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HISTORY OF 



CRAWFORD COUNTY 



IOWA 



A RECORD OF SETTLEMENT, ORGANIZATION, 
PROGRESS AND ACHIEVEMENT 



Local history is the ultimate substance of national history-WiLsoN 



VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRATED 



CHICAGO: 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING CO. 

1911 



CWd 



,onBLlC UBRARYI 



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T.uOtM FOUH0*T.OHt. 



THE NEW YORK 

PU'BLIC LIBRARY 








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BIOGRAPHICAL 



CHARLES L. VOSS. 

Among the younger generation of those who came to Crawford after the 
pioneer period but who have contributed largely to its recent growth and pros- 
perity there is none who stands nearer to the hearts of the people than C. L. 
Voss. Still in his prime, with every faculty alert, with keen appreciation of the 
refinements of life, with a character grounded in integrity and with a heart that 
responds promptly and cheerfully to the obligations of man's brotherhood, it is 
a pleasure to include this brief sketch in a history of Crawford county. Croesus 
admonishes, "Call no man happy until you know the manner of his death," but 
judged by any less austere standard, Mr. Voss seems to have well laid the 
foundation for a successful, happy and helpful career. 

Though occupying for many years the responsible position of cashier of the 
Bank of Denison, he is best known throughout western Iowa as a daring and 
highly successful buyer and seller of real estate. His holdings are large and 
are scattered throughout all this portion of the state. He is almost as much a 
business man of Sioux City as of Denison, and we are to be congratulated that 
he has thus far refused the very tempting offers made him to engage in business 
in larger cities. Mr. Voss presents the rare combination of a man who not only 
knows how to make money but how to spend it. To spend it for himself with- 
out ostentation, for travel, for art, for good literature and for all the refine- 
ments of a good home. To spend it for others with a glad willingness that is 
the best index of a generous nature. 

Mr. Voss is a sincere and genuine Christian, one of the most helpful and 
liberal members of the Methodist church of Denison. In politics he is a repub- 
lican of the stalwart school and he has taken an active, though thoroughly un- 
selfish part in the councils of his party. As president of the Denison Commer- 
cial Club he has inspired that organization with much of his own enthusiasm 
and thoroughness and has launched it upon what promises to be the most suc- 
cessful year of its history. His education has been a continuing process for he 
is a lover of good books and a thoughtful student of men and events. 

In his home life he has been exceedingly fortunate. On October 2, 1895, 
he was married to Miss Gertrude Gulick, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene 



6 lllSTDRV Ul- CRAWFURU CUL'XTY 

Gulick. of this city, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere. Mrs. Voss is a Deiii- 
son girl, educated in our schools and in Cornell College at Mount Vernon. Iowa. 
She is one of the most representative and best beloved of Denison's young 
matrons. She takes an active and helpful part in all the work of club life and 
social life and church life, but she combines with all of these activities a wifely 
and motherly devotion which make her home all that it should be, a delightful 
center for her loved ones and her friends. They have one son, Eugene Loyal, 
who is at once the pride and the hope of the home. 

A native of Illinois, Mr. \'oss w^as born in Freeport, October 19, 1867, one 
of the eight children of Henry and Catharine (Maurer) \'oss. The family name 
is indicative of the German origin, and while comparatively little is known con- 
cerning the ancestral record, the paternal grandfather lived and died in Ger- 
many. His son, Henry \'oss, was born in Holstein, Germany, and in his native 
land engaged in merchandising. When a young man, however, he came to 
America and traveled into the interior of the country as far as Freeport, Illi- 
nois. In 1 86 1, following the outbreak of the Civil war, he espoused the Union 
cause and served for three years and nine months, being promoted to official 
rank. He was wounded at Raleigh and at the close of a long and valorous serv- 
ice received an honorable discharge. After the war he returned to Freeport, 
where he engaged in merchandising. He married Catharine Maurer, who was 
born in Alsace. Germany, and was a daughter of Daniel and Catharine Maurer, 
who. emigrating to the new world, settled in Freeport. Illinois, where they lived 
for many years, the father passing away at the age of eighty-two and the mother 
when seventy years of age. Their family numbered a son and three daughters : 
Catharine. Jacob, Lucy and Carolina. Of these the first named became the 
wife of Henry \'oss and is now living in Freeport, Illinois, at the age of sixty- 
eight years. Mr. \'oss, however, passed away in January, 1908, at the age of 
seventy-one years. Both were members of the Lutheran church. In their family 
were three sons and five daughters : Qiarles L. ; Lucy, a resident of Freeport, 
Illinois; Josephine, the wife of Frank Miller, of Norway, Iowa; Emma, Matilda, 
Jacob, Kathryn and Daniel, all of Freeport. 

Charles L. \'oss was only a year old when brought to Iowa by his parents, 
who settled at Cedar Rapids but later removed to Blairstown, from which point 
they afterward returned to Freeport. He grew to manhood at Blairstown and 
attended the public schools there. He also was a student of the school at Blairs- 
town and subsequently attended Coe College at Cedar Rapids. His initial busi- 
ness training came to him in a clerical position in a bank but after a short time 
he was made bill clerk l^y Shaver & Dows. at Cedar Rapids. Later lie was con- 
nected with the bank of G. F. \'an \'echten, of Cedar Rapids, and subsequently 
returned to Blairstown and was in the Benton County State Bank for several 
years. In 1889 he removed to Denison and was abstractor and bookkeeper for 
the Bank of Denison until 1896, when he was promoted to the position of cash- 
ier, in which capacity he is still serving. 

Mr. Voss is a member of several fraternal organizations. He has attained 
high rank in Masonry, belonging to Sylvan Lodge, Xo. 507, A. F. & A. M. ; 
Ark Chapter, No. 89. R. A. M. ; Mount Zion Commandery, K. T. ; Des Moines 
Consistory, A. A. S. R. ; and Abu Bekr Temple of the Nobles of the Mystic 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 7 

Shrine. He also holds membership in Dowdall Lodge, No. 90, K. P., and with 
the Modern Woodmen of America. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Eastern Star. In all the relations of life he has proven himself a man of gen- 
uine worth and straightforward purposes and his progress in business has been 
the direct result of energy, intelligently directed. 



A. C. WEEKS. 



A. C. Weeks, serving as city marshal of Denison, was born in Cedar county, 
Iowa, on the 12th of April, 1852, his parents being L. A. and Elizabeth (Rigby) 
Weeks, who were natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio respectively. The mother 
passed away in Cedar county on the 13th of April, 1861, and the father, who 
was married a second time, removed to Kansas in 1872, his demise occurring 
in the Sunflower state in 1897. By his first wife L. A. Weeks had four chil- 
dren, as follows : A. C, of this review ; Leroy T., who is a resident of Sabula, 
Iowa ; AHce M., the wife of S. E. Day, of Sabula, Iowa ; and O. W., who makes 
his home in Vancouver, Washington. Unto Air. Weeks and his second wife 
were born two children, namely : Clifford, a resident of Kansas ; and Sylvia, the 
wife of Zene Smith, of Salem, Oregon. 

A. C. Weeks acquired his education in the common schools and when a 
youth of sixteen began working as a farm hand in his native county, being 
thus employed until 1872. He then followed the range for a short time and 
after returning to Cedar county operated a rented farm until 1879. In that 
year he came to Crawford county, locating at Denison, where he was success- 
fully engaged in the dray business for about fourteen years. In 1894 he was 
elected city marshal, holding the office for two years. In 1907 he was again 
made city marshal, his re-election being an indication of the confidence of the 
public in him and a recognition of his ability. He has served in that position 
continuously since, ably discharging the important duties devolving upon him. 
His home, which he owns, is a commodious and attractive residence at No. 214 
Washington avenue. 

On the 13th of April, 1875, Mr. Weeks was united in marriage to Miss 
Elmira Elizabeth Kalb, whose birth occurred in Cedar county in 1853, her pa- 
rents being George and Dorcas Kalb, both natives of Ohio. They took up their 
abode in Cedar county, Iowa, in 1853. while the year 1879 witnessed their ar- 
rival in Crawford county. Mr. Kalb now makes his home in Oklahoma but 
his wife was called to her final rest in 190Q. They had a family of nine children. 
Unto our subject and his wife have been bom four children, the record of whom 
is as follows. Hattie A., whose birth occurred in Linn county. Iowa, on the 
31st of August, 1876, is the wife of Ray D. Garrison, of Grand Junction, Colo- 
rado. G. D., who was born in Cedar county, Iowa, on the 17th of November, 
1878, is now a contractor of Springfield, Missouri. Jessie, whose natal day was 
April 13. 1882, is the wife of Francis J. Gable, who is now engaged in business 
at Lincoln, Nebraska. Lucas A., is a civil engineer of Monett, Missouri. 



8 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Weeks has sup- 
ported the men and measures of the repubHcan party, being convinced that its 
principles are most conducive to good government.- From 1902 until 1904 he 
served as a street commissioner. Both he and his wife are devoted and con- 
sistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. Weeks also belongs 
to the Sons of \'eterans and to the Red Men. Those who know them enter- 
tain for them high regard in recognition of their many good traits of character 
and their loyalty to principles that are most commendable. 



P. E. C. LALLY. 



The life record of P. E. C. Lally is an excellent illustration of what may be 
accomplished when ambition and determination point the way. He has never 
feared to venture where favoring opportunity has led the way nor has he failed 
to use any means whereby he might develop and strengthen his native powers 
and talents. In this way he has become well qualified as a lawyer and today 
occupies a prominent position at the Crawford county bar. 

He was born in County Mayo. Ireland, June 8, 1856. The genealog)' of the 
Lally family can be traced for five hundred years in Ireland. John Lally, the 
paternal grandfather, a native of tliat country, devoted his life to farming but 
died at an early age, his death resulting from an accident. He had wedded Mary 
Hester and they had become the parents of nine children, six sons and three 
daughters, Peter, Thaddeus, John, Patrick, Thomas, Frank, Mary, Ellen and 
Kitty. All of these children with the exception of Peter, Thaddeus and Thomas 
came early to America and settled in different parts of the country. One of the 
sons, John, was killed by a rebel sympathizer at Covington, Kentucky, at the 
outbreak of the Civil war. 

Peter Lally, a member of this family and the father of P. E. C. Lally, 
was born in Ireland and devoted his life to general farming. He was married 
in his native country to Nancy Corcoran, whose parents were farming people 
of County Mayo, Ireland. Mrs. Lally died on the Emerald isle in 1876, when 
about sixty years of age, and in 1881 Peter Lally crossed the Atlantic to 
America and made his home with his son Patrick in Vail and later in Denison, 
Iowa. His death occurred when he had reached the age of seventy-nine years. 
Both he and his wife were members of the Catholic church. Their family 
numbered four sons and two daughters: John, who died in Chicago; Sarah, the 
wife of Henry O'Neill, of County Mayo, Ireland; Michael, a resident of Man- 
chester, England, who was superintendent of the street car system there for 
twenty years ; Patrick E. C, of this review ; Frank, who died in New York 
city; and Mary, who died in infancy. 

P. E. C. Lally spent his youthful days upon his father's farm in County 
Mayo, Ireland, to the age of eigiiteen years and during that period attended 
the country schools in the acquirement of his education. He afterward began 
clerking in Westport, Ireland, and later in Newport. In 1874 he sailed for 
America, attracted by the tales which he heard concerning opportunities here 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 9 

offered. He did not bring with him any false ideas, however, that wealth 
should be had for the asking but realized that dihgence and determination are 
the forces which will swing open the portals of success. For a short time he 
lived in Chicago and then removed to De Kalb county, Illinois, after which he 
worked upon a farm and engaged in teaching school. In 1877 he came to Iowa, 
settling in Greene county, where he was employed at farm labor and on the 
railroad. He also taught school and with ambition to direct his efforts into 
professional channels took up the study of law under the direction of Hon. J. J. 
Russell, who directed his reading until his admission to the bar in 1880. He 
then located for practice in Vail, where he remained until his removal to Deni- 
son in 1887. Here he practiced alone until 1889, when he formed a partnership 
with Judge Conner, and since that time they have been associates in law practice 
under the style of Conner & Lally. This is one of the strongest law firms of 
the city and its position is indicated in the liberal clientage accorded them. 
Mr. Lally has proved himself a strong and able advocate and safe counselor. 
He prepares his cases with diligence and care, and in the presentation of his 
arguments his deductions follow with logical sequence. 

On the I St of September, 1880, Mr. Lally was united in marriage to Miss 
Kittie Hughes, a daughter of Frank and Margaret (McGrath) Mungon Hughes, 
of Greene county, Iowa. This marriage has been blessed with eleven children. 
Margaret E., the eldest, is the wife of Clem M. Mahan, residing on a ranch 
near Kansas City, Missouri, and they have two children, Catherine Claudine 
and Addis Clement. Thomas A. E. is practicing law in Spokane, Washington, 
as a member of the firm of Cannon, Ferris, Swan & Lally. Frank H. is now a 
senior in the Creighton Medical School. Genevieve A. is the wife of Dr. P. J. 
Brannan, of Denison, and has two children, Joseph Lally and Robert King 
Brannan. Beatrice is a graduate of the musical department of Drake Univer- 
sity and of the musical department of Denison College. Blanid Marie and Inez 
Clare are pursuing a classical course in Mount St. Joseph College at Dubuque 
and both are graduates of the Denison high school. Rachel, Mary Alexes, 
O'Connell Lincoln and Patricia Katharine are all at home. The eldest son is a 
graduate of Denison College, of the University of Notre Dame and of the law 
department of Harvard University. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lally hold membership in the Catholic church, in the faith of 
which they are rearing their family. ' Mr. Lally is a fourth degree member of 
the Knights of Columbus, and his son Thomas is a member of the same order, 
and both are members of the Catholic Who's Who in America. Mr. Lally like- 
wise belongs to the American-Irish Historical Society. He occupies an emi- 
nent position as a representative of the Crawford county bar, is an eloquent 
pleader and strong in argument. His friends at different times have strongly 
urged him to become a candidate for district judge, but he has always refused. 
His political allegiance was originally given to the democratic party, and upon 
its ticket he was elected county attorney, filling the office for two terms. He is 
now an advocate of republican principles, however, and he stands at all times 
a firm supporter of his honest convictions. He belongs to the library board and 
is ever a recognized supporter of measures and movements for the general good. 
He is an influential member of the Knights of Columbus and a popular speaker 



10 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

at their gatherings. His social quaHties, his keen intellect and his genuine worth 
make him a favorite wherever he is known, and he has long since established 
himself as a representative and valued citizen of Denison, seeking at all times 
the public good rather than personal advancement. 



JOHX PETT. 



Conspicuous among the early residents of Union township, Crawford county, 
where he has attained a position of prominence and affluence, is John Pett, whose 
birth occurred September 27, 1824, at Eddington, Warwickshire, near Stratford- 
on-Avon, England, the birthplace of the immortal Shakespeare. His parents 
were William and Hannah (Gascoyne) Pett, the former of whom was born in 
Seven Oaks, County Kent, situated a few miles from London, and there he 
followed the vocation of a nurseryman. The mother was born in Warwick. 
They were the parents of five children, of whom but two survive: John, of this 
review ; and Thomas, who is a contractor and resides in England. The parents 
never left the old country but spent their entire lives there, the father dying in 
1838 and the mother passing away in February, 1865. 

John Pett was educated in the Wiltshire and Dorchester schools, which he 
attended until twelve years of age, at which time his father died and he began 
the struggle for existence on his own account. His first position was in a dry- 
goods store, where he served an apprenticeship of four years, but being dissat- 
isfied with that kind of work he gave it up and was on the police force for two 
years. He then learned the carpenter trade, which he followed until his de- 
parture from England in 1851. On March 4 of that year he sailed from Liver- 
pool and on May 2 landed at Xew Orleans, whence he went to St. Louis and 
there worked at his trade for awhile but as cholera was raging in the city at 
that time he concluded to leave and proceeded to Muscatine, Iowa. After 
spending one summer in that city he returned to St. Louis and followed his 
trade for the succeeding two years. He next went to Utah and from there to 
Nevada, where he remained working at his trade for twelve years, at the end 
of which time he removed to .Shelby county, Iowa, and in 1864 came to LInion 
township, Crawford county, where he rented a farm for two years and then 
bought one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 26, only eighteen acres of 
which were broken. However, he continued to gradually improve the rest of 
the land and, as his financial circumstances would allow, added to his holdings 
until they now amount to two hundred and forty-five acres, which he utilizes for 
general farming and the raising of graded stock. His first venture in the latter 
industry' was with hogs, which he sold in Council r.luffs, Iowa, then the nearest 
market. During his spare time he worked at his trade and helped to construct 
the first store of H. C. Laub, for wliom lie clerked at odd times. He saw the 
ground broken for the first railroad into Denison and has been an eye witness 
to almost all the improvements that have been made in Crawford county during 
the past forty-seven years. 




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HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 13 

Mr. Pett was married in Birming-ham, England, in 1846, to Miss Mary Anne 
Ingraham, of Oxfordshire, England, and they became the parents of eleven 
children, of whom ten survive: Mary Anne, who is the wife of Fred M. 
Shaw and lives in Osborn county, Kansas ; William, who resides in Shelby 
county, Iowa; Oliver J., at home; John M., of Union township, Crawford 
county; Jane, deceased; Samuel R. and Fanny L., at home; Ellen N., who be- 
came the wife of David P. Young and lives in Johnson county, Missouri ; George 
A., of Dunlap, Iowa; Fred A., at home; and Serena, who married George H. 
Young and makes her home in Houghton, South Dakota. Mrs. Pett died in 
this county, July 11, 1892, but was buried in Galland Grove, Shelby county. 

In politics Mr. Pett is a stanch democrat and has always taken an active 
interest in the welfare of his party as well as the public affairs of his com- 
munity. He held the office of assessor for one term, has been township trustee 
for twenty years and for a number of years has held a position on the school 
board. While his family on the other side of the water hold membership in 
the Church of England, his religious views coincide with those of the Latter 
Day Saints and he has been an elder in this church since 1863. His family are 
also members of the same congregation. Having passed the eighty-seventh 
milestone on his life's journey, he looks back upon a record of industry and 
usefulness, of years well spent in fulfilling every duty to his family and to his 
fellowmen, and he is today enjoying the peace and contentment of an honored 
old age in the midst of his family and among his many friends, who accord him 
their highest esteem. 



LOREN CORNWELL. 



The financial interests of Denison and this part of the state find a worthy 
representative in Loren Comwell, president of the Crawford County State 
Bank. In the management of this institution he displays sound judgment and 
enterprising spirit and in the control of other business interests he also has 
proven his ability and progressiveness. 

He was born in Fulton county, New York, February 10, 1838, and has 
therefore passed the seventy-third milestone on life's journey. His parents 
were Timothy and Elizabeth (Kenyon) Cornwell, natives of Connecticut and 
Rhode Island respectively. The father was a son of Ashbel Cornwell, who was 
born in the Charter Oak state and followed the occupation of farming. He 
lived at that period when an old time courtesy prevailed and when men bore 
the picturesque dress of velvet coat, knee breeches, silk stockings and buckled 
shoes. When the call to arms sounded and America attempted to throw off 
the British oppression, he became a soldier of the Revolutionary war, partici- 
pating in the battle of Bunker Hill, and aided in the attainment of liberty. 
Both he and his wife, who bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Gaylord, lived to 
very old age and reared a family of six children, including Enoch, Ashbel, 
Titus, Timothy, a daughter and another child who died in infancy. The mater- 
nal grandfather of Loren Cornwell was Barnabas Kenyon, who was born in 



14 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Rhode Island and also made farming his life work. He married a Miss Clark 
and both reached old age. Their family numbered two sons and two daugh- 
ters, Asa, Randall, Elizabeth and Susan. 

Timothy Cornwell, father of Loren Comwell, engaged in tanning through- 
out his entire life, having a tannery at Uroad Albin, in Fulton county. New 
York, where he died in 1871 at the age of eighty years. His wife survived him 
and passed away in 1877 at the age of eigiity-three years. They were both 
earnest. Christian people, holding membership in the Presbyterian church. Their 
family numbered three sons and two daughters, of whom two lived to maturity, 
Ashbel, who died in 1888, and Loren. The others, Richard, Sarah and Lucy, 
died in childhood. 

Loren Comwell was reared to manhood in Fulton county. New York, and 
through the period of his youth worked in his father's tannery and also attended 
the village school. After completing his education, his entire time was given to 
assisting his father until he attained the age of twenty years, when in 1858, with 
his brother Ashbel, he came west to Iowa, settling in Butler county. His brother 
engaged in the hotel business, while Loren Cornwell turned his attention to mer- 
chandising. Ten years later, in 1868, they came to Denison and built a ilour- 
ing mill on the Boyer river about a mile and a half southwest of the town, 
operating it for five years. On the expiration of that period Loren Cornwell 
was elected county treasurer and took up his abode in Denison, occupying the 
ofiice through reelection for ten consecutive years, his record being one of which 
he has every reason to be proud. He discharged his duties with promptness, 
fidelity and capability, and his fellow townsmen gave indication of their faith 
and confidence in him by reelecting him. After his retirement from office he 
divided his time between farming and banking. He was associated with Leslie 
M. Shaw, J. P. Conner and J. P. Miller in organizing the Crawford County 
State Bank in May, 1884, with a capital stock of fifty thousand dollars, which 
has since been raised to one hundred thousand dollars. In 1886 Mr. Cornwell 
was chosen president of the bank and has since been at the head of this institu- 
tion which is conducted along safe and conservative lines, commending it to the 
confidence and support of the public. In addition to banking he improved six 
or seven hundred acres of land which he has since sold. In this way, however, 
he contributed largely to the agricultural development of the county. In 1880 
he built a beautiful residence in Denison which he occupies through the greater 
part of the year, although spending the winter months in California. 

On the 24th of November, 1881, Mr. Cornwell was united in marriage to 
Miss Lydia J. Dennis, who was born in Fulton county. New York, a daughter 
of Eli and Mary Ann (Kennedy) Dennis, the former a native of Rhode Island 
and the latter of the Empire state. Mr. Dennis was a son of Joseph D., who 
was also born in Rhode Island and was of English descent. He was the owner 
of mills of different kinds and was well known in his locality. He married 
Lydia Hart. His father was Thomas Dennis, a soldier of the Revolutionary 
war. The maternal grandfather of Mrs. Cornwell was Robert Kennedy, a na- 
tive of the Empire state who married Jane Palmerton. Their daughter, Mary 
Ann. became the wife of , Eli Dennis and unto them were born three daughters; 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY . 15 

Mrs. Cornwell; Martha A., now the deceased wife of Zalmon Gilbert; and 
Mary, the wife of Herbert Drake, of Gloversville, New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cornwell are members of the Congregational church, and Mrs. 
Cornwell is connected with the Daughters of the American Revolution. Mr. 
Cornwell holds membership with Sylvester Lodge, No. 505, A. F. & A. M., and 
gives his political support to the republican party. He was originally a demo- 
crat for many years and upon that ticket was elected county treasurer in a 
strongly republican county. His views upon the money question, however, led 
him to give his support to the republican party in 1896, and he has since voted 
with that organization. He is classed today with the prominent and repre- 
sentative men of his part of the state. His energies have been so directed that 
he has not only won individual success but has also contributed to the prosperity 
of the community. In matters of citizenship he holds to high ideals and gives 
his support wherever he believes practical methods will obtain desired results. 
In business affairs he has sustained an unassailable reputation for integrity 
as well as enterprise and at all times has employed constructive rather than de- 
structive methods, his labors constituting an important factor of the sum total 
of progress and successful accomplishment in Crawford county. 



NICOLAUS LAFRENTZ. 

Nicolaus Lafrentz, who Hved retired in Denison for the last thirteen years 
of his life and died February 11, 191 1, was long and successfully identified 
with agricultural pursuits and continued to own ten hundred and twenty acres 
of highly improved land in Crawford county. His birth occurred in Germany 
on the 17th of May, 1835, his parents being Jacob and Anna Lafrentz, who 
spent their entire lives in that country. Their children were five in number, 
namely: Anna, the widow of Henry Freese, of Crawford county, Iowa; Hans, 
who resided with our subject; Nicolaus, of this review; and two who have passed 
away. 

Nicolaus Lafrentz spent the first twenty-two years of his life in the father- 
land and there received his education. In 1857, having determined to establish 
his home on this side the Atlantic, he emigrated to the United States, first locat- 
ing in Scott county, Iowa, where he worked on a farm for about two years. On 
the expiration of that period he went to Jackson county, Iowa, there residing 
until 1869, when he came to Crawford county. He purchased a farm here and 
began its cultivation and improvement, being successfully engaged in its opera- 
tion until he put aside the active work of the fields in 1898. In connection with 
the tilling of the soil he made a specialty of raising and feeding stock, which 
branch of his business added materially to his annual income. For thirteen 
years he lived in honorable retirement at Denison, where he owned a handsome 
residence. During his active business career he accumulated ten hundred and 
twenty acres of valuable land in this county, all of which is still in possession 
of the family. 



16 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Mr. Lafrentz was married twice. In i860 he wedded IMiss Amanda Fulton, 
a native of Ohio, by whom he liad si.x children, namely: Jacob, who is a resi- 
dent of Montana; Henry, living in Crawford county; James, who makes his 
home in Salt Lake City; Anna, tlie wife of Ingwert Hollander, of Crawford 
county; Daniel, who is a resident of Montana; and Etta, who is the wife of 
William Di.xon and also resides in Montana. The mother passed away in 1880 
and the following year Mr. Lafrentz was again married, his second union being 
with ;Miss Dora Moller, a native of Germany. Unto them were born five chil- 
dren, as follows : Christ. John, Albert, Max and Sarah. 

In politics Mr. Lafrentz was a republican and his fellow townsmen, recog- 
nizing his worth and ability, called him to several. positions of public trust. He 
held the offices of trustee, assessor, justice of the peace and school director, dis- 
charging his duties in these various connections in a most prompt and capable 
manner. Fraternally he was identified with the Masons, belonging to Lodge No. 
518 at Denison, while both he and his wife were consistent and devoted mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church. ^Ir. Lafrentz never regretted his determination 
to come to the new world, for here he found the opportunities which he sought 
and through their wise utilization won a place among the wealthy and respected 
citizens of his community. The period of his residence in Crawford county 
covered more than four decades and he enjoyed a wide and favorable acquaint- 
ance within its borders. 



LOUIE EVERS. 



The records of Crawford county show that, on the whole, the offices have 
been filled by men of ability, faithful to the trusts reposed in them. As county 
treasurer Louie Evers has given proof of his public-spirited citizenship. He 
has discharged his duties with ability, promptness and fairness and to his fel- 
low citizens is known as an honest, honorable man. 

One of Iowa's native sons, Mr. Evers was born in Clinton. December 29, 
1874, and is of German lineage. His paternal grandfather. John Evers, was 
born in Germany but spent the last twenty-eight years of his life in Denison, 
where he passed away in 1902, at the age of seventy-four. Unto him and his 
wife were born three daughters and two sons, Louie, Charles, Susannah. Eliza- 
beth and Emma. Of these Oiarles Evers became the father of him whose name 
introduces this review. A native of Germany, Qiarles Evers was there married 
to a daughter of John Bendixen. who was a German farmer and on coming to 
the United States about 1874 settled in Crawford county, Iowa, where he passed 
awav in 1895. at an advanced age. His wife was more than seventy years of 
age at the time of her death. They had a large family, which included Will- 
iam. Fred. Peter, Asmus, Henry, Doris, Elizabeth and others. 

On crossing the Atlantic to America Charles Evers and his wife became 
early settlers of Clinton. Iowa, where he followed carpentering and contracting. 
In 1874 they removed to Denison. where Mrs. Evers passed away in 1880. Later 
the father married again, his second union being with Mary Petersen, and unto 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 17 

them were born five sons, of whom three are now hving, WilHam, John and 
Carl. By the first marriage there were four children, of whom but two are liv- 
ing, Louie and August, the latter a resident of Superior, Wyoming. The father 
continued a resident of Denison until July, 1910, when he removed to Green 
River, Wyoming, where all of his sons with the exception of Louie had preceded 
him and are now engaged in the lumber and contracting business. 

Louie Evers was only three months old when brought by his parents to 
Denison and here he has since lived. At the usual age he entered the public 
schools and later became a student in Denison College. After putting aside his 
text-books he began learning the carpenter's trade and eventually began con- 
tracting on his own account, following that business until 1903, when he was 
appointed deputy county recorder for a term of two years. On his retirement 
from office he was given charge of the hardware department of the Balle-Brod- 
ersen Company and occupied that position for two years, after which he was 
elected county treasurer in 1906 and is still filling the position. 

On the 8th of January, 1901, Mr. Evers was united in marriage to Miss Ida 
Lorenzen, a daughter of A. B. and Hannah (Christiansen) Lorenzen. Mrs. 
Evers was born in Crawford county, Iowa, but her parents were natives of Ger- 
many. They came to this county, however, at an early day and are now resi- 
dents of Denison. They had several children, of whom five are now living, 
namely, Anna, Ida, Lorenz, Adalina and Andrew. The marriage of Mr. and 
Mrs. Evers has been blessed with three children, Lorenz, Dorothy and Louie. 

The parents are Lutherans in religious faith, and Mr. Evers holds member- 
ship with the Knights of Pythias. Politically he is a democrat and closely 
studies the questions and issues of the day, so that he is able to support his 
position by intelligent argument. He is proving a competent official, manifest- 
ing the utmost loyalty in office. 



THOMAS NIELSEN. 



Thomas Nielsen, a popular hotel proprietor of Denison, owns one of the 
best equipped hostelries west of Des Moines. His birth occurred in Denmark 
on the I2tli of March, 1857, his parents being Niels and Mattie (Clausen) 
Thomsen, who spent their entire lives in that country. They had a family of 
five children, of whom our subject is the only survivor. 

Thomas Nielsen was reared to manhood in Denmark and obtained his educa- 
tion in the schools of that country. He has continually broadened his knowl- 
edge by reading, experience and observation and is now able to speak fluently 
in three languages: Danish, German and English. When twenty-five years of 
age he bade adieu to his native land and crossed the Atlantic to the United 
States, wishing to test the truth of the many favorable reports which had 
reached him concerning the advantages and opportunities to be enjoyed in the 
new world. After landing on American shores he came direct to Denison, 
Crawford county, Iowa, and secured employment as a farm hand, working thus 
for a year. He then became a clerk in the store of G. P. Miller & Company, 



18 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

remaining in the employ of that concern for twelve years. On the expiration 
of that period he embarked in business as a hotel proprietor of Denison, where 
he has remained continuously since, conducting an up-to-date establishment 
which has been well patronized. He now owns the hotel building, which is a 
three-story brick structure containing over fifty rooms and which the citizens of 
Denison erected at a cost of sixty-five thousand dollars. Coming to this coun- 
tr>' empty handed, he has since worked his way steadily upward to a position of 
considerable prominence and prosperity and may therefore well claim the proud 
American title of a self-made man. 

While still a resident of Denmark Mr. Nielsen was joined in wedlock to 
Miss Mary Chrestensin, who was born in that country in 1857. Her father 
emigrated to the United States in 1885 and both he and his wife are now living 
in Denison. Mr. and Mrs. Nielsen are the parents of six children, as follows : 
Ever, who is a resident of Montana; Maurice C, at home; .Mattie, the wife of 
R. B. Smith, of Denison ; and T. W., Albert and Emma, who are likewise still 
under the parental roof. 

Mr. Nielsen is a stanch republican in politics but has never sought office as 
a reward for his party fealty. His religious faith is indicated by his member- 
ship in the Lutheran church, to which his wife also belongs. His life has ever 
measured up to a high standard of manhood and honorable purpose and the 
years have brought him a circle of friends almost coextensive with the circle of 
his acquaintances. 



DAVID WALTERS. 



David Walters, the owner of a fine farm of one hundred and twenty acres 
m Paradise township, has continuously resided thereon for the past three dec- 
ades. His birth occurred in Wales on the 23d of April. 1841. his parents being 
John and Elizabeth (Richards) Walters, who were born, reared and married 
in that country. In 1853 the father brought his family to the United States, 
locating m Danville, Pennsylvania, where he made his home until i860 In 
that year he removed to Fallbrook, Pennsylvania, and there resided until 1865 
when he went to Brookville, Ohio, where he spent the remainder of his life' 
passing away in 1887. He was a coal miner in his native land and during his 
residence in America also worked as a coal and ore miner. The demise of his 
wife occurred in Crawford county, Iowa, in 1891. Tlicir cliildren were seven 
in number, namely: David, of this review; Margaret, the wife of Alex Allen 
of Oliver Springs. Tennessee; Thomas, who is a resident of Florence. Colorado' 
Samuel, living in New Castle, Colorado; John, of Palmer, Nebraska; and Tames' 
and William, who are deceased. 

David Walters had no opportunity to acquire an education in early life In 
the mines of Wales a miner could not always get as many cars as he' could fill 
and when our subject was five years old he went with his father to the mines' 
to claim his share of cars. At the age of seven he began to use the pick and 
when a lad of eight could claim a half turn of cars. When twelve years of age 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 19 

he took a job of driving mules in the mines, being thus employed until his emi- 
gration to the new world. Here he took charge of a stationary engine at Dan- 
ville, Pennsylvania, hoisting iron ore, which position he held for about four 
years. On the expiration of that period he returned to mining and was thus 
busily employed until 1881, when he came to Iowa, locating on the farm in 
Paradise township, Crawford county, which has remained his place of abode 
continuously since. The property comprises one hundred and twenty acres of 
rich and productive land and has been well improved in every particular. Mr. 
Walters' undertakings as an agriculturist have been attended with a gratifying 
measure of success and he has long been numbered among the substantial and 
esteemed citizens of the community. 

In 1880 Mr. Walters was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Morgans, a 
native of Wales and a daughter of John and Hannah (Davis) Morgans, who 
were likewise born in that country. They crossed the Atlantic to the United 
States in 1872, locating in Brookville, Ohio. Airs. Morgans died in 1878, while 
Mr. Morgans was called to his final rest in 1889, passing away in Reynoldsville, 
Pennsylvania. The latter was a coal miner and the father of three children, as 
follows: Mrs. Walters; John, who died in 1878; and Thomas, who is a resident 
of Franklin, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Walters are the parents of four chil- 
dren, namely: Anna, the wife of Carl Nicholson, of Bloomfield, Nebraska; and 
David J., William T. and Bessie, all yet at home. 

Mr. Walters gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has 
held the offce of school director. His religious faith is indicated by his mem- 
bership in the Baptist church, to which his wife and children also belong. He 
was formerly connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His life 
has been one of industry and his unfaltering labor and intelligent management 
of his business affairs have brought him substantial and well merited prosperity. 
Moreover his personal qualities insure him the high regard and esteem of all 
with whom he comes in contact. 



MRS. ELIZABETH L. CRIPPEN. 

Mrs. EHzabeth L. Crippen, one of the well known and esteemed ladies of 
Denison, has made her home here for a third of a century. Her birth occurred 
in Racine county, Wisconsin, on the 27th of October, 1843, her parents being 
Rufus and Hannah M. (Webber) Watterman, both of whom were natives of 
Massachusetts. They removed to the state of Wisconsin in the '30s and there 
spent the remainder of their lives. They reared a family of six children, four 
of whom still survive. 

It was in Wisconsin that Elizabeth L. Watterman gave her hand in mar- 
riage to Alonzo Carpenter, a native of New York, who took up his abode in 
the Badger state at an early day. In 1878 they came to Crawford county, Iowa, 
locating in Denison, where Mr. Carpenter was employed as bookkeeper by a 
lumber concern. Their union was blessed with one son, Harry A. Carpenter. 
Alonzo Carpenter died in 1885 and his remains were interred in the Denison 



20 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

cemetery. In 1888 Mrs. Carpenter became the wife of Harrison Crippen, like- 
wise a native of the Empire state, who was one of the early settlers of Crawford 
county. He became quite an extensive landowner here and when he passed 
away in 1897 the community mourned the loss of one of its most jjrosperous 
and respected citizens. 

Airs. Crippen is connected with Eastern Star Lodge, Xo. 207, at Denison, of 
which she is serving as treasurer. She is also a consistent and valued member 
of the llaptist church, taking an active and helpful part in its work. Mrs. 
Crippen still owns two line residence properties in the city of Denison and that 
she has ever displayed attractive personal qualities is indicated by the fact that 
she enjoys the warm friendship and rei^ard of all who know her. 



EDWIN DARLING, M. D. 

Dr. Edwin Darling is the oldest practicing physician of Crawford county, 
having been identified with the medical fraternity here for more than four 
decades. His birth occurred in Franklin county, \'ermont, on the 18th of March, 
1838, his parents being Benjamin Franklin and Cynthia (Blake) Darling, who 
were likewise natives of the Green Mountain state. Coming to Iowa in 1848, 
they purchased and located on a farm in Jackson county, where they spent the 
remainder of their lives. Their children were five in number, namely: Edwin, 
of this review^; Emily, who is deceased; Viola, the wife of George Leslie, of 
Oklahoma; Jeanette, who is the wife of George L. Wright and now' resides in 
Denver, Colorado; and Edson, who has also passed away. 

Edwin Darling began earnmg his own livelihood at the early age of four- 
teen years, securing employment as clerk in a drug store at Maquoketa, Iowa, 
where he remained until the outbreak of the Civil war. In 1861 he offered his 
services in defense of the Union, joining the Ninth Iowa Infantry and remain- 
ing with that command until the ist of August, 1865. He participated in the 
battles of Pea Ridge, Arkansas Post, Vicksburg, Lookout Mountain, Atlanta, 
Georgia, and several other hotly contested engagements and also went with 
Sherman to the sea. During the entire period of his connection with the army 
he acted as hospital steward and fortunately escaped injury of any kind. He 
was mustered out at Clinton in 1865 and then returned to Jackson county, where 
he again entered the drug store in whicli he had been formerly employed. Hav- 
ing determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work, he pursued a 
course of study in tlie medical college at Cincinnati, Ohio, and was graduated 
from that institution in 1867. He first followed his profession at Maquoketa, 
Iowa, for tW'O years and in March, 1870, came to Crawford county, locating 
for practice in Deloit, where he remained for seven years. On the expiration 
of that period he came to Vail and has here since enjoyed an extensive and 
lucrative practice. That his diagnosis is correct and careful, his judgment 
sound and his application of remedial agencies efifective is shown in the ex- 
cellent results which have attended his efiforts. He is now the oldest practicing 
physician in Crawford county and has kept in close touch with the onward 




DR. AND :\IRS. EDWIX DARLING 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 23 

march of the profession, continually broadening his knowledge and promoting 
his efficiency by reading and investigation. 

In 1867 Dr. Darling was united in marriage to Miss Adaline Stevens, who 
was born in Ohio on the 19th of November, 1848, her parents being John and 
Mary Jane Stevens. They are both deceased, the mother passing away April 
7, 191 1, at the age of eighty-eight years, at the home of our subject. They 
reared a family of six children. 

In politics Dr. Darling is a republican and his fellow townsmen, recognizing 
his worth and ability, have called him to several positions of public trust. He 
has held both town and township offices and acted as mayor of Vail for sev- 
eral terms, while during President Harrison's administration he served as post- 
master. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Lodge No. 
422, which he helped to organize and in which he has filled all of the chairs. 
He is likewise a member of Chapter No. 89 at Dunlap and also belongs to the 
Eastern Star. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, with which his wife is also affiliated. His life in all of 
its phases has commanded the respect and confidence of his fellowmen and he 
now ranks high among the prominent and valued citizens of Vail and Craw- 
ford county. 



HON. HENRY C. LAUB. 

In every community there are found a few" citizens who are ever the lead- 
ing spirits in promoting the upbuilding of the vicinity and molding its public 
policy. They are its real founders, and their 'enterprise constitutes the moving 
force in all that is accomplished there. Such a man in Crawford county was 
Hon. Henry C Laub. No history of this part of the state would be complete 
without extended mention of him and his life work, which constitutes so im- 
portant a factor in the annals of the county. 

His birth occurred in Little York, Pennsylvania, April 18, 1824, his parents 
being William and Catharine (Snyder) Laub. The father was born in Reading, 
Pennsylvania, and was of sturdy Pennsylvania Dutch stock. For many years 
he figured as a leading citizen of Gettysburg and held a number of clerical po- 
sitions in connection with the county offices there, while later he was chosen 
by popular suffrage to the office of county treasurer. He had a brother Henry 
who served as a soldier of the war of 181 2. The death of William Laub oc- 
curred in Gettysburg, when he was sixty-five years of age. His wife, who was 
born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and was of German-Irish origin, came to Iowa 
after the death of her husband and spent her last days in Denison, her death 
occurring when she had reached the age of seventy-six. Mr. and Mrs. William 
Laub were the parents of nine children, as follows : Henry C, Louisa, Catha- 
rine, William B., Julia, Mary, John, Charles and George. 

Henry C. Laub spent his early youth in Gettysburg and at the age of twelve 
years began to provide for his own support as a farm hand working in that way 
for four years and two months. The spirit of adventure, however called him 

Vol. 11— 2 



24 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

elsewhere, and lie ran away to Frederick county, Maryland, where he secured 
a situation and remained until eighteen years of age. He then returned to 
Gettysburg and spent a few months in school. This was the only educational 
training he received and yet he became a well informed man. reading and ex- 
perience bringing him constantly broadening knowledge, until there were few 
subjects of importance that could be touched upon that he could not intelligently 
and entertainingly discuss. He remained throughout life a close student in the 
school of alTairs, and his receptive mind and retentive memory gave him an in- 
tellectual grasp that few college students have equaled. While he was still in 
his teens he began learning the shoemaker's trade, which he followed for four 
years, using his leisure hours in reading and study so that at the end of that time 
he was qualified for teaching and followed tiie profession for four years. 

The west, with its wider opportunities, attracted him, and hoping to make 
more rapid progress in the business world in this section of the country, he 
came to Iowa in November, 1851, making his way to Muscatine, where on the 
day of his arrival he was engaged to teach school. For two years he was iden- 
tified with the educational interests of the city, after which he went to Cedar 
Rapids and turned his attention to merchandising, opening a general store. 
Subsequently he removed to Scotch Grove, about eight miles from Cedar Rap- 
ids and began the cuhivation of an eighty acre farm. He afterward spent a 
year and a half in agricultural pursuits in Benton county and in 1855 arrived at 
Mason's Grove, Crawford county, where he resided for two years. It was his 
intention to continue farming, and he purchased a tract of land near Deloit but 
he soon recognized the need of mercantile enterprises and opened a little store 
in that village. About that time J. W. Denison, in the interest of the Provident 
Western Land Company, was endeavoring to found a town in the Boyer valley 
in the center of Crawford county. He attempted to estabHsh a store but the 
men he employed proved incapable or dishonest. Mr. Laub had about decided 
to build a store at Marshall's Grove about a mile northeast of Denison but Mr. 
Denison dissuaded him from that purpose and traded the stock of merchandise 
which he had for Mr. Laub's land. Thus Denison secured her pioneer mer- 
chant, who for so many years was closely associated, not only with the business 
development of the county seat, but also with its progress and improvement 
along many other lines. Locating here in 1857, he erected a store building, 
twelve by eighteen feet, and goods which he purchased in Chicago were hauled 
overland by ox teams. Selling his goods on credit, the following spring found 
him with a greatly depleted stock and very little money, for the country was 
new and the early settlers had no cash with which to pay for their merchandise. 
However, he pushed on toward the goal of success and erected a store at West 
Side and another at Dunlap, admitting others to partnership in the venture. 
He soon found himself, however, seventy-eight thousand dollars in debt and 
resolved that thereafter he would manage the business alone. He went to Chi- 
cago, borrowed ten thousand dollars as a working capital and bent every energy 
toward the upbuilding of the business with the result that within three years he 
had paid off not only the indebtedness of seventy-eight thousand dollars but 
had also a substantial little capital remaining. He was never discouraged in the 
face of difficulties but with optimistic spirit continued his labors and won the 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 25 

substantial prosperity that ultimately crowns earnest effort, intelligently di- 
rected. For years Mr. Laub was a merchant prince of western Iowa. Denison 
was his central place of business, but through partnerships he extended his in- 
terests in every direction. He erected buildings, purchased stock and became 
the owner of thirty-two different stores, including those located at CarroUton, 
West Side, Smithland, Harlan, Dunlap, Butler's Mill, Correctionville and St. 
Johns. 

Mr. Laub's business career was a notably successful one, and none have 
more fully deserved the proud and honorable title of a self-made man, for he 
started out in life on his own account at the age of twelve years and from 
that time until his death was dependent entirely upon his own resources. He 
had a remarkable experience and a successful career. He always trusted the 
people and won the high regard of all with whom' he came in contact. Mer- 
chandising, however, was but one phase of this busy man's career. He gave 
substantial evidence of his faith in Denison in replacing his little frame store 
building by a stone and cement structure on Main street, which was the first 
substantial business house of the city. This was later succeeded by the Laub 
block, erected in 1871. He was also the contractor who built the present city 
hall and he erected the McKim Hall and extended the Laub block on Broad- 
way. He built fully forty residences in the city and at one time was the largest 
property owner in Denison. As a landlord he was never oppressive, always 
kept his buildings in good condition and it was seldom that he lost through the 
failure of a tenant to pay, for all appreciated his consideration and his kindness. 
He possessed, too, a mechanical genius of superior order and invented a car 
coupling device. While engaged with many and varied business interests and 
activities, he never neglected his duties of citizenship and cooperated in every 
movement for the general good. In pioneer times he served as sheriff of Craw- 
ford county, summoned the first jury that ever sat in the county court and in 
later years found pleasure in relating the fact that he had to walk clear to the 
south edge of the county to serve some of the summons. He was the first 
county surveyor and for twelve years filled the office of superintendent of 
schools. He also built the first schoolhouse in Denison, now used by the Luth- 
eran parochial school, and he took the contract for the erection of the court- 
house and the west brick school. He built the first oven and burned the first 
brick made in Denison, and when the Northwestern Railroad Company was 
extending its line westward, Mr. Laub contracted to haul the poles and erect 
the first telegraph line that connected Boone and Council Bluffs. He seemed to 
understand the great value of any enterprise and whenever he believed that 
such a project would prove of benefit he gave in its support freely and gen- 
rously. Later in his life he met with some financial reverses, but these did not 
affect him greatly, save as they lessened his power to give. Few men have ever 
been more generous or responded more cheerfully when aid was needed. "Giv- 
ing was almost a passion with him ; it was always a pleasure and not a task," 
said one of the local papers. "No man had to urge him to do his duty; he al- 
ways did it and a little more." 

On the 7th of February, 1848, in Frederick, Maryland, Mr. Laub was united 
in marriage to Miss Lydia Baer, a daughter of Jacob and Matilda Baer, who 



26 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

were farming people and were of German descent. Mrs. Laub was born in 
Frederick county. Maryland, and by her marriage became the mother of eight 
chililren. Alice, the eldest, became the wife of James Ainsworth, editor of the 
Denison Review, and they had one son, Claude. Mary, the second daughter, is 
the wife of J. B. Romans, and has four children: Dolly, lone, Junia and Harry. 
William, a liveryman of Denison, married Edna Goodspeed and has three chil- 
dren, William, Hazel and Harold. Catherine is the wife of Thomas Perkins, 
of Seattle, Washington. Eli, living in Sioux City, Iowa, married Grace Gil- 
more and has three daughters. Anna Elizabeth became the wife of George 
Bartholomew, a banker, who died leaving a daughter, Belle, and since his death 
Mrs. Bartholomew has engaged in the practice of medicine, being now located 
in Evanston, Illinois. Belle, the seventh member of the Laub family, died at 
the age of twenty years. Lilly is the wife of Carl F. Kuehnle, vice president 
of the Bank of Denison, and president of the Bank of Manilla, Iowa, and they 
have two children, Lydia Belle and Carl F. Kuehnle. Mrs. Lydia Laub died in 
1896, at the age of seventy-two years. She was a member of the Methodist 
church and a most earnest and active worker in the Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union. On the nth of January, 1898, Mr. Laub was again married, 
his second union being with I\Iiss Mary E. Snouffer, a daughter of Henry and 
Sarah (Baer) Snouffer. There is one child of this marriage, Henry Clay Laub. 

]\Ir. Laub was a member of the Methodist church, to which his widow 
also belongs. For seventy-six years he was identified with that denomination, 
and his entire life was the exposition of his faith in the Christian religion. If 
he made mistakes — and what man does not — they were of the head and not of 
the heart. It is impossible for a man to successfully conduct so many and 
vaiied business enterprises as Mr. Laub did and not awaken enmity and oppo- 
sition, and a person with such positive, aggressive force as Mr. Laub could not 
hope to avoid this, and yet he perhaps had a hundred friends to one enemy, and 
the consensus of public opinion places his name high on the roll of the pro- 
gressive citizens and honorable and upright men. His word carried weight in 
political circles and his support was given to the whig party until its dissolution, 
after which he joined the ranks of the republican party. He was influential in 
its councils and frequently served as a delegate to the state conventions. That 
his mind reached out broadly in the world is indicated by the large and elegant 
library, which is one of the chief features of his beautiful home in Denison. 

While every class of citizen mourns the death of Mr. Laub. his demise is 
perhaps most deeply regretted, outside of the circle of his family and closest 
friends, by the poor, for to them he was ever a friend, ready to extend a help- 
ing hand at all times. One who knew him well wrote: "His acts of charity were 
manifold. His accomplishments were large. He was effective, dynamic, con- 
trolling, powerful. He succeeded in more different fields of activity than any 
other man western Iowa has known. He was lovable. He made warm friends 
and held them throughout life. He was kindly and considerate. He was a good 
judge of human nature and he liked to speak kindly of his fellows. Not long 
ago it was the writer's privilege to interview him as to the early history of the 
county and it was a real pleasure to find how eager he was to give credit to 
others and to tell of their achievements rather than his own." 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 27 

An accident a few years prior to his death, resulting in a broken hip, com- 
pelled him to use crutches throughout the remainder of his life but in this as 
on every other occasion where an incident might have served to discourage or 
dishearten him, he called all his latent resources to meet the situation, never 
ceased to be a regular attendant at church and was to the last a familiar figure 
on the streets of his city. He was a man of commanding presence and has been 
described as tall, big boned, well built, straight as an Indian, lithe, quick mo- 
tioned, strong. His features showed lines of strength and character, his eye 
was keen and piercing, but with quick flashes of humor and of kindliness. He 
went clean shaven all through his life, and it was partially owing to this fact 
that so little change was noticed in him from time to time. In fact, he looked 
what he was, a sturdy, active, virile, capable, kind-hearted man. He might well 
be termed the Grand Old Man of Crawford county. His record is an exposi- 
tion of the words of Lincoln, "There is something better than making a living — 
making a life." Moreover, it is not from the few conspicuous deeds of life 
that the blessings chief y come which make the world better, sweeter, happier; 
but from the countless, lowly ministries of the everyday s, the little faithful- 
nesses that fill long years. There were many of these "little ministries" in the 
life of Mr. Laub, who seemed to neglect no opportunity of doing good to 
others, of speaking an encouraging word, or extending a helping hand. His 
life was an inspiration, and his memory will long remain as a benediction to 
those who knew him. 



BERNHARDT J. SIBBERT. 

Bernhardt J. Sibbert, an enterprising business man, alive to the opportunities 
of the present day, is now manager and one of the leading stockholders of the 
J. B. Romans Company, dealers in hardware, agricultural implements and auto- 
mobiles at Denison. He was born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, on the 13th 
of June, 1869, and is a son of Henry and Elsie (Harson) Sibbert, who were 
likewise natives of that country. His grandfather, Bernhardt Sibbert, was a 
lifelong farmer of Germany, where both he and his wife lived to old age. The 
maternal grandfather, Henry Harson, was also an agriculturist. Unto him and 
his wife were born several children, including Harold, Johannas, Elizabeth, 
Mary and Elsie. 

Henry Sibbert devoted the greater part of his youth to study, made con- 
tinuous and gratifying advance in the field of intellectual development and af- 
terward successfully engaged in teaching for many years. He died in Germany 
in 1908 at the age of seventy-two years, while his wife passed away about 1880. 
Both were of the Lutheran faith, closely adhering to the teachings of that 
church. Their family numbered six children, four sons and two daughters, 
namely : Anton, in the government employ in Germany ; Bernhardt J., of this 
review ; Johannas H., of Denison ; Ernest F., also of Denison ; Helena, the 
widow of E. Hansen ; and Mary, who married Herman Luth and, like her sister 
Helena, is a resident of Germany. 



28 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Bernhardt J. Sibbert, of this review, acquired his education in Germany 
where he remained until sixteen years of age. The spirit of adventure and the 
desire for broader opportunities led him to come to America in 1885 and, settling 
in Denison, Iowa, he entered the employ of J. B. Romans as a clerk. That he 
was loyal to the interests of his employer and faithful in the discharge of his 
duties was indicated by his admission to a partnership in 1900. As the years 
passed greater responsibilities were intrusted to him and since the retirement of 
Mr. Romans in January, 1906, the business has been carried on by B. J. Sib- 
bert, E. R. Reimers and E. F. Sibbert. They have a well appointed hardware 
store, together with large automobile and machinery departments. Their sales 
reached an extensive figure annually, and the business, conducted along progres- 
sive lines, is constantly growing. In addition to his mercantile interests Mr. 
Sibbert is manager of the Opera House, and it is his purpose to provide Denison 
with a superior line of attractive entertainments. 

On the 5th of June, 1895, Mr. Sibbert was joined in wedlock to Miss Amanda 
Gronau, a native of Clinton county, Iowa, where her parents, Carl and Mary 
(Heiden) Gronau, settled at an early day on coming to the United States from 
their native land of Germany. Of this marriage there is one son, Carl. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Sibbert are adherents of the Methodist church and take 
an active interest in its work. For fifteen years Mr. Sibbert has been leader 
of the choir, and both he and his wife cooperate in other church activities. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with Sylvan Lodge, No. 507, A. F. & A. M. ; Ark 
Chapter, No. 89, R. A. M.; and Dowdall Lodge, K. P. His study of the po- 
litical questions and issues of the day has led to his stalwart support of the 
republican party. He does not seek nor desire office, however, preferring to 
concentrate his energies and his attention upon his business affairs, and in the 
successful conduct of his commercial interests the city is also a direct bene- 
ficiary. 



HARRY A. CARPENTER. 

Harry A. Carpenter, who has been agent for the American Express Com- 
pany at Denison for the past nine years, was born in this city on the 25th of 
October, 1878, his parents being Alonzo and Elizabeth (Watterman) Carpenter, 
who were natives of New York and Wisconsin respectively. They came to 
Crawford county, Iowa, in 1875, the father being employed as bookkeeper by 
a Denison lumber concern until called to his final rest in 1884. The mother af- 
terward gave her hand in marriage to Harrison Crippen, who has also passed 
away. 

Harry A. Carpenter, who was the only child of his parents, supplemented his 
preliminary education by a high school course. He remained under the parental 
roof until twenty-four years of age, when he was married and established a 
home of his own. Learning the carpenter's trade in early life, he worked at 
that occupation until 1902 and then became agent for the American Express 
Company at Denison, which concern he has since represented here. His fidelity 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 29 

in the discharge of his duties is evidenced in the fact that he has been retained 
in the service of the company for nine years. He was also engaged in the sta- 
tionery business for one year. 

In 1902 Mr. Carpenter was united in marriage to Miss Maud Bryan, a 
daughter of D. F. and Rachel Bryan, who are now residents of Crawford 
county. Mr. Carpenter lost his wife in September of the same year in which 
he had married her. In 1907 he wedded Miss Myrtle Barber, a native of Craw- 
ford county and a daughter of Warren C. and Frances (Watkins) Barber. Her 
father has passed away but her mother still survives, now making her home with 
our subject. 

Mr. Carpenter is a stanch republican in politics but has never sought office 
-as a reward for his party fealty. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons 
and the Knights of Pythias. Both he and his wife have always lived in this 
county and the circle of their friends is a wide one. 



GEORGE SPRECHER. 



George Sprecher, a clerk in the freight department of the Chicago & North- 
western depot at Denison, is one of the well-to-do and enterprising young resi- 
dents of the city. His birth occurred in Denison, Iowa, on the 31st of August, 
1877, his parents being Cyrus and Belle (Deffenbaugh) Sprecher, the former a 
native of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and the latter of Strawsburg, that state. 
•Cyrus Sprecher was a merchant in Chambersburg at the time the rebels burnt 
the town. He came to Denison, Iowa, in 1872 in order to settle the estate of his 
brother Samuel, who was killed in a railroad accident. In 1874 he took up his 
permanent abode here, erected a brick store and subsequently engaged in busi- 
ness as a commission merchant, dealing in live stock, coal, etc. He gave his 
political allegiance to the republican party, served as township trustee for 
eighteen or twenty years and was also a member of the city council. Both he 
and his wife were Lutherans in religious faith but attended the Presbyterian 
church here. Mr. Sprecher was called to his final rest on the 27th of March, 
1906, when seventy-four years of age. The period of his residence in Denison 
covered more than three decades and in his passing the community lost one of 
its most substantial and respected citizens. His widow, who still survives him, 
lias a host of warm friends here. 

George Sprecher, an only child, was reared in Denison and supplemented his 
preliminary education, obtained in the public schools, by a course of study in 
the University of Iowa. After putting aside his text-books he was employed 
I>y the telephone company for a year and then acted as assistant postmaster for 
a period of eleven years. Since January, 1910, he has acted as a freight clerk 
for the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company at Denison, being a most 
valuable and trusted employe. 

On the 15th of June, 1902, Mr. Sprecher was united in marriage to Miss 
Grace Baer, who was born at Point of Rocks, Maryland, her parents being 
Lewis M. and Laura (Fulton) Baer, likewise natives of that state. They took 



30 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

up their abode among the early settlers of Denison, Iowa, and Lewis M. Baer 
served as night watchman of the town for more than twenty years. He passed 
away here in the spring of 1910 but is still survived by his widow. Their chil- 
dren were two in number : William and Grace Mary. 

In politics Mr. Sprecher is a republican, while in religious faith he is a 
Presbyterian. His wife is a member of the Methodist church. In Masonry he 
has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, belonging to Sylvan 
Lodge, No. 507, A. F. & A. M.; Ark Chapter, No. 89, R. A. M., of Dunlap; 
Harlan Commandery, No. 90, K. T. ; Za-ga-zig Temple of the Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine ; and Des Moines Consistory, No. 3, S. P. R. S. He is also 
identified with the Modern Woodmen and the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, belonging to Denison Lodge, No. 626, of the latter fraternity. In the 
town of Denison, where his entire life has been spent, he is widely and favor- 
ably known. 



C. T. MARSHALL. 



In looking over the life history of those who now make Charter Oak their 
home, one cannot but be impressed with the record of C. T. Marshall, who, 
beginning his career with no other capital than good health, boundless energy 
and a firm determination to win his way in the world, has risen to a position 
of iniluence and holds an honored place among the people of his home town. 
Born in Kane county, Illinois, January 3, 1847, he is the son of John and Mar- 
garet (Davis) [Marshall, both of whom were natives of New York state, the 
father's birth taking place February T2, 1806, and the mother being born in 
November, 18 10. They were married in New York state in 1832 and went to 
Illinois in 1843, being among the pioneer settlers of Kane county, where the 
father located on a two hundred acre farm and followed agricultural pursuits 
during the remainder of his life. The mother was always a faithful member 
of the Baptist church. Unto this couple ten children were born, of whom seven 
survive, as follows: Harriet, now Mrs. Joseph Wilson, of Crawford county, 
Iowa; Julia, who married Henry Jobe and lives in Denison, Iowa; Mary, who 
became the wife of H. Sheldon and resides in Colorado; C. T., of this review; 
Albert, a resident of Omaha, Nebraska; Celia, the wife of Daniel Sheldon, a 
retired farmer of Illinois; and Alice, the wife of Horace Nash, living in Iowa. 

C. T. Marshall had all the educational advantages possible in the district 
schools of Kane county until he was fifteen years old and then went to Michi- 
gan, remaining there for three years. On his return to Illinois he located in 
McHenry county, where he spent a few years, and then removed to Sioux City, 
Iowa, in the spring of 1869, but in 1870 he took u]) his residence in Charter Oak 
township, Crawford county. Although lint a poor boy, without money or 
friends, he was ambitious and with indomitable courage, to which was added 
his desire to succeed in some branch of worthy industry, he began his labors 
behind the plow and such was his industry, combined with economy, that he 
w-as able to save enough from his earnings to purchase a one hundred and 




C. T. MARSHALL 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 33 

twenty acre farm on section 14, Charter Oak township. It was wild, rough 
prairie land, but he began at once to break and cultivate it, built a small home 
for himself and shelter for his stock and then started farming on his own be- 
half. His success was assured from the first and from time to time, as his cir- 
cumstances would allow, he added to his holdings until he became the possessor 
of twelve hundred acres of highly improved land in Charter Oak township. He 
subsequently disposed of four hundred acres on section 10, but still retains eight 
hundred acres on different sections in Charter Oak township. While he still 
followed general farming he made a specialty of feeding cattle for the market, 
his disposals amounting to as high as one thousand head per annum. He was 
also interested in hogs and fattened hundreds of them for the market every 
year. In 1909, having decided to retire from active farm life, he purchased a 
home in Charter Oak and there moved his family but still continues to person- 
ally manage his extensive estates as well as to supervise other interests with 
which he is connected. He owns a majority of stock in the Peoples Store at 
Charter Oak and holds the responsible position of president of the Farmers 
Bank in that city. 

Mr. Marshall has been twice married, his first wife having been Miss Dora 
Comstock, of Denison, Iowa, whose parents were natives of New York state, 
born near Albany. As pioneers they moved to Denison in 1856, the father 
buying his first farm from H. C. Laub, who preceded them a few years and 
who died recently. Mr. Comstock engaged" in the milling business and farming 
until his death, which occurred in 1872, his wife dying in 1862. 

The children of this first marriage are as follows : Celia, who married John 
Hart, of Minneapolis, Minnesota; Elgia, now Mrs. Stark, of Charter Oak; 
Harriet, who became the wife of Gus Peters, of Charter Oak; Nellie, who is 
now Mrs. Fitzpatrick and resides in Nevada; Lena who married W. L. Smith, 
of Lane, South Dakota; Jessie Belle and Mabel, with their brothers on the 
farm in Charter Oak township ; Martha, the wife of John Jacobsen, of Charter 
Oak; lona, who is the wife of S. Jones and lives in Charter Oak; C. T., Jr., 
born August 20, 1890; and C. J., born February 19, 1892. The last two are 
living at home. The death of Mrs. Marshall occurred in 1903. 

The second marriage of Mr. Marshall took place May 29, 1905, when he 
was united to Mrs. Judith (Maloney) Mathews, of Denison, a daughter of 
A. D. and Bridget (Shearnan) Maloney, natives of Queens and Longford coun- 
ties, Ireland, respectively, the father having been born February 28, 1819, and 
the mother's birth occurring March 28, 1835. Mr. Maloney emigrated to the 
United States in 1836 and Mrs. Maloney arrived in this country in 1842 when 
but seven years of age. They both located in Lexington, Kentucky, and were 
there married in 1854. He held the position of division superintendent of the 
Lexington & Covington Railroad and continued thus employed until 1861, when 
he removed to Denison, Iowa, and purchased the homestead at present occupied 
by Mrs. Maloney and which is one of the landmarks of the town. Both she 
and her husband were reared in the Roman Catholic faith and in this house 
the first Catholic services were held, as there was at that time no church in 
Denison. For some time after coming to Iowa Mr. Maloney engaged in farm- 
ing and at one time owned several hundred acres of land. His death occurred 



34 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUXTY 

in Uenison in 1888. By her tirst union .Mrs. 2^1arshall became the mother of 
two daughters, namely: Cecil, the wife of j\Ir. Xichols, superintendent of the 
manual training department in a school at South Omaha, Nebraska ; and Marie, 
who is teaching school in Omaha. Mrs. Marshall was born February 28, 1855, 
and has two sisters: Catherine, the widow of D. O. Johnson, of Charter Oak; 
and Mary, who is Mrs. Ed. Phelan and resides in Omaha. 

In his political views Mr. ^Marshall has always been an earnest and con- 
scientious supporter of republican principles and has ever held the interests of 
his party at heart. He has taken an active part in local afifairs, was for several 
years township trustee and for thirty years held the office of township treas- 
urer, a record of which any man may well be proud, attesting, as it does, not 
only his efficiency as a business man, but also the confidence in which he is 
held by the residents of the community in which he resides. As a member of 
the school board for many years he materially assisted in advancing the educa- 
tional facilities in his township. The salient factors in the prosperity of Mr. 
Marshall have been tireless energy and honesty of purpose, combined with 
everyday common sense, and his life record should serve as a source of en- 
couragement and inspiration to others, showing what may be accomplished when 
one has the will to do and the courage to overcome all obstacles that beset life's 
pathway. 



L. LAFAYETTE BOND, M. D. 

Dr. L. Lafayette Bond, a leading physician and surgeon of Denison, has 
practiced his profession in Craw^ford county for the past thirty-six years. His 
birth occurred in Harrison county. West \'irginia, on the 14th of August, 1841, 
his parents being Richard C. and Eliza A. (Grant) Bond, who were likewise 
natives of that state. Abel Bond, the paternal grandfather, was also born in 
\'irginia and came of English descent. He was an agriculturist by occupation 
and served as a major in the Revolutionary war. Unto him and his wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Sarah Powers, were born the following children : 
Polly, Richard C, Levi, Hannah. Thomas, Elnathan, Augustus, Sarah, Samuel 
and Louis. The maternal grandfather of our subject was likewise a native of 
\'irginia and became a slaveholder and planter. 

Richard C Bond, the father of L. Lafayette Bond, w^as a Baptist minister 
of the old school. In 1846 he journeyed westward to Rock county, Wisconsin, 
becoming a pioneer preacher of Lima, that state. He took up a homestead near 
Lima Center in Rock county and subsequently purchased three eighty acre tracts 
of land near what is Milton Junction from Polly Goodrich, one of the earliest 
settlers of the locality. There he spent the remainder of his life, passing away 
on the 20th of January, 1910. when ninety-seven years of age. His wife was 
called to her final rest in 1896 when in the seventy-sixth year of her age. They 
were the parents of four children, two sons and tw^o daughters, as follows: 
Arthur G., who is deceased ; L. Lafayette, of this review ; ]\Iary M.. who is de- 
ceased, as is also her husband. John W. Meyers ; and Louisa, who died in 
infancy. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 35 

L. Lafayette Bond was a little lad of five years when he accompanied his 
parents on their removal to Wisconsin.' They traveled by boat from Wheeling, 
West Virginia, to Galena, Illinois, where they met Abel Bond, the grandfather 
of our subject, who escorted them to his home. Mr. Bond of this review re- 
mained on the farm until twenty-one years of age. He obtained his early edu- 
cation in the district schools and subsequently attended Milton College. At the 
time of the outbreak of the Civil war, in May, 1861, he endeavored to enter 
the Union army but was rejected because he was a minor and did not have the 
consent of his parents. In September, 1861, he enlisted with a number of the 
students of Milton College, joining Company K, Thirteenth Wisconsin Volun- 
teer Infantry, and rendezvousing at Janesville, Wisconsin. With that command 
he remained for three years and three months, holding the rank of sergeant. 
His was the First Brigade of the Fourth Division of the Twentieth Army 
Corps, Army of the Cumberland, under General Thomas. He participated in 
the battles of Clarksville, Tennessee, Fort Donelson and Chickamauga and 
acquitted himself in a highly creditable manner. 

After returning home he pursued a course of study in Bryant & Stratton 
Business College of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, but later determined upon the prac- 
tice of medicine as a life work and entered Rush Medical College of Chicago, 
from which institution he was graduated in 1870. The first five years of his 
professional career were spent at Welton, Iowa, where he also taught school 
during four winter terms in order to add to his income. In 1875 he came to 
Westside, Crawford county, Iowa, and there practiced medicine successfully 
until 1899, which year witnessed his arrival in Denison. Here he has remained 
continuously since, enjoying a lucrative and constantly growing practice. He 
has been surgeon for the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company since 1883 
and is widely recognized as a skilled and able representative of his calling. He 
is a member of the Crawford County Medical Society, the Missouri Valley 
Medical Society, the Iowa State Medical Society, the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, the American Association of Railway Surgeons and the Association of 
the Northwestern Railroad Surgeons, thus keeping in close touch with the ad- 
vancement made by the profession. 

Dr. Bond has been married twice. On the 20th of November, 1868, he 
wedded Miss Elnora E. Hamilton, a native of Alfred Center, New York, and 
a daughter of Edward and Melissa (Burdiek) Hamilton, By that union there 
were two children, namely: Lulu E., who died of diphtheria when nine years of 
age; and Frederic H., an attorney by profession, who was a graduate of the 
law department of the Iowa State University in 1895 and passed away on the 
28th of November, 1908. He had wedded Miss Ada Hawkins, of Fonda, Iowa, 
and at his death left a widow and three children. The demise of Mrs. Elnora 
E. Bond occurred in 1893, when she had attained the age of forty-six years, 
her remains being interred in the Bond family lot at Milton, Wisconsin. For 
his second wife Dr. Bond chose Mrs. Fannie Harrison, the widow of Captain 
William Harrison and a daughter of John Hutson. She passed away in 1906 
in the faith of the Methodist church, of which she had been a valued and de- 
voted member. 



36 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Dr. Bond gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is a most 
loyal and public-spirited citizen, lie served as mayor of West Side for a num- 
ber of years and also acted as president of the West Side school board for some 
years. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Sylvan Lodge, 
No. 507, A. F. & A. AI., and likewise to the Eastern Star. He maintains the 
strictest conformity to the highest professional ethics and enjoys in full measure 
the confidence and respect of his professional brethren as well as of the general 
public. 



GRANT LEROY CASWELL. 

Grant Leroy Caswell, editor of the Denison Bulletin, in which connection 
he is publishing a paper of progressive character, was born in Boone county, 
Iowa, July 18, 1869. His father, Lebeus Addison Caswell, was a native of 
Maine, as was his father, who was also of English descent. The ancestors of 
the family came to America prior to the Revolutionary war, four brothers sail- 
ing from England to the new world, two settling in Maine and two in ?^Iassa- 
chusetts. The grandfather was a farmer and inventor, and his inventive genius 
was displayed in the first corn planter in the United States. He remained a 
resident of the east until his death, which occurred when he had reached an 
advanced age. Among his children were David, Lebeus, Alary and Mrs. Frances 
Oakes. 

L. A. Caswell was reared in the Pine Tree state, acquired his education in 
New England and afterward engaged in the operation of a sawmill. More than 
a half century ago, however, he made his way to the middle west, settling at 
Albert Lea, ^Minnesota, and afterward at Boonesboro, Iowa, where he operated 
a sawmill and engaged in the lumber business. He was a resident of that lo- 
cality from 1864 until 1882. He married Louisa Loomis, a native of Erie, 
Pennsylvania. Her father, a Methodist preacher, died when about sixty years 
of age, after rearing a large family, including Mrs. Emma Ward, \\'illiam, Mrs. 
Louisa Caswell, and others whose names are not remembered. At the time of 
his death L. A. Caswell was one of the oldest Odd Fellows in Iowa, having 
been a member of the order for fifty-one years. He passed away in 1908, at 
the age of seventy-eight years, and his wife died in 1900, when about sixty-five 
years of age. They were the parents of seven children, five sons and two 
daughters: Lulu, the wife of Lorenzo F. Chapin, of Pasadena, California; Carl 
F., a resident of Coon Rapids, Iowa ; Fannie, the wife of P. Scanlan. of Chi- 
cago; Grant L., of this review; Ned W., of San Francisco, California; Norval, 
of Coon Rapids ; and Judd J. 

Grant L. Caswell was reared in his native county and began his education 
in the schools of Moingona, while later he continued his studies in Ogden, in 
Boone, and in Coon Rapids. After putting aside his text-books he began learn- 
ing the printer's trade at Coon Rapids and has been connected with the business 
continuously since. He at first worked mornings and evenings without com- 
pensation, but soon his ability enabled him to command good wages. He was 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 37 

fifteen years of age when he left home and was employed as a tradesman from 
1883 until 1889. He then purchased the paper on which he was working — the 
Ashton Argus— at Ashton, Iowa, and pubUshed it for two years. Prominent 
political leaders of Iowa at Sibley then offered him inducements to locate there 
and take charge of the Sibley Tribune in company with W. P. Webster. He 
remained at that place for six years, at the end of which time he purchased the 
Rock Rapids Review in connection with L. F. Chapin, with whom he was as- 
sociated for a year. He next came to Denison on the ist of December, 1897, 
and purchased the Denison Bulletin and has since been its editor and publisher, 
making this one of the leading journals in this part of the state. The paper was 
established in 1873 as a democratic weekly and has a good circulation, together 
with a gratifying advertising patronage. Mr. Caswell also conducts a job print- 
ing business and in 1910 he erected a handsome brick building, a two-story and 
basement structure, today the home of the Bulletin. It is well equipped accord- 
ing to the most modern ideas of newspaper publication, and the paper is an 
attractive sheet. 

On the 6th of May, 1891, Mr. Caswell married Aliss Eva Clark, a native of 
Grinnell, Iowa, and a daughter of James W. and Jane (Cast) Clark, who for 
about a quarter of a century have been residents of Ashton, Iowa, where Mr. 
Clark, a most prominent citizen, has filled the ofifice of mayor for twenty years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Caswell are parents of four children: Carl Clark, Flora B., Paul 
H. and Donald Leroy, the eldest being now a student in the college at Iowa City. 

Mr. Caswell belongs to Sylvan Lodge, No. 507, A. F. & A. M., in Denison, 
and Ark Chapter, No. 99, R. A. M., at Dunlap. He is also an active member 
of Dowdall Lodge, K. P., and has membership relations with the Modern Wood- 
men of America, the Woodmen of the World and the Improved Order of Red 
Men. In politics he has always been a democrat and both personally and through 
the columns of his paper has labored for the interests of the party and the 
adoption of its principles. 



JACOB SIMS. 



Jacob Sims, of Denison, is an able representative of the legal fraternity and 
has built up an enviable and distinctively representative clientage. His birth 
occurred in Dodgeville, Wisconsin, on the 30th of November, 1850, his parents 
being James and Ann (Harris) Sims, both of whom were natives of Cornwall, 
England. His paternal grandfather, who was likewise born in Cornwall, Eng- 
land, worked in the tin mines there and passed away in that country in middle 
life. Among his children were the following named : James, John, William and 
Thomas. Simsbury, Connecticut, now a large manufacturing town, was founded 
by and named in honor of a representative of the family. The maternal grand- 
father of our subject, who spent his entire life in England, worked as a tin 
miner and passed away in middle life. He was the father of a large family of 
children, including Ann, Elizabeth, John, William, Samuel, Mark, Joseph and 
Jacob. 



38 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

James Sims, the father of Jacob Sims, was a Methodist minister and a pio- 
neer preacher in Wisconsin. The year 1845 witnessed his emigration to Amer- 
ica and it was at Dodgeville, Wisconsin, that he first took up his abode. He 
was an itinerant preacher, riding horseback and carrying his saddlebags while 
a circuit rider among the pioneers. He had a number of charges in Wisconsin 
and was a member of the West Wisconsin Conference from the time of its 
organization, while previously he had been connected with the Wisconsin Con- 
ference, spending thirty-six years altogether in the active ministry in tliat state. 
Coming; to Iowa in 1890, he spent the remainder of his life in Council Bluffs, 
passing away in 1909 at the age of eiglity-six years. His wife was called to 
her final rest on the 12th of October, 19 10, when in the eighty-fifth year of her 
age. Unto them were born ten children, three sons and seven daughters, as 
follows: Jacob, of this review; Mary A., the widow of W. E. Bainbridge, of 
Council Bluffs, Iowa; Susan, the wife of F. D. Hamilton, of Minneapolis, 
Minnesota; Jennie, who is a resident of Council Bluffs; Sadie, who is deceased; 
Cora, the wife of George Bell, of Montfort, Wisconsin; May, who is a teacher 
in the public schools of Council Bluffs; Lena, the wife of J. M. Sylvester, of 
Washington, D. C. ; and two who died in early childhood. 

Jacob Sims remained under the parental roof until about twenty years of 
age and obtained his more advanced education in Lawrence University of Ap- 
pleton, Wisconsin, from which institution he was graduated in 1874. Becoming" 
identified with educational interests, he acted as a high school principal at 
Oconto, Wisconsin, for one year and then went to Milwaukee, where he had 
editorial charge of the Christian Statesman for a short time. In October, 1875, 
he removed to Minneapolis, Minnesota, and purchased the Citizen, a weekly 
journal which he published for two and a half years. On the expiration of that 
period he went to Council Bluffs, Iowa, and took up the study of law, being 
admittefl to the bar on the 4th of January, 1879. At Council Bluffs he followed 
his profession successfully until January, 1908, when he came to Denison, where 
he has resided continuously since, enjoying a lucrative and c^rowing practice. 
For a number of years prior to his removal here he had been coming to Denison 
on legal business. His success in a professional way affords the best evidence 
of his capabilities in this line. He is a strong advocate with the jury and concise 
in his appeals before the court. Much of the success which has attended him 
in his professional career is undoubtedly due to the fact that in no instance will 
he permit himself to go into court with a case unless he has absolute confidence 
in the justice of his client's cause. Basing his efforts on this principle, from 
wliich there are far too many lapses in professional ranks, it naturally follows 
that he seldom loses a case in whose support he is enlisted. 

On the nth of January, 1887. ]\lr. .Sims w^as united in marriage to Miss 
Anna H. Squire, a native of Rockford, Illinois, and a daughter of Daniel and 
Mary (Keeling) Squire. Their children are five in number, namely: James D., 
Mariana, Katharine. Marjorie and John Alan Sims. The three older children 
are students in the university at Iowa City, while the two younger ones are at- 
tending the high school at Denison. 

Mr. Sims is a republican in politics and has served as a member of the 
school board. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, having joined the 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 39- 

order at Council Bluffs about twenty years ago. Both he and his wife were 
reared in the Methodist faith but are now members of the Presbyterian church. 
Mr. Sims is a man of many friends, his genial manner, unfailing courtesy and 
unfeigned cordiality gaining him the high regard of those with whom he is. 
brought in contact. 



J. F. HARTHUN. 



J. F. Harthun needs no introduction to the readers of this volume, for his 
work as educator and editor has made him widely known. He is now publish- 
ing the Denison Zeitung, and its editorial writings indicate the wide range of 
his thought and investigation. Like a considerable proportion of Crawford 
county's valued citizenship he is of German birth. He was born in Christfelde, 
in the province of Westpreussen, Germany, February 14, 1845, ^^^ was one of 
five children of Ludwig and Johanna (Frank) Harthun who were likewise na- 
tives of Germany. The father was a miller by trade as was his father before 
him, who made milling his life work and was killed in his mill, becoming caught 
in a wheel. His son, Ludwig Harthun, was engaged in the milling business for 
a number of years and later turned his attention to farming, which he followed 
in Germany up to the time of his death in 1872, when he was sixty-five years 
of age. His wife was one of a family of five daughters. Their parents were 
farming people and their father died in Germany at an advanced age. Mrs. 
Harthun passed away in Germany in 1888 at the age of seventy-two years. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Harthun were members of the Lutheran church. Unto 
their marriage were born two sons and three daughters : Otto ; Julius F. ; Ma- 
tilda, deceased, who was the wife of Ludwig Jarchow; Alvine, who died in 
young womanhood ; and Ludowike. 

Julius F. Harthun spent his youth in the land of his nativity and acquired 
an academical education, being graduated in 1867. He afterward took up the 
profession of teaching, which he followed in his native land until 1873, although 
in the meantime he served as a soldier in the Franco-Prussian war of 1870- 1. 
He has a medal which he received in that country when a soldier and another 
that was presented to him on the occasion of the one hundredth anniversary 
of the birth of Emperor William L 

In 1873 J. F. Harthun sailed for the United States and settled in New 
York, where he remained for four years, during which time he taught in a 
German private school and also gave instruction in three or four other schools. 
Subsequently he went to Detroit, Michigan, where for two years he was a 
teacher in a German academy. He was then elected principal of a school at 
Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, where he continued his educational labors for four 
years, after which he was offered a position in Omaha, where A new school had 
been opened. He continued as its principal for four years and in 1885 came to 
Denison where he taught school for three years. In 1888 he purchased the 
Denison Zeitung and is still editing the paper, of which he has made an attract- 
ive journal, devoted to the discussion of local and general news. It is published 



40 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

in accordance with progressive ideas in newspaper work and is accorded a good 
circulation. 

In October, 1871, Mr. Harthun was married to Miss Alvine Daer, a daugh- 
ter of August and Charlotte (Schuelke) Daer. Mrs. Harthun was born in 
Germany where her parents lived and died. She became, by her marriage, the 
mother of ten children : Herman, who married Blanch Burks and is a traveling 
man, living in Omaiia ; Anna and Julius, both at home; Hugo, of Kansas City, 
Missouri, who married Birdie Lang and has two children, Robert and Dorothy; 
Heinrich. at iiome ; and hve who are now deceased. 

The mother j)assed away October 25, 1907, at the age of sixty-five years. 
She was a lady of many excellent qualities and a member of the Lutheran 
church. Mr. Harthun still holds membership in that church and belongs to 
various associations. He was the founder of the German Odd Fellows lodge in 
Denison called Sidonia Lodge, No. 393, of which he was the first noble grand. 
He became a member of the order on his birthday, joining Goethe Lodge, No. 
112, I. O. O. F.. of Fond du Lac. He is likewise president of the Cierman 
Soldiers Society in Denison called the Landwehrverein and is president of the 
Deutsche Bruederschaft, which means German Brotherhood. He has been the 
leader of four singing societies at Denison, Charter Oak, West Side and Man- 
ning Association, and he is the financial secretary of the Westlichen Krieger- 
bund. He likewise belongs to the German Press Association and has much 
more than local reputation as an orator, having made many speeches through- 
out the country, even appearing in support of a political measure and again at 
the graves of friends. ■ He possesses both eloquence and natural oratorical 
ability, and on such occasions, as well as in his editorials, proves himself a clear 
thinker and cogent reasoner. 



INGEMAR LIND. 



Thirty-seven years ago Tngemar Lind came to Crawford county and he has 
ever since been closely connected with its agricultural interests. He is now the 
owner of a valuable farm of two hundred and forty acres and has acquired a 
standing as one of the representative men of the county. He was born in 
Sweden. June 10. 1849, a son of Nils I. and Ingri M. Lind, both of whom were 
born in Sweden. They came to America in 1857, and spent three years in Chicago^ 
after which they made their home for fourteen years in Monroe county, Wisconsin, 
moving in 1874 to Crawford county, Iowa. Here they continued during the re- 
mainder of tlicir lives, the mother being called away in August, 1900, and the 
father in January, 1905. 

Ingemar Lind was their only child. He came with them to the United States 
at the age of eiglit years and received his education in the public schools of Chi- 
cago and Wisconsin. He continued with his parents until after their deaths and 
smce reaching manhood has diligently ajiplied himself to agriculture and stock- 
raismg. He is now the owner of two hundred and forty acres of land on Sec- 
tion I, Otter Creek township, and forty acres in Sac county, Iowa. He engages 



PU'BLIC L. 



TILDES ■■ ->• 




MK. AM) MKS. INCEMAR LIND 




MR. AND MRS. NILS I. LIND 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 45 

extensively in the cultivation of grain and also in feeding stock, both branches of 
his business proving very profitable. Being an excellent judge of stock, Mr. 
Lind is seldom in error as to the value of an animal and he usually succeeds in 
obtaining the highest prices that are quoted in the market. 

In October, 1881, Mr. Lind was united in marriage to Miss Brita Thumstrom, a 
native of Sweden and a daughter of Carl P. and Brita K. Thumstrom, both of 
whom were also born in that country. They came to America in 1889 and located 
in Crawford county, Iowa, the father passing away here August 23, 1903, and the 
mother on March 26, 1909. There were four children in their family. Nine 
children came to brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. Lind, namely: Hannah, 
who was born February 20, 1883, and is the wife of Alfred Danielson, of Sac 
county, Iowa; Nels, who was born February 13, 1884, and is a mail carrier of 
Kiron Iowa; Charles P., born July 9, 1885, living at home; Mary M., who was 
born September 30, 1886, and died August 6, 1888; Lydia, who was born Feb- 
ruary 19, 1888, and is now the wife of S. W. Lundstrom, of Crawford county; 
Mary M., born December i, 1889; George, born January 28, 1893; John, born 
January 23, 1895, and Esther, born February 23, 1897, all of whom are at home. 

Mr. Lind has from his youth been accustomed to work, having early been 
taught by his parents the importance and value of labor. He has applied him- 
self to excellent advantage and enjoys a measure of prosperity which he richly 
merits, as it is the direct result of his own efforts. He and his wife are iden- 
tified with the Lutheran church and politically he supports the republican party. 
He is a good friend of education and has served most acceptably for two terms 
as a member of the school board. 



JOHN B. ROMANS. 



John B. Romans, who was called to his final rest on the 7th of December, 
1910, was one of the pioneer settlers of Denison and for many years was widely 
recognized as a prominent resident of the city. His birth occurred in Harrison 
county, Ohio, on the 6th of September, 1842, and he lived to reach the sixty- 
eighth milestone on life's journey. His parents, Elisha and Elizabeth Romans, 
both came from old Quaker families. In 1856 he accompanied them on their 
removal to Clinton county, Iowa, where his father engaged in farming with 
flattering prospects of success. Within a year or two, however, on account of 
the panic of 1857 ^^^ ^^ account of obligations created by him which he ex- 
pected to meet by payments to be made to him for property which he had sold 
on time, and the failure of the purchasers to make such payments, his remaining 
property was sacrificed and he lost practically everything he had. He then 
rented a farm and started anew but soon afterward, in March, 1858, his death 
occurred, leaving our subject, then sixteen years of age, the eldest child in the 
family 

The other children were as follows : Catherine, who married George F. 
Goudie, now living at Miller, South Dakota; Ann, who gave her hand in mar- 
riage to E. F. Councilman, now living at Seney. Iowa ; Hannah, who became the 



Vol. ir- 



46 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

wife of Charles B. Eaton, of Manchester, Iowa; Lewis, who now lives in Deni- 
son ; Robert A., who recently removed from Denison to Aberdeen, South Da- 
kota, to engage in the banking business ; and Eva, who is deceased. 

The entire charge of the family after the father's demise devolved upon 
John B. Romans and he did not for a moment shirk the responsibility of taking 
his father's place in providing for his widowed mother and his younger broth- 
ers and sisters. In a short time, by his industry and economy, he had saved 
enough capital with which to purchase an eighty-acre farm, on which the family 
lived for several years. His mother afterward came to Crawford county, pass- 
ing away at Charter Oak on the 27th of February, 1889. 

As John B. Romans grew to manhood he became imbued with ambition for 
an education and for a portion of four years he attended the State University 
at Iowa City, where he applied himself diligently to his studies, being obliged 
to work his way through college. Soon after leaving Iowa City he came to 
Craw^ford county, where at the age of twenty-six he was joined in wedlock to 
Miss ]\Iary Laub, a daughter of the Hon. H. C. Laub, then the leading mer- 
chant and business man of the county. The young couple spent the first year 
of their married life on the farm with Mrs. Romans and then returned to 
Denison, where for three years our subject was employed in the mercantile es- 
tablishment of ^Ir. Laub. At the end of that time he formed a partnership with 
hfs employer, the business being conducted under the firm style of Laub & 
Romans. This relation was maintained until 1884, w'hen Mr. Laub was suc- 
ceeded by Robert A. Romans, who remained a member of the firm until 1890, 
after which J. B. Romans continued the business alone. Several years later the 
business was incorporated under the' name of J. B. Romans Company, B. J. 
Sibbert and others taking stock in the concern, and has been conducted as such 
continuously since, although Mr. Romans closed out his interest in the com- 
pany four or five years prior to his demise. During his active career he was 
one of the most prominent factors in the business affairs of Denison. 

The following is an excerpt from an obituary appearing in one of the local 
papers at the time of his death. "The extensive business which he conducted 
brought him in contact with almost every person in the county and it is safe 
to say that he enjoyed as wide and favorable an acquaintance as any other busi- 
ness man living here during all this time. Mr. Romans was a man whose coun- 
sel and advice w-ere sought at all times by those who were interested in the 
development of Denison and the county. No meeting was ever called to con- 
sider improvements of a public nature that Mr. Romans was not present and 
his advice eagerly sought. He always stood ready to contribute his share, in a 
financial way. in support of any improvement of a public character. 

"He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and his labors and 
influence were a tower of strength in building up and maintaining the church. 
He was for many years, and until his death, one of the trustees and a member 
of the board of stewards of the church and frequently attended the Des Moines 
annual conference as a delegate from the church here. He was also prominent 
in the work of raising the money for building the normal college here and one 
of the best friends of the school after it was established. From the beginning 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 47 

he was a member of the board of directors of the institution. For several years 
he was a member of the board of trustees of the pubHc schools of Denison and 
always diligent in the discharge of his official duties. 

"Politically, until 1896, he was a supporter of the republican party and 
prominent in its councils, locally and in the state at large. He was not satisfied 
to simply be a republican but was an enthusiastic worker in aiding in carrying 
the party forward to victory. Each year he joined other speakers in making a 
canvass of the county, his voice having been heard in the schoolhouses and 
other places of meeting here. He was chairman of the republican county cen- 
tral committee up to and including the year 1895. In 1896 he was won over, as 
were many other republicans, to Mr. Bryan and free silver and became what was 
then known as a 'free silver republican.' He was nominated by the democrats 
and free silver republicans in that year for congress in this district and made 
the race against Hon. J. P. Dolliver but failed in the election. After the election 
of President McKinley as president that year, Mr. Romans gradually drifted into 
the democratic party and for several years he was easily the leader of the party 
in this county, being not only prominent in county politics but a potent factor 
in the management of the party in the state. Of late years Mr. Romans has 
been practically out of business and out of politics." 

Mr. Romans' first wife passed away on the 9th of July, 1900, her death 
being the result of the explosion of a gasoline stove. She was a woman of 
superior ambition and energy and a leader in all movements looking toward the 
uplift of her sex. By her marriage she became the mother of four children, 
namely: Harry, who is deceased; Lydia Maude; lone, now Mrs. Lane H. Good- 
man, of Sioux City, Iowa; and Junia, now Mrs. M. J. McAhren, of Denison. 

On the 29th of December, 1901, Mr. Romans was united in marriage to 
Mrs. Christine Snyder, a native of Boston, Massachusetts, and a daughter of 
C. C. and Anna (Whittaker) Mason, both of whom were born in Leeds, Eng- 
land. The father, who was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, emi- 
grated to America at an early day, settling first in the New England states. 
In i860 he removed to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and his demise occurred at 
Racine, that state, in 1864. Five years later his wife was called to her final 
rest. They were the parents of six children, of whom Mrs. Romans is now the 
only survivor. At the early age of fifteen years she had lost both of her parents 
and, being thus thrown upon her own resources, began teaching school. In 
1870, in Janesville, Wisconsin, she gave her hand in marriage to Benjamin 
Snyder, who was a native of Dutchess county. New York. Their union was 
blessed with two sons : Albert, who is now engaged in business at Creston, Iowa ; 
and Harry, who is also a resident of Creston. Mr. Snyder died in September, 
1889, and was buried at Creston, Iowa. 

Mrs. Romans now owns a third interest in the estate of John B. Romans, 
which is valued at over one hundred thousand dollars. She has a beautiful 
residence in the city of Denison. In Eastern Star Lodge, No. 207. she has filled 
all of the chairs from matron down and she also belongs to several clubs at 
Denison. She is possessed of unusual ability and tact and has filled numerous 
positions of responsibility to the credit of herself and friends. She held the 



48 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

position of state president of the Women's Relief Corps and was urged to make 
the race for national president but declined. Her many excellent traits of 
heart and mind have endeared her to all with whom she has come in contact 
and therefore she has a host of warm friends. 



T. J. RULE. 



T. J. Rule, a well known and representative agriculturist of Paradise town- 
ship, was born m Spring Rock township, Clinton county, Iowa, on the 14th of 
February, i860, his parents being George and Ellen Lucretia (Columbus) Rule. 
The father, a native of Scotland, emigrated to Canada when twelve or fifteen 
years old and subsequently took up his abode in Coldwater, Michigan. In 1854 
he assisted his father in erecting a mill in Spring Rock township, Clinton county, 
Iowa, and afterward removed to Alden, Hardin county, Iowa, where he pur- 
chased a mill. In 1875 he went to De Witt, Iowa, and in the fall of 1876 came 
to Crawford county, locating in Dow City. He bought the old hotel site and 
a half interest in a mill and made his home in Dow City until 1879, when he 
removed to the farm on which our subject now resides in Paradise township. 
He erected commodious and substantial buildings and lived thereon until called 
to his final rest in 1892. His political allegiance was given to the republican 
party and in 1872 he represented Clinton county in the state legislature. He 
also held a number of minor offices, ever discharging his public duties in a most 
prompt and capable manner. In religious faith he was a Baptist, while fra- 
ternally he was identified with the Masons, belonging to the Shrine and being 
probably one of the best known representatives of the craft in this part of the 
state. He was also a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 

It was while a resident of Canada that George Rule wedded Miss Ellen L. 
Columbus, who was a native of that country. Mrs. Rule continued on the farm 
until 1893, when she took up her abode in Dow City, remaining there for two 
years. On the expiration of that period she returned to the old home place but 
in 1905 once more removed to Dow City, where she has resided continuously 
since. She was the mother of nine children, as follows: William, who is en- 
gaged in the milling business at Rutland, Iowa; Agnes, the wife of E. V. God- 
dard, of Dow City, Iowa; John, who is a resident of St. Anthony. Idaho; George, 
living in Lake View, Iowa; T. J., of this review; Ellen Mary, who makes her 
home in Dow City, Iowa; A. L., who is engaged in the hardware business at 
Red Oak, Iowa; Lincoln, a resident of Boone, Iowa, who is employed as con- 
ductor by the Northwestern Railroad Company ; and Anna, who is deceased. 

T. I.' Rule was reared under the i)arental roof and obtained his education 
in the schools of his native county. Since his father's demise he has operated 
the old homestead farm of two hundred and forty-five acres in Paradise town- 
ship and also owns and cultivates an additional tract of forty-five acres. Under 
his careful supervision the property has been brought to a hij^h state of culti- 
vation and improvement and the well tillc<l fields annually yield bounteous har- 
vests which find a ready sale on the market. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 49 

On the 20th of December, 1892, Mr. Rule was united in marriage to Aliss 
Minnie Davie, by whom he had seven children, namely: Herbert; Robert; Vera, 
who is deceased ; Warren ; Jesse ; Margaret ; and Thomas. 

In politics Mr. Rule is a republican, while fraternially he is identified with 
the Modern Woodmen of America at Dow City, Iowa. His life has ever been 
such as to commend him to the confidence and high regard of all with whom he 
has been brought in contact either in business or social circles. 



REV. JOHN JAMES DE FREE. 

Rev. John James De Free, a well known and highly respected resident of 
Denison, has been pastor of the First Presbyterian church here since 1907. His 
birth occurred at Spring Lake, Alichigan, on the 29th of February, 1876, his 
parents being Rev. James and Johanna (Bolks) De Free, natives of the Nether- 
lands. His paternal grandfather was John De Free, also a native of the Neth- 
erlands, who was a carpenter by trade. He emigrated to the United States in 
1847, settling at Zeeland, Alichigan, where he worked at carpentering. He 
acted as an elder during the entire period of his residence there and has given 
to the church two sons and six grandsons and granddaughters as ministers and 
missionaries. Flis demise occurred when he had attained the age of eighty-one 
years, while his wife was about seventy-five when called to her final rest. They 
had seven children who grew to maturity, namely : Dena, Feter, Dirk, Lena, 
John, James and Jane. 

Rev. Seine Bolks, the maternal grandfather of our subject, was likewise a 
native of the Netherlands and in his youth was employed as a shepherd. He 
came to the United States in 1849, settling in Michigan and living principally in 
the vicinity of Holland, that state. He was the pioneer preacher there, being 
the first pastor at Overisel, Michigan, while subsequently he had charges in 
Chicago, South Chicago and Milwaukee. He was also the first pastor of the 
Dutch Reformed church in Sioux county, Iowa, at Orange City, where he 
passed away at the age of eighty-two years. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Gertrude Brower and was likewise born in the Netherlands, was sixty- 
seven years old at the time of her demise. They were the parents of four chil- 
dren who reached mature years, namely : Albert, Garrett, Johanna and Simon. 

Rev. James De Free, the father of the gentleman whose name introduces 
this review, was reared as a farm boy in Alichigan and later taught school in 
order to defray the expenses of an advanced education. He graduated from 
Hope College of Holland, Michigan, in 1867 and in 1870 completed the course 
in the Western Theological Seminary at that place. First he served as pastor 
in the Spring Lake Dutch Reformed church and then removed to Sioux Center, 
Iowa, where he preached in the Dutch Reformed church for exactly thirty years. 
At the present time he is pastor of the Dutch Reformed church at North Ya- 
kima, Washington. Unto him and his wife were born the following children : 
Lena, now the wife of G. Boeyink, of Sioux Center, Iowa ; Dr. Seine de Free, 
of Sioux Center ; John James, of this review ; Gertrude, the wife of Henry 



50 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUXTY 

Evenhuis, of North Yakima, Washington ; Xeal, wlio is a resident of Sioux 
Center; and Albert. Hving in North Yakima, Washington. 

Rev. John James De Free, who was a little lad of four years when taken by 
his parents to Sioux county, Iowa, grew to manhood in Sioux Center and ob- 
tained his early education in the country schools. He completed the course in 
the Northwestern Classical Academy at Orange City, Iowa, in 1895, graduated 
from Hope College of Holland, Michigan, with the class of 1899 and in 1903 
finished his studies in Princeton Seminary. His first pastorate was at Alta, 
Iowa, where he remained from 1903 until 1907, which year witnessed his arrival 
in Denison. For the past four years he has been pastor of the First Presby- 
terian church here and his labors have proven a potent element in the moral de- 
velopment of the community. 

On the 9th of September, 1903, Rev. De Pree was joined in wedlock to 
Miss Marie K. Boer, a native of Albany, New York, and a daughter of Rev. 
H. K. and Mary (Kroon) Boer, the former a native of the Netherlands and the 
latter of Michig^an. They are now residents of Grand Rapids, Michigan, and 
are the parents of four daughters who grew to maturity : Jeanette, Antoinette, 
Marie and Charlotte. Rev. De Pree and his wife have two sons, Donald and 
Wilbur Henry. 



A. J. BOND. 



A. J. Bond, commonly known as "Juddy" Bond, is successfully engaged in 
business as the proprietor of an undertaking establishment at Denison and also 
handles pianos and organs. His birth occurred in Springfield, Massachusetts, 
on the 15th of October, 1846, his parents being Eli Daniel and Selah (Sea- 
grave) Bond, who were likewise natives of that state. His paternal grand- 
father, who was also born in Massachusetts, came of English origin. He 
participated in the war of 181 2. Unto him and his wife were born four chil- 
dren, namely: Elias, Daniel, Benjamin and Edwin. The maternal grandfather 
of our subject was likewise a native of ^Massachusetts and came of English 
ancestry. 

Eli Daniel Bond, the father of A. J. Bond, was a stone and brick mason and 
also worked at plastering. He removed to Michigan about 1851, settling- in 
Petersburgh, Monroe county, where his demise occurred in 1861, when he had 
attained the age of fifty-three years. His wife was called to her final rest in 
March, 1863, at the age of forty-eight years. Both were Baptists in religious 
faith. They were the parents of four sons and a daughter, as follows : Albert 
P.; Selina J., the wife of E. S. Plimpton, now deceased; A. J., of this review; 
Edwin E., who died when about thirteen years of age; and George W. S., who 
is a resident of Eureka, California. 

A. J. Bond, whose name introduces this review, accompanied his parents on 
their removal to Michigan and resided there until March, 1863, arriving in 
Denison, Iowa, April 4, 1863, when sixteen years of age. He entered the 
employ of H. C. Laul) and when a call was made for eight volunteers from 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 51 

Crawford county enlisted in Company I, Thirty-second Iowa Volunteer In- 
fantry, being mustered in at Fort Dodge, Iowa. With that command he served 
until the close of hostilities between the north and the south, returning home in 
May, 1866. He participated in the battle of Fort De Rusa and was under fire 
during the greater part of the time consumed in going up the Red River. He 
next went to Lake Charcott in Arkansas and thence followed General Price on 
his raid through Missouri. Being then ordered to Nashville, he took part in 
the two days' fight there, next went across to Eastport and thence to New 
Orleans. On leaving that city he went to Mobile and participated in the en- 
gagements at Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely. He served as a private during 
the entire period of his enhstment and participated in many skirmishes, proving 
at all times a brave and loyal soldier. When the war had ended he returned 
home and worked as a plasterer in association with his brother until 1871. He 
then secured a position as clerk with Samuel Sprecher and a year later, owing 
to Mr. Sprecher's death, took charge of the store as manager. He purchased 
the building and subsequently admitted M. H. Hendricks to a partnership, con- 
ducting a grocery establishment under the style of Bond & Hendricks for about 
two years. On the expiration of that period he sold out to Mr. Hendricks and 
entered the employ of E. S. Plimpton as a clerk, holding that position for eleven 
years. While thus engaged he also devoted some attention to undertaking and 
while in Mr. Plimpton's service embarked in the furniture and undertaking 
business on his own account, being associated with his brother George under 
the firm style of Bond Brothers. After disposing of his interest to his brother^ 
he purchased the jewelry and music store of S. H. Clawson, conducting it for 
ten or eleven years. At the end of that time he sold his stock to E. C. Cham- 
berlin with the exception of the pianos and organs, which instruments he still 
handles. On the retirement of his brother George he again entered the un- 
dertaking business and has since conducted an enterprise of that character with 
excellent success. 

On the iSth of April, 1872, Mr. Bond was united in marriage to Miss Lucy 
G. Harris, who was born in Monroe county, Michigan, on the i6th of Novem- 
ber, 1849, ^"d who was an old schoolmate of his. Her parents, Henry and 
Betsy B. (Bedient) Harris, were both natives of New York. They took up 
their abode among the pioneer settlers of Monroe county, Michigan, Mr. Harris 
entering land from the government. His demise there occurred in 1871 when 
he was more than eighty years of age. His widow came to Denison, Iowa, and 
here passed away at the age of seventy-six. One of her brothers was more than 
one hundred years old at the time of his demise. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Bond 
were born two children, namely : Elva Dell, who is a kindergarten teacher in 
the public schools of Denison; and Edward H., who died on the 27th of Alay, 
1906, when thirty-two years of age. Miss Elva Dell Bond is a Daughter of 
the American Revolution, her ancestors having participated in the war for in- 
dependence. 

Mr. Bond is a republican in politics, being a stanch supporter of the party 
which was the defense of the Union during the dark days of the Civil war. He 
served as township clerk for a period of twenty years and also acted as assessor 
for many years or until he resigned. He is a member of John A. Logan Post, 



52 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

No. 58, G. A. R., and also belongs to Dowdall Lodge. Xo. 90, Knii^hts of Pythias. 
In religious faith both he and liis wife are Methodists. The period of his resi- 
dence in Denison covers almost a half century and he enjoys an extensive and 
favorable acquaintance here. 



HON. RUDOLPH C. IL LEHFELDT. 

The history of Crawford county would be incomplete and unsatisfactory 
were there failure to make prominent reference to the Hon. Rudolph Carl 
Henry Lehfeldt, whom his fellow townsmen have honored with election to the 
office of state senator. His record as a business man is at the same time worthy 
of earnest consideration as showing what may be accomplished by determination 
and energ}' when guided by sound, practical judgment and characterized by in- 
tegrity. 

Air. Lehfeldt is a native of Germany, his birth having occurred in Curan by 
Lubeck, December 28, 1840. His grandparents in the paternal line were 
Joachim and Helena (Schroeder) Lehfeldt, farming people of Germany, and 
there reared a family of three children : John, Henry and Anna. Of these John 
Lehfeldt was the father of R. C. H. Lehfeldt and was born in Holstein, Ger- 
many, where he learned the distiller's trade. He married Mary Stehn, also a 
native of Holstein and a daughter of John Stehn, a sheep man of Germany, 
who spent his entire life there. The death of John Lehfeldt occurred in 1846, 
when he was sixty-one years of age, while his wife passed away in 1844 at the 
age of fifty-two years. They were both Lutherans in religious faith. Their 
family numbered eight children, six sons and two daughters : Henry, deceased ; 
Wilhelm, of Holstein, Germany ; Fritz, of Denison, Iowa ; Louis, who passed 
away in Germany ; Herman, who also lives in the fatherland ; Emma, the wife of 
Carl Hansen, of Los Angeles. California; Anna, the deceased wife of Herman 
Braun ; and Rudolph C H., of this review. 

The last named was reared in the land of his nativity, attended tlie i)ublic 
schools and afterward became connected with the sheep industry. In 1870 he 
came to America, settling near Denison, where he purchased two hundred and 
thirteen acres of land. T'or fifteen years he was connected with general agricul- 
tural pursuits in tliis county and in 1885 removed to Montana, residing in the 
vicinity of Billings until 1890. He then again came to Denison and lived upon 
the old home farm for a year, after which he purchased the Lafe Goodrich farm 
of three hundred and ninety-two acres. On this he engaged extensively in feed- 
ing sheep until 1901. when he left the farm and erected a beautiful home in 
Denison, which he still occupies. He yet owns both of his farms and from 
his property derives a substantial income, but he has sold the sheep business to 
his sons. 

On the 2d of November. 1864. Mr. Lehfeldt was married to Miss Mary 
Witt, who died in 1873. leaving four children. Ludwig lives in l>illings, Mon- 
tana, and has the following children : Clara. Hilda. Rudolph and Herbert. Her- 
man married Otilla Nerdenenberg, by whom he has five children : Hedwig, 




R. C. H. LEHFELDT 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 55 

Martha, Victor, Otilla and Hertha. Olga is the wife of John Schroeder, of 
Bilhngs, by whom she has three children : Amanda, Walter and Herman. Al- 
vina married Rudolph Molt, also of Billings, and their family consists of three 
children : Emma, Bertha and Alma. In 1880 Mr. Lehfeldt was again married, 
his second union being with Miss Mary Schroeder, by whom he had one son, 
William, who wedded Edna Marie Eicker and is now living near Billings, Mon- 
tana. On the 5th of January, 1894, Mr. Lehfeldt married for his third wife. 
Miss Sophia Leptien, a daughter of Detleff and Helena (Braach) Leptien. Mrs. 
Lehfeldt was born in Marengo, Iowa, in the vicinity of which her parents 
settled at a very early day on coming to this country from Holstein, Germany. 
They now live in Redlands, California. They were the parents of five children: 
Fred, Louis, Sophia, Mary and Charlotte. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lehfeldt has also been blessed with five children, as follows: Hertha, Eldor, 
Martha, Erma and Carl. 

The parents are members of the Lutheran church and Mr. Lehfeldt is a 
republican, well versed on the questions of the day and active in the work of 
the party. In 1894 he was elected state senator and represented his district 
during the four succeeding years when the general assembly was in session. He 
is a self-made man and his is a creditable record, showing what may be accom- 
plished when one has the will to dare and to do. He has never taken advantage 
of the necessities of his fellowmen but has conducted business interests along 
progressive lines and prosperity has been the reward. Both he and his wife have 
a wide acquaintance in the county and their friends are many. 



JOSEPH H. MAHONEY. . 

Joseph H. Mahoney, who holds the responsible position of freight inspector 
of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, with headquarters in the superin- 
tendent's office at Boone, Iowa, was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin, May 24, 1866, 
a son of Timothy and Mary (Hickey) Mahoney. The parents are natives of 
Ireland, whence they emigrated at an early age and upon arriving in this coun- 
try located in Wisconsin, where they continued to reside until the spring of 1867. 
when they came to Iowa and the father followed farming on a quarter section 
of land in Boone county. Subsequently they removed into Boone city and for 
the past thirty years have lived in retirement, passing the evening of their lives 
in peace and contentment and in the enjoyment of the fruits of their early labors. 
They are both hale and hearty, although the father has passed the eightieth mile- 
stone on life's journey, while the mother is but five years his junior. Mr. 
Mahoney still retains possession of his farm in Boone county. 

To this worthy couple have been born ten children, the following of whom 
are still living: William, who lives in Casper, Wyoming, and is employed as an 
engineer on the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad; Frank, who is connected 
with the Union Pacific Railroad and resides in Denver, Colorado; Edward, who 
makes his home in Boone, Iowa; Joseph H., of this review; Dora, w^ho became 
the wife of P. M. Reilly and lives in Hastings, Nebraska; Mary, who resides 



56 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

with her parents; Timoth}-, who i> a partner in the law firm of Gxx>dykoontz & 
Mahoney, located in Boone. The members of the family who are deceased are 
James, George and John. 

The early education of Joseph H. IMahoney was obtained in the district 
schools and, being a bright scholar as well as an ambitious youth, when but six- 
teen years old he secured a position as teacher in one of the county schools, 
working on the farm during the summer months. After being three years thus 
employed he attended the Iowa State College for one year and then secured a 
clerkship in the postoffice at Boone, which position he occupied one year. On 
November 15, 1887, he entered the employ of the Chicago & Northwestern Rail- 
road, serving in various minor capacities at the Boone station for seven years 
and on December 5, 1894, was promoted to the office of station agent at Deni- 
son, representing the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, serving in this capacity 
during the following fifteen years. On December 15, 1909, he was again pro- 
moted, this time to the position of freight inspector, with headquarters at Boone, 
having jurisdiction over all matters pertaining to the handling of freight in 
the territory from Des ]\Ioines to Omaha, including the branches of the Sioux 
City division of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. He maintains his resi- 
dence in Denison, where he owns a comfortable home. 

Mr. ]\Iahoney was married June 20, 1898, to ^Nlollie B. Malony, a daugh- 
ter of Andrew and Bridget (Sherran) Malony, to w'hom five children were born, 
those living being as follows : Judith, who married C. S. Marshall, of Charter 
Oak; Mary, who became the wife of Edward Phalen and lives in Omaha, Ne- 
braska ; Kate, who is now living in Denison and is the widow of D. O. John- 
son, a former resident of Charter Oak; Mollie, the wife of our subject; and 
Maggie, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Mahoney are the parents of one child, George 
Andrew, who was born in 191 1. 

In his political opinions Mr. ]\Iahoney has always given his support to the 
republican party. In religion he is a member of the Roman Catholic church 
and fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias. He is a man of 
•strong character, ever faithful to his duties, which he has always performed 
with an efficiency that has won for him the commendation of his superiors, 
and socially he possesses the high regard of a wide circle of friends. 



THOMAS NORRIS. 



Natives of the Emerald isle have ever been known for their tiirift and in- 
dustry, and Mr. Norris is no exception to the rule. His parents, Thomas and 
Mary (Nash) Norris, were born in County Coi'k, Ireland, and immigrated to 
the United States in 1853, locating in South Reading, Massachusetts. In those 
days there were no five day trips, as are now made by our modern ocean grey- 
hounds, and they spent three months en route in an old sailing vessel. The 
father resided in South Reading until 1862 and then removed to Delaware 
county, Iowa, accompanied by all his family with the exception of his son 
Thomas. There ho lived for two years and then removed to Spring Grove 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 57 

township, Linn county, locating near Troy Mills, but later going to Paris in the 
same county. He followed the occupation of farming all his life. In religion 
he was an adherent of the Methodist church and politically was a republican. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Norris were born six children, as follows : Lucy, the wife of 
A. Dwindle, of Delaware county, Iowa; Benjamin, living in Central City, Linn 
county; James, who died in 1892; Thomas, the subject of this sketch; William, 
who resides in Manchester, Delaware county ; and the sixth, who died in infancy. 

Thomas Norris, Jr., was born in County Cork, Ireland, April 2, 185 1. His 
early education was acquired in the public schools of Ireland, and when fifteen 
years old, in 1866, being impressed with the better opportunities in the United 
States, of which he had heard, he decided to come to this country and embarked 
on the steamer City of Manchester. Upon his arrival he started at once for 
Linn county, Iowa, and located at Spring Grove, where he spent two years with 
his father, later coming to Crawford county. One winter previous to his com- 
ing to this county he resided in Charles City, Floyd county, Iowa. Desiring to 
resume his education he attended school in Des Moines and later in Denison, and 
has made his headquarters at the latter town since 1869. Here he resided for 
four years before removing to his farm. Mr. Noris made his fist land purchase 
in 1875-6, buying two hundred and seventy acres in Denison township, and 
there established his farm, which he called "Bonny View," as it commands a 
fine view of Denison. It is one of the most valuable pieces of property in 
Denison township, having all the most modern improvements. Mr. Norris 
makes a specialty of live stock, having some fine Poland China and Duroc Jersey 
hogs and shorthorn cattle upon his place. He also deals in horses, giving par- 
ticular attention to Percherons. 

The marriage of Mr. Norris took place September 21, 1878, when he was 
united to Miss Mary Anne Maloney, a daughter of Timothy and Nancy Maria 
(Smith) Maloney. She was born in Whiteside county, Illinois, and educated in 
the district schools of that state and the high school of Palo, Ogle county, 
Illinois. She taught for two years at Pleasant Hill school, near Manilla, from 
1876 to 1878. Her father was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, and came 
to the United States when a boy, in 1849, locating in New York state, near 
Springport. In 1856 he removed to Whiteside county, Illinois, residing there 
until 1876, when he came to Iowa, taking up his residence near Des Moines. 
Here he continued to engage in farming until his death, which occurred Novem- 
ber 12, 1890, at the age of eighty years. He and his wife were married in 
1852. Mrs. Maloney was born in Seneca county. New York, September 21, 
1820, and died October 20, 1899. She came of a distinguished family which 
can be traced back to the time of the American Revolution. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Maloney six children were born, as follows : John Smith, living in Oklahoma ; 
Andrew K., deceased ; Mary Ellen, deceased ; Mary Anne, the wife of our sub- 
ject; Sarah Ella, deceased; Effie Elizabeth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norris are the parents of six children : James Harry, born 
July 7, 1879, is now a traveling salesman; Mary Effie, born February 3, 1883, 
is principal of the Westbrick school of Denison and resides at home; Ralph 
"Arthur, born December 11, 1885, married Clara A. McAhron and is engaged in 
the shoe business in Denison; Paul Ford, born September 19, 1888, Vera Vic- 



58 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

toria, born October 30, 1896, and William John, born December 12, 1898, are all 
at home. Mr. Xorris has always taken an active interest in the affairs of his 
township and is at present one of the school directors. In politics he supports 
the republican party. 



ALFRED WRIGHT. 



Alfred Wright, the manager of the Green Bay Lumber Company at Deni- 
son, has acted in that capacity since 1899. ^"^'s birth occurred in Waverly, 
Iowa, on the 8th of October, 1868, his parents being William and Rachel 
(Smith) Wright, both of whom were natives of England. His ])aternal grand- 
father was likewise born in that country and became identified with mercantile 
interests. Unto him and his wife, who bore the maiden name of Eldershore, 
were born five children, namely: John, Richard, William, George and Thomas. 
James Junea Smith, the maternal grandfather of our subject, was a manufac- 
turer of sauces and pickles in England. He wedded Miss Rachel Eldershore 
and their children were James, Zealint;- and Rachel. Following his demise Mrs. 
Smith married a ]\Ir. Reynolds of Philadelphia, Pemisylvania, by whom she 
had one daughter, ^Margaret. 

William Wright, the father of Alfred Wright, emigrated to America in 
1848 and for a short time worked as an architect in Ijaltimore, Maryland. He 
entered the Episcopal ministry and in 1866 journeyed westward to Waverly, 
Iowa, where he preached the gospel, later officiating" at Nashua. Denison. Des 
Moines, Marengo, Grinnell, Carroll and Vail. He likewise served in the Giris- 
tian commission during the Civil war. In 1852 he was a missionary with his 
wife in Africa where they encountered many hardships and dangers. He was 
a man of energy, ability and high character and a devout follower in the foot- 
steps of the Master. His demise occurred in Denison in 1900, when he had 
attained the age of seventy-six years, while his wife was called to her final rest 
in the spring of 1910. being at that time eighty-one years old. They were the 
parents of six children, three of whom reached maturity, namely: \\'illiam T., 
a practicing physician of Denison ; Leighton, who is likewise a resident of 
Denison; and Alfred, of this review. 

The last named accompanied his parents on their various removals and first 
came to Denison in 1876, remaining here during the following i\\e \ears. In 
1899 he returned to this city and has resided here continuously since. He com- 
pleted the prescribed course of study in the high school at ^Marengo, Iowa, in 
1886 and in 1890 was graduated from Grinnell College. Subsequently he fol- 
lov.ed the profession of teaching for two years and then entered the service of 
the Green Bay Lumber Company, working for them at Carroll and various 
other places. From 1893 until 1899 he had charge of the yard at A'ail and for 
the past twelve years has managed the company's yard at Denison. In this 
capacity he has contributed not a little to the success of the concern, being a 
man of excellent executive ability and sound judgment. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 59 

On the I2th of June, 1909, Mr. Wright was joined in wedlock to Aliss ^lar- 
g-aret Kelly, a native of Crawford county and a daughter of John and Bridget 
(Rasp) Kelly. Mr. Wright gives his political allegiance to the republican 
party and is now serving as chairman of the county central committee. In reli- 
gious faith he is an Episcopalian, while his wife is a devoted communicant of 
the Roman Catholic church. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, be- 
longing to Sylvan Lodge, No. 507, A. F. & A. M. ; Ark Chapter, No. 89, R. A. 
M.; and also of the council, R. & S. M. He is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias fraternity, belonging to Dowdall Lodge, No. 90. He enjoys the full 
respect and confidence of all who know him and has many warm friends in his 
locality. 



JOHN F. PFARR. 



The mercantile business offers an inviting field for a young man of energy 
and ability especially if he has a gentlemanly address and is actuated by a 
laudable ambition to win his way to the front by honorable methods. Many 
of the best known merchants have been attracted from agricultural pursuits 
and one of this number is John F. Pfarr now senior member of the firm of 
Pfarr, Gebert & Hunt, of Denison. He is a native of Pomeroy, Ohio, born 
December 12, 1866, and is a son of Philip and Elizabeth (Hoepfner) Pfarr. 
The father was a native of Germany and was educated in that country and 
reared as a farmer. At the age of twenty-eight he came to America and set- 
led in Meigs county, Ohio, now living on a farm near Pomeroy, in that county. 
His wife was born on the place where they reside. They are both members 
of the German Protestant church. Our subject's paternal grandfather was also 
a farmer. He died in Germany when a young man and his widow subsequently 
married his brother, John George Pfarr, by whom she had two children, Peter 
and George. She came to America and took up her home in Meigs county, 
Ohio, where she continued to reside during the remainder of her life. There 
were three children by the first marriage: Philip, Elizabeth and Catharine. 
The maternal grandfather of our subject was Peter Hoepfner, who came from 
Germany and was a pioneer of Meigs county, Ohio. His wife was Catharine 
Brown and they had one child, Elizabeth. 

Seven children were born to Philip and Elizabeth Pfarr, namely: Jacob, of 
Cedar county, Iowa ; Mary, now the wife of Paul Stahl, of Okanogan county, 
Washington; Kate, now Mrs. W. W. Stobart, of Meigs county, Ohio; Lucy, the 
wife of George Gaul, of Cedar county, Iowa ; John F., the subject of this re- 
view; Philip L., also of Okanogan county, Washington; and Minnie, the wife 
of Henry Kautz of Meigs county, Ohio. 

John F. Pfarr was reared on his father's farm in Ohio and as a boy attended 
the district schools, later becoming a student in Carleton College at Syracuse, 
Ohio. After leaving college he worked on a farm for several years, but hav- 
ing made up his mind that the west ofifered more favorable inducem.ents than he 
could hope to find in his native state, he came to Cedar county, Iowa, in 1888. 



60 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

His first employment in this state was as a farm laborer but later he became a 
clerk in a store at Tipton. In 1890 he arrived in Denison and for three years 
acted as clerk for the firm of J. P. Miller & Company. In 1893 he became as- 
sociated with J. J. Wieland and Flugo Gebert in the general mercantile business. 
Later Mr. W'ieland sold his interest to X. L. Hunt and the firm has since borne 
the title of Pfarr, Gebert & Hunt. They have a large general store and carry 
a well selected stock which meets the demands of an extensive and growing 
patronage. 

On the loth of October, 1898, Mr. Pfarr was united in marriage to Miss 
Jessie H. Shattuck, who was born at Francestown, New Hampshire, a daugh- 
ter of John L. and Sarah (Hartney) Shattuck. She came west about 1896. 
Her father died in the east in 1903 at the age of sixty-eight years, but her mother 
is still living at home. There were four children in the family in which Mrs. 
Pfarr was reared, the others being Anna Belle, John Alfred and Berenice. Two 
children came to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. Pfarr, Dorothy and Sarah 
Elizabeth. 

Since casting his first presidential vote Mr. Pfarr lias been in sympathy 
with the republican party and has given to its platforms and candidates his 
earnest support. At all times he has cooperated in movements aiming to pro- 
mote the public good and his influence may always be counted upon in for- 
warding any project that will make Denison a more beautiful city or a more 
inviting place for business. Socially he is prominent in the community, and 
fraternallv he holds membership in .Sylvan T-odge. No. 507, A. F. & A. M. 



ROBERT P. PLIMPTON, M. D. 

Dr. Robert P. Plimpton, of Denison, has attained marked success in the prac- 
tice of his profession in the city of his birth and is recognized as one of the 
leading homeopathic physicians in this section of the state. He was born July 
13, 1871, a son of Edward S. and Salina J. (Bond) Plimpton, both natives of 
Massachusetts. Silas W. Plimpton, the paternal grandfather, was three times 
married and by his first wife had four children, namely: Maria, the wife of a 
Mr. Peabody ; Edward S. ; Albert ; and Silas Jr. ITe died at the advanced age 
of eighty-seven years. The maternal grandfather was Albert Bond, also a na- 
tive of Massachusetts, and by trade a mason. He lived to be about seventy 
years old. Edward S. Plimpton, the father of our subject, received his early 
education at Providence. Rhode Island, his parents having moved there when 
he was a child. At the age of sixteen he entered a bank at Providence, in 
which he worked for five years. In 1857 he came to Denison, Iowa, which he 
made his home until 1900, when he removed to Salida, Colorado. He was in 
the mercantile business in Denison and continued in the same line at Salida. 
Here he took an active part in politics and was elected city treasurer, serving 
in that office for several years. He was also a member of the school board 
and has filled a similar position in Salida. The mother of our subject passed 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 61 

away in March, 1909, at the age of seventy-one years, and in 1910 Mr. Plimp- 
ton was married to Miss Lucy Tucker. 

There were seven children in the family of Edward S. and Salina J. Plimp- 
ton, namely : Caroline, now the wife of Rev. E. T. Fegtly, of Des Moines, 
Iowa; Edward, Jr., of Salida, Colorado; Lilian, the wife of Rev. H. S. Black, 
of Portland, Oregon; WilHam, of Glenwood, Iowa; Robert P., the subject of 
this review; George who died in infancy; and Elfreda, the wife of A. H. Fisher, 
of Long Beach, California. 

Robert P. Plimpton received his preliminary education in the public schools 
of Denison and later graduated from the high school. He then entered Des 
Moines College, graduating in 1896 with the degree of A. B. Having decided 
upon a professional career he became a student in the Chicago Homeopathic 
Medical College and in 1900 was graduated with the degree of M. D. He began 
practice at Plattsmouth, Nebraska, but in the fall of 1901 came to Denison 
and bought out Dr. Bolles. He has since continued in this city, where he has 
made for himself a creditable name and gained a goodly measure of financial 
success. 

On the loth of December, 1902, Dr. Plimpton was united in marriage to 
Miss Etta F. Walker, who was born in Bloomington, Illinois, and is also a grad- 
uate of the Des Moines College, being a member of the class of 1897. She is 
also a post-graduate of the University of Chicago of 1898, and previous to her 
marriage successfully engaged in teaching school in this county for four years. 
Her parents, Henry C, and Sophia (Darrow) Walker, were both natives of 
Pennsylvania, from which state they removed to Bloomington, Illinois, and in 
1880 came to Iowa, locating on a farm near Atlantic in Cass county. In 1890 
they removed to Des Moines but are now living at Boulder, Colorado. Mrs. 
Plimpton is their only child. Her paternal grandfather was John Wallace 
Walker, who married Mary (House) Foster and lived at New Milford, Penn- 
sylvania. He was a teacher during the greater part of his life and died at the 
age of seventy-two years, while his wife lived to the advanced age of eighty- 
nine years and eleven months. In their family were seven children, namely: 
Catharine, Henry C, Byron F., Harriet, Emma, William and Ella. 

Mrs. Plimpton is entitled to membership in the Daughters of the American 
Revolution as she traces her ancestry back to Nathan Darrow, who fought for 
the independence of the colonies. He was the youngest of four brothers but 
the others were all forced into the British service and died at sea. He mar- 
ried Anna Perkins, whose father and his two brothers were taken prisoners 
during the war and the two brothers were later killed in the battle of Fort 
Griswold. Gurdon Darrow, the son of Nathan, was born at Groton, Connecti- 
cut, and married Sally Moxley. In early life he left his old home in the Nut- 
meg state and traveled on foot to Pennsylvania, locating at Harford, Susque- 
henna county, where he built a log cabin and developed a farm. He was a sol- 
dier of the war of 1812. His son, Austin Darrow, has spent his entire life on 
the old homestead at Harford. By trade he is a carpenter and he followed that 
occupation for some time but later turned his attention to farming. He married 
Sarah Evans and they are the parents of Airs. Sophia Walker, the mother of 
Mrs. Plimpton. He was one of the founders of the Odd Fellows lodge at Har- 



62 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

ford and is a mcm])cr of the r.ai)tist church, to whicli the Darrow family have 
always belonged. 

Dr. Plimpton and his wife are both identilied with the Baptist church and 
he is a member of its board of trustees, being one of the most active and etfi- 
cient supporters of the church, h'raternally he is identified with Sylvan Lodge, 
No. 507. A. F. (.\: .\. -M.. and his wife holds membership in the Daughters of 
the American Revolution. Ever since casting his first ballot he has voted with 
the republican party. He stands high in the estimation of his ])rofessional 
brethern and the large practice he enjoys is evidence of generous appreciation 
on the i)art of the ])ubHc. 



S. A. DOW. 



The name of Dow is an old and honored one in Crawford county, having 
been prominently identified with its progress and development for more than 
half a century. The present head of the family, S. A. Dow, who is mayor of 
Dow City, was born in the town where he now resides on the 12th of March, 
1856. The father S. K. Dow, was a native of New Hampshire, his birth oc- 
curring in 1821, but at the age of eleven years he migrated to New York with 
his parents, where they resided for one year and then went to Cass county, 
Michigan. He was educated and reared in the latter state, remaining a member 
of the paternal household until he had reached his twenty-fifth year. On the 
28th of October, 1846, he was united in marriage to Miss Chloe Anne Smith, 
who was born in X'erona, New York, in 1825, the officiating clergyman being 
the Rev. Jacob Price. The young people began their domestic life in Michigan 
continuing to reside in that state until 1852, when they' came to Iowa, first 
locating in Harris Grove, where they remained until November, 1855, at which 
time they removed to Crawford county and settled on a farm in Union town- 
ship, the ])resent site of Dow City. Both Mr. and Mrs. Dow possessed the 
essential qualifications of the pioneer and despite the hardships and privations, 
discouragements and misfortunes never lost hope and persistently clung to their 
determination, wdiich was to establish a home on the Iowa i)rairies. In 1866 the 
Northwestern Railroad came through Crawford county and a ])ostoffice was 
located on their homestead called Dowville, Mr. Dow being made postmaster. 
Some time thereafter a church was erected through the eflforts of Mr. and Mrs. 
Dow, who in 1857 had united with the Baptist church under the ministrations 
of the Rev. J. W. Denison. A school and stores followed later and soon quite 
a village had spnmg u]> which was incorporated and named after the man on 
whose farm it stood. Mr. Dow was a man possessing unusual business acumen 
and at one time was interested in several projects, in all of which he met with 
most gratifying success and accumulated real estate in L^nion township, which 
aggregated twenty-six hundred acres. Although engaged in the grain, stock and 
lumber business in addition to the cultivation of his large farm, he always had 
the time to fulfill his civic duties and gave his services to the advancement of 
any movement the adoption of which he felt would be of benefit to the com- 




]\iK. AND MRS. S. E. DOW 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 65 

munity. He was always prominently identified with all local political matters 
giving his support to the candidates of the democratic party. That he was held 
in high esteem is evidenced by his election to many of best offices, among which 
were those of county treasurer and probate judge, which he filled in a highly 
creditable manner. Six children were born unto Mr. and Mrs. Dow, three of 
whom died in infancy, and those who attained maturity were: Alma, now de- 
ceased; S. A., our subject; and William, a carpenter, residing in Dow City. 
The father passed away on the 3d of October, 1907, and the mother survived 
him only a few days, her demise occurring on the 30th of November. 

S. A. Dow acquired his preliminary education in the common and high 
schools of Dow City, after which he attended the Baptist University at Des 
Moines. Returning home from college he went into business with his father, 
with whom he was identified until he was twenty-nine years of age, and then 
engaged in farming for a time, later opening a real-estate office. He has ever 
since continued in this business, handling both local and western property, and 
is meeting with more than average success. 

In 1883 Mr. Dow was united in marriage to Miss Candice E. Davis, who is 
a native of Maryville, Missouri, and they have become the parents of two chil- 
dren : Golda Alma and Chloe Anne. The family attend the Baptist church and 
fraternally Mr. Dow is identified with the Modern Woodmen of America and 
the Improved Order of Red Men, while formerly he was also affiliated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is a strong advocate of the prin- 
ciples of democracy and takes an active and, helpful interest in local govern- 
mental matters. He has occupied the highest office in the municipality for the 
past two years, the responsibilities of which he has discharged in a manner 
generally satisfactory to the community at large. 'He is highly esteemed in his 
native town, in the social life of which his family hold a distinguished position. 



RUDOLPH KNAUL. 



For more than thirty years closely identified with the business interests of 
Denison and also an active and efficient worker in the cause of public education, 
Rudolph Knaul is justly held in high regard by the people of the city. He was 
born in Berlin, Germany, February 24, 1850, a son of Adolph and Mary 
(Woltke) Knaul. the former of whom was born in Brandenburg and the latter 
at Wittenberg, Germany. There were four children in the family, our subject 
being the only one now living. The mother and the other children died from 
cholera in 1856. The father learned the tanner's trade and later became a mer- 
chant in Berlin. In 1868 he emigrated to this country and spent the first eigh- 
teen months in Chicago, then locating at Clinton, Iowa, where he entered the 
drug business. He was three times married, and by his second wife had four 
children, three of whom are now living, namely : Gertie, who married George 
Rumsey ; Anna, who became the wife of George Naeve, a banker of Denison ; 
and Lena, who married J. C. Mastie and now live at Chardon, Ohio. The third 

wife of Mr. Knaul was a Miss Horst, and there were two children born to that 
Vol. 11— 4 



66 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

union: Otto; and Bertha, now tlie wife of Dr. PL C. Simpson, of Denison. 
The paternal grandfather' of our subject was a tanner and died in Germany 
from the effects of an accident. There were four children in his family : Ru- 
dolph, Robert, Adolph and Johanna. John Woltke, the maternal grandfather, 
who was a watchmaker and jeweler and passed away in the old country but had 
spent alx)ut twenty years in the United States. 

Rudolph Knaul received the advantages of a good education in his native 
land and engaged in the drug business for a year and a half in that country 
after leaving school. In 1868 he arrived in America and spent the first two 
years in Qiicago, clerking in a drug store. He then went to Clinton, Iowa, 
and clerked in his father's store, after which he returned to Chicago, where 
he was identified for a year and a half with the same line of business. He again 
came to Clinton and spent two years, at the end of which time he decided to 
locate permanently and in 1879 he selected Denison as his home. He has ever 
since been connected with the drug business in this city and maintains a neat 
and well stocked store, being accorded a large and lucrative patronage. 

On the 24th of July, 1876, Mr. Knaul was united in marriage at Clinton to 
Miss ]\Iaggie Au. who was born in New York city, July 28, 1854, a daughter 
of Julius and Maggie Au. The father was born in Hanover, Germany, and the 
mother in Bavaria. He was a harness and trunk maker. He and his wife both 
died in Lyons, Iowa. There were six children in their family : Charles, Will- 
iam, George, Emma, Maggie, and a son who died in infancy. Two daughters 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Knaul, namely: Mamie, who married M. E. Lies, 
of Waterville, Washington, and has one child, IMargaret ; and Alys, an artist, 
who does beautiful work on china and is living at home. 

Politically, Mr. Knaul is an earnest supporter of the republican party, with 
whose principles he has been in accord ever since he cast his first ballot in 1871. 
He early obser\'ed the beneficial efifects of education and for twenty-five years 
has been a member of the school board of Denison, in the course of which time 
he has greatly assisted in advancing the cause of education in the community. 
An intelligent, progressive and capable citizen, he has been successful in business 
and has gained a host of warm friends in this city. 



L. H. PETERSEN. 



Of German birtli. Mr. Petersen came to this country when a boy and has 
made an enviable record for himself as a farmer of Denison township, Craw- 
ford county. He was born in Schleswig, Germany, March 24, 1876, a son of 
John and Mary (Thompson) Petersen, both of. whom were also natives of 
Schleswig, where they were married. The father came to the United States 
with his second youngest son in the spring of 1885. the mother and remaining 
children arriving in the fall of that year. He located at Irvin. Shelby county, 
Iowa, where he was employed on a railroad until death ended his labors in 1890. 
He is survived by his wife, who resides at Buck Grove, Iowa. To them were 
bom eight children, as follows: John, who makes his home in Denison; L. H. ; 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 67 

Thomas, who lives at Buck Grove ; DtidHef , who is a farmer residing near Buck 
Grove; Lena, who is the wife of Bennett Trueper and Hves in the vicinity of 
Buck Grove; Ira, who Hves in Dakota; Dora and Johannah, deceased. 

The pubHc schools of Germany afforded L. H. Petersen his early mental 
training and when not pursuing his studies he occupied his spare time by 
working in the fields until 1885, when he emigrated to the United States. Com- 
ing to Iowa he spent four years in Shelby county, and later engaged in opera- 
ting rented land in Crawford county for two years, making his first purchase 
of real estate in 1907, which consisted of eighty acres. By careful management 
he was enabled from time to time to add to his holdings until they now aggre- 
gate one hundred and sixty acres of highly improved land. Mr. Petersen gives 
his attention principally to general farming and stock-raising but is also in- 
terested in the raising of poultry, making a specialty of fancy breeds, among 
which are the Partridge Wyandottes. 

The marriage of Mr. Petersen occurred in 1901, when he was united to Miss 
Augusta Trueper, who was born in Oldenburg, Germany, a daughter of Will- 
iam and Louisa (Eisenhauer) Trueper, in whose family were three children, 
namely : William, who lives in Denison ; Bernhardt, residing in Buck Grove ; and 
Augusta. Mr. Trueper's death occurred in Germany and Mrs. Trueper married 
again, her second husband being Carl Remen, a resident of Denison, by whom 
she had four children, Anne, Carl and Louis, residing in South Dakota; and 
Gertrude, who makes her home in Denison. Mr. and Mrs. Petersen are the 
parents of four children, but only Arnold and Alma are now living. Eldon, 
who was born August 5, 1906, died January 3, 191 1, and was buried in the 
Lutheran church cemetery. 

In politics Mr. Petersen is a republican and although he has never desired 
nor sought public office he has always given his loyal support to the party of 
his choice. Both he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. He 
is a worthy example of the German-American citizen who after arriving in this 
country becomes imbued with the American spirit, and he has contributed to the 
best interests of the community in which he resides. 



T. I. GARRISON. 



Among the most responsible and successful citizens of Denison is T. J. 
Garrison, whose life stands as a monument of well directed energy, prudent 
foresight and ability. Mr. Garrison has never had a thirst for office or that 
hankering for publicity which often besets men otherwise successful and which 
many times leads to broken hearts and disappointed hopes. He has been con- 
tent to be known as a man of honor and probity, to surround himself with com- 
fort and luxuries, to enjoy the palatial home which he has built for himself, 
and to help his children grow to successful maturity. The comparative affluence 
which he now enjoys has not been the result of fortune's whim but the result 
of downright hard work, self-denial and sheer ability. 



68 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

-Mr. Garrison was born in Jones county, Iowa, August 22, 1849, a son of 
Solomon and llaniet (Simpson) Garrison. His father was born in Ohio, Feb- 
ruary 13. iSi(), and rcnK)ved lo Iowa immechately after liis marriage on Jan- 
uary 2"/, 1 84 1, setthng in Jones county near the present town of OHn. Twelve 
years later, in 1853, he removed with his family to Onion Grove, near Clar- 
ence, Iowa, where he resided for hfteen years and then returned to Pleasant 
Hill, Jones county. Three of their children having located in Nebraska, in 1883 
the parents removed to that state, making their home at Reynolds. There the 
father died March 2, 1891, the mother afterward making her home with her 
youngest datighter, Mrs. A. D. Hunt, at Mount Vernon, Iowa, where she passed 
away December 9, 1903. To Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Garrison were lx)rn eight 
children, two of whom died in infancy. Those living are: Cyrena, born October 
13, 1843, "ow the wife of John Ashby, of Coggon, Iowa; W. S., born Septem- 
ber 5, 1846, who was married to Miss Emma J. De Camp and now lives at 
Wyoming. Iowa; T. J., the subject of this review; G. R., born May 8. 1854, who 
married Sarah E. Robinson, January 20, 1876, and is now a resident of Cali- 
fornia; L. L.. born February 28. 1858. now an insurance agent in Lincoln, 
Nebraska; and Dema E.. born March 25, 1861, now the wife of A. D. Hunt, of 
Mount Vernon, Iowa. 

Mr. Garrison w-as but a very small lad when his father removed to Clar- 
ence, Cedar county, Iowa. He attended the public schools of that place, pass- 
ing through the different grades until he entered Cornell College at Mount Ver- 
non. His college career was not long, however, as at the age of seventeen he re- 
turned to Clarence and engaged in the hardware and lumber business with 
J. W. Simpson. Later a Mr. Martin was taken in as a partner and the firm 
became Simpson, Garrison & Martin. Mr. Garrison continued in that business 
until he was twenty-seven years of age. when he began to read law. His energy 
and determination are well illustrated by the fact that he decided upon this 
course after having passed his early youth and that he pursued his studies alone, 
purchasing his own books from his earnings and instructing himself so rapidly 
that in the fall of 1879 he was admitted to the bar in Tipton, Cedar county, 
Iowa. In 1880 Mr. Garrison came to Denison, forming a partnersliip with 
I. T. Roberts and succeeding to the law practice of Tabor & Tabor. This part- 
nership continued for several years until the withdrawal of Mr. Roberts from 
the firm, after which Mr. Garrison conducted his extensive business alone until 
the last few years, when he withdrew from practice to enjoy the fruits of years 
of toil. As a lawyer Mr. (larrison enjoyed the reputation as one of the wisest 
and safest of counselors. He always avoided litigation if possible and his work 
was that of an adviser and a ]:)eacemaker rather than an advocate. For many 
years he was the local attorney for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway 
and the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, and in this capacity he enjoyed the 
confidence and personal friendship of the highest officials of tlie two roads. 
He conducted the delicate details concerned with the purcliase of the right of 
way for the Milwaukee and also for the double tracking of the Chicago & North- 
western Railroad througli the coimty. and he succeeded in doing this with no 
dissatisfaction on the i)art of the railroad or of the people. Wise and far- 
sighted investment added to his income as an attorney until, as we have stated. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 69 

he has been enabled to retire from business, surrounded with a goodly portion 
of life's enjoyments. 

On the 17th of February, 1870, Mr. Garrison was united in marriage to ]\Iiss 
Emma Carothers. To them were born four children: Lillian A., whose gift of 
music and whose lovable disposition have been an added blessing to the home ; 
Edgar S., who has through a series of well earned promotions been appointed 
to the important position of judge of the Canal zone; Ray D., who married 
Miss Hattie Weeks, of this city, and who is in the fruit-raising business at 
Grand Junction, Colorado ; and Earling R., who is the life and joy of the home 
and who bids fair to duplicate his father's business sagacity. 

In Mr. Garrison we have the picture of a forcefvil, self-made man, of kindly 
disposition, loyal to his friends, and who has earned for himself the respect and 
consideration of the communitv. 



JAMES SCOTT. 



One of the well kept and highly cultivated farms of Paradise township is 
the property of James Scott, who has been a resident of Crawford county for 
more than forty years. He is a native of Canada but is of Irish extraction, his 
grandparents having come from Counties Carlow and Kilkenny, Ireland. His 
paternal grandfather, John Scott, crossed the ocean in 1822, and his maternal 
grandfather, William Garland, in 181 5, and both located in Canada. The eldest 
child of William and Mary Ann (Garland) Scott, also natives of Canada, our 
subject, was born near Ottawa on the 28th of April, 1858. The parents mi- 
grated from Canada, where the father had followed farming, and located on a 
farm in Union township, this county, in December, 1869, and for thirty years 
Mr. Scott engaged in general farming and stock-raising. He had been married 
previously, his first wife being Emily Davis, also a Canadian, and they became 
the parents of the following children: Mary Jane, the wife of A. P. Hardy, of 
Mitchell, South Dakota ; John, deceased ; and Sarah, who married Edgar Palm- 
er, of Lexington, Oregon. There were six children of the second marriage 
beside the son James, and they are as follows : Barbara Ann, living in St. 
Anthony, Idaho ; William Garland, a resident of Lexington, Idaho ; Matilda, 
who became the wife of P. J. Hallowell, of Paradise township, this county; 
Ellen Sophia, who is teaching in St. Anthony, Idaho; Jonathan Albert, a black- 
smith of Dow City, Iowa ; and Henry Griffth, a farmer of Paradise township. 
The father passed away in 1899 and the mother died in 1895. 

James Scott acquired his education in the common schools of Canada and 
Crawford county, Iowa, and when old enough to lay aside his text-books and 
assume the heavier responsibilities of life he decided to become an agriculturist. 
He remained at home until his marriage. During that time he had acquired 
the means which enabled him to buy eighty acres of land in Union township, 
and this he cultivated for about two years and then removed to his present 
place. Here he has resided for twenty-six years, during which time he has 
made many and great improvements and his is one of the best farming prop- 



70 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

erties in Paradise township. The buildings are all substantial and in g-ood con- 
dition ; he keeps a superior grade of stock ; and his fields are given the care 
and supervision whicli results in large harvests and good prices. He now owns 
eighty acres in Union and one hundred acres in Paradise township. 

It was on the 27th of December. 1882, that Mr. Scott was united in mar- 
riage to Miss ]\Iary Amelia Hallowell, a daughter of Joseph and Marcia (Adams) 
Hallowell, the father being a native of Xew York and the mother of Ohio. 
They migrated from Ohio to Illinois and came to Iowa in 1853 but did not locate 
in Crawford county until 1867. Here they both passed away, the father in 1880 
and the mother in 1897. Mrs. Scott is the youngest of the five children born 
unto Mr. and Mrs. Hallowell, the others being as follows: George, who is now 
dead ; Ophelia, also deceased ; John, a farmer of Crawford county ; and Peter 
J., also a farmer of this county. ^Nlr. and Mrs. Scott have become the parents 
of six children : Mary Ellen, Anna Laura, Thomas Garland, Rosella Beatrice 
and James Hallowell, all of whom are at home, while the fourth child died in 
infancy. 

Mr. Scott is of the Episcopalian faith and is fraternally identified with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America, 
his local afiiliation with these two orders being with the Dow City lodges. His 
eldest daughter, Mary, is identified with the Rebekahs, the ladies auxiliary of 
the Odd Fellows. Mr. Scott has always remained free from party dictation in 
political matters, never having voted a straight ticket but once and that was a 
republican, nor would he ever accept an office. He is one of the progressive 
and highly esteemed citizens of his community, where his sound principles and 
keen sense of honor have won the respect they are always accorded. 



LEWIS L. OSTERLUXD. 

The foreign born citizens of Crawford county have done much to advance 
the agricultural possibilities of Iowa and prominent among these may be men- 
tioned Lewis L. Osterlund, a farmer and stock-raiser of Milford township. He 
was born near Stockholm, Sweden, August 9, 185 1, a son of August and Chris- 
tina C Osterlund, who were farmers in their native country', where they both 
died when Lewis L. was quite young. The latter obtained his education in the 
public schools of Sweden and then followed farming until twenty-one years old. 
Hearing of the greater advantages ofifered to young men in the United States, 
he decided to better his condition and in 1872 emigrated to this country. He 
first located in Illinois but remained there but a few months and then removed 
to Clinton. Iowa, where his first occupation was logging on the [Mississippi river 
and working in the lumberyards of the Clinton Lumber Company. There he 
remained for seven years, living economically, and by saving his earnings he 
was enabled to buy eighty acres of land in Milford township, Crawford county, 
upon which in 1879 he began practical farming. Owing to his former experience 
in the old country he was successful from the beginning, erected a modern house 
and made other needed improvements upon his land, which was located on sec- 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 71 

tion 2^. This he sold in 1892 and purchased one hundred and twenty acres on 
section i, later buying three hundred and twenty additional acres on section 2, 
making a total of four hundred and forty acres, which today ranks among the 
finest improved land in Crawford county and where he carries on general farm- 
, ing and stock-raising. He makes a specialty of shorthorn Durham cattle and 
feeds both cattle and hogs for the market. 

In August, 1876, ^Ir. Osterlund married ^liss Xellie Olson, of Clinton, 
Iowa. Her parents Nels and Hannah Olson, were natives of Sweden and 
came to this countr}^ in 1873, taking up their residence in South Dakota, where 
the father died in 1906. being still survived by the mother. To ]\Ir. and Mrs. 
Osterlund have been born the following eleven children: Laura, now Airs. Rob- 
ert Hawley, of Crawford county ; Rose, the widow of Charles ]\Iaynard ; Charles, 
who was born December 2, 1880, and is now residing in Nevada; Olga. now 
Mrs. Patrick Gallagher; Arthur, born June 15. 1885, now living in Cotton- 
wood, South Dakota; Lewis, Jr., born August 16, 1888, also living in South 
Dakota; Roy, born April 4, 1890; Myrtle; Walter, born June 18, 1894; Lily 
and Carrie. The younger members of the family are still at home. 

Mr. Osterlund has always upheld the principles of the republican party and 
has efficiently filled the office of township trustee for two terms. He has also 
served for several years as school director and was twice appointed by Gov- 
ernor Shaw to the farmers convention, once at Boston and once at Colorado 
Springs. Fraternally he is a worthy member of Vail Lodge. No. 422, A. F. & 
A. AI. and Chapter No. 89, R. A. M., of Dunlap, Iowa. Religiously he is a 
<:onsistent member of the Lutheran church. Mr. Osterlund is a worthy example 
of all that goes to make an exemplary citizen of the countr}' of his adoption, 
and his abilities as an agriculturist as well as his personal characteristics have 
won for him recognition* and the approbation of the community wherein he 
resides. 



CHARLES W. MERRILL. 

Charles \\\ 2\Ierrill. who stands today as one of the representative and pro- 
gressive business men of Denison, was born July 7, 1855, in Ohio, a son of 
John W. and Julia (Heaton) Merrill, both of whom were natives of New 
York state. In 1869 they removed to Linn county, Iowa, where the father 
rented one hundred and sixty acres of land, upon which he resided until 1882 
and then took up his residence in ]\Iontezuma. Iowa, remaining there during 
the rest of his life. Seven children were born to this couple, of whom but two 
survive, namely: Harriet, who became the wife of R. C. Ring and lives in Linn 
county; and Charles W. Those deceased are James, Ouincy. Rufus, \\'illiam 
C. and Lucy. 

After passing through the public schools Mr. Merrill served an apprentice- 
ship to the wagonmaker's trade and has since continued to successfully follow 
this branch of industry. His first employment was obtained at Center Point, 
Linn county, where he remained about five years and then moved to Thorn- 



72 lilSTUKV OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

burg. Iowa, where he spent fifteen years. lie next Hved in Greene, Iowa, there 
engaging in the same occuiJalinn for iwo and a lialf years, lie then came to 
Denison, opened up a carriage and wagon shop and h\ unremitting industry, 
and his unquestioned abihty in this line of work has succeeded in building up a 
large and lucrative business. 

On December 28, 1879. ^^^'- -Merrill was united in marriage to Miss Addie 
L., a daughter of J. M. and Eliza j. (Torrence) Potter, who were the parents 
of seven children, four of whom, including Mrs. Merrill, survive, the others 
being: Ella M., who became the wife of H. C. Printy and lives in Center Point. 
Linn county; Franklin, who is a farmer near Columbia Falls, Montana; Artie 
^label, who married George W. Lee and resides in Sac City. Iowa. Mr. I'otter 
is a native of Indiana and followed farming in that state and in Iowa until he 
retired and came to reside with his daughter. Mrs. Merrill. At the age of 
eighty-four he is enjoying a serene old age. His wife departed tins life in 
igo- in her seventy-fourth year. Mr. and Mrs. Merrill are the parents of four 
children, two of whom are living, namely : Clififord C. who resides in Omaha, 
Nebraska; and Mabel J., who became the wife of A. L. Moeller and lives in 
Council Bluffs. Iowa. 

IMrs. Merrill is president of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, of 
wdiich she was also for a short time district president. Mr. Merrill casts his 
vote for the republican party and although he takes an abiding interest in all 
local affairs that tend to improve his town he has never sought political prefer- 
ment. In religion he holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. In 
his business career he has made an excellent record and has not only become 
favorably and well known but has gained a gratifying measure of prosperity, 
while personally he is a man whose worth and high princi])les are well appre- 
ciated by his many friends. 



FRANK H. DOWNS. 



Frank H. Downs, a well known farmer and stock-raiser of Crawford county, 
was born in Gloucester county, New Jersey, June 5, 1867. a son of Edward J. 
and Lucinda (Graham) Downs, the former of whom was born May 7, 1834. in 
New Jersey where he grew to manhood, and there his marriage took place No- 
vember 20. 1856. He was a farmer and charcoal burner, marketing his products 
in IMiiladelphia. and he followed those occupations until he was forty-two years 
of age, wdien he came west, locating in Menard county. Illinois. He was a son 
of Thomas and Maria Jane Downs. His widow is a native of Ireland and 
makes her home in Denison, Iowa. They were the parents of ten children, of 
whom all but one survive, namely : Hudson, who lives in Arion. Iowa ; Maria 
Jane, who married Charles Gaines and resides in Menard county. Illinois ; John 
F.. who is a farmer near North Platte. Nebraska ; Elmer Ellsworth, who is lo- 
cated in Dawson county, Nebraska ; Franklin H. ; Sarah Elizabeth, who became 
the wife of Morris McHenry, Jr., and resides in Dow City; Ed J., Jr., who is 
on a farm near Overton, Nebraska; Lucinda, who married Isaac Howorth, of 




F. H. DOWNS 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 75 

Goodrich township ; and Emma, who is the wife of Ed R. Green and Hves 
in Overton, Nebraska. 

The initial education of Frank Downs was obtained in the common schools 
of Menard county, Illinois, supplemented by a course in the Indian Point graded 
schools. With the object of taking up agriculture as his life vocation he began 
active work on a rented farm in Shelby county, where he remained three years 
and then came to Crawford county. Here he was engaged in the livery busi- 
ness for seven years, his stables being located at Arion. Deciding to once more 
embark in agricultural pursuits, he rented a farm, which he cultivated for two 
years and then bought one hundred and sixty acres in Boyer township, com- 
prising what is called the McMartin farm. Here he resided for five years and 
then moved to his present location, his farm here consisting of two hundred and 
five acres. Besides this he owns real estate in the town of Arion. He is an 
extensive dealer in live stock, making a specialty of English Berkshire hogs and 
polled Durham cattle and also handles a high grade of Shropshire sheep. 

The marriage of Mr. Downs took place April 8, 1898, when he was united 
to Mrs'. Nellie (Acker) Wall, who was born in Ogle county, Illinois, a daughter 
of John and Nellie (Harrington) Acker, the former of whom was born in Ogle 
county, April 5, 1835, and the latter in Otsego county, New York, October 10, 
1839. During the Civil war Mr. Acker enlisted in the Union army at Chicago 
in 1861, becoming a member of an independent company known as Sturgas 
Rifles, named for the man who fitted them out.. This company was sent out as 
General McClellan's bodyguard and participafed"' in the seven days' battle of 
the Wilderness, remaining in the service until McClellan was removed. As it 
was an independent company it could not be sent anywhere without the consent 
of its members and they were mustered out and returned home in 1862. In 
1863, however, Mr. Acker joined Company M, Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry, 
and was commissioned first lieutenant but during his service was on special duty 
most of the time, being stationed at Jefferson Barracks and later at Alton, 
Illinois, where he guarded three hundred prisoners. His wife was with him 
most of the time until he was ordered to the front in pursuit of General Price 
of Missouri. He served as aid-de-camp on General McNeal's stafif, assisting 
in guarding about fifteen hundred prisoners at Alton all one summer. When 
they went into winter quarters his wife joined him, but when there was any 
danger of fighting she was sent home. He was mustered out in 1865 at the 
close ol the war. Mr. Acker moved to Boone, Iowa, in 1865 and lived there 
for three years, after which he went to Avoca, Iowa, and engaged in the hard- 
ware business for eighteen years, going from there to Hand county, South Da- 
kota, where for the following thirteen years he followed farming and then 
removed to Everett, Washington, which is at present the home of himself and 
wife. They are the parents of five children, of whom the following are living: 
NeUie; Tessora V., who is the wife of George Dulitz and lives in Washington 
state; and Ahce May, who became the wife of Homer Brown and resides in 
Oregon. On the maternal side Mrs. Downs comes of good Revolutionary stock, 
her great-grandfather Harrington, having served as a private in the Continental 
army. He died shortly after the close of the war from the effects of the hard- 



76 IIISTURY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

.ships suffered durinf;^ his service. When al the front his brave wife was left 
with a family ot small children to care for on a little farm, her stock consisting 

of one horse and a few sheep. She cultivated her land, doing all the work 

herself, sheared 'ler sheep, carded the wool and spun and wove the material for 

the clothes of her family. She also knitted socks, dried nieat and melted her 

pewter ware into bullets, which she took on horseback, a distance of a hundred 

miles, through the woods to her husband, although she was surrounded on all 

sides by the English troops. Her friends feared for her safety but she trusted 

implicitly in God and was brought safely home. 

Mrs. Downs was educated in Avoca and taught school for thirteen years. 
While living in Everett, Washington, she was a member of the Women's Relief 
■Corps of that city. Mer first husband, Harry Wall, to whom she was married 
December 7, 1887, in Hand county. South Dakota, was a native of Indiana and 
followed the vocation of farming. To them was born one child, Eva May, who 
became the wife of Neil Graham and now resides in Everett, Washington. Mr. 
and Mrs. Downs are the parents of three children, namely: Nathaniel Acker, 
Frank, Jr., and Eliza Early, all of whom are under the parental roof. 

In his political views Mr. Downs is a republican. Both he and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which they give their hearty 
stipport. He is a well known representative of farming interests in Union town- 
ship and his highly cultivated lands and the excellent condition of his graded 
stock indicate, as nothing else could do. his untiring energ}- and capable man- 
agement, and his thorough reliability in all business affairs has gained for him 
the confidence of everyone with whom he deals. 



C. P. HARVEY. 



In tracing the genealogy of the Harvey family we find there was a Colonel 
Daniel Harvey, an oi^cer in the English army who settled in Ireland and who. 
.as far as can be learned, is the head of the present generation. Michael Har- 
vey, the father of C. P. was born in County Armagh, Ireland, ]\Iarch 27th, 
1 81 7, whence he emigrated to the United States about 1837, locating in New 
York city, where he married Miss Ellen McGill, who was also born in Ireland in 
1819. He resided in New York about five years then removed to Lee county, 
Illinois, where he followed stock-raising and farming. He was a very early set- 
tler and some of the papers giving him possession of his land were signed by 
President Fillmore, per his secretary. In politics he was a democrat nearly all 
his life. He died in 1867, being survived by his wife, who departed thi,-^ life in 
1903. and both were interred in Sandy Hill ceme.tery. Lee county. They were 
the parents of the following eight children: Thomas A., who is a lawyer resid- 
ing in Lead City, South Dakota, and who for years was criminal attorney for 
ATeade county ; James, who is a farmer and stockman in Lee county. Illinois ; 
C. P. ; Mack, who is living on the old homestead in Lee county ; John, who is 
mayor of Amboy, Illinois ; and three others, Mary, Charles and an infant, all 
deceased. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 77 

C. P. Harvey was born in Lee county, Illinois, May 2, 1852, and obtained his 
early education in the public schools. He remained at home until twenty years 
old and then went to Chicago, where he remained for two and a half years in 
the employ of Shuler & Company. Returning to Lee county he engaged in 
farming for one year, and later removing to Clinton, Iowa, followed the same 
occupation for four years, going from there to West Side, Crawford county 
in 1878. Here he remained for about fourteen years, one of which he spent in 
conducting a meat market in the village, another in acting as superintendent of 
the poor farm, the remaining twelve years being occupied in farming for him- 
self. Subsequently he moved to East Boyer and continued the pursuit of agri- 
culture there for four or five years, later going to Paradise township. After 
three or four years' farming here he located in Denison township, buying two 
hundred and forty acres of land which now comprises his homestead. ' Under 
Mr. Harvey's able management it has become a highly improved and valuable 
piece of property and most creditably reflects his ability to apply modern meth- 
ods in obtaining the best results from the soil. In connection with general farm- 
ing he is interested in the raising of fine stock. 

Mr. Harvey was united in marriage in 1876 to Miss Hannah Polhamus, a 
native of Iowa, who is of Pennsylvania Dutch ancestry, and they had three 
children, namely: Earl, who was accidently killed; Thomas Albert, who lives 
opposite the home place and who in 1894 married Miss Lissie Latshaw, born in 
Shelby county, Iowa, and they have three children, Grace Gladys, Glen Eldon 
and MerHn Paul; James, who occupies the adjoining farm, and who married 
Miss Florence Warmath, born in Denison, and they have two children, twins, 
Frank and George. 

In regard to politics Mr. Harvey has always been a democrat and takes an 
active interest in the affairs of his party. He served on the board of supervisors 
from 1883 to 1886 and has been a member of the school board for the past 
twenty-six years. In his fraternal connections he is affiliated with the Knights 
of Pythias. He has brought to his life work a well trained mind, which has 
made it possible for him to carry to a successful conclusion the ambitions of his 
early youth, and among his many friends he is recognized as a man of sterling 
worth and of the strictest integrity, a reputation he has never failed to uphold. 



REV. H. C. WILLIAM FRESE. 

On account of the nature of their calling the clergy occupy a prominent place 
in the community and wield an influence which often profoundly afifects the 
lives of those with whom they come in contact. Men only of unsullied char- 
acter and of the very highest attainments mentally and morally are worthy of 
the responsibility of expounding the holy writ, and to this number belongs Rev. 
H. C. William Frese, whose name stands at the head of this sketch. 

He was born in Tonawanda, Xew York, August 23, 1873, and is a son of 
Rev. Louis and Louisa (Richter) Frese, natives of Hanover, Germany, and St. 
Louis respectively. The father received his preliminary education in Ger- 



78 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

many and at seventeen years of age crossed the ocean to America and engaged 
for several years as a bookkeeper in Xcw York city. About 1866 he went to St. 
Louis and studied for the ministry of the Lutheran church, graduating from 
Concordia Seminary, lie began preaching at Archibald, Ohio, and successfully 
carried on his work for many years, his last charge being at Council Bluffs, 
Iowa, where he died in 1900. At the time of his death he was fifty-four years 
of age and in the midst of a life of great usefulness. His wife is still living and 
makes her home at Champaign, Illinois. Henry Frese, the paternal grand fatlier 
of our subject, was a farmer in Germany and married Henrietta Hincke. They 
had four sons and one daughter: Adolph, Julius, Ernst, Louis, and Henrietta, 
now the wife of Fred Riebow, of South Omaha. The four sons were all min- 
isters of the gospel. The maternal grandfather, jolin Richter, was a native of 
Saxony, Germany. He was a cooper by trade and located in St. Louis many 
years ago. He married Louisa Espenschied. and tliey were the parents of four 
children : Ernst, Louisa, Theresa and Theodore, the two last named being now 
deceased. There were ten children in the family of Louis and Louisa Frese, 
namely: Esther, now ]\Irs. Henry Dirks, of Poplar Blufif, Missouri; H. C. Wil- 
liam, of this review; Theresa. Louisa and Julius, all of whom are deceased; 
Louis, a teacher at Cedar Rapids. Iowa; Emil and Walter, both of whom are 
deceased ; and Emma and Anna, who are living at home. 

H. C. William Frese received his early education in the parochial schools 
of Effingham and Champaign, Illinois. He later became a student of the North 
Western University of Watertown, Wisconsin, and Concordia College at Spring- 
field. Illinois, graduating in theology from the latter institution in 1896. He 
began his labors as a missionary at Poplar Bluff, Missouri, continuing there for 
four years. His second charge as a pastor was at St. Paul's Lutheran church 
in Council Bluffs. He came to Denison in 1903 and since that time has been 
pastor of Zion's Lutheran church and also superintendent of the Lutheran 
school of this city. 

On the 2d of October, 1902, Mr. Frese was united in marriage to ^liss 
Elizabeth Bosecker. who was l)orn at Evansville, Indiana. Her parents, who 
W'ere also natives of that state, moved to Wabash county, Illinois, when she was 
very young and she grew to womanhood there. She received her early educa- 
tion in Wabash county- and later attended the State Normal School in Carbon- 
dale, Illinois. She was married to Mr. Frese near Cowlin";. IlHnois. Her 
father was a farmer but is now living retired at Mount Carmel. Illinois. He 
held various township offices and was school treasurer for over twenty years and 
supervisor for three years. Ijeing very active in all works pertaining to the ad- 
vancement of the neighborhood. There were four children in their family, 
namely: Elizabeth, now Mrs. H. C. William Frese; Frederick; Mary, the wife 
of Theodore Wirth ; and Lena. The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Frese was 
Carl Bosecker. a farmer of Saxony, Germany, who died wlicn comparatively a 
young man. but his widow lived to the age of seventy-eight years. Tliey had 
five children: Anna, Elizabeth. William. Christian and Andrew. The maternal 
grandfather was Jacob Schweikhard. a native of Bavaria. Gennany. and a 
farmer. He married Margaret Baumgartner and died in early manhoorl. but she 
lived to the age of seventy-five. There were three children in their family. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 79 

namely : Jacob, Charlotte and Frederick. Four children have come to bless the 
home of Air. and Airs. Frese : William and Elizabeth, deceased ; Walter ; and 
Ruth. 

Politically Mr. Frese gives his adherence to the republican party, believing 
that in so doing he is promoting the best interests of the nation. He is thor- 
oughly active and efficient in his church work and is a member of the Evan- 
gelical Lutheran synod of Missouri, Ohio and other states. Thoroughly alive 
to the great advances made along all lines during the earlier years of the twen- 
tieth century, he is, moreover, a constant student of the great book which is the 
basis of his belief, his message from Sunday to Sunday attracting large and in- 
terested audiences. He aims to walk in the path prescribed by the great Alaster 
and by his unselfish acts as well as by his words he has been instrumental in 
inducing many to adopt the Christian life. 



JOHN HALLOWELL. 



John Hallo well, who owns a fine farm of two hundred and twenty acres in 
Paradise township, was born in Elgin, Illinois, on the 2d of February, 1853. his 
parents being Joseph and Alarcia (Adams) Hallowell. The father was a native 
of Saratoga county. New York, and the mother of Ohio. Joseph Hallowell 
grew to manhood in his native state and then migrated to Ashtabula county, 
Ohio, where he met and married Miss Adams. Shortly after this event the 
young couple located in Elgin, Illinois, where they lived until 1853. In the lat- 
ter year they again started westward, Iowa being their destination this time. 
and they settled on a farm in Putnam township, Fayette coimty, but after re- 
siding there five years they removed to Clayton county. They were residents 
of the latter county for nine years and at the end of that time located on the 
farm in Paradise township, which their son now owns. They were the parents 
of five children, but only three are now living, however, George and Ophelia, 
the two eldest, having passed away. Those surviving are: John, our subject: 
Peter J., who is living on a farm which adjoins his brother's on the north ; and 
Mary, the wife of James Scott, who owns the adjoining farm on the west. The 
father was a blacksmith and farmer, and being quite successful in both under- 
takings he had accumulated considerable property at the time of his demise in 
1880. The mother passed away in 1897 and was laid to rest beside her husband 
in the Dow City cemetery. 

John Hallowell acquired his preliminary education in the common schools 
of Clayton and Crawford counties, and later attended the State College at 
Ames for one year. He remained at home, assisting his father with the cultiva- 
tion of the farm until after the latter's demise, when he took the entire respon- 
sibility. He has never married and continues to live on the home farm, which 
he now owns. 

Mr. Hallowell was reared in the Universalist faith and was at one time a 
member of the Alasonic fraternity but has not been affiliated with that organiza- 
tion of recent years. He used to give his political support to the democratic 



80 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

party but has transferred his alle£jiance to the men and measures of the republi- 
can party, considering that their pohcy is now better adapted to subserve the 
best interests of the country. lie has never held office, being a quiet, unobtrusive 
man who has always fullilled the requirements of good citizenship as he recog- 
nized them, and although he has devoted his time almost entirely to the advance- 
ment of his personal interests they have always been of a nature to promote 
those of the community at large. 



REV. M. J. FARRELLY. 

It is doubtful whether in the state of Iowa a more faithful and efficient 
pastor can be found than Father M. J. Farrelly, of the St. Rose of Lima Cath- 
olic church, of Denison. He has officiated as head of the church ot this place^ 
for twenty-four years and the great respect in whicli he is held by his parish- 
ioners as well as by the entire community is proof of his worth. Born at 
Aughavass, Ireland, March i, 1854. he was reared as a farmer boy by good 
Catholic parents and received his early education in his native land. The fath- 
er's business was principally that of buying anrl selling cattle and shipping them 
to England and Scotland. He died in 1892 at the age of eighty-four years. 
The mother came to America in 1893 ^^^ passed away in Denison, Iowa, on the 
i6th of December, 1899, being then seventy-three years of age. There were 
seven sons and two daughters in the family, namely : Luke, now deceased ; 
Patrick F., who is pastor of St. Joseph's church at Carroll, Iowa; Thomas, 
who died at the age of eighteen years; M. J., the subject of this review; Mrs. 
B. McGuire, of St. Paul, Minnesota, whose husband died October 26, i9ior 
James, a commission merchant of Chicago; Philip, who is a farmer and lives 
near Denison; Peter, of Denison; and Mary, the wife of J. T. Haugh, of Deni- 
son. Luke Farrelly, the paternal grandfather, a farmer in Ireland, married a 
Miss Mastcrson and they had seven children, Luke, Matthew, Peter, James, 
Michael, Thomas, and a daughter who died when young. The maternal grand- 
father was Patrick Fitzpatrick who was a farmer of Ireland and also married 
a Miss Masterson. Their family included eight children, Philip, Patrick, Ann, 
Ellen, Mar)'. Alice, Adelia and Margaret. 

Father Farrelly came to America in 1872 and for two years worked by the 
month on a farm near Lawler in Chickasaw county, Iowa. In 1874 he entered 
the Christian Brothers School at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, and in the fall of 
the following year became a student in St. Joseph's College at Dubuque. Iowa, 
where he spent two years in the study of the classics, graduating in moral 
philosophy in 1877. In the fall of the same year he went to Montreal, Canada, 
where he engaged for three years in the study of theology. Returning to 
Dubuque, he was ordained a priest of the Roman Catholic church on the 21st 
of .September. 1880. His first appointment was in charge of a parish at Man- 
chester. Iowa, where he continued for seven years, and while there built a 
church at Ryan ancl at Earlville and a parsonage at Manchester. He also se- 
cured for the congregation a new cemetery and carried out other important 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 81 

undertakings. Under the appointment of Bishop Hennessy he has served since 
October i, 1887, as pastor of St. Rose of Lima church at Denison. He has also 
been for nine years in charge of the Charter Oak church as an out mission. 
In 1890 he built the CathoHc school known as the St. Rose of Lima parochial 
school, which now has seventy-five pupils exclusive of those taking instruction 
in music, who number about sixty. In 1896 he erected a new church in this 
city, which cost twenty thousand dollars and has a seating capacity of seven 
hundred persons. It is elegantly furnished and was recently handsomely re- 
decorated and frescoed, being known as one of the most beautiful churches in 
the state. In the fall of 1910 Father Farrelly effected the purchase of the 
handsome residence of George W. Nicholson, one of the finest in the city, and 
it is now the parsonage of the church. 

Father Farrelly has always retained his interest in his studies and is deeply 
versed in history, literature, science, theology and all subjects that interest a 
wide-awake and progressive scholar and religious teacher of the twentieth cen- 
tury. He is an eloquent and convincing speaker and is often invited to deliver 
addresses before patriotic, literary or religious bodies in the state. He is a 
power for good and his influence has ever been exerted in behalf of the weaker 
members of society and in the upbuilding of the best interests of the state and 
nation. 



JOHN H. TAMM. 



For nearly twenty years John H. Tamm has been connected with business 
interests in Denison and has assisted as a public-spirited citizen in promoting 
the welfare of the community. He found congenial employment in mercantile 
lines and the success that has attended his efforts is proof of his ability. He 
was born in Clinton county, Iowa, April 14, 1865, a son of Henry and Catharine 
(Stoltenberg) Tamm, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father 
was reared as a farmer. He came to America at the age of eighteen and en- 
gaged at various times in clerking, teaming and farming in Davenport and 
Camanche, Iowa. In 1882 he settled in Morgan township, Crawford county,, 
and bought seven hundred and twenty acres of land, which he partly improved. 
He died three years after taking up his residence in this county, being then in 
the midst of a useful life, as he was only forty-seven years old. He was promi- 
nent in the community and served with marked ability as justice of the peace, 
school trustee and in other township offices. His wife is still living and makes 
her home at Ida Grove. She is a member of the Lutheran church, as was also 
her husband. Three children were born to them : John H., of this review ; and 
Charles and Edward, both of whom live near Schleswig. 

Our subject's grandfather Tamm was a blacksmith in Germany and lived 
to the age of sixty-five years. Of his family Henry, Fred, Anna and Dora came 
to America and two members remained in the old country. The grandparents 
on the maternal side, Peter and Betty Stoltenberg, established their home in 
Crawford county, Iowa, where they spent their last years. They had four chil- 



82 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

dren: Catharine; I Iciin ; r.crtha. of Davcnpurt, ihc widow of John Johann; 
and W'ilhani. 

lohn II. Tanini hvcd in Clinton county until sixteen years of age and re- 
ceived his eilucation in the district schools and in a business college at Daven- 
ix)n. He came to Crawford county with his parents and lived at home until 
he reached manhooil. he and his brothers then taking charge of the home farm. 
In 189-' he took up his residence in Denison and entered the farm implement 
business, with which he has ever since been connected. He also sells automobiles 
and by intelligent and thoughtful attention to the wants of his customers has 
attracted a liberal patronage. 

On the 8th of June, 1892. Mr. Tamm was united in marriai^e to Miss Or- 
ville Ililbert, a native of Clinton county and a daughter of Hans and Lena 
(Paulman) Hilbert. The father was born in Iowa and the mother in Germany. 
There were five ciiildren in their family: Orville, Ferdinand, William, Alfred 
and Minnie. 

Mr. Tamm and his wife are sincere members of the Lutheran church and 
take a deep interest in its various beneficences. Politically he is not allied with 
any of the established parties, as he prefers to vote independently, selecting- his 
candidates according to the needs of the times. He is genial and pleasing in 
address and has made a host of friends not only by his kindly disposition but 
also by his honorable and straightforward dealing. 



JOHN F. KEPFORD. 



A hundred and sixty acre farm on section 17. Washington tow-nship, pays 
tribute to the well directed effort and capable supervision of John F. Kepford, 
who has been identified with the farming interests of Craw^ford county for a 
quarter of a century. A native of this state, he was born in Washington town- 
ship, Johnson county, on the 12th of December, 1855, a son of Jacob and Mar- 
tha (Shue) Kepford. of Lancaster county. Pennsylvania, in which state they 
were also married. There were thirteen chihh-en in the family but Sarah and 
Hattie. the nintli and tenth in order of birth, have passed away, while the first 
two died in infancy. Those surviving are: Mary, the wife of Antone Bast, of 
Washington township; Martha, who married Thomas Tranter, of Johnson 
county; Ellen, who became the wife of James Tranter, of Washington town- 
ship; John F.. our subject; Jacob, a farmer in Washington township; Joseph. 
who resides in Union township; David, living in Des Moines; Edward, residing in 
Union township; and Phila. the wife of Frank Jones, of Schleswig. The parents 
migrated from Pennsylvania to Iowa in pioneer days, first locating in Johnson 
county, where they resided until 1888, at wiiich time they removed to Craw- 
ford county and settled on a farm in Union township, where they continued to 
live until Mr. Kepford's demise in 1899. Ever since attaining manhood he had 
been engaged in agricultural pursuits with the exception of the three years he 
served at the front during the Civil war. Mrs. Kepford still survives and is 
living on the old homestead in I'nion township. 



« 



-J^ 







HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 85 

John F. Kepford obtained his education in the public schools of Johnson 
county, remaining a member of the paternal household until he was seventeen 
years of age, at which time he began working as a farm hand. He continued to 
follow that occupation for six years, during which period he acquired the means 
to begin farming for himself as a renter in his native county. He remained a 
resident of Johnson county until 1884, when he removed to Crawford county 
and purchased land in Union township, which he cultivated for nine years. At 
the end of that time he bought his present place in Washington township, where 
he has ever since engaged in general farming and stock-raising. His home- 
stead is well improved and plentifully stocked, while the fields are given the care 
and supervision which results in excellent harvests, judged as to both quantity 
and quality. Mr. Kepford is also interested in real estate in Buck Grove. 

On March 3, 1886, Mr. Kepford was united in marriage to Miss Harriet 
Ellen Tillett, of Belmont county, Ohio, a daughter of Henry E. and Mary 
(Brewer) Tillett. Her father was a native of Virginia and her mother of the 
Buckeye state. They removed to Iowa in 1858 and located in Cedar county, 
where they remained for twenty years, and then came to Crawford county, 
setthng upon the place where Mr. Kepford now resides. The father passed 
away in 1887 but the mother survived until 1891. Mr. and Mrs. Tillett were 
the parents of the following children: Etheline. E., a resident of Buck Grove; 
Anna Elizabeth, deceased; John Wesley, living* ri»' Denver, Colorado; Mary 
Caroline, deceased; Margaret L., the wife of John A. Horton, living near Sac- 
ramento, California; Henry A., a resident of Redfield, South Dakota; Harriet 
E., the wife of John F. Kepford; Ethelbert W.-, deteased; Eutes C, living in 
Goodwin, South Dakota; and Newton B., Edward, Bertha and an infant, all 
of whom are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Kepford have one daughter Martha Eura, 
who, after completing the common schools, attended the high school at Ames 
for three years. They also reared E. H. Polzien, who continues to make his 
home with them. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Kepford and their daughter hold membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Ever since granted the right of franchise Mr. Kep- 
ford has given his support to the candidates of the republican party. He always 
takes an active interest in local governmental afifairs, although he has never 
filled any public office save that of school director. He is a man whose in- 
fluence can always be counted upon to advance any movement the adoption of 
which would improve local conditions and is esteemed accordingly in his 
community. 



JOHN SCHNOOR. 



From a farmer boy to manager of an important mercantile establishment 
in a flourishing city is a long step and yet it has been made by John Schnoor, 
now at the head of the Salomon Furniture Company of Denison. The success 
which has attended his efforts is the result of his industry and enterprise, which 
are dominant traits in his character. He was born in Holstein. Germany, April 
22, 1869, son of Nicholas and Anna (Asmus) Schnoor, both natives of Ger- 



Vol. II— 5 



86 • HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

many. Tliere were six children in their family, namely : Marie, now deceased ; 
Minnie, who married Herman Rush and is also deceased ; Caroline, widow of 
Claus J. Salomon of Denison ; Jacob, of Amherst, Nebraska; John, of Denison ; 
and Emma, who died at the age of nine years. Marie, the first born, was 
drowned at sea in 1883. going down with the vessel and all on board; Emma 
lost her life by a sandbank falling upon her; and the father, who was a sailor, 
died in Germany at the age of forty-eight years. All three of these deaths 
occurred in 1881. Mrs. Schnoor came to America with her children Caroline, 
Minnie and John in 1883, her son Jacob having preceded them in March of the 
same year. The mother died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Caroline Salo- 
mon, January i, 191 1. The family is identified with the Lutheran church. 
The paternal grandfather of our subject, Claus Schnoor, was also a sailor. He 
died in the same year as Kaiser Wilhelm and they were about the same age. 
There were three sons in his family : Hans, Jacob and Nicholas, and several 
daughters. The maternal grandfather, Hans Asmus, was a baker. He died in 
Germany at the age of about fifty-six years. Six of his children grew to ma- 
turity, namely : Henry, Hans, John, Elsabe, Antje, and Anna. 

John Schnoor lived in his native country until fourteen years of age and re- 
ceived his early education in the common schools. In 1883 he came to America 
with his mother and they located on a farm in Crawford county, where he con- 
tinued until the fall of 1887. In the meantime he assisted in building the rail- 
road yards at Manilla, Iowa. In November, 1887, he went to work at Denison 
under Claus Sievers, the pioneer harnessmaker of Crawford county, now de- 
ceased. After four years with Mr. Sievers, the subject of this review removed 
to Amherst, Nebraska, and there followed his trade. In 1894 he went to Man- 
ning, Iowa, where he remained for four years, and then took up his residence at 
Denison and for seven years successfully conducted a harness-making establish- 
ment in this city. He sold out to the Semmann Manufacturing Company and 
next entered the employ of his brother-in-law, C. J. Salomon, in the furniture 
business, and after the latter's death became manager of the concern, in which 
position he has since continued. 

On the 27th of December, 1889, Mr. Schnoor was united in marriage to 
Miss Augusta Kunz, who was born at Appenrade, Schleswig, Germany, a daugh- 
ter of Anrlreas and Augusta (Lorenzen) Kunz. Her parents came to America 
first in 1880 but made three trips back and forth across the ocean, finally set- 
tling in Denison in 1883. The father is now deceased but the mother is living in 
this city. Of their children Andrew, Amalia, Nicolina, Marie and Augusta are 
now living. A daughter, Brigita. and a son are deceased. Four children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Schnoor, namely: Amanda. Edna, Hilda and Esther. 

Mr. Schnoor and his wife are both members of the German Methodist church 
and their children are also connected with that denomination. Politically, he 
gives his support to the democratic party. He was elected justice of the peace 
at Manning but did not qualify as he moved away soon after his election. He 
served for two years as member of the city council of Illinois. Fraternally, he 
is identified with Sylvan Lodge. No. 507, A. F. & A. M., and the Eastern Star. 
He also belongs to Denison Lodge, No. 626, I. O. O. F., the Encampment, the 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 87 

Rebekahs and the Modern Woodmen of America. A man of unquestioned in- 
tegrity and high ideals, he has made practical application in business and private 
life of the beautiful teachings of the orders to which he belongs and is greatly 
respected by a wide circle of warm personal friends in Denison. 



A. H. RUDD. 



A. H. Rudd, the proprietor and editor of The Enterprise, the local paper of 
Dow City, is a native of Crawford county, his birth occurring on section 9, 
Union township, on the i8th of November, 1856. He is the oldest surviving 
child of John R. and Serelda (Jordan) Rudd, the father a native of Pennsyl- 
vania and the mother of Keokuk, Iowa. John R. Rudd came to Iowa from 
Pennsylvania in the early '50s, first locating in Shelby county, where he resided 
for a brief period and then removed to Crawford county, settling on section 9, 
Union township, where he continued to reside until 1902. His farm was un- 
broken prairie when it came into his possession, and after erecting a log cabin 
he began cultivating the soil and for more than forty years engaged in general 
farming and stock-raising. Nine years ago he left the farm and is now living 
retired in Dow City, where he enjoys the ease and comfort awarded him as the 
result of the close application and self-denial of his youth. JMr. Rudd has 
always given his political support to the men and measures of the democratic 
party, while his religious affiliation is with the Latter Day Saints. His wife is 
a daughter of William and Mary Jordan, who were among the pioneers of Craw- 
ford county, where they spent the last years of their lives. Mr. and Mrs. Rudd 
are the parents of eleven children, as follows : Hiram, deceased ; A. H., our sub- 
ject; Alvin, a minister of the Latter Day Saints at Wilberton, Oklahoma; John, 
a painter and decorator of Dow City; Mary, the wife of Clair Butterworth of 
Dow City; D..M., living in Orlando, Florida; Ellen, the wife of J. D. Antrim, 
of Redfield, Iowa ; Emma, the deceased wife of J. R. Griffin ; S. E., a linotype 
operator, of Norfolk, Nebraska; Fannie, the wife of John A. Hearst, a farmer 
of Union township ; and the eldest, who died in infancy. 

A. H. Rudd acquired his education in the common schools of Dow City and 
his first business venture was the editing of the newspaper he now owns. He 
traded a team of horses for the Boyer Valley Clipper, which three months later 
became known as The Enterprise, under which name it has ever since been 
issued. During the twenty years of his proprietorship it has developed into a 
clean, popular and wide-awake local newspaper with a good circulation. In 
addition to the editing of this, Mr. Rudd conducts a job office, in which he is 
meeting with marked success, as his books show an output of over two and one- 
half million blanks for the year just ended. He owns the building where his 
office is located as well as his residence. 

In 1887 Mr. Rudd and Miss May Dobson, of this county, were united in 
marriage, and they have become the parents of the following children : H. R., 
a graduate of the Dow City high school and the electrical engineering depart- 
ment of the Iowa State College at Ames, now located at North Yakima, Wash- 



88 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

ington ; \'innie, also a graduate of the high school and the musical department 
of Graceland College, living at iiome; Sunshine, who is attending the high 
school ; and Gladys, at home. 

The family attend the church of the Latter Day Saints, in which denomina- 
tion jNIr. and Mrs. Rudd are very active workers, he being the priest of the local 
branch and superintendent of the Sunday school, while Mrs. Rudd has been a 
teacher of the Sunday school for over twenty years. Politically Mr. Rudd has 
always affiliated with the democratic party and takes an active part in local gov- 
ernmental matters, having served as township clerk and assessor, while he was 
also city treasurer for nine years and county supervisor for three. He is one 
of the progressive as well as public-spirited citizens of the town and through 
the columns of his paper has urged the adoption of many measures which have 
been for the improvement and betterment of the community. 



BEN7AMIN S^HTH. 



The dairy interests of Crawford county find a worthy representative in Ben- 
jamin Smith, who resides on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Denison 
township. Mr. Smith was born in Peekskill, Xew York, on the 20th of July, 
1863, his parents being Benjamin and Catharine (Ellis) Smith, also natives of 
the Empire state, but whose latter days were spent in Kansas. Ten children 
were born unto Mr. and Mrs. Smith, as follows: Ida, the wife of Gilbert Lan- 
caster, of Garrison, New York; Byron, residing in Golden, Colorado; Lois, who 
married Albert Cooper, of Portland, Oregon ; Annie, the wife of Richard Hun- 
ter, of Abilene, Kansas; Benjamin, our subject; Adelia, also of Abilene; Frank- 
lin, a resident of Joplin, Missouri ; Susan, the wife of Alexander Wilson, of 
Abilene, Kansas; Phoebe, who died in infancy; and Charles, of Oklahoma. 

The early years of Benjamin Smith's life were spent in New York and 
Kansas, in the common schools of which states he acquired his education. Com- 
ing to Iowa with his parents in 1887 he located in Harlan, where his father had 
bought two hundred acres of land, in the cultivation of which he assisted, re- 
maining at home until he was married. Subsequent to this event he worked as 
a farm hand for more than three years, at the end of which period he returned 
to Kansas, where his father owned eight hundred acres of land, one-half of 
which our subject rented. After cultivating this for three years Mr. Smith 
came back to Iowa, locating upon one hundred and eighty acres of land which 
he rented in Shelby county. He operated this for three years and then rented 
one hundred and sixty acres elsewhere, upon which he resided for two years. 
At the end of that period he leased a four hundred-acre tract, which he culti- 
vated for three years. During the time of his residence in the Hawkeye state 
he had accumulated the capital necessary to buy land, so moving to Crawford 
county in 1902, he purchased two hundred and eighty acres, in the cultivation 
of which he was engaged for seven years. Disposing of his interests in 1909 he 
lx)ught a quarter section in the northeastern part of Denison township, where 
he is now conducting an extensive dairy business, the majority of his cattle 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 89 

being shorthorns. This is one of the oldest farms in Denison township, as 
upon it was built the first frame house in Crawford county, which Mr. Smith 
has torn down during his residence here. The house was erected about 1856 
and was entirely constructed of oak and walnut. Two years ago, while digging 
a cistern upon his homestead, Mr. Smith found two Indian skulls and a horse- 
shoe, which he presented to the Rev. Mr. Frazee. 

At Harlan, Iowa, on the 25th of March, 1888, Mr. Smith was united in 
marriage to Miss Annie Lorenzen, a daughter of Fred and Anna (Johnson) 
Lorenzen, natives of the province of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. Migrating 
to Iowa many years ago Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzen first located in Davenport but 
are now residing in Pottawattamie county. They were the parents of eleven 
children, of whom Mrs. Smith is the eldest, the others being: Peter, a resident 
of Pottawattamie county, Ella, the wife of Henry Gertz, of Luverne, Rock 
county, Minnesota; Henry, who died in infancy; Herman, living in Shelby 
county, Iowa ; George, a resident of the same county ; Edward, also a resident of 
Shelby county; Laura, the wife of Earnest Bachman, of Pottawattamie county; 
and Ernest and Rudolph, deceased; and Mollie, also living in Pottawattamie 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have become the parents of five children : Alma, 
the wife of Thomas Meade, of Portland, Oregon ; Clarence Walter, also of 
Portland ; and Harold, Ralph and Ruby, who is seven years of age, the last 
three all at home. 

The family affiliate with the Methodist Episcopal church, while fraternally 
Mr. Smith is identified with the Modern Woodmen of America. In matters 
politic Mr. Smith gives his support to the candidates of the democratic party. 
Not being an office seeker, however, he does not actively participate in civic af- 
fairs, preferring to devote his attention to the advancement of his personal in- 
terests. 



PETER J. HALLOWELL. 

Peter J. Hallowell, who engages in general farming and stock-raising on 
one hundred and sixty acres of land in Paradise township, Crawford county, 
is a native of this state, having been born in Fayette county, on the i6th of 
October, 1855. He is the youngest son of the late Joseph and Marcia (Adams) 
Hallowell, who were among the early residents of this county. He acquired his 
education in the district schools of Fayette and Crawford counties, remaining a 
member of his father's household until he had reached the age of twenty-nine 
years. In 1882 he began working as a farm hand, continuing in this occupation 
for three years, and at the end of that period he located on the quarter section 
where he continues to live. 

In 1882 Mr. Hallowell was united in marriage to Miss Alatilda Scott, a 
daughter of William and Mary Ann (Garland) Scott, who were also early 
residents of this county, migrating here from Canada. Four children have been 
born unto Mr. and Mrs. Hallowell, who are as follows : Ada E., the wife of 
J. G. Rule, of Red Oak, Iowa; Inez A., the house secretary of the Young 



90 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Women's Christian Association of Des Moines ; Joseph E., who married Daisy 
Glassburner and lives at home; and Jennie E., who is also at home. 

Fraternally j\Ir. Hallowell is identified with the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, his local affiliation being with the lodge at Dow City. He has always been 
a strong advocate of the principles of republicanism and gives his support to 
the candidates of that party. Although he has never taken a particularly active 
part in local politics he served for two years as trustee of his township. He is 
considered one of the successful and substantial agriculturists of the community, 
his being one of the valuable homesteads in the township. 



JAMES P. JONES. 



A self-made man who started upon his business career without a dollar and 
has won his way to fortune, James P. Jones, of Denison, is justly held in high 
regard by all who know him. He was born in Clinton county, Iowa, May 15, 
i860, a son of John and Honora (Carlon) Jones, both of whom were natives of 
County Clare, Ireland, when they were married. The father was reared a 
farmer and learned the stone-mason's trade in Ireland. He came to America 
early in the '50s and after stopping for a while in New York state took up his 
residence in La Salle county, Illinois, working at stone-masonry and house- 
building. He was employed on the first bridge built across the Mississippi river 
at Davenport and lived on the island and in Rock Island. He subsequently 
bought a farm in Clinton county, which he cultivated to good advantage. He 
died in the northern part of Iowa in 1891, at the age of eighty years. Mrs. 
Jones, who was born at Mount Shannon, Ireland, in 1823, came to Crawford 
county in 1879 alter her husband's death and lived on a farm in Washington 
township with her children. She died Sunday, January 8, 1905, at the age of 
eighty-two years, and was in many respects a remarkable woman. She and her 
husband were earnest members of the Catholic church. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Rogers Jones, was a farmer and 
spent his entire life in Ireland. Among his children were William, Rogers, 
James, John, Maria and others. The maternal grandfather was also a farmer 
in Ireland. Of his children Honora, Julia and Kate came to America. Honora 
is the mother of our subject, and Julia, now deceased, formerly lived in Deni- 
son. Patrick, one of his sons, died in Ireland. There were ten children in the 
family of John and Honora Jones, three of whom are now living, namely : Julia, 
a resident of Denison; James P., the subject of this review; and John H., also 
of Denison. 

James P. Jones was reared on the old homestead in Clinton county and re- 
ceived his early education in the district schools. He was graduated from 
the Davenport Business College and subsequently came to Denison and started 
in the live-stock and real-estate business, with which he has ever since been 
connected. Being a man of energy and good judgment, he has been higlily suc- 
cessful in his affairs. He is the owner of six hundred and forty acres in Craw- 
ford county and about three sections of land in Sanljorn, Spink, Faulk and 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 91 

Potrer counties, South Dakota. On coming to Crawford county, he gathered 
corn at fifty cents a day and chopped wood for seventy-five cents a cord, work- 
ing industriously at any honorable employment that he could find. By un- 
daunted perseverance he overcame every obstacle and is now financially inde- 
pendent. 

On the i8th of June, 1892, Mr. Jones was united in marriage to Miss Isabel 
C. Blakely, a daughter of David D. Blakely., She was born in New York, her 
parents being natives of Ireland. Her father came from County Antrim, near 
Belfast, and her mother from County Gal way. They were early settlers of 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, her father being identified with a packing house in that 
city, where he and his wife are still living. They were the parents of ten chil- 
dren, six of whom survive, namely: Kate, David, John, Isabel C, Elizabeth and 
Grace. Mrs. Jones grew to womanhood in Cedar Rapids and received a fine 
education, being a graduate of a convent and the Conservatory of Music at 
Cedar Rapids. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Jones : David B., 
who died in infancy ; William B. ; and James D. 

Mr. Jones and his estimable wife were reared in the Catholic faith and are 
sincere followers of the church. They have resided in Denison many years, 
and their pleasant home is a favorite gathering place for friends who are al- 
ways assured of a cordial greeting. Mr. Jones gives his support politically to 
the republican party. He has served in various township offices but never as- 
pired to larger political honors as his interest has been concentrated upon his 
family and his business. 



CHRIST P. VOLLERSEN. 



Another enterprising German, who, through his own well directed efifort, is 
now numbered among the affluent citizens of Crawford county, is Christ P. 
Vollersen, engaged in the grain and live-stock business in Dow City. A native 
of the province of Schleswig-Holstein, he was born on the loth of January, 
1867, a son of Christ and Christina (Inguersen) Vollersen, who spent their 
entire lives in the land of their birth, where the father engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. In their family were the following children : Samuel, living in Ger- 
many; Mary, a resident of Duluth, Minnesota; Nicholas, of Ricketts, Iowa; 
Christ P., our subject; Ingburg, residing in Chicago; Paul, of Germany; and 
Christina, living in Alineola, this state. 

Christ P. Vollersen lived at home and attended the common schools of his 
native land until the death of his parents, which occurred when he was fourteen 
years of age. For three years thereafter he resided with an uncle and then 
came to America to seek his fortune. He was only a youth of seventeen years 
when he arrived in the United States, unfamiliar with the language and customs 
but possessing a rich heritage of thrift, energy and determination, qualities 
which characterize his countrymen. Making his way westward to Iowa, he first 
located in Clinton, where he obtained employment in a sawmill and on the rail- 
road until the following autumn, when he went to Dixon, Scott county. In 



92 HISTORY OF CRAWTORD COUNTY 

the latter place he secured work as a farm hand, continuing in that occupation 
for three years, when he removed to Crawford county, where he followed the 
same employment for a year. He then rented land in Soldier township, which 
he cultivated for three years, and at the expiration of that period his tireless 
energy, economy and capable management made it possible for him to become 
a property owner and he bought a place in Willow township, upon which he 
continued to reside for sixteen years. Disposing of the latter place he bought 
land in Paradise township, which he cultivated for three years, and then came 
to Dow City and bought the grain and live-stock business of Joseph McCole, 
including the plants, elevator and yards. Air. \'ollersen has met with most grati- 
fying success in all of his undertakings and as a result now owns two hundred 
and forty acres of well improved and highly cultivated land in Paradise town- 
ship besides his business and residence in town. 

Nineteen years ago was solemnized the union of Mr. Vollersen and Miss 
Eliza Peterson, also a native of the province of Schleswig-IIolstein, and unto 
them have been born the following children : Christina, Emma, Minnie, Henry, 
and Mary, all of whom are at home. 

The family attend the services of the German Lutheran church, with which 
denomination the parents are identified by membership. Ever since his naturali- 
zation Mr. \'ollersen has given his political support to the democratic party. 
Although he has never been an aspirant to public honors or the emoluments of 
office, he at one time served as a school director. He is a quiet, unobtrusive 
man, whose good judgment, sound principles and honorable business transac- 
tions have won the respect of all who come in contact with him. 



EDWTN A. FINK. 



The state of New York is represented in almost every county of the west 
by sons or daughters who sought under favorable circumstances to establish a 
home among strangers. In numberless instances their efforts have met with 
succes's and today many of the most honored people of the great west are from 
the Empire state. Edwin A. Fink, now living retired at Denison at tlie ven- 
erable age of eighty-two years, was born at Prattsville, Green county, New 
York, August 9, 1829. 

His parents were Harry and Lucinda (Beers) Fink, also natives of Greene 
county. New York. They were descendants of old Holland Dutch families that 
were among the first settlers in that county. The father was reared as a farmer 
and devoted his life to that occupation. He came to Iowa in 1879 ^^'^ fl'^'^^ 
November i following, being then seventy-one years of age. His remains were 
interred in the cemetery at Deloit. Crawford county. His wife departed this 
life May 28, 1855. at the age of forty-nine years. He was a member of the 
Dutch Reformed church but she was a devout Methodist. Adam Fink, the 
paternal grandfather, married Katrina Hummell and died from the. effects of 
the kick of a colt. There were eight children in their family, namely: Peter, 
Harry, John. Martin. Eli, Margaret. Jane and Polly. The maternal grandfather 



^^s 


1 




1 




H 




H 




^K^^l 







EDWIN A. FINK 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 95 

was Cornelius D. Beers, who was a native of New Jersey and engaged in farm- 
ing. He died when a young man from the effects of a bayonet wound which he 
accidentally received. His wife was Weighty Disbro and in their family were 
six children : Seth, Betsy, Lucinda, Harry, Clara and Silas. Eleven children 
were born to Harry and Lucinda Fink, seven of whom grew to maturity : Cor- 
nelius K. ; Edwin A., the subject of this review; Cordelia and Cornelia, twins; 
Willis T., now living in Cherry county, Nebraska ; Martha ; and Ann Augusta. 

Edwin A. Fink was reared in his native county until nineteen years of age 
and as his parents were poor he had in his boyhood but limited opportunities of 
education. At eleven years of age he went to live with a widow who gave him 
his board and clothes and sent him to school. He remained in her home for 
five years and made himself useful by taking care of about forty head of cattle. 
After leaving the friendly shelter afforded by this kind-hearted woman, he went 
to Red Falls and worked in a sawmill and at various other occupations for three 
years, never receiving during this time more than eight dollars per month. 

After a visit at home he started out in 1849, being then not quite twenty 
years of age, to seek his fortune in the world. He followed the Erie Railroad 
to Hornellsville, New York, and spent three or four years in Steuben county, at 
the end of which time he went to Sheboygan, Michigan, in company with about 
sixty men, to work in the woods and in the sawmills. After a short stay he 
started southward and at Detroit got oif the boat and out of curiosity visited 
the shops of the Michigan Central Railroad. The businesslike air that prevailed 
about this establishment attracted his fancy and the next morning he went to 
work for the company and for nearly two years ran a switch engine in the yards 
at night. He next found himself in charge of an engine on the construction of 
a railroad and became so enamored of railroading that he was identified with 
that line of industry for twenty-five years. In 1866 he came to Clinton, Iowa, 
and for twelve years followed railway engineering and the machinist's trade. 

Mr. Fink arrived in Denison in 1878 on the same train that carried Hon. 
Leslie M. Shaw and his wife to this city. Later he traded a farm in Clinton 
county for land in Otter Creek township, Crawford county, upon which he lived 
for five years. He began with one hundred and sixty acres, to which he later 
added eighty acres. Subsequently he bought land in Goodrich township and 
owned at one time four hundred and seventy acres in the township and two 
hundred and forty acres in Otter Creek township, being one of the leading 
farmers in that part of the county. He lived in Goodrich township until 1899, 
when he retired to Denison. He still owns two hundred and twenty acres of 
land in this county, for which he has refused one hundred and seventy-five dol- 
lars per acre. He has been remarkably industrious and enterprising and well 
merits the prosperity that resulted from his labors. 

On the 24th of May, 1855, Mr. Fink was united in marriage to Miss Eliza 
Amadon, a daughter of Smith Amadon. She passed away on the 12th of Jan- 
uary, 1893, ^t the age of fifty-eight years. There were eleven children in the 
family, seven of whom grew to maturity, namely : Isabel, who married Dorr 
Comfort, of Pender, Nebraska, and has become the mother of two children ; 
Hannibal, now owning three-eighths of the old homestead, who married Nellie 
Comstock and has five children ; Nora, who lives on a farm near Laurel, Ne- 



96 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

braska, and married Eli Johnson, by whom she has three children; Edwin, Jr., 
living eighty miles south of Dallas, Texas, who married Rhoda Swinson, of 
Minnesota, and is the father of three children ; Oliver, of Wills Point, Van 
Zandt county, Texas, who married Florence Brogdon and has two cihldren ; 
Harry, now deceased, who married Ida Conquest and had two children ; and 
Eliza, now living at Onawa, Iowa, who married Lewis C Albright, and is the 
mother of three children. 

]\Ir. Fink was again married January 7, 1897, his second union being with 
iMrs. Laney ]\Iiller, the widow of Amos H. Miller, who served two years and 
eight months in the Civil war as a member of the Fourteenth Wisconsin \'ol- 
unteer Infantr}' and was hurt by a fall from a freight train during his service. 
He remained an invalid during the rest of his life and at his death left his 
widow with four small children to care for, but she nobly performed her part, 
being an excellent mother. The children by her first marriage were : Abram, 
Eugene, George M., John T. and Frank R. Mrs. Fink was born in Alsace- 
Lorraine, Germany, and is the daughter of Joseph and Alary (Smith) Rice, 
both of whom were natives of Germany. She came to America with her parents 
when she was nine months old, in 183 1, and was thirteen years of age when 
her parents moved from Xew York and settled in Fond du Lac county, Wis- 
consin. She migrated to Iowa in 1896. 

Mr. Fink has passed through many vicissitudes in the course of his long and 
useful life. He gained in the great school of experience a practical education 
which assisted him in becoming a model farmer, setting an example in the con- 
duct of his business which awakened a spirit of enterprise wherever he was 
known. As a public-spirited citizen he has performed his part in the develop- 
ment of the county, taking a lively interest in the promotion of enterprises cal- 
culated to improve the social condition of the people. Possessing a kindly and 
benevolent disposition, he has generously responded to calls for assistance from 
those less fortunate than himself, and his actions have always reflected honor 
upon himself and those with whom he has been associated. 



WILLIS H. WTGGIXS. 



One of the energetic and progressive business men of Dow City is Willis 
H. Wiggins, a native of this county, having been born in Union township on 
the I2th of May, 1872. The parents, M. G. and Sarah (Hayes) Wiggins, are 
still living and also make their home in Dow City. 

Mr. Wiggins acquired his education in the public schools of his native town, 
which he attended oflf and on until 1890. When old enough to l^egin working 
for himself he entered a mill, remaining there until he had thoroughly mastered 
the trade, at which time he left in order to assist his father in his business. 
Two years later he opened a place of business of his own. His first venture was 
a lunch counter, which he most successfully conducted for nine years, and then 
put in a line of groceries. He has since added general furnishings and shoes, 
so that he is now handling a general merchandise stock. He has met with most 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 97 

gratifying success in his various undertakings and has quite extensive real- 
estate interests in Dow City, owning the building in which his store is located 
as well as two brick business blocks. 

On the 19th of February, 1901, Mr. Wiggins was united in marriage to 
Miss Kate E. Grififin, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Griffin, living near Buck 
Grove, and they have become the parents of two children : John and Martin. 

Mr. Wiggins was reared in the Methodist Episcopal faith but Mrs. Wiggins 
is a communicant of the Roman Catholic church. Fraternally he is identified 
with the ^Modern Woodmen of America, his local affiliation being with the lodge 
of Dow City. Ever since attaining his majority Mr. Wiggins has actively par- 
ticipated in all local political matters, always giving his support to the candi- 
dates of the republican party. He is held in high regard and served as town- 
ship treasurer for eight or ten years, which fact indicates his satisfactory 
■discharge of the duties of the office. 



WILLIAM H. LAUB. 



For thirty years past connected with the business interests of Denison and 
now most acceptably filling the office of mayor of the city, it may truthfully be 
said of William H. Laub that he is a leading member of the community. He 
was born in Benton county, Iowa, June 24, 1855, a son of Henry C. and Lydia 
(Baer) Laub, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. He was less 
than six months old when his parents brought him to Denison, and he has ever 
since made his home in this city. He received his preliminary education in the 
public schools and later attended successively the Indianola, Western and Cornell 
Colleges. After leaving college he worked for his father until twenty-eight 
years of age and then on August 13, 1881, embarked in the livery business in 
Denison, with which he has ever since been connected. From the start he pur- 
sued a straightforward policy and by becoming thoroughly acquainted with the 
wants of the people and maintaining his establishment at a high standard of 
efficiency he gained a large and growing patronage. He is now reaping the 
fruits of many years of close application and is in the enjoyment of a handsome 
competency. 

On the 6th of December, 1883, Mr. Laub was united in marriage to Miss 
Edna Goodspeed, a native of Burlington, Vermont. Her parents were both 
natives of England and came to this country, settling in Vermont, where they 
died when she was quite young. Three children came to bless the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Laub. WilHam Austin, the eldest, is assisting his father in the livery 
business. Edna Hazel is a teacher of music at Amity Conservatory of Music 
at College Springs, Page county, Iowa, and has charge of instruction in piano, 
pipe organ and harmony at that institution, and also teaches several classes in 
the public schools of College Springs. She is a graduate of the Denison high 
school, the Conservatory of Music of Simpson College at Indianola, Iowa, hav- 
ing received a diploma from the latter institution on June 9, 1909. Harold is 
now a student in the Denison public schools. 



98 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Mrs. Laub is a member of the Methodist church, l)ut her husband is not 
identified witli any religious denomination. Politically he has since he attained 
his majority supported the republican party and has been an active worker in 
its behalf. He was elected mayor of the city in March, 1910, and has admin- 
istered tlie office to the general satisfaction of voters of all parties. He has 
always been known as a man of most admirable principles, thoroughly loyal to 
his friends, a liberal giver to all wortiiy objects and a patriotic and broad-minded 
citizen who has assisted in num])erless ways in advancing the permanent wel- 
fare of Denison. 



S. C. DUNHAM. 



S. C. Dunham, who has devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits 
throughout his entire business career, is now one of the substantial and rep- 
resentative farmers of East Boyer township. His birth occurred in Clinton 
county. Iowa, on the 26th of May, 1851, his parents being John A. and Celinda 
H. (Richardson) Dunham. The father, a native of Fulton county, Illinois, 
was a son of Cornelius Dunham. The other children of that marriage were 
Louisa, Cornelius and Soplironia. lH)r his second wife Cornelius Dunham, 
the paternal grandfather of our subject, chose Mrs. Margaret Miller nee Scott, 
by whom he had five children, namely : Margaret, who is a resident of Dimlap, 
Iowa; Samuel S. and Flora, who are deceased; and Martha and Z. T., both liv- 
ing in Dunlap, Iowa. Mrs. Margaret Miller was the widow of Samuel Miller, 
by whom she had four children, as follows : James, who has passed away ; 
Elizabeth, who is a resident of Rapid City, South Dakota; and ]\Iary Jane and 
George, both of whom are deceased. 

On leaving his native county John A. Dunham, the father of S. C Dun- 
ham, removed to Jackson county, Iowa, where he was married in 1848. Three 
years later, in 185 1, he took up his abode in Clinton county. Iowa, while sub- 
sequently he went to IJlackhawk county locating on the present site of Cedar 
Falls. In 1854 he came to Crawford county, locating near Dimham's Grove, 
where he passed away the same year. He was the father of three children, 
namely: Alice, who is deceased; S. C, of this review; and Mrs. Elsie I'rink, 
who makes her home in Nebraska. In 1856 Mrs. Celinda H. Dunham gave 
her hand in marriage to Tracy Chapman, by whom she had nine children, as 
follows: Lois, who has passed away; Mrs. I'hoebe Mason, who is a resident of 
Vail. Iowa; Mrs. Ilulda Martin, living in Omaha, Nebraska; Harlow H., who 
follows farming in East Boyer township ; Delia, who is deceased ; Mrs. Salinda 
North, who makes her home in Milforrl township; Rhoda, a resident of \'ail. 
Iowa; Tracy, an agriculturist of East Boyer township; and one who died in 
infancy. The mother of these children was called to her final rest on the 27th 
of May. 1897, her demise being the occasion of deep and widespread regret. 

S. C. Dunham obtained his education in a log schoolhouse at Dunlap. Iowa, 
and remained under the parental roof until nineteen years of age. At that time 
he started out as an agriculturist on his own account and the work of the fields 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 99 

has claimed his attention almost continuously since. With the exception of 
seven years spent in Nebraska and a period of six years in Monona county, 
Iowa, he has always made his home in Crawford county. At the present time 
he operates a tract of one hundred and eighty acres of land in East Boyer 
township — the site of the old homestead where Cornelius Dunham and Frank- 
lin Prentiss, the original settlers of this county, located in 1849. Mr. Dun- 
ham owns a farm of eighty acres in Minnesota and is widely recognized as a 
prosperous and esteemed citizen. He possesses considerable mechanical skill 
and has invented, among other things, a hay loader which has proved a very 
useful device, about twenty-five of them being now utilized in Crawford county. 

When twenty-three years of age Mr. Dunham was joined in wedlock to Miss 
Mary J. Miller, by whom he had ten children, the record of whom is as follows : 
Kate, the wife of RoUa Christy, of Dunlap, Iowa; John A., who is a resident 
of Los Angeles, California; Lois, the wife of John Rovve, of Missouri Valley, 
Iowa; Gussie, the wife of Ed Christy, of Dunlap, Iowa; Edith, the wife of 
Neal Crampton, of Hayes township, this county ; Bessie, who is deceased ; Tracy, 
living in Oroville, California ; Fanny, the wife of Henry Sowder, of Chadron, 
Nebraska ; and Jessie and Jennie, twins. 

Mr. Dunham is a republican in politics and has held a number of township 
offices, ever discharging his public duties in a most prompt and capable man- 
ner. His interests are thoroughly identified with those of Crawford county 
and at all times he is ready to lend his aid and cooperation to any movement 
calculated to benefit this section of the country or advance its wonderful 
development. 



CLAUS BIELENBERG. 



Claus Bielenberg, who has lived retired in Schleswig for the past nine years, 
followed farming throughout his active business career and accumulated eleven 
hundred and ten acres of valuable land, all of wdiich is in Crawford county with 
the exception of a quarter section which lies in Ida county. His birth occurred 
in Holstein, Germany, on the 20th of March, 1840, his parents being Hans and 
Dora (Rusch) Bielenberg, both of whom are deceased. Their children were 
nine in number, namely: Amelia, the wife of Fred Jaade, of Germany; Claus, 
of this review; Margaret, the wife of J. Fredricks, of Brooklyn, New York; 
John, Jacob and Peter, all of whom have passed away ; Herman, who when 
last heard from was in California; Henry, whose demise occurred in New 
York; Rheina, who is living in Germany. 

Claus Bielenberg remained in his native land until he had attained his 
majority and in 1861 crossed the Atlantic to the United States, wishing to test 
the truth of the many favorable reports which he had heard concerning the op- 
portunities to be enjoyed in the new world. Making his way to Davenport, 
lov/a, he first worked as a farm hand for three years and then cultivated rented 
land for eight years. On the expiration of that period, having accumulated 
sufficient capital, he purchased a tract of one hundred and sixty acres in Craw- 



100 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

ford county. As his financial resources increased, owing to his untiring industry 
and capable management, he added to his holdings from time to time until 
they now embrace eleven hundred and ten acres, making him one of the exten- 
sive landowners of this part of the state. All of his property lies in Craw- 
ford county with the exception of one hundred and sixty acres in Ida county. 
In 1902 he put aside the active work of the fields and purchased a home at 
Schleswig, where he has since enjoyed well earned ease. He has added to and 
remodeled his residence from time to time until it is now very commodious 
and beautiful. 

On the ist of March, 1864, Air. Bielenberg was joined in wedlock to Aliss 
Margaret Stubbe, a daughter of John and Margaret (Plahtj Stubbe, who had 
five children, namely: Alartin, who is deceased; Mrs. Bielenberg; Sophie, the 
wife of Claus Warner, of Davenport, Iowa; Lena, the wife of Peter Hah- 
mann, of Schleswig, Iowa; and John, who has also passed away. Mr. and 
]Mrs. Bielenberg are the parents of eight children, as follows: Henry and Fred, 
who are farming near Schleswig, Iowa; Rosa, the wife of Fred Fredrickson, 
also living near Schleswig; Dora, the wife of Fred Rienking, near Schleswig; 
Martha, the wife of Carl Wellendoph, of Ida county; Adolph and Claudius, 
living near Schleswig, Iowa ; and Julius, who makes his home in Nebraska. 

Since becoming a naturalized American citizen Mr. Bielenberg has sup- 
ported the democracy, believing firmly in the principles of that party. His 
religious faith is indicated by his membershij) in the Lutheran church. The 
hope that led him to leave his native land and seek a home in America has 
been more than realized. He found the opportunities he sought and through 
their wise utilization has won a place among the most prosperous and re- 
spected citizens of his community. 



THOMAS AHART. 



That Crawford county ofifers excellent opportunities for ambitious and 
energetic young men has often been demonstrated Init in no instance more 
clearly than in the career of Thomas Ahart, who is a highly respected citi- 
zen of the county and for eight years past a member of the county board of 
supervisors. He was born near Lake Constance, Germany, December 10, 1863, 
a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Wieland) Ahart. The father engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits in his native land. He came to America with his family in the 
spring of 1866. arriving in Chicago without money nor did he possess any means 
of support except his brave heart and strong arms. The Chicago & North- 
western Railroad was at that time being built through Iowa and had been com- 
pleted as far as Boone. Mr. Ahart engaged to work upon the construction of 
the road and received transportation for himself and family to Boone. He 
continued in railroad construction until the line was completed to Dunlap and for 
two years afterward worked as trackman. He then began farming on a tract 
of land near the present town of Arion and so continued until his retirement 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 101 

from active labor in 1906. He and his wife are still hale and hearty and are liv- 
ing in a comfortable home north of Dow City, near their son John. 

Thomas Ahart received his education in the country schools, his studies 
being confined to the common branches, as his assistance was needed at home 
and the school period was limited to a few months each winter. In those days 
the country schoolhouses were small and men teachers were ^ usually hired. 
Spelling bees were in vogue and the boys and girls apparently enjoyed themselves 
fully as much as they do today. The old schoolhouse in which Mr. Ahart pur- 
sued his studies in his boyhood still stands about two and one-half miles south- 
west of Dow City and is one of the interesting historic landmarks of the neigh- 
borhood. At eighteen years of age he laid his books aside and, being the eldest 
child in the family, applied himself diligently to work upon the home farm. At 
the age of twenty-three he commenced farming on his own account on the 
southeast quarter of section 25, Union township. This land was given him by 
his father but was incumbered with a mortgage of seven hundred dollars. The 
young farmer met with the usual ups and downs of life in the earlier days, 
but by patience and perseverance he paid ofif the incumbrance and purchased 
two hundred acres, making a total of three hundred and sixty acres in one tract 
which he now owns, the last land which he bought costing ninety dollars per 
acre. He acquired eighty acres south of Dow City and later sold this land for 
thirty-four dollars per acre. He engages in general farming but has devoted 
a great deal of attention to stock raising and feeding. His place is well equipped 
and is provided with a beautiful residence, a large barn and other necessary out- 
buildings. He makes use of the best modern machinery and on account of his 
perseverance and good judgment has met with an abundant measure of suc- 
cess. Although he has engaged extensively in business for many years he has 
never been involved in a lawsuit. 

Mr. Ahart ever since arriving at manhood has given his support to the 
democratic party and has been actively identified with political affairs, filling 
a number of offices of trust and responsibility. He was trustee of Union town- 
ship for four years and served as school director for many years, having for 
the last four years been president of the school board of Union township. In 
the fall of 1902 he was elected a member of the county board of supervisors, 
taking office January i, 1903. He has since been continuously on the board and 
was chairman during 1910, his present term of office extending to January, 1912. 
During his incumbency the beautiful new courthouse was built at Denison and 
preparations are now being made to build a county home one mile east of Arion. 
The cost of the courthouse was one hundred and fifteen thousand dollars, and 
the estimated cost of the county home with outbuildings is twenty-five thousand 
dollars. A drainage ditch is also under construction to straighten the course 
of the Boyer river for eleven miles, beginning a mile east of Arion and emptying 
into a similar ditch at Dunlap. As a public-spirited citizen Mr. Ahart takes a 
lively interest in everything pertaining to the upbuilding of the county and is 
a stockholder in the Crawford Fair Association and the Denison Hospital. 

On the 20th of December, 1886, Mr. Ahart was united in marriage at Deni- 
son to Miss Anna Honz, who was born in Baden, Germany, July 7, 1863, and 
came to America in the spring of 1886. Nine children have blessed this union, 



1U:> HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

seven of whom are now living- namely: George William, Mary Regina, Joseph 
Leo, Lin ford. Dorothy. John Theodore and Bernard Raymond. A daughter, 
Kate, died at the age of two years and seven months, and a son died in infancy. 
George William is now twenty-three years of age and continues at home. Mr. 
and Mr>. Ahart are giving their children every desirable advantage of educa- 
tion, one son, Leo. now attending the high school in Dow City. 

Mr. Ahart and his family are identified with the Roman Catholic ciiurch 
and are members of the parish at Buck Grove. He is not connected with any 
secret or fraternal order. He is a man of wide observation and has a mind well 
stored with many interesting reminiscences. He remembers as an incident of 
his early life that when he was two and one-half years of age his father wheeled 
him and all their worldly goods in a wheelbarrow from Boone to Jefferson, a 
distance of twenty-live miles.. The trip was accomplished in one day, after the 
father had traveled the same distance on that day to secure the wheelbarrow. 
Mr. Ahart has lived to see a great transformation in Crawford county and has 
assisted very materially in the upbuilding of the county. He is recognized as 
a man of highest honor and unimpeachable integrity whose sound business judg- 
ment has been of inestimable value to Crawford county. It is doubtful whether 
any man in this section of the state stands higher in the confidence of the people 
than the gentleman whose name introduces this review. 



JOHN FXK. 



Since the age of twenty-si.x years John Eck has applied himself to agricul- 
ture in Crawford county and his efforts have not been in vain as he is well es- 
tablished in his business, and a farm of one hundred and sixty acres pays 
tribute to his industry. 1 le is a native of Germany. Ijorn January lO, 1856, and 
is a son of John and Lena (Moeller) Eck, both of whom were born in Ger- 
many. The father died in iHCm), when the subject of this review was thirteen 
years of age. and the mother was called away in 1881. In their family were 
seven children : Katrina. deceased ; Matilda, now living in Germany ; Lena, also 
in Germany; Wilhclmina, deceased ; John, of this review; Theodore, who lives 
in Nebraska ; and Wiebke. living in Germany. 

John Eck gained his education in the public schools of the old country and 
remained at home until twenty-six years of age. Having decided, however, that 
the new world ofTered superior advantages, he crossed the ocean to the United 
States and came to Crawford county, working by the month for three years 
as an introduction to his experience as a farmer in Iowa. Having thus obtained 
a practical knowledge of the work for which he showed an adaptability, he 
rented land for three years and at the end of that time he purchased eighty 
acres in Charter Oak township. He cultivated his farm for seven years, and, 
having decided to locate in another part of the township, he sold his land and 
bought one hundred and sixty acres on section 30 and 31. where he still lives. 
He rai-ses the various grains best adapted to the climate and soil, and his live- 
stock interests contribute liberallv to his income. 









!2i 




HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 105 

In 1885 Mr. Eck was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Hargens, who was 
born in Germany, November 5, 1866. She emigrated to America as a child 
with her mother, the father having died leaving four children : Gertrude and 
John, both of South Dakota ; Minnie, now Mrs. John Eck ; and Celia, deceased. 
Five children came to brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. Eck: John, who was 
born January 31, 1886, and is still living at home; Lena, who was born April 
I, 1889, the wife of Herman Schneekloth, now conducting the home farm for 
Mr. Eck; Ferdinand, born March 28, 1891 ; William, who died in infancy; and 
Henry, who died at the age of three months. The mother of these children 
died in 1895, at the age of twenty-nine years. She was a woman of many at- 
tractive qualities, an invaluable assistant to her husband and to her children 
a true and loving parent. 

Mr. Eck and his family are members of the German Lutheran church and 
take a deep personal interest in its welfare. Ever since becoming a naturalized 
citizen of the United States he has supported the democratic party, believing 
that its principles are more conducive to good government than those of any 
other party. He has been prominent in local affairs and for four years past 
has served as township trustee and for eight years as a member of the school 
board. He is a true friend of education and is active, wide-awake and efficient 
in all his undertakings, fully deserving the respect in which he is held by those 
who know him. 



RUFUS L. HILL. 



Living retired after many years of active participation in business affairs, 
Rufus L. Hill, of Denison, is one of the truly successful men of Crawford 
county. He is a native of Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, born March 31, 
1 84 1, a son of Thomas G. and Marilla (Bliss) Hill, both of whom were also 
born in the Keystone state. The mother was a cousin of the noted singer, P. P. 
Bliss, who was killed in a wreck in Ohio several years ago. The father, who 
was for many years a lumberman, came west in 185 1 and located near Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa, where he engaged in farming. In 1878 he took up a homestead 
near Alma, Nebraska, continuing there until 1889, when he and his wife went to 
Holdrege, Nebraska, to live with the subject of this review. In 1902 they 
came to Denison and continued here until their deaths in the spring of 1908. 
The father was then ninety-one and the mother eighty-eight years of age. They 
traveled life's journey together from 1839, a period of sixty-nine years, and pre- 
sented a beautiful example of fidelity and harmony in their domestic relations. 
They were devout Methodists and died in the triumph of a living faith in God 
and immortality. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject was Thomas Hill, a native of Ver- 
mont. He was a soldier of the war of 1812 and served with his regiment at 
Sacketts Harbor, New York. Later he engaged in farming near Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania, and died there at an advanced age. His wife, Mrs. Permelia Hill, 
was a native of Massachusetts. In their family were : Charles C. ; Thomas G. ; 



Vol. n— 6 



106 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Frederick, who died from the effect of wounds received in the Civil war; Horace, 
who was also a soldier in the Civil war and died in Andersonville prison ; 
Eliphalet P.. who was a passenger conductor on the Pennsylvania Railroad for 
more than forty years ; and Alexander, who is now engaged in the dry-goods 
business at Homer City, Pennsylvania. Jeremiah Bliss, the grandfather on the 
maternal side, was born in Massachusetts and was a farmer and carpenter. He 
married Mary Lucore, and they had eight children, Marilla L., James, Sylvia, 
Mary, Isaac, Jeremiah, Anna and John. 

Twelve children were born to Thomas G. and Marilla Hill, five of whom are 
now living, namely: Rufus L.. the subject of this review; James J., of Linn 
county. Iowa; Alexander F.. of Arkansas; Mary, the wife of Hiram Harris, 
of Goodnight, Oklahoma ; and Albina, now Mrs. G. S. McCorkle, of Alma, 
Nebraska. 

Rufus L. Hill was reared in Cedar Rapids. Iowa, and received his educa- 
tion in the public schools. In his early manhood he ran an engine in his fath- 
er's lumber mill but after his marriage engaged in farming in Linn county for a 
short time and then entered the sewang machine business in Tama county, after 
which he became connected with the marble business at Holdrege, Nebraska, 
continuing there from 1879 to 1897. In the latter year he came to Denison and 
engaged in the same business with marked success, recently, however, having 
turned over the management to his sons. Walter L. and Albert R. 

On the 1st of January, 1863, Mr. Hill was united in marriage to Miss Mar- 
garet E. Wayt, a native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of William C. and 
Elizabeth Wayt. The parents were also natives of Pennsylvania and were 
Quakers, or Friends. The mother died in Cedar Rapids. Iowa, at the age of 
forty-three, and the father in Jefferson, Iowa, at the age of eighty-six years. 
Four of their children grew to maturity. John J., Margaret E.. Wooster B. and 
Benjamin F. Ten children were born to ]\Ir. and Mrs. Hill, namely: Carrie, 
who married J. T. Strome. of Grand Junction. Colorado, and has eleven children ; 
Walter, of Omaha. Nebraska, who married Elizabeth lUdl and is the father of 
seven children; Marilla. now of Blackfoot. Idaho, who married Grant Fraker 
and is the mother of seven children; Albert R.. who married Birdie E. Ewall 
and is the father of three children; Cora, who died at the age of seven years; 
Frank C. now of Emporia, Kansas, who married Clara Holmes and has an 
adopted son ; Earl ; Paul, who died at the age of two and one-half years ; Mary, 
who died at the age of six months; and Warren, who died at the age of eight 
months. The mother of these children passed away in 1888 at the age of forty- 
four years. 

On the 17th of September, 1889, Mr. Hill was married to Mrs. Eliza A. 
Wilson, the widow of Harrison J. Wilson, of Fairfield, Grundy county, Iowa, 
a daughter of James M. and Caroline M. (Davidson) Collier. Mrs. Hill by her 
former marriage had six children : Ira J., now of Dickinson. North Dakota, 
who married Viola Chase and is the father of four children ; George F.. of Cedar 
Falls. low-a, who married Effie Burgess and is the father of four children ; Car- 
rie H., of Waterloo. Iowa, who married Rev. E. N. Miller and is the mother of 
six children ; Wellington M., who married Mattie Gibson, now deceased, by 
whom he had two children, and for his second wife wedded Mrs. S. E. Hanson; 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNXY 107 

Ernest M. of Cedar Falls, Iowa, who married Mary Dority, and is the father of 
one child, a daughter; and Julia O., who married WilHam P. Cox and is now 
living at Enid, Oklahoma. The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Eliza A. Hill 
was James Collier, who married Margaret Driesdal and became the father of 
one son. The maternal grandfather was Ira Davidson. His wife was Luania 
Clark. Mrs. Hill has five great-grandchildren. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hill reside in a beautiful home in Denison, which is the center 
of generous hospitality. He has made a study of social and political questions 
and as a result gives his support to the prohibition cause as representing the 
most important problem of the times. He is a man of patriotic and loyal nature 
which frequently finds avenues of expression, making him a prominent mem- 
ber of the community. At the time of the Civil war he enlisted in Company 
H, Twentieth Iowa Regiment, but was rejected on account of rheumatism. In 
business afifairs he has always been controlled by principles of the highest 
honor, and he enjoys in the evening of a long and active life the confidence 
and esteem of all who know him. 



THOMAS J. HOFFMAN. 

Thomas J. Hoffman, who has served as postmaster of Vail since his ap- 
pointment to that office on the ist of July, 1897, has also been successfully en- 
gaged in the grain and stock business here for more than a third of a century. 
His birth occurred in Iowa on the 4th of December, 1846, his parents being 
Henry and Nancy (Baldwin) Hoffman, who were natives of Pennsylvania and 
Kentucky respectively. They took up their abode in Keokuk county, Iowa, in 
1846 and the following year entered land in Boone county, where the father 
erected a log cabin. The primitive little structure had a clapboard roof, a 
puncheon floor and a door with a string latch. That the region was still but 
sparsely settled is indicated by the fact that the nearest market was Davenport. 
Henry Hoffman passed away in Boone county in 1869, while his wife was called 
to her final rest in 1878, her demise occurring in Crawford county. Their 
children were eleven in number, namely : Elizabeth, who is a resident of West 
Bend, Iowa; Thomas J., of this review; Ella, the wife of Everell Springer, of 
Pennsylvania ; and eight who are deceased. 

Thomas J. Hoffman attended the common schools in the acquirement of an 
education and remained with his father until 1864, when he joined Company 
H, Forty-fourth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, serving with that command for one 
hundred days. On the expiration of his term of enlistment he returned to 
Boone county, Iowa, and in 1867 came to Crawford county, purchasing a farm 
whereon he resided for ten years. On abandoning agricultural pursuits he took 
up his abode in the village of Vail, where he has been identified with the grain 
and stock business continuously since, having met with success in his undertak- 
ings in this connection. He was appointed postmaster of Vail by President 
McKinley on the ist of July, 1897. and for the past fourteen years has dis- 
charged the duties of this office in a most satisfactoiy and commendable man- 



108 HISTORY OF CRAWTORD rorXTV 

ner. Mr. Hoffman has a nice residence in \'ail and also owns the building in 
which the postoffice is located. 

In 1869 Mr. Hoft'man was united in marriage to Miss Debbie Leonard, a na- 
tive of Michigan and a daughter of Nathaniel and Mary Leonard. Unto them 
were born three children, as follows : Leonard S., who is married and acts as 
assistant postmaster of \'ail ; Harry B., who is a resident of Denver, Colorado; 
and Earl E., living in \'ail, Iowa. The wife and mother passed away on the 
8th of February, 1903, iier remains being interred in the Vail cemetery. In 
1908 Mr. Hoft'man was again married, his second union being with Miss Annie 
Wall, a native of England, who came to the United States with her parents at 
an early day. Both her father and mother are now deceased. 

In politics Mr. Hoffman is a republican and for several years he served on 
the school board. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to 
Diamond Lodge, No. 422, at Vail, in which he has filled some of the chairs. 
His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Good qualities of heart and mind have gained for him warm and last- 
ing friendships and he has a wide and favorable acquaintance in this part of 
the county. 



HERMAN W. BOECK. 



The agricultural interests of Crawford county find a worthy representative 
in Herman \V. Boeck, who is operating a quarter section of rich and productive 
land in East Boyer township. His birth occurred in Davenport, Iowa, on the 
9th of October, 1875, his parents being Henry and Catherina (Kahler) Boeck, 
both of whom are natives of Holstein, Germany. The father, who was born 
January 24, 1839, crossed the Atlantic to the United States in 1859, locating in 
Davenport, Iowa, where in March, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company E, 
Second Iowa Cavalry. He served with that command for four years and four 
months, and was mustered out with the rank of second sergeant. He made a 
creditable military record, never faltering in the performance of any task assigned 
him. On returning to Davenport he became identified with industrial interests as 
a contractor and 1 milder, investing his earnings in Crawford county land. At 
the present time his holdings embrace twelve hundred acres of valuable land 
here. He retained his residence in Davenport and managed his estate in Craw- 
ford county from that point. A jDortion of the property is now being operated 
by our subject. Henry Boeck has been twice married, his first union being with 
Elizabeth Peterson, by wdiom he had three children, namely : William F., who 
is a resident of Xishnabotny township, Crawford county; Laura, the widow of 
Otto J. Teegen, of Davenport, Iowa; Lizzie, the wife of Fritz Brandenburg, of 
East Boyer township, this county. Unto Henry and Catherina (Kahler) Boeck, 
who celebrated their marriage in Davenport, were born five children, as follows : 
Herman W., of this review ; Ferdinand and August IL, both of whom are resi- 
dents of Davenport, lov, a; George H., living in Nishnabotny township; and 
Louisa, the wife of August A. Schnoor, of Nishnabotny township. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 109 

Herman W. Boeck obtained his education in the public schools of his native 
city and also pursued a short course of study in the Iowa Commercial College. 
When a lad of eleven years he began spending his summers on his father's land 
in Crawford county, attending school in Davenport during the winter seasons. 
General agricultural pursuits have claimed his time and energies throughout his 
entire business career and have proved a gratifying source of remuneration to 
him. He now operates one hundred and sixty acres of land belonging to his 
father in East Boyer township and annually harvests good crops which find 
a ready sale on the market. 

In 1897 Mr. Boeck was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Blunk, a native 
of Germany, who accompanied her parents on their emigration to the new world 
when a little maiden of four or five years. Mr. and Mrs. Boeck now have three 
children: Oliver C, Benton H. and Alfred R. 

Mr. Boeck is a republican in politics and is serving his second term as town- 
ship clerk, while for three years he held the office of assessor. He belongs to the 
Sons of Veterans at Denison and is also a member of the Masonic fraternity at 
Manilla, Iowa. Both Mr. and Mrs. Boeck are identified with the Eastern Star 
at Manilla and are also consistent members of the Lutheran church at that place. 
They are well known and highly esteemed as people of genuine personal worth 
and the hospitality of the best homes of the locality is freely accorded them. 



TOHN B. DUNBAR. 



Although thirteen years have passed since John B. Dunbar, of Denison, was 
called from earthly scenes, his memory survives in the hearts of many to whom 
he was endeared by acts of courtesy and kindness. He was a native of Swanton, 
Franklin county, Vermont, born November 9, 1842, and was a son of Almon 
C. and Fannie (Crawford) Dunbar, both of whom were born in Vermont. The 
father was a miller at Swanton and died after he had passed the age of seventy 
years, his wife departing this life five years later. They were both members of 
the Methodist church. There were seven children in their family: John B., 
the subject of this review; George B. and Almon C, deceased; Elisha B., now 
living at West Danville, Vermont; Sidney, of Richford, Vermont; Sarah, who 
married Stephen Jones; and AHce, the wife of George Jones, who, although of 
the same name, was not related to Stephen Jones. 

John B. Dunbar was reared in his native town and attended the public 
schools, graduating from the high school. After laying aside his books he as- 
sisted his father in the mill, continuing in Vermont until he was thirty-one years 
of age. In 1873 he came west and located in Denison, Iowa, where he engaged 
in the milling business and later became interested in insurance and real estate 
in company with Charles Bullock. He was for twenty-five years a resident of 
Denison and became recognized as one of its most respected citizens. 

On the 8th of December, 1861, Mr. Dunbar was united in marriage to Miss 
Mercy M. Phelps, who was born at Stanbridge. Quebec, Canada, February 7, 
1846, a daughter of Elnathan and Phoebe (Blakely) Phelps, both of whom were 



110 IIISTURY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

natives of Connecticut and went with their parents to Canada. Elnathan Phelps 
died in Canada at the age of sixty years and his wife passed away five years 
later, being then sixty-three years of age. They were the parents of the follow- 
ing children : Eliza, John B., Zaccheus Lock, Zaccheus Aylmer, William E., Al- 
bert T., Anna J. and ]\Iercy M. The father comes of Revolutionary stock, the 
greatgrandfather having been a soldier under General Washington. The maternal 
grandfather, Zaccheus Blakely, was a farmer of Connecticut. Four daughters 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Dunbar: Emma Eliza, who died at the age of seven- 
teen and one-half months; Ella Eunice, who passed away at the age of three 
years and seven months; Ada Julia, who died at the age of eleven years; and 
Lena Phelps, whose death occurred at the age of nine years. 

Mr. Dunbar died August 9, 1898, having reached the age of fifty-six years 
and being then in the midst of an active and useful career. He was identified 
with the Baptist church, of which Mrs. Dunbar is also a member. Fraternally 
he was connected with the ^vlasonic lodge at Rich ford, \'ermont, in which he 
retained membership after coming west, and politically he gave his adherence 
to the republican party. During the Civil war he served as cavalryman, guard- 
ing the frontier against the rebels, and he bravely performed his duty in war as 
well as in times of peace, when he set an example of industry, application and 
helpfulness to others well worthy of imitation. 

Although IMrs. Dunbar has been sorely afflicted by the loss of those she held 
most dear, she has been sustained by an unfaltering trust in a Divine hand that 
guides all things aright, and her faith in the assurance of holy writ has never been 
shaken. She has many friends in Denison whom she has attracted by qualities 
of mind and heart that are recognized the world over as the foundation of a 
beautiful character. She will make her home in Lafayette, Indiana. 



' THOMAS JOCHIMSEN. 

Thomas Jochimsen, who follows general farming and stock-raising in East 
Boyer township, is the owner of three hundred and twenty acres of rich and 
productive land. His birtlr occurred in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, on the 
5th of October, 1856, his parents being Claus and Anna (Ratje) Jochimsen, 
who were born, reared and married in that country. The father, who worked as 
a carpenter in Germany, crossed the Atlantic to the United States in 1878, first 
locating in Davenport. Iowa, where he spent nine months. On the expiration 
of that period he came to Crawford county, settling in East Boyer township, 
where he made his home until 1883. In tliat }-ear he j)urchased and located 
upon a tract of raw prairie land in Xisimabotny township, improving the prop- 
erty and bringing it under a high state of cultivation. His demise, which oc- 
curred in 1902, was the occasion of deep and widespread regret, for he had lived 
in Crawford county for almost a quarter of a century and had gained an ex- 
tensive circles of friends here. His wife died in 1904, her remains being interred 
in the Nishnabotny cemetery. They reared a family of six children, as follows : 
Thomas, of this review; Botilda, the wife of Conrad Eric, of Council Blufifs ; 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 111 

Peter, who is a resident of Manilla, Iowa; Kate, the wife of Hans Miller, of 
Ida county, Iowa; Henry, living in Nishnabotny township; and Claus, who makes 
his home in Colorado. 

Thomas Jochimsen obtained his education in the common schools of his 
native land and after putting- aside his text-books worked as a farm hand. He 
was a young man of twenty-two when he accompanied his parents on their emi- 
gration to the new world and in 1888 started out as an agriculturist on his own 
account in Crawford county, cultivating land which he rented from his father 
until 1892. In that year he located upon his present farm in East Boyer town- 
ship, first purchasing one hundred and sixty acres. By additional purchase he 
•extended the boundaries of the place until it now embraces three hundred and 
twenty acres of land which responds readily to the care and labor which he be- 
stows upon it. The property is lacking in none of the improvements and ac- 
cessories of a model farm of the twentieth century and in its neat and thrifty 
appearance indicates the careful supervision of the owner. In addition to cul- 
tivating the cereals best adapted to soil and climate Mr. Jochimsen devotes con- 
siderable attention to stock-raising, finding both branches of his business profit- 
able as well as congenial. 

In 1891 Mr. Jochimsen was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Neimeyer, 
who was born in Germany and came to the United States with her parents in 
1877. Unto our subject and his wife have been born four children: Anna, 
Eddie, Henry and Herbert, all at home. 

In politics Mr. Jochimsen is a republican, while his religious faith is in- 
dicated by his membership in the Lutheran church, to which his wife also be- 
longs. In an analyzation of his character and life work we note many of the 
characteristics which have marked the German nation for many centuries, — the 
perseverance, reliability, energy and unconquerable determination to pursue a 
course that has been marked out. It is these sterling qualities which have 
_gained to Mr. Jochimsen success in life and made him one of the substantial 
and valued citizens of East Boyer township. 



EDMUND HOWORTH. 



As one of the pioneers and extensive landowners of Union township, Ed- 
mund Howorth has for over half a century been identified with the agri- 
cultural development of Crawford county. He was born in North Lancaster- 
shire, England, December 23, 1823, a son of Ferdinand and ]\Iary (Howorth) 
Howorth, the former of whom was also a native of Lancastershire, whence he 
emigrated to the United States in 1842, locating in Athens county, Ohio. Here 
he remained until 1853 and then moved to Union township, Crawford county, 
Iowa. He had followed the occupation of wool comber in the old country but 
upon taking up his residence in Iowa he engaged in farming and continued along 
this branch of industry until his death. His wife, who was also a native of 
England, departed this life in Crawford county, her remains being interred in 
the Dow City cemetery. Of the eight children born to this couple but two sur- 
vive : Edmund, of this review ; and Daniel, who resides in Dunlap, Iowa. 



112 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Edmuiul Howorth obtained his early education in the elementary schools 
of England and continued to reside in the land of his birth until 1850, when 
he decided to seek new fields for his endeavors and came to the United States, 
eventually, in 1S53, locating in Union township, this county, where he purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres of land for one dollar and twenty-hve cents per 
acre. This he improved and continued to reside upon until 1901, a year later 
taking up his abode in Dow City. During this time he had. by unwonted thrift 
and diligence, added to his landholdings until they aggregated twelve hundred 
and five acres, all of which is located in Union and Goodrich townships. 

The marriage of Mr. Howorth was solemnized in 1862, when he was united 
to Miss Sabina Goodrich, a daughter of Isaac Goodrich, of Goodrich township. 
She died in November, 1906. Mr. and Mrs. Howorth became the parents of 
nine children, of whom the following survive : John William ; Mary ; Lulu ; 
Isaac, who lives in Goodrich township; Margaret, who became the wife of Fred 
E. Butler and lives in Lewiston. Idaho ; and Frank C, who resides in Union 
township. The active work of the farm is now entrusted to the sons, who have 
added very materially to the estate, bringing it to an unusual state of cultivation 
and greatly enhancing its value. While general farming in all its branches is 
carried on, they make a specialty of raising blooded horses, in which they have 
met with unusual success. 

]^Ir. Howorth is an independent Republican and has served as trustee 
of Goodrich township. In his religious faith he is a consistent and faitliful 
member of the Baptist church. He has now passed his eighty-seventh milestone 
on his journey through life and in reviewing his career it is found to be char- 
acterized by industry and integrity in all his business dealings and by faith- 
fulness to every trust imposed upon him in other relations of life. 



IRA C. GILLMOR. 



Ira C. Gillmor has not only acquired unqualified success as an extensive 
stock-raiser in Crawford county but has also been connected prominently with 
the public affairs of Denison township and has done much to advance its inter- 
ests both politically and socially. Mr. Gillmor was born on the adjoining farm 
to the north. June 12, 1876, a son of Isaac Gillmor. and successively passed 
through the public and liigh schools of Denison, later pursuing his studies in 
Cornell University at Mount X'ernon. Upon concluding his course there he 
entered into partnership with his father on the old homestead, which connection 
continuerl until 1898, when he removed into Denison, in order to widen liis field 
of endeavor. For the ensuing five years he engaged in the livestock business, 
buying and shipping, a part of this time special attention being given to west- 
ern horses. Subsequently he removed to his present property on sections 28 
and 29. Denison township, consisting of three hundred and sixty acres of some 
of the best grazing land in the state. With increased facilities he has con- 
tinued to engage in the live-stock business, his past wide experience enabling 
him to build up a large and ever growing trade in that branch of industry. He 




ISAAC GILLMOR 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 115 

is now stocking his farm with registered Aberdeen Angus cattle, of which he 
will make a specialty as a breeder. Aside from his live-stock interests he has 
considerable landholdings in South Dakota. 

The marriage of Mr. Gillmor took place April 20, 1898, when he was united 
to Miss Mabel Hardy, a daughter of A. P. Hardy. She was educated in the 
Dow City schools and high school, later attending Denison College, after which 
she taught for three years in the rural schools of Denison township. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Gillmor have been born two children, namely: Ira Hardy, March 16, 
1899, and Zella Olive, May 12, 1902. 

Mr. Gillmor has taken a conspicuous part in the political history of his town- 
ship, always doing everything in his power that would tend toward clean gov- 
ernment. A stanch republican, he has been chosen by his party at different 
times to fill positions of responsibility, has served two terms as township clerk, 
being at the present time the incumbent of that office, has been clerk of election 
for seven years and filled the position of secretary of the school board for six 
years. In discharging the duties of the offices he has shown his executive ability 
and proven his loyalty to the general welfare in such a manner as to command 
the generous esteem and respect of his fellow townsman. Fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Knights of Pythias, while his wife is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and socially is a member of the P. E. O. Mr. Gillmor stands as 
a type of the highest manhood, is a man of strict integrity, ever upright and 
honest in all his business transactions, always genial and courteous with his 
fellow beings, and his numerous friends recognize in him all the sterling quali- 
ties for which he is well known. 



JOHN SAGGAN. 



John Saggan, one of the well known and prosperous residents of Denison, is 
a native of the fatherland, his birth having occurred in Holstein on the ist of 
May, 1867. His parents, H. H. and Christina Saggan, who were also born in 
Germany, crossed the Atlantic to the United States in 1872 and during the first 
five years of their residence in the new world made their home in Chicago, Illi- 
nois. In 1877 they came to Crawford county, Iowa, spending the remainder of 
their lives on a farm here. H. H. Saggan passed away in 1910, while his wife 
was called to her final rest in 1907. They reared a family of three children, 
namely: Mary, the wife of Paul Rosburg, of Plymouth county, Iowa; John, of 
this review ; and Martin, who is a resident of Denison, Iowa. 

John Saggan, who was a little lad of five years when he accompanied his 
parents on their emigration to America, attended the common schools in the 
acquirement of an education and when not busy with his text-books assisted his 
father in the operation of the home farm. On attaining his majority he rented 
the place and was busily engaged in its cultivation for ten years. On the ex- 
piration of that period he took up his abode in Denison, where he has remained 
to the present time, being engaged in business as the proprietor of a saloon. 
He now owns a brick business block containing five store buildings on West 



IIG HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Broadway and is widely recognized as a substantial and representative citizen 
of the community. 

In February. 1892. Mr. Saggan was united in marriage to Miss Ella Jepsen, 
a daughter of Peter and Anna Jepsen, of whom more extended mention is made 
on another page of this volume. Unto our subject and his wife have been born 
live children, as follows : Henr)' P., Saggan Hugo, Martin, Edward and Harry. 

Mr. Saggan gives his political allegiance to the tlemocracy but has no desire 
for the honors and emoluments of office. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to Lodge Xo. 393 at Denison. 
He well merits the proud American title of a self-made man, owing his present 
prosperity entirely to his own efforts. 



ALBERT BAXDOW 



Albert Bandow, a successful and enterprising agriculturist of East Boyer 
township, is the owner of a well improved farm of one hundred and sixty acres. 
His birth occurred on Canal street in Chicago, Illinois, on the 23d of June, 1875. 
his parents being Christ and Frederica (Witenberg) Bandow, who were born, 
reared and married in Germany. The father, who worked as a farm hand in 
Germany, crossed the Atlantic to the United States in 1870, locating in Chicago, 
Illinois, where he was employed in a tanning establishment for six years. On 
the expiration of that period, in 1876, he removed to Carroll county, Iowa, tak- 
ing up his abode in Washington township, wdiere he made his home until called 
to his final rest in 1900. His widow, who still survives, now makes her home 
with one of her sons in East Boyer township, Crawford county. They were the 
parents of eleven children, seven daughters and four sons, namely: Mary, the 
wife of William Jensen, of Arcadia, low-a ; Lena, the wife of George Kellen, of 
Garden, Michigan; Sophia, the wife of Henry Precht, of Jennings, Louisiana; 
Anna, the wife of Charles Scgbert, of East Boyer township; Bertha, the wife 
of Nels Bred.ahl, of Adair county, Iowa; Emma, tlie wife of Hans Bredahl. of 
Adair County, Iowa; Albert, of this review; Amelia, who is deceased; Lewis, 
living in East Boyer township; Julius, who is with his brothers; and Charles, 
who is likewise a resident of East Boyer township. 

Albert Bandow acquired his education in the district schools and remained 
under the parental roof until he had attained his majority. At that time he 
started out as an agriculturist on his own account and in connection with the 
tilling of the soil also engaged in threshing. His present farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres in East Boyer township was his original and only purchase of 
land and is now under a high state of cultivation and improvement. He keeps 
good graded stock and in both his farming and live stock interests has won a 
gratifying measure of success. 

On the 8th of September, 1899, Mr. Bandow was united in marriage to Miss 
Frieda Jager. a native of Clayton county. Iowa, born Way 16. 1881. and a daugh- 
ter of Lewis and Minnie (Lapel) Jager. Her father, a native of Germany, emi- 
grated to America in 18^17 and passed away March 24, 1898. The mother of 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 117 

Mrs. Bandow died November 7, 1900. Mr. and ]\Irs. Jager were the parents of 
five children, as follows : Herman and Lewis, both of whom are deceased ; 
Mrs. Albert Bandow ; Adella, the wife of Lewis Bandow, of East Boyer town- 
ship; and Ella, who has also passed away. Unto our subject and his wife have 
been born three children : Lewis, Carl and Herbert, all at home. 

Mr. Bandow gives his political allegiance to the republican party, believing 
that its principles are most conducive to good government. In religious faith 
he is a Lutheran, both he and his wife belonging to the church of that denomina- 
tion. His salient characteristics are such as make for good citizenship in any 
community and which win the esteem, confidence and good-will of all. 



CHAUNCY D. MILLER. 

Coming of worthy ancestry and early imbued with an ambition to win an 
honored name in the world, Chauncy D. Miller, of Denison, has succeeded in 
maintaining the good name of his family and also in earning substantial recogni- 
tion as a leading citizen of Crawford county. He was born in Tompkins county, 
New York, January 4, 1846, a son of Andrew J. and Marilla (Searles) Miller, 
the former of whom was a native of New York and the latter of Massachusetts. 
The father was reared as a farmer and moved to Huron county, Ohio, in 
1852, where he lived for sixteen years, then taking up his residence in Lenawee 
■county, Michigan, where he spent the remainder of his life, being called away 
after he had passed the eightieth milestone of his earthly career. His wife 
survived him and died in Crawford county, Iowa, when about eighty years of 
age. Mr. Miller was a man of more than ordinary intelligence and a leader 
in the community. He took an active part in politics and held various town 
offices, always discharging his duties with the highest sense of honor. He and 
his wife were consistent members of the Baptist church. Alexander Miller, 
the paternal grandfather of our subject, was a native of New York. He served 
as an officer in the Revolutionary war and applied for a pension from the gov- 
ernment when he was one hundred and four years old. The grandfather Searles 
was a native of Massachusetts but moved to New York state, where he passed 
his later years. He lived to the age of ninety-two. 

Nine children were born to Andrew J. and Marilla Miller, three of whom 
are now living, namely: Aretas H., who was for three years a soldier in the 
Civil war and now makes his home in Denison ; Clara E., the wife of Henry 
Hall, of Boyne, Michigan; and Chauncy D., our subject. 

Chauncy D. Miller at the age of six years moved with his parents to the 
state of Ohio, where he grew to manhood and received his education in the pub- 
lic schools. In 1868 he accompanied his parents to Michigan, but having de- 
cided to make his home west of the Mississippi river, he traveled across the 
country in the fall of 1871, his objective point being Crawford county, Iowa, 
He began life in this county by renting a farm in Denison township but later 
moved to the city of Denison, where he lived for three years. He then bought 
-one hundred acres in East Boyer township, which he greatly improved. He has 



118 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

acquired more land and owns one hundred and forty-three acres in one tract. 
He continued upon his farm until 1898, when he rented it to his son, and once 
more took up his residence in Denison. In 1899 he entered the milling business 
and in the spring of the following year he built a modern mill at Denison, which 
he has ever since operated. Under excellent management, the business has 
been largely developed and the products of the mill are now distributed over a 
radius of many miles in this section. 

In September, 1868, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss Marcia T. 
Butler, a native of Morenci, Michigan, and a daughter of Flavel and Jane (Bald- 
win) Butler. Elias Baldwin, the maternal grandfather of Mrs. Miller, moved 
from Massachusetts to Michigan in the territorial days of the latter state and 
was prominent in business and municipal affairs. His wife was Tryphena 
Moore before her marriage. Four children have been born to Mr. and ]\Irs. 
Miller, namely : Ethel T., now a bookkeeper in her father's mill, who graduated 
from the Denison Normal School and taug-ht school for ten years ; Arthur W., 
who is connected with a fruit-packing establishment at Whittier, California; 
Albert E., who was graduated from the University of Iowa and is now in the 
law department of the census bureau at Washington, D. C. ; and Edward F., 
who married Miss Daisy Miller, of New York, and is now in the paymaster's 
department at Mare Island navy yard. Miss Ethel T. ]\Iiller is a member of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution and is a lady of unusually fine mental 
attainments. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller are active members of the Baptist church, in which he 
serves as trustee. Politically he is allied with the republican party and has held 
various township offices. He was for nine years consecutively a member of the 
school board of East Boyer township and also served as justice of the peace. 
He is a man of energy, enterprise and progressiveness. and his labors have met 
with deserved financial reward. Always prompt and straightforward in his 
dealings, he enjoys the confidence of a wide circle of friends and acquaintances 
in this part of the state. 



LEONARD S. HOFFMAN. 

Leonard S. Hoffman, who was appointed assistant postmaster of \'ail on the 
1st of July, 1897, has since ably discharged the duties devolving upon him in 
that connection. He is numbered among the worthy native sons of Crawford- 
county, his birth having here occurred on the 21st of February, 1877. His 
parents were Thomas J. and Debbie (Leonard) Hoffman, more extended men- 
tion of whom is made on another page of this work. He attended the common 
schools in the acquirement of an education and was reared to manhood under 
the parental roof. Starting out to earn his own livelihood, he entered the ser- 
vice of the Northwestern Railroad Company and remained in the employ of that 
corporation for a year and a half. On the ist of July, 1897, he was appointed 
assistant postmaster of \'ail and has held the office continuously since, aiding 
his father, who has acted as postmaster for the past fourteen years. He owns 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 119 

a fine residence and also a lot in Vail and is widely recognized as a substantial 
and respected citizen of the community. 

On the 30th of November, 1897, Mr. Hoffman was united in marriage to 
Miss Alice M. Crampton, who was born in Crawford county on the nth of 
April, 1880, her parents being Benjamin and Jane Crampton, natives of England. 
Following their emigration to the new world they took up their abode in Clinton 
county, Iowa, but are now residents of Vail. Mr. and Mrs. Hofifman have four 
children, namely: Gladys, Grace G., Dorothy J. and Edward C. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Hofifman has sup- 
ported the republican party, believing that its principles are most conducive to 
good government. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to 
Diamond Lodge, No. 422, at Vail, of which he has served as secretary for eleven 
years. He is also a member of Homestead Lodge, No. 659, of the Yeomen and 
likewise belongs to the Pioneer Homestead Association of Des Moines, Iowa. 
His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church, with which his wife is also afifiliated. They have spent their entire lives 
in Crawford county and enjoy a wide and favorable acquaintance within its 
borders. 



FRANK E. COMSTOCK. 

Frank E. Comstock, a well known and enterprising agriculturist of East 
Boyer township, resides on a highly improved farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres and also owns a quarter section of land in Iowa township. His birth oc- 
curred in this state on the 5th of October, 1880, his parents being John W. and 
Ella (Keller) Comstock. A sketch of the father appears on another page of 
this work. John W. Comstock came to Crawford county when his son Frank 
was one year old and has resided within its borders continuously since. Unto 
him and his wife were born seven children, as follows : Charles, who is a resi- 
dent of Montana; Frank E., of this review; Nellie, the wife of Patrick Has- 
sett, who follows farming in Denison township; and May, Dowie, David and 
Mabel, all of whom are yet at home. 

Frank E. Comstock attended the common schools of Nishnabotny township 
in the acquirement of an education and remained on his father's farm until 
twenty-six years of age, when he was married and established a home of his 
own. He resided in Goodrich township for two years and then came to East 
Boyer township, locating on the farm which has remained his place of abode 
continuously since. The property embraces one hundred and sixty acres of rich 
and productive land and all of the improvements thereon stand as monuments to 
his enterprise and industry. In addition to his home farm he owns a tract of 
one hundred and sixty acres in Iowa township, which is also under a high state 
of cultivation. He annually gathers rich and abundant harvests as a reward 
for his labor and well deserves recognition among the substantial and representa- 
tive citizens of the community. 

On the 24th of April, 1906, Mr. Comstock was united in marriage to Miss 
Hannah Hassett, a daughter of Jerry and Bridget (O'Donovan) Hassett, who 



120 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

are natives of Irclaiul and now make their home in Denison, Iowa. They are 
the parents of eleven children, namely: Alary, the wife of Michael McAIann, of 
Denison, this state; Con, who is a resident of East Boyer township; Bridget, the 
wife of Francis McSurley, of Nishnabotny township; Tom, an agriculturist 
of East Boyer township; Patrick, living in Denison township; Maggie, who is 
the wife of Patrick Lane and resides near Vail, Iowa; John, who resides on the 
old iiomestead in East Boyer township; Nellie, the wife of James Bowman, 
of Washington township; Mrs. Comstock ; Kate, who is employed as a 
stenographer by the Swanson Lumber Company of Denison, Iowa; and Lizzie, 
the wife of Clarence O'Mara, of Washington township. Unto our subject and 
his wife has been born one child, Francis Lee, whose birth occurred on the 4th 
of February, 1907. 

In politics Mr. Comstock is a republican, while his religious faith is indi- 
cated by his membership in the Catholic church, of which his wife is likewise 
a communicant. Lie has won a creditable measure of prosperity for one of his 
years and the sterling qualities of his manhood have made the circle of his 
friends almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintances. 



ALBERT SLECHTA. 



Coming to America very early in life Albert Slechta has since his childhood 
made his home in Crawford county. Lie has been closely identified with agricul- 
tural and stock-raising interests and has acquired an enviable reputation as a 
breeder. He was born in Bohemia, March 27, 1876, and is a son of Albert and 
Mary (\'onnestic) Slechta. The family emigrated to America in 1881 and 
located in Crawford county, Iowa, where the father successfully engaged in 
farming. He rented land for ten years and then purchased two hundred and 
forty acres, which became the home place. He died at the age of seventy-seven, 
but the mother is now living on the homestead with her son Albert. There 
were seven children in their family, six of whom grew to maturity, namely : 
Mary, who is now deceased ; Frank, who lives in Crawford county ; Albert, of 
this review; Joseph, wlio also lives on the home place; Charles, at home; and 
Lucy, deceased. 

Albert Slechta received his education in the common schools of Crawford 
county and was reared on the home farm, showing an interest in the various 
duties pertaining to stock-raising and agriculture, which indicated marked ability 
in a pursuit to which he has devoted the best energies of his life. After the 
death of his father he and his brother Joseph were associated in carrying forward 
the work, although at the time they did not have money enough even to buy a 
team of horses. Today they have acciuired an acknowledged reputation as farm- 
ers and stock-breeders and are in possession of one of the valuable properties 
of Milford township. They have devoted special attention to the breeding of 
full blooded Percheron horses and have about fifty head in their herd, the leader 
of which they value at more than fifteen hundred dollars. They have five full 
blooded mares, two of them having been imported from Europe. They are 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 121 

both men of resourceful business ability, and in the field to which they have 
turned their attention they have found ample room for the exercise of talents, 
which have brought well merited rewards. 

Mr. Slechta of this review is in hearty sympathy with the democratic party 
but has never aspired to public office as he is entirely devoted to his business. 
He and his brother are members of the Catholic church, in which they were 
reared, and as citizens they have ever attempted to perform their duty in be- 
half of their fellowmen. 



LOUIS MARTIN HENRY MUNDT. 

Louis Martin Henry Mundt, one of the worthy native sons of Crawford 
county, is well known as a successful agriculturist and respected resident of East 
Boyer township, where he owns three hundred and twenty acres of rich and 
arable land. His birth occurred in that township, one mile from his present resi- 
dence, on the 7th of July, 1878, his parents being Robert and Frederica (Voss) 
Mundt. The father, a native of Hanover, Germany, crossed the Atlantic ta 
the United States about 1865, locating near McGregor, Clayton county, Iowa, 
where he resided for two or three years. On the expiration of that period, in 
company with Fred Heiden, he came to Crawford county in a covered wagon, 
locating in East Boyer township, where he followed farming until 1898. In 
connection with the tilling of the soil he devoted considerable attention to the 
feeding of stock, meeting with success in both branches of his business. On 
putting aside the active work of the fields he took up his abode in Denison, where 
he lived in honorable retirement until called to his final rest in 1908. He had 
prospered in his undertakings and at the time of his demise owned eleven hun- 
dred and thirty acres of valuable land. Coming to the new world in early man- 
hood, he eagerly availed himself of the opportunities here ofifered and as the 
years passed by worked his way steadily upward to a position of affluence. He 
justly merited the proud American title of a self-made man and in his passing" 
the community lost one of its most esteemed and substantial citizens. His widow, 
likewise a native of Germany, still makes her home in Denison, where she has 
an extensive circle of warm friends. They were the parents of seven children, 
as follows: one who died in infancy; W. N., who is a resident of California; 
Ida and Willie, who are deceased ; Freda, the wife of William Plagge, of Buck- 
grove, Iowa; Louis M. H., of this review; and Emma, who has likewise passed 
away. 

In pursuit of an education Louis M. H. Mundt attended the common schools 
of his native township and also spent one term in the German school at Deni- 
son. He remained with his parents until twenty-one years of age, when he was 
married and established a home of his own, locating on the farm which has 
been his place of abode continuously since. The property embraces three hun- 
dred and twenty acres of land and is lacking in none of the improvements and 
accessories of a model farm of the twentieth century. The place in its neat and. 
thrifty appearance gives evidence of his careful supervision and the well tilled 



122 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

fields annually yield golden harvests in return for the care and labor which he 
bestows upon tliem. 

In 1900 Mr. Alundt was united in marriage to Miss Dora Kahl, a native of 
Holstein, Germany, and a daughter of Christ and Henrietta (Coke) Kahl, who 
were likewise born in that country. They emigrated to the United States in 
1890, settling in Goodrich township, Crawford county, Iowa, where they have 
resided continuously since. Unto them were born eight children, namely : 
August, living in Goodrich township, this county; Lizzie, who is deceased; Ber- 
tha, the wife of Fred Kahl, of Milford township; William, who makes his home 
in Goodrich township; Anna, the wife of John Keighan of Shelby county, Iowa; 
Minnie, the wife of William Watje, of Redlands, California; Mrs. !Mundt; and 
Augusta, the wife of William Warn, of Goodrich township. Mr. and Mrs. 
Mundt have three children, Freda, Albert and Hattie, aged respectively ten, 
eight and four years. 

Mr. Mundt is a democrat in politics and has served as school director. His 
religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Lutheran church, of which 
his wife is also a communicant. He has resided in Crawford county from his 
birth to the present time and is well known as a reliable and straightforward 
business man. fully meriting the confidence and good will which are extended 
to him by his fellow citizens. 



OSCAR S. GOODRICH. 

For more than half a century the Goodrich family have been prominently 
identified with the agricultural development of Crawford county, the late Isaac 
B. Goodrich having been the first settler to enter land in the county, in recog- 
nition of which fact he was later honored by having the township where his 
homestead was located named after him. He was born in the state of New 
York in 1804, a son of Philander Goodrich, who was a descendant of one of 
the old families of New England. The spirit engendered by many generations 
of pioneer life early drove Isaac B. Goodrich westward. He first located in 
Michigan and later in Illinois and at an age when the majority of men consider 
retiring from active life again migrated, Iowa being his destination this time. 
He arrived in Crawford county in June, 1854, after a long and tiresome jour- 
ney by wagon oftentimes over unbroken prairie. Locating in Milford town- 
ship, he erected a log cabin fourteen by twenty feet, which was the first shingled 
house in the county. This provided shelter for the family, while he and his 
sons cleared the land and placed it under cultivation. In 1855 a sawmill was 
located in Denison at the foot of the hill near the present site of the North- 
western Railroad stockyards, and with the assistance of his sons, Mr. Goodrich 
cut the trees which were hauled to the mill, the lumber being later transported 
to Goodrich township, where it was utilized in the construction of a house. 
Many weeks of hard labor were spent in the cutting and hauling of the timber, 
after which they had to erect the house, which was built entirely of oak and 
walnut. The shingles which were of black walnut, Mr. Goodrich made himself, 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 125 

in the course of which process, owing to his crude and hmited facilities, he 
sacrificed three of the fingers of his right hand. He acquired two hundred and 
ninety acres of land, which he cuUivated up to the time of his demise in 1881. 
Mrs. Goodrich only survived him until April of the following year. Always 
having been just a little in advance of the progress of civilization, their lives 
had ever been hard, but they possessed all the essential characteristics of the 
pioneer, their personalities being strongly felt in the social, as well as the educa- 
tional development of the county. 

Mr. Goodrich and Miss Margaret Gamble were united in marriage in New 
York and unto them were born eleven children. The first five, Luzina, Sa- 
brina, Adeline, Leverett C. and TuUy, and also the two youngest, Philander 
and Minerva, are deceased. The' others are: William, a resident of South 
Dakota; Oscar, our subject; Rufus, living in Idaho; and Milo, who resides in 
Minnesota. The family always attended the services of the Baptist church, of 
which the parents were members. His political support Mr. Goodrich accorded 
the democratic party. He was a public-spirited man and always took an active 
and helpful part in civic afifairs, for many years serving as a member of the 
board of supervisors. A man of high ideals, sound principles and incorruptible 
integrity his personality was a dominant factor in the development of the 
county where he spent the latter years of his life. 

Oscar S. Goodrich, a son of Isaac B. and Margaret (Gamble) Goodrich, was 
born in Illinois on the 4th of September, 1854. Being but an infant when his 
parents removed to Iowa, the greater part of his life has been spent in the 
Hawkeye state, in the district schools of which he acquired his education. He 
remained a member of his father's household until he had attained his majority, 
at which time he rented sixty acres of land and engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. After cultivating this for two years he removed to an eighty acre tract 
which his father presented him. Here he followed general farming and stock- 
raising until the 22d of November, 1910, when he removed to Denison, where 
he continues to live retired. 

Mr. Goodrich's plans for a home of his own had their culmination on the 
5th of November, 1873, in his marriage to Miss Lucy Butler, of Arion, Iowa. 
Mrs. Goodrich is a daughter of James and Catherine (McCall) Butler, who 
lived on a farm on the present site of the town of Arion. The family residence 
was a log house, as were the majority of the homes of that period, and there 
Mrs. Goodrich as well as her two sisters were married. Mr. Butler was cap- 
tain of a company of volunteers in 1864-5, stationed at Cherokee, where they 
were ready to respond to calls from the settlers who were greatly harassed at 
that time by the Indians. Ten children were born unto Mr. and Mrs. Butler : 
Donald J., deceased, who was the first white boy born in Crawford county ; 
Margaret, the wife of Valdo Talcott; William; Lucy, the wife of Oscar S. 
Goodrich ; Agnes, who married Dr. W. B. Evans ; Lorenzo C. ; Charles ; and 
three who died in infancy. All members of the family now surviving reside in 
Arion, with the exception of Mrs. Goodrich, who lives in Denison. 

Mr. and Mrs. Goodrich have become the parents of eight children: Wil- 
ham, who passed away in infancy ; Una B., the wife of Howard Matthews, of 
El Reno. Oklahoma; and Isaac B. and Leverett C, twins, the former a resident 
Toi. n— 7 



126 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

of Cushing. aiul ihc latter uf Kiron; Libby, who is a skilled sportswoman, hav- 
ing killed many deer and bear in Wyoming, and is the wife of Clyde Hufman, 
of Thermopolis, Wyoming; Catharine, who married Bert Justice, of Alilford 
township; Agnes Marie, who was born on the 2d of September, 1895; and Ruth 
Sabrina, whose birth occurred on the 26th of May, 1897. 

The family affiliate with the Baptist church. The Goodrich home contains 
many interesting things associated with the early history of Crawford county, 
among them being a black walnut desk wdiich many years ago was made for 
the courthouse out of lumber Isaac B. Goodrich cut and hauled to the mill for 
that purpose. When the new courthouse was built and furnished this desk 
was presented to ]\Ir. Goodrich who upon his death gave it to his son Oscar S., 
by whom it is highly treasured because of its many associations. He has ever 
taken an active and helpful part in the local political affairs, giving his support 
to the republican party. He has been elected to the minor township offices, the 
duties of which he discharged in a manner generally satisfactory not only to his 
constituency but to the public at large. 



CHARLES F. BUSS. 



After a residence of over half a century in Union township Charles F. Buss 
may well look back with satisfaction upon a life spent in honorable industry and 
feel that he has met with that sviccess which it is the desire of every man to 
attain. Born in Prussia, May 12, 1833, he is a son of Gottlieb Buss. His 
mother, who bore the maiden name of Homenberg, dying when he was but two 
years old, he was adopted by an aunt, with whom he made his home until he 
reached the age of seventeen years, when he emigrated to the United States. 
His father and only sister both died in Prussia. Upon his arrival in this country 
he first located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and engaged in the lumber business, 
buying wood in the country and selling it in town. He continued to follow 
that vocation for about eighteen months and then, removing eighteen miles west 
of Milwaukee, began working on a farm, his wages being eight dollars a month. 
There he remained until about 1853, when he concluded to go farther west and 
started for Oregon. About this time, however, occurred an Indian outbreak 
and after getting as far as the state of Iowa he decided to remain there and 
bought eigrhty acres of land on Middle Coon. Carroll county. 

This Mr. Buss later sold and in 1855 purchased two hundred acres of land in 
Union township, Crawford county, upon which he has resided since 1859. The 
land was wild and unbroken, no furrow having as yet been turned upon it, but 
imbued with characteristic energy' he at once began its development, made im- 
provements, set out trees and from time to time added to his property until he 
now owns three hundred and twenty acres comprising the home place, besides 
which he has three quarter sections in Boyer township and thirty-seven acres 
of timber land on section 30, Union township. While devoting his main efforts 
to general farming he makes a specialty of live stock, feeding cattle and hogs 
for the market. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 127 

In 1857 Mr. Buss was married to Aliss Eudosia House, but of this union no 
children were born. His second marriage took place in June, 1863, when he 
was united to Miss Maria Agens, and they became the parents of eight chil- 
dren, of whom the following named are living: Lydia, who is the wife of Lewis 
Vore and lives in Union township; William, who also resides in Union town- 
ship; Clara, who married Fred Parker, a resident of Michigan; and Fred, who 
is living at home and assists his father in the management of the home farm. 

In his political relations Mr. Buss gives his support to the principles advo- 
cated by the democratic party, although in former years he was a republican. 
Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, while fra- 
ternally he is affiliated with the Patrons of Husbandry. Mr. Buss is in every re- 
spect a self-made man who, after coming to this country realized the great ad- 
vantages it ofifered to those who wished to make the most of them and his ad- 
vancement in life has come because he has made the most of his opportunities. 



JOHN FASTJE. 



Among the prosperous business men of Denison is John Fastje, well known 
as a manufacturer and dealer in furniture, who by enterprise and good manage- 
ment has gained an established reputation as one of the most progressive men 
in the community. He was born in Oldenburg, Germany, December 10, 1864, 
a son of Bernhard and Fredericka (Kuzel) Fastje, both of whom were natives 
of the fatherland. The father was reared a farmer but after his marriage went 
into the restaurant business and was also constable. He died in 1871 at the age 
of forty-eight years.. His widow came to America and made her home in Deni- 
son until called to her final rest in 1907, at the age of seventy-eight years. She 
and her husband were both faithful members of the Lutheran church. Her 
father was a shoemaker in Germany and was the head of a family of nine daugh- 
ters. There were nine children also in the family of Bernhard and Fredericka 
Fastje, five of whom are now living, namely: Fredericka, wife of Fred Eisen- 
haur, of Denison; John, the subject of this review; Sophia, now Mrs. Henry 
Rogge, of Denison; Helena, wife of John Reeh, of Havre, Montana ; and Henry, 

also of Havre. 

John Fastje was educated in the public schools of Germany and learned the 
cabinet-maker's trade, at which he worked for a number of years after reach- 
ing his majority. In 1891, believing that conditions for advancement were more 
favorable in America he came to this country and settled at Denison, Iowa, 
where he followed the carpenter's trade, and also engaged successfully as con- 
tractor. In 1904 he began manufacturing and dealing in furniture and now has 
one of the most attractive stores in Denison. occupying three floors. He manu- 
factures a complete line of bank and office fixtures and has built up a large and 

growing patronage. 

On the 3d of May, 1891, Mr. Fastje was united in marriage to Miss Jo- 
hanna Wessels, a native of Germany and a daughter of Frederick and Johanna 
(Wedel) Wessels. Two children were born to this union : Freda and John. 



128 HISTURV Ui" CRAWFORD COUNTY 

The wife and mother having been called away in 1893, Mr. Fastje was again 
married on the 20th of May, 1895, his second union being with Miss Anna 
Christiansen, a daughter of Hans and Meta Christiansen. Seven children came 
to bless this union, two of whom died in infancy. The others are Robert, Will- 
iam. Carl, Martha and Dorothea. 

Mr. Fastje is a firm believer in the authority of the Bible and holds member- 
ship in the Lutheran church. His wife is a Methodist, although formerly iden- 
tified with llie Lutherans. Socially he is connected witli the Odd Fellows and 
the Xortli .\nierican Krugerverein. l-^-er since arriving in this country he has 
given his support to the democratic party, believing that in so doing he is ad- 
vancing the best interests of the state and nation, lie served faithfully as a 
soldier in the regular army in Germany and received many lessons that have 
been of great value to him as a private citizen. He has through his own efiforts 
won his wav to independence and has acquired not only a competence financially 
but a nobility of character, his friends feeling that in him they can absolutely 
trust and knowing that they will not be betrayed. 



J. M. YOUNG, M. D. 



Dr. J. M. Young, a prominent member of the medical fraternity in Craw- 
ford county, has built up an extensive practice at \'ail. His birth occurred in 
Greene county, Iowa, on the 27th of September, 1869, his parents being Thomas 
and Jane (Burke) Young, who were natives of South Carolina and Iowa re- 
spectively. The father passed away on the 2d of June, 1882. while the mother 
was called to her final rest in September, 1872. Their children were five in 
number, namely: William, who is now a practicing physician of Jefferson, Iowa; 
Emma, the wife of Daniel Beterbenner of Alliance. Nebraska; J. M., of this 
review; Eva, the wife of William Elmore, of Alliance, Nebraska; and one who 
is deceased. 

Dr. J. M. Young began earning his own livelihood at the early age of thir- 
teen years, learning the drug business and being engaged as a pharmacist until 
1895. I" ^'i^t year he entered the State Medical College at Omaha, from which 
institution he was graduated in 1898. Locating for practice at Jamaica, Iowa, 
he there remained until 1908, wdiich year witnessed his arrival in X'ail, Craw- 
ford county. This town has since remained the scene of his professional labors 
and his practice has steadily increased as he has demonstrated his ability to cope 
with the intricate problems which continually confront the physician. His high 
standing in professional ranks is indicated by the fact that he is now serving as 
president of the Crawford County Medical Society. 

On the 6th of March, 1901, Dr. Young was united in marriage to Miss May 
Lundy, of Jamaica. Iowa, her parents being T. C. and Mattie (Harrison) Lundy. 
who are natives of Ohio and Alabama respectively. Both still survive, making 
their home at Coon Rapids, Iowa, where Mr. Lundy acts as a bank cashier. Mrs. 
Young, who was one of a family of seven children, is a graduate of the high 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 129 

school at Manning and followed the profession of teaching for eleven years prior 
to her marriage. 

Dr. Young gives his political allegiance to the democracy and has held the 
office of county physician. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belong- 
ing to Diamond Lodge, No. 422, at Vail, while both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Eastern Star there. He also belongs to Lodge No. 315 of the 
Knights of Pythias at Bayard, Iowa, in which he has filled all of the chairs. 
His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Christian church, with 
which his wife is also affiliated. He has attained a creditable position in pro- 
fessional circles, while the salient characteristics of his manhood are such as 
have brought him the warm regard of those with whom he has been otherwise 
associated. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON BIDLACK. 

George Washington Bidlack, the owner of two hundred acres of valuable 
land in Crawford county, is widely recognized as one of the substantial and rep- 
resentative agriculturists of East Boyer township. His birth occurred in Lu- 
zerne county, Pennsylvania, on the 15th of March, 1844, his parents being Sam- 
uel Jimpson and Hannah (Thompson) Bidlack, while his paternal grandparents 
were John J. and Martha (Hicks) Bidlack. The grandfather, a native of Con- 
necticut, was bound out as a boy. He participated in the war of 181 2 and was 
starved to death on a British prison ship. Samuel J. Bidlack, the father of our 
subject, was born in Pennsylvania. He removed to Illinois in 1864, locating in 
Carroll county, where he made his home until called to his final rest in 1872. 
Unto him and his wife were born ten children, as follows : George W., of this 
review; Alice, who is a resident of Manilla, Iowa; Evan T., who is deceased; 
Mary, the wife of W. S. Roderick; Maria, who has also passed away; Benja- 
min H., living in Nishnabotny township, Crawford county; Joseph, who makes 
his home at Rockford, Iowa ; Sarah and William, who are likewise deceased ; 
and one who died in infancy. 

George Washington Bidlack attended the common schools in the acquire- 
ment of an education and remained with his parents until 1870, when he was 
married and established a home of his own. He came to Crawford county,- 
Iowa, in that year and with the exception of a few years spent in McLean 
county. North Dakota, has resided within its borders continuously since. His 
homic farm; a productive tract of land comprising two hundred acres, was entirely 
unimproved when it came into his possession but he set resolutely to work and 
eventually brought the fields under a high state of cultivation. He also has 
property holdings in North Dakota, to which state he removed with his family 
in order to take up a homestead claim. Although sixty-five years of age at the 
time, he hauled lumber for a distance of fifty miles, erected five shanties on as 
many different homesteads and made such other improvements as the gov- 
ernment required. 

In 1870 Mr. Bidlack was united in marriage to Miss Frances M. Camp- 
bell, a native of Illinois, by whom he has four children, namely: Grace, a school 



130 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

teacher of Sac City, Iowa; Martha, at home; Laura, the wife of W. G. Mer- 
riam, of Garrison. North Dakota; and Ellen, the wife of J. A. McCutcheon, of 
Garrison, North Dakota. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Jiidlack has sup- 
ported the men and measures of the republican party, believing that its prin- 
ciples are most conducive to good government although he voted for Bryan every 
time he was a candidate. While serving as justice of the peace his decisions 
were characterized by the utmost fairness and impartiality. His religious faith 
is indicated by his membership in the Methodist church, while fraternally he is 
identified with the Masons, belonging to the lodge at Manilla, Iowa. He has 
always been a man of exemplary habits and strict integrity and in the course of 
a long life has performed his part in advancing the true welfare of the 
community. 



MICHAEL L. HOULIHAN, Sr. 

To attain success in life it is not necessary to possess either money or in- 
fluence, as is evidenced by the career of Michael L. Houlihan, Sr., who, begin- 
ning with nothing, has acquired an independent competence which he is now 
enjoying after many years of industry. ];]orn in County Clare, Ireland, in August, 
1840, he is the son of Patrick and Bridget (Hoogan) Houlihan, both of whom 
were also natives of County Clare, where they died, the mother at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety years. They were the parents of nine children, of whom 
four survive, as follows : Mary, who is at home ; Michael L. ; Nora, who lives 
in Ireland ; and Cornelius, retired, who resides in Kansas City, Missouri. Those 
deceased are John, Patrick, Bridget, Austin and Thomas. 

Through force of circumstances Michael L. Houlihan was not enabled to 
obtain any book education, but the knowledge he has secured in the school of 
experience has served every purpose as far as his mental qualifications are con- 
cerned. Thrown upon his own resources at the early age of nine years, he began 
life as a stock-herder, combined with other kinds of labor. At the age of 
twenty-seven he emigrated to the United States, arriving here in 1865 and lo- 
cating in Davenport but only remained there two weeks and then went to Wau- 
kon, Iowa, whence he made a trij) on the Mississippi river. Later he engaged in 
railroad work and coal mining, after which he took up farming near Grinnell 
and there spent two and one-half years. He married Miss Mattie Kraemer, 
by whom he had one child. John Patrick, who cost the mother her life, and the 
child died at the age of three months. 

Mr. Houlihan rented his father-in-law's farm, upon which he remained for 
four years, and then came to Crawford county, living in Hayes township for one 
year. He subsequently located in East Boyer. continuing his residence there for 
nineteen years, after which he removed to Soldier township, and lived there for 
twenty years. In 1907 he came to Denison township, where he purchased land, 
to which, as his circumstances would permit, he added at intervals until he be- 
came the owner of eleven hundred and thirty-nine acres, which he has developed 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 131 

to a high state of cultivation, giving to it the benefit of his wide experience in 
agriculture, acquired in former years, and today he has one of the most valuable 
pieces of property in Crawford county, upon which he has made three sets of 
improvements that go to make it one of the most modern and up-to-date farms 
in this section of the state. Here he has continued to carry on general farming 
and stock-raising on an extensive scale, and that he has met with success is at- 
tested to by the flourishing condition of his estate and stock. 

The second wife of Mr. Houlihan was Mrs. Michael O'Brien, whose maiden 
name was Bridget McMahon and who by her first husband had two children : 
Mary, deceased, and Dennis, now living in Denison township. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Houlihan have been born the following children : John and Martin, who reside 
in Denison township ; Cornelius, who gives his time to assisting his father on the 
home farm ; Thomas, a physician, who is practicing in Ida Grove, Iowa ; Michael, 
who is cashier and manager of the bank in Vail, Iowa ; Ellen, who became the 
wife of Edward Houston, of Boyer township ; Bridget, Bryan, Frances, Mar- 
garet, who are living at home ; Marjory, Nora Francis and two others, who are 
deceased. 

In politics Mr. Houlihan casts his ballot for the democratic party but is 
liberal enough to vote for a friend if he thinks he is deserving of his support. 
He has never sought political favors but has most efficiently filled the offices of 
township trustee, supervisor and school director. In every respect Mr. Houli- 
han is a self-made man, one who has relied upon his own ability to make a place 
for himself in the world and is a most encouraging example to the younger 
generation of what well directed industry and determination will do for him 
who makes up his mind to succeed in life. 



EMIL BIELENBERG. 



Emil Bielenberg, a well known and substantial resident of Schleswig, devotes 
his attention to general farming and stockraising interests, owning one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of productive land in Ida county. His birth occurred in 
that county on the 4th of November, 1879, his parents being Jacob and Emma 
(Meyer) Bielenberg. Their family numbered seven children, as follows: Emil, 
of this review; Lena, the wife of Fred Petersen, of Crawford county; Will- 
iam, who is likewise a resident of Crawford county; Dora, the wife of John 
Bendixen, of this county; Fred, who is deceased; Minnie, the wife of Will- 
iam Aldog, of Ida county; and August, who has passed away. 

Emil Bielenberg was reared on the home farm and early gained practical 
knowledge of the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. The 
work of the fields has claimed his time and energies throughout his entire busi- 
ness career and until the spring of 1910 he worked as a farm hand. At that 
time he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in Ida county, where 
he is now carrying on general farming and stock-raising, meeting with a gratify- 
ing measure of success in both branches of his business. 



132 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUXT^' 

On the 25th of June. 1903, Mr. Dielenberg was joined in wetUock to Miss 
Maggie Petersen, a daughter of J. C. and Anne Petersen, of Schles^vig. His 
political allegiance is given to the democracy, while in religious faith he is a 
Lutheran. He is a young man whose life has ever been actuated by upright 
and honorable principles and well merits the regard and esteem which are uni- 
formlv accorded him. 



HENRY N. TAHN, 



A native of Iowa, Henry N. Jahn has made his home in Crawford county 
for more than forty years, becoming actively identified with various interests 
here. He is now at the head of a flourishing implement business at Manilla. He 
comes of sturdy Teutonic ancestry and was born four miles from Davenport, in 
Scott county, Iowa, November 14, i860, a son of Claus and Louisa (Kortum) 
Jahn, both of whom were natives of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. The father, 
who learned the miller's trade, came to America in 1853, and arrived at the 
end of his journey, near Davenport, with one dollar and a half in his pocket. 
He began his career in the new world as a farm laborer and applied himself 
with such diligence that in 1857 he was prepared to engage in farming on his 
own account. He was one of the pioneers of Hayes township, Crawford county, 
and became one of the substantial men of his section. He now lives in Manilla 
and is the owner of four hundred acres of good land in this county. His wife 
departed this life in 1890 at the age of fifty- four years, Mr. Jahn having now 
arrived at the age of seventy-seven. He held various township offices while 
living upon his farm but never devoted much attention to politics, as his in- 
terests were concentrated upon his business. He holds membership in the Luth- 
eran church and is one of its earnest supporters. Claus Jahn, the paternal 
grandfather of our subject, had five children: Claus, Bertha, Catharine, Henry 
and Anna. The maternal grandfather, M. Kortum, died near Davenport in 
middle life leaving a widow and the following children: Christian, William, 
Joachim, Henry, Louisa and Eli.se. There were six children in the family of 
Claus and Louisa Jahn, four of whom are now living: Henry N., Anna E., Will- 
iam L. and Emile. 

Henry N. Jahn came to Crawford county with his parents at the age of 
nine years and was reared on his father's farm, receiving his early education in 
tlie district schools. He continued at home until twenty-seven years of age and 
then for five years farmed a part of his father's Jand. In 1893 he removed to 
Manilla and the following year began buying- and shipping hogs with his 
brother, William L.. the two continuing together in business for ten years. In 
1895 they built a steam elevator at Manilla and were for eight years actively 
engaged in the grain business. They also owned a half interest in the Isaac 
Hurd Lumber Company from tooi to 1903. They then bought three hundred 
acres of land in Miner county. South Dakota, but Mr. Jahn of this review sold 
his interest to his brother in 1908. In 1904 he formed a partnership in the 
implement business with L. L. Hockett, and they continued together imtil Feb- 




HENRY N. JAHN 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 135 

riiary, 1908, when the partnership was dissolved. The business has since been 
carried forward by Mr. Jahn and is one of the prosperous enterprises of the 
town. 

On the 3d of January, 1900, Mr. Jahn was united in marriage to Miss May 
E. Roderick, who was born in Milledgeville, Whiteside county, lUinois, a daugh- 
ter of WilHam and Mary E. (Bidlack) Roderick, the former of whom was born 
in Maryland and the latter in Pennsylvania. They removed to Illinois, where 
they lived for a number of years, settling in Crawford county, Iowa, in 1882. 
The father died in 1905 and the mother now lives in Manilla. Two children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Jahn, Wilbur R. and Ruth E. 

Religiously Mr. and Mrs, Jahn are both identified with the Presbyterian 
church. Politically he gives his support to the republican party, being an earn- 
est advocate of the progressive element of that organization. He has shown 
himself to be a man of excellent business capacity and capable management, and 
his efforts have been crowned with a gratifying measure of success. He early 
learned that diligence and close application are highly important factors in the 
accomplishment of any worthy object and it is along those lines that he has 
achieved his prosperity. 



BENJAMIN Y. NICHOLSON. 

Many theories have been advanced concerning success and much has been 
written about the best way of achieving it, but careful investigation into the 
lives of the most successful men show that their advancement is not due to 
any fortunate combination of circumstances nor to the following of any given 
rule but is based upon the foundation principles of industry, energy, perseverance 
and close application. Another proof of. this fact is found in the life record 
of Benjamin Y. Nicholson, now secretary and treasurer of the Nicholson Produce 
Company of Denison. 

He was born in Jerusalem, Ohio, October 3, 1863, his parents being John L. 
and Eleanor (Young) Nicholson. He came to Iowa with his parents in 1864 
when but a year old and remained a resident of New Sharon until seventeen 
years of age, during which period he mastered the branches of learning that 
constitute the public school curriculum. Ambition to be up and doing for him- 
self led him to leave home and go to Vail, Iowa, where he joined his brother, 
George W., in the poultry, butter and egg business. The partnership between 
them has extended for twenty-eight years and for the past twenty years Ben- 
jamin Y. Nicholson has resided in Denison, having charge of the business here 
most of that time. Their ramifying trade interests reach out to various sec- 
tions of this and surrounding states. They buy from a large territory and make 
extensive annual shipments, finding a ready sale for their products on the 
market. 

On the 1 8th of May, 1888, Benjamin Y. Nicholson was united in marriage 
to Miss Lydia Maude Watson, who was born in England and was brought to 
America by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Watson, when quite young. 



136 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

The family were early settlers of Crawford county anrl her father died in Vail 
about twenty years ago. Her mother, however, is still living. They were the 
parents of four sons and four daughters, William W., Charles S., John S., 
James. Fannie, Lydia AI.. Alice and Lizzie. The marriage of I\Ir. and Mrs. 
Nicholson has been blessed with six children, namely : Clair W., Pearl E., Ben- 
jamin Y., Jr.. Gladys Erma, and two who died in infancy, Russel and Merrill. 
]\Ir. Nicholson is an advocate of Masonic principles and endeavors to em- 
body in his life the benevolent and charitable spirit of the craft. His member- 
ship is with Sylvan Lodge, No. 507, A. F. & A. AL, of Denison ; Ark Chapter. 
R. A. AL, of Dunlap ; Mount Zion Commandery, K. T., of Harlan, Iowa; and 
Za-ga-zig Temple of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine of Des Moines. He also 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias lodge. Politically a republican, he served 
for about twelve years as a member of the city council, exercising his official 
prerogatives in support of many measures and movements for the general good. 
He has also been a member of the school board for fourteen years and the cause 
of public education finds in him a warm friend. He was chairman of the county 
central committee when Hon. Leslie M. Shaw was elected governor and served 
as chairman for two years. He believes that the best interests of good gov- 
ernment are to be conserved through the adoption of the principles of the re- 
publican party and thus he labors earnestly and untiringly in its behalf. 



L. A. VORE. 



As a native son of Union township, Crawford county, L. A. Vore is one 
of the best known and highly respected agriculturists in this section of the 
state whose early efforts in farming operations have gained for him an ade- 
quate competence which he is now enjoying on his home place near Dow City. 
He was born in Union township. May 25, 1858, a son of R. and Anna Eliza 
(Whaley) Vore, both of whom first saw the light of day in Ohio, the father's 
birth occurring in Athens county. There they were married and in 1855 came 
to Crawford county, Iowa, locating at North Grove, Union township. In those 
days methods of travel were very crude and the journey was made in wagons, 
forty days being consumed en route, while the hardships during the trip were 
many and severe. Mr. \'ore remained in Crawford county until about 1900 
and then removed to Dunlap, Iowa, where he still continues to reside. He has 
always been engaged in agricultural pursuits but of late years he has taken an 
active interest in politics, his support being given the republican party. Mrs. 
Vore was a faithful member of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal church until her death, 
w^hich occurred January 20, 191 1. To this couple were born the following 
children: Ellen, who is the wife of A. P. Lyman, of Oklahoma; L. A., of this 
review; Charles, deceased; Pearl, who follows farming near Spring Lake, 
Texas ; Fred, a resident of Nebraska. 

L. 'A. Vore remained at home until twenty-six years of age, although he had 
worked for himself since attaining his majority, subsequently locating on the 
property upon which he now resides and which, under his careful and business- 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 137 

like management, has been increased in extent until it now comprises four hun- 
dred and twenty acres of highly developed farm land, all the improvements 
upon it having been made by himself. 

Mr. Vore was married in 1884 to Miss Lydia Buss and the following five 
children were born to them : Nellie, who became the wife of Isaac Gardner, 
traveling salesman for the Brist Manufacturing Company, of Topeka, Kansas ; 
Susie, Pearl, Hattie and Charles, who are residing at home. 

In his political views Mr. Vore is a republican but has never been an office 
seeker, although he keeps well informed on all the issues and questions of the 
day, as is the duty of every true American citizen. Fraternally he is affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and with his wife holds member- 
ship in Rebekah chapter. In religion they both give their helpful support to 
the Methodist Episcopal church. Advancing civilization has wrought many 
changes in the county since the pioneer days, changes for the better which Mr. 
Vore has watched with keen interest and in which he has borne his full share, 
both in the business development and in his individual affairs. His success is 
the more gratifying for the reason it is well earned, and his worth as a man is 
demonstrated by the high esteem which is uniformly tendered him by all who 
have the pleasure of his acquaintance. 



J. PETER JEPSEN. 



J. Peter Jepsen, who is engaged in general farming and stock-raising on a 
two hundred acre farm in Otter Creek township, is. a native of Germany, his 
natal day being the 7th of July, 1868. His parents, Thomas and Christina 
(Petersen) Jepsen, spent their entire lives in the land of their nativity and there 
his two brothers, the only surviving members of the family with the exception 
of himself, reside. Six children were born unto Mr. and Mrs. Jepsen, but the 
two youngest, Glaus and Carsten, and Margareta, the third child and only daugh- 
ter, have now passed away, leaving the two eldest sons, Hans and Thomas, and 
J. Peter, who is the fourth in order of birth, the only surviving members of the 
family. 

J. Peter Jepsen remained a subject of Germany until he had passed the 
twenty-eighth anniversary of his birth, at which time his general dissatisfaction 
with conditions as he knew them there, and the confident hope and belief that 
broader and greater advantages were to be found in America, prompted him 
to take passage for the United States. He arrived here in 1894 and almost 
immediately made his way westward locating in Crawford county, Iowa, where 
he obtained employment on a farm and for ten years he continued in this oc- 
cupation. Here the characteristics of his nationality — perseverance, energy and 
thrift — served to make it possible for him to acquire during that period the 
money essential to begin farming for himself, and he rented two hundred acres 
of land and engaged in general farming and stock-raising. For more than ten 
years now he has continued to reside there, following the same pursuits, which 
have proven to be sufficiently lucrative to enable him to become the owner of 



138 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

one-half section of land in Xorth Dakota. lie is known as one of the success- 
ful and capable agriculturists of his township and is realizing profitable returns 
from botli his stock and farm products. 

On the 28th of February, 1900, Mr. Jepsen was united in marriage to Miss 
Lizzie Xaeve, a daugb.tor of William and Mary (Schneider) Naeve. Mr. and 
Mrs. Xaeve had five children, of whom Mrs. Jepsen is the eldest, the others 
being as follows : Katie and Emil, both deceased ; Freda, at home ; and Willie, 
an adopted son. Three children have been born unto Mr. and Mrs. Jepsen: 
Walter, who is ten years of age; Harley, now in his eighth year; and Alice, who 
has passed her second birthday. 

The family always attend the services of the Lutheran church, of which 
Mr. and Mrs. Jepsen are communicants. Ever since naturalization conferred 
upon him the full rights of a citizen of the United States Mr. Jepsen has taken 
an active interest in all ])olitical issues and questions of vital concern to the 
public. He supports the candidates and measures of the democratic party and 
his party fealty has been rewarded by his election to the oflfice of assessor, 
while he is at present serving as clerk of his township, in the discharge of the 
duties of which he seems to be meeting with the general approval of the 
community. 



OTTO HEXRY VOSGERAU. 

Although only twenty-five years of age and just fairly started in his busi- 
ness life. Otto Henry Vosgerau, manager of Der Crawford County Demokrat, 
has attained recognition as one of the energetic and capable citizens of the 
county. He is a native of Stockholm township, this county, born October 17, 
1886, and is a son of Henry and Elise (Kreuger) Vosgerau. The father was 
born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, in 1834, and on coming to America first 
took up his residence in Clinton county, Iowa. Later he removed to Crawford 
county and located upon a farm which he cultivated until 1898, when he retired 
to Denison. In 1910 he removed to Sac county, Iowa, and there passed away 
October 9, 1910. The mother is still living and makes her home in this county. 
There were seven children in their family, five of whom survive. 

Otto H. Vosgerau spent the earlier years of his boyhood on the home farm 
and received his preliminary education in the i)nblic schools. Later he attended 
a college and applied himself to his studies with a diligence that gave bright 
promise as to his future. On the ist of January, 191 1, he acquired a half-in- 
terest in Der Crawford County Demokrat, of which he has since been manager. 
The paper was established in 1887 and is published weekly, being the official 
organ of the county. As it is conducted on thoroughly reliable and conserva- 
tive lines it wields considerable influence in this section of the state and under 
the new management gives promise of a much more extensive circulation. 

On the 28th of July, 1909. Mr. Vosgerau was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret Roettger. a native of Goodrich township, Crawford county, and a 
daughter of Fred Roettger. Her mother is deceased but her father is still liv- 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 139 

ing in this county. There were three children in their family. One daughter, 
Lucile H., has come to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. Vosgerau, her natal 
day being October 23, 1910. 

Mr. Vosgerau and his wife are valued members of the Lutheran church 
and are well known socially in Denison. They live in a beautiful residence in 
one of the most attractive parts of the city and he also owns eight acres within 
the city limits. He has made an excellent beginning in a business which his 
friends prophesy is destined to bring to him. honor and prosperity. 



JOHN TEBBE. 



John Tebbe, who well deserves the title of a self-made man, his present suc- 
cess in the agricultural world coming to him as the result entirely of his own 
well directed efforts, is one of those sturdy citizens who have come from the 
fatherland and in the new world have found opportunities for advancement in 
business impossible in the old world. Born in Germany, in the Rhine province, 
on the i6th of March, 1850, he is a son of Albert and Henrietta (Tebbe) Tebbe, 
both natives of the fatherland, the former's birth occurring in the same place 
as that of the son. That district remained the home of the family until 1875, 
when Albert Tebbe, with his wife and seven children, came to the United States, 
locating in Clinton county, Iowa, near Big Rock. He had been a farmer in his 
native country and after coming to Iowa resumed that occupation, being thus 
engaged in Clinton county until his death, which occurred on the 12th of May, 
1894. He had survived his wife for only a few years, her death occurring July 
30, 1890. Their family of seven children included the following: Henry, a 
farmer of Hanover township; John, of this review; Elizabeth, the wife of 
George Bush, a farmer of Lost Nation, Iowa ; Anna, who married Henry Bush, 
a farmer of Jackson county, Iowa; Minnie, the wife of William Kuhn, of Qin- 
ton county; Matilda, who wedded August Kuehl, also of Clinton county; and 
Christina, the wife of Leonard Zogg, who follows farming in Genoa, Wisconsin. 

In the common schools of Germany John Tebbe acquired a good education 
and he remained with his parents during the period of his boyhood and youth. 
He was a young man of twenty-five years when, in 1875, he came with the 
family to the United States and for a year after his arrival here was employed 
as a farm hand in Clinton county. At the end of that time he rented a farm, 
which he operated until coming to Crawford county in 1882, when he purchased 
a farm, becoming the owner of eighty acres of land in Hanover township. 
Later, however, he sold that property and acquired another tract in the same 
township, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres. To the improvement of 
that property he devoted his entire time and attention, bringing it under a good 
state of cultivation, and it remained his place of residence for eighteen years. 
He then purchased an eighty acre tract near Kenwood, in Paradise township, 
but never lived upon that place, coming to his present home about three years 
ago. Altogether his possessions aggregate three hundred and twenty acres, all 
located in Paradise township and all in excellent condition. The home place 



140 IHSTDRV OF CKAWFORU COUNTY 

is equipped with good buildings and all modern conveniences for facilitating 
farm labor, and besides cultivating the cereals best adapted to soil and climate 
he engages in stock-raising to a considerable extent. His stock is of an ex- 
cellent grade and therefore commands ready sale and good prices on the market. 
He has adopted practical, progressive methods in the management of his aflfairs, 
gives close application to and is careful in the supervision of his business in- 
terests, and his efforts therefore are effective forces in the acquirement of sub- 
stantial results. 

It was in the year 1881 that Mr. Tebbe was united in marriage to Miss Jo- 
hanna Tebbe, and unto them have been bom seven children, namely : Anna, de- 
ceased ; Emma, the wife of Jurgen Detlefsen; Albert, Christina, Herman, all 
at home ; Elizabeth, deceased ; and George, at home. 

The parents are members of the Lutheran church, in the work of which 
they take a helpful interest, and in politics Mr. Tebbe gives his support to the 
republican party. He is not, however, an active worker in party ranks, prefer- 
ring that his duties of citizenship shall be performed in a private capacity, and 
yet he has ever taken a deep interest in all matters pertaining to the welfare of 
the comm.unities in which he has resided and he is numbered among Iowa's 
loyal adopted sons. The sturdy qualities in his nature, which are the birthright 
of the Teutonic race, have been elements in the acquirement of a gratifying 
success, while the personal elements in his character — clean manhood and honest 
principles — speak for desirable and valuable citizenship. 



GEORGE A. NORELIUS. 

Among the native sons of Iowa who have assisted very materially in the ad- 
vancement of the locality in which their lot has been cast is George A. Norelius, 
a prominent citizen of Kiron. He was born in Hamilton county, Iowa, Decem- 
ber 5, 1868, son of A. and Christina Norelius, who are now living in Crawford 
county. 

Mr. Norelius of this review received his early education in the district 
schools and later entered the Western Xomial College of Shenandoah, Iowa, 
from which he was graduated in 1888. He began his business career as a teacher 
and continued for five terms, but being attracted to commercial life he entered 
general mercantile business at old Kiron on March i, 1892, and continued at 
that place for seven years, when he moved his store building to new Kiron and 
resumed the same line of business. He served for four years as postmaster, 
discharging his duties with the same fidelity that he evinces in his own affairs 
and meeting with the hearty approval of the people. He is prominently iden- 
tified with various enterprises, being director of the Kiron State Bank and also 
of the Farmers & Merchants Bank at Sheyenne, North Dakota. As a farmer 
he has been very successful and owns one hundred and ten acres of land on 
section 19. Stockholm township, and three hundred and twenty acres in Dickey 
county. North Dakota, also one hundred and twenty acres in Per- 
kins county, South Dakota, and has a one-half interest in the opera house at 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 141 

Kiron. He and his family occupy a fine residence in Kiron, which is provided 
with all modern conveniences. 

On the 2ist of December, 1890, Mr. Norelius was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma Hanson, a native of Sweden and daughter of N. A. and Christina Han- 
son, both of whom were born in Sweden. They came to America about 1870, 
and the mother died in this country in 1888. The father is still living and re- 
sides at Kiron. There were ten children in their family. Five children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Norelius, namely : Neva C, who is now a student in 
college at Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Elsie R. and Jessie P., also students at 
college ; Irma E. ; and Everett A. 

Politically Mr. Norelius gives his support to the democratic party, of which 
he is a stanch adherent. He has served as justice of the peace and president 
of the school board and is now mayor of the village of Kiron, which office he 
has filled with marked ability for several terms. Fraternally, he holds member- 
ship in Wheeler Lodge, No. 398, A. F. & A. M., and he is an earnest believer 
in the beneficent principles of this order. He is a representative business man 
and by his acknowledged ability and high character has attracted many friends 
and is justly held in high regard by all who claim the honor of his acquaintance. 



G. P. KEAIRNES. 



G. P. Keairnes, who is recognized as one of the prominent and successful 
farmers of Union township, was born in Shelby county, November 20th, 1862, 
a son of Wilson and Sarah (Parks) Keairnes, both of whom were natives of 
Virginia. The father came to Iowa in 1852, locating in Grove township, Shelby 
county, where he obtained land from the government and erected thereon a log 
house. This was a unique performance in those days and the ceremonies at- 
tending the "log-raising," as it was teruned, were witnessed by every man in the 
county, fifteen in number. He remained at that location until 1904, when he 
removed to Dunlap and has since continued to reside in that city. 

Fifteen children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Keairnes, of whom the follow- 
ing eleven survive : Elizabeth, who became the wife of A. Beedle and resides in 
Harrison county, Iowa ; Julia, who lies at home in Dunlap ; William, who re- 
sides in Shelby county; Sarah, who is the widow of George B. Runnels and 
makes her home in Shelby county; Harry, who is on a claim in South Dakota; 
M. W., who lives in Grove township, Shelby county; Edward, who is farming 
in the Dakotas ; Jeannette, who is the wife of S. H. Buchter and resides in Ply- 
mouth county, Iowa; G. P., of this review; Mary, who married Thomas Woren, 
of Chicago, Illinois ; and Martha, who became the wife of William Hammer, 
of Harrison county, Iowa. The mother departed this life in 1906 and is interred 
in the Dunlap cemetery. 

G. P. Keairnes obtained his elementary education in the district schools of 
Shelby county and remained under the parental roof until he was twenty-three 
years old, when he began farming upon his own responsibility. He rented land 
in Shelby county and there labored in the fields for eight years, after which 



14l> HISTORV of CRAWFORD COUXTV 

he purchased land in the same locaHly and cuntinued to operate this until 1901. 
In that year he disposed of his property and removed to Washington township, 
Crawford county, remaining there for four years and then coming to Union 
township, where he has since continued to reside. He devotes his entire time 
and attention to general farming on an extensive scale, his farm property in 
that township comprising four hundred and twenty acres, besides which he is 
the owner of one hundred and twenty acres in Shelby county. 

In 1891 Mr. Keairnes was united in marriage to Miss Viola S. Cross, a na- 
tive of Shelby county, and imto them nine children have been born, including: 
John W.. Mary H., Ward. Lloyd V., Ruby L., William \'., Sarah S. and Elsie 
Mabel. Two are now deceased, W^illiam V. having died May 2, 191 1. 

The political support of Mr. Keairnes has always been given to the republi- 
can party and in religion both he and his wife follow the precepts of the Lat- 
ter Day Saints. Since his residence in Crawford county he has been considered 
an important factor in advancing the agricultm-al interests of Union township, 
where he has a wide circle of friends, in whose esteem he holds a high place. 



GEORGE H. HOLDSWORTH. 

George H. Holdsworth. who occupies the old family homestead in Iowa 
township and is prospering in his business, was born in Mercer county, Illinois, 
January i, 1866. He is a son of John II. Holdsworth, who was born in County 
Fermanagh, Ireland, July 22, 1821, and grew to manhood on the Emerald isle, 
where he was married April 8, 1846, to Miss Margaret Irvin. One year after 
their marriage they emigrated to Canada, where they continued until 1855, when 
they arrived in Illinois, locating at Preemption, Mercer county. In 1884, Mr. 
Holdsworth removed with his family to Crawford county, Iowa, and located in 
Iowa township. He died May 11, 1905, the mother having passed away four 
years previously, and their remains were interred in Manning cemetery. There 
were twelve children in their family, six of whom are now living, namely : 
Matilda, the wife of T. J. Armstrong who lives near Manning; Martha, who 
married James Waller, of Rock Island, Illinois; Letitia, who became the wife 
of William Dixon, of Jeannette, Pennsylvania; Sarah, the wife of Andrew 
Geisinger, of Xew Jersey; Belle, the wife of Lou Stimim, of Minnesota; and 
George H. 

George H. Holdsworth received his preliminary education in the district 
schools and as he grew up became well acquainted with the details pertaining 
to agriculture and stock-raising. He remained with his parents and is now 
the owner of the old homestead, which embraces one hundred and fifty-four 
acres of good land. The property is well improved and provided with all de- 
sirable modern facilities. In 1910 Mr. Holdsworth completed the improvements 
by the erection of one of the most substantial barns in the county. In addition 
to the home farm he cultivates three hundred and twenty acres to good ad- 
vantage. He raises a good grade of stock and also feeds stock for the market. 



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HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 145 

In 1892 j\Ir. Holdsworth was united in marriage to Miss Dora Brigmann, a 
native of Schleswig, Germany, who came to America with her parents, the 
family taking up their residence in Crawford county, Iowa. Five children 
have blessed this union, namely: George Washington, Edward Henry, Alexan- 
der, Matilda Jane, and John James, all of whom are at home and are being 
given excellent advantages of education and training. 

Ever since arriving at voting age, Mr. Holdsworth has supported the re- 
publican party, believing that in so doing he assists in advancing the best in- 
terests of the whole country. He is not a member of any religious denomina- 
tion, but attends the Presbyterian church and is a liberal contributor to worthy 
causes. Industrious and enterprising, he is steadily forging ahead financially 
and has gained a position of comparative independence. He is a man of sound 
judgment and richly deserves the success that has crowned his efforts as an 
agriculturist and stock-raiser. 



FRANK ARTHUR BROWN. 

Frank Arthur Brown, mayor of Manilla and a leading business man of Craw- 
ford county, is a native of Argyle, Lafayette county, Wisconsin, born February 
20, 1869. His parents were Thomas Henry and Mary Ann (Penniston) Brown, 
the former born in Hartford, Connecticut, and the latter in Nottingham, Eng- 
land. The father was educated and grew to maturity in his native state and as 
a young man moved to Lafayette county, Wisconsin, where he was married. 
Later he took up his home in Shelby county, Iowa, where he continued three or 
four years, finally settling on a farm in East Boyer township, Crawford county. 
He removed to Manilla when the town was started in 1896 and has ever since 
been in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway. He served 
for three years and three months in the Union army during the Civil war, being 
a member of Company G, Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers. His command 
was assigned to the Army of the West and participated in the Atlanta cam- 
paign and the celebrated march of Sherman to the sea. He is a member of the 
Presbyterian church and his wife is a member of the Methodist church. Our 
subject's grandfather Brown was one of the early settlers of Lafayette county, 
Wisconsin, where he died at the age of seventy years. He had five children : 
Thomas Henry, Alexander, Joseph, ]\Iollie and Jane. The maternal grand- 
father, Daniel Penniston, was born in England. He came to this country about 
1855 and settled near Argyle, Wisconsin, where he engaged in farming and also 
in mining. He was twice married and there were two children by his first 
union, Mary Ann and Charles. Mrs. Penniston died on shipboard of cholera 
when the family were coming to this country. 

Six children blessed the union of Thomas Henry and Mary Ann Brown, 
namely: Frank Arthur, the subject of this review; Eliza Catharine, now the 
wife of E. C. Baker, of Alanilla; Abbie Caroline, now Mrs. Arthur Brink of 
Galva, Iowa ; Fred Neroy, of Manilla ; Celia Ann, who married Leslie Anthony 

Tol. n— 8 



146 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

and is now deceased; atid Emma Jane, the wife of William J. Kehr, of Wes- 
sington Springs. South Dakota. 

Frank -Vrthur Brown came with his parents to Iowa at the age of five years 
and grew to manhood in Crawford county on his father's farm. He was edu- 
cated in the district schools and continued at home until eighteen years of age, 
when he started out in life for himself by working by the month for farmers 
in the neighborhood. After ten years of industrious application he rented a 
farm on his own account, which he cultivated to good advantage for seven years. 
In 1905 he purchased an interest in the Manilla Roller Mills and moved to town, 
becoming a partner of R. Rasmussen in the milling and grain business, a voca- 
tion to which he seems eminently adapted judging by the success that has at- 
tended his efi'orts along this line. He is also secretary and a stockholder of the 
Manilla Telephone Company and owns a quarter section of land in Lyman 
county, South Dakota, his wife being the owner of two quarter sections. 

In ^lay. 1900, Mr. Brown was united in marriage to Aliss Carrie T. Bar- 
ber, a daughter of Rockley and Sarah A. (Tomlinson) Barber. Mr. Brown is 
a descendant of worthy ancestry and in his career has shown the traits of ambi- 
tion, energy and thrift which are so essential in the accomplishment of any 
worthy purpose. He justly occupies a high place in the estimation of the peo- 
ple of this section. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church, 
of which he is trustee. Fraternally he is connected with Golden Leaf Lodge. 
No 595, A. F. & A. M.. and the Knights of Pythias. He gives his allegiance 
to the republican party and was elected mayor of Manilla in the spring of 
1910 and still occupies that office, having discharged its duties in such a way 
as to meet the unanimous approval of the people. His interests are closely 
identified with ^lanilla and he is recognized as one of its most progressive and 
enterprising citizens. 



E. N. McCORD. 



That the life history of E. N. McCord is a record of success is due to the 
persistent effort and intelligently directed industry which he has displayed 
through the manv vears of his connection with agricultural interests. He is a 
grandson of Allen" and Nancy (Hezlep) McCord and comes of Scotch-Irish 
lineage. His father, David McCord, was born in Lawrence county, Pennsyl- 
vania, April 28, 1839, was there reared and educated, and he remained in the 
Keystone state until attaining his majority, when, in i860, attracted by the op- 
portunities of the middle west, he made his way to Illinois, locating in Douglas 
county, where he resided for twelve years. The year 1872 witnessed his arrival 
in Crawford county. Iowa, and he became one of the first settlers on Paradise 
creek. Here he made his home throughout his remaining days and passed away 
on the 7th of January, 1892. He had been a farmer all his life and at the time 
of his death was the owner of two hundred acres of land in Paradise township. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Phoebe J. Schouten, was born in Sara- 
toga county, New York, and when fifteen years of age removed with her 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 147 

parents to Illinois, the family home being established in Douglas county. There 
she met and married David McCord. She is yet living and resides during the 
summer months in Crawford county, Iowa, while the winter seasons she spends 
in Oklahoma. By her union with Mr. McCord she became the mother of five 
children, as follows: Mamie, the wife of Robert Grayson, a lawyer of Boyn- 
ton, Oklahoma; E. N., of this review; Addie, who wedded James Bixler, of 
Centerville, South Dakota, where he engages in agriculture; Nannie, the wife 
of W. D. Suiter, a farmer of Boynton, Oklahoma; and Alma, the wife of Ed 
Duncan, also engaged in farming in Crawford county. There was also an 
adopted son, Allen, who is now a draftsman in the government employ, stationed 
at Santa Fe, New Mexico. 

E. N. McCord, the eldest son of the family, was born in Areola, Illinois, on 
the 23d of September, 1868, and was therefore but four years of age when he 
accompanied his parents on their removal to Crawford county in 1872. In the 
schools of this county he gained a good education and while not engaged in his 
school work assisted his father about the home farm, early becoming familiar 
with the duties that fall to the lot of the country lad. He started out independ- 
ently as a farmer when twenty-three years of age and in the following year, 
upon the death of his father, assumed charge of the old homestead and has since 
continued to make that his place of residence. He now owns two hundred and 
eighty acres of rich land which in its well improved condition and high state 
of development indicates the practical methods which he has employed and the 
industry, diligence and perseverance which have characterized his efforts. In 
addition to general farming he is an extensive raiser and breeder of high grade 
stock, the excellence of which is recognized throughout the district, and both 
branches of his business are so carefully managed that they have prospered 
under his careful supervision and keen business sagacity until he is today rec- 
ognized as one of the substantial and successful agriculturists of Paradise 
township. 

It was on the 15th of March, 1891, that Mr. McCord was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ida Bixler, who was born in Jackson county, Iowa, a daughter 
of Isaac and Mary E. (Jones) Bixler. Her father, whose birth occurred in Ohio 
on the 14th of March, 1839, was taken to Jackson county, Iowa, when but a 
year old, and there he grew to manhood. In the spring of 1881 he came to 
Crawford county and located in Paradise township, where he made his home 
until his death in February, 1909. He was a farmer and followed that occupa- 
tion throughout his lifetime. His wife, who was born in England, came to the 
United States when only six months old and at the age of thirteen removed 
with her parents to Iowa, the family locating at Lyons. She was married in 
Springvale, Iowa, and still survives, making her home at present in Dow City. 
By her marriage to Mr. Bixler she became the mother of seven children, 
namely : Frank, a farmer of Paradise township ; Mrs. McCord ; William, a car- 
penter of Elk City, Oklahoma ; James, engaged in farming in Centerville, South 
Dakota; Etta, the wife of Carey Saxton, of Denison township; Samuel, a farmer 
of Oaks, North Dakota; and Lottie, who resides with her mother in Dow City, 
Iowa. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. McCord has been blessed with four 



148 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

children: Clarence, now eighteen years of age; Gladys, aged sixteen years; Mar- 
cus, aged eleven years ; and lone, ten years. 

Fraternally Mr. McCord is identified with Denison Lodge, I. O. O. F., and 
the Modern Woodmen of America at Dow City, and in politics gives stalwart 
support to the republican party, believing that the principles of that organiza- 
tion are best adapted to conserve the interests of state and nation. He is in- 
sured in the Banker's Life Association and is progressive in all of his ideas both 
in personal and public matters. His has been a life of continuous activity, char- 
acterized by well directed efforts and close application, and the success that has 
attended his labors has been substantial and well merited. 



JOHN M. JOHNSON, M. D. 

The success of Dr. John ]\L Johnson, of Denison, in the practice of medi- 
cine is a striking illustration of the progress which may be made by a young 
man who thoroughly prepares himself for an important calling. Seven years 
ago he opened an office in this city and today he is at the head of the hospital 
of which he was the founder and has also built up a flourishing practice. 

He is a native of Seneca. Kansas, born March 17, 1874, and is a son of 
Albern and Clara (Hampton) Johnson, the former of whom was born in Ver- 
mont and the latter in Illinois. The father w^orked when a boy in the milling 
business in Vermont. At the age of fourteen he removed to Sycamore, Illi- 
nois, with his parents and there grew to manhood. Later the family moved to 
Oregon, Missouri, where he and his father started a lumber and planing mill, 
which was just fairly established when the Civil war broke out and he enlisted 
in the Union army, becoming a member of the Thirteenth Missouri Cavalr}^ 
He participated in many of the great battles, among which were Shiloh, Gettys- 
burg and Chickamauga, and also in some of the most important movements of 
the war. and was slightly wounded at the battle of Shiloh. He enlisted as a 
private but performed his duties so ably that he was made provost marshal. 
He served for three years and nine months and after receiving his honorable 
discharge lived in various places in Kansas, his property at Oregon having been 
destroyed while he was absent in the army. At Seneca, Kansas, he was married 
to Clara Hampton and after living in town for a few years he began farming. In 
1876 he removed to York, York county, Nebraska, where he bought one hundred 
and sixty acres of the Burlington & Missouri Railway, Upon which he resided 
until 1900, since which time he has lived in Omaha. There were seven children 
in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, four of whom are now living: John 
M.. the subject of this review; Lena Beatrice, now a music teacher in Omaha; 
Alaude J., the wife of Frank Brown, of Florence, Nebraska; and Mary C, a 
teacher in the public schools of Omaha. 

Our subject's paternal grandfather was a millwright and also ran sawmills. 
He was the head of a large family, among whom may be named George W., 
Samuel, Emma, Albern L. and Edward William. The maternal grandfather 
was Jasper N. Hampton, a native of Illinois, who married Maria Ir\'^in. He 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 149 

was captain of a boat on the Mississippi river which plied between Muscatine, 
Iowa, and New Orleans, but later he became a farmer in York county, Ne- 
braska. His wife passed away in October, 1910, at the age of seventy-nine 
years, and he took up his home in Omaha. In their family were Anna, Clara 
C, Mary, Mildred, James and Gertrude. 

John M. Johnson was reared on his father's farm in York county, Nebraska, 
from two years of age and attended the district schools and the York high 
school. Later he entered the United Brethren College at York, from which he 
was graduated in 1894. He then taught school for four years and in 1898 
matriculated in Creighton Medical College at Omaha but later transferred his 
allegiance to the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from 
which he was graduated with the degree of M. D. in 1902. He began prac- 
ticing in Omaha but in 1904 came to Denison and started a small hospital in 
his own home. Three years later he founded the Denison Hospital, of which 
he is superintendent. The hospital has from the beginning been a remarkable 
success and is one of the well established institutions of this city. 

On the i6th of June, 1904, Dr. Johnson was united in marriage to- Mrs. Lola 
R. Ellithorpe, widow of N. S. Ellithorpe and a daughter of Frank B. Doty. Two 
children have been born of this union, Mary Claire and John A. Mrs. John- 
son by her former marriage was the mother of one son, Ralph C. 

Professionally Dr. Johnson holds membership in the County, State and 
American Medical Associations and has many friends in those organizations 
who are in thorough sympathy with the important work which he is carrying 
on in Denison. Fraternally he is very active, being connected with the Odd 
Fellows, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Maccabees, the Woodmen 
of the World, the Yeomen of America and the Royal Highlanders. In religious 
belief he adheres to the teachings of his early years and is identified with the 
Catholic church. Energetic and efficient, he has won a high standing in his pro- 
fession and is recognized as one of the leading practitioners of the healing art 
in Denison. 



SOLOMON W. SLATER. 

Solomon W. Slater, who passed away on the ist of March, 1906, was one 
of the pioneer settlers of East Boyer township, where he spent the greater part 
of his life, devoting his attention to general agricultural pursuits and owning 
four hundred and forty acres of valuable land at the time of his demise. His 
birth occurred in Ulster county, New York, on the 15th of September. 1838. 
His paternal grandfather, Walter Slater, was of Holland descent and took uj> 
his abode among the early settlers in the vicinity of New York city. 

James Slater, the father of Solomon W. Slater, was likewise a native of 
Ulster county, New York. He lost his wife in 1850 and four years later jour- 
neyed westward with his children, traveling by boat to Albany, New York, thence 
to Bufifalo by rail, by boat to Chicago and by rail to Rock Island. From the last 
named place he made his way by team to Crawford county, Iowa, locating 



150 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

on the farm which remained his home during the rest of his Hfe and which 
afterward came into possession of our subject. At the time of his arrival here 
there were but ten or twelve voters in the county. The place on which he set- 
tled was a tract of raw land on section lo. East Boyer township, and thereon 
he erected a log cabin, fourteen by sixteen feet. In this primitive little structure 
hospitality was dispensed in a liberal manner, it being the best stopping place 
west of Carroll, Iowa, — twenty-five miles distant. James Slater performed the 
arduous labor incident to the development of a farm and carried on general 
agricultural pursuits until called to his final rest on the nth of July, 1879, when 
he had attained the age of seventy-two years. His political allegiance was given 
to the republican party and he was widely recognized as a substantial and re- 
spected citizen of the community. Unto him and his wife were born four 
children, namely : James, Maria, Solomon W. and Anna. All are now deceased. 

Solomon W. Slater, who was a youth of sixteen when he came to Craw- 
ford county with his father, assisted in developing the home farm, first clearing 
and then breaking the land. Whenever the family was in need of provisions 
he drove a team to Council Blufifs, eighty miles distant. He never left the old 
homestead and was successfully identified with general farming interests 
throughout his active business career, accumulating four hundred and forty acres 
of highly improved land. 

When a young man of twenty-seven years Mr. Slater was united in mar- 
riage to ^liss Sarah Winans, a native of Bureau county, Illinois, and a daugh- 
ter of Clarke and Catherine (Chivley) Winans, who came to Iowa in 1854, 
locating at Mason Grove. Clarke Winans passed away on the 24th of Septem- 
ber, 1885. while the demise of his wife occurred April 3, 1898. Their children 
were eight in number, as follows : Henry, who is deceased ; Elizabeth, the wife 
of Eli Olney, of Odebolt, Iowa ; Mrs. Sarah Slater, who has passed away ; 
George, who is a resident of Deloit, Iowa; Mrs. Mary Slater; Josiah, who is 
deceased; Julia, the wife of Taylor Pierce, of Omaha, Nebraska; and Clarke, 
who is living at Odebolt, Iowa. 

Unto Solomon W. and Sarah (Winans) Slater was born one son, Henry, 
who now follows farming in East Boyer township. He wedded Miss Mary 
AlcWilliams, by whom he has one child, Helen. Three years after the death of 
his first wife, which occurred February 20, 1865, Mr. Slater wedded her sister 
Mar}', who is likewise a native of Bureau county, Illinois. By that union there 
were four children, the record of whom is as follows : George, who resides 
on the home farm, married Miss Lillian Hulce, by whom he has one child, Mary. 
Katie is the wife of Arthur Barrow, a live stock dealer of Manilla, Iowa, by 
whom she has three children: Hazel, Harry and Charles. Grace is the wife of 
E. E. Griffin, of Oldham, South Dakota, and the motiier of one child, Florence. 
Frank, who wedded Miss Lillian Northam, is now a widower with two children, 
Carl Franklin and Harold Lawrence. 

Mr. Slater was a rcpuljlican in politics and held several local offices, the 
duties of which he discharged in a satisfactory and commendable manner. He 
was a member of the school board, acted as township trustee and also served 
in the capacity of township treasurer. Frank and jovial in manner and straight- 
forward in all his dealings, he won the regard and esteem of all with whom he 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 151 

came in contact and was a well known and popular citizen. The period of his 
residence in this county covered more than a half century and he witnessed the 
wonderful transformation which occurred as pioneer conditions gave way be- 
fore the onward march of civilization. His estate has been divided but his 
widow still resides on the home place, owning forty acres thereof. Mrs. Slater 
is widely and favorably known and has a host of warm friends in the community. 



REV. CHARLES RUNGE. 

The Rev. Charles Runge, who is in charge of the pastorate of St. Paul's 
German Lutheran church in Hanover township, Crawford county, was born in 
Pommern, Germany, in 1859, and is a son of Frederick and Frederica (Beitz) 
Runge. The parents, who were born and married in the fatherland, emigrated 
to the United States with their family in 1862 and located on a farm in Shaw- 
ano county, Wisconsin, where they continue to reside. They own a large tract 
of land, which is well improved and highly cultivated, being one of the valuable 
properties in that county. Mr. Runge no longer engages in active farming, al- 
though they continue to reside on the homestead, as he has now reached the ven- 
erable age of seventy-seven years, and Mrs. Runge has passed her seventy-fifth 
year. They were the parents of the following children: John, who is married 
and operates the home farm ; Franklin, living at Underbill, Oconto county, Wis- 
consin ; Fred, who is a resident of the same place ; Anna, the wife of Robert 
Rose, of Bonduel, Wisconsin; Ida, who died at the age of eighteen years and 
is buried in Sioux City, Iowa; and our subject. 

After he had completed the common-school course Charles Runge entered 
Concordia College at Springfield, Illinois, where he continued to study until fully 
qualified to enter the ministry. After his graduation he was elected to the pas- 
torate of the German Lutheran church in Sioux City, Iowa, and after presiding 
over that parish for seven years accepted his present charge. In addition to 
his duties as pastor he has charge of the parochial school which is conducted in 
connection with the church. 

The marriage of Rev. Charles Runge and Miss Paulina Dicke was solem- 
nized on the 1 2th of October, 1883. Mrs. Runge is a daughter of the Rev. P. 
and Catrina (Betzler) Dicke and was born in Therese, Dodge county, Wiscon- 
sin. Her parents were natives of Germany but came to America and settled in 
Cecil, Wisconsin, in an early day, and there they still reside, the fathtr now be- 
ing eighty-nine years of age and the mother seventy-eight. Thirteen children 
were born to them, as follows: Carofine, who is now deceased; Henry,, who lives 
in Underbill, Wisconsin; Mary, the wife of John Krieger, of Waterloo. Iowa; 
Paulina, now Mrs. Runge; Frederick, deceased; Herman, also deceased; Her- 
mine, the wife of the Rev. H. Daib, of Merrill, Wisconsin; William, also re- 
siding in Merrill, Wisconsin; Anna, who married Gustave Rothe, of Hanover 
township ; Charles, living in Cecil, Wisconsin ; Julia, the wife of Paul Fiene, of 
Charter Oak, Iowa; Johannes, who lives in Minnesota; and Clara, the wife of 
Emil Petermann, of Advance, Wisconsin. 



152 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Nine children liavc liecii born to Rev. and Mrs. Runge, of whom the two 
eldest, William and Clara, are deceased, and the others are: Johannes, who is a 
music teacher in Chicago; Barney, a graduate of the high, school, who is em- 
ployed in the First National Bank at Charter Oak, Iowa; Lydia, who is also a 
graduate of the high school, now in Chicago; Martin, who is a high school grad- 
uate, now in the bank at Ricketts, Iowa ; Esther, Alfred and Paula, all at home, 
the two former attending school. 

Rev. Runge has made many friends during the long period he has presided 
over the parish in Hanover township and is highly regarded and respected not 
only bv the communicants of his own church but by others. He is a man of 
high ideals and rigid principles, yet withal is charitable in his judgments and 
liberal in his views, which undoubtedly has tended to strengthen his hold on the 
community at large. 



JOHN H. RATH. 



A study of the life of John H. Rath most clearly demonstrates that success 
does not depend so much upon opportunities as the ability to dominate condi- 
tions. A native of Germany, he was born near Kiel on the 24th of July, 1864, 
being the eldest child of I^Ved and Katrina (Burk) Rath. The father spent his 
entire life in the land of his nativity but the mother came to the United States 
in 1886, locating at Davenport, Iowa, where she passed away one year later. 
The other five children in the family are as follows : Christ, a farmer of Cedar 
county, Nebraska ; August, who follows the same vocation in Nishnabotny town- 
sliip, Crawford county ; Dora, the wife of Charles Bundy. of Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia ; Charles, farming in Washington township ; and William, a farmer of 
Minor county, South Dakota. 

John H. Rath obtained his education in the common schools of his native 
land, where he resided until he had attained his majority, at which time he de- 
cided to avail himself of the better opportunities afforded young men in America. 
Upon his arrival in the United States he made his way westward to Daven- 
port, Iowa, where he worked at the mason's trade for two years and then re- 
moved to Crawford county. He worked as a farm hand in East Boyer town- 
ship during the first year of his residence here, after which he went to Nish- 
nabotny township, where he farmed as a renter for seven years. By means of 
thrift, good management and close application he acquired the capital which en- 
abled him to buy a farm at the end of that period, and he came to Washington 
township, where he purchased three hundred and sixty acres of land, which he 
still owns and cultivates. He has effected many and extensive improvements 
upon his homestead during his occupancy, making it one of the valuable proper- 
ties of the county. The buildings and fences are all substantially constructed 
and kept in repair, the pastures contain a high grade of stock, while the fields 
are cultivated in accordance with the best methods of modern agriculture, all of 
which pay tribute to the progressive ideas and capable supervision of the owner. 

Mr. Rath has been twice married, his first union being with Miss Eliza 
Schroeder, a native of Germany, who passed away in 1899, and they became the 




JOHN H. RATH 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 155 

parents of the following children : Henry, Otto, Rudolph, Freda, Elsie and Carl, 
all of whom are at home with the exception of Carl, who is living in Los 
Angeles, California. In 1901 Mr. Rath was united in marriage to Miss Katie 
Jurgensen, and unto them have been born three children : Clara, Herbert and 
Robert. 

The family attend the services of the Lutheran church with which the 
parents are identified by membership. Mr. Rath is an ardent advocate of the 
principles of democracy, the candidates and policy of which party always are 
given his support. He stands well in the estimation of his fellow citizens, having 
but recently been elected to the office of township trustee, while he is serving 
his third term on the board of school directors. In addition to his extensive 
agricultural interests Mr. Rath is a stockholder as well as one of the organizers 
of the Farmers Lumber Company of Buck Grove and he also owns stock in the 
lumber company at Manilla. He is the type of man who, in the advancement of 
his private interests, never loses sight of his responsibilities as a public citizen 
and thus would be an acquisition to any com.munity. 



H. W. OTTO. 



Among the enterprising young men of Denison is H. W. Otto, well known 
in connection with the tea and coffee business. He has shown a progressiveness 
in commercial affairs that has secured a handsome annual income which gives 
promise of larger development. He was bom at Bremen, Germany, May 23, 
1880, a son of C. and Christina (Goetlieb) Otto, both of whom were born in 
Germany. They came to America in 1885 and located in Crawford county, 
Iowa. The mother is deceased but the father is still living and makes his home 
in Denison. There were fourteen children in their family, five of whom survive, 
namely: Henry, Wilhelmina, Christ, Freda and H. W. 

H. W. Otto has a very dim recollection of his native land, as he came with 
his parents to the new world at the age of five years. He grew up as one of a 
large family, in which each was expected to perform his or her share of work, and 
the habits of industry thus acquired have been to him of inestimable value. He 
possessed advantages of education in the common school and later attended col- 
lege. At fourteen years of age he began clerking in a general store in Denison 
and devoted himself to that line of trade for seventeen years. He then became 
identified with the Denison Tea & Coffee Store, and by his uniform courtesy 
and ability to meet the wants of customers he has assisted greatly in the growth 
of its business. 

In 1903, Mr. Otto was united in marriage to Miss Marie Finnern, who was 
born in Germany in 1880, a daughter of Christian Finnern. Her parents came 
to this country and are now living in Crawford county. There were ten chil- 
dren in their family. Four children have come to brighten the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Otto, namely: Walter, Herman, Flora and Harriett. 

Ever since reaching manhood Mr. Otto has given his allegiance to the re- 
publican party and is a sincere advocate of its principles. Religiously he and 



156 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUXTV 

his wife are identified with the Lutheran church. He made thorough prepara- 
tion for the vocation in which he is now engaged, bringing to it a zeal and con- 
centration of mind that seldom fail to attract merited reward. He is greatly- 
interested in the development of the business and as his methods are up-to-date 
.and entirely trustworthv there is no doubt as to his success in years to come. 



E. E. XEWKIRK. 



E. E. Xewkirk, who is now acting as manager of the Xeola Elevator Com- 
pany with elevators at Kenwood, Paradise township, has by a series of progres- 
sive steps worked his way upwards in the business world from a humble posi- 
tion, his record indicating clearly the force of industry, energy and perseverance. 
A native of Pennsylvania, he was born on the nth of September, 1862, a son of 
William and Elizabeth (Huggans) Xewkirk. The family came to the United 
States from Holland, the name originally being Van Xewkirk. William New- 
kirk, who was also born in the Keystone state, was there reared and married 
and continued to make it his place of residence until the outbreak of the Civil 
war, when he offered his services to his country as a defender of the Union 
cause. He enlisted as a soldier in the Seventh Pennsylvania Reserves and gave 
up his life at the engagement of Gaines Mills, before Richmond, at which time 
the regiment had been forced to retreat. During the battle he was twice wounded 
.and was urged by his comrades to go to the rear. This, however, he refused to 
do, retaining his place at tiie front, and while thus talking and reloading his 
gun he was again struck by a shell which terribly mutilated his body. It was 
then that the company was forced to retreat, and two comrades started to carry 
Jhim back with them, an almost impossible task, owing to the nature of his 
wound and the fact that he was a large man. Realizing that he would die, 
.anyway, he begged them to leave him, and he was last seen crawling toward a 
spring from which he was trying to get a drink. Nothing has ever been heard 
as to the place of his burial. His widow, who was also born and reared in Penn- 
sylvania, still survives and yet makes her home in that state. Their family con- 
sisted of six children, as follows: John, a resident of Elizabethville, Pennsyl- 
vania; one who died in infancy; William, whose whereabouts are unknown; 
Perry, of Amorita, Oklahoma; Joel, of Montclair, Xew Jersey; and E. E., of 
this review. 

The last named when but five years of age was sent to the Soldiers' Orphans' 
Home at Loysville, Pennsylvania, and there remained until sixteen years old, 
during which period he received a good education. He then went to Newport 
and was a pupil in the town school there for a short time, after which he went 
to York, Pennsylvania, to learn the blacksmith's trade, serving an apprentice- 
ship of six months, at the end of which time he returned to Xewport and for a 
season was engaged in boating on the canal. He next sawed wood for the rail- 
road company, being thus employed until the i6th of February. 18S0, when, 
imbued with a desire to test the opportunities of the west, he made his way to 
Illinois and worked on a farm in P)ureau county until 1883. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 157 

In that year Mr. Newkirk came to Iowa and for two years was a resident 
of Carroll county, after which he loaded his effects into a wagon and came to 
Crawford county, arriving- here on the ist of March, 1885. He first located in 
Union township, where for one year he engaged in breaking prairie, and then 
for three years he carried on farming on rented property. Finally, by reason of 
the strict economy, which he practiced at all times, and the close application, 
with which he applied himself to the work at hand, he was able to save suffi- 
cient capital with which to purchase a farm of his own, thus establishing him- 
self independently in the business world. His first purchase consisted of a 
tract of eighty acres just west of the town of Kenwood in Paradise township, 
to which he has since added an adjoining farm of eighty acres. The ground had 
already been broken but had not been developed to any great extent, and after 
taking up his abode thereon Mr. Newkirk devoted his energies to its further cul- 
tivation. He put many improvements upon the place, erected good buildings 
and installed modern machinery, and today the farm is a most productive and 
valuable property. He engaged in general farming with most gratifying suc- 
cess until about three years ago, when he came to Kenwood to take charge of the 
elevator at this place owned by the Neola Elevator Company. In this capacity 
he is also proving most successful, bringing to bear in the discharge of his duties 
the same spirit of energy, determination and close application which had char- 
acterized his steady advance through the preceding years. 

Mr. Newkirk laid the foundation for a happy home life of his own through 
his marriage, on the 14th of December, 1884, to Miss Euphemia McDonald, a 
native of Pennsylvania. They attend the Methodist Episcopal church and are 
popular with a large circle of friends, acquaintances and neighbors. Mr. New- 
kirk gives his support at the polls to the republican party but takes no active 
part in politics, preferring to concentrate his attention entirely upon his busi- 
ness interests, in the management of which he is proving himself most capable 
and successful. Since his arrival in Kenwood he has become known to his 
fellow townsmen as a desirable and valued citizen, his business methods and per- 
sonal traits of character commanding their respect, confidence and good-will. 



GEORGE V. JORDAN, 



George V. Jordan, one of the most prosperous and influential residents of 
Paradise township, is the owner of nine hundred and thirty acres of rich and 
arable land in Crawford county. His birth occurred in Paris, Oxford county, 
Maine, on the 6th of August, 1846, his parents being Enoch C. and ^lary Rich- 
ardson (Cleaves) Jordan. The father, who was born in Saco, York county, 
Maine, on the 30th of September, 1808, was a son of Ichabod Jordan, whose 
birth occurred in Saco, IMaine, on the 24th of September, 1770. The latter passed 
away in the same house in which he was born, being called to his final rest on 
the 20th of May, 1865. On the 5th of February, 1797, he had wedded Miss 
Mary Cofiin, who was a daughter of James Coffin and died on the loth of Octo- 
ber, 1859. Ichabod Jordan was a sea captain. When he was a young man of 



158 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUXTV 

twenty-one years his ship, The Fame, was captured by the British sliip. Favorite, 
which was commanded by Arthur Wood. In 1805 Ichabod Jordan commanded 
the American ship Ocean and made a trip to Stockhohn, Sweden. His arrival 
there was celebrated by the city, and the king and queen came on board and 
dined. During the war of 1812 Captain Jordan was a prisoner on board the 
frigate Boxer at the time of her engagement with our American ship, Enter- 
prise. He voted for George Washington and for every president down to Lin- 
coln. His father, Tristram Jordan, was born on the 13th of May, 1731. at Win- 
ter Harbor, now Biddeford, York county, Maine, and was married three times. 
In 1749, in Berwick, he wedded Hannah Goodwin, who was a daughter of Cap- 
tain Ichabod Goodwin, was born on the 24th of July, 1730, and passed away 
on the loth of July. 1775. For his second wife Tristram Jordan chose Miss 

Dorcas . whom he wedded at Falmouth in December, 1778, 

and who died on the 19th of December, 1781. His third wife, who bore 
the maiden name of Hannah Frost and whom he married in Berwick on the 
2 1 St of May, 1784, was called to her final rest on the 26th of September, 1789. 
Tristram Jordan, who was eleven years old when his father died, followed mer- 
chandising at Saco, Maine. When a young man of twenty-three he was chosen 
selectman of the town, serving in that capacity from 1754 until 1762. He also 
acted as captain of the militia and was appointed colonel by the council of Massa- 
chusetts in 1776, while in 1787 he was elected senator by the county of York. 
He removed from the Falls at Saco to his estate two miles north on Ruxton 
Road, where his demise occurred on the ist of November, 1821. Tristram Jor- 
dan was a son of Samuel Jordan, who was born in 1684, at Spurwink, now Cape 
Elizabeth, Cumberland county, ]\Iaine, and died on the 20th of December, 1742. 
In 1718, in York county, Maine, Samuel Jordan wedded Miss Olive Plaisted, 
whose birth occurred on the ist of May, 1698, and who w^as called to her final 
rest in 1763. Her parents were James and Mary (Rish worth) Plaisted, of 
Brunswick, Maine. Samuel Jordan, his mother and all the other children of 
the family were captured by the Indians and taken to Trois Riviers in Canada, 
where Mr. Jordan remained a prisoner for seven years, spending six years with 
the Indians and one year with the French. At one time, when asked whether 
he preferred the Indians or the French, he replied: "The Indians." In 1717 we 
find his name recorded at Winter Harbor, Maine, where he was conducting a 
store, but on account of his knowledge of Indian afifairs he was of greater value 
to the government as interpreter. After the treaty of 171 7 he acted as Indian 
agent, government agent and interpreter. He was a man of great energy, a 
prominent factor in business affairs and a leader in the Congregational church. 
Samuel Jordan was a son of Dominicus Jordan, who. was born at Spurwink, Cum- 
berland county, Maine, prior to 1664. In 1681 the latter wedded Miss Hannah 
Tristram, a daughter of Ralph Tristram, of Winter Harbor, now Biddeford, 
Maine. At the beginning of King Philip's war, in 1675, in company with the 
other members of his father's family. Dominicus Jordan left the settlement when 
it was attacked by the Indians and the homes destroyed. Six years later he 
returned, residing there until the second Indian war in 1690, when he was again 
forced to leave, this time remaining away until 1698. He was known as "the 
Indian killer." In 1703 a party of apparently friendly Indians called on him 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 159 

to buy some goods and, taking him off his guard, buried a hatchet in his brain, 
leading his wife and children as prisoners to Canada. Dominicus Jordan was 
a son of the Rev. Robert Jordan, clergyman of the Church of England as early 
as 1639. He was established at Richmond's Island as successor to Mr. Gib- 
son but the precise time of his coming is not known, nor the exact place of his 
nativity in England. It is supposed, however, that he crossed the Atlantic about 
1639. At Richmond's Island the Rev. Robert Jordan wedded Miss Sarah Win- 
ter, the only child of John Winter. On account of his religious beliefs he spent 
the winter of 1654 and also that of 1663 in jail. His demise occurred at Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire, in 1679, when he had attained the age of sixty-eight 
years. 

Enoch C. Jordan, the father of George V. Jordan, spent his early life in 
Saco, Maine, and subsequently removed to Paris, Oxford county, that state. 
Later, however, he returned to his birthplace, there passing away in 1880. By 
trade he was a courier. Unto him and his wife were born eleven children, the 
record of whom is as follows : Mary Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam, both of whom 
are deceased; James H., who died in front of Morris Island, at the siege of 
Charleston, in 1863; EHzabeth R., who has passed away; Charles Albert, an 
architect of Chicago, Illinois; Enoch, a surveyor of Saco, Maine; George V., 
of this review ; Isabelle, who is a resident of Boston, Massachusetts ; Caleb, 
who follows farming in Defiance, Ohio; Mrs. Louisa Robinson, of Council 
Bluffs, Iowa ; and Mary, who makes her home in Saco, Maine. 

George V. Jordan, whose name introduces this review, acquired his educa- 
tion in the common schools and remained with his parents until ten years of age, 
while during the next six years he lived with his grandparents. He worked on 
a farm in Maine for two years and when a youth of nineteen came to Iowa, 
spending a short time in Modale, Harrison county. He then taught school in 
Crawford county for two years. On the expiration of that period he purchased 
land at Gallen's Grove, retaining the tract, however, for but a few months, when 
he exchanged it for the property on which he now resides in Paradise town- 
ship, Crawford county. He first made a number of small improvements and 
subsequently erected a mammoth residence. In the conduct of his agricultural 
interests he has won a gratifying measure of success and his property holdings 
at the present time embrace nine hundred and thirty acres of valuable land in 
this county. He is also a director of the Arion State Bank at Arion, Iowa, of 
which he was one of the organizers and of which he has served as vice-president. 

In 1868 Mr. Jordan was united in marriage to Miss Nettie Wetherby, a na- 
tive of Allegany county, New York, and a daughter of William and Susan 
(Moore) Wetherby, who were born in New York and Vermont respectively. 
They took up their abode in Elgin, Illinois, where occurred the death of Mr. 
Wetherby. His widow came to Iowa in the fall of 1867 and passed away in 
1896. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Jordan were born five children, namely: William, 
a horse dealer of Dow City, Iowa; Mary, twin sister of William, who is de- 
ceased ; Lizzie, the wife of H. G. Scott, an agriculturist of Paradise township ; 
Nettie, the wife of George Rule, who also follows farming in Paradise town- 
ship; and George V., who has passed away. 



160 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Mr. Jordan i? a republican in politics and held a number of minor offices 
in the early days. He was a charter member of the Baptist church at Dow City 
and has ever been deeply and helpfully interested in its work. The period of 
his residence in Crawford county covers more than four decades and he has 
long enjoyed an enviable reputation as one of its most respected and esteemed, 
citizens. 



H. T. MOELLER. 



One of those who has actively and successfully contributed to the commer- 
cial development of West Side is H. J. Moeller, who for a period of seventeen 
years has been engaged in the general merchandise business here. A native of 
Germany, his birth occurred in the province of Schleswig-Holstein on Christmas 
day. 1863, l)eing a son of Peter and Catherine (Diers) Moeller. The father 
passed away in the fatherland at the age of sixty-five years, but the mother emi- 
gratecl to the United States with her children in 1881, locating in Davenport, 
where she continued to reside until her demise in 1901 at the age of eighty-two. 
H. J. Moeller is the youngest of the six children born unto his parents, the 
others being: George, who resides in Davenport; Peter, a farmer near West 
Side; Minnie, the wife of William Lepteen, of Davenport; Wiebke, wdio mar- 
ried John Luetze, of Chicago; and Annie, the wife of Rudolph Meyer, also of 
Chicago. 

FI. J. Moeller was a youth of seventeen years when he left his native land, 
in the common schools of which country he acquired his education. Coming to 
Davenport, Iowa, in 1881, he continued to make his home with his mother for 
two years, at the end of which time he came to West Side, entering the employ 
of Peters & Suhr, who were engaged in the lumber and implement business, 
being identified with them for nine years. Withdrawing from this in 1892, he 
took a position on the railroad, which he retained for a year, at the expiration 
of which period in connection with John F. Grote he embarked in the general 
merchandise business. This arrangement continued for ten years and then Mr. 
Moeller bought the interest of Mr. Grote and has since been conducting the 
business alone. He has met with success in this venture and in addition to his 
store owns a very pleasant residence which he and his family occupy. 

In March, 1886, Mr. Moeller was united in marriage to Miss Ida Boock. who 
is a native of Bryant, Iowa, although of German extraction, her birth occurring 
on the 14th of April. 1867. She is the eldest of the. five children born unto her 
parents. Henry and Catherine (Kuhl) Boock, the others being: Chris and 
Henr}', residents of West Side; Tillie. the wife of John Rinefeld. of Kansas; 
and Emma, who married Jack Hall, of Boone. Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Aloeller 
are the parents of the following children: Harry, living in Omaha, Nebraska; 
Fred, who passed away on the 24th of November. 1892, at the age of four years; 
Alma, whose demise occurred on the 6th of December, 1892, at the age of two 
years ; Carl, residing in Omaha. Nebraska ; Roy. who is assisting his father in 
the store ; and Arlo and Earl, both of whom are still at home. The familv affiliate 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 161 

with the Lutheran church, while fraternally Mr. Moeller is identified with the 
Masonic order and the Modern Woodmen. 

A strong advocate of the principles of democracy Mr. Moeller gives his politi- 
cal support to the men and measures of that party. That he stands well in the 
opinion of his fellow citizens is indicated by the fact that he is and has been 
for twenty years a member of the council. A public-spirited man, he has always 
openly declared his support of every measure he considered to be for the benefit 
of the community at large, which fact of itself would make him a most desir- 
able citizen. 



GEORGE MENAGH. 



George Menagh, one of the most prosperous, enterprising and respected 
citizens of Denison, conducts an extensive business as a general merchant and 
miller. He is a native of County Down, Ireland, his parents being Hugh and 
Ann Menagh, who were likewise born in that country. The father, who was 
employed as an engineer by the Northern Counties Railroad in Ireland, crossed 
the Atlantic to the United States in 1869, coming direct to Denison, Iowa. On 
arriving in this county he turned his attention to farming in East Boyer town- 
ship, first purchasing a tract of eighty acres and later buying forty acres more. 
It was all raw prairie when it came into his possession, but he set resolutely 
to work and soon transformed the property into a rich and productive farm. 
Since about 1882 he has made his home in Denison, being one of the well known 
and highly esteemed residents of the community. His wife was called to her 
final rest in August, 1902. They were Baptists in early life but later joined the 
Holiness Band. Unto them were born five children, as follows : George, of 
this review; Charles; Anna, the wife of A. D. Randall; Hugh; and Sarah, the 
widow of a Mr. Chesney. 

George Menagh spent the first seventeen years of his life in the land of his 
nativity and there acquired his education. After putting aside his text-books 
he worked for some time as a cabinet maker but after emigrating to the new world 
became identified with general agricultural pursuits, following farming in Craw- 
ford county, Iowa, until 1880. In that year he took up his abode in Denison 
but continued breaking prairie for the farmers of the vicinity. In 1883 he- 
began buying grain in association with his brother Charles, the partnership be- 
ing maintained for several years or until he purchased his brother's interest. 
He still deals in grain, coal, hay and all kinds of mill feeds and enjoys an ex- 
tensive trade along those lines. On the 2d of July, 1903, he established a grocery 
business in Denison, which he has developed into a general store, opening on 
two streets and having both south and west fronts. He manufactures harness 
and sells dry goods, meats, groceries and notions. His sons and daughter are 
associated with him in business and assist in the conduct of the extensive estab- 
lishment, in which a large number of clerks are employed. 

Mr. Menagh was united in marriage to Miss Isabella Henderson, a native of 
County Antrim, Ireland. Her father died when she was an infant and her 



162 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

mother when she was fourteen years old, leaving her an orphan living with her 
uncle Thomas Luney. Unto our subject and his wife were born four sons and 
one daughter, namely : Elizabeth ; Charles William, who wedded Miss Sadie 
Bohart and has one son, George ; James ; David ; and John. 

Mr. Menagh gives his political allegiance to the republican party, believing 
that its principles are most conducive to good government. Throughout his 
business life he has been watchful of indications pointing to success, has utilized 
his opportunities to the best advantage and has been upright and honorable in 
all his dealings. Though born across the water, he is thoroughly American in 
spirit and interests and the town of Denison numbers him among its leading 
and valued residents. 



R. W. PAUL. 



For more than twenty-five years R. W. Paul has been a resident of Craw- 
ford county and through his industry, perseverance and sound business judg- 
ment he has acquired one of the most attractive farms of Boyer township. He 
is a native of Clinton county, Iowa, born September 15, 1865, and is a son of 
Darius and Charlotte (Cady) Paul. The father was born in New York state 
and after reaching manhood came to Iowa and took up his residence in Clinton 
county, where he continued until his death, which occurred in 1895. He was a 
minister of the Baptist church and a man of marked ability and many sterling 
traits of character. The mother was also a native of the Empire state and died 
about one year before the death of her husband. There were seven children 
in the family : Fanny, now the wife of Light Demming, of Silverwood, Michi- 
gan ; Minnie, now Mrs. Lisle Cudney, of Central City, Nebraska; Emma, the 
wife of Kilmer Barker, of Plainview, Texas; Charlotte, who married Art Rey- 
nor, of Central City, Nebraska; R. W., of this review; Julia, the wife of Clar- 
ence Barr, of Dewitt, Iowa ; and Anna, who married John Clarke, also of 
Dewitt. 

R. W. Paul grew to manhood under the favoring conditions of a happy home 
and received his early education in the district schools of Clinton county. He 
began farming in his native county and after arriving at the age of twenty-one 
years came to Crawford county, locating on land which belonged to his father. 
Fifteen years ago he purchased the property and has made other accessions so 
that at the present time he is the owner of five hundred and sixty acres. He 
has erected two sets of buildings and follows general farming and stock-feeding, 
sparing no eflforts to secure the best results from his work. He is very thorough 
in everything he undertakes and has one of the model places of the township. 

In 1889 Mr. Paul was united in marriage to Miss Almary Davis, of Craw- 
ford county, and three children came to bless their union: Darius H., \^era M. 
and Viola V.. all of whom are at home. Politically Mr. Paul gives his adher- 
ence to the democratic party, but he has never sought the honors of public 
office, as his interest has been concentrated upon his business. He has served 
very acceptably as a member of the school board. He and his wife are identi- 




MR. AND MRS. R. W. PAUL 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 165 

fied with the Baptist church and earnest workers in its behalf. Fraternally he 
is connected with the camp of Modern Woodmen of America at Dow City. Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul have many friends and their home is a welcome gathering place 
whose generous hospitality is widely acknowledged. Always loyal to his con- 
victions, he ranks high in the estimation of his associates and acquaintances, 
there being in him a stability of character and a clearness of judgment which 
command respect wherever he is known. 



JURGEN SCHROEDER. 

The strong characteristics of industry and steadfastness of purpose which 
are predominant in the Teutonic race are fully demonstrated by the career of 
Jurgen Schroeder, who, seeking broader fields of endeavor in a foreign coun- 
try, has attained that measure of success that comes to all who work for it. A 
son of Jurgen and Gertrude (Bliesman) Schroeder, he was born May 26, 1851, 
at Fehmarn Island, Puttgarten, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, the fourth in a 
family of four children born to this couple, the other surviving child being Dor- 
othea, who is the wife of Charles Tamn and resides in Germany. Those de- 
ceased are Mathias and Nichols. 

On July 7, 1868, at the age of seventeen years, Jurgen Schroeder emigrated 
to the United States and upon arriving in this country began working on a farm 
near Davenport. Iowa, where he remained for two years. He then went to 
Tama county, this state. In 1873 he rented one hundred and sixty acres in 
Tama county, which he farmed until 1877, when, on January 20 of that year, 
he removed to his brother's farm near Denison, where he continued for the en- 
suing six years, and then purchased eighty acres of land one mile west of 
Schleswig. Here he inaugurated his first business venture by opening a small 
store on the farm, which he conducted until the advent of the railroad into 
Schleswig, in 1899, when he moved, not only his business, but his entire build- 
ing, consisting of the store, a blacksmith shop and a dance hall, to the town and 
there continued his mercantile pursuits on a more extensive scale. He is now 
engaged in general merchandising and owns the largest establishment of its 
kind in Crawford county outside of Denison. From his initial venture, which 
began in a room ten by twelve feet in Hohenzollern, he has developed and ex- 
panded his business enterprises until at the present time it comprises a dry- 
goods department twenty-five by one hundred feet and a grocery department 
twenty-four by sixty-four feet, with an addition in the rear twenty by twenty- 
four feet, which is utilized as a store room. The building is heated by steam, 
lighted by gas and has all the up-to-date improvements that are necessary for 
the conduct of a modern store. 

Mr. Schroeder has been married three times, his first wife having been Miss 
Wilhelmine Carstens, of Davenport, Iowa, by whom he had four children, 
namely: Matilda, who married H. J. Seymour, of Soldier, Iowa; W. H., who 
resides in Schleswig; Maggie, who is the wife of Herman Jahle and lives near 
Schleswip-: and Herman, who makes his home in Washington. The mother of 

Vol. II — '1 



166 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

these children died December 13. 1^73, and subsequently Mr. Schroeder was 
married in Hohenzollern, Iowa, to Miss Johanna Lorensen, by whom he had 
four children, as follows: Olga, Walter and Freda, who are at home, and Eddie, 
who is attending school in Des Moines. Mrs. Johanna Schroeder having died, 
Mr. Schroeder was married August 8, 1900. to Mrs. Tena Frahm, of Denison, 
Iowa, and they have one son, Raymond. 

Mr. Schroeder has always cast his vote for the republican party and takes 
a deep interest in the welfare of his community. He served as postmaster at 
Sclileswig for four years and held the same position at Hohenzollern for eight 
years. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Odd Fellows and the German Broth- 
erhood in Denison, while religiously he is a member of the Evangelical church. 
In the countr}' of his adoption he has ever maintained a reputation for in- 
tegrity and honest dealings in all his business enterprises and richly merits 
the confidence and high esteem accorded him by his fellow citizens. 



JOHN B. GLASSBURNER. 

John B. Glassburner who is engaged in the breeding and raising of thorough- 
bred stock in Washington township, is a native of Iowa, having been born near 
Drakeville. Marion township, Davis county, on the 14th of Alarch, 1857. His 
parents, Samuel B. and Mary P. (Edwards) Glassburner, were both natives 
of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, but were married in Iowa. Samuel B. 
Glassburner came to Iowa with his father in 1847 ^nd located in Davis county, 
where the latter spent the remainder of his days. John B. Glassburner is the 
eldest in a family of four children. The others are as follows : Amanda, the 
wife of Owen Williams, of Batavia, Iowa ; W'illiam L., who lives in Washing- 
ton, this state; and Rachel, the wife of Blueford Haines, of Unionville, Iowa. 
The parents remained upon the homestead as long as the father was able to en- 
gage in active farming and then retired to Washington, where they are living 
with their son. 

John B. Glassburner acquired his education in the district schools of Davis 
county, remaining- at home and assisting his father in the cultivation of the farm 
until he had attained his majority. In 1878 he began farming for himself as a 
renter in his native county but after living there one year removed to Appa- 
noose county, where he resided until i88r. On the 13th of February in the 
latter year he located on a farm on section 32,. Charter Qak township, this 
county, and for twelve years Mr. Glassburner engaged in general farming and 
stock-raising. In 1903. however, he removed to Charter Oak and lived there 
until the spring of 1905, at which time he settled on his present homestead in 
W^ashington township. During the period of his occupancy he has very much 
improved this place, having erected, in addition to the other extensive improve- 
ments, a fine residence with modern appointments. His farm contains two 
hundred and forty acres of land, all of which is under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. He makes a specialty of breeding and raising thorough bred Poland China 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 167 

hogs, Durham cattle and Oxford sheep and is meeting with most gratifying 
success in his undertaking. 

Mr. Glassburner was married in 1878 to Miss Amanda Allen Boyer, also 
a native of Davis county, and they have become the parents of six children, as 
follows : Maimie F., who after graduating from the high school entered the 
training school in Chicago and for six years has been engaged in mission work 
in southern China, near Hia-kiang; Frank J., who is also a high school grad- 
uate; Daisy H., the wife of Joseph Hallowell, of this county; Grace L., the wife 
of Eldridge Bryan ; Fred R., attending college at Ames ; and Ruth P., who 
is attending school at Dow City. All of the children graduated from the high 
school at Charter Oak with the exception of the youngest daughter. 

The family are all members of the Methodist Episcopal denomination and 
are active church workers. Mr. Glassburner is also identified with a fraternal 
insurance order. Although he always gives his political support to the can- 
didates of the republican party, he never participates in local governmental mat- 
ters as he does not care for public honors or the emoluments of office. He is 
one of the highly respected citizens of the community where he resides, as well 
as one of the most prosperous, while socially the family affiliates with the best 
people. 



GUSTAVE H. LOCHMILLER. 

Although Gustave H. Lochmiller is one of the younger representatives of 
agricultural interests in Crawford county, he is yet widely known, for his entire 
life has been passed in this locality and he represents one of the early and promi- 
nent families of this section of the state. He was born on the home farm, lo- 
cated on section 3, East Boyer township, February 22, 1867. His parents, 
Phillip and Carolina (Nehoof) Lochmiller, were natives of Germany, where 
they were married, after which they emigrated to the United States. They at 
once made their way to Crawford county, Iowa, and, being pleased with this 
part of the country, made it their permanent location, purchasing a farm in East 
Boyer township, which the father cultivated for many years. He became a 
successful man and is now making his home in Denison, where he is living in 
honorable retirement. Unto him and his wife were born eight children, as fol- 
lows : Antonia, the wife of W. E. Johnson, of Los Angeles, Cahfornia; Clemen- 
tina, the wife of E. E. Ransom, of Denison; Gustave H., of this review; Phillip, 
deceased ; George, who makes his home in Garrison, North Dakota ; Frank, de- 
ceased; one who died in infancy; and Rudolph, a resident of Denison. 

Gustave H. Lochmiller pursued his early education in the district schools 
of East Boyer township and completed his studies in the Denison high school, 
which he attended for two years. He remained under the parental roof until 
the time of his marriage, having in the meantime been thoroughly trained in 
the work of the home farm. However, following his marriage, he clerked in 
a store in Denison for fifteen years, but at the end of that time decided to 
again take up farming and in 1901 located on a farm in Washington township. 



168 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

After a year, however, he removetl to the old home place in East Boyer town- 
ship and today owns the property, composing two hundred and forty acres. 
He here engages in general farming and stock-raising, and that he thoroughly 
understands his work in both branches is indicated by the splendid success which 
has come to him. 

It was on the 26th of May, 1895, that Mr. Lochmillcr was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Alice Blackman, who was born in Denison township, Crawford 
county, a daughter of Jerome and Celia (Harper) Blackman. The father was 
born in the state of New York but his death occurred in Crawford county in 
1909. Tlie mother, however, still survives and makes her home in Denison. 
Their family numbers ten children, as follows: Frances, the wife of John Duff, 
a resident of Denison township; William, who makes his home in Paradise 
township, Crawford county ; Edward, of Denison ; Guy, also of this city ; Alice, 
now Mrs. Lochmiller; John, of Denison township; Claud, who makes his home 
in Dow City; Anna, the wife of Floyd Smith, of Washington, Iowa; Fred, of 
Denison ; and Carl, at home. Mrs. Lochmiller supplemented her early educa- 
tional training by study in the college at Denison, after which she engaged in 
teaching for two terms. By her marriage she has become the mother of two 
sons and two daughters but the younger son and second in order of birth, 
Phillip, is deceased. The others are Gustave H., Jr., Alice and Abbie, all with 
their parents. 

In his political views Mr. Lochmiller is a republican, and in his fraternal re- 
lations is a Woodman of the World. His wife is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lochmiller have spent their entire lives 
in Crawford county and are therefore widely and favorably known, the hospi- 
tality of their pleasant country home being greatly enjoyed by their numerous 
friends and acquaintances. 



PETER MILLER. 



Abundant success has been the reward of Peter Miller in his efforts to 
found a home in America. A farm and ranch owner, he spends his winters in 
Denison and his summers amid the beautiful scenes of nature in Montana. His 
prosperity is to be ascribed to his unwearied application and good business judg- 
ment, two qualities that are of great importance in the accomplishment of any 
woi thy undertaking. 

He is a native of Prussia, born December 30. 1846, a son of Christian Die- 
trich and Sophia (Petersen) Miller, who were also born in Prussia. The father, 
whose birth occurred in Galding. learned the carpenter's trade and became a 
contractor and bridge builder. In 1869 he emigrated to America and after 
spending ten years at Davenport, low^a, settled in Denison, where he lived re- 
tired, passing away in 1891. at the age of seventy- four years. His wife died 
three years later, having attained the same age as her husband. They were both 
members of the Lutheran church. Nicholaus Miller, the paternal grandfather 
of our subject, was a forester in Germany in the employ of the government and 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 169 

was an officer in the army at the time of the Napoleonic wars. There were 
three children in his family, John, Nicholaus and Christian. The grandfather 
on the maternal side was Claus Petersen, who made thatched roofs for houses 
and also served as a soldier in the army at the time of Napoleon. 

There were eight children in the family of Dietrich and Sophia Miller, 
namely : Nicholas, of Denison ; Henry, of Holstein, Iowa ; Peter, of this re- 
view ; Christina, now Mrs. William Werner, of Holstein ; John, of Schleswig, 
Iov;a; Doris, the widow of Nicholas Frantz, of Denison; Minnie, now Mrs. 
Fred Martens, of Davenport, Iowa; and August, of Denison. 

Peter Miller was reared in his native country and received his education 
there, spending one year, after laying aside his books, on a sailing vessel at sea, 
He then became a teamster in the Danish army and later served in a similar 
capacity in the German army. In 1867, he came to America and spent the first 
winter at Davenport, Iowa, being attracted in the spring to Nebraska, where he 
assisted in the construction of the Union Pacific Railway. However, he again 
went to Davenport and began farming in Scott county. About 1877 he removed 
to Otter Creek township, Crawford county, where he established his home, 
now owning a valuable place of two hundred and forty acres in that township. 
In 1890 he took up his residence in Denison and three months later went to 
Montana, where he started a sheep ranch near Lloyd, which he also owns. He 
spent eight years in the northwest but has lived in Denison during the winters 
since 1898. He is recognized as a man of good business ability who seldom un- 
dertakes anything that he does not carry through successfully. 

On the 22d of December, 1875, Mr. Miller was united in marriage in Scott 
county to Miss Elizabeth Claussen, who was born at Eckenford, Schleswig-Hol- 
stein, Germany, a daughter of George Henry William and Marie (Wieland) 
Claussen. Her parents came to America in 1853 when their daughter Elizabeth 
was a year and a half old and settled at Davenport, where she grew to woman- 
hood. Her mother died about two months after coming to this country and the 
father subsequently married, the maiden name of his second wife being Mary 
Stegermann. She passed away in 1891. Mr. Claussen departing this life in 
1906, at the age of eighty-four years. There were two children by his first 
marriage: John, who lives at Wilton, Iowa; and Elizabeth, now Mrs. Peter 
Miller. Of the second union two children also were born : Christian, of South 
Dakota; and Doretta, the wife of George Banick, who is engaged in the bank- 
ing business at Wilton. Mr. Claussen was a soldier at the time of the revolu- 
tion in Germany in 1848. John Claussen, the paternal grandfather of Mrs. 
Miller, was a carpenter and lived to be fifty years of age. In his family were 
four children, John, Henry, Frederick and Rudolph. Her grandfather Wie- 
land, on the maternal side, engaged in teaming in Germany and owned a num- 
ber of teams. His children were Peter, Dirk, Sarah and Marie. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Miller: Henry and Christ 
are engaged in the stock business in Montana. Henry married Sophia Hofeldt 
and has four children, Ervin Peter, Leslie Robert, Dorothea and Marjorie. 
Christ married Caroline Khure and has three children. Lillian, Dorine and Doris; 
the two youngest being twins. Louis died at the age of thirteen years. Lillian 



170 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

is now the wife of J. W. Miller, abstractor for the Bank of Denison, and the 
mother of one daughter, Waline. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miller occupy a beautiful home in Denison, which he erected 
in 1898 and provided with all modem conveniences. Socially he and his wife 
are well known and religiously they are affiliated with the Lutheran church, of 
which they are stanch supporters. Mr. Miller gives his support to the republican 
party and is a valued member of Sylvan Lodge No. 507, A. F. & A. M., of Den- 
ison, but his friends are by no means limited to lodge membership, as they are 
to be found wherever he is known. No one envies him his good fortune as it 
has been obtained by thoroughly honorable means, and his properties are man- 
aged in such a way as to add to the permanent welfare and prosperity of the 
country. 



MARTIN FRIEDRICHSEN. 

IMartin Friedrichsen, the owner of three hundred and twenty acres of excel- 
lent farming land in Otter Creek township, is a native of Germany, his birth 
occurring in that country on the 24th of May, 1863. He is the eldest child of 
K. M. and Elizabeth (Petersen) Friedrichsen, who emigrated to the United 
States with their family in 1881 and located in Crawford county, Iowa. After 
residing here one year they bought an eighty acre farm in Otter Creek town- 
ship, which they continued to cultivate until 1889, when they retired to Schles- 
wig, where they are now living. They were the parents of nine children, those 
beside the son IMartin being: Agnes, the wife of Henry Bendixen, of Schleswig; 
Fred, who lives in Otter Creek township ; Magdelina, who married Ed Kestner ; 
Knud, also a resident of Otter Creek township ; Catharina, the wife of Henry 
Ricketts, of Nebraska; Julia, who married Emil Elser, of Ida county; Freda, 
the wife of John Jurgensen, of Morgan townshi]> ; and Carl, living in Otter 
Creek township. 

Martin Friedrichsen acquired his education in the schools of his native land, 
following which he apprenticed himself to the carpenter's trade, following that 
occupation during the first seven years of his residence in America. In 1888, 
however, he bought eighty acres of land and engaged in general farming and 
stock-raising but is now making a specialty of feeding cattle and hogs for the 
market. He has met with most gratifying success in his various ventures and as 
a result now owns one-half section of land in Crawford county, all of which is 
well improved and under a high state of cultivation. His is one of the valuable 
properties of Otter Creek township and the improvements are substantial and 
kept in good condition. He keeps a fine grade of stock and his fields are given 
the capable supervision which produces abundant harvests. 

On the 27th of March, 1888, tlie union between Mr. Friedrichsen and Miss 
Anna Guttburg was solemnized. Mrs. Friedrichsen is a native of Germany, in 
which country her parents. Johann and Marguerita (Botliam) Guttburg, still 
live, the father at the venerable age of ninety-two y^ars and the mother at 
eighty-one. Nine children were born unto them but only eight attained matur- 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 171 

* 

ity, the youngest dying in infancy. The others are as follows: Laurence, Elsaba 
and Johann, all of whom are living in Germany ; Marguerita, deceased ; Franz, 
of Germany; Claus, residing in Schleswig; Anna, the wife of Martin Fried- 
aichsen; and Katherina, who married Christian Kruse, of Minnesota. Mr. and 
Mrs. Friedrichsen have also had nine children. Ella, Carl, Johannes, Marvine, 
Anna, Fred, Alfred and Violet, are still at home, while Marguerita, the fourth in 
the order of birth, died in infancy. 

The family attend the services of the Lutheran church with which denomina- 
tion they are identified by membership. Mr. Friedrichsen is a public-spirited 
man and always takes an active interest in all local issues, at all times giving his 
support to the democratic party. He stands high in the regard of his fellow 
citizens who have elected him to various minor offices in his township, the duties 
of which he discharged in a manner satisfactory to the community. He has many 
friends in Otter Creek township whose regard is accorded him most justly as he 
is a man worthy of esteem. 



THEO ROHWER. 



Among the younger business men who have attained more than a moderate 
degree of success in the commercial circles of their home town is Theo Rohwer, 
who is at present holding the responsible position of cashier in the banking es- 
tablishment of Baxter, Reed & Company. Born December lo, 1868, he is a son 
of Henry and Catherine (Barofsky) Rohwer, both of whom were natives of 
Germany. The father emigrated to the United States in 1858 and located in 
Davenport, Iowa, where he followed his trade as a shoemaker until 1862, when 
he and four other young men took an overland journey by wagon to Nevada, 
where for a few years he was employed in quartz mining. He made his home- 
ward trip by way of San Francisco and the isthmus of Panama, again taking 
up his residence in Davenport, where he engaged in the shoe business until 
1882, when he located on a farm in Tama county, Iowa, remaining there until 
1904. That year he again returned to Davenport, where he now resides. To 
him and his wife were born eight children, of whom the following are living: 
Julius, of Ida Grove, Iowa ; Gustav, of Moline, Illinois ; Theo, of this review ; 
Henry, of Seattle, Washington; and Amanda, the wife of Fred Fick, of Ida 
Grove. The deceased members of this family are: George, who died in 1900; 
and Clara and Anna, both of whom died in infancy. The mother departed this 
life in 1885. 

From his ninth birthday Theo Rohwer labored on the farm until seventeen 
years old. He attended the Davenport Business College during the winters of 
1888 and 1889 and then obtained employment in a general store. He worked 
one year for Montgomery Ward & Company of Chicago, and then came to Ida 
Grove, where for the following six years he clerked in a general store. Since 
1899 he has been in the bank of Baxter Reed & Company, acting in the capacity 
of cashier. 

Mr. Rohwer was married at Ida Grove to Catherina Brechwald, a daughter 
of Andrew and Barbara (Schmidt) Brechwald. She is one of a family of nine 



172 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

children, the others being as follows: Alary, who became the wife of Charles 
Seaman and died in 1888; Agnes, who married John Schmidt, of Clinton county, 
Iowa; John, of Carroll county, Iowa; Ferd A., of Ida Grove; Barbara, the wife 
of William Murphy, of Ida Grove; Elizabeth, who became the wife of Robert 
Mien and resides in Kansas; Jacob, wiio is living in Canada; and Theresa, who 
married Frank Hart and makes her home in Nebraska. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Rohwer have been born seven children: Julius, John, Theresa, Helen, Roland, 
Emmett and Alice. 

In politics Mr. Rohwer has always cast his ballot for the democratic party 
and fraternally he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a man of keen business acumen and 
executive ability, is well known for his strict integrity and faithful attention to 
his duties, and he possesses the entire confidence of his employers as well as the 
high regard of his fellow townsmen. 



NINUS L. HUNT. 



Xinus L. Hunt, a member of the firm of Pfarr, Gebert & Hunt, general 
merchants of Denison, is numbered among the worthy native sons of Crawford 
county, his birth having occurred in Goodrich township on the 19th of October, 
1855. His parents, Alonzo R. and Margaret (Dobson) Hunt, were natives of 
New" York and Ohio respectively. His great-great-grandfather on the paternal 
side came from England or Wales and was drowned in T.ong Island Sound. 
Captain Ziba Hunt, the great-grandfather, served as a captain in the Revolu- 
tionary war. The following communication was received in reference to his 
service : 

New York State Library, Albany. 

February 7, 191 1. 
This is to certify that on folio 169 of volume XX of a series of manuscript 
volumes entitled, "Manuscripts of the Colony and State of X^ew York in the 
Revolutionary War" in the custody of the regents of the University of the 
State of Xew York in the State Library is a land bounty right signed by the 
members of a class in Colonel William B. Whiting's regiment of Albany County 
Militia, district of Kings, and that among the members of this class is Ziba 
Hunt. 

(Signed) Peter X^elson. 

Assistant Archivist. 
In testimony whereof, the seal of the University of the State of X^ew York 
has been affixed at the city of Albany this 7th day of February, 191 1. 

August S. Downing, 
Acting Commissioner of Education. 
Captain Hunt, who was a tanner by trade, married Johanna Blont, a daugh- 
ter of Ambrose and Johanna (Clark) Blont. and with his family removed to 
Xew Lebanon, Columbia county, Xew York, in 1780. He was born in 1746 
and died in 1820. There were thirteen children born to him and his wife. 




N. L. HUNT 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 175 

Walter Hunt, the grandfather of our subject, was a native of New York and 
a farmer by occupation. He was the father of a large family of children, in- 
cluding Amos, Elizabeth, Johanna, Amanda, Emily, William, George, Isaac, 
Alonzo R. and Jason Z. 

Benjamin Dobson the maternal grandfather of Ninus L. Hunt, was born in 
Ohio in 1799 and became a miller. He came to Crawford county, Iowa, in 
185 1, laid out the town site of Deloit, named the place and there erected the first 
saw and flour mill. He lived to attain the age of seventy-seven or seventy-eight 
years, while his wife, who bore the maiden name of Keziah Wolf, was called 
to her final rest in 1863. Among their children were the following named: 
Thomas, John, Benjamin, William, Elihu, Margaret and Elizabeth. 

Alonzo R. Hunt, the father of the gentleman whose name introduces this 
review, was reared in New York and followed farming as a life work. He 
came to Iowa in 1848, settling in Harrison county, where he wedded Miss Mar- 
garet Dobson, their marriage being the first to take place in that county. The 
year 1853 witnessed his arrival in Crawford county and here he held the office 
of county recorder. In the spring of 1857 he removed to Johnson county. Ne- 
braska, settling on a homestead near Tecumseh. He acted as probate judge of 
Johnson county and at the time of the Civil war enlisted in Company t), First 
Nebraska Cavalry, serving with that command for a little less than a year. His 
demise occurred in the hospital at Omaha at the comparatively early age of 
thirty-seven years. His widow returned to Deloit, Iowa, where she passed 
away on the 25th of November, 1905, when seventy-six years of age. She was 
a devoted and consistent member of the church of the Latter Day Saints. By 
her marriage she became the mother of six children, three sons and three daugh- 
ters, as follows : Sarah A., the deceased wife of Lafayette Robbins ; Amos W., 
who is a resident of Alberta, Canada; Ninus L., of this review; Mary L., the 
wife of John F. Gofif, of Glen, Minnesota; Elder Charles J., living in Deloit, 
Iowa ; and Cynthia, who died when about eighteen months old. 

Ninus L. Hunt was born and reared in Crawford county and has spent his 
entire life within its borders with the exception of six or seven years' residence 
in Nebraska. He was reared to the work of the farm, drove cattle, broke 
prairie, and did all the other tasks incident to the cultivation of the fields, re- 
maining under the parental roof until he had attained his majority. In the 
acquirement of an education he attended the district schools and also the public 
schools of Deloit, Iowa. After completing his studies he followed the profes- 
sion of teaching for five winter terms, while the summer seasons were devoted 
to farming. While engaged in teaching he was elected to the office of township 
assessor, holding that office for seven years in succession. On the expiration 
of that period he formed a partnership with his brother, Charles J., and in 
September, 1882, they opened a general mercantile establishment in Deloit, con- 
ducting business under the firm style of Hunt Brothers for twelve years. N. L. 
Hunt then purchased his brother's interest and continued the business alone for 
four years before disposing of it. In the fall of 1887 he was nominated and 
elected county auditor, being the first republican ever chosen for that office in 
Crawford county. He was elected by a majority of fifty, overcoming a demo- 
cratic majority of five hundred and forty-three, and served for two years. In 



17G HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

the fall of 1894 he was nominated for the position of county recorder and 
elected by a majority of forty-one, holding the office for two years. Subsequently 
he worked in the Bank of Denison for four years, being employed by Shaw & 
Kuehnle. At the end of that time he bought an interest in the concern with 
which he is now connected, becoming a member of the firm of Pfarr, Gebert & 
Hunt, general merchants. They enjoy an extensive and profitable trade and 
Mr. Hunt is widely recognized as one of the substantial business men and re- 
spected citizens of his native county. 

On the 22d of February, 1880, Mr. Hunt was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma L. Mason, a native of Milford township, Crawford county, and a daugh- 
ter of Jesse and Eliza (Johnson) Mason, who were born in Kentucky and Illi- 
nois respectively. They were pioneer settlers of Crawford county, Iowa, com- 
ing in 1850 and spending the remainder of their lives here. Their children were 
three in number, namely: Jane, Margaret and Angeline. Jesse Mason, who 
was twice married, had the following children by his second wife: Matilda; 
David and Jesse, twins; John; Julia; Hiram C. ; Emma L. ; and Andrew J. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hunt are the parents of three children : R. Blaine, who is working for 
a publishing company in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; and N. Leslie and Margaret, 
who are attending school. 

In politics Mr. Hunt is a republican and, as previously shown, his fellow 
townsmen have honored him by election to several positions of public trust and 
responsibility. After serving as township assessor he w-as elected township 
clerk of Milford township, and served as secretary and president of the school 
board and as school treasurer in that township. For three years he was post- 
master of Denison and has served as notary public and director of the normal 
school. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen 
of the World and the Sons of Veterans. No breath of suspicion has ever as- 
sailed his good name and on the contrary he stands as a splendid type of the 
honorable, reliable, successful man, the public-spirited citizen and the trust- 
worthy friend. 



JOHN LOUIS McCLELLAN. 

A gallant soldier when the life of his country was in danger, a useful and 
progressive citizen in times of peace and a generous and kind hearted gentle- 
man, John Louis McClellan of Denison can claim many friends in Crawford 
county. He became a resident of this locality soon after the Civil war, and as 
a contractor assisted very materially in the erection of the substantial buildings 
of Denison. He is now living retired. He was born at Gettysburg. Pennsyl- 
vania, April 7, 1838, a son of John and Mary McClellan, both of whom were 
natives of the Keystone state. The father was a hotel keeper and later a banker 
in Gettysburg. He died at the time of the Johnstown flood in his eighty-first 
year. He belonged to the state militia, attaining the rank of colonel in that or- 
ganization. Our subject's grandfather, \\'illiam McClellan, was a soldier in the 
war of 181 2. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 177 

John Louis McClellan was the only child of his parents and was reared at 
Gettysburg, receiving his education in the public schools and at Pennsylvania 
College. After leaving college he learned the carpenter's trade, and just as he 
was ready to begin his business career the Civil war threw its shadow over the 
land. He responded to the first call of President Lincoln and enlisted in the 
Second Pennsylvania Volunteers for three months. At the close of this period 
he reenlisted for nine months in the One Hundred and Sixty-fifth Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, and after the term of his enlistment expired he once more offered 
his services to the government, becoming a member of the Twenty-first Penn- 
sylvania Cavalry, in which he continued until the close of the war. He was a 
private during the entire period and was discharged at Gettysburg in July, 1865. 
In 1866 he came west with his wife to Iowa and spent one year in Mahaska 
county, being then attracted to Crawford county, which has since been his home. 
He engaged in carpentering, bridge building and contracting and also in house 
moving. He built the old courthouse, the west brick school building and many 
of the most substantial structures of Denison, which stand as monuments to his 
skill as a builder. 

On the 15th of April, 1862, Mr. McClellan was united in marriage to Miss 
Georgia Wade, a daughter of James and Mary (Filby) Wade. She was born 
at her grandmother's old home on the 4th of July, 1841, on the present site of 
the battlefield of Gettysburg and grew to womanhood in Gettysburg. When 
about fourteen years of age she began learning the millinery business, in which 
she continued until she was married. Since 1866 she has made her home in 
Iowa. Her father was a native of Virginia and her mother of Pennsylvania. 
He died at Gettysburg at the age of sixty-three years, the mother also passing 
away at the same place, aged seventy-two. There were five children in their 
family: Georgia Wade, now Mrs. John Louis McClellan; Jennie, who was killed 
during the battle of Gettysburg; John James, of Mancos, Colorado; Samuel 
S., of Peoria, Illinois ; and Harry M., who died in Seattle, Washington, in 1907. 
The father of Mrs. McClellan was by trade a tailor. Her grandfather was a 
soldier of the Revolution and was killed at the battle of Brandywine. Her 
grandmother before her marriage was Elizabeth Mills. Samuel Filby, the grand- 
father on the maternal side, was a native of Pennsylvania and a carpenter by 
trade. His wife was Elizabeth De Groff. They had four children. 

Six children came to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. McClellan, one of 
whom died in infancy, the others being: Louis Kenneth, now a farmer living 
near Red Deer, Alberta, Canada, who married Bessie McMulkin and has two 
sons, Joseph and John; Jennie Wade, who married Richard Cook, a railroad 
man in Monmouth, Illinois ; Jim Britton, now a house mover of Denison, who 
married Ala Kinney and had eighteen children, thirteen of whom are now liv- 
ing, Georgia, Gladys, Mary, Martha, Bessie, Fred, Jim, William, Job, Harry, 
John, Russell and Louis ; Nellie G, of Los Angeles, who married Fred S. 
Heffelfinger and has three children, Annie M., John M. and Kitty; and John H., 
who married Carrie Kelley and lives in Carroll. 

Mrs. McClellan has been for many years one of the prominent workers in 
lines of philanthropy in Iowa. She was secretary of the National Women's Re- 
lief Corps and also state president of the same organization. Moreover, she 



178 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

has been national press correspondent, chairman of the national executive board, 
department secretary and department treasurer of llie Women's Relief Corps. 
She has served as state president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union 
and as member of the board of trustees of this organization. She was also in- 
terested for eleven years in the Benedict Home and at the present time is audi- 
tor of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union for the state of Iowa. She 
is recognized as one of the most active workers in the two great organizations 
named that can be found in this state. 

Mr. McClellan and his wife are both adherents of the Christian Science Church 
and stanch believers in its teachings. He belongs to the John A. Logan Post, Xo. 
58, G. A. R., and is now past commander. He has served many times as ofificer 
of the day and also marshal of the day on Memorial Day. Politically, he gives 
his support to the republican party and for three terms served as city marshal of 
Denison, being the first marshal of this city. In the discharge of his duties, both 
public and private, he has been governed by a high sense of honor and has been 
fearless in the support of what he believed to be just and true. He has won 
the confidence of those with whom he has come into contact and is admitted 
by all to be a worthy representative citizen of Crawford county. 



HERMANN KOENEKAMP. 

A worthy ambition is a powerful incentive and without it very little can be 
accomplished along lines of human progress. It is the key that unlocks the door 
of opportunity and the young man who possesses it, if he is guided by sound judg- 
ment, is on the highway to fortune. The truth of this statement is clearly illus- 
trated in the life of Hermann Koenekamp, whose name stands at the head of this 
sketch. He was born in Oldenburg, Germany, March 21, 1849. His father, who 
was a farmer, died in Germany when our subject was four years old. He was 
by occupation a farmer and religiously was identified with the Lutheran church, 
as was also his wife. The mother, who before her marriage was Catharina 
Doris, lived to the age of eighty-three years, passing away in 1893. 

Hermann Koenekamp was reared and educated in his native land and at the 
age of fourteen was apprenticed to the blacksmith's trade, which he followed 
until the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian war in 1869. He then enlisted in the 
regular army, in which he continued about three years, being honorably dis- 
charged from service August 5, 1872. Laying aside his military accoutrements 
he returned to his old home, where he was married,, and six weeks after his dis- 
charge from the army started with his young wife for America. After living 
for eleven months in the city of Chicago, he engaged for two years in farming 
in Cook county and in the fall of 1875 came to Crawford county, Iowa, and 
rented a farm in Goodrich township, upon which he lived for two years. Later he 
lived in Hanover and Morgan townships, and about 1881. having acquired the 
necessary capital, purchased two hundred and forty acres in Denison township of 
Hon. Leslie M. Shaw, upon which he lived until 1894, disposing of it three years 
later. In 1894 he purchased a farm of four hundred and forty acres near Dow 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 179 

City, Iowa, from the Crawford County State Bank, which he sold in the spring of 
1 910, and in 1908 he bought one hundred and sixty acres in Faulk county, South 
Dakota, purchasing another tract of one hundred and sixty acres in 1910, which 
is located near Watertown, South Dakota. He still owns both of these farms 
and also a beautiful residence in Denison, which he purchased in 1904. He has 
an improved farm of four hundred and eighty acres in Kansas, which he bought 
in 1910. His undertakings have been accompanied with a gratifying measure of 
success and he has for years been known as one of the highly prosperous citizens 
of this county. 

On the 6th of October, 1872, Mr. Koenekamp was united in marriage to Miss 
Eliza Meyer, who was born at Oldenburg, Germany, March 14, 1853, a daughter 
of Christ and Margaret (Choringer) Meyer. Her parents were both natives of 
Germany and her father died in that country in 1895, at the age of more than 
seventy years, her mother having passed away in 1863 at the age of forty-five. 
There were six children in their family : Helena, Wilhelm, Christian, Eliza, 
Henry and Johanna. The father was a soldier in the regular army of Germany 
and became a teamster and farmer. Eleven children came to bless the union of 
Mr. and Mrs. Koenekamp, namely: Emma married Wilhelm Plahn, of Pierce, 
Nebraska, and has nine children, Lena, Herman, Anna, Henry, Amelia, Wilhelm, 
Hilda and Hattie, twins, and Emma. Ida died at the age of nine months. Mary 
married Jacob Mehman and they now live in Denison township. Lena married 
Hans Blom, of South Dakota, and they have one son, Julius. Christ and Her- 
man are both farmers of the state of Washington. Bertha is now Mrs. Joseph 
R. Best and has two children, Louisa and Homer. Bernhardt is a resident of 
Raymond, Washington. Johan and Hans are both living in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. Louisa is living at home and is a student in the high school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Koenekamp are members of the Lutheran church and active 
workers in its behalf. He is identified with the Denison Lonverin, the German 
soldiers society, and also with Die Deutsche Bruederschaft, the German brother- 
hood. Politically, he gives his support to the republican party. He has not 
aspired to the honors and emoluments of office as he prefers the quiet life of a 
private citizen. Essentially a self-made man, his example has been to others an 
inspiration and support, the value of which can never be known. 



A. E. ANDERSON. 



Some men are born with a talent for mercantile life, possessing a good ad- 
dress, intelligent application and an appreciation of the wants of the public as 
well as the energy necessary to carry through successfully what they undertake. 
A. E. Anderson, of Kiron, belongs to this class, judging by the result of his 
efiforts up to the present time. He is a native of Sweden, born April 17, 1877, 
and is therefore a young man justly fairly launched in the business world. His 
parents are Lars and Anna Anderson, both of whom were born in Sweden and 
came to America in 1889. After living for a number of years in Crawford 
county they bought land in Ida county, Iowa, which they recently sold in order 



1^0 IIJSTORV OF CRAWFORD COUXTY 

to establish a permanent home at Kiron. There were three children in their fam- 
ily namel>-: Andrew, who is now living upon the old homestead; Maggie the 
wue of Oscar Johnson, of Crawford county; and A. E., the subject of' thil 
review. •' ■■'"* 



A. L Anderson came to America with his parents at twelve years of age and 
recened h,s prehrnmary education in the public schools, later attending college 
He rema.ned at hon,e until manhood and then entered mercantile business^ 
Ida cotmty. In ,907 he took up his residence in Kiron and has since been a the 
head of a general store there. He owns the b.,il,ling in which he conducts his 

ar,rhTsTuturr ' "''""' '" P"^""' ^^'''^ '"'' '^ =■ ^""-'" P'phecy 

Darty'^HiTas'"'''"^ " 1°""^'^' ""■■ -^"^"'°'' ^'' ^"PP°"^" "'^ -P"Wican 
party. He has never sought pohfcal honors, preferring to devote his et^tire en- 

erg,es to h,s busmess affairs. He is friendly toward all branches of the Christ an 

rehg,on and al efforts to advance the welfare of his fellowmen. He has m d^a 

h,g y creditable record as a business man and as a citizen and is a fa -m nded 

gentleman who never seeks to advance his own interests to the injury of o thert 

be.ng governed m all h,s dealmgs by principles of truth and honor 



ADOLPH F. MEYERS. 



One of the capable and promising farmers of Crawford county is Adolph F 
Meyers whose home ,s on section 34, Soldier township, where he has a hthW 
productive farm of three hun.Ired and twentv acres. He is a native o f lis 

M^rs "Z of' r ""'• r" -^ =°" °^ -^""'P" -'^ Katrina Tvogel 01 ) 
Meyers, both of whom were born in Germany. The father came to Amer a 

at the age of twenty years and lived for some time in Cook coun tv Tn 
w ere he was married, coming in ,8;6 .0 Crawford unty loTa^^H '":; 
h,r.y years he was actively identified with the agricultural interests A^ Z 
tm,e of h,s death m ,906 he owned seventeen hundred acre of „ , . 
county. He was an unusually successful farmer ,1 T '" "'" 

perseverance, good judgntent and t n emi hedTh ^acte^Hi ^T ""f '"" 
■n .cx>3. They were both members of the Lutl e a , hurcf T " '""' 

children ,n .heir family, namely: .Minnie, nov^ ^ ife of Otto t^"" T 
gust, William, Dora, wife of Henry VVeddene^AVoL^P ;„?""';; 
eiUeerveY^"™^ '" "^-'-^ -""'- ^'^ "-- -o diedt ZZ " 

and began farmmg on his own account bein^ now fln^ . ^'^ath of hi. father 
who know him. ^ ' ^'^^ '" *^^ estimation of all 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 181 

On the 5th of March, 1903, Mr. Meyers was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma Cheer, who was born in Iowa, June i, 1880, a daughter of John and 
Barbara (Lamp) Cheer. Her father was born in Germany and her mother in 
Iowa. They were married in this state and are now Hving on a farm of three 
hundred and twenty acres in Woodbury county, the father being sixty-seven and 
the mother fifty-four years of age. They were the parents of eleven children, 
namely : Emma, now Mrs. Adolph F. Meyers ; Louie, Lena, Adolph, Minnie 
and Emil, all of whom are at home; Qara, who died at the age of fourteen 
years ; Leacy, Freda and Albert, who are at home ; and Willie, who died in 
infancy. Four children have come to brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. Mey- 
ers, namely : George, Otto, Edna and Clara. 

Mrs. Meyers, like her husband, possessed advantages of education in the 
public schools. She is a member of the German Lutheran church as is Mr. 
Meyers, and they are loyal supporters of that organization. He gives his willing 
assistance to the promotion of the general good of the community and his voice 
and influence are always in behalf of improvement. He has been a lifelong 
democrat, and although he has never sought the honors of office he is ever ready 
to assist his friends who are ambitious to gain political recognition. He and 
his wife are genial and hospitable and have many^ friends in Crawford county. 



C. HENRY BOHM. 



C. Henry Bohm, one of the thrifty and energetic sons of Germany who 
has been a factor in the agricultural development of Washington township, was 
born in Oldenburg on the i6th of December, 1856. His parents, Henry and 
Sophia Bohm, are still living in the fatherland. Five children were born to 
them, of whom the son Henry is the eldest. The others are : Lizzie, who lives 
in Germany ; Doris, now Mrs. Krueger, living in Hanover township ; Augusta, 
who married August Miller, of Goodrich township; and Antone, living in Ger- 
many. 

C. Henry Bohm obtained his education in the common schools of his native 
land. When he was old enough to lay aside his text-books he obtained work on 
a farm and continued in this occupation until he was twenty-seven years of age, 
at which time he decided that the United States afforded better opportunities 
for industrious young men than the old country and so took passage for Amer- 
ica. Upon his arrival here he made his way westward to Rock Island, Illinois, 
where he obtained employment in a sawmill. He remained there but a few 
months, however, and then came to Crawford county, Iowa, where he worked 
as a farm hand for two years, first near Denison and later in Milford township. 
During that period he accumulated the means necessary to begin farming for 
himself, so rented land in Goodrich township, which he cultivated for six years. 
At the end of that time he went to Paradise township, where he rented land for 
two years and then bought eighty acres but soon afterward removed to Wash- 
ington township. He farmed there as a renter for three years and then bought 
the land he was cultivating, making all of the payments in five years. Later he 



182 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

bought his present homestead, consisting of two hunch-cd and forty acres on 
section 19, Washington township, where he engages in general farming and 
stock-raising, in both of which he is meeting with marked success. During the 
period of his residence he has effected many improvements, making his farm 
one of the most valuable in that portion of the county. 

in 1885 Mr. Uohm was united in marriage to Miss Christina Moss, a native 
of Germany, who passed away in 1894. Five children were born of this union, 
but the eldest son, William, is the only one now surviving. For his second wife 
Mr. Bohm chose Miss Lena Grammerstrof, their marriage being solemnized in 
1895, and unto them were born the following: Emil, Carl, Eddie and Augusta. 

The family always attend the Lutheran church, with which denomination 
the parents are identified by membership. Ever since he was granted the full 
rights of citizenship Mr. Bohm has given his political support to the republican 
party, considering that its policy is best adapted to subserve the interests of the 
majority. Although he does not actively participate in municipal affairs, not 
aspiring to public office, he fulfills the demands of good citizenship by going to 
the polls on election day and casting a ballot. Mr. Bohm's life, like those of 
many of his fellow countrymen, most clearly demonstrates what it is possible 
to accomplish in America with an asset of perseverance and determination. 



ALEXIS HENRY HARPER. 

In recording the life history of any man it is always interesting to know 
what were the elements of character that made it possible for him to attain an 
independent place in the world and in studying the personal qualities of Alexis 
Henry Harper we find that he possesses the requisite amount of energy, am- 
bition and application that go to make success. Born in Utica, New York, Feb- 
ruary 26, 1850, he is a son of James Henry Harper. His mother died when 
he was but three years old and all trace of her and her family have since been 
lost. His only sister, Sarah Jane, married James Wiley, but nothing has been 
heard from her since 1873. at which time she was supposed to be living in 
Bolivar, Missouri. When Alexis H. was six years of age his father took him 
and his sister to Racine, Wisconsin, and there left them while he continued his 
journey to California in the quest of gold. He met with his death on the west- 
ern plains in 1861 on his way back to Racine. 

Alexis Henry Harper pursued his early education in the public schools of 
Racine, making that city his home until 1869, when he went to Cedar county, 
Iowa, and located in Springdale township, residing there until 1874. In that 
year he came to Washington township, Crawford county, and here purchased a 
farm, upon which he lived for two years, at the end of that period returning to 
Cedar county, where he resided the following two years. Once more coming to 
Crawford county he located in Boyer township, rented land until i88r, and then 
moved to his present location on sections 19 and 20, Union township. TTere he 
improved his farm, consisting of one hundred and twenty acres of land, besides 




]\IR. AXD MRS. A. H. HARPER 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 185 

which he owns two houses and three lots in Dow City, all of which he has 
acquired as a result of his individual efforts and tenacity of purpose. 

In 1873 ^^r- Harper was married to Miss Marianna Bonsall, who was born 
in Chester county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Joseph W. and Sarah (Hunt) 
Bonsall. Her parents were both natives of Pennsylvania and removed to Cedar 
county, Iowa, in 1861, remaining there until 1878, when they came to Crawford 
county, where they spent the rest of their lives. They were the parents of six 
children, of whom but two survive, Mrs. Harper and Chester, the latter being a 
rural route mail carrier residing in Dunlap, Iowa. Mrs. Bonsall's death oc- 
curred in 1903, her husband passing away in 1907. 

In politics Mr. Harper has always supported the principles of the republican 
party and locally is known as a "standpatter." Fraternally he is a popular mem- 
ber of the Masonic order and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and with 
his wife also holds membership in Rebekah chapter. They are both worthy 
members of the Baptist church, in which he serves as a trustee, while she holds 
the office of clerk. Mr. Harper's life has been one of continuous activity and 
he has made good use of his business opportunities, carrying forward to a suc- 
cessful completion whatever he undertakes. He deserves much credit for his 
splendid record, whereby he has advanced from a humble position in life to a 
place among the prominent and prosperous agriculturists of Crawford county. 



GEORGE W. NICHOLSON. 

The broader spirit of the new century found expression in the business rec- 
ord of George W. Nicholson, president of the Nicholson Produce Company of 
Denison. For a number of years he was in control of large affairs and ex- 
tensive interests in this connection. His ability to manage, his business and 
financial instinct, his quick comprehension of a situation and his secure grasp 
of details were all elements in his successful conduct of a business which has 
long since assumed large and profitable proportions. 

Mr. Nicholson was a native of Ohio, his birth having occurred in Barnesville, 
Belmont county, October 6, 1853. He died March 2, 191 1, at Tampa, at Mrs. 
Barley's home. His parents were John L. and Eleanor (Young) Nicholson, 
also natives of the Buckeye state. The father was a son of John Nicholson, who 
was born in Baltimore, Maryland, but became an early settler of Smithfield, 
Ohio. In 1864 he sought the opportunities of the middle west, making his way 
to New Sharon, Iowa, where he lived for thirty-five years. He died, however, 
while on a visit in Denison in 1899, in the eighty-first year of his age. His 
wife survived him four years, passing away in 1903 at the age of seventy-seven 
years. Mr. Nicholson had been reared as a member of the Society of Friends or 
Quakers, but in later life he and his wife both became members of the Meth- 
odist church. He held a number of local offices and was a prominent and valued 
citizen of the community in which he lived. His family numbered nine chil- 
dren, namely : Amanda J., who died in young womanhood ; Martin W., of New 

Sharon, Iowa; George W., of this review; John W., deceased; Charles L., of 
Vol. 11—10 



186 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Blair, Xebraska ; Ross A., who died at Xewton. Iowa, in 1909; Benjamin Y.^ 
a resident of Denison ; Oliver E., who died in Boulder, Colorado; and ]\Iar>', 
who passed away in infancy. 

George W. Nicholson spent tlic first eleven years of his life in tlie state of 
his nativity and then came to Iowa with his parents in 1864. He was a resident 
of Xew Sharon for about five years, during which period he attended the pub- 
lic schools. When a youth of fifteen he started out to make his own way in 
the world and was employed at construction work on the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad. In 1880 he came to Craw^ford county and for eight years 
was a resident of Vail. On the expiration of that period he removed to Deni- 
son. where he lived for five years, after which he went to Grand Junction, where 
he remained for fourteen years. He then returned to Denison, where he en- 
gaged in the poultry, butter and egg business, which has claimed his time and 
attention from 1874 until his death. He and his brother, Benjamin, were as- 
sociated in this enterprise for twenty-eight years and conducted a business of 
extensive proportions. In 1908 they erected in Denison a large storage plant, 
which is sixty by sixty feet and five stories in height including basement. There 
is also an L addition. They drew trade from all directions and from a large 
district, and were among the leading shippers of this part of the state. 

On the 4th of August, 1884, Air. Nicholson was married to Miss Frances 
Long, a daughter of J. F. and Bridget (Butler) Long. Four children w^ere born 
of this marriage: Grace Frances, now the wife of Guy O. Baker; George, w^ho 
died at the age of two years ; Georgiana May, who is attending high school ; and 
John, who died in infancy. The mother passed away in 1896 at the age of 
thirty-four years. She was a Catholic in religious faith. Her birth occurred 
at Elk Point, Dakota, while her father was a native of Boston, Massachusetts, 
and her mother of Ireland, being brought to America when only a year old. 
Mr. and Mrs. Long were early settlers of Dakota, but for some years lived in 
\'ail, Iowa, where Mr. Long passed away. The death of Mrs. Long occurred 
at Grand Junction, Iowa, in the spring of 1910. On the 14th of August, 1905, 
Mr. Xicholson was again married, his second union being with May O. Adams, 
who was born at Atlantic City, New Jersey, where her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Alfred Adams, still reside. She is one of six children, the others being: Louis; 
Alfred; Bentley ; Carrie, the wife of Louis Rothchild ; and Pauline, the wife of 
Frederick Holmes. The father, Alfred Adams, is a son of John Adams, who 
came to this country from France with four brothers and settled in New [er- 
sey. The family have since scattered over the L'nited States and are very promi- 
ment in the east. Mrs. Nicholson was reared and educated in Atlantic City, 
where she was graduated from the high school. She lived for a time in Xew 
York, but was married in Chicago, and has made her home in Denison for the 
past six years, being very prominent in social circles here. 

George W. Nicholson was an exemplary and prominent member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. He belonged to Jeflferson Lodge, No. 57. A. F. & A. M., of 
Grand Junction; Jefiferson Chapter, R. A. M. ; Jeflferson Commandery, K. T. ; 
Des Moines Consistory, A. A. S. R.. in wliicli he has attained the thirty-second 
degree of the Scottish Rite ; and Za-ga-zig Temple of the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. His political allegiance was given to the republican party. He never 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 187 

sought nor desired ofBce as a reward for party fealty, yet was not remiss in 
the duties of citizenship, supporting at all times those measures and movements 
which he deemed of essential value in the conduct of business afifairs or in 
promoting the interests of the community. He passed away at Tampa, Florida, 
March 2, 191 1. 



FRANK McHENRY. 



Frank McHenry, a prominent and well known agriculturist who has been 
identified with the farming interests of Crawford county for forty-four years, 
was born in Rock county, Wisconsin, April 9, 1856, a son of Vincent and Dency 
(Nefift) McHenry. The mother's birth occurred in Rhode Island, but the 
father was a native of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where their marriage 
occurred. In 1855 he went to Wisconsin, locating near the town of Milton, and 
remained there ten years. He then came to Iowa and took up his residence at 
Boonesboro. After a twelve months' sojourn here he removed to Janesville, 
Minnesota, and a year later again came to Iowa and rented land on section 18, 
Union township, Crawford county. For three years he operated this farm and 
then purchased land on the same section and upon which his son Frank is now 
living. In the course of time he brought it to a high state of cultivation. Here 
he made his home until his death, which occurred in 1891. In politics he was 
an old line whig and later supported the republican party. His wife died in 
Crawford county in 1903. They were the parents of four children, two of whom 
survive, namely: Helen, who is the wife of C. F. Cassidy and lives in Denison; 
Frank, of this review. 

Frank McHenry in early youth attended the district schools of Wisconsin 
and later those of Crawford county. He then took up his life work on the 
home farm and has since given his entire time and attention to the pursuit of 
agriculture, bringing to his labors a well trained mind and a knowledge born in 
the school of experience. Aside from his farm of eighty acres on section 18, 
Union township, he owns an additional eighty acres on section 20, all of which 
is well improved and valuable land. 

On March 21, 1883, Mr. McHenry was united in marriage to Miss Mar- 
garet Gibson, who was born in Huron county, Ontario, Canada, August 12, 
1858, a daughter of Samuel and Margaret (Shillington) Gibson. Her father 
was born in Canada, of Scotch-Irish parentage, and came to Crawford county 
in 1871, locating in Union township, where he lived until 1883. In that year 
he removed to Charter Oak and later to Dunlap, where he remained but a short 
time and then went to Missouri. He subsequently returned to Crawford county 
and resided with his children until his death, which took place in 1910. His 
wife was a native of the north of Ireland and her death occurred in Crawford 
county in 1877. Three children were born to this couple : Robert Henry, living 
in Hugo, Colorado; Margaret; and Lydia, the wife of C. W. Pierce, a resident 
of Denison. Mrs. McHenry was educated at Cornell College, Mt. Vernon, and 
for eight years taught school in Crawford county. Mr. and Mrs. McHenry have 



188 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

one child, Ruth, who is the wife of E. R. Morrison. They are residing on the 
home place and are the parents of one child, Raymond McHenry. 

In his political views Mr. McHenry supports the republican party, and in 
religion both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
of which he is one of the trustees. His wife joined the church when but eight 
years old. Mr. McHenry is an excellent type of those who go to make the 
best farm element of the county, where he is recognized as one of the sub- 
stantial and representative citizens. 



C. J. TELLGREN. 



C. J. Tellgren, who was formerly engaged in agricultural pursuits in Craw- 
ford county but is now living in Kiron, where he has a wagon and repair shop, 
is a native of Sweden. He is a son of G. F. and Elizabeth Katherine Tellgren, 
also natives of Scandinavia, his birth having occurred on the 30th of January, 
1862. The parents emigrated to the United States in 1885, and in February 
of which year they settled on a farm in Crawford county, Iowa. The father 
passed away on the 21st of March, 1908, but the mother is still living, although 
she has passed her seventy-fifth anniversary. They were the parents of five 
children, who were as follows: C. J., our subject; Andrew, deceased; O. F., 
living in Crawford county; Enoch, who resides in Ida county; and Alfred, also 
of this county. 

C. J. Tellgren received his education in the common schools of his native 
land, remaining a member of his father's household until he had attained his 
fifteenth year, at which time he started out in life for himself. He worked as 
a farm hand for two years and then entered the army. After two years' service, 
he decided to become a citizen of the United States and after receiving his dis- 
charge he took passage for America. Upon his arrival he made his way west- 
ward, locating in Crawford county, Iowa, where he obtained employment upon 
a farm, continuing to work for others for three years. At the end of that 
period he had accumulated sufficient means to enable him to farm as a renter 
and for sixteen years he cultivated leased land. In 1900 he gave up agricultural 
pursuits and removed to Kiron, where he opened a wagon and repair shop, 
which he is still conducting. Mr. Tellgren is an excellent mechanic, having been 
a high class engineer in Sweden when he was seventeen years of age. He has 
met with moderate success in his various ventures and owns his residence and 
two lots, as well as his shop and a building and two acres of land within the 
village limits. 

Mr. Tellgren was married on the 3d of July. 1S89, to Miss Matilda Swanson, 
one of the five children born unto Mr. and Mrs. Swan Nelson, of Sweden, who 
spent their entire lives in their native land. Three children have been born 
unto Mr. and Mrs. Tellgren. as follows: Maud T., Anna V. and Minnie M. 
They are all graduates of the high school and the eldest and youngest are now 
at home, but the second daughter is attending college in Des Moines. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 189 

They attend the services of the Baptist church, and Mr. Tellgren always 
supports the candidates and measures of the republican party. He takes an 
active interest in all municipal matters and at the present time is a member of 
the board of aldermen. The family is highly regarded in Kiron, figuring promi- 
nently in all of the social activities. 



THOMAS MICHAELSEN. 

Thomas Michaelsen, who is prominently identified with the agricultural in- 
terests of Hanover township, having a homestead there consisting of two hun- 
dred and forty acres, all under a high state of cultivation, was born in Germany 
on the 5th of January, 1870. His parents, C. H. and Katrina (Hansen) Michael- 
sen, were also natives of the fatherland, in which country they were married, 
but emigrated to the United States with their family in 1883. Landing in New 
York they immediately made their way westward and located in Crawford 
county, Iowa, very soon thereafter buying one hundred and sixty acres of land, 
which they cultivated for thirteen years. In 1896 they sold this and removed 
to Arion, Iowa, settling on two hundred acres, which Mr. Michaelsen owned 
and continued to operate until 1903. They then migrated to Oklahoma, where 
he is interested in several banks, and are now residents of Wheatland, that 
state. Mr. and Mrs. Michaelsen are the parents of the following children : 
Henry, living in Canadian county, Oklahoma; Thomas, our subject; Johannes, 
who resides in Missouri ; H. F., also of Oklahoma ; and Margaret, who is still 
at home. 

Thomas Michaelsen acquired his education in the common schools of Craw- 
ford county and after laying aside his text-books he worked for his father until 
he had attained his majority and then began farming as a renter, which he con- 
tinued for four years. During this period he had by careful planning, economy 
and industry managed tO' save the required capital necessary to purchase land 
and invested in two hundred acres in Hanover township. He cultivated this 
for eleven years and then traded for two hundred and forty acres in Otter 
Creek and Morgan townships, and after owning this for a short time he again 
traded for land in Hanover township. At the end of three years he sold that 
place and moved to Oklahoma, where he resided until 1906, at which time he 
returned to Iowa. He is now living on two hundred and forty acres of land on 
section i, Hanover township. One hundred and sixty acres of his homestead 
is the land which his father bought when he first came to Iowa. Here he en- 
gages in general farming and stock-raising but makes a specialty of feeding 
and shipping cattle to the market. He is an indefatigable worker, but his per- 
sistence and thrift have been rewarded by more than moderate success, and 
although still in his prime, Mr. Michaelsen is rated as one of the substantial 
agriculturists in his township, as in addition to his well improved and highly 
cultivated homestead, he owns two hundred and forty acres of good land in 
Oklahoma. 



190 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

The marriage of Mr. Michaelsen and Miss Mary Sievers occurred on the 
28th of January, 1 891. She was born in Scott county, Iowa, and is a daughter 
of John and Anna (Hansen) Sievers, natives of Germany, who came to the 
United States in 1867 and first located in Davenport, this state, where they 
lived for five years. In 1872 they bought a farm in Crawford county for five 
dollars per acre and after cultivating it for fifteen years they retired and re- 
moved to Denison, where they continued to reside until their death. The mother 
passed away in 1898, and the father in 1900. Mrs. Michaelsen was the only 
child born of this union. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michaelsen have become the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Herbert H., who was born on the 28th of September, 1892, and is 
attending college at Denison; Ehrhardt J., born on the nth of February, 1894, 
also attending college; Robert N., born on the 27th of September, 1895, attend- 
ing the German school; Alwin W., born on the 15th of April, 1897, going to 
school; Victor S., born on the 7th of November, 1898; Zuehla A. C, born on 
the 24th of September, 1900; Leonhardt, born on the 13th of April, 1902; the 
seventh child who died in infancy; Hortense J. M., born on the 30th of April, 
1908; and Walter T., born on the 4th of June, 1910. 

The family always attend the services of the Lutheran church, with which 
denomination the parents are affiliated by membership. Ever since acquiring 
the right of suffrage Mr. Michaelsen has given his support to the democratic 
party, considering that its policy is best adapted to protect the interests of the 
agriculturist. He has always taken an active part in local politics and his party 
fealty has been rewarded by his election to various offices. He served as con- 
stable for one term, was assessor for five years and was a member of the board 
of school directors for seven years. He is highly regarded in his community, 
where he is considered to be a man of high principles and sound integrity. 



MICHAEL J. .MONAGHAN. 

There is no doubt that young men have been coming more rapidly to the 
front during the past quarter of a century than ever before, and also that they 
have been in many instances highly successful. They are to be met with in 
the professions and in all lines of business, and many of them have shown a 
clearness in judgment and a capability in management of important affairs that 
are truly gratifying. Among the young men of Crawford county who are tak- 
ing an active part in jiublic affairs is Michael J. Monaghan. editor and proprietor 
of the Observer at \'ail. He is a native of \'ail. born May 12, 1887, and a 
son of Michael J. and Mary A. Monaglian. 

He was reared under the favoring conditions of a peaceable home and re- 
ceived his education at St. Ann's Academy at \'ail, graduating from that insti- 
tution in 1904 as valedictorian of his class. After leaving school he entered the 
Observer office and learned the printer's trade, continuing there for three years. 
He then worked for two years in Indiana, after which he returned to Vail and 
purchased the Observer from C. C. \'ail. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 191 

Mr. Monaghan is an earnest friend of education and fills the position of sec- 
retary of the independent school district. Fraternally, he is connected with the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the Brotherhood of American Yeoman at 
Vai!. He made an excellent start in Hfe by graduating at the head of his class 
at school and the expectations of his friends have not been disappointed. Hav- 
ing thoroughly prepared himself for newspaper work by learning the printer's 
trade, he is now, as editor and manager of a paper, in a position to do effective 
service in the interest of the community. Under his management the paper has 
made commendable progress and is today one of the influential publications of 
this section. 

Industrious, enterprising and ambitious to attain an honorable place in life, 
Mr. Monaghan in the estimation of his friends is certain to win the favors of 
fortune, and ranks as one of the highly prominent young men of the community. 



JOHN THOMAS HAUGH. 

One of the energetic and highly capable buisness men of Denison is John 
'Thomas Haugh, who for twenty-seven years has been connected with the cloth- 
ing business of this city. He is a native of Davenport, Iowa, born October 12, 
1854, and is a son of Mark and Margaret (Rasp) Haugh, the former born in 
Ireland and the latter in Canada. The father emigrated from the Emerald isle 
to Canada and engaged in lumbering, coming to the United States in 1848. 
After living for a short time in Chicago he removed to Davenport, Iowa, where 
he followed various pursuits and became a farmer in the vicinity of that city. 
He passed away in 1862 at the age of forty-eight years, but his wife is still 
living and has made her home in Denison since 1882. Michael Haugh, the pa- 
ternal grandfather of our subject, lived to be ninety-five years old and spent his 
last years in Scott county, Iowa. His children were Mark, Martin and John. 
The maternal grandfather, John Rasp, settled with his family on a farm in 
Scott county, Iowa, and had eight children, namely: Michael, ^^largaret, ]\Iary, 
Ellen, Eliza, John, Thomas and Bridget. There were five children in the family 
-of Mark and Margaret Haugh, three of whom are now living, namely : John 
Thomas, the subject of this review; Mary L., the wife of Patrick Meade, of 
■Crawford county ; and Bridget, now Mrs. Thomas Clarke, of Denison. 

John Thomas Haugh was reared upon his father's farm in Scott county, 
Iowa, and received his education in the district schools and at St. Anthony's 
parochial school in Davenport. He came to Crawford county in 1882, and in 
order to get a start in life worked at anything he could find to do. In 1884 he 
entered the employ of M. Goldheim, clothier, and four years later purchased 
an interest in the store. In 1892 Mr. Goldheim having died, the business was 
continued under the name of Haugh & Kemming, but in 1900 the firm was dis- 
solved, and in April, 1901, Mr. Haugh became associated with F. W. Brummer, 
and the business has since been carried forward under title of Haugh & Brum- 
mer. It is now one of the most prosperous concerns of the kind in this part of 
the state. 



192 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

On the 6th of May, 1891, Mr. Haugh was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Farrelly, a native of Ireland, and a sister of Rev. Father Farrelly of Denison. 
One daughter, Marguerite, has blessed this union. Mr. Haugh and his es- 
timable wife were both reared in the faith of the Catholic church and are con- 
sistent members of that organization. Socially, he is one of the w'ell known 
men of the community, being a member of Charles Carroll Council, No. 780, 
Knights of Columbus. Politically, he gives his support to the democratic party, 
and although his attention is mainly devoted to his business he is at the present 
time serving acceptably as member of the city council. It is safe to say that 
no citizen stands liigher in the estimation of the people of Denison and vicinity 
than the gentleman whose sketch is herewith presented. 



SAMUEL B. SMYTH. 



The rich agricultural resources of Crawford county afforded Samuel B. 
Smyth an excellent opportunity for the exercise of his talents, and he is now 
living in honorable retirement in Denison after many years of active labor, 
during which he became known as one of the leading farmers of the county. 
He was born in County Antrim, Ireland, in a town called White Abbey, July 
29, 1829, and is a son of Samuel and Jane (Baxter) Smyth, both of whom were 
born of Scotch parents in Scotland. The father, who was a farmer in Ireland, 
died in that country, and the mother subsequently came to America with her 
sons and passed away in Livingston county, Illinois, in 1865, at eighty years of 
age. She and her husband were members of the Presbyterian church. There 
were four children in their family, namely : Jane, Mary, James and Samuel B. 
Jane married a Mr. Blair and died in Ireland. Mary, the second in order of 
birth, became the wife of Thomas Luney and they later emigrated to this coun- 
try, where they took up their permanent abode. James also cast his lot with 
the new world. 

Samuel B. Smyth was reared in his native land as a farmer boy and received 
his early education in the common schools. He learned the machinist's trade at 
Belfast and worked there for several years. In 185 1, in company with his 
mother and his brother James, he crossed the ocean and they resided for two 
years at St. Giarles, Kane county, Illinois, then moving to a farm near Pontiac. 
Livingston county, that state. In 1865 he and his brother settled upon a farm 
about a mile and a half east of Denison, Iowa, where they acquired two hun- 
dred acres of land, which they cultivated to good advantage, purchasing more 
land as their resources increased until they owned a farm of four hundred acres. 
They remained together until the death of the brother, which occurred July 4, 
1903. he having then arrived at the age of ei,efhty-one years. They held their 
property in common and were highly successful in their business affairs. Sam- 
uel B. Smyth still owns the beautiful home farm of four hundred acres and 
also three hundred acres in Stutsman county. North Dakota, near Medina. 

In 1864 he was married to Miss Martha Rollins, a sister of James Rollins, of 
East Boyer township. The beloved wife passed away in 1890. She was a 





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HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 195 

member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Smyth is now eighty-two years of age 
and looks back on a long life of usefulness, nearly sixty years of which have 
been passed in America. He is a sincere believer in the Bible and is a member 
of the Presbyterian church, whose teachings he regards as a true interpretation 
of the doctrines of the New Testament. Politically, he has given his support 
to the republican party ever since he arrived in America, but he has never 
aspired to the honors of office, preferring to devote his energies to business 
affairs. Although well advanced in years he is active in mind and body and 
reads without glasses. He has been through life a close reader and observer 
and has derived great pleasure from communion on the printed page with 
master thinkers of all the ages. As a patriotic and representative citizen he is 
greatly respected by all who know him. 



MATHIAS HUGO. 



Mathias Hugg is a native of Alsace, France, which used to be known as the 
Garden of France, but since 1871 it has belonged to Germany. He was born 
March 5, 1850, a son of Mathias and Marie Salome (Oberhn) Hugg, both of 
whom were also natives of France. The father was of Swiss extraction, while 
the mother was of German descent. Mathias Hugg, Sr., was a weaver by trade 
and came to the United States in 1865, sailing from Havre to America and 
locating in Lake county, Illinois, where he resided for thirteen years. In 1878 
he came to Crawford county, Iowa, making his residence at Coon Grove, in 
Washington township. There he bought land and resided until his death in 
1891 at the age of seventy-four years. In politics he was a republican, and in 
his religion was a member of the Evangelical church. Two children were born 
to him, of whom one is the subject of this sketch, and the other is George, at 
present a farmer living near Piatt, South Dakota. 1 

Mr. Hugg of this review obtained his early education in both the French 
and German public schools, which he supplemented by a course in the schools 
of this country. He remained at home until thirty-one years old. when he rented 
a part of his father's farm, upon which he resided until 1869. In the meantime 
he had become owner of that farm, which he subsequently rented, while he re- 
moved to his present location, where he had previously bought one hundred 
and twenty acres. In November, 1910, he sold forty acres of his property and 
at present engages in general farming and stock-raising on the remainder. 

In 1882 Mr. Hugg was united in marriage to Miss Anna Marie Schwartz, 
who was born in the same locality as her husband. Her parents were Jacob and 
Anna Marie (Hild) Schwartz. Her father died in Alsace, where her mother is 
still living. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Schwartz, as follows: 
Anna Marie, the wife of our subject; Catherine, who held a position as a school 
teacher in Ostheim, Alsace, for thirty-two years, being subsequently retired on 
a pension ; and Madelaine, who is now residing in Minnesota. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugg are the parents of five children, namely: Emil M. is 
a clerk in the Crawford County Bank. George Walter is a farmer and stock- 



196 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

raiser in Oacoma, Lyman county, South Dakota. He married Miss Lillie Paul- 
sen and they have one child, Fernetta IMarie. Martha Marie is living at home. 
Esther Salome and Susana C. are both deceased. 

In politics Mr. Hugg is a republican and is serving as one of the township 
trustees, to which office he was elected for a third term. He has been school 
director in Washington township and has held the same office for two terms in 
Denison township. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hugg are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



RALPH OTIS McCONNAUGHEY, D. D. S. 

For seven years Dr. Ralph Otis McConnaughey has practiced dentistry at 
Denison and has attained a measure of success which indicates that he has a 
thorough knowledge of his profession. He is a gentleman of pleasing address 
who keeps fully up-to-date in his calling and numbers among his patrons many 
of the leading families of this part of the state. 

He was born in Washington county, Iowa, July 23, 1878, his parents being 
John T. and Lucetta (Mills) McConnaughey, the former a native of Pennsyl- 
vania and the latter of the Western Reserve of Ohio. The father, who was 
reared as a farmer at Bedford, Pennsylvania, came to Iowa about 1850 and 
settled in Washington county. He passed away in 1900, at the age of fifty- 
eight years. His wife is now living at Benzonia, Michigan, and is a member of 
the Congregational church, as was also her husband. He was a soldier in the 
Civil war, enlisting at nineteen on the 28th of July, 1861, in Company E, Seventh 
Iowa \'olunteer Infantry. He was transferred August 2, 1861, to Company H 
of the same regiment and was appointed musician June 12, 1861. On January i, 
1864, he reenlisted as a veteran and was promoted to the position of principal 
musician of the regiment September 10 following. He was wounded in the 
right leg March 21, 1865, at the battle of Bentonville, North Carolina, and was 
mustered out of service August 7, 1865, at New York city. He was a gallant 
soldier and as a private citizen was greatly respected by all who knew him. 

David P. McConnaughey, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was a 
native of Pennsylvania and was of Scotch-Irish descent. He learned the hat- 
ter's trade and became a manufacturer of hats, but in 1850 was attracted to the 
west and located in Washington county, Iowa, where he purchased land from 
the government. He died at the age of ninety-four years. The maiden name 
of his wife was Catharine Thompson and she was the mother of eight children, 
one of whom died in infancy. The others were Samuel. David, Jr., Alexander, 
William, John, Emily and Elizabeth. The maternal grandfather, Manning 
Mills, was a native of Ohio. He also settled in Washington county, Iowa, and 
lived upon his farm to an advanced age. He had seven children : Harlow, Ernst, 
Jay, Lucetta, Isaljel, ]\Iyra and Effie. 

There were five children in the family of John T. and Lucetta McCon- 
naughey, namely: Ralph Otis, of this review; Harlow Alexander, now a resi- 
dent of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania ; Grace Elizabeth, a missionary in China ; John, 
who died at the age of eleven years ; and William, who died in infancy. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 197 

Ralph O. McConnaughey was reared on the farm of his father in Wash- 
ington county and gained his early education in the district schools, later at- 
tending the high schools at West Chester and Grinnell, Iowa. After working 
for several years at Dixon, Illinois, he decided to devote his attention to den- 
tistry and entered the dental college of the State University at Iowa City, gradu- 
ating with the degree of D. D. S. in 1904. He has since successfully engaged in 
practice at Denison. 

On the 2d of October, 1907, Dr. McConnaughey was united in marriage at 
Denison to Miss Allie Sewell, a daughter of Luman and Ella (Wieting) Sewell, 
and by this union one child, John Sewell, has been born. 

The success of Dr. McConnaughey is due to his conscientious application 
and a natural adaptability to a profession which is both an art and a science 
and required a highly trained hand and an intelligent mind, both of which are 
happily possessed by the subject of this review. He is a prominent worker in 
fraternal orders, being a member of Sylvan Lodge, No. 507, A. F. & A. M. ; 
Dowdall Lodge, No. 90, K. P. ; and also of the Sons of Veterans. He and his 
wife are identified with the Presbyterian church. Politically he gives his sup- 
port to the republican party, but the honors and emoluments of public office have 
never appealed to him, as his interests are concentrated upon his profession. 



HERMAN H. OTTO. 



Coming from Germany with his parents when but six years old, Herman H. 
Otto, the subject of this sketch, has attained the position in life of a substantial 
farmer and influential citizen of Crawford county, and he has made an unquali- 
fied success in agricultural pursuits. He was born September 20, 1866, a son 
of Henry and Louisa (Winterfeldt) Otto, both of whom are natives of Ger- 
many. They came to the United States in 1872, locating in Rock Island county, 
Illinois, where they resided until 1883, when they removed to Crawford county, 
Iowa. They settled in Goodrich township and continued to live there until 
1903, in which year they took up their residence in Denison, where the father 
still makes his home. The mother departed this hfe in 1906. They were the 
parents of three children, namely : Herman H. ; Henry, who lives on the home 
farm in Goodrich township; and Anna, who is the wife of Fred Lenz, of 
Monona county, Iowa. 

Herman H. Otto received his education in the common schools of Rock 
Island county, Illinois, later coming to Crawford county with his parents. He 
remained with them until he was twenty-four years of age. then started to 
farm on his own account in Goodrich township, later moving to Paradise town- 
ship, and subsequently coming to Denison township, wh/ere he took up a farm 
which is now within the city limits. In 1900 he removed to his present location 
and has greatly enhanced its value by making many modern improvements. He 
now owns one hundred and sixty acres of land, in addition to which he operates 
eighty acres of land adjoining his farm. 



198 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

In 1891 Mr. Otto was married to Miss Mary Holtman, a resident of Craw- 
ford county, who passed away in 1910. To this couple the following four chil- 
dren were born : Selma, Fred, Hattie and Marie, all of whom are living at 
home. In politics Mr. Otto is a democrat and has taken an active interest in 
his party. He has served as trustee of Denison township for seven years and 
is now president of the board. He is a member of the Lutheran church, and is 
in every respect a highly esteemed citizen of Crawford county. 



H. C. MARTIXS. 



Some men are born with an unalterable ambition that carries them above 
discouragement and nothing but death can prevent them from accomplishing 
what they start out to do. Such a man is H. C. Martins, of West Side, who 
began life for himself when fifteen years of age with seven dollars and a half 
in his pocket and nothing else to depend upon but his own strong arms and an 
unflinching courage. He is now a flourishing business man on the high road 
to prosperity. 

He was born in Germany, February 6, 1861, a son of John and Margaret 
(Hansen) ^lartins both of whom were natives of Germany. They came to 
America in 1865 and took up their residence at Wheatland. Clinton county, 
Iowa. The mother passed away three weeks after her arrival in this country. 
The father continued at Wheatland for seven years and then rented a farm near 
Lost Nation in Clinton county, which he cultivated for nine years. In 1880 
he removed to Crawford county, where he remained until his death in 1893. 
There were four children in the family, namely: Peter ]., a farmer now living 
retired at West Side; Anna, the wife of Claus Benning, of Clinton county, 
Iowa; Henry, living at Council Bluffs; and II. C, our subject. 

Arriving in America with his parents at four years of age, Mr. Martins of 
this review continued witli his father until fifteen years of age and early be- 
came acquainted with the various details pertaining to agriculture and stock- 
raising. He had but limited advantages of education in the district school and 
even as a boy began working as a farm hand, at which occupation he continued 
for ten years. Being attracted to mercantile pursuits, he entered the hardware 
business at West Side and is now senior member of the firm of Evers & Martins, 
dealers in hardware, furniture and implements, and also engaged in the under- 
taking business. Mr. Martins owns the building in which the store is located 
and a comfortable residence in West Side and is also interested in a lumberyard 
at this place. He has good natural ability, discernment and practical experience 
with men and affairs, so that he is well qualified for the position he occupies as 
a capable and progressive business man. 

On the I2th of December, 1885, Mr. Martins was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret Jahn, who was born in Germany in 1868, a daughter of J. F. and 
Kathrina Jahn. Her parents came to this country and both are now deceased. 
Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Martins, namely : Jessie, who 
graduated from the West Side high school and also took a course in college; 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 199 

Elmer J., also a graduate of the high school and of Boyles' Business College, of 
Omaha ; Cora, now a student in the high school ; and Grace, still in the graded 
school. 

Mr. Martins and his wife are both consistent members of the German Luth- 
eran church and have many warm personal friends in that organization. Po- 
litically he affiliates with the republican party, believing that its principles are best 
adapted to enhance the permanent interests of the country, and although he has 
never been an aspirant for public office he has served with marked ability for 
twenty-one years as a member of the village council. He has a genial disposi- 
tion and readily makes friends wherever he is known. He is also industrious, 
enterprising and quick to take advantage of circumstances leading to success. 
A man of genuine worth, he is recognized as a substantial citizen who would 
reflect credit upon any community. 



EDWARD E. CLAUSON. 

Prominent among the business men of Kiron and vicinity is Edward E. 
Clauson, a member of the firm of Clauson Brothers, for the last eight or nine 
years a flourishing concern of Crawford county. He was born in this county, 
February 8, 1871, a son of C. F. and Katherine (Johnson) Clauson, both na- 
tives of Sweden. They came to America in 1865 and located on a farm in 
Stockholm township, which became the family homestead. The mother passed 
away about 1890, but the father is now living at his old home and has arrived 
at the age of seventy years. Fourteen children were born to them, five of whom 
still survive, namely: Alfred J., WilHam C, Edward E., Otto E. and Eda C, 
now Mrs. Edward Anderson. All reside in Crawford county. 

Edward E. Clauson was reared under the protecting influence of a good 
home and received his early education in the district schools. He assisted his 
father in farm work until twenty years of age and then, being attracted to mer- 
cantile pursuits, entered the employ of N. L. Hunts, the owner of a general 
store at Deloit, where he continued for four years, also filling the position of 
assistant postmaster. He next came to Old Kiron and clerked in a store for 
two years, also filling the position of postmaster in this town about ten years. 
In 1902 he moved to new Kiron and has since been engaged in the furniture 
and undertaking business under the title of Clauson Brothers and has served 
for six years as postmaster. He is a man who possesses a variety of talents 
and as an auctioneer he has gained an enviable reputation in this section. He 
is thoroughly wide-awake and energetic, and as he has the confidence of the 
community his efforts are yielding handsome returns. 

In February, 1901, Mr. Clauson was united in marriage to Miss x\nna Lund- 
berg, who was born in Sac county, Iowa, a daughter of Axtel and Matilda Lund- 
berg, both of whom are natives of Sweden. They came to America in the '60s 
and located in Sac county, where they now reside. There were nine children 
in their family, all of whom are still living. Four children came to bless the 



200 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

union of Mr. antl Mrs. Clauson. namely: Raymond B., Bernice O., Xevvell F. 
and Ralph C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clauson are both earnest members of the Free Mission churchy 
in wliich he takes an active interest and served for eleven years as superintendent 
of the Sunday school, being now treasurer of the same organization. Politically 
he gives his support to the republican party, and although he has not urged 
claims for office, he was the first treasurer of Kiron. The excellent business 
ability of Mr. Clauson is exemplified in the prosperity of the firm with which 
he is connected, and his reliability is beyond question. His life has been char- 
acterized by principles of industry and justice which are recognized the world 
over as of enduring worth. 



GUSTAV RARE. 



The owner of four farms, one of them consisting of five hundred and sev- 
enty acres of well improved land in Crawford county and the head of a family 
of eighteen children now living. Gustav Rabe may be justly regarded as a re- 
markable man. He has won his way to fortune assisted by his estimable wife, 
who has indeed been to him a true companion and to her children a wise and 
loving mother. Mr. Rabe was born at Yor, Pommern, Germany, June i, 1850, 
a son of Johann and Mary Rabe. The parents were also natives of Germany 
and the mother died in the old country in 1857. In 1882 the father came to 
America and spent the remainder of his days with his son Gustav. There were 
five children in the family, two of whom are now living: Frederick, of South 
Dakota ; and Gustav. of this review. 

Gustav Rabe received his education in his native land and in 1869. being 
then nineteen years of age, he came to America and began work in a lumberyard 
in Chicago. He started at the bottom of the ladder but applied himself with 
such diligence to his work that he was promoted to various positions, becoming 
foreman and salesman in the yard. He continued with his employers for ten 
years, in the meantime, however, preparing to start in business independently. 
In 1879 he came to Crawford county, Iowa, and took up his home on one hun- 
dred and ten acres of land in Morgan township, which he had bought four years 
previously. He has ever since continued on this place and has conducted his 
affairs with such ability and clear judgment that he now owns eleven hundred 
and seventy acres of land, which is divided into four farms. The homestead 
consists of five hundred and seventy acres and is very highly improved. He has 
four hundred acres in Monona county. Iowa, and two hundred acres of good 
land in Knox county, Nebraska. He is a large raiser of grain and also an ex- 
tensive feeder of cattle and hogs. In addition to his agricultural interests he 
is a stockholder and vice president of the German Savings Bank of Ricketts, 
Iowa. 

In 1875 Mr. Rabe was united in marriage to Miss Frederica Fischer, who 
was born in Germany, May 2. 1859, a daughter of Johan and Sophia Fischer. 
Her parents were both natives of Germany. They came to America in 1869 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 201 

and took up their residence in Chicago, Illinois. The father died four years, 
later. In 1879 the mother came to Crawford county and made her home with 
Mr. and Mrs. Rabe during the remainder of her life. There were two children 
in her family: Frederica, and John, who is engaged in farming in Hanover 
township, Crawford county. 

Nineteen children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Rabe, all of whom sur- 
vive except the youngest, Sophia, who died in infancy. Those now living are: 
Gustave J., born December i, 1876, who is married and occupies a part of his 
father's farm; Martha, born August 3, 1878, and is the wife of Fred Gierstorf, 
a farmer of Crawford county; Louisa, who was born October 2, 1880, and mar- 
ried Henry L. IMueller, proprietor of a barber shop in Chicago ; John B., born 
March 3, 1882; Caroline, born October 18, 1883; William, born July 11, 1885; 
Bertha, born October 11, 1886, who lives with her sister in Chicago and is en- 
gaged in dressmaking; Anna, born August 19, 1888; Emma, born January 29, 
1890, who has a high-school education, passing as the best penman in Crawford 
county; Albert, born May 11, 1891 ; Bernhard, born January 21, 1893; Freda, 
born December 24, 1894; Matilda, born April 28, 1896; Walter and Paulina, 
twins, born February 18, 1898; Gertrude, born September 24, 1901 ; Henry, 
born December 7, 1903 ; and Theodore, born November 26, 1905. Thirteen of 
the children are still living at home. The parents have given their children good 
opportunities of education and training. They have been reared to systematic 
habits of industry and all who have arrived at the age of discretion have shown 
themselves to be useful and honorable members of society. It is doul^tful whether 
a similar record of such a large family can be presented in Iowa or any other 
state of the Union. 

Mr. Rabe and his family are sincere believers in the Bible and all are identi- 
fied with the German Lutheran church. Politically he is in thorough sympathy 
with the republican party and he has found time to serve as member of the 
school board and also for six years as township clerk. The success he has at- 
tained has been due to untiring diligence and a capacity in management not 
possessed by ordinary men. He has set a worthy example to his children and 
in all relations with his fellowmen has ever attempted to perform his duty. It 
would be difficult indeed to find a more capable or patriotic citizen in Crawford 
county than the gentleman whose name stands at the head of this sketch. 



PETER JOHANNSEN. 



Peter Johannsen, who by his early industry has earned the privilege of re- 
tiring from the active labors of life, was born November 24, 1848, a son of 
Peter and Christine (Walter) Johannsen who were natives of Germany, in 
which country all their children were born, six in number, of whom but three 
now survive, namely : Alary, the wife of Henry Boyse, living in Hanover town- 
ship. Crawford county ; Peter, of this review ; and Hans, who resides in Deni- 
son. The parents spent their entire lives in the fatherland, the father dying 



202 TIT STORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

when about seventy-six years old, and the mother passing away at about the 
same age. 

Peter Johannsen of this review emigrated to the United States April ir, 
1868, first locating in Chicago, where he worked in a lumberyard for a short 
period and then went to Lyons, Iowa, and was employed on a farm for two 
years. He subsequently moved to Clinton, Iowa, and worked in a sawmill until 
1877. In that year he came to Crawford county and purchased eighty acres of 
prairie land, which he broke and cultivated and to which he added from time 
to time until his possessions now aggregate one thousand acres. Here he con- 
tinued the pursuit of agriculture until he had acquired a comfortable compe- 
tence, when he rented the property to his sons and retired to enjoy a well earned 
rest, and at present is residing in his beautiful home in Schleswig, Iowa. 

In 1871 Mr. Johannsen was united in marriage to Gyde, the only daughter 
of Xise and Christina (Hansen) Hansen, and to them ten children have been 
born, of whom the following are living: Peter and John, who operate the home- 
stead in Crawford county; Hans who lives in Ida county; Christina, who be- 
came the wife of Charles Tamm and makes her home in Crawford county ; 
Mary, the wife of Edward Tamm, of this county; and Annie, who married Carl 
Loose and resides in Crawford county. The two first born and William and 
Clara, all died in infancy. 

Mr. Johannsen has always given his loyal support to the democratic party 
and during his residence in Crawford has held several township offices. In his 
religious views he has ever been a consistent I^utheran. Possessing the sterling 
characteristics of the German race, he early developed all the attributes that 
make the successful man and has also gained an honored name in the land of 
his adoption, being regarded as one of the public-spirited and worthy citizens 
of Crawford county. 



JAMES ROLLINS. 



James Rollins a well known farmer and stockman of East Boyer township, 
is the owner of three hundred and sixty-three acres of rich and productive land. 
His birth occurred near Belfast, Ireland, on the 13th of July, 1834. his parents 
being William and Jane (White) Rollins, who spent their entire lives on the 
Emerald isle. The father, a farmer by occupation, was an elder in the Presby- 
terian church. Our subject is the only surviving member of a family of five 
children, the others being William G., Martha, John and Robert. 

James Rollins was reared on the home farm and attended the public schools 
until twenty years of age. In 1854 he came to the United States on a sailing 
vessel and took up his abode near Pontiac, Illinois, where he was engaged in gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits until 1862. In that year he enlisted for service in the 
Union army, joining Company M, First Illinois Light Artillery, and remaining 
with that command until honorably discharged at Chicago on the 24th of July, 
1865. As a private he participated in the following engagements: Green River 
Bridge. Columbia. Campbellsville, Muldraugh's Hill, Lebanon. Franklin, Triune. 



C 
K 

o 







HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 205 

Chattanooga, Ringgold, Pea Pine Creek, Chickamauga, Ringgold Gap, Stone 
Ridge, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, Strawberry Plains, Loudon, Tiger 
Creek, Rockyface Ridge, Rockyface Gap, Resaca, Etowah River, Barrett's Mills, 
Euhalle River, Widow Jackson's, Coosa River, Adairsville, Kingston, New Hope 
Church, Pumpkin Vine Creek, Dallas, Ackworth, Lost Mountain, Pine Mountain, 
Big Shanty, Kenesaw Mountain, Marietta, Chattahoochee River, Buckhead, 
Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta (the battles of July 22d, July 28th and also the siege 
of that city), Stone Mountain, Jonesboro and Lovejoy. After the last named 
skirmish Mr. Rollins did garrison duty until discharged. At Chickamauga his 
horse was shot from under him in the midst of battle but he always fortunately 
escaped injury and was never in a hospital during the entire period of his enlist- 
ment. He was under fire for one hundred and seventy-eight days and traveled 
three thousand one hundred and two miles. When hostilities had ceased he came 
to Denison, Iowa, in August, 1865, and subsequently purchased his present farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres on sections 17 and 18, East Boyer township. 
The following year he began making improvements, first erecting a frame house, 
sixteen by twenty-two feet, which he later replaced by a fine residence which 
is still standing. He now owns three hundred and sixty-three acres of valuable 
land and in connection with the tilling of the soil devotes considerable attention 
to stock, breeding polled Durham cattle, Poland China hogs and also raising fine 
horses. In addition to his agricultural interests he acted as agent for the Kiron 
Insurance Company for four or five years. He is likewise interested in real 
estate at Denison and has long been numbered among the prosperous and 
representative citizens of Crawford county. 

On the 7th of October, 1869, Mr. Rollins was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma Coleman, a native of Cleveland, Ohio, and a daughter of Spencer and 
Elizabeth (Crocker) Coleman. The father was likewise born in the Buckeye 
state, while the mother's birth occurred in Germany. Spencer Coleman, who was 
a shoemaker by trade, came to Iowa about 1870, locating near Cedar Rapids, 
where he turned his attention to general agricultural pursuits. Subsequently he 
purchased a farm in Missouri, making his home in that state until called to his 
final rest in 1895. He was twice married, his first wife passing away when 
their only child, Emma, was but two years of age. For his second wife he chose 
Miss Malinda Carnes, by whom he had three children, as follows : Sarah, the 
wife of Wallace Carnes, of Missouri; Arthur, who is deceased; and Nettie, the 
wife of Alvin Colliss Senter, of Greene county, Iowa. Mrs. Malinda Coleman, 
the mother of the above children, died in 1897. Unto our subject and his wife 
have been born eight children, namely : William C, who wedded Theresa Nyers, 
of Denison, Iowa, by whom he has one child, Lucille ; one who died in infancy ; 
Frank S., a cement contractor of Denison, Iowa ; Jennie, at home ; John, en- 
gaged in the real-estate business at Denison, who married Miss Susie McCutch- 
eon, by whom he has two children, Leslie and Irene ; Lizzie, the wife of William 
Robertson, a railroad man of Des Moines, by whom she has one child, James ; 
James A., who wedded Kate Davis and is now a widower with two children, 
Ruby and Ruth; and Robert E., still at home. 

Mr. Rollins is a republican in politics and has been called to fill a number of 
local offices. He has served in the capacity of township trustee, was also town- 

Vol. II— 11 



206 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

ship clerk for two terms and acted as a school director for nine years. His 
religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Presbyterian church, to 
which his wife and children belong. He still maintains pleasant relations with 
his old army comrades through his membership in John A. Logan Post, G. A. R., 
and in days of peace has ever been as loyal to the interests of his adopted coun- 
try as when he followed the old flag upon southern battlefields. He has now 
passed the seventy-sixth milestone on life's journey and receives the respect which 
should ever be accorded one who has traveled thus far on this earthly pil- 
grimage and whose career has been at all times upright and honorable. 



CARL HARTWIG. 



Some men are born with a capacity that makes it comparatively easy for 
them to accomplish what to others would appear almost impossible. They pos- 
sess an ambition that urges them forward to greater effort from year to year 
and they have a self-confidence not known to many of their fellows. Carl 
Hartwig, whose name stands at the head of this sketch, was endowed with un- 
usual business talents and beginning empty-handed in a strange country he won 
a fortune. He is now living retired at Denison and is one of the highly re^ 
spected citizens of Crawford county. 

He was born in Hanover, Germany, December 7, 1846, a son of Frederick 
and Dora Hartwig, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father was 
a farmer and also conducted a grocery store in Hanover. He and his wife both 
lived to be sixty years old and were faithful members of the Lutheran church 
In their family were nine children, namely : Ernst, deceased ; Marie, the widow 
of Henry Bierman, of Denison; Frederick, now living in Germany; Louise and 
Henry, deceased ; Carl, of this review ; Herman, now living at Kendall, New 
York; George, of Rockville, Connecticut; and Anna, widow of William Eigen- 
drauch, of Germany. 

Carl Hartwig was reared and educated in the village of Hemsen, Hanover, 
Germany, and after laying his books aside learned the watchmaker!s trade, which 
later he found his health would not permit him to follow. In 1868. being then 
twenty-two years of age and desirous of securing the best advantages to be 
found anywhere in the world, he emigrated to America and began his contest 
with fortune as a farm laborer in Niagara county, New York. After several 
years he returned to his old home to visit his mother and other members of the 
family, and then in 1873 once more set his face westward, coming to Crawford 
county, Iowa. After renting land in Goodrich township for five years, he pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres, and as time passed he increased his pos- 
sessions until he now owns eight hundrcrj and eighty acres of good Crawford 
county land, which he has improved and made very valuable. In 1898 he re- 
moved to a beautiful home which he erected in Denison, and he has since made 
his residence in this city. 

On the 28th of February, 1875, ^^^- Hartwig was united in marriage to 
Miss Sophia Busche, who was born in Anderton, Hanover, Germany, December 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 207 

i8, 1853. She is one of a family of six children, as follows: Sophia, Louisa, 
Katharina, Henry, Ernst, and Marie. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Hartwig, namely: Herman, Carl, Otto and Frederick, all of whom are de- 
ceased; Henry, who married Linda Knapp and is now living at home; and 
Lena, also living at home. Herman married Martha Schug and left one daugh- 
ter, Florence. 

Mr. Hartwig owes his gratifying success to an unconquerable spirit which 
never yielded to disappointment, and he became one of the prosperous and pro- 
gressive farmers and stock-raisers of the county. He is a man who inspires 
respect and who possesses the good-will of all with whom he comes into con- 
tact. He and his wife are members of the German Lutheran church. Politically 
he gives his support to the republican party. He served as school director for 
a number of years and is now a member of the board of directors of the Ger- 
man school at Denison. 



w. B. McDonald. 



. The adversities of life are vv'hat develop the potential qualities in a man's 
character, and that W. B. McDonald has met and overcome the obstacles that 
beset his path during his early career demonstrates the fact that he possesses 
those elements that make for success. Born in Cattaraugus county. New York, 
March 6, i860, he is a son of John and Mary Elizabeth (West) McDonald. The 
father died when the subject of this review was quite young and the record of 
his birth has been lost. There were three children in the family, of whom two 
survive: W. B., and Euphemia, who became the wife of E. E. Newkirk and 
lives in Kenwood, Iowa. 

When but six years old W. B. McDonald left New York state and went to 
Richland county, Wisconsin, where he remained until 1869, and in that year 
came to Iowa, locating in Cedar county, where he sought such education as was 
afforded in the public schools near Stanwood. In the fall of 1879 he removed 
to a farm near Glidden, Carroll county, and remained there for three or four 
years. He then came to Crawford county and lived in Boyer township for two 
years, at the expiration of which time he took up his residence in Union town- 
ship and has since continued to make that his home. In 1906 he purchased a 
tract of improved land on sections 32 and 33 from Reuben Vore, who had 
moved on it in the early '50s, and a year later Mr. McDonald took possession 
of his property, to which he has gradually made additions until now he owns 
two hundred and eighty acres of the best farming land in Iowa and here fol- 
lows general farming, besides handling blooded stock. 

The marriage of Mr. McDonald took place March 20, 1886. when he was 
united to Miss Sarah Ellen Langley, who was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, 
a daughter of G. W. and Nancy J. (Gearheart) Langley. both natives of Ohio. 
Her father was a carpenter by trade and moved west when she was a young 
girl, locating in Story county, Iowa. In 1880 he came to Crawford county, re- 
sided for some time in Dunlap and subsequently bought a farm in Boyer town- 



208 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

ship. Both lie and his wife are still living and make their home in Dow City. 
Unto them seven children were horn, namely: Margaret Elizabeth, who is the 
wife of Charles Rasniussen and lives in Ainsworth, Nebraska; Walter and Jay, 
also of Ainsworth, Nebraska; Sarah Ellen; Clement, of Enders Lake, Nebraska; 
Ethel, who is the wife of Frank Bennall, residing in Union township; and Bes- 
sie, who married George Bennall and makes their home in Dow City. 

x\Irs. McDonald's elementary education was obtained in the public schools 
of Story county and Dunlap, supplemented by a course in a high school, and by 
the knowledge thus acquired she was enabled to become a teacher, which voca- 
tion she followed for three years, one term of which was spent in Boyer town- 
ship and the remainder of the time in Willow township. Air. and Mrs. Mc- 
Donald are the parents of three children: Nellie, who is the wife of Fred Wiley 
and resides in Union township ; Ward and Carl Frederick, who are at home. 

Mr. McDonald's political allegiance is given to the democratic party and 
fraternally he is a member of the Yeoman, of Dow City. His wife holds mem- 
bership in the Methodist Episcopal church. His record goes to show what may 
be accomplished by one who starts out in the world empty-handed if he has the 
determination and energy to apply to a high purpose. 



RAYMOND E. VAUGHAN. 

Although he has been at the head of the newspaper less than two years, 
Raymond E. X'aughan has made an admirable impression on the readers of the 
Schleswig Leader, and gives promise of attaining marked success in the field of 
journalism. He w-as thoroughly prepared for such a responsibility, and as he 
is greatly interested in his work, it is hardly possible that his hopes will be dis- 
appointed. 

A native of Jasper, Minnesota, he was born January 20, 1890, a son of L. M. 
and Anna (York) X'aughan. The father was born in Ohio and the mother in 
Grant county, Wisconsin. They were married in Wisconsin and the mother is 
now deceased, having passed away August 26, 1906. After his marriage L. M. 
Vaughan bought a farm in South Dakota, where he lived w-ith his family for 
ten years, and then removed to Jasper, Minnesota, and conducted a livery estab- 
lishment in that place for ten years. After selling out he operated an elevator 
for several years and now owns a farm of three hundred and fifty acres, prin- 
cipally pasture land, in the valley of the Wisconsin river, in Wisconsin. He 
devotes his attention principally to raising Ilolstein cattle and has attained an 
enviable reputation on account of the excellent judgment he has displayed in 
the management of this business. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
L. M. \'aughan, one of whom died in infancy, the others being: Harry L., of 
Walertown, South Dakota; Laura, who died at the age of fourteen; and Ray- 
mond E., of this review. 

Raymond E. \'aughan received his preliminary education in the public 
schools and for two years was a student at high school. At fourteen years of 
age he entered the employ of the Rock Island Railway Company, with which 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 209 

he continued for one year. Being attracted to the newspaper business, he began 
work in a printing office at Jasper, Minnesota, and later went to Wauzeka, Wis- 
consin, devoting four years to learning the printer's trade and gaining an insight 
into the details of newspaper management. In August, 1909, being then nine- 
teen years of age and ambitious to make an honorable name for himself, he 
came to Schleswig and purchased the Schleswig Leader, of which he has since 
been editor and proprietor. 

Politically Mr. Vaughan is not affiliated with any of the great party organ- 
izations, preferring to be independent and at liberty to exercise a perfectly free 
judgment in all matters pertaining to the public welfare. In religious faith he 
is a firm believer in the principles of Christianity and is a consistent member of 
the Presbyterian church. His circle of friends is steadily increasing, and it 
would be difficult to find a young man in Crawford county who is starting in 
business life under more favorable conditions than the subject of this review. 



JOHN N. DUFF. 



A prosperous and enterprising farmer and stock-raiser of Denison town- 
ship, Crawford county, Iowa, John N. Duff was born in Kane county, Illinois, 
December 17, i860, a son of John and Sarah (Grey) Duff. The father was a 
native of Scotland, born in the Highlands, and came to the United States in 
1840, locating in Kane county, Illinois, where he resided until his death in 1892. 
As a youth he was a sheep herder and followed the vocation of farming all his 
life. He was an intellectual man, very fond of reading and was well posted on 
all the current topics of the day. In politics he was a republican but notwith- 
standing this fact was a great admirer of President Cleveland. His wife was 
born in New York state and died in Kane county, Illinois. The final resting 
place of both parents is in Buena Vista cemetery. To them six children were 
born, as follows : Anna Eliza, the wife of W. C. Pollock, a resident of Denison 
township ; Robert, who died when eight years old ; Ellen, who lives with her 
brothers and sisters ; Harriet, the wife of John H. Hall, of Shelby county, 
Iowa; John N., the subject of this sketch; and Lillie Jane, the wife of Lewis 
Lenze, of Kane county, Illinois. 

John N. Duff obtained his education in the public schools of Kane county, 
where he remained with his parents until eighteen years of age, coming at that 
time to Crawford county and locating on a quarter section of land in Paradise 
township, which had been previously purchased by his father. Here he lived 
for six years, after which he rented land for five years in the same township, 
and then bought eighty acres in Washington township, continuing his residence 
there for fourteen years. In 1907 he removed to Denison township, where he 
has since lived, and is now the owner of one hundred and twenty acres of well 
improved land, on which he raises stock in connection with farming. 

Mr. Duff was married December 13, 1886, to Miss Frances Elizabeth Black- 
man, who was born in Kane county, Illinois, a daughter of Jerome and Celia 
(Harper) Blackman. Her father is deceased and Mrs. Blackman makes her 



210 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

home in Denison. To Mr. and Mrs. Duff have been born three children: Rosa 
Ella, who died in 1909. at the age of eighteen; John X., Jr., thirteen years old; 
and William Edward, deceased. In his political views Mr. Duff adheres to the 
republican party. While not affiliated with any special church, both Mr. and 
Mrs. Duff conduct their lives on sound religious principles. 



WINFIELD SCOTT MOORE. 

An experience of twenty years at the bar has demonstrated the ability of 
Winfield Scott Moore, of Manilla, as an attorney of more than ordinary pene- 
tration and judgment and also as a man of unsullied character whose aim is to 
be guided by truth and justice. He is a native of Springfield, Missouri, born 
February 4, 1866, and traces his ancestry back to John Moore, a native of Ire- 
land, who came to the new world in colonial days and settled in \^irginia. He 
was in General Washington's regiment at Fort Duquesne and engaged in battle 
with the French and Indians when General Braddock was killed. His son, Wil- 
liam Moore, was born in Augusta county, Virginia, in 1735, and became a mem- 
ber of the \^irginia Militia, being with General Forbes in his campaign in 1758. 
He was a member of Colonel William Campbell's regiment in the Revolutionary 
war and engaged in the battle of King's Mountain. His son, William Moore. 
Jr., was born in Berkeley county, West Virginia, in 1759, and also participated 
in the Revolutionary war under Colonel John Sevier, commanding a Tennessee 
regiment. He also took part in the battle of King's Mountain. 

Nathaniel Davis Moore, a son of William Moore, Jr., and the grandfather 
of our subject, was born in Greenville, Tennessee, October 10, 1790, and as a 
soldier served in Captain Dyke's company of Tennessee men under General 
Jackson at the battle of New Orleans in the war of 1812 and also at the noted 
engagement of Horseshoe Bend in Alabama. By occupation he w^as a farmer. 
He was one of a family of eight children, having three brothers and four sis- 
ters. He married Margaret Dyke, a native of X'irginia, and they lived to the 
ages of seventy-seven and eighty-four years, respectively. In their family were 
also eight children, namely: Henry D.. Nathaniel B., William, Christina, Pene- 
lope, Catharine, Louisa and Margaret. 

William Moore, the father of our subject, was lx)rn in Monroe county, Ten- 
nessee, in 1830, and also made farming his life occupation. In 185 1 he removed 
to Missouri and located near Springfield, but is now a resident of that city, 
having reached the ripe old age of eighty-one years-. He was twice married, his 
first wife being Susan Christian, by whom he had three children: James I., now 
a resident of Pinehurst, Idaho; Lucinda J., the wife of W. W. Wheeler, of 
Springfield, Missouri; and Simeon C. also of Springfield. For his second wife 
the father married Mrs. Ruth Ann (Graham) Price, also a native of Tennessee, 
and the widow of John Price, by whom she had one son, Martin L. She de- 
parted this life January 7, 1897, at the age of fifty-eight years, ten months and 
three days. She was a faithful member of the Presbyterian church, as is also 
Mr. Moore. He was a stanch Union man during the Civil war and served for 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 211 

fifteen months in the Federal army, being a member of Company H, ^Missouri 
State Mihtia Cavalry. By his second marriage he had four children, namely : 
Winfield Scott, of this review; Nathaniel D., of Springfield, Missouri; Susie 
M., wife of Rankin C. Stokes, of Carson, Iowa; and Rev. William G., pastor 
of the First Presbyterian church, of Le Mars, Iowa. 

James Graham, the maternal grandfather of our subject, was a farmer of 
Tennessee and died at the ripe old age of eighty-four years. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Lucinda Wilson, died at the age of sixty-eight years. 
Their children were: Ruth Ann, ^Margaret L., WilHam R., Sarah L., Caroline, 
Helen, James H., Richard and Josephine. James Graham was a son of Richard 
Graham, who came to this country from Scotland and settled in North Carolina, 
where he followed farming. He married Elizabeth ^lassey. 

Winfield Scott Aloore was reared at Springfield, Missouri, and educated in 
the common schools, receiving his college training in a southern Methodist school 
at Morrisville, Polk county, Missouri. He early became acquainted with farm 
work, laboring for one man for two years. Subsequently he taught school and 
at the same time studied law, having determined to devote his attention to that 
profession. He was admitted to the bar in Kansas in 1891, being then twenty- 
five years of age and began practice at Springfield, Missouri. Previously he 
had served as deputy county recorder of Polk county for three years, from 1887 
to 1890, and from 1895 to 1897 he was clerk of the probate court at Springfield. 
In April, 1899, he removed to Oklahoma City and practiced law there for one 
year, then returning to Springfield. In March, 1902, he took up his residence 
at Salix, Iowa, where he practiced for two years, then settling at ^Manilla and 
engaging in his profession with such success that he soon became recognized as 
one of the prominent members of the Crawford county bar. In addition to his 
legal business he has devoted considerable attention to farming and is the owner 
of three hundred and forty acres of land in ^Meagher county, Montana. 

On the I2th of October, 1898, Mr. Moore was united in marriage to ]\Iiss 
Fanny Bigelow, who was born in Woodbury county, Iowa, November 16, 1876, 
a daughter of Ariel T. and Sarah (Beers) Bigelow. The father is a native of 
Maine and is now living near Salix, having arrived at the age of seventy-one 
years, his wife being sixty-six years of age. There were nine children in their 
family, namely: ]\Irs. Rosa L. Gibbs ; Charles H.; Warren T. ; Belle, wife of 
R. D. Markell ; George F. ; Fannie, now Mrs. Winfield Scott Moore ; Laura K., 
wife of J. E. O'Meara; Madge E., wife of M. L. Duggan ; and Nettie O.. wife 
of Thayer Vincent. One daughter, Ruth, has blessed the union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Moore. 

Politically Mr. Moore gives his support to the republican party, and frater- 
nally is identified with Golden Leaf Lodge, No. 595, A. F. & A. M., being one 
of the charter members of the lodge. He also belongs to the Knights of Pythias, 
the Modern Woodmen of America, Iowa Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, and the Sons of Veterans, of Denison. He and his wife are con- 
nected with the Presbyterian church and active workers in its behalf. He may 
be designated as a self-made man, having won his way through many obstacles 
to a position of honor which few men in any community can rightfully claim. 
Possessing capable discernment and clear and convincing powers of expression, 



212 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

he is a masterful advocate and a good counselor. He is a close and constant 
student of law as well as of the progress of events and few men are better in- 
formed as to the great movements which are influencing the world. His fidelity 
to his clients is one of his strong characteristics and he possesses a force of char- 
acter that gives weight to his opinions which command respect wherever he is 
known. 



I. N. VOLLERSEN. 



The life record of I. N. Vollersen, manager of the Green Bay Lumber Yard 
at Ricketts, is an admirable example of success attained by one who started 
empty-handed and has gained a position of comfort and ease through his indo- 
mitable energy and resourcefulness. He is a native of Germany, born at Hogel, 
Schleswig-Holstein. June i8, 1865, a son of Christopher and Christina (Ing- 
wersen) Vollersen. The parents passed their entire lives in Germany, the 
mother dying in 1880, and the father one year later. There were eight chil- 
dren in their family, of whom five came to America, namely: Mary, now the 
widow of J. H. Sorgenfrei, of Duluth, Minnesota; I. N., of this review; C. P., 
of Crawford county; Ingeburg, who married Peter J. Petersen, of Chicago, Illi- 
nois; and Christina, the wife of Rev., Otto Fitzler, of Mineola, Iowa. Paul H. 
still lives in Germany, and Henry and Matilda are deceased. 

I. N. Vollersen was educated in the public schools of Germany and when 
seventeen years of age started out to seek his fortune in the new world. He 
landed in America in March, 1882, and worked for three years in Davenport, 
Iowa. He then farmed on rented land for two years, and in 1887 came to Craw- 
ford county, Iowa, and purchased eighty acres in Soldier township, which he 
cultivated for four years. Disposing of his farm, he removed to Charter Oak 
and engaged in various occupations until 1898, when he was made manager of 
a lumberyard, which position he still holds. He has been very successful as a 
business man and now owns a third interest in a hardware and implement store 
at Battle Creek, Iowa ; a third interest in two hundred and eighty acres of land 
in Hand county, South Dakota; and also owns a fine home and a small farm at 
Ricketts. 

On the 20th of February, 1885, Mr. Vollersen was married to Miss Chris- 
tina Tebbe, who was born in Scott county, Iowa, in December, 1864, a daugiiter 
of Herman and Anna (Grafif) Tebbe, both of whom were born in Germany. 
The parents came to America early in the '60s and in the latter part of the 
Civil war Mr. Tebbe was drafted into the Union army and after his discharge 
followed farming, becoming the owner of two hundred and ninety-four acres 
of land in Scott county. He died in 1897, his wife passing away four years 
later. There were five children in their family: Herman, who is now living on 
the homestead in .Scrjtt covmty ; Hannah, the wife of John Tebbe, of Crawford 
county; Emma, now Mrs. William Keuhl, of Crawford county; Clara. wIk) mar- 
ried Herman Kramer, of Kansas; and Christina now Mrs. I. X. Vollersen. 
Two children came to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. Vollersen: Christopher 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 213 

H., born January i, 1886, who married Freda Voss and is now manager of a 
hardware and implement store at Battle Creek, Iowa; and Anna C, born Feb- 
ruary 26, 1887, who is the wife of Louis E. Haag, manager of a lumberyard at 
Winner, South Dakota. The children were both given excellent educational ad- 
vantages, the son being a graduate of the Charter Oak high school. 

Mr. Vollersen and his wife are members of the Lutheran church and politi- 
cally he gives his support to the democratic party. He is identified with the 
Masonic lodge, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Sons of Herman, all 
of Charter Oak, and has many warm personal friends in those organizations. 
He has been governed by a noble ambition to win an honorable name and a 
competency for his family and he has succeeded perhaps even beyond his early 
expectations. He today occupies an acknowledged position as one of the sub- 
stantial citizens of Crawford county. 



PETER J. KLINKER. 



For eight years past Peter J. Klinker has served as county attorney of Craw- 
ford county, performing his duties so acceptably as to meet with the general 
commendation of his constituents. He was born in Wester Ohrsted, Germany, 
January 9, 1877, a son of Hans H. and Anna M. (Michaelsen) Klinker, both 
natives of Germany. The father was a farmer and fine stock-raiser, attaining 
quite a reputation as a breeder, and was identified for many years with fairs 
and fancy stock shows. He departed this life in 1881. Mrs. Klinker came to 
America in June, 1882, and settled at Denison, where she is still living. After 
her arrival in this state she married Nicolaus Schroeder, a retired farmer, who 
is now deceased. There were four children by her first marriage, three of whom 
are now living: Hans H., of Seattle, Washington; Margaret, the widow of 
Philip Lochmiller, of Denison ; and Peter J., the subject of this review. One 
daughter, Lavina M., was born to Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder. She is now a nurse 
in the Masonic Home at Plattsmouth, Nebraska. 

Peter J. Klinker came to America with his mother at five years of age and 
secured his early education in the public schools, graduating from the Denison 
high school in 1895. Having evinced a decided inclination for a Hterary or pro- 
fessional career, he matriculated in the State University at Iowa City, taking 
a full course of four years and graduating in 1900 with the degree of Ph. B. 
A year later he graduated from the legal department of the university with the 
degree of LL. B. He was at once admitted to the bar and began practice at 
Denison, showing an adaptability to the profession which gave bright promise 
as to the future. In the fall of 1902 he was elected on the republican ticket as 
county attorney and has since been reelected to the same office every two years 
and is now serving in his fifth term. 

Mr. Klinker gives thorough consideration to each case as it comes forward 
and stands fearlessly for what he believes to be right according to the law and 
for the best interests of the people. He has proved a most capable and efficient 
county attorney, possessing a readiness of resource and an adaptability to emer- 



214 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

gencies which have carried hini through many difficulties. A constant student, 
he lias a mind well stored with legal knowledge and as he is a clear and logical 
speaker, he never fails to gain an attentive and respectful hearing. He ranks 
today as one of the most promising attorneys of Crawford county. Endowed 
with genial social qualities, he can claim a host of friends throughout a wide sec- 
tion in this part of the state. His religious belief is that of the Lutheran church. 
He is a prominent worker in fraternal orders, being identified with Sylvan Lodge, 
No. 507, A. F. & A. M., of Iowa City ; Chapter Xo. 2, R. A. M. ; Palestine 
Commandery Xo. 2, K. T. ; and Za-ga-zig Temple. A. A. O. X. AI. S. He is 
also connected with the Order of the Eastern Star, Dowdall Lodge, Xo. 90, 
K. P., and Ute Tribe, Xo. 92, I. O. R. M. 



HEXRY HAGGE. 



Although he has passed the. proverbial age limit of three-score-and-ten, time 
seems to have but mellowed the years that have passed over the head of Henry 
Hagge, who today is reaping the harvest of his early endeavors, and he now 
lives retired from the activities of life in his comfortable residence in West 
Side. Crawford county. Born October 2. 1838, in Germany, he is a son of 
John and Christina (Rohw-er) Hagge, and is the only remaining child in a fam- 
ily of five, the following being deceased : Jurgen, Claus, Dora and John. The 
last named died in 1872. Both the parents spent their entire lives in Germany 
and there passed away. 

Henry Hagge emigrated to the United States in 1864, locating near Daven- 
port, Iowa, and as w-as customary in those primitive days, broke the prairie 
land by the aid of oxen and continued to follow farming in that locality for the 
ensuing four years. He then came to Crawford county and bought one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land, which he also broke in the same primitive way, and 
to this property, as time went on, he added other lands until at the present time 
he owns three hundred and forty acres. Aside from this he purchased two hun- 
dred and forty acres, which he gave to his son. He gave his entire attention 
to farming on a broad scale and to the raising of live stock, being very careful 
to see that the latter was of the finest breed. After nearly forty years spent 
in tilling the soil, such was his industry and business sagacity that, in 1904. he 
was enabled to retire from his hard labor and in the spring of that year took up 
his residence in West Side and has since made that his home. 

On March 10, 1868, Mr. Hagge was united in marriage to Miss Sophia 
Magdalena Grage, a daughter of Chris and Sophia Grage, whose other two chil- 
dren were Claus and Jurgen. Mr. and Mrs. Hagge became the parents of nine 
children, of whom the following eight survive: John, of West Side; Stena, who 
married John Strattman, of Crawford county; Anne, who is the wife of John 
F. Sheldorf, of Crawford county; Amilia. the wife of Henry Ort. of Manning. 
Iowa; Emma, who married Henry Frahm. of Carroll county; Henr\^ and Julius, 
who reside in Crawford county; and Dora, who is the wife of Henrv Frahm. of 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 215 

Crawford county. Mrs. Hagge, who was a consistent member of the Lutheran 
church, passed away on the ist of July, 1909. 

Mr. Hagge has ever taken an active interest in the political affairs of his 
community, giving his support to the democratic party, and at various times has 
held minor township offices. In religion he is a consistent member of the Luth- 
eran church. Through the long period of his life work Mr. Hagge has always 
relied upon his own efforts and independently worked his way to the pinnacle 
of success. He has a wide circle of friends who enjoy the hospitality of his 
•charming home. 



J. H. TRYON. 



The building interests of Manilla have been most ably represented in the per- 
son of J. H. Tryon, who has been engaged in contracting for nearly thirty 
years. He was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, on the 13th of August, 1852, and 
is a son of Noah J. Elizabeth Jane (Smith) Tryon. The father was born on 
-old General Harrison's farm in either Miami county, Indiana, or just across 
the line in Ohio, continuing to live there until about 1847, when he accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Vigo county, Indiana. After residing in the lat- 
ter place about twenty years he went to Missouri, locating at Neosho, where 
he lived, for six years, and then returned to Terre Haute, in which city he passed 
away in 1873. -^^ was also a contractor and builder and a mechanic of more 
than average skill. His maternal grandfather Gardner was of English extrac- 
tion but a native of New York, in which state he learned shipbuilding, being 
identified with that trade in New York City for a time, following which he mi- 
grated west. He first located in eastern Indiana, where he accepted a position as 
overseer on the estate of General Harrison, but later he removed to Terre Haute, 
buying a farm, in the cultivation of which he engaged until he passed away 
about 1869. Noah J. Tryon was twice drafted into the Union army but the first 
time he failed to pass the examination, and the second he was compelled to hire 
a substitute. He met Miss Smith, who subsequently became his wife, in \^igo 
•county, Indiana, in which county they were married. She was a native of Mer- 
cer county, Kentucky, as was also her father, John Wesley Smith, who for many 
jears was an overseer for Colonel Thompson, a large slaveholder in Virginia. 
Mrs. Tryon passed away in 1894 and was buried in Defiance, Iowa, the father, 
however, was interred in Vigo county, Indiana. They were the parents of ten 
■children, only three of whom are now living: J. H., who is our subject; and 
Amanda, John Wesley, William, and Cynthia Ellen, all four of whom are de- 
ceased; Albert Riley, living in the vicinity of Defiance, Iowa; and Agnes and 
Mahlon B., both deceased ; Katherine, the wife of John Alman Dunham, of Los 
Angeles, California; and Noah J., also deceased. 

J. H. Tryon remained at home until he had attained his twenty-third year, 
acquiring his education in the public schools of Vigo county, Indiana, following 
the completion of which he engaged in work with his father until he had mas- 
.tered his trade. He removed to Shelby county, Iowa, in 1879, locating upon a 



216 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

farm on the present site of the town of Defiance. Ahhough he was engaged 
in agricuhural pursuits he devoted the greater part of his energies to the car- 
penter's trade during the first year of his residence there, later undertaking con- 
tracting as well. I'Vom there he removed to Manilla, erecting the first residence 
in the town which was for a Mr. Fuller, and there he has ever since continued 
to make his home, lie has built a large portion of the town, in addition to the 
large number of residences and buildings he has constructed outside of the city 
limits. Buildings within a radius of fifty miles, whether of brick, stone, cement 
or frame have been erected by him. lie has been most successful in his work 
and is regarded as one of the substantial citizens of the town. Mr. Tryon has 
acquired quite extensive real-estate interests, and in addition to his home and 
other residences in Manilla owns one hundred and sixty acres of land in Mc- 
Lean county, North Dakota and some property in Los Angeles, California. 

While residing in Vigo county, Indiana, Mr. Tryon was united in marriage 
to Miss Elizabeth Jane Smith, a native of that county, and they have become 
the parents of the following: Claude Orval, who is associated with his father 
in contracting and building, married Miss Hazel May DeWitt in 1908, and they 
have one child. Merle. Rula A. and Charley A., who is a piano tuner, are both 
at home. Bertha Ethel, who is the wife of G. J. Disburg, a railway operator 
of Manilla, has two children : Georgia Elizabeth and Gilbert James. Five ciiil- 
dren were born unto Mr. and Mrs, Tryon but the eldest died in infancy. 

The family attend the Methodist and Presbyterian churches though the parents 
are members of Christian church of Defiance. Fraternally Mr. Tryon is 
affiliated with the Masonic order and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He is quite prominent in the latter organization, being one of the charter mem- 
bers of the Manilla lodge, which is now twenty-six years old and in which he 
has passed all of the chairs. Mr. Tryon is well and favorably known through- 
out the community in which he has been engaged in business for so many years, 
and where he has made many friends. Hs is a man of unusual skill and ver- 
satility and has exhibited considerable ability as an architect, always having 
executed the designs for all of his work. 



CHRIST ERNST. 



For nearly a third of a century Christ Ernst has been prominently identified 
with the agricultural interests of Crawford county and has contributed much 
of his time and energy to the development of the farming lands in the vicinity of 
SchleswMg. He was born in Hanover, Germany, December 11. 1847, a son of 
Jurgen and Maggie (Wadamaear) Ernst, both of whom were also natives of 
Germany. Their family consisted of six children, four of whom are now liv- 
ing, namely: Christ, of this review; Peter, a resident of Schlesvvig; Anna, who 
lives in Crawford county ; and Henry, of Ida county. Henry and Frederick 
are deceased. Both of the parents lived and died in the land of their birth. 

At the age of twenty years Christ Ernst emigrated to the United States 
and on August 18, 1868, took up his residence in Davenport, Iowa. In 1870 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 217 

he commenced running a thresher, and, renting three acres of land, turned his 
attention to the raising of onions, being thus engaged until 1874, when he rented 
one hundred and sixty acres of land in Scott county. In 1880 he came to Craw- 
ford county and purchased eighty acres. By thrift and industry, he has 
been enabled to gradually add to his property until his holdings now amount 
to eight hundred and sixty-five acres of well cultivated land, whereon he fol- 
lowed general farming and stock-raising. In 1907 he bought two lots in Schles- 
wig, upon which he has erected a delightful two-story house, where he at present 
resides. 

On January 24, 1874, Mr. Ernst was united in marriage to Doris Cortum, a 
daughter of Fritz and Laura (Orsbor) Cortum, she being third in order of birth 
in a family of six children, of whom four others survive, namely : Nancy, the 
wife of J. D. Schambroh, of Davenport; Otto, of Cedar county; Louise, the wife 
of Peter Ernst, of Schleswig; and Emma, who married William Strobrig, of 
Davenport. Ernst is deceased. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ernst have been born seven 
children, who are named as follows : Elme, who is the wife of A. Krauk, of 
Lyon county, Iowa; Charles, Rudolph and Julius, who live in Crawford county; 
Clara and Edna, who reside at home ; Adelia, who is deceased. 

In his political preferment Mr. Ernst is a stalwart democrat but has never 
sought political favors at the hands of his party. In religion he is a faithful 
member of the Lutheran church. His life has been full of hard work but his 
purpose was a high one and he determined to gain it if courage and untiring 
energy could win it for him. How well he has succeeded is shown by the re- 
sults, as he is now able to enjoy to the full the fruits of his early endeavors. 



LUDWIG SCHOMBERG. 

A native of a foreign land, Ludwig Schomberg in early manhood decided to 
cast his lot under the stars and stripes, and today he has no reason to regret his 
decision, as he has obtained home, friends and a competency. He was born in 
Germany, January 12, 1865, a son of Henry and Elizabeth Schomberg, both of 
whom were natives of the old country. The mother died in 1888, and five years 
later the father came to America and now lives with his son Ludwig at West 
Side. He has attained the venerable age of eighty-eight years. There were 
three children in his family, namely : Christ, who now makes his home in Ne- 
braska; Ludwig, the subject of this review; and Elizabeth, who is deceased. 

Ludwig Schomberg was reared in Germany and received his preliminary 
education in the public schools but has learned a great deal in the school of ex- 
perience which is not set down in the books. He served for ten weeks in the 
German army and still remembers some of the lessons of obedience and atten- 
tion then inculcated. In 1888, being then twenty-three years of age, he crossed 
the ocean to the new world and came to West Side, Crawford county, Iowa, where 
he was employed at the carpenter's trade for five years. He then worked for a 
similar length ofi time in the lumberyard at West Side and next turned his at- 
tention to the dray business, in which he continued for five years. However, he 



218 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

was again attracted to mercantile life and bought a third interest in the West 
Side Lumber Company, which handles coal, lumber and all kinds of building 
materials. The business has grown steadily and the firm is now one of the 
flourishing concerns of West Side, its patronage extending over a wide section 
of the county. 

In 1892 Mr. Schomberg was united in marriage to Miss Maria Luckhardt, 
who was born in Germany in 1873, a daughter of Johan Luckhardt. Mr. and Mrs. 
Luckhardt came to America in 1885 and established their home in Crawford 
county, Iowa. The father is now deceased but the mother is still living in this 
county. Six children came to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. Schomberg, 
namely: Frederick J., Hilda A., Carl C, Henry E., Ludwig W., Jr., and Alice L. 

Politically, Mr. Schomberg affiliates with the repubHcan party, whose prin- 
ciples he considers highly important for the perpetuity of free institutions. He 
has not sought public office but he served for two years as member of the town 
council, showing an interest in affairs of the town that greatly pleased his sup- 
porters. He is a valued member of Setting Sun Lodge, No. 349, A. F. & A. M., 
and also of Camp No. 2991, M. W. A. He has served for ten years past as an 
officer in the latter organization. He and his wife affiliate with the German 
Lutheran church and are firm believers in its teachings. He owns a residence 
and ten acres of land in West Side, which he acquired by his well directed labors, 
thus providing for himself and family the comforts of a home. He is to be 
congratulated on the good use he has made of his opportunities and the hon- 
orable position he occupies in the community, of which he is a highly honored 
member. 



WILLIAiM EIFFERT. 



Although a native of a foreign land and therefore obliged to meet with many 
obstacles in effecting a foothold in America, William Eiffert never yielded to 
discouragement and is now living in a beautiful home at West Side in the em- 
joyment of a comfortable competency. He was born in Germany, February 26, 
1854, a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Gerhold) Eiffert, both of whom passed 
their entire lives in the old country. There were eight children in the family, 
namely: William, of this review; Carl, now living in Germany; Conrad, of 
West Side; Elizabeth, the wife of Bernard Lange, of South Dakota; Gertrude, 
deceased; Henry and Herman, both of West Side; and Catharina, deceased. 

William Eiffert received his early education in the public schools of his 
native land and remained in Germany until several years after reaching the 
estate of manhood. In 1880, having decided to seek his fortune in the new 
world, he crossed the ocean and came to Jackson township, Crawford county, 
where he associated with his brother in purchasing two hundred and forty acres 
of land. They developed the property until it largely increased in value and 
then sold it and bought four hundred acres on sections 29 and 30, township 84, 
range 36, Carroll county, which they still own. In 1906 our subject purchased 
a home with five acres of land in West Side, where he has lived retired with 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 219 

his family since 1907. As a farmer he attained a large measure of success 
through good judgment and habits of industry which he acquired early in life. 

On the 25th of Febrtiary, 1882, Mr. Eiffert was united in marriage to Miss 
Lizzie Spangler, a daughter of Henry and Johanna (Scheinsberg) Spangler, 
both of whom were born in Germany. Four children came to bless this union: 
Curt, now living in South Dakota ; Martha, who is the wife of Rev. Fred Rolf, 
of Rock Island, Illinois; Helen, deceased; and Herbert, who is living at home 
and is attending school. 

Mr. Eiffert and his brother Conrad have shown remarkable efficiency as 
agriculturists and stock-raisers and are worthy of the high respect in which they 
are held by their neighbors and friends. They are both men of generous spirit 
and may always be depended upon to assist in forwarding any worthy move- 
ment which aims to promote the permanent welfare of this region. They are 
classed with the leading citizens wherever they are known. Both are identified 
with the republican party and hold membership in the Evangelical church. 



P. W. WEBERG. 



P. W. Weberg, an extensive farmer and stock-raiser of Crawford county 
who has, by his perseverance and continuous industry, accumulated sufficient 
of this world's goods to render him independent for life, is a native of Sweden, 
born January 13. 1854. His parents emigrated to the United States in 1867, 
first locating in Boone county, Iowa, whence they removed in 1868 to Crawford 
county. Here the father bought eighty acres of land, upon which he resided 
for several years, and then disposed of his holdings and removed to Omaha, 
Nebraska. To him and his wife were born seven children, of whom six survive, 
as follows : Anna married Peter Larsen, who died in Sweden, and she is now 
living in Los Angeles, California. Christina is the widow of E. W. Anderson 
and resides on a farm near Kiron, Crawford county. Larson lives in Omaha, 
Nebraska ; Lydia became the wife of Andrew Larson, and makes her home in 
St. Louis, ^Missouri. Inez married N. A. Christinsen, formerly of Omaha but 
now living in Los Angeles. P. W. completes the family. The mother departed 
this life at the age of seventy-four, the father passing away two years later in 
his seventy-sixth year. 

The youth of P. W. Weberg was spent in assisting his father on the home 
farm, continuing thus employed until he was twenty-two years old, when he 
rented the place, which consisted of eighty acres, and cultivated it on his own 
account for two or three years. He then bought the farm in partnership with his 
sister, to whom he subsequently sold his interest. His next purchase was eighty 
acres of land one mile west in Otter Creek township, which he still owns and to 
which he has added five hundred and thirty-five acres, this comprising his prop- 
erty in that and Stockholm townships. In April, 1906, he bought seventy-six 
acres within the city limits of Denison, to which he has added one hundred and 
twenty-four acres, and here he has since made his home, giving it the name of 
"City View Stock Farm." Besides general farming he makes a specialty of rais- 



220 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

ing shorthorn cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs, in which he has met with splendid 
success. During a great flood that swept this part of the country in August, 
1907. he suffered considerable loss in stock, besides which about forty acres 
of his hay was destroyed. 

Mr. Weberg has been twice marrietl, his first wife being Miss Bertha Larson, 
whose death took place in 1885. He was subsequently united in marriage to Lot- 
tie, a tlaughter of N. F. and Ingred Rodine. Her mother died February 13, 
1907. By his first wife, Sophia, Mr. Rodine had the following eight children : 
Matilda, Caroline, John, Carl, Maud, John Abel, Maria and Charlotta, all of 
whom are deceased except the first named. To Mr. and Mrs. Weberg have been 
born four children, as follows : Earl DeWitt, Ralph Waldo, Percy Bryan and 
Peter Carroll, who reside at home with their parents. 

Politically Mr. Weberg gives his support to the democratic party and has 
been active in local affairs, as is indicated by his having filled several township 
offices. In his religious views he is a faithful follower of the Baptist denomi- 
nation. His life has been one of great activity and his ability in business circles 
has found expression in the acquirement of the valuable property which he now 
owns, the cultivation of which has made him one of the substantial residents of 
the community, while his worth as a man is demonstrated by the high esteem in 
which he is uniformly held. 



WILLIAM M. LILL. 



Unusual energy and resourcefulness brought success to William M. Lill, 
whose well cultivated farm of two hundred and eighty acres on section 9, 
Soldier township, was convincing proof of his ability as a business man. He 
was a native of Germany, whence so many of the thrifty citizens of Iowa have 
come, and was born November 9, 1847, a son of August and Cardine (Prauske) 
Lill. The mother died when the subject of this review was eight years of 
age, and of the six children in the family one died in Germany, while the 
other five came to America, namely : Ernestine, the widow of John Merring, 
of Chicago ; Henrietta, now the widow of Charles Denhard, also of Chicago ; 
William M., of this review; August, deceased; and Caroline, the wife of Fredd 
Topp, of Chicago. The father was again married in Germany to Miss Minnie 
Toorick. He came to America with his family in 1870 and died in this 
countr}'. January 4, 1894, his second wife passing away in 1908. 

William M. Lill pursued his education in his native land and continued 
there until twenty-one years of age. In 1868 he crossed the ocean to America 
and for eight years worked in Chicago at any honorable occupation that he 
could find. He saved his earnings and after acquiring a moderate capital came 
to Crawford county in 1876 and purchased eighty acres of land in Charter 
Oak township, which he cultivated for twenty years. He then sold that farm 
and bought two hundred and eighty acres on section 9, Soldier township, which 
he developed until it became one of the best improved farms in the neighbor- 
hood. It is provided with a comfortable residence, ample outbuildings and 



> 
2:; 



?3 







HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 223 

all conveniences for modern farming. Mr. Lill cultivated his land to good ad- 
vantage and live-stock interests also constituted an important factor in his suc- 
cess. 

On the 2 1 St of December, 1873, he was united in marriage to Miss Henrietta 
Wage, who was born in Germany, May 9, 1852, a daughter of Adam and Julia 
Wage, who were the parents of two children ; Rose, now the widow of Carl 
Miller, of Detroit, Michigan; and Henrietta, now Mrs. WilHam Lill. Nine 
children came to brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. Lill, five of whom are 
still living: Emma, the wife of Albert Bartels, of Crawford county, Iowa; 
John, also of Crawford county ; William, who lives on the family homestead ; 
Otto, who also cultivates a portion of his father's farm ; and Fred, who is mar- 
ried and engaged in farming in Ida county. The son Otto was married October 
25, 1905, to Miss Clara Clausen, who was born in Crawford county, May 10, 
1881, and they have three children: Walter, who was born July 3, 1906; Sadie, 
born August 31, 1908; and Edna, born July 15, 1910. 

Mr. Lill, like his family, was a firm adherent of the German Lutheran 
church and politically he gave his support to the Democratic party. As a 
patriotic and wide-awake citizen he took an active interest in public afifairs and 
served as township trustee for eight years and as road supervisor for a similar 
length of time. He was a resident of Crawford county for thirty-five years and 
assisted very materially by his influence and example in advancing the general wel- 
fare. He was known as industrious, enterprising and thoroughly capable and no 
man in the county stood higher in the estimation of friends and acquaintances 
than William M. Lill, who passed away on the nth of March, 191 1. 



THOMAS W. BELL. 



For almost four decades the name of Bell has been an honored and promi- 
nent one in Crawford county and Thomas W. Bell, whose name introduces this 
record, fully sustains the reputation that has always been borne by his father. 
He was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, September 5, 1862, a son of Samuel 
and Jennie (Allen) Bell, both of whom were natives of Scotland. The father 
was a cloth finisher, and in 1854, believing that America ofifered better oppor- 
tunities for making a livelihood, he emigrated to the new world. He first lo- 
cated in Lawrence, Massachusetts, spending a number of years there and then 
located near Island Pond, Vermont. He there followed farming for a time but 
eventually decided to try the broader opportunities of the middle west and ac- 
cordingly, in April, 1873, came to Crawford county, Iowa. At that time much 
of the land was still in its wild state and the homes of the settlers were widely 
scattered, there being but two houses between his home in East Boyer township 
and the village of Vail. However, he began working diligently and persistently 
and as the years passed, success came to him so that at the time of his death, 
which occurred in May, 1892, he was the owner of five hundred and twenty 
acres of valuable land in Crawford county. He was one of a family of three 
sons and two daughters, but was the only member who came to the United 



Vol. 11—12 



224 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

States, one sister now living near Glasgow, Scotland, wliilc his two brothers 
when quite young started for Australia and were never again heard from. The 
mother of our subject, who was also born and reared in Scotland, gave her hand 
in marriage to Samuel Bell in Lawrence, Massachusetts. She, too, has departed 
this life, her death occurring in Crawford county in 1901, and both she and her 
husband lie buried in the Vail cemetery. Their family numbered three sons 
and three daughters, as follows: Mary, the wife of C. N. Baker, of Bridgeport, 
Washington; Lizzie, the wife of George Lyon, a resident of Denison ; David, 
who follows farming in East Boyer township ; Thomas W., of this review ; 
Robert, a farmer of Lyman county. South Dakota; and Jennie, the wife of 
George Albert, of Nevada, Missouri. 

Thomas W. Bell was a lad of eleven years when he accompanied his parents 
from New England to Crawford county. His education, which was begun in 
the country schools of his native state, was continued in the schools of Crawford 
county, and his training at farm labor was received under the direction of his 
father. He remained at home until he was twenty-seven years of age and 
then began farming on his own account in Hayes township, where he made 
his home until 1904. He next removed to Manilla, Crawford county, and v.as 
there proprietor of the hostelry known as the Bell House, for four years. He 
also was engaged in the draying business for one year and followed carpentering 
to some extent. After a time he returned to the home place and again engaged 
in farming, now owning two hundred acres in East Boyer township, this for- 
merly constituting a part of the homestead property. He likewise owns two 
hundred and forty-seven acres in Hayes township and forty-two acres lying in- 
side the corporation limits of Denison. He has one hundred and sixty acres in 
Lyman county. South Dakota, so that his landed possessions are now quite ex- 
tensive. Mr. Bell engaged in general farming and stock-raising and was for- 
merly a breeder of Poland China hogs. His land is in a good state of cultiva- 
tion, while the place is improved with modern and substantial buildings, and 
his property is considered as valuable as any to be found in Crawford county. 
In the spring of 191 1 he removed to his place in Denison, where he is now 
living. 

It was on the 26th of January, 1889, that Mr. Bell was united in marriage 
to ]\Iiss Addie Baker, who was born in Cedar county, Iowa, a daughter of 
William and Jane (Stone) Baker. The parents were born in Pennsylvania and 
are of Dutch extraction. The father was taken to Indiana when but two years 
of age and during his youth went to Ohio, but eventually came to Crawford 
county, where he engaged in farming throughout the remaining years of his 
active business career. I'oth he and his wife are still living and they now make 
their home in Manilla, this county. Their family numbers six children: Henr}'. 
a resident of Scranton, Iowa ; Addie, now Mrs. Bell ; Libbie, who makes her 
home in Los Angeles, California; Clayton, a resident of Manilla, Iowa; Emma, 
who has departed this life; and Louise, the wife of Cass Wood, residing near 
Olin, Iowa. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Bell has been blessed with two 
sons and one daughter, all still at home; Myron; Clarence, who in June. 191 1, 
was graduated from Denison College ; and Queen, who is attending school in 
Denison. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 225 

Mr. Bell's study of the political issues and questions of the day has led him 
to give stalwart support to the republican party, yet he has never been active as 
an office seeker, for his time is fully occupied with his private business affairs. 
He holds membership in the Presbyterian church and is a Mason, while both 
he and his wife are members of the Order of the Eastern Star at Manilla. He 
has ever been alert for opportunities that will win advancement, and along this 
line he pursued his way until he occupied a foremost place among the substantial 
agriculturists of Crawford county. 



A. P. GRAINGER. 



A. P. Grainger, a substantial and prosperous farmer and a progressive and 
public-spirited citizen of Paradise township, Crawford county, was born in 
Kingston, Canada, on the 24th of September, 1866, a son of P. K. and Amanda 
(Wemp) Grainger. The father, whose birth occurred in County Fermanagh, 
Ireland, May 10, 1832, was but two years old when he crossed the Atlantic with 
his parents, who took up their abode in Kingston, Canada, and there he was 
reared and educated. Upon attaining his majority he taught school for fifteen 
years, after which he was engaged in farming until 1881, when he came to Craw- 
ford county, Iowa, locating in Paradise township, where he improved and ope- 
rated a farm for some time. Later he removed to another farm in Paradise 
township, which he also developed, and there he remained until his death on the 
24th of June, 1908, his remains being interred in the Catholic cemetery north 
of Dow City, Iowa. His wife was born at Amhurst Island, Canada, and long 
survived her husband, passing away February 24, 1910. By her marriage to Mr. 
Grainger she had become the mother of eight children, as follows : Mary, the 
wife of Marion Cole, who is engaged in the feed business in Dow City, Iowa; 
Anna, who wedded J. C. Grandy, a railroad telegraph operator of Warsaw, In- 
diana ; Lucretia, deceased; A. P., of this review; James Allen, who is associated 
with our subject in farming; Edward F., an agriculturist of Paradise township; 
Charles, engaged in farming in Nebraska ; and Rachel, the widow of John Gary, 
who makes her home at Denison, Iowa. 

Reared amid the scenes and environment of his native country, A. P. Grain- 
ger attended the schools of Kingston and acquired a good common school edu- 
cation. He was a youth of fifteen years when his father crossed the border and 
sought a home in the United States, and after the arrival in Iowa the son as- 
sisted in the development and cultivation of the home farm in Crawford county. 
Upon attaining man's estate he entered the business world on his own account, 
wisely chosing as his life work the occupation to which he had been reared. He 
has since given his attention to agricultural pursuits and is now the owner of 
eighty acres of land in Paradise township, all under a good state of cultivation. 
He has labored earnestly and today his farm, in its well improved condition, gives 
every indication of prosperity and is the visible evidence of a Hfe of thrift, en- 
ergy and determination. 



226 HISTORY OF CRAWf ORD COUNTY 

Mr. Grainger was united in marriage, in 1910, to Miss Johanna Purcell, of 
Paradise township, and he and his wife are both faithful and consistent members 
of the Catholic church, the teachings of that denomination forming the guiding 
spirit in their lives. Although Mr. Grainger has ever given loyal support to the 
principles of the republican party, he has never sought nor desired public office 
as the reward of party fealty, but has preferred to concentrate his energies upon 
his business activities. His interest in community afifairs, however, has never 
been slack, and he is a public-spirited citizen, interested in the general welfare. 
Progress may be said to be the keynote of his career, and he is recognized by his 
fellow men as a valued and representative member of the community. 



BERXHARD SIEGFRIED AXDRESEN. 

For the past five years cashier of the German Bank of Schleswig, Iowa, Bern- 
hard Siegfried Andresen has attained a deserved reputation wherever he is 
known as a gentleman of education and discernment and of most excellent busi- 
ness ability. He was born at Ahrenshoeft, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, October 
29, 1868, a son of Carsten and Margarethe (Petersen) Andresen. The father 
engaged in farming, and the ancestors on both sides of the house lived for many 
generations at Ahrenshoeft or in the vicinity. 

The subject of this review was reared under the parental roof and received 
his education in the common schools and at the Real Gymnasium at Rendsburg, 
graduating in 1886. He showed special talent for mathematical and historical 
siibjects while at college. After leaving school he worked for a year in a public 
office but resigned as he did not like the work and the chances of promotion were 
small. Having decided to seek his fortune under the stars and stripes, he came 
to America in 1888 and first took up his residence in Indiana, later arriving in 
Iowa, where he engaged in farming. In 1897 he visited his old home in Ger- 
many for a short time and in 1902 he became connected with the German Bank 
at Schleswig, Iowa, as assistant to Mr. Kruger, the cashier of the bank. Upon 
the death of Mr. Kruger, in 1906, he was appointed by the board of directors as 
his successor and has since continued in that position, discharging his duties in a 
way that has met the hearty approval of the directors and patrons of the 
institution. 

On the 23d of September, 1908, Mr. Andresen was united in marriage at 
Denison, Iowa, to Miss Adelheid Xiewoehner, formerly a deaconess at St. Louis. 
She was born at Annapolis. Maryland. One son, Bernard, has come to bless this 
union, his natal day being November 18, 1909. 

Mr. Andresen has found in liis estimable wife a worthy helpmate and they 
have entered upon their married life under most favorable circumstances. He 
has always been governed by high ideals and in the discharge of his various obli- 
gations has shown a fidelity to principle and a clearness of judgment which re- 
flect upon him the highest credit. He ranks as one of the substantial and pro- 
gressive men of Crawford county. Fraternally he has been identified with Syl- 
van Lodge, Xo. 507, A. F. & A. M., since 1906, with Lodge No. 696, I. O. O. F., 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 227 

since 1910, and with the Sons of Herman since 1902. He is a sincere beHever in 
the authority and inspiration of the Bible and holds membership in the Evangeli- 
cal Lutheran church of the North American synod, which corresponds with the 
church to which his ancestors belonged in Germany as far back as 1535. 



REV. A. D. GREIF. 



Rev. A. D. Greif, pastor of the German Lutheran church of Soldier township, 
is one of the prominent ministers of the denomination in the west and is recog- 
nized as one of its most efficient workers. He was born in Meiningen, Ger- 
many, June 16, 1849, a son of Carl F. and Susanna (Sengling) Greif, the for- 
mer of whom was born December 3, 1822, and the latter in 1823. The father 
was a teacher in the schools of Germany and also a teacher of music. He was 
the director of three singing societies at one time. There were seven children in 
the family of Mr. and Airs. Carl F. Greif, namely: Ludovic, now a college pro- 
fessor in Germany; Marie, now Mrs. Hoeltzel, whose home is also in Germany; 
A. D., the subject of this review; August, Emma and Henry, all of whom are 
living in Germany ; and Carl. The mother of these children died at the 
age of thirty-five years, and four years later the father again married and there 
were eight children by the second union. He died November 8, 1890. 

A. D. Greif received his preliminary education in the public schools and then 
attended college for six years, showing a capacity for study that gave bright prom- 
ise for his future. At the age of nineteen he bade farewell to relatives and 
friends and started for America, having fully determined to work out his destiny 
under the favoring conditions of the republic. After teaching school for three 
months in New York he came west to St. Louis and took a course in theology 
at Concordia Seminary. In June, 1870, being then twenty-one years of age, he 
was ordained as a minister of the Lutheran church. His first charge was at 
William Penn, Texas. After three years at that point he was assigned to a 
congregation at Serbin, Texas, where he continued for two years, subsequently 
going to Little Rock for one and one-half years, to Chandlerville, Illinois, for six 
years, and thence to Davenport, Iowa. Since April 17, 1910, he has been pas- 
tor of Immanuela Lutheran church in Soldier township, discharging his duties 
with an efficiency that meets the hearty approval of members of the church and 
the entire community. 

On the 17th of April, 1874, at New Orleans, Louisiana, Air. Greif was 
united in marriage to Miss Louisa Odendahl, a native of Germany. She came to 
America with her parents when a child, the family taking up its residence at 
Fort Wayne, Indiana, where the mother shortly afterward died. The father 
went to live with his son at New Orleans and continued there until his death, 
which occurred when he was eighty-six years of age. Twelve children were 
bom to Air. and Mrs. Odendahl, six of whom are still living: Frederick; Louisa, 
now Mrs. A. D. Greif; Detleff; Friederike Huettmann ; Henriette ; and Alary 
Gassner. Among those deceased are Friederike, Alichaella and Adelbert. Air. 
and Airs. Greif have no children of their own but have adopted a son, Herman 



228 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

T. Greif, who was born in Texas, June 20, 1874, and is now the minister of 
the German Lutheran church at Davenport, and a daughter, Freda, now the 
wife of Otto \Vesti)lial, of Davenport, Iowa. 

Mr. Greif by a hfe of self-sacrifice and devotion to a noble cause has not 
only gained a wide reputation in the Lutheran denomination but has attained a 
noble character which is of more value than great earthly riches. He is a thor- 
ough scholar, a clear and convincing speaker, and is intimately acquainted with 
the great Book on which his teachings are based and whose message it is his mis- 
sion to deliver. As a conscientious and hardworking pastor he has met with 
great success and it is hardly necessary to say that he has a host of ardent sup- 
porters and admirers in the church of which he is a worthy representative. His 
standing is indicated by the important offices he has tilled, haviiig been for fif- 
teen years visiting elder, for five years first vice president and for two years 
president of the Iowa district of the German Evangelical Lutheran synod of 
Missouri, Ohio, and other states. 



MATHIAS FREY. 



One of the self-made men of Denison township, Crawford county, is Mathias 
Frey, a well known and prosperous farmer of that locality. His parents, both of 
whom were natives of France, were Mathias and Mary (Oberlin) Frey. The 
mother died there in 1874, and the father's death occurred in 1880. Politically 
he favoured a republican form of government for his country. To this couple 
five children were born, as follows: Mary, deceased; Mathias; Jacob, at present 
a farmer in France, who was a soldier in the Franco-Prussian war of 187 1 ; Sa- 
lome, residing in France; Lena, deceased. 

The subject of this sketch was born March 11, 1846, in Epesheim, which at 
that time belonged to France, but after the war was acquired by Germany. The 
early education of Mr. Frey was obtained in the public schools, where, besides 
his own language, he was taught German. At the age of fourteen he entered 
the tailor shop of his father in order to learn the trade and remained there two 
years. He then worked on a farm for four years, at the expiration of which 
time he decided to emigrate to the United States. He first located in Chicago 
and worked in that city and vicinity for eight years. He then married and re- 
moved to Lake county, Illinois, three years later coming to Crawford county, 
Iowa, where for two years he worked on a farm. He then rented land in Wash- 
ington township and one year later removed to Denison township. Sixteen 
years ago he bought the farm he now resides on, consisting of one hundred acres, 
in the latter township, having since then greatly improved the property, and he is 
now engaged in general farming and stock-raising. 

In 1874 Mr. Frey was united in marriage to Miss Kerren Jensen, who is of 
Danish extraction. By this union there are eight children, as follows : Mary, the 
wife of H. Stahl, of Bucks Grove. Iowa; Sarah, the wife of Julis Mahler, who 
follows the carpenter's trade irl Denison ; Henry, deceased ; Emma, who mar- 
ried Bert Hester, of Washington township; Lydia, the wife of Carl Clausen, 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 229 

a farmer residing in Spinks county, South Dakota; Rose, deceased; George and 
John, who are residing at home. Mr. Frey is poHtically a stanch repubhcan and 
has served his township as school director. In his rehgion he is a member of 
the Evangehcal church. 



PETER J. MARTENS. 



After nearly a quarter of a century devoted to the interests of agriculture in 
Crawford county, during which time he has witnessed the great development 
and progress of this section of the state, Peter J. Martens is now, as the result 
of his industry and business acumen, enjoying at his home in West Side the com- 
forts of Hfe for which he toiled so many years. He was born in Holstein, Ger- 
many, October 23, 1852, a son of John H. and Margerette (Hansen) Martens, 
who emigrated to the United States, March 27, 1865, and settled in Wheatland, 
Clinton county, Iowa. The other children born to this couple are : Annie, who is 
the wife of Claus Binning and resides in Clinton county; Henry J., who lives in 
Council Bluffs, Iowa ; and Herman C, whose home is in West Side. The mother 
-died in 1865, only three weeks after arriving in this country, and the father sur- 
vived her until May 10, 1893, when he, too, passed away. 

Upon reaching the age of twenty years Peter J. Martens rented one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land in Clinton county and worked there for about five 
years, at the end of which period he came to Crawford county and purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres. This he cultivated and continued to add to his 
property as his financial circumstances would allow until at the present time he 
owns six hundred acres, all of which is located in West Side township. At one 
time he was a stock raiser and feeder on an extensive scale and shipped thou- 
sands of head of cattle to the markets. On January 15, 1902, having acquired 
a sufficient competency to render him independent for the remainder of his life, 
he retired from active labor and is now residing at his home in West Side. 

Mr. Martens was married May 11, 1875, to Miss Minnie Hohn, a daughter 
of Carl and Mary Hohn, of Clinton county. Unto them were born ten children, 
of whom the following survive: Ida, who became the wife of August Rohwer 
and lives in West Side; John, who resides on the old homestead in West Side 
township with his brothers Edward and Herman ; Charles, who is in business 
in West Side ; Louis, of West Side ; Emil, who lives in Logan, Iowa ; Jennie, 
who married Leroy Dolise and resides in Carroll county ; and Ella, who lives at 
home. The other child, Clara, died in infancy. Mrs. Marten's demise occurred 
in February, 1887. On December i, 1888, Mr. Martens was united in mar- 
riage to Emma L. Kay, of Wheatland, Clinton county, a daughter of Gottlieb 
and Christina Grau. 

Mr. Martens has always given his support to the principles upheld by the re- 
publican party and has ever manifested his interest in any movement that tended 
to the advancement of his community. For sixteen years he held the office of 
township trustee, for nine years he served as school treasurer and has also acted 
in the capacity of road supervisor, and whatever has been the nature of his offi- 



230 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

cial duties he has discharged them with efficiency and executive abihty. In his 
rehgious views he is an adherent of the Lutheran church. He has made his 
way in the world without the assistance of either money or influence, he has 
made a host of friends and earned their high regard, and he has never had occa- 
sion to regret his determination to cast his lot in with the men of his adopted 
country. 



W. C. POLLOCK. 



The admirable qualities of thrift and industry which characterize the Scotch 
race are exemplified in the career of W. C. Pollock, who, by his unaided efforts 
has acquired an independent position in the country of his adoption and is today 
one of the leading farmers and stock-breeders of Crawford county. He was born 
in Glasgow, Scotland, September 13, 1856, a son of John and Ellen (Cook) Pol- 
lock, both of whom were natives of Ayrshire, Scotland, where the father spent 
his entire life. The mother came to the United States in 1880, locating in Chi- 
cago, where she died. They were the parents of eight children, seven of whom 
survive as follows : John, James, Joseph, Jessie, and Ellen, all of whom reside at 
home in Chicago ; Adam, who is living in San Antonio, Texas ; and W. C, the 
subject of this sketch. 

W. C. Pollock had such educational advantages as were accessible in the pub- 
lic schools of Glasgow until he was fourteen years of age, when he came to the 
United States and made his home with an aunt who lived in Kane county, Illi- 
nois, upon whose farm he remained for two years. When twenty-two years old 
he came to Crawford county, Iowa, and purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
of land, to which in 1904 he added another tract of one hundred and thirty-six 
acres, upon which he now resides, his other property lying just north of the home 
place. Although his original intention was to devote his time to agriculture he 
subsequently turned his attention to live stock and has made a specialty of rais- 
ing Percheron horses, graded cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs. For the past four- 
teen years he has been exhibiting the latter at county fairs and stock shows and 
in 1909 had the honor of taking first prize at the county fair. He purchased from 
S. E. Morton & Son, of Camden, Ohio, a hog named King of Colonials, and the 
two hogs now at the head of the herd are from this one and are called Arion 
Wonder No. 90509. and King of Colonials Again No. 80267. Mr. Pollock Is one 
of the extensive breeders of hogs in Crawford county, has spent much time and 
study in perfecting one particular strain and for the past ten years has been labor- 
ing to secure a uniform color, in which he has so far succeeded that among a 
herd of sixty head there is not one that varies in shade. 

In 1877, when Mr. Pollock was twenty-one years old, he was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Anna DufF, who was born in Kane county, Illinois, and was of 
Scotch descent. They became the parents of six children, as follows : Hattie, 
deceased; Mabel, who became the wife of Edward Granger, a prosperous farmer 
of Crawford county; Nellie, who is a school teacher of Boise city, Idaho; Jo- 
seph C., the owner of a farm in Dixon county, Nebraska; John, whose farm lies 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 231 

near Bloomfielcl, Nebraska; Ernest, who aids his father in the management of 
the home farm. 

In poHtics Mr. Pollock casts his vote with the republicans and has served 
ten years as central committeeman. In their religious views Mr. and Mrs. Pol- 
lock are followers of the Presbyterian church. He is in every essential a self- 
made man, having started with nothing and worked himself up to his present 
position among the successful business men of Crawford county, and he pos- 
sesses the confidence and respect of all with whom he comes in contact. 



OTTO H. STEGEMANN. 

Otto H. Stegemann, who lives on an excellent farm of two hundred and forty 
acres on section 29, Otter Creek township, where he engages in general farming 
and stock-raising, was born in Germany on the 12th of August, 1859. His 
parents, Edward and Caroline (Rohdy) Stegemann, emigrated to the United 
States with their family in 1870. They first located in Muscatine county, Iowa, 
and after residing there for six years they removed to Crawford county, where 
the parents continued to live during the remainder of their days. Of their 
children, the youngest died in infancy and those surviving are as follows : Augusta^ 
the wife of John Doerfler, of Soldier township; William who lives in Otter Creek 
township; Minnie, residing in Schleswig; Ernest, living in Buck Grove; Otillie, 
who became the wife of John Reimers; Albertine, the wife of A. P. Hollander, 
of Schleswig; Otto H., our subject; Gus D., residing in North Platte, Nebraska; 
and Albert, who is living in Schleswig. 

Otto H. Stegemann was a lad of eleven years when his parents came to the 
United States, and the greater part of his education, therefore, was obtained in 
the district schools of Iowa. He early became familiar with agricultural pursuits 
and continued to work for his father for some years, the latter owning three 
hundred and twenty acres of land, which he purchased in 1886. Two years later 
he bought one-half of section 29, Otter Creek township, where our subject now 
lives, and subsequently acquired one hundred and twenty acres on section 28. 
Otto H. Stegemann purchased from his father twO' hundred and forty acres in 
Otter Creek township, where he now makes his home, and his wife has one- 
half of that amount in Charter Oak township. He has met with gratifying suc- 
cess in all of his ventures and is today regarded as one of the substantial and 
successful agriculturists in his community. 

Mr. Stegemann established a home of his own by his marriage on the 14th of 
October, 1889, to Miss Minnie Meyer, a daughter of Adolph and Catherine 
(Voglepohl) Meyer. She is the eldest of the seven children born to her parents, 
the others being: August, who lives in Soldier township; WilHam, a resident of 
the same place ; Dora, the wife of Henry Nedermyer, of Charter Oak township ; 
Adolph, living in Soldier township; Henry, deceased; and Edward, residing in 
Charter Oak township. Mr. and Mrs. Stegemann have two children: Alartha 
and Marcus, both of whom are still at home. 



2Z2 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

They are of the Evangehcal faith and affiliate with the Lutheran church. Ever 
since acquiring the full rights of citizenship Mr. Stegemann has given his po- 
litical support to the democratic party, believing that its policy is best adapted 
to protect the interests of the masses. He actively participates In local affairs 
and has several times been elected to the various township offices, the duties of 
which he faithfully and satisfactorily discharged. He has been a resident of 
Otter Creek township for twenty-five years, during which period he has made 
many friends, the regard of whom he continues to retain. 



JOHN BRAASE. 

John Braase, who resides on a well cultivated farm of two hundred acres 
located on sections i and 2, Hanover township, Crawford county, was born in 
Germany on the 2d of March, 1862. His parents, Henry O. and Sophia (Peter- 
sen) Braase, were born, reared and married in the fatherland but emigrated 
to America with their family in 1883 and settled in Jackson county, Iowa. Dur- 
ing the first year of their residence in the United States they worked out but 
at the end of that time they removed to Ida county, this state, and rented one 
hundred and sixty acres of land, which they farmed for two years, and then 
came to Crawford county, continuing to lease land for six years. During this 
period by thrift, hard work and much self-denial they were able to accumulate 
the capital which enabled them to realize their great ambition — to hold property 
of their own, and in 1892 they bought one hundred and sixty acres of land upon 
which they located. They cultivated this for six years and during that time 
added another one hundred and sixty acres to their original tract, all of which 
was well improved and under a high state of cultivation at the time of Mr. 
Braase's demise in 1898. Mrs. Braase still survives at the venerable age of 
seventy-eight years and makes her home in Schleswig, Iowa. The first born of 
their five children died in Germany. The eldest of those surviving is John, and 
the others are as follows : August, a resident of Crawford county ; Dora, the 
wife of Fred Berendes, of South Dakota; and Fred, who lives on the old home- 
stead. 

John Braase was twenty-one years of age when his parents became citizens 
of the United States so that his education was acquired in the schools of Ger- 
many. He remained at home until he had passed the twenty-eighth anniversary 
of his birth, when he began farming as a renter, which method he continued 
for three years. His industry and application, assisted by the ambition and 
strength of youth, made it possible for him to save during that time the money 
necessary to become a property owner. His first farm contained eighty acres 
and after cultivating this for a time he traded it for a portion of the land con- 
tained in his present homestead in Hanover township. 

Mr. Braase completed arrangements for a home of his own by his marriage 
on the 8th of January, 1890, to Miss Dora Hansen, who was born in Scott 
county, Iowa, on the 20th of September, 1872. She is a daughter of Peter and 
Theresa (Struve) Hansen, who were born in Germanv but were married in 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 233 

the United States, and for thirteen years thereafter they cultivated rented land 
in Scott county and other places and then bought a farm in Morgan township, 
Crawford county, which they operated until the time of their retirement in 
1906. They are now living in Schleswig, enjoying the ease and comfort made 
possible in the evening of life by the thrift and industry of their youth. They 
were the parents of the following children besides Mrs. Braase, who is the 
eldest of the family : Louisa, deceased, the wife of Johannes Lorenzen, of Mor- 
gan township ; Emma, who died at the age of eighteen years ; Adolph, a resident 
of Schleswig, Iowa ; Henry, who is living in Morgan township ; John, of Morgan 
township, this county; Theresa, the wife of Henry Rickett, of Schleswig; and 
Helmina, the wife of Ernest Boock, of Schleswig. 

Mr. and Mrs. Braase have become the parents of four children, as follows : 
Henry, who was born on the 26th of October, 1893, and is still at home; John, 
born on the 15th of June, 1896; Herbert, born on the i6th of August, 1899; 
and Emma, who was born on the loth of August, 1908. 

The family attend the services of the Lutheran church, with which the 
parents are identified by membership. Although he has always supported the 
principles of the democratic party, Mr. Braase does not actively participate in 
political afifairs, as he does not aspire to public office. However, he meets the 
requirements of good citizenship by going to the polls on election day and 
casting his ballot for the candidates of his party. He is held in high regard in 
his community and is considered one of the substantial farmers of the town- 
ship. 



H. H. FRAHM. 



There are quite a number of residents in Crawford county who are of Ger- 
man nativity and among these is H. H. Frahm, a prosperous farmer of Denison 
township. He was born in Schleswig-Holstein August 22, 1868, a son of Her- 
man and Maggie (Luth) Frahm. His early youth was spent in Carroll county, 
Iowa, where he obtained his education in the public schools and there remained 
with his parents until twenty-two years old. He then left the home place and 
removed to Denison, where for ten years he engaged in stock buying and the 
elevator business, at the end of which period he bought one hundred and twenty 
acres of land on section 35, Denison township. 

Mr. Frahm has taken an active part in politics, always casting his vote for 
the republican party, and has held the office of school director of his township. 
He is a member of the Holiness church, with which, during her lifetime, his 
wife was also affiliated. In 1890 M. Frahm was united in marriage to Miss 
Lizzie Burkhoffer, who was a native of Switzerland and whose demise occurred 
November 21, 1910. They were the parents of the following six children: John; 
Lillian, deceased; Harry Alfred; Hattie Hazel; Henry Willie; and Fay Ruby. 

Herman Frahm, the father of our si^bject, was born in Schleswig, while the 
mother's birth occurred in Holstein, Germany. He followed the vocation of 
farming in his native country until 1874, in which year he carpe to the United 



234 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

States, living in Chicago for awhile, but subsequently removing to Carroll 
county, Iowa, where he resided for twenty years. He then, in 1893, moved to 
Crawford county and took up his residence in the city of Denison, where he is 
still living. Mr. Frahm having attained the ripe age of eighty-seven years and 
his wife that of eighty-three. They enjoy the distinction of being one of the 
oldest couples in the county. Mr. Frahm is still the owner of one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in Carroll county. To them were born ten children, as fol- 
lows : Maggie, Katie and John, all three deceased; Tina, wife of X. A. Miller, 
residing in Milford, Iowa; Peter, a farmer living near Mason City, Iowa; Her- 
man, who lives at Stratton, Colorado; Maggie and Lizzie, both deceased; H. H., 
the subject of this sketch ; and George, who is in the draying business at Denison. 



C. M. DUGAN. 



Among the citizens of Crawford county who have been successful in agri- 
culture and stock-raising and are now enjoying the fruits of many years of labor 
is C. M. Dugan, of West Side township. He is a native of Michigan, born 
April I, 1859, a son of Martin and Mary (Ryan) Dugan, both of whom were 
bom in Ireland. They emigrated to America and lived for a number of years 
in Michigan. The family came to Linn county, Iowa, about 1859, and in 1871 
arrived in Crawforrl county. The father devoted his attention to farming, in 
which he continued until his death. May 25, 1899. The mother passed away 
five years later, on March 18, 1904. There were eight children in their family, 
seven of whom are now living. 

C. M. Dugan attended the public schools in his boyhood and remained with 
his parents until thirty years of age assisting in the work of the home farm. He 
then removed to a farm on section 7, West Side township, which he cultivated 
to good advantage for ten years, and at the end of that time he took up his resi- 
dence in Vail, where he continued for five years. In 1906 he removed to a place 
of one hundred and forty-five acres on section 30, West Side tow^nship, which 
he now owns. The air of neatness and order that prevails throughout his farm 
indicates the thoughtful attention which he bestows upon his work and is also 
proof of generous financial returns. In addition to his agricultural interests he 
is vice president of the Farmers State Bank at Vail. He is a man of marked 
influence in the community whose opinion commands respect wherever he is 
known. 

In 1892 Mr. Dugan was united in marriage to Miss Anna Kelly, who was 
born at Peoria, Illinois, November 25, 187 1. a daughter of M. and Mary (Con- 
way) Kelly. The father was born in Ireland and the mother in Massachusetts. 
Mrs. Kelly died August i. 1882, in Illinois, and subsequently Mr. Kelly came to 
Crawford county. Iowa, where he is now living. There were seven children in 
his familv, five of whom survive. Six children have been born to ^Ir. and Mrs. 
Dugan. Mabel. Martin. Nellie. Edward, Carl M. and Lucile. The three older 
children are in attendance at the high school at Vail. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 235 

Mr. Dugan has always been a man of sound common sense. He is honorable 
and upright in his dealings and generous in his estimate of others, standing 
among the representative and progressive citizens of the county. In the de- 
velopment of this section he has borne his share and it may be said to his 
credit that he has never sought to advance his interests to the injury of others. 
Politically he gives his support to the democratic party. He has served as a 
member of the board of county supervisors and as township trustee and school 
director. In religious belief he and his wife are sincere adherents of the Cath- 
olic church. 



CARL HOPP. 



The life of Carl Hopp is an illustration of success achieved in the face of 
difficulties that to an ordinary man would have appeared insurmountable. How- 
ever, he courageously pressed forward and today he is the owner of a valuable 
and productive farm in Soldier township, which he acquired through his own 
perseverance and energy. He was born in Germany, September i, 1863, a son 
of John and Sophia (Peters) Hopp, both of whom were natives of the old 
country. The father died in 1904, but the mother is still living and is sixty- 
nine years of age. There were six children in their family, namely: William, 
Sophia, Friedericki, Minnie, Hattie and Carl, all of whom are still living in 
Germany except the subject of this review. 

Carl Hopp was reared and educated in his native land and continued there 
until twenty-five years of age. Believing that he could advance more rapidly 
under the favoring conditions of the new world he came to America in 1888 
and for three years worked by the month in Crawford county, Iowa. He then 
rented land for one year, after which he bought one hundred and sixty acres in 
Charter Oak township, which he greatly improved, increasing its value so that 
in 1907 he was able to trade his farm for land on section 27, Soldier township, 
thus acquiring three hundred and twenty acres, upon which he has placed many 
improvements. He raises and feeds stock and as he gives careful attention to 
his work he has been highly successful and is regarded as one of the most pros- 
perous farmers in this section. 

On the I St of September, 1890, Mr. Hopp was united in marriage to Miss 
Hattie Wittkopp, who was born in Germany and came to America with her 
father in 1888, the mother having previously died. Mr. Wittkopp settled in 
Crawford county, Iowa, and continued here until his death, which occurred in 
1904. Six children came to brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hopp, namely: 
Ella, who was born April 3, 1891, and is the wife of Theodore Mesick of Craw- 
ford county; Emil, who was born September 24, 1893; Leo, born June i, 1894; 
Martin, born July 24, 1898; Olga, born December 7, 1900; and Paul, born Jan- 
uary I, 1902. The mother of these children passed away March i, 1902. and 
Mr. Hopp was married to Mrs. AmeHa (Lentz) Schreiber. She was a native 
of Germany and came to this country with her parents, who settled on a farm 
in Crawford county. After acquiring a competency they retired to Denison, 



236 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

where her father died in 1902, and the mother six years later. They reared a 
family of twelve children, all of whom are now living. Mrs. Hopp had two chil- 
dren by her former marriage, namely: Albert, who was born February 14, 1899; 
and William, born December 14, 1903. 

-Mr. Hopp gives his allegiance to the democratic party, and he and his wife 
are both identified with the Lutheran church. He came to America twenty- 
three years ago and under the friendly protection of the stars and stripes has 
accomplished what would have been practically impossible in his native land. 
He has met with deserved reward for his labors and is known as a patriotic 
and liberty-loving citizen, who has set a worthy example for his children, train- 
ing them to become active and useful members of society. He has many friends 
who admire him because of his upright and manly character. 



EVERETT W. PIERCE. 



It is doubtful whether any other man in Denison stands higher in the respect 
of the community than Everett W. Pierce whose name introduces this review. 
For twenty years he has been identified with the First National Bank of this 
city, of which he is bookkeeper, and previous to that time he gained an honor- 
able position both as a school teacher and as a business man. 

He was born at Sterling, Illinois, December 10, 1853, ^ son of Ezekiel and 
Hannah (Mills) Pierce, the former of whom was a native of New York and 
the latter of New Jersey. The father was a carpenter in early manhood but 
later became a farmer. He removed to Sterling in 1845 and later to a farm 
near Fulton, but passed away at Morrison, Illinois, in 1907, at the age of eighty- 
five years. The mother is still living and is seventy-eight years of age. She is 
a Universalist in religious faith, as was also her husband. 

Perry Pierce, the paternal grandfather of our subject, learned the carpen- 
ter's trade, but later devoted his attention to farming. He was a soldier of the 
war of 1812, and was twice married, being the father of two children, Ezekiel 
and Mary, by his first marriage, and five by his second, Lucy, Gordon, Elvira, 
David and Diana. Stacy Mills, the grandfather on the maternal side, was of 
English Quaker stock and was born in New Jersey. He was a weaver by trade 
and his father was a soldier of the Revolutionary war and also of the French 
and Indian war. He died at the age of fifty- four years and was the father of 
three children, Peter, Hannah and Elizabeth. 

There were ten children in the family of Ezekiel and Hannah Fierce, eight 
of whom grew to maturity, namely : William H., now of Butte, Montana ; Ever- 
ett W., the subject of this review ; Anna L., now the widow of Anson Baker, of 
Morrison, Illinois; Fred and Frank, twins, the former of whom is deceased, 
while the latter makes his home near Spokane, Washington ; Mary, deceased ; 
Clarence, who is living near Fulton, Illinois, on the old homestead ; and Carrie, 
who passed away soon after reaching womanhood. 

Everett W'. Pierce was reared under the favoring conditions of country life 
and received his preliminary education in the district schools, later attending 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 237 

college at Fulton for five terms, the institution then being known as the North- 
ern Illinois College. He began his business career as a school teacher and was 
engaged for two terms in the locality where he was reared and for three years 
in Crawford county, Iowa, also becoming principal of the Dow City public 
schools, which position he filled most creditably for two years. However, he 
came to the conclusion that business life offered more favorable inducements 
than the schoolroom and he entered the hardware business at Dow City, in which 
he continued for twelve years and attained a gratifying measure of success. 
Since 1890 he has been connected with the First National Bank of this city and, 
possessing natural ability, discernment and practical experience, he has shown 
himself to be eminently qualified for the position he occupies. 

On the 17th of July, 1878, Mr. Pierce was united in marriage to Miss Lydia 
Gibson, who was born in Huron county, Ontario, Canada, a daughter of Samuel 
and Margaret (Shillington) Gibson, the former of whom was born in Canada 
and the latter in the north of Ireland, being a member of a Protestant family. 
They came to Crawford county, Iowa, and took up their residence near Dow 
City, where the mother passed away in 1878. The father survived his faithful 
companion for thirty-one years, departing this life in 1909. There were three 
children in their family: Robert H.; Margaret, the wife of Frank McHenry; and 
Lydia. Two children came to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. Pierce : Faith E., 
who married William Rhodenbaugh and died March 26, 1904; and Foster H., 
who married Annie M. Reynolds and is now a veterinary surgeon and state 
deputy at Faulkton, South Dakota. 

Mr. Pierce is a man of genial traits and pleasing personality and in the dis- 
charge of his business responsibilities has shown a fidelity that meets the hearty 
approval of the officers and patrons of the bank. As a citizen he is patriotic 
and ever willing to lend a hand in forwarding any worthy object. He and his 
estimable wife are both active workers in the Methodist church, of which he is 
steward and class leader. 



OTTO E. CLAUSON. 



Among the young business men of Crawford county who are every year ad- 
vancing to greater responsibilities is Otto E. Clauson of Kiron. He has from 
the beginning of his business career shown an ability and interest in his work 
which gives bright promise as to the future. He was bom in Stockholm town- 
ship, August 9, 1876, son of C. F. and Kathrine (Johnson) Qauson, mention 
of v/hom is made in the sketch of Edward Clauson, elsewhere in this work. . 

Mr. Clauson of this review grew to manhood under the paternal roof and at- 
tended the district schools, where he secured the foundation of an education that 
has assisted him very materially in his contact with the world. At eighteen years 
of age he began farming on his own account by renting part of his father's land, 
which he cultivated industriously for seven years. He then purchased twenty 
acres in Stockholm township and also a house and lot in Kiron. In 1904 he took 
up his residence in town and entered into partnership with his brother in the 



238 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

furniture and undertaking business. They also handle real estate, and as they 
are active and efficient and pay close attention to the needs of their patrons, they 
have attained a gratifying measure of prosperity. 

In 1901 Mr. Clauson was united in marriage to Miss Emma Lundberg, who 
was born in Sweden, a daughter of John and Anna Lundberg. The parents 
came to this country and located in Sac county, Iowa, where the father is now 
living, the beloved mother having passed away in 1910. Three children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Clauson. namely: Leslie Myron, and Eveline and Emma, 
both of whom are deceased. In 1904 the mother of these children was called 
from earthly scenes and in 1905 Mr. Clauson was married to Miss Alfena Lillie- 
holm, who was born in Rock ford, Illinois, and is a daughter of A. F. Lillieholm. 

Politically, Mr. Clauson ever since reaching manhood has given his support 
to the republican party. He has taken quite an active and influential part in pub- 
lic affairs, serving as assistant postmaster of Kiron for six years and as mail 
carrier for three years. He has also held the office of justice of the peace and 
school director of Stockholm township and was a member of the town council 
of Kiron for six years. He is not connected with any religious denomination 
but his wife is a valued member of the Free Mission church. He readily makes 
friends as he has a genial address and pleasing manner and possesses in a high 
degree the warm regard of all with whom he associates. 



HENRY KROHNKE. 



Henry Krohnke, a well-to-do and influential agriculturist of Crawford 
county, where he owns five hundred and sixty acres of land and engages in gen- 
eral farming and stock-raising, was born in Germany, February 26, 1851, a son 
of Hans and Annie (Bergman) Krohnke. the other surviving members of the 
family being Claus and Jurgen, both of whom reside in Schleswig; and Maggie, 
who married John Petersen and lives in Aberdeen, South Dakota. Sophia is 
deceased. Both of the parents lived and died in the fatherland. 

Henry Krohnke emigrated to the United States in 1869. when he was seven- 
teen years old, and located on a farm near Davenport, Iowa, where he worked 
until attaining his majority, when he rented sixty acres of land and cultivated it 
for two years. He then bought a threshing machine, running it for one year, 
and in 1875 ^^ removed to Crawford county, where he divided his time between 
operating a thresher and breaking wild land. He broke the prairie land upon 
which the county poor farm was formerly situated. In 1888 he purchased eighty 
acres of land, to which he subsequently added other lands until his holding now 
amounts to five hundred and sixty acres. 

On November 2. 1876, Mr. Krohnke was united in marriage to Annie 
Suckstorf, a daughter of Henry and ^Maggie (Krueger) Suckstorf, who were 
the parents of ten children, of whom the following survive : Henry, residing in 
Schleswig: Dora, the wife of Adolph Rickers, of Crawford county; August and 
John, of Bloomfield, Nebraska ; and Annie. The deceased members of the fam- 
ily are Nicholas and George, besides three who died in infancy. The union of 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 239 

Mr. and Mrs. Krohnke has been blessed with four children, namely: Augusta, 
who became the wife of William Bumann and resides in Bloomfield, Nebraska; 
John, who lives in Crawford county; Mattie, the wife of William Bielenberg, 
of Crawford county; and Amelia, who lives at home with her parents. 

Mr. Krohnke has taken an active interest in politics, giving his support to 
the democratic party, and he has held a number of township offices. He at- 
tends the Lutheran church, to which he is a liberal contributor. Fraternally he 
is affiliated with the Sons of Harmony. He has resided on his present farm for 
nearly a quarter of a century and deserves much credit for the part he took in 
helping to reclaim this district for the uses of civiHzation. He is widely and 
favorably known throughout the community by reason of his long residence 
here, and the success he has gained is the merited reward of his own labor and 
indefatigable industry. 



EDWARD DEWEY. 



At the venerable age of eighty-five years Edward Dewey is now living re- 
tired at his home in West Side, Crawford county, Iowa, where he is enjoying 
the income derived from his former investments in agricultural lands. He was 
born November ii, 1826, in Deerfield, Oneida county, New York, a son of Zelolas 
and Mehitable (Roberts) Dewey, in whose family were seven children, namely: 
Albert and Leander, both deceased ; Edward, of this review ; Truman, a resident 
of Buftalo, New York, who died in 191 1; Maria, the deceased wife of James 
O'Brien, of Oneida county ; Mary, who wedded James Rawley and made her home 
in Chicago, but is now deceased; and Charles, also deceased. Both parents died 
in New York. 

When twenty-two years old Edward Dewey rented a part of the old home- 
stead, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres in Oneida county. New York, 
which he continued to cultivate until the death of his parents when, their prop- 
erty being divided among the children, he sold his share and moved to Huntley, 
Illinois. There he bought eighty acres of land, upon which he lived for several 
years, and then, in 1876, he came to Crawford county, Iowa, and purchased two 
hundred and sixty acres, where he continued to be actively engaged in general 
farming and stock-raising until his retirement in 1904. In that year he sold 
his farm and came to West Side, where he purchased a lot and erected the 
comfortable home in which he now resides. 

Mr. Dewey has been twice married, his first wife being Roxanna Coffin, a 
native of Herkimer county. New York, to whom he was united March 4, 1847. 
By this union three children were born, two of whom survive, namely: Maurice, 
who lives in West Side, Iowa; and CHlTord, who makes his home in Florida. 
Roxanna, the third in order of birth, is deceased. In March, 1859, Mr. Dewey 
was married to Miss Mary Smith, of Huntley, Illinois, who was second in order 
of birth in a family of four children, the others being Henry, a resident of Illi- 
nois; Caleb, deceased; and Adeline, who married Henry Transue, of Dundee, 
Illinois. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Dewey, namely: En- 
voi. 11—13 



240 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

gene, w ho lucate^l in South Dakota ; Harriet, who married Frank Wagner, of 
Boone, Iowa; Lily, who became the wife of James Roxborough and resides in 
Council Bluffs; Georgia, the wife of Herman Mum, of Belhngham, Washington. 
Politically Mr. Dewey has always been a stanch republican and in religion 
he was reared in the faith of the Universalist church. He is now enjoying a well 
earned rest after a long period of intense activity, his energy and perseverance 
making possible the success which now enables him to live in ease and comfort. 



WILLIAM BERTRAM. 



Another of the many sons of Germany who have contributed largely to the 
development of the natural resources of Crawford county is William Bertram, 
who owns an excellent farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 20, 
Washington township. He was born in Oldenburg on the 20th of October, 
1858, and is a son of John and Sophia (Thompson) Bertram. The parents were 
also natives of the same place and there the father died in 1869, the mother 
having passed away some time previously. Unto them were born the following 
children : Antoinette, still living in Germany ; Johanna, who passed away in 
1909; John, deceased; Hendrica, also living in the fatherland; William, our sub- 
ject; Wilhelmina, residing in New York city; George, who died in 1908; and 
Sophia, who lives in Germany. 

William Bertram acquired his education in the common schools of his native 
land and after laying aside his text-books he assisted his father in the cultiva- 
tion of the home farm, remaining under the paternal roof until he had passed 
the twenty-fifth anniversary of his birth. At that time, however, he felt con- 
vinced that conditions in the United States must be much more favorable for 
an ambitious young man than in Europe so took passage for America. He 
landed in Baltimore, where he remained for three w^eeks, and then went to New- 
ark, New Jersey. After a residence of eight months in the latter city he started 
westward, his destination being Macon county, Illinois, at which place he ob- 
tained employment for two months. At the end of that time he went to Smith 
Center, Kansas, and after living there for two years he came to Crawford 
county, Iowa, first locating at Denison. The first year he was here he worked 
as a farm hand but on the expiration of that period his accumulated savings 
enabled him to begin farming for himself. He cultivated rented land for seven 
years and then bought his present place. Then, as now, he possessed those 
qualities of thrift, energy and determination, which always make for success 
in any vocation, and consequently he added to his original tract from time to 
time until now his realty holdings aggregate two hundred and forty acres, one 
hundred and sixty of which are on section 20, Washington township, and the 
remaining eighty on section 29. 

On the I St of March, 1889, Mr. Bertram married Miss Marie Louisa Kunz, 
who is also a native of Germany, born in Abenrade, Schleswig-Hohtein, Oc- 
tober 31, 1866. Her parents were Andreas and Augusta (Lorenzen) Kunz. who 
spent their early life in the fatherland and came to the United States in 1881, 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 241 

locating in Denison, Iowa. Here the father passed away on the 28th of April, 
1907, at the age of seventy-eight years, but the mother is still living in Denison, 
at the age of seventy-six. Mrs. Bertram has three sisters and one brother, 
namely: Amelia, the wife of William Schiernbeck, of Davenport; Nicolina, the 
wife of William Vondohlen, of Denison; Augusta, the wife of John Schnoor, 
also of Denison; and Andreas, a resident of Granite, Oklahoma. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bertram have ten children: Augusta, the wife of William Barkhoff, of Logan, 
Iowa; Emma, who lives in Oklahoma; and William, John, Sophia, Bertha, Min- 
nie, George, Henry and Mary, all at home. 

The family attend the services of the Lutheran church, of which denomina- 
tion the parents are communicants. Ever since acquiring the rights of franchise 
through naturalization, Mr. Bertram has given his political allegiance to the 
republican party, as the principles of that organization most nearly conform to 
his ideas of a government best adapted to subserve the interests of the majority. 
He takes an active interest in all local political matters and at present is serving 
as township trustee. He is one of the many young men who have come to the 
United States and, unfamiliar with either the language or customs, by his in- 
dustry, resolution and persistence has won a position which makes him worthy 
of the esteem and respect of the community where he is residing. 



W. A. GARNER, M. D. 



Although in practice at Kiron only four years, Dr. W. A. Garner has gained 
in a remarkable degree the confidence of the people and it is doubtful whether 
any other young physician in country practice in Iowa has made greater head- 
way in an equal length of time. His success may be ascribed to his devotion to 
his profession and the close and conscientious attention he gives to his patients. 
He possessed excellent advantages of education and training which have proved 
of very great value in the difficult vocation to which he is devoting the best 
energies of his life. 

He was born in Cedar county, Iowa, July 2, 1877, a son of Pearl and I\Iary 
(Cory) Garner. The father is a native of Maryland and the mother of New 
York state. They came to Iowa about the '50s, and are now living in Ida county. 
There were six children in their family, namely: J. E., of Ida county; Grace, 
the wife of Clyde Barrett; Ralph; Eva; Dwiglit ; and W. A., the subject of this 

review. 

After receiving his preliminary education in the public schools. Dr. Garner 
graduated from the Academy of Sac City and later entered Des Moines Col- 
lege at Des Moines, graduating with the degree of B. S. Having decided upon 
a professional career, he went to Chicago, where he was graduated in medicine 
in 1905, attaining such a high standing in his class that he was given the ad- 
vantages of interneship and was able to make practical application of the prin- 
ciples in which he had been instructed by a number of the leading physicians and 
surgeons of America. Since 1907 he has engaged in active practice at Kiron 



242 HISTORY" OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

and has attained a reputation as one of the highly successful physicians in this 
part of the county. 

Dr. Garner still enjoys the freedom of bachelorhood. Politically he is in 
sympathy with the republican party but has no desire for the honors and emolu- 
ments of public office, preferring to devote his entire attention to his profession. 
Fraternally he is connected with Wheeler Lodge, No. 398, A. F. & A. M., 
and the lodge of the Yeomen of the World at Odebolt. Young, ambitious to 
gain an honored place in his calling and endowed with a fair share of confidence 
in himself, there is no reason why he should not attain high rank in the medical 
world. It is men of this stamp that reach the front and become leaders not only 
in the professions but in business, politics and all the honorable employments of 
modern civilization. 



F. W. LUETH. 



Thrift and energy have been the prominent factors in the success of F. W. 
Lueth, who has acquired four hundred and twenty acres of land in Nishnabotny 
township. He is a native of the province of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, his 
natal day being the 19th of January, 1844. His parents were Frederick and 
Dorothea (Doss) Lueth, also natives of Germany, in which country the mother 
passed away, but in 1881 the father emigrated to the United States, making his 
home with his two sons, F. W. and Henry, until his demise. They were the 
parents of six children: Deitlief, who is a resident of Germany; Dorothea, de- 
ceased; F. W., our subject; Anna, of Germany; Henry, who is living in Ne- 
braska; and Maggie, also a resident of Germany. 

F. W. Lueth was reared in the parental home, acquiring his education in the 
common schools of his native land, of which he continued to be a resident until 
he had attained his twenty-fifth year. Having become dissatisfied with the lim- 
ited possibilities of the old world, in ]\Iarch, 18^)9. he took passage for the 
United States, feeling confident that he should find here the opportunities for 
which he was seeking. Making his way westward he first located in Clinton 
county, Iowa, where he continued to reside for six years. At the expiration of 
that period he removed to Carroll county, remaining there until 1883, at which 
time he came to Crawford county. Three years before settling here he had pur- 
chased eighty acres of prairie, which formed the nucleus of his present home- 
stead. He immediately broke the land and placed it under cultivation and had 
begun to erect a house anrl outbuildings before leaving Carroll county. General 
farming and the breeding of graded stock has claimed his attention, but he is 
also an extensive feeder of cattle and hogs. He has met with success in his 
various ventures and as a result has added forty acres to his homestead, in 
addition to which he also owns eighty acres on section 25, Nishnabotny town- 
ship, and a fourth of section 36. All of tlie necessary improvements have been 
made upon the latter place, which is now occupied by his son. 

Mr. Lueth's plans for a home of his own had their culmination in his mar- 
riage in 1875 to Miss Augusta Wensel. a native of Germany, and they have be- 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 245 

come the parents of seven children : WiUiam, who is a resident of Nishnabotny 
township; Emma; Emmiel ; Richard; Dehlah, who is the wife of WilHam 
Haynes, of Denison; Hulda; and John. All of the children with the exception 
of the eldest son and Mrs. Haynes are living at home. 

Although he was confirmed in the Lutheran church when a boy in Germany, 
Mr. Lueth is not now identified with any denomination. Fraternally he is 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, and he is also a member of the Germania 
Society at Manilla. Ever since naturalization conferred upon him the right of 
sufifrage, he has given his political support to the candidates of the democratic 
party until within the last two years, when he transferred his allegiance to the 
republican party. He has always taken an active interest in civic affairs, having 
served as road supervisor for six or eight years. Mr. Lueth came to America 
with a very limited capital and although there have been difficulties and ob- 
stacles in his path, he has resolutely overcome them, carrying to a successful 
issue everything he has ever undertaken, and as a result he is rated as one of 
the substantial agriculturists of the county. 



FERDINAND FREDERICK RANNIGER. 

Among the capable dairymen of Crawford county must be mentioned Ferdi- 
nand Frederick Ranniger, who resides on an eighty-acre tract in Denison town- 
ship. He was born in Clinton county, Iowa, on the 2d of December, 1879, a 
son of Frederick and Augusta (Grage) Ranniger. In their family were three 
children, but two of whom attained maturity. Ferdinand Frederick, our subject 
and Anna, who became the wife of W. H. Rule of Crawford county. The eldest 
child died in infancy. 

The boyhood and youth of Ferdinand Frederick Ranniger were spent in 
the paternal home and were largely devoted to the acquirement of an education. 
After completing the course of the common schools he engaged in teaching, fol- 
lowing that occupation for five years. At the expiration of that period he bought 
eighty acres of land in Denison township, where he continues to reside, en- 
gaging in dairying and raising thoroughbred hogs. 

On the 4th of April, 1906, Mr. Ranniger was united in marriage to Miss 
Merle Merab Smith, a daughter of M. N. and Loretta G. (Higley) Smith, of 
Denison. Her parents were among the early settlers of Iowa and removed 
from the eastern part of the state to Crawford county with an ox team in 1873. 
They were en route to Kansas, but one of their sons having the misfortune to 
break his leg they were forced to stop at Arcadia until he recovered, during 
which period they decided to become permanent residents of this county and 
so located upon a forty-acre farm, which they bought in the northeastern part 
of Denison township. They cultivated this property until 1887, at which time 
the town of Manilla began to boom, and on disposing of their farm they removed 
there. While residing in Manilla they lost two of their children with typhoid 
fever, following which they removed to Denison, where they continued to re- 
side until Mrs. Smith passed away in 1907, at the age of sixty-eight. Mr. Smith 



246 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUXTY 

subsequently went to Wisconsin and he continues to reside at Wautoma. that 
state. Seven children were born unto them, but the two eldest, Bird \\ and 
\'innie, are deceased. The others are: May V,, the wife of A. G. Bagge. of 
Fonda, Iowa ; Hope, who married Professor G. X. Knight, of Salina, Kansas, 
and is now deceased ; Iva H., who is connected with the Crawford County State 
Bank of Denison ; Glen H., deceased; and Merle, the wife of our subject. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ranniger have become the parents of two children : Clifford Earl, born 
on the lOth of May. 1907; and Howard, whose birth occurred on the 14th of 
July. 1 9 10. 

The religious views of Mr. and ]\Irs. Ranniger conform to those of the 
Methodist Episcopal denomination in which they hold membership. Being an 
advocate of the principles of republicanism, Mr. Ranniger gives his support to 
the men and measures of that party, but not caring for public honors or the 
emoluments of ofifice he never actively participates in affairs of a governmental 
nature. 



ADAM BOHLAXDER. 



A residence of sixteen years has been sufficient to cause Adam Bohlander, 
who owns three hundred acres of land on section 24, Xishnabotny township, to 
be recognized as one of the representative farmers of Crawford county. He 
w^as born in Cook county, Illinois, on the i8th of December, 1850, and is a 
son of John G. and Catherine (Gloss) Bohlander. The parents were natives of 
Germany, from which country they emigrated to the United States in 1832. 
They were among the pioneer settlers of Cook county, having located there im- 
mediately upon their arrival in this country, continuing to make it their home 
until about 1855 or 1856, at which time they removed to Du Page county. Illi- 
nois. The mother passed away in 1852 and the father in 1861. Seven children 
were born to them, the son Adam being the youngest. The others are: John G., 
Sr.. a resident of Hinsdale. Illinois; Peter, who is living in the same place; 
Ma'-y. the wife of Rudolph Pfister. of Brookfield, Missouri; Margaret, deceased; 
and Phillip, who was a veteran of the Civil war; and Henry, also deceased. 

Adam Bohlander remained in Cook county. Illinois, until he was twelve years 
old. acquiring his education in the common schools. He saw both Chicago fires 
and relates many interesting reminiscences of the great fire of 1871, the light 
from which was so brilliant that it was possible to read a newspaper with per- 
fect ease at his home. Before this he had moved to Du Page county, where he 
continued to reside until 1877 or 1878, when he went to Creston, Illinois, where 
he remained for a year, and then went to Pottawattamie county. Iowa. After 
spending three years in the latter place he removed to Shelby county. Iowa, 
coming from there to Crawford county in 1893. where he has lived continuously 
since. When Mr. Bohlander took up his residence in this county he first located 
upon a farm a mile and a half north of ^Manilla, where he resided until five 
years ago, when he removed to town. During the entire period of his active 
life he has been identified with agricultural pursuits, in which he has met with 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 247 

success, having acquired a fine farm of three hundred acres on section 24, Nish- 
nabotny township, and a very pleasant residence in Manilla, and he is now 
able to live retired enjoying the mental and physical ease assured by a comfort- 
able income. 

In 1874 in Du Page county, Illinois, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Bohlander and Aliss Dora A. Niemann, and unto them have been born five chil- 
dren : Alfred, who is a resident of Norfolk, Nebraska; Lewis, of Nishnabotny 
township; Frank, of the same place; Bertha, the wife of Gustave Lapel, living 
north of Manilla ; and Emma, who is at home and is engaged in teaching school. 

His political support Mr. Bohlander always accorded the democratic party 
until the adoption of the "sixteen to one" platform, following which he trans- 
ferred his allegiance to the republican party. Although he takes an interest in 
civic affairs, he has never held any official position save that of school director. 
Left an orphan at the age of twelve years, Mr. Bohlander is entirely a self- 
made man, having attained the position he holds today through his own unaided 
efforts. He has a very high sense of integrity and justice and takes great pride 
in being able to say that he has never either been under arrest nor sued. 



FRED JESCHKE. 

Fred Jeschke, who owns one hundred and eighty-one acres of highly cultivated 
land on section 4, Hanover township, was born in Chicago, Illinois, on the 13th 
of July, 1 87 1, and is a son of Gustave and Mary (Ebert) Jeschke. The parents 
w'ere born in Germany but emigrated to the United States with their respective 
parents when children and located in Chicago, where they met and were married. 
In 1878 they removed to Crawford county, Iowa, and settled on a farm, a por- 
tion of which is now included in the homestead of their son Fred. The father 
operated his land until his retirement in 1900. When he withdrew from active 
farming he removed to Ricketts, Iowa, where he continued to make his home 
until his demise in 1908. His widow is still living at the age of fifty-nine years 
and now resides in Chicago. They were the parents of two children besides our 
subject. The eldest, Albert, died at the age of three years, and the whereabouts 
of the other son, R. C, are unknown. 

Fred Jeschke was only seven years of age when his parents located in Craw- 
ford county and his education was acquired in the district schools of Iowa. He 
remained at home until he was twenty-four years of age and then began work- 
ing for himself. He had already decided to follow the vocation of farming, 
feeling that it offered better opportunities, while it was the occupation to which 
he was best adapted by training, so he rented land which he cultivated for two 
years. At the end of that period he took charge of the old homestead for his 
father and has ever since continued to reside there. During the period of his 
occupancy he has added to his original tract and improved it and his is now 
one of the valuable properties of the township. Besides his general farming 
Mr. Jeschke feeds stock, in fact he consumes all of the grain he raises in that 
manner. 



248 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

In 1895 Mr. Jeschke and Miss Amelia John were united in marriage. Mrs. 
Jeschke is also a native of Qiicago, having been born in that city in 1879, a 
daughter of Carl and Bertha (Kruse) John, who were also natives of Germany. 
They located in Chicago when they first came to the United States, and in 1878 
they removed to Crawford county, Iowa, and settled on a farm near Charter 
Oak, where they lived until their retirement. In 1908 they took up their resi- 
dence in Charter Oak, where they are still living, the father having passed the 
seventy-third milestone in life's journey. They are the parents of the following 
children: Amelia, the wife of Fred Jeschke; Lizzie, who married Carl Kutschin- 
ski, of Crawford county; Charles, who is a resident of the same county; Ida, 
the wife of George Fogle, also of the same county; Bertha, the wife of Fred 
Messenbrink, of Crawford county ; Annie, who is at home ; Lena, the wife of 
Albert Stressel, residing in this county ; Otto, who lives in Charter Oak ; and 
Minnie, Matilda and Bernhard, all three of whom are living at home. 

Seven children have been born unto Mr. and Mrs. Jeschke, as follows: Gus- 
tave, who was born on the 27th of February, 1896; Bernhard, born on the 5th 
of August, 1898; Otto, born on the 20th of December, 1899; Carl, born on the 
14th of May, 1902; Edna, born on the 20th of May, 1905; William, born on 
the 26th of August, 1906; and Herman, born on the 24th of August, 1908. 

The family attend the Lutheran church, with which the parents are identi- 
fied by membership. Ever since attaining his majority Mr. Jeschke has always 
supported the candidates of the democratic party. He takes an active interest 
in all local politics and has been elected to various offices, the duties of which 
he has faithfully and competently discharged. He was constable for four 
years and justice of the peace eight, and at the present time he is serving as 
township trustee. He is one of the progressive citizens of his community and 
has many friends by whom he is highly regarded. 



PETER FREDERICK JEPSEN. 

Thirty-six years ago Peter Frederick Jepsen came to Crawford county. He 
was then a young man of twenty-eight years and by education and experience 
well qualified to note the agricultural possibilities of this county. He applied him- 
self diligently to his chosen occupation and today is one of the large landowners 
of the county and one of its most respected citizens. Born in Schleswig-Hol- 
stein, Germany, Januar}' 13, 1847, he is the son of John and Elsobao (Peter- 
sen) Jepsen. The father was a weaver by trade and followed that occupation 
in early life but later engaged in farming. Seeking to improve his condition 
he emigrated to the new world in 1869 and spent six years in Clinton county, 
Iowa. In the spring of 1875 he came to Crawford county and bought a sect-ion 
of land in Goodrich township, ui)on which he took up his residence, becoming 
one of the well known farmers of that section. He died in 1878 at the age of 
sixty-two years. The mother of our subject departed this life in 1865, being 
then forty-eight years of age. She and her husband were both members of the 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 249 

Lutheran church. He was greatly respected by his neighbors and friends and 
was mayor of the village of Jagel in Germany. 

John Jepsen, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was a weaver and 
small farmer and devoted his attention to teaching during the winter seasons. 
He married Margaretta Jepsen and there were four children in their family: 
Jurgen, John, Claus and Margaretta. The maternal grandfather was Peter Pet- 
ersen, a farmer in the fatherland, whose wife was Qbel Petersen. He died in 
middle life but Mrs. Petersen lived to be about eighty years of age. There were 
seven children in their family, namely: Henry, Claus, Detloff, Peter, Elizabeth, 
Elsobao and Kathrina. Seven sons came to bless the union of John and Elsobao 
Jepsen: John, now living in this county; Peter Frederick, the subject of this 
review; Henry and Hans, both deceased; Frederick, of Goodrich township; 
August, deceased; and Jurgen. 

Peter Frederick Jepsen was reared upon a farm in Germany and early became 
acquainted with the business to which he has devoted a large part of his life. 
He received his education in his native land, and, being an ambitious young man, 
he decided at twenty years of age to seek his fortune in America. Accordingly, 
in 1867, he crossed the ocean and settled in Clinton county, Iowa, but later spent 
one year on a farm in Dakota. In the fall of 1875 he purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Goodrich township, Crawford county, which he im- 
proved to good advantage, making it one of the valuable farms of the township. 
As years passed he showed remarkable ability in the acquisition of land and he 
now owns nine hundred and sixty acres in Goodrich township, also one hundred 
and twenty acres in Milford township, one hundred and seventy-eight acres in 
East Boyer township, and six hundred and forty acres in Hayes township. He 
has sold a farm of one hundred and twenty acres and in addition to land here- 
tofore designated he owns one hundred and ninety-one acres near Dunlop in 
Harrison county. He now has all told two thousand and ninety nine acres. In 
1904 he removed to Denison, where he has since lived retired. 

On the loth of October, 1867, Mr. Jepsen was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Laumbach, who was born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, October 10, 
1842, a daughter of Henry and Wiepke (Utermann) Laumbach, her parents 
being also natives of Germany. The father died in 1857 and the mother in 1864, 
aged forty-two and forty-eight years respectively. The maternal grandfather of 
Mrs. Jepsen was Hans Utermann, and his wife before her marriage was Mar- 
garetta Herringsen. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Jepsen has been blessed by the 
birth of nine children, five sons and four daughters, as follows : Anna married 
William Gehring of Hanover township and has three children, William, Edward 
and Otilla. Johan, a farmer of Goodrich township, married Maria Nath and has 
two children, Peter and Anna. Peter, also a farmer of Goodrich township, mar- 
ried Margaretta S.chroeder, by whom he had three children, Emma, Peter and 
Walter and Hilda. Carolina married Martin Saggan and has seven children, 
to this union, Elizabeth and Edna. Elsobao married Joannas Saggan and they 
have five sons, Henry, Hogel. Martin, Edward and Harry. Henry, a farmer 
of East Boyer township, married Marie Hallender and they have two children, 
Walter and Hilda. Carolina married Martin Saggan and has seven children, 
Emma, Anna, Carolina, Joannas, Bernhard, Marie and Martin. Jurgen, of Good- 



250 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

rich township, married Anna Johansen and is the father of three children. W'il- 
helmina, Albert and Johan. Julius, also of Goodrich township, married Anna 
Rassow and has three children, Martin, Otilla and Malinda. Emma, now living 
at Denison, married Henry Xath and is the mother of two children, Henry and 
Edna. 

Air. and Mrs. Jepsen are consistent members of the Lutheran church and 
active workers in its behalf. Politically, Mr. Jepsen is in sympathy with the 
democratic party and gives his earnest support to its principles and candidates. 
He is a good friend of education and served for five years as member of the 
school board of Goodrich township and for a number of years as township trus- 
tee and school treasurer. By an industrious and straightforward life he years ago 
gained an established reputation for integrity and fidelity to duty and his per- 
sonal worth is fully demonstrated by the esteem in which he is held by a wide 
circle of friends and acquaintances in Crawford and adjoining counties. 



JOHN E. JOHNSTON, 



John E. Johnston, deceased, who for more than thirty years was a citizen 
of Crawford county and died on a farm in this county in 1902. was a native 
of Sweden. He was reared and educated in the land of his birth and, believing 
that conditions were more favorable in America for an ambitious young man 
desirous of securing the best advantages available for himself and family, he 
crossed the ocean in 1871 and during the remainder of his life was a patriotic 
and useful citizen of this republic. He settled in Crawford county, Iowa, and 
by his industry and high character gained recognition as one of its substantial 
citizens. His memory is revered by all who knew him. Mrs. Johnston is still 
living and makes her home with her daughter in Otter Creek township. There 
were six children in their family, three of whom still survive. 

His daughter, Hannah Johnston, who is now the owner of a well miproved 
farm in Otter Creek township, was born in Sweden. She came to this country 
with her parents and grew to womanhood in Crawford county, receiving an 
excellent education in the public schools, and under her mother became thor- 
oughly acquainted with the duties of the household. In 1884 she was united 
in marriage to C. G. Carlson, also a native of Sweden. He came to America in 
1881 and located in Crawford county, where he became acquainted with his 
future wnfe. There were six children in their family, namely: Alfred B., who 
was born December 17, 1884, and died December 30. 1888; Selma E., who was 
born February ii. 1887. and is living at home; Walter S.. who was born Sep- 
tember 3, 1888, and is also at home; Agnes E., who was born September 24, 
1890, and died August 16, 1896; Edith E., born March 7, 1893. and Esther M., 
born May 31, 1896, both of whom are at home. 

The mother of these children is one of the well known residents of the 
county, having made her home here for many years. The home farm, which 
comprises one hundred and fifty-nine acres on section 2. Otter Creek town- 
ship, has been greatly improved under her direction and is provided with a 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 251 

handsome residence and all modern facilities for its cultivation, making it one 
of the desirable properties in this part of the county. She is a lady of fine in- 
telligence and strength of character and has many friends and acquaintances 
who have been attracted by her sterling worth. Religiously she adheres to the 
Free Mission church, in which she was reared, and is an earnest worker in its 
behalf. She has given her children liberal advantages of education and has 
trained them to become useful and honorable members of society, willing at all 
times to perform their part in forwarding the interests of those with whom they 
are associated. 



A. A. FISHEL. 



For the past thirty-one years A. A. Fishel has devoted his energies to the 
vocation of agriculture in Crawford county and has met with that modicum of 
success which comes to all who have a purpose in life. He was born in Seneca 
county, Ohio, near Mexico, January 12, 1858, a son of Daniel and Mary J. 
(Mills) Fishel, both of whom were natives of Ohio, in which state the father 
spent his entire life. He followed the trade of a millwright until the outbreak 
of the Civil war, when he enlisted in Company A, Sixty-first Regiment of Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, in which he held the rank of corporal. He served for three 
years from April, 1861, and participated in many famous battles, among them 
being Bull Run, Gettysburg and Lookout Mountain, and was wounded in the 
hand just before reaching Atlanta, in an engagement at Peach Tree Creek, it 
being the same battle, on the same day and almost at the same hour that Gen- 
eral McPherson was killed. He was sent home on account of his wounded hand, 
which remained in a crippled condition during the remainder of his life. After 
returning to Ohio he engaged in various occupations and during the closing 
years of* his life was deputy postmaster at Upper Sandusky. His family came 
from Pennsylvania and was of German descent. Of the eight children born to 
him and his wife the following survive: Susan E., who became the wife of 
B. L. Trimble and resides in Minnesota; A. A., of this review; Jerusha E., who 
married J. H. Harmon and lives in Upper Sandusky, Ohio; and William, who 
is a banker of Dow City. The father's death occurred at Upper Sandusky in 
1873, but his wife survived him until March, 1906, and her remains were in- 
terred in Dow City (Iowa) cemetery. 

Mr. Fishel took advantage of the facilities ofifered by the public schools of 
Ohio in obtaining his education. He subsequently came to Crawford county, 
Iowa, and in 1880 entered upon his life work, which he had decided would be 
the pursuit of agriculture. Such was his industry and business abihty that he 
has been able to become the owner of one hundred and twenty acres of land 
on section 34, Union township, upon which he has made many valuable improve- 
ments, including modern and up-to-date buildings. Here he has followed farm- 
ing in all its various branches and is regarded as an authority on all subjects 
pertaining to the tilling of the soil. 

Mr. Fishel has been twice married. His first wife was Lydia, a daughter 
of G. W. Huntington, of Dow City, the results of this union being two chil- 



252 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

dren, namely: Norine E., who married H. Alexander and resides in Dow City; 
and Robert, who also lives in Dow City. Mrs. Fishel departed this life in 
189S, her final resting place being Dow City cemetery. Mr. I'ishel's second 
marriage took place in 1906, when he was united to Mrs. Lydia Click, of Deni- 
son, Iowa. 

The democratic party has always had the support of Mr. Fishel, who has 
taken an active interest in the political afifairs of his community and filled the 
office of township trustee for one term, at the expiration of which he was re- 
elected. In his fraternal relations he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of 
America. During his long residence in Union township he has made many 
friends, who recognize in him a man of integrity, whose word is as good as his 
bond, and they accord him the sincere regard that such qualities so richly de- 
serve. 



JACOB C. PETERSEN. 

Living retired from the labors of a long and active career, Jacob C. Petersen 
is spending his declining days in the midst of ease and plenty. He is a man 
of well balanced mind, who at the beginning of his business life denied himself 
many comforts in order to acquire a competence. This he has accomplisiied and 
he is now one of the highly respected citizens of Crawford county. He was 
born in Germany, February 7, 1842, a son of Fred and Anna (Keellsen) Peter- 
sen. The mother died in the old country, but the father came to America in 
1884 and made his home with the subject of this review, passing away at the 
age of eighty-nine years. There were seven children in the family, namely : 
Annie, who became the wife of Hans Brotherson, of Otter Creek township, and 
is now deceased ; Lizzie, the wife of K. Fredricksen, of Schleswig, lowd ; Ferdi- 
nand, who died in Germany; Jacob C, of this review; Doris, who married 
Adolph Berger, of Ida county, Iowa, and is now deceased; Gusta, now the wife 
of Peter Petersen, of Crawford county; and Friedericka G., who became the 
wife of Thomas Petersen, of Ida county, and is now deceased. 

Jacob C. Petersen was reared in Germany and educated in the public schools 
of his native land. At the age of twenty-seven years, having decided that more 
favorable openings were presented in America than could be expected in a 
thickly settled country, he crossed the ocean and in 1869 came to Davenport, 
Iowa. In 1873 he removed to Crawford county and purchased eighty acres, 
which he cultivated to such good advantage that he acquired funds by which he 
was enabled to increase his farm to two hundred and eighty acres. He engaged 
in general farming and stock-raising, and as he paid close attention to his busi- 
ness and used excellent judgment, he met with deserved success. In 1903 he 
retired to Schleswig and is now living in a comfortable residence which was 
erected under his directions. 

On the 2d of December, 1872, Mr. Petersen was united in marriage to Miss 
Annie Hoist, a daughter of John F. and Christina (Lassen) Hoist, who were 
the parents of five children, namely: Annie, now Mrs. Jacob C. Petersen; Mag- 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 253 

gie, the wife of John Haas of Mapleton, Monona county, Iowa; John F., of 
Denison; Christina, wife of John Witt, of Paradise township; and Marie, who 
became the wife of John Oeser, of West Side, Iowa, and both of them are de- 
ceased. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Petersen seven children were born, one of whom 
died in infancy. The others are: Agnes, now the wife of E. Wolhman, of Otter 
Creek township; Christina, the wife of Carl Bell, of Schleswig; Maggie, now 
Mrs. E. Bielenberg, of Morgan township; Annie, wife of Morris Dellifsen, of 
Crawford county; Fred, also of Crawford county; and Hannah, wife of August 
Rienking, of Ida county. 

Politically Mr. Petersen gives his support to the democratic party and is a 
stanch believer of its principles. He has served in all the minor township offices 
and also as trustee and justice of the peace. In discharging his duties as a 
public officer he evinced the same interest and ability that he has exercised m 
private afifairs, thus gaining the confidence of all who know him. His success 
in his life vocation has been due to his strict probity and sagacity and the system- 
atic manner in which he conducted his work. He "is exceedingly popular with 
his neighbors who recognize that he possesses many generous and noble quali- 
ties. 



GUSTAV SCHREIBER. 

Among the German-American citizens of Crawford county are to be found 
many of its most prosperous people. In numerous instances they owe their for- 
tunate condition almost entirely to their own industry and application. Gustav 
Schreiber, who owns a beautiful farm in Soldier township, is a native of Ger- 
many and has by the good use of opportunities attained in his adopted state a 
gratifying measure of success. 

He was born February ii, 1871, a son of Ferdinand and Louisa (Stroh- 
feldt) Schreiber, both of whom were born in Germany. They came to America 
with their family, arriving in this country, February 22, 1888. After spending 
eight years in Chicago, Illinois, they removed to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where 
they lived for one and one-half years, when death visited the household and 
the beloved mother was called away. The father and one of the sons, Gustav, 
came to Crawford county, Iowa, and here he lived, making his home with his 
son until he was called away in 1901. There were four children in the family: 
Augusta, now the wife of Herman Semlor, of Chicago; Carl, of Crawford 
county; Gustav, the subject of this review; and William, who died at the age 
of twenty-nine years. 

Gustav Schreiber crossed the ocean with his parents at the age of seventeen, 
having previously secured his school education in his native land. At the age 
of twenty-six he bought eighty acres in Soldier township, Crawford county, 
which he cultivated to good advantage for eight years, selling it at a price much 
in advance of its cost. He then purchased land on section 22 of the same town- 
ship and has shown such good judgment in his work that at the present time he 
is the owner of two hundred and forty acres, one of the most productive prop- 
erties of its area in this part of the county. 



254 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

On September i6, 1897, Mr. Schreiber was united in marriage to Miss Emma 
Kroll. who was born in Chicago, December 10, 1878, a daughter of Gustav and 
Augusta (Scheeve) Kroll. both natives of Germany. They were married in 
Chicago and lived in that city until 1888, when they came west and settled on 
a farm in Crawford county, Iowa. The mother died December 24, 1907, the 
father passing away about three years later, on March 30, 1910. There were 
six children in their family, namely: Emma, now Mrs. Gustav Schreiber; Wil- 
liam, of Woodbury county, Iowa; and Gustav, Emil, George and Clara, all 
residents of Crawford county. Seven children came to bless the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Schreiber: Walter, who was born October 2, 1898; George, born ]\Iay 
31, 1900; Edwin, born November 18, 1902; Meta, born October 15, 1904; 
Mahala, born October 27, 1906; Otto, born September 16, 1908; and Gustav, 
born December 4, 1910. 

Mr. Schreiber and his wife were both reared in the Lutheran church and 
give their earnest support to that organization. Politically he affiliates with the 
democratic party. From his boyhood he has recognized the value of labor in 
the accomplishment of any worthy purpose. He early determined to acquire a 
competency and with this end in view he did not hesitate to practice self-denial 
when it was necessary in order to get a start. He now enjoys a prosperity which 
he well deserves and has also assisted materially by his labors in adding to the 
wealth of the county. His success cannot fail to encourage ambitious young 
men, as the road to fortune and ease is open to all who will readily apply them- 
selves during the early years of their business life, thus acquiring a safe foun- 
dation for permanent prosperity. 



CARL SCHELM. 



For thirty-six years a resident of Crawford county, Carl Schelm now de- 
ceased, will be remembered as one of its successful and highly respected citizens, 
who won recognition through undaunted perseverance and acknowledged busi- 
ness ability that would have gained for him prominence in almost any com- 
munity. His death, which occurred April 15, 1907, was the occasion of general 
regret, as he had made a host of friends and was widely known as an upright 
and useful citizen who was ever ready to extend a hand of helpfulness to those 
less fortunate than himself and to assist in promoting the happiness of those 
with whom he was associated. 

He was born in Germany and came to America in 1867, first taking up his 
residence in Jackson county, Iowa. In 1871 he came to Crawford county and 
began working on a farm. Later he bought land in Hanover township and 
as the years passed became the owner of two hundred acres in that township 
and also a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Brown county, Nebraska. 
He was a man of good practical judgment in business and as he was thoroughly 
familiar with the duties that fall to the lot of the farmer, his labors met with 
de=;erved recompense. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 255 

In^ 1874 Air. Schelm was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Sutrow, and 
by this union four children were born, namely: Minnie, now the wife of Her- 
man Baak, of Crawford county; Dretta, the wife of Fred Hermsmayer, of 
Brown county, Nebraska; and William and Albert, both of whom are living in 
Nebraska. The mother of these children died in 1885, and Mr. Schelm was 
married one year later to Mrs. Frieda (Fehmerling) Kayser, who was born in 
Germany, January 23, i860. By her first marriage she became the mother of 
two children: Carl and EHzabeth, both of whom are deceased. Two children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Schelm: Gustav, whose natal day was October 27, 
1888, died at the age of one year; George W., the younger child, was born 
November 6, 1890, and is now living at home with his mother. He is a promis- 
ing young man and is a graduate of the Denison high school, being now in at- 
tendance at the normal school. 

Mr. Schelm of this review gave his support to the republican party and 
served in various township offices. He was a thorough farmer, paying close 
attention to his work, so that it was productive of highly satisfactory returns. 
As a citizen he was devoted to his county and state, and as the head of a family, 
his first thought was always for those he loved. His remains were interred in 
Hanover cemetery and a suitable monument marks the grave as a testimonial 
from his wife and son. Mrs. Schelm and her son still own the farms in Iowa 
and Nebraska and also a handsome residence in Denison, which is the family 
home. They visited Germany and remained for six months amidst scenes with 
which she was familiar in her earlier years. She is now permanently located at 
Denison and has many friends and acquaintances in this city. 



JOHN T. WALSH. 



A highly improved farm of one hundred and eighty acres in West Side town- 
ship is evidence of the energy and ability of John T. Walsh, who is recognized 
as one of the progressive men of his section. His success has been due to a 
laudable ambition and an unalterable perseverance which are important elements 
in his character. He is a native of Livingston county, Illinois, born June 10, 
1869, and is a son of James E. and Honora (Breen) Walsh, both of whom were 
born in Ireland. The father came to America in 1850 and was married in Illi- 
nois to Miss Honora Breen. Later he came with his family to Crawford county, 
Iowa, and he and his wife are now living at Vail, the former having reached 
the age of seventy-six, while the latter is seventy-seven years of age. They are 
the parents of four children. 

John T. Walsh received his early education in the common schools and later 
had the advantage of attending the high school. He continued at home until 
arriving at maturity and then, having decided to devote his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits, he began farming upon his own account. He has applied 
himself to such excellent advantage that he now owns one hundred and eighty 
acres of land on sections 29 and 32, West Side township, all of which is under 
admirable cultivation and capable of producing large crops. Everything about 



256 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

the place is in good order and denotes that he has prospered in his caUing and 
is in comfortable circumstances. He raises various grains, but makes a spe- 
cialty of raising and feeding stock for the market. 

On May 21. 1907, Mr. Walsh was united in marriage to Miss Alice Coughlin, 
who waj born in Canada, a daughter of Patrick and Mary (Quinn) Coughlin. The 
father was born in Ireland and the mother in Canada. She is now deceased, 
but Mr. Coughlin is living at Dunlap, Iowa. There were eleven children in 
their family, eight of whom survive. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Walsh: Maurice Francis Carroll, who was born October 19, 1909; and James P., 
who was born April 17, 1910, and died July 6 following. 

Mr. Walsh may be designated as a self-made man, as he has attained a grati- 
fying degree of financial prosperity entirely through his own efforts. He is 
recognized as the possessor of clear judgment and sound business ability, and 
as he is genial and public-spirited, he enjoys the unqualified respect and esteem 
of those who know him. Politically he is not identified with any of the great 
organizations, but votes independently, preferring to be controlled by the con- 
ditions that prevail at the time of the election. Fraternally he is a valued mem- 
ber of Lodge Xo. 780, K. C, of Carroll, and has taken a great interest in the 
order, having filled all the chairs in the lodge. In religious belief he and his 
wife are Catholics. 



NELS P. LARSON. 



Although Nels P. Larson was born in Sweden, he probably knows more 
about the United States than he does about his native land. He has traveled 
from New York to San Francisco and has also been in the south, gaining a 
good knowledge of the country before he finally selected Crawford county, 
Iowa, as his permanent home. He has seen no cause to regret his choice of a 
location, as he is now the owner of a beautiful farm which yields abundant 
annual harvests, making him practically independent financially. He was born 
in Sweden, February 22, 1852, a son of John and Mary Larson, mention of 
whom is made elsewhere in this work. 

Nels P. Larson was educated in the common schools of his native land, and 
in 1868 came to America with his parents, stopping for a while in New York 
city, where he worked as a teamster. He then went to Brooklyn, where he 
worked in a brickyard, subsequently being attracted to South Carolina, in which 
state he spent two years upon a cotton plantation and in a store. He next was 
identified with railroad construction in Pennsylvania as teamster for a year, 
and during the next three or four years spent his time largely in the coal mines. 
Having seen considerable of the east, he turned his face westward and crossed 
the continent to California, where he worked in a lumberyard for three years. 
In 1879 he came to Crawford county, Iowa, and began farming, carrying his 
work forward with such success that he is now the owner of four hundred acres 
on sections 23, 24 and 25, Otter Creek township. He raises grain and feeds 
cattle and hogs for the market. He is also a stock buyer and shipper in com- 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 257 

pany with N. P. Swanson of Kiron. In addition to other interests Mr. Larson 
is a stockholder of the Farmers Telephone Company of Kiron. As he is a 
man of good judgment he is recognized as one of the leading citizens in his 
part of the county. 

On the 1st of January, 1886, Mr. Larson was united in marriage to Miss 
Christina Young, a native of Sweden and a daughter of A. P. Young. Both of 
her parents are deceased. Mrs. Larson came to this country with them in her 
infancy and was reared and educated here. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Larson 
has been blessed by the birth of three children, namely: Mildred, who is a 
graduate of music and is now living at home; Elwood L., also at home; and 
Louise, deceased. 

Mr. Larson gives his support to the republican party and takes an active 
part in affairs of his township, having served as school director and as road 
superintendent for a number of years. He is a valued member of the camp of 
Modern Woodmen of America at Denison, and the Yeomen of the World at 
Des Moines. He and his wife were reared in the Lutheran church and are 
earnest supporters of that denomination. He is a man of great energy and de- 
termination, and as he possesses good business judgment, he is generally suc- 
cessful in his undertakings and is justly respected by all who know him. 



WILLIAM E. EGGERS. 



As a man who has materially assisted in the development and progress of 
the agricultural and commercial interests of Crawford county, William E. Eg- 
gers holds a prominent position among the residents of Arion, which owes much 
to his individual endeavors in the behalf of its welfare. He was born in Jack- 
son county, Iowa, near Green Island, September 3, 1863, a son of Frederick 
Eggers. (For ancestral history of the Eggers family, see sketch of P. J. Eggers 
in this volume.) When the father moved from Jackson county he was the 
possessor of two wagons, five horses and some cattle, and it fell to the lot of 
his son William E. to drive and take care of the cattle. Their journey was by 
way of Cedar Rapids, which was at that time but a mere village, and they 
forded the river there, although the water was high enough to reach the bottom 
of the wagon box. 

William E. Eggers acquired his early education in the Lyman public school 
under the tutelage of Ayl Marshall. He remained on the home farm until at- 
taining his majority, when he rented some land from his father and began the 
pursuit of agriculture on his own account. He later decided to embark in the 
live-stock business, purchasing his first carload of cattle from the man who for- 
merly owned the place whereon he now resides, and from that time he has been 
an extensive feeder and shipper of high grade stock. His first personal ac- 
quisition of land was on section 13, Paradise township, comprising one hundred 
and twenty acres, and in 1895 he bought his present property, consisting of 
two hundred acres, which has the benefit of all the modern improvements that 
go to make an up-to-date farm. Aside from these holdings he owns two hun- 



Vol. 11—14 



258 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

dred and eighty acres in Knox county, Nebraska. Mr. Eggers has been an im- 
portant factor in the organization and maintenance of Arion's most prominent 
pubHc institutions, to which he has contributed hberally of both his time and 
financial assistance. He is a stockholder in the Denison Hospital, one of the 
charter members of the Arion State Bank, of which he was a director and bank 
examiner, at present filling the ofifice of vice president, and he was one of the 
organizers of the Crawford County Fair Association, in which he is a stockholder 
and a member of the board of directors and now president. 

The marriage of Mr. Eggers occurred March 22, 1893, when he was united 
to ^liss Carrie Lanser, a resident of Crawford county, and to them the follow- 
ing three children were born : Arthur, now sixteen years old ; Ellen, fourteen 
years old ; and Sears William, eleven years old. 

The democratic party has always had the support of Mr. Eggers and for 
six years he has held the office of township trustee, and has been reelected for 
another term. Fraternally he is connected with Arion Lodge, No. 5560, Modern 
Woodmen of America, of which he is a charter member. In his religious faith 
he follows the teachings of the Lutheran church. He has always remained a 
resident of his native state, and his success today is the result of his early am- 
bition to make a place for himself among his fellow citizens. Broad-minded, 
possessing a genial and courteous nature, his many friends exfend to him the 
high regard which he so well merits. 



CHRISTIAN SCHNOOR. 

Christian Schnoor, who for twenty years was closely identified with the agri- 
cultural interests of Crawford county but is now living in Schleswig. was born 
in Germany on the i6th of October, 1856. His parents, Jurgen and Doris 
(Bermaster) Schnoor. were also natives of Germany, and it was there Mrs. 
Schnoor passed away. The father came to America in 1874 and located in 
Davenport, where he continued to reside until his demise at the age of about 
seventy years. Four children were born unto Mr. and Mrs. Schnoor, the son 
Christian being the youngest. The others are as follows : Henry, who is de- 
ceased ; Christina, who became the wife of Hans Schmidt, of Scott county; and 
John, who is residing in the same place. 

Christian Schnoor was but a youth of seventeen years when he left his na- 
tive land, in the common schools of which he obtained his education. L'pon his 
arrival in the United States he made his way westward and located in Daven- 
port, Iowa, where he obtained employment as a farm hand. He continued in 
that occupation for seven years and during that time, by means of the sterling 
qualities of thrift, energy and perseverance, which characterize the Teutonic 
nation, acquired the means necessary to enable him to become a property owner. 
He therefore bought eighty acres of land on section 3, Morgan township, where 
he engaged in general farming. During his long years of service he had learned 
much of agricultural methods as pursued in America, and being an observing 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 259 

man, was now able to benefit from the experience of his former employers. 
He used good judgment and intelligence in the direction of his work and the 
result was profitable returns from his harvests. He removed to Schleswig in 
1901 and is now renting his farm. He owns property in Schleswig and is in- 
terested in various other things. Although he is enjoying the mental ease 
and physical comfort always assured by a competence, he is not leading an idle 
life always being busily engaged in some pursuit. 

Mr. Schnoor's fraternal relations are confined to membership in the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, while his political allegiance is always given to 
the republican party, as he considers that its policy is best adapted to subserve 
the interests of the majority. He does not actively participate in municipal 
afifairs, not being an aspirant for public office, but he always complies with the 
requirements of good citizenship by casting a ballot at all elections. During the 
long period of his residence in Crawford county he has made many friends 
whose esteem he retains. 



EMIL PAUTSCH. 



Emil Pautsch, who is engaged in general farming and stock-raising in Han- 
over township, has been closely identified with the agricultural development of 
Crawford county for more than twenty-five years. He was born in Germany, 
November 29, 1869, a son of Ferdinand and Wilhelmina (Nass) Pautsch, also 
natives of the fatherland, who emigrated to the United States in 1870 and lo- 
cated in Chicago, where they continued to reside for six years. In 1876 they 
removed to Crawford county, Iowa, and bought a farm which they cultivated 
until the father's death in 1896. Mrs. Pautsch is still living and makes her 
home with her children. They were the parents of twelve children, four of 
whom died in infancy, those who lived to maturity being as follows : Theresa, 
the wife of Louis Green, of Charter Oak, this county; Emil, our subject; Robert, 
who lives in Luverne, Minnesota ; George, deceased ; Ida, living in Hanover 
township; Emma, the wife of Otto Heabner. of Hanover township; Carl, who 
is living on the homestead ; and Bernard, also living on the homestead. 

Emil Pautsch acquired his education in the common schools of Crawford 
county, and when he had obtained such knowledge as he deemed essential to 
pursue his vocation, his text-book gave place to the work of the field and he 
assisted his father in the cultivation of the home farm. He remained under the 
parental roof until he was twenty-four years of age, at which time he began 
farming for himself on a portion of his father's land, which was later given to 
him and forms a part of his present holdings. He engaged in general farming 
and stock-raising, making a specialty of feeding cattle for the market, and in 
all of his undertakings he met with most gratifying success and as a result he 
was able to add to his original tract until he now owns three hundred and 
twenty acres of finely improved and highly cultivated land. In addition to his 
homestead he also owns a half section in Spink county. South Dakota, and one 
hundred and sixty acres in Rock county, Minnesota. He is devoting the greater 



260 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

part of his time to the feeding of cattle and now has five carloads of very fine 
stock which he is prei)aring for the market. 

Mr. Pautsch was united in marriage to Miss Anna Lill in 1894, a daughter 
of August and Theresa (Reetz) Lill. She was born in Chicago on the 8th 
of February', 1874. but is of German extraction, her parents being natives of 
the fatherland. Mr. and Mrs. Lill removed to Iowa in 1879 and settled on a 
farm in Crawford county, which they operated until their deaths. They were 
thrifty, hard-working people and owned two hundred and eight acres of well 
cultivated land at the time of their demise. Eight children were born unto 
them, two of whom died in infancy, those living being as follows : John, who 
lives in Sioux City, this state; Anna, the wife of Emil Pautsch; Laura, who 
married R. Weed, of Charter Oak township ; Minnie, the wife of George 
Pautsch, of Luverne, Minnesota ; Theresa, who is unmarried and lives at Char- 
ter Oak; and August, who resides on the homestead in Charter Oak township. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Pautsch have been born eight children, who are as follows : 
Adelheid, who was born on the 8th of October, 1895 ; Ferdinand, born on the 
2d of February, 1897; August, born on the 19th of July, 1899; Elna, born on 
the 3d of March, 1900; Ernest, born on the 28th of February, 1903; Alfred, 
born on the 5th of April, 1908; and Laura and Martin, who died in infancy. 

The family attend the Lutheran church, of which denomination the parents 
are members. Politically Mr. Pautsch has always been identified with the demo- 
cratic party, and has been elected to the office of constable for several terms, 
while at the present time he is a member of the board of school directors. He 
is one of the progressive, public-spirited citizens of his district, who during his 
long residence here has won the regard and esteem of the community. 



JOHN LEE RICHARDSON. 

A pioneer, a soldier and a farmer, who is now serving as state oil inspector, 
John Lee Richardson of Denison has led an active and useful life, in the course 
of which he has made many friends and materially assisted in promoting the 
public welfare. He was born in the village of Cassadaga, Stockton township. 
Chautauqua county. New York, September 6, 1837, a son of Nathan and Asenath 
(Johnson) Richardson, who were also natives of New York. The father, who 
was a farmer, was l^orn and reared at Cooperstown, Otsego county, and re- 
moved to Palmyra, Wayne county, and from there to Chautauqua county. Sub- 
sequently, he came to Iowa and died in Linn county in 1870 at the age of seven- 
ty-one years. His first wife was Asenath Johnson, who died in Chautauqua 
county, New York, at the age of forty years. There were five children by tiiat 
union, namely : Nancy, who married James W. Barber, of Lake county. Ohio, 
and is now deceased; Reuben, deceased; Jane, the wife of Samuel Whiting of 
Lake county, Ohio, who died in the Civil war, and she is now also deceased ; 
John Lee, the subject of this review; and Martha, who w-as the wife of H. B. 
McKean of Linn county, Iowa, and is now deceased. After the death of his first 
wife the father married Mrs. Morton, by whom he had three daughters: Sarah, 




JOHX L. RICHARDSON 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 263 

of Huron, South Dakota, who is the widow of Leander Batchelder; Abia, the 
widow of David Cargill, and JuHa, of Polo, Linn county, Iowa, the wife of P. A. 
Yates. All three of their husbands were soldiers of the Civil war. The father 
served as teamster in the war of 1812, and he and his first wife were members 
of the Friends church. The paternal grandfather of our subject was Hill Rich- 
ardson, a native of Massachusetts. He was a farmer and a soldier of the war 
of 1812. His wife was Sallie Lee, and they had eight children: Ammi, Nathan, 
William. Areuna, John, Freeman, Louisa, and Cynthia. 

The Richardson family is of Norman origin and its history dates back to 
the time of William the Conquerer. Many noted names in English history were 
identified with this family. The first American ancestor Ezekiel Richardson, 
arrived in this country from England in 1630. He was soon followed by two 
brothers, Samuel and Thomas, and assisted in founding the town of Woburn, 
^Massachusetts. Edward and Moses Richardson fought side by side in the Revo- 
lutionary war, and at the laying of the cornerstone of Bunker Hill monument, 
June 17, 1825, not even Lafayette, who was present, excited more interest than 
these brothers, who rode together and were the observed of all observers. Moses 
Richardson, another member of the family, was awakened at midnight, shoul- 
dered his musket, and at five o'clock in the morning was dead — one of the first 
to fall at the battle of Lexington. He with three brothers was buried in a 
trench in the Cambridge cemetery, and in 1870 the city of Cambridge erected 
a monument to the three men, upon which is inscribed, "O, what a glorious 
morning is this !" The coolness of Captain Israel Richardson, who was in the 
Alexican war, won for him the title of "Fighting Dick." The motto of the fam- 
ily "Trust in God" has ever sustained them, and almost without exception they 
have been found worthy, whether subjects of the British crown or following 
the stars and stripes in the land of their adoption. 

John Lee Richardson was reared in Chautauqua county. New York, and 
came west with his parents in 1844. Subsequently, he went to the frontier of 
iMinnesota, where he lived for six years, hunting and trapping. He also drove 
a government team and carried the mail on foot through a forest of one hundred 
and sixty miles, only one white man living on the route at Mill Lake, an Indian 
trader by the name of Fox. He came to visit his parents in Iowa, and while in 
this state enlisted in Company A, Twentieth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and served 
with great credit for three years. During the entire period he never received 
the slightest injur3\ although he participated in many important battles and 
never missed a march in which his regiment took part. He was present at the 
battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas, the siege of \'icksburg. in the Red River cam- 
paign under General Banks, at the siege of Fort Morgan, in the ^Mobile cam- 
paign, and also participated in the last fight of his regiment at the storming of 
the works of Fort Blakely, on the 9th of April, 1865. After receiving his hon- 
orable discharge he came home and worked upon his sister's farm in Linn 
county, Iowa, for several years, her husband having died in the army. He then 
removed to northern Missouri, where he continued for five years, but since 1874 
has made his home in Crawford county, the first six years being passed upon a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres, which he purchased in Soldier township. 



264 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

He moved to Denison on account of his wife's health, but he still owns the farm, 
one of the higlily improved properties of the neighborhood. 

On the 14th of October, 1868, Mr. Richardson was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary McArthur, a daughter of James McArthur. They are both members of 
the Baptist church, in which he has for a number of years served as deacon. 
He is identified with John A. Logan Post, Xo. 58, G. A. R., and has been its 
adjutant for many years. Politically, he gives his support to the republican 
party. He was deputy county treasurer two years and has also served as town- 
ship assessor and as assessor in Dension. For about eight years he was janitor 
of the North Side public school, and it is to his credit to say that he has the 
friendship and good-will of all the children. 

Although he has passed the Psalmist's three score years and ten, he is still 
deeply interested in affairs both public and private and discharges his duties 
as state oil inspector with a fidelity that meets the general approval. As a soldier 
he was faithful and true and in the various relations of life he has ever attempted 
to perform his duty, thus meriting the high esteem in which he is held by all 
with whom he comes into contact. 



GUST SANDERS. 



Coming to America twenty-four years ago, Gust Sanders has by his intelli- 
gent application won a home for himself and family and also an honorable repu- 
tation as one of the substantial and trustworthy citizens of Crawford county. 
He was born in Sweden, May 17, 1868, a son of John and Lena Oleson, both 
of whom spent their entire lives in Sweden. There were two children in their 
family: Gust, the subject of this review; and Axel, who is deceased. 

Gust Sanders was educated in his native country and after arriving at a 
suitable age learned the carpenter's trade. Ambitious to see the world and also 
to take advantage of the opportunities presented under the favoring influences 
of the American republic, he came to the United States in 1887, spending the 
first seven years in Chicago, where he found employment at his trade. In 1894 
he arrived in Crawford county, Iowa, and continued work at his trade, becoming 
one of the well known carpenters in this section. In 1908 he became associated 
with C. S. Johnson under the firm name of Johnson & Sanders and has since 
been identified with the general mercantile business at Kiron. The firm has 
attained a recognized standing as one of the reliable and prosperous concerns 
in Crawford county. 

In 1905 Mr. Sanders was united in marriage to Miss Emma Anderson, a 
native of Sweden and a daughter of Gustave and Lisa Anderson, both of whom 
are still living in the old country. There were four children in the family of 
Mr. and Mrs. Anderson, and two children came to bless the union of ]\Ir. and 
Mrs. Sanders ; Elnora. who was born February 26, 1907, and died Mav 2}^, 
1910; and Lucile, born May 30, 1910. 

Mr. Sanders and his wife are upholders of the Christian faith and are 
valued members of the Mission church of Kiron. He has not devoted much 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 265 

attention to politics as his family and his business require his time, but he has 
observed the effects of the saloon and is an uncompromising advocate of tem- 
perance, believing this subject of more importance to the welfare of the country 
than many others that absorb the public mind. He is industrious, reliable and 
wide-awake and deserves the gratifying success he has achieved in his adopted 
country. 



HENRY KUHLMAN. 



Henry Kuhlman has clearly demonstrated by his life what it is possible for 
an ambitious and determined young man to achieve in the United States. A 
German by birth, he was not only practically without means, but was unfamiliar 
with the customs and language of the country when he arrived in this country-, 
but he was rich in perseverance and industry and today he owns eleven hundred 
and ten acres of highly cultivated land in Crawford county. He was born on 
the 30th of May, 1850, and is a son of Frederick and Marie (Keuthan) Kuhl- 
man, who spent their entire lives in the fatherland. They were the parents of 
ten children, three of whom, besides our subject, are now living: Marie, the 
wife of William Ahrens, of Germany; Louisa, who married Henry Hase, of 
Germany; and George, who is a resident of Charter Oak township, Crawford 
county. 

The first twenty-three years of Henry Kuhlman's life were spent in the 
old country, but at the end of that period he felt that he possessed the ability 
to make something of his life were he only able to exercise those powers which 
he felt must forever lie dormant in the conservative atmosphere of the caste- 
bound land of his nativity. America seemed to offer the opportunities for which 
he longed, so crossing the Atlantic, he landed in this country on the 6th of April, 
1873, and immediately made his way westward to Crawford county, Iowa. He 
worked out by the month during the first two years of his residence here, during 
which time he carefully laid aside a portion of his earnings until in 1875 he 
had saved sufficient to enable him to buy eighty acres of land, which formed 
the nucleus of his extensive realty holdings of the present time. His home- 
stead in Hanover township contains seven hundred and fifty acres, in addition 
to which he owns three hundred and sixty acres in Paradise township. It is 
all well improved and highly cultivated, and everything about his homestead 
gives evidence of the thrift, careful supervision and regard for details which are 
always active factors in the acquirement of success. 

On the 7th of May, 1878, Mr. Kuhlman completed his arrangements for a 
home of his own by marrying Miss Hetten Martin. She is also a native of 
Germany and was born on the 29th of September, 1852, a daughter of IMichael 
and JuHa Martin. The mother died in the fatherland and the father came to 
America and made his home with his children until the time of his demise, 
twenty years later. Eight children were born unto Mr. and ^Irs. Martin, as 
follows :' Gusta, the wife of William Ockelbine. of Kansas ; Paulina, who mar- 
ried Herman Minda, of Sac City, Iowa; Gustave. living in Charter Oak. this 



266 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

state; Albert, a resident of Mapleton, Iowa; Hetten, the wife of Henry Kuhl- 
man ; and Amelia, Frederick and Emil, all of whom are deceased. 

Mr. and Airs. Kuhlman have become the parents of twelve children, eight 
of whom are still living: Alwena, who was born in 1881 and became the wife 
of Carl Teas, of Charter Oak township; Dora, whose birth occurred in 1882, 
and who married Herman Keipe, of Hanover township; Elizabeth, born in 
1884; Henry, born in 1886; Herman, born in 1890; Gustave, born in 1893. 
George, born in 1895; Marie, born in 1897; two who died in infancy; and 
Emma and Lena, both deceased. All but the two eldest of those living are 
still at home. 

The family attend the Lutheran church, of which denomination they are 
members. Ever since naturalization conferred upon him the full rights of citi- 
zenship, Mr. Kuhlman has supported the candidates and principles of the dem- 
ocratic party, and although he has never been an office seeker, he has served as 
a school director for the past two years. He is indeed a self-made man, as his 
success is entirely due to his unfaltering determination, persistent effort and 
tireless energy. His has not been a phenomenal record of brilliant achievements 
but the steady and substantial progress which is ever the reward of well directed 
effort when sustained by faithful service and incorruptible integrity. He has 
been a resident of Hanover township for more than three decades and during 
that period he has made many friends whose regard and respect he retains, and 
both he and Mrs. Kuhlman are highly esteemed in the community. 



LOUIS M. COON, M. D. 

Dr. Louis M. Coon, a practicing physician and surgeon of Denison, has 
gained an enviable reputation as a successful representative of the medical pro- 
fession in Crawford county. He is also an extensive landowner, having six- 
teen hundred acres in this state and in South Dakota. His birth occurred near 
Madison, Wisconsin, on the 20th of August, 1863, his parents being William W. 
and Mary E. (McHenry) Coon, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of 
Allegany county, New York. Paul AL Coon, the paternal grandfather, was 
born in Oberlin, Ohio, and sold the first eighty-acre tract of land on the site 
chosen for Oberlin College. He was a successful agriculturist and quite an 
extensive landowner and operated both flour and sawmills. He was likewise 
a stone mason by trade and engaged in business as a contractor and builder. 
In the early days he went to Wisconsin, later removed to Minnesota and sub- 
sequently took up his abode among the pioneer settlers of Crawford county, 
Iowa. He passed away at Arion. where he had resided for some years, living 
to attain the venerable age of eighty-three. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Thirza Cole, survived him for two years, being eighty-two years old 
when called to her final rest. They were the parents of three children, two sons 
and a daughter, as follows : William W. ; Paul ; and Matilda, who gave her hand 
in marriage to John Oliver, a farmer and stock-raiser of Winfield, Kansas. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 267 

The maternal grandfather of our subject was a native of New York and fol- 
lowed farming and stock-raising throughout his active business career. 

William W. Coon, the father of Dr. Louis M. Coon, left Ohio as a boy in 
company with his parents, the family home being established in Huntington, 
Indiana, where Paul M. Coon owned large flouring and sawmills. Subsequently 
the family removed to Albion, Dane county, Wisconsin, where William W. 
Coon attended Albion College. On leaving that town he went to Topeka, Kan- 
sas, and entered the employ of the government, freighting to Fort Hall, Oregon. 
When a young man of twenty he had crossed the plains four times. At that 
early period there was only one house on the present site of Denver, Colorado. 
After returning to Albion, Wisconsin, he wedded Miss Lucinda M. Warren, 
who died soon afterward of typhoid fever, Mr. Coon also falling a victim to 
the disease. For his second wife he chose Mary E. McHenry, with whom he 
removed to Alden, Minnesota, there purchasing a farm on which he made his 
home for ten years. On the expiration of that period he came to Iowa and 
bought a farm on the present site of Arion, continuing to reside thereon until 
called to his final rest in August, 1909, when he had attained the age of seventy- 
four years. In religious faith he was a Baptist, as was also his wife, who died 
on the 20th of May, 1910, when seventy-four years of age. William W. Coon 
enlisted at Madison, Wisconsin, at the time of the Civil war, but was not al- 
lowed to serve because of an injury in the shoulder which he had sustained 
when, as a boy, an Indian pushed him from a high embankment. He held 
various town offices in Minnesota and in Crawford county, Iowa, acting as 
school trustee, school director, etc. He was a gentleman of benevolent and 
charitable disposition and his home was a most hospitable one, always open for 
the reception of his many friends. Unto him and his wife were born three 
children, one son and two daughters : Louis M., of this review ; Helen, who died 
at the age of sixteen years ; and Jessie, who passed away when twenty-three 
years old. The last named was the wife of Wihiam Schouten and left a little 
daughter, Helen. 

Dr. Louis M. Coon, whose name introduces this review, was a small child 
when he accompanied his parents on their removal to Freeborn, Minnesota, 
and a youth of twelve when he came with them to Iowa. He remained on his 
father's farm until eighteen years of age and obtained his early education in 
the district schools. Subsequently he pursued a course of study in Milton Col- 
lege at Milton, Wisconsin, and later attended the State University of Iowa. 
Having determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work, he entered 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons at St. Louis, Missouri, from which in- 
stitution he was graduated in 1898. He first located at Arion, but for the past 
four years has followed his profession in Denison, enjoying a constantly grow- 
ing and lucrative practice. That he keeps in touch with the fraternity in its 
advancement, experimentation and experience, is indicated through his mem- 
bership with the Crawford County Medical Society, the Iowa State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association. He has always been a great 
speculator and now owns sixteen hundred acres of land in Crawford and 
Monona counties of Iowa and near Aberdeen, South Dakota, as well as near 
Sioux City, Iowa. 



268 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUXTY 

On the ist of January, 1889, Dr. Coon was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Ella 
Clark, a native of Ann Arbor, Michigan, and a daughter of Joseph and Eliza 
Clark, both of whom were born in New York. The Doctor and his wife have 
one child. William Louis Coon. 

Fraternally Dr. Coon is identified with the Masons, belonging to Sylvan 
Lodge, No. 507, A. F. & A. AL, while both he and his wife are members of the 
Eastern Star. He is likewise connected with the ^lodern Woodmen. In re- 
ligious faith both he and his wife are Baptists. Dr. Coon is a man of marked 
individuality, of strong character and stalwart purpose, wdio in citizenship and 
professional circles and in private life commands the respect of all with whom 
he has been brought in contact. He served as mayor of the city while residing 
in Arion, and in Denison has been a member of the city council for the past 
three years and chairman of the finance committee. 



FRITZ WTTT. 



Fritz Witt, who owns an excellent two hundred acre farm in Crawford 
county, has acquired a competence which now enables him to live retired in 
Schleswig, where he has recently erected a thoroughly modern residence. He 
was born in Germany on the 4th of November, 1847, and is a son of Carl and 
Johanna (Esmark) Witt, who lived and died in the fatherland. They were 
the parents of the following children: Sophia, the wife of Hans Kruse, of 
Manning, Iowa ; Louisa, who is deceased ; Johanna, who married Carl Staak. 
of Germany; Christina, deceased; Maria, the deceased wife of Rudolph Lehfrerdt, 
of Denison ; Carlotta, the wife of Fritz Hensen, of Germany ; Carl, of Denison ; 
and Fritz, the subject of this sketch. 

Fritz Witt was a resident of his native land for the first twenty-three years 
of his life, but in 1870 he decided that the United States afforded better oppor- 
tunities for the energetic young men than the older country. Upon landing he 
immediately made his way westward and located in Crawford county, Iowa, and 
for seven years he followed various pursuits, during which time he acquired the 
capital to buy eighty acres of land. He was a sheep herder in the old country 
and so in addition to his agricultural pursuits, made a specialty of sheep-raising, 
in which venture he met with gratifying success and was able to add to his 
holdings from time to time until he acquired two hundred acres of land. About 
twenty-one years ago he and George Mayercord. of Denison. were engaged in 
the shipping of cattle and hogs for a time, and it proved to be a profitable un- 
dertaking. Mr. Witt is a man who cautiously plans and as carefully executes 
every project he enters into and the result is a concentration of effort which 
usually compels success. He has rented his homestead to his son and is 
now enjoying in the evening of life the ease which his comfortable circumstances 
provide. 

On the 6th of January, 1875, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Witt and 
Miss Johanna Ohl. of Otter Creek township, a daughter of Ernest and Delside 
(Dibbern) Ohl. Seven children were born unto ^Iv. and Mrs. Ohl, as follows: 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUXTY 269 

August, who is living at Denison ; William, a resident of Dunlap, this state; Amil, 
living at Blue Island, Illinois; ^Margaret, the wife of Carl Schreder, of Buck 
Grove; Matilda, who married Herman Framberg, of Chicago; Johanna, the wife 
of Fritz Witt; and Christina, who became the wife of Jurgen Schroeder, of 
Schleswig. Mr. and Airs. Witt have become the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Emma, the deceased wife of Amos Hollander; Ludwick of Otter Creek 
township; Christina, the wife of John Krohnke, of Schleswig; Amanda, the wife 
of William Schmidt, of Schleswig; Benjamin, of Schleswig; and Ella, who mar- 
ried Paul F. Wilson, of Omaha. 

They all affiliate with the Lutheran church, according to which faith they 
endeavor to guide their lifes. Mr. Witt has ever given his support to the demo- 
cratic party and takes an active interest in all local political issues, having served 
in the majority of the minor township offices, the duties of which he discharged 
creditably and satisfactorily to his constituency. He has many friends who ac- 
cord him the respect his life principles and business policy most justly merit. 



CHRISTIAN H. RUSCH. 

From his earliest recollection Christian H. Rusch has been identified with 
Crawford county. He was born on a farm in this county, January 19, 1880, a 
son of Claus and Bertha (Jansen) Rusch, the former of whom was born in Ger- 
many and the latter in America. They were married in Crawford county, Iowa, 
and the father bought two hundred and twenty acres of land here, which he cul- 
tivated for a number of years. He sold that property in 1898 and purchased 
four hundred acres on sections 17 and 18, Morgan township, upon which he lived 
until his retirement in 1905. He and his wife now make their home at Schles- 
wig. By their union ten children have been born, namely : Christian H., of this 
review; Henry, who lives in ^Morgan township; Elizabeth, the wife of John 
Claussen, of Crawford county; Julia, who married Paul Kleppen, of Nebraska; 
and Katie, Ella, Maggie, Metha, John and Herman, all of whom are at home. 

Educated in the district schools, Christian H. Rusch continued at home until 
twenty-six years of age. He then rented a part of his father's homestead, upon 
which he still resides. He makes a specialty of feeding stock and as he is a good 
judge of animals he is able to buy to advantage and to command fair prices for 
what he has to sell. 

On the 27th of February, 1906, Mr. Rusch was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie Claussen, who was born at Clinton. Iowa, June 24, 1882, a daughter of 
Henry and Katie (Witthon) Claussen, both of whom were born in Germany. 
They came to America about 1880 and lived in Clinton county, Iowa, for sev- 
eral years before coming to Crawford county, where 'Sir. Claussen rented land 
for several years aiid then bought one hundred and sixty acres in Soldier town- 
ship. He cultivated his farm with a goodly measure of success until 1909, when 
he disposed of it, and he and his wife have since lived retired at Ricketts. There 
were ten children in their family seven of whom are now living, namely: John, 
of Schleswig; Dora, the wife of William IMeyers, of Crawford county; Anna, 



270 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

who is at home; Minnie, now Mrs. Christian H. Rusch ; Peter, also at home; Her- 
man, of Nebraska ; and Bertha, at home. Mr. and Mrs. Rusch have one child, 
Harvey, born March 23, 191 1. 

I'olitically Mr. Rusch gives his support to the democratic party but he is in 
no sense an office seeker as he has never cared for the honors or emoluments of 
public office. He prefers to concentrate his attention upon his business and the 
result is seen in his productive fields and well fed animals which are unmistakable 
evidences of prosperity. He is never backward in aiding a worthy cause and no 
man is more ready or willing to relieve distress or extend a helping hand to the 
unfortunate. He and his wife are valued members of the German Lutheran 
church. 



HUGO KROHNKE. 



Hugo Krohnke, a leading business man of Schleswig, is a native of Cedar 
county, Iowa, born February 26, 1874. He is a son of Jurgen and Dora (Ha- 
mann) Krohnke, both of whom were natives of Germany. They came to America 
about 1864 and Mr. Krohnke began in his quest of fortune in the new world 
by working by the month on a farm near Daveni)ort, Iowa. After several years 
he rented land and then, having acquired sufficient capital, he purchased eighty 
acres in Morgan township, Crawford county, to which he applied himself with 
such diligence that he became one of the large landholders of the county. He is 
now the owner of one thousand and forty acres, which is divided into six dif- 
ferent farms, all of them being in Crawford county except eighty acres which is 
in Woodbury county, Iowa. The land is well improved and under an e.xceHent 
state of cultivation. j\Ir. Krohnke retired from active labor in 1903 and is now 
living in a beautiful home at Schleswig. There are four children in the family, 
namely: Herman, a resident of Nebraska; George, of Ricketts, Iowa; Hugo, 
the subject of this review; and Emma, who is the wife of E. L. Dieckmann, of 
Sioux City, Iowa. 

Hugo Krohnke attended the district schools in his boyhood and under his 
father became acquainted with the various details of agriculture and stock- 
raising. He continued at home until twenty-four years of age and then pur- 
chased a livery stable at Schleswig, which he has since conducted, also engaging 
extensively in buying and shipi)ing live stock. He has a well equipped livery es- 
tablishment, which he conducts in such a manner as to attract a lucrative pat- 
ronage. He is a man of good business sagacity and has the confidence of the 
entire community. 

On the 23d of May, 1906, Mr. Krohnke was married to Miss Emma Rick- 
ers, a native of Otter Creek township and a daughter of Adolph and Dora 
(Suckstorf) Rickers. The parents were both born in Germany but were mar- 
ried in Iowa. Mr. Rickers engaged successfully in farming but retired to Otter 
Creek in 1896. He died ten years later but his widow is still living and makes 
her home with the subject of this review. She is now sixty-five years of age. 
There are three children in the family, namely: Henry and George, both resi- 
dents of Nebraska ; and Emma, now Mrs. Hugo Krohnke. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 271 

Mr. Krohnke and his wife are active members of the German Lutheran 
church and are well acquainted in their locality, with which Mrs. Krohnke has 
been identified all her life. In politics he supports the republican party, whose 
platforms and candidates he has endorsed by his vote ever since he attained man- 
hood. Fraternally, he is connected with the Sons of Herman and as a business 
man and citizen he is ever actuated by principles of integrity and progressiveness. 



JOHN JOSEPH McDERMOTT. 

For twelve years past editor and publisher of The Manilla Times, John Joseph 
McDermott has acquired a reputation not only as a clear and convincing writer 
but also as one of the substantial and progressive citizens of Crawford county. 
He was born at Clinton, Iowa, December ii, 1878, a son of Anthony and Mary 
Agnes (Hook) McDermott, the former of whom was a native of County Mayo, 
Ireland, and the latter of Liverpool, England. The father, who was born July 
16, 1852, left home at fourteen years of age and became a sailor but after ar- 
riving at manhood decided to try his fortune in America and came to Clinton 
county, Iowa. He was married at Toronto, Iowa, to Mary Agnes Hook and took 
up his residence in Clinton, where he continued until May, 1893, then locating 
on a farm two and one-half miles northwest of Manilla in Nishnabotny township, 
Crawford county. He removed to Manilla in 1908, and died there August 12, 
1910. His beloved wife passed away February 3, 1897. Mr. McDermott gave 
his support to the democratic party, and being a stanch friend of education served 
most acceptably for a number of years as member of the school board. He and 
his wife were devoutly attached to the Catholic church and in their lives indi- 
cated a profound desire to follow the teachings of the Great Master. The last 
words of Mr. McDermott were expressive of his deep sense of the presence of 
God and his desire to meet once more with his companion, whose death he had 
sincerely mourned. Our subject's grandfather McDermott was a native of Ire- 
land and engaged in farming. He came to America and died at Clinton, Iowa, 
at the advanced age of ninety-seven years. There were eight children in his 
family, namely: Michael, Anthony, Patrick, John, Mrs. Owen Kingsley, Mrs. 
James Sheridan, Bridget and Mrs. Thomas Rimmer. This branch of the family 
is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. James Hook, the maternal grandfather, married 
Kate Sibbons in England. They came to America and after living for a short 
time in Clinton county, Iowa, removed to Crawford county, settling in Nishna- 
botny township. They both died at Manilla well advanced in years, having reared 
a family of seven children, namely: James, Mary Agnes, Patrick, Mrs. Kate 
Haley, Mrs. James Norkett, William and Francis. There were ten children in 
the family of Anthony and Mary Agnes McDermott, six of whom grew to ma- 
turity: John Joseph; Kathryn, now of Omaha, Nebraska; George, Anthony, 
Theresa, and LilHan, all of Manilla, Iowa. 

John Joseph McDermott was reared at Clinton until eighteen years of age 
and received his education in the parochial and public schools, also attending the 
Clinton Business College. After laying his books aside he learned the printer's 



272 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

trade and has since devoted his attention principally to that business. In 1896 
he came to Crawford county and for the past twelve years has been publisher 
of The Manilla Times, an independent weekly newspaper, which has many read- 
ers in this part of the state. He maintains a well equipped general job printing 
establishment for general catalogue and other lines of work in connection with 
his paper. 

On the 5th of November, 1903, Mr. McDermott was united in marriage to 
Miss Marguerite Brockelsby, a native of Crawford county and a daughter of 
W. H. and Malinda Brockelsby. The father was born in England and the mother 
in Pennsylvania. They came west and settled in Crawford county and are now 
living in Hayes township. There were five children in their family : Richard, 
Edward. Winifred, Marguerite and Elsie. Mr. and Airs. AIcDermott have two 
children, Joseph Muril and Francis Clyde. 

Mr. McDermott's success in the management of his paper has been due to his 
unswerving loyalty to the section in which he lives and the fairness and impar- 
tiality with which he has treated all subjects of public interest. A man of good 
judgment and fair discrimination, he has proven a safe adviser, and his aim at 
all times has been to promote the general welfare , rather than to advocate any 
special interest. In religious belief he adheres to the Catholic church, and so- 
cially he is a valued member of the Modern Woodmen of America and the Com- 
mercial Club of Manilla. 



RICHARD G. BAER. 



One of the prosperous farmers of Crawford county, is Richard G. Baer, a 
son of Andrew J. and Jane (Kelly) Baer. His father was born in Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania, and removed to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1862, later 
coming to Crawford county in 1871. He located in Denison township, two miles 
south of Denison, where he resided until his death in 1886. He was a member 
of the Presbyterian church. His wife, who was also a native of Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, is still living. Ten children were born to them, three of 
whom are deceased. Those who survive are: Elias Henry, a resident of Port- 
land. Oregon ; Frank M.. of Denison, Iowa ; Martha, the wife of Francis Mur- 
doch, of Denison township; Richard G., the subject of this sketch; Emma, the 
wife of Jesse Rank, of Denison; Susie, the deceased wife of E. S. Miles, of 
Dunlap, Iowa ; and George C, who resides in Vergin, Saskatchewan, Canada. 

Richard G. Baer attended school in Denison township, although his birth oc- 
curred in Clinton county, Iowa, April 26, 1866. He resided at home until he 
was twenty-four years of age, at which time he bought the farm where he now 
resides. This consists of one hundred and twenty acres, located on section 36, 
Denison township, and on which he has made many modern improvements, both 
as to buildings and farm machinery. 

In 1890 Mr. Baer was united in marriage to Miss Alice Riddle, a native of 
Crawford county, and they are the parents of eleven children, as follows : Lil- 
lian ; Jetta, who is teaching school in this county ; Laura, attending college in 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 273 

Denison; Florence, Robert, Pearl, Vernie, Paul, Elsie, Evelyn and Theodore, 
all living at home. 

In politics Mr. Baer is a republican. Formerly he and his wife were mem- 
• bers of the Baptist church but are now affiliated with the Holiness mission. 



HENRY KIEPE. 



Henry Kiepe, who lives on a highly cultivated farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres in Hanover township, was born in Germany on the 14th of March, 1861, 
and is a son of William and Sophia (Boenieng) Kiepe. His parents spent their 
entire lives in the land of their nativity, the father dying at the age of thirty- 
five years and the mother at fifty-four. Of the three children born to them the 
son Henry was the only one to become a citizen of the United States, the other 
two, Herman and Charley, having remained in the fatherland. 

The first twenty-two years of Henry Kiepe's life were spent in Germany, 
but at the end of that period he decided that better opportunities were afforded 
ambitious young men in America, so he took passage for the United States and 
in 1883 began his Hfe in the new world. During the first two and one-half years 
of his residence here he worked by the month as a farm hand in CHnton county, 
this state. xA.t the expiration of that time he removed to Monona county, where 
he was similarly employed for a time, and then rented land which he farmed for 
three years. By means of careful management, perseverance and economy he 
saved the capital necessary to buy eighty acres of land, which he cultivated for 
twelve years, but during that period he added another one hundred and sixty 
acres to his original tract. He sold this property in 1901 and bought a quarter 
section of land in Crawford county, upon which he now resides. Mr. Kiepe is a 
capable man of progressive ideas, as is attested by the general appearance of his 
homestead. The improvements are good and are kept in repair, the pastures 
contain good grades of stock and the well tilled fields yield abundant harvests, 
all of which are due to the careful supervision which he personally gives to 
every detail about his farm. 

On the 14th of November, 1886, Mr. Kiepe was united in marriage to Miss 
Sophia Quitmeier, who is also a native of Germany, her birth occurring in that 
country on the 12th of September, 1865. Her father died in the fatherland and 
her mother was married again and emigrated to the United States with her hus- 
band and family in 1888. They located on a farm in Monona county, this state, 
which they cultivated until 1908. in which year the mother died. The stepfather, 
however, is still living at the age of sixty-six years. By her first marriage Mrs. 
Quitmeier had two children: Henry, who died in Germany, and Mrs. Kiepe. 
Three children were born of the second marriage, as follows: Frederick, who 
lives in Monona county ; Mary, the wife of Jorgen Cook, of Charter Oak town- 
ship, this county ; and Charley, who lives on the old homestead near Charter Oak. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kiepe have become the parents of six children : Herman, who 
was born on the 30th of April, 1887, and who is married and living in Hanover 
township ; :\Iary, who was born on the 25th of October, 1888, and is the wife of 



274 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Henry Fredricks; Charley, who was born on the 6th of April, 1890; Fred, born 
on the 3d of October, 1891 ; Annie, who was born on the nth of Jannary, 1896; 
and Arthur, born on the 30th of August, 1902. All but the first two are still at 
home. 

The family attend the services of the Lutheran church, with which tiiey are 
identified by membership. Mr. Kiepe gives his political support to the republican 
party but does not actively participate in public afifairs as he does not aspire to 
office. He has always given his time and energy to the development of his per- 
sonal interests rather than public, however, he is ever ready to assist in the 
promotion of any measure the adoption of which would be for the general wel- 
fare of the community. 



THOMAS HAYES. 



A well known name associated with the agricultural development of Craw- 
ford county is that of Hayes, the family continuing to be ably represented in 
the person of Thomas Hayes, who owns two hundred and eighty acres of land 
in Nishnabotny township, in the cultivation of which he engages. He was born 
in Monona county, Iowa, on the 226. of January, i860, and is a son of Thomas 
and Emily (Riggs) Hayes. The father was a native of New Jersey, but of 
Scotch extraction in both the paternal and maternal lines, his mother having 
been a McMurty prior to her marriage. Thomas Hayes, Sr., was a shoe- 
maker, following his trade while journeying from village to village through 
New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Illinois, arriving in Chicago about 1835 
or 1836. From there he proceeded to Burlington, where he located about 1838, 
continuing to make it his home for fifteen consecutive years. In 1853 he re- 
moved to Monona county, Iowa, settling in the vicinity of Onawa, where he 
resided for thirteen years, then came to Crawford county, first locating in Deni- 
son. He purchased land in what is now known as Hayes township, which was 
later named in his honor because he broke the first prairie there. He settled 
upon the place and engaged in its cultivation in the fall of 1869, his family, 
however, did not arrive until later, continuing to make it his home until 1875, 
when he passed away and was buried in the township which bore his name. 
Mr. Hayes was always one of the prominent and highly respected men in his 
community, ever taking an active and helpful interest in the political aft'airs of 
the township, having served as justice of the peace and in other minor offices. 
His wife was a native of Kentucky but migrated to Iowa with her people in 
1838, and here she met the man whom she subsequently married. She survived 
her husband for over twenty years, her demise occurring in 1898. 

Ten children were born unto Mr. and Mrs. Hayes, the order of their birth 
being as follows: Amelia, deceased; Sarah, who is the wife of M. G. Wiggins, 
of Dow City, Iowa ; Henry, a resident of Oklahoma ; Martha, who has never 
married and is living in Omaha, Nebraska ; Emma, deceased ; Thomas, our sub- 
ject; Callie, who married J. B. Milligan. of Nebraska; Silas, who is living in 
South Dakota; the ninth, who died in infancy; and James, also deceased. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 275 

The district and public schools of Hayes township and Denison provided 
Thomas Hayes, Jr., with his education and he determined to become an agri- 
culturist. He remained a member of the paternal household until he had at- 
tained his twenty-third year, at which time he left to begin his career. The 
unsettled districts of the west had as great a fascination for him as for his 
father before him, so he went to Nebraska, locating upon a farm in Cuming 
county, which he cultivated for nine years. Returning to Iowa at the expira- 
tion of that time he purchased land on section 21, Nishnabotny township, which 
has continued to be his home for nearly twenty years. He has made all of the 
improvements upon his farm, which is one of the best in the vicinity, the build- 
ings all being substantially constructed and well repaired. Success has attended 
the efforts of Mr. Hayes and he has added to his original tract until he has 
acquired two hundred and eighty acres of land. He engages in general farming 
and stock-raising, having a iine breed of registered shorthorns, and makes a 
specialty of feeding stock for the market, being one of the most extensive feed- 
ers in the township. 

In 1883 Mr. Hayes was united in marriage to Miss Mary M. Milligan, a 
native of Pennsylvania, and they have become the parents of the following 
children : Clarence L., a resident of Nishnabotny township ; Mabel, the wife of 
George Massie, of North Dakota; and Howard, Thomas, Ruth, Joseph, Katie 
and Irma and Enid, twins, all of whom are at home. 

In politics Mr. Hayes is a republican, having served in some of the minor 
township offices, but his own interests have absorbed so much of his time and 
attention that he has never been prominently identified with public affairs. He 
is one of the energetic and enterprising agriculturists of the community, whose 
capable direction of his affairs is bringing him a goodly, measure of success. 



HENRY GOETSCH. 



It was through the application of energy and perseverance that Henry Goetsch 
established himself upon a comfortable financial basis, becoming the owner of a 
productive farm which he acquired as the result of his own exertions. He is 
also the owner of a prosperous livery and feed business at Kiron. He was born 
in Wisconsin, February 20, 1868, a son of Carl and Carolina (Baumann) 
Goetsch, both of whom were born in Germany. They came to America in 1864 
and after spending five years in Wisconsin removed to Boone county, Iowa, and 
later to Harrison county, where they spent seven years. In 1892 they went to 
California, where the father died in December, 1898, but the mother is still liv- 
ing in that state. They were the parents of ten children, nine of whom are now 
living. 

Henry Goetsch was brought to Iowa in his infancy and received his early 
education in this state. He remained at home until twenty-one years of age and 
then rented a .farm in Harrison county, Iowa, which he cultivated for ten years, 
then purchasing a farm in the same county which he developed into a valuable 
property. In March, 1910, he removed to Kiron and purchased a feed and livery 

Vol. 11—15 



276 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

business, of which he has since had charge. He also manages the farm and as 
he is alert and enterprising and, moreover, uses good judgment in everything 
he undertakes, he has attained a creditable measure of success. 

In September, 1889, Mr. Goetsch was united in marriage to Miss Sarah 
Mesching, who was born in Minnesota and is a daughter of Henry and Julia 
(W'endorff) Mesching, both natives of Germany. Her parents came to America 
and after living for some time in Minnesota removed to Harrison county, Iowa, 
where they now make their home. There were twelve children in their family. 
Four children came to brighten the lives of Mr. and ]\Irs. Goetsch, namely: 
John, who was born August 8, 1891, and is now attending school at Schleswig, 
Iowa; Glenn, born July 12, 1895; August, born September 6, 1896; and Elmer, 
born October 20, 1900, all of whom are at home. 

Mr. Goetsch as a patriotic American citizen has devoted considerable atten- 
tion to political questions and is an ardent adherent of the republican party, 
which he believes has the ability to manage the alTairs of the nation success- 
fully. He is a member of the German Lutheran church, as is also his wife. 
They are giving their children the advantages of a good education and by their 
influence and example are contributing to the general welfare of the community. 
Mr. Goetsch is to be congratulated upon the position he has attained, and the 
higli respect in which he is held by his acquaintances is evidence of his genuine 
worth. 



BRINTEX SHARP. 



Brinten Sharp, an enterprising and prosperous farmer of Union township, 
was born in Center county, Pennsylvania, August 11, 1855, a son of Ehjah and 
Delilah (Canada) Sharp, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. The 
father followed the vocation of forgeman in one of the large iron mills of that 
state and at the time of the Civil war enlisted as a soldier and for three years 
faithfully performed his duties in the rank and file. To him and his wife were 
born five children, of whom three survive, as follows : William, who resides in 
Milton, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania; Brinten, of this review; and Jeanette. 
The father's death occurred in 1899, the mother having passed away when our 
subject was but six years old. 

After obtaining such education as he could in the public schools of Pennsyl- 
vania, Brinten Sharp engaged in farming in his native state for six years and 
then removed to Kane county, Illinois. There he worked by the month for three 
years, after which time he removed to Davison county, South Dakota, where 
he was numbered among the first settlers. He took a homestead, proved up on 
it and spent the following five years there, subsequently coming to Crawford 
county, Iowa. He located on a farm near Vail and for two years conducted a 
dairy business. He then removed to Union township, bought one hundred and 
sixtv acres of land, which he later sold, and then purchased another tract, but 
after living on this for awhile he disposed of it and in 1907 bought his present 
home. Altogether he has owned three farms in Union township, all of which 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 277 

he improved, and at present his holdings consist of one hundred and twenty acres 
of excellent farming land. 

Mr. Sharp was married at the age of twenty-one to Miss Anna Stover, a 
native of Pennsylvania, and the following nine children have been born to them : 
Milford, who lives in Dow City; Amanda, who became the wife of Charles 
Vassar and lives in Parker, South Dakota; Ira, a resident of Ute, Iowa; Elmer, 
of Rapid City, South Dakota; Ida, who married William Sterrett, of Dow City; 
Alabel, who is now Mrs. Allen Haymouth and resides in Dow City ; Floyd, Meryl 
and Vivian, who are at home with their parents. 

In exercising his right of franchise Mr. Sharp casts his vote for the repub- 
lican party, and while taking due interest in public welfare he as never sought 
political preferment. In religion he was reared in the Presbyterian faith, and 
fraternally he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He is recognized as a man of strict integrity 
and genuine worth in every relation of life and is classed with the well known 
and intelligent agricuhurists of Union township, where he enjoys the merited 
esteem of his fellow citizens. 



CARL ERICK ENGBERG. 

Among the natives of the Scandinavian countries who have been successfully 
associated with the agricultural interests of Crawford county must be numbered 
Carl Erick Engberg, who is now residing in Kiron. His birth occurred in Swe- 
den on the 29th of April, 1840. The parents, John Erick Lofqueist and Engred 
(Christophsen) Engberg, emigrated to the United States in 1861 and located in 
Henry county, Illinois, which continued to be their home for many years. Six 
children were born to them, as follows : Margaret, the wife of Laus Longberg, 
of Sac county, Iowa; Carolina, who became the wife of Samuel Petersen, of 
Henry county, Illinois; Johannas, deceased; Carl Erick, our subject; Christopher, 
deceased; and Jonas, also deceased. The father passed away in Henry county, 
Illinois, at the age of ninety-one years, and the mother in Sac county, Iowa, at 
the age of seventy. 

Carl Erick Engberg came to America with his parents and located in Henry 
county, Illinois, where he began working as a farm hand, in which capacity he 
continued for eight years. He was an industrious and economical young man 
and was thus able to put aside a portion of his wages every month and in this 
manner acquired the capital to buy land. In May, 1869, he bought one hundred 
and sixty acres in Stockholm township, Crawford county, and about the same 
time he purchased a ten acre timber tract near Boyer, this county. He engaged 
in general farming and stock-raising, in both of which ventures he met with 
a fair degree of success, owing to his close application and capable management. 
In 1904 he bought a quarter section of land in South Dakota and six years later 
he acquired one hundred and sixty acres in Bruett county, Minnesota. He 
still owns his South Dakota and Minnesota farms but sold his homestead in 
Crawford county in 1904. Two years prior to selling his farm he bought prop- 



278 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

erty in Kiron, upon which he erected several residences and in one of these 
he now Hves. 

On the 26th of I*'cbriiary, 1870, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Engberg 
and Aliss Johanna Johnson, a daughter of Axel and Palnella (Neilsen) Johnson. 
Xine children were born to Mr. and Airs. Johnson, of whom Mrs. Engberg was 
the eldest. The others are as follows: Elenora, the wife of Swan Johnson, of 
Sac county; Olive, who lives in Chicago; Elizabeth, deceased; Augusta, who 
resides in Colorado Springs, Colorado; Lena, the wife of George Oscar Oster- 
green, of .St. Paul, Minnesota; Xels, living in Lyons, Nebraska; Joseph, who 
went to sea as a boy and was never heard from afterward ; and Charles, of 
South Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. Engberg have become the parents of seven chil- 
dren but only four are now living, John, the eldest, passing away at the age of 
thirty-eight, and Oscar and Robert, the next two in the order of birth, dying in 
infancy. Those surviving are: Nettie, the wife of Harlund Smith, of Sioux 
Falls, South Dakota ; Joseph, living at Kiron ; Caroline, the wife of the Rev. 
Walter Forest, of Ames, Iowa; and Lilly, who is at home. 

The family attend the Baptist church, of which they are members. Politi- 
cally Mr. Engberg affiliates with the prohibition party, considering that its policy 
is best adapted to promote the moral welfare of the public. He is a public- 
spirited man and takes an active interest in local affairs and has been elected to 
several of the minor township offices, the duties of which he capably discharged. 
The family is well known and highly regarded in Kiron and the hospitality of 
their pleasant home is graciously extended to their many friends. 



THOMAS HODKIN, 



Among the native sons of England who have become prominent in agricul- 
tural circles in Crawford county is Thomas Hodkin. He was born in Chester- 
field. Derbyshire, January 27, 1838, a son of George and Mary (Brown) 
Hodkin, both of whom were natives of Derbyshire. The father was by trade 
a stone-mason and also engaged in farming. He removed with his family to 
Buxton, England, about the time our subject left home when a boy and con- 
tinued there during the remainder of his days. He and his wife are both buried 
at Buxton. There were three children in the family : Jane, deceased ; Thomas, 
of this review ; and George, also deceased. 

Thomas Hodkin possessed limited advantages of education in his early life. 
He entered the service of Duke Francis of Bedford as stable boy, continuing 
in that position until about twenty-four years of age. He was then in the 
employ of two sisters by the name of Travers, who belonged to the aristocracy 
and continued in their service for about six years. At the age of thirty he was 
married and, having decided that more favorable opi)ortunities were presented 
in the new world, he purchased tickets for himself and bride from London to 
Iowa City, Iowa. After arriving at his destination he worked in the vicinity 
of Iowa City and West Liberty and later rented land near Downey. In 1882 he 
came to Crawford county and purchased a small farm, which he cultivated until 




MR. AND MRS. THOMAS HODKIN 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 281 

1893, when he moved to his present location in Willow township. He acquired 
two hundred acres, which he improved with good buildings and in other ways, 
and transformed the property into one of the attractive farms of this region. 
He has since sold forty acres and now has a well kept place of one hundred 
and sixty acres, which yields a handsome income. 

In 1865 Mr. Hodkin was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Compton, of 
Bedfordshire, England, who proved to him a loving wife and helpful companion. 
She passed away in 1903 and was buried in the cemetery at Dow City, Iowa. 
Their home was brightened by the arrival of eight children, namely : Charlotte, 
now the wife of John Sanders, of Charter Oak, Iowa; George, who is fore- 
man of a bridge gang; Blanch, the wife of Carl Larson, of Redfield, South 
Dakota; Horace, of Boyer township; Daisy, now Mrs. John Grant, of Charter 
Oak; Jennie, the wife of Peter Hansen, of Streeter, North Dakota; Thomas B., 
who is Hving at home; and Jesse, of Redfield, South Dakota. 

In his native country Mr. Hodkin was a member of the Church of England, 
but after he came to the United States he united with the Methodist church, 
with which he is still afifiliated. In politics ever since arriving in this count^-y he 
has adhered to the republican party. He is a strong advocate of education and 
has assisted greatly in promoting the interests of the schools of his township, 
having served most ably as a member of the school board. In business he has 
always been governed by principles of justice and fairness and in the evening 
of a long and useful life he retains the respect and honor in an eminent degree 
of his neighbors and acquaintances. 



CLINT SCIFORD. 



As a representative of the young men who are coming forward to occupy places 
of responsibility in agricultural circles Clint Sciford of Soldier township deserves 
mention in the history of Crawford county. He was born on the farm which 
he now owns, October 19, 1886, a son of George and Theresa (Bowers) Sciford, 
both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. They came to Iowa with their re- 
spective parents and were married near Muscatine, locating in 1874 in Soldier 
township, Crawford county. Here Mr. Sciford engaged very successfully in 
farming and was the owner at one time of six hundred and ninety-six acres, which 
he acquired through his diligence and good judgment. He retired to x-Xrion, 
Iowa, in 1900, having previously divided his land among his children, of whom 
there are six now living, namely : Charley, Emma, now the wife of Fred Blunk, 
and George, all of Crawford county; Benjamin, of Boyd county, Nebraska; 
Ella, the wife of Wallace Sommers, of Minnesota; and Clint, the subject of this 
review. Sherman, the fifth in order of birth, is deceased. 

Clint Sciford attended the district schools and was reared under influences 
that gave every desirable opportunity for laying the foundation for a useful 
business career. At fifteen years of age he began life on his own account as pro- 
prietor of a livery barn but at the end of one year went to Omaha, continuing 
for a year in that city. He then returned home and began farming, later coming 



282 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

into possession of his share of the estate. He now owns one hundred and twenty 
acres, which is well improved, and under his competent management is yielding 
handsome returns. 

On the 27th of April, 1908, Mr. Sciford was united in marriage to Anna 
Moore, who was born in St. Louis, September 23, 1880. a daughter of Charles 
and Josephine (Trefts) ]\Ioore. The father was born in Cincinnati and the 
mother in St. Louis, where they were married. The father passed away in 1895, 
his companion dying ten years later. There were seven children in their family, 
namely : Nettie, wife of William Jasen, of Chicago, Illinois ; William and Char- 
ley, of St. Louis; Anna, now Mrs. Clint Sciford; John, of St. Louis; Minnie, 
the wife of Elmer Page, of Denver, Colorado; and Joseph, who lives in Los 
Angeles, California. Mrs. Sciford was a widow when she married Mr. Sciford, 
and the mother of one child. Earl, born on the 5th of February, 1907. 

Mr. Sciford gives his support to the republican party but is not prominent in 
political afTairs, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business. He is 
an efficient member of the community and is known as a successful and progres- 
sive farmer who takes an active interest in his calling and whose business qualifi- 
cations are more than ordinary. Genial and kindly in disposition, he has made 
many friends who prophesy for him a bright and prosperous future. 



lOHN GRIFFIN, 



Although he has passed the eighty-first milestone on life's journey, John 
Griffin continues to be quite actively engaged in general farming and stock-rais- 
ing on his excellent farm in Washington township. He w^as born in Ireland 
in March, 1829, being the eldest child of Thomas and Anne (Lillis) Griffin. The 
parents, who were also natives of the Emerald isle, spent their entire lives in the 
land of their birth, where the father engaged in farming. Five children were 
bom to them, the other four being as follows : iMargaret, the wife of John Mc- 
Donald, living in the state of New York; Bridget, who married John Eustis, 
residing at Pond Beach, New York; Kate, deceased; and Thomas, whose where- 
abouts are unknown. 

John Griffin obtained his education in Ireland, remaining a subject of the 
British crown until he had passed his twenty-second year, at which time he re- 
solved to become an American citizen. Upon his arrival in the United States he 
first located in Louisiana, where he remained for one year, and then spent one 
summer in St. Louis, Missouri, after which he went to Davenport, where he 
lived for a year, and then returned to Louisiana, spending the winter there. In 
the spring he went to Memphis, Tennessee, where he remained until the close of 
the Civil war, when he came to Iowa, first locating in Clinton county and later 
removing to Crawford county and settling in Denison township, where he farmed 
as a renter for about twelve years. He then bought the farm in Washington 
township, where he now resides. Mr. Griffin has always been an energetic and 
enterprising man and has met with more than moderate success in his agricultural 
pursuits, being regarded as one of the substantial farmers in his community. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 283 

Mr. Griffin was united in marriage in 1862 at Memphis, Tennessee, to Miss 
Mary Carey, a native of County Clare, Ireland. Nine children were born of this 
union as follows : Thomas, who is living in Nebraska ; Anne, residing in Council 
Bluffs; Mollie and Patrick, who are at home; John, a resident of Omaha, Ne- 
braska; James, living in the same place; Margaret, the wife of Jesse Bennett; 
Katie, the wife of Willis Wiggins, of Dow City ; and Mitchell, deceased. Mr. 
Griffin also reared three children belonging to his son Thomas : John, Grace 
and Gertrude. 

The family are communicants of the Roman Catholic church. Mr. Griffin 
has always been independent in his political views, giving his support to such men 
and measures as he felt were adapted to promote the best interests of the people. 
He has not been an aspirant for public office but is at present serving as a school 
director. During the long period of his residence in Crawford county he has 
shown himself to be a man well worthy of the esteem which is accorded him. 



PETER BOECK. 



Thirty years ago Peter Boeck, now a well known farmer of Crawford county, 
landed in America from a foreign land. He came to this country because he 
believed it offered more favorable inducements than could be found in Europe 
and the result has exceeded his anticipations. He is today one of the highly re- 
spected citizens of the county and he and his family enjoy the blessings of an 
abundant prosperity. He was born in Germany, April i, 1850, a son of Peter 
and Margaret (Reimel) Boeck. The parents passed their entire lives in the old 
country, the father dying in 1875 and the mother in 1881. There were four chil- 
dren in their family: Thomas, who is still living in Germany; Peter, of this re- 
view; Henry, who is a tailor and lives in Germany; and Annie, the wife of John 
Ericksen. 

Peter Boeck was educated in his native land and continued to live there until 
thirty-one years of age. He arrived on the western shores of the Atlantic ocean 
in ]^Iarch, 1881, and located in Hamilton county, Iowa, where he worked at 
eighteen dollars per month. As time passed he received higher wages but he 
continued in the employ of others for eighteen years. In 1899 he came to Craw- 
ford county and began farming upon his own account on land which he now 
owns. From time to time he purchased more land and his farm now comprises 
three hundred and thirty-seven acres on sections 15 and 16, Hanover township. 
In addition to general farming, he is an extensive stock-feeder and as he uses 
good judgment he has attained marked success. He developed his farm from 
the virgin prairie and made many improvements which are among the best to be 
seen in the township. 

On the 8th of December, 1898, Mr. Boeck was united in marriage to Mrs. 
Louisa Klinker, the widow of Peter Klinker, who was born in Germany and 
married in that country. He died September 15, 1897. There were five children 
in his family, namely: Meta, who was born October 19, 1884, and is now the 
wife of Peter Boeck, of Charter Oak township; George, who was born May 



284 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

28, 1887, and now lives in Monona county, Iowa; Mary, who died at the age of 
six months; and Wilham, born August 19, 1894, and Bernhardt, born January 
15, 1897, both of whom are Hving at home. Mrs. Boeck is a daughter of Juer- 
gen and EHzabeth (Goss) Kroeger, also natives of Germany. They came to 
America in 1882 and settled in Crawford county, passing the later years of their 
lives with their children. The mother died in August, 1886, and the father in 
November, 1890. Seven children besides Louisa, now Mrs. Peter Boeck, were 
born to them, namely: Elizabeth, the wife of Henry Vosgran, of Crawford 
county; Minnie, who became the wife of Marcus Wilefang and is now deceased; 
John, who lives in Germany; Peter, of Plymouth county, Iowa; Mary, the wife 
of Brother Christiansen, of Denison ; Dora, the wife of Hans Petersen, of Ger- 
many; and Adolph, of Cherokee, Iowa. One child, Charley H., has come to 
bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. Boeck, his natal day being November 4, 1900. 
Even as a boy Mr. Boeck was impressed with the fact that industry and per- 
severance are important factors in success and his life is a striking illustration of 
this truth. He applied himself with untiring zeal and thus acquired the founda- 
tion of the competence he now enjoys. His record cannot fail to be an inspira- 
tion to others who aspire to financial independence. Politically he adheres to 
the democratic party and religiously he and his wife are earnest supporters of 
the German Lutheran church. 



JOHN O'SHEA. 



The ability to work hard, the ambition to get ahead in the world and the 
tenacity to carry out this desire are three qualities that have placed John O'Shea 
in the successful position he today occupies as one of the successful farmers of 
Crawford county. He was born in County Cork, Ireland, about December 25, 
1840, a son of Timothy and Julia (Newman) O'Shea. His father was a native 
of Ireland, where he died about 1847 or 1848, the history of his early life being 
unknown. The mother was also born in Ireland and was of English extraction. 
She came to this country and lived with her son until she also passed away in 
1892. To this couple the following four children were born: Ann, deceased; 
John; Abigail, of Dunlap, Iowa; and Jane, of Grand Island, Nebraska. 

John O'Shea obtained his early education in the public schools of Ireland and 
although quite young at the time of his father's death he worked during his 
leisure hours and for three months received wages which amounted to about two 
dollars and forty cents in United States money for' his labor. Later he was em- 
ployed for two years at thirty-five dollars a year, every cent of which he saved 
as he had meanwhile determined to seek his fortune in the new world, and he 
used his earnings to defray his expenses to the United States, landing in New 
York city in 1864. As he had a little money left, he went to Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, where he worked for four months in order to earn enough to continue 
his journey westward. This he accomplished, locating in Cedar Rapids, Linn 
county, Iowa, and as soon as he had accumulated enough money he sent to the 
old countrv for his mother and eldest sister, who were followed later on bv the 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 285 

remaining two children. His mother resided with him until 1876. in which year 
he built her a home in Dunlap, Iowa, and there supported her until her death. 

When Mr. O'Shea located in Cedar Rapids he secured employment on the 
railroad section, remaining there for four years, at the end of that period moving 
to Johnson county, where he purchased land and lived thereon during the next 
three years. He then went to Shelby county, again buying land, upon which he 
lived until 1907. In that year he disposed of his holdings, amounting to four 
hundred acres, and came to Crawford county. Here he bought two hundred 
and eighty acres of land, building upon it his present residence, and has since 
added to his possessions one hundred and eighty-six acres located one-half mile 
out of Denison. 

In 1876 Mr. O'Shea was married to Miss Mary Castelloo, who was born 
in Canada, a daughter of Thomas and Anne (Kilroo) Castelloo, both of whom 
were natives of County Tyrone, Ireland. They emigrated to Canada in the early 
'50s and later moved to Clinton county, Iowa, where the father died. The 
mother then went to Shelby county, Iowa, where her death also occurred. They 
were the parents of seven children, namely : Anne and Matthew, both deceased ; 
Mary; John, deceased; Kate, of Mapleton, Iowa; Michael, deceased; and 
Thomas, of Sioux City. To Mr. and Mrs. O'Shea were born the following 
eight children: Timothy, thirty-three years old February i, 1910, is a member 
of Dunlap Council, No. 1248, Knights of Columbus; Julia, thirty-one years old; 
John Thomas, twenty-nine years ; Matthew Michael, twenty-seven years ; Agnes, 
twenty-five years ; William Henry, twenty-three years ; Patrick Oliver, twenty- 
one years; and Peter Charles, eighteen years old. 

All of the children are living at home and with their parents are faithful 
members of the Roman Catholic church. Politically Air. O'Shea gives his 
support to the democratic party and at one time was elected to the office of 
justice of the peace but declined to qualify. For four years he has been a di- 
rector on the school board. Mr. O'Shea is broad-minded in his views, is a man 
whom to know is to respect, ever doing all in his power to upbuild and maintain 
the good standing of his township. 



J. H. SCHMADEKE. 



One of the extensive landowners and progressive citizens of Crawford county 
is I. H. Schmadeke, who for a period of more than twenty-five years has been 
one of the active factors in the agricultural development of this county. He is 
a native son of Iowa, having been born in Jackson county on the 29th of July, 
1859, and is a son of Frederick and Sophia (Storm) Schmadeke. The father 
was a native of Hanover, Germany, and the mother of jMecklenburg. They 
emigrated to the United States with their respective parents in childhood and 
met and were married in Iowa. Shortly after that event they purchased eighty 
acres of land in Jackson county, this state, for which they paid two and one- 
half dollars per acre, and followed farming during the remainder of their lives. 
Upon them devolved all of the hardships of pioneer life, but they were strong 



286 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

and industrious and by means of careful management and economy had acquired 
an estate of two hundred and eighty acres at the time of Mr. Schmadeke's 
death, ah of which was well improved and under a high state of cultivation. 
They were the parents of the following children: Mary, who died at the age of 
two years; J. H., our subject; Annie, the wife of Edward Hachmeister, of Du 
Page, Illinois; Henry and William, who are twins, the former residing in Craw- 
ford county and the latter in Jackson county, this state ; and the sixth who died 
in infancy. The father passed away in March, 1893, and the mother in August 
of the following year. 

J. H. Schmadeke obtained his preliminary education in the common schools 
and after completing the course there he attended a commercial school. He 
remained at home with his parents until he was twenty-five years of age and 
then engaged in farming on his own account on two hundred and forty acres 
which he had bought and which forms part of his present homestead. He is a 
man of more than average capabilities and has made a gratifying success of his 
various enterprises, which has enabled him to add to his original tract at differ- 
ent times until at the present he owns five hundred and sixty acres in Hanover 
township. It is well improved and under a high state of cultivation, although 
when he bought the land it was unbroken prairie, and is today regarded as one 
of the valuable farming properties of the county. He has always engaged in 
general farming and stock-raising, making a specialty of thoroughbred short- 
horn cattle and Belgium horses, and he has also been an extensive feeder of 
cattle for the market. In addition to his large home farm, Mr. Schmadeke owns 
three hundred and twenty acres of improved land in Boyd county, Nebraska, a 
section in Dakota, and one hundred and sixty acres near Havre, Montana. 

]\lr. Schmadeke was united in marriage on the 13th of March, 1885, to Miss 
Ida Kukkuck, who was born in Jackson county, Iowa, on the 28th of June, 
1867. By this union were born seven children: Annie, who was born on the 
20th of January, 1886, and is now the wife of Ever Nielsen, of Montana; Dora, 
born on the 13th of September, 1887, the wife of Andrew Lorenzen, of Olive, 
California; Freda, born on the 19th of December, 1890, still at home; Frederick, 
born on the 26th of January, 1893, attending college at Denison ; Ida, born on 
the 9th of April, 1895, at home; Laura, born on the 8th of May, 1898; and 
August, born on the nth of October, 1900. The wife and mother passed away 
on the 1st of February, 1901, and on the 8th of June, 1904, Mr. Schmadeke 
married Miss Wilhelmina Langc, who was born in Clinton county, Iowa, on 
the 8th of October, 1866. She is a daughter of Gahart and Marie (Voss) 
Lange, who were born in Germany but emigrated to the United States and 
settled on a farm in Clinton county, Iowa, which they operated until 1906, when 
they retired and are now living with a daughter near the old homestead. The 
father is seventy-seven years of age and the mother seventy-five. They are the 
parents of the following children : Henry, deceased ; John, a resident of Sac 
county, Iowa; Mary, the wife of Louis Schmidt, of Crawford county; Wilhel- 
mina, the wife of J. W. Schmadeke; William, living in Sac county; Annie, who 
married John Moore, of Clinton county ; and Otto, also of Clinton county. 
Three children have been born unto Mr. and Mrs. Schmadeke: Edna, whose 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 287 

birth occurred on the nth of August, 1905; Leona, who was born on the 21st 
of March, 1907; and Arma, born on the i8th of February, 1910. 

The family attend the German Lutheran church, of which the parents are 
members. Ever since attaining his majority Mr. Schmadeke has given his po- 
litical support to the democratic party. He takes an active interest in all local 
issues and for twenty-four years has served as a trustee of his township, which 
fact most concUisively proves that he has capably discharged the duties of the 
office. He is one of the highly respected men of Hanover township and during 
his long residence has won the friendship of many citizens whose regard he 
continues to retain. 



A. H. COOK. 



A. H. Cook was a lad of but twelve years when he first crossed the threshold 
■of the business world, and since that time he has been dependent upon his own 
resources, the success which has come to him being the direct result of his own 
unaided efforts. One of Iowa's native sons, he was born in Jackson county, 
near Green Island, May 5, 1872, a son of Henry and Mary Cook, both natives 
of Germany. In the fatherland the parents resided until 1872 when, crossing the 
Atlantic to America, they made their way direct to Iowa and located first in Jack- 
son county. They resided in various parts of that county for about eight years 
and in 18S0 the family started for Crawford county, the father, accompanied 
by one son, coming with the stock. He was last heard of in Cedar Rapids, where 
he was seen talking with three men, and it is supposed that he met with foul 
play. In the meantime the mother with the rest of the family, traveling by rail, 
had arrived in Crawford county, and she established her home in Hanover 
township, where she remained for a time, later removing to Paradise township 
and subsequently to Charter Oak, where her last days were spent. She passed 
away in 1902. She was the second wife of Henry Cook, and by her marriage 
became the mother of four children: A. H., of this review; Mary, deceased; 
Anna, who has also passed away; and Louisa, the wife of John Thielman, of 
Charter Oak, Iowa. By the former marriage of Mr. Cook there were three 
sons: Fred, of Wyoming, Iowa; Henry, of Mapleton, Iowa; and William, like- 
wise of Wyoming. 

A. H. Cook spent the first eight years of his life in Jackson county, after 
which he came with his mother to Crawford county and was a pupil in the public 
schools near his home until twelve years of age. It then became necessary for 
him to seek employment, whereby he might earn his own livelihood, and thus 
early in life he put aside his text-books and entered the business world as a farm 
hand, being engaged in this capacity until twenty-one years of age. Upon at- 
taining his majority he took up farming on his own account in Paradise town- 
ship and has since been a resident of that township with the exception of three 
years spent in Denison township. He is now the owner of one hundred and 
sixty acres of rich farm land, upon which he has placed many modern improve- 
ments, and the well kept appearance of the property denotes a life characterized 



288 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

by tlirift, industry and perseverance. Progress has also been a forceful element 
in his career and has been a potent factor in the acquirement of a goodly pros- 
perity which has come to him with the passing years. 

On the 8th of November, 1893, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Cook 
and Miss Ellen A. Green, a daughter of Ezra and Emily (Clarke) Green, who 
came to Crawford county from Wisconsin about 1870 or 1871. The father passed 
away in this county on the 20th of August, 1880, but the mother still survives 
and makes her home at Rolfe, Iowa. They were the parents of ten children, 
as follows : Frank, of Dow City, Iowa ; Fred, deceased ; Elsworth, residing near 
Plover, Iowa; Ellen A., who became the wife of our subject; Charles, of Rolfe, 
Iowa ; Bessie, Arthur and Jessie, all now deceased ; Earl, a resident of Rock- 
well City. Iowa; and Raymond, also living in Rolfe. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Cook 
have been born one son, Oliver Arthur, who was born July 19, 1899, and is now 
attending school. 

Before her marriage Mrs. Cook was an educator of much ability and taught 
school for twenty-five terms in Crawford county. She and her husband are 
both members of the Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. Cook is identified 
with the Modern Woodmen of America at Dow City. Interested as all American 
citizens should be in the political situation of the country, he has thoroughly in- 
formed himself concerning the questions and issues of the day and gives stalwart 
support to the republican party. He was school director and is a strong advo- 
cate of progress along educational lines as well as in other phases of community 
life. He early learned the lesson that success must be purchased at the price 
of earnest, well defined labor, and with the passing of the years perseverance, 
diligence and integrity have constituted the guiding posts of his career, bring- 
ing him to the honorable position which he now occupies in the opinion of his 
fellow citizens, among whom he has long lived and labored. 



PETER ATZEN. 



Peter Atzen, who now lives retired in a beautiful home in Denison, is one of 
the self-made men of Crawford county. Thrown upon his own resources in his 
boyhood, he bravely met every obstacle and as the years passed became one of 
the successful farmers of this county. He was born in Schleswig-Holstein, Ger- 
many. December 14, 1857, a son of Broder and Josina (Jessen) Atzen, both of 
whom were natives of Germany. The father was a laboring man. and, seeking 
to improve his condition, he came to America in 1875 and began his career 
in the new world at Clinton, Iowa, removing nine months later to a farm in 
Olive township, Crawford county, where he died in 1897, at the age of sixty-nine 
years. He was a soldier of the German army from 1847 to 1852. participating 
in the war of 1848. His wife lived to be eighty-one years of age. passing away 
in 1908. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject. Christian Atzen, was a farmer of 
Germany and his wife was Christina Jessen. They were the parents of three 
children, Broder, Christina and Martha. The maternal grandfather died when 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 289 

young and his history is lost, the mother of our subject being the only child in 
his family. She was a remarkable woman. At nineteen years of age she lost 
one of her limbs and for sixty-two years thereafter could move about only with 
the aid of a wooden leg and yet she reared her children and performed her house- 
hold duties with a spirit of cheerfulness seldom witnessed even in those not called 
upon to sufifer from bodily affliction. Her father died when she was an infant 
and her mother married Henry Clausen, four daughters being born of this 
union, namely, Hannah, Christina, Frederica and Sophia. 

The following children were born to Broder and Josina Atzen : Minnie, who 
became the wife of Erich Matsen, of Chicago, and is now deceased ; Henry, of 
Maquoketa, Iowa; Peter, the subject of this review; Josina, now Mrs. Fred Walk, 
of Chicago; Carl, now a practicing physician of Omaha; and John, deceased. 

Peter Atzen was educated in his native land and nine days after his con- 
firmation started for America, arriving in New York on the 26th of April, 1873. 
He grew to manhood on a farm in Clinton county, Iowa, working for himself 
from the time he arrived in this country. After renting land for three years 
in Clinton county he moved to Ida county and continued renting for two years, 
at the end of which time he came to Crawford county and purchased two hundred 
and forty acres in Hanover township, which he broke, cleared and improved. 
He continued upon his farm until March, 1908, when he removed to Denison, 
where he now resides. He still owns the home place which is one of the most 
valuable farms in the township and also a half section in Jackson county, Min- 
nesota. His land in this county originally cost him twelve dollars and a half 
per acre but it is now worth at least one hundred and fifty dollars an acre. 

On the ist of January, 1883, Mr. Atzen was united in marriage to Miss 
Justina Christiansen, who was born in Risum, North Schleswig, Germany, April 
I, 1865, a daughter of M. F. and Hannah (Petersen) Christiansen. The fam- 
ily came to America in 1872 and for five years Mr. Christiansen was a teamster 
at Clinton, Iowa. In 1877 he removed to a farm in Scott county but seven years 
later came to Crawford county and acquired a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres in Hanover township. Subsequently he sold his farm and took up his 
residence in Denison, where he now lives in retirement. He is seventy-seven 
years of age and his wife is three years his junior. In their family were eight 
children, six of whom are now living: Anna Christina, the wife of Gust Rus- 
ing; Justina, now Mrs. Peter Atzen; Sibbern; Julius; Amelia, the wife of Henry 
Kolls; and Hannah, now Mrs. John Jacobson. The paternal grandfather of 
Mrs. Atzen was Sibbern Christiansen, a wagonmaker of Germany. He was twice 
married and by his second wife had two children, Christian and Anna. Hans 
Petersen, the grandfather on the maternal side, was the head of a family of 
five children, Hannah, Bertha, Lena, Niss and Christ. 

Ten children came to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. Atzen: George, of 
Washington township, who married Emma Foss and has one son, Raymond; 
Fred, now living on the home place, who married Bertha Foss and has one 
daughter, Lilian; Carl; Minnie, who married Meinhard Thompson, of Good- 
rich township, and is the mother of one son, Henry; Henry, who died at the 
age of four years ; Hannah, Josina, Hilda, Walter and Bernhard, all of whom 
are at home. 



290 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

As head of a large and promising family Mr. Atzen has set an example of 
industry and perseverance which cannot fail to influence the lives of his chil- 
dren long after he has departed this life. lie and his excellent wife are mem- 
bers of the German Lutheran church and politically he is affiliated with the 
democratic party. A man of strong individuality and great determination, he 
has attained a goodly measure of success in business affairs. By nature genial 
and social, he has readily made friends and few men of his age can claim a 
greater number of sincere admirers in Crawford county. 



CHARLES MILLER. 



The man who starts out in life with a definite purpose in mind toward the 
realization of which he directs his concentrated energies invariably attains his 
ambition ultimately. As a youth Charles ]^Iiller aspired to become a successful 
agriculturist, and the realization of his desire is evidenced by the beautiful 
farm of three hundred and twenty acres which he cultivates in Iowa township, 

Mr. Miller is the eldest son of Christopher and Madeline (Hager) ^Miller, 
natives of Hamburg, Germany, from which country they emigrated to the United 
States in 1852, landing in New York on the 29th of April. Three days later the 
son Charles was born, his natal day being the 2d of May. The parents continued 
to live in New York city for three years and then removed to Davenport, of 
which city they were residents for five years. At the expiration of that period 
they migrated to Muscatine, where they remained until 1865 and then went to 
Tipton. After living there for two years they removed to Mechanicsville, Cedar 
county, Iowa, where they spent the remainder of their days, being laid to rest 
in the cemetery of that town. The father, who was a shoemaker, was actively 
engaged in his trade up to four days before his death, which occurred in 1903. 
The mother's demise occurred in 1899. They were the parents of five children, 
those beside our subject being: Betty, the wife of E. W. Stoddard, of Cedar 
Rapids ; Lizzie, who married John Sutton, of Manilla ; John, who is a resident 
of Mechanicsville; and Frank, the youngest member of the family. 

The first nineteen years of the life of Charles Miller were spent under the 
parental roof, very largely occupied in acquiring an education, in the pursuit of 
which he attended the German and public schools. In 1871 he left home to begin 
his business career, and, coming to Crawford county, he worked by the month 
as a farm hand for three years, following which he engaged in breaking prairie 
and threshing. He broke between twelve and fifteen hundred acres of prairie 
during the early years of his residence in this 'county, which was then very 
sparsely settled. In 1878 he first located upon his present farm, Init later spent 
three years elsewhere, returning in 1886. All the improvements upon the prop- 
erty have been made by him. 

For his wife and helpmate Mr. Miller chose Miss Minnie O. Thompson, 
who passed away on the 14th of November, 1908, and was laid to rest in the 
cemetery at Manilla. Seven children were born unto them : C. F. and W. A., 
both residents of Isabel, South Dakota; and John M., Eli Alfred, Hugh Ed- 
ward, Guy Elijah and Clarence Chester, all of whom are at home. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 291 

The family attend the services of the Methodist Episcopal church of which 
Mrs. Miller was a member. When he first attained his majority Mr. Miller 
gave his political support to the candidates of the democratic party, but being a 
gold standard man he transferred his allegiance to the republican party when 
Bryan first ran for president. Although he takes an interest in local afifairs he 
has never been an office seeker, as his personal interests have always demanded 
his entire attention. No man in Iowa township is any more entitled to be 
termed self-made than is Charles Miller, whose measure of success is attributable 
to his own perseverance and thrift and is generally so recognized by those who 
know him. 



JOHN A. DORFLER. 



As a stock raiser and feeder John A. Dorfler, of Soldier township, ranks 
high in the estimation of his neighbors and acquaintances, having made a suc- 
cess of his business and acquired an established reputation for straightforward 
dealing. He was born in Muscatine county, Iowa, May 24, 1870, a son of John 
and Augusta (Stegemann) Dorfler. The parents were both born in Germany 
and a record of their lives appears elsewhere in this work. 

Mr. Dorfler of this review was reared as a farm boy and attended the dis- 
trict schools, devoting his attention closely as the years passed to farming and 
stock-raising. He continued at home with his father until twenty-five years of 
age and then began farming on his own account on land belonging to his father, 
which he cultivated for sixteen years. Upon the division of the estate he re- 
ceived one hundred and sixty acres of highly improved land on section 13, Sol- 
dier township. He has given special attention to stock-feeding and although he 
is an extensive grain raiser, he buys grain from other farmers, as he feeds to 
his stock more than he can raise himself. He is an excellent judge of farm 
animals and handles none but good grades. 

On the 2d of June, 1895, ^^^- Dorfler was united in marriage to Miss Edith 
B. Meyer, who was born at Denison, Iowa, July 21, 1876, a daughter of August 
and Henrietta (Harder) Meyer, who were born, reared and married in Ger- 
many. They emigrated to America in 1864 and took up their residence at Pon- 
tiac, Illinois, where the father followed the tailor's trade, which he had learned 
in his native country. After a short time he began farming in that state, but 
in 1874 came to Iowa and bought land in Crawford county. However, he lived 
in Denison and conducted a hotel for seven years before he located on his farm. 
In 1900 he retired and has since made his home at Lake View, Iowa. He was 
very successful in business and became the owner of eight hundred acres of 
good land in Jackson township. He is now seventy-six years of age, while his 
wife is one year his junior. There were fourteen children in their family, five 
of whom are now living, namely: Minnie, the wife of William Heller, of Lake 
View; Arthur, of Guthrie Center, Iowa; Frantz, of Auburn. Iowa; Edith B., 
now Mrs. John A. Dorfler; and William, of Crawford county. Three children 
came to brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. Dorfler, one of whom died in in- 



292 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

fancy, the others being Frank \V., who was born February ii, 1897, and John 
A., born March 18, 1909. 

Pohtically Mr. Dorfler supports the democratic party. He has not desired 
nor sought pubHc office but has served as a member of the school board for two 
years. Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic lodge at Charter Oak and 
also with the lodge of the Modern Woodmen of America. Energetic and self- 
reliant, he has in his business shown an ability that is highly creditable. By the 
concentration of his energies he has achieved gratifying financial returns and 
his reputation for honesty has never been questioned. 



HENRY W. MAYNARD. 

Henry W. Maynard was one of the most extensive and successful agricul- 
turists of Crawford county, where he owned five hundred and sixty acres of 
land. He was born in Kane county, Illinois, May 29, 1850, a son of Abraham 
and Ann (Terwilliger) Maynard, both of whom were natives of New York state 
and who in 1845 removed to Illinois, where they located on a farm. To this 
couple eight children were born, of whom the following are still living: George, 
wb.o resides in Lake View, Iowa; Edwin and Charles, both of whom live in Illi- 
nois; and Etta, who is the wife of S. M. Dow and lives in Illinois. The de- 
ceased members of the family are: Henry, of this review; James, who died in 
Lake View in 1910; Mary, whose death occurred at the age of twelve years; and 
Philip, who died in infancy. 

Henry W. Alaynard secured his early education in the public schools of 
Kane county and on attaining his majority worked as a farm hand until 1876, 
when he purchased forty acres of land and began farming on his own account. 
He sold this property in 1880 and purchased eighty acres on sections 8 and 9, 
Jackson township, and to this land he continued to add as his financial circum- 
stances would permit until his holdings aggregated five hundred and sixty acres 
of the finest cultivated land in Crawford county and upon which he made all 
modern improvements in the way of fences and outbuildings. Here he fol- 
lowed general farming in all its branches but made a specialty of feeding and 
shipping live stock, in which he met with more than usual success. 

In 1876 Air. Maynard was married to Miss Julia Lane, a daughter of 
W. M. and Julia (Adams) Lane, the former of whom was a native of Syracuse, 
New York. In their family were two children, the other one being Leroy C, 
who resides in Troy, New York. Mr. and Mrs. Maynard became the parents 
of seven children, namely: Ruby, who is the wife of John Richardson, of 
Omaha. Nebraska ; Lily, who married Anthony Slechta, of Fowler, Kansas ; 
George and William, who live in Crawford county; James, who resides in Kan- 
sas; Harrison and Henry, at home. 

In politics Mr. Maynard was interested in tlie welfare of the republican party, 
which always had his support, and he was active in all public movements that 
tended toward the betterment of his community, and he served as township 
supervisor. Fraternally he affiliated with the Masons and his wife is a mem- 




IIKNKN .\1A^ NAKI) 




MRS. HENRY MAYNARD 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 295 

ber of the Order of the Eastern Star. A few weeks before his death, which 
occurred April 19, 191 1, he went to Sioux City and took the fourteenth degree 
in Masonry. His remains were interred in Vail cemetery. In his religious views 
he followed the tenets of the Methodist Episcopal church. His worth as a man 
and citizen is demonstrated by the high regard in which he was uniformly held, 
while his ability as a business man is attested to in the acquirement of the val- 
uable property which he owned and in the conduct of which made him one of 
the substantial citizens oi Crawford county. 



PROFESSOR WALTER CROSBY VAN NESS. 

Among the practical educators of the west Walter Crosby Van Ness, princi- 
pal of the Denison Normal & Business College, occupies an honored place. Ever 
since leaving the university, nearly thirty years ago, he has devoted his time and 
energies to teaching and the success he has attained is evidence that he made no 
mistake in the selection of a calling. He was born in Perry, Lake county, Ohio, 
October 7, 1854, a son of James and Laura Ann (Cook) Van Ness, both of whom 
were born in New York. The father was a tanner and currier by trade and be- 
came a successful farmer. He died in Lake county, Ohio, in 1909 at the age of 
seventy-five years, but the beloved wife and mother is still living. She is a faith- 
ful member of the Methodist church, as was her husband. Our subject's paternal 
grandfather, Caleb Van Ness, was a native of New York state and also was a 
tanner and currier. He was a local Methodist preacher and made a record for 
marrying people. Politically he was a zealous supporter of the republican party. 
He had a large family, most of his children dying in early manhood or woman- 
hood and only one is now living, Henry Van Ness, of Perry, Lake county, Ohio. 
Joseph Cook, the maternal grandfather, was born April i, 1800, and died Sep- 
tember 13, 1844. He married Nancy Richmond, and there were twelve children 
in their family, namely: Joseph W., Nancy J., Jehial P., Laura Ann, Colonel B., 
Susan Maria, James B. I, James B. II, Cynthia R., Benjamin A., Martha Amelia 
and Emma A. To James and Laura Ann (Cook) Van Ness three children were 
born : Walter Crosby, the subject of this review ; Eugenia, who died when a 
small child ; and Emogene, now the wife of D. J. Webb of Perry, Ohio. 

Walter Crosby Van Ness was reared on his father's farm and received his 
preliminary education in the district schools of Lake county, later attending a 
select school, Madison Seminary and Grand River Institute at Austinburg, Ashta- 
bula county, Ohio. He matriculated in the Western Reserve University, grad- 
uating from that noted institution in 1883 with a degree of A. B., and three years 
later took the degree M. A. from the same university. He began teaching in New 
Lyme Institute at South New Lyme, Ashtabula county, Ohio, immediately after 
his graduation and continued there for seven years, then becoming principal of 
the city high school of Ravenna, Ohio, in which position he acquitted himself 
with high credit. In 1893 he came to Denison and has since been principal of 
the Denison Normal & Business College, building up the institution until it is 
now one of the most popular of its kind in this part of the country. 
Vol. n— 16 



296 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUXTY 

On the 27th of June. 1883, Mr. \'an Xess was united in marriage to Miss 
Ida R. Webb, a native of Lake county, Ohio, and a daughter of Wilford and 
Wilhehnina (Champion) Webb. Her parents were natives of Schoharie county, 
New York, and the mother is now Hving at Perry, Ohio, the father having passed 
away at the age of seventy years. There were three children in their family: 
Ida R., Delbert J., and Carrie, deceased. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Van Xess 
has been brightened by the birth of four children : Grace R., who is a graduate 
of Cornell College, Mount \'ernon, Iowa; Loretta I., who is now a teacher of 
Denison College; Irene L. and Hubert J., both students in the public schools. 

Politically Mr. \'an Xess gives his support to the republican party, whose 
principles of protection and centralization he heartily endorses. Fraternally he is 
identified with Symbol Lodge, Xo. 452. A. F. & A. ]\I.. of South Xew Lyme, 
Ohio; Doudall Lodge, Xo. 90. Knights of Pythias, of Denison; and the Wood- 
men of the World. He and his wife are both members of the Order of the East- 
ern Star. He has received wide recognition on account of his marked ability as 
a teacher and school manager. A constant student, he keeps abreast of the times 
on all subjects pertaining to his calling, and as a public speaker he is in wide 
demand upon educational topics. He has a host of friends and former students 
in all the states of the west and has no cause to regret that eighteen years ago 
he established his home in the beautiful city of Denison. 



X. E. LARSOX. 



Through his well directed industry X. E. Larson has attained a responsible 
position among the citizens of Crawford county and is the owner of a beautiful 
farm in Otter Creek township which yields a handsome annual revenue. He was 
born in Sweden, December 11. 1865, a son of Lars and Mary Larson, both na- 
tives of Sweden. The father died in 1868 and in 1877 the mother came with her 
children to America, settling upon a farm in Crawford county. She passed away 
March 3, 1905. In the family were three children: Anna, now the wife of Robert 
Anderson, of Kiron ; J. G., of Crawford county; and X. E., the subject of this 
review. 

X. E. Larson was educated in the common schools of Sweden and came with 
his mother to this country when twelve years of age. After arriving in Craw- 
ford county he worked for three years for his uncle and then was employed by 
other farmers in the neighborhood for two years. Having arrived at an age 
when he could begin independently with a good prospect of success and being 
inspired by a laudable ambition, he started out on his own account by renting 
land, and in 1892 he purchased one hundred and sixty acres on sections 13 anfl 
24, Otter Creek' township, upon which he established his home. The place is 
well improved and has been made one of the highly productive properties of the 
township. He is a good judge of stock, and being energetic, alert and enter- 
prising, he is regarded as one of the substantial men of the community. Inde- 
pendent of his agricultural interests, he is a stockholder in the Farmers Lumber 
Company of Kiron and a director of the Farmers Telephone Company. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 297 

In September, 1888, Air. Larson was united in marriage to Miss Matilda 
Swanson, who was born in Sweden, a daughter of Xels and Tora (Nelson) 
Swanson, mention of whom is made in the sketch of N. P. Swanson elsewhere 
in this work. Seven children came to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. Larson: 
Hazel C. who was born August 2, 1889, and is now the wife of Enoch :\Iiller, 
of Sac county, Iowa; :\Iae Anna Alarie, born April 26, 1891, who graduated 
from rural schools; Ruth E., who was born December 2, 1892, and is living at 
home; Julia H., born October 11, 1894; Abbie E., born January 28, 1897; Ray- 
mond N., born December 4, 1899; and Esther Matilda, born November 16, 1902. 

]\Ir. and Mrs. Larson are stanch believers in the authority and inspiration of 
the Bible and are active workers in the Baptist church, in which he is a member 
of the board of trustees. He gives his support to the republican party, believing 
that its principles accord with the progress of the age and can best subserve the 
interests of the republic. He and his wife are at the head of a happy family 
and they have many friends in this part of the county who enjoy the hospitality 
of their attractive home. 



ANDREW HARRINGTON. 

The keynote of the success of Andrew Harrington as a farmer is a practical 
knowledge of his business and a habit he acquired early in life to perform to 
the best of his ability anything his hands found to do. As a result his farm 
is one of the highly productive properties of West Side township and he enjoys 
a goodly measure of prosperity. He is a native of Cedar county, Iowa, born 
April 30, 1867, and is a son of John and Hannah Harrington, both of whom 
were born in County Cork, Ireland. They came to the new world as children 
with their parents, the two families locating at Fall River, Massachusetts. There 
they were married and later removed to Richmond, Virginia, from which place 
they went to Boston, Massachusetts, finally starting westward. They lived for 
a while in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, and then for two years in Cedar county, 
Iowa, but in 1871 came to Crawford county and settled upon a farm which is 
now the family homestead. ]\Ir. Harrington was a man of great industry, and 
he improved his place v/ith a handsome residence and other buildings, all of 
which indicated good taste and judgment. He was successful as an agriculturist 
and stock-raiser and his death July i, 1888, was a distinct loss to the com- 
munity. The mother continued for seventeen years at the old home and was 
called from earthly scenes June 24, 1905. There were fourteen children in 
their family, six of whom are now living, namely: Mary, who is the widow of 
Charles Dupont ; William, who lives in West Side township ; Joseph, of Craw- 
ford county; Maggie, who makes her home at \'ail ; Alichael, of South Dakota; 
and Andrew, of this review. 

Andrew Harrington came with his parents to Crawford county at the age of 
four years, and in his boyhood and youth attended the public school, devoting 
his attention to various duties about the house and farm when not occupied with 
his books. After the death of his father he continued upon the home place, of 



298 ■ HISTORY' (Jl- CRAWI-OKD COUXTY 

which he is now tlic owner. It comprises three hundred and twenty acres on 
section ^t,. West Side township, and as he gives his best thought to his work 
and keeps fully abreast of the times in everything pertaining to agriculture and 
stock-raising, he has met with an abundant measure of success. 

In iS(>i Mr. Harrington was united in marriage to Miss Rosa O'Connell, 
who was horn at I)ul)U(|ue, Iowa, a daughter of John and Rose O'Connell, l>oth 
of whom are now deceased. There were four children in their family. Two 
children came to brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. Harrington, namely: IManch 
M., and Earl C, both of whom are now attending high school at Vail. Mrs. 
Harrington, the beloved wife and mother, passed away February 25, 1899, and 
her remains were interred in the cemetery at Vail. She was a consistent mem- 
ber of llic Catholic church and possessed many estimable traits of mind and 
character. 

Mr. Harrington has met with deserved success in his business. He is an 
enterprising and broad-minded man, fully awakened as to the opportunities and 
possibilities of the twentieth century, and he has enhanced the beauty and value 
of his surroundings. Religiously he is identified with the Catholic church and 
politically gives his adherence to the democratic party. 



JACOB WEISS. 



One of the extensive landowners of Crawford county is Jacob Weiss, who 
is successfully engaged in general farming and stock-raising on his homestead 
of two hundred and twenty acres in Denison township. Born in Germany on 
the 25th of March, \H(x), he is a son of George and Madelaine (Feuerbach) 
Weiss. The mother passed away in the fatherland, but the father emigrated to 
the Ignited States in 1880, first locating in Chicago, where he resided for fifteen 
months. Removing to'Denison at the end of that period, he continued to reside 
here until he passed away in i8()4 at the age of seventy-six. 

The early years of Jacob Weiss were spent in his native land, attending tlie 
common schools, where he acquired his education, lie was only a youth wlu-n 
he took up his residence in the United States, but being both energetic and 
thrifty he and his brother accvmiulated the necessary capital to buy one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Washington township, in the cultivation of which they 
engaged imtil our subject's marriage. Subsequently they divided the farm, each 
taking eighty acres, and by rigid economy and careful management, Mr. Weiss 
added one hundred and twenty acres to his tract, which he continued to operate 
for eighteen years. Disposing of that place in 1901, he removed to Denison 
township, where he inirchased one hundred and forty acres, later adding another 
eighty and thus making the aggregate two hundred and twenty. Here he is 
engaged in general farming and stock-feeding, devoting particidar attention to 
the latter, now having seven hundred shee]), one Inmdred and liftv head of 
cattle and about two hundred hogs, which lie is pre]")aring for the market. A 
most capable and energetic man, Mr. ^^\•i^s has met with marked success in his 
ventures, which is doubtless due to his unusual foresight and well directed ef- 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 299 

fort, which have resulted in his acquiring three hundred acres of land on sec- 
tions 25 and 16, Willow township, in addition to his excellent homestead. His 
home faj-m, which is on section 11, Denison township, is well improved and 
under a high state of cultivation, being considered one of the valuable properties 
in the locality. 

On the 14th of November, 1883, ^Ir. Weiss' plans for a home had their cul- 
mination in his marriage to Miss Rosa Bachman. Fifteen children have been 
born of this union: George; Albert; John; Emily; Matilda; Edward, deceased; 
Annie; Martha; August, deceased; Ruth; Clara; Marie; Theodore; Walter; and 
Elizabeth. 

The religious views of the family accord with those of the Methodist Epis- 
copal denomination, with which they affiliate. Ever since acquiring the right 
of franchise ^Ir. Weiss has given his political support to the men and measures 
of the republican party, considering that the principles of that organization are 
best adapted to subserve the interests of the majority. He has been the choice 
of his party for a number of the township offices, the duties of which he dis- 
charged most creditably. Mr. Weiss has never regretted the transference of 
his allegiance to the United States and feels that the conditions existing in this 
country are such that any young man possessing energy and perseverance can 
win a place for himself. 



W. D. MUNDT. 



General farming and stock-raising claim the attention of W. D. Mundt. who 
during his entire career has been identified with the agricultural development of 
Crawford county. He is one of those thrifty and enterprising sons of Ger- 
many, who through the intelligent direction of their activities have become num- 
bered among the successful landowners of the county. His birth occurred in 
Hanover on the 12th of February, 1873, which was also the birthplace of his 
parents, Diedrich and Sophia (Meyer) Mundt. They emigrated to the United 
States in 1880, first locating in East Boyer township, Crawford county, where 
the father purchased forty acres of land. On disposing of that place, he pur- 
chased a farm on section 5, Nishnabotny township, in the cultivation of which 
he engaged until his retirement nine years ago. Since 1902 l\Ir. and Mrs. Died- 
rich Mundt have been making their home in Denison, having acquired during 
their residence in this country a competence which provides them with the com- 
forts of life. They are the parents of three children: W. D.. our subject; Min- 
nie, who is a resident of California; and Lena, of Denison. They affiliate with 
the Lutheran church, and Mr. Mundt gives his political support to the democratic 
party. 

As he was a lad of seven years when his parents settled in the United States, 
W. D. Mundt has spent practically his entire life not only in the state of Iowa 
but in Crawford county. His boyhood and youth were quite similar to those 
of other lads of his circumstances, his education being obtained in the district 
schools and his vacations largely occupied in assisting his father in the cultiva- 



300 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUXTY 

tion of the homestead. He remained a member of the paternal household until 
he had attained his twenty-third year, at which time he started out for himself. 
His energies have always been intelligently directed and' as a result he has met 
witii more than moderate success, having acquired six hundred acres of fine 
farming land. It is all under an excellent state of cultivation and is well 
stocked with full-blooded hogs and cattle, which he feeds himself. 

In 1896 Mr. ^lundt's plans for a home of his own had their culmination in 
his marriage to Miss Anna Lochmiller, a daughter of Herman Lochmiller, of 
East Boyer township. Three children have been born of this union : Bernhard, 
Lulela and Reinhard. 

The church affiliation of the family is with the Lutheran denomination, while 
politically Mr. Mundt supports the principles of the democratic party, for whose 
candidates he always votes. x\ny man who acquires through his own unaided 
effort the amount of property owned by Mr. ]\Iundt possesses those qualities 
which make for success in any vocation in life if wisely applied, namely, energy 
and determination. 



X. P. SWAXSON. 



The business interests of Crawford county have many worthy representa- 
tives who have won their way to responsible positions in the community by in- 
telligent application and a zeal which never yielded to difficulties. Among the 
men who thus deserve mention is X. P. Swanson, a well known and highly 
respected citizen of Kiron. He is a native of Sweden, born September 27, 
1865, and a son of Xels and Tora Swanson, both of whom were born in Sweden. 
They came to America in 1871 and located on a farm in Craw^ford county, 
low^a, continuing here during the remainder of their lives. There were eight 
children in their family, four of whom are now living, namely: Matilda, the 
wife of X. E. Larson, of Crawford county, a record of whom appears else- 
where in this work; Celia, now Mrs. Adolph Linberg, of Omaha, X'ebraska ; 
X. P., the subject of this review; and Samuel, of Woodbury county, Iowa. 

N. P. Swanson came to Iowa with his parents when six years of age and 
received his early education in the schools of Crawford county. He assisted 
his father upon the home farm until he arrived at the age of seventeen and 
then, desiring to begin farming for himself, rented the homestead which he cul- 
tivated with a success that gave bright promise as to his future. Subsequently 
he purchased the farm on which the village of Kiron now stands and as the 
years passed he prospered greatly in his wurk. so that he is now the owner of 
one hundred and sixty acres of good land in Crawford county and five hundred 
and twenty acres in Woodbury county. He engages extensively in liuying, sell- 
ing and shipping stock of all kinds, and as he is a good judge of animals and 
a man of large experience in the business, he has attained a gratifying measure 
of success. Aside from his other lines of activity, he is a member of the board 
of directors of the Farmers Telephone Company. 

In 1887 Mr. Swanson w^as united in marriage to Miss Mary Olson, a native 
of Sweden and a daughter of Peter and Anna Olson, both of whom are de- 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 301 

ceased. Nine children have been born to iMr. and Mrs. Swanson, namely: 
Emma E., the wife of Oscar Larson, of Sioux City, Iowa; and ^^label, Roy, 
Edna, Judith, Ehner, Leshe, Evelyn and Teddie M., all of whom are at home! 
Politically Mr. Swanson votes the republican ticket, and although he has 
not sought the emoluments of office, he has served most acceptably as a mem- 
ber of the town council of Kiron. Fraternally he is identified with the camp 
of the Modern Woodmen of America at Schleswig, Iowa. He is a public- 
spirited man and is ever ready to assist in any movement that sincerely aims 
to lift the burdens from shoulders unable to bear them. He and his estimable 
wife are at the head of a large and promising family and they have endeavored 
to install into their children the principles of industry and self-respect so im- 
portant in the accomplishment of any worthy object in life. 



H. W. LOGSDON. 



H. W. Logsdon, who for the past eleven years has devoted his time and 
energies to the cultivation and improvement of his two hundred acre farm lo- 
cated on sections 13 and 14, Union township, was born July 24, 1865, near 
Newton, Jasper county, Iowa, a son of Rev. B. F. and C. J. (Logsdon) Logs- 
don, both natives of Kentucky, the father's birth taking place near Munford- 
ville. The mother was of German parentage. Rev. Logsdon came to Iowa when 
about twenty years of age and located near Newton, where he resided at in- 
tervals until a few years ago. He followed the calling of ministry for three 
and a half years in Crawford county during the .'80s and was attached to the 
Wesleyan Alethodist church in Marshall. His father was born in Ireland and 
there engaged in farming until he emigrated to the United States. He settled 
in Kentucky, where his death occurred when his son, B. F., was seven years 
old. Unto B. F. Logsdon and his wife nine children were born, of whom the 
following survive : H. W., of this review ; F. G., who is a farmer living near 
Ira, Iowa; Charles, who resides in Rhodes, Iowa; Lulu, who is the wife of 
W. F. Sissel and lives in Durant, Iowa; Maud, who married Iddo Kinsel and 
resides near Tama, Iowa. 

The public schools of Jasper county afforded H. W. Logsdon his early edu- 
cation and he remained at home until attaining his majority, when he resolved 
to start out in life upon his own responsibility. He rented land in Denison 
township, Crawford county, where he farmed for one year, and then removed 
to Paradise township, buying a small farm, which he improved and cultivated 
for twelve years. In 1900 he came to Union township, where he purchased land 
on sections 13 and 14, to which he has added from time to time until he now 
■owns two hundred acres of highly cultivated farming property, most of the 
improvements being the result of his personal labors. Here he pursues general 
farming and his holdings are considered to be among the most valuable in his 
section of the county. 

In 1887 I\Ir. Logsdon was united in marriage to ^Ii?s Deborah Smith, a 
daughter of T. R. B. and Jane (Graham) Smith, both of whom were born in 



302 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Canada of Irish parents. They came to the United States ahout thirty-five years 
ago and located in Denison township, whence they removed to Union township. 
Six children were born to them, of whom the following survive : Sarah Jane, 
who lives in Denison ; Deborah ; R. B., who is a farmer in Union township ; 
and John, who resides in Oakdand, California. The father departed this life 
June 24, 1890, the demise of the mother occurring in 1910. 

Mr. and Mrs. Logsdon are the parents of seven children, namely: Gertrude, 
who, after being graduated from the Dow City high school, pursued a course 
of musical studies at Simpson College and later taught school for four terms in 
Crawford county, became the wife of Frank J. Glassburner and resides in 
Union township. Birl W., Fred H., Bertha J., Herman Leslie, Clarence Russell 
and Stanley Smith are living under the parental roof. Birl is a graduate of 
the Dow City high school, and it is the intention of the parents to give the 
other children the same educational advantages as soon as their years will per- 
mit. 

Politically Mr. Logsdon has always given his support to the republican party 
and has taken an active interest in the local affairs of the township. He filled 
the ofifice of justice of the peace with efficiency and to the entire satisfaction 
of his constituents and served two terms as school director. In religion both 
he and has wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are well 
and favorably known throughout the community. He is deeply interested in 
everything that pertains to the material, intellectual and moral development of 
the locality in which he lives and is a man of many friends — an honored and 
respected resident of Union township. 



JOHN D. O'HARA. 



The young men of Denison find a worthy representative in John D. O'Hara, 
who is now serving as clerk in the postoffice of this city. Active, ambitious and 
enterprising, he has made a start which gives bright promise for a life of use- 
fulness and honor. He comes of Irish ancestry and is a native of Peru, In- 
diana, born May 23, 1888, and a son of Michael and Nora (Kelley) O'Hara. 
The father was born in Ireland and the mother in Indiana. Michael O'Hara 
came to America with his parents in his boyhood. He was reared in this country 
and is still living in Indiana. His wife departed this life in 1890. There were 
seven children in their family, five of whom survive-. 

At two years of age, having lost his mother, John D. O'Hara became a 
member of the family of his uncle, Patrick Burke, of Denison, Iowa, with whom 
he still makes his home. He was given every desirable advantage of education 
in school and college and applied himself to his studies with most excellent 
results. Two years ago he was appointed a clerk in the postoffice by Mr. Myers, 
in which position he has since continued. Politically he gives his support to the 
democratic party and fraternally is a valued member of the Improved Order of 
Redmen, in which he is serving as sachem. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 303 

By his geniality, gentlemanly address and other sterling qualities Mr. O'liara 
has made a host of friends and well wishers who are unanimously of the opin- 
ion that he is one of the most promising young men of the city. His life has 
been entirely upright and honorable, and in business he has acquitted himself 
in such a way as to meet the approval of patrons of the postoffice and of all with 
whom he has come into contact. 



HENRY SHIRTCLIFF. 



Crawford county owes much to those men who came west of the Mississippi 
river when their principal fortune consisted of their strong arms and their 
indomitable will. By undaunted perseverance they carved out for themselves 
honorable names and a competence, becoming financially independent. Of this 
class of men is Henry Shirtclifif, now living retired at Denison. He was born 
in Yorkshire, England, September 6, 1830, a son of Edward and Hannah 
(Makin) ShirtcHff, both natives of England. The father was educated for the 
Episcopal ministry, but did not take kindly to that calling, so he began clerking 
in his father's store and afterward became a successful merchant. He emi- 
grated to America and settled at Lynnville, Morgan county, Illinois, where he 
engaged in general merchandising. He made a trip to England at the time of 
Queen Victoria's coronation and bought a stock of goods there, shipping it to 
this country. The boat to which it was transferred sank in the Mississippi 
river, the goods being recovered two weeks later in a badly damaged condition. 
Mr. Shirtclifif made a fair start in life but died at the beginning of a useful 
career, in 1840, being then only thirty-six years old. His wife died about 1875, 
at the age of seventy-three years. She was a faithful member of the Methodist 
church. 

Edward Shirtclifif, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was a native of 
England. He was also a dry-goods merchant and was the father of three chil- 
dren : Edward, Sarah and Jane. The maternal grandfather, Richard Makin, 
was a shoe merchant, and his wife was Catharine Greenwood before her mar- 
riage. There was one son and several daughters in their family. The son died 
when a small boy and the daughters were Isabella, Elizabeth, Hannah, Harriet, 
Ann, and Rebecca. There were four children in the family of Edward and 
Hannah Shirtclifif, namely : Frederick Edward, who is now living at Kilbourne, 
Mason county, Illinois; Henry, the subject of this review; Catharine, who be- 
came the wife of Fred Smithson and is now deceased; and Alfred, also de- 
ceased. 

Henry Shirtclifif came with his parents to America when two years of age 
and grew to manhood near Jacksonville, in Morgan county, Illinois, receiving 
his education in private schools. He began his business career by working as 
a farm hand and later engaged in farming on his own account in Morgan county, 
also being identified with the live stock, milling, merchandising and butchering 
business. At thirty-five years of age, in 1865, he went to Minnesota and con- 
tinued in that state for eight years, but believing that better opportunities were 



30i HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

presented in Iowa, he came to Crawford county and in 1873 began cultivating 
a farm two miles north of Deloit. in Goodrich town.-^hip. Three years later he 
removed to \'ail, wliere he engaged in the live stock business for seventeen or 
eighteen years. In 1905 he retired, taking up his home at Denison with his 
daughter, Mrs. Ainsworth. He is the owner of a well improved farm of two 
hundred acres in Willow township. 

On the 5th of December, 185 1, Mr. Shirtcliff was united in marriage to Miss 
Frances Colley, who was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1827. Xine children 
came to bless this union: Edward, Fred, Fannie. Edith, ]\Iinnie, Alice. John, 
Charles and Katie. Edward, now engaged in the land business in Alberta 
county. Canada, married Miss Rose Xixon and they have two sons, Alfred and 
Henry. Fred is in charge of the home farm in Willow township. He married 
Miss Hattie Cady and they have two children, Frankie and Fred. Fannie mar- 
ried Rol Riley and became the mother of thirteen children, but she is now de- 
ceased. Edith married John Ainsworth, of Denison, a record of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work. 

In 1906 ]\Ir. Shirtcliff was called upon to mourn the loss of his beloved wife, 
whose many estimable qualities greatly endeared her to the entire community. 
She was a sincere member of the Episcopal church, but her husband has never 
been identified with any religious denomination. Since 1865 he has been con- 
nected with the r^Iasonic order, having been made a Master Mason at that time. 
Politically he affiliates with the republican party. He cast his first vote for 
John C. Fremont, "the Pathfinder," and has voted for every republican candi- 
date for president since that time. He served as a member of the town board 
in \'ail but has never aspired to political honors, preferring to devote his at- 
tention to his private affairs. Today he is recognized as one of the substantial 
citizens of the county and has the satisfaction of knowing that he has gained 
his position almost entirely through his own unremitting diligence. A thorough 
gentleman and a citizen who has assisted materially in advancing the general 
welfare, he well merits the respect and esteem in which he is held. 



CHARLIE GREEXE. 



Charlie Greene is a worthy representative of German-American citizenship 
in Hanover township, where he owns and operates two hundred and eighty acres 
of finely improved land. He was born in Illinois October 5. 1867, a son of 
William and Dora (Messenbrink) Greene. The' parents were natives of Han- 
over, Germany, where they were reared and married, after which they emi- 
grated to the United States, first locating near Chicago, Illinois. They both 
worked in the employ of others for a year after their arrival in the new world 
and in this way gained their start in life. Mr. Greene then rented a small tract 
of land, which he operated for a few years. He carefully managed his busi- 
ness affairs and worked diligently and persistently, so that he was eventually 
able to purchase land, becoming the owner of one hundred acres. After a few 
years he sold that tract and invested his money in another tract of one hundred 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 305 

and sixty acres, which remained in his possession for a few years, when he 
disposed of his property in Ilhnois and, seeking the broader opportunities of 
Iowa, located in Crawford county. He here purchased four hundred and eighty 
acres of improved land and for ten years operated the same. He was success- 
ful in his undertakings and at the end of a decade had secured a competency 
that enabled him to retire from business cares, and since that time he has made 
his home with his children, having now reached the advanced age of eighty- 
three years. His wife, however, has departed this life, her death occurring on 
Christmas day of 1891. Unto Mr. and ^Irs. Greene were born eight children, 
but five of the number are deceased, two having died prior to the emigration 
of the family to this country, and two died in the United States during their 
infancy, while Emma passed away at the age of seven years. Those living are : 
Louis, who follows farming near Charter Oak, Iowa; Charlie, of this review; 
and August, who is now living retired in Sioux City, Iowa. 

Charlie Greene spent his early boyhood and youth upon the home farm in 
Illinois and accompanied his parents on their removal to Crawford county, Iowa. 
He acquired his education in the common schools and remained under the pa- 
rental roof until he had reached the age of twenty-four years, when he started 
out to make his own way in the world by renting a part of the old homestead. 
After a year, however, his father deeded to him one hundred and sixty acres 
of his land, to which he has since added by purchase, his possessions now em- 
bracing two hundred and eighty acres. His land lies in Hanover township, and 
all has been placed under a high state of cultivation, so that he annually gathers 
good crops as a reward for the care and labor which he bestows upon it. In 
addition to his farming he raises stock to a considerable extent, black polled 
cattle being his specialty. He raises and feeds from one to two carloads of 
cattle each year and always realizes a good profit in the city markets. 

It was on the nth of June, 1891, that Mr. Greene was united in marriage 
to Miss Sophia Neddermeyer, who was born in Charter Oak, Crawford county, 
a daughter of Christ and Katrina (Kunze) Neddermeyer, both natives of Han- 
over, Germany. The father came as a young man to the United States and for 
a few years after his arrival worked in New York. He then came to Iowa, lo- 
cating in Jackson county, where his marriage to Miss Kunze occurred. They 
have become the parents of ten children, but two of the number are now de- 
ceased. Those living are: Sophia, now Mrs. Greene; Marvin, who follows 
farming near Charter Oak; Julius, who also engages in farming near Charter 
Oak; Rosa, the wife of Robert Pautsch, a farmer residing near Johnson. Minne- 
sota; Annie, of Mitchell, South Dakota; Emma, the wife of Henry Ricket. also 
of Alitchell; Adolph and Elsie, at home. Those deceased are Otto and Christ. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Greene have been born four sons, namely: William, who 
was born on Christmas day of 1895, and has just completed his education in 
the common schools and who can read, write and speak the German as well as 
the English language; Herbert, who was born July 5. 1901. and is now in 
school; Erwin, born May 29, 1905; and Clarence, who was born October 19, 

1909. 

Mr. Greene supports the men and measures of the republican party, but is 
not an active worker in political circles. He and his family attend and support 



306 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

the German Lutheran church. It is true he had hetter advantages than many 
a young man starting out in hfe, but he has since improved each and every op- 
portunity that has come to him and his dihgence and perseverance have gained 
him the success that now gives him rank among the leading farmers and stock- 
raisers of Hanover township and Crawford county. He is well known, too, 
for his fair and honorable dealing, and all who know him speak of him in terms 
of praise and commendation. 



ENOCH T. COCHRAN. 

Forty-two years ago Enoch T. Cochran came to Denison and he has been a 
witness of its progress, assisting materially in the work which has made this city 
one of the most attractive places of its size in the state. He was born in Craw- 
ford county, Pennsylvania, June 29, 1855, a son of John M. and Lucinda (Gil- 
laspey) Cochran, both of whom were natives of the Keystone state. The father 
wa^; a farmer and came west with his family in 1869, settling in Goodrich town- 
ship, Crawford county, Iowa, upon a farm of ninety acres, which he and his 
sons carefully cultivated. In 1878 he removed to Denison, where he continued 
to reside until his death at the age of seventy-five years. His wife departed this 
life in 1878, having arrived at the age of sixty-seven years. She and her hus- 
band were consistent members of the United Presbyterian church. 

Robert Cochran, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was a native of 
Mercer county, Pennsylvania, and became one of the respected farmers of his 
section. He was married to Mary Moore, wdio died at the age of eighty years, 
and they were the parents of three children : John M., William and Lavina, who 
became the wife of Peter France. Robert Gillaspey, the maternal grandfather, 
was also a farmer of Pennsylvania. He removed from Williamsport, Lycoming 
county, Pennsylvania, to Crawford county in the same state in 181 8, and died 
there when about ninety-two years of age. There were seven children in his 
family, namely : Lucinda, Mary, Margaret. Hannah, Elizabeth, Jane and Joseph. 

The family of John M. and Lucinda Cochran consisted of seven children, 
namely: Robert G., now in Los Angeles, California; William, of Denison. Iowa; 
Murray J., of Tonopah, Nevada; W'esley, deceased; Charles J., of Phoenix, 
Arizona; Enoch T., the subject of this review; and a daughter who died in 
infancy. 

Enoch T. Cochran lived in Crawford and Venango counties, Pennsylvania, 
until fourteen years of age and received his early education in the common 
schools, coming to Denison with his parents in 1869. After arriving at his new 
home he took advantage of the opportunities offered by the excellent public- 
school system and when the time arrived for him to begin his business career he 
started as a clerk in one of the stores of this city. Subsequently, he was ap- 
pointed deputy postmaster, serving for three and one-half years under Reuben 
HeR'elfing, and under J. Fred Meyers. He later went to Harlan, Iowa, and there 
filled the position of deputy postmaster for six years. Returning to Denison in 
1885, he was made deputy county treasurer and continued in that office until 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 307 

1900. Previously he had filled the office of township clerk and was for six years 
city clerk of Denison. In the meantime he had engaged in the real-estate busi- 
ness and after retiring from the office of the county treasurer was connected 
with the implement business but since 1905 has devoted his attention to real estate 
and insurance, in which he has shown a capability productive of highly gratifying 
returns. 

On the 28th of December, 1881, Mr. Cochran was united in marriage to 
Miss Clara L. Marshall, a native of New York, who came to Crawford county 
with her parents, WiUiam and Juha (Chapin) Marshall, in the fall of 1869, 
settling in Morgan township and later removing to Denison township. Both of 
her parents are now deceased. Six children were born to them : William H., 
Ella, Fred, Frank, Lewis and Clara L. One son, Clyde M., was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Cochran. He married Theresa Balsky, and is now in the employ of 
the Middle West Grain Company at Omaha. He is the father of two children : 
Robert Enoch and Howard Marshall. Mrs. Cochran having died in 1888, Mr. 
Cochran was again married, the lady of his choice being Miss Ida M. Deuel, a 
native of New York state, and a daughter of Benjamin and Sylvia Deuel, who 
were the parents of two children, Alice and Ida M. Her father was twice mar- 
ried, one daughter, Alethia, being born to the first union. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Cochran two children have been born : Sylvia Alice and Robert Lyman, the for- 
mer of whom is now successfully engaged in teaching school, and the latter is a 
student in the senior class of the Denison high school and a highly promising 
young man. 

In public afifairs Mr. Cochran showed an ability that gained the general ap- 
proval of the people, and in business he has met with a goodly measure of suc- 
cess and has obtained a competence for himself and family. He and his esti- 
mable wife are members of the Presbyterian church and active workers in its 
behalf. He is identified with Sylvan Lodge, No. 507, A. F. & A. M., the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America and the Improved Order of Red Men, and is a stanch 
believer in the principles of those beneficent orders. 



ANDREW LARSON. 



Andrew Larson has been actively and successfully identified with the agri- 
cultural interests of Crawford county for many years past and is now the owner 
of a well improved farm in Otter Creek township. He is a native of Sweden, 
born August 19, 1849, and is a son of John and Mary (Anderson) Larson, both 
of whom were born in Sweden. They came to America in 1867 and established 
their home in Pennsylvania, where the mother died. In 1877 the father removed 
to Crawford county, Iowa, and engaged in farming. He was killed by a tor- 
nado about 1882. There were nine children in his family, seven of whom are 

still living. 

Andrew Larson came to America with his parents when he was eighteen 
years of age and continued at home until after reaching manhood. He began 
his business career by working in the coal mines in Pennsylvania but subse- 



308 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

quently became connected with farming in Crawford county, Iowa, and carried 
on iiis work with such energ}- and good judgment that he was enabled to pur- 
chase two hundred and twenty acres of land on sections 25 and 26, Otter Creek 
township. He has made many improvements upon his farm, building barns, 
corn-cribs and fences, and setting out trees, etc., thus greatly enhancing its 
value. He engages in general farming but makes a specialty of raising and 
feeding stock for the market and has met with gratifying success. 

In 1888 ]\Ir. Larson was united in marriage to Miss Amanda Falk. a native 
of Chicago and a daughter of Erick Falk, who emigrated to America with his 
wife from Sweden and is now deceased. The mother is still living anfl makes 
her home in Minnesota. Five children came to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Larson, namely: Hollis L., who was born October 10, 1889; Ive E.. born June 
22, 1892; Ervin E.. born August 7, 1894; Ruby I., born January 9, 1897; and 
Orange H., born February 19, 1899. All are living at home. 

Mr. Larson was called upon to mourn the death of his beloved wife, who 
passed away August 22, 1906, and whose remains were interred in Kiron ceme- 
tery. She was a faithful member of the Methodist church and was a woman 
of many excellent qualities which endeared her to all with whom she was asso- 
ciated. Mr. Larson is a man of genial disposition and is recognized as one of 
the reliable citizens of Crawford county, whose word is entirely to be depended 
upon and who aims to perform his whole duty in everything he undertakes. He 
is a sincere friend of education and a lover of his adopted country. He has 
set an example of unflagging industry well worthy of imitation by those who 
come after him, as it leads to almost certain victory. He is not identified with 
any religious denomination but is a firm adherent of the republican party whose 
principles appeal to him as being highly essential to the perpetuity of a free 
government. 



A. G. SCHOENJAHN. 

Success has attended the efiforts of A. G. Schoenjahn in establishing himself 
in business and he is now the owner of a farm in West Side township, which 
has developed into one of the desirable properties of Crawford county. His 
good fortune is the direct result of ambition and energy. He is a native of 
Clinton county, Iowa, born February 25, 1874, and is a son of Henry and 
Pauline Schoenjahn. The parents were both born in Germany and on coming 
to America took up their residence in Clinton county, Iowa. In 1878 the family 
removed to Sac county and three years later to Crawford county, where Mr. 
Schoenjahn established himself as an agriculturist and stock-raiser. His wife 
passed away in 1908, but he is still living. There were eight children in their 
family, five of whom survive. 

A. G. Schoenjahn came with his parents to Crawford county at the age of 
seven years and received his early education in the public schools. He con- 
tinued with his father until after reaching maturity and in 1899 removed to the 
farm which he now owns. It comprises two hundred and forty acres and is 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 309 

located on section 22, West Side township. He carries on general farming and 
specializes in the raising and feeding of stock. As he thoroughly understands 
all phases of agriculture and stock-raising, he has met with deserved prosperity. 

In 1899 ^^^- Schoenjahn was united in marriage to ^^liss Henrietta Doshe, 
who was born in Clinton county, a daughter of Henry and Caroline (Lamp) 
Doshe. The parents were born in Germany and came to this country, being 
now residents of Crawford county. There were eight children in their family, 
six of whom are living. Four children came to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Schoenjahn, namely : Perry W., Grace M., Glenn L. and Carrie P. 

Mr. Schoenjahn and his wife are valued members of the Lutheran church. 
Politically he is identified with the democratic party, to which he has given his 
support ever since he reached manhood. He has not sought political honors, 
but is serving at the present time as township trustee and director of the school 
board, displaying in the discharge of his duties the same interest which he 
evinces in his own afifairs. Fraternally he is connected with the Highland 
Nobles and with Camp No. 2991, 'M. W. A., of West Side. ^Irs. Schoenjahn 
has been a valued assistant to her husband and as the head of the household 
has shown an ability which is greatly to be commended. He has led an active 
and useful life which gives promise of increasing efficiency in years to come. 



HENRY SCHWARZ. 



Arriving in America in his early boyhood, Henry Schwarz came to Crawford 
county with his parents and has succeeded so well as an agriculturist and stock- 
raiser that he is now firmly established, being the owner of three hundred and 
twenty acres of good land. He was born in Germany, September 15, 1862, and 
is a son of Christian and Dorothea Schwarz, both of whom were natives of 
Germany. The family came to America in 1873 and spent nine years in Illi- 
nois. In 1882 they came to Iowa and settled in Crawford county, Mr. Schwarz 
buying a farm in Morgan township. He became the owner of one hundred and 
sixty acres, which he cultivated to excellent advantage and attained a gratifying 
measure of prosperity. He lived to reach the age of seventy-three years and 
his wife passed away at the age of seventy-two. They were the parents of six 
children, namely: Christian, of Chicago; John, of Illinois; Charles and Fritz, 
both of Crawford county; Henry, the subject of this review; and Caroline, who 
died in Germany at the age of three years. 

Henry Schwarz received his education in the public schools of Germany and 
Illinois. He came to Crawford county with his parents at the age of twenty 
and two years later began farming on rented land. He was especially apt even 
in his boyhood in becoming acquainted with the details of agriculture and stock- 
raising and as an independent farmer he has been from the beginning remarkably 
successful. He bought one hundred and sixty acres as the foundation of his 
present farm on section 21, Soldier township, and as his resources increased 
purchased more land until he is now the owner of a highly improved place, 
which yields him generous returns each year. He is a general farmer and is 



310 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

very successful as a stock-feeder, usually receiving the very best prices for 
what he has to oflfer in the market. 

In 1885 ]\Ir. Schwarz was united in marriage to Miss Amelia Henkle, who 
was born in Germany, February 20, 1863, and is a daughter of John and Caro- 
line (Wendt) Henkle. Her parents came to America when the daughter was 
four years of age and after spending ten years in Illinois settled in Crawford 
county, Iowa. At the present time her father is visiting in Germany and her 
mother is in Arkansas. Their children are: Emma, now the wife of J. B. 
Crissman, of Arkansas; Herman, also of Arkansas; Augusta, deceased; Amelia, 
now Mrs. Henry Schwarz ; and Emil, who died at the age of forty-four. Six 
children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Schwarz: Alma, who is now 
the wife of Louis Koeppen, of Crawford county; Carrie, at home; Walter E. ; 
Emma ; Elsie ; and Henry. 

Politically Mr. Schwarz is identified with the democratic party. He has 
been prominent in public affairs in his township and has served with great 
fidelity as assessor for three terms, trustee for one term and member of the 
school board for twelve years. The high esteem in which he is held by his 
neighbors is indicated by his election to responsible offices. Religiously he and 
his family are earnest adherents of the German Lutheran church. 



WILLIAM FLEMING. 



After seeing a large part of the world, William Fleming settled in Crawford 
county and is now known as one of its representative citizens, his beautiful 
farm of three hundred and eighty acres in Stockholm township being convinc- 
ing evidence of his business ability. He is a native of Scotland, born December 
31, 1850, and is a son of Rev. James and Isabella (McClelland) Fleming, both 
of whom spent their entire lives in that country. There were twelve children 
in their family and eight of them are now living. 

William Fleming was educated in the common schools and continued at home 
until sixteen years of age, when he yielded to an irresistible desire to visit dis- 
tant countries and went on board a ship which carried him to New Zealand. 
He spent three and one-half years upon a ranch as a shepherd. Returning 
home, he remained for one and one-half years amid familiar scenes and then 
bade farewell to relatives and friends and crossed the ocean to America. In 
1875 he located in Crawford county, Iowa, and purchased eighty acres of land 
in West Side township, which he cultivated with a goodly measure of success 
for nine years. Disposing of that farm, he bought land in Stockholm town- 
ship and as the years passed and his resources increased he acquired adjoining 
farms until he now has one of the most valuable properties in the township. 
He devotes his attention largely to raising, feeding and shipping cattle and 
Duroc Jersey hogs, and a visit to his place will prove that he has attained un- 
usual success along these lines as well as in the cultivation of the grains. He is 
also a stockholder in the Farmers' Telephone Company of East Boyer. 




ME. AND MRS. WILLIAM FLEMING 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 313 

In 1883 Mr. Fleming was united in marriage to Miss Mary Currie, who was 
born in Scotland, December 25, 1864, a daughter of Duncan and Mary (Smith) 
Currie. The family came to America in 1872 and located in Sac county, Iowa. 
The parents are now deceased. Nine children came to bless the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Fleming, namely: James D. and John, both of Crawford county; 
Mary and Grace I., at home ; Jessie E., who is now engaged in teaching school ; 
Margaret; Nellie and Willie, twins; and Charles R. 

On the 24th of October, 1909, Mr. Fleming was called upon to mourn the 
loss of his beloved wife whose remains were interred in Odebolt cemetery, in 
Sac county. She was a true and helpful companion and a woman of many ster- 
ling qualities that greatly endeared her to those with whom she was associated. 
Mr. Fleming and his children are identified with the Methodist church and are 
active workers in its behalf. Politically he supports the principles and candi- 
dates of the republican party and although he has not sought public office he 
has served as a member of the school board and as road superintendent. He 
has always been governed by a desire to observe truth and justice in his dealings 
with his fellowmen, and he has many friends in a section where he has lived 
for more than a third of a century. 



GEORGE B. SMITH. 



The gratifying success which has crowned the efforts of George B. Smith 
as head of a flourishing book store, is a bright prophecy as to his future in the 
business world. He has been identified with the book, stationery and news 
business only about two years but has fully demonstrated his ability in a line 
for which he seems especially adapted. 

Born in Harrison county, Iowa, May 24, 1884, he is the son of Harrison 
and Sarah (Hammond) Smith, the former of whom was born in Vermont and 
the latter in Ohio. The father was reared in his native state and educated there, 
subsequently becoming a resident of Harrison county, Iowa. At the time of 
the Pikes Peak gold excitement he was attracted to the Rocky mountains and 
engaged for several years in prospecting and mining. He returned to Iowa and 
preempted land near Magnolia in Harrison county, becoming the owner of 
three hundred and twenty acres, which he brought to a high state of cultiva- 
tion. He and his wife are now living retired at Woodbine, Iowa. They are 
greatly respected by a wide circle of friends and acquaintances and are earnest 
workers in the Methodist church. Our subject's grandfather Smith was a 
farmer of Vermont and reared four children : Mary, George, John and Harrison, 
lohn Hammond, the maternal grandfather, was a native of Ohio and also a 

farmer. 

There were six children in the family of Harrison and Sarah Smith, namely: 
Orton, of Pisgah, Iowa ; Carrie, now the wife of George H. Peyton, of Pisgah ; 
Edna, now Mrs. O. L. Peyton, of Pisgah ; John, deceased ; Edith, who married 
Eugene Peyton, of Creighton, Nebraska; and George B., the subject of this 



review. 

Vol. n— 17 



314 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

George B. Smith was reared on the paternal farm in Harrison coimty and 
attended tlie district schools, later becoming a student in the high school at 
Little Sioux, lie continued his studies at the Woodbine Normal School, from 
which he was graduated in 1907. He taught for one year in that institution, 
but being attracted to mercantile life he came to Denison in 1908 and purchased 
the bookstore of U. G. Johnson, which he has since conducted under his own 
name. Under his management it has become one of the leading establishments 
of the city, the patronage from month to month showing a steady increase and 
attracting the best class of trade in the city. 

On the 17th of January, 1909, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss 
Edna Cater, a native of Carson, Iowa, and a daughter of Edward and Mary 
(Belknap) Cater, both of whom were born in Illinois. The mother died in 
Pottawattamie county, Iowa, and the father is now living on a farm near Wood- 
bine. Three children in their family grew to maturity, namely : Roy, Claude and 
Edna. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have one daughter, Wilhelmina M., who was born 
January 25, 191 1. 

The success of Mr. Smith is mainly due to his energy and good judgment, 
which are indispensable elements in accomplishing any important undertaking. 
Being a man of pleasing address, he readily makes friends and the attractive 
appearance of his store indicates that he has excellent taste and understands the 
art of displaying goods to the best advantage. He and his wife are well known 
in social circles and in religious belief are identified with the Methodist church. 
Politically Mr. Smith gives his earnest support to the republican party. 



HERMAN BAAK. 



Although born in a great city, Herman Baak has spent nearly all his life 
amid the inviting scenes of Crawford county and he has no cause to regret that 
his lot was cast in a farming community. He is a representative agriculturist 
of Soldier township and the owner of one of the most attractive farms in his 
part of the county. A native of Chicago, he was born February 29, 1872, his 
parents being August and Sophia (Koch) Baak. They were born in Germany 
and came to America in 1868, passing the first six years in Chicago. In 1874 
they arrived in Crawford county, Iowa, and Mr. Baak purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres, which he cultivated for six years. He then sold his farm and 
once more took up his residence at Chicago, where Mrs. Baak died in 1881. 
There were six children in their family, one of whom died in infancy. The 
others were : August, who died when a child ; Herman, of this review ; Emma, 
now the wife of Gustave Kroll, of Monona county, Iowa; Louis, who died at 
the age of four years ; and Otto, who now lives in Chicago. The father re- 
turned to Crawford county with his children after the death of his wife and 
resumed farming, prosecuting his work with such energy that he became the 
owner of two hundred and forty acres of good land on section 33, Soldier town- 
ship. He w^as again married, in 1886, to Miss Sophia Wickman and continued 
upon his farm until his death, which occurred in June, 1907. By his second 






HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY > \,>^i ^ 315 

marriage four children were born, three of whom grew to maturity, namely: 
William, Richard and Ernest, all living in Crawford county. The mother of 
these children makes her home in Ida county, being now the wife of Fred 
Meyerr\ - 

Herriian Baak was educated in the public schools and applied himself to 
agriculture and stock-raising, continuing with his father until twenty-four years 
of age. He then rented land for four years, at the end of which time he pur- 
chased a farm comprising two hundred and forty acres on sections T)^ and 33, 
Soldier township. It is provided with modern improvements and the fields 
yield abundant annual harvests. Mr. Baak has been an extensive stock-raiser 
and fed all of his grain to his stock, thus realizing the highest return for his 
labor. He left the farm in the spring of 191 1, however, and is now conducting 
a garage and auto business at Ricketts. 

In 1896 Mr. Baak was married to Miss Minnie Schelm, who was born in 
Crawford county, August 23, 1874, a daughter of Carl and Alinnie (Sutroh) 
Schelm. Her parents were born in Germany and came to America, settling in 
Scott county, Iowa. Afterward they removed to Crawford county, where the 
father is engaged in farming. The mother died in 1886, and two years later 
Mr. Schelm was married to Miss Freda Fermeling, a native of Germany. By 
his first marriage four children were born: Alinnie, now Mrs. Herman Baak; 
Doretta, who is the wife of Fred Hemmyers, of Nebraska ; and William and 
Albert, also of Nebraska. By his second union two children were born : Gus- 
tave, who died at the age of ten months ; and George, who is now living with his 
mother in Denison. Mr. Schelm died in 1897. Two children came to bless the 
union of Mr. and Mrs. Baak: Martha S., who was born August 28, 1898, and 
is now attending school; and Edna F., born November 26, 1899. 

In politics Mr. Baak votes in support of honest government administered ac- 
cording to business principles. He has not been an aspirant for public office 
but served very acceptably as a member of the school board. He and his wife 
are sincere adherents of the Lutheran church and firm believers in its teachings. 
As a farmer he has been highly successful and in the discharge of his duties as 
a citizen and head of a family he is governed by motives of integrity and honor 
Avhich constitute the foundation of good citizenship. 



GEORGE NAEVE. 



Some men are endowed with a capacity that overcomes every obstacle. They 
are the leaders in a community and whether in business or professional life 
easily occupy the first rank. To this class belongs George Naeve, vice president 
of the Crawford County State Bank, and one of the largest landowners of the 
county. He is a native of the village of Gross-Wittensee, Schleswig-Holstein, 
Germany, born October n, 1857, and is the only son of Jurgen and Catherina 
(Fleck) Naeve. The father was an industrious farmer of good reputation, he 
and his wife being members of the Lutheran church. The grandfather Fleck 




316 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

on the maternal sitle married Marie Stroch and tliey lived to be (|nite advanced 
in years, rearing a large family. 

George Xaeve received his preliminary education in the schools of his native 
land and as soon as he was old enough began working in a nursery near the 
city of Kiel, where he continued for two or three years. He then went to Ham- 
burg and on arriving at the age of nineteen decided that he would seek his for- 
tune in the new world. Accordingly, in 1876, he bade farewell to his relatives 
and friends and crossed the ocean to America, going to Jackson and Clinton 
counties, Iowa, where he was employed at farm work. In the winter of 1878 
he removed to Kiron, Crawford county, and continued at farm labor in the 
summer, wdiile attending school during the winter months. In tlie meantime 
he had gained a good knowledge of the English language and of the habits and 
customs of the people of his adopted country. In the spring of 1879 he came to 
Denison and entered a hardware store as a clerk, in which capacity he continued 
for four years, when he became connected with the McHenry Bank, being identi- 
fied with that institution for five years. After resigning from his position in 
the bank he entered the real-estate, loan and abstract business, which he con- 
ducted with very marked success, becoming widely known on account of his 
large operations in real estate and investments. On January i, 1907, he became 
vice president and a very large stockholder of the Crawford County State Bank, 
a position which he still occupies. He is very largely interested in real estate 
and did own several thousand acres of land in Crawford county and still has 
about eight thousand acres in partnership with Carl Gronau in North and South 
Dakota, these gentlemen also owning several town sites. His home in Denison 
is one of the most beautiful private residences of the city. He is vice president 
of the German Bank of Schleswig and the Farmers State Bank of Charter Oak 
and also a stockholder in the Kintyre State Bank of Kintyre, North Dakota, the 
Denison Improvement Company, the Denison Hospital Company and the Oak- 
land Cemetery ^Association, being president of the Denison Improvement Com- 
pany and a trustee of the Oakland Cemetery Association. 

In December, 1885, Mr. Naeve was united in marriage to Miss Anna Knaul, 
a native of Berlin, Germany. She came to America with her parents at the age 
of four years, making her home in Clinton, Iowa, where her father was the 
owner of a drug store. He was three times married. His first wife died in 
Germany. The second passed away in Clinton, Iowa, and was the mother of 
Mrs. Naeve, while the third wife survived her husband, who died in middle life. 
There was one child by the first union, Rudolph Knaul; three daughters by the 
second, Gertrude, Anna and Lena; and two children l)y the third. Otto and 
Bertha. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Naeve has been brightened by the birth 
of four children : Marie, who is a graduate of the Denison high school and 
Lake Forest (Illinois) University and is now living at home; Louis, who died 
at the age of ten months; Erma, also a graduate of the Denison high school and 
now attending Lake Forest University; and Margaret, who died at the age of 
two months. 

Mr. Naeve started as a young man in a strange country upon his own re- 
sources. Difficulties served only to sjiur liim to renewed efifort. strengthening 
his will and developing an indomitable spirit of self-reliance that are his promi- 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 317 

nent characteristics. Today his name represents the highest business foresight 
and integrity, and he ranks as one of the most energetic and capable business 
men of Crawford county. His religious faith is indicated by membership in 
the Lutheran church, while his wife is a member of the Presbyterian church. 
He is a trustee and stockholder of Denison College and is well known as a 
stanch friend of education. 



HENRY C. KOLLS. 



Although Henry C. Kolls is one of the younger representatives of farming 
and stock-raising interests in Crawford county, he is yet one of the well-to-do 
and prominent citizens of this section of the state, for he has an extensive 
acreage, his possessions comprising two hundred and eighty acres in East Boyer 
township and four hundred and six acres in Paradise and Denison townships. 
He took up his abode on the latter place in the spring of 191 1 and is now bend- 
ing his energies to the further development and improvement of this valuable 
property. 

He is a native of Iowa, his birth having occurred in Clinton, February 11, 
1873, his parents being Rudolph and Elna Eliza (Neilson) Kolls, The father, 
a native of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, emigrated to the United States in 
1872 and first located in Clinton, where he spent the succeeding years up to 
1879. He then came to Crawford county, locating on a farm in Goodrich town- 
ship, where he lived until a short time prior to his death, when he removed to 
Denison, and there passed away on the 29th of November, 1908. He was promi- 
nent in the community in which he lived and for a number of years served as 
trustee of Goodrich township. His wife, who was born in Sweden, went to 
Germany when but six or seven years of age and was there reared and married. 
She died in Crawford county in 1895. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Kolls were 
born nine children : Louisa, the wife of R. H. Brown, a resident of Denison ; 
Carl, deceased; Maggie, who has also passed away; Anna, the wife of Julius 
Jensen, a resident of South Dakota; Henry C, of this review; Carl, the second 
of the name, now a resident of Hanover township, Crawford county; Adolph, 
who lives in Paradise township ; Rudolph, a resident of South Dakota ; and one 
who died in infancy. 

Henry C Kolls, the second son and fifth in order of birth, pursued his 
studies in the district schools of Goodrich township. He was early trained in 
the work of the home farm and during the period of his boyhood and youth 
assisted his father, with whom he remained until he had attained his majority. 
He then began farming on his own account, renting land of his father, and 
eventually he purchased a farm from him, operating the same for nine years. 
On the expiration of that period he removed to Denison, where he spent two 
years, after which he lived one year on a farm two and a half miles south of 
the city. In 1908 he took up his abode on a farm which he now rents, compris- 
ing two hundred and eighty acres of land in East Boyer township, and in the 
spring of 191 1 removed to his farm of four hundred and six acres, located 



318 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

partly in Paradise and partly in Denison township. He is giving his undivided 
attention to the further development and improvement of the latter place and 
it is one of the valuable tracts of that section of the county. He carries on 
general farming to some extent, but the major part of his time is given to the 
raising and feeding of live stock. In the year 1910 he fed six carloads of cattle 
and two carloads of hogs and this branch of his business is proving to him a 
gratifying source of revenue. 

Mr. Kolls chose as a companion for the journey of life, Miss Christina 
Amelia Christensen, their marriage being celebrated in 1894. She is a daughter 
of M. and Mrs. M. F. Christensen, well known residents of Denison. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Kolls have been born four children : Ella Louisa, Fred Carl, Henry 
Adolph and Leona Amelia. 

Mr. Kolls gives stanch support to the republican party, always casting his 
ballot in support of the candidates on that ticket, yet he is not an office seeker. 
His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Lutheran church. Per- 
haps the highest tribute that can be paid Mr. Kolls is that he has been successful 
in all of his undertakings and that he has so discharged his duties as a citizen 
and as a business man as to merit the confidence of those who know him best. 



HENRY HOLLMANN. 



lliirty-seven years ago Henry Holhnann located in Crawford county and 
during the time that has since elapsed has developed his farm into one of the 
most productive properties in Morgan township. He deserves great credit for 
the work he has done, especially when it is considered that he began without 
capital and is therefore a self-made man. He was born in Germany, September 
7, 1849, 3- son of T. H. and Anna (Blackwell) Hollmann, both of whom were 
natives of Germany and continued there during their entire lives. The mother 
died February 2, 1872, and the father passed away on the 19th of the follow- 
ing March. In their family were eight children, three of whom died in infancy, 
the others being: Henry, of this review; Heinrich, of Shiner, Texas; George 
and Diedrich, both of whom died in Germany; and Elizabeth, who died at the 
age of fifty-nine years. 

Henry Hollmann acquired his early education in the public schools of his 
native land and in 1865, being then sixteen years of age. he came to .America, 
first making his way to Monroe county, Michigan. Later he was a sailor on 
the Great Lakes for five years, in the course of which time he acquired consid- 
erable experience that has been of practical value to him in later years. Finally, 
having decided to settle down, he arrived in Iowa in 1870 and spent four years 
working on a farm, becoming intimately acquainted with the details of agricul- 
ture and stock-raising. On the i8th of May, 1874, he came to Crawford county 
and bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 14, Morgan town- 
ship. The land when he acquired it was raw prairie, but he has greatly im- 
proved his place by the erection of substantial buildings and the excellent ap- 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 319 

pearance of the farm is convincing evidence of the interest he takes in his 
work and the financial success he has achieved. 

In 1884 Air. Holhnann was united in marriage to Miss Annie Schafer, who 
was born in Germany, July 14, 1861, and came to America the year of her mar- 
riage. She is one of a family of five children, three of whom are still living in 
Germany. A brother, Diedrich, came to America and died in California. Five 
children have come to brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hollmann : George 
D., who was born April 12, 1888, and received his education in the public schools 
and the Denison Normal School; Katie, born December 29, 1890, who was edu- 
cated in the common schools; John M., who was born June 16, 1894, and also 
educated in the common schools; and Harry and Adolph, both of whom died 
in infancy. 

Mr. Hollmann and his wife are sincere members of the German Lutheran 
church and have reared their children in the same belief in which they them- 
selves were reared. As a pubHc-spirited man he is interested in the afifairs of 
the community and is a willing assistant in every movement that aims to pro- 
mote the general welfare. He is well known in Morgan and adjoining town- 
ships and can claim an extensive circle of friends whom he has attracted by his 
sterling character. 



C. H. WIESE. 



One of the many sons of Germany who have come to America with very 
limited capital but an inexhaustible supply of energy and determination and by 
means of well directed effort has won where a man with less strength of purpose 
would have been defeated, is C. H. Wiese. He is a native of Schleswig-Hol- 
stein and the youngest son of John Henry and Margaret Katrina (Ghoul) 
Wiese, his birth occurring on the 22d of March, 1862. His parents, who were 
also from the province of Schleswig-Holstein, emigrated to the United States 
and located at West Side, Iowa, where the father passed away in 1904. The 
mother was also a resident of Crawford county at the time of her death, which 
occurred in 1885. Only three of the five children born to them survive, those 
besides our subject being: Ida, who is married and living in the fatherland; 
and John, a resident of Omaha, Nebraska. 

C. H. Wiese acquired the greater portion of his education in Germany, only 
attending school one winter after his arrival in the United States. As soon 
as he was old enough to begin work he obtained employment as a section hand, 
following that occupation at Aspinwall four years. At the end of that period 
he worked in a lumberyard for five years and then began farming in Iowa town- 
ship. After living there three years he removed to a farm in Hayes township, 
which he cultivated four years, and then returned to West Side, where he spent 
two years. In the meantime he had become very enthusiastic about Nebraska, 
and migrating to that state, he bought a half section of land in Dixon county, 
upon which he resided for three years. Returning to Crawford county at the 
expiration of that period, he located on sections 21 and 22, Washington town- 



320 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

ship, where he now owns two hundred and forty acres of excellent farming 
land. He has made many improvements upon his homestead during the period 
of his residence here, so that it is now one of the most valuable farms in the 
township. He engages in general farming and stock-raising and is meeting with 
marked success in both ventures. 

On the 22(\ of March, 1885, Mr. Wiese was united in marriage to Miss 
Katrina Schmahl, who was born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, February 14, 
1865, a daughter of Kai and Katrina (Mueller) Schmahl. Her father is now 
deceased, but her mother is still living in Germany. Mrs. Wiese has one sister 
in America, Sophia, the wife of Otto Passick, residing in Carroll county, Iowa. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wiese have become the parents of eight children, who are as 
follows: Minnie, the wife of Detlef Peterson, Washington township; and Emil, 
Bridget, Emma, Ida, Florence, Etta and Elsie, all of whom are at home. 

The family afifiliate with the Lutheran church. The democratic party is 
always given the political support of Mr. W'iese, and although he does not 
actively participate in local governmental affairs he meets the requirements of 
good citizenship by casting his ballot on election day. He is in every sense of 
the word a self-made man, as the success he has achieved in life is due solely 
and directly to his own effort, and as such he justly deserves the respect ac- 
corded him in the community where he resides. 



W. F. BOECK. 



A highly improved and cultivated farm of one hundred and sixty acres is 
a credit to the well directed energies of W. F. Boeck, who was born in Daven- 
port, Iowa, on the loth of September, 1867. He is a son of Henry and Eliza- 
beth (Peterson) Boeck, both natives of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, from 
which country they emigrated to the United States, locating in Davenport in 
1858. The father, who was a carpenter, followed his trade until the breaking 
out of the Civil war and, enlisting in the Second Iowa Cavalry, he went to the 
front serving for four and a half years. During that time he saw much active 
service, participating in some of the most notable battles of the war. Returning 
to Iowa after receiving his discharge, he invested the money he had earned at 
his trade in land in Crawford county. Ultimately he acquired eleven hundred 
and seventeen acres, all of which he brought to a high state of cultivation and 
still retains in his possession. Mr. Boeck retired several years ago and is now 
living in Davenport, spending his winters in Florida. He was married twice, 
and his first wife, who passed away in 1873, was the mother of our subject and 
two daughters: Elizabeth, the wife of Fred Brandenberg, of East Boyer town- 
shin, and Laura, the widow of Otto Teegan. of Davenport, Iowa. For his sec- 
ond wife Mr. Ilocck chose Miss Catherina Kahler, and they are the parents of 
five children, four sons' and one daughter: Herman, who is a resident of East 
Boyer township ; George, of Nishnabotny township ; Ferdinand, of Davenport, 
Iowa; August, also of Davenport; and Louisa, the wife of August Schnoor, of 
Nishnabotny township. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 321 

W. F. Boeck was reared at home, acquiring his education in tlie common 
schools of Davenport, which he continued to attend until he had attained his 
sixteenth year. In 1884 he came to his father's farm to assist in breaking the 
prairie and has been here ever since. He has always been engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits. He owns a section of land in Logan county, Kansas. His place 
is thoroughly modern in all of its appointments, and he is the only farmer in 
this section of the state who has an electric lighting plant, his residence and all 
outbuildings being wired. Although Mr. Boeck has engaged in general farming 
and stock-raising for over twenty years, he has made a business of threshing 
during the season, which has proven to be most lucrative. 

In 1893 Mr. Boeck was united in marriage to Miss Anna Gosch, who is also 
of German parentage, and they have become the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Viola Augusta, Henry Theodore, Harry William, Howard Herman, Ve- 
ronica Bertha and Hugo Fred, all of whom are at home. 

The family attend the Lutheran church, of which the parents are members, 
while fraternally Mr. Boeck is affiliated with the Masonic order, being identified 
with Manilla Lodge, of which he is a senior steward, and Mrs. Boeck is a 
member of the Eastern Star. Politically he is identified with the republican 
party. He always takes an active and helpful interest in all local affairs and is 
now serving as assessor in Nishnabotny township, and he also served for several 
years on the school board. He is one of the enterprising citizens of the com- 
munity, whose efforts have been rewarded with good financial returns because 
of his carefully considered and capably executed plans. 



JOHN L. AINSWORTH. 

Among the honored citizens of Denison is John L. Ainsworth, who as a 
school teacher has attained an enviable record in Crawford county, having de- 
voted his best talents and energies to that vocation for thirty years past. He 
was born in Lomira, Dodge county, Wisconsin, August 5, 1861, a son of Michael 
and Mary (Rice) Ainsworth, the former a native of New York state and the 
latter of Alsace-Loraine, France. The father was a farmer by occupation. 
Coming to Crawford county, Iowa, in the fall of 1868, he located five miles north 
of Denison in Goodrich township, where he purchased a farm of one hundred 
and forty acres, upon which he lived for thirty-three years. He passed away in 
1901, having then reached the age of eighty-four years. His beloved wife died 
at the age of seventy-seven years in 1905. They were both stanch believers in 
the authority and inspiration of the Bible and active members of the Methodist 
church, performing their part nobly in the upbuilding of the county. Joseph 
Ainsworth, the paternal grandfather of our subject, who was also a native of 
New York state, was a farmer by occupation and served in the American army 
in the war of 1812. He died in Wisconsin, being then well advanced in years. 
The maternal grandfather. Joseph Rice, was a native of Alsace, France. Seek- 
ing more favorable conditions than he found in his own country, he came to 
America and lived for many years in Dodge county, Wisconsin. He spent the 



322 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

last part of his life in Crawford county, Iowa. Seven children in the family of 
Michael and Mary Ainsworth grew to maturity, namely : Joseph O. and Edwin 
M.. both of whom are now deceased; Charlotte H., now Mrs. E. O. Thien, of 
Denison; Ancil D.. of Ute, Iowa; George E., of Canton, Illinois; John L., the 
subject of this review; and Adelle, now the wife of J. C. Phillips, of Virgil, 
South Dakota. 

John L. Ainsworth came to Crawford county with his parents when seven 
years of age and has ever since been a resident of this county. He was reared 
under the favoring influences of a country home and as a member of a family 
in which each was expected to perform his duty, either in the house or in the 
fields. He early gained practical lessons of application and self-denial that 
have been of inestimable value to him in later life. In the district schools he 
gained his preparatory education, later becoming a student of the Denison Nor- 
mal & Business College. After preparing himself for such a responsibility, he 
began teaching in Crawford county in 1881, continuing without interruption to 
the present time, and becoming recognized years ago as one of the thoroughly 
qualified educators of this section. 

On the 2d of April, 1890, Mr. Ainsworth was united in marriage to Miss 
Edith Shirtcliff, a daughter of Henry and Frances (Colley) Shirtcliff, a record 
of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Mrs. Ainsworth is a member of the 
Episcopal church, but her husband is not identified with any religious denomi- 
nation. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias, and politically 
he supports the candidates and principles of the republican party as those best 
adapted in his opinion for the preservation of the liberties of the republic. As 
a professional teacher he is a constant student of the world's progress and 
being a man of unusual intelligence and of wide observation his opinions com- 
mand respect wherever he is known. He is conscientious in the discharge of 
his duties and hundreds of young men and women who have been under his 
care as pupils regard him as a friend and counselor whose greatest desire is 
to promote the welfare and happiness of others. 



FRANK F. LARSON. 



Many of the most prosperous and public-spirited citizens of Iowa are natives 
of Sweden or descendants of Swedish ancestry. ■ The traits of frugality, in- 
dustry and self-reliance so prominent in the people of the mother country have 
been exemplified by their representatives in the new world, and it is seldom 
we meet with a Swede in America who is not self-supporting or financially in- 
dependent. Frank F. Larson, who owns a valuable farm of two hundred and 
twenty acres in Crawford county, is a striking example of success in agricultural 
pursuits accomplished by one who was born in Sweden and sought a home in 
this republic. His eyes first opened to the light of day November 22, 1862. He 
is a son of John and Mary (Anderson) Larson, a record of whom appears in 
the sketch of Andrew Larson, which mav be found elsewhere in this work. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 323 

Frank F. Larson came to this country with his parents and remained at home 
until arriving at maturity. He worked in the coal mines of Pennsylvania and 
subsequently engaged in farming in Crawford county, Iowa, prosecuting his 
work with such ability that he now owns one of the most beautiful farms in 
Otter Creek township. He has made many improvements thereon, erecting 
buildings and fences, and putting in drainage, etc., and as he is very energetic 
and enterprising he meets with a goodly measure of prosperity. He specializes 
in the raising and feeding of stock, which he handles to excellent advantage, 
being thoroughly acquainted with this line of business. 

In March, i8g6, Mr. Larson was united in marriage to Miss Anna Meyers, 
who was born in Sweden, March 7, 1873, and came to America when she was 
seventeen years of age. She is a daughter of Charles and Martha (Falk) 
Meyers, both of whom were born in Sweden. The mother died in 1887, but 
the father is still living in the old country. There were six children in their 
family. Four children have come to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. Larson, 
namely : Rudolph, Edith, Erma and Ray C. 

Mr. Larson and his wife are members of the Lutheran church and are rear- 
ing their children in the same faith. Politically, he gives his support to the 
republican party, believing that in so doing he is advancing the permanent in- 
terests of the nation. In business affairs he is prompt and reliable, and in all 
the relations of life he aims to perform his duty to the best of his ability and 
has thus gained a reputation as one of the substantial men of this section. 



WILLIAM GOTTSCH. 



Citizens of foreign birth have performed an important part in the develop- 
ment of Crawford county and in the list of those who are now prominent in 
agricultural circles stands the name of William Gottsch, a native of Germany. 
His eyes first opened to the light of day in the province of Holstein, August 16, 
1868, his parents being Peter and Elsie Gottsch, who were also natives of that 
province. The family came to America in 1881 and located in Carroll county, 
Iowa, where the parents are still living. Five children were born to them, three 
of whom survive. 

William Gottsch came to the new world with his parents when he was thir- 
teen years of age and received his education in Germany and in the district 
schools of Iowa. He continued at home until he reached manhood and then 
took up his residence on the farm where he now lives on section 15, West Side 
township. This place comprises three hundred and twenty acres, on which he 
has erected substantial buildings and made other improvements, developing the 
farm into one of the most desirable properties of the tovvnship. He also has 
charge of three hundred and twenty acres which belongs to his father and en- 
gages quite extensively in raising and feeding stock for the market. He is a 
thorough business man and is regarded as one of the substantial and progres- 
sive farmers of the county. 



324 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

In 1896 Mr. Gottsch was united in marriage to Miss Mary Kruse, who was 
born in Hayes township, Crawford county, December 29, 1873, a daughter of 
Otto and Metha Kruse. Her parents were born in Germany and came to Amer- 
ica in 1856, locating in Crawford county, Iowa, where they still live. There 
were six cliildren in their family, four of whom survive. The union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Gottsch has been blessed by four children, namely : Alfred P., who 
was born August 8, 1897; Hilda Anna, born December 26, 1899; Rudolph C.,. 
born August 30, 1904; and Gilmer Otto, born December 30, 1905. 

Mr. Gottsch has attained his present honorable position in the community 
through a practical knowledge of his business and an innate ambition which has 
ever urged him to the accomplishment of worthy objects. He is known as one 
of the reliable and energetic men of his township who never falters in the dis- 
charge of any obligation and is generally capable of carrying to a successful 
conclusion whatever he undertakes. Politically he gives his support to the re- 
publican party and fraternally he is a valued member of the Knights of Pythias. 
He and his estimable wife hold membership in the Lutheran church and are 
active workers in its behalf. 



FREDERICK BERNARD WILLIAM GREIF. 

Frederick Bernard William Greif. who is engaged in general farming and 
stock-raising in Washington township, is a native of Germany, having been born 
in Langwarden, Oldenburg, on the 6th of November, 1857. His parents. Diet- 
rick and Sophia Vocke, spent their entire lives in the fatherland, where the 
father was a farmer. In the family were seven children, but only four survive: 
William, now a farmer in Floresville, Texas; Frederick B. W., our subject; 
Mary, the wife of William Bruns, of Shiner, Texas; and Minnie, the wife of 
Bernard Meentzen, of Germany. 

Mr. Greif of this review had his last name changed from \'ocke to Greif 
after coming to this country by the court at Denison. He acquired his educa- 
tion in his native country, after which he engaged in farming there until 1887, 
when he decided to become a citizen of the United States. Upon his arrival in 
America he first located at Defiance, Shelby county, this state, where he worked 
as a farm hand for two years, after which he farmed as a renter and later came 
to Crawford county. He bought eighty acres of land in Denison township, upon 
which he resided for five years, and then sold and moved to one Inmdred and 
sixty acres on section 31 of the same township. After selling the latter place he 
bought eighty acres in Washington township, which he cultivated for two years. 
On disposing of it. he bought one hundred and twenty acres on sections 10 and 
II, Washington township, where he is now engaged in general farming and 
stock-raising. 

In 1882, five years before emigrating to the United States, Mr. Greif was 
united in marriage to Miss Sophia Janssen. also a native of Oldenburg, and they 
have become the pqjents of one child, Deitrich, who has never married and lives 
on a farm one mile north of the homestead. They also have adopted a child, 
Hattie May Steward, who is now attending school. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 325 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Greif are of the Lutheran faith, while pohtically he 
afhhates with the repubhcan party. Although he has never aspired to public 
honors or the emoluments of office, Mr. Greif served two years as road super- 
visor. He is a thrifty, hard-working man, and by means of his energy and 
close application has met with a fair degree of success during his residence in 
this country. 



KARL AUGUST SCHREIBER. 

Charter Oak township is largely made up of citizens either of German birth 
or ancestry, and to the former class belongs Karl August Schreiber, for his birth 
occurred in the fatherland on the 17th of June, i860. His parents, Ferdinand 
and Louisa (Strohfeld) Schreiber, were likewise natives of Germany and there 
they lived until 1888, which year witnessed their arrival in the new world. 
Upon reaching American shores the father made his way with his family to 
Chicago, residing in that metropolis for eight years. He then removed to Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, where he spent two years and it was while living in that 
city that the death of the wife and mother occurred in June, 1896. Subse- 
quently the father came to Crawford county, Iowa, and made his home with his 
children throughout his remaining years, his death here occurring in October, 
1903, when he had reached the advanced age of eighty years. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Ferdinand Schreiber were born nine children, as follows : Augusta W., the wife 
of Herman Semlor, a resident of Chicago; Karl A., whose name introduces this 
review; Herman, deceased; Gustav, a resident of Crawford county; Fred W., 
Amelia A., William and Ferdinand, all of whom have departed this life; and 
one who died in infancy. 

Karl August Schreiber spent the period of his boyhood and youth in his na- 
tive country and upon attaining his majority he emigrated to the new world, be- 
lieving that in the United States he might enjoy better advantages in the busi- 
ness world. He at first located in Maryland but only spent a brief period in that 
state, going thence to Chicago, where for fifteen years he worked at the car- 
penter's trade. He then continued his westward journey and also changed his 
occupation, for upon his arrival in Crawford county, Iowa, he engaged in farm- 
ing, having previously purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land here. For 
six years he developed and cultivated his place and then sold the same. He in- 
vested his money in his present property, comprising two hundred and forty 
acres, located near Charter Oak in Charter Oak township. In 1909 bought two 
hundred and forty acres in Paradise township and now owns four hundred and 
eighty acres. He has made many improvements on his farm, has placed the 
fields under a high state of cultivation and his place is now one of the finely 
improved properties of his section of the county. He is engaged in raising 
various cereals which are adapted to Iowa soil and each year gathers abundant 
harvests as a reward for the care and labor which he bestows upon the fields. 

Mr. Schreiber has been married twice. He was first married October 31. 
1887, to Miss Augusta Dumke, who was born in Germany and was brought by her 



326 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

parents to America when only a year old. To this union were born two daugh- 
ters and one son, namely: Martha, who was born March 29, 1889, and now 
resides in Chicago; Clara, who was born March 2, 1894, and is now at home; 
and Carl, who was born July 9, 1900, and is also at home. The wife and mother 
was calletl to her final rest in April, 1901, and on the nth of July, 1905, Mr. 
Schreiber wedded Mrs. Emma Goerner, the widow of Frank Goerner, who 
passed away in 1902. Mrs. Schreiber was born in November, 1869. and is a 
daughter of Frederick and Wilhelmina Lipsky, both of whom died in Germany. 
She is the eldest in a family of eight children, of whom four still survive, these 
being: Adolph, who resides in Germany; Fred, of Crawford county; Max, also 
of Crawford county; and Mrs. Schreiber. The four who are deceased passed 
away in their native land. By his second marriage Mr. Schreiber has two sons 
and one daughter: Herman, whose birth occurred on the nth of May, 1906; 
Adolph, born March 17, 1908; and ]\Iarie ]\I., born June 7, 1910. By her former 
marriage Mrs. Schreiber has five children, as follows: Fritz, who was born in 
Chicago, November 13, 1894; Gertrude, born April 28, 1896; Alma, born April 
8, 1898; Ida, born November 20, 1899; and Martha, who was born October 3, 
1902. 

The parents are members of the German Lutheran church and in this faith 
are rearing their children. It is astonishing to witness the success of young 
men who have emigrated to America without capital and from a position of 
comparative obscurity have worked their way upward in the business world. 
The readiness with which they adapt themselves to circumstances and take ad- 
vantage of opportunities ofifered brings to them success and wins them a place 
among the leading men of the community in which they reside. To this class 
belongs Karl A. Schreiber, wdio is today one of the successful and well known 
farmers of Charter Oak township and Crawford county. 



R. BENSON SMITH. 



That success in this life is not dependent upon either influence or inherited 
wealth is fully demonstrated by the career of R. Benson Smith, who by his 
own unaided efforts has acquired sufficient property to yield him an adequate 
competence for the remainder of his life, although he has not yet reached the 
turning point ordinarily termed "middle age." Born in the western part of 
Canada, May 16, 1873, he is a son of Thomas and Jane (Graham) Smith, both 
of whom were natives of Canada but of Irish parentage. They came across 
the border line in 1875 and located in Denison township, Crawford county, 
Iowa, where they resided for fourteen years and then removed to Paradise 
township, the father having always followed the vocation of farming. Unto 
them six children were born, of whom four are living, as follows : Sarah, 
who married Howard Cole and lives in Denison; R. Benson; Deborah, who be- 
came the wife of H. W. Logsdon ; John W., who holds a government position 
in Oakland, California. Anna E. married W. E. Cole and died in Denison in 
1907; and Melissa married Theodore McCramer and is also deceased. They 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 327 

were the two oldest. The father died in the spring of 1894 and was interred 
m the Denison cemetery. The mother's demise occurred in 1910. 

R. Benson Smith was but two years old when he was brought to Crawford 
county by his parents and his initial education was obtained in the public schools, 
one year being spent in the Dow City school. Thrown upon his own resources 
at an early age he decided to take up farming as his life work, his first ven- 
ture being on a rented farm in Paradise township. Eventually he purchased 
eighty acres of land in Union township and by unabating thrift and industry 
he has been enabled to increase his holdings gradually until at the present time 
he owns two hundred and eighty acres of highly improved farm land, which 
he devotes to general farming and stock-raising, making a specialty of stock- 
feeding. 

Mr. Smith has been twice married, his first wife having been Miss Lily E. 
Morris, a native of Crawford county, by whom he had one child, Ethel, who is 
now living on the home farm. Mrs. Smith passed away in 1900. In 1907 Mr. 
Smith was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Sherman, who was born in Car- 
roll county, and they are the parents of three children, one of whom survive, 
Robert and Mabel, twins, who are deceased; and Hope, who was born Decem- 
ber 26, 1910. 

The political allegiance of Mr. Smith is given to the republican party, but 
he has never sought nor desired public office. He takes an active interest in all 
matters pertaining to local afifairs and is one of the directors of the school board. 
In religion he holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal church and is one of 
its ardent and earnest workers. His present prosperity is due entirely to his 
own labor and perseverance and he therefore deserves commendation as a self- 
made and successful business man who holds the respect and kindly considera- 
tion of everyone in his section of the county. 



H. H. DERNER. 



One of the most attractive farms of Iowa township is the homestead of 
H. H. Derner, who owns two hundred and forty acres of land on section 36, 
in the cultivation of which he has been engaged since 1898. ]\Ir. Derner is a 
native of Schleswig-Holstein, his birth having occurred on the i8th of October, 
1866. He knows little of his parentage, as he left home when a very small lad, 
emigrating to the United States when a youth of about fifteen years. 

In his early manhood Mr. Derner migrated to Iowa, first locating in Carroll 
county, farming as a renter near Manning until about 1898, at which time he 
removed to Crawford county. Upon his arrival here he purchased two hundred 
and forty acres of land on section 36, Iowa township, upon which he has evei 
since continued to reside. He has wrought marvelous improvements in the 
property during his residence, having erected a large, commodious residence of 
ten rooms and substantial barns and outbuildings. The buildings upon the place 
are all painted white, the grounds well cared for and the entire farm has an ap- 
pearance of neatness and thrift which makes it most attractive. Although he en- 



328 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

gages in general farming and stock-raising Mr. Derner makes a specialty of 
feeding stock. He possesses the qualities essential to success in any vocation, 
— energ}-. perseverance and system — and the result is that his various ventures 
have all rewarded him with lucrative returns. His buildings are kept in repair, 
his stock well housed and his fields given the careful supervision which results 
in abundant harvests, which command good prices in the market. 

Mr. Derner established a home for himself in 1887, at which time he was 
united in marriage to Miss Augusta Stein. Nine children have been born of this 
union: Lillie. who is the wife of George Boock, of South Dakota; Laura, who is 
a resident of Clinton, Iowa; and Herman, Louisa, John, Selma, Malinda, Nettie 
and Hazel, all of whom are at home. 

The religious faith of the family is manifested through their affiliation with 
the Lutheran denomination, while fraternally Mr. Derner is identified with the 
Modern Woodmen of Amerca, his membership being in the Manilla Camp, and 
he also liolds life insurance in two of the old line companies. Politically his 
views coincide with those of the democratic party, for whose candidates he 
always casts his ballot. He takes an active and helpful interest in civic affairs 
and is now serving as school treasurer of the township, while for the past three 
years he has been township trustee. In addition to his extensive realty hold- 
ings Mr. Derner is a stockholder of the Mutual Insurance Company of Craw- 
ford and Carroll counties, of which organization he has been treasurer for eight 
years. He is one of Crawford county's self-made men, having been thrown 
upon his own resources w^hen a very small lad and by means of his own well 
directed and capably executed plans has achieved the success which has rewarded 
his efforts. 



JUDGE JAMES PERRY CONNER. 

Carlisle has said that "biography is the most interesting as well as the most 
profitable reading," and there is in the life record of one to whom success has 
come as the reward of earnest and honorable effort something that arouses the 
ambition and stimulates the labors of others. There is much in the history of 
Judge James Perry Conner that can be set down with profit, for throughout 
his life he has held to high standards of manhood and citizenship and in public 
service has maintained a stainless record, exciting little of the envy and unfair 
criticism which are so often heaped upon an official by those who hold differing 
political opinions. Men of all parties speak of him in terms of confidence and 
high respect. 

He was born in Morristown (now Parker), Randolph county, Indiana, Jan- 
uary 27, 185 1, his parents being Dr. William L. and Maria A. (Stiffler) Conner, 
the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of Pennsylvania. Dr. 
Conner, after his graduation from a medical college, located for practice in 
Morristown. Indiana, where he remained an active and valued member of the 
profession until his death, which occurred in 1854, when he was but thirty- 
three years of age. His wife survived him and married again, her second hus- 




J. p. COXXER 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 331 

band being Carey Bradfielcl. In 1856 they removed to Iowa, settling in Spring 
Creek township, Black Hawk county, where Mrs. Bradheld passed away at 
the age of fifty-seven years. Her husband reached the age of sixty-five. They 
were the parents of three children, of whom but one is now living— Ellsworth 
Bradfield, of Minnesota. The Conner family to which the father belonged was 
noted for its many sons, all stalwart men, over six feet in~ height. Unto Dr. 
and Mrs. Conner there were born four children: Martha, the wife of W. R. 
Bradfield, of La Porte City, Black Hawk county, Iowa; Calvin, who died at 
the age of twenty-six years, after having been admitted to the bar ; James P. ; 
and one who died in infancy. 

James Perry Conner was reared upon the old home farm and acquired his 
early education in the district schools. At the age of sixteen he went away to 
school, attending the Upper Iowa University. He had come to this state in 
1856, with his mother, and has, therefore, been almost a lifelong resident of 
Iowa. After attending the Upper Iowa University he returned home and en- 
gagd in teaching in the school in which his early education had been acquired. 
Later he turned his attention to the study of law, which he pursued in the State 
University at Iowa City, and following his graduation in June, 1873, he was 
admitted to the bar and on the 15th of November, 1873, settled at Denison for 
the practice of his profession. He was not long in demonstrating his power as 
an advocate before the courts and also gave proof of his ability and judgment as 
a counselor. In 1880 he was elected district attorney of the thirteenth judicial 
district, which position he acceptably filled for four years. In 1884 he was elected 
judge of the circuit court of the thirteenth judicial district of Iowa and in 1886 
was elected district judge of the sixteenth judicial district, having the support 
of both the republican and democratic parties, a fact indicative of the impartial 
service which he had rendered when previously upon the bench. He has long 
been recognized as a leading member of the republican party in Crawford 
county and in 1892 was a delegate to the republican national convention at Minne- 
apolis. On the 26th of September, 1900, he was nominated by the republican 
convention of the tenth Iowa district as its candidate for the fifty-sixth congress 
to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of the Hon. John J. P. Dolliver, 
recently deceased. Judge Conner was elected to the office and by reelection 
served also in the fifty-seventh, fifty-eighth, fifty-ninth and sixtieth congresses. 
At his last election he received twenty-six thousand and seventeen votes against 
fifteen thousand, three hundred and seventeen cast for J. B. Butler, the demo- 
cratic candidate; six hundred and twenty-nine for N. S. Sheffield, the socialist 
candidate; and seven hundred and sixty-one for William Beckett, the prohibi- 
tion candidate. His work in congress has shown that he has a statesman's grasp 
of afifairs, that he has given careful consideration to questions coming up for 
settlement and that he stands firmly in support of what he believes to be right. 
The integrity of his position is never questioned, and even those opposed to him 
politically entertain for him high respect because of his loyalty to his honest 
convictions. 

On the I2th of October. 1875. Judge Conner was married to Miss Allie M. 
Cowdrey. They have a son, Raymond, who is manager of the Review Publish- 
ing Company, in which Judge Conner is a heavy stockholder. He belongs to 

Vol. 11—18 



332 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

the Methodist church and gives his aid and ccx^pcration to all the agencies and 
movements which tend to uplift humanity, to broaden the vision of life and to 
promote material, intellectual, political, social and moral i)rogress. While he 
has held to high ideals, he has labored with practical ])urpose. Few men of 
Crawford county have remained longer in ]n\h\\c service, and the record of none 
has been more faultless in honor, fearless in conduct or stainless in reputation. 



PARKER W. HARDING. 

Parker W. Harding, who is now regarded as one of the most successful 
attorneys of Denison, has practiced law in Crawford county for more than 
twenty years, having previously followed his profession for over fourteen years 
in Charter Oak before his removal to the former city six years ago. His ad- 
vancement has been due to his energy, comprehensive knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of law and gentlemanly address, which has attracted a host of friends 
wherever he is known. He was born at Lockeport, Nova Scotia. October 2"/, 
1863, and is the only son of Captain Simeon and Margaret (McQuhae) Har- 
ding, who were also natives of Nova Scotia. 

In 1906 Mr. Harding brought his parents and two sisters to the United 
States and they located at Council Bluffs. Iowa, wdiere the father died two 
years later. Captain Harding was for more than forty years a master mariner, 
sailing out of the port of Lockeport, Nova Scotia. His remains were interred 
in Walnut Flill cemetery. The mother of our subject is still living in Council 
BlufTs with her two daughters. She is a Baptist in religious belief, as was also 
her husband, both of them being descendants of pioneer Baptist ministers, the 
Revs. Harris and Theodore Harding, whose names are enrolled on the tablets 
of the Acadia Baptist College. 

Richard Harding, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was born in Eng- 
land and was also a sea captain, living to the advanced age of ninety years. He 
was the father of six children. The sons, Simeon, Robert and William, were all 
sea captains. Robert died at Lockeport, Nova Scotia, while William has retired 
from the sea and for many years has been an adjuster for the marine service 
in New York city. Anna R., the eldest daughter, is now living in Denison, 
Iowa; Elizabeth is the wife of B. R. Morrow of Denison; and Mary wedded 
Robert Firth of Lockeport, Nova Scotia, and is now deceased. Robert Mc- 
Quhae, the maternal grandfather of our subject, was a native of Scotland and 
by occupation was a farmer. He came to America and spent his last days in 
Jordan Falls, Nova Scotia, where he died at the age of ninety years. The 
maiden name of his wife was Margaret McDonald. She, too, was of Scotch 
birth and her death occurred in her eighty-eighth year. 

There were five children in the family of Simeon and Margaret (McQuhae) 
Harding, namely: Parker W., of this review; Rosa W.. who was educated in 
the United States and died at the home of her parents in Nova Scotia after 
reaching womanhood; Emma J., the wife of Richard Gwillam, a manufacturer 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 333 

of Gloversville, New York; Allie F., the wife of Dr. J. E. Clausson, of Beatrice, 
Nebraska; and Lizzie P., who is Hving with her mother at Council Blufifs. 

Parker W. Harding was reared at Jordan Falls, Nova Scotia, and received 
his early education at Shelbourne Academy. Later he entered Acadia College, 
Wolfville, two miles from Grand Prae, near the mouth of the Gaspereaux river, 
and within six miles of Cape Blomidon and the Basin of Minas, both of which 
are prominently noted in Longfellow's immortal poem, Evangeline. He early 
indicated a taste for a professional career and studied law in his native country, 
coming to the United States in 1888 when twenty-five years of age. In 1890 
he was admitted to the bar at Des Moines, Iowa, and immediately afterward 
began practice at Charter Oak, showing an ability which gave bright promise 
as to his future. In 1904 he came to Denison, where he has since followed 
his profession, being now the senior member of the well known firm of Harding 
& Kahler. He is a clear and logical speaker and as he makes thorough prepara- 
tion for every case in which he is interested and centers his argument upon the 
main point at issue he never fails to hold the attention of the jury and often 
carries the day in the face of the most determined opposition. It is greatly to 
his credit that his clientage is found among the leading merchants, farmers and 
capitalists of the county. 

In 1890, upon his admission to the bar, Mr. Harding was united in marriage 
to Miss Margaret M. Kevan, a resident of Dow City, Iowa. She is a native 
of Illinois and a daughter of Charles and Jean (Taylor) Kevan. Her parents 
were born in Scotland and for a number of years made their home at Charter 
Oak, Iowa, but both are now deceased. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harding are valued members of the Methodist church, in 
which he is an earnest worker and is a member of its board of trustees. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights 
of Pythias. Politically he gives his support to the republican party. He and 
his wife occupy a beautiful residence in Denison and their home is the center 
of hospitality where friends and acquaintances are sure of receiving a cordial 
greeting. He is one of the honored citizens of Crawford county who has justly 
earned the success he has attained and who commands the confidence of his 
fellowmen by an irreproachable character and an abiding interest in the perma- 
nent welfare of his adopted city. 



CARL GRONAU. 



Carl Gronau, a successful real-estate dealer of Denison. has resided here for 
the past three decades and is widely recognized as one of the most valued and 
prosperous residents of Crawford county, owning between seven and eight 
thousand acres of land. His birth occurred in Mecklenburg. Strelitz. Germany, 
on the I2th of January, 1844, his parents being Carl and Carolina (Kloeckncr) 
Gronau, who were likewise natives of that country. His paternal grandfather, 
Carl Gronau, was a wagonmaker by trade and served in the French and Ger- 
man war of 1806 as a soldier of the German army, participatmg m the battle 



334 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

of Austerlitz. He died when about seventy-six years of age, while his wife, who 
bore the maiden name of CaroHna Wagner, passed away in early womanhood. 
Their children were Carl, Wilhelm and Augusta. William Kloeckner, the ma- 
ternal grandfather of our subject, was a miller. He married A iss Sommer, 
who died in early womanhood. 

Carl Gronau, the father of the gentleman whose name introduces this re- 
view, was a wagonmaker by trade. He came to America when seventy years 
of age and visited with his son Carl for one year. At the end of that time he 
returned to Germany and there passed away at the age of eighty-four years. 
At one time he served as an alderman in his city. Both he and his wife were 
Lutherans in religious faith, the latter living to attain the age of fifty-six years. 
They had eight sons, four of whom still survive, as follows: Carl, of this re- 
view; Frederick, living near Kiron. Crawford county; Rudolph, who is a resi- 
dent of Strelitz, Germany ; and Emil, a blacksmith of Spokane, Washington. 

Carl Gronau was reared in his native land and attended the common schools 
in the acquirement of an education. After putting aside his text-books he was 
employed in his father's wagon shop and also did farm work. In accordance 
with the laws of the country, he likewise served in the regular army as a private 
for three years. In 1869, when a young man of twenty-five years, he crossed 
the Atlantic to the United States, first spending one year in Jackson county, 
Iowa. Removing to Chicago, Illinois, he there remained for two years, on the 
expiration of which period he returned to Jackson county and there made his 
home until 1881. In that year he came to Denison and this town has remained 
his place of residence during the intervening three decades. He conducted a 
wagon and blacksmith shop for six years and then embarked in the real-estate 
business, which still claims his attention. At one time he owned twelve farms 
but has disposed of these and now has lands in North and South Dakota, and in 
Alberta, Canada. His property holdings embrace between seven and eight thou- 
sand acres of land. His business undertakings have been attended with a grati- 
fying measure of success. During the first year of his residence in this country 
he erected a home and in 1900 built his present commodious and beautiful dwell- 
ing, standing on the site of the old Denison home— the first erected in the city 
of Denison. He has built a number of the substantial residences here and has 
also improved a number of farms, having spent over ten thousand dollars for 
improvements on his Dakota farms during the past year. He has long been re- 
garded as a valued and leading citizen of Denison and Crawford county, having 
spent vast sums of money in developing property. 

On the 24th of June, 1870, Mr. Gronau was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary 
Heiden, a native of Germany, who in 1869 came to America with her parents, 
Fritz and Carolina (Pankow) Heiden, the family home being established in 
Jackson county, Iowa. There her father and mother spent the remainder of 
their lives, the former attaining the age of about eighty-one, while the latter was 
seventy-four years old when called to her final rest. They were the parents of 
two sons and two daughters, namely: Wilhelmina, Frederick, Mary and [ohn. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Gronau were born four children, as follows: Lena and' Wil- 
liam, who died of diphtheria in early life; Amanda, the wife of J. B. Sibbert, of 
Denison, by whom she has one son, Carl; and Louisa, living in Los Angeles, 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 335 

California, who is the wife of John D. Sievers and the mother of two sons, 
Paul and William Edward. 

Mr. Grouau gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has 
served as a 'member of the city council for three years. He is enterprising 
and public-spirited to a marked degree and has always taken an active interest 
in those movements and measures instituted to promote the general welfare of 
Denison. In fact no history of the county would be complete without the rec- 
ord of his life and work. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belong- 
ing to Sylvan Lodge, No. 507, A. F. & A. M., while both he and his wife are 
members of the Eastern Star. Coming to America in early manhood, he wisely 
utilized the opportunities offered in a land unhampered by caste or class and 
worked his way steadily upward to a position of prominence and affluence. 



HARRY LAMP. 



Harry Lamp, who is a native son of Crawford county, his birth occurring 
on the 13th of January, 1884, is the second oldest child of Ferdinand and Dora 
(Simon) Lamp, natives of Germany, the father coming to America when a 
youth of sixteen years and the mother with her parents when a child of two. 
They were married in Crawford county and have ever since continued to reside 
here. They began their domestic life on a farm of one hundred and twenty 
acres, which the father owned and where he engaged in general farming and 
stock-raising for twenty-five years. In 1908, however, they sold that property 
and bought elsewhere, and at the present time they own five hundred and sixty 
acres of land, all of which is well improved and under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. Two hundred and forty acres are in Crawford county and the other three 
hundred and twenty in Minnesota, but the latter place and one of the farms in 
this county are rented as Mr. Lamp is only cultivating the homestead. His suc- 
cess in agricultural pursuits he owes to his close application and tireless energy, 
but in the acquiring of his realty interests he has been most ably assisted by the 
careful supervision and capable management which Mrs. Lamp gives to her 
household affairs. Ten children have been born to them, those beside Harry 
being: Paulina, who married Ed Georguis, a farmer of Crawford county; Anna, 
the wife of Louis Goettsch, who is the cashier of the Union Savings Bank, of 
Davenport; Bertha, who married Elvin Wick, a baker, of Harlan, Iowa; and 
Elsie, William, Minnie, Edwin, Julia and Otto, all of whom are still at home. 
The parents are yet in their prime, the father now being fifty-two years of age,, 
while the mother has only passed her forty-fifth year. 

Harry Lamp acquired his preliminary education in the district schools of 
Crawford county and then pursued a course in a commercial college, remaining 
a member of his father's household until he had reached his twentieth year, at 
which time he left home to accept a position with the Neola Elevator Company 
of Aspinwall, Iowa. He was identified with that concern for one year and then 
entered the employ of the Pride Poultry Company for a similar period. At the 



336 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

end of that time he became a yard man and after serving in this capacity for a 
year he was promoted to the position of general manager, which he still retains. 

Mr. Lamp was united in marriage on the 19th of December, 1906, to Miss 
Amanda W'iese, who was born and reared in this county, being a daughter of 
Carl and Dora (Schutt) Wiese. Her parents were natives of Germany but 
were married in America and some time afterward they located on a farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres in Crawford county, which they continued to cul- 
tivate until the time of their retirement. They are now living in West Side, 
Iowa, where they own a very pleasant and comfortable residence, the income 
from their excellent farm, together with other resources, affording them all of 
the comforts and many of the luxuries which they were denied during their 
hard-working youth. They are the parents of eight children. Mrs. Lamp being 
the second child and eldest daughter. The others are: Charley, living in Clar- 
inda, Iowa; Fred, who resides in West Side; Maggie, the wife of Herman 
Martin, of West Side; Albert, who hves in Denison ; Frank, also of West Side; 
and two who are dead. Mr. and Mrs. Lamp have had three children: Wayne, 
who died at the age of one year; Josephine, who was born on the 8th of Oc- 
tober, 1909; and Lloyd, whose birth occurred on the 24th of December, 1910. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lamp affiliate with the German Lutheran denomination, in 
the faith of which they were reared. Politically he gives his support to the 
candidates and measures of the democratic party, and although he does not 
aspire to public honors or the emoluments of office, he fulfills the requirements 
of good citizenship by voting at all elections. 



J. F. WILLIAM JAHN. 



Among the young men of Hayes township who have started under highly 
favorable conditions as farmers, may be named J. F. William Jahn. He pos- 
sessed excellent advantages of training and is now cultivating a place of two 
hundred and twenty acres which yields generous returns for the time and labor 
bestowed upon it. He is a native of Hayes township, born on section 31, July 9, 
1882, a son of Paul William and Catherine (Lemster) Jahn, both of whom 
were born in Germany. The father came to America in boyhood with his 
parents and settled in Hayes township, Crawford county, Iowa. He was very 
successful as an agriculturist and stock-raiser and improved three farms. He 
and his wife are still living and make their home on section 31. There were 
nine children in their family : Lena, who married Henry E. Kuhl, of Iowa town- 
ship ; J. F. William; Minnie, the wife of Gus Meggers, of Iowa township; Her- 
man and Henry, both residents of Hayes township; Amanda, the wife of Gus 
Peppers, of Hayes township ; Louis, who makes his home with his brother 
Herman ; and Adelia and Hugo, who are living at home. 

Mr. Jahn of this review attended the country schools of Hayes township, 
where he gained the rudiments of an education which he has greatly broadened 
by reading and observation. He continued with his parents until twenty-four 
years of age and then moved to the place which he now owns. He carries on 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 337 

general farming and also gives special attention to the feeding of Hereford 
cattle for the market. He has from his youth been earnest and energetic in 
his work and has gained deserved prosperity. 

On the 13th of March, 1907, Mr. Jahn was married in Iowa township to 
Aliss Martha Peper, who was born in Iowa township, a daughter of George 
and Sophia (Meggohtsen) Peper, the former of whom is deceased. Two chil- 
dren have come to brighten the home of ^Ir. and Mrs. Jahn, Hugo Paul George 
and Willette Catherina Fredericka. 

^Ir. Jahn and his wife are both members of the Lutheran church and accept 
its teachings as their rule of life. They take a great interest in the progress of 
this section of the state, both having been born in Crawford county, and they 
are willing assistants in all movements seeking to promote the general welfare. 
]\Ir. Jahn is not identified with any political organization. The success he has 
gained is the result of his well directed efiforts and gives promise of still larger 
rewards in the years to come. 



JULIUS H. A. CHRISTIANSEN. 

A native of Crawford county, Julius H. A. Christiansen has made special 
use of his opportunities and, although he has not reached the age of thirty years, 
he is the owner of a valuable farm of two hundred and forty acres, which he 
is cultivating to excellent advantage. His birth occurred August 27, 1882, and 
he is a son of Anthony W. A. and Wilhelmina (Prien) Christiansen. The 
father was born in Germany and the mother in Brazil, South America. They 
were married in Crawford county, Iowa, and Air. Christiansen began farming 
on his own account by renting land. After three years he purchased two hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Soldier township, which he sold in 1899, buying five 
hundred and forty-three acres in Jackson township. Later he disposed of this 
farm and bought one hundred and sixty acres in Crawford county and an equal 
amount in Ida county. On selling both of these properties he purchased four 
hundred and eighty acres in Nebraska, but in 1909 disposed of his Nebraska 
farm and went to South Dakota. He is now living upon a place of three hun- 
dred and twenty acres. His beloved wife, who was the mother of eleven chil- 
dren, died November 15, 1910. Nine of the children are now living, namely: 
Caroline L., who is the wife of William Meyers, of Crawford county; Marie, 
now iMrs. \\'illiam Evers, of Green River, Wyoming; Julius H. A., of this 
review; and Albert, Bernhard, Ludwig, Johann. Henry and Otto, all of whom 
are Hving with their father in South Dakota. 

Tubus H. A. Christiansen, the subject of this review, possessed advantages 
of education in the common schools and grew to manhood under the parental 
roof, showing even in his boyhood an aptitude for agricultural pursuits that 
gave bright promise as to his future. He continued at home until twenty-three 
years of age and then rented land on his own account for four years, after 
which he bought the farm which he now owns on section ^3^ Soldier town- 
ship. The neat and attractive appearance of everything about the farm indi- 



338 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

cates careful attention to details and progressive methods, and its owner is 
rightly regarded as one of the prosperous men in his locality. 

On October i8, 1905, Mr. Christiansen was married to Miss Hulda Baak, 
who was born in Crawford county, Sejjtember 25, 1885, a daughter of William 
and Caroline (Koch) Baak. Her parents were both born in Germany and 
came to America, living for several years in Chicago, after which they settled 
in Crawford county, Iowa. Mr. Baak engaged in farming until his retirement 
in 1910. There were hve children in his family, two of whom arc now living: 
Hulda, now Mrs. Julius H. A. Christiansen; and Emma, the wife of Magnus 
Hollander, of Crawford county. The mother died May 5, 1903. Mr. Baak is 
living at Schleswig, Iowa, and is again married. The union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Christiansen has been blessed by the birth of a son, William A. E., who was 
born July 8, 1906. 

Mr. Christiansen and his wife are members of the German Lutheran church 
and are widely and favorably known. He has conducted his business system- 
atically and according to most approved methods. Each year has added to his 
financial resources, and it may be truly said of him that he represents the sub- 
stantial and progressive citizenship of Crawford county. 



OTTO T. STALEY. 



The name of Otto J. Staley represents industry, persistence and reliability 
and through these qualities he has acquired an honorable reputation in Craw- 
ford county and also a highly productive farm. A native of Iowa City, John- 
son county, Iowa, he was born August 30, 1852, and is a son of Arthur and 
Clara (Ray) Staley. The father was born in Bavaria, Germany, and came to 
the United States in 1849, spending the first three years in this country at 
Zanesville, Ohio. He had learned the carpenter's trade in Germany and he 
followed that occupation at Zanesville. Having decided to come westward, he 
traveled by wagon down the Muskingum and Ohio rivers and up the Missis- 
sippi to Muscatine, Iowa, and then across the country by ox team to Iowa City. 
After working at his trade for a year in the state of his adoption, he moved to 
a farm which he had purchased about twelve miles north of Iowa City and later 
built the first house in the town of Solon. He was one of the useful and en- 
terprising citizens of Johnson county and lived to the advanced age of ninety- 
three years and six months, being called away December 24, 1909. His remains 
were interred in the cemetery at Solon. His wife was also a native of Ger- 
many, but they were married in Ohio. She died at the family homestead in 
this state in 1887. In their family were seven children, namely: Frances, who 
mairied John Meyers, of Missouri; Clem, now living in Johnson county, Iowa; 
Otto J., the subject of this review; Eugene, who makes his home in the state 
of Washington ; Freda, of Chicago ; Mary, who is living on the home place ; and 
Phillip, who purchased the old homestead and now lives there. 

Otto J. Staley was educated in the public schools of Johnson county and 
continued with his parents until twenty-one years of age. In 1873 he came 



. HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 339 

to Crawford county in a covered wagon, the journey requiring seven days, and 
he has ever since been identified with the agricultural interests of this county. 
He worked by the month, and later he and his brother rented the farm which 
he now owns. In 1906, having acquired the necessary capital, he began inde- 
pendently by purchasing eighty acres of raw land and applied himself so suc- 
cessfully to its cultivation that he now owns three hundred and twenty acres, 
which he has largely improved in value by the erection of buildings, fences, etc. 
He raises grains and also keeps blooded Norman and coach horses and other 
graded stock which he handles to excellent advantage. 

In 1882 Mr. Staley was united in marriage to Miss Amelia Hofer, a native 
of Johnson county, Iowa, and a daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Meyers) 
Hofer. The parents were both born in Germany and were early settlers of 
Johnson county. There were seven children in their family, while fourteen 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Staley, namely: Agnes, now the wife 
of Albert Pithan, of Willow township ; Charles, also of Willow township ; Mark, 
who lives at Herrick, South Dakota ; William, of Hanover township ; Frank and 
Clara, both of whom are at home; Luke, Leo and Leonard, triplets, Asa, Edith, 
Paul, Verna and Florence, all of whom are at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Staley are at the head of one of the most remarkable families 
of Iowa, and the excellent training they have given their children is evidence of 
the good sense and clear judgment of the parents. Ten of the children are 
still at home, while four have started out on their own account in the great 
school of life. Mr. Staley has from his boyhood recognized the value of labor 
and has applied himself with an energy and ability that have produced gratifying 
returns. He and his wife and family are sincere adherents of the Catholic 
church. Politically he supports the democratic party and has served with great 
satisfaction to the people as trustee and clerk of Charter Oak township. 



CHARLES LINDBERG. 



Charles Lindberg owns an excellent farm of one hundred and twenty acres 
in Stockholm township, where he was engaged in general farming and stock- 
raising for a long period, but for the past fourteen years has lived retired. He 
is of Scandinavian extraction, his birth occurring in Sweden on the ist of Jan- 
uary, 1835. His parents, John and Mary (Larson) Lindberg, spent their entire 
lives in the land of their nativity and there they are laid to rest. 

Charles Lindberg remained a citizen of the old country until he had passed 
the thirty-fourth anniversary of his birth, having emigrated to the United States 
in the year 1869. The period was sufficiently long, however, for him to feel 
convinced that his chances of acquiring the means or giving his children the 
opportunities he desired were far greater in America, with its great tracts of 
unimproved and uncultivated land, than in his native country. Upon his ar- 
rival here he made his way westward to Crawford county. Iowa, where he 
bought forty acres of land, breaking the prairie of his new farm with a team 
of oxen He possessed all the characteristics which distinguish his countrymen 



340 lllSrom' ()!• CKAWI'ORI^ C()L".\1\ 

and make them such (.Icsirahle pioneers, antl h_v niean> ol his i)er>islenl endeavDi". 
thrift anil inihistry added to his original hohhng from lime to time until he now 
owns one hundrei.1 and twenty acres of valual)le land. 

Before leaving Sweden, in June, iS()4, .Mr. l.indherg was united in marriage 
to Miss Annie Larson, a daughter oi i.ars and Annie Carlson. 1 ler parents 
and brothers anil sisters all passed away in their uali\e land, and she died .May 
o, 191 1. Eight children were born unto .Mr. and .Mrs. Lindberg, but only four 
are now li\ing, Annie, Christina, .Mfred and .\ugusta having passed away. 
Those surviving are: Alfreda, the wife of Cus Clausen, of .Xebr.iska ; Willie, 
who is living in Crawford county, and besides his own, lia> cliaige of the home 
farm; Annie, who became the wife of Otto Larson, of this county; and C hris- 
tina, the wife of I'eter Miller, of Woodbury county, Iowa. The family are 
communicants of the Baptist church. 

Ever since naturalization conferred upon him the rigiit of franchise, .Mr. 
Lindberg has given his support to the candidates and measures of the repub- 
lican party. He has never sought public honors or the emoluments of office, 
but meets the requirements of citizenship by being at the polls on election day 
and casting his ballot for the men chosen by liis party for the various offices in 
his township and county. He is one of the leading men in his community as 
well as one of the successful and sulistantial agriculturists. 



AUGUST MEYER. 



Enterprise and thrift have been prominent characteristics in the career of 
August Meyer, the neat and orderly appearance of his farm in Soldier town- 
ship indicating that his reputation as a rtr.st-class farmer is well deserved. His 
birth occurred in Du Page county, Illinois, November 3, 1867, a son of Adolph 
and Katrina (Vogelpohl) Meyer, both of whom were born in Germany. The 
father came to America prior to the Civil war and lived in Illinois, Missouri 
and Kansas, then again taking up his residence in llliiKjis, where he was mar- 
ried. In 1876 they settled on a farm wdiich Mr. Meyer had previously i)ur- 
chased in Charter Oak township, Crawford county, and here he continued dur- 
ing the remainder of his life. He died in 1907, his wife i)assing away in 1900. 
By their union seven children were born, five boys and two girls, namely: 
Minnie, now the wife of Otto Stegemann, of Crawford county; August, of 
this review; William, also of Crawford county; Dora, who is now Mrs. Henry 
Neddermeyer, of Crawford county; Adoli)li. of Crawford county; Henry, who 
died at the age of twenty; and Edward, who is also living in this county. 

August Meyer received his education in the public schools and remained with 
his parents until 1895. when he took charge of one of his father's farms which 
he now owns. He has prospered in his work and as opportunity presented pur- 
chased more land until he has accumulated four hundred acres. His farm is 
located on section 26, Soldier township, and is under an excellent state of cul- 
tivation, the neat and attractive appearance of the place indicating that its owner 
is a first-class farmer and is acquainted with the most progressive methods. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 341 

He engages extensively as a stock-raiser and feeder and is a fancier of polled 
Angus cattle, being the owner of some of the best specimens of this breed that 
are to be seen in the county. Mr. Meyer is a director of the German Savings 
Bank at Kicketts, Iowa, and is also serving as secretary of the Crawford Ojunty 
Mutual Telqjhone Company. 

On the 8th of March, 1895, Mr. Meyer was united in marriage to Miss 
Dora Hammann, who was born in Crawford county, April 19, 1876, a daughter 
of Carl and Therese (Seilsj Hammann. Her parents were Ixith born in C^er- 
man}' and came to America in the 705. They were married in Iowa and later 
Mr. Hammann purchased a farm in Hanover township, Crawford county, where 
he Hved for a number of years, when he retired and resided in Dow City and 
later in Charter Oak. He subsequently sold his place and now lives near Jjalti- 
more, Maryland, having reached the age of sixty-six years. Mr. and Mrs, 
Me}'er have become the parents of seven children, namely : Anna, Ixjrn April 
20, 1898; Ida, April 25, 1900; Dora, November 27, 1901 ; Henry, January 12, 
1903; Martha, February 2^, \</^j; Minnie, August 5, 1908; and Herman, April 
28, 1910. 

Mr. Meyer and his family are members of the German Lutheran church, 
and he is an earnest worker for all movements seeking to promote the welfare 
of the community. Politically he gives his support to the democratic party and 
is now serving as township clerk, having filled the office to the general satis- 
faction of the people for five terms consecutively. He is interested in the cause 
of education and also in the promotion of good roads and efficiency in all de- 
partments of township, county and state government. By reason of his many 
good qualities, Mr. Meyer is greatly respected by his neighbors and acquaint- 
ances, and the valuable property he has acquired is evidence of his sound busi- 
ness ability. 



JOHN H. KRAL. 



John H. Krai, a prosperous and well known agriculturist of Crawford 
county, is the owner of four hundred and sixty acres of valuable land in West 
Side township. His birth occurred in Iowa City, Johnson county, Iowa, on the 
20th of July, 1864, his parents being Joseph and Theresa (Slechtaj Krai, both 
of whom were natives of Bohemia. They crossed the Atlantic to the United 
States in 186 1, locating in Johnson county, Iowa, and later purchasing land 
there. On the 21st of May, 1875, they came to Crawford county, here also 
buying a tract of land. Joseph Krai was successfully engaged in general agri- 
cultural pursuits in this county throughout the remainder of his active l^smess 
career and t-^---^ awav on the i6th of May, 1900. His widow, who has at- 
tained the a.'-- eightv-eight years and still enjoys good health, no^^• makes 
her home with one of her scmis in Crawford county. Unto them were lx>rn 
eleven children, five of whom are yet living. 

John H Krai acquired his education in the common schools and remamed 
under the parental roof mtii he had attained his majority, ^'tartmg out as an 
agricnterist on his own account, he bought forty acres of land m Mdford town- 



342 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

ship and later added to his holdings by additional purchase as his financial re- 
sources increased. He now owns four hundred and forty acres of rich and 
productive land in West Side township and in connection with the tilling of the 
soil makes a specialty of raising Duroc Jersey hogs. He feeds from six to ten 
carloads of cattle annually, and in both branches of his business has won a 
gratifying measure of success. 

On the 5th of January, 1886, Mr. Krai was united in marriage to Miss 
Frances B. Fiala, who was born in Bohemia on the 2d of April, 1866, her par- 
ents being Joseph and Alary (Haskovec) Fiala, likewise natives of that coun- 
try. Emigrating to the United States, they landed in New York city on the 
I St of January, 1867, and later settled on a farm in Johnson county, Iowa, 
subsequently they removed to Webster county, this state, there spending the 
remainder of their lives. Joseph Fiala passed away on the 17th of December, 
1898, while his wife was called to her final rest on the 4th of August, 1897. 
They reared a family of eight children, all of whom still survive. Mr. and Mrs. 
Krai likewise have eight children, as follows: Rose, whose birth occurred on 
the 7th of October, 1886; Leon L., whose natal day was January 15, 1889; Milo 
George, who was born January 3, 1891 ; Mary T., who first opened her eyes to 
the light of day on the ist of June, 1893; Adaline, whose birth occurred Jan- 
uary 23, 1896; Lydia Josephine, who was born June 5, 1898; Joseph Edward, 
born July 25, 1900; and Edwin Victor, whose natal day was February 2^, 1905. 

Fraternally Mr. Krai is identified with the Masons, belonging to Lodge No. 
422 at Vail, in which he has filled all of the chairs. He is also a member of 
the Yeomen at Vail, while both he and his wife are connected with the Eastern 
Star there. Their religious faith is indicated by their membership in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. Mr. Krai's business interests have been carefully con- 
ducted, his duties of citizenship capably performed and at all times he has been 
true to the obligations and responsibilities that have devolved upon him in every 
relation of life, making him one of the w'orthy and much respected residents of 
his community. 



EDWARD LANCER. 



One of the progressive and successful farmers and stock-raisers of Crawford 
county, a man who represents the best interests of the community in which he 
resides is Edward Langer, a native of Denison .township, born June 5, 1887, his 
parents being August and Jennie (Weiland) Langer. The birth of both his 
parents occurred in Germany, where the father's youth was spent. About 1870 
he came to the United States and for the following two years engaged in rail- 
roading, after which he came to Crawford county and purchased land, which at 
the present time comprises the home farm. Here he married Miss Weiland 
and to them were born the following ten children: Kate, who became the wife 
of William Piper, of South Dakota, and is now deceased ; Mary, who lives at 
home; George, who resides in Lincoln county. Idaho; Lizzie, the wife of T. R. 
Beers, of Vale, Oregon ; Minnie, who married Sam Bichler, of Fullerton, North 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 343 

Dakota; August, deceased; Frances, who lives in Idaho; Edward, our subject; 
Anna and AHce, both of whom are Hving at home. 

In his youth Edward Langer attended the public schools of Crawford county, 
supplementing the knowledge obtained there by a year's course in the college 
at Denison. He then returned to the home farm, to which he has since given 
his entire time and attention. Having studied the science of agriculture, his 
labors, perseverance and energy have succeeded in bringing his fields to a high 
state of cultivation and his live stock comprises the best class of animals ob- 
tainable. His possessions, all told, amount to two hundred acres of rich farm- 
ing and grazing land. Mr. Langer is one of the youngest as well as the most 
energetic farmers in his community and enjoys the respect and esteem of his 
fellow citizens, who are glad to count him among their friends. 

In politics he adheres to the precepts of the democratic party and takes an 
active interest in all afifairs in which the welfare of his county is concerned. 
Although in religion his parents were of the Catholic faith, several of their 
children deviated in their views and became affiliated with the Presbyterian 
church, and to this and other local churches Mr. Langer gives his cordial sup- 
port. 



F. J. SMITH. 



Having experienced many of the fluctuations of life, in the course of which 
he bravely faced every obstacle, F. J. Smith is now pleasantly located in a beau- 
tiful home in Willow township and has the satisfaction of feeling that he and 
his family are provided with a comfortable competency. He is a native of Iowa 
City, Iowa, born January 4, 1856, and is a son of Lawrence L. and Elizabeth 
(Graber) Smith. The father was born in Germany and came to the United 
States when thirteen years of age, living for several years at Cleveland, Ohio. 
In early manhood he came to Iowa and located at Iowa City, where he met 
Elizabeth Graber, to whom he was married. He passed away three years after 
his marriage, having just fairly started in life as a farmer. Our subject's pa- 
ternal grandfather was a blacksmith and landowner in Germany. Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Smith is a native of Germany and came to the United States at the age of 
five years, her parents being among the early settlers of Iowa City. Her father 
was a carpenter by trade. She was married a second time, her second union 
being with Michael Smith, a brother of her first husband, and to them six chil- 
dren were born : George, now living at Plainview, Nebraska ; Mary, who mar- 
ried Jacob Fackalman, of Willow township, Monona county, Iowa; Peter, of 
Plainview, Nebraska; Rose, who is the wife of John Hannigan, of Boyer town- 
ship; Anna, now Mrs. Chester Hunter, of Willow township; and John, who lives 
in Monona county, Iowa. 

F. J. Smith, who was the only child by his mother's first marriage, received 
his early education in a little log schoolhouse two and one-half miles from his 
home. He remained with his mother until seventeen years of age and then 
began working on a farm for Z. T. and Samuel Dunham. Later he engaged 



344 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

in farming on his own account in Willow township and spent two years in 
Dunlap and eleven years in Omaha in the elevator business, becoming manager 
for the Pevie Elevator Company at Omaha. In 1896, however, he returned to 
farming in Willow township and rented land for four years. In 1901 he pur- 
chased a farm, which he brought to a high state of cultivation. He has sold 
a part of his land, but still owns eighty acres. He has erected a handsome 
residence, which is provided with all desirable conveniences of modern life, and 
he is known as one of the highly successful farmers of the township. 

In i(S79 Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Tillie Lewis, a native of 
Chicago and a daughter of Thomas and Anna Lewis, the former of whom was 
born in France and the latter in Ireland. Three children were born to "Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith: Arch Lawrence, who studied medicine at Lincoln. Nebraska; 
George Edward, who is now a railroad engineer in the employ of the Chicago & 
Northwestern Railroad at Chicago. Illinois ; and Leonard Lewis, who married 
Florence Wickwire and lives on a farm adjoining our subject's farm. The 
mother of these children having passed away. Mr. Smith was again married 
in 1905. the lady of his choice being Miss Eva C. Hufiford, a native of Crawford 
county and a daughter of Adam and Lucia (Lepper) Hufiford, and one child, 
Myrtle E., has come to bless this union. Mr. Hufiford. the father of Mrs. 
Smith, was born in Pennsylvania and the mother was born in Clinton county, 
Iowa. They removed from Clinton county to Crawford county thirty-five years 
ago and located on a farm near Vail. 

Mr. Smith politically gives his allegiance to the democratic party, believing 
that its principles are adapted to the prosperity and perpetuity of the republic. 
He was reared in the Catholic church and is a man of consistent principles and 
high ideals. Fraternally he is a valued member of the Odd Fellows lodge at 
Charter Oak and of the local branch of the Ancient Order of United Workmen 
at the same place. His wife is an active worker in the Rebekahs. The business 
methods of Mr. Smith have always been honorable and trustworthy, and today 
he enjoys the confidence of his neighbors and a wide circle of friends in Craw- 
ford county. 



GEORGE SCHNEIDER. 



Although comparatively a recent arrival in Crawford county, George 
Schneider is well established upon his farm and is one of the prosperous citi- 
zens of Boyer township, displaying an energy and" ability in the management of 
his business which have produced goodly returns for the time and labor em- 
ployed. He was born in Stephenson county, Illinois, August 29, 1871, a son 
of Ernest and Johanna (Kab) Schneider, both of whom were born in Germany. 
The father came to the United States at the age of sixteen anrl the mother when 
she was fourteen years of age. Three years after his arrival he oflfered his 
services to his adopted country and fought as a soldier for the Union from 
1863 until the close of the war. He participated in several important battles 
and underwent many hardships, but never failed to respond to the call of duty. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 345 

After the war he engaged in farming in Illinois until 1883 and then removed 
to Custer county, Nebraska, where he lived until 1896. He then removed to 
Atlanta, Georgia, and is now making his home in that city. The mother passed 
away in 1883. There were fourteen children in the family, eleven of whom 
grew to maturity, namely : Ernest, now living in Nebraska ; Lillie, a resident 
of Oconto, Nebraska; Barbara, also of Oconto; George, of this review; John, 
who lives in Boyer township ; Lawrence, who is a farmer and lives near Moore- 
head in Harrison county, Iowa ; Susie, of Oconto ; Anna, of Deadwood, South 
Dakota ; Louise, of Boyer township ; Pearl, whose whereabouts are unknown ; 
and Lizzie, twin sister of Pearl, deceased. 

George Schneider received his education in the public schools and after ar- 
riving at manhood began farming in Pottawattamie county, Iowa, where he 
continued for four years. In 1895 he removed to Dunlap, Iowa, where he 
farmed for two years, after which he took up his residence in Council Bluffs. 
In 1907 he bought eighty acres of land in Boyer township, Crawford county, 
upon which he established his home. He has greatly improved his place and 
engages in raising cereals and also in stock-breeding, handling a good grade of 

animals. 

In 1894 Mr. Schneider was united in marriage to Aliss Bertha Handke and 
they have four children, Walter Edward. Bertha, Edward William and Esther 
Emma. Politically he is in thorough sympathy with the republican party and 
gives to it his hearty support. He has served with acceptance as road super- 
visor of his township for one term. In religious belief he is Lutheran and fra- 
ternally he is identified with the lodge of Modern Woodmen of America at 
Underwood and the Eagles of Sioux City. Being of a social disposition, he 
readily makes friends and is greatly esteemed for his frank and genial manner. 
A man of intelligence and application, his success in his chosen calling is as- 
sured, and it is evident that he made no mistake in locating within the friendly 
limits of Crawford county. 



GILL FREDERICKS. 



Among the prosperous young farmers of Crawford county is Gill Fredericks, 
of Hanover township. He was born in the immediate locality in which he now 
lives, June 30, 1887, a son of Fred and Christina (Steffen) Fredericks. The 
parents were both born in Germany and came to America, settling on a farm 
in Crawford county, which his father cultivated until 1909- He is now livmg 
retired at Denison and is the owner of three hundred and sixty acres on sec- 
tions 26 and 28, Hanover township, and also of a beautiful residence at Deni- 
son There were six children in the family, namely : Charley. Lena, Frederick, 
Henry, Gill and Mary, all of whom are living in Crawford county. Mar>'. the 
last named, makes her home in Denison. 

Gill Fredericks was reared under highly favorable conditions on the home 
farm and received his education in the district schools. He began farming for 
himself at twenty years of age upon a portion of the homestead and after two 



346 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COU.>ITY 

years removed to another part of his father's land, which he has cultivated with 
a judgment and skill that give bright promise as to his business ability. He 
is now recog'nized as one of the substantial farmers of the county. 

On the 23d of February, 1910, Mr. Fredericks was united in marriage to 
Miss Amanda Henning. who was born in this county, October 5, 1886, a daugh- 
ter of Christ and Mary Henning. The father was born in Germany and the 
mother in tiiis country. They were actively identified with the agricultural in- 
terests of Crawford county until 1907, when they disposed of the farm and 
removed to Denison, where they are now living retired. In their family are 
ten children : Henry, John, Anna, Christ, Justus, Amanda, Hans, Yerna, Nada 
and Walter, all of whom are living in Crawford county, except Henry whose 
home is in Nebraska. One child, Walter, has come to brighten the lives of 
Mr. and Mrs. Fredericks, his natal day being December 26, 1910. 

Mr. Fredericks and his estimable wife are members of the German Lutheran 
church and are counted among its active supporters. They were both reared in 
this county and have many friends who have known them since their childhood. 
From his earliest recollection, Mr. Fredericks has been identified with agricul- 
tural interests and by honorable business methods he has acquired an enviable 
reputation as a gentleman who by an upright life merits the high regard in 
which he is held. 



EDWARD MEYER. 



The name of Meyer is well known in Crawford county, representing as it 
does remarkable success in farming and unquestioned financial integrity. The 
founder of the family here has passed to his reward, but Edward Meyer of this 
review is a worthy representative as is clearly shown by the record he has 
made although he is still a young man and is just fairly started in his chosen 
vocation. He was born on the farm where he now lives on section 3, Charter 
Oak township, November 27, 1883, a son of Adolph and Katrina (Vogelpohl) 
Meyer, both of whom were natives of Hanover, Germany. They came to 
America when young and were married in Cook county, Illinois, where Mr. 
Meyer engaged in farming for eleven years after his marriage. He then came 
to Crawford county, Iowa, and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land. 
He was a remarkably clear-minded business man and was highly successful, 
becoming one of the leading farmers of the county. He added to his posses- 
sions until he owned seventeen hundred acres. He passed away June 3, 1907, 
after having met with a measure of success accorded to few men starting out 
in limited circumstances. There were seven children in his family, namely: 
Minnie, now the wife of Otto Stegemann ; August; William; Dora, the wife 
of Henry Weddenmeyer ; Adolph ; Henry, who died at the age of eighteen 
years; and Edward, our subject. All of the family now living make their 
home in Crawford county. 

Edward Meyer was educated in the district schools and continued at home, 
assisting in cultivating the farm until after the death of his father. Upon the 




MR. AND MRS. ADOLPH MEYER 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 349 

division of the estate he came into possession of his interest in the homestead 
and is now the owner of seven hundred and twenty-three acres, his place being 
known as one of the most highly improved farms in that part of the county. He 
is an extensive stock-feeder and by good management is meeting with a hand- 
some recompense for time and labor employed. He makes a specialty of high 
grade Angus cattle and Poland China hogs, which he fattens for market. 

On the 26th of October, 1904, Mr. Meyer was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma Maas, who was born in Crawford county, February 15, 1886, a daughter 
of Charley and Christina (Krueger) Maas. The parents were born in Germany 
and came to America in 1874, spending the first six years after their arrival in 
Chicago. They then settled in Crawford county, Iowa, where the father en- 
gaged in farming. The mother died in 1906, but the father is still living on 
the family homestead and is now sixty-four years of age. Their family in- 
cluded thirteen children, of whom the following are now living and make their 
homes in Crawford county: William, Martha, Gusta, Elizabeth, Herman, Emma, 
Alvena and Max. Four children came to brighten the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Meyer; Edwin, who was born March 26, 1905; Willie, born April 23, 1907; 
Louis, born June 27, 1909; and Elmer, born November 2, 1910. 

Mr. Meyer and his wife are identified with the Lutheran church and are in 
full sympathy with all worthy enterprises seeking to promote the general wel- 
fare. He has possessed every desirable advantage of training, early having 
become acquainted with the practical details of agriculture and stock-raising, 
and has few superiors of his age in those lines. Although he is in charge of 
a large farm which involves many responsibilities he performs his duties 
promptly and efficiently and has acquitted himself in a way that gives assurance 
of still greater success in years to come. 



C. A. LARSON. 



A member of a family that is well known in Crawford county, C. A. Larson 
has gained an established reputation as one of the substantial citizens of his 
locality, being the owner of a well improved farm in Stockholm township. He 
is a native of Sweden, born December 10, 1854, a son of John and Mary Larson, 
a record of whom is presented in the sketch of Andrew Larson, which appears 
elsewhere in this work. 

C. A. Larson received his education in his native land and at thirteen years 
of age crossed the ocean to America and lived for several years in Pennsylvania. 
He then came to Crawford county, Iowa, continuing with his parents until 
after reaching manhood, when he began farming on his own account and rented 
land for five years. In 1887 he purchased the place on which he now lives, 
embracing one hundred and sixty acres on section 5, Stockholm township. Sub- 
sequently his wife inherited one hundred and fifty acres on section 6, the same 
township, and both farms are now being cultivated by Mr. Larson. As they 
are provided with modern facilities, the work is carried forward very satis- 
factorily. Mr. Larson makes a specialty of raising and feeding stock and as 



Vol. n— 19 



350 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

he keeps a good grade of animals and thoroughly understands farm manage- 
ment, he has attained a large measure of success. 

On March 20, 1882, Mr. Larson was united in marriage to Miss Ereka 
Erickson, who was born in Sweden, October 22, 1861, a daughter of Herman 
and Julia Erickson, both natives of Sweden. They came to America in 1862 
and lived for eight years in Minnesota and then located in Crawford county, 
Iowa, where they continued during the remainder of their lives, the mother 
passing away April 18, 1888, and the father November 6, 1896. Three chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Erickson, the wife of our subject being the 
only one now living. Twelve children constitute the family of Mr. and Mrs. 
Larson, one of whom died in infancy, the others being: Lillie E., born Feb- 
ruarj^ 22, 1883, who received a musical education and is now the wife of Rufus 
Morgan, of Crawford county; Alma B., who was born January 15, 1885, and 
is a graduate of Highland Park College of Des Moines, Iowa ; Alfred O., who 
was born December 9, 1886, and is now farming upon the old homestead; Julia 
J., born June 7, 1888, Etta I., born February 15, 1890, and Eldred R., born 
March 16, 1892, all of whom are at home; Alvin L., who was born February 18, 
1895, and died on the 8th of March following; Russell A., born April 25, 1897, 
Edna F., born April 14, 1898, Earlin L., born June 28, 1900, and Lafe Theodore, 
born July 7, 1902, all of whom are at home. 

Mr. Larson owes his present prosperous condition to his habits of industry 
and a laudable ambition to win a reputable place for himself in the community. 
His success is proof of the possibilities in America for young men of good 
habits who are w^illing to apply themselves in early life in order to enjoy an 
abundance in later years. Politically he gives his adherence to the republican 
party and although he has not sought the honors of office, he has served with 
marked ability as school director and road superintendent. He and his wife 
are stanch members and supporters of the Baptist church. 



ANDREW A. BOSS. 



For the past seven years the agricultural skill of Andrew A. Boss has been 
expended in the cultivation of a farm of one hundred and sixty acres located on 
section 36, Iowa township, the general appearance of the property being a 
tribute to his well directed efiforts. Mr. Boss was born in Guttenberg, Clayton 
county. Iowa, on the 12th of Januar}', 1865, and is a son of the late John and 
Agatha (Veonberell) Boss, natives of Germany. The father came from Lich- 
tenstein to the United States in 1848, first locating in Dubuque, Iowa, where 
he remained for two years, and then removed to Guttenberg, where he met the 
lady whom he subsequently married. They became the parents of three chil- 
dren besides our subject, who is the third in order of birth: John, w^ho is living 
near Casey, Iowa ; Matthias, deceased ; and Sophia, the wife of Martin Peter- 
son, of Carroll county, Iowa. The father passed away in Guttenberg in 1893. 
He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, having joined that organization 
in the fatherland, and he was also a veteran of the Civil war, having enlisted 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 351 

as a private in Company D, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry. On the 
9th of April, 1864, while in discharge of his duties at Pleasant Hill, he was 
captured by the enemy and sent to Fort Tyler and Hampton, Texas, where he 
was retained for eight months and then exchanged, returning to his command 
on the 27th of December, 1864. He saw much active service during the war, 
participating in many of the notable battles, but was never wounded but once. 
Airs. Boss survived her husband t^o years, her demise occurring in Pottawatt- 
amie county, Iowa, where she was buried, in 1895. 

The common schools of Guttenberg provided Andrew A. Boss with an 
education, which was acquired before the age of fourteen years, at which time 
he left the paternal roof to begin his business career. For several years after 
leaving home he worked for various farmers in the neighborhood and then re- 
moved to Walnut, Iowa, where he continued to follow the same occupation for 
six years longer. At the expiration of that period he leased land, in tlie culti- 
vation of which he engaged for four years, coming to Crawford county about 
1893. During the first five years of his residence here he lived about a mile 
and a half north of his present homestead. He subsequently rented this prop- 
erty and removed to Carroll county, where he farmed for three years, and then 
went to Audubon county, remaining there for five years. Returning to Craw- 
ford county seven years ago, he purchased a quarter section of land in Iowa 
township, upon which he continues to reside. He has made practically all of 
the improvements upon this property, and they are all substantial structures 
and well kept. General farming and stock-raising absorb his attention and he 
makes a specialty of breeding shorthorn cattle and other graded stock. 

In 1895 Mr. Boss was united in marriage to Miss Helen Sanders, and they 
have become the parents of four children : Alfred, George, William and Edna, 
all of whom are at home. 

The religious views of the family coincide with those of the Lutheran de- 
nomination with which they affiliate. The fraternal relations of Mr. Boss are 
confined to membership in the Modern Woodmen of America, his identification 
being with Manilla Camp, while in politics he is a stanch democrat. He takes 
an active interest in local affairs and was at one time road supervisor, while 
for the past year he has served as president of the school board of Iowa town- 
ship, but he prefers to concentrate his energies upon the development of his 
private pursuits. 



W. A. DAVIE. 



One of the well known citizens of Crawford county is W. A. Davie, farmer, 
business man and member of the state legislature. He has passed the greater 
part of his life in this county and few men are better informed as to the re- 
sources and possibiHties of this part of the state or have a larger acquaintance 
among its people. He was born near Pontiac, in Livingston county. Illinois, 
October 13, 1855, a son of John Turner and Hannah (Hoskins) Davie. The 
father was born in Devonshire, England. December 27,, 1823. He was one of 



352 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

five children, the eldest of whom inherited the family estate. Two brothers 
went to Australia and have never since been heard from. John T. Davie served 
in the British army and later learned the brick-mason's trade. Desiring to im- 
prove his condition, he emigrated to America and made his home for a short 
time in Quebec, Canada. Subsequently he removed to Michigan and lived there 
for several years, then moving to Pontiac, Illinois, where he remained until 
1856, when he came west and took up his home in Orange township, Clinton 
county, Iowa. In 1861 he removed to ]\Ionona (now Crawford) county and 
engaged for fifteen years in farming in Boyer township, but in 1876 crossed the 
line into Harrison county. He passed away December 3, 1883. He was highly 
successful as a farmer, especially in the raising of grain. In political belief he 
affiliated with the democratic party and was prominent in its councils, serving 
as township clerk, trustee, assessor and in other offices. Religiously he was 
identified with- the Church of England and fraternally was a valued member of 
the Masonic order. His wife was born in New Jersey and was of Irish and 
Dutch descent. Her parents died when she was quite young and she was reared 
by an aunt in New York. There were eight children in the family of Mr. and 
Mrs. John T. Davie: Isabel, now the wife of John W. Coon, of Paradise town- 
ship ; W. A., of this review ; Emma, now Mrs. Amos Hunt, of Canada ; Estella, 
who died March 26, 1876; Ida, the wife of Livy Hunt, also of Harrison town- 
ship; Nettie, who is deceased; Frank, who died January 15, 1906; and Minnie, 
who married T. J. Rule, of Paradise township. Mrs. Davie was twice married, 
her first husband being John Rogers, by whom she had one child, Ellen, who 
became the wife of Frank Roberts, of Dunlap, Iowa, and is now deceased. 

W. A. Davie received his early education in the district schools of Boyer 
township and continued at home until he grew to maturity. In 1876 he began 
farming on his own account, in which he has been highly successful, making a 
specialty of stock-raising. He is the owner of two hundred and eighty acres in 
Crawford and Shelby counties, which under his management are yielding sub- 
stantial annual returns. For two years past he has been manager of the Farm- 
ers Cooperative Lumber Company of Dunlap. He was one of the organizers 
of this company in 1900 and was its first president and still continues in that 
office. The company started with a capital of twenty-five hundred dollars and 
now is capitalized at nearly twenty-five thousand dollars, being one of the highly 
prosperous concerns of the county. ^Ir. Davie was also one of the organizers 
of the Kiron Insurance Company, formerly a Swedish concern, which has since 
been taken over by the Farmers Mutual Fire & Tornado Insurance Associa- 
tion of Kiron, Crawford county, Iowa, and he has served as director of the 
same for five terms. 

On October 29, 1876, Mr. Davie was united in marriage to Miss Mary Eliza- 
beth Fullerton, a native of Ohio, and i^ve children have blessed this union: 
Edith, who is the wife of John Flunt, of Harrison county; Maude, now Mrs. 
Omer Musgrove, also of Harrison county ; Ray, who is engaged in farming, his 
place adjoining that of his father; Harry, who assists his father on the home 
farm; and Maybelle, now the wife of Fred Cook, of Union township. The 
mother of these children was called away April 29. 1904, and Mr. Davie was 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 353 

subsequently married to Mrs. Florence (Painter) Griffith, a lady of many ex- 
cellent qualifications of mind and heart. 

In political affairs Mr. Davie is a supporter of the democratic party and has 
taken an active part in its campaigns. He served in the twenty-second, twenty- 
third, thirty-first and thirty-second Iowa general assemblies and also was elected 
to fill a vacancy in the twenty-ninth general assembly, discharging his duties 
most effectively. In 1885 he was elected a member of the county board of su- 
pervisors and has also served in all of the township offices, being now a member 
of the board of trustees. Fraternally he is connected with Lodge Xo. 244, 
A. F. & A. M., Chapter No. 89, R. A. M., and Lodge No. 385, O. E. S., all 
of Dunlap; also being connected with Golden Lodge, No. 178, I. O. O. F., and 
Golden Crown Lodge of the Rebekahs. While not affiliated with any religious 
denomination, he attends all churches and is a Hberal contributor to religious 
causes. Of a genial and kindly temperament, he has many friends and ac- 
quaintances and is entirely worthy of the sincere regard in which he is held 
by all who know him. 



HENRY C. SCHROEDER. 

The permanent progress of any state depends largely upon its farming com- 
munity, not only because of the development of the natural resources but be- 
cause the agriculturist always establishes a home, thus laying the foundation of 
the social and educational as well as the civil advancement. Henry C. Schroe- 
der, of Schleswig, had been prominently identified with the farming and political 
development of Crawford county for a quarter of a century. He was born in 
Germany on the 15th of October, 1854, a son of Emanuel and Ann M. (Muder) 
Schroeder, who emigrated to the United States in 1870. They first located in 
Cook county, Illinois, and after residing there for a short time removed to 
Crawford county, Iowa, where they passed away, the father on the 4th of March, 
1889, and the mother on the ist of March, 1907. Of the four children born to 
them the son Henry C. is the only one now surviving, the daughter and second 
child, Anna E., having passed away, while the two youngest died in infancy. 

Henry C. Schroeder remained in the fatherland until he had passed his fif- 
teenth year, when he took passage for the United States. He remained with 
his parents in Cook county, Ilhnois, until 1878, when he went to Ida county, 
Iowa, where he worked as a farm hand for two years and then rented eighty 
acres in Crawford county, which he cultivated for one year and then bought it. 
He was an energetic, ambitious young man, possessing that determined persis- 
tence which invariably wins success in any undertaking, and he shortly added 
to this another eighty acres. He was married soon afterward and then began 
cultivating his wife's farm, which consisted of two hundred acres, in addition 
to his own. He engaged in general farming and stock-raising until 1884. at 
which time he began making a specialty of buying and feeding stock for the 
market and so sold his two eighty-acre tracts and operated his two hundred 
acre farm. He is a man who quickly recognizes an opportunity which the less 



354 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

sagacious would ignore and as a result he wins where others lose, not only 
because of his unusual foresight, which reveals possibilities, but because he 
dominates conditions. He is today acknowledged as one of the affluent citizens 
of the county, owning almost eleven hundred acres of farming land, all of which 
is well improved and under a high state of cultivation. In the fall of 1910 he 
retired to Schleswig, where he owns a comfortable home and is enjoying the 
ease and relaxation from business responsibilities which his comfortable com- 
petence assures him. 

Mr. Schroeder was united in marriage on the 27th of January, 1882, to Mrs. 
Minna Zabel, who was an only child of Sigismund and Augusta (Weckwerth) 
Brietang. Four children were born unto Mr. and I\Irs. Schroeder but only three 
attained maturity, Annie, the eldest, dying at the age of five years. The three 
surviving are as follows : Hulda, the wife of William Reinking, of Ida county, 
Iowa; Clara, who became the wife of Carl Jessen, of Crawford county; and 
Henry H., also a resident of this county. 

The faith of the family is that of the Lutheran denomination, with which 
organization they are identified by membership. Ever since acquiring the full 
rights of citizenship, Mr. Schroeder has supported the candidates and principles 
of the democratic party, as he considers that its policy is best adapted to pro- 
tect the interests of the majority. He has always actively participated in all 
political issues and has been awarded some of the best offices not only of the 
township but the county. His party first elected him to the position of school 
director, he was later made treasurer of the board and was then made township 
assessor; at the expiration of his term he was elected township clerk, after 
which he served on the board of county supervisors and has but recently retired 
from the state legislature. In each and all of these positions, from the lowest 
to the highest, he has conscientiously discharged his duties and has received the 
approval of all. As the years of his residence in Crawford county have increased 
it has but served to strengthen the esteem and respect which is accorded him, 
binding him more closely to his fellowmen. 



GEORGE P. SWARTZ. 



George P. Swartz, one of the substantial and well known citizens of Stock- 
holm township, Crawford county, was born May 24, 1859, in Clinton county, 
Iowa, a son of Henry P. and Eliza (Koch) Swartz, both of whom were natives 
of Pennsylvania, whence they moved in 1855 to a farm in Clinton county, Iowa. 
They were the parents of seven children, five of whom are still living, namely: 
Ella, the wife of E. P. Keith, of Ida Grove, Iowa; George P.; William L., of 
Tipton, Iowa; Arthur L., of Westbrook, ^Minnesota ; and Burdette V.. of South 
Dakota. The mother died in Cedar county when about fifty years old, the 
father's demise occurring in Ida Grove at the age of seventy-five. 

George P. Swartz attended the public schools and remained on the home 
farm until twenty-three years old. when he rented one hundred and twenty 
acres of land in Cedar county, Iowa, which he cultivated for about one year. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 355 

He then went to Jones county, located on one hundred and sixty acres and re- 
mained there two years. At the end of that time he returned to Cedar county 
for one year, after which he moved to Ida county and there engaged in farming 
and various other industries until 1894, when he went to Minnesota and rented 
one-half section of land near what is now known as Westbrook. There he 
resided until 1900 and then removed to Pine county, the same state, where he 
bought forty acres and remained there until 1905, in which year he came to 
Cravv'ford county, Iowa, and purchased what is now his home in Boyer, Stock- 
holm township. 

Mr. Swartz has been twice married, his first wife being Anna Nash, a 
daughter of William and Mary (Gates) Nash, of Cedar county, Iowa, whom 
he wedded in the fall of 1883 at Tipton, Iowa. Of the three children born to 
them, two are living, namely: Catherine E., the wife of Clifif Lawrence, of 
Houston, Texas ; and Angle Irene, who married George Maynard and lives in 
Crawford county. Mrs. Swartz departed this life in 1887 at Clarence, Cedar 
county, Iowa. On January 30, 1901, Mr. Swartz was married to Lydia Erick- 
son, a daughter of John A. and Martha Erickson. 

Mr. Swartz in his political relations is a stalwart republican and has always 
given his support to the men and principles of that party. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Modern Brotherhood Association. His life has been one of 
industry, bringing to his work an intelligent appreciation of all that goes to 
make success, and that he has attained this goal is manifested by the prosperity 
which he at present enjoys. 



WILLIAM F. NUTTER. 

The owner of one hundred and twenty acres of highly productive land in 
Willow township, William F. Nutter is assured of a handsome annual income 
and is numbered among the respected and representative citizens of Crawford 
county. In his life work he has shown himself possessed of the elements of 
energy, thrift and other traits necessary in the attainment of a worthy purpose 
in any calling. 

He was born in Clinton county, Iowa, August 21, 1874, a son of Franklin 
and Elizabeth (Mathing) Nutter. The parents were both natives of Licking 
county, Ohio, and were married in that county. They came to Iowa and made 
their home at Clinton until 1881, when they removed to a farm near Odebolt. 
Sac county, and two years later came to Crawford county, locating in Willow 
township. After renting land for a while, Mr. Nutter purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres in that township, which he improved until it became a valuable 
property. He died in 1899, and his wife passed away three years later. There 
were eight children in their family : Alitha, now the wife of James W^ickwire. 
of Boulder, Colorado; Tackson, who lives at Durango, Colorado; Wallace, who 
has charge of a boat on the Great Lakes; James, of Clarinda. Iowa; Mary, who 
lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Edward, also of Minneapolis; Ida. the wife 
of F. H. Brown, of Charter Oak; and Wilham F.. of this review. 



356 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

Educated in the public schools, William F. Nutter assisted in the work of 
the home farm until he reached the age of twenty-one years and then began 
cultivating the land upon which he has since lived. He owns one hundred and 
twenty acres, which he has improved by the erection of substantial buildings, 
making it one of the desirable places in the township. He is a good manager, 
as he engages actively and intelligently in his business, and his efforts have been 
rewarded with good results. 

In 1896 Mr. Nutter was united in marriage to Miss Augusta Cue, a daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Susannah R. (Arrowsmith) Cue. Her father was born in 
England and was among the early settlers of Willow township, Crawford 
county, Iowa, becoming a very prominent citizen of this section. He served 
valiantly for three years in behalf of the Union in the war of the rebellion and 
is now living at Wichita, Kansas. Mrs. Nutter's mother died in May, 1901. 
They were the parents of five children: Alfred, of Gordon, Nebraska; INIarion, 
of Willow township ; Augusta, now Airs. W^illiam F. Nutter ; and Elizabeth 
and Ralph, both of whom live in Willow township. Two children have come 
to bless tBe union of Mr. and Mrs. Nutter: Charlotte L., now fourteen; and 
Hazel May. now twelve years of age. 

Mr. Nutter has always voted in support of the candidates and platforms of 
the republican party, although he has never had political aspirations. He is a 
sincere believer in honesty in public as well as in private affairs, and his life 
is a commendable example of fairness in all dealings with others. He is not 
a member of any religious denomination but attends the Methodist church, and 
as a useful and progressive citizen he possesses the respect of the people of 
the entire neighborhood. 



WILLIAM H. PRUTER. 

William H. Pruter, of Crawford county, is a native son of Iowa, born Au- 
gust 22, 1873, his parents being William F. and Helena (Rohr) Pruter. They 
are natives of Holstein, Germany, and were married in the old country. In 
1869, believing that more favorable opportunities awaited energetic and de- 
serving people in the western hemisphere than could be expected in the older 
countries of Europe, they crossed the ocean to America and after spending four 
years in Clinton county, Iowa, removed to Crawford county. Here Mr. Pruter 
engaged very successfully in agriculture and stock-raising and became the owner 
of four hundred and eighty acres of good land in Crawford and Carroll coun- 
ties. He started upon his own resources without capital and deserves great 
credit for what he accomplished. In 1902 he and his wife removed to Daven- 
port, where they are now living. There were four children in their family: 
Frank, of Hayes townshi]) ; Charles, of Iowa township; John, who is now living 
in the state of Washington; and William IT. 

The subject of this review acquired a practical education in the common 
schools, thus laying the foundation for a life of usefulness and honor. He 
continued at home with his parents, assuming many of the responsibilities, until 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 35 



■0( 



after attaining his majority. Then, having been married, he Hved across the 
road from the old home until after his parents removed to town, since which 
time he has resided at the family homestead. He owns two hundred and forty 
acres of valuable land, which yields bounteous harvests, and his wife is the 
owtier of sixty acres near West Side. He gives his attention to agriculture and 
also to raising graded stock for the market. 

In 1895 Mr. Pruter was married to Miss Clara Moeller, who was born at 
Davenport, a daughter of Peter Moeller, of West Side, Iowa. Two cliildren 
have come to brighten their home, Clarence and Leslie. Mr. Pruter and his 
wife are not members of any religious denomination, but they are stanch be- 
lievers in Christianity and attend the German Lutheran church, being liberal 
contributors to that organization. He has voted independently ever since he 
reached his majority. He is recognized as an industrious, enterprising and pro- 
gressive man and has gained a measure of success which gives proof of the 
wise application of his energies. 



REV. ADOLPH AMSTEIN. 

Twenty-one. years ago Rev. Adolph Amstein accepted a call to fill the pulpit 
of the German Lutheran church at Charter Oak, of which he has ever since 
been pastor, discharging his duties with an earnestness and fidelity that have 
met with the hearty approval of the entire community. He was born in Ger- 
many, February 26, 1869, a son of Sebastian and Fredericka (Bartholmaes) 
Amstein, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father was by trade a 
blacksmith, but later became a hotel and store keeper and so continued until 
his retirement. He died at the age of seventy-three years, but the mother is 
still living in Germany and has arrived at the venerable age of eighty-five years. 
There were ten children in their family, namely: Aurelia, deceased; Mathilde. 
Pauline, Florine, Heinrich, Christiana, Johann and Rosine, all of whom are 
living in Germany; Reinhold, now hving in Ida county, Iowa; and Adolph, of 

this review. 

Adolph Amstein was given excellent advantages of education in his native 
land, attending the common schools until he reached the age of fourteen years. 
He received private lessons for two years in Latin and German and at the same 
time studied music, history, geography, algebra and essays at an academy. In 
1885, being then sixteen years of age, he came to America and, as he had de- 
cided to enter the Christian ministry, took a course of instruction m theolog}' 
at Springfield, Illinois. Being too young to qualify as a regular mmister of 
the church, he was sent out as a vicar or assistant, spending one year m Dakota, 
six months at Davenport, Iowa, and an. equal length of time in Hanover town- 
ship Crawford county. He then returned to Springfield and completed his 
course In 1890 he received a call from the German Lutheran church at Charter 
Oak, which he has accepted and he has ever since most acceptably occupied that 
position. 



358 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUx\TY 

On the I5tli of April, 1891, Mr. .Vmstein was united in marriage to Miss 
Sophie Grunke, who was born at Waterloo, Wisconsin, August 27, 1867, a 
daughter of Friederich and Augusta (Bagganz) Grunke, both natives of Ger- 
many. The parents came to America and spent three years at Watertown, Wis- 
consin, then locating at Waterloo, this state. The father died in 1885, but the 
mother is still living at Waterloo, at the age of eighty-five years. In their family 
were seven children, namely: Alvina, of Wisconsin; Emma, of Minnesota; 
Sophie, now ^irs. Adolph Amstein ; and Huldah, Elizabeth, Helen and Ida, all 
of whom are deceased. The home of Rev. and Mrs. Amstein has been blessed 
by the birth of eight children : Elsie, who was born in May, 1892, and has re- 
ceived a common school and musical education ; Erwin E., who was born April 
14, 1894, and is now living at home; Herbert C., born December 25, 1897; Helen 
M., born June 16, 1898; Adele M., who was born September 30, 1900, and died 
January 6, 1901 ; Edgar T., born ]\Iarch 27, 1902; Lorena E., born September 
12, 1904; and Ruth M., born November 9, 1906. 

Mr. Amstein is a constant student of all subjects pertaining to his chosen 
calling, a clear and logical speaker, and possesses a knowledge of human na- 
ture that has greatly assisted him in his arduous work. He is deeply versed in 
the Bible and especially in the life and teachings of the Great Master, in whose 
footsteps he has ever humbly walked. By his patience, earnestness, sincerity 
and unselfish labors in behalf of others he has gained the unqualified confidence 
and respect of his fellowmen. 



THOMAS RAE. 



We have before us the picture of a young Scotch lad working hard all day 
at the weaving, reading at night and dreaming great dreams which perhaps few 
but a hard-headed Scotch lad could make come true. Into this boy's hands came 
a book of travel telling of the wonders of America and especially of that rich 
but almost unoccupied territory beyond the Mississippi. Into that boyish mind 
came the desire to share in the benefits of this free country and into his heart 
came the determination to realize this new ambition. Wages were small and 
it took much time and much saving and self-denial to secure the passage money 
which brought Thomas Rae to the land of his dream. It was April 2, 1863, 
that he left his native land and some two weeks later that he landed at Portland, 
Maine, to make his fortune in the new world. He did not at once realize his 
desire to go to the west, a living had to be made in the meantime and something 
of a nest egg put by for the founding of the fortune that he hoped was to come. 
He secured employment in the Pepperell Mills at Biddeford, Maine, near Saco, 
and there he lived four years. On April 10, 1865, the day on which the glor- 
ious tidings of Lee's surrender reached the Pine Tree state, Mr. Rae was united 
in marriage to Miss Jeanie Allen, also a native of Scotland. She was a loving 
helpmate, w-ho contributed largely to the success of the future and who has won 
a very dear place in the hearts of all. 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUxXTY 359 

In 1866, Mr. Rae paved the way for a western home by the purchase of 
sixty acres of land in far-off Crawford county, Iowa, a place which he had 
never seen, but of which he had heard through his brother George. By 1867 
enough had been saved to warrant the western journey, and together the young 
married couple started for the country that was to be their home. I\Ir. Rae's 
first land purchase was in Union township and he built the first frame house 
in that locality, a building one story high and fourteen by twenty feet in dimen- 
sion. He added to this as he was able and he now owns one of the finest country 
houses in Crawford county. Although he knew almost nothing about farming 
at the start, he was persistent, energetic and thrifty, and as the years passed 
he added to his original tract until he now owns five hundred acres in Paradise 
and Union townships. Although he had to endure all the hardships and priva- 
tions of a pioneer, doing many things by hand which today are done by ma- 
chinery, he was not one to acknowledge defeat, but kept on, never losing sight 
of the goal, until he is today one of the most successful and substantial farmers 
of the county. He makes a specialty of breeding and raising fine stock and is 
meeting with most gratifying success. 

Air. Rae has always taken great interest not only in his own affairs but in 
the civic and religious affairs of the community. He has taken active part in 
all those things which make for good. Both he and his wife are faithful mem- 
bers of the Methodist church and have been among the most ardent and help- 
ful members of that church at Dow City. Politically, Mr. Rae has been a stal- 
wart republican, and in 1900 his value as a party worker was recognized by 
his election as a member of the electoral college from the tenth district of Iowa. 
He has held many positions of trust and confidence in his locality and is re- 
spected as an able and conscientious citizen by all. He has long been identified 
with the Masonic fraternity, having joined Saco Lodge, No. 9, A. F. & A. M., 
of Saco, Maine, in 1865. He was one of the charter members as well as one 
of the organizers of Hospitable Lodge, No. 444, A. F. & A. M., of Dunlap, 
Iowa, and he is at present chairman of the finance committee of the Sylvan 
Lodge, of Denison. Mr. Rae has always been an ardent temperance worker 
and in fact he not only supports but forwards every movement, the adoption of 
which he believes means a higher moral standard in the community. 

Mr. Rae was born at Kettle's Bridge, Kings Kettle, Fifeshire. Scotland, a 
son of Thomas and Janet (Buck) Rae. The parents were Scotch and spent 
their entire lives in the land of heather, where the father was a hand-loom 
weaver. Mr. Rae has several times in the days of his prosperity visited the 
land of his birth and renewed the old assocations. On his last visit to Scotland 
he was accompanied by his son James, who went partly for an educational ex- 
cursion, as well as to see the scenes of "Bonnie Scotland." While in London 
they were received by Mr. Asquith, prime minister, in his private room in the 
house of commons, being very cordially received by that distinguished gentU- 
man, and they appreciated the honor granted them by such a pleasant interview. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Rae were born six children: :\Iary. who is deceased; 
Thomas, living at home; Nettie and Willie, twins, the former the wife of John 
Branhall, a mechanical engineer, of Des Moines, and the latter deceased ; Allen, 
who was chief electrician on the United States steamship Wilmington during 



860 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

the famous voyage to the tropics of South America when the far reaches of 
the great rivers were explored where white men had never been before, but 
after three years in the navy, during which time he circumnavigated the globe, 
he resigned and is an expert electrician in Chicago ; James, the youngest, now 
principal of the high school at Iowa City. 

We cannot speak too highly of Mr. Thomas Rae as a citizen. His splendid 
good sense, his astute judgment and his kindly heart commend him to all who 
have the i)leasure of his acquaintance. 



P. C. DUNHAM. 



A farm of nearly five hundred acres of good land in Crawford county pays 
tribute to the energy and skill of P. C. Dunham. He is a native of Boyer town- 
ship, this county, born February i6, 1865, and is a son of Cornelius Dunham, 
Jr., and Maria (McKenzie) Dunham. The father was born in Sangamon 
county, Illinois, and came to Crawford county, Iowa, March 3, 1832, with his' 
father, Cornelius Dunham, Sr., the pioneer settler of Crawford county, a rec- 
ord of whom is found in the sketch of Z. T. Dunham, which appears elsewhere 
in this work. Cornelius, Jr., was reared under the conditions of pioneer life 
in Crawford county and was educated by a tutor in the home. He became a 
farmer of Boyer township and an extensive stock-raiser, also engaging in butch- 
ering and in the general mercantile and clothing business at Dunlap, Iowa. Sub- 
sequently he returned to Boyer township, where he spent the remainder of his 
days. He was a very active and energetic man and cleared about four hundred 
and fifty acres of land. Politically, he was an ardent supporter of the democratic 
party and served acceptably as a member of the board of supervisors of Craw- 
ford county, having previously held almost all the township offices. He was 
also connected with the Masonic order and the Odd T^ellows, and was generally 
a leader in anything that he undertook. He passed away in 1894 and his re- 
mains were interred in Pleasant Hill cemetery at Dunlap. His wife was born 
in Birmingham, England, January 18, 1839, and came to this country when she 
was a girl of twelve years. About 1867 or 1868 she received a legacy from rela- 
tives in England and this was used in buying the family homestead in this 
county, where our subject now resides. She was married to Mr. Dunham in 
Crawford county, February 22, 1858, and died eleven years after the death of 
her husband, January 14, 1905. She was also buried in Pleasant Hill cemetery. 

There were five children in their family, namely: Charles D., who was born 
January 7, 1859, and now lives in Boyer Township ; Sophronia Isabel, who was 
born October 5, i860, and is the wife of S. 11. Johnston, of Carroll county; 
Mary Elnora, who was born September 20, 1862, and died November 16, 1888; 
P. C, our subject; and Samuel Alexander, who was born January 30, 1868, 
and died February 12, 1903. 

P. C. Dunham received his early education in the common schools of Boyer 
township and later attended the normal school at Dunlap. He taught school 
one term and then began farming on the family homestead, with which he has 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 361 

ever since been identified. He is a general farmer and stock-raiser and has 
applied himself with such good results that he now owns four hundred and 
seventy-six acres of improved land and fifteen acres in timber in Boyer and 
Union townships. He probably raises and markets more hogs than any other 
man in Crawford county. He and his family occupy a beautiful residence, 
which is supplied with all modern conveniences. The Illinois Central Railroad 
passes the home and trains can be flagged so that it is possible for members of 
the family to do their trading in Omaha. This is in marked contrast with con 
ditions which existed in the early days when his grandfather Dunham was 
obliged to travel four days by ox team to reach the nearest market. 

On September 5, 1885, Mr. Dunham was united in marriage to Miss Ella 
M. Hoff, who was born in Indiana. Ever since casting his first ballot he has 
given his support to the democratic party. He has served as member of the 
school board and as treasurer of the board for ten years. Religiously he gives 
his adherence to the Methodist church, and fraternally is connected with Acorn 
Camp, No. 325, M. W. A., of Dunlap. 

Representing the third generation of his family in Crawford county, Mr. 
Dunham has worthily upheld the name and is one of the highly respected men 
in this part of the state. He has attained a large measure of success in his 
business, being gifted with a worthy ambition and clear judgment, and it may 
truly be said of him that he never seeks to advance his own interests to the 
injury of others. 



RICHARD BAAK. 



Richard Baak was born on the farm where he now lives, on section 33, Sol- 
dier township, September 13, 1887, and has spent his entire life amidst the 
scenes familiar to him in his childhood. He is a son of August and Sophia 
(Wickman) Baak, a record of whom is given in the sketch of Herman Baak 
which appears on another page of this work. 

Richard Baak possessed the advantages of attendance at the district schools 
and in his boyhood assisted in the work of the home farm as his services were 
necessary, thus gaining a thorough knowledge of an occupation that has become 
his life pursuit. At the age of twenty-one, after his father's death, he took 
charge of one hundred and twenty acres — his portion of the family estate. His 
brother Ernest also received one hundred and twenty acres and they have con- 
ducted their business together, managing to better advantage than if the farms 
were entirely separated. They carry on general farming and stock-feeding and 
are securing results which indicate the application of good judgment and the 
most approved modern methods. 

On the 23d of June, 1909. Mr. Baak was united in marriage to Miss Ida 
Rickert, who was born in Hanover township, 3*Iay 9, 1888, a daughter of 
Joachim and Anna (Huencke) Rickert, both of whom were born in Germany. 
They were married in America and Mr. Rickert engaged in farming until his 
death, which occurred in 1905. The mother is living with her children and has 



362 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

now reached the age of sixty-eight years. There were four clii.'dren in the 
family: Herman, W'iHiam and Edward, all of whom live in Monona county; and 
Ida, now ^Irs. Richard Baak. 

Mr. and Airs. Baak have made a happy start in married life and their home 
is always open to friends who here receive a cordial greeting. They were reared 
in the German Lutheran faith and are earnest believers in its teachings. As 
a public-spirited citizen, Mr. Baak is a willing assistant in every worthy cause 
that gives evidence of advancing the general good. He is a practical man and 
his success is due to his knowledge of his business and his close application. 



HARRY HERBERT STURGES. 

Harry Herbert Sturges, a well known and prominent citizen of Charter Oak, 
Iowa, and publisher and proprietor of the Charter Oak Times, was born in a 
log cabin near La Valle, Sauk county, Wisconsin, February 8, 1863, his parents 
being Horatio A. and Catherine (Williams) Sturges. The former's birth oc- 
curred March 27, 1827, near Dunkirk, New York, and that of the mother Oc- 
tober 13, 1831, near Ashtabula, Ohio. The grandfather in 1837 removed from 
New York to Ashtabula county, Ohio, and although receiving only a common 
school education, he studied law during his leisure moments, being finally ad- 
mitted to the bar. His son, Horatio A., was also a self-educated man and was 
admitted to the bar after a course of home study. In 1845 the latter moved to' 
Wisconsin, remaining there three years and then returning to Ohio to be mar- 
ried. Two years later he went to Darlington, Wisconsin, and there as a fron- 
tiersman broke the wild land for the purpose of farming, in which he engaged 
for some time. He then removed to Alichigan, but only remained there one 
year and again returned to Wisconsin, this time settling near Boscobel and 
later in Sauk county, where he practiced law until 1863, when he offered his 
services in the defense of the union. He enlisted in the Ninth Wisconsin Bat- 
tery of Light Artillery and served until the close of the war, being stationed in 
Missouri and Kansas. After being mustered out at Fort Leavenworth, he 
once more returned to Wisconsin and resided there until 1880, then removed to 
Gary in the northeastern part of South Dakota, where he practiced law and 
conducted a real-estate business until his death in 1895. His wife only sur- 
vived him one year, dying in 1896. She was a member of the Methodist church 
and later in life he joined her in that faith. 

Harry H. Sturges attended the district school until seventeen years old, 
when he began driving a stage in South Dakota, where later he taught school 
for three years and read law in the office of his father for the same length of 
time. He then 'embarked in the printing business, and in June, 1901, came to 
Charter Oak, Iowa, where he bought the Charter Oak Times, a weekly news- 
paper, from F. L. Hills. Since becoming owner of the Times, Mr. Sturges has 
infused a new spirit of progress in its business, has more than doubled the 
circulation, while the advertising matter has been increased to three times its 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 363 

Drmer quantl;>.. Besides his newspaper, Mr. Sturges conducts a job printing 

;fice, it being the only one in the town or in the vicinity. 

On June 26, 1889, Mr. Sturges was married to Miss Etta L. Christy, of Ver- 
miHon, South Dakota, a daughter of Thomas and Mary EHzabeth (Dunton) 
Christy. Her mother, who was born in northern New York state, was left an 
orphan when fourteen years old, was married, became a mother and widow, and 
was remarried before she was twenty-one years old. The father, who was 
born in Ohio, is a carpenter and contractor by trade and for years has resided 
at the famous Hot Springs, South Dakota. He is now, at the age of seventy- 
two years, a carpenter in the government sanitarium there. He is a veteran of 
the Civil war. Both parents of Airs. Sturges are still living. The children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Sturges are three in number, as follows: Ethel C, a high-school 
student of the graduating class of 191 1; Carl C, who was born February 13, 
1892, and is also of the class of 191 1; Halbert M., born in October, 1893. 

Politically Air. Sturges has always voted the republican ticket but has never 
sought nor desired public office, being content to give his support to the party 
in other ways. In his fraternal relations he is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, in which society his father was at one time the second 
oldest member in Wisconsin. In religion he holds to the faith of the Methodist 
church. He is one of the substantial citizens of Charter Oak and uses the in- 
fluence of his paper to support and advance any project of a public nature that 
would tend to elevate and improve the condition of his home town. 



C. J. BOHNSACK. 

Agricultural pursuits have always claimed the attention of C. J. Bohnsack, 
who is residing upon a highly improved farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
in Iowa township. He was born in the province of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, 
on the 19th of August, 1864, and is a son of William and Minnie (Lingfeldt) 
Bohnsack. The parents emigrated to the United States in 1881, first locating 
in Walcott, Scott county, Iowa, where they remained for two years. Later 
they removed to Manning in Carroll county, where they made their home for six 
or seven years and then purchased a farm in Audubon county. Mr. Bohnsack 
engaged in the cultivation of the latter place for about nine years, subsequently 
returning to Manning, where he passed away in 1905 and was laid to rest in the 
village cemetery. Mrs. Bohnsack is still living. Two children were born unto 
them, a son and a daughter. The latter, Dora, became the wife of John G. 
Clausen, of Chicago. 

Being a youth of seventeen years when his parents emigrated to the United 
States, C. J. Bohnsack had already acquired his education, in the pursuit of 
which he attended the common schools of his native land. He remained a mem- 
ber of the paternal household until he attained his majority. Farm work en- 
gaged his activities for the first four years after leaving home, during which 
time he saved enough of his wages to enable him to rent eighty acres of land on 
section 27, Iowa township, which he cultivated for three years. At the expira- 



364 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

tion of that period he rented the place he now owns on section 13, to which he 
acquired the title by right of purchase in 1902. During the nine years of his 
ownership Mr. Bohnsack has wrought many improvements in the place, hav- 
ing erected one of the finest residences on any form in the county. Although he 
owns but one hundred and sixty acres he operates four hundred, in addition to 
which he is a very heavy feeder of stock. His interests are extensive but he 
is a man who is capable of handling things upon a large scale, and he is meet- 
ing with most gratifying returns from his various undertakings. 

In 1887 Mr. Bohnsack completed his arrangements for a home of his own 
by his marriage to Miss Anna Mason. Seven children have been born of this 
union : William, Henry, Dora, Augusta, Louis, Emma and John, all of whom 
are still at home. 

In their religious faith the views of the family conform to the tenets of the 
Lutheran denomination with which they affiliate, while fraternally Mr. Bohn- 
sack is identified with the Modern Woodmen of America, being a member of 
the camp at Manning. The democratic party has claimed the allegiance of Mr. 
Bohnsack ever since being granted the right of franchise. He has always taken 
an active and helpful interest in public afifairs and has served as assessor for 
four terms and as road supervisor for four years, while for twelve years he was 
a member of the school board, during all but two of which he was also secre- 
tary. He is one of the men who possesses the ability to win when the necessary 
assets are energy and perseverance, to which qualities he owes such success as 
has been meted to him. 



ANDREW NORELIUS. 



One of the highly respected citizens of Crawford county is Andrew Norelius, 
who in the evening of a life of great usefulness as a preacher, lawyer and busi- ' 
ness man, is now living retired in Stockholm township. He was born in 
Sweden, July i, 1830, a son of A. P. and Elizabeth Norelius, both of whom were 
natives of Sweden. They came to America in 1853 and located in Minnesota, 
where they continued during the remainder of their lives, the mother passing 
away in 1864, while the father departed this hfe in 1888, There were eight 
children in their family: Peter and John, deceased; Andrew, the subject of this 
review ; Erick, now a minister of Vassar, Minnesota ; Olef , Louis and Carrie, 
deceased; and Julia, wife of Ben Bong, of ^Minnesota. 

Andrew Norelius was reared in his native land and educated in the common 
schools, later receiving advantages of higher education in this country. At 
twenty years of age he came to America, and being attracted to the great west, 
spent fourteen months in Knox county, Illinois, and then went to Moline, that 
state, where he worked at the carpenter's trade until 1855. After his marriage, 
which took place in Illinois, he went to Burlington, Iowa, where he attended 
college for one year, having decided to become a minister of the gospel. He 
took up his residence in Jefferson county, Iowa, and for seventeen years offi- 
ciated in the pulpit of the Baptist church. However, in 1864, in response to an 




ANDREW X0RELIU8 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 367 

urgent call for soldiers, believing that his adopted country needed his services, 
he enlisted in Company D, Third Minnesota Regiment, and continued in the 
ranks until the close of the Rebellion. After receiving his lionorable discharge 
at Jacksonville, Arkansas, he went to Minnesota, where he engaged in preach- 
ing for four years. In 1869 he came to Crawford county and purchased a farm 
of one hundred and forty acres, upon which he has since resided. Since 1873 
he has not participated prominently in business although he still continues as 
secretary of the Kiron Farmers Mutual Insurance Company, having occupied 
this office to the entire satisfaction of the members of the company for the past 
twenty-five years. 

In 1855 Mr. Norelius was united in marriage to Miss Christina Peterson, 
who was born in Sweden in 1832, a daughter of Samuel and Margaret Peter- 
son, both of whom passed their entire lives in the old country. Nine children 
came to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. Norelius, five of whom are now living, 
namely: Adolph, now a resident of South Dakota; Hilma, the wife of Erb Stolt, 
of North Dakota ; Francis, who is living on the old homestead ; Elizabeth and 
G. A., of Kiron. 

Mr. Norelius has made a careful study of politics and as a result gives his 
support to the 'populist party, as he believes that organization best adapted to 
preserve the liberties of the republic. He has never sought the emoluments and 
honors of office, but served for eighteen years as postmaster at old Kiron and 
has filled all of the offices in the township with an ability and fidelity that greatly 
pleased the people. Fraternally, he is a valued member of the Masonic order 
and also of Post No. 58, G. A. R., at Denison. By an upright and unselfish 
Christian life he has gained the esteem of a host of friends and acquaintances 
who have complete confidence in his word, as he is a man who has always en- 
deavored to speak the truth and also in all relations of life to perform his duty. 
He clearly deserves a place among the honored citizens of Crawford county. 



CHEALS W. PAYNE. 



Cheals W. Payne needs no introduction to the readers of this volume, for 
few men in this part of the state are more widely known in Crawford county 
than he. His is a notable career of a successful man, who started out in life 
empty-handed and came to America with no capital save industry and determi- 
nation. Those quaHties, however, will always serve as a sure and safe founda- 
tion upon which to build prosperity. The early years of his residence in^ Iowa 
constituted a period of earnest and unremitting toil, but thereby he acquired a 
sum of money sufficient to enable him to make his first purchase of land. From 
that time forward he has speculated and dealt largely in real estate and there are 
today few men in Iowa whose property holdings equal his in extent or impor- 
tance. He was born in Lincolnshire, England, August n, 1846, his parents 
being George and Eliza (Cheals) Payne, who were likewise natives of Lincoln- 
shire, in which country they spent their entire lives. They were the parents of 
five children, namely: Caroline, now deceased; John R. and George, who are 



Vol. 11—20 



368 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

still residents of England ; Cheals W., of this review ; and Lucy Hannah, who 
is still living in England. 

The youthful days of Cheals W. Payne were passed in his native country 
and his education was there acquired, but when twenty-three years of age he 
came to the new world in company with his brother George in the spring of 
1870, attracted by the broader opportunities which he had heard might be ob- 
tained in America. He did not tarry on the eastern coast but made his way at 
once into the interior of the country, the two brothers settling on a farm which 
they rented in Clinton county, Iowa. With characteristic energy they took up 
the task of tilling the fields and raising good crops and for seven years lived 
upon that place. In the fall of 1877 they removed to Crawford county and 
purchased the farm upon which Cheals W. Payne now lives. Both brothers 
recognized the advantages and opportunities here offered and foresaw some- 
thing of what the future had in store for Crawford county. Believing that the 
land must necessarily rise in value with the development of the district and the 
settlement of the county, they began buying and speculating in property and 
also were among the pioneers in raising, feeding and shipping stock. They con- 
tinued to purchase land in this county and other parts of the state until at the 
present time Cheals W^ Payne is the owner of several fine and valuable farms 
in Crawford county, being associated with a partner in the ownership of four- 
teen thousand acres in this county and in the vicinity of Sioux City, Iowa. They 
also own forty thousand acres in Nebraska and Mr. Payne owns individually 
nine thousand acres in Colorado. He has thus become one of the most ex-* 
tensive landowners of Iowa and in his investments has shown keen distrimina- 
tion and sound judgment. Fle also owns two business blocks in the village of 
West Side, together with an elevator and six lots on which it stands. He is the 
president of the Valley Bank at West Side and has been the promoter of various 
interests of a public and semi-public character. He and his brother George 
continued in partnership from 1870 until 1884, when the brother sold out and 
returned to England w^ith his family. 

While Mr. Payne has prospered in the conduct of extensive and important 
business affairs, his success is to him a matter of gratification because it enables 
him not only to provide handsomely for his family, but also to do much for 
educational activities, in which he is particularly interested. He has contributed 
eighty-seven thousand dollars to the Morningside College near Sioux City, Iowa, 
and has also been a generous supporter of other educational movements. He 
is a firm believer in the cause of education as a preparation for life's practical 
and responsible duties and as an element in the development of high and hon- 
orable character. At the present writing he is serving on the board of trustees 
of Morningside College. 

On the i8th of February, 1885, ^^^- Payne was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary A. Dannatt, who w-as born in Clinton county, Iowa, and is a daughter of 
John S. and Emily (Evison) Dannatt. both of wdiom were natives of England, 
whence they came to the United States with their parents in early childhood. 
They were first residents of Clinton county, Iowa, where the father of Mrs. 
Payne passed away. The mother, however, is still living in that county. Mrs. 
Payne was one of a family of ten children, of whom nine are still living. By 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 369 

her marriage she became the mother of two children, but the elder. Ethel M., 
who was born December 15, 1886, died May 28, 1887. The younger, Arthur 
C, born March 19, 1896, is still in school. 

The parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which Mr. 
Payne is one of the trustees, while his wife is one of the stewards. They are 
interested in all that pertains to the educational and moral as well as the ma- 
terial progress of the community, and their influence is always on the side of 
right, progress, reform and truth. In all of his business dealings Mr, Payne 
has been strictly reliable, never taking advantage of the necessities of a fellow- 
man, but the years have brought him success by reason of his sound judgment 
and unfaltering industry. 



JOHN A. ERICKSEN. 



The rapid progress and development of the state of Iowa, both socially and 
educationally, can be largely attributed to its agricultural population. Those hard- 
working, thrifty and self-sacrificing men and women came here and established 
homes and by means of their loyal citizenship and public spirit have assisted 
in bringing the state to the position it occupies today. Among these must be 
numbered John A. Ericksen, who for a period of more than forty years has 
been identified with the farming interests of Crawford county. He was born 
in Sweden on the 3d of April, 1836, and is a son of Mangus and Karliesa 
Ericksen, both of whom passed their entire lives in Sweden. Eight children 
were born unto Mr. and Mrs. Ericksen, but two sons, John A., who is the eldest 
of the family, and Peter, who has always lived in Sweden, are the only surviv- 
ing members. 

John A. Ericksen spent the first thirty years of his life in Sweden. At the 
end of that period he was convinced that he could never realize his ambition — 
which was to become the owner of landed property — in the land of his birth, 
so he took passage for America. Upon his arrival in the United States he made 
his way westward and located in Webster county, Iowa, where he bouglit one 
hundred and sixty acres of land. He cultivated this for one year, then sold and 
removed to Crawford county, where he bought a quarter section, upon which 
the town of Kiron is now situated. He sold this and purchased elsewhere, grad- 
ually adding to his holdings as he acquired the means until he now owns one- 
half section of land in this county. All the hardships and privations which are 
ever the lot of those brave men and women who form the advance guard in the 
spreading of civilization fell to the lot of John Ericksen. He had no horses, so 
hauled his household goods from Webster county with a team of oxen, and he 
also used them to plow the unbroken prairie of his new farm. There were no 
improvements upon his land and he not only had to cut the logs necessary for 
his cabin, but had to raft them across the river. However, he possessed all the 
needed qualities of the pioneer and despite the many discouragements never once 
thought of acknowledging defeat, and today is recognized as one of the aftluent 
citizens of the community. He rented his homestead seven years ago and re- 



370 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

tired to Kiron, being now able to enjoy the ease and leisure denied him (hiring 
the early years of his life. 

Mr. Ericksen has many interesting reminiscences to relate of the pioneer 
days, many of them relative to the hardships encountered by the settlers in their 
efforts to establish homes. Very few of the men owned horses, the majority 
depending upon oxen, which they used to cultivate the fields and haul their 
produce to and from the market. Once on a dark, dismal, March day in the 
'60s Mr. Ericksen took his ox team and went to Boyer to haul logs. He was 
goitig to haul five loads up on the prairie a distance of about half a mile, where 
he could conveniently get them any time when needed during the summer. When 
he was finishing his third load it began to snow ; by the time he was throwing 
off the last log the flakes were coming thick and fast and the wind was con- 
stantly rising. Turning his team he started toward home, walking beside his 
sled and holding on to one of the stakes. The storm had increased in intensity 
until he could not see the oxen ; his home was five miles away and there were 
no roads; prairie all the way \vith nothing by which he could locate himself 
even could he see, so tying a sack over his head for protection he trusted his 
fate to the slow steady beasts who were drawing his sled. At last they came to 
the creek on his land and when they crossed the bridge he thought the oxen 
would turn homeward, but, as cattle are prone to do, they went in the path of 
the storm, drifting out into a cornfield where the Bank of Kiron now stands. 
Numbed with the cold and almost exhausted, Mr. Ericksen's senses were vet 
sufficiently alert for him to realize he was lost. Stopping his team, he endeav- 
ored to locate himself, realizing if he any longer depended upon the oxen his 
fate would be similar to that of many another settler in those days. At last 
establishing his position he started homeward. It continued to storm for three 
days and nights, during which time he and his wife and child were snowed in. 
He was unable to get out to the barn to feed his stock but twice, and being 
without a shovel, he used a slab to plow a path from the house to the barn. 

In 1875, some years after the preceding incident, Mr. Ericks.en started to 
Denison with a load of corn, which he was going to use to pay a note he had 
given on a grocery bill. It was fine in the morning when he started, but when 
he left town it began to snow and blow from the north. He was compelled to 
let his team walk, but had nearly reached home when the blizzard became so 
severe he was forced to turn around and return the way he had come. Reaching 
the homestead of Mr. Newcome he put up his horses and stayed all night, going 
home the following day. On another occasion, accompanied by his wife, he 
went to \'ail with a load of wheat. Having discharged his business he fed his 
team, hitched up and started homeward. They had not gone far, however, when 
it began to storm. Realizing the impossibility of their being able to make the 
journey that night, he stopped at Mr. De Wolf's, where they remained until 
the following day. They were not the only guests the De Wolf's had that 
night, however, as their home also afforded protection for the school children. 
Mr. Ericksen completed arrangements for a home by his marriage on the 
22d of November. 1868. to Miss Martha Julia Larsen, of Crawford county. 
The young couple began their domestic life in a sod house, which about four 
months later had the misfortune to catch fire, thus destroying all of their house- 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 371 

hold effects. Undaunted, however, he built another house, equipping it with 
the absolute necessities, to which he made additions from time to time as his 
means permitted. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ericksen were born the following chil- 
dren: Lydia, the wife of George Swartz, of Boyer; Fred, who lives in Stock- 
holm township; Effiie, who became the wife of C. S. Johnson, residing in Boyer; 
Levi, who lives in the same place; and Emil and Amanda, both of whom have 
passed away. 

The family are all Christians and hold membership in the Baptist church. 
Mr. Ericksen gives his political support to the prohibition party, feeling its 
principles are best adapted to promote the moral welfare of the community. 
He has never been an office seeker, not aspiring to public honors, but he did 
serve for a time as a member of the board of school directors. He is one of 
the self-made men of Crawford county who has attained his ambition through 
his own unaided effort, without imperiling the interests of others, and during 
his forty years' residence here he has made many friends whose regard and 
esteem has been strengthened with the passing of time. 



ALBERT R. HILL. 



As an energetic and successful business man Albert R. Hill, of Denison. is 
entitled to a place in a work treating of the substantial citizens of Crawford 
county. He was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, August 31, 1869, a son of Rufus 
L. and Margaret E. Hill, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. He 
came with his parents to Tama, Iowa, at the age of five years and lived there 
two and one-half years, the family moving to a farm in Harlan county, near 
Alma, Nebraska, in 1878. He received his education in the district schools and 
in the public schools of Orleans, Nebraska, later coming to Jefferson, Iowa, 
where he learned the marble cutter's trade. After acquiring his trade he went 
to Holdrege, Nebraska, and engaged in business with his father. In 1896 he 
settled at Denison, Iowa, and he and his father bought out his brother, Walter 
L., who was at the head of a successful marble business. In June. 1908, the 
two sons purchased the father's interest and are now carrying on a prosperous 
marble, granite and monument business, which each year gives gratifying evi- 
dence of the ability and progressiveness of its managers. 

On the 15th of February, 1899. ^Mr. Hill was united in marriage to Miss 
Birdie Ewall, a native of Denison and daughter of Nils A. and Christine (Starr) 
Ewall. Her father was born in Sweden and came to America with his parents 
when he was twelve years of age. He grew to manhood in Crawford county, 
where his parents died and were buried in Oakland cemetery at Denison. Nils 
A. Ewall died in 1896 at the age of thirty-eight, his wife having been called 
away in 1889 at the age of thirty-one years. Mrs. Hill's grandfather. Elias 
Ewall. was a soldier in Sweden. There were three children in his family: Nils 
A.; John, now living Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Orlando, of Council Bluffs, 
Iowa. Charles Starr, the maternal grandfather, was also a native of Sweden. 
He came to America and served as a soldier in the Civil war. He died in 



372 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

middle life, but his wife lived to be over eighty years of age. There were four 
children in their family, namely: Albert, now of Boone county, Iowa; Mrs. Fred 
Beck, deceased; Airs. Charles Erickson, of El Reno, Oklahoma; and Airs. Peter 
Nord, also of El Reno. Three children, all of whom are sons, came to bless 
the union of Air. and Airs. Hill, namely: Ray Ewall, Howard Bliss and Robert 
Leon. 

Religiously Air. Hill is identified with the Alethodist church, but his wife 
is a member of the Baptist church. Politically, he gives his support to the 
democratic party, believing that by so doing he is best advancing the permanent 
welfare of the nation. By an honorable and upright life he has commanded the 
good-will of all who know him. He represents a class of men whose records 
are always interesting— the men who win success by wisely directed efifort and 
whose ambition it is not only to advance their own interests, but the interests 
of all with whom they are associated. 



WILLIAAI A. THEOBALD. 

One of the successful stock-feeders in Crawford county is William A. Theo- 
bald, who is living upon a farm of three hundred and twenty-eight acres on 
section 34, Nishnabotny township, in the cultivation of which he has been engaged 
for nearly thirty years. He is the eldest son and second child born to Robert 
and Isabelle (Bernard) Theobald, his birth having occurred in Aliddleberry, 
Iowa county, Wisconsin, on the 14th of January, 1854. The father was a 
native of England but left the mother country when a lad of twelve years, lo- 
cating on Prince Edward's Island, where he continued to reside until he re- 
moved to Middleberry in 1848. During his residence on the island Air. Theo- 
bald, who was a lumberman, operated an up and down saw in a shipyard, 
and after going to Wisconsin he sawed all of the lumber which he used in the 
construction of the barn on his farm. In 1871 he came to Crawford county, Iowa, 
where he bought two hundred and forty acres of prairie just two miles west 
of the homestead of his son William A. He engaged in the cultivation of this 
until he passed away in 1900, being one of the most prominent as well as exten- 
sive agriculturists in the community. Air. Theobald was always an active and 
energetic man and death came to him on his way to work, just in the manner 
he had desired. He was twice married, his first wife being Sophia Goldsmith, 
to whom he was united while living on Prince Edward's Island. One child, 
William, was born to them but he passed away in infancy, and after locating 
in Wisconsin Airs. Theobald also died. Some time later Air. Theobald was 
agpin married, his second choice being Isabelle Bernard, a native of Prince 
Edward's Island, but their marriage was solemnized in Wisconsin. Seven chil- 
dren were born of this union : Jane, the wife of Ed Pennison, living in the 
vicinity of Defiance. Iowa; William A., our subject; Sophia, the wife of Joseph 
Slagg, who is a resident of North Dakota ; Phyllis, who married Addison Alor- 
gan, of Alanilla, Iowa; James, who died in infancy; Delia, the wife of Fletcher 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 373 

Dyson, of Boone, Iowa; and Edward, an ex-auditor of Crawford county, of 
Manilla. 

The early years of William A. Theobald were spent upon the family home- 
stead in Wiscon'sin, the district schools of which state provided him with an edu- 
cation. After laying aside his text-books he engaged with his father in the cul- 
tivation of the farm, remaining a member of the paternal household until he 
had attained his twenty-eight year, at which time he was married and removed 
to the place where he continues to reside. He engages in general farming and 
stock-raising and for the past ten years has been a heavy feeder of stock. 
Success has rewarded his efforts and he has added to his original tract, now 
owning three hundred and twenty-eight acres of land on section 34, Xishnabotny 
township, all of which is well improved and under a high state of cultivation. 
He has erected two residences and is now living in the second, which is a large, 
comfortable house, well designed to meet the needs of a permanent country 
home. 

For his wife Mr. Theobald chose Miss Christina McCloud, a native of 
Nova Scotia, who was teaching in Crawford county at the time of their mar- 
riage in 1882. Nine children have been born of this union: Alaybell Eliza, who 
is a teacher, living at home; Forester M., Ravina, Herbert Alfred, Margaret, 
Edward Henry, R. Fred, Blanche, and Beulah, all of whom are at home. 

The religious faith of the family is manifested through their connection with 
the Presbyterian church, while politically Mr. Theobald affiliates with the re- 
publican party. Although he is a progressive and public-spirited man he does 
not prominently participate in civic affairs, owing to the heavy demands made 
upon his time by his extensive personal interests. One of the successful and 
substantial farmers of Nishnabotny township, Mr. Theobald owes the position he 
has attained to his ability to ably direct large undertakings, in the development 
of which he concentrates all of his energy. 



JACOB LINCOLN RIGGLEMAN. 

Among the citizens of Stockhold township who is successfully engaged in 
general farming and stock-raising is Jacob Lincoln Riggleman, who is a native 
of Pendleton county, West Virginia, his natal day being ^^larch 29, 1862. Unto 
his parents, Jacob and Julia (Borror) Riggleman, were born the following chil- 
dren: Martha, of Indiana; Mary Ellen, the wife of William Tomlinson, of 
lUinois; Emily, deceased, who married John Ours, of West \'irginia ; George 
David, deceased; Ann Rebecca, the wife of Levi Reel; Benjamin, deceased; 
Henry, a resident of West Virginia; Jacob, the subject of this sketch; John, 
of West Virginia; and Mahala. the wife of Isaac Judy, of West Virginia. 
The mother passed away in 1865 but the father survived until 1905. 

Jacob Lincoln Riggleman was reared at home, acquiring his education in 
the common schools of his native state. Arriving in Denison on the 15th of 
October, 1883, he obtained employment as a farm hand, which vocation he 
followed for two years. Migrating to Colorado in 1885, he engaged in ranching 



374 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

for three years, and on returning to Crawford county at the expiration of that 
period he rented one hundred and ten acres of land, which he cuhivated until 
1890. During the first two years he kept house for himself wliile operating 
the farm; the third year he boarded; and the fourth he married. His father- 
in-law presented the couple with a quarter section of land in Stockholm town- 
ship, on section 32, to which he later added two hundred acres more on sections 
5 and 6, Alilford township. Mr. Riggleman has efifected many improvements in 
his homestead during his occupancy, the property being considered one of the 
most valuable in the township. Here he follows general farming, making a 
specialty, however, of the breeding and raising thoroughbred Hereford cattle 
and Poland China hogs, in which he is meeting with more than average success. 

On Christmas, 1893, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Riggleman and 
Miss Anna Beatrice Newcom, who was born November 21, 1869, a daughter 
of John D. and Sarah Ann (Dobson) Newcom. Two children were born unto 
Mr. and ]\Irs. Newcom, but the son, James Eli, passed away at the age of five 
years. Mrs. Newcom, a daughter of Thomas Dobson, has the distinction of 
being the first white girl born in Crawford county, and Mrs. Riggleman the first 
white girl born in Stockholm township. Five children have been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Riggleman: John Randolph, born March 29, 1895; Jesse Austin, who 
was born on the loth of January, 1898; Leslie Earl, born on the 4th of March, 
1899; Newcom Dale, born on the 5th of August, 1901 ; and Ruby Margretta, 
whose birth occurred on the 24th of April, 1903. 

The family attend the Methodist Episcopal church. Although he is not an 
aspirant for public honors or the emoluments of office Mr. Riggleman is an 
ardent advocate of the principles of republicanism, for the candidates of which 
party he always casts his vote. 



CLARK W. WHITE. 



Clark W. White, now living on the old family homestead in West Side town- 
ship, is recognized as one of the leading farmers of Crawford county, the suc- 
cess he has achieved in his calling being accepted as evidence of his special 
ability in agriculture and stock-raising. He is a native of McHenry county, 
Illinois, born May 16, 1858, and is a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Whimble) 
White. The parents were born in England and came to America in 1856. After 
living for a number of years in Illinois they arrived in Crawford county in 1872, 
where the father established himself as a farmer. He was called from earthly 
scenes in November, 1908, the mother having died five years previously. There 
were seven children in their family, all of whom are deceased except the sub- 
ject of this review. 

Clark W. White received his preliminary education in the public schools of 
Illinois and came with his parents to Crawford county when fourteen years of 
age. He continued with his father upon the home farm until the age of twenty- 
seven and then took charge of the place upon which he still lives. He now owns 
two hundred and forty acres of land on section 20, West Side township, and 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 375 

as he applies modern methods in his work and keeps thoroughly informed on 
all matters pertaining to agriculture and stockraising he received generous re- 
turns for his labors. 

On the 23d of February, 1887, Mr. White was united in marriage to Miss 
Ada Tefift, who was born at Richmond, IlHnois, December 25, 1867, a daughter 
of C. H. and Mary (Churchill) Tefift. The father was born in Rhode Island 
and the mother in New York state. They removed to Illinois, where they 
continued during the remainder of their lives. There were four children in 
their family, two of whom^ survive : Charles, and Ada, now Mrs. Clark W. 
White. Four children came to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. White, Beulah 
B., Howard, Leslie and Evelyn L. Leslie was born May 7, 1898, and died Sep- 
tember 7 following. 

Mr. White is a genial, courteous and obliging gentleman and gains the con- 
fidence of all with whom he comes in contact. He and his wife afifiliate with the 
Presbyterian church. Politically he gives his allegiance to the republican party 
and he has served as township trustee and for twenty years as a member of the 
school board, in the discharge of his official duties displaying a fidelity and zeal 
meriting the hearty approval of the people. He is a valued member of Lodge 
No. 422, A. F. & A. M. ; Olive Branch Lodge, No. 205, O. E. S. ; and Yeomen 
Lodge No. 659. Mrs. White and her daughter Beulah and son Howard are also 
members of the Eastern Star lodge and the Yeomen, the former having served 
most acceptably as matron of Olive Branch Lodge. 



WILLIAM F. BAAK. 



A highly productive and valuable farm on section 34, Soldier township, is an 
indication of the business ability of William F. Baak, who carries on general 
farming and the raising and feeding of stock. He has made his home in Craw- 
ford county all his life, having been born in Soldier township, November 17, 
1883. He is a son of August Baak, a record of whom is given in the sketch of 
Herman Baak that appears on another page of this work. 

William F. Baak was reared on his father's farm and possessed the ad- 
vantages of education in the district schools. He continued at home until twenty- 
four years of age and was then married and began farming on his own account 
on one hundred and fifty acres on section 34. Soldier township. He has a com- 
fortable residence and convenient barns and outbuildings, and the general ap- 
pearance of the place indicates careful management and gratifying financial 
returns. He engages in general farming but makes a specialty of raising and 
fattening stock for the market. 

On the 4th of March, 1908, Mr. Baak was united in marriage to Miss Clara 
Wendt, who was born in Morgan township, October 4, 1888. and^ is a daughter 
of Adolph and Elizabeth (Mahnke) Wendt, the former of whorn was born in 
Germany and the latter in Chicago. They were married in Charter Oak town- 
ship, Crawford county, Iowa, and Mr. Wendt purchased a farm in Morgan 
township, which he cultivated for two years. He then sold his property and 



376 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Soldier township, which he 
managed excellently until his retirement in 1910. He and his wife are now 
making their home in a pleasant residence at L'te, Iowa, and are enjoying the 
fruits of many years of labor. There were six children in their family: Clara, 
now Mrs. William F. Baak ; Elsie, Lillie and Willie, all of whom are at home; 
and Carl and Catherine, both of whom are deceased. Two children came to 
bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. Baak: Leonard E. R. E., who was born May 
20, 1909; and Clarence E. A. H., born December 21. 19 10. 

Mr. Baak and his wife give their hearty support to the German Lutheran 
church, of which they are members. While not a politician, he performs his duty 
at the polls by voting for men and measures that he believes to be best adapted 
to promote the welfare of the country. Although a young man, he is well started 
as a farmer, and the prosperity he has acquired is the visible evidence of his 
good judgment and his progressiveness in a work to which he is devoting the 
best energies of his life. 



Z. T. DUNHAM. 



A member of one of the well known pioneer families of Crawford county 
and a highly successful farmer. Z. T. Dunham is recognized as one of the for- 
tunate citizens of Iowa. He lives on the farm upon which he was reared, it 
being one of the most beautiful places in this part of the state, widely known 
as the Pioneer Stock Farm. He was born in Maquoketa, Jackson county, Iowa, 
December 17, 1849, a son of Cornelius Dunham, Sr., and Margaret Scott (Miller) 
Dunham. The father was a native of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, and 
his father was born in England and engaged in fishing on the coast of Cape 
Cod. 

Cornelius Dunham, Sr., was the youngest son in a family of nine children 
and appears to have been of a roving disposition in his early years. He left home 
before arriving at manhood and traveled extensively through the eastern states 
and Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin. X'irginia and the Carolinas. arriving in 
Iowa early in the '40s. He began farming near Maquoketa and continued there 
until 1849, when in company with Franklin Prentice he came to Crawford 
county in a prairie schooner drawn by oxen, being the first white man to locate 
in this county. He made his home for two and one-half years in East Boyer 
township, and then removed to a place on section ;^;^, Boyer township, 
which became the family homestead. He shipped the first hogs and cattle 
to Chicago in 1861 that were sent out of this county. In November of that 
year he started with about two hundred head of hogs and twenty head of cattle 
to drive to Marshalltown, the nearest railroad point. Upon loading his animals 
he found that he had only two carloads of hogs, the others having escaped in 
the course of the drive, but none of the cattle were missing. At another time 
he went with a boatload of dressed hogs to St. Louis and while in that city the 
river froze up so that it became necessary for him to return home overland. 
He purchased a pony, which he rode on the return journey, sleeping out at night 



HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 377 

in the woods. One day he met a band of Indians, from whom he purchased a 
pair of moccasins as he was sadly in need of covering for his feet. Shortly 
afterward, as he continued homeward, a second band of Indians came in sight 
who proved to be hostile to the tribe which he had left behind a short time pre- 
viously. They recognized the moccasins as having been made by their enemies 
and at once gave evidence of great excitement. Understanding the Indian nature 
from frequent contact with the red men, ^Ir. Dunham instantly removed his 
moccasins from his feet and handed them to the Indians. They immediately 
cut the moccasins to pieces but replaced them with another pair equally as good 
and the traveler resumed his journey in safety. He became one of the principal 
men in this section of the state and at the time of his death, which occurred in 
1865, he was the owner of thirty-three hundred acres of land, which in his 
opinion as an extensive traveler was as rich as any that could be found in the 
United States. He w^as in full sympathy with the republican party and before 
the war was an outspoken abolitionist. He also was in sympathy with the Meth- 
odist church, of which he was a member in his early manhood. 

Cornelius Dunham, Sr., was twice married and four children by his first 
marriage grew to maturity, John A., Louisa, Sophronia and Cornelius Jr., all of 
whom are now deceased. Five children were born of the union of Cornelius and 
Margaret Dunham, namely: Margaret, who is now the wife of J. N. Obanion, 
of Boyer township; Martha, who is now living at Dunlap, Iowa; Samuel, of 
Braydentown, Florida; Jasper, who died in infancy; and Z. T., of this review. 
The first husband of Mrs. Dunham was Samuel Miller and five children were 
born of this union: James, Elizabeth, I\Iary Jane, George, and one who died 
in infancy. Mary Jane went away with the Mormons and was married to a 
member of that organization, nothing more ever having been heard of her 
until after her death. 

Z. T. Dunham received his early education mainly at home under a private 
tutor. Subsequently he attended a seminary in Illinois. He has always con- 
tinued upon the old homestead, which is endeared to him by many associations. 
He is now the owner of eight hundred and eighty acres, most of which is under 
a high state of cultivation. He has made many improvements upon the farm, 
including a modern residence provided with all desirable facilities and a large 
brick barn, which is one of the notable buildings in this part of the county. He 
has attained an enviable reputation as a breeder of polled Durham cattle and 
was a charter member of an organization in 1889 whose members devote their 
attention to this breed. 

In 1871 Mr. Dunham was united in marriage to Miss Emma Lane, a native 
of Illinois, and seven children were born to them : Artz L., now living in Boyer 
township; Clifford S., who is connected with the musical department of the 
Colorado State University at Boulder, Colorado; Carrie Widney. of ^vlorrison, 
Illinois; R. W., at home; C. A., who lives with his brother, Artz L. ; Jennie 
Margaret, who is attending college at Cedar Falls, Iowa; and Frederick, de- 
ceased. 

Mr. Dunham has witnessed the marvelous development in Crawford county 
—a portion of the state which was largely unoccupied when he was a youth and 
is now one of the richest sections of Iowa. He has assisted very materially in 



378 HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY 

bringing about this great transformation. Politically he gives his support to 
the republican party, belonging to that branch of the organization known as the 
"standpatters." He has not sought the honors or emoluments of public life 
but has served in various township offices. In religious belief he gives his ad- 
herence to the Methodist Episcopal church and has faithfully served for many 
years as a member of the board of trustees of the local organization. 



JOHN J. McWILLIAMS, M. D. 

It would be difficult to designate a name more honored in Crawford county 
than that of Dr. John J. AlcWilliams. For twenty-eight years he has been 
identitied with the medical profession in this county and during the last twenty- 
four years has been a resident of Charter Oak. He was born at Denison, June 
5, i860, a son of Dr. David McWilliams, who practiced in Crawford county 
for more than forty years, passing away at Denison in 1898 at the age of eighty- 
one years. He was a native of Belfast, Ireland, and after coming to this coun- 
try spent several years at Pontiac, Illinois, but removed to Crawford county, 
Iowa, in 1857, eight years after the first permanent settlement was made in this 
county. He became one of the most noted physicians in this part of the state. 
He was twice married, and by his first marriage two children were born : Hugh 
C, who engaged in farming and is now living retired at Denison; and David 
H., a large landowner and druggist who is living retired at Charter Oak. The 
second wife of Dr. McWilliams was Mary Cleghorn before her marriage. She 
was born in Glasgow, Scotland, and became the mother of seven children, 
namely: Charles, who died at the age of two years; John J., the subject of this 
review; Elizabeth J., now the wife of J. S. Xesbit, a farmer of Missouri; Char- 
ley ^1., who is in the government service at Denison; Marie A., now the wife 
of Henry Slater, a farmer of Denison; Emma, the wife of Albert Healey, who 
is in the furniture business at Oto^ Iowa ; and Lillian, the wife of Rev. L. C. 
McCuen, of Kearney, Nebraska. 

John J. McWilliams received his preliminary education in the common 
schools, and, having decided to follow in the footsteps of his fatiier. entered 
the Keokuk (Iowa) Medical College at the age of nineteen, comi)leting the 
course available in that institution, after which he matriculated in Rush Medical 
College of Chicago, from which he was graduated