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Full text of "History of Crawford County, Pennsylvania; containing a history of the county; its townships, towns, villages, schools, churches, industries, etc.; portraits of early settlers and prominent men; biographies; history of Pennsylvania; statistical and miscellaneous matter, etc., etc. Chicago, Warner, Beers, 1885"

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RirVNOLDc HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 

I 11] III iiiii II iii|i|ii iiiiiiiiii i|ii!| 



3 1833 01145 0050 



HI8TOEY 



CRAWFORD COUNTY, 



PENNSYLVANIA, 



VOLUME II 

Containing A History of the County; its Townships, Towns. 

Villages, Schools, Churches, Industries, etc.; Portraits of 

Early Settlers and Prominent Men; Biographies; 

History of Pennsylvania; Statistical and 

Miscellaneous Matter, etc., etc. 



ILrjTJSTI^.i^TEI3. 



CHICAGO: 

WARNER, BEKRS & CO. 

1885. 



1871037 



PART V. 

BIOGEAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



Meadville 709 

Athens Township 770 

Beaver Township 7S8 

liloonifield Township 791 

CainhridKe Township 800 

Conneaut Township 819 

Cussewago Township 841 

Kasl Fairfi. Id Township 857 

East Kallowfleld Township. 8fi3 

Fairfield Township 864 

(ireenwood Township 869 

Ilavlield Township „ 871 

Mead Township 891 

North Shenango Township 904 

Oil Creek Township 913 

I'ine Township 919 

Rjindolph Township 92-5 

Richmond Township 943 

Rockdale Township 9G2 



Rome Township 97(1 

Sadsbury Township gg.'i 

South Shenango Township 9flu 

Sparta Township 999 

Spring Township 1010 

Steuben Township 1066 

Suninierhill Township 105S 

Summit Township 1080 

Titusville 1088 

Troy Township „ 1]0I 

Union Township 1107 

Venaugo Townsliip 1112 

Vernon Township 112.S 

AVayne Township U37 

West Fallowlield Township li:!9 

West Shenango Township 1141 

Woodcock Township 114:! 

.lanieslown, Mercer County 1184 



PART Y. 



Biographical Sketches, 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, 



MEADVILLE. 



S. J. AFFANTRANQEE, livery and sale stables, Meadville, is a native of 
the Keystone State, and has seen as much of the globe as Gen. Grant, having 
been in every State and most of the Territories of the Union, has made three 
overland journeys to California, and has been in- most foreign countries; he 
has been three times over the Atlantic Ocean, and has circumnavigated the 
globe, settling down at last in his native State. He is a quiet man, attending 
strictly to his business, in which he has been successful. He has been a fre- 
quent contributor to the newspapers of Meadville. He makes it a rule never 
to be in haste to be rich, great or wise. In politics he is a Democrat; is a 
member of the Town Council. He was married first in Virginia, and again 
after the death of his first wife in 1862, having lived a widower sixteen years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Afi"antranger have four children — Celia, Virginia, May A. and 
Edward J. Our subject is a son of John and Josephine (Earnest) AJBfantr an- 
ger, natives of Switzerland, and who had to work three years to pay the man 
who paid their passage to America. They had thirteen children, nine of whom 
grew up, our subject being the sixth. He first learned blacksmithing, at which 
he worked for several years. He then owned and conducted a carriage factory 
in Indiana for eleven years. Since 1873 he has lived in Meadville. He was 
born in this county, April 7, 1826, and here expects to stay until higher powers 
call him away. 

JOHN C. ANDERSON, stationer and bookseller, Meadville, was born in 
Meadville, September 28, 1856, and is the son of Joseph D. and Jane (Carr) 
Anderson, natives of this county. His father was born in 1819, and is now a 
resident of Wisconsin. Of his four children, John C. is the youngest. Our 
subject, who has been in a bookstore since thirteen years of age, went into 
business for himself in Meadville in 1876, and has continued here ever since. 
He is an active member of t"he fire department, being at one time Assistant 
Engineer. He takes a deep interest in whatever will promote the general 
prosperity of the citizens. In politics he is a Republican. He keeps, besides 
a full stock of books and stationery, wall paper and school supplies, also school 
furniture of all kinds. 

FRED G. ANDREWS, hotel proprietor, Meadville, was bom in Ashland, 
Ohio, December 12, 1853, son of Austin Andrews, who was also a hotel keeper, 
and who raised a family of three children, of whom Fred G. is the youngest. 
He received his education in the graded schools of Buffalo, N. Y., and early 
commenced to learn printing, at which he continued seven years in Toledo, 
Ohio. Having obtained a position on a vessel bound for Buenos Ayres, South 
America, he was on the ocean one year, during which he visited many foreign 
porta. Soon after landing in America he accepted a position in the Wheeler 



710 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Dramatic Cempany, with whom he remained three years, when he took a com- 
pany himself on the road for a year, playing "Rip Van Winkle. " He then went 
as clerk in Bonney's Hotel, Buffalo, N. Y. , for two years, and then acted for a 
third year as manager. In 1883 he came to Meadville, and, in company with 
his elder brother, took the Commercial Hotel and the depot dining hall and 
lunch rooms. Fred Q. Andrews was married in Toledo, Ohio, in 1882, to 
Gertrude Nelson, and they have one child — Grace Marie. Mrs. Andrews is a 
member of the Presbyterian Church. In polities Mr. Andrews is a Republican. 

J. S. AUSTIN, chief train dispatcher for New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio 
Railroad, Meadville, was born in Canada, January 25, 1842, and is a son of 
Horace and Barbara Austin, both of English descent, the father a native of 
Mississippi, the rriother of Nova Scotia. Our subject, who is the second in a 
family of seven children, received his education in the common schools of Port- 
age County, Ohio. At the commencement of the war he enlisted in the First 
Ohio Light Artillery. He was a non-commissioned officer, and served three 
years. He learned telegraphy at Cleveland, Ohio, and in 1865 came to this 
county, where he has held various positions on the railroad staff. His marriage 
with Sylvia A. Lindsay took place in 1867. They have been residents of Mead- 
ville since 1869. Politically Mr. Austin is a Republican. 

CHARLES J. BARRETT, of the firm of Barrett & Bros., of the Craw- 
ford County Iron Works, manufacturers of mill furnishing machinery, steam 
engines, etc., was born in Minnesota, July 25, 1849, and is a son of Samuel 
and Jeanet (Osbom) Barrett, natives of England, and who emigrated in 1834, 
settling in Erie City, Penn., where they now are. His father was a cabinet- 
maker. There are three brothers engaged in the Crawford County Iron Works 
(of which they are making a success) — C. J., J. O., and W. N. One brother, 
George, is a resident of Erie City, and all the brothers are practical mechanica 

SAMUEL P. BATES, LL.D., the subject of this sketch, has been chiefly 
noted as an author, though his life has been singularly devoted to active pur- 
suits. His writings have been principally upon educational and military 
themes. His histories of the battles of Gettysburg and Chancellorsville, two 
of the most sanguinary and important, in a military view, of any during the 
long years of fratricidal warfare, have made his name more widely l^nown than 
any of his published works, having received elaborate notice in the English 
press, and been highly commended by the leading Generals in both the 
Union and Confederate Armies, as well as by eminent English and French 
military critics. The first, however, of his literary ventures was a volume of 
Lectures on Education, which has passed through several editions and has 
attained a wide circulation. 

Mr. Bates was born on the 29th of January, 1827, in Mendon, Mass., where 
bis ancestors for several generations had resided. -His father, Laban Bates, and 
his mother, Mary (Thayer) Bates, lived to celebrate their golden wedding, 
and died at the verge of eighty years. He was educated in the Worcestei 
Academy, and at Brown University under the Presidency of Dr. Francis Way- 
land, graduating in the class of 1851. He was noted in his college days for 
his proficiency in the mathematics and in philosophy, several premiums hav- 
ing been awarded him in competitive examinations. The first year after leav- 
ing college was devoted to the study of English literature, chiefly the writings 
of Milton and Shakespeare. For five years subsequent he was employed in 
teaching the ancient languages at Meadville, Penn. — which he has made his 
home — and in the meantime gained a local reputation as a lecturer on educa- 
tional topics and instructor at teachers' institutes. During the four years in 
which he was at the head of the Meadville Academy, he organized teachers' 



MEADVILLE. 711 

classes, before which he delivered, annually, courses of lectures on the science 
and practice of teaching, which gave the first impulse toward establishing 
normal schools in this section of the State. In 1857 Mr. Bates was elected 
Superintendent of the schools of Crawford County for a term of three years. 
This was one of the largest and most influential counties in the State, having 
an area nearly equal to the entire arable surface of Ehode Island. Here was 
presented a wide field for the exercise of his well-defined views of education, 
and he soon acquired a State reputation for ability and efficiency in educa- 
tional work. It was at this period that he collected together the lectures 
which he had delivered before educational bodies, which were published by 
Messrs. A. S. Barnes & Co., of New York, as one of the volumes of their popular 
Teacher's Library, under the title of Lectures on Mental and Moral Cult- 
ure. This was soon followed by a little work entitled Methods of Conduct- 
ing Teachers' Institutes, which was also made one of the numbers of the 
Teachers' Library, and which has had a large sale, having become the hand- 
book for conducting these useful and popular institutions. At the end of his 
first term, in 1860, he was re-elected Superintendent and commissioned for a 
second term, but soon afterward resigned to accept the office of Deputy State 
Superintendent of Schools, tendered him by Dr. Thomas H. Burrowes, under 
the administration of William F. Packer. This position he held for a period 
of six years, and devoted a large portion of his time to the holding of County 
Institutes, on one occasion being in the four corner counties of the Common- 
wealth on four successive weeks. During this period he became widely known 
by his labors in the National Teachers' Association, before which body he 
delivered his address on Liberal Education, at its meeting at Ogdensburg, 
N. Y., in 1864, which was published in Barnard's American Journal of 
Education, and also in pamphlet form, in which it had a wide circulation. It 
was in this address that the diverse pronunciation of the ancient languages 
was pointedly referred to, and the necessity of professional training for 
instructors in the higher institutions strongly urged. His views produced a 
deep impression in educational circles, and was the origin of the agitation 
which soon followed upon the subject of founding a great national university, 
where persons destined to become professors in colleges and universities might 
obtain a thorough training in the science of education. 

At this period, in recognition of his labors in the educational field, the 
degree of LL. D. was conferred upon him, a compliment fairly earned, and 
judiciously bestowed. In the last year of his first term as Deputy State Super- 
intendent, he was designated by Gov. Curtin to visit the colleges of the Com- 
monwealth and report upon their condition. This was a delicate duty, as the 
authorities generally consider themselves independent of all outside super- 
vision, and regard any intrusion with a jealous eye. But so judiciously was 
the work performed, that the reports brought out a vast fund of information 
respecting the history and condition of these institutions, and led, in several 
instances, to radical improvements in their organizations and methods of 
instruction. These reports were published, and widely circulated in the jour- 
nals of the day, but never have been collected in book form, which their great 
value richly merited. During the first year of his service in the office of 
Superintendent he was employed by Edward F. James, of Westchester, to pre- 
pare a digest and brief exposition of the school law of the State, for insertion 
in his volume of Toumship and Local Laws. This proved an arduous under- 
taking, as heretofore no systematic guide for the administration of the school 
system had ever been given, and his work formed the basis of the full 
exposition which was soon after issued from the School Department, and 



712 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

which he himself revised and re-wrote in the subsequent administration. 
The forms of report books now used by teachers throughout the State were 
devised and prepared by him, monthly reports having previously been 
made on loose sheets, liable to be lost or destroyed, and often never dis- 
tributed nor used. His thorough acquaintance with the practice of teaching 
enabled him to systematize the operations in the central oflSce, and many of 
the forms and methods for the administration of the school system, even to its 
minutest details, are due to his guiding hand. After pursuing a thorough 
course in the Boston School of Physical Culture, he prepared a series of arti- 
cles upon this subject profusely illustrated, which were published in the 
School Journal of Pennsylvania. Each article was accompanied by copious 
notes on the preservation of health, together forming a complete treatise, 
though never issued in book form. Deeming him eminently fitted, both by 
capacity and culture for the dfficult and delicate work, Andrew G. Curtin, who 
was then in the Executive Chair, appointed him, in 1866, State Historian, an 
office created by act of the Legislature for the purpose of gathering the mate- 
rial and setting in an enduring form a complete account of the organizations 
which went forth from the State to do battle for the Union when threatened 
by a rebellion unparalleled in the world's annals. To write of events that 
transpired ages ago, where the material is ample, is comparatively easy, but 
to gather up the fragmentary annals of campaigns scarcely finished, and weave 
from them veritable narratives which shall stand the criticism of the men who 
were a part of the great transactions, is a far more difiScult and embarrassing 
task, and requires for its accomplishment a degree of patience and painstak- 
ing, of careful discrimination and wise judgment rarely possessed. For seven 
weary years he was unceasingly employed, and the result was published by 
the State, at an expense of nearly a quarter of a million of dollars, in five 
super royal octavo volumes of over 1,400 pages each, entitled History of Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, and forms an enduring monument of the patriotism of 
the State, and of the research and taste of its author. 

Upon the completion of this labor, Mr. Bates was immediately engaged 
to write the Lives of the Governors of Pennsylvania, a work of over 500 octavo 
pages, and is one of the pleasantest, and most absorbingly interesting of his 
many works. Closely following^this was a work entitled the Martial Deeds of 
Pennsylvania, published in royal octavo form of some 1,100 pages, illustrated 
with maps and charts and over eighty portraits of distinguished oflScers and 
civilians made famous during the war. It was also published in quarto form 
in red line edition at an expense of $50 per copy. The matter is divided 
into three pai-ts: Part L, general history; Part II., biographical sketches 
of officers; and Part III. lives of civilians eminent in State and national 
service, and other miscellaneous matter. This work has formed the topic of 
more favorable criticism and eulogistic comment than any ever issued 
upon the history of the Commonwealth. The History of the Battle of Gettys- 
burg, which followed hard upon, a book in royal octavo, embellished with por- 
traits and maps, is the one which has won for its author a more than national 
reputation, "and stamped him as a war critic and arbiter of military opera- 
tions of the very first order." A History of the Battle of Chancellor sville, 
similar in scope and form to that upon Gettysburg, was issued from the press 
in 1882, and has proved scarcely less popular. A condensed History of the 
State of Pennsylvania, which forms a part of this volume, completes the list 
of his book publications, though numerous fugitive writings have been scat- 
tered along his whole career, among which we may mention his contributions 
to the new edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica, now in process of publica- 
tion. 



MEADVILLE. 713 

In the summer of 1877 Mr. Bates made a tour of Europe, extending 
through England, Scotland, France, Italy, Switzerland. Germany and Belgium, 
and upon his return prepared a series of twelve lectures upon themes suggested 
by his journeyings, which he generously delivered for the benefit of the Mead- 
ville Public Library. Mr. Bates was married in 1856 to Sarah Josephine 
Bates, and has a family of seven children: Edward T., in the music business, 
Arthur L., a practicing attorney, both of Meadville, Alfred J., Walter I., Ger- 
trude L., Josephine, and Florence. 

L. C. BEACH, general agent subscription books, Meadville, was born in 
Vernon Township, this county, September 15, 1837, and is a son of Isaac and 
Nancy (Cooper) Beach, natives of Connecticut, of English origin. The 
father, who was born in 1792, came to this county in 1816 and farmed in Ver- 
non Township; he died in 1872. The mother was born in 1799, and died in 
1858. They were married in 1822 and had a family of nine children, of whom 
eight grew to maturity and six are now living, live of whom are in this county, 
L. C. and four sisters. Our subject received his education in Meadville 
schools and at Allegheny College. In 1855 he commenced teaching and for 
six years followed that vocation, acting as Principal of the academy for two 
years. For the last twenty-two years he has devoted his time to the book busi- 
ness in Meadville, as agent for publishing houses. He was married in 1864 
to Mary C. Bigoney, and they have had eight children, viz.: William E., 
Bertha E. (deceased), George Frederick, Gertrude, Harry, Mary, Lucy and an 
infant (deceased). Mr. Beach is a member of the I. O. O. F. He is a promi- 
nent member of the Republican party in Meadville, and is now a member of 
the State Assembly from this county. 

F. H. BEMIS, insurance agent, Meadville, was born in Sturbridge, 
Worcester Co., Mass., November 29, 1823, son of Samuel and Betsy (Bigelow) 
Bemis, of English descent, former a farmer by occupation. Our subject was 
raised on the farm, received a common school education and when he reached 
his majority entered the Qaaboag Seminary in Warren, Mass., where he 
remained, teaching school at intervals till 1847, in which year he came to Mead- 
ville and attended the theological school for three years. After this Mr. Bemis 
taught school at intervals till 1860, when he left for Massachusetts, remained 
in that State till 1866, then returning to Meadville entered the insurance busi- 
ness, which he is at present engaged in. Our subject was married in 1851 to 
Sarah E., daughter of Maj. John Clark, of Mead Township, and to this union 
have been born eight children, five of whom are now living, viz. : John C, 
Frank L., Ella S., Herman H. and George Herbert. 

DR. DANIEL BEMUS (deceased), eldest son of William and Mary (Prender- 
gast) Bemus, was born in the town of Pittstown, Rensselaer Co., N. Y., on the 
4th of September, 1784. His paternal grandfather, William Bemus, was, at the 
time of the battle of Saratoga, the owner of and resided upon the battle-field 
known as Bemus Heights. His future profession was early decided upon, and 
to fit him for it, extraordinary opportunities, for those times, were afibrded 
him; in addition to the advantages of the public schools, he received the 
instruction of a private tutor. When nineteen years of age he commenced the 
study of medicine with his uncle, Jediah Prendergast, a physician in active 
practice in Pittstown. In the spring of 1805, in company with his father's 
and maternal grandfather's families, in all twenty-nine persons, he went to 
Tennessee to search for a new home possessing the advantages of a mild cli- 
mate and productive soil. They proceeded by wagon and flat-boats to Duck 
River, near Nashville, Tenn. , their intended location. Being dissatisfied with 
this country, the whole family turned northward, passing through Kentucky, 



714 BIOGKAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Ohio, and western Pennsylvania, arriving at Erie the end of September, 1805. 
The following spring they removed to their permanent home, now known as 
BemuB Point, Chautauqua Lake. In the fall of 1805 Daniel went to Phila- 
delphia for the purpose of attending medical lectures at the University of 
Pennsylvania, going the whole distance on horseback. The next spring he 
returned to the home of his uncle, Thomas Prendergast, at Westfield, N. Y., 
remaining there practicing and reading during the summer. His practice 
extended from Silver Creek, N. Y. , along the Lake Shore road to Erie, Penn., 
a distance of over fifty miles. He returned to Philadelphia in the fall of 
1806; attended lectures during the winter, and graduated in the spring of 
1807 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Soon after his return to his 
father's home, he was requested by Dr. Kennedy, a prominent physician of 
Meadville, Penn., then temporarily at his mills near Jamestown, N. Y., to take 
charge of his practice during his absence, and this resulted in Dr. Bemus 
locating permanently at Meadville, Dr. Kennedy retiring in his favor. On 
June 12, 1810, our subject was married to Jane, daughter of William Miles, 
of Union, Penn., who died August 2, 1826. To them were born two daughters 
— Mary, born March 21, 1814, who married J. Stewart Riddle, an attorney of 
Meadville, and who died March 3, 1839, leaving one daughter, Arianna, mar- 
ried to Thomas B. Kennedy, of Chambersburg, Penn., and Julianna W., born 
February 26, 1816, died December 9, 1836. Dr. Bemus next married, June 
19, 1835, Mrs. Jane Clark, widow of Conner Clark and daughter of Hon. John 
Brooks. By this second marriage was born May 8, 1836, Julia Prendergast, 
who married George H. Bemus, a lawyer of Jamestown, N. Y., now residing 
in Meadville. Their children are — William Marvin, a physician residing at 
Jamestown, N. Y. ; George Prendergast, also at Jamestown; Selden, who died 
in infancy, and Dudley, residing with his parents. Dr. Bemus at once took a 
prominent position at Meadville, and was the leading physician for many 
years. He was one of the first Trustees of Allegheny College, doing much to 
j)romote the interests of that institution. The old college building was con 
structed upon a plan drawn by him. He was a member of the Episcopal 
Church and one of the first Vestrymen of Christ Church, Meadville. In poli- 
tics he was first a Whig and then a Republican. During the war of 1812 he 
was Chief Surgeon of the division commanded by Ma j.- Gen. Mead. About 
1828 he built extensive woolen, flour, lumber and oil mills on French Creek, 
about two miles above Meadville. As a business man he was successful, 
accumulating a handsome fortune, and at his death was possessed of consid- 
erable property. He died February 21, 1866, at the advanced age of eighty- 
throe years. Few men of his time were better kno^v^l or more highly esteemed 
in the community in which he lived. 

GEORGE BEJSTNINGHOFF, retired farmer and oil producer, Meadville. 
was born in Clearfield County, Penn., April B, 1825, and is a son of John and 
Elizabeth (Heist) Benninghoff, who were of German ancestry. His father was 
first a hatter by trade, was in later life a farmer, and succeeded at one time in 
accumulating a fortune of $300,000. He was a resident of Venango County, 
Penn., fourteen years, and before his death lived in Greenville, Penn, where 
he died in 1882. He had twelve children, who were all at their father's 
funeral but one, who was sick at the time. The father and all his sons were 
Republican in politics. George Benninghoff, the eldest of the family, received 
a common school education in Venango County, Penn., was reared on the farm, 
and for several years pursued agriculture with success, commencing on fifty 
acres of unimproved land in Venango County, which he cleared up. In 1861 he 
purchased a farm in Mead Township, and removed to Meadville in 1880. 



MEADVILLE 715 

From 1860 to 1883 he was engaged as an oil producer, since when he has beeD- 
retired. He was married in 1848 to Julia A., daughter of John Baney, a. 
prominent farmer of Venango County, Penn. They have five children : Almena 
Helen, wire of E. L. Afifantranger, farmer; Lewis Nelson, farmer in Sugar 
Grove, Mercer County, and who was also in the oil business for sixteen, 
years; Livingston, a farmer; George E.. a practicing physician of Bradford, 
Penn.; Julia M., wife of C. E. Morgan, of Cleveland, Ohio. Mrs. Benning;- 
hoff is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Politically- our subject is a 
Kepublican. 

R. C. BOILEAU, retired merchant, Meadville, was born in Centre 
County, Penn., December 27, 1810; son of Daniel and Mary (Robinson) 
Boileau, natives of this State, of French and Irish descent. Daniel was Quar- 
termaster-General in the Revolutionary war. Our subject, the seventh in a 
family of eight children, grew up in the same town with Gov. Curtin, and 
they were chumu together in boyhood. He acquired his education in his native 
county, and early in life learned the jeweler and watchmaker trade. In 1831 
Mr. Boileau came to Meadville, and embarked in the jewelry business, which 
he carried on for thirty years; was also in the dry goods business for a number 
of years. He dealt in real estate extensively, and built several business blocks. 
He has been financially successful, and has accumulated a handsome property. 
He was married, in 1834, to Harriet W. , daughter of Col. Shryock, a native of 
Hagerstown, Md., and to this union were born nine children, eight attaining 
maturity: Elizabeth, married G. P. Hosmer, in Lockport, N. Y. ; Maria, married 
toH. H. Thompson, in Bath, N. Y. ; Nathaniel, deceased; Polo, inlllinoia; Rol- 
and C, Jr., in Meadville, Ellen, widow, married to M. D. Newman, in Milford, 
Penn.; Harriet, married to R. Bard, Ravenna, Ohio; Emma, married to J. H. 
Culbertson, in Meadville; Marion, youngest daughter, unmarried, being with 
her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Boileau are members of the First Baptist Church, 
in which he has been a Deacon for forty years. He never led a political life. 

WILLIAM R. BOLE, attorney atUaw, Meadville, was born in Venango- 
Township, this county, October 15, 1838, son of David M. and Mary D. (Clark) 
Bole, who were of Scotch-Irish descent and natives of this county. David M. 
Bole, who lives in this county, was a member of the State Legislature (1848), 
and has held nearly every office in the gift of the township of which he is a 
resident. His father, grandfather of our subject, immigrated to this county 
from the north of Ireland about 1798. He married in this county, engaged 
in farming and rapidly acquired considerable property. He was prominently 
engaged in public enterprises, notably the pike road from Meadville to Water- 
ford, this county. He died at the age of seventy-two. His family numbered 
six children — three boys and three girls — of whom are now living David M. , 
John, Williamj and Martha, all residents of this county. Our subject, the 
eldest of a family of ten children, was reared on a farm and attended the com- 
mon schools till he was seventeen years of age. Most of his time from then 
till he was twenty-two years old was spent in Meadville Academy, Edinboro 
State Normal School, Allegheny College, in teaching school and in the study 
of his chosen profession. After reading law for a year with A. B. Richmond, 
he commenced a practice which he has continued successfully ever since. He 
was'maiTied in 186'2, to Martha S., daughter of Frederick) Pendleton, of this 
county, who bore him one child — Robert C. She died m 1881, at Meadville. 
In politics Mr. Bole is a Democrat. 

C. M. BOUSH, attorney at law, Meadville, was born in Mundelsheim, 
Wurtemberg, Germany, March 19, 1831, and is a son of Charles M. Boush, 
who was Principal of the common schools in said town in Germany, and who 



716 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

had a family of ten children, of whom our subject is the sixth. Mr. Boush 
received an academic edacation in his native land, was employed in mercantile 
pursuits, and received a practical knowledge in the manufacture of cotton 
silk and woolen goods. He immigrated to this country in 1853, and lived first 
in Sheakleyville, Mercer Co., Penn. , clerking eighteen months in a store. He 
settled permanently in this city in the spring of ]855, and embarked in the 
grocery and confectionery business with his brother Albert. In 1862 he was 
elected Justice of the Peace, serving five years. While Justice he studied law 
with W. R. Bole; was admitted in 1868, and has since continued practice. 
Mr. Boush, who was twice a widower, was married to his present wife, Mary, 
daughter of Jacob Snyder, October 17, 1864. They are members of the 
Reformed Church, in which he is an Elder. He organized the first Sabbath- 
school for that church here in 1850, and was Superintendent for many years. 
Of his four children two are at home, his daughter and his youngest son, a stu- 
dent at Allegheny College. His eldest son is in business in Canada, and his 
second son is American Consul at CoUingwood, Ontario. INIr. Boush has been 
twelve years a member of the City School Board, and took an active part in 
the organization of the present school system. He has been six years a mem- 
ber of the City Council and three years City Solicitor. He was an active pro- 
moter of the Meadville Hospital, and is its Clerk and Treasurer. He is at 
present Grand Master of the A. O. U. W. for Pennsylvania, takes an active 
interest in the benefit insurance organizations, and is in every way an active 
and successful business man. He was for years an active Democrat, but takes 
no interest in politics now. 

J. H. BOYLES, livery, Meadville, was born in Mead Township, this 
county, April 3, 1840, and is a son of Sylvester and Sarah (Hamilton) Boyles. 
His mother was born in Mead Township in 1814. His father came here in 
1835, and settled on a farm, raising a family of nine children, of whom J. H. 
is the eldest He received a common school training, and was reared on the 
farm until 1859, when he went into the oil business, continuing until 1863, 
when he enlisted in the One Hundred and Fiftieth Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteer Infantry, serving until the close of hostilities. He was a member of 
the President's body-guard, and saw Booth shoot Lincoln and then jump from 
the opera- box. Our subject has never attended a theater since, and never 
expects to attend another. At the close of the war he came home and farmed 
one year, then again went into the oil business, continuing until 1876, when 
he went into the livery business in Meadville, in which he has been very suc- 
cessful, although he has had to pay $6,000 bail money for other parties. The 
present firm is Boyles & Billings, organized in 1884. He was married in 1861 
to Sarah, daughter of Jeddiah Reynolds. They are both members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he has been Trustee, Secretary and 
Treasurer. Our subject's grandfather was the Rev. Patrick Boyles, a pioneer 
preacher of note. 

J. B. BEAWLEY, attorney, Meadville, was born July 26, 1844, in Mead- 
ville. His grandfather, Hugh Brawley, an early settler of this county, was a 
farmer and contractor by occupation. He was elected Sheriff of this county 
in 1823, and served in the Pennsylvania Legislature. He was the parent of six 
children. Hon. J. Porter Brawley, the second in this family, was educated at 
Allegheny College, and studied law; served two terms as member of the Legisla- 
ture; was elected to the State Senate in 1846, serving three years; was Sur- 
veyor-General from 1850 to 1856. He had a family of six children, of whom 
J. B. is the eldest. Our subject acquired his education at Meadville and in 
Allegheny College, from which he graduated in 1860. He accepted a clerk- 



MEADVILLE. 717 

ship in the Census Bureau, and was at Washington, D. C, till 1862; then 
returned to Meadville and commenced the study of law in the office of Finney 
& Douglass, and was admitted to the bar in 186-4. Mr. Brawley began practice 
before the Crawford bar with Edward Wilson, and was associated with him 
for two years. In 1868 he became a partner with Judge David Derickson, on 
whom Allegheny College conferred the degree of LL. D. in 1884, and con- 
tinued associated with him until July, 1875, upon the withdrawal of Judge 
Derrickson from practice. He was admitted to practice in the United States 
Supreme Courts January 18, 1877. In 1880 he formed a co-partnership with 
John 0. McClintock, with firm name of Brawley & McClintock. Mr. Brawley 
has been twice married; on the first occasion, in 1870, to Miss Fanny C. 
Ford, who died in 1872. His second marriage was with Maria, daughter of 
Judge David Derrickson. Our subject and wife are adherents of the First 
Presbyterian Church, of which he has been a member twenty-two years, and is 
now an Elder. He was a member of the General Assembly that met at Chicago, 
111., in 1877; also of the National Democratic Convention, 1880. 

HON. JOHN BROOKS, deceased, who was one of the earliest settlers of Craw- 
ford County, and who occupied many prominent positions among her pioneers, 
was a son of William and Anna Brooks (whose maiden name was Snodgrass), 
and was born in the Parish of Rye, County Donegal, Ireland, May 12, 1765. 
During his boyhood he received a fair English education, and at the age of 
fourteen was apprenticed in the city of Belfast, Ireland, and learned the trade 
of wheelwright. Several years after the expiration of his apprenticeship, in 
1786, and after the death of his father, he immigrated to the United States and 
landed at New York about 1792-93. He remained in New York or vicinity 
for a brief time, and in 1794 removed to the territory which was afterward 
organized as Crawford County, Penn., where he remained during the balance 
of his life. In 1798 his mother and two brothers, Quenton and William, 
immigrated to America, and settled in Crawford County, where they remained 
until their deaths. Mr. Brooks first settled on a farm in what is now Green- 
wood Township, adjoining the Mercer County line, about a mile from Sheak- 
leyville, and remained there for a few years. He, however, soon removed to 
Meadville, and commenced business athis trade, which he followed for several 
years. He afterward entered into mercantile business, which he carried on 
until about 1828, when he retired to his farm on the Franklin Turnpike, about 
three miles southeast of Meadville, where he resided till the time of bis death, 
which occurred June 3, 1831, in the sixty-seventh year of his age. He was 
the first Justice of the Peace in Crawford County after its organization; was 
one of the State Commissioners to lay out and construct the Susquehanna & 
Waterford Turnpike, and for two terms was County Treasurer. In 1813, during 
the war with Great Britain, he organized and commanded a company which went 
to Erie to resist the invasion of the soil of Pennsylvania, which was then thought 
imminent. After arriving in Erie he was appointed aid to Gen. Mead, Division 
Commander, with the rank of Major. The troops remained at Erie until after 
the defeat of the BritLsh fleet, off Put- in Bay, by Commodore Perry, when the 
troops were disbanded and returned to their homes. In 1817 he was appoint- 
ed by Gov. Simon Snyder an Associate Judge of Crawford County, which 
oflBce he held fourteen years, or until his death. Judge Brooks was married 
twice, his first wife being Elizabeth Wright, to whom he was united July 24, 
1800, and by whom he had three children — two daughters and one son, the 
only survivor being Mrs. Jane Bemus, of Meadville, now in her eighty-third 
year. His second wife was Susan Nichols, daughter of Thomas Nichols, of 
Jersey Shore, Lycoming Co., Penn., to whom he was married August 7, 1810, 



718 BIOGRAPHirAL SKETCHES. 

and by whom he had eight children — three sons and five daughters — all of whom 
are dead but Eliza, the wife of Col. David Compton, of Mead Township, Hen- 
ry B. and Thomas N. Judge Brooks belonged to what is called the Seced- 
era, a branch of the old Covenanters or Scotch Presbyterians. He was a man 
of more than ordinary ability, a good English scholar, and well read in the lit- 
erature of his day. He was upright, honest, and reliable, and an honor to the 
community in which ho lived and spent the greater part of his life. 

A. C. CALVIN, M. D., Meadville, was born in this county, October 21, 
1854, and is a son of Joseph A. and Mary (Frame) Calvin, natives of Penn- 
sylvania, and of Scotch-Irish descent. His father was a farmer, and raised a 
family of four children, of whom our subject is the eldest. Dr. Calvin was 
■educated at Allegheny College, and took a medical course at Jefferson Medical 
College, graduating in 1878. Commenced practice in Philadelphia, but in 
the fall of 1878 came to Meadville, where he has been in practice ever since. 
He was married in Meadville in 1880, to Priscilla, daughter of James A. 
McFadden, for many 3'ears an attorney in Meadville, and who died in 1877. 
They have one child, J. M. The Doctor is a member of the I. O. O. F. ; in 
politics a Republican. 

"W. H. CARMAN, liveryman, Meadville, was born in this county in 
1847, and is a son of Aaron and Elizabeth (Carr) Carman, the father a native 
of New Jersey, a carpenter by trade, and'who came with his parents to this 
county at an early day; the mother of German and Scotch origin and a native 
of Pennsylvania. Our sabject, the eldest of a family of seven children, was 
reared on a farm, acquired a common school education, and at the age of fif- 
teen went on the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio Railroad as fireman. After 
acting in this capacity for three and a half years he was promoted to engineer, 
ran the lightning train on the Emlenton, Shippensville & Clarion Railroad and 
has been credited with making, while on that road, the fastest time ever made 
on a narrow gauge railroad. After five years of ; this, life, Mr. Carman 
embarked in the hotel and livery business, and in 1879 came to Meadville to 
engage in his present business, ttiat of proprietor of the Park Avenue Livery 
Stable, a two-story structure 50x100 feet, where he has a tine array of roads- 
ters, elegant carriages and wagons of all descriptions. Our subject was mar- 
ried in 1880 to Miss Turilla Phipps, a native of Pennsylvania. Mr. Carman 
is a member of the K. of H , A. O. U. W., and K. of P. . 

REV. JAMES G. CARNACHAN, LL.D., pastor of Park Avenue Congrega- 
tional Church, Meadville, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, August 29, 1829, 
and is a son of James S. and Jane (Black) Carnachan, natives of Scotland. 
Their family consisted of eight sons and one daughter, our subject being the 
oldest He received his education at the Andersonian College, Glasgow, and 
entered the University of Glasgow the session of 1843-44 and graduated in 
May, 1858. He entered,the ministry the same year in Scotland, and in 1856 
came to America, settling in Tioga County, Penn., as pastor of Nelson and 
Farmington Churches from December, 1856, to September, 1858. He was then 
called to Troy, Bradford County, Penn. , remaining there until May, 1866, 
when he assumed the pastorate of the Grove Presbyterian Church at Danville, 
Penn., vifhere he continued until June, 1869. He then became pastor ot the 
First Presbyterian Church of Meadville, remaining in that capacity until the 
organization of the Park Avenue Congregational Church in April, 1881, of 
which he has since been pastor. He was married June 16, 1856, to Mary Mel- 
<3au, only daughter of George Macfarlane, merchant, Glasgow. She died June 
13, 1866. Of their family of five children, four survive — two sons and two 
daughters. Dr. Carnachan was again married June 2, 1868, to Rachel Ann, 



MEADVILLE. 719 

only daughter of Robert H. Long, merchant, Lancaster, Penn. Rev. Dr. Car- 
nachan was in the service of the Christian Commission from August to Novem- 
ber, 1864, and was Superintendent at the Fifth Corps Depot Hospital, City 
Point, Va. He was also elected Chaplain to the One Hundred and Thirty-sec- 
ond Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, an honor he was compelled to decline. 
The title of LL.D. was conferred upon him in 1875 by the free University of 
Naples by promotion. 

HON. GAYLORD CHURCH (deceased), late Presidei^t Judge, was among 
the most prominent citizens of Crawford County, Penn. He was born in 
Otsego, N. Y., in 1811, son of William and Wealthy (Palmer) Church. His 
parents, who were natives of Connecticut and of English descent, came to 
Pennsylvania in 1816, settled in Mercer County and there followed farming. 
Our subject, who was the second son in a family of six children, was reared on 
the farm and attended the Mercer Academy; studied law with Hon. John J. 
Pearson, who was afterward President Judge of the Twelfth Judicial District 
of Pennsylvania. He was admitted to the bar in 1834, and the same year 
came to Meadville. where he spent the remaining portion of his life, dying 
here in 1869, loved and respected by all who knew him. He was a Democrat 
in politics. In 1837 he was appointed Deputy Attorney- General of the dis- 
trict, and in 1840 was elected to the Legislature, serving two terms. In 1843 
he was appointed President Judge by Gov. Porter of the Sixth Judicial Dis- 
trict, consisting of Erie, Crawford and Venango Counties, and served till 
1851, when the office became elective. He then resumed his law practice till 
1858, when he was appointed a Judge of the Supreme Court by Gov. Packer, 
to till a vacancy. He was married in 1837 to Anna B. Pearson, of Mercer, 
Penn., a daughter of Bevan and Ann Pearson, who were members of the Society 
of Friends. This union was blessed with eight children, six of whom at pres- 
ent survive. Judge Church and wife were members of the Episcopal Church, 
of which he was a Vestryman many years. His widow still survives him and 
resides in Meadville, while the family are among the leading ones of north- 
western Pennsylvania. 

HON. PEARSON CHURCH, President Judge of the Thirtieth Judicial Dis- 
trict, consisting of Crawford County, Penn., is a son of Hon. Gaylord Church 
(deceased), who was also President Judge of this district. He was born in Mer- 
cer County, Penn., but has resided all his life in Meadville. He was gradu- 
ated at Allegheny College in 1856, previously studying law one year with his 
father, and was admitted to practice February 9, 1858, at the age of twenty. 
He has ever been a Democrat in politics. He was married in 1868, to Miss 
Kate, daughter of Hon. Samuel A. Law, of Delaware County, N. Y. To this 
union have been born two daughters. Mr. and Mrs. Church are members of 
the Episcopal Church at Meadville, of which he has been Vestryman for over 
twenty-five years. He has always taken a lively interest in all that pertains to the 
church here and elsewhere in Crawford County. He has also been active in 
almost every public enterprise in this place; was elected a member of the School 
Board in 1870, and in 1872 President of the Board of Control of the Mead- 
ville schools. In the same year he was elected a delegate to the Constitu- 
tional Convention, and during 1872 and 1873 assisted in forming the present 
Constitution, which was ratified and adopted December 16, 1873. In 1859 he 
was made a Freemason. He is now a member of the Grand Lodge of the F. 
& A. M. ; member of the Grand Chapter R. A. M., and of the Grand Com- 
mandery of K. T. He has taken thirty-two degrees in Masonry, and for ten 
years was D. D. G. M. of Masons for the district of which Crawford County 
was a part. In 1877 he was elected President Judge of the Thirtieth Judicial 



720 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

District. He has rendered several important decisions while an incumbent of 
this oflBce, being the first Judge in Pennsylvania, and perhaps in the Union, 
to decide that colored children should have the same access to our public 
schools as white children. After this decision the Legislature of the State of 
Pennsylvania made it a part of the statute law. In 1879 the Legislature 
passed an act making it the duty of the -Judge of the county to hold a term of 
the courts four times a year in the city of Titusville. This measure created 
considerable feeling upon the part of the citizens of the county as it tended 
to greatly increase the public expenses and to complicate the ordinary processes 
of the courts. Meadville and Titusville were especially interested as the 
movement affected them locally to a considerable degree, and of course it was 
not long before the whole matter came before the courts. The suit was brought 
by numerous tax-payers to compel the county authorities to carry into effect 
the bill. Judge Church, in an able and exhaustive opinion, decided the law to 
be in conflict with the Constitution and therefore void, and consequently 
refused to administer it. The nest year another act of a similar import was 
passed designed by its promoters to avoid the constitutional difficulties of the 
former act. Like litigation was resorted to to prevent its enforcement, but 
Judge Church decided the second act to be also unconstitutional and void. Both 
of these decisions were affirmed by the Supreme Court of the State. This 
ended the efforts of the city of Titusville to have a court held within its bor- 
ders. In 1883 he decided the Tidewater Pipe Line case, which put an end to 
the great Standard oil monopoly for carrying oil. Ajiother effort was made in 
behalf of the Standard Oil Company to injure and destroy its only rival. A 
stock-holder of the Tidewater Pipe Line Company, acting in the interest of 
the Standard Oil Company, used his position as stock-holder in an effort to 
dissolve and thus legally destroy the company. After a sharp contest he was 
signally defeated, and Judge Church, in an elaborate and exhaustive opinion, 
settled the rights of all parties to the litigation, deciding in favor of the Tide- 
water Company. This decision was acquiesced in by the defeated party, as 
no appeal was taken from the decision of Judge Church, bat the same parties 
afterward took the measures above mentioned with the result as above stated. 
It has been the good fortune of Judge Church to be very often called upon to 
decide grave questions of great public as well as private importance and inter- 
est — indeed, more than often falls to the lot of a Common Pleas Judge. They 
have been affirmed in every instance by the Supreme Court of the State. 

ALFRED G. CHURCH, attorney at law, Meadville, was born in Mead- 
ville, November 10, 1851, and is a son of Hon. Gaylord Church, who was Judge 
of the Sixth Judicial District from 1843 to 1852. He is also a brother of 
Judge Pearson Church, the President Judge of the Thirtieth District. Our 
subject received his schooling at Riverdale, N. Y., and at Harvard University, 
at which latter institution he graduated in the regular course in 1873, after an 
attendance there of four years. In the same year he entered the office of his 
brother, Pearson Church, and was admitted in 1875, continuing practice here 
ever since. He was married December 5, 1876, to Alice L. Mosier, by whom 
he has one child — Agnes Pearson. Mr. and Mi's. Church are members of the 
Episcopal Church. In politics Mr. Church is a Democrat. 

COL. JOHN M. CLARK, hotel proprietor, Meadville, was born April 2, 
1837, and is a son of Ashbel and Mary (Weller) Clark, the former a farmer, a 
native of Connecticut, of Scotch descent, and for twenty-seven years a Justice 
of the Peace in Meadville, the latter also a native of Connecticut. They had 
a family of four boys and two girls, of whom John M. is the youngest. Our 
subject received a good English education in the common schools and in Alle- 



MEADVILLE. 721 

gheny College. He afterward clerked in Erie City for several years, also at 
Erie City Iron Works from 1856 to 1861, when he enlisted in the three months 
service in Col. McLane's regiment, at the expiration of which time he enlisted 
in Company I, Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He was 
appointed Assistant Adjutant to Gen. Hayes, of Massachusetts, and continued 
in that capacity until June 27, 1862, when he became Adjutant of the regi- 
ment, serving as such till the close of service. After the war he returned to 
this city and purchased the "American," which he conducted for two years. 
Most of Col. Clark's time has been spent in the hotel business, except when he 
was in the grocery trade in Erie City. He was Chief of the Fire Depart- 
ment for eight years. Our subject was married in 1862 to Bessie V., daugh- 
ter of Charles Banyard, of Erie City, and of English descent. They have 
three children: Cora, Bessie and Mattie. They are members of the Episcopal 
Church of Meadville. 

COL. JOHN BROOKS COMPTON, District Attorney, Meadville, was born 
November 17, 1835, in Mead Township, this county, and grew up on the farm of 
hie father. Col. David Compton, attending district school and Meadvi lie Academy. 
He then became a teacher, and by that means secured funds to prosecute his stud- 
ies at Allegheny College, which he entered in the spring of 1858, and continued 
a student till his senior year, when he enlisted as a private in the three months' 
service, joining the Meadville Grays, which were stationed at Pittsburgh. He 
was soon promoted to Sergeant. While in camp, Sergt. Compton wrote his 
commencement oration, and obtained a furlough for the purpose of graduating 
with his class. He committed to memory his oration on his way home in a 
stage coach, and appeared with his class, June, 1861, in uniform, at the 
request of his class and the faculty. Soon after graduation he joined the 
famous Eighty-third Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, as a private, 
and became First Sergeant of Company F. At the battle of Gaines' Mill, 
June 27, 1862, he was wounded, but led his company live days after, at the 
battle of Malvern Hill, taking thirty-two men into the fight, of whom eight 
were killed, and fourteen wounded, himself among the latter. He was men- 
tioned for gallantry in the dispatches of the Division Commander, and was 
sent to the hospital at Portsmouth, Va., where he remained until September, 
most of the time in a critical condition. He afterward went to Alexandria, 
and then to Washington, where he was discharged on account of disability from 
wounds and sickness. Returning home, after a partial recovery of health. Col. 
Compton began the study of medicine under Dr. Edward Ellis, of Meadville, 
but he had to abandon it on account of continued ill health, and at the sugges- 
tion of friends he became a candidate for the Republican nomination for Pro- 
thonotary of the county. Being successful, he was elected in the fall of 1863 
by 2,000 majority, and served the entire term. During that time he com- 
manded a company of Emergency Men, serving until the capture of Mor- 
gan and the battle of Gettysburg. He was appointed by Gov. Curtin a Com- 
missioner to take the vote of the State soldiers in the field for the election of 
1864, being assigned to Washington City and vicinity. At the general can- 
vass of the same year he was assigned to the Army of the Potomac, and was 
elected Secretary of the Board. In this capacity all the tickets, poll books, 
etc., had to pass through his hands. These were sent in due time by express, 
but were tampered with at Baltimore, or somewhere on the way, so that in 
order to obtain them, the Harrisburg officials were telegraphed for a new sup- 
ply and tho Secretary was obliged, with barely time, to visit Washington with 
a guard, and watch the precious material till safely landed at City Point, and 
thus saved to the State and Nation the vote of the Pennsylvania soldiers in the 



722 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

entire Army of (he Potomac. During his Prothonotaryship he was entered as 
a law student by the late Darwin A. Finney, and was admitted to practice June 
11, 1868, which profession and practice he has since continued. He was three 
times appointed attorney for the county, and is solicitor for the Meadville Loan 
Association and other corporations. Col. Compton was appointed by Gov. 
Hartranft an Aid-de-Camp on his military staff, with the rank of Colonel, and 
served through his two terms, when he was re-appointed on his staff, as Major- 
General of the State, which position he still retains. He was on duty dur- 
ing the Centennial Encampment of the Pennsylvania National Guard, and on 
August 10, the date of the great military parade at Philadelphia, was appointed 
OfBcer of the Day. As a politician Col. Compton has ever been an active sup- 
porter of the Republican party, both in council and upon the stump. He was 
Chairman of the Republican County Committee in 1872, and was Senatorial 
Delegate to the State Convention in 1873. In 187-1 he received the nomina- 
tion of his party as a candidate for the Legislature by a larger number of 
votes than any of his colleagues. This was the year of the great political 
revolution in the county, the entire ticket being defeated, but Col. Compton 
getting the highest vote of any Republican candidate. In 1873 he presided as 
Chairman of the meeting of the Return Judges of the primary elections. In 
1881 he was elected District Attorney of the Thirteenth District, consisting of 
Crawford County, by the largest majority of any candidate on the Republican 
ticket. Col. Compton is a member of the Board of Directors of the Meadville 
City Hospital; also Past Master Workman of Jefferson Lodge, No. 1, A. O. U. 
W. ; Past Noble Grand of Crawford Lodge, No. 734, 1. O. O. F; for several terms 
President and Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of the Odd Fellows' Home 
of western Pennsylvania; Commander of Sergeant Peiffer Post, No. 331, G. 
A. R. He and his family are members of the Second Presbyterian Church, 
of which he is a Trustee and Secretary. Our subject was married November 12, 
1863, to Fannie E. Kingsley, of Springfield, Mass. Of their family two sons, 
Herbert K. and Charles K., died in infancy; Kate Leora, a very interesting 
and lovely child, died of diphtheria on Christmas eve, 1881, in her twelfth 
year. The eldest daughter, Gertrude E., now in her sixteenth year, alone 
remains of this happy family of children to bless and comfort the parents. 

M. S. COOPER, farmer, Meadville, was born in this county August 17, 
1830, and is a son of Lewis and Fidelia (Smith) Cooper, natives of Massachu- 
setts and Connecticut respectively, and of English origin. His parents were 
early settlers of Yernon Township, this county. The father, who was a promi- 
nent farmer, had a family of six children, all of whom except our subject were 
the children of his second wife, our subject's mother dying when he was 
young. The father died in 1856. He had held most of the township oflSces. 
Our subject received his education in Kingsville College, Ohio, and farmed 
until he was thirty-eight years of age, when he came to Meadville. He served 
as Chief of Police in Meadville, but his life work has been that of an agri- 
culturist. He was married in 1856 to Rachel, daughter of Robert Harper, 
who is a sister of Hon. W. S. Harper, of Meadville; they have one child — 
Rebecca. Mr. and Mrs. Cooper are members of the First Presbyterian Church 
of Meadville. In politics he is a Republican. 

J. A. COOPER, master mechanic for the Eastern Division of the New 
York, Pennsylvania & Ohio Railroad, Meadville, was born in the State of New 
Jersey, July 24, 1831, and is a son of Albert and Mary (Concklin) Cooper, both 
natives of New Jersey, of Holland descent, the father a blacksmith by trade. 
J. A., who is the third in a family of seven children, received a district school 
education in his native county. He first learned the trade of his father, at 



MEADVILLE. 723 

■which he continued for a time. Since 1851 he has been in railroad employ- 
ment of various kinds, and has filled tbem all satisfactorily. He was married 
in Meadville in 1866 to Anna, daughter of Aaron Johnson, and they have two 
sons — Frank and Bert. Mrs. Cooper is a member of the Baptist Church. Our 
subject^has been a member of the School Board for two terms, and a resident 
of the city since 1863. 

JOHN C. COTTON, physician, Meadville, was bom in Pennsylvania Au- 
gust 31, 1828, son of William and Elizabeth (Black) Cotton, both natives of 
Pennsylvania; the father of Scotch-Irish and the mother of English descent. 
William Cotton was a farmer and raised a family of six children. Our subject 
received his education at the common schools and at the high school of New 
Bedford, and also at the academy at Pulaski. He also attended Allegheny 
College for three years, and graduated therefrom in June, 1853. Left Alle- 
gheny College in senior year in 1849, read medicine and graduated and then 
returned to Allegheny College and graduated from both colleges in same year. 
In 1853 he graduated in medicine from Cleveland Medical College, practiced 
medicine for two years in Kentucky, and since 1855 has practiced in Mead- 
ville. Was a charter member of Crawford County Medical Society eighteen 
years ago, since which he has been an active member; is also a member of 
Pennsylvania State Medical Society and of the American Medical Association. 
He was married in 1855, to Mary, daughter of Judge William Davis, and their 
children are William D. and Harry A. Dr. and Mrs. Cotton belong to the 
Presbyterian Church, of which he has been Trustee. For twelve years ho was 
United States Examining Surgeon for pensions ; he is politically a Republican. 

LAWRENCE COYLE, County Treasurer, Meadville, was born in Rome 
Township, this county, September 19, 1839, and is a son of Patrick and Mary 
(Griffin) Coyle, who were also natives of this country, but of Irish descent. 
Our subject's grandfather, Roger Coyle, came to Crawford County about 1800, 
and was a farmer. His son Patrick, Lawrence's father, was a farmer and a 
large lumber dealer. He was for a number of years a Justice of the Peace. 
He was a soldier in the war of 1812. » Our subject received his education in 
the common schools, and has been a farmer most of his life. Before his 
election as County Treasurer, Mr. Coyle held several official positions in the 
township. He has been twice married; first, to Miss Mary Ann Stark, in July, 
1860. Her death occurred December, 1869. Mr. Coyle was married to Miss 
Lucinda Phillips, April, 1873. She died in March, 1883. He has three chil- 
dren now living: Clara, Lavern and Mark. In politics Mr. Coyle is a Repub- 
lican. 

HUGH F. COYLE, train dispatcher on the New York, Pennsylvania & 
Ohio Railroad, Meadville, was born in Angelica, Allegany Co., N. Y., Septem- 
ber 21, 1855, and is a son of Bernard and Susan (Kilduff) Coyle, natives of 
Ireland. His father, who was by occupation a jeweler, was married in Alle- 
gany County, N. Y., and had a family of nine children of whom Hugh F. is 
third. Our subject received his education at Andover, in his native county, 
and then'commenced the study of telegraphy, which he pursued with such zeal 
and diligence that, at the age of fifteen, he^took charge of the telegraph office 
for the Erie Railway, where he remained until 1874. He then went to St. 
Joseph, Mo., where for one year he was train dispatcher, when ho was made 
manager of the office at Green River, on the Union Pacific Railway. In 1877 
he was married to Elizabeth Sinon, by whom he has one son — Eddie B. He 
then accepted a position on the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio Railway, 
as assistant train dispatcher, but since 1881 he has been train dispatcher. In 
politics he is a Republican. 



724 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

REV. RICHARD CRAIGHEAD, retired minister, Meadville, was bom in 
South Middleton Township, Cumberland County, Penn., October 31, 1815, and 
is the son of "William and Hetty (Weakley) Craighead. His paternal ances- 
tors were from Scotland, his maternal ancestors from England. He pursued 
his academic studies at New Haven, Conn. ; graduated at Washington College, 
Washington, Pa., in 1836; entered the Western Theological Seminary the 
same year; was licensed to preach in June, 1839, and ordained and installed 
over the church at Springfield, Erie Co., Penn., September 9, 1840. He 
was called in November, 1843, to take charge of the Second Presbyterian 
Church of Meadville, Penn., and continued as pastor of the church until 
November, 1874, a period of thirty-one years, only relinquishing his charge 
on account of continued ill health. He still resides in Meadville, preaching 
occasionally as his health will permit. He was married, January 14, 1841, to 
Miss Lydia L., daughter of John Reynolds, Esq., of Meadville, Penn. 

JOHN HAYS CULBERTSON, United States Deputy Collector, Meadville, 
was born in Richmond Township, this county, April 2, 1840, only son of David 
and Nancy M. (Mackelduff) Culbertson, natives of Chester County, Penn. Pre- 
vious to marriage David Culbertson, our subject's father, in about the year 
1818, removed with his father, John Culbertson, to Woodcock Township, this 
county, where the latter engaged in agriculture for some time, having previ. 
ously spent the greater portion of his early life in manufacturing woolen goods 
in Chester County, Penn. David Culbertson remained with his parents until 
after his majority, and in 1835 returned to Chester County. On March 4, that 
year, he married Nancy M. Mackelduff, and shortly after returned to this county, 
locating on a farm of 250 acres in Richmond Township. Mr. and Mrs. David 
Culbertson were parents of two children, viz.: Elizabeth Ann, born April 10, 
1836, married August 9, 1857, to Jacob Cowan, of this county, and July 11, 
following year, died of hemorrhage of the lungs at the residence of her father, 
and John Hays, oui' subject. David Culbertson in 1848 sold his farm in Rich- 
mond Township, and purchased one of about 100 acres in and adjoining the 
borough of Blooming Valley. In connection with this farm there was a hotel 
property, both of which interests he operated until about the year 1855, at 
which time he leased his hotel and for some years thereafter gave his exclusive 
attention to farming. In about the year 1866, feeling that himself and wife, 
both of whom were getting pretty well advanced in years, should lead a less 
active and busy life, and as their only son and child living was then residing 
in Meadville, David Culbertson sold his Blooming Valley farm and hotel prop- 
erty to Alonzo Drake, and, in 1866, removed to Meadville and purchased a 
house and lot. No. 639 Washington Street. On June 14, 1871, Nancy M. Cul- 
bertson, our subject's mother, died. On October 12, same year, J. H. Cul- 
bertson was married to Miss Emma A., daughter of R. C. Boileau, Esq., of 
Meadville; and after this date and until his death, which occurred October 19, 
1877, David (his father) resided with him. To this union were born three 
children— Anna S., born August 5, 1872; Williard B., born May 31, 1875, and 
Blanche, born December 5, 1878. The early life of the subject of this sketch 
was spent at home with his parents, going to school, and in assisting about the 
farm until the winter of 1864, when he came to Meadville and entered the 
wholesale grocery house of McFarland Bros., as book-keeper, where he remained 
for three years, but had to abandon oflSce work on account of failing health, 
and a portion of the summer of 1867 was spent up Lake Superior in regaining 
his former health and strength, which was fully restored. The balance of the 
year, 1867, and up to August, 1868, Mr. Culbertson acted in the capacity of 
cashier of the McHeury House, Meadville, after which time he opened a gen- 



MEADVILLB. 725 

eral insurance agency on Chestnut Street, same city. In 1871 he associated 
■with him in that business John Reitze, and the firm was known as Culbertson & 
Eeitze, now representing some dozen or more of the best insurance companies 
in the United States. In 1874 our subject was appointed United States Dep- 
uty Collector under Hon. James C. Brown, and continued as such until August 
1, 1883. On August 1, 1883, he was again appointed Depaty Collector by 
Jacob F. Walther, successor to Hon. James C. Brown. 

JOHN DAVENPORT, drayman, Meadville, was born in Ulster County, N. 
Y., August 10, 1816, and is a son of Isaac and Rebecca (Munson) Davenport, 
natives of New York, and of English descent, the former a farmer. They had 
a family of nine children, seven of them now living, of whom John is the 
fourth. His schooling was obtained in his native county, and early in life he 
went as boatman on the Delaware & Hudson Canal, at which occupation he 
spent many years. He was married in 1845 to Jane Ann Lounsberry, also a 
native of Ulster County, N. Y., and of Holland descent. They had nine chil- 
dren, seven now living: Levi, freight clerk on the New York, Pennsylvania & 
Ohio Railroad; Mary Ellen, wife of Frank Bartlett; Anna, wife of Anson B. 
Leberman; Harriet, wife of Edward Orris, merchant in Meadville; Philip; J. 
E. and Blanche. Mrs. Davenport is a member of the Park Avenue Congrega- 
tional Church. In politics Mr. Davenport is Republican. Our subject came 
to Meadville in 1866, and is now owner of six wagons and thirteen horses. 
In 1879 he built an ice house, in which he annually stores 1,000 tons of ice. 
His eldest son was a member of the Fifty-sixth New York Infantry during the 
two last years of the war of the Rebellion. 

HON. WILLIAM DAVIS, JR., deceased. Among Meadville's most hon- 
ored citizens was the gentleman whose name here appears. For nearly half a 
century he was identified with the business, social and educational develop- 
ment of the city, and throughout this long period he constantly grew in the 
respect and esteem of the community. With respect to the family history, we 
learn that his grandfather, James Davis, was an early settler from Franklin 
County, Penn., settling here in 1795. His parents, James and Mary (Cotton) 
Davis, are described as being pious, well-informed people, who took all pos- 
sible care in preparing their son for his station in life. Judge Davis was born 
in Vernon Township, Crawford County, September 7, 1812, at a time when 
his father was absent from home doing military service for the country in the 
war with Great Britain. His education was procured mostly from private 
schools. , He remained with his father until he attained his majority. At the 
age of twenty-two he married Miss Mary Johnston, daughter of Lancelot 
Johnston, Esq., who still survives him. One year after his marriage he came 
to Meadville and engaged in the shoe and leather business, and from 1835 to 
1863 continued in that branch of the mercantile trade in this city. His public 
life began in 1840, when he was elected to the borough Coiincil, where he con- 
tinued three years. In 1846 he was elected Burgess of the borough, and served 
three terms. As a Whig candidate in 1849 he was elected County Treasurer, 
at a time, too, when the Democratic party held a large majority in the county. 
In 1857 he was chosen one of the Trustees of Allegheny College, and held the 
position with credit to himself and honor to the institution until his death, 
June 30, 1881. In this connection we remark that he always took a deep 
interest in all educational matters, not only in the college but also in the pub- 
lic schools of the city, having been many years officially connected with their 
management. He was elected Associate Judge of the county in 1863, again 
in 1868, and again ii; 1873, covering a period of fifteen years, a distinction 
never enjoyed by any other occupant of the offica The arduous duties of his 



726 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

position were discharged with eminent satisfaction to the members of the bar 
as well as to his constituency. Judge Davis was an active member of agri- 
cultural organizations, and took a deep interest in projects having for their 
aim the improvement of farming. He was an honorary member of the Craw- 
ford County Historical Society from its organization until his demise. He 
was for twenty years a Director of the Crawford County Mutual Insurance 
Company, and for several years its faithful Treasurer. Judge Davis was a 
man of fine personal appearance; in disposition most amiable. When the 
personal delinquencies of any of his acquaintances was the subject of conver- 
sation he participated as little as possible, and as soon as opportunity offered 
changed the subject by referring to redeeming traits in their character. He 
was a beloved member of the First Presbyterian Church, and for a great num- 
ber of years served upon the Board of Trustees of that body. His every day 
life was a beautiful exhibit of practical, self denying Christianity, and few, if 
any, possessed in so large a degree that charity which " thinketh no evil, suf- 
fereth long and is kind." He died as he lived, with an unwavering faith in 
his Divine Master and an unswerving devotion to right and duty. Six of 
Judge Davis' children siu-vive: the eldest child and daughter, Mary, is the 
wife of Dr. J. C. Cotton, of Meadville; second daughter, Ellen, is the 
wife of Dr. J. P; Hassler, of Cochranton; youngest daughter, Emma, is 
unmarried; eldest son, James J., is Secretary and Treasurer of the Water Gas 
Company, of St. Louis, Mo.; second son. Henry L., is connected with the 
Philadelphia branch of the Standard Oil Company, of which he is one of the 
managers; the youngest son, William W., is teller in the Oil City Trust Com- 
pany Bank of Oil City, Penn. 

GEORGE B. DELAMATER was born at Whitehall, N. Y., January 14, 
1821. In 1822 his parents removed with him to Crawford County, Penn. He 
received a thorough and practical education, attending, among other schools, 
the academy at Waterford, Penn., and Oberlin and Allegheny Colleges. He 
afterward studied law, and in 1847 was admitted to the bar. For about five 
years he pursued the active practice of his profession. He then, however, 
became engrossed in business enterprises and in a great measure withdrew from 
active practice. For a time he was employed in editing and publishing a 
newspaper at Youngsville, Warren Co., Penn., and afterward engaged with 
good success in manufacturing and mercantile pursuits at Townville, Penn. 
From 1860 to 1864 he was largely interested in oil developments along what 
is known as Oil Creek, and by that means was enabled to add very largely to 
his wealth. In 1864 he removed to Meadville, Penn., where he has since 
resided. During his entire life he has been a remarkable student and has 
accumulated large law and miscellaneous libraries. He is a Trustee of Ober 
Hn College, and Trustee and Vice-President of Allegheny College, to both of 
which he has contributed largely, and has been for many years largely inter- 
ested in banking. At the time of the organization of the First National Bank 
of Meadville and until 1871, he was a Director therein, being the largest stock- 
holder. At that time he sold his interest. He has also been one of the largest 
share-holders in the Keystone National Bank, of Erie, Penn. , since its organ- 
ization; not living in Erie he is not in the Board of Directors. He was also 
one of the organizers of the Erie Dime Saving and Loan Association. Few 
business enterprises in Meadville have been started without his active and suc- 
cessful co-operation. He is Director in the gas and water companies, in both 
of which he is heavily interested. In 1875 he erected what is'known as the 
Delamater Block, the finest business building in Crawford County. The 
institution, however, to which he is most closely allied is the banking firm of 



MEADVILLE. 727 

Delamater & Co., of which he is senior member. It was organized in 1876, 
and is at present regarded as one of the solid institutions of the county. Mr. 
Delamater has ever manifested a deep interest in political affairs; when but a 
boy. he knew intimately " old John Brown," and while he deprecated the 
rashness of that old hero in some of his late undertakings, always sympathized 
with the Free Soil and Republican parties. In 1848 he was a|jdelegate to the 
District Convention which nominated John W. Howe, who was the first Free 
Soil member of Congress for Crawford, Mercer and Venango Counties, and the 
same year was a delegate to the National Convention at Buffalo. In 1870 he 
was elected to the State Senate by Erie and Crawford Counties. His record 
during his three years' term shows faithful and able service. Since then he 
has declined political preferment. He has ever been the open friend'and pro- 
moter of religion and temperance. In his youth studious, industrious and 
circumspect; in middle life cautious, modest and successful, and in lately ears 
enjoying the happy result, in the confidence and respect of all. Mr. Delamater 
married in 1847, Susan Cowle Town, born in 1820, daughter of the late Noah 
Town, Esq., and who is in the eighth generation on the part of her paternal 
ancestors, being a descendant of William Town, an Anglo-American, born in 
England about 1600, and who upon immigrating to America settled at Salem, 
Mass. Her father, Noah Town, was born at Granville, N. Y., November 11, 
1786; married Susannah Martin, of French extraction, June 18, 1809. He was 
a son of Joseph Town, born February 22, 1761, and who married Hannah Col- 
man, a descendant of Elder Brewster, of "May Flower" notoriety. His 
nephew, Salem Town, author of various school books and other works, had a 
national reputation. Joseph Town was the son of Israel Town, born February 
12, 1727, who was a son of Israel Town, born November 18, 1684, who was a 
son of John Town, born April 2, 1658, who was a son of Jacob Town, born in 
1631, who was a son of the first settler, William Town, who was living in 
Salem, Mass., in 1640. The children of George B. Delamater are: George 
Wallace, born March 31, 1849; Thomas Albert, born December 7, 1850; Susan 
Adelaide, born March 27, 1859, and Victor Morris, born November 1, 1860. 

GEORGE WALLACE DELAMATER, of the banking firm of Delamater 
& Co., Meadville, son of G. B. Delamater (whose sketch appears abave , 
was born in Meadville, March 31, 1849. After a preliminary course of 
studies he matriculated as a student of Allegheny College, and graduated from 
this institution in June, 1869, soon after which he entered upon a course of 
studies in the Law Department of Harvard College and under Hon. H L. Rich- 
mond & Son, which he completed and was admitted to the bar of Crawford 
County February 1, 1875. His liberal education, practical knowledge of bus- 
iness affairs, and extensive acquaintance supplementing his legal studies, 
qualify him for an active and useful career, either in the practice of law or as 
a banker, in the firm of which he is a leading member. In 1S77 he was 
elected Mayor of the city of Meadville, and discharged the duties of this ofBce 
during his term with credit In 1878 he was chosen Senatorial delegate to 
the Republican State Convention at Harrisburg, and subsequently in the same 
year was made Chairman of the Republican County Committee, in which posi- 
tion he conducted an efficient and successful campaign. In 1880 he was 
chosen Presidential Elector for Pennsylvania, and cast his vote for J. A. Gar- 
field. His industry, integrity and energy command the confidence of a large 
circle of friends and of the public. 

C. J. DENNINGTON, photographer, Meadville, was bom in this county in 
October, 1850, son of John and Margaret (Hollister) Dennington, the father a 
native of England, the mother of New York State, of English descent. The 



728 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

father, who was a farmer, died in this county after a residence of over fifty 
years. C. J., the youngest of a family of seven children, was educated here, 
and in 1872 commenced to learn photography, and having a natural taste for 
art work he soon acquired a reputation as an artist in his line. He was mar- 
ried in 1874 to Martha, daughter of Luther Wilder, who was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Dennington is a member of the Koyal 
Arcanum; politically, a Eepublican. 

JOSEPH DEKICKSON, retired merchant, Meadville, was born in Dau- 
phin County, Penn., July 5, 1801, son of David Derickson. 

AUGUSTUS DEEST, retired merchant, Meadville, was born August 24, 
1822, in Germany, son of August and Christina (Berkes) Derst, who both died 
in Germany before our subject set sail for America. They were the parents of 
nine children, of whom Augustus, Jr. , is eighth and the only one to come to 
the New World. He was married in 1844 to Margaret Burchardt, in his native 
land, where the eldest child, Charlotte, was born, and in 1846 they came to 
America, landing in New York, thence traveling direct to Meadville, Penn. 
Here the family of Mr. and Mrs. Derst was increased, in course of time, by 
six, viz. : Daniel, married to Mary Christy, Mary, wife of Henry Leighty 
(have one child); Henry, in Colorado; John in Kansas, married to Kate Small- 
enberger, of Meadville; Clara, at home, and Elizabeth, deceased. Charlotte 
is now the wife of Hem-y M. Eupp, a native of New York, proprietor of res- 
taurant on Water Street, Meadville; have five children: Carrie E., George A., 
Henry M., Jr., Lottie and Elmer H. Mr. Derst commenced life on nothing, 
and for the first seven years after arriving in the land of his adoption, labored 
at whatever he could find to do. He was absent for a time in California. 
For twenty years our subject carried on with success a grocery on Water 
Street, Meadville, and his industry and uprightness in business have enabled 
him to retire with a good competency, not having for the past twelve years been 
engaged in any special business. 

HON. JOHN DICK, deceased, who was of Scotch-Irish descent, was born 
in Pittsburgh, Penn., June 17, 1794, son of William and Anna (McGunnegle) 
Dick, and the eldest of four brothers who attained mature age, viz. : John, 
David, James E. and Wilson W.,a]l now deceased. He was brought to Mead- 
ville by his parents in the year of his birth, when the place was but a hamlet 
of log-houses. He was married, November 16, 1830, to Jane A., eldest daugh- 
ter of Samuel Torbett, Esq., one of the pioneers of Crawford County, and 
many years largely interested in real estate business. To this union were 
born six children: George M., entered as cadet at West Point in 1850, assigned 
to duty in Texas in Col. EobertE. Lee's regiment, and died in 1856; J. Henry, 
died at the age of eighteen; Samuel Bernard; Anna C, married toD. C. Shry- 
ock; Mary E., married to Edward S. Sayer, and John. Gen. John Dick died 
May 29, 1872, in the seventy-eighth year of his age, leaving behind him the 
inestimable heritage of a good name, and when the grave closed over him it 
shut out forever from human sight, but not from loving memory nor from the 
afiection of the heart, a man who had in his lifetime seen the creation in this 
section of telegraphs, railroads, canals, schools, commerce and other evidences 
of advanced civilization, with the inevitable and consequent regression of the 
red man toward the setting sun, and the extinction of their title under the 
provisions of Wayne's Treaty; it shut out foi:ever from all earthly view one 
whose every action in life pronounced him to be by nature a gentleman — an 
honest man — tender-hearted as a child, influenced even to a fault by the warmth 
of his own feelings, ever ready to protect the weak against the strong, and to 
cover the faults of a friend with the mantle of charity. In a word, as a sin- 



MEADVILLE. 729 

cerely good man, he was possessed of maay strong and admirable points of 
character. Physically he was of a noble and commanding presence. To the 
last his will was strong, his heart warm and radiant, emotional as though kin- 
dled by the lires of youth, while his clear blue eyes beamed in harmony with 
the kindly, sympathetic tones of his rich voice. In his household he was a 
worthy example in all its duties as a sincere Christian, a devoted husband and 
an aflFectionate father. The disease which carried him oflf was in the form of 
a violent cold, which settled on his lungs and baffled the best medical treat- 
ment. 

Hon. John Dick was for many years a successful merchant in Meadville, 
and was one of the founders of the private banking house of J. R. Dick & Co. , 
which, in 1850, was known as J. & J. R. Dick. In 1840 he was a member of 
the Electoral College which cast the vote of Pennsylvania for Gen. Harrison. 
In 1850 Gov. Johnson appointed him Associate Judge of Crawford County, 
and following year he was elected and commissioned to the same place. It 
was while tilling this position he was first elected to Congress, from the dis- 
trict composed of the counties of Erie and .Crawford, in 1852, continuing to 
represent it for three consecutive terms. The military titles conferred on Gen. 
Dick commenced early in life, and ran through a rapid and uninterrupted pro- 
motion. At the age of twenty-seven he was elected Major of the First Battal- 
ion, and was so commissioned by Gov. Hiester in 1821. In 1825 he was made 
Colonel of the Thirty-first Regiment; in 1831 he was commissioned by Gov. 
Wolf Brigadier-General of the Second Brigade, Sixteenth Division, composed 
of the counties of Beaver, Butler, Mercer, Crawford, Erie, Venango and War- 
ren, extending from the banks of the Ghio to the shores of Lake Erie. In all 
matters of improvement for the general good he was an earnest co-worker and 
a generous contributor. The Eastern Plank Road was constructed mainly 
through his instrumentality, and to him is Meadville, as well as surrounding 
country, indebted in a large measure for the Atlantic & Great Western Rail- 
road. He was one of the Trustees of Allegheny College, President of Craw- 
ford Mutual Insurance Company for several years; at one time Captain of the 
Cussewago Fire Company, the earliest organization in the fire department in 
this city, over forty years ago, and at the time of his death he was the oldest 
vestryman of Christ Church, Protestant Episcopal, Meadville, having been 
elected to that position February 7, 1829, and for more than forty years he 
devoted his best energies to the welfare of the parish. 

The mother of Hon. John Dick, whose maiden name was McGunnegle,wa8 
born at Carlisle in 1767, and, as already stated, came to this place with her 
first husband, William Dick, in 1794. Travelling at a period when this sec- 
tion of the country was mostly a wilderness, she went from Pittsburgh to Frank- 
lin, Penn., in a keel-boat, and traveled from Franklin to Meadville through a 
remarkably deep snow, on horseback, in the month of December, canying in 
her arms her infant child — the future Hon. John Dick. William Dick died 
in 1810, and in 1817 she inter-married with Hon. Jesse Moore, formerly of 
Chester County, Penn., but at that time and up to his decease President Judge 
of this Judicial District, by whose death, in 1824, she again became a widow. 
She died in Meadville, March 5, 1848. She was a. most exemplary, pious. 
Christian lady, for many years a consistent member of the Protestant Episco- 
pal Church of Meadville. 

Col. Samuel Bernard Dick, banker, Meadville, third son of Hon. John and 
Jane A. (Torbett) Dick, was born in Meadville, October 26, 1836, and received all 
the advantages of the best private schools and colleges at home, but left col- 
lege to enter into business before he took his degree. He was engaged with 



730 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

his father and uncle in the banking business at the breaking-out of the war of 
the Rebellion, and he at once tendered his services to Gov. Curtin, and was 
commissioned Captain of the Meadville Volunteers, the lirst company of troops 
organized in Crawford County. The company went into camp at Pittsburgh, 
and on the organization of the far-famed Pennsylvania Reserve Corps, in May, 
joined that organization, and his company became known as Company F, Ninth 
Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve Corps. Immediately following the first bat- 
tle of Bull Run, the regiment and division were ordered to Washington, and 
sworn into the service of the United States for three years' service, and became 
the right wing of the Army of the Potomac. On the 20th of December, 1861, 
at Dranesville, Va., Capt. Dick was severely wounded while leading Gen. 
Ord's advance in that engagement He returned home, but on the opening of 
the spring of 1862, although he had not entirely recovered from his wound.he 
rejoined his company, and participated with them in all the battles of the Army 
of the Potomac, under Gen. McClellan, commanding his regiment at South 
Mountain and Antietam. For gallant and meritorious action, while command- 
ing his regiment, he was recommended by Gens. Mead, Reynolds, and Hooker 
for promotion to the rank of a Brigadier-General, but continued ill health 
resulting from exposure and wounds, compelled his return home on sick leave, 
where he remained until the first of March, 1863, when, under the advice of 
the surgeon in charge, he was reluctantly compelled to resign his commission. 

When Gen. Lee's army moved northward into Pennsylvania in the summer 
of 1863, Gov. Curtin telegraphed Capt Dick to come immediately to Harris- 
burg, and requested him to take charge of the organization and mustering 
into service of all the State troops west of the Allegheny Mountains, and at the 
urgent request of the Secretary of War took command of the Fifth Regiment 
Pennsylvania Militia, and proceeded to New Creek, Va. , where he assumed 
command of all the forces at that point, relieving Gen. Kelly. At the expira- 
tion of this service, he returned to private life, and resumed the banking busi- 
ness in Meadville, in which he is still engaged, and is now the head of the 
firm of J. R. Dick & Co., which had been organized in 1850. In 1864 Col. 
Dick was elected a member of the Electoral College of Pennsylvania which 
cast the vote of the State for Lincoln's re-election. 

Col. Dick has been very prominent in the Masonic fraternity since 1857, 
having served through all the minor grades in Lodge, Chapter and Command- 
ery up to 1878, when he was elected the Grand Commander of Knights Tem- 
plar in Pennsylvania, and in 1880 was elected Grand Master of Masons in 
Pennsylvania, being the highest distinction in the power of the fraternity to 
bestow. Col. Dick is the only person ever chosen to be Grand Master of 
Masons west of the Allegheny Mountains, and the only Mason in Pennsylva- 
nia who ever held the office of Grand Commander and Grand Master. 

In 1863 Col. Dick married Miss Agnes Scott, of Pittsburgh, Penn., daugh- 
ter of Thomas Scott, for many years President of the Merchants' and Man- 
ufacturers' Bank of that city, and to this unioij were born two children: John 
Henry and Harriet A. In 1878 he was elected by the Republicans of his dis- 
trict to represent them in Congress serving one term. He was Mayor of Mead- 
ville in 1870, and under- his administration the City Market was erected. He 
is Director and Treasurer of the Meadville Gas Company, Meadville Water 
Company and Phcenix Iron Works; Director of the Meadville Glass Works, and 
Treasurer of Crawford Mutual Insurance Company; has been a Trustee of 
Allegheny College for many years, and President of the Board of Trade since 
its organization. The Colonel is a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 
and has been for many years a vestryman in Christ Church, Meadville. Of a 



MEADVILLE. 731 

genial and warm-hearted temperament, courteous and charitable by nature, 
Col. S. B. Dick has made himself hosts of friends, who invoke for him many 
years yet of usefulness, honor and happiness. 

David, second son of William and Anna (McGunnegle) Dick, and brother 
of Hon. John Dick, was born March 1, 1797, the second white child to see the 
light of day in Meadville, which was his home during his long and busy life. 
He was an enterprising, popular and liberal man, an intelligent and much 
respected citizen. He died in 1870 of erysipelas. David Dick was the origi- 
nator of the antifriction press, and the " Allegheny, " the first steamboat to 
ascend the Allegheny River, was the product of his energy. He was a mem- 
ber of the Protestant Episcopal Church. He was married toLydiaC. Calhoun 
of Carlisle, Penn. James R. Dick, the third son of William and Anna Dick 
was bom in Meadville, April 22, 1801. In 1816 he moved temporarily to 
Pittsburgh, Perm., where he remained five years. He then returned to Mead- 
ville and went into business with his brother David. From 1835 to 1840 he 
for a second time, became engaged in business in Pittsburgh, in partnership 
with the late Col. David C. Stockton. About 184:5 he resumed business in 
Meadville, in company with his brother, Gen. John, and subsequently, in 1850, 
established himself in the banking business, in which he remained until within 
a few days of his death, which occurred February 9, 1875, at which time he 
was Senior Warden of the Protestant Episcopal Church. He was married 
to Harriet, daughter of John Kelty Smith, of New Orleans, La., by whom 
he had one son — Jesse Moore — born in Meadville, July 22, 1833, married in 
1861 to Louisa Thorp, of New York City, and died February 2, 1874, without 
issue. For his second wife James R. married Miss Harriet S. Thorp, of Fair- 
field County, Conn., and to this union were born Anna M., widow of Lieut. 
Com. John McFarland; Harriet S., wife of George S. Cullum; Sturges T., 
married to Adelaide King, daughter of Charles A. King, Esq., of Toledo, Ohio; 
Elizabeth W., wife of Col. J. Ford Dorrance. Wilson W., the youngest son 
of William and Anna Dick, was born in Meadville, July 17, 1808, and soon 
after attaining his majority, chose law as his profession. He was admitted to 
the bar of Crawford County in 1829, and immediately began to practice, but 
not finding the pursuit of Blackstone congenial, he soon abandoned it and 
assisted his brothers in merchandising. In 1832 he married Miss Elizabeth 
Betts. In 1840 he was elected Justice of the Peace, serving one term. From 
1848 to 1850 he was engaged in the coal business at Greenville, and from 1856 
to 1865 was similarly interested at Georgetown. With the exception of these 
two intervals and the time spent in the study of law at Pittsburgh, Penn., Mr. 
Dick was a continuous resident of Meadville. He was a devoted Christian 
man, a member of and for fifty-five years a faithful and exemplary communi- 
cant of the Episcopal Church. He died July 31, 1882. 

WILLIAM F. DICKSON, foundryman, Meadville, was born in this county, 
February 15, 1819, and is a son of Joseph Dickson, who was born in this State 
in 1790, and has lived longer in this county than any man now in it. Our 
subject grew to manhood in Hayfield Township, this county, attending the old 
log-schoolhouse, and working in his father's mill from the time he was big 
enough to be of any use, but he was so attentive to his schooling that, in 1837, 
he commenced to teach school, and continued to do so for thirteen winters. 
In 1840 he was married to Harriet, daughter of John Burns, a native of this 
county, her father being a prominent farmer of Hayfield Township. They 
have four children — Emma, wife of Robert Anderson, of Meadville; Aurelia, 
wife of S. G. Curry, of Curry & Co., foundrymen; Ellen, wife of William 
Hoap, of Meadville, and H. M., Clerk in the Recorder's office. In 1862 Mr. 



732 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Dickson enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Fiftieth Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, serving till the close of the war. In 1872 he was elected 
Register and Recorder of the county, and again in 1875, serving as a county 
officer for twelve years. He has been Secretary of the I. O. O. F. Lodge for 
thirty-five years. In 1879 he purchased his present foundry, which has been 
carried on under the firm name of Curry & Co. In politics our subject is a 
Republican. 

J. COLLINS DICKSON, coal merchant, Meadville, was born March 26, 
1824, in Hayfield Township, on the same farm which his grandfather, James 
Dickson, bought in 1794 and settled on in 1796, purchasing a tract of 800 
acres for 20 cents an acre. Our subject was the third sod of Joseph Dick- 
son, and spent his youthful days on the farm and engaged in the saw and 
grist mills owned by his father and grandfather. His education was limited 
to that obtainable at the log schools of that period. When seventeen his 
parents moved to Meadville, and for twenty-six summers he ran on the canal 
and for all but three years owned his own boat. Since 1871 Mr. Dickson has 
been in the coal business. He has been twice married, first in 1858 to Mary 
Sterrett, who died in 1872, and in the fall of the following year he was again 
married, on this occasion to Katie E. Wilson, and the fruit of this union is 
one child — Nevin R. Mr. and Mrs. Dickson are members of the Park Avenue 
Congregational Church. In politics he is a Republican. The father of Mr. 
Dickson, Joseph Dickson, is now living in Meadville at the advanced age of 
ninety-five years, having lived in the county since May, 1794. 

ARCHIBALD S. DICKSON, Meadville, was born near here August 8, 1834, 
son of Joseph and Mary (Frazier) Dickson, natives of Pennsylvania, of Scotch 
descent. Joseph Dickson was born February 12, 1790, in Pittsburgh, Penn., 
and came with his parents to Crawford County, in 1794. He and his brother 
Robert served in the war of 1812, he being an Orderly- Sergeant, and he is 
still drawing a pension for his services. In 1815 and 1818 he built a flour 
and saw-mill, four miles north of Meadville, which he operated for eighteen 
years; was also engaged in farming. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, in which he has been an Elder since 1831. His wife was born in 
1800. They reared twelve children and one died in infancy, seven now 
residing in this county. Two of his sons participated in the late war, viz. : 
William now living in Meadville, and Joseph, who served as First Lieutenant. 
The subject of this sketch moved with his parents to Pittsburgh in 1839, and to 
Meadville in 1840. He attended the common schools, and when fourteen 
years of age commenced to learn the drug business, and when nineteen years 
old embarked in the same line on his own account, and this industry he con- 
ducted successfully for twenty-one years and then retired. Mr. Dickson was 
elected and served, 1868-69, as a member of the City Council; in 1871 was 
elected Mayor, and re-elected in 1872. During 1877 and 1878 he served 
again in the Council. He was appointed and served two years, 1878 and 1879, 
as President of the Missouri & Pacific Railroad; was also a Director of the 
the Meadville Railroad, serving as President of the latter in 1883. Mr. Dick- 
son has successfully engaged in various enterprises. 

COL. J. FORD DORRANCE, attorney at law, Meadville, was born in Kings- 
ton, Penn. , April 19, 1852, and is a son of Charles and Susan (Ford) Dor- 
rance, the former of Scotch-Irish, the latter of English descent. Charles 
Dorrance is a banker, and now President of Wyoming National Bank of 
Wilkes Barre, Penn., but in his early life was a farmer, and he still owns the 
400-acre farm purchased of the Government, by Col. Benjamin Dorrance, the 
great-grandfather of our subject, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. 



MEADVILLE. 733 

and was killed at the battle of Wyoming. Our subject's grandfather was 
a member of the Pennsylvania Legislature. Col. J. F. Dorrance is the third 
of a family of five children, and received his education at Lehigh University, 
where he graduated in 1869. Soon after he came to Meadville, and studied 
law with Hon. David Derickson. He was admitted to the bar in 1875, and 
has practiced ever since. He was married in 1875 to Elizabeth W., daughter 
of the late James R. Dick, for many years a prominent banker of Meadville. 
In 1878 Col. Dorrance was appointed on Gov. Hoyt's staff with the rank of 
Colonel, and served three years. He is attorney and financial agent for the 
Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York, and has loaned many thousands 
of dollars for them. He carries on a constantly increasing law business. Mr. 
and Mrs. Dorrance are members of Christ Church (Episcopal), of which he is 
a Vestryman. 

JOSHUA DOUGLASS, attorney and counselor at law, Meadville, was born 
in Rochester, N. Y., August 1, 1826. His parents came to Meadville in 1832 
and settled on a farm in Mead Township. Our subject acquired his education 
mostly at the academy in Meadville, and studied law with Hon. A. B. Rich- 
mond. He was married in 1848 to Calsina L. Finch, who died in 1849. He 
was again married in 1853 to Lavantia, daughter of Joel and Sophia Dens- 
more, of Erie City. Their silver wedding was celebrated October 4, 1878. 
Their children are — Marion, born February 7, 1855, married December 22, 
1875, to Charles W. Lane, of Meadville (have two children: Ralph, born May 
9, 1877, and Elsie, born December 14, 1878); Ellen, born July 19, 1858, mar- 
ried June 23, 1880, to Cornelius Van Home, attorney, of Meadville, Penn. (had 
one child, Robert, born March 23, 1884): Robert, born November 17, 1861, 
died in 1862; Mabel, born February 22,1864, married in July, 1882, to Harry 
C. Flood, of Meadville, Penn., and Gertrude, born November 8, 1866. Mr. and 
Mrs. Douglass are members of the Unitarian Congregation of Meadville. In 1850 
Mr. Douglass went to California; returned in 1852 and commenced to read law, 
in which he has been successfully practicing since 1854; was admitted to the 
Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in 1858, to the United States Courts in 1862, 
and to the Supreme Court of the United States in 1869. He has been -a 
Republican since the organization of that party. Mr. Douglass is of Scotch 
origin, and has in his possession a carefully written history of his family, pre- 
pared by a member of the same, which embraces many eminent names. Hon. 
Stephen A. Douglass is a member of the family, and is of the seventh gene- 
ration. 

THOMAS J. DOYLE, merchant tailor, Meadville, was born at Cavan, 
Ireland, November 30, 1842, son of Patrick F. and Mary (McFarland) Doyle, 
the former a native of Ireland the latter of Paris, France. Mrs. Patrick F. 
Doyle's father, James McFarland, had strong political sentiments, and was so 
candid and zealous in expressing his fidelity to the rebel cause, that he was 
forced to flee his country, and, together with his family, he re.'^ided for three 
years a refugee in France, and it was within this period that the mother of 
our subject was born. She has long survived her husband, and at this writ- 
ing (fall of 1884) resides at Ballinamore. County Leitrim, Ireland. Patrick 
F. and Mary Doyle had born to them eight children, four of whom died in 
infancy. Those who attained majority are — James, residing in St. Louis, Mo. ; 
William, deceased; Kate, now Mrs. John White, in New York City; and 
Thomas J. Our subject came to America in 1859, and first located in New 
York City, engaging with James Johnson as an apprentice to the trade ho now 
follows. Previous to leaving Ireland he had served two and one-half years 
in the same vocation. He remained ih New York City, perfecting himself in 



734 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

his trade, with different firms, until the spring of 1865. May 1 of that year 
he came to Meadville, Penn., where he has since resided. He was first 
employed by Porter & Uowell, remaining with them in the capacity of cutter 
for four years. Nest he engaged with Reefer & Orris, with whom he serrad 
from 1869 to 1878. In this latter year he again changed employers, and 
began to work for I. N. Klein, with whom he continued until the latter 
removed to Cleveland, Ohio, to embark in the wholesale trade. This was in 
1881, at which time Mr. Doyle began business on his own account, opening 
out at 250 Chestnut Street, Meadville. He continued here for two years, 
then in 1883 formed a copartnership with W. H. Gaskill, under the firm name 
of Gaskill & Doyle. They began to do business at 208 Chestnut Street, in 
the Opera Building, and from the first their business was highly prosperous. 
In January, 1884, the Opera House was consumed by fire. Gaskill & Doyle 
rescued most of their stock, but sustained a loss of $1,000. They resumed 
business at once, and at this writing (fall of 1884) are located at 227 Chestnut 
Street. Mr. Doyle is a Democrat, candid in his manner and statements, a 
good friend, and devoted to his family. He married, December 22, 1866, 
Miss Julia A., daughter of James Housten, Esq., of Meadville, Penn. Their 
union has been blessed with five children, four now living: Mary J., William 
H., Kittie E. and E. Grace. 

HENRY DREUTLEIN, cigar manufacturer, Meadville, was born in Ger- 
many,November 8, 1848, and is a son of Christopher Dreutlein, by occupation a 
miller, but who followed cigar making after he came to America in 1860. Henry, 
who is the eldest of a family of five children, received his education in his native 
land, and naturally learned from his father the art of manufacturing cigars. 
He came to Meadville in 1866, established his business here and has met with 
more than average success, all his brands of cigars being well and favorably 
known. He was married in 1872 to Caroline Worst, a native of Buffalo, N. 
Y., and of German descent. Their children are Catharine, Anna, G. H., 
Lottie and May. They are members of the Catholic Church. He votes the 
Democratic ticket; is a member of the K. of P. and R. A. societies. 

A. L. DUNBAR, Division Superintendent of the New York, Pennsylvania 
& Ohio Railway, Meadville, was born in Bushnell, Pike Co., Penn., November 
9, 1838, son of Francis K. and Maria (DeWitt) Dunbar, natives of Pennsylva- 
nia, the former of Scottish and the latter of Hollandish descent. Our subject, 
the eldest in a family of six children, received his education in the common 
schools of Pike and Monroe Counties, Penn., early learning telegraphy, and 
has been in the employment of railway companies ever since, always proving 
himself faithful and a competent railway man. He was married in 1867 to 
Mary J., daughter of John Carr, of Meadville, and they have one child — 
Harry. Mrs. Dunbar passed from earth in 1880. She was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Our subject is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, of which he is a Trustee. 

J. D. DUNN, photographer, Meadville, was born in Hayfield Township, 
this county, August 17, 1829, and is a son of Simeon and Eliza (Compton) 
Dunn. His grandfather, James Dunn, came to this county in 1794, was a 
farmer, for many years Justice of the Peace. He had a large family. All of his 
eons, seven in number, were soldiers in the war of 1812. Our subject's father, 
who was the youngest in the family, followed farming, spending his life in 
Crawford County. He had a family of seven children, of whom J. D. is the 
second; he died in 1866. Our subject, till seventeen years old, was raised on 
the farm in Hayfield Township, and after receiving a common school education, 
he learned plastering, which he worked at for several years until his health 



lb71CS7 

MEADVILI.E. 735 

gave way. He then learned photography, at which he continued one year. 
Then he came to Meadville and worked at plastering until 1857, when his 
health again failed. He then started his present business, which he has con- 
tinued ever since. Mr. Dunn was twice married, on first occasion, in 1854, 
to Martha J. Maxwell, a native of Meadville, of Irish descent. The fruit of 
this marriage is one daughter — Helen E. Mrs. Dunn died in I866,and three 
years later Mr. Dunn married Miss Olive Hall. They have two children — Lulu 
and Gertie. Mr. aud Mrs. Dunn are members of the Christodelphian Church; 
in politics he is a member of the National Greenback party. 

L. D. DUNN, undertaker and liveryman, Meadville, was born in Hayfield 
Township, this county, July 7, 1832, and is a son of Simeon and Eliza (Comp- 
ton) Dunn, the father being of French and Scotch descent, coming to Hay- 
field Township in 1794, from Fayette County, Penn. The mother was a 
native of this county and of English descent. Our subject's grandfather, 
James Dunn, was a land agent and farmed here from 1794 to his death. Sim- 
eon Dunn, oui- subject's father, was a farmer, a soldier in the war of 1812; 
he raised a family of seven — five boys and two girls — all now residents of this 
county. The fifth son settled in Nashville, Tenn., at the close of the war, and 
died there October 19, 1884. L. D. Dunn, our subject, the fourth son, was 
educated in the common schools. He farmed until 1870, then kept store at 
Coon's Corners until 1876, when he came to this city and embarked in his pres- 
ent business. He was married in 1853 to Mary E., daughter of Dr. Hiram 
Boyd, the latter a resident of Crawford County for over fifty years. They 
have three children: Ettie, wife of Byron De Forest; H. E., a dentist in Coshoc- 
ton; Mary, wife of D. D. Malroy. Mr. and Mrs. Dunn are members of the 
Christodelphian Church; in politics he is a Republican. 

REV. JAMES J. DUNN,. pastor of St. Bridget's Church, Meadville, was 
born in Malahide, Dublin Co., Ireland, June 9, 1841; arrived in Baltimore, 
Md., in 1849; entered Mt. St. Mary's College, Emmittsburg, Md., August 24, 
1857; graduated at the same institution June, 1863, receiving the degrees of 
A. B. and A. M. ; entered the seminary attached to the college in the fall of the 
same year and was ordained by Bishop Quinlan of Mobile for the diocese of 
Erie, in the church attached to the college, on October 28, 1866; remained 
for one year attached to the college as Adjunct Professor of Latin and Greek; 
entered upon missionary work at Oil City, Penn., October, 1867, was placed in 
charge of the congregation at Petroleum Center in June, 1868, and transferred 
to the charge of St. Bridget's Church, Meadville, March 4, 1874. 

DAVID C. DUNN, dentist, Meadville, was born in this county, April 17, 
1845, and is a son of Rensselaer and Rebecca (Compton) Dunn. The father, a 
carpenter and resident of this county, was twice married, our subject being 
the eldest of the family. He received his education in the schools of Mead- 
ville, and commenced the study of dentistry when seventeen years of age with 
Dr. Greenlee, of Meadville. After completing his course of gtudy he entered 
upon the practice of his profession which he continued with excellent success, 
having been in practice here since 1869. He was married in 1868 to Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Col. Hays, of Meadville, and they have four children, viz.: 
"William C, Anna, Ellen, and Wallace H. jVIrs. Dunn is a member of the First 
Presbyterian Church. Politically Mr. Dunn is a Republican. 

L. F. EDSON, grocer, Meadville, was born in Bloomfield Township, this 
county, April 15, 1837, and is a son of Chelos and Julia Ann (Bloomfield) 
Edson. His mother was a daughter of Stephen Bloomfield, from whom the 
township was named, and who came to this county in 1815, and settled on a 
farm. Our subject's father was born in Massachusetts; came to this county at 



736 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

an early day, settled on a farm and raised a family of thirteen children, of 
whom L. F. is the sixth. He received a common school education, and devoted 
himself to farming until he and two of his brothers enlisted in the army. 
One of the brothers who was in the war is now elected Prothonotary of this 
county. Our subject enlisted in 1863 in Company I, Eighty-third Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged in 1865 for disability. Since he 
returned home he has been in mercantile business. He was, twice married, 
on first occasion, September 12; 1861, to Esther A. Stilson, who died, and 
Mr. Edson then married, June 12, 1878, Amanda S. Harris, who bore him two 
children: Leon and Roscoe. Our subject has served two terms as Justice of 
the Peace in Bloomfield and Steuben Townships, and has been School Direc- 
tor, Collector, etc. In politics he is a Republican. 

EDWARD ELLIS, M.D., Meadville,was born in Chester Mass., January 15, 
1804. His parents were Ebenezer Ellis and Ruth (Stiles) Ellis. His ancestors on 
both sides were of English blood, and were among the earliest colonists of 
New England. His grandfather, Samuel Ellis, served in the French and 
Indian wars and in the Revolution. His father was a farmer and the father 
of nine children, his five sons being each six feet or over in height. Dr. 
Ellis is a graduate of Berkshire Medical College, which was formerly the 
Medical Department of Williams College, and at that time a school of reputa- 
tion. He attended lectures both in Philadelphia and New York His health 
being delicate he determined upon a change of locality and climate, and came 
in 1826 to this county, then a comparatively new and unsettled region. His 
practice therefore extends over a period of nearly sixty years, and now, at the 
age of eighty-one, he still attends to the duties of his profession. His physi- 
cal strength is remarkable and his health unimpaired. Dr. Ellis has been 
twice married; first, on April 4, 1832, to Mrs. Mary Kennedy, who died in 
1840; afterward on March 31, 1842, to Miss Sarah Buchanan, of Meadville, 
who died March 14, 1844. By his second marriage he had one daughter, 
Elizabeth Ruth, who was married in 1864 to the Rev. Marison Byllesby, then 
and for some time afterward Rector of Christ Church, Meadville. Of this 
church Dr. Ellis was one of the Wardens for many years, and is still a Ves- 
tryman. During his long residence in Meadville Dr. Ellis has taken an active 
interest in the welfare of the community. He has aided many young men 
in obtaining an education, and- established others in business, some of whom 
are now prominent and successful men. He was at one time largely inter- 
ested in manufacturing and other enterprises which promised to contribute 
greatly to the prosperity of the place, but which turned out to be unfortunate 
investments, and resulted in the total loss of his large property. His losses, 
however, have neither lessened the cheerfulness of his temper nor his kindness 
of heart. 

CHARLES FARNICORN, butcher, Meadville, was born in Germany 
June 20, 1835, and is a son of Francis K. Farnicorn, a tailor by trade, who 
came to America in 1846, settling down as a farmer in this county. He had a 
family of three children. Charles, the eldest, was reared on the farm, where he 
worked by the month for several years, and acquired his education in the com- 
mon schools. In 1846 he came to Meadville, remaining here two years, when 
he moved back into the country. In 1870 ho commenced butchering, which 
he still follows. He was married to Barbara, daughter of Andrew Dudenhoffer, 
a prominent farmer of this county. They have five children — Anna M. , John 
J., Edward C, Mary L., and Margaret B. They are both members of the 
Catholic Church. In politics he is a Democrat. He. has been a member of 
the Town Council, and in 1884 he was elected Mayor of Meadville. 



MEADVILLE. 737 

DAVID M. FARRELLY, attorney, Meadville, was born March 15, 1807, 
in Meadville, and is a son of Patrick and Elizabeth (Meade) Farrelly; the for- 
mer a native of Ireland, and who came to this county at an early day, was a law- 
yer. He was elected to Congress in 1820, served three terms, but died about 
the close of his last term. Our subject's mother was a daughter of Gen. 
Meade, who was at one time a large and wealthy land owner here, and laid out 
Meadville, of which he was the founder. Of Patrick and Elizabeth Farrelly's 
family, David M. , our subject, is the eldest. He is a graduate of Allegheny 
College, and in 182-4 entered West Point as a cadet, remaining three years, 
when he returned to Meadville and studied law under David Derickson, In 
the spring of 1830 he was appointed Register and Recorder of Deeds of Craw- 
ford County by Gov. Wolfe. In 1836 he was elected a member of the 
Constitutional Convention. In 1838 he was appointed Surveyor in locating 
Erie Canal from Glenville to Erie, and had charge of that line of survey. He 
is now one of the oldest law practitioners in Meadville. His brother, Hon. 
John Wilson Farrelly, is a graduate of Allegheny College, and in 1840 was 
elected to Congress from this district. He served under Presidents Taylor and 
Fillmore as Sixth Auditor of the Treasury Department of the United States. 
Our subject's other brother, Patrick, a graduate of West Point, was a Lieuten- 
ant in the Mexican war, and died at Fort Ouichita in 1852. Our subject was 
married in 1843 to Elizabeth Meade, who was a grand-daughter of Gen. Meade. 
They have live children now living. 

JAMES FERGUSON, dentist, Meadville, was born in Canada, November 
23, 1837, and is a son of Edward and Mary Ann (Kirkpatriek) Ferguson, 
natives of Ireland, who reared a family of live sons and one daughter, our sub- 
ject being the third child. He received his education in his native land, and 
there learned printing, working at that business for four years. During the 
war of the Rebellion he came to the United States, and in 1864 was in the 
Quartermaster's Department. After the war he took up the study of dentistry, 
attending the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario, Canada, where he 
graduated in 1871. In 1879 he was married in Canada to Elizabeth G. San- 
ders, and they have two children — Grace and Edward James. The Doctor has 
established a good practice in Meadville. 

THEODORE L. FLOOD, Meadville, was born in Williamsburg, Penn., 
February 20, 1842. He was educated in the academy of his native town, and 
studied privately two years under Dr. Ulysses Hewitt, of the same place; 
received his theological education at the Biblical Institute, Concord, N. H., 
now the school of theology in the Boston University. He was converted in 
his sixteenth year in Williamsburg; was licensed to exhort when eighteen, 
and licensed as a local preacher in his twentieth year. He served in the war 
nine months as First Sergeant and Lieutenant; joined the New Hampshire 
Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in his twenty-second year, in 
1864; served as Superintendent of the public schools in Salem, N. H. , one 
year. While pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church in. that place (he was 
pastor in New Hampshire from 1864 to 1874, at Rumney, Seabrook, Salem, 
Newmarket and Keene) he was made Presiding Elder of the Concord District in 
the New Hampshire Conference when thirty two years of age, and was elected 
President of the New Hampshire State Sunday-school Convention in 1874, 
which was composed of delegates from eleven different religious denomina- 
tions. Failing health obliged him to seek a change of climate, and he was 
transferred to the Erie Conference, and stationed at Jamestown, N. Y. , in 
April, of 1874. While here, he delivered a series of four lectures, which 
were published by the congregation in pamphlet form: "Temperance and the 



738 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Excise Law, " " Spiritnalism, " "Protestantism and the Romish Church," and 
" The Bible in the Common Schools." His next pastorate was the First 
Methodist Episcopal Church at Meadville, Penn., a body of about 700 mem- 
bers. Allegheny College is located here, and the faculty and students mostly 
attend this church. Here Mr. Flood delivered a series of three lectures which 
were printed in a number of local papers, also in the Assembly Herald. They 
were: "Novels and Novel Reading," "Modern Social Life," "Theater 
Going, Dancing and Card Playing." Mr. Flood is the author of a book pub- 
lished by Estes & Lauriat, of Boston, Mass., entitled, "A Hundred Ministers 
and how they Switched off." While pastor in Jamestown, N. T., he published 
a monthly local church paper entitled, the Herald of the Cross, also published 
one in Meadville called the Evangel. In 1876 the Ohio Wesleyan University 
conferred upon Mr. Flood the degree of Master of Arts. Mr. Flood as editor, 
and Mr. M. Bailey, of Jamestown, N. Y. , as manager, founded the Chautauqua 
Assembly Daily Herald, the ofiBcial organ of the great Chautauqua meetings in 
1875, and at this writing Mr. Flood has entered upon his ninth year as editor 
of this paper. It is a quarto forty-eight column paper issued monthly, till 
July, 1880, during the year, and daily during the Chautauqua meetings in 
August. There were 6,000 copies of the daily issued in August, 1880, and 
6,000 copies of the monthly the previous year. Mi-. Flood purchased Mr. 
Bailey's interest in the Chautauqua periodicals in October, 1880, so that he 
is now the editor and proprietor of both the Assembly Herald and the Chau- 
tauquan. Mr. Flood, with the Rev. J. W. Hamilton, of Boston, Mass., has 
published at the Methodist Episcopal Book Concern in New York City a book, 
"Lives of the Methodist Bishops, " from the standpoint of an active episcopacy. 
The design of the book is to give a sketch of the life of every deceased Bishop 
in every branch of Episcopal Methodism, with a steel engraving of each one. 
The articles have been prepared by eminent vyriters in all branches of Method- 
ism, both in England and America, and several of them by Mr. Flood. Mr. 
Flood was elected a member of the General Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church which met in May, 1880, in Cincinnati, Ohio. He was 
made Doctor of Divinity by Mount Union College at Alliance, Ohio, in 1881. 
In 1880 Dr. Flood, as editor and proprietor, established in Meadville the 
Chautauquan, a monthly magazine, organ of the Chautauqua Literary and 
Scientific Circle. The first year it reached a circulation of 15,000 copies, and 
in 1884 its circulation had reached nearly 50,000 copies. After three years' 
service in Meadville, Dr. Flood preached two years at Trinity Church, Oil 
City, and supplied the pulpit of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Titusville 
one year. In December, 1883, he purchased the Meadville Daily and Weekly 
Republican, located at Meadville, Penn., the leading secular and political jour- 
nals of Crawford County. He made his son, Harry C. Flood, editor and pro- 
prietor of these periodicals. Dr. Flood was elected in 1883, the second time, 
delegate to the General Conference of his church, at the head of the delegation. 
In 1883 he purchased a residence on the Diamond, in Meadville, where he now 
resides. Our subject was married, June 20, 1862, in Huntingdon, Penn., to 
Miss Annie M., daughter of David Black, Esq., of that town, and by this 
union were bom two sons and one daughter: Harry C. , Ned A. and Rebie M. 
Dr. Flood retired from the pastorate in October, 1882, to devote himself exclu- 
sively to the editorial work and business management of the Chautauqua 
periodicals. 

HARRY C. FLOOD, editor and proprietor of the Republican, Meadville, 
was born May 19, 1864, in Huntingdon County, Penn., son of Theodore L. 
and Annie M. C. (Black) Flood, the former born in Blair County, Penn., the 



MEADVILLE. 739 

latter in Huntingdon County, Penn. Our subject, their eldest son, received 
the principal part of his education in Allegheny College. He studied law and 
graduated in Albany (N. Y.) Law School in 1883, and opened a law office in 
Franklin, Ind., but returned to MeadvLlle the same year, and entered upon his 
present work, that of editor and proprietor of the Meadville Daily and Weekly 
Republican. His father, Theodore L. Flood, D. D., has had charge of the 
Chautauqua Magazine for several years, and Harry C, naturally inclined to 
journalistic work, has succeeded in building up a large patronage for his 
paper. As the name of the paper wonld indicate, his views are Republican. 

JAMES F. FRAZIER, druggist, Meadville, was born in Meadville, May 
16, 1847, son of Roderick and Mary (Morris) Frazier. The former, a native 
of Chester County, Penn., of Scotch descent, born May 2, 1802, came to 
Meadville with his parents in 1806, and here learned the tanner's trade and car- 
ried on a tannery for many years. He also manufactured boots and shoes, and 
carried on a meat market, conducting all three businesses cotemporaneously, 
besides, in later life, owning and operatiag a flour-mill, thus proving him to 
have been an energetic, active and useful business man in the early days. Mr. 
Frazier died in 1852. His family consisted of seven children, four of whom 
are now residents of Meadville. His wife was of Welsh descent, and came 
with her parents to Meadville in 1815. Her father, a farmer, was a native of 
New York. She died in 1856. 

A. M. FULLER, merchant, Meadville, was bom in 1847, in Littte Falls, 
N. Y., son of M. A. and Mary (Holcomb) Fuller, natives of New York, of 
English descent, parents of two children. M. A. Fuller was a merchant in 
Meadville for sixteen years, having commenced business in 1848. Our subject 
came to Meadville in 1870 and embarked in the dry goods business, which he 
has continued in up to the present time, employing now sixteen hands. His 
store, which stood in the Opera Block, was destroyed by tire January 8, 1884, 
and Mr. Fuller has since purchased a quarter interest in the property with a 
view to again prosecuting his business in the same quarters. Our subject has 
attained his present position as a business man by his own efforts, and has 
succeeded in establishing a large and profitable business. He was married 
January 27, 1876, to Elizabeth, daughter of Leon C. Magaw, and to this 
union were born two children: Marian and Frederick. Mr. Fuller was elected 
President of the P. S. D. A., serving four years, and re-elected in 1884. The 
dairy is one of the leading farming industries of the county, and has con- 
tributed more largely than any other interest to the prosperity of the farm- 
ing community of this section. He was also elected, in 1884, President of the 
Meadville Glass Company (limited), an enterprise he was active in establishing 
and in which he has been a stock-holder since its organization. He has taken 
a special interest in all public improvements, being especially energetic in 
securing the repairing of the streets of Meadville and the accomplishing of 
other improvements of advantage to the city. Mr. Fuller is connected with 
the Congregatit)nal Church, in the organization of which he took active part. 

CHARLES GABLE, proprietor Gable House, Meadville, was born Novem- 
ber 3, 1830, in Woodcock Township, this county, on his father's farm, son of 
John C. and Sarah (Frankfield) Gable, natives of Lehigh County, Penn., and 
who came to this county in 1825, 'locating in Woodcock Township. John.G. 
Gable first engaged in agriculture, which he followed two years, when he 
removed to Meadville and began the business of teaming between Erie and Pitts- 
burgh, an enterprise he conducted for six years and then returned to agriculture, 
which vocation he continued to follow until his death. To the union of John 
G. and Sarah Gable were born seven children, five of whom are now living. 



740 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

resideDts of this county. Charles Gable, our subject, the youngest surviving 
child, remained on the farm with his father until he arrived at the age of nine- 
teen, when he was employed with his brother John, who was conducting the 
Crawford House in Meadville. His engagement with his brother extended 
over a period of two years, and on April 1, 1852, he assumed exclusive control 
and management of the hotel, and retained this relation until 1856, when he 
formed a co-partnership with C. S. Eyre, and conducted a genera] store on 
corner of Chestnut and South Main Streets, where now stands the stone Meth- 
odist Church. Business was continued at this stand five years, when it was 
removed to Tidioute, Penn., and in 1863 the partnership was dissolved. Our 
subject then embarked in the transportation of oil from Pit Hole, Venango 
County, to Scott's Landing, Warren Co., Penn., by flat-boat. This was in the 
spring and summer of 1863. The following winter he owned teams and 
engaged in the transportation of oil from Oil Creek to Titusville, Penn. On 
March 1, 1864, our subject purchased in Meadville the property which he now 
occupies and conducts, known as the Gable House. After nine years of pros- 
perity he leased out his city property and moved to the farm, formerly owned 
by his brother John, on the old State road, which farm of 170 acres is beauti- 
fully situated and has been much improved. In 1873 Mr. Gable retook pos- 
session of the Gable House, and since that date has continued to conduct it 
with success. Oar subject was elected in 1882 to a seat in the City Council. 
He was «narried April 27, 1857, to Nancy A. Stainbrook, of Meadville, Penn. 
To this union have been born ten children, nine now living: Arthur E. ; Charles 
E., married in 1883, to Miss Florence Archer, of Meadville, Penn. (have one aon, 
an infant); Frank P.; Emmett E. ; Carrie; Georgia, married in 1884, to A. H. 
Steele, of Meadville, Penn. ; William H. ; Burton and Hattie May. 

JAMES D. GILL, one of the oldest business men of Meadville. was born 
September 17, 1822, on the west bank of French Creek, Hayfield Township, this 
county, son of Robert and Harriet (Duno) Gill, the latter of whom was a 
daughter of James Dunn, a Captain in the Revolutionary war. Robert Gill 
was born in Scotland, and was the eldest son of William Gill, a carpenter by 
trade, who came from Glasgow in 1786, settling in Pittsburgh, Penn. In 1793 he 
came to Crawford County and after raising a crop returned to Pittsburgh, and 
in 1794 moved with his family to what is now Hayfield Township, this county, 
where he followed farming the balance of his life. His eldest son, the father 
of our subject, acquired his education in the subscription schools of Hayfield 
Township, and followed farming until his death, which occurred in 1828. Our 
subject, after attending the schools of his native township, Meadville Academy 
and Allegheny College, clerked in a store at Meadville for six years. In 1844 
he started a general store on his own account and continued in this business 
until 1857, when he embarked in the hardware trade, which he conducted till 
1873. In 1874 he was elected President of the Crawford Mutual Insurance 
Company, and in 1877 President of the Meadville Water Company, and is fill- 
ing both these positions at the present time. Mr. Gill has been twice married: 
on the first occasion in 1847 to Elizabeth, daughter of Gen. Daniel Shryock, 
who bore him one child — William R. (now deceased). Mr. Gill lost his wife 
by death in 1851, and in 1853 was remarried to her sister — Susan E. Shryock, 
by whom he has throe children: Harriet E. ; D. A., who is now managing the 
hardware business, and Elizabeth. In politics Mr. Gill is a Democrat. In 
1857 he was elected to the Borough Council; in 1865 was appointed Chief 
Engineer of the Fire Department, a post he filled with honor, and in 1873 
served as Mayor of Meadville. 

WILLIAM GILL, hardware merchant, Meadville, was born Januarv 28, 



MEADVILLE. 741 

1842, in Meadville, Penn., 6on of William and Maria E. (Mead) Gill, who 
were both natives of this county, the former of Scotch and the latter of English 
descent. William Gill, Sr. , was a house plasterer by trade, but in later 
life was a dry goods and grocery merchant. Our subject, who was the fourth 
child, was educated at Allegheny College, and in the Commercial College at 
Pittsburgh, Penn. In early life he acted as clerk, and in 1860 he embarked in 
the hardware businees, in which he still continues. Mr. Gill was married in 
1874 to Blanche S., daughter of Hiram Stowe and a sister of Hon. E. H. 
Stowe, of Pittsburgh, Penn. They have four children, viz.: Katherine C, 
David Donaldi Robert Stowe and Martha Stowe. In politics Mr. Gill is a 
Democrat. 

NORTON L. GLEASON, attorney at law, Meadville, was born in South 
Shenango Township, Crawford Co., Penn., April 11, 1852, and is a son of 
Norton D. and Sarah E. (Hart) Gleason, both of English descent. His parents 
were natives of Trumbull County, Ohio, and came to Crawford County, Penn., 
to farm in 1833, settling in South Shenango Township, raising a family of six 
children, of whom our subject is fourth. He was reared on the farm and 
received an excellent education, finishing in the following schools, viz. : Edin- 
boro State Normal, Farmington Seminary and Allegheny College. After this 
he entered the law ofi&ce of Compton & McKay, of Meadville, in 1874, and was 
admitted to practice April 6, 1876: commenced practice in Meadville the same 
year, but in 1877 he went to Cochranton, Penn., where he remained in the 
practice until 1883, when he returned to Meadville. In our subject's educa- 
tional career he taught in all ten terms, and supported himself at college by 
teaching. His mother died August 9, 1870, his father May 28, 1880. He is 
an active member of the I. O. O. F., having filled all the chairs. Politically 
he is a Republican. 

JAMES GRAHAM, Clerk of Court, Meadville, was born in Beaver Coun- 
ty, Penn., May 5, 1838, and is a son of Hugh and Anna (Johnson) Graham, 
natives of Pennsylvania and of Scotch-Irish descent. His father was a car- 
penter and came to this county in 1856, raising a family of four children, of 
whom James, the eldest, learned his father's trade, working at building saw- 
mills, etc. In 1876 he was elected Justice of the Peace of Bloomlield Town- 
ship, and continued in this office till 1882, when he was elected to his present 
position. He was married in 1861 to Sarah Lincoln, a native of this county, 
and their children are Eva, Jennie, Ljman and Addie. They are members 
of the Second Presbyterian Church. He is a Republican. 

THOMAS W. GRAYSON, editor and proprietor of the Crawford Democrat, 
Meadville, was born in Baltimore, Md., in 1817, son of John Grayson, a native 
of Ireland, who was brought to the United States in his infancy. John Gray- 
son marched out of Baltimore as First Lieutenant in the war of 1812 and par- 
ticipated in various engagements and conflicts with Great Britain, remaining 
in the service until the declaration of peace in 1815 and officiating as Adjutant 
of two consolidated regiments. Upon going to the war office at Washington 
for his discharge he was there informed that he was assigned to the peace estab- 
lishment and would be located at Fort McHenry. He declined the proffered 
honor for the reason that he had no taste for the service in time of peace. 
Soon after the war he married Martha, daughter of John and Mary Wray, and 
in 1817 established the Washington Examiner. In 1839 he was succeeded in 
the publication of the paper by his eldest son, Thomas W. Grayson, who was 
the senior of four brothers and two sisters. In 1860 the subject of this sketcb 
sold out his interest in the Washington Examiner and in May, 1861, became 
editor and proprietor of the Crawford Democrat. 



742 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

JOHN HAAS, butcher, Meadville, was born in the town of Mergentheim, 
Wurtemberg, Germany, August 12, 1848, and is a son of John Andrew and 
Barbara (Keitel) Haas, natives of Germany. John Haas received a good edu- 
cation in Germany, and early learned the trade of his father, that of a butcher, 
at which he has worked all his life, with the exception of three months when 
he first came to Meadville, at which time he worked in a brick yard. In 1873 
he came from Germany, and remained in New York for a time working at his 
trade. His health failing, he went to England but returned as soon as he 
recovered and settled in Meadville in 1875, working five years here for Harry 
Peirson, in the butchering business. Since 1880 he has been in business, and 
since 1882 he has carried on the industry alone. He was married in 1873 to 
Sophia Hofman, a native of Germany, by whom he has three children, 
Matilda, Charles and Sophia. Mi\ and Mrs. Haas are members of the German 
Lutheran Church. He is a member of the A. O. U. W. ; in politics a Demo- 
crat. 

SAMUEL T. HIALLOCK (deceased) was bom in the Empire State, July 4, 
1812, and received his schooling in his native State. His parents were mem- 
bers of the Society of Friends (Quakers). His early life was spent as a mer- 
chant in New York State. For a time he was a commission merchant in New 
York City, subsequently a merchant at Dentville, N. Y., and in 1847 came to 
Riceville, this county, where he carried on a store, grist-mill and saw-mill in 
company with Jesse Smith, until 1856, when he retired to a farm. His wife's 
maiden name was Sarah C. Bailey, a native of Massachusetts. Their union 
was blessed with eight children, of whom five now survive: Dr. W. B. Hal- 
lock, of Cromwell, Conn.; E. N., an oil dealer of Bradford, Penn.; Martha, 
wife of N. A. T. Carroll, of Buffalo, N. Y.; Hannah S.; P. F., an attorney of 
Meadville, the only representative of the family now in Crawford County. 
He was born in Crawford County, March 30, 1849, and choose law as his pro- 
fession, studying in the office of Joshua Douglass in Meadville, and was admit- 
ted in 1878; to the Supreme Court in 1881. In politics he is Democratic. He 
was married in Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1878, to Miss Jidia A. Barto. Their chil- 
dren are Robert P., (deceased) and Edith, now two years old. The subject of 
this sketch was a conductor on the "underground railroad," being among 
the early Abolitionists, and always took an active interest in public affairs. 

JOHN HAMMER, SR., retired manufacturer, Meadville, was born in Ba- 
varia, Germany, July 22, 1822. He received a common school education and 
early in life was set to learn the cooper trade, at which his father, John Ham- 
mer, and his grandfather, George Hammer, both worked. He came to New 
York in 1846 and worked at his trade in that city until 1862, when he came to 
Meadville, and opened a shop, commencing with eighteen hands. He after- 
ward took in two partners and added a saw-mill to the business, then employ- 
ing about thirty hands. In 1880 he commenced the manufacture of cigars, 
but has now turned the business over to his sons. He was married in 1847 to 
Rosena Long, a native of Bavaria. Their children are: John, cigar manufac- 
turer, Meadville, married; Edward, in business with his brother; John, also 
married; Emma and Louisa, at home; Pauline, wife of George Hessinger, 
cigar manufacturer, Meadville. Mr. and Mrs. Hammer are members of the 
Protestant Lutheran Church. 

JOSEPH HAMPSON, plumber and gas-fitter, Meadville, was bom in To- 
ronto, Canada, July 31, 1844, and is a son of William and Elizabeth (Smiley) 
Hampson, natives of England, who immigrated to Toronto in 1830, where our 
subject's father died in 1876. Joseph, the sixth in a family of ten children, 
was educated in Toronto, where he learned the trade of a tinner, working at 



MEADVILLE. 743 

the same five years. In 1864 he came to Cincinnati and the following year to 
Meadville, embarking in his present business. He was married in 1865 to 
Elizabeth Dolmage, a native of Canada, of English parentage, and this union 
has been blessed with twelve children, of whom two sons and seven daughters 
still survive. Mr. Hampson, by his own exertions, has acquired a fair compe- 
tency, having, besides real estate in the city, a farm in Mead Township. 

JOSEPH M. HANNAH, butcher, Meadville, was born December '2, 1850, 
in Meadville, Penn., son of James and Rebecca (Leiphart). Hannah, former a 
native of Scotland, latter of Pennsylvania, parents of eight children, viz. : 
John, Sarah (widow of T. York, a railroad conductor killed in a collision Decem- 
ber 24, 1883); Joseph M.; Robert (married to Julia Conners); Ella; James 
(married to' Margaret De Ross); Ida; William and Frank (two latter deceased). 
James Hannah came to this county about 1824-26 and settled in the city of 
Meadville. He was a wagon and buggy-maker by trade, and for many years 
did an extensive business in that line on Arch Street, Meadville. Our subject 
was married April 18, 1870, to Christina, daughter of George Houser, who 
bore him one child — Agnes. Mr. Hannah received his education in Meadville; 
went into business first with his brother in 1877, afterward bought him out, 
and since 1878 has carried on butchering. Mr. Hannah ranks among the 
prominent butchers in Meadville. Is a member of the Royal Arcanum. 

WALTER S. HARPER, Mayor of Meadville for 1882 and 1883, also pro- 
prietor of planing-mill and lumber yard, was born in Vernon Township, Craw- 
ford Co., Penn., March 16, 1834, son of Robert and Rebecca (Quigley) Har- 
per, who were also natives of that township, the former of whom died in 1865, 
the latter in 1879. His paternal grandfather, David Harper, was born in Ire- 
land, and came to this county, settling in Vernon Township, in 1802. He was 
a soldier in the Revolutionary war, by occupation a farmer. Our subject's 
mother was of English and Scotch descent. His great-grandfather Quigley 
was a Colonel in the Revolutionary war. James Quigley was the first Sheriff 
of this county. Our subject is a member of a family of fourteen children, 
thirteen growing to manhood and womanhood, twelve of whom still reside in 
this county. He was reared on a farm and received a common school educa- 
tion. At eighteen years of age he learned the carpenter's trade, and from that 
entered his present occupation. In 1870 he bought an interest in his present 
business, and in 1877 he bought out his partner and has since been conducting 
the business alone, employing from fifteen to twenty men. Our subject mar- 
ried in 1863 Miss Sarah Denny; she dying, he became united in marriage 
with Margaret, daughter of John Glenn, of Erie, Penn., and to this union 
were born three children: Florence E. , Margery B., and Walter G. 

HENRY HARTMAN, blacksmith, Meadville, was born in Vernon Town- 
ship, this county, in May, 1824. His parents, Jacob and Barbara (Marsh) 
Hartman, were natives of Switzerland and came to America in 1817, and to 
this county in 1820, where they resided until their death. Mr. Hartman was 
married in March, 1848, to Phebe L. Morris, a daughter of John Morris. 
They had seven children, all of whom are living and are residents of Mead- 
ville with the exception of the eldest daughter, Mrs. E. P. Clark, Vassar, 
Mich. Mrs. Hartman died November 1, 1880. Mr. Hartman began his trade 
in Meadville in 1842. In 1845 he went to Wisconsin and after remaining 
there two years returned to Meadville, where he began business for himself, 
which he has continued in the same place to the present day. He and his son 
carry on an extensive blacksmith shop on Dock Alley. 

COL. JOSEPH C. HAYS, Meadville, was born in Somerset, Penn. , July 4, 
1810. His grandfather on his mother's side was Samuel Wallace, of Cumber- 



744 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

land County, Penn., a Scotchman by birth, and his grandfather John Hays 
settled in Franklin County, Penn., on his arrival in this county from Ireland. 
His father, whose name was also John, died in Somerset, Penn., July 11, 1811, 
leaving a family of four sons and one daughter. The widowed mother 
removed soon after to Carlisle, Penn. , and subsequently to Harrisburg. After a 
brief stay in Franklin County at his grandparents' home, the boy — Joseph C. 
— acquiring the elements of an English education in a log schoolhouse, the 
family removed to Harrisburg, Penn., where he completed his education at 
the academy in that city, and then commenced to learn the art of printing in 
an office owned principally by Simon Cameron. But he soon after went to 
Philadelphia in order to perfect a knowledge of the business in a book-print- 
ing establishment. His health failing through close application to business, he 
was induced to accept a clerical position, and for several years performed the 
duties of book-keeper to a firm who were builders and contractors of the large 
viaduct over the Conemaugh River on the Allegheny Mountains, seven miles 
above Johnstown, being then called the " Portage Railroad " (the first road of 
the kind built by the State of Pennsylvania). His health being established, 
our subject engaged in several undertakings, one of which was the publishing 
a paper called the Expositor, in company with George Fleming, of Carlisle, 
Penn. In 1836 he removed to Meadville, Penn., where he issued the first num- 
ber of a paper called the Statesman, on July 27th of that year, which was 
continued under his control until May, 1841, when Col. Hays was appointed 
Postmaster of Meadville by President Harrison. His official career was cut 
short by John Tyler, who came to the Presidency on the death of Gen. Harri- 
son. He then engaged for a season in mercantile pursuits, but in 1848 
he relinquished these for the press, and January 13 of that year, commenced 
the publication of the Crawford Journal. The political sentiments of this 
paper were those of the Whig party, although its anti-slavery views were so 
pronounced as to give it the character of an "Abolition sheet." This paper 
our subject continued to own and control until 1864. During most of this 
time the Journal was the only paper of this class in Meadville, and the party 
increased from a minority of over 500 in 1848, to a majority of 2,500 in 1860. 

Col. Hays was variously honored by the party during this period. In 1859 
he was elected County Treasurer, and sent as delegate to the Chicago Conven- 
tion that nominated Abraham Lincoln for President in 1860. The latter, in 
1861, appointed him Postmaster of Meadville, but he was removed from this 
position in 1862 on charges which were proven false. Col. Hays, on his own 
urgent demand, was tried by the United States District Court held at Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., in October, 1862, and a verdict of acquittal rendered by the jury 
on the charges preferred against him. The finding of the jury was approved by 
the presiding Judge and the United States District Attorney, and certified to 
President Lincoln. The latter, in vindication, appointed Col. Hays, in May, 
1864, an Assistant Quartermaster with the rank of Captain. An accident 
which befel him at Chambersburg, Penn., soon after the rebels burnt that city, 
disabled him from active service, and he resigned. 

In January, 1872, he was appointed a Postoffice Inspector, which position 
he held until August 15, 1883, nearly twelve years, and when he retired 
received from the head of his Department a certificate that he had proved him- 
self "an efficient and conscientious officer." The title, "Colonel," was con- 
ferred on him by two different Governors of Pennsylvania (Pollock and Curtin), 
they appointing him an Aid-de-Camp on their staffs with that rank. Educated 
in Presbyterianism, and having early joined a church of that pursuasion, he 
became affiliated with the First Presbyterian Church of Meadville, Penn., in 



MEADVILLE. 745 

which he is at present a Ruling Elder, and lives retired from business among 
friends acquired during a residence of nearly half a century. 

ERNEST A. HEMPSTEAD, editor and proprietor of the Craivford Jour- 
nal, Meadville, was born in Dimock, Susquehanna Co., Penn., about six miles 
south of Montrose, December 15, 1851, and for the drst decade of his life 
resided there and in the adjoining town of Brooklyn, when he removed to 
Philadelphia. He received his education in the public schools of that city, 
entering the high school at the age of foui'teen and remaining three years. 
He came to Meadville in 1870, entering the office of the Crawford Journal for 
the purpose of acquiring a thorough knowledge of the art of printing. Jan- 
uary 1, 1873, just two weeks after he had arrived at his majority, he took edi- 
torial charge of the Journal during the absence of the editor, L. W. Thick- 
stun, at Harrisburg. In April following he took entire charge of the office 
and became the publisher of the paper. In June, 1874, in company with his 
father, O. G. Hempstead, of Philadelphia, he purchased the office, and in 
1883 purchasing the interest of his father, be became the owner of the busi- 
ness, which during the ten years of his management has increased more than 
fourfold. Mr. Hempstead has conducted the Crawford Journal eleven years 
and a half, a longer time than any of his predecessors, excepting the founder, 
J. C. Hays. The Crawford Journal under that name was founded in 18-18, 
and is now in its thirty-sixth volume. Mr. Hays, the founder, was the editor 
until 1863 or 1864. He was succeeded within two years by John D. Nichols, 
Bliss & Nichols, R. C Frey, Thomas McKean, Robert Andrews and HoUister 
& Metcalf. In 1868 Tyler & Chalfont became the owners, and a few months 
later Col. C. W. Tyler purchased the interest of his partner, and conducted 
the business until 1872. This, in brief, is the history of the Crawford Jour- 
nal and of its present owner and editor. 

EDGAR HUIDEKOPER (deceased), was born at Meadville, Penn., May 30, 
1812, and died September 9, 1862, in his native place, which had always been his 
residence. His father was Harm Jan Huidekoper, a native of Holland, who 
came to America in 1796, arrived at Meadville, his subsequent home, in the 
year 1804, and on the 1st day of January, 1805, became the local agent of the 
Holland Land Company, which position he held until its affairs were wound 
up. His mother was Rebecca (Colhoon) Huidekoper, of Scotch descent, born 
at Carlisle, Penn. He was married on the 28th day of June, 1838, to Fran- 
ces Shippen, daughter of Henry Shippen, President Judge of the Sixth Judicial 
District of Pennsylvania. To this union eight children were born, six sons and 
two daughters, named respectively: Henry Shippen, Frederic Wolters, H'^rman 
John, Edgar, Gertrude, Elizabeth, Rush Shippen and Frank Colhoon. Edgar 
Huidekoper, the subject of this memoir, was a man of good judgment, great 
industry and strict integrity in his business relations in life. He was an able 
financier. He was Treasurer of the Meadville Theological School in its early 
days, carrying on this task with untiring industry and unsleeping vigilance 
joined to enterprise and courage. He made judicious investments whereby its 
scanty funds yielded large returns. He was a patriot as well as faithful citi- 
zen, performing his duties to the community in which he lived, to the church 
to which he was attached, and to his country with that zeal which characterized 
all his acts. And yet out of the strong came forth sweetness. He was affection- 
ate, with a love passing the love of a woman. His thoughtfulness for others 
was kind and generous. Ho could confer favors with that delicacy which 
leaves no taint of pride with the giver, no sense of humiliation with the 
receiver. He established the first steam grist-mill at Meadville, contributed 



746 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

toward public improvements and built for himself and family a comfortable 
home on Chestnut Hill. Whatever he did, he did well. 

PROF. FREDERIC HDIDEKOPER, Meadville, son of H. J. and 
Rebecca Huidekoper, was born April 7, 1817, in a portion of Mead Township 
now included in Meadville, this county. He attended for a year or two village 
schools, but from 1825 to 1834 he had, with his brothers and sisters, private 
tuition in his own home. In 1834 he entered Harvard University one year in 
advance. After having studied that year and commenced the succeeding one, 
the oculist ordered him to give up study, which he did for six years. During 
four of these he worked on the farm, allowing himself ten minutes a day for 
reading. During the next two years (1839-41) he traveled in Holland, Ger- 
many, Switzerland, France and Great Britain. On his return home he studied 
theology during two years, but was precluded from entering the theological 
school at Cambridge as his sight would not safely permit the study of Hebrew, 
which was then required. In 1844 he aided in starting the Meadville Theolog- 
ical School, in which he taught during many years. His three published works 
are " Belief of the First Three Centuries Concerning Christ's Mission to tha 
Underworld" (1854), "Judaism at Rome" (1876) and " Indirect Testimony of 
History to the Genuineness of the Gospels " (1878). He aided in laying out 
Greendale Cemetery, and was instrumental after many years' labor in straight- 
ening the southern extremity of Meadville. 

HON. H. J. HUMES, State Senator and attorney at law, Meadville, was 
born in Woodcock Township, this county, September 29, 1844, and is a son of 
James and Eliza (Snell) Humes, his father being a native of this county, of 
Scotch-Irish descent, and following agriculture as his life pursuit; his mother 
being of English descent, but born in Connecticut. Our subject was the sec- 
ond in a family of four children, and received his education in the common 
schools, at Edinboro Normal School and at Allegheny College, where he grad- 
uated in 1869. He studied law with W. R. Bole, in Meadville; was admitted 
to practice in 1871, and commenced business in Meadville in October, 1872, 
for himself, and has ever since continued here. In politics he is a Democrat. 
In 1873 and 1874 he was Chairman of the Democratic County Committee, and 
in 1876 a member of the State Committee, and in 1882 was elected State Sen- 
ator for the Fiftieth District of Pennsylvania, by 401 majority. As author of 
the Humes Bill, compelling the investment of the surplus funds in the State 
Treasury in State or United States bonds, he acquired a State reputation. 
He was married, in 1874, to Delia E. , daughter of Thomas J. Lowery, who was 
an early settler of this county, and at one time Associate Judge. Mr. Lowery 
was of Scotch-Irish extraction. Mr. and Mrs. Humes have one child — Lowery 
E., born July 26, 1878. Our subject is a prominent member of the A. O. U. W. 
He is pre-eminently a self-made man, and deserves credit for his success in 
life. 

SAMUEL W. KEPLER, proprietor of the Kepler House, Meadville, was 
born in this county, June 19, 1821, son of Jacob and Margaret A. (Peiffer) 
Kepler, the former a native of Maryland, and eldest son of Peter Kepler, who 
located in LeBceuf Township, Erie Co., Penn., in 1798, the latter a native 
of Pennsylvania. Jacob began his business career in 1817, in Woodcock, 
this county, conducting a hotel there for twenty-one years, at same time keep- 
ing the postoffice. He was the father of thirteen children. In 1843 he aban- 
doned the hotel business and removed on a farm in Haylield Township, this 
county, where he remained about twenty-six years, and then came to Venango 
and opened a tavern. Much of his time was occupied in the manufac 
ture of domestic wines. He served through the war of 1812. He died in 



MEADVILLE. 747 

1877, in his eighty-fourth year. His widow still draws a pension from the 
government. Our subject married, in 1843, Christine, daughter of Michael 
Sherred, of this county, and to this union were born seven children, five now 
living: Pharus D., Peter S., E. Cassius, Frank P. and Thomas. In 1860 Mr. 
Kepler married (for second time), Martha C, daughter of Maj. Reuben Strouss, 
of Saegertown, this county, and seven children were the result of this union, 
five now living — Edgar, Tracy, Anna, Matt ie and Frederick. Our subject com- 
menced business in 1853 by opening a hotel at McKean Corners, Erie County, 
where he remained two years; then moved to Venango, this county, and 
there kept hotel until 1860. Following five years he spent in Titusville, Penn., 
in same line of business, and then for three years operated a farm in Wood- 
cock Township, this county. In 1868 Mr. Kepler took charge of the Eagle 
Hotel, Meadville, and at different intervals kept two other hotels, till 1879, in 
which year he opened the Kepler House. Our subject and family are mem- 
bers of the Unitarian Church; he is a member of the A. O. U. "W., E. A. U., 
and I. O. O. F., Encampment D. D. G. P. 

THEODORE B. LASHELLS, physician, Meadville, was born in New Ber- 
lin, Union Co., Penn., March 20, 1839, son of George E. and Eliza (Baskin) 
Lashells. Dr. Lashells received his classical education at Jefferson College, 
Washington County, Penn., and his medical education at Columbia College, 
Washington, D. C, from which institution he graduated in February, 1862, 
when he entered the United States service as Assistant Surgeon, Twelfth Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Cavalry. Was promoted to the rank of Surgeon, and 
assigned to the One Hundred and Seventy-first Pennsylvania Volunteer Infan- 
try, in which he served till the fall of 1863. He was taken prisoner of war 
and paroled, during which time, and before his exchange, he built and organ- 
ized the St. Aloysius Hospital, at the National capital. Returning home in ill 
health, he began the practice of his profession at Meadville, where he has 
remained since. In 1864 he was appointed Surgeon of the Board of Enroll- 
ment for this Congressional District, which position he held till the close of 
the war. In 1868 he was appointed Surgeon for the Atlantic & Great Western 
Railroad, now the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio Railroad, which position 
he still retains. The Doctor is at present a member of the Board of Examin- 
ing Surgeons for pensions for this county. He was married, October 1, 1863, 
to Miss Jane Kellogg, step-daughter of Maj. Samuel A. Torbett, and two chil- 
dren have blessed this union — Mary Bess, born July 20, 1865, and Edward 
Torbett, born July 3, 1869. 

REV. D. D. LEBERMAN. pastor of St. Paul's Reformed Church of Mead- 
ville, was born in Lebanon County, Penn., May 16, 1841, and is a son of 
Jacob L. and Henrietta (Fake) Leberman, the former a native of Germany, 
the latter of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His father has been for 
many years a merchant of Meadville. Our subject, the eldest of a family of 
eight children, received his education at the Swatara Institute and- the Theo- 
logical Seminary, TiflSn, Ohio, of the Reformed Church, at which he gradu- 
ated in 1864. He was then licensed to preach, and his first appointment was 
at Titusville, Penn., for one year. He was then engaged in church work, not 
being able to preach on account of his health. Since I860 he has made Mead- 
ville his home. Since 1867 he has been in charge of a church here, and has 
also had charge of Zion Hill, in Union Township, since 1872, and both 
churches have nourishing Sunday-schools. He was married in 1864, to Miss 
Julia E. Persons, a native of Ohio and of English descent. They have two 
children: Edward Oscar and Henry Harbaugh, the former a member of the 
Freshman class in Allegheny College, the latter a student of Meadville High 



748 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

School. Mr. Leberman takes a deep interest in education, having been thir- 
teen years on the School Board, during the'whole of which time he has been 
Secretary. In his political views Mr. Leberman is Democratic. 

JOHN C. LIMBER, grocer, Meadville, was born May 2, 1852, in Meadville, 
Penn., and is a son of T. J. and Angelina (Kincaid) Limber, natives of Pennsylva- 
nia, of English descent. Hia father, who was a tailor by trade, was born in this 
county in 1807, and was a son of John Limber, a farmer and early pioneer of 
this county. Our subject's parents had a family of six children, of whom 
three are now living. John C Limber, who was the third child in the fam- 
ily, acquired his education in the high school and Commercial College of 
Meadville. He then embarked alone in the grocery business, but in 1872 
took in as partner George S. Shattuck, which partnership existed for eight- 
een months, when Mr. Limber continued alone for two years. In 1876 he 
formed the partnership with Daniel Veith which has existed ever since, under 
the style of Veith & Limber. They conduct two stores in different parts of 
the city. Mr. Limber was married in 1879, to Delia J., daughter of the late 
Alexander Davis, who was a farmer. They have one child — Evelyn Belle. 

PROF. ABIEL ABBOT LIVERMORE, Meadville, was born in 'W^ilton, 
N. H. , October 30, 1811, second son of Jonathan and Abigail (Abbot) 
Livermore. His grandfather, Jonathan Livermore, was the first minister of 
the town, and his great-grandfather of the same name reached the age of one 
hundred years and seven months. Our subject passed his boyhood on the 
farm, attended the district school, and encountered the usual experiences of a 
country lad. At the age of fifteen he left home to attend school in Chelmsford, 
Mass., and afterward was prepared for college atPhilipps Academy, Exeter, N. 
H. ; entered Harvard College in 1830, and graduated in 1833. In June, 1883, 
he celebrated with fourteen of his classmates the fiftieth anniversary of their 
graduation. The next three years after graduation were passed in the Cam- 
bridge Divinity School in preparation for the Christian ministry. After the 
usual candidating, he was ordained November 2, 1836, over the Congregational 
Unitarian Church in Keene, N. H. He was married May 17, 1838, to Eliza- 
beth Dorcas Abbot, daughter of Rev. Jacob Abbot, of Windham, N. H., who 
died in South Boston, Mass., September 13, 1879. Though not blessed with 
children, several young persons were brought up in their family and were 
cherished with parental love. Prof. Livermore was invited in 1850, after a 
happy ministry in Keene, to settle over the Unitarian Church of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and he removed to that city in May. In 1856 he was invited to New 
York to the editorship of the Chistian Inquirer, and at the same time became 
pastor of the Unitarian Church in Yonkers, N. Y. These oflSces he tilled till 
1863, when he was invited to the Presidency of the theological school in Mead- 
ville, Penn., which he still holds. The works which Mr. Livermore has pub- 
lished are a " commentary" on the whole New Testament in six volumes, " The 
Mexican War Reviewed," a prize essay of the Peace Society, a volume of "Dis- 
courses," "A Marriage Offering," and occasional sermons, addresses and 
reviews. The latest publication was in 1884, called " Anti-tobacco." In look- 
ing over the changes and chances of so many years he finds one great lesson 
written over all his life, of gratitude to God and sympathy with mankind. On 
June 18, 1883, he was married to Mary A. Moore, of Meadville. 

REV. THOMAS D. LOGAN, pastor of Second Presbyterian Church, Mead- 
ville, was born in Allegheny City, Penn., January 29, 1851, and is a son of 
John T. and Henrietta (Bryan) Logan, the former a native of Maryland and 
of Scotch-Irish descent, the latter of Pennsylvania, and of Irish and German 
descent. Thomas D., who is the sixth of a family of seven children, received 



MEADVILLE. 749 

his early education in Pittsburgh, where his father carried on mercantile busi- 
ness. He graduated at Lafayette College in 1869, and in 1874 graduated at 
the theological seminary at Allegheny, Penn., received his license to preach 
in the Presbyterian Church in 1873, and was regularly ordained in 1875. 
Previous to his entrance upon the ministerial sphere he taught school one year. 
Since 1874 he has been pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church of Mead- 
ville. He was married in 1877 to Caroline B. , daughter of John Mahoney, 
and their children are Howard, Elizabeth and Marjorie. 

HENKY H. LOVERIDQE, retired civil engineer, Meadville, was born in 
Genesee County, N. Y., December 1, 1817, and is a son of Ethan and Caro- 
line (Gunn) Loveridge, the former a native of Massachusetts, the latter of 
Connecticut, and both of English descent. His father, who was a farmer, 
reared a family of five children, of whom Henry H. was the eldest. He 
remained on the farm until seventeen years of age, when he studied civil 
engineering, and then went on public works, where ho contitmed working for 
many years, being employed on the Erie Canal for over thirty years, of which 
for several years he was Superintendent of the French Creek feeder. He was 
married in 1843 to Nancy Jane, daughter of John B. Plummer, a merchant in 
Mercer County, Penn., and to this union were born two children, William P. 
and Florence. Mr. and Mrs. Loveridge are members of the Park Avenue 
Congregational Church. He has been a member of the Council of Meadville; 
in politics is a Republican. 

WILLIAM McARTHUR, real estate dealer, Meadville, was born in this 
city, October 19, 1815, and is a son of William and Rebecca (McClean) Mc- 
Arthur. His father was born in Ireland, and came to America about the close 
of the Revolutionary war, taught school in York County, and studied survey- 
ing with the McCleans, and when Pennsylvania lands came into market he 
came in 1794 to Meadville, and laid out the town for Gen. Meade. He was 
appointed District Surveyor, and in 1800 was "elected State Senator for the 
district composed of Crawford, Erie, Venango, Warren and Mercer Counties, 
his opponent being Gen. David Meade. He served two terms in the Legisla- 
ture (the capital was then Lancaster), and he rode back and forth spring and 
fall on horseback over the mountains during said terms. While he was State 
Senator he was appointed by the Governor, Simon Snyder, Prothonotary of 
this county, and also Register and Recorder, which positions he tilled until 
his decease in 1822. Our subject's mother, Rebecca McClean, was of Scotch- 
Irish descent, and a daughter of Col. Moses McClean, who served in the Rev- 
olutionary war, and who, with his brothers, helped survey the famous Mason 
and Dixon's line — in fact, had run the line from Cape Henlopen, or Cornelius, 
to the Chesapeake Bay, the north line, and the twelve-mile circle round the 
New Castle Court House before Mason and Dixon came to this country. These 
lines were run between 1760 and 1703. Mason and Dixon came in 1764, 
accepted the work already done, and with the former Surveyors ran the cele- 
brated Mason and Dixon's line westward. Our subject, who is the fifth of a 
family of six, received his education in the academy at Meadville. He then 
learned carpentering, and also worked at millwrighting. In 1840 he was 
appointed Justice of the Peace by Gov. David R. Porter, and in 1842 was 
elected Prothonotary and Clerk of the several • courts for Crawford County, 
which oiBces he served until 1845. Mr. McArthur was married in 1848 to 
Helen Hines, a niece of Col. James Corhan, of this county. She died in 1855, 
and in 1872 he married Mrs. Hersh, widow of Rev. Chares Horsh, of Baltimore, 
Md., whose maiden name was Mary McClean. He has four children by his 
first wife. Mr. and Mrs. McArthur are members of the Park Avenue Congre- 
gational Church, under the charge of Rev. James G. Carnachan, D. D. 



750 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

EMMETT W.McARTHUR, attorney at law, Meadville, was born in Sbenango 
Township, this county, June 10, 1853, and is a son of Jeremiah and Hannah 
(Elliottj McArthur, who were also natives of this county. His father and 
grandfather, who came to this county in 1795, were both farmers. Our sub- 
ject is the second of a family of three, and received his education in the com- 
mon schools and Jamestown Seminary, and also Edinboro Normal School. He 
studied law in Meadville in the office of J. B. Brawley, Esq., was admitted 
to the bar in 1884, and entered at once upon the practice of his profession. 
Since 1883 he has been connected with the Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company of Crawford County, and is Secretary and Treasurer of the same. 
In politics he is a Democrat. 

JOHND. McCOY, attorney at law, Meadville, was born in Mercer County, 
Peun., May '22, 1847, and is a son of Col. D. C. and Nancy Jane (Nelson) 
McCoy, who were natives of Pennsylvania and of Scotch-Irish descent. His 
father is a prominent lawyer and, with exceptions of the time spent in the 
army, has lived in this county since 1854. John D., the eldest of a family of 
six, received his education io the academy and at Allegheny College. He 
studied law with his father, was admitted to the Crawford County bar in 1873, 
to the United States Courts in 1881, and to the Supreme Courts in 1882. The 
firm is D. C. McCoy & Son. Our subject is a prominent member of the I. O. 
O. F. ; is politically a Republican, but has never held any office. 

JAMES E. McFARLAND, banker, Meadville, is a grandson of James 
McFarland, who emigrated from Ireland about 1800 and located in Chambers- 
burg, Penn., engaging in mercantile trade at that place until his death. One 
son, John McFarland, the father of our subject, was born in Ireland in 1797. 
He remained with his father until nineteen years of age, when he began the 
publication of the Sentinel at Chambersburg, Penn., and, removing to Carlisle, 
same State, he published thei-e the Volunteer, afterward the Commonwealth, 
at Harrisburg. His last enterprise was the establishment of the Allegheny 
Democrat, at Pittsburgh, Penn., about 1824. He was man-ied March 1, 1816, 
at Hagerstown, Md., to Catherine Eberly, a native of Chambersburg, Penn. 
He died August 12, 1827. The death of his widow occurred October 10, 1876, 
at her son's residence in Meadville, Penn., and her remains were interred in 
his family lot in Meadville cemetery. James E. McFarland, our subject, is 
the only surviving child of the above couple. He was born at Chambersburg, 
Penn., January 4, 1817. When fourteen years of age he was apprenticed to 
his father's trade, serving his full time at Pittsburgh, Penn. In 1885 he came 
to this county and established the Craivford Democrat, which paper strongly 
advocated the election of George Wolf for Governor. Afterward he became 
the purchaser of the Meadville Courier and continued to publish the united 
papers over a period of twenty-five years. In 1840 he was appointed Deputy 
United States Marshal for Crawford County; in 1845 he was elected Protbono- 
tary, to which office he declined re-election. In 1848 Mr. McFarland was the 
Democratic nominee for Congress; served as Postmaster at Meadville during 
the full terms of Pierce and Buchanan respectively. In 1862 he engaged in 
the general banking business; in 1865 be was one of the incorporators of the 
Merchants National Bank at Meadville, and accepted the Presidency of 
the same. Shortly afterward a reorganization of the bank officials took place 
and he was elected Cashier, which post of trust he has filled acceptably to all 
concerned for a period of eighteen years. He has served as Councilman and 
School Director. In 1838 Mr. McFarland was married to Mary Scott, of Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., and to this union were born eight children: Sarah S., intermarried 
with Dr. T. J. Young of Titusville, Penn. (have two children, David and Kath- 



MEADVILLE. 761 

«rine); John, who entered the Naval Academy in 1851 (John served with dis- 
tinction throughout the Rebellion, was rapidly promoted from Midshipman on 
the Iroquois to Lieutenant-Commander; was in several engagements and was 
among the first to enter New Orleans under Farragut. He sailed through the 
West Indies and visited China, Japan and California. He died at his father's 
residence, in 1874, from disease contracted through exposure during his service 
in the navy); Thomas S., residing at Buffalo, N. Y., is a member and Secre- 
tary of the Union Oil Company of Buffalo, mairied to Miss Fanny Otterstater, 
of Meadville (have three children, Frank, Adelaide and John); Katherine 
(deceased); James E., Jr., Assistant Cashier Merchants National Bank, also 
member of the firm of McFarland & Co., of Meadville Bottling "Works; Eliza- 
beth S., married to William S. McGunnegle, of Meadville (have two children, 
George K. and James;; Mary, married to G. W. Delamater (have two children, 
Susan and James Scott); Anna (deceased). Time has dealt kindly with 'Mi. 
McFarland, and although past three score and a half years of age, and consid- 
ering the labor he has undergone and his active business life, his health and 
vigor and mental capabilities remain unimpaired. 

GEORGE KENNEDY McGTJNNEGLE (deceased) was born in Meadville, 
Penn., June 10, 1800. In early life our subject acted as book-keeper for Will- 
iam Hill & Bro., Pittsburgh, Penn., and in 1821 he went to St. Louis, Mo., 
where he was engaged as clerk for his uncle, Capt. James McGunnegle, of the 
United States Army, then Quartermaster of that military district In 1829 a 
branch bank of the United States was established at St. Louis, and Mr. McGun- 
negle accepted the position of Chief Clerk. The parent bank at this time 
was in the zenith of its financial glory, but soon after succumbed to the war 
waged upon it by President Jackson. In 1833 our subject went into business 
as a member of the firm of Hill & McGunnegle, wholesale grocers and com- 
mission merchants (changed the following year to McGunnegle & Way), and 
continued until 1842. In a career covering over half a century, Mr. McGun- 
negle was more or less identified with the great material interests of the city 
and State, filling many positions of honor and trust, among which we might 
mention the Presidency of the Board of Underwriters; Presidency St. Louis 
Insurance Company; Presidency old Chamber of Commerce; Secretary Ohio 
& Mississippi Railroad Company ; Presidency Ohio & Mississippi Telegraph 
Company, now leased to the Western Union. Mr. McGunnegle was elected to 
the House of Representatives in 1837, and to him probably as much, if not 
more than to any other man, is due the present complete system of railroads in 
the State. He drafted the memorial to that body, and had passed the bill to 
charter a railroad, this being the first step taken in that direction. At this 
time he had chartered also the St. Louis Insurance Company, was elected its 
President and continued in ofiice until within a few years of his death (which 
occurred at St. Louis, Mo., December 12, 1878), when growing infirmities com- 
pelled him to relinquish active work. Mr. McGunnegle was married in 1828 
to Elizabeth Easton Starr, a native of Rome, N. Y., born November 16, 1809, 
niece of Col. Rufus Easton, and sister of the first wife of Senator Henry S. 
Geyer. To this union were born eight sons and two daughters. The eldest 
son, Wilson, entered the naval service in 1845, and, after reaching the grade of 
Lieutenant Commander, died in 1803 during the war; another son, AVilliaro S., 
entered the navy (see his biography below); one daughter married Gen. Ino 
W. Davidson, of the United States Army; the other married Benjamin E. 
Walker, of St. Louis; others surviving continue to live in St. Louis. Mrs. 
McGunnegle died at St. Louis, Mo., October 27, 1864. 

WILLIAM S. McGUNNEGLE, banker, Meadville, was born at St. Louis, 



752 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Mo., November 7, 1846, son of George Kennedy and Elizabeth Easton (Starr) 
McGunnegle (see biography above). Our subject attended the public schools 
at St. Louis, Mo., and the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., 
from v?hich he graduated in 1867. His first cruise after receiving an appoint- 
ment in the navy was vcith the Mediterranean squadron under Admiral Farra- 
gut, and he served at different times in the Atlantic, Pacific, West Indian and 
Asiatic squadrons. Passing through the grades of Ensign and Master, he v?as 
promoted to a Lieutenancy in 1871; he resigned his commission in 1876, and 
then entered banking business at Meadville, Penn. Our subject was married 
at Meadville, October 29, 1874, to Lizzie Scott McFarland, born at Meadville, 
Penn., May 8, 1850, daughter of James E. and Mary (Scott) McFarland, for- 
mer born at Chambersburg, Penn., in 1817, latter bom in Pittsburgh, Penn., in 
1818. Two children have been born to this union — George Kennedy and 
James. Mr. and Mrs. McGunnegle are members of the Episcopal Church; in 
politics he is a Republican. 

CHARLES COURTNEY McLEAN, Veterinary Surgeon, Meadville, was 
born February 2, I860, in Meadville, son of John T. and Jane (Courtney) 
McLean, former a native of New York, latter a daughter of Bailey Courtney, 
Esq., late of Meadville. They reside at 1009 Water Street, Meadville. John 
T. McLean is the possessor of two farms adjacent to Meadville, and at this 
writing (1884), devotes his attention to agriculture. Dr. C. C. McLean is the 
eldest of three children bom to the above couple; his sister, Alice Russell, is 
the second child; his brother, Frederick Hector, being the youngest. Our 
subject attended the common schools of the city; is a graduate of Mead- 
ville High School; also took a business course in the Meadville Commercial 
College, and, supplementary to his literary and business education, he spent 
some time in other preparations for the practice of his profession, before he 
attended the celebrated Ontario Veterinary College, located at Toronto, Ont. , 
at which institution he matriculated in October, 1881, and from which he 
graduated March, 1883. Upon his return home from college he entered on 
the practice of his profession, locating his office at 1010 Water Street, Mead- 
ville. Dr. McLean is enthusiastic in his profession, is thoroughly equipped 
for its practice, and enjoys a liberal patronage. 

WILLIAM McMILLEN, loan office and wood yard, Meadville, was bom 
in Hayfield Township, this county, August 8, 1840, and is a son of John and 
Jane (Bradley) McMillen. His grandfather came to Pennsylvania in 1797, 
settled in Hayfield Township about 1800, taking up land from the Holland 
Land Company, and devoting himself to farming, as did also his son John.- 
William McMillen followed farming until he was thirty-two years of age, 
when he came to Meadville, where for a time he was Market Master, and in 
1879 commenced his present business. He was married in 1867 to Mary, 
daughter of John Mahoney, a native of this county, and of Irish descent. 
They have six children: Mary, Maggie, Adda, Ella, Annie and William, Jr. 
In politics IVIr. McMillen is a Democrat. 

LEON C. MAGAW, cheese manufacturer, Meadville, was born July 16, 
1827, son of Col. William and Adeline (Chappotin) Magaw. The latter was a 
native of Rhode Island, of French descent; Col. William Magaw was born 
in Pennsylvania, and is of Scotch descent; came to Meadville in 1809; 
clerked for some time under Samuel B. Magaw (one of the early merchants); 
afterward became a prominent merchant himself, and also entered largelj' into 
the manufacture of straw paper, of which he was the inventor. Our subject, 
the elder son, was educated in Meadville, and at a private school, at Buffalo, 
N. Y. When twenty-two years of age he embarked in the grocery trade, and 



MEADVILLE. 753 

continued in the same for thirty years, fifteen years of which as a wholesale 
dealer. In the year 1880 he started a cheese factory, and at present has 
retired from the grocery trade, and owns and operates fourteen cheese factories. 
He is the most extensive cheese manufacturer in Pennsylvania; he sells his 
products throughout the United States and Mexico. Mr. Magaw has been 
twice married, on first occasion, in 1851, to Sophie M. Selden, of Pittsburgh 
(of French descent), who bore him the following children: Elizabeth S. , wife 
of A. M. Fuller, merchant here; G. Selden, a merchant in Chicago; Adelaide 
Louise, wife of John I. Shryock, merchant here. His wife dying in 1864, 
our subject remarried, in 1866, Mrs. Susan E. Thorp, of Brooklyn, N. Y., 
formerly Miss Gray, of Newburyport, Mass. By this union are two daughters, 
Leon a and Ethel, and two sons, I. Thorp, and Louis Deb. The entire family 
are members of the Episcopal Church. 

J. S. MATS(JN, train dispatcher, Meadville, was born in Chautauqua 
County, N. Y., November 6, 1853, and is a son of Charles and Helen (Can- 
field) Matson, natives of New York and of English descent. His father in 
early life was a farmer, latterly a railroad man, and is now a conductor on the 
New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio Railroad. Our subject, who is the eldest of a 
family of four children, was educated in the graded schools of Jamestown, N. Y. 
At the age of eleven he went into a telegraph office, applying himself with 
such diligence to the study of telegraphy that in six months he commenced as 
night operator in Cambridge, this county; he was then sent as operator to 
Corry, Penn., where he remained two years. In 1870 he was appointed assist- 
ant to train dispatcher at Meadville, and in 1872 was promoted to train dis- 
patcher, which business ho has followed until present writing, except for one 
year, when he was passenger conductor on the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio 
Railroad. He was married in 1875, to Rachel Briah, of Tiffin, Ohio, and they 
have one child — William Paul. Mr. Matson is in politics a Republican; he 
is a member of the Royal Arcanum. Since eleven years of age he has made 
his own way in the world. 

ENOS MICHEL, of the firm of Farnicorn & Michel, meat market, Mead- 
ville, was born in Germany, June 11, 1846. and is the son of Jacob and Bar- 
bara (Futler) Michel, natives of Germany. He received his education and 
learned in his native land the trade of a butcher, at which he continued to 
work when he came to America in 1866, settling in this city. He worked six 
years for others, then went in business for himself until, in 1870, the present 
partnership was formed. Our subject was married in 1872, to Kate Dudenhoefier, 
a native of Germany, and they have six children: Lena, Louis, Charles, 
Edward, Anna Theresa and Lucy. Mr. and Mrs. Michel are members of the 
Catholic Church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

HON. CHARLES W. MILLER, merchant, Meadville, was born in Ashta- 
bula County, Ohio, in 1837, and is a son of Ezra B. and Sophronia M. (Baldwin) 
Miller, natives of Connecticut, and of English descent; the former a carpenter 
and joiner by trade. They had three children, of whom Charles AV. is the second. 
Our subject received his education chiefly at the academy at Orwell, Ohio. Early 
in life he was a clerk in a dry goods store. In 1869 he opened a general store in 
Espyville, Penn., which he continued until 1870, when" he came to Meadville 
as Assistant Assessor of Internal Revenue, which position he held four years, 
when ho embarked in the drug business, in which he has since continued. He 
was married, in Espyville in 1862, to Mary E., daughter of James Espy, from 
whom Espyville took its name. They have three children now living: Agnes, 
Nettie and Marion. Mr. Miller is a Republican, and in 1884 received the 
nomination of that party for Congress. He has been a member of the Mead- 
ville Town Council for three years, and for two years Mayor of Meadville. 



754 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

W. S. MURRAY, engine dispatcher, Meadville, was born in New York 
State, 0(!tober 20, 1833, and is a sou of H. N. and Sarah C. (Sackett) Murray, 
nativ&s of New York, the father of Scotch and the mother of English descent. 
The father, who was by trade a tailor, raised a family of five children, of whom 
W. S. is the third. As his father died before he had finished the course of 
the common schools, our subject was early set to learn carpentering, which 
he followed for seven years, since which he has been employed by railway 
companies. Commenced railroading in 1858, and in 1863 he came to Mead- 
ville, which has ever since been his home. From 1863 to 1873 he ran an 
engine, and he was then appointed dispatching engineer, for which his long 
experience eminently qualities him. He was married in Great Bend, Penn. , to 
Ruth A. Carpenter, and they have two children — William F. and Fred H. 
Mr. Murray has served three years on the School Board; politically he is a 
Republican. 

CAPT. ISAAC E. MYERS, Assistant Postmaster, Meadville, was born in 
Meadville, January 18, 1835, and is a son of Isaac and Lydia (Fox) Myers, of 
German descent, and who came to Meadville in 1825. His father, who was a 
watch-maker and jeweler, had a family of ten children, of whom Isaac E. is 
the sixth. He first learned the jewelry business under his father, and was in 
that industry in Meadville City from 1850 to 1862, when, being drafted, he was 
elected Captain of Company K, One Hundred and Sixty-ninth P. D. M., in 
which regiment he served until 1863. Then he volunteered in 1864, and raised 
Company F, of the One Hundred and Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry; was elected Captain of his company and served until the close of 
the war, being present at Lee's surrender. He then received an appointment 
as Mail Agent, and served six years; next he studied medicine, and for one 
year he clerked in a drug store. Then he was appointed Clerk in the Mead- 
ville PostoflSce, and afterward to his present position of Assistant Postmaster, 
which he has held for several terms. He was married in 1858 to Maria, 
daughter of James Swager, of Mercer County, Penn., and their children are 
Sarah M., L. C. (a tinner), I. E., F. G. and C. H. Our subject and wife are 
members of the First Methodist Episcopal Church. Capt. Myers has taken an 
active part in matters pertaining to the militia, and since he returned from the 
war has acted as Captain in the same, his company leading the militia of Penn- 
sylvania in Washington at the inauguration of the lamented President Garfield. 

EDWARD NORTHAM, of Meadville, was born in this county August 18, 
1826, and is a son of George and Hannah (Jenkins) Northam, natives of New 
York and of English descent. His father was Ensign in the One Hundred 
and Fifty-fourth Regiment of New York Infantry, and with his wife came to 
this county in 1820, settling in Troy Township. Our subject, the fifth in a 
family of seven, was educated in this county, and since 1840 has been a resi- 
dent of Meadville. He learned wool-carding with Alanson Lindley, who 
started that business here in 1835, and was till his decease a wealthy and influ- 
ential citizen. Mr. Northam resided and worked with him for seven years, 
commencing in 1840, and in 1853 took charge of the business and has since 
been proprietor. He is also a carpenter, which trade he learned and has worked 
at. He was married in 1845 to Nancy Hamilton, and they have four children 
now living. The eldest son was aboard the "Gen. Lyon" when that vessel was 
burned off Cape Hatteras; he was a soldier, and had suffered three months 
imprisonment in Salisbury, N. C, rebel prison. The other children are: Ellen 
C. (deceased), Ida (deceased); Henry M., who is with his father; Anna R., 
Minnie E. and John A. Mr. and Mrs. Northam are members of the First 
Presbyterian Church. In politics he is a Republican. 



MEADVILLE. 755 

EDGAR C. PARSONS, M. D., Meadville, was born November 19, 1847, 
at Alexandria, Ohio, son of Hiram G. and Dorotha (Page) Parsons, former a 
native of Nevr York, latter of Vermont. Hiram G. Parsons was brought when 
quite young from New York to Alexandria, Ohio, by his mother, who was then 
a widow, and was reared in Alexandria, near which place he made agi'iculture 
his main occupation. He was twice married, on first occasion, in Alexandria, 
Ohio, to Dorotha Page, who bore him three children: Edgar C, Electa and 
Jerusha, the latter of whom was married to William H. Banner, a resident of 
Champaign County, 111. ; Electa was married to E. P. Robb, residing in Kan- 
sas. To the second marriage of Hiram G. Parsons were born five children 
— three boys and two girls. Our subject received bis literary education at the 
public school and an academy at Johnstown, Ohio, and commenced the study of 
medicine under Dr. A. B. Wilder, of Knoxville, Iowa, about January, 1871. 
After leaving school in 1867, he taught school two terms in Ohio, beginning 
in the winter of the latter year, and in 1868 moved from Ohio to Knoxville, 
Iowa, taught school for several terms in Marion and Mahaska Counties, that 
State, and in 1870 accepted the charge of the intermediate department, and 
later of the grammar school at Knoxville, Iowa, which position he filled till 
June, 1873. In the fall of 1873 our subject attended medical lectures at the 
Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago, 111., and after taking one course he 
began the practice of his profession at Rantoul, 111., where he remained till 
the fall of 1876, and then went to the Hahnemann College at Philadelphia, 
from which he graduated March 8, 1877. In the spring of that year the Doc- 
tor established himself in Meadville, and has here continued since in successful 
and active practice. In the spring of 1883 the Doctor was appointed Health 
OfBcer of Meadville, and is now serving a second term in that capacity. Our 
subject was instrumental in effecting the organization of the Crawford County 
HomcBopathic Medical Society, of which he has since been Secretary. He is 
also a member of the Homoeopathic Medical Society of Pennsylvania. Dr. 
Parsons was married at Irwin Station, Westmoreland County, Penn., October 
14, 1874, to Amanda, daughter of James G. Boyd, Esq., merchant of that 
place. To this union have been born two children — Page W. and Evangeline. 

ROBERT PATTON (deceased) was born in County Down, Ireland, Octo- 
ber 31, 1881. His parents immigrated to this country while he was yet a 
small boy. He was a harness-maker, having learned the trade at Pittsburgh. 
On May 20, 1849, he married Miss Jane McMahon, who survives him. In 
1850 he moved to Cochranton, now one of the most enterprising villages in 
Crawford County, and opened a harness-shop, which was in operation until 
1856, at which time he commenced mercantile business, and continued the same 
until his death, June 8, 1882. Mr. Patton was a successful merchant. From 
a small beginning, by his untiring application and superior skill, his business 
rapidly increased, and very few merchants in the county enjoyed as liberal a 
patronage. About eight years before his death he took as a partner his oldest 
eon, James C, the style of the firm being R. Patton & Son. In 1877 the 
Cochranton Savings Bank was organized. Sir. Patton was one of the orig- 
inal movers in the enterprise, and was its first President, which office he filled 
until his death, and under his administration, ably assisted by the other 
ofiicers, the bank did a flourishing business and proved itself an indispensable 
addition to the business interests of Cochranton. Mr. Patton was also the 
first President of the French Creek Valley Agricultural Association, which 
has become not only a matter of importance to Cochranton, but to the counties 
of Mercer, Venango and Crawford. As a business man Mr. Patton was univer- 
sally respected by those with whom he had dealings. He was prompt in. meet- 



756 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

ing all his obligations, and at the same time was a lenient creditor. He took 
a deep interest in the welfare of the village, and was among the first to sup- 
port any enterprise that promised to be beneficial. The public school was a 
matter of great importance, and its importance did not arise from the fact 
that he had children to educate, but was based on broader grounds — the general 
good. No one appreciated more fully the advantages of an education. Mr. 
Patton, though not a technical scholar, was practically a learned man. His 
course of reading was extended and thorough. He could give the date and 
the attending circumstances of the important events in English, French and 
American history. Whatever he read he remembered, and his recollection was 
clear and distinct. In political matters he was one of the best informed men 
in the county. He mastered the details and understood the eifects and ten- 
dencies of party action. Though a man of strong convictions, he was tolerant 
with those who differed from him. He was free from malice and wished every 
one well. Mr. Patton did much toward advancing the material interests of 
Cocbranton, and his influence will long be felt. He was a warm friend, a con- 
genial companion, a kind neighbor, a generous man, a devoted father and an 
affectionate husband. Those who knew him best loved and respected him the 
most. 

ELARRY PEIRSON, butcher, Meadville, was born in London, England, 
October 8, 1837, and is a son of William Peirson, a tailor by trade, who had a 
family of nine children, Hugh being the youngest Our subject received his 
schooling in London, and learned the trade of a butcher, which he has fol- 
lowed through life. In 1855 he came from London to Canada, but not liking 
that country, he stayed there but six months, then came to Cleveland, Ohio, 
remaining five years; thence he came to Meadville, where he keeps the largest 
meat market in the city. He was married in 1871, to Eliza J. Fields, and 
their children are Harry Austin and Bessie M. Mr. and Mrs. Peirson are 
members of the Episcopal Church. In politics he is a Democrat. He has 
been a member of the City Council; is a member of the I. O. O. F., and K. of 
P. societies, and is President of the Meadville Sportsman's Club. 

WILLIAM PENTZ, Justice of the Peace, Meadville, was born April 2, 
1820, in York, Penn., and is a son of Daniel and Rachel (Shaffer) Pentz. both 
natives of York, Penn., and of German descent; came to Meadville in 18-15. 
His father was a tobacconist and came to this county in 1856, remaining three 
years. He raised a family of eleven sons and one daughter. Eight of the 
sons are now living; one was killed on the railroad in 1871 in Meadville. 
William received his schooling in his native county and learned first the trade 
of his father, but afterward that of a plasterer, and also carried on butchering 
for eight years. In 1870 he was appointed Court Crier; in 1872 he was elected 
Justice of the Peace, serving till 1877. In 1878 and 1879 i vvas Superintend- 
ent of the Odd Fellows' Home in Mead Township. _ In 1 882 he was again 
elected Justice of the Peace and still holds the office. He was a member of 
the Council of Meadville Borough 1850, 1851 and 1852. He was married in 
1841 in Allegheny City, to Mary A. Campbell, a native of Kentucky and of 
Irish parentage. They have six children living: Mary E. , wife of John M. 
Jones, of Arizona; Rosa, wife of A. B. Blystone; Margaret J., wife of Fred- 
erick Cole, of Greenbush, Mass.; W. H., a carpenter in Meadville, married to 
Thyphena Peese; Sarah, wife of L. K. Johnston, and Emma B., at home. 
The family all belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which Mr. Pentz 
has been for many years a local preacher, and in 1866 and 1867 was on the 
Circuit. He has been a Deacon in the church for many years. 

HON. S. NEWTON PETTIS, Meadville, son of Solomon and Ruth (House) 



MEADVILLE. 757 

Pettis, was born in Lenox, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, October 10, 1827. He 
received a good education and taught school near his home from 1842 to 1845. 
He began his law studies with Hon. Joshua R. Giddings, at Jefferson, Ohio, 
in 1846, and in 1848 came to Meadville and pursued them with Hon. H. L. 
Richmond until his admission to the bar in 1849. He then commenced prac- 
tice at Meadville, which he has continued ever since, except when interrupted 
by service on the bench and absence on a foreign mission. He soon formed a 
law partnership with Hon. James Thompson (since Chief Justice of Pennsyl- 
vania), which existed until his election to the Supreme bench in 1857. His 
practice was large and successful; his preparation of cases thorough. He made 
his client's cause his own. Some of his cases involved large interests. While 
counsel for the Crawford County Commissioners, he brought to a successfut 
termination the noted suit on the bonds of the Erie & Pittsburgh Railroad 
Company, thereby saving to the county a large sum. In 1870 he was appointed 
General Council for the Atlantic & Great Western Railroad Company. Though 
several times while in public service compelled to suspend professional prac- 
tice, upon his return to the bar he has taken a new hold and keeps abreast of 
the decisions, maintaining his professional rank. A native of the Western 
Reserve, the pupil of Giddings, and attaining his majority the same year that 
the party was efficiently organized on the Buffalo platform, his instincts were 
sympathetic with Free Soil. Much was to be overcome in Crawford, where its 
Democracy, caressed at Washington and entrenched at Harrisburg under its 
skillful leader (a State official of wide political renown), had so long main- 
tained an unbroken front. Starting as a campaign speaker in 1848, he has 
through nine Presidential and twelve Gubernatorial campaigns been conspicu- 
ous in his own and frequently in neighboring counties and in Ohio. In 1876 
he filled daily appointments of the Ohio State Republican Committee from 
September 10, to October 12. No one was more efficient in transforming a 
Democratic majority of 700 in Crawford County into a Republican of 2,000. 
He has frequently represented Crawford in State conventions. In 1800 he was 
influential and untiring in nominating Curtin for Governor. His unremitting 
efforts in the nomination that year of Lincoln, in the Chicago Convention, and 
in giving him the vote of the Pennsylvania delegation, are well known. It 
involved patient labor, tact and skill, and was probably the best work of his 
life, for in none were results more clearly traceable to initiatory efforts. Few 
events in American history have been more far-reaching in their ultimate 
tendency than the nomination and election of Abraham Lincoln. 

As Mr. Pettis entered active life, political parties were taking a new 
departure. The adjustment of the questions growing out of the acquisition of 
Mexican territory, followed by those of the restriction of slavery extension, 
the fugitive slave bill, the admission of California, and other "compromise 
measures " of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska Bill and repeal of the Missouri Com- 
promise, the admission of Kansas with secession, rebellion and war, with its 
results, the reconstruction measure; cunency, impeachment and resumption 
were all questions which aside from tariff and other domestic matters, were 
being considered. In the discussion of these he came before the people 
absorbed in his subject; armed with facts and figures, with intense earnestness 
and forgetfulness of self, he caiTied conviction to his audiences. Appointed 
by President Lincoln in March, 1861, to the United States Supreme bench of 
Colorado, he aided in the organization of that Ten'itory. At the call to arms, 
he was active in raising volunteers and filling quotas and furnishing supplies 
to the army. In this work it was his privilege to obtain from President Lin- 
coln permission to initiate and perfect a plan, by which 1,800 Confederate 



758 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

prisoners at Kook Island were enlisted in tbe Union Army, and on payment to 
each of SlOO, credited to the quotas required from this congressional district, 
which sum was paid from a fund of about $200,000 placed by the people at 
the disposal of Judge Pettis. This put an end in this district to the broker- 
age in substitutes, under which glaring abuses had arisen. Being the intimate 
friend and participant in the nomination of both Lincoln and Curtin, he 
maintained his relations with each, even up to the week preceding the assassin- 
ation, when he sought to impress upon the President the necessity of greater 
care for his personal safety. Knowing him so well, it was his part, as a friend, 
at a meeting of the Crawford County bar, after the death of the President, to 
pay a tribute to his memory, which for its delineation of the martyr's charac- 
ter, and appreciation of the Nation's loss, will be long remembered. In 1868, 
after persistent requests, he became a candidate for Congress in the Twentieth 
District, and carried Crawford County without opposition. After seven weeks 
of balloting another was nominated. During the same year, Hon. D. A. Fin- 
ney's death caused a vacancy in the Fortieth Congress. To this Judge Pettis 
was elected. Having taken his seat, he was assigned to the Committee on 
Elections and made a report on the contested election of the then Mexican 
delegate, Col. Chavis, which involved much research and was ratified by the 
House, in awarding him the seat. This investigation and report secured for 
Judge Pettis the recognition its patient examination and clearness of analysis 
merited. In 1872 he declined a numerously signed call for Congressional 
candidacy. In 1874 he again received the county's nomination for Congress, 
but after weeks of balloting, he advised the subsequent nomination of Mr. 
White, of Mercer. At the death of Judge Lowrie, in November, 1876, on the 
petition of many members of the bar and several thousand Crawford people, 
of the Senator and three or four Representatives, and fifty-nine or sixty mem- 
bers of the Republican County Committee, he was appointed President 
Judge of the Crawford Judicial District, remaining on the bench until Janu- 
ary, 1878. When a re-appointment from the Governor was anticipated to be 
necessary, it was asked by every member of the Crawford bar. In 1877, at the 
written request of all the Republican Congressmen and United States Senators 
of Pennsylvania, and of many public men from other States, he was agreed 
upon by President Hayes and his cabinet for the Peruvian Mission, but subse- 
quently appointed Minister to Bolivia. Arriving at the Bolivian capital, he 
found Peru, Bolivia and Chili involved in a wasting and bloody war, in which 
much destruction of life and property had been incurred, with devastation of 
country and paralysis of commerce. Peace seemed hopeless except as follow- 
ing the subjugation of a belligerent. Well versed in the details and merits of 
the controversy, after conference with the Peruvian Minister and Bolivian 
Secretary of State, he proceeded first to Lima, where his proposals of a mode 
of settlement were gladly received; then to Chili, where his plan of arbitra- 
tion or of a compromise line of boundary was met with gratifying considera- 
tion. Believing that this well-intended proposition, so auspiciously begun, 
with the approval of the United States Government, would culminate in suc- 
cess. Judge Pettis' hopes were crushed by the officious interference of an out- 
sider, so that the initiatory steps under which the war would have been ended 
and bloodshed saved were rendered a nullity. As was well remarked by one 
of our prominent journals, " His oflfort had been nothing more than an unoffi- 
cial suggestion to the belligerents of a basis of negotiation, upon which they 
could without humiliation, dishonor or loss, agi'ee to meet for settlement of 
questions of dispute between them. It was so stated, and appeared perfectly 
understood by all parties who knew or had interest in what was proposed. 



MEADVILLE. 759 

There was nothing to create a prejudice against the United States Government, 
nothing inconsistent with its attitude of neutrality. No harm was done by the 
attempt. Failure did not leave matters worse than before, but better. Done 
so unobstrusively and kindly, each of the belligerents regarded it as a friendly 
suggestion, not as an effort to interfere in their affairs. Had it succeeded it 
would be difficult to estimate the great results secured to our people and to the 
belligerents. Instead of the long, bloody, ruinous war which has since fol- 
lowed, it would have been a peaceful solution. To the United States it would 
have been almost equally fortunate. The good opinion and friendly feeling, 
which all three of the belligerents entertained toward us, would have been 
confirmed. Our diplomatic relations with them, instead of being unpleasant 
and annoying, would have been most agreeable. Our commerce with them, 
instead of being destroyed, would have been promoted and enlarged, and the 
United States would have secured the commanding influence which her popu- 
lation, position, colonization and firmness as a nation, ought to give her among 
the Republics of America. " Returning from his mission he was nominated 
by President Hayes to a Western Judgeship, but rejected by a Democratic 
Senate. He resumed law practice, which he stillcontinues. He was strongly 
urged for appointment as Governor of Dakota in January last, but never 
allowed any application to be made for it. 

The domestic life of our subject has been exceptionally happy. He was 
maiTied in September, 1852, to Miss Emma L. Wightman, and to this union 
have been born three children, two now living — Gertrude Wylie, married to 
Capt. John W. Pullman, A. Q. M., U. S. Army, and Herbert Ray. Their son, 
Rush, died March 14, 1882, at the age of fourteen, while attending school at the 
Chamberlin Institute, Randolph, N. Y. He was a lad of much promise, whose 
early death was deeply deplored; his disposition and character were especially 
eulogized by his teachers and schoolmates, to whom he had become greatly 
endeared. Judge Pettis still resides at Meadville, where, yet in his meridian, 
he can contemplate the worth, thus far, of a long, busy and pre-eminently 
useful life. In the changes he has witnessed in business, in politics and in 
the progress of the country, he can feel that he has been neither indifferent nor 
idle. If sometimes his hopes have been misplaced, his friends untrue or his 
labors futile, he can yet feel that the world is better from his work and that 
he has not lived in vain. The bench, the bar and the forum have alike been 
the field of his efforts. His services have been rendered in times of peace and 
of war, as well at home as abroad, and in the distant West. To have done 
his part well in each and at all times was his aim, and to have benefitted man- 
kind his accomplished purpose. 

HON. ALEXANDER POWER, retired, Meadville, was born in 1806, in 
Crawford County, Penn., son of Samuel and Margret (Cather) Power, and a 
full cousin of Capt. William Power, a farmer who came to Crawford County 
in 1795. Our subject's father was in the war of 1812. He reared nine 
children, of whom Alexander, the eldest, and five others are still living. 
Our subject received a common school education, attending school in a log 
schoolhouse in this county, and farmed the greater part of his life. In 1858 
he came to Meadville, and embarked in mercantile trade, in which he con- 
tinued for about five years very successfully. He also operated with others in 
a mill in this county for three years. Mr. Power is a member of the Congre- 
gational Church; has been a member of the School Board for fourteen years, 
and Treasurer of the Board during that time. Is a Democrat in politics. In 
1844 he was elected to the Legislature and served two terms; also served as 
Justice of the Peace ten years from 1840 to 1850. He has been twice married ; 



760 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

on the first occasion, September 25, 1847, to Mary D. Swaney, who died in 
1851, and he then married, ou January 23, 1855, Mary B. MeClure, who died 
February 2, 1875. 

COL. J. W. H. EEISINGEE, Postmaster, Meadville, was born at Beaver, 
Penn., January 19, 1833, son of Charles and Providence (Eoberts) Reisinger, 
the former a native of Pennsylvania, of German descent, the latter of Mary- 
land, of English lineage. Charles Eeisinger was a blacksmith; came to Craw- 
ford County in 1851 and died in Meadville in 1882. Our subject, the second 
child, was educated at Allegheny College, graduating with the degree A. B. 
in 1856, subsequently receiving the degree A. M. He chose teaching as his 
vocation, and for three years, from 1858 to 1860, inclusive, taught in the 
grammar schools of Evansville, Ind. He then came to Meadville. In 1862 
hejjoined the One Hundred and Fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
Company H; served as Captain eighteen months, then became Major of the 
Twenty-fifth Regiment United States Colored Troops; soon after was promoted 
to Lieutenant- Colonel, serving as such till the close of the war. He then went to 
Forest County, Penn., where he published the Bee for a year, and in 1869 
moved to Franklin, same State, where he bought the Venango Citizen, which 
he published one year. In 1870 he again came to Meadville and bought the 
Meadville Republican, which he published from 1870 till January 1, 1884. 
Our subject was married in 1870 to Louisa E. , daughter of Dr. Josiah Wi- 
nans, of Tionesta, Penn., and by this union were born two children: Paul and 
Louisa, both now living. Mrs. Eeisinger died September 29, 1875, and is 
buried in Greendale Cemetery. Col. Eeisinger was appointed Postmaster 
in April, 1882, which office he still holds. 

EOE EEISINGEE, attorney at law, Meadville, was born in Fallstown, 
Beaver Co., Penn., October 28, 1842, and is a son of Charles and Providence 
(Eoberts) Eeisinger. The former, a native of Lancaster County, Penn., was of 
German descent, by occupation a blacksmith; the latter a native of Harford 
County, Md., of English and Welsh descent. They had a family of seven 
children. Roe being the fifth child and fourth son. The parents moved to 
Crawford County in 1850. Our subject received his education in the common 
schools and Allegheny College. In 1862 he enlisted in Company H, One 
Hundred and Fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, was Color Bearer, was 
three times wounded at the battle of Gettysburg, and served until 1865. He 
then received a commission as Second Lieutenant in Company D, One Hun- 
dred and Fourteenth United States Colored Regiment, was promoted to First 
Lieutenant and served in Texas until 1867, when he returned to Meadville, 
studied law with A. B. Eichmond, was admitted to the bar in 1870, and has 
continued in the practice of his profession ever since. In politics he is a 
Eepublican. 

JOHN EEYNOLDS (deceased), was bom at Colchester, England, June 18, 
1782, and came to this county in 1795. His grandfather inherited a large en- 
tailed estate in "Worcestershire, England. He married Sarah Fox, of London, 
by whom he had nine children, the eldest of whom, John, inherited the estate. 
William, the third son, married Lydia, daughter of John Thomas, a Baptist 
minister, by whom he had seven daughters and four sons, the eldest being 
John, the subject of this sketch. The Eeynolds family in England was com- 
posed of strict Church of England people, but William Eeynolds, father of 
John, when a young man, united with the Baptist denomination, and the 
immediate cause of the immigration of William to America was his sympathy 
with the French Eepublican movement of that period, having been a sufferer 
by the sacking of his house and destruction of his property during the prog- 



MEADVILLE. 761 

ress of what was knowQ as the Birmingham riots, he having before that time 
removed to that city. The celebrated Joseph Priestly was also a sufiferer by 
those riots, which likewise caused hisimmigration to America. John Reynolds 
was educated in Birmingham and Leominster by private tutors. In 1797 he 
came with his father to Venango County, Penu., and settled on a tract of 
land bought from the Holland Land Company, at Cherry Tree Run. In 1805 
he removed to Meadville, and was engaged as assistant teacher in the academy 
here. In 1807 he was connected with Col. Marlin in surveying lands of the 
Holland Land Company and continued to be thus occupied for several years. 
Subsequently he began the study of law under the directions of Col. Marlin. 
In 1812 he was. admitted to the bar, but devoted little time to the practice of 
his profession, applying himself almost exclusively to real estate business. In 
1814 he married the widow of Dr. Kennedy, by whom he had two sons and 
two daughters. Mrs. Reynolds died November 27, 1845. Our subject's demise 
occurred July 23, 1871. John Van Liew, eldest child of John Reynolds, was 
born in Meadville, April 12, 1815; graduated at Jefiferson College, Penn., in 
1834; received from said college the degree of A. M. in 1838 and of D. D. in 
1858. He studied theology at Princeton, from the fall of 1835 to that of 1838. 
He was licensed to preach the Gospel in April, 1838, and was ordained a minister 
of the Presbyterian Church in the fall of 1839, and in the same fall was installed 
pastor of the First Pesbyterian Church in his native town. His whole time of 
service in said church was thirty years. In September, 1838, he was married 
to Evelina B. L. Gaston, of Somerville, N. J., who died in June, 1849. Our 
subject was married to his second wife, Catharine E. Bell, at Allegheny City, 
in October, 1851. William, youngest child of John Reynolds, was born in 
May, 1820. He graduated from Allegheny College in 1837; married Julia 
Thorp, of New York City. Jane Maria, elder daughter of John Reynolds, was 
born in 1817, was married to A. Sergeant, M. D., a native of Somerville, N, 
J., in 1845. Lydia L., younger daughter of John Reynolds, was born in 1818, 
and was marriedinl841, to the Rev. Richard Craighead, a native of Cumberland 
County, Penn., and for thirty-one years pastor of the Second Presbyterian 
Church of Meadville, Penn. 

H. W. REYNOLDS, of the Athens Mills Company, Meadville, was born 
in Meadville, August 26, 1852, grandson of John Reynolds, and son of William 
Reynolds, of Meadville. He is now a partner with his father in the Athens 
Mills Company, one of the most important manufacturing enterprises in this 
city, employing about forty hands, and making a specialty of the manufacture 
of doors, sash and window blinds. The mill was first started in 1868, by 
William Reynolds and William Thorp. Since March 1, 1877, when Mr. Thorp 
sold out, he has been a partner with his father and general business manager. 
He was married in 1876 to Cora A. Mosier, a native of this county. 

HON. HIRAM LAWTON RICHMOxVD, of Meadville, Penn. Richmond, 
as a personal cognomen, is an ancient English name. It is of Norman origin, 
and doubtless came over with William the Conqueror. The great battle 
of Hastings was fought on the 14th of October, 1066. Immediately after his 
victory, William vowed to build an abbey on the high grounds where Harold 
had posted his army, as commemorative of that great event. And soon the 
magnificent structure arose, and its high altar stood on the very spot where 
Harold had planted his standard during the fight, and where the carnage was 
thickest. Hence it took its name of " Battle Abbey. " And to perpetuate the 
memory of his commanders and companions in arm, who survived the battle, 
William caused a list of their several names to be made out and preserved 
among the archives of the abbey, known in history as " The Great Roll of 



762 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Battle Abbey." In that list the name jfiirhmond is found. The next year, 1067, 
the name first appears in English necrology, to wit: Alan Richmond, Earl of 
Brittany. Mr.Richmond's more immediate ancestors were of Wiltshire, England. 
In 1638 John Richmond, of Ashton- Keynes, Wiltshire, came over,and becameone 
of the first purchasers of the town of Taunton, thirty-five miles south of Boston. 
It is believed that nearly all the Richmonds in this country, and they are not a 
few, are descendants of John, of Taunton. A son of his, Edward Richmond, 
moved into Rhode Island. From this Edward the subject of this sketch is 
lineally descended. His father, Dr. Lawton Richmond, was born in Provi- 
dence, R. I., August 7, 1784. When seven years old, in 1791, his parents 
moved to the State of New York, and settled in Herkimer County, on what 
was called the Royal Grant, where he grew up to manhood. The family was 
a large one, consisting of nine brothers and three sisters, all of whom are 
now dead; the last one. Freeman Richmond, died December 24, 1880, at the 
advanced age of ninety-one years, three months and twenty-six days. Having 
received a good academic education, he entered the office of Drs. Todd & 
Hanchet, as a student o:^ medicine, and having completed his course of study, 
and passed a close and critical examination before the Board of Censors, he 
TBceived his first permit or license to practice medicine, from the Chancellor 
of the State. May 23, 1809, he was united in marriage with Miss Sarah Town- 
send, a beautiful and intelligent young lady of eighteen, of Scotch extraction. 
That spring, immediately after his marriage, he moved to western New York, 
stopping for a year or more in the town of Chautauqua, Chautauqua 
County, where the subject of this sketch was born May 10, 1810, but finally 
locating where Westtield now is, then known as the Cross-roads Th& 
country was new and sparsely settled, yet he soon entered upon a lucrative 
practice of his profession. But the tide of immigration began to set heavily, 
still westward. Dr. Richmond was a pioneer by inclination. Fond of the 
pleasures, the adventures and hazards of frontier life, he too caught the west- 
ern fever, and taking his little family and small accumulations, he migrated to 
southern Indiana, the then Eldorado, and settled in Allensvillo, Switzerland 
County, a frontier village of half a dozen log-houses, forty-eight miles below 
Cincinnati, and eight miles back from the river. The State had but recently 
been admitted into the Union, and its southern portion filled up rapidly with 
Eastern people. The Doctor and his wife were members of the Methodist 
Church, active and ardent; indeed had joined that church in its very morning, 
when they were yet single. He was a local preacher and was ordained an 
Elder at his own house, while living in Indiana. Well versed in sacred liter- 
ature, and blessed with an easy flow of language, his heart full of the work, 
he was a good and effective preacher. When the demands of his profession 
would permit, he had a series of Sabbath appointments, which he generally 
tilled. But the arduous duties imposed upon him by the practice of medicine, 
in a new and rugged country, sparsely settled, wore upon his constitution, and 
his health so failed him that to regain it he deemed it advisable to seek a 
more northern clime; and in 1829, he, with his family, returned to his old and 
early home in the State of New York. He remained here until 1834, when 
he moved to Meadville, Penn , mainly that he might give his two sons the 
advantages of attending Allegheny College, which had then just come under 
the patronage of the Methodist Church. 

The educational opportunities of Hiram, the elder of the two sons and the 
subject of this sketch, had been very few previous to the return of the family 
North — such only as were furnished in the log schoolhouse of the frontier, and 
one winter's private instruction under the direction of a worthy young man of 



MEADVILLE. 763 

the name of Pratt, who was studying mndicine with the Doctor. He loved 
mathematics, and in one winter, without an instructor, he " ciphered " his way 
nearly through " Old Pike's Arithmetic." He thus spent, and in reading such 
books as fell in his way, his winter evenings and leisure day hours, when there 
was no school within his reach. On their return to New York, he then being 
nineteen years old, he entered a private academy, and by close application to 
study, not wasting an hour, he soon acquired a good English education. He 
now commenced the study of medicine with his father, and pursued it for two 
years. But his aspirations were for the legal profession, upon preparation for 
which he would have entered in the lirst instance, but for a popular prejudice 
indulged by his parents, that a man could not be both a lawyer and a Christian ; a 
strange notion indeed, and yet, even in this enlightened age, indulged in by 
many good people. On their moving to Meadville, as above stated, he entered 
Allegheny College, as a student, and remained two years. In the winter of 
1836 he was registered by the Hon. David Derickson, as a student of law, and 
in February, 1838, was admitted to the bar. 

In December after his admission, he was united in marriage with Miss 
Maria Power Shryock, daughter of Gen. Daniel Shryock, a worthy citizen and 
leading merchant of the place. She has proven a faithful, affectionate and 
devoted wife and mother. Popular in his address, he had a smile, a hand- 
shake and a how-do-you-do for every one worthy the recognition whom he met. 
His first two efforts as an advocate were of a character that gave him position 
as a young lawyer of much promise, and he soon entered upon a lucrative 
practice. As an advocate, he was soon ranked among the first in the State. 
As a stump and platform speaker he had but few superiors. In politics he was 
a Whig. Crawford County was then largely Democratic, and continued so 
for some ten years. In 1847 she for the tirst time sent Whigs to the Legisla- 
ture, and in 1848 gave a large majority for Gen. Taylor for President, as 
against Gen. Cass. Mr. Richmond, from his entry into public life, has always 
taken great interest in the political issues that sprang up from time to time, 
demanding consideration. He is no trimmer, is a man of positive ideas, is out- 
spoken in his convictions, and ready to defend them on all suitable occasions. 
Perhaps no man contributed more than he to change the political character of 
Crawford County. After the election of 1848 she continued Whig so long as 
that party had an existence, and subsequently became still more strongly 
Republican, and has continued so ever since. In 1872 Mr. Richmond was 
elected a member of the Forty-third Congress, from the Twenty-fifth District, 
by the largest majority the district ever gave. The district consisted of the 
counties of Crawford, Mercer. Venango and Clarion; is the most pop- 
ulous and wealthy in the State — rich in iron, coal and other minerals — and 
embracing within its limits the great oil-producing territory of the State. 
Upon taking his seat he was appointed on two important Committees — the 
Committee on Indian Affairs and the Committee on Public Expenditures. The 
Indian Committee consisted of twelve members, all of whom, except three, 
were experienced and able lawyers. He took great interest in Indian affairs, 
reported several bills on questions committed to him in Committee, each one 
of which passed the Committee, and both Houses of Congress, without objec- 
tion or amendment. When the question of appropriations in aid of the Indian 
came iip he made an able speech, which attracted much attention among the 
frieuds of the red- man, and was published entire in the Cherokee Advocate, a 
paper published by the Indians, in the Indian Territory. His idea as to our 
duty to the Indian is thus expressed in the concluding paragraph of that 
speech: " Bring him (the Indian) within the embrace of our civilization, ele- 



764 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

▼ate him to the proud position of American manhood and citizenship, confer 
apon him all the prerogatives of a man, equal in rights and privileges to every 
other man, then will we have made some atonement for the great wrongs we 
have done him through the ages that are past." 

Mr. Richmond is a life-long Methodist, as were his father and mother 
before him, and for many years a Leader and Steward in the church, and has 
done much to advance its spiritual and temporal interests. He was a delegate 
to and Temporary Chairman of the Methodist State Convention of Pennsyl- 
vania, which met in Philadelphia October, 1870. By appointment he pre- 
pared and presented to the convention an essay on "The Duty of the Chris- 
tian Citizen to the State as a Political Organization," which was well received 
and very highly commended. He is a friend to and promoter of education. For 
many years he has been a Trustee of Allegheny College. In the celeebrated 
Chamberlain will case, which passed through the courts of the State of New York, 
the property and domicile of the testator being in that State, Mr. Richmond 
was the only Pennsylvania lawyer who appeared in the case, and has the merit 
of having raised the point upon which the case turned, and was ultimately 
decided in favor of the college by the Court of Appeals. His argument pre- 
pared in that case with great labor and research, is a masterpiece of logic and 
learning. He has one of the largest and best selected libraries in northwest- 
ern Pennsylvania, and here he may be found almost any day in the year, and 
almost any hour in the day. 

Mr. Richmond is now seventy-four years old, yet he retains his physical 
and mental vigor to a remarkable degree. He is still in the active practice of 
his profession. A leading daily of his city thus speaks of one of his recent 
forensic efforts; " When court convened yesterday morning the case of false 
pretenses against O. U. Bunting was called, and the Hon. H. L. Richmond, 
Sr., opened to the jury. Mr. Richmond made a very powerful address to the 
court. Although one of the oldest practitioners at the bar, and with the 
weight of years upon him, he conducted the case alone with the keenness and 
vigor of youth ; and in summing up his line of defense, and forging his chain of 
evidence, with the perfection of every link, which would add laurels to the 
brow of any of the lawyers who sat around in the pride and prime of life, 
there was not one sign of weakness in constructive power in argument, not 
one lack of grace and force of rhetoric and language. The plea was, indeed, 
one of rare ability, and that in face of the fact that he had a very bad case (in 
legal parlance), and the effect upon the jury was apparent from the beginning, 
while the whole crowded court listened in absolute silence, charmed by the 
splendid scene, its central figure the majestic and snowy-haired orator 
himself." 

Mr. Richmond has an interesting family of eight children, five sons and 
three daughters, all living and of adult years. Hiram Lawton, his first-born, 
an alumnus of Allegheny College, has for many years been in the active and 
successful practice of the law in his native city, and also connected with the 
City Government — either as Member of the Council or Mayor of the city — 
was also for a time Chief of the Fire Department In 1880 was a delegate 
to the Republican National Convention at Chicago. He married Virginia 
Vance, whose father, now deceased, was a leading lawyer of New Lisbon, Ohio. 
Maria, married to Col. Charles H. Hawkins, largely engaged in the iron busi- 
ness in Chicago. Daniel Shryock, an active, energetic and successful business 
man, was Supervisor of the Census for the eleven northwestern counties of 
Pennsylvania, is now extensively engaged in the lumber and ice business, and 
is Superintendent of and a heavy stock-holder in the Conneaut Lake Ice Com- 



MEADVILLE. 765 

pany. Almon George, an alnmnus of Allegheny College, a promieing young law- 
yer, recently elected, by a very large majority, District Attorney of his county, 
is an amateur artist and admirable caricaturist; married to Mary Grayson, 
second daughter of Thomas Grayson, Esq., editor and proprietor of the Craiv- 
ford Democrat. Elizabeth, married to T. Albert Delamater, engaged in rail- 
road and lumber business and second son of Hon. George B. Delamater, a 
banker. James Edward, grocer, is an active and energetic business man, and 
has a large business. Charles Fremont, a young man of much promise, is 
engaged in the lumber business; and Harriet, the youngest of the flock,-^ fine- 
looking, intelligent and interesting young lady. 



D. S. RICHMOND, manager of Conneaut Lake Ice Company (limited), 
Meadville, is the second son of Hon. H. L. Richmond, of Meadville. He 
received his education in Allegheny College. In 1874 he embarked in the 
lumber business under the firm name of Richmond & Delamater. In 1879 he 
•was elected to his present position as manager of the Conneaut Lake Ice 
Company, a history of which appears in this volume. He has been City Aud- 
itor and member of the City Council; is a member of the I. O. O. F. He is 
one of Meadville's most enterprising businessmen. In 1880 he was appointed 
Supervisor of Census of the Tenth District of Pennsylvania. In politics Mr. 
Richmond is a Republican. 

A. B. RICHMOND, attorney, Meadville, was born in Switzerland County, 
Ind. , April 26, 1825, son of Lawton and Sarah (Townsend) Richmond, natives 
of New England, of English descent, and is a direct descendant of John 
Richmond, the Puritan, who came over in the " Mayflower." His grandfather, 
William Richmond, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Lawton Rich- 
mond, subject's father, was a practicing physician and surgeon in the war of 
1812. After the war he followed his profession in Indiana until 1834, when 
he removed to this county and practiced medicine until his death, which 
occurred in 1843. He was also a local preacher in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and preached the first Methodist sermon in Chautauqua County, N. 
Y. He was parent of three daughters, who died young, and two sons, H. L. , 
a prominent lawyer of Meadville, and A. B. Our subject attended Allegheny 
College, and then took a medical course and practiced for three years iu Mead- 
ville, during which time he studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1851. 
He has found his medical knowledge of much service in his law practice. Mr. 
Richmond is one of the most noted criminal lawyers in this State, having been 
employed in over 4,000 criminal cases, sixty-five being homicides. He is also 
an expert mechanic, and can make a clock or steam engine. In 1853 he was 
appointed Assistant Director of machinery at the Crystal Palace. Mr. Rich- 
mond has delivered many scientific lectures on philosophy, physiology and 
chemistry, making his own apparatus for illustrating his subjects. He has 
been a prominent temperance lecturer and author for many years; was State 
Commissioner for Pennsylvania at the "World's Fair, 1866. He is author of the 
great temperance work, "Leaves From the Diary of an Old Lawyer," which 
contains "Intemperance and Crime" and " Court and Prison ;' ' also a tem- 
perance novel, " A Hawk in an Eagle's l^est," which have received the highest 
commendation from the press, and an extensive circulation. Our subject was 
married September 7, 1848, to Mary Jane, daughter of Levi Morris, of this 
county, and by this union were born three sons: Louis L. , jeweler in Mead- 
ville, married to Miss Winnie Day, of Ohio (have two children. May W. and 
George D.); Hiram M., deceased, married to Miss Margaret, daughter of Daniel 



766 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES; 

Fowler, of Meadville (had one daughter, Margueritee F. ); and Mai. Charles 
E., on the Governor's stafif, now reading law with his father. 

JAMES D. ROBERTS, attorney at law, Meadville, was born in Mercer 
County, Penn., August 9, 1850, son of Enoch and Mary (Calvin) Roberts, who 
were natives of Peiiusylvania, the father of English, the mother of Irish 
descent. The father is a blacksmith, came to the county in 1856, and is still 
a resident of Fairfield Township. James D. is the eldest of a family of four 
children, one of whom is dead, and received his literary education at the New 
Lebanon Academy and the Edinboro State Normal, from which he graduated 
in 1873. He supported himself while in school, and after leaving school he 
taught for two years. He then commenced the study of law in the office of J. 
J. Henderson, of Meadville, being admitted to the district courts in 1876, and 
in 1878 to the Supreme Court of the State, and the United States District 
Circuit Courts. He was married, in 1880, to Flora A., daughter of Charles 
Forbes, a farmer and dairyman of this county. They have one child — Mary. 
Both are members of the Second Presbyterian Church, of which he has 
recently been elected Elder, and has been for the past four years Superintend- 
ent of the Sabbath-school. 

WILLIAM RODDICK, Meadville, was born October 17, 1829, in Dum- 
friesshire, Scotland, where, after receiving a common school education, when 
sixteen years of age, he was employed upon public work, first in construction 
of sewgrage, in Carlisle City, England. His parents were William' and Mar- 
garet (Johnstone) Roddick, natives of Scotland, the former a farmer. They 
had a family of niae children. In March, 1856, our subject came to this 
country, and three days after landing was employed as foreman of construc- 
tion on the Grand Trunk Railway of Canada, and after the completion of the 
road he remained foreman until 1862, when he moved to Jefferson County, 
Ohio, and did the first work on the Jamestown & Ashtabula Railroad. In 
April, 1865, Mr. Roddick came to Meadville, where he has since remained. 
In the following spring he was appointed Street Commissioner, and at the end 
of the second year he was made Policeman and Street Commissioner, in which 
capacity he served two years, when the duties of High Constable, Fire Warden 
and Pound Keeper were added to his other duties, which positions he has held 
ever since. During his incumbency he has superintended a vast amount of 
work for the city. He was married, October 11, 1853, to Miss Mary McCall, 
of his native town, who followed him to America, six months after his immi- 
gration. Their children now living are: Anna, wife of James Elder, in 
Iowa; James, an engineer; Susan, at home; William, a boiler-maker, in Mead- 
ville, Penn. ; John, at home. Mr. and Mrs. Roddick are members of the Park 
Avenue Congregational Church, of which he has been Trustee since the 
organization. Mr. Roddick is a member of the I. O. O. F., being Past Noble 
Grand, Past Chief Patriarch, and a member of the Grand Lodge of the State; 
he is also a member of the K. of P. 

HENRY ROGERS, proprietor of the Colt House, Meadville, was born in 
Bradford County, Penn., in 1847, and is a son of Hiram and Abigail (Parks) 
Rogers, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English descent, his father being a 
wagon maker by trade. They had a family of five children. Henry Rogers 
received a common school education in his native place, and first engaged in 
the oil business, in which, in all, he has spent seventeen years. In 1884 he 
started his present hotel business, which bids fair to be a success. . He was 
married, in this city, in 1873, to Sabina, daughter of Sylvester Boytes, one of 
the first settlers in Meadville. In politics Mr. Rogers is an old-fashioned 
Jacksonian Democrat. 



MEADVILLE. 767 

SUSAN F. ROSE, M. D., physician, Meadville, was born in the city of 
Philadelphia, September 21, 1845, and is a daughter of Peter and Eliza A. 
(Boyer) Rose. Her parents were also natives of Philadelphia, her father of 
Welsh and English, her mother of French descent. Peter Rose, who came 
with his family to this county about 1857, was a farmer and lumber dealer. 
He raised a family of eight children, Susan F. being the fourth. He died in 
1882. Our subject received her educatioff in the graded schools of her native 
city, and studied medicine under Dr. Smith in this county from 1872 to 1875. 
In 1873-74 she attended the Woman's Medical College at Philadelphia, and 
graduated at the Homoeopathic Hospital and College at Cleveland, in the year 
1875. She then commenced the practice of medicine at Townville, in this 
county, and two years later came to Meadville, where she has continued prac- 
tice. 

H. R. ROTH, Superintendent of Public Schools of Meadville, as an edu- 
cator is among the most prominent men of his age in the State of Pennsyl- 
vania. He was born in Pennsylvania, son of Reuben S. and Anna M. Rupp, 
and is of German descent. He was reared on a farm and attended tJie district 
school until fourteen, when he went to Cumberland Valley Institute, where he 
pursued his studies with such diligence that at the age of eighteen he was able 
to enter the Dickinson College, taking a position 4n the junior class, and at 
twenty graduated with honors. In 1875 he was elected Professor of Mathe- 
matics in the Pennington Seminary, N. J., and in 1877 accepted a position at 
the head of the public schools of Sunbury, Penn., where he remained until 
1881, since when he has occupied his present position. He is a thorough 
scholar and a good disciplinarian. He is a prominent member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. Mr. Roth was married in 1878 to Amy C, a daughter 
of W. R. F. Weimer, Sunbury, Penn. In 1883 Mrs. Roth departed this life. 

ARNOLD RUSSELL, engineer, Meadville, is an old and well-tried rail- 
road man, having served the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio Railroad for twen- 
ty-one years, and during all that time has never been called to the Superin- 
tendent's office for any misdemeanor or for any accident. He was born at 
Honesdale, Wayne Co., Penn., October 23, 1845, and is a son of Gaylord and 
Esther (Walton) Russell, of German and Irish descent. His father, who was 
a farmer, raised a family of six children, of whom Arnold is the fourth. Our 
subject received his education in his native county; in his eighteenth year he 
went on the railroad as fireman, and was running an engine before he reached his 
majority. For several years he ran a construction train on which he was both 
engineer and conductor. Since 1865 he has been first-class engineer on pas- 
senger trains. He is always prompt and ready for duty, and in twenty-one 
years has never missed a pay-day. He was married in 1866 to Miss Nancy, 
daughter of William Adams, a native of this county and of English descent. 
Their children are: Lizzie, Mabel, William Henry and Robert Stanley. Mrs. 
Russell is a member of the Park Avenue Congregational Church. In politics 
he is Independent. During the war he enlisted in a Pennsylvania regiment, 
but it was not called into active service. He is a prudent man and carries an 
insurance of 17,000 on his life. He is also owner of a farm of ninety acres 
in Hayfield Township, this county. He is a member of Knights of Pythias, 
the A. O. U. W., and of the American Legion of Honor. 

JOHN SCHEAFNOCKER, Constable, Meadville, was born in Germany, 
October 10, 1831, and is a son of George and Elizabeth (Minsenier) Scheaf- 
nocker, the former of whom, a weaver by trade, came to America in 1835, set- 
tling in Pittsburgh, Penn. John was first a newsboy in Pittsburgh, and what- 
ever education he has acquired was gathered outside the school-room, ^^'hen 



768 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

he was old enough he was set to learn the painter's trade, and became a skilled 
carriage painter. Ill 1861 he came to Meadville and worked at his trade until 
his enlistment in the army as a member of Company A, Two Hundred and 
Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving until the close of the war. 
He is now a member of the G. A. R. For a time he had a shop here and car 
ried on the painting business, but for the past seventeen years he has acted as 
Constable. 

HON. HENEY SHIPPEN (deceased) was born December 28, 1788, in 
Lancaster City, Penn. He graduated at Dickenson College, Carlisle, Penn., 
studied law in his native city and commenced practicing his profession there. 
He was united in marriage with Elizabeth Wallis Evans (a grand-daughter 
of John Lukens, the first Surveyor-General of the State), a native of Northum- 
berland, Penn., who bore him nine children, five of whom are now living: Mrs. 
Edgar Huidekoper, Meadville; Edward, in Louisville Ky. ; Evans W., in Mead- 
ville; Eev. R. R., in Washington, D. C. ; and Joseph, in Chicago, 111. Mr. 
Shippen was Captain of the Lancaster Horse, First Brigade, Fourth Division, 
in the war of 1812, James Buchanan, afterward President of the United 
States, serving as private under him. After the war he moved to Huntingdon, 
Penn., from where he was sent as a member of the Legislature of the State, 
and followed his professioti there till 1825, when he was appointed by the 
Governor President Judge of the Sixth Judicial District, comprising Erie, 
Crawford, Mercer, Venango and Warren Counties, serving until his death in 
1839. The subject of this sketch possessed a judicial mind of the highest 
attainment, inherited from a long line of ancestry, each one of the four pre- 
ceding generations of the Shippen family having given to the State a Judge. His 
great-great-grandfather, Edward Shippen, a Quaker [a son of William Ship- 
pen, a member of Parliament from Presbury, Cheshire, England) was born in 
1639 in England, immigrated to Boston in 1668, moved to Philadelphia in 1693, 
was Speaker of the Assembly in 1695, and from 1696 to 1700 was member of the 
Provincial Council. William Penn named him, in the charter October 25, 1701, 
as the first Mayor of the city of Philadelphia, and on • the death of Penn's 
depiity, Hamilton, of New Jersey, May, 1703, he became the head of the Govern- 
ment. At this time he was also a Provincial Judge. His great-grandfather, 
Joseph Shippen, born in Boston in 1678, was amongst the men of science of 
his day, and in 1727 joined Dr. Benjamin Franklin in founding the Junto in 
Philadelphia. His grandfather, Edward Shippen, was born in Boston in 
1703, was Mayor of the city of Philadelphia in 1744, and was afterward Judge 
under both the Provincial and State Government. His father, Joseph Shippen 
(brother of Edward Shippen, Chief Justice in 1799), was born in Philadelphia 
in 1732, commissioned Colonel in the Provincial Army in 1758, and served in 
the expedition that captured Fort Du Quesne; commissioned Secretary of the 
Provincial Council of Pennsylvania in 1762, and was appointed Judge of 
Lancaster Court in 1789. 

EVANS W. SHIPPEN, oil producer, Meadville, was born in Huntingdon, 
Penn., March 16, 1824, son of Hon. Henry and Elizabeth W. (Evans) Shippen. 
He came to Meadville with his parents in 1825, and acquired his education in 
the common schools and at Allegheny College. From 1844 to 1863 he was 
engaged in the iron business in Lancaster and Philadelphia Cities. He 
became interested in the production of petroleum while living in Philadelphia 
in 1860, soon after the first oil well was drilled, chartered a barque and shipped 
one of the first full cargoes of oil to England. In 1864 he returned to 
reside in Meadville. He was united in marriage in Philadelphia, in 1851, 
with Catherine Y. McElwee, a great- grand- daughter of Judge Jasper Yeates, 



MEADVILLE. 769 

author and compiler of Teafces' Reports, and who was Chief Justice of Penn- 
sylvania from 1791 to 1817. Her grandfather, Charles Smith, was Provost of 
the University of Pennsylvania, and her father, Thomas B. McElwee, was an 
attorney in Bedford, Penn. Mr. Sbippen has in his possession many old let- 
ters, books and papers of provincial times. He is a representative business 
man fostering a number of enterprises in this and Venango Counties. 

JAMES J. SHRYOCK, retired merchant and railroad President, Meadville, 
was born in Conneaatville, Crawford Co., Penn., March 12, 1821, son of 
Daniel and Elizabeth (McNamara) Shryock. His mother was a native of 
Pennsylvania, of English descent. His father, born in Maryland, of German 
lineage, came to this county in 1818, and manufactured salt in Beaver Town- 
ship until 1822, when he came to Meadville and engaged in merchandising till 
1842. He reared six children. Our subject, the eldest son, was educated at 
the Meadville Academy, graduating in 1837. He then clerked for his father 
till 1839, when he embarked in general merchandising. In 1855 he was 
appointed Director of the Pittsburgh & Erie Railroad Company by the com- 
missioners of this county. In 1857, in company with J. D. Gill, he bought the 
Cussewago Mills. In 1858 he became one of the incorporators of the Meadville 
Railroad Company, now merged into the Atlantic & Great Western, and was 
elected a Director. In 1859 he was one of the incorporators of the New York 
Division of the Atlantic & Great Western Railroad, and was chosen Director. 
In the same year he sent several samples of the newly discovered petroleum to 
London, England; in December, 1861, he purchased 3,000 barrels for that 
market. Id 1864 he became one of the Board of Directors of the Naw Lisbon, 
Ohio, Railroad Company. In 1865 he was elected President of the Pennsyl- 
vania Division of the Atlantic & Great Western Railroad, the same year a 
Director in the Mercer Mining & Manafacturing Company and also of the 
Shenango & Allegheny Railroad Company. On the consolidation of the rail- 
roads of the Atlantic & Great Western Company, in 1866, he was elected Vice- 
President, and the same year was appointed a Director of the Pithole Railroad 
Company. When the Atlantic & Great Western passed into the hands of a 
receiver in 1867, Mr. Shryock was made his assistant, and in 1868 became 
President of the Shenango & Allegheny Company. He was elected President 
of the Meadville Water Company in 1874; in 1880 was elected President of the 
Meadville Railway Company. Mr. Shryock has been twice married, on first 
occasion, 1842, to Priscilla, daughter of Robert Gill, who bore him three chil- 
dren, viz. : John J., a carpet merchant; Frank R., milling; and Emma, wife of 
Noble H. Merwin, of Cleveland, Ohio. This wife dying in 1869, he was 
remarried, 1871, to Mary, daughter of George A. Shryock, of Philadelphia, a 
manufacturer, who was the first to make straw boards, extensively used at the 
present time. Mr. and Mrs. Shryock are members of the Park Avenue Con- 
gregational Church, of which be is a Trustee. He is also one of the incorpora- 
tors and a Director of the Greendale Cemetery and for many years was a Trustee 
of Allegheny College. 

JOHN J. SHRYOCK, merchant, Meadville, was born in Meadville August 
8, 1853, and is a son of James J. and P. L. (Gill) Shryock, the former a promi- 
nent citizen of Meadville. Oui' subject is the second of three children, and 
received his education in the common school of Meadville and at Allegheny 
College. In 1873 he obtained a position as clerk in a wholesale carpet store in 
Cleveland, Ohio, where he remained two years. He then embarked in busi- 
ness with T. A. Delamater, and they continued with success until 1888, since 
which time Mr. Shryock has continued the business alone, being the most 
extensive dealer in this part of the S ate, selling to all neighboring towns and 



770 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

not infrequently adjoining States. He married September 13, 1883, Adelaide 
Louise, daughter of L. C. Magaw, a prominent merchant of Meadville. 
Mr. and Mrs. Shryockare members of the Episcopal Church; in politics he is 
a Democrat. 

A. W. SMITH, President of the Meadville Business College, was born in 
Vernon Township, Trumbull Co., Ohio, September 18, 1833, and is a son of 
Conrad M. and Sarah (Hall) Smith, both natives of New Jersey, and of Ger- 
man and French descent. Our subject was reared on the farm until seventeen 
years old, and received his education at Vernon Academy. He then com- 
menced to learn carpentering, working at his trade in summer, and teaching 
district school in winter, for five years. He then entered upon his college 
course, and in two years graduated, being then twenty-four years of age. In 
1860 he was engaged as Principal of the academy at Greenupburg, Ky. He 
also attended Hiram College while James A. Garfield was President of it. At 
one time Mr. Smith accepted the Superintendency of the Bryant & Stratton 
Business College in Cincinnati, and after a time was transferred to the Albany 
college. He was also engaged at times in New York, Brooklyn, Troy, and 
Cleveland. In 1865 he formed a copartnership with Bryant & Stratton, and 
opened the Meadville Business College. Under his management the college 
has had an attendance of 126 students per year, most of whom graduated and 
now hold prominent positions. In 1862 our subject was married to Mary J., 
daughter of Hiram Moe, a native of New York and of Scotch descent. Mr. 
Smith has served three years as Auditor of the county. 

EDWARD P. SPRAGUE, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of 
Meadville, was born October 18, 1843, and is a son of Rev. Daniel G. and 
Caroline (Wood) Sprague. His father, who was a Presbyterian minister, had 
a family of four children, of whom Edward P. is the youngest. Our subject 
received his education in Newark, N. J., and at Williston Seminary, East- 
hampton, Mass., then afterward took a regular course at the University of 
New York City. He was the first in rank of scholarship, and valedictorian of 
the class in 1864. He then entered the Andover Theological. Seminary, from 
which he graduated in 1867, and was ordained pastor of the First Presbyterian 
Church at Salem, Washington Co., N. Y., in April, 1868. He was married 
the same year to Miss Sarah F., daughter of Dr. Henry S. Dering, of Long 
Island, N. Y. They have two children: Vesta D.^ and Dering J. He con- 
tinued as pastor at Salem until 1881, and during his pastorate he vrrote a 
biography of his father, and a history of the church at Salem, which were pub- 
lished in pamphlet form and are now a part of the history of the county, being 
extensively read and published in other histories. In 1881 he resigned his 
pastorate to accept his present charge, where he was installed November 3, 
1881. In his political views Mr. Sprague is a Republican. He is distin- 
guished for his fluency as a public speaker, and is beloved by all for bis social 
qualities. 

H. STEELE, proprietor of steam bakery, Meadville, was born in Herki- 
mer County, N. Y., December 16, 1820, and is a son of Adam and Dorothy 
(Daggett) Steele, natives of New York and of German descent, former a car- 
penter by trade. They had a family of seven children, of whom H. is the 
youngest. Our subject received his education in Jamestown, N. Y., and until 
twenty-six years of age worked in a sash and blind factory. He then came to 
Meadville, engaging for twenty-two years in the foundry business; he made 
the machinery used by Mr. Drake in boring for oil. He then went into the oil 
business for himself, having the good fortune to strike oil, and is still dealing 
in this article, owning oil lands. He was married in Meadville to Catharine 



MEADVILLE. 771 

J. Frost, and their children are: Albert H , a railroad President, residing in 
Chicago ; Bryan C, a manufacturer in Chicago ; Fletcher A., in Meadville ; 
William, a merchant in Ohio ; George, in railroad business; Homer, and Lucy 
M., a widow. In his political views Mr. Steele affiliates with the Republican 
party. 

FRANK A. STRIFFLER, proprietor of the " Budd House," Meadville, 
was born September 17, 1853, in Warren County, Ohio, son of Sebastian and 
Barbara (Beck) Striffler, natives of Germany, who came to America in 1845, 
settling for a time iu Pittsburgh, Penn., but after a few years removing to 
Butler County, Penn., and from there to Warren County, Ohio. Sebastian 
Striffler was by trade a merchant tailor. They were parents of nine children, 
six now living, viz.: Christina, Mary, Peter, Frank A., Matilda and Maggie. 
Our subject was educated in Meadville, Penn. , and graduated from the com- 
mercial college. He was married March 28, 1875, to Lena, daughter of Jacob 
Michael, by whom he has three children: Frank, Maggie and Clara. Mr. 
Striffler took charge of the "Budd House" in April, 1881. This first-class 
hotel is located on Water Street, convenient to the railroad station, a bus being 
sent to meet all trains. The "Budd House, " under Mr. Striffler's manage- 
ment, offers best advantages to the traveling public at most reasonable rates. 
Our subject is a member of the C. B. A., of Meadville. 

WI LLIAM THOMEIER, shoe-maker, Meadville, was born in Germany, 
July 25,1840; and is a son of Peter J., and Frances K. (Ottimen) Thomeier, 
natives of Germany, who came to America in 1855, and in 1856 settled in 
Meadville. Peter J. Thomeier was a stone-mason. Our subject, who is third 
of a family of seven, since eighteen years of age has worked at shoe-making, 
and since 1862 in Meadville. He was married in 1865 to Miss C. C. Kopp, a 
native of Germany, and they have had seven children, six of whom are yet 
living. They are: Anna, Katie, Fannie, Emma, Charles and Edna. The fifth 
child, Franklin, is deceased. In politics Mr. Thomeier is a Democrat; he is a 
member of the City Council; is the owner of two houses and lots, and has 
made his own way in the world. 

TOTMAN & HEISERMAN, builders of fine light buggies. Park Avenue, 
Meadville, came from Ohio to this city in 1883, embarking in their present 
business, turning out only first-class work of the best material. Their busi- 
ness this year is double that of last year, and they now employ nine men. 
They have spent their time at their business since boyhood. The senior mem- 
ber of the firm, H. M. Totman, was born in Connecticut in 1853, and is a son 
of A. C. and Martha (Atkins) Totman, of English and Scotch ancestry, the father 
a jeweler by trade. He received his education and in 1868 graduated at East 
Bloomfield Academy, New York. As he has been engaged for sixteen years 
as a carriage trimmer, and during that time has worked in some of the largest 
carriage manufactories in America, his experience eminently qualifies him for 
his department of the work He was married in 1876 to Miss Belle Thomp- 
son, in Ohio. They have four children: Georgia, Norma, Juanita and Win- 
nie. They are members of the Presbyterian Church. In politics Mr. Totman 
is a Republican. W. E. Heiserman is a native of Stark County, Ohio, born 
July 17, 1852, and is a son of Gideon and Rebecca (Smith) Heiserman, of 
German descent, parents of seven children, of whom our subject is second. He 
was educated in Paris, Ohio; has most of his life worked at wood finishing on 
carriages, and is a master workman. He was married in Ohio, in 1881, to 
Miss Belle Miller. They have one daughter — Araminta. They are members 
of the English Lutheran Church. In politics he is a Republican. 

GEORGE D. TRAWIN, wholesale and retail dealer in dry goods, notions. 



772 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

etc., 904 and 906 Water Street, Meadville. As one of the most prominent 
industries and praisewortliy enterprises that have tended to develop the mer- 
cantile interests of Meadville, more than a passing reference is due to the 
mammoth establishment of George D. Trav?in, vyho may safely be said to be 
the best representative of the rising trade of the city. Mr. Trawin is a native 
of New Jersey, and previous to coming to Meadville was engaged in the dry 
goods business in Cleveland, Ohio, Cincinnati and other points. He has been 
connected with the business interests of this place for the past six years, and 
deservedly enjoys the confidence of the purchasing public of the city and sur- 
rounding country, as his experience, dating back some twenty years, and 
extensive facilities in every respect, good business qualities, together with 
personal attention to every department of his establishment, and discretion in 
the purchasing of goods, eminently qualify him to transact his flourishing 
business with satisfaction to all classes of the community; and it is a well 
known fact that the establishment is not operated in the interests of any one 
special class to the exclusion of any other class, but all alike are courteously 
attended by a staff of twenty to twenty-five courteous assistants. The house 
was originally established by W. H. Andrews in the year 1858, but has been 
under the proprietorship of Mr. Trawin since 1881, and since that date the 
business has attained its highest usefulness and secured its greatest patronage. 
The building occupied is 46 feet in width by 130 feet in depth, and is in all 
respects a central and noticeably flourishing institution. 

COL. C. "W. TYLER, attorney at law, Meadville, was born in Montrose, 
Susquehanna Co., Penn., March 6, 1838. His grandfather, Simeon Tyler, 
was of good New England stock, a native of Massachusetts. His grandmother 
was a Brewster, also of Massachusetts, and a descendant of the Puritan Brew- 
sters. His father, Simeon Tyler, Jr., was born in Connecticut, but moved 
with his father into Susquehanna when that county was a wilderness. His 
family consisted of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the 
youngest; only one other, a sister, is now living Col. Tyler was raised on a 
farm, and, in his early days, shared the privations incident to a new and par- 
tially developed country. At the early age of ten years he was apprenticed to 
learn the printer's trade, dividing his time for several years between the print- 
ing oflSce and the local academy, with an occasional summer on the farm. In 
the summer of 1855 he worked at his trade in Syracuse, N. Y. In January, 
1856, he attended New York Central College, at McGrawsville, Cortland Co., 
N. Y. In July of that year he left this institution for Homer, N. Y., in the 
same county, where he remained for nearly two years, attending a seminary 
which ranked high as an educational institution. During this time he taught 
school one winter in Dryden, Tompkins Co., N.' Y. From Homer he returned 
to Montrose, where, after working one season on a farm, he read law with Hon. 
F. B. Streeter, who was Solicitor of the Treasury under President Pierce. Col. 
Tyler was admitted to the bar in 1860. Being in poor health, early in 1861 
he visited Minnesota, returning to Montrose in the spring of 1862, much bene- 
fitted by his Western trip. In August of that year he assisted in raising a 
company of volunteers, of which he was elected Captain, and joined the One 
Hundred and Forty-first Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry at Harris- 
burg. He was with his regiment in the Army of the Potomac, participating 
in all the great battles of that heroic army from Second Bull Bun to just prior 
to the surrender at Appomattox. At Chancellorsville and in the wilderness he 
received slight wounds. At Gettysburg, July 2, 1863, he was severely wounded 
by a miuie ball through the right leg. Returning to his regiment in the 
following December, he was promoted to be Major, vice Maj. Spalding, who 



MEADVILLE. 773 

lost a leg at Gettysburg and who subsequently died. In June, 1864, he was 
promoted to be Lieutenant-Colonel of the regiment, vice Lieut. -Col. Watkine, 
killed on the 18th day of May, before Petersburg. About this time Madill, 
Colonel of the regiment, who for some time had been in command of a bri- 
gade, was promoted to be Brigadier-General, which entitled the subject of our 
sketch to a commission as a full Colonel, but owing to an unfortunate order of 
the Secretary of War, promotion was denied to officers whose regiments were 
below the minimum. In March, 1865, ill health compelled Col. Tyler to 
resign his commission, and he returned to Susquehanna County and engaged 
in the practice of law. At the request of Hon. W. H. Jessup, Assessor of 
Internal Revenue for that district. Col. Tyler was appointed one of the Assist- 
ant Assessors. Soon after Mr. Jessup was removed by President Johnson, and 
the position was tendered to Col. Tyler if he would become a supporter of the 
President in his conflict with his party. Col. Tyler declined to "Johnsonize," 
as it was called, and he was soon removed, to accommodate some one more 
pliant. In August, 1867, Col. Tyler removed to Meadville, entering into part- 
nership with R. Lyle White in the publication of the Meadville Republican. 
Two years later, disposing of his interest in the Republican, he purchased the 
Crawford Journal, which he conducted until 1872, when he retired from the 
printing business, and again embarked in the practice of law, in which pro- 
fession he is still engaged, being now associated with P. F. Hallock, Esq., 
under the firm name of Tyler & Hallock. In 1876 Col. Tyler was elected, as 
a Republican, to the Pennsylvania Legislature, serving during the years 1877 
and 1878. He was again elected in 1880 for a new term of two years. He 
was one of the "Independents" during the Senatorial contest in the Legisla- 
ture, which attracted the attention of the whole country. He was nominated 
for re-election in 1882, but defeated at the general election, owing to dissen- 
sions in the Republican party; although he received within twenty votes of the 
highest on his ticket. In the spring of 1883 the citizens of the First Ward of 
Meadville, without distinction of party, unanimously elected him to the City 
Council, of which he is still a member. He is one of the Trustees 
of the Meadville Theological School; a Past Master of Crawford Lodge, 
No. 234, A. Y. M., and a Past Grand of Crawford Lodge, No. 734, of 
the I. O. O. F., which Lodge he has at several times represented in the Grand 
Lodge of the State. Col. Tyler was married, March 14, 1864, to Lucy T. 
Warner, of Montrose, Penn. They have had four children, only two of whom 
are now living: Lizzie R., born in August, 1866, and Mabel, born in October, 
1868. 

ANDREW J. WALP, stoves and tinware, Meadville, was born in this 
city, July 10, 1840, and is the son of David and Elizabeth (Geller) Walp, the 
former a native of Pennsylvania, and early settler of this county, the latter a 
native of Germany. They had a family of seven children, of whom Andrew 
J. is the eldest. The family gi'ew up in Meadville, receiving their education 
in the common schools. Andrew J. chose the tinner's trade, which has been 
his occupation for twenty-seven years, an experience that places him at the 
head of his business. He was married in 1861 to Miss Mary P., daughter of 
Henry McCoy, a native of Meadville, and of Scotch -Irish descent. They had 
six children, of whom five survive. Their names are Carrie E. ; George, in 
his father's store; Addie; A. J. Jr., deceased; Frank and Willie at school. 
Mr. Walp is a Republican in politics; is a member of the K. of P., and is a 
Knight Templar. 

PHILIP P. WENZ, Justice of tbe Peace, Meadville, was born in Bavaria, 
Germany, January 15, 1845, and is t son of Philip Q. and Sarah (Kahler) 



774 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Wenz, natives of Germany, who came to America in 1858 and raised a family 
of four children, of whom Philip P. is the yonngest. He remained with his 
parents taking care of them in old age. His mother is still living at the 
advanced age of seventy-nine; his father passed away in 1884, in his eightieth 
year. They resided for many years in Meadville. Mr. Wenz was a candidate 
for Clerk of the Courts in 1881, and received a flattering vote, though defeated 
with the rest of the Democratic ticket, but the following spring was elected Jus- 
tice of the Peace by a large majority. He received his education partly in his 
native land and partly in Meadville Academy, and Bryant, Stratton & Smith's 
Commercial College, where he graduated with honor. Mr. Wenz followed the 
tailoring business in Meadville for many years, until he was elected Justice of 
the Peace. 

Peter Wenz, the eldest son of Philip G. and Sarah (Kahler) Wenz, and 
brother of the above named, was well known among the Christian people of 
Meadville about the years 1859 and 1860, as an educated young man, who 
resigned a lucrative position in the Bavarian Revenue Service, and came to 
Meadville in the former year and entered Allegheny College to prepare him- 
self for the missionary work. He died in 1860, before he was fully prepared 
to enter into that field of usefulness, loved and respected bv all. 

HENRY ERB WILSON, merchant and distiller. This gentleman takes 
high rank as one of the most successful business men of Meadville. He is a 
son of Samuel and Nancy (McDonald) Wilson, natives of Belfast, Ii-eland. 
In 1843 the father of our subject came over to America and located upon Gov- 
ernment land near Hamilton, Ontario, engaging at once in agriculture. At 
this date the present prosperous city of Hamilton contained a population not 
exceeding a dozen permanent citizens, and what are now center lots of the city 
could have been purchased at the rate of $4 per acre. Previous to his coming 
to America, Samuel Wilson had married and was the father of three children, 
and after three years of prosperity in the land of his adoption, he returned to 
the old country and brought over his family to the home he had prepared for 
them, and for more than forty years he has continued to reside and prosper 
upon the lands be originally took up. To the union of Samuel and Nancy 
Wilson were born six children: Mary Ann, married to Louis Mills, Esq., of 
Hamilton, Ontario; James, deceased; Lizzie C, residing with Henry E.; Mag- 
gie, married to John Anderson, Esq., of Hamilton, Ontario; Hugh, residing 
in Wentworth County, Ontario, and Henry E., who was born on his father's 
farm, June 2, 1853. Until twelve years of age he lived the usual life of a 
well-to-do, industrious fai'mer's son. He then went to reside with his brother- 
in-law, Louis Mills, with whom he remained three years, the greater part of 
the time being spent in attendance at an excellent literary academy. At fif- 
teen he was influenced by reports of oil operations to go to Oil City, Penn., 
and was inspired with an ambitious hope to acquire a fortune. He remained 
there nine years, serving in the capacity of clerk for various parties. In 1872 
and 1873 he visited the home of his parents. In the latter part of tdis year 
we find him employed as clerk in Meadville with Tracy Colt, in whosa service 
he continued four years. Here, on a borrowed capital of $150, he assumed 
the lease of the property, corner of Chestnut and Water Streets, known as the 
St. Cloud. At this writing he continues to occupy these premises, conducting 
thereat a general restaurant business, and in addition a railroad ticket broker- 
age office, he being a well-known member of the Ticket Brokers' Association of 
the United States. In January, 1882, our subject purchased the Peifier Dis- 
tillery, and is now engaged in the manufactui-e of that celebrated and popular 
brand of liquor made at that establishment. In May, 1882, he still added to 



MEADVILLE. 775 

his business interests by opening a wholesale liquor store on Chestnut Street, 
and becoming a heavy importer of the best foreign stock. By dealing always 
in reliable goods and paying strict and unremitting attention to the advance- 
ment of his commercial interests, Mr. Wilson has succeeded in thoroughly 
establishing himself as one of the solid business men of the city of Mead- 
ville. Mr. Wilson is an A. F. & A. M., a member of the I. 0. O. F., the K. of 
P. and Royal Arcanum. 

BEV. FRANZ WINTER, pastor of St. Agatha" s Church, Meadville, was 
bom October 11, 1840, in Haste, near Osnabruck, kingdom of Hanover. He 
attended the parish school from seven to fourteen years of age, and the Gym- 
nasium Carolinum at Osnabruck. In 1872 Mr. Winter came to America. For 
four years he attended St. Vincent College, near Latrobe, Westmoreland Co., 
Penn. He was ordained priest August 24, 1876, and served for a short time 
at Meadville, Penn. On September 24, 1876, he took charge of the newly 
erected St. Elizabeth Church at Corry, Penn., which was dedicated for divine 
worship that day. Since the end of October, 1883, our subject has been trans- 
ferred from Corry to St. Agatha's Church, Meadville. 

WILLIAM M. WOODRUFF, insurance agent, Meadville, was born May 
30, 1843, in Portage County, Ohio, and is a son of Chauncey and Paulina 
(Bray) Woodruff, natives of Connecticut, and of English and Scotch descent. 
His father died in 1851, and his mother lived to be eighty-six years of age. 
Our subject is the youngest of a family of eleven children, and at the age of 
eighteen he learned telegraphy, which he followed until 1872. Since then he 
has been in the employment of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New 
York, and is now district agent. He was married December 25, 1866, to 
Jessie Wood, and they have three children: William B. , Frank M. and Harry 
P. Mr. and Mrs. Woodruff are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
of which for several years he has been Steward and Trustee, and for seven 
years Treasurer. 

C. M. YATES, M. D., Meadville, was born January 2, 1804, at German- 
town, a suburb of Philadelphia, son of John and Mary (Riter) Yates, former a 
native of London, England, and formerly a shipping merchant of Philadel- 
phia; latter a native of Trenton, N. J. Our subject was left an orphan at the 
age of about eight years, and his father's estate permitting him to receive a 
thorough education he was placed under the charge of Rev. Francis A. Luther, 
a private instructor, with whom he remained several years, and from his tuition 
he entered Garrison Academy, near Baltimore, Md., where he completed his 
literary education. When eighteen years of age he then studied under Prof. 
Samuel Baker, of that city, finishing his medical education at the University 
of Maryland in 1825. The Doctor then immediately commenced the practice 
of his profession, locating at Meadville, Penn., where he continued in active 
and successful practice for forty years, and then retired. Our subject was 
united in marriage in 1826 with Maria A., sister of James B. Buchanan, and 
to this union were born five children, one now surviving — Mary Dunham. The 
Doctor was again married about 1850, on this occasion to Clara, daughter of 
Dr. Chamberlain, of this county. By this union were seven children, six now 
living, viz.: William M. , married to Margaret Spade, of Meadville, Penn. 
(have one child, Dora Clara; they live in Meadville); Anna, wife of D. P. 
McClintock, a native of Ireland (have four children: Clara, Marie, Charles 
and an infant daughter; they reside in New York City); Albert; Emma, wife 
of Arthur Greenes (have two children; they reside in Minnesota) ; rraDk,mac- 
ried to Ella Ewing, a native of this county (have one child, Ray); and Jennie. 
Dr. Yates is the only surviving member of the original chartered lodge of 



776 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Meadville F. & A. M. , which may be regarded the parent lodge of that fra- 
ternity for all northwestern Pennsylvania. 

JOHN W. ZONE, liveryman, Meadville, was born in Woodcock Township, 
this county, February 15, 1829, and is a son of Peter and Catharine (Swartz) 
Zone, natives of Lehigh County, Penn., and of Pennsylvania-German origin. 
His father was a laborer, and came to Woodcock Township in 1827, owning 
there a farm, which he continued to work until his decease in 1883. He raised 
a family of two sons and two daughters, John W. being the eldest in the fam- 
ily. The mother was twice married, and was a widow when she married Mr. 
Zone. Our subject was reared on the farm until his twentieth year, when he 
worked by the month for a time, then came to Meadville, where he followed 
teaming and draying for fifteen years. He then went into the livery business, 
which he has carried on most of the time since. He was married in 1854 to 
Eliza, daughter of Daniel Shartle, and of German descent. They have four 
children, two now living: Frank H., in the livery business, married, and 
Emma May, at home. Mrs. Zone is a member of the German Reformed 
Church, Mr. Zone of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a member of 
the A. O. U. W. and K. of P. ; in politics a Eepublican. 



ATHENS TOWNSHIP. 



CHARLES F. ADAMS, deceased, was born in Susquehanna County, 
Penn., April 2, 1816, son ■ of Asa and Sibyl Adams. While teaching 
school in Hayfield Township, this county, our subject became acquainted 
with Miss Eveline Lefevre, whom he married June 6, 1844. She was born 
May 20, 1820, daughter of the pioneers, Adam and Mary Lefevre. To this 
union were born the following children: Adella L., deceased; Emma M., 
deceased at eighteen years of age; Charles J., deceased, and Edwin P., an 
express agent at Halstead, Kan. After living on a farm for a few years after 
their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Adams moved to Meadville, Penn., in 1848, 
where our subject was elected Sheriff of Crawford County, creditably discharg- 
ing the duties of same. At the expiration of his term of office Mr. Adams car- 
ried on a general merchandising store for about sixteen years at Conneautville. 
In 1871 Mr. Adams was elected Jury Commissioner, and was then re-elected, 
which term expired in fall of 1872. They then lived for some years on a farm 
near Meadville, and in 1877 went to Sterling, Rice Co., Kan. There Mr. 
Adams, who was a useful and influential citizen, died July 8, 1881. His 
remains are buried at Conneautville, this county. His widow now resides in 
her native township, enjoying the comforts of a serene and peaceful old age. 

FRANKLIN ADAMS^ farmer, P. O. Riceville, was bom July 28, 1832, in 
Susquehanna County, Penn., sou of Asa and Sibyl Adams, who came to this 
county about 1836, locating in Athens Township in 1837. The former died 
February 16, 1862, aged seventy-seven years; the latter died May 29, 1858. 
Here our subject grew up, enduring the hardships that fell to the lot of a 
pioneer's son. He married, January 2, 1854, Ruth A. Parker, born in Catta- 
raugus (vounty, N. Y., February 23, 1832, daughter of Thomas and Mary Parker. 
When eighteen years old she came to this county with her parents, from Chau- 
tauqua County, N. Y. Our subject and wife settled in this township after 
their^ marriage, chiefly devoting themselves to farming. They have acquired a 



ATHENS TOWNSHIP. 777 

comfortable home, having purchased, in 1874, the old Clement's farm, where 
they now live. They have one son — Thomas Eugene — who married Viola Hall. 
They reside near Grand Valley, Warren Co., Penn., and have a family of four 
children: Jasper 0., George M., Mattie B. and William F. Mrs. Franklin 
Adams is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Oar sub- 
ject is an A. F. & A. M., and a member of the K. of H. He is a stanch Repub- 
lican; a man of much influence in the community. 

WILLIAM G. ASH, farmer, P. O. Riceville, was born March 31, 1852, in 
Cuasewago Township, this county, son of Jonas and Sarah Ash. He was reared 
on his father's farm, aci^uiring his education in the district schools. He mar- 
ried, April 29, 1873, Rebecca E. Colter, born in Venango Township, August 7, 
1852, daughter of John and Phebe (Scott) Colter, who were also natives of 
Venango Township. By this union were born two children: Mina M. and 
Ray M After their marriage our subject and wife lived in Venango Town- 
ship three years, locating, in 1876, on their present farm, which consists of 
100 acres of land. Mrs. Ash is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Mr. Ash is an energetic and successful young farmer, and is winning the 
esteem of the whole community. In politics he supports the Republican 
party. 

JOHN G. ASH, farmer, P. 0. Riceville, was born October 19, 1853, in 
Cussewago Township, this county, and is the son of Jonas and Sarah Ash, who 
were among the pioneers of that township. Our subject was brought up on 
his father's farm, and received his education in the schools of the home dis- 
trict. He was united in marriage November 18, 1873, with Alvira Brace, 
daughter of Josiah and Mary Ann Brace, of Hayfield Township, this county. 
They came to Athens Township the next year and purchased the farm they 
now occupy, comprising 100 acres of well improved land. Their children are 
Florence May and Everett DeForest. Mr. Ash has always been a Republican. 
He is an industrious, enterprising young farmer respected by all. 

JAMES BIDWELL, proprietor of saw-mill, Little Cooley, was bom 
in this township May 3, 1838; son of Cyrus and Elizabeth Bidwell, the former 
of whom, when a lad, came to this county with his father, Russell Bidwell, 
and July 4, 1837, married Elizabeth Smith, daughter of George Smith, of 
Blooming Valley, and settled in Athens Township. They were parents of the 
following children: James, Mrs. Mary Ann Higby, Lewis, Oscar, Loren, Benton, 
Albert, Emma (died May 1, 1872), Rebecca and Darwin C. Cyrus Bidwell 
departed this life December 12, 1882. Our subject, the oldest son of these 
early pioneers, spent his boyhood days engaged mainly in performing the 
duties that fell to the lot of a farmer's boy in those early times, and attended 
the district schools. In 1872 he purchased the saw-mill on Muddy Creek, 
formerly owned by Thomas Smith. He had previously bought a farm and 
engaged in farming on his own account. Mr. Bidwell is an upright, reliable 
business man. He still carries on the mill, engaging in farming through the 
summers. He has ever been a Democrat, inheriting his principles from past 
generations. 

HARRISON H. BOYLE, farmer, P. 0. Centreville, was born in Tompkins 
County, N. Y., October 19, 1821; son of Jesse and Sarah (Kelley) Boyle, wlio, 
after a four years' residence in Allegany County, N. Y», came to this county 
in 1837, and here lived a few years in Meadville and Randolph townships 
before they settled permanently in Spring Township, about 1843, where they 
died. The children born to this couple are: Mrs S. M. Hamilton, Harrison 
H., Jonas, Lucy (now Mrs. A. Sperry), Charles S., George, LaFayette, D wight, 
Mary (now Mrs. Page, of Dorset, Ohio), and Arvilla (now Mrs. Doty, of 



778 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

McPherson County, Kan.). Our subject, after traveling some years, during 
which time he visited most of the States in the Union, married, February 25, 
1847, Sarah M. Corell, born in Livingston Co., N. T., March 21, 1830, 
daughter of James and Mnrilla Corell, of Athens. By this union are the fol- 
lovying children: Wellington, married to Ella Brand; Fayette, married to 
Eva Cory; Bruce E. and Nellie. Mr. and Mrs. Boyle are members of the 
Congregational Church, and are ardent friends of the cause of education, 
giving their children both literary and musical advantages. They settled after 
their marriage on their present farm (now a part of C^ntreville Borough), to 
which they have added until it now comprises some 330 acres. Their house 
being burned in 1872, they replaced it by their present handsome residence. 
Mr. Boyle is a man of sterling character, and is a useful citizen. 

LEANDER AARON CONNER, farmer, P. O. Riceville, was born in 1834 
in Chautauqua County, N. Y.; son of James and Nancy (Correll) Conner, 
natives of Ulster County, N. Y. , and Lancaster County, Penn., respectively, 
and who, after living in Chautauqua County, N. Y., several years, came to this 
county, settling in Athens Township in 1842. They were parents of the fol- 
lowing children: Henry, in Chautauqua County, N. Y. ; William; James F. ; 
Abel and Wiafield in Michigan; Mrs. Roxana Yarrington, of Iowa; and L. 
Aaron, besides four deceased. Mrs. Conner departed this life March 17, 1881, 
Mr. Conner following her June 6, 1883. They were an upright, gioneer peo- 
ple of the strictest honor. Our subject grew to manhood, sharing the many 
disadvantages common to the sons of the early settlers, improving, to the best 
of his ability, the limited educational opportunities afforded him. He spent 
six years, while a young man, traveling over the various States in the North- 
west, and returned in 1858. In 1861 he married Julia B. Goldfinch, born at 
Elizabeth, N. J., in 1843, daughter of William and Christiana Goldfinch, of 
Folkestone, England. They then settled down on the old homestead, com- 
prising seventy-five acres of well- improved land, taking oare of Mr. Conner's 
parents until their decease. They have one son — Leon A. Both are firm 
adherents of the Baptist faith and enthusiastic advocates af the temperance 
cause. Mr. Conner, a carpenter and joiner by trade, as was his father before 
him, is a skillful mechanic. 

ISAAC W. CUMIVONGS, farmer, P. O. Lincolnville, a native of Massa- 
chusetts, was born June 28, 1811. His parents. Dr. Nathan and Phebe (Max- 
well) Cummings, started to come to this county in 1812, but owing to the war 
remained in New Y'^ork State until 1815, when they came to and settled in 
Cambridgeboro, Penn. Dr. Cummings was the first physician in Cambridge 
Township, for many years bravely enduring alone all the hardships of a pio- 
neer practitioner, and ended a useful life highly respected by all who knew him. 
He was the parent of twelve children. Our subject, the ninth in the family, 
was married August 23, 1833, to Louisa Swift, of Woodcock Township, this 
county. By this union were the following children: Linns Serrel, in Michi- 
gan; Mrs. Bede J. Skelton (deceased); Isaac D. (deceased); William D. 
(deceased); Dean, in Richmond Township, this county; Mrs. Eunice A. Faulk- 
enberg; Mrs. Mary S. Nodine (deceased); Curtis C, in Woodcock Township, 
this county; Isaac W.; Mrs. Phebe L. Hume; and Mrs. Susan S. Pinney. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cummings, after spending several years each in Richmond, Wood- 
cock, Venango and Bloomfield Townships, finally settled in 1880 on their pres- 
ent farm in Athens Township. Mr. Cummings has followed lumbering quite 
extensively. About 1853 he was engaged in mercantile business for two years 
in Richmond Township in partnership with James LefiSngwell; was also in 
same business about 1858-59 in Venango Township along with Erastus 0. 



ATHENS TOWNSHIP. 779 

Beach Previously he operated a saw-mill for two years in Sparta Township. 
He is a Democrat politically; was twice elected Justice of the Peace, and has 
filled various other township offices with credit to himself and to the satisfac- 
tion of the people. 

M. DOBBS, SR., farmer, P. O. Lincolnville, was born in Canada, March 
18, 1787, son of Michael Dobbs, a soldier in the Revolutionary war who bore 
many scars received in its hard-fought battles, and grandson of Michae] 
Dobbs, a native of England. Our subject moved to the State of Vermont dur- 
ing the war of 1812, coming to this county about 1830. Here he married 
Mary Phelps, who was then but sixteen years of age. By this union were born 
six children — three boys and three girls — Michael Jr., Andrew Jackson, Samuel 
E., Elner, Mary and Betsy. Mr. and Mrs. Dobba are still living and enjoy- 
ing the respect of the community. 

ALONZO DRAKE, farmer, P. O. Little Cooley, was born in (ienesee 
County, N. Y., March 4, 1819; son of James and Sallie Drake, who came to 
this township in 1831. Our subject came here with his parents, and was 
brought up on his father's farm, enjoying the limited educational advantages 
of those early days. He married, November 5, 1846, Sophronia Wilford, born 
in Genesee County, N. Y., June 26, 1825, and came to this county in 1843, 
with her parents, Jeremiah and Clara Wilford. Mr. and Mrs. Drake settled 
on the old homestead in this township, comprising seventy -five acres of well- 
improved land, where they still reside. The children born to this uoion are — 
Leroy W., married to Caroline Smith, living on an adjoining farm; Stanley, 
married to Effie Rondebush, teaching in Titusville Commercial College; Clara 
M. ; and J. Clifton. Mr. Drake has ever been a Republican. He takes a deep 
interest in the public affairs of his township; has satisfactorily filled various 
of its offices and has served fourteen years as School Director. He has always 
led a life of justice and morality; is independent in his religious views, and is 
one of the most useful and influential citizens of Athens Township. 

LEVANT J. DRAKE, bridge-builder and Postmaster, Little Cooley, was. 
born in Allegany County, N. Y., March 23, 1828; son of James and Sallie, 
(Marvin) Drake, natives respectively of Seneca and Otsego Counties, N. Y., and 
who moved to this county from Genesee County, settling in Athens Township 
in 1831. They were parents of the following children: Alonzo; Melissa, after- 
ward Mrs. Chapin and now deceased; Levant J.; Dorluskie, now Mrs. Archi- 
bald; Loduskie, now Mrs. Minniss; Legrand M. ; Jerome; Amanda, now Mrs. 
Graham; and Philo. Mr. Drake took an active interest in public affairs, fill- 
ing many of the township offices; he died in February, 1876, his widow fol- 
lowing him in October of the same year. They were upright pioneer people 
and rendered valuable service in the development of Athens Township. Our 
subject married October 19, 1854, Adelia Fuller, born in 1835, in Lorain 
County, Ohio, daughter of Josiah E. (deceased), and Mary Fuller. By this 
union were born Alta, now Mrs. Harter; Alton P.; Amanda E., died Febru- 
ary, 1882, aged twenty-one; Willie H. ; Lyle L., deceased; Jessie, deceased; 
Birnez, deceased; Inez; and Ethel. Mr. Drake built the first permanent hotel 
at Little Cooley, opening it in 1857. It has been one of the most popular 
houses in western Pennsylvania In 1883 he leased the hotel and retired from 
business. In 1861 Mr. Drake was appointed Postmaster at Little Cooley, 
which position he has filled almost ever since. He is a man of strict integrity, 
upright in his dealings and has tilled nearly all the township offices. In pvol- 
itics is a Republican. 

PHILO DRAKE, farmer, P. 0. Little Cooley, was born in Athens Town- 
ship, this county, May I, 1842; son of James and Sallie (Marvin) Drake. He 



780 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

married July 2, 1868, Adeline E. Hawkins. To this union were born the fol- 
lowing children: Algenia, James and Friend W. Mr. Drake now occupies the 
old homestead of the family and has a farm of 165 acres of land. He is a 
reliable business man, holding independent' views in politics, and is a citizen 
of much influence and usefulness in the community. 

EBENEZER FELTON, deceased, came to Meadville, Penn., about 1805, 
adopting the profession of surveyor. In 1829 he bought land and cleared one 
of the first farms in Athens Township, this county, and, with James Drake, 
built and operated the first saw-mill, grist-mill and carding-machine in this 
township. Mr. Felton at one time was supposed to own 9,000 acres of real 
estate in this and adjoining counties. He established the fortunes of many of 
the early pioneers by allowing them to work for him and giving them land 
in exchange for their services. He was of a too generous disposition and oth- 
ers over-reached him in business transactions until he had finally to relinquish 
all his immense estate. He held various local offices, having been County 
Surveyor for twenty-five years. He never married. He died about 1850, at 
the residence of Eliva Barton, Meadville. Mr. Felton rendered invaluable 
services in developing Athens and surrounding portions of this county, and it 
is but just that his memory be preserved and that his name should go down to 
posterity. 

GEORGE FLEEK, JR. (deceased) was born at Blooming Valley, this 
county, October 27, 1837, son of George Fleek, Sr. He married January 1, 
1863, Ellen A. Woodside, born March 4, 1839, in Washington Township, Erie 
Co., Penn,, daughter of John and Polly Woodside, of Washington Township, 
Erie Co., Penn., of which they were early settlers. Mrs. Woodside now 
resides in Rockdale Township, this county, aged seventy- eight. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fleek, after their marriage, located in Little Cooley, where he established a 
general merchandise business, and as he was a man of good business habits, 
he prospered and soon after opened a branch store at Miller's Station. He also 
dealt largely in real estate and became possessor of several extensive farms in 
this township. To Mr. and Mrs. Fleek were born Mrs. Mary E. Southworili, 
Mrs. Georgia M. Drake and Bernice A. Mr. Fleek, on January 18, 1879, was 
hurt by a falling tree while engaged in lumbering, and died from the efiects of 
his injuries on the Wednesday following, January 22, in the forty-second year 
of his age. He was a kind husband and father, and an esteemed citizen. His 
widow, who has devoted herself to the interests of her family, giving them 
good advantages for musical and literary culture, is now residing on the pleas- 
ant homestead in Little Cooley, and is respected by the whole community. 

JAMES C. GRAHAM, farmer and stock-dealer, P. O. Little Cooley, was 
born February 22, 1840, in Centreville, this county; son of Samuel Graham, 
born in Philadelphia, Penn., who came to Linesville, this county, in 1808 with 
his father, James Graham. They were of famous Scotch-Irish descent. Sam- 
uel Graham married Miss Hester Campbell April 15, 1820, at Warren, Penn. 
She was a descendant of an intelligent and influential family of Ithica, N. Y. , 
who were noted for their valuable services in the cause of education. They 
settled in Centreville, this county, where Mr. Graham died October 18, 1841, 
leaving five children: Mrs. Mary Thomas, De Witt C, Mrs. Harriet A. Parker, 
John C. and James C. Mrs. Graham afterward married Samuel Symmonds, of 
Athens Township, this county, who died December 30, 1871. She now lives 
with her son, James C. Our subject attended the schools of Athens Township 
and a select school at Spartansburg till 1858. He then engaged in teaching, 
and obtained means to attend Waterford Academy two years. At the call of 
the Governor he enlisted with the emergency men for the defense of the State 



ATHENS TOWNSHIP. 781 

in 1883. Returning home he entered upon a olussical course in Allegheny 
College, Meadville, teaching between terms, and graduated with the degree of 
A. B. June 23, 1870. The college conferred the degree A. M. upon him in 
1873. After serving as Principal of the acadamies at Linesville and Townville 
one year each, he was elected Superintendent of Public Schools of Crawford 
County, Penn., for the regular term of three years, on the first ballot. May 7, 
1872, and was re-elected in 1875. He advocated many useful measures, among 
which were a graded course for common schools, and a change of the annual 
term. He tilled the position with distinguished ability and retired with a 
highly honorable record. He then served two years as Principal of the union 
schools of Mercer, Penn. , after which he retired to the farm and is now chief- 
ly engaged in the rearing of stock and in its traffic. At the session of the State 
Teachers' Association held at Erie in 1877, he was elected a member of the 
Executive Committee, holding the position for that year. Mr. Graham has 
been engaged at intervals reading law under Hon. A. B. Richmond, of Mead- 
ville, and is now completing his studies with a view to practice. 

ERASTUS W. HALL, farmer, P. O. Centreville, was born in Susquehanna 
County, Penn., April 8, 1828; son of Harmon and Prudence Hall, who came 
to this township in 1837. Here they cleared a farm and reared their children, 
six of whom are now living in this and Erie Counties. Our subject, who was 
brought up on his father's farm, was married June 80, 1849, to Harriet Ship- 
man, by whom he has the following children: Mrs. Rose Hart, Mrs. Freelove 
Obert, Orrin E., Mrs. Viola Adams, Mrs. Lizzie Rogers, Frank and Harry. 
Mr. Hall enlisted during the late war, April, 1864, in the Twelfth Regiment 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, served under Sheridan in the Virginia cam- 
paigns, and received an honorable discharge July, 1865. On his return he 
resumed farming, and by industry has acquired a comfortable home. He has 
taken a prominent part in the public afifairs of his township, tilling nearly all 
of its offices; he served as School Director nine years in all. Politically he is 
a stanch Republican. 

HENRY HATCH, retired farmer, P. O. Centreville, was born April 30, 
1803, in Whitehall, Washington Co.. N. Y., where his parents, Elisha and 
Rebecca Hatch, both died. He came to this county in February, 1824, and 
settled in Athens Township in the following November. He married Mrs. 
Annie Thomas, in June, 1826, and by this union had the following children: 
Mrs. Chloe Post, Mrs. Caroline Adams and Solon. ' Mr. Hatch has been living 
on his present farm since 1827. He lost his wife by death April 12, 1872. 
She was a faithful, devoted wife and a kind mother. Her loss was mourned 
by a large circle of friends. Our subject was a Democrat until the Kansas 
controversy, and has supported the Republican party since its organization. 
He has led a temperate, upright life, and has always been just in his dealings 
with his fellow-men. He is now enjoying a calm and peaceful old age, living 
in the same house with his son, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Mr. 
Hatch is one of the heroic pioneer citizens whose indomitable energy con- 
quered the perils of the wilderness and whose memory will be preserved by 
posterity. 

SOLON HATCH, farmer, P. O. Centreville, son of Henry Hatch, whose 
biography appears above, was born February 9, 1831, in Athens Township, 
this county. Here he grew up, sufifering all the disadvantages comtoon to the 
lot of a pioneer boy, acquiring his education largely by private study and a 
course of reading. He was married November 3, 1861, to Louisa Gray, born 
January 1, 1846, daughter of John and Emilie Gray. To this union were 
born the following children, viz. : Mrs. Nellie Fosburgh, Mary Anna and Henry 



782 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Leroy. In March, 1864, Mr. Hatch enlisted in the Twelfth Regiment Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Cavalry, serving principally with Sheridan in the Virginia 
campaign. He participated in a number of severe engagements and was hon- 
orably discharged July 28, 1865. On his return he settled down to the life 
of a farmer. He has held most of the township offices, serving with credit to 
himself and giving satisfaction to the community. He is a friend of the cause 
of education. A member of the G. A. R. In politics he is a Republican. 

JOHN A. HIMEBAUGH, merchant, Centreville, was born June 11, 1829, 
in SaegertowD, this county; son of the pioneer, Jacob Himebaugh. He was 
married May 10, 1859, to Barbara Jane Campbell, born in Venango Town- 
ship, this county, July 22, 1832, daughter of Thomas and Lydia (Siverling) 
Campbell, the former of whom, also a native of Venango Township, was a son 
of Thomas Campbell, Sr., who came from Westmoreland County, Penn., and 
settled in that township in very early times. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell had two 
children — John H. and Barbara Jane. Mr. Campbell died in 1835, his widow 
February 24, 1882. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Himebaugh lived in 
Venango Township until 1869, when they came to this township. They are 
now residing on the third farm they have owned here (on which they settled 
March, 1867,) comprising 200 acres of well-improved land. They have reared 
an intelligent family of six children: Thomas C, who studied law in the office 
of Curtis & Norton, in Erie, Penn. , and was admitted to the bar at that place in 
1880; William C, who graduated from Bellevue College with degree of M. 
D. ; Jacob C, proprietor of lumber mill at Centreville, married to Mary Mo- 
rau; Jennie; Anna; and Fred. For several years Mr. Himebaugh has been 
engaged in merchandising in Coleville and Aiken, in McKean County, Penn., 
and is now established in JDUsiness at Clarendon, Warren Co., Penn.. leaving 
the family to carry on the farm. He is a member of the K. of H. Mrs. 
Himebaugh is an adherent of the Congregational Church. 

SQUIRE HUGH T. HUTCHISON, farmer, P. O. Little Cooley, was born 
January 30, 1836, in Athens Township, this county; son of Joseph Hutchison, 
who came from Northumberland County, Penn., with his father, Elder Hutch- 
ison, in very early times, and married Florence Thompson, of Columbiana 
County, Ohio, by whom he had seven children. Joseph Hutchison died in 
1854, and om- subject being the second child and eldest son of the family, 
assumed all the cares and responsibility of the same. He was educated at the 
district schools and married October 5, 1870, Helen M. , daughter of Asahel 
and Rosina Hamilton, of Rockdale Township. They settled on the old fami 
ly homestead, comprising 140 acres of Hcely improved land, which for a half 
century has been held by this family, descending from father to son and then 
to grandson. Squire Hutchison is a Democrat, politically. He has been very 
active in public affairs, satisfactorily tilling nearly every office in the town- 
ship, and for ten years acted as Justice of the Peace, with credit to himself 
and satisfaction to the people. 

LEWIS C. JAMESON, farmer, P. O. Centreville, was born in Susquehan- 
na County, Penn., 1832; son of Peter and Sophia (Cripps) Jameson, natives of 
England, who soon after marriage emigrated to America, settling in Pennsyl- 
vania. Our subject was brought up on his father's farm and received his edu- 
cation at the district schools. He was united in marriage, in 1853, with Per- 
melia E. Kelley, a native of same county. In 1859 they came to this county, 
where they have since resided. They have a comfortable home, comprising 
fifty-five acres of well-improved land, acquired by industry and good manage- 
ment. Mrs. Jameson is a consistent member of the Baptist Church. Oursubject 
is an energetic and successful farmer, and a useful citizen. In politics he is a 
Republican. 



ATHENS TOWNSHIP. 783 

PHILANDER LANGDON, farmer, P. O. GenterviJIe, was born October 
27, 1821, at Phelps, Ontario Co., N. Y., son of James and Joanna Langdon, 
who moved to Chautauqua County, N. Y. , when Philander was seven years 
of age, living there until 1841, when they came to Spring Township, this 
county, where Mrs. Langdon died in April, 1863, and Mr. Langdon in May, 
1870. The subject of this sketch was married November 12, 1843, to Jane 
Doty, born November 12, 1826, in Allegany County, N. Y., daughter of Hi- 
ram and Abigail Doty, who settled in Spring Township, this county, when she 
was about five years old. The children born to this union are: Mrs. Abbie Vance, 
Mrs. Harriet Howard, Mrs. Sadie Dearmant, J. Franklin, Mrs. Addie Fish, 
W. Grant, and Eva (all now living), and five deceased, viz.: George W., Mrs. 
Helen Marsh, Mrs. Jeanette Merrill, Harlow C. and Viola. Mr. Langdon enlist- 
ed December 29, 1861, in Company H, One Hundred and Eleventh Regiment 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving in the Armies of Virginia and of the 
Potomac until April, 1863, when he received severe wounds in the battle of 
Chancellorsville. He was honorably discharged December 29, 1864. Mr. 
and Mrs. Langdon moved to their place on Oil Creek, this township, in 1868, 
and have here a fertile farm of seventy acres. Our subject is a member of 
the G. A. R. In {)oliticB he is a Republican. 

CAPT. MATTHEW MERCHANT, farmer, P. O. Riceville, was born in 
this township, October 20, 1842; son of Luther and Margaret Merchant, who 
came from Allegheny County, N. Y. , to this county, in 1830, and began devel- 
oping their farm from the wilderness. They were parents of — Andalusia, who 
died here, aged seventeen; Luther, who died in Illinois; Alvin E., residing at 
Riceville, Penn. ; and Matthew. The father of our subject, by a former mar- 
riage had three children, one of whom, Susan, now Mrs. Bartlett, resides in 
Riceville. He died in 1865, his widow surviving him until 1880. The sub- 
ject of this sketch enlisted July 1, 1S61. and served three years in the Tenth 
Pennsylvania Reserves; then re-enlisted in the One Hundred and Ninety-first 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving with distinction till the close of 
the war. He participated in over twenty of the memorable battles fought by 
the Army of the Potomac, of which his regiment formed a part, and received 
several slight wounds. On October 8, 1864, while in temporary command of 
the One Hundred and Ninety -first Regiment in front of Petersburg, he was 
severly wounded by a shell, having his horse killed under him, and he still 
suflers from the effects of the wound. Capt. Matthew Merchant was a brave 
soldier; enlisting as a private he came home Captain of his company. He was 
married November, 1865, to Anna Weller, by whom he has had the following 
children: Slater M. ; Mertie, deceased; Reuben D. ; and Irvie. He now resides 
on a part of the homestead farm. From 1867 to 1870 he engaged in mercan- 
tile business at Lincolnville. He takes an active part in the public affairs of 
his township, having held most of its offices; is now serving as School Direct- 
or and Assessor of Athens Township. In politics he is a Republican. 

HENRY L. MINIUM, druggist, Little Cooley, was born in Cambridge 
Township, this county, February 28, 1851; son of Jacob and Susan (Saeger) 
Minium, the former of whom died recently; the latter still lives in Venango 
Borough, this county. Our subject was reared on his father's farm, acquiring 
his education at the district schools. When eighteen years old he engaged 
with the Atlantic & Great Western Railroad Company (now the New York, 
Pennsylvania & Ohio), and while in their employ, by an unfortunate accident, 
he lost his left arm. He then obtained the position of agent and telegrapher 
for same road, at their office. Mill Village, Erie Co., Penn., and there he 
remained till the spring of 1883, when he resigned to accept the office of 



784 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Appraiser of Merchandise, Erie County. May 28, 1883, he purchased the 
only drug store in Little Cooley and is doing a prosperous business. He was 
married September 22, 1875, to Amanda F. Sherrod, of Mill Village. Mr. 
Minium is an enterprising young man of good business ability, respected by 
all. 

JAMES DONALD IHnNNISS, farmer and attorney at law, P. O. Taylor's 
Stand, was born October 17, 1826, in Meadville, Penn. ; son of John and Sarah 
Ann (Scowden) Minnies, natives of Susquehanna County, Penn., and who 
were early settlers of this county. John Slinniss died about 1828, and his 
widow subsequently married Dr. Silas Taylor. She died November 15, 1883, 
in the ninety-second year of her age. Our subject has lived at his present 
home at Taylor's Stand since he was ten years of age. He married January 7, 
1843, Miss Loduskie Drake, a native of Batavia, N. Y., born December 25, 
1828, daughter of James and Sally Drake. Five children were the result of 
this union, viz.: Josephine, now Mrs. Chapman; Edna J., now Mrs. Wright j 
William Fulcher; Ernest J. and Gertrude G. Mr. Minniss takes a deep inter- 
est in the cause of education, and has given his family first-class advantages. 
At the February term of court, 1859, he was admitted to the bar of Crawford 
County, having held the ofiSce of Justice of the Peace for two terms previous- 
ly. He has since divided his time between his profession and his farm. Mr. 
Minniss in politics, is a Republican. 

JAMES H. ONGLEY, farmer, P. O. Little Cooley, was born at Newfield, 
N. Y., January 20, 1844:, and came to this county with his father, John T. 
Ongley, in 1857, and to Athens Township in 1864. He married. May 8, 1864, 
Maria H. Pratt, born August 8, 1847, in Richmond Township, this county, 
daughter of David and Lydia Pratt. They immediately settled on the farm 
they now occupy, which they have cleared, improved and made into a comfort- 
able home by their own labors. They are interested in the cause of educa- 
tion, giving good advantages to their children, whose names are: Orlando T. , 
Archie B., Elva M. and Bertha A. Mr. Ongley is an industrious, reliable 
farmer; a Republican in politics. Both he and his wife are pious members of 
the Second Advent Church. 

JOSHUA POST, farmer, P. O. Centreville, was born February 22, 
1818, in Washington County, N. Y. He came to this county in 1830, 
with his parents, Samuel and Mary Post, who, after living a short time in 
Sparta and Rome Townships, settled in this township, where they cleared 
their farm and raised their family. They were parents of the following 
children: Stephen (deceased), Warren (deceased), Ezra (deceased), Joshua, 
Leonard, in Niagara County, New York, Samuel, Mary (deceased), Harvey, 
Mrs. Prudence Yarrington, in Iowa. Mi-s. Post died May 20, 1847; Mr. Post 
died May 24, 1865. They were industrious, upright people, enjoying the 
respect of all who knew them. Our subject was married February 26, 1843, to 
Matilda Adams, born in Susquehanna County, Penn., in 1822. She came 
here in the winter of 1836-37 with her pai-ents, Asa and Sibyl Adams. By 
this union were born Mrs. Emma I. Fish, Mrs. Hattie V. Hall, and eight 
others, most of whom died in early childhood. After their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Post settled down in Athens Township. They have here a fine farm of 
eighty acres of well-improved land. Mrs. Post is a member of the Congrega- 
tional Church. Mr. Post is a Democrat in principles, but supports the best 
men. 

OTIS S. RICE, merchant. Little Cooley, was born in Athens Township, 
adjoining Riceville, this county, January 18, 1851; son of Stephen and Clar- 
issa (FoUett) Rice. The former, a son of the pioneer, Samuel Rice, died 



ATHENS TOWNSHIP. 785 

June, 1871; the latter now resides in Rieeville. Our subject was married 
December 22, 1870, to Lucy D. Luce, born in Warren County, Penn., April 15, 
1850, daughter of Shubael N. and Malinda Luce. By this union there is one 
son, Henry Melvin. Mr. Rice, in November, 1879, established in Little 
Cooley a dry goods, grocery and general merchandising business. His store 
occupies two large rooms. By thorough business principles and courtesy to 
his customers he has built up a prosperous trade. He is a member of the 
K. of H. 

JAMES W. RICHARDS, farmer, P. O. Little Cooley, was born in 1830, 
in Vernon Township, this county; son of James Richards, who came from 
Ireland to this county in 1800, settling at Meadville, where he did some of 
the first work on the old Mercer pike. He married Ann Hutchison, a native 
of Susquehanna County, Penn., and seven of his children live in this county. 
He died in September, 1874. His widow is residing on the old homestead in 
Vernon Township. Our subject was raised on his father's farm, and attended 
the district schools. In 1855 he bought his farm in Athens Township; three 
years later he married Elizabeth, daughter of Michael Coy, of Blooming Val- 
ley. Mr. and Mrs. Richards have lived on this farm ever since. Both are 
firm believers in Christianity, and are liberal supporters of the church. Our 
subject is a man of strict integrity, wielding much inlluence for good in the 
community. He has ever been a Democrat in politics. 

JOHN ROOT, farmer, P. O. Lincolnville, was born December 18, 1820, in 
Athens Township, this county. His father, Elihu Root, came here from Ver- 
mont in 1816, and took a 200-acre tract of donation land in Athens Town- 
ship. He was married to Miss Polly Nichols, a native of Connecticut, but a 
resident of Richmond Township, this county. They died leaving eight chil- 
dren, four of whom are now living — John, George W., Mrs. Lucy Skiflf and 
Mrs. Ruhanna Porter. Our subject received his education in the schools of 
those early times. He married Mary Jane Darrow, of Union Township, Erie 
County, Penn., November 20, 1845. They then settled on the farm where 
they now reside and have built up a comfortable home. Their children are — 
Melvin M., Mrs. Malona Jane Patterson, Mrs. Alice M. Gifi'ord, Mrs. Mary C. 
Skiff, Edwin J. and Clara B. Mr. Root has been a life-long Republican. Is 
an adherent of the Second Advent Church. He is a man of upright character 
and strict integrity, highly esteemed by all. 

PETER RUSSELL, farmer, P. O. Little Cooley, was born in 1822, in 
Broome County, N. Y., son of Stephen and Harriet Russell, who came to 
Crawford County, Penn., in 1836, locating in Randolph Township, but in 1853 
moving to the State of Wisconsin, where they died. Our subject came to this 
county with his parents; married Sarah Jane Southwick, of Randolph Town- 
ship, this county, July 4, 1844, and settled in Athens Township about 1852. 
Here he has acquired a farm of 230 acres, and operates a cheese factory at 
Little Cooley. Mrs. Russell departed this life October 8, 1867, leaving four 
children — Ellen, a teacher, Mrs. Delilah Bunting, Edmund and Mrs. Alice 
Glenn. Mr. Russell subsequently married Lucinda Stoddard and thoy now 
live on their farm near Little Cooley. He is a successful business man, a sup- 
porter of the Greenback policy, and a firm believer in the doctrine of spiritu- 
alism. 

OLIVER B. SCOTT, retired farmer, P. O. Rieeville, was born May 25, 
1808, in Jefferson County, N. Y., son of Oliver and Dorcas (Pryor) Scott, the 
former of whom was a native of Vermont, the latter of Connecticut. They 
were early settlers of New York State and never lived in Pennsylvania. Our 
subject came to this county in April, 1834, over fifty years ago. Here he mar- 



786 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

ried, June 15, 1835, Elizabeth L. Saunders, born in Connecticut, March 9, 
1815, daughter of Charles and Diana (Smedly) Saunders, who were among the 
early pioneers of this county and who both died here. After their marriage, 
Mr. and Mrs. Scott settled down on their farm in this township, and by indom- 
itable energy and perseverance have cleared up their place and made a good 
home. Their children were — Norman, a soldier in Company I, Eighty-third 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, killed in the battle at Gaines' 
Mill, Va., June 27, 1862; Mrs. Martha P. Blood; Mi-s. Lovina D. Glancy; and 
David Newman. Mr. and Mrs. Scott are industrious pioneer people and are 
now enjoying a quiet, peaceful old age, respected by the entire community. 

DAVID N. SCOTT, farmer and shipper, P. O. Riceville, was born Decem- 
ber 29, 1845, in Athens Township, this county, son of Oliver B. and Elizabeth 
L. (Saunders) Scott (see sketch above). During the late war he served three 
months in the infantry, then enlisted December, 1863, in Battery G, First 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery, serving till the close of the war. He 
received an honorable discharge July 3, 1865. He was married March 3, 1866, 
to Lestine M. Carpenter and has had three children: Mabel L., Velma M. and 
Guy N. Mr. Scott is an energetic, enterprising business man. He is a F. & 
A. M. : a member of the G. A. R., and of the K. of H. In politics he is a 
Republican. 

WARREN D. SHOTWELL, dealer in hardware, crockery, groceries, 
notions, etc., Little Cooley, was born October 5, 1835, in Otsego County, N. Y.; 
son of Phineas (of New Jersey) and Eliza (Cox) Shotwell, the former of whom 
died in 1874; the latter about 1881, in Iowa. Our subject came to this 
county in 1862. Here he married, September 24, 1863, Helen, daughter of 
William R. Rainey, of Richmond Tovraship. They have two children: Will- 
iam R. and Ethel M. In 1875 Mr. Shotwell sold his farm and established 
his present business in Little Cooley. By strict attention to business and 
courteous treatment of his customers he has built up a large and prosperous 
trade with this community. Mr. Shotwell is a member of the I. O. O. F. and 
A. O. U. W. He is a man of generous impulse and is a useful citizen. 

MARTIN SMITH, merchant. Little Cooley, was born May 12, 1828, in 
Blooming Valley, Woodcock Township, this county; son of Jeremiah Smith, 
who came here when eight years old, with his father, Ebenezer Smith, from 
Susquehanna County, Penn., who settled in Mead Township. He afterward 
married Catherine Bitenour, a distant relative of Gov. Ritenour, and settled 
in Woodcock Township. Our subject received his early education in this 
county. He spent the year 1845 in Connecticut, and on his return home he 
married Nancy Ann Wescoat, by whom he has the following children: Martha, 
afterward Mrs. Bloomfield, now deceased; Harriet, now Mrs. Smock; Miranda, 
now Mrs. Nichols; Losina; Orrie, now Mrs. Keith; Arthur E.; Minnie; and 
Earnest. The year following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Smith came to this 
township, developing one of the first farms near Little Cooley, where they 
remained six years. They then went back to Blooming Valley, where he 
built the house known as the "Black Horse," which was burned down in 1857, 
and subsequently rebuilt by him on another lot, where it now stands. After 
keeping hotel and engaging in merchandising for some time there, Mr. Smith 
came to Little Cooley, and here, in 1875, established a gi-ocery and general 
merchandise store. Mr. Smith is a generous, free-hearted man, enjoying the 
esteem of a large circle of friends. 

SAMUEL SMITH, farmer, P. O. Little Cooley, was born June 19. 1839, 
in Mead Township, this county; son of Andrew Smith. Our subject came to 
Bloomfield Township, this county, with his parents, when three years of age 



ATHENS TOWNSHIP. 787 

and there was reared, acquiring his education in the district school. About 
1860 he purchased a farm just across the line in Athens Township, and has 
here a comfortable, well-improved place comprising tifty-two acres of land, 
which was cleared and reclaimed from the wilderness entirely by his own exer- 
tions. He was married January 10, 1878, to Harriet Langworthy. Mr. Smith 
is a man of strict integrity; is quite liberal in supporting churches and other 
«nterpriBes for the public good. Politically he is a Democrat. 

CLAKK SOUTHWOKTH, farmer, P.O. Eiceville, was born in Chenango 
County, N. Y. , in 1825; son of Hiram and Algina (Howard) South worth, who 
moved to Erie County, Penn., in 1827, and came to this county, settling in 
Rome Township in 1839. Hiram Southworth was a useful citizen, active in 
public affairs, holding the office of Justice of the Peace in all twenty years 
— four terms, from 1847 to 1867. He departed this life in 1875 on his seventy- 
third birthday, his wife having preceded him in 1869. Six of their children 
grew to maturity, viz. : Clark ; Abigail, afterward Mrs. Maynard (now 
deceased); Lee, in Steuben Township, this coiinty; Bruce, in Centreville, 
Penn.; Avis E., now Mrs. Bishop, in Kansas; and Viola, now Mis. Post, in 
Kansas. Our subject was married September, 1853, to Catherine, daughter of 
John C. and Catherine McGee. By this union are Lettie, now Mrs. Bryant, 
Freedom, Hiram, Henry, Grant, Lena, Lee and Huldah. Mr. and Mrs. South- 
worth first settled on apiece of land in Rome Township, this county, purchased 
by Mr. Southworth of Alfred Huidekoper, and paid for in teaching school at 
$16 per month. In 1865 they sold this farm and bought their present home 
near RiceviJle, this township, which by industry and good management they 
have developed into a fine farm of ninety acres. Our subject has led a tem- 
perate life, and is an earnest advocate of the principles of temperance. He is 
liberal both in views of religious and political affairs. 

WILLIAM W. STRICKLAND, miller, P. O. Little Cooley, was bom 
July 23, 1838, in Gainesville, "Wyoming Co., N. Y. ; son of William and Bet- 
sey Strickland, who located at Springfield, Erie Co., Penn., in 1849, and there 
died. The father was a native of England, where he served an apprenticeship 
at the miller's trade. After coming to America he operated several important 
mills in different portions of New York State and Pennsylvania, and also 
started the first flouring-mill at Tecumseh, Mich. Our subject was thoroughly 
instructed and trained by his father to the same business. He married, March 
1, 1858, Mary J. Cross, of Girard Township, Erie Co., Penn., who died in 
1868, leaving three daughters — Alice, now Mrs. Fullerton; Eva, now Mrs. 
Fleek, and Carrie, now Mrs. Scott. Mr. Strickland, January 24, 1869, next 
married Esta Webber, of Girard. By this union there are three children, viz.: 
Louie, Maud and Francis. Mr. Strickland first operated a mill at Mosiertown, 
this county, which burned in 1860. He then worked at his trade in this and 
adjoining counties until 1873, when he established his present mill at Little 
Cooley, rebuilding it entirely in 1880, and he has now a first-class custom and 
merchant mill of three run of stones, called "Fair Play Mills." Our subject 
thoroughly understands his business, and by strict honesty and courteous deal- 
ings with his customers has biiilt up a large trade extending into several sur- 
rounding townships. He is liberal in his religious views and believes in the 
universal application of the "golden rule." 

LEWIS R. VAN SICKLE, M. D., physician and surgeon. Little Cooley, 
was born in Harmony, Chautauqua Co., N. Y., January 4, 1859; son of 
Benjamin and Jane Van Sickle, who now reside in Warren County, Penn. 
Our subject received his literary education at the schools of his native county 
and in Sugar Grove, Penn. In 1878 he began the study of medicine with Dr. 



788 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

H. J. Boyd, of Watts Flats, N. T., graduating from Starling Medical College 
in the spring of 1880. He established himself in Little Cooley in the spring 
of 1882. The Doctor is a thoroughly educated and scientific physician. By 
his courteous treatment to all he is rapidly winning his way into popular favor 
as well as rising to the highest rank in his profession. 



BEAVER TOWNSHIP. 



WILLIAM BROUGHTON, farmer, P. O. Beaver Centre, was born in the 
town of Barre, Orleans Co., N. Y., July 22, 1818; son. of Michael and Maryba 
(Lewis) Broughton, former a native of Rutland County, Vt. They were 
parents of two children. His first wife dying in 1820, Michael Broughton 
married, in 1827, Sallie Gillan, a native of Canada. In the fall of 1835 they 
came to this county, settling in Conneaut Township on a fifty-acre piece of 
woodland which he and his sons cleared up and converted into a farm. He 
was a stone-mason by trade. A member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
He died in the fall of 1859 leaving seven children out of a family of thirteen 
by his second wife, who is now living with her third husband, Lorenzo Ham- 
mond, in Ashtabula County, Ohio. She had six sons in the late war, one of 
whom died in a rebel prison and another of disease. She has been a con- 
sistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for over fifty years, 
although brought up a Quaker. Our subject came to this county with his 
father, and for thirty years worked chiefly at his trade of stone-mason. He 
assisted in constructing the locks on Erie Extension Canal. He was married 
February 18, 1842, to Hester Flowers, a native of Warsaw Township, N. Y., 
and daughter of Carl W. Flowers, who settled in this township in 1835; he 
was a soldier in the war of 1812; reared a family of six children, five now 
living. He and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
She died in 1838 and he followed her in 1869. To our subject and wife have 
been born ten children, seven now living, viz: Lucy A., wife of L. W. Odell; 
Adda H., wife of James E. Fenner; Sarah E., wife of M. Young; Mary E., 
wife of F. Hicks; Villa M. ; Tina J., wife of William Mathews; and Edith E. 
Mr. Broughton is owner of fifty acres of land. In politics he is a Republican. 

GRELLETTE COREY, farmer and undertaker, P. O. Conneautville, was 
born August 7, 1825, in North Hampton Tovmship, Montgomery (now Fulton) 
Co., N. Y. ; son of William and Lucy (Williams) Corey, formerly residents of 
Mayfield Township, Montgomery (now Fulton) Co., N. Y., who came to this 
county in 1837, with four children, settling in Conneaut Township. William 
Corey was a farmer, carpenter, joiner and wheelwright, which trades he 
worked at the greater part of his time. He purchased 100 acres of woodland 
which he and his sons cleared up into a farm. He held several township 
offices. His wife's father owned three slaves until the Constitution or laws of 
New York State set at liberty all slaves in that State; but he kept one or two 
of them, paying them wages after they got their freedom. One, named Black 
George, remained with his employer till after the war of 1812. In that war 
Mr. Williams was pressed into service, but being a cripple, was returned 
home. William Corey died in 11)75, his wife in 1864 They were parents of 
three sons and one daughter, all now living. Our subject, who is the eldest, 
took up the trade of carpenter. He was married in 1853 to Mary E., daughter 
of Gerden Kennedy, a native of Vermont; he moved to Gainesville, Wyoming 



BEAVER TOWNSHIP. 789 

Co,, N. Y., in 1812, and to Conneaut Township in 1833. To this union were 
born two children: Rose Ella, wife of B. Burns, and Lillian E., wife of F. W. 
Hunger. Our subject moved to this township with his family in 1857, set- 
tling on the farm of sixty-two acres he now owns. Mr. Corey, in 1881, fell 
from the roof of a barn, twenty-six feet, breaking both arms, and is thereby 
crippled for life. He has held several township offices; is a member of the 
R. T. of T. ; in politics is a Republican, formerly a Whig. His wife is a 
member of the Congregational Church. 

WALTER R. dp; GROODT, farmer, P. O. Conneautville, was born on the 
farm he now owns and lives on, in this township, June 24, 1849; son of Cor- 
nelius and Martiaett (Spaulding) De Groodt, former a native of Piatt's Hol- 
low, Madison Co., N. Y., latter of Middletown, Rutland Co., Vt. They came 
to this county with their eldest child in 1837, and settled in Spring Town- 
ship, southeast of Springboro, where our subject manufactured brick for about 
tvjo years; they then moved on a farm in this township, where our subject now 
resides. Here they cleared fifty acres of land and improved 100. They were 
parents of six children. Cornelius De Groodt died April 17, 1883; his widow 
is now living with her youngest son, Walter R. Our subject was married 
October 2, 1876, to Bessie De Maranville, a native of Kingsville, Ashtabula 
Co., Ohio. Mr. De Groodt is owner of 112 acres improved land, being his fath- 
er's old homestead. He makes a specialty of breeding graded cattle and South- 
down sheep. In politics he is Republican. His sister, Hattie, an experienced 
school teacher, who has taught thirty terms and is considered an expert at 
that profession, also resides with him. 

LUTHER GATES, farmer, P. O. Beaver Centre, was born April 5, 1834, 
in Chautauqua County, N. Y., a son of Calvin and Caroline Gates, natives of 
New York State, who came to this county in 1836, settling in Beaver Centre, 
where they took up 200 acres of land. They were the parents of nine chil- 
dren — two died in infancy, five now living — viz.: Luther; Roderick M. (was a 
soldier in the Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the late war and 
died in hospital at Alexandria in 1863), Albert (was a member of the Sixteenth 
Wisconsin Regiment during same period and died in hospital at Pittsburg Land- 
ing), Ann C, wifeof Asa N. Belknap; Emeline, wifeof G. C. Cooper; Ora; and 
George H. The parents were members of the Christian Church. The father, 
who had held the office of Justice of the Peace and all township offices, died 
August, 1882. His widow is now residing with her son, Luther, in the sev- 
enty-fifth year of her age. Our subject received a good common school educa- 
tion, and taught school one term. He served three years in Second Pennsyl- 
vania Cavalry, 1861-1864: was married in 1854 to Mary West, a native of 
Erie County, Penn. The results of this union are three children: Ida, Flor- 
ence, wife of Frank A. Boyce, and Ernest A. Mr. and Mrs. Gates are 
members of the Christian Church. Our subject owns 100 acres of land; ia 
a member of the G. A. R. at Springboro; held several township offices; in pol- 
itics he is a Republican. His paternal grandfather was a soldier in both the 
Revolutionary war and the war of 1812. 

JAMES VICKERY, farmer and land surveyor, P. O. Conneautville, was 
born in Russia, Herkimer Co., N. Y., September 16, 1819; son of Asa and Pol- 
ly Vickery, latter a native of Rensselaerville, N. Y. Asa Vickery, whose name 
indicates English origin, a native of Chatham, N. Y., was by profession a land 
surveyor, also a farmer. He served as Justice of the Peace for over thirty 
years, and was an Associate Judge of the County Court, one term; also a mem- 
ber of the Assembly, one term. He died January 14, 1857, aged sixty-five 
years; his widow March 7, 1884, at the age of eighty-seven. They were the 
parents of three children, two now living: Mrs. Mary Ann Gray and our subject. 



7 90 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Melissa died July 11, 1883, aged forty-eight. Mary Ann was second wife of 
Latham Gray, who died September 25, 1884, aged eighty-five years. Our sab- 
iect, who is the only son, received his school training in Herkimer County, N. 
Y., and finished his education in Fairfield Academy, Herkimer County. On 
November 17, 1850, he was married to Louisa Rowland, born March 20, 1828, 
in Boonville, Oneida Co.; N. Y. The results of this union are eight children, 
viz. : Mary M. ; Ellen L. ; Nettie A., wife of E. Folts; Tinnie, wife of Charles 
E. Harmon; Asa H., married Miss Ida Herriott, of North Shenango Town- 
ship, this county; Julia E., wife of Lee S. Harmon; George H. ; and Ida O. 
Our subject and wife came to this county in 1851, and resided for about four 
years in the northern part of Conneant Township, and in 1855 moved to this 
township, where they settled finally on their present farm of about fifty-eight 
acres. Mr. Vickery has done much in the surveying of this section of the coun- 
ty, a profession he carries on in addition to farming pursuits. He has held 
several township oflSces. In politics he is a Republican. 

E. A. WHITFORD, farmer, P. O. Springboro, was born in Ticonderoga, 
N. Y., May 19, 1824; son of Oliver and PhcEbe Whitford; former a native of 
Ticonderoga, N. Y. , latter of Massachusetts. Oliver Whitford was a soldier 
of the war of 1812, and was present at the battle of Plattsburg. His father, 
who was a native of Rhode Island, was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. 
Our subject's parents came to this county in October, 1836; resided in Spring 
Township one year, and then moved, in 1837, to this township. They had a 
family of eleven children, six now living. The mother died in January, 
1864; the father in February, 1874. Our subject, who is seventh in the 
family, commenced working when seventeen years of age for a Mr. Sturte- 
vant, remaining with him five years, during which time he earned fifty acres 
of wild land, where he now resides, in this township. Previous to this he 
drove horses on a canal in New York State. He was married Nov. 4, 1847, 
to Hester C. Boyce, a native of New York State and daughter of Joseph 
Boyce, who came to this county in 1836. To this union were born five chil- 
dren, four now living: Lestina, wife of L. F. Cornell; Chancy; Delia, wife 
of Thomas McFeeters; and Wayne. Mr. Whitford owns 200 acres of 
improved land. He enlisted August 27, 1864, in the Third Pennsylvania 
Heavy Artillery, attached to the Army of the Potomac. He was placed on one 
occasion sentry over Jeff Davis and his Secretary, Clay; he was honorably 
discharged June 16, 1865. He is a member of the G. A. R. at Springboro, 
has served as Justice of the Peace for twenty years and Constable two years. 
In politics he is a Republican. 

JAMES WILLIAMS, farmer, P. O. Conneautville, was born February 4, 
]830, in Darien, Genesee Co., N. Y., eldest child of Frederick and Abby 
(Jenks) Williams. He was married December 12, 1850, to Mary E. Christie, 
born December 25, 1828, in this county, acd daughter of Andrew and Mary 
(Meyler) Christie. Her father was born in this county, his father having 
been one of the first settlers in this section. Her mother's parents were 
Welsh, and came to this county when the mother was a girl. Our subject and 
wife are parents of six children, viz: Ira, married to Miss Ella Hide; Clara 
P., wife of N. P. Spencer; Mina, wife of Douglas Dewitt; Thorp; James G. ; 
and Lizzie. There are seven grandchildren, six of whom are boys. Mr. Will- 
iams is owner of 200 acres of land. In addition to agriculture he 
pays considerable attention to the raising of fine graded stock, both horses and 
cattle, and he is a noted expert at training cattle and" horses. He has held 
several township ofiices; in politics is a Republican. In their religious views 
the family are liberal, not fettered with creeds or sectarianism, believing the 
best doctrine is to do good to all mankind, the lowly in particular. 



BLOOMFIELD TOWNSHIP. 791 



BLOOMFIELD TOWNSHIP. 

HENRY M. BATCHELDER, lumberman and proprietor of saw-mill, 
P. O. Lincolnville, is a native of Vermont, born February 16, 1835; son of Syl- 
vester C. and Sarah Batchelder, who came to this county in 1847, and are now 
residing in Richmond Township. Our subject was married September 26, 
1858, to Sallie Jane Alexander, by whom he has two children: Mrs. Emma 
Buchannon and Emmett. Mr. Batchelder is a successful business man; has 
been engaged in the lumber trade seventeen years this fall (1884) and now 
owns a saw-mill at Lincolnville and one in Troy Township, this county. 

SYLVESTER SYLVANTJS BISBE, farmer, P. O. Union City, was born 
June 28, 1846, in Union Hity, Erie Co., Penn. ; son of Reuben (deceased) and 
Naoma Bisbe. He was reared and educated in Bloomfield Township, this 
county, to which his parents had moved in 1849. He was united in marriage 
July 5, 1869, with Fannie C, daughter of Joseph Bacon, by whom he has the 
following named children — Clarence Eugene, Fiorina Maud, Fred Leverne, 
Jessie Pearl and Merna Cora. Mr. and Mrs. Bisbe have been industrious and 
successful in life, acquiring since their marriage a fine farm of 200 acres of 
well-improved land, part of which was the old family homestead. Our sub- 
ject takes great interest in the cause of education and has given his family 
good advantages. In politics he supports the Republican party. 

FREEMAN BLAKESLEE, P. O. Bloomtield, was born in 1818 in this 
township; son of Elkanah Blakeslee, who came from Genesee County, N. Y., 
about 1817, having previously been married to Cynthia Edson, of Ver- 
mont. Here he took up 400 acres of land, which he cleared and developed 
into a farm. After rearing a family of four boys and two girls he died in 
1874, his wife having preceded him in 1871. Our subject was united in mar- 
riage March. 1857, with Mary Ann Woodward, a native of Chester County, 
Penn., and purchased the farm they now occupy, comprising 200 acres of well- 
improved land. By this union were born the following named children: Mrs. 
Cynthia Jane Emerson, Eveline, Elmira and Mary E. (deceased). Mr. Blakes- 
lee is liberal in his political views, supporting the men and measures which he 
believes secure the best interests of the people. He is a friend of the cause 
of education. He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. 

NORMAN HUDSON BL.ANCHARD, merchant, Bloomfield, was born in 
Sparta Township, this county, September 1, 1855, son of Francis R. and Sophro- 
nia Blanchard, now residents of Rockdale Township. Our subject was reared on 
his father's farm, acquiring his education in the district schools. He married 
December 23, 1874, Media B. Cushing, of Sherman, N. Y. By this union 
there are two children: Gary and Inez. The family lived on the farm until 
June, 1881, when Mr. Blanchard bought out Henry Thomas, at Shreve's 
Ridge. He carries a stock of general merchandise, is a reliable, enterprising 
business man, and by courtesy and fair dealing has built up a large and pros- 
perous trade with the surrounding community. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. 

JULIUS N. BROWN, farmer, Lincolnville, was born in Rockdale Township, 
this county, January 16, 1828, grandson of Jesse Brown, who came from Ver- 
mont in 1814, founded the settlement and postoffice at Brown Hill, and who 



792 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

died leaving two sons: Lucius, a resident of that place, and George A., mar- 
ried to Mary, daughter of Bozilla Shreve, who was also an early settler. They 
lived upright, useful lives, and died leaving a family of seven boys and three 
girls, of whom Julius N. is the eldest. Our subject was twice married, on the 
first occasion in 1850 to Sarah A. Woodward, by whom he had seven children, 
four now living: Nelson, Ira, Franklin and Mrs. Elizabeth Jackson. Mrs. 
Brown departed this life September 30, 1867, honored and respected by all. 
He subsequently married Elmira Rhodes, and they had five children, only 
Andrew and Grant surviving. Mr. Brown is an industrious, successful farmer 
and keeps his place, on which he has first-class improvements, in good con- 
dition. 

GEORGE M. COLE, M. D., physician and surgeon, Lincolnville, was 
born in Woodcock Township, this county, May 19, 1853, son of Matthias and 
Eliza J. Cole, now residents of Richmond Township, this county. Our sub- 
ject was reared on his father's farm, acquiring his literary education in the 
district schools and at the academy in Blooming Valley. He began the study 
of medicine at Meadville, Penn., in 1876. He was married December 11, 
1879, to Virene A. Vunk, of Edinboro, Penn., and June 7, 1881, graduated 
with degree of M. D. at the Eclectic Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio. To 
Dr. Cole and wife have been born two children: Francis C. (deceased) and 
Edith Blanche. The Doctor settled in Lincolnville in 1881, and has already 
built up a large and lucrative practice, as he is a well skilled and scientific 
physician. 

BARNET BUSHNEL CUMMINGS (deceased) was born in 1817 in Centre- 
ville, this county; son of Cornelius and Minerva (Baxter) Cummings. Having 
lost his mother when he was but five years of age, and his father, who was a 
pioneer and the first Postmaster of Centreville, Penn., when he was fifteen years 
old, our subject was brought up in the family of David Winton, Esq. He 
was married, August 16, 1840, to Lydia H. Carter, born March 14, 1822, near 
Syracuse, N. Y., daughter of Thomas and Abi (Hotchkiss) Carter. By this 
union were twelve children, six growing to maturity, viz: Ella A., Barnet 
Bushnel (who died in 1880 aged thirty-one), Winfield'S. , Thomas Carter, Mrs. 
Carrie Davidson and Lizzie W. Mrs. Cummings' parents came to this county 
and lived at Centreville from 1839 to 1841, then returned to their farm in 
Cattaraugus County, N. Y., subsequently moving to Oberlin, Ohio, where the 
mother died December 31, 1864. The father afterward married Mrs. Abigail 
Hinman, his deceased wife's sister, who in a few years also died. Mr. Carter 
has three sons living: Ladwick, of Randolph, N. Y., Franklin, of Oberlin, 
Ohio, and Lafayette, of Chicago, 111., and one daughter, with whom he is 
residing, enjoying the comforts of an honored old age. Mr. Cummings, our 
subject, was born in Centreville, moved to Riceville and there established a 
hotel and was appointed the first Postmaster. In 1857 he was elected Reg- 
ister and Recorder of this county on the Republican ticket. After filling this 
office with ability he served one term as Deputy Sheriff; in 1865 he returned to 
Riceville with his family and again took charge of the hotel. April 26, 1872, 
Mr. Cummings fractured his right leg by falling from a load of hay and died 
from the effects of his injuries May 9. He was a man of generous impulses 
and high honor, and his loss was deeply lamented. His widow, who is a lady 
of exalted character, enjoying the respect of her neighbors, still keeps the 
hotel on the family homestead. She is a member of the Unitarian Church of 
Meadville. 

THOMAS L. DOBBINS, farmer and Justice of the Peace, P. O. Lincoln- 
ville, was born in Washington County, N. Y. , January 17, 1841; son of 



BLOOMFIELD TOWNSHIP. 793 

Joseph and Martha Dobbins, the latter of whom died in 1879. Joseph Dob- 
bins, now aged eighty-three, is still living on the old homestead. Our subject 
was principally educated in the home schools; at sixteen years of age he we at 
to Minnesota and there engaged in lumbering and farming, and also went to 
school. During the late Rebellion he enlisted, September 28, 1861, in the 
Second Regiment, Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, serving in the Army of the 
Cumberland After his discharge, May 20, 1862, he returned to his native 
county; then attended school two terms at Union Village and there re-enlisted, 
December 28, 1863, in the Sixteenth Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery, 
and followed the fortunes of his regiment, participating in several engage- 
ments in Virginia. He received a severe wound in the left leg (from the 
effects of which he nearly lost his life) in front of Petersburg, Va., September 
19, 1864, and was honorably discharged May 19, 1865. Mr. Dobbins came to 
this county in 1866 and was here married, July 3, 1868, to Nancy A., daugh- 
ter of John Hamilton, of this township. They have two sons: Harry L. and 
Frank P. Squire Dobbins is a Republican in politics. He has filled the 
offices of Clerk three years. Auditor nine years, Inspector of Elections 
one year and School Directoir three years. He was elected Justice of the 
Peace in February, 1882. He belongs to various local societies, takes a prom- 
inent part in every beneficial enterprise and has given the highest satisfaction. 
in all the various offices he has filled. 

WARD K. ELDERKIN, M. D., Riceville, was born in Columbus, Penu., 
July 27, 1855; son of D. W. and Lois (King) Elderkin, natives of New York 
State, who located in Columbus, Penn., in 1851, and in 1857 moved to Spartans- 
burg, this county, where they are now residing. Our subject attended the 
home schools until he was seventeen years of age, then went to Cleveland, 
Ohio, and engaged in the laboratory of R. C. and C. S. Clark, where he 
remained until 1877, when he matriculated in the Eclectic Medical Institute of 
Cincinnati, graduating with the degree of M. D. in 1881. After following 
his profession one year at Bear Lake, Penn., he located in Riceville, this 
county, in 1882. The Doctor was married July 6, 1876, to Mary E. Shute, 
of Cleveland, Ohio, by whom he has one daughter, Diamonda S. Dr. Elder- 
kin is a well-educated man, thoroughly skilled in his chosen profession, and 
enjoys the respect and confidence of the citizens, as well as of his professional 
brethren. 

ALBA S. GEER. merchant, Lincolnville, was born in Bloomfield Town- 
ship, this county, December 20, 1837; son of Alphonso and Mary (Phillips) 
Geer, natives of Wells, Vt. , and Whitehall, N. Y., respectively. They lived 
in this county from 1823 to 1853, then went to Olmsted County, Minn., 
where they died. Our subject was married January 1, 1854, to Celestia 
Moses, by whom he has seven children: Alba S., Noble, H., Mrs. Rose Carter, 
D. Eugene, Mary C, Josephine and Welcome. Mr. Geer followed agricult- 
ural pursuits for several years. He moved to Minnesota in 1855, remaining 
there till 1861, when he returned to his native township. In March, 1880, he 
purchased a lot i& Lincolnville, erecting a fine, commodious store, and estab- 
lishing a general merchandize business, which he is' still carrying on, and by 
his courtesy and fair dealing has won the confidence and respect of the whole 
community. 

WALTER R. acd SAMUEL M. LINDSAY, tinsmiths, Riceville, are natives 
of Mercer County, Penn. ; sons of Robert and Adeline Lindsay, natives of 
Venango County, Penn., who were parents of six children who grew to matur- 
ity, and of their family Finley was killed at the battle of Fredericksburg, Va. ; 
Samuel, a soldier of the Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 



794 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

was -wounded at the second battle of Bull Run, and was honorably discharged 
on account of same. He came to Riceville in 1866, where he still resides. 
Walter R. Lindsay learned the trade of tinsmith at Meadville, Penn., and 
settled in Riceville in 1862. He was married April 11, 1867, to Mary A., 
daughter of John H. and Mary (Brown) Dickson, of Blooming Valley. By 
this union were born Mabel E. , Letillia E. and Wayne (deceased). The sub- 
jects of this sketch, upright, enterprising business men, have always been 
active in public affairs, holding all the oflScial positions in their borough. 

MOSES MAINE, farmer, P. O. Union City, Erie County, was born in the State 
of Ohio, April 14. 1819. His parents, Nathan and Rebecca Maine, were natives 
of New England, and settled in the western part of this county about 1820, 
and there Moses was brought up on the farm. In 1843 our subject came to 
Bloomfield Township, this county, and began clearing up the farm he had 
bought of Dr. Edward Ellis, which now comprises 130 acres of well-improved 
land. He was married January 21, 1856, to Mary, daughter of Ryland Ken- 
nedy and widow of Roswell Hodge, by whom she had two daughters— Emily 
and Frances Hodge. By her union with Mr. Maine she has eight children: 
Mrs. Elizabeth Lewis, Mrs. Lucy Choate, Estella, Mrs. Hannah Edwards, 
Charles, Bessie, Harry and Nancy. Mr. Maine has been actively engaged in 
the development and improvement of his township. He and his worthy wife 
are members of the Free- Will Baptist Church. In politics he is a Republican. 

CYRUS C. MARSH, farmer, P. O. Union City, Erie County, was born in Hum- 
phrey, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y. , November 28, 1830, son of Danforth and Minerva 
Marsh, who both died in New York. They were parents of seven sons and two 
daughters, now prosperous citizens scattered all over the country from New 
York to Nebraska Five of the sons served in the Union Army during the 
late Rebellion, all returning home safely. Our subject came to Bloomiield 
Township, this county, in 1853; was married July 25, 1855, to Fannie A. Wes- 
5ott, of Chautauqua County, N. Y. , and has the following-named children: 
George Danforth, Rush Duane, Fred Carter. In 1 856 Mr. and Mrs. Marsh 
settled on their present farm, and by their industry have acquired an estate 
consisting of 300 acres of well-improved land. They are consistent members 
of the United Brethren Church, and are interested in the cause of education, 
and in all efforts conducive to the mental and moral growth of the commimity. 
Mr. Marsh is a Republican in politics; has held various local and township 
offices. During the late war he enlisted, February 29, 1864, in the Sixth- 
teenth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, and served in the Army of 
the Potomac under Gen. P. H. Sheridan. He participated in eighteen differ- 
ent engagements, and was honorably discharged August 11. 1865, with the 
rank of Sergeant. 

ISAAC MILLER, farmer, Bloomfield, was born June 1, 1806, in the 
Township of Rockdale, this county, in a house which stood near the present 
residence of Daniel Kelley, a little northwest of the center of the township. 
He is a son of George and Barbara Anu Miller, the former of whom came to 
this county in 1792 to explore, and settled here in 1794. He boated 
provisions in a canoe from Pittsburgh for ten years. The subject of this 
sketch received such advantages as the schools of that time afforded, and man- 
aged to become pretty well acquainted with arithmetic, reading and writing. 
In the fall of 1827 he was married to Patience Allee, eldest daughter of John 
Allee, Esq. About this tiine his father deeded to him, in fee simple, eighty 
acres of timber land, in consideration of the sum of $160. Aside from being 
owner of this land, and being possessed with energy and health, he had 
neither money nor goods movable. He easily obtained credit for such things 



BLOOMFIELD TOWNSHIP. 795 

as were absolutely necessary for housekeeping, erected a log-house, into whic 
he moved, and then commenced clearing the land, and engaged in the lumber 
business. In a few years he was free from debt, had considerable personal 
property, and owned 400 acres of land. He afterward sold all but 177 acres, 
146 of which he put in an arable condition. He erected substantial buildings 
upon this land, the brick dwelling-house now standing a short distance from 
Miller's Station. Mr. Miller here held several offices of public trust and 
responsibility, in the administration of the afifairs of which offices the strict- 
est integrity always characterized his course. He secured the postoffice at 
Miller's Station (named in his honor), and was the first Postmaster in the 
township. He exerted himself in the promotion of every plan calculated to 
improve his neighborhood, not only substantially in the opening of highways, 
but in the erection of churches, schoolhouses, etc. In 1865, after living in 
one place for almost sixty years, Mr. Miller sold his estate and moved to Saeger- 
town, where he purchased a farm and built a fine dwelling-house. In 1871 
he disposed of this property, and the ensuing year moved to Chautauqua 
County, N. Y., where he remained until the spring of 1875, when he returned 
to this county, having previously purchased land and erected handsome build- 
ings. Mr. Miller and his estimable wife, who is now almost seventy-five years 
old, are, at the time of this writing (1884), in the enjoyment of moderately 
good health. They are both firm believers in the great truths of Christianity 
from a careful investigation of its evidence. At an early age they united with 
the Baptist Church from conviction of its excellence. Their principles have 
been those of its true members — enlarged and tolerant. There have been born 
to them ten children, eight of whom are now living. Their births are as fol- 
lows: John A., May 19, 1829; Nancy A,, May 30, 1831; William A., Novem- 
ber 1, 1833; George W., March 16, 1836; Judson H., August 4. 1838; Harri- 
son C, November 15, 184'0; AlmiraL., August 11, 1843; Parker E., March 
3, 1846; Josiah V., June 30, 1848; Sidney K, November 1, 1851. 

WILLIAM H. MORTON, farmer, P. O. Chapinville, was born in Bloom- 
field Township, this county, October 28, 1840, son of Darius and Prudence 
Morton, who came here from Allegany County, N. Y., about 1888. Darius 
Morton departed this life in 1853. His widow resides with her eon. Our 
subject enlisted January 17, 1864, in the Sixteenth Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Cavalry and served in the Army of the Potomac. He participated in many of 
the hard fought battles of eastern and central Virginia, and was discharged 
August 23, 1865, with the rank of Corporal. He then returned to this town- 
ship and followed the occupation of cooper in various surrounding towns. He 
was married March 19, 1870, to Minerva Lee, and has one son, Eoscoe B. 
Mr. Morton is an industrious and prosperous farmer. He settled on his 
present place in 1874. He has held different local and township offices. In 
politics he is a Republican. 

JAMES B. PAIGE, farmer, P. O. Lineolnville, was born May 6, 1842. in 
Wyoming County, N. Y., son of Isaac W. and Hannah (Torrey) Paige. After 
the death of his wife, May 6, 1870, Mr. Paige came here and lived with his 
son, James B., until his death, which occurred October 1, 1881. During the 
late Rebellion our subject enlisted October 9, 1861, in the Ninth Regiment 
New York Volunteer Cavalry and served in the Army of the Potomac. He 
received a severe wound, a ball passing entirely through his body at Cedar 
Creek, Va., October 19, 1864. He made a brilliant record as a brave and 
faithful soldier, and was mustered out with an honorable discharge July, 
1865. After the war Mr. Paige came to this township, and February 14, 1869» 
;narried Cynthia A. Potter. Their children are: Lavinia D. and Marvin J. 



796 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Mr. Paige by industry has acquired an estate comprising about 270 acres of 
■well-improved land. He has filled various local and township offices; takes 
great interest in the cause of education. In politics he is a stanch Repub- 
lican. 

CHARLES PARKIN, JR., farmer, P. O. Lineolnville, was born July 15, 
1830, in Ripley, Derbyshire, England, son of Charles Parkin, Sr. , who mar- 
ried Mary Turton. She died in 1847, and in 1848 he came to America, fol- 
lowing the occupation of a collier in different counties of this State. After 
living in Perry County, Ind., from 1862 to 1870, he came to Bloomfield Town- 
ship, Crawford County, where he now resides. Our subject, who had pre- 
viously worked in several counties of Pennsylvania, Virginia and Ohio, went 
to Perry County, Ind., and was married there December 10, 1851, to Ann 
Scott. By this union there are seven children: Marianna, Charles Benjamin, 
John William, Joseph Edmund, Hamilton, Elizabeth Alice and Albert Henry. 
Mr. Parkin after his marriage superintended and operated coal mines in Perry 
County, Ind., and in Kentucky until 1875, when he moved on his present farm 
in this township, which he had previously purchased. He has been industri- 
ous and very successful in life, and has accumulated 275 acres of well- 
improved land. He has reared an intelligent family and is recognized as a 
useful citizen by the community. Id politics he is a Republican. 

DR. CHARLES PAYNE was born in Whitby, Ontario, December 10, 1844; 
son of Charles and Jane C. (Whitney)Payne. He received a classical education 
at the Whitby Grammar School. At the age of eighteen he began the study 
of medicine, first under his uncle, Henry Payne, F. R. C. S. E. , in Sheffield, 
England, and attended one course of medical lectures. Returned to this 
countiy in the spring of 1864, and entered the Second Corps Hospital, Army 
of the Potomac, where he remained until the close of the war in 1865. He 
then continued the study of medicine four years with Dr. Theodore B. Lash- 
ells, of Meadville, Penn., and attended two courses of medical lectures at the 
University of Wooster, Cleveland, Ohio, from which he graduated in 1869. 
He located in Riceville, Penn., March, 1869, immediately after graduating. 
The Doctor was married July 10, 1877, to Miss Vella N. Markham. He has 
been most successful in his profession, having built up a large and lucrative 
practice, and won the respect and confidence of the entire community. 

WILLIAM PORTER, farmer and postmaster, Chapinville, was born in 
1822 in County Down, Ireland, son of John and Bell Porter. He immigrated to 
America and to Lawrence County, Penn., in 1841, purchasing the place he 
now occupies in Bloomfield Township, this county, in 1844. He was married 
in 1845 to Mary Porter, of Lawrence County, Penn., and in the spring of 
1847 brought his wife to his farm in this township, and immediately set to 
work clearing and beautifying their home. Besides their own children — John 
W. and Mrs. Margaret A. Bennett — Mr. and Mrs. Porter have reared in their 
family, John G. and Jennie N., children of John K. Porter, brother of our 
subject. The Chapinville Postoffice being established in 1855, Mr. Porter was 
appointed Postmaster, and still holds his commission. Mr. Porter and entire 
family are members of the Presbyterian Church. 

SETH POUND, farmer, P. O. Lineolnville, was born in Erie County, N. 
Y., October 17, 1832; son of Joseph and Rachel Pound, who were early set- 
tlers of that county, the former of whom died there in 1867; the latter resides 
on the old family homestead, aged seventy-nine years. Of their twelve chil- 
dren, ten are now living. Our subject has been twice married; on first occa- 
sion June 1, 1852, to Maria Cox, who died June 2, 1856, leaving one son — 
John. Mr. Pound then married, January 16, 1859, Elizabeth Cox, and by this 



BLOOMFIELD TOWNSHIP. 797 

union has one daughter — -Mrs. Dora Loomis. He settled in Bloomfield Town- 
ship, this county, in 186'2, and by industry and good management has built up 
a comfortable farm property. He and his wife are members of the United 
Brethren Church, of which he is a Trustee and class leader. In 1863, while 
in camp at Pittsburgh and on his way to the seat of war, Mr. Pound met with 
an accident, whereby he lost a part of two lingers of the right hand, which 
resulted in his being honorably discharged from the service. He has been a 
life-long Republican. 

HON. ROBERT M. RANGE, farmer, P. O. Lincolnville, was born in 
Rockdale Township, this county, February 13, 1847, a descendant of John 
Range, one of the Aides-de-Camp of Gen. Wolfe at Quebec, also a First Lieuten- 
ant during the Revolutionary war, and an uncle to President John Tyler, and 
whose son, our subject's grandfather, also a John Range, cousin of President 
Tyler, was a soldier during the war of 1812, and with whom he graduated at 
Baltimore, Md. — the first frontier settler of Forest County, Penn. He was 
father of James L. Range, who was born in Venango, Penn. Married Jane 
McKay, of Erie County, by whom he had eleven children, Robert M. being 
the sixth. He died August 24, 1880; his widow now lives at Dayton, Washing- 
ton Territory. Our subject was married March 19, 1871, to Josephine Teeple, 
who has borne him one son — Wayne L. Mr. Range is a Republican in poli- 
tics; he was appointed County Appraiser of Merchandise in 1878; was an 
officer in the House of Representatives during the Legislative session of 1881; 
acted as President of the Oil Creek Valley Agricultural Association — 1882- 
83— and is now the Crawford County member of the Republican State Cen- 
tral Committee. Although yet a young man, Mr. Range is rapidly pushing 
his way to the front as a representative of the intelligence and enterprise of 
Crawford County. 

WILLIAM ROSSELL, farmer, P. O.Union City, Erie County, was born on 
the farm he now lives on in this township, October 5, 1^29; son of William Rossell, 
who was born in 1781, a soldier of the war of 1812, came from New Jersey 
to west Pennsylvania about 1800, and here married Charlotte Reynolds, resid- 
ing near Titusville. After living at various places in Erie County, Penn., 
along Oil Creek (where he followed lumbering for several years), they finally 
purchased the farm in Bloomfield Township, this county, where ]\Irs. Rossell 
died in 1887 and Mr. Rossell in 1865. They reared a family of eight chil- 
dren, three now living: Mrs. Elizabeth Shreve, Mrs. Susan Warner and Will- 
iam. Our subject was reared and educated here and helped his father clear up 
the farm. He was married October 5, 1851, to Maria, daughter of Joshua and 
Nancy Negus, by whom he has three children; Hamlet El wood, Charlotte E. 
and Bertha Mabel. Mr. Rossell has bought all the family homestead and 
adjoining land, comprising, in all, 336 acres of well improved land. The sec- 
ond frame barn built in this township, which was erected by his father, is on 
this farm and still in use. Mrs. Rossell is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. Mr. Rossell is a Republican in politics; has been School 
Director nine years, Auditor nine years, Supervisor two years. Assessor one 
year, and is now serving as School Director of his township. He has given 
great satisfaction in all the various offices ho has filled. 

REV. CYRUS SHREVE, Bloomfield. No better representative of the 
Christian characters of Crawford County can be found than the reverend 
gentleman whose name heads this brief biography. He was born July 23, 
1825, in Bloomfield Township, this county; sou of Israel and Elizabeth 
(Bloomfield) Shreve, direct descendants of the pioneers, Richard Shreve and 
Thomas Bloomfield, whose characteristics are mentioned elsewhere. Our sub- 



798 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

ject united with the Baptist Church at the age of twenty-five years, and stud- 
ied theology. He was ordained at Bloomfield in 1853. January 1, 1856, he 
married Miss Florella Nourse, a daughter of William and Ruth (Bobbins) 
Nourse. She was born October 22, 1822, in Londonderry, Windham Co., Vt., 
and removed with her parents in 1854 to Cataraugus County, N. Y. To this 
union were born four children, two of whom sxirvive, viz. : Milton W. and 
Owen M Both were graduated from the Lewisbarg University in the class of 
1884. Elder Shreve has held various charges in this and Venango Counties 
with success always attending his labors. He is a member and one of the 
organizers of the Pennsylvania Baptist Ministers' Union, and is a theologian 
of broad and comprehensive views. In Rev. Cyrus Shreve we find a marked 
instance of a self-made man, talented, energetic and careful, educated by his 
own energies and perseverance; sociable and affable in his intercourse with all. 
The good that he has done will only be known in that day when the secrets of 
all hearts shall be revealed. 

DARIUS SHREVE, farmer, P. O. Bloomfield, was born December 25, 
1833, in this township; son of Israel and Elizabeth Shreve, who were among the 
earliest citizens of Bloomfield Township. Oar subject married, June 3, 1862, 
Almira M. Miller, who has borne him four children — Elvia L., Emery A., Len- 
dell D. and Myrtie P. After their marriage they settled on the old homestead 
of the Shreve family, where they still reside and have a fine farm consisting 
of ninety acres of well-improved land. They are both members of the Baptist 
Church. Mr. Shreve is a supporter of Republican principles but always votes 
for the best man. He was prominent during the late Rebellion in raising 
recruits and supplies for the service. Mr. Shreve has held most of the oflBces 
of Bloomfield Township, always discharging his duties with credit to himself 
and satisfaction of the people. 

JULIUS H. SHREVE, farmer and pressor of hay, P. O. Lincolnville, was 
born September 13, 1845, in Bloomfield Township, this county; son of Valen- 
tine and Jane Sophia (Carroll) Shreve, the former of whom, a son of Will- 
iam Shreve, died here about 1868; his widow is still living on the old home- 
stead. Our subject was married in this county, October 6, 1868, to Isadore 
Warner, born in Girard, Erie Co., April 28, 1850, daughter of Henry and 
Sophia Warner. By this union were born two children — Ned V. and Edith 
Blanche. The occupation of Mr. Shreve has been chiefly farming; he now 
owns 150 acres of well-improved land at the head of Oil Creek Lake. Is a 
Republican in politics; and an A. F. & A. M. He has for four years satisfactorily 
filled the ofiice of Township Constable. 

JOSEPH SMITH, farmer, P. O. Lincolnville, was born in Mead Township, 
this county, November 19, 1824, son of Andrew Smith, a native of New Jersey, 
who came to Crawford County when a small boy, and in the course of time 
married Martha, daughter of Jacob Loper; settled in Bloomfield Township in 
1838, and here died April 12, 1882. His widow survives him and lives on 
the homestead. They were parents of the following named children : Joseph, 
Israel, Mrs. Hannah Buchannon, David, Samuel, Mrs. Lucinda Fosburgh, 
Daniel, Hiram, and Angeline Kelly, the youngest daughter. The subject of 
this sketch was married December 14, 1848, to Emeline Loomis, born in Ver- 
mont, October 31, 1828, daughter of Jonathan and Margaret Loomis, who 
were early settlers of this township. Mrs. Smith came here in 1836. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith have been born Nathan, of Colorado; Jacob, of Spring 
Creek, Warren Co., Penn. ; Oscar; Mrs. Caroline Ongley; and Mrs. Sabroy Col- 
lins, of Erie County, Penn. Mr. Smith was a soldier in the One Hundred 
and Sixty- ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and is now drawing a pen- 



BLOOMFIELD TOWNSHIP. 799 

sion for the heart disease which he contracted while in the army. He is a 
Republican in politics. Has served as School Director three terms. The family 
«re all members of the United Brethren Church, of which Mr. Smith has been 
Trustee for five years. 

JAMES SMITH, farmer, P. O. Lincolnville, was born in Woodcock 
Township, this county, March 18, 1825; son or James and Catherine Smith. 
Our subject has been twice married, on first occasion, March 11, 1850, to 
Hannah Wescoat, by whom he had three children, viz. : Mrs Beulah Smelzer, 
Sylvester Henry, and Mrs Florence Kingsley. His wife dying December 13, 
1859, Mr. Smith married, April 12, 186(3, Susannah Holliday, bom in Beaver 
County, Penn., February 22, 1837, daughter of Harvey and Sarah Holliday, now 
residing in Athens Township, this county. The children born to this union are 
as follows: James, Sarah, George, Blanche, Pearl, Albert and Melissa. Mr. 
Smith served as a soldier, during the late war, in the One Hundred and Sixty- 
ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, from November, 1862, to July, 1863. 
He is an upright man with independent political views and by hard work and 
economy has acquired a comfortable home. 

ALEXANDER SMITH, farmer, P. O. Lincolnville, was born in Woodcock 
Township, this county, September 10, 1828. His father, James Smith, a sol- 
dier of the war of 1812, came to this county from New Jersey about 1800. 
He married Catherine, daughter of Jacob Loper, a pioneer, and had sixteen 
children, twelve o^ whom are now living. They were an upright pioneer peo- 
ple. James Smith departed this life in 1876, aged eighty-six; his wife pre- 
ceded him in 1848. They left an influential family to mourn their memory. 
Our subject was married January 26, 1862, to Rachel A. Bunce. During the 
late war he enlisted, October 18, 1862, in the One Hundred and Sixty-ninth 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry; served at Yorktown,Va., and was honorably 
discharged July 26, 1863. Starting out in life entirely dependent on their 
own resources, Mr. and Mrs. Smith accumulated a fine property. Mrs. Smith 
died September 28, 1869, leaving five children: Willie A., Frank L., Carrie 
v., Charles A., and Valentine. Mr. Smith afterward married Mrs. Martella 
A., widow of Jeremiah Bunce. By this union were bom Vessie M. Scott, 
Walter, and Ethel. Mr. Smith has tilled various township ofiSces. In politics 
he is a Republican. 

MILES W. SPENCER, farmer, P. O. Chapinville, was born in Wayne 
Township, Erie Co., Penn., January 22, 1842, son of William O. and Lucretia 
(Drake) Spencer, natives of the same county, who settled in Rockdale Town- 
ship, this county, in 1852, where the former died May 5, 1859. His widow 
subsequently married Cyrus Avery, and still resides in that township. After 
the death of his father, the care of the family mainly devolved on our subject, 
the second child and oldest son, and he faithfully discharged his duty. He 
married, October 3. 1858, Adeline, daughter of Seth and Clarissa Sturgis, 
natives of Connecticut, and very early settlers of this township. By this union 
were born Hattie D., George W., Clara B. , Walter M. and Nellie N. 
(deceased). Since their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Spencer have lived in this 
township with the exception of two years spent in Rockdale Township, one 
year at Corry, Erie County, and the winter of 1882, during which Mr. Spencer 
kept a general provision store at Mill Village, Erie County. Mr. Spencer, 
who is an energetic, enterprising business man, has principally engaged in 
buying and shipping stock. Ho purchased the Sturgis homestead farm, on 
which he has built a handsome residence, and added many other valuable 
improvements. He is very much interested in the culture and improvement 
of live stock, and has on his place sotne valuable fine blooded animals. 



800 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

W. B. TAYLOR, farmer, P. O. Lincolnville, was born in Otsego County, 
N. Y., October 6, 1830; son of Charles and Polly (Thornton) Taylor, who 
came to Erie County, Penn., in 1845. They were parents of the following 
named children: Charles W., of Michigan, was a soldier in the Union Army 
during the late war; Washington D., who died in his country's service at City 
Point, Va. , August 28, 1864; jVIrs. Jane Young (deceased); Daniel A., of 
Galena, III.; William B.; John H., shot by guerrillas in Missouri, July 28, 
1862; and Oliver J., who died in his country's service after the battle of 
Chancellorsville, January 2, 1863. Mrs. Taylor departed this life May 19, 
1854. ]VIr. Taylor subsequently married again and now lives in Oceana 
County, Mich. Our subject obtained his education mainly by private study 
while farming and lumbering, and early engaged in teaching. In 1847 he 
ran, on the Clarion River, the first engine used for manufacturing lumber in 
Pennsylvania. He was married July 3, 1853, to Exana G. Chapin, born in 
Smyrna, N. Y. , September 16, 1834, daughter oE John Chapin, of this town- 
ship, and has the following named children: Jared T., Mrs. Delana G. Sill, 
Clement C, Oliver H. and Alma J. Mr. Taylor, besides managing his large 
farm, has also extensively engaged in settling decedents' estates. He is a 
Republican in politics and has always held firm temperance principles. 



CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 

HENRY ALLEN, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, a native of the County of 
Kent, England, was born September 2, 1806; son of James and Elizabeth 
(Fuggle) Allen, who settled in what is now Cambridge Township, this county, 
in 1824. They located on the farm on which Mr. William Masters now resides, 
and cleared most of it. They had thirteen children: Charles, William, Mary. 
Eliza, Ann, Henry, Henry (second), Jane, Matilda and Thomas; three others 
died in infancy. Our subject was married August 30, 1833, to Mary, daugh- 
ter of John I. and Elizabeth (Huston) Humes, of Woodcock Township, this 
county. By this union there were ten children, viz.: James J., Matilda J., 
John O., Oscar E., Mary J. (deceased), Parnell E. (deceased), Henry C, Ade- 
laide L., Homer W. and Alma J. Of these, James J. married Martha J. Agee, 
in Dakota; Matilda J. married James Hawthorne, in Cambridge Township, 
this county; Henry C. married Maggie I. Klein, also in Cambridge Township; 
Adelaide L. married Amos Willey in Bloomfield Township; Homer W. lives 
in Montana; Alma J. married Francis Glover in Bloomfield Township ;• John 
O. and Oscar E. reside with their parents. Mr. Allen has lived fifty years on 
his farm, most of which he cleared himself. He has been Supervisor and 
School Director of his township. In politics he is a Democrat His wife has 
been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church fifty -seven years. 

LYMAN H. ALLEN, farmer,P.O. Cambridgeboro, was born in Albany, N. Y., 
October 15, 1821; son of Charles and Phila (Webster) Allen, who settled in 
what is now Cambridge Township, this county, in 1822. Charles Allen was a 
native of England; son of James and Elizabeth (Fuggle) Allen, the latter 
of whom located in this township, in 1824. Our subject was married, June 26, 
1846 to Hannah, daughter of James and Sarah (Ashman) Kelly, of Rockdale, 
Township of this county. By "this union there are six children: Celestia L., 
wife of George Herrick, in Salamanca, N. Y'. ; Sarah E., wife of Uriah Fink, 



CAMBKIDGE TOWNSHIP. 801 

in Cambridgeboro; Emma C, wife of George Webster of Rockdale Township, 
this county; Esther S., wife of Dr. Dwight Gray, in Cambridgeboro; 
Charles O., married to Rosa Watson, and lives on the homestead with his 
father; Milo R. L., married to Ida Fox, in Salamanca, N. Y. In 1854 Mr. 
Allen settled on his present farm, which he cleared himself. He and his wife 
are adherents of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the Cam- 
bridge Grange. In politics he is a Republican. 

FREDERICK J. ALLEN, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in 
Cambridge Township, this county, July 16, 1824; son of Charles and Phila 
(Webster) Allen, who settled in Cambridge Township in 1824. The former 
was a native of England, the latter of Albany, N. Y. They were parents of 
live children: Eliza A. (deceased), Lyman H, Frederick J., Sally M. (deceased) 
and Rachel E. Our subject was united in marriage November 13, 1851, with 
Sophronia M., daughter of William and Annis Shattuck Arbuckle, and has had 
four children: Alarene C. (deceased), Berkley W. (deceased), Annis F. and Carrie 
S. Mr. Allen resides on the farm where he was born and where his father 
first settled and which he cleared. He and his family are members of the 
Presbyterian Church. In politics he is a Republican. 

BRADFORD W. AMES, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in what 
is now Cambridge Township, this county, October 20, 1837, son of Willard and 
Emily (Marcy) Ames; the former a son of Amos and Roby (Andress) Ames, 
who came from Massachusetts and settled in this township in 1813. They 
were parents of seven children: Elizabeth, Isaac, Asaph, Laura, David, Will- 
ard and Anna. Willard and Emily Ames had ten children, viz. : Amos M., 
Emily C, Esther A., Esther A. (second), Jemima M., Joseph W., Laura A., Brad- 
ford W., Joseph C. and an infant not named. Our subject was married October 
20, 1863, to Amanda, daughter of Seth and Abigail (Lester) Calkins. The 
issue of this union is three children: Ellis H. and Ella C. (twins) and Brad- 
ford W., Jr. Mr. Ames resides on the old homestead settled by his grand- 
father in 1813. Ho has held nearly every oflBce in the gift of his town.ship; 
in politics is independent. He and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

TIMOTHY L. BARBER, attorney at law and auctioneer, Cambridgeboro, 
was born in Chautauqua County, N. Y., June 20, 1835; son of Chauncey and 
Keziah (Green) Barber. His father died when he was but four months old. 
In 1837 his mother moved to Girard, Erie Co., Penn., and resided there till 
1847, when she settled in Rockdale Township, this county, where she resided 
till her death, which occurred in 1875. Our subject was educated at the com-, 
•non school and located in Cambridgeboro in 1854, and learned the shoe-maker's 
trade, which was his principal business up to 1872, when he began to practice 
law, in which he is still engaged. Besides attending to his profession ho is 
doing an extensive business as auctioneer, having been licensed in 1879, and 
is considered A, No. 1 in this line. He was married, June 20, 1859, to Mary, 
daughter of Samuel and Maria Peters, early settlers of Cussewago Township, 
this county. By this union there are two children: Eva and Clara D. Mr. 
Barber has held several offices in Cambridgeboro. He is a member of the 
Knights of Honor. In politics he is a Democrat. 

JACOB S. BAUGHER, farmer, P. O. Woodcock, was born in Chautau- 
qua County, N. Y., January 4, 1816; son of John and Esther (Stoupt) Baugher, 
who settled in this township in 1819; the latter was a daughter of Jacob 
Stoupt and of German descent. John Baugher, who was a son of Henry 
Baugher, a native of Germany and one of the first settlers in Cambridge 
Township, coming here in 1800, was parent of following children: Mary, 



802 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Jacob S., David, Michael, Margaret, Emily J., Nancy, Isabella, Laura J. and 
Samuel. Our subject was married, March 10, 1842, to Lucy A., daughter of 
George and Christena (Null) Heile, of Lebanon County, Penn. By this union 
there were the following children: Charles L., married to Lucy Wood, in Rich- 
mond Township; Melissa, deceased; David T., married to Sophia Humes, in Rock- 
dale Township; George A., married to Parnell Humes, in Richmond Town- 
ship; John S., married to Eveline Lang, in Woodcock Towilship; Helen, 
deceased; James O., married Olive Winings, in Cambridge Township; L. War- 
ren, married to Effie Hemstreet, in Cambridge Township; and Martha A., wife of 
Wilber Shaffer, resides in Woodcock. Mr. Baugher lives on a part of the 
farm settled by his grandfather in 1800. He and his wife are members of the 
Methodist Church. He has been Supervisor and School Director of his town- 
ship. In politics is a Democrat 

CALVIN W. BEECH, contractor and builder, Cambridgeboro, was born 
in this township, July 29, 1843 ; son of Orestes and Ruth (Dodge) Beech, the 
former born in what is now Cambridge Township, this county, son of Anon 
Beech, who came from Windsor, Mass., and settled here in 1810. The father 
of Mrs. Beech was also an early settler of Cambridge Township. Orestes 
Beech was parent of ten children, eight now living, viz. : Orville, married to 
Maria Simmons, in Cambridge Township, this county; Edwin, married to Kate 
Roberts, in Washington Township, Erie Co., Penn. ; Huldah, wife of Avery 
Swan, of Nodaway County, Mo. ; Calvin W. ; Scribner, married to Tilly Bur- 
dich, in Nodaway County, Mo.; Washington, married to Elda Snow, also in 
Nodaway County, Mo. ; Albert and Amos. Our subject was mairied March 18, 
1869, to Margaret M., daughter of Liberty and Catherine (Shaffer) Leonard, 
of this township, by whom he has had four children:- Nellie, Ida, Clarence 
(deceased) and Freddie (deceased). Mr. Beech located in Cambridgeboro in 
1869 and engaged in contracting and building, which occupation he still fol- 
lows. Mr. and 'Mie. Beech are adherents of the Presbyterian Church. He is a 
member of the K. of H. In politics he is a Republican. 

DARIUS D. BIRCHARD (deceased), whose portrait appears in this work, 
was born September 21, 1804, in Berkshire County, Mass. ; son of James and 
Lucy (Gillett) Birchard, natives of Berkshire County, Mass. They were the 
parents of fourteen children, ten of whom grew up and came to Crawford 
County, viz. : James K., Virgil, Lucy, Hannorah S., Worthy, Lydia O., Darius 
D., Cyrus, Levi G. and Adeline F. The parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Birch- 
ard, came to what is now Cambridge Township, this county, in 1813, and here 
died, the father in 1852, the mother in 1847; they were worthy members of 
the Presbyterian Church. Our subject attended the county schools and was 
brought up on a farm. He was married October 20, 1830, to Caroline Parker, 
born May 10, 1810, daughter of Joel and Abigail (Hart) Parker, natives of 
Connecticut, who settled in Ashtabula County, Ohio, where they died. They 
were parents of nine children, viz. : Lola, Moses A., Joel, Abigail, Caroline, 
Hannah, Levi, Harriet N., and one who died when an infant. Her parents were 
members of the Congregational Church. She was educated in the country 
schools and taught two terms. Soon after marriage our subject and wife set- 
tled on the farm now owned by their son, Dwight D., which they carried on 
until 1864, and then settled in Cambridgeboro, this county, where they erected 
a fine dwelling. Here Darius died in 1871. To our subject and wife were 
born nine children, viz. : Dwight D., Philena C, Sabia A., James, Henry C, 
Lola M., Francis P., Ledru R. and Edward L. C. Mr. Birchard was an 
adherent of the Presbyterian Church, with which organization his widow, who 
survives him, is also connected. 



CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 803 

ALONZO D. BIRCHARD, physician, Cambridgeboro, was born in Vernon 
Township, this county, February 28, 1836, son of Levi G. and Elizabeth 
{Gross) Birchard, and grandson of James Birchard, who settled in what is now 
Cambridge Township, this county, in 1813. Our subject was reared on a farm 
and received his early education at the common schools. He afterward 
attended select schools at Cambridgeboro and Meadville, Penn., and in 1860 
was a student at Allegheny College, Meadville. In 1861 he began the study 
of medicine with Dr. William J. Gamble, of Mosiertown, Penn., where he 
remained three years. In 1864 he received his diploma from the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, New York, and began the practice of his profession 
with Dr. Gamble, of Mosiertown, the same year, remaining with him two 
years. In 1866 he located in Cambridgeboro, where he has since been in 
active practice. He was married December 15, 1864, to Hannah F., daughter 
of John W. and Lodeika (Rockwell) McFadden, early settlers of Cambridge 
Township, this county, and by this union there are five children: George G., 
'Clarence C, Bessie B., Alonzo D. , Jr. and Louisa A. Dr. Birchard and 
wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the K. of 
H. and the A. O. U. W. 

EDWARD L. BIRCHARD, druggist and jeweler, Cambridgeboro, was born 
in Cambridge Township, this county, February 3, 1852, son of Darius D and 
Caroline (Parker) Birchard. Darius D., son of James Birchard, was one of 
the ten children who came with their parents from Becket, Mass., and settled 
in what is now Cambridge Township, this county, in 1813. Edward L. Birch- 
ard, our subject, learned the jeweler's trade at Warren, Ohio, going there in 
1873. In 1875 he opened a jewelry store in Geneva, Ohio, where he remained 
till 1876, when he came to Cambridge and engaged in the same business here. 
In 1883 he bought the drug business of A. K. Fever, which he is carrying on 
in connection with his jewelry trade. He is a member of the Masonic order, 
Lodge 473, of Cambridge, and is Treasurer, Collector and a member of the 
Council. In politics he is a Republican. 

PETER CATLING, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was bom in the 
County of SnflFolk, England, February 20, 1826; son of John and Mary (Page) 
Catling, of that locality. He came to America in 1853, and located in Wayne 
Township, Erie County, where he resided eight years, and in 1861 settled in 
Rockdale Township, this county. Here he lived until 1869, when he moved 
to Cambridge Township, where he now resides. He was married Novem- 
ber 16, 1848, to Margaret, daughter of Edward and Elizabeth (Jones) 
Edwards, of North Wales. By this union there are three children: Mary, 
born in England, wife of Sylvester Mitchell (they reside in this township); Jane 
A., wife of Andrew Frisbie, in LeBoeuff, Erie Co., Penn.; Edward J., mar- 
ried to Virginia Anderson (they reside on the home farm with his father). 
Mr. and Mrs. Catling are members of the Christian Church at McLallen's 
Corners, Erie County. He is now serving his fourth term as Auditor of his 
Township. In politics he is a Democrat. 

CHARLES F. CHAMBERLAIN, late County Superintendent Schools, 
Cambridgeboro, was born in Strongsville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, March 5, 1844; 
son of Uriah T. and Sarah (Sanborn) Chamberlain, who settled in Conneaut 
Township in 1853. Uriah T. was a son of Deacon Isaac and Amy (Benton) 
Chamberlain, the former an extensive farmer in central New York State; one 
of the leaders in the temperance reform, and at the time of its first agitation he 
kept a prominent hotel, which was the first, and for a long time the only 
temperance house known in that region. His wife, a relative of Hon. Thomas 
Benton, was of Puritanic origin, whose ancestors came over in the "May- 



804 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

flower," and several relica of that historic voyage are still preserved iu the 
family as heirlooms. Uriah T. graduated from Oberlin College in 1838; was 
ordained and installed as pastor of the Congregational Church of Fitchville, 
Ohio, the same year. His last pastorate was with the Congregational Church 
at Hartford, Trumbull Co., Ohio, where he preached regularly one-half the 
time till the last Sabbath in October, 1878, at which time his health failing, 
he was obliged to discontinue his labors. He died at the residence of his son, 
in Cambridge, January 10, 1880, in his seventy-first year; his widow survives 
him at the age of seventy-five and resides with her son, Charles F. They had 
seven children: Mary F. (deceased), Isaac D., now in Nebraska, Ebenezer 
B., New York; Charles F. ; Sarah S. , married to C. S. Carr, in Michigan; 
Uriah T. Jr. (deceased) and George A., (deceased). Our subject married, 
December 4, 1870, Flora, daughter of Deacon Seth and Irene (Smith) Waid, 
of Randolph Township, this county. They have one child, Anna L. Mr. 
Chamberlain has been a prominent resident of Cambridgeboro since 1875. 
He began teaching in the common schools at the age of seventeen. He was 
teacher in the public school at Riceville three years, beginning in 1864; in 
] 867-68 he was Principal of the graded school at Mosiertown, and in 1869 went 
to Hydetown, where he was Principal of the graded school six consecutive 
years. In 1875 our subject came to Cambridgeboro, and was Principal of the 
high school three years; in 1878 he was elected Superintendent of the com- 
mon schools of this county, and is now serving his 3econd term. He is Chair- 
man of the Executive Committee of the Pennsylvania State Teachers' Associa- 
tion; in 1876 was associated with D. P. Robbins, M. D., in the publication of 
the Cambridge Index. Our subject and wife are members of the Congrega- 
tional Church. In politics he is a Republican. He has always been an 
active worker in the cause of temperance, and for two years was President of 
the Cambridgeboro Christian Temperance Union. Since the above was writ- 
ten our subject, on June 1, 1884, closed his second term of office as Superin- 
tendent of the schools of Crawford County, and in July following moved with 
his family to Humboldt, Richardson Co., Neb., having been previously elected 
to the position of Superintendent and Principal of the schools of that city, 
and since his arrival there he has been unanimously elected President of the 
Teachers' Association of Richardson County for the ensuing year. 

RICHARD D. CROSLEY, mason, Cambridgeboro, -was born in Collins, 
Steuben Co., N. Y., November 5, 1825; son of Moses and Catherine (Ayers) 
Crosley, who settled in Hayfield Township, this county, in 1834. Only 
four of the eleven children born to them are now living: James in Cortland 
County, N. Y., Edwin, in Illinois, Moses, in Hayfield Township, this county, 
and Richard D., who resided in Hayfield Township, this county, till he was 
twenty-five years of age. He learned his trade at Conneautville, and in 1858 
located in Cambridge, where he has lived ever since. Our subject has been 
twice married; on the first occasion, December 29, 1860, to Mary L., daughter 
of Samuel St. John, of Washington Township, Erie Co., Penn., by whom 
there were two children: Mary C, wife of Derastus Closson, of Cussewago 
Township, this county, and Miles R. His second marriage. May 30. 1875, 
was with Martha Collins, a native of Delaware, of German descent, and a 
dai^ghter of Samuel H. and Eliza R. (Cole) Collins, of South Carolina. Mr. 
Crosley has been a School Director of Hayfield, and has held other minor 
offices. In politics he is a Republican. 

JACKSON DOCTOR, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in Cam- 
bridge Township, this county, October 25, 1840; son of James and Mary 
(Humes) Doctor, the former a son of Leonard and Elizabeth (Hiimes) Doctor, 



CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 805 

who settled in what is now Cambridge Township, this county, in 1800. 
Leonard was a son of George Doctor, who was a native of Germany. Eliza- 
beth, the wife of Leonard, was a native of Lycoming County, Penn. , and of 
Irish parentage. Mary, the wife of James Doctor, was a daughter of Archi- 
bald Humes, who settled here in 1797. Of the twelve children born to James 
Doctor, nine are now living, viz; John D., Margaret, Elizabeth, Rebecca, 
Sarah J., James L., Jackson, Leonard J. and Joseph M. Our subject was 
married September 19, 1871, to Agnes, daughter of James and Ann (Hutchi- 
son) Richard, of Vernon Township. By this union are two children: Estella 
and Emma. Mr. Doctor has been Judge of Elections, School Director, and 
has held many other offices in his township. In politics he is a Democrat. 

WILLIAM L. DOW, millwright, Drake's Mills, was born in Springfield, 
Mass., June 8, 1818; son of Asa and Anna (Little) Dow, all of whom located 
in Cambridge Township, this county, in 1838. Mr. Dow learned the trade of 
millwright after coming here and has followed that business ever since. He 
was married, January 8, 1844, to Betsy, daughter of Jonathan and Lydia 
(Pressy) Reynolds, early settlers of Erie County. By this union there are 
two daughters: Lydia, wife of Alton Thompson (have three children: Clyde, 
William and Earl), and Lina, wife of William Nason (have two children: 
Edgar G. and Maud). Both daughters reside in Cambridge Township, and 
Mr. Dow has lived in the vicinity of Drake's Mills ever since he settled in the 
county. 

IRAD C. DRAKE, merchant, Cambridgeboro, was bom in Cranesville, 
Erie Co., Penn., November 27, 1849, son of Henry A. and Lucina (Sherwood) 
Drake. Henry A. was a son of Francis and Demis (Kelsey) Drake, of Stock- 
bridge, Mass., and Francis was a son of William Drake, a native of England, 
who came to Massachusetts in his youth and lived and died there. Lucina, 
the wife of Henry A. Drake, was a daughter of John Sherwood, who settled 
in Washington Township, Erie Co., Penn., in 1816. Irad C. Drake, our sub- 
ject, located in Cambridge in 1877 and engaged in the clothing and gents' 
furnishing goods business, which he has carried on successfully to the present 
time. He was married, May 8, 1883, to Emma L., daughter of Isaac B. and 
Maria (Mossinger) Gerow, of Cambridge Township, this county. Mr. Drake 
and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a member 
of the I. O. O. F., E. A. U., and A. O. U. W. 

EUGENE DRAKE, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in Union City, 
Erie Co., Penn., August 12, 1852, son of Henry A. and Lucina M. (Sher- 
wood) Drake. He settled in Cambridge Township in 1867, and was married 
January 1, 1877, to Ida, daughter of Zadok and Elizabeth (Waterhouse) 
Rhodes, who settled in what is now Cambridge Township in 1835. By this 
union there are two children: Zadiee A. and Allen E. Mr. Drake has resided 
on his farm since 1877. 

JAMES R. DURHAM, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in Rock- 
dale Township, Crawford Co., Penn., July 24, 1816, son of James and Moor 
(Fullerton) Durham, who settled in Crawford County in 1797, the former a 
native of Delaware, the latter a daughter of Thomas Fullerton, an early settler 
of this county. They were parents of nine children: Hannah, Sally, Polly, 
Betsey, James R., Mary Ann, Jane, Hazard P. and Angeline. James Dur- 
ham, Sr. , was one of the first settlors on French Creek, Rockdale Township, 
this county, where he cleared a farm; he also cleared eleven acres on what in 
now known as Water Street, in the city of Meadville, Penn. He died in 1865, 
aged eighty-six. Our subject has always resided in Rockdale and Cambridge 
Townships, and has been principally engaged in farming. He was married 



806 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

April 17, 1838, to Lavina, daughter of Pilgrim and Rebecca (Alford) Isher- 
wood, who were early settlers of Rockdale Township, this county. By this 
union were born Rebecca J. (deceased); Amy L., wife of Truman Hendry x, of 
Elkhart, Ind. ; Polly E. (deceased); Rose E., wife of Dr. Robbins, Erie, Penn. ; 
FrancenieE. (deceased); LenaE., wife of Andrew McElheney, Franklin, Penn.; 
Fayette M. (deceased); Addie H., wife of Henry Dowler, residing with her 
parents; Phebe E., wife of Sherod Chapin, Cambridge Township; Kate M., 
wife of Fredric Chapin, Clarendon. Penn.; Sylvia A., wife of Charles Quill- 
iam. Clarendon, Penn. ; Wilson S., Rockdale Township; Hattie A.; John C. 
Mr. Durham and wife are members of the Baptist Church. He has been 
Supervisor and Treasurer of his township for several terms. In politics is a 
Democrat. 

GLENN I. FOLSOM, merchant, Cambridgeboro, was born May 3, 1857; 
was the first white male child to see the light of day in Glencoe, McLeod 
Co., Minn., now a city of 8,000 inhabitants. He is a son of John and Mary 
J. (Smith) Folsom, former a native of New Hampshire, and a pioneer of Min- 
nesota, latter a native of Erie County, Penn. John Folsom was a son of 
John W. Folsom, of New Hampshire. Mrs. Folsom was a daughter of John 
W. and Parmelia M. (Fuller) Smith, who were natives of Essex County, N. Y. 
They were parents of three children: Watson A. (deceased), Glenn I., and 
Edith E. (deceased), wife of John McKee. Our subject was married Decem- 
ber 9, 1880, to Edna T., daughter of Frederick A. and Tryphosa (Snow) Nich- 
ols, by whom he bas one child — Donald B. Mrs. Folsom's mother was a 
daughter of Ralph and Thankful (Snow) Snow, who came from Becket, Berk- 
shire Co., Mass., and settled in what is now Cambridge Township in 1816. 
Mr. Folsom has been in business in Cambridgeboro since the fall of 1882, and 
owns an interest in the Grange store. He is a F. & A. M., a member of the 
I. O. O. F., and E. A. U. In politics he is a Republican. 

JAMES W. FORD, merchant. Cambridgeboro, was born in Woodcock, 
this county, July 31, 1852, son of William and Mary A. (Stone) Ford, 
the former a son of James Ford, who was a son of Peter Ford, all early set- 
tlers of Woodcock Township, this county; the latter a daughter of Winette 
Stone, who, with her father, was also an early settler of that township. James 
W. Ford, our subject, was man-ied April 2, 1877, to Anna Burns, of Genesee, 
N. Y. They have three children: Hattie M., Howard W. and Blanche. Mr. 
Ford located in Cambridgeboro in the spring of 1883, and, in company with 
his brother, Henry O., embarked in the grocery and boot and shoe trade, in 
which they are engaged at the present time. He is a member of the I. O. O. 
F., and the A. O. U. W. 

OLIVER A. GAGE, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in Waterford 
Township, Erie Co., Penn., November 1, 1819, son of Richard and Clara 
(Alford) Gage, who came from Addison Coanty, Vt. , and located in Erie 
County, Penn., in 1816, removing to what is now Cambridge Township, this 
county, in 1820. Here they located on the farm (which they cleared) now 
owned by Henry Klie. In 1838 they settled on the farm now owned by our 
subject, most of which they cleared. Richard Gage died in March, 1869, in 
his eighty-fourth year. His wife died April 7, 1865, aged seventy- four. They 
were parents of twelve children: Peter A., in Cambridge; Aurelia, wife of 
William Mitchell (both deceased); Cyrus (deceased), Stephen (deceased) ; Car- 
oline, wife of Timothy Butler, Nebraska; Walter R. (deceased;; Oliver A. ; 
Harriet, wife of Daniel Smith 'both deceased"); Rebecca (deceased); Nelson 
(deceased); Orange, residing in Kansas, and Julia Ann, wife of A. M. Edwards, 
residing in Titusville, Crawford Co., Penn. Oliver A. Gage has been twice 



CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 807 

married; on first occasion, January 1, 1847, to Mary, daughter of Eliud and 
Polly (Williamson) Greaves, of Vermont, by whom he had six children: Clara, 
wife of Laban A. Tucker, of Cambridge Township (have one child — Walter); 
James, married Eliza Greaves, of Cambridge (have two children: Mary A. and 
George R. ) ; George (deceased ) ;Adelia (deceased) ; Stephen and Alvin (deceased). 
Our subject's second marriage, February 1, 1883, was with Augusta, daughter of 
William and Minerva (Hamlin) Sharp, of Warren, Penn., by whom he had one 
child — Mary E., born August 10, 1884. Mr. Gage is a member of the Cam- 
bridge Grange. In politics he was formerly a Republican, but is now inde- 
pendent. 

ISAAC B. GEROW, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in Oil Creek 
Township, this county, October 11, 1829, son of Gilbert A. and Jeannette 
(Titus) Gerow. Gilbert A. Gerow, a hatter by trade, was a native of Orange 
County, N. Y. , and settled in Oil Creek Township, this county, in 1814, where 
he passed the greater part of his life, though the last ten years were spent in 
Troy, N. Y. , where he died in 1844, aged sixty-four years. His wife, born in 
Lancaster, Penn., was a daughter of Daniel Titus, one of the first settlers in 
Oil Creek Township, where he located in 1796. Our subject was married 
April 15, 1849, to Maria, daughter of Andrew Mossinger, of Mead Township, 
this county. By this union were eight children: John, married to Catherine 
Peck (they live in Warren County, Penn. ); Gilbert, deceased; Daniel, deceased; 
Daniel T. , married to Lillie Hyde; Marvin, now in Montana; Henry andObed, 
deceased and Emma L., wife of I. C. Drake, of Cambridge. Daniel T. was 
a graduate of the normal school, Edlnboro, Penn. ; studied law two years with 
W. R. Bole, of Msadville, and was admitted to the bar. He is now the prin- 
cipal agent of the Standard Oil Company at Jacksonville, Fla. Isaac B. Gerow 
spent the first five years of his married life in Venango County, Penn. After- 
ward lived three years in Riceville, this county, engaging in the lumber busi- 
ness. He then returned to Venango County and manufactured lumber for 
twenty-two years. In 1870 he purchased the f ai'm in Cambridge Township 
where he has since resided. He has held the office of County Commissioner 
one term; Auditor of his township six years, and many other minor offices. He 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; in politics a Republican. 
Among the many adventures Mr. Gerow experienced in the early days, may be 
recorded the following: In the summer of 1854 a lynx or catamount inhab- 
ited the woods surrounding Mr. Gerow's residence in Venango Township, and 
became the terror of the neighborhood. On Christmas day of that year our 
subject and five others went in pursuit of the lynx, taking a fox hound with 
them which soon got on the scent and drove the brute to cover under some 
tree tops lying in a deep hollow. Mr. Gerow, managing to get a fair aim at 
his lynxship, fired and killed him. The animal measured five and a half feet 
from tip to tip. 

DANIEL GEROW, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in Oil Creek 
Township, this county, June 5, 1831, son of Gilbert and Jeannette (Titus) 
Gerow. (See sketch of I. B. Gerow.) Our subject, who was reared on a farm, 
when fourteen years old went to Venango County, Penn., and there engaged 
in farming and lumbering until he was thirty-six years of age. During the 
late Rebellion he enlisted September 8, 1862, in Company D, Eighteenth 
Pennsylvania Cavalry, and was in the battles of Winchester, Cedar Creek, 
Hagerstown, Falling Water, and many other engagements. After serving 
three years he was honorably discharged June 12, 1865. In 1868 he settled 
on the farm where he now resides, in this township. Mr. Gerow was married 
November 13, 1856, to Emily L., daughter of Aspinwall and Frances Cornwall, 



808 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

of Allegheny Township, Venango Co., Penn. By this union were born eight 
children, four now living, viz.: Herbert A., Cecil E. , Charles C. and Lizzie 
D. Our subject and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
He has served several terms as School Director of his township and one term 
as Supervisor. In politics he is a Republican. Mr. Gerow is a F. & A. M. 
and a member of the G. A. E. 

JAMES K. HAWTHORN, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was bom in 
Sugar Creek Township, VenangcCo., Penn., December 23, 1828, son of John 
D. and Sarah (Cousins) Hawthorn. John D. was a son of Delano Hawthorn, 
one of the first settlers of the State of Illinois; his wife was a daughter of 
"William Cousins, a native of England and one of the first settlers of Venango 
County, Penn. Our subject settled in Cambridge Township, this county, in 
1865. He was married January 1, 1862, to Matilda, daughter of Henry and 
Mary (Humes) Allen, of Cambridge Township, this county, the former of whom 
was a native of England, and settled in Cambridge Township in 1824; the latter 
was a daughter of John Humes, an early settler of Woodcock Township, this 
County. By this union there were six children, viz. : Abner, William, Boone, 
Mary (deceased), James and Bertha. Mr. Hawthorn and wife are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has been Supervisor and School Director 
of his township. In politics he was formerly a Democrat, but is now a Pro- 
hibitionist. 

ALONZO HERRICK, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in Berk- 
shire County, Mass., June 2, 1818, son of Ezra and Nancy (Ward) Herrick, 
who in 1836 settled on the farm in Cambridge Township now owned by O. E. 
Kingsley, which they cleared and improved. They subsequently moved to 
Cranesville, Erie Co., Penn., and there died. They were parents of eight 
children, viz.: Almira (deceased), wife of James Sargent, of Massachusetts; 
William, residing in Erie County, Penn., was married twice, his first wife 
being Betsy Robbins, his second Angeline Durham; Alonzo, our subject; 
Eunice, wife of Darius Rockwell, in Cambridge Township, this county; 
Nathan, married to Julia Goodenough, in Cranesville; Olive, wife of Harvey 
Hilliger, in Wisconsin; Nancy; Phineas, married to Martha Hotchkiss, in 
Michigan. Our subject was married April 23, 1845, to Eliza A., daughter of 
Ira and Amret (Cass) Nichols, formerly of Massachusetts, who located in 
Waterford Township, Erie Co., Penn., in 1831, and in 1835 removed to Rock- 
dale, now Cambridge Township, this county, settling on the farm now occupied 
by our subject, with whom Mrs. Nichols, now in her ninety-fourth year, is 
living. To Mr. and Mrs. Herrick were born eight children: Nancy A.; Sarah 
M., wife of John Anderson, of Topeka, Kan.; George C, married to Lizzie 
Culbertson, Edinboro, Penn.; Norton J., married to Flora Culbertson, Cam- 
bridgeboro; Alice E. ; Joseph M. , married to Blanche Burchfield, in 
Edinboro, Penn. ; Myra; and Willie C. Mr. Herrick and wife are adherents 
of the Methodist Church. He is a member of the G. A. R. In politics he is 
a Republican. 

JOHN P. HICKS, liveryman and farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born 
in Cambridge Township, this county; son of William and Mary (Fullerton) 
Hicks, natives of Pennsylvania (both deceased). They were the parents of four 
children, of whom John P. is the third. Our subject received a common 
school education, and at the age of seventeen engaged to learn shoe-making, 
at which trade he worked sixteen years. By industrious habits and economy, 
he saved enough money to enable him to purchase a farm of ninety acres in Cam- 
bridge Township, this county. He owned a livery stable four years previous 
to 1876, when he moved to his present farm. Four years later he returned 



CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 809 

to Cambridge, and again entered the livery business, and at present has six 
horses. He deals more or less extensively in horses— buying and selling. 
Mr. Hicks was married in 1877 to Lorena Farlin, a native of this county. 
He has served the people of this township one year as Assessor. In politics 
he is a Democrat. 

GEORGE D. HUMES, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born March 13, 
1828, son of Robert and Mary (Doctor) Humes; the former a son of Archibald 
Humes, who settled in what is now Cambridge Township, this county, in 1797; 
the latter a daughter of Leonard and Elizabeth (Humes) Doctor, who settled 
in this township in 1803, together with a brother and sister, Frederick and 
Mary Doctor, who never married. Their mother, who came with them, died 
in 1805 at an advanced age. Archibald Humes was the parent of three chil- 
dren: Mary, wife of James Doctor; Margaret, wife of George Doctor, and 
Robert, who married Mary Doctor and had two children — Elizabeth and George 
D. Our subject was married May 27, 1855, to Esther A., daughter of Will- 
ard and Emily (Marcy) Ames. By this union are two children: Elmer E. and 
Edwin G.' Mr. Humes was so unfortunate as to lose his arm by being caught 
in a threshing-machine, December 23, 1848. He and his wife are members 
of the Methodist Church. Our subject is a member of Cambridge Lodge, 901, 
I. O. O. F., and the E. A. U. of Cambridge. He has been Justice of the Peace 
fifteen years and has held nearly every o£Sce in the gift of his township. 
Politically he is a Democrat. 

ALLEN D. HUTCHISON, proprietor of livery, Cambridgeboro, was 
born in Richmond Township, this county, July 19, 1843; son of Elder and 
Harriet (Allen) Hutchison; the former a son of one of the first settlers of Rich- 
mond Township, this county, the latter a daughter of William and Harriet 
Allen, and grand daughter of James and Elizabeth (Fuggle) Allen, who set- 
tled in this township in 1824. All were natives of England. Elder Hutchi- 
son was parent of five children: Elizabeth, Mary, Allen D., Brady and Dwight. 
Our subject, Allen D. , was married April 15, 1866, to Mary L., daughter of 
James and Eunice (Morse) Decker, of Rockdale Township. By this union 
were four children: Delroy and Frank, now living; Blanche and Harry, 
deceased. Mr. Hutchison lived in Richmond Township until after marriage, 
when he removed to Rockdale Township, where he resided three years. In 
1874 he located in Cambridge, where he has since resided. He is a member of 
the Masonic Lodge of Cambridge. Has been Constable of the borough four 
terms; in politics is a Democrat. 

AMOS KELLY, banker, Cambridgeboro, was born in Rockdale Township, 
this county, September 8, 1838, son of John and Mary (Langley) Kelly, the 
former of whom was the first white child born in Rockdale Township, this 
county, son of Isaac and Hannah (Carnahan) Kelly, who located in Bloomtield 
Township, this county, in 1799, but in 1800 removed to Rockdale Township, 
where they passed the remainder of their lives. The father of our subject 
was twice married; on first occasion, December 20, 1821, to Mary, daughter 
of John and Mary Langley, the former a native of Ireland and who settled in 
Cambridge Township, this county in 1812; the latter a native of Washington 
County, Penn. By this union were six children: Nancy, deceased; James P. ; 
Polly A., wife of H. H. Howard; John L. ; George N., deceased; and Amos. 
The present wife of .lohn Kelly was Mrs. Lydia (West) Hamilton, to whom he 
was married March 4, 1846. and to this union wore born three children: Joseph- 
ine, wife of Jason McCray; Agnes, deceased; and an infant, deceased. 
Our subject was married May 14, 1857, to Adelaide, daughter of Virgil and 
Mary (Logue) Birchard, and grand -daughter of James Birchard, formerly of 



810 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Massachusetts, who settlfld in Cambridge Township, this county, in 1813. Mr. 
nd Mrs. Kelly are parents of six children: Alton A., Milford B ; Bernie C, 
eceased; Frank R.; an infant, deceased; and Inez, deceased. Our subject 
and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. In 1872 he located in 
Cambridceboro, and in company with his brother. John Langley Kelly, 
embarked in banking business, which has since been conducted suoc^sfully 
under firm name J. L. & A. Kelly. In politics Mr. Kelly is a stanch Repub- 
lican. 

HENRY C. KLIE, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in Washing- 
ton Township, Erie Co., Penn., October 28, 1845; son of Henry and Aurelia 
(Arnaman) Klie, who located in Rockdale Township, this county, in 1855, 
and, after residing there eighteen years, moved to Richmond Township, this 
county, where they now live. Our subject was married January 1, 1870, to 
Amelia, daughter of Henry Bramer, and a native of Germany. By this union 
there are three children: Dona, Frank and Walla. Mr. Klie purchased his 
farm in Cambridge Township in 1874. He has acted as Supervisor, Inspect- 
or, Judce of Elections, and Auditor of his township. In politics he is a 
Democrat. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge at Cambridge. 

AARON T. LONG, butcher, Cambridgeboro, was born in Cambridge 
Township, this county, July 13, 1834; son of Jacob and Ann (Wolf) Long, 
who came from Lebanon County, Penn., and settled in this township about 
1828. Jacob Long had eight children, three of whom are living, viz. : Har- 
riet, wife of Frank Maxwell; Margaret M., wife of John Terrill; and Aaron 
T. Our subject was married November 26, 1863, to Lucretia, widow of 
Henry C. Long, by whom she had three children, two now living: Edward D., 
now in Wisconsin, and George C, of East Saginaw, Mich. (George C. was 
married September 24, 1884, at East Saginaw, Mich., by Rev. W. Spencer, to Miss 
Leona Zeron, of Port Dover, Ontario. She is a daughter of Zera and Phebe 
(Carter) Rockwell, who settled in Cambridge Township in 1817.) By this union 
there are two children: Clara E. and Flora A. Mr. Long had always fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits until 1877, when he sold his farm and located in 
Cambridgeboro, and has since been engaged in butchering. He has been 
Supervisor of his township, Judge and Inspector of Election. In politics he 
is a Democrat. Mr. Long, wife and eldest daughter are members of the Pres- 
byterian Church. 

MATTHEW H. LUSE, Justice of the Peace, Cambridgeboro, was born in 
Warren County, Penn., December 11, 1844; son of Israel and Elizabeth 
(Tuthill) Luse, of that county. Israel Luse, who was a son of Shubel Luse 
and a native of Vermont, was lost at sea in 1849, while on a voyage to Cali- 
fornia. Elizabeth, his wife, a native of Warren Comity, died in 1851. Ovir 
subject came to this county in 1859, locating at Meadville, where he learned 
the trade of carriage-painter. At the age of sixteen he enlisted in the war of 
the Rebellion, going out in Company I, Second Pennsylvania Cavalry. He 
was in the battles of Opequan, Va., Cedar Mountain, Seven Pines, Gettys- 
burg, Mine Run, the Wilderness, second battle of Bull Run, and other 
engagements. He was taken prisoner at the second battle of Bull Run and 
paroled on the field. In 1864 he was again taken prisoner, at Petersburg, 
and after nine months' confinement in Libby, Andersonville, Savannah and 
Millen prisons, was exchanged, and he then rejoined his regiment at Peters- 
biu'g. He enlisted October 6, 1861, and was honorably discharged July 13, 
1865. Our subject was married April 20, 1874. to Sarah, daughter of Charles 
P. and Margaret (Baiigher) Penoyer, of Cambridgeboro. By this union were 
born two children, Charles (deceased) and Ernest. Mr. Luse located in Cam- 



CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 811 

bridgeboro in 1873. In 1881 he was appointed Justice of the Peace, to fill 
an unexpired term, and was elected in 1882 for a term of five years. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican. Mr. Luse and wife are members of the Conf.'regationaI 
Church; he is a member of the I. 0. O. F., A. O. U. W., K. of H. and G. A. R. 

L. HALSEY MITCHELL, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in what 
is now Cambridge Township, Crawford Co., Penn., December 14, 1832. son of 
Peter and Hannah (Weston) Mitchell, and grandson of Nathan Mitchell, who 
settled in Rockdale Township, this county, in 1801. Peter Mitchell was the 
parent of seven children: Polly, wife of Thomas Holden, Erie County, Penn.; 
Harriet, wife of Josiah Robbins, of Cambridge Township, this county; Eunice 
(deceased), wife of W. C. Isherwood; Susan, wife of James Culbertson of Erie 
County, Penn. ; James W. ; George W., and L. Halsey. Our subject was married 
February 14, 1856, to Adeline, daughter of Stephen and Elizabeth (Isherwood) 
Culbertson, of Erie County, Penn., by whom he has two children: Ella, wife of 
Charles Siverling, residing in Erie County, Penn. (they have one son, named 
Albertis Leroy) and Florence E. Mr. Mitchell never sought office, though he 
has held several minor positions in his township. He is a Republican in poli- 
tics. Is a member of the A. O. U. W., and of the Cambridge Grange. 

SYLVESTER M. MITCHELL, farmer and blacksmith, P. O. Cambridge- 
boro, was born in Cambridge Township, Crawford Co., Penn., May 23, 1850, 
son of William and Aurelia (Gage) Mitchell, and grandson of Nathan Mitchell, 
who settled in Rockdale Township, this county, in 1801. Our subject was 
married January 10, 1871, to Mary Catling, a native of England, and daughter 
of Peter and Margaret (Edwards) Catling, of Cambridge Township, this county. 
By this union were born four children, viz.: Peter, Slabel, Bertie and Anna. 
Mr. Mitchell has lived on his present farm for five years. In politics he is a 
Republican. 

AMASA F. MOSES, editor and proprietor of the Cambridge Netcs, Cam- 
bridgeboro, was born October 6, 1855, in Potsdam, N. Y., son of A. B. and 
Mary A. (Foster) Moses, the former born in 1815, in Vermont, and the latter 
in 1829, in the State of New York. They were the parents of six children. 
Our subject was educated in an academy at Canton, N. Y., and has always 
been an extensive reader on general subjects. His education has not only 
been literary but musical, and in 1873 he learned telegraphing. In 1874 he 
began the printer's trade at Union City, Penn., and rapidly advanced to the 
foremanship and subsequently to the position of publisher and editor. He 
was married in 1877 at Cambridgeboro, Penn., to Anna B. Hanson, born in 
Venango, Penn., in 1857, daughter of S. W. and Mary (Siverling) Hanson, 
the former born in 1835, in Canada, the latter in 1840, in Venango, Penn. 
To this union have been born four children, of whom two are now living, viz.: 
Roy and Ernest. Our subject resided in St. Lawrence County, N. Y., until 
1870, when he removed with his parents to Erie County, Penn., and came to 
Cambridgeboro in 1876. In 1878 he bought the Leader, a newspaper at 
Waterford, Erie Co., Penn., and in 1883 he returned to his present home, 
where he gives his personal attention to the editing and publishing of the 
Cambridge News. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church; a Republican 
in politics. He is a member of the I .O. O. F. and E. A. U. societies. 

BENJAMIN B. REYNOLDS, manufacturer, Cambridgeboro, was born in 
Waterford Township, Erie Co , Penn., September 17, 1837; son of George and 
Betsy (Lyiuan) Reynolds, both natives of this county and early settlers of Water 
ford Township, Erie County; tbe former of Scotch and Irish descent, son of 
William Reynolds; the latter was a daughter of William Lyman, and of Gormac 
lineage. Our subject was educated in the common schools of Erie County. In 



812 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

1855 he located in Woodstock, McHenry Co., 111., and worked in a planing- 
mill until the breaking out of the Rebellion. He enlisted, August 6, 1861, in 
Company F, Ninety- tifch Illinois Volunteer Infantry; and was in the battle 
of Champion Hill, went through the siege of Vicksburgand Natchez; took part 
in other minor engagements, and was honorably discharged at Chicago, 
111., June 17, 1863. Mr. Reynolds has been twice married, on first occa- 
sion, February 1, 1858, to Irene M., daughter of Matthew and Betsey (Gilbert) 
Reynolds, of Woodstock, 111., by whom he had one son, George M. Mrs. 
Reynolds dying April 14, 1874, our subject was married October 22, 1874, 
to Frances, daughter of Thomas and Fanny (Wyman) Bloomfield, and grand- 
daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Morris) Bloomfield, who were among the 
first settlers of Bloomfield Township, this county, which bears their name. 
The Bloamfields were of Scotch and the Wymans of Welsh and English descent; 
the ancestors of the latter being among the Pilgrims who came over in the 
"May Flower," and landed on Plymouth Rock. In 1866 Mr. Reynolds located 
in Cambridge and for three years worked in Johnson, St. John & Co.'s planing- 
mill. He went to Rockdale in 1869 and after occuping the position of foreman 
in the planing-mill of Kelly, Howard & Co. for three years, purchased the mill 
and continued the business two years for himself. In 1875 ho returned to 
Cambridge and embarked in same business which he conducted for four years, 
then began manufacturing shingles, in which he is still engaged. From 1878 
to 1882, in company with T. T. Root, he did an extensive business in barrel 
headings; since 1879, has also been engaged in manufacturing cider. In 1880 
he commenced making apple jelly, in which he is doing a large business, 
having all the latest improvements in machinery for manufacturing this article. 
Mr. Reynolds is one of the leading manufacturers and business men of Cam- 
bridge. Is a member of the I. O. O. F., A. O. U. W. and G. A. R. In 
politics he is a Republican. 

JAMES G.RHODES, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in Connecti- 
cut, June 5, 1808; son of Jonathan and Mary (Young) Rhodes, who settled in 
what is now Cambridge Township, this county, in 1835, on the tract now owned 
by his sons, James G. and Jonathan S. and Zadock's widow. They were parents 
of nine children: James G., Zadock, deceased; Amy, wife of Samuel B. , 
Thomas, in Missouri; Hiram B. (deceased); Jonathan S. : Lydia, wife of John 
Waterhouse, in LeBa3uf Township, Erie Co., Penn. ; Catherine, wife of Hiram 
Isherwood, of Cambridge Township, this county; Caroline, wife of William 
Laugherty, of Rockdale Township, this county; Violetta, wife of Christopher 
Warren, in LeBoeuf, Erie Co., Penn. Our subject was married November 14, 
1851, to Sally, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Anderson) Daniel, early set- 
tlers of Rockdale Township, thi§ county, the former a native of Bucks County, 
this State, the latter a native of Virginia. By this marriage there were eight 
children: Daniel (deceased); Hiram, married Viola Drake; George, married 
Alice Campbell (now deceased) ; Elizabeth, wife of Charles Campfield, of Rock- 
dale Township, this county; Anna (deceased); Mary; Rio and John. Mr. 
Rhodes has resided on his present place ever since he came to this county 
with his parents in 1835. He has been Constable, Supervisor and School 
Director of Rockdale Township, this county, and has held other minor offices. 
In politics he is a Republican. 

ZADOCK RHODES, deceased, was born in Sterling, Conn., August 25,1811, 
son of Jonathan and Mary (Young) Rhodes, who settled in Rockdale, now Cam- 
bridge Township, this county, in 1835. He was married January 21, 1841, to 
Elizabeth, daughter of William and Rebecca (Isherwood) Waterhouse, of Le- 
Boeuf Township, Erie Co., Penn. By this union were six children: Amy 



CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 818 

(deceased); Lewis (deceased); Almina F. ; Young J., married to Aurie Porter; 
Ida M., wife of Eugene Drake, and Allen. Those now living reside in Cam- 
bridge Township, this county. Mr. Rhodes held the office of Road Commis- 
sioner and School Director of his township several terms. In politics he was 
a Democrat. He died July 12, 1870, in his fifty-ninth year. His widow 
resides on the old homestead. 

YOUNG J. RHODES, lumber manufacturer, Cambridgboro, was born in 
Rockdale Township, this county, August 8, 1852; son of Zadock Y. and Eliz- 
abeth (Waterhouse) Rhodes, early settlers of that township. Our subject was 
raised on a farm and received his early educatiou at the common schools. He 
attended the Mount Union College at Alliance, Ohio, two years, graduating 
from that institution in 1874. He located in Cambridge Township, this, 
county, in 1875, and embarked in the manufacture of lumber, in which busi- 
ness he has been profitably engaged up to the present time. Mr. Rhodes was 
married May 31, 1875, to Aurie, daughter of Philander G. and Clarissa 
(Mitchell) Porter, of Cambridge Township, this county. By this union there 
are three children : Dolly, Horace and Robert. Mr. Rhodes is now serving 
his second term as Justice of the Peace. In politics he is a Democrat. 

JONATHAN S. RHODES, farmer, P. 0. Cambridgeboro, was born in 
Rhode Island, January 7,1821; son of Jonathan and Mary (Young) Rhodes, 
who settled in what is now Cambridge Township, this county, in 1835. Our 
subject was married May 20, 1852, to Mary A., daughter of Jonathan and 
Louisa (Doolittle) Stoddard, who has borne him five children : Alida S., 
Ellen L., Emma C., Zadoc L. and Mary A. Of these Alida S. married Edgar 
Throop, of Rockdale Township, this county. They have three children : Den- 
nis, Lillie and Lynn (twins). Emma C. married J. N. Jarvis; have one child — 
Ethel — and reside in Tennessee. Mary A. married James McClafferty, ot 
Washington Township, Erie County. Mr. Rhodes lives on a part of the tract 
his father took up and settled on in 1835. In politics he is a Democrat. 

JOSIAH ROBBINS, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in Washing- 
ton Township, Erie Co., Penn., April 21, 1817, son of Josiah and Elizabeth 
(Steward) Robbins, who located in Erie County in 1815, and removed from 
thence to Rockdale Township, this county, in 1821. Josiah Robbins, Sr., who 
was a native of Connecticut, died in 1862, in his seventy-third year; his 
widow, a native of New York, departed this life February 22, 1882, aged 
eighty-nine. Of their fifteen children six are now living: Josiah, George, 
Henry, Palace, Abigail and Mary. Our subject was married July 16, 1840, to 
Harriet, daughter of Peter and Hannah (Weston) Mitchell, and grand-daugh- 
ter of Nathan Mitchell, who came from Massachusetts and settled in Rockdale 
Township, this county, in 1801. By this union there were five children, viz. : 
Hannah, wife of Benjamin Akerly, residing in Waterford Township, Erie Co., 
Penn. (have four children: Victor, Leon, Clark and Nellie); Maryette, deceased; 
Halsey, deceased; Eunice, deceased, and George, married to Paulina Churchill, 
of LeBoeuf (have one child — DeForest L.). Mr. Robbins has lived on his 
present farm fifteen yeai-s. He was formerly a Whig in politics, but has been 
a Republican since the organization of the party. 

ADDISON O. ROCKWELL, retired, Cambridgeboro, was born in what is 
now Cambridge Township, this county, December 16, 1819, son of Bernard 
and Rebecca (Mercy) Rockwell, who settled in Rockdale (now Cambridge) in 
1817. They were from Berkshire County, Mass., and had six children: Addi- 
son O., Sally A., Emily M. (deceased), Emeline M. (deceased), Eunice L. 
(deceased) and Esther F. Bernard Rockwell died October 9, 1864, at the age 
of seventy-two; his widow is still living, at the age of eighty-five. Our sub- 



814 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

ject was married October 8, 1845, to Martha L. , daughter of Sylvester and 
Mercy (Thomis) Root, who settled here in 1819. By this union were two chil- 
dren: Wilbur F. (deceased), and LaRue D., who married Fannie Lane, of 
Potter County, Penn. , by whom he has had four children: Alfred L., Flor- 
ence, Ethel and Paul, the latter two deceased. LaRue D. was in the late 
war, having enlisted February 23, 1864, when but fourteen years of age, in 
Company E, Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Was wounded 
at Laurel Hill, battle of the Wilderness, May 8, 1864, and honorably dis- 
charged October 4, 1865. He is now a practicing physician at Union City. 
Addison O. Rockwell owns the farm on which his father first settled. He has 
held every ofi&ce in the gift of his township, with the exception of Justice of 
the Peace and Constable. Is a member of and Steward in the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. Mrs. Rockwell is an adherent of the Baptist denomination. 

EPHRAIM S. ROCKWELL, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in 
what is now Cambridge Township, this county, July 13, 1824; son of Zera 
and Phebe (Carter) Rockwell, who came from Massachusetts and settled in 
this township in 1817. They were the parents of eight children, viz. : William 
S., Louisa M., Laura A., Abner O , Horace N. , Ephraim S., Harriet P. and 
Phebe L. Zera Rockwell died in 1862 in his seventy-first year. Our subject 
has been twice married; on first occasion in September, 1847, to Mary E. 
Dodge, of this township, who bore him four children: William D. (deceased), 
Frank D., Hannah L. and Linn L. His second marriage occurred July 5, 
1875, with Lettie, daughter of Phineas and Maria (Noble) Elderkin, of this 
township. Mr. and Mrs. Rockwell are members of the Presbyterian Church. 
He has been School Director of his township several terms. In politics is a 
Republican. 

SUMNER F. ROOT, farmer, P. O. Cimbridgeboro, was born in Cambridge 
Township, Crawford Co., Penn., July 7, 1831, son of Daniel and Susannah 
(Church) Root, who came from Middletield, Hampshire Co., Mass., to Cam- 
bridge (then Rockdale) Township, this county, in 1819, and settled on the 
farm now owned by our subject. They started with an ox-team, but when 
thev got as far as Albany the oxen gave out and were exchanged for a pair of 
horses. It took five weeks to make this journey. Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Root 
had six children, viz.: Electa D., wife of E. S. S. Root, residing in Rockdale 
Township, this county; Meribah A.., married to Rev. N. O. Thomas, in Rich- 
mond Township, this county; Daniel, also in Richmond Township; Eliakim 
W., deceased; Sumner F. and Ann. Daniel Root, Sr. , died September 3, 
1881, in his eighty-ninth year; his wife died September 25, 1858, aged sixty 
three She was a daughter of Green H. Church, of Middletield, Mass. The 
Root (originally spelled Rootes) family, of Cambridge, are descended from 
John Rootes, a native of Badby, Northamptonshire, England, who settled in 
Connecticut in 1635-36, and are known as the Farmington line. Our subject, 
Sumner F., and his sister Ann, reside on the old homestead. 

JUSTIN ROOT, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in what is now 
Cambridge Township, this county, December 29, 1833; son of Sylvester and 
Mercy (Thomas) Root, who settled in Cambridge Township in 1820. The 
father of our subject came from Middletield, Mass. , and was a son of Daniel 
and Electa (Wardwell) Root. ' Daniel was a son of Thomas Root, whose father, 
Timothy Root, was a native of Westfield, Mass. The Roots are descendants 
of three brothers who came from England and settled in Salem, Mass., in 1635- 
36. Sylvester Root had eight children: Martha L., Sally A., Harmony, Syl- 
vester B. , Justin, Morton, Timothy T. and Lucy A. Justin Root, our sub- 
ject, was married January 10, 1861, to Nancy, daughter of Levi G. and Eliza- 



CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 815 

beth (Gross) Birchard, by whom he has two children: Lizzie A., born April 
14, 1865 (the day President Lincoln was assassinated), and Andrew A, bom 
August 28, 1866, died of typhoid fever September 27, 1884, aged eighteen 
years, one month. He was a grand and noble young man, and being the only 
son, his loss is a sad affliction to his parents and sister. Mr. Boot lives on a 
part of the farm settled by James Birchard in 1813. He is a member of the 
Knights of Honor; is a Republican in politics. He and his family are members 
of the Presbyterian Church. 

AMASA B. ROSS, retired, Cambridgeboro, was bom in Peru, Berkshire 
Co., Mass., November 26, 1810; son of Increase B. and Lucy A. (Foote) Ross, 
who were parents of three sons: Amasa B., Charles and John. All were 
natives of Massachusetts and early settlers of Cambridge, this county. Increase 
B. Ross was a son of Amasa and Sarah (Bartlett) Ross. Amasa B. Ross, our 
subject, settled in Cambridge, this county, in 1838, and engaged in the mer- 
cantile business, which he followed until 1870, when he retired. He was mar- 
ried November 10, 1840, to Harriet R., daughter of Samuel and Betsy (Cros- 
by) Beedy, who settled in Erie County about 1830; they were formerly of New 
Hampshire. To this union were born six children, viz. : Dixi H., married to 
Lucy Burchard (have two children: Harry and Harriet, and reside at Victoria, 
Vancouver Island, B. C); Mowbray B., married to Mary E. Fullerton (have two 
daughters: Florence G. and Hattie M., and reside in Brooklyn, N. Y. ); Bertha 
M. (deceased); Grace H. (deceased) married George Wade, left twin daughters 
named Grace R. and Georgie R. ; Winsluw B., married to Adell Leffingnell, 
(deceased) (have one child — Almond B. — and reside in Cambridge); Minnie F. 
(deceased). Mr. Ross was the leading merchant in Cambridge until his retire- 
ment in 1870. He served one term in the Pennsylvania State Legislature in 
1854-55; was a School Director of his township sixteen years and filled many 
other important offices. He was formerly a Whig, but joined the Republican 
party at its organization and has been one of its active supporters ever since. 
Our subject always takes a leading part in educational and church interests; 
has been a member of and one of the Deacons in the First Congregational 
Church of Cambridge since its organization in 1852. 

EMORY P. RUSSELL, proprietor and Principal of the Conservatory of 
Music, Cambridgeboro, was born in New York City, September 20, 1855, son 
of. Joseph and Julia A. (Pool) Russell, now residents of Boston, Mass. He 
received his early education at the schools of Newton, Mass., and graduated 
from the high school of that place. He began the study of music when twelve 
years of age; for ten years was a student of music in Boston under special 
instructors, and is now considered one of the most thoroughly trained musicians 
in the country. While studying to master his profession, he was employed in 
one of the largest silk stores in Boston, and used his salary to pay for his 
musical education. He was a member of the Boylston Musical Club for sev- 
eral years, and sang in many of the leading churches and concert companies of 
Boston. He taught music in the public schools of Newton and Watertown, 
Mass., two years. Mr. Russell was married April 16, 1879, to Jennie M., 
daughter of John and Clarinda (Brackett) Little, of Cambridge, Mass. In 1881 
he took charge of the musical department of the State Normal School at Edin- 
boro, Penn., where he remained two years. There were but fourteen students 
of music when he took charge. When he left, the class had increased to for- 
ty-nine. In the fall of 1883 he located in Cambridge, and opened the Cam- 
bridge Conservatory of Music, which has succeeded far beyond his expecta- 
tions, and the press has given Lim many complimentary notices in reference to 
the thoroughness of the instructions given at this institution. Our subject has 



816 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

recently purchnsed a lot 60x220, on which he has erected a fine hall which will 
accommodate 200 students. He has five assistants, and his wife is Principal 
of the piano department. Prof. Russell is a gentleman of culture and refine- 
ment, and thoroughly uaderstands his profession. He is a member of the 
Northwestern Commandery of Knights Templar, the Ancient Order United 
Workmen, and Equitable Aid Union. He and his wife are members of the 
Baptist Church. 

JONATHAN W. SALEN, hotel keeper, Cambridgeboro, was born in Rich- 
mond Township, this county, September 12, 1845, son of William and Hettie 
(Moyer) Salen, who settled in that township in 1840, on the farm where they 
now reside. William Salen was a native of France, and his wife of Lehigh 
County, Penn. They had eleven children: Sally, deceased; Helena, Ange- 
line; Catherine, deceased; Peter, William, Jonathan W., Lewis; Esther, 
deceased; Mary; George, deceased. Our subject was raised on a farm. At 
the age of twenty-six he engaged in the drug business at Pierpont, Ohio, fol- 
lowing same occupation three years. In 1872 he moved to Concord, Erie Co., 
Penn. , and embarked in the lumber trade, in which he still retains an interest 
there along with W. R. Wade. In 1877 Mr. Salen removed to Corry, Penn., 
and engaged in the manufacture of lumber, shingles, etc., which business he 
sold out in the fall of 1882, and in May, 1883, he came to Cambridge and 
purchased the American Hotel property, which he remodeled from cellar to 
garret. It now has the reputation of being second to no hotel in western 
Pennsylvania. Mr. Salen has been twice married; on first occasion, December 
28, 1871, to Agnes P.', daughter of John and Lydia (West) Kelly. John Kelly 
was the first white child born in Rockdale Township, this county, and was a 
son of Isaac and Hannah (Carnahan) Kelly, who settled in what is now Bloom- 
field Township, this county, in 1799. To this union were born three children: 
John, Maud (deceased) and Walla. Oiir subject's second marriage was 
December 13, 1882, with Mrs. Helen Jude, daughter of John and Mary Ray- 
mer, of Spartansburg, Penn. Mr. Salen is a F. & A. M., a member of the 
I. O. 0. F., and the E. A. U. 

ADAM SHERRED, farmer, P. O. Venango, was born in Venango Town- 
ship, this county, November 22, 1810; son of Michael and Elizabeth (Zerns) 
Sherred, who came from Susquehanna County, Penn., and settled in Venango 
Township, this county, in 1797. Michael was a son of Jacob Sherred, an 
early settler of Washington Township, Erie Co., Penn. He was parent of 
twelve children: John, Adam, George, Henry, Polly, Peggy, Sally, Christena, 
Leah, Solomon, Jonathan and Blaria. Our subject was married October 1, 
1835, to Susan, daughter of John and Susan (Lytle) Shearer, who settled in 
what is now Cambridge Township in 1797. To this union were born seven 
children, viz.: Mary A., wife of James L. Doctor; Andrew J., married to 
Emily Hardman, of Ohio; John O., married to Tabitha Johnston; Michael 
M., married to Mary J. Bole; Lucian S., married to Clara Campbell; Josiah 
D., married to Julia Brookhouser; James S., married to Ella Peiffer. Mr. 
Sherred has lived on his farm since 1837. He has been Judge of Election. 
In politics is a Democrat. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

MICHAEL M. SHERRED, cheese-maker, P. O.Venango, was born in Cam- 
bridge Township, this county, November 25, 1842; son of Adiira and 
Susan (Shearer) Sherred. He was married September 10, 1872, to Mary J., 
daughter of John and Margaret (Gilmore) Bole, of Venango Township, this 
county. By this union there is one child, Ray G. Mr. Sherred and wife are 
members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the K. of P. In 
politics is a Democrat. 



CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 817 

ALANSON SHERWOOD, manufacturer, Cambridgeboro, was born in this 
township, July 22, 1832; son of Burnet M. and Eliza (Briggs) Sherwood, 
and grandson of John Sherwood, who settled in Washington Township in 
1816. Alanson Sherwood was twice married; his first wife was Louisa, 
daughter of Hiram Johnson, of Edinboro, formerly of Maine, to whom he was 
married November, 1854. By this union there were three children: Ada, 
(deceased), William and Eliza B. His second wife was Emma Johnson, a 
half-sister of his first wife, to whom he was married September, 1873. The 
issue of this marriage was one child — Mabel. Mr. Sherwood began the manu- 
facture of shovel handles in Edinboro, in 1853, and carried on business there 
until 1873, when he located in Cambridgeboro, and engaged in the same 
business on a larger scale, and in connection with that, in company with his 
father, engaged also in flour-milling, planing-mill and lumber business, which 
partnership lasted until 1881, when the father sold his interest to three of his 
sons; they in turn sold to Thomas H. Agnew, the same year, and the business 
has been carried on successfully to the present time, under the firm name of 
Sherwood & Agnew. Mr. Sherwood is now Burgess of Cambridgeboro, serv- 
ing his second term. In politics be is a Republican. 

BENJAMIN F. SIVERLING, stock dealer, Cambridgeboro, was born in 
Venango Township, this county, May 1, 1844; son of Jacob and Barbara 
(Kleckner) Siverling, and grandson of Daniel Siverling, who was one of the first 
settlers in what is now Venango Township. Our subject was married Novem- 
ber, 1872, to Fannie, daughter of Joseph and Sarah (Parker) Stillwell, of New 
York City, by whom he had one child — Sarah A. Mrs. Siverling died August 
28, 1879, and in the same year he located in Cambridgeboro, this township. 
He is a member of the K. of H. and the E. A. U. In politics Mr. Siverling 
is a Republican. 

WATSON S. SMITH, farmer, P. 0. Cambridgeboro, was born in Mill 
Creek Township, Erie Co., Penn., June 25, 1856; son of John W. and Per- 
meiia M. (Fuller) Smith, who settled in Rockdale Township, this county, in 
1857. They had thirteen children, nine of whom are now living, viz. : Mary 
J. (Mrs. John Folsom), Susan C. (Mrs. John Dawson), Sabra (Mrs. Henry Lang- 
ley), Melvina (Mrs. S. C. T. Dodd), John A. (married RhodaBunoe), Julia (Mrs. 
Chas. Ferry), Minnie, Victory C. (married Emma E. Deans), and Watson S. 
Our subject was married January 18, 1880, to Arlette, daughter of Hardy and 
Almira P. (Pratt) Cuqhing, of Panama, N. Y., by whom he has one child — 
Kenneth C. John W. Smith died in 1877 at the age of sixty-eight; his wife 
died in 1873. Our subject had always resided in Rockdale Township until the 
spring of 1884, when he removed to Cambridge. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. 

JEREMIAH M. STANFORD, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in 
Jefi'erson County, N. Y., October 26, 1821; son of Giles and Betsy (Bunce) 
Stanford, who settled in Rockdale Township, this county, in 1847. They had 
twelve children: Jeremiah M., Aurelia, Newell (deceased), Riza, Mary, Jean- 
nette, Cassandra, Andrew, Harriet, Charlotte (deceased), George and Oscar. 
Our subject was married July 8, 1852, to Sally, daughter of Sylvester and 
Mercy (Thomas) Root, who settled in Cambridge Township, this county, in 
1820. By this union were ten children: Frank, Mercy H., Eliakim, Ada, 
Charlie, Egbert, Ella, Timothy, Ralph and Myra. Of these, Mercy H. mar- 
ried Frank Shrobb, of Meadville, Penn., and resides in Clinton County. Penn. 
(have foiy children: Nora, Almon and two infants). Mr. Stanford lived in 
Rockdale Township, this county, until 1883, when he purchased the Sylvester 
Root farm in Cambridge Township, where he now resides. Both he and his 
wife are members of the Baptist Church, In politics he is a Republican. 



818 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

JACOB P. STRAYER, A,*M., M. D., Cambridgeboro, was born in Green- 
wood Township, this county, Augost 6, 1853, son of Jacob and Jemima (Dan- 
iels) Strayer, the former of whom came from York County, Penn., and settled 
in Greenwood Township in 1821. Jacob P., our subject, was raised on a farm, 
receiving his early education at the common schools and later at the graded 
school in Geneva. In the spring of 1873 he went to the normal school at 
Ediuboro, where he remained one term. In the fall of the same year he 
entered Allegheny College at Meadville, where he graduated in 1878, and the 
same year began the study of medicine with Dr. E. H. Dewey, of Meadville. 
He is a graduate of Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, of the class of 
1880. He began the practice of medicine the same year in Geneva, where he 
remained until 1882, when he located in Cambridge, this county, where he 
has been practicing to the present time. He was married September 30, 1877, 
to Lois A. Slaven, of Greenwood, this county, by whom he has one child — 
Blanche L. His wife died October 10, 1883. 

GEORGE UPHAM, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in Canton, 
Mass., October 25, 1815, son of Nathan and Susannah (Tilden) Upham, the 
former a native of England, the latter of Scotland, and who located in 
LeBoBuf Township, Erie County, in 1817. They were parents of nine chil- 
dren: Naomi, Freelove, Sally, Susan, Clarissa, Nathan, Eliza, George and 
Roxa. Our subject purchased his farm in Cambridge Township in 1841; it 
comprises seventy-one acres of land, fifty-live of which he has cleared himself, 
and which he settled on in 1845. He was married September 18, 1845, to 
Lydia, daughter of Robert and Mercy (Atwell) Dodge, natives of Vermont; 
By this union were seven children, viz.: Mary, deceased; Roxa C, wife of 
Sylvester Culbertson, Erie County; George C, married to Tempie Smith, 
reside in Nebraska; John N., married to Emma R. Racop, Venango Town- 
ship, this county; Effie O., wife of A. B. Skelton, Nebraska; Amos T., also in 
Nebraska; and Uattie A., who lives at home with her parents. In politics Mr. 
Upham is a Democrat. 

GEORGE L. WADE, formerly junior member of the firm of Moses & Wade, 
editors and proprietors of the Cambridge News, Cambridgeboro, was born 
April 25, 1857, in Chautauqua County, N. Y. His father, Lewis N. Wade, 
was born in 1831, and died in 1874. He was a farmer and lumberman, and 
for many years was in business in Union City, Erie County. He was a mem- 
ber of the I. O. O. F., and A. O. U. W. His wife, Relief M. (Bates) Wade, 
was born in the State of New York in 1839. They were the parents of three 
children: J. E., F. E. and George L. She is now in Cambridgeboro, the wife 
of H. L. Bacon, whom she married in 1880. Our subject received ac ommon 
school education, and began the printing business with J. A. Pain, of the 
Carry Telegraph. He picked up the trade with rapidity, and in two years he 
held cases at Meadville, and subsequently at Greenlee, Penn., Warren, Cleve- 
land and Akron, Ohio, Grafton, W. Va., Erie, Penn., and other places. 
In 1879 and 1881 Mr. Wade engaged in the job printing business in Brad- 
ford, Penn., under the firm name of Lerch & Wade, and in 1882 he bought a 
half interest in the Cambridge Neivs, on which he has been instrumental in 
assisting Mr. Moses in making it a lively newspaper, such a journal as is 
demanded by the intelligent reading community through which it circulates. 
July 10, 1884, Mr. Wade sold his half interest in the News to his partner, Mr. 
Moses, but is still an attache in the office. Our subject was married Decem- 
ber 4, 1882, to Grace H., a daughter of A. B. Ross. She was born in 1851, 
and died December 24, 1883, leaving to her husband the care of two sweet lit- 
tle girl babies, named Grace Ross and Georgie Ross. He is a member of the 
I. O. O. F. lu politics a Republican. 



CONNEAUT TOWNSHIP. 819 

JOHN B. WILBEK, hardware merchant, Cambridgeboro, was born in 
Rensselaer County, N. Y., May 30, 1830, eon of William B. and Bethana (Ben- 
nett) Wilber, the former a son of William Wilber, and of Qerman lineage, 
the latter a daughter of Israel and Ruth Bennett, and of Scotch-Irish descent. 
John B. Wilber, our subject, came to this county in 1850, locating in Beaver 
Township, where he engaged in the lumber business. He was married in 
September, 1856, to Mary, daughter of John and Susan (Rockwell) Jobee, by 
whom he had three children: Frank (deceased), Mark and Harry. Mark was 
married October 17, 1883, to Kate Glenn, daughter of William Glenn, of 
Chautauqua County, N. Y. Mr. Wilber settled in Cambridge in 1866, and 
engaged in lumbering six years. In 1872 he embarked in the hardware trade, 
and, in 1873, to accommodate his increasing business, built a store 26x100 
feet. In 1878 he enlarged his building 26x60, making his store 52 feet 
wide by 100 feet long. Above this is one of the finest halls in the State, hav- 
ing a seating capacity of 400, opera folding chairs, stage 24x30, scenery 
and dressing rooms. This hall is let for theater and lecture purposes. Mr. 
Wilber is the leading merchant in his line of business in this portion of the 
county. In politics he is a Republican. 



CONNEAUT TOWNSHIP. 

WILBUR ABELL, farmer and produce shipper, t. 0. Linesville, was 
born in Springfield Township, Erie Co., Penn., November 26, 18S2, son of 
Alexander and Maria (Hurlburt) Abell, former a farmer, and a native of the 
neighborhood of Saratoga, N. Y., latter a native of Erie County, Penn. His 
paternal ancestors at one time were owners of the land where the city of 
Saratoga n<jw stands. Alexander Abell and his wife were parents of six chil- 
dren, four now living. Their son Harlow R. was a member of the Four- 
teenth Pennsylvania Cavajry, was wounded and taken prisoner, and died in a 
Rebel prison at Salisbury, N. C. They are now living in Springfield Town- 
ship, Erie Co., Penn., members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our sub- 
ject, who is third in the family, received an academic education, was thor- 
oughly instructed in German, and taught school several terms in his younger 
days. Naturally he has a literary turn of mind, and has written several essays 
on farming, which were published in some of the leading magazines. He 
purchased his present farm of sixty acres in Conneaut Township, this county, 
in 1873, moved on it February 22, 1876, and has built a new residence. Mr. 
Abell put in the first wagon scales in his neighborhood, and laid the first 
mile of underground draining in his section. He makes a specialty of raising 
potatoes and onions, having at present seven acres of the former and three- 
quarters of an acre of the latter. He never sows timothy, but invariably 
seeds with clover. In the fall and winter of 1863 Mr. Abell handled over 
$18,000 worth of potatoes, besides much other produce, and same time fed 
and fattened twenty-one head of heavy cattle. Our subject married, Novem- 
ber 23, 1875, Edith B. Philips, a native of Girard Township, Erie Co., Penn., 
educated at the L. E. S. , Fainesville, Ohio. Two children were born to this 
anion: J. Lawrence and Rebecca M. Mr. and Mrs. Abell are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics he is independent; is a strong sdvo- 
«ate of temperance, having never in his life drank a drop of liquor. 



820 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

MOSES ALLEN, farmer and miller, P. O. Linesville, was born in South 
Shenango Township, this county, July 25, 1813, son of Steven and Jane (Gil- 
liland) Allen, former a native of Washington County, latter of Fayette 
County, Penn., parents of nine children, five now living. One son, LiflSet, 
was killed by the cars in Linesville, this county, in 1883. They were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian Church. Steven Allen came to Crawford County 
when a small boy, in 1795, with his father, who had been a soldier in the Rev- 
olutionary war. He was a soldier in the war of 1812; died in 1874, his widow 
in 1876. Our subject, who is eldest in the family, is a miller, an occupation 
he has worked at the better part of his life, in connection with farming. He 
was twice married, on first occasion to Mary, daughter of Samuel and Hannah 
Burwell. By this union were born nine children, eight now living: Mary J., 
wife of David Patent: Steven; Sarah O., wife of George Allen; Hugh, Win- 
field L. ; Gaylord ; Webster S. ; Fred and Byron. Steven was a soldier during 
the war of the Rebellion, in the One Hundred and Eleventh Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and was in many engagements; was wounded in the right 
hip and returned home at the close of the war. He was killed in a steam 
saw-mill in 1866. Mrs. Allen died in 1860, and our subject then married, 
in 1864, Mrs. Lucinda C. Kendall, widow of Charles Kendall, and daughter 
of Levi Gaylord, of Geneva, Ohio, of which place she is a native. She had 
three children by her first marriage, two now living: William V. and Levi G. 
Charles Kendall was a soldier in the war of the Rebellion, and died from the 
effects of disease contracted in 1861. To Mr. and Mrs. Allen have been born 
three children: Morton, Steve and Edgar. Our subject is a member of the 
Old School Presbjrterian Church; is owner of fifty acres oi well-improved land, 
with a fine residence erected thereon in 1880, where he and his wife are now 
leading a "retired life. 

WILLIS D. BARBER, farmer and breeder of shorthorn cattle, P. O. Penn 
Line, was born on the farm he now lives on, in Conneaut Township, this 
county, May 31, 1850, son of Elijah A. and Amanda (Drake) Barber, natives 
of Connecticut, parents of four children — two sons and two daughters. They 
were married in 1833. Elijah A. Barber came to Crawford County in 1832. 
He was a prominent farmer, owning at one time 300 acres of land, most of 
which he and his sons cleared. He was a Captain in the State Militia; an 
active Whig in an early day, but a Republican since the formation of that 
party. He died in 1865. His widow, who is now over eighty years of age, 
came to Crawford County in 1833. She is living with our subject and her 
daughter Florence A. on the old homestead. Mrs. A. H. Bates is one of her 
daughters, and her son, Horatio E., is a prominent farmer in Conneaut Towu- 
ship, this county. Our subject, who is the youngest child, received a good 
common school education and was brought up to farming life. He owns 125 
acres, part of it his father's old homestead, and is now breeding and raising 
shorthorn cattle. He has some registered stock from the best families of 
shorthorns in Ohio and New York State. He is a member of the State Police; 
in politics a Republican. 

A. H. BATES, proprietor Penn Line cheese factory, Penn Line, was born 
in (Jonneaut Township, this county, August 25, 1839; son of Patrick H. and 
Emma J. (Fish) Bates, and brother of Alanson S. Bates, whose sketch follows 
this. Ohr subject received a good common school education, and commenced 
life at the age of fourteen as a clerk in a dry goods store in Penn Line. In 
1868 he opeaed a general store for his own account in same place, and this he 
carried on successfully till the fall of 1875, when, his health failing, he was 
compelled to close out the business.' In 1873 he purchased a one-half interest 



CONNEAUT TOWNSHIP. 821 

in tLe Penn Line cheese factory. This industry utilizes the milk of about 
800 cows, many of its patrons coming from Ohio. The gradual increase of the 
patronage of this factory since our subject took hold of it is a safe guarantee 
of its future as well as an evidence of its present and past success. It is 
probably the largest cheese factory in Pennsylvania, and Mr. Bates is entitled 
to much credit for its progress. He was married in 1867 to Miss Augusta 
Barber, a native of Conneaut Township, this county, daughter of E. A. Bar- 
ber, an early settler of this Section, and who died September 8, 1865. Her 
mother is now living with her son, W. D. Barber. One child has blessed this 
union — Ned A. Our subject is a member of the A. O. U. W. and State Police; 
in politics he is a Republican. He is owner of twenty-two acres of improved 
land. 

ALANSON S. BATES, retired merchant, Penn Line, was born in Conne- 
aut Township, this county, September 22, 1843, son of Patrick H. and Emma 
J. (Fish) Bates, former a native of Clinton County, latter of Albany County, 
N. Y., and daughter of Joseph Fish, who settled inSummerhill Township, this 
county, in 1815. -He was a farmer and cleared up 400 acres of land in that 
section; was father of a large family. Patrick H. Bates came in 1821, when 
a boy, to Crawford County, with his father, Zadok, who settled in Conneaut 
Township and was a prominent fai-mer. He had three sons in the war of 
1812, two of whom were riflemen at the battle of Plattsburg. The first hus- 
band of grandmother Bates was killed by the Tories during the Revolutionary 
war. Our subject's grandfather Bates died in 1834, and the widow then 
returned to her home in Clinton County, N. Y., and there died. The parents 
of our subject had nine children; they lived together half a century and never 
in that time lost a member of the family. The father died June 5, 1883, and 
his widow followed him August 7, same year. Alanson S., who is sixth in 
the family, received a common school education. He enlisted in 1862 in the 
One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, Army of 
the Potomac. His corps was kept on the reserve force at the battle of Antie- 
tam. He was honorably discharged in January, 1863, and returned home. 
Following summer our subject served three months in the Fifty-sixth Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry, Army of West Virginia, and in the fall of 1863 was 
again honorably discharged and returned home. During the winter of 1864— 
65, he received authority to recruit a company, of which he was commissioned 
Second Lieutenant, and was attached to the One Hundred and Third Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry, Tenth Corps, Army of the Cumberland. They did 
duty at Roanoke Island and Newberne. He was finally honorably discharged at 
the close of the war and returned home. His brother "William served nine 
months with the One Hundred and Thirty seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, and his brother David nearly three years in all, part of the time 
with the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry. Our subject married, in 1866, Adelia 
Borden, a native of this county and daughter of James Borden. She died in 
December, 1868, and Mr. Bates then married, in 1873, Sarah Spencer. One 
child was born to this union — Willie S. Mrs. Bates is a member of the Pres- 
byterian Church. After the war Mr. Bates was for some time in mercantile 
business and officiated as Postmaster at Penn Line, but is now retired. He 
was President of the Linesville Savings Bank for two years; is a member of 
the G. A. R., A. O. U. W., and is a F. & A. M. ; in politics he is a Republican. 
Since above was written Mr. Bates has disposed of his business interests in 
Penn Line, and removed to Andover, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, where he has organ- 
ized a bank, of which he has taken cliarge as Cashier. 

DAVID BOLLARD, manager of the Farmers' Store Company (limited), 



822 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Center Road station, this township, was born in England, December 23,1829; son 
of Thomas and Hupsabah Bollard. He came to America when twenty years of 
age, and worked at his trade, that of a shoe-maker, at night, laboring on a farm 
by day, until his marriage, which occurred in 1854, with Hannah J. Groves, a 
native of New York, and daughter of David Groves, one of the early settlers 
of this section. To this union have been born seven children, six now living, 
viz.: Lydia M., Lewis G., Charles F. , Mary J., Minnie and Frank D. Our 
subject settled m Conneaut Township, this county, in 1850, and being a hard 
worker has cleared a great deal of laad. He has tilled the office of Township 
Treasurer many years, and is recognized as a man of integrity and trust. In 
January, 1881, Mr. Bpllard was appointed manager of the Farmers' Store Com- 
pany (limited), with place of business at Centre Road station, in the heart of Con- 
neaut Township. This enterprise is owned by a joint stock company, with a 
capital of $2,000, and is doing a satisfactory business under the management of 
our subject. Mr. Bollard is an A. F. & A. M., and member of the R. T. of T., 
and State Police; in politics he is a Republican. His sou, Lewis J., married 
Miss Lillie A. Crocket, a native of Conneaut Township, who has borne him 
one child — William D. 

WILLIAM H. BRADT, farmer and breeder of short horn cattle and Cots- 
wold sheep, P. O. Linesville, was born at New Salem, N. T., April 2, 1850; son 
of Henry D. and Abigail (Rushmore) Bradt, also natives of New Salem, where 
were born also the grandfather and great-grandfather of our subject. Henry 
D. Bradt and his wife came to this county in 1870. They are the parents of 
four children. She is a member of the German Reformed Church. He kept 
a store and hotel in his younger days, but most of his life has been spent in 
farming pursuits. Our subject, who is youngest in the family, received a good 
common school education. He was married in 1872 to Miss RachieL. Irons, a 
native of Conneaut Township, this county, and daughter of James B. Irons, 
a brother of B. O. Irons. Two children — Grace and Velma — were born to this 
union. Our subject and wife are members of the Baptist Church, and of the P. 
of H. ; He owns ninety-two acres of well-improved land; is making a specialty 
of breeding short horn cattle, and has some registered animals of this stock; 
has also registered Cotswold sheep, of which he has a fine flock. Mr. Bradt 
has held several township offices; in politics he is a Republican. 

CHANCY B. BROOKS, farmer and dealer in milk, P. O. Linesville, was 
born on the farm he now owns and lives on in Conneaut Township, this county, 
April 16, 1835, son of Isaac and Aldula (Brown) Brooks, former a native of 
this township, latter of the neighborhood of Montreal, Canada. They were 
parents of nine children, five now living. Isaac Brooks was a Quaker and 
aided in establishing that society in Conneaut Township; his wife had broth- 
ers serving the United States Government in the war of 1812. She dying in 
1871, Mr. Brooks remarried, and his second wife departed this life March 3, 
1884. He is living on the old homestead with his son. Chancy B., and is now 
in his seventy eighth year. Our subject, who is fifth in the family, received 
but a limited education, as he was kept hard at work. He was married Sep- 
tember 26, 1856, to Mary L. Waters, a native of Ohio, and sister of A. W. 
Waters, whose biography elsewhere appears in this volume. Six children were 
born to this union, five now living: George L., Alson C, Fred J., Myrtie C. 
and Zed I. Our subject and wife are members of the Liberal League Society 
of Linesville. Mr. Brooks owns 180 acres of well-improved land, his father's 
old homestead. He furnishes the village of Linesville with milk; is making a 
specialty of breeding short horn cattle, and graded Cotswold sheep. Our sub- 
ject is independent in politics and liberal in religious principles, not bound 
to any party or creed. 



CONNEAUT TOWNSHIP. 823 

O. F. BUSH, farmer and carpenter and joiner, P. 0. Conneautville, was 
born in Oneida County, N. Y. , June 20, 1812, son of Derrick and Rachael M. 
(Mcintosh) Bush, natives of Massachusetts, and parents of live children — three 
now living. They were members of the Baptist Church. Derrick Bush was 
a tanner and shoe-maker by trade, and in addition worked on a farm. He died 
at Linesville, Penn., October 25, 1867, aged seventy-nine years; his wife died 
November 20, 1820, aged thirty-two. Our subject, who ,is the third in the 
family, received a limited education. He learned the trade of carpenter and 
joiner when young, and has worked at it for a considerable length of time. 
He was married December 16. 1833, to Solemy Beach, who bore him one son 
— Joseph C, now proprietor of a wholesale tobacco business in Erie, Penn. 
She died April 28, 1877, and our subject then married, December 25, 1879, 
Mrs. Margaret Kazebee, widow of John Kazebee. She was born on the farm 
where she now lives, October 18, 1829, and'is a daughter of William Johnston, 
who settled on this same farm in 1801. He came from Cumberland County, 
Penn.; was a soldier in the war of 1812, going to the front twice, for which 
he received two land grants and a pension. Mrs. Bush had two children by 
her first husband: John W., and Ella M., wife of William R. Sprague. She 
is a member of the Presbyterian Church, of which her parents were charter 
members, at Conneautville. Her mother died December 4, 1865, and her 
father October 5, 1873, aged eighty-three. Our subject has owned at dififerent 
times three farms in Crawford County, and cleared a large area of land. He 
built several houses in Linesville, toward which village he has probably done 
more than any other individual. He has held the offices of Justice of the 
Peace, Coroner and School Director, latter for twelve years. lu politics he is 
a Republican with strong temperance proclivities; has traveled extensively in 
the Western States and along the Pacific coast, having spent the winter of 
1871 in Oregon. 

COL. P. B. CARPENTER, contractor and builder, Conneautville, was 
born in Herkimer County, N. Y., January 12, 1827, son of Daniel and Tem- 
perance (Warfield) Carpenter, former a native of Massachusetts, latter of Mar- 
seilles, France. They were parents of thirteen children, six now living. 
Daniel Carpenter was a drummer boy in the war of 1812; and was a 
mechanic. Was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he 
took a special interest, and of which his father, who lived to the patriarchal 
age of ninety-four years, was a minister (the grandfather lived to the age of 
one hundred and four years); he died in January, 1882, his wife December 19, 
1880. Our subject, who is the fifth in the family, received an academic educa- 
tion, and at the age of seventeen, his health being frail, commenced to learn 
the trade of brick mason and plasterer in Russia Township, Herkimer Co., N. 
Y., remaining with his employer five years, two latter as a partner. His health 
being re-established, our subject attended school winters, and during the sum- 
mer months took contracts as a builder. He was married at the age of eighteen, 
to Miss Sarah Fenner, also a native of Herkimer County. To this union were 
born five children, four now living: Abbie, wife of Oren Pentield; TaberV.; 
Sarah, wife of D. F. Booth, and Fenner B., all now located on their father's 
original farm, within sight of his homestead. In 1861 (3ol. Carpenter 
recruited Company H, Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, of 
which he was commissioned Captain August 16, 1861. He served in the field 
with the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac. In 1863 he was appointed Assist- 
ant Provost Marshal of Crawford County, Penn., which position he held till the 
close of the war, and was honorably discharged in August, 1865. He is now 
Colonel of the Fifteenth Pennsylvania National Guards, holding the oldest 



824 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Colonel's commission in the State. With the exception of the time he was in 
service in the army, our subject has been a contractor and builder for thirtj- 
nine years. He built the present court houses at Meadville, this county, Char- 
don, Coshocton and Ravenna, Ohio, the first Presbyterian and Christian E. P. 
Churches, besides many of the finest business blocks in Meadville and Ohio, 
and many other churches as well as banks, schools, etc., in Ohio. He has been 
owner, from time to time, of over 250 acres of well-improved land. Col. Carpen- 
ter is a member of the 1. O. O. F. ; has taken the thirty-secOtid degree in 
Masonr. In politics he is a Republican. 

T. H. COREY, farmer, P. O. Conneautville, was born in Summerhill Town- 
ship, Cayuga Co., N. Y., January 8, 1832; son of Archibald and Luretta Corey, 
who came to Crawford County in 1837 and settled in Conneaut Township. 
•They were parents of six boys and six girls, of 'whom nine are now living. 
They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Archibald Corey was 
acarpenter and joiner and millwright. He died in 1837, soon after coming to 
Crawford County, and his widow followed him in 1866. Our subject, who is 
the tenth child in the family, received a common school education. He mar- 
ried, December 25, 1855, Miss Lottie T. Doling, a native of New York and 
daughter of L. W. Doling, now of Beaver Township, having come to Crawford 
County and settled in that township in 1851. Mr. Doling had a family of 
nine children, seven now living. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church; is now living with his daughter, Mrs. Louesa Johnson, in Beaver 
Township, this county. His wife, who was also a member of the same church, 
died in 1872. Our subject and wife were parents of four children, three now 
living: Thomas A., married September 18, 1884, to Miss Ida C. Rood; Ella L., 
wife of Leonard Holman, and Nettie M., wife of Arch B. Greenfield. Mr. 
and Mrs. Corey are members of the R. T. of T. He enlisted September 7, 

1864, in the Two Hundred and Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
attached to Ninth Corps, Army of the Potomac; was in the battle of Weldon 
Railroad; was wounded in the finger and right side at Petersburg, which 
necessitated his being sent to the hospital, and he had to suffer thirteen days 
before having his wounds dressed. He was honorably discharged in May, 

1865, for physical disability. Our subject is a member of the G. A. R. and 
A. O. U. W. ; in politics a Republican. Mr. Corey is owner of 130 acres of 
well-improved land. 

MAJOR C. DORCHESTER, farmer, P. O., Centre Road Station, was born 
June 27, 1810, in Parish, N. Y. ; son of Reuben and Sophia Dorchester, former 
of whom died when our subject was very young; the latter kept house in Mer- 
cer County, Penn., until she reman'ied. Our subject lived with his grand- 
father until 1828, in which year he purchased sixty-two acres of land partially 
cleared. October 2, 1834, he married Miss Nancy Tuttle, a native of North 
East, Erie Co., Penn. Two children were born to this union : Ruth S., 
wife of Edwin Egbert, and Reuben S. Mrs. Dorchester was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church; she died in 1838. Mr. Dorchester then married, 
in 1840, Miss Elizabeth E. Sackett, a native of Edinburg, Portage Co., 
Ohio, born March 28, 1819, and daughter of Samuel S. Sackett, a farmer. By 
this union there are three children : Seth S., who was a soldier in the war of 
the Kebellion; EmelineE., wifeof Jacob Van Slyke, and Caroline E., wifeof 
Edwin Lawrence. Our subject and wife have been members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church forever fifty years. He moved to Crawford County in April, 
1853, and settled on the farm he now owns and lives on in Conneaut Township. 
In politics he is a Republican with strong temperance proclivities. 

SETH S. DORCHESTER, farmer, P. O. Centre Road Station, was born 



CONNEAUT TOWNSHIP. 826 

in Mercer County, Penn., January 9, 1844, son of M. C. Dorchester. In 1862 
he enlisted in the three months' service with the Army of the Potomac, and 
on March 7, 1864, he again enlisted, on this occasion in Company I, Second 
Pennsylvania Cavalry, also with the Army of the Potomac. He was in the 
battle of Todd's Tavern four days, and was there wounded, May 7, 1864, 
through the right thigh. He remained in hospital until he returned to his 
regiment about August 15, 1864; then participated in the battles of Beam's 
Station, Wyatt House (two days), Boydtown Plank Road, Stony Creek, through 
the entire siege of Petersburg, and finally at Lee's surrender, serving in all 
about twenty-one months. He was honorably discharged in July, 1865. On 
September 10, 1865, Mr. Dorchester married Miss Philena Shaw, a native of 
Conneaut Township, and daughter of Moses D. Shaw, Sr. , who came to Craw- 
ford County in 1842. He was a farmer, father of eleven children, and is now 
living in Sammerhill Township. Three daughters and one son were born to 
this union: M Lizzie, E. Jennie, Grace P. and Charles S. Our subject and 
wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is owner of seventy- 
five acres of land, which he moved on to at the close of the war; this he 
cleared and improved, and it is now a fine farm. In politics he is a Republican. 

EDMUND ELLSWORTH, farmer, P. O. Centre Road Station, was born 
at North East, Penn., March 20, 1824, son of John and Fannie (White) Ells- 
worth, natives of Cazenovia, N. Y., parents of eight children, five now living; 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which Mr. Ellsworth was a 
leader for many years. They moved to this county and settled in Hayfield 
Township in 1840. John Ellsworth, who had been a farmer all his days, died 
in 1850, his wife in 1845. Our subject, who is second in the family, received 
a common school education, and learned the trade of molder, at which he 
worked for fifteen years. He married, December 25, 1850, Mary T. Cox, a 
native of Wayne Township, this county, daughter of Levi Cox, and grand- 
daughter of Samuel Gehr, an early settler in this county. To this union were 
born three children: Ruth A., who has taught school successfully for over 
fifteen years; Eva, a dress-maker; and Fred W. , at present attending Alle- 
gheny College at Meadville, Penn. Mr. Ellsworth moved to his present fine 
farm of seventy acres in Conneaut Township in 1864, and since he abandoned 
his trade has applied himself exclusively to farming. He is a member of the 
I. O. O. i'. In politics a Republican. 

MRS. NANCY W. GILLILAND, P. O. Linesville, was born in Warren, 
Penn., September 15, 1821, daughter of Thomas T. and Margaret Page, who 
were born and brought up in Philadelphia, parents of ten children. They 
were good. Christian people, members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Mr. Page, who had been a farmer all his days, died in 1849, his widow in 
1853. Our subject, who is fifth in the family, was married in September, 
1847, to Samuel Gilliland, a native of Conneaut Township, son of Samuel 
Gilliland, Sr. , one of the very early settlers and farmers of Conneaut Town- 
ship, the father of a large family. Samuel Gilliland, Jr., died in March, 1865, 
leaving his widow, our subject, over 140 acres of excellent land, most of which 
he and his sons cleared. He carried on a lumber business at one time in War- 
ren County, Penn., in which he earned the money that bought his farm. Mrs. 
Gilliland is the mother of three children: William P., married and has a fam- 
ily; Frank L. , also married and has a family; and Samuel D., who is single 
and lives with his mother, managing the old homestead which they still hold. 
Our subject managed to keep her childi'en together after her husband's death, 
and raised them in a manner reflecting the highest credit on her. She and 
two eldest sons are members of the Disciple Church. 



826 BIOGKAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

W. C. GRAHAM, farmer, P. O. Penn Line, was born on the farm where 

he now lives in Conneaut Township, this county, June 25, 1840; son of Will- 
iam and Nancy Crocket Graham, former a native of Pine Township, latter of 
Conneaut Township, this county. They were parents of six children, four 
now living. T. B. Graham, of Spring Township, this county, is one of the 
sons. William Graham, who was a farmer and who cleared 125 acres of 
laud, died in March, 1870; his widow lives with our subject on the old home- 
stead, having attained the ripe age of eighty years. Her father, Thomas B. 
Crocket, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Our subject, who is fourth in 
the family, received a common school education and was brought up on the 
farm. He was married October 6, 1859, to Miss Lucinda Jackett, a native of 
Cayuga County, N. Y., daughter of Isaac Jackett, who came to Crawford County 
about 1843. Three children have been born to this union: Dellie N., wife of 
H F. Turner; Jay I. and Burton. Mr. Graham is a member of the A. O. XJ. 
W. and S. K., and along with his wife of the Patrons of Husbandry. He has 
on his farm some fine specimens of short horn cattle, the breeding of which 
he is making a specialty of and into which it is his intention to enter very 
extensively, his farm being well adapted for stock-raising. The strain of his 
short horns are from the celebrated J. F. King farm in Trumbull County, 
Ohio. Mr. Graham is a Democrat in politics. 

HARLOW J. GREENFIELD, farmer, P. O. Conneautville, was born in 
Cayuga County, N. Y., October 7, 1823; son of Archibald and Catharine Green- 
field and half-brother of Dr. R. N. Greenfield, whose biography appears below. 
Our subject received a common school training and taught school to some 
extent. He was married in April, 1849, to Miss Caroline Phelps, a native of 
Herkimer County, N. Y., and daughter of Benjamin Phelps, who settled in 
Crawford County in 1847, and sister of J. B. Phelps. To this union have 
been born five children, two now living: Sarah C, wife of P. S. Pease, and 
Archibald B. Mr. and Mrs. Greenfield are members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church. Our subject came to Crawford County with his father in 1840. 
He had the misfortune to break his leg when in the saw-mill business, and in 
1872 had three of his bams destroyed by lightning, entailing a loss of over 
$2,000. Mr. Greenfield has held several township ofiices; in politics is a 
Republican. 

R. N. GREENFIELD, physician and surgeon, Penn Line, was born in 
Conneaut Township, this county, December 3, 1840; son of Archibald and 
Naoma Greenfield, former a native of Herkimer County, N. Y., latter of Mass- 
achusetts. They came to Crawford County in September, 1840, settling in 
Conneaut Tovmship, where they cleared a farm of 100 acres heavily timbered 
land. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, to which Mr. 
Greenfield had belonged for forty years before his death, which occurred in 
1870. With the exception of three years the widow resided with her son, Dr. 
John W.f Greenfield, of Spring, Penn., until her death, which took place 
August 27, 1884. Her connection with the Methodist Episcopal Church existed 
over sixty years. Mr. Greenfield had been a soldier in the war of 1812. 
They were parents of four children, of whom Dr. R. N. Greenfield is the eld- 
est. He received a common school educaton before the war of the Rebellion 
broke out, and in 1862 he enlisted for nine months in the One Hundred and 
Thirty seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry attached to the First Corps 
Army of the Potomac. He was in the battle of South Mountain, Piatt's Plan- 
tation, Chancellorsville and many other engagements, and was honorably dis- 
charged in June, 1863. During the winter of 1863-64 he attended the normal 
school and in April of the latter year he enlisted in the Second Pennsylvania 



CONNEAUT TOWNSHIP. 827 

Heavy Artillery, serving in Burnside's Corps, Army of the Potomac. He par- 
ticipated in the battle of the Wilderness; was through the entire siege of 
Petersburg and finally at the capture of Lee's army. His com])any lost thirty- 
three men at Cold Harbor. Our subject was honorably discharged as Corporal 
in February, 1866, and in following spring commenced reading medicine with 
Drs. Dunn & Greene, Conneautville. In 1869 he graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, after which he began the practice of his profession at Penn 
Line, where he has continued ever since, enjoying an excellent business and 
the confidence of the public. The Doctor was married in 1873 to Miss Jessie 
Maloney, a native of Crawford County, and daughter of James and Kate 
Maloney, natives of New York State and early settlers of Crawford County. To 
this union have been born two children, one now living — John C. Dr. Green- 
field is a member of the G. A. R., A. O. U. W. and is an A. F. & A. M. In 
politics he is a Republican. 

JOHN G. HOLMAN, farmer and dairyman, P. O. Conneautville, was 
born in Templeton, Mass., February 28, 1822; son of Jonathan and Susan T. 
(Greenleaf) Holman, also natives of Templeton, former of Scotch descent. 
They came to Crawford County, July 3, 1834, and settled on 176 acres of land 
in the woods in Conneaut Township, when but few roads were cut and deer, 
bears and wolves were plentiful. They were parents of twelve children, nine 
now living. Jonathan Holman was a mechanic, and to some extent made 
measures and boxes. He was, it is claimed, the original inventor of the screw 
propellor, but, like many other inventors, made no money out of it. He died 
in 1855, aged sixty-five years; his widow, who was a member of the Baptist 
Church, died March 21, 1883, aged eighty-six. Our subject, who is third in the 
family, is a natural mechanic and inventor, besides being an expert cheese-maker. 
He invented a sulky gang-plow, self- adjusting. As a practical manufacturer 
of cheese he has had thirty-one years of experience and has no superior. He 
received the first award of the State of Pennsylvania, and second award of the 
United States, as a practical factory cheese-maker, from the United States 
Commission at the Centennial, 1876. He operated a cheese factory on his own 
farm for about eight years. This was destroyed by fire November 21, 1881, 
entailing a loss of $2,000. Mr. Holman was married in 1847 to Miss Abigail 
Robins, a native of Crawford County, and daughter of Josiah Robins, an old 
settler of this county. He was a soldier of the war of 1812, stationed at 
Black Rock. To this union were born nine children, six now living, viz. : 
Sylvana J., wife of L. M. Nickles, Leonard S., Fred W., Minnie A., Mabel 
L. and Jessie L. Our subject and wife are members of the Latter Day Saint's 
Church. He is owner of 103 acres well-improved land. 

WILLIAM G. JACKETT, farmer, P. O. Steamburgh, was born Novem- 
ber 19, 1838, in Cayuga County, N. Y. ; son of Isaac R. and Betsy E. 
Jackett, former a native of Chenango County, and latter of Cayuga County, 
N Y. They came to Crawford Couuty in 1848; were members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church; parents of five children, all now living. Isaac R. 
Jackett was a merchant up to the time he came to this county, and then 
bought a farm in Conneaut Township. He was killed by a tree falling on 
him, first winter after coming. His widow here reared the children, although 
under great disadvantages, the family being very young and the country com- 
paratively new. She is now living with her youngest child, Isaac F., in Con- 
neaut Township. Our subject, who is the eldest, had but a limited education, 
having had to work hard. He was married in May, 1861, to Miss Augusta L. 
Weaver, a native of Onondaga County, N. Y., and daughter of Sylvester and 
Amadella Weaver. Fom- children have been born to this union, three now 



828 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

living: Willie C, Charles and Ettie. Mr. and Mrs. Jackett are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. He established a brick-yarji in 1874, and 
has been making bricks extensively since; the machinery is worked by steam 
power. He has also a jelly factory in connection, and ho finds a good patron- 
age. Our subject is a member of the A. O. U. W., State Police, and I. O. 
O. F. In politics is a Democrat. 

ANDREW JOHNSON, farmer, P. O. Conneautville, was bom in Con- 
neaut Township, this county, November 1, 1835; son of William and Margaret 
(Mellan) Johnson. He is the youngest in the family and was brought up on 
the farm. He enlisted in 1861, in Company I, Second Pennsylvania Cavalry, 
serving iu the Army of the Potomac. He was in the second battle of Bull 
Run, and the engagement at Culpeper Court House, after which he was 
seized with typhoid fever, was sent to hospital and honorably discharged 
March 4, 1862, for physical disability. Mr. Johnson has never fully recov- 
ered from that illness. He was married March 13, 1869, to Miss Frances 
Spencer, a native of Chester, Ohio, and daughter of John B. Spencer, one of 
the early pioneers of this section. To this union were born four children: 
Eugenia May, John S., James G. and Roland A. Mrs. Johnson is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church. Our subject is owner of sixty-seven acres of well- 
improved land. He is a member of the R. T. of T., E. A. U. and Or. A. R.; 
in politics is a Republican. 

ISAAC LADNER, farmer and mechanic, P. O. Linesville, was born in 
Conneaut Township, this county, April 29, 1881, son of David and Betsy 
(Thorn) Ladner, natives of New Jersey, parents of nine children, eight now 
living. They were members of the Society of Friends or Quakers, which 
society they aided in establishing, in an early day, in Conneaut Township. 
David Ladner came with his father from New Jersey to this county in 1812, 
an ox team conveying them the whole distance. He was a chair-maker by 
trade, at which he worked to some extent. He took up fifty acres of wild land, 
which he cleared and improved. He held some of the township ofiSces and 
took some interest in politics. He died August 14, 1869; his wife October 7, 
1866. Our subject, who is the eighth of the family, received a common school 
education and learned the trade of plasterer in his younger days, which he has 
worked at considerably. He married, in 1852, Miss Rebecca Thorn, also a 
native of this township, and a daughter of David Thorn, who came to this 
county about 1812. JFive children were born to this union: William T., 
Emma B., wife of Dexter Boon; Zilla M., Fred L. and DeWit C. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ladner and their son, William T., are members of the R. T. of T. 
Our subject is owner of 153 acres chiefly improved land, part of which is his 
grandfather's old homestead, and when not working at his trade has always 
followed farming. He makes a specialty of breeding Holstein cattle, of 
which he has some registered stock; has some graded short horn cattle, also 
Cotswold sheep. Mr. Ladner is liberal in his religious views, with a leaning 
toward Spiritualism. In politics he is independent. 

HULBERT LANDON, farmer, P. O. Centre Road Station, was born in 
Luzerne County, Penn., April 19, 1818, son of Daniel and Nancy (Mitchell) 
Landon, who settled in Conneautville, this county, in 1836. They were 
members of the Methodist Church, in which Mr. Landon took special interest. 
Parents of fifteen children, seven now living. Daniel Landon was by trade a 
carpenter and joiner, as well as contractor and builder. He was a soldier in 
the war of 1812, and at one time Colonel in the State Militia. He died in 
1880; his wife in 1864. Our subject, who is eldest in the family, received a 
good common school education and taught school two terms at an early day in 



CONNEAUT TOWNSHIP. 829 

Illinois. He married, on January 1, 1839, Miss Delania S. Homer, a native of 
Orleans County, N. Y., and daughter of Benjamin Homer, who came to Craw- 
ford County in 1833, and was a prominent farmer of Conneaut Township. To 
this union were born four children, three now living, viz.: Benjamin D., Julia 
R., wife of Lewis Hill, and William H. Mr. Landon enlisted September 5, 
1861, in Company H, Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, attached 
to the Fifth Corps Army of the Potomac. He was present at the second battle 
of Bull Run, Antietam and Fredericksburg; after which last named battle he 
was taken ill, sent to the hospital and was honorably discharged for physical 
disability March 80, 1863, and returned home. His son, Benjamin D., enlisted 
the same day and in the same regiment as his father, and was through the 
seven days' fight on the Peninsula, and was wounded at Malvern Hill in the 
right hip by a piece of shell. Was also in the second battle of Bull Run and 
the engagement at Antietam. He veteranized in the Second Pennsylvania 
Cavalry, and served all through the "Wilderness, at the siege of Petersburg, 
and was present at Lee's surrender. After serving four years he was honora- 
bly discharged in 1865. Our subject and son are both members of the G. A. 
R. For about three years they, along with our subject's father, together 
acknowledged each quarter their vouchers for a pension at Conneautville. Mr. 
and Mrs. Landon are members of the R. T. of T. and the P. of H. He is owner 
of sixty-one acres of fine land, and is a member of the Evangelical Church. In 
politics he is a Republican. 

JAMES A. LAWRENCE, farmer, P. O. Centre Road Station, was born in 
Conneaut Township, this county, January, 18, 1823; son of Luman and Mary 
(Crocket) Lawrence, former a native of the vicinity of Albany, N. Y., latter of 
Pennsylvania, parents of ten children, eight now living. Luman Law- 
rence, who was a farmer, came to Crawford County in 1815 and settled in 
Conneaut Township. He was a hard working pioneer and cleared a large area 
of land. He was an old line Whig in politics, son of a Revolutionary 
soldier. He died in 1867, his wife in 1845. Our subject, who is third in 
the family, had no educational advantages. He was married. May 5, 1846, to 
Miss Clarissa Moses, a native of Connecticut, who bore him six children, 
three now living: Lucy, wife of Almon DavoU (had one son deceased); 
Celestia, wife of Martin SpoulF (had three sons, one deceased), and Char- 
lotte, wife of John Hague (have two sons). Mrs Lawrence died in January, 
1856; and in January, 28, 1858, our subject married Mrs. Mary Garwood, a 
native of Sadsbury Township, this county, widow of Aaron Garwood, and daugh- 
ter of Abel Freeman, a native of New Jersey, and one of the very early set- 
tlers of western Crawford County. She had two children by her first husband, 
one now living, Samuel Garwood (he had three children, two now living). By 
her present husband she has had three children: Mary R., widow of Jacob Dic- 
key (she has two sons and one daughter); Harriet C, wife of L. A. Couch (had 
two sons, one now living), and James M., married to Miss Minnie O'Neill, 
daughter of Dr. A. O'Neill, of Conneautville (they have one son, J. Glenn). 
The mother of Mrs. James A. Lawrence was also a native of Sadsbury Town- 
ship, this county, and her maternal grandfather, William Campbell, was one 
of the very first settlers of that section. Mr. Lawrence owns 100 acres of 
well improved land, most of which he cleared himself. He was the first to 
introduce short horn cattle in Conneaut Township and of which he has made 
a specialty. In politics he is a Democrat. 

ANSON LEONARD (deceased), second son of Asa and Esther (Brown) Leon- 
ard, was born in Worthingtou, Mass., January 28, 1800. He departed 
this life at his old home in Penn Line, Crawford County, August 28, 1872. 



830 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

His father purchased property in Pierpont, Ohio, where he moved his family 
in 1812, and it was in schools of this township that the subject of the present 
sketch received most of his education, and taught many terms of school. In 
1828 he was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Baker, daughter of Emerson 
and Elizabeth (Porter) Baker, who was born in Newburyport, Mass., in 1810. 
The children of this union are ten in number, viz.: Charlotte P., Mary L. 
(deceased), Esther E., Asa (deceased), Myra M., Byron S., M. D. (deceased), 
Hattie A., Emerson B., Lillian P., Bird A. Mr. Leonard had a decided liter- 
ary mind, and upon all general subjects was well informed. He held the 
office of Justice of the Peace for many years. He served as a member of the 
State Legislature in 1850, and was the first Abolitionist member ever elected 
from Crawford County. He was a strong supporter of and an earnest worker 
in the Abolition cause. 

REV. HENRY D. LOWING, minister of the Congregational Church, P. 
O. Centre Road Station, was born in Gainsville, N. Y., May 29, 1827; son of 
Stephen and Hannah (Cobb) Lowing, former born in Peru, N. Y., June 3, 1798, 
latter in Pawlet, Vt., June 13, 1794, parents of six children, three now living. 
They moved to the farm our subject now owns and lives on in Conneaut Town- 
ship, this county, in 1834. \V'illiam, father of Stephen Lowing, was born 
April 11, 1758, in Kingston, Jamaica, and came to this country when seven 
years of age. He was a Captain in the Revolutionary war and was present at 
the battles of Bunker Hill, Lexington, Concord, and was but a short distance 
from Gen. Warren when he fell; ^ras at Valley Forge, battle of Monmouth, 
Trenton, and under Gen. LaFayette at the capture of the British batteries at 
the siege of Yorktown. About 1781 he was promoted to a Captaincy and was 
honorably discharged at the close of the war. Our subject's father was a 
farmer all his days, and with the assistance of his sons cleared the farm on 
which he settled. He and his wife were members of the Congregational 
Church. He was a Justice of the Peace ten years. He died November 28, 
1871, his widow March 31, 1872. Our subject, who is fourth in the family, 
was married April 21, 1853, to Miss Nancy J. Pierce, a native of Conneaut, 
Ohio, and daughter of Lucius and Sarah A. (Vosburg) Pierce. To this union 
were born seven children, five of whom are now living, viz. : May C. , wife of 
Cassius M. Potter; Frank C, of the Linesville Herald; Henry S., Samuel W. 
and Sarah J. Rev. Mr. Lowing received a common school education and at 
the age of seventeen entered the Kingsville Academy, which he attended two 
years. He taught school upward of twelve years and entered the ministry in 
1856, since which time he has been an active worker in the Christian cause. 
He was elected a member of the State Legislature in the fall of 1878, I'emain- 
ing two terms; was a member of the Committees on Agriculture, Vice and 
Immorality, and Librarian first term; was Chairman of the Committee on 
Retrenchment and Reform, and a member of the Committee on Insurance and 
Banks, County and Township second term; was one of the members instru- 
mental in getting the bill passed the House amending the Constitution so as to 
prohibit the sale and manufacture of liquor, but which was lost in the Senate. 
In politics he is a Republican with strong temperance proclivities. He joined 
the One Hundred and Fifty-fourth New York Volunteer Infantry as Chaplain 
September 23, 1862, serving till January 5, 1864, when he was honorably dis- 
charged for physical disability at Chattanooga, Tenn. His regiment was 
attached to the Eleventh Corps and he participated in the battles of Chancel- 
lorsville, Gettysburg and Mission Ridge. 

SOLOMON LUKE, farmer, P. O. Centre Road Station, was born on the 
farm he now owns and lives on in Conneaut Township, this county, February 



CONNEAUT TOWNSHIP. 831 

24, 1840; son of John and Charity (Ramore) Luke, natives of New Scotland, 
N. Y., and parents of twelve children. The father of John Luke was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary war and our subject has the powder horn he car- 
ried during that struggle. John came to Crawford County in 1829, and was 
engaged in farming all his life. He died in 1864. His widow, now in her 
eighty-fifth year, is living with her son, Solomon, on the old homestead; she 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our subject, who is eighth 
in the family, received a common school education. He married, July, 1860, 
Miss Margaret C. McGuire, born in 1844, a native of Summerhill Township, 
this county, and daughter of Francis McGuire, one of the earliest settlers of 
western Crawford. To this union have been born three girls: Mary Adella, 
wife of Perry Mickle, born in 1861 (have one child, Katie, born in 1883); 
Jennie M., born in 1863; and Maggie C, born in 1866. Mr. Luke is a member 
of the R. T. of, T. and the State I'olice; in politics a Republican. He is 
owner of fifty-one acres of well-improved land, his father's old homestead, 
where he carries on a general line of farming, buying, selling and shipping 
stock extensively, and is probably the largest dealer in western Crawford. 

HIRAM A. MALONEY, farmer, P. O. Penn Line, was born in 
Mead Township, this county, July 4, 1833; son of James and Catharine 
(Flick) Maloney, former a native of Westmoreland County, latter of Susque- 
hanna County, Penn. They were parents of nine children, live now living. 
James Maloney came from Westmoreland County, Penn., to this county with 
his parents, in August, 1797, making the journey through the wilderness on a 
pair of oxen, at which time Meadville was in the midst of a forest and almost 
unknown. He was a farmer all his days and cleared up a large farm in Mead 
Township, this county; held several township offices. His wife died in 1860; 
he died in 1863. Our subject's paternal grandfather, Daniel Maloney, was a 
native of Ireland. At the breaking out of the Revolutionary war, he was 
taken prisoner by the British while on board a merchant vessel, and after 
being exchanged he enlisted in the American Navy and served till the close of 
the war. He was present in several sharp naval engagements. Our subject, 
who is second in the family, received an academic education. He taught 
school in his younger days and learned the trade of carpenter, which, however, 
he worked at but little. In 1860 he went into the oil regions, where he 
operated with success until February, 1864, in which year he came toConneaut 
Township, this county, and purchased his present farm. He was married in 
1873 to Miss Myra M., daughter of Anson Leonard, whose biography appears 
in this volume. Four children were born to this union: Florence E. , Charles 
H. , Willie A. and Forest D. Mr. Maloney was a Justice of the Peace five 
years, and has held several township offices; has been an A. F. & A. M. since 
1865; is a member of the A. O. U. W. ; in politics is a Republican. 

GEORGE V. MANNING, farmer, P. O. Centre Road Station, was born in 
Jackson, Mich., March 14, 1839; son of Abraham and Hannah Manning, 
natives of New York. The former, who was a farmer, died in 1848, and his 
widow married William Miller, a native of New Jersey; he came to Crawford 
County in 1834; was a farmer all his life; held several township offices and 
was a man of much usefulness in his day, having assisted in constructing all 
the roads in his section. He bas now attained the ripe old age of eighty-one 
years. His first wife died in 1858 and is interred in the family burying ground 
on the farm, where also lie the remains of the only brother of Mrs. Manning. 
Our subject was married in February, 1862, to Miss Anna M. Miller, daugh- 
ter of William Miller, above spoken of, born in Conneaut Township, this 
county, in 1836. Seven children have been born to this union, viz.: William 



832 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

A., Stella E., George W., Charles B., Fred., Nellie H. and Annie M. Mr. 
Manning owns 160 acres of improved land and has always followed farming 
pursuits, excepting two years spent when a young man in a woolen factory. 
He is making a specialty of the breeding and raising of short horn cattle. He 
is a member of a Grange, the A. O. U. W. and State Police; has held several 
township offices; in politics is a Republican. The mother of our subject is a 
consistent member of the Presbyterian Church. 

JOHN MAXWELL, farmer, P. O. Steamburgh, was born on the farm he 
now owns and lives on in Conneaut Township, this county, June 11, 1818; 
son of George and Elner (Martin) Maxwell, natives of Ireland. They settled 
on the same farm our subject now occupies, about 1815; were parents of 
seven children, three now living; were Protestants and good (Christians, but 
had no opportunity in those early days of attending any church. Her father 
settled on a farm north of them in 1805. George Maxwell died in 1852, and 
his widow in 1859. Our subject received only a limited common school educa- 
tion. He learned the trade of carpenter when young, and worked at it for 
about seven years, since which he has been engaged in farming. He married 
in 1849 Miss Emeline Phelps, a native of New York State, and daughter of 
Chester Phelps, who is now living in South Penn Line. Six children were 
born to this union, four now living: Allen J., Chester, Sarah Jane (wife of 
Newman B. Thompson), and Emma. Mrs. Maxwell died in January, 1877. 
Mr. Maxwell, wife and two sons were charter members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church at Steamburgh, of which our subject has been Trustee and Stew- 
ard ever since its organization. He takes special interest in this church and 
in the Christian cause generally; he is owner of his father's old homestead, of 
111 acres, well improved. His son, Allen J. is a graduate of Allegheny Col- 
lege and entered the ministry in the Methodist Episcopal Church in the fall 
of 1882. He is now preaching to an English congregation at Cawnpore, 
India. 

ALVAH D. MILLER, farmer, P. O. Linesville, was born in Tioga County, 
N. Y., July 30, 1830, son of Seymour and Jerusha Miller, also natives of 
Tioga County; former a soldier of the war of 1812, father of nineteen chil- 
dren — twelve by his first wife, seven by his second; his father was a Revolu- 
tionary soldier. Our subject, who is the eighth child by first wife, was married 
February 15, 1855, to Miss Dinah Garwood, who was bom on the farm she 
now lives on in Conneaut Township, this county, October 2, 1815, daughter 
of Obed Garwood, who came from Cumberland County, Penn., in 1798. His 
family numbered twelve children, Mra Miller being the only surviving rep- 
resentative of the most prominent old pioneer family of this township. Mi. 
Garwood built the first grist-mill in this section, and was engaged in milling 
business nearly all his life; he was owner of 500 acres at one time, and cleared 
by hard labor a large area of land. He was a cripple from birth, an earnest 
Christian, a member of the Seceder Church. He died in 1851, his wife in 
1846. Our subject and wife are of the Baptist persuasion. She has seventy 
acres of well-improved land, part of her father's old homestead. 

SAMUEL A. MILLER, farmer, P. O. Linesville, was born on the farm 
he now owns and lives on in Conneaut Township, this county, August 18, 
1846; son of John M. and Almira (Brown) Miller, the former a native of 
Elizabeth, N. J. , the latter of Canada. They came to this county about 1824, 
and settled in Conneaut Township; were parents of ten children, five now 
living, and were members of the Universalist Church. John M. Miller was a 
hard working man; he hauled lumber and shingles from this section to Con- 
neaut Harbor on Lake Erie, and cleared a large area of land. He died in 



CONNEAUT TOWNSHIP. 833" 

1850, and his widow is now living with our subject on the old homestead. Two 
of their sons fought for the Union cause in the war of the Rebellion. Edeon 
B. was a member of Company I, One Hundred and Forty-lifth Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, and was killed at the first battle of Fredericksburg. Our 
subject, who is ninth in the family, received a common school education. He 
enlisted, when seventeen years of age, in 1862, in Company H, One Hundred and 
Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served under Gen. Hancock 
in the Second Corps, Army of the Potomac. He was in the battles of Antietam, 
Snickers' Gap and first Fredericksburg, where he was wounded through the 
right arm. He remained in a hospital at Fort Wood, N. Y. and returned to 
his regiment in July, 1863. He was afterward in the battles of Brandy 
Station, Mine Run, through the Wilderness campaign, including Cold Harbor 
and Spottsylvania Court House, through the siege of Petersburg, the capture 
of the Weldon Railroad and finally at the capture of Lee's army, besides 
several minor engagements; serving in all two years and ten months. He 
was honorably discharged June 5, 1865, and returned home. Our subject was 
engaged in the sale of nursery stock, and in the fire insurance business for 
several years. He was married, September 20, 1875, to Caroline L. Shaw, 
daughter of M. D. Shaw, whose biography appears in this work. He is a 
member, together with his wife, of the R. T. of T. and P. of H. Mr. 
Miller owns forty- five acres of land, part of his father's old homestead. He is 
a member of the G. A. R. In politics a Republican. 

EDGAR PARTCH, farmer, P. O. Penn Line, was born in Ferris- 
burg, Vt. , January 24, 1837; son of Esbon and Clarissa (Stearns) Partch, 
also natives of Ferrisburg, the former being of English lineage. They 
came to Crawford County in 1841, settling on a farm in Conneaut Township. 
They were members of the Baptist Church, which merged into the United 
Brethren Church, the congregation subsequently uniting with the Wesleyan 
Methodist. Esbon Partch was a hatter by trade and a farmer by occupation, 
and being a hard-working man, cleared a large area of land. He died in 
1866. His widow now lives with her son Edgar, having attained the advanced 
age of eighty years. Our subject, who is the youngest son, received but a 
meager education. He learned the trade of carpenter by himself, and followed 
it in connection with farming from the time he was eighteen years old. He 
was married in 1858 to Miss Achsa Tanner, a native of Fowler, Ohio, and 
daughter of Elisha Tanner, who came to Crawford County in 1855. Her 
parents are both deceased. She died in 1859, and Mr. Partch then married, 
in April, 1861, Miss Miaa Thompson, a native of Erie County, Penn., and 
daughter of William Thompson, now of Conneaut Township, Erie County. 
This union has resulted in three children: William E., Anna and Monnie. 
Our subject, wife and children are members of the P. of H. He is owner of 
266 acres of land, nearly all cleared, part of which is his father's old home- 
stead. He is now making a specialty of breeding short horn cattle. He is 
one of the principal stockholders in the Farmers' Store Company (limited), of 
Conneaut Township. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., Masonic fraternity 
and State Police. In politics he is a Republican. 

JULIUS PENFIELD, farmer, P. O. Penn Line, was born in Madison 
County, N. Y., May 4, 1816; son of Seth and Naamah (Staples) Penfield, 
natives of Connecticut, who came to Crawford County in 1834, settling in Con- 
neaut Township. Seth Penfield was a blacksmith by trade, at which he worked 
to some extent in connection with farming. They were parents of eight boys, 
five of whom are now living. He died in 1870, his wife in 1861. Our 
subject, who is the fourth son, received but a limited education and was 



834 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

brought up to farming life. He married, June 8, 1841, Miss Eliza McCann, a 
native of Dutchess County, N. Y., and daughter of John and Betsy McCann. 
Four children have been born to this union: John S., Elijah S., Adelbert H. 
and Sarah J., wife of Henry Sanderson. The sons were all soldiers in the war 
of the Eebellion. John S. served in the Second Ohio Battery throughout the 
campaign, becoming a veteran ; Adelbert H. served eighteen months in the Sec- 
ond Pennsylvania Cavalry and was in several engagements; Elijah S. enlisted 
in the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry, serving three years, attached to the Army 
of the Potomac. He participated in several engagements, and was a prisoner in 
the Rebels' hands over six months; was confined in Libby, Belle'Isle and Sal- 
isbury prisons, and when exchanged was barely alive and with difficulty sur- 
vived; he was honorably discharged in 1865 and returned home. He married, 
in October, 1865, Miss Sarah A. Potter, daughter of George Potter. Two chil- 
dren were born to this union: Hubert A. and Ruby L. Elijah S. is a member 
of the G. A. R., P. of H. and A. O. U. W. Our subject owns 125 acres of fine 
land, all of which he cleared. In politics he is a Republican, as are also his 
three sons. 

HENRY A. PENFIELD, farmer, P. 0. Conneautville, was born in Con- 
neaut Township, this county, July 1, 1847, youngest son of Julius and Eliza 
Penfield. Our subject received a common school education. When sixteen 
years of age he enlisted in Company E, Thirty-second Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, serving three months with the Army of the Potomac. Having con- 
tracted disease while in the front he was discharged for physical disability, 
but in 1864, his health being re-established to some extent, and his patriotism 
running high, he enlisted in the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry, and again 
served in the Army of the Potomac. He was engaged in the battles of Todd's 
Tavern, Beaver Dam, Ashland's Station, front of Richmond, Hanover Ferry, 
Old Church Tavern, Cold Harbor, Franklin Station, Prospect Hill, St Mary's 
Church, Jerusalem Plank Road, and Malvern Hiil, at which place he was sun- 
etruck, which caused him to be sent to the hospital. On return to his regiment 
"he was present at the battles of Ream's Station, Wyott House (two days) 
Boyd town Plank Road, Stony Creek, and finally at Lee's surrender; was hon- 
orably discharged in July, 1865, and returned home. In February, 1867, Mr. 
Penfield married Miss Freelove Fenner, a native of Conneaut Township and 
daughter of Morgan L. Fenner, an old settler of this section. To this union 
were born three children: Gussie, Lida, Byron. Our subject owns sixty-eight 
acres well-improved land with a handsome residence on same built in 1882. 
He is an A. F. & A. M., a R. T. of T., and member of the G. A. R. ; in politics 
a Republican. 

J. B. PHELPS, proprietor Phelps' Cheese Factory, and farmer, P. O. Con- 
neautville, was born in Herkimer County, N. Y., December 12, 1836; son of 
Benjamin and Sarah (Greenfield) Phelps, former a native of Rensselaer, N. Y., 
latter of Herkimer County, N. Y. They came to Crawford County in 1847 
and settled in Conneaut Township; were members of the Baptist Church; 
parents of nine children, eight now living. Benjamin Phelps was an exten- 
sive farmer; he died June 20, 1873, his wife, January 3, 1854. Our subject, 
who is the youngest in. the family, received a good common school education. 
He enlisted in December, 1861, in the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry, Com- 
pany I, attached to the Army of the Potomac; participated in the second bat- 
tle of Bull Run and Gettysburg; was all through the Wilderness campaign; 
in the battle of Weldon R. R. ; at Deep Bottom; throughout the sieg;e of 
Petersburg, and finally at the surrender of Lee, besides being in sev- 
eral minor engagements. He was slightly wounded in the left groin at St. 



CONNEAUT TOWNSHIP. 835 

Mary's Church; became veteran in 1864, and was honorably discharged July 
13, 1865, as Quartermaster Sergeant Mr. Phelps was married February 22, 
1866, to Miss Lucy Allen, a native of Conneaut Township, and daughter of 
Daniel Allen. Two children have been born to this union: J. Guy and Sadie 
L. Our subject's cheese factory is located on his farm in Conneaut Township. 
It consumes the milk from about 500 cows and has a patronage which places 
Mr. Phelps at the head in the confidence of the public. He is a member of 
the Executive Committee of the Crawford County Agricultural Society; is an 
A. F. & A. M. ; member of the G. A. K. and P. of H. ; in politics a Kepubli- 
can. Mr. Phelps is owner of 150 acres of well-improved land. 

GEORGE POTTER, farmer, P. 0. Steamburgh, was born in Conneaut 
Township, this county, September 7, 1812; son of Samuel and Susannah 
Potter, natives of New Jersey, former of whom came to Crawford County in 
1799, his family in 1801. They were parents of six children, all deceased 
except George, who is fifth in the family. The father of Samuel Potter was a 
Revolutionary soldier and died from wounds received at the siege of York- 
town. Samuel was a brick-maker by trade, but chiefly followed farming and 
stock dealing. He cleared about 150 out of 600 acres of land he owned. He 
died in 1866, his wife in 1864. Our subject received a limited education and 
was reared a farmer. He was married in 1834 to Louise "Wilder, a native of 
Batavia, N. Y., sister of Hiram Wilder, of Spring Township, this county. 
Five children have been bom to this union, four of whom are now living: 
Alonzo A., Franklin H., Mary J., who died in 1868 at the age of twenty-one 
years; Sarah A., wife of E. S. Penfield, and Caroline E., wife of George 
Huntley. Our subject and wife are charter members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church at Steamburgh. Mr. Potter is emphatically a self-made man. In 
politics he is a Republican. 

JOSEPH POTTER, farmer and carpenter and joiner, P. O. Linesville, 
was born in Conneaut Township, this county, April 29, 1823; son of Clark 
and Nancy (Fry) Potter, former a native of New York, latter of Centre County, 
Penn. ; parents of five children, four now living; members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. Clark Potter is a descendant of one of four brothers who 
came here in a very early day, of English extraction. He came to this county in 
1801, with his father, Samuel Potter, a soldier of the war of 1812, and whose 
father was killed in the Revolutionary war. Samuel Potter was born Septem- 
ber 16, 1773, died September 18, 1865. Clark Potter was a farmer and 
cleared a farm in Conneaut Township. He died January 14, 1852; his wife, 
October 5, 1850. Our subject, who is the eldest in the family, settled on the 
farm where he now lives in Conneaut Township, in 1853. He worked at the 
trade of carpenter and joiner for forty years, in connection with farming; is 
owner of eighteen acres of improved land. He was married September 16, 
1849, to Sarah Wiser, widow of Alva B. Wiser, and daughter of James and 
PhcEbe (Meaker) Graham, former of whom was a brother of the father of 
Thomas Graham. To Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Potter were born four children, 
three now living: Cassius M., Sarah A., wife of H W. Thompson, and Joseph 
A. One son, Gideon L., died at the age of twenty-three years. Our subject, 
wife and sons are members of the Congregational Church. Mr. Potter is a 
man of literary attainments. In politics is a Republican. Mrs. Potter had 
one son by her first husband, named Alva B., now residing in Hand County, 
Dakota. 

PHILIP ROBERTSON, farmer, P. 0. Centre Road Station, was bom in 
Dryden, N. Y., May 16, 1808, son of George and Mary (Smith) Robertson, 
former a native of Scotland, latter of Saratoga County, N. Y., and a member 



836 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

of the Baptist Church. They settled, about 1796, in Tompkins County, N. Y., 
where they died; were parents of thirteen children, seven now living. George 
Robertson was brought to America when an infant, learned the trade of car- 
penter, but, after settling in Tompkins County, followed farming. He was 
Captain of a militia company. Our subject, who is seventh in the family, had 
but a limited school training, although his brothers were well educated. He 
was married February 14, 1833, to Sarah, daughter of Chapman and Esther 
Fulkerson, and a native of Dryden, N. Y. ; her parents were natives of Long 
Island. Her paternal grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. To 
this union were born three children: Mary E., deceased wife of A. M. Osborne; 
George C. and Daniel S., last two named married and living on farms adjoin- 
ing their father's. Mary E. undertook to cross the plains with her husband 
with teams in about 1863, but died on the way. She left one son, Charles M., 
who was reared and educated by our subject and wife, and is now engaged in 
teaching in Colorado. Our subject came to Crawford County with his wife in 
1835, and, although then "without a cent," in time purchased the farm he now 
resides on, which was partially cleared. He now owns eighty-six acres of 
line, well-cleared land at Summit Station. Mr. Robertson in politics is a 
Democrat. 

HENRY B. RUSHMORE, dealer in phosphates, and breeder of Berkshire 
hogs, was born in Conneaut Township, this county, April 13, 1839, son of 
John and Hannah (Moore) Rushmore, natives of New York, who came to this 
county in 1831. Our subject, who is second in the family, received a good 
common school education. He married, October 27, 1864, Miss Mary E. Irons, 
a native of Conneaut Township, born April 26, 1846, and daughter of James 
R. Irons, eldest brother of B. O. Irons. To this union were born two chil- 
dren: Alfred J. and Mabel A. Mrs. Rushmore is a member of the Baptist 
Church, and, along with her husband, of the order of P. of H. and R. T. of 
T. Mr. Rushmore owns 100 acres of well-improved land; is making a speci- 
alty of breeding Berkshire hogs, of which he has at present on hand some tine 
registered stock; is also raising a high grade of Cotswold sheep; is dealing to 
a considerable extent in the "Homestead Phosphates," manufactured at Detroit, 
Mich. In politics our subject is Republican. 

W. E. SANDERSON, carriage maker, Steamburgh, was born in Bainbridge, 
Ohio, March 1, 1841, son of Edward W. and Nancy J. (Treet) Sanderson, for- 
mer a native of New York, latter of Connecticut. They came to this county 
and settled in Conneaut Township in 1854; parents of five children. Edward 
W. Sanderson, a farmer, was an invalid during the last thirty years of his 
life. He died in 1876. The father of his widow was a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary war. She is now living with her son, W. E,, on the old homestead. 
She had the misfortune to break her arm when in her seventy-fifth year. Our 
subject, who is second in the family, had a common school education, and had 
to work hard when a boy. He enlisted, August, 1862, in the One Hundred 
and Thirty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, attached to the Army of 
the Potomac; participated in the battles of Blue Ridge Gap, South Mountain, 
second battle of Fredericksburg and Chancel lorsvi lie. He served with the 
regiment ten months, and was honorably discharged. In February, 1864, our 
subject again enlisted, on this occasion in the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry, 
also attached to the Army of the Potomac, and engaged in the battles of the 
Wilderness, Beaver Dam Station, South Ann River, Meadow Bridge, Cold 
Harbor (where he was slightly wounded in the left foot), Trevilian Station, 
White House, and St. Mary's Church, where he was taken prisoner June 24, 
1864. He was confined in Libby, Danville, Anderson ville, Charleston, and 



CONNEAUT TOWNSHIP. 887 

Florence prisons until paroled, March 6, 1865, when he returned to the Union 
lines in an almost famished condition. In addition to above named, Mr. San- 
derson was in several minor engagements. He was honorably discharged May 
15, 1865. He is a member of the G. A. R. In politics he is a Republican. 
He learned his trade of carriage-maker after leaving the army, and has since 
chiefly worked at that when his health permitted. 

W. G. SCHERMERHORN, farmer, P. O. Conneautville, was bom in 
Deerfield, Oneida Co., N. Y., May 4, 1821; son of Cornelius and Nancy 
Schermerhorn, natives of Oneida Co., N. Y. ; parents of nine children, seven of 
whom are now living. Cornelius was a tanner and shoe-maker during the 
earlier part of his life, but subsequently followed farming pursuits. He was 
a cousin of President Martin VanBuren. He was a member of the order of 
Freemasonry during the Morgan excitement, remaining true to the order. He 
died October 5, 1883. His widow is now living on the old homestead in New 
York State. The name "Schermerhorn" is of Holland origin and our sub- 
ject's ancestors came from a place by that name in Holland many years ago. 
Our subject, who is eldest in the family, learned the trade of carpenter when a 
young man, at which he has chiefly worked until within the past few years. 
He was married in 1851 to Miss Abigail Fenner, a native of Herkimer Co., 
N. Y., and to this union have been born two sons; Hay den A. and John C. 
Mr. and Mrs. Schermerhorn came to Crawford County in February 1854, set- 
tling in Conneaut Township. He is owner of seventy-five acres of well- 
improved land and is making a specialty of breeding Holstein cattle. In politics 
he is a Republican. The father of Mrs. Schermerhorn was a soldier in the 
war of 1812; he was a miller and farmer, and died when she was but ten years 
old. 

DANIEL D. SPALDING, farmer, P. O. Linesville, was born .in Oxford 
County, Conn. , October 3, 1807 ; son of John and Martha (Denison) Spalding. 
John Spalding was an educated man and a school teacher, also a singing 
teacher in an early day in Connecticut. He was a brother of Solomon Spald- 
ing, who, it is asserted, wrote a religious tale corresponding with Joseph 
Smith's-(the founder of Mormonism) ''Book of Mormons,'' and entitled " The 
Manuscript Found." After Spalding's death, the manuscript fell into the 
hands of one Sidney Rigdon, an intimate acquaintance of Joseph Smith. Our 
subject's mother, while living in Springfield Township, Erie Co., Penn., was 
attacked by Indians in her home, but she managed to escape into the woods 
with her four small children, leaving the Indians to pillage the house. Daniel 
D. Spalding came to this county in 1827, and settled in Conneaut Township 
when there were only three houses by the road, between his place and Con- 
neautville. He first took up seventy-live acres of land which he cle..'Ted, and 
at one time owned 175 acres, all of which he accumulated by hard work and 
industry. Mr. Spalding was married in 1832 to Miss AlathearWhaley, a native 
of Schuyler, Herkimer Co., N. Y., and daughter of Thomas Whaley,who came to 
Crawford County in 1817, settling in Conneaut Township. He was a soldier in 
the war of 1812, a shoe-maker and farmer. To Mr. and Mrs. Spalding were 
born three children, two now living: Mrs. Eunice A. Bamum and Lemuel D. 
Our subject is member of no church, although brought up a Baptist. Was an 
old line Whig until the formation of the Republican party, since when he has 
nailed his flag to that mast. Mrs. Eunice A. Barnum's mother's father had a 
family of eight children — six daughters and two sons. Her father's father had 
a family of ten children — six daughters and four sons. 

WILLIAM C. SPRAGUE, farmer, P. O. Centre Road Station, was bom 
in Fabius, Onondaga Co., N. Y., October 27, 1804; son of John and Rhoda 



838 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

(Crittenden) Sprague, former a native of Massachusetts, latter of Vermont. 
Thej^ were parents of five children, two now living. John Sprague was a tan- 
ner and currier, which trade he worked at certain times in the year and was 
engaged in farming the balance. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. 
His wife died about 1835. Our subject moved to Crawford County in 1837, 
with his wife, and settled in Summerhill Township. He married in April, 
1828, Miss Amanda Lord, a native of New York State. She died in 1842 and 
OUT subject then married, in 1846, Miss Elizabeth Ransom, daughter of Robert 
Ransom, of Erie Co. , Penn. One child was born to this union — William R. , 
a native of Summerhill Township. Mrs. Sprague died December 13, 1872. 
William R. married, October, 1877, Miss Ella Kazebee, a native of Conneaut 
Township, and daughter of John Kazebee. Her grandfather, William John- 
son, was among the very earliest settlers in this section. One daughter was 
the result of this union, named Floy; she died July 26, 1883. This couple 
are living with our subject and caring for him in his old age. The youngest 
brother of our subject, Franklin, shot himself by accident in November, 1844, 
while hunting in the woods, and his body was not discovered for three days 
afterward. Our subject owns sixty-two acres of well-improved land; he is a 
member of the Patrons of Husbandry ; held the office of Justice of the Peace 
five years; in politics is a straight Democrat. 

ADAM STEFFEE, farmer and Bank Director, P. 0. Linesville, was born 
in Venango County, Penn , December 17, 1833, son of Adam and Sarah 
(Stroup) Steffee, natives of Bellefonte, Penn., parents of nine children, five 
now living; members of the Church of God. The name Stefifee is of German 
extraction. Adam Steffee, who had been engaged in farming all his days, 
was located in a rich oil region, and he finally sold his farm of 230 acres for 
oil purposes. He died in October, 1878; his widow, March 29, 1883. Our 
subject, who is the seventh in the family, received but a limited education, 
being kept close to work when a boy. He married, in June, 1853, Catharine 
Dougherty, a native of Huntingdon County, Penn., and daughter of Edward 
Dougherty, a native of Haurisburg, Penn., and a soldier of the war of 1812. 
The result of this union was six children, viz. : Joanna, wife of Alexander 
McDonald; Sarah M., Martha J., Adam E., John S. and Mary E. Our sub- 
ject, wife and daughter Mary E. are members of the Baptist Church; Joanna 
and Sarah M., of the Catholic Church. Mr. Steffee came to this county and 
settled on his present farm of 120 acres improved land in Conneaut Township 
in 1873, and built a fine residence thereon in 1881. He keeps a high grade 
of cattle and sheep. He is a Director and one of the principal stockholders 
of the Linesville Savings Bank; in politics" a Republican; a strong advocate 
of temperance. The father of Mrs. Steffee owned a farm of 100 acres; he was 
noted for honesty and integrity; a miller by occupation, and father of a fam- 
ily of eight children, all now living. 

MRS. SARAH STEVENS, P. O. Centre Road Station, was born in Mercer 
County, Penn., March 5, 1833, daughter of Abraham and Catharine (Carrin- 
ger) Kazebee, former a native of New York, latter of Pittsburgh, Penn. Abra- 
ham Kazebee was a shoe-maker by trade, at which he worked until his mar- 
riage, when he commenced farming. He and his wife were members of the 
Presbyterian Church, parents of six children, of whom our subject is the 
youngest She was married September 8, 1859, to George L. Stevens, a 
native of Conneaut Township, this county, and a son of Nathen Stevens, one 
of the old pioneers of this section. He sent four sons to the Union Army dur- 
ing the war of the Rebellion, two of whom returned home; the other two were 
killed. George L. Stevens enlisted in 1861 in Capt. Mason's Company, One 



CONNEAUT TOWNSHIP. 839 

Hundred and Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving in the Sec- 
ond Corps under Gen. Hancock. He passed through all the hardships and 
battles of that glorious regiment, and was killed while on picket duty at Cold 
Harbor, June 4, 1864 He was a good soldier, and laid his life down that the 
Union might live. His brother, Thomas B., was a member of the Second 
Pennsylvania Cavalry, and was killed early in 1864. Mrs. Stevens had two 
sons: John R., married to Miss Ella Walton, May 26, 1880 (she is a native of 
Conneaut Township, and daughter of Levi Walton); and Manual G., born Sep- 
tember 25, 1861, and died November 8, 1861. John R. was educated mainly 
at the Soldiers' Orphan School at Titusville, and Mercer, Penn. Our subject 
is owner of twenty acres of well-improved land, with a handsome residence on 
same, built in 1882. She resides with her son on the old homestead her hus- 
band owned when he went in the army. Mrs. Stevens has seen some hard 
times, having had a great deal of sickness. She enjoys a pension. 

BENJAMIN STIMPSON, farmer, P. O. Steamburgh, was born in Con- 
neaut Township, this county, January 3, 1842, son of Thomas and Susan 
(Hayes) Stimpson, former a native of Yorkshire, England; latter of Canajo- 
harie, N. Y. They came to this county in 1839, and were the parents of two 
sons and two daughters. The eldest son, Ira, enlisted in 1861 in the Second 
Ohio Calvary, serving in all nearly five years, chiefiy in the Western Army; 
was in many engagements, passed through the hardships encountered by that 
glorious regiment, and was honorably discharged at the close of the war as 
First Sergeant. The mother of our subject died in January, 1881. The 
father is now living in his eighty-first year, a consistent member of the Meth- 
odist Church. Benjamin Stimpson, the youngest in the family, enlisted Sep- 
tember 3, 1861, in the Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving 
with the Army of the Potomac under Gen. Porter. He participated in the 
battles of Little Bethel and Hanover Court House, the seven days' fight before 
Richmond, on the Peninsula and the battle of Gaines' Mill, where he was 
wounded by a minie ball passing through both lungs. The bullet entered his 
right side, and came out on his left He was also wounded in the left thigh 
at the same time. Mr. Stimpson was there taken prisoner, and had to remain 
nine days before having his wounds dressed, and when that was being done a silk 
thread was passed through his body in the track of the bullet, which brought 
out a piece of his blouse. Our subject was held prisoner thirty days, during 
which he suffered untold hardships. When he was again able to stand upright 
and was convalescent, he weighed only eighty-five pounds; he now weighs 216 
pounds. In the ambulance that conveyed him off the field were three other 
wounded men who all died. Being exchanged he was honorably discharged 
on account of physical disability, and returned home in December, 1862. 
Mr. Stimpson then went West, where he remained until 1863; then came to 
the oil country of Pennsylvania and New York, where he was engaged in buy- 
ing and selling oil and contracting for wells as well as producing oil, meeting 
with much success for a time, but reverses came and he lost all. Recuperating, 
however, part of his fortune, he bought his present farm of fifty acres of 
improved land. Our subject was married October 2, 1883, to Miss Florence 
Nixon, a native of Avon Springs, N. Y. He is a member of the I. 0. O. F., 
and K. of P. 

MRS. ANGELINE THOMPSON, Linesville, was born in Dryden, N. 
Y., December 20, 1813, daughter of John and Catharine Weaver, natives 
of New York, who came to Conneaut Township, this county, in 1833, parents 
of fourteen children, three now living. John Weaver, who was lame, was a 
tailor by trade, at which he worked the greater part of his life. He took up a 



840 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

farm of fifty acres woodland, which he cleared. His father was a soldier in 
the Revolutionary war. Our subject, who is the twelfth in the family, taught 
school for several terms before her marriage, which occurred in 1837 with 
Marcus Thompson. He was a native of Vermont, son of Isaac Thompson, who 
came to Crawford County in an early day. This union resulted in eight chil- 
dren, five now living, viz.: Mary, wife of Daniel C. Clark; Catharine, wife 
of Daniel C. Landon; Ann; Clarissa, wife of George H. Peck, and Henry W. 
Their son, William, was a soldier in an Ohio regiment during the war of the 
Eebellion, and died in hospital at Nashville, Tenn.,of disease contracted while 
in the service. Mr. Thompson, husband of our subject, enlisted in the Eighty- 
third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving in the Army of the Poto- 
mac. He was killed at the battle of Spottsylvania Court House, May 8, 1864. 
His widow enjoys a pension. Mrs. Thompson and her third daughter are liv- 
ing together. 

MRS. BRIDGET "WALSH, P. O. Linesville, was born in Ireland, Febru- 
ary 1, 1834, and came to America in 1854. She was married October 14, 1861, 
in St. John's Cathedral, Cleveland, Ohio, to Martin V. Walsh, born on the 
farm where our subject now lives, in Conneaut Township, this county, May 6, 
1836, sou of Philip Walsh, who was born May 24, 1800, in Ireland. Philip 
came to America in 1820, settling for a time in Plainfield, N. J., where he 
married a Miss Senith Shortle. They came to this county about 1825. Mrs. 
Walsh dying, Philip married for his second wife Miss Martha Davis, a native 
of North Shenango Township, this county, and daughter of Patrick Davis, an 
early settler of that section. His third son, Thomas Walsh, was thoroughly 
educated at Mt. St. Mary's Academy, Emmittsburg, Md., intended for the 
priesthood, but he died just before his ordination, in April, 1863. Philip 
Walsh was a farmer all his days. He cleared the greater part of 175 acres of 
land, which he at one time owned. He died October 29, 1880, a consistent 
member of the Catholic Church. Martin V. Walsh, who was his third child 
by his second marriage, was also a farmer all his life. There are also two 
other surviving sons of Philip Walsh: Richard, living on part of his father's 
farm, and Patrick, living in the State of Iowa, both having large families. 
Mrs. Walsh is the mother of five children, four now living, viz. : Martha E., 
Thomas L., Teresa M. and Blacala A. Our subject and all the family are 
members of the Catholic Church. Martin V. Walsh died December 28, 1879, 
leaving his widow and children 125 acres of excellent land, part of his father's 
old homestead. 

SAMUEL P. WARRINER, farmer, P. O. Centre Road Station, was born 
in Gainsville, N. Y., September 30, 1823, son of Chester and Drusilla Warri- 
ner, natives of Vermont. The former, by trade a carpenter and joiner, but by 
occupation a farmer, was a soldier of the war of 1812; his father was a Revo- 
lutionary soldier. The parents came to Crawford County in 1834, settling on 
100 acres of land in Conneaut Township, which our subject assisted in clear- 
ing. They were the parents of three sons and two daughters. Formerly adher- 
ents of the Presbyterian body, they became members, latterly, of the Congre- 
gational Church, in which Chester was a Deacon. He died July 10, 1863, and 
his widow followed him February 5, 1869. Our subject, who is the youngest 
in the family, received an academic education, and taught school nine winters. 
He married, in 1847, Miss Keziah W. Kennedy, a native of Allegany County, 
N. Y., born October 4, 1823, and daughter of Gerden Kennedy. They came 
to Crawford County in 1832, and settled in Conneaut Township. Mr. Ken- 
nedy was a prominent faiTuer, and both he and his wife were charter members 
of the Presbyterian Church. Our subject and wife are the parents of two chil- 



CtJSSEWAQO TOWNSHIP. 841 

dren: Hattie, and Sakie L., wife of J. A. Potter. They are members of the 
Congregational Church. Our subject served as Justice of the Peace five years; 
is owner of fifty acres of well -improved land, part of his father's old homestead. 
In politics he is a Republican, and is a strong advocate of prohibition. 

MRS. ELIZABETH R. WRIGHT, P. O. Penn Line, was bora in New 
Jersey, October 7, 1820, daughter of Isaac Wintermute, a soldier of the war 
of 1812, who came to Crawford County when a young man, immediately before 
that war, and took up 200 acres of land on Conneaut Creek, in this township, 
which he cleared and improved. He then returned to N'ew Jersey, married, 
and brought his young wife to his new home. They were the parents of seven 
children, four now living; were members of the Presbyterian Church, of which 
he was a charter member, at Conneaut Centre. She died in 1829, and he fol- 
lowed her August 3, 1833. Our subject, who is third in the family, was mar- 
ried July 24, 1841, to William Wright, a native of Louisville, N. Y., born 
March 4, 1816, and son of Aaron Wright, a soldier of the war of 1812. To 
this union were born fourteen children, eleven now living, viz.: Mary E., wife 
of Hiram Branch; Oscar, a three months' soldier toward the close of the war of 
the Rebellion; Flora, wife of R. M. Dunham; Clara J., wife of John Silla- 
way; Charlotte, wife of D. Bean; Charles; Jennie and Jessie (twins), the lat- 
ter wife of C. Ryan; Isa, wife of L. W. Branch; Juliana, and Henry A., the 
youngest. W. H. was a soldier during the war of the Rebellion, in the One 
Hundred and Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry; he died in 1863 
from disease contjacted during service. Mr. Wright taught school many years 
after coming to Crawford County. He held the position of Justice of the 
Peace fifteen years, and has filled several other township offices. He all his 
life followed farming; a man of integrity and influence. He died May 31, 
1878. Mrs. Wright resides on the old homestead of 106 acres improved land. 



CUSSEWAGO TOWNSHIP. 



ELIAS BARNS, farmer and mechanic, P. O. Crossingville, was born 
March 19, 1820, in Victor, Ontario Co., N. Y. His parents, Jonathan J. and 
Lovina (Bradley) Barns, settled in Girard Township, Erie County, in 1832, and 
helped develop the resources of , that country. This family was established in 
the United States by Thomas Barns, who emigrated from England to Nor- 
folk, Conn., ia the early history of the colonies. Silas Barns and Zolman 
Bradley, our subject's grandfathers on both sides, were Revolutionary soldiers. 
Our subject married Miss Parmelia Peet, October 28, 1841. She was born 
June 23, 1824, in Portage Township, Allegany Co., N. Y. ; her parents, Lewis 
and Margaret (Gerhart) Peet, became pioneers in Cussewago Township, this 
county, in 1840. Their children are Mrs. Martha P. Carnahah, Mrs. Anna 
L. Sperry; Mrs. Margaret Liephart, deceased; Arthur, deceased; Byron B., of 
Wood County, Ohio; Mrs. Elmina A. Daniels; Charles, in Michigan; Mrs. Ella 
V. Heard and David P. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Barns settled on 
the farm which he had been engaged the previqus summer in clearing up and 
improving. By industry and good management they have built up a property 
of eighty acres of well-improved land. Mr. Barns is a carpenter by trade; he 
erected many buildings in the surrounding townships, and built the house in 



842 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

which he now resides. Mr. Barns has been a Eepresontative to the State 
Grange; is a Methodist; in politics originally a Whig, now a Republican. 

CHARLES A. BENNETT, deceased, was a native of Stephentown, 
Rensselaer Co., N. Y., born October 5, 1794, son of Israel and Ruth (Brown) 
Bennett. He married Miss Laura Jewett, a native of Connecticut, born June 
27, 1805, daughter of Ira and Elizabeth (Warren) Jewett. The result of this 
onion was seven children: Mrs. Charity A. Liephart; Mrs. Lucy J. Sexton; 
Edwin L. ; Israel J., deceased; Alonzo H. W. ; Mrs. Cordelia F. Frontz, 
deceased, and Mrs. Laura B. Davis. Mr. Bennett had formerly been married 
to Miss Luana Hilt, of Stephentown, N. Y., who died leaving seven children, 
five now living, viz. : Mrs. Jeanette Brace, in Missouri; Mrs. LavoniaM. Hall, 
in Grand Rapids, Mich.; Mrs. Luana J. Hills, in Grand Rapids, Mich.; Emily 
A., wife of A. B. Pullman, in Chicago; and William H., in Erie County, Penn. 
After living in Clarendon, Orleans Co., N. Y. , some years, our subject and 
family came to this county, and settled in Cassewago Township, October 11, 
1847. Here Mr. Bennett purchased land and began developing a farm. On 
this there was an old mill site, with an old saw and grist-mill. On these he 
made repairs, and when complete, operated them, converting the grist-mill into 
a saw-mill in about two years. He manufactured lumber for the home market 
and for shipment abroad, chiefly to Pittsburgh, selling there at that time first 
class pine lumber for $7.50 per thousand, while at the mill it was 15.00. About 
1860 he took two sons, Edward L. and Alonzo H. W., into partnership with him, 
and they then built a large steam mill near the old site in 1864. Mr. Bennett 
died July 30, 1871, since which time the business has been carried on by his 
sons. Mrs. Bennett is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In pol- 
itics our subject was a life-long Republican. 

EDWIN L. BENNETT, lumber manufacturer, Mosiertown, was born 
September 25, 1839, in Clarendon, Orleans Co., N. Y. ; son of Charles A. Ben- 
nett. Our subject came to Cussewago Township, this county, with his father's 
family in 1847, and here received his education. He married Miss Ellen A. 
Taylor, daughter of David Taylor, of Beaver Centre, Penn., January I, 1868, 
and their children are Millicent Eugenie, Rush E., Emma G., and Nellie B. 
Our subject engaged at eighteen years of age as partner with his father in the 
saw-mill, hating worked in the mill from early boyhood. At bis father's 
death he and his brother, Alonzo, took entire charge of the establishment, and 
he now owns the saw-mill department entirely himself. He does an exten- 
sive business, extending to the surrounding townships, besides supplying the 
local trade; ships also to New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore. Mr. Ben- 
nett has also a fine farm of 120 acres well -improved land, known as the Job 
Potter farm. Our subject takes a deep interest in the cultivation and 
improvement of fine stock on his place, and makes a specialty of Durham and 
Jersey cattle. He has some very fine thoroughbred animals. His farm is 
very productive, having yielded 140 bushels of corn and 400 bushels of pota- 
toes per acre. Mr. Bennett is a first-class business man and a citizen of wide 
influence in the community; in politics he is a Republican. 

GILBERT K. BENNETT, retired farmer, Mosiertown, was born in 1801 
in Stephentown, Rensselaer Co., N. Y. He married, October 21, 1830, Mise 
Mary E. King, born in 1807. They came to this county and settled in Cus- 
sewago Township in 1851. They lived on a farm on Cussewago Creek, and 
Mr. Bennett carried on extensive lumbering interests. Their children are 
George G., in Bradford. Penn.; John K., Superintendent of Pullman cars, 
Buffalo, N. Y. ; Ann Mary; Lydia Gertrude and Clara Emma, besides 
lour deceased. Mr. and Mra Bennett owned and carried on the Cussewago 



CDSSEWAGO TOWNSHIP. 848 

House for several years, during which time he held the appointment of Post- 
master of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Bennett are consistent members of the 
Baptist Church, having been faithful in the cause for over fifty years. Their 
golden wedding was celebrated October 21, 1880, by many friends. He is a 
hearty, well-preserved old pioneer, a man of upright integrity, enjoying the 
highest respect of the entire community; in politics he is a Democrat. 

HENRY P. BOGGS, lumberman, Mosiertown, was born August 15, 1833, 
in Woodcock Township, this county. His father, Benjamin E. Boggs, a 
native of New Jersey, born January 1, 1790, passed his boyhood in Philadel- 
phia. He married Miss Elizabeth Burkhaulter, of Lehigh County, Penn. 
She was a descendant of one of the " Mayflower " Pilgrims, born April 10, 1796. 
They settled in this county in about 1829, where Benjamin E. followed his 
trade as tanner and currier. He died in 1867; his widow in 1872. Our sub- 
ject learned the tanner and currier trade in Meadville, Penn. He married 
Miss Juliana Woodring, February 21, 1856. She was born September 10, 
1835, in Cussewago Township, this county, and is a daughter of Samuel 
Woodring. After their marriage they settled in Mosiertown, where they still 
reside. Mr. Boggs has op«rated a tannery here, and carried on a boot and 
shoe establishment for twenty-seven years. He held the appointment of Post- 
master from 1865 to 1872, having tilled the position of Deputy four years 
previously. From 1873 to 1880 he was prospecting in the oil regions of 
Pennsylvania, and in 1881 he went to Morgan County, Tenn., where he car- 
ried on an extensive lumbering business. Mrs. Boggs is a consistent member 
of the Baptist Church. Mr. Boggs is an A. F. & A. M. ; a life- long Repub- 
lican, having cast his first vote for Fremont, and has voted for Republican Pres- 
idents ever since. 

JOHN W. BRADISH, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown. was born May 11, 1850. 
in Haytield Township, this county. His father, John Bradish, son of the 
famous pioneer of Erie County, Penn., Walter Bradish, came to this county in 
1842. He married Miss Mary Page, a native of Spring Township, this county, 
and in 1865 they moved from Haytield Township and settled near Mosiertown, 
where they resided the remainder of their lives. Their children are Mrs. 
Dolly Heath, of Elk Creek Township, Erie Co. ; John W., and Mrs. Mary A. 
Hites, of Elk Creek Township, Erie County. Our subject received his edu- 
cation principally in the schools of Mosiertown. He married Miss Louisa, 
born in Cussewago Township, this county, daughter of Elihu Hotchkiss, August 
29,1871. Sbewasborn May 1, 1850. They have one son— Willis. Mr. Brad- 
ish has a fine farm of 100 acres of well-improved land. He is a lifelong 
Republican. Mr. Bradish is an energetic, enterprising young farmer; is 
highly respected by the entire community. 

EDWIN G. CUTLER, proprietor of Cutler House, Crossingville, was born 
June 3, 1833, near Rutland, Vt. His father, Gilbert Cutler, married Sarah 
McConnell, by whom he had seven children, viz.: Joel Barnard, deceased; 
Henry S., of Edinboro, Penn.; Edwin G. ; Franklin D. , deceased; Mrs. Sarah 
L. Brandt, of Montgomery City, Mo. ; Mrs. Lucy J. Tabor; Carrie E., deceased. 
Mr. Cutler started with his family in 1837, intending to go to Michigan. 
Leaving his family at Girard, Penn., he went to Michigan, purchased 280 
acres, eighty acres of which is the present site of Jackson. He finally gave 
up his possessions there and remained in Girard, where he kept a hotel for 
several years, spending an interval of a few years of that time on a farm near 
that place. In 1845 he moved to Crossingville, where he purchased the hotel 
and a farm adjoining. Here he lived until his death, January 14, 1871. His 
widow followed him October 3, 1876. Our subject remained with his parents, 



844 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES; 

not forming any matrimonial alliance. He now owns the hotel property known 
as the Cutler House, besides a farm of 100 acres adjoining the village, and 
one of fifty acres in Erie County. Mr. Cutler is a member of the Western 
Crawford Lodge, F. & A. M., of Conneautville; in politics he is a Republican, 

JAMES DAVIS, farmer, P. O. Crossingville, was born December 19, 1812 
in CuBsewago Township, this county. His father, Rev. Isaac Davis, came to 
this township from New Jersey, in 1795, and here settled. He here mar 
ried Miss Nancy Lewis, a native of Maryland. Their children are James 
Mrs. Zernah Boyde, and Mrs. Elizabeth Thayer, besides fouf deceased. Mr. 
Davis was one of the pioneer preachers of the Baptist Church. He died June 
20, 1859; Mrs. Davis died June 10, 1838. Our subject married May 25, 1837 
Miss Elizabeth Erwin, born February 9, 1818, in this township. Their chil- 
dren are Erwin; Hiram; Mrs. Julia A. Stevens, of Salida, Col.; Kiz; Zacha 
riah T. ; Elizabeth; James Fred; Mi'S. Rose Clark and Jessie Maud. They set 
tied on their present farm in 1844. Here by industry and good management 
they acquired a farm of 225 acres of well-improved land, part of which they 
have donated to their children. Mr. Davis served his township in various 
positions, and held the office of School Director three terms; in politics he is 
a Republican. 

SETH DONAHUE, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was born August 14, 1843, 
in Cusaewago Township, this county, and is a son of James Donahue. He 
enlisted in August, 1862, in the One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served in the Virginia campaigns in 
the Army of the Potomac He was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville, 
Antietam, Fredericksburg and several skirmishes. At the close of his service 
he re-enlisted in April, 18(53, in Company A, One Hundred and Eleventh 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving until the close of the war. 
He was a faithful soldier and has an honorable record. Mr. Donahue married 
Mary M. Joslin, September 9, 1866, and their children are Wilson, Bertha, 
and Ora. Our subject owns a farm of eighty acres of land; he has held sev- 
eral township offices, always discharging his duties satisfactorily to the peo- 
ple; in politics a Republican. Mr. Donahue is a man of upright integrity and 
good standing in this community. 

LEONARD ERWIN, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was born January 30, 
1803, in Cussewago Township, this county. His father, Robert Erwin, came 
here from Northumberland County, Penn., in 1797, and married Elizabeth 
Strauss, of Virginia. Of their ten children, five are now living, viz. : Leonard; 
James, in McKean County, Penn.; Mrs. Lydia Towuley; Mrs. Elizabeth Davis 
and Mrs. Julia A. Mills, in Iowa. Mrs. Erwin died October 11, 1856; Mr. 
Erwin in October 1858. Our subject married, March 6, 1828, Sarah, daughter 
of Arnold Freeman. She died November 28, 1835, leaving three children: 
Gilbert, Mrs. Elizabeth Mosier, and Albert. Mr. Erwin next married Miss 
Keziah Allee, November 9, 1836. She was born within the limits of Hayfield 
Township, this county, January 5, 1817. Her father, John Allee, was an ear- 
ly settler in that township. Mr. Erwin settled where he now resides, in 1828. 
He has here a fine farm of 104 acres, and takes an interest in breeding Dur- 
ham cattle. He has served the people in most of the township offices. In 
early times he held the rank of Captain in the Volunteer Militia. In politics 
Mr. Erwin is a Republican. Mrs. Erwin is a member of the Baptist Church. 

AROLD FREEMAN, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was born July 24, 1807, 
in Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., N. J. His father, Arold Freeman, born in 
1770, married Miss Sarah Edgar. They located in Cussewago Township, this 
county, in 1816, and here settled and improved the large farm where Thomas 



CDS8EWAG0 T0WN8HIP. 846 

Best now resides. Mrs. Freeman died May 13, 1834; Mr. Freeman January 
7, 1836. They were very upright, respeoted pioneer citizens, and left an hon- 
ored name to posterity. They had eleven children, viz. : Mrs. Dilla Thornell, 
Mrs. Mary Stelle, Mrs. Isabel Farland, Mrs. Rachel Thickstun, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Anderson, Mrs. Sarah Erwin, Arold, Edgar, Thomas, Mrs. Jane Erwin 
and Martha, all deceased except Arold. Our subject married Mary Davis, 
November 23, 1833. She died January 10, 1877, leaving seven children: 
Mrs. Dilla Patterson, of Kansas; Mrs. Julia Clark, of Michi'gan; Mrs. Elvira 
Fuller, of Michigan; William; Thomas; Jeffrey, and Arold A., who is Alder- 
man of the Fourth Ward, Erie, Penn. Mr. Freeman acquired a fine farm of 
150 acres of well-improved liad; in religion he is a Universalist; in politics a 
Bepublican. 

MANNING T. FEEEMAN, farmer, P. 0. Orossingville, was born August 9, 
1825, in Cussewago Township. His father, Edgar E. Freeman, was born in 
1794, in Middlesex County, N. J., and came to this county with his father, 
Arold Freeman, Sr., in 1818. Here his mother, Sarah, died in 1834, and his 
father in 1836. Arold, Jr., now seventy-eight years of age, is their only son 
now living out of ten children. He married Miss Mary Davis, who died Janu- 
ary 10, 1877, leaving seven children. Edgar Freeman married Joanna, daugh- 
ter of George Heard. They raised eleven children. Two of their sons, Eph- 
raim and Asa, were soldiers in the Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, and were killed July 2, 1862, at Malvern Hill, Twoof their daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Mary Hotchkiss and Mrs. Sarah Meabon, live in Erie County, Penn. 
Edgar died May 12, 1848. Their son James E. went to Kansas at seventeen 
years of age and provided a home for his mother, where she lived until her 
death, February 18, 1872. He then married Miss Martha Graves, of Cuba, 
N. y., November 9, 1873, and now resides on his farm of 240 acres in Riley 
County, Kan. Manning T., our subject, married Misi Juliann Stelle, September 
3,1846, who died January 14, 1868, leaving seven children: Benjamin, in Mich- 
igan; Mrs. Mary S. Maxon; Mrs. Josephine Williams; Mrs. Ella A. Kennedy; 
Mrs. Isadore Ehrett, of West Virginia; Manning and Asa at home. Mr. Free- 
man then married Sliss Ann Maria Whitford, March 9, 1869. She was born 
August 1, 1839, in JefTerson County, N. Y. They have three sons: Edward 
W., Robert W. and Charles M. Mrs. Freeman is a Sabbatarian, Mr. Freeman 
a Universalist, and keeps the seventh day. He owns 180 acres of land; in pol- 
itics is a Republican. 

LOT D. FREEMAN, farmer, P. 0. Venango, was born June 12, 1833, in 
this county, and is a son of William and Luoinda (Spaulding) Freeman. He 
married Miss Lucy Thompson in 1855, by whom he had five children, of whom 
three are living: William, George and Savilla. George attended the State Nor- 
mal School at Edinboro, Erie County, and taught several terms. He now holds 
an office on the U. S. iron steamer S. Michigan, on Lake Erie. After the death 
of Mrs. Freeman Mr. Freeman married Miss Mary Thompson. They have 
three children: Charles, Byron and Kay. Mr. Freeman has here a tine farm 
of eighty acres, which he improved mostly himself. He takes especial inter- 
est in his dairy and in raising fine Chester hogs. He has served his township as 
School Director, and in various minor offices. Mr. Freeman takes an interest 
in the education of his children. In politics he is a Greenbacker. 

SAMUEL D. FULLERTON, merchant, Mosiertown, was born October 
28, 1850, in Rockdale Township, this county, where his parents, David L. and 
Elizabeth Fullerton, still reside. Oar subject was brought up on his father's 
farm, and attended the schools of the home district. October 2, 1872, he mar- 
ried Miss Anna E. Amee, born November 27, 1850, daughter of Horatio B. 



846 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

and Caroline Ames, of Mill Village, Erie Co., Penn. Their children are 
Frank C. , Serana, Ernest C. , Pierce Leroy and Josephine Mr. Fullerton 
came to Mosiertown in 1882, and established a general merchandise store, also 
carries on a hotel. In September, 1883, he took into partnership Newell E. 
White. They have a full stock of dry goods, groceries, etc., a complete line 
of goods for general merchandising. By their excellent business principles 
and courtesy to the public they are building up a large and flourishing trade. 
Mr. Fullerton is a life-long Democrat; a man of upright integrity. 

WILLIAM JENKS GAMBLE, physician and surgeon, Mosiertown, was 
born in Boston, Mass., December 23, 1824. His father. Rev. John Gamble, 
a native of Belfast, Ireland, of Scotch Presbyterian descent, born in 1777, 
married Miss Eliza Parr, born in 1785, in County Down, Ireland, and a des- 
cendant of the famous old Parr family of England. They immigrated to 
America in about 1807. Being educated for the ministry of the United 
Presbyterian Church, he adopted the profession of teaching and was engaged 
in Jamestown and Greenville Academies, making a specialty of classics and 
higher mathematics. After a long life of usefulness he died iu 1844. His 
widow followed him in 1866. She was the mother of nine children. Our 
subject was educated in the Jamestown Seminary and Franklin Academy, and 
at the age of nineteen years he was teaching the English branches, mathematics, 
Latin and Greek languages. At the age of twenty- three he began the study 
of medicine under Dr. Gibson, of Jamestown. He graduated at the Eclectic 
Medical College, of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1854. He had established himself 
at Mosiertown in 1851, prior to his taking 4he degree of M. D., and has since 
remained there. He married, December 12, 1865, Miss Helen M. Beebe, of 
Pleasantville, Venango Co., Penn., and of their three children William M. and 
Robert B. survive. Mrs. Gamble died May 25, 1873. On December 18, 1876, 
the Doctor married Miss Esther J. Bingham, born in 1846, in eastern Penn- 
sylvania, a daughter of Rev. Bingham, a native of Mercer, Mercer Co., Peun., 
born in 1810, and died in Mosiertown in 1876; his widow survives. The 
present Mrs. Gamble has blessed her husband with three children: Eleanor, 
seven years old, John K.,four years old, and Martha Elizabeth,* six months old. 
The Doctor has been averse to office, yet his neighbors, recognizing his worth 
and honesty, thrust upon him the position of Township Treasurer for two 
terms, and School Director for many years, and he has been willing to serve 
his share of the small offices where pay is not considered. He was firmly 
attached to the cause of the union, and has been a life-long adherent of the 
Republican party, to which he clings tenaciously. Our subject became a mem- 
ber of the National Eclectic Association, June 14, 1877. He is a physician 
of first-class scientific attainments, and enjoys one of the most extensive prac- 
tices in western Pennsylvania. Personally he is of splendid physique, being 
six feet, three and a half inches in height and portly in proportion. Elsewhere 
in this volume will be found steel portraits of this worthy citizen and repre- 
sentative physician of Crawford County and his good lady. 

HARRISON HARNED, farmer, P. O. Edinboro, Erie County, was born Jan. 
16, 1836, in Cussewago Township, this county. He is a grandson of David Ear- 
ned, and a son of John and Sarah (Freeman) Harned. He obtained such edu- 
cation as the schools of those early days or the home district afforded. When 
he was fourteen years of age he had the misfortune to lose his right eye by 
accident, which prevented his being accepted when he offered his services in 
defense of the Government in 1861. He married Miss Nancy E. Lewis, Sep- 
tember 28, 1859. They settled where they now live in 1864, where by indus- 
try and gopd management they have acquired a fine farm of seventy to eighty 

• Born AoguBt 22, 1884. 



CDSSEWAGO TOWNSHIP. 847 

acres. Their children are Mrs. Clara A. Sipps, John L., Charles H. , Guy 
M. , Pearlie C. and Edith V. Mr. Harned takes an earnest interest in public 
affairs, and is at present serving his township as Supervisor. He discharges 
his duties faithfully and to the satisfaction of the people. In politics he is a 
life-long Republican. 

JACOB HARNED, farmer, P. O. Edinboro, Erie County, was born Dec. 16, 
1840, in Cussewago Township, this county. His father, John P. Harned, was born 
in this township in 1808, where his parents, David and Ann (Perkins) Harned, 
former of New York, latter of Virginia, settled in 1801. He married Sarah, 
daughter of Jedediah Freeman, August 20, 1831. Of their twelve children 
seven are now living: Smith, Harrison, Hiram, Mrs. Almira Pier, Mrs. Jane 
Skelton, Jacob and John D. L. Our subject enlisted, in August, 1862, in the 
One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
serving in the Virginia campaigns and taking part in the skirmish of Cramp- 
ton's Pass, and battles of Antietam, Piatt's Plantation, Va., and Chancellors- 
ville, receiving an honorable discharge in May, 1863. Mr. Harned married 
Miss Lovina Lewis, November 4, 1869. Their children are Josiah Enestus, 
Lillie v., Mary B., James Hiram and Sophia. Our subject now owns fifty 
acres of excellent land. Mrs. Harned is a member of the Seventh Day Baptist 
Church. In politics he is a Republican. 

JAMES H. HEARD, farmer, P. O. Crossingville, was born December 16, 
1820, in Cussewago Township, this county. His grandparents, George and 
Alche Heard, natives of Elizabeth, N. J., came to this county in 1794, and, 
after living a short time on French Creek, near Meadville, settled in Cussewago 
Township, this county, and took up the central tract of land in the township. 
Of their eight children but two are now living, viz. : James, of Genesee 
County, Mich., and Mrs. Lettie Hotchkiss. Their eldest son, Randolph, mar- 
ried Miss Mary Hamilton, born in Maryland, and was brought to Washington 
Township, Erie County, when two months old, and here she was raised. Mr. 
Heard died in 1862, aged sixty-seven years, seven months and three days; his 
widow in 1873, aged seventy-four years, nine months and twelve days. Of 
their ten children, four are now living: James H., George W., Ammi B., the 
latter living in Erie, Penn., and Mrs. Letitia Harned. Our subject married. 
May 1, 1851, Margaret A., daughter of George W. Syers, of this township. 
Thej' have resided ever since on their home of 160 acres of well-improved 
land on Cussewago Creek. Their children are Adella D., C. Fred and Mary 
E. Mr. Heard has taken some interest in public affairs, and tilled acceptably 
various township oflSces. He is a worthy, representative citizen of Cusse- 
wago. In politics he is a Republican. 

FREDERICK C. HELMBRECHT, farmer, P. 0. Mosiertown, was born 
May 22, 1846, in Venango Township, this county. His father, Henry Helm- 
brecht, a native of Hanover, Germany, married Miss Hannah M. C. Hampe. 
They immigrated to America in 1836 and immediately settled near Drake's 
Mills, Venango Township, this county. There they began clearing up and 
developing their farm. They sold out April, 1858, and located in Cussewago 
Township, this county, and here they died, Mr. Helmbrecht April 28, 1883, 
and his widow May 2, 1883. Their children were Frederick, who died in 
Germany; Mrs. Amelia Matthews, deceased; Henry C.,a soldier of the Eighty- 
third Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, who was killed in the battle 
of the Wilderness, and Frederick C. Our subject, when a boy, bravely offered 
his services to the Government, but was restrained from service by his father. 
He married, September 11, 1866, Miss Amanda Hickernell, of Haytield Town 
ship, this county, who bore him the following named children: Charles H., 



848 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Frank W., Freddie E., Carrie May, Adella E. and Israel (deceased). Mr. 
Helmbrecht has here a fine f arm of 104 acres of well- improved land, it being 
the family homestead. He believes in the cause of popular education and is 
giving his children good advantages; in politics he is a Republican. 

NATHANIEL B. HILLS, millwright, Mosiertown, was born September 17, 
1824, in Onondaga County, N. Y. ; son of Obed and Alsimana Hills, who were 
residents of Cussewago Township, this county, from 1838 to 1862, when they 
removed to Erie County, Penn., and afterward to Genesee County, Mich., 
where they died, Mr. Hills in his ninetieth year. Our subject is the fourth in 
a family of fourteen children. He early began learning the carpenter's trade 
and gradually developed from that to the business of millwright. He has 
put up a great many grist and saw-mills in the surrounding townships and 
counties ; has also done a great deal of repair work, and has the reputation of 
being a skillful workman, having always met with marked success. Mr. Hills 
married, September 10, 1843, Miss Elizabeth Smith, daughter of Ephraim and 
Peggy Ann (Harrington) Smith, born September 17, 1823, in Greene County, 
N. Y., and has lived in this county since 1827. To this union have been born 
three children : Warren Benson, of Bradford, Penn. ; Mrs. Amanda Gary, of 
Philadelphia, and'Effie. Mrs. Hills brother, G. W. L. Smith, was a soldier in 
the Thirteenth Regiment, Missouri Infantry, and was killed at the battle of 
Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. Mr. Hills is a consistent member of the Baptist 
Church; in politics he has been a Republican since the campaign of Fremont 
and Buchanan. 

SHELDON HOTCHKISS, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was born March 31, 
1820, in Cussewago Township, this county. His father came to Cussewago 
Township, this county, from Connecticut in 1816, taking forty-two days with 
an ox-team. His son, Joel, married Mary Sperry. He followed the trade of 
carpenter and erected many of the buildings in this and adjoining townships. 
Our subject is the seventh of eleven children. In 1841 he married Clarissa, 
daughter of Thomas Haggerty, of this township. They settled and cleared a 
farm of fifty acres of wild land which they sold, then bought a part of the John 
Clawson homestead. Their children are Vincent A., of Erie County, Penn. ; 
Mrs. Mahetable Freeman; Mrs. Welthy Jane Mosier; Mrs. Evaline McLeland; 
Mrs. Rosetta Crain; Mrs. Emma Steinhoof, and John W. Mrs. Hotchkiss 
died December 26, 1871. She was a member of the Christian Church. Mr. 
Hotchkiss has held most of the township offices, fulfilling his duties faithfully. 
In politics he is a Republican. 

ELIHU HOTCHKISS, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was born in this town- 
ship, March 31, 1824, and is a son of Joel and Mary (Sperry) Hotchkiss, of 
Connecticut, who came to this county by wagon in 1817, settling in this town- 
ship, where they developed their farm and raised a family of ten children. 
Our subject was married April 22, 1845, to Julia, daughter of Jeremiah Colvin. 
She died August 4. 1868, leaving six children: Mark; Sophronia, died July 
28, 1865; Louisa Bradish; Willis, died February 21, 1866; Rosetta Monck- 
enhoupt; and Cassius G., died March 29, 1865. On March 2, 1865, Mr. 
Hotchkiss married Miss Rachel Stelle, a native of New Jersey, and the chil- 
dren by this marriage are Zernah, Darwin A. and Otis A. Mr. Hotchkiss 
has been industrious and successful in life, and has a fine farm of 225 acres 
of well-improved land, part of which was the old family homestead. He 
takes a great deal of interest in the improvement of fine stock on his place. 
He has been a life-long Republican. Cussewago Township contains no more 
useful and influential citizen than our subject, Elihu Hotchkiss. 

HIRAM HOTCHKISS, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was bom May 5, 1828, 



CXrsSEWAGO TOWNSHIP. 849 

in CuBsewago Township, this county. His father, Luther Hotohkiss, son of 
Joel and Mary Hotchkiss, settled in this township in 1818. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Rev. Isaac Davis, one of the pioneer Baptist preachers, 
January 3, 1826. She was born April 23. 1805, and her parents came to this 
county, from New Jersey, in 1795, and here settled. Mr. and Mrs. Luther 
Hotchkiss developed a farm of 120 acres in western Cussewago Township. 
Their children are Hiram, Mrs. Nancy Erwin (deceased), Gilbert, James, 
Mrs. Martha Herriek, Mrs. Adeline Morgan, Mrs. Amelia Herrick and Mrs. 
Mary Hills (deceased). Mr. Hotchkiss died March 28, 1848; she still lives, 
aged eighty,^and her portrait appears in this volume under the name of Eliza- 
beth Hotchkiss, by her own reciuest. In 1861 she married Lewis Thayer, of 
Conneaut, Ohio, who died in 1873. Our subject married Amrilla, daughter of 
Lewis Peet, September 3, 1848. She was born October 2, 1829, in Allegany 
County, N. Y. Their children were: Martin Luther, Norton J., Charley D. 
(deceased), Belvia E. and Lydia E. Mr. Hotchkiss owns 428 acres of land, 
including the old homestead, and is raising Durham cattle on his farm. He 
and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. 

LEWIS H. HOTCHKISS, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was born October 6, 
1829, in Cussewago Township, this county. His father, Alvin Hotchkiss, son 
of Joel Hotchkiss, married Miss Lettie Heard, daughter of George Heard, and 
they now live near Edinboro, Erie Co., Penn. Our subject married Miss 
Hannah E. Huckleberrj. of Venango Township, this county, March 15, 1855, 
and settled where they now reside. Their children were Mrs. Adora Donahue, 
Lewis E. , U. S.j Grant, Charles, Devirn, Pearl Grace, Alvin (deceased), 
Estella (deceased). Mr. Hotchkiss enlisted February 25, 1864, in Battery H, 
Third Pennsylvania Light Artillery, serving in the Maryland and Virginia 
campaigns, and received an honorable discharge July 25, 1865. He had six 
brothers (making seven with himself) in the war of the Rebellion, and tl^y 
served for periods of from six months to four years. He has since devoted his 
energies to his farm, which now consists of 100 acres, having bought fifty of it 
when a boy, and fifty since the war, and has improved it. He pays considerable 
attention to the culture and improvement of fine stock. Mr. Hotchkiss has 
served the township as Supervisor and Treasurer of School Board. In politics 
he is a Republican. 

JOSIAH G. LEWIS, farmer, P. O. Crossingville, was born July 29, 
1818, in Cussewago Township, this county. His grandfather, George Lewis, 
came from Maryland to this county in very early times and died in 1801. His 
son, Eber, married Elizabeth Gibson, and they had seven children: George, 
Josiah G., John D., Nathaniel, Augustus H. , and two sisters deceased. Our 
subject married Miss Sophia St. John, August 3. 1842. They settled in the 
woods and cleared up and improved their present farm of eighty-six acres. 
Their children are — Eber S., of Venango County, Penn. ; Mrs. Mary Green- 
field; John D. ; Mrs. Lavina Harned, and Samuel T. Samuel T. having 
thoroughly prepared himself tor the teacher's profession, has been for several 
years successfully engaged in teaching in Crawford and Erie Counties and 
Venango and Franklin Townships. He married Miss Katie Regan, who is also 
an experienced teacher. 

WATSON W. LITTLE, M. D., Mosiertown, was born February 18, 1849, 
in Townville, this county. His father, James R. Little, was born in Rut- 
land, Vt. Our subject received his education- in the schools of Townville and 
Springfield, Erie Co., Penn., and began the study of medicine in 1872 under 
Dr. D. S. Freeman, of Tidioute, Penn. He graduated with the degree of 



850 BIOGKAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

M. D., in the Medical Department of the University of the Western Reserve, 
Cleveland, Ohio, March 5, 1881, and during this time he practiced his profes- 
sion under the supervision of his preceptor. Immediately upon his gradua 
tion the Doctor established himself in Mosiertown, associated with Dr. W. J. 
Gamble. He has made thorough preparations and already takes rank as a 
physician of first-class scientific attainments and is rapidly building up a 
large and profitable practice. Dr. Little is descended on his father's side 
from the well known sturdy and upright race of the Scotch-Irish, and on 
his mother's side from a long lino of practicing physicians. Personally he is 
a man of compact build and strong physique, evidently well adapted to endure 
the fatigue and exposure of a busy practitioner. November 5, 1874, the 
Doctor married Miss Helen M. Morse, of Girard, Erie Co., Penn., and to this 
union have been born one son and one daughter: Winifred M., and Harold 
H. (deceased). Mrs. Little is a consistent member of the Christian Church. 

JOHN MILTON MANVILLE, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was born Aug- 
ust 21, 1825, in Jefferson County, N. Y.; son of Henry and Matilda (Wait) 
Manville. He came to Cussewago Township, this county, with his mother in 
1838, and here he learned the cabinetmaker's trade and carried on a shop in 
Mosiertown for a period of seven years. He married, September 30, 1845, 
Miss Harriet E. , daughter of Dan Stebbins, born August 17, 1825, this town- 
ship. Their childi'en are Mrs. Mary M. Davis, Jean M. , and Mrs. Carrie A. 
Heard, besides three who died in childhood. Our subject purchased the old 
family homestead of Dan Stebbins in 1865, where they now reside. They 
have here a fine farm of fifty, acres of well-improved land. Mr. and Mrs. 
Manville are consistent adherents of the Presbyterian faith. He is a man of 
upright integrity and a useful and influential citizen in the community. 

NATHAN MOSIER, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was born in Lehigh 
County. Penn., June 6, 1819. His parents, Abraham and Elizabeth (Hotten- 
stein) Mosier, settled in Cussewago Township, this county, in 1832. Five of 
their seven children are now living, viz. : Nathan, Mrs. Abigail Deichman, 
Mrs. Sarah Siverling, Mrs. Harriet Croop, Mrs. Mary Moyer. For his sec- 
ond wife Mr. Mosier married Sarah Hower, by whom he had one son — Abram 
(deceased.) Our subject married Eliza Love, and their children are: Archi- 
bald, William, Maicellus, Robert, Mrs. Ellen Woodring and Bertha. Mr. 
Mosier has lived on his present farm over forty years. He is a member of the 
Lutheran Church. In politics is a Republican. 

JOHN MUCKINHOUPT, farmer, P. O. Venango, was born in Cambridge 
Township, this county, March 19, 1819, and is a son of George and Margaret 
(Himebaugh) Muckinhonpt. George and his father, Philip, a native of Ger- 
many, were among the early settlers of Cambridge Township, this county. 
Oui- subject married, September 20, 1843, Margaret, daughter of Henry and 
Catherine (Muckinhoupt ) Peters, of Cussewago Township, this county. The 
next year they settled where they now reside and cleared from the wilderness 
a farm of 110 acres. Their children are George H., John A., Morgan D., 
Mrs. Emma Payne, Frank, Mrs. Maggie Peters and Mellie. Mr. and Mrs. 
Muckinhoupt are members of the First Lutheran Church of Venango. In poli- 
tics he is a Democrat. 

JAMES NASH, farmer, P. O. Crossingville, was born July 12, 1833, in 
Cussewago Township, this county. His father, Michael Nash, a native of 
County Clare, Ireland, came to America between 1820 and 1824. He married 
Miss Mary Callauan, of this county, in 1828. After living a short time in 
Meadville, Penu., they finally settled in Cussewago Township, this county. 
She died in 1851; he in 1856. Their children were — William, James, Mrs. 



C08SEWAG0 TOWNSHIP. 861 

Catharine Mather, John (deceased), Mrs. Mary A. Wickham, Thomas, Patrick 
(deceased), Mrs. Maggie Cronan, and Joanna, who died in infancy. Our sub- 
ject married Miss Joanna Sullivan, May 26, 1859. She was bom June 10, 
1838, and is a daughter of Daniel Sullivan. Their children are — Michael H. ; 
Daniel T., who has been Deputy County Treasurer for six years and is at present 
writing, Democratic candidate for Treasurer; Catharine A.; William M. : John 
V. (deceased); George E. ; Mary; Peter; Maggie M. and Frederick L. In 
1863 Mr. Nash took the entire charge of the family homestead, which he still 
occupies. He now owns 100 acres of well-improved land. Mr. and Mrs. 
Nash are pious members of the Catholic Church. In politics he is a consistent 
Democrat. 

SELDEN E. PIER, farmer, P. O. Crossingville, was born May 21, 
1833, in Chautauqua County, N. Y. His father, Amon B. Pier, of New York, 
married Miss Lois E. Bronson, of Chautauqua County, a native of Canada. 
They settled in this township in 1844. Here Mrs. Pier died December 31, 
1859. Mr. Pier then married Mrs. Sarah Gibson, also deceased, and he now 
lives with his son. Our subject married in 1852 Almira C, daughter of 
John P. Harned. Settling where they reside, they have acquired a farm of 
ninety acres. Their children are Mrs. Martha J. Torrey, and Hiram A., who, 
having made thorough preparation for the profession of teaching, is now 
highly successfully engaged in that vocation in the city schools of Knoxville, 
Tenn. Mr. Pier spent three months in his country's service, in 1863, as a 
soldier in the Fifty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He has served 
his township as Supervisor two years, and is now in his third year as Auditor; 
in politics he is a Republican. 

PETER L. POTTER, lumber manufacturer, Mosiertown, was born July 19, 
1830, in Allegany County, N. Y. His parents, Clark and Elizabeth Potter, 
located in this county in 1834, and settled in Cussewago Township the follow- 
ing year. Of their twelve children, our subject, Amos \V., Daniel N. and 
Mrs. Catherine Sterrett now live in this county. Mrs. Potter died in June, 
1865, Mr. Potter in 1881, aged eighty-one years. Eight of his sons served 
in the Rebellion, making an aggregate of twenty-one years of service, more, 
it is claimed,- than any other family in the United States. Our subject 
enlisted in August, 1861, in the Sixth Regimeat, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, 
and re-enlisted as a veteran in 1864, serving until the close of the war. He 
served in the Army of the Potomac, in the Virginia campaigns, under Gen. 
Sheridan. He took part in many of the hard-fought battles and was severely 
wounded at Middleburg, Va. , in June, 1863. He was taken prisoner at the 
battle of the Wilderness and suffered in Andersonville prison eight months. 
He has a record as a brave and faithful soldier. He now owns a saw-mill on 
Cussewago Creek which he is operating very successfully. 

THOMAS EDWARD RICE, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was born November 
27, 1822, in Cussewago Tovmship, this county; son of Harmon and Mary 
(Barnes) Rice, who came to this county in 1815, and settled on a farm near 
Meadville, and the following year located in Cussewago on the farm which 
they cleared and improved, and where they lived and died. Harmon was a 
native of Connecticut, a son of Thomas Rice and of English descent. Mary, 
his wife, was a native of Orange County, N. Y., daughter of Edward Barnes, 
who served through the Revolutionary war. They had ten children: Sally 
Ann (deceased), born May 13, 1809; Henry, January 9, 1811; William 
(deceased), March 15, 1813; Harmon, June 13, 1816; Hiram, September 26, 
1818; Thomas E. ; Mary Ann (deceased), September 25, 1824; Elizabeth, 
June 10, 1830; Amaziah (deceased), August 10, 1833; Hezekiah (deceased), 



852 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

December 14, 1836. Harmon Rice died in 1865, in his eighty-fourth year; 
his widow in 1876, in her eighty-fifth year. Our subject married, January 30, 
1851, Lura Ann, daughter of Homer and Betsey (Williams) Beeman, of Mead 
Township. Lura A. was born August 17, 1831, in Ontario County, N. T., 
and came with her parents to Mead Township, Crawford Co., Penn., in 1838. 
Thomas and Lura Rice had six children, viz. : Loretta E., born April 9, 
1852; Frank E. (deceased), born March 9, 1855; J. Wilson, February 16, 
1857; Addie A., September 9,1862; Clara M., July 4,1867; Thomas O. 
(deceased), born June 8, 1872. Mrs. Rice is a member of the Baptist Church. 
Mr. Rice in politics is a Republican. They sold their farm near Mosiertown 
in 1867, and located on the old homestead, where they now reside. Their 
daughter, Addie, was married to Jerome B. Greenlee, November 23, 1881. 
They have one child — Frank M. — born December 23, 1882. They are members 
of the Baptist Church. 

ELIAS ROGERS, farmer, P. O. Venango, was born December 25, 1823, 
in Chautauqua County, N. Y. His parents, Aretus and Elois Rogers, left that 
county, and after living some years near Albion, Erie Co., Penn., finally set- 
tled in Cussewago Township, this county, in 1837. They lived the lives of 
upright pioneers, and died here leaving four children: Mrs. Eliza Cole, Mrs. 
Jane Wing, Elias, and Mrs. Mahala Hotchkiss (deceased). Our subject mar- 
ried Miss Catherine Siverling March 23, 1844. She is a daughter of the 
pioneer John Siverling, a native of Venango Township. Since their marriage 
our subject and wife have lived in Cussewago Township, with the exception 
of two years spent in Cambridge Township, this county. Here they have a 
comfortable home of fifty acres. Their children are Mrs. Rosetta Blystone, 
Mrs. Eliza S. Mead, Mrs. Hannah Steele, Alfred, Mrs. Mary Terrill, Mrs. Kerny 
Dilley and AUie. Mrs. Rogers belongs to the United Brethren Church. Oar 
subject was in politics formerly a Whig, but is now a Greenbacker. 

HON. SALVADOR SLOCUM, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was born Novem- 
ber 15, 1844, in Mead Township, this county; son of Eleazer, of Massachu- 
setts, and Lois C. (Merriam) Slocum, a native of Connecticut, who settled in 
Mead Township, this county, in 1835. Our subject received his education 
in the schools of the home district, and took a commercial course at the Iron 
City Commercial College, Pittsburgh, Penn. At about eighteen years of age 
he engaged in the oil developments in western Pennsylvania, and held inter- 
ests therein until 1880. In 1867 he went to Goodrich, Mich., and conducted 
a general merchandising store for two years. Having owned the William Penn 
House at Pittsburgh for several years, he opened a hotel there in 1868, 
which he carried on for about four years. August 13, 1867, Mr. Slocum mar- 
ried Miss Celestia E. , daughter of Henry W. Manville, of Mosiertown, this 
county, and to this union were born seven children, two of whom are now liv- 
ing: Belle and Georgiana. In 1873 he established a general merchandising 
store at Mosiertown, which ho continued until the spring of 1879. He soon 
afterward purchased his present residence and farm in the village. In 1882 
Mr. Slocum was elected Representative from Crawford County to the General 
Assembly of the State of Pennsylvania, being the only Republican elected 
from the county at that election. He served with ability and faithfulness, and 
left a sterling record as an honorable and conscientious servant of the people. 
Mrs. Slocum is a consistent member of the Baptist Church. Mr. Slocum is a 
F. & A. M. 

GEORGE SPITLER, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was born May 26, 1840, 
in Haytield Township, this county. His father, Philip Spitler, a native of 
Union County, Penn., was a descendant of a long line of that name, the first 



CUSSEWAGO TOWNSHIP. 853 

of -whom came to this State from Germany in 1702, and cast his lot with the 
rising fortunes of the young colonies. Philip Spitler married Miss Mary Zim- 
merman, of Swiss descent, a native of "Union County, Penn. They settled in 
this county about 1838. He was a weaver by trade, but employed himself 
occasionally at farming and other work. He was accidentally drowned in 
Bemis' Dam, French Creek, in October, 1842. His widow died April 1, 1877. 
Their children were Samuel; Henry, who pre-empted the land which is now the 
site of Topeka, Kan., where he died of cholera in 1855; Israel, died in his 
country's service in Kentucky during the war of the Rebellion; George, and 
Philip (deceased). Our subject enlisted, August 19, 1863, in the Seventy-sixth 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He was severely wounded at Drury's Bluflf, 
Va., May 16, 1864, causing permanent disability. He received his discharge 
May 5, 1865, and left an honorable record as a brave and faithful soldier. 
September 24, 1863, our subject married Miss Fanny Nisley, of Hayfield Town- 
ship, this county, born June 15, 1843, in Dauphin County, Penn., and daugh- 
ter of Jacob Nisley, born in Dauphin County, Penn., in 1806, and Barbara 
(Hoffman) Nisley, born in Lancaster County, Penn., in 1812, both of German 
descent. They immigrated to this county in 1852, and settled in Cussewago 
Township, near Mosiertown, and were largely influential in establishing the 
church of the United Brethren in Christ. Mrs. Nisley died in 1872. Mr. 
Nisley is Htill enjoying life at a ripe old age, and is in fair health. To this 
union were born — Flora Viola, who died in February, 1868, aged twenty-two 
months; J. Arthur; May B. ; Albert L. A.; J. Lloyd; Kittie Georgie and Fran- 
ces Lucretia. After spending over three years in the oil regions, our subject 
and family settled in Cussewago Township, this county, in 1869, and here 
they have a comfortable home of fifty acres of well-improved land. Mrs. Spit- 
ler is a consistent member of the United Brethren Church. Mr. Spitler has 
held the office of School Director fourteen years, and Secretary of the Board 
most of the time. He was himself a teacher several years in early life. In 
politics he is a Republican. 

ROBERT L. STEBBINS, farmer, manufacturer and stock-raiser, P. O. 
Mosiertown, was born July 3, 1839, in Cussewago Township, this county. 
His father, Lemuel Stebbins, a native of Wilbraham, Mass., born in 1798, was 
a descendant of the celebrated Stebbins family of Essex County, England. 
Rowland, the founder of the family in America, immigrated in 1634 to Spring- 
field, Mass. Lemuel came to this township in 1819, where he married, March 
6, 1823, Lucinda Greenlee, born January 2, 1803, daughter of the famous 
pioneer, Michael Greenlee, of Delaware, who came to this township from 
Fayette County, Penn., in 1797, remaining one year in Meadville, Penn. 
After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Stebbins settled in Cussewago Township, 
this county, where they afterward resided. Here they cleared up and devel- 
oped a fine farm of upward of 300 acres of land. Mr. Stebbins kept store at 
Mosiertown for several years. He was a leading spirit in all improvements. 
He established the first cheese-factory in this part of the country; also built a 
steam grist and saw-mill. He was a thorough example of a self-made man, 
as he had but 25 cents when he came to the county. He died September 24, 
1852. His widow survives him, and is now living at the family homestead, 
and, although at the advanced age of eighty-one years, is still in good posses- 
sion of her faculties. Their children are — Mrs. Amanda Whipple; Mrs. Lorene 
Clarke, of South Pueblo, Col.; Lot D. ; Orson M. (deceased); Erastus B. 
(deceased); Mrs. Chloe R. Carr; Robert L. ; Matilda L., of Denver, Col. ; Ben- 
jamin F., drowned July 26, 1881, at Oil City, Penn. ; and Rufus R. (deceased). 
Benjamin F. was a soldier in the Sixteenth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer 



854 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Cavalry. He was wounded in the right arm at Sheperdstown, W.Va., and lost 
his left leo- at Hatcher's Run, Va. He was County Treasurer one term. At 
the time of his death he was a member of the Oil City Oil Exchange. Our 
subject is now living with and taking care of his aged mother. He owns a 
fine place of 180 acres well- improved land; also owns and operates the only 
I."'' 9-mill tor the manufacture of sugar and molasses from Northern cane or 

/•hum in Cussewago Township, which he established in 1880. This is per- 
.ups the largest establishment of the kind in the State. Mr. Stebbins takes an 
active interest in public affairs; has held the office of Town Clerk and various 
township offices, fulfilling his duties with fidelity and to the satisfaction of the 
people. He takes a deep interest in the improvement of live stock, and is 
at present engaged in the raising of thoroughbred short horn cattle on his 
farm. In' politics our subject is a Republican. 

JOSHUA W. SWENEY, farmer and Justice of the Peace, P. O. Crossing- 
ville, was born March 29, 1833, in Cussewago Township, this county. His 
grandfather, Alexander Sweney, is a native of County Donegal, Ireland; came 
to America when a young man. He married Sarah Harkins, and settled in 
Cussewago Township, this county, in 1788, having previously come out here 
and taken up l,fiOO acres of land for himself, brother and two brothers-in- 
]a\v, being one of the first settlers in the northern part of the township. After 
raising a family of twelve children, all of whom grew to maturity, he 
departed this life in March, 1845, aged seventy years. His widow died in 
1870, aged seventy-six. Their second son, Edward H. , married in 1832 Jane 
McLaughlin, a native of County Tyrone, Ireland, and settled on his part of 
the old homestead. Of their nine children seven are now living, Joshua W. 
and Mrs. Josephine O'Brien being residents of this locality. Mr. Sweney 
died April 23, 1863, aged fifty-six years. His widow died March 4, 1884, 
aged seventy- four. Their son Thomas G., a soldier of Company B, Eight- 
eenth Regiment, Pennsylvania Cavalry, died in the service of his country Jan- 
nary 14, 1864, at Stevensburg, Va. Our subject married, July 31, 1854, 
Maria Smith, a native of County Cavan, Ireland, and settled where he now 
resides, and where he has a fine farm of 110 acres of well-improved land. Their 
children are Thomas A., of Patterson ville, La.; Mrs. Mary Kearney; Kate, 
the present teacher at Crossingville school; Edward C, and William C. 
Squire Sweney, consistently with the principles of his forefathers, is a Dem- 
ocrat; a member of the Catholic Church. He has served his township in the 
various township offices, being at the present time Justice of the Peace. 

ERASTUS J. TERRILL, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was born in Cam- 
bridge Township, this county, August 22, 1829. His father, Daniel Terrill, 
married Miss Harriet Payne, daughter of James Payne, and settled in Cam- 
bridge Township in 1825. The following of their eight children are now liv- 
ing, viz.: Mrs. Elizabeth Spencer, Erastus J., Miriam, Mrs. Huldah Clough, 
Mrs. Sophia Evans and Isaac. They settled in Cussewago Township in 1854, 
where Mr. Terrill died in 1865. His widow survives him at the age of seven- 
ty-nine. Our subject married Sarah, daughter of Aaron and Sarah Ellis, of 
Cambridge Township, this county, October 30, 1851. Their children are 
Mrs. Harriet Riddle, Mrs. Elizabeth Cole, Mrs. Tabitha Miles, Mrs. Marietta 
Rogers, Alma M., Alfred J., Albert G., Daniel L., Andrew 0., and Clayton 
E. Mr. Terrill is a Republican in politics. 

CHARLES M. VEILET, merchant end Postmaster, Mosiertown, was 
born March 26, 1855, in Munda, Livingston Co., N. T. His parents, Alonzo 
and Mercy Veiley moved to Crawford County, Penn., in 1865, and now live in 
Richmond Township. Our subject obtained his education in the schools of 



CU8SEWAG0 TOWNSHIP. 855 

the county. He married, October 27, 1880, Miss Cora Wilber, born September 
30, 1861, daughter of W. J. Wilber, of Cussewago Township, this county, and 
to this union has been born one child — Georgie May. In the spring of 1882 
Mr. Veiley established a general merchandise store in the Slocum Building, 
Mosiertown, and purchased the building in January, 1884. He has here a 
full stock of dry goods, groceries, hardware, boots and shoes, etc., and by 
strict business and courtesy to his customers, he has built up a verj' large and 
flourishing trade. Our subject was appointed Postmaster April 10, 1883, 
which appointment he still holds. Mr. Veiley is a young business man of 
much energy and enterprise; in politics he is a Republican. 

CALVIN WALDO, farmer, P. O. Edinboro, Erie County, was born in 1810 
in Bennington County, Vt. , and is the son of Gersham and Martha Waldo. He 
married, in 1835, Miss Polly Ann Calkins, of Genesee County, N. Y., born in 
Cayuga County, N. Y. , in 1814. They settled where they now live, in Cussewago 
Township, this county, in 1837, and cleared up and developed a fine farm. 
Their children were Gersham C, who died in Kansas, September 10, 1858; 
Daniel C, in Crawford County, Penn. ; Thomas B.,in Erie County, Penn. ; Mrs. 
Mary Lewis, in Erie County, Penn. Our subject, formerly a member of the 
Baptist Church, is now an adherent of the Seventh Day Baptist Church, to 
which he and his worthy wife have belonged ever since the organization of the 
Cussewago Church, about thirty-five years ago. Mr. Waldo is a Christian of 
deep piety, and firm convictions in his chosen faith. He is one of the old 
respected pioneer citizens, whose manly efibrts and self-denial have aided to 
redeem this prosperous land from the wilderdess. 

DANIEL C. WALDO, farmer, P. O. Venango, was born March 23, 1843, 
in Cussewago Township, this county, and is a son of Calvin Waldo. He 
went in defense of his country in 1863, as a soldier of the Fifty-sixth Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Militia. He married, September 23, 1865, Miss Clara 0. Randall, 
an adopted daughter of A. P. Harris. She died February 28, 1872, leaving four 
children: Mary, EflSe, Clara E., Calvin Gersham, and one infant (deceased). 
Mr. Waldo married, December 1, 1872, Lucinda, daughter of Smith and Auril- 
la (Bacon) Wiard, of Spring Township, this county, born April 29, 1845. They 
have five children: Smith (deceased), Mabel E., Alice A., Morgan D. and Lucia 
M. Mr. Waldo has a fine farm of 117 acres. He and his worthy wife are 
consistent members of the Seventh Day Baptist Church. Our subject has 
served his township as School Director, Tax Collector, and Census Enumera- 
tor. In politics he is a Republican; a member of the Crawford County Repub- 
lican County Committee. 

HIRAM WEBSTER, deceased, was a native of the State of New York, 
born January 22, 1818, and came to this county when a young lad, with his 
father, Ephraim Webster, prior to 1830. His father moved to Iowa where, he 
(died. Our subject married, March 31, 1843, Miss Zeruah Davis, born August 
19, 1819, in Cussewago Township, this county, and daughter of Rev. Isaac 
and Nancy Davis. Her parents were among the very earliest settlers of this 
township. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Webster settled in this town- 
ship, where they developed a comfortable home. They had following children: 
Henry, James Albert, and Homer (deceased). Mr. Webster died May 28, 1866, 
leaving an honorable name to posterity for honest and upright integrity. Mrs. 
Webster afterward married Dr. Hiram Boyd, who died August 7, 1877. She 
is now living at the old family homestead, enjoying a peaceful old age, highly 
respected by the entire community. James Albert Webster, her son, was born 
April 14, 1855. After receiving his early education in the schools of the home 
district, he attended, three terms, the State Normal School, Edinboro, Erie 



856 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

County. He early engaged in teaching and has taught four terms in Hayfield 
Township, this county, and live in Cussewago Township, having the school at 
Mosiertown one term. He left a record as a faithful and successful teacher, 
and gave good satisfaction to his patrons. He married Miss Addie Mucken- 
haupt, November 11, 1880. She died December 16, 1882. Mr. Webster has 
held the oflSces of School Director, Township Clerk, and Treasurer, and now 
holds the position of Assessor. He is an energetic young business man and a 
citizen of wide influence; in politics a Republican. 

NEWELL E. WHITE, merchant, Mosiertown, was born May 19, 1838, 
in Richmond Township, this county. His father, John White, of near Ere- 
donia, N. Y., and among the early settlers of Richmond Township, this 
county, married Miss Polly Gould, and of their seven children, David, of 
Little Cooley, Newell, and Diantha I. are now living. Our subject enlisted 
in the One Hundred and Fiftieth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
in August, 1862. He served in the Army of the Potomac and took part in the 
battles of Gettysburg, Wilderness, Petersburg and many more of the memo- 
rable conflicts of the Virginia campaigns. He was severely wounded in the 
battle of Gettysbtirg, resulting in permanent disabilities. He served his time 
out, and received his discharge in June, 1865, having an honorable record as a 
brave and faithful soldier. October 12, 1865, Mr. White married Miss Josephine 
C. Fross, of Richmond Township, this county. Their children are: Rollo R. 
and Royal J. (deceased). Our subject carried on a general merchandising 
store at Lyona, this county, in 1876, 1877, and at Townville during 1879, 
then established himself in business at Mosiertown in 1880. His present 
partner is S. D. Fullerton. They carry on a prosperous and growing trade 
which by their courtesy and strict attention to business they are rapidly 
building up. Mrs. White died November 1, 1883. She was a faithful wife 
and loving mother, beloved by all who knew her. She was a pious member of 
the Baptist Church, of which Mr. White is also a member. 

JOHN STOUT WIARD, farmer, P. O. Crossingville, was born in Cusse- 
wago Township, this county, July 14, 1826. His father, Leman Wiard, came 
from Connecticut to this township in 1819, and married Elizabeth, daughter 
of John Chamberlain. After living the life of an honest pioneer, he died in 
1847, at the age of forty-seven years. Of their eight children three are now 
living: John Stout, Mrs. Adaline Hites and Mrs. Lydia Joslin. Our subject 
married in January, 1855, Harriet, daughter of Jacob Flaster, now of Iowa. 
They now own a farm of 300 acres of well-improved land, including the home 
stead which they have made by industry and good management. Their chil- 
dren are Winfield L., Leora A., Aaron, Henry and Frank. Mr. Wiard was a 
soldier nine months, between 1862 and 1863, in the One Hundred and Sixty- 
ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He is devoted to the culture of live 
stock and has some very fine short horn and Devonshire cattle. Our subject 
is a Republican; has held several township of&ces, always with credit to him- 
self. Mra Wiard and the two eldest children are members of the United 
Brethren Church. 

WILLIAM WILEY, farmer, P. O. Crossingville, was born October 25, 
1825, in Fryeburg, Oxford Co., Me. His parents, Hamilton and Malvina 
Wiley, now live at that place, having spent but one year in this county, while 
on a visit to their son. Our subject while a young man came to Cambria 
County, Penn., where he was engaged several jeai's making staves for the 
West India market. While there he married Miss Harriet Langdon, October 
14, 1854. In April of the following year he located at Crossingville, this 
county, and established a shook factory, which he carried on until 1858, when 



EAST FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP. 867 

he sold out and speot three years in the State of Maine. He finally returned 
to this county, purchased a farm, and settled in Cussewago Township, in 
1861, -where he still resides. Here, by industry and good management, with 
the assistance of his worthy wife, he has acquired a fine farm of 150 acres of 
■well-improved land. To Mr. and Mrs. Wiley have been born three children; 
Hamilton, married to Miss Eva L. McCamman; Mary M., and Hattie O. The 
son now carries on the farm, and the two daughters, having made thorough 
preparation for the profession of teaching, are now very successfully engaged 
in that vocation in the schools of this county. Mr. Wiley is independent in 
his political views, always aiming to support the best men and principles. He 
is a citizen of upright integrity and enjoys the highest respect of the entire 
community. 

AMANDAS T. ZIMMER, hotel-keeper, Mosiertown, was born July 13, 
1836, in Lehigh County, Penn. His parents, Daniel and Caroline Zimmer, 
now reside in Berks County. He married Miss Susanna Keinard, of Berks 
County, Penn., June 8, 1862. Their children are: Daniel Tilmon, Wilson 
A. and Charles William. Our subject was reared in Berks County and learned 
the miller's trade, which he followed for twenty- eight years. He moved to 
this county in April, 1867, and followed his trade one year at Stitzerville, ten 
yeai's at Saegertown and five years at Venango. He took charge of the hotel at 
Mosiertown April 2, 1884, having purchased the property in 1881. Mr. Zim- 
mer carries on here a first-class house, which is justly celebrated as a place of 
entertainment for the weary traveler. He and Mrs. Zimmer are consistent 
members of the Lutheran Evangelical Church. Our subject takes a deep 
interest in education. In politics he is a Democrat. 



EAST FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP. 

ALEXANDER S. BEATTY, farmer, P. O. Shaw's Landing, was born 
April 5, 1831; son of Finlaw and Jane (Shaw) Beatty, the mother a native of 
East Fairfield Township, and the father of Perry County, Penn. Their family 
consisted of two sons: Samuel, who died about 1872 in Meadville, where his 
■widow still lives, and our subject, who lives on the old home farm of sixty 
acres, which he owns and which is well improved. Finlaw Beatty was twice 
married, first to Miss Isabella Work, sister of ex- Judge Work, which union 
■was blessed with six children, of whom four survive: W. W. Beatty and 
Mrs. A. E. Wentworth, living in Iowa; I. M. Beatty and Mrs. M. P. Harvey, 
at Shaw's Landing, Penn. Mrs. Beatty died June 30, 1825, and our subject's 
father was again married, and he and his second wife, Jane Shaw, died in 
March, 1852, there being but two days difference in the dates of their deaths. 
Our subject was married December 24, 1860, to Miss Elizabeth E. Harvy, and 
they have four children: Finlaw A., Frank H., Matthew W. and Anna 
Blanche, all living. Mr. Beatty was mail agent on the Franklin branch of the 
New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio Railroad from Meadville to Oil City for three 
and a half years. He is now Postmaster at Shaw's Landing. He has been 
School Director for several terms. He and his wife are members of the United 
Presbyterian Church. 

JOHN J. COCHRAN, Cochranton, is a son of Joseph and Susan E. 
(Hill) Cochran, natives of Pennsylvania, the father born May 10, 1809, the 



858 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

mother February 11, 1810. They were married in Adams Coanty, Penn. , 
June 15, 1833, and came the same month to this county, locating where Coch- 
ranton now stands. Joseph Cochran taught the first school in the village, 
and, being a surveyor, assisted in arranging the town plat. He died Septem- 
ber 1, 1848. Mrs. Cochran still survives, enjoying perfect mental and reason- 
able physical health, making her home with her daughter, Margaret J. (now 
Mrs. M. H. McComb). Our subject was the elder of their two children, and 
was born May 14, 1837, in Cochranton, where he was reared and educated. 
He was married in Adamsville, this county, December 25, 1860, to Miss Mary 
McKee, who has borne him seven children, viz.: Maggie E., Jennie R., Rose 
A., Joseph A., James H. M., William H and Charles H. The last named died 
at the age of two years and four months. Mrs. Cochran and her daughter, 
Jennie E., are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mrs. McComb is a 
member of the United Presbyterian Church. 

WILLIAM DEAN, Je. , farmer, P. O. Cochranton, was born on the farm 
on which he now lives, October, 1842, and on which his grandfather, William 
Dean, located in 1794. His parents were William and Nancy (Brawley) 
Dean. He was married May 22, 1872, to Miss Sarah E. Mook, of Mercer 
County, Penn. , who has borne him three children: Henry E., David S. and 
Archie D. Mrs. Dean's father, David Mook, died in 1875; her mother, Mar- 
garet, is living with her. Of the thirteen brothers and sisters of our subject, 
eight are still living. Mr. and .Mrs. Dean are members of the P. of H. ; Mr. 
Dean is also a member of the A. O. U. W. 

REV. D. DONNAN, minister, Cochranton, is a native of Princetown, 
Schenectady County, N. Y., and received his preparatory training in Schen- 
ectady Lyceum or Academy. He entered the freshman class of Union College, 
Schenectady, and graduated during the last years of the presidency of Dr. 
Eliphalet Nott, in 1845. He studied theology in the Theological Hall at 
Cannonsburg, Washington Co., Perm., now the United Presbyterian Theo- 
logical Seminary, at Xenia, Ohio. He was settled for some years as pas- 
tor of the United Presbyterian Congregation of Newark, N. J., and while 
there was married, in 1855, to Miss E. E., daughter of David and Catharine 
Williamson, of Xenia, Ohio. He left Newark and came to Cochranton Decem- 
ber, 1865, and was installed early in April, 1866, pastor of the congrega- 
tions of Cochranton and Power, under the care of Lake Presbytery of the 
United Presbyterian Church of North America. 

MATTHIAS FLAUGH, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in this county, 
September 4, 1818, and is a son of George Flaugh, whose father, Matthias, 
came from Germany, and located near Saegertown, this county, at a very early 
day, and where he remained until his death. Our subject's father was a sol- 
dier in the war of 1812. Matthias Flaugh was married September, 1839, to 
Miss Catharine, daughter of Benjamin and Fanny (Brindle) Brovm, who has 
borne him three children: William, born September, 1840, married Sarah E. 
Byham, December 21, 1865, has eight children, four surviving; Aaron, born 
May, 1842, married Amanda Young, in 1863; and Frances, born November, 
1843, was married to George Smith, died November, 1862, aged nineteen 
years and eleven months. Mr. Flaugh has a home farm of sixteen acres well 
improved and forty acres in Mead Township. In politics the family is Demo- 
cratic. Mr. and Mrs. Flaugh are members of the Reformed Church. 

JAMES P. HASSLER, M. D., physician, Cochranton, was born at Mt. 
Pleasant, Westmoreland Co., Penn., February 13, 1835, son of John and Sarah 
(Shearer) Hassler, who were parents of twelve children, viz.: Samuel, a 
Methodist minister, died in 1852; Joseph, died in 1849; Lucinda, died in 



EAST FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP. 859 

infancy; Rebecca, died of acute disease; Melinda; David S., in mercantile 
business at Mt. Union, Ohio; John Frederick, killed by lightnincr in 1854; 
Elmira, died of acute disease; Cyrus M., in mercantile business in Findlay, 
Ohio; James P.; Augustus E., editor of the Pawnee Republican, Pawnee City, 
Neb.; and May Elizabeth, died in infancy. In 1835 John Hassler moved to 
a farm in Rostraver Township, same county, where the family were brought 
up. At fourteen years of age our subject was sent to school at Greensburg, 
and subsequently to Mt. Pleasant, and when seventeen entered Allegheny 
College, where he graduated iu 1856. He spent several years in teaching, 
spending a year in Kentucky and two years in Michigan. Afterward he read 
medicine at Meadville, in the office of Dr. J. C. Cotton, and graduated from 
the Medical Department of the University of Michigan in 1864. The summer 
of the same year he spent in the United States General Hospital, at Point 
Lookout, and in the fall returned to Meadville and resumed the practice of 
medicine with Dr. Cotton. In the summer of 1865 he removed to Gochranton, 
a village ten miles from Meadville on the Franklin branch of the New York, 
Pennsylvania &Ohio Railroad: here he has since resided, diligently and labori- 
ously engaged in the practice of his profession, and with satisfactory success. 
He was married August, 1860, to Miss Ella, daughter of the Hon. William 
Davis, of Meadville, a gentleman of great personal popularity in the county, as 
was shown by his election for three terms to the position of Associate Judge. Their 
family consists of three sons and three daughters. Their eldest son is destined 
to be "a newspaper man," and at present has a position in Pittsburgh. Dr. 
Hassler has given considerable time and attention to educational matters, hav- 
ing been on the Board of Education at Gochranton for fifteen years and for 
several years a member of the Board of Control of Allegheny College. He 
has written extensively for the press, local and professional, and occasionally 
takes a hand in the political discussions of the day. In church relations, a 
Methodist; in social organizations, a Knight Templar; belongs also to several 
benevolent societies in the town where he lives. In politics he is a quiet but 
somewhat determined adherent to the Democratic party, with charity for others 
who hold a different opinion. 

CHARLES HOLMES, hotel-keeper, Gochranton, was born in Mercer 
County, Penn., August 5, 1855, and is a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (^ Dick- 
son) Holmes. He was married September 25, 1875, to Miss Mary E. Holmes. 
Came to Gochranton, August 7, 1883, when he took possession of the hotel 
known as the Shafer House, now the Holmes House, situated on the corner of 
Adams and Walnut Streets. It is a three-story frame structure, well arranged, 
neatly furnished, and having excellent sample rooms and other hotel conveni- 
ences. In connection with the hotel he has the best livery in the place. His 
motto is " universal satisfaction," which is always given to his numerous cus- 
tomers. He is a genial and pleasant gentleman and has an amiable helpmeet. 

ROBERT McFATE, Sr., farmer, P. O. Gochranton, was born in Venango 
County, Penn., in 1816, where he was brought up. His parents were Robert 
and Jane I'Culbertson) McFate. In 1844 he married Letitia McFate, born in 
Ireland: her parents being Robert and Elizabeth (Black) McFate, and came to 
America with her sister Margaret, (now Mrs. David McFate) and her brother 
Robert, being then about eighteen years of age. Our subject came to this county 
in 1867, locating on the farm where he now lives, and which is a well-improved 
farm of ninety-seven acres. He and his wife are members of the United Presby- 
terian Church, and are highly respected by all who know them. Politically 
Mr. McFate stands firm in the Democratic faith. 

DAVID McFATE. farmer, P. O. Cochi'anton, was born Januarj' 16, 



860 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

1836, in Venango County, Penn., where his parents resided for many- 
years. They came to this county, locating in Cochranton, in 1866, on a 
farm where the father, Joseph, died in February, 1879, and where the mother, 
Margaret, still lives. Their family consisted of ten children, of whom six sur- 
vive. David, the second of the family, was reared and educated in Venango 
County, where he married Miss Margaret McFate, March 9, 1865. To this 
union were born four children: Francis J., Lizzie B. and two deceased in 
infancy. Mr. and Mrs. McFate and Francis J. are members of the United 
Presbyterian Church of Cochranton. Politically Mr. McFate is a Republican. 
He has a farm of sixty-five acres, on which he has a splendid residence and 
where he has made good improvements. Mrs. McFate is a native of Ireland; 
came to America when sixteen years of age, and to Venango County, Penn., 
when twenty-two, having located temporarily in Philadelphia. Her father is 
still living in Wayne Township, this county; her mother died in Ireland. 

HUGH McGOUEAN, Sr. , proprietor cooperage and stave factory, Coch- 
ranton, was bom November 12, 1825, in the reign of George III, in County 
Down, Ireland; son of John and Margret McGouran. In 1843 our subject 
went to England, where he remained for six years, during which time he 
crossed the Irish Sea twelve times. From England he went to Swansea, 
Soiith Wales, there stayed about one year and then returned to Ireland. On 
January 81, 1851, he married Eliza Jane Pegan, also a native of County Down, 
Ireland, born September 12, 1826. On March 25, 1851, Mr. McGouran and 
his young wife embarked for America in a small vessel from Belfast, Ireland, 
via Liverpool, England, which port they left April 1 following, landing in 
Philadelphia, Penn., on 28th same month. Two days after they went to Pitts- 
burgh, Penn., over the Allegheny Mountains, and from Pittsburgh came to this 
county, where they have since made their home. To our subject and wife 
were born the following named children: John, Maggie E., Sarah, Hugh W., 
Sadie J., Ella, Jennie C, Francis J. and Mary El Zaida, of whom five are 
dead. In 1868 Maggie, the eldest daughter, paid a visit to her parents' 
native place, taking passage in the steam-ship "City of London," and on May 15, 
1869, her father sailed from New York to Liverpool, England and from that 
city to Ireland, returning to America in the steam-ship " City of Paris," August 
12, 1869, accompanied by his daughter. On June 7, 1884, Mr. McGouran 
and another daughter, Ella, sailed from New York in the steam-ship " Alaska," 
for Europe, visiting the chief places in England, Ireland and Scotland, and 
returning to New York by the same vessel August 25, that year. Our subject 
purchased a farm in Wayne Township, this county, on which he lived nine 
years, and during that period he followed the business of shipping produce to 
Pittsburgh on the Allegheny Kiver. From Wayne Township he moved to 
Cochranton, this county, and has since resided here with his family. Shortly 
after coming, Mr. McGouran embarked in the oil business in Venango County, 
Penn., sinking wells and shipping oil down the Allegheny, etc., in which he 
met with tolerably good success. Retiring from that enterprise March 17, 1865, 
the year of the high water at Oil Creek, he engaged in the cooperage and stave 
manufacturing business, employing some twenty men. When trade is brisk 
Mr. McGouran turns out from five to six thousand s^^aves and headings, and 
about one hundred barrels complete, every day. He is still carrying on this 
indtlistry, and with continued marked prosperity. 

HENRY P. MARLEY, farmer, P. O. Cochranton, was born in East Fair- 
field Township, this county, March 25, 1832; son of James J. and Julia A. 
(Hart) Marley. His grandfather, Henry Marley, came from his native land, 
Ireland, to Meadville in 1793, and the same year built a cabin on the farm 



EAST FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP. 861 

now owned by Dr. John Marley. There he lived till his death, which occurred 
in 1854, in his' ninety-third year. He was the father of three children, two 
sons and one daughter; James J. is the only one living. James J. Marley, Sr., 
was the father of ten children, of whom six are still living: Henry P.; Ange- 
line, now Mrs. William McCauley, of Venango County; James J., Jr.; Julia 
A.; Mrs. Samuel Doubt; David A., and John W., a practicing physician in 
Chicago. Our subject's parents are still living in East Fairfield, have been 
married fifty-seven years, and have always resided on the same farm. Mrs. 
Marley was a daughter of Philip Hart, formerly of Little York, Penn., and 
who was a son of Conrad Hart, a native of Germany, who settled in this town- 
ship in 1804. They had born to them ten children, six of whom are now liv- 
ing. . The subject of this sketch was reared in his native township and edu- 
cated in the common school. He was married November 25, 1855, to Marilla 
H. , daughter of Amos and Lydia (Hall) Pierce, natives of New England, and 
who came to this township in 1854. The issue of this marriage is four chil- 
dren : Kingston S. , William H. , Frank W., and Homer P. Mr. Marley was 
in the late war, enlisting March 4, 1864, in Company I, Tenth Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Reserves, and was in the campaign in the Wilderness and at the bat- 
tle of Spottsylvania, where he was wounded in the right fore-arm while making 
a bayonet charge; was taken prisoner and sent to Richmond, where he was con- 
fined in prison three months and two days, when he was exchanged and 
brought to Annapolis, Md. He was honorably discharged after one year's 
service. During his incarceration in the Rebel prison he suffered severely. 
He had there an attack of typhoid fever and chronic diarrhoea, from the effects 
of which he never recovered. So weak was he when he was discharged that he 
had to be assisted in walking. His wound was dressed in prison, and three and 
a half inches of bone extracted from his arm. Mr. Marley and wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is a member of the G. A. R. Post,Mead- 
ville, of the State Police of Erie and Crawford, and of the P. of H. He has 
held several of the minor ofiBces of the county, and is now serving a term as Jus- 
tice of the Peace. In politics he is a stanch Republican. On April 8, 1884, he 
received the nomination of the Republican primaries for County Commis- 
sioner. 

REV. JOHN W. PONTIUS, clergyman, Cochranton, was born near Mil- 
lerstown, Butler Co., Penn. , August 14, 1846 ; prepared himself for college at the 
Clarion Collegiate Institute, Rimersburg, Penn.; entered Franklin and Marshall 
College, Lancaster, Penn., in the fall of 1869, and graduated in 1873; was 
licensed to preach the gospel June 11, 1875; was ordained to the holy minis- 
try July 18, 1875, and installed as pastor of the Mission Church at Lock 
Haven, Penn., on the same day. On account of ill health he was constrained 
to resign at the close of the year, but succeeded in placing the mission on a 
fair footing, and increasing its membership from twenty to forty-thiee. He 
received a call from Zion's charge in this county, April 4, 1877, and accepted 
the same and entered upon the duties of his present pastorate April 15, 1877. 
THOMAS SHAFER, hotel keeper, Cochranton, was born in Mead Township, 
September 5. 1835, and is ason of Philip andElizabeth (Knierman) Shafer, natives 
of Germany, who settled in Mead Township, this county, in 1830, where Mr. 
Shafer worked three years on a farm and then removed to Greenwood Town- 
ship, purchasing a farm there which he cleared and improved and where he has 
resided ever since. He has six children living: Henry, Thomas, Philip, George, 
John and David. The subject of this sketch was raised on the farm and edu- 
cated in the schools of Greenwood Township. In 1856 he went to California 
and engaged in mining. In 1859 he returned and located in Union Township, 



862 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

this county, engaging in farming, and there remained until ISTljWhenhecameto 
Cochranton and has been chiefly engaged in hotel keeping ever since. He was 
married November, 1863, to Fanny, daughter of James and Rebecca (Eobin- 
son) Martin, of Cochranton, and by this union they have five children, of 
whom but one now survives. Mr. Shafer keeps the leading hotel of Cochran- 
ton, and is always ready and willing to cater to the wants of the traveling 
public and make them feel at home; in connection with his hotel runs a 
tine livery. He has been Burgess of Cochranton one term and has held other 
minor offices. In politics he is independent. 

REV. C. B. WAKEFIELD, the subject of this sketch, was born in Jeffer- 
son Township, Fayette Co., Penn., October 15, 1852. Here he was reared and 
educated, attending the common schools until fourteen years of age, when he 
was sent to fitting school preparatory to entering college. Having made the 
necessary preparation, he entered Waynesburg College, Pennsylvania, in the 
latter part of 1868, and graduated in the Classical Department in 1873. All 
of this time was not spent in college, as the subject of this sketch, like many 
another poor boy, had to step aside from the regular duties of college, and 
teach to earn money to prosecute his studies. From 1873 to 1876 he spent in the 
teaching profession, at the same time paying some little attention to law. About 
this time Mr. Wakefield connected with the Presbyterian Church, and deter- 
mined to study for the Gospel ministi'y. In the summer of 1876 he entered 
the National School of Elocution and Oratory at Philadelphia, taking the 
junior course, and in the fall of the same year matriculated at the Western 
Theological Seminary, where he spent three years, graduating in the spring of 
1879. He was immediately invited to occupy the pulpit of the Presbyterian 
Church at Somerset, Penn. This invitation was accepted, and on June 7, 
1879, at the regular meeting of Redstone Presbytery, he was ordained to preach 
the Gospel, and installed pastor for half-time of the Somerset Presbyterian 
Church. This work was partly under the supervision of the Board of Home 
Missions. While here Mr. Wakefield married Anna Benford, second daughter 
of G. W. Benford. He remained two years at Somerset, and then removed to 
Fairchance, Penn. , accepting a call there and only remaining six months. The 
next permanent settlement he made was in Cochranton, Crawford County, in 
1881, where he now resides, having accepted a call to the Presbyterian Church 
of this place. 

AARON WELLER, farmer, P. O. Shaw's Landing, was born in Massa- 
chusetts in 1813, coming in 1817 with his parents, Jonathan and LovinaWel- 
ler, to this county, where his father was killed by a falling tree in 1819, and 
his mother died in 1840. They had a family of nine children, of whom Aaron 
is the seventh. He was married in November, 1840, to Miss Olive Coburn, of 
Randolph Township, this county, who has borne him four children, all living: 
Almeron, William, Mary and Jeanette. Mary married Thomas Blanchard, and 
Jeanette married William Best, and both reside on farms contiguous to that 
of their father. The sons are members of the P. of H The politics of the 
family is Democratic. Mr. Weller has a well-improved farm of 100 acres on 
which he has lived twenty-two years. 



EAST FALLOWFIELD TOWNSHIP. 863 



EAST FALLOWFIELD TOWNSHIP. 

SAMUEL H. FINDLEY, farmer, P. O. Atlantic, was born in East Fal- 
lowfield Township, this county, February 4, 1821, son of Moses and Elizabeth 
(Hays) Findley, natives of Ireland of Scotch descent. They immigrated to 
America in 1808 and 1803 respectively, settling in this county, where they 
were married in 1811. They had a family of ten children, of whom only 
three are now living, viz.: Thomas W., J. B. and Samuel H. The father died 
December 14, 1846, aged sixty-three years, and the mother died April 6, 
1874, aged eighty-three years. Our subject has made his home on the old 
homestead, where he still remains and has given his chief attention to farm- 
ing; has also given some time to carpentering. He built a large cheese fac- 
tory which he operated several years in this township. Mr. Findley vras mar- 
ried June 22, 1847, to Miss Louisa Custard, a native of Greenwood Town- 
ship, this county, born November 17, 1827, and daughter of Richard and 
Almera (Wetmore) Custard, former a native of Pennsylvania of G^man 
descent, latter a native of New York State, of English descent. They settled 
in this county in 1798, and were married here in 1826. They had two chil- 
dren, one now living — the wife of our subject— with whom they now make their 
home, the father aged eighty-nino, the mother eighty-seven. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Findley were born seven sons and five daughters, viz.: Almera L., Will- 
iam H., Richard C, M. Elizabeth, Frank E., Thomas C, Emma E., R. Anna, 
Hattie C, James H., Samuel R. and Glennie M., all living. Our subject and 
wife are members of the United Presbyterian Church. He has served the 
township in most of its offices; was ten years a Justice of the Peace; in 1874 
was elected Representative from this county, serving until 1878. In politics 
Mr. Findley is a Republican. 

OBADIAH H. LACKEY, farmer, P. O. Atlantic, was born in Salem Town- 
ship, Mercer Co., Penn., February 7, 1818, son of William and Mary (Hazen) 
Lackey, natives of this State, of English and Irish descent respectively, and 
whose parents came to this country in 1798, settling in Mercer County, Penn. 
William Lackey came from Allegheny County, Penn., to this county, where 
he lived until he married; then moved to Salem Township, Mercer Co., Penn. 
He raised his family in Salem Township, which township adjoins East 
Fallowtield, this county. He died in May, 1871, aged seventy-five; his widow 
died April 14, 1873, aged seventy- three. Our subject followed carpentering 
for about thirty year.s, and in 1842 purchased land in this township upon which 
he now resides. This he cleared and improved, and here he carries on general 
farming. IVIr. Lackey was married March 13, 1845, to Miss Mary Minnis, a 
native of this township, born February 14, 1827, and a daughter of William 
and Sarah (Mattocks) Minnis. To this union were born one son and four 
daughters: Emily C, Sarah M., Mary, Annabella and William M., all now 
living except Mary. Mr. and Mrs. Lackey are members of the Baptist 
Church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

JOHN MINNIS, farmer, P. O. Atlantic, was born in East Fallowfield 
Township, this county, October 15, 1831; son of William and Sarah (Mat- 
tocks) Minnis, natives of this State, of Scotch -Irish and English-German 
descent, respectively, and whose parents were among the first settlers of this 



864 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

county. William Minnis died in 1876, aged eighty-three; hia widow, now in 
her ninety-second year, resides with our subject. John Minnis became owner 
of his father's homestead in 1852, and still resides thereon. He has improved 
it in many ways. He was twice mamed; on first occasion, in 1853, to Miss 
Sarah Allen, of Mercer County, this State, whose parents were early settlers 
in that county. To this union were born four children, viz. : Nancy E., Caro- 
line, 'William W. and Joseph G. Mrs. Minnis dying July 26, 1869, our sub- 
ject married, December 1, 1870, Miss Rachel C. Boyd, a native of Guernsey 
County, Ohio. She is the mother of two children: George B. and Victor H. 
Our subject has served the township in most of its oflSces; in politics he is a 
Democrat. His first wife was a Methodist; his present one is a Presbyterian. 
"JAMES F. RANDOLPH, farmer, P. O. Adamsville, was born in Mead 
Township, this county. May 4, 1813; son of James F. and Charlotte (Ulery) 
Randolph, natives of New Jersey and Ohio, and of English and German 
descent, respectively. Our subject's father came to this county in 1792; was 
married in 1799, and by this union were born thirteen children, of whom only 
three are now living: George F., James F. and Amanda L. The parents both 
died in this township. Our subject received a common school education and 
taught school thirteen winters in this county. In 1838 he purchased land in 
this township, on which he now resides, and this he has cleared and otherwise 
mncU improved. Mr. Randolph was married February 3, 1845, to Mrs. 
Mary (McQueen) McMichael, of East Fallowfield Township, and by this union 
were bom twins: John O. and James 0., former of whom died in infancy; 
latter resides on the home farm with his father, is married and has a family 
of three children: Mary A., James H, and Bessie M. Mrs. Randolph had five 
children by her first husband, who died April 13, 1835. She died December 
6, 1881, in her seventy-third year. She was a member of the United Presby- 
terian Church, of which denomination Mr. Randolph is also a member. In 
politics he is a Republican. 



FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP. 

THOMAS C. CALVIN, farmer, P. O. Calvin's Comers, was bom in West 
Fallowfield Township, this county, April 1, 1835, and is a son of Robert and 
Elizabeth (Kelly) Calvin. James Calvin, his grandfather, born near Wash- 
ington County, Penn. , came as a pioneer about 1800, purchasing and clearing 
a farm, and remaining on it till his death. T. C. Calvin's matemal grand- 
father, John Kelly, a native of Ireland, was also an early settler of East Fal- 
lowfield. His father, Robert Calvin, was born in Mercer County, Penn., but 
spent most of his life on a farm in this county, and for the past few years a 
resident of Meadville. He had seven children: Catherine, Jeanette, Sarah, 
James, John M., Thomas C. and David M. , the first four of whom are deceased. 
Our subject was married, Februarj- 14, 1872, to Miss Mary, daughter of Sam- 
uel Baxter, of Mercer County, Penn., by whom he has one child living — 
Robert C, Jr. Mr. Calvin came to this township in 1852, with his parents, 
and has ever since resided on his present farm. He is a member of the United 
Presbyterian Church; has held several township ofBces. In politics he is a 
Republican. 

JOSEPH H. DICKSON, farmer, P. O. Cochranton, was born August 10, 



FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP. 865 

1832, in this township, and is a son of George and Rachel (McQuiston) Dick- 
son. The father was a native of Fairfield Township, this county, where he 
lived all his life, dying March 1, 1845; the mother, after the decease of Mr. 
Dickson, married John Crouch, with whom she now resides on the old home- 
stead. Mr. and Mrs. Dickson had a family of eleven children, of whom five 
are now living. Our subject was married, December 23, 185S, to Mary E., 
daughter of Johnson and Eliza A. (Larimer) Birch. They have one daughter — 
Nettie, who was married, May 30, 1883, to Andrew J. Baughman, and one 
son, George, deceased aged fourteen months. Mrs. Dickson is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Dickson is a Democrat, and has held 
the oflSces of Collector, Constable, and Judge of Elections. 

JOHN G. HANES, farmer, P. O. Custard's, was born in Munsingen, King- 
dom of Wurtemberg, Germany, November 24, 1810, and is a son of Philip 
and Catharine (Mann) Hanes. He came to America, landing in Philadelphia 
August 1, 1832, and man-ied on the fourth of the following month Anna M., 
daughter of Henry and Anna M. (Shoup) Mauch. After his marriage he set- 
lied in Columbia County, Penn., where he resided until 1842, when he settled 
on his present farm in this township, which he cleared and improved from a 
wilderness, contending with the trials attending early pioneer life. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hanes have had a family of six children, of whom there are now living 
Catharine, Andrew, and Hannah, now Mrs. A. M. Framnuth. Mr. and Mrs. 
Framnuth have two children: Mary E. and John A. He enlisted, in 1862, in 
Company H, One Hundred and Fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
served three years in the Quartermaster's department, and at the close of the 
war was honorably discharged. Mr. Hanes has a farm of seventy acres where 
he lives, on which, and on another farm of fifty-three acres close by, he has 
made such improvements as to cause him to be regarded as one of the repre- 
sentative farmers of his township. He and his family are members of the 
German Reformed Church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

SAMUEL HILL, f^j-mer, P. O. Cochranton, was born in November, 1807, 
and is a son of Archibald and Mary (Fulton) Hill, natives of Ireland. His father 
came to America in 1797, located on a tract of 400 acf es, of which Samuel still 
owns 150 acres, where he resides. His mother came to America in 1792, and 
with her husband located, immediately after marriage, on a farm in the woods, 
which they, as soon as possible, set to work to improve. Mr. Hill, in order to 
get the necessaries of life, worked in a saw-mill for a Dr. Kennedy. He died 
May 3, 1817, aged fifty-two years. Mrs. Hill died April 7, 1845, aged sixty- 
five years. They had a family of eight children, of whom three survive. 
Samuel, the fourth in the family, was married December 24, 1840, to Marga- 
ret, daughter of James and Sarah (Fulton) Montgomery, and by this union 
were born seven children: Archibald, who volunteered August, 1862, in Com- 
pany H, One Hundred and Fiftieth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infan- 
try, serving till his death September 5, 1863, after participating in the battle 
of Gettysburg; James, who enlisted in same corps, at same time, serving till 
the close of the war, and receiving a iiesh wound at Gettysburg; Thomas, 
George, Milton and Eliza J. The family is Republican in politics. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hill are members of the United Presbyterian Church. 

COL. R. C. JOHNSON, President of the Cochranton Farmer's Co-opera- 
tive Associated Bank, P. O. Shaw's Landing, was born in New York State, 
March 4, 1805, and is a son of Richard C. and Sabina (Blomers) Johnson, 
natives of New York, and of English and Holland descent. His father, who 
was a merchant, lost his life in the war of 1812. Our subject received a dis- 
trict school education, and came to this county in February, 1832, settling in 



866 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Spring Township. He married Martha Cook, who died, leaving no children; 
then the Colonel married Mary A., daughter of Edward and Nancy (Burch- 
lield) Herrington, natives of this State, who came to Crawford County in 1795 
or 1796. Mrs. Johnson's father was a farmer, and was in the war of 1812; 
her grandfather, James Herrington, and two of his brothers were in the Rev- 
olutionary war, were present at Yorktown, and saw Cornwallis deliver up his 
sword to Gen. Washington. Her grandfather settled at the outlet of Conneaut 
Lake, where he built a mill soon after the Revolutionary war; he was also a 
surveyor. Mrs. Johnson is of English and Irish origin. Col. and !Mrs. John- 
son have no children now living. The Colonel is a prominent member of the 
Masonic fraternity, being a member of Lodge No. 234, of which he has been 
Worshipful Master for three terms; he has also been Presiding Officer of the 
Chapter, and was first High Priest. He was elected Master of Conneaut 
Grange in 1874; re-elected in 1875; appointed District Deputy for Crawford 
County by D. B. Mauger, Master of the State Grange of Pennsylvania; was 
elected Master of Crawford County, Pomona Grange, in 1877; appointed Dep- 
uty at Large for the State of Pennsylvania in March, 1877, by Col. Victor E. 
Piolett, who was then Master of State Grange. Politically, the Colonel is 
Democratic; has served as Deputy Sheriff under Charles F. Adams; has been 
for ten years Superintendent of the canal; has served as Mail Agent for the 
New York & Erie Railroad for two years. He had served in the Militia from 
an early day, and had risen to the rank of Colonel, and on the outbreak of the 
late Rebellion he promptly took sides with his country, raised a company of 
cavalry, of which he was elected Captain, and was assigned to the Second 
Pennsylvania Cavalry. He served until 1862, when he resigned. The Colonel 
has always taken an active interest in all that could promote the progress of 
Crawford County. 

ORVIS MANN, farmer, P. O. Custard' s, was born in Dutchess County, N. 
Y., July 28, 1807, and is a son of "William and Ruhamah (Barnum) Mann, who 
removed to Delaware in his infancy, and there he was reared- His maternal 
grandfather, Isbon Barnum, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, died 
in his native State, Connecticut, aged about seventy. Our subject was married 
in 1836, to Miss Mary, daughter of Edward Burhans, of Delaware County, N. 
Y., by whom he had six children: Frances, Mrs. Newel Bly, Helen, Electa 
(now Mrs. "William A. Cook), Mary L. , Mrs. Jerome J. Hill, Josephine, and 
an infant deceased. In 1838 Mr. Mann settled in Chautauqua County, N. Y., 
where he resided until 1853, when he removed to this township, locating on. 
the farm on which he still resides, and a part of which he cleared and 
improved. He has held several township offices. In politics he is a Democrat. 

WILLIAM H. MARSHALL, farmer, P. O. Custard's, was born in Fair- 
field Township, this county, March 31, 1840, and is a son of John and Isabel 
(Leonard) Marshall. The former was a native of Fairfield Township, this 
county, and spent his whole life on the farm where our subject was born; he 
died August 31, 1870, aged fifty-nine years; the latter, a native of Massachu- 
setts, came with her parents to Pennsylvania about 1820. They had a family 
of seven children, of whom five are now living, "William H. being the eldest. 
He was married March 20, 1872, to Laura, daughter of John Mallery, a resi- 
dent of this township. They have a home farm of ninety-eight acres, well 
improved. Politically Mr. Marshall is a Republican. 

AARON W. MUMFORD, farmer, P. O. Cochranton, was bom in September, 
1808, on a farm adjoining his present home, where he was reared and educated; 
son of James and Catharine ("Wright) Mumford, whose fathers were both in the 
Revolutionary war. Our subject began going to school in the first schoolhouse 



FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP. 867 

in the township, which was situated within a hundred yards of his present 
residence, and he then played with his schoolmates in the shade of a white 
oak tree now in his door yard, and the tree has been preserved because of this 
fact. " Woodman, spare that tree, touch not a single bough; in youth it shel- 
tered me, and I'll protect it now." The schoolhouse was made of round logs. 
The windows were spaces of about eight inches wide, extending the full length 
of the building, over which was stretched greased paper, supported by sticks 
across the " window." The desks were slabs laid on pins driven in the wall 
below the window, and the seats were slabs with pins f6r legs. The room was 
heated by a fireplace the full size of the end of the house. Mr. Mumford was 
married January 14, 1834, to Miss Margaret Moore, of Mercer County, Penn., 
daughter of Hugh and Ann (Sheakley) Moore, and to this union were born six 
children: Sarah A., Mary C, James M. , Hugh A., Sue S. and Anna M. The 
first three are deceased. James M., the only married one of those three, left a 
wife and four children. Hugh A. is married to Sarah Dean and has two chil- 
dren. Sue S. was married to Joseph Thatcher, who died in January, 1874, 
leaving one child, born on the anniversary of his grandfather's birth, for whom 
he is named. Mr. Mumford has served two terms as County Surveyor of 
Crawford County, and fifteen years as Justice of the Peace of his township. 
At the time of its construction he was one of the Directors of the Atlantic & 
Great AVestern (now the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio Railroad), also of 
the Franklin branch. At the same time he was general agent of the company, 
the buying of ties, lumber, and procuring the right of way resting chiefly 
upon him. He is one of Crawford's most highly respected citizens, and has 
excellent business abilitv. 

ALLEN NELSON, 'farmer, P. O. Cochranton. was born June 6, 1814, in 
Fairfield Township, this county, on the farm formerly occupied by his parents, 
David and Jane (Milligan) Nelson. His grandfa,ther, John Milligan, was an 
early settler of Westmoreland County, Penn. His father, David Nelson, came 
to this county in company with Capt. Buchanan in the fall of 1796, took up 
the land on which our subject now resides, built a small cabin, cleared one 
acre, sowed wheat thereon, and shortly returned to Westmoreland County, and 
in 1797 married Jane, daughter of John Milligan, returned in the spring, and 
began as a pioneer in the woods. His death occurred in June, 1848, at the 
ripe age of seventy-two years. Their family consisted of the following chil- 
dren: Polly (Mrs. Myers), aged eighty-four; Betsy, wife of Rev. Thomas 
McDaniel; John, deceased; James, deceased; David, deceased; Jane (Mrs. 
McClintock), Allen, William and Daniel. Our subject was married in Decem- 
ber, 1835, to Hannah, daughter of Allen Dunn, of Sandy Lake, an old settler. 
She was the youngest of a family of seven children. To Mr. and Mrs. Nelson 
were born — Elizabeth, now Mrs. William Line, in Kansas; David, deceased; 
Dunn, married to Martha Bell; Francis, married to Sarah A. Williams; Sam- 
uel, married to Mary Patton; Leslie; Margaret, now Mrs. Applegate, in Kan- 
sas; Emory; and James, deceased. Mr. Nelson is a member of the United 
Presbyterian Church. His father was a Colonel in the war of 1812, and served 
seven months at Fort Meigs. 

HENRY PETERMAN, farmer, P. O. Cochranton, was born in this town- 
ship, May 16, 1820, and is a son of Henry and Julia Ann (Hart) Peterman, 
who settled in Fairfield Township in 1802, locating on and improving the 
farm now owned by Henry Hart, and where they continued to reside during 
the remainder of their lives. They had seven children: Betsy (deceased), 
Julia (deceased), Peter (deceased), Conrad, Sarah (deceased), Rachel (now Sirs. 
Joseph Kirkpatrick, in Canada), and Henry. Our subject married, April 6, 



868 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

1843, Jane, daughter of William and Eliza (Kirkpatrick) Gourley, natives of 
Ireland, who settled in this township about 1830. The issue of this union 
was seven children: William, Maggie (Mrs. Charles Strayer), May J. (Mrs. 
William Evans), Ina (Mrs. William Ewing), Margaret M. (Mrs. Benjamin 
McNamara), Sarah L. (Mrs. Eben Hamilton) and Joseph. Mr. Peterman has 
resided on his present farm since 1865, and he is one of Fairfield's represent- 
ative farmers. He and wife and six eldest chi Idren are members of the United 
Presbyterian Church, of Cochranton. In politics he is a Democrat. 

JOHN H. PETERMAN, farmer, P. O. Cochranton, was born February 25, 
1836, on his grandfather's farm in Fairfield Township, this county, and is a son 
of Conrad and Eliza (Gourley) Peterman. His father was a native of this county, 
and was married February 27, 1834, and reared a family of nine children, of 
whom seven survive, John H. being the eldest. His mother was a native of 
Ireland. Our subject was married December 16, 1858, to Miss Jane Chatley, 
who has borne him nine children, of whom eight survive. He was elected 
Justice of the Peace in 1874 and in 1880 for terms of five years each. By 
trade Mr. Peterman is a carpenter, and has IJuilt many of the frame houses in 
the neighborhood. During the late war he was drafted October 16, 1862, and 
served nine months in Company I, One Hundred and Sixty -ninth Regiment. 
He is a member of Silas W. Smith Post, G. A. R., and of the P. of H. He 
and wife are members of the United Presbyterian Church. In politics he is a 
Democrat. His home farm comprises about 130 acres. 

WILLIAM PORTER (deceased) was born in York County, Penn., March 
20, 1805, and was a son of John and Mary (May) Porter, who came to this 
county in 1808, settling on land near French Creek, in Fairfield Township, and 
had a family of seven children, of whom two, James and Thomas, are known to 
be now living. (Martha, if alive, is in Nevada.) Our subject was married 
November, 1827, to Sarah, daughter of Richard and Sarah (Curts) Custard, 
the tenth in a family of twelve children. He died April 24, 1869, leaving the 
following children: Nancy A (deceased), Mary A., John, Benjamin F., 
James A., George C, Dr. Samuel S., William P., Sarah C. (deceased), Annie B., 
Frances L., Martha J. (deceased) Mary A. married Hiram Power, has three 
children; John married Celestia Tinker (deceased) and has two children; 
Benjamin F. married Helen Derrickson, and has one child; James A. mar- 
ried Miss Small, have two children; Dr. Samuel S. married Nellie Vanzant, 
of New York, resides in Meadville, engaged in the practice of medicine, 
has one son; William P. married Jane H. Hannah, have four children; Annie 
B. married Samuel BIy, have two children; Frances L. married John Shaffer, 
now of Idaho, have two children. Mrs. Porter is now a resident of Custard 
Village. She is a member of the United Presbyterian Church; a lady of much 
public spirit 

ANDREW READ, farmer, P. O. Cochranton, was born in Allegheny 
County, Penn., May 23. 1809, and is a son of William and Isabel (Todd) 
Read. His grandfather, William Read, was an early settler of Allegheny 
County, and his maternal grandfather, Henry Todd, was an early settler of 
eastern Pennsylvania. Our subject came to this county in 1854, locating on 
his present farm in Fairfield Township. His first wife was Jane, daughter 
of Robert and Elizabeth (Gaunee) Cooper, of Allegheny County, by whom 
he had five children: Elizabeth (Mrs. Robert Stevenson), William (de- 
ceased), James, Isabel (Mrs. Hiram Blood), Catharine (Mrs. Reuben Painter). 
His present wife is Polly, daughter of Henry and Margaret (Scroggs) Heath, 
of Fairfield Township, this county. Her father was a native of Allegheny 
County, Penn. ; settled in Fairfield Township in 1798, where he cleared and 



GREENWOOD TOWNSHIP. 869 

improved a farm, afterward removing to Wayne Tovimship, locating on the 
farm now owned and occupied by his son, Eobert Keath, and where he lived 
and died. He built a powder-mill there, and was a manufacturer of powder 
for several years. Mrs. Read's maternal grandfather was Allen Scroggs, for- 
merly of Westmoreland County, and of Scotch descent. He settled on the farm 
now owned by our subject in 1796, which he cleared and improved, and where 
he lived till his death. Mr. and ]\Irs. Read are members of the United Pres- 
byterian Church. In politics he is a stanch Democrat. 

CHARLES STRAYER, farmer, P. O. Cochranton, -was bom in Fairfield 
Township, this county, August 9, 1844, and is a son of Martin and Rachel 
(Ralya) Strayer. His father, a native of Little York, Penn., is a son of Dan- 
iel Strayer, and settled in Fairfield Township in 1832, purchasing a farm 
which he cleared and improved, and where he lived until 1867, when he 
removed to Iowa, where he now resides. He had nine children: Miley, Anna, 
Levi, Charles, Perry, William, Mary A., Nancy J. and Rebecca C. Our sub- 
ject has always resided in this township except when he enlisted, September, 
1861, in the late war, re-enlisting in 1863, and serving until the close of the 
war. He was at the battles of Cedar Mountain, Rappahannock Station, Antie- 
tam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and many other engagements. He was mar- 
ried September 10, 1868, to Miss Elizabeth M., daughter of Henry and Jane 
(Gourley) Peterman, by whom he has two children: Henry M. and William J. 
Mr. Strayer has resided on his present farm since 1866. He is a member of the 
G. A. R. ; in politics a Republican. 



GREENWOOD TOWNSHIP. 

WILLIAM P. BILES, farmer, P. O. Custard's, was born on the banks of 
the Monongahela River, in Washington County, Penn., March 18, 1814, and 
is the son of Charles and Jane (Miles) Biles, whose children were eight in 
number, as follows: Jehial, Eleanor, William P., Mary, John, Aebury, Enoa 
and Andrew. Jehial, Eleanor and Mary all died, leaving families at Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, Pittsburgh, Penn., and Poland, Ohio, respectively; John and Enos 
are also dead; Asbury and family live in Missouri. Charles Biles and wife 
lived and died in Lawrence County, Penn. Our subject was married March, 
1836, to Annie, daughter of James and Nancy (Mitchell) Murdock, by whom 
he has had four children: John, married Sally A. Williams (have one child — 
Edith); Caroline, married William Aramor (have two children: Ida and Carrie); 
James, married Bertha Power (they have lost one child — Wallace); William 
P., Jr., married Sarah Dilla (he studied medicine at Cincinnati, Ohio, and is 
now practicing at Union City (has two children: William and Bertha). An- 
drew Biles, our subject's brother, was a soldier in the late war, and fought like 
a hero as he was through the seven battles participated in by the Potomac 
Army and survived them all, but when fever laid its hand upon him he fell. 
His father went to meet him at Philadelphia and brought him home, and, at 
his own request, he was buried by his mother. Our subject in religious belief 
is an Adveutist. 

JONATHAN D. CHRIST, farmer, P. O. Geneva, was born April 19, 1831, 
in Austintown, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and is a son of Daniel F. and Mary 
(Grove) Christ, of the Buckeye State. He settled in this township in 184(), 



870 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

and married, first, Emeliza, daughter of Robert and Cynthia (Brower) Will- 
iams, of this county, by whom he had nine children: Mary J., Mary Chas- 
tina, Isaiah L., Robert D., Frederick A., Etta L. , James C, David C. and 
John E. His wife died March 30, 1873, and he afterward married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Reuben and Lonly (Anderson) Sutton, of this township. Mr. 
Christ is a thorough business man, having at one time been Justice of the 
Peace, and filled other offices of the township and countj'. He at one time 
owned nearly all the land upon which the little village of Geneva now stands. 
He is an ujjright, Christian man, belonging to the United Brethren Church, 
and its chief supporter in this vicinity. In politics he is a stanch Prohibi- 
tionist. 

JOSIAH J. COULTER, merchant miller, Geneva, was born February 18, 
1830, in Venango Township, Crawford Co., Penn., and is a son of Wil- 
son and Elizabeth Coulter, of this county. He moved to this township 
in 1871, purchasing a grist-mill which was known as the McMichael & 
Brooks Mill; has improved the mill until now it is one of the best 
country mills, and now making a very fine brand of what is termed 
" hulled buckwheat" flour. This is conceded to be the best in the market,and 
is being shipped in all directions. He has lately put in a thirty-horse power 
engine from the Phcenix Iron Works, of Meadville, Penn. The engine-house 
is built entirely of brick and iron, thus making it perfectly fire proof. By 
careful business management and upright dealing, Mr. Coulter has acquired 
an excellent reputation with all who know him. The mill is situated in the 
southern portion of the county, and is easy of access, with good roads leading 
to it from all directions. 

A. P. MARSHALL, farmer, P. O. Custard's, was born February 28, 1839, 
in Fairfield Township, this county, and is a son of John and Isabel (Leonard) 
Marshall, natives and life-long residents of this county, descendants of New 
England families who were among the earliest settlers of Crawford County. 
They were parents of seven children, of whom five are now living: Harrison, 
Clinton, Landsing( deceased), James, Alexander, John, Mary Ellen (deceased). 
Mrs. Marshall still occupies the old home farm, she having lost her husband 
in 1870. Our subject was married November, 1882, to Ella, daughter and sec- 
ond in the family of six children of Hiram Randolph, an old and highly 
respected family of early pioneers of this county. The issue of this marriage 
was one child — James G. The farm of Mr. Marshall is well watered and 
improved, and is situated in the northern part of the township near Custard's 
Postoffice. 

W'lLLIAJM J. MELLON, lumber dealer and merchant miller, Geneve, 
was born April 14, 1832, and is the son of Alexander and Isabella (Porter) 
Mellon, who settled in this county about 1830, and purchased 200 acres of 
land upon which he built the second grist-mill in this section of the country. 
His maternal grandfather, Francis Porter, with his wife, Ruth, settled in this 
county about 1803, where they had seven children, all now living: Elizabeth, 
aged eighty-two; Isabella, aged eighty; William, aged seventy-eight; Rachel, 
aced seventy-six; Charles, aged seventy-four; James, aged seventy-three; 
^lary, aged sixty-eight. Our subject has never been married and has lived a 
rather secluded life, improving the property which was left in his charge: he 
is strictly upright in all his dealings with his fellow-men, and has the respect 
and admiration of all who know him. His father's family consists of seven 
children: William J., John, Francis, Rachel, Mary, Alexander and Sarah. 
Our subject is no politician. In religious views the family are Presbyterian. 

DAVID E. SMITH, hotel- keeper, Geneva, was born in Woodcock Town- 



HAYFIELD TOWNSHIP. 871 

ship, this county, January 20, 1832, and is the son of Jeremiah and Catharine 
(Ritner) Smith. His grandfather, James Smith, settled in this county about 
1796, and married Ruth Ann, daughter of Sergeant Picket (of Revolutionary 
fame) and they had eleven children: Robert, William, James, George, Jere- 
miah, Betsy. Sally, Polly, Edward, Andrew and Joseph. His maternal grand- 
father, David Ritner, brother of Gov. Joseph Ritner, settled in this county 
about 1815, married Anna Catharine Fiscus, of Pennsylvania, and had nine 
children: Susan, Henry, Maria, Fannie, Daniel, Peggy, Benjamin, Catharine 
and Jane. The parents of our subject had twelve children: Martin, Peter, 
David E., Ruth Ann, Sylvester, Mary, Angeline, Van Buren, George, Nathan, 
Clara and Fannie. Our subject was married three times; the first time to 
Mary Jane, daughter of Thomas and IMartha Lillibridge, of this county. The 
date of this marriage was September 25, 1854, and the issue was two children: 
Josephine and Lavina; he was separated from this woman in April, 1858. 
Mr. Smith next married Susan, daughter of Peter and Susan (Hamilton) Mc- 
Keever, July 14, 1861. She died February 11, 1864, leaving one child. Flora 
Belle. His third wife is Amanda Maria, daughter of James and Emily (John- 
son) Hood, of this county, by whom he has four childi-en: Os.ce A., Gertrude, 
Eugene and David W. Our subject has, b}' his own indomitable perseverance, 
placed himself in the front rank of business men. He has held several 
borough offices; in politics is a stanch Republican. 



HAYFIELD TOWNSHIP. 



LEWIS P. ACKER, farmer, P. O. Coon's Corners, was born in Lehigh 
County, Penn., February 8, 1847, and is a son of Jonas and Mary (Frantz) 
Acker, who came to Crawford County, Penn., in 1852, and lived six months in 
Woodcock Township. In the fall of 1852 he settled on the farm now occu- 
pied by our subject, part of which he cleared and improved. Mi-. Acker died 
in August, 1865, at the age of forty-seven years. Both he and his wife 
were natives of Lehigh County, Penn., and were of German descent. They 
had ten children: Willoughby F. (deceased), Lewis P., Henry, Reuben, Alex- 
ander, John, James, Mary (Mrs. Frank Lilly), Christiana (deceased) and 
Lovina (deceased). Our subject resides on the old homestead with his mother, 
who has attained the age of sixty-five. He is a member of the State Police; 
has been Assessor of the township two terms; in politics he is a Democrat. 
He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

ISAAC W. ALLEE, farmer, P. O. Saegerstown, was born in Hayfield 
Township, this county, February 23, 1834, son of John and Nancy (Truitt) 
AUee. John was a native of Delaware, and a son of Isaac Allee, a native of 
Holland, his wife a native of England. Both settled in what is now Hayfield 
Township, this county, in 1796. Isaac W. located on the farm now owned by 
James Kilday, but remained there only a short time. John settled on the 
farm now occupied by our subject, when but fourteen years of age, taking up 400 
acres of land in his father's name. His father soon after came on the farm, 
and he went to Saegertown, and worked in the grist mill for Maj. Alden sev- 
eral years, when he returned to Hayfield and worked the farm now owned by 
Wilson Hunter and Ezra Brookhouser. Here he lived two or three years, when 
he purchased his father's farm, all of which he cleared and improved, and 



872 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

where he resided vmtirhis death, which occurred November 29, 1862, in his 
eightieth year. He was in the war of 1812, serving as Quartermaster; was a 
Justice of the Peace of Hayfield Township for twenty- two years. Nancy, his wife, 
was a native of Armstrong County, Penn., and a daughter of Parker Truitt, of 
English and Irish descent. John had five children: Patience (Mrs. Isaac 
Miller), now of Bloomfield Township; Parker, deceased ; Keziah (Mrs. Leonard 
Erwin), of Cussewago Township; Ehoda, deceased; Isaac W. Our subject 
was married November 7, 1860, to Mary J., daughter of Peter A. and Betsy 
(Dirham) Gage, early settlers of Cambridge Township, this county. By this 
union there were sis children: Alice K., Ella L. (Mrs. George D. Manville, 
of Warren, Penn.), Bessie M., Mary D., Kate W. and John G. Mr. Allee 
resides on the old homestead where his father first settled. He has filled many 
of the offices in the gift of his township. In politics he is a Republican. 

LEWIS R. AMIDON, farmer. P. O. Hayfield, was born in Hayfield Town- 
ship, this county, on the farm where he now resides, May 6, 1839, and is a 
son of Elijah and Elizabeth (Spaulding) Amidon, who settled in Spring Town- 
ship, this county in 1834, and in 1835 removed to Hayfield Township, locat- 
ing on the farm now owned by our subject, which they cleared and improved 
and there they lived and died. They had nine children, viz.: Hiram; Mary 
I., deceased; Horace S., deceased; Miranda (Mrs. A. Keep); George E. ; 
Henry, deceased; William H. ; Lewis R. and Lucinda (twins), the latter 
deceased. The Amidons were of French descent, and the Spauldings of 
Puritan stock, whose ancestors came over in the " Mayflower." The subject of 
this sketch has been twice married. His first wife was Caroline, daughter of 
Samuel and Rosana (Bradish) Russell, of Summerhill Township, this county, 
to whom he was married July 3, 1862, and by this union there were three 
children: Gertrude, Frank and Russell. Our subject married his present wife 
December 27, 1874. She is Amanda, daughter of Parker and Catherine 
(Baker) Allee, and grand-daughter of John Allee, who settled in Hayfield 
Township, this county, in 1796. By this union there are four children: 
Louie, Albert R., Clifton E., and Clarence, deceased. Mr. Amidon resides on 
the old homestead farm. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and his wife of the Baptist. He has held several ofSces in the town- 
ship; in politics he is a Republican. 

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG, fanner, P, O. Saegerstown, was born in York 
County, Penn., February 19, 1814, son of John and Mary (Hinkle) Ai-mstrong, 
who settled in Hayfield Township in 1834, our subject coming at the same 
time. John was a native of Halifax, Nova Scotia, and his wife of York 
County, Penn. They settled on the property now occupied by the Saegertown 
Cemetery, which they cleared and improved. They had three children: Will- 
iam, Sarah (Mrs. David Gehr) and Eliza (Mrs. Balzer Henry). Our subject 
was married November 15, 1834, to Lucy A., daughter of Frederick and Mar- 
garet (Gehr) Hickernell, of Hayfield Township, by whom he had ten children, 
seven now living, viz.: Alfred B., married Abba Woodring (had fifteen chil- 
dren, three deceased); Sarah, married Tillman Frantz (had six children, one 
deceased); Margaret, married Robert Kern (had five children); William L., 
married Jennie Wasson (have one child); Isaac S., married Katie Harteon 
(have six children); John W., married Amelia Ridle (had two children, one 
dead), and Kernie, married T. B. Peters (have one child). Mr. Ai-mstrong 
has resided in Hayfield Township since 1834. He has held the office of Jus- 
tice of the Peace, and various other offices in the gift of his township. In 
politics he is a Republican. Both he and his wife are members of the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church. 



HAYFIELD TOWNSHIP. 873 

GEORGE W. BARNES, farmer, P. O. Haytield, was born in Fairfield Town- 
ship, this county, August 12, 1841; son of Palmer and Elizabeth (Wien) 
Barnes, formerly of Berks County, who settled in Fairfield Township in 1836, 
cleared and improved a farm there and afterward came to Hayfield Township, 
where the father is living with our subject at the present time. They had 
six children: Hannah (Mrs. Andrew J. Wygaut), Elizabeth, George W., Sarah 
(Mrs. Joseph Wolford), Molly (Mrs. I. Baker) and John. The subject of this 
sketch was raised on a farm and always followed farming as an occupation. 
He was in the late war of the Rebellion, having enlisted March 12, 1864, in 
Company A, One Hundred and Twenty-fir»t Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry; 
was in the campaign of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Petersburg, Weldon 
Railroad, Hatcher's Run and many other engagements ; was honorably discharged 
in July 1865. He was married July 14, 1861, to Elizabeth, daughter of Hen- 
ry and Susan Humel, of Clarion County, Penn., by whom he has had three chil- 
dren: John (deceased), William and Kate. Mr. Barnes settled in Hayfield 
Township in 1869, and has lived on his present farm since 1875. He has held 
the offices of Supervisor and School Director. In politics he is a Republican. 

PORTER J. BEEBE, manufacturer, Hayfield, was born in Batavia, N. Y., 
August 17, 1830; son of William and Cyrena (Maxon) Beebe, who settled in 
Hayfield Township, this county, in 1844 and there died. William was a black- 
smith by trade, a native of Vermont and a son of Ebenezer Beebe. Cyrena, 
his wife, was a daughter of Joseph Maxon, of Allegany County, N. Y., and of 
Scotch descent. William had eight children: Porter, Kirtland, Lucy (Mrs. C. 
Fidler), Almiron (deceased), Lodema (Mrs. Ebenezer Bain) in Omaha, Mary 
(deceased), Alender and Charles. The subject of this sketch has resided in 
Hayfield Township since his father's settlement in 1844. He was married 
January 5, 1855, to Cynthia, daughter of Aretus and Bannah (Billings) Smith, 
formerly of Oneida County, N. Y., and among the first settlers of Hayfield 
Township. By this union there is one child — Jennie. In 1859 Mr. ISeebe 
embarked in the manufacturing of lumber, in which he continued up to 1868. 
He is engaged in the manufacturing of handles, whiffletrees and neck yokes, 
in which he has done an extensive business since 1868, and has the largest 
manufactory of the kind in this county. In 1874 his mill, the largest in the 
county, burned down, but he re-built the same year. E. W. Shippen, of Mead- 
ville, has been interested with him since 1879. Mr. Beebe is one of the 
representative business men of the county; is a member of the R. T. of T. , an 
I. O. O. F. ; in politics is a Republican. 

JAMES BOYD, farmer, P. O. Coon's Corners, was born in Butler County, 
Penn., April 6, 1831, and is a son of John and Sarah (Ruggles) Boyd, who 
settled in Wayne Township, this county, in 1845. His paternal grandfather 
was George Boyd, who settled in Butler County in 1800. The children of 
John were six in number: George, William and John (twins), James, Martin 
and Emeline (Mrs. Roland Fairbanks). Our subject worked five years in 
Meadville at the carpenter's trade and the balance of his life has been spent 
in farming. He was married January 19, 1860, to Edna, daughter of Warren 
and Martha (Bowen) Fairbanks, of Wayne Township, this county, formerly of 
Chautauqua County, N. Y. The issue of this union is nine children: John, 
Alzora, Herman, Lavonia, Warren, Edith, Jessie, Martin and Chester. Mr. 
Boyd came to Hayfield Township in 1879 and located on the farm where he 
now resides. Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. In politics he is a Republican. 

EZRA BROOKHOUSEK, farmer, P. O. Saegerstown, was born in Hayfield 
Township, this county, November 4, 1835, son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Straw) 



874 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Brookhouser. His paternal grandfather, Jacob Brookhouser, Sr., was a native 
of Philadelphia, and at an early age moved with his parents to Westmoreland 
County, Penn., where he lived until 1797, when he settled in what is now 
Haylield Township, this county, on the farm now occupied by our subject, 
which he cleared and improved. Jacob, Sr., had'seven children: Rhoda (Mrs. 
Michael Straw, deceased), Jacob, Polly (Mrs. John Saeger), Elias (deceased), 
Rebecca (Mrs. Joseph Foxj, Nancy (Mrs. Philip Straw), Louisa (Mrs. David 
George). Jacob, Jr., was twice married, his first wife being Elizabeth Straw, 
daughter of Jacob Straw, who settled in Haytield Township, this county, in 
1796. By this union there were nine children: Amanda (deceased), Aaron 
(deceased). Emily (Mrs. Martin Flick), Sarah (Mrs. A. Mook), Mary (^Mrs. 
James Herrick), Ezra, Louisa (Mrs. George Rhodes), Lavina (Mrs. John Hun- 
ter) and Almera (Mrs. George P. Miller). His second wife was Naomi Baker, 
of Saegertown. Our subject was married May 15, 1863, to Martha, daughter 
of Ezra and Mary (Polk) White, of Erie County, by whom he had three chil- 
dren: Victoria (deceased), Birdie and Freddie. Mr. Brookhouser has 
always lived in Haylield Township, with the exception of eight years, when 
he resided in Michigan. His father died September 26, 1884, on the home- 
stead where he was born and raised; for many years he had been a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our subject in politics is a Democrat. 

WILLIAM S. CAMPBELL, farmer, P. O. Venango, was born in Genesee 
County, N. Y., March 23, 1816; son of James and Olive (Bennett) Campbell, 
who settled in LeBcBuf Township, Erie County, in 1819, where our subject 
resided until 1864, when he located in Hayfield Township, on the farm where 
he DOW resides. He has been twice married; his first wife was Martha, 
daughter of Edward Bunting, of Erie County, Penn., by whom he had eight 
children, five now living, viz.: Olive (Mrs. V. Ambrose), in Nebraska; Helen 
(Mrs. William Hooper), in Cattaraugus County, N. Y. ; John, in same place; 
Margaret (Mrs. A. Haybarger), in Nebraska, and George, also in Nebraska. 
His present wife is Rachel, daughter of John Webster, of Cambridge Town- 
ship, this county, by whom he has three children: Adella, Edward and Will- 
iam. Mr. Campbell is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and his 
wife is a Presbyterian. In politics oiu" subject is a Republican. 

OSCAR D. CLEMENS, farmer, P. O. Venango, was born in Venango Town- 
ship, this county, November 13, 1841; son of William I. and Sarah ( Culbert- 
son) Clemens. William I. was a son of John Clemens, a native of Ireland, 
who was one of the first settlers of LeBoeuf Township, Erie County, Penn. 
Sarah, his wife, was a daughter of John Culbertson, who settled in Washing- 
ton Township, Erie County, Penn. , in 1800. William I. settled in Venango 
Township in 1840. In 1847 he located on the farm now owned by M. Tuttle, 
then known as the Braden tract, comprising 114 acres, which he cleared and 
improved. He had eight children: Aleious A., Susan (Mrs. J. L. Skelton), 
Margaret (Mrs. Joseph Gridley), John C. (deceased), Josephine (Mrs. J. J. 
Whipple), Oscar D., W. I. (deceased), and Sabra (Mrs. James Detweiler). 
Oscar D., our subject, was married in September, 1864, to Tabitha, daughter 
of Henry and Elizabeth (Humes) Sherred, of Cambridge Township. By this 
union there are three children: Sabra, Eltie and Earl A. Mr. Clemens 
removed from Venango Township to Cambridge Township in the spring of 
1869. In the spring of 1870 he moved to Cornplanter Township, Venango 
County, Penn., where he engaged in the oil business, meeting with success. 
In the spring of 1874 he came to Hayfield Township, where he now resides. 
Besides his farm of 112 acres in Hayfield Township, he owns a farm in Ven- 
ango Township of sixty-eight acres and another in Steuben Township of 130 



HAYFIELD TOWNSHIP. 8T5 

acres. He is a breeder of Norman and Percheron horses, having a herd of 
twelve, part of which are registered in the Percheron stud book. No. 2917, 
and in the Norman stud book, No. 2544. Also has horses registered in Percher- 
on stud book, No. 2880, and in Norman stud book, No. 2506. Mr. Clemens 
is one of the representative farmers of his tovynship; is an A. F. & A. M., and 
a member of the I. O. O. F. and K. of P.; in politics he is a Democrat. 

ELIJAH D. CROSLEY, farmer, P. O. Coon's Corners, was born in Cum- 
berland County, N. J., March 2, 1818, son of Moses and Catherine (Ayers)Cro8- 
ley. Moses was a native of New Jersey, and settled in Hayfield Township, 
this county, in 1836, locating on the farm now owned by Robert Devore, where 
he lived and died. He had eleven children, viz.: James, Moses (deceased), 
Aaron (deceased), Edmund, Moses, Elijah D. , Richard, Amasa (deceased), Nathan, 
(deceased), Elizabeth (deceased), Mary (deceased. ) The subject of this sketch has 
been twice married; on first occasion to Eunice, daughter of Miles Curtis, of Hay- 
field Township, this county, by whom he had three children: Edmund, Miles, 
and an infant daughter, deceased. His present wife was Mrs. Laura Lake, 
daughter of Amasa Colegrove, of Litchfield, Ohio, by whom ho has one child 
— Abram. Mr. Crosley has resided in Hayfield Township since 1836. He pur- 
chased his present farm in 1845, which he cleared, and on which he has made 
all the improvements. He is one of the representative citizens of Hayfield 
Township; is a member of the Seventh Day Baptist Church. He has held vari- 
ous offices in the gift of his township; in politics is a stanch Republican. 

BENJAMIN GULP, farmer, P. O. Saegersfown, was born in Northumber- 
land County, Penn., March 18, 1822, son of Henry and Salome (Coler) Culp. 
His parents died when he was but a small child. At the age of twenty he 
came to this county, and located in Saegertown. In 1844 he purchased a 
farm in Cussewago Township, which he cleared and improved, now owned by 
James Hickernell. In 1852 he settled in Hayfield Township, and has resided 
on his present farm since 1881. He has been twice married; on first occasion 
to Eve, daughter of John and Catherine Zimmerman, of Union County, Penn., 
by whom he had eight children: Henry, Isaac, Israel, Silas J., Anna L., 
(Mrs. Josiah Hickernell, deceased), Sarah M. (Mrs. John Williams), Mary J. 
(Mrs Joseph Brink), and B. Frank, born in Haylield Township, this county, 
October 23, 1864. His present wife is Mary M. , daughter of John and Pollv 
(Hickernell) Flaugh, whose paternal grandfather was Matthias Flaugh, one of 
the first settlers of Woodcock Township, this county. Her maternal grand- 
father, Frederick Hickernell, was one of the first settlers of Hayfield Town- 
ship. By this union there is one child — Charles S. Mr. Culp has held sev- 
eral offices in the gift of his township; in politics he is independent. Both he 
and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1843 our 
subject was Orderly Sergeant of a militia company of Crawford County, and 
in 1862 was appointed by Gov. Curtin First Lieutenant of a volunteer com- 
pany of the Hayfield Guards. In 1850 he assisted in building the plank road 
between Erie and Meadville, in which enterprise he was one of the principal 
stock-holders. 

JEREMIAH CUTSHALL, farmer, P. O. Saegersfown. was born in Summit 
Township, this county, August 20, 1826, son of George and Jane (Sterling) 
Cutshall. George, with his brother Jacob, came from Cumberland County, 
Penn., to Randolph Township, this county, in 1814, and settled in the north- 
ern part of that township, both clearing large farms, which are now owned 
and occupied by their descendants. They made the journey through the woods 
with a six-horse team, crossing the streams that were too deep to ford by using 
their wagon box as a boat, in which to convey their goods, a few at a time. 



876 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

On the way one of their horses died, and a bull which they drove was placed 
in harness in its stead, the rest of their journey. George had to go to Mead- 
ville to work out his taxes, as there were no roads in his vicinity. He resided 
in Randolph Township up to 1880, when he removed to Lorain County, Ohio, 
and died there in 1881, at the age of seventy -six years. He had the following 
children: Nancy A. (Mrs. John Seaman), in Dakota; Jeremiah; Eliza (Mrs. 
E. Tinker), in Ohio; Anna M. (Mrs. David Keep), deceased; Mary J. (Mrs. S. 
Seaman); Sarah E. (Mrs. V. Sterling), in Dakota; George W., Philip, Jacob, 
Joseph (deceased), Lydia (deceased), and Lysander (deceased). Our subject 
was married, December 7,1850, to Mary E. , daughter of Marshall and Almina 
(Brown) Cain, formerly of Stockbridge, Mass., and who settled in Woodcock 
Township, this county, in 1833. By this union were eleven children: Leroy 
(deceased), Rosa (Mrs. William Cole), Laroky (Mrs. Samuel Humel), Zenobia 
(Mrs. Thomas Shoup), Flora P. (Mrs. Bion Faunce), Elma (Mrs. Walter 
Dunn), Darwin, Bertie, Maud, Grace, and Leon (deceased). Mr. Cutshall 
was a resident of Randolph Township, this county, up to 1864, when he pur- 
chased his farm in Hayfield Township, where he now resides. He has been 
Supervisor and School Director of his township; in politics is independent. 
Both he and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church. 

HENRY DeROSS. farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in Hayfield Town- 
ship, this county, March 11, 1828, son of Alexander and Susan (Cole) DeRoss. 
His paternal grandfather was Henry DeRoss, a native of France, who came to 
America with Gen. LaFayette, fought through the war of the Revolution, and 
afterward settled in what is now Germantown, Penn. , where he married Helen 
German, of the family from whom Germantown bears its name. His maternal 
grandfather, Conrad Cole, settled in Hayfield Township, this county, in 1802, 
where he cleared up a farm and lived and died. Alexander DeRoss settled in Hay- 
field Township, this county, in 1822, on the farm now owned by our subject, which 
he cleared and improved and where he lived and died. He had nine chil- 
dren: Helen (Mrs. Judson Smith), Henry, George W., Alex. H., Conrad, 
Sylvester (deceased), Jonathan G. (who served in the late war, in Company H, 
Pennsylvania Bucktails, and was killed in the last day's fight at Hatcher's Run), 
Hiram C. and David E. The subject of this sketch was raised in his native 
township and always resided there. He was married July 2, 1854, to Cather- 
ine, daughter of Jacob and Eliza (Mosier) Stire, of Hayfield Township, this 
county, by whom he has had four children, Susan M. (deceased), Margaret I. 
(Mrs. James Hanna) Sherman and Catherine. Mr. DeRoss and wife are mem- 
bers of the Lutheran Church. He has held several of the minor oflBces in his 
township; in politics is a Republican. 

JOHN HARTMAN, farmer, P. O. Mead,ville, was born in Vernon Town- 
ship, October 26, 1822, and is a son of John J. and Barbara (Marsh) Hart- 
man, who settled in Vernon Township, this county, about ^810, clearing up a 
farm there, and afterward removed to Hayfield Township, locating on the farm 
now owned by David Seavy, which they cleared and improved, and where they 
lived and died. They were natives of Switzerland, and had the following 
children: Barbara (Mrs. Joshua Ware), Catherine (Mrs. S. Shoup), Jacob 
(deceased), John, Henry, Samuel (deceased), Elizabeth (Mrs. Joseph Baker), 
Abraham, and Mary (Mrs. Roderick Frazier). Our subject came to Hayfield 
Township with his parents in 1830, and was married September 16, 1845, to 
Julia A., daughter of Conrad and Mary (Renner) Bachman, early settlers of 
Woodcock Township, this county. By this union there are eleven children: 
Mary (Mrs. A. Rice), Sadie, Samuel, Christiana (Mrs. Owen Powell) Emma, 
William, Tama (Mrs. E. Minnis), Minnie, Jennie, Alvin L. and Edgar (twins). 



HAYFIELD TOWNSHIP. 877 

Mr. Hartinan has resided on his farm since 1840, which he has cleared and 
made all the improvements thereon. He and his wife are members of the 
Reformed Church. He has held nearly all the offices in the gift of his town- 
ship; in politics is a Democrat. 

ELI HICKERNELL, farmer, P. O. Saegerstown, was born in Hayfield 
Township, this county, January 3, 1812, and is a son of Frederick and Mar- 
garet (Gehr) Hickernell, who settled in Hayfield Township, this county, in 
1796, locating in three different places, and finally purchased a tract of the 
Holland Land Company, now owned by his descendants, which he cleared and 
improved, and where he Jived and died. He was of French descent, a clothier 
by trade, and fulled and dressed cloth for many years. His wife was connected 
with the Gehr family, who were among the first settlers of Summit Township, 
this county. They had twelve children: Mary (deceased), Sally (deceased), 
Elizabeth (deceased), Delilah (deceased), Margaret (Mrs. Samuel Eaton, of 
Ohio), Grizzilla (deceased), Lucy A. (Mrs. William Armstrong), Alexander, 
David, Ell, Lewis, and Frederick (deceased). The subject of this sketch was 
married January 25, 1835, to Sarah, daughter of Captain John and Catherine 
(Ondrum) Gehr, of Sadsbury Township, this county, by whom he has had six 
children: Harriet (Mrs. Oswald Hyroch), Sylvanie (Mrs. Henry Foust), Amanda 
(Mrs. Fred Hellenbrech), Yilimine (Mrs. Thomas Hickernell), Levi, mar- 
ried to Salena, daughter of Henry Simpson, and James, married to Kate, 
daughter of J. Cole. Mr. Hickernell resides on a part of the Hickernell 
homestead; has served as Overseer of the Poor two terms; in politics is a 
Democrat. Both he and his wife have been members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church for many years. 

JACOB L. HITES, farmer. P. O. Hayfield, was born in Hayfield Town- 
ship, this county, April 29, 1831, and is a son of Jacob and Mary (Lewis) 
Hites. Jacob settled in what is now Hayfield Township, this county, in 
1812. He was a son of Jacob Hites, an early settler of Cussewago Township, 
this county. Mary, his wife, was a daughter of George Lewis, who came to 
Meadville in 18(X), settled in Cussewago Township in 1801, and died there in 
1802. Jacob and Mary Hites had nine children: Betsey, Hannah, Harrison 
(deceased), Lewis, Matilda, Samuel C, Ebenezer, Jacob L., and George 
(deceased). Our subject was married July 4, 1855, to Mary A., daughter of 
Charles and Angeline (Martin) McGill, and grand- daughter of Patrick McGill, 
who settled in Woodcock Township in 1795. By this union there is one child 
living — Corwin O. He and his brother Arthur were the first settlers in what 
is now Saegertown. They came to that locality when it was a dense forest 
and took up 800 acres of land. Mr. Hites has resided on his farm at Little's 
Corners since 1882. Both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
Church. In politics he is a Prohibitionist. 

SAMUEL HOWER, farmer, P. O. Saegerstown, was born in Union County, 
Penn., January 28, 1811; son of George and Catherine (Leibe)Hower. George 
and his wife were natives of Berks Countj', Penn., and settled in Vernon Town- 
ship, this county, in 1834, and in 1835 removed to Woodcock Township, tliis 
county, where they lived and died. They had twelve children, three of whom 
are now living: John, in Union County, Samuel and Catherine (Mrs. Jacob 
Moyer). Our subject settled in Woodcock Township, this county, in the 
spring of 1835. He afterward purchased a farm in Venango Township, where 
he lived two years, and then returned to Woodcock Township, where he resided 
until 18(51, when he purchased the fai'tn on which he now resides in Hayfield 
Township. Here he erected all the buildings. He was married, July 30, 1844, 
to Catherine, daughter of George and Margaret Bevelhimer, of Woodcock 



878 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Township, this county. By this union there were seven children: George 
(deceased), Elizabeth (Mrs. Thomas Wikoff), Susie (deceased), John, Mary, 
Catherine (deceased), and Abby. Mr. Hower is one of the substantial farmers 
of Haylield Township. He is a member of the Lutheran Church of Saeger- 
town. In politics h^! is a Republican. 

JOSEPH R. INGOLS, farmer, P. O. Norrisville, was born in Swanton, 
Franklin Co., Vt., November 24, 1809, and is a son of Parker and Mercy 
(Holmes) Ingols, who were the parents of four children: Joseph R. , Rebecca 
(deceased), Mary (deceased) and Phebe (Mrs. James L. Stray), of Ludington, 
Mich. The subject of this sketch settled in Hayfield Township, this county, 
in 1830, and in 1844 purchased the farm where he now resides, most of which 
he cleared and improved. He was married October 20, 1833, to Mary, daugh- 
ter of John and Sarah (Foster) Curtis, of Wyoming County, N. Y. By this 
union there were nine children: Lucy M. (Mrs. Benjamin Hake), Adelia M. 
(Mrs. John G. Patterson), Parker (deceased), Darius C., Luther, Susan (Mrs. 
Ralph Rockwell), Nancy (Mrs. G. W. Hickernell), J. Eugene and Mary (Mrs. 
C. L. Morrison). Mr. Ingols is a member of Spring Corners Christian Church, 
with which he has been connected for many years. He has held several of the 
offices in the gift of his township. In politics he has always been a stanch 
Democrat, and cast his first vote for President for Gen. Andrew Jackson. 

JAMES JOHNSON, wagon-maker, P. O. Haytield, was born in County 
Armagh, Ireland, April 17, 1831, and is a son of David and Susan (Porter) 
Johnson, who settled in Meadville, this county, in 1833, and in 1835 located 
in Haytield Township, where they lived and died. They had nine children, 
viz : James, Ann J., Porter, Margaret (Mrs. Andy Sloan), Susanna, Mary 
(deceased), Thomas, Eliza (Mrs. G. Floyd) and Robert. The subject of this 
sketch was in the war of the Rebellion, having enlisted in August, 1804, in 
Company G, Eighty-second Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He was in the 
battle of Cold Harbor and other engagements and at Lee's surrender at Appo- 
mattox Court House. He was honorably discharged with the regiment in 
August, 1805. Mr. Johnson was married April 7, 1875, to Eveline, daughter 
of John F. and Jane Selby, of Franklin, Penn. Mr. Johnson has followed 
the business of wagon- making in Hayfield Township since 1854. In politics 
he is a Republican. 

JAMES M. JONES, farmer, P. O. Vallonia, was born in Haytield Town- 
ship, this county, on the farm where he now resides, February 7, 1824, son of 
John and Barbara (Barge) Jones. His paternal grandfather was Abram Jones, 
a Welshman, who came to this county about 1800. He was a surveyor, and 
did most of the surveying for the Holland Land Company. He had five chil- 
dren: William, John, Elizabeth, James and Peter, all now deceased. John 
had thirteen children, of whom nine grew to manhood and womanhood, viz. : 
Maria (deceased), Jonas (deceased), Eliza (deceased), Keziah (deceased), Caro- 
line (deceased), James M., Cookson, Frederick (deceased) and Abram (deceased). 
Mr. Jones located on the farm now owned by our subject, which he cleared 
and improved, and there lived and died. The subject of this sketch has been 
twice married. His first wife was Sarah A., daughter of John and Hopestil 
(Jones) Morris, of Hayfield Township, this county. Five children were born 
to this union: Eliza (Mrs. Alex Formau), John, Frank, Maria J. (Mrs. Robert 
Lucas) and Elizabeth (Mrs. Morgan Jones). His present wife was Julia, 
daughter of George and Mary (Brookhouser) Rhodes, of Hayfield Township, 
this county. By this union there are t^ree children: Albert, Keziah and Clara. 
Mr. Jones owns and resides on the old homestead, where his father first set- 
tled in 1814. He is the proprietor of a saw-mill, which has been in existence 



HAYFIELD TOWNSHIP. 879 

on his farm since his father first settled, and which was built by him. He is 
now the only representative of his father's family in Crawford County. In 
politics he is independent. 

EGBERT KELLEY, farmer, P. O. Hayfield, was born June 4, 1847, son of 
Stillman and Eliza (Stewart) Kelley, who settled in Hayfield Township, this 
county, in 1849, locating on the farm now owned and occupied by our subject, 
and most of which they cleared and improved. They had seven children, viz. : 
Harriet (Mrs. L. Cotton), Robert, Maria (Mrs. Thomas Davis), Ada (Mrs. 
Fred. Riddle), Walter, Ann (Mrs. Curtis Stein) and Frank. The subject 
of this sketch was married, March 26, 1873, to Hattie, daughter of Wash- 
ington and Anna Howard, of Mead Township, this county. By this union 
there are five children: Robert, Bertio, Anna, Harry and Clara.* Mr. Kelley 
was in the late war of the Rebellion, having enlisted, April, 1863, in Company 
I, Second Pennsylvania Cavalry; was in the seven days fight before Rich- 
mond, the campaign of the Wilderness, and many other engagements; was 
taken prisoner before Petersburg and sent to Libby prison, and from there to 
AndersonviJle; was a prisoner nine months, and was paroled toward the close 
of the war, and was honorably discharged from the service at Annapolis, Md., 
in 1865. He resides on the old homestead where his father settled in 1849. 
In politics he is a Republican. 

ROBERT T. KERN, farmer, P. O. Saegerstown, was born in Lehigh 
County, Penn., August 14, 1842, and is a son of Daniel and Lydia (App) 
Kern, who settled in Saegertown in 1850, and embarked in the hotel business, 
which has been kept in the Kern name up to the present time. The subject 
of this sketch was in the war of the Rebellion, enlisting, December 26, 1861, 
in Company I, One Hundred and Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry; 
served two years and re-enlisted as veteran for three years longer or during 
the war, in same company and regiment. He was in the battles of Cedar 
Mountain, Antietam, Gettysburg, Wahatchie, Lookout Mountain, Resaca, Dal- 
las, and numerous skirmishes; was taken prisoner at Peach Tree Creek, near 
Atlanta, and was confined in Andersonville and other prisons for eight months. 
At the close of the war he received an honorable discharge from the Govern- 
ment. He was married in December, 1868, to Margaret, daughter of William 
and Lucy A. (Hickernell) Armstrong, of Hayfield Township, by whom he has 
five children: Agnes L., Sarah H., Julia F., Josiah A. and Alice D. Mr. 
Kern has resided in Hayfield Township twelve years, and since 1874 on his 
present farm, a part of which he has cleared and improved. Both he and his 
wife are members of the German Reformed Church. In politics he is a Dem- 
ocrat. 

JAMES A. KILDAY, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in Hayfield 
Township, this county, December 6, 1834, son of Daniel and Sarah (Zarley) 
Kilday. His paternal grandparents were Daniel, Sr. , and Martha (Eury) 
Kilday, early settlers of Hayfield Township, this county. Daniel, Sr. , was a 
native of Ireland, and settled on the farm now owned by our subject, though 
the land had been previously taken up by his wife, who came from eastern 
Pennsylvania. She was a school teacher, and taught both English and Ger- 
man. Sarah, the wife of Daniel, Jr., was a daughter of Jacob and Mary 
(Evans) Zarley, early settlers of Hayfield Township, this county. Daniel, Sr., 
had three children: Thomas, Robert and Daniel, Jr., all now dead. The chil- 
dren of Daniel, Jr., were James A., Mary, Martha, Eliza (.Mrs. Freeman Ford), 
Jane (Mrs. Thomas Ralph), and Lavina (Mrs. Ebenezer Clark). Our subject 
has been twice married. His first wife was Sarah A., daughter of Joseph and 
Eliza (Mason) Dickson, to whom he was married in March, 1858. By this 



880 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

union there were three children: Eliza, Wanda (Mrs. Howard Dowdell) and 
James A. Our subject's present wife is Viola, daughter of Martin and Eliza- 
beth (Jones) Johnson, of Meadville, to whom he was married on March 29, 
1874. The issue of this union is three children: Maud M., Oscar and Laura. 
Mr. Kilday served in the late war of the Rebellion. He enlisted in Company 
H, One Hundred and Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, October, 
1862; served nine months, when he was honorably discharged. He has filled 
various ofSces in his township. In politics is a Republican. 

HENRY LANKTON, farmer, P. O. Haytield, was born in Cattaraugus 
County, N. Y., May 12, 1832; son of Amasa and Lydia (Little) Lankton. 
Amasa was a native of Hartford, Conn., and settled in Haytield Township, this 
county, in 1842; afterward moved to Illinois and died there. Lydia, his wife, 
was a daughter of Henry Little, an early settler of Haytield Township, this 
county, and after whom Little's Comers derives its name. He was a soldier 
of the Revolution. The children of Amasa and Lydia Lankton were three in 
number : Lucy (IVIra. Farnsworth), Arba, died at Vicksburg during the war, 
and Henry. Our subject was married March 29, 1854, to Mary, daughter of 
Abram and Rebecca (Huber) LeFever, of Haytield Township, this county, and 
by whom he has three children : Anna (Mrs. Philo Morse), Tinnie (Mrs. 
Andrew DeArment) and Cora. Mr. Lankton has lived on his present farm 
since 1871. Both he and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. He 
has served four years as School Director of bis township; in politics is a 
Republican. 

JAMES E. LEWIS, retired farmer, P. O. Saegerstown, was born in Fayette 
County, Penn., July 5, 1796; son of George and Betsey (West) Lewis, who 
came to Meadville, this county, in 1800, and in 1801 settled in Cussewago 
Township, where George died in 1802, leaving a family of nine children, viz. : 
John, George, Nancy, Betsey, Nathaniel, Abel, James E., Patty and Polly, all 
now deceased but James E. Our subject, at the age of eighteen, settled in 
Haytield Township, this county, and for three years rented a farm of David 
Mason, and then purchased twenty-tive acres of land, year by year adding to 
it until he accumulated 209 acres, most of which he cleared and improved and 
a part of which he now resides on. He has done a great deal of hard work, in 
fact, few people of the present time realize he could have accomplished so 
much. He was married in February, 1817, to Rachel, daughter of Jacob and 
Mary (Evans) Zarle}', who were early settlers of Haytield Township. By this 
union there were tive children, three now living : Jacob Z., Mary (Mrs. John 
Crawford), and Lavina (Mrs. Walter Sloan). Mr. Lewis has resided on his 
farm since 1814. He never attended school a day in his life, but possessing 
brains and a business tact has been a successful farmer. At the advanced age 
of eighty-eight years he is still hale and hearty, though a great suflferer 
from rheumatism, the result of hardship and trials of pioneer life. He has 
been a member of the Seventh Day Baptist Church for many years. In politics 
he was formerly a Whig, but joined the Republican party at its organization 
and has been a stanch adherent of it ever since. 

HENRY P. LILLY, farmer, P. O. Mosiertown, was born in Saegertown, 
this county, February 7, 1840, and is a son of Samuel and Esther (Beize) Lil- 
ly. Samuel, in his youth, learned the trades of blacksmith, shoe-maker and 
carpenter, though during most of his life he followed farming. He came from 
Northumberland County, Penn., and settled in Saegertown in 1835, and there 
married; then afterward lived in Venango Township, this county, several 
years, on what is known as the Tarr farm. In 1871 he located in Cussewago 
Township, this county, and where he died in March, 1880, in his sixty- third 



HAYFIELD TOWNSHIP. 881 

year, where his widow now resides. His children were Kate (Mrs. George 
Heist), Henry P., Mary (Mrs. Charles Bush), James, Andrew, Alice (Mrs. 
Edward Kern), John, Sarah (Mrs. John Dieterman), Julia (Mrs. S. Snyder) and 
Frank. Our subject was married September 10, 1868, to Mary A., daughter 
of William Schultz, of Hayfield Township, this county, and by this union there 
are five children: Samuel G., William E., Charles E., Nancy D. and Ettie B. 
Mr. Lilly has resided permanently on his present farm since 1873. He is one 
of the representative farmers in the northern part, of the township. In politics 
he is a Republican. 

WILLIAM H McGILL (deceased) was born in Venango County, Penn., 
January 21, 1844, and was a son of William H. and Elizabeth (Weikal) 
McGill. His paternal grandfather was Patrick McGill, a native of Ireland, 
who settled in Woodcock Township, this county, in 1795. Our subject was 
reared in Hayfield Township and was educated in the common schools. He was 
in the late war of the P»ebellion, having enlisted August 15, 1861, in Company 
B, Eighty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry; he re-enlisted 
February 15, 1864; was promoted Second Lieutenant Company E, new organ- 
ization, December 28, 1864, commissioned First Lieutenant February 17, 1865, 
and was honorably discharged with the regiment March 17, 1865; he was in 
all the important engagements participated in by the regiment: the siege of 
Yorktown, Hanover Court House, Malvern Hill, Bull Run, Antietam, Fred- 
ericksburg, Gettysburg, etc. Mr. McGill was married December 27, 1866, to 
Eveline, daughter of David and Lucy (Lawton) Wheeler, of New York, by 
whom he has five children: Elizabeth, Alonzo, Joseph, Maud and Belle. He 
settled on the farm now occupied by his widow in 1881, though he had owned 
the property since 1874. Our subject was a man of executive ability, sterling 
qualities, and was a worthy citizen. He was a member of the K. of R. and the 
I. O. O. F. ; in politics he was a stanch Republican. He died March 21, 1882, 
in his thirty-ninth year. 

JAMES McMILLEN, farmer, P. O. Hayfield, was born in Hayfield Town- 
ship, this county, May 15, 1814, son of James and Mary (Thompson) McMil- 
len, who settled in Hayfield Township in 1794. They came from the north of 
Ireland, and settled on the farm now occupied by their son John in the north- 
ern part of the township, which they cleared and improved. Both were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian Church and lived and died on the home farm. They 
had six children: Thomas (deceased), James, Jane (deceased), Robert and 
John (twins), and David (deceased). The subject of this sketch was married 
November 10, 1839, to Martha, daughter of Eli Williams, formerly of New 
York, and who settled in Summerhill Township, this county, in 1831. By 
this union there are eight children: Adelia (Mrs. Harvey Rockwell), Clara 
(Mrs. Frank Weller), Minnie (Mrs. Thomas Cooper), Delilah M. (Mrs. Reuben 
Deeter), Emma (Mrs. Hiram McCray), Sarah, Alice (Mrs. Joseph Barns) 
and J. Wallace (married to Livona Fou.st). Mr. McMillen has resided since 
1839 on his farm, all of which he has cleared and improved. Both he and his 
wife have been members of the Methodist Episcopal Church since 1838. In 
politics he was formerly a Democrat, but joined the Republican party at its 
ox'ganizatioD, and has been a stanch supporter of it ever since. 

JOHN McMILLEN, farmer, P. O. Rundell's, was born in Hayfield Town- 
ship, this county, on the farm where he now resides, February 14, 1818, and 
is a son of James and Mary (Thompson) McMillen. James was a native of 
Ireland, of Scotch parents, and came to America when sixteen years of age 
with a brother, Robert. He settled in what is now Hayfield Township, this 
county, in 1799, locating on the farm where our subject resides, which he 



882 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

cleared and improved, and where he lived and died. His wife was a daughter 
of James Thompson, a native of Ireland, and settled in Beaver Township, 
this county, in 1802; afterward removed to Spring Township, and there died. 
The subject of this sketch was married July 4, 1839, to Jane, daughter of 
William and Caroline (Rundel) Bradley, of Haj'lield Township, this county, 
and by this union there are seven children, now living: William, Caroline 
(Mrs. Abner McDowell), Jane (Mrs. John Sloan), Ada, James, Mary and Mar- 
tha. Mr. McMillen has always lived in Hayfield Township on the farm where 
he was born and raised. In politics he has always been a stanch Democrat. 

JOHN H. MOORE, Meadville, was born in County Leitrim, Ireland, 
November 1 2, 1816, son of Edward and Mary A. (Irwin) Moore, who came to 
America in 1819. In 1824 they located in Youngstown, Ohio, and lived and 
died there. Edward was a brick-layer and stone-mason by trade. The subject of 
this sketch was raised in Youngstown and educated in the common schools, and 
afterward took a course of instruction at the Allegheny College of Meadville, 
Penn., which he left three weeks before he would have graduated. In 1839 
he went to Clarion County, Penn., and embarked in the iron business with 
Rev. Ralph Clapp. Here he remained eighteen years, and then returned to 
Youngstown, where he engaged in farming; lived there until 1864, then 
removed to Haytield Township and settled on the farm where he has since 
resided. He was married April 25, 1838, to Laura, daughter of Jonathan 
Weller, an early settler of Mead Township. By this union there were six 
children: Edward L., of Cleveland, Ohio; Clinton F., of Venango County, 
Penn.; Mary A. (Mrs. Levi Birch), of Vernon Township, this county; Homer 
C, Emily S. and Martha W. Mr. Moore is one of the representative farmers 
of Hayfield Township; a stanch Republican. He is a member of the United 
Brethren Church, his wife of the Presbyterian. 

WILLIAM V. MORSE, farmer, P. O. Hayfield, was born in Burlington, 
N. Y., August 7, 1816, son of William C. and Triphena (Bradley) Morse. His 
paternal grandfather was Timothy Morse, a native of Massachusetts, of 
English descent, who settled in Otsego County, N. Y. , before the Revolution. 
He was a soldier under Gen. Washington, serving three years. Two years of 
the time he was one of Washington's body guard. His maternal grandfather 
was Azariah Bradley, a native of New England, aud an early settler of Otsego 
County, N. Y., where he lived and died. William C. Morse had six children, 
viz.: W^illiam V.; Sally M. (Mrs. Nelson Cornwell), in Lawrence, Mich.; Eras- 
tus W^., in Brushville, Wis.; Arminda, deceased; Milo, deceased; and Triphena 
(Mrs. Lorenza McKee), in Dakota. William C. lived in Hayfield Township 
for a time with our subject, and while on a journey was killed by the cars at 
Cambridge, Penn. The subject of this sketch came to this county in 1837, 
and settled in Summerhill Township, where he lived five years; then went to 
Woodcock Township, where he remained one year, working at the trade of 
carding and cloth dressing. In 1844 he located at Little's Corners, working 
at his trade until 1853, in which year he settled on the farm where he now 
resides, and continued at his trade there for three years; then selling his 
machinery, in 1858, he built a saw-mill, and has since manufactured a 
great quantity of lumber and shingles. Mr. Morse has been twice married. 
His first wife was Margaret, daughter of William and Margaret (Brown) Mat- 
thews, to whom he was married May 17, 1888. By this union there were nine 
children: Margaret T. (Mrs. John McKelvey), Mary (Mrs. H. Coon), John, 
Sarah (Mrs. Sylvester McMillen), Martha (Mrs. David Jenkins), William, 
Harriet (Mrs. Amos McMillen), James and George. His present wife is Car- 
oline, daughter of William McKelvey, of Hayfield Township, this county, to 



HAYFIELD TOWNSHIP. 883 

■whom he was married June 16, 1854, and by whom he has one child — Emma 
M. Mr. Morse has a fine farm of ninety-five acres, on which he resides, all of 
•which he has cleared and improved. He is one of the enterprising, pushing 
farmers of the township, and a worthy citizen. In politics he is independent. 

LEVI PETERS, farmer, P. O. Saegerstown, was born in what is now 
Hayfield Township, this county, January 16, 1821; son of Jacob, Jr., and 
May (Siverling) Peters. His paternal grandfather was Jacob Peters, Sr. , who 
settled in Venango Township, this county, in 1804; afterward located in Hay- 
field Township, where he died. His maternal grandfather was Christopher 
Siverling, who settled in Venango Township in 1796. Jacob, Jr., had ten 
children: Samuel, in Erie County; George (deceased); Lydia (deceased); 
Saloma (Mrs. Peter Smith): Levi; John; David, in Oregon; Caroline (Mrs. George 
Kleckner); Jacob, and Edward (deceased). Our subject was married January 
16, 1842, to Eliza, daughter of John and Sarah (Graft) Liephart, of Hayfield 
Township, this county. Mr. Peters has seven children, seventeen grand- 
children and one great-grandchild, and there has never been a death among 
his de.scendants up to May, 1884. His children are Lydia A. (Mrs. Stephen 
Woodring), Sarah A. (Mrs. John Flick), Francis, Charles H., Augusta (Mrs. 
Jacob Fleischer), Tamzen (Mrs. Morgan Muckenhoupt), and Preston. Mr. 
Peters has been Supervisor and School Director of his township; in politics is 
a Democrat. 

ROBERT QUAY, farmer, P. O. Saegerstown, was born in Venango Town- 
ship, this county, September 14, 1813; son of Samuel and Mary (Carpenter) 
Quay, who came from Susquehanna, Penn., and settled in Venango Township, 
this county, in the year 1797, locating on the farm now owned by the John 
Quay heirs, which they cleared and improved, and where they lived and died. 
They had eight children; two died in infancy, the others lived up to manhood 
and womanhood, viz. : Archibald (deceased), Sarah (deceased), John (deceased), 
Elizabeth (deceased), Samuel and Robert. Samuel, Sr., lived to be eighty- 
thi-ee years old, and his wife was sixty-eight when she died. Robert Quay, 
our subject, was raised in Venango Township, this county. He remained with 
his parents until he was twenty-two years old. He then engaged in lumbering 
in Warren County, Penn., for several years, and in 1840 he settled in Hayfield 
Township, this county, on the farm where he now resides; has mostly cleared 
up the farm and put good substantial buildings thereon. He was married, 
December 24, 1843, to Elizabeth McGill; by this union there were six chil- 
dren: Samuel C. (deceased), James B. (deceased), Sarah A. (Mrs. Philip 
Spitler), Mary E. (Mrs. John Hower), Henry M., and John. After he was 
married he repaired an old stillhouse which stood on the land when he bought 
it, he moved into it and commenced clearing the 'timber from his land for 
tilling purposes. He raised several acres of potatoes each year for many 
years. He utilized his timber and built flat-boats and boated the potatoes to 
Pittsburgh, that being his only market. 

THOMAS C. REYNOLDS, farmer, P. O. Hayfield, was born in Hayfield Town- 
ship, this county,AprU 3,1830, and is a son of Thomas and Margaret (Dunn) Rey- 
nolds. Thomas was a native of Philadelphia; came to Crawford County, Penn., in 
1801, and lived inMeadville eleven years, workingduringthat time in the distil- 
lery for Judge Mead in the winters, and on his farm in summers. About 1815 he 
settled in Hayfield Township on the farm now owned by our subject, which he 
cleared and improved. Margaret, his wife, was a native of New Jersey, a 
daughter of Philip Dunn, who settled in Hayfield Township, this county, in 
1803. Thomas Reynolds had twelve children, of whom seven are now living, 
viz.: George, Jane, Priscilla (Mrs. John Huntj, Thomas C, Philip D., Ruth, 



884 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

and Sally A. (Mrs. John Collom). Our subject was in the late war of the 
Bebellion, having enlisted October, 1862, in Company H, One Hundred and 
Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He served one year, when he 
was honorably discharged on account of disability. He resides on part of the 
old homestead farm. In politics he is a Republican. 

FRANCIS SEAVY, farmer, P. O. Saegerstown, was born in Brownington, 
Vi, March 7, 1812; son of Ebenezer and Hannah (Eaton) Seavy, who settled 
in Mead Township, this county, in 1818, and in 1821 removed to what is now 
Hayfield Township, locating on the farm now known as the McQuiston farm, 
where they resided until 1831, and then moved to the farm now owned by 
Ebenezer Seavy, Jr., heirs, where they lived and died. Our subject has been 
a resident of Hayfield. Township since nine years of age. He was married 
January 28, 1833, to Lydia, daughter of George and Elizabeth (Mason) Lewis. 
Her paternal grandfather was George Lewis, and maternal grandfather, David 
Mason, both among the first settlers of Hayfield Township. The issue of this 
union was seven children: Hannah (Mrs. E. Schlosser), Elizabeth, Joanna 
(Mrs. David Hopkins), Sarah (Mrs. William H. Seavy), James (deceased), and 
two infants (deceased). Mr. Seavy has always followed farming as an occupa- 
tion. He was elected to the office of Justice of the Peace of Hayfield Town- 
ship, but declined to serve, and has held various township offices. Both he and 
his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics he is a 
Republican. 

SAMUEL SEAVY, farmer, P. O. Saegerstown, was born in Vermont, Sep- 
tember 21,1816, son of Ebenezer and Hannah (Eaton) Seavy, who settled in 
Mead Township, this countj', in 1818; removed to Hayfield Township in 1821, 
where they died. Ebenezer had twelve children: Mary (deceased), Francis, 
Charles (deceased), Samuel, Harriet (deceased), John (deceased), William (in 
Wisconsin), Ebenezer (deceased), Rebecca (deceased), Elizabeth (Mrs. J. Pike, 
in Richmond Township, this county), David, James (deceased). The subject 
of this sketch was married December 3, 1840, to Harriet, daughter of James 
and Hannah (Pratt) Freeman, early settlers of Mead Township, this county. 
By this union there were three children: James, William E., and Hannah L. 
(deceased). Mr. Seavy has resided in Hayfield Township since his father's 
settlement, with the exception of eighteen years that he spent in Wisconsin. 
Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He 
has held the office of School Director; in politics is a Republican. 

WILLIAM E. SEAVY, farmer, P. O. Saegerstown. was born in Hayfield 
Township, this county, October 16, 1843, son of Samuel and Harriet (Freeman) 
Seavy. His paternal grandfather was Ebenezer Seavy, a native of Vermont, 
who settled in Mead Township, this county, in 1818, and in 1821 removed to 
Hayfield Township. For many years he operated a saw-mill on French Creek, 
near Saegertown, afterward removed to the farm now owned by the Ebenezer 
Seavy, Jr., heirs, and there lived and died. Our subject's maternal grand- 
father, James Freeman, was among the first settlers of Hayfield Township; 
he settled on the farm now owned by Philetus Payne, which he cleared and 
improved, and though in those days land was cheap, he was twenty-one years 
in paying for it. Our subject, in 1844, went with his parents to Wisconsin, 
where he resided eighteen years. He served in the late war of the Rebellion, 
enlisting in July, 1861, in Company E, Seventh Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, 
and was in the battles of Gainesville, second battle Bull Run, South Mountain, 
Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Chancellorsville and many other 
engagements, including Cold Harbor, before Petersburg and the taking of the 
Weldon Railroad. In November, 1863, he was sent home as a Recruiting 



HAYFIELD TOWNSHIP. 885 

Officer, and rejoined his regiment at Cold Harbor in June, 1864; he was hon- 
orably discharged September 1, 1864. He located in Hayfield TowBship in 
1864, and was married July 23, 1865, to Jane B., daughter of William and 
Maria (Rideout) Southwick, of Richmond Township. By this union there were 
three children: Elpha L.. an infant (deceased) and Silas F. Mr. Seavy 
returned to Wisconsin in 1867, where he lived until 1870, when he returned 
to Hayfield Township, where, with the exception of two and a half years, 
during which he was in Shamburg, Penn., engaged in butchering and the 
oil business, he has since resided. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics he is a stanch Republican. 

JOHN F. SEAVY, farmer, P. O. Saegerstown, was bom in Columbia County, 
Wis., September 5, 1856, and is a son of Ebenezer, Jr., and Mary A. (War- 
den) Seavy, and grandson of Ebenezer Seavy, Sr., who settled in Mead Town- 
ship, this county, in 1818, and afterward moved to Hayfield Township, where 
he lived and died. Ebenezer, Jr., had four children: John F., Edgar E., 
Theodore G. and LeRoy E. Ebenezer, Jr., was a resident of Wisconsin for 
several years, returning to Hayfield Township in 1860, and settled on the old 
homestead of his father, where he died in 1868, at the age of forty-two. Mary, 
his wife, was a daughter of James Warden, formerly of New York, and an 
early settler of Cussewago Township. Our subject was married December 23, 
1875, to Maggie C, daughter of George and Mary (Moyer) Moyer, of Saeger- 
town, by whom he has one child — Alice D. Mr. Seavy resides on the old 
homestead of his father and grandfather. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church; his wife of the Lutheran. In politics he is a Republican. 

EDWARD S. SKEEL, lumberman and Justice of the Peace, Hay- 
field, was born in Hayfield Township, this county, October 11, 1837; son of 
Eliab and Sally A. (Wheeler) Skeel. Eliab was a native of Greene County, 
N. Y., and settled in Hayfield Township, this county, in 1829. He was a car- 
penter and millwright by trade, and put up a great many buildings in this 
county during his day. He was twice married; his first wife was Ruth Yale, 
of New York, by whom he had five children: Harriet (Mrs. Hastings Harronn, 
deceased); Abigail (Mrs. David Harronn), of Colorado; William, Gilbert 
and Ruth (Mrs. H. S. Amidon). His second wife was Sally A. Wheeler, a 
native of Steuben County, N. Y., daughter of Jenks and Amanda Wheeler, 
who were among the first settlers of Hayfield Township. By this union there 
were born: Nathan, Martha (deceased), Huldah (Mrs. William Krider), E. S., 
Stephen M., Amanda (Mrs. George Menely), Eliza (Mrs. A. L. Baker), Lewis 
W. (Lewis was killed December 13, 1862, at the battle of Fredericksburi,', Va.), 
Linus W. and Wheeler. The subject of this sketch has always resided in 
Hayfield Township. He was in the late war, having enlisted in August, 1861, 
in the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry; was in the second battle of Bull Run 
and other minor engagements, and at the defense of Washington during 
the battle of Antietam; he was honorably discharged on account of disability 
November 3, 1862. He again enlisted and became First Lieutenant of Com- 
pany D, Fifty-sixth Pennsylvania Militia, from June 29, 1861, to August 13, 
1863. He was mari-ied March 4, 1860, to Louisa, daughter of John F. and 
Jane (Rogers) Selby, of Tuscarawas County, Ohio, by whom he has five children 
now living: J. Barnard, Loa (Mrs. Frank Wasson), William, Edward S. and 
Frank. Mr. Skeel is a member of the I. O. O. F., the State Police, and G. A. 
R. He has held the ofiice of Constable six years, and is now serving his sec- 
ond term as Justice of the Peace; in politics is a stanch Republican. 

JACOB SMITH, fanner, P. O. Saegerstown, was born in Bavaria, Ger- 
many, March 15, 1819; son of Peter and Elizabeth (Speise) Smith, who settled 



886 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

in Woodcock Township, this county, in 1832, and in 1833 removed to Hayfield, 
where they lived and died. They located on the farm adjoining that of our 
subject, a part of which they improved. They had four children: Elizabeth 
(Mrs. Henry Peififer), Peter (deceased), Simon and Jacob. The subject of 
this sketch was married March 29, 1846, to Sarah C, daughter of Philip and 
Leah (Gehr) Straw, and grand-daughter of Jacob Straw, who settled in Hay- 
field Township, this county, in 1796. The issue of this union is six children: 
Abigail, Emma, Henry, Wallace, Alice and Maggie. Mr. Smith has been a 
resident of Hayfield Township since his father's settlement in 1833; he has 
always followed farming as an occupation, and is a representative, enterpris- 
ing citizen. He and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church of Saeger- 
town. In politics he is a Democrat. 

JAMES SMITH, farmer. P. O. Kundell's, was born in Hayfield Township, 
this county, April 7, 1821; son of Nelson and Polly (West) Smith, who came 
from Greene County, N. Y., and settled in what is now Hayfield Township, 
this county, in 1816; both were natives of New York. Nelson was a son of 
Elijah Smith, and settled on the farm now owned by our subject in 1816, 
which, with the assistance of his sons, he cleared and improved. He was a 
minister of the Methodist Episcopal denomination, a homeopathic physician, 
a blacksmith and shoe maker. In an early day he did all the blacksmithing 
and shoe-making in his vicinity. He was a man adapted to all kinds of work 
and when anything was needed to be done for himself or neighbors he gen- 
erally found a way to accomplish it. He died in 1868 at the age of seventy- 
seven and his widow in 1871 aged seventy-nine. They had eleven children: 
Emeline (wife of Rev. I. O. Fisher), John E., Nelson, Jesse, Ephraim, James, 
Betsey (Mrs. J. B. McDowell), Ensign H. (deceased), George W. S., Mary A. 
(deceased) and Irus H. (deceased). The subject of this sketch has been thrice 
married. His first wife was Adeline J. , daughter of John McDowell, of Dick- 
sonburg, to whom he was married February 1, 18-19, and by whom he had 
three children: Emelissa (deceased), M. Adell (Mrs. Edward Rogers), and 
Homer J. (deceased). His second wife was Sarah, daughter of Robert McCoy, 
of Spring Township, this county, to whom he was married June 9, 1864, and 
by this union there was one child — Sarah (deceased). His present wife is 
Lydia D., daughter of William Rundel, of Spring Township, this coanty, to 
whom he was married February 8, 1870. Mr. Smith resides on the old 
homestead, where he was born and raised. He is one of the representative 
farmers of this county, everything about his farm indicating thrift and enter- 
prise. Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
In politics he is a Republican. 

FERNANDO C. SMITH, farmer, P. O. Norrisville, was born in Chester, 
Mass., November 27, 1829, and is a son of Nelson and Sophia (Carrington) 
Smith, who settled in Hayfield Township, this county, in 1834, locating on 
the farm now owned by William Morehouse, which they cleared and improved. 
Nelson was a native of Massachusetts and a son of Joab Smith. His wife was 
a native of Connecticut and a daughter of Charles Carrington. His grand- 
father on his father's side was William Lonon, who was drafted into the Brit- 
ish Army during the Revolution. He refused to serve, deserted and joined the 
American Army and fought through the war, then settled near Boston. Nel- 
son Smith had nine children, seven of whom are now living: Lorenzo P., Fer- 
nando C, D'Lett (Mrs. Jefferson Line), Oscar B., D'Mira Z. (Mrs. Abram 
Eeymore), Mardilla (Mrs. A. C. Swift), William L. Our subject, who has 
always resided in Hayfield Township, was married April 15, 1857, to Jane E., 
daughter of Daniel Cartbi-, of Summerhill Township, this county, by whom he 



HATFIELD TOWNSHIP. 887 

has five children: Philander A., Elmore E., Verner, Floyd and Dennis. Mr. 
Smith has resided since his marriage on his present farm, most of which he 
cleared and improved. He has held various township offices; in politics is a 
Republican. 

STEPHEN SNYDER, farmer, P. 0. Saegerstown, was born in Lehigh 
County, Penn., December 27, 1822, and is a son of Solomon and Susanna 
(Schlosser) Snyder, who settled in the northern part of what is now Hayfield 
Township, this county, in 1829, where they cleared up a farm. Both lived and 
died in Hayfield Township. They had seven children: Solomon, Stephen, 
Susan (Mrs. William Reichel), Griffith (deceased), Amos, William and Edward. 
Our subject was married April 27, 1848, to Elizabeth, daughter of Andrew and 
Catherine (Shoe) Hinkle, of Cussewago Township, this county, and by this 
union is one child — Israel. Mr. Snyder has lived on his present farm since 
1847, all of which he has cleared and improved. He and his wife are attend- 
ants of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics he is a Republican. 

ISRAEL SNYDER, farmer, P. O. Saegerstown, was born in Hayfield 
Township, this county, March 21, 1849, and is a son of Stephen and Elizabeth 
(Hinkle) Snyder. His paternal grandfather, Solomon Snyder, settled in Hay- 
field Township in 1829, and his maternal grandfather, Andrew Hinkle, was an 
early settler of Cussewago Township. The subject of this sketch was the 
only child of his parents. He was'married May 19, 1870, to Esther D., daugh- 
ter of Frederick and Elizabeth (Henry) Hickernell, early settlers of Hayfield 
Township, this county, and by this union there were three children: Clarence 
(deceased). Jay W. and S. Dow. Mr. Snyder is an attendant of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, of which his wife is a member. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. 

WILLIAM L. STOCKTON, farmer and Justice of the Peace, P. 0. Saeg- 
erstown, was born in Mead Township, this county, December 25, 1843; son of 
John M. and Eliza (Logan) Stockton. His paternal grandfather was Robert 
Stockton, formerly of Washington County, and one of the first settlers of Ver- 
non Township, this county, where he lived and died. He served in the war of 
1812 and was the Colonel of his regiment His children were: Robert, Thomas 
(deceased), Maria, Joseph, John M. (deceased), Martha (deceased), Sarah, 
David B. and James. Our subject's father, John M., was bom in Vernon 
Township, this county, and was a resident of Mead Township twenty years. 
In 1855 he removed to Hayfield Township, where he died at the age of sixty- 
seven years. His wife was a daughter of Moses Logan, an early settler of 
Greenwood Township, this county, and a prominent citizen. John M. had ten 
children: Robert (deceased), Harvey H. (a Baptist clergyman, deceased), 
Moses (deceased), Clarinda (deceased), William L., Letitia (Mrs. J. Tenney), 
Cyrus J., James L., Eveline (Mrs. J. Smith), and Charlotte (deceased). Our 
subject was married May 7, 1862, to S. Jennie, daughter of Solomon and Mary 
A. Himebaugh, of Hayfield Township. The issue of this union was one child 
— Marie Elda. Mr. Stockton has been a resident of Hayfield Township since 
1855, and lived on his present farm since 1863. He is one of the representa- 
tive farmers of Crawford County; has held various township offices; and is now 
serving a second term as Justice of the Peace; in politics he is a Republican 
and a stanch advocate of temperance principles. He and his family are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Saegertown, in which he is holding 
the office of Steward. 

AMASA J. STRAW, farmer, etc., P. 0. Saegerstown, was born in Hayfield 
Township, this county, on the farm where he now resides, November 4, 1835; 
son of Michael and Rhoda (Brookhouser) Straw. Michael was born on the 



888 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

farm now owned by our subject, and was a son of Jacob Straw who settled on 
the same farm in 1796, which he cleared and improved. Jacob had five chil- 
dren: John, Michael, Philip, Betsy and Mary, all now deceased. Michael had 
eight children: Mary E. (Mrs. Chris. Siverling, deceased), Azariah, Hazro, 
Amasa, Delilah (Mrs. George Mason), Ellen, Sarah (deceased), and Simon 
(deceased). Ehoda, the wife of Michael, was a daughter of Jacob Brookhouser, 
one of the first settlers of Hayfield Township. Our subject was married 
December 14, 1869, to Louisa, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Smith) Peif- 
fer, and grand- daughter of John Peifier, an early settler of Bloomfield Town- 
ship and later of Woodcock Township, this county. By this union there are 
two children: Simon and Elizabeth. Mr. Straw has always resided on the old 
homestead. He and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church, Saeger- 
town. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. In politics he is a Democrat. 

DAVID A. TORRY, farmer, P. O. Venango, was born in Venango Town- 
ship, this county, September 1, 1833: son of Archibald and Margaret (Adams) 
Torry. His paternal grandparents were James and Margaret (Alexander) 
Torry, natives of Ireland, who were married in Virginia, and came from there 
to this county in 1802, locating in what is now Venango Township, on the 
farm now owned by George Cole, which, with the assistance of his sons, he 
cleared and improved. Margaret, the wife of Archibald, was a daughter of 
David and Barbara (Wilson) Adams, who were among the early settlers of 
what is now Cambridge Township, this county. James and Margaret Torry 
had ten children: Hamilton, Archibald, Martha, Mary, David, James, John, 
Susan, William and Jane. Archibald Torry had ten children: David A., 
James M., William M. (deceased), John E., Archibald A., Martha J. (Mrs. C. 
Byham), Rebecca L. (Mrs. Robert Quay), Elijah, Mary (Mrs. Mark Shields), 
and Margaret L. Mr. and Mrs. A. Torry are still living, and occupy a part of 
the farm where his parents first settled. The subject of this sketch was a 
resident of Venango Township up to 1866; from that time until 1868 he lived 
in Woodcock Township, and then located in Hayfield Township, where he now 
resides. He was married January 9, 1866, to Rebecca, daughter of Henry 
and Elizabeth (Smith) Peifier. of Hayfield Township, this county. Both he 
and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a F. & A. 
M., a member of the I. O. O. F. and A. O. U. W. In politics he is a Dem- 
ocrat. 

HARRISON WASSON, farmer, P. O. Coon's Comers, was born in Fair- 
field Township, this county, December 25, 1821; son of William and Eliza- 
beth (Marshall) Wasson. His jiaternal grandfather was Daniel Wasson, a 
native of Ireland, who came to America in 1774, joined Gen. Washiugton's 
army and fought through the war of the Revolution. He was one of the first 
settlers of Scrubgrass Township, Venango Co., Penn. The children of 
William were ten in number: Harrison, Nathaniel M., Daniel, William, 
James, John (deceased), Joseph (deceased), Mary E., Elizabeth and Sarah J. 
Mr. Wasson was a veteran of the war of 1812, and enlisted in the late war of 
the Rebellion, when seventy years of age. He died in the hospital at St. 
Louis, Mo., of small-pox, in 1863. The subject of this sketch was married 
February 26, 1846, to Sarah J., daughter of John and Jane (Gibb) Watt, of 
Butler County, Penn. The issue of this union was ten children: John 
(deceased), Elizabeth (Mrs. R. E. Morris), Mary J. (Mrs. Lewis Armstrong), 
Adeline (Mrs. C. F. Moore), L. Franklin, William O., Sarah C. (deceased), Maggie, 
Howard and Clinton. Mrs. Wasson's father was John Watt, a native of Scot- 
land, and an early settler of Butler County. Mr. Wasson located in Hayfield 
Township, this couaty, in 1865, where he has since resided. He is one of the 



HATFIELD TOWNSHIP. 889 

representative farmers of his township, and has held various township ofiSces. 
In politics he is a Republican. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Presbyterian Church. 

CONRAD WATSON, farmer, P. O. Norrisville, was born in Hayfield Town- 
ship, this county, July 28, 1821; son of William and Magdalena (Cole) Wat- 
son. William was a native of County Derry, Ireland, a son of George Watson, 
and settled in Haytield Township in 1818. His wife was a daughter of Con- 
rad Cole, who was said to be the first man to come over the Alleghenies with 
a team and wagon, and who settled in Hayfield Township in 1802. He was a 
native of Lehigh County, Penn., a son of George Cole, whose parents came 
from Prussia. William Watson had eight children: Conrad, George W., Caroline 
(Mrs. Diivid Hosier), Eliza A. (Mrs. Phil Shaffer), Matilda (deceased), William, 
Mary (Mrs. Ben Cole), and Robert. The subject of this sketch was mar- 
ried April 6, 1848, to Mary E., daughter of John and Sarah (Carroll) Sims, 
formerly of Maryland, and early settlers of Hayfield Township. To this 
unioa were born ten children: George A., William A., Sarah E. (Mrs. Milton 
Standford), Frank C, Minerva E. (Mrs. George Jenkins), Clara D. (Mrs. 
William Ludwig), Mary E., Alma R. (deceased), Wanda A., Ward T. Mr. 
Watson has cleared several farms in Hayfield Township, and has lived on his 
present one since 1850. He began without a dollar, and is now one of the 
substantial farmers of the township. He has held various township offices. 
In politics he is a stanch Republican. 

GEORGE W. WATSON, farmer, P. O. Hayfield, was born in Hayfield Town- 
ship, this county, June 2, 1824, son of William and Magdalena (Cole) Watson. 
William was a native of Killymallaugh, County Derry, Ireland, and settled in 
Haytield Township in 1818. He was a son of George Watson. The maternal 
grandfather of our subject was Conrad Cole, who settled in Hayfield Township 
in 1802. William Watson was a linen weaver by trade, and came to America 
with the determination to better his condition, and in 1825 he settled on the 
farm now occupied by our subject, which he cleared and improved with the 
assistance of his boys. He was a man of stern convictions; an upright 
citizen. He died in 1858 at the age of sixty-seven. The subject of this 
sketch was married July 4, 1850, to Mary, daughter of Israel and Catherine 
(Minium) Berlin, by whom he has four children: Adelia (Mrs. William A. 
Selby), John C, Alvira (Mrs. Edgar S. Harroun) and Charles A. Israel Ber- 
lin was a soldier in the war of 1812, and his father, Isaac Berlin, a soldier in 
the Revolution. He settled in Woodcock Township in 1807. Our subject 
resides on the old Watson homestead, where he has always lived with the 
exception of ten years. He is a member of the I. 0. O. F., and the State 
Police; has held nearly all the offices in the gift of his township; was elected 
County Commissioner in 1872, serving one term; in politics he is a Repub- 
lican. 

ROBERT WATSON, farmer. P. O. Haytield, was born in Hayfield Town- 
ship, this county, October 28, 1839, and is a son of William and Magdalene 
(Cole) Watson. William was a native of Ireland, son of George Watson, and 
settled in Haytield Township, this county, in 1818. Magdalene, his wife, was 
a daughter of Conrad Cole, said to.be the first man to accomplish the feat of 
coming over the Alleghenies with a team and wagon, and who settled in Hay- 
field Township in 1802. The subject of this sketch was raised in his native 
township; has been a resident of Woodcock Township one year, Summerhill 
Township two years, and Vernon Township nine years, and has lived in Hay- 
field Township the balance of his time. He was married August 22, 1801, to 
Henrietta, daughter of Henry and Susan (Peiffer) Forham, early settlers of 



890 BIOaRAFHICAL SKETCHES: 

Hayfield Township, this county, and by this union there are four children: 
Eva (Mrs. Augustus Hanks), George, Anna and William. Mr. Watson has 
resided on his present farm since 1882. He is a member of the State Police. 
In politics a Republican. 

READING WILSON, farmer and blacksmith, P. O. Meadville, was born 
in Bucks County, Penn., October 6, 1823, son of John and Betsy (Himel- 
wright) Wilson, who settled in Meadville, this county, in 1826, and in 1827 
.removed to Woodcock Township, this county, and settled on the farm now 
occupied by the widow of Francis Wilson, which they cleared and improved, 
and where John Wilson died in 1848 at the age of sixty-nine. Oui- subject 
resided in Woodcock Township until eighteen years of age, and then went to 
Meadville to learn the blacksmith's trade, at which he worked three yeai's 
there. He then located in McGuffintown, in Haylield Township, and opened 
a blacksmith shop, where he has worked at his trade up to the present time. 
In 1849 he purchased the farm, where he now resides, of his brother-in-law, 
John H. Culbertson, which he has since that time carried on in connection 
with his other business. Our subject was married March 22, 1849, to Catherine 
G., daughter of Robert and Alice (Frazier) Dickson, former a native of Scot- 
land and a son of James Dickson, generally known as " Scotch Jimmie," who 
first came to Meadville in 1793, settled in Meadville in 1794, and then on 
the farm now owned by our subject in 1796. On reaching Meadville Robert 
Dickson was enrolled in the militia and performed military duty with the 
men when but nine years of age, serving with credit to himself and danger 
to the redskins. For this service he was afterward awarded a State pension. 
Then in 1811 he was commissioned by Gov. Simon Snyder for four years Lieu- 
tenant of the first company of the One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Regiment 
of the militia of Pennsylvania in the First Brigade of the Sixteenth Division, 
composed of the militia of the counties of Beaver, Butler, Mercer, Crawford, 
Erie, Venango and Warren. He took part in the war of 1812 and for 
patriotic services in that struggle was given a United States pension. After 
his father's death Mr. Dickson inherited a part of the old homestead, on 
which he lived for over three-quarters of a century. He was regarded as 
a man of strict integrity, highly esteemed and respected by his neighbors. 
He died in the ninetieth year of his age. Mrs. Wilson's maternal grandfather 
was Roderick Frazier, a native of Scotland, who served in the British Army 
under Cornwallis, and after the close of the war located in Carlisle, Penn. ; 
in 1806 settled in Hayfield Township, this county, where he died at the 
age of seventy-five. Our subject by his marriage has had five children: Alice 
E. (deceased), Kate E. (Mrs. J. C. Dickson), Wanda A. E. (deceased), J. R. 
Eugene (deceased) and William H. Mr. Wilson has served his township as 
School Director. In politics he is a Republican. 



MEAD TOWNSHIP. 891 



MEAD TOWNSHIP. 

L. BENNINGHOFF, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born m Venango 
County, Penn., April 9, 1852, and is a son of George and Julia Ann (Baney) 
Benninghoff, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. George Ben- 
ninghoff. who was a farmer, raised a family of live children, of whom L. is the 
third. Our subject received his training in the common schools and finished 
his education at the Commercial College of Meadville. He embarked in the 
oil business early in life, continuing in the same for seven years, but now 
resides on the farm of eighty acres, belonging to his father, who is now living 
a retired life in Meadville. Our subject was married in 1877, to Emma 
daughter of George Cole. Their children are — Mabel, George V. , and Nor- 
man. Mrs. Benninghoff is a member of the Lutheran Church. In his poli- 
tics Mr. Benninghoff is a Bepublican. 

C. M. BRAWLEY, farmer, P. O. Bousson, was born September 12, 1852 
in Mead Township, this county, son of Francis and Eleanor (Stewart) BraTvjey' 
natives of Pennsylvania and of Irish descent, the former born February W 
1806, in Crawford County, Penn., and the latter August 21, 1806, jn Erie 
County, Peon. James and Mary (Glenn) Brawley, the parents of Francis 
Brawley, came to this county about 1800, and nine of their children grew ud 
four of them now living, viz. : Francis, James, Harriet and Sarah. The father 
was in the war of 1812. Francis Brawley, whose portrait appears in this 
work, is now living two miles west of the old home farm. He was married in 
1838 to Eleanor Stewart, who died in 1876, and to this union were born six 
children, four of whom are now living, viz. : Sabina E., married to John Pow- 
ell; Marion F., married to Adelia Kelley; Mary E. and Charles M. Mrs. 
Brawley was a member of the Methodist Church, to which denomination Mr. 
Brawley also belongs. He is owner of 110 acres of excellent land. C M. 
Brawley, the subject of this sketch, was married in 1876 to Miss Cena Chase 
a daughter of John Chase, the result of which union is one child — Rov. He 
and his wife are sincere Methodists and take an active interest in the Sabbath- 
school in their neighborhood, of which Mrs. Brawley is the Superintendent. 
The Brawley family are mentioned elsewhere in this volume. 

HUGH P. BRAWLEY, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in this town- 
ship, April 24, 1853, and is a son of John R. and Sarah (Haskins) Brawley, 
the father a native of Pennsylvania, the mother of New York, and descend- 
ants of Dutch and Irish ancestry. John R. was a successful farmer.?* He 
died in 1877. He raised a family of six children, of whom Hugh P. is' the 
youngest. Our subject finished his education in the State Normal School at 
Edinboro, in Erie County. He was married in 1875 to Florence, a daughter 
of James Hamilton, and they have four sons: John, Lee, Hariy and Milton. 
He is the owuer of 170 acres of land, 150 of which are in this township. 
Politically Mr. Brawley is a Democrat. 

WILLIAM BUCHANAN, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in this town- 
ship, September 8, 1827, and is a son of Alexander and Caroline (Compton) 
Buchanan, natives of Pennsylvania, the former a farmer of Scotch-Irish, the lat- 
ter of Welsh descent, and both early settlers of this county. They had a family 
often children. The father died in 1867, the mother following in 1873. Will- 



892 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

iam was their eldest child, and he and three brothers served their country in 
the late war. Robert was Lieutenant-Colonel of his regiment. Edward and 
David were in Sherman's army, with Gen. Hooker's corps. William Buchanan 
was in the Sewnd Ohio Volunteer Infantry as Second Sergeant, and re-enlisted 
in the One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Since the 
war he has followed farming. In politics he is a Republican. 

C. BTAM, farmer and carpenter, P. O. Meadville, was born in this county, 
November 15, 1826, and is a son of John and Abigail (Oaks) Byam, natives of 
Massachusetts. The father, a pioneer of this county, in the early part of his 
career conducted a saw-mill and latterly farmed. Our subject, who is the 
sixth child of a family of seven boys and four girls, received a common school 
training and worked on the farm till his majority, since which he has mostly 
followed carpentering. He owns a farm of fifty-five acres. He was married in 
1851 to Wilhelmina L. Scott, and this union has been blessed with eight chil- 
dren, of whom seven are now living — four sons and three daughters. Mr. 
Byam has served his district six years as School Director. In politics he is a 
Democrat. 

REV. EUGENE COGNEVILLE, Catholic priest, P. O. Frenchtown, was 
born in France, September 13, 1840, son of Nicholas and Margaret (Mangel) 
Cogneville, also natives of France, the former of whom had been a wine grower 
in his native land, and is now living with his son (our subject) at Frenchtown; 
his wife died in France in 1862. Our subject was educated chiefly in the 
schools of his native country, but completed his tuition in the schools of St. 
Vincent, Latrobe, Perm., to which place he came in 1864. Two years later 
he was ordained at Erie, Penn., by Right Rev. Young, and entered upon his 
labors at St. Hippolytus Church, of Frenchtown, where he has a copgregation 
of about 600. 

DAVID COMPTON, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was bom in Meadville, March 
14, 1810, and is a son of David and Rebecca (Perrine) Compton, the former of 
New Jersey, the latter of Virginia. His father was the youngest son in his 
family and, in accordance with the family custom, the youngest son was named 
David, which custom has been continued through four generations. Our subject's 
father, a carpenter and farmer, came to this county in 1794; he was a soldier in 
the war of 1812, but was only required to go as far as Erie City. He was 
twice married and raised sixteen children, our subject being the youngest son 
by the first wife. He received his schooling in the country and has made 
farming his life work. For many years he was Captain of a military com- 
pany, called Crawford County Volunteers. He was married in 1835 to Eliza 
N., daughter of John Brooks, who was at one time Assistant Judge of this 
county. Their children are — Col. John B., David P., Margaret (deceased), 
Nancy D., A. Blanche, and Marion C. Mr. and Mrs. Comptom are members 
of the Presbyterian Church, of which he has been for many years an Elder. 

JAMES DANIELS, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in Randolph Town- 
ship, this county, October, 3, 1846, and is a son of Samuel J. and Juliette 
Daniels, the father a farmer, a native of this county and now a resident of 
Randolph Township; the mother a native of Vermont They had a family 
of five children, of whom James is the second. Our subject was educated 
in the common school, and has chosen as his life work the calling of a farmer; 
he now owns fifty acres of land in a high state of cultivation. He was married 
in 1866; his wife died in 1879, leaving four children: Wilber L., Anna 
Adell, Hattie and Ella. He was again married in 1883. Mrs. Daniels is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Daniels is a Democrat; he 
holds the office of Constable. 



MEAD TOWNSHIP. 895 

CAPT. JAMES H. DAVIS, farmer, P. O. Pettis, was born in Mead Town- 
ship, this coaatj, September 29, 1815, son of Patrick and Isabella (Linsley) 
Davis, natives, the former of Berks County, Penn., of Welsh descent, the lat- 
ter of Ireland, of Irish extraction. His father came to Meadville in 1796, in 
company with six brothers, all of whom bought property, but three of th& 
number became discouraged and returned to their native county. Patrick 
operated a tannery for many years in Meadville. He was twice married. Our 
subject, who is the eldest child by his father's second marriage, received a com- 
mon school education and was brought up on a farm. He was married in 
1839 to Sarah Stockton, a native of Pennsylvania and of English descent^ 
which union has been without issue. They are members of the United Pres- 
byterian Church. He has been Justice of the Peace, School Director, Super- 
visor, Assessor and Auditor of Mead Township. He was Commissioned Captain 
of a militia company by Gov. David R. Porter, of Pennsylvania, August 3, 
1842, and held the same until the law governing militia organizations was 
nullified. He began life for himself at the age of twenty-one, when he obtained 
a deed for the farm where he now resides, and which he has cleared, making 
it one of the best farms in the township. He has paid out $12,550 for land 
during his life and he now possesses a large amount of property, th& 
result of the efforts of himself and wife. He built and operated a saw-mill on 
his farm, and has an interest in the Warner Cheese Factory. He has always 
been' active in the interests of his township, and, with William Warner, was a 
solicitor for aid to construct the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio Railroad, 
from their own township and others. In politics he is a Democrat. His portrait 
appears elsewhere in this volume. His wife's father, Col. Robert Stockton, was 
the fourth child of Robert and Mary (McKenny) Stockton, who were the parents 
of eight children: Thomas, Margaret (married to Col. John Cotton, who was 
once an Elder in a church at Meadville), Frances (married to Charles Stewart), 
Col. Robert (once an Elder in a Meadville church), Jane (married to Rev. 
John Brice), John, Rev. Joseph, and Elizabeth (piarried to Rev. James Cun- 
ningham). Of these. Rev. Joseph was born February 25, 1779, in the neigh- 
borhood of Chambersburg, Penn., and in 1784 the family left that plao© 
for a settlement on a farm, in the vicinity of Washington, the county seat of 
Washington County, Penn. He was married May 8, 1800, to Esther Clark, a 
daughter of David Clark, and soon after became an inhabitant, with hia bosom 
friend, of Meadville, this county, which was the first settlement formed in 
Pennsylvania, north of Pittsburgh and west of the Allegheny River and Cone- 
wango Creek, initiated by Gen. David Mead in 1787. On June 23, 1801, h» 
was ordained and installed the first pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Mead- 
ville. During the nine years he resided here, he had charge of the Meadvill& 
Academy, together with the Presbyterian congregations of Meadville and Con- 
neaut Lake. Rev. Joseph Stockton is mentioned elsewhere in this work. 

HENRY J. DEWEY, farmer, P. 0. Meadville, was born in Mead Town- 
ship, this county. May 17, 1832, and is a son of Stillman and Susan (Scott) 
Dewey, natives of Massachusetts and of English descent. His father came 
when young to this county; was a blacksmith by trade; be raised a family of 
six childreQ, of whom Henry is the eldest After receiving the usual district 
school education our subject devoted himself to agriculture, which he has 
made his life work; has also been in the oil business to some extent; he is at 
present conducLing a dairy, selling milk ia the city of Meadville. He was mar- 
ried in 1854 to Phoeba Phelps, who died in 1863, leaving one daughter, Sarah, 
now Mrs. Adolphus Hicks. He was again married in 1868, to Martha J., 
daughter of James aud Sarah (Paltock) Plaw, who were English and early 



894 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

settlers of Crawfond County; they have an adopted son — Walter S. Mrs. 
Dewey is a member of the Baptist Church, and in 1882 was elected School 
Director, the first lady ever elected to that office in this township. Her long 
experience of thirty-seven terms as a teacher, twenty of them in this township, 
coupled with the fact that she was so successful a teacher that she never found 
any difficulty in obtaining a school, but was always in demand by different 
sections, certainly warranted her election. In politics Mr. Dewey is inde- 
pendent. His farm includes eighty-eight acres. 

ISAAC S. DOANE, civil engineer and farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born 
April 30, 18l8, in Massachusetts, son of Reuben and Hannah (Slayton) Doane, 
natives of Massachusetts, and of Scotch descent. Reuben Doane was a sea 
Captain, and in one of bis voyages was shipwrecked in the Atlantic, losing his 
entire wealth, after which his son, Isaac S., caied for his wants. Our subject 
received an academic education at a Baptist institution in Worcester, Mass. 
He made the study of mathematics a specialty, and chose civil engineering as 
a profession, which he has successfully continued through life, commencing 
when seventeen years old on the Western, now Albany & Boston Railroad, 
under Maj. Whisler, of the United States Army, and there remained sixteen 
years. He next surveyed for eighteen months on the Rome & Watertown 
Railroad; next on the Sackett's Harbor & Ellisburg Railroad; then on the 
Potsdam & Watertown Railroad; next was chief engineer on the Oswego & 
Rome Railroad; following that he surveyed the route for the Oswego & New 
York Midland Railroad, and was appointed chief engineer of the Lake Ontario 
Shore Railroad; afterward surveyed the Boston, Hoosac Tunnel & Albany Rail- 
road, and many other works of a greater or less degree of magnitude, includ- 
ing a portion of the Atlantic & Great Western, the St. Louis & Mt. Vernouj 
and considerable work on some of the roads in Canada. When sixteen years 
of age Mr. Doane purchased a small farm for $1,000, making a payment of $10 
on the amount, and his earnest will and busy hands were set to work to obtain 
means to pay the balance, which was accomplished in one year, he having real- 
ized $500 by grafting and budding trees, $300 from one acre of musk melons, 
by teaching school in winter and making boots and shoes. Mr. Doane has 
been defrauded out of many just accounts, but is, nevertheless, the possessor 
of a beautiful farm and other property, besides what he has deeded to his sons. 
Mr. Doane was twice married, on first occasion to Miss M. E., daughter of 
Rev. Winthrop Morse, and has by her — E. A., civil engineer; Nellie A., a music 
teacher of tine ability, and Walter A., civil engineer, now on the Canadian 
Pacific Railway. Mrs. Doane dying, Mr. Doane then became united in marriage 
with Sarah B., a sister of his first consort, and to this union were born — Leo 
L., a civil engineer, now in Baltimore studying to be a physician and surgeon, 
and May L., a music teacher, etc. The daughters have attained special 
admiration, the eldest for her skill in music, the youngest for her accomplish- 
ment in elocution and music. Our subject is at present city engineer for 
Meadville. In politics he is a Republican. He is of aij inventive turn of 
mind, and has devised some articles now giving valuable services although 
others claim the patent. 

E. A. DOANE, civil engineer, P. O. Meadville, was bom in Columbia County, 
N. Y., May, 1846, and is a son of Isaac S. and Elizabeth (Morsej Doane, 
natives of Massachusetts. The father, who is a civil engineer, and has resided 
in this county since 1854, raised a family of five children, of whom E." A. is 
the eldest, and who learned his profession at Oswego, N. Y. Our subject's 
firet work was on the Oswego & Rome Railroad, where he remained three 
years; he was then employed one year for the Chicago & North Western Rail- 



MEAD TOWNSHIP. 895 

road; then on the Sioux City Railroad, in Iowa, where he remained until 1871. 
He next accepted a position as principal assistant engineer on the Lake Ontario 
Shore Railroad, where he continued two years. His health failing, he pur- 
chased the farm in this township where he now resides. Mr. Doane was sev- 
eral years chief engineer of the Lake Ontario Shore Railroad, and Rome, 
Watertown & Ogdensburg Railroad; also of the Meadville & Linesville Rail- 
road, and of several other lines, dui'ing their construction. He has now a fine 
farm of 120 acres. Inhis political views he is Republican.' He was married, 
in 1873, to Flora, daughter of Hubbard Betts, a native of New York, and of 
English descent. They have one son — Alonzo Betts — and one daughter — Jes- 
sie. Mr. and Mrs. Doane are Episcopalians in their church relations. 

J. W. DOUGLAS, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in Meadville, Sep- 
tember 20, 1818, and is a son of Joseph and Harriet (Williams) Douglas. Our 
subject's grandfather came to this county in 1797; was in the war of 1812, 
and had a brother a Major in the British Army. The grandfather taught the 
first school in this county, the schoolhouse being the old blockhouse in Mead- 
ville. J. W. is the eldest of a family of eight children, and early in life 
commenced merchandising, acting in that capacity thirty-seven years in Mead- 
ville. He was married February 22, 1844, to Eliza, daughter of John E. 
Smith, a pioneer hotel keeper of Meadville, and who lived to be ninety years 
of age. The results of this uniou have been six children, viz. : Mary, Sarah, 
Harriet, Jessie, Nellie and Carrie. Mr. Douglas is a Democrat in politics. 
In 1852 and 1853 he was County Treasurer. For thirteen years he was 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the First Regiment of Crawford County Volunteers, of 
which his father, who had also been in the war of 1812, was Colonel. 

S. E. ELLIS, farmer and dairyman, P. O. Meadville, was bom in Mead 
Township, this county, November 16, 1825, and is a son of John and Betsy 
(Sackett) Ellis, natives of Massachusetts, of English ancestry, who came to 
this county at an early day. The father, who was a farmer, raised a family of 
six children, S. E. being the third. Our subject received a common school 
training, and has chosen farming as his life vocation, taking dairying into 
connection, usually keeping thirty cows, and since he started for himself 
has been successful. He now owns a fine farm of 240 acres near the City of 
Meadville limits. He is Democratic in politics; has been seven years a School 
Director, but is no office seeker. He was married first to Frances A. Fry, a 
native of Massachusetts, by whom he had seven children, four now living, viz.: 
Albert F., Henry VV., Nellie M. and Cora. His first wife dying in 1874, he 
again married, his second wife being Amelia, daughter of Dr. Palmer, of New 
York. Mr. Ellis is a member of the Episcopal Church. 

DAVID S. ELLIS, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in this township 
January 25, 1828, and is a son of John and Betsy (Sackett) Ellis, natives of 
Massachusetts, and of English and Welsh descent. Our subject's grand- 
fathers were both soldiers in the Revolutionary war. His maternal grandfather 
settled in Ohio; his grandfather Ellis came to Crawford County in 1817, pur- 
chased 400 acres of land, and gave 100 acres to his son John, who settled 
where our subject now lives. John Ellis was born in 1796 and died in 1871; 
in 1812 he defended his country's cause. His wife was born in 1793 aod died 
in 1868. David S. was married in 1859 to Lucy J. Brawley. who died in Feb- 
ruary, 1862, leaving one child— Hattie Louise — wife of W. A. Doane. Our 
subject was married again, in 1866 to Adda M. Lord, who died in 1875; she 
was a member of the Episcopal Church. In politics Mr. Ellis is a Democrat, 
as were his father and grandfather before him. He has held some official posi- 
tions in his township. He is one of Mead Township's successful farmers. 



896 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

CLAEK ELLIS, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was bom in Mead Township, 
this comity, June 27, 1838, and is a son of Abel and Sarah (Goodwell) Ellis, 
natives of Massachusetts and of English descent. Abel Ellis was bom in 
1813, and came in 1826 with his parents to this county, where he lived until 
his decease in 1877. He had two children: Henry, a carpenter in Meadville, 
and Clark, who early chose the vocation of bis father, that of a farmer. Our 
subject received his education at the common schools of Meadville; is in the 
milk business in connection with general farming, and 'has met with success. 
He was married in 1856 to Mary Ann Harris, a native of New York State, 
daughter of Harvey Harris, a farmer of Mead Township. Their children are — 
Edwin, Amy, Earnest, Willis. Mr. Ellis is owner of a farm of eighty-seven 
acres. Mrs. Ellis is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our sub- 
ject, in politics, is a Republican. 

M. M. GERDON, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Meadville, was bom in 
Bavaria, Germany, December 29, 1827, and is a son of Adam Gerdon, a 
farmer, who had a family of five children, of whom M. M. is the third. Our 
subject received. his education in his native land, going as far as the high 
schools. He then learned the soap and candle business, at which he worked 
until he came to Meadville in 1852, where he landed an almost penniless 
stranger in a strange land, unable to speak a word of English. He worked 
at his trade for the following two years, and then, after renting and farming 
lands for six years, purchased a farm of 130 acres, on which he now resides. 
He was married in 1853 to Mary Tavernier, a native of Germany, and their 
daughters are Margaret, wife of Reuben Smith; Kate, wife of Joseph Theu- 
ret; Louise, wife of C. Sweet; Mary, Georgina, and Nancy; the sons are 
John W., Frank J., Albert, Lewis, Clinton and Earnest Mr. Gerdon is in 
politics a Democrat. When he landed here he had but $5.00 in his pocket, 
but is now wealthy. 

A. C. GORTON, lumberman, and proprietor of steam saw-mill, P.O. Mead- 
ville, was bom in Mead Township, this county, September 27, 1854, and is a 
son of A. N. and Mary D. (Williams) Gorton, the former a native of New 
York State, the latter of Pennsylvania. A. N. Gorton, who was a millwright 
and farmer, came to this county in 1844, and after a residence here of twenty- 
nine years, died in Missouri in 1880. Our subject, the youngest of five chil- 
dren, received a common school training, and has since been engaged in the 
lumber and saw-mill business. He erected his mill in 1881, in which he 
makes shingles, lath and all kinds of lumber. He was married in 1876 to 
Lucy, daughter of James H. Carr, of Warren County, Penn. He is a mem- 
ber of the I. O. O. F lodge of Meadville. 

X!. C. HATCH, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was bom in this township June 2, 
1826, and is a son of Ira and Electa (Wilder) Hatch, natives of Vermont and 
New York respectively. The father was a farmer. They had a family of 
nine children, of whom C. C. is the fourth. Our subject was educated at the 
district school, and has made farming his life vocation^ now owning the well- 
improved faim on which he resides. Being in Wisconsin when the war broke 
out, he enlisted in 1862, in Company K, Thirty-third Wisconsin Volunteer 
Infantry; was at the siege of Vicksburg, and in ten important battles. He 
was discharged at the close of hostilities in 1865. Mr. Hatch was married in 
1850 to Louise, daughter of John Robins, and their children are — Frank, 
Ira, George, Mary, Cora and Virgil. Mr. and Mrs. Hatch are church members. 
He is a Republican in politics. 

A. J. HUNTER, retired farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born on the farm 
where he now resides in Mead Township, this county, November 11, 1815; son 



MEAD TOWNSHIP. 897 

of James Hunter, whose parents, John and Isabella Hunter, were natives of 
Ireland, whence they emigrated to Cumberland County, Fenn. , in 1773, and 
from there to Allegheny County, Penn., in 1775. James Hunter, our 
subject's father, was bom in Cumberland County, Penn., August 10, 1775, 
and with his parents moved to Allegheny County, Penn. , in 1786. In Novem- 
ber, 1799, he settled on a tract of land belonging to the Holland Land Com- 
pany. On May 3, 1801, he married Sarah Cunningham, and May 10, same 
year, came on the farm now occupied by our subject. A. J. Sunter, who is one 
of a family of seven children, after receiving his education in the log school- 
house of the period, made farming his chosen occupation and since 1880 has 
also engaged in lumbering. He married, in 1843, Sarah Pardee, who bore 
him eleven children, viz.: Jesse, a farmer; Sarah, now Mrs. Frank Little; 
James, a farmer; Isabella, now Mrs. Orville Maloney; May, at home; John; 
William; Emma, now Mrs. Alfred Brown; Ella, now Mrs. John Drake; 
Perry and Anna. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter have reason to congratulate them- 
selves that their family are all living {ind residing near them. 

JOSEPH JEUNET was bom in France, November 1, 1814, son of Alex- 
ander Jennet, who was for thirty years in an office under the French Govern- 
ment. Joseph early in life learned watch-making, and became very expert at 
his art, in 1858 inventing a valuable watch escapement. He was married in 
France in 1840 to Louise Courteou, and they had live children, all but the 
youngest being born in France. In 1853 they immigrated to America, and 
settled on the farm in Mead Township on which he still resides; his wife 
departed this life in 1873. Their children are Paul, Mary, Augustine. Ernest 
and Valerie. In 1881 Mr. Jeunet established a cheese factory here. The 
family belong to the Catholic Church. In politics he is a Republican. 

PERRY KIMMEY, carpenter and joiner, P. O.Meadville, who has been a resi- 
dent of this county for nearly half a century, was bom April 5, 1834, and is a 
son of William and Sarah (McFadden) Kimmey; the former, a farmer, came to 
this county when a young man, the latter was born in Pennsylvania, of Irish 
descent. They both died in this county. They had a family of twelve chil- 
dren, of whom Perry is the fourth. Our subject was educated in the Mead- 
ville public schools, and in that city learned the carpenter and joiner's trade, 
at which he has worked ever since with more than ordinary success. He now 
owns a farm near Meadville. In 1861 he enlisted in Company D, Eighty-third 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving two years. He was in seven well- 
contested engagements, and was wounded at the battle of Malvern Hill. 
Returning home he resumed his occupation. 

LEWIS KRAEER, oil dealer and farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in 
Washington County, Penn., December 10, 1845, and, being the son of a farmer, 
his early life was spent amid agricultural pursuits, but he soon embarked in 
the oil business, which he has continued with success to the present. He owns 
a farm in this township on which his family reside. He was married, August 
30, 1866, to Hepsy Baker, also a native of Washington County, Penn., and 
their family consists of six children, as follows: Samuel, Edward, Carrie, 
Alda H, Olower and Jennie. Mr. and Mrs. Kraeer are members of the Pres- 
byterian Church, in which he was an Elder in Butler County. He came to 
this township in 1882, and purchased his present farm of 107 acres.. During 
the late war he served in the Pennsylvania Cavalry, but was ultimately dis- 
charged for disability. 

O. G. LAKE, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in Chautauqua County, 
N. Y., December 2, 1833, and is a son of Calvin and Elizabeth (Goodsell) 
Lake, natives of New York and of French, German and English descent. 



898 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Calvin Lake was a farmer; came to this county in 1833, and raised a family of 
three sons and three daughters, of whom our subject is the eldest. He was 
early set to learn carpentering and has also worked in saw-mills. He is a 
natural mechanic and has traveled considerably, thereby improving his skill 
in that line. He settled on a farm in 1862, and the same year he was married 
to Catharine, daughter of John Cole, a farmer of Cussewago Township. 
Their children were — Mary Ellen (Mrs. John Flickinger), John (deceased), 
Mark Parker (at home on the farm), George L., Luke J., Mina'E., Emma C. , 
Matthew H. and James K. During the late war our subject enlisted and served 
three months in the first three requisitions under John W. McLane, Colonel 
in the Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He owns the farm of fifty-three 
and a half acres on which he resides, and lias made what he has by his own 
exertions. He went into the oil business when it was booming, and, to use his 
own expression, he came out "busted," but he was not the man to give up the 
battle of life. For several years he was a resident of Erie County, Penn., liv- 
ing on the farm which he exchanged for the one he now owns. In politics 
Mr. Lake has been a Greenbacker since 1876. 

CAPT. JAMES LESLIE, farmer, P. O Meadville, was born in Lawrence 
County, Penn., May 25, 1807, and is a son of James and Margaret (Gaston) 
Leslie, the former a native of Ireland, the latter of Pennsylvania. Our sub- 
ject, after receiving the ordinary training of the district school, spent several 
years in the hotel business, conducting first the " Leslie House," at New Cas- 
tle, Penn., which hotel received its name from him; he then conducted the 
"McLure House" in "Wheeling, W. Va. , for several years, which is still the 
largest house in the State. In 1865 he purchased his farm of 175 acres in 
this township, on which he still resides. For several years our subject was 
Captain of a rifle company, from which he derived his title. He was married 
in 1828 to Clarissa Houk, who bore him seven sons, viz.: A. H, J. W., M. L., 
R. C, J. P., William M. and W. S. Capt. Leslie and five of his sons were in 
the Union Army. Mrs. Leslie departed this life in 1854, and in 1856 CapL 
Leslie married E. M. Hayden, of Pittsburgh, Penn. , who bore him two chil- 
dren: Emma R. and B. B. 

GEORGE W. LORD, retired farmer, P. O. Meadville, was bom in New 
York, November 4, 1804, and is a son of Solomon and Lila (Taffany) Lord, 
natives of Connecticut and of English descent. Our subject's grandfather 
was in the Revolutionary war, and lived and died in New York. Solomon 
Lord was in the war of 1812; came to this county in 1808, and raised a fam- 
ily of eleven children, of whom George W. is the seventh. Our subject was 
reared on the farm, but has labored at carpentering for over fifty years; he 
was married in 1834 to Permelia, daughter of Samuel Axtell, a native of Penn- 
sylvania, and of English descent. She died in Mead Township in 1881. Her 
father was a physician, who practiced for many years in Mercer County, Penn. 
Mr. Lord is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as was also his late 
wife. In politics he is a Republican. 

J. C. McCLINTOCK, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in Venango 
County, Penn., February 11, 1851, and is a son of Hamilton and Mary (Jack) 
MeClintock, natives of Pennsylvania, and of Scotch-Irish descent His 
father, who was a farmer and oil producer, and a very successful business man, 
raised a family of eight children, of whom J. C. is the fourth. The father 
died in 1882 at Pittsburgh, Penn., where he had resided for several years. 
Our subject finished his education at Iron City Commercial College, where he 
graduated in 1871, and first engaged in the iron business in Pittsburgh, then 
for a time was in the oil business with his father. In 1880 he moved to Mead 



MEAD TOWNSHIP. 899 

Township, settling on his prfisent farm of 220 acres. He was married in 1873 
to Laura Flinn, and they have one son — Albert. Mr. and Mrs. McClintock are 
members of the Presbyterian Church. 

JAMES McKINNEY, retired farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in Warren 
County, Penn., September 28, 1811, and is a son of John and Rebecca (Arthurs) 
McKinney, the father a native of Ireland, the mother of Pennsylvania, and 
of Holland descent. John McKinney, who was a farmer and lumber dealer, 
died in Warren County, Penn., in 1841. James is the sixth in a family of 
nine children; was reared on the farm, and at the age of thirteen he carried 
the mail from Mayville, N. Y. , to Meadville, Penn., by way of Titusville, 
serving in that capacity till 1827. In those days there were but few houses 
between Meadville and Titusville. He afterward engaged in the lumber bus- 
iness, continuing at the same until 1866. He then went to farming in West- 
moreland County, Penn., where he remained until 1870, when he sold out and 
bought the farm near Meadville on which he now resides. He was married 
in 1837 to Lydia Turner, and their children are — Harriet, now Mrs. Henry 
Clasen, in Meadville; J. L., a well-known business man of Titusville, and the 
choice of the Democratic party for Congress in 1884; J. C, an oil dealer in 
Titusville; H. B., an oil dealer; H. R., an oil dealer in Bradford, and G-. R. 
The second child, Mortimer, and sixth child, Jefferson, are deceased. Mr. 
McKinney has given all his family the benefit of a good education. By pru- 
dent industry he has been financially successful. In politics he is Democratic. 

KEV. L. G. MERRILL, pastor of the Meadville Circuit of the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church, Meadville, was born near Vienna, Trumbull Co., Ohio, 
July 15, 1825, and is a son of Ansel and Any (Combs) Merrill, the father a 
native of Connecticut, the mother of Ohio, and both of English descent. The 
father was a wealthy clock manufacturer. Our subject is the fourth in a 
family of eleven children. He attended the academy at Vienna, Ohio, and 
Kingsville and Allegheny Colleges. Having chosen the ministry as his pro- 
fession, his first charge was at South Oil City for one year as supply. He was 
then regularly appointed. He has preached at several places since, and as his 
labors have been blessed he has remained generally two years in a place. He 
was married in 1854 to Amanda A., daughter of F. A. Wilson; their surviving 
children are Luella, wife of W. A. Seyler; Alice, wife of George F. Sheets; 
Florence, Hattie and Laura. Politically, Mr. Merrill regards the prohibition 
issue as paramount. He is the owner of twenty- five acres of well-improved 
land in Mead Township, this county. Having been all his life a close student 
and a hard worker, he is now taking a year's vacation to recuperate his health. 

WILLIAM MERRIMAN, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in Somerset Co., 
Penn., October 17, 1880, and is a son of George and Elizabeth (Oris) Merriman, 
natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. William is thie eldest of a fam- 
ily of three children, and received his education in the common schools and Mead- 
ville Academy. He remained with his father, was in canal and railroad business 
until he was eighteen years of age, since which time he has farmed and part 
of the time been in the dairy business. He was married in 1851 to Henrietta 
Harrington, a native of this county, and of English descent. Their children 
are — George, Crawford, Herman and Joanne. Mrs. Merriman is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Merriman is a Republican, politically. 

JESSE PARDEE, retired, P. O. Meadville, was born March 18, 1802, in 
Connecticut, son of Daniel and Flora (Bray) Pardee, the former a native of 
Connecticut, the latter a daughter of Asa Bray, a Colonel in the Revolution- 
ary war. They were the parents of eight children: Bray, Daniel, Lydia, Sal- 
lie, James, Fannie, Jesse and John. Our subject was educated in the common 



900 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

schools, and in early life learned the occupation of a farmer; also worked in 
a rope-walk. He commenced life without any means, but by industry and fru- 
gality he accumulated some 210 acres of land, which he has partly divided 
among his children, with whom he now lives comfortably on the interest of 
his savings, having been retired from active life for the past thirteen years. 
Mr. Pardee has also had transactions to some extent in oil. He came to this 
county in 1820, walking all the way from Connecticut, with a knapsack on his 
back weighing thirty-six pounds, starting on his journey February 22, and 
arriving in Meadville March 13 following. He then began work on the Mead- 
ville and Franklin pike; after that he cleared ten acres of land for Christian 
Steinbrook, at the same time improving the occasion by courting his employ- 
er's daughter, Elizabeth, who subsequently became his wife February 7, 1822; 
her mother's name was Esther Troutman. To this union were born ten chil- 
dren, viz.: Sallie, wife of Jackson Hunter; Susan, wife of Joseph Johnson; 
Christian J., deceased; Catharine, deceased; Mary, deceased; Esther, wife of 
John Southwick; John H. (see sketch below); Emeline, wife of D. Fowler, 
deceased; Florinda, deceased, and Elizabeth, wife of J. B. Girard. Mrs. 
Pardee died in 1845. She was a member of the Lutheran Church. Mr. Par- 
dee has 118 lineal descendants now living — six children, fifty grandchildren, 
and sixty -two great-grandchildren. He has filled the o£Bce8 of Supervisor, 
Assessor and Collector three terms, and Assistant Assessor three terms; was 
President of the first board of School Directors for Mead Township. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican. 

JOHN H. PARDEE, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Meadville, was born 
in Mead Township, this county, on the farm where he now resides, April 25, 
1834, and is the second son of Jesse and Elizabeth (Steinbrook) Pardee (see 
sketch above). Our subject has devote.d his entire life to farming and stock- 
raising, and now owns 150 acres of land, nearly all under a high state of cul- 
tivation. He was married May 22, 1872, to Julia A., daughter of Samuel 
Homan, a prominent farmer of this county, and to this union have been born 
four children: Flora, Fannie, Jesse and Maggie. Mrs. Pardee is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics our subject is a Republican. 

F. F. RUNDEL, farmer, P. O. Bousson, was born in Erie County, Penn. , 
July 21, 1859, and is a son of Loren and Eliza (Ross) Rundel, natives of 
Pennsylvania, and of English origin. Loren Rundel was a farmer, and 
F. F. wisely chose his father's vocation; being the eldest son, he remained 
at home working with his father on their farm of seventy-six acres, on which 
they have resided since 1872. They vote the Democratic ticket. 

AUGUSTUS RUSHLANDER, farmer, P. O. Blooming Valley, was born 
in France, March 30, 1843, and is a son of John C. and Harriet (Besanson) 
Rushlander, who were also natives of France, came to America in 1853, set- 
tling in Mead Township, where they raised a family of two children, of whom 
Clovis, the eldest, went to Arkansas. Augustus Rushlander received a common 
school education, and has made farming his vocation, now owning a fine 
farm of over 300 acres. He was married in 1867, to Virginia Verrain, and 
their children are — Leander, Eugenie, Augustus, Louise, Mary and Blanche. 
The family are members of the Catholic Church. 

WILLIAM SMITH, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in Mead Township, 
February 14, 1827, and is a son of William and Betsey (Looper) Smith, the 
father a native of New Jersey, of English descent, the motiier a native of 
Pennsylvania, of German descent. They came to this county about 1810, and 
raised a family of six sons and five daughters, William being the tenth. 
The father, in the early part of his life, was a shoe-maker, in the latter 



MEAD TOWNSHIP. 901 

pai't a farmer; he was in the war of 1812; died in Mead Township, Penn., 
in 1848. His brother, George, uncle of our subject, was also in the war 
of 1812, and still lives in this township at the venerable age of ninety- four 
years. Two of our subject's brothers, Robert and James, were engaged in 
the late war. Our subject received an ordinary district schooling, and has all 
his life followed agriculture, owning a farm of 100 acres. He was married in 
1855 to Cornelia Moore, who died in 1881, leaving two children: Loomis H. 
and Mina E. In politics Mr. Smith is a Kejmblican. 

SETH B. SMITH, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was bom in Connecticut, 
February 5, 1829, and is a son of Harmon and Julia (Pierpont) Smith, natives 
of Connecticut, and of English origin. In the pioneer days of this county 
Harmon Smith was a cooper, but in later life followed farming; he had a 
family of eight children. Seth B. was raised on a farm, but in 1853 he went 
to California, remaining three years; he has traveled over the greater portion 
of the United States. He has been twice married, first in 1857, to Mary Ann 
Devore, who died in 1872. This union was blessed with four children. For 
his second wife Mr. Smith married Catharine, daughter of David Johnson, 
and to this union was born one child. Mrs. Smith is a member of the 
Reformed Church. Mr. Smith in his political views is Democratic; he takes 
deep interest in education, having served his district three years as School 
Director. On the occasion of his return from California, our subject had a 
narrow escape from death at Panama; some Spaniards set upon and massacred 
forty Americans, but Mr. Smith's life was saved by the kind offices of a 
friendly native, who secreted him till danger was past. 

J. T. SMITH, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in Connecticut, September 
28, 1830, and is a son of Herman and Julia (Blakeslee) Smith, also natives of 
Connecticut, and of English descent. They came to this county in 1840; the 
father, who followed coopering and farming, died in Mead Township in 1855. 
J. T., who is the second of eleven children, was reared on the farm, received a com- 
mon school education, and is now owner of ninety acres of well- improved land 
in Mead Township. He has been twice married; on first occasion, in 1853, 
to Anna Brown. His second wife is Mary Brown, who has borne him six 
children: Irvin, John, Edna, Ella, Anna, and an infant not named. Mrs. 
Smith is a member of the Reformed Church. Mr. Smith is a Democrat; has 
held most of the oflices of the township. 

FREDERICK STADTLER, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in Ger- 
many, September 29, 1829, and is a son of John Stadtler, a native of Ger- 
many, who was a laborer; he raised a family of four children, of whom Fred- 
erick is the second. After receiving his education in his native land, our sub- 
ject came to America in 1853, where he acquired the English language. He 
first worked as a day laborer, and afterward rented a farm for five years, 
when he came to Meadville, and for thirteen years followed the vocation of a 
teamster. Then in 1875 he purchased a farm of sixty-eight and a half acres 
in tbis township, which is in a high state of cultivation, and on which he still 
resides. He was married in 1855 to a native of Germany, and they have nine 
children, seven living, as follows: John, Fred, Henry, Frank, Charles, Louise 
and Daniel. Mr. and Mrs. Stadtler are members of the Evangelical Protest- 
ant Church. 

CHARLES L. STITZER, lumberman and farmer, P. O. Meadville, was 
born in this county. May 23, 1840, and is a son of John and Sarah (Mauer) 
Stitzer, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. The father, a farmer, 
settled in East Fairfield Township, this county, in 1838, and raised a family 
of eight children, of whom Charles L. is the sixth. Our subject received a 



902 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

common school education and commenced early in life to work at the saw-mill 
business, which he has continued with success to the present. In 1877 he lost 
his mill and a large quantity of lumber by lire. He now owns 110 acres of 
land in this township. He was married in 1865 to Sarah, daughter of David 
Baird, and a native of this county. Their children are C. M., Homer L., 
Emma V., and Elizabeth Annabel. Mr. and Mrs. Stitzer are members of the 
Keformed Church. Politically he is a Democrat. 

EGBERT L. WAID (deceased) was born May 1, 1826, in Riceville, Craw- 
ford Co., Penn., and was brother of F. C. Waid, whose sketch' appears in this 
volume. He received a common school education, was brought up on a farm, 
and during life was engaged as a tiller of the soil. Mr. Waid was married 
October 16, 1852, to Almeda Wheeler, a daughter of Abram and Amanda (Tay- 
lor) Wheeler, who were the parents of ten children, viz. : Lorenda, Lorenzo, 
Elisha T., Roxana, Elvira, Phoebe M., Samantha, Elijah M., Almeda and 
William V. This union was blessed with three children: Orlanda, Nick P., 
and Ira (deceased). Our subject .died June 17, 1880, deeply regretted by 
many friends and neighbors. His widow is now residing on the farm in 
Mead Township which was improved by him. He was a member of the K. of 
H.; in politics a Repablican. In early life he was somewhat remarkable as a 
successful trainer of steers and oxen on the farm, and in after years in the 
breaking and training of horses. He was a model farmer, and neatness and 
perfect order in all things were prominent features upon all parts of bis farm. 
It is through the generosity and family respect of his brother, Mr. F. C. Waid, 
that his portrait appears in this history. 

WILLIAM WARNER, retired farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born Septem- 
ber 19, 1815, in Massachusetts, son of Bela and Sarah (Kingman) Warner, 
natives, the former of Connecticut, the latter of Massachusetts and of English 
extraction. William was their only child and came with his parents to this 
county, in 1841 ; was educated in the county schools and brought up on 
the farm. He was united in marriage in 1838 with Amy P. Prentiss, who died 
in 1879, a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1882 
our subject was married to Mrs. Mary A. Elder, widow of James H. Elder 
(deceased in 1853), and daughter of Charles Clapp. She is an adherent of the 
Presbyterian denomination. Mr. Warner was appointed Commissioner to fill 
the unexpired term of Isaiah Lane, in January, 1862. In the fall of the same 
year he was elected to continue the same term, and in 1863 was re-elected for 
a full term of three years. He has been a Justice of the Peace in Mead Town- 
ship and was Tax Collector for the same in 1859, 1861, 1880 and 1888, and 
has not been unwilling to serve in some of the minor oflSces where it is all work 
and no pay. Our subject in politics is a Republican. In this volume will be 
found a portrait of this worthy, substantial and representative man. 

N. M. WASSON, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Meadville, was born in 
Crawford County, Penn., November 23, 1823, and is a son of William and 
Betsy (Marshall) Wasson, natives of Pennsylvania, the mother born in this 
county. The father came here soon after the war of 1812, took up a farm, and 
raised a family of six sons and three daughters, of whom N. M. is the second 
child. He was brought up on the farm, and in early life ran a boat for haul- 
ing iron to Pittsburgh, but has been for many years a prosperous and success- 
ful farmer, owning 120 acres of good land well improved. He was married in 
1845, and his children by his first marriage are — James, Elizabeth, AVilliam, 
Sarah J., and Catharine. Mrs. Wasson dying in 1855, in the following year 
he married Rachel (Barr), widow of John Porter, by whom she had two chil- 
dren: S. T. and Julia. The fruits of this last union are — David L., John 



MEAD TOWNSHIP. 903 

M., Edwin D. , Lucy E., and Charles H. Mr. and Mrs. Wasson are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he has been Steward, Trustee and 
Treasurer. He is a Republican in politics; has been Supervisor, Collector and 
was Census Taker in 1880; he is a member of the State Police, havinj;; served 
as Captain. 

J. C. WHITEHILL, farmer, P. O. Meadville, was born in Pennsylvania, 
May 20, 1845, and is a son of David and Esther (Packer) Whitehill, natives 
of Pennsylvania, and of Scotch-Irish ancestry. J. C. received the usual com- 
mon school training at the district school, early embraced the vocation of 
his father, that of lumberman, and was in the South for thirteen years in that 
business. He came to this township in 1883 and purchased a farm of 100 
acres. He was married, in 1S78, to Marj^ E., daughter of Benjamin McGehee, 
and they have two children: Lucy L. and Mabel. Mrs. Whitehill is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Whitehill has, through energy 
and enterprise, achieved success as a business man. 

LORENZO WILLIAMS, farmer and lumberman, P. O. Guy's Mills, was 
born in Massachusetts, July 26, 1815, and is a son of E. and Hannah (Parrish) 
Williams, natives of Massachusetts and of English and Welsh descent. His 
father, who was by trade a tanner, in 1828 settled in the woods four miles east 
of Meadville and engaged in farmiiig and lumbering until his death, which 
occurred in 1867, at the ripe old age of eighty-five years. Our subject's 
grandfathers were both in the Revolutionary war; his grandfather Williams 
was born December 29, 1741, and died January 26, 1816. Lorenzo Williams, 
third in a family of four children, was reared on a farm, but naturally gravi- 
tated toward the lumbering business. Although his scholastic education was 
limited to that afforded in a log schoolhouse, what he lacked in schooling he 
made up in industry in business, and early in life commenced the manufacture 
of felloes for wagons, -continuing his farm work at the same time, which has 
increased from his first purchase of fifty acres to 250 acres in this township, 
and in all his different lines of business he has been financially successful. 
He commenced manufacturing in 1849, in which industry be remained ten 
years. He was married in 1844 to Margaret, daughter of William and 
Margaret (Wentz) Hope, the former of Irish and the latter of German descent. 
William Hope was by occupation a wagon-maker, and his daughter, Margaret, 
was born in Meadville in 1818. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Williams are 
as follows: Alfred, a farmer and lumberman, married; Effie (Mrs. D. C. Cut- 
ler), of Randolph Township; John, farmer and partner with his father in saw- 
mill, married; Ella, wife of Dr. Sedler, of Salamanca, N. Y. ; Florence, 
died March 14, 1881, in her twenty-second year; Emma, an adopted daughter, 
at home. They have given their family a good business education, in order 
to inculcate habits of prudence and economy. 

JAMES WIRT, farmer and apiarist, Meadville P. O., a prominent early 
pioneer of Mead Township, was born December 9, 1814, in New Jersey, 
received his education in a Quaker school, and learned his father's trade, that 
of a cooper, which he followed for many years. He has always been a hard- 
working man, and is now owner of a seventy-acre farm; he always loved the 
bee and long cherished the idea of bee culture; he now has sixty-five swarms, 
to which he devotes most of his time. He was married in Mead Township in 
1839 to Anna Shanger, and they have had four children: Charles, the eldest, 
died in the army; Lewis, Sarah and Edward. Mr. Wirt is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically he is a Greenbacker. 

JOHN D. WYMAN, P. O. Meadville. This gentleman besides being a 
farmer is engaged in the manufacture of tiles, also of lumber, owning a saw- 



904 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

mill. In 1875 he started the first tile manufactory in this county, which he 
still continues successfully to operate. His farm consists of 100 acres in the 
vicinity of Meadville. He was born in Randolph Township, this county, Feb- 
ruary 9, 1830, and is a son of James and Caroline (Gibbs) Wyman, the father 
a native of New Hampshire, the mother of Vermont. They came into the 
woods and cleared a farm in this county, raising a family of nine children, 
John D. being the seventh. The father died in this county in 1871. Our 
subject received a common school education, was reared on a farm, but has for 
years conducted a successful saw-mill business. He was married in 1858 to 
Prudence Taylor, and they have three children: William G., Hettie M. and 
Jessie C. Mrs. Wyman and two of the children are members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. 



NORTH SHENANGO TOWNSHIP. 

JAMES ALLEN, mason, P. O. Espyville, was born in North Shenango 
Township, this county, June 6, 1825; son of Stephen and Jane (Gilliland) 
Allen. His father, who was a native of New Jersey, settled in South Shenango 
Township, this county, in 1802, where he lived with his father, Moses Whitta- 
ker Allen, until after his marriage; about 1814 he moved to Mead Township, 
this county, where he worked at farming until 1824, in which year he moved 
to North Shenango Township, where he built a saw and grist-mill and a card- 
ing and clothing mill. His wife was a daughter of Hugh Gilliland, who 
came from Fayette County, Penn., and was an early settler of Summerhill 
Township, this county. Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Allen had ten children: Moses, 
Simpson (deceased), Hugh (deceased), William (deceased), Eliphalet (deceased); 
Sarah, now Mrs. Thomas Stockton; Nancy, now Mrs. Neal A. McKay; James, 
Elizabeth (deceased) and Eliza J., now Mrs. Aaron Chapman. Stephen died 
in 1874 at the age of eighty-six, and his widow in 1875, also at the age of 
eighty-six. The subject of this sketch was reared in North Shenango Town- 
ship; he is a wool-carder and cloth -dresser by trade. He was twice married, 
his fii-st wife being Mary E. Johnson; his present wife is MaryE., daughter of 
Lyman and Olive (Gillett) Waring, of Conneaut Township, this county, to 
whom he was married October 7, 1869. By this union there were three children: 
Olive J., Sarah R. and Bm-ke (latter deceased). Mr. Allen was a soldier in 
the war of the Rebellion, having enlisted September 14, 1861, in Company I, 
Eighty-thirdPennsylvania Volunteer Infantry; he was at the siege of Yorktown, 
Va., in the seven days' fight before Richmond ; was wounded at Malvern Hill; was 
in the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, Mine Run, Chancellorsville, in the 
Wilderness campaign, was present at the siege of Petersburg, and in many other 
engagements ; he was honorably discharged September 20, 1864. He was engaged 
in farming in Conneaut Township, this county, from 1866 to 1875, when he 
returned to North Shenango, where he still resides. He is a member of the 
United Presbyterian Church, his wife of the Methodist Church. He is a 
member of Capt. A. J. Mason Post, No. 322, G. A. R., Department of Penn- 
sylvania; in politics he is a Republican. 

JOSEPH R. ANDREWS, farmer, P. O. Espyville, was born in East Fal- 
lowfield Township, this county, September 3, 1816, son of John and Elizabeth 
(Richardson) Andrews, who were among the first settlers of East Fallowfield 



NORTH 8HENANG0 TOWNSHIP. 905 

Township. They located on the farm now owned by their son, Hezekiah 
Andrews. This they cleared and improved, and there lived and died. John 
Andrews was a native of Ireland, his wife a native of Maryland. They^had 
nine children: Nancy (deceased), Joseph R., John (deceased), Robert (deceased), 
David (deceased), William, Hezekiah, Elizabeth (deceased) and Charles. The 
subject of this sketch was reared in East Fallowtield Township, this county; 
was educated in the common schools and Allegheny College at Mead vi lie. In 
1840 he settled in North Shenango Township on the farm where he now lives, 
and which he has cleared and improved. He was thrice married, his first wife 
being Sarah, daughter of Sidney B. Herriott, who settled in North Shenango 
Township, this county, in 1799. By this union there were three children: 
Emily, Cyrus, and Francis (deceased). His second wife was Pasca (Weir) 
Conrad, who lived but one year after marriage. His present wife is Elizabeth, 
daughter of Andrew Linn, who settled in North Shenango Township, this 
county, in 1800. By this union there were two children: Herbert and Ran- 
som, both deceased. The former was killed in the fall of 1883, in his seven- 
teenth year, by a stroke of lightning. Mr. Andrews owns three farms, compris- 
ing about 500 acres. In politics he is a Republican. 

GEORGE C. CAMPBELL, farmer, P. O. Espyville, was born in South She- 
nango Township, this county, October 27, 1835, son of Charles and Sarah T. (De- 
forest) Campbell, who came from New Jersey, and were among the early set- 
tlers of North Shenango Township, this county. They first located on the farm 
now owned by A. M. Gaugh; from there went to Espyville, where Mr. Camp- 
bell worked at blaoksmithing about two years. He then went to South She- 
nango Township and purchased the farm now owned by William Fonner; 
afterward purchased a farm near Campbell's Corners, where he lived many 
years. He was born May 4, 1797, and died iu 1880. His wife was born 
August 31, 1793. They had nine children: William (deceased), Isaac 
(deceased), Jemima (deceased), John W. (deceased), Melissa (now Mrs. N. W. 
Wolverton), Elizabeth (deceased), Charles, George C. and Hiram K. The lat- 
ter was in the war of the Rebellion, having enlisted in Company H, One 
Hundred and Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry; was taken prisoner 
at the battle of Gettysburg, and kept a prisoner at Belle Isle 137 days, when 
he was paroled, re-joined his regiment at Annapolis, and died a few days after 
from the effects of starvation. The subject of this sketch was reared in South 
Shenango Township, this county, and educated in the common schools there. 
He resided there until 1859, when he located in North Shenango Township on 
the farm where he now resides. He was married February 17, 1859, to Man- 
dana, daughter of Samuel C. and Chloe (Duty) Hollister, of North Shenango 
Township, this county, by whom he has six children: Jessie (now Mrs. J.H. Free), 
Elton F., Fred, Nellie, Chloe D. and Albert B. Mr. Campbell and wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was drafted in the late war, 
but sent an alien as a substitute. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. ; in pol- 
itics a Republican. 

ROBERT B. COLLINS, farmer, P. O. Espyville, was born in North 
Shenango Township, this county, March 1, 1825, son of Isaac W. and Mar- 
garet (Bennett) Collins. Isaac W. was a native of MifBin County, Penn., and 
with two brothers, Henry and Elijah, settled in North Shenango Township, 
this county, in 1801. The family first settled on the farm now owned 
by Hiram Collins, and Isaac W. soon after settled on the farm now 
owned and occupied by our subject, which be cleared and improved, and where 
he lived and died. His wife was a daughter ot William Bennett and sis- 
ter of Robert, Anthony and Henry Bennett, who were among the first settlers 



906 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

of North and South Shenango Townships. William Bennett, the maternal 
grandfather of our subject, lived to be one hundred and four years old. Mr. 
and Mrs. Isaac W. Collins had elfeven children: Isaiah (deceased), Rachel 
(deceased), Henry B., Ann (deceased), Nancy (now Mrs. Dr. I. Clapp), Matthew 
(t. (deceased), Elijah, John P., William (deceased), Robert B. and Margaret E. 
(latter deceased). The subject of this sketch was reared in North Shenango 
Township, received a limited education in the common schools, and has always 
resided on the old homestead. He was married, April 27, 1848, to Lucy A., 
daughter of Lester and Laura (Hillyer) Waters, of Andover, Ohio, by whom 
he has seven children: Homer, Edgar, Howard L., Albert W., Ernest H., 
Maud V. and Frarfk R. Mr. Collins and wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. He has held the ofiSce of School Director of the township 
three terms; in politics is a Democrat. 

ROBERT CUNNINGHAM, farmer, P. O. Linesville, was bom in Lancas- 
ter County, Penn., October 13, 1800; son of Martin and Sarah Cunningham, 
who came to this county in 1801, making the journey on horseback, our sub- 
ject being carried in his mother's arms. They remained for a time in Con- 
neaut Township, and afterward settled in what is now Pine Township, where 
they lived for several years and finally removed to South Shenango, where 
they died. They had eleven children, of whom six are now living: Robert, 
William F., Eliza, Nancy, Samuel M. and Sarah. The subject of this sketch 
has been twice married; his first wife was Rachel Collins, by whom he had 
eleven children, eight now living: William A., James H., Margaret E., 
Nancy A., Sarah E., Isaac M. , Robert A. and Vestine. His present wife was 
Mrs. Hannah (Ferris) Reynolds, widow of Samuel Reynolds. Mr. Cunning- 
ham has lived since 1824 on his present farm, all of which he has cleared and 
improved. He has been a noted hunter, having killed over 3,000 deer and 
many bears and catamounts. He never knew what fear was in hunting expe- 
ditions, although he has been in several tight places. For a man of his years 
our subject enjoys good health, though he is now nearly blind. In politics he 
has always been a Democrat. 

ALEXANDER C. ESPY, farmer, P. O. Espyville, was born in North She- 
nango Township, this county, November 27, 1824; son of Patterson and Mercy 
(Freeman) Espy. His paternal grandfather, George Espy, came from Fayette 
County, Penn. , to this county in 1802, and took up a large tract of land where 
Espyville now stands, and which derived its name from him. He built the 
first grist-mill in what is now North Shenango Township, also the first saw- 
mill; was in the milling business for many years. The maternal grandfather 
of our subject was Alexander Freeman, a native of New Jersey, and among 
the first families who settled in Mead Township, this county. At the time of 
their settlement there were but nine white families in Meadville, and the 
mother of our subject often played with the Indian children, in her childhood, 
on the spot where the city of Meadville now stands. Patterson Espy prac- 
ticed law more or less in his day; he was also a surveyor and farmer, and 
cleared a part of the farm now owned and occupied by our subject. During 
the war of 1812 he was engaged in buying cattle for the use of the American 
Army. He died July 18, 1859, in his seventy-third year, and his widow Jan- 
uary 26, 1862, in her seventy-fifth year. They had ten children: Phebe S. 
(now Mrs. Joseph Patton), Maria (now Mrs. John Dickey), Thomas S., Eliza 
A. (deceased), Rebecca J. (deceased), Permelia F. (now Mrs. Frey, in Iowa), 
Rosina M. (deceased), Alexander C. , Stephen B. (killed at the battle of Chat- 
tanooga, July 30, 1863), and George W. (deceased). The subject of this sketch 
was reared and educated in his native township, where he has always resided. 



NORTH SHENANGO TOWNSHIP. 90T 

He was married December 24, 1856, to Sarah M., daughter of James and 
Nancy (Espy) Espy, of North Shenango Township, this county, by whom he 
has Lad seven children: Rosifia (now Mrs. C. J. Mordoflf, in Minnesota), 
Loema (now Mrs. Albert Collins), Dora (deceased), Georgie, Clark, Ella and 
Roy. Mr. Espy and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and of the E. A. U. He has served his township as Justice of the Peace two 
terms and has held several other minor offices. In politics he was reared a 
Democrat, but is now independent. 

WILLIAM F. ESPY, farmer, P. O. Espyville, was born in North She- 
nango Township, this county, January 3, 1835; son of John and Margaret 
(Free) Espy. His paternal grandfather, George W. Espy, came from Fayette 
County, Penn., to this county, in 1802, locating in Shenango Township, and set- 
tling where the village of Espyville now stands, and which took its name from 
him. He took up a tract of 400 acres, part of which he cleared and improved, 
and here he lived and died. He had eleven children: Nancy, Patterson, 
Josiah, Thomas, Ann, Richard, Hugh Mc. , David, James, John and Steven- 
son, all now deceased. The maternal grandfather of our subject. Peter Free, 
a native of Lancaster County, Penn., settled in North Shenango Township in 
1806, and cleared up a farm, where he lived and died. The children of John 
Espy were seven in number: Rebecca A. (now Mrs. Thomas Russell), Mary 
(deceased), Nancy (deceased), Sarah (deceased), William F., James K. and 
Margaret. The subject of this sketch was reared in North Shenango, and was 
educated in the common schools. He was married, June 20, 1861, to Helen 
M., daughter of Lyman and Olive (Gillett) Waring, of Conneaut Township, this 
county. The issue of this union was seven children: Harley J. , Olive M., 
George S., Frank G., Nora E., Anna R. (deceased), Winnie B. Mr. Espy 
resides on the farm where his father settled in 1836, and which was cleared 
and improved by him. His father died June 1, 1872, at the age of seventy-two 
years. The widow now resides with our subject. Mr. Espy and wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, with which they have been con- 
nected for many years. Id politics he is independent. 

LEWIS FREEMAN, P. O. Linesville, was born in Warren County, N. J., 
April 8, 1824, son of Henry and Lydia (Kerr) Freeman. He was reared in 
his native county and there resided until 1845, when he came to South She- 
nango Township, this county, remaining one year and working on a farm by 
the month during summer, and attending school in winter. In 1848 he 
returned to New Jersey and lived there until 1856, in which year he located in 
North Shenango Township, this county, and bought a farm of 215 acres, along 
with his brother, J. H. Freeman, with whom he remained one and a half 
years, when they divided the farm, our subject taking ninety-five acres which, 
with the exception of forty acres, he still has in his possession. In 1858 our 
subject rented the farm he now occupies, and in 1860 purchased it. It then 
comprised 125 acres, but he has since bought land adjoining, and now has a 
tine farm of 224 acres, part of which he has cleared, and on which he has 
made all the improvements in buildings, etc. Mr. Freeman was twice mar- 
ried, his first wife being Elizabeth, daughter of Charles and Sarah Campbell, 
by whom he had three children: Clara (deceased), Sarah L. and Dora. His 
present wife is Phebe A., daughter of John and Elizabeth (Collins) Linn, 
who settled in North Shenango Township, this county, in 1800. Mr. Freeman 
and his family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was 
elected President of the Linesville Savings Bank in the fall of 1883; has 
held several offices in the gift of his township. In politics is a Republican. 

JOHN HAYS, farmer, P. O. Espyville, was born in County Donegal, Ire- 



908 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

land, September 13, 1824, son of George and Mary (Moffat) Hays, of Scotch 
and Irish descent. He was reared and educated in his native country, as were 
his parents before him: he immigrated to America in 1848, remaining in Phila- 
delphia six months, and then settled in Venango County, Penn., where he 
cleared and improved a farm and resided until 1864, when he sold his farm, 
moved to Philadelphia and there lived one year. In 18fi5 he settled in North 
Shenango Township, this county, on the farm on which hd now resides, of 
which, at that time, there were but eight acres out of 200 under the plow. 
Mr. Hays now has 100 acres under a high state of cultivation. He was mar- 
ried. May 18, 1852, to Nancy, daughter of Robert and Margaret (Starrett) 
Gregg, natives of Ireland; she immigrated to this country in 1842. By this 
union there are seven children: William G. , George M., Robert A., Margaret 
S. (now Mrs. William A. Gregg), Adam M., Henry L. M. and Anna M. Mr. 
Hays and family are members of the United Presbyterian Church. He has 
served the township as Treasurer two terms. In politics has always been a 
Republican. 

WILLIAM HATS, farmer, P. O. Espyville, was bom in County Donegal, 
Ireland, June 8, 1833, son of George and Mary (Moffat) Hays, who immigrated 
to America in 1850 and located in Venango, Penn., where they died. They 
were parents of six children: John, Grizzella, Mary (deceased), Mary, Robert 
and William. Our subject settled in North Shenango Township in 1865, on 
the farm where he now resides and most of which he cleared and improved. 
The farm comprises 146 acres, ninety of which are under a high state of cul- 
tivation. Mr. Hays was married September 22, 1859, to Rebecca, daughter of 
Charles and Jane (Hays) Moore, natives of Ireland, and later residents of 
Armstrong County, Penn. By this union there are five children now living: 
Grizzella, Charles, Mary, Elizabeth S. and Margaret A. Mr. Hays, his wife 
and three eldest daughters are members of the United Presbyterian Church. 
In politics our subject has always been a Republican. 

J. O. KENT, physician and surgeon, Espyville, was born in Lenox, Ashta- 
bula Co., Ohio, March 11, 1840, son of Silas and Mary (Brown) Kent His 
father was a native of Connecticut and settled in Kingsville, Ohio, in 1822. 
In 1836 he removed to Lenox, Ohio, where he cleared and improved a farm 
and there lived and died. Mary, his wife, was a daughter of Capt. Charles 
Brown, a native of England, an old lake Captain well known on the lakes in 
his day. The subject of this sketch was reared in Lenox, Ohio, and educated 
in select schools. At the age of twenty-three he read medicine with Dr. W. 
T. McMurtry, now of Geneva, Ohio; afterward took a course of lectures at the 
Medical University of Ann Arbor, Mich., and commenced the practice of medi- 
cine in Espyville in 1867, where, with the exception of three years while 
located in Rock Creek, Ohio, he has since been in active practice. He was 
married in 1871 to Mary, daughter of Richard and Nancy Ann (McKay) Free, 
of South Shenango Township, this county. By this union are three children: 
Leonore, Clare and Donald. Dr. Kent is now the only practicing physician in 
North Shenango Township; in politics he is a Republican. 

NATHAN S. LINN, farmer, P. O. Espyville, was born in this township, Janu- 
ary 8, 1819, son of Andrew and Theadate (Buell) Linn. His father was a 
native of New Jersey, and a son of Alexander Linn, who died in New Jersey, 
and whose widow, Hannah Linn [nee Armstrong), with a family of five chil- 
dren, settled in what is now North Shenango Township, this county, in 1800, 
locating on the farm now divided and owned by Joseph and Joseph A. Linn. 
The children of Alexander and Hannah Linn were — John, Polly, Euphemie, 
Andrew, George and Joseph. Andrew married Theadate, daughter of Ezra 



NORTH SHENANGO TOWNSHIP. 909 

and Dorothy (Sanborn) Buell, of Kinsman Township, Trumbull Co., Ohio, by 
whom he had nine children: Nathan S. ; Minerva, now Mrs. Jacob Martin; 
Ezra B. ; Sarah L., now Mrs. Jacob Frey; Hannah, now Mrs. John T. Hitch- 
cock; Elizabeth, now Mrs. J. R. Andrews; Joseph; Maryette, deceased, and 
Andrews., deceased. The subject of this sketch was reared in North She- 
nango Township, where he has always resided, and was educated in the com- 
mon schools. He was married October 23, 1844, to Eachel, daughter of 
Aaron H. and Sisson (Fowler) Herriott, and grand- daughter of Sidney Herriott, 
who settled in North Shenango Township in 1799. By this union there were 
six children: Cyrus H., Aaron H. (deceased), George A. (deceased), Milton H. 
(deceased), Charles H. (deceased), and Julian K. Mr. Linn has lived since the 
spring of 1845 on the farm where he now resides, all of which he has cleared 
and improved. Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Our subject has served the township as Justice of the Peace two 
terms; in politics he is a Republican. 

REV. KOSCIUSKO McARTHUR, farmer, surveyor and minister, P. O. 
Espyville, was born November 10, 1812, in South Shenango Township, this 
county, son of John and Abigail (Allen) McArthur; a native of Ireland, he 
came to South Shenango Township in November, 1804, and within a year or 
two afterward located on the farm now owned by his son, the Rev. John J. 
McArthur, Methodist. This farm he cleared and improved and lived on it 
until his death, November 10, 1843. He was a good scholar, a man of exten- 
sive information, and had a valuable collection of books. Abigail, his wife, 
bom August 21, 1785, was a native of New Jereey, and a daughter of Moses 
and Sarah Allen, one of the first settlers of South Shenango Township; she 
died June 13, 1862. Mi', and Mrs. John McArthur had eleven children, viz.: 
Kosciusko; Rebecca (Mrs. James Free), bom Januarv 21, 1814; Joseph, bom 
May 16, 1815, died December 31, 1860; John J., born January 21, 1817; 
Moses S., M. D., born April 10, 1819, died November 2, 1876; Jane, now 
Mrs. Elijah Colins, bom February 16, 1821; "William, born July 25, 1823, 
died December 5, 1880; Sarah, born October 5, 1825, died December 10, 1876; 
Margaret, born November 8, 1827, lived only six weeks; Andrew, born Janu- 
ary 21, 1829, and Jeremiah P., bom January 21, 1831. The subject of this 
sketch was reared and educated in South Shenango and in North Shenango 
Townships, studied Latin, Greek, Hebrew, French and surveying without the 
aid of a teacher, and was ordained at Girard, Erie Co., Penn., June 21, 1855. 
Began the practice of surveying in 1848. He was married September 2, 1834, 
to Miss Jennette, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Gamble) Elliott, of South 
Shenango Township, and by this union were born four children: Mary, now 
Mrs. William J. Dickey; John R. ; Abigail, now Mrs. Thomas McAdoo, and 
Caroline, now Mrs. William Dennington. K, McArthur has lived on the farm 
on which he now resides, in North Shenango, since his marriage. Jennette, 
his wife, was born February 8, 1811, died August 13, 1872. He has practiced 
surveying since 1848, in connection with the farm and the ministry. In relig- 
ious belief he is a Universalist, with which denomination, as a minister, he 
has been connected since 1855. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. 
Held the office of County Auditor three years; was at different times School 
Director, and taught school in the winters from 1834 to 1869. In politics he 
is a Democrat and a strong advocate of temperance. 

ROBERT S. McKAY, farmer, P. O. Espyville, was born in Randolph 
Township, this county. May 30, 1824, son of Joseph and Mary (Gilliland) 
McKay, who settled in Randolph Township, this county, about 1814, locating 
on the farm now owned and occupied by Neal McKay, and which they cleared 



910 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

and improved. Joseph, who was ji son of Neal McKay, a native of Scotland, 
aD early settler of Randolph Township and later of Waterford, Erie Co., 
Penn., died in 1827; his wife was a daughter of Hugh Gilliland, formerly of 
Fayette County, and an early settler of Conneaut Township, this county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph McKay had seven children: Hugh G.; Neal; Nancy, deceased; 
James, deceased; Eliza, deceased; Robert S. ; Angeline, deceased. Our sub- 
ject was reared in Randolph Township, this county, until thirteen years of 
age, when he was thrown on his own resources. For one year he worked in a 
tan-yard, and then in a carding-mill in Conneaut Township, this county, until 
twenty-six years of age. In 1848 he settled in North Shenango Township, on 
his present farm, part of which he cleared and fenced, and on which he made 
all the improvements in buildings, etc. He was married September 16, 1845, 
to Susan, daughter of John and Catherine (Brown) Garrison, of Pine Town- 
ship, this county, by whom he had seven children: Helen J., now Mrs. H. 
Fonner; John S., Joseph O., Kate A., Myrtle E., Boyd and Nell G. Mr. and 
Mrs. McKay are members of the United Presbyterian Church, with which they 
have been connected since 1859, and in which he is an Elder. Our subject 
was appointed Mercantile Appraiser by the County Commissioners in 1862, 
serving in that capacity one year; he has held nearly all the offices in the 
gift of the township. In politics he is a stanch Republican; a strong advocate 
of prohibition. 

JOSEPH McNUTT, farmer, P. O. Linesville, was born in County Donegal, 
Ireland, October 17, 1826, son of David and Elizabeth (Burns) McNutt, who 
immigrated to America in 1832, and purchased a farm where the city of Buffalo 
now stands, and where they resided . two years. In 1834 they came to this 
county and lived on a rented farm in South Shenango Township one season, 
and then removed to what is now Summit Township, and purchased a farm of 
100 acre.H, which they cleared and improved; there they lived and died. They 
had seven children: Hannah, now Mrs. Samuel Morrow; James, deceased; 
William; Jane, now Mrs. James Hays; Elizabeth, deceased; Joseph; and Mary 
A., deceased. The subject of this sketch resided in Summit Township from 
1834 until his settlement, in 1866, on his present farm (part of which he has 
improved) in North Shenango Township. He was married December 5, 1851, 
to Anna J., daughter of William and Mary (Thompson) Caldwell, of County 
Antrim, Ireland. The issue of this union was six children: John B. , Emma, 
William C. (deceased), Albert E., Mary (deceased) and Francis. Mr. and Mrs. 
McNutt are members of the United Presbyterian Church of North Shenango, 
in which be has been an Elder for several years. He has held nearly all the 
offices in the gift of his township. In polities he is a Democrat. 

E, P. MERRITT, farmer and Justice of the Peace, P. O. Espyville, was born 
in Chautauqua County, N. Y., August 24, 1832, son of James and Aana (Miller) 
Merritt, natives of Chautauqua County, N. Y., who settled in Conneaut Town- 
ship, this county, in 1833, where they cleared and improved a farm and lived 
until the father died, June 5, 1855. The mother, who is now living with her 
children, was ninety years old April 24, 1884. They were parents of ten chil- 
dren: William, Ransom, Jane (now Mrs. William Runnells). Thaddeus, Perses 
(now Mrs. Lukecook), Enos, Elsa A. (deceased), Eliphalet P., Melinda 
(deceased) and Margaret (late Mrs. Samuel Winings, deceased). Our sub- 
ject was reared in Conneaut Township, this county, and educated in the com- 
mon schools and the Kingsville and Anstinburg Academies. He was married 
September 15, 1861, to Laura A., daughter of Charles and Cena (Delamater) 
Lester, of Richmond Township, this county, and grand-daughter of Benjamin 
Delamater, formerly of Whitehall, Washington Co., N. Y., at Hatch Hill, 



NORTH SHENANGO TOWNSHIP. 911 

about four miles from the village. By this union there were two children: 
James and Edie, both deceased. IMr. Merritt resided in Conneaut Township 
until" 1863; was a resident eight years of Eichmond Township, Ashtabula 
Co., Ohio, where he carried on a general store, and was Postmaster for two 
years. During three yeai's of his residence there he was Deputy Sheriff under 
Sheriff Scoville. Mr. Merritt was a soldier of the war of the Rebellion, a private 
in Capt. Cromell's Company G, One Hundred and Fifth Regiment Ohio Vol- 
unteer Infantry; was taken prisoner of war and paroled. His parole ticket 
reads as follows: " Headquarters Army of Kentucky. Lexington, September 
5, 1S62. I, E. P.Merritt, One Hundred and Fifth Ohio, Company G., a pris- 
oner of war, captured by the Confederate forces under Maj. -Gen. S. Kirby 
Smith, having this day paroled, do solemnly swear that I will not take up 
arms against the Confederate States of America until duly exchanged, and 
that I will not communicate any military information to the enemies of the 
Confederate States, which I may obtain while in their lines. The penalty for 
the violation of this parole is death. (Official) N. T. Roberts, Captain and Pro- 
vost Marshal. " He was honorably discharged from the service of the United 
States the 22d day of April, 1863, at Columbus, Ohio. April 1, 1871, he 
located in North Shenango Township, this county, where he has been princi- 
pally engaged in farming, buying hides, pelts, furs, etc. He was elected 
Justice of the Peace for the township in 1881; in politics he is a stanch 
Republican. 

WILLIAM PATTERSON, farmer, P. O. Haitetown, was born in Alle- 
gheny County, Penn., April 4, 1814, son of William and Sarah (Stewart) 
Patterson, who settled in North Shenango Township, this county, in 1832. 
They located on the farm now owned by Thomas Patterson, part of which 
they cleared and improved, and there lived and died. The paternal grand- 
father of our subject was James Patterson, and his maternal grandfather was 
John Stewart, an early settler of North Shenango Township, and who later 
removed to South Shenango Township, where he died. He was a soldier of 
the Revolution, enlisting when but seventeen years of age; was taken prisoner 
and kept in confinement till the close of the war, six months on board ship; 
during his incarceration, he averred, he was fed on ground glass, and he 
always after held everything British in utmost contempt. When released he 
was so weak from ill treatment that he could hardly stand. He was paid in 
Continental money, which was good, for nothing. Mr. and Mrs. Patterson, 
Sr., had nine children: John, James (deceased), William, Thomas, Nancy 
(now Mrs. Joseph Henry), Mary K. (deceased), Joseph Stewart (deceased), 
Elijah Finney (deceased), and an infant (deceased). The subject of this sketch 
settled in 1845 on the farm where he now resides, all of which he has cleared 
and improved. He was married J anuary 9, 1845, to Eleanor A., daughter of 
Hugh and Nancy (McWilliams) Blair, of North Shenango Township, this 
county, by whom he had three children; Nancy L., William O. and Hugh L., 
all deceased within two weeks, in 1853, of typhoid dysentery. Mr. Patterson 
and wife are members of the United Presbyterian Church of Hartstown, in 
which he has been an Elder upward of thirty years. In the days of the 
militia he was Captain in Republican Green's Volunteer Company. In poli- 
tics he is a Democrat. 

JOHN W. SIMONS, farmer and stock dealer, P. O. Espyville, was born 
in Bedford County, Penn., February 19, 1827, son of John and Rebecca 
(Williams) Simons, both natives of Bedford County, Penn., who removed to 
Columbiana County, Ohio, in 1828, and in 1833 located in Ashtabula County, 
Ohio, and there lived and died. The subject of this sketch located in North 



912 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Shenango Township, this county, in 1862 on the farm where he now resides, 
and which he purchased of his father-in-law, Joseph Robinson, who settled 
there ia 1837, and cleared and improved it; he was formerly from Wethers- 
field, N. Y. ; his wife was Abigail Strong, of the same place. They had 
eight children: Palmyra (deceased), Warren, Charles, Nelson (deceased ), George 
(deceased), James (deceased), Adelia and George. Our subject was married to 
Adelia Robinson, June 22, 1854, by whom he has four children: Mary E., 
Charles M., Minnie A. and Joseph. Mr. Simons has been engaged in buying 
and selling stock for many years. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a F. & A. M. , a member of the A. O. U. 
W. and the E. A. TJ. In politics he is a Democrat. 

JAMES STEWART, farmer, P. O. Linesville, was born in North She- 
nango Township, this county, on the farm where he now resides, December 4, 
1830, son of John and Sarah (Wilson) Stewart, who settled in North Shenango 
Township about 1828, locating on the farm now owned and occupied by our 
subject, and part of which they cleared and improved. John was a son of 
John and Mary (Robertson) Stewart, former a native of Paxton Township, 
Dauphin Co. , Penn. At the breaking out of the war of the Revolution he 
enlisted in the Continental Army at the age of seventeen; was captured 
by the British seven days after, and kept a prisoner until the close of the war. 
He settled in North Shenango Township, this county, with his son John, where 
he resided until his death. The maternal grandfather of our subject was Hugh 
Wilson, who was among the early settlers of North Shenango Township. He 
was a son of Hugh Wilson, and both were natives of Lancaster County, Penn. 
The children of John and Sarah (Wilson) Stewart numbered ten: James, 
Hannah (now Mrs. J. H. Freeman), Hugh R., John, Mary (now Mrs. W. P. 
Bennett), Sarah, Allen W., William P., Andrew T. and Miranda E. (now Mrs. 
M. Trace). The subject of this sketch was reared in North Shenango Town- 
ship, this county; received a limited education in the common schools and has 
always resided on the old homestead. He was married February 27, 1861, to 
Elizabeth A., daughter of James and Sarah (Fletcher) Blair, of West Fallow- 
field Township, this county. By this union there are two children: Clement 
E. and Fred. Mr. Stewart was Postmaster of Stewartsville for sixteen years. 
In politics he is a Democrat. 

NATHAN W. WOLVERTON, farmer, P. O. Espyville, was born in Warren 
County, N. J. , February 3, 1824, and is a son of Peter and Anna (Quick) 
Wolverton, both natives of "New Jersey and of Holland descent. When twelve 
years of age our subject moved to Trumbull County, Ohio, with his mother. 
In 1854 he settled in North Shenango Township, this county, on the farm 
where he now resides aad on which he has made all the improvements. He 
was married April 6, 1854, to Melissa E., daughter of Charles and Sarah J. 
(Deforest) Campbell, of North Shenango Township, this county, by whom he 
has had five children : Calvin K., Hiram E., Charles C. (deceased), Sarah J., 
and Ralph T. He and his family are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, in which he has been Steward upward of twenty-five years. He is a 
representative farmer and worthy citizen; has held several ofiBces in the gift 
of the township; in politics he is a Republican. 



OIL CREEK TOWNSHIP. 913 



OIL CREEK TOWNSHIP. 

ELISHA ARCHER, farmer, P. O. Hydetown, was born February 23, 1835, 
in Plum Township, Venango Co., Penn. His parents, John G. and Susanna 
(Wilson) Archer, settled in Troy Township, this county, in 1857, and 
there cleared up and improved a fine farm of 120 acres, where they resided 
until their deaths; former died in 1870, latter in 1869. They were upright, 
industrious people and won the highest respect of all who knew them. Mr. 
Archer was a helpless cripple from the effects of rheumatism during the last 
thirty years of his life. Their children were William; John (deceased); Alvin 
(deceased); Elisha; James, of Troy Township, this county; Samuel, of Venango 
County, Penn. ; Robert, a soldier in the Fourteenth Regiment United States 
Infantry, who died October 9, 1862, at Little York, Penn., and George. Our 
subject was very kind in his care and attention to his aged parents. He mar- 
ried Miss Rebecca Proper, of Venango County, September 22, 1859, and they 
then settled where they now live. Here by industry they have acquired and 
improved a good home of eighty-five acres adjoining Hydetown Borough. 
Their children were Ida, Lizzie, Elmer (deceased), Clarinda, Hattie (deceased), 
and Ernest. Mr. Archer has served his township in various positions; is at 
present Collector of Taxes. He and his worthy wife are Methodists. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican. 

GEORGE C. BARTLETT, farmer, P. O. Hydetown, was born October 4, 
1825, in Oneida County, N. Y. His parents, Horace and Clarissa (Seward) 
Bartlett, natives of New Haven County, Conn., passed their active life in 
Oneida County, N. Y., where the latter died in 1851. Horace Bartlett died 
in 1881, while residing with his son here. He was respected and beloved by 
all who knew him for his many noble qualities. Our subject, in September, 
1851, married Miss Mary A. Denison, of Essex, Conn. , born November 5, 1824, 
daughter of Robert Fordyce and Fannie Maria (Griswold) Denison. To this 
union have been born four children: Helen M., wife of B. F. Edwards, of 
Titusville; Mary G., wife of William Edwards, of Titusville; George F. and 
Carrie D. After living on a farm in Oneida County ten years, they came to 
Titusville, this county, in 1861, and there Mr. Bartlett engaged in developing 
oil territory and refining oil, being proprietor of the Sunshine Oil Works. In 
1876 he purchased his present farm of 800 acres, in the Borough of Hydetown, 
and located here in 1878, retiring permanently from the oil business. Mr. and 
Mrs. Bartlett and their entire family are consistent members of the Presbyte- 
rian Church in Titusville. Mr. Bartlett was largely instrumental in the suc- 
cessful establishment of the church and the building of their present hand- 
some church edifice. They also take a deep interest in the cause of educa- 
tion, and have given their children good advantages. 

GARRETT A. CONOVER, mason and carpenter, P. O. Titusville, was born 
December 2, 1828, in Essex County, N. J. His parents, David and Sallie 
(Everett) Conover, of New Jersey, came to Oil Creek Township, this county, 
in 1882, where the latter died in 1835, after which Mr. Conover returned to 
New Jersey, where he now lives. Our subject remained in this county with 
his uncle, William Kerr, and here he married, December 4, 1851, Miss Mary 
Ann McLaaghlin, born January 14, 1885, at Kerr's Hill. Her grandfather, 



914 BIOGKAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

James McLaughlin, a native [of Ireland, settled in Rome Township, this county, 
in 1800, and there died at the age of one hundred and four years. Her father, 
John McLaughlin, married Susan Kerr. They settled at Kerr's Hill, where 
they resided until their deaths. Our subject and wife then settled at Kerr's HilJ, 
where Mr. Conover has ever since followed his occupation as carpenter and 
joiner and stone mason. Their children are — Mrs. Susan E. Mars, Samuel M., 
Mrs. Ida Crawford, Howard, Hattie J., Willie and Garrie B. . Mr. Conover 
has served his township in almost all the offices, holding several from two to 
four terms each, and has always discharged his duties faithfully, and to the 
entire satisfaction of the people. He and his worthy wife are consistent mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian Church, in which he has for many years been an Elder. 
In politics he is a Republican. 

JAMES W. CRAWFORD, miller, P. O. Titusville. was born November 20, 
1829, in that part of Trumbull County, Ohio, now known as Mahoning County. 
His parents, William and Ann (Wilson) Crawford, both died there in 1881, 
aged ninety-two and eighty- six years respectively. Our subject married Miss 
Sylvina Dunlap, October 13, 1852, and to this union were born seven children: 
Thalia, Mrs. Celicia Alcom, Mrs. Lucy Ann Tefft, Gemella, James Albert, Ben- 
ton and Mabel. He followed the carpenter's trade most of his life; moved to 
Oil Creek Township, this county, in 1870. In 1884 he became a partner in 
the Roseburg Mills. Mr. and Mrs. Crawford are consistent members of the 
United Presbyterian Church. In politics he is an earnest Prohibitionist. 

JOHN GILSON (deceased) was a native of Maryland, and was brought 
up in Bedford County, Penn. His father, William Gilson, a native of En- 
gland, was an American soldier in the Revolution. He married Alice Shirley, 
and they and their nine children settled in Oil Creek Township, this county, 
where Mr. Gilson, Sr., died in 1807. His widow died in 1844 in her ninety- 
sixth year. Our subject, started on foot fi-om Bedford County, Penn., for the 
lake region in 1799. He reached Oil Creek in December, and was crippled 
while cutting down a tree to cross the swollen stream near Centreville. This 
laid him up through the winter, and determined his course in staying. 
Returning in the spring to Bedford County, he married Anna Bell, and they 
came here on foot, settling permanently in 1800. They took up six tracts 
of land and retained one of 400 acres for themselves. They lived the lives of 
upright pioneers, and left an honorable name to posterity. Of their thirteen 
children, sis are now living, viz.: Charles B., Thomas, Richard B., Mrs. 
Elizabeth Early, Mrs. Ann Navy, and John B. 

THOMAS GILSON, farmer, P. O. Titusville, was born July 4, 1811. 
He married Miss Elizabeth C. McLaughlin, September 21, 1848. They then 
settled on their farm and began clearing and improving it. Their children 
are Mrs. Lucy Ann Reynolds, Mrs. Hannah J. Reynolds, Mrs. Marietta 
Goodrich, and Mrs. Delilah Wheattall. Mr. Gilson is an earnest and life-long 
Democrat. 

CHARLES B. GiLSON, farmer and mechanic, P. O. Titusville, was born 
March 29, 1807, in Oil Creek Township, this county. While a young man he 
learned the trade of carpenter and joiner under T. H. Hoskins, working in 
Forest, Crawford, Erie, Venango and other counties adjoining. He married 
Miss Marietta Moore, of Venango County, December 1, 1836. After living in 
Titusville some years (their property being where the Oil Exchange now 
stands), they moved to their present place in the township, where they have 
ever since resided. Their children are Edward L., Mrs. Priscilla Shaw 
(deceased), Samuel, Mrs. Melissa Jane Stackpole, Leonard, and Dr. Willis O., 
of Spring Creek Station, Wan-en Co., Penn. Mr. Gilson has done a great deal 



OIL CREEK TOWNSHIP. 915 

of work through this country as a millwright, being known as a first- class 
mechanic and always commanding the highest positions. He is a Greenbacker ; 
formerly a Democrat; voted first for Andrew Jackson. 

JOHN B. GILSON, farmer, P. O. Titusville, was born September 6, 1825, 
on the farm where he now resides, in Oil Creek Township, this county; son 
of John and Anna (Bell) Gilson (see sketch of John Gilson). He married, 
December 25, 1853, Miss Nancy Early, of Rome Township, this county, a 
native of Vermont, born December 20, 1837, daughter of James and Hannah 
{Bradford) Early, early settlers of Rome Township. To this union were born 
three children: Mrs. Ida Victoria Kerr, Willard J. and Cyrus J. They also 
brought up Charles James Early, son of Thomas Early (deceased). After their 
marriage our subject and wife took care of Mr. and Mrs. John Gilson (our 
subject's parents) until their deaths, and they now occupy the old homestead. 
By industry and good management they have added to it until they now own 
a farm of 175 acres of well-improved land; besides ninety acres they have 
recently bought. In politics Mr. Gilson is a Democrat. 

WILLIAM KELLY (deceased) was a native of County Deiry, Ireland, 
and came to America in 1819, settling in Oil Creek Township, this county, in 
1823. He married Miss Mary Mclntyre in ]822. She was born in this town- 
ship in December, 1802. Her parents, John and Hannah Mclntyre, were 
natives of Ireland, and came here from Mifflin County, Penn., in 1798. After 
their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Kelly settled on the farm near Titusville, Penn. 
Their children are — John, in Erie, Penn. ; James, in Rome Township, this 
county; Hannah; Oliver; Mary; Mrs. Susan Newton, in Fredonia, N. Y. ; and 
Mrs. Isabel Gee. This family has contributed quite largely to the ranks of 
the profession of teaching, as all except Oliver have been engaged in that occu- 
pation. Mr. Kelly died February 4, 1861. His widow now resides on the 
family homestead with her daughters, Hannah and Mary, and son, Oliver. 

ANDREW KERR, retired farmer, P. O Titusville, was born April 8,1807, 
in Oil Creek Township, this county. His father, James Kerr, a native of Ire- 
land, came to America at ten years of age. He married Miss Margery Alcom, 
also a native of Ireland. They moved from Frankstown, Penn., to Oil Creek 
Township about 1800. James Kerr died in 1812; his widow in 1866, aged 
eighty-six. They were noble pioneers and rendered valuable service in the 
settlement of this county. Our subject married Anna Shelmadine in 1836. 
She died in 1841, leaving four children: John Wesley; James Henry, a soldier 
of the Fifty-seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, killed at the 
battle of Fair Oaks, Va. ; William Jasper and Mrs. Anna Kitlinger. Mr. Kerr 
next married, in 1843, Anna Baldwin, a native of Oil Creek Township, this 
county, born in 1825, 'daughter of Daniel and Rosanna Baldwin. Their chil- 
dren were — Hannah (deceased), Mrs. Juline Bates, Mrs. Perrilla Hummer, Dan- 
iel West, Mrs. Emma Carroll, Andrew T. (deceased), Mrs. Mary L. Sodiman 
and Cassius. Mr. Kerr has divided his land liberally among his sons, and 
has still 200 acres of fine land left. In his quiet old age he is deprived 
entirely of his eye-sight. He and his worthy wife are members of the United 
Brethren Church. In politics he is a stanch Republican. 

ANDREW A. KERR, farmer, P. O. Gresbam, was born in August, 1812, 
in Oil Creek Township, this county. His parents, Andrew and Nancy (Mars) 
Kerr, natives of Ireland, came from Lancaster County, Penn., in 1801. Here 
they endured the hardships incident to pioneer life, and cleared up and devel- 
oped a farm. Their children were — Jane, Mrs. Margaret ^IcGinnett, Mary 
Ann, Samuel, Mrs. Nancy Root, William, Mrs. Sarah Ashton, Mrs. Susan 
McGlaughlin and Andrew A., all deceased except William and Andrew A. Our 



916 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

subject married Miss Mary Mars, of Mercer County, Perm., January 14, 1840, 
and they then settled where they now live, and developed a comfortable home. 
Their children were — William, of Crawford County; Andrew, Jr., of Vinton, 
Benton Co., Iowa; Mrs. Nancy Mars; Mrs. Mary Jane Mack, of Indiana County, 
Penn. ; Isabel, (deceased); James A. (deceased); Susan and Samuel B. Mrs. 
Kerr died March 8, 1867. She was an earnest Christian, and her loss was 
mourned by a large circle of friends. Mr. Kerr and his entire family are con- 
sistent members of the United Presbyterian Church, and he has been a mem- 
ber of its session since he united with that denomination in 1859. He is an 
enthusiastic Prohibitionist; one of the worthy and representative citizens of 
Oil Creek Township. 

SILAS KERR, farmer and lumberman, P. O. Titusville, was born April 9, 
1824, in Oil Creek Township, this county. His father, David Kerr, whose 
parents emigrated from County Tyrone, Ireland, was born in Frankstown, 
Penn., and came to this county soon after with his parents. Here, having lived 
the life of a pioneer's son in the new county, he married Miss Esther Shelma- 
dine. He died in 1833, leaving live children: Silas, Mrs. Jane Tubbs, Mary 
(deceased), Robert R., and Mrs. Susan Tubbs (deceased). Mrs. Kerr died June 
6, 1874. Our subject married Miss Mary Tubbs, July 1, 1847, and they have 
remained in Oil Creek Township, this county, ever since, with the exception of a 
few years spent lumbering in adjoining townships in Warren County. In 
about 1871 they located on their present farm. To Mr. and Mrs. Kerr have 
been born eight children: Mrs. Esther A. Whitford, Mrs. Lina Fish (deceased), 
David T. , Mrs. Mary Perkins, Gary, and Ina, and two infants (deceased). Mr. 
Kerr now owns property to the amoimt of 900 acres besides extensive lumber 
mill interests. In politics he is a Democrat. 

JAMES M. KERR, miller, P. O. Titusville, was born December 26, 1844, in Oil 
Creek Township, this county; son of David Kerr. He married Miss Fannie M. 
Homer, of Rome Township, this county, in May, 1871. She died August 22, 
1878, leaving one daughter — Lena M. Mr. Kerr afterward married Miss Eva 
L. Brooks, January 1, 1880. She was born in Warren County, Penn., and is 
a daughter of Henry Brooks. They have two children: Edna M. and Lina. 
Our subject has been engaged in farming most of his life. In the spring of 
1878 he and his two brothers, Lynn H. and La Fayette J., purchased the old 
Thompson mill site on Thompson Ran in Oil Creek Township, this county, 
and built a large flour and general custom mill with three run of buhrs. In 1881 
our subject purchased his brothers interest and has since been carrying on the 
business on his own account. He has succeeded in making an excellent repu- 
tation for the mill and is building up a large custom. Mr. Kerr has served 
his township as Supervisor and School Director, positions he is now holding. 
He is a man of lirst-class business principles. In politics is a Republican. 

ALBERT B. KERR, miller and millwright, P.O. Titusville, was born August 
16, 1855, in Kerr's Hill, Oil Creek Township, this county. His father, William 
Kerr, one of the oldest pioneers of the township, and a son of Andrew Kerr, 
is also a native of this township. Here he married Miss Catherine Conover, 
and settled where he now lives. Their children are — Mrs. Sarah Ann St. Clair, 
of Iowa, Andrew M. , George C. , Garrett B. , William H. , John N., Mrs. 
Ophelia Alcorn, of Iowa, and Albert B. Mrs. Kerr died in 1877. Mr. Kerr 
survives her at the advanced age of eighty-two and is one of the most highly 
respected citizens of the township. Albert B. married Miss Maggie J. Mack, 
April 20, 1881. Tney have two sons: Arthur N. and Stanley A. In Febru- 
ary, 1884, a partnership was formed consisting of Albert B. Kerr, Garrett B. 
KeiT, Hugh Jamison and James W. Crawford, for the purpose of carrying on a 



OIL CREEK TOWNSHIP. 917 

mill near Titusville on the Buffalo, New York & Philadelphia Kailroad. They 
erected a new building and fitted it up with machinery. The mill was opened 
in May, and by strict attention to business principles they are building up a 
large and flourishing custom. Mr. and Mrs. Ken* are consistent members of 
the Presbyterian Church. He is an earnest supporter of the Prohibition party, 
and at the County Convention in April, 1884, was nominated as their candi- 
date for Prothonotary. Garrett B. Kerr was born July 4, 1844, and married 
Miss Emma Kerr, April 30, 1871. Their children are — LydiaL., Frederick C. 
and Kate. 

ROBERT LEWIS, farmer, P. O. Titusville, was born July 18, 1813, in 
Oil Creek Township, this county. His grandparents, John and Elizabeth 
Lewis, of Ireland, came to this county in about 1800, and after living here 
several years moved to Cincinnati, Ohio. Their son, Robert, remained here 
and married Miss Jane Curry, daughter of one of the early pioneers of this 
township. He died in January, 1813, and his only son Robert (our subject) 
was born in July following. Mrs. Lewis afterward married William Wilson, 
of Yenango County. Our subject married Miss Sallie Breed, March 14, 1839. 
They then settled where they now reside, and here by industry and good man- 
agement they have acquired a fine farm of 100 acres of well- improved land. 
Their children were — Mary, William W., Charles Hai-vey (deceased), John H., 
and Freelie M. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis are consistent members of the Presby- 
terian Church. He is a man of upright integrity and a citizen of recognized 
influence in the community. In politics a lifelong Democrat. 

BENJAMIN MARS, farmer, P. O. Gresham, was born June 5, 1822, in 
Lawi-ence County, Penn. His father, William Mars, a native of Ireland, immi- 
grated to America while a young man, and after living some time in Franks- 
town, Penn., finally settled in Lawrence County with his brothers and sisters, 
in about 1802, and there he married Miss Nancy Alexander. They developed 
a fine farm, now owned by their son John J. Mr. Mars was a soldier in the 
war of 1812. Our subject, who is the third of their four sons, came to this 
township in 1844 and followed his trade as carpenter and developed his farm. 
Here he married, March 10, 1846, Miss Isabel McGinnett, who died February 
17, 1852, leaving two sons: William, deceased January 4, 1882, and John 
Alexander, deceased November 28, 1855. Mr. Mars afterward married, 
October 19, 1854, Miss Rebecca Breed, daughter of John Breed, a native of 
Connecticut, and settler of Venango County. Their children were — John 
Andrew, Mary Edith (deceased January 22, 1866), and Adelaide. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mars are consistent members of the United Presbyterian Church. By 
industry and good management he has acquired a comfortable and pleasant 
home. Mr. Mars is one of the leading and representative farmers of Oil 
Creek Township. In politics he is a life-long Republican. 

CAPT. ALANSON H. NELSON, Justice of the Peace, Hydetown, was 
born April 22, 1828, in Tompkins County, N. Y., and moved to Chautauqua 
County, same State, at four years of age. His father, William Nelson, 
enlisted in the Regular Army and was killed in the Seminole war. Our subject 
came to Oil Creek Township, this county, at seventeen years of age, and spent 
about nine years lumbering. He married Miss Electa Strong, of Chautauqua 
County, N. Y., November 8, 1849. In 1855 he sold out his interest in the 
lumbering mill and bought a farm near the eastern border of this township. 
Our subject enlisted August 1 1861, in the Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteer Infantry, leaving his wife and seven small children. He, with Capt. 
Chase, organized Company K, to the number of thirty men, by whom he was 
elected First Lieutenant. When they reached Harrisburg, Penn., he was 



918 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

chosen to return and make up the remainder of the company, which he did, 
enlisting fifty-live more men. The company was assigned to the Army of the 
Potomac. At the death of Capt. Chase our subject was promoted to the com- 
mand, June 17, 1862. He led his company through seventeen of the hard- 
fought and historic battles of the Virginia campaigns. In the absence of 
the field officers Capt. Nelson, being the senior Captain, took command of 
the regiment for a period of eighteen months. He received his discharge in 
November, 1864, leaving an honorable record as a brave and faithful soldier. 
Since returning home he has devoted himself as actively to the pursuits of 
civil life and the care of his family. Mr. Nelson was one of the organizers of 
the Republican party in this county, but in 1872 he joined the Liberals and 
voted for Horace Greeley, and in 1874 he joined and commenced the active 
work of organizing the Greenback party. He was elected Justice of the Peace 
in February, 1882, in Hydetown Borough, where he was located in April, 
1881. He has served in the same ofBce two terms in Oil Creek Township. 
Seven of Capt. Nelson's nine children are now living, viz. : William, in Smith 
County. Kan. ; Mrs. Norah Keefer, Hornellsville, N. T. ; Mrs. Lucy Jones; 
John; Dr. Charles E. ; Mary and Frank. 

JOHN PASTORITJS, farmer, P. O. Titusville, was born November 9, 1828, 
in Centre County, Penn. His father, Abram Pastorius, married Martha Boal. 
He made a trip to this county as early as 1801, on a visit to his two elder 
brothers, who were early settlers here. He went back and brought a yoke of 
oxen for his brothers' use on the farm, and returned to Centre County on foot. 
His ancestors, referred to in Whittier's poems, were among the first settlers of 
Germantown, Penn. Abram Pastorius and his wife, Martha, settled in Oil 
Creek Township, this county, in 1838. Of their six children, four are now 
living: William, James, Mrs. Jane Eobison and John. Mrs. Pastorius died 
in 1843, Mr. Pastorius in 1871, aged eighty-four years. Our subject, after 
obtaining a common school education, took a short course in Allegheny Col- 
lege. He married Catherine J. Peebles, June 21, 1855. She was born in 
Juniata County, Penn., in 1835, and was brought to this county in 1837 by her 
parents, James and Margaret Peebles. Their children are — Mrs. Martha J. Lewis, 
Margaret O. and James B. Our subject and wife have given their son a good 
farm as a start in life, and have still a tine farm of 160 acres left. Mr. Pas- 
torius has served the township in most of its offices, always fulfilling his duties 
faithfully and to the satisfaction of the people. He is a man of strict integ- 
rity, and is highly respected by the entire community. In politics he is a 
Democrat. 

JOHN SWAN SON, miller, Hydetown, is a native of Jankoping, Sweden, 
born April 12, 1834, and with his wife came to America in 1871, locating in 
Titusville, this county. Here, while learning our language and customs, he 
worked at the carpenter's trade for two years. Having acquired the trade of 
miller in his native country, he rented Thompson's Mill in Oil Creek Town 
- ship, this county, which he operated for about five years. In 1880 he, in part- 
nership with P. A. Foreblom, of Titusville. purchased a mill site of Charles 
Hyde, and erected the Hydetown Mills. This they have fitted up with first- 
class machinery, costing them in all upward of $12,000. Mr. Swanson has 
personal charge of the mills. By his excellent work and polite treatment of 
his patrons he has built up a good reputation for the mills, and a large custom. 
January 18, 1858, he was married to Elizabeth Munson, by whom he has two 
children: William and Emily. The family belongs to the Swedish Lutheran 
Church, Titusville. Mr. Swanson is a business man of strict integrity, and as 
a citizen is respected by the entire community. 



PINE TOWNSHIP. 919 



PINE TOWNSHIP. 

SILAS C. BISHOP, farmer, P. O. Linesville.'was born in Pine Township, 
this county, April 3, 1819, and is a son of Abram and Phebe (Maxwell) 
Bishop, who came from New Jersey, and located in this county about 181!^; 
about 1816-17 they settled on the farm now owned by Eufus Bishop, which 
they cleared and improved, and there lived and died. They reared a large 
family, ten of whom grew to maturity: William F. (deceased), Eliza A. 
(deceased), Stephen M., John M., Francis, Silas C. Daniel, Eufus, Ephraim 
and Maria. The subject of this sketch has always resided in Pine Township; 
was married December 22, 1838, to Rachel, daughter of William Meeker, of 
this township, by whom he has four children: Sylvester; Clarissa, Mrs. James 
Garwood; Caroline, Mrs. Alfred Red; and Evaline, Mrs. Dillon P. Bright 
Mr. Bishop has resided on his present farm about thirty- eight years, and has 
made all the improvements. He has held various ofiSces in the township. In 
politics he has always been a Republican, and a strict advocate of temperance 
principles. 

EIJFUS BISHOP, farmer, P. O. Linesville, was born in what is now Pine 
Township, this county, February 8, 1824, and is a son of Abram and Phebe 
(Maxwell) Bishop, natives of New Jersey, and among the first settlers of Con- 
neaut Township, and later of Pine Township, this county, where they cleared 
and improved the farm now owned and occupied by our subject. Abram was 
a son of James and Susan'Biehop, of New Jersey, and early settlers in what is 
now Summit Township, this county. Mr. and Mrs. Abram Bishop had thir- 
teen children, of whom eight are now living. The subject of this sketch Las 
always resided on the old homestead. He was married January 24, 1850, to 
Julia Ann, daughter of John and Anna (Hill) Garwood, of Sadsbury Township, 
this county. The issue of this union was live children: Sarah A. (Mrs. George 
Souders), Martin (deceased), Calvin L., Melissa J. and Martha E. Mr. 
Bishop has held several township offices. In politics he is a Republican. 

WILLIAM C. BURT, farmer, P. O. Linesville, was born in Fowler, 
Trumbull Co. , Ohio, April 8, 1831; son of Alva and Cornelia (Colts) Burt, 
natives of Genesee County, N. Y., and who were among the pioneers of Trum- 
bull County. Our subject was reared in Ashtabula County, and received a 
limited education in the common schools of Andover, that county. At the age 
of sixteen years he went on the lakes, and followed sailing one year, and at 
the age of seventeen purchased a farm of sixty acres in Richmond Township, 
Ashtabula Co., Ohio, which he paid for in six years, working at month's wages. 
When twenty years of age he commenced lumbering in diiferent sections of the 
country, which he followed up to 1866 for others, and then located in Pine 
Township, this county, purchased the farm where he now resides and 
embarked in the lumber business for himself, which he followed ten years. 
Since 1876 he has been principally engaged in farming. He cleared and 
improved his farm himself, lost a fine residence by fire in 1875 and rebuilt in 
1876. His farm comprises 120 acres, about 100 of which are improved. 
Our subject was married in 1855, to Augusta, daughter of Alonzo and Priscilla 
(Prescott) Moulton, of Conneautville. His wife is a native of Maine. They 
have one child — Dorcas. Mr. Burt is an A. Y. M. He has held several offices 
in the gift of the township. In politics he is independent. 



920 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

"WILLIAM E. DENNIS, farmer, P. O. Linesville, was born in Pine 
Township, this county, December 31, 1844; son of Aaron and Betsy (Meeker) 
Dennis. His father came from the eastern part of the State and located in 
Pine Township about 1834. His mother was a daughter of William Meeker, 
who settled in Pine Township in 1819, and with three brothers^ — Moses, John 
and Joseph — located on the farm a part of which is now owned by John Gaff- 
ney, where they manufactured brick for several years. William Meeker later 
settled on the farm now occupied by the widow of his son. Smith Meeker, and 
lived there until his death. Aaron Dennis, the father of our subject, was twice 
married. His first wife was Betsy Meeker, by whom he had eleven children: 
William E., S. P., Polly J. (Mrs. James Culver), Almira (Mrs. Andrew Jack- 
son), C. C, A. T., Emily (Mrs. George Adsit), Mary (Mrs. S. E. Clark), 
Harriet (Mrs. D. A. Herring), John and Carrie. His second wife was Mrs. 
Lucy (Flick) Wrightnour, by whom he had four children: Nancy (Mrs. 
Charles D. Brown), Jonah, Charlie and Maggie. The subject of this sketch 
was reared in Pine Township and received a limited education in the common 
schools. He served in the late war of the Rebellion, being drafted for nine 
months, and went with Company K, One Hundred and Sixty-ninth Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry; was on guard duty most of the time, and was honor 
ably discharged at the expiration of his term. He was married September 30, 
1873, to Lucy, daughterjof John and Amanda (Smith) Eea, of Pine Township, 
this county. He located on the farm where he now resides in 1870, most of 
which he cleared and stumped himself and made all improvements in buildings, 
etc., and has now one of the best producing farms in the township. Both he 
and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a member 
of the G. A. K. ; has always been a Republican in politics and a strong 
advocate of prohibition. 

JACOB FREY; farmer, P. O. Linesville, was bom in Conneaut Township, 
this county, September 18, 1806, and is a son of Henry and Barbara (Baum- 
gartner) Frey, both natives of Lancaster County, and of German descent, who 
settled in this county in 1800, locating in Conneaut Township, where they 
cleared and improved a farm and there lived and died. They had sixteen 
children: Catherine, John, Betsey, Polly, Barbara, Nancy, Martha, David, 
Joseph, Samuel, Jacob, Henry, Enoch, George, Simeon and an infant, all 
deceased but Samuel, Jacob, George and Simeon. The subject of this sketch was 
reared in Conneaiit Township, this county, and resided here up to 1867, when 
he purchased the farm in Pine Township where he now resides, a part of which 
he has improved. The farm comprises 200 acres, about sixty of which are 
under good cultivation. The subject of this sketch has been twice married. 
His first wife was Rebecca, daughter of Samuel and Susan (Payton) Gilliland, 
of Conneaut Township, this county, by whom he had five children: Mary, 
Amos (deceased), Benjamin J., Louisa R. (now Mrs. Smith Line), and Alinda 
E. (now Mrs. William M. Shaw). His present wife is Sarah L., daughter of 
Andrew and Theodate (Buell) Linn, of North Shenango Township, this county, 
by whom he has had five children: Arista B. (deceased), Caroline T. (now Mrs. 
William L. Wildrick), Henry, Nervie, and Buell L. (deceased). Mr. Frey is one 
of the substantial farmers of Pine Township. Both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church, with which they have been connected 
for many years. He has held several o£Bces in the gift of Conneaut and Pine 
Townships; in politics he is a Prohibitionist. 

MYRON HENDRICK, farmer, P. O. Linesville, was born in New Hamp- 
shire, February 12, 1841, and is a son of Otis M. and Lucy (Alden) Hen- 
drick, who settled in Pine Township, this county, in 1852, locating on the 



PINE TOWNSHIP. 921 

farm now owned by B. Seelye, Esq., which was one of the oldest settled in the 
township, though, at the time they located oa it, it was all over-run with 
underbrush, which they had to clear oflf, and in the course of time had to 
make all necessary improvements, such as fencing, putting up new buildings, 
etc. They resided there until 1864, when they purchased another farm in the 
neighborhood. Otis M. Hendrick died in 1873 at the age of sixty-nine, on 
the farm now owned by C. R. Hendrick. He was a native of Wilbraham, 
Mass. His wife is a native of Connecticut, and still survives him. He had 
five children: Orlando B. (deceased), Myron, Otis N. (killed near Richmond in 
the late war of the Rebellion), Lucy (now Mrs. Frank H. Potter), and Carlos 
R. The subject of this sketch was married July 2, 1868, to Eliza, daughter 
of Obed and Margaret (Gilliland) Garwood, of Conneaut Township, this 
county, by whom he has three children: Harry H., Blanche and M. Park. 
Mr. Hendrick has lived on the farm where he now resides since 1868; is one of 
the thorough-going farmers of Pine Township; he has held nearly all the 
offices in the gift of his township, and is now serving his second term as Jus- 
tice of the Peace. The last time he was elected, he received every vote cast in 
the township, and had more votes than any other officer that was voted for. In 
politics he was a DemcJcrat, but now is a Prohibitionist. 

B. O. IRONS, Postmaster at Linesville, was born in Conneaut Township, 
this county, February 24, 1824, son of George and Rachel L. (Lane) Irons, 
who settled in Conneaut Township, this county, in 1816, on the farm now 
owned by W. H. Bradt, which they cleared and improved and where they 
lived and died. George Irons was a native of New York City, a son of Capt. 
John Irons, a native of Holland and an old sea Captain, who was drowned in 
New York harbor. Rachel L., the wife of George, was a native of New Jer- 
sey, and a daughter of James and Susan (Keats) Bishop, who settled in what 
is now Summit Township, this county, in 1816. George Irons had nine chil- 
dren, of whom three died in infancy, and six grew to maturity, viz. : Martha 
A., now Mrs. J. V. Ladner; Mary E., afterward Mrs. S. L. Curtis, deceased; 
James R. ; William B. ; Susan A., now Mrs. A. W. Bunnell, and Bradford O. 
Our subject was reared in Conneaut Township, this county, and educated in 
the common schools. He was married October 4, 1854, to Amanda, daughter of 
Lewis and Lorinda (Crooker) Ward, of Cussewago Township, this county, by 
whom he had one son, G. Warner, who died in his twenty-sixth year. A|ter 
his marriage Mr. Irons was engaged in farming seven years in Conneaut 
Township, and then removed to Linesville, where he embarked in mercantile 
business, in which he was actively engaged for several years. In 1874 he was 
appointed Postmaster at Linesville, which position he still holds. His wife 
died December 11, 1883, aged fifty-two. Both she and her son were members 
of the Baptist Church of Linesville, as is also our subject, who has been a mem- 
ber since seventeen years of age. Mr. Irons is a member of the I. O. O. F., 
and is one of the representative and leading citizens of Linesville; he has 
served as Burgess of Linesville, and has held many other minor offices. In 
politics he is a Republican, and a strong advocate of temperance principles. 
Mr. Irons also owns the land situated within the northern limits of Linesville, 
known as the Northwestern Pennsylvania Poultry Farm, upon which he has 
recently erected several buildings adapted to the poultry business.. Messrs. 
H. J. Eager and M. B. Naramore have rented the premises for a term of 
years, and are establishing the most extensive poultry business in this part 
of the State. 

REV. CHAMBERS T. JACK, minister of the Baptist Church, Linesville, 
was born in Kittanning, Penn., March 20, 1846, son of John and Alice (Bow- 



922 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

ser) Jack, natives of Armstrong County, Penn., parents of five sons and five 
daughters. One son, James W., served in all about three years during the war 
of the Rebellion in the Seventy- eighth, also One Hundred and Fourth, Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry; was honorably discharged and returned home 
without a wound. The father, who was a consistent member of the Regular 
Baptist Church, died June 15, 1883; the mother, a consistent member of the 
German Baptist Church, is now living in Clarion County, Penn., with three 
of her children. Our subject, who is third in the family, graduated from 
Reidsburgh University, Clarion County. Penn., where he afterward taught mathe- 
matics and Latin for one year. In the fall of 1875 ]\Ir. Jack commenced the 
ministry in the Regular Baptist Church at Enterprise, Penn., where he 
remained two years; from there he went to Townville, this county, in 1876, 
and in 1879 came to Linesville to fill the charge as Pastor of the Baptist 
Church, continuing as such until January 1, 1884, when he was obliged to 
resign in consequence of a stroke of paralysis. Our subject enlisted in 1865 
in the One Hundred and Fourth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving 
with the Army of the Potomac, chiefly under the Provost Marshal, at Norfolk, 
Va. Was present at the siege of Petersburg, and after about six months' serv- 
ice was honorably discharged at the close of the war, In August, 1865, and 
returned home. He was twice married, on first occasion, in 1869, to Miss 
Tilla A. Bowser, a native of Armstrong County, Penn., and to this union were 
born two daughters: Almeda M. and Lula L. Mrs. Jack dying April 6, 1878, 
our subject married, August 20, 1881, Miss Rosa A. Heath, a native of Will- 
iamstield, Ohio, daughter of Linus T. Heath, who moved to this county in 1867, 
locating in Linesville in March, 188'2, and has been engaged in general 
mercantile business here ever since. Mr. and Mrs. Heath are consistent mem- 
bers of the Baptist Church. Mrs. Jack is their only child. To Rev. and Mrs. 
Jack has been born one son- — Fred. Our subject is an earnest, energetic, patri- 
otic and Christian man. Since his return from the army hia health has shown 
itself to have been much impaired during the service. 

NATHAN KNAPP farmer. P. O. Linesville, was born in Onondaga County, 
N. Y. , April 10, 1821; son of David and Sophia (Knapp) Knapp. He came 
to Crawford County, Penn., .in 1843, and in 1844 located in Pine Township. He 
was married December 31, 1845, to Anna, daughter of William and Barbara 
(Frey) Meeker, of Pine Township, this county, by whom he has three chil- 
dren: James D., Albert E. and William F. He settled on the farm, where he 
now resides, in 1848, that section being then an unbroken wilderness. In 
1861 he built a saw and shingle-mill, and became engaged in the manufacture 
of laths and shingles, in which he continued about twenty years, and in the 
meantime cleared and improved between forty and fifty acres of his farm. 
His wife's father, William Meeker, settled in Pine Township, this county, in 
1818. He was a native of Virginia and a resident of Meadville, Penn. Sev- 
eral years previous to his settlement in Pine Township, he settled on the farm, 
a part of which is now owned by John Goffrey; this he cleared and after- 
ward removed to the farm now occupied by the widow of his son. Smith 
Meeker, and resided there until his death. He had seven children: Sarah, 
now Mrs. Edwin Bishop; Betsey, now Mrs. Aaron Dennis; Rachel, now Mrs. 
S. C. Bishop; Patience, now Mrs. Milo Miller; Polly, now the widow Gardner, 
a resident of Linesville; Adeline and Anna (twins), former married to John 
D. Williams, both now deceased; latter now Mrs. Nathan Knapp. Mr. and 
Mrs. Knapp are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics he 
is a Republican. 

THOMAS LIMBER, proprietor of tannery, Linesville, was born in Mer- 



PINE TOWNSHIP. 923 

cer County, Penn. , August 20, 1840; son of Christopher and Elizabeth (Armor) 
Limber, former a native of Mercer County, latter of Crawford County, Penn., 
both now living in Mercer County. They are parents of seven children. Mr* 
Limber is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Christopher LiuK 
ber, who is a farmer, was a private, and his father an officer in the Revolution, 
ary war. Our subject and his brother, William W. , enlisted October 1, 1861, 
in the Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving with the Army of 
the Potomac, and were present at the siege of Yorktown and the engagements 
at Williamsburg and Fair Oaks, at which latter, May 30, 1862, Thomas 
was wounded in his left shoulder by a minie rifle ball, and was consequently- 
honorably discharged in October, 1862, and returned home. William W. 
remained in the service, and was in all the engagements his regiment partici- 
pated in. He received a severe wound in the left leg, and had a thumb 
injured. He veteranized, and at the close of the war was honorably dis- 
charged. Our subject enlisted, for the second time, for three months, when Gen. 
Lee made his raid into Pennsylvania, and was present at the battle of Parkers- 
burg. Mr. Limber learned the trade of tanner and currier before the war,, 
a business he has worked at most of his life. He moved to Linesville in the- 
spring of 1874, and purchased the tannery at that place in 1876, since which 
time he has conducted the business alone. He also owns a handsome resi- 
dence in Linesville, and fifteen acres of improved land just outside the corpora- 
tion limits. Our subject was twice married, on first occasion, in 1866, to Misp. 
Elizabeth Donaldson, a native of Mercer Covyity, Penn., who bore him two chil- 
dren: Emma J. and William J. Mrs. Limber dying May 19, 1871, our sub- 
ject then married, August 4, 1873, Miss Sarah J. Kodgers, a native of Mercer 
County, Penn., and to this union were born three children: Katie G., Charles- 
C. and Thomas C. Mrs. Limber died November 28, 1883. Our subject is at 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, also the R. T. of T. , and is a 
Commissioner of the S. N. Warner Post, No. 352, G. A. R. 

FRANK C. LOWING, editor Linesville Herald, Linesville, was born in 
Randolph, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y., January 11, 1857, and is a son of H. D. and 
Nancy J. (Pierce) Lowing. He was educated in Oberlin College; at the age of 
fourteen served an apprenticeship at the printer's trade, in Newton County, 
Mo., and later in Pittsburgh, Penn. In 1881 he took charge of the editorial 
department of the Linesville Herald, of which he is one of the proprietors, 
and which he has successfully conducted to the present time. He was married 
in October, 1879, to Christiana, daughter of L. W. and E. N. Jencks, of Con- 
neaut Township, this county, by whom he has two children: Eva and Lillian. 
In politics Mr. Lowing is a Republican. 

HON. ROBERT P. MILLER, attorney at law, Linesville, was born near 
New Castle, Penn., and is a son of Jesse and Rebecca (Steele) Miller. He was- 
reared on a farm and educated in the common schools and the academy at New 
Castle, and after leaving school studied law with A. M. Barnes, Esq., of New 
Castle. He settled in Linesville in 1846; was admitted to the bar of Crawford 
County in 1853, and was engaged in the practice of law up to 1858, when he> 
was elected to the Legislature and re-elected in 1859. He was the sole repre- 
sentative of the county, though the county previously had two members. In 
1860 he embarked in mercantile business, in which he was engaged about sevea 
years, and since then has given his time to farming and the practice of his 
profession. He was married in 1843 to Margaret, daughter of Alexander and 
Elizabeth (Chambers) Erwin, of Lawrence County, Penn. They have no chil- 
dren, but have an adopted son — Walter. Mr. Miller is a member of th* 
Masonic fraternity and the P. of H. , and is known throughout the coun- 



924 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

ty by the P. of H. as an able speaker and a faithful representative of 
their interests. He has served the Borough of Linesville as Burgess several 
terms, and is now serving a second term as Justice of the Peace. He is now 
the National Greenback candidate for Congress for his district. In politics 
he was formerly a Republican, but of late years has been Independent. 

ALVIN MILLER (deceased) was a native of New York State, born in 
1823; son of John and Anna (Brown) Miller, who settled in Evansburg, this 
county, about 1830, and afterward for a time resided in Summit Township, 
and about 1840 located in Linesville, where they lived and died. They had 
seven children: Mahala, Nelson, Alvinia, Caroline, Alvin, Emily, Maryette 
(now Mrs. William Cunningham), all deceased except the last-named. The 
subject of this sketch was a resident of Linesville about forty years, during 
which time he carried on the blacksmith's trade. He was married May 13, 
1847, to Rhoda, daughter of Samuel and Sophia (Meacham) Eastman, of 
Linesville, Penn., by whom he had five children: Harmon, Vamum, Alonzo, 
James (deceased) and Arvilla. The three sons are engineers in the employ of 
the Erie & Pittsburgh Railroad. Mr. Miller was a member of the Free-Will 
Baptist Church. A prominent P.|& A. M., member of the I. O. O. F. and 
the R. T. of T. He had held several oflSces in the Borough of Linesville, 
and was a stanch Republican. He died June 14, 1880, at the age of fifty- 
seven years. His widow, three sons and a daughter survive him. 

M. B. NARAMORE, dentist, Linesville, was born in East Fallowfield 
Township, this county, April 15, 1842, son of Levi and Sarah A. (Barber) 
Naramore, natives of Steuben County, N. Y., and who came to this county in 
1836, settling on a farm in East Fallowfield Township. They were parents of 
five children and were consistent members of the Baptist Church. Levi died 
in the fall of 1843; his widow, being left with the five children, was obliged to 
surrender our subject to the care of others, who gave him no advantages (other 
than what might be derived from hard work), and who returned him to his 
mother at the age of about nine years, poorly clad and in delicate health. Dur- 
ing our subject's stay with his grandfather, his mother married William Camp- 
bell, by whom she had one son. Mr. Campbell died before M. B. returned 
home; the widow died in 1867. Our subject attended school after leaving his 
grandfather, received a partial academic education, and in 1862 commenced 
the study of dentistry with his uncle, John Naramore, at Rochester, N. Y., 
then entered on the practice of his profession in 1868, in Linesville, Penn. 
where he has since continued with eminent success. The Doctor has been a 
member of Lake Erie Dental Association, and Pennsylvania State Dental 
Society each for over twelve years. He has practiced his profession for past six 
years, each alternate two weeks at Linesville and Conneautville, Penn., and at 
both places enjoys a first-class connection. Dr. Naramore was married, Octo- 
ber 12, 1869, to Miss Emma E. Deiter, a native of Livingston County, N. Y. 
Our subject owns a fine residence centrally located in Linesville. He is a mem- 
ber of the I. O. O. F., and R. A. ; in politics is an anti-monopolist. 



RANDOLPH TOWNSHIP. 925 



RANDOLPH TOWNSHIP. 

DON E. ASHLEY, M. D., P. O. Guy's Mills, was born at Guy's Mills, Jan- 
uary 13, 1846, son of Carl D. Ashley, also a physician, who came to Guy's 
Mills at an early day. He studied medicine with Dr. Woodruff, of Meadville, 
and his first year's practice was at Centreville. He afterward located at Guy's 
Mills, and there followed the practice of his profession for thirty-five years. 
He moved from Guy's Mills to Meadville, Penn., where he resided for some 
five or six years before moving to Cleveland, Ohio, where he still resides. His 
wife, Harriet (Sikes) Ashley, died in September, 1877. They were the par- 
ents of three children, now living: Carlton G., Nellie M. and Don E. Our 
subject attended the common schools of his native town, and finished his edu- 
cation in the common branches at the high school of Townville, this county. 
He studied medicine with his father, and received his diploma from the med- 
ical college at Cleveland, Ohio, where he graduated in 1871. He entered on 
the practice of his profession at Mill Village, Erie County, where he remained 
six months, and then went to Little Cooley, this county. He there continued 
practice about nineteen months, and then moved to Guy's Mills, where he took 
charge of his father's practice on the latter leaving that town. Here the Doc- 
tor has since remained, and to such an extent has he gained the confidence of 
the people by his thorough knowledge, skill and close attention to business, 
that his ride now extends over five townships. Our subject was married. Sep- 
tember 8, 1870, to Miss Mary A. Guy, born in 1850, by whom he has one child 
— Don Carlton — born January 19, 1873. Mrs. Ashley is a daughter of Augus- 
tus and Maria (Ames) Guy, former deceased. Dr. Ashley iu politics is a Repub- 
lican. 

FRANK BANDLEY, stone mason and farmer, P. O. Townville, was born 
in Mead Township, this county, November 22, 1839, son of Jacob and Susan 
(Mason) Bandley, natives of Switzerland. They immigrated to America and 
located in New Jersey, in 1828, but eventually moved to Mead Township, this 
county. They were the parents of seven children, of whom Frank is fifth. Our 
subject received a limited education, and learned the trade of stone mason, 
which he has always worked at more or less. He bears the reputation of being 
a good workman, honest in all his business transactions. In 1873 he came to 
Randolph Township, this county, and bought a farm, which he sold nine years 
later, and then removed to his present place of residence. Mr. Bandley enlisted, 
September 10, 1864, in Company F, One Hundred and Ninety-ninth Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry, serving to the close of the war, and was in several 
engagements. In 1860 our subject married Miss Judy Dickson, born in Wood- 
cock Township, this county, in March, 1838. Four children have been born 
to this union: William E., Mary A., Ida M. and Julia. 

VIRGIL G. BIRCHARD, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born in 
Venango (now Cambridge) Township, this county, October 27, 1821, son of 
Virgil and Jemima (Marcy) Birchard, natives of Massachusetts and early set- 
tlers of Crawford County, parents of four children, of whom Virgil G. is the 
eldest. The early life of our subject was spent on the farm and in attending 
school in the neighlmring schoolhouse. His first farm was situated in Rock- 
dale Township, this county, where he remained several years. In 1865 he 



926 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

purchased the farm on which he now resides, consisting of 106 acres of choice 
land, located in the northeast part of the township. Ten years previous to 
removing here Mr. Birchard lived in the Brawley neighborhood, and while 
there was twice elected Justice of the Peace; has also served in other town- 
ship offices. Was formerly a member of the State Police. During the Rebellion 
he was drafted, but hired a substitute. On December 3, 1844, he was married to 
Mies Mary H. Hall, born in Randolph Township, this county, February 15, 
1826, daughter of Ansel and Clarissa (Spring) Hall. To this union were born 
three children: Celestia, wife of James Everett; Virgil A,, landlord of the Com- 
mercial Hotel at Guy's Mills, and Mary, wife of Jerry M. Burroughs, also of 
the Commercial Hotel. Our subject has been a consistent member of the 
Congregational Church of Guy's Mills for several years. In politics he is a 
jstanch Republican. 

BIRCHARD & BURROUGHS, proprietors of Commercial Hotel, Guy's 
Mills. Virgil A. Birchard, senior member of this firm, was born in Randolph 
Township, this county, July 7, 1857, son of V. G. Birchard. His early life 
was employed in assisting his parents on the homestead farm and in attending 
the common and select schools of the county. In 1878, in company with his 
parents, he went to New Albion, N. Y., and purchased the hotel property 
known as the " New Albion House," and continued in business there three 
years, when he returned to Randolph Township. Our subject then engaged 
with A. M. Hall as teamster and assistant in his store. During the summer 
of 1883 he assisted on his father's farm, and in March, 1884, in partnership 
with his brother-in-law. J. M. BuiTOughs, opened the Commercial Hotel at 
Guy's Mills, in connection with which they have a livery stable and do gen- 
eral teaming for the merchants. Jerry M. Burroughs was born in Cattaraugus 
County, N. Y., July 8, 1857, son of Aretus P. and Susan (Woodmancy) Bur- 
roughs (both deceased), natives of Rhode Island, parents of six children, viz. : 
Leroy A., Ira P., Joseph A., Avery D. (deceased), Patheria J. (wife of A. 
Mosier) and Jerry M. Our subject was raised on a farm and obtained his 
education in the common and high schools of his native county. His first 
business enterprise was in New Albion, N. Y., where he opened a grocery 
which he disposed of a year later and became junior member of the firm of 
Birchard & Burroughs. He was united in marriage August 8, 1880, with Miss 
Mary C. Birchard, born March 13, 1860. Three children were the result of 
this union: Sadie Edna, Merle and Inez. Although young in years the firm 
of Birchard & Burroughs are experienced in business, energetic and enter- 
prising. 

DeWITT C. BLANCHARD, retired farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born 
in Steuben Township, this county, June 23, 1840, sou of George W. and Eliza 
J. (Coburn ) Blanchard, natives of Vermont, and early settlers of Crawford 
County (both deceased). They were parents of eleven children, of whom DeWitt 
C. is the youngest. Our subject received a common school education, and early in 
life learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, which he followed till the war 
of the Rebellion broke out, when he enlisted in a three months regiment, but 
eventually entered the Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, Com- 
pany A. Mr. Blanchard was in all the engagements in which the regiment 
took part until he was wounded at Gaines' Mill, Va., June 27, 1862, which 
necessitated his discharge in October, same year. In September, 1864, he 
re-enlisted, and served till the close of the war. In consequence of his wound 
he has worked but little at his trade, and about two years since was compelled 
to retire from active life and labor. For several years he was also engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, and now lives on his farm. Our subject was married 



RANDOLPH T0WN8HIP. 927 

August 28, 1864, to Mies Ellen Sikes, bom in Randolph Township, this 
county, January 10, 1847. Two children were born to this union: Fred M. 
and Mildred. Mr. Blanchard has filled several township offices, and is at 
present Assessor; has for six years acted as Tax Collector. He is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. Is a member of Gleason Post, G. A. R., 
and the K. of H. Politically he is a Republican. 

PETER BOGARDUS, Postmaster and farmer, P. O. Black Ash, was born 
in Allegany County, N. Y., December 16, 1838, son of -Nicholas Bogardus, 
also a native of Allegany County, born April 17, 1815, and son of Peter and 
Elizabeth (Dempsey) Bogardus, natives of New York, and parents of ueven 
children. Nicholas, who is the fifth in the family, came to this county and 
located on the farm where he now lives, and which at that time was in a state 
of nature. He was married to Fanny Taft, who died leaving to his care three 
sons: Peter, Timothy and Mark. His second wife, Isabel Hoffman, is a native 
of Warren County. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
for about forty years. Our subject, who has always followed the occupation 
of a farmer, was appointed, in 1878, Postmaster at Black Ash, where he opened 
a small grocery business. He was married March 20, 1860, to Emily A. Dan- 
iels, a native of this county, born October 10, 1840; died September 18, 1863, 
leaving one son — James B. — born January 17,1861, married December 25, 1883, 
to Ida L. Boals, born in "Venango County, Penn., June 14, 1865. Abigail 
Adkinson, second wife of our subject, was born in South Shenango Township, 
December 4, 1836; died August 11, 1874, leaving three children: Emily J., 
Alfred E. and Peter L. Mr. Bogardus was married for the third time January 
27, 1876, to Ellen Oaks, born in this county August 17, 1841. Our subject is 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; of the K of H at Guy's Mills; 
has filled several township offices. 

JOHN W. BRAWLEY, farmer, P. O. Frenchtown, was born in Mead 
Township, this county, January 16, 1842, son of John R. and Sarah (Hoskins) 
Brawley, who were among the first settlers of Crawford County, parents oiE 
six children, of whom John W. is the fourth. Our subject was educated at 
the common schools of his neighborhood, and began his career in life as a 
iarmer, which occupation he has always followed. He was married Septem- 
ber 10, 1869, to IVIiss Louisa Hamilton, by whom he has four children, viz.: 
William, George, Hattie and Lovina. 

ALLEN T. BRITTON (deceased) was born in Greene County, Va., Janu- 
ary 15, 1823, third child of William and Nancy (Baremore)Britton, natives of 
Oreene County, Va., and of German descent; they reared a family of thirteen 
children. Our subject received a common school education and early in life 
began to work at the carpenter's and joiner's trade, at which he continued 
until he earned the money to make a payment on a farm, when he turned his 
attention to agricultural pursuits and eventually became one of the substantial 
as well as practical farmers of Randolph Township and also became quite an 
extensive stock grower. He was but two years of age when his parents moved 
to this county and located in South Shenango Township, where his early life 
was employed in assisting on the home farm, and in attending the common 
schools of the neighborhood. Our subject was united in marriage September 
30, 1847, with Miss Hannah Mullen, who was born in South Shenango Town- 
ship, this county, March 18, 1830, daughter of William and Matilda (Driggs) 
Mullen, natives of Pennsylvania and New York respectively, and early settlers 
of South Shenango Township, this county. They were parents of twelve chil- 
dren, of whom Mrs. Britton is the fifth. To this union following children were 
born, viz. : William A. (deceased), married to Angeline Davison (they had two 



928 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

children: William B. and Emma E.); Charles P., married to Emma E. Ban- 
ister (have four children: Alice F., Earnest D., Harry and Charles); Orlando 
H., married to Rilla Pierce (have two children: Myrtia B. and Nellie A.); John 
A., married to Helen Hall (have three children: James K., Allen H. , and Lee 
M.); Luther E., married to ElathaOaks (have two children: Clinton W. and 
Lela E.); Nancy M., married to Jonathan Oaks (have one child, Lina E.); 
lanthia E., married to Duane Terrell (have one child, Benton C. ); George W. ; 
James E. ; Jane A. ; Earnest G. ; Estella P. ; Mary E. ; Fred E. and Henry W. Mr. 
Britton moved with his family to Randolph Township, this county, in 1859, and 
his farm soon became one of the best regulated in the country. He enlisted 
in Company A., Two Hundred and Eleventh Pennsylvania "Volunteer Infantry 
and during service contracted a disease which eventually ended his career, 
March 19, 1875, and his loss fell heavily upon the neighborhood as well as his 
family. Since the death of her husband the farm has been successfully car- 
ried on by Mrs. Britton with the assistance of her children. In this volume 
will be found a portrait of A. T. Britton, deceased. 

OLIVER L. BRUNSON, retired farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born in 
Charlotte, Chautauqua Co., N. Y., January 12, 1839, son of Munson and 
Electa (Chase) Brunson, natives of Massachusetts, and parents of seven chil- 
dren, four of whom died in infancy. Our subject received a common school 
education and commenced life as a farmer. He taught school one term in 
South Randolph. During the war of the Rebellion he enlisted in Company F, 
One Hundred and Fifty-fourth New York State Volunteers, serving three 
years. He participated in several noted engagements, such as Chancellorsville, 
Fredericksburg and Gettysburg, on which latter occasion, in the bayonet 
charge to capture the flag, he was wounded in the left shoulder and taken 
prisoner July 1, 1863. Mr. Brunson was confined in several prison dens; 
first, in Belle Isle, then Libby; thence sent to Scott's Prison, from there 
returned to Belle Isle, and finally conveyed to AndersonvilJe, Savannah, 
Millen, Charleston and Florence, respectively, at which latter place he was 
paroled November 20, 1864. While prisoner he contracted scurvy and rheu- 
matism, which renders him a total cripple and almost helpless; as a partial 
compensation for which he receives a pension of $72 per month. The three 
brothers living were all in the service and all disabled — Enos S., wounded in 
the right hand, Alfred F., wounded in the left hand, and our subject wounded 
in the left shoulder. Mr. Brunson was married October 10, 1865, to Miss 
Rosa Shade, born May 22, 1844. To this union were born four children: 
Leon E., Mary L. and Florence and Flora (twins). Our subject is a member 
of the Congregational Church at Guy's Mills; in politics he is a Republican. 

JOSEPH STILLMAN BYHAM, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born in 
New York State, while his parents were en route to this county, June 15, 1816, 
eldest child of John E. and Abigail (Oaks) Byham, natives of Massachusetts. 
Our subject received a common school education and commenced life as a 
farmer. He moved to his present property in 1838, and from a wilderness has 
transformed it into a flourishing farm. Mr. Byham was married November 
15, 1838, to Mary M. Drake, daughter of Abraham and Prvidence (March) 
Drake, born in Massachusetts, August 14, 1817. Six children were the 
result of this union, four now living: Josephs.; Diana E.. wife of Marcus 
Daniels; Edgar and Charles F., all married and living within sight of the old 
homestead. Charles F. was born October 6, 1856, and married July 17, 1881, 
to Elizabeth Rees, born in Wayne Township, this county, July 16, 1863, 
daughter of William and Susan (Brown) Rees, natives of Crawford County. 
Our subject has been School Director several years. 



RANDOLPH TOWNSHIP. 929 

EDWIN BYHAM, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born in Randolph Town- 
ship, this eoanty, January 25, 1826; son of Jonas and Mary (Smith) Byham, 
natives of Massachusetts and early settlers of Randolph Township. They 
were parents of twelve children, of whom Edwin is fourth. Our subject 
received such school training as the times afforded. In 1876 he moved to his 
present farm, which is carried on in all branches. Mr. Byham was married in 
1856 to Miss Ellen C. Cady, born in Chautauqua County, N. Y., December 17, 
1837. Four children were born to this union, viz. : Eber, Abram, Leverette 
and Sylvia. Our subject had the misfortune to receive an' injury in the arm 
several years ago, which has within the past three years developed into rheu- 
matism, rendering him in a measure helpless and causing him intense suffer- 
ing, which he endures with great fortitude and without a murmur. He has 
been Township Assessor. Is a member of the Congregational Church at Guy's 
Mills. His son Eber, who is at home managing the farm, was born March 13, 
1857, and was married September 12, 1878, to Miss Florence Fagundus, a 
native of Wayne Township, this county, born June 1, 1858. To this union 
were born four children: Cora May, Florence Mildred, Lulu Maud and Fran- 
cis Lynn. The two eldest were consumed to ashes and Lulu Maud badly 
burned in a house that was destroyed by fire. 

NEWELL BYHAM, proprietor of saw-mill, P. _0. Guy's Mills, was born 
in Randolph Township, this county, February 27, 1850. Our subject was 
raised on a farm and received his education at the common schools. He com- 
menced life as a farm hand, which occupation he followed several years He 
came to his present place of residence in 1881 and built a saw-mill with a 
capacity of 4,500 feet per day. Mr. Byham has deservedly gained the highest 
esteem of the people by his fair and honest dealings; he is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church; in politics is a Republican. 

ESICK L. COBURN, farmer, P. O. Townville, was born in Chenango 
County, N. Y., November 19, 1803; son of Amariah and Rose Linda Cobum. 
Our subject received a limited common school education and served an appren- 
ticeship to the tanner's, currier's and shoe-maker's trades, which occupation 
he followed several years. He was twice married; on the first occasion Octo- 
ber 10, 1826, to Hannah R. Jewel, born May 22, 1803; she died about 1843, 
leaving seven children, viz.: Joseph H., Maria E., Susannah L., Humphrey J., 
Thomas B., Harvey M. and Laura P. Mr. Coburn next married, in 1844, 
Phcebe Smith, a native of Crawford County, by whom he had five children, 
four living: Ira C, Lida A., John and Frances E. Our subject has held sev- 
eral minor township offices. He has been Deacon in the Congregational Church 
several years. He has been an enterprising, hard-working man, and is highly 
respected in the community. 

CHARLES H. CORLISS, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born in Grafton 
County, N. H., January 23, 1855; son of Calvin and Carrie (Hartwell) Cor- 
liss, natives of New Hampshire, now making their home in Dakota; the former 
born in 1827, a machinist by trade, but of late years a farmer; the latter born 
December 29, 1834. They are parents of four children: Bell, Carrie, Harley 
and Charles H. Our subject received a common school education, and served 
an apprenticeship to the butcher's trade. In 1866 he opened a shop in Titns- 
ville, Penn., where he continued in business about eight years, when he came 
to Randolph Township, this county, where his father purchased a farm. For 
several years Mr. Corliss dealt extensively in stock, buying and selling, and 
during the last four or five years has employed most of his time in teaming. 
He was married. May 3, 1881, to Miss Hattie Sybrant, born in Mead Town- 
ship, this county, October 9, 1860, daughter of Oscar and Rassella (Gilbert) 



930 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Sybrant, the latter deceased. Our subject is a member of the K. of H. Lodge 
of Guy's Mills, and of the L O. O. F., of Townville. 

WILLIAM P. CROUCH, farmer, P. O. Randolph, was born in Randolph 
Township, this county, Blarch 28, 1849; son of Delos and Susannah (Byham) 
Crouch, former of whom was born March 4, 1816, and died June 5, 1875; the 
latter was born January 18, 1821, and died May 17, 1863. Delos Crouch 
came to Randolph Township, this county, in 1826, and followed farming all 
his days. He was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in 
which he was Steward several years. They were parents of six^girls and four 
boys: Mary E. (wife of C. Loveless), Emma J. (wife of S. Fitch), Ella S., 
Adelia (deceased, wife of T. Wilder), Eudora, Inez, Lesley (died in the army), 
William P., Roscoe (deceased) and Horace E. The latter was bom July 27, 
1858, and graduated at the Cambridge Conservatory of Music, June 25, 1884. 
Our subject's paternal grandfather, Jonathan Crouch, was born April 2, 1773, 
and died November 20, 1826. His wife, Elizabeth Perkins, was born May 17, 
1791, and died August 21, 1873. The subject of this sketch was regularly 
brought up to fanning, and has followed that occupation all his life. He was 
married December 17, 1876, to Miss Amelia Smith, born in Randolph Town- 
ship, this county, September 22, 1856, daughter of Joel and Mary (Blanchard) 
Smith, of Randolph Township. 

GEORGE W. CUTSHALL, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills. The grandfather 
of our subject, Philip Cutshall, was born in Pennsylvania in 1767; ajid his wife 
Elizabeth was bom in 1760. In 1803 they came from Cumberland County to 
Venango County, settling about six miles west of Franklin. They had three 
sons: John, Jacob and George, and one daughter — Nancy. The sons, on 
arriving at maturity, were among the early settlers of this township, locating 
in 1814, their parents coming subsequently. Their father died in 1829, their 
mother in 1836. Their youngest son, George, the father of our subject, was 
born in Cumberland County, Penn. , April 29, 1799, and was four years old 
when brought to Venango County, where he grew to maturity, undergoing the 
privations of pioneer life. In 1823 he married Jane Sterling, and by this 
union had thirteen children: Jeremiah, Nancy, Eliza, Maria, Mary Jane, 
Gorge W., Warren, Sarah E., Philip M., Jacob A., Joseph R., La Fayette and 
Lydia A. Mr. Cutshall settled on the place where his son George now resides, 
and was the owner of 400 or 500 acres, which now constitute several farms. 
Here Mr. Cutshall remained the greater portion of his life and here he raised 
his family. A short time prior to his death, in company with his wife, he 
visited his daughter in Lorain County, Ohio, and eventually purchased prop- 
erty and removed there, where he died in March, 1876, his widow in April, 
1883. The subject of our sketch was born on the homestead on which he now 
lives, December 30, 1832. Owing to lack of school privileges in his youth, 
his education is somewhat limited, but his mind has been broadened by the 
extended experiences of a life which, although mainly devoted to the farm, 
has also reached out to numerous business enterprises. Among other things, 
he assisted in building the first railroad that ran into Cleveland, Ohio. He 
has held nearly all the official honors it is in the power of the township to 
bestow. During the war he went out with the State militia, but did not see 
active service. He is a member of the State Police, also of the Grange at Guy's 
Mills. In 1853 he was married to Matilda I. Masiker, who was born Sep- 
tember 12, 1830. The result of this union has been three children: A. Frank, 
Sarah Eliza (wife of W. E. Russell, of Randolph Township), Lafayette (born 
April 19, 1860, died October 10, 1864). Mr. Cutshall is one of the most 
extensive breeders of short horn cattle in the county, having several head pur- 



RANDOLPH TOWNSHIP. 931 

chased in Kentucky and Ohio, and about twenty head of registered stock of 
his own raising. 

LOREN DAVISON, retired farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born in Otis 
Mass., June 25, 1819; son of Nathaniel and Amy (Gile) Davison, natives of 
Massachusetts; former born November 12, 1793, and still living on the old home 
place. In 1821 our subject's parents removed to Randolph Township. When 
twenty-four years of age Loren left home and took up the farm he now resides 
on, then covered with wood, but now under thorough cultivation and rented by 
his sons, our subject having retired from active life. During the Rebellion Mr. 
Davison enlisted in Company G, Fifty-sisth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
being detailed from his company to do provost guard duty. For twenty-five years 
during the summer months he was a well-digger, earning at that occupation 
from $100 to $125 per year. In 1843 Mr. Davison married Abigail Hodge, 
born in Vermont in 1826, and daughter of Sylvanus and Sally (Rose) Hodge, 
natives of Vermont and early settlers of Crawford County. To this union 
have been born seven children: Emma (wife of P. Phillips), Charles H. (mar- 
ried to Sarah Heth), Sylvanus (married to Evelina Phillips), William C. 
(deceased), David M. (married to Delia Hites), Warren (married to Sarah 
Culver), and Ella (wife of Bert Smith). Our subject for twenty-five years 
has been a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In poli- 
tics he has always been a Republican. 

WILLIAM DAVISON, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born in Randolph 
Township, December 80, 1830, son of Nathaniel and Amy (Gile) Davison. 
Our subject received a fair common school education and chose farming as his 
life vocation. He commenced to work for his father as soon as he was old 
enough to wield an ax, trimming brush and burning log heaps. His farm is 
a standing testimony of what industry and perseverance can accomplish in a 
comparatively short period. Mr. Davison has converted it from a wild, sterile 
condition to a high state of cultivation. He has always been a hard working 
man, most of the means with which he bought his farm having been earned 
by clearing land at $10 per acre, and his house represents many days of labor 
performed at the nominal sum of 50 cents per day. He is owner of a fine 
stallion, of Percheron, Morgan and English stock. Our subject was married 
January 12, 1859, to Lovina Case, born in Michigan, in February, 1842, and 
to this union were born eight children: Nellie, wife of J. B. Humes, married 
June 12, 1881; George; Elliott; Ruby, wife of H. L. Shorts, married June 21, 
1884; Olive; Florence; Minnie and an infant not named. 

JOHN A. GRAHAM, farmer and stock-dealer, P. O. Randolph, was born 
in ShefBeld, Ashtabula County, Ohio, February 3, 1837, son of David and 
Martha (Bentley) Graham (both deceased), former supposed to have been a 
native of Vermont, latter born in New York. They were the parents of five 
children: John; William D.; Susan, wife of Mead Johnson; Elizabeth 
(deceased), and Mary Jane, wife of A. W. Lewis, of Shamburg, Venango 
County, Penn. Our subject, when about six years of age, was brought by his, 
parents to Evansburg, this county, and from there to Yates County, N. Y. , 
where the family remained three or four years, and then returned to Crawford 
County, locating in Randolph Township. John A. received a common school 
education and learned the cooper's trade, at which he worked about ten years. 
He spent five years in Clarion County, Penn., engaged with a pipe company, 
and while there he operated more or less extensively in oil, in which he was 
■quite succe-ssful. Of late years he has turned his attention to farming and 
stock-raising. The farm on which he now lives he purchased in 1880. Mr. 
Graham was married December 20. 1801, to Miss Amy Armstrong, born in 



932 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Crawford County in 1843. To this union have been born six children, viz. : 
William, Karl, John, Clifford, Martha, wife of F. E. Humeston, and 
Lena. Mrs. Graham is a daughter of James and Martha (Barton) Armstrong, 
former a native of this county, now deceased, latter of New York State, now 
living. They were the parents of four children: Almeron, Amy, Mary and 
Elizabeth. Our subject is a self-made man, and has accumulated his prop- 
erty entirely by his own energy and enterprise. 

BENJAMIN GRIGGS (deceased) was born in Ashtabula County, Ohio, in 
1818; was a farmer and quite extensively engaged in stock-dealing. In the 
fall of 1841 he settled in Randolph Township, this county, in the woods, and 
the next fall had twelve acres cleared and sowed to wheat. He accumulated a 
large property and gave to each of his five children a good farm, and left a 
good home for his widow, with ample means for all her wants. Although not 
a professor of religion, he was liberal in the support of religious institutions, 
and his loss was felt by the community as well as by his family. For two 
years he provided a room in his house for school purposes, and eventually gave 
the ground on which stands the schoolhouse, near his late residence. His 
widow, Catharine (Boomhauer), is still living at Guy's Mills, and is the mother 
of six children, viz.: Edwin, Adelbert (deceased), Judson, Albert N., Louisa 
and Sarah. The youngest son, Albert N., is still living on the home farm; he 
inherits all his father's energetic nature; aside from growing the usual crops 
he is an extensive fruit grower. He has for a number of years been a con- 
sistent member of the Baptist Church. Politically he is identified with the 
Republican party. He was married December 25, 1870, to Miss Ellen Town- 
ley, who was boru in 1849, and by whom he has three children: Lydia, Catha- 
rine and Clarence. 

JUDSON A. GRIGGS, farmer and stock-dealer, P. O. Randolph, was 
born in Randolph Township, this county, June 15, 1846; son of Benjamin 
and Catharine (Boomhauer) Griggs. Oiu* subject obtained his education at 
the common schools of the county, and has always followed the occupation of 
farmer. In connection, he also extensively handles stock, both buying and 
selling. Mr. Griggs was married October 29, 1867, to Catharine S. Henry, a 
native of Ashtabula County, Ohio, born June 15, 1846. To this union have 
been born three children: Herbert, Adelbert and Gertrude. He is an active 
member of the Grange at Guy's Mills; is a member of the Baptist Church. 
In politics he is a Republican. Mrs Griggs' mother, Eliza M. (Willard) Henry, was 
born in Connecticut in 1811, and moved to the State of Ohio in her fourth 
year with her widowed mother, her father, grandfather and grandmother hav- 
ing all died in one week, from that dread disease, cholera. Mrs. Griggs' 
father, William Henry, was born in the State of New York in 1813; he was a 
farmer by occupation; was married in his twenty- fourth year and died in the 
forty-sixth year of his age, deeplv mourned by all of his friends. 

FRANKLIN GUY, farmer, P. O. Randolph, was born in Randolph Town- 
ship, this county, March 22, 1833; son of Jacob and Sasan (Wyman) Guy, 
former a member of one of the first four families to locate in this township. 
Jacob Guy erected the first saw-mill in this locality, from which Guy's Mills 
derives its name; he also built and carried on a store for many years. At one 
time he owned about 700 acres of land in this township. He died in 1851, 
aged about seventy- five years: his wife preceded him in 1833. They were 
the parents of nine children: Mary Hetty, Emeline, Susan, Mary Juliette, 
Ward B., Augustus, Helen, Melancton Wheelar, and Franklin; all deceased 
except Mary Juliette and Franklin. Our subject received a common school 
education; operated a saw-mill at Guy's Mills for about ten years. He pur- 



BANDOLPH TOWNSHIP. 938 

chased the present farm in 1856. Mr. Guy was married in 1851 to Lovina S. 
Thompson, a native of Massachusetts, who bore him three children: Agenia, 
wife of John Bole; William T. and Fanny M. Mrs. Guy was a daughter of 
Jared and Axie (Hubbard) Thompson (both deceased), natives of Maesachasetts 
and early settlers of Randolph Township. She died December 27, 1881. 
Our subject has served the township as Clerk, several years, and is Overseer 
of the Grange at Guy's Mills. Politically he is a Republican. 

JAMES A. HALL, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born September 15, 
1822, in Delaware County, N. Y., and came to this county in 1823 with his 
parents (see biography of A. M. Hall in this volume). Our subject was reared 
on a farm and educated at the common schools. He was twice married; on 
the first occasion, May 12, 1853, to Esther L. Prentice, born in Hampshire 
County, Mass., and who died June 13, 1854. Mr. Hall then married, in 
1855, Helen C. Noble^ born in Washington County, N. Y., died November 27, 
1857, leaving one child, Helen, bom November 26, 1857, now wife of J. A. 
Britton (see biography of Allen T. Britton in this volume). They were married 
September 18, 1876, and have three children: J. R., born June 18, 1878; 
Allen H., bom August 15, 1880; Leon M., born September 5, 1882. Mr. 
Hall has served his township as Auditor and School Director several terms. 
He is Clerk of the Congregational Church and has been a Deacon in the same 
for years. In politics, was originally a Whig, is now a Republican. 

IRA R. HALL, farmer and Postmaster at Randolph, was born in this town- 
ship, June 3, 1825; son of Leonard and Sally (Jones) Hall. He received a 
good education and for ten years followed teaching as his profession, when he 
turned his attention to farming, in connection with which for several years he 
dealt largely in stone pumps. Since 1871 he has conducted a cheese factory 
every summer, and at one time controlled five factories, dealing quite exten- 
sively in cheese. With a view of retiring from active business he has dis- 
posed of several of his interests, and now utilizes the milk of but 250 cows. 
Our subject has held several township offices and in 1882 was appointed Post- 
master at Randolph. He is a member of the Grange at Randolph, also of the 
E. A. V. of Meadville; for twenty years has been connected with the Christa- 
delphian organization. He was married in 1850 to Miss Rebecca Camp, born 
in Hayfield Township, this county, and who died in 1866. By her he had 
two sons: Eugene and Friend L. In 1867 Mr. Hall was again married, on 
this occasion to Margaret A. Smith, born in Cussewago Township, this county, 
and by her he has two daughters: Rebecca and Arminetta Mr. Hall is very 
enterprising and has always been foremost in any undertaking for the develop- 
ment of the county and for the advancement of religious and educational priv- 



ADOLPHUS M. HALL, merchant, Guy's Mills, was born May 5, 1848. His 
grandfather, Ansel Hall, bom in 1796, was a native of Massachusets, a farmer 
and cooper by occupation; in 1824 he settled on a quarter section in this town- 
ship, which he subsequently divided among his three sons; he died in 1873. 
His wife, Clarissa (Spring) was also a native of New York, born in 1803, 
died in 1882, mother of three sons and one daughter: James A., Merritt W., 
David T., and Hannah, wife of Virgil G. Birchard. David T., the father of 
our subject, was born in this township, April 8, 1824, is a farmer by occupa- 
tion and is still living. Sarah H., (Pike) his wife, bom October 13, 1829, is 
also now living. Their family consisted of two sons and two daughters: 
Orvelina and Adella (both deceased). Homer D., of the firm of Zigler, Hall & 
Lippet, of Meadville, and Adolphus M. Our subject after receiving a common 
school education, and six weeks before he was sixteen years of age, enlisted in 



9 34 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

Company F, Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served to the 
close of the war, being discharged at the general muster. His father enlisted 
in the same company at the same time, but in the battle of the Wilderness 
received a wound in the neck and right arm which disabled him in this his 
first engagement. After his return home, our subject engaged for one year in 
farming, and then entered the employment of Thorp & Reynolds as book-keeper, 
remaining with them one year. In July, 1866, he formed a partnership 
with his father, purchasing the property then known as the "Crawford House," 
at Guy's Mills, and opened a grocery store under the firm name of D. T. Hall 
& Son. The following spring they bought the general merchandise stock of 
Radle Bros., and in 1872 the firm became Hall & Sons, Homer Hall being 
taken into the partnership. In 1873 they built the store now occupied by K. 
S. Smith, and two years later the father retired, and the firm became A. M. 
Hall & Bro., continuing thus until 1879, when the firm dissolved and our sub- 
ject erected the building he now occupies, branching into business for himself. 
His stock consists of general merchandise, with the addition of drugs and fur- 
niture, and he deals also extensively in lumber and shingles. From a poor 
man with but a few dollars, and only business ability to recommend him, he 
has gradually increased his stock in proportion to the demand, and as a result 
of his exertions he has the satisfaction of managing a large and prosperous 
business, which has steadily increased until his sales amount to about $40,000 
annually. He was married October 6, 1874, to Miss Emma J., daughter of 
Hiram and Jane (Wade) Hatch, born in this township, July 17, 1853. Hiram 
Hatch and wife are the parents of five children: Carrie, Erbie, Harry, Frank, 
and Emma J. 

CALVIN HATCH, Se. , retired farmer, P. O. Randolph, was bom at White- 
hall, Washington Co., N. Y., July 7, 1803, son of Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Reed) Hatch, natives of Connecticut. Our subject received a fair common 
school education and taught four terms. He followed the occupation of farmer 
through life, but is now retired from active life and labor. He came to Ran- 
dolph Township and settled on his present farm of seventy acres in 1821. 
Mr. Hatch was married May 10, 1826, to Cecelia B. Clark, born in Massachu- 
setts June 6, 1808, daughter of Isaiah and Charlotte (Moore) Clark, natives 
of Connecticut. Our subject has been a consistent member of and Deacon in 
the Baptist Church for over half a century. 

CALVIN HATCH, Jr., farmer, P. O. Randolph, was born in Mead Town- 
ship, this county, October 28, 1833, and when aboiit three years of age was 
brought by his parents to Randolph Township. They settled two and a half 
miles north of Guy's Mills, where they cleared about 200 acres of land. The 
father of our subject, Samuel Hatch, is still living; the mother, Caroline 
(Weller), is deceased. They were the parents of eight children: Hiram, 
DeWight, Philip (deceased), Calvin, Jr., Moses W. , Oscar, David O., and Car- 
oline, wife of William Ashley. Our subject was married December 8, 1856, 
to Miss Maria Danly, born in Genesee County, N. Y., October 9, 1832, daugh- 
ter of George and Abigail (Clough) Danly, natives of Chautauqua County, 
N. Y., both deceased. To this union were born five children: Leonard H. , 
Carrie M. , Emma A., James W., and John, an infant (deceased). Mr. Hatch 
is an active member of the K. of H. Lodge at Guy's Mills, of which order he 
is a charter member. In politics he is independent. 

JOHN K. HOVEY, farmer, P. O. Townville, was born in Chittenden 
County, Vt., March 3, 1821, son of John F. and Elizabeth (Hill)Hovey, natives 
of Vermont. Our subject obtained his education in the common schools of his 
native county, and when thirteen years of age went with his parents to Lorain 



RANDOLPH TOWNSHIP. 985 

County, Ohio. His father was a book-binder, but eventually became a farmer. 
On March 18, 1843, our subject was married to Miss Mary E. Bunce, bom in 
Chautauqua, N. Y., July 10, 1821. This union resulted in five children, three 
now living: Rev. E. H. Hovey, of Spartansburg, Peon., who was educated 
at Reidsburgh, Clarion Co., Penn., and ordained in Wisconsin; Sarah E. ; Ella 
J., wife of Enos A. Scott. Mr. Hovey is a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church. He is recognized as one of the substantial farmers of this county, 
and the appearance of his farm denotes him to be a practical one. 

VOLNET JONES, retired farmer and minister, P. O. Guy's Mills, was 
bom in Rutland County, Vi, November 9, 1800, son of Joel and Rhoda 
(Sprague) Jones, natives of Massachusetts, and parents of nine children, of 
whom Volney is third. Our subject, when seventeen years old, came to Ran- 
dolph Township with his patents; his chief occupation was farming, with the 
exception of about ten years spent in the West as traveling missionary. He 
has been connected with the United Brethren Church the greater portion of 
his life, and has preached more or less until within the past few years. On 
November 29, 1829, Mr. Jones was united in marriage with Esther Thurston, 
a native of Mead Township, this county, and who died in 1844. Seven chil- 
dren were born to this union, two only now living; William and Addison. Our 
subject owns a nice farm of forty-eight acres, under an excellent state of culti- 
vation. He is the oldest living land-mark left to tell the tale of the hardships 
and privations incident to pioneer life in Randolph Township, and one of the 
pleasures of his declining years is the knowledge of having lived an upright 
and honorable life. In politics Mr. Jones was originally a Democrat, but 
since the nomination of Abraham Lincoln to the Presidency he has been iden- 
tified with the Republican party. 

MRS. BELINDA (DAVISON) KEEP, P. 0. Guy's Mills, was born 
April 29, 1817. She has been twice msirried — on first occasion April 28, 
1836, to Edward Pratt, who died nine years afterward, leaving to her care four 
small children, viz.: William E., Mary L., Melissa and Oscar. Our subject 
then married in 1861 Archibald W. Keep, born September 20, 1799. He was 
a most energetic and hard-working man; besides clearing his own farm, he 
lent his assistance to his neighbors in the same hard task. He died February 
12, 1881. He had accumulated a nice farm, which he left to his widow, who 
resides on the same, carrying on general farming with the assistance of her 
grandson, Fred M. , son of Oscar, her youngest son by her first husband. 

REUBEN LEWIS, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born at Cool Spring, 
Penn., February 15, 1844, son of Reuben and Sadie (McCartney) Lewis, early 
settlers of Mercer County, Penn. Our subject received a common school edu- 
cation and commenced life as a farmer, which occupation he continued in. He 
came to his present place in Randolph Township in 1878. Mr. Lewis enlisted 
during the war of the Rebellion in Company G, One Hundred and Forty-fifth 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and remained in the service three years; 
was in nearly all the battles in which his regiment took part and was wounded 
in the shoulder. He was married May 5, 1869, to Mary Drake, dauajhter of 
John and Sarah (Petit) Drake. Four children were born to this union: Will- 
iam E., Emma M., Velorus and John (the latter deceased). Our subject has 
been a consistent member of the United Brethren Church for several vears. 

SAilUEL H. McCartney, farmer and stock dealer, P. 0. Randolph, 
was born October 27, 1841, in Greenwood Township, this county; son of 
Robert and Diantha (Densmore) McCartney. He received a good common 
school education, and in 1866 bought his present farm in this township. In 
connection with farming, he makes a specialty of handling live stock, both 



936 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

buying and selling. During the war of the Eebellion, our subject enlisted in 
Company I, Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, Capt. A. D. Moore, 
remaining in the service three years. On the consolidation of the Eighty-fourth 
and Fifty-seventh regiments, January 6, 1865, the company was changed from I 
to D. His company took part in twenty-nine engagements, among which were 
Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Petersburg Mine, Cold Harbor, Deep Bottom, etc. 
During his term of service Mr. McCartney was wounded seven times; he was 
discharged as Sergeant. Our subject was married, August 18, 1865, to 
Martha Miller, born in Greenwood Township, this county, in 1843. To this 
union have been born two children: Fred and Frank. 

JAMES ALEXANDER MoCAETNEY, farmer, P. O. Randolph, was born 
at Cochranton, this county, April 7, 1847; son of Robert and Diantha (Dens- 
more) McCartney. His education was limited to such as could be obtained 
in the common schools of the county. He engaged in farming as an occupa- 
tion for life; has always given his attention to agricultural pursuits, and he 
is justly recognized as a representative, progressive young man. Our subject 
was married, July 10, 1870, to Miss Hulda Lyon, born in Richmond Town- 
ship, this county, December 24, 1853, daughter of Alanson and Melissa 
(Looker) Lyon, former deceased. To this union have been born two children, 
Maud and Harry. In politics Mr. McCartney is a Republican. 

NEAL McKAT, retired farmer, P. O. Black Ash, was born near Conneaut- 
villo, Penn., October 3, 1816, and when eighteen months old his parents, 
Joseph and Mary (Gilland) McKay, removed to Randolph Township, and 
located on a portion of the present farm of our subject. They came to Penn- 
sylvania in 1817, and were blessed with seven children: Nancy, James, Eliza, 
Angeline, Hugh, Robert and Neal. The father died when Neal was ten years 
old and the latter suffered severely by his demise, being compelled to labor 
hard to maintain his mother and himself. He early engaged on the construc- 
tion of the canal from Meadville to Franklin at |13 per month, and after two 
years of such toil his salary was advanced to $18 per month, which amount 
was given to his mother, and on that and what she made by weaving, the fam- 
ily was sustained. In 1838 our subject's mother was mairied to Jacob Trace, 
and soon after died. Neal had but little school advantages, and they were 
experienced with arduous trips three miles through the woods, where wild 
animals abounded, and in the log-cabin with its puncheon floors, slab seata 
and writing desks. At the age of twenty-one there was a debt of $700 hang- 
ing over the old homestead which was contracted after his father's death, and 
our subject assumed the responsibility of eradicating the same with the under- 
standing that the property should be his. This he paid out principally by 
labor at 50 cents per day. He was married. May 7, 1839, to Lydia Smith, 
daughter of Philip and Hettie Smith, who came to Pennsylvania in 1839, one 
year subsequent to her arrival with her brother, Benojah Smith. At the time 
of their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. McKay possessed property valued at about 
$100, and by their united eflForts they have secured 175 acres of finely 
improved land, and possess an estate valued at over $10,000, of which they 
can truly claim to be the artificers. They have no children, save one by adop- 
tion — David T. ^whom they have reared and educated, together with three other 
children of their relatives. Mr. and Mrs. McKay joined the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church over thirty years ago, under exhortation of Rev. E. Hull, at 
East Randolph, and have been consistent members since, he having been Stew- 
ard, Class-leader and Trustee. He votes the Democratic ticket. The family 
are of Irish descent, the original Neal and Nancy (Montgomery) McKay hav- 
ing come to America at an early date, settling in Crawford County, Penn. 



EANDOLPH TOWNSHIP. 987 

One, Joseph McKay, was in the war of 1812, and stationed at Erie at the time 
of Perry's great naval victory. His father was a Revolutionary soldier. 

JAMES A. McLACHLIN, farmer, P. O. Randolph, was born December 
11, 1828, in Randolph Township, this county; son of James and Mary 
(Stainbrook) McLaohlin, former a carpenter and joiner as well as farmer; he 
was in the war of 1812, and at Erie at the time of Perry's victory. Our sub- 
ject was raised on a farm, and when twenty-one years of age started out for 
himself, going to Forest County, Penn., and engaging in lumbering for five 
years. While there he purchased fifty acres of the farm he now owns, and to 
which he has added ninety-seven acres more, besides all necessary improve- 
ments and substantial buildings. He has filled satisfactorily a number of 
township offices, such as School Director, Supervisor, and the like. He is an 
active member of the Grange at Guy's Mills. He was married, March 7, 1867, 
to Miss Kate, daughter of James and Mary (Radcliffe) Mc Connell, and who 
was born April 2, 1844. A younger brother of our subject enlisted in Com- 
pany B, Eighteenth Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, and served nearly three 
years. He was placed in a hospital at New Haven, with black measles. 
On his recovery and while en route to his company, he was seized with small 
pox and died. 

JOHN L. McLACHLIN, P. O. Randolph, was born in Randolph Town- 
ship, this county, August 16, 1833; son of James and Mary (Stainbrook) Mc- 
Lachlin, former deceased, Scotch descent; latter, now living, of Irish and 
Dutch lineage. They were parents of four children living: John, James; 
Nancy, wife of T. Humes; and Phoebe, wife of William Coburn. Our sub- 
ject, in connection with his farm labors, has done threshing for several years, 
and was the first to introduce a separator into the township. On his farm 
there is a private saw-mill, which is operated by a traction engine, the first 
one owned in the county. Mr. McLachlin bought the farm where he now 
lives in 1875. He is part owner of the famed thorough-bred bull, registered as 
"David Mosier," weight 2,200 pounds. Our subject has filled several town- 
ship offices, and is at present Supervisor, an office he is filling the third term 
of two years each. 

WILLIAM M. MANING, farmer, P. O. Black Ash, was born in Beaver 
(now Lawrence) County, Penn., September 27, 1827; son of John and Sarah 
(Munnell) Maning, natives of eastern Pennsylvania, and both deceased. Our 
subject received but a limited common school education, and in 1841 came 
to North Shenango Township with his parents. He has always followed 
farming, and has owned the farm on which he now resides for thirty-five 
years. From a state of nature he has placed it in a state of cultivation that 
bespeaks him to be a practical farmer. His fine brick residence, erected in 
1883, is the only one of the kind in Randolph Township, and is a monument 
to his industry and enterprise. His farm is stocked with tine short-horn cattle. 
During the war he wan draftod, but discharged soon after on account of physi- 
cal disability. He is a member of the K. of H. and the Grange, is also con- 
nected with the Spiritualist Church. He was married January 1, 1856, to 
Mary A. Lamphear, who was born in Ohio, June 20, 1836. They have a fam- 
ily of six children: William O., Claj'ton E., May, Nora, Ollie and Effie. 

J. R. MORGAN, mill-owner and farmer, P. O. Gay's Mills, was born in 
Sullivan County, N. Y., July 14, 1850; son of Nicholas and Rose (MoGrath) 
Morgan, natives of Ireland. Our subject came ,to this county in 1871, and 
for seven years made his home in Meadville, except a short time spent in the 
oil regions. In 1878 he purchased a saw-mill having a capacity of 10,000 feet 
per day, built about eighteen years since by A. Gilbert. In connection with 



938 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

this mill, Mr. Morgan also bought 300 acres of land, nearly all covered with 
timber, which he is rapidly clearing. He was married February 17, 1878, to 
Miss Reuah Gilbert. Our subject is an energetic and enterprising business 
man and enjoys the confidence of every one for his honesty and fair dealings. 
He is an active member of the K. of P., at Meadville. 

JOHN MURDOCH, farmer, P. O. Sugar Lake, was bom in Lanarkshire, 
Scotland, April 5, 1839; son of John and Jane (Jack) Murdoek, natives of 
Scotland, former of whom came from that country to America in 1841, settling 
in Meadville, this county, where he followed the occupation of a carpenter, 
and died August 28, 1858; his wife died in Scotland in 1854. They were the 
parents of two children: Agnes and John. Our subject received his education 
in the common schools of his native land, and in early life learned the trade of 
blacksmith, which he followed for several years, but eventually tui'ned his 
attention to farming. At the age of eighteen he decided to try his fortune in 
the New World. The farm which he then purchased and now lives on was 
settled in an early day by the Oaks family. Mr. Murdoch eventually cleared 
and placed under cultivation many acres of land and in addition to other 
improvements he has erected fine farm buildings necessary for comfort and con- 
venience. He is a prominent stock-grower. In 1860 our subject married 
Miss Mary, daughter of Jackson and Susan Brawley. She died in 1873, leav- 
ing five children, viz.: James, Jane, William, Guy and Susan.* Mr. Mur- 
doch was again married, on this occasion, June 3, 1875, to Henriette, daughter 
of John and Mary Allen, born June 3, 1849. She is the mother of one child 
— Josephine. Mr. Murdoch is an active member of the K. of H. at Guy's 
Mills. 

ANDREW J. OWEN, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, is a son of William and 
Sally ''Sterling) Owen, former a native of Massachusetts, latter of Pennsyl- 
vania, both deceased. They were parents of seven children, of wbom Andrew 
is the youngest. Our subject received a common school education and taught 
school several terms. He learned the trade of cooper,, at which he worked 
several years and then turned his attention to farming. He bought his farm 
when covered with forest and has cleared over 100 acres. Mr. Owen enlisted 
in Company F, One Hundred and Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, serving ten months, and was in four engagements. He was wounded 
in the the left leg and contracted a chronic disease which has disabled him in 
some respects from active labor. Our subject was married January 1, 1858, 
to Elizabeth Clark, a native of this county, born December 25, 1839. Seven 
children were born to this union: Estella (deceased), Matis, Don E., Velma, 
Roy. Maud, and Lyle. Mr. Owen is an active member of the K. of H., at 
Guy's Mills. 

PAUL PHILLIPS, blacksmith and farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born in 
Venango County, Penn., February 15, 1843; son of Anthony and Libby(Cauvel) 
Phillips, natives of Centre County, Penn., and early settlers of Venango Coun- 
ty, former deceased. They were parents of eleven children, of whom Paul is 
sixth. Our subject received a common school education and learned black- 
smithing, a trade he worked at for twenty years. He is a good workman and 
has accumulated a fair portion of this world's goods. His farm in Randolph 
township consists of ninety acres of choice land under good cultivation. On 
March 9, 1880, Mr. Phillips was united in marriage with Miss Lucy McMullen, 
a native of Randolph Township, this county. In politics our subject is inde- 
pendent 

ELIAS SHAFFER, farmer, P. O. Black Ash, was born in Woodcock Town- 
ship, this county, February 22, 1830; son of Daniel and Sarah (Wikoflf) 



RANDOLPH TOWNSHIP. 989 

Shaffer, natives of this county (both deceased). They were parents of nine 
children, of whom Elias is fourth. Our subject received a common school edu- 
cation and entered on his career of life as a farmer, an occupation he has 
always followed. He came to Randolph Township, in April, I06O, and here 
made most of the improvements on a large farm. Mr. Shaffer was married in 
1853 to Miss Helena, daughter of William Salen, born May 22, 1833, and to 
this union were bom nine children, viz.: Ellen, Charles, Edgar, Minnie, Will- 
iam, Ward, Sarah, Leslie, and Bertha. Our subject has served the people of 
the township in several minor oflBces and is an active member of the Grange 
at Guy's Mills. He is an energetic, enterprising man and socially ranks high 
in the estimation of the community. 

HORACE T. SIKES, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born in Allegany 
County, N. Y., February 13, 1822; son of Philander and Mary (Faunce) Sikes, 
former a native of Washington County, N. Y., a blacksmith and farmer; latter 
a native of New Hampshire. They were parents of six children, viz. : Horace 
T. Squair, Harriett, Selden, James and Mahaly. Our subject was raised on a 
farm and received a common school education. He has worked at blacksmith- 
ing and now owns and operates a saw-mill which he erected on his farm in 
1848. He came to this county in 1836 with his parents, who located on a farm 
DOW owned by James Hall. Mr. Sikes, in company with his brothers, Selden 
and Squiar, enlisted in Company A, Two Hundred and Eleventh Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, in 1864, serving till the close of the war. He was mar- 
ried December 14, 1843, to Mary E. Keep, a native of Massachusetts, who bore 
him four children now living, viz. : Wolcott E. ; Ellen E, wife of D. C. Blancb- 
ard; Cherill A., wife of W. W. Sikes, of Venango County, and Flora E., wife 
of M. Lyman, of West Andover, Ohio. Wolcott E. was married September 
25, 1878, to M. Estella Selby, of Ohio, and by her has one child —Lee. Mr. 
Sikes is an active member of Gleason Post G. A. R. ; has been connected with 
the Methodist Episcopal Church for years. In politics is a Republican. 

EPHRAIM SPRING, merchant and Assistant Postmaster, Randolph, was 
born in Delaware County, N. Y. , February 11, 1809; son of Ephraim and 
Mary (Sumner) Spring, former a native of Washington County. N. Y., latter 
of Connecticut. They were parents of nine children, of whom Ephraim is 
fifth. Our subject obtained the chief part of his education in the common 
schools of his native county; came to this township in 1823 and engaged in 
farming. In 1874 he opened a grocery store in Randolph, where he now 
resides. Mr. Spring was twice married, on first occasion to Mary Radle, who 
died in 1872. She bore him nine children, of whom only two survive, viz. : 
Adeline and Mary. On August 25, 1874, our subject married Mrs. Mary (Hall) 
Haight, widow of William Haight, by whom she had one child — Pemrose — 
night railroad agent at Leavittsburg, Ohio. Mrs. Spring was born in Ran- 
dolph, April 21, 1831, and is a daughter of Leonard and Sally (Jones) Hall, 
former of whom was born in Vermont, May 4, 1795; came to Meadville, this 
county, in 1816, and to Randolph Township in 1826, at which time there was 
but one house between Randolph and Guy's Mills. He made the trip from 
Meadville on an ox-sled. He died September 29, 1878. His wife was born 
October 19, 1797; died September 10, 1868. They were the parents of ten 
children. Our subject was Captain of a militia company at Meadville four- 
teen years, and during the Rebellion he raised a company of sixty-five men, of 
which he was twice elected Captain, but his age prohibited him from going to 
the front. Thirty of his men volunteered with Capt. Ira Ayre. Mr. Spring 
was elected as Justice of the Peace in 1845 and filled that office thirty years-, 
was Postmaster at Randolph nine years; politically he is a Republican. 



940 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

HENBY P. STEADMAN, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born in Rome 
Township, this county, December 18, 1863; son of Perry and Esther (Bald- 
win) Steadman, the former of whom was born in East Fallowfield Township, 
this county, May 31, 1829; the latter in New York State, March 2, 1831. They 
were married July 28, 1849, and had a family of ten children, six of whom 
are now living, viz.: Alvah D., Catharine M. , Cyrus W., Mary E., Henry P. 
and EflSe E. Our subject received a common school education. During the 
winter seasons for several years he worked in a saw-mill. In the spring of 
1884 he rented a farm of fifty acres and began life for himself. Mr. Steadman 
was married October 4, 1880, to Miss Mary Grinnell, a native of Crawford 
County, Penn., born September 7, 1863, daughter of Morris B. and Maggie 
(Aimes) Grinnell, early settlers of Greenwood Township, this county, both 
now deceased. To this union were born two children: Jeptha and Maggie. 
Our subject is an industrious young man, and is destined to be a successful 
farmer. He is a member of the United Brethren Church. Politically, he is a 
Republican. 

JOHN E. STEWART, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born on the farm 
where he now lives in Randolph Township, this county, August 3, 1843; son 
of John and Mary Stewart (both deceased); the former a native of this coun- 
ty, the latter of Erie County, Penn. They were parents of six children, of 
whom John E. is fourth. Our subject obtained his education in the common 
schools, and having been raised on a farm has always followed that occupa- 
tion. He was married September 4, 1872, to Miss Clarinda Daniels, born in 
Randolph Township, this county, March 20, 1851, the result of which union 
is one child — Hattie Maude. Mr. Stewart is a member of the K. of H. at 
Guy's Mills; is connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics is 
a Democrat. 

DAVID F. SWEET, blacksmith and farmer, P. O. Sugar Lake, was born 
in Richmond Township, this county, June 25, 1828; son of A. B. and Anna 
(Blanchard) Sweet, natives of New York, and parents of twelve children, of 
whom David F. is the seventh. They moved from New York to this county in 
March, 1828. Our subject was brought up a farmer and is a blacksmith by 
trade, at which he has gained a wide reputation for his skill and for his hon- 
est, straightforward business transactions. He came to his present place in 
1876 and built a shop on his farm. ]\Ir. Sweet was married in 1851 to Eliz- 
abeth Shoemaker, of Wayne Township, this county, born in 1829. They have 
two children now living: Florence, wife of R. Ferry, and Samuel B. Mr. Sweet 
is highly esteemed in the community for his many good qualities. 

RALPH UTLEY (deceased) was born in Landgrove, Vi, June 12, 1817. 
He came to Randolph Township, this county, in 1855, and bought the farm 
where his son Edward C. pow lives. He' was married at Whitehall, N. Y., 
March 6, 1839, to Miss Laura J. Noble, a native of Whitehall, N. Y. , born 
November 22, 1819, and now living. To this union were born five children, 
viz. : George H. (deceased), Mary G., Eliza M., Helen A. (deceased), and Edward 
C. Mr. Utley was a very prominent man in his day and was recognized as 
one of the substantial farmers of the township. His son Edward C. was 
bom January 15, 1859, and received a good common school education. He is 
an energetic young man, and bids fair to become a practical, successful farmer. 
He married, March 30, 1880, Miss Alice M. Hanks, a native of Crawford 
County, Penn., born August 12, 1859. 

JAMES C. VIRTUE, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born in Upper 
Canada, now Ontario, July 19, 1844, son of Edward and Mary A. (Hall) Virtue, 
natives of Canada, former deceased, latter still living. His educational privi- 



RANDOLPH TOWNSHIP. 941 

leges were limited to the common schools. At the age of ten years he 
was deprived of a father's care, and being the oldest of seven children, a large 
burden fell upon his young shoulders in assisting to care for the family. He 
has accumulated a large estate by his own efforts, and the property he now 
owns represents many hours of hard labor performed by his own hands. In 
1865 he came to Pennsylvania and located in the oil regions, where he engaged 
in the wood business for three years, at the end of which iime he came to 
Randolph Township, this county, and bought a farm. He is nniversally 
termed the first farmer of the township, and the appearance of his farm, upon 
which he has made nearly all the improvements, does not in any respect belie 
the assertion. His cattle are of thoroughbred Jersey and short- horn families, 
and his sheep full-blooded stock. He always buys the best and consequently 
has the best to sell. He helped build the Methodist Episcopal Church at 
Guy's Mills, of which he has been a leading member for years. Our subject 
married, March 4, 1869, Lucetta Frankenberger, who was born in Venango 
County, this State, in 1848, and by this union are three children, viz. : Clair 
W., Ernest E. and Mabel E. In politics Mr. Virtue is a Republican. 

SYLVESTER WILDER, M. D., retired, Guy's Mills. This aged and 
honored gentleman, so well and favorably known throughout this county, was 
born in Oneida County, N. Y., in 1809, son of Thomas and Rebecca (Yarns) 
Wilder, the father a native of Massachusetts, the mother, of New York State. 
Among the passengers on the " Mayflower," who landed at Plymouth Rock in 
1620, fleeing from religious persecutions in England, were two brothers, John 
and Daniel Wilder, and of these Thomas Wilder, our subject's father, was a 
lineal descendant. Thomas Wilder was born and reared near Boston, and at 
the age of nineteen years removed to Oneida County, N. Y., where he subse- 
quently married. In 1831 he removed to this township, of which he remained 
a resident until his death in 1856. He served in the war of 1812 under Gen. 
Brown. His family consisted of three sons and one daughter, of whom two 
sons, Luther and Sylvester, survive, and are both residents of this township. 
Sylvester settled in this township one year later than his father, or in 1832. 
In 1834 he married Maria Sellew, of Wetherstield, Conn., who bore him one 
child, that died aged eleven days. Mrs. Wilder died March 25, 1864, aged 
fifty-four years. In 1868 Dr. Wilder married for his second wife Mrs. Mary 
R. Lippitt, of Cambridge. In early life he entered upon the study of medi- 
cine, and for twenty-eight years engaged in the practice of his profession, at 
the same time carrying on quite an extensive farming business. Financially, 
the Doctor's life has been very successful. Although he raised no children of 
his own, his fatherly care and attention have been given to several adopted 
children, giving them a good education, and at maturity furnishing each of 
them with abundant means to start well in business life. The Doctor has been 
a member of the Congregational Church for many years, in which by his 
Christian character and influence, and his liberal giving of his means, he has 
been one of the main pillars. For more than half a century Dr. Wilder has 
been a resident of this community, and during this long period the many 
public acts of his life and the noble deeds of charity to the poor and indigent 
and to all worthy objects have been extended with such a beneficent hand as to 
endear him in the hearts of the people of this community and throughout his 
large and extended circle of acquaintances. 

THOMAS J. WILDER, farmer, P. O. Randolph, was born in Randolph 
Township, this county, February 1, 1841; son of Luther and Sarah (Byham) 
Wilder, former of whom was born in Oneida County, N. Y., January 25, 1805; 
latter born in Worcester County, Mass., December 4, 1818. Luther Wilder 



942 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

came to Randolph Township, this county, in 1834, settling on the farm where 
he now lives. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
about sixty-seven years, and class-leader thirty-six years. Has been twice 
married; on first occasion, March 2, 1829, to Lucy Ward, who died May 20, 
1836, leaving one child, Sylvester W. His second marriage occurred March 
28, 1837, with Sarah Byham, who bore him nine children, viz.: Martin L., 
Thomas J., Chancy G., Maria L. (deceased), Sarah J. (deceased), Elisha R., 
Mary E., Martha S. and Jonas B. (deceased). The paternal grandfather of 
our subject is supposed to have been of German descent; he was a farmer by 
occupation; a teamster in the war of 1812. Of his family of five children. 
Dr. Wilder and Luther are the only ones now living. Omr subject was raised 
on a farm, and has been a farmer all his life. During the war of the Rebellion, 
he enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, and during the sixteen months he was in the service he took part in 
seventeen engagements and received one wound. He participated in the bat- 
tles of the Wilderness, Weldon Railroad and Hatcher's Run. Mr. Wilder was 
married December 25, 1880, to Miss Adelia Crouch, who died a few months 
later. Our subject is a member of Gleason Post, G. A. R., at Townville, and. 
of the K. of H. at Guy's Mills. He is a consistent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

JACOB WILSON, M. D., phywcian and surgeon, Guy's Mills. Prior to 
the war of the Revolution, Moore Wilson, a native of England, immigrated to 
America, settling in Virginia, and soon after enlisted in the war, serving ualil 
its close. He became owner of a large plantation with quite a number of 
slaves, and there he resided during the remainder of his life. He died very 
suddenly, it is supposed of heart disease, while apparently in quite robust 
health, at the advanced age of one hundred years. Of his children, Jacob 
Wilson, the father of our subject, was born in West V^irginia, served in the 
■war of 1812, subsequently married Miss Maugerette Killpatrick, of Baltimore, 
Md., and about 1820 removed to Ohio, and settled at or near Akron, Summit 
County. A few years later, at the time of the building of the Erie & Pitts- 
burgh Canal, he removed to Sherman's Corners, this county, and contracted 
for and superintended the construction of one section of that canal. After the 
completion of this work he settled on a farm in Richmond Township, where 
he resided till near the time of his death. He died like his father, very sud- 
denly, of heart disease, in August, 1864. He was the father of five sons and 
six daughters, of whom seven are now living: Nancy, James A., Harriet, 
Maugerette, Jacob, John K. and Thomas. Of these, Jacob, the subject of 
this sketch, was born in 1834, in this county, raised on his father's farm, and 
when seventeen years of age entered Allegheny College, where he continued 
nearly three years; then he studied medicine with Drs. Wither wax and Carter, 
at Davenport, Iowa, remaining with them about four years. He then attended 
a full course at the Medical Department at Ann Arbor College, Michigan. In 
1858 he married Miss Jane E., daughter of George and Sarah Hotchkiss, 
settled in this county and entered upon the practice of his profession. He 
has now practiced twenty-six years, and is the oldest practicing physician in 
Randolph Township. His business has constantly increased and is now 
extended over a large extent of territory. In 1882 he graduated in the West- 
ern Reserve College, Cleveland, Ohio, and in the spring of the same year 
removed to Guy's Mills, where he has since carried on his profession. He is 
the father of two sons and two daughters: Hattie May (now IMrs. F. L. Hall), 
James L., Burt L. and Addie M. 

JACOB WOOD, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born in Columbiana Coun- 
ty, Ohio, April 16, 1806, son of John and Elizabeth (Mourey) Wood, natives 



RICHMOND TOWNSHIP. 943 

of Bonthem Pennsylvania. John Wood was in the war of 1812, and while in 
the flervice fell sick and died in 1813. They were the parents of ten children, 
of whom Jacob is sixth. Our subject received but a limited education, and 
served an apprenticeship to the blacksmith's trade at Salem, Ohio. In 1838 he 
came to Crawford County, and was the same year married to Barbara Sherrod, 
who bore him eleven children, viz. : Lewis, John, William (deceased), Andrew, 
Martha, Bebecca, Erastus, Elizabeth, Lucy, Alice and Alford. Mr. Wood 
worked at his trade ten months in each of the following places : Edinboro, Erie 
County, and Venango Township, this county, then went to Stark County, 
Ohio, where he remained seven years; he then returned to Crawford County, 
and cleared a farm, which he sold, and again applied himself to his trade in 
Cambridgeboro, this county, fifteen years, and finally came to Randolph Town- 
ship and settled on his farm in 1880. He has held several minor township 
ofSces. Is a member of the Congregational Church. 

SAMUEL F. WOOD, farmer, P. O. Townville, was bom in Otsego Coun- 
ty, N. Y., March 15, 1817, son of Isaiah and Hannah (Fisk) Wood, the former 
of whom was born in Rhode Island, a miller by trade, and an early settler of 
Steuben Township, this county. The latter was a native of Connecticut. 
They were the parents of seven children, viz. : Bamet, James, Samuel F., Wil- 
lard, Sarah, Catharine and Louisa. When about five years of age our subject 
was brought by his parents to Steuben Township, this county, where he received 
a common school education, and early in life commenced to learn the trade of 
carpenter and joiner, at which he has worked more or less in connection with 
farming. In 1841 he went to Richmond Township, this county, and remained 
till 1881, and then came to Randolph Township, where he has a farm of fifty 
acres. Mr. Wood has been for many years a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church. In politics he is a Republican. 

EZRA R. WRIGHT, farmer, P. O. Guy's Mills, was born in Jefferson 
County, N. Y., July 17, 1824, son of William and Lucy (Eastman) Wright, 
the former a native of New Hampshire, the latter of Vermont, early settlers of 
Venango County, Penn. Ezra R. Wright was raised on a farm, and has 
always followed agricultural pursuits. He came to this township in 1864, and 
has demonstrated the fact that he is an excellent husbandman by placing his 
farm in a high state of cultivation. He takes quite an interest in high grade 
stock and fowls, of which he has quite a number. At the death of his first 
wife, Mary Hasson. he was left with five children, viz.: Wilhelmina, wife of 
Charles Crook; Frederick N., who married Edith Faunce; Alvira, wife of 
Lawrence Mofifat; Mary, wife of J. Hill, and John, who married Ella Boyles. 
Mr. Wright married for his second wife Naney Dufiield, a native of Venango 
County, Penn., by whom he has two children, viz. : Harvey M. and Emma, 
both now living at home, assisting their parents upon the homestead farm. 



RICHMOND TOWNSHIP. 

EDWIN J. BAILEY, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was bom in Chautau- 
qua County, N. Y. , January 13, 1829; son of Simon P. and Nancy (King) Bailey 
(both deceased), natives of Onondaga County, N. Y. ; parents of seven children, 
of whom Edwin J. is fourth. They came to this county when he was an infant. 
Our subject's education was limited to the common schools of the neighbor- 



944 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

hood, and bis early life was employed in assisting his parents on the farm. 
On reaching his majority, Mr. Bailey commenced life as a parpenter and joiner, 
an occupation he has followed for about twenty-five years in connection 
with his farm, which consists of 150 acres of choice land. He was married 
December 25, 1853, to Miss Martha E. Clark, born March 25, 1837, and by 
this union there are six children, viz. : Rodolph C. , Eda E., Hattie L., Neva, 
Melva M and Donn E. Recognizing the importance of good education, Mr. 
Bailey has spared no pains in that respect for his children. He is an energetic, 
enterprising man, taking an active part in all county undertakings, especially 
such as tend to the advancement of religion and education. 

EDWIN BAKER, farmer, P. O. Townville, is a native of Steuben Town- 
ship, this county, born November, 1848; son of Freeland and Betsy (Alten- 
bnrg) Baker, natives of Pennsylvania, and now living in Steuben Township. 
They were parents of five children, viz. : Amy (deceased), Edwin, Frank 
(deceased), Louie Bell and Fred. Our subject received a common school edu- 
cation and entered on his career in life as a farmer. In 1868 he purchased 
the farm where he now lives, consisting of 104 acres of excellent land. Mr. 
Baker was married, March 5, 1868, to Juliette Myers, born in Woodcock Town- 
ship, this county, February 14, 1847. and the result of this union is two chil- 
dren: Frank, born May 4, 1871, and Don, born October 7, 1877. Our sub- 
ject is a member of the Baptist Church at Townville. Is at present serving the 
township as Supervisor; is. an active member of the I. 0. 0. F. 

HENRY D. BERTRAM, farmer, P. O. Little Cooley, was bom in Ger- 
many, December 11, 1836, son of George Henry and Hannah Bertram. He 
oame to America in 1853, and located at Cambridgeboro, this county, where he 
followed blacksmithing until he moved to his farm, in Richmond Township, 
in 1869. Mr. Bertram was married, October 28, 1858, to Miss Mary Mathews, 
a native of New York State, and to this union were born seven children: Emma, 
George, Fred, Mary, Nelson, Charles and Henry. Our subject is an ener- 
getic, enterprising man, and highly esteemed by all who know him. He is 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and of the A. O. U. W. In pol- 
itics he was formerly an adherent of the Republican party; lately, however, 
he has become identified with the Prohibitionists. 

GEORGE L. BOWMAN, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born in 
Columbia County, Penn. , August 1, 1810. He received but a limited educa- 
tion, and served as an apprentice to the cabinet-making, a business in which he 
opened out for himself, when twenty-three years of age, at Cambridge, thir 
county, where he remained about fourteen years. He then went to Rockdale 
Township, this county, immediately turning his attention to farming, and here 
he remained twenty- three years. He next came to his present farm of 100 acres 
of excellent land, in Richmond Township, this county, well cultivated and 
stocked. Mr. Bowman was married March 15, 1840, to Caroline A. Webster, 
a native of Brockville, Ontario, and to this union were born six children, viz.: 
Susan, wife of Sam Stewart; Emma, wife of Willis Morse; Lena, a teacher in 
Cleveland, Ohio; Albert and Albion (twins) and Alsaett, wife of Dr. Farley, 
of Townville. In addition to his farm labors, our subject devotes part of his 
time to repairing wagons, buggies, etc., having on his place a combined wagon 
and blacksmith shop. Politically Mr. Bowman is a Democrat. 

ALBION BOWMAN, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born in - Cam- 
bridge, this county, January 23, 1847; son of George and Caroline (Webster) 
Bowman, early settlers of this county, both now living. They are the parents 
of six children, of whom Albion and Albert (twins) are the only boys. Our 
subject received his educational training at the common schools, and learned 



EICHMOND TOWNSHIP. 946 

at first the trade of a painter, which he followed five years, when he turned his 
attention to agrioaltoral pursuits. In 1874 he moved to his present farm, 
which presents every evidence of prosperity, the result of careful cultivation. 
Mr, Bowman was married January 1, 1873, to Miss Estella Navy, born in 
Steuben Township, this county, November 7, 1854, and daughter of William 
and Jeanette (Hopkins) Navy; former, a native of this county, died August 2, 
1861; latter, a native of New York, now living. They were parents of two 
children, of whom Mrs. Bowman is eldest. Two children are the result of this 
union, Don and Nettie. Our subject has the reputation of being energetic and 
enterprising, honest and upright in all business transactions, and is highly 
esteemed by all. 

PRENTIS N. BRESEE, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born in Trum- 
bull County, Ohio, October 28, 1837; son of Nathan and Huldah (Chipman) 
Bresee, natives of New York State; former a farmer and mechanic, died May 
3, 1877, latter in 1857. They were parents of seven children, of whom Pren- 
tis N. is second. The early life of our subject was employed in attending the 
common schools and assisting on the farm. In 1843 he came to Richmond 
Township, this county, with his parents, and here he has followed the occupa- 
tion of farmer, without intermission, having met with good success as a return 
for hard work and perseverance. During the war of the Rebellion he enlisted 
in Company I, Tenth Pennsylvania Reserves, March, 1864. On August 19, 
following, he was captured by the Rebels, and held prisoner seven months in 
Libby, Belle Isle and Salisbury prisons. When liberated he returned 
home on furlough, at the expiration of which he went to camp at Annapolis, 
where he received his discharge. He then turned his attention to agriculture. 
Mr. Bresee was married June 11, 1861, to Miss Mary R. Marsh, born in 
Medina County, Ohio, by whom he had four children: EflSe, Wilbur, Chester and 
one deceased. Our subject held the office of Constable ten years, from 1869; 
assessed the township twice and collected taxes once; is a member of the 
Grange at New Richmond; politically a Republican. 

JAMES W. BURDICK, farmer, P. O. Townville, was bom in Sparta Town- 
ship, this county, July 24, 1842, son of Elias and Mary Ann (Willey) Burdick, 
former deceased. Our subject received but a limited education, attending only 
a few terms at the common schools, as his facilities were not of the best. 
During the Rebellion he enlisted in Company B, Eighty-second Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, Capt. Knight, serving his country faithfully two years. 
He was in several engagements, among which was the battle of the Wilderness, 
where he received eleven bullet holes in his clothes and four wounds, three in 
his left arm and one in his right hand; a Testament which he carried in his 
pocket stopped one bullet which would undoubtedly have killed him. In 1869 
he purchased his farm in Richmond Township. Mr. Burdick was married 
March 31, 1879, to Miss Sarah, daughter of Stephen Hunt, and by her has 
two children : Mary and Addie. He was a member of a G. A. R. post which 
was disbanded. Is a member of the Christian Church. 

ISRAEL CANNON, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born in Chenango 
County, N. Y., March 12, 1812; son of Stodard and Polly (Heneager) Cannon. 
He was brought when a child by his parents to Chautauqua County, N. Y., 
and his early life was passed in assisting his father on the farm. Our subject 
came to Richmond Township, this county, about 1834, and cleared the farm 
where he now lives and expects to end his days. He has always been a hard- 
working man, and has accumulated his property by his own energy and indus- 
try, although he has had a great deal of trouble in the way of sickness and 
death in the family. Mr. Cannon is now living with his third wife, who was 



946 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

a Mies Helen Dauforth, by whom he has four children living: Bert, Eva', 
Minnie and Bay Richmond. He has been a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church over sixty years. Politically he is a Republican. 

RILEY CARPENTER, farmer, P. 0. Townville, is a native of Vermont, 
bom August 12, 1821, son of Abner and Nancy (Hanz) Carpenter, also natives 
of Vermont. They came to Crawford County at an early day, and settled on 
land now owned by Welcome Carpenter, and there died. Their six children 
are Welcome, Charles, Aaron, Riley, Parley, and Sophia, widpw of Washing- 
ton Kelly. The grandfather served through the entire Revolutionnxy war. 
Our subject received his school training in the old log schoolhouse, immedi- 
ately commenced farming, and in 1851 pui-chased his present farm of 170 acres 
of improved land, where he makes a specialty of raising cattle. He was married 
in 1848 to Lovicy, daughter of John Pratt, who was killed by the falling limb 
of a tree, and by this union were born eight children, viz. : James E., Emma 
E., Eva N., Martin L., Lydia L., Lillie L., John R. and Hattie N. Mr. 
Carpenter enlisted during the Rebellion in Company C, One Hundred and 
Fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving three years in the hospital, 
department He has held several township oflSces; politically he is a Repub- 
lican. The family are connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church of 
Townville. 

EMERSON CHAMBERLAIN, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was bom at 
Williamstown, Mass., July 12, 1811, son of Anson and Rhoda Chamberlain. 
His education was obtained in the common schools of Chenango County, N. 
Y., where his parents removed when he was but two years of age. Mr. Cham- 
berlain was twice married, his first wife living only a few years. She was the 
mother of two childten: Oscar and Mary, both now deceased. In 1838 our 
subject returned to Chautauqua County, N. Y., where he remained three years. 
On February 23, 1840, he married Miss Elvira Aiken, born in Chautauqua 
County, N. Y., August 23, 1816, and to this union were born eleven children, 
viz.: Adeline (deceased), Adelaide, Cornelia, Anson (deceased), Henry, Amelia, 
Viola, Laura, Emeline, Homer and Clara. Soon after his second marriage 
our subject came to Crawford County, and settled on and cleared the farm 
where he now lives, which is under a high state of cultivation and supplied 
with substantial buildings. Our subject has held several minor township offices. 
Has been an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for nearly forty 
years. 

DONAL CHILDS, retired fanner, P. O. Lyona, is a native of Washington 
County, N. Y., bom December 23, 1808. He received a common school 
training, and commenced life as a farmer, an occupation he has followed with- 
out intermission till date of his retirement from active labor. He settled in 
Athens Township, this county, in 1830, and three years later moved to Rich- 
mond Township, where he now lives. His farm consists of fifty acres of 
choice land now managed by his son Joseph. Mr. Childs was married in 1827 
to Miss Mary Hazleton, a native of Vermont, who died in 1875. To this 
union were born six boys: Reuben, Eli, Byron, Lucius, Warren and Joseph, 
all living and all farmers, excepting Lucius and Warren, former of whom is 
in mercantile business, latter a shoemaker. Our subject was formerly a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically he was a Whig until the 
organization of the Republican party, when he became identified with it. He 
cast his first vote for Jackson. 

SILAS CLARK, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born on a farm near 
where he now resides in Richmond Township, this county, August 6, 1825, son 
of Joseph and Sybil (Phillips) Clark, natives of Washington County, N. Y., 



RICHMOND TOWNSHIP. 947 

and who settled in Bichmond Township in 1820. They were parents of five 
children, of whom Silas is the eldest. The first school oar subject attended 
was on the subscription plan, and his education was limited to that and the 
common schools. He first directed his attention to farming, but eventually 
learned shoe-making, which trade he followed for about fifteen years, and 
finally devoted himself exclusively to the farm. He has at present some Dur- 
ham cattle, a grade he expects in the future to make a specialty of; also makes 
a business of fruit-tree grafting. Mr. Clark during the war of the Rebellion 
enlisted in the Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, Company F, 
Capt. D. C. McCoy, under command of Col. John W. McLane. He was dis- 
abled and returned to his regiment oh three different occasions; was in he 
service twenty-seven months, and soon after Lee's surrender received his dis- 
charge at Washington, D. C. He was married January 29, 1847, to Miss 
Mary Ann, daughter of Gamaliel Phillips, and a native of this county, born 
April 19, 1827. To this union were born twelve children, eight now living, 
viz. : David, Gamaliel, Delbert, Whiteley, Jennie, Gertie, Rose and Hale. 
The eldest son, George, was in the service during the Rebellion, and died in 
hospital at Pittsburgh, Penn. 

JEREMIAH CLARK, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born on the farm 
where he now lives. May 22, 1831, son of Joseph and Sybil (Phillips) Clark, 
natives of New York State and early settlers of Richmond Township, this 
county, having bought the farm where their son Jeremiah now resides. Our 
fiubject received a common school education, and commenced life as a carpen- 
ter and joiner, which ocjcupation he followed fifteen years. During the 
Rebellion he enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Fiftieth Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, Capt. Resinger, attached to Army of the Potomac; was 
wounded in the hand at the battle of Gettysburg; was in hospital in conse- 
quence three months, and then rejoined his company. Soon afterward was 
again wounded in the same hand, this time so seriously that he had to be dis- 
charged. After his return home Mr. Clark turned his attention to farming, 
which occupation he still follows. Our subject was at one time a member of 
the I. O. 0. F. 

LYMAN CLARK, fanner, P. 0. Now Richmond, is a native of Richmond 
Township, this county, bom August 25, 1834; son of Ira H. and Betsy (Day) 
Clark, natives of Washington County, N. Y., and early settlers of this town- 
ship (both deceased). They were parents of ten children, of whom Lyman is the 
fourth. Our subject. received a common school education, and was apprenticed 
to the trade of shoe-maker, an occupation he followed several years at Rock 
Island, 111., Waterford, Titusville, McClintockville and New Richmond, Penn. 
Eventually he adopted farming and lumbering, the former of which he has 
engaged in to the present time, with the exception of a few years spent in 
the oil regions, where he still holds an interest. Mr. Clark was married, March 
13, 1857, to Miss Rebecca A. Bailey, bom in Richmond Township, this 
county, July 30, 1838, daughter of Simon and Nancy (King) Bailey, both 
deceased, natives of Onondaga County, N. Y., parents of seven children. To 
this union were bom five children, only one now living, Clellie R., wife of 
Frank Hubble, of Liucolnville, Penn. Our subject owns a well cultivated, 
compact, though not large farm, with good buildings and abundance of live- 
stock. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church several 
years; was at one time connected with the Grange. Is politically a Democrat. 

ABEL CROSS, retired farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born in Otsego 
County, N. Y., November 27, 1812. He spent his early days on his father's farm 
and in attending school in the neighboriLg log sohoolhouse. He commenced life 



948 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

for himself as a farmer, and in 1838 came to this county, where he now resides on 
the third farm he has cleared, comprising 110 acres of well-improved land, sit- 
uated near New Richmond. Mr. Cross has been very successful, and is looked 
up to as a substantial, practical man, bearing a reputation for energy and 
enterprise and honest fair dealings in. all business transactions. Our subject 
was married October 16, 1836, to Miss Rosella Lurgy, a native of Cattaraugus 
County, N. Y. , born January 19, 1819. To this union were born five children: 
Joel, Cyrus, Eugene, Sally and Susan, all now living. Joel has been an army 
surgeon nearly fifteen years. Mr. Cross has retired from active labor, and 
his place is now under the management of his youngest son, Eugene. In pol- 
itics he has always been a stanch Republican. 

BTJRNEY DANFORTH, retired farmer, P. O. New Richmond, is a native 
of Bristol County, Mass., born May 28, 1807, son of Richmond and Catharine 
Danforth. He was reared on a farm and educated at the common schools of 
his native county. His first occupation was that of distiller, which he followed 
for three years. He then bought and ran a canal-boat for several years, but 
eventually turned his attention to farming, and bought the place where he now 
resides in 1829. At' one time he owned between 300 and 400 acres, but since 
retiring from active life has disposed of the greater part of it. In 1839 Mr. 
Danforth married Sarah Gail, who died in 1850, leaving eight children; and 
in 1852 our subject married Sarah Belden, of Vermont, who died eight years 
later; she was the mother of four children. Mr. Danforth's third marriage 
occurred in 1862, with Martha Edmons, who has borne the following-named chil- 
dren: John, George, Mariette, Frank and Albert. 

JAMES E. DAVISON, farmer, P. O. Lyona, is a native of Randolph 
Township, this county, born September 12, 1837, son of John and Ruth 
(Kitelinger) Davison, former a native of Massachusetts, latter of Pennsylvania, 
early settlers of Randolph Township and still living in the same township. 
They are the parents of eight children, of whom James E. is eldest. Our 
subject had few facilities for attending school, consequently his education was 
limited, but he is a great reader, and takes more weeklj- and monthly papers 
than probably any other man in the township. His library is extensive, con- 
taining many valuable and popular works, and having traveled considerably, 
he is enabled to give interesting and graphic descriptions of all noted places 
he has visited. Mr. Davison enlisted during the war of the Rebellion, in 
Company I, Tenth Pennsylvania Reserves, Capt. Howe, under command of 
Col. Ira Ayre, and while on picket duty near Bull Run he received a wound in 
the hand which disabled him from further duty, so he was discharged. Our 
subject was married July 4, 1861, to Miss Alvira N. , daughter of Ebenezer 
Hunt, the first settler of Richmond Township; she was born October 18, 1835. 
Mr. and Mrs. Davison have two children by adoption: Charles, of West Point, 
Neb., and Flora, wife of W. H. Smith, of Randolph Township. Mr. Davison 
has served the township in every oflSce from lowest to highest; is Past Master 
of the Grange at New Richmond; politically he is a Republican. 

FAYETTE DELAMATER, farmer, P. O. Blooming Valley, was born on 
the farm where he now resides, July 1, 1827, fourth child of Thomas and 
Martha (Day) Delamater, former a native of Washington County, N. Y. , and 
an early settler of this county, died at the age of seventy years; latter a native 
of Vermont, died aged sixty-two years. They were parents of seven children. 
Our subject's education was limited to the common schools of his neighbor- 
hood. He commenced life as a farmer, and in addition to the time therein 
employed taught school several winters. He has a large, well-cultivated farm 
in ship-shape condition, and for several years he has dealt in live stock in 



RICHMOND TOWNSHIP. 949 

addition to growing the usual crops. Mr. Delamater, in 1851, married Miss 
Sarah Peelman, a native of Woodcock Township, this county, born in 1832. 
To this union were born four children: Eva, wife of Judson Sayer; Ella, wife 
of D. W. Wright; Alice, wife of Willis Bentley; and Albert L., at home. 
Our subject during the war of the Rebellion enlisted in a company of Home 
Guards, but did not enter into active service. He is an active member of the 
Grange at New Richmond, also of the R. T. of T. , Blooming Valley. He 
and his wife are connected with the Congregational Church at Guy's Mills. 

ALEXANDER FOSBURGH, farmer, P. O. Little Cooley, was born i n Steuben 
County, N. Y., June 2, 1822. His educational privileges were limited to the 
common schools, and his first business enterprise was building flat-boats on 
French Creek, of which he has constructed as many as fifty-three in one year. 
In connection with boat-building Mr. Fosburgh owned and operated a saw-mill 
for a number of years. In 1864 he purchased a farm of fifty acres of choice 
land, and entered on the life of an agriculturist. He has all farm buildings 
necessary for comfort and convenience, and everything in ship-shape order. 
Our subject was married, July 16, 1846, to Cynthia Fisk, who died November 
19, 1871, and he then became united, March 22, 1872, with Rosanna Sloan, a 
native of this county, born April 26, 1827. The result of this union has been 
two children. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, farmer, P. O. Townville, was born August 6, 
1820, in Genesee County, N. Y., son of Eber and Martha (Kimble) Franklin, 
former a native of Vermont, latter of New Jersey. They were parents of 
thirteen children, viz. : Sophia, Andrew, Ichabod, Benjamin, Lyman, Lovina, 
Mary, Eber, Joanna, Orillia, George, Harrison and an infant (deceased). Our 
subject attended school in a log-cabin, his early books being the reader and 
spelling-book. He commenced life as a day laborer, and by industry and 
economy earned enough to buy a farm. In 1851 he settled on his present prop- 
erty of 130 acres, and at one time owned 240 acres, half of which he gave his 
son. He has a dairy of twenty cows, and sends the milk to the Franklin 
Cheese Factory, which he built in 1871, and sold after operating it one season. 
Mr. Franklin married, in November, 1841, Mary Rideout, of New York State, 
who bore him four children: Melissa, wife of William Hadlock; Esther, wife 
of H. M. Cutshall (she taught school several terms before marriage); Flora, 
wife of A. Winans, and Earl, married to Alice Shorts. Our subject has filled 
several minor township ofiices; is a member of the Grange at New Richmond; 
in politics is independent. He is a believer in the doctrine of Spiritualism. 

THOMAS W. GREEN, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born in Jeffer- 
son County, N. Y., May 1, 1822. His education was very limited, as he had 
to work most of the time when a boy, and had but little time to attend school. 
He entered upon his career in life as a farmer, an occupation he has since fol- 
lowed, and by energy and enterprise has prospered well. He left his home in 
New York State for the West in 1840, and settled in Richmond Township, this 
county, where he has now a farm well cultivated, and a pleasant home. Mr. 
Green was married, July 7, 1845, to Miss Mary E. Baldwin, by whom he has 
seven children, viz. : Pembroke, Charles, Francis, Sarah, Rhoda, Ann and 
Bertha, all living. 

ZENAS M. GRISWOLD, farmer, P. 0. New Richmond, is a native of 
Rutland County, Vt., born September 23, 1816, son of Samuel and Irene 
(Bronson) Griswold, natives of Vermont, both now deceased, parents of four 
children, of whom Zenas M. is the eldest. They moved to St. Lawrence County, 
N. Y., when our subject was four years of age, and from there to Chautauqua 
County, N. Y. In 1836 Samuel Griswold came to Richmond Township and 



950 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

purchased the "Ashley heir property, " of which our subject still owns sixty- 
one acres. Mr. Griswold received a good common school education, and had 
to work hard, up to reaching his majority, at farming b)' the day or month. By 
industry and economy he saved enough from his earnings to make a payment 
on a farm for himself, which farm is well supplied with all necessary build- 
ings, etc. Mr. Griswold was married November 17, 1842, to Miss Charlotte 
Fisk, born in April, 1821, daughter of Elisha Fisk, a native of Otsego County, 
N. Y. Our subject has been a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church for twenty years. In politics is a Democrat. 

FRIEND L. HALL, M. D. , New Richmond, was born in Randolph Town- 
ship, this county, June 11, 1855, son of Ira R. and Rebecca (Camp) Hall, 
natives of Pennsylvania, latter deceased. They were parents of two sons: Ira 
E. and Friend L. Up to the age of fifteen our subject's time was employed 
on the farm and in attending school. He then engaged to learn the trade of 
cheese-making, which he followed about five summers, teaching school in the 
winters — one term wlien he was seventeen years old. The business of cheese- 
making eventually took him to Oregon and California, where he remained two 
and a half years. The Doctor traveled over the West considerably, and 
attended one course of medical lectures at Willamette University, Portland, 
Oregon. He received his diploma at the Western Reserve College, of Cleveland, 
Ohio, March 15, 1881, and commenced the practice of his profession at Little 
Cooley, this county, coming one year later to New Richmond, and has met with 
more than ordinary success, his ride now extending over four townships; the 
result of a thorough knowledge of the science of medicine, and close attention 
to business. Our subject was married April 6, 1878, to Miss Hattie M. Wil- 
son, a native of Greenwood, this county, born November 9, 1859, and daughter 
of Dr. Jacob Wilson, of Guy's Mills, this county. One child has been born 
to this union, named Charles Mack Hall. 

L. G. HAMILTON, retired farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born at 
Wellington, Ohio, August 16, 1829, son of Asa and Lydia (Deland) Hamil- 
ton, former a native of Connecticut, latter of Massachusetts, both now de- 
ceased. They were parents of six children, of whom L. G. is the fourth. Our 
subject received a common school training, and at the age of fifteen com- 
menced working at the trade of carpenter and joiner, at which he continued, 
in connection with farming, for about twenty-five years. In 1857 he came to 
this township, and purchased a farm which he cleared and placed under a high 
slate of cultivation. Mr. Hamilton was married December 10, 1854, to Cath- 
arine Baird, a native of Connecticut, born February 6, 1834. Three children 
were the result of this union: Elsie, Adelbert L. (deceased) and Ai G. Our 
subject is recognized as one of the substantial farmers of the township, and has 
been very successful in all his undertakings. He has tilled several of the 
minor township offices; has been an active F. & A. M. several years; is a mem- 
ber of the Grange of New Richmond. In politics a Republican. 

JARED L. BARTER, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, is a native of 
Herkimer County, N. Y., born June 21, 1818; son of Henry and Sophronia 
(Hyde) Harter, natives of New York, (both deceased). They were parents of 
seven children, of whom Jared L., is the eldest. Our subject received a com- 
mon school education; in May, 1854, he purchased a farm in Rockdale Town- 
ship, this county, and in 1862 moved to Richmond Township, where he has 
since been engaged in farming. Mr. Harter was married June 1, 1843, to 
Miss Cynthia E. Paddock, a native of Chautauqua County, N. Y., born March 
26, 1820, daughter of Samuel and Cynthia (Mattison) Paddock, former a 
native of Connecticut, latter of Vermont, (both deceased). They were the 



RICHMOND TOWNSHIP. 951 

parents of nine children, .of whom Mrs. Harter is fourth. To onr subject and 
wife were born seven children: Henry L., Darwin R. ; Vera A., wife of E. John- 
son; John P., Solomon E.. Gilbert J., and Lucy, wife of E. Carpenter. Mr. 
aad Mra Harter aie members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at New Rich- 
mond. Politically, he is not a partisan, but usually votes the Republican 
ticket. 

ELIAS N. HOLMES (deceased) was born in Otsego County, N. Y., July 
22, 1808; son of Samuel and Parmelia (Andrews) Holmes, natives of Connecti- 
cut (both deceased). They were parents of four children, of whom Elias N. 
was the youngest. Our subject, who was a farmer by occupation, came to 
Richmond Township, this county, in 1839, and cleared a farm of 110 acres. 
He held several township offices. Mr. Holmes, was married February 4, 1831, 
to Susan A., only child of Daniel and Betsy (Stout) Luther, former a native 
of Rhode Island, latter of New Jersey (both deceased). Mrs. Holmes is a 
native of Tompkins County, N. Y. , and is the mother of nine children, viz.: 
Rennselaer D. , Walter C, Mary D. , Eugene O., Charles H. , Lsander H. , Ellen 
E., Allison U., and Fanny — last two named now living at home assisting 
their mother in the management of the farm. Mr. Holmes died August 23, 
1879, universally respected and much lamented. 

EBENEZER HUNT, retired farmer, P. O. Lyona, was born in Washing- 
ton County, Vt., May 28, 1796; son of David and Sarah (Otis) Hunt, of En- 
glish descent and connected with the early history of Massachusetts. They 
were the parents of nine children, of whom Ebenezer is third. The educa- 
tional privileges of our subject were limited, and at the age of nineteen he 
decided to try his fortune in the far West. Coming to Erie County, Penn., he 
in same year moved to Meadville, and in 1817, in company with his brother, 
came to Richmond Township, of which he is recognized the real pioneer, being 
the oldest living land-mark to tell the tale of the hardships and privations 
incident to pioneer life in the wilds. Owing to new divisions of the town- 
ships, Mr. Hunt has lived in three, yet has never moved. He has always been 
a hard-working man and has helped to clear over 200 acres of land. In spite 
of his patriarchal age, he is still hale and healthy. Our subject for over half 
a century has been a consistent member of the Baptist Church. He was mar- 
ried September 18, 1824, to Lovina Hatch, a native of Whitehall, N. Y. , born 
in 1800. She was the mother of nine children. Her death occurred in July, 
1865 

ZEPHANIAH E. KINGSLEY, Postmaster and general merchant, New 
Richmond, was born in Townville, this county, October 30, 1854; son of Ed- 
gar and Polly (Altenburg) Kingsley, natives of New York, now living near 
Townville, and whose parents were among the early settlers of Steuben Town- 
ship, this county. Our subject, who is second in a family of six children, 
received his education at the common and select schools of the county, and the 
college at Moadville, finishing with a commercial course. In 1876 he commenced 
life as a merchant, at Townville, where he remained three years. Selling out 
his business interest there, Mr. Kingsley came to New Richmond, where he 
again embarked in mercantile pursuits, and has an excellent store, stocked 
with a general line of groceries and all articles required by the farming com- 
munity generally. He has succeeded in gaining a large and lucrative trade, 
the result of energy, enterprise and close attention to business. On September 
6, 1880, our subject was appointed Postmaster of New Richmond, an office 
he still holds; is also Township Treasurer. He was married September 21 ,1876, 
to Miss Mary E. Barlow, bora in this county, July 25, 1855, and the result of 
this union are two children: Ivy and Joe. Mr. Kingsley is a member of the 
I. O. O. F., No. 929, at Townville. In politics is a Republican. 



952 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

JOHN McFADDEN, farmer, P. O. Little Cooley, is a native of Randolph 
Township, this county, born September 2, 1828; son of Thomas and Sarah 
(Cameron) McFadden, natives of this county. They were parents of nine 
children, of whom John is second. Our subject received but a limited educa- 
tion, as he had to work hard in his younger days, and at the age of sixteen 
could neither read nor write. He has been a farmer most of his life, and in 
connection, has worked at the trade of carpenter and joiner and also at team- 
ing in the oil regions. In 1854 he purchased the farm on which he now 
resides, and which he has placed under a high state of cultivation. Mr. McFad- 
den was married, in 1850, to Miss Harriet N. Howk, born in Lorain County, 
Ohio, July 3, 1833, and daughter of Lyman and Laura (Heath) Howk, natives 
of Massachusetts (both now deceased). To this union were born eleven chil- 
dren, nine now living, viz.: Lyman A., John A., Thomas L., Jay W., Laura A., 
all living in York Township, Stafford Co., Kan. ; Abraham L., Elmer G., Hattie 
N., and Sadie A. Those deceased are Charles C, and Ardie S. Our subject is an 
energetic, enterprising man and has made all his property by industry and per- 
severance. He has been connected with the United Brethren in Christ Church 
for about twenty years, was six years a member of the Erie Annual Confer- 
ence, and eight years with the Zion Church; is also a member of the Annual 
Conference. 

JAMES McFADEN, merchant, P. O. New Richmond, was born in Green- 
wood Township, this county, August 29, 1824; son of William and Sarah 
McFaden. Our subject's early life was spent on the farm, and it may be said 
of his education, that, with the exception of two months spent in the common 
schools, it was obtained mainly from observation and contact with the world. 
"When fifteen years of age he came with his parents to Richmond Township, 
this county, and, young as he was, assisted in cutting most of the roads run- 
ning each way from New Richmond. Mr. McFaden remained at home until 
he was twenty-seven years of age and then engaged in farming for his own 
account until May, 1877, when he abandoned that occupation and commenced 
merchandising in New Richmond. He has here a general store well stocked 
with groceries and all goods required by the farming community. Our sub 
ject has been twice married; on first occasion to Miss Jane Adams, who died 
in 1878, leaving four children all grown up. Mr. McFaden then married, 
September 17, 1879, Miss Metta Hamilton, a native of this county, born in 
1847. He served as Postmaster of New Richmond three years and has held 
several township offices; was an active member of the Grange eight years. 

DAVID LATHEN ilACKEY, retired farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was 
born in Otsego County, N. Y., October 8, 1812; son of Elias and Annie 
Mackey. He received a common school education, and in 1835 came to Craw- 
ford County, Penn., as an apprentice to the mill-wright trade, an occupation 
he followed many years. In 1842 he settled on the farm where he now lives, 
cutting a home for himself and wife out of the forest. Mr. Mackey was mar- 
ried, January 1, 1840, to Miss Sarah Ann Polly, a native of Jefferson County, 
N. Y., born June 27, 1816. One child was born to this union, LibbieC, wife 
of Taylor E. Burt, a native of this county, now living with Mr. Mackey. The 
farm of our subject is under a high state of cultivation and well supplied with 
necessary buildings. Mr. Mackey has retired from active labor, but still pre- 
serves a lively interest in the cultivation of bees, in which industry he is the 
most prominent in the county, having ninety swarms, which during the honey 
season require his whole attention. He has served as Justice of the Peace 
four terms of five years each, and has at all times taken an interest in county 
improvements, especially those tending to the advancement of religious and 
educational privileges. 



RICHMOND TOWNSHIP. 958 

THOMAS H. MILES, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born in New 
Haven, Conn., February 14, 1815; son of Capt. George and Polly (Storer) 
Miles, also natives of New Haven, parents of seven children. Capt. George 
Miles who was an old salt water sailor, came out here in 1817, became a fresh- 
water sailor, and was for many years a lake Captain, one of his vessels being the 
steamboat "Pioneer," the second steamboat to sail the lakes. During the war of 
1812-1814, the vessel he was on board of, while on a trip between New York and 
New Haven, was captured by a British man-of-war. The ship and cargo were 
released on payment of $8,000 in cash, and the Captain, who was our subject's 
grandfather, was permitted to go to New Haven to procure the necessary funds 
while the passengers and crew were paroled. The following is a copy of the 
parole of honor of our subject's father: "Having captured George Miles, 
passenger on the sloop ' Susan,' of New Haven, with others, on the 10th inst., 
all of whom are of course prisoners of war, and being willing so far to miti- 
gate the rigors of war, with respects to him, as to exempt him from personal 
imprisonment on the express condition, he has this day solemnly subscribed 
to, whereby he has pledged bis most sacred word and honor, as an honest man 
and Christian, not to serve against Great Britain, her dependences or her 
allies, until regularly exchanged. Given under my hand on board of his 
Brittanic Majesty's ship, 'Pomona,' off Plum Island, October 17, 1814. 
'Cartinet. ' " In the summer of 1836 Capt. George Miles raised two of the vessels 
that were captured by Commodore Perry in the fight on Lake Erie, and which 
were sunk at the time in Erie Bay, whore they had lain ever since. They were the 
bark "Detroit" and the brig "Queen Charlotte." Capt. Miles took command of 
the ''Detroit" and in the following November conveyed her into the port of Chicago 
with the stars and stripes flying at her mast-head, having a cargo of 5,000 
barrels of salt at $5.00 per barrel, and in this event the Captain used to say 
he had much satisfaction, as it was a good set-ofif to his own capture, years 
before, by the Britishers. He died in 1863. His wife died about 1840. Our 
subject, who is fourth in the family, for many years followed sailing both on 
the ocean and the lakes. At the time when there were but two full-rigged 
whips on the lakes, he sailed in one of them, the "Milwaukee." On May 14, 
1834, he was in a boat with ten others on the Bay of Erie, conveying passen- 
gers to a steamer, when the boat capsized, drowning all but two, one of the 
saved being Mr. Miles. Since 1850 our subject has turned his attention to 
farming on the old homestead, assisted by his son George W. He was mar- 
ried, January 3, 1856, to Miss Henrietta M. Brown, also a native of New 
Haven, Conn., born March 26, 1829. Two children wore the result of ttiis 
union: William B. (deceased in infancy), and George W. 

MORRISON SAYRE, farmer, P. O. Now Richmond, is a native of Craw- 
ford County, Penn., born May 25, 1857; son of James and Martha (McOaughry) 
Sayre, the former of whom was killed in the battle of the Wilderness; the lat- 
ter is now living in Rush County, Kan. They wore parents of five children, 
viz.: Laverne, wife of A. Johnson; Nettie, wife of H. S. Phillips; Arvilla 
(deceased), Alice (deceased), and Morrison. The last named was married 
October 10, 1877, to Eliza, daughter of F. M. Hamilton, born March 31, 1858. 
By this union is one child — Victor. Mr. Sayre acted as Township Treasurer 
four years; in politics he is a Republican. He still owns 125 acres of the 
original homestead tract. James Sayre was a man who gained the good-will 
of all, and his loss was felt by the entire community as well as by his own 
family. 

PHILANDER MORSE, farmer, P. 0. New Richmond, was born January 
26, 1819, in Chautauqua County, N. Y., and came to Richmond Township, this 



954 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

coanty, in 1840, with his parents, and there he lived for some time within 200 
rods of his present place of residence. He has witnessed the development of 
the township until the land became nearly all under cultivation, and he can 
scarcely recall when the metamorphosis from a wilderness to a fertile agricult- 
ural garden took place. His education was limited, and he early entered upon 
his career in life as a farmer, which occupation he has alwaj's followed. Mr. 
Morse was married, July 25, 1841, to Miss Jane Fosburgh, born in New York, 
November 25, 1820. Three children were born to this union, one now living 
— Willis — assisting his father on the farm. Our subject takes a lively interest 
in all enterprises tending to the good of the county. He is not identified with 
any religious denomination, but attends meetings. In politics he is a Democrat. 

WILLIAM MORSE, retired farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born in 
Ripley, Chautauqua Co., N. Y., October 24, 1820, son of Artemus and" Amy 
(Benedick) Morse. The father was a native of Vermont, but removed to Rip- 
ley, N. Y., in 1814, and died when our subject was but nine years old. The 
mother was raised in Montgomery County, N. Y., and died in Richmond Town- 
ship, this county, in her eighty-ninth year. She was a devoted Christian, and 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church seventy years. Our subject 
received a common school education at Ripley, and in 1837 he came to Craw- 
ford County, to learn the trade of tanner, in John Brown's tannery, where he 
remained six months, then returned to his home in New York. In 1839 our 
subject again took up his residence in this county, served three years at the 
tanning and currying trade, and earned the money with which he bought ten 
acres of land, partly in following that trade and partly in shoe-making and 
laboring on the farm. Mr. Morse was married, August 25, 1841, to Miss Lydia 
Lambertson, born in Tompkins County, N. Y., July 14, 1824. Nine children 
have been born to this union, four now living: Harriett F., Amy S. , Frank 
W. and Ella. Our subject has owned his present place of residence since 1841, 
and now has in land 550 acres, of which 250 are under cultivation. From a 
certain point on his farm can be seen seven churches. He was one of the 
founders of the Keystone Creamery, built in 1868, the second factory in the 
county, and which for eight years did a very extensive business. Mr. Morse 
has retired from active labor, and his grounds and factory are operated by 
others. During the war of the Rebellion he filled the orders for substitutes 
and furnislied thirty men. Our subject has been a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church forty-nine years, and Sunday-school Superintendent almost 
continually for forty years. 

JAMES MORSE, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in Chautauqua 
County, N. Y., April 22, 1828, and when eleven years old came with his par- 
ents to Richmond Township, this county, where his early life was spent in 
assisting on the farm. His education was very limited, almost his entire 
schooling being obtained during the winters when he was twenty and twenty- 
one years of age. Being the youngest in the family, and all the others having 
commenced life for themselves, the care of the father and mother devolved on 
him, and since their deaths he has remained on the old homestead, where he 
carries on farming in all its branches, dealing more or less extensively in stock. 
Mr. Morse was married, January 28, 1857, to Miss Hannah Landon, born in 
Chautauqua County, N. Y., December 23, 1827. One child is the result of 
this union — Alice E. — wife of Fred Root, a young farmer of Richmond Town- 
ship, this county. Our subject's land interests are quite extensive, he having 
by energy and economy acquired some 700 acres. Mr. Morse has held sev- 
eral minor township offices. Has been an active member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church at North Richmond for over thirty-three years. 



RICHMOND TOWNSHIP. 955 

DAMON BUEL PINNEY, retired farmer, P. O. Woodcock, was born in 
Litchfield County, Conn., February 11, 1807. In 1836 he came to Erie County, 
Penn., and following year moved to the farm where he now lives. He received 
a common school education and entered at once into the occupation he has 
always followed. He is now retired from active labor, and the work of the 
farm is carried on, under his directions, by his two sons, Albert Grover and 
Samuel C. Mr. Pinney has been twice married, on first occasion in Colebrook, 
Conn., January 12, 1830, to Miss Sarah Pendleton, a native of Rhode Island, 
born January 5, 1810, died May 24, 1850, leaving six children, all now liv- 
ing: Michael S., Hobart B., Mary E., Adell, Orville F. and AlbertG. In 1851 
our subject married Mias Mary Griswold, who died in 1867. She bore him 
two children: Samuel C. and Hattie D., both living. Our subject has always 
been an industrious, enterprising man, and has accumulated a large property. 
He is still hale and hearty, and bids fair to enjoy for many years the fruits of 
his labor and of a well-spent life. 

SAMUEL POLLEY, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born at Ellisburg, 
JeflFerson Co., N. Y., May 23, 1818, son of Orin A. and Clarissa Polley, 
former of whom, a prominent man in his day, lived to be ninety-four years, 
eight months, fifteen days old; latter died aged seventy-five. Our subject 
received a limited education and commenced life as a carpenter, a trade he 
followed for nearly twenty years, when he turned his attention to agricultural 
pursuits. The first frame building he e^er erected still stands on his farm. 
In April, 1884. he came with his parents to Richmond Township, this county. 
They cut their way to the farm from Mr. Swift's place, and their wagon was 
the first to travel from there to a point three miles beyond. At that early day 
shingles passed as money, and Mr. Polley has hauled many loads on his 
father's wagon to Erie for the neighbors, and made purchases for them. He 
remembers paying as high as $1.50 per bushel for corn, and receiving that 
amount for a bunch of 1,000 shingles. Our subject was married January 16, 
1844, to Miss Mary Hotchkiss, born at Hampton, N. Y., in October. 1823. 
Three children, now living, are the result of this union: William, Etta and 
Orin D. , latter residing at home. In politics Mr. PoUev is a Republican. 

WILLIAM JEROME RICHARDSON, deceased, 'was a native of the 
State of New York, born April 14, 1835. He was by trade a carpenter and 
blacksmith, at which occupation he worked in connection with his farm. Our 
subject was married December 25, 1857, to Miss Sarah Rainey, born in 
this county, December 25, 1837, and the result of this union is three 
children: Fred, Lee and Madge, the sons being both millers. Mr. Richardson 
was a valued member of the Grange at New Richmond, and an energetic, 
enterprising man, a loving husband and a kind father, highly esteemed by all 
who knew him. He died January 3, 1882. Mrs. Richardson still remains on 
the farm, which is under her management. She makes no specialties, but 
grows the usual crops. 

WILLIAM SALEN. retired farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born 
October 10, 1804. Owing to the loss of the records, there is some dispute as 
to the actual birthplace of Mr. Salen. He has been told that he was a native 
of Germany, but thinks he was born in Lehigh County, Penn. He came to 
the place where he now lives in 1840 and cleared his own farm. He was mar- 
ried in 1830 to Miss Hettie Mover, a native of Lehigh County, Penn., and to 
this union were born eleven children, viz.: Sally (deceased), Helena, Ange 
line, Catherine (deceased), Peter, William, Jonathan W.. Lewis, Esther (de- 
ceased), Mary, George (deceased). Mrs. Salen died in 1870. Our subject is 
a member of the Reformed Church. He is now retired from active labor and 



956 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

the management of the homestead farm has devolved on his son Lewis, who 
owns the farm adjoining. Lewis was born March 9, 1848, and married Feb- 
ruary 4, 1873, to Miss Sarah A. Perry, born in Richmond Township, this county, 
in April, 1856. The result of this union is five children: Delbert, Charles, 
Luella, Anna and William. 

JOHN B. SANDERSON, farmer, P. O. Lyona, is a native of Genesee 
County, N. Y., born October 29, 1835; son of Nelson and Betsy Louisa Sander- 
son, the former a native of Vermont, now residing in Missouri; the latter a 
native ot New York, deceased. They had a family of ten children, of whom 
John R. is third. Our subject came to Woodcock Township, this county, with 
his parents in 1846, and there obtained a common school education. He 
worked as a day laborer until he was twenty- two years of age, then commenced 
to learn the trade of stone-mason, which occupation he followed twelve years; 
also worked at the cooper's trade about five years. In 1873 Mr. Sanderson 
purchased his farm of seventy-one acres, where he now lives, and here he car- 
ries on general farming, and deals in live stock — buying and selling. He 
enlisted in Company B, Twelfth Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, Lieut. Dan 
Lewis, under command of Col. Pierce, serving about fifteen months. He par- 
ticipated in several engagements; was taken prisoner near Charleston, Va., 
and was confined in Andersonville and Florence prisons. Mr. Sanderson was 
married in October, 1859, to Ellen, daughter of Nelson (deceased) and Mary 
(Perringtou) Odell, and a native cff Allegany County, N. Y. Four children 
were born to this union: William, Virgil, Matie and Ada, the last-named 
deceased. Our subject has been Collector and School Director in the town- 
ship; is a member of the Grange at New Richmond. In politics is Independ- 
ent with a leaning toward the Republican party. 

JOSEPH SAYRE, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, is a native of Essex Coun- 
ty, N. J., born September 1, 1819; son of John and Catharine (Thorp) Sayre, 
natives of New Jersey, and settlers in 1842 of North Shenango Township, this 
county. They came to this State in a onehorse wagon and in going over a 
portion of the Allegheny Mountains Mrs. Sayre pushed behind to assist the 
horse. They finally settled in Richmond Township, this county, in 1837, and 
here, February 22, 1876, John died, and February 8, 1883, his widow followed 
him. The last few years of her life were spent with her son Joseph, where 
she found kind hands ever ready to administer to her comfort. She joined 
the Baptist Church many years prior to her demise, and always lived a consist- 
ent, exemplary Christian life. Coming to this county when it was a perfect 
wilderness, it was no uncommon occurrence for her to carry a sack of corn 
several miles to be ground, and the father carried a bushel of com thirty miles 
on his back for the family. They were parents of ten children, viz.: Joseph, 
Sallie, James, Susan, John, William, Isaac, Thompson, Prawl and Mary. One 
time our subject, after the family came to Richmond Township, was taken sick, 
and his father being absent at work, his mother took Joseph and his sister 
Sallie and started with them to a neighbor's house about three-quarters of a 
mile distant, with a foot of snow on the ground, but being dead tired out, she 
took off her skirt, wrapped Sallie in it, and having dug a hole in the snow 
placed her there, then carried our subject to the neighbor's and went back for 
his sister. The father of our subject was drafted in the war of 1812 -and his 
father, Joseph, hired a substitute. The subject of this sketch was educated 
in the log-cabin of those primitive days, and brought up on a farm. He was 
married in 1842 to Sylvia, daughter of Levi and Amanda Beardsley, natives 
of New York; the former deceased. The latter was born in Genesee County, 
N. Y., in 1827 and came with her parents to this county in 1837, settling in 



RICHMOND TOWNSHIP. 957 

Athens Township; she now resides with her daughter, Mrs. Joseph Sayre. 
They wore parents of eight children, viz. : Lurany, Philiira, Lorena, Sylvia, 
Sallie, James, Helen and Ezra. Levi Beardsley was a merchant in New York 
State, and a miller and farmer in Pennsylvania. To our subject and wife were 
born three children, one now living — Levi — married to JStinerva Lyon; they 
have two children: Joseph L. and Loona. Mr. Sayre has been Township 
Assessor, Auditor, Supervisor, School Director and has filled other offices; 
in politics he is a Republican. He and his wife are members of the Bap- 
tist Church, in which he is a Deacon. During the Rebellion he enlisted in 
Company G, Fifty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteer Militia, and served till the 
close of the war. He is owner of 100 acres of well -improved land with good 
water and other essentials, of which little fortune he is the artiticer, besides 
some $4,000 which he gave to his children. 

WILLIAM SAYRE (deceased) was born in this county, son of John and 
Catharine (Thorp) Sayre. (See biography of Joseph Sayre above.) Our sub- 
ject was a prominent farmer and stock-grower. His farm was always 
well cultivated, and is to-day a standing testimony to his enterprise and 
industry. He died in 1881. He was married to Miss Sarah Willey, fiow liv- 
ing, who bore him four children: Nicholas W. : Rosetta, wife of Robert Lingo, 
a farmer of Richmond Township; Catharine, wife of Bert Hawthorne, a 
farmer residing at Townville, this county, and James. Nicholas W. lives on 
the old homestead, and is considered an enterprising, industrious young man 
destined to become one of the leading substantial farmers of this township 

ISAAC SAYRE, farmer, P. 0. New Richmond, was born December 27 
1829, in North Shenaugo Township, this county, son of John and Catherine 
(Thorp) Sayre. He received his school training in the old log-cabin so com 
mon in those early days, and began life for himself as a farmer when twenty 
one years old. His present farm was then a wilderness, but he cleared every 
rod of it, and all the timber now standing is second growth. Mr. Sayre mar 
ried, in 1851, Betsy A. Willey, and by her had six children, four now living, 
viz.: Alice, Sylva, Jennie and Gertrude. The deceased are Frank and Anna 
Mrs. Sayre died in March, 1869, and Mr. Sayre then married Dinah Hunt 
who bore him sis children: J. W., Hattie M., Luna E., John, Monetta and 
Maggie. Our subject enlisted during the Rebellion in Company B, Eighteenth 
Pennsylvania Cavalry, serving from September 13, 1863, to July 29, 1865. He 
was in several engagements, and at the battle of Gettysburg was shot through 
the right foot, which has made him a cripple for life. This occurred in the 
same charge in which Geu. Farusworth was killed. While in the service he 
contracted a throat affection which troubles him considerably. Mr. Sayre has 
been Township Assessor, Assistant Collector, and Return Judge of Elections. 
Has held offices in the order of the A. O. U. W. He has been a member of the 
Baptist Church since be was twenty-one years old. In politics is a stanch 
Republican. When fourteen years of age he walked barefooted four miles to 
hear Judge Pettis make a Republican speech. 

JUDSON E. SAYRE, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born on the farm 
where he now resides August 7, 1851, son of John and Lucy (Stewart) Sayre, 
natives of Pennsylvania, and early settlers of Richmond Township, this 
county, former deceased, latter now living with our subject. John Sayre was, 
in hie day, one of the most prominent men in the county, a consistent Chris- 
tian, hard-working man, esteemed and respected by all who knew him, and his 
death universally mourned. In the few years he lived in Richmood Township he 
cleared for himself nearly 200 acres of land. He gave his life to save the 
Union, having been killed at the battle of the Wilderness during the war of 



958 r.IOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

the Rebellion. The subject of this sketch was educated at the common schools 
during winter, and in summer was employed on the homestead farm. Being 
the only child, and a mere boy when his father died, he remained at home, and 
eventually took charge of the home farm, part of which he inherited when he 
came of age. He deals extensively in stock, buying and selling, and is the 
only one in his neighborhood who has at the present time any thoroughbreds. 
His herd consi.sts of one bull, registered as Wintield; one heifer, registered as 
Crawford Rose: one cow, registered as Perena; one full-blooded calf, not reg- 
istered; three cows and three calves, half -blooded, besides a flock of sheep 
with lambs equal to any in the county. Mr. Sayre married, July 2, 1870. 
Miss Eva, daughter of Fayette Delamater, of New Richmond, this county, born 
Februarv '22, 1S52. He is an active member of the A.. O. U. W. 

JOSEPH N. SCOTT, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born in Venango 
Township, this county, June 28. 1838, son of AVilliam and Mary (Skelton) 
Scott, former a native of Whitehall. N. Y. , born May 3, 1811. came to this 
county in 1824. a farmer by occupation and still living; latter a native of this 
county born April 7, 1819, died June 21, 1880. They were parents of eight 
children, of whom Joseph N. is second. Our subject received a limited edu 
cation, and commenced life for himself as a day laborer in a saw-mill, where 
he soon became head sawyer. In connection with his farm he followed lum 
bering and milling until about two years ago. He moved to his farm in Rich- 
mond Township, this county, in 1859. On January 1, 1867, he was married 
to Catherine Gray, born February 9, 1843, and by this union there are two 
children: Burt D. and Alton M. Mr. Scott has held several of the minor 
township offices, and is at present a Justice of the Peace elected in 1882. Is 
a charter member of the A. O. U. AV. at New Richmond. Politically he has always 
been recognized as a Democrat, but contends that ho is no party man, voting 
only for men and principles. 

ROBERT SMITH (deceased) was born in Crawford County, Penn., Janu 
ary 20. 1813. and always lived here, son of George and Charlotte Smith. 
Early in life he learned the trade of millwright, which occupation he followed 
for several yeai's, but his health failing, he eventually turned his attention to 
farming, at which he continued up to the time of his death. Our subject was 
a verv energetic and enterprising man, fully alive to the interests of his native 
county, and he always took an active part in any undertaking tending to its 
development. He died July 20, 1882, deeply mourned by his widow, son and 
daughter and all who knew him, having been during his entire lifetime highly 
esteemed and revered. He married, September 17. 1847, Barbara Rust, also a 
native of this county, born July 28, 1814. who bore him two children: Char- 
lotta. wife of Amos Johnson, and George H., born May 12, 1850, a farmer, 
living on the old homestead. The appearance of the farm denotes George H. 
to be a diligent, wide-awake man. destined to become a successful husband- 
man. In politics he is a Democrat. He was married January 1, 1874, to Miss 
Carrie Hamilton, born in this county July 10, 185<). and daughter of Francis 
and Mary (Howk) Hamilton, natives of Lorain County, Ohio, and early set- 
tlers of Crawford County, Penn. 

AVILLIAM SMITH, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, was born in Clarion 
County, Penn., March 10, 1829, son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Ishawood) Smith, 
former a native of Ireland, latter of English descent. Our subject received a 
common school education and commenced life on the farm, in which occupa 
tion he has met with more than ordinary success, and by energy and industry 
has accumulated a tine farm property, well-improved and stacked, furnished 
with a large and commodious residence, besides substantial barns and out- 



RICHMOND TOWNSHIP. 959 

buildings. Mr. Smith was married in 1854 to Miss Jane Boreland, also a 
native of Clarion County, Penn., who bore him six children, viz. : Clifton C. , 
Burwell, McClellan, Frank, James and Wade, all living. 

ORRIN SWIFT, farmer, P. 0. New Richmond, was born in Woodcock 
Township, this county, November 17, 1825; son of Dean and Beedie (Waters) 
Swift, former a native of Vermont, latter of Connecticut. His educational 
privileges were limited to the common schools of the neighborhood, where he 
spent his boyhood days. He learned no trade or profession, but chose the 
occupation of a farmer. Mr. Swift moved on his pr^ent farm in Richmond 
Township in 1858, and he has met with success in all his undertakings. He 
was married July 4, 1859, to Maria Webster, born in this county, by whom 
he has two children: William Isaac, and Beedie Jane, wife of John Cole, a 
farmer of Richmond Township, this county. 

GEORGE W. TOWNLEY, retired farmer, P. O. Woodcock, was born in 
Erie County, Penn., May 12, 1810; son of Robert and Mary (Brown) Townley, 
former a native of Ireland, born April 14, 1777, came to America in 1797, 
settling in Erie County, Penn. He was a mechanic and school teacher. His 
death occurred October 22, 1861. His wife was born in Lycoming County, 
Penn., in May, 1778, and died !n 1862. In May, 1821, our subject came to 
Crawford County with six brothers, four of whom settled and cleared farms 
in Richmond Township. Owing to our subject having to go five miles to 
school, his education was limited. He was a farmer and raised stock exten- 
sively; has 400 acres of land, nearly all under cultivation, but is now retired, 
the homestead farm being under the management of his son Leon. Mr. 
Townley was married February 25, 1838, to Miss Lydia Erwin, born in this 
county February 25, 1815. To this union were born three sons and five 
daughters, all now living, viz.: Emeline, Martha, Mary Ann, Ellen, Kate, 
Leonard, Leon and Lynn. Our subject has always taken a lively interest in 
all county improvements, and has taken an active part in bringing it to its 
present state of development. 

CYRUS TOWNLEY, farmer. P.- O. Woodcock, was born on the farm 
where he now lives in Richmond Township, this county, July 16, 1837, son 
of Harvey and Betsy (Lytle) Townley; former a farmer and early settler of 
Richmond Township, died November 5, 1875, latter a native of Erie County, 
Penn., died July 5, 1879. They were parents of seven children. Our sub- 
ject, who is third in the family, was educated in the common schools, has fol- 
lowed farming as a life occupation, and in connection deals largely in live- 
stock, buying and selling. He is part owner of the imported Percheron 
stallion Alencon, and is justly recognized as one of the substantial farmers of 
the county, and highly esteemed. Mr. Townley was married in August, 1863, 
to Miss Adelaide Turner, born in this township. Three children were the 
result of this upion: Maud A., Clyde E. and Mary A. Our subject is a 
Director in the Farmers Mutual Insurance Company. Is a member of Coven- 
ant Lodge, 473, A. Y. M., at Cambridge, and a member of the A. O. U. W. at 
New Richmond. 

ALEXANDER M TOWNLEY, farmer, P. O. Woodcock, was born in Rich- 
mond Township, this county, April 28, 1848 ; son of John B. and Priscilla Town- 
ley, the father a native of Erie County, Penn. , one of the early settlers of Craw- 
ford County, born in 1807, died in Florida, February 8, 1883; the mother, also 
a native of Erie County, Penn., died in 1850. They were parents of eight chil- 
dren, five now living, of whom Alexander M. is the youngest The early life 
of our subject was spent in attending the common schools and in rendering 
what assistance he could on the homestead farm where he has always lived 



960 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

and where he now carries on general farming in all its branches. He deals 
extensively in stock and is owner of the celebrated Durham bull, Bell Duke. 
Mr. Townley was married October 18, 1877, to 'Miss Nattie Wilson, born in 
Woodcock Township, this county, in 1858, and to this union was born, Janu- 
ary 13, 1884, one child, William Bell. Our subject justly bears the reputa- 
tion of being an industrious and enterprising man, highly esteemed by all 
who know him. 

ABRAHAM WARD, farmer, P. O. New Richmond, is a native of Cusse- 
■wago Township, this county, born May 22, 1818, and son of William and 
Betsey (Lanphir) Ward. His school training vyas obtained in the old log 
schoolhouse of the early days, and he commenced life as a farmer, an occupa- 
tion he has followed without intermission, working, in connection, at his trade 
of carpenter and joiner. In 1855 he came to Richmond Township, where he 
cleared a farm of eighty-eight acres of choice land, which he has placed under 
a high state of cultivation. Mr. W'ard was married in 1856 to Miss Maria 
Bradford, who died in 1863, leaving three children, only one of whom is now 
living — William W. Our subject then married, in 1864, Miss Mary Miller, a 
native of Ireland, and who was brought to America when about six years of 
age. Mr. Ward is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, New Rich- 
mond, and the Grange at same place. 

WILLIAM WILLIS, farmer, P. O. Woodcock, was born in this county, 
November 27, 1808, and came to his present place of residence in 1836, where 
he has cleared a farm of forty acres. His parents were Isaac and Rachal 
(Wilson) Willis, former a native of Chester County, Penn., born in 1763; 
latter a native of Maryland, born in 1776. When our subject was twenty one 
years old his father died, leaving him with a family of six to support. At 
that early day he had to carry his grist to mill on his back. In 1833 Mr. 
Willis was married to Mies Jane Hutchison, who died February 4, 1864. 
She was the mother of seven children. Mr. Willis, for his second wife, mar- 
ried, July 3, 1866, Mrs. Mary Ewer, a native of Lehigh Couuty, Penn. , born 
November 25, 1825. Our subject has retired from active labor, although the 
farm is still managed under his personal direction. He operates a small 
dairy and grows the ordinary farm crops. 

JESSE WINANS (deceased) was born in Portage County, Ohio, son of 
Jacob and Catharine Winans, natives of eastern Pennsylvania. They moved 
to Portage County, Ohio, at an early date, and from there came to this county, 
where they died at advanced ages, he being ninety-three years old. Our sub- 
ject came to Richmond Township in 1839, and bought the farm where his 
death occurred January 13, 1883. His farm was left to the management of 
his sons, while he worked at his trade, that of carpenter and joiner. He was 
a man highly esteemed and universally mourned by all who knew him. Sev- 
eral years prior to his death he became a member of the Baptist Church. In 
politics he took much interest and was a strong Republican. During the 
Rebellion he sent six sons to fight for the Union, .of whom only three returned 
home. Our subject was married to Miss Rachel Gray, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, now living on the old homestead, and to this union were born thirteen 
children, viz. : Samuel, John, Eliza, James, David, Jason, Eehadwick, William, 
Eleanor, Lydia, Boyd, Olive and Emma. James, David and Jason died in 
the army during the Rebellion. Boyd is at home, a school teacher by profes- 
sion, born July 19, 1854, married November 2, 1883. William was born 
November 15, 1848; resides on the homestead, is an energetic and enterprising 
young farmer; was married September 22, 1883, to Anna Frost, a native of 
Richmond Township, this county, born in 1859. 



EICHMONb TOWNSHIP. 961 

ALBERT V. WINANS, fanner, P. O. Townville, was born in Richmond 
Township, this county, April 5, 1853. son of A. R. Winans, who was born in 
Trumbull County, Ohio, September 19, 18'24, only child of James and Polly 
(B'rankfather) Winans, natives of Germany, and early settlers of Trumbull 
County, Ohio. After the death of his first wife, James was again married, on this 
occasion to Caroline Hall by whom he had six children, viz. : Alonzo, Jane, Julian, 
Hannah, Esther and Foretta. A. R. Winans was educated at the Farmington 
Academy, Ohio, for a Methodist preacher, and for a time Qxhorted, but he is 
now a believer in the doctrine of Spiritualism. He was raised on a farm, and 
in 1847 bought one for himself in Meigs County, Ohio; then, in 1851, removed 
to his present property of 100 acres in Richmond Township, this county. He 
was married in 1846 to Jane, daughter of John and Catharine (Cline) Johns- 
ton, aiid by her had nine children, viz.: Mary, wife of Sylvester Osborn; 
Viola, wife of John Titus; Rebecca, wife of James Carpenter; Albert, Sydney, 
Elliott, Ellsworth, Sylvester, and James (deceased). He was drafted during 
the Rebellion, but was discharged on account of sickness. Albert V., our sub- 
ject, received a common school education and began life as a farmer. In 1881 
he purchased a farm, in connection with which he buys and sells produce, his 
market being Titusville. He was married September 10, 1876, to Miss Flora 
Franklin, born February 21, 1857, and by this union are three children: Ethel, 
Mabel and Maud. 

CHARLES WINSTON, farmer, P. O. Townville, was born July 14, 1835, 
in Bristol, Ontario Co., N. Y., son of Horatio and Minerva (Carpenter) 
Winston, natives of New York, who came to Pennsylvania in 1835, settling in 
Richmond Township, this county, where Horatio purchased fifty acres of land, 
at 13 shillings per acre. It is thought he bought this tract before mov- 
ing his family to same, and came to look up a locality, on foot, in company 
with his brother Abram, who bought seventy-four acres adjoining in 1834, 
bringing his family in sleds. The father of Horatio and Abram had settled 
in this county previous to this. The subject of this sketch is the eldest in a 
family of seven children, viz. : Charles, Charlotte, Clarissa, Priscilla, Cor- 
nelia, Chloe and Alice. The father is deceased, and the mother resides on the 
old homestead, both members of the Baptist Church. Charles Winston had 
few educational advantages, and at the age of twenty-one began work for 
himself. In 1856 he bought a farm of 100 acres from John Reynolds, which 
he has improved and added to, and after selling part from time to time, has 
now 140 acres, with excellent buildings, including a barn 50x60 feet, and 
where he is making a specialty of breeding thoroughbred cattle. Our subject 
was married, April 21, 1861, to Jeannette, daughter of Daniel and Margaret 
Hopkins, and the result of this union is three children: Edith, Maud and 
Clyde. He is a member of the A. O, U. W. ; has served in some of the minor 
township offices where remuneration is not considered. 

JOSIAH WILLEY, farmer, P. O. Lyona, was born August 13, 1830; son 
of James and Sally (Custer) Willey. James was born October 1, 1797, in Mas- 
sachusetts; became an early settler in Rockdale Township, this county, and 
came to Richmond Township about 1840, where he is now living with his son 
on the old homestead. His education was very limited. He was fourteen 
years old before he ever wore shoes and he experienced all the hardships inci- 
dent to pioneer life. He was twice married; first occasion, in 1820, to Sally 
Custer, who died in 1841, leaving eight children, all gi'owing to manhood and 
womanhood. For his second wife Mr. Willey married Minerva Miller, now 
living. He has been a member of the Baptist Church nearly halt a century. 
Josiah, the subject of this sketch, received a common school education, has 



962 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETOHES: 

always followed farming, and is now residing on the homestead, which he 
assisted his father in placing in its present high state of cultivation, and in 
1878 he erected a fine dwelling. During the war of the Rebellion he enlisted 
in Company K, Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, with Capt. 
Little, remaining in the service twenty-three months; was in several engage- 
ments, the most noted being the battle of Pittsburg Landing. Mr. Willey was 
married January 4, 1856, to Miss Mary E. Glen, born February 25, 1840, and 
daughter of Simon and Barbara (Rickard) Glen, of German descent and early 
settlers of Haytield Township (both now deceased). To this union were born 
two daughters and two sons: Laura J., Anna, Elmer, and George A. Our sub- 
ject is & member of Gleeson Post, G. A. R. at Townville. 

D. W. WRIGHT, farmer, P. O. Townville, was born at Ashville, N. Y. , 
December 4, 1845; son of William aod Elizabeth (Kelso) Wright, natives of 
New York; former, a stone-mason by trade, is now living in Richmond Town- 
ship, this county; latter died in 1848. They were parents of nine children, 
of whom D. W. is the seventh. Our subject had no opportunity of attending 
school after he was fifteen years old. He caine to Richmond Township with 
his parents about 1859, and twenty years later purchased his farm and 
embarked in agricultural pursuits, his chief specialty being trading in sheep and 
cattle, which he ships to New Y^ork and Philadelphia. Mr. Wright married, 
November 7, 1867, Lorania Sayre, who died February 9, 1879, and he then 
became united in marriage, April 24, 1881, with Ella (Delamater) Akin, born 
July 21, 1854, and daughter of Fayette and Sfrah (Peelman) Delamater. Mr. 
Wright collected the taxes for 1880 in Richmond Township. Has been a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church for fifteen years. In politics is a Republican. 



ROCKDALE TOWNSHIP. 

WILLIAM O.BABCOCK, farmer, P. O. Mill Village, Erie County, was born 
in Chautauqua County, N. Y. June 16, 1831 ; son of Asa G. and Rosena (Trask) 
Babcock, who settled in Rockdale Township, this county, in 1851, on the farm 
now owned by our subject. They were parents of seven children, viz.: Han- 
nah, wife of Jehiel Devereaus; William O. ; Phebe, wife of Samuel A. Way; 
Nancy, wife of Daniel Carroll; Ellen, wife of Hamilton Armour; Huldah, wife 
of Charles Henry; and Isaiah. Our subject has been twice married; on first 
occasion to Sarah, daughter of William Scott, of Richmond Township, this 
county, by whom he had two children: Charles (deceased) and Willie. His 
second union. May 16, 1806, was with Martha, daughter of Bradish and Eliza 
Brovpn, early settlers of this township. By this union there is one child — 
Ellen. Mr. Babcock is one of the representative farmers of Rockdale Town- 
ship; everything about his farm, on which he has resided since 1851, shows 
thrift and enterprise. In politics he is a stanch Republican. 

ASA C. BEEDY, farmer, P. O. Miller's Station, was born in Washington 
Township, Erie Co., Penn., September 23, 1827; son of Samuel and Betsy 
(Crosby) Beedy, who settled in Erie County, Penn., in 1817, coming in the 
spring of 1836 to this (Rockdale) Township, where they lived and died. They 
located on a farm now owned by George Anderson. Samuel was a son of 
Jonathan Beedy, of Straflord County, N. H., and was a native of that 
State. The Beedys were of German descent. Betsy, tlie wife of Samuel 



ROCKDALE TOWNSHIP. 963 

Beedy, was a daughter of Asa Crosby, of Hanover, N. H., and of English 
lineage. The children of Samuel Beedy and wife were Matilda, Harriet 
(Mrs. A. B. Koss), Eliza A. (deceased), Susan (Mrs. Dr. Morgan), Grace 
(deceased), Rebecca (Mrs. 'William Johnson), Asa, Winslow (deceased), Josiah 
(deceased), and Mary. Our subject was married March 26, 1865, to Sarah, 
daughter of Kev. Willard and Clarissa (Ciimmings) Stickney, by whom he has 
had three children : Samuel; Winslow who was accidentally shot by a play- 
mate at school when but six years of age; Grace C, and Winslow R. Our 
subject has lived on his present farm since 1864; was never a seeker after 
office; in politics is a Republican. 

MILFORD R. BIRCHARD, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in 
Cambridge Township, this county, March 24, 1832; son of Virgil and Mary 
(Logue) Birchard and grandson of" James Birchard, who settled in that town- 
ship in 1813. Virgil was twice married, his first wife being Jemima Marcy, 
by whom he had four children: Gillett, residing in Randolph Township, this 
county; ZelotusA., of Warren County, Penn. ; Eveline, wife of Lorenzo Johnson, 
of Woodcock. Penn.; and J. Ozro, of Rockdale Township, this county. He 
had five children by his second wife, Mary Logue, viz. : Milford R.; Ade- 
laide, wife of Amos Kelly; Ellen (deceasedj, Emily (deceased), and Alzada, 
wife of Andrew LeFever. Our subject was married June 15, 1865, to Kate, 
daughter of John and Mary ( Brookhauser j Saeger, of this township, who has 
borne him four children; Cora E., Mamie S., Charlie J., and Florence 
(deceased). Mr. Birchard has served his township as Justice of the Peace two 
terms of five years each, and has filled other minor offices; in politics is a 
Republican. 

BURLIN BUNCE, farmer, P. O. Miller's Station, was born in Oneida 
County, N. Y., August 23, 1827; son of Jacob and' Mary A. (Fields) Bunce, 
who settled in this township in 1843 on the farm now owned by Benjamin 
Wheeler, and of which they cleared a part, and in 1848 removed to the farm 
now owned by Charles F. Bunce, making all the impi-ovements on that place. 
Jacob Bunce was twice married; his first wife, Mary A., daughter of Philip 
and Phebe (Furman) Fields, of Oneida County, N. Y., was mother of eight 
children: Burlin, Laura (wife of David Kelly), Oliver. George H. (deceased), 
Alonzo, Jeremiah (deceased), Louisa (wife of Samuel McCrillis), Rachel A. 
(deceased). By his second wife, Mrs. Susan (Hammondl Butler, he had six 
children, viz.: Catherine (wife of C. Wing), Clarissa (wife of Ed. Frost), 
Sarah H. (deceased), Charles F., Valentine, and Libbie (wife of John Wykoff). 
Jacob Bunce is still living, in his eightieth year, and resides on the home- 
stead with his son Charles F. Our subject was married November 21, 1848, 
to Sarah, daughter of Jonathan and Sarah Hammond, of Vernon Township, 
this county, and to this union were bom eight children: John S. (deceased), 
Maggie A. (wife of James Wilson), Augusta (deceased), Samuel J., Laua F. 
wife of Eugene Canfield), Lucy S. (wife of David Lisk), Lovina S., James 
B., and Lizzie R. Mr. Bunce lost his wife by death, February 8, 1882. He 
has lived on his present farm since 1855. Has held various offices in his 
township. Li politics he is a Democrat. He is a member of the Methodist 
Church, as was his wife for sixteen years before her death. 

WILLIAM CAMPBELL, farmer, P. O. Mill Village, Erie County, was bom 
in Rockdale Township, this county, on the farm where he now resides, March 24, 
1822, son of James and Sarah (Lytle) Campbell, who settled in Rockdale Town- 
ship, this county, in 1818. James was a son of Jane Campbell, who with six 
children settled in Washington Township, Erie Co., Penn., in 1798, braving 
all the hardships and trials of pioneer life. He was twice married; on first 



964 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

occasion to Jane Hamilton, of Venango County, Penn., who bore him one 
child — James H. — now deceased. His second marriage was with Sarah, daugh- 
ter of John Lytle, an early settler of Waterford Township, and later of 
LeBoeuf Township, Erie County, who was the first member of the Pennsylvania 
Legislature from Erie County. To this union were born ten children: John 
(deceased), Jane (deceased), William, Hannah (deceased), Nancy (living in 
Waterford), Matthew (in Waterford), George (deceased), Sarah (deceased), Susan 
(deceased), andElias, in Bockdale Township, this county. Our subject has also 
been twice married; onfirstoccasion,_July 8, 1845, to Julia, daughter of Cleve- 
land Holmes,of Michigan, who bore him four children: Sarah (deceased), George 
C. (married to Tillie Youngs), Charles (deceased), and James. His present 
wife is Helen, daughter of Alexander Hamilton, of Edinboro, Peun. , to whom 
he was married, May 19, 1881. She is a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
as were also her father and mother, the former of whom died January 14, 1846, 
aged sixty-eight, and the latter February 10, 1874, at the age of seventy-nine. 
Mr. Campbell has held various township offices. In politics he is a Republi- 
can. 

JONATHAN CANFIELD, farmer and dairyman, P. 0. Mill Village, Erie 
County, was born in Hamburg, Erie Co., N. Y. , December 25, 1822, son of Dennis 
and Phebe (Griffin) Canfield, who lived and died there. Our subject purchased 
the property where he now resides in 1853; settled on it in 1856, and has cleared 
it and made all the improvements. He was married, December 31, 1849, to 
Helen P., daughter of Daniel and Susan P. (Ames) Hall, of Brant, Erie Co., N. 
Y., by whom he has had two children: William P. (drowned while bathing 
when twenty years of age), and Helen P. Mr. Canfield is a self made man in 
every sense of the word. When he bought his farm in 1853 he was the pos- 
sessor of but $30; he is now one of the leading and representative farmers of 
Crawford County; has always been interested in improvements, and keeps up 
with the times. Besides attending to his farming interests he operates a cheese 
factory, at Mill Village, Erie County, which he has carried on successfully since 
1879. He is also President, and one of the heaviest stock-holders, of the Farm- 
ers Co-operative Bank of Union City, Erie County; has filled all the township 
offices with the exception of Justice of the Peace and Constable, and is now a 
candidate for the office of County Commissioner. In politics is a stanch Re- 
publican. Mr. Canfield is a member of Union City Grange, and he and his 
family are adherents of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Mill Village. 

HIRAM CANFIELD, farmer and auctioneer, P. O. Mill Village, Erie Coun- 
ty, was born in Erie County, N. Y., October 15, 1826, son of Dennis and Phebe 
(Griffin) Canfield. The former, asoldier of the war of 1812, formerly of Vermont, 
was a son of Dennis Canfield, who was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. Phebe, 
his wife, was a daughter of Jonathan Griffin, of East Hamburg, Erie Co., N. 
Y. Our subject settled in Rockdale Township, in 1854, locating on the farm 
where he now resides, which he cleared and improved, and on which he has 
lived ever since, with the exception ot six years. He was married, December 
18, 1850, to Mary J., daughter of Harvey and Margaret (Miller) Hull, of Chau- 
tauqua County, N. Y., and by her has five children: Horace W.. married to 
Catherine Strayer; Mary R., wife of Joseph McLatchey; Vernon P., mairied 
to Marion Finney; Ida A., wife of John Flaugh, and Dennis H. Mr. Canfield 
is now serving as Justice of the Peace; has held various other township offices; 
in politics is a Democrat. Besides attending to his farming interests he is a 
licensed auctioneer, and is widely and favorably known as such, not only serv- 
ing the citizens of his own section, who require his services, but attends to calls 
in that line in the States of New York, Ohio and Kansas. 



ROCKDALE TOWNSHIP. 965 

JOHN D. DOCTER, farmer, P. O. Miller's Station, was born in Cambridge 
Township, this county, June 9, 1823, son of James and Mary (Humes) Doc- 
ter, the former a son of Leonard Docter, who settled in Cambridge Township 
in 1801, the latter a daughter of James Humes, one of the first settlers of 
Woodcock Township, this county. Our subject was raised in his native town- 
ship, where he remained until 1874, when he came toEockdale Township, this 
county, and located on the farm where he now resides. He was married June 
27, 1850, to Elizabeth, daughter of Norman and Sally (Colter) Thomas. The 
father was a native of Magsachusetts and an early settler of Cambridge Town- 
ship; the mother was born in Venango Township, this county, daughter of 
Thomas Colter, who settled there in 1796. Mr. and Mrs. Docter have five 
children: Phiannah, wife of John Borland; Asher T, married to Caroline 
Steinhoff; Mary, wife of Joseph Hutson; James E. and John. Ail are resi- 
dents of Rockdale Township. Mr. Docter held various township offices during 
his residence in Cambridge. In politics he is a Democrat. 

HANNIBAL H. FINNEY, farmer, P. O. Miller's Station, was bom in 
Rutland County, Vt., November 8, 1816, son of Levi and Orpha P. (Clark) 
Finney, of that place. Mr. Finney came to this county in 1851 and located 
in Meadville, where he resided one year, and in the fall of 1852 settled in 
Rockdale Township, on the farm where he now resides, which comprises 500 
acres; about 200 improved, mostly by himself. He was married January 9, 
1845, to Mary L., daughter of Abel and Mary (Low) Willoughby, of Shrews- 
bury, Vt By this union were ten children: John W., Frank C. , Charles 
(deceased), Darwin A., Fred M., Hannibal H., Jr., 'Willoughby W., Marion 
E. (wife of Vernon P. Canfield), George L. and Cassius L. Mr. Finney has 
been Justice of the Peace of Rockdale Township for two terms. In politics 
he was formerly a Republican, but is now an advocate of the Greenback doc- 
trine. Besides his farming interests he owns a saw-mill and manufactures lum- 
ber, lath and shingles. 

DAVID L. FULLERTON, farmer, P. O. Miller's Station, was bom in 
what is now Cambridgeboro, this county, April 2, 1820, son of Bailey and 
Mary (Humes) Fullerton, and grandson of Thomas Fullerton, who settled in 
that township in 1797. The father of our subject was married in 1803, and 
the same year located where Cambridgeboro now stands, and here he resided 
until his death. He died February 25. 1854, at the age of seventy-four. He 
was parent of ten children: James, deceased; Bailey K. ; Lettie, deceased; 
John H., deceased; Andrew J.; Polly, deceased; David L. ; Joshua, deceased; 
Samuel, deceased, and Elizabeth. Our subject was married March J8, 1847, 
to Elizabeth Stokes, of Venango Township, this county. By this union were 
twelve children: Sarepta, wife of George France; Oscar, now in Iowa; Sam- 
uel; Harriet, wife of Alfred Shelhamer; Peirce, in Iowa; Mary, wife of John 
Peters; "Wheeler, deceased; Edie, deceased; Loren K., in Iowa; Jennie, wife 
of Aimer Parker; Kerney and Kate. Mrs. D. L. Fullerton was a daughter of 
John and Margaret (Peters) Stokes, who settled in Venango Township, this 
county, in 1804. coming from Tnion County. Penn. John Stokes, a son of 
George Stokes, had twelve children: George; Jacob, deceased; John; Polly, 
deceased; Katherine, deceased; Margaret, Samuel, Susan, William, Catherine 
E,, David H. and Augustus W. (deceased). Mr. Stokes died June 10, 1861, 
aged eighty-one years; his widow died January 27. 1876, in her ninety-sixth 
year. Our subject has resided in this township since his marriage, with the 
exception of one year that he lived in Cambridge. He has held various offices 
in his township. In politics is a Democrat. Both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian ChurcL 



966 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

ARTHUR JERVIS, farmer. R O. Cambridgeboro. was born in Armstrong 
County, Penc, September 27, 1829, sou of Thomas R. and Jane (Haughay) 
Jervis, vrho settled in Rockdale Township, this county, in 1839, on the farm 
now owned by our subject, where they lived and died. They were parents of 
three children: John, Arthur, and Isabel, wife of Jacob Decker, both now 
deceased. Our subject was married January 9, 1859, to Mary M. , daughter of 
Georo-e and Sarah (Spencer) Wilcox, of Rockdale Township, this county, by 
whom he has had live children: Donna N., wife of Ernest Birchard; Comma, 
Emmett, Frank, Jimmy, Jennie and Kate. Jimmy and Jennie are deceased. 
Mr. Jervis occupies a part of the homestead where his father first settled. He 
is a member of the A. 0. U. W. In politics is a Democrat. Both he and his 
wife are members of the Methodist Church. 

DANIEL KELLY, retired farmer, P. O. Miller's Station, was born in 
Rockdale Township, this county, November 3, 1812, son of Isaac and Hannah 
(Carnahau) Kelly, who located in Bloomtield Township in 1799, and in 1800 
removed to this township, where they spent the remainder of their days. Isaac 
Kelly was a native of New Jersey, and was married in Northumberland County, 
Penn., in 1797. He was parent of eight children: James (deceased), John, 
Sarah (deceased), Polly (deceased), Rachel (deceased), Hannah (deceased) 
Isaac and Daniel. Our subject was married October 12, 1854, to Martha M., 
daughter of Hezekiah and Margaret (Spring) Howard, early settlers of Ran- 
dolph Township, and later of Rockdale Township, this county. By this union 
there are four children, viz. : DeOmer, DeElmer, Lovina D. and Dorinda V. 
DeOmer married Hetty, daughter of Isaac and Betsy (Jarvis) Willis, of Rock- 
dale Township, this county. Mrs. Kelly, who was for thirty-three years a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church, died March 13, 1875, in her fifty-fifth 
year. Mr. Kelly has always resided in this township; for the past twenty-six 
years has been living on his present farm. He has held various township 
oflSces. In politics is a Democrat. 

JAMES P. KELLY, farmer, P. O. Miller's Station, was born in Rockdale 
Township, this county, July 27, 1824, son of John and Mary (Langley) Kelly, and 
grandson of Isaac and Hannah (Carnahan) Kelly, who located in Bloomfield 
Township, this county, in 1799, and in 1800 settled in this township, where 
they died. John Kelly, the father of our subject, was the first white child bom 
in Rockdale Township, the date of his birth being September 22, 1800. At the 
date of this writing, March 1884, he is still living and resides in Cambridge- 
boro. Our subject was married January 27, 1852, to Mary, daughter of James 
and Sarah (Willis) Kelley, by whom he has three children: Alveretta, wife of 
Charles D. Edson (have two children: Zella L. and Bessie); Addie M., and 
Morris S., who married Carrie Veley. Mr. Kelly is now serving his township 
as Justice of the Peace, and has held various other offices. In politics he is a 
Republican. 

JOSEPH B. McFADDEN, fai-mer, P O. Miller's Station, was born in Cam- 
bridtre, this county, January 23, 1835, son of John W. and Lodiska S. (Rock- 
well) McFadden, who settled in Cambridge, this county about 1820. They 
were parents of nine children: Rebecca (deceased), Catherine (deceased), 
George, E. W. (deceased), Rebecca N. (wife of John N. Shannce), Joseph B., 
Hannah F. (wife of A. D. Birchard), John W. and Catherine (wife of Charles 
Buck). The father, a hatter by trade, during his residence in Cambridge 
engaged in farming, lumbering, blacksmithing and mercantile pursuits. Our 
subject lived in Cambridge until 1857, when he came to this township, where 
he has since resided. He Las been twice married; on first occasion, May 10, 
1857, to Mary, daughter of John Saeger, one of the first settlers of Saeger- 



ROCKDALE TOWNSHIP. 967 

town, this county. By this union there were four children : Haida (deceased), 
Charles A., Catherine (wife of Roland Ford), and Minnie. Our subject's present 
wife, to whom he was married August, 1869, is Emily Siverling, daughter of 
Christopher Siverling, of Saegertown. They have sis children: Mary, Mattie, 
Emma, Joseph, George and Fred. Mr. McFadden is a Republican in politics; 
a member of the Cambridge Grange and with his wife an ardent adherent 
of Zion Church. 

JOHN D. McLATCHEY, farmer, P. O. Mill Village, Erie County, was born 
in Venango County, Penn., April 19, 1839, son of William and Susan (Dale) 
McLatchey, the former a native of Westmoreland County, Penn. , and the latter 
of Centre County, Penn. His paternal grandfather, Charles McLatchey, of 
Scotch descent, was a native of Cumberland, and a pioneer of Westmoreland 
County, Penn. His maternal grandfather, Joseph Dale, of English lineage, 
was a pioneer of Centre County. William and Susan McLatchey were parents 
of eleven children, six now living: John D. , Elizabeth C, wife of James W. 
Mitchell; Samuel W. ; Emma, wife of William Hull; Joseph F. and William 
M. Our subject was reared in Venango County, Penn., attending the common 
schools, and is a graduate of the Iron City Commercial College. He enlisted 
during the late Rebellion, August, 1861, in Company G, Eighty-third Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry, and participated in the siege of Yorktown, seven 
days' tight before Richmond, battles of Hanover Court House, Middleburg, 
Fredericksburg, Mine Run, Chaucellorsville, Spottsylvania, Gettysburg and 
the campaign of the Wilderness, in which he was wounded in the right shoul- 
der. After serving for three years and one month, he received an honorable 
discharge. In 1866 he came to Rockdale Township with his parents; was 
married January 21, 1868, to Martha R., daughter of Benjamin and Tryphena 
(Curtis) Throop, of this township. By this union are two children: Ella and 
Benjamin D. Mr. McLatchey has resided on his present farm since 1872. He 
has held several township offices, serving one term as School Director. He has 
always taken an active interest in educational matters. He was Enumerator 
of the census in 1880. In politics is a Republican. 

DANIEL McQueen, farmer, P. O. Chapinville, was born in Edinburgh, 
Scotland, September 20, 1829, son of Donald and Grace (Davidson) McQueen, 
who settled in Rockdale Township, this county, in 1839, locating on the farm 
now owned by our subject, which they cleared and improved, and where they 
died. They were both members of the Presbyterian Church, but after Mr. 
McQueen's death in 1858, at the age of sixty years, his widow joined the Bap- 
tist denomination. She survived until 1879, dying at the age of eighty- three. 
They were parents of live children: Daniel; Ann (deceased), wife of Jeremiah 
Mackey; Margaret, wife of Charles Hewell; Alexander, and Jane, wife of 
Capt. George Harkness. Our subject was married November 18, 1855, to Mary, 
daughter of Anthony and Lucy (Morton) Mickel, early settlers of this town- 
ship. By this union there are live children: Byron A., Grace (wife of Lee 
Black), Mary J., Donald A. and Josephine. Mr. McQueen resides on the old 
homestead, comprising 100 acres, having purchased the interest of the other 
heirs. He also owns another farm of 140 acres. He has held various town- 
ship offices. In politics is a Republican. 

HENRY MITCHELL, retired farmer, P. O. Milt Village, Erie County, was 
bom in Le Boeuf Township, Erie Co., Penn., near the Crawford County line, Aug- 
ust 30, 1803, son of Nathan and Mary (Cooper) Mitchell, who settled there in 
1802. Nathan Mitchell was twice married, his first wife being Mary Cooper, 
by whom he had a family of six, viz. : Peter, Lysander, William, Henry, Eliza 
and Cooper. Our subject is the only member of this family now living. For 



968 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

his second spouse Nathan married Mrs. Mary E. Lyman, by whom he had 
eight children: Maria, Mary, Jane, Perry, Elizabeth C, Lewis H., George W. 
and Olive, all deceased but Jane, wife of Christian Straw, of Venango Town- 
ship, this county. Nathan Mitchell's widow, now (1884) Mrs. Tont Watson, 
resides on the homestead with our subject. She had five children by her for- 
mer husband: Kobert F., James H., Nathan S., John A. and Mary J. Our 
subject settled on the farm where he now resides in 1839, it being a part of a 
tract of land located by his father in 1802. He was married March 8, 1836, 
to Mary P., daughter of Jaroes Hodges, of Cambridge Township, this county, 
formerly of Vermont. By this union were four children: Nathan, deceased; 
Abigail, deceased; Sarah, deceased; and Mary, wife of Samuel McLatchey. 
Mr. Mitchell lost his wife by death October 31, 1882, in her eightieth year. 
He is a member of the Presbyterian Church of Mill Village, Erie County, and 
his wife became a member sixty-five years previous to her death. 

ELISHA SMITH, farmer, P. O. Brown Hill, was born in Crown Point, 
Essex Co., N. Y., November 25, 1815, son of Benjamin and Susan (Wilson) 
Smith, who subsequently lived in Mill Creek Township. Erie Co., Penn. Our 
subject settled at Brovsm Hill, Kockdale Township, this county, on the farm 
where he now resides, in 1838, and was married April 13, 1839, to Jane, 
daughter of James and Polly (Thompson) Barber, by whom he has had three 
children: Anvilla, deceased; Mandilla, deceased, and Anne. Mandilla married 
James C. Leslie, of this township, and had four children: Clyde, Claude, 
Cassius and Max. Mr. Smith, one of the representatiee farmers of his township, 
has held several township oiBces; in politics he is a Republican. 

GEORGE L. WEBSTER, farmer, P. O. Cambridgeboro, was born in 
Cambridge Township, this coimty, June 13, 1839, son of Lyman and Jane 
(Willey) Webster, who settled in that township about 1821, together with John 
Webster, the father of Lyman. They came from Massachusetts. Lyman 
Webster, who located on the farm now owned by the heirs of Joseph L. Webster, 
had nine children: James L. , deceased; Mary M., wife of Jonathan Russell; 
Eliza A., wife of George Hart; Clarissa M., wife of Phil Stevens; Abigail P., 
wife of Dwight Burrows; George L. ; Francis G., deceased; Grove F., 
deceased: and Amos J., deceased. Our subject was married April 29, 1869, 
to Emma C, daughter of Lyman H. and Hannah (Kelly) Allen, early settlers 
of Cambridge Township, this county. By this union there are two children: 
Mertie C. and Rosa M. Mr. Webster always lived in his native township 
until coming to Rockdale Township in the spring of 1882, when he located on 
his present farm. Both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
Church. He is a member of the K. of H. ; in politics is a Republican. 

GEORGE WILCOX, farmer, P. O. Miller's Station, was born in Gran- 
ville, Mass., March 13, 1810; son of Eleazer C, and Cynthia (Noble) Wilcox; 
the former a son of Eleazer C. and Jemima (Munson) Wilcox, natives of Con- 
necticut; the latter a daughter of Eager and Mary (Phelps) Noble. Eleazer 
C. was born May 20, 1780; was a farmer in Granville, Mass., until 1818, 
when he removed to Floyd, Oneida Co., N. Y., where he died of dropsy, Janu- 
ary 31, 1827. Of the children of this family, all, with their partners in life, 
are, or have been, members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, except the 
first wife of Noble Wilccx, who was a Baptist. Of the seventy-four grand- 
children of this family, forty-four were living in 1876. During the Civil war 
three died in the service of their country. Our subject settled in Rockdale 
Township, in the spring of 1854, on the farm where he yet resides, which 
comprises about 540 acres located in Rockdale and Richmond Townships. He 
was married July 24, 1836, to Sarah, daughter of Elijah and Catharine (Boss) 



KOCKDALE TOWNSHIP. 969 

Spencer, of Oneida County, N. Y., by whom he has had eleven children, seven 
ndw living, viz. : Mary, wife of Arthur Jervis; Julius M., married to Mary 
Hotohkiss; Louisa C, wife of George F. McCray; Henry W., married to Lucy 
Glover; George M., married Adelle Hotchkiss; Sarah E., wife of Walter Bly- 
stone; Spencer N., married to Ida Hoag. Mrs. Wiloox is one of eighteen 
children, five of whom died young. Those now living are Betsy, Philander, 
Polly, Charles, Sarah, Heman, Joseph, James, Louisa, Matilda, Cynthia, 
Merrit and Buel. One of the deceased, Matson, was drowned at the age of 
nine years. Her parents were Methodists, the mother before she was fifteen 
years old. George Wilcox has been a devoted Christian for over forty-six 
years, an element in the Methodist Episcopal creed, to which organization his 
estimable wife* has been attached for over fifty years, and the financial inter- 
ests of the church of their choice have beea benefitted by their relationship. 
As an appreciation of his worth, his neighbors have intrusted Mr. Wilcox with 
the offices of Township Auditor, School Director, Inspector of Elections, etc. 
Our subject owqs and operates, through his sons, a fine cheese factory, located 
on hia farm. In politics Mr. Wilcox is a Democrat. 

D. O. WING, farmer and lumberman, P. O. Miller's Station, was born 
October 3, 1816, in Albany, N. Y. ; son of David and Mariam (Cronkite) 
Wing, natives, the former of Vermont, the latter of Hooaick, Rensselaer Co., 
N. Y. They were parents of the following-named children: Submit, Anna, 
Ora, Mariam, Henrietta, Maria, and D. O. The father, who was a drover, 
died in 1817. He belonged, at his demise, to the Baptist Church, as did also 
his widow, who died in 1878 (then wife of William Farwell, by whom she 
had two children, Betsy and Levi L.). Our subject, being left fatherless when 
one year old, was subject to the protection of his grandmother, Anna Cronkite, 
until he was four years old, at which period, his mother having been married 
to William Farwell, he was taken to their home. His educational advantages 
were much limited, being such as the log-cabin, with its slab seats and writing 
desks, and puncheon floor and ancient fire-place afforded. He labored on the 
farm until twenty years old, when he engaged at Comstock & Bostwick's 
sawmill, at Mil ford, Otsego Co., N. Y., (at the time when it was disputed 
that a mill could be run by steam), and was appointed assistant sawyer, under 
George Newton, of Corning, N. Y. Here he continued one year, when he 
withdrew to Greene County and engaged in the tan bark business, following 
the same two years, and then worked on a farm one year. In 1836 he came 
by canal to Buffalo, by lake to Erie City, and by stage to Venango Township, 
this county, and there took employment in the Klecknei*8aw-mill, at which he 
was engaged for four years. While there he built the first house in the vil- 
lage of Venango, soon after having helped to lay out the place. In 1840 Mr. 
Wing was married to Mary J., daughter of A.retus and Lois (Nubre) Rogers, 
natives of Vermont and the parents of four childreji, viz. : Eliza, Mary J., Elias 
and Mahala. The parents came to this county in 1836, where they died. 
They were members of the Christian organization. The father was called out 
in the war of 1812. To this union were born Dine children, of whom are now 
living: Jerome, married to Mary Foster (have two children: William and 
Jennie; he is a carpenter in Salamanca, N. Y.); Cornelius, married to Kate 
Bunce (have four children: Adelbert, Sherman, Alta and Delia; he was one of 
the Lincoln Guards stationed at Washington, D. C, for about three years); 
Levi L., married to Rebecca Hays (have four children: Alma, George, Morris 
and Dimmis); Loron, married to Emma McCray (have one child, Susan J.; 
he works on the farm); Charles, married to Mary Smith (have no children; he 
farms and works in the mill with his father); Melissa, married to Calvin Crow 

04 



970 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

(have two children, Ina and Orson; he is a farmer). In 1841 Mr. Wing 
removed tu Rockdale Township, this county, where he rented the "Randolph 
saw-mills," and operated the same with good success. He built many flat- 
boats and floated his lumber down French Creek to the Allegheny River, 
thence to Pittsburgh, Penn. At the expiration of seven years he bought a 
farm of 164 acres and managed the same until 1866, when he gave his entire 
attention to the old Randolph saw-mills, which he bought in 1864. About 
the same time he purchased a 500-acre tract of land, heavily timbered, known 
as the "Donation Lot," presented to Gen. Wayne for his services in the war 
of 1812. He worked the timber from this land into lumber, and has since 
added 200 acres more of good timber land. He is preparing the timber for 
building material, including lumber, latha and shingles, all of which he 
makes a specialty. Mr. Wing was a Democrat until the formation of the 
Republican party, since when he has been an out-spoken advocate of Repub- 
licanism, and has shown a degree worthy of prominent oifices in the gift of 
his party, but being adverse to office, he has not made any record in that way. 
He and his estimable wife are worthy members of the Congregational Church 
of Cambridgeboro. As a thorough representative business man of Crawford 
County, Mr. Wing has been solicited and consents to have his portrait appear 
in this history. 

JAMES WOODSIDE, farmer, P. O. Miller's Station, was born December 
J 3, 1829, in Erie County, Penn. , son of John and Polly (Snell) Woodside, 
natives of the same State, and parents of twelve children, nine of whom are 
now living, viz. : James, William, Jane, Charlotte, Robert, Chester, Loretta, 
Marian and Ellen. Our subject was educated in the county schools, and at the 
age of seventeen he left home and engaged in a sawmill knovsm as Marvin's 
Mill, located in Cambridge Township, this county. At the end of Ave years 
he was employed at the " Johnstown mill," and at the expiration of three years 
he bought the "Purse mill," which he operated for thirteen years with suc- 
cess. Selling hig mill he went to Forest County, Penn., and engaged in lum- 
bering and erecting mills for about six years; afterward bought the Isaac 
Kelley mill in this county, which he operates at the present time. Our sub- 
ject married, in 1854, Maria Anderson, who bore him two children, both now 
deceased, as well as their mother. Mr. Woodside married for his second 
wife, Sarah J. Jervis, but has no issue. He possesses along with his wife 
about 1300 acres of good land, and is dealing to some extent in cattle. His pres- 
ent residence he erected in 1872. Our subject has served his township in 
many of the minor offices; has been brought out as a representative for 
County Commissioner by his political (Greenbacker) party. Is a member of the 
Cambridge Lodge of A. F. & A. M. 



ROME TOWNSHIP. 

DANIEL BEMENT (deceased) was born in Southington, Conn., March 
10, 1789. He married, October 4, 1812, Miss Nancy Kimball, who was born Sep- 
tember 6, 1792, and in 1818 they immigrated to Centreville, Crawford Co., 
Penn., making the entire journey with an ox-team. Here Mr. Bement carried 
on his business, that of tanner and currier, for many years, and in later life 
retired to a farm. Our subject died March 21, 1873, aged eighty-four years; 



ROME TOWNSHIP. 971 

Mrs. Bemeat died December 14, 1862, aged seveuty years. They were upright 
pioneer people, and left an honored name to posterity. Their descendants 
include many of the leading and influential families of Crawford County. 
Their children are Henry. Mrs. Julia Clark, Silas, Mrs. Nancy Post, George, 
Joel, Mrs. Miranda Rodier and Frank. 

WILLIAM E. BENNETT, farmer, P. O. Spartansburg, was born Sep- 
tember 27, 1830, in Ellery, Chautauqua Co., N. Y. ; son of Daniel and Dolly 
(Anais) Bennett. The father, a soldier in the war of 1812, was also a native of 
Chautauqua Couijty, N. Y., and in 1840 moved to Rome Township, this county, 
where he cleared and developed his farm. The mother, a native of Vermont, 
died in 1843, leaving thirteen children; six are now living, viz.: Charles and 
Ezra in Warren County, Penn. ; Milton, in Chautauqua County, N. Y. ; Will- 
iam E. ; Martha J., widow of P. S. Magee; Mary Ann, wife of Robert Kerr. 
Four of his sons gave their lives for their country's cause, viz. : Jason, who 
died from a wound received in the battle of Bull Run; George, reported mis- 
sing; Wesley, who died from tlie effects of wounds received in the mine explo- 
sion before Petersburg; and John, who died in Anderson vi lie prison. Daniel 
Bennett subsequently married Mrs. Lydia Rew; he died at Mageetown, Feb- 
ruary 11, 1883, in his eighty-ninth year. He and all his sons, excepting Ezra, 
were stanch Democrats. Our subject acquired his education in the limited 
schools of the home district, and when but thirteen years of age commenced life 
for himself, and as soon as he had suflicient means accumulated, bought a 
farm. He was married September 7, 1857, to Emeline Chase, born in this 
township, January 12, 1837, daughter of John Chase. To this union were 
born Mary Lucretia, now Mrs. Rowley; John M. C, Lena J,, William 
Henry and two deceased in early childhood. After marriage they settled on 
the farm on which they have since resided, comprising 140 acres of fertile 
land. Mr. Bennett is a successful farmer, selling produce from his farm, 
which brings from $800 to $1,200 annually. He also takes active interest in 
the improvement of fine stock, having now fifty seven head of short-horn cattle, 
and some horses of a superior breed. He prefers to lead a retired life, though 
he is now filling the oflSce of School Director; he has been a life-long Dem- 
ocrat. 

STEPHEN CARROLL, farmer, P. O. Titusville, was bom July 24, 1826, 
in Sandy Lake (now Worth) Township, Mercer Co., Penn. His father. Rev. 
William Carroll, a Presiding Elder in the Erie Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, was a native of Washington County, Penn. , but moved to 
Mercer County, same State, in an early day; be there married Rachel Sutton, 
a native of Maryland. They spent one year (1849) in this county, but returned 
to Mercer County, where they ended their days. They were parents of eleven 
children. Our subject, the next to the youngest in this family, came to Oil 
Creek Township, Crawford Co., Penn.. in 1847, and erected a saw-mill. In 
1850 he located in Rome Township and devoted himself to farming. He was 
married, November 28, 1849, to Esther, daughter of James Kerr, by whom he 
had three children: Angle, wife of Mr. Hummer, and two deceased in childhood. 
During the late war Mr. Carroll enlisted, September 8, 1862, in Company D, 
Eighteenth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, serving in the Army of 
the Potomac and participated in the engagements at Hanover Court House. Get- 
tysburg, South Mountain and many other of the memorable battles fought in Vir- 
ginia and Maryland. He was a brave soldier and received an honorable discharge 
June 6, 1865. He acted as Company Clerk at Cumberland, Md., at the mus- 
tering out and is reliable authority for the statement that nearly every survivor 
of the company was present at the last muster. Since his return he has taken 



972 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 

an active part in political affairs; was elected School Director, Supervisor, Jus- 
tice of the Peace; appointed May 5, 1879, by Gov. Hoyt, Sealer of Weights and 
Measures for Crawford County; reappointed June 12, 1882, and is discharg- 
ing the duties of this position with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of 
the community. Squire Carroll has a fine farm of 100 acres well-improved 
land, and is devoting his attention to the breeding of live stock, having some 
very fine pure-blooded cattle of the short-horn variety, and was one of the first 
to introduce this improved grade of cattle in his township. 

HENRY CARROLL, farmer, P. O. Centreville, was born January 1, 1837, 
in Union Township, Erie Co., Penn.; son of M. Can'oll, now a resident of 
Sumner, Iowa. During the late Rebellion, our subject enlisted, August 11, 
1862, in the One Hundred and Forty-fifth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, and participated in the battles of Fredericksburg, Cold Harbor and 
Fort Hill, where he was wounded by a minie ball which resulted in his losing 
his right arm, and after a long course of treatment in hospital he received an 
honorable discharge, December, 10, 1864. During his service Mr. Carroll 
came home on a fiu-lough and was married, October 13, 1863, to Adelia Rice, 
born in Rome Township, this county, June 16, 1843, daughterof William Rice, 
by whom he has the following children: Ionia M., Grant S. , and Ida A. After 
the war, Mr. Carroll spent two years, 1868 and 1870, in Iowa and Wisconsin, 
but finally settled on the old homestead of William Rice, near the edge of 
Centreville Borough. Mr. Carroll has ever been a Republican, and has taken 
an active interest in the public affairs of this township, holding most of the 
ofiSces of this borough. He is a member of the G. A. R. 

GILBERT L. CLARK, M. D., physician and surgeon, Centreville, was 
born'in this borough, February 15, 1848; son of the well-known pioneer, James 
Clark. He received his literary education at the home schools and Allegheny 
College, Meadville. At twenty-two years of age he began to study medicine 
with Dr. A. P. Waid, of Centreville; took a preliminary and regular course of 
lectures at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia (1872 and 1873); then 
engaged in practice with his former preceptor, Dr. Waiu; subsequently attend- 
ed Miami Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio, receiving the degree of M. D. in 
1875; then resumed his practice here. In 1880 he attended an additional course 
of lectures at Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York. The Doctor 
there married, January 12, 1880, Caroline L. Banning (daughter of E. P. Ban- 
ning, M. D., of that city), by whom he has the following children: Gilbert 
Ralph, Inez Emily and Grace Elaine. He and wife are members of the Con- 
gregational Church. Since marriage the Doctor has continuously practiced his 
profession in his native place. He is an energetic business man, thoroughly 
trained in his chosen profession, and by his upright life and scientific attain- 
ments has built up for himself a large and prosperous practice. 

GARRET BONTJM CONOVER, farmer, P. O. Titusville, was born Septem- 
ber 26, 1818, in Hunterdon County, N. J. ; son of Garret A. aad Sarah Conover, 
who came to Rome Township, this county, November 8, 1832. This place was 
then a wilderness, and they began at oncre to clear and develop their farm. 
After living xaseful lives they passed to their final reward, honored by all who 
knew them. They were parents of twelve children; one son, Ralph, was a sol- 
dier in the Eighteenth Pennsylvania "Volunteer Cavalry, and was killed on the 
Potomac at Brandy Station. Our subject, the sixth in the family, married, 
June 5, 1845, Eliza Ann Thompson, born January, 1826, in Oil Creek Town- 
ship, this county, daughter of John Thompson. By this union were born 
Mary E., wife of Mr. Phue; John G. ; George B., Justice of the Peace, this 
township; Emma J., wife of Mr. Jones, of Coshocton, Ohio; Fannie; Melvina, 



KOME TOWNSHIP. 978 

a suocesaful teacher at Grand Valley, Warren Co., Penn. ; Katie and Libbie. 
They also raised Elliott E., son of Ralph Conover. After their marriage they 
settled where they now live, Mr. Conover has acquired a fine farm of 150 
acres of well-improved land besides giving a good start in life to his children, 
who are all useful and intelligent members of society. He was formerly a 
Democrat in politics, but is now an advocate of prohibition. Our subject 
and his wife are believers in the Universalist doctrine, but most of their chil- 
dren belong to the United Presbyterian Ch