best and most progressive men in 




BENJAMIN F. WOODWARD 



122 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the community joined him when in the fall o£ 1867 he organized the United States 
and Mexico Telegraph Company. In this enterprise he was associated with such men 
as Henry M. Porter, William N. Byers, D, H. Moffat, F. Z. Salomon, L. B. Maxwell, 
John Dodd and E. Spiegelberg. They completed a line from Denver to Santa Fe, opening 
it for business in 1868. In the fall of that year Mr. Woodward and his associates 
constructed the line to Cheyenne. In 1875 he was induced by General Palmer to accept 
the important post of superintendent of the telegraph lines along the now rapidly extend- 
ing Denver & Rio Grande system. When he left that position it was to develop his 
real estate and other interests. He was one of the men who in the early days could 
vision the future of Denver and Colorado. In those pioneering periods it took courage 
to invest heavily in Denver really, but this Mr. Woodward did and thus laid the founda- 
tion for the fortune which came to him by reason of his early faith and foresight. 

Mr. Woodward was one of the most active members of the Central Presbyterian 
church. He was one of its earliest members, was prominent in effecting the consolida- 
tion of the old Seventeenth Street church with the Central. He was trustee for nearly 
the entire period of his membership, and for many years its president. When the 
present church edifice was erected he was one of the heaviest contributors. He was the 
founder of Riverside cemetery, now one of the most beautiful of the city's burial places. 
It is due largely to his initiative that the Young Men's Christian Association was made 
a great and influential institution in Denver. 

Benjamin F. Woodward was foremost in all that stood for civic progress, and his 
labors were most far reaching and resultant. He recognized clearly the value of any 
project or plan which he endorsed and he labored zealously for its adoption and success- 
ful promotion. His death, which occurred March 22. 1908, while he was making a tour 
of Mexico, was mourned by the entire community. He left one son, Frank L. Wood- 



ward, who is today one of the leaders in the professional and social life of the city and 
state. 



FRANK LINCOLN WOODWARD. 

Frank Lincoln Woodward, son of Benjamin F. Woodward, was born in Denver, 
June 16, 1866. As a child and man he stands as a type of that pioneering spirit which 
has made a great productive center of this foothill district. It is this that has made 
him a worthy successor to the giants of the early days, among whom his father was 
by no means the least. 

In the acquirement of his education Frank L. Woodward was graduated from the 
East Denver high school in the class of 1884. In 188S he was graduated from Yale 
University with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and in 1890 he left the Yale Law 
School with the degree of LL. B. He next entered the lav,- office of the firm of Benedict 
& Phelps in 1891, and the following year became connected with the law oflSce of 
Rogers, Cuthbert & Ellis. In 1900 he entered upon the practice of law independently 
and has since followed his profession with success, being classed among the prominent 
representatives of the Denver bar. His activities in other lines have attracted nation- 
wide attention. He has always been an enthusiastic golfer and early took the lead in 
making Denver the center of western golfing affairs. In 1896 he was a member of 
the first golf committee of the Denver Country Club. In 1901 he won the Colorado 
state golf championship at the Cheyenne Mountain Country Club, Colorado Springs. 

In January, 1913, the United States Golf Association elected him second vice presi- 
dent, in 1914 he was chosen first vice president and in 1915 became the president. In 
1912 it was largely through the efforts of Mr. Woodward that the Western Golf Associa- 
tion held its annual tournament in Denver. In that year he was elected president of 
the Trans-Mississippi Golf Association, and in 1914 he became president of the Western 
Golf Association. In 1909 he was elected president of the Denver Country Club, and 
has filled that office many times since — a tribute to his progressiveness, as the Country 
Club of Denver is a model institution of its kind. 

Mr. Woodward was the leading factor in bringing the Chicago Grand Opera Com- 
pany to Denver for its most successful season in the far west, and he performed the 
same service for the Boston Grand Opera Company in the following year. Since 1911 
he has been president of the Denver Symphony Orchestra Association, which is 
responsible for the yearly musical festivals so much appreciated by Denver lovers of 
the artistic in music. 

In 1913 he was elected secretary of the Denver Society of the Archaeological Insti- 
tute of America, serving in that capacity until 1916, when he was chosen president of 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 123 

the association, and still continues in that office. In 1913 he was elected president of 
the Denver Federation of Charity and Philanthropy, and Is still serving in that capacity, 
having been out of office but one year. In 1917 he was elected president of the Univer- 
sity Club of Denver, succeeding himself in 1918. He was secretary of the Colorado Yale 
Association in 1904, and elected president in 1905. 

For years he has been a life member of the American Red Cross, and during 
almost the entire period of his connection with that body served as a member of the 
executive committee of the Denver Chapter. 

He is a prominent member of the Denver Chamber of Commerce, and the Denver 
Civic and Commercial Association, serving on its art committee, its good roads com- 
mittee, its committee on Rocky Mountain National Park, and on other committees 
which have to do with the development work of the organization. In 1918 he was 
appointed by Mayor Mills as a member of the Denver water commission, which is in 
sole charge of the newly purchased water system. He was prominent in the organiza- 
tion of the Denver Morris Plan Company, a remedial and industrial loan organization 
the parent organization of which was the Industrial Finance Corporation of New York. 
He is a director of the Colorado Historical Society; and has for many years been a 
vestryman of St. Barnabas church, of which Rev. Charles Marshall is rector. 

When the country sent out its call for men to give their time and energy to 
various departments of public service Mr. Woodward was one of the first to respond 
among the famous dollar a year men. He is now deputy federal food administrator for 
the state of Colorado, and is giving most of his time to that service, and as such sat in 
the state council of defense organized by Governor Gunter. 

On the 10th of February, 1891, Mr. Woodward was married at New Haven, Connecti- 
cut, to Miss May Farnam, a daughter of Charles H. and Alice (Davies) Farnam. 



ALLAN F. WRIGHT. 



Allan F. Wright, who for more than four years has served as a member of the 
board of pardons in Colorado, makes his home in Denver and is well known as one of 
the conductors on the Colorado & Southern Railroad. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, 
on the 23d of April, 1873, a son of Malcolm and Elizabeth (McGlll) Wright, in whose 
family were five children: Melville; Edna, the wife of L. G. Kay; Stella; Stanley; and 
Allan F. 

The last named was but five years old when his parents came to Colorado, establish- 
ing their home in Denver. The father was a pioneer tanner here and followed that 
business to the time of his death, which occurred on the 25th of December, 1907. He is 
survived by his widow, who yet makes her home in Denver. Allan F. Wright pursued 
his education in the Villa Park school, one of the public schools of Denver, and when 
his textbooks were put aside started out in the business world as an employe of the 
Windsor Hotel. Later he entered the employ of the Colorado & Southern Railroad Com- 
pany, with which he has since been associated, and. advancing in that connection, he has 
for some time served as conductor. He is popular with the traveling public because he 
is courteous and obliging and he has made many friends among those who have occasion 
to travel over the road. 

Mr. Wright gives his political allegiance to no particular party. For 'more than 
four years he has been a member of the state board of pardons, in which connection he 
has done important work, giving much time to ihe duties of the board, and these duties 
he discharges with a marked sense of conscientious obligation. He belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias Lodge, No. 52, of Pueblo, Elks Lodge, No. 17, of Denver, to the Order 
of Railway Conductors, and also to the Railroad Young Men's Christian Association. He 
stands for all that is highest and best for the individual and for the community at large 
and is a man whose sterling worth and splendid characteristics have commanded for 
him the respect, confidence and goodwill of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



IRA THORNTON SHEPPARD. 



Ira Thornton Sheppard, who has extensive farming interests in Elbert county, was 
born in Jacksonville, Illinois, December 25, 1867, a son of William Stewart and Mary 
(McAllister) Sheppard. The paternal grandfather removed from Kentucky to Illinois. 
He was a Baptist minister and his son, William Stewart Sheppard, also devoted his life 



124 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

to the cause of the ministry. Both the Sheppard and McAllister families come of Scotch 
ancestry. 

Reared amid the refining influences of a cultured home, Ira T. Sheppard enjoyed 
the educational advantages accorded by schools in the vicinity of Jacksonville, Illinois. 
Through the period of his boyhood and youth he also became actively connected with 
farming and followed that pursuit in his native state for a time, after which he removed 
westward to Hutchinson, Kansas, where he engaged in the dairy business for eight years. 
On coming to Colorado in 1914 he purchased an entire section of land in Elbert county, 
which constitutes a part of his present holdings. Throughout the intervening period he 
has concentrated his efforts upon the development and improvement of his property and 
is the owner of one of the fine ranches in his section. 

On the 8th of October, 1890, at Lynnville, Illinois, Mr. Sheppard was united in 
marriage to Miss Percie Clyde Fisher. They have an interesting family of tour sons and 
a daughter: Glen C, who is now a lieutenant with the United States army at Camp 
Kearny; Guy Raymond, who is a corporal in active service in France; Fred Leroy, who 
also offered himself for enlistment but was rejected on account of physical disability; 
Ralph Benjamin, who is a student in the Colorado State Agricultural College at Fort 
Collins; and Mary Electa, twelve years of age. Mr. Sheppard and his family are widely 
and favorably known in Elbert county and he is regarded as a man of excellent business 
ability and of enterprising spirit, who capably directs his ranching interests and at the 
same time finds opportunity to cooperate in well defined plans and measures for up- 
building the county and advancing its civic interests. 



WILLIAM W. PORTER. 



William W. Porter, engaged in the real estate and investment business in Denver, 
was born in Monroe county, Missouri, November 30, 1850, and is descended from New 
England ancestry, while the line is traced back still farther to England. His father, 
the Rev. James Porter, was a native of Kentucky, in which state representatives of 
the family settled at an early period in its development. He became a minister of the 
Baptist church and devoted his entire life to that holy calling, his last days being 
passed in Monroe county, Missouri, where he departed this life in 1855, at the age of 
sixty-five years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Anna Walker, was a native 
of Virginia and belonged to one of the old families of that state of English lineage. 
To Rev. and Mrs. Porter were born eleven children, six sons and five daughters, two 
sisters and four brothers of William W. Porter still living. He was one of twins. 

William W. Porter acquired his early education in public schools and later he 
attended a college at Huntsville, Missouri, while subsequently he was graduated from 
Mount Pleasant College in 1871. He started out upon his business career on attaining 
his majority and throughout all the intervening period has devoted his attention and 
energies to the real estate business, which he followed in Moberly, Missouri, until 1882, 
in which year he removed to the west with Denver as his destination. He arrived in 
this city in November and immediately opened a real estate office. That he has pros- 
pered as the years have gone by is indicated in the fact that he has continued in this 
line in Denver for thirty-six years and has long been regarded as one of the foremost 
real estate dealers of the city. He has conducted an extensive business, negotiating 
many important property transfers, and there is no man more thoroughly informed 
concerning realty values in this section of the state. At one time he was a director 
of the People's Bank during the '90s. 

On the 8th of October, 1872, Mr. Porter was united in marriage to Miss Lucy B. 
Miller, a native of Missouri and a daughter of Dr. J. H. and Lucinda Miller, of Moberly, 
Missouri, her father being one of the old-time and prominent physicians of that place, 
a graduate of Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia. To Mr. and Mrs. Porter have 
been born three children: Miller B., who is associated with his father in the real 
estate business; George, deceased; and one who died in infancy. Miller B. Porter mar- 
ried Miss Bertha Bonsall and to them has been born a son, William W., named in honor 
of his grandfather. 

Politically Mr. Porter is a stalwart advocate of democratic principles, having 
always supported the party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He 
served for thirteen years as a member of the board of park commissioners. He did 
splendid service in that connection, contributing much to the improvement of the city 
through the development of its parks. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce 
and also of the Denver Real Estate Exchange, serving at one time as a director of the 




WILLIAM W. PORTER 



126 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

latter. His religious faith is that of the Baptist church and his life is guided by its 
teachings. He is a man of sterling worth whose life has measured up to high stand- 
ards, while his business career has been characterized by the utmost integrity. For 
thirty-six "years a resident of Denver, he is widely and favorably known in its 
circles and he also has marked characteristics which make for personal popularity. 



MRS. MARY JANE DANNEMAN. 

Mrs. Mary Jane Danneman is widely known as one of the capable business women 
and large landowners of Elbert county, her home being near Matheson. She was born in 
Missouri and in 1S79, the year after the Indians had been driven out of Elbert county, 
she took up her abode within its borders with her first husband, Sydney Housh. For a 
year thereafter she never saw a woman's face. It was her wisdom and knowledge of 
farming, however, that made the homestead a big paying proposition. She is a lady of 
superior education who has not only promoted her own knowledge through extensive 
reading and observation but has given her children the best educational opportunities 
afforded by the schools of the state. At the same time she has carefully managed her 
business affairs and made judicious Investments until her holdings have increased by 
purchase and she is now the owner of one of the largest and best equipped farms near 
Matheson. 

Ten years ago Mrs. Housh became the wife of Richard Danneman, a well known 
rancher, who has been an able aid to her in the development of her property. 

.By her first marriage Mrs. Danneman has three living children, Edna, Nellie and 
Robert, and the last named is now a member of the Aero Squadron at Chanute field. 
There were also two daughters who have passed away: Bertha, who married Walter E. 
Holt by whom she had two children. Bertha and Jack Holt, the former the wife of Norman 
H. Mcllhenney; and Anna, who in February, 1909, married Fay White and died August 
29. 1909, at the young age of nineteen. Mrs. Bertha Holt was married in 1895, and death 
called her on October 7, 1917. 

Mr. and Mrs. Danneman are among the most highly esteemed residents of Matheson, 
both enjoying the greatest respect of their neighbors, in whose affections they hold a 
firm place. 



REUBEN J. MORRIS. 



Reuben J. Morris, a prominent figure in mining, mercantile and banking circles, 
his close identification with all these interests contributing in substantial measure to 
the development of the state along those lines, is rated as one of the most progressive 
business men of Colorado, being president of the North Denver Bank, of the Goss- 
Morris Mercantile Company and of the Douglas Mountain Copper Mines Company. He 
was born in Quincy, Illinois, July 19, 1852, a son of Commodore Perry and Mary Eliza- 
beth (Perry) Morris, the former a native of Kentucky, while the latter was born in 
Alabama. Commodore Perry Morris on leaving his native state became a resident 
of Illinois and later was a pioneer settler of Kansas. He devoted his life to the 
occupation of farming and passed away in Gilpin county, Illinois, prior to the Civil 
war. His widow long survived him and died in Hamilton. Missouri, in 1906. 

Reuben J. Morris, the elder of their two children, attended the public schools of 
Illinois and after putting aside his textbooks and while still a boy in years he worked 
upon the home farm, being thus employed to the age of nineteen years, when he 
joined the United States army as a regular and was stationed at Nashville, Tennessee, 
until called with his company to suppress the riots at New Orleans, Louisiana, in 
which a number of people were killed. He was a member of Company P, of the 
Sixteenth United States Infantry, and after completing his five year term of enlist 
ment he received an honorable discharge. He then removed to northern Missouri 
where he operated a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits for two years. On 
selling that property he turned his attention to merchandising in Barton county, Mis- 
souri, where he remained for three years, after which he removed to Denver in 1891, 
While in Hamilton, Missouri, he had his first experience in the mercantile business, 
being for several years with the firm of Anderson Brothers, prominent merchants 
of that town. In Denver he secured a clerkship in the grocery store of J. W. Gilder- 
sleeve, with whom he remained for five years, and on the expiration of that period 



128 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

resigned his position to enter business on liis own account. In connection with C. F. 
Goss, he organized the Goss-Morris Mercantile Company and established business at 
No. 2900 West Twenty-fifth avenue, in North Denver. They started in a modest way 
but as the years have passed their business has grown to wonderful size and propor- 
tions. They started with a small stock of groceries, but later various departments 
were added, including a meat and vegetable department, which has developed into one 
of the extensive business interests of the kind. The next addition was a dry goods, 
clothing and shoe department and through this avenue the income of the firm has 
also been materially increased. At a later date Mr. Goss and Mr. Morris disposed of 
their grocery and meat departments in order to devote all of their time and attention 
to their dry goods and clothing trade, in which connection they have built up one of 
the largest business enterprises of the kind in North Denver, enjoying an extensive 
and well deserved patronage. They have closely studied the trade and have held to 
the highest standards in the personnel of the house, in the business methods followed 
and in the treatment rendered to patrons. Mr. Morris has also been very active in 
financial circles. He organized the North Denver Bank, the only banking institution 
in that section of the city, and from the beginning has remained its president. He was 
also one of the organizers and was elected a director and member of the advisory 
board of the Merchants Fire Insurance Company. He is the president of the Douglas 
Mountain Copper Mines Company, which owns six hundred and sixty acres of the 
richest copper bearing rock in that district. They own in Moffat county more than 
fourteen distinct claims and have four leased properties. At a recent date the com- 
pany has shipped to its properties on Douglas mountain. In the extreme western end 
of Moffat county, all material necessary for a reverberatory smelter capable of handling 
twenty tons of ore daily. This smelter was completed and ready for operation on the 
1st of December and is expected to yield a daily net profit of more than four hun- 
dred dollars. The company has more than three thousand tons of ore, averaging ten 
per cent copper, at the mouth of the shaft of its Bromide mine now ready for the 
smelter and about five thousand tons of fifteen per cent copper ore blocked out in the 
mine. This mine has three levels and a total of thirteen hundred feet of workings. 
It has recently been equipped with a complete set of mining machinery. Of the thirty- 
one copper properties owned by the company, seven have shipped ores better than 
fifteen per cent copper. Mr. Morris, as president of the company, is associated with 
Vachael C. Walters, who is secretary of the company, and Robert Pherson, an experi- 
enced copper mine operator, who is general manager. 

On the 14th of September, 1881, in Hamilton, Missouri, Mr. Morris was married 
to Miss Hattie Laura Goss, of that place. In politics he maintains an independent 
course, but his fellow townsmen, recognizing his worth and ability, elected him as 
senator to the nineteenth and twentieth general assemblies. He is ai member of the 
Civic and Commercial Association of Denver, also of the Merchants Association, 
and is a loyal representative of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. There is an 
old saying that "Nothing comes of nothing;" there must always be a basis for build- 
ing and in the case of Mr. Morris, while he did not have financial assistance or 
resources at the outset of his career, he did have various substantial qualities and 
characteristics that have constituted the foundation of his later progress and success. 
He had courage and he had energy. Moreover, he early recognized the fact that 
industry comes out victor and he determined to his own satisfaction that if success 
can not be had for the asking it will surrender to persistent and continued effort. 
Wherever opportunity has pointed the way he has been quick to see and utilize his 
advantages and, step by step, has proceeded along the path to the desired goal and 
today figures prominently in banking, commercial and mining circles. 



A. L. LOBAN. 



A. L. Loban, a highly respected agriculturist of El Paso county, is the owner of 
the Blu/f View farm, which is situated in the fertile and scenic Bijou Basin. Its pro- 
ductiveness has been greatly enhanced by the care and labor he has bestowed upon 
the fields, for in all his farm work he follows the most progressive methods. In its neat 
appearance the place indicates his close application and well directed energy and El 
Paso county numbers him among her representative ranchmen. He was born August 
20, 1865, in Delaware county, Iowa, a son of Andrew and Sophia (Greensleet) Loban, 
the former a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, and the mother of Warren, Washington 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 129 

county, Vermont. The paternal grandfather came to America in 1840 and was the 
founder of the family on the soil of the new world. 

A. L. Loban acquired a common school education in Iowa and for a number of years 
was engaged in the butter business at Webster City, at Randall and at Paullina, Iowa. 
He also carried on farming for a number of years in that state, where he remained 
until 1900, when he came to Colorado, settling at Boulder, where he was interested in 
mining and in the development of oil fields. In 1910 he removed to the Bijou Basin and 
purchased eight hundred and eighty-six acres of land, since which time he has success- 
fully engaged in farming with the exception of two years spent in Boulder, where he 
engaged in tungsten mining. He is the secretary and treasurer of the Wall Street Mine, 
located in the central mining district in Nugget Gulch, on what is known as Left Hand. 
At the same time he is a most progressive ranchman, having good buildings upon his 
place, all of which were erected by him. He has one hundred head of cattle and milks 
on an average of thirty-five cows, selling cream. 

In 1888 Mr. Loban was united in marriage to Miss Alice Caroline Tatham, of Carroll. 
Illinois, who passed away in 190.3. On the 7th of January, 1905, Mr. Loban wedded 
Adelyn Louise Tunnell, who was born in Illinois but was reared in Colorado. They have 
become parents of eight children: Elizabeth, Homer, Dorothy, Genevieve, Irene, Florence, 
Clyde and Edgar. The older ones are attending school. 

Mr. Loban is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, having connection with 
the lodge at Boulder, and his wife is identified with the Royal Neighbors. In politics 
he has always been a republican but is now giving earnest support, as are hundreds of 
others of the party, to President Wilson and the policy which he is pursuing in con- 
nection with the war. The family attend the Presbyterian church. They are highly 
esteemed people of the community, respected for their sterling worth, their many ex- 
cellent traits of character winning them high regard and warm friendship. 



HARRY C. STEPHENS. 



Among the younger bankers of Washington county, Colorado, is Harry C. Stephens, 
who as cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Otis represents important financial inter- 
ests. He was born in Osage county, Kansas, July 31, 1894, his parents being Preston and 
Leona (Slice) Stephens, natives of the Sunflower state. While in Kansas, Preston 
Stephens followed agricultural pursuits, remaining in that state until about twenty- 
eight years of age, when removal was made to the state of Washington. There he resided, 
however, for only nine months and in 1899 went to Yuma, Colorado, where he engaged 
in the general merchandise business, so continuing tor a number of years. He still 
makes his home in that city but is now connected with the furniture business, being 
quite successful in this line and enjoying the confidence and regard of his fellow citizens. 
His wife is also living. 

Harry C. Stephens was reared under the parental roof and received his education 
in Yuma, Colorado, and also in the district schools of Washington county. Having com- 
pleted his school work, he decided upon banking as a life work and in 1910 secured a 
position as clerk and bookkeeper in the First National Bank of Yuma. His inherent 
interest in the work, his close application and his naturally quick perception and 
undoubted ability led to his promotion to the position of assistant cashier, which ofiice 
he held seven years. In May, 1917, Mr. Stephens came to Otis, considering this a favor- 
able field for the establishment of a new bank. After looking over the ground carefully 
he decided upon the venture and with others organized the Farmers State Bank. The 
institution is capitalized for fifteen thousand dollars and the surplus is placed at seventy- 
five ^hundred dollars. Although it has been in existence merely two years, its deposits 
already amount to one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars. Thomas P. Rehder 
is president and Cloyd C. Fisch vice president. The bank is housed, in a thoroughly 
modern, fire and burglar proof building, which was especially erected for the purpose, 
and they have occupied the same since July 6. 1918. Besides being cashier Mr. Stephens 
is a director of the bank, the affairs of which are practically solely under his manage- 
ment. While he follows a conservative policy, protecting to the fullest extent depositors 
and stockholders, yet he is progressive and ever ready to render financial aid to those 
who desire loans from the institution in order to extend legitimate business interests 
of a mercantile or agricultural character. In his section he has become recognized as a 
financial authority and is often consulted upon matters of investment, as he is well 
informed in regard to stock and bond values and also as to real estate valuations. 

On the 14th of October, 1914, Mr. Stephens married Hazel B. Tribbett, daughter of 
Vol. rv— 9 



130 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Charles and Mary (Gashaw) Tribbett, the former being numbered among the honored 
pioneers of Yuma, where he follows agricultural pursuits. His wife passed away in 
1910. Mr. and Mrs. Stephens have one child, Dorothy Irene, whose birth occurred 
October 2, 1915. 

Mr. Stephens readily cooperates in all measures and movements undertaken in the 
interest of his community, in the growth of which he is deeply concerned. In his posi- 
tion as cashier of the bank he is not only acquiring individual fortune but in large 
measure contributes to the development of the town, and his work is therefore of great 
importance locally. Along political lines he is independent, supporting the candidates 
whom he considers best fitted for office, without being influenced by their party affilia- 
tions. His religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal church and fraternally he 
belongs to the Knights and Ladies of Security. Since coming to Otis he has made many 
friends in the town, for although he has been here but two years, it has taken his 
fellow citizens only a short time to recognize in him an able business man who is guided 
by the strictest and most honorable principles in the conduct of his affairs and who is 
public-spirited and holds friendship inviolable. 



OSEE WALLACE HOFFMAN, M. D. 

Specializing In the treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. Dr. Osee 
Wallace Hoffman has made for herself an enviable name and place in professional circles 
in Denver. She is accorded high rank and standing by her colleagues in the field of 
medicine and surgery and her ability is recognized by an extensive clientage. Dr. Hoff- 
man is a native of Greene county, Pennsylvania, where her ancestors have lived through 
several generations. She is descended from the Mason-Taylor and Jewell families of 
Virginia and Pennsylvania, all of whom were prominent in Colonial and Revolutionary 
days. Her grandfather, Peter Fry, on the maternal side, was a captain in the War of 
1812 and many of her ancestors figure on the pages of American history, and patriotism, 
progressiveness and loyalty have ever been numbered among their marked characteris- 
tics. While unable to do much active work herself, in our recent conflict, she has done 
her bit and members of her family, following in the footsteps of their ancestors, have 
given their lives on the field of battle for their country. Her only first cousin is in 
active service at the head of a nurses' division in France. 

Dr. Hoffman graduated from the Washington Female Seminary of Pennsylvania, 
afterwards entering the Laura Memorial Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio. After 
completing her medical course she took special clinical work in eye, ear, nose and throat 
treatment under the most eminent men of that city and entered upon active practice in 
Denver in 1900, where she limited her practice to this special work, becoming the woman 
pioneer in the west in this field, and has won for herself a very favorable position in 
professional circles of this city. Recognition of her work came to her by her appoint- 
ment to the position of assistant clinical professor in the eye and ear department of 
Denver Gross Medical College, which position she filled six years. 

Dr. Hoffman belongs to the American Medical Association, the Colorado State Medi- 
cal Society and the Medical Society of the City and County of Denver. She is a member 
of the Young Ladies' Clio Club, the Medical Women's War Service League, the Red Cross 
and similar organizations. Her religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. She 
works in all the hospitals of Denver and her labors have been of great value to mankind. 



AUGUST H. BEUCK. 



August H. Beuck, owner of one of Colorado's largest ranches, was born in Kiel, 
Holsteia, May 24, 1854, a son of Henry Beuck, a farmer of that section, which at that 
time belonged to Denmark. He spent the first fourteen years of his life in his native 
country and then came to America, settling in Davenport, Iowa. He there remained 
for about two years and in 1870 came to Colorado and soon became interested in the 
fine opportunities for cattle raising in Elbert county, making his start in the business 
in 1874. By 1876 he had purchased a preemption and proved up on one hundred and 
sixty acres of land on the East Bijou in Elbert county. He began raising shorthorns 
and Durham cattle and by 1885 had nearly a thousand head of fine stock of those 
breeds. August H. Beucli was one of the first cattle owners in the west to experiment 
with Pasteur's vaccine for the extermination of blackleg. He has always followed the 




AUGUST H. BEUCK 



132 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

most progressive methods in the care of his stock and the development of his herds. 
and his opinions are largely accepted as authority upon stock raising in his section 
of the state. 

In Central City, Colorado, Mr. Beuck was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Miller 
and they have become the parents of two sons, Frederick and Henry Beuck, who now 
own and operate the two big ranches in the vicinity of the town of Buick, a station on 
the Union Pacific, which was named in honor of the subject of this review. By mistake 
the department called it Buick, but steps are now being taken to restore the name to the 
intended form of Beuck. 

The sons are reputed to be among the most progressive, alert and energetic young 
farmers of Elbert county. There is nothing of a modern nature found in the equipment 
of the finest farms of the present day that is not to be seen upon their places. The 
parents sent the two sons to the Denver schools, where they obtained liberal educa- 
tional advantages which have assisted in making them leaders in their line of business 
in the county. Henry Otto Beuck, who was born near Agate, March 10, 1883. was 
married in Denver on the 20th of March, 1912, to Miss Jennie Matheson, a daughter of 
the founder of the town of Matheson. They have become parents of two children, 
Janet Rose and Henry Duncan. 

In his political views August H. Beuck has always been a republican and in 1889 
he was elected to the office of county commissioner, in which position he served con- 
tinuously until 1896, making a most creditable record in oflSce. as is indicated by his 
reelections. He is ever loyal to the best interests of the community in which he 
and he and his sons have made the name of Beuck an honored one in their locality. 



JOHN A. McGUIRE. 



John A. McGuire, president of the Outdoor Life Publishing Company and also of 
the McGuire Printing Company, with office at No. 1824 Curtis street in Denver, was 
born in Polk county, Iowa, near Des Moines, April 20, 1S69. His father, the late 
Michael McGuire, was a native of Ireland and came alone to America in 1S48, when 
sixteen years of age. He immediately took up his abode near Ottumwa, Iowa, where 
he was employed at farm labor, and subsequently he removed to Polk county, Iowa, 
where he purchased land and engaged in farming until 1881. He then came to Colo- 
rado, settling in Denver, at which time he was a traveling representative of John 
McConville & Company. For this firm he traveled throughout the central western and 
Rocky Mountain states and continued with the house until he reached the age of 
sixty years, when he retired from active business and made his home in Denver until 
his death, which occurred in June, 1910, when he was seventy years of age. During 
the period of the Civil war he was traveling in the south and on several occasions 
was arrested by Confederate soldiers on the supposition that he was a spy. He man- 
aged, however, to clear himself of the imputation but had considerable trouble. His 
religious faith was that of the Roman Catholic church. He wedded Mary McGonigle, 
also a native of Ireland, born in 1S45 in Donegal, which was also the birthplace of 
her husband. She came to America with her widowed mother, who brought with her 
four children. They settled near Ottumwa, Iowa, and it was there that she met and 
married Mr. McGuire. She became the mother of seven children, six of whom are 
living. In May. 1883, she removed to Colorado and is still a resident of Denver. 

John A. McGuire, the eldest of his parents' family, was educated in the public 
schools of Des Moines, Iowa, to the age of thirteen years, when his textbooks were 
put aside and he entered upon an apprenticeship to the printer's trade with a farm 
journal called The Homestead, which is still in existence and is today one of the lead- 
ing agricultural papers of the country. He was associated therewith for a year, at 
the end of which time his family removed to Denver, and he afterwards completed his 
trade with the Denver Inter-Ocean, a weekly paper. In 1887, when he was eighteen 
years of age, he became associated with a monthly journal called Sports Afield, which 
was the first sporting monthly established in the United States. He was connected 
with that paper for five years and his second position was that of foreman of the 
printing department, his first position having been that of editor of the cycling depart- 
ment, at which time cycling was a very popular sport in America, and Mr. McGuire 
became an expert rider, taking part in many racing contests. When he became chief 
consul of the Colorado division he headed a committee of four who attended the national 
convention of the League of American Wheelmen at Louisville, Kentucky, where they 
secured the national meet for the following year. The meet was accordingly held in 



134 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Denver in 1894 and on that occasion Mr. McGuire was one of the contestants, but on 
the second day of the contest met with an accident which caused him to withdraw. 
However, he won in various contests on other occasions in both local and state meets 
and was regarded as one of the best riders in the west. In January, 1893, Mr. McGuire 
founded the Cycling West, a paper which he published successfully tor five years, at 
the end of which time he sold the plant, which was afterward utilized for the publica- 
tion of an automobile journal. In 1898, in connection with J. A. Ricker, he established 
and published the first issue of Outdoor Life. The partnership continued for. seven 
years, at the end of which time Mr. McGuire purchased Mr. Ricker's interests and 
since that time has been sole owner of this paper, which is one of the most interesting 
sportsmen's magazines published. It has among its writers some of the best known 
sportsmen of the country, treating of all kinds of sports with rod and gun, and every- 
thing that is of interest to the fisherman and the huntsman. Since taking up the 
publication of this magazine Mr. McGuire has won substantial success. He has made 
the publication one of great interest to a wide circle of readers who are found through- 
out the entire country. 

Mr. McGuire has been married twice, first on Thanksgiving evening of 1896. 
Through this union he became the father of two children, Gertrude and Harry, aged 
respectively twenty and fifteen years. Both were born in Denver. On the 31st of 
July, 1909, Mr. McGuire was married in Denver to Miss Lena Pearl Carper, a daughter 
of J. P. and Virginia (Hamilton) Carper, who were pioneer settlers of Denver. To 
this marriage has been born a daughter, Virginia, whose birth occurred in Denver, 
March 28. 1911. The family residence is at No. 500 Franklin street, Denver, and the 
property is owned by Mr. McGuire. 

In his political views Mr. McGuire is independent. In 1898 he was a candidate 
for the state legislature on the republican ticket but was defeated. He belongs to 
the Denver Civic and Commercial Club and is interested in all of the plans and projects 
put forth for the upbuilding of the city. He belongs also to the Mountain Club and 
to all local shooting clubs and he is a member of St. Philomena's Roman Catholic 
church. He finds his chief diversion in hunting large game in Alaska, Canada. Mexico 
and the western part of the United States and has many splendid mounted trophies. 
He is considered an authority on the fauna of the Rocky Mountain region, especially 
as to grizzly bears, and he gave to the Museum of Natural History at City Park in 
Denver probably the finest group of grizzly specimens in the world. His friends speak 
of him as a man of unusually fine personality, of tenacity and clear thinking powers, 
who is careful and conservative, very upright and honorable. They mention him, too, 
as a gentleman in every way — one who has built up a very successful business by 
observance of strict business ethics and also by reason of his genial personality. 



WILLIAM KUMMER. 



William Kumnier resides near Lakewood, just outside of Denver, where he has five 
acres of land. Here he is largely living retired, having in previous years followed the 
barbering business. He was born in Rheinsberg, Germany, March 14, 1856, a son of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Kummer. The father died when his son William was but four weeks 
old and the mother passed away when our subject was but a year and a half old, 
so that he knows little concerning his parents. His rearing was in charge of the town 
until he was fourteen years of age. He then went to Berlin, where he learned the barber- 
ing business and for four years he conducted a shop of his own in that city. He left there 
on the 28th of December, 1883, thinking to have better business opportunities in the new 
world than he could secure in that land. He arrived in New York on the 21st of January, 
1884, and for two years worked at his trade. He also conducted a shop of his own for 
two years in New York and was proprietor of a barber shop in Brooklyn from 1887 until 
1890, having five chairs in his shop. In November of the latter year, however, he started 
for the west with Denver as his destination, reaching this city on the 7th of December. 
He then opened a shop at No. 1464 South Tenth street, where he remained until 1893, 
when he removed to No. 1422 West Colfax avenue, there purchasing a house and building 
a shop in front in which he had three chairs. He remained in the barbering business 
there until 1907, when he purchased five acres of land in Lakewood and opened a country 
grocery store. This he conducted tor three years and during two years of that time 
was also exchange manager for the Lakewood branch of the telephone company. On the 
expiration of that period he erected a new residence on his five-acre tract and returned 
to the barbering business, which he conducted in the Western Hotel for five years. At 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 135 

the end of that time he retired and is now occupied with looking after the development 
and cultivation of his five acres. 

Mr. Kummer was married in Berlin, on the 21st of May, 1S80, to Miss Bertha Lehnert 
and they have a son, Ernest William, who was born in Denver and is now a mechanic 
with the Packard Company of that city. He is of a very studious nature, possesses an 
inventive turn of mind and is a young man of whom the parents have every reason to 
be proud. He applies himself closely to his business and puts forth every effort to ad- 
vance along that line. 

Mr. Kummer gives his political allegiance to the republican party, which he has 
supported since becoming a naturalized American citizen. He belongs to the Woodmen 
of the World and also to Harmony Lodge, No. 61, A. F. & A. M., being a loyal follower 
of the craft. 



HERBERT SHAW DeSOLLAR. 

Herbert Shaw DeSollar needs no introduction to the representative business and 
banking fraternity of Colorado. However, a few facts of his life story may prove of 
interest. He was born in Beardstown, Cass county, Illinois, July 26, 1855. His parents, 
Henry Brown and Jane (Cook) DeSollar, came to America from England in early life, 
locating in Beardstown, Illinois. His father conducted under the name of The DeSollar 
Carriage & Wagon Manufacturing Company the largest establishment of its kind in 
central Illinois. 

Herbert Shaw DeSollar was one of four children. At the age of seventeen he took 
up the profession of teaching, which he followed for four years. Later he graduated with 
high honors from the Gem City Business College at Quincy, Illinois, and was 
acknowledged to be one of the finest penmen in the United States. Mr. DeSollar after- 
wards engaged in commercial college work and established a chain of business colleges 
in various cities in the central states. This work finally brought him to Denver in 1888, 
when he founded the Central Business College. The success of this institution needs no 
comment, as hundreds of Colorado's leading young business men and bankers are its 
graduates. In 1906 he retired from commercial college work and since then has devoted 
most of his time to the real estate and investment business. His activities reached a 
climax when he successfully concluded two real estate transactions which entailed two 
of the highest commissions ever paid in Denver. 

On July 26, 1885, Mr. DeSollar was married to Miss Hattie May Le Brun, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Julian Albert Le Brun, of Chicago, Illinois. Their only child, Hattie 
Jeannette DeSollar, now the wife of Horace H. Brooks, was born in Denver. She acquired 
her education in the Wolcott School for Girls and later at the Girls' Collegiate School of 
Los Angeles. California. 

In politics, Mr. DeSollar maintains an independent course. He belongs to different 
organizations of the city and is a prominent Mason. 



EVAN THOMAS EVANS. 



Evan Thomas Evans, whose landed possessions in Elbert county are most extensive, 
was born at Pen y Groyes, Wales, in June, 1859, his parents being Thomas and Mary 
Evans. On leaving the little rock-ribbed country of Wales they crossed the Atlantic 
to the Holland Patent in New York, our subject being at that time a youth of fourteen 
years. Within a brief period the family removed westward to Red Oak, Iowa, and 
there Evan T. Evans successfully followed farming until 1903, when he removed to 
Elbert county, settling on his present large ranch. The removal was made on account 
of the health of one of his children. 

It was in 18S6 that Mr. Evans was united in marriage in Plainfield, New York, to 
Miss Eleanor Perry and they became the parents of six children, Roy, Mamie, Lillie, 
Gilbert, Elsie and Perry. The youngest is now at Camp Fremont, California, being a 
private in an infantry regiment. 

As the years have passed Mr. Evans has concentrated his efforts and attention upon 
his farming interests, adding to his possessions as his financial resources have increased 
until he is now the owner of eighteen hundred acres of the richest land in Elbert 
county, situated on the outskirts of the town of Elizabeth. He still owns the three 
eighty acre tracts that he farmed in Iowa and he is reputed to be the most prosperous 




MR. AND MRS. EVAN T. EVANS 






EVAN T. EVANS' RANCH 



138 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

farmer of Elbert county. His methods have at all times been practical and progres- 
sive and the neat and thrifty appearance of his places is an indication of his undaunted 
spirit and his thorough familiarity with the most advanced ideas of modern agriculture. 
Mr. Evans is a member of the Presbyterian church and takes a deep interest in 
its affairs. He has been an elder for the past fifteen years, has served as a director 
on the school board for fifteen years, and is secretary of the Elizabeth high school, 
doing everything in his power to promote moral and mental growth and extend edu- 
cational influence. His aid is always given on the side of progress and improvement 
and his cooperation can be counted upon to further any movement for the general 
good. 



WILLIAM RAYMOND SANDERSON, M. D. 

Dr. William Raymond Sanderson, who in young manhood qualified for the practice 
of medicine and for many years has been identified with cattle raising in Colorado, 
making his home at the present time near Kuhns Crossing, was born in December, 1857, 
near Druid Hill Park in Maryland. His father was Thomas Sanderson, whose father 
removed from Lancaster, Pennsylvania, to Frederick, Maryland, where Thomas Sander- 
son was born. Representatives of the family in the fifth generation are now living upon 
a part of the old family homestead in the east. 

William Raymond Sanderson was educated in the famous Lawrenceville, New Jer- 
sey, school under the celebrated teacher. Dr. Samuel M. Hamill. In preparation for a pro- 
fessional career he entered the University of Maryland at Baltimore and after complet- 
ing his course was for a time one of the resident physicians of the Baltimore City Alms- 
house. He came to the west in 18S2 and associated himself with his brother, John P. 
Sanderson, in the live stock business. 

In the '80s, when Dr. Sanderson removed to Elbert county and engaged in the cattle 
business, it was followed by such leading men of the state as Governor Routt, Governor 
J. A. Cooper, Finis P. Ernest, W. H. H. Cranmer and Dewey C. Bailey. Dr. Sanderson 
purchased his first herd of cattle from the late Senator Frank T. Cochrane. Through- 
out all the intervening years Dr. Sanderson has been engaged in the cattle industry. 

Dr. Sanderson was for a time coroner of Elbert county, which is the only public 
office that he has ever held. Notwithstanding his desire to keep out of office, he has 
been a potent factor in promoting public progress and improvement through his support 
and endorsement of every measure for the general good. He believes that public office 
is a sacred trust and strongly advocates enfranchisement of women. His brother's son, 
John P. Sanderson, Jr., is a first lieutenant in France, where he was heroically fighting 
for the democratization of the world. 



RUSSELL HARRIS FORBES. 

Russell Harris Forbes, confidential secretary to Verner Z. Reed, a Denver capitalist, 
with offices in the city of Denver, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, December 12, 1885. The 
family comes of Scotch ancestry and was founded in America by the grandfather of 
Russell H. Forbes, who on crossing the Atlantic in 1837 took up his abode in Ashland 
county, Ohio. The Forbes family has been represented in the Buckeye state from 
pioneer times. Henry William Forbes, father of Russell H. Forbes, was born in 
Cleveland, Ohio, and was a son of Alexander Forbes, who at the time of the discovery 
of gold in California crossed the plains to the Pacific coast in 1849 and was there 
engaged in mining. In Cleveland he became a pioneer contractor and builder and con- 
tinued to make his home in that city until his death, which occurred in 1914, when he 
had reached the advanced age of ninety years. His son, Henry William Forbes, followed 
mercantile pursuits first in Cleveland and afterward in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and 
in Chicago, Illinois, his death occurring in 1901, at the early age of forty-five years. 
In young manhood he had wedded Miss Anna M. Schermerhorn, a native of Albany, 
New York, and a descendant of one of the old families of the Empire state — a family 
coming of Dutch ancestry. The line is traced directly back to the early seventeenth 
century and after the emigration to the new world members of the family took active 
part in the work of colonization and participated in the Revolutionary war, and Mrs. 
Forbes is now connected with the Daughters of the American Revolution. She still 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 139 

makes her home in Cleveland. To Mr. and Mrs. Forbes were born two children, the 
daughter being Myrtle H., now the wife of Chester T. Brackett, a journalist of Cleveland. 

Russell H. Forbes, the only son in the family, pursued his education largely in the 
public schools of Oak Park, a Chicago suburb, and in the University of Wisconsin. At 
the age of eighteen years he took up the profession of civil engineering and in 1904 
removed to the west, going first to New Mexico. He followed civil engineering in 
connection with the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad and afterward came to 
Denver, where he arrived on the 1st of May, 1906. He immediately entered upon pro- 
fessional activity in this state and continued exclusively in that field of labor until 
1912, when he started to practice his profession independently. But hard times came 
on and general business conditions were poor, so that he abandoned his oflice and 
became an engineer for railroads and mining companies. He next took up journalism 
and from 1912 until 1914 was a reporter on the Denver Post. While engaged in news- 
paper work he was a strong advocatei of the good roads movement in Colorado and 
spent considerable time and effort in the early development of public opinion along that 
line and the projects connected with the improvement of the thoroughfares, instituting 
much work that has since accomplished splendid results. In 1914 Mr. Forbes became 
connected with Verner Z. Reed, taking charge of a campaign which Mr. Reed organized 
and financed to improve market conditions for the fruit growers of the state and which 
was continued until 1915. On the 1st of January, 1916. Mr. Forbes entered Mr. Reed's 
oflice as assistant secretary and three months later was made his confidential secretary, 
which position he has since filled. He is also a director of the Mid-West Oil Company 
and a member of other corporations of which Mr. Reed is the principal stockholder. 

On the 2d of February, 1910, Mr. Forbes was united in marriage in Denver to Miss 
Rose R. Lowrie. a native of Nashville, Tennessee, and a daughter of Harold W. and 
Rosa (Redford) Lowrie, who are representatives of old Carolina and Tennessee families. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Forbes have been born four children: Elizabeth A., born in Denver, 
April 7, 1912; Robert H.. August 22, 1913; Rose Myrtle, June 20, 1916; and Margery, 
July 30. 191S. • 

In politics Mr. Forbes maintains an independent course. In 1917 he was appointed 
on the commission of conciliation by the United States department of labor, being one 
of the dollar a year men in maintaining conditions which contribute much to the 
successful prosecution of the war. Mr. Forbes is a member of St. Mark's Episcopal 
church and his chief diversion comes through hunting, fishing and motoring. He is a 
lover of all phases of outdoor life and when leisure permits spends his time in that way. 
Merit and ability have brought him prominently to the front in business connections 
and his worth is widely acknowledged by those with whom he has been brought in 
contact. His vision is broad, his sagacity keen and his judgment sound. 



FRANK PURSE. 



Frank Purse, engaged in the dairy business on Rose Hill at Aurora, selling only 
to the wholesale trade, was born at Grey Abbey, in County Down, Ireland, a son of 
John and Jane (Lemon) Purse. His education was acquired in his native country 
and he came to the United States when about seventeen years of age. thinking to have 
better business opportunities in the new world. He arrived in Denver about 18S5 and 
not long afterward entered the dairy business in what was then Arapahoe but is new 
Adams county. He remained there for a few years and subsequently purchased fifteen 
acres on Rose Hill, where he continued in the dairy business, in which he has since 
been engaged. He is one of the well known dairymen of this section of the state and 
has conducted his interests along progressive, modern and scientific lines. He retailed 
milk about fifteen years but now sells only to the wholesale trade. He has a well 
equipped dairy, thoroughly neat and sanitary in every department, and he keeps cows 
of high grade. 

On the 21st of March, 1900, Mr. Purse was married to Miss Mabel McDonald, a 
daughter of Asa B. and Nancy J. (Dillon) McDonald. The father was a contractor 
of prominence in his chosen line of business and was the builder of the Adams county 
courthouse, the Arapahoe county courthouse and the residences of John F. Campion, 
J. S. Brown, C. S. Morey and a number of the palatial homes of the more prominent 
people of this section of the state. Mrs. Purse was born and reared in Cleveland, Ohio, 
and by her marriage has become the mother of a daughter, Elizabeth Frances Jane. 

Fraternally Mr. Purse is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America. In 
politics he is a republican and regards it as the duty as well as the privilege of every 



140 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

true American citizen to exercise his right of franchise in support of the 
which he believes. He served for four years as county commissioner of Adams county 
and made an excellent record by his fidelity to the trust reposed in him. He is always 
loyal to the best interests and to everything that has to do with the welfare and 
progress of his district. His business career has been a most active one and his close 
application and Indefatigable energy have been strong points in the attainment of that 
measure of prosperity which he is now enjoying. 



A. H. FRERICHS. 



A. H. Frerichs, cashier of the Stockmen's National Bank of Brush, Colorado, was 
born in Talmage, Nebraska, in November, 1886, a son of Theodore and Mary (Teten) 
Frerichs, who were pioneers of Otoe county, Nebraska, to which place they removed 
about 1878. The father is a banker there and has devoted his entire life to the banking 
business, his present connection being that of cashier of the Bank of Talmage, and 
he is also the president of the Stockmen's National Bank of Brush. He has had much 
to do with the commercial and financial upbuilding and development of the section 
of the state in which he lives and his energy has brought substantial results. His 
wife passed away in April, 1908. 

A. H. Frerichs was reared in Talmage, Nebraska, pursuing his education in the 
schools of that place and of Omaha. His connection with Brush dates from 1907, 
when he came to Morgan county to accept the position of assistant cashier of the 
Stockmen's National Bank. A few years later he and his father purchased the con- 
trolling interest In this bank and in 1911 A. H. Frerichs was made cashier. This bank 
is capitalized for thirty-five thousand dollars and has a surplus and undivided profits of 
twenty-five thousand dollars, while its deposits have reached four hundred thousand 
dollars. The bank is in excellent condit^ and its business is steadily growing. 
In 1908 the Stockmen's National Bank erected a modern bank and office building on the 
main street of the town. 

Mr. Frerichs was married in October. 1908, to Miss Blanche Puffer and to them 
has been born a daughter, Dorothy D.. whose birth occurred in August, 1909. In 
religious faith Mr. and Mrs. Frerichs are Presbyterians, loyally supporting the church 
in all of its branches of work and contributing liberally to its support. Fraternally 
Mr. Frerichs is connected with Lodge No. 1143, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and 
his political allegiance is given to the republican party, which finds in him a stalwart ad- 
vocate. He is the present mayor of Brush and his administration is marked by notable 
devotion to the public welfare, with practical methods for the achievement of his pur- 
poses. Moreover, Mr. Frerichs is actively engaged In war service work, ably assisting 
in promoting all measures of the government in order to make the world safe for 
democracy and is now serving as member of the Morgan County Council of Defense and 
as vice chairman of the local Red Cross organization. 



ELLIS HUNTSMAN. 



Ellis Huntsman, actively, successfully and extensively engaged in farming in Elbert 
county, was born in Noble county, Indiana, March 27. 1885, a son of Riley and Sarah 
(Belli Huntsman, both of whom are representatives of old colonial families. They 
are now residents of Colorado Springs and Mr. Huntsman of this review puts forth 
every effort to make them comfortable and happy in their declining years, thus repaying 
them by filial devotion for the love and care with which they surrounded him in his 
youth. 

Ellis Huntsman was educated in the public schools to the age of sixteen years, and 
accompanied his parents to Colorado, arriving in this state in 1898. The family home 
was established in Elbert county, in what is generally known as the Divide district, 
and since that time -the members of the family have been substantial citizens of this 
state. His brother, L. E. Huntsman, has one hundred and sixty acres adjoining the 
property of Ellis. He is married and has a pleasant home on the Divide. Another 
brother is the head of the H. C. Huntsman Mercantile Company at Matheson. Colorado, 
and a sister is the wife of O. S. Keysor, a large land holder of this district. 

Ellis Huntsman is devoting his time and energies to the development of what is one 
of the best farms of the county, comprising five hundred and twenty acres. This he has 




A. H. FRERICHS 



142 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

acquired and converted into a valuable property, employing the most modern and pro- 
gressive methods in the cultivation of the fields, while all modem improvements are 
found upon the place. An air of neatness and thrift pervades the farm and gives indica- 
tion of the practical efforts of the owner. 



GEORGE A. MITZE. 



George A. Mitze, a farmer and stock raiser successfully carrying on business in 
Adams county, Colorado, was born in Kansas on the 29th of November, 1873. His 
parents, George and Elizabeth Mitze, were natives of Germany, who came to America 
in the '50s, at which time they located in Peoria, Illinois. They afterward removed 
to Kansas, where they resided until 1874 and then came to Colorado, settling on a 
farm in Denver county, where they spent their remaining days. They had a family 
of five children, three of whom are living. 

George A. Mitze was reared and educated in Colorado, pursuing his studies in the 
public schools. After his textbooks were put aside he took up farming on his own 
account, having been reared to that occupation, so that he brought practical experience 
and knowledge to the beginning of his business career. After a time he purchased his 
present farm, comprising one hundred and ninety-five acres of good land, a part of 
which is under ditch. He has improved his place with one of the finest homea in 
the county and upon his land are found large and substantial barns and outbuildings, 
furnishing ample shelter to grain and stock. Everything about the place is indica- 
tive of his progressive spirit and practical methods and the results which he achieves 
are most gratifying. 

In 1900 Mr. Mitze was united in marriage ta Miss Mary Bukoutz, a native of 
Kansas, and to them have been born six children: Mary E., Albert H., Bertha H., 
William A., Emma C. and Clara Alice. Mr. and Mrs. Mitze are members of the 
Lutheran church, and he gives his political allegiance to the republican party. They 
are highly esteemed in the community in which they make their home and enjoy 
the warm-hearted hospitality which is cordially extended to them by their many 
friends. Mr. Mitze has devoted his entire life to agricultural pursuits and is num- 
bered among those who have made this district a most productive and prosperous one. 



CHARLES HOEFFER. 



Charles Hoeffer, a resident farmer of Adams county and proprietor of the Alpine 
Creamery of Denver, was born in Germany, October 28, 1859, a son of John Hemry 
and Mary (Dick) Hoeffer, who were natives of that country, where they spent their 
entire lives and there reared their family of thirteen children, seven of whom are 
living. John Henry Hoeffer was for fifty years a teacher in Germany, his home being 
at Birk, in the government district of Siegburg on the Rhine. 

Charles Hoeffer spent the days of his boyhood and youth in Germany, where he 
attended public school. He came to America in 1878, when a youth of nineteen years, 
and first settled in Tipton, Missouri, where he remained for two years. He then came 
to Georgetown, Colorado, where he engaged in mining, and in 1881 he purchased the 
farm in Adams county upon which he now resides. Taking up his abode upon this 
place, he bent his energies to its development and cultivation and has lived thereon 
throughout the intervening period save for six years when he was a resident of Denver, 
during which time he conducted a meat market in that city. Tiring, however, of city 
life, he returned to the farm and has since given his efforts and attention to its man- 
agement, while he is also operating the Alpine Creamery of Denver, of which he is 
the owner and from which source he derives a very gratifying revenue. 

In the year 1883 Mr. Hoeffer was married to Miss Katherine Summerhauser, a 
native of Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Hoeffer became the parents of four children: Kath- 
erine, who is conducting a hotel at Limon, Colorado; Mary, ia business in Limon; 
Elizabeth ; and Charles, who is living in Denver. These children were born of Mr. 
Hoeffer's first marriage and the wife and mother passed away in 1892. In 1900 Mr. 
Hoeffer was again married, his second union being with Miss Amelia Frederici and they 
became the parents of four children: Amelia G., at home; Gertrude, who is teaching 
school; Henry, who is attending Sacred Heart College; and Helen, who is also in 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 143 

Sacred Heart College. Again Mr. Hoeffer was called upon to mourn the loss of his 
wife, for In 1914 Mrs. Amelia Hoeffer passed away. 

Mr. Hoeffer is a member of the Catholic church and In his political allegiance has 
given support to the democratic party, but has never been an office seeker. He now is 
a valued member of the Grange and belongs to the Farmers Non-Partisan League. His 
entire time and attention have been concentrated upon his business affairs and the 
careful direction of his farming and creamery interests has brought to him the success 
which is now his. 



JAMES N. CALDWELL. 



James N. Caldwell is the president of the Colorado National Investment Company 
of Denver and one in whose career the spirit of western enterprise and progress finds 
exemplification. He is a western man by birth, by training and by preference. The 
strong appeal of opportunity has never been unheeded by him and throughout his 
entire life hs has been identified with mining interests, which have constituted one 
of the chief sources of the wealth of the west. He also now largely handles stocks, 
bonds and land and is one of the prominent investment men of penver. 

Mr. Caldwell was born in Laramie, Wyoming. November 18, 1876. His father, 
Isaac P. Caldwell, was a native of Pennsylvania, where his ancestors had lived through 
several generations. The family is of English origin and was founded in America soon 
after the Revolutionary war. Isaac P. Caldwell was reared and educated in Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, and prior to the Civil war removed westward to Richmond, 
Missouri. There he engaged in the practice of law for many years and served as judge 
of the probate court. During the period of hostilities between the north and the 
south he served in the quartermaster's department of the United States army and was 
stationed in New Mexico. After the war was ended he removed to the west, becoming 
a resident of Laramie. Wyoming, and was actively associated with many interests which 
have had marked bearing upon shaping the history of that state. He was connected 
with Senator Clark and Mr. Corlett in framing the constitution of Wyoming and he 
figured as a very prominent official, lawyer and citizen of that state. He served as a 
member of the general assembly and was for several terms mayor of his city. In addi- 
tion to the practice of law he had other business interests, being the active president 
of the Albany County National Bank. His aid and influence were ever on the side of 
progress and improvement, and Laramie and the state benefited much by his efforts. 
At the time of the widespread financial panic of 1S93 he removed to Denver, where he 
continued to make his home throughout his remaining days, his death occurring in 
Not ember. 1916, when he had reached the advanced age of eighty-two years. He had 
acquired his education in the University of Virginia and that institution had con- 
ferred upon him the LL. B. degree. In politics he was a stanch republican, laboring 
•untiringly to advance the interests of his party in state and national elections. His 
religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church. He was a man who commanded 
and enjoyed the respect, confidence and honor of those who knew him. In early man- 
hood he wedded Sarah Margaret Catlett, a native of Kentucky and a representative 
of one of the old families of that state. The town of Catlettsburg is named in honor 
of her grandfather, who was of French descent and who was one of the pioneer resi- 
dents of Kentucky. Mrs. Caldwell survives and yet makes her home in Denver. By 
her marriage she became the mother of three children. Marion, Jennie B. and James N. 

The last named attended the public schools of Laramie and also the University 
of Wyoming and at the age of nineteen he started out in the business world, entering 
upon active connection with mining interests of Colorado. In this business he is still 
actively engaged although his attention is now largely given to stocks, bonds and 
land, which he handles under the name of the Colorado National Investment Company. 
Thoroughness characterizes all that he undertakes and his indefatigable effort, his 
close study of business conditions and his progressive and thoroughly reliable methods 
have constituted the fundamental forces in his career in the attainment of his present 
success. 

On the 27th of March. 1907, Mr. Caldwell was married in Kansas City. Missouri, 
to Miss Ada L. McAfee, a native of Kansas and a daughter of James McAfee. They 
have become parents of two daughters: Laura Margaret, born in Denver, December 24, 
1911; and Virginia, born in Denver, June 24, 1913. 

The family reside at Willow Grange on Josephine street in an attractive home 
which is owned by Mr. Caldwell. He finds rest, recreation and interest in his war 



144 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

gardening and he also turns for diversion to hunting, fishing and motoring. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party and his religious faith is that of 
the Divine Science church. His military experience, following his two years' mili- 
tary training while in the University of Wyoming, covers three years in the Colorado 
National Guard as sergeant in the Signal Corps. He stands as a high type of American 
manhood and citizenship, ever interested in the welfare and progress of his community 
and his country and thoroughly alive to the duties and obligations of every loyal 
American. 



J. G. WINTERMEYER, M. D. 

Dr. J. G. Wintermeyer. a practicing physician of Denver, was born in Manitowoc, 
Wisconsin, July 7, 1865. a son of August and Elizabeth (Schoupf) Wintermeyer. The 
father was born in Wiesbaden, Germany, but came to America when a lad of only 
thirteen years. The mother's birth occurred in Bavaria, Germany, and she, too, was 
thirteen years of age when she crossed the Atlantic. Valentine Wintermeyer, the 
grandfather, established his home in Wisconsin, where he engaged in farming, and he 
was also well known as a literary writer and poet. He died in Chicago. Illinois, in 1908. 
His son, August Wintermeyer, was reared in Wisconsin and took up the occupation of 
farming. He came to Colorado and resided in Elizabeth to the time of his demise, which 
occurred in 1913, when he had reached the age of seventy-six years. His widow still 
occupies the old homestead there. They were the parents of eight children: Mrs. Ida 
Nelson, Emma, Mrs. Elmer Green, Mrs. Louise Vogelsang, Julius, Oscar, J. G., and one 
who has passed away. 

Dr. Wintermeyer pursued his early education In the graded schools of Wisconsin 
but on account of the condition of his health was obliged to leave school. He after- 
ward attended a business college in Chicago, from which he was graduated and then 
went again to Manitowoc, Wisconsin, where he spent a year in a general store. He 
was suffering, however, from asthma and his health failed rapidly. He therefore sold 
out his business in Manitowoc and on the advice of his physician removed to Colorado 
Springs in 1887. There, after partially recovering his health, he entered into the whole- 
sale fruit and produce business and while thus engaged he also did whatever he was 
able for the benefit of the community. He was chosen a delegate to the Lutheran con- 
ference at Baltimore, where he was in close consultation with the head of the Lutheran 
church in America. He was sent to Baltimore at his own request to secure for Colorado 
Springs a church and pastor, but the purpose of the trip proved unavailing, as he 
received very little encouragement. After his return, however, he persevered in his 
efforts, assisted by two or three others, who finally gave up the struggle to secure 
a church. Dr. Wintermeyer then continued alone and eventually was able to obtain 
a lot for the purpose for which he so persistently labored. He then renewed his 
efforts, which ultimately resulted in the building of the present fine Lutheran church 
at Colorado Springs, a church which is the direct result of the untiring labor and 
consecrated zeal of Dr. Wintermeyer. He also did much other work for the benefit 
and upbuilding of the community while a resident of Colorado Springs, but his old ail- 
ment returned, and on the advice of a prominent physician of that place, he began to 
study his own condition and at the same time he entered the Gross Medical College of 
Denver, having disposed of his business interests at Colorado Springs. He was 
graduated in medicine in 1896 and his wife. Mrs. Thurza Wintermeyer, was a member 
of the same class, being now a registered and well known physician of Denver. To- 
gether they began practice. Dr. Wintermeyer had closely studied the disease of asthma 
and felt that he had attained a high measure of proficiency in treatment of such cases. 
He decided to begin his professional life in a smaller town than Denver and removed 
to Laramie, Wyoming, where for two years he continued in active practice. While 
there he met an old and prominent member of the medical profession who had per- 
fected a relief for asthma but not a permanent cure. He disclosed his theories and 
ideas to Dr. Wintermeyer, who, recognizing their value, began working out along the 
same line, combining the practitioner's knowledge with his own experience and the 
knowledge which he had acquired in college. He worked upon his own case first and 
found that in a short time his asthmatic condition had entirely disappeared and that 
he had finally effected a permanent cure. His discovery became known and patients 
flocked to him from various parts of the country to consult him concerning their ail- 
ment. He has since effected many cures of the most obstinate cases and he now has 
an established and well merited reputation for most efficient work in this branch of 
medical practice. Mrs. Wintermeyer also practices medicine and is well known la 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 145 

this connection. In 1898 they returned to Denver and have since been located in their 
beautiful home at No. 3409 West Thirty-second avenue. 

It was on the 26th of August, 1894, that Dr. Wintermeyer was married to Miss 
Thurza Young, of Kansas, a daughter of Robert and Lucy Young, the former a Civil 
war veteran from Kansas. Mrs. Wintermeyer is widely known because of her activity 
in women's organizations. She is clerk of Highland Circle, No. 98, of the Neighbors of 
Woodcraft, a position which she has occupied for eighteen years, and in this connection 
she has worked up the membership from forty to five hundred. She is now filling the 
position of grand magician of the Grand Circle of the Women of Woodcraft and she is 
identified with the Independent Order of Foresters, the Royal Neighbors and the 
Modern Brotherhood of America. Dr. J. G. Wintermeyer has membership with the 
Modern Woodmen of America, the Woodmen of the World, the Neighbors of Woodcraft, 
the Court of Honor, the Sons of Herman, the Bavarian Society and several other 
organizations. In politics he maintains an independent course. 

Besides his city property Dr. Wintermeyer is the owner of two fine ranches, one 
of which he leases. This is located near the city of Golden. The other he operates on 
his own account as a dairy and stock ranch and it is situated at Deertrail, Colorado, 
not far from Denver. Both are valuable properties and are the visible evidence of 
his life of well directed energy and thrift. Dr. Wintermeyer, in his perfection of an 
asthmatic cure and in his work for the church, has made his life of great usefulness 
and benefit to his fellowmen and Denver numbers him among her well known and 
skilful physicians. 



EDWARD PRENTISS COSTIGAN. 

Edward Prentiss Costigan, named a member of the United States tariff commission 
on March 21, 1917. is a leader in the group of younger Coloradoans, who have in recent 
years claimed national attention. 

Edward P. Costigan, born in King William county, Virginia, is a son of George 
Purcell and Emilie (Sigur) Costigan. Both the father and mother have been prominent 
in Colorado affairs. The family removed to this state from Ohio in 1877, locating at 
Lake City, in the southwestern part of Colorado, there remaining for about a year. 
They thence removed to Ouray, where they resided for about five years, and when San 
Miguel county was created the father, George P. Costigan, was appointed by Governor 
Grant the first judge of that county. He was subsequently twice elected to the same 
position in Telluride. Both he and his wife, Mrs. Emilie Costigan, were interested in 
mining. They became the owners of the Belmont mine, which was subsequently sold 
to an English company. The property has since been expanded into the Tomboy mine 
of Telluride. The Belmont was originally thought to be a silver lode. Mrs. Costigan 
first acquired an interest in it and she and Judge Costigan were developing it when its 
gold values were discovered. Judge and Mrs. Costigan make their liome in Denver, 
although the Judge witli unabated interest and energy is engaged at present in mining 
in Mono county, California, near the Nevada line. Judge Costigan is a well known 
Mason, and Mrs. Costigan is prominent in the Denver Woman's Club and similar centers 
of activity and influence. 

George Purcell Costigan, Jr., another conspicuous member of the family, was 
formerly for a time a law partner of Edward P. Costigan, and became later dean of 
the Nebraska State Law School at Lincoln. He is now a professor in the law department 
of Northwestern University at Chicago, Illinois: and is the author of several legal 
works, including "Costigan's Mining Law." and "Legal Ethics," which have attracted 
wide attention. 

Edward P. Costigan was educated in the schools of Denver, was admitted to the 
bar in Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1897, and graduated from Harvard University in 1899. 
In 1900 he began practice in Denver and immediately took part in reform politics. In 
1902 he was declared elected a member of the Colorado house of representatives, a 
contest preventing his assuming his seat during the session. At this early period in his 
career he became one of the leaders in the movement for honest elections, a fight that 
continued for over a decade. During and after 1906 he was attorney for the Honest 
Elections League and from 1906 until 1908 for the Law Enforcement League. 

In the midst of his general law practice Mr. Costigan acted as legal adviser In the 
fight for a local option law, which was finally sustained in the supreme court of the 
state. In 1910 he was chairman of the Dry Denver Committee in its Denver campaign. 
He was among the leaders of a newly organized Direct Primary League and a Direct 

Vol. IV— 10 



146 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Legislation League of Colorado in their successful efforts to adopt the constitutional 
amendments and laws indicated by the names of these organizations. In this period 
he was also president of the Civil Service Reform Association of Denver; and in 1912 
he helped organize the citizen's party, which carried the municipal election of that 
year. Later when the progressive party was organized, he was its Colorado candidate 
for governor both in 1912 and in 1914. His association with many reform movements 
indicates his standing upon questions of vital interest to his community and state. 

In his practice Mr. Costigan on different occasions represented the Denver Chamber 
of Commerce and Arizona commercial organizations in freight rate litigation before 
the Interstate Commerce Commission. In 1914, at the time of the congressional investi- 
gation into the Colorado coal strike. Mr. Costigan was attorney for tha United Mine 
Workers of America. In the now celebrated murder cases growing out of the strike Mr. 
Costigan represented and secured acquittals for numerous defendants. 

On the 12th of June, 1903, Mr. Costigan was married to Miss Mabel G. Cory, of 
Denver, who was a classmate of her husband in the East Denver high school. She 
was secretary and Mr. Costigan was president of the class in which they graduated. 
She has long been active in the educational, church and club circles of Denver and in 
other public connections. In church circles she is widely known as a lecturer at 
summer schools of missions such as are held at Boulder, Colorado, and at Omaha, 
Nebraska, being an expert in Sunday school primary work, renowned for her remarkable 
gifts for story-telling, for children. For three years, from 1912 until 1915, she was 
president of the Woman's Club of Denver. In the spring of 1916, as chairman of the 
industrial committee of the Colorado State Federation of Women's Clubs, she organized 
and conducted a campaign to amend the child labor law of Colorado so as to prohibit 
such labor in the beet fields of the state. She has long been a deep student of the 
problems of labor and of the foreign born in America, and for some years she has 
been a member of the advisory council of the National Child Labor Committee. 

Mr. Costigan has delivered many public addresses in recent years including pub- 
lished discussions before the State Bar Association. On the 30th of December, 1917, at 
Philadelphia, in an address before the joint session of the American Economic Asso- 
ciation, The American Historical Association, the American Political Science Associa- 
tion and the American Sociological Society, he asserted that the victory of the Allies 
meant international control in many new fields, including a fair apportionment of essen- 
tial raw materials among the nations, and a policy of conservation and use of national 
resources as the best means of cancelling hereafter the heavy war debts of the world. 
In the course of his remarks, he added: "Nothing during these trying times said or 
done by President Wilson has more strikingly or serviceably evidenced his leadership 
than his rejection of 'selfish and exclusive economic leagues.' His criticism brought 
home to a large portion of the public, both here and abroad, what historians and 
economists instantly perceived when the Paris resolutions were announced, that the 
division of the world into two permanently hostile economic groups would give inter- 
national sanction to the vast and inhuman ruthlessness which has irredeemably dis- 
credited German autocracy." 

In September, 1918, while the war was in progress, Mr. and Mrs. Costigan went 
to France. Together they visited the battlefields and investigated conditions in the 
region between Chateau Thierry, Soissons, and Rheims; and Mr. Costigan in October 
also visited the fighting region in the St. Mihiel sector between Metz and Verdun. They 
were in London at the time of the signing of the armistice, and returned in December, 
1918, with the first after-the-war homeward movement of American soldiers. 



ROBERT B. SPENCER. 



Robert B. Spencer, owner and editor of the Fort Morgan Times and the Evening 
Times, the former a weekly and the latter a daily paper published at Fort Morgan, was 
born in Monroe county, Iowa, September 2. 1872, a son of Wellington and Amanda 
(Hammond) Spencer, who were natives of Ohio. The father was a farmer by occupation 
and at an early period in the development of Monroe county, Iowa, went to that section 
and purchased land whereon he and his family took up their abode. He then improved 
and developed the property, which he continued to cultivate until 1915, when he sold his 
farm there and removed to Kansas. In the latter state he purchased land which he is 
still cultivating and which is pleasantly situated near Topeka, where he and his wife 
have an attractive home. 

Robert B. Spencer was reared and educated in Albia, Monroe county, Iowa, and 




ROBERT B. SPENCER 



148 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

finished his studies at the Wesleyan College at Mount Pleasant, Iowa, where he won the 
degree of Master of Arts. He then took up the profession of teaching and for five years 
occupied the position of superintendent of schools of Monroe county. With the outbreak 
of the Spanish-American war he enlisted for active service as a member of Company F, 
Fitty-iirst Iowa Volunteer Infantry, with which he served as sergeant for a year and a 
half, doing active duty in the Philippine islands for a year. 

In 1907 Mr. Spencer arrived in Fort Morgan, Colorado, and purchased the Fort Morgan 
Times, which he has since published. Later he established a daily paper known as the 
Evening Times and has published it continuously since 1908. He has made these very 
attractive journals to a large reading public, for the papers are devoted to a discussion 
of general and local news, while his editorials indicate thorough familiarity with the 
vital problems and issues of the day. He has one of the best equipped printing plants 
in the state, supplied with two linotype machines, and he does a very extensive job 
printing business. 

Mr. Spencer was married on the 10th of September, 1902, to Miss Carrie E. Eyestone 
and to them were born five children: Alice, whose birth occurred July 9, 1903; Robert, 
who was born April 21, 1908; Murlin, -born November 11, 1911; Marian, April 9, 1913, 
and Nelda, July 9, 1916. Mrs. Spencer is a daughter of J. W. and Margaret (Gardner) 
Eyestone, who were natives of Indiana and of Ohio respectively. They became pioneer 
residents of Iowa, and at the time of the Civil war Mr. Eyestone went to the front as a 
lieutenant of Company K of the Thirteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He participated in 
a number of hotly contested engagements and then returned at the close of the war to 
Iowa, purchasing land in Washington county. He continued to cultivate this farm for 
a number of years, but is now living in Mount Vernon. Iowa, having removed to the city 
in order to give his children the benefit of its educational opportunities. His wife passed 
away there in 1918. 

In his political views Mr. Spencer is a republican, and for two years he filled the 
office of mayor of Port Morgan. He also served on the school board for four years and 
was president of the Commercial Club for some time, doing active work in furthering the 
welfare and upbuilding of the city in every possible way. His religious faith is that of 
tlie Methodist Episcopal church, he is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he belongs 
to the Young Men's Christian Association. In the last named he is very active and has 
been in charge of the twelfth district for the association, including six counties. In a 
word, he stands for progress and improvement along material, social, intellectual and 
moral lines, and his efforts have been far-reaching and resultant. 



FRED S. BROWN. 



Fred S. Browo, an investment broker of Denver and also the owner of the finest 
poultry and hog ranch in the west, situated in Arapahoe county, was born April 10, 
1869, in the city which is still his home, the family residence then occupying what is 
now the site of the Chamber of Commerce. His father, John Sidney Brown, was a 
pioneer of Denver, born in Ohio in 1833, and a representative of one of the old families 
of that state of English lineage. The first of the family in America came to the 
new world prior to the Revolutionary war and settled in New England. Members of 
the family participated in the struggle for independence and in the War of 1812. John 
Sidney Brown was reared and educated in Ohio and when twenty-seven years of age 
came to the west, making his way direct to Denver, where he established a wholesale 
grocery business which is still being conducted. He was active in its management and 
remained sole proprietor of the business until his death, which occurred in Denver, 
January 15, 1913, when he was seventy-nine years of age. His political allegiance waa 
given to the republican party and he was a man of genuine worth, highly esteemed both 
in business and in citizenship. He married Irene Sopris, a native of Indiana, whose 
parents came to Colorado during the latter part of the '50s and thus cast in their 
lot with its pioneer settlers. Mrs. Brown passed away in Denver in 1881, at the age of 
forty-two years. In the family were five children, three sons and two daughters, all 
of whom are yet living, namely: Fred S., of this review; Elizabeth, now the wife of 
Andrew B. Inglis, a resident of Seattle, Washington; Edward N., living in Denver; 
Katherine, the wife of N. A. Johanson, of Seattle, Washington; and W. K., a wholesale 
grocer of Denver. 

Spending his youthful days in his native city, Fred S. Brown acquired his educa- 
tion in the public and high schools and passed the examination for Yale University but 
instead of pursuing a college course entered his father's business establishment and 



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FRED S. BROWN 



150 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

was associated with the wholesale grocery business for twenty-six years. He started 
in a humble capacity but gradually worked his way upward through personal effort and 
ability, acquainting himself with the business in all of its departments and thus quali- 
fying for administrative direction and executive control. He eventually became vice 
president of the company and so continued until 1913, when upon the father's death the 
business was divided and Fred S. Brown took over the investment business, to which 
he has since given his attention, his father having established the Brown Investment 
Company, which he was conducting in addition to the wholesale grocery business. 
Fred S. Brown is thoroughly familiar with commercial paper and the value of all 
investments and his business in this connection is now extensive and important. He 
is also largely engaged in ranching and stock raising and his ranch of twenty-one 
acres in Arapahoe county is one of the best equipped for the raising of poultry and 
hogs to be found in the west. He has studied closely every question bearing upon 
the scientific development and care of hogs and poultry and has upon his place the 
finest breeds of both. 

On the 7th of April, 1898, Mr. Brown was married in Denver, Colorado, to Miss 
Margaret Ganser, a native of Illinois and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Ganser, of 
an old Illinois family. Mr. Brown's military record covers tour years' service as a 
member of Company K of the Colorado National Guard. In politics he maintains an 
independent course but is not remiss in the duties of citizenship and actively cooperates 
in the well defined plans and purposes of the Denver Civic and Commercial Association 
for the upbuilding of the interests of the city in every particular. In addition to his 
membership in that organization he belongs to several more strictly social institutions, 
including the Denver Club, the Denver Country Club, the Lakewood Country Club 
and the Denver Athletic Ckib. A lifelong resident of the city, he has for forty-nine 
years been a witness of its growth and development, rejoices in what has been 
accomplished and at all times lends his aid and cooperation to movements for the 
public good. He has a very wide acquaintance and his pronounced social qualities make 
for personal popularity, while his genuine worth results in warm friendships. 



JOSEPH W. MORELAND 



Joseph W. Moreland is a prominent and successful ranchman who is also general 
manager of the Elevator Company at Peyton. He is classed with the substantial citi- 
zens that Indiana has furnished to Colorado, his birth having occurred in Perry county 
of the former state on the 21st of October, 1866, his parents being James H. and Martha 
Moreland, the former a native of Ohio. They removed with their family to Olney, Rich- 
land county, Illinois, during the early boyhood of Joseph W. Moreland, who there acquired 
a common school education. In 18S6, when a young man of twenty years, he removed 
to Leoti, Kansas, and for five years was connected with the Missouri Pacific Railroad, 
having charge of a track gang. He arrived at Peyton, Colorado, in 1S97 and purchased 
three hundred and twenty acres of land, since which time he has successfully engaged 
in ranching. He has good buildings upon his place, engages in general farming, feeds 
cattle and milks twenty cows. In addition to the further development and improvement 
of his farm he is managing the business of the Peyton Farmers Cooperative Elevator 
Company, of which he is one of the stockholders. His business activities are intelli- 
gently directed, his enterprise is unfaltering and what would seem difiSculties in the 
path of the weak ofttimes have served as stepping-stones in his career. 

In November, 1890, Mr. Moreland was united in marriage to Miss Lorinda Miller, 
a daughter of R. B. and Jennie Miller. She was born in Iowa but was reared in 
Piper City, Ford county. Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Moreland have been born eight 
children: Elsie, the wife of Frank Derby, residing at Lake George, Colorado, by whom 
she has a daughter, Inez; Tressa, the wife of John Owen, of Calhan, Colorado, and 
the mother of a son, Owen, and a daughter, Eleanor; Jennie, the wife of Willie Green, 
a ranchman of Eastonville, Colorado, by whom she has a son, Ira; Walter S., who is 
in the United States army and is at present in the government lumber camps of Wash- 
ington; James Ira, who is training with a campany of heavy artillery at Camp Funston; 
and Kenneth, Wayne and Jewel, all at home. 

Mr. Moreland is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, belonging to Pey- 
ton Camp, No. 9229, of which for seventeen years he has been the clerk. He is a man 
in whom his fellow townsmen have implicit faith and confidence. His political allegiance 
is given to the republican party and his fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth and 
public spirit, have frequently called him to office. He has served for two terms, or four 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 151 

years, as justice of the peace in El Paso county and has fearlessly and efficiently dis- 
charged the duties of that position. He has been a member of the school board for 
twenty years and he is a champion of every movement that tends to promote the 
progress and upbuilding of his community. He has many friends who recognize his 
sterling worth, speaking of him in terms of high regard, and in his business career 
he has demonstrated his resourcefulness as well as his reliability, both of which have 
won for him a creditable position among the ranchmen and grain dealers of his section 
of the state. 



ELIJAH L. WEST. 



Elijah L. West, who resides near Wheatridge in Jefferson county, where he took 
up his abode thirty-four years ago, owns and cultivates a tract of land devoted to 
gardening and the raising of small fruit. He is also successfully engaged in busi- 
ness as a merchant of Denver. His birth occurred in Richmond, Kentucky, on the 
3d of October, 1863, his parents being Perry and Susan (Lauless) West, both of whom 
have passed away. The father served as a soldier of the Civil war. 

Elijah L. West pursued his education in the schools of his 'native city to the age 
of nineteen years and then made his way to Texas, where he was engaged in farm- 
ing for two years. In 18S4 he came to Colorado, settling at Wlieatridge. and soon 
thereafter he purchased a tract of land which he has cultivated continuously and 
successfully throughout the intervening period. On September 4, 1911, he purchased 
the store of F. A. Burnell, the oldest hay, grain and feed house in Denver, and this 
he has also since carried on, enjoying an extensive and most gratifying patronage. 
He is widely recognized as a capable, progressive and enterprising business man , 
whose methods are thoroughly reliable and straightforward. 

On the 12th of June, 1886, in Denver, Colorado. Mr. West was united in marriage 
to Miss Dora E. Ramboz, a daughter of Louis and Holymphia (Le-Liever) Ramboz. 
They located on a ranch on Clear creek in 1864, where Mrs. West was born and reared, 
so that her early life was replete with the experiences of pioneer existence. By her 
marriage she has become the mother of six children, as follows: Maude E., who is 
the wife of A. E. Towner; Nora E., who gave her hand in marriage to James Franze; 
Claude L., who wedded Miss Jennie A. Mooney; Raymond L., who married Miss Edna 
A. Cummings; Howard H.; and Walter W. 

Mrs. West is also from a pioneer family of Jefferson county. Her parents were 
both born in France, and both came with their parents to America during their child- 
hood. Louis Ramboz first came to Colorado in 1859, remaining about a year. On the 
11th of March, 1860, at St. Joseph, Missouri, he wedded Miss Holymphia Le-Liever 
and in 1864 they located on a tract of land in Jefferson county where they continued 
to reside until the mother's death which occurred January 15. 1886, in her forty-second 
year. Louis Ramboz survived until November 13, 1898, when he passed to eternal rest, 
aged sixty-three years. He was numbered among the earliest settlers of Jefferson 
county and by his progressive methods and advanced ideas aided materially in the 
development of the country. Among other things it may be mentioned that he brought 
to the section, and put into active operation, the first combined mowing and reaping 
machine ever used in Jefferson county. Politically he was a republican and an ardent 
supporter of the principles of the party. 

Mr. West is justly recognized as one of the very first settlers in the Wheatridge 
section, the entire region being an undeveloped wilderness at the time of his loca- 
tion here. Not only has he been a witness to the growth and development of the 
community, but has also had active part in bringing about the transition. Every 
movement tending towards the public good, has received his active aid and assistance, 
particularly the securing and actual construction of the splendid public roadways for 
which the section is noted. He was also one of the most active workers in organizing 
the Wheatridge Grange, of which he became a charter member and' was elected the 
first master, a position he has filled, at various times, to the extent of more than ten 
years. This was the first Grange to be established in Colorado, receiving Charter 
No. 1. Here also, and largely through the efforts of Mr. West, was established the 
first Juvenile Grange in the state, Wheatridge, No. 1, and in which his son, Walter 
W. West, was elected the first master and served two terms. Another son, Raymond 
L., after graduating from high school, entered the State Agricultural College, at Fort 
Collins, where he pursued a course in mechanical and irrigation engineering and has 





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ELIJAH L. WEST 




MRS. DORA E. WEST 



154 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

won distinction in tlie practice of his profession. Tlie two youngest sons are still 
residing at home, actively engaged in the cultivation of the home ranch. 

In his political views Mr. West is a stalwart republican and his fellow townsmen 
have frequently called upon him for public service. He has been president of the 
school board of Wheatridge for five years and for four years, from 1908 until 1912, 
held the office of county commissioner, making a most excellent record in that connec- 
tion. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Arvada Lodge, No. 141, 
A. F. & A. M., and he is also connected with the Woodmen of the World and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. His religious faith is that of the Christian church, of 
which he is a devoted and consistent member. He has gained a most extensive and 
favorable acquaintance during the long period of his residence in Jefferson county 
and enjoys an enviable reputation as a representative business man and esteemed citizen 
of the community. 



JOHN T. FITZELL. 



John T. Fitzell, conducting business under the name of the Ideal Laundry Com- 
pany, of which he is president, dates his residence in Denver from 1890, but later spent 
four years in Cripple Creek, returning to Denver in 1904. He was born in County 
Kerry, Ireland, May 17,, 1870, a son of Thomas and Theresa (Fitzell) Fitzell. The 
ancestry of the Fitzell family can be traced back to William the Conqueror. In early 
life the parents of John T. Fitzell came to Canada, making the trip soon after their 
marriage. The father engaged in farming and after residing for a time in Canada 
removed to Colorado and is now a resident of Los Angeles, California, where he is living 
retired. His wife passed away in that city in 1914. 

John T. Fitzell was the eighth in order of birth in a family of fourteen children. 
He pursued his education in the public schools of Canada and afterward started out in 
the business world in connection with the grocery trade, at which he was employed for 
two years. He then turned his attention to the laundry business and in 1890 he arrived 
in Colorado, where he became connected with the Queen City Laundry Company of 
Denver. He was with the company for two years and then entered the employ of the 
Imperial Laundry Company as manager, there remaining until 1900. He then went to 
Cripple Creek, where he became manager of the Cripple Creek Laundry, and incidentally 
took up mining. He won success in both branches and remained there for four years. 
In 1904, however, he returned to Denver and purchased an interest in what is now 
the Ideal Laundry at No. 2500 Curtis street. The business was organized by Otto Heries 
and Mr. Fitzell at the date indicated became his partner. They conducted their interests 
most successfully until the business outgrew its quarters, after which they consolidated 
the laundry with that of Sidney Culbertson, who had conducted business under the 
name of the Red Star Laundry. They formed what is now the Ideal Laundry and upon 
the death of Mr. Heries in 1915 the partners made arrangements to purchase his 
interests upon the settlement of the estate. Since then the business has been incor- 
porated and the patronage has continually increased, for the service rendered the public 
is highly satisfactory. The name Ideal is a guarantee of excellent workmanship. Mr. 
Fitzell is the president and manager of the business, with Mr. Culbertson as the secre- 
tary and treasurer. Since the incorporation of their business the business has more 
than doubled and is continually growing. Something of the vast volume of their trade 
is indicated in the fact that they now employ one hundred and twenty-five people. The 
most modern machinery has been installed and there is every facility to promote the 
work and make the output of the highest possible character. In the present year (1918) 
a large addition is being built, sixty-two and a half feet square. This makes their 
plant one of the largest and most modern in the city. They have fourteen delivery 
wagons and auto trucks, and the business is thoroughly systematized in every depart- 
ment. 

On the 26th of April, 1892, Mr. Fitzell was married to Miss Lydia M. Lang, of Denver, 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lang, of Hanover, Canada. They have become 
parents of three children. Grant R., born in Denver in 1895, was graduated from the 
manual training department of Boulder University and was with the American Beet 
Sugar Company until 1918, when he joined the national army. He married Miss Marina 
Acola in Mendon, Missouri. J. Alvin, born in Denver in 1900, is now in the Kemper 
Military Academy. Doris, born in 1902, is a student in the East Denver high school. 

Mr. Fitzell is identified with various societies and clubs. He belongs to the 
National Laundrymen's Association and thus keeps in touch with everything having 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 155 

to do with the trade. He is a member of the Civic and Commercial Association and 
thereby cooperates in many well defined plans for the city's upbuilding and for the 
promotion of those interests which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. Frater- 
nally he is connected with the Elks and the Woodmen of the World, and in club circles 
his membership extends to the Motor and Lions Clubs. Such in brief is the life history 
of a man who has used his time and talents wisely and well, and entirely unassisted 
has worked his way steadily upward from a humble position in the business world to 
a place where he is controlling extensive and important interests, placing him among 
the men of affluence in Denver. 



OSCAR G. KEYSOR. 



Oscar G. Keysor, devoting his attention to sheep raising at the town of Keysor, 
was born in Barton county, Kansas, October 5, 1878, a son of John and Anna (Schnars) 
Keysor. The father removed from Ohio to Kansas. The mother was originally from 
Pennsylvania and was descended from one of the old Pennsylvania Dutch families. 

Spending his youthful days in his native state, Oscar G. Keysor largely devoted his 
attention to the acquirement of a public school education and when twenty years of 
age came to Colorado in the year 1898. He first made his way to Galatea, on the 
Missouri Pacific, near Sugar City, and in 19U0 he homesteaded in Elbert county. His 
mother and his three brothers also homesteaded and at present two brothers, Oscar G. 
and Ora S., the latter thirty-four years of age, are partners in one of the largest sheep 
raising businesses in the state. The mother died on the old homestead thirteen years 
ago. The sons, Oscar G. and Ora S., lease many thousand acres of land for sheep 
raising. 

On the 17th of April, 1912. Oscar G. Keysor was united in marriage to Miss Ruth 
Anderson and to them have been born two sons, John Willand and Robert Frederick. 
Oscar G. Keysor is the postmaster of the town of Keysor, which was named in honor 
of himself and brother. 



WILLIAM M. WILDER. 



William M. Wilder was throughout his life a skilled mechanic who executed im- 
portant work along that line, save for a brief period prior to his demise, when he lived 
retired. He was born in Rochester, New York. November 29, 1846, a son of Edward 
and Sarah E. (Alton) Wilder, the former a native of New York and the latter of London, 
England. At the usual age he became a pupil in the public schools and subsequent to 
the completion of his course, when he was still a youth in his teens, he spent ten 
months as a member of Company E of the One Hundred and Eighty-sixth New Y'ork 
Volunteers, doing active service at the front in defense of the Union. When the war 
was over he returned to Rochester, where he learned the machinist's trade, at which 
he worked in his native city until 1871. He then removed to Newcastle, Indiana, where 
he continued to work as a machinist until 1888. In the latter year he came to Denver 
and entered the employ of F. N. Davis, a brick contractor, with whom he continued until 
1891. In that year the big strike occurred, after which Mr. Wilder worked on the 
capitol contract. In 1893 he entered the machine shop of David & Creswell, there 
remaining for several years, and afterward he was employed by W. F. Altoff & Son and 
later by Haven Brothers. Eventually, however, his health failed and he retired from 
active business life. He was a very ingenious mechanic, thoroughly enjoying work 
at his trade, and his eflSciency was in large measure due thereto. A fine example of 
his workmanship is the stairway in the State Capitol and he ever took great and just 
pride in his work which he performed to the best of his ability, and that ability con- 
stantly increased, as his skill and experience widened. 

On the 30th of April, 1870. Mr. Wilder was married in Newcastle, Indiana, to Miss 
Mary M. Pence, a daughter of Cyrus P. and Catherine (Kyger) Pence. Three children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wilder: Minnie U., who became the wife of Harry L. Price; 
Edward, who is engaged in the grocery business in Denver; and Bessie B., who is 
employed in the Kesler Stationery Store in Denver. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Wilder was connected with Crocker Post, G. A. R.. 
and thus maintained pleasant relations with his old army comrades. His political 
allegiance was given to the democratic party but he was never an office seeker. His 



156 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

attention was always given to his business affairs and tlirough his close application 
and fidelity to the work entrusted to him he won a liberal measure of success, becoming 
one of the men of affluence of his community. He was thus able to leave his family 
in comfortable financial circumstances when death called him on the 1st of December, 
1915. His demise was deeply regretted not only by the members of his household but 
by many with whom he had come in contact and who had come to esteem him for his 
genuine traits of character. 



MARTIN JEROME PEASE. 



Martin Jerome Pease, one of the progressive citizens of his community, is the owner 
of a valuable farm of nine hundred and thirty-one acres in Elbert county near Simla. 
He was born April 7, 1861, in southeastern Missouri, a short distance from Pilot Knob. 
His father, Martin Pease, was descended from one of the old families of Massachusetts. 
The mother, who bore the maiden name of Susan Ann Nalle, was a native of Kentucky 
and both were descended from old families represented in the Revolutionary war. 

Martin Jerome Pease was for some years a resident of Kansas before removing 
to Colorado in 1911, in which year he secured his present property holdings, purchasing 
one of the finest farms of Elbert county. It is situated in the vicinity of Simla and 
contains nine hundred and thirty-one acres. It is in every respect a model place, splen- 
didly equipped with large and substantial buildings, and in addition to the production of 
crops he is also engaged in stock raising. His business affairs are wisely and carefully 
managed and success in substantial measure is crowning his efforts. 

On the Sth of April, 1891, Mr. Pease was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Lewis, 
of Kansas, who is a native of Maryland. They have become the parents of five children: 
Lewis F., who was in Camp Kearny until discharged by reason of physical disability; 
Arthur, who enlisted in the Boulder University Corps; Martin, at home; Edith, who 
is the wife of Rex Hixson; and Marie. 

Mr. Pease is actuated by a spirit of progress in all that he undertakes and in all 
of his relations to the community and the public at large. Thoroughly alive to the 
needs of the country and the opportunities of the hour, he was one of the promoters 
of the Liberty Loan and one of the largest subscribers at Simla. He is a director of 
the State Bank of Simla, is the secretary of the school board and is foremost in every 
movement for the advancement of his community. 



ARMOUR C. ANDERSON. 



Armour C. Anderson, one of Denver's leading real estate men, also active in 
municipal affairs as a member of the public utilities commission, was born in Mercer 
county, New Jersey, a son of William and Ellen (Marshall) Anderson, both of whom 
were born as subjects of the British isles. The father's birth occurred in the north 
of Ireland, while the mother was a native of Scotland, and with their respective 
parents they came to the United States when seven years of age. the families settling 
in the state of New York. Later removal was made to Maryland, where the father of 
Armour C. Anderson engaged in railroad contract work and assisted in building 
the road from Baltimore to Washington. William Anderson became prominent as 
superintendent of railroad construction and as a contractor and his death occurred 
near Washington in 1897. He had long survived his wife, who passed away in Mary- 
land in 1876. Their family numbered seven children, among whom was Armour C. 
Anderson of this review. 

In early life Armour C. Anderson attended school in Prince Georges county, 
Maryland, and in 1881 he arrived in Colorado, taking up his abode in Denver, where 
he was first employed in newspaper work on the Denver Evening World and Denver 
Tribune. He continued on the paper for three years and then embraced an opportunity 
to go to Mexico with Governor Shepherd of Washington. He remained in that country 
for some time but eventually tired of the southern republic and in 1885 returned to 
Denver. Here he concentrated his efforts and attention upon the real estate business, 
and although he began operations along that line in a small way, he gradually worked 
his way upward until he ranked with the leading real estate men of the city and is 
now one of the large operators and individual property owners of Denver. He has 
valuable realty holdings in the city. His investments have been most carefully and 




ARMOUR C. ANDERSON 



158 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Judiciously made and bring to him a substantial financial return. He occupies a 
prominent position among real estate men of the city and in 1893 and 1894 held the 
presidency of the Denver Real Estate Exchange. 

Mr. Anderson has long been a devoted member of the Central Presbyterian 
church and for the past quarter of a century has been its chief usher. He belongs 
also to the Denver Athletic Club, of which he has been a representative for fifteen 
years. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons as a Knight Templar and member 
of the Mystic Shrine and he has likewise attained the thirty-second degree of the 
Scottish Rite. His political allegiance has always been given to the republican party 
since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and in 1910 he was elected to 
the public utilities commission and has since devoted much valuable service to the 
city. He was also a member of the state legislature for two terms under the Waite 
administration and gave the most thoughtful and earnest consideration to the vital 
questions which came up for settlement there. He was likewise one of the promoters 
of the beautiful Pioneer monument, assisting in laying the cornerstone when the 
dedicatory services were held. He is well worthy to be classed with Denver's leading 
and representative men. 



JOSEPH WILKINSON. 



For forty-four years Joseph Wilkinson, who died July 30, 1918, had been identified 
with the agricultural interests of Colorado. He made his home on section 33, town- 
ship 6, Weld county, and his career was a most active and useful one. He passed the 
seventy-eighth milestone on life's journey and in a review of his record one can see 
that he was a self-made man whose success was due entirely to his own initiative, 
industry and perseverance. Such a record should serve to inspire and encourage all 
who read it, showing what can be accomplished by the individual. Mr. Wilkinson was 
born in Pennsylvania, November 11, 1840, and was a son of Will Perry and Mary Ann 
(Edwards) Wilkinson. The father was a farmer by occupation and was the owner 
of one hundred acres of land which he carefully cultivated. His wife was born in 
Holland and both have now passed away. 

Spending his youthful days under the parental roof, Joseph Wilkinson acquired 
a public school education, continuing his studies until he reached the age of nineteen. 
He afterward worked in the coal mines of his native state and also on the farm. At 
length, however, he determined to see something of the country and made his way 
to California. He was pleased with the district and decided to remain. Afterward he 
obtained a position in a mill and for five years he continued upon the Pacific coast, 
but on the expiration of that period retraced his steps eastward as far as Colorado, 
where he arrived in 1S74. He had very little money at that time and began logging 
on the river. He afterward went upon a ranch, where he remained for three years, 
and during that period he carefully saved his earnings until his industry and economy 
had brought him sufficient capital to enable him to start in business independently. 
He then purchased a farm of eighty acres and began the cultivation of wheat, potatoes 
and oats. It was not long before the place showed the result of his earnest labors 
and sound business judgment. After a time he purchased another farm, comprising 
one hundred and sixty acres, situated three miles northeast of Greeley, and through 
the intervening years to his death he carried on his farming interests successfully. 
He studied the soil, knew the crops best adapted to climatic conditions here and so 
intelligently directed his labors that success came to him. 

In March, 1871, Mr. Wilkinson was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca Sutliff 
and to them were born three children: Brice, who is in Arizona in the employ of a 
copper company and is engaged in building a smelter; Mabel, who was born in Colo- 
rado in 1886 and was a librarian in Wyoming, but at this writing is attending the 
State Teachers' College of Colorado for her M. A. degree. She is the wife of Ellis 
Ethridge. Blanche died at the age of three and one-half years in 1880. 

In his political views Mr. Wilkinson was a republican, voting for the men and 
measures of the party since reaching man's estate. He never sought or desired office, 
however, for he concentrated his efforts, his thoughts and his attention upon his business 
affairs. Mr. Wilkinson was a man of genuine worth and deserved much credit for 
what he had accomplished. He started out in life empty-handed and had to struggle 
for each penny that he gained. As the architect of his own fortunes he builded wisely 
and well and his developing powers grew through the exercise of effort. He lived to 
see remarkable changes in Weld county during the period of his residence here and 




JOSEPH WILKINSON 



160 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

was familiar with every phase of pioneer life. Moreover, he contributed in marked 
measure to agricultural progress in this section and was numbered among those who 
have aided in laying broad and deep the foundation upon which has been built the 
present progress and prosperity of the county. 



JOHN NORMAN. 



Rapidly coming to the front as a monument builder and stone engraver of the 
highest ability, John Norman certainly deserves mention among the representatives of 
active industrial life in the Queen City of the Plains. He was born in Norway, Sep- 
tember 24, 1875, a son of Otto and Sarah (Johnson) Norman. The father was for a long 
period a well known blacksmith of Manti, Utah. He came to this country in 1878, 
settling at Manti, where he still resides, but his wife passed away in Norway in 1918, 
while on a visit to her childhood home. They had a family of four children, two of 
whom are living, the younger being Carl Wilhelm Norman, now residing in Norway. 

The elder son, John Norman of this review, attended the public schools of his 
native country in his boyhood days, having remained there with his mother. After 
leaving school he began work as an apprentice at the stone and marble cutter's trade, 
learning all kinds of monument work, including artistic designing. After thoroughly 
mastering the business he left the land of the midnight sun and came to America, 
settling first at Rockport, Massachusetts, where he continued to work at his trade 
until July 20, 1916. At that date he came to Denver and bought out the established 
business and property of Hans Anderson at No. 4989 Vine street. He has since con- 
ducted a successful monument and marble business. His place of business is close to 
the Riverside cemetery, in which are found many evidences of his artistic and high- 
class work. 

On the 18th of October, 1907, Mr. Norman was married to Miss Clara Gustaveson. 
a daughter of Gus Gustaveson of New York city, and they have one child, John Robert, 
who was born in New York city, September 10, 1911, and who is now a pupil in the 
public schools of Denver. The family has resided in this city for only a brief period 
but has already become widely and favorably known and Mr. Norman has made for 
himself a most creditable place in business circles, for his long apprenticeship and 
previous experience in the line of his chosen vocation well qualify him for the excellent 
work that he is now doing as a marble cutter and monument manufacturer. 



CHARLES N. YEAMANS. 



One of the foremost merchants of Akron, Colorado, is Charles N. Yeamans. who 
there conducts an establishment carrying hardware, furniture and harness goods besides 
other articles, which business was founded in 1885. On account of his strictly fair 
methods he enjoys a large patronage not only from his city but the surrounding dis- 
tricts. He is also engaged in the undertaking business. Born in Marshalltown, Iowa, 
August 7, 1858, Mr. Yeamans is a son of N. F. and Lydia E. (Hoffman) Yeamans, the 
former a native of Virginia and the latter of Pennsylvania. The father was a miller 
by trade and removed to Iowa, locating in Marshall county at an early day. There he 
acquired land which he improved and cultivated for many years to good advantage. He 
finally retired, taking up his residence in Marshalltown. where he remained for a few 
years, at the end of which period he came to Akron, Colorado, which remained his home 
until his death on November 17, 1898. His widow survived him only a short time, 
passing away in 1899. 

Charles N. Yeamans was reared under the parental roof and received his education 
in the public schools of Marshall county, Iowa. He then learned the trade of carriage 
painting and continued in this work for several years. In ISSO he went to Frontier 
county, Nebraska, where he took up a homestead claim, improving his land and operat- 
ing it for some time. From there he made his way to Cambridge, Furnas county. 
Nebraska, where he and his brother were engaged in business for several years, or 
until 1885, which year marked their arrival in Akron. Our subject and his brother upon 
coming to this city engaged in the hardware and implement business and successfully 
continued along this line for about seventeen years, when Charles N. Yeamans acquired 
the interest of his brother and he has since conducted the business on his own account. 
Under his able management it has grown by leaps and bounds and his strict 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 161 

integrity has secured to him a patronage that is valuable and extensive. He has greatly 
added to the lines which were originally carried by the firm and today he not only 
deals in hardware, furniture and harness goods but he also carries agricultural im- 
plements, as well as vehicles and wagons, also having on hand sheet iron and doing 
galvanized iron work. Moreover, he has added an undertaking branch and has installed 
all modern facilities necessary to conduct funeral services in a dignified way. By his 
untiring energy and managerial ability he has built up a business which is considered 
one of the most important in his section of the state and its continuous existence of 
over thirty-three years indicates the reputation which the house enjoys with the public. 
His customers are treated with courtesy and politeness and the goods sold are what 
they are represented to be. Mr. Yeamans' method is to give satisfaction and it may be 
said of his patrons that the phrase, "once a customer, always a customer," holds good. 
He carries complete assortments in his establishment and all who come to him for 
their purchases have the benefit of being enabled to select from the best goods made 
by the most highly reputed manufacturers in their respective lines, in the United 
States. By careful buying and taking opportune advantages of market and conditions 
Mr. Yeamans is often enabled to offer his wares at more than reasonable prices and 
these opportunities to thus buy quality goods are appreciated by the public. 

On September 28, 1888, Mr. Yeamans was united in marriage to Miss Sadie Walters 
and to them have been born two children. Glenn O., who is a fine musician and plays 
the baritone horn, is now a corporal with the Three Hundred and Eighth Arizona 
Cavalry Band and is stationed at Douglas, Arizona. Max, the younger son, is yet at 
home. 

Although Mr. Yeamans' mercantile interests are large and demand most of his time 
and attention, he has participated in the public life of his community and served as the 
first town clerk of Akron and was also a member of the council for many years. PYom his 
commercial pursuits he derived the means which enabled him to develop twelve hundred 
acres of land, bringing the same to a high state of cultivation. These twelve hundred 
acres are comprised in two farms which he owns and both of which are located close 
to the town of Akron. They are well improved and all modern machinery and facilities 
may be found upon his holdings. He always follows the latest methods in his farm 
work and it may be mentioned in this connection that only recently he sold, from two 
hundred and forty acres, fall wheat to the value of five thousand, five hundred dollars. 
However, at present he leases his farms, receiving a very gratifying rental. Politically 
Mr. Yeamans is a republican and his religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, to which he has belonged all his life and in the work of which he takes the 
deepest interest. He is helpful in maintaining the organization and has assisted many 
charities and institutions which have for their purpose moral and intellectual develop- 
ment. Fraternally he belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights of 
The Maccabees. He is ever ready to lend a helping hand where aid is needed in pro- 
moting the public welfare and has proven himself a public-spirited citizen. Such success 
as has come to him is due entirely to his own labors and none can grudge him the 
prosperity which has attended his efforts. His many friends in Akron and vicinity 
speak of him in the highest terms of appreciation and acknowledge his high qualities 
of character. His business principles place him with the most reliable merchants of 
the county and in these cireles his word is considered as good as his bond. 



THOMAS P. REHDER. 



Commercial and financial interests of Otis and Washington county, Colorado, are 
prominently represented by Thomas P. Rehder, whose activities have not only resulted 
in individual prosperity but have been a valuable factor in the general development of 
his section. Mr. Rehder is not only successfully engaged in the hardware and implement 
business in Otis but he has also taken an important part in the organization of the 
Farmers State Bank, of which he serves as president. Although the active routine work 
of the bank naturally falls largely to the cashier, Mr. Rehder as president of the organi- 
zation has a paramount part in laying down the policy to be followed, and the success 
which this financial institution has thus far enjoyed — it has been in existence for two 
years — is largely to be ascribed to the wise direction and sound business principles of 
Mr. Rehder. 

Thomas P. Rehder was born in Tama county, Iowa, March 5, 1879, a son of Peter and 
Annie (Kammer) Rehder, natives of Germany. The former came to America when 
seventeen years of age and for a short time was located in Davenport, Iowa, whence he 

Vol. IV— H 



162 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

went to Tama county, that state, where for a few years he worked out as a farm hand. 
Carefully saving his earnings, he accumulated the means which permitted him to buy 
land and he improved and operated his farm until 1885, when he went to O'Brien county, 
Iowa, where he again bought a farm, which he cultivated until 1901. He always employed 
the latest methods in his farming operations and placed many modern improvements 
upon his land, making it a valuable property. He now resides in Calumet. O'Brien 
county, Iowa, having retired from active work. His wife passed away in 1881. 

Thomas P. Rehder was reared under the parental root and received his education 
in the schools of O'Brien county. Iowa, being five years of age when his father removed 
to that district. Having completed his education, he hired out as a farm hand for 
two years but at the end of that period took up clerking, so continuing for a year. He 
and his father then established a general store in Calumet and for nine years they con- 
ducted the same, deriving a gratifying income from the enterprise. He then determined 
to seek the opportunities of the farther west and in 1910 came to Otis, Washington 
county, Colorado, deciding upon this place as a favorable location for the establishment 
of a new mercantile business. He opened a hardware and implement store and this he 
has successfully conducted ever since. He carries a complete line of heavy and shelf 
hardware and his well selected assortment entirely meets the demands of his customers. 
His implement department is well stocked and he carries the latest lines in farm 
machinery. His goods are of the best quality and everything Mr. Rehder sells is as he 
represents it to be. His honorable principles have insured him a reputation for fair 
dealing which extends far over the boundaries of his city and he today enjoys a trade 
from a large section of Washington county. In 1911 he erected a modern store building, 
which he has since occupied, and the growth of his business may be inferred from the 
fact that after a few years even this store did not prove large enough and in 1917 he 
had to build an addition in order to accommodate his large stock. In the same year he 
became an active factor in the organization of the Farmers State Bank of Otis and upon 
its incorporation was elected president of the institution. The bank is founded upon 
solid and conservative principles and its deposits today exceed one hundred and twenty- 
five thousand dollars. 

In October, 1903, Mr. Rehder was united in marriage to Miss Louise Boldenow and 
to them have been born five children: Burnell J. P., Orval H., Bernice H., Elda L. and 
Florine M. 

Mr. Rehder is a republican and unswervingly supports the measures and candidates 
of that party. He- has taken a helpful part in the public life of his community, in the 
growth of which he is deeply interested and to which he has contributed by his business 
activities, and since the incorporation of the town he has served as a member of the 
town council, having now held that ofRce for one and a half years. He is thoroughly 
convinced of the value of education and warmly champions the improvement of educa- 
tional facilities for the benefit of the young. As a member of the local school board 
and also of the county high school board he finds ample scope to follow out his ideas in 
regard to educational improvements and has done valuable work in raising school stand- 
ards in his town and county. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church, in the 
work of *hich he is actively interested. In coming to Colorado, Mr. Rehder has found 
the opportunities for business development which he sought and he has made good use 
of these opportunities, his ability, energy and determination winning for him substan- 
tial material prosperity. 



DAVID C. GUIRE. 

David C. Guire, who died July 23, 1902, was one of the honored pioneer settlers 
of Colorado who bravely faced the hardships and privations as well as the dangers of 
frontier life and aided in reclaiming the region for the purpose of civilization. A 
native of Indiana, he was born on the 22d of March, 1833. Early in life he went to 
Decatur county, Iowa, with his parents and there pursued his education. During 
vacation periods he worked upon the home farm and after his textbooks were put aside 
took up the occupation of farming as a life work. He engaged in tilling the soil in 
Iowa until 1862, when he removed westward to Colorado, making his way to Monu- 
ment, where he took up a homestead and a preemption claim consisting of three 
hundred and twenty acres of land. During the Indian troubles at Monument in 1868 
he was active in fighting and subduing the red men, who went upon the warpath, 
murdering and pillaging, and burning the homes of many of the settlers. Property was 
unprotected, all life was unsafe, but men of courageous spirit such as Mr. Guire came 



164 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

valiantly to the front and aided in bringing into subjection the savages who resented 
what they considered inroads upon their rights to the country. As a pioneer Mr. Guire 
contributed in large measure to the development and upbuilding of the district. When 
these hard conditions of pioneer life were somewhat allayed his efforts and attention were 
concentrated on the further development and cultivation of his land and in time he came 
to be the owner of a highly improved ranch property consisting of two hundred and 
fifty-nine acres, he having sold twenty-one acres for a reservoir and later disposed of 
forty acres. 

Mr. Guire first married Nancy Thorn, who died in 1865, leaving the following 
children: Robert, who passed away in 1902; Delilah, who married Thomas Graney and 
died about 1899, leaving seven children; Selina; Almira; Annie; and Mackey, who died 
when five years of age. For his second wife Mr. Guire chose Mrs. Elizabeth Wise, 
the widow of Dr. C. H. Wise, a Civil war veteran, who following the close of hostilities 
came to Colorado for the benefit of his health but passed away four years later. Dr. 
and Mrs. Wise had two children: Edgar Wise, who passed away June 17, 1904; and 
Zorah, who became the wife of Albert Bassett, of Colorado Springs. The latter had 
seven children, as follows: Crawford, who is a member of the United States army with 
the rank of corporal of Company C, Eighth Division, Ammunition Train; Frances; 
Harry, who died when fifteen years of age; Clyde; Wilbur; Alice; and Glen. Mr. and 
Mrs. Guire had two children: Walter, who died in infancy; and Ida Pauline Guire, who 
was born January 3, 1881. She is a high school graduate of Castle Rock, Colorado, and 
is the wife of Charles Garrett, a rancher living near Monument. They have become the 
parents of six sons and a daughter: Frances, Harold, Paul, Howard, David, Raymond 
and Ralph. The last named died in infancy. 

In his political views Mr. Guire was a democrat. His religious faith was that of the 
Dunkard church and fraternally he was connected with the Masons, belonging to the 
lodge at Colorado Springs. His worth as a man and citizen was widely acknowledged. 
He had many sterling traits of character, among which was his loyalty in friendship 
and his devotion to the welfare and happiness of his family. In business affairs he 
was always thoroughly reliable as well as progressive and his enterprise carried him 
into important relations with the agricultural development of his section of the state. 
As one of the pioneers he contributed much to advancement and improvement here 
and aided in laying broad and deep the foundation upon which has been built the 
present prosperity of the district. 



ARTHUR SCOTT MILLER. 



Arthur Scott Miller enjoys peculiar distinction as a prime factor in the mam- 
moth building operations of the past forty years in Denver — a period marked by an 
entire revolution, the principal feature of which in recent years is the modern apart- 
ment house, at once a real utility and an ornament to the city. He is credited with 
the erection of so many buildings of this character in Denver that he has become 
known in Colorado as "Apartment House Miller." Many buildings which he has 
erected are the principal ornaments of their respective neighborhoods, pleasing to the 
eye and constructed with conscientious regard for real utility and the comfort and 
health of their inmates. In all these large concerns he has not only been a contributor 
to the wealth of the city through the creation of much valuable property but has 
brought great benefit to the community in providing homes for a multitude of worthy 
families of the middle class and in furnishing employment to hundreds of workmen. 
Real estate in all parts of the city where he has operated has rapidly advanced in 
value and unsightly vacancies have, through his efforts, become occupied by attractive 
edifices. He is indeed widely known as the builder and owner of the largest num- 
ber of modern apartment houses of the capital and, moreover, is the originator of 
•what is known as the buffet apartment. The story of his life work is an interesting 
one, as it is marked by many a forward step, showing his adaptability to the oppor- 
tunity that has been presented. 

Arthur Scott Miller was born on a farm in Kent county, Michigan. November 13, 
184S, a son of Jerad and Jeannette (McPherson) Miller. He is a representative in the 
seventh generation of the family in America, the progenitors of whom were William 
and Patience Bliller, who came to the new world from England in 1630 and were 
among the founders of Farmington, Connecticut, and afterward among the founders 
of the city of Northampton, Massachusetts. In the latter place they reared their 
family. Stephen Miller, the great-grandfather of Arthur S. Miller, was a soldier of 



w 






\ 




ARTHUR S. MILLER 



166 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the Revolutionary war, was with Colonel Ethan Allen at Ticonderoga and was present 
at the surrender of General Burgoyne. Mr. Miller of this review is therefore eligible 
to membership in the Sons of the American Revolution. His father was born in 
Wyoming county, New York, and in 1846 removed to Kent county, Michigan, where 
he settled on virgin soil, becoming one of the pioneer agriculturists of that locality. 
As the years passed he became wealthy through his carefully conducted business 
Interests and in his later years lived retired, passing away on the old homestead. 
His wife was born in Monroe county. New York, and they were married In the Empire 
state but soon afterward removed to Michigan, where their ten children were born 
and reared. Mrs. Miller passed away, as did her husband, upon the old home farm 
In Kent county. 

When a youth of fifteen years Arthur Scott Miller enlisted for service in the 
United States navy in the war of the rebellion and was on active duty tor a year 
or until the close of hostilities. He lost his eldest brother, George W. Miller, in the 
war, the latter meeting death at the battle of Fair Oaks. Virginia. After having re- 
ceived an honorable discharge from the navy, Arthur Scott Miller devoted a part 
of his time to work upon the old home farm and also attended the district and later 
the city schools, and college until he reached his twenty-first year. His academic 
work was done at Kalamazoo College in Michigan and later in Cornell University. 
He left the latter institution to take up the profession of teaching, in the schools of 
Michigan, and while thus engaged in educational work he devoted his leisure time 
to preparation for a position as court stenographer and also to preparation for 
newspaper work. In the latter field he found much satisfaction. He became a 
reporter on papers published at Grand Rapids, Michigan, and at Buffalo, New York, 
and while thus employed he assisted in reporting the Beecher-Tilden trial for the 
New York Tribune, which created wide interest and a deep sensation at that time. 
Having qualified for court reporting, he afterward devoted his time and attention to 
such work as well as to newspaper reporting for a number of years. He was at 
different periods identified with newspapers of Buffalo. New York, Cleveland, Ohio, 
Fort Wayne, Indiana, and Denver, Colorado. He established his home In the Queen 
City of the Plains in March, 1S80, and was made official stenographer of the district 
court of the second judicial district under Judge Victor A. Elliott, serving from 
1881 until Judge Elliott left the district bench to take his place upon the supreme 
bench in 1889. During his incumbency as stenographer to the district court Mr. 
Sparnick, the clerk, died, and, at Judge Elliott's request, Mr. Miller filled the position 
of clerk as well as that of stenographer, until a new appointment for clerk could 
be made. While in newspaper work Mr. Miller reported speeches of many notable 
men, including Senator Roscoe Conkling, Carl Schurz, Chauncey Depew, Emory Storrs 
and many others. He also reported many law cases in which distinguished men 
appeared as counsel. While engaged in professional court stenographic work he also 
took up the study of law and was regularly admitted to the bars of Indiana and of 
Colorado, but he never entered actively upon practice. He still retains his mem- 
bership, however, in the law bodies of the state and has found his knowledge of law 
an invaluable aid to him in the transaction of his business. While employed in 
stenographic work he gained intimate knowledge of technical matters of practice, 
particularly relating to appeals and writs of error, and his advice was often sought 
by lawyers while he was connected with the courts. 

While following his professional duties Mr. Miller became interested in real estate 
investments for the conservation of his earnings and incidentally learned that in 
architectural work and building operations he had found a most congenial field of 
labor. So successfully did he operate along those lines that he was induced to 
abandon both the law and stenographic work and devote his entire time and attention 
to the productive building industry. He has been the builder of many fine resi- 
dences, business blocks, family hotels and apartment houses. He has acted as his own 
architect, has superi'ised the construction of buildings and his work in this connec- 
tion has contributed nearly one hundred structures to Denver. He has made a 
study of the apartment house and he has the distinction of having been the first to 
build the buffet apartment. Many there were who predicted the failure of this, but 
results have proven otherwise. Among the more recent apartment buildings put 
up by Mr. Miller are the Toltec, Magnolia, Mayfair, Darlington and Doris, all of 
which and others he still owns. He has ever studied to combine utility, sanitation, 
convenience, comfort and beauty and the results achieved have been most satisfactory. 

In 1877, at Fort Wayne, Indiana, Mr. Miller was married to Miss Louise Lytle, 
a daughter of William and Nancy (Bird) Lytle, the latter being a member of the 
James Bird family, especially mentioned in connection with the history of the War 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 167 

of 1S12. Mrs. Miller died while on a visit in Fargo, North Dakota, in July, 1885. 
There were two children of this marriage. Irene, born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, is the 
wife of Frank Goodman, of San Diego, California, and they have two children: Frank 
Goodman, Jr., who served in the Coast Artillery until the close of the war, when he 
received his honorable discharge from the army and returned to his position as artist 
and cartoonist on the San Diego Union: and John Goodman, of San Diego. Roland 
Miller, the son, was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and is prominent as an architect 
of Denver, in business with his father. In 1893 Mr. Miller was married at DeKalb, 
Illinois, to Mrs. Emma Elwood, who had two daughters by a former marriage, namely: 
Mrs. Raymond Sargent, of Denver; and Mrs. W. E. D. Stokes, of New York city. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Miller have been born two children. Victor Arthur, who was born 
In Denver, was graduated from the high school of this city with honors as a mem- 
ber of the class of 191.5, numbering two hundred and sixty-six students. The same 
year, at the age of sixteen, he entered Yale University and continued there until the 
completion of the work of the Junior year in 1918, when he joined the United States 
army and received a coolmission as second lieutenant while but nineteen, having 
trained for nearly two years in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps at Yale University. 
In addition to military work in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, which was 
strenuous and is akin to the work exacted of West Point cadets, he carried all of 
his academic studies with "A" markings, receiving at the end of the junior year 
the much coveted gold key of the Phi Beta Kappa society, there having been only 
fifteen so honored out of a class of twenty-five hundred. He served for one month in 
the training camp at New Haven, Connecticut, in 1918 and also two months at Camp 
Jackson, South Carolina, where he received his commission. He was then ordered 
to Camp Zachary Taylor in Kentucky, where his training in the field artillery was 
completed, and he served for a time as an Instructor at that camp. Having received 
his honorable discharge from the army after the close of the war, Victor A. Miller 
returned to Yale to complete his interrupted academic course, and to graduate and 
receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts, in June 1919. Marcella Miller, the younger 
of the two children, is now fifteen years of age and is a member of the junior class 
in the Wolcott School. She is a devotee of athletics, standing high as a tennis 
player, and is also a golf enthusiast. She drives a gas car like a professional, is 
a fine horseback rider, skater and all 'round athlete and is very popular with the 
younger society set in Denver. 

Such in brief is the history of Arthur Scott Miller who, ever actuated by a 
laudable ambition, has carefully and wisely utilized his opportunities and as the 
years have gone on has reached a most creditable place not only in the business circles 
of his adopted city but also in the high regard of Its leading men. 



ARTHUR E. GAINES. 



There are many who have attempted to define success and to establish rules for its 
attainment. Careful analyzation into the cause of business advancement always brings 
the individual to the conclusion that one of its indispensable concomitants is unfaltering 
industry, a fact which Arthur E. Gaines grasped at the outset of his career, and the fact 
has influenced his entire connection with business life. He realized, too, that in com- 
mercial activities one must give value received and that there is no better advertisement 
than satisfied patrons. His business methods, therefore, have ever measured up to the 
highest commercial standards and he is now senior partner in The Gaines & Erb Manu- 
facturing Company in Denver, manufacturers of artificial limbs, also dies, tools and 
mechanical work. 

Mr. Gaines was born in Council Bluffs. Iowa, January 25, 1876, and is descended from 
one of three brothers who came to the new world on the Mayflower at the time of the 
colonization of New England. His father, the late Makee C. Gaines, was a native of 
Vermont, his birth having occurred at Castleton, that state, where his ancestors had 
lived through several generations. He, however, left New England to try his fortune in 
the new but rapidly developing west and settled in Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he took 
up his abode in the latter '70s. For a quarter of a century, covering the last period of 
his life, he was with the Grand Union Tea Company of Council Bluffs, where he con- 
tinued to make his home until called to his final rest. He passed away March 31, 1918, 
at the age of sixty-eight years, his birth having occurred September 11, 1849. He was a 
man of domestic tastes who took no active part in clubs or politics but outside of busi- 
ness hours spent his time with his family. In matters of citizenship, he was a loyal and 



168 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

devoted American, giving his earnest support and effort at all times to the furtherance 
of the Interests of state and nation. He married MInta Englesperger, -who was born In 
Ohio and is of German lineage. She is still living and occupies the old home at Council 
Bluffs. They became the parents of five children. 

Arthur E. Gaines whose name introduces this review was the second in order of 
birth of his father's family and in the public schools of his native city he pursued his 
education to the age of thirteen years, when necessity prompted him to start out in the 
business world on his own account. He was first employed in the sales department of 
the Standard Oil Company at Council Bluffs and continued with that corporation for 
five years. He afterward became a street car conductor for the Omaha & Council Bluffs 
Street Railway Company and was engaged in that work for three and a half years. 
Later he was with the Union Pacific Railroad Company as a brakeman, making the run 
between Grand Island and North Platte, Nebraska. He continued in the railroad service 
for four years, or until January, 1902, when he met with an accident which occasioned 
the loss of his right leg. After recovering from his injuries he went to Chicago to be 
fitted with an artificial leg and his interest in the matter resulted in his taking employ- 
ment with a dealer in artificial limbs. He there thoroughly learned the business in all 
its departments and it was wliile there that he made the acquaintance of Arthur A. Erb, 
his present partner. At length they determined to engage in business on their own 
account and sought a profitable field of labor in the west. In 1904 they came to Denver 
and established their business at its present location. The beginning was small but with 
the passing of time the firm has built up a very extensive trade, their patronage exceed- 
ing that of any other establishment in the same line of manufacture in the west. They 
make shipments to all parts of the world and have a branch establishment in Pueblo. 
With the passing years tlieir business has further increased and they employ twenty- 
eight skilled workmen and yet, the efforts of these men can by no means supply the 
demand. 

On the 14th of October, 1903 Mr. Gaines was married in Council Bluffs to Miss Rose 
Shearon, a native of Indiana and a daugliter of L. and Minnie (Kirby) Shearon, the 
former now living, while the latter has passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Gaines have a daugh- 
ter, Minta Le Rea, who was born in Denver, February 8, 1907. The family reside at 
No. 1736 Franklin street, where Mr. Gaines owns his home. 

His military experience covers service with the old Third Regiment of the Iowa 
National Guard, in which he served as a noncommissioned officer. His political alle- 
giance has always been given to the republican party and fraternally he is an Odd Fellow 
of high degree. He is also the present czar of the Muscovites and is chief patriarch 
of the encampment branch. In fact, he is very active in the order and is treasurer of 
the cantons of the military brancli of tlie Odd Fellows. During one of its military drills 
his team won the grand prize, a silver cup as well as money. Mr. Gaines is also a past 
president of the general relief department of the Odd Fellows Society of Denver and is 
a member of the Grand Lodge of Colorado. He likewise belongs to the Brotherhood of 
Railway Trainmen, to Denver Lodge, No. 21, Loyal Order of Moose, to the Lions Club 
and to the Kiwanis Club of Denver. He belongs to St. Stephen's Episcopal church. An 
active member of the Denver Civic and Commercial Association he is also a member of 
the board of directors of the Denver Manufacturers Association. His activities are thus 
broad and varied and touch the general interests of society in many ways, his aid and 
influence being always given on the side of progress and improvement. His wife is 
active in the Red Cross and in other public matters affecting the general welfare. Both 
are highly esteemed and Mr. Gaines is recognized as a close student of the many prob- 
lems which affect general progress and which have bearing upon the business develop- 
ment of Denver. He is highly esteemed as a man, respected as a citizen and his personal 
qualities are such as have won for him warm friendships. 



DENNIS SHEEDY. 

Dennis Sheedy, conducting a profitable business at Brush as proprietor of the 
Sheedy Mercantile Company, was born in Canton, Illinois, on the 3d of March, 1868, 
a son of Michael and Johanna (Callahan) Sheedy, who were natives of Ireland and 
who came to America at an early day, establishing their home in Illinois. The father 
was a railroad contractor, which business he followed until 1871, when he removed 
to Nebraska, where he took up land and began the development and improvement of 
a farm, continuing its further cultivation until his life's labors were ended in death. 
He passed away in the year 1900 and liis widow survived him until 1907. He was a 




DENNIS SHEEDY 



170 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

brother of Dennis Sheedy of Denver, a prominent banker and the president of the 
Denver Dry Goods Company. 

Dennis Sheedy of this review, who was named for his uncle, was reared and 
educated in Nebraska and also at St. Marys, Kansas. When his course was completed 
he made his initial step in the business world by securing a clerkship in a store. He 
followed clerking for several years and in 1904 removed to Yuma, Colorado, where he 
worked for three years. On the expiration of that period he came to Brush, Morgan 
county, and purchased the general merchandise stock of Ole Nelson. He afterward 
sold an interest in the business to Mr. Nelson's daughter and the store was conducted 
under the name of the Nelson-Sheedy Mercantile Company for five years, when Mr. 
Sheedy disposed of his interest to the Nelsons and bought out the general merchandise 
establishment of O. C. Jensen. He has since conducted business alone and has built 
up a trade of large and gratifying proportions. He carefully manages his business 
affairs and his progressive spirit is bringing excellent results. He puts forth every 
possible effort to please his patrons and has ever realized that satisfied customers 
are the best advertisement. He is also a stockholder and one of the directors of 
the Stockmen's National Bank of Brush. 

In June, 1906, occurred the marriage of Mr. Sheedy and Miss Hattie Giddings. 
Their religious faith is that of the Catholic church and fraternally Mr. Sheedy is 
connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His political allegiance is 
given to the democratic party and for four years he has served as a member of the 
town board of Brush. 



G. BRINTON HEPP, M. D. 



Training in Cornell College, in the Chicago Medical College, experience in St. Luke's 
Hospital in Chicago and active practice in Buffalo, New York, have qualified Dr. G. 
Brinton Hepp for the important professional work that he has done as a physician and 
surgeon since coming to Denver in 1910. He was born in Armor, New York, January 22, 
1866, and is a son of Louis Hepp, a native of Sipperfeldt, Germany, whence he camei 
to America in 1850. He settled at Armor. New York, and now resides in Hamburg, 
that state. He was for many years engaged in mercantile pursuits at Armor and was 
active in support of educational movements and of civic interests. For years he served 
as a trustee of the Armor school board and did everything in his power to promote the 
cause of public education. He married Caroline Ackerman, who was of German descent 
but was born in the Empire state. She also is living. They became the parents of 
four children, three of whom survive: Edward, who is now an agriculturist living at 
Hamburg, New York; Perry, a practicing dentist of Denver; and G. Brinton of this 
review, who was the second in order of birth. 

G. Brinton Hepp was reared on his father's farm and early in life acquired a prac- 
tical knowledge of farm labor. During his college years he passed his vacations at 
home on this farm which''he really considered his home until the age of twenty-flve 
years. After mastering the branches of learning taught in the public schools of Armor, 
Dr. Hepp continued his education in Hamburg Academy, now the Hamburg high school, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1886. He next entered Cornell University, 
where he pursued a scientific course, being graduated from the Ithaca institution with 
the Bachelor of Science degree. He next entered the Chicago Medical College, in which 
he completed his course in 1891, and after his graduation he took further work in the 
Post Graduate Hospital, where he acted as interne for a year. He was also connected 
with St. Luke's Hospital of Chicago in a similar capacity and began the private prac- 
tice of his profession in Buffalo, New York. He located there in 1893 and continued 
an active member of the profession in that city for seventeen years, or until 1910. when 
he removed to Denver. He has since been in active and continuous practice in Colorado 
and his recognized ability has won him professional prominence and success. He 
belongs to the Denver City and County Medical Society, the Colorado State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association. 

Dr. Hepp was married in 1902 to Miss Frances French, a native of Rochester, New 
York, and a daughter of Orra Clark and Anna French. They have become parents of 
two children: Clark Louis, who was born in Buffalo, New York, December 6, 1902; and 
Florence Frances, born in Buffalo, December 31, 1904. 

While a student at Cornell. Dr. Hepp had two years' military training, which covers 
his military experience. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party and 
he alw^ays keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day, but has never 




DR. G. BRINTON HEPP 



172 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

sought or desired office. Fraternally he is a Mason, belonging to Liberty Lodge, of 
which he served as treasurer, and his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church, 
which has guided him in all of his life's relations. Dr. Hepp is today one of the 
respected citizens and valued representatives of professional life in Denver. Thoroughly 
satisfied with the west, he expects to make this city his home throughout his remaining 
days and in Denver he has built up a very large practice, which has come to him in 
recognition of his professional skill and ability. He is most conscientious in the dis- 
charge of all of his professional duties, is careful in diagnosis and his analysis of a 
case is seldom if ever at fault. He is keenly interested in everything that has bearing 
upon his profession and his broad reading keeps him in touch with the latest research 
work and scientific development that has to do with the practice of medicine and surgery. 
He does not hastily discard old and time-tried methods, yet he keeps in touch with 
the trend of modern thought and utilizes every available means that will assist him 
in the pursuit of professional activity. 



HARRY J. ENGLISH. 



Harry J. English, connected with the wholesale lumber business of Denver as presi- 
dent of the R. W. English Lumber Company, was born in Ludlow, Illinois, September 
25, 1870, a son of Robert Wallace and Ella (Crawford) English, the former a native of 
Erie, Pennsylvania, while the latter was born in Greenupsberg, Kentucky. In early life 
they removed to Illinois, where the father engaged in the lumber business. He became 
a resident of Chicago in 1S75 and there continued until 1888, when he came to Denver 
and organized the R. W. English Lumber Company, making this city the headquarters 
for the business, which in its varied trade relations covers a wide territory. He con- 
tinued as president of the company until his death, which occurred in 1916, when he had 
reached the age of seventy-one years. He was thus long an active factor in the trade 
circles of city and state and his enterprise and progressiveness carried him into impor- 
tant connections. • At the time of the Civil war he responded to the country's call for 
troops, enlisting in the Sixty-eighth Illinois Infantry, with which he served for some 
time. His salient traits of character were of a most commendable nature and his enter- 
prise and ability brought him to a prominent position during his residence in Colorado. 
His widow survives and is yet residing in Denver. They had two children. 

Harry J. English was a pupil in private schools of Chicago and afterward attended 
the Phillips Exeter Academy, of Exeter. New Hampshire. He later entered Yale Uni- 
versity and after finishing his education came to Denver, the family having in the mean- 
time removed to this city. Here he became associated with his father in the lumber 
business and after the father's death was elected to the presidency of the R. W. English 
Lumber Company and has since directed its interests. He is thoroughly familiar with 
every phase of the lumber trade and his executive force and wise direction have been 
strong elements in the further development of the business. 

In 1896 Mr. English was married to Miss Mary K. Jackson, of Schenectady, New 
York, a daughter of Colonel Jackson of the United States army. They have one son, 
Allan Jackson, who was born in Denver, November 15, 1898. He attended Pomfret School 
of Pomfret, Connecticut, preparing there for Yale University which he entered in the 
class of 1919 S. He is now serving as second lieutenant of field artillery in the United 
States army. 

Mr. English is a member of the Denver Club and Denver Country Club. He is promi- 
nent in social and club life and enjoys a personal popularity among a large circle of 
friends and acquaintances. 



ROADY KENEHAN. 



Roady Kenehan, prominent in labor circles of Colorado for many years, has devoted 
much of his life to public service. He was born in Rathdowny, Queens county, Ireland, 
May 1, 1856. a son of Thomas and Bridget (Bacon) Kenehan. The father engaged in 
blacksmithing and horseshoeing, a pursuit which the ancestors had followed through 
generations. 

Roady Kenehan acquired a common school education in Rathdowny and when 
nine years of age began learning the trade of horseshoeing and became an expert work- 



HISTORY OF COLORADO , 173 

man along that line. For many yeal-s he continued active in blaclismithing. He came 
to the United States in 1873 making Philadelphia his home. 

He received military training as a member of the Fencibles of Pennsylvania, and 
Gallo Glasses, an Irish regiment, which had its origin in 1564, when Shawn O'Neill went 
to England to make terms of peace with Queen Elizabeth. The Gallo Glasses carried 
a battle axe, and wore a wolf dog skin over their left shoulder. They were O'Neill's 
bodyguard on this momentous occasion. This regiment is in existence in many parts 
of the world where Irish, and men of Irish descent, are located. 

Leaving Philadelphia in the spring of 1S79, Mr. Kenehan traveled west to North 
Dakota. He came to Denver, April 7, 1880. He was for twenty years secretary-treasurer 
of the Journeymen's Horseshoers International Union of the United States and Canada 
and during that period worked continuously at horseshoeing. 

In Denver, Mr. Kenehan was married to Miss Julia Casey, a daughter of Martin 
Casey and their children are: Thomas, Ella, Katharine, Grace, Ready, Jr., and Martin. 

Mr. JCenehan has always given his political allegiance to the democratic party and 
has been a most earnest worker in behalf of labor in the ranks of the democratic party. 
In April, 1897, he was appointed a member of the newly created board of arbitration 
by Governor Adams. At the expiration of his first term, he was reappointed by Governor 
Thomas, and for a third term in 1901 by Governor Orman. In May, 1904, he was elected 
supervisor for the first district of Denver. He closed his term in this office in May, 
1908, and the following November was elected state auditor of Colorado. Two years later 
he was elected state treasurer, and in 1912 was again elected state auditor. On July 22, 
1917, Mr. Kenehan was appointed by Secretary of War Baker, a member of District 
Draft Board No. 2 for the state of Colorado. He was elected secretary of the draft board 
and held that position during its existence. He was a member of the Colorado state labor 
advisory board and filled the office of secretary during the existence of the board. On 
April IS, 1918, he received the appointment of federal director of labor for Colorado from 
Secretary of Labor Wilson. 

Mr. Kenehan's study of labor conditions has been most thorough and comprehensive. 
He is a broad-minded man of wide vision and with a spirit responsive to equity and fair- 
ness in all regards. He has sought just solution for many problems with which he has 
had to deal and his work in connection with Colorado and the war is of great value to 
vealth and country. 



JAMES BENJAMIN WALKER. 

James Benjamin Walker is the owner of a splendid farm property improved 
with all modern equipment, in the vicinity of Husted, and in his business career 
has ever displayed the spirit of typical western enterprise and progress. He is a 
native son of Colorado, his birth having occurred near Monument, August 12, 1864, 
his parents being Henry B. and Mary Walker, the former a native of Illinois, while 
the latter was born in Germany. The father became one of the pioneer settlers 
of Colorado, having crossed the plains in 1860, and during the Indian troubles of 
1868 his home and buildings were destroyed by the red men, at which time he was 
residing on a claim near Monument. Subsequent to the Indian troubles he bought 
a relinquishment of a Mr. Cousins and thus came into possession of a ranch, six 
miles south of Monument, whereon he resided until 1907, when he sold that prop- 
erty and took up his abode in Colorado Springs. A year later he removed to Den- 
ver, where he passed away in 1914 and where his widow still resides. 

James Benjamin Walker was reared under the parental roof and early be- 
came an active assistant of his father in the work of developing and improving the 
ranch. He continued to assist his father until he felt able to start out in business 
on his own account, at which time he purchased his present ranch property, com- 
prising nine hundred acres, lying in a beautiful green valley about three miles 
off the main highway, leading toward Colorado Springs from Monument. He has 
greatly improved his property, bringing the fields under a high state of cultiva- 
tion and pasturing two hundred head of cattle on his rich meadow lands. He has 
attractive modern buildings and all the substantial improvements found upon a 
model farm of the twentieth century, including a large silo. He Is recognized as 
one of the leading and most progressive farmers of the community. 

In 1907 Mr. Walker was united in marriage to Miss Janet Reid, a native of 
Scotland and a daughter of Robert and Maggie (McTavish) Reid. Her mother 
died when Mrs. Walker was but six weeks old and she was reared by her aunt, 




RANCH OF JAMES B. WALKER 



176 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Maggie Reid, with whom she came to America at the age of six years, arriving in 
Chicago on the 20th of January, 1878, and there she received her education. For 
a number of years she lived with her uncle, Alexander McCormack, at Palmer Lake, 
Colorado, and for two years was a resident of Denver. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walker are widely and favorably known in the district in which 
they reside, enjoying the friendship and kindly regard of all with whom they have 
come in contact. Mr. Walker stands as one of the most progressive agriculturists 
of his community and his methods may well be followed by those who wish to make 
their efforts along agricultural lines count for the utmost. 



FREDERICK RUSSELL McILHENNEY. 

Frederick Russell Mcllhenney, who has been closely identified with ranching 
interests in Elbert county and with political activities as well, was born in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, on the 14th of April, 1856, a son of William S. and Katherine (Achuff) 
Mcllhenney, the former of Scotch-Irish lineage, while the latter came of Pennsylvania 
Dutch ancestry. His education was acquired in the public schools of his native city 
and he was a youth of seventeen years when on the 11th of May, 1873, he arrived in 
Colorado, settling first at Colorado Springs. In 1875 he removed to Riverbend, in 
Elbert county, and has since resided within the borders of the county, covering a period 
of forty-three years. He has been active in its business affairs and in its development. 
For many years he engaged in ranching and for two decades he conducted a store in 
Riverbend. His fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth, have called him to public 
office and for four years he has served as assessor of Elbert county. In 1918 he was 
given the republican nomination for county treasurer and he is regarded as one of 
the leaders of his party in his section of the state. 

Mr. Mcllhenney was married thirty-seven years ago to Miss Mary Hudson, In 
what is now the city of Eastonville, Colorado. They became the parents of four sons 
and two daughters. Two of these children have passed away: Theodore, who died in 
1913 at the age of twenty-nine years; and Evelyn, who died in infancy. Two of the 
living sons are married and one son is now in the service of his country, being 
stationed at this writing (December, 1918) in England. As one of the pioneers of 
Colorado, Mr. Mcllhenney has for forty-five years witnessed its growth and develop- 
ment and throughout the entire period has borne his share in the work of public 
progress and improvement. He can relate many an interesting incident concerning 
the early days and conditions which then existed and his memory forms one of the 
connecting links between the pioneer past and the progressive present. 



WILLIAM M. LAMPTON. 



William M. Lampton is the genial and well known general freight agent of the 
Denver & Rio Grande Railroad at Denver. He has faithfully served this company for 
nearly twenty-seven years and is one of the most popular representatives of railroad 
interests in this section of the country. He was born in Pettis county, Missouri, Sep- 
tember 2. 1863, a son of Mitchell M. and Elizabeth (Rowland) Lampton, both of whom 
were natives of Kentucky, whence they removed to Missouri in 1856, settling in Pettis 
county, where the father engaged in farming for a number of years. He passed away in 
Sedalia, Missouri, in 1S85, while his wife died in St. Louis in 1894. During the Civil 
war he served as a colonel with the Confederate army, enlisting in 1861 and remaining 
with his command until he surrendered at Shreveport, Louisiana, in 1865. During 
much of his military service he was with General Price, To Mr. and Mrs. Lampton 
were born nine children, those living being: Reuben L., a resident of St. Louis, Missouri; 
James C, whose home is in Hannibal, Missouri; Mrs. Walter Lewis, also of St. Louis; 
and Mrs. F. C. Stevens, of the same city. 

The other surviving member of the family is W. M. Lampton of this review, who 
was the fifth, in order of birth. In his boyhood days he was a pupil in the public 
schools of Sedalia, Missouri, and afterward attended a college at Fulton, Missouri, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 18S2. He then took up railroad work in 
the employ of the Texas-Pacific Company at Port Worth, Texas, acting as clerk in the 
freight department until 1885, when he turned his attention to mercantile interests on 
his own account at Fort Worth, continuing in business there until 1892. He then sold 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 177 

out and came to Denver, where he entered the claim department of the Denver & Rio 
Grande, remaining in that capacity, however, tor only a short time. He next entered 
the freight department as chief clerk and has advanced from time to time, being 
promoted from position to position until he is now general freight agent. As such 
he is widely known throughout the country, being one of the prominent representatives 
of railway interests in the west. There is no feature of the business with which he is 
not thoroughly familiar and his marked capability and executive force have been the 
salient qualities which have brought him to his present position of responsibility. 

On the 19th. of November, 1884, Mr. Lampton was married to Miss Jeannette Fisher, 
of Denver, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel H. Fisher, pioneers of this city, where 
they arrived in 1870, living on Seventeenth and Curtis streets, now In the heart of the 
business district. 

Mr. Lampton is a member of the Denver Club, also of the Denver Country Club and 
the Denver Athletic Club, while in his fraternal relations he is an Elk. In politics he 
maintains an independent course, nor has he ever aspired to public office, although he 
has been tendered many. He has preferred to concentrate his attention upon his busi- 
ness affairs and the thoroughness with which he has undertaken his part, his conscien- 
tious sense of duty and his clearly defined powers have been the strong elements in 
winning him promotion. While his initial railroad position was an humble one, he has 
steadily advanced and is today one of the best known and most highly esteemed rail- 
road representatives of the west. 



BENJAMIN URSERY JAMISON. 

Benjamin Ursery Jamison is the cashier of the Elizabeth (Colo.) State Bank and 
one of its stockholders. He was born on a farm in Franklin county. Virginia, October 
19, 1860, but since 1892 has made his home in Colorado. His parents were Wiley P. 
and Emma Jamison. The grandfather in the paternal line was Scotch and the great- 
grandfather in the maternal line was a resident of Lunenburg county, Virginia. The 
family was established in that locality at a very early period in the colonization of the 
new world. 

Benjamin U. Jamison pursued his education in the public schools near his father's 
home and remained a resident of the Old Dominion until 1883, when he started out for 
himself, going to Missouri. He located at Pendleton, in Warren county, and was there 
employed as telegraph operator and station agent. In 1892 he removed to Colorado and 
in 1894 took up his abode at Elizabeth, where for twenty-four years he has largely made 
his home. He was station agent at Elizabeth until about 1899 and in 1904 he became 
connected with the banking business at Arvada, Colorado, where he remained until 
1906. He then returned to Elizabeth and has since been closely identified with her 
business and financial interests. The population of the town is about three hundred 
and the prosperity of its citizens as well as of the farmers in the vicinity is shown 
by the fact that the deposits in the State Bank of Elizabeth amounted to two hundred 
and forty thousand dollars on the 31st of August, 1918, and at this writing, in October, 
1918, have passed the quarter million mark. Mr. Jamison is the cashier and one of the 
stockholders in the bank and the success of the institution is attributable in large 
measure to his enterprise and thorough understanding of the banking business. He is 
doing everything in his power to develop the institution and his labors have been most 
effective. He is likewise a stockholder in the Arvada Bank and one of the directors 
of the Elbert County Bank of Elbert. He is thus extending his interests in banking 
and has made for himself a creditable position in financial circles of this section of 
the state. 



JUNIUS W. DICKINSON. 



Junius W. Dickinson, expostmaster of Peyton, has at various times held other offices 
in El Paso county and is recognized as one of the local leaders of the republican party. 
He is an active and enterprising merchant, conducting a general store since 190.5. A 
native of the Empire state, he was born in Binghamton, New York, June 26, 1868, a son 
of Ira E. and Ella (Washburn) Dickinson. He completed a high school course and when 
his studies were over he became connected with the shoe trade at Binghamton, in w'hich 

Vol. IV— 12 



178 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

line of business he continued for five years. He was afterward manager for a store of 
tlie Atlantic & Pacific Company at Binghamton for five years. 

Removing to Colorado, Mr. Dickinson was identified witli the Russell-Gates Mer- 
cantile Company for twelve years at Eastonville and at Peyton and while thus serving 
he was appointed by President McKinley to the office of postmaster, in which position 
he continued for sixteen years. He has held the office of justice of the peace for a num- 
ber of years and his decisions have been strictly fair and impartial. In' 1905 he engaged 
in commercial pursuits on his own account and opened a drug store and general mer- 
chandising establishment, which he has since conducted. He carries a carefully selected 
line of goods and his business has grown and developed with the passing years. In 1904 
he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres and in 1909 secured an eighty acre tract, 
his farm property being now operated by his son. He displays keen sagacity and sound 
judgment in all of his business affairs and never stops short of the successful achieve- 
ment of his purpose. 

In 1893 Mr. Dickinson was married to Miss Minnie V. Osbom, of Binghamton, New 
York, who is a graduate of the high school of that city and also of a private school 
known as the Lady Jane Grey College of Binghamton. Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson have 
become the parents of four children. Ira E., now upon his father's ranch, was born 
May 11, 1894, and married Lucy Beebe, of Fort Collins, by whom he has two children, 
Aaron J. and Robert. Osborn J., born March 19. 1896, married Nellie Williams, of Pey- 
ton, and has a son, Roger Williams. Norman R., born March 9, 1903, is attending high 
school. Raymond, born October 13, 1905, is a pupil in the graded schools. All of the 
family are Baptists in religious faith, loyally adhering to the teachings of the church 
and doing all in their power to promote its growth and extend its influence. 

Mr. Dickinson has given his political allegiance to the republican party since age 
conferred upon him the right of franchise and he cooperates heartily in every plan and 
movement for the general good, while at all times his career measures up to high stand- 
ards of manhood and citizenship. 



RICHARD FRANCIS RYAN. 



Richard Francis Ryan has been spoken of as "self-made and well made." He is 
recognized as one of the leading young representatives of the Denver bar and is now 
inheritance tax appraiser and assistant attorney general. His career has been marked 
by consecutive progress and each forward step has brought him a broader outlook and 
wider opportunities. He was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. October 4, 1879, a son 
of John and Bridget (Manion) Ryan. The father, a native of Ireland, is now deceased, 
but the mother is still living in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. 

Reared under the parental roof, Richard Francis Ryan acquired a public school 
education, passing through consecutive grades to the high school. For five years 
thereafter he was connected with the Eaton, Crane & Pike Stationery Company of 
Pittsfield and in 1898, when a youth of nineteen years, removed westward to Denver, 
where he has since made his home. For a short time he was in the employ of the 
Denver Dry Goods Company and afterward spent one year in connection with the 
dry goods house of A. T. Lewis & Son. Later he was identified with other houses in 
mercantile lines in Butte, Montana, and Seattle, Washington, but eventually determined 
to prepare for the practice of law and entered Westminster University, of Denver, 
Colorado, from which in due course of time he was graduated, having completed the 
law studies. He introduced into the university the idea of holding courts by the 
students in court rooms. He was a teacher of court procedure in that university, 
giving instruction in the night law school. Admitted to the bar of Colorado, he 
entered upon active practice and has since concentrated his efforts and attention upon 
his profession and upon public duties. On the 9th of January. 1909, he was appointed 
for a four years' term to the position of division clerk of the county court and in 1913 
for a four years' term to the position of division clerk of the district court. He belongs 
to the Denver Bar Association and has served on some of its important committees. 
He is now occupying the position of state inheritance tax appraiser and assistant 
attorney general. 

Mr. Ryan was married in 1903 to Miss Margaret M. Mullen, of Central City, Colo- 
rado, and they have a son, Thomas R., fourteen years of age, who is a pupil in the 
public schools. Mrs. Ryan is a granddaughter of Thomas Mullen, a pioneer of Central 
City, who built the state house and was superintendent of the construction of the 
postoffice building in Denver, a two and a half million dollar structure. Both Mr. and 




RICHARD F. RYAN 



180 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Mrs. Ryan are widely known in this city and held In the highest esteem. He belongs 
to the Denver Athletic Club and to Elks Lodge, No. 17; is also a fourth degree member 
of the Knights of Columbus, and has membership in St. Francis De Sales Catholic 
church. He is a democrat in politics and is connected with the Democratic Club. He 
believes that the courts should be separate from party politics. In all that he does he 
is actuated by a spirit of progressiveness that has been most resultant and he is rec- 
ognized as a man of sterling worth, forceful and resourceful, with a broad outlook and 
keen discernment, and his developing powers are bringing him into important con- 
nections and relations. 



ARCHIE SCOTT LEFFINGWELL. 

A. S. LefBngwell, founder and president of the Leffingwell Mercantile Company of 
Brighton, was born in "Winnebago county, Illinois, on the 14th of November, 1858, 
his parents being Jackson and Sarah Ann (Dean) Leffingwell, the former a native of 
Ohio, while the latter was born in the state of New York. They became residents 
of Illinois in 1S4S, taking up their abode upon a farm in Winnebago county, and both 
are still living. They became the parents of five children and the family circle yet 
remains unbroken by the hand of death. 

A. S. Leffingwell spent his youthful days in his parents' home and acquired his 
early education in the public schools of Illinois, after which he continued his studies 
In the Beloit high school at Beloit. Wisconsin. The year 1877 witnessed his removal 
to Iowa with his parents, at which time the family home was established upon a 
farm in Carroll county. There he continued until 1893, when he came to Colorado, 
settling in Brighton, where he has since made his home, covering a period of a quarter 
of a century. Here he turned his attention to the hardware business, in which he 
has since continued and he carries a large stock of shelf and heavy hardware and 
has also extended his efforts to include other lines, for he deals in oils and paints, 
furniture and meats. He is recognized as one of the leading business men of his 
adopted city, alert and energetic, and his prosperity is due to close application and 
Indefatigable energy. 

On the 7th of December, 1893, Mr. Leffingwell was married to Mrs. Jennie Root, 
who passed away in the year 1908. In 1909 he wedded Miss Josephine Brundage, of 
Brighton, and they have become parents of two children, Jackson and Margaret. 
Mr. Leffingwell has membership with the Modern Woodmen of America. His interests 
and efforts, however, ar.e most closely concentrated upon his business affairs and it Is 
by reason of this intense application that he has won the measure of success which he 
now enjoys. He was one of the organizers of the Farmers State Bank, which he 
later served as vice president, and is recognized as one of the successful, representa- 
tive citizens of the community in which he has so long resided, and to the welfare 
of which, he has always been responsive. 



HARRY RUFFNER. 

Actuated by the spirit of giving the best in him to his state and her people, Harry 
Ruffner has stood sponsor for many things of a public and patriotic nature which have 
been of the greatest worth to Colorado. Who can measure the influence of his labors 
or fatliom the force of his example? He was born in Denver during the territorial days 
of Colorado, his birth occurring on the 14th of March. 1863. His father, John C. Ruffner, 
was proprietor of the Colorado House in 1862 and 1863, having arrived In Colorado 
territory from Fort Leavenworth. Kansas, in April, 1860. In that year he went to 
Oro Gulch and for many years thereafter he was closely associated with the pioneer 
development and progress of the state. He owned aud made a present of South Pueblo 
to George M. Chilcott. He wedded Mary Jane Estes, who arrived with her parents in 
Colorado territory May 5, 1859, being the first unmarried white woman within the 
borders of the state. She accompanied her parents to Fort Lupton, Colorado, where 
John C. Ruffner won her hand in marriage in April, 1S61. She was a daughter of Joel 
and Martha Estes. who located in the famous park that now bears the family name — ■ 
Estes park. This beautiful park was discovered by Joel Estes, September 12, 1859. He 
had previously crossed the continental divide in 1847 and went to Baker City, Oregon. 
He returned and went to California in company with his elder son in 1849, and when 




ARCHIE S. LEFFINGWELL 



182 ■ HISTORY OF COLORADO 

he once more made his way to Colorado by the overland route he brought back with 
him thirty-five thousand dollars in gold. He was known by the Indians as the Bjg 
White Chief and was a member of their many councils. Joel Estes was always a path- 
finder and trapper, though he maintained a great plantation on the frontier of this 
territory, now known as St. Joseph, Missouri. 

Harry Ruffner pursued his early education in the Denver school at the corner of 
Fourteenth and Arapahoe streets in the years 1868, 1869 and 1870. In the following 
year he became a student in the high school at Del Norte, Colorado, where he con- 
tinued his studies from 1871 until 1875. Taking up newspaper work, he became the 
first "devil" on the San Juan Prospector, published at Del Norte, Colorado, and was 
the first newsboy on the streets of Leadville on the 1st ot April, 1878. In 1881 he was 
appointed assistant postmaster of Gunnison, Colorado, and continued in that position 
until 1885, when he was transferred to Las Vegas, New Mexico, as an expert in the 
postal service where he also was engaged in the stationery business. He participated 
in the Oklahoma rush in 1889 and was also engaged in the stationery business in 
Guthrie where he was known as "Ruffner The Stationer." He was elected clerk of 
the appellate court at Guthrie, being the first incumbent of that office In that city. He 
also organized the first two hose companies in Oklahoma territory and was the first 
man to hold the position of a fire chief in the territory. He has always been identified 
with the frontier and has contributed in marked measure to pioneer development. He 
was also in charge of the first ceremonies celebrating the anniversary of the opening 
of Oklahoma territory and he superintended the first inaugural ball held in honor of 
Governor Steele, the first territorial governor of Oklahoma. 

On the 1st of July, 1890, Mr. Ruffner returned to Denver and with the interests of 
the city has since been closely associated. He founded the "Sons of Colorado" Society 
and is the father of Colorado Day. As deputy jury commissioner he perfected the jury 
commission system which was promulgated in June, 1911. He has held numerous 
positions in all things patriotic and has devoted forty years of his life to public and 
patriotic service. He has never asked for nor held any public office save that of 
deputy postmaster, sheriff and jury commissioner. His service has been a freewill 
offering to the public good and his labors have been of far-reaching effect and benefit. 

Another Interesting accomplishment of Mr. Ruffner is worthy of mention here. 
He was the originator of the plan — and through his guidance and tactful supervision it 
has been made a decided success — of the handling of the governor's inaugural ball by 
the Sons of Colorado. These wonderfully successful balls, which as many as seventeen 
thousand people have attended, including two thousand couples in full dress, have been 
models of well managed affairs, arousing not only the admiration but the wonder of 
those who can appreciate the multiplicity of detail in connection with such mammoth 
affairs and the master mind necessary for carrying through successfully an official social 
function of such magnitude._ 

By a first marriage Mr. Ruffner has a son, Ralph Rockafellow, born in Gunnison, 
Colorado, who is Colorado's second grandson, or representative of the second generation 
of Colorado-born Ruffners. On June 27, 1893, in Boulder. Colorado, Mr. Ruffner was 
married to Miss Mary Theodora Grissom, a daughter of Dr. Eugene Grissom, ot Raleigh, 
North Carolina, and a direct descendant of Oliver Wolcott, signer of the Declaration 
of Independence. She is also a direct descendant on her father's side of Sir Thomas 
Gresham, the famous financier of Queen Elizabeth's reign, who founded the Royal 
Exchange in London in 1565. Dr. Grissom was internationally known as an authority 
on mental diseases and was vice chairman of the International Medical Society in 
1876. Mrs. Ruffner's mother was a Miss Bryan. To Mr. and Mrs. Ruffner have been 
born a son and a daughter: Eugene Grissom, who married Miss Violet Dameron; and 
Lillian Grissom, who married Herbert R. Parsons, and both she and her husband died in 
Aspen, Colorado, on October 23, 1918. 

Mr. Ruffner was one of the first infants baptized in the Episcopal church in Colorado 
territory, the ceremony taking place in St. John's cathedral, and he has since been 
identified therewith. In politics he has always been strictly republican, giving stalwart 
support to the party. He was one of the founders of Denver Lodge, No. 65, of the 
Knights of Pythias and is a member of Oriental Lodge, No. 87, A. F. & A. M. He is 
likewise Member No. 1 of the Southern Colorado Pioneers Society and belongs to the 
Sons of Colorado, which organization he founded, the Colorado Pioneers, the Colorado 
Church Club and is an honorary member of the Pioneer Ladies Aid. He is also captain 
commander of J. C. Fremont Camp of the Sons of Veterans. There is no man in the 
state more deeply interested in the history of Colorado or who has been more actively 
associated with its public and patriotic movements than Mr. Ruffner, who has been 
the promoter of many activities which have heightened the fame of the state. With the 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 183 

deepest love for the state in which he was born, lie has done everything in his power 
to promote its welfare and has the deepest pride in its fair name. As one of its pioneers 
he has contributed in marked measure to its development and progress and has done 
everything in his power to foster the love of the people for the state. His own patriotic 
spirit has awakened a responsive thrill in many a breast and his contagious enthusiasm 
has been a potent element in advancing many projects of public welfare. 



ROBERT JOHN HANLON. 



Robert John Hanlon, who is busily occupied with the cultivation of an excellent 
ranch property of six hundred and forty acres situated in the Wolfcreek district of 
Elbert county, is of Canadian birth, his natal day having been June 24, 1867, and the 
place of his nativity Sherbrooke, Canada. His father, John Hanlon, was also born in 
the vicinity of Sherbrooke, while the mother, who bore the maiden name of Ann Jane 
Henderson, was born in Belfast, Ireland. 

In the schools of his native country Robert J. Hanlon pursued his education and 
was a young man of twenty-three years when in 1890 he came to Colorado, having in 
the meantime engaged in farming in Canada and in the eastern part of the United 
States. With his arrival in the west he settled first in Denver, but in 1892 removed to 
Elbert county and homesteaded near Elizabeth. With characteristic energy he began 
the development and improvement of the hitherto uncultivated tract of land, but his 
original farm he has since sold. Later he took up another homestead near Wolfcreek, 
in Elbert county. His wife in young womanhood had also homesteaded on the land 
which they now occupy and their possessions include six hundred and forty acres, which 
have been converted into a rich and productive farm. As opportunity has offered Mr. 
Hanlon has added improvements to the property and has carefully cultivated the fields, 
which annually return to him golden harvests. He has been persistent and energetic 
and the results achieved have been gratifying. 

In 1898 Mr. Hanlon was united in marriage to Miss Addie Friedman and to them 
have been born seven children, namely: Edward L., Mary E., Albert R., Frank K., Ralph 
J., Roy W. and George W. 

For more than a quarter of a century Mr. Hanlon has resided in Colorado and has 
ever been loyal to the welfare and best interests of the state. He has put forth every 
effort to improve business conditions and persistent energy has enabled him to overcome 
all difficulties, which have seemed rather to serve as an impetus for renewed effort 
on his part. 



OTTO VOGEL. 



An excellent farm property of forty acres pays tribute to the care and labor bestowed 
upon it by Otto Vogel. Born in Zurich, Switzerland, on the 11th of July, 1863, he is a 
son of Jacob and Judith (Haupt) Vogel. The father, a farmer by occupation, first came 
to the United States in 1867, making his way to Dallas, Texas, then a town of fifteen 
hundred inhabitants. His loghouse still stands there although it has been moved farther 
out, two or three times, as the city grew. Two years later he returned to the land of 
the Alps, where he remained until 1881 and then again came to the new world, after 
which he took up the occupation of farming in Kansas, where he lived for a year. He 
next came to Colorado and settled near Broomfield, purchasing one hundred and sixty 
acres of land which he carefully cultivated and developed to the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1909. To him and his wife were born three children: Emma, Ida and 
Otto. 

The last named attended school in Switzerland. He came to the new world with 
his father, upon the latter's return to this country in 1881 and upon his father's death 
received forty acres of land, which he has since owned and cultivated. Prior to his 
marriage he had assumed the management of his father's entire farm and has thus 
been long and extensively identified with agricultural interests in his section of the 
state. His methods are at once practical and progressive and he is actuated by a spirit' 
of advancement in all that he undertakes. He has studied the conditions and the needs 
of the soil, knows the crops that are best adapted to climatic conditions here and has 
so directed his efforts that annually he has gathered good harvests. 

On the 20th of August, 1889, Mr. Vogel was married to Miss Eliza Langmeler, a 



184 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

daughter of Heinrlch and Susan Langmeier, the wedding being celebrated in Denver. 
They have become the parents of two children: Elsie, the wife of Charles Bode, by 
■whom she has two children. Otto and Henrietta; and Emma, the wife of William H. 
Infanger. 

The political faith of Mr. Vogel is that of the democratic party but he has never 
been an office seeker, preferring to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his busi- 
ness affairs, which have been wisely and carefully directed, bringing him the substantial 
success that is now his. From the age of eighteen he has resided continuously in the 
new world and for more than a third of a century has made his home in the vicinity 
of Broomfield, closely identified with its agricultural interests and contributing in 
marked measure to its progress in this direction. 



WALTER WISE. 



Walter Wise is the able and efficient young manager for the Fisk Rubber Company 
of Denver, having charge of the sales and distribution of goods of that firm over the 
states of Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico and a portion of Nebraska. He has thor- 
oughly studied conditions of the trade and has developed notable success in the busi- 
ness through the field in which he labors. He is today one of the most familiar fig- 
ures in connection with the tire trade and wherever he is known he is spoken of in 
terms of the highest regard. 

Mr. Wise was born near Auburn, Georgia, January 17, 18SS, a son of Allen Sher- 
wood and Elizabeth (Adams) Wise, who are natives of Georgia, but in 1900 removed 
to Dublin. Texas, where Mr. Wise is engaged in ranching. They became the parents 
of two children: Luther V., who has passed away; and Walter, of this review. 

Walter Wise was the elder and in his boyhood days he was a pupil in the public 
and high schools of Dublin, Texas. His first position was that of clerk in a drug 
store and later he served in various ways along business lines. He went to Dallas, 
Texas, in 1909, and for six months was an automobile tire salesman, after which he 
removed to Kansas City, Missouri, where he acted as city salesman for the Fisk Rub- 
ber Tire Company, continuing there from 1909 until 1914. 'In the latter year he 
came to Denver to take charge of the local and district branch of the company in this 
city, and so ably has he managed the business that the sales from this branch have 
more than held their own with those of much larger districts in other parts of the 
country. He knows that he is representing goods of the highest quality and he does 
not hesitate to recommend them. Moreover, he is alert, energetic and determined, 
carrying forward to successful completion whatever he attempts. 

On the 28th of October, 1914, Mr. Wise was married to Miss Marguerite Hardy, of 
New Albany, Indiana, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank R. and Ella Wood (Hedden) 
Hardy of that place. The Hardy family is a well known and prominent one in that 
section of Indiana, while the Reddens were pioneer manufacturers and have been 
leaders in industrial circles in southern Indiana for many years. Mr. and Mrs. Wise 
have one child, Walter Richard, born in Denver, August 1.3, 1915. 

Fraternally Mr. Wise is connected with the Masons. He belongs to 'the Young 
Men's Christian Association and his aid and influence are ever given on the side of 
right and truth, of advancement and progress. He is the possessor of many sterling 
traits of character which have gained for him the highest esteem of all with whom 
he has been brought in coptact as he has traveled widely over the length and breadth 
of this land. 



JOHN EDWARD YEAMANS. 



John Edward Yeamans, who is living retired in Akron, Colorado, was for many 
years one of the most successful merchants of that city and by his labors has con- 
tributed to the general progress and growth of his city and county. All of his business 
dealings have ever been undertaken upon a strictly fair basis and therefore his success 
is well merited and his prosperity well earned. He was born in Marshalltown, Iowa, 
in January, 1857, a son of Nathan F. and Lydia E. (Hoffman) Yeamans. the former a 
native of Virginia and the latter of Pennsylvania. The father was a farmer and miller, 
taking up his abode in Iowa and locating in Marshall county at an early day in the 
history of the state. Having acquired a comfortable competence he retired and for four 




WALTER WISE 



186 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

years made his residence in Marshalltown, coming at tlie end of that period to Akron, 
Colorado, where his remaining days were spent. Death called him November 17, 1898, 
his widow surviving until 1899. 

John E. Yeamans spent his boyhood under the parental root and received his 
education in the schools of Marshalltown, Iowa. At the age of eighteen he began to 
learn the blacksmith's trade, taking up this occupation in that city, and there he con- 
tinued along that line for five years. The lure of the west was upon him. however, and 
in 1880 he and his brother, Charles N. Yeamans, went to Frontier county, Nebraska, 
where they homesteaded. They proved up on their claim and then proceeded to Furnas 
county in the same state, where they engaged in the blacksmith and implement business 
until November, 1885, when they decided upon another removal and came to Akron, 
Colorado. Here they opened a business which is flourishing today. In the beginning 
they gave their principal attention to hardware and implements, the firm being 
established under the name of Yeamans Brothers & Company. Mr. Yeamans and his 
brother continued together for about seventeen years, when John E. Ye'&mans retired. 
Under the able management of the brothers, who harmoniously cooperated, the business 
grew and their trade increased from year to year, so that prosperity attended their 
efforts. Mr. Yeamans had a large part in this success, for it was he who as the elder 
took much of the management upon his shoulders. The policies which he followed 
proved entirely successful and he secured a large patronage for the business, his 
customers implicitly trusting his word, as he would never misrepresent goods or try 
to make a sale by high-handed methods. The reputation of the firm for honesty is 
built therefore as upon a rock and much of the success of the business is due to this 
fact. Upon first arriving in Akron, Mr. Yeamans also took up a preemption claim. 
After having sold to his brother he engaged in the blacksmithing business and continued 
therein until June 15, 1918, when he sold out and retired from active work, having 
acquired a comfortable competence. He now look^ after his farming interests, owning 
land in partnership with his brother and also owning independently one hundred and 
sixty acres, all improved farming property, near the town. His wife is also the possessor 
of a fine property. Mr. Yeamans is likewise the owner of the Citizens Bank building 
in Akron and has several other business properties. 

On October 10, 1887, Mr. Yeamans wedded Alma A. Dexter, of Toledo, Tama county, 
Iowa, and to them were born four children, namely: Floy, the wife of A. S. Wilcox, a 
farmer residing one mile east of Akron; C. William, who resides in Chicago and is 
purchasing agent for the Belt Line Railroad; and Marion Edna and Lillian Elma. twins. 
The former is the wife of Joseph Nolte and resides in southwestern Missouri, while 
the latter married Clinton Dausdill, of Akron, Colorado. Mrs. Yeamans passed away 
November 25, 1901, and on September 20, 1905, Mr. Yeamans married Mrs. Leanah 
Abbott, her first husband, C. H. Abbott, having passed away June 20, 1899. By him 
she had three sons: William A. Abbott, now with the American expeditionary forces in 
France; Charles T. Abbott, with the One Hundred and Fifteenth Ammunition Train in 
France; and Leroy A. Abbott, at home. 

Mr. Yeamans is a republican in his political affiliation and his religious faith is 
that of the Methodist Episcopal church. While his has been a busy and useful life 
in regard to his private affairs, he has also found time to serve in public capacities and 
has ably administered the office of town clerk and also that of coroner of Washington 
county. Moreover, he has served as a member of the town council of Akron. His 
public activities have ever been of a progressive character and, in accord with his 
business reputation as a purposeful man of rugged, honest principles, and he has done 
everything in his power to plant deep a civilization of moral and material worth in the 
section of the state which has been his home for so many years. 



JOHN D. WILSON. 



Honored and respected by all, no man occupies a more enviable position in the 
business and financial circles of Eaton than does John D. Wilson, the president of the 
First National Bank, whose comprehensive knowledge of the banking business is matched 
by his honorable purpose and straightforward methods in all that he undertakes. Colo- 
rado numbers him among her native sons, for he was born in Greeley on the 3d of 
December, 1881, his parents being Thomas H. and Mary (Milne) Wilson, who were 
natives of Scotland and in 1881 came to America, settling at Greeley, Colorado. Mr. 
Wilson came to the new world as manager for Lord Ogilvie, having charge of his landed 
interests in this state for two or three years. He afterward removed to Eaton and 




JOHN D. WILSON 



188 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

purchased land before the town was established, becoming owner of a tract of one 
hundred and sixty acres which he entered from the government. He at once began 
to develop and Improve the property and continued Its cultivation for many years. He 
still makes his home upon that place, but is now living retired from active life, leaving 
to others the work of tilling the soil and further developing the property. His wife also 
survives. 

John D. Wilson was reared at Eaton and supplemented his public school training 
by a course in the Agricultural College at Fort Collins, Colorado, from which he was 
graduated with the class of 1901. He then returned home and began work as book- 
keeper in the bank of Thomas, Sullivan & Wilson, his father being part owner in that 
institution. Mr. Wilson of this review remained in that position for a year, after which 
the First National Bank was organized in 1902 by W. W. Sullivan, who was its lirst 
president, while F. L. Weller became the first cashier. Mr. Wilson continued with the 
other bank until March, 1905, when the two banks were consolidated and Mr. Wilson 
entered the First National as vice president. At that time Mr. Sullivan sold his interest 
in the business and A. C. Adams was made president. In June, 1910, the latter resigned 
and Mr. Wilson was elected to the presidency. C. J. Stockfleth came to the First 
National with Mr. Wilson in the capacity of assistant cashier, and upon the death 
of Mr. Weller, the cashier, in 1915, Mr. Stockfleth succeeded to the position, which he 
is now occupying. The bank is capitalized for one hundred thousand dollars and has 
surplus and profits amounting to twenty-flve thousand dollars, while its deposits have 
reached six hundred and eighty-six thousand dollars. The bank is in a most prosperous 
condition, its business most thoroughly systematized and ably managed, and the officers 
are men who inspire confidence in the institution. In addition to his interests at 
Eaton, Mr. Wilson has farming property in this locality from which he derives a good 
rental. He is also a stockholder and one of the directors in the Farmers Bank at 
Severance, Colorado. 

In April, 1907, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Marie Rempen, a 
daughter of Theodore and Charlotte (Gotthardt) Rempen, who were residents of Ger- 
many. The father died in 1S93, but the mother is still living. To Mr. and Mrs. Wilson 
have been born four children: Mary, who was born in May, 1909; Thomas, in Septem- 
ber, 1911; Norman, in December, 1914; and Robert, in May, 1917. 

Fraternally he is connected with the Masons as a member of the lodge, chapter and 
commandery and is most loyal to the teachings of the craft. He is also identified with 
the Order of the Eastern Star and with the Woodmen of the World. Politically he is a 
democrat, believing firmly in the principles of the party, but never seeking or desiring 
office as a reward for party fealty. His religious faith is that of the Congregational 
church and his life is guided at all times by its teachings. Those, who know him — 
and he has a wide acquaintance — find in him a man who at all times is worthy of con- 
fidence, trust and respect. He is a man of high Ideals not only in relation to business 
but in matters of citizenship as well and his activity in behalf of public interests has 
been far-reaching and effective. 



The couplet 



HENRY AUGUSTUS BUCHTEL, D. D., LL. D. 



"He leaves a patriot's name to aftertimes 
Linked with a thousand virtues and no crimes" 



might well be chosen to epitomize the public service of Henry Augustus Buchtel as 
clergyman, educator and Colorado's governor. Holding to high ideals, his service to his 
state has nevertheless been of the most practical character and his labors will not 
have reached their culmination until movements which he instituted have been 
brought to their full fruition. He was born near Akron, Ohio, September 30, 1S47, 
and the ancestral line is traced back to Wurttemberg, Germany, whence in 1753* 
came the founder of the family in America, making settlement in Pennsylvania. 
This was John Buchtel, an astronomer of note, whose strong mentality has been an 
inherited force in later generations. The ancestral line comes down through Solomon 
and Maria (Reber) Buchtel and Dr. Jonathan B. and Eliza (Newcomer) Buchtel to 
Henry Augustus Buchtel of this review. The family name is perpetuated in Buchtel 
College at Akron, Ohio, which was built and equipped by John R. Buchtel. a cousin of 
Dr. Jonathan B. Buchtel. The last named, after preparing for and entering upon the 



* HISTORY OF COLORADO 189 

practice of medicine, removed from Akron, Ohio, to Indiana in 1848 and made his 
home for a time at Elkhart, whence he went to South Bend. 

Largely in private schools of the latter city Governor Buchtel acquired his early 
education, which was supplemented by a year's study in what is now De Pauw Univer- 
sity. He afterward devoted several years to business, giving some time to service as 
foreman of the country order department in the wholesale drug house of Burnhams & 
Van Schaack, of Chicago. Ultimately he became a partner in a wholesale and retail 
grocery house of South Bend, Indiana, but decided to give up commercial interests in 
order to prepare for the ministry, having for a number of years been deeply interested 
in the cause of religion. Again entering Asbury (now De Pauw) University, he was 
graduated therefrom in 1872 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Soon afterward he 
was married and was sent by his church as a missionary to Bulgaria, residing for a 
brief period at Rustchuk on the Danube river. His first regular pastorate was at Zions- 
ville, Indiana, and at subsequent periods he was located in pastoral work at Greencastle, 
Knightstown, Richmond and Lafayette, Indiana, at Denver, Colorado, at Indianapolis, 
Indiana, at Mount Vernon, New York, and East Orange, New Jersey. 

Rev. Buchtel severed his pastoral relations in the east in 1899 to return to Colorado 
as chancellor of the University of Denver, an institution which at that time was 
burdened by a great debt. He made it his first duty to procure necessary funds and 
after an untiring and vigorous campaign succeeded in raising two hundred and sixty 
thousand dollars, which cleared the property from all mortgage encumbrances, though all 
floating debts were not extinguished until the total amount of cash secured aggregated 
a third of a million dollars. The total amount secured by Chancellor Buchtel for the 
scliool down to the present year (191S) is more than a million dollars. During his 
administration the attendance increased from six hundned to fourteen hundred students. 
The University of Denver is the pioneer school of higher learning in Colorado. It now 
has fourteen hundred students and approximately one hundred and sixty professors. 
As chancellor. Rev. Buchtel has visited every part of Colorado and it is said that no 
man in the state has a broader acquaintance. His prominence as the successful head 
of this institution led to his selection for other public service and honors, for in the 
fall of 1906 the republican party named him as its candidate for governor. When offered 
the candidacy he wrote in reply: "I accept the nomination you have tendered with 
the distinct understanding that I am not to be expected to make any pledges of any 

character to anyone I hope we shall be able to make a campaign which is in 

harmony with the best traditions of the republican party, that is, a business campaign 
that is clean and honest." That Colorado's citizens believed in him and his policy 
is indicated in the fact that election returns gave to him a majority of approximately 
twenty thousand. His inauguration, contrary to the usual custom of the state, took 
place in the Trinity Methodist Episcopal church, which Governor Buchtel had largely 
aided in building while serving as its pastor. He concluded his inaugural address with 
a prayer, which was followed by the Lord's prayer. This was indicative of the spirit 
of his administration, which was characterized by the highest ideals of manhood and 
of citizenship. All appropriations for the biennial period, as well as all deficits of 
former administrations, were paid in full, and the administration turned over to its 
successor three hundred thousand dollars in cash. The legislative enactments, too, 
were of a character that proved of the greatest benefit to the state at the time and 
not only looked to the exigencies of the moment but considered also the opportunities 
of the future. A pure food law was enacted, also one requiring the inspection of build- 
ing and loan associations. A civil service law found its way to the statute books of 
the state and laws providing state employment agencies and the establishment of juvenile 
court and detention houses for child offenders. Another law that was enacted provided 
for the employment of prison labor on public highways. There was passed a meat and 
slaughter-house inspection law and one of the best local option laws which has also been 
adopted by other states. Other legislation of importance that was secured during his 
administration related to banking, railroads and insurance. 

It was on the 4th of February, 1873, that Governor Buchtel was united in marriage 
to Miss Mary Stevenson, daughter of William N. Stevenson, of Greencastle, Indiana. 
They became parents of two sons and two daughters: Dr. Frost Craft Buchtel; Henry 
Augustus, Jr., who died in 1901; Emma, now the wife of Dr. William G. Lennox, both 
of whom are doing missionary work in China; and Mary. 

In the year 1884, Governor Buchtel received from his alma mater the honorary 
degree of D. D. and in 1900 that of LL. D. Since his retirement from office he has 
devoted his entire attention to his services as chancellor of the University of Denver. 
His service as governor of Colorado, however, constitutes a chapter in its history of 
which the state is justly proud. His election followed an era of great bitterness and 



190 HISTORY OF COLORADO ' 

it was due to his rare tact and splendid qualities of heart and mind that conflicting ele- 
ments were brought together. He was indeed a peacemaking governor. Since his term 
of office, the old harsh, unforgiving attitude of political opponents has largely disappeared 
from the strife of parties. The people of the state can never forget the great "good- 
fellowship" banquet given by Governor Buchtel and which marked the beginning of an 
era in the history of the commonwealth. His course has marked the triumph of truth, 
of right and progress. His methods have been practical, while his vision has been 
broad and his ideals high. His appeals to the manhood of the state have never been 
in vain and his teachings and example have been a guiding force for the adoption of all 
those elements which work for good to the individual and to the community at large. 



TAYLOR GREEN. 



Taylor Green, one of the pioneers of Elbert county, was born in the state of New- 
York in 1834 and acquired his education in local schools there. He learned the trade 
of carpentering in his youthful days and when he came to Colorado in 1871 he went 
at once to Elbert county, where he established himself in the contracting business. 
Many of the finest and largest farm buildings in the county were planned and erected 
by him. 

Prior to his removal to Colorado he had served for three years in the Union army 
under General Sherman and at the time of his death in 1906 was an honored member 
of the Grand Army post in Elbert county, thus maintaining pleasant relations with 
his old military comrades, with, whom he had marched to the defense of the Stars 
and Stripes during the momentous period of the Civil war. 

On the 2d of December, 1891, Mr. Green was married in Denver to Miss Gertrude 
McArthy, a native of Prince Edward Island. Albert T. Green, their son, is now in 
Base Hospital, No. 29, in London, doing active service for his country. He enlisted 
in June, 1917, and was mustered in at Camp Cody, New Mexico, in March, 1918, going 
later to Camp Crane, Pennsylvania, and then to important hospital service in London. 



JOHN WICH. 



Starting in business on his own account with practically no funds and otherwise 
handicapped, John Wich nevertheless has gradually overcome all obstacles and difiS- 
culties and in the course of years he became one of Denver's leading boiler men and 
manufacturers, and owner of one of the largest concerns of the kind in the west — 
the Star Boiler & Sheet Iron Works. In this connection he made for himself an 
enviable name and place in the business circles of the west and at a recent date he 
sold out and is now living retired, enjoying the fruits of his former toil in a well 
earned rest. 

Mr. Wich was born in Bavaria, April 13, 1852, a son of John and Catharina Wich, 
who were natives of the same country, where the father was engaged in the meat 
business. Both he and his wife have passed away. In their family were ten children. 

John Wich, the ninth in order of birth in his father's household, attended the 
public schools of his native country and at the age of eighteen years bade adieu to 
friends and fatherland and sailed for America, attracted by the opportunities which 
he believed he might enjoy on this side of the Atlantic. He located at Wilkes-Barre, 
Pennsylvania, and for a time was employed by the Central Railroad Company of New 
Jersey. He afterward learned the boiler maker's trade at Wilkes-Barre and remained 
there for five years. Subsequently he went to Texas and was employed at his trade 
in various parts of that state. In 1880 he came to Denver and for two months worked 
for others, after which he established a small shop in connection with a partner. That 
relation was continued successfully for nine years, at the end of which time, in 1889, 
Mr. Wich purchased the interest of his partner and continued as sole owner of the 
business. From a small start he developed the present extensive establishment, 
which he conducted with profit tor many years. He developed a business second to 
none of the character in the west. He employed fifty experienced workmen and had 
a splendidly equipped plant covering more than a city block. The business was con- 
ducted under the name of the Star Boiler & Sheet Iron Works and he manufactured 
all kinds of steam boilers and did sheet iron work of all descriptions. On the 4th 
of September, 1918, having decided to retire from active business life, he made a sat- 




JOHN WICH 



192 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

isfactory arrangement for successfully closing out the business, selling at a good 
figure to McDougall Overmeyer. Mr. Wich is one of the pioneer boiler and sheet 
metal manufacturers of the west and his establishment largely set the standard for 
the labors of others along the same line. He never aspired to office, preferring to 
devote his entire time and energies to the development of his business with results 
that were extremely satisfactory. 

In Denver, on the 27th of September, 188S, Mr. Wich was united In marriage to 
Miss Alvina Gerdau, of Denver, who was born in Denmark and came to America 
when seventeen years of age.' Mr. and Mrs. Wich have become parents of six children: 
Maude, deceased; Ruth, who has also passed away; Lillian, at home; John, who was 
killed in a motorcycle accident on the 20th of June, 1915; Edith, who is a graduate 
of the Denver high school; and Catharine, who was also educated in Denver schools. 

Fraternally Mr. Wich is connected with the Knights of Pythias and with the 
Improved Order of Red Men and was formerly a member of the Denver Manufacturers' 
Association and the State Manufacturers' Association. He has certainly never had 
occasion to regret his determination to come to the new world, for in this land he has 
found the opportunities which he sought and in their utilization has made steady 
progress. He found here conditions that do not hamper the efforts of the individual 
but which stimulate imagination and ambition, and wisely utilizing his opportunities, 
he has advanced step by step until, with a handsome competence secured through his 
own labors, he is living retired, enjoying ease and comfort. 



CHARLES MILTON HOBBS. 



Charles Milton Hobbs, who died in Denver. January 27, 1910, left the impress 
of his individuality in various ways upon the life and thought of this city. He was 
prominent in railway and business circles for many years and was equally well known 
as a philanthropist and man of letters. His birth occurred in Carthage. Indiana, 
October 4, 1S54. his parents being Dr. Wilson and Zelinda (Williams) Hobbs, the 
former a prominent physician of the Hoosier state, who removed from Carthage to 
Knightstown, Indiana, and there spent his remaining days. 

It was in the common schools of his native state that C. M. Hobbs mastered the 
elementary branches of learning, while later he became a student in the University 
of Indiana at Bloomington. Following his removal to the west he was employed 
for a time in the United States Government Signal Service, Bureau of Observation, and 
was stationed at Pike's Peak. In the year 1878 he entered the employ of the Denver 
& Rio Grande Railroad Company and remained in the responsible position of purchasing 
agent for the line, for twenty-five years. In 1904 he went to Nevada, where in company 
with Rodney Curtis, Lawrence Phipps, Delos Chappell and other prominent men of 
Denver, he organized the Nevada & California Power Company, of which he was 
made manager, thus directing the important interests of that corporation. In business 
affairs he displayed keen judgment and marked sagacity, readily recognizing the diffi- 
culties as well as the opportunities of every situation and bending his energies with 
determination to the mastery of the former and the utilization of the latter. Failure 
had no part in his scheme of things. He recognized the fact that there can always 
be carved out paths whereby one may reach the desired goal, and energy and determina- 
tion brought him far on the highroad to success. 

On the 9th of August. 1879. Mr. Hobbs was united in marriage to Miss Ina S. 
Blaine, of Colorado Springs, who survives him and is prominent in the social life 
of Denver. She belongs to several clubs and is interested in the various activities 
promoted by Denver women for the benefit of the city. In this she follows the lead 
of her husband, whose efforts in behalf of public progress were far reaching and 
resultant. 

Mr. Hobbs was a member of the Central Presbyterian church, in the work of 
which he took a most helpful part. He was vitally interested in the Young Men's 
Christian Association and was president of the Denver branch for ten years. His 
political allegiance was given to the republican party and along more strictly social 
lines his connection was with the Denver Club and the Denver Athletic Club. 

He was a profound student and took great interest in literary matters, his reading 
being broad and most comprehensive. He had great pride in collecting a magnificent 
library, with the contents of which he was intimately familiar, and he was the author 
of a number of published lectures, notably "Colorado vs. Switzerland," which he 
delivered throughout the east by request of various railroad and civic associations. 





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CHARLES M. HOBBS 



194 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

The entire trend of his aid and influence was toward uplift and advancement, for the 
individual and for the commonwealth, and association with him meant expansion and 
elevation. 



CHARLES W. EGGERT. 



Charles W. Eggert is the president of the Eggert Ice Company of Denver, one of 
the largest natural ice companies of the west. He came to this city with eighty cents 
in his pocket, riding a bicycle, in which way he made the trip from his old home at 
Manitowoc, Wisconsin. He started upon his business career here as driver of an ice 
wagon and from that point has steadily progressed until he is now at the head of one 
of the wholesale ice industries of the state. He was born in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. 
December 4, 1875. a son of Fred and Bertha (Schultz) Eggert. who were of European 
birth. The father came to America with his parents when a lad of eight years and the 
mother was but two years of age when brought by her parents to the new world. Both 
families established a home in Wisconsin, where the paternal grandfather. John Eggert, 
settled at a very early day as one of the pioneers of Manitowoc. There he cleared land, 
developing the virgin soil into a very productive farm. Many times in those early days 
he was obliged td leave the plow and take up a gun in order to protect his family from 
bands of marauding Indians. He continued a resident of Wisconsin until called to his 
final rest. 

His son. Fred Eggert. was educated in the country schools of Wisconsin and after- 
ward learned the shoe business, since whicli time he has been active in that trade, 
ranking for many years as one of the leading shoe merchants and highly respected 
citizens of Manitowoc. His wife was also reared and educated there and their marriage 
occurred in that city. They had a family of eight children: Fred, now residing in 
California; Edward, of Manitowoc, Wisconsin; William, of Denver; George, who has 
passed away; Mrs. Eleanor Kohls, of Manitowoc, Wisconsin; and William and Minnie, 
who are also deceased. 

Charles W. Eggert was the fourth in order of birth in this family. He attended 
school in Wisconsin and after completing his education was there connected with the 
stationery business for five years. He became a sufferer from asthma, however, and in 
1S95 started for Colorado for the benefit of his health. He rode a bicycle the entire dis- 
tance, living in the open on the advice of his physician and reaching Denver with less than 
a dollar in his pocket. It was imperative that he obtain immediate employment and he 
secured a position as deliveryman in connection with an ice business. He worked for 
a time for wages, saving what he could, and at length he resigned and purchased two 
ice delivery wagons and horses and started out in the business on his own account. 
His patronage has steadily increased until he is today at the head of one of the largest 
wholesale ice enterprises of the west, handling natural mountain ice. The Eggert Ice 
Company of Denver has built three large reservoir lakes, covering many acres, in the 
Rockies. These are situated up the Platte canyon, two at Singleton, Colorado, and one 
at Pine Grove. A gravel bottom has been built and each spring that supplies a lake, 
is kept thoroughly clean so as to ensure absolute purity of the water. The ice. which 
comes direct to the company's large storage ice houses in Denver, has been specially 
tested by expert chemists and is pronounced one hundred per cent pure. So rapidly has 
the wholesale ice trade of this company grown that in 1917 seventeen hundred carloads 
of full capacity were shipped from the Denver ice houses to the Pacific coast and large 
shipments are constantly being made to other parts of the country. When one considers 
the modest beginning, the growth and development of the undertaking seem marvelous, 
but the outcome is the direct result of the business energy and enterprise of the founder, 
who started the business in 1899 and incorporated it in 1907. He became the president, 
with G. A. Kartack as the vice president, and the business was capitalized for one 
hundred thousand dollars. Both a wholesale and retail trade is conducted and seven- 
teen wagons are used. 

Mr. Eggert has been married twice. He first wedded Miss Clasina Nielsen, of 
Denver, on the 22d of November, 1899, and on the 2d of October, 1913, she passed away. 
She w^as a daughter of Captain Paul Nielsen, a well known navigator of the Great 
Lakes. She left one child. Charles Eggert. Jr.. who was born in Denver. June 15, 1903, 
and is now attending school. On the 18th of January, 1915, Mr. Eggert was married to 
Nemma L. Jones, of Denver, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh R. Jones, who were 
pioneers of the west, the father having come with ox teams to Denver in 1859, reaching 
his destination after various encounters with the Indians while en route. By a former 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 195 

marriage Mrs. Eggert had two children: Hugh, born January 28, 1902; and Laura, born 
September 26. 1904. 

Fraternally Mr. Eggert is a Mason who has tilled all of the chairs in Harmony 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and has served on the building committee. He also belongs to 
the Royal Arcanum and to the Royal League, while in politics he maintains an inde- 
pendent course. He does not seek nor desire office, for his business affairs make full 
demand upon his time and attention. He has constantly enlarged his facilities to meet 
the demands of a growing trade and his is a notable career of successful achievement, 
resulting from close application and persistency of purpose that has never faltered in 
the face of difficulties but has pressed forward to the goal of success. 



NELS NELSON. 



Nels Nelson is the owner of a splendidly improved ranch property situated in 
Elbert county and comprising six hundred and forty acres of rich and valuable land. 
Mr. Nelson is one of the substantial citizens that Sweden has furnished to Colorado. 
He was born In that country November 25, 1864, and was a young man of twenty- 
three years when he bade adieu to friends and family and sailed for the new world, 
reaching Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1887. Soon afterward he made his way westward 
to Denver, where he worked at his trade of cabinetmaking, which he had previously 
learned in Sweden. There he resided for a considerable period but in 1896 took up his 
abode in Elbert county, homesteading a part of his present big ranch, which is 
situated halfway between Elizabeth and Parker. He is now the owner of six hundred 
and forty acres of valuable land and has one of the best farms in the county. This 
he has brought under a high state of cultivation, adding many modern improvements, 
and the fields annually produce substantial crops. 

Mr. Nelson married Miss Ida Ventemeyer. By a former marriage he had five 
children: Joy; Philip, who is now in France; William, who has enlisted and is ready 
for service overseas; and Adolph and Clarence, who are farming with their father. 

For a year Mr. Nelson was road overseer for Elbert county and he has been an 
active supporter of many plans and measures for the general good. He has sought to 
improve the district in every possible way and his activity along agricultural lines 
has to a degree set the pace which others have followed. His labors show what can 
be accomplished when there is a will to dare and to do. Taking over a tract of un- 
developed land, he has converted it into rich and productive fields which annually 
return to him golden harvests, and his farm is now one of the best ranch properties 
of the district. 



MRS. MARY MAGUIRE COOK. 

Mrs. Mary Maguire Cook, with extensive landed possessions in Elbert county, is well 
known as a business woman, at the same time holding a prominent position in social 
circles. Moreover, she is one of the pioneer women of the state, having been born at 
Russell Gulch, in Gilpin county, her parents being Thomas and Letitia Maguire. Like 
so many sturdy pioneers of that period, Thomas Maguire crossed the plains with an ox 
team and made a number of such trips in the days when the Indians were still a men- 
ace to travel. He first arrived in the state in 1S53 and was engaged in business at Rus- 
sell Gulch. In 1873 he removed to Elbert county and became one of the leading cattle 
men of that section, developing interests of large extent. It was through his efforts and 
those of his fellow ranchers that Elbert county became noted for the high class of its live 
stock, forming one of the centers of the live stock industry in the state. During the 
period of his residence in Gilpin and later in Elbert county he was one of the stanch 
supporters of the Methodist church. 

Mary Maguire. the daughter, was an associate in both the public and Sunday schools 
of Central City, Gilpin county, of Emma Teller, the brilliant daughter of the late Sena- 
tor Henry M. Teller. Soon after the removal of the family to Elbert county the daugh- 
ter Mary was married in the Bijou, where her father lived, to Joseph Cook, Jr., who 
was another of that splendid group of pioneer farmers whose faith in Elbert county was 
rewarded by a rich return both in crops and in cattle. He developed his business In- 
terests to extensive proportions and when he passed away in 1912 left to his widow one 
of the best ranch holdings in the state. Mr. and Mrs. Cook became the parents of three 




THOMAS MAGUIRE 



198 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

daughters, all of whom are married to prosperous Colorado farm owners. These are 
Mrs. F. W. Trask, Mrs. E. R. Mourning and Mrs. C. A. Clow. 

Nature was most gracious to Mrs. Cook in her physical and intellectual endowments 
and her beauty and intellect are matched by her splendid business ability and executive 
force. She is an excellent financier and has vastly increased the holdings left by both 
her father and husband. In her home she is a most gracious hostess, and is one of the 
social leaders of the county in which she has so long resided. 



REV. GEORGE BEDELL VOSBURGH. Ph. D., D. D. 

Rev. George Bedell Vosburgh, an eminent representative of the Baptist ministry and 
a distinguished lecturer, was born in Stockport, Columbia county. New York, on the 
ISth day of November, 1849, a son of Bartholomew C. and Anna Eliza (Bedell) Vos- 
burgh. The ancestors of the family in the paternal line came to this country in 1685 
from Holland. The mother was of English lineage, the Bedell family having been 
founded in America also in 1685. The Vosburghs lived in what is now Columbia 
county, on the east side of the Hudson river, and the Bedell family home was in what 
Is now Greene county, on the west side of the river, opposite the Vosburgh home. 
The Bedells were Quakers. 

In the acquirement of his education Dr. Vosburgh was graduated from the Albany 
(New York) Normal College in 1870, from Colgate University of Hamilton, New York, 
with the Bachelor's degree in 1S73 and from the Hamilton Theological Seminary in 
1874. He received the degree of Master of Arts in 1883 and the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy in 1884 from the University of Chicago, both degrees being granted as the 
result of post-graduate work. In 1892 Shurtleff College conferred upon him the hon- 
orary degree of Doctor of Divinity. Before completing his training for the ministry 
he had taught school in early life. He was ordained to the Christian ministry at 
Cooperstown, New York, in June, 1874, and he was in the active pastorate from that 
date until October, 1911. His successive pastorates were as follows: First Baptist 
church of Cooperstown, New York. 1874-1877; Bergen Baptist church of Jersey City, 
New Jersey, 1877-1879; Millard Avenue Baptist church of Chicago, 1879-1883; First 
Baptist church of Decatur, Illinois, 1883-1890; First Baptist church of Elgin, Illinois, 
1890-1893; Stoughton Street Baptist church of Boston, Massachusetts, 1893-1897; First 
Baptist church of Denver, Colorado, 1897-1911. He is regarded as the leading Baptist 
minister of Colorado and as one of the foremost Baptist ministers of the United States. 
His opinion has great weight throughout the country. He was president of the 
Colorado Baptist Convention for four years and has been president of the Baptist 
Pastors' Conferences of Chicago. Boston and Denver. His pastoral record has been 
one of marked achievement. The churches he has served have all enjoyed permanent 
growth of a definite nature in numbers, strength and influence. It is worthy of note 
that in most of his pastorates large sums of money have been raised for the payment 
of debts, for important improvements, or for new edifices, and that deep spiritual 
awakening, resulting in the conversion of hundreds, took place. His administrative and 
executive qualities are as remarkable as his literary and oratorical gifts. He has a strong 
and attractive personality. In his written productions he is a consummate master of 
expression and on the platform he is an orator of impressive power. His mind is 
marked by vitality and resiliency and as a thinker he is clear, cumulative and con- 
structive. 

Dr. Vosburgh was married on August 24, 1881, in Arlington, Massachusetts, to 
Miss Florence Louise Learned, a daughter of Albert C. and Lucy (Coolidge) Learned, 
both representatives of old colonial families whose ancestors came from England at 
an early period in the settlement of the new world and were represented in the war 
for independnece. Dr. and Mrs. Vosburgh have one daughter, Edna Hays, who was 
educated in the United States and in France, where she spent four years, in the study 
of art. Her paintings have been accepted in the salons of the old world, where they 
have received high praise. She became the wife of Bernard Lentz, a graduate of 
West Point and at that time a lieutenant in the Twenty-first Infantry, their marriage 
being celebrated on the 18th of August, 1909. They spent several years in the 
Philippines and Major Lentz, who in 1918 was made a colonel, is now a member of the 
General Staff at Washington, D. C. They have two sons. Paul Leonard Vosburgh, 
the only son of Dr. and Mrs. Vosburgh, was born at Decp,tur, Illinois, May 30, 1887. 
and was educated in the public schools of Denver and in the University of Denver. He 
is a thoroughgoing, strong-minded business man and is now (1918) at the head of the 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 199 

Wadhams & Kerr Brothers wholesale grocery house at Walla Walla, Washington. He 
was married in Chicago, Illinois, October 20, 1910. to Miss Opal Parr and they have 
one child, a son, Richard Parr Vosburgh. 

Dr. Vosburgh has traveled extensively in Mexico, Europe, Egypt, Syria and the 
Orient. Fifteen times he has crossed the Atlantic. In 1896 he made an extended 
journey through Egypt. Syria, Turkey and Greece. In 1911 and 1912 he made a leisurely 
journey around the world, spending much of the time in India. Java, the Philippines, 
China and Japan. He has been a close and sympathetic student of the economic, 
political, social and religious customs and ideas of the peoples among whom he has 
traveled. As a result he has written much and informingly upon his travels, while 
his travel lectures, of which he has given thousands, are among the finest utterances 
of their type now heard upon the American platform. In addition to tlieological pur- 
suits, he has read widely and thought deeply upon economic and industrial problems, 
while the study of art has been an avocation that he has pursued with delight for 
years. He has thus become a writer and lecturer of wide repute on social questions 
and upon art. In view of his intimate knowledge of the higher life of the whole world 
he was appointed a few years ago lecturer on "Civilization in the Twentieth Century" 
in the University of Denver. This position is probably unique in the universities of 
our country today. He spends half of each year in residence at the University and 
the other half in extension work in Colorado and adjoining states, especially In higher 
institutions. Tliere are very few, if any, men who address each year so many young 
men and women of college grade. He is chaplain of the Colorado Society of the Sons 
of the Revolution, a member of the National Institute of Social Science, a member of 
the Denver Civic and Commercial Association and is a thirty-second degree Mason. 
He has always taken a deep Interest in civic affairs and in all state, national and 
international questions. All that pertains to the welfare of man is of interest to him, 
whether concerning the Bible, economics, capital and labor, art, literature or music. 
While he is intensely an American, he understands and appreciates the life problems 
of all peoples and is interested in them. He is not a provincialist but is a true cos- 
mopolitan. A man of broad scholarship and varied attainments, he is a guiding spirit 
in public thought and action. 



WILLIAM S. WILL. 



The well devised business plans and capable management of William S. Will, 
have brought success to the Midland Casket & Manufacturing Company of Denver, of 
whose interests he has had control for a number of years. He was born in Ripley 
county, Indiana. May 17, 1869, a son of William and Katherine (Hill) Will. The 
father was born in Europe, while the birth of the mother occurred in Kentucky. 
William Will, Sr., came to America when but ten years of age with his parents, who 
settled in Ohio, where he was reared. When a young man of twenty he went to 
Indiana and with the outbreak of the Civil war he volunteered and joined the Sixth 
Indiana Infantry, with which he went to the front, participating in many stirring 
engagements. He was wounded several times. On one occasion a cannon ball struck 
him in the back of the neck, wounding him severely, but after several months spent 
in a hospital he recovered and returned to the fighting line. At the close of the war 
he received an honorable discharge and returned to Versailles, Indiana, where he was 
married and engaged in merchandising on his own account. He remained in business 
there to the time of his death, which occurred December 13, 1909. His wife removed 
from Kentucky to Indiana in her girlhood days with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jonathan Hill, who were pioneer settlers of that region. Mrs. Will is still living 
at the advanced age of eighty years, her birth having occurred October 29, 1838, and 
she yet makes her home in Versailles. Indiana. They had a family of seven children, 
six of whom are living: Anna M., a trained nurse residing with her mother: Mrs. Ida 
Thompson, whose husband is a newspaper editor of Versailles, Indiana; William S.; 
Mrs. C. S. Gookins, who is diagnostician at the Reed Hospital at Washington, D. C; 
Joseph A., proprietor and editor of a newspaper at Rising Sun, Indiana; and Mrs. 
Nancy L. Schrader, of Limon, Colorado. 

In his boyhood days William S. Will was a pupil in the public schools of Ver- 
sailles, Indiana, and after completing his high school work he entered a newspaper 
office as a printer's devil at the princely salary of fifty cents per week. After serving 
his apprenticeship on the Versailles Republican he resigned and went to North Vernon. 
Indiana, where he continued in newspaper work. Under the presidential administra- 



200 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

tion of Benjamin Harrison he was appointed deputy postmaster of North Vernon, 
Indiana, and served for four years. In the meantime he resigned his position in news- 
paper circles and after his term as postmaster expired he returned to his former occu- 
pation, becoming editor of the Four Counties Chronicle at Aurora, Indiana. After two 
years he sold out on account of failing health and Came to Colorado, settling at 
Elizabeth, where he conducted the postoffice, and also assisted in the Elizabeth State 
Bank, where he continued for two years. He then became connected with the Russell 
Gates Mercantile Company, with which he remained until April, 1912. In that year 
he became interested in the Midland Casket & Manufacturing Company of Denver, which 
was maintaining a precarious existence, endeavoring to keep out of the bankruptcy 
court. From the time when Mr. Will assumed the management of the business it has 
steadily grown and is today one of the successful manufacturing concerns of Denver, 
of which he is the secretary, treasurer and general manager. 

On the 30th of September, 1909, Mr. Will was married to Mrs. Belle C. Richards, 
the widow of Everett Richards, of Zanesville, Ohio. Fraternally he is connected with 
the Knights of Pythias and his religious faith is that of the Congregational church. 
There have been no unusual or spectacular phases in his career. He has worked per- 
sistently and energetically since making his initial start in the business world, wisely 
using his opportunities and advancing step by step until he is now in active control 
of an Important and profitable commercial and manufacturing concern, which is con- 
ducting an extensive business, shipping caskets to New Mexico. Kansas, Utah, Wyom- 
ing and Nebraska, and in the business from fifteen to twenty expert workmen are 
employed. 



RUFUS E. SPENCER. 



Rufus E. Spencer, president of The R. E. Spencer Lumber Company of Denver, 
was born in Lynchburg, Tennessee, December 31, 1878, a son of J. W. and Jacynthia 
(Waggoner) Spencer, who were likewise natives of Tennessee, where they remained 
until 1913, when they came to Denver, in which city they now make their home. The 
father was for many years engaged in farming but is now living retired. Their 
family numbered seven children, five of whom survive: William M., a resident of 
Colorado; Ernest W., now in France; Mrs. George Berry, living in Denver; Mrs. 
Joseph Waggoner, of Tennessee; and Rufus E., who was the third in order of birth 
In the family. 

In his boyhood days Rufus E. Spencer was a pupil in the public schools and when 
in his nineteenth year completed his studies in the Lynchburg (Tenn.) high school. 
He afterward spent two years as a student in the State College at Lexington, Ken- 
tucky, and for one year subsequent to that time engaged in clerking in an attorney's 
office in Whitley county, Kentucky, but resigned his position to become bookkeeper 
and cashier for the Kentucky Lumber Company, with which he remained for two 
years. On the expiration of that period he came to Denver in 1901 and secured a 
position as bookkeeper with the Hallack Lumber & Supply Company, remaining with 
that house for two years. He next obtained a similar position with the E. W. Robin- 
son Lumber Company of Denver but after eighteen months returned to the Hallack 
Lumber & Supply Company as manager of the yard, acting in that capacity for five 
years. In 1909 he resigned and organized The R. E. Spencer Lumber Company, which 
has since been successfully conducted under his immediate control. He is the presi- 
dent and manager of this business, which is a close corporation, successfully carrying 
on a large business as general dealers in lumber and builders' supplies of all kinds, 
together with paints and oils, and automobile tires and accessories. Mr. Spencer has 
also installed a fine gas and filling station near his yard, which is in charge of his 
father. Extending his efforts, he became one of the organizers of the Chapin Lumber 
Company, of Aurora, Colorado, of which he is the vice president, and he likewise owns 
a half interest in a lumberyard at Hereford, Colorado, which is managed by his ' 
brother. He is likewise a director of the Thomas Realty Company and a stockholder 
in the Drovers State Bank and in the Merchants Bank of Denver. Forceful and re- 
sourceful, he has thus carried his activities into various connections, each one of 
which has profited by his cooperation, sound judgment and keen sagacity. 

On the 22d of January, 1902, Mr. Spencer was married to Miss Bessie P. Forman, 
at Loveland, Colorado, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Forman, of a well known 
family of Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Spencer have become parents of four children. 
Paul R., born in Denver on April 13, 1903. Is attending the Manual Training high 
school. Ruth Elizabeth, born in 1906, is also a high school pupil. Nancy D., born 




RUFUS E. SPENCER 



202 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

in Tennessee in 1911, is a legally adopted daughter, a child of Mr. Spencer's deceased 
sister. Richard O., born in Denver, December 6, 1915, completes the family. 

Mr. Spencer is a Mason, belonging to lodge, chapter, commandery and to the 
Mystic Shrine. He also has membership in the Denver Motor Club, in the Civic and 
Commercial Association and in the Colorado-Wyoming Lumber Dealers Association. 
He stands for all that is most worth while to the individual and to the community at 
large and cooperates generously and heartily in all movements for public progress and 
improvement in the community in which he lives. He is possessed of many sterling 
traits of character and his business qualifications are such as have enabled him to 
work his way steadily upward from a humble position to one of prominence in con- 
nection with the lumber, hardware supplies, and retail coal trade of the city. He is 
now controlling a business of substantial proportions and his close application and 
indefatigable energy have constituted the foundation upon which he has built his 
success. 



SAMUEL C. YODER. 



Samuel C. Yoder Is one of the more recent additions to the citizenship of Elbert 
county, where he is now extensively engaged in farming. He was born on a farm In 
Iowa county, Iowa, September 14, 1867. a son of Cornelius D. and Barbara Yoder, who 
removed to the middle west from Somerset county. Pennsylvania. The father is 
descended from Swiss ancestry, while the mother's people were of German lineage. 

Samuel C. Yoder acquired a public school education in Iowa while spending his 
youthful days upon his father's farm, where he was early trained to the work of the 
fields, soon becoming familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring 
for the crops. He never sought to change his occupation, finding pleasure and success 
in his farm work, in which he continued in Iowa until 1912. On the 22d of February 
of that year he arrived in Elbert county, Colorado, and purchased his present large 
holdings, comprising three hundred and twenty acres of land in the vicinity of Matheson. 
He is carefully, systematically and successfully promoting the work of the fields 
and his large ranching interests are valuable, while his progressive methods are 
recognized by all. 

On the 3d of October, 1893. in Iowa county, Iowa, Mr. Yoder was married to Miss 
Barbara Miller and to them have been born three children, a son and two daughters. 
Already the family have become well known in this section of the state and have gained 
the warm friendship and kindly regard of those with whom they have 
associated. 



THOMAS STARK. 



Thomas Stark is numbered among the self-made men living in El Paso county. 
He has been dependent upon his own resources from the age of twelve years and has 
met many difficulties and obstacles, but working his way upward, has in the course 
of years become one of the substantial residents of his part of the state. He was 
born in Pike county. Missouri, July 10, 1848, a son of Thomas and Eliza (Goldsbury) 
Stark. The father, a native of Kentucky, was reared in Pike county, Missouri, to which 
place his mother had removed after the death of her husband in 1857. The family 
are direct descendants of General Stark of Revolutionary war fame. The grandfather 
of Thomas Stark was a soldier in the War of 1812, in which he was wounded, and his 
injuries caused his death soon after his discharge. 

Thomas Stark had very little opportunity to acquire an education. He was but 
twelve years of age when the Civil war broke out. His father was a large slave 
owner in the south and conditions were so radically changed by the events then occur- 
ring that Thomas Stark had little chance to continue his education. In 1870 he came 
to the west, dividing his time between Colorado and Wyoming, where for two years 
he was employed in government survey work. While in Wyoming in 1871 he sat on a 
jury in a famous murder case, in which there were also two women acting on the jury, 
the first time that women were ever given representation on a jury in the country. 
On this occasion the defendant was convicted. 

In 1872 Mr. Stark removed to Englewood, Colorado, where he was employed on a 
farm for one season and then made his way on foot to Colorado Springs, carrying 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 203 

with him his bed and Winchester. He was willing to do almost anything that would 
earn him a few dollars and finally he secured employment at the Wilson coal bank at 
a wage of one dollar per day. In 1874 he went to Missouri, where he purchased sixty 
head of cattle, which he drove through to a ranch in Elbert county, and thereon he 
engaged in cattle raising and ranching for twenty-five years. His interests in that 
connection rapidly increased and he was extensively engaged in that business until 
the range land was all taken up by the homesteaders. He then disposed of his cattle 
and has since lived retired in Colorado Springs save that he followed the turf for a 
few years and became nationally known as the owner of fast horses. At Memphis, 
Tennessee, his horse Porto Rico made a mile in 2:11, while at Lexington, Kentucky, 
Red June made a mile in 2:10y4 flat. He is still a lover of good horses, which he 
keeps for his own pleasure. 

In 1884 Mr. Stark was married to Miss Ella I. Whitney, of Maine, and they have 
become parents of two daughters, Elizabeth W. and Louisa E., both of whom are high 
school graduates and are with their parents in Colorado Springs, the family having 
a pleasant home at No. 517 East Pike's Peak avenue. 

Mr. Stark gives his political endorsement to the democratic party, but the honors 
and emoluments of office have had no attraction for him. His time and attention, his 
thought and purpose, have been concentrated upon his business affairs and although 
he started out in the world empty-handed at an age when most boys are in school, he 
has today won a place among the substantial citizens of Colorado Springs, being now 
the possessor of a competence that is the reward of earnest, persistent labor. 



EDWARD ROBERTS MURPHY. 

Edward Roberts Murphy, now living retired in Denver, was formerly general 
auditor of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad Company and is well known in railroad 
circles throughout the west. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 
20th of December, 1S43, a son of William C. and Almira (Roberts) Murphy. The 
father, espousing the cause of the Union, served with the rank of captain in the 
Civil war. 

In the public schools of his native city Edward R. Murphy pursued his early 
education and passed through consecutive grades until he became a student in the 
Quaker high school, from which he was graduated with the class of 1S61. He started 
out upon his business career as an employe in a country store, being thus employed 
for two years. Prompted by a spirit of patriotism, he then responded to the country's 
call for troops and enlisted for active duty with Company K of the One Hundred and 
Twenty7first Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, but physical disability won him an 
honorable discharge owing to the fact that he had sustained an injury to his spine. 
He afterward had charge of the business of manufacturing shell fuses in the Frank- 
ford arsenal until the end of the war and was later bookkeeper for the Cooper 
Firearms Company at Frankford, Pennsylvania. Mr. Murphy took a course in law 
at the University of Pennsylvania, and for a short time practiced his profession in 
Philadelphia, but preferring a business rather than a professional career he gave up 
the law in 1S66 to enter the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, with 
which he was identified until 1880. He left the position of chief clerk in the comp- 
troller's office to become auditor with the Texas & Pacific Railroad Company, in 
which capacity he served for a year. In 1881 he was made auditor of the Denver 
& Rio Grande Railroad Company and so continued to act until June 30, 1917, when 
he was retired on account of his age. He had spent fifty years in railroad service 
and was a most trusted and capable representative of the corporation which he served. 
For more than a third of a century he had been with the Denver & Rio Grande and 
was widely recognized as one of the able officials of the company. 

Mr. Murphy was twice married, but the wife whom he wedded in early manhood 
passed away. On the 19th of May, 1910, in Denver, he married Minnie B. (Hall) 
Perry, who was born May 2, 1863, a daughter of Charles L. and Mary M. (Hill) Hall. 
A sketch of her father appears elsewhere in the work. Mrs. Murphy had by her 
first marriage a daughter, Mary Antoinette, born June 27, 1888, in Denver, who is 
now Mrs. Frank W. Frueauff of New York, and has a daughter, Margaret Hall, born 
February 23. 1913, in Denver. 

Mr. Murphy gives his political endorsement to the republican party. He was 
reared in the faith of the Society of Friends and still retains membership in the Race 




EDWARD R. MURPHY 




MINNIE B. HALL MURPHY 



206 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Street Meeting House of Philadelphia. He is a well known representative of the 
Masonic fraternity, having joined Oriental Lodge, No. 87, A. F. & A. M., of Denver, upon 
its organization, and he also held membership with the Royal Arch Chapter but was 
demitted from both in December, 1895. He belongs to the Denver Club, to the Denver 
Motor Club and to the Denver Artists Club and is well known in these organizations, 
where his social qualities have won for him popularity among the membership. He 
has now passed the seventy-iifth milestone on life's journey and the rest from business 
cares that he is now enjoying is Indeed well merited. 



MRS. MINNIE B. HALL MURPHY, C. S. D. 

In the early Christian Science work of Colorado Mrs. Minnie B. Hall Murphy was, 
in company with her mother. Mrs. Charles L. Hall, a pioneer and directly responsible 
for the establishment of the work in the state. 

Mrs. Murphy is a native of Colorado,* having been born in Denver on the 2d day 
of May in the year 1863, the daughter of Charles L. and Mary Melissa Hall, both of 
whom are mentioned more extensively on following pages of this work. Here she received 
the rudiments of her liberal education, much of it being obtained from a tutor while 
living on her father's ranch at Colorado Salt Works in Park county. In later years, 
however, this early training was supplemented by courses at Battle Creek College in 
Michigan and in the schools of Maquoketa, Iowa. Mrs. Murphy is also enrolled as 
a member of the alumni of Wolfe Hall. Denver. In art work and as a leader in 
various enterprises, particularly those of charitable nature, Mrs. Murphy has been a 
leader. At the age of sixteen she began the study of china painting, then oil painting 
with Henry Read of Denver, and later studied at the Chicago Art Institute and with 
the New York Art League, with Franz Bischoff of Detroit and with other notable 
teachers. Mrs. Murphy is now a member of the National Arts Club of New York and the 
Denver Art Association; also has her work displayed in annual national exhibits. 

In 1885 Mrs. Murphy, then Miss Minnie B. Hall, first learned of the work of 
Christian Science. In the early part of this year she accompanied her mother, Mrs. 
Hall, to the east, where specialists were to treat her mother for blindness and lame- 
ness. Many physicians had pronounced her case as hopeless, but every means was 
sought to bring relief. En route to the east they stopped in Chicago, where they 
learned of a friend who had been cured of a very grievous affliction by Christian 
Science and they immediately determined to try the new art of healing upon Mrs. 
Hall. Several weeks were spent there under the care of a Christian Science practitioner, 
with the result that Mrs. Hall was completely cured of both her blindness and lameness. 
This so strengthened their belief in the theory of Christian Science, that the mother 
and daughter immediately returned to Denver, resolved to establish the work here. 
In the face of much opposition and not without much difficulty they succeeded in their 
efforts, their first work being the healing of a crippled old scissor-grinder who came 
to their house. This old man discarded his crutches within three weeks and the visible 
cure effected in him brought scores of others to Mrs. Murphy and her mother. Regular 
meetings were 'held at their home, 412 Broadway, and later at No. 3 La Veta place. 
On January 4, 1S86, an association known as the Metaphysical Christian Science 
Institute Association was organized at the Hall home and the charter, No. 20, was 
secured from the National Christian Science Association of Boston in the following 
year. Previous to this time Mrs. Murphy had received a charter, numbered sixteen, 
authorizing her to conduct the Colorado Christian Science Institute. In her work 
here, Mrs. Murphy was under the instruction of Mrs. Mary Baker Eddy and in May, 
1886, she received word from Mrs. Eddy to come to Boston, there to take the regular 
Normal Course in Christian Science. This she did. taking the full course under the 
personal instruction of Mrs. Eddy and forming a personal friendship with the founder 
of Christian Science which was to mould and influence her whole subsequent life and 
work. 

In addition to inaugurating the work at Denver, Mrs. Murphy began the work at 
Canon City, Pueblo, Colorado Springs, Greeley and at several other points outside 
of the state; in a few of these lectures she was assisted by Mr. T. H. Donehue, her 
student. In July, 1887. the first Sunday school was organized by Mrs. Nettie Hall 
McQuade, C. S. D., a sister, at the Hall home, an account of which is to be found 
In Volume V of the Christian Science Journal. The First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
was formally organized at Denver. January 11, 1891, and the first meeting held in 
Winkler's Hall, Sixteenth and Tremont streets; services were held in various other 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 207 

places until the building of the church, wherein the first services were held on Christ- 
mas day, 1891. 

In the activities connected with war work in Denver Mrs. Murphy has been 
very prominent, having begun immediately after the declaration of war to engage in 
the various enterprises for the benefit of the soldiers. She established a unit of the 
comforts forwarding committee of Boston in Denver, the first of this work in Colorado 
which, joined with three other units, was later under the supervision of the Comforts 
Forwarding Committee, on Fifteenth street in Denver, Colorado, with headquarters in 
Boston. The situation in Denver in the days of April and May, 1917, was such that 
some concerted action was necessary. There was no fund in the state treasury with 
which to feed and clothe the hundreds of young men who were coming into the city, 
on their way to be mustered into tlie federal service. Appreciating the situation Mrs. 
Murphy conceived the idea of giving a military eutertainlnent and, with the funds 
secured, provide some means of filling the wants of these boys. Within a short time 
she secured the loan of El Jebel Temple and had made all other arrangements neces- 
sary for the entertainment, which was given successfully on the night of May 5th. Over 
eighteen hundred dollars was taken in at this entertainment, which was used by 
General Baldwin, the Red Cross and the National League of Women's Service. Then 
her idea was carried out to start a cafeteria tor the soldiers. In other lines of war 
work, in knitting, in generous support of the government and Red Cross calls and in 
the work of the Comforts Forwarding Committee, Mrs. Murphy gave her efforts un- 
ceasingly. About forty women joined Mrs. Murphy in making garments for soldiers, 
at Mrs. Murphy's home, and she designed and executed a comfort kit, which won words 
of commendation from both oflicers and enlisted men, here and overseas. Mrs. Murphy 
was appointed one of a committee of three from the First Church to raise twenty-five 
thousand dollars for Christian Science Camp welfare work, among the soldiers. 

Minnie B. Hall was first married on September 7, 18S7, to William R. Perry of 
Denver, who is deceased. To this union there was born in Colorado in 18S8. one 
daughter, Mary Antoinette, now the wife of Mr. Frank Frueauff of New York city, 
and who has won considerable fame in the theatrical and literary circles of the 
country, having been leading woman for several seasons with David Warfield in 
"The Music Master" and the author of a charming book of verse and songs. Margaret 
Hall Frueauff. granddaughter of Mrs. Murphy, is of the third 'generation to be born 
in the state of Colorado, and in Denver, her birthday being February 23. 1913. Mrs. 
Perry was married on May 19, 1910, to Mr. Edward Roberts Murphy, of Denver. 



CHARLES L. HALL. 



Charles L. Hall, intrepid Pike's Peaker and one of the most successful of Colo- 
rado's citizens, was born on the 22d day of November, 1835. in Sherman, New York, 
and died August 15, 1907, in Denver, Colorado. He was the son of Asahel and Betsey 
Wood (Ripley) Hall; the former was born October 9, 1797, and died March 4, 1877, 
and the latter was born in 1800 and passed away May 15, 1856; their marriage occurred 
in the year 1816. Asahel Hall was the son of Richard Hall and Alice (Arnold) Hall; 
Richard Hall was born April 21, 1762, and died November 15, 1843. at New Haven, 
Vermont; Alice Arnold, of Mansfield, Connecticut, was born April 18. 1762. and died 
December IS, 1839; their marriage took place October 2, 1781. The father of Richard 
Hall was Lieutenant Nathaniel Hall, born in Mansfield. Connecticut, February 8, 1724, 
and died July 27, 1816. at New Haven. Vermont, who was an oflicer during the Revo- 
lutionary war in the Continental army; Nathaniel married in 1745 Martha Storrs, who 
was born April 28. 1728, and died June 16, 1808. Nathaniel Hall was the son of Theo- 
philus Hall, whose birth date is not known, but who died August 29, 1747, and Ruth 
Sargeant; the last named was born March 29. 1697, and married Theophilus Hall, 
March 21. 1720 or 1721. The next in the ancestral line was Captain William Hall, 
who was baptized June 8, 1651, and died June 11, 1727. The father of Captain William 
Hall was John Hall, born about 1609 and who died July 23, 1696; he came to the 
colonies with Governor Winthrop and was number sixteen or nineteen on the mem- 
bership roll of the first church at Charlestown, which became the first church in Boston. 
John Hall married Elizabeth Learned, whose father came to this country about 1630. 
Charles L. Hall is a descendant of John Arnold, who as one of the minute men 
fought in the battle of Bunker Hill and rose to the rank of ensign. Mr. Hall is also a 
descendant of John and Elizabeth Howland and of Mr. and Mrs. John Filley, all of 
whom came to America on the Mayflower in 1620. 

When Charles L. Hall was a lad of nine years his parents moved from New York 




CHARLES L. HALL 




MRS. CHARLES L. HALL 



210 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

state to Maquoketa, Jackson county, Iowa, and there he received his primary schooling, 
finally entering Iowa College at Davenport, where he remained until 1859 studying law, 
also pursuing various courses of study designed to fit him tor the ministry. 

When twenty years of age young Hall left school for a time and started in the 
flouring business at Maquoketa. Iowa, but found this occupation unprofitable. The 
stories he heard concerning the wonderful Pike's Peak country had made a profound 
impression upon his imagination and he ultimately decided to seek his fortune in 
Colorado. Accordingly he left Iowa and came overland to the Rockies, locating on 
Ralston creek, where he started a cattle ranch. For a few months he operated this 
property, then sold and on December 14, 1859, left Denver for California Gulch, now 
Leadville, where strikes were being made and hundreds of prospectors were settling. 

Here he was moderately successful in prospecting and mining and in the following 
winter visited the San Juan district. As early as 1860 vague rumors of wonderfully 
rich leads of ore in the southwestern part of Colorado reached the miners then 
operating at Clear Creek, on Tarryall Creek and in California Gulch, and early in 1861 
a large party of experienced prospectors, including Mr. Hall, was formed to explore a 
region then totally unfamiliar to them. The start was made by Hall, with two com- 
panions—Harris and O'Neill— and no incident of unusual character occurred until 
the party began the ascent of the mountains from the south on the brink of the Animas 
canyon, about twenty miles above where the town of Durango is now situated. This 
was in the latter part of February. 1S61. It was during this trip that Mr. Hall had 
an experience which for hardship, peril and threatened starvation is without equal 
in the annals of the Rocky Mountain region. With his two companions, Mr. Hall 
reached the Uncompahgre, passed the site of Ouray, and came to Cow creek, where 
their quest for gold was unsuccessful. Previously they had made a camp in Baker's 
Park and here they decided to return. The trip around by the wagon road seemed 
too long for their supply of provisions, so, believing the next river over the divide 
from the Animas was the Los Pinos, by which they could find a short cut, they started 
over the mountains, but instead of striking the Los Pinos they came upon the Lake 
fork of the Gunnison. A man named Nate Hurd had a camp on the Uncompahgre, 
where Mr. Hall knew that some hides were cached and upon which they could satisfy 
their growing hunger. Their small stock of rations had been exhausted and the three 
men were unable to obtain more, so they hurried their footsteps v/ith the hope of reach- 
ing Kurd's camp across the mountains before starvation overpowered them. On the sixth 
day, as they toiled toward the summit of the mountain, they boiled the flour sacks 
they carried and drank the broth; then they ate their buckskin breeches, their boot- 
tops, and finally a buffalo-robe which they had used for a bed. In relating the details 
of the desperate situation Mr. Hall afterwards described how they relished a colony 
of ants which they found under a decaying log. But the three men persisted even 
without food,— staggering along the banks of precipices, where a slip meant a fall of 
hundreds of feet, clambering painfully over inclined planes of frozen snow, stumbling 
with weakness where any sudden concussion might have started an avalanche, falling 
down from sheer exhaustion when life seemed hardly worth the effort to rise. Mr. 
Hall finally realized that his two companions were plotting against him— scheming 
to murder him and use his body for food. This desperate intention becoming known 
to him he warned them that he would travel no farther with them, nor sleep in their 
presence. He made his bed in a hidden nook of the rocks, but did not remain there, 
which was all that saved his life as he found evidences the next morning that the 
two others had crept to his bed at night, bent upon taking his life. O'Neill and Harris 
soon after left him. but before many hours Harris returned, saying that he feared 
for his own life with O'Neill and preferred to remain with Hall. The men weakened 
rapidly to such an extent that they could scarcely regain their feet after resting. 
Toward the last they were obliged to travel mostly on their hands and knees, making 
about one mile each day. Then, one fortunate day, the report of Hall's pistol was 
heard by Ben Eaton, later state governor, and his party, who were prospecting in the 
vicinity. The two sufferers were quickly rescued and transported to Baker's Park, 
given a little food and started on the road to recovery. During the fourteen and one- 
half days upon this trip Mr. Hall was reduced in weight to just forty-eight pounds. 

After this harrowing experience Mr. Hall returned to California Gulch and con- 
tinued prospecting, also on Cash creek above Fairplay. In the spring of 1S62. having 
located salt springs about twenty miles from Fairplay. Mr. Hall established the Colorado 
Salt Works. During the period of active operations these salt works were always 
managed by the Hall family. At this place the Indians received their annuities and 
upon order from the territorial government could also receive salt. Mr. Hall was 
twice elected to the territorial legislature from this district. Park county, and in later 
years was elected from Lake county for one term. He was also county commissioner 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 211 

of Park county for three terms. His home in this county, erected in 1872, was and is 
considered the best residence in that locality. 

In the winter of 1S7S Charles L. Hall removed to Leadville and almost immediately 
began taking active part in the improvement and development of that community. 
His first work here was in contracting for the grading of streets, laying of pipes, etc., 
all of which was done under his personal supervision. A short time later, in company 
with such men as William Bush and H. W. Tabor, he organized a company to light 
Leadville with gas; Mr. Hall was afterwards one of the promoters of the same utility 
at Pueblo, being one of the directors of the Pueblo Gas & Electric Company. Mr. Hall 
was one of the firm of Bush, Tabor & Hall which opened the Windsor Hotel in Denver 
in June, 1880, then the largest and most popular hostelry in this part of the west. 
He afterward sold his interest in this hotel to Mr. Tabor. 

Mr. Hall's mining success really began in the year ISSl, when, with Dennis Sullivan 
and two others, he purchased the Mylo group of mines in the Ten Mile district. Before 
this time. Mr. Hall had prospected the same as hundreds of others and had met 
with the same indifferent success. He also bought an interest in the famous Sixth 
Street shaft in Leadville and in the Rose group at Ouray. In 1892 he went to Arizona 
and there discovered the noted Mammoth mine, out of which he took minerals worth 
eight hundred thousand dollars. At the time of his death Mr. Hall was the owner of 
about forty mines in Colorado and Arizona. Mr. Hall was delegated to represent 
Arizona territory at the metallic convention held in St. Louis, Missouri, in October, 
1893. 

During the War of the Rebellion Mr. Hall was a lieutenant in the Second Colorado 
Cavalry and participated in the various campaigns of that regiment. He was in the 
hunt for the guerrilla bands which came into this territory from the south and also 
was at Sand Creek, when the troops under Chivington so decisively defeated the 
Indians under Black Kettle. 

In the year 1862 Mr. Hall was married to Mary Melissa Hill Nye, a native of 
New York state. A sketch of Mrs. Hall follows. 



MRS. MARY MELISSA HALL. 

Mary Melissa Hall, wife of Charles L. Hall, was born in Genesee county. New York, 
March 8, 1838 and died July 17, 1899, in Denver, Colorado. She was the daughter 
of Ebenezer and Hannah (Barber) Hill, who were natives of New York state. Her 
girlhood days were spent in the state of her birth, where she received her schooling 
and at a very early age she married Nathan Nye. In the year 1860, in company with 
her husband, father and her two children — Ella and Hal B. — she came overland to the 
Pike's Peak country. Her experiences upon this trip and in making a home here were 
those of the typical pioneer woman of the west, but hard as they were they brought 
forth sterling traits of character which dominated her life. 

In the year 1862 she was married to Charles L. Hall, to which union were born the 
following children: Minnie B., born May 2, 1863, wife of Edward R. Murphy, of Denver; 
Charles A., born July 19, 1865. died May 21, 190G, who was a miner, stockman, ranch- 
owner and operator of the Mammoth mine in Arizona; and Mildred Nettie, born May 30, 
1869, wife of Thomas McQuade. of Park county. 

During the early days of Colorado's history Mrs. Hall met and overcame with 
Spartan courage many of the trials and dangers attendant upon border life. There 
were Indians who often came to her home for food and who at one time fought a 
pitched battle in the rear of the house, the Utes, who were friendly with the whites, 
being arrayed against the Arapahoes and Cheyennes. After this engagement Mrs. 
Hall's home was utilized as a hospital for the wounded Indians. At another time, a 
desperado, who had terrorized the country more or less, called at the home while Mrs. 
Hall was alone and announced his intention of carrying her away with him. Undaunted, 
this brave woman played her part well in the face of this ruffian and placated him 
until she was able to reach her rifle and cover him. Fortunately for himself the 
desperado held up his hands as instructed, for Mrs. Hall was a dead shot. The first 
American flag in what is now the state of Colorado was made by Mrs. Hall on the 
4th of July, 1861, her materials for the same consisting chiefly of a red flannel dress, 
a blue, sunbonnet and goods which had been intended for a white shroud. Mrs. Hall 
was then living at Baker's Park in the Ouray district and here she hoisted the flag; 
it was later cut down by a rebel sympathizer but was afterwards returned to Mrs. 
Hall by that noted plainsman and scout — Kit Carson. In the formation and establish- 
ment of Christian Science in Denver and Colorado Mrs. Hall was the pioneer. Suffering 



212 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

from total blindness and lameness at one period of her life, she sought relief through 
the teachings of the Christian Science church and, having found not only relief but a 
cure for her afDictions, devoted her efforts afterwards to the start of the Christian 
Science practice in this part of the country. In 1885 the first services were held in 
her home at No. 412 Broadway and in 1886 services were held at No. 3 La Veta place. 



WILLIAM TAMLIN. 



There is much that is interesting and at times unique in the life history of 
William Tamlin, one of the old-timers of Elbert county. He was born in Italy, prob- 
ably in the year 1857, and as nearly as he can remember came to this country in 1867, 
crossing the Atlantic as a boy musician. He ran away within a few months after 
the time that he landed on the shores of the new world and never saw any of his 
people again. Forty-five years ago he arrived in Colorado and became a cowboy. He 
became an expert rider, so that his services were in demand as a jockey and he 
rode in races throughout the western country, but the lure of cowboy life was strong 
and he returned to the business of cow punching. He rode for the big cattle owner, 
"Dad" Grimes, of Wichita, also for "Shanghai" Pierce, of Texas. lor Henry Davis 
and the firm of Johnson Brothers. He had all of the experiences that came to the 
cowboy on the western ranges in the early days and was familiar with many events 
which found their place on the pages of history. 

About forty years ago Mr. Tamlin was married to Miss Minerva J. McCorkle, of 
Clay county, Missouri, and they have five sons and three daughters, namely: George 
S.; Henry, who was for a time in the army; Vincent; Albert; Willie; Nora; Mary; 
and Lizzie. Four of the sons are married and are now successfully following farming. 

For many years Mr. Tamlin engaged in freighting for the big Elbert county firms 
and later built the first livery stable in the new town of Simla. He has prospered as 
time has passed and is now the owner of a model farm of three hundred and twenty 
acres, which he has brought under a high state of cultivation and to which he has 
added all modern improvements, equipments and accessories. His land is under a 
high state of cultivation and as a reward of his labors he annually gathers golden 
harvests. Mr. Tamlin was educated in the school of hard knocks. He has the 
appearance of a college professor and is one of the best informed men in his county 
on affairs of the day. Possessing an observing eye and a retentive memory, he has 
constantly broadened his knowledge and from each experience in life has gained the 
lesson therein contained. Dependent upon his own resources from a very early age, 
he has steadily worked his way upward, not only winning success but also developing 
character that has gained for him the respect of those who know him. His reminiscen- 
ces of the early days are most interesting and Elbert county honors him among its 
pioneer citizens. 



CHARLES ROBERT BROCK, LL. D. 

Charles Robert Brock, a member of the well known Denver law firm of Smith, 
Brock & Ferguson, son of Daniel R. and Mary Lucas Brock and a lineal descendant 
of John Brock, a captain in the War of 1812, and John Brock", first lieutenant of the 
Tenth Regiment of Virginia in the War of the Revolution, was born near London, 
Laurel county, Kentucky, on May 9. 1865, and was the first born in a family of eleven 
children. His parents were deeply religious. The most unselfish of mothers graciously 
taught her children to reverence their father, and the father sternly and yet affection- 
ately led them to treat their mother with respect and tenderness. The chief aim of 
the parents was first to give their children proper moral and religious training, and 
second to afford every available means for their intellectual development. In the latter 
respect the facilities were limited. However, when four years and two months old 
the subject of this sketch entered a school conducted by his mother's sister in a log 
schoolhouse at Rough Creek and was present every day during the term of one hun- 
dred days. The next year the school was conducted by his father, and again he was 
in regular attendance every day of the term. From that time until he was seventeen 
years of age he attended the country school on an average of about one hundred days 
each year, working during the intervals between school terms on his father's farm. 
He had no idle hours. In the winter evenings he was directed in his studies by his 
father and mother. His mother patiently memorized his lessons and then taught them 



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CHARLES R. BROCK 



214 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

to her boy as she moved about her household duties. The memory of those days is 
both sweet and tender. His father had little patience when his son seemed too stupid 
readily to understand a problem in arithmetic or algebra without any, or at most with 
one, explanation. He was rather stern in his exactions, but the deepest affection always 
existed between the father and son. It continues to this day, and weekly letters have 
always passed between them when separated. To his home life and home training 
he attributes whatever of virtue he may possess, and just to the extent that his life 
fails in being what it ought to be he recognizes that he has failed to follow the teach- 
ings of his devoted father and sainted mother. 

When seventeen his father sent him to an academy at London for one term. At 
the end of this term he procured a certificate of qualification and taught a country 
school. From that time until he was twenty-one years old each year he taught one 
term of five months and attended an academy at London or Barbourville for a like 
term. In. this way he prepared for college, and in January, 1887, entered the State 
College, now the University of Kentucky, from which he graduated in June, 1890, with 
the degree of Baclielor of Science. He was selected by the faculty to deliver an 
address at his graduation. The theme was "Our Glory and Our Shame," his purpose 
being to make a plea for independence in tliought and action. A Lexington journal 
published the address and commenting on it said: 

"It is with pride and pleasure that we lay before our readers the address of Mr. 
Charles R. Brock, of Laurel county, Kentucky, delivered at the closing exercises of the 
State College, June 5th. It is the province of the Journal to give attention to and pro- 
mote the material development of the state, but the methods of the Journal are only a 
change in the tactics prosecuted for ten years by The Lexington Observer for the up- 
building of the intellectual, moral and educational work of the state. 

"Mr. Brock has happily touched upon both in this able and manly address, com- 
bining the two lines of development with such manliness and courage as to mark him 
as worthy the highest confidence of his fellow citizens. The evidence of intellectual 
vigor and moral courage to be found in this address is such as should reassure the 
faltering faith of every patriotic citizen of the commonwealth." 

The compliment he appreciated most, however, came from his father. A few days 
after his graduation his mother confidentially let him know that his father, who was 
present at his graduation, had indicated that he was not ashamed of the address. His 
father was not willing to "spoil" his children by compliments. Accordingly this inti- 
mation that he was not displeased was received as a piece of extravagant praise. 

He and a member of his class. Professor James A. Yates, now of the Kansas State 
Normal School, at Pittsburg, Kansas, became associate principals for the school year 
1890-91 of the Laurel Seminary at London. During this year, in accordance with an 
ambition which had been steadily developing for a number of years, he began the 
active study of law. During the school year 1891-92 he taught in Williamsburg Institute, 
now Cumberland College, at Williamsburg. While at Williamsburg he lived in a room 
adjoining the law office of the late R. D. Hill, one of the most capable and painstaking 
lawyers in southeastern Kentucky. Not because it was required, but as a slight ex- 
pression of appreciation of the direction of his studies as given by Mr. Hill, and for the 
use of his books and the occupation of his office as a study, he acted as a kind of 
janitor of the law office, as he did of his own adjoining room. Before the end of the 
year he was admitted to the bar. In June, 1892, he and Mr. Hill formed a partnership 
for the practice of law at London under an arrangement for Mr. Brock to be in charge 
of the oflice at that place. The partnership continued for three years, Mr. Hill having 
given his name essentially for the help and assurance which it afliorded. When he 
felt that the young lawyer was able to proceed alone the partnership was dissolved. 

During the remaining years that he practiced law at London it is no exaggera- 
tion to say that he steadily gathered about him the most desirable clientage the town 
and surrounding country afforded. Within this period those who had known him 
from childhood became willing to seek and to take his advice. In the meantime, on 
June 1, 1893, he was most happily married to Miss Katherine P. Brown, a daughter 
of Judge W. L. Brown of London, Kentucky. In 1901 Mrs. Brock's physician advised 
that her health would be improved by the Colorado climate, and this advice brought 
the husband and wife to Denver. They reached Denver in time for Mr. Brock to vote 
against the adoption of Article XX of the state constitution. This amendment, how- 
ever, appears to have had no little influence in shaping his future professional career 
in Colorado. It consolidated the office of the city attorney and that of the district 
attorney of the Denver district. There was a vacancy on the staff of the district attor- 
ney. Word reached Mr. Brock at an unexpected moment that the district attorney 
desired to fill this vacancy with a man to whom he could entrust a share of the 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 215 

civil business of the city and that his name was being considered for the position. 
An arrangement was made by which he agreed to work one month on trial without 
compensation and If at the end of the time the district attorney was convinced of his 
ability to perform the duties desired he was to be appointed. The appointment was 
made at the end of the month and for eighteen months his connection with the office 
continued. He resigned to become associated with Milton Smith, the senior member 
of the present firm of Smith, Brock & Ferguson, with whom he came in contact as 
an incident to his official duties. When in the city attorney's office he had charge 
of litigation of considerable moment to his adopted city, including what was known 
as the "Wine Room Cases," which he argued in the supreme court of the United 
States. The basis of the writ of error from that tribunal was the contention that 
a charter provision which excluded women from saloons or rooms adjacent thereto 
constituted a discrimination against women as such, in violation of the Constitution 
of the United States — a contention resisted by Mr. Brock and repudiated by the 
supreme court. 

In July, 1904, he was designated by the late Mayor Speer for the pleasing duty of 
presenting to the Cruiser Denver, then at Galveston, Texas, a silver service on behalf 
of the city of Denver. In connection therewith It was also his privilege to present 
to the Cruiser a silver pitcher on behalf of thp Daughters of the American Revolution. 

He Is devoted to his profession and attributes whatever of success he has attained 
to the fact that he has always preferred a fair income earned directly from his pro- 
fession to a much larger income obtained from any other source. For several years 
he has lectured on the law of public service companies and equity pleading in the 
law school of the University of Denver and is now a member of the board of trustees 
of that Institution. 

At the Golden Jubilee of the University of Kentucky, in 1916, Mr. Brock was one 
of three of the alumni of the university selected for honorary degrees, the other 
two being Dr. John L. Patterson, dean of the University of Louisville, and Dr. Thomas 
H. Morgan of Johns Hopkins University, Mr. Brock himself receiving the degree of 
Doctor of Laws. 

In religion he is a Baptist, having been baptized in the Cumberland river and 
Into the fellowship of the Williamsburg Baptist church before leaving his native 
state. Since coming to Denver he has been a member of the First Baptist church, is 
a regular attendant upon its services and finds pleasure in contributing of his means 
for its local support and for the maintenance of its work in foreign fields. He advo- 
cates tithing, which he has consistently practiced for more than twenty years, as the 
scriptural and most effective method of raising funds for religious purposes. He 
believes that the question of the future life is the most important that engages the 
thought of man. While entertaining the protoundest regard for all evangelical denomi- 
nations he has no toleration for the popular heresy that it makes no difference what 
a man believes on questions of religion provided only he is honest in his belief. 
Saul of Tarsus, when "breathing out threatenings and slaughter against the disciples 
of the Lord," was probably as honest as when under inspiration he wrote the Epistle 
to the Romans. 

In politics he calls himself a conservative democrat. This because he voted for 
Palmer and Buckner electors in 1896 and has not found it possible to assent to all 
of the progressive measures advocated by his party. He has never sought or desired 
political preferment. Under appointment of Governor Buchtel. however, he served 
as a member of Colorado's first civil service commission from 1907 to 1911 — an office 
without compensation. His fundamental political creed finds illustration in an address 
which he delivered in June, 1918, at the installation of Dr. McVey as president of 
the University of Kentucky. Speaking of patriotism he then said: 

"Within the past year many of us have learned that patriotism, like religion, can- 
not be spontaneously evolved; its development is a process. It is the peculiar province 
of a state school to breathe out a true spirit of patriotism — loyalty to our written 
constitution, an instrument so wise, both in its grants and its limitations, that no 
believer in representative government has yet been able to suggest any material 
improvement. 

"With the proper ending of this World war our country will be confronted with 
grave and difficult problems. The conflict between labor and capital, the line of de- 
marcatton between the right of private management and the right of public regula- 
tion of public service companies, the controversy between legitimate regulation and 
government ownership of public utilities, have already presented questions fraught 
with serious difficulties and attended with some dangers. Important as they are, 
those questions will be subordinated to problems more vital and fundamental. Doubt- 



216 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

less the most important will be with respect to the subtle attacks of socialism upon 
our representative form of government. 

"The enemies of representative government, of whom socialists are the chief, 
have already been active. They will become more so when the war ends. It is to their 
efforts primarily that the initiative and referendum, the recall of officers, and espe- 
cially the recall of judicial decisions, have been adopted in a number of the states. 
So plausible have been the advocates of these so-called reforms that many good-in- 
tentioned men have been beguiled to support them. 

"It may be true, and undoubtedly it is true, that changes in our industrial and 
sociological conditions may from time to time necessitate modifications of our con- 
stitution. Nevertheless, in the representative feature of that instrument it is believed 
that it expresses the concentrated wisdom of the ages. And I submit that upon our 
loyalty to that feature of our form of government must ultimately depend its per- 
petuity. It is that feature which the framers of the constitution contemplated would 
always insure the selection of men with some special fitness for the duties attaching 
to their office. It was believed that specially qualified representatives selected by the 
people for the purpose could better make, interpret and execute the laws than any 
of these duties could be performed by the people collectively. 

"The initiative and referendum and the recall of officers in general, although 
ignoring this principle, might prove innocuous. When, however, the representative 
feature of our government is encroached upon to the extent that judicial officers and 
judicial decisions are declared to be subject to recall at the election of the people 
as a whole, we strike at the very foundation of our liberties and of our form of 
government. Against any encroachment, however plausible the scheme, which strikes 
at a principle so vital as the independence of the judiciary and the principle which 
would select and call to duty a person specially fitted for the performance of that 
duty, we need to be constantly on our guard. Upon their loyalty to these principles 
depends the loyalty of our citizens to our government, for after all loyalty to our 
government depends upon loyalty to the written constitution of our fathers." 

When not engaged in his professional duties his chief pleasures are found in 
his home, his books, his church and travel as opportunity affords. He is a member 
of the University Club of Denver and of its board of directors, of the Denver Club, the 
Denver Motor Club, an honorary member of Phi Delta Phi, and a member of the 
Denver, Colorado, and American Bar Associations. 



JAMES ABSALOM MAULDIN. 

James Absalom Mauldin, deceased, was one of the extensive landowners of Elbert 
county, prominently and actively connected with its agricultural interests for many 
years. He was born in Hall county, Georgia, September 16, 1846, a son of Terrill W. 
and Sarah (Jackson) Mauldin. The father died in the year 1862 and the support of 
the family then devolved upon James A. Mauldin of this review, who at that time was 
a youth of but sixteen years. The burden was a heavy one for young shoulders, but 
he bravely faced conditions and did everything possible to promote the interests and 
welfare of the family. He had pursued his education in the Hall county public schools 
and when twenty-one years of age he decided to leave his native state and seek the 
opportunities of the growing west. Accordingly in 1867, accompanied by his mother 
and his three younger sisters, he came to Colorado, settling in Elbert county, where 
he secured land. As the years passed his labors brought to him increasing financial 
resources and he made judicious investments in property until at the time of his 
death he was the owner of sixteen hundred and twenty acres of valuable land in the 
vicinity of Elizabeth. He converted the wild and arid tract into rich and productive 
fields, from which he annually gathered good harvests, and he added many modern 
and attractive improvements to his farm, transforming it into one of the valuable 
ranch properties of the district. 

Mr. Mauldin was twice married. He first wedded Miss Caroline McCurry, a native 
of Missouri, who passed away in the year 1890. On the 25th of February, 1892, he was 
married at Geneseo, Illinois, to Miss Frances E. Tee. of Cambridge, that state, and 
they became the parents of five children, James F., William B., Charles Wesley, 
Harold Stratton and Nellie Ruth. Mrs. Mauldin's father and mother and two of her 
sisters were born on the Isle of Wight, while the Mauldin family comes of Scotch- 
Irish ancestry. William B. Mauldin, the second son. is in the service of his country, 
having been trained at Camp Cody, New Mexico, and at Camp Dix, New Jersey. He 




d yt cM-^^^^JoUn^ 



218 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

is now in France, valiantly defending the cause of his country and of the allies 
in this world struggle for democracy. The youngest son, Harold Stratton, was in the 
new draft. 

Mr. Mauldin gave his political allegiance to the democratic party and his fellow 
townsmen, recognizing his worth and ability, frequently called upon him for public 
service. Three times he was elected county commissioner, making a most creditable 
record in that office. He passed away February 24, 1908, after a residence of forty- 
one years in Colorado. He was therefore a witness of the greater part of the growth 
and development of the state, for pioneer conditions existed at the time of his arrival 
and he and his mother and sisters had to face many of the privations and hardships 
incident to the settlement of the frontier. As the years passed, however, these dis- 
appeared before an advancing civilization and Mr. Mauldin was among those who 
contributed in bringing about the marked change which has made Elbert county one 
of the most progressive and prosperous sections of the state. 



GEORGE FRANK;LIN CHASE. 

George Franklin Chase, of Boulder, passed away on the 27th of October, 1918, at 
the age of eighty-one years. During the latter part of his life he lived retired but for 
many years had been prominently and successfully identified with agricultural pursuits, 
his prosperity enabling him in his later years to enjoy a rest which he truly and 
richly merited. He came to Colorado from far-off New England, his birth having 
occurred in Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1837. His paternal grandfather, Nicholas Chase, 
was a native of New Hampshire and was a descendant of Aquilla Chase, who with 
two brothers came from England to America, becoming founders of the family in the 
new world. George W. Chase, father of George Franklin Chase, was born in New 
Hampshire, spent his youthful days in that state and was married there to Miss Ann 
Mathews, who passed away in 1839, after which he was married again, in 1844. He 
later removed to York county, Maine, where he opened a little general store in New- 
field, conducting business for a few years. He then sold his stock and turned his 
attention to the clothing trade at that place, carrying on the business until about 
1857. Subsequently he concentrated his efforts and attention upon farming in York 
couny, Maine, and was thus identified with Its agricultural development until his 
demise, which occurred in 1874. 

George Franklin Chase pursued his education in the public schools of York 
county, Maine, and in other districts where the family lived. He was twenty-two years 
of age when he came to Boulder, Colorado, arriving in the year 1S59 and thus casting 
in his lot with the earliest pioneers of this section of the state. The city of Boulder 
had just been laid out and the work of progress and improvement seemed scarcely 
begun, but he had the prescience to discern something of wliat the future had in 
store for this great and growing western country and, obeying the dictates of his 
judgment, he gathered the reward of his labors in the fullness of time. He at once 
took up wild land and with characteristic energy began the arduous task of developing 
a new farm. Many hardships and difficulties confronted him, but he persevered and 
in the course of years transformed the wild tract into richly productive fields, from 
which he annually gathered substantial harvests. He always retained possession of 
the land which he settled upon in 1859. for which he later obtained a patent from the 
government and which to the time of his death remained a source of substantial and 
gratifying income to him. 

On the 14th of May. 1864, in Biddeford. Maine, Mr. Chase was united in marriage 
to Miss Augusta A. Staples and to them were born four sons and a daughter, but the 
last mentioned died in infancy. The eldest son, Frederick L., was graduated from 
the University of Colorado in the class of 1886 and afterward won the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy in Yale University in 1891. He was astronomer at the Yale 
Observatory until 1913, when he returned to Boulder and is now living with his 
mother. George Arthur, the second son, died in 1897, at the age of thirty years. 
Charles H. has also passed away, and Harry A., the youngest son, was graduated 
from the University of Colorado in 1899 and departed this life in 1902. The only 
member of the family who married was George Arthur, the second son, who wedded 
Dora Milner but left no children. 

In politics Mr. Chase was a stalwart republican, having supported the party 
from the date of its organization to the time of his demise. He once s.erved as county 
commissioner of Boulder county, Colorado, filling the position for three years, and he 




GEORGE F. CHASE 



220 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

also served as one of the first trustees of Boulder. He was a member of the Colorado 
Home Guard during the period of the Civil war. Fraternally he was a Knight 
Templar and Royal Arch Mason and when called to his final rest he was serving 
for the forty-fourth year as treasurer of Columbia Lodge, No. 14, A. P. & A. M., a 
record which it is believed is unprecedented in Masonry. He was a Congregationalist 
in religious faith and did much active work in behalf of the church and in support 
of Masonry, exemplifying in his life the beneficent spirit of the craft -which is based 
upon a recognition of the brotherhood of man and the fatherhood of God. His life 
was indeed an honorable and upright one and constituted an influencing factor for 
good in the community in which he so long lived. Great indeed were the changes 
which came to Boulder and the surrounding district during the period of Mr. Chase's 
connection with the state, and as one of the honored pioneers and substantial citizens 
he deserves mention in the history of Colorado. He remainod an officer of the First 
Congregational church in Boulder from its organization in 1866 until the time of his 
demise, this being the second Congregational church organized in Colorado territory. 
When death called him, his pastor pronounced a fitting eulogy upon him, in which he 
said: "Deacon Chase came from a race of sturdy men. He had the pioneer spirit. 
He lost neither his religion nor his conscience by the side of the long trail across 
the plains. He brought a New England conscience into the new land where distinctions 
of right and wrong were not always any too clear. For conscience sake, during the 
long, slow journey across the country by ox teams, he and a few companions rested 
each Sabbath while others of the original caravan pushed on. On the same day, how- 
ever, all reached Boulder together. Those who had kept their faith finished strong 
and fresh; the others, with tired bodies and worn-out teams. Such men as he stood 
against the drift towards carelessness and Indifference in the early days. He stood 
without wavering for the things of the spirit when most men were seeking only gold. 
He early identified himself with the Congregational church and for more than fifty 
years filled the office of deacon with honor to himself and the church. His unusual 
fidelity has been a bulwark. It kept weaker souls true to their tasks. Duty was not 
a word he disliked. 

"In times of grief, men found, in his stanch faith, comfort and hope. Because 
he lived faithfully, it has been easier for other men to resist sin, work cheerfully and 
bear grief manfully. It could be said of him, as was said of another Godly man, 
'Whenever he walks by my shop I say to myself. There goes a true man, and that 
moment everything good in me feels stronger, and I find it easier to live as I ought.' 

"There was a solidity and firmness in his character that makes it fitting to say 
that he was, 'As an hiding place from the wind, and a covert from the tempest.' 

" 'A man shall be as rivers of water in a dry place.' We who live near the plains, 
once called 'The Great American Desert.' and have watched the streams flow down 
from snowy heights and spread out in a thousand streamlets, giving, through their 
beneficent ministrations, the beauty of growing crops and the riches of abundant 
harvests, can appreciate this figure of speech. Such is the man who mediates between 
the heights of God and the dry plains of human life. 'Down from the heights of life 
where uptower to heaven the great ideals of faith and hope, of duty and destiny,' come 
the streams that beautify and fructify the great stretches of ordinary life. We are 
all better because some men live with the Eternal, and through them, out into the 
channels of friendly intercourse, flows the grace of God. 

"Deacon Chase was a man of God. His religion was not a form, a mere attempt 
to satisfy God by rite and ceremony; nor was it the correct and ungracious goodness 
of the mere legalist. Religion was his life. We cannot think of two distinct sides 
to the man, one secular and the other sacred. His piety was natural and unaffected. 
He knew what it was to feed upon heavenly bread and drink from the spiritual foun- 
tains, but he lived as he prayed and he prayed as he lived. He was a churchman 
because it was in the 'fellowship of kindred minds' that he found it easier to meet 
and serve God. His worship was earnest and sincere; his church work as natural 
as his farming. 

"Some religious men dwell always in the heights. But the truly great are those, 
like Moses, who come down from the mountain with the word of God for the people. 
What finer thing can be said of a man than that his life was a channel through 
which flowed kindness, justice, love! Such men make churches possible. They keep 
community life high minded and true spirited. We ordinary men owe more to these 
spiritually minded men than we are ever willing to acknowledge. No community 
grows into strength and nobleness of character without such men. Should they pass 
without leaving successors, our community would soon be ungracious at-J barren in its 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 221 

life and ugly in its culture. It is entirely fitting that we cherish the memory of all the 
quiet, unobtrusive men who, like Mr. Chase, are 'as rivers of water in a dry place.' 

" 'A man shall be as a shadow of a great rock in a weary land.' Notice the pic- 
ture this figure suggests: The caravan has trekked its silent, dusty way along the 
weary road for hours. It halts for a rest beneath the shadow of a great cliff by 
the wayside. In the coolness and restfulness of the shade the springs of human fellow- 
ship bubble forth. The toil of the road is forgotten except as subject of jest. Heart 
reaches out to heart, voice answers to voice, and laugh kindles laugh, until spirits as 
well as bodies are made fresh for the journey once more. So the shadow of the rock 
may stand for the refreshment and joy that come from God's Great-hearts who ease the 
toil of life's journey by their cheer and good fellowship. In their presence the 
tragedy of the way is softened and the joys are heightened. All blessings on the 
men who relieve the weariness of life by their cheeriness, the strain of life by their 
kindness, and ease the friction of the way by the oil of gladness! They are the real 
peace-makers who shall be called the Children of God. 

"Mr. Chase was such a man. His was the friendly heart that makes a good com- 
panion whether at work or play. He smoothed human relations by his own good- 
temper. He was a man of peace, tactful and conciliatory, whose differences with other 
men were righted by friendly council rather than in courts of law. He possessed the 
cheering, healing grace of kindliness, — a virtue beyond appreciation in a world of 
irritable people. It meets the hosts of sour looks and ungracious words and scatters 
them by its magic. It softens the asperities of life and brings smiles where frowns have 
been. There are great men we admire from afar; good men who inspire us by example; 
but it is the kind man in whose shade good fellowship thrives. We have many ways of 
measuring the greatness of our fellows; but I am sure that if all the feeble folk, the little 
children, and the weak and infirm could decide who are great, the kindly man would be 
king of them all. 

"Mr. Chase did his part, by a kindly spirit, to wipe out contentiousness, harshness 
and pain, and to send men singing along the way. He truly 'lived in a house by the 
side of the road and was a friend to man.' The Journey of Life has been made easier 
and pleasanter for many of us who have rested by the way in the shadow of his gracious 
personality. 

"Mr. Chase lived his life nobly and then came to the moment of translation quietly 
and beautifully at the close of an evening of friendly talk in his own home. He passed 
with a heart filled with goodwill, and^ rich in the esteem and love of lodge, church and 
community. He built his life into these institutions, and as long as they endure, his 
personality will be potent for good among us. He loved life, yet because he loved life, 
he did not feav death. He felt that the man who lives with God lives an eternal life 
over which death has no power. His body served the spirit for more than the allotted 
time and so it was fittingly laid aside for a spiritual body in which he serves his Master 
and 'grows rich in a deeper sanctity.' 

"Do you ask the secret of this modest, gracious, beloved man? It has been an open 
secret to those who have known him at all intimately. He was Christ's man. Could 
he respond to these words, he would say with the Psalmist and all truly great, 'Not 
unto us, O Lord, not unto us, but unto Thy name give the glory, for Thy mercy and Thy 
truth sake.' He would say with the great Apostle, 'The life I lived in the flesh I lived 
by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.' " 



PERRY DAVIS. 



Important business interests and oificial duties have claimed the time and atten- 
tion of Perry Davis, who is one of the prominent live stock dealers of Elbert county, 
also well known as a bank president and as a public official. Mr. Davis was born in 
Charleston, West Virginia, on the 1st of January, 1868, a son of Robert Hamilton and 
Sarah Jane (Hall) Davis. The mother came of an old Virginian family established 
in that state in early colonial days. The father was born in West Virginia and there 
resided until 1871, when he removed with his family to Jewell county, Kansas. 

Perry Davis was at that time but three years of age. He pursued his education in 
the schools of Kansas and in his early youth took up farm work, to which he gave his 
time and energies until 1889, when at the age of twenty-one years he made his way to 
the Divide country and filed on a claim near Simla, in Elbert county. During that 
period he was recognized as one of the most daring as well as one of the most reliable 
cowboys on the cattle range, riding for Lem Gammon, now one of the leading stockmen 



222 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

of the state and a member of the State Live Stock Commission. Mr. Davis has recently 
been appointed brand inspector for Simla and Matheson. As the years passed on he 
acquired large tracts of land and is today one of the prominent ranchmen of his section 
of the state. There is nothing concerning the range nor cattle raising in any connec- 
tion with which he is not familiar and his unfaltering Industry and intelligently 
directed efforts have brought him substantial success. When the Matheson State Bank 
was formed a few years ago he became its president and is still at th« head of that 
institution. 

On the 19th of November, 1917, Mr. Davis was united in marriage, to Miss Clara 
M. Roberts, of Phillipsburg, Kansas, a brilliant and talented woman of liberal educa- 
tion, thoroughly versed in the literature of the day. 

Mr. Davis Is a stalwart democrat and four years ago was elected sheriff of Elbert 
county, which is normally republican by a majority of three hundred. In 1916 he was 
reelected by a majority of six hundred and seven, the largest vote ever given any 
officer in the county. He was again nominated in 1918 but declined to become a can- 
didate for a third term, as his growing business Interests now make full claim upon 
his time and attention. His elections are proof of his personal popularity and the con- 
fidence reposed in him by his fellow townsmen, who have found hirn a loyal and fearless 
officer, doing much to preserve law and order. However, his business affairs have been 
steadily developing and his ranching interests are now extensive and important, while 
as president of the Matheson State Bank he is closely associated with financial interests 
of the locality. 



HENRY A. LINDSLEY. 



Henry A. Lindsley, one of the ablest members of the Denver bar, is a representa- 
tive of that prominent coterie of men who have constituted a dynamic force in the 
development of Denver's greatness through the advancement of her material interests 
and the upholding of her legal, intellectual and moral status. Mr. I>indsley was born 
in Lebanon, Tennessee, March 30, 1871, a son of Henry Stevens and Mary Bashie 
(Atkins) Lindsley. Henry A. Lindsley comes from a family that has been promi- 
nent in educational and professional circles in Tennessee ever since it was first estab- 
lished in that state by Dr. Philip Lindsley, D. D., the great-grandfather. The latter 
was vice president for years and later president elect of the College of New Jersey at 
Princeton, now Princeton University, before going to Tennessee, where he organized 
the University of Nashville and remained its president for several years. On his 
mother's side the ancestors of Henry A. Lindsley were among the pioneers of Louisiana. 

Accorded liberal educational opportunities, Mr. Lindsley obtained his degree of 
Bachelor of Arts from Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, in 1889, and 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1890, when not yet twenty years of age. He came at 
once to Denver and in 1893 the firm of Whitford & Lindsley was organized, which 
later became the firm of Decker & Lindsley. During the next seven years Mr. Lindsley 
■won for himself a place among the most prominent of the younger attorneys of the 
city. In 1899, when only twenty-eight years of age, he was elected district attorney, 
serving for four years. On the 1st of December, 1902, he was. under the newly adopted 
Article XX of the state constitution, required to and did fill not only the office of 
district attorney but also that of county and city attorney. In 1904, when a charter 
was finally adopted, he was appointed attorney of the city and county of Denver by 
the late Mayor Robert W. Speer. and remained his adviser and closest friend until 
Mr. Speer's death. It required the greatest legal skill to pave the way for the physical 
development of Denver. The great plans of Mayor Speer, which are now evident in 
a wonderfully beautiful and improved city, were not easy of execution. At every point 
there was opposition. It was to this task, of sweeping aside the litigation which oppo- 
nents of civic betterment were constantly invoking, that Mr. Lindsley devoted his 
wonderful energies and resourceful mind. There was so much of this work that the 
recital of it would cover many pages. For example, the first great fight made on 
Mr. Speer's plans was on the question of the validity of special assessments. The 
decision meant either progress or its opposite to Denver. Mr. Lindsley had the cases 
advanced on the docket and won them all. after one of the greatest legal battles in 
the history of western municipalities. The era of public improvement in Denver 
started when the fight was won. The bond issue for an auditoriur^ of which the 
people of Denver are now so proud, was three times defeated. It was fought in the 




HENRY A. LINDSLEY 



224 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

courts under the leadership of one of the greatest legal minds in the west. The strug- 
gle was, in fact, Herculean, for the men of the opposition brought every legal techni- 
cality into play. Here, too, Mr. Lindsley won out. It is but scant justice to him to say 
that there is hardly a great public improvement planned by Mr. Speer, and scarcely 
a great reform or innovation projected, in the planning and execution of which he did 
not go to Mr. Lindsley for advice. He closely studied all of the grave, complex and 
important problems that came up in connection with the city's rebuilding and im- 
provement and Denver certainly owes to him a debt of gratitude in that he removed 
every legal obstacle that hindered civic growth, progress and development. Mr. Linds- 
ley has been connected as attorney or in an advisory capacity with practically every 
constitutional case decided by the supreme court of Colorado since 1900 and a large 
majority of these have been decided in favor of the side on which he contended. Today 
he is justly counted one of the leading members of the Colorado bar, a man whose 
legal knowledge is based upon a rare native shrewdness as well as a resourceful and 
analytical mind. 

Mr. Lindsley was married to Miss Ada H. Sherman, a daughter of Nathaniel Sher- 
man, and they have one son, Henry Sherman Lindsley. Mr. Lindsley is a member 
of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is a Mason of the thirty-second degree 
and also a Shriner. His club memberships include the Denver Athletic Club and the 
Lakewood Golf Club. He is also a member of the Denver Civic and Commercial Asso- 
ciation. He has many attractive social qualities in addition to that strength of 
character which everywhere commands respect and confidence. Nature endowed him 
with keen mentality and he has used his talents wisely and well, not only for the 
benefit and upbuilding of his fortunes, but for the promotion of public interests which 
will make his service to the city of acknowledged worth through years to come. 



GEORGE C. ORR. 



G«orge C. Orr. president of the Orr-Walworth Foundry Company of Denver and 
owner of one of the best equipped foundry plants in the west, has made for himself a 
most creditable position in the business circles of his adopted city. This is due to 
the thoroughness with which he has mastered everything that he has undertaken 
and the spirit of enterprise which he has always displayed. 

George C. Orr was born in Rock Island, Illinois, December 7, 1S61, a son of 
Patrick and Mary (Cumminsky) Orr, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of 
Easton, Pennsylvania. On coming to America, in his boyhood days, the father located 
in the Keystone state, but in 1857 removed to Rock Island, Illinois, where he engaged 
in blacksmithing. having acquired a knowledge of that trade while in the east. After 
a time spent at the forge he gave up that work to engage in coal mining but later 
again took up the trade and did blacksmithing on a bridge which was being erected 
across the Rock River, some few miles from Rock Island. While thus working a span 
of the bridge broke and he was killed by the fall, in the year 1866. His widow long 
survived him. passing away in May, 1917, at the age of seventy-eight years. They had 
a family of three children: Mrs. Ella Wehand living at Moline, Illinois; George C; 
and Mrs. Jennie Boyle, whose home is at Alexandria, Indiana. 

In the public schools of Moline George C. Orr pursued his education, and having 
inherited his father's mechanical skill and ingenuity, took up work along that line. 
He was employed on the Rock Island arsenal, assisting in building that famous 
plant. He worked on the building until 1S81, when he came to Denver and secured 
a position as molder with the Colorado Iron Works. He there remained until 1883, 
when he returned to Moline, where he again spent a year. On the expiration of that 
period he once more became a resident of Denver and worked at his trade in con- 
nection with various foundries until 1896, when he joined William C. Enz in forming 
a partnership under the name of the Enz-Orr Foundry Company. This association was 
maintained until 1913, when Mr. Orr purchased the interest of his partner. The 
business had been incorporated in January, 1909, with Mr. Enz as the president, Mr. 
Orr as the vice president and George Eckhart as the secretary. This is a close cor- 
poration, and they have thirty employes and through the period of the war have been 
engaged in government work. 

In June, 1902, Mr. Orr was married to Miss Sarah Frances McDonald, of Denver, 
a daughter of J. McDonald, of Moline, Illinois. They have become the parents of 
three children. William Enz, born in Denver in 1903, is attending h'rh school. This 
boy has a natural inclination toward electrical work and has displayed marked skill 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 225 

in this particular branch of work. George Cum, born in Denver in 1908, is now in 
the high fifth grade in the public schools. He already has shown marked adaptability 
as a thorough mechanic and molder and has displayed unusual proficiency along the 
latter line, turning out as fine work as men who have followed the trade all their 
lives. At a recent date a visitor to his father's plant saw two tons of iron fittings 
for marine engines which this boy had made and which had been passed upon as 
perfect and yet young George had received absolutely no aid in the work. The youngest 
of the family is Sarah Frances, w^ho was born in Denver in 1911 and is also in school. 
Mr. Orr is one of Denver's representative men and citizens. He is particularly 
well known in connection with athletic interests and was the leader of the Bnz-Orr 
bowling team, which won the Denver City championship in 1912. In politics he is 
independent, voting for the candidates whom he regards as best qualified for office. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is a 
member of the drill team, which has won a number of prizes in competition all over 
the country. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. He and his family 
occupy a fine home at No. 1225 Detroit street, in Denver, and this and his valuable 
plant are the visible evidence of his life of well directed energy and thrift. Following 
the line of his natural talents, he has steadily worked his way upward and the 
thoroughness and initiative which he has displayed have brought him to a most 
enviable position in the business world. 



LEWIS E. EWAN. 



The story of the development of Colorado, like that of every new state, is the 
gradual unfolding of a drama of hardship and danger and the realization of the dream 
of those sturdy men and women who endured the privations of frontier days, and 
carved an empire from the wilderness. Among those who had part in Colorado's 
transformation are Lewis E. Ewan, and his worthy wife, who for many years were 
residents of Jefferson county, but are now residing in Littleton. Mr. Ewan came to 
Colorado in 1880, making the trip overland, driving a mule team from Independence, 
Kansas. — a trip that was five weeks in the making. Arriving in Morrison, on the 
26th day of May. of the year above mentioned, he located there, but after a brief 
stay, located on Turkey creek, where he entered into a contract for hauling stone 
from the quarry to the rail shipping point, near Morrison. It is of interest to note 
that in the carrying out of this contract, he hauled the red sandstone which was 
utilized in the construction and adornment of many of the important buildings in 
Denver, among them being the old Union Station; the building formerly occupied by 
the Colorado National Bank at Seventeenth and Larimer streets; the original Daniels 
& Fisher store building, and many others. 

In 1882, he began ranching on eighty acres which he purchased and located upon. 
This holding was subsequently increased as years went by and he prospered, until 
he had acquired a total of five hundred and forty-five acres, making one of the finest 
ranches in that section, while in the meantime, he had won for himself recognition 
as one of the representative and best known ranchers and stockmen of the state. 
During these years of residence upon his ranch, and in conjunction with his activities 
in stock raising, he was also engaged in the butchering and meat supply business at 
Morrison. He formed a partnership with M. M. Nay for the conducting of this latter 
business and the firm soon became widely known. They did not only an extensive 
local business but also furnished a large portion of the meat supply for the surround- 
ing towns and villages, including places as far distant as Golden, Idaho Springs, Denver, 
and others. 

During the latter years of their residence in Jefferson county, Mr. and Mrs. Ewan 
had made their home in Morrison, where they continued to reside until 1903, when they 
removed to Oregon, and for the ensuing two years, engaged in agricultural pursuits 
in the fruitful and picturesque Willamette valley. Disposing of their property there, 
in 1905, they returned to Colorado, and in 1917, located in Littleton where they now 
reside. 

Mr. Ewan is a native of Virginia, and was born in Fort Republic, in the famous 
Shenandoah valley, February 17. 1847. His parents, Robert M. and Caroline (Lewis) 
Ewan, were born natives of Virginia, and each was descended from a long line of 
distinguished colonial ancestry. In 1859, the parents moved to Michigan, locating in 
Berrien county, whence, soon afterward, they removed to Illinois, locating on a farm 
but a few miles from Lewiston, in Fulton county. There they were numbered among 




LEWIS E. EWAN 




MRS. LEWIS E. EWAN 



228 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the early pioneers of the section, and made their home during the remainder of their 
lives, the father passing away at the age of seventy-six years, the mother being called 
to final rest five years later, and in her seventy-seventh year. 

Lewis E. Ewan is the eldest of a family of five sons and three daughters. He was 
but a lad of twelve years, when he accompanied his parents to Michigan, later going 
with the family to Illinois. His boyhood days were spent in Fulton county, where 
he attended the public schools of the neighborhood, and shared in the limited advan- 
tages which fell to the lot of the average boy of that place and period. In 1870, re- 
sponding to the lure of the west, he went to Kansas, locating in Independence, where 
he established himself in the real estate and also the meat business, coming from there 
to Colorado, as previously noted. 

On December 23, 1872, Mr. Ewan was united in marriage with Miss Hattie B. 
Wright, who was born in Indiana, July 20, 1854, a daughter of Stanbury B. and Mary 
Flagg (Potter) Wright. The parents were natives of Vermont and New York respec- 
tively, the progenitors on both the paternal and maternal side being direct lineal 
descendants from Puritan ancestors who took active part in the Colonial and the 
Revolutionary wars. Mr. and Mrs. Wright came to the west at a time when settlers 
were few, locating first in Indiana, then in Iowa, then in Kansas, and finally in 1879, 
in Colorado, making their home at Morrison where they continued to reside until the 
final summons called them to their eternal rest. The father died September 13, 1885, 
and the mother September 16, 1889, each having attained the age of eighty years. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ewan have been born nine children, of whom seven attained 
maturity, as follows: Mary L., now Mrs. Edwin Sanger; Bessie E., who is Mrs. F. J. 
Frink, and resides in Montana; Anna L., who wedded J. D. Tracy, and resides at 
Morrison; Hariet Irene, who became the wife of Charles W. Tuttle, of Denver; Carl 
W., of Livingston. Montana; Lewis E., now in the government service as a forest 
ranger at Big Timber, Montana; and June V.. now Mrs. N. K. Groesbeck. 

In political faith Mr. Ewan has always been a democrat, and an active sup- 
porter of the party principles. He has taken prominent part in political affairs having 
served as delegate to both state and congressional conventions. He was appointed 
by Governor Shafroth water commissioner for the ninth district, filling the position 
so acceptably that, upon the expiration of his term, he was reappointed his own suc- 
cessor. 

In fraternal circles, Mr. Ewan is well known as a member of Golden Lodge, No. 
13, I. O. O. F., also holding membership in the Encampment. He has received all 
of the official honors, conferred in the subordinate lodge, and has served as a mem- 
ber of the Grand Lodge of the order. Both he. and his worthy wife, are members of 
the Rebekahs, in which Mrs. Ewan has served as a delegate and three terms as noble 
grand of the order. The religious faith of the family is that of the Christian Science 
church, in which both are respected members. While they have been blessed with a 
goodly measure of material prosperity, the record of their lives has been such that, 
in looking back over the past, there can be found no reason for regret, and they will 
leave to their posterity the priceless heritage of a good name, which is more to be 
desired than great riches. 



NEWTON LOREN GLEASON. 

Newton Loren Gleason, one of Elbert county's famous pioneers, was born at Hart- 
ford, Cortland county. New York, August 1, 1844. His ancestry can be traced back 
to the period of the Mayflower, for John and Priscilla Alden are the Pilgrims to whom 
his blood relationship extended. In 1856 his parents removed to Iowa and there he was 
educated. He entered the army at the first call for troops by President Lincoln to 
preserve the Union and served throughout the conflict under General Thomas as a 
member of the Fifth Iowa Cavalry, participating in a number of hotly contested engage- 
ments. In 1868 he arrived in Elbert county, Colorado, and became a notable factor in 
the development of "the Divide." Not only did he contribute to the material progress 
of the community but also left the impress of his individuality upon its political 
history. He served for two terms as county treasurer and for one term as clerk of the 
district court and he was a member of the fifteenth general assembly of Colorado. 

On the 9th of November, 1870, Mr. Gleason was married to Miss Jennie Fisher 
and they became the parents of three children: Carl, who is county assessor of Elbert 
county, now living in Denver; Bernard; and Alice, who married George Blazer, they 
making their home in Elizabeth, Colorado. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 229 

Mr. Gleason passed away October 11, 1908, and at the time of his death was a 
member of Elbert County Post, No. 103, G. A. R., and also a member of Fowler Lodge, 
I. 0. O. F., of Elizabeth. He was one of the directors and the assistant cashier of the 
Farmers Bank of Elizabeth and a member of the board of trustees of the Elizabeth 
Presbyterian church. His funeral was one of the largest ever held in Elbert county, 
practically the entire population attending to pay its tribute of respect to this man, 
who was regarded as one of Elbert county's most prominent promoters and builders. 

His son, Bernard Horace Gleason, who now manages the large Gleason ranch, was 
born in the loghouse on the old homestead July 24, 1876. In the conduct of his busi- 
ness affairs he displays marked enterprise and indefatigable energy, having made 
the Gleason property one of the finest ranch interests of this section. He is now 
treasurer of the Kiowa school board and Is prominent in all the civic affairs of the 
county. 

On the 30th of June, 1903, Bernard H. Gleason was married to Miss Lola Cable at 
Elizabeth, Colorado, and they have become the parents of two children, Bernard Loren 
and Mangie Alice. Like his father, Bernard H. Gleason is exerting a widely felt 
influence over public thought and action in his community and over the development 
of the material resources of the district. He displays sound judgment in all of his 
business affairs and his activities, while promoting individual success, are also advanc- 
ing public prosperity. 



THEODORE NOTT. 



A valuable farm of two hundred and forty-two acres in Adams county is the prop- 
erty of Theodore Nott, who for many years has ranked with the most progressive agri- 
culturists of his section of the state. He is now living retired in Denver but still holds 
farming interests that return to him a substantial annual income. He was born in 
St. Lawrence county. New York, on the Sth of August, 1842, a son of Reuben and Olive 
(Bailey) Nott. His youthful days were passed in his native county and after master- 
ing the branches of learning taught in the district schools he attended an academy, 
thus becoming well qualified for life's practical and responsible duties. He started out 
In life independently when a youth of nineteen and for four years conducted a stage 
line which carried the mail between Antwerp, Jefferson and Ogdensburg, New York. 
The succeeding year was devoted to the conduct of a livery business in Carthage, New 
York, and for four years he was proprietor of a livery stable at Antwerp. The west, 
however, attracted him and, leaving the Empire state, he started across the country 
for Denver, Colorado, traveling by rail to Cheyenne, Wyoming, and thence by stage 
to his destination. This was in the spring of 1869. He turned his attention to the 
dairy business as a partner of his brother, conducting business in the vicinity of 
Blackhawk and Central City for about four years. In the fall of 1869 his family Joined 
him in Colorado, for on the 11th of October, 1865, Mr. Nott had married Miss Carrie 
P. Proctor, of Antwerp, New York. 

On removing from his ranch in Jefferson county Mr. Nott took up his abode in 
Denver, where he conducted a dairy business for three years, and then established 
his home in Arapahoe county, thirty-two miles east of Denver, where he began raising 
sheep. For seventeen or eighteen years he was extensively identified with the sheep 
industry and realized a handsome profit from his investments and labors. With the 
money thus gained he purchased Denver real estate but suffered heavy losses because 
of the collapse of the boom. In 1892 he traded property for one hundred and sixty 
acres of land on section 6, township 2, range 67, and was there actively engaged in 
farming for many years, converting his place into one of the valuable farm properties 
of the state. His land is splendidly irrigated and everything about the place is kept 
in excellent condition. Neatness and order prevail and the buildings are large and 
substantial, furnishing adequate shelter for the grain and stock. Mr. Nott continued 
to reside upon his farm for an extended period and then, retiring from active business 
life in 1914, took up his abode in Denver, where he has since lived retired, enjoying 
the fruits of his former toil. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Nott were born six children. Edward, living at Kiowa, Colorado, 
married Delia Wood and has one daughter, Helen. Maud is the wife of Edward Clay, 
a railroad man, and has two daughters, Dorothy and Sophia. Ernest married Bertha 
Eberly and their children are Anna and Elizabeth. Reuben married Mamie Trout and 
has a daughter, Genevieve. Fred married Anna Shaw and their children are Evelyn 
and Edward Proctor. Stella is deceased. On the 11th of October, 1915, the children 



230 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

and grandchildren of Mr. and Mrs. Nott planned a wonderful surprise for them as a 
celebration of their golden wedding and the occasion was one never to be forgotten 
by those who participated therein. For a half century this worthy couple had traveled 
life's journey together, sharing with each other the joys and sorrows, the adversity and 
prosperity that checker the careers of all. To them has been accorded the privilege 
of passing down the hill of life together In their sunset days, a privilege that is 
accorded comparatively few. 

In politics Mr. Nott was a supporter of democratic principles in early manhood, 
but after his removal to Colorado joined the ranks of the republican party, with which 
he has since affiliated. He has ever been a stalwart champion of the cause of educa- 
tion and for many years served as school director, thus giving the weight of his official 
aid and influence to measures for the upbuilding and improvement of the school system 
of the state. He has ever stood for advancement in all lines having to do with the 
welfare of community and country, and has taken an advanced stand upon many 
Questions relating to public progress. 



ROBERT S. COX. 



The life record of Robert S. Cox covered a period of almost sixty-five years. Through 
much of this time he was identified with ranching interests in Colorado and was a 
most respected citizen of Loveland and of Weld county. He vvfas born in New Jersey, 
September 3, 1837, a son of Stewart and Julia A. (Ivens) Cox, who were also natives 
of that state. The father followed farming in New Jersey and afterward in Indiana, 
devoting his entire life to agricultural pursuits. He put aside the cares and labors of 
the farm, however, after the death of his second wife. His first wife passed away in 
1840 and following the death of his second wife Stewart Cox made his home with 
his son Robert until his demise, which occurred in 1888. 

Robert S. Cox spent his youthful days in Indiana, where his experiences were 
those of the tarmbred boy who divides his time between the duties of the schoolroom, 
the pleasures of tlie playground and the work of the fields. He remained with his 
father until he had attained his majority and in 1861, when a young man of twenty- 
four years, he responded to the country's call for troops to aid in the preservation of 
the Union, enlisting as a member of Company I, Forty-seventh Indiana Infantry, with 
which he served for four years. He then returned home with a most creditable mili- 
tary record, having valiantly defended the Union cause on many a southern battlefield. 
He afterward engaged in clerking in Indiana until 1883. when he determined to try 
his fortune in the west and made his way to Colorado, where he purchased a ranch 
in Weld county. This he cultivated and Improved for six years, after which he re- 
moved to Greeley, where he made his home for a year and a half. He then took up 
his abode in Loveland and purchased forty-eight acres adjoining the city, in fact the 
tract is now a part of the city. His attention and energies were further given to the 
development and cultivation of the place until his death, which occurred in August, 
1902. Since that time his widow has sold off most of the land in acre tracts, still 
occupying the old home. 

It was in January, 1861, that Mr. Cox was united in marriage to Miss Martha Jane 
Ogden, a daughter of Elihu and Sarah A. (Parish) Ogden, who were natives of Mary- 
land and of Ohio respectively. Mrs. Cox was born in Indiana in March, 1843. her 
parents having removed to that state at an early day. Her father was a farmer and 
stock raiser and bought and Improved land in the Hoosier state, devoting his remaining 
days to farming in Indiana. He died in 1860, while his wife was called to her final 
rest in February, 1874. To Mr. and Mrs. Cox were born six children: Homer D., now 
residing at Loveland; Nellie, the wife of Willis Sheets, whose home is in Montana; 
Burchard M., a resident farmer of Larimer county; and Lulu M., Florence A. and 
George S., all deceased. 

Mr. Cox served as a justice of the peace in Weld county and was faihtful In office, 
his decisions at all times being strictly fair and impartial, based upon the law and 
the equity in the case. His political endorsement was given to the republican party 
and his religious faith was that of the Methodist Episcopal church, to the teachings of 
which he loyally adhered. He was also a consistent member of the Masonic fraternity 
and he proudly wore the little bronze button that proclaimed him a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic. In all matters of citizenship he was as true and loyal to 
his country as when he followed the nation's starry banner on southern battlefields. 
In fact his entire life was marked by integrity and faithfulness to duty and his sterling 




ROBERT S. COX 



232 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

worth -won for him warm friendships, so that his death was deeply regretted not only 
by his immediate family but throughout the entire community when he was called to 
the home beyond. 



JOHN M. HOPPER. 



John M. Hopper is now largely living retired upon his valuable farm property in 
the vicinity of Matheson. His has been an active and useful life and his identification 
with Elbert county covers an extended period, while his residence in Colorado dates 
from about 1888. He was born in Guernsey county. Ohio, February 17, 1849. His 
father, John Hopper, was a native of Virginia, while his mother, who bore the maiden 
name of Eliza McGregor, was of Scotch birth. The family removed from Ohio to 
Illinois when John M. Hopper was a youth of seventeen years and at a subsequent 
date the family home was established in Iowa. He was reared to the occupation of 
farming, early becoming familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring 
for the crops. Thirty years ago he came to Colorado and for a time was a resident of 
Pueblo but subsequently removed to Elbert county and homesteaded. The property 
which he secured at that early day and which was then a tract of wild, undeveloped 
land that has now been transformed into a valuable farm is being operated by his 
only son, Bert B. Hopper. As the years passed John M. Hopper added to his original 
holdings by purchase from time to time until he now has nine hundred and sixty acres. 

On the 5th of September, 1878, Mr. Hopper was united in marriage to Miss Lettie 
0. Scovel, of Sheridan, Iowa, a daughter of Eli H. and Daphne (Boss) Scovel of Cat-' 
taraugus county, New York, who later became residents of Colorado. Her father's 
people were of Scotch lineage and the family was established in America in colonial 
days. The Boss family came from Massachusetts, and thus in both lines Mrs. Hopper 
is a representative of old families of New England. She is a lady of marked intel- 
lectual force, exceptionally well informed, keeping in touch with all the vital questions 
and issues of the day. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hopper are widely and favorably known, 
their social as well as their financial position being an enviable one, while the sterling 
traits of their character have gained for them the high respect and unfaltering friend- 
ship of those with whom they have been brought in contact. 

Bert B. Hopper was born in Derby, Iowa, October 13, 1879, and removed with his 
parents to Colorado when about nine years of age. He received his education largely 
in the schools of Pueblo and after discarding his textbooks turned his attention to 
agricultural pursuits and is now operating the extensive farm of his father. On Decem- 
ber 2, 1908, he married Fern Turner, a daughter of Judge Turner of Kiowa and to them 
have been born two children: Dwight, whose birth occurred on March 28, 1910, in 
Colorado Springs; and Donald, born in Kiowa, January 10, 1913. Mr. and Mrs. Bert 
B. Hopper are popular in the younger social set of Elbert county where they have 
many friends, and he has ever given his wholehearted support to worthy movements 
undertaken on behalf of the general public, along lines of material as well as mental 
and moral advancement, thus proving himself a valuable citizen. Moreover, he con- 
tributes to general prosperity by the further improvement of his ranch, thus pro- 
moting agricultural progress along modern ideas. 



W. H. NEVEU. 



W. H. Neveu, one of the best known representatives of iron manufacturing interests 
in Denver as well' as the pioneer manufacturer of radiators not only in this city but 
in this section of the entire west, has acquired his high position as a representative of 
that industry through superior workmanship and a thorough technical knowledge of 
the business. 

Mr. Neveu was born in Stamford, Connecticut, September 7. 1876, a son of Moses 
and Josephine (Cadron) Neveu, the former a native of Montreal, Canada, and the 
latter of North Adams, Massachusetts. The father came across the border into the 
United States when a youth, and afterward learned the carpenter's trade, which he 
later followed in Stamford, Connecticut, and subsequently in St. Paul. Minnesota, re- 
moving with his family to the latter city in the early '80s, where he continued to 
reside until he came to Denver in 1889. When he located here he took up contracting, 
which business he followed for some time. He afterward engaged in the bakery 



234 HISTORY OF COLO^ ADO 

business in North Denver and is now at the head of a profitable trade in that line. \ 
His father, also named Moses, was a well known contractor of Denver in the early 
days and lived to a ripe old age, passing away in this city in 1915. The grandmother, 
Mrs. Mary Neveu, was called to her final rest In Denver in 1911. There were three 
children born to Moses and Josephine Neveu: W. H., of this review; Frank, who is 
living in Houston, Texas; and Mrs. Sophie Parkin, a resident of Salt Lake City, Utah. 

W. H. Neveu attended the public schools of St. Paul, Minnesota, and later of 
Denver. Entering upon his business career, he was for some time connected with 
the grocery trade, while later he gave his attention to the meat business, remaining 
active along those lines for about eight yeays. Following this he served an apprentice- 
ship as a sheet metal worker and in going into business for himself, in 1903, he 
bought out the interests of Elias Mathews, who was proprietor of one of the oldest 
sheet metal concerns in Denver, having established business in 187S. Soon after taking 
over these interests Mr. Neveu included in the business that of radiator repairing, 
so that his connection with that branch of the industry dates back to the earliest days. 
Later, as the business grew and expanded, it was devoted solely to radiator manufac- 
turing and repairing and its equipment was increased until it now includes a complete 
outfit such as is necessary for the most intricate repair job or the construction of any 
kind of new work in the line of radiators. By close attention to his business and 
personal supervision of all work turned out, Mr. Neveu has built up the leading enter- 
prise of its kind In the Rocky Mountain country. Holding to the adage that a sat- 
isfied customer is the most effective form of advertising, his work has come to be a 
standard and his commercial integrity is unquestioned. Mr. Neveu has made a decided 
success of his business and in so doing deserves great credit, for this has resulted 
entirely from his unaided efforts, determined purpose and laudable ambition. 

On the 10th of February, 1S9S, Mr. Neveu was married to Miss Mabel Morgan, of 
Denver, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Morgan, who were pioneer people of this 
city, arriving in 1860. Mr. and Mrs. Neveu have three children. Walter F., born in 
Denver in January, 1899, is now In school. Irene and Leona are also in school. 

Mr. Neveu is a member of the Royal Arcanum and also of the Kiwanis Club. 
He belongs likewise to the Denver Civic and Commercial Association and to the Man- 
ufacturers Association and he is regarded as one of the reliable business men of the 
city. 



J. H. McKEE. 



J. H. McKee is senior partner in the firm of McKee & Slack, who occupy a foremost 
position among the manufacturers of calendars and advertising novelties in the west. 
They have built up a business of substantial and gratifying proportions along lines 
which will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. 

Mr. McKee was born in Prescott, Wisconsin, June 4, 1856. a son of John and Mary 
E. (Vasminder) McKee, both of whom were natives of Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, whence they removed westward to Wisconsin in 1852. There the father engaged 
in the book and stationery business until 1869, when he removed to Bloomington, 
Illinois, where he carried on business in the field of insurance until his death in 1872. 
His wife died at Bloomington in 1903. They had a family of five children, namely: 
J. H.. of this review; James A., who has passed away; Maggie, who is also deceased; 
W. I., who is engaged in the wholesale lumber business at Quincy, Illinois; and 
Frank W., who is a prominent figure in musical circles of New York city, being the 
well known composer of many popular songs and instrumental pieces, and is now 
called by leading musical journals "the Waltz King." 

At the usual age J. H. McKee became a pupil in the public schools of Prescott, 
Wisconsin, and afterward spent a year as a student in the ward school at Bloomington, 
Illinois. Upon his father's death there devolved upon him the responsibility of sup- 
porting his mother and the younger brothers and sister. He then engaged in the book 
and notion business until his twenty-first year. During this time he took a great interest 
In athletics, especially running and walking, he having covered one hundred yards 
sixteen different times in ten seconds flat, also walked one mile in seven minutes and 
twenty-six seconds, which was within twenty-eight seconds of the world's record at 
that time. He decided to become a traveling salesman and went upon the road as a 
representative of a cigar and tobacco house. He won success as "a knight of the 
grip," building up a large trade for the company which he represented. He con- 
tinued upon the road for thirteen years and then in 1890 came to Denver. Here he 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 235 

was appointed register of tlie land office under the administration of President Ben- 
jamin Harrison and located at Hugo, Colorado, opening the office at that place. He 
occupied the position for four years and while so engaged he was also state agent 
for the Manhattan Life Insurance Company. A change in politics left him out of 
office and in 1894 he returned to Denver, where he later became engaged In the bicycle 
business, in which he continued only one year. He afterward was associated with 
Williams, Wood & Company, wholesale grocers, in the capacity of buyer and manager 
of the cigar department and remained In that connection for two years, when they 
discontinued business. He subsequently entered the mercantile brokerage business, 
handling belts, belt dressing paint and other commodities, and conducted a successful 
business of that character until 1900. He then sold out and went on the road, selling 
calendars and advertising novelties on commission. In 1906 he formed a partnership 
with G. E. Slack in the manufacture of calendars and advertising novelties. In their 
manufacturing and jobbing interests the firm has risen to prominence and are now 
conducting one of the largest business enterprises of the kind in the west. Their 
trade covers the five states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona 
and the business is steadily increasing. They have ever recognized the fact that sat- 
isfied patrons are the best advertisement and their earnest desire to please their cus- 
tomers has been a salient feature in the growth of their trade. 

On the 6th of September, 1883, Mr. McKee was married at Lexington, Illinois, 
to Miss Nora Preble, a daughter of Chester and Louise Preble. They now have one 
child, George Lloyd McKee, born in Bloomington, Illinois, in 1890. He was edu- 
cated in Denver and married Miss Nellie Bowles, of Littleton, Colorado. He is now 
engaged in farming. 

Mr. McKee belongs to the Civic and Commercial Association, the Advertising Club 
and the United Commercial Travelers Association. In politics he maintains an inde- 
pendent course, voting according to the dictates of his judgment with little regard 
for party ties. He has worked his way upward entirely unassisted and is a self-made 
man who as the architect of his fortunes has builded wisely and well. He started 
out in the world with a cash capital of but twelve dollars and a half and today he 
ranks with the representative manufacturers of his adopted city. 



WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON CRANMER. 

William Henry Harrison Cranmer. who for many years was actively, prominently 
and successfully identified with the cattle industry in Colorado and whose enterprise 
yet finds tangible evidence in the Ernest & Cranmer building of Denver, was born in 
Cooper county, Missouri, in 1841, his parents having removed from Tennessee to 
Missouri, at which time they took up their abode in Warrensburg. The mother died 
when her son William was but thirteen years of age. He attended school in his native 
county and with his twin brother, Thomas, served in the Confederate army, participat- 
ing in the campaigns in Missouri and Kansas and making a gallant record. When 
the war was over he went to Texas, where he engaged in the cattle business and there 
became acquainted with John Hittson, for whom he worked as foreman for ten years. 

Mr. Cranmer's residence in Colorado dated from 1869, although he had previously 
visited the state in connection with his employer's cattle interests. In that year, how- 
ever, he embarked in the cattle business on his own account, becoming a partner of Wil- 
liam Hittson. brother of John Hittson, in the purchase of the Three Circle ranch in Elbert 
county. After the marriage of his partner Mr. Cranmer bought his Interest in the 
business and thus established an extensive cattle business which proved his lifelong 
occupation and brought him substantial wealth. He also engaged in the real estate 
business to some extent. Investing his profits from the cattle industry in property. 
He was also associated with Finis P. Ernest in the erection of the Ernest & Cran- 
mer building of Denver, which still stands as a substantial monument to the enterprise 
and progressiveness of the builders. 

On the 22d of December. 1874, Mr. Cranmer was united in marriage at the White 
ranch, the home of the bride, then in Arapahoe county, to MSss Martha J. Hittson, born 
in Palo Pinto county, Texas, a daughter of his former employer, and they became the 
parents of seven children. Jessie May, the eldest, is the wife of William P. McPhee, of 
Denver, and they have three children: William Cranmer, John Raymond and Willamain 
Cranmer. Jennie Leontine became the wife of William C. Russell, a mining man, and has 
one son, William C, Jr. William Henry Harrison. Jr.. married Margaret Wood and is the 
father of two sons, William H. H. (Ill) and Robert Lorin. W. H. H. Cranmer, Jr., 




MARTHA J. CRANMER 




WILLIAM H. H. CRANMER 



238 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Is now captain of Battery B, One Hundred and Forty-eighth Regiment of the First 
Artillery, and is serving in France. George Erne&t, now at camp Zachary Taylor, 
Louisville, Kentucky, married Jean Chappell. daughter of the late Delos Chappell, of 
Denver, and has four children: Allen, Forest, Silvia and Chappell. Norma died at 
the age of nine months. Catherine H. formerly resided in New York city, is now at a 
government school in Portland, Oregon, taking a course in physio-therapy preparing 
for government service. Willamain H. is the wife of Grover Coors, of Golden, Colorado. 
The family circle was broken by the hand of death when on the 2d of December, 
1890, the husband and father was called to his final rest. He was a man devoted to 
the welfare and happiness of his family and found his greatest pleasure in promoting 
their best interests. As a business man he ranked among the prominent representatives 
of the cattle industry in Colorado, his interests being most carefully and intelligently 
directed. He was one of those who helped to build up the great cattle Interests of the 
state and at all times he stood for progress and improvement in public affairs, the 
sterling worth of his character and the integrity of his activities bringing him the 
highest respect of all with whom he came in contact. 



MRS. MARTHA J. CRANMER. 

It is a matter of history that Colorado was one of the first states in the union to 
adopt woman sufi'rage; it is further a matter of history that suffrage has been success- 
ful here, a condition induced in great measure by the character of the women concerned. 
Governmental powers were accepted by them with moderation instead of radicalism, 
even as these powers had been sought by feminine wisdom and tact instead of mili- 
tancy. It is with one of these women that this sketch has to do, to treat of her 
character and work which in so many ways is typical of the warm-hearted and strong 
woman of the west. 

Martha J. Cranmer was born in Palo Pinto county, Texas, on October 30, 1857, a 
daughter of John Hittson, mentioned elsewhere in this work. She was reared In a 
home noted for its hospitality, where the latch-string was always out to the traveler 
across the plains, and warm food and rest awaited him. In this atmosphere she ac- 
quired the traits which have guided her in after-years in the management of her own 
home and in her other associations. At an early age she was chosen by her father 
to accompany him to Colorado and from that time until his death she was his constant 
companion, business advisor and his inspiration. Here in the shadow of the Rockies 
she married William H. H. Cranmer, whose career is set forth at length on other 
pages, giving him her devotion and comradeship until his death, when she was left 
with a family of children, the oldest of whom was fifteen. These she reared to man- 
hood and womanhood as she herself had been taught, and has been rewarded by seeing 
them joined by marriage to the best families of the middle west. Not only did Mrs. 
Cranmer accomplish the task of maintaining her home, but found the opportunity to 
indulge her desires and energy in other activities, social, political, philanthropic and 
charitable. 

Of democratic affiliation. Mrs. Cranmer's most notable position In political life is 
that of membership upon the state board of pardons, to which position she was first 
appointed by Governor Ammons. Her most recent appointment to this board was by 
Governor Gunter in December, 1918. Mrs. Cranmer has also been a member for four 
years of the state central committee and has taken leading part in the various state 
conventions, also participating as a member of numerous committees. 

In her charitable work Mrs. Cranmer found opportunity, when the United States 
entered the World war, to be of inestimable benefit to the boys who were enlisting and 
who came to Denver before departing for the training camps. She made almost daily 
trips to Fort Logan, carrying delicacies and clothing for the soldiers who were ill, 
even going into the wards and giving to them the kind attentions which only a loving 
mother's heart knows. Those in the ranks and upon the staffs, also those of civilian life 
who knew of her work, regarded her with profound respect and affection which was 
expressed in many ways. In the campaigns for the Liberty loans, in the Red Cross 
drives, and in all the other activities connected with the war. Mrs. Cranmer took a 
leading part in addition to contributing a large share of the material benefits. 

In other charitable enterprises Mrs. Cranmer has also been prominent, being vice 
president of the Sauds House Association, and chairman of the house committee of 
this organization. In these different phases of her work, social, political, civic, Mrs. 
Cranmer has borne herself with that quiet, domestic dignity which is the criterion of 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 239 

sterling womanhood, the quality of which cannot be mistaken. She has accomplished 
material results through her energy, courage and enjoyment of the work in hand, 
the simple pleasure of seeing the light of gratitude in another's eyes being sufficient 
pay in her estimation. 

Mrs. Cranmer, though unostentatious in her social life, holds membership in many 
of the clubs of the city, among them being the Territorial Daughters of Colorado, the 
Woman's Press Club, the Daughters of the Confederacy, the Jane Jeffersons, the 
National Suffrage Association, the East Side Woman's Club of Denver, the Old Ladies' 
Home, Radiant Chapter of the Eastern Star, the S. 0. 0. B. Lodge, and the Society of 
The Nearest Kin 



CHARLES W. SAVERY. 



Among the leading security investment brokers who have forged their way to 
the front is Charles W. Savery, now one of the prosperous representatives of this 
line of activity in Denver. Prior to his removal to this city he was engaged in 
the brokerage business in Philadelphia but while there lost nearly his entire fortune 
and after paying off his debts he came to Denver to start anew with a cash capital 
of less than six hundred dollars. In the intervening years he has become one of 
the most prosperous security investment brokers of the city, due to his good judg- 
ment and honorable business methods. 

Mr. Savery was born in Philadelphia, November 15, 1878, a son of Stephen 
and Susan (Forsythe) Savery, who were also natives of the Keystone state, where 
they spent their entire lives, the father there engaging in farming. Their family 
numbered six children, of whom Charles W. Savery was the second. He attended 
the West Town school and also a Quaker boarding school of his native city, from 
which he was graduated at the age of seventeen years. He was afterward em- 
ployed in various ways and for a time devoted his attention to the lumber trade, 
while subsequently he secured a position in connection with the brokerage business, 
spending six years in that way in the east. In 19 08. following heavy losses in Phila- 
delphia, he came to Denver and with a very limited capital embarked in the broker- 
age business here. In 1910 he incorporated his interests and has since been presi- 
dent of the C. W. Savery Securities Company, handling all kinds of high grade 
securities. He also organized the Fifty-Fifty Food Growers' Association, which 
has nine hundred and sixty acres of valuable land on Boulevard F, ten miles from 
Denver, and he was one of the organizers of the Apex Refining Compamy, which has 
filling stations at various places. Mr. Sachs and Mr. Savery constitute the executive 
board, having entire charge. The Fifty-Fifty Food Growers' Association operates 
two ranches, one of one hundred and sixty acres, fifteen miles from Denver, and 
the other of eight hundred acres, situated but ten miles from Denver. This property 
is equipped for the raising of hogs on an extensive scale. The company was formed 
by C. W. Savery and A. B. Kamp and with them they associated W. H. Savery, who 
is a graduate of the Pennsylvania State College of the department of animal hus- 
bandry. They established the business of raising hogs in December, 1916. with 
seventy-five brood sows and two pedigreed boars. These have multiplied until they 
now have about thirteen hundred standard Duroc hogs on their ranches and have 
sold hogs for pork to the value of sixteen thousand dollars. Substantial buildings 
have been erected upon the ranches for the shelter of the hogs and the equipment 
of the place includes an alfalfa grinder with auto truck and all modern machinery. 
A farm tractor is used to operate the threshing machine in the cutting and binding 
of the wheat and both machines are owned by the company. One of the ranches is 
supplied with water from the Bull Irrigation canal and the eight hundred acre ranch 
has upon it the Farmers' High Line ditch. The business of the company is rapidly 
developing and has already become a profitable investment. 

On the 16th of June, 1906, Mr. Savery was married to Miss Frances Darlington, 
of Denver, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Darlington, and they have become the 
parents of three children. Robert S., born in Philadelphia in 1907, is now attend- 
ing school in Denver. Stewart, born in Denver, October 7, 1911, is likewise in 
school. Jean, born February 4, 1914, completes the family. 

In politics Mr. Savery maintains an independent course. He belongs to the 
Masonic fraternity, and that he has attained high rank therein is shown in the fact 
that he is now a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. He also belongs to the Denver Ath- 
letic Club. He has worked his way upward entirely through his own efforts and 



240 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

is regarded as one of the prominent brokers of Denver. His advanced ideas and pro- 
gressive methods are a forceful element in the attainment of his growing success. 



WILLIAM H. FERGUSON. 



William H. Ferguson, attorney at law, practicing in Denver as a member of the 
firm of Smith, Brock & Ferguson, was born January 9, 1884, in Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, a son of William C. and Annie (McKnlght) Ferguson. 

William H. Ferguson, the youngest of a family of six children, was educated in 
the public and high schools of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and was graduated, magna 
cum laude, from Washington and Jefferson College in 1905 with the Bachelor of Arts 
degree, being the honor man of his class. He completed his law course at the University 
of Denver in 1908, receiving an LL. B. degree. He then began the practice of law 
in Denver. He was associated with the firm of Smith and Brock from 1909 to 1912 and 
in the latter year became a member of this firm which at that time adopted the firm 
name of Smith, Brock & Ferguson. In 1910, he was offered and accepted a place on 
the faculty of the law school of the University of Denver and has since continued 
to lecture there on different subjects. 

On January 26, 1915, Mr. Ferguson was married to Miss Janet Goetzen, a native 
of Colorado. They reside at 163 Lafayette street, Denver. 

He belongs to Delta Tau Delta, Phi Delta Phi, the University Club, where for 
several years he has served as a director, Denver Country Club, Denver Motor Club, 
and. Denver Civic and Commercial Association. He is also a member of the American 
Bar" Association, the Colorado State Bar Association and the Denver Bar Association. 

His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church and in politics he is a re- 
publican. 

The firm of Smith, Brock & Ferguson, of which he is a member, is counsel for the 
Bell telephone companies in the mountain states, the Continental Oil Company and 
associated companies, Chicago Title and Trust Company, the Farmers Reservoir and 
Irrigation Company, the Burlington Ditch, Reservoir and Land Company, the receiver 
of the Denver and Salt Lake Railroad Company, several insurance companies and other 
corporations and individuals and Mr. Ferguson's entire time and energy have been 
devoted to his professional duties. Both in the trial and argument of cases and in 
the various duties and responsibilities connected with a large and important office 
practice, Mr. Ferguson is recognized as one of the leading members of the Denver bar. 



THOMAS L. PHILLIPS. 



Thomas L. Phillips has contributed much to the development of Elbert county 
through the establishment of the town of Elizabeth, which he laid out and which has 
become the leading railroad center of the county. He is engaged in ranching and ia 
accounted one of the valued and representative citizens of the community. He was 
born upon a farm in Delaware on the 18th of February, 1S44, and comes of good old 
Revolutionary stock in both the paternal and maternal lines. The family removed 
from Delaware to Illinois during the boyhood of Thomas L. Phillips, who was there 
reared and attended the public schools. It was in 1865,' when twenty-one years of age, 
that he left the middle west and came to Colorado, taking up a homestead in Elbert 
county, a part of which is still a portion of the Phillips holdings of four hundred and 
twenty acres near the town of Elizabeth. In the early days he worked in a sawmill 
and as a cow puncher for Webber Brothers and he became familiar with all of the 
experiences, the hardships, the privations and the opportunities of those pioneer times. 
He recalls the Indian scares but was never in an actual fight with the red men. He 
remembers, however, that for some years he stacked grain with a loaded rifle near 
at hand ready for business. As the years have passed on he has witnessed many 
changes in conditions of life and in methods of farming. He has seen the rich, wild 
and undeveloped district into which he penetrated reclaimed for the purposes of civili- 
zation and it was he who laid out the town of Elizabeth during the early period of his 
residence in Elbert county. It is today a thriving and enterprising city, having en- 
joyed substantial growth. In the development of his ranching interests Mr. Phillips 
has followed progressive methods. He has placed acre after acre of his land under the 




WILLIAM H. FERGUSON 



242 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

plow and it has been made to bring forth golden harvests as the result of the care 
and labor which he has bestowed upon it. One proof of his marked enterprise Is 
the present productivity of his land, while the buildings upon his place stand as 
monuments to his progressive spirit. 

In 18S7 Mr. Phillips was united in marriage to Miss Carolina Olson and to them 
have been born a son and a daughter: Arthur Lee Phillips; and Mrs. F. J. Burns, 
living at Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Mr. Phillips is identified with Denver Lodge, No. 5, A. F. & A. M.. which is the 
oldest Masonic lodge in the state, and he has ever been a loyal adherent of the craft, 
true to its teachings and the beneficent spirit upon which it is founded. He has ever 
been recognized as a man of genuine worth during the fifty-three years of his residence 
in this state. There are few who have been connected with the state for a longer 
period and he recalls many interesting incidents of the early days when the work of 
progress and development seemed scarcely begun, when there were great open ranges 
and few fences to indicate that white men had laid claim to the land. The work, how- 
ever, has been carried forward in keeping with the progressive spirit that has char- 
acterized agricultural life in the last half century and the home place of Mr. 
exemplifies what can be accomplished upon the western frontier when there : 
to dare and to do. 



CHARLES G. McEACHERN, M. D. 

Although but five years have come and gone since Dr. Charles G. McEachern 
opened an office in Denver, he has won a place as one of the eminent surgeons of the 
city, his professional colleagues and contemporaries, as well as the general public, rec- 
ognizing the fact that his surgical work is the expression of the latest scientific re- 
searches and discoveries. 

Dr. McEachern was born in Vaiden, Mississippi, January 24, 1875. His father, 
Angus T. McEachern. was a native of Mississippi and a representative of an old and 
prominent family of that state of Scotch descent. The founder of the family in 
America was Daniel McEachern, who after crossing th* Atlantic established his home 
in North Carolina, where he became a planter and slaveholder. His son, Angus T. 
McEachern, was reared and educated in Mississippi and he, too, became a successful 
planter. With the outbreak of tbe Civil war he espoused the cause of the Confederacy, 
joining tbe army as a private when a youth of sixteen years. He resided throughout 
his life in Carroll county, Mississippi, and was a respected and valued citizen of that 
section of the state. He took a deep interest in political matters and civic affairs and 
gave stanch support to democratic principles. His death occurred in August, 1917, 
when he had reached the age of seventy-one years. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Guerring Shipp, is a native of Mississippi and a descendant of an old and 
prominent family of that state of Scotch lineage. She yet occupies the old family 
homestead in Carroll county, Mississippi, where she reared her family of eight children, 
five sons and three daughters. 

Dr. McEachern of this review, who was the second son in the family, began his 
education in the public schools of Carroll county and afterward attended the West 
Point Military School at West Point, Mississippi. He then became a student in the 
University of Nashville at Nashville, Tennessee, where he pursued his professional 
course, being graduated from the medical department with the class of 1900. His 
early life had been spent on his father's plantation and his youthful experiences were 
those of the farmbred boy, but after his graduation he entered upon active practice 
at Vaiden. whence he removed a year later to Moss Point, Mississippi, continuing in 
the latter place until 1913. He then came to Denver, Colorado, where he arrived 
on the 1st of June, 1913. While engaged in active and continuous practice in Denver, 
he specializes in surgery, to which he devotes his attention exclusively. He Is a 
member of the medical staff of the National Jewish Hospital, also of the Denver County 
Hospital and of the orthopedic department of the University of Colorado. 

Dr. McEachern was married in Chicago, Illinois. October 26, 1905, to Miss Laura 
Griffin, a native of Moss Point, Mississippi. Her parents were James Wyatt and 
Katherine (McCallum) Griffin, prominent pioneer people of Mississippi. Dr. and Mrs. 
McEachern have become parents of two sons: Wyatt Griffin, born October 26, 1908, 
at Moss Point, Mississippi; and Charles Malcolm, born in Denver, August 16, 1914. 
Dr. McEachern has recently erected a beautiful residence at No. 721 Emerson street 
and there he and his family are most pleasantly located. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 243 

While in school Dr. McEachern had a most thorough military training and was 
captain of Company A. On May 7, 1918, Dr. McEachern was appointed captain in the 
medical section of the United States army and has engaged in hospital work in various 
camps. He gives his political endorsement to the democratic party. He was made 
a member of the Masonic craft ai Vaiden, Mississippi, in 1901 and he belongs to 
Colorado Chapter, No. 29, R. A. M., and Denver Commandery, No. 25, K. T. He also 
has membership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being identified with the 
lodge at Moss Point, Mississippi. He is likewise connected with the Denver Athletic 
Club and his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Central Presbyterian 
church of Denver. Along strictly professional lines he is connected with the American 
Medical Association, the Colorado State Medical Society, the Denver City and County 
Medical Society and the Tri State Medical Society, which includes Mississippi, Arkansas 
and Tennessee, and is also a member of the National Surgeons Association. With a 
nature that could never be content with mediocrity, he has put forth every effort to 
gain the highest degree of efficiency possible, continually studying along lines of 
greatest benefit to professional ability. With purpose strong and steadfast he has 
achieved much and the progress that he has already made indicates that his future 
career will be well worth the watching. 



ALBERT F. SITTLOH. 



Twenty years of faithful service and constantly expanding powers have brought 
Albert F. Sittloh from a modest position to a foremost place in the Denver Dry Goods 
Company, with which he occupies the position of manager of all the woman's apparel 
departments. His career has been one of steady growth, illustrating the fact that power 
develops through the exercise of effort. It moreover illustrates the possibilities for 
successful attainment that lie before every American citizen. 

Mr. Sittloh was born in Bartholomew county. Indiana, August 14. 1871, a son of 
Henry and Mary (Doesher) Sittloh, both of whom were natives of Indiana, born 
in Wayne and Bartholomew counties respectively. The father remained a resident of 
that state throughout his life. He was engaged in farming in early manhood and 
afterward entered the farm implement business with the firm of Garr, Scott & Com- 
pany but passed away in Indiana when but thirty-four years of age. His widow 
survives and is now a resident of Richmond, that state. They had a family of four 
children, of whom Albert F. is the eldest and one has passed away. The others are 
Mrs. George Bartel and Mrs. Fred Heitbrink, both of Richmond. Indiana. 

In his boyhood days Albert F. Sittloh attended the public schools of his native 
state but when a lad of twelve summers was obliged to go to work. His first employ- 
ment was in a dry goods store in Indiana and he continued actively in the dry goods 
business until he came to Denver in September, 1898. During this period he had 
thoroughly familiarized himself with the business and was considered one of the 
ablest representatives of the dry goods trade in his native state. On making his way 
to the west he was most favorably impressed with Denver and decided to remain. He 
then sought out the largest mercantile establishment of the city in order to secure 
employment. He was told by the management that if he would accept a very modest 
salary to start with, until they became convinced of his capability, he might go to 
work. This he did and il was not long before his powers and understanding of the 
business were recognized and promotion followed. Prom time to time he has been 
advanced until he now commands a large salary with a company that employs a 
thousand people and he is recognized in commercial circles throughout the country 
as one of the most valuable men in the dry goods trade, especially familiar with 
woman's wear. For a number of years he has been at the head of this department, 
which is the largest and most important of the store. He personally did all of the 
buying for his departments until the growth of the business made it impossible tor 
him to do so and he now has six assistant buyers, who are under his immediate 
supervision. • He also has the supervision of hundreds of salespeople, there being ten 
departments under his charge. To these he gives the closest attention, carefully watch- 
ing every detail of the business as well as principal features. He studies the market 
and the public and from the former meets the demands of the latter, with a trade that 
is continually growing. Not a little of the success of the Denver Dry Goods Company 
in recent years is attributable to his efforts and his capable management of the depart- 
ments under his immediate control. 

On the 12th of November, 1902. Mr. Sittloh was married to Miss Elma Bartel, a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bartel, of Richmond, Indiana, and they now have a 



244 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

daughter, Jeanne, born In Richmond in 1906 and a pupil in the schools of Denver. In 
social circles the family occupies a very enviable position. Mr. Sittloh's efforts have 
not been confined to his business alone, for he is a man of pronounced activity along 
other lines, especially those contributing to the moral progress of the community. He 
has been a foremost factor in the upbuilding of the City and State Sunday School 
Associations and was the president of the former and is chairman of the board of 
directors of the latter, with an enrolled membership of one hundred and forty thousand 
in the state. He is continually studying the problems of the moral education of the 
young with the same thoroughness that he brings to bear in solving the problems of 
business. He is a member of the Denver Athletic Club, also of the Denver Civic and 
Commercial Association and president of the Lions Club and a director of the National 
Garment Retailers' Association of New York city. The story of honorable and suc- 
cessful achievement is always one that thrills the reader. Such is the record of 
Mr. Sittloh. His present financial standing is in marked contrast to his condition 
when he started out in life at the age of twelve years, working for a very meager wage. 
He entered the employ of the Denver Dry Goods Company at a salary of but ten dollars 
per week and today is at the head of large departments which he manages most suc- 
cessfully. Notwithstanding the heavy demands made upon his time and attention in 
this way, it has been his rule to set apart some time each day for the labors of love 
to which he is so devoted. He has constantly striven for the right and from his 
early youth has given a large portion of his time to the service of others. 



THOMAS JOSEPH McCUE. 



In the more recent political history of Colorado the name of Thomas Joseph McCue. 
state senator, national committeeman and democratic leader, stands out as that of 
one born to the purple of high civic honor. His untimely death on the 9th of August, 
1913, deprived the state and the nation of a great lawmaker. Had the word been spoken 
in 1911, during the now famous senatorial deadlock of Colorado, Thomas J. McCue 
would have been chosen to succeed the late Charles J. Hughes, Jr., in the United States 
senate. Some votes were cast for him. An almost unanimous vote of the convention 
was his if the party leaders had spoken on the last day of that memorable session, 
but he would not even permit his name to be placed officially in nomination. 

Thomas J. McCue was born in Sangamon county, Illinois, August 26. 1864. His 
parents removed to Chicago two years later and barely escaped with their lives in 
the great fire of 1S71. After spending some time in Massillon. Ohio, the family removed 
to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where Thomas J. McCue was educated. In 1885 he became 
a resident of Kansas and took up a homestead and timber claim comprising three 
hundred and twenty acres of land in Thomas county. There he devoted his attention 
to agricultural pursuits until 1890. when he went into the lumber business, in which 
he and his brother, William P. McCue, were very successful. From 1893 until Jan- 
uary, 1896, Thomas J. McCue was receiver at the land office in Colby, Kansas. Where- 
ever he lived his ability and intense energy brought him to the front as a leader in 
public affairs as well as in business circles. 

Although a resident of Denver from 1896, he did not become prominent politically 
until 1908, when he was elected state senator from the first district. Durin.? the years 
that preceded and followed his election he, associated with his brother, built up one 
of the largest lumber companies in the state. He preferred to concentrate his efforts 
and attention upon the business rather than upon politics, and keen discernment and 
unfaltering energy made theirs one of the most important lumber interests of Colorado. 
But with his election to the state senate, Mr. McCue could no longer keep in the back- 
ground. He won statewide prominence when he became floor leader for what were 
called the Old Guard Democrats, who controlled the seventeenth general assembly. 
The great issue of that session was the direct primary law and for three weeks he 
led the fight for an assembly feature. It was finally carried with the McCue amend- 
ments at an extra session of the legislature. In the democratic state convention of 
1911. Mr. McCue became a candidate for national committeeman, was elected and at the 
next national convention in 1912 at once assumed a leading position in the party 
councils. In the campaign of 1912 his success in bringing together a split party and 
winning the election of a United States senator elicited from national leaders of the 
party some most complimentary congratulations, including a letter from Josephas 
Daniels, secretary of the navy during both administrations of President Wilson. He 
was also given great credit for his zealous advocacy of the direct primary law and it 




THOMAS JOSEPH McCUE 



246 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

was Mr. McCue who framed and introduced the joint resolution that gave to Denver its 
wonderful mountain park system. Politics to him was a pastime. He played the 
game for the pleasure there was in it and for the opportunity it gave him of promoting 
public welfare, having no ambition for political honors or gain. Ever possessing the 
courage of his convictions, he was a tenacious advocate of what he thought right and 
his advocacy of any measure lent it prestige. 

Following his return from the democratic national convention of 1912 Mr. McCue 
refused to consider a nomination for governor, as he felt that his business required 
his attention. He then concentrated his efforts upon the further development of the 
lumber trade with notably gratifying success. While a prosperous business man. he 
did not live to accumulate. He was liberal and kind-hearted, utterly void of selfishness 
and no worthy or deserving cause ever appealed to him in vain. He was an excellent 
judge of human nature and he took great pleasure in recommending capable individuals, 
his keen sagacity enabling him readily to detect the possibilities and the strength of 
business men, and he seldom made a mistake in this way. After his passing his brother, 
William F. McCue, assumed his place as head of the lumber business and has vastly 
extended it. He. too, has been called to the front in politics, tor in 1918. at Ihe Denver 
primary, he was chosen democratic candidate for state senator, standing at the top 
of the poll among the candidates for that office. At the same time he directs the impor- 
tant business interests which have been built up by the brothers. On the 2d of May. 1917, 
he announced a service retirement plan, whereby twenty-yeaf employes who have passed 
the age of sixty-flve or thirty-year employes who have passed the age of sixty will be 
retired with thirty per cent of their monthly wage. In case of women the retirement 
age is ten years less than that of men, the president and directors of the company being 
alone exempt from the benefits of this plan. 

The widow of Thomas J. McCue is still living in Denver and is prominent in social 
and war work, contributing in large measure to the activities which are proving of 
such great worth to the country in this hour of crisis. In her maidenhood she was 
Catharine M. Grier, a native of Mapleton, Wisconsin. Their marriage was celebrated 
at Norton. Kansas,- on the 16th of February, 1898, and their home life was largely 
ideal. Mr. McCue was most devoted to the interests of his home, finding his greatest 
happiness at his own fireside in the companionship of his wife and their many friends. 
His personal qualities were such as made tor friendship among all who knew him. He 
was straightforward, reliable and high-minded and he had many sterling traits which 
won for him not only the highest regard of those who knew him but also made him 
very popular in social circles. 



WILLIAM EBERT. 



William Ebert, engaged in the raising of alfalfa and also in the live stock busi- 
ness, handling cattle quite extensively, is the owner of twelve hundred and eighty 
acres of valuable farm land in Adams county. He is a native of Colorado, his birth 
having occurred on the 20th of August, 1S71, in what was then Arapahoe county but 
is now Adams county, his parents being Ferdinand F. and Kate (Roeder) Ebert. His 
father, now deceased, was born in Brunswick, Germany, October 20, 1823, and in 1851 
crossed the Atlantic, reaching an American port after forty-eight days spent upon the 
water. He did not tarry in the east but made his way at once to the Mississippi valley, 
settling in Iowa, where he engaged in farming for seventeen years. He arrived in 
Colorado in the spring of 186S and thereafter made his home in what later became 
Adams county, to the time of his demise, acquiring a valuable ranch property, on 
which he engaged extensively in the raising of cattle and horses. The place is con- 
veniently and pleasantly located about fourteen miles east of Denver on the north side 
of the Kansas Pacific Railroad. In all of his business affairs Mr. Ebert was energetic 
and enterprising and carried forward to successful completion whatever he undertook. 
His political allegiance was given to the republican party in the early years of his 
residence in America but later he became a stanch advocate of the principles of the 
democratic party. He never sought or desired office and served only as a member 
of the school board. 

On the 27th of June, 1858, Ferdinand Ebert was married to Miss Kate Roeder, 
also a native of Germany, whence she came to the United States with her mother in 
her girlhood days. Their marriage was celebrated in Iowa and to them were born 
three sons and three daughters: Ferdinand F.; George W., living in Salt Lake City; 




WILLIAM EBERT 



248 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

William, of this review; Mary, the wife of Herman C. Behrens; Annie, the wife 
of B. Speier. of Denver; and Helena. 

William Ebert pursued a public school education, continuing his studies until 
he reached the age of fifteen years. During vacation periods he worked with his 
father upon the home farm and was thus engaged until the father's death in 190ft, 
when he took over the old home place of twelve hundred and eighty acres and has since 
cultivated it on his own account. He is now engaged quite extensively in the raising 
of cattle and also in the production of alfalfa. What he undertakes he accomplishes. 
He is alert, wide-awake, energetic and his persistency of purpose has also been one 
of the strong and salient features in the attainment of success. Everything about his 
place is kept in good condition. An air of neatness and thrift pervades the farm and 
the Ebert ranch is regarded as one of the attractive features of the landscape. 

In politics Mr. Ebert maintains an independent course, nor has he ever been an 
aspirant for public office. He has served however, as a member of the school board 
and the cause of education finds in him a stalwart champion. He stands for progres- 
siveness in public affairs but prefers to concentrate his time and attention upon his 
individual business interests, which, carefully directed, have brought to him sub- 
stantial success. 



MINERVA L. Mccarty. 



Minerva L. McCarty, superintendent of schools in Elbert county, is a native of 
Denver and a daughter of James and Ella Viola (Johnson) McCarty. Her maternal 
grandmother. Mrs. Marcia Johnson, came to Denver with her parents in 1859, the 
journey being made with ox team and wagon. Many of the relics of that journey, 
including buffalo hides and implements used while en route, were long kept as 
mementos by the family. From that time to the present representatives of the family 
have been active factors in promoting the substantial development of the community. 

Miss McCarty of this review was educated in the schools of Denver and at the 
Teachers College of Greeley, being graduated from the latter institution with the class 
of 1912. In 1904 she came to Elbert county and took up a homestead in the eastern 
part of the county, of which she remained the owner until 1917, when she sold the 
property. It was in the year of her arrival in Elbert county that she became actively 
identified with its school system. She continued as a teacher from 1904 until 1916, 
when she was elected county superintendent of schools on the republican ticket. So 
satisfactory has been her record in this connection that in 1918 she was again made the 
nominee of the party for the office. She holds to high standards of education, putting 
forth every possible effort to improve the schools and advance the curriculum, making 
it of the greatest possible worth as a preparation for life's practical duties and respon- 
sibilities. She displays a contagious enthusiasm in her work and the results achieved 
have been most satisfying. 



JOHN P. GRAVES. 



John P. Graves, now living retired in California but for. many years actively 
identified with ranching interests in Colorado and one of the well known and hon- 
ored pioneers of the state, was born in Waynesville. Illinois, October 8, 1848, a son of 
Oliver and Lucy (Story) Graves. His father was born in Montpelier, Vermont. March 
13, 1813, and in his native town spent the days of his boyhood and youth, but after 
his marriage was for some years a resident of the state of New York. He afterward 
engaged in the wholesale and retail grocery business in Bloomington, Illinois, remain- 
ing in trade there for four years, after which he withdrew from commercial pursuits 
and turned his attention to farming. In 1849, attracted by the discovery of gold in 
California, he made his way across the plains to the Pacific coast. His journey was 
a thrilling one and while he himself escaped arousing the enmity of the Indians he wit- 
nessed many harrowing scenes, one of which was the revenge taken upon a white man 
by the Indians for the shooting of an Indian squaw. They skinned the man alive and 
with the skin they whipped his brother and father. Such dreadful scenes as these he 
was forced to witness and it may well be imagined that he was extremely grateful 
when he reached his destination in safety. He successfully followed mining in Call- 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 249 

fornia for two years and then returned to his home with his father-in-law, Palmer 
Story. 

John P. Graves pursued his education in the schools of Bloomington, Illinois, to 
the age of twelve, when he came to Colorado and for a tew years was employed by 
James Tynon, a grocer. He then turned his attention to farming, which he followed 
for several years before preempting, aboMt 1875, a tract of one hundred and sixty 
acres on Dry creek. With characteristic energy he began the development of that 
tract and continued its further cultivation until a few years ago, when he retired from 
active business and removed to California, leaving the management of his ranch to his 
two sons. Franlc 0. and Phillip. He lived a busy and useful life, his labors bringing 
about a marked transformation in the appearance of the quarter section of land which 
came into his possession. He added to it all modern accessories and equipment and 
converted it into one of the fine farms of the district. 

Mr. Graves was united in marriage to Mary E. Wadsworth and their children 
were: Frank 0.; Ernest; Phillip; Bertha, the wife of James Crooks; and Clarence, 
who is with the United States infantry in France. 

Phillip Graves, to whom we are indebted for the material concerning his father, 
was born upon the old homestead ranch at Arvada and was educated in the public 
schools of Jefferson county. Through vacation periods and after his textbooks were 
put aside he continued work on the ranch with his father and has spent the greater 
part of his life on this property. He wedded Marion Crooks and to them have been 
born four children, Henry, Lucy, Margaret and Benjamin. 

Phillip Graves is now associated with his brother in the development of the home 
farm and ranks among the enterprising agriculturists of the community. His entire 
time and attention are concentrated upon the work of the fields and his labors are 
productive of excellent results. 



JAMES M. BRADSHAW. 



James M. Bradshaw, owner of the Bradshaw ranch of nineteen hundred and 
thirty acres, situated near Peyton, in El Paso county, was born in Hancock county, 
Illinois, on the 5th of April, 1849, a son of John and Susanna (Dickson) Bradshaw. 
He acquired a common school education and in 1866, when a youth of seventeen years, 
removed to Franklin county, Kansas, where he resided upon a farm until 1885. He 
then came to Colorado and purchased eighty acres of school land and also preempted 
one hundred and sixty acres and homesteaded one hundred and sixty. As his financial 
resources have increased he has added to his holdings from time to time, making 
other purchases until his landed possessions now embrace nineteen hundred and 
thirty acres, constituting one of the large and fine ranches of his section of the state. 
It is devoted to the raising of stock and grain and he produces from five to ten thou- 
sand bushels of grain per annum and has upon the place about one hundred and 
twenty head of cattle. The Bradshaw ranch is a splendidly improved property. There 
are beautiful groves of trees that surround house, barns and sheds and every modern 
equipment is to be found upon the place. Well kept fences divide the farm into fields 
of convenient size and the latest improved machinery facilitates the work of plowing, 
planting and harvesting. He is not only an extensive grower of wheat but also mills 
it on the ranch, manufacturing whole wheat graham flour, which is to be found on 
sale in many stores of the locality. The ranch is pleasantly and conveniently located 
about four and a half miles northwest of Peyton and Mr. Bradshaw is regarded as 
one of the most substantial and progressive farmers of El Paso county. 

Mr. Bradshaw was united in marriage to Miss Lydia Brubaker, of Ashland, Ohio, 
who went with her parents to Douglas county, Kansas, in 1866, and was there educated. . 
She became the wife of Mr. Bradshaw on the 25th of October, 1877. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Bradshaw have been born two sons. Marcus, born July 28, 1878, married Sarah Barn- 
hart and has two sons, George and Albert. Earl Bradshaw, after completing a high 
school course, pursued a course in electricity and steam fitting at Des Moines, Iowa, and 
is now engaged in business along that line. 

Mr. Bradshaw is a stockholder in the Farmers State Bank of Peyton and also a 
stockholder in the Peyton Farmers Cooperative Elevator Company at that place. He 
is a man of sound business judgment and his life has been one of well directed 
industry and thrift. He accomplishes what he undertakes by reason of a stalwart 
purpose that knows no defeat. He has been a resident of El Paso county for a third 
of a century and has contributed in marked measure to its progress and improvement. 




JAMES M. BRADSHAW 




THE JAMES M. BRADSHAW RANCH 



252 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

In 1918, he was a candidate for the office of county commissioner on the democratic 
ticket. He is actuated by a public-spirited devotion to the general good in all that 
he does and in the development of his farming interests is permeated by a spirit of 
patriotism that prompts him to raise the largest possible wheat crops in order that 
the boys over there may be well supplied. All who know him — and he has a wide ac- 
quaintance — speak of him in terms of high regard. 



METT GORDON. 



Mett Gordon is a well known rancher of Elbert county, living on section 33, town- 
ship 12, range 57, not far from Limon. He was born in Austria in 1860. a son of Mett 
and Mary Gordon. The father died when the son was but an infant. The latter 
acquired his education In his native country and afterward spent three years in mil- 
itary service, but when he left the army he at once started for America, where he 
could be free and work out his own ideas of life, enjoying and utilizing the oppor- 
tunities that came his way. In the year 1885 he became a resident of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, and as his financial resources were extremely limited, rendering it 
imperative that he seek immediate employment, he accepted any work that offered. 
He entered the steel mills, where he remained for a year, and during that time he was 
studying and acquainting himself with the English language. Later he went to 
Buffalo, New York, where he was employed in a brewery for a year, and then removed 
to Chicago, where he secured work in a foundry. On leaving that city he made his way 
to Pueblo, Colorado, and after pursuing different kinds of work he removed to Elbert 
county and homesteaded on section 33, township 12, range 57. For a time he lived 
in a frame house of one room. He had to go to work in order to get the necessary 
money for the development of his own place. For five years he was employed by 
others and during this period he saved everything possible that he had earned. He 
purchased cattle one by one until at the end of five years he had eighty-five head. 
During the five year period he was employed on the Holt Live Stock Company's ranch, 
first at a salary of fifteen dollars per month, while later he received twenty dollars 
per month. 

In 1891, in Cleveland, Ohio, Mr. Gordon was married to Miss Barbara Jankovich, 
a native of Austria, who has indeed been a helpmate to her husband. She did the farm 
work while he was employed by others and thus materially assisted her husband in 
gaining a start. During the early years of his residence in Colorado Mr. Gordon had a 
very exciting experience. He decided to buy some land hut he did not have the money 
nor even railroad fare with which to get to the land office in Denver. However, he 
received assistance from some one in Limon, who advanced him ten dollars. He then 
went to Denver and when making his way to the land office he met two well dressed 
young men who spoke to him and asked him if he knew anything about land. He 
replied that he knew something about it in the section where he lived. One of the 
youths said his father wanted to buy some land and wished Mr. Gordon would go and 
speak to him, saying that he was to be found in a certain building. After a little 
persuasion Mr. Gordon went with the young men and on entering the room discovered 
that it was a gambling joint. The men invited him to take a hand at cards but he 
refused, saying that he had business to transact and could not waste the time, but 
they prevailed upon him to stay and play. He also explained that he did not under- 
stand the game and one of the young men agreed to stand behind him and tell him 
what cards to play. Soon he learned that it was necessary to put the money on the 
table. He realized then that if something wasn't done quickly he would lose the little 
money that he had. As one of the men was moving toward him Mr. Gordon jumped 
out of his chair and over another and bolted out of the door running down twenty 
steps and into the street, with the gang following him, but they did not get him, as he 
gained the sidewalk before they could reach him. Not being used to the country, he 
did not care to call the police. He certainly had a narrow escape with his money. Not 
having the necessary funds, he started out to try to borrow money and after some 
difficulty in this connection he came across W. S. Pershing, of Limon, who used his 
influence and enabled Mr. Gordon to gain a start. He secured four hundred dollars, 
purchased his land and returned home. Since that time he has prospered and has In- 
creased his stock to a great extent. He has made wonderful improvements upon his 
farm, where are to be seen some of the most beautiful trees of this section. Today he 
has an attractive home and surroundings of which any man might be proud. Upon 
his place are large barns and outbuildings for the shelter of grain and stock and he 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 253 

utilizes the latest improved machinery to facilitate the work of the fields. His family 
have aided him in carrying out his plans and he has been very successful. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Gordon were born ten children, of whom eight are yet living, Mett. Zephia, 
Prank, Loie, Mary, Josie, Barbara and Bernard, and they have an adopted daughter, 
Annie, who is now one of the family. The children are of the Catholic faith. 

In politics Mr. Gordon has always been a republican since becoming a naturalized 
American citizen, giving stalwart allegiance to the party. He is a self-educated as 
well as a self-made man. He speaks the English language fluently and has become 
a representative resident of the community in which he makes his home. He is 
interested in community welfare, especially in the improvement of the roads, and 
he stands for progress and advancement along all practical lines. His business career 
has been productive of good results. He has worked earnestly and indefatigably to 
attain success and is now numbered among the representative farmers and cattle 
raisers of Elbert county. 



FRANK LESLIE BARTLETT. 

Dr. Frank Leslie Bartlett, now acting president of the Merchants Bank of Denver, 
twice president of the Denver Chamber of Commerce and for over a decade the leader 
in Colorado of the good roads movement, is a native of Maine, having been born at 
Hanover, Oxford county, March 2, 1S52. He is a sou of Cyrus Bartlett, also a native 
of the Pine Tree state, and a lineal descendant of Josiah Bartlett, one of the signers 
of the Declaration of Independence. 

Frank L. Bartlett when eighteen years of age entered the University of Michigan, 
where he specialized in chemistry and mineralogy. During his last year in college he 
held the position of tutor. For sixteen years after completing his education he was 
assayer of the state of Maine, accepting that position when only twenty-one years of 
age. During the period which he served in that capacity he also pursued a medical 
course at Dartmouth College for the general scientific value of the study but not with 
a view to practice. Later he was appointed professor of natural science at Westbrook 
College, near Portland, and in 187S. during the mining excitement in eastern Maine, 
he began devoting his attention to the treatment of ores. Later, at the urgent request 
of the governor, he went abroad to study methods of ore treatment and upon his return 
erected the Portland Smelting & Reduction Works for the treatment of ores from 
eastern Maine and the provinces. 

It was Dr. Bartlett who first called attention in New England to the manufacture 
of sulphuric acid from iron pyrites. From the Milan mine in New Hampshire which 
he purchased he laid the foundation for an extensive business in the furnishing of 
pyrites to the acid manufactories. In 1880 he began his important work in the solving 
of problems of treating zinciferous ores. For ten years he conducted his experiments 
at the Portland works with results that were exceedingly satisfactory. He sought for 
a larger field, coming to Colorado and establishing the American Zinc-Lead Smelter in 
Canon City, where he began operations in 1891. His patents are among the most im- 
portant in the smelting industry, one of the most notable being secured on the famous 
Bartlett concentrator. It is but just to say that no other man has given such careful 
attention to the study of zinc ore and few have accomplished as much as he. 

On the 17th of December, 1879, Dr. Bartlett was married to Miss Hattie W. 
Baldwin, of Bangor, Maine. 

In 1902 Dr. Bartlett sold his interests in the American Zinc-Lead Smelter and 
removed to Denver, where he engaged in the manufacture of his concentrators. Having 
some spare time and being greatly interested in road improvement, he with others 
organized the Colorado Motor Club and he remained its president for five years. In 
1906 this club, together with the Chamber of Commerce, began a series of rcrad conven- 
tions which resulted in the introduction of various road bills in the legislature and 
the formation of the Colorado Good Roads Association, of whicli Dr. Bartlett was 
president for two years. He was also the representative of the roads department of 
the United States government for several years. He visited all parts of Colorado 
in the interests of better highways and was largely instrumental in securing the present 
laws relating to the public roads, in fact, his work in this connection cannot be over- 
estimated. He has done much to shape public thought and action and in arousing 
public sentiment concerning the improvement of the highways and his labors have 
indeed been far-reaching and effective. In the meantime he was president of the 
Chamber of Commerce in 1910 and 1911 and while acting in that office taised the money 



254 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

and buUt the fine building of the Chamber in Champa street. This is now owned and 
occupied by the Civic and Commercial Association and other allied commercial asso- 
ciations. During his connection with the Chamber of Commerce Dr. Bartlett inaugu- 
rated the movement for and secured the consolidation of the city and county of Denver 
and was instrumental in bringing about other reforms and improvements in connec- 
tion with the civic welfare. 

Dr. Bartlett has never taken an active part in politics but has ever been deeply 
interested in public improvements and always ready to lend his aid and cooperation to 
any undertaking for the commercial advantage of the city or the upbuilding of those 
interests which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. He remains one of the 
active business men of Denver as president of the Merchants Bank, of which he was 
one of the founders, and as an official of several other enterprises and his faith in 
Denver and the state is indicated by his extensive investments in Colorado property. 



ROBERT W. CAMPBELL. 



Robert W. Campbell passed away at Longbeach, California, on the 18th of January, 
1919. He had many substantial traits of character which endeared him to friends and 
neighbors and, moreover, he was numbered among the pioneer settlers of Brighton and 
of that section of the state. In his later years he lived practically retired in Brighton 
but was still the owner of valuable farm property from which he derived a substantial 
annual income. He was born in Nashville, Tennessee, on the 25th of March, 1860, and 
was of Scotch descent. His parents, John B. and Maria (Allen) Campbell, were both 
natives of the land of hills and heather, in which they were reared and married. In 
the early '50s they determined to try their fortune in the new world and crossed the 
Atlantic to the United States. They established their home at Nashville, Tennessee, 
but after living there for several years removed to Indiana, where they took up their 
abode on a farm about 1866. Their remaining days were passed in that state and they 
were among the highly respected residents of the community in which they made 
their home. They had a family of seven children, four of whom are yet living. 

Robert W. Campbell was but three years of age when he went with his parents 
to Indiana, where he was reared and educated, mastering the branches of learning 
taught in the public schools. In 1884 he came to Colorado, settling at Brighton, and 
for eleven years was employed in the Brighton creamery, first as a helper, later as 
engineer and then general manager in full charge of the business, his fidelity as well 
as his keen executive ability having been quickly recognized by those with whom he 
had business relations. He was then appointed postmaster and occupied that position 
for three terms under republican administrations. As time passed he made investments 
in property and became the owner of five hundred acres of fine farm land. In 1918 he 
raised six thousand bushels of wheat and six hundred bushels of beans. He gave gen- 
eral supervision to his farming and ranching interests, but the actual work of the place 
was done by those whom he employed. His sound judgment and keen discrimination, 
however, were important elements in the successful conduct of his place. 

In April, 1884, the year in which he came to Colorado, Mr. Campbell was mar-ried 
to Miss Ella Whitehead, a native of Indiana, and they became parents of two daughters, 
but the first born, Carrie, is deceased. The other daughter. Bessie, has become the 
wife of Harry Bates and is now living in Denver. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell owned and 
occupied a fine residence in the village of Brighton and enjoyed all of the comforts 
and many of the luxuries of life. 

In his political aflSliations. Mr. Campbell was a stalwart republican, and he always 
endorsed and ardently supported the principles of the party. He served as road over- 
seer for eight years, when John Twombly was county commissioner from the Brighton 
district and when Adams and Denver counties were a part of old Arapahoe county, and 
to his initiative and personal efforts may be attributed, in large measure, the excellent 
roads of the district. When Adams county was formed he took an especially active 
part in the contest for the location of the county seat, and the leading members of both 
political parties willingly gave him much credit for his work in winning the contest 
for Brighton. He also participated in the early politics of Denver and was recognized 
as one of those men who fought the battles fairly ind aboveboard. He would never 
countenance, nor desire, a questionable victory, nor would he deign to employ those 
petty tricks so often the subterfuge of the professional politician. He could accept an 
honorable defeat, if the voters of his district so willed, rather than be returned 




ROBERT W. CAMPBELL 



256 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the victor in a contest won through dishonest methods. After discontinuing his work 
as road overseer, he purchased the farm where he resided four years, after which 
he was appointed postmaster for Brighton, and served in ihat capacity for twelve 
consecutive years. 

There were no spectacular phases in the life of Mr. Campbell. He pursued the 
even tenor of his way in the conduct of his business, and his diligence and determina- 
tion were the salient points in winning him the success that numbered him with the 
substantial residents of Adajns county. Moreover, the methods which he employed 
won for him an honored name and he was among the valued and respected citizens 
of Brighton. Some time prior to his death Mr. Campbell suffered from an automobile 
accident, from which he never fully recovered. Thinlcing that he might be benefitted 
by a western trip, he went to Longbeach, California. The trip, however, was too much 
for him and there he passed away. When the news of his death was received in 
Brighton it caused deep sorrow throughout the town, tor his many substantial traits of 
character had endeared him to those with whom he was associated and everywhere 
he was spoken of in terms of high regard. He possessed the qualities of good citizen- 
ship, of fidelity in friendship, and one who knew him well said he was "always identified 
with all public movements, liberal to a fault, a typical big-hearted westerner." 



WILLIAM C. BRADBURY. 



William C. Bradbury is numbered among the builders of the great western empire. 
His life work literally and figuratively has been along construction lines, leading to the 
utilization of the natural resources and to the development of Colorado in many ways. 
An eminent American statesman has said that eastern training and learning grafted 
upon western opportunity produces the strongest in American citizenship. William C. 
Bradbury constitutes an example of this. He was born in Taunton, Massachusetts, Febru- 
ary 1, 1849, a son of Cotton C, and Rebecca Bradbury. His father was born in York, 
Maine, in August. 1822, and the mother, who bore the maiden name of Rebecca Brewer, 
was born in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1819, a representative of one of the old Quaker 
families. Soon after the birth of William C. Bradbury, the father went to California, 
attracted by the mining excitement on the Pacific coast. The trip was made in 1849 
by way of the overland route and after two years spent on the western coast he returned 
by way of the Isthmus of Panama. During the early youth of his son William, he and 
his family resided in Boston or near that city. There were five sons but only two are 
now living, the surviving brother of our subject being George E. Bradbury, of Colorado. 

William C. Bradbury acquired a common school education in Boston, Massachusetts, 
and Providence, Rhode Island, but when fourteen years of age ran away from home to 
enlist for service in the Civil war. He was accepted and spent two weeks as a drummer 
boy, after which his father found him and took him home. For a year or two afterward, 
however, he was so persistent in his desire to enter the army that his father finally gave 
consent but by that time the eighteen-year-old law was rigidly enforced and Mr. Brad- 
bury, being young in appearance and slight in build, was not accepted at the recruiting 
offices of either the army or the navy in Boston, to both of which he applied. Between 
1868 and 1871 he held several salaried positions in Boston and for a year owned and 
operated a job printing office in that city. In 1871 he came to the west to make a pay- 
ment on properties at Evans, Colorado, for his father, who was interested with a num- 
ber of St, Louis parties in colonizing the town of Evans. Mr. Bradbury arrived in Denver 
in June, 1871, and concluded to remain in this state. As a boy he had always been 
intensely interested in hunting, trapping and fishing and he spent the winter of 1871-2 
in the cattle camp of Lyman Cole at Fremont Orchard, on the Platte river in Colorado, 
in hunting buffaloes, antelope and wolves and in trapping otter, beaver and other fur- 
bearing animals, as well as in making a trip to the mountains up the Cache la Poudre 
river after elk and deer. 

In the spring of 1872, Mr, Bradbury was united in marriage to Miss Hattie A. 
Howe, who came from Boston, Massachusetts, to Colorado with her parents in 1871. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bradbury began their domestic life in Denver, which at that time was a 
city of five thousand population. They became the parents of seven children: Buckley 
C. Miriam, William C, Harriet, Isabelle B., Luther F. and George Edward; but only 
four of the number are now living, these being: Harriet, the wife of G. H. Locke, of 
Milford, Massachusetts; Isabelle B., now Mrs. I. B. Gelder, of Denver; Luther F., of 
Boston, Massachusetts; and George E., who is now a member of the United States 
aviation service. 




WILLIAM C. BRADBURY 



258 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

After establishing his home in Denver, Mr. Bradbury entered the employ of Lewis 
& Bancroft, architects, as a draftsman and in the latter' part of the year 1872 removed 
to Colorado Springs, where he entered mercantile circles, establishing a prosperous 
business as a dealer in paints, oils, glass, artists' materials and wall paper, and employ- 
ing a force of men for painting and paper hanging. He continued the business until 
1878, when his health failed and, physicians insisting that he must live out-of-doors, he 
sold the business and began freighting with a mule outfit from Colorado Springs to 
Leadville. His patronage in this direction increased until he was utilizing five eight- 
mule teams, the route being up Ute Pass via South Park and Buena Vista. At the 
same time he also established a six-horse stage line and mail route from Colorado 
Springs to Leadville, via Ute Pass and Western Pass, and operated these until the 
South Park Railroad was completed into South Park and the Rio Grande Railroad was 
approaching Leadville, making it impossible to further compete with the railroads. 
His entire outfit was then taken to Tres Piedras, New Mexico, where under R. E. Sloan, 
who was then in charge of the southern division of the tie and timber department of 
the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad construction, he was put in charge of two sawmills 
and the tie camps at Tres Piedras and of the transportation of the lumber and ties 
from these camps used in the construction of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad between 
Antonita and the New Mexico state line. From there he moved the mules and mill out- 
fits and performed similar services in the construction of portions of the line of the 
same railroad between Chama and Durango. This being completed, his outfits were 
then moved on to be used in connection with grading work on the Burlington Railroad, 
then building into Denver. He completed his first contract of six miles of railroad grad- 
ing near the present town of Akron, Colorado, and from that time until 1909 was actively 
engaged in railroad construction, doing work in various departments, including tunnel- 
ling, grading, masonry, bridge work and track laying, in many of the western states and 
old Mexico. He also constructed numerous irrigation systems of canals and reservoirs 
in Colorado, New Mexico. Idaho and Wyoming. Associated with partners he had the 
contract for forty miles of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad in Montana. He 
also had the contract for thirty miles of the Burlington & Missouri Railroad in Colo- 
rado and Nebraska, fifty miles of the Oregon Short Line Railroad in Idaho, thirty- 
five miles of the Colorado Midland Railroad in Colorado, one hundred and twenty miles 
of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific between the Missouri river and Colorado Springs, 
Colorado. He also constructed ninety-seven miles of the Pecos Valley Railroad in 
Texas and New Mexico, including grading, bridging and track laying, had the contract 
for large portions of the Chihuahua & Pacific Railroad in old Mexico, fifty miles of the 
Denver, Texas & Fort Worth Railroad in Colorado, forty miles of the Chicago, Burling- 
ton & Northern in Illinois and Wisconsin, also portions of the Laramie. Hahns Peak & 
Pacific Railroad in Wyoming, three hundred miles of the Union Pacific Railroad, includ- 
ing new and second track, in Kansas, Nebraska. Wyoming and Colorado and sundry 
short lines for the Denver & Rio Grande and tor the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company 
in Colorado. He has constructed numerous irrigation systems. Including canals and 
storage reservoirs, in the states of Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico, of which 
the following are some of the larger and more important: the systems of the Idaho 
Mining & Irrigation Company' of Idaho; the Wyoming Development Company in Wyom- 
ing, of which the town of Wheatland is now the business center; the Pecos Valley irri- 
gation system. New Mexico, of which Carlsbad and Roswell are the principal centers; 
and the Colorado canal in Colorado. 

Mr. Bradbury has also been engaged in sundry development projects of the state, 
the most conspicuous being perhaps the lands under the Colorado canal mentioned above 
which takes its water from the north side of the Arkansas river, about twenty miles 
east of Pueblo, and covers the lands surrounding the present towns of Ordway, Sugar 
City, Olney Springs and Crowley. He constructed this canal in 1890 under contract and 
afterward acquired ownership of the same, as well as thirty-five thousand acres of land 
underlying it, which he purchased from the state of Colorado. At the time of construc- 
tion there was not a habitation under the line of the canal, the land being open pmirie 
cattle range, though the Missouri Pacific Railroad had been completed through it. 
Shortly after the construction of the canal he sold large interests in the property but 
has been continually interested and engaged in its colonization and development up to 
the present. At one time, while still owning ten thousand acres of the lands and water 
rights, he operated sixteen different farms of large acreage under irrigation and at times 
was interested in the cattle and sheep business, one year feeding and fattening seven 
thousand head of lambs, which he sold in eastern markets; and the following year he 
fattened, and marketed in the east seventeen thousand head of lambs. While develop- 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 259 

ing the properties he also planted, on the same, over seven hundred acres in apple and 
other fruit orchards. 

Mr. Bradbury has always been an enthusiastic sportsman and angler since earliest 
childhood, having hunted all smaller game and fish as a boy in New Englaud, while 
after coming to Colorado he annually hunted buffalo until 1876, when they became scarce. 
He has devoted all his spare time and found his recreation in the hunting of game on the 
plains and mountains of the west, including elk, deer, sheep, antelope, bear, etc., down 
to the smaller game animals and game birds. He has enjoyed fishing in most of the 
western states and also fished in the ocean for salmon, tuna, sword fish and all other 
large garqe fish of the Pacific, together with tarpon and other game fish of the Gulf, as 
well as all the large game fish of Florida and the Atlantic waters. He is and has been 
a member of numerous hunting and fishing clubs of Colorado, Utah, California and 
Texas, including the Tuna Club of California, and he likewise has membership in the 
Denver and other clubs of the capital. For years he has been an enthusiastic 
oblogical student and collector and has donated to the Colorado Museum of Natural 
History probably the most extensive collection of birds' eggs on public exhibition in the 
United States, comprising over four thousand five hundred sets of eggs with nests and 
representing nearly nine hundred different species of North American birds. His life 
has been one of intense activity and broad usefulness. His labors have always been 
of a character that have contributed to upbuilding and progress and he has been a 
most dominant factor in shaping the development of the west, opportunity ever being 
to him a call to action to which he has made ready response. 



SAMUEL BERESFORD CHILDS, M, D. 

Dr. Samuel Beresford Childs of Denver, widely known physician and roentgenol- 
ogist, is a man of broad scientific knowledge and training. He is one of the early 
workers in the field of roentgenology. 

Dr. Childs comes from Connecticut, having been born in East Hartford, November 
5, 1861, a son of Dr. Seth Lee and Juliet (Wood) Childs. The elder Dr. Childs was 
a prominent physician of Connecticut, where he practiced his profession for over 
forty years, leaving the impre.ss of his individuality upon public thought and opinion, 
having served as a member of the Connecticut state senate. His wife was a daughter 
of the Rev. Luke Wood, a talented Congregational minister. 

Dr. Samuel B. Childs attended the Hartford public schools and was graduated 
from the Hartford high school with the class of 1879. He was graduated from the 
academic department of Yale University with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1883, 
and in 1887 he won his M. D. from New York University Medical School. In the 
interim he had devoted the years 1884 and 1885 to teaching school in East Hartford. 
Following his graduation from medical college he became an interne in the out- 
patient department of Chambers Street Hospital of New York and in June, 1887, was 
appointed an interne in the Hartford Hospital, and during the last ten months of 
his service there was house physician and surgeon. He began practice in Hartford 
in 1888 as a physician and surgeon and continued in that city until 1895 when, on 
account of his health, he came to Denver and soon thereafter resumed the active 
practice of his profession. 

Since 1900 he has devoted his attention to diagnosis and to treatment by the 
use of the Roentgen-ray. From 1900 to 1912 he was professor of anatomy in the 
Denver University Medical School and in the Denver and Gross Medical College. 
Since 1912 he has been professor of roentgenology in the medical department of the 
University of Colorado. He is a member of the Medical Society of the City and 
County of Denver and has served as its president. He is also a member of the 
American Medical Association and of the American Roentgenological Society. 

Dr. Childs was a member of the Hartford City Guard of the Connecticut state 
militia and in 1888 and 1889 he was assistant surgeon of the Connecticut National 
Guard. In politics he maintains an independent course, voting for men and measures 
rather than for party. He is a great lover of out-door sports, — is an enthusiastic 
hunter, fisherman and golfer. He belongs to the Denver Club, Denver Country Club 
and to the Colorado Yale Association and was president of the Yale Association in 
1911. He is a member of the Twenty-Third Avenue Presbyterian church. Dr. Childs 
has ever been actuated by high ideals and in his practice he has striven to attain the 
highest degree of efficiency. 

Dr. Childs has been twice married, his first wife being Henrietta Willett, whom 



260 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

he married in 1890 in West Hebron, New York, and who died in 1906, leaving one 
son, John Wood, who was born in 1896. In 1908 Dr. Childs married Anne Starling of 
Henderson, Kentucky. Mrs. Childs Is a great-great-granddaughter of Justice Thomas 
Todd of the United States supreme court, who married Lucy Payne Washington, the 
young widow of George Steptoe Washington and only sister of Dolly Madison. Lucy 
Payne Washington lived with her sister, Mrs. Madison and her marriage to Justice 
Todd was the first marriage to be solemnized in the White House. 
Dr. and Mrs. Childs have one son. Samuel Beresford, Jr. 



JOHN SAHM. 



For twenty-seven years John Sahm has been a resident of Colorado, arriving in 
Elbert county in 1891, and through the intervening period he has contributed much 
to Its agricultural development. He was born in Belleville, Illinois, on the 15th of 
December, 1866, and is a son of German parents who on coming to the new world 
settled at Belleville. In the schools of his native city John Sahm pursued his educa- 
tion and was a young man of twenty-five years when he sought the opportunities of 
the west, making his way to Elbert county, Colorado. Here he purchased a farm of 
six hundred acres close to the town of Elizabeth. He has a model farm property, to 
which he has added many modern improvements and equipments, and today he is 
regarded as one of the most prosperous men in his section. He has brought his land 
under a high state of cultivation, has added substantial buildings, has divided his 
place into fields of convenient size by well kept fences and he utilizes the latest 
Improved farm machinery in caring for his crops. 

In 1890 Mr. Sahm was united in marriage to Miss Mary Anderson. They have 
had no children of their own, but their generosity has prompted them to care for 
and give a home to five orphan children, one of whom came to them when seven years 
of age. They were taken from the Home for Dependent Children at Denver and 
from St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum. All have been given excellent educational privileges 
in the fine public schools of Elizabeth and have thus been qualified for life's practical 
and responsible duties. Two of the sons have enlisted and are now in the service 
of their country, while the other three children are upon the farm. Mr. Sahm is a 
man of generous and benevolent spirit, continually extending a helping hand where 
aid is needed. In his business affairs he has displayed keen wisdom and sound judg- 
ment in everything relating to the advancement of the productivity of the soil and 
the raising of crops. The worth of his ideas is manifest in the large harvests which 
he gathers, placing him among the substantial agriculturists of his part of the 
state. 



RALPH EVERET PINNICUM. 

Ralph E. Finnicum, one of the brilliant young lawyers of the state of Colorado, 
has recently established himself in Kiowa and has already gained a gratifying client- 
age. He came to this city in May, 1918, and quickly demonstrated his ability, as is 
evident from the fact that he has been chosen county attorney of Elbert county, now 
ably representing the interests of the county. Formerly he was a partner in the firm 
of Hilliard & Finnicum, with oflfices in the Guardian Trust building in Denver. He was 
born in State Center, Iowa. December 2, 1886. a son of George E. and Effle (Ryan) 
Finnicum, both of whom are living, the father being actively engaged in business as 
an engineer. The mother was born in Iowa and by her marriage has two children, 
the brother of Ralph E. Finnicum being Leo G. Finnicum, now a resident of Stockton, 
California. The family is of English ancestry, the first of the name who settled 
on this side of the Atlantic coming to the new world from England about 1800. 

At the usual age Ralph E. Finnicum became a pupil in the public schools of Des 
Moines, Iowa, and after mastering the work of the high school there entered the 
State University of Iowa, from which he was graduated in 1912 with the LL. B. degree. 
He then removed to Denver, was admitted to practice in the courts of this state in 
that year, and in 1912 was also admitted to the Iowa bar. During the period of his 
residence in the west he has given his attention to general law practice and while in 
Denver built up a liberal clientage. Since coming to Kiowa he has continued very 
successful, his previous reputation and experience greatly helping him in the building 




JOHN SAHM 



262 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

up of his private practice. He now however gives a great deal of his time and effort 
to his duties as county attorney, thereby rewarding the confidence and trust which 
the public reposed in him by calling him to that office. While yet a comparatively 
young man, he has already displayed marked ability, is thoroughly versed in the law 
and acquainted with principle and precedent, is ever careful and painstaking in the 
preparation ot his cases and clear and logical in his deductions. He is forceful and 
resourceful and ably presents his cause before court and jury, readily bringing out by 
close analysis the points which he desires to demonstrate. He belongs to the Denver 
County and City Bar Association, of which he has been a member for about four 
years, and has won many friends among his brethren of the legal profession. 

In June, 1915, Mr. Finnicum was united in marriage to Miss Loraine Hilliard, ot 
Denver, Colorado, the wedding being celebrated in that city. During their residence 
in Colorado they have gained many friends in the state and have been received with 
open arms by the young social set of Kiowa and Elbert county. 

Mr. Finnicum has always taken a laudable interest in public affairs and is ever 
ready to give his support to measures which he considers of value to the community, 
county and state, and although he has been a resident of Elbert county for but a 
short time he has been elected to the position of county attorney, giving the best 
that is in him to faithfully perform his duties in that connection. He is greatly 
interested in war work and has in every way assisted in making the various drives 
and campaigns of the government successful, being fully in accord with the policy set 
up by the administration, of gaining a world-wide victory for democratic ideals. Per- 
sonally Mr. Finnicum is well liked, as he is easily approachable, sympathetic and 
pleasant-mannered. 



THEODORE ADDISON ERB. 

Among the valued citizens of Akron, Colorado, who contributed much to the growth 
and development of this community was Theodore Addison Erb, who for a number ot 
years successfully conducted business interests here. His efforts were devoted to the 
management of a hotel but he was also engaged in the plumbing business, and it 
was through an accident while performing labors in this line that his life was termi- 
nated in 1914. Although it is now several years since Mr. Erb has passed away, his 
memory is still enshrined in the hearts of his friends, who respected him as an hon- 
orable and straightforward man of high qualities of heart and character. 

Theodore A. Erb was a native of Maryland, where he was born March 24, 1852. 
a son of Christopher and Mary (Shade) Erb, natives of Pennsylvania. For many 
years Christopher Erb followed agricultural pursuits in Virginia, to which state he 
had removed from Pennsylvania in his youth, and the Old Dominion remained his 
home until death called him in 1903. His wife had preceded him to the home beyond 
in 1S96. 

Although born in Maryland, Theodore A. Erb was reared in Virginia, where the 
parental home was established, and he received his education in the home neighbor- 
hood. His schooling, however, was very limited, for he put aside his textbooks at the 
age of eleven and began to learn the blacksmith and wagon maker's trade. Becoming 
proficient in these lines, he continued to work at his trade in Virginia until 1885, 
when at the age of thirty-three he decided to seek the less thickly populated sections 
of the west in order to grow up with the country and improve his opportunities. He 
first removed to Trenton, Nebraska, where for five years he was engaged in the im- 
plement business but at the end of that time went to McCook in the same state, there 
giving his attention to the conduct and operation of a hotel which he successfully 
managed tor three years. In 1893 he came to Akron. Colorado, and this city remained 
his home until his untimely demise in 1914, so that for over twenty-one years he was 
a resident of Akron, Washington county. Upon his arrival in this city he bought a 
hotel, to the operation of which he devoted his energies throughout the remainder 
of his life, although he conducted a plumbing business at the same time. He man- 
aged his hotel along modern ideas and put forth every effort to make his guests com- 
fortable. His place therefore was well patronized and became favorably known to 
the traveling public. In the plumbing business Mr. Erb was also quite successful, 
deriving from this line of his activities a gratifying addition to his income. His death 
occurred from the effect of burns which he had received while doing plumbing work. 
His sudden death was not only a great shock to his immediate family but was deeply 
regretted by his many friends and the traveling public, who had come to know him 




MR. AND MRS. THEODORE A. ERB 



264 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

as a reliable, trustworthy, honorable and pleasant man. Moreover, Mr. and Mrs. Erb 
operated a railroad eating house for about eight years but after the discontinuance 
of the same served meals in the hotel, this proving more satisfactory to the public. 
Subsequent to his death Mrs. Erb opened a cafe in connection with the hotel which 
she successfully operates, maintaining a rooming house in addition. 

On July 21, 1884, occurred the marriage of Theodore A. Erb and Susan S. Payne, 
a native of Frederick county, Virginia, where she was born in November, 1866, and a 
daughter of Summerfield and Susan (Timberlake) Payne, natives of Virginia, where 
the father followed farming all his life. During the war between the states he served 
as a lieutenant in the Confederate army, being active throughout the entire period 
of the war, and for four months he was held prisoner at Fort McHenry. His death 
occurred in August, 1885, while his wife died in 1866. To Mr. and Mrs. Erb were born 
two children: Anna M.. who married Worth M. Miller, a newspaper editor of Ogallala, 
Nebraska; and Ruth G., who makes her home with her mother. Mr. and Mrs. W. M. 
Miller have two children, Suone, who is now eleven, and Marcellus Harwood, who is 
seven years of age. 

From that time when he took up his residence in Akron, Colorado, until his death 
Mr. Erb always cooperated with his fellow citizens in order to promote or support plans 
for the growth of his community either in a material or moral and intellectual way. 
He was interested in all matters concerning Akron and was ever ready by word, deed 
and means to render assistance to worthy causes. Fraternally he was a member of 
the Masonic order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, while Mrs. Erb belongs to the Eastern Star. The principles of 
brotherhood underlying these organizations always guided Mr. Erb in his conduct 
toward his fellowmen, to whom he ever was kind and helpful. His religiou.« faith 
was that of the Presbyterian church, in the work of which he took active part, and 
politically he was a democrat. Although more than four years have passed since death 
claimed one of Akron's most useful and most respected citizens, the memory of Theo- 
dore Addison Erb lives in the hearts of his fellow citizens, for all recognized in him 
a loyal American, a successful business man of honorable principles and a true, 
faithful friend who would never fail in an emergency. 



HAROLD PAGE MARTIN. 



Harold Page Martin, an active practitioner at the bar of Boulder, lo whom 
success has come as the result of thorough training and broad experience, was born 
upon a farm in Boulder county, Colorado, in 1878. His father, William J. Martin, was 
a native of England and came to the United States in his boyhood days with his 
father, following the death of his mother. They settled first in the east but after- 
ward removed westward to Colorado, where they arrived in the early '60s. William J. 
Martin became a gold miner and was part owner of the Caribou mine in Boulder 
county, Colorado, which he and his partner discovered. He was married in Central 
City, Colorado, to Miss Ida S. Wilson and they are now occupying a farm in Boulder 
county. 

Spending his youthful days under the parental roof, Harold Page Martin became 
familiar with all the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist, for in 
his boyhood his time was divided between his studies in the schoolroom, the pleasures 
of the playground and the work of the fields. After mastering the elementary branches 
of learning in the district schools he became a student in the high school of Boulder, 
Colorado, from which in due course of time he was graduated. He later entered the 
University of Colorado at Boulder and won the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy upon 
graduation with the class of 1901. With broad literary learning to serve as a founda- 
tion upon which to rear the superstructure of professional knowledge, he took up the 
study of law and in 1904 completed a course in the law department, winning the LL. B. 
degree. He practiced for two years in Denver, covering 1905 and 1906, and then 
returned to Boulder, where he opened an office. His record stands in contradistinction 
to the old adage that a prophet is not without honor save in his own country, for in 
the county where practically his entire life has been passed Mr. Martin has been 
accorded a liberal and distinctively representative clientage. He is most careful and 
painstaking in the preparation of his cases and presents his cause with clearness and 
strength, never failing to impress judge and jury with the correctness of his position 
and seldom failing to gain the verdict desired. 

Mr. Martin is a republican in his political views and takes active part in further- 
ing the principles in which he believes. He has served as deputy prosecutor of Boulder 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 265 

county for several years but has not been a politician in the sense of office seeking. He 
belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks aud is also a member of the Boulder 
Club. He is appreciative of the social amenities of life and among the members of 
these organizations he has many friends. 



MELVIN C. GOSS. 



Melvin C. Goss, devoting his life to the practice of law in Boulder, where he 
opened his office in 1906, has through the intervening years become well established 
as a successful lawyer whose ability enables him to solve many intricate and involved 
professional problems. Colorado numbers him among her native sons, for his birth 
occurred upon a farm in Pueblo county in 1874. He comes of English and Scotch 
ancestry. His father, Calvin W. Goss, was born in Tennessee in the year 1828 and 
after reaching manhood was married to Miss Sarah Parsons, a native of North 
Carolina. The father served as a soldier of the Civil war, joining the Eleventh Kansas 
Cavalry, and was largely engaged in fighting Indians upon the Wyoming frontier. 
His last days were spent in Pueblo, Colorado, where he departed this life in 1913, 
after having devoted many years to general agricultural pursuits in Pueblo county. 

It was there upon the old homestead farm that Melvin C. Goss was reared, his 
youthful days being passed in the usual manner of the farmbred boy. He attended 
the country schools and after mastering the branches of learning therein taught, 
became a student in the high school of Pueblo. Ambitious to enter upon a professional 
career, he decided upon the practice of law as a life work and in preparation therefor 
entered the University of Colorado, in which he pursued the law course, winning 
the LL. B. degree upon graduation with the class of 1906. He then located for practice 
in Boulder, where he has since remained, and through the intervening period he has 
enjoyed a constantly growing clientage. Advancement at the bar is proverbially slow, 
yet no dreary novitiate awaited him. He soon demonstrated his power to handle 
legal questions and one of the characteristics of his practice has been the thoroughness 
with which he has prepared his cases. He is also identified with business interests 
as the assistant secretary of and the attorney for the Western Light & Power Com- 
pany of Boulder and is also attorney for the Boulder National Bank and attorney for 
and a director in the Mercantile Bank and Trust Company. 

On the 10th of June, 1913, in Denver. Mr. Goss was united in marriage to Miss 
Eleanor Hoyme, a daughter of the late Captain Hoyme of the United States army. 
Mr. Goss belongs to the Boulder Club and is also identified with Phi Alpha Delta, a 
college fraternity. Both he and his wife are widely known and highly esteemed in 
Boulder, occupying a very enviable position in social circles, their many friends bearing 
ready testimony to their genuine worth. 



LOUIS W. HENDERSHOTT. 



Louis W. Hendershott is living retired in a beautiful home at the corner of 
Seventh street and Turner avenue in Berthoud. For a long period he was identified 
with ranching interests but ultimately put aside business cares to enjoy in well earned 
rest the fruits of his former toil. He was born in Livingston county. New York, 
March 24, 1856, a son of John and Sarah (Sterner) Hendershott, who were natives of 
Pennsylvania. The father was a farmer and in early life removed to New York, where 
he purchased land about 1840. He improved that place and continued its cultivation 
throughout the remainder of his days. His father also became a resident of the 
Empire state at the same time and purchased land there. He had twelve sons and 
they all settled in that vicinity. The death of John Hendershott occurred in New 
York in 1860 and his widow, long surviving him, passed away in 1889. 

Louis W. Hendershott was reared and educated in the Empire state, remaining 
under the parental roof until he had attained his majority, after which he cultivated 
the home farm for three years. He had previously had liberal experience in that line 
of work, his vacation periods being devoted to the task of developing and cultivating 
the fields. In 1881 he left the east for Colorado and took up his abode in Larimer 
county, purchasing land a mile south of Berthoud which he improved. In partnership 
with H. V. Bennett, he bought the property and together they carried on their ranching 
interests for six years, at the end of which time Mr. Hendershott disposed of his in- 




LOUIS W. HENDERSHOTT 




MRS. LOUIS W. HENDERSHOTT 



If iilffliffy^ ^ nfflyriririr ' *'sH 


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LOUIS W. HENDERSHOTTS RANCH, WELD COUNTY, FOUR AND A HALF 
MILES NORTHEAST OP BERTHOUD 




LOUIS W. HENDERSHOTT'S RESIDENCE, SEVENTH AND TURNER 
AVENUE, BERTHOUD 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 269 

terest to Mr. Bennett. He afterward rented land for a year and next bought one hundred 
and sixty acres in Weld county four and a half miles northeast of Berthoud. This he 
at once began to develop and improve and continued its cultivation until 1900 but lived 
upon the place until 1914, when he took up his abode in Berthoud, erecting a large 
and attractive residence at the corner of Seventh street and Turner avenue, where he 
has since remained. While upon his ranch he engaged in the raising of high grade 
Percheron horses and shorthorn cattle. He also fed sheep for several years. He is 
now a stockholder and one of the directors in the First National Bank of Berthoud, 
and is a stockholder in the Fairburn Lumber Company of Berthoud. His investments 
have been judiciously made and he derives therefrom a substantial annual income. 

In September, 1883, Mr. Hendershott was united in marriage to Miss Hattie Keirnes 
and to them were born two sons: Carroll C, who is operating his father's place and one of 
his own adjoining; and Orlan N., a farmer of Weld county, living a mile north and a 
mile and a half east of the old home place. The wife and mother passed away in 
July, 1900, and on the 4th of February, 1902, Mr. Hendershott wedded Jennie Parker. 

Politically he is a democrat and his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian 
church. He also belongs to the Masonic fraternity and the Eastern Star and in these 
associations are found the rules which govern his conduct and shape his course in all 
the relations of lite. He commands the respect, confidence and goodwill of those with 
whom he has been brought in contact and his friends in this section of the state are 
legion. 



JOHN ANDERSON. 



John Anderson, county judge of Douglas county and one whose record upon the 
bench, characterized by strict fairness and impartiality, has won the support of the 
general public, was born in Sweden, October 31, 1863, a son of Andrew and Margaret 
E. (Astberg) Anderson. He acquired his elementary education in the schools of his 
native country and afterward became a student in the Lutheran Academy at Wahoo, 
Nebraska, having come to America in June, 1882, when a youth of nearly nineteen 
years. He started upon his business career as an employe of the Omaha Grant Smelt- 
ing Company, being there employed for two years. In August, 1885, he arrived in 
Colorado, making his way first to Denver, and in 1886 removed to Douglas county, 
where for ten years he was superintendent of stone quarries for different concerns, 
acting in that capacity until called to the office of sheriff of Douglas county by 
election in 1908. He made an excellent record and was reelected in 1910, serving in 
that position until 1912, when he was elected on the democratic ticket to the office of 
county judge. He was always a stanch supporter of democratic principles but when 
elected county judge made nonpartisan appointments, which was not according to 
party rule, and hence he was not again nominated by the democrats for the office. At 
the close of his term in 1916. however, he became a candidate for reelection on an 
independent ticket, making the run against botli republican and democratic candidates, 
and winning the election by a good majority — a fact which indicates that the public 
is satisfied with the equity and impartiality of his rulings. As judge of Douglas county 
he represents all of the people and does not show any political preference and in 
consequence the old party organization did not support him. but public opinion 
endorsed his course. He has also been secretary of the school board for nine years 
and the cause of education finds in him a stalwart champion. He continues a factor in 
business circles as one of the stockholders in the First National Bank of Castle Rock. 

In 1886 Judge Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Augusta Oberg, who was 
born in Sweden, and they have become parents of five children. Edgar T., who was 
born March 16, 1887, was graduated from the high school and spent three years in the 
State University at Boulder, after which he devoted one year to the study of law. 
He attended the second officers training camp at Fort Sheridan, near Chicago, and 
received a commission as second lieutenant. He then went to France, attending tlie 
French artillery school at Samour and now holds the rank of first lieutenant in 
the field artillery, having been engaged in active duty with the Stars and Stripes on 
the battlefields of the western front. Richard E., born October 21, 1888, was graduated 
from high school, spent a year in the Colorado College at Colorado Springs and four 
years in the West Point Military Academy, from which he was graduated with the 
class of 1912. He is now a lieutenant-colonel in the field artillery in France. He 
married Anne White Glover, of New York city, and has one child, Cornelia Livingston. 
Alice Elizabeth, the next of the family, was born March 21, 1890, attended the high 



270 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

school for three years and is the wife of Leonard Ellis, a ranchman residing at Edge- 
mont, South Dakota, and they have one child, John Leonard. Agnes S., born July 
26, 1892, is a graduate of the high school, of the Woman's College at Denver and also 
of the Greeley Normal School, and is now successfully teaching in South Dakota. 
Robert A., born February 15. 1904, is a high school pupil at Castle Rock. 

Judge Anderson and his family have made their home at Castle Rock since 1890, 
occupying a substantial residence which he owns. He belongs to the Odd Fellows 
Lodge, No. 139, also to the Court of Honor, No. 1109, at Castle Rock and is a highly 
esteemed representative of those organizations. A man of genuine personal worth, 
of a high sense of honor in office and of marked fidelity in citizenship, he is today 
numbered among the most valued and representative residents of his section of the 
state. 



HON. EBEN E. HUGHES. 



Hon. Eben E. Hughes, actively and prominently identified with the agricultural 
development of Elbert county, was born at Llanelly, South Wales, on the 18th of June, 
1868, a son of Richard and Sarah Hughes. The father was a brilliant minister of the 
Presbyterian faith who came to America in 1870, when his son Eben was but two years 
of age. The paternal grandfather was connected with the noted church insurrection. 
Both father and grandfather were men ever ready to fight for the faith that was so 
dear to them and Richard Hughes came to this country like the Pilgrims of old for 
the religious liberty which in that period was still but a name in England. The 
grandfather of Eben E. Hughes in the maternal line served under the Duke of Wel- 
lington at the battle of Waterloo. After crossing the Atlantic in 1870 Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Hughes went first to Mankato, Minnesota, and in 1874 removed to Columbus 
Junction, Iowa. There the family prospered and the father became widely noted for 
the power of his eloquence. Both he and his wife lived to round out long and beau- 
tiful lives in the town of Columbus Junction, honored by all with whom they came "in 
contact. 

In 1890 Eben E. Hughes, then a young man of twenty-two years, removed to 
Colorado and on the 4th of June, 1891, was united in marriage to Miss Ellen E. 
Jones, of Denver, the wedding being celebrated in the little Welton Street Welsh church. 
Mrs. Hughes is one of the leading women of Elbert county and takes a deep interest 
in all that stands for the progress and development of her sex. To Mr. and Mrs. Hughes 
have been born the following named: Edward, who is now in the service of the gov- 
ernment at Colorado College; Walter, who is in France in the service of his country; 
Leila and Mary, two talented daughters, who have taken the places of their brothers 
on the farm and are thus doing a splendid work in releasing man power in order to 
aid in winning the war; and Ralph, who is the youngest of the family, and is also in 
Colorado College in the S. A. T. C. 

Eben E. Hughes has been active in the development of Elbert county since he 
removed to this district with his bride in 1891. Through the intervening years he has 
borne a helpful part in all that has pertained to its progress and upbuilding and his 
liberal education, his persuasive power and oratorical ability have been potent factors 
in educating the public along many lines of progress. In 1918 he was named as the 
republican candidate for legislative honors and was elected representative of his dis- 
trict comprising Arapahoe and Elbert counties. No one questions his fitness for the 
position nor his loyalty to any cause which he may espouse and he is widely recognized 
in Elbert county as a splendid type of American manhood and citizenship. 



WILLIAM LEWIS ARMSTRONG. 

Since 1908 William Lewis Armstrong has been a resident of Boulder, Colorado, 
where he is living largely retired, enjoying the fruits of former business activity, 
enterprise and judicious investment. He was born upon a farm in Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1844, being a son of William and Lucy Ann (Hickernell) Armstrong, 
who were likewise natives of the Keystone state. The former was a son of John 
Arinstrong, also born in Pennsylvania. William Armstrong was born in York county 
in 1816 and throughout the greater part of his active business career was a contracting 




HON. EBEN E. HUGHES 



272 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

builder of Pennsylvania, where he passed away in the year 1904, having for about 
four years survived his wife, who died in 1900. 

William Lewis Armstrong, whose name introduces this review, was reared upon 
the old homestead farm in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, early becoming familiar 
with the work of the fields from the time of the early spring planting until crops 
were harvested in the autumn. In the winter months he attended the country schools 
and then at the age of eighteen years, or in September, 1862. he enlisted in response 
to the call for troops to aid in the preservation of the Union, becoming a private of 
Company D, Eighty-third Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He was 
mustered out in May, 1S65, at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, after having participated in 
the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville. Gettysburg and many other 
hotly contested engagements of the war which led up to the final victory which 
crowned the Union arms. At Fredericksburg he was slightly wounded. Following 
his military experience, he went to the oil regions of Pennsylvania, where he remained 
until 1908, winning success through well directed business efforts and Investments. 
He has become interested in Oklahoma oil property and. moreover, is the president 
of the Mercantile Bank of Boulder, president of the Nederland State Bank, and a director 
of the Louisville (Col.) State Bank. He became a resident of Boulder in 1908 and 
through the intervening period has made his home in this city. 

On the 16th of February, 1870. in Crawford county, Pennsylvania. Mr. Armstrong 
was married to Miss Mary J. Wasson, a daughter of the late Harrison Wasson, a native 
of Pennsylvania, and to them was born a daughter, Hattie Mabel, who became the 
wife of Abram McCoy, of West Virginia, who died in 1907, leaving four children, 
namely: Lewis J., who is with the One Hundred and Fifteenth Engineers of the 
national army; Freda, who married Albert D. McArthur. of Idaho, and they have a 
son William Lewis, named in honor of his great-grandfather; Ernest; and Abram 
Armstrong McCoy. 

Mr. Armstrong belongs to the Boulder Club and to the Boulder Golf Club, while 
fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His 
religious faith is indicated in his membership in the First Presbyterian church of 
Boulder, of whicli lie is serving as a trustee. In politics lie has always been a stalwart 
republican and while in the east served for one term as county commissioner of 
Venango county, Pennsylvania, while since taking up his abode in Boulder his fellow 
citizens have twice chosen him to fill the office of mayor. He is now taking a very 
active part in Red Cross work and is doing everything in his power to sustain his 
country in its aim at world democracy. He is one of the most esteemed citizens of 
Boulder, interested at all times in the general progress of his city, the commonwealth 
and the country. 



FREDERICK A. WALD. 



Frederick A. Wald, as a member of the firm of Wald & Mosher, is one of the 
owners of The Oasis, a valuable ranch property in Elbert county, not far from Kutch, 
and is a recognized leader among the agriculturists and stock raisers of the state. 
He was born in New York city, October 12, 1862, a son of Fred and Louise Wald. both 
of whom were natives of New York. In 1869 they removed with their family to Bay 
City, Michigan, where the mother is still occupying the old home. 

Frederick A. Wald was a lad of about seven years at the time of the removal 
to the middle west, where he was reared and educated. He entered business life as an 
apprentice to a plumber and gas fitter and when fifteen years of age ran away from 
home in order that he might enlist in the Twenty-third United States Infantry Band, 
with which he served for five years. In that period he saw only border service. At 
the end of that time he returned home and entered railroading, to which occupation 
he devoted twenty-seven years of his life, spending much of that time with the Michi- 
gan Central, while later he was yardmaster with the Pere Marquette at Saginaw. 
Michigan. 

In 1906 Mr. Wald removed to Colorado for the benefit of his health and today he 
is as robust as ever. The bronchitis from which he had suffered in the east was 
entirely cured in this climate. With his arrival in Colorado Mr. Wald began rail- 
roading at La Junta and later he entered into a partnership with J. B. Mosher and 
purchased eight hundred acres of land in Elbert county near Kutch. The firm is 
engaged in raising registered Hampshires that command notably large prices. They 
now have forty-five head of blooded Hampshires upon their place and also fifty head of 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 273 

pedigreed shorthorns. The Fort Collins Agricultural College has made a special record 
of the blue ribbon won by the firm with one of its Hampshires at the county fair 
held in Kutch in 1917. The firm owns one hog which cost them at the time of the 
purchase a dollar per pound. Their ranch is known as The Oasis and includes four 
hundred acres of land under cultivation, with fine fruit trees and shade trees. The 
barn is one of the largest and best equipped in the county. Not only have they been 
very successful in stock raising, but have made equal progress in crop production. 
They have raised eight hundred pounds of beans to the acre, fifty bushels of corn, 
twenty-seven and twenty-eight bushels of rye— all this in a dry country. They have 
studied the best methods of tilling the soil and developing the crops and thoroughly 
understand existing conditions, so that their labors produce the best possible results. 
Their activities have constituted a standard which others have followed and the 
members of the firm rank with the most prominent and progressive agriculturists and 
stock raisers of the state. 

Mr. Wald was married in 1887 to Katherine Enright and their children were: 
Palmer, who has enlisted for service with the colors in France; and Laverne, who is 
private secretary to the secretary of state of Michigan. Mrs. Wald died in 1898 and 
on September 16, 1901. Mr. Wald was united In marriage to Margaret Fee French, of 
Saginaw, Michigan. 

Mr. Wald is very prominent in political circles and is a single-tax man. He is 
perhaps the best posted resident of the county on economic topics of the day. He 
possesses a fine library and is a student of the best literature, keeping in touch with 
the trend of thought in past ages as well as with the questions of interest of the 
present. Mrs. Wald is the secretary of School District No. 6, which includes twenty- 
one schools, and is a stalwart champion of the cause of public education. In fact she 
and her husband stand for progress and improvement along all lines which tend to 
promote the material, intellectual, social and moral progress of community and 
commonwealth. 



UPTON T. SMITH. 

Upton i". Smith, at one time treasurer of Douglas county and a well known and 
honored citizen of Castle Rock, was born in Monroe, Waldo county, Maine, September 
22. 1843, a son of Gustavus Watson and Rosilla (Pattee) Smith. The paternal grand- 
father. Daniel Smith, who it is thought was born in New Hampshire, settled in Waldo 
county, Maine, about 1800 and there Gustavus W. Smith was born and reared. Later 
he became a prominent citizen of the town of Monroe, where he served as selectman. 
His fellow townsmen would have elected him to the legislature but he refused to accept 
the nomination. When his son, Upton T. Smith, was thirteen years of age the father, 
having married a second time, removed to another county. 

It was then that Upton T. Smith went to make his home with a cousin, with whom 
he remained for about four years, during which period he attended the country 
schools and also spent one term as a pupil in the academy at Newburgh, Maine. He 
afterward occupied the position of messenger for the high sheriff of Penobscot county 
for a year. In May. 1861, when a youth of but seventeen years, he responded to the 
first call of the country for troops to serve for three months in the Civil war. He 
enlisted but the company was not accepted under that call. On the 2Sth of the same 
month he enlisted again, becoming a member of Company H, Sixth Maine Infantry, 
which was assigned to the Army of the Potomac. He participated in the engagements 
of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Cold Harbor, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Rappahannock 
Station, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and various skirmishes. He was always at the 
front on active duty but was never wounded or captured. After three years of faith- 
ful service he was honorably discharged at Portland, Maine, and returned to Levant, 
that state, where his father was living. 

The sheriff of Bangor, Maine, appointed Mr. Smith to the office of deputy. After 
three months, feeling the need of a better education, he attended the academy at 
Searsport and a year later became a student in Eastman's Business College at Pough- 
keepsie, New York, from which he was graduated in April, 1867. He then taught 
school for one term at Saddle River, Bergen county. New Jersey, and subsequently 
went to New York city, where he was employed for a year by the Brooklyn City 
Railway Company in the capacity of conductor. 

It was while there that Mr. Smith met Parker N. Savage, who was the owner of 
mining properties in Colorado, and Mr. Smith accompanied him to the west, arriving 

Vol. IV— 18 



274 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

at Central City on the 1st of March, 1869, having made the journey by stage from 
Cheyenne. He then engaged in prospecting but was not successful. In September, 
with a brother, who had recently come from Maine, and with Newton S. Grout, Mr. 
Smith set out on a surveying expedition. In the tall of 1869 he entered a quarter 
section of land on section 26, township 8. range 68 west, and there developed and im- 
proved a farm, to which he afterward added, so that his place comprised five hundred 
and twenty acres in all. 

In 1872 Mr. Smith returned to Maine and in the town of Monroe, on the 8th of 
November, was married to Miss Sarah E. Grout, who was born in Jackson township, 
Waldo county, Maine, a daughter of Robert C. and Elizabeth (Stowers) Grout. Four 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith. Hattie Avis, born upon the home farm 
November 2. 1873, became the wife of Thomas Hall, who passed away on February 12, 
1911. To this union were born seven children as follows: James Ross, Murray Doug- 
las, George Edwin, John Pringle, Wallace Treat, Elizabeth Isabelle and Guy Monroe. 
Her second union was with George F. Short, of the Cripple Creek district and to 
them was born Rose Ella. Edwin W., head of the commercial department of the North 
Side high school of Denver, the second of the family, was born February 19. 1878, and 
married Zelma Woods, of Fort Collins. Guy W., born October 7, 18S5, was graduated 
from the State University of Boulder and pursued a post graduate course in the State 
University of Illinois at Champaign, where he won the Ph. D. degree. He is now a 
teacher of higher mathematics in the State University of Kentucky at Lexington. 
Roger Putnam, born October 3, 1887, and a direct descendant of Israel Putnam of 
Revolutionary war fame, was graduated from the high school of Castle Rock and 
from the Agricultural College at Fort Collins and is now private clerk and stenographer 
to the chief of police of Denver. He married Elizabeth Thompson, of Denver. 

Mr. Smith cast his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln in 1864 and has 
continued a stanch republican to the present time. He was elected treasurer of 
Douglas county and continued to fill that office for seven years. During his term of 
office he assisted in organizing and became vice president of the First National Bank 
of Castle Rock, and soon after retiring as county treasurer helped in founding the 
Peoples Bank of Castle Rock of which he was chosen president. Owing to the un- 
faithfulness of a cashier the bank proved only a partial success and after about two 
■years was absorbed by the First National Bank of Douglas county. Although he now 
lives largely retired, he is still doing some business in the field of real estate and also 
looking after some property for others. He is a stockholder and one of the directors 
of a county newspaper called the Record-Journal. In Grand Army circles he has been a 
very prominent figure. He was a member of Blunt Post, No. 65, G. A. R., of which 
he was the first commander, occupying that position for two terms. He is now 
commander of Post No. 65 and is also a member of the Odd Fellows lodge of Castle 
Rock. While he was in the army he sent ten dollars of his pay home each month to 
his father and this was returned to him when he resumed his education, being used 
to meet the expenses of his college course. The thorough educational training which 
he received constituted the basis of his success in life. His has been a most useful, 
active and honorable career, winning for him the respect and confidence of all with 
whom he has been associated, and in public affairs he has been as true and loyal to 
the welfare of his country as when he followed the nation's starry banner on the 
battlefields of the south. 



FRANK J. SCHMID. 

Frank J. Schmid, a farmer of Elbert county, was born in Germany in 1878, a son 
of John and Annie (Miller) Schmid. He came to this country with his mother when 
six years of age to join the husband and father, who had crossed the Atlantic two 
years before. The family home was established in Kansas City and after acquiring 
a limited education Frank J. Schmid started out in business life by working on the 
railroad, cleaning engines and assisting in other tasks in the roundhouse. He later 
became connected with the brick business at several places, working at different times 
in Trinidad and Pueblo, Colorado. He continued to work on the brick press for four 
years and in Pueblo was employed by the Standard Brick Company for five years. 
On the expiration of that period he returned to Trinidad in 1897 and in 1904 came to 
his present place which is situated on section 6. township 12, range 59, and he also 
owns a quarter of section 60. He lived in a sod house that is still in existence. He 
had to encounter many of the hardships which are conditions of pioneer life. When 




FRANK J. SCHMID 



276 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

he arrived in this section the county was yet in an undeveloped state. On the prairies 
there were only cattle and sheep; little of the land was cultivated, and many believed 
that it was not possible to raise crops in the district. His financial resources were 
limited at the time of his arrival, but he had a team and wagon, harness, a cow and 
calf and twenty-five dollars in money. During the first year he could only plant a 
small tract of about twenty acres, but at the present time he has about one hundred 
and sixty acres under cultivation. At different periods he found it necessary to go out 
to work in order to earn a little ready money. He has seen the time when he did 
not have a pair of shoes to wear and when there was no food in the house. One time 
he traveled twenty-eight miles to a store to see if the people would let him have some 
provisions for himself and his wife until he was in a position to pay for them. The 
storekeeper refused him credit. The next day he went about the same distance and 
received the same answer from another merchant. The third day, however, he was 
very lucky, for he made a call on two brothers of the name of Keysor, who conducted 
a little store a few miles away, and they extended to him the credit which he required. 
As time passed he proved up on his property, was able to meet all of his indebtedness 
and he increased his original holdings until now four hundred and ten acres are 
within the boundaries of his farm. In 1912 he built a nice home and he has all 
modern improvements upon his place. A very substantial measure of success has 
attended his efforts during the past few years and he is now very profitably carrying 
on general farming, although he raises cattle to some extent. 

In 1903 Mr. Schmid was married to Miss Mary E. Miller, a daughter of Phillip 
and Annie (Mills) Miller and a native of Kentucky. They are members of the Metho- 
dist church and Mr. Schmid gives his political allegiance to the democratic party. 
He is very much interested in astronomy and is ambitious to be able to give more 
of his time to the study of that science. While born in Germany, he is thoroughly 
American in spirit, interest and loyalty and he and his wife have been active sup- 
porters of the Liberty Loan and all movements that will promote the safety and wel- 
fare of the American boys at the front. He is a genial gentleman, kindly and courteous 
in manner, and his sterling worth and ability are recognized by all. 



A. J. FYNN, Ph. D. 



Dr. A. J. Fynn. of Denver, educator, author, lecturer and musical composer, is 
well known throughout the entire country, particularly by reason of his contribution 
to the literature concerning the American Indian. Dr. Fynn was born on a farm in 
Herkimer county. New York, a son of Michael and Mary (Barnes) Fynn. The father 
was a native of Ireland and came to America in early life, settling in the state of 
New York, where he was engaged in various lines of business until the Civil war, when 
he volunteered for service, enlisting in the One Hundred and Twenty-first New Y'ork 
Regiment of Infantry, in July, 1863, and losing his life during the engagement at 
Y'orktown in the following November. His wife was born in Connecticut, and died in 
Salisbury, New Y'ork, in 1908. They had a family of four children, those still living 
being A. J.. Hiram A. and Phebe H., the two brothers being residents of Denver. 

Dr. A. J. Fynn began his education in the rural schools of his native county and 
afterwards attended Fairfield Seminary. He was graduated on the completion of a 
preparatory course in 187S and later entered Tufts College of Massachusetts, from 
which he was graduated with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1884. In 1S87 he won 
the Master of Arts degree from the same institution, and received his Doctor of 
Philosophy degree from the University of Colorado in 1899. In 1914 Denver Univer- 
sity conferred upon him the honorary degree of Doctor of Literature. 

After winning his Bachelor of Arts degree he resumed his educational work, having 
formerly taught in the rural schools and the union districts of his native state. Tie 
also spent one year as instructor in Fairfield Seminary. In 1S89 he came to Colorado, 
and was elected principal of the Central City high school. He was afterward superin- 
tendent of schools in Alamosa, and later became a member of the faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Colorado at Boulder, teaching and attending lectures at the same time. 
On leaving that institution he removed to Denver in 1S99 and has since had the super- 
vision of three different schools of the city. In 1915 he became principal of the Gilpin 
school, which is regarded as one of the most excellent and thorough of the public 
educational institutions of the state. In addition to this, for several years he has been 
connected with the extension work of Denver University as professor of anthropology 
and literature, and is constantly in demand as a lecturer on these subjects. Another 




DR. A. J. FYNN 



278 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

branch of his educational work is that of Normal Institute conductor. Dr. Fynn thinks 
that the aim of modern American education should be, first, to make the child appre- 
ciate his own country through careful study of its language, literature, history, gov- 
ernment and social institutions, and, second, lo develop the child in the direction of 
his natural aptitudes so that he may become an efficient citizen. 

A lifelong student, Dr. Fynn has constantly extended his researches and investi- 
gations into various fields, and he is the author and publisher of several works not only 
of high literary but also of scientific merit. Of his volume entitled "The American 
Indian as a Product of Environment" the Boston Transcript said: "Perhaps no other 
book gives in small compass a truer idea of the Indian and his life." The Washington 
Star stated that "The final chapter, in which is found Dr. Fynn's conclusions as to the 
facts he has observed and assimilated, is convincing in its breadth of view and calm- 
ness of judgment." The Review of Reviews said: "While Dr. Fynn's work has especial 
reference to the Pueblo Indians of the Southwest, his chapters contain many sugges- 
tions which have force as related to the study of other Indian tribes. There is no 
attempt at technical discussion, but all of Dr. Fynn's comments are of interest to the 
general reader as well as to the student of anthropology." Equally favorable com- 
ments were made by the press in all sections of the country. 

Dr. Fynn has also written the words and composed the music for a number of 
popular songs, including "The Mohawk," which is said to reproduce in music the emo- 
tions produced by the fascinating landscape of the Mohawk valley. He is also the 
writer of the song, "Where the Columbines Grow," which has been adopted by the 
Colorado Legislature as the official state song, the spirit of the great romantic West 
being suggested in its every line of verse and every strain of music. His latest 
production is entitled, "Brother Jonathan Leaves Home," a patriotic song, voicing 
the spirit of the recent war. 

Dr. Fynn was married in August, 1902, to Miss Mary McDonald, of Woodville. 
New York, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John McDonald. 

Fraternally, he is a prominent Knight Templar Mason; in politics is a republi- 
can; and in religious faith a Universalist. He has held the presidency of the Denver 
Teachers' Club and of the Philosophical Society, and has been for years chairman of 
the educational committee of the Denver Civic and Commercial Association. He 
is a member of the Colorado Schoolmasters' Club, a director and the treasurer of the 
State Historical and Natural History Society, and a life member of the Archeological 
Institute of America. He has made valuable contributions to the sum total of human 
knowledge and with definite purpose his labors and investigations are carried forward 
to the accomplishment of a given end. 



MRS. MYRTLE CRAWFORD. 



Mrs. Myrtle Crawford is the superintendent of the schools of Washington county 
and makes her home in Otis, where her husband John H. Crawford, is engaged in 
business as a druggist. They are well known and highly esteemed people of the 
town. Mrs. Crawford was born in Maryville, Missouri, a daughter of Alvin S. Charles, 
a native of Illinois, who removed to Missouri and was for many years engaged in 
merchandising at Maryville. His last days were spent in St. Joseph, that state, where 
he passed away in 1911. He was a veteran of the Civil war, having served throughout 
the entire period of hostilities between the north and the south as a defender of the 
Union cause. His religious faith was that of the Methodist Episcopal church, to 
which he always loyally adhered. In early manhood he wedded Fannie E. Davis, a 
native of Kentucky, who survives and is now living with her daughter, Mrs. Crawford. 
In the family were three sons and four daughters, but two of the sons have now 
passed away. The surviving son, Virgil N. Charles, is a first lieutenant at Camp Bowie, 
Fort Worth, Texas. 

Mrs. Crawford was educated in the public schools of Maryville, passing through 
consecutive grades to her graduation from the high school; and in the Maryville 
Seminary, in which she pursued a classical course. She afterward entered the Colorado 
State Teachers College at Greeley, where she won the degree of Bachelor of Pedagogy. 
Taking up the profession of teaching, she soon proved her ability to impart clearly 
and readily to others the knowledge which she had acquired and for five years she 
successfully engaged in teaching school in Otis, becoming principal of the school. 
In November. 1918, she was elected superintendent of the public schools of Washing- 
ton county and is now occupying that position. She is carefully studying the con- 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 279 

ditions of the school system of the county and is doing everything in her power to 
inaugurate new and improved methods which shall be for the benefit of the school 
system. 

In 1903 Myrtle Charles became the wife of John H. Crawford, of Graham, Missouri, 
who is now engaged in the drug business in Otis, having a well appointed stcre. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Masons and the Odd Fellows and is a faithful 
follower of the teachings of these organizations. To Mr. and Mrs. Crawford have been 
born two children: Marceline, fourteen years of age; and William Edward, a youth 
of eleven years. The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church 
and in its work they take an active and helpful interest, Mrs. Crawford now serving 
as superintendent of the Sunday school. They have a nice home in Otis which is 
the abode of warm-hearted hospitality and is the center of a cultured society circle. 



GEORGE W. FOOTE. 



George W. Foote, who is now living largely retired in Loveland, Larimer county, 
Colorado, although he yet serves as president of the Larimer County Bank & Trust 
Company, has in many ways made valuable contributions toward development and up- 
building in his part of the state. Foremost among the lines of activity with which he 
was connected were cattle interests, in which business he was a leader, and later he 
also was for a number of years very successful in the livery business, maintaining 
stage lines while so engaged. Through his efforts high standards of cattle breeding 
were introduced into his county and he thereby built up not only a most prosperous 
individual business but set a valuable example for others to follow. For over forty 
years he has now been a resident of Larimer county, having come here in 1874, so that 
he is numbered among the honored pioneers of his section. 

Born in Mill Creek Hundred (New Castle county), Delaware. November 23, 1842, 
Mr. Foote is a son of William and Susan (Faulk) Foote, natives of New Castle county, 
that state. The father was an agriculturist by occupation and passed his entire life 
upon the farm on whicli he was born but he died at liis summer home at New Garden, 
Pennsylvania, at the venerable age of eighty-five years. Tlie paternal grandfather of 
our subject was William Foote. Sr., who was a prosperous cooper and also gave some 
attention to agriculture in Delaware, while the maternal grandfather, John Faulk, a 
lifelong resident of that state, was a miller. William Foote was recognized as one of 
the most enterprising agriculturists of his county, introducing many efficient methods 
and new ideas along that line, and was also highly regarded as a citizen, for he was 
always progressive and public-spirited, readily giving his aid and support to measures 
which he recognized as of value to his community. Politically he was an adherent of 
the whig party. His wife also attained a ripe old age, passing away after having com- 
pleted her eighty-seventh year. 

George W. Foote was reared upon his father's farm, acquiring such education as 
the earlier schools of Newcastle county. Delaware, alTorded. and after laying aside his 
textbooks he remained with his parents until he reached the age of twenty years. In 
the meantime having heard favorable reports in regard to the excellent opportunities 
presented in the then far west, he decided to follow Horace Greeley's advice and in 
1874 came to Colorado, locating at that time in Greeley, where he remained for about 
six years. During this period he bought and successfully operated a stage line be- 
tween Greeley and Namaqua continuing thus for five years. He then sold out and in 
1881 came to Loveland, Colorado, where he became associated with a Mr. Stoddard in 
the livery and sales stable business. This partnership was maintained for twenty-two 
years to the mutual benefit of both of the parties concerned and at the end of that 
period Mr. Foote disposed of his interests. In 1S78, or forty years ago, Mr. Foote ac- 
quired title to land near Loveland and in 1887 he thereon erected a handsome residence. 
Following in the footsteps of his progressive father, he soon derived a gratifying 
income from his original tract, which enabled him to acquire more land as the years 
passed until he now owns twenty-seven hundred and twenty acres, three hundred and 
twenty of which are located in Weld county, while the remainder is in Larimer county. 
Mr. Foote engaged in the raising of pure bred cattle, acquiring a fine herd of Galloways. 
He built up an excellent and profitable business along this line, being recognized as 
one of the foremost cattle breeders within the state. Moreover, he also turned to 
feeding cattle and derived a gratifying addition to his income from this source. Among 
his holdings were one hundred and sixty acres, located where the sugar factory now 
stands and which he sold to that concern at a considerable advance. A great deal of 




GEORGE W. FOOTE 



282 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

his land he rents but he is still engaged in the cattle business although he has largely 
retired from the active work, now giving his attention chiefly to the managing and 
financial end of his affairs. In 1894 Mr. Foote became interested in banking, being 
elected vice president of the Larimer County Bank & Trust Company, while seven years 
later, or in 1901, he was elected to the chief executive position, that of president. As 
such he has since served to the great advantage of the institution over which he pre- 
sides, which is conducted along proven and conservative methods, having attained a 
reputation as one of the best banks of this part of the state. At the same time pro- 
gressive ideas are followed in its management, for the officers of the bank are ever 
ready to extend credit where financial aid is needed in order to promote new enter- 
prises or make possible important business deals which result in the upbuilding and 
development of the region. The policy of the bank is largely laid down by Mr. Foote, 
who has not only an intimate knowledge of local conditions but has also acquired a 
business insight which has made him a most trustworthy as well as experienced banker. 
While engaged in the livery business Mr. Foote operated a stage line from Loveland to 
Estes Park, continuing in that business for seven years, and being very successful in 
that enterprise. 

Before his migration to the west George W. Foote was united in marriage to Sarah 
A. Woodward, the ceremony being performed in the east in 1869. To this union were 
born two children: James Lindsey. a resident of Los Angeles, California; and Anna 
J., deceased. Mrs. Foote passed away in 1893 and in 1894 Mr. Foote wedded Delia E. 
Weaver, of Muscotah, Atchison county, Kansas, a daughter of Conrad and Sarah 
(Hershman) Weaver, the former a native of Germany and tlie latter of Ohio. The 
father was a successful farmer and in the early days of the history of the state w-ent 
to Kansas, locating near Muscotah. where he purchased land. This tract he improved, 
making it a valuable property, and has operated the same to the present time, his wife 
also surviving. The father was but seven years of age when he was brought to 
America and during the confiict between the north and south took up the banner of 
the Union, fighting during the last year of that struggle in order to preserve the Union 
under one flag. To the second marriage of Mr. Foote were born three children: Lester 
G., a successful agriculturist, who resides north of Loveland; Edna D.. who is attend- 
ing school; and Albert W., who passed away in May, 1908, at the age of six years. 

The family stand high in their community, being numbered among the most 
prominent people of the neighborhood, both Mr. and Mrs. Foote often entertaining their 
many friends in their beautiful and hospitable home. They have ever been deeply in- 
terested in uplift and progress along intellectual as well as moral lines and have ever 
given their help to worthy public enterprises. Their beautiful and modern home is 
located at No. 343 East Fifth Street, in Loveland. The Foote family is distinctively 
American and is very prominently connected in the east and middle west, being blood 
kin to some of the famous men and women of the past century, among them Harriet 
Beecher Stowe. of Uncle Tom's Cabin fame, and the famous Brooklyn preacher, Henry 
Ward Beecher. Mr. Foote of this review is fully upholding the traditions connected 
with the family name, being now numbered among the most successful as well as pros- 
perous men of his district and also being a representative of the highest type of 
American citizenship. His political affiliation is with the republican party but he has 
never desired office. Fraternally he belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. Mrs. Foote is a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the work 
of which she is helpfully interested. Both enjoy the highest regard and respect of all 
who know them, having throughout their lives contributed toward the elevation of 
standards that affect living conditions here, by furthering those ideals which perfect 
human conduct and action. 



LEONARD A. SWEET. 



With the ever increasing demand for automobile housing in the city of Denver new- 
garages for this purpose have been established from time to time and many of these 
in recent years have built up a business of extensive proportions not only in housing 
cars but in making repairs and furnishing supplies. The Denver Garage, owned by 
Leonard A. Sweet, is perhaps one of the best managed and most conveniently located in 
the city and is patronized by many of the downtown business men and bankers of 
Denver. It has grown in popularity ever since the day that it was opened and its patron- 
age is now extensive. 

Mr. Sweet, the proprietor, was born in Independence. Iowa, May 1, 1876, a son of 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 283 

Anson C. and Ida (Blood) Sweet, the former born in the state of New York and the 
latter in the state of Wisconsin. The father removed to Iowa in early life and on leav- 
ing that state established his home in Colorado Springs, Colorado, where he engaged 
in the dry goods business for a considerable period. In later years, however, he has 
lived a retired life and is now making his home in Independence, Iowa, at the age of 
seventy-nine years. He has, however, retained all of his interest in Colorado, where 
the mother of Leonard A. Sweet, still makes her home. They had a family of three 
children, of whom one died in infancy. A brother, H. B. Sweet, is a resident of Sidney, 
Nebraska, and is proprietor of the Sidney Motor Company. 

The eldest of the family is Leonard A. Sweet of this review, who after completing 
a high school education at Independence, Iowa, came to Denver in the latter part of 
the 1,1st decade of the nineteenth century. Here he entered the internal revenue depart- 
ment as cashier and remained a trusted government employe for twenty years. At 
the end of that period he started to engage in business on his own account and in 1917 
established the Denver Garage at Nos. 1437-39 California street. This is in the very 
heart of the downtown shopping district of Denver and since the day the garage was 
opened it has proven a profitable business venture and is today one of the most popular 
establishments of the kind in the city. Mr. Sweet also maintains a repair department 
and carries a full line of accessories. He is now negotiating to handle a new car that 
will be on the market in a short time. 

For a few months while holding his government position in connection with the 
interna) revenue department Mr. Sweet acted as assessor, by appointment, of Arapahoe 
county, but aside from this has never held public office and has always voted independ- 
ently. 

On the 6th of June, 1916, Mr. Sweet was married to Mrs. Helen Thomas, the widow 
of Harry Thomas, of Denver, who by her former marriage had a daughter, Charlotte 
Thomas, born in Denver. While a native of Iowa, Mr. Sweet has spent almost his entire 
life in Denver and while he has never sought to figure prominently in public connections 
he has become well known in the city and his fidelity to duty while in the government 
service as well as his enterprise in business circles have gained for him a creditable 
position in the regard of his fellow townsmen. 



LAFAYETTE MILLER. 

Lafayette Miller, who departed this life in 1888, was one of the pioneer settlers 
of Colorado who contributed in substantial measure to the early development of the 
state and aided in laying broad and deep the foundation upon which has been built 
the present progress and prosperity of the commonwealth. The town of Lafayette 
was named in his honor, as he was once the owner of the land upon which it stands, 
having secured the tract as a homestead from the government. 

Mr. Miller was born in Toulon. Illinois, March 18, 1840, a son of John and Mary 
Ann (Able) Miller, whQ were natives of New Jersey and after living for some time in 
Illinois removed to Linn county, Iowa, where they settled upon a farm, which they 
made their abiding place throughout their remaining days. 

Lafayette Miller was reared and educated in Iowa, and having arrived at years 
of maturity, was married there in 1S62 to Miss Mary E* Foot, a native of the state 
of New York and a daughter of John B. and Sallie (Cole) Foot, the former a native 
of Massachusetts, while the latter was born in the Empire state. They removed to 
Michigan in 1852 and in 1858 became residents of Iowa, settling upon a farm, where 
they made their home until 1868, when they came to Colorado and established their 
residence in Boulder county. Again the father secured a tract of land, which he con- 
verted into a productive farm, he and his wife living upon that place until they were 
called to the home beyond. They had a family of ten children, but only two of the 
number now survive. 

Following his marriage in 1862, Lafayette Miller, accompanied by his bride, started 
across the plains with ox team and wagon and after traveling for about three months 
they reached their destination. They located on a farm in Boulder county, where he 
built a log cabin, the roof covering being hay and dirt. He secured a homestead of 
eighty acres and later he purchased an improved farm, while subsequently he took up 
his abode on Rock creek. There he conducted a stage tavern and resided at that place 
until 1870, when he purchased the land on which the village of Lafayette now stands. 
The town was founded by his widow, who named it in honor of her husband. Mr. Miller 
led an active, busy and useful life and his labors contributed in marked measure to 



284 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the substantial development and upbuilding of the district in which he made hia 
home. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Miller were born six children: Thomas J. and Charles L., both 
deceased: George I., who resides upon the home farm; Frank S., also deceased; James 
P., who is now an attorney, successfully engaged in the practice of law at Houston, 
Texas; and Amelia A., who has departed this life. There are six grandchildren. 

The family circle was again broken by the hand of death when in 1888 Mr. Miller 
was called to his final rest. He left behind him many friends, as well as his imme- 
diate family, who mourned the loss of a devoted huband and father, one who was 
always anxious to put forth every possible effort if it would advance the welfare and 
happiness of the members of his household. Mr. Miller always took an active part in 
politics and was a stanch supporter of democracy. Fraternally he was connected with 
the Masons and the Odd Fellows and was a loyal adherent of the teachings of those 
organizations. 

Mrs. Miller has been very active in temperance work and has been an equally 
effective worker in behalf of the schools, serving for eight years on the school board. 
She is a member of the Episcopal church and is most earnest in the work thereof. In 
fact her aid and influence are always given on the side of right, progress, truth, reform 
and improvement and her efforts have been productive of splendid results along those 
lines. She now owns and occupies a fine residence in the village of La-fayette and 
she is one of Colorado's honored pioneer women, having for fifty-six years 
within the borders of the state. 



EDWARD W. ROBINSON. 



Edward W. Robinson, lumber and coal merchant of Denver and one of the repre- 
sentative business men and manufacturers of the city, was born in Waterloo, Lower 
Canada, now the province of Quebec, August 4, 1858, a son of Rev. George C. and 
Harriet J. (Whitten) Robinson. The mother was a native of Ireland, whence she 
made her way to Canada in early life. The father was born in Waterloo, Lower 
Canada, his parents having removed there from Vermont. He was a very faithful and 
highly esteemed clergyman of the Church of England in Canada. He died in Aylmer, 
Quebec, Canada in 1882, since which time Mrs. Robinson has come to Denver, where 
she makes her home. They were the parents of nine children, of whom three are still 
living: Harriet S., Harold F. and Edward W., all residents of Denver. 

Edward W. Robinson attended public school in different places in Canada and high 
school at Montreal. He was then employed in various ways, working some time in a 
general store. In 18S4 he went to Florida, settling at Orlando, where he was em- 
ployed in a hardware store for a short time. He then went to Davenport, Thayer* 
county, Nebraska, where he started in the lumber and coal business on his own ac- 
count, which business he successfully conducted for eight years, also having branch 
yards at Shickley and Oak, Nebraska, a part of this time. 

Mr. Robinson settled in Denver in 1892 buying out the Cone Lumber and Coal 
Company. He has since established a large woodworking mill which is thoroughly 
equipped with the latest improved machinery for doing all kinds of wood work. His 
motto is "Good Service." 

On the 1st of March, 1892, Mr. Robinson was married to Miss Emma J. Bishop, 
of Ottawa, Canada, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Bishop, of that city. They 
have become the parents of three children. The eldest. Norah L., now Mrs. A. E. 
Moody, born in Denver in 1893, graduated from Miss Wolcott's School of Denver and 
Wellesley College of Massachusetts and is the wife of Lieutenant A. E. Moody, of 
Golden, Colorado, who is a graduate of the Massachusetts School of Technology and is 
now in France, a first lieutenant in the Coast Artillery and an aerial observer. Se- 
leucia, born in Denver in 1895, is also a graduate of Miss Wolcott's School and of Dana 
Hall, Wellesley. George Sidney, born in Denver in 1897, is a graduate of Colorado 
College. He enlisted as a flyer in aviation and has completed the ground school work 
at Berkeley, California, and the flying at Southern Field, Americus, Georgia. 

In politics Mr. Robinson is an independent democrat. He served on the park board 
of Denver, from 1912 until 1914, and assisted in starting Denver's beautiful system of 
mountain parks. Fraternally he is a member of the Masons, the Royal Arcanum and the 
Woodmen of the World. He also belongs to the Civic and Commercial Association of Den- 
ver, with which he has been identified for many years. He is likewise treasurer of the 
South Denver Community Young Men's Christian Association and is a director of the 



^^^^^ ■ ^^^ 


■ 


1^^^^^^^^^^ ^.Mtt>^^^^ 






i 



EDWARD W. ROBINSON 



286 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Mountain Club and a member of the State Historical and Natural History Society. 
His interests and activities, as thus indicated, are broad and varied, touching the 
general interests and welfare of society, while as a business man he has contributed 
to the commercial development of the city as well as he has promoted his individual 
fortunes. 



WALTER EUDEAN HOLT. 



Walter Eudean Holt is one of the extensive landowners of Elbert county, where 
he has made his home since 18S6, or for a period of almost a third of a century. He 
was born in Hardin county, Iowa. July 14, 1868, a son of John H. and Mary Jane Holt, 
both of whom were natives of Ohio and of English descent, while in the maternal line 
the ancestry in America is traced back to one of the early colonial families of Virginia. 

Walter E. Holt pursued his education in the schools of his native state and was 
a young man of eighteen years when he left the Mississippi valley and came to Colo- 
rado, where he has since resided. He located in Elbert county and as the years have 
passed has made for himself a most creditable position in its agricultural circles. He 
is now the owner of nine hundred and sixty acres of rich and valuable land, which 
he has brought to a high state of productivity. The methods which he employs in the 
cultivation of his farm are most progressive and resultant and his labors have been 
attended with excellent success. 

In 1895 Mr. Holt was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Housh, a daughter of 
Mrs. Mary Jane Housh Danneman and her first husband, Sydney Housh. The death 
of Mrs. Holt on October 7, 1917, was greatly mourned by a host of friends who had 
been cheered and assisted by her attentions in illness and who always looked to her 
as the leader in all of the women's farm movements of this section. She had exerted 
marked influence for progress in the community and her genuine worth was acknowl- 
edged by all. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Holt were born a daughter, Bertha, who is the wife of Norman 
H. Mcllhenney. a son of one of Elbert county's most noted public men and who is 
in the service of his country abroad; and a son. Jack, on July 20, 1899, who is there- 
fore nineteen years of age. He remains upon the farm with his father, whom he 
greatly assists by relieving him of much of the active work. Jack Holt is a likeable, 
pleasant mannered young chap, who takes up life's duties with a serious mind and stead- 
fast purpose and is full of youthful energy. 

Mr. Holt gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and in 1916 was 
elected to the oflice of county commissioner, in which capacity he is now serving. 
He has always been loyal to the best interests of the community and active in sup- 
port of valuable public measures but has never been a politician in the sense of 
office seeking. His farming interests have largely claimed his time and energy, and 
the results of his close application and intelligently directed efforts have been most 
gratifying. 



MICHAEL M. RINN. 



Prominent among the able members practicing at the Boulder bar is Michael M. 
Rinn, whose thoroughness combined with a natural gift of oratory has made him a 
strong advocate before the court, while his sound judgment is manifest in the wisdom 
of his counsel. He was born in Covington. Indiana, in 18S3, and is therefore yet a 
comparatively young man but already has made for himself a place in professional 
circles that many a one of twice his years might well envy. His father, Thomas M. 
Rinn, was born in County Kerry, Ireland, but in infancy was brought to the new 
world, the family home being established in Indiana, where he spent his remaining 
days, his death occurring in Covington, that state, in 1913. 

Michael M. Rinn passed his boyhood and youth in Covington and pursued his 
early education in the schools there. He afterward entered the University of Michigan, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1905 on the completion of a law course 
that brought to him the LL. B. degree. For a year thereafter he engaged in the prac- 
tice of law in Denver but in 1906 removed to Boulder, where he opened an office and 
has since followed his profession. He has made for himself a creditable position at 
the bar. He throws himself easily and naturally into the argument with a self- 








WALTER E. HOLT RANCH 



288 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

possession and a deliberation that indicate no straining after effect. The precision 
and clearness of his statement, the acuteness and strength of his argument indicate 
a mind trained in the severest school of investigation and to which the closest reason- 
ing has become habitual and easy. 

In Covington, Indiana, in 1914, Mr. Rinn was united in marriage to Miss Fauneil 
Hall and they are now the parents of a daughter, Alice Marie. Mr. Rinn is a director 
of the Citizens National Bank. His political allegiance is given to the democratic 
party and for five years he has filled the office of county attorney of Boulder county 
but has sought no political preferment outside the strict path of his profession. He 
belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, to the Phi Delta Phi fraternity 
and to the Sons of the American Revolution, being entitled to membership in that 
organization through his maternal ancestry. He stands for progress and improvement 
In all community affairs and has taken active part in advancing many interests which 
have been of great worth to the city in which he lives. 



COLOMAN JONAS. 



Coloman Jonas, prominent in the art of taxidermy and animal group mounting, 
having won international fame in this connection, and also a most successful furrier 
of Denver, has proof of his fine workmanship and ability in many large natural history 
museums in the country. He was born in Budapest, Hungary, February 18, 1879, 
a son of John and Julia (Szilady) Jonas, who were also natives of that country. The 
father was identified with the government postal service throughout the greater part 
of his active lite and is still living in Budapest, but the mother has passed away. In 
the family were twelve children, eight of whom survive. One of these was Louis Jonas, 
a brother of Coloman Jonas and until the declaration of war a partner in business 
with him. He enlisted in the national army as a member of the Engineering Corps 
and is now serving with the rank of sergeant in France. This young man is one of 
America's leading sculptors. He has made a speciaS study of animal life and has 
done some wonderful work in his art, making his studies from life. He was a student 
under Professor Proctor, the distinguished New York sculptor, and was for four years 
connected with the American Museum of Natural History in New York city. John 
Jonas, the second brother, has charge of a branch house in Livingston, Montana, and 
he, too, is well known as a taxidermist. A sister. Miss Zella Jonas, is also in business 
with her brother and has charge of the Denver fur department. Four of the family, 
Stephen, Laslo, Geza and Ethel Jonas, are still living in Budapest. Hungary. 

Mr. Jonas of this review was the third in order of birth in the family. He attended 
the public and high schools of his native country and afterward pursued special courses. 
Later he took up the study of animal life and of taxidermy under the direction of a 
firm in Budapest that had an international reputation. He continued to devote his 
time and thought to that work and remained with the firm for ten years, gaining 
broad and valuable experience. As he became more proficient in his art his fame in 
that connection spread and he believed that his experience justified his removal to 
America with the purpose of engaging in business on this side of the Atlantic. Ac- 
cordingly in February, 1905, he arrived in the United States and settled first at Col- 
orado Springs, where he remained in business for three years. He then removed to 
Denver in 1908 and has since won a reputation and built up a business that is one 
of the largest of the kind in the west. In 1917 he received orders for furs and for 
animal mounting from thirty-eight different states. He carries a very extensive line 
of fine furs of all kinds and at the same time the taxidermy department of his business 
is a most extensive and important one. Specimens of his splendid work in this con- 
nection are seen in some of the natural history museums of the country and there is 
no one who gets more lifelike results in the mounting of animals and birds than Mr. 
Jonas. 

On the 17th of June, 1912, Mr. Jonas was married to Esther (Balogh) Bordas, 
of Denver, the widow of Paul Bordas. She had two children by her first marriage 
who have since taken the name of Jonas. These are: Helen, born in Budapest in 
1902 and now attending the high school at Denver; and Joseph, born in Chicago, Illi- 
nois, in 1905, and also in school. There is one child of the second marriage, Esther, 
born in Denver in 1913. 

In politics Mr. Jonas maintains an independent course. Fraternally he Is con- 
nected with the Denver Lodge of Elks, No. 17. He belongs to the Civic and Commer- 
cial Association, also to the Manufacturers Association, the Kiwanis Club and to the 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 289 

Ad Club and he is an officer of the First Reformed church of Denver. He has never 
had occasion to regret his determination to try his fortune in the new world. He has 
here found excellent opportunities and a quick recognition of his superior skill and 
ability and as the years have passed he has built up a business of most extensive and 
gratifying porportions. Since he and his brother established their branch store in 
Montana E. A. Lockwood, of Idaho Falls, Idaho, made the statement that others would 
either have to improve their methods or go out of business, which indicates the care 
and painstaking methods of the firm, their enterprise and artistic work. They have 
ever held to the highest standards and ready recognition has come to them in their 
steadily increasing patronage. 



HARVEY STEWART. 



Among the venerable citizens of Jefferson county is Harvey Stewart, who from 
pioneer times has been familiar with the history of Colorado. He was in this state 
when there were only a few isolated mining camps, the work of progress and improve- 
ment having scarcely begun. In 1863 he became identified with farming interests 
independently and in 1880 acquired the property upon which he still resides. He has 
passed the eighty-third milestone on life's journey, his birth having occurred in 
Macoupin county, Illinois, December 31, 1835, his parents being Charles and Mary 
Stewart, natives of Virginia and North Carolina respectively. The paternal grand- 
father was of Scotch birth. The maternal grandfather was one of the heroes of the 
Revolutionary war. 

During his infancy Harvey Stewart was taken by his parents from Illinois to 
Missouri, the family home being established near Independence, in Jackson county, 
where he lived for twenty-three years. He came to Colorado in 1859 and made his way 
into the mining camps above Denver, arriving in that locality on the 28th of April. He 
purchased the second copy of the Rocky Mountain News, obtaining the paper while it 
was still wet from the press, but found nothing in it to interest him, e.xcept a hint of 
the discovery of the Blackhawk mine at Central City. Mr. Stewart then went to Cen- 
tral City and over to Spanish Bar, now Idaho Springs, where he worked through the 
summer, continuing there until November, when he returned to Denver and for two 
weeks sought in vain to obtain work. As he could find no employment he went back 
to Independence, Missouri, where for one year he engaged in teaching school. He then 
entered the Confederate army in the Raines Division and served until taken ill, when 
he was honorably discharged and sent home. He was detained by the authorities for 
a few days for being a Confederate, but after taking the oath of allegiance to the 
Federal government was released and in 1862 returned to Colorado, where he entered 
the employ of a Mr. Fisher at Fort Halleck, cutting hay for the government. He was 
thus employed during the first fall, after which he took up a homestead on Clear creek 
in 1863. There he engaged in farming for eighteen years. In 1880 he purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of land from George Yule and took up his abode upon that 
tract, which has since been his home, his time and attention through the intervening 
years being given to general agricultural pursuits. In fact he has engaged in farming 
in Colorado for a half century and more, and has contributed in no small measure to 
the agricultural development of the eastern section of the state. 

On the 1st of December. 1867, Mr. Stewart was united in marriage with Miss Mary 
Patrick, who was born in Andrew county. Missouri, March 23, 1846. She was educated 
in the public and high schools of Fillmore, Missouri, and when a young lady of sixteen 
years, came with her parents to Denver. She is a daughter of John and Sarah (Cloyd) 
Patrick, who were both natives of Missouri. In 1863, they came to Colorado, taking 
up their abode on a farm six miles below Denver. In 1865, they removed to a farm 
on Clear creek, in Arapahoe county, where they were numbered among the early set- 
tlers, and where they continued to reside until their demise, the father dying January 
11, 1874. He was born February 15, 1818. The mother died February 19, 186C. Her 
birth occurred August 29, 1823. To Mr. and Mrs. Stewart were born two daughters. 
Minnie Agnes, born January 28, 1869, is the wife of Alexander Ritchie, and they have 
a daughter, Lois Minnie. The second daughter, Sarah Gertrude Stewart, was born 
February 6, 1S71, and died July 6, 1909. She was educated in East Denver high school, 
later becoming a student at Denver University, from which she graduated, with honors, 
as a member of the class of 1904. In the fall, immediately following her graduation! 
she accepted the position of teacher of English in North Denver high school, continuing 
there for five years, and winning for herself high esteem in her chosen profession. 




HARVEY STEWART 




MRS. MARY STEWART 



292 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

While connected with this school she liad taken post-graduate courses at the University 
of Chicago, and also at the University of California. Her untimely death cut short a 
brilliant career as an educator, and brought deep sorrow to a wide circle of friends. 
In his political views Mr. Stewart has always been a democrat, giving stalwart 
support to the party, and be served for one term, about 1S96, as a member of the 
state legislature, but the honors and emoluments of office have had little attraction 
for him. However, he has always kept well informed on the questions and issues of 
the day and has ever been able to support his position by intelligent argument. He 
belongs to Highlands Lodge, No. 86, A. F. & A. M.. and is also identified with High- 
lands Commandery, No. 30, K. T. His religious faith is indicated by his membership 
in the Christian church. It will be observed that Mr. Stewart is one of the few remain- 
ing pioneers whose advent into the state dates back to 1859, and he is a living witness 
of the wonderful transformation which has taken place since that time, a transforma- 
tion in which he had an active part. His first journey to Colorado was made by wagon, 
over the old trail, and consumed many weeks in the making. Danger constantly lurked 
along the way, and many interesting incidents of the trip are recalled by him. Possessed 
of sterling traits of character and guiding his life by high and honorable principles, 
Mr. Stewart has ever commanded the respect and confidence of all with whom he has 
come in contact and his friends are many. 



JOHN POLLOCK. 



John Pollock, president of the Littleton Feed & Fuel Company and formerly closely 
identified with ranching interests in Colorado, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
May 11, 1848. His father, Richard Pollock, was a native of Belfast, Ireland, and when 
a little lad came with relatives to the United States. They landed at Philadelphia and 
some years later he established a grocery business in that city and as the years passed 
became one of the prosperous merchants in his line but later lost much of his well 
acquired fortune in speculation in the oil fields, fn 1834 he married Sarah Morrison, 
who came to this country with her parents from Glasgow, Scotland, her native city. Her 
death occurred in the year 1858. while Mr. Pollock survived until 1S6S. 

Their son, John Pollock, after mastering the branches of learning taught in the 
graded schools of Philadelphia, continued his studies in the high school but did not get 
to complete his course there owing to the death of his father, which necessitated his 
providing for his own support. He then took up the painting trade in Philadelphia, at 
which he worked for a short time, and in 1868 he removed to Omaha, Nebraska, while 
later he went to North Platte and then to Denver. He spent only two weeks in the 
Colorado metropolis, however, and returned to Omaha on horseback, continuing his 
residence in that city until 1871. He was employed there in the painting shop of the 
Union Pacific Railroad and afterward became timekeeper and bookkeeper for Joshua 
Taylor, who had taken the contract for the stone used in the erection of the Lincoln 
penitentiary. This necessitated Mr. Pollock's removal to Lincoln, Nebraska, where he 
was engaged until the completion of the work, when he started with Mr. Taylor for 
St. Paul, Minnesota. At Knoxville, Iowa, however, they paused and Mr. Taylor secured a 
ccntrict there for getting out stone for culverts on the Albia & Des Moines Valley Rail- 
road, Mr. Pollock remaining in his employ until 1871, when following the great Chicago 
fire he went to that city to view the ruins. He then continued his journey to Phila- 
delphia and afterward visited New York city but again came to Colorado in June, 1S74. 
Here he began contracting and secured the contract for painting the courthouse at Castle 
Rock. In the following year he went to San Juan county when the gold excitement there 
was at its height. In the fall of 1875 he became identified with ranching interests, 
beginning to herd cattle on his own account and at the same time was similarly employed 
by Albert Benjamin. He watched the herds under his charge in the vicinity of Acquia 
until 1879, when on account of the scarcity of grass he started his herd for the head- 
waters of the north fork of the Republican river. Mr. Pollock continued in the cattle 
business until 1SS3, when he sold his herd of three hundred head, for which he received 
about sixteen thousand dollars. He then returned to Denver and soon afterward pur- 
chased a farm near the city, on which he engaged in general agricultural pursuits for 
a considerable period. In 1903, however, he sold his ranch and took charge of the Green- 
laud ranch, owned by J. A. McMurtrie, remaining in that connection until 1909. The 
following year he lived retired from business, but indolence and idleness are utterly 
foreign to his nature and when a twelvemonth had passed he joined with Ben. Kelt 
and R. F. Gill in organizing the Littleton Feed & Fuel Company, of which he has since 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 293 

been president. They have conducted a substantial business at Littleton, their trade 
steadily increasing, so that the enterprise has become one of the profitable commercial 
interests of the town. 

On the 23d of July, 18S4, Mr. Pollock was married to Miss Jessie M. Babcock, of 
Douglas county, Colorado, and a daughter of Alonzo A. and Rosa (Estlake) Babcock. 
They are well known socially, having a large circle of warm friends who esteem them 
highly by reason of their sterling worth. Mr. Pollock is well known in Masonic circles, 
belonging to Western Lodge, No. 22, A. F. & A. M., of Littleton, and Denver Chapter, 
No. 2; Colorado Consistory, No. 1, and EI Jebel Temple, at Denver. Of the first he is a 
past master and the treasurer. His political allegiance has always been given to the 
republican party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and while a resi- 
dent of Douglas county he was a candidate for county commissioner, also for the state 
legislature, being defeated for the latter by the narrow margin of seven votes. In all 
matters of citizenship he stands for progress and improvement, for development and 
advancement, and his efforts in behalf of the public good have been far-reaching and 
beneficial. 



FRANK L. MOORHEAD. 



Boulder, the seat of the University of Colorado, with its splendidly organized law 
school and also the seat of many progressive business enterprises and the center of large 
mining interests, has drawn to it a large number of the leading attorneys of the state. 
Testing his ability with other representatives of the profession, Frank L. Moorhead has 
become well established as an able lawyer of developing powers and is now accorded a 
gratifying clientage. Boulder numbers him among her native sons. He was born in 18S5, 
of the marriage of James L. and Josephine (Carnahan) Moorhead. The father was 
born in Holmes county, Ohio, and after removing westward to Colorado when this was 
still largely a frontier state he was married in Boulder to Josephine Carnahan. Rear- 
ing their family in Boulder, Frank L. Moorhead attended its public schools and in 
1907 completed a classical course in the State University with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. He determined upon the practice of law as a life work, and with broad literary 
learning to serve as the foundation upon which to rear the superstructure of profes- 
sional knowledge, he entered the law school and won the LL. B. degree upon gradua- 
tion with the class of 1909. He has since practiced in Boulder and in April, 1916, he 
was appointed city attorney to fill a vacancy caused by the death of H. E. Rowland. 
He was reappointed in April, 1917, and was again appointed under the new charter on 
the 1st of January, 1918, so that he is the present incumbent in the position. He ia 
also a director of the Boulder Building & Loan Association. 

In his political views Mr. Moorhead has always been a republican since age con- 
ferred upon him the right of franchise. He belongs to the Delta Tau Delta and the 
Phi Delta Phi, two college fraternities. He is also a member of the Boulder Club and 
he attends the Episcopal church. His genuine worth has won him high regard on 
the part of his fellowmen and his professional career thus far is an augury of future 
success and advancement. 



GEORGE P. STEWART. 



George P. Stewart, serving for the third term as county treasurer of Douglas 
county, was born February 18. 1863, near Melbourne, Australia, a son of Charles and 
Emma (Salas) Stewart, the former a native of Scotland, while the latter was of Aus- 
tralian birth. When George P. Stewart was but four years of age he was taken to 
England by his uncle to be educated in the schools of that country and they were three 
months in making the trip. He attended the public schools of London and St. Aubins, 
and later became a student of Victoria College on the isle of Jersey. He crossed the 
Atlantic to America in 1879, when a youth of sixteen years, and made his way to 
Plum Station, now Sedalia, Colorado, where he lived with an uncle. He afterward 
took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres and also preempted one hundred 
and sixty acres and secured a timber claim of equal amount. Subsequently he kept 
adding to his holdings from time to time as his financial resources increased until his 
landed possessions aggregated seventeen hundred acres. He had been educated for 
engineering work and since coming to the new world has done more or less in that 



294 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

connection, in addition to his labors along other lines. For twenty years he occupied 
the position of county surveyor — a fact which stands as unmistakable evidence of his 
capability, fidelity and the confidence reposed in him by his fellow townsmen. Appre- 
ciative of his worth and recognizing his loyalty to every public duty, his fellow citizens 
elected him to the ofiice of county treasurer and by reelection have continued him in 
the position for four terms. Since first coming to Colorado he has spent one year in 
California and at two other times has visited that state. 

Mr. Stewart was united in marriage to Mrs. Millie Mclnroy, also a native of 
Australia, and to them have been born four children who are living. George H., who 
was born December 8, 1S83, and is residing upon a ranch on Plum creek, married Marg- 
aret Grout and has four children, Margaret, Amy, Helen and Elizabeth. Douglas N., 
born December 25, 1S87, married Lena Ayers, of Fort Collins, and has two children, 
Mildred and George P. Douglas N. Stewart is now county engineer, serving for the 
second term in that position. Charles C, born in December, 1890, is now in the 
United States army as veterinary surgeon, being in the Veterinary Medical Corps 
with the commission of lieutenant. George M., born October 22, 1895, enlisted in the 
cavalry but is now serving as sergeant with infantry troops. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Episcopal church. Mr. Stewart 
gives his political allegiance to the Republican party, of which he has always been a 
stalwart champion. Fraternally he is connected with the Woodmen of the World at 
Castle Rock and is clerk of the local camp. Coming to the new world in young man- 
hood, he has always been a loyal American citizen, putting forth the most earnest 
effort to advance the welfare and substantial upbuilding of his community, his com- 
monwealth and his country, and the spirit of patriotism dominating the family is indi- 
cated in the fact that two of the sons are now with the colors. 



JASPER D. BABCOCK. 



Jasper D. Babcock, filling the office of justice of the peace at Morrison, has led 
a most active, useful and interesting life, bringing him into close connection with 
mining interests in various parts of Colorado, while as hotel proprietor he has also 
become widely known. He has passed the seventy-fourth milestone on life's journey, 
his birth having occurred in Rochester, New York, February 9, 1845. He is a son of 
Sanford and Adelia J. (Green) Babcock, the latter a sister of Seth Green, the dis- 
coverer of the method of artificial propagation of fsh. Jasper D. Babcock comes of 
Revolutionary war stock and his grandfather. Adanijah Green, was a soldier of the 
War of 1812 and one of the founders of Rochester, New York. 

Jasper D. Babcock was educated in the schools of Springfield, Illinois, whither 
he had gone with his parents, when a lad of about twelve years, and in which city 
his father for many years, followed his profession of dentistry. The last years of the 
parents' lives were spent in Colorado where they made their home with their son 
Jasper D. In 1861, when a youth of but sixteen years, he responded to the country's 
call tor troops, joining the boys in blue of Company C, Second Illinois Light Artillery. 
He was on detached service with the United States Military Telegraph Corps and 
the principal engagements in which he participated were at Arkansas Post, Vicks- 
burg. Champion Hill and Port Gibson. When the war was over he became an operator 
for the Western Union Telegraph Company and acted as station agent and operator 
at various places on the Illinois Central Railroad between St. Louis and New Orleans. 
He afterward remained at Marlin, Texas, as telegraph operator from 1867 until 1869 
and in the latter year came to Colorado but remained at that time for only a short 
period. He then returned to Illinois, going to Macoupin county, where he accepted 
a position with the old Rockford. Rock Island & St. Louis Railway as telegraph opera- 
tor and agent, at Medora, where he remained until late in 1873, going then to Kansas 
City, Missouri, and associating himself with the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway 
Company. In April, 1875, he once more made his way to Colorado, settling in Jefferson 
county, where he entered the employ of the Colorado Central Railroad as agent and 
operator. He worked at the old Beaver Brook station until 1879, when he turned 
his attention to the hotel business in Golden, there remaining until 1881. He after- 
ward built the famous resort "Troutdale in the Pines" in the Bear Creek canyon and 
conducted it until 1893. He next engaged in mining in different parts of the state 
until 1897, when he resumed the hotel business at Evergreen, where he continued 
until 1908. In that year he became a resident of Morrison. He engaged in prospecting 
and mining until 1910, when he was appointed postmaster of the town and occupied 







'mt^ 




F 


^^^ 




y 






296 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the position until 1915. He is now serving as justice of the peace but otherwise has 
retired from active business. He has been a great enthusiast ever trap shooting and 
was president of the Denver Shooting Club. He has a beautiful medal for being the 
best shot in the club, awarded him in 1876. He has been a great hunter and fisherman 
and has greatly enjoyed all forms of outdoor life. 

On the 10th of November, 1866, Mr. Babcock was united In marriage at Mound 
City, Illinois, to Miss Lizzie Cecelia Tibbs, who was born in Deerfield, Ohio, but was 
educated and reared at Mound City, Illinois. The children of this marriage are: 
Mary, the deceased wife of William Tudor; Lizzie C, who is the wife of John Kirby 
and is manager for the telephone company in this district; J. Dwight, a ranchman 
and cattle raiser of Routt county; and William A., who is engaged in the same 
line of business in Eagle county. In November, 1916, Mr. and Mrs. Babcock celebrated 
their golden wedding. There was a wonderful surprise charivari and almost the 
entire town turned out. The Episcopal wedding ceremony was read over again by the 
minister as it had been fifty years before and the occasion was made one of great 
Interest and delight to all who participated therein. The companionship of Mr. and 
Mrs. Babcock has grown all the closer as the long years have passed and they have 
shared together the joys and sorrows, the adversity and prosperity that checker 
the careers of all. The love which they bear each other has been the redeeming feature 
that has compensated for all earthly trials and hardships and they are certainly 
fortunate in that they have been permitted to go down the western slope of life thus 
far together. Their religious faith is that of the Christian Science church. In politics 
Mr. Babcock is a republican and fraternally is a Mason, having been initiated into the 
order, in the early '70s, in Fidelity Lodge, No. 152, at Fidelity, Illinois. He Is also 
a Knight of Pythias and an Odd Fellow. He also has membership in T. H. Dodd Post, 
G. A. R., of Golden, and thus maintains pleasant relations with his old army com- 
rades. In days of peace, as in days of war, he has ever been a true and loyal American 
citizen, as faithful to his country as when he followed the nation's starry banner on 
the battlefields of the south. 



FRED L. PADDELFORD. 



Fred L. Paddelford, for sixteen years superintendent of the State Industrial School 
at Golden, was born on a farm in Henry county, Illinois, January 24, 1867, a son of 
James H. and Rachel D. (Hanna) Paddelford. In the paternal line the ancestry is 
traced back to the colonial period and the mother of James H. Paddelford passed 
away at the notable old age of ninety-three years. She had attended the funeral of 
George Washington. In the maternal line the family comes of Scotch-Irish ancestry. 

Fred L. Paddelford was educated in the public and high schools of Illinois and 
in 1888, when twenty-one years of age, was a teacher in the Illinois State School for 
Boys at Pontiac, with which he was connected until 1891. He afterward read law 
in Lincoln, Nebraska, and was admitted to the bar in 1893. Subsequently he returned 
to the State School at Pontiac, with which he remained until the Spanish-American 
war broke out, at which time he joined the Third Nebraska Infantry. 

After the war Mr. Paddelford took up ranching in Wyoming but in 1900 came to 
Golden, taking up \s'ork as a teacher in the State Industrial School. His previous 
experience along that line was of great benefit to him and recognition of his worth 
and ability came in his appointment in 1902 to the superintendency of the school, in 
which position he has now been retained for more than sixteen years. He is today 
one of the noted educators of the country in his particular branch. He has accom- 
plished wonders with the boys by being a companion to them and calling forth the 
best in them. He has studied boy nature, knows their temptations and their possi- 
bilities and conducts his work along constructive lines. He is an athlete of note, in 
the state, and is still pitcher on the school baseball team and in the summer of 1918 
struck out eighteen men in one game. This naturally gives him a strong hold upon 
the boys and he soon wins their confidence and love. Hardly a day passes but one 
of his old graduates comes to visit him and the institution under his supervision has 
become one of the finest in the country. Notable improvements have been carried on 
during the sixteen years of Mr. Paddelford's connection with the school. The acreage 
has been increased from fifty-eight to four hundred and sixty-five acres and the lawns 
have been trebled in size. Two cottages have been erected, also a gymnasium, a 
kitchen, dining room, bakery and chapel. Two barns have been completed, the school 
forces doing all the work thereon, and an addition to the hospital has been erected 




FRED L. PADDPLFORD 



298 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

from concrete blocks made by the boys, who have also done all the other work. All 
the toilet rooms have been furnished with enameled wainscoting and tiled floors. All 
of the cement walks now in use have been laid except the one from the main drive 
to the old main building. A fountain basin has been constructed and the road paved 
for traffic and pedestrians from the grounds to the depot. A florist has been employed 
and the grounds have been greatly beautified. Considerable equipment has been 
placed on the playgrounds, a one hundred foot flagpole has been erected and the flag 
is always kept flying. There has been an addition built to the print shop, through 
the labor of the boys, machinery has been installed in the shoe shop and the aaj> 
penter shop, with additional equipment in the machine, print and laundry shops. 
Brick pavement has been laid all about the dining room building and the school has 
recognized the value of refining influences, to which end white napkins and white 
tablecloths are in use at every meal in the boys' dining rooms, while silverware and 
china dishes have been substituted for ironware and enameled dishes. The variety 
and attractiveness of the food has been greatly increased and boys are permitted to 
talk in the dining room. Toothbrushes and powder are furnished all boys and every 
efi'ort has been made to produce a desire for that physical cleanliness which is always 
a part of moral and cultural development. One of the improved features of the farm 
has been the introduction of pedigreed cattle, horses and hogs, the calves raised sell- 
ing as high as four hundred dollars each. A silo of five hundred tons capacity has 
been erected. Thirteen hundred cherry trees have been planted on land above ditch 
and irrigated from a big \vel\ of eight hundred thousand gallons which has been put 
in, furnishing enough water for all domestic purposes and to some extent for irriga- 
tion. Hundreds of rods of woven wire fence have been put up. a refrigerating and 
ice plant has been erected. Concrete hotbeds have been constructed and beds in the 
greenhouse have been made of concrete. The greenhouse supplies all flowers for tables, 
chapel, schoolrooms, etc. Great indeed have been the improvements made in the sys- 
tem of instruction. Instruction is given on alternate days, the intervening days being 
devoted to work of various kinds upon the farm. Corporal punishment has been 
almost entirely abolished. There are three male teachers for the higher grades, two 
female teachers for the lower grades and there are also special teachers employed 
for instruction in various branches of work, including the machinist's trade. The 
boys are given religious instruction; Catholic boys are taught separately in their 
Sunday school, while arrangements have been made for the Jewish boys to have 
instruction in their religion given by volunteer teachers from Denver. There is a 
well organized band of thirty-eight pieces, which furnishes music for all chapel exer- 
cises and entertainment. The military organization has been perfected and modernized 
and a fine silk flag has been won for "being the best drilled military organization 
in line on July 4, 1911," in Denver. Five purple championship ribbons and prizes 
have been taken on live stock at the Western Stock Show besides numerous first and 
second premiums won there and at the State Fair. Lecture and entertainment courses 
have been greatly extended and basketball, football and baseball games are regularly 
scheduled and played with high school and other outside teams. The school is con- 
ducted along the most humanitarian lines, that the boys may be fitted physically, 
mentally and morally to become good citizens and a large percentage — more than 
ninety per cent — finally make good. 

In April, 1917, Mr. Paddelford was married to Dr. Esther S. Cherry, a musician 
of note, who was musical critic on Denver papers and at the time of her marriage 
was the first vice president of the Denver Woman's Club. The influence of both 
Mr. and Mrs. Paddelford has been along cultural lines and their work of a construc- 
tive character. That Mr. Paddelford is a man of keen sagacity and of deep sympathy 
and human interest is shadowed forth between the lines of this review and his work 
has gained him well deserved prominence in this connection. 



E. PORTER SMITH. 



E. Porter Smith, of Arvada, Colorado, who is now living retired, has been a suc- 
cessful agriculturist, having acquired a (Competence as the result of his industrious 
life's labors. He is a native of Harmony, Maine, and was born March 3, 1845, a son 
of Samuel and Lucy (Bates) Smith. When he was three years of age the family 
removed to Bloomington, Illinois, but when he was six years old left there, for Boston, 
Massachusetts. In that city he remained for two years, when removal was made to 
Lawrence, Kansas. The father was a drummer in John Brown's Company and E. Porter 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 299 

Smith of this review was in the Indian troubles upon the Kansas frontier. Later he 
served two years with Company M, of the Eleventh Kansas Cavalry, being in Price's 
raid in 1864, and he was out on the plains when Lee surrendered. He then came to 
Colorado, finding work in the Georgetown mines, and after having saved sutficient 
money acquired one hundred and sixty acres of land near Broomfield, to the success- 
ful cultivation of which he devoted his time and attention until several years ago, when 
he retired, selling out at that time. In his farming methods he was progressive and 
made many improvements upon his place, creating out of a wilderness a valuable 
farming property. He thus acquired a competence which now permits him to rest 
from further labor. In his early days he assisted in building the Colorado & Southern 
Railroad, working on the grade work. 

On September 30, 1870, Mr. Smith was married in Arvada to Miss Mary Graves, 
a daughter of Oliver and Lucy (Story) Graves, natives of Vermont and Ohio respec- 
tively. Their daughter Mary was born in Bloomington, Illinois, and came with her 
parents to Colorado in 1860, where they settled in the mountains between Golden and 
Central. Her father engaged in farming, along which line he was successful, and 
also built the toll road between Grey Hill and Smith's Hill. To Mr. and Mrs. Smith 
eleven children were born: Oliver, who is located near Broomfield; George S.; 
Frank; Winnie, who is now Mrs. William Schulz and resides near Griffith; Nettie, 
the wife of Ernest N. Carne; Harry, of Broomfield; Ada, the wife of H. Metzger, of 
Cleveland, Ohio; Myrtle, who is Mrs. Theodore Scheppe; Homer; Alfred, who is now 
in France with Company F, Fourth United States Infantry; and Mary L., who married 
David Landry of Colorado Springs. 

E. Porter Smith is a republican in his political views and has always supported 
the men and measures of that party. He is deeply interested in public progress and 
by developing a fine farm property has contributed toward the agricultural upbuilding 
of his state. Moreover, he is ever ready to give aid to movements of a public nature 
which have for their purpose the benefit of the public and he is highly esteemed in 
his community, where he has made many friends, being numbered among its pioneers. 
His religious faith is that of the Methodist church and he is interested in its work and 
its allied institutions. All who know him speak of him in the highest terms and 
whatever success has come to him is attributable to his own efforts, so that he can 
be truly called a self-made man. 



GEORGE W. HIXSON. 



W. Hixson is the owner of one of the finest farm properties not only of 
Elbert county but of this section of the state. A beautiful residence, large and sub- 
stantial barns and sheds and every equipment of the model farm are found upon his 
place. His entire life has been devoted to agricultural pursuits. He was born upon 
a farm near Hillsboro, Iowa, March 21, 1857, a son of David and Phoebe (Sayers) 
Hixson. The Hixson family removed from Kentucky to Iowa, three generations living 
in the latter state. Their ancestral line in America dates back to the colonial period. 
On the paternal and maternal sides the family comes from Ohio. 

In 1898 George W. Hixson arrived in Colorado and homesteaded on the site of 
his present farm, securing a tract of land which constituted the nucleus of his present 
extensive possessions, covering twenty-four hundred acres. He is carrying on his opera- 
tions in a partnership connection under the firm style of Geo. W. Hixson and Sons. 
They make a specialty of feeding beef cattle and raising shorthorns and Poland China 
hogs. Theirs is the only beef feeding and cattle finishing point in this section of 
Colorado, the firm becoming pioneers in this line. They have so developed their inter- 
ests that the farm is regarded as one of the show places in their section of the state. 
They have model barns and two big silos, together with every equipment necessary 
for the care of stock and of grain. 

Mr. Hixson was married in Iowa on the 14th of March. 1883, to Miss Lizzie Enders- 
by, who comes of English ancestry. They are parents of three sons and a daughter. 
One of the sons, Bryan W., has enlisted at the Fort Collins Agricultural College. The 
other sons are: Loren B., who is at home; and B. Rex, who is married. The daughter, 
Verna May. is also under the parental roof. 

The career of George W. Hixson is one of marked progress. He is a man of keen 
sagacity, farsighted and enterprising, and has been actuated at all times by a laudable 
ambition that has ever prompted him to take a forward step when the way was open. 
His life record indicates the fact that activity does not tire but gives resistance and 



302 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

that power grows through the exercise of effort. He is today a strong and resourceful 
man, strong in his honor and good name, strong in his ability to plan and perform. 
Carlyle has said: "Obstacles in the path of the weak often become stepping-stones 
to the strong," which statement finds verification in the life record of George W. Hixson. 



CHARLES VOEGTLE. 



Charles Voegtle, who passed away on the 27th of September, 1917, was closely 
associated with the business interests of Boulder, where for a long period he was 
active in the real estate field. He was born in Baden, Germany, June 7, 1841, a son 
of Anton and Frances (Friedrich) Voegtle, whose family numbered eight children, 
five sons and three daughters. The father was a farmer and keeper of vineyards in 
Germany and never came to the new world. 

The son crossed the Atlantic to America in 1865 and made his way direct to Quincy, 
Illinois, where he secured a position in the Dick Brothers Brewery. There he advanced 
rapidly by reason of his adaptability and faithfulness. He remained in that position 
until 1875, when, attracted by the opportunities of the growing west, he removed to 
Boulder, Colorado, where he began business on his own account, building a brewery 
which was operated under the firm style of Weisenhorn & Voegtle. He was thus 
active until 1884, when he sold his interest to his partner, and from that time he gave 
his attention to a fruit farm about one mile out of Boulder. He also conducted a 
small fruit farm of ten acres at the corner of Third avenue and Fifteenth street. 

On the 2Sth of January, 1869, Mr. Voegtle was married to Miss Johanna Weisen- 
horn, a native of Germany and a daughter of Silas and Barbara (Zaehringer) Weisen- 
horn, who came from Germany in 1857 and settled in Quincy, Illinois, where Mr. and 
Mrs. Voegtle were married. She is still living in Boulder with her daughters, Barbara 
Frances and Mrs. John Reinert. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Voegtle were as fol- 
lows; August Anton, who passed away in 1911 at the age of forty-one; Barbara Fran- 
ces, residing with her mother; Charles Joseph, of Nashville, Tennessee, who married 
Ivy Montgomery, by whom he has a daughter. Ivy; and Emma Caroline, who wedded 
Francis John Reinert, of Boulder, and has four children, Paul, Carl, Francis J. and 
George. 

Mr. Voegtle was a German Catholic in religious faith. He took much interest in 
his home and little fruit farm and cared nothing for political activity. He acquired 
considerable wealth as the years passed and his business affairs were carefully con- 
ducted. In 1911 he built the Voegtle block in Boulder, which is one of the handsomest 
office buildings of the city. 



ARTHUR PONSFORD. 



Arthur Ponstord is actively engaged in the practice of law as senior partner in the 
firm of Ponsford & Carnine of Denver. He was admitted to the bar in 1895 and the 
following year entered upon the active work of the profession, in which he has since 
successfully continued. A native of England, he was born at Netley, Southampton, on 
the 24th of April, 1870, a son of the Rev. William and Susan Dora (Ruddach) Ponsford, 
the former a native of Netley, Southampton, while the latter was born in Scotland. The 
father became a clergyman of the Church of England and devoted his life to that holy 
calling, passing away in 1900. His wife is also deceased. In their family were seven 
children. 

Arthur Ponsford, whose name introduces this review, pursued his education in 
private schools of Thorpe Mandeville, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England. Crossing the 
Atlantic, he spent several years in Canada and in 1887 came to the United States. In 
1889 he made his way westward to Denver and ultimately deciding upon the practice 
of law as a life work, began preparation for the profession. He was admitted to the 
bar of Colorado in 1895 and the following year entered upon the active practice of 
law in Denver, forming a connection with Stuart D. Walling, who was afterward a judge 
of the court of appeals. That association continued for five years, at the end of which 
time Mr. Ponsford was alone in practice until 1905, when he became a member of the 
firm of Hersey & Ponsford. He practiced in that connection for two years and was 
then again alone until 1917, when he was joined by Charles F. Carnine in the organiza- 
tion of the present firm of Ponsford & Carnine, which has since continuously existed. 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 303 

They make a specialty of banking law and Mr. Ponsford acts as counsel for various banks 
and corporations. He is thoroughly informed concerning this branch of jurisprudence 
and his ability is pronounced. He belongs to the Denver, the Colorado State and the 
American Bar Associations and thus keeps in touch with the active work of the pro- 
fession, with the high ideals for which it stands and with the purposes which it wishes 
to accomplish. He has always been a close and discriminating student of law, is strong 
in the presentation to a cause before the court, is logical in argument, clear in reasoning 
and is considered a safe and wise counselor. For twenty years he has been counsel for 
the Denver National Bank and also for the Denver Stock Yards Bank and various other 
important financial institutions. He turns from heavy professional cares and responsi- 
bilities to the pleasure and recreation which he gets in farm life. He is much interested 
in Holstein cattle and has a fine herd upon his farm at Willow Springs, near Mount 
Morrison, Colorado. 

On the 7th of May, 1897, Mr. Ponsford was married to Miss Julia Emily Houghton, 
a sister of Rev. Dr. John Henry Houghton, a very prominent and honored resident of 
Denver, who passed away in December, 1917. He was the rector of St. Mark's Episcopal 
church and was greatly beloved by his people. To Mr. and Mrs. Ponsford have been 
born two children: Dorothy Muriel, who was born January 6, 1900, and is "now attending 
the Wolcott School in Denver; and Barbara, who was born November 19, 1907, and is 
a pupil in Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Ponsford's social nature finds expression in his membership in the Denver 
Athletic Club and the Lakewood Country Club. Fraternally he is a Mason, having 
membership in Albert Pike Lodge, No. 117, of Denver, of which he is a past master, 
and he also belongs to Colorado Consistory. No. 1, A. & A. S. R., having thus attained 
the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. He has likewise crossed the sands of the 
desert with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, belonging to El Jebel Temple. In politics 
he is an independent republican, for while he usually votes for the men and measures 
of the party, he does not consider himself bound by party ties. He is a very active 
and interested member of St. Mark's Episcopal church, in which he is serving as a ves- 
tryman, and he is also a trustee of the diocese of Colorado. He does all in his power to 
advance the interests and promote the work of the church and stands loyally in support 
of all these forces which are of cultural value and which promote the uplift of the 
individual or advance the welfare of the community at large. He holds to high profes- 
sional standards in the practice of law and few men are as careful to conform their 
practice to the advanced ethics of the profession as is Arthur Ponsford. 



ARTHUR W. FITZGERALD. 



Arthur W. Fitzgerald, who for eight years has been a representative of the Colorado 
bar, practicing at Boulder, is now a meml>er of the firm of Tedrow & Fitzgerald, which 
is accorded rank among the leading law firms of their section of the state. Mr. Fitz- 
gerald is a native of New York, his birth having occurred in Lorraine, Jefferson county, 
in 1879. His paternal grandfather, Joseph Fitzgerald, was born in Ireland and came to 
America with his brothers in early manhood, settling first in New York city. He 
afterward removed to Jefferson county. New York, where the family home was long 
maintained. In response to the call of his adopted country for aid in the Mexican war 
he donned the nation's uniform and went to defense of American interests on the 
southern border. His son, Frank Fitzgerald, is a native of Jefferson county, New 
York, born in the year 1852. There he spent the period of his boyhood and youth 
and after reaching man's estate wedded Drucilla Fisher. He has always remained 
a resident of the Empire state and now lives in Orwell, New York, where his wife 
passed away in 1911. 

The removal to Orwell was made during the very early childhood of Arthur W. 
Fitzgerald, who there spent the first twenty years of his life and acquired much of 
his early education, although his high school course was pursued at Pulaski, New 
York, where he was graduated with the class of 1897. He afterward entered the 
State University of Indiana at Bloomington, where he pursued his more specifically 
literary course, winning the Bachelor of Arts degree as an alumnus of 1904. He 
then took up the profession of teaching, becoming principal of the high school at 
Gosport, Indiana. He next went to the south and spent two years in teaching at 
Cuero, Texas, and on the expiration of that period was chosen principal of the 
high school at Ennis, Texas, of which he had charge for a year. At the end of that 
time he came to Boulder and entered the law school of the Colorado State University, 



304 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

for he had determined to make the practice of law his life work. He completed 
his course by graduation with the class of 1910, at which time the LL. B. degree 
was conferred upon him. He at once entered upon the active work of the profession 
in the office of Richard H. Whiteley, now deceased, and in January, 1912, he be- 
came associated with Harry B. Tedrow. who in 1914 was called to the office of 
United States district attorney. The partnership relation, however, continues and the 
firm of Tedrow & Fitzgerald occupies a prominent position at the Boulder bar. 

On the 16th of August, 1914, in Boulder, Mr. Fitzgerald was united in marriage 
to Mrs. Elizabeth (Turrell) Andrew, a daughter of the late J. W. Turrell, who was a 
pioneer druggist of Longmont, Boulder county, Colorado. Mr. Fitzgerald is an Episco- 
palian in religious faith. His political allegiance is given to the republican party, 
and while he is greatly interested in the vital questions and issues of the day and 
keeps well informed on all important political matters, he does not seek nor desire 
office. His military record covers service with a cavalry company of the Colorado 
National Guard. He is now concentrating his undivided interest and attention upon 
his professional duties and his devotion to his clients' interests is proverbial. He has 
the faculty of presenting most clearly and forcefully a truth which he wishes to impress 
upon the minds of his hearers and his oratory, clothing sound logic, carries conviction 
and merit has enabled him to mount the ladder of fame. 



ROBERT LEWIS EULER. 



Robert Lewis Euler, occupying the position of sheriff of Boulder county and mani- 
festing the utmost promptness, fearlessness and capability in the discharge of his du- 
ties, was born in Warsaw, Illinois, in 1S68. His father, William D. Euler. was born 
in Germany in 1829 and came to the United States in 1844. After living for many 
years in the middle west he removed to Colorado in 1872 and his last days were spent 
in Boulder, where he departed this life in 1915. He had at that time been a resident 
of the state for forty-three years, for he came to the west when Colorado was still 
under territorial rule and when the work of development and progress was yet in its 
pioneer stages. Through the passing years he bore his part in the task of reclaim- 
ing a wild region for the purposes of civilization and in advancing the welfare of his 
community along all lines of progressive citizenship. 

His son, Robert Lewis Euler, was a little lad of but four summers when the family 
came to this state. He was reared in Boulder and pursued his education in its public 
schools. He turned his attention to the livestock business when about nineteen years 
of age and has directed his attention in that field of activity to the present time. He 
has become one of the leading live stock dealers of his section of the state and has 
conducted his business in a very extensive and progressive way. 

On the 20th of February, 1895, in Denver. Mr. Euler was united in marriage to 
Miss Georgia Lindley Williams, a daughter of the late Lindley Williams. They have 
become the parents of three sons, namely: Lou W., Robert Rowland and Clinton Olney. 
The family attend the Congregational church. Mr, Euler has membership with the 
Masons and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and is loyal to the teachings of 
these organizations. His military experience covers service as a member of Company 
H of Boulder, a company of the Colorado National Guard, with which he was identified 
for three years. He has always voted with the republican party and in 1913 he was 
chosen to the office of under sheriff of Boulder county and served in that capacity for 
four years. In 1916 he was elected sheriff and in the following January entered upon 
the duties of the position for a two years' term. He is making an excellent record 
in office by reason of his faithfulness and fearlessness, doing everything in his power 
to curb crime and maintain the highest standards of law and order. 



HUGH L. SHELLABARGER. 



Hugh L. Shellabarger, mayor of Castle Rock, was born in Littleton, Arapahoe 
county, Colorado, October 9, 1870, a son of George and Emily (Drummond) Shella- 
barger, both of whom were natives of Ohio. They became residents of Littleton in 
1869, at which time the father homesteaded and turned his attention to ranching. 

Reared under the parental roof, Hugh L. Shellabarger completed his public school 
education by graduation from the high school, after which he spent two years as a 




ROBERT L. EULER 



306 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

student in the University of Denver and also pursued a commercial course at Spring- 
field, Ohio. For ten years he was with the Denver Union Water Company in different 
capacities and during the latter part of that period acted as foreman of the filter plant. 
Later he spent four years as representative of the firm of O'Brien & Rhoades, who 
were contractors and builders of water plants. Mr. Shellabarger acting as superintend- 
ent of construction on several plants in western Colorado and Arizona. In 1906 he 
embarked in business on his own account at Littleton, forming a partnership with his 
brother William tor the conduct of a grocery store at that place. In 1914 they came 
to Castle Rock, where they now conduct the leading grocery house of the city. They 
carry a large and attractive line of staple and fancy groceries and in fact their store 
contains everything that the market affords. They have built up a trade of gratifying 
proportions through honorable and progressive methods, closely studying the wishes of 
their patrons and putting forth every effort to please. At the same time their prices 
are reasonable and thus the number of their customers is continually increasing. 

In 1897 Mr. Shellabarger was united in marriage to Miss Lula Eagleton, a native 
of Ohio, and to tfcem have been born two children, Gertrude E. and Ruth E. The 
former is a high school graduate and is now successfully teaching, while the latter 
is still a high school .student. The family attend the Methodist church and Mr. Shella- 
barger is a member of the Woodmen of the World and the Knights of Pythias. His 
political allegiance has always been given to the democratic party and he has fre- 
quently been called upon to serve in positions of public trust, being a member of the 
town board, also a school trustee and treasurer of the school board, while for three 
years he was a member of the school board of Littleton. In 1917 he was elected mayor 
of Castle Rock and made so creditable and satisfactory a record during his first term 
that his fellow townsmen again called him to the position and he is now serving for 
the second time. He exercises his official prerogatives in support of all progressive 
measures and movements, his course justifying his classification with the most valuable 
officials of the city as well as with its substantial merchants and business men. 



J. F. BARNHILL. 

J. F. Barnhill. president and general manager of The Colorado Pitchblende Com- 
pany, occupies a conspicuous position in the mining circles of Colorado, and among 
the younger men of the state in that industry he stands foremost. 

Mr. Barnhill was born February 20, 1885, on a farm near Brashear, Adair county, 
Missouri, a son of George W. and Cecelia (Howk) Barnhill. The father was born in 
Louisville, Kentucky, while the mother was a native of Adair county, Missouri. 

George W. Barnhill was a well known farmer and stock raiser and his death 
occurred in 1897, leaving a widow and two sons. The widow remarried and now 
lives at Kellogg, Idaho. Of the sons J. F. is the elder while the younger, Roy L., is 
prominently identified with the Acme Manganese Mining Company of Hot Springs, 
Arkansas. 

J. F. Barnhill as a boy attended the public schools in Gibbs, Missouri, later sim- 
ilar institutions at Farmington and Walla Walla. Washington. His education since 
the age of sixteen has been largely acquired in the school of experience. He began 
making his own way at the age of thirteen. However, as circumstances permitted 
he studied at night and in this way added materially to his previous limited educa- 
tional training. When he started out to do for himself he was employed at ranching 
in Washington. He was too ambitious to limit his progress to these lines and seeking 
something where advancement would be more rapid he went back east, to St. Joe, 
Missouri, where he became an apprentice in the trade of machinist. Here he found 
a wider field for his natural mechanical skill which was soon evidenced by his invent- 
ing the interlocking rail which he patented. He devoted considerable time to this 
invention, which, as a result of prolonged litigation has failed to-date to bring him 
as much of a reward as he is entitled to. He was connected with the Wrought Iron 
Range Company of St. Louis, being employed by that firm at St. Louis. Missouri. In 
1909 he came to Denver and for some time was in the employ of the Chicago, Burling- 
ton and Quincy Railroad, after which he became connected with the mining industry 
as vice president and managing director of the Golden Age Mining and Reduction 
Company of Boulder county, as well as in connection with other mining properties. 
Mr. Barnhill acquired a knowledge of the rich mineral deposits of that section of 
the state and discovered that the great deposits of fluor spar ore on the Colorado 




J. F. BARNHILL 



308 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

Pitchblende Company's property at Jimtown carried extraordinary values In uranium, 
radium and other rare minerals. The fluor spar underlays approximately two square . 
miles of territory and extends from the surface down to unknown depths. It is tlie 
largest known uranium-radium deposit in the world. Assays of concentrates taken 
from this property and made by Victor Blanc, one of the leading chemists In the 
state, show values of $914.16 per ton, not including the fluor spar, which averages 
about seventy per cent in the crude ore, and when concentrated to an eighty-five 
per cent product. Itself yields about twenty-two dollars per ton gross. It is to 
the development of this wonderful property that Mr. Barnhill as its president and 
general manager. Is now devoting his energy. A plant of one thousand tons daily 
capacity is planned, which on the authority of engineers and experts will yield a 
daily profit that most mining projects would be glad to secure In a month. 

Mr. Barnhill's interests include numerous other mining properties among which 
is the Acme Manganese Mining Company of Hot Springs, Arkansas, of which he is 
president and general manager. His keen executive ability and great power as an 
organizer have been valuable factors in his business connections and have brought 
him into prominence in industrial and financial circles. He Is a member of the Colo- 
rado Manufacturers' Association. 

While yet a man of less than middle age he has achieved a success that reflects 
a whole lot of credit upon him. Thrown on his own resources at an early age his 
progress has been wholly of his own making and not without the "hard luck" that to 
one less determined might have proven a stopping point in his career. 



SAMUEL GROVER PHILLIPS. M. D. 

Dr. Samuel Grover Phillips, a prominent homeopathic physician and surgeon of 
Denver, whose hospital work and wide general practice have gained for him a place in 
the front rank of the representatives of the homeopathic school in the city, was born 
in Hindsville, Arkansas, January 6, 1863. His father, the late Samuel G. Phillips, 
was a native of Alabama and was of English descent. The family traces its ances- 
try back to a period antedating the Revolutionary war and settlement was originally 
made in the New England states. Samuel G. Phillips became a successful planter 
and through the later years of his life resided in Arkansas. His early life, however, 
was- spent in southern Missouri and Texas and during the Civil war he served with 
the Confederate army, becoming captain In an Arkansas regiment. He was at the 
front throughout the entire period of hostilities between the north and the south. He 
had previously been a large slaveholder and he became a well-to-do planter of Arkansas, 
where he continued to make his home until his death, which occurred in that state 
in 1896, when he was seventy years of age. In politics he was a stanch democrat 
and served as sheriff of Madison county, Arkansas, while for one term he was also 
county assessor. Fraternally he was connected with the Masons. He married 
Elizabeth Johnson, a native of Tennessee, where her family has been represented from 
pioneer times. They come of English and Scotch ancestry and the family was estab- 
lished on American soil at an early period in the development of the new world. Mrs. 
Phillips had a brother. Hon. Robert Johnson, who was a prominent jurist of Madison 
county, Arkansas. Mrs. Phillips passed away at the age of seventy-two years. She 
had become the mother of nine children, two sons and seven daughters. 

Dr. Phillips of this review was the seventh in order of birth In that family. He 
was educated in the public schools of Hindsville. Arkansas, and also attended the 
College View College, near Lincoln, Nebraska. He completed his studies, however, 
in the Kansas City University of Kansas City, Kansas. For seventeen years previous to 
1906, Dr. Samuel G. Phillips had charge of the field work for the Pacific Press Pub- 
lishing Company of Oakland, California, with branch house at Kansas City. Missouri. 
He began at the bottom with them and worked his way to the top. He was field 
manager for the territory extending from Mexico to Canada and from the Mississippi 
river to the Pacific coast. The company was a distributor and publisher of bibles 
and other religious works. Dr. Phillips made his headquarters in Arkansas, Missouri 
and Colorado, and handled millions of dollars for the company. In 1906, however, 
tiring of the nomadic life and desiring to take up the practice of medicine and sur- 
gery, he resigned his position. The company endeavored by increased pay and other 
inducements to persuade him to remain. They offered him the opportunity to go for 
them to England, to the Pacific islands and also to Australia: but Dr. Phillips 
adhered to his determination to become a physician and surgeon. He spent three 




DR. SAMUEL G. PHILLIPS 



310 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

years in the Denver Homeopathic College and for one year was a student in the 
medical department of the Kansas City University. He was graduated with the M. D. 
degree in 1910 and through the following two years he served as an interne at the 
Park Avenue Hospital in Denver. He next entered upon the private practice of 
'medicine, in which he has since actively continued and his pronounced ability is 
evidenced in his increasing patronage. He was at one time medical examiner of the 
German American Life Insurance Company of Denver and was medical examiner of 
the Modern Brotherhood and the Knights and Ladies of Security. He was also con- 
nected with the Modern Woodmen of America in a similar capacity and is now medi- 
cal examiner for the Court of Honor and medical examiner for the American Life 
Insurance Company. He is a member of the staff of St. Anthony's Hospital of Denver 
and also of the Park Avenue Hospital Association and its vice president. He is a 
well known and frequent contributor to medical journals and his writings always 
elicit interest and attention. He belongs to the American Institute of Homeopathy, 
to the Colorado State Homeopathic Society and to the Twentieth Century Medical Club 
of Denver. He is likewise identified with the Denver Homeopathic Society and was 
at one time vice president of the Colorado State Homeopathic Society. He holds to 
high professional standards and has kept abreast in all of his professional work and 
thought with those who are recognized leaders in the practice of homeopathy. 

Dr. Phillips has been twice married. In 1884. in Hindsville, Arkansas, he married 
Anna Fritz, a native of that state and a daughter of Martin and Matilda (Johnston) 
Fritz, the former now deceased. To Dr. and Mrs. Phillips were born eight children, 
six sons and two daughters. His second marriage occurring October 2, 1918, when he 
wedded Mrs. Marian F. Brown, a native of Iowa, and a graduate nurse. 

Dr. Phillips maintains an independent course in the exercise of his right of fran- 
chise yet often supports republican principles, in which he believes. He is a Mason 
of high rank and member of the Mystic Shrine and he also belongs to the Lions Club 
and to the Kiwanis Club of Denver. His social qualities render him popular in these 
organizations, while at the same time his professional skill and conscientious service 
have gained for him an enviable position as a homeopathic practitioner. Dr. Phillips 
has pursued postgraduate work in surgery at the Metropolitan and Bellevue Hospitals 
of New York city. He also spent some time visiting the prominent hospitals at Wash- 
ington, D. C, his object being to further perfect himself in surgery. 



ROBERT G. PAYNE. 



The Yale Laundry, of which Robert G. Payne is the founder and of which he is 
now president and manager, is one of the leading establishments of the kind in the 
city. It had its start in a very modest and unostentatious way, the work being under- 
taken by Mr. and Mrs. Payne in small quarters, but through careful attention to busi- 
ness they have developed a patronage of extensive proportions and their trade is 
now in a well equipped plant. 

Mr. Payne was born in Maury county, Tennessee, May 4, 1864, a son of James 
Madison and Lucy C. (Perry) Payne, the former a native of Virginia and the latter 
of Tennessee. In young manhood the father removed to Tennessee, where he and his 
wife spent their remaining days, and he became well known as a planter and slave- 
holder prior to the Civil war. He was born in 1815 and died at the age of eighty-six 
years, while his wife, who was born in 1S22, passed away at the age of seventy-eight. In 
both the paternal and maternal lines Robert G. Payne comes of families long identified 
with the south and prominent in connection with many events in both Virginia and 
Tennessee. 

The youngest in a family of eight children, Robert G. Payne attended the schools 
of Maury county until his seventeenth year, when he left home and made his way to 
Emporia, Kansas, where he became an employe in a grocery store, continuing in that 
position for five years. He then severed his connection with the house and removed 
to Denver in 1889. Here he again secured a clerkship in a grocery store, with which 
he continued for five years, after which he obtained a position with the Old Home- 
stead Baking Company and was in that employ tor twelve years. On the 20th of 
June, 1910, he established a small laundry in connection with his wife. It was at 
first a hand laundry but as the business grew the most modern machinery has been 
installed and today the Yale Laundry is one of the best equipped of the city. In 1913 
the New Method Laundry was consolidated with the Yale and as the result of the 
amalgamation of these two strong companies the business has increased many fold, 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 311 



employing now from seventy-five to eighty people and utilizing nine delivery 

and trucks. The building occupied is thoroughly modern in every way and the trade 

now extends to various points outside of Denver. Mr. Payne is the president and 

manager of the business. The corporation is a close one. Mr. Payne is president of 

the Denver Laundrymen's Association. He also has membership in the Manufacturers 

Association. 

Mr. Payne has been married twice. He first wedded Miss Anna L. Casey, a native 
of Tennessee, the wedding being celebrated in 1891. She passed away in Denver in 
1904, leaving a son, Harold B. Payne, who was born in Denver in 1898 and is a 
graduate of the high school. He is now in the national army with the Artillery Corps 
at Camp Taylor. In 1906 Mr. Payne was married to Minnie E. Ball, a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Henry Ball, well known people of Denver, having resided here 
from the early days. Mr. Payne may truly be called a self-made man and as the 
architect of his own fortunes he has builded wisely and well. 



GEORGE W. HARRIMAN. 



Inseparably interwoven with the history of Jefferson county is the name of 
George W. Harriman because of the active part which he took in the promotion of 
its interests. He was identified with mining, with hotel keeping, with the agricultural 
development of his section of the state, and his work was particularly valuable in 
connection with irrigation interests. While actuated by the laudable ambition of 
winning success in his business affairs, he at the same time was ever mindful of 
his duties and obligations as a citizen, contributing in large measure to the upbuild- 
ing of the district in which he made his home. 

A native of Canada, Mr. Harriman was born in Argentine on the 1st of Sep- 
tember, 1826, his parents being Reuben and Abigail (Davis) Harriman, whose family 
numbered seven children. The father was a native of Vermont, bom January 1, 1799. 
In his youth he accompanied his father to Canada, where he learned the shoemaker's 
trade and afterward followed that occupation throughout his entire life. In 1833 he 
became a resident of Niagara county. New York, where he resided until 1842. He 
then went to Ohio, whence he afterward/ removed to Indiana. At a later period he 
went to Michigan and in 1848 took up his abode in Walworth county, Wisconsin, where 
he resided until he was called to his final rest on the 12th of April, 1863. 

George W. Harriman accompanied his parents on their various removals, thus 
gaining wide experience which proved of worth to him in his later years. Having 
reached adult age, he was married November 11, 1851, at Elkhorn, Wisconsin, to Miss 
Betsy M. Spencer and for six months thereafter conducted a hotel there but at the 
end of that time turned his attention to farming. In 1858, however, he became pro- 
prietor of a livery stable at Elkhorn, Wisconsin, and also again conducted a hotel 
there. 

The year 1860 witnessed his arrival in Colorado. Making his way across the 
plains with a two-horse team, he reached Boulder on the 2Sth of June and afterward 
went to Central City, whene he devoted a month to mining and then established a 
boarding house, which he conducted for a year. In the spring of 1861 he located at 
Kenosha, Park county, Colorado, where he built a hotel, which he carried on for 
three and a half years. He was one of the pioneer hotel men of the state and while 
thus engaged he took part in the Espanosa and Runnell raids. Because of the lawless 
conditions that existed in the frontier settlement, he decided to dispose of his inter- 
ests there in October. 1865, and returned to Wisconsin, where he spent the winter. 
However, the lure of the west was upon him and in the following spring he returned 
to Colorado and conducted a stage line running between Denver and Buckskin Joe. 
A year later he removed to Turkey Creek, two miles above Morrison, in Jefferson 
county, and there built a hotel, which he conducted for three years, and at the same 
time was engaged in stock raising and teaming. In 1870 he settled on what became 
known as the Harriman ranch, on Bear creek, between Fort Logan and Morrison, 
homesteading one hundred and sixty acres of land, to the development and improve- 
ment of which he at once gave his attention. He studied closely the conditions of 
the country, its opportunities and possibilities and realized how valuable the district 
would become if water could be supplied to the arid plains. He became the originator 
and principal promoter of the extensive irrigation system of Bear Creek valley. He 
was the prime mover in support of the Arnett ditch, which had been begun two years 
before. It was Mr. Harriman who worked out the plans for its completion by hta 




MRS. HATTIE M. WATSON 



314 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

undaunted energy and saw that the project was carried forward to success. On the 
completion of the ditch with all of its ramifications Mr. Harrlman took over the 
Arnett interests and it became known as the Harriman ditch. In 1873 he was the 
builder of a large reservoir, the first in Colorado, and thus he became the father of 
the great system of storage reservoirs now- so prominent a feature in the develop- 
ment of the state and the promotix)n of its agricultural interests. He was largely 
instrumental in building the Bergen reservoirs and was also one of the heaviest stock- 
holders in the Soda Lake reservoirs. The worth and value of his labors can scarcely 
be overestimated. He was indeed an important factor in that work which has made 
Colorado to bloom and blossom as the rose, reclaiming its arid districts tor the pur- 
poses of civilization, converting wild tracts of land into rich and productive farms 
that provide the means of livelihood for thousands. 

In all public affairs Mr. Harriman was also deeply interested and his fellow 
townsmen, appreciative of his worth and ability, elected him a member of the board 
of county commissioners that had charge of the erection of the courthouse at Golden. 
His fellow townsmen strongly urged him to become a candidate for the state legisla- 
ture, but his ambition was not in the path of office holding and he declined. While 
Fort Logan was being builded he was one of the contractors who made brick for the 
building and he also did much teaming work in connection with the erection of the 
fort. His business affairs were wisely and carefully directed and as the years passed 
he kept adding to his holdings until within the boundaries of his ranch were 
comprised eight hundred and eighty acres. A spirit of warm-hearted hospitality per- 
vaded the place, its good cheer and hearty welcome being greatly enjoyed by the many 
friends of the family. In 1897 Mr. Harriman sold his ranch and removed to Fort 
Logan, where he lived retired until his demise. Mr. Harriman reached the age of 
almost ninety years, passing away on the 24th of August, 1915, while the wife and 
mother died on the 2d of May, 1908. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harriman became the parents of four children, but only two sur- 
vive, Clark S., a prominent ranchman of Park county, Colorado, and Hattie M., the 
latter the widow of W. J. Watson. She was born in Park county, Colorado, and 
reared and educated in Denver. On August 18, 1886, she married William J. Watson, 
a native of England, who had come to America, with his parents, when a lad of 
fifteen years and resided in Kansas until 1882, when he came to Colorado, locating 
in Jefferson county. Following their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Watson resided in Jef- 
ferson county until 1S87, when they removed to the western slope, where he was 
numbered among the leading ranchmen and stockraisers, up to the time of his death 
which occurred October 2, 1896. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Watson were born two sons: George H., a well known and 
prosperous ranchman of Park county, Colorado; and William C, now with the Southern 
Pacific Railway Company as agent at Fernley, Nevada, and prominently identified 
with the Order of Railway Trainmen. 

In her political views Mrs. Watson is a republican, believing firmly in the prin- 
ciples of the party. She was postmaster at Fort Logan from 1912 to 1916 and she 
has been very prominent and active in public affairs of the community, doing not a 
little to shape public thought and opinion. Her labors in behalf of war activities 
were particularly valuable and resultant. She has been a member of the Woman's 
Division of the Colorado Council of National Defense, very active in Red Cross work, 
was a surveyor on the registration of nurses for war work and a member of the food 
administration at Fort Logan. At once recognizing the needs of the country with 
the entrance of America into the war and knowing that there would be much work 
that women could do in this connection, she began giving her time and effort to meet 
these calls for service, doing everything within her power that would promote the 
interests, the health and the welfare of the boys over there. 



CHARLES A. MacMILLAN. 



Charles A. MacMillan needs no introduction to the readers of this volume 
and especially to the citizens of Denver, where he is widely and prominently 
known as a la-w'yer and by reason of his activities along philanthropic lines. Illinois 
claims him as a native son, for his birth occurred in the city of Peoria on the 15th of 
October, 1870. He is a son of James Calvin and Katherine (Anderson) MacMillan. 
In the paternal line he comes of Scotch-Irish ancestry, although the family has been 
represented in the United States through three generations. In the maternal line he 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 315 

is descended from New England stock. His father was born in Indiana but removed 
to Illinois, where he engaged in farming and stock raising. When the country be- 
came involved in civil war, however, he offered his aid to the Union and went to 
the front with the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry, with which he did active service. He 
was an aide-de-camp on the staff of General Grant and he remained at the front until 
victory crowned the Union arms. He is now residing upon a farm in Arapahoe 
county, Colorado, but is not actively engaged in agricultural pursuits, having put aside 
business cares to enjoy a well earned rest. To him and his wife have been born six 
children, of whom five are living. 

Charles A. MacMillan was a public school pupil in Kansas, to which state his 
parents removed after leaving Illinois. Later he continued his education in the Uni- 
versity of Denver as a member of the class of 1894. He then left that institution but 
studied law in Denver under a private preceptor and thus qualified for admission to 
the bar. He was licensed to practice in 1896 and opened an office in the E. and C. 
building in Denver. After a brief period, however, he removed to Wyoming, settling at 
Rock Springs, and for two terms he served as prosecuting attorney of the district. 
He then removed to Spokane, Washington, where he remained for seven years, prac- 
ticing law there until appointed special United States district attorney under President 
Taft, in which capacity he served from 1909 until 1911. The following year he re- 
turned to Denver, where he has since engaged in the practice of law and in the 
management of his private interests. 

In 1899 Mr. MacMillan was united in marriage to Miss Anna Wight, who was 
born in Maine, a daughter of Frederick D. Wight, of Denver, who was at one time 
a very prominent business man of Trinidad, Colorado, and a leading citizen of the 
state. His later years were passed in Denver, where he died about six years ago, 
leaving an extensive estate. To Mr. and Mrs. MacMillan have been born five chil- 
dren: Dorothy, a student at The Wolcott School, Denver, and who possesses considerable 
musical talent; Charles Wight, born August 1, 1902, in Denver, a high school pupil; 
Frederick Dearborn, born October 2, 1904, in Rock Springs, Wyoming, attending high 
school; and Ruth and Marjorie, who are also in school. 

Mr. MacMillan turns to motoring, to trout fishing and to golf for recreation. He 
belongs to Beta Theta Pi, a college fraternity, and he is also connected with the Benev- 
olent Protective Order of Elks and with the Masonic fraternity. His membership in 
the latter is in Oriental Lodge, No. 74, A. F. & A. M., of Spokane; in Colorado Chapter, 
No. 29, R. A. M.; Denver Commandery, No. 25, K. T.; and in El Jebel Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine. He belongs to the Lakewood Country Club and to the Denver Athletic 
Club, and is a member of the Denver Civic and Commercial Association. He is also 
a member of the First Congregational church and of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation and in the latter is serving on the boys' committee. He takes a deep interest 
in philanthropic work, contributing generously to the support of many plans and move- 
ments toward ameliorating hard conditions of life for the unfortunate and is ever ready 
to extend a helping hand where aid is needed. Intensely interested in the vital prob- 
lems of the country at the present time, he does active service in connection with the 
promotion of Liberty loans and the Red Cross. His life has Indeed been a busy, active 
and useful one, characterized by high purposes and fraught with great good. 



JOHN R. WOLFF. 



Liberal educational training well qualified John R. Wolff for professional activity 
and since 1900 he has been actively and successfully engaged in the practice of law 
in Boulder. He was born upon a farm in Jefferson county, Colorado, near Denver, in 
1877. His grandfather, John B. Wolff, was a native of Martinsburg, Virginia, and was 
a son of Joseph Wolff, who served America as a soldier in the War of 1812 and again 
in the Mexican war. He was also keeper of the Long Bridge at Washington, D. C, 
during the Civil war. His father had been a soldier in the Continental army during 
the Revolutionary war and thus through many generations the family has manifested 
the utmost loyalty to American interests. John Wolff, the father of John R. Wolff 
of this review, was born in Wheeling, Virginia, now West Virginia, in the year 1848 
and was a youth of fourteen years when in July, 18fi2, he arrived in Colorado in 
company with his father. They settled upon a ranch near Denver, where John Wolff 
remained for six or seven years. He then returned eastward as far as Iowa and 
spent two years in that state, after which he again became a resident of Colorado, 
settling in Larimer county. At a later period he removed to Adams county, where 



316 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

he engaged in ranching for a number of years and then took up his abode in Boulder, 
where he now makes his home. 

Between the years 1881 and 1895 John R. Wolft remained upon his father's farm 
in Adams county, Colorado, having the usual experiences that fall to the lot of the 
farmbred boy who divides his time between the acquirement of a public school educa- 
tion and the work of the fields. He continued in the district schools until 1888, when 
he entered the North Denver high school, from which he was graduated with the 
class of 1895. He determined upon a professional career and with that end in view 
entered the University of Colorado at Boulder, completing his law course as a graduate 
of the class of 1899 and finishing his academic course as a member of the class of 
1900. Thus well qualified by liberal literary and professional training, he entered upon 
the practice of his profession in Boulder and through the intervening years has 
specialized in mining law, showing marked ability in handling important cases of 
this character, while the extent of his clientage indicates much concerning his success. 

On the 22d of July, 1903, Mr. Wolff was united in marriage to Miss Maude C. 
Hague, a daughter of Charles G. Hague, and they now have two children, John R. and 
Lois Josephine. Mr. Wolff is a member of the First Presbyterian church, is also 
identified with the Boulder Club and is a Master Mason. His political allegiance is 
given to the republican party and these associations and membership relations indicate 
much of the nature of his interests and the rules which govern his conduct. Aside 
from his activity along those lines and in the path of his profession he is greatly 
interested in mining and is a director in many mining companies, having made most 
judicious investment in mining properties in this section of the country. His judg- 
ment is sound, his discrimination keen and his investments have brought to him 
a substantial financial return. There ars few, if any, more thoroughly conversant 
with mining law in all of its departments and phases, and the soundness of his legal 
opinions is attested by colleagues and contemporaries at the bar. 



JAMES N. COUNTER. 



James N. Counter, one of the progressive, alert and energetic business men of 
Brighton, was born in the province of Ontario, Canada. January 10, 1858, a son of 
Charles and Adelaide (Watts) Counter. He obtained his education in Ontario and 
in Kansas, the family having removed during his boyhood days to the latter state. He 
learned the printer's trade in Belleville, Kansas, where he worked until he reached his 
majority. He then went to Oberlin, Kansas, where he conducted a newspaper for a time, 
and in 1887 he arrived in Wray, Colorado, where he purchased the Wray Rattler, which 
he owned and published for ten years. He made it a very attractive journal, the name 
indicating the enterprising spirit manifest in the paper and its endorsement of all those 
interests of benefit to the public. Prospering in his undertaking, he extended the scope 
of his business activity by the purchase of a lumber yard there. This he conducted 
until 1902, when he disposed of his interests in Wray and removed to Brighton, where 
he became owner of a lumber yard, in which he carries an extensive line of all kinds 
of lumber and building supplies. He has built up a business of large and gratifying 
proportions. 

In Belleville, Kansas, on the 29th of July, 1883, Mr. Counter was united in 
marriage to Miss May Tucker, a daughter of H. Tucker. Their children are four in 
number. James C. is now in the service of the government as irrigation manager 
of the Belle Fouche (So. Dak.) irrigation project. He is a graduate of the state 
college, at Fort Collins, where he pursued a thorough course in civil and irrigation 
engineering, being later elected to the office of county surveyor for Adams county, 
which position he filled most creditably. Benjamin T. Is associated in business with 
his father in Brighton. Clara J. is the wife of William A. Gaddis. Mildred, the young- 
est, is yet at home. 

Mr. Counter belongs to the Masonic fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. In the former he has connections with Brighton Lodge, No. 7S, A. F. & A. M., 
of which he is a past master; Denver Chapter. No. 2, R. A. M.; Colorado Commandery, 
No. 1, K. T.; and El Jebel Temple of the Mystic Shrine. His political allegiance is 
given to the democratic party and he is recognized as one of its leaders in his section 
of the state. His fellow townsmen, recognizing his worth and ability, called him to 
the office of mayor and continued him in that position for four years, during which 
he gave the city a most businesslike and progressive administration. He studied 
its needs and its possibilities, seeking to obviate the former and develop the latter 




JAMES N. COUNTER 



318 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

to the benefit of the entire community. Adams county chose him to be its rep- 
resentative in the state legislature from 1914 until 1916 and while a member of the 
house he gave the most thoughtful, earnest and careful attention to all vital ques- 
tions which came up for settlement. He stands for progressiveness in public affairs 
just as he does in business life and his entire career has been characterized by steady 
advancement, while each forward step has brought him a broader outlook and wider 
opportunities. 



ISAAC E. McBROOM. 



Isaac E. McBroom was a respected citizen of Arapahoe county and when death 
called him his loss was deeply felt by his many friends and associates in that section 
of the state. He was born in Indiana, April 22, 1830, a son of Joseph and Phoebe 
(Young) McBroom, both of whom were natives of Virginia. In early life, however, 
tljey removed to Indiana and Mr. McBroom was for many years actively engaged in 
farming there. 

Isaac E. McBroom spent his youthful days to the age of thirteen years in his 
native state and then accompanied his parents on their removal to St. Joseph, Missouri, 
where he continued his education, which had been begun in the public schools of 
Indiana. In 1850 he removed to Mills county, Iowa, where he settled upon a farm 
and there resided until 1860, when he crossed the plains to Denver with that great 
tide of emigration that was flowing into the state and reclaiming its vast areas for 
the purposes of civilization. He settled upon his widow's present farm, homestead- 
ing one hundred and sixty acres which adjoins the present town of Fort Logan, although 
the town had not been established at that period. He was one of the pioneer agricul- 
turists of the community and contributed to the development and improvement of 
his section of the state in large measure. He first built a log cabin and occupied 
that dwelling until 1889, when he erected a fine brick residence that is still standing 
upon the place — one of the attractive farm homes of the district. As the years passed 
he energetically and successfully followed farming and stock raising, both branches 
of his business proving profitable. He was thus actively engaged to the lime of 
his demise. 

In Iowa, in 1854, Mr. McBroom had been married to Miss Emma L. Brower, a native 
of Kane county, Illinois, and a daughter of Joseph and Cordelia (Hussy) Brower. both 
of whom were natives of the state of New York. They removed westward to Illinois 
in the '30s and became residents of Iowa in 1850, at which time they settled upon 
a farm, there spending the remainder of their days. Mr. and Mrs. McBroom became 
the parents of three children, but the first two died in infancy. The surviving daughter, 
Eva, is the wife of Clark Payter and they live upon the farm with her mother. They 
have one son, Richard E., who is a high school pupil. 

The death of Mr. McBroom occurred on the 17th of October, 1914, when he had 
reached the venerable age of eighty-four years, and his remains were interred in 
the Littleton cemetery. He was a self-made man, who started out in the business world 
empty-handed, but by unfaltering industry and determination he acquired a handsome 
fortune and left his family in most comfortable financial circumstances. In politics 
he was a very loyal and earnest republican, never faltering in his support of the prin- 
ciples of the party. He served upon the town board and upon the school board and at 
all times he stood for progress and improvement in his community. He had been loyal 
in citizenship, had conducted business interests with ability and success and he laid 
down his task in the twilight of the day, when all that he had to do had been nobly 
and fully completed. 



FRED C. CRAMER. 



Fred C. Cramer, possessed of executive ability and qualities of business leadership, 
is now at the head of the Denver Powerine Company, of which he purchased the 
control on June 2, 1913. This company handles petroleum products and has developed 
a business of extensive proportions. Mr. Cramer was born at Saratoga Springs, New 
York, February 23, 1864, a son of Boardman J. and Mary E. ("Wright) Cramer, who 
were also natives of the Empire state. In the year 1861 they removed westward to 
Lawrence, Kansas, and there the father engaged in carpenter work. Later, however, 



320 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

the family returned to New York, remaining for a year, and tlien removed to Lawrence, 
Kansas, where Boardman J. Cramer resided to the time of his death in 1S82. His 
widow survived and passed away in Denver in 1911. In their family were five children, 
three of whom have passed away, the surviving brother of Fred C. Cramer being 
Charles B. Cramer, a former state engineer of Colorado and a well known resident 
of Denver. 

Fred C. Cramer was the third in order of birth in his father's family. He 
attended the schools of Lawrence. Kansas, and afterward spent two years as a student 
in the University of Kansas, thus receiving liberal educational privileges. In 1S81 he 
established his home at Leadville, Colorado, where he began work in a harness shop at 
a wage of twenty-five dollars per month, and board. He left that position in March, 
1882, and traveled through various sections of Idaho, remaining for a time at Boise 
and there fitting out for a prospecting trip through the Wood River district. He re- 
mained in that state until 1885, when he came to Denver, en route to Rochester, New 
York, where tor three years he was employed as a dry goods clerk and also in a flour 
mill. In 1888, however, he again came to the west, making his way to Breckenridge, 
Colorado, where he engaged in mining and civil engineering on his own account. He 
maintained his home at Breckenridge until 191?. and, in addition to his other activities 
there, engaged in practice as a civil and mining engineer, maintaining an office for that 
work in Cripple Creek from 1891 until 1893. In 1913 he disposed of his interests at 
Breckenridge and returned to Denver, where as stated he purchased the controlling 
interest of the Denver Powerine Company, of which he has since been the president. 
This company handles all kinds of high class petroleum products and maintains various 
oil filling automobile stations which are the pride of Denver. These are situated in 
various parts of the city and the one located at Fourteenth and Tremont streets is 
as fine as can be found in the entire west. Mr. Cramer is also the president of the 
Midnight Oil Company, operating in Colorado and Wyoming. His business interests 
are thus extensive and important and substantial success is rewarding his labors. 

On the 17th of June, 1890, Mr. Cramer was married to Miss Louise E. Brooks, of 
Leadville, Colorado, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Brooks, pioneer people of that 
city. Her father is still living, now making his home at Seattle. Washington. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cramer have two children: George B., born in Breckenridge, August 6, 1891; 
and Harold F., born in Denver, August 20, 1897. Harold F. Cramer was educated in 
the East Denver high school, with a year's study at Golden, and is now a member of 
the United States army, serving with Company G, of the Twenty-ninth Colorado 
Engineers, which is attached to the Rainbow Division, that in the drives of 1918 has 
covered itself with undying credit and honor. George B. Cramer is married, having 
wedded Miss Hazel E. Anderson, and is in the United States Tank service at Camp 
Colt, Pennsylvania. 

In politics Mr. Cramer maintains an independent course, but has been affiliated 
with the democratic party for twenty-five years. While living in Breckenridge he 
served as treasurer of the town tor several years, making a most creditable record In 
that position. Fraternally he is a Mason, having membership in the blue lodge, and 
he belongs to the Kiwanis Club, also to the Denver Motor Club and to the Denver Civic 
and Commercial Association. He stands for all that has to do with the progress, 
development, upbuilding and improvement of the city and state and his lite typifies 
the progressive spirit of the west, leading to its rapid and substantial advancement. 



JOHN McINNES. 



John Mclnnes is one of the well known residents of Boulder, who after long and 
prominent connection with business affairs is now living retired, although he still acts 
as vice president of the First National Bank of Boulder, to which position he was 
called in 1902. He was born in Ontario, Canada, February 1, 1840. His fatlier, Donald 
Mclnnes, a native of Scotland, was born in the year 1792 and crossed the Atlantic to 
Canada in 1817. He was married in Ontario to Margaret McRae and died in the year 
1851, while his wife passed away in 1850. 

John Mclnnes was therefore a little lad of but eleven years when left an orphan. 
He was reared in Ontario and acquired a common school education, after which he 
took up the profession of teaching, which he followed through two winter seasons in 
Ontario, and in 1862 he came to the United States, making his way to the copper 
mining country on Lake Superior. There he resided tor four years, being connected 
with a mining company In above-ground work. At the close of the Civil war he re- 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 321 

moved to Green Bay, Michigan, wliere he resided for thirty-one years and during 
that period was actively and extensively engaged in the lumber business. Attracted 
by the opportunities of the west, he arrived in Boulder, Colorado, in 1898 and through 
the succeeding period of twenty years has been a resident of this city. In 1902 he was 
called to the oflice of vice president of the First National Bank of Boulder and has 
since occupied that position but is now practically living retired. He was connected 
with copper mining, in which he won a notable measure of success. In all business 
affairs he has displayed keen sagacity which has resulted in judicious investment, 
and indefatigable energy and unfaltering perseverance have also been features of his 
business career, placing him in his present position as one of the prosperous residents 
of Boulder. 

In December, 1S97, in Michigan, Mr. Mclnnes was united in marriage to Miss 
Georgina C. Helps and to them have been born two sons and a daughter: Donald, 
Gertrude and Gordon. The family home, which is one of the finest in Boulder, was 
built about 1904. The religious faith of Mr. and Mrs. Mclnnes is that of the Presby- 
terian church, while socially he is connected with the Boulder Club and in his political 
views is a republican. He displays many of the sterling characteristics of the people 
who come from the land of the crag and glen, of mountain peak and mountain lake, 
of lowland heath and plain — the land of liberty, poetry and song, of religious and 
educational zeal, the home of Wallace and Bruce, of Scott and Burns, the land whose 
heroes have honored Britain's flag on every field from Waterloo to the Crimea and 
Lucknow, on to the great battlefields of the World war. Scotland has been the ances- 
tral home of many of America's brightest, best and most capable men. It is from that 
land that Mr. Mclnnes traces his lineage, and the determined purpose which has ever 
marked the Scotch people has been one of the strong and salient forces in his honor- 
able and prosperous career. 



ROBERT A. CHACE. 



Robert A. Chace, who owns and operates a ranch on section S, in Morgan county, 
adjoining the town of Fort Morgan, and makes a specialty of the raising of Percheron 
horses, Galloway cattle and Poland China hogs, has been very successful in the con- 
duct of his business affairs. The reason is not far to seek. He has always regarded 
Industry as the basis of honorable success and industry has therefore constituted the 
foundation on which he has builded his prosperity. Mr. Cliace comes to Colorado from 
Illinois. He was born in Ottawa, that state, on the 22d of August, 1857, a son of 
Edward and Elizabeth (Lewis) Chace, the former a native of Massachusetts and the 
latter of Pennsylvania. The father, a farmer by occupation, removed westward to 
Lasalle county, Illinois, at an early period in the development of that region, settling 
there about 1832. The work of improvement had scarcely been begun in that district, 
for it was in that year that the Black Hawk war occurred and decided the question 
of the supremacy of the Indians in Illinois, the white settlers demonstrating their 
right to rule over the land and utilize it for the purposes of civilization. The father 
purchased and improved land, which he continued to cultivate throughout his remain- 
ing days, his death there occurring on the 11th of April, 1875. His widow survived for 
many years, passing away at the home of her son, Robert A., on the 30th of July, 1900. 

Robert A. Chace was reared and educated in Lasalle and Livingston counties of 
Illinois, remaining with his parents after completing his education and cultivating the 
old homestead farm in Livingston county until the spring of 1888, when he removed to 
Arapahoe county. Colorado, where he took up a homestead eighty miles east of Denver. 
This he continued to develop for five years, proving up on the claim in 1893. He 
afterward sold that property and bought a farm in Morgan county, a mile south of 
Fort Morgan. This he also developed and improved, continuing the cultivation of 
that land until 1899, when he purchased his present place of one hundred and sixty 
acres. Later he bought an additional tract of one hundred and sixty acres across the 
road and has further invested in land as his financial resources increased until his 
holdings now aggregate five thousand acres in Morgan county, farming, however, only 
a section of this. In all of his undertakings he has been quite successful and has 
become widely known as a leading stock raiser, making a specialty of Percheron horses, 
Galloway cattle and Poland China hogs, and his business in that direction has 
brought to hira substantial profits. He is also a director of the First National Bank of 
Fort Morgan, in which connection he has remained for many years. He has ever 
stood for progress and improvement along all lines leading to" general benefit and 



322 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

upbuilding throughout the state. He was largely instrumental in securing the location 
of the sugar factory at Fort Morgan and he now has been a director of the National 
Western Stock Show of Denver for several years and also an exhibitor from its be- 
ginning. He has been prominently associated with Irrigation interests, being con- 
nected with various ditch boards and serving at one time on fourteen different boards. 
His close study of every problem connected with irrigation has made his judgment 
in that regard very valuable and his cooperation has done much to enhance land 
values in the state through the development of its irrigation Interests. 

On the 13th of September, 1882, Mr. Chace was married to Miss Alice Everett, a 
daughter of Alfred E. and Susan J. (Bowers) Everett, the former a native of Frances- 
town, New Hampshire, while the latter was born in Chester, Ohio. Her father followed 
farming throughout his entire business career, residing most of that period in Livings- 
ton county, Illinois, where Mrs. Chace was born. He was one of the first settlers there 
and was closely associated with its agricultural interests to the time of his death, 
which occurred in November, 1875. For more than three years he had survived his 
wife, who passed away in March, 1872. To Mr. and Mrs. Chace have been born seven 
children: Alfred, who was born in August, 1SS6, and is now at Camp Grant, Illinois; 
Reno E., who is operating the Chace & Sons ranches in Wyoming, comprising thirty 
thousand acres of land, on which they run sheep and cattle — an important project 
for one of his years, for he was born in October, 1887; Myra, who was born in August, 
1890, and is the wife of Professor R. J. Hale, of Fort Morgan, agricultural teacher in 
the public schools and also having charge of extension work for the State College; 
Willard, who was born November 12, 1S97, and is at home; Ida, who died In November, 
1898, when but eighteen days old; one child, who died in infancy; and Cora, who died 
in November, 1899, at the age of four and a half years. 

Politically Mr. Chace is a republican and in 1896 was nominated on the party ticket 
for the office of state legislator but was defeated. His religious faith is that of the 
Presbyterian church. He has done splendid work on behalf of public progress and 
improvement, especially in connection with the development of the natural resources 
of Colorado. His labors have been an effective force in stimulating ambition and a 
desire for progress and improvement on the part of others, especially in connection 
with the National Western Stock Show of Denver. 



JOHN W. ROBB. 

John W. Robb is the owner of an excellent property in eastern Jefferson county, 
now in the suburb of Lakewood, and his land is devoted to farming and fruit growing. 
Although he once owned many acres he now has sold all but ten, for Mr. Robb has 
reached the eightieth milestone on life's journey. He was born at Vernon, Jennings 
county, Indiana, of Scottish parentage, on the 15th of July, 1838. The public schools 
afforded him his educational opportunities and in his youthful days he worked in his 
father's woolen factory until he reached the age of seventeen. In 1855 the family 
removed to Walshville, Montgomery county, Illinois, after which John W. Robb left 
home at the age of twenty-one years and traveled through Missouri and Kansas. In 
Kansas City he secured a position in the Bullard machine shops, which were devoted 
to the making of quartz mills for the mines. In April, 1860, accompanied by two 
of his brothers, he started for Pike's Peak and on the 15th of May arrived in Denver, 
from which point he proceeded to Central City. He engaged in prospecting and mining 
and later he assisted in building a ditch from the Fall river to Nevada City. He 
was also one of the promoters in organizing the Empire and Union mining districts. 
In September, 1861, he enlisted in Company K of the First Colorado Cavalry and 
served for four months. He then enlisted in Company H, Curtis' Horse Regiment, at 
Peru, Nebraska, and was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland. The name of the 
organization was changed to the Fifth Iowa Cavalry and they went directly into active 
service. At the battle of Franklin, on Dick river, in 1864, and while on picket duty 
at night, Mr. Robb was captured, stripped of his uniform and marched to the Fort 
Columbia stockade in Tennessee. Thence he was transferred to Montgomery, Ala- 
bama, and afterward to Thomasville, Georgia, from which point he was taken to Selma, 
Alabama, and afterward to Meridian, Mississippi, while finally he was sent to Ander- 
sonville. Georgia, having marched seven hundred miles barefooted and suffering all 
the miseries and tortures of prison life. Once he made his escape from his captors 
but after a chase of nine days was recaptured. On the approach of Union forces he 
was paroled and returned to his command at Nashville, Tennessee. 




JOHN W. ROBB 



324 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

With the close of the war Mr. Robb returned to Colorado to find that his agent, 
in whose care he had placed his interests had made his escape and the property, 
amounting to thirty-eight thousand dollars, had been sold, regardless of the act of 
congress giving a soldier a year to return to his mines. Mr. Robb was therefore 
obliged to begin life anew but soon became a victim to mountain fever and was forced 
to go into the valley. 

It was then that Mr. Robb located four miles west of Denver, on the West Colfax 
road, in Jefferson county. He purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land and for 
many years devoted his time and energies to general agricultural pursuits and fruit 
raising. He brought the land under a high state of development and improvement 
and it is today one of the excellent properties of this section of the state. During the 
intervening years, however, he has sold all but ten acres which now constitutes his home 
place, where he lives with his daughter Martha, his wife having passed away two 
years ago. 

In his political views Mr. Robb is a republican and has ever been a stalwart sup- 
porter of the party which was the defense of the Union during the dark days of the 
Civil war and has always been a party of reform and progress. He is a member of the 
Society of Colorado Pioneers and maintains pleasant relations with his old military 
comrades as a member of A. Lincoln Post. No. 4, G. A. R. He was one of six brothers 
who served in the Union army and is the sole survivor. His has indeed been an 
active and useful life, and he can look back over the past without regret and forward 
to the future without fear. 



CHARLES EMERSON. 



Charles Emerson, who passed away in Denver, August 23, 1S96, at the advanced 
age of eighty-one years, was born in Marietta, Ohio, August 6, 1815, his parents being 
Caleb and Mary (Dana) Emerson. The father was a lawyer and newspaper pub- 
lisher of Marietta, Ohio. The ancestors came to America between 1640 and 1700. 
They were mostly English, with a slight French strain, and members of the family 
through succeeding generations have been lawyers, farmers and preachers. 

Charles Emerson attended the schools of Marietta, Ohio, in which city he was 
reared, and also spent a year or more as a student in Oberlin College before entering 
the University of Cincinnati for the study of medicine. Between courses of study he 
taught school. He also served an apprenticeship with a practicing physician, a course 
that was often followed by medical students at that time. In his early twenties he 
settled in Van Wert, Ohio, where he practiced medicine until about thirty-seven 
years of age. He afterward entered the banking business, establishing a private bank 
In Van Wert in connection with a Mr. Wells of that place. The bank was nationalized 
as the First National Bank of Van Wert in 1861 with Mr. Emerson as president and 
Its active executive head, and he remained in active connection therewith until 1870. 
when he removed to Greeley, Colorado, and there entered a private banking firm 
as an inactive partner. He sold his Ohip Interests in 1876. settling permanently in 
this state, and with C. G. Buckingham, of Boulder, Colorado, founded the bank of 
Emerson & Buckingham, of Longmont, Colorado, but was never active in the work 
of the bank, which is one of the oldest moneyed institutions in the state and is still 
in existence, though recently it has been nationalized under another name. Mr. Emer- 
son soon parted svith his interest in the bank, as did Mr. Buckingham, to Charles 
Day and Walter Buckingham. He afterward engaged extensively in real estate oper- 
ations and irrigation enterprises and at one time owned ten thousand acres of land 
in Colorado. He was the largest stockholder and the first president of the Platte and 
Beaver Improvement Company, which built The Upper Platte and Beaver Canal and 
The Lower Platte and Beaver Canal of Morgan county, Colorado, bringing under irri- 
gation over thirty thousand acres of land in the eastern part of that county. He also 
engaged in the cattle business and after selling his Greeley interests removed to Denver 
in 1S85, there spending his remaining days, his death occurring August 23, 1S96. 

On the Sth of May, 1842, Mr. Emerson was married to Margaret (Bangman) 
Grier. who died in 1869, and on the 15th of March, 1873. he wedded Mrs. Kate (Hill) 
Atkinson, a widow, the latter a daughter of Richard and Mary (Richings) Hill, the 
former an export merchant oi Birmingham, England, where Mrs. Emerson was born 
March 10, 1835, dying in Denver, June 10, 1908. Mr. Emerson's children, born of his 
first marriage, were Elizabeth E. Marble, Mary Buckingham and Margaret E. Smith, 
but the last named is the only one now living. The children of the second marriage 




CHARLES EMERSON 



326 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

are: Charles William and George Dana, both of whom are married; and Rose Hill, 
the wife of Stanley V. Hamly, of Denver. 

Mr. Emerson was not a party man but was inclined to single tax ideas. He served 
as the first local treasurer of Union colony of Greeley, occupying the office for six years. 
While he made valuable contribution to the development and progress of the state, it 
was not as an office holder but in the advancement of his individual interests, which 
were ever of a character that constlJ.ute(Lan important element in the upbuilding of the 
districts in which he operated. 



HENRY P. MANHART. 



Henry P. Manhart, county and state road contractor, who has done important 
public work especially in bridge building, makes his home at Castle Rock. He was 
born in Douglas county, Colorado, April 15, 1870, a son of Christ and Sarah (Varney) 
Manhart, both of whom are natives of Pennsylvania and came to Colorado in 1860. 
They are now residents of Sedalia. 

Henry P. Manhart acquired a common school education while spending his youth- 
ful days upon his father's farm. He was also trained in the work of the fields and 
after his textbooks were put aside he assumed the management of the home ranch, 
which he continued to further develop and cultivate until 1902, when he established a 
market at Sedalia, continuing in business there for four years. On the expiration of 
that period he removed tO Pierce, Colorado, where he engaged in the implement busi- 
ness for two years, and later he took up his abode at Larkspur, Colorado, where he 
carried on mercantile interests for two and a half years. Since that date he has been 
engaged in contract work in road iaiid bridge construction, both for the county and 
state, in Douglas county. He does practically all of the bridge construction work in 
his county and keeps busy throughout the year a large force of workmen. He 
thoroughly understands the- scientific principles of bridge building as well as the 
practical phases of the work and the results of his labors are highly satisfactory to 
the public. 

In 1898 Mr. Manhart was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Lowell, who was bom 
in Maine but was reared in Sedalia, Colorado. They have one child, Bessie F., born 
December 21, 1900, now a high school graduate who expects soon to enter Colorado 
College with a two years' scholarship in recognition of the highest standing in her 
class. Mr. Manhart is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being 
identified with Lodge No. 142 at Sedalia. He is leading a busy and useful life. There 
are no esoteric phases in his career, his entire course being characterized by industry 
and enterprise, leading to the wise use of his opportunities, and his work has ever 
been of a character that has contributed to public progress and welfare. 



JAMES COWIE. 

James Cowie is a business man of discernment and marked enterprise whose 
attention is now largely given to the supervision of his invested interests, which 
include much property in Boulder, where he -makes his home. He was born in For- 
farshire, Scotland, in 1855, a son of William Cowie, who was born in 1800 and passed 
away in the land of hills and heather in the year 1866. 

James Cowie obtained his education in the schools of his native country and in 
1872, when a youth of seventeen years, bade adieu to friends and native land and 
sailed for the new world. He took up his abode in Syracuse, New York, where he 
remained for five years, being there engaged in clerking. In 1877 he came to Boulder 
county, Colorado, where he turned his attention to mining, concentrating his efforts 
upon mining activities for twelve years, during which time. he was connected with 
the famous Caribou mine as mill assayer and assistant superintendent. This was a 
position of large responsibility, the duties of which, however, he most capably dis- 
charged. In 1S89 he w^as elected clerk of Boulder county and by reelection was 
continued in that office for four years. For ten years, beginning in 1S97, he served on 
the Boulder school board and long before the expiration of that term of office he was 
called to higher political honors. It was in 1902 that he was made the nominee of the 
republican party for the oflSce of secretary of state and endorsement of his first term's 
service came to him In reelection, so that he was the incumbent in that position for 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 327 

four years. He was again called to a position of public trust in 1905, when he was 
chosen mayor of Boulder for a two years' term, during which he gave to the city a 
businesslike and progressive administration characterized by various needed reforms 
and improvements. He has never ceased to feel the keenest interest in politics but 
Is not active as an office holder at the present time. His attention is concentrated, in 
as far as he gives his time to business affairs, upon the interests of the Boulder 
Building & Loan Association, of which he has been the president for a quarter of a 
century. 

In January, 1881, In the city of Boulder, Mr. Cowie was united in marriage to Miss 
Irene Beckett Reed, a daughter of the late James Reed and a native of Iowa. To them 
have been born three daughters: Irene Jane, now deceased; Isabel C, who is the wife 
of Floyd Redding, a well known architect of Denver; and Josephine R., who is the 
wife of Bailey H. Dunlap, living in La Feria, Texas. 

Mr. Cowie is well known as a representative of the Masonic fraternity in Boulder, 
having attained the Knight Templar degree, while with the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine he has crossed the sands of the desert. He is also identified with the Knights 
of Pythias and with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He stands for all those 
things which have progressive worth in the life of the individual and of the community 
and his career is an illustration of the fact that the path of opportunity is open to 
all. Without special advantages at the outset of his career, his equipment being that 
of a common school education, he started in the business world and step by step has 
worked his way steadily upward. Watchful of all opportunities pointing to success, 
he has wisely utilized the chances which have come to him and his keen sagacity has 
enabled him to understand the right time for real estate investment. Accordingly he 
has added to his holdings as the years have passed on, until his property interests 
now return to him a most gratifying income. 



WILLIAM M. GRAVES. 



Among the successful business men of Arvada, Jefferson county, was numbered 
William M. Graves, who there profitably conducted a blacksmith shop which was also 
fitted with feed grinders, planing mill, turning lathe and other machinery along 
similar lines. Moreover, he operated threshing machines and from this source derived 
a gratifying addition to his income. He was among the pioneers of his district and 
during the long period of his residence in Jefferson county he made many friends, in 
business as well as in private life. All were agreed upon his high qualities of charac- 
ter, his sound business principles and his value as a public-spirited citizen. 

William M. Graves was born near Bloomington, Illinois, August 12, 1846, the eldest 
of five children born to Oliver and Lucy (Story) Graves. The other members of the 
family are: John, who is farming near Broomfield, Colorado: Mary, the wife of E. 
Porter Smith, who follows the same line of work near Broomfield; Edward, a mining 
man, who makes his home in Denver: and Harry, a merchant of Broomfield. Oliver 
Graves, who was one of the California Argonauts, was a native of the Green Mountain 
state, being born in Montpelier, March 13, 1813. His youthful days were spent in 
the city of his birth but after his marriage a removal was made to New York state, 
where the family home was maintained for several years. The opportunity of attain- 
ing more readily to fortune and independence in the farther west decided him to 
remove to Illinois, where in the city of Bloomington he established a wholesale and 
retail grocery business which he conducted tor four years, at the end of which time 
he embarked in agricultural pursuits. The world-stirring news of the rich gold dis- 
coveries in California in the year 1849 induced him, however, to seek out the gold 
fields and court fortune to grant him a rich stake. He started across the plains and 
amid dangers from Indians and other sources he pursued his way until at last he 
reached his destination. His journey was filled with thrilling incidents, and while 
he himsflf did not arouse the enmity of the red men, he witnessed many harrowing 
scenes. One ot these was the skinning of a white man alive by the Indians as a 
revenge for shooting an Indian squaw. Such terrible scenes he was forced to witness 
and it was therefore with gratitude in his heart that he finally reached his destination 
unscathed. In his mining operations he was more successful than most of those 
who sought fortunes in California and after two years of arduous labor he returned 
home with his father-in-law. Palmer Story, bringing a considerable sum of money 
with him. During the Pike's Peak excitement of 1859 Mr. Graves was attracted to 
Colorado and engaged in mining at Spring Gulch. In 1860 he again returned to Illinois 



328 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

in order to take his family west and they settled twelve miles from Blackhawk, where 
he bought a toll road from Golden Gate, twelve miles up into the mountains. He was 
however, unable to hold it and in 1S62 he removed to Arvada, where he had taken up 
a ranch claim in January. 1861. Here he settled, devoting the balance of his life 
to agricultural pursuits and acquiring a gratifying competence. His death occurred 
May 4, 1896, when he was in his eighty-fourth year. 

William M. Graves was reared in Illinois and there received his early education. 
When about fourteen years of age he came with the family to Colorado and at the age 
of seventeen he was apprenticed to the blacksmith's trade in Golden Gate with Ashley 
Howard. He thus continued for eighteen months, when he removed to Denver, con- 
tinuing to work along the same line under Ansel Barker, who had a shop on the 
present site of Brown Brothers' wholesale grocery. While in Denver six lots were 
offered him on that site for three hundred and fifty dollars but he refused to buy 
them. For two years he remained with Ansel Barker, but then his father's illness 
caused him to give up his work there and he returned home in order to take charge 
of the farm. He had bought a thresher in the fall of 1868 and about three years later 
took up the threshing business in a regular way, becoming quite successful along 
this line and operating three steam threshers, which were kept busy day after day 
during the season. He also built a blacksmith's shop in Arvada and in connection 
with this business, which grew to gratifying proportions, he had a shop fitted up with 
feed grinders, planing mill, turning lathe, band saw and other machinery to do 
special work for the surrounding farmers, saving them thereby delay and trouble. 
All his enterprises were managed ably and as the years passed he prospered. He also 
continued in the operation of the home farm, which he brought to a high state of 
productiveness, installing modern machinery and facilities upon the place. He was 
thoroughly well versed in agricultural subjects, knew which crops were the most profit- 
able and studied soil conditions, climate, moisture problems, etc., following scientific 
principles in the operation of his land. 

On January 14, 1S6S, the marriage of William M. Graves and Miss Elizabeth Perrin 
was celebrated. To them eleven children were horn, three of whom died in infancy. 
The others are: Ollie; Charles; Ruth; Annie; Robert; Louise; Nellie; and Ida, who 
has passed away. The family enjoy the high regard of the community in which they 
live and are honored as pioneers of the section. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Graves was a republican and faithfully supported 
the measures and candidates of that party. The public welfare found in him a stanch 
friend and he supported many movements undertaken for the benefit of Jefferson 
county, having in 1892 been elected county commissioner on the republican ticket 
and, being reelected, served two terms in that capacity. His reelection stood as in- 
controvertible proof of his popularity and ability and his unselfish aims in serving 
the county turned out to its benefit. In his official capacity he promoted and supported 
projects and improvements which greatly developed the district. The cause of educa- 
tion also was always close to the heart of Mr. Graves and for fifteen years he was 
school director of his district. As a public-spirited and patriotic American citizen 
he proved an invaluable factor in planting the seeds of civilization in the wilds of 
the west and his county and town have been bettered through his activities. 



JOHN R. HOPKINS, M. D. 



Dr. John R. Hopkins, a physician and surgeon of Denver, was born at Stony 
Creek, Ontario, Canada, January 30, 1871, a son of Silas and Katherine (Agnew) 
Hopkins. The mother was born in the north of Ireland but in early life went to 
Canada, where she was married. The father was a native of that country and engaged 
extensively in fruit raising, becoming one of the prominent orchardists near Ham- 
ilton, Ontario, where he passed away in 1888. His wife survived him for a coiisidr 
erable period, dying in 1912. They had a family of six children, four of whom ara 
living: Dr. William B. Hopkins, a prominent physician and surgeon of Hamilton, 
Ontario; Dr. Marshall W. Hopkins, living at Edmonton, Canada; and Edward, of 
Hamilton. 

The other surviving member of the family is Dr. Hopkins, of Denver, who attended 
school in Hamilton and afterward entered the University of Toronto, where he pur- 
sued his medical course and was graduated in 1893. He later attended lectures for 
post graduate work in London hospitals and at Edinburgh in the Royal College of 
Physicians and Surgeons and in other clinics and hospitals in Great Britain. He 




DR. JOHN R. HOPKINS 



330 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

devoted some time each year to post graduate work for fourteen years and was a student 
at the clinics of the Drs. Mayo in Rochester, Minnesota. In 1907 he began going 
abroad for post graduate study in Vienna, Berlin, Paris and other European centers. 
In fact, he has put forth every possible effort to promote his knowledge and thereby 
increase his efficiency in professional work. He entered upon active practice at the 
age of twenty-two years and after following his profession in Canada until 1900 came 
to Denver, where he opened an office, and through the intervening period has won 
a place among the most eminent surgeons of the state. For fourteen years he has 
been one of two chief surgeons on the staff of St. Anthony's Hospital in Denver. He 
belongs to the Denver City and County Medical Society, the Colorado State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association, is a life member of the Surgeons 
Club of Rochester, Minnesota, a member of the Anglo-American Medical Association 
of Berlin, and the American Medical Association of Vienna. 

In 1895 Dr. Hopkins was united in marriage to Miss Lottie Sherk, of Ridgeway, 
Ontario, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Sherk, who are prominent people of that 
place. Dr. and Mrs. Hopkins have two children: Hazel, bojn in Canada, October 1, 
1896, and a graduate of Colorado College of the class of 1918; and Hugh, who was^ 
born in Canada, November 1, 1899, and is now a sophomore in the University of 
Colorado. 

In politics Dr. Hopkins maintains an independent course but stands for that 
which is progressive in citizenship and loyally adheres to all plans and measures 
for the general good. His religious faith is that of the Trinity Methodist Episcopal 
church. He holds to the highest professional ideals and standards and has put forth 
every possible effort to majrif' his service of greatest worth in the world, realizing 
fully the responsibilities and .obligations that devolve upon the physician and surgeon. 
Few men have given so much time to study, investigation and research and his 
broad learning places him in 'the front rank of the eminent members of the pro- 
fession in Colorado. 



HON. CHARLES E. CROSSWHITE. 

Many are the interests which Hon. Charles E. Crosswhite represents In his 
district and state, and it must be conceded that in whatever line Mr. Crosswhite has 
been active he has been successful. Foremost with him have always been his agri- 
cultural interests, along which line he has become a leader, being now owner of a 
very valuable property. However, he is also connected with transportation and mer- 
cantile companies and, moreover, has large dairy interests thus augmenting his income 
from many lines. This, however, does not yet exhaust the variety of duties which he 
has taken upon his shoulders, for Mr. Crosswhite is also an able and energetic repre- 
sentative of his district in the Colorado state legislature. 

Charles E. Crosswhite was born in Gentry county. Missouri, a son of Alexander . 
D. and Lucy (Wright) Crosswhite, natives of Virginia and Kentucky respectively. 
The father was at different periods in various walks of life, being not only a successful 
teacher and lawyer but having also taken up mercantile and farming lines with good 
financial results. C. E. Crosswhite is a high school graduate and subsequently attended 
the Central Christian College at Albany, Missouri. The year 1896 marked his arrival 
in Colorado and more specifically in Cherry, Douglas county, where he secured a 
position with D. R. Williams, who was engaged in the dairy, creamery and mercan- 
tile business. It took Mr. Crosswhite but a few months to demonstrate to his employer 
his ability and in 1897 Mr. Williams gave to the energetic young man complete man- 
agement of the creamery and cheese factory. Thus Mr. Crosswhite became an expert 
cheese maker and his enterprise along that line may be estimated from the fact 
that he was the first to introduce the Babcock test in Douglas county. 

In 1901 Mr. Crosswhite married Miss Annie B. Williams, a daughter of D. R. and 
Alvera 0. (Pond) Williams, natives of Massachusetts. Her father was numbered 
among the early pioneers of Douglas county, of which he became a large landowner 
and one of the leading citizens. In many ways he promoted progress and develop- 
ment, giving valuable aid to movements which had for their purpose material as well 
as moral or intellectual growth. For three terms he efficiently served as county com- 
missioner and it was he who owned and operated the first cheese factory in the state 
of Colorado, known as Factory No. 1. In 1909 Mr. and Mrs. Crosswhite removed to 
Oklahoma and there they made their home until 1912 in Custer county. There he 
was not only prominently connected with agricultural interests, giving particular 




HON. CHARLES E. CROSSWHITE 



332 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

attention to cattle and hogs, but also served as township trustee in 1912. The return 
to Colorado was made in 1913 and he now owns a valuable ranch of seven hundred 
and sixty acres near Cherry, Colorado. This is in a high state of cultivation, suitable 
buildings to shelter stock and produce having been erected and everything about the 
place denoting progressive and energetic management. Moreover, Mr. Crosswhite was 
the organizer and is a director of the University Hill Dairy & Produce Company of 
Boulder county and in this connection maintains a dairy of fifty head of milch cows, 
the enterprise being operated in a most up-to-date and sanitary manner. It is a 
modern milk distributing business, and being conducted on sound principles, a sub- 
stantial income is derived from this enterprise. Moreover, Mr. Crosswhite is president 
of the Cherry Creek Mercantile & Transportation Company,- which operates motor 
trucks between Cherry and Denver. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Crosswhite are highly respected and esteemed in their com- 
munity. They have become the parents of eight children. William L., Hazel L., Percy 
R., Lucy E., David E., Edna M., Edgar W. and Thomas F. The children have been 
reared in the atmosphere of a refined Christian home and the best educational oppor- 
tunities have been provided for them. 

Mr. Crosswhite is a democrat by political persuasion and in 1914 was elected to 
the twenty-first general assembly of Colorado and not only took good care of the 
interests of his constituents but also gave careful attention to all those measures 
which were of general benefit to the state, giving his endorsement to bills which he 
considered of value to the greatest number. He was not only active in committee 
rooms but upon the floor of the house in order to secure the best advantages for his 
district and his term of office was identified with a number of improvements which 
resulted through his legislative activity. Fraternally he is a Mason and stands high 
in the esteem of his brethren of the craft. Mr. and Mrs. Crosswhite have a large 
circle of friends in their neighborhood and are esteemed as people of high accomplish- 
ments who have qualities of heart and character which endear them to all who come 
in contact with them. 



JOHN H. McKAY, M. D. 



Dr. John H. McKay is one of the well known physicians and surgeons of Denver 
and is conducting a private sanitarium for the treatment of nervous diseases. He was 
born in Madison, Mississippi, January 8, 1868, and is a son of John H. and Katherine 
(Mathews) McKay. The mother was born in Mississippi and belonged to a prominent 
southern family. The father was a native of Kentucky but became a well known and 
prominent physician and surgeon of Mississippi, where he engaged in the practice of 
his profession for many years, living at Madison and at Carrollton. During the Civil 
war he espoused the cause of the Confederacy and enlisted for service in the southern 
army, becoming a surgeon with the rank of major. He remained at the front during 
the entire period of hostilities. After the war was over he removed to Memphis, 
Tennessee, where he continued in the practice of his profession up to the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1897. For a long period he has survived his wife, who passed 
away in Madison, Mississippi, in 1882. They had a family of four children, of whom 
only two are living, the sister being Mrs. T. H. Boswell. of Memphis, Tennessee. 

Dr. McKay was the youngest of the family and in his youthful days he attended 
the Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College, from which he was graduated in 
1888. He then entered Tulane University and completed a course in medicine with 
the class of 1890. He located for practice in Durant, Mississippi, where he successfully 
followed his profession until 1897, when failing health required him to give up his 
work there and remove to the west. He devoted two years to recovering his health, 
following a thorough system which he marked out and by so doing lie regained his 
strength and resumed his practice in Memphis, Tennessee, where he resided for 
another period of five years. In 1904, however, he returned to Denver, for during his 
sojourn in this state he had come to acknowledge the lure of the west. He bought 
property at No. 2839 Colfax avenue, where he established a sanitarium for the treat- 
ment of nervous diseases, of which he has made a specialty for the past fifteen years. 
He has twenty-five rooms for patients in this institution and every convenience for 
their care and comfort. He also enjoys a large outside practice and is one of the 
representative and highly respected physicians and surgeons of Colorado. He belongs 
to the Denver City and County Medical Society, the Colorado State Medical Society 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 333 

and the American Medical Association and thus he keeps in close touch with the trend 
of modern scientific thought, research and investigation. 

On the 22d of December, 1891, Dr. McKay was united in marriage to Miss Beulah 
Handy, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Handy, representatives of an old southern 
family. They now have one child, Elizabeth McKay, who- was born in Escatawpa, 
Mississippi, in 1900, and is now attending the Wolcott School in Denver as a member 
of the class of 1918. 

In politics Dr. McKay is a democrat. He and his wife hold membership in the 
South Broadway Christian church and they are well known socially. In his pro- 
fession Dr. McKay has attained high rank. He is most conscientious and faithful 
in the performance of his professional duties and is constantly studying to make his 
service of greater benefit and worth to his fellowmen. His developed powers have 
brought him prominently to the front in the treatment of nervous diseases, so that 
his opinions along this line are largely accepted as authority not only by the general 
public but by the profession as well. 



J. W. HIGBY. 

While almost four years have passed since J. W. Higby was called to his final 
rest, Colorado is still benefiting by business interests which he instituted and for 
many years he was regarded as one of the most forceful, resourceful and progressive 
men of his section of the state. He possessed unfaltering enterprise, keen sagacity, 
laudable ambition and high principles of business integrity. Born in Illinois on 
the 17th of February, 1854, he spent his youthful days upon the home farm with his 
father and after his schooldays were over began farming on his own account, following 
that pursuit in Illinois and in Iowa until 1888, when he removed to Eastonville, 
Colorado. 

At that date Mr. Higby secured employment with the Russell-Gates Mercantile Com- 
pany as a clerk and after six months became one of the partners in the business and 
for twelve years remained the vice president of the corporation, which at that time 
operated twelve stores in El Paso, Elbert and Douglas counties. Successful as he was 
along mercantile lines, this constituted but one phase of his activities. In 1888 
he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres and also preempted a similar amount 
of land and secured a timber claim of like size near Calhan, Colorado. His wife occu- 
pied the claim for six years in order to prove up on the property, while Mr. Higby 
remained at Eastonville to conduct the interests of the Russell-Gates Mercantile 
Company. He remained an active factor in the conduct and successful management 
of that business until 1900, when he sold his interests and removed to Monument, 
where he established a mercantile house and, contrary to the predictions of all of his 
friends, he made of it a notable success. He closely studied the wishes and interests 
of his patrons, as well as the market, ever recognizing the fact that satisfied customers 
are the best advertisement. He held to the highest standards in the personnel of the 
house, in the line of goods carried, in the treatment of his customers, and his 
business showed a rapid and substantial growth. Centering his efforts in a way upon 
Monument and the district surrounding, he purchased in 1902 sixteen hundred and 
forty acres of woodland near Monument and erected thereon a number of sawmills, 
which he utilized in furnishing fifty thousand railroad ties for the Denver & Rio 
Grande Railroad Company. He also cut all of the tree tops into cordwood, shipping 
hundreds of carloads of cordwood into Fort Logan and Denver. Ranching interests 
also claimed his attention to a still greater degree and in 1910 he purchased the 
Greenland ranch of sixteen thousand, two hundred and eighty acres at Greenland, 
Colorado, and up to the time of his death in February, 1915, he spent most of his time 
upon the ranch, leaving his mercantile interests in charge of competent and trusted 
employes. The ranch has a capacity of twenty-five hundred head of cattle, with a 
thousand acres under cultivation and two thousand acres of hay land. After pur- 
chasing this property Mr. Higby sold a two-fifths interest in the ranch to one of his 
closest friends, C. C. Henning, of Colorado Springs. The ranch at present is under tne 
management of two of his sons, Louis and Carl, who carry on the business under tne 
name of the J. W. Higby Ranch. 

In 1S82 Mr. Higby was united in marriage to Miss JIarie Emily Briley, of Garden 
Grove, Iowa, a daughter of Stephen H. and Jane (Hyatt) Briley, the former a min- 
ister of the United Brethren church. Mr. Higby on his deathbed desired it to be 
known that to his wife he owed his success in life, saying that any man w'ith a wjfe 




J. W. HIGBY 
President ot the Greenland Land & Cattle Company 




MRS. J. W. HIGBY 



336 HISTORY OF COLORADO 

like his could not do otherwise than win success, for she at all times was the guiding 
spirit of his life, encouraging and assisting him when there were trials and diffi- 
culties to be met. Her cooperation and her encouragement were strong elements in 
his advancement, as he claimed. In other w-ords, theirs was largely an Ideal com- 
panionship. Each shared in the interests, the ambitions and the projects of the other 
and their deepest concern was for the welfare and happiness of their six children. 
Olive May, their eldest, became the wife of James Killin, a ranchman residing near 
Monument, and they have one child, James Lewis. Louis R. married Jennie Lake, 
of Colorado Springs, and resides upon the home ranch. Carl M. wedded Dorothy 
Hulbert. of Logansport, Indiana, by whom he has three children, Marie E., Carl R. 
and John W., and they, too, reside upon the home ranch. William Eugene wedded 
Blanche David, of Marionville, Missouri, by whom he has two children, William D. 
and James E., and in his business connections is well known as the manager of the 
Monument store. Kate is the wife of Fred Noe, living on a ranch near Greenland, 
and they have five children. William F., Carl F., Charles L., Campbell and Catharine. 
Jack B., who was manager of the mercantile business at Greenland and died of 
influenza in the early winter of 1918, married Gladys Johnstone, of Greenland, and 
had one son, Ladus Jack. The Higby estate comprises three-fifths of an interest in 
the ranch of sixteen thousand, two hundred and eighty acres and the mercantile enter- 
prises at Greenland and Monument. The business is largely under the management 
of the children, all of whom are graduates of the East Denver high school, and the 
daughters are also graduates of the Manual Training school at Denver, Olive grad- 
uating from the State Teachers' College at Greeley, while the boys pursued a busi- 
ness course at the Modern School of Business in Denver. The family is one of which 
the mother has every reason to be proud, for her training and teaching have devel- 
oped men of high moral principles, none of her sons having ever tasted intoxicants or 
tobacco, and her daughters are proving to be most efficient in modern scientific 
housekeeping. Their course reflects credit upon an untarnished family name, and 
indicates the wisdom of the training given by the parents. Mr. Higby counted no 
personal effort or sacrifice on his part too great if it would promote the welfare and 
happiness of his wife and children. In the career of such a man the broadest spirit 
of the new twentieth century found expression. The philosopher Emerson once said: 
"An Institution is but the lengthened shadow of a man." Judged by this standard, 
measured by his extensive ranching and commercial interests, Mr. Higby was a great 
man who owed his success to intense industry and not to special ability. An analyza- 
tion of the records of most successful men will indicate that their advancement is due 
to that quality of intense industry. However, his life was never self-centered. While 
he attempted important things and accomplished what lie attempted, his success never 
represented another's losses, but was built up through constructive effort. He was a 
dependable man in any relation and any emergency — one in whom to have confidence. 
His easy dignity, his frankness and cordiality of address, with a total absence of 
anything sinister or anything to conceal, indicated him to be a man ready to meet 
any obligation of life with the confidence and courage that come of conscious per- 
sonal ability, right conception of things and an habitual regard for what is best in the 
exercise of human activity. 



JAMES PURSE. 



James Purse, who follows ranching near Aurora, dates his residence in Colorado 
from 1881 and after earnest efforts to gain a start in the business world he is now 
numbered among the substantial farmers of the county. He is a native son of the 
Emerald isle, his birth having occurred in Belfast, Ireland, on the 28th of October. 
1852, his parents being John and Jane (Lemon) Purse. At the usual age he began 
his education in the public schools of his native country and in 1875, when a young 
man of twenty-three years, he bade adieu to friends and native land and sailed for 
the new world. He made his way at once to Chicago, Illinois, where he spent six 
months, after which he removed to Henry county, Illinois, where he resided for six 
years. He was there engaged in farming and during that period took out his citizen- 
ship papers, giving his full allegiance to the land of his adoption. He continued his 
residence in the Mississippi valley until 1881, when he made his way westward to 
Denver. For more than a decade he remained in that city, working in various ways, 
but in 1892 rented one hundred and sixty acres of land, which he continued to culti- ' 
vate for fifteen years. On the expiration of that period he purchased a farm in Adams 



HISTORY OF COLORADO 337 

county and has since carried on general agricultural pursuits. His land is carefully 
and systematically cultivated and his energy has enabled him to overcome hardships 
and difficulties and worli his way steadily upward to success. 

In Atkinson, Illinois, Mr. Purse was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Irvine, a 
daughter of John and Sarah Irvine and a native of Ireland. They have become the 
parents of two children: Fred, who married Jennie L. Pedersen and has four children, 
Irvine, Bertrand, Bertha and Melvina; and Clara, who became the wife of Walter 
Duggan and has two children, Raymond and Timothy. 

In 'tis political views Mr. Purse is a republican and fraternally is connected with 
the Woodmen of the World. His long residence in this section has made him widely 
known and his enterprise and the many substantial traits of his character have gained 
him classification with the representative residents of Adams county. 



GEORGE E. BERMONT. 



George E. Bermont, engaged in merchandising at Lafayette, was born in Franklin 
county, Pennsylvania. November 19, 1866, a son of George and Clara (Gilbert) Bermont. 
who were likewise natives of the Keystone state. The father there passed away, but 
the mother is still living. They reared a family of six children and all yet survive. 

George E. Bermont spent his youthful days in his native state and is indebted 
to its public school system for his educational privileges. He continued there until 
about seventeen years of age, when he removed westward to Carroll county, Illinois, 
where he resided for four years, during which period he was employed as a farm hand. 
The opportunities of the far west, however, attracted him and he made his way to 
Colorado, settling in Boulder county. Throughout the intervening period he has been 
identified with commercial interests, establishing a business at Lafayette, where he 
handles all kinds of merchandise and machinery. He has built up a large and gratify- 
ing trade and has an extensive stock, being thus ready to meet the demands of his 
customers at all times. He has otherwise been closely and prominently identified 
with the business development of the community, tor during eight years he was 
president of the First National Bank of Lafayette and he is the owner of valuable 
property, including a brick store building and a residence in the town. 

In 1892 Mr. Bermont was married to Miss Katherine Jones, of Youngstown, Ohio, 
a daughter